WorldWideScience

Sample records for cathodoluminescence

  1. Cathodoluminescence of Irradiated Hafnium Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Martin and Michael Rhoby for their hard work in fixing assorted problems that cropped up during the course of my thesis work. Emily A. Purcell...Cathodoluminescence Microscopy of Inorganic Solids. New York: Plenum Press, 1990. [13] D. Drouin, A. R. Couture, D. Joly , X. Tastet, V. Aimez and R. Gauvin

  2. Cathodoluminescence of cubic boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkachev, V.D.; Shipilo, V.B.; Zajtsev, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    Three optically active defects are detected in mono- and polycrystal cubic boron nitride (β-BN). Analysis of intensity of temperature dependences, halfwidth and energy shift of 1.76 eV narrow phononless line (center GC-1) makes it possible to interprete the observed cathodoluminescence spectra an optical analog of the Moessbaner effect. Comparison of the obtained results with the known data for diamond monocrystals makes it possible to suggest that the detected center GC-1 is a nitrogen vacancy . The conclusion, concerning the Moessbauer optical spectra application, is made to analyze structural perfection of β-BN crystal lattice

  3. Cathodoluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiguchi, Takashi

    1996-01-01

    CL is a luminous phenomenon caused by that the accelerating electrons irradiated to the materials. CL method is one of the estimation method of physical properties using luminescence caused the positive hole pair generated by excited electron beam in the micro field. CL can be observed by a combination of the scanning electron microscope (SEM) and the photo detector. The excitation origins, the concentrator system, the detector system, the image processing system, the electrical signal detector system and the cooling parts were explained in detail. The evaluation method, one of the estimation method of materials in the micro-field, can be applied to the distribution of crystal defect in semiconductor, its functional analysis, the photo device of semiconductor hetero film, the studies of luminescent materials, oxides, ceramics and organic materials, for example, organism. For the example of measurement and analysis, the evaluation of micro field (GaAs crystal, dislocation of Si crystal), wide gap materials (diamond film) and depth analysis are explained. (S.Y.)

  4. Introduction to cathodoluminescence in semiconductors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dussac, M.

    1985-01-01

    The use of cathodoluminescence in a scanning electron microscope leads to acquire a spectrum in a place of the sample surface, or to register the intensity profile of a special emission band along a scanning line, or also to realize a map of the irradiated sample. Composition variations can then, at ambient temperature, be determined, also defects can be shown, together with grain joints and dislocations, radiative and non radiative regions can be distinguished and, at low temperature, elementary processes of luminescence can be studied and impurities identified in semiconductors. Through this analysis method is applicable to every insulating or semiconductor material (that is to say to every material having a gap), in this article only crystalline semi-conductor will be studied [fr

  5. Cathodoluminescence of cubic boron nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tkachev, V.D.; Shipilo, V.B.; Zaitsev, A.M.

    1985-01-01

    Three types of optically active defect were observed in single-crystal and polycrystalline cubic boron nitride (β-BN). An analysis of the temperature dependences of the intensity, half-width, and energy shift of a narrow zero-phonon line at 1.76 eV (GC-1 center) made it possible to interpret the observed cathodoluminescence spectra as an optical analog of the Moessbauer effect. A comparison of the results obtained in the present study with the available data on diamond single crystals made it possible to identify the observed GC-1 center as a nitrogen vacancy. It was concluded that optical Moessbauer-type spectra can be used to analyze structure defects in the crystal lattice of β-BN

  6. Cathodoluminescence and its application in the planetary sciences

    CERN Document Server

    Gucsik, Arnold

    2009-01-01

    This book provides an overview of cathodoluminescence properties of the planetary materials. It provides a unique introduction to cathodoluminescence which is widely used in the geosciences, because it is a non-destructive and "easy to use" method.

  7. Cathodoluminescence study of vickers indentations in magnesium ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vickers diamond pyramid indentations made in single crystal of magnesium oxide (MgO) were examined in an environmental scanning electron microscope interfaced with an AVS-2000 spectrophotometer for luminescence. Three distinct zones around the indentations were identified to exhibit cathodoluminescence, which ...

  8. Cathodoluminescence Microscopy of Nanostructures on Transparent Substrates

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Narváez, A.C.

    2014-01-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL), the excitation of light by an electron beam, has gained attention as an analysis tool for investigating the optical response of a structure, at a resolution that approaches that in electron microscopy, in the nanometer range. However, the application possibilities are

  9. Cathodoluminescence study of anodic nanochannel alumina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Q.X. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Saga University, Honjo-1, Saga, 840-8502 (Japan)]. E-mail: guoq@cc.saga-u.ac.jp; Hachiya, Y. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Saga University, Honjo-1, Saga, 840-8502 (Japan); Tanaka, T. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Saga University, Honjo-1, Saga, 840-8502 (Japan); Nishio, M. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Saga University, Honjo-1, Saga, 840-8502 (Japan); Ogawa, H. [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Saga University, Honjo-1, Saga, 840-8502 (Japan)

    2006-07-15

    Nanochannel alumina (NCA) templates with highly ordered pore arrays were prepared by anodizing pure aluminum foil in acid solutions. Cathodoluminescence measurements reveal that a blue emission band appears at around 2.8 eV and its energy position depends on measurement temperature and pore size of NCA. The shift of the blue emission band energy with temperature is ascribed to the variations of electron-phonon interactions. X-ray absorption near-edge fine structure results show that the blue emission band shift with pore size is due to the local environment change of atoms in NCA.

  10. Confocal filtering in cathodoluminescence microscopy of nanostructures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narváez, Angela C.; Weppelman, I. Gerward C.; Moerland, Robert J.; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.; Kruit, Pieter

    2014-06-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy allows optical characterization of nanostructures at high spatial resolution. At the nanoscale, a main challenge of the technique is related to the background CL generated within the sample substrate. Here, we implement confocal detection of the CL signal to minimize the background contribution to the measurement. Nano-phosphors were used as point sources to evaluate the filtering capabilities of our confocal CL system, obtaining an axial intensity profile with 2.7 μm full width at half maximum for the central peak, in good correspondence with theoretical expectations. Considering the electron interaction volume, we found that the confocal filter becomes effective for electron energies above 20 keV, when using a 25 μm pinhole (0.86 Airy units). To illustrate our approach, we present confocal CL imaging of gold nanowires and triangular shaped plates deposited on an indium-tin oxide covered glass substrate, comparing the images with those obtained in standard unfiltered CL detection. The results show that confocal CL microscopy is a valuable tool for the investigation of nanostructures on highly cathodoluminescent substrates, widely used in biological and optical applications.

  11. Confocal filtering in cathodoluminescence microscopy of nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Narváez, Angela C., E-mail: a.c.narvaez@tudelft.nl, E-mail: j.p.hoogenboom@tudelft.nl; Weppelman, I. Gerward C.; Moerland, Robert J.; Hoogenboom, Jacob P., E-mail: a.c.narvaez@tudelft.nl, E-mail: j.p.hoogenboom@tudelft.nl; Kruit, Pieter [Imaging Physics, Faculty of Applied Sciences, Delft University of Technology, Lorentzweg 1, 2628CJ Delft (Netherlands)

    2014-06-23

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy allows optical characterization of nanostructures at high spatial resolution. At the nanoscale, a main challenge of the technique is related to the background CL generated within the sample substrate. Here, we implement confocal detection of the CL signal to minimize the background contribution to the measurement. Nano-phosphors were used as point sources to evaluate the filtering capabilities of our confocal CL system, obtaining an axial intensity profile with 2.7 μm full width at half maximum for the central peak, in good correspondence with theoretical expectations. Considering the electron interaction volume, we found that the confocal filter becomes effective for electron energies above 20 keV, when using a 25 μm pinhole (0.86 Airy units). To illustrate our approach, we present confocal CL imaging of gold nanowires and triangular shaped plates deposited on an indium-tin oxide covered glass substrate, comparing the images with those obtained in standard unfiltered CL detection. The results show that confocal CL microscopy is a valuable tool for the investigation of nanostructures on highly cathodoluminescent substrates, widely used in biological and optical applications.

  12. Cryosystem for cathodoluminescence investigations by means of electron microprobe analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schreiber, J.

    1982-01-01

    A cryosystem is presented which has been designed as auxiliary equipment for electron beam microprobes used in cathodoluminescence studies. The sample holder temperature is adjustable down to 66 K with an accuracy of 0.5 K. Finally, experimental results (transmission spectra and cathodoluminescence spectra of N-doped GaP epitaxial layers at 80 K; changes in microscopic cathodoluminescence distribution at small angle grain boundaries at the (0001) plane of CdS during temperature decrease from 300 to 80 K) obtained by means of the described measuring equipment are given for illustration

  13. Thermo- and cathodoluminescence properties of Sepiolite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez L, Y. [Universidad Autonoma de Nayarit, Ciudad de la cultura Amado Nervo s/n, 63155 Tepic, Nayarit (Mexico); Correcher, V. [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Garcia G, J., E-mail: yamilet.lazcano@uan.edu.mx [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Sepiolite, Si{sub 12}Mg{sub 8}O{sub 30}(OH){sub 4}(OH{sub 2}){sub 4}·8H{sub 2}O, has been well studied from the chemical and structural point of view; however, studies on their luminescence properties have been scarcely reported. This work focuses on the thermoluminescence (Tl) and cathodoluminescence (Cl) response of a natural sepiolite from Madrid, Spain previously characterized by means of environmental scanning electron microscope, X-ray fluorescence (X RF) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques. The complexity of the thermoluminescence glow curves of non-irradiated and irradiated samples suggests a structure of a continuous trap distribution involving multi-order kinetics. UV-IR Cl spectral emission shows five peaks centered at 330, 400, 440, 520 and 770 nm. Such emission bands could be due to (i) structural defects, [AlO{sub 4}] or non bridging oxygen hole centers, and (II) the presence of point defects associated with Mn{sup 2+} and Fe{sup 3+}. Sepiolite, which has different household applications such as: moisture control, containment of accidental liquid spillages, in ashtrays to avoid smoke odor, control of liquid leakages, and odours in dustbins and cat litters; is a good candidate for personal dosimetry in the case of radiation accident or radiological terrorism. in situations where knowledge of doses to individuals is required, but monitoring was not planned. (Author)

  14. Cathodoluminescence in the scanning transmission electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kociak, M., E-mail: mathieu.kociak@u-psud.fr [Laboratoire de Physique des Solides, Université Paris-SudParis-Sud, CNRS-UMR 8502, Orsay 91405 (France); Zagonel, L.F. [“Gleb Wataghin” Institute of Physics University of Campinas - UNICAMP, 13083-859 Campinas, São Paulo (Brazil)

    2017-05-15

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) is a powerful tool for the investigation of optical properties of materials. In recent years, its combination with scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) has demonstrated great success in unveiling new physics in the field of plasmonics and quantum emitters. Most of these results were not imaginable even twenty years ago, due to conceptual and technical limitations. The purpose of this review is to present the recent advances that broke these limitations, and the new possibilities offered by the modern STEM-CL technique. We first introduce the different STEM-CL operating modes and the technical specificities in STEM-CL instrumentation. Two main classes of optical excitations, namely the coherent one (typically plasmons) and the incoherent one (typically light emission from quantum emitters) are investigated with STEM-CL. For these two main classes, we describe both the physics of light production under electron beam irradiation and the physical basis for interpreting STEM-CL experiments. We then compare STEM-CL with its better known sister techniques: scanning electron microscope CL, photoluminescence, and electron energy-loss spectroscopy. We finish by comprehensively reviewing recent STEM-CL applications. - Highlights: • Reviews the field of STEM-CL. • Introduces the technical requirements and challenges for STEM-CL. • Introduces the different types of excitations probed by STEM-CL. • Gives comprehensive overview of the last fifteenth years in the field.

  15. Tuning the cathodoluminescence of porous silicon films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biaggi-Labiosa, A.; Fonseca, L.F.; Resto, O.; Balberg, I.

    2008-01-01

    We have obtained intense cathodoluminescence (CL) emission from electron beam modified porous silicon films by excitation with electrons with kinetic energies below 2 keV. Two types of CL emissions were observed, a stable one and a non-stable one. The first type is obtained in well-oxidized samples and is characterized by a spectral peak that is red shifted with respect to the photoluminescence (PL) peak. The physically interesting and technologically promising CL is however the CL that correlates closely with the PL. Tuning of this CL emission was achieved by controlling the average size of the nanostructure thus showing that the origin of this CL emission is associated with the quantum confinement and the surface chemistry effects that are known to exist in the porous silicon system. We also found that the electron bombardment causes microscale morphological modifications of the films, but the nanoscale features appear to be unchanged. The structural changes are manifested by the increase in the density of the nanoparticles which explains the significant enhancement of the PL that follows the electron irradiation

  16. Temperature effects on cathodoluminescence of enstatite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohgo, S.; Nishido, H.

    2017-12-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) of enstatite has been extensively investigated for planetary science applications. The CL features are affected by many factors of impurities such as transition metal elements, structural defects and sample temperature. However, the temperature effects on enstatite CL have not been clarified so far. In this study, we have quantitatively evaluated temperature effects on enstatite CL. Three samples of luminescent enstatite were employed for CL spectral measurements. Color CL imaging was carried out using a cold-cathode type Luminoscope with a cooled-CCD camera. CL spectroscopy was made by a SEM-CL system, which is comprised of SEM (JEOL: JSM-5410LV) combined with a grating monochromator (OXFORD: Mono CL2). The CL emitted from the sample was collected in the range of 300-800 nm with a photomultiplier tube by a photon counting method at various temperatures from -193-50 degree C. All CL spectra were corrected for total instrumental response. Color CL imaging reveals various CL emissions with red, reddish-purple and bluish-purple in the terrestrial and extraterrestrial enstatite. All of them have two broad emission bands at around 400 nm in a blue region and at around 670 nm in a red region at room and liquid nitrogen temperatures. The spectral peak in a red region is sharpened and enhanced at lower temperature due to reduction of thermal lattice vibration and an increase in luminescent efficiency. CL intensity at around 670 nm of enstatite decreases with an increase in sample temperature up to -110 degree C from -193 degree C, and increases with an increase in sample temperature between -110 and 50 degree C. This behavior is not able to be explained by a temperature quenching theory based on an increase in the probability of non-radiative transition with the rise of temperature. A least-square fitting of the Arrhenius plot by assuming a Mott-Seitz model provides an activation energy of less than 0.01 eV in temperature quenching process from

  17. Apparatus for temperature-dependent cathodoluminescence characterization of materials

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Bok, Jan; Schauer, Petr

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 25, č. 7 (2014), 075601:1-7 ISSN 0957-0233 R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TE01020118; GA ČR(CZ) GA14-20012S Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : cathodoluminescence * electron beam * cryostat * scintillator * YAG:Ce Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.433, year: 2014

  18. Annealing effects on cathodoluminescence of zircon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Y.; Nishido, H.; Noumi, Y.

    2011-12-01

    U-Pb zircon dating (e. g., SHRIMP) is an important tool to interpret a history of the minerals at a micrometer-scale, where cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging allows us to recognize internal zones and domains with different chemical compositions and structural disorder at high spatial resolution. The CL of zircon is attributed by various types of emission centers, which are extrinsic ones such as REE impurities and intrinsic ones such as structural defects. Metamictization resulted from radiation damage to the lattice by alpha particles from the decay of U and Th mostly causes an effect on the CL features of zircon as a defect center. However, slightly radiation-damaged zircon, which is almost nondetectable by XRD, has not been characterized using CL method. In this study, annealing effects on CL of zircon has been investigated to clarify a recovery process of the damaged lattice at low radiation dose. A single crystal of zircon from Malawi was selected for CL measurements. It contains HfO2: 2.30 w.t %, U: 241 ppm and Th: 177 ppm. Two plate samples perpendicular to c and a axes were prepared for annealing experiments during 12 hours from room temperature to 1400 degree C. Color CL images were captured using a cold-cathode microscope (Luminoscope: Nuclide ELM-3R). CL spectral measurements were conducted using an SEM (JEOL: JSM-5410) combined with a grating monochromator (Oxford: Mono CL2) to measure CL spectra ranging from 300 to 800 nm in 1 nm steps with a temperature controlled stage. The dispersed CL was collected by a photoncounting method using a photomultiplier tube (Hamamatsu: R2228) and converted to digital data. All CL spectra were corrected for the total instrumental response. Spectral analysis reveals an anisotropy of the CL emission bands related to intrinsic defect center in blue region, radiation-induced defect center from 500 to 700 nm, and trivalent Dy impurity center at 480 and 580 nm, but their relative intensities are almost constant. CL on the

  19. Pulsed cathodoluminescence of nanoscale aluminum oxide with different phase compositions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kortov, V.S.; Zvonarev, S.V.; Medvedev, A.I.

    2011-01-01

    The methods of pulsed cathodoluminescence have been used to study compacted powders and ceramics containing different phases of aluminum oxide. An intensive luminescence of the samples under study in the visible, NIR, and UV regions of the spectrum has been found. The luminescence bands are very broad and include a few components. The number of the bands depends on the phase composition of the samples. The oxygen vacancies, which capture one or two electrons, produce luminescence centers in the near UV region. The most probable in the visible region is the luminescence of aggregate defects, impurities, and surface centers. - Highlights: → We investigate pulsed cathodoluminescence spectra of nanoscale alumina. → We found the intensive luminescence in the visible, NIR, and UV regions. → The transformation of R-line structure depends on phase composition of alumina. → We substantiate the relation of luminescence bands with concrete centers.

  20. Study of the photo and cathodoluminescent properties of the rubi

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martinez S, E.; Garcia H, M.; Ramos B, F.; Alvarez F, O.; Rivera M, T.; Azorin N, J.; Falcony G, C.

    1999-01-01

    In this work are presented the results of the study of the photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence properties of the rubi analysing its use in radiation dosimetry. The rubi presented a centered emission spectra in 697 nm when this was excited with UV at a wavelength 364 nm. X-ray analysis show a rhombohedric structure. While the analysis performed by EDS was obtained the composition (O= 63.13, Al= 36.75 and Cr= 0.12) weight percent, the cathodoluminescent spectra presented three peaks at 555, 600 and 630 nm, being the peak or maximum emission the 600 nm. The results showed the rubi is a promissory material for the radiations dosimetry. (Author)

  1. Nanoparticle discrimination based on wavelength and lifetime-multiplexed cathodoluminescence microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garming, Mathijs W H; Weppelman, I Gerward C; de Boer, Pascal; Martínez, Felipe Perona; Schirhagl, Romana; Hoogenboom, Jacob P; Moerland, Robert J

    2017-08-31

    Nanomaterials can be identified in high-resolution electron microscopy images using spectrally-selective cathodoluminescence. Capabilities for multiplex detection can however be limited, e.g., due to spectral overlap or availability of filters. Also, the available photon flux may be limited due to degradation under electron irradiation. Here, we demonstrate single-pass cathodoluminescence-lifetime based discrimination of different nanoparticles, using a pulsed electron beam. We also show that cathodoluminescence lifetime is a robust parameter even when the nanoparticle cathodoluminescence intensity decays over an order of magnitude. We create lifetime maps, where the lifetime of the cathodoluminescence emission is correlated with the emission intensity and secondary-electron images. The consistency of lifetime-based discrimination is verified by also correlating the emission wavelength and the lifetime of nanoparticles. Our results show how cathodoluminescence lifetime provides an additional channel of information in electron microscopy.

  2. Optimization of Poly-(Methylphenylsilylene) Specimens for Cathodoluminescence Measurement

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schauer, Petr; Nešpůrek, Stanislav; Schauer, F.; Autrata, Rudolf

    2003-01-01

    Roč. 9, Sup. 3 (2003), s. 156 - 157 ISSN 1431-9276. [MC 2003. Dresden, 07.09.2003-12.09.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GA202/01/0518 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4050913; CEZ:AV0Z2065902 Keywords : cathodoluminescence measurement * CL emission * light guide Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.648, year: 2003

  3. Cathodoluminescence study of ytterbium doped GaSb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hidalgo, P.; Mendez, B.; Ruiz, C.; Bermudez, V.; Piqueras, J.; Dieguez, E.

    2005-01-01

    Yb-doped GaSb ingots have been grown by the Bridgman method. The defect structure and compositional homogeneity of the crystals have been investigated by cathodoluminescence and X-ray microanalysis in the scanning electron microscope. The nature of the point defects has been found to depend on the position along the growth axis. Doping with Yb has been found to reduce the luminescence intensity of GaSb and no infrared emission related to intra-ionic transitions of the Yb 3+ ions has been detected

  4. Cathodoluminescence from beta-Ga_2O_3 nanowires

    OpenAIRE

    Nogales Díaz, Emilio; Méndez Martín, Bianchi; Piqueras de Noriega, Javier

    2005-01-01

    ß-Ga_2O_3 nano- and microwires with diameters ranging from tens of nanometers to about one micron and lengths of up to tens of microns, have been obtained by sintering Ga_2O_3 powder under argon flow. The structures have been investigated by cathodoluminescence in the scanning electron microscope. The samples showed the violet-blue emission characteristic of Ga_2O_3 and a red emission at 1.73 eV dominant in the nanowires and other nano- and microstructures formed during the sintering treatmen...

  5. Polarised infrared cathodoluminescence from platelet defects in natural diamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kiflawi, I.; Lang, A.R.

    1977-01-01

    It is reported that the large platelet defects occasionally found in natural diamonds emit polarised cathodoluminescence in the near infrared. There is much uncertainty regarding the composition and structure of the platelets. New findings on the optical properties of the platelets are discussed. The discovery that cathodoluminescence from giant platelets can be seen in the near infrared using an image converter was followed up by photographic recording with Kodak high speed infrared films, and it was found that the infrared emission from the platelets is polarised in the platelet plane with a considerably higher polarisation ratio than in the case of their visible emissions. In order to assess the degree of polarisation of the infrared emission a Polaroid Type HR linear polariser was used, which is very effective at the longest wavelengths recorded by the Kodak high speed infrared film. The high degree of polarisation of the platelet infrared emission constitutes a well defined optical characteristic that any model for platelet structure, and for optical processes associated with platelets, must satisfactorily accommodate. (U.K.)

  6. Colossal photon bunching in quasiparticle-mediated nanodiamond cathodoluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feldman, Matthew A.; Dumitrescu, Eugene F.; Bridges, Denzel; Chisholm, Matthew F.; Davidson, Roderick B.; Evans, Philip G.; Hachtel, Jordan A.; Hu, Anming; Pooser, Raphael C.; Haglund, Richard F.; Lawrie, Benjamin J.

    2018-02-01

    Nanoscale control over the second-order photon correlation function g(2 )(τ ) is critical to emerging research in nonlinear nanophotonics and integrated quantum information science. Here we report on quasiparticle control of photon bunching with g(2 )(0 ) >45 in the cathodoluminescence of nanodiamond nitrogen vacancy (NV0) centers excited by a converged electron beam in an aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscope. Plasmon-mediated NV0 cathodoluminescence exhibits a 16-fold increase in luminescence intensity correlated with a threefold reduction in photon bunching compared with that of uncoupled NV0 centers. This effect is ascribed to the excitation of single temporally uncorrelated NV0 centers by single surface plasmon polaritons. Spectrally resolved Hanbury Brown-Twiss interferometry is employed to demonstrate that the bunching is mediated by the NV0 phonon sidebands, while no observable bunching is detected at the zero-phonon line. The data are consistent with fast phonon-mediated recombination dynamics, a conclusion substantiated by agreement between Bayesian regression and Monte Carlo models of superthermal NV0 luminescence.

  7. Cathodoluminescence of single ZnO nanorod heterostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Piechal, Bernard; Donatini, Fabrice; Dang, Le Si [CNRS-CEA-UJF joint group ' ' Nanophysique et Semiconducteurs' ' , Universite Joseph Fourier (CNRS UMR 5588), Saint Martin d' Heres (France); Yoo, Jinkyoung; Yi, Gyu-Chul [National CRI Center for Semiconductor Nanorods and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH), Pohang (Korea); Elshaer, Abdelhamid; Mofor, A.C.; Bakin, Andrey; Waag, Andreas [Institute of Semiconductor Technology (IHT), TU Braunschweig (Germany)

    2007-05-15

    Optical properties of ZnO-based single nanorods are probed by cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements at T = 5 K. We observe a variation of the ZnO near band edge CL by three orders of magnitude along the nanorod axis, accompanied by a spectral blueshift of 10-30 meV. This indicates a rather poor structural quality of the nanorod bottom part, close to the substrate. ZnO/ZnMgO quantum wells grown on top of ZnO nanorods are found to exhibit much stronger confinement effects as compared to their two-dimensional counterparts, suggesting a reduced spontaneous and piezoelectric polarization effects. (copyright 2007 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Microstructural investigation into calcium phosphate biomaterials by spatially resolved cathodoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goetze, J.; Heimann, R.B.; Hildebrandt, H. [Freiberg Univ. of Mining and Technology (Germany). Dept. of Mineralogy; Gburek, U. [Wuerzburg Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Experimental Dentistry

    2001-02-01

    From cathodoluminescence (CL) investigations of synthetic and natural calcium phosphates it can be concluded that the CL of pure synthetic apatite is mainly characterized by intrinsic luminescence, whereas the luminescence of naturally occurring apatites is frequently activated by trace elements. CL revealed internal structures within plasma-sprayed hydroxyapatite coatings which were not discernible by SEM-BSE imaging. However, cathodoluminescence microscopy alone can presently not be used in every case to characterize synthetic calcium phosphate biomaterials because of the dominant intrinsic blue CL emission. In the future, optimum results will likely be achieved by using a combination of CL microscopy and spectroscopy with other spatially resolved analytical methods such as SEM-BSE, SEM-CL or micro-Raman spectroscopy. In the present study, different types of tetracalcium phosphate dental cements could be distinguished due to varying CL colours and CL spectra that are caused by a different content of impurity Mn. These results emphasize the advantages of spectral CL measurements for spatially resolved detection of trace elements in solids. (orig.) [German] Ergebnisse von Kathodolumineszenz- (KL-) Untersuchungen synthetischer und natuerlicher Apatite zeigen, dass die KL synthetischer Apatite vorrangig durch intrinsische Lumineszenz gekennzeichnet ist, waehrend die KL natuerlicher Apatite meist durch Spurenlemente aktiviert wird. Mittels KL koennen Internstrukturen in plasmagespritzten Hydroxylapatit-Schichten sichtbar gemacht werden, die im REM-BSE nicht nachweisbar sind. Allerdings kann die KL-Mikroskopie aufgrund der dominierenden blauen intrinsischen Lumineszenz gegenwaertig nicht als alleinige Untersuchungsmethode zur Charakterisierung von Calciumphosphat Biomaterialien eingesetzt werden. Optimale Resultate werden zukuenftig durch Kombination von KL-Mikrroskopie und -spektroskopie mit anderen ortsaufgeloesten analytischen Methoden wie REM-BSE, REM-KL oder Mikro

  9. Cathodoluminescence and ion implantation of cadmium sulphide/cuprous sulphide solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glew, R W; Bryant, F J

    1975-10-01

    By the use of implantation with copper ions or oxygen ions of 50 keV energy, changes in the cathodoluminescence emission spectrum from cadmium sulfide/cuprous sulfide thin film manufactured solar cells have been correlated with changes in the phases of the cuprous sulfide layer. Thus, monitoring the relative intensities of cathodoluminescence emission bands affords a method of assessing the cuprous sulfide layer and possibly predicting the performance of the cells.

  10. Cathodoluminescence study of Si/SiO2 interface structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zamoryarskaya, M.V.; Sokolov, V.I.; Plotnikov, V.

    2004-01-01

    The structure of interface of thermal silicon oxide on p- and n-silicon with different content of activators (boron and phosphorus) was studied by using the method of the local cathodoluminescence (CL). The results of the CL study of the thick silicon oxide layers on silicon show that the content of the defects related with oxygen deficit decreases near the interface. In the same time, new bands in green and red range appear in CL spectra. The CL spectra of the layer with thickness 5-15 nm near interface are analogous to CL spectra of a composite of silicon nanoclusters and silicon oxide. The comparison of CL spectra of silicon oxide grown on p- and n-silicon shows that the film on p-silicon is characterized by higher concentration of silicon-deficit defects and silicon 'islands' near the surface. It may be the cause why the electrical hardness of silicon oxide on p-silicon is lower than the one on n-silicon. The integral electro-physical characteristics of silicon oxide also were measured. The bulk charge and the density of interface states of silicon oxide on p-silicon are higher than for oxide on n-silicon. The oxidization of n-silicon with nanostructure surface leads to the appearance of the CL bands related with oxygen deficit and silicon 'islands' in silicon oxide

  11. Cathodoluminescence of semiconductors in the scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noriegas, Javier Piqueras de

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Cathodoluminescence (CL) in the scanning electron microscope (SEM) is a nondestructive technique, useful for characterization of optical and electronic properties of semiconductors, with spatial resolution. The contrast in the images of CL is related to the presence of crystalline defects, precipitates or impurities and provides information on their spatial distribution. CL spectra allows to study local energy position of localized electronic states. The application of the CL is extended to semiconductor very different characteristics, such as bulk material, heterostructures, nanocrystalline film, porous semiconductor, nanocrystals, nanowires and other nano-and microstructures. In the case of wafers, provides information on the homogeneity of their electronic characteristics, density of dislocations, grain sub frontiers, distribution of impurities and so on. while on the study of heterostructures CL images can determine, for example, the presence of misfit dislocations at the interface between different sheets, below the outer surface of the sample. In the study of other low dimensional structures, such as nanocrystalline films, nanoparticles and nano-and microstructures are observed elongated in some cases quantum confinement effects from the CL spectra. Moreover, larger structures, the order of hundreds of nanometers, with forms of wires, tubes or strips, is that in many semiconductor materials, mainly oxides, the behavior of luminescence is different from bulk material. The microstructures have a different structure of defects and a greater influence of the surface, which in some cases leads to a higher emission efficiency and a different spectral distribution. The presentation describes the principle of the CL technique and examples of its application in the characterization of a wide range of both semiconductor materials of different composition, and of different sizes ranging from nanostructures to bulk samples

  12. Cathodoluminescence for the 21st century: Learning more from light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coenen, T.; Haegel, N. M.

    2017-09-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) is the emission of light from a material in response to excitation by incident electrons. The technique has had significant impact in the characterization of semiconductors, minerals, ceramics, and many nanostructured materials. Since 2010, there have been a number of innovative developments that have revolutionized and expanded the information that can be gained from CL and broadened the areas of application. While the primary historical application of CL was for spatial mapping of luminescence variations (e.g., imaging dark line defects in semiconductor lasers or providing high resolution imaging of compositional variations in geological materials), new ways to collect and analyze the emitted light have expanded the science impact of CL, particularly at the intersection of materials science and nanotechnology. These developments include (1) angular and polarized CL, (2) advances in time resolved CL, (3) far-field and near-field transport imaging that enable drift and diffusion information to be obtained through real space imaging, (4) increasing use of statistical analyses for the study of grain boundaries and interfaces, (5) 3D CL including tomography and combined work utilizing dual beam systems with CL, and (6) combined STEM/CL measurements that are reaching new levels of resolution and advancing single photon spectroscopy. This focused review will first summarize the fundamentals and then briefly describe the state-of-the-art in conventional CL imaging and spectroscopy. We then review these recent novel experimental approaches that enable added insight and information, providing a range of examples from nanophotonics, photovoltaics, plasmonics, and studies of individual defects and grain boundaries.

  13. Can cathodoluminescence of feldspar be used as provenance indicator?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scholonek, Christiane; Augustsson, Carita

    2016-05-01

    We have studied feldspar from crystalline rocks for its textural and spectral cathodoluminescence (CL) characteristics with the aim to reveal their provenance potential. We analyzed ca. 60 rock samples of plutonic, volcanic, metamorphic, and pegmatitic origin from different continents and of 16 Ma to 2 Ga age for their feldspar CL textures and ca. 1200 feldspar crystals from these rocks for their CL color spectra. Among the analyzed rocks, igneous feldspar is most commonly zoned, whereby oscillatory zoning can be confirmed to be typical for volcanic plagioclase. The volcanic plagioclase also less commonly contains twin lamellae that are visible in CL light than crystals from other rock types. Alkali feldspar, particularly from igneous and pegmatitic rocks, was noted to be most affected by alteration features, visible as dark spots, lines and irregular areas. The size of all textural features of up to ca. 150 μm, in combination with possible alteration in both the source area and the sedimentary system, makes the CL textures of feldspar possible to use for qualitative provenance research only. We observed alkali feldspar mostly to luminesce in a bluish color and sometimes in red, and plagioclase in green to yellow. The corresponding CL spectra are dominated by three apparent intensity peaks at 440-520 nm (mainly blue), 540-620 nm (mainly green) and 680-740 nm (red to infrared). A dominance of the peak in the green wavelength interval over the blue one for plagioclase makes CL particularly useful for the differentiation of plagioclase from alkali feldspar. An apparent peak position in red to infrared at < 710 nm for plagioclase mainly is present in mafic rocks. Present-day coastal sand from Peru containing feldspar with the red to infrared peak position mainly exceeding 725 nm for northern Peruvian sand and a larger variety for sand from southern Peru illustrates a discriminative effect of different source areas. We conclude that the provenance application

  14. FIB-SEM cathodoluminescence tomography: practical and theoretical considerations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Winter, D A M; Lebbink, M N; Wiggers De Vries, D F; Post, J A; Drury, M R

    2011-09-01

    Focused ion beam-scanning electron microscope (FIB-SEM) tomography is a powerful application in obtaining three-dimensional (3D) information. The FIB creates a cross section and subsequently removes thin slices. The SEM takes images using secondary or backscattered electrons, or maps every slice using X-rays and/or electron backscatter diffraction patterns. The objective of this study is to assess the possibilities of combining FIB-SEM tomography with cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging. The intensity of CL emission is related to variations in defect or impurity concentrations. A potential problem with FIB-SEM CL tomography is that ion milling may change the defect state of the material and the CL emission. In addition the conventional tilted sample geometry used in FIB-SEM tomography is not compatible with conventional CL detectors. Here we examine the influence of the FIB on CL emission in natural diamond and the feasibility of FIB-SEM CL tomography. A systematic investigation establishes that the ion beam influences CL emission of diamond, with a dependency on both the ion beam and electron beam acceleration voltage. CL emission in natural diamond is enhanced particularly at low ion beam and electron beam voltages. This enhancement of the CL emission can be partly explained by an increase in surface defects induced by ion milling. CL emission enhancement could be used to improve the CL image quality. To conduct FIB-SEM CL tomography, a recently developed novel specimen geometry is adopted to enable sequential ion milling and CL imaging on an untilted sample. We show that CL imaging can be manually combined with FIB-SEM tomography with a modified protocol for 3D microstructure reconstruction. In principle, automated FIB-SEM CL tomography should be feasible, provided that dedicated CL detectors are developed that allow subsequent milling and CL imaging without manual intervention, as the current CL detector needs to be manually retracted before a slice can be milled

  15. Introduction of cooperating conductive components into the phosphor to improve the low voltage cathodoluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shang, Chun Yu; Kang, Hui; Jiang, Hong Bo; Bu, Shu Po; Shang, Xiao Hong; Wu, Yan

    2013-01-01

    In order to improve the electric conductivity of Y 2 O 3 :Eu 3+ phosphor with the least amount of conductive component so as to maximize the improvement in low voltage cathodoluminescence, In 2 O 3 and Cu nanowires (NWs) were simultaneously introduced to form Cu NWs/In 2 O 3 -attached Y 2 O 3 :Eu 3+ phosphor. In 2 O 3 and Cu NWs play different roles in the formation of electrically conductive network, i.e., Cu NWs are suitable as conductive channels for charge transmission due to their one-dimensional morphology with large slenderness ratios, while the island-like In 2 O 3 condensates form local conductive contacts joining the adjacent Cu NWs. Meanwhile, In 2 O 3 forms attachment between Cu NWs and the phosphor. Owing to the cooperating effects between Cu NWs/In 2 O 3 conductive components in the phosphor, the efficiency in low voltage cathodoluminescence was significantly improved. -- Highlights: ► In 2 O 3 /Cu NWs were introduced in Y 2 O 3 :Eu 3+ phosphor to improve the low voltage cathodoluminescence. ► In 2 O 3 /Cu NWs play different key roles in the formation of electrically conductive network. ► The cooperating effect was proved by comparing the experimental data and the calculated results. ► The low voltage cathodoluminescence was significantly improved

  16. Cathodoluminescence as a method for the study of degradation of polysilanes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horák, Petr; Schauer, Petr

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 252, č. 2 (2006), s. 303-307 ISSN 0168-583X R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA100100622 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : cathodoluminescence * polysilanes * electron beam * poly[methyl(phenyl)silylene] * degradation * metastability Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 0.946, year: 2006

  17. Silicon-Vacancy Color Centers in Nanodiamonds: Cathodoluminescence Imaging Marker in the Near Infrared

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Huiliang; Aharonovich, Igor; Glenn, David R.; Schalek, R.; Magyar, Andrew P.; Lichtman, Jeff W.; Hu, Evelyn L.; Walsworth, Ronald L.

    2013-01-01

    We demonstrate that nanodiamonds fabricated to incorporate silicon-vacancy (Si-V) color centers provide bright, spectrally narrow, and stable cathodoluminescence (CL) in the near-infrared. Si-V color centers containing nanodiamonds are promising as non-bleaching optical markers for correlated CL and secondary electron microscopy, including applications to nanoscale bioimaging.

  18. Identification of various luminescence centers in CuI films by cathodoluminescence technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sirimanne, Prasad M.; Soga, Tetsuo; Jimbo, Takashi

    2003-01-01

    CuI films are prepared by different techniques at room temperature. An expansion of band gap energy was observed for the thin films prepared by pulse laser deposition technique. Various luminescence centers are identified in CuI films and different mechanisms are proposed for cathodoluminescence at different centers

  19. Nanoparticle discrimination based on wavelength and lifetime-multiplexed cathodoluminescence microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Garming, Mathijs W H; Weppelman, I Gerward C; de Boer, Pascal; Martínez, Felipe Perona; Schirhagl, Romana; Hoogenboom, Jacob P; Moerland, Robert J

    2017-01-01

    Nanomaterials can be identified in high-resolution electron microscopy images using spectrally-selective cathodoluminescence. Capabilities for multiplex detection can however be limited, e.g., due to spectral overlap or availability of filters. Also, the available photon flux may be limited due to

  20. Development of a shear-force scanning near-field cathodoluminescence microscope for characterization of nanostructures' optical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercu, N B; Troyon, M; Molinari, M

    2016-09-01

    An original scanning near-field cathodoluminescence microscope for nanostructure characterization has been developed and successfully tested. By using a bimorph piezoelectric stack both as actuator and detector, the developed setup constitutes a real improvement compared to previously reported SEM-based solutions. The technique combines a scanning probe and a scanning electron microscope in order to simultaneously offer near-field cathodoluminescence and topographic images of the sample. Share-force topography and cathodoluminescence measurements on GaN, SiC and ZnO nanostructures using the developed setup are presented showing a nanometric resolution in both topography and cathodoluminescence images with increased sensitivity compared to classical luminescence techniques. © 2016 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2016 Royal Microscopical Society.

  1. A nano-graphite cold cathode for an energy-efficient cathodoluminescent light source

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander N. Obraztsov

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available The development of new types of light sources is necessary in order to meet the growing demands of consumers and to ensure an efficient use of energy. The cathodoluminescence process is still under-exploited for light generation because of the lack of cathodes suitable for the energy-efficient production of electron beams and appropriate phosphor materials. In this paper we propose a nano-graphite film material as a highly efficient cold cathode, which is able to produce high intensity electron beams without energy consumption. The nano-graphite film material was produced by using chemical vapor deposition techniques. Prototypes of cathodoluminescent lamp devices with a construction optimized for the usage of nano-graphite cold cathodes were developed, manufactured and tested. The results indicate prospective advantages of this type of lamp and the possibility to provide advanced power efficiency as well as enhanced spectral and other characteristics.

  2. Thermal dependence of free exciton emission in ultraviolet cathodoluminescence of colloidal ZnS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bui, Hong Van; Pham, Van Ben [Faculty of Physics, VNU-Hanoi University of Science, 334 Nguyen Trai, Thanh Xuan, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Le, Si Dang [Institut Néel, CNRS, 25 rue des Martyrs, BP 166, F-38042 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Hoang, Nam Nhat, E-mail: namnhat@gmail.com [Faculty of Engineering Physics and Nanotechnology, VNU-University of Engineering and Technology, 144 Xuan Thuy, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2016-10-15

    Cathodoluminescence properties of the colloidal ZnS nanopowders synthesized by using hydrothermal process, a large scale production method, are reported. The cathodoluminescence spectra were obtained for temperature from 5 to 300 K, where an intensive free exciton originated 326 nm emission was observed. This band did not split under the increase of excitation beam current density and prevailed even at room temperature. The weaker emissions appeared at 331, 333, 337 and 343 nm which were related to excitons bound to neutral acceptor (A{sup o}, X), transition from conduction band to acceptor levels (e, A) and their corresponding (e, A)−1LO, (e, A)−2LO phonon replicas. With increasing temperature the free exciton band shifted towards lower energy and its intensity decreased at 36.5 meV thermal quenching threshold. The dependence of band gap on temperature was also determined.

  3. Cathodoluminescence properties of yttrium aluminum garnet doped with Eu2+ and Eu3+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trofimov, A. N.; Petrova, M. A.; Zamoryanskaya, M. V.

    2007-01-01

    Yttrium aluminium garnet (YAG) doped with Eu 2+ and Eu 3+ ions is very interesting as a phosphor for conversion of light-emitting diode light for white light sources. The europium ion occupies the structural position of yttrium in yttrium aluminium garnet and has valence state Eu 3+ . Our sample was doped with Zr 4+ , which is why some of the europium ions had valence state Eu 2+ . As a rule, luminescence of Eu 3+ ions is observed in the orange and red range of spectrum. The luminescence of Eu 2+ in yttrium aluminum garnet is characterized by an intensive broad band with maximum of intensity at about 560 nm (green color). In this work, we studied the intensity and decay time dependences on europium concentration, and the influence of excitation power density on the cathodoluminescence of the sample. The most interesting result is the change of visible cathodoluminescence color in dependence on the density of the exciting power

  4. Cathodoluminescence Study of Microdiamonds and Improvements of Signal Detection by Lowering Temperature of the Sample

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaškovicová, Naděžda; Skoupý, Radim; Paták, Aleš; Hrubanová, Kamila; Krzyžánek, Vladislav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 23, S1 (2017), s. 2284-2285 ISSN 1431-9276 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA17-15451S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : cathodoluminescence * sugnal detection Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering OBOR OECD: Electrical and electronic engineering Impact factor: 1.891, year: 2016

  5. Cathodoluminescence and Thermoluminescence of Undoped LTB and LTB:A (A = Cu, Ag, Mn)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    and Mn Ions for Nonlinear Applications.” Acta Physica Polonica A 107, no. 3 (2005): 507-518. [22] Kimball Physics, Inc.. Operator’s Manual: EMG...CATHODOLUMINESCENCE AND THERMOLUMINESCENCE OF UNDOPED LTB AND LTB:A ( A = Cu, Ag, Mn) THESIS Zachary L. Hadfield, USA AFIT-ENP-13-M-13...STATEMENT A . APPROVED FOR PUBLIC RELEASE; DISTRIBUTION UNLIMITED The views expressed in this thesis are those of the author and

  6. Study of spatial resolution of YAG:Ce cathodoluminescent imaging screens

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schauer, Petr; Bok, Jan

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 308, 1 August (2013), s. 68-73 ISSN 0168-583X R&D Projects: GA TA ČR TE01020118; GA ČR GAP102/10/1410; GA MŠk EE.2.3.20.0103 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : Spatial resolution * Imaging screen * Electron microscope * Cathodoluminescence * YAG:Ce single crystal * Line spread function * Modulation transfer function Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.186, year: 2013

  7. Color electron microprobe cathodoluminescence of Bishunpur meteorite compared with the traditional optical microscopy method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Araujo Tosi

    Full Text Available Abstract Cathodoluminescence (CL imaging is an outstanding method for sub classification of Unequilibrated Ordinary Chondrites (UOC - petrological type 3. CL can be obtained by several electron beam apparatuses. The traditional method uses an electron gun coupled to an optical microscope (OM. Although many scanning electron microscopes (SEM and electron microprobes (EPMA have been equipped with a cathodoluminescence, this technique was not fully explored. Images obtained by the two methods differ due to a different kind of signal acquisition. While in the CL-OM optical photography true colors are obtained, in the CL-EPMA the results are grayscale monochromatic electronic signals. L-RGB filters were used in the CL-EPMA analysis in order to obtain color data. The aim of this work is to compare cathodoluminescence data obtained from both techniques, optical microscope and electron microprobe, on the Bishunpur meteorite classified as LL 3.1 chondrite. The present study allows concluding that 20 KeV and 7 nA is the best analytical condition at EPMA in order to test the equivalence between CL-EPMA and CL-OM colour results. Moreover, the color index revealed to be a method for aiding the study of the thermal metamorphism, but it is not definitive for the meteorite classification.

  8. Synthesis and cathodoluminescence characterization of ZrO2:Er3+ films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martínez-Hernández, A.; Guzmán-Mendoza, J.; Rivera-Montalvo, T.; Sánchez-Guzmán, D.; Guzmán-Olguín, J.C.; García-Hipólito, M.; Falcony, C.

    2014-01-01

    Trivalent erbium doped zirconium oxide films were deposited by the ultrasonic spray pyrolysis technique. Films were deposited using zirconium tetrachloride octahydrate (ZrCl 4 O·8H 2 O) and erbium nitrate hexahydrate ((NO 3 ) 3 Er·6H 2 O) as precursors and deionized water as solvent. The dopant concentrations in the spray solution were 1, 3, 5, 10 and 15 at% in ratio to zirconium content. The films were deposited on corning glass substrates at different temperatures from 400 up to 550 °C. Films deposited at temperatures lower than 400 °C were amorphous, however, as substrate temperatures are increased, the ZrO 2 films presented a better crystallinity and showed a tetragonal phase. Cathodoluminescence (CL) emission spectra showed bands centred at 524, 544 and 655 nm associated with the electronic transition of Er 3+ . - Highlights: • The films of ZrO 2 :Er 3+ were obtained by spray pyrolysis. • Emission spectra of ZrO 2 :Er 3+ films were reported. • Cathodoluminescence of ZrO 2 :Er 3+ films was analyzed. • Cathodoluminescence of ZrO 2 :Er 3+ films showed strong dependence on substrate temperature and electron voltage

  9. Cathodoluminescence (CL) features of the Anatolian agates, hydrothermally deposited in different volcanic hosts from Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hatipoglu, Murat, E-mail: murat.hatipoglu@deu.edu.t [Dokuz Eylul University, IMYO, Izmir Multidisciplinary Vocational School, Gemmology and Jewellery Programme, TR-35380 Buca-Izmir (Turkey); Ajo, David [Institute of Inorganic Chemistry and Surfaces, CNR, Corso Stati Uniti 4, I-35127 Padova (Italy); SMATCH (Scientific Methodologies Applied to Cultural Heritage), Largo Ugo Bartolomei 5, I-00136 Rome (Italy); Sezai Kirikoglu, M. [Istanbul Technical University, Faculty of Mine, Department of Geological Engineering, TR-34469 Maslak-Istanbul (Turkey)

    2011-06-15

    Two different types of multi-colored gem-quality agate samples were investigated. They are both found in the same area in the Cubuk-Ankara region of Turkey although the first group is morphologically and geologically distinct from the second, being nodular-shaped agates occurring in cavity-spaces of a rhyolite host rock with an acidic character. They generally do not have any macroscopic inclusions, but the second group of rather block-shaped agates occurs in the fracture-spaces of an andesite host rock with a more neutral character, i.e. of lower free silica content, and they may display pseudomorphic bar-like macroscopic inclusions. Cathodoluminescence results at room temperature were obtained using measurements with alternating current (AC) (at energies of 14 and 24 keV) as well as direct current (DC) (at 14 keV energy), and they display remarkably different patterns between the two types of agates. It reveals a relation between the CL emissions and the presence of some transition metal elements. It is obvious that all trace elements do not play a direct role. Gaussian fitting of the cathodoluminescence AC experimental data at 14 keV energy obtained from the agates of rhyolite host indicates that there are three major spectral emissions, the dominant one being in the longer-visible wavelength region (red region) at about 690 nm. Additionally, two lesser emission lines occur in the middle-visible wavelength region (yellow region) at about 590 nm, and in the smaller-visible wavelength region (blue region) at about 430 nm. In spite of these, the same data from the agates of andesite host indicate that there is only one remarkable spectral emission which is in the in the middle-visible wavelength region (yellow region) at about 590 nm. On the other hand, Gaussian fitting of the cathodoluminescence AC experimental data at 24 keV energy obtained from the agates of rhyolite host indicates that these initial spectral emissions shift from the red and yellow regions to

  10. Qualification of a new defect revealing etch for CdTe using cathodoluminescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watson, C.C.R.; Durose, K. (Dept. of Physics, Univ. of Durham (United Kingdom)); Banister, A.J. (Dept. of Chemistry, Univ. of Durham (United Kingdom)); O' Keefe, E.; Bains, S.K. (Philips Infrared Defence Components, Southampton (United Kingdom))

    1993-01-30

    The action of a new defect revealing etch comprising a saturated FeCl[sub 3] solution has been investigated. The etch was found suitable for use on (111)A, (anti 1anti 1anti 1)B and other surface orientations of CdTe, and (111)A and (anti 1anti 1anti 1)B surfaces of Cd[sub 0.96]Zn[sub 0.04] Te. Direct correlations with cathodoluminescence and infra-red microscopy have shown the etch to successfully reveal twin boundaries, precipitates and dislocations. A background etch rate of approximately 2 [mu]m min[sup -1] has been measured. (orig.).

  11. LabVIEW-based control and data acquisition system for cathodoluminescence experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bok, J; Schauer, P

    2011-11-01

    Computer automation of cathodoluminescence (CL) experiments using equipment developed in our laboratory is described. The equipment provides various experiments for CL efficiency, CL spectra, and CL time response studies. The automation was realized utilizing the graphical programming environment LabVIEW. The developed application software with procedures for equipment control and data acquisition during various CL experiments is presented. As the measured CL data are distorted by technical limitations of the equipment, such as equipment spectral sensitivity and time response, data correction algorithms were incorporated into the procedures. Some examples of measured data corrections are presented. © 2011 American Institute of Physics

  12. Trisoctahedral gold nanocrystal: A promising candidate for the study of plasmonics using cathodoluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maity, Achyut; Maiti, Arpan; Satpati, Biswarup; Chini, Tapas Kumar

    2016-01-01

    We study plasmon assisted luminescence from an isolated single trisoctahedral (TOH) gold (Au) nanocrystal using cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy and imaging in a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). The site specific e-beam excitation reveals a double peaked spectrum with the localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR) at 540 nm and 660 nm and a single resonant peaked spectrum at 560 nm. The spatial variation of the plasmon assisted luminescence was strongest at the apex points as well as at the edges and corners.

  13. Cathodoluminescence-activated nanoimaging: noninvasive near-field optical microscopy in an electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischak, Connor G; Hetherington, Craig L; Wang, Zhe; Precht, Jake T; Kaz, David M; Schlom, Darrell G; Ginsberg, Naomi S

    2015-05-13

    We demonstrate a new nanoimaging platform in which optical excitations generated by a low-energy electron beam in an ultrathin scintillator are used as a noninvasive, near-field optical scanning probe of an underlying sample. We obtain optical images of Al nanostructures with 46 nm resolution and validate the noninvasiveness of this approach by imaging a conjugated polymer film otherwise incompatible with electron microscopy due to electron-induced damage. The high resolution, speed, and noninvasiveness of this "cathodoluminescence-activated" platform also show promise for super-resolution bioimaging.

  14. Cathodoluminescence (CL) and electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) studies of clay minerals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetze, J.; Ploetze, M.; Goette, T.; Neuser, R.D.; Richter, D.K.

    2002-01-01

    Sheet silicates of the serpentine-kaolin-group (serpentine, kaolinite, dickite, nacrite, halloysite), the talc-pyrophyllite-group (talc, pyrophyllite), the smectite-group (montmorillonite), and illite (as a mineral of the mica-group) were investigated to obtain information concerning their cathodoluminescence behavior. The study included analyses by cathodoluminescence (CL microscopy and spectroscopy), electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR), x-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and trace element analysis. In general, all dioctahedral clay minerals exhibit a visible CL. Kaolinite, dickite, nacrite and pyrophyllite have a characteristic deep blue CL, whereas halloysite emission is in the greenish-blue region. On the contrary, the trioctahedral minerals (serpentine, talc) and illite do not show visible CL. The characteristic blue CL is caused by an intense emission band around 400 nm (double peak with two maxima at 375 and 410 nm). EPR measurements indicate that his blue emission can be related to radiation induced defect centers (RID), which occur as electron holes trapped on apical oxygen (Si-O center) or located at the Al-O-Al group (Al substituting Si in the tetrahedron). Additional CL emission bands were detected at 580 nm in halloysite and kaolinite, and between 700 and 800 nm in kaolinite, dickite, nacrite and pyrophyllite. Time-resolved spectral CL measurements show typical luminescence kinetics for the different clay minerals, which enable differentiation between the various dioctahedral minerals (e.g. kaolinite and dickite), even in thin section. (author)

  15. Soft X-ray and cathodoluminescence measurement, optimisation and analysis at liquid nitrogen temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacRae, C. M.; Wilson, N. C.; Torpy, A.; Delle Piane, C.

    2018-01-01

    Advances in field emission gun electron microprobes have led to significant gains in the beam power density and when analysis at high resolution is required then low voltages are often selected. The resulting beam power can lead to damage and this can be minimised by cooling the sample down to cryogenic temperatures allowing sub-micrometre imaging using a variety of spectrometers. Recent advances in soft X-ray emission spectrometers (SXES) offer a spectral tool to measure both chemistry and bonding and when combined with spectral cathodoluminescence the complementary techniques enable new knowledge to be gained from both mineral and materials. Magnesium and aluminium metals have been examined at both room and liquid nitrogen temperatures by SXES and the L-emission Fermi-edge has been observed to sharpen at the lower temperatures directly confirming thermal broadening of the X-ray spectra. Gains in emission intensity and resolution have been observed in cathodoluminescence for liquid nitrogen cooled quartz grains compared to ambient temperature quartz. This has enabled subtle growth features at quartz to quartz-cement boundaries to be imaged for the first time.

  16. Contrast and decay of cathodoluminescence from phosphor particles in a scanning electron microscope

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Engelsen, Daniel den; Harris, Paul G.; Ireland, Terry G., E-mail: terry.ireland@brunel.ac.uk; Fern, George R.; Silver, Jack

    2015-10-15

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) studies are reported on phosphors in a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). ZnO: Zn and other luminescent powders manifest a bright ring around the periphery of the particles: this ring enhances the contrast. Additionally, particles resting on top of others are substantially brighter than underlying ones. These phenomena are explained in terms of the combined effects of electrons backscattered out of the particles, together with light absorption by the substrate. The contrast is found to be a function of the particle size and the energy of the primary electrons. Some phosphor materials exhibit a pronounced comet-like structure at high scan rates in a CL-image, because the particle continues to emit light after the electron beam has moved to a position without phosphor material. Image analysis has been used to study the loss of brightness along the tail and hence to determine the decay time of the materials. The effect of phosphor saturation on the determination of decay times by CL-microscopy was also investigated. - Highlights: • Contrast enhancement are observed in secondary electron and cathodoluminescent images of phosphor particles sitting on top of others. • Backscattered electrons largely explain the observed contrast enhancement. • After glow effects in CL-micrographs of phosphors enable the determination of decay times. • Phosphor saturation can be used to determine the decay time of individual spectral transitions.

  17. Phase controlled synthesis and cathodoluminescence properties of ZnS nanobelts synthesized by PVD

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Changqing; Zhu, Kexin; Peterson, George; Zhang, Zhihong; Jian, Zengyun; Wei, Yongxing; Zheng, Deshan

    2018-01-01

    Zinc sulfide (ZnS) nanobelts were synthesized via physical vapor deposition to explore the electronic properties of optoelectronic nano-devices. It was determined that the mass ratio of wurtzite (WZ) phase to zincblende (ZB) phase and the preferential orientation (100) are related to the carrier-gas flow rate. The high concentration of planar defects within the phase boundary enhances phase transition. Cathodoluminescence measurements show a red shift of the 337 nm band-gap emission due to stacking and twin faults. We find a direct correlation between the magnitude of the red shift and the mass ratio of ZB phase. With an increase in the ZB phase, there is an increase in the concentration of stacking and twin faults introduced by the phase transformation, as indicated by an increasing red shift in the data. The absorption peaks at 666 and 719 nm were found by UV-vis absorption spectrum, which is attributed to surface defects. This work would help to better understand the important roles of planar defects in the phase transition and also provide us with a feasible route to control phase ratio and cathodoluminescence properties of ZnS nanobelts and other II-VI semiconductor nanostructures.

  18. Cathodoluminescence and Raman Spectromicroscopy of Forsterite in Tagish Lake Meteorite: Implications for Astromineralogy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arnold Gucsik

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Tagish Lake meteorite is CI/CM2 chondrite, which fell by a fireball event in January 2000. This study emphasizes the cathodoluminescence (CL and Raman spectroscopical properties of the Tagish Lake meteorite in order to classify the meteoritic forsterite and its relation to the crystallization processes in a parent body. The CL-zoning of Tagish Lake meteorite records the thermal history of chondrules and terrestrial weathering. Only the unweathered olivine is forsterite, which is CL-active. The variation of luminescence in chondrules of Tagish Lake meteorite implies chemical inhomogeneity due to low-grade thermal metamorphism. The blue emission center in forsterite due to crystal lattice defect is proposed as being caused by rapid cooling during the primary crystallization and relatively low-temperature thermal metamorphism on the parent body of Tagish Lake meteorite. This is in a good agreement with the micro-Raman spectroscopical data. A combination of cathodoluminescence and micro-Raman spectroscopies shows some potentials in study of the asteroidal processes of parent bodies in solar system.

  19. Cathodoluminescence study of SnO{sub 2} powders aimed for gas sensor applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korotcenkov, G. [Technical University of Moldova, Chisinau (Moldova, Republic of)]. E-mail: ghkoro@yahoo.com; Nazarov, M. [Technical University of Moldova, Chisinau (Moldova, Republic of); Zamoryanskaya, M.V. [A.F. Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, RAS, St. Petersburg, Russia (Russian Federation); Ivanov, M. [Technical University of Moldova, Chisinau (Moldova, Republic of); Cirera, A. [EME/CERMAE. Dep. Elect., University of Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Shimanoe, K. [Kyushu University, Kasuga-shi, Fukuoka (Japan)

    2006-06-15

    In this paper we report on cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra of SnO{sub 2} powders, synthesized using the wet chemical route. The analysis of influence of the modes of calcination (T {sub an}-450-800 deg. C), and doping by both Pd and Pt (0.01-10.0 wt.%) on CL spectra was made. It was found that the measurement of CL spectra could be an effective research method of nanostructured metal oxides, aimed for gas sensor applications. It was established that in nanocrystalline SnO{sub 2} the same system of energy levels, associated with radiative recombination, as in single crystalline and polycrystalline SnO{sub 2}, is retained. It was found that doping by both Pd and Pt modifies the structural properties of SnO{sub 2} grains. Also, there is an optimum doping; near 0.1-0.2 wt.%, at which a maximum intensity of cathodoluminescence is reached. It was concluded that for low concentrations of both Pd and Pt additives in SnO{sub 2} an improvement of the material's crystal structure is promoted, and is associated with a decrease in the non-radiating recombination rate.

  20. Time-resolved cathodoluminescence microscopy with sub-nanosecond beam blanking for direct evaluation of the local density of states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moerland, R.J.; Weppelman, I.G.C.; Garming, M.W.H.; Kruit, P.; Hoogenboom, J.P.

    2016-01-01

    We show cathodoluminescence-based time-resolved electron beam spectroscopy in order to directly probe the spontaneous emission decay rate that is modified by the local density of states in a nanoscale environment. In contrast to dedicated laser-triggered electron-microscopy setups, we use commercial

  1. Spatial modulation of above-the-gap cathodoluminescence in InP nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tizei, L H G; Zagonel, L F; Ugarte, D; Cotta, M A; Tencé, M; Stéphan, O; Kociak, M; Chiaramonte, T

    2013-01-01

    We report the observation of light emission on wurtzite InP nanowires excited by fast electrons. The experiments were performed in a scanning transmission electron microscope using an in-house-built cathodoluminescence detector. Besides the exciton emission, at 850 nm, emission above the band gap from 400 to 800 nm was observed. In particular, this broad emission presented systematic periodic modulations indicating variations in the local excitation probability. The physical origin of the detected emission is not clear. Measurements of the spatial variation of the above-the-gap emission points to the formation of leaky cavity modes of a plasmonic nature along the nanowire length, indicating the wave nature of the excitation. We propose a phenomenological model, which fits closely the observed spatial variations. (paper)

  2. Spatial modulation of above-the-gap cathodoluminescence in InP nanowires

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tizei, L. H. G.; Zagonel, L. F.; Tencé, M.; Stéphan, O.; Kociak, M.; Chiaramonte, T.; Ugarte, D.; Cotta, M. A.

    2013-12-01

    We report the observation of light emission on wurtzite InP nanowires excited by fast electrons. The experiments were performed in a scanning transmission electron microscope using an in-house-built cathodoluminescence detector. Besides the exciton emission, at 850 nm, emission above the band gap from 400 to 800 nm was observed. In particular, this broad emission presented systematic periodic modulations indicating variations in the local excitation probability. The physical origin of the detected emission is not clear. Measurements of the spatial variation of the above-the-gap emission points to the formation of leaky cavity modes of a plasmonic nature along the nanowire length, indicating the wave nature of the excitation. We propose a phenomenological model, which fits closely the observed spatial variations.

  3. Thermoluminescence and cathodoluminescence studies of calcite and MgO: surface defects and heat treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goeksu, H.Y.; Brown, L.M.

    1988-01-01

    Some of the problems which preclude accurate thermoluminescence (TL) dating of geologically formed calcite stem from different sample pre-treatment procedures, such as grinding, drilling or pre-heating. It has long been known that grinding can introduce spurious TL in calcite, but there have been wide differences of opinion as to the magnitude of the influence and its importance. Therefore, various grinding and acid-washing procedures have been suggested to avoid spurious thermoluminescence. Various models have been developed to explain the mechanism. We have studied the changes in thermoluminescence (TL) and cathodoluminescence (CL) properties as well as in the spectral composition of the glow from calcite and MgO due to surface defects and heat treatment. It is found that both laboratory heat treatment and surface indents give rise to changes in TL efficiency. (author)

  4. Solid state cathodoluminescence and the properties of its two emission peaks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu Xurong

    2007-01-01

    We discovered solid state cathodoluminescence (SSCL). For its identification we excluded all artifacts, carried out its cross proof and studied its generality. Its spectrum is characterized by the appearance of short wavelength peak when the applied voltage is increased. Three voltage ranges are distinguished, in the lower voltage range we have the long wavelength emission, in the middle range we have both long and short wavelength emissions, and in the higher voltage range we have only the short wavelength emission. The mechanism of this spectral shift lies in the electrical field ionization of excitons. This effect initiates the applicability of band model besides molecular excitons theory. The temporal behaviors of both peaks in SSCL are studied with a method of estimating lifetime by means of frequency dependence on intensity. The lifetime of short wavelength emission is found to be 5 ms and that of long wavelength emission is less than 0.05 ms

  5. Simultaneous specimen current and time-dependent cathodoluminescence measurements on gallium nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campo, E. M., E-mail: e.campo@bangor.ac.uk; Hopkins, L. [School of Electronic Engineering, Bangor University, Gwynedd LL57 1UT (United Kingdom); Pophristic, M. [Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, University of the Science, Philadelphia, Pennsylvania 19104 (United States); Ferguson, I. T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Missouri University of Science and Technology, Rolla, Missouri 65409 (United States)

    2016-06-28

    Time-dependent cathodoluminescence (CL) and specimen current (SC) are monitored to evaluate trapping behavior and evolution of charge storage. Examination of CL and SC suggests that the near band edge emission in GaN is reduced primarily by the activation of traps upon irradiation, and Gallium vacancies are prime candidates. At the steady state, measurement of the stored charge by empiric-analytical methods suggests that all available traps within the interaction volume have been filled, and that additional charge is being stored interstitially, necessarily beyond the interaction volume. Once established, the space charge region is responsible for the steady state CL emission and, prior to build up, it is responsible for the generation of diffusion currents. Since the non-recombination effects resulting from diffusion currents that develop early on are analogous to those leading to device failure upon aging, this study is fundamental toward a holistic insight into optical properties in GaN.

  6. Nitrogen binding behavior in ZnO films with time-resolved cathodoluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mei, Y.F.; Fu, Ricky K.Y.; Siu, G.G.; Wong, K.W.; Chu, Paul K.; Wang, R.S.; Ong, H.C.

    2006-01-01

    ZnO film with (1 0 0) orientation was produced on silicon substrate and doped with nitrogen using plasma immersion ion implantation. The effects due to N doping were investigated using cathodoluminescence (CL). In the heavily nitrogen-doped ZnO film, the intensity of ultraviolet (UV) band decreases and that of the visible band increases as a function of the electron bombardment cycle i.e. time. Based on the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) analysis, the unstable Zn-N bond is responsible for the CL behavior and the experimental results agree well with the first-principle calculation. Our work is helpful to our understanding of the role of p-type dopants in ZnO

  7. Efficiency of Cathodoluminescence Emission by Nitrogen-Vacancy Color Centers in Nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiliang; Glenn, David R; Schalek, Richard; Lichtman, Jeff W; Walsworth, Ronald L

    2017-06-01

    Correlated electron microscopy and cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging using functionalized nanoparticles is a promising nanoscale probe of biological structure and function. Nanodiamonds (NDs) that contain CL-emitting color centers are particularly well suited for such applications. The intensity of CL emission from NDs is determined by a combination of factors, including particle size, density of color centers, efficiency of energy deposition by electrons passing through the particle, and conversion efficiency from deposited energy to CL emission. This paper reports experiments and numerical simulations that investigate the relative importance of each of these factors in determining CL emission intensity from NDs containing nitrogen-vacancy (NV) color centers. In particular, it is found that CL can be detected from NV-doped NDs with dimensions as small as ≈40 nm, although CL emission decreases significantly for smaller NDs. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  8. Photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence properties of Y2O3:Eu nanophosphors prepared by combustion synthesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vu, Nguyen; Kim Anh, Tran; Yi, Gyu-Chul; Strek, W.

    2007-01-01

    Eu-doped Y 2 O 3 nanophosphors were prepared using combustion synthesis. In this method, urea was employed as a fuel. The particle size was estimated to be in the range of 10-20 nm as determined by X-ray diffractometry and transmission electron microscopy. The photoluminescent and cathodoluminescent spectra are described by the well-known 5 D 0 →7 F J transition (J=0, 1, 2, etc.) of Eu 3+ ions with the strongest emission for J=2. The optical properties of nanophosphors were compared with commercial with an order of micrometer size. The effects of urea-to-metal nitrate molar ratio and the other synthesis conditions on the particle size and luminescent properties will be discussed in detail. The red emission of Eu-doped Y 2 O 3 nanophosphors is promising materials not only in high-resolution screen but also in telecomunication as well as in biosensor

  9. Flexible, cathodoluminescent and free standing mesoporous silica films with entrapped quasi-2D perovskites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilakopoulou, Anastasia; Papadatos, Dionysios; Koutselas, Ioannis

    2017-04-01

    The effective entrapment of hybrid organic-inorganic semiconductors (HOIS) into mesoporous polymer-silica hybrid matrices, formed as free standing flexible films, is presented for the first time. A blend of quasi-2D HOIS, simply synthesized by mixing two-dimensional (2D) and three dimensional (3D) HOIS, exhibiting strong photoluminescence, is embedded into porous silica matrices during the sol-gel synthesis, using tetraethylorthosilicate as precursor and Pluronic F-127 triblock copolymer as structure directing agent, under acidic conditions. The final nanostructure hybrid forms flexible, free standing films, presenting high cathodoluminescence and long stable excitonic luminescence, indicating the protective character of the hybrid matrix towards the entrapped perovskite. A significant result is that the photoluminescence of the entrapped HOIS is not affected even after films' prolonged exposure to water.

  10. Design of a cathodoluminescence image generator using a Raspberry Pi coupled to a scanning electron microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez, Alfredo; Santiago, Ulises; Sanchez, John E.; Ponce, Arturo

    2018-01-01

    In this work, an innovative cathodoluminescence (CL) system is coupled to a scanning electron microscope and synchronized with a Raspberry Pi computer integrated with an innovative processing signal. The post-processing signal is based on a Python algorithm that correlates the CL and secondary electron (SE) images with a precise dwell time correction. For CL imaging, the emission signal is collected through an optical fiber and transduced to an electrical signal via a photomultiplier tube (PMT). CL Images are registered in a panchromatic mode and can be filtered using a monochromator connected between the optical fiber and the PMT to produce monochromatic CL images. The designed system has been employed to study ZnO samples prepared by electrical arc discharge and microwave methods. CL images are compared with SE images and chemical elemental mapping images to correlate the emission regions of the sample.

  11. High-resolution photocurrent microscopy using near-field cathodoluminescence of quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heayoung P. Yoon

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available We report a fast, versatile photocurrent imaging technique to visualize the local photo response of solar energy devices and optoelectronics using near-field cathodoluminescence (CL from a homogeneous quantum dot layer. This approach is quantitatively compared with direct measurements of high-resolution Electron Beam Induced Current (EBIC using a thin film solar cell (n-CdS / p-CdTe. Qualitatively, the observed image contrast is similar, showing strong enhancement of the carrier collection efficiency at the p-n junction and near the grain boundaries. The spatial resolution of the new technique, termed Q-EBIC (EBIC using quantum dots, is determined by the absorption depth of photons. The results demonstrate a new method for high-resolution, sub-wavelength photocurrent imaging measurement relevant for a wide range of applications.

  12. Imaging the Hidden Modes of Ultrathin Plasmonic Strip Antennas by Cathodoluminescence

    KAUST Repository

    Barnard, Edward S.

    2011-10-12

    We perform spectrally resolved cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging nanoscopy using a 30 keV electron beam to identify the resonant modes of an ultrathin (20 nm), laterally tapered plasmonic Ag nanostrip antenna. We resolve with deep-subwavelength resolution four antenna resonances (resonance orders m = 2-5) that are ascribed to surface plasmon polariton standing waves that are confined on the strip. We map the local density of states on the strip surface and show that it has contributions from symmetric and antisymmetric surface plasmon polariton modes, each with a very different mode index. This work illustrates the power of CL experiments that can visualize hidden modes that for symmetry reasons have been elusive in optical light scattering experiments. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  13. Ion beam induced charge and cathodoluminescence imaging of response uniformity of CVD diamond radiation detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Sellin, P J; Galbiati, A; Maghrabi, M; Townsend, P D

    2002-01-01

    The uniformity of response of CVD diamond radiation detectors produced from high quality diamond film, with crystallite dimensions of >100 mu m, has been studied using ion beam induced charge imaging. A micron-resolution scanning alpha particle beam was used to produce maps of pulse height response across the device. The detectors were fabricated with a single-sided coplanar electrode geometry to maximise their sensitivity to the surface region of the diamond film where the diamond crystallites are highly ordered. High resolution ion beam induced charge images of single crystallites were acquired that demonstrate variations in intra-crystallite charge transport and the termination of charge transport at the crystallite boundaries. Cathodoluminescence imaging of the same crystallites shows an inverse correlation between the density of radiative centres and regions of good charge transport.

  14. Scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence imaging of subgrain boundaries, twins and planar deformation features in quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamers, M. F.; Pennock, G. M.; Drury, M. R.

    2017-04-01

    The study of deformation features has been of great importance to determine deformation mechanisms in quartz. Relevant microstructures in both growth and deformation processes include dislocations, subgrains, subgrain boundaries, Brazil and Dauphiné twins and planar deformation features (PDFs). Dislocations and twin boundaries are most commonly imaged using a transmission electron microscope (TEM), because these cannot directly be observed using light microscopy, in contrast to PDFs. Here, we show that red-filtered cathodoluminescence imaging in a scanning electron microscope (SEM) is a useful method to visualise subgrain boundaries, Brazil and Dauphiné twin boundaries. Because standard petrographic thin sections can be studied in the SEM, the observed structures can be directly and easily correlated to light microscopy studies. In contrast to TEM preparation methods, SEM techniques are non-destructive to the area of interest on a petrographic thin section.

  15. Cathodoluminescence microcharacterization of forsterite in the chondrule experimentally grown under super cooling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gucsik, A.; Tsukamoto, K.; Nishido, H.; Miura, H.; Kayama, M.; Ninagawa, K.; Kimura, Y.

    2012-01-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) of laboratory forsterite chondrules has been characterized to clarify the formation process of chondrules and related mechanism of the crystal growth in a supercooled melt. Color CL image of the experimentally grown forsterite exhibits significant blue luminescence in the main branches of the interior structure of lab-chondrule, which reflects to the anisotropy of crystallization. A new CL band centered at 450–525 nm (2.76–2.36 eV) in blue to green region might be assigned to a microdefect-related center, which is a diagnostic peak for the forsterite that was formed due to the rapid growth as high as ∼10 mm/s or higher from a supercooled melt.

  16. Cathodoluminescence microscopy and spectroscopy of micro- and nanodiamonds: an implication for laboratory astrophysics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gucsik, Arnold; Nishido, Hirotsugu; Ninagawa, Kiyotaka; Ott, Ulrich; Tsuchiyama, Akira; Kayama, Masahiro; Simonia, Irakli; Boudou, Jean-Paul

    2012-12-01

    Color centers in selected micro- and nanodiamond samples were investigated by cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy and spectroscopy at 298 K [room temperature (RT)] and 77 K [liquid-nitrogen temperature (LNT)] to assess the value of the technique for astrophysics. Nanodiamonds from meteorites were compared with synthetic diamonds made with different processes involving distinct synthesis mechanisms (chemical vapor deposition, static high pressure high temperature, detonation). A CL emission peak centered at around 540 nm at 77 K was observed in almost all of the selected diamond samples and is assigned to the dislocation defect with nitrogen atoms. Additional peaks were identified at 387 and 452 nm, which are related to the vacancy defect. In general, peak intensity at LNT at the samples was increased in comparison to RT. The results indicate a clear temperature-dependence of the spectroscopic properties of diamond. This suggests the method is a useful tool in laboratory astrophysics.

  17. Dislocation related droop in InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes investigated via cathodoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pozina, Galia [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Ciechonski, Rafal [GLO AB, Scheelevägen 22, SE-22363 Lund (Sweden); Bi, Zhaoxia [Solid State Physics, Lund University, Box 118, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Samuelson, Lars [GLO AB, Scheelevägen 22, SE-22363 Lund (Sweden); Solid State Physics, Lund University, Box 118, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); Monemar, Bo [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Solid State Physics, Lund University, Box 118, SE-22100 Lund (Sweden); TokyoUniversity of Agriculture and Technology, Koganei, Tokyo 184-8588 (Japan)

    2015-12-21

    Today's energy saving solutions for general illumination rely on efficient white light emitting diodes (LEDs). However, the output efficiency droop experienced in InGaN based LEDs with increasing current injection is a serious limitation factor for future development of bright white LEDs. We show using cathodoluminescence (CL) spatial mapping at different electron beam currents that threading dislocations are active as nonradiative recombination centers only at high injection conditions. At low current, the dislocations are inactive in carrier recombination due to local potentials, but these potentials are screened by carriers at higher injection levels. In CL images, this corresponds to the increase of the dark contrast around dislocations with the injection (excitation) density and can be linked with droop related to the threading dislocations. Our data indicate that reduction of droop in the future efficient white LED can be achieved via a drastic reduction of the dislocation density by using, for example, bulk native substrates.

  18. Cathodoluminescence and Raman characteristics of CaSO{sub 4}:Tm{sup 3+}, Cu phosphor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekdal, E. [Ege University, Institute of Nuclear Sciences, 35100 Bornova, İzmir (Turkey); Guinea, J. Garcia [MuseoNacional Ciencias Naturales, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Kelemen, A. [Centre for Energy Research, Radiation Safety Laboratory, P.O. Box 49, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Ayvacikli, M. [Celal Bayar University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, Muradiye, Manisa (Turkey); Canimoglu, A. [Nigde University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, Nigde (Turkey); Jorge, A. [MuseoNacional Ciencias Naturales, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Karali, T. [Ege University, Institute of Nuclear Sciences, 35100 Bornova, İzmir (Turkey); Can, N., E-mail: cannurdogan@yahoomail.com [Celal Bayar University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, Muradiye, Manisa (Turkey); Physics Department, Jazan University, P.O. Box 114, 45142 Jazan (Saudi Arabia)

    2015-05-15

    The physical characterization and phosphor emission spectra are presented for CaSO{sub 4} doped with Tm and Cu. All spectral wavelengths are related to electronic transitions of Tm{sup 3+} ions. The powder X-ray diffraction pattern showed that the compound exhibits orthorhombic structure and all reflections were indexed without any other secondary impurity phases. Chemical and structural properties of the samples have been characterized by means of Raman spectroscopy and environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) with an attached X-ray energy dispersive system (EDS). Group frequencies concept is essential point to the interpretation of the bands due to the main SO{sub 4} vibrational units and these displayed main characteristic intensive Raman bands including typical strong intensity at 1016 cm{sup −1} that corresponds to ν{sub 1}SO{sub 4} vibrational mode. From the spatially-resolved cathodoluminescence (CL) spectrum, main emission bands of Tm{sup 3+} centered at 346, 362, and 452 nm, due to the respective transitions of {sup 3}P{sub 0}→{sup 3}H{sub 4}, {sup 1}D{sub 2}→{sup 3}H{sub 6}, {sup 1}D{sub 2}→{sup 3}F{sub 4} were clearly identified. The study is novel as no such CL-ESEM data are available for this doped compound. - Highlights: • Characteristic and cathodoluminescence properties of CaSO{sub 4}:Tm{sup 3+}, Cu have been investigated. • Several sharp and strong CL emission bands due to rare earth ion were observed for rare earth doped sample. • The nature and limitation of the interaction between CaSO{sub 4} and the activator ions were discussed.

  19. Automated sub-5 nm image registration in integrated correlative fluorescence and electron microscopy using cathodoluminescence pointers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haring, Martijn T.; Liv, Nalan; Zonnevylle, A. Christiaan; Narvaez, Angela C.; Voortman, Lenard M.; Kruit, Pieter; Hoogenboom, Jacob P.

    2017-03-01

    In the biological sciences, data from fluorescence and electron microscopy is correlated to allow fluorescence biomolecule identification within the cellular ultrastructure and/or ultrastructural analysis following live-cell imaging. High-accuracy (sub-100 nm) image overlay requires the addition of fiducial markers, which makes overlay accuracy dependent on the number of fiducials present in the region of interest. Here, we report an automated method for light-electron image overlay at high accuracy, i.e. below 5 nm. Our method relies on direct visualization of the electron beam position in the fluorescence detection channel using cathodoluminescence pointers. We show that image overlay using cathodoluminescence pointers corrects for image distortions, is independent of user interpretation, and does not require fiducials, allowing image correlation with molecular precision anywhere on a sample.

  20. EPR and cathodoluminescence of defects in diamond irradiated by nickel ions with energy of 335 MeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varichenko, V.S.; Martinovich, V.A.; Filipp, A.Z.; Didyk, A.Yu.

    1995-01-01

    Defect production in natural diamond irradiated by 335 MeV Ni ions within a dose range of 5·10 12 - 5·10 14 cm -2 has been studied by EPR and cathodoluminescence techniques. It is shown that the high energy ion irradiation leads to the appearance of modified track like one-dimensional structures with nontetrahedral coordination of atoms. A mechanism of microwave conductivity in modified structures of irradiated samples discussed in frame of a model of mobile quasi-particles of corresponding paramagnetic centres. Peculiarities of concentration distributions of paramagnetic centres corresponding to ion-modified structures and cathodoluminescence centres through the irradiated layer are connected with track channeling and stopped of a part of ions because of their elastic collisions with lattice atoms during ion stopping. (author). 18 refs., 5 figs

  1. Light-emitting nanocasts formed from bio-templates: FESEM and cathodoluminescent imaging studies of butterfly scale replicas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver, J; Withnall, R; Ireland, T G; Fern, G R; Zhang, S

    2008-01-01

    Nanocasts comprising of red-light-emitting cubic Y 2 O 3 :Eu phosphors were made from butterfly wing scale bio-templates. We report herein the first cathodoluminescent images made from such nanocasts and show that valuable insights into the nature of the internal structure of the casts can be gained by the use of this technique. The casts faithfully reproduced the fine sub-micrometre size detail of the scales, as was made evident by both FESEM and cathodoluminescent images that were collected from the same sample areas using a hyphenated FESEM-CL instrument. There was excellent agreement between the FESEM and cathodoluminescent images, the image quality of the latter indicating that the Eu 3+ activator ions were evenly dispersed in the Y 2 O 3 :Eu phosphor on a sub-micrometre scale. The casts were made by infilling the natural moulds with a Y 2 O 3 :Eu precursor solution that was subsequently dried and fired to convert it into the phosphor material. This method provides a simple, low cost route for fabricating nanostructures having feature dimensions as small as 20 nm in size, and it has the potential to be applied to other metal oxide systems for producing nano-and micro-components for electronic, magnetic or photonic integrated systems

  2. Surface Features and Cathodoluminescence (CL) Characteristics of Corundum Gems from Eastern of Thailand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boonsoong, A.

    2017-12-01

    Thailand has long been well known as a supplier of gemstones and also one of the world's color stone centers for decades. The principal gemstones are corundum, garnet and zircon. The corundum deposits of Chanthaburi-Trat Provinces form the most significant ruby-sapphire concentration in Thailand. Corundums are commonly found in secondary deposits (alluvium, elluvial, residual-soil and colluvium deposits as well as stream sediments) with the thickness of the gem-bearing layer varying from 10-100cm and the thickness of the overburden ranging up to 15m. A number of corundum samples were collected from each of the twenty-nine corundum deposits in the Chanthaburi-Trat gem fields, eastern of Thailand. Corundum varies in colour across the region with colours associated with three geographic zones; a western zone, characterized by blue, green and yellow sapphires; a middle zone with blue, green sapphires plus rubies; and an eastern zone yielding mainly rubies. This project has aim to study surface features and characterize the Cathodoluminescence (CL) of corundum gems in the Chanthaburi-Trat gem fields, Thailand. Surfaces of the corundums under a scanning electron microscope show triangular etch features and randomly oriented needle-like patterns. These reveal that the corundums have interacted with the magma during their ascent to the Earth's surface. Surface features attributable to transport and weathering processes are scratches, conchoidal fractures and a spongy surface appearance. Clay minerals and Fe-Ti oxide minerals deposited on the spongy surfaces of some corundums also indicate that these grains experienced chemical weathering or reacted with the soil solution while they were in the alluvium. Cathodoluminescence shows some blue sapphires to exhibit dull blue luminescence. The main cause of the CL appearance of sapphires is likely to be a quench centre, Fe2+ in their structure. The bright red luminescence in corundum reflects a high Cr3+ content and is always

  3. Application of Cathodoluminescence to The Study of Feldspars: Imaging and Spectrometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fonseca, Rute; Couto, Helena

    2017-12-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) studies were carried out on polished thin sections of different feldspar samples (from migmatites, granites, aplite-pegmatites and granitic aggregates) using a hot cathode CL equipment HC3-LM coupled to an optical microscope and to a spectrometer (SpectraPro 2300i and a CCD Pixis 400B detector and the software Winspec32) from the Faculty of Sciences of University of Porto. The system was operated at 14kV and a filament current of 0.18 mA. The samples were coated with a thin gold film using a Cressington 108 Auto device. Luminescence images were acquired during the CL analysis with an adapted digital video-camera (KAPPA PS 40C-285 (DX) with dual stage Peltier cooling) and an acquisition time between 351ms and 3,52s. The CL study, including imaging and spectrometry, proved to be an important tool to complement the feldspar petrography as it contributes to the identification of features not observed under optical microscope. The application of the Cathodoluminescence to feldspar allows distinguishing between potassic feldspar and plagioclase, differentiating generations of feldspar and displaying internal zoning and growth areas, among other. The spectrometry complements the CL imaging. It allows obtaining a qualitative level of emission intensity, which permits the interpretation of the nature of this luminescence in each feldspar. Bands shown in the spectra are related to the existing activator elements. In the present study, it was found an association of each feldspar to different spectra and respective colour. The plagioclases exhibit yellow or green luminescence. The activator element is Mn2+, showing a broad emission band between 550 - 570 nm specially detected on this type of feldspars, due to the replacement of K+ for Mn2+. The potassium feldspars have more or less intense blue colour associated with various activators elements: the activator element is Cu2+ showing a broad emission band between 420±5 nm. This emission band can be

  4. Cathodoluminescence (CL Characteristics of Quartz from Different Metamorphic Rocks within the Kaoko Belt (Namibia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Sittner

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Quartz of metamorphic rocks from the Kaoko belt (Namibia representing metamorphic zones from greenshist to granulite facies were investigated by cathodoluminescence (CL microscopy and spectroscopy to characterize their CL properties. The samples cover P-T conditions from the garnet zone (500 ± 30 °C, 9 ± 1 kbar up to the garnet-cordierite-sillimanite-K-feldspar zone (750 ± 30 °C, 4.0–5.5 kbar. Quartz from 10 different localities and metamorphic environments exclusively exhibits blue CL. The observed CL colors and spectra seem to be more or less independent of the metamorphic grade of the host rocks, but are determined by the regional geological conditions. Quartz from different localities of the garnet-cordierite-sillimanite-K-feldspar zone shows a dominant 450 nm emission band similar to quartz from igneous rocks, which might be related to recrystallization processes. In contrast, quartz from different metamorphic zones in the western part of the central Kaoko zone (garnet, staurolite, kyanite, and kyanite-sillimanite-muscovite zone is characterized by a heterogeneous blue-green CL and a dominant 500 nm emission band that strongly decreases in intensity under electron irradiation. Such CL characteristics are typical for quartz of pegmatitic and/or hydrothermal origin and indicate the participation of fluids during neoformation of quartz during metamorphism.

  5. Synthesis and cathodoluminescence of Sb/P co-doped GaN nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Zaien; Liu, Baodan; Yuan, Fang; Hu, Tao; Zhang, Guifeng; Dierre, Benjamin; Hirosaki, Naoto; Sekiguchi, Takashi; Jiang, Xin

    2014-01-01

    Sb/P co-doped Gallium Nitride (GaN) nanowires were synthesized via a simple chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process by heating Ga 2 O 3 and Sb powders in NH 3 atmosphere. Scanning electron microscope (SEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), transmission electron microscope (TEM) and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) measurements confirmed the as-synthesized products were Sb/P co-doped GaN nanowires with rough morphology and hexagonal wurtzite structure. Room temperature cathodoluminescence (CL) demonstrated that an obvious band shift of GaN nanowires can be observed due to Sb/P co-doping. Possible explanation for the growth and luminescence mechanism of Sb/P co-doped GaN nanowires was discussed. Highlight: • Sb/P co-doped GaN nanowires were synthesized through a well-designed multi-channel chemical vapor deposition (CVD) process. • Sb/P co-doping leads to the crystallinity deterioration of GaN nanowires. • Sb/P co-doping caused the red-shift of GaN nanowires band-gap in UV range. • Compared with Sb doping, P atoms are more easy to incorporate into the GaN lattice

  6. Simultaneous cathodoluminescence and electron microscopy cytometry of cellular vesicles labeled with fluorescent nanodiamonds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Sounderya; Pioche-Durieu, Catherine; Tizei, Luiz H G; Fang, Chia-Yi; Bertrand, Jean-Rémi; Le Cam, Eric; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Treussart, François; Kociak, Mathieu

    2016-06-02

    Light and Transmission Electron Microscopies (LM and TEM) hold potential in bioimaging owing to the advantages of fast imaging of multiple cells with LM and ultrastructure resolution offered by TEM. Integrated or correlated LM and TEM are the current approaches to combine the advantages of both techniques. Here we propose an alternative in which the electron beam of a scanning TEM (STEM) is used to excite concomitantly the luminescence of nanoparticle labels (a process known as cathodoluminescence, CL), and image the cell ultrastructure. This CL-STEM imaging allows obtaining luminescence spectra and imaging ultrastructure simultaneously. We present a proof of principle experiment, showing the potential of this technique in image cytometry of cell vesicular components. To label the vesicles we used fluorescent diamond nanocrystals (nanodiamonds, NDs) of size ≈150 nm coated with different cationic polymers, known to trigger different internalization pathways. Each polymer was associated with a type of ND with a different emission spectrum. With CL-STEM, for each individual vesicle, we were able to measure (i) their size with nanometric resolution, (ii) their content in different ND labels, and realize intracellular component cytometry. In contrast to the recently reported organelle flow cytometry technique that requires cell sonication, CL-STEM-based image cytometry preserves the cell integrity and provides a much higher resolution in size. Although this novel approach is still limited by a low throughput, the automatization of data acquisition and image analysis, combined with improved intracellular targeting, should facilitate applications in cell biology at the subcellular level.

  7. The preparation and cathodoluminescence of ZnS nanowires grown by chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Meng-Wen; Cheng, Yin-Wei; Pan, Ko-Ying; Chang, Chen-Chuan; Shieu, F. S.; Shih, Han C.

    2012-11-01

    Single crystal ZnS nanowires were successfully synthesized in large quantities on Si (1 0 0) substrates by simple thermal chemical vapor deposition without using any catalyst. The morphology, composition, and crystal structure were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy. SEM observations show that the nanowires have diameters about 20-50 nm and lengths up to several tens of micrometers. XRD and TEM results confirmed that the nanowires exhibited both wurtzite and zinc blende structures with growth directions aligned along [0 0 0 2] and [1 1 1], respectively. The CL spectrum revealed emission bands in the UV and blue regions. The blue emissions at 449 and ˜581 nm were attributed to surface states and impurity-related defects of the nanowires, respectively. The perfect crystal structure of the nanowires indicates their potential applications in nanotechnology and in the fabrication of nanodevices.

  8. Cathodoluminescence characteristics of polycrystalline diamond films grown by cyclic deposition method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seo, Soo-Hyung; Park, Chang-Kyun; Park, Jin-Seok

    2002-01-01

    Polycrystalline diamond films were deposited using a cyclic deposition method where the H 2 plasma for etching (t E ) and the CH 4 +H 2 plasma for growing (t G ) are alternately modulated with various modulation ratios (t E /t G ). From the measurement of full width at half maximum and I D /I G intensity ratio obtained from the Raman spectra, it was found that diamond defects and non-diamond carbon phases were reduced a little by adopting the cyclic deposition method. From the cathodoluminescence (CL) characteristics measured for deposited films, the nitrogen-related band (centered at approximately 590 nm) as well as the so-called band-A (centered at approximately 430 nm) were observed. As the cyclic ratio t E /t G increased, the relative intensity ratio of band-A to nitrogen-related band (I A /I N ) was found to monotonically decrease. In addition, analysis of X-ray diffraction spectra and scanning electron microscope morphologies showed that CL characteristics of deposited diamond films were closely related to their crystal orientations and morphologies

  9. Photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence of Mn doped zinc silicate nanophosphors for green and yellow field emissions displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omri, K.; Alyamani, A.; Mir, L. El

    2018-02-01

    Mn2+-doped Zn2SiO4 (ZSM2+) was synthesized by a facile sol-gel technique. The obtained samples were characterized by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, photoluminescence (PL) and cathodoluminescence (CL) techniques. Under UV excitation, spectra showed that the α-ZSM2+ phosphor exhibited a strong green emission around 525 nm and reached the highest luminescence intensity with the Mn doping concentration of 5 at.%. However, for the β-ZSM2+ phase, an interesting yellow emission band centered at 575 nm of Mn2+ at the Zn2+ tetrahedral sites was observed. In addition, an unusual red shift with increasing Mn2+ content was also found and attributed to an exchange interaction between Mn2+. Both PL and CL spectra exhibit an intense green and yellow emission centered at 525 and 573 nm, respectively, due to the 4T1 (4G)-6A1 (6S) transition of Mn2+. Furthermore, these results indicated that the Mn2+-doped zinc silicate phosphors may have potential applications in green and yellow emissions displays like field emission displays (FEDs).

  10. Scanning Electron Microscope-Cathodoluminescence Analysis of Rare-Earth Elements in Magnets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imashuku, Susumu; Wagatsuma, Kazuaki; Kawai, Jun

    2016-02-01

    Scanning electron microscope-cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) analysis was performed for neodymium-iron-boron (NdFeB) and samarium-cobalt (Sm-Co) magnets to analyze the rare-earth elements present in the magnets. We examined the advantages of SEM-CL analysis over conventional analytical methods such as SEM-energy-dispersive X-ray (EDX) spectroscopy and SEM-wavelength-dispersive X-ray (WDX) spectroscopy for elemental analysis of rare-earth elements in NdFeB magnets. Luminescence spectra of chloride compounds of elements in the magnets were measured by the SEM-CL method. Chloride compounds were obtained by the dropwise addition of hydrochloric acid on the magnets followed by drying in vacuum. Neodymium, praseodymium, terbium, and dysprosium were separately detected in the NdFeB magnets, and samarium was detected in the Sm-Co magnet by the SEM-CL method. In contrast, it was difficult to distinguish terbium and dysprosium in the NdFeB magnet with a dysprosium concentration of 1.05 wt% by conventional SEM-EDX analysis. Terbium with a concentration of 0.02 wt% in an NdFeB magnet was detected by SEM-CL analysis, but not by conventional SEM-WDX analysis. SEM-CL analysis is advantageous over conventional SEM-EDX and SEM-WDX analyses for detecting trace rare-earth elements in NdFeB magnets, particularly dysprosium and terbium.

  11. Contrast and decay of cathodoluminescence from phosphor particles in a scanning electron microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    den Engelsen, Daniel; Harris, Paul G; Ireland, Terry G; Fern, George R; Silver, Jack

    2015-10-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) studies are reported on phosphors in a field emission scanning electron microscope (FESEM). ZnO: Zn and other luminescent powders manifest a bright ring around the periphery of the particles: this ring enhances the contrast. Additionally, particles resting on top of others are substantially brighter than underlying ones. These phenomena are explained in terms of the combined effects of electrons backscattered out of the particles, together with light absorption by the substrate. The contrast is found to be a function of the particle size and the energy of the primary electrons. Some phosphor materials exhibit a pronounced comet-like structure at high scan rates in a CL-image, because the particle continues to emit light after the electron beam has moved to a position without phosphor material. Image analysis has been used to study the loss of brightness along the tail and hence to determine the decay time of the materials. The effect of phosphor saturation on the determination of decay times by CL-microscopy was also investigated. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Biosynthesis of cathodoluminescent zinc oxide replicas using butterfly (Papilio paris) wing scales as templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Wang; Zhang Di; Fan Tongxiang; Ding Jian; Gu Jiajun; Guo Qixin; Ogawa, Hiroshi

    2009-01-01

    Papilio paris butterflies have an iridescent blue color patch on their hind wings which is visible over a wide viewing angle. Optical and scanning electron microscopy observations of scales from the wings show that the blue color scales have very different microstructure to the matt black ones which also populate the wings. Scanning electron micrographs of the blue scales show that their surfaces comprise a regular two-dimensional array of concavities. By contrast the matt black scales have fine, sponge-like structure, between the ridges and the cross ribs in the scales. Using both types of scale as bio-templates, we obtain zinc oxide (ZnO) replicas of the microstructures of the original scales. Room temperature (T = 300 K) cathodoluminescence spectra of these ZnO replicas have also been studied. Both spectra show a similar sharp near-band-edge emission, but have different green emission, which we associate with the different microstructures of the ZnO replicas

  13. Biosynthesis of cathodoluminescent zinc oxide replicas using butterfly (Papilio paris) wing scales as templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Wang [State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 200240, Shanghai (China); Zhang Di [State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 200240, Shanghai (China)], E-mail: zhangdi@sjtu.edu.cn; Fan Tongxiang; Ding Jian; Gu Jiajun [State Key Lab of Metal Matrix Composites, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 200240, Shanghai (China); Guo Qixin; Ogawa, Hiroshi [Department of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Saga University, Saga 840-8502 (Japan)

    2009-01-01

    Papilio paris butterflies have an iridescent blue color patch on their hind wings which is visible over a wide viewing angle. Optical and scanning electron microscopy observations of scales from the wings show that the blue color scales have very different microstructure to the matt black ones which also populate the wings. Scanning electron micrographs of the blue scales show that their surfaces comprise a regular two-dimensional array of concavities. By contrast the matt black scales have fine, sponge-like structure, between the ridges and the cross ribs in the scales. Using both types of scale as bio-templates, we obtain zinc oxide (ZnO) replicas of the microstructures of the original scales. Room temperature (T = 300 K) cathodoluminescence spectra of these ZnO replicas have also been studied. Both spectra show a similar sharp near-band-edge emission, but have different green emission, which we associate with the different microstructures of the ZnO replicas.

  14. Photomosaics of the cathodoluminescence of 60 sections of meteorites and lunar samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akridge, D.G.; Akridge, J.M.C.; Batchelor, J.D.; Benoit, P.H.; Brewer, J.; DeHart, J.M.; Keck, B.D.; Jie, L.; Meier, A.; Penrose, M.; Schneider, D.M.; Sears, D.W.G.; Symes, S.J.K.; Yanhong, Z.

    2004-01-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) petrography provides a means of observing petrographic and compositional properties of geological samples not readily observable by other techniques. We report the low-magnification CL images of 60 sections of extraterrestrial materials. The images we report include ordinary chondrites (including type 3 ordinary chondrites and gas-rich regolith breccias), enstatite chondrites, CO chondrites and a CM chondrite, eucrites and a howardite, lunar highland regolith breccias, and lunar soils. The CL images show how primitive materials respond to parent body metamorphism, how the metamorphic history of EL chondrites differs from that of EH chondrites, how dark matrix and light clasts of regolith breccias relate to each other, how metamorphism affects eucrites, the texture of lunar regolith breccias and the distribution of crystallized lunar spherules ("lunar chondrules"), and how regolith working affects the mineral properties of lunar soils. More particularly, we argue that such images are a rich source of new information on the nature and history of these materials and that our efforts to date are a small fraction of what can be done. Copyright 2004 by the American Geophysical Union.

  15. Cathodoluminescence investigation of Ge-point defects in silica-based optical fibers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reghioua, I., E-mail: imene.reghioua@univ-st-etienne.fr [Univ-Lyon, Laboratoire H. Curien, UMR CNRS 5516, 18 rue du Pr. Benoît Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Girard, S.; Alessi, A.; Di Francesca, D. [Univ-Lyon, Laboratoire H. Curien, UMR CNRS 5516, 18 rue du Pr. Benoît Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France); Martin-Samos, L.; Fanetti, M. [Materials Research Laboratory, University of Nova Gorica, Vipavska 11c 5270-Ajdovscina (Slovenia); Richard, N.; Raine, M. [CEA, DAM, DIF, F91297, Arpajon (France); Valant, M. [Materials Research Laboratory, University of Nova Gorica, Vipavska 11c 5270-Ajdovscina (Slovenia); Boukenter, A.; Ouerdane, Y. [Univ-Lyon, Laboratoire H. Curien, UMR CNRS 5516, 18 rue du Pr. Benoît Lauras, 42000 Saint-Etienne (France)

    2016-11-15

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements have been performed on Ge doped and Ge/F co-doped optical fibers, in the aim of studying the spatial distributions of the emitting precursor defects present in the as-drawn optical fiber as well as those of the radiation induced centers generated by the 10 keV electron exposure. Using the CL instrument, we recorded different emission bands located in the visible spectral domain (300–750 nm) as well as CL imaging of associated defects, with a spatial resolution of about 1 µm, along the fiber transverse cross sections. In the pristine fiber, Germanium Lone Pair Centers (GLPCs) emitting at 400 nm are the main precursor sites observed in both fibers. Whereas during electron exposure, these centers are converted into other Ge-related defects. In this paper, we studied in situ their bleaching kinetic using CL monochromatic imaging. As expected, our results show that the GLPC signal decreases with the electron fluence, confirming its precursor role. Thanks to the CL abilities, we also demonstrate that the GLPC conversion into radiation induced defects (and then its bleaching kinetic) depends on the germanium concentration, opening the way to a better control of the radiation sensitivity of germanosilicate glass.

  16. Cathodoluminescence of rare earth implanted Ga2O3 and GeO2 nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nogales, E; Hidalgo, P; Lorenz, K; Méndez, B; Piqueras, J; Alves, E

    2011-07-15

    Rare earth (RE) doped gallium oxide and germanium oxide micro- and nanostructures, mostly nanowires, have been obtained and their morphological and optical properties have been characterized. Undoped oxide micro- and nanostructures were grown by a thermal evaporation method and were subsequently doped with gadolinium or europium ions by ion implantation. No significant changes in the morphologies of the nanostructures were observed after ion implantation and thermal annealing. The luminescence emission properties have been studied with cathodoluminescence (CL) in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Both β-Ga(2)O(3) and GeO(2) structures implanted with Eu show the characteristic red luminescence peak centered at around 610 nm, due to the (5)D(0)-(7)F(2) Eu(3+) intraionic transition. Sharpening of the luminescence peaks after thermal annealing is observed in Eu implanted β-Ga(2)O(3), which is assigned to the lattice recovery. Gd(3+) as-implanted samples do not show rare earth related luminescence. After annealing, optical activation of Gd(3+) is obtained in both matrices and a sharp ultraviolet peak centered at around 315 nm, associated with the Gd(3+) (6)P(7/2)-(8)S(7/2) intraionic transition, is observed. The influence of the Gd ion implantation and the annealing temperature on the gallium oxide broad intrinsic defect band has been analyzed.

  17. Defect analysis in GaN films of HEMT structure by cross-sectional cathodoluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isobe, Yasuhiro; Hung, Hung; Oasa, Kohei; Ono, Tasuku; Onizawa, Takashi; Yoshioka, Akira; Takada, Yoshiharu; Saito, Yasunobu; Sugiyama, Naoharu; Tsuda, Kunio; Sugiyama, Toru; Mizushima, Ichiro

    2017-06-01

    Defect analysis of GaN films in high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) structures by cross-sectional cathodoluminescence (X-CL) is demonstrated as a useful technique for improving the current collapse of GaN-HEMT devices, and the relationship between crystal quality and device characteristics is also investigated. The crystal quality of intrinsic-GaN (i-GaN) and carbon-doped GaN produced clearly different peak intensities of blue luminescence (BL), yellow luminescence (YL), and band-edge emission (BE), which is independently detected by X-CL. Current collapse in GaN-HEMT devices is found to be determined by the BL/BE and YL/BE ratios at the top of the i-GaN layer, which is close to the channel. Moreover, the i-GaN thickness required in order to minimize the BL/BE and YL/BE ratios and the thickness dependency of GaN for minimizing the BL/BE and YL/BE ratios depending on the growth conditions can be evaluated by X-CL. However, there is no correlation between current collapse in GaN-HEMT devices and the YL/BE ratio by conventional photoluminescence because HEMT devices consist of multiple GaN layers and the YL signal is detected from the carbon-doped GaN layer. Thus, the X-CL analysis method is a useful technique for device design in order to suppress current collapse.

  18. Growth and characterization of red-green-blue cathodoluminescent ceramic films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gozzi, Daniele; Latini, Alessandro; Salviati, Giancarlo; Armani, Nicola

    2006-06-01

    Gd2O3 and Y2O3 films, respectively, doped with Eu3+, Tb3+, and Tm3+ have been grown by the electron beam physical vapor codeposition technique on optically polished quartz substrates. The film samples have been doped at different concentrations by the corresponding rare-earth oxides. The concentration range explored is from 0.9% to 9.8% on 18 samples. For each film sample an extended characterization has been performed by thin film-x-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersion spectroscopy, cathodoluminescence spectroscopy, and color coordinate analysis. Y2O3 films display the most intense red-green-blue (RGB) emission and their film morphology and structure are more compact and crystalline with respect to Gd2O3 monoclinic films. Eu3+ and Tb3+ doped Y2O3 films grow oriented along the (222) direction. The ratios between the intensities of the electric dipole and magnetic dipole transitions have been also evaluated. The blue emission of Tm3+ doped Gd2O3 is lacking in the dopant concentration range from 1.6% to 7.6%, whereas it is present in Tm3+ doped Y2O3 films, at approximately the same dopant concentration range (1.9%-9.8%). Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage plot of the color coordinates of all the RGB film samples has been reported together with the RGB phosphor standard used in cathodic ray tube TV screens.

  19. Cathodoluminescence emission study of nanocrystalline indium oxide films deposited by spray pyrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Korotcenkov, G. [Technical University of Moldova, Chisinau (Moldova, Republic of)], E-mail: ghkoro@yahoo.com; Nazarov, M. [Technical University of Moldova, Chisinau (Moldova, Republic of); Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology (Korea, Republic of); Zamoryanskaya, M.V. [A.F.Ioffe Physical Technical Institute, RAS, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Ivanov, M. [Technical University of Moldova, Chisinau (Moldova, Republic of)

    2007-07-31

    The results of analysis of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} film cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra are presented in this paper. In{sub 2}O{sub 3} films, aimed for gas sensor application, were deposited by spray pyrolysis from 0.2 M InCl{sub 3}-water solutions. The influence of grain size (10-60 nm), film thickness (20-400 nm), pyrolysis temperature (T{sub pyr} = 400-520 deg. C), and annealing in the air or nitrogen atmospheres (T{sub an} = 600-1100 deg. C) on CL emission of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} is discussed. CL spectra of as-deposited In{sub 2}O{sub 3} films were characterized by a broad band centered at {lambda} {approx} 570-600 nm. The annealing of studied films leads to a considerable increase of CL intensity. High annealing temperature of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} films (T{sub an} > 850 deg. C) is being accompanied by the appearance of additional bands centered at {lambda} {approx} 400, 550, and 650 nm, which are peculiar to single-crystalline In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanobelts, or nanowires with perfect crystal structure. It was concluded that the improvement of crystal structure and the decrease of the concentration of oxygen vacancies are the main factors determining the change of CL spectra of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} films and the appearance of edge luminescence.

  20. A preliminary study of CdS for solar cells using combined TEM and cathodoluminescence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mam, K.; Durose, K.; Halliday, D.P.; Szczerbakow, A.

    2005-01-01

    A study of the suitability of a combined transmission electron microscope (TEM)/cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging and spectroscopy apparatus for investigations of CdS is presented. Photoluminescence (PL) was used to evaluate the effect of the Ar + and I + ion beam thinning used in TEM specimen preparation of CdS: a minor increase in yellow emission (594 nm) resulted. However, excitation of luminescence spectra in the TEM had a quenching effect on red luminescence (734 nm), this being considered due to the high excitation density compared to that in PL. Significant electron beam damage to the CdS could be avoided by using scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) illumination in preference to the conventional TEM mode, which generally uses higher beam current density. Dislocation images were correlated with contrast in the STEM-CL imaging mode. The potential of the apparatus to make further direct correlations of CL images with diffraction contrast TEM imaging was assessed using the Rose visibility criterion

  1. Cathodoluminescence of rare earth implanted Ga2O3 and GeO2 nanostructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nogales, E; Hidalgo, P; Mendez, B; Piqueras, J; Lorenz, K; Alves, E

    2011-01-01

    Rare earth (RE) doped gallium oxide and germanium oxide micro- and nanostructures, mostly nanowires, have been obtained and their morphological and optical properties have been characterized. Undoped oxide micro- and nanostructures were grown by a thermal evaporation method and were subsequently doped with gadolinium or europium ions by ion implantation. No significant changes in the morphologies of the nanostructures were observed after ion implantation and thermal annealing. The luminescence emission properties have been studied with cathodoluminescence (CL) in a scanning electron microscope (SEM). Both β-Ga 2 O 3 and GeO 2 structures implanted with Eu show the characteristic red luminescence peak centered at around 610 nm, due to the 5 D 0 - 7 F 2 Eu 3+ intraionic transition. Sharpening of the luminescence peaks after thermal annealing is observed in Eu implanted β-Ga 2 O 3 , which is assigned to the lattice recovery. Gd 3+ as-implanted samples do not show rare earth related luminescence. After annealing, optical activation of Gd 3+ is obtained in both matrices and a sharp ultraviolet peak centered at around 315 nm, associated with the Gd 3+ 6 P 7/2 - 8 S 7/2 intraionic transition, is observed. The influence of the Gd ion implantation and the annealing temperature on the gallium oxide broad intrinsic defect band has been analyzed.

  2. Microscopy and Cathodoluminescence Spectroscopy Characterization of Quartz Exhibiting Different Alkali-Silica Reaction Potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuchařová, Aneta; Götze, Jens; Šachlová, Šárka; Pertold, Zdeněk; Přikryl, Richard

    2016-02-01

    Different quartz types from several localities in the Czech Republic and Sweden were examined by polarizing microscopy combined with cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy, spectroscopy, and petrographic image analysis, and tested by use of an accelerated mortar bar test (following ASTM C1260). The highest alkali-silica reaction potential was indicated by very fine-grained chert, containing significant amounts of fine-grained to cryptocrystalline matrix. The chert exhibited a dark red CL emission band at ~640 nm with a low intensity. Fine-grained orthoquartzites, as well as fine-grained metamorphic vein quartz, separated from phyllite exhibited medium expansion values. The orthoquartzites showed various CL of quartz grains, from blue through violet, red, and brown. Two CL spectral bands at ~450 and ~630 nm, with various intensities, were detected. The quartz from phyllite displayed an inhomogeneous dark red CL with two CL spectral bands of low intensities at ~460 and ~640 nm. The massive coarse-grained pegmatite quartz from pegmatite was assessed to be nonreactive and displayed a typical short-lived blue CL (~480 nm). The higher reactivity of the fine-grained hydrothermal quartz may be connected with high concentrations of defect centers, and probably with amorphized micro-regions in the quartz, respectively; indicated by a yellow CL emission (~570 nm).

  3. Cathodoluminescence characteristics of sandstone and the implications for sandstone type No. 512 uranium deposit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Xiaodong; Guan Taiyang

    1998-12-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) technique, as a special petrologic tool, has been applied to the studies of uranium hosted sandstone from No. 512 uranium deposit located in Xinjiang Autonomous Region, Northwest China. The detrital grains including quartz, feldspar, debris and cements display distinguishing CL properties. The quartz grains mainly demonstrate brown and dark blue CL, feldspar grains demonstrate blue and bright blue CL, calcite cement displays bright yellow-orange and orange-red CL with significant CL zoning, while the debris, mud and sand cements have dark red CL, multicolor CL or non-luminescence. The characteristics of overgrowth, fracture healing, and the original contact relations of detrital grains appear much more significant with CL than that with conventional visual methods. Much more information can be contributed by CL technique to decipher the provenance area, to explain the cementation, consolidation and other diagenesis processes of sandstone. The CL technique also provides and efficient tool for identifying detrital grains and cements, and for more precisely estimating the proportions of various detrital grains and cement components in sandstone. The CL emission of uranium hosted sandstone revealed the existence of radiation-damage rims of quartz grains at the places with a little or no uranium minerals nearby, which may imply a uranium-leaching episode during the diagenesis of sandstone

  4. Cathodoluminescence studies of defects and piezoelectric fields in GaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henley, S.

    2002-01-01

    High spatial resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) mapping studies were carried out in GaN based material systems similar to those used commercially in the manufacture of light emitting diodes (LED) and laser diodes (LD). The area of prime interest was the effect of defects in these materials, such as dislocations, on the luminescence production. For this purpose a field emission scanning electron microscope (SEM) was modified and calibrated so that cathodoluminescence studies could be carried out at temperatures down to 8K on thinned samples suitable for characterisation by transmission electron microscopy. An InGaN/GaN single quantum well (QW) similar to those used in the fabrication of short-wavelength GaN LEDs was studied. It was demonstrated that threading edge dislocations act as non-radiative recombination centres in this sample. It was estimated from CL maps and from computer simulations that these threading dislocations reduce the overall QW luminescence by at least 60% compared to that from a dislocation free sample. Is has also been shown that 'V-shaped' pits present reduce the QW luminescence production in this sample by a further 10% due to the missing QW material. The presence of a large piezoelectric field across the QW was shown to red shift the QW luminescence peak due to the quantum confined Stark effect (QCSE). It was possible to partially screen this field, under high intensity excitation, producing a blue shift of the QW peak. This blue shift was observed in CL and photoluminescence (PL) experiments. It is suggested that separation across the well of charge carriers of opposite signs screened the piezoelectric field. The blue shift of the QW luminescence was observed to remain after high electron dose irradiation in the SEM. This effect was not observed in PL measurements after high laser power exposure. The CL blue shift could be removed by irradiation with a UV lamp. It was shown that the minority carrier diffusion length (MCDL) increased from

  5. Cathodoluminescence mapping - optimising collection conditions and examples of applications to minerals and mineral processing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilson, N.C.; MacRae, C.M.; Lynch, R.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: A Cathodoluminescence (CL) system has been developed at CSIRO Minerals that allows the simultaneous collection of X-ray, backscatter and multi-channel CL data on a JEOL 8900/8200 microprobe. This system offers significant benefits over traditional CL, X-ray and BSE techniques in that direct comparison with the elemental concentrations at the same pixel or over the same region is now possible. The CL signal is collected from a monocular eye-piece which is integrated into the electron optics on the electron microprobe. From here it is fed via a fibre optic to a grating spectrometer with a 2048-element linear charge-coupled device (CCD)-array. The CCD array is connected to a PCI A/D card in a PC. The PC also contains a digital I/O card that is connected to the microprobe to synchronise the CL capture with the X-ray capture. This paper looks at the various modifications we have made in order to improve the capturing and processing of the CL data. One of the first improvements we made was to fit a cooling device to stabilise the temperature of the CCD. Spectra acquired from a CCD has a 'dark noise' background which is dependent upon temperature, and CL maps acquired without the cooling device can show subtle variations in room temperature which lead to background banding or artefacts in the image. The removal of background drift due to thermal instability has enabled us to implement automatic background subtraction at every pixel. This has significantly improved peak to background ratios and enabled more subtle chemical and structural modifications within the CL image to be seen. We have also made a modification to allow the collection of CL maps in beam scan mode, as well as stage scan mode. Cathodoluminescence can offer very high spatial resolution; at low voltages resolutions of down to 20 nm have been recently achieved. Depending upon the region of interest, one can now select pixel sizes on this system down to 50 nm. When performing beam maps on larger

  6. Simultaneous cathodoluminescence and electron microscopy cytometry of cellular vesicles labeled with fluorescent nanodiamonds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagarajan, Sounderya; Pioche-Durieu, Catherine; Tizei, Luiz H. G.; Fang, Chia-Yi; Bertrand, Jean-Rémi; Le Cam, Eric; Chang, Huan-Cheng; Treussart, François; Kociak, Mathieu

    2016-06-01

    Light and Transmission Electron Microscopies (LM and TEM) hold potential in bioimaging owing to the advantages of fast imaging of multiple cells with LM and ultrastructure resolution offered by TEM. Integrated or correlated LM and TEM are the current approaches to combine the advantages of both techniques. Here we propose an alternative in which the electron beam of a scanning TEM (STEM) is used to excite concomitantly the luminescence of nanoparticle labels (a process known as cathodoluminescence, CL), and image the cell ultrastructure. This CL-STEM imaging allows obtaining luminescence spectra and imaging ultrastructure simultaneously. We present a proof of principle experiment, showing the potential of this technique in image cytometry of cell vesicular components. To label the vesicles we used fluorescent diamond nanocrystals (nanodiamonds, NDs) of size ~150 nm coated with different cationic polymers, known to trigger different internalization pathways. Each polymer was associated with a type of ND with a different emission spectrum. With CL-STEM, for each individual vesicle, we were able to measure (i) their size with nanometric resolution, (ii) their content in different ND labels, and realize intracellular component cytometry. In contrast to the recently reported organelle flow cytometry technique that requires cell sonication, CL-STEM-based image cytometry preserves the cell integrity and provides a much higher resolution in size. Although this novel approach is still limited by a low throughput, the automatization of data acquisition and image analysis, combined with improved intracellular targeting, should facilitate applications in cell biology at the subcellular level.Light and Transmission Electron Microscopies (LM and TEM) hold potential in bioimaging owing to the advantages of fast imaging of multiple cells with LM and ultrastructure resolution offered by TEM. Integrated or correlated LM and TEM are the current approaches to combine the advantages of

  7. The preparation and cathodoluminescence of ZnS nanowires grown by chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, Meng-Wen; Cheng, Yin-Wei; Pan, Ko-Ying; Chang, Chen-Chuan; Shieu, F.S.; Shih, Han C.

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► ZnS nanowires have been achieved by thermal evaporation. ► The nanowires were 20–50 nm in diameter and up to tens of nanometers in length. ► Single-crystalline wurtzite and sphalerite ZnS phase are coexist in the nanowires. ► The ZnS nanowires showed almost identical blue luminescence at room temperature. ► ZnS nanowires may be appropriate for use in UV/blue LED phosphor materials. - Abstract: Single crystal ZnS nanowires were successfully synthesized in large quantities on Si (1 0 0) substrates by simple thermal chemical vapor deposition without using any catalyst. The morphology, composition, and crystal structure were characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy. SEM observations show that the nanowires have diameters about 20–50 nm and lengths up to several tens of micrometers. XRD and TEM results confirmed that the nanowires exhibited both wurtzite and zinc blende structures with growth directions aligned along [0 0 0 2] and [1 1 1], respectively. The CL spectrum revealed emission bands in the UV and blue regions. The blue emissions at 449 and ∼581 nm were attributed to surface states and impurity-related defects of the nanowires, respectively. The perfect crystal structure of the nanowires indicates their potential applications in nanotechnology and in the fabrication of nanodevices.

  8. Cathodoluminescence response of natural and synthetic lanthanide-rich phosphates (Ln3+: Ce, Nd)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrera-Villatoro, A.; Boronat, C.; Rivera-Montalvo, T.; Correcher, V.; Garcia-Guinea, J.; Zarate-Medina, J.

    2017-12-01

    This paper reports on the cathodoluminescence (CL) emission of both natural and synthetic lanthanide-rich phosphates (Ln3+: Ce, Nd) previously characterized by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Environmental Scanning Electronic Microscopy (ESEM) and Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy. The thermal treatment at 700 °C performed on the synthetic sample obtained by chemical precipitation, promotes increasing of the crystallinity degree giving rise to a phase transition from the hexagonal (comprising monazite and rabdophane) into the monoclinic (cerianite and monazite) structures detected by XRD. Despite the size and the morphology of the grains are similar under ESEM, it could be appreciated significant differences among CL signals attending to the shape (with well-defined peaks for the annealed sample) and intensity (with lower emission for the non-thermally pretreated synthetic phosphate). The main wavebands centered at (i) 360, 380 and 490 nm are associated respectively with 5D3/2 → 2F5/2 and 5D3/2 → 2F7/2 transitions as well as a redox reaction assigned to the presence of Ce3+, (ii) 276, 424, 516 and 531 nm are linked respectively to 2G9/2→4I9/2, 2P1/2→4I9/2, 4G9/2→4I9/2 and 4G7/2→4I9/2 Nd3+ transitions and (iii) 400-490 nm is due to non-bridging oxygen hole centers related to the tetrahedral PO43- groups or structural defects for the heated synthetic samples. The natural sample from Madagascar, with a very complex CL spectrum, displays a characteristic band emission in the green-yellow and red regions corresponding to [UO2]2+ groups and Sm3+ respectively.

  9. Modeling on the cathodoluminescence properties of the thin film phosphors for field emission flat panel displays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Kyu-Gong

    2000-12-01

    In order to investigate the effects of the film roughness with the fundamental luminance parameters of thin film phosphors, Y2 O3:Eu films with different thickness and roughness values were deposited on various substrate materials using a pulsed laser deposition technique under a controlled experimental procedure. The best luminous efficiency was observed from the Y2O3:Eu films on quartz substrates due to the smaller refractive index and low absorption characteristics of the quartz substrates which produce a larger amount of total internal reflection in the film and low loss of light intensity during the multiple internal reflections. The trapped light inside the film can escape the film more easily due to rougher film surface. The better epitaxial growth capability of the Y2O 3:Eu films with the LaAlO3 substrates resulted in higher luminous efficiency in the small surface roughness region. Higher luminous efficiency was observed in reflection mode than in transmission mode due to the contribution of diffusely scattered light at the air-film interface. A new theoretical model based on the diffraction scattering theory of light, the steady-state diffusion condition of carriers and the Kanaya-Okayama's electron- beam-solid interaction range satisfactorily explains all the experimental results mentioned above. The model also provides solid understandings on the cathodoluminescence properties of the thin film phosphors with the effects of other single or multiple luminance parameters. The parameters encountered for the model are surface roughness, electron-beam-solid interaction, surface recombination rate of carriers, charge carrier diffusion properties, multiple scattering at the interfaces (air- film, film-substrate, and substrate-air), optical properties of the material, film thickness, and substrate type. The model supplies a general solution in both qualitative and quantitative ways to estimate the luminance properties of the thin film phosphors and it can be

  10. Microscopic View of Defect Evolution in Thermal Treated AlGaInAs Quantum Well Revealed by Spatially Resolved Cathodoluminescence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yue Song

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available An aluminum gallium indium arsenic (AlGaInAs material system is indispensable as the active layer of diode lasers emitting at 1310 or 1550 nm, which are used in optical fiber communications. However, the course of the high-temperature instability of a quantum well structure, which is closely related to the diffusion of indium atoms, is still not clear due to the system’s complexity. The diffusion process of indium atoms was simulated by thermal treatment, and the changes in the optical and structural properties of an AlGaInAs quantum well are investigated in this paper. Compressive strained Al0.07Ga0.22In0.71As quantum wells were treated at 170 °C with different heat durations. A significant decrement of photoluminescence decay time was observed on the quantum well of a sample that was annealed after 4 h. The microscopic cathodoluminescent (CL spectra of these quantum wells were measured by scanning electron microscope-cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL. The thermal treatment effect on quantum wells was characterized via CL emission peak wavelength and energy density distribution, which were obtained by spatially resolved cathodoluminescence. The defect area was clearly observed in the Al0.07Ga0.22In0.71As quantum wells layer after thermal treatment. CL emissions from the defect core have higher emission energy than those from the defect-free regions. The defect core distribution, which was associated with indium segregation gradient distribution, showed asymmetric character.

  11. Cathodoluminescence properties of SiO2:Pr3+and ZnO.SiO2:Pr3+ phosphor nanopowders

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mhlongo, GH

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available regardless of the incorporation of Pr3+ and nanocrystalline ZnO or annealing at 600 °C. The particles were mostly spherical and agglomerated as confirmed by Field Emission Scanning Electron Microscopy. Thermogravimetric analysis of dried gels performed... Science, vol. 45(19): 5228-5236 Cathodoluminescence properties of SiO2:Pr 3+and ZnO·SiO2:Pr 3+ phosphor nanopowders G. H. Mhlongo, O. M. Ntwaeaborwa, M. S. Dhlamini, H. C. Swart, K. T. Hillie ABSTRACT: The successful incorporation of Zn...

  12. Cathodoluminescence, fluid inclusions and trace element data for the syntaxial quartz cementation in the sandstones of Ora Formation, northern Iraq

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omer, Muhamed Fakhri; Friis, Henrik

    2018-01-01

    Quartz cements of the quartz arenitic sandstones from the Chalky Nasara and Ora section of the (Devonian-Carboniferous) Ora Formation in northern Iraq have been studied. A combination of Hot-Cathodoluminescence (CL), LA-ICP-MS and fluid inclusions microthermometry revealed three syntaxial quartz......-bedded sandstones than in the6 thickly-bedded sandstones filling most of remaining pore space during mesogenesis. The Q3 was formed during early telogenesis stage fully cementing the sandstones and the fractures were filled by hydrothermal chlorite and sulfides. Significant amount of trace elements Al, Li, Ge...

  13. Photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence properties of green emitting SrGa2{S}4 : Eu2+ thin film

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chartier, Céline; Benalloul, Paul; Barthou, Charles; Frigerio, Jean-Marc; Mueller, Gerd O.; Mueller-Mach, Regina; Trottier, Troy

    2002-02-01

    Photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence properties of SrGa2S4 : Eu2+ thin films prepared by reactive RF magnetron sputtering are investigated. Luminescence performances of the phosphor in the thin film form are compared to those of powder samples: the brightness efficiency of thin films is found to be about 30% of the efficiency of powder at low current density. A ratio higher than 40% is expected at higher current density. Thin film screens for FEDs will become a positive alternative to powder screens provided that film quality and light extraction could be improved by optimization of thickness and deposition parameters.

  14. Effect of Mg co-doping on cathodoluminescence properties of LuGAGG:Ce single crystalline garnet films

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schauer, Petr; Lalinský, Ondřej; Kučera, M.; Lučeničová, Z.; Hanuš, M.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 72, OCT (2017), s. 359-366 ISSN 0925-3467 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA16-05631S; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212; GA MŠk ED0017/01/01 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : multicomponent garnet film * LuGAGG:Ce,Mg * liquid phase epitaxy * cathodoluminescence * scintillator * electron detector Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering OBOR OECD: Electrical and electronic engineering Impact factor: 2.238, year: 2016

  15. Concentration effect of Tm3+ on cathodoluminescence properties of SiO2: Tm3+ and SiO2:Ho3+, Tm3+ systems

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Dhlamini, MS

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available .physb.2011.09.091 Concentration effect of Tm3+ on cathodoluminescence properties of SiO2: Tm 3+ and SiO2:Ho 3+, Tm3+ systems M.S. Dhlamini, G.H. Mhlongo, H.C. Swart, O.M. Ntwaeaborwa, K.T. Hillie ABSTRACT: Cathodoluminescence (CL) properties of Si...O2 powders activated with thulium (Tm3+) and holmium (Ho3+) ions prepared by a sol–gel process were investigated. Different molar concentrations of Tm3+ co-doped with Ho3+ were studied. The 460 nm peak was monitored and the influence of the beam...

  16. Synthesis and cathodoluminescent properties of Y2SiO5:Tb3+ phosphors prepared from uniform precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Deyong; Yang Sen; Wang Jieqiong; Zheng Aqun; Song Xiaoping; Yu Demei

    2012-01-01

    The luminescent properties of phosphors are sensitive to the size of phosphor particles. The commercial Y 2 SiO 5 :Tb 3+ phosphors usually show relatively larger particle size (5–10 μm) due to the irregular morphology of rare earth oxide precursor and thus degrade the luminescent properties. In this paper, we report the Y 2 SiO 5 :Tb 3+ phosphors synthesized from the uniform Tb-doped Y 2 O 3 precursor by a homogeneous precipitation method. Compared with the commercial phosphors, the obtained Y 2 SiO 5 :Tb 3+ phosphors manifest the uniform morphology with much smaller particles distributing from 0.8 μm to 1.9 μm. Consequently, the cathodoluminescent intensity under low excitation voltage (1–5 kV) was increased, demonstrating a strong green emission with a dominant wavelength of 545 nm. Our results indicate an effective way to develop the high-quality phosphors for field emission display. - Highlights: ► The Y 2 SiO 5 :Tb 3+ phosphors are synthesized by a homogeneous precipitation method. ► They manifest the uniform morphology with much smaller particles than commercial one. ► The corresponding cathodoluminescent intensity of green emission is greatly enhanced. ► Our results indicate an effective way to develop the high-quality phosphors for FED.

  17. Cathodoluminescence imaging and spectroscopy of excited states in InAs self-assembled quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khatsevich, S.; Rich, D.H.; Kim, Eui-Tae; Madhukar, A.

    2005-01-01

    We have examined state filling and thermal activation of carriers in buried InAs self-assembled quantum dots (SAQDs) with excitation-dependent cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging and spectroscopy. The InAs SAQDs were formed during molecular-beam epitaxial growth of InAs on undoped planar GaAs (001). The intensities of the ground- and excited-state transitions were analyzed as a function of temperature and excitation density to study the thermal activation and reemission of carriers. The thermal activation energies associated with the thermal quenching of the luminescence were measured for ground- and excited-state transitions of the SAQDs, as a function of excitation density. By comparing these activation energies with the ground- and excited-state transition energies, we have considered various processes that describe the reemission of carriers. Thermal quenching of the intensity of the QD ground- and first excited-state transitions at low excitations in the ∼230-300-K temperature range is attributed to dissociation of excitons from the QD states into the InAs wetting layer. At high excitations, much lower activation energies of the ground and excited states are obtained, suggesting that thermal reemission of single holes from QD states into the GaAs matrix is responsible for the observed temperature dependence of the QD luminescence in the ∼230-300-K temperature range. The dependence of the CL intensity of the ground-and first excited-state transition on excitation density was shown to be linear at all temperatures at low-excitation density. This result can be understood by considering that carriers escape and are recaptured as excitons or correlated electron-hole pairs. At sufficiently high excitations, state-filling and spatial smearing effects are observed together with a sublinear dependence of the CL intensity on excitation. Successive filling of the ground and excited states in adjacent groups of QDs that possess different size distributions is assumed to

  18. Shock pressure estimation in basement rocks of the Chicxulub impact crater using cathodoluminescence spectroscopy of quartz

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomioka, N.; Tani, R.; Kayama, M.; Chang, Y.; Nishido, H.; Kaushik, D.; Rae, A.; Ferrière, L.; Gulick, S. P. S.; Morgan, J. V.

    2017-12-01

    The Chicxulub impact structure, located in the northern Yucatan Peninsula, Mexico, was drilled by the joint IODP-ICDP Expedition 364 in April-May 2016. This expedition is the first attempt to obtain materials from the topographic peak ring within the crater previously identified by seismic imaging. A continuous core was successfully recovered from the peak ring at depths between 505.7 and 1334.7 mbsf. Uplifted, fractured, and shocked granitic basement rocks forming the peak ring were found below, in the impact breccia and impact melt rock unit (747.0-1334.7 mbsf; Morgan et al. 2016). In order to constrain impact crater formation, we investigated shock pressure distribution in the peak-ring basement rocks. Thin sections of the granitic rocks were prepared at intervals of 60 m. All the samples contains shocked minerals, with quartz grains frequently showing planar deformation features (PDFs). We determined shock pressures based on the cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy of quartz. The strong advantage of the CL method is its applicability to shock pressure estimation for individual grains for both quartz and diaplectic SiO2 glass with high-spatial resolution ( 1 μm) (Chang et al. 2016). CL spectra of quartz shows a blue emission band caused by shock-induced defect centers, where its intensity increases with shock pressure. A total of 108 quartz grains in ten thin sections were analyzed using a scanning electron microscope with a CL spectrometer attached (an acceleration voltage of 15 kV and a beam current of 2 nA were used). Natural quartz single crystals, which were experimentally shocked at 0-30 GPa, were used for pressure calibration. CL spectra of all the quartz grains in the basement rocks showed broad blue emission band at the wavelength range of 300-500 nm and estimated shock pressures were in the range of 15-20 GPa. The result is consistent with values obtained from PDFs analysis in quartz using the universal stage (Ferrière et al. 2017; Rae et al. 2017

  19. Study of electron-beam-evaporated MgO films using electron diffraction, optical absorption and cathodoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aboelfotoh, M.O.; Ramsey, J.N.

    1982-05-21

    Reflection high energy electron diffraction, optical absorption and cathodoluminescence were used to study MgO films deposited onto fused silica, single-crystal silicon and LiF substrates at various temperatures. Results showed that some of the same optical absorption and emission bands observed in X- or UV-irradiated, additively colored or mechanically deformed MgO crystals were observed in evaporated MgO films. The peak positions and the relative peak intensities of the optical absorption and emission bands depended on the substrate temperature during film deposition as well as on the structure of the film. The effect of heating the films in air and vacuum on the optical absorption and emission bands is also discussed.

  20. Cathodoluminescence of GaN diped with Zn in the process of epitaxial growth and by the method of ionic implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khasanov, I.Sh.; Gippius, A.A.; Kuznetsov, A.V.; Petrov, M.N.; Sletov, M.M.

    1984-01-01

    The cathodoluminescence (CL) method was used to investigate the epitaxial GaN layers doped with Zn both in the process of growth and by the method of ionic implantation for the purpose of clarifying the effect of doping technique on impurity luminescence. It was shown that (2-3)x10 18 cm -3 concentration is optimal with respect to intensity of impurity ''blue'' luminescence for gallium nitride doped with Zn. The intensity of GaN ''blue'' luminescence during Zn ionic implantation is several times lower as compared with doping in the process of growth. This is related to incomplete optical activation of impurity atoms in the process of postimplantation thermal annealing. Increase of zinc concentration above optimal during ionic implantation intensifies crystal lattice disordering, which is supported by intensification of 1.7 eV cathodoluminescence band in spectra conditioned by defects

  1. Enhanced cathodoluminescence from InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes with nanohole arrays fabricated using anodic aluminum-oxide masks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Doan, M. H.; Lim, H.; Lee, J. J.; Nguyen, D. H.; Rotermund, F.; Mho, S. I.

    2010-01-01

    Blue InGaN/GaN light emitting diodes (LEDs) have been grown by using low-pressure metalorganic chemical vapor deposition. To improve the light extraction from the LEDs, we have fabricated nanohole arrays on top of the p-GaN layer by using anodic aluminum oxides as etch masks. The AAO membranes are fabricated by using a two-step anodization process in an oxalic-acid solution. Atomic force microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy show that the nanohole arrays formed on top of the LEDs have a quasi-hexagonal geometry. The cathodoluminescence measurements are used to investigate the light extraction from the nanopatterned samples. Cathodoluminescence intensity of a LED with the nanohole array is enhanced up to 10 times compared to that of a sample without a nanohole array. We also investigated the spatially-resolved luminescence profile around the nanoholes.

  2. High resolution cathodoluminescence spectroscopy of carbonate cementation in Khurmala Formation (Paleocene-L. Eocene) from Iraqi Kurdistan Region, Northern Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omer, Muhamed F.; Omer, Dilshad; Zebari, Bahroz Gh.

    2014-12-01

    A combination of high resolution cathodoluminsecnce-spectroscopy (HRS-CL) with spatial electron microprobe analysis and optical microscopy is used to determine paragenesis and history of cementation in the limestones and dolostones of Khurmala Formation which is exposed in many parts of Northern Iraq. Khurmala Formation was subjected to different diagenetic processes such as micritization, compaction, dissolution, neomorphism, pyritization and cementation that occurred during marine to shallow burial stages and culminated during intermediate to deep burial later stages. Five dolomite textures are recognized and classified according to crystal size distribution and crystal-boundary shape. Dolomitization is closely associated with the development of secondary porosity that pre-and postdates dissolution and corrosion; meanwhile such porosity was not noticed in the associated limestones. Microprobe analysis revealed three types of cement, calcite, dolomite and ankerite which range in their luminescence from dull to bright. Cathodoluminescence study indicated four main texture generations. These are (1) unzoned microdolomite of planar and subhedral shape, with syntaxial rim cement of echinoderm that show dull to red luminescence, (2) equant calcite cements filling interparticle pores which shows dull luminescence and weak zonal growth, (3.1) homogenous intrinsic blue stoichiometric calcite with dull luminescence and without activators, (3.2) coarse blocky calcite cement with strong oscillatory zoning and bright orange luminescence which postdates other calcite cements, (4) ankerite cement with red to orange, non-luminescence growth zonation which is the last formed cement.

  3. Cathodoluminescence investigations on quartz cement in the sandstones of Khabour Formation from Iraqi Kurdistan Region, Northern Iraq

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omer, Muhamed F.; Friis, Henrik

    2014-03-01

    The Ordovician deltaic to shallow marine Khabour Formation in Northern Iraq consists mainly of sandstone with minor siltstone and interbedded shale. The sandstones are pervasively cemented by quartz that resulted in very little preserved primary porosity. Cathodoluminescence and petrographic studies showed that the silica cementation occurred in five successive phases which can be distinguished by their luminescence pattern. The precipitations of two phases have predated the major compaction process while the other phases are younger. The successive phases represent a sequence of changes in silica supply which were classified as very early and early, derived from dissolved biogenic silica that precipitated as opal/microquartz, possibly pre-compactional and of non-luminescent quartz overgrowth type. This was followed by phases whose silica supply derived from pressure solution of quartz, dissolution of feldspar, and hydrothermal fluids related to major thrust fault event. These successive quartz cement phases showed an increase in luminescence and the development of complicated zonation pattern in late-stage quartz cementation.

  4. Spatially resolved investigation of competing nanocluster emission in quantum-disks-in-nanowires structure characterized by nanoscale cathodoluminescence

    KAUST Repository

    Prabaswara, Aditya; Stowe, David J.; Janjua, Bilal; Ng, Tien Khee; Anjum, Dalaver H.; Longo, Paolo; Zhao, Chao; Elafandy, Rami T.; Li, Xiaohang; Alyamani, Ahmed Y.; El-Desouki, Munir M.; Ooi, Boon S.

    2017-01-01

    We report on the study and characterization of nanoclusters-related recombination centers within quantum-disks-in-nanowires heterostructure by utilizing microphotoluminescence (mu-PL) and cathodoluminescence scanning transmission electron microscopy (CL-STEM). mu-PL measurement shows that the nanoclusters-related recombination center exhibits different temperature-dependent characteristics compared with the surrounding InGaN quantum-disksrelated recombination center. CL-STEM measurements reveal that these recombination centers mainly arise from irregularities within the quantum disks, with a strong, spatially localized emission when measured at low temperature. The spectra obtained from both CL-STEM and mu-PL correlate well with each other. Our work sheds light on the optical and structural properties of simultaneously coexisting recombination centers within nanowires heterostructures. (C) The Authors. Published by SPIE under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. Distribution or reproduction of this work in whole or in part requires full attribution of the original publication, including its DOI.

  5. Multispectral Emissions of Lanthanide-Doped Gadolinium Oxide Nanophosphors for Cathodoluminescence and Near-Infrared Upconversion/Downconversion Imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doan Thi Kim Dung

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Comprehensive imaging of a biological individual can be achieved by utilizing the variation in spatial resolution, the scale of cathodoluminescence (CL, and near-infrared (NIR, as favored by imaging probe Gd2O3 co-doped lanthanide nanophosphors (NPPs. A series of Gd2O3:Ln3+/Yb3+ (Ln3+: Tm3+, Ho3+, Er3+ NPPs with multispectral emission are prepared by the sol-gel method. The NPPs show a wide range of emissions spanning from the visible to the NIR region under 980 nm excitation. The dependence of the upconverting (UC/downconverting (DC emission intensity on the dopant ratio is investigated. The optimum ratios of dopants obtained for emissions in the NIR regions at 810 nm, 1200 nm, and 1530 nm are applied to produce nanoparticles by the homogeneous precipitation (HP method. The nanoparticles produced from the HP method are used to investigate the dual NIR and CL imaging modalities. The results indicate the possibility of using Gd2O3 co-doped Ln3+/Yb3+ (Ln3+: Tm3+, Ho3+, Er3+ in correlation with NIR and CL imaging. The use of Gd2O3 promises an extension of the object dimension to the whole-body level by employing magnetic resonance imaging (MRI.

  6. Spatially resolved investigation of competing nanocluster emission in quantum-disks-in-nanowires structure characterized by nanoscale cathodoluminescence

    KAUST Repository

    Prabaswara, Aditya

    2017-06-30

    We report on the study and characterization of nanoclusters-related recombination centers within quantum-disks-in-nanowires heterostructure by utilizing microphotoluminescence (mu-PL) and cathodoluminescence scanning transmission electron microscopy (CL-STEM). mu-PL measurement shows that the nanoclusters-related recombination center exhibits different temperature-dependent characteristics compared with the surrounding InGaN quantum-disksrelated recombination center. CL-STEM measurements reveal that these recombination centers mainly arise from irregularities within the quantum disks, with a strong, spatially localized emission when measured at low temperature. The spectra obtained from both CL-STEM and mu-PL correlate well with each other. Our work sheds light on the optical and structural properties of simultaneously coexisting recombination centers within nanowires heterostructures. (C) The Authors. Published by SPIE under a Creative Commons Attribution 3.0 Unported License. Distribution or reproduction of this work in whole or in part requires full attribution of the original publication, including its DOI.

  7. Multi-wavelength emission from a single InGaN/GaN nanorod analyzed by cathodoluminescence hyperspectral imaging

    KAUST Repository

    Kusch, Gunnar

    2018-01-23

    Multiple luminescence peaks emitted by a single InGaN/GaN quantum-well(QW) nanorod, extending from the blue to the red, were analysed by a combination of electron microscope based imaging techniques. Utilizing the capability of cathodoluminescence hyperspectral imaging it was possible to investigate spatial variations in the luminescence properties on a nanoscale. The high optical quality of a single GaN nanorod was demonstrated, evidenced by a narrow band-edge peak and the absence of any luminescence associated with the yellow defect band. Additionally two spatially confined broad luminescence bands were observed, consisting of multiple peaks ranging from 395 nm to 480 nm and 490 nm to 650 nm. The lower energy band originates from broad c-plane QWs located at the apex of the nanorod and the higher energy band from the semipolar QWs on the pyramidal nanorod tip. Comparing the experimentally observed peak positions with peak positions obtained from plane wave modelling and 3D finite difference time domain(FDTD) modelling shows modulation of the nanorod luminescence by cavity modes. By studying the influence of these modes we demonstrate that this can be exploited as an additional parameter in engineering the emission profile of LEDs.

  8. Cathodoluminescence and ion beam analysis of ion-implanted combinatorial materials libraries on thermally grown SiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, C.-M.; Pan, H.C.; Zhu, D.Z.; Hu, J.; Li, M.Q.

    1999-01-01

    A method combining ion implantation and physical masking technique has been used to generate material libraries of various ion-implanted samples. Ion species of C, Ga, N, Pb, Sn, Y have been sequentially implanted to an SiO 2 film grown on a silicon wafer through combinatorial masks and consequently a library of 64 (2 6 ) samples is generated by 6 masking combinations. This approach offers rapid synthesis of samples with potential new compounds formed in the matrix, which may have specific luminescent properties. The depth-resolved cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements revealed some specific optical property in the samples correlated with implanted ion distributions. A marker-based technique is developed for the convenient location of sample site in the analysis of Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) and proton elastic scattering (PES), intended to characterize rapidly the ion implanted film libraries. These measurements demonstrate the power of nondestructively and rapidly characterizing composition and the inhomogeneity of the combinatorial film libraries, which may determine their physical properties

  9. Large-Scale Fabrication of Boron Nitride Nanotubes via a Facile Chemical Vapor Reaction Route and Their Cathodoluminescence Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong Bo

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cylinder- and bamboo-shaped boron nitride nanotubes (BNNTs have been synthesized in large scale via a facile chemical vapor reaction route using ammonia borane as a precursor. The structure and chemical composition of the as-synthesized BNNTs are extensively characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and selected-area electron diffraction. The cylinder-shaped BNNTs have an average diameter of about 100 nm and length of hundreds of microns, while the bamboo-shaped BNNTs are 100–500 nm in diameter with length up to tens of microns. The formation mechanism of the BNNTs has been explored on the basis of our experimental observations and a growth model has been proposed accordingly. Ultraviolet–visible and cathodoluminescence spectroscopic analyses are performed on the BNNTs. Strong ultraviolet emissions are detected on both morphologies of BNNTs. The band gap of the BNNTs are around 5.82 eV and nearly unaffected by tube morphology. There exist two intermediate bands in the band gap of BNNTs, which could be distinguishably assigned to structural defects and chemical impurities. Additional file 1 Click here for file

  10. Cathodoluminescence studies of anomalous ion implantation defect introduction in lightly and heavily doped liquid phase epitaxial GaAs:Sn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norris, C.B.; Barnes, C.E.

    1980-01-01

    The anomalous postrange defect introduction produced by shallow ion implantation in GaAs has been investigated in Sn-doped liquid phase epitaxial (LPE) material using depth-resolved cathodoluminescence in conjunction with layer removal by chemical etching. 100-keV Ne + or 200-keV Zn + ions were implanted into lightly or heavily Sn-doped LPE layers at temperatures between 80 and 300 K. All implantations were subsequently annealed at 300 K. Although the projected ion ranges for the implants were on the order of 1000 A, significant postrange damage was observed at far greater depths. At depths up to several microns, the damage introduction produced severe nonradiative recombination but simultaneously caused an apparent increase in the concentration of incumbent luminescence centers responsible for an extrinsic band near 1.39 eV. A weak damage-related band near 1.2 eV could also be seen in one instance. At depths of 5--30 μm, the postrange damage had the opposite effect of annihilating incumbent 1.39-eV luminescence centers. The efficiency of the damage introduction has a complicated temperature dependence which is significantly different for the ion/substrate combinations investigated. However, no conditions were found for which the damage introduction could be inhibited. While our measurements are the most extensive to date concerning the anomalous ion implant damage introduction in GaAs, the detailed mechanisms responsible for this effect still remain obscure owing in part to the limited understanding of defects in GaAs

  11. Cathodoluminescence | Materials Science | NREL

    Science.gov (United States)

    shown on a computer screen; the image of a sample semiconductor material appears as a striated oval material sample shown above; the image is a high-contrast light and dark oval on a dark background and was top left of copper indium gallium selenide semiconductor material sample; the image is shown on a

  12. E-beam irradiation effect on CdSe/ZnSe QD formation by MBE: deep level transient spectroscopy and cathodoluminescence studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kozlovsky, V I; Litvinov, V G; Sadofyev, Yu G

    2004-01-01

    CdSe/ZnSe structures containing 1 or 15 thin (3-5 monolayers) CdSe layers were studied by cathodoluminescence (CL) and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS). The DLTS spectra consisted of peaks from deep levels (DLs) and an additional intense peak due to electron emission from the ground quantized level in the CdSe layers. Activation energy of this additional peak correlated with an energy of the CdSe-layer emission line in the CL spectra. Electron-beam irradiation of the structure during the growth process was found to influence the DLTS and CL spectra of the CdSe layers, shifting the CdSe-layer emission line to the long-wave side. The obtained results are explained using the assumption that e-beam irradiation stimulates the formation of quantum dots of various sizes in the CdSe layers

  13. Cathodoluminescence studies of chevron features in semi-polar (11 2 ¯ 2 ) InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brasser, C.; Bruckbauer, J.; Gong, Y.; Jiu, L.; Bai, J.; Warzecha, M.; Edwards, P. R.; Wang, T.; Martin, R. W.

    2018-05-01

    Epitaxial overgrowth of semi-polar III-nitride layers and devices often leads to arrowhead-shaped surface features, referred to as chevrons. We report on a study into the optical, structural, and electrical properties of these features occurring in two very different semi-polar structures, a blue-emitting multiple quantum well structure, and an amber-emitting light-emitting diode. Cathodoluminescence (CL) hyperspectral imaging has highlighted shifts in their emission energy, occurring in the region of the chevron. These variations are due to different semi-polar planes introduced in the chevron arms resulting in a lack of uniformity in the InN incorporation across samples, and the disruption of the structure which could cause a narrowing of the quantum wells (QWs) in this region. Atomic force microscopy has revealed that chevrons can penetrate over 150 nm into the sample and quench light emission from the active layers. The dominance of non-radiative recombination in the chevron region was exposed by simultaneous measurement of CL and the electron beam-induced current. Overall, these results provide an overview of the nature and impact of chevrons on the luminescence of semi-polar devices.

  14. Recombination dynamics in coalesced a-plane GaN ELO structures investigated by high spatially and ps-time-resolved cathodoluminescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bastek, B.; Bertram, F.; Christen, J. [Institute of Experimental Physics, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg (Germany); Wernicke, T.; Weyers, M. [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Berlin (Germany); Kneissl, M. [Institute of Solid State Physics, Technical University, Berlin (Germany)

    2008-07-01

    The characteristic epitaxial lateral overgrowth (ELO) domains of fully coalesced a-plane GaN layers were directly imaged by highly spatially and spectrally resolved cathodoluminescence microscopy (CL) at 5 K. The patterned layers were grown by MOVPE on r-plane sapphire substrate and stripe masks oriented in the [01 anti 10] direction. In the area of coherent growth (I) the broad basal plane stacking fault (BSF) emission centered at 3.41 eV dominates the spectra. Also in the region (II) of coalescence the BSF luminescence dominates, however, the intensity increases by one order of magnitude compared to area (I). In complete contrast, in the stripes associated with the laterally grown domains (III) in [0001] direction, exclusively an intense and sharp (D{sup 0},X) emission at 3.475 eV is observed. ps-time-resolved CL of the free excitons (FX) recorded from this domains (III) decays bi-exponentially. The initial lifetime of 180 ps is primarily given by the capture of FX by impurities to form bound excitons (BE). With rising temperature this capture time constant decreases as T{sup -1/4} and reaches a minimum of 104 ps at T=60 K. Above 60 K, i.e. when FX starts to dominate the BEs, the lifetime increases rapidly to a value of 240 ps for 300 K.

  15. Upconversion emission and cathodoluminescence of Er{sup 3+}-doped NaYbF{sub 4} nanoparticles for low-temperature thermometry and field emission displays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Du, Peng; Yu, Jae Su [Kyung Hee University, Department of Electronics and Radio Engineering, Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Luo, Laihui [Ningbo University, Department of Microelectronic Science and Engineering, Ningbo (China)

    2017-03-15

    The Er{sup 3+}-doped NaYbF{sub 4} nanoparticles were fabricated by a hydrothermal method. The green and red emissions located at around 525, 542 and 657 nm corresponding to the {sup 2}H{sub 11/2} → {sup 4}I{sub 15/2}, {sup 4}S{sub 3/2} → {sup 4}I{sub 15/2} and {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} → {sup 4}I{sub 15/2} transitions of Er{sup 3+} ions, respectively, were observed when pumped at 980 nm light. Furthermore, with the help of the fluorescence intensity ratio technique, the thermometric properties of as-prepared products from the thermally coupled {sup 2}H{sub 11/2} and {sup 4}S{sub 3/2} levels of Er{sup 3+} ions were studied by analyzing temperature-dependent upconversion (UC) emission spectra. The maximum sensitivity for the Er{sup 3+}-doped NaYbF{sub 4} nanoparticles was found to be around 0.0043 K{sup -} {sup 1} with a temperature range of 93-293 K. In addition, the cathodoluminescence (CL) spectrum of the synthesized nanoparticles was nearly the same as the UC emission spectrum and the CL emission intensity did not exhibit saturation with the increase of accelerating voltage and filament current. (orig.)

  16. Cathodoluminescence study of Mg activation in non-polar and semi-polar faces of undoped/Mg-doped GaN core-shell nanorods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hortelano, V.; Martínez, O.; Cuscó, R.; Artús, L.; Jiménez, J.

    2016-03-01

    Spectrally and spatially resolved cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements were carried out at 80 K on undoped/Mg-doped GaN core-shell nanorods grown by selective area growth metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy in order to investigate locally the optical activity of the Mg dopants. A study of the luminescence emission distribution over the different regions of the nanorods is presented. We have investigated the CL fingerprints of the Mg incorporation into the non-polar lateral prismatic facets and the semi-polar facets of the pyramidal tips. The amount of Mg incorporation/activation was varied by using several Mg/Ga flow ratios and post-growth annealing treatment. For lower Mg/Ga flow ratios, the annealed nanorods clearly display a donor-acceptor pair band emission peaking at 3.26-3.27 eV and up to 4 LO phonon replicas, which can be considered as a reliable indicator of effective p-type Mg doping in the nanorod shell. For higher Mg/Ga flow ratios, a substantial enhancement of the yellow luminescence emission as well as several emission subbands are observed, which suggests an increase of disorder and the presence of defects as a consequence of the excess Mg doping.

  17. Upconversion emission and cathodoluminescence of Er"3"+-doped NaYbF_4 nanoparticles for low-temperature thermometry and field emission displays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Du, Peng; Yu, Jae Su; Luo, Laihui

    2017-01-01

    The Er"3"+-doped NaYbF_4 nanoparticles were fabricated by a hydrothermal method. The green and red emissions located at around 525, 542 and 657 nm corresponding to the "2H_1_1_/_2 → "4I_1_5_/_2, "4S_3_/_2 → "4I_1_5_/_2 and "4F_9_/_2 → "4I_1_5_/_2 transitions of Er"3"+ ions, respectively, were observed when pumped at 980 nm light. Furthermore, with the help of the fluorescence intensity ratio technique, the thermometric properties of as-prepared products from the thermally coupled "2H_1_1_/_2 and "4S_3_/_2 levels of Er"3"+ ions were studied by analyzing temperature-dependent upconversion (UC) emission spectra. The maximum sensitivity for the Er"3"+-doped NaYbF_4 nanoparticles was found to be around 0.0043 K"- "1 with a temperature range of 93-293 K. In addition, the cathodoluminescence (CL) spectrum of the synthesized nanoparticles was nearly the same as the UC emission spectrum and the CL emission intensity did not exhibit saturation with the increase of accelerating voltage and filament current. (orig.)

  18. Investigations of lateral and vertical compositional gradients in Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} by highly spatially, spectrally and time resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, Mathias; Ribbe, Stefan; Hempel, Thomas; Bertram, Frank; Christen, Juergen [Institute for Experimental Physics, Otto-von-Guericke-University, Magdeburg (Germany); Witte, Wolfram; Hariskos, Dimitrios [Zentrum fuer Sonnenenergie- und Wasserstoff-Forschung Baden-Wuerttemberg (ZSW), Stuttgart (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Luminescence properties of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} (CIGS) layers with different thicknesses were investigated by means of highly spatially, spectrally and time resolved cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy at low temperature (T=5 K). A polycrystalline CIGS thin film with a thickness of 2.4 {mu}m was grown using an in-line co-evaporation process with a final Cu-poor composition on top of a sputtered Mo layer on a soda lime glass substrate. The layer thickness was then reduced by highly controlled bromine methanol etching. The typical grainy (d{sub average}=3 {mu}m) structure of the untouched sample develops thin longish structures under the influence of the etchant. Integral CL spectra of the samples are dominated by donor-acceptor pair (DAP) luminescence. The peak energies of these spectra are ranging from 1.13 eV to 1.22 eV with decreasing layer thickness. The lateral distribution of the luminescence is inhomogeneous regarding the intensity as well as the peak energy. Time resolved CL shows a strong dependence of the initial lifetime from the emission energy.

  19. Impacts of Carrier Transport and Deep Level Defects on Delayed Cathodoluminescence in Droop-Mitigating InGaN/GaN LEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhao, Zhibo; Singh, Akshay; Chesin, Jordan; Armitage, Rob; Wildeson, Isaac; Deb, Parijat; Armstrong, Andrew; Kisslinger, Kim; Stach, Eric; Gradecak, Silvija

    2017-07-25

    Prevalent droop mitigation strategies in InGaN-based LEDs require structural and/or compositional changes in the active region but are accompanied by a detrimental reduction in external quantum efficiency (EQE) due to increased Shockley-Read-Hall recombination. Understanding the optoelectronic impacts of structural modifications in InGaN/GaN quantum wells (QW) remains critical for emerging high-power LEDs. In this work, we use a combination of electron microscopy tools along with standard electrical characterization to investigate a wide range of low-droop InGaN/GaN QW designs. We find that chip-scale EQE is uncorrelated with extended well-width fluctuations observed in scanning transmission electron microscopy. Further, we observe delayed cathodoluminescence (CL) response from designs in which calculated band profiles suggest facile carrier escape from individual QWs. Samples with the slowest CL responses also exhibit the lowest EQEs and highest QW defect densities in deep level optical spectroscopy. We propose a model in which the electron beam (i) passivates deep level defect states and (ii) drives charge carrier accumulation and subsequent reduction of the built-in field across the multi-QW active region, resulting in delayed radiative recombination. Finally, we correlate CL rise dynamics with capacitance-voltage measurements and show that certain early-time components of the CL dynamics reflect the open circuit carrier population within one or more QWs.

  20. A multimodal microcharacterisation of trace-element zonation and crystallographic orientation in natural cassiterite by combining cathodoluminescence, EBSD, EPMA and contribution of confocal Raman-in-SEM imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, G; Lerouge, C; Schmidt, U

    2018-01-16

    In cassiterite, tin is associated with metals (titanium, niobium, tantalum, indium, tungsten, iron, manganese, mercury). Knowledge of mineral chemistry and trace-element distribution is essential for: the understanding of ore formation, the exploration phase, the feasibility of ore treatment, and disposal/treatment of tailings after the exploitation phase. However, the availability of analytical methods make these characterisations difficult. We present a multitechnical approach to chemical and structural data that includes scanning electron microscopy (SEM)-based imaging and microanalysis techniques such as: secondary and backscattered electrons, cathodoluminescence (CL), electron probe microanalyser (EPMA), electron backscattered diffraction (EBSD) and confocal Raman-imaging integrated in a SEM (RISE). The presented results show the complementarity of the used analytical techniques. SEM, CL, EBSD, EPMA provide information from the interaction of an electron beam with minerals, leading to atomistic information about their composition, whereas RISE, Raman spectroscopy and imaging completes the studies with information about molecular vibrations, which are sensitive to structural modifications of the minerals. The correlation of Raman bands with the presence/absence of Nb, Ta, Fe (heterovalent substitution) and Ti (homovalent substitution) is established at a submicrometric scale. Combination of the different techniques makes it possible to establish a direct link between chemical and crystallographic data of cassiterite. © 2018 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2018 Royal Microscopical Society.

  1. Investigations of vertical chemical gradients in Cu(In,Ga)S{sub 2}-thin films prepared by sulfurization of sputtered precursor layers using highly spatially resolved cathodoluminescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribbe, Stefan; Mueller, Mathias; Bertram, Frank; Hempel, Thomas; Christen, Juergen [Institute for Experimental Physics, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg (Germany); Rodriguez-Alvarez, Humberto; Lauche, Jakob; Schock, Hans-Werner [Helmholtz Center Berlin for Materials and Energy (Germany)

    2012-07-01

    The luminescence properties of Cu(In,Ga)S{sub 2}(CIGS)-absorber layers for thin film solar cells have been studied by highly spatially resolved cathodoluminescence (CL) at low temperature (T=5 K). In/Cu-Ga-precursors were annealed with elementary sulfur pellets in a rapid thermal process at different annealing times to represent different growth steps of the CIGS absorber layer. Spatially integral CL spectra show a dominant peak at 825 nm accompanied by a low-energy shoulder at 890 nm. Only a slight blue shift of the main peak is observed by variation of the excitation density. Investigations of cross-sections show for all samples a similar luminescence distribution. Near the molybdenum back contact distinct areas show luminescence emitting at 680-750 nm. In contrast, in upper regions of the layer a homogeneous low-energy luminescence at around 820 nm is observed which exhibits the most intensive spots on the cross-section. In local spectra we observe a change of the dominant recombination channel at the interface of these two regions.

  2. Distinction between amorphous and healed planar deformation features in shocked quartz using composite color scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamers, Maartje F.; Pennock, Gill M.; Herwegh, Marco; Drury, Martyn R.

    2016-10-01

    Planar deformation features (PDFs) in quartz are one of the most reliable and most widely used forms of evidence for hypervelocity impact. PDFs can be identified in scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) images, but not all PDFs show the same CL behavior: there are nonluminescent and red luminescent PDFs. This study aims to explain the origin of the different CL emissions in PDFs. Focused ion beam (FIB) thin foils were prepared of specific sample locations selected in composite color SEM-CL images and were analyzed in a transmission electron microscope (TEM). The FIB preparation technique allowed a direct, often one-to-one correlation between the CL images and the defect structure observed in TEM. This correlation shows that composite color SEM-CL imaging allows distinction between amorphous PDFs on one hand and healed PDFs and basal Brazil twins on the other: nonluminescent PDFs are amorphous, while healed PDFs and basal Brazil twins are red luminescent, with a dominant emission peak at 650 nm. We suggest that the red luminescence is the result of preferential beam damage along dislocations, fluid inclusions, and twin boundaries. Furthermore, a high-pressure phase (possibly stishovite) in PDFs can be detected in color SEM-CL images by its blue luminescence.

  3. The Role of Activator-Activator Interactions In Reducing in Low-Voltage-Cathodoluminescence Efficiency in Eu and Tb Doped Phosphors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SEAGER, CARLETON H.; TALLANT, DAVID R.

    1999-01-01

    High resolution measurements of spectrally resolved cathodoluminescence (CL) decay have been made in several commercial and experimental phosphors doped with Eu and Tb at beam energies ranging from 0.8 to 4 keV. CL emission from the lowest two excited states of both rare earth activators was compared to the decay of photoluminescence (PL) after pulsed laser excitation. We find that, at long times after the cessation of electron excitation, the CL decay rates are comparable to those measured in PL, at short times, the decay process is considerably faster and has a noticeable dependence on the energy of the electron beam. These beam energy effects are largest for the higher excited states and for phosphors with larger activator concentrations. Measurements of the experimental phosphors over a range of activator fractions from 0.1 to 0.002 show that the beam energy dependence of the steady-state CL efficiency is larger for higher excited states and weakens as the activator concentration is reduced. The latter effect is strongest for Y 2 SiO 5 :Tb, but also quite evident in Y 2 O 3 :Eu. We suggest that the electron beam dependence of both the decay lifetimes and the steady state CL efficiency may be due to interaction of nearby excited states which occurs as a result of the large energy deposition rate for low energy electrons. This picture-for non-radiative quenching of rare earth emission is an excited state analog of the well-known (ground state-excited state) concentration quenching mechanism

  4. Emission properties of hydrothermal Yb3+, Er3+ and Yb3+, Tm3+-codoped Lu2O3 nanorods: upconversion, cathodoluminescence and assessment of waveguide behavior

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barrera, Elixir William; Pujol, MarIa Cinta; DIaz, Francesc; Choi, Soo Bong; Rotermund, Fabian; Park, Kyung Ho; Jeong, Mun Seok; Cascales, Concepcion

    2011-01-01

    Yb 3+ and Ln 3+ (Ln 3+ = Er 3+ or Tm 3+ ) codoped Lu 2 O 3 nanorods with cubic Ia3-bar symmetry have been prepared by low temperature hydrothermal procedures, and their luminescence properties and waveguide behavior analyzed by means of scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM). Room temperature upconversion (UC) under excitation at 980 nm and cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra were studied as a function of the Yb + concentration in the prepared nanorods. UC spectra revealed the strong development of Er 3+4 F 9/2 → 4I 15/2 (red) and Tm 3+1 G 4 → 3 H 6 (blue) bands, which became the pre-eminent and even unique emissions for corresponding nanorods with the higher Yb 3+ concentration. Favored by the presence of large phonons in current nanorods, UC mechanisms that privilege the population of 4 F 9/2 and 1 G 4 emitting levels through phonon-assisted energy transfer and non-radiative relaxations account for these observed UC luminescence features. CL spectra show much more moderate development of the intensity ratio between the Er 3+4 F 9/2 → 4 I 15/2 (red) and 2 H 11/2 , 4 S 3/2 → 4 I 15/2 (green) emissions with the increase in the Yb 3+ content, while for Yb 3+ , Tm 3+ -codoped Lu 2 O 3 nanorods the dominant CL emission is Tm 3+1 D 2 → 3 F 4 (deep-blue). Uniform light emission along Yb 3+ , Er 3+ -codoped Lu 2 O 3 rods has been observed by using SNOM photoluminescence images; however, the rods seem to be too thin for propagation of light.

  5. Photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence of YVO{sub 4}:Sm{sup 3+} thin films prepared by pulsed laser deposition method with various substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Hyun Kyoung; Chung, Jong Won; Moon, Byung Kee; Choi, Byung Chun; Jeong, Jung Hyun [Pukyong National University, Dept. of Physics, Busan (Korea); Yi, Soung-Soo [Silla University, Dept. of Electronic Material Engineering, Busan (Korea); Kim, Jung Hwan [Dongeui University, Dept. of Physics, Busan (Korea)

    2008-08-15

    YVO{sub 4}:Sm{sup 3+} films have been deposited on different substrates using pulsed laser deposition method. The films were deposited on fused silica, MgO(100), Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001), and Si(100) substrates. The crystallinity and surface morphology of the films were investigated using X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscope (SEM), respectively. The films grown on the different substrates have different crystallinity and morphology. The full-width at half-maximum (FWHM) of (200) peak are 0.20, 0.14, 0.12, and 0.18 for fused silica, MgO(100), Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001), and Si(100), respectively. The crystallite size, estimated by using Scherrer's formula, of phosphors grown on fused silica, MgO(100), Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001), and Si(100) was about 7.25, 10.08, 11.88, and 8.14 nm, respectively and it has a maximum at 11.88 nm for the thin film grown on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001). The photoluminescence and the cathodoluminescence spectra were measured at room temperature using a luminescence spectrometer and the emitted radiation was dominated by the red emission peak at 602 nm radiated from the transition of {sup 4}G{sub 5/2}{yields}{sup 6}H{sub 7/2}. YVO{sub 4}:Sm{sup 3+} films have maximum PL intensity for the films grown on the Al{sub 2}O{sub 3}(0001) substrate and the brightness of the films were higher 1.3, 2.9, and 5.0 times in comparison with that of the YVO{sub 4}:Sm{sup 3+} films grown on MgO(100), fused silica, and Si (100) substrates, respectively. The crystallinity, surface morphology and luminescence spectra of thin-film phosphors were highly dependent on substrates. (orig.)

  6. Hydrothermal Evolution of the Giant Cenozoic Kadjaran porphyry Cu-Mo deposit, Tethyan metallogenic belt, Armenia, Lesser Caucasus: mineral paragenetic, cathodoluminescence and fluid inclusion constraints

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hovakimyan, Samvel; Moritz, Robert; Tayan, Rodrik; Rezeau, Hervé

    2016-04-01

    stockwork. One of them is the east-west-oriented 6th vein zone in the northern part of the deposit, which contains quartz-molybdenite veins and late quartz-galena-sphalerite veins. This is interpreted as a telescoping between porphyry and epithermal environments. It is supported by microscopic studies of mineral paragenesis, which reveal the presence of enargite and tennantite-tetrahedrite, luzonite, sphalerite, and galena, generally in a gangue of quartz, followed by a late carbonate and gypsum stage. On-going fluid inclusion studies are being carried out on quartz samples from the different mineralization stages. Five types of fluid inclusions were distinguished according to their nature, bubble size, and daughter mineral content: vapor-rich, aqueous-carbonic, brine, polyphase brine and liquid-rich inclusions. Cathodoluminescence images from the porphyry veins reveal four generations of quartz. Molybdenite and chalcopyrite are associated with two different dark luminescent quartz generations, which contain typical brine, aqueous-carbonic and vapour-rich H2O fluid inclusions, with some of them coexisting locally as boiling assemblages. Epithermal veins are mainly characterized by liquid-rich H2O fluid inclusions. Microthermometric studies of fluid inclusions reveal a major difference in homogenisation temperatures between the early quartz-molybdenite- chalcopyrite stage (Thtotal between 3600 and 4250C) and the late quartz-galena-sphalerite vein stage (Thtotal 300-2700C), which is attributed to the transition from a porphyry to an epithermal environment in the Kadjaran deposit.

  7. Structure, composition, morphology, photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence properties of ZnGeN{sub 2} and ZnGeN{sub 2}:Mn{sup 2+} for field emission displays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Q.-H. [MOE Key Laboratory of Bioinorganic and Synthetic Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510275 (China); Guangzhou Research Institute of Non-ferrous Metals, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510651 (China); Wang, J., E-mail: ceswj@mail.sysu.edu.cn [MOE Key Laboratory of Bioinorganic and Synthetic Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510275 (China); Yeh, C.-W.; Ke, W.-C.; Liu, R.-S. [Department of Chemistry, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Tang, J.-K. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Wyoming, Laramie, WY 82071 (United States); Xie, M.-B.; Liang, H.-B.; Su, Q. [MOE Key Laboratory of Bioinorganic and Synthetic Chemistry, State Key Laboratory of Optoelectronic Materials and Technologies, School of Chemistry and Chemical Engineering, Sun Yat-sen University, Guangzhou, Guangdong 510275 (China)

    2010-12-15

    Yellowish-orange-emitting ZnGeN{sub 2} and orange-red-emitting ZnGeN{sub 2}:Mn were synthesized by a facile and mild gas-reduction-nitridation reaction at 1153 K under NH{sub 3} flow with air-stable raw materials ZnO, GeO{sub 2} and MnCO{sub 3}. The structure, composition, morphology, photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence properties of ZnGeN{sub 2} doped with or without Mn{sup 2+} were systematically investigated. Rietveld refinements show that the as-synthesized samples are obtained as single-phase compounds and crystallize as an orthorhombic structure with a space group of Pna2{sub 1}. The actual chemical composition of the as-prepared ZnGeN{sub 2} determined by energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy suggests that the Ge vacancy defects probably exist in the host. The SEM image reveals that the Zn{sub 0.99}Mn{sub 0.01}GeN{sub 2} particles form aggregates {approx}500-600 nm in size. The diffuse reflection spectrum and photoluminescence excitation spectrum confirm that the band edge absorption of ZnGeN{sub 2} at low energy is 3.3 eV ({approx}376 nm). Upon UV light excitation and electron beam excitation, ZnGeN{sub 2} gives an intense yellowish-orange emission around 580-600 nm, associated with a deep defect level due to the Ge vacancy defects, and ZnGeN{sub 2}:Mn shows an intense red emission at 610 nm due to the {sup 4}T{sub 1g}({sup 4}G) {yields} 6A{sub 1g}({sup 6}S) of Mn{sup 2+}. The unusual red emission of Mn{sup 2+} in tetrahedral Zn{sup 2+} sites is attributed to the strong nephelauxetic effect between Mn{sup 2+} and the surrounding tetrahedrally coordinated nitrogen. The photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence emission colors of ZnGeN{sub 2}:Mn have a high color purity of {approx}93-98%. These results demonstrate that ZnGeN{sub 2}:Mn is a novel, promising red-emitting nitride, potentially applicable to field emission displays with brilliant color-rendering properties and a large color gamut.

  8. Synthesis and investigation of photo/cathodoluminescence properties of a novel green emission phosphor Sr{sub 8}ZnLu(PO{sub 4}){sub 7}:Eu{sup 2+}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Long, Qiang; Wang, Chuang; Li, Yanyan; Ding, Jianyan [Department of Materials Science, School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University (China); Key Laborary of Special Function Materials and Structure Design, Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Tianshui South Road No. 222, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China); Wang, Yuhua, E-mail: wyh@lzu.edu.cn [Department of Materials Science, School of Physical Science and Technology, Lanzhou University (China); Key Laborary of Special Function Materials and Structure Design, Ministry of Education, Lanzhou University, Tianshui South Road No. 222, Lanzhou, Gansu 730000 (China)

    2016-06-25

    An Eu{sup 2+}-activated Sr{sub 8}ZnLu(PO{sub 4}){sub 7} (SZLP:Eu{sup 2+}) green emitting phosphor was synthesized and its crystal structure has been refined and determined from the XRD profiles by Rietveld refinement method. The excitation spectra of the SZLP:Eu{sup 2+} phosphors covered the range from 250 to 450 nm, which matches well with n-UV chips. SZLP:Eu{sup 2+} exhibited broad-band green emission centered at about 520 nm under 400 nm irradiation with a high quantum efficiency (QE) value of 67.4% and good thermal stability, its emission intensity remains 77% at 150 °C of that measured at room temperature. In addition, to investigate its application in field emission displays, the cathodoluminescence spectra of SZLP:Eu{sup 2+} as a function of the accelerating voltage, probe current and the electron radiation time were also measured and discussed in detail. Excellent degradation resistance properties with good color stability were obtained by continuous low-voltage electron-beam excitation of the phosphor. - Highlights: • An novel green emitting phosphor was firstly synthesized by solid state reaction. • The excitation spectra match well with n-UV chips and the quantum efficiency is 67.4%. • The thermal stability of the phosphor is superior to commercial phosphors.

  9. Pulsed cathodoluminescence and Raman spectra of MoS{sub 2} and WS{sub 2} nanocrystals and their combination MoS{sub 2}/WS{sub 2} produced by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bozheyev, Farabi, E-mail: farabi.bozheyev@gmail.com [Institute of High Technology Physics, National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Ave., 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation); National Nanolaboratory, al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 71 al-Farabi Ave., 050000 Almaty (Kazakhstan); Nazarbayev University Research and Innovation System, 53 Kabanbay Batyr St., 010000 Astana (Kazakhstan); Valiev, Damir [Institute of High Technology Physics, National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Ave., 634050 Tomsk (Russian Federation); Nemkayeva, Renata [National Nanolaboratory, al-Farabi Kazakh National University, 71 al-Farabi Ave., 050000 Almaty (Kazakhstan)

    2016-02-29

    Molybdenum and tungsten disulfide nanoplates were produced by self-propagating high-temperature synthesis in argon atmosphere. This method provides an easy way to produce MoS{sub 2} and WS{sub 2} from nanoplates up to single- and several layers. The Raman peak intensities corresponding to in-plane E{sup 1}{sub 2g} and out-of-plane A{sub 1g} vibration modes and their shifts strongly depend on the thicknesses of the MoS{sub 2} and WS{sub 2} platelets indicating size-dependent scaling laws and properties. An electron beam irradiation of MoS{sub 2} and WS{sub 2} powders leads to an occurrence of pulsed cathodoluminescence (PCL) spectra at 575 nm (2.15 eV) and 550 nm (2.25 eV) characteristic to their intrinsic band gaps. For the combination of MoS{sub 2} and WS{sub 2} nanopowders, a PCL shoulder at 430 nm (2.88 eV) was observed, which is explained by the radiative electron-hole recombination at the MoS{sub 2}/WS{sub 2} grain boundaries. The luminescence decay kinetics of the MoS{sub 2}/WS{sub 2} nanoplates appears to be slower than for individual MoS{sub 2} and WS{sub 2} platelets due to a spatial separation of electrons and holes at MoS{sub 2}/WS{sub 2} junction resulting in extension of recombination time.

  10. Deciphering igneous and metamorphic events in high-grade rocks of the Wilmington complex, Delaware: Morphology, cathodoluminescence and backscattered electron zoning, and SHRIMP U-Pb geochronology of zircon and monazite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aleinikoff, J.N.; Schenck, W.S.; Plank, M.O.; Srogi, L.A.; Fanning, C.M.; Kamo, S.L.; Bosbyshell, H.

    2006-01-01

    High-grade rocks of the Wilmington Complex, northern Delaware and adjacent Maryland and Pennsylvania, contain morphologically complex zircons that formed through both igneous and metamorphic processes during the development of an island-arc complex and suturing of the arc to Laurentia. The arc complex has been divided into several members, the protoliths of which include both intrusive and extrusive rocks. Metasedimentary rocks are interlayered with the complex and are believed to be the infrastructure upon which the arc was built. In the Wilmingto n Complex rocks, both igneous and metamorphic zircons occur as elongate and equant forms. Chemical zoning, shown by cathodoluminescence (CL), includes both concentric, oscillatory patterns, indicative of igneous origin, and patchwork and sector patterns, suggestive of metamorphic growth. Metamorphic monazites are chemically homogeneous, or show oscillatory or spotted chemical zoning in backscattered electron images. U-Pb geochronology by sensitive high resolution ion microprobe (SHRIMP) was used to date complexly zoned zircon and monazite. All but one member of the Wilmington Complex crystallized in the Ordovician between ca. 475 and 485 Ma; these rocks were intruded by a suite of gabbro-to-granite plutonic rocks at 434 ?? Ma. Detrital zircons in metavolcanic and metasedimentary units were derived predominantly from 0.9 to 1.4 Ga (Grenvillian) basement, presumably of Laurentian origin. Amphibolite to granulite facies metamorphism of the Wilmington Complex, recorded by ages of metamorphic zircon (428 ?? 4 and 432 ?? 6 Ma) and monazite (429 ?? 2 and 426 ?? 3 Ma), occurred contemporaneously with emplacement of the younger plutonic rocks. On the basis of varying CL zoning patterns and external morphologies, metamorphic zircons formed by different processes (presumably controlled by rock chemistry) at slightly different times and temperatures during prograde metamorphism. In addition, at least three other thermal episodes are

  11. Emission properties of hydrothermal Yb{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+} and Yb{sup 3+}, Tm{sup 3+}-codoped Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanorods: upconversion, cathodoluminescence and assessment of waveguide behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barrera, Elixir William; Pujol, MarIa Cinta; DIaz, Francesc [Fisica i Cristal.lografia de Materials, Universitat Rovira i Virgili, Campus Sescelades c/ Marcel.lI Domingo s/n, E-43007 Tarragona (Spain); Choi, Soo Bong; Rotermund, Fabian [Division of Energy Systems Research, Ajou University, 443-749 Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kyung Ho [Korea Advanced Nano Fab Center, 443-270 Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Mun Seok [Advanced Photonics Research Institute, Gwangju Institute of Science and Technology, 500-712 Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Cascales, Concepcion, E-mail: ccascales@icmm.csic.es [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas, c/Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz, 3 Cantoblanco, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2011-02-18

    Yb{sup 3+} and Ln{sup 3+} (Ln{sup 3+} = Er{sup 3+} or Tm{sup 3+}) codoped Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanorods with cubic Ia3-bar symmetry have been prepared by low temperature hydrothermal procedures, and their luminescence properties and waveguide behavior analyzed by means of scanning near-field optical microscopy (SNOM). Room temperature upconversion (UC) under excitation at 980 nm and cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra were studied as a function of the Yb{sup +} concentration in the prepared nanorods. UC spectra revealed the strong development of Er{sup 3+4}F{sub 9/2} {yields} 4I{sub 15/2} (red) and Tm{sup 3+1}G{sub 4} {yields} {sup 3}H{sub 6} (blue) bands, which became the pre-eminent and even unique emissions for corresponding nanorods with the higher Yb{sup 3+} concentration. Favored by the presence of large phonons in current nanorods, UC mechanisms that privilege the population of {sup 4}F{sub 9/2} and {sup 1}G{sub 4} emitting levels through phonon-assisted energy transfer and non-radiative relaxations account for these observed UC luminescence features. CL spectra show much more moderate development of the intensity ratio between the Er{sup 3+4}F{sub 9/2} {yields}{sup 4}I{sub 15/2} (red) and {sup 2}H{sub 11/2}, {sup 4}S{sub 3/2} {yields} {sup 4}I{sub 15/2} (green) emissions with the increase in the Yb{sup 3+} content, while for Yb{sup 3+}, Tm{sup 3+}-codoped Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanorods the dominant CL emission is Tm{sup 3+1}D{sub 2} {yields} {sup 3}F{sub 4} (deep-blue). Uniform light emission along Yb{sup 3+}, Er{sup 3+}-codoped Lu{sub 2}O{sub 3} rods has been observed by using SNOM photoluminescence images; however, the rods seem to be too thin for propagation of light.

  12. Photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence properties of Sr{sub 2}Gd{sub 8}Si{sub 6}O{sub 26}:RE{sup 3+}(RE{sup 3+}=Tb{sup 3+}or Sm{sup 3+}) phosphors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hussain, Sk. Khaja [Department of Electronics and Radio Engineering, Kyung Hee University, 1 Seocheon-dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Rao, Gattupalli Manikya [Department of Physics, College of Science and Technology, Andhra University, Visakhapatanam, Andhra Pradesh 53003 (India); Raju, G. Seeta Rama; Krishna Bharat, L. [Department of Electronics and Radio Engineering, Kyung Hee University, 1 Seocheon-dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Subba Rao, P.S.V., E-mail: raopsvs@rediffmail.com [Department of Physics, College of Science and Technology, Andhra University, Visakhapatanam, Andhra Pradesh 53003 (India); Yu, Jae Su, E-mail: jsyu@khu.ac.kr [Department of Electronics and Radio Engineering, Kyung Hee University, 1 Seocheon-dong, Giheung-gu, Yongin-si, Gyeonggi-do 446-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2016-10-15

    Trivalent terbium (Tb{sup 3+}) or samarium (Sm{sup 3+}) ions individually activated green and orange emitting Sr{sub 2}Gd{sub 8}Si{sub 6}O{sub 26} (SGSO) phosphors were synthesized by a citrate sol–gel method. The X-ray diffraction patterns of SGSO:Tb{sup 3+} and SGSO:Sm{sup 3+} phosphors exhibited the characteristic diffraction peaks of oxyapatite in a hexagonal lattice structure. The photoluminescence (PL) properties at ultraviolet (UV) or near-UV excitation wavelengths were measured for Tb{sup 3+} or Sm{sup 3+} ions doped SGSO phosphors as a function of its respective concentration. The PL spectra of SGSO:Tb{sup 3+} phosphors revealed the characteristic emission peaks of both Gd{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} ions which are associated with 4f–4f transitions under 274 nm of excitation wavelength. When the concentration of Tb{sup 3+} ions increased over 0.05 mol (5 mol%), the emission intensities of {sup 5}D{sub 3} transitions decreased due to the well-known cross-relaxation process. However, based on the intensities of {sup 5}D{sub 4} transitions, the optimum concentration of Tb{sup 3+} ions was found to be 0.05 mol. Under 404 nm of excitation wavelength, the SGSO:Sm{sup 3+} phosphors exhibited the characteristic orange emission at 600 nm due to the {sup 4}G{sub 5/2}→{sup 6}H{sub 7/2} electronic transition. The optimum concentration of SGSO:Sm{sup 3+} phosphors was found to be 0.02 mol. The decay curves of the optimized SGSO:Tb{sup 3+} and SGSO:Sm{sup 3+} phosphors were well fitted to single exponential functions and their lifetimes were calculated. Furthermore, the optimized phosphor samples showed good thermal stability. Likewise, cathodoluminescence properties were also studied for the optimized samples as a function of filament current and accelerating voltage. The Commission International de I-Eclairage chromaticity coordinates were calculated for the SGSO:Tb{sup 3+} and SGSO:Sm{sup 3+} phosphors.

  13. Cathodoluminescence microcharacterization of ballen silica in impactites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumura, T.; Ninagawa, K.; Toyoda, S.; Gucsik, A.; Nishido, H.

    2009-01-01

    The ballen silica shows fairly weak (faint) CL with homogeneous feature in its grain exhibiting almost same spectral pattern with two broad band peaks at around 390 and 650 nm, which might be assigned to self-trapped excitons (STE) or an intrinsic and nonbridging oxygen hole centers (NBOHC), respectively, recognized in amorphous and crystalline silica. In addition, ballen silica from Lappajaervi crater shows bright and heterogeneous CL with a broad band centered at around 410 nm, presumably attributed to [AlO 4 /M + ] 0 centers or self-trapped excitons (STE). Micro-Raman and micro-XRD analyses show that fairly homogeneous CL part is α-quartz and heterogeneous CL part is composed of α-cristobalite and α-quartz. These indicate that ballen silica could be formed in the quenching process from relatively high temperature.

  14. Transition radiation in EELS and cathodoluminescence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stöger-Pollach, Michael, E-mail: stoeger@ustem.tuwien.ac.at; Kachtík, Lukáš; Miesenberger, Bernhard; Retzl, Philipp

    2017-02-15

    The excitation probability of transition radiation is measured for varying beam energies in a transmission electron microscope once using optical spectrometry of the emitted light and second using electron energy loss spectrometry. In both cases similar results are found being in good agreement with theory. The knowledge about this probability enables us to judge whether or not transition radiation has to be considered in EELS and CL data interpretation. Additionally it is shown that the emission of transition radiation happens at the sample surfaces only, when the electron passes the vacuum/sample interface and thus feeling the change of its dielectric environment. We demonstrate that in the case of aluminum the influence of transition radiation on the low loss EELS spectrum is only minor and conclude that it might be negligible for many other materials. - Highlights: • We determine the probability for the excitation of transition radiation at a large variety of beam energies in TEM. • We use a GATAN VULCAN system for optical spectrometry in the TEM. • We do angular resolved EELS experiments in a standard TEM with an angular resolution of 7.57 μrad.

  15. Cathodoluminescence and Photoemission of Doped Lithium Tetraborate

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-03-01

    Applications," Acta Physica Polonica A , vol. 107, no. 3, pp. 507-518, 2005. [21] M. Ignatovych, V. Holovey, T. Vidoczy, P. Baranyai, and A ...official policy or position of the United States Air Force, Department of Defense, or the United States Government. This material is declared a work of...are the basis for neutron detection, and a 2 4 7Li B O crystal enriched with Mn should show improved efficiency for neutron detection. 2 4 7Li B O

  16. Depth-Resolved Cathodoluminescence of Thorium Dioxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-03-01

    plutonium-239 (239Pu)-based nuclear weapons. Thorium also results in less highly radioactive waste in comparison to the uranium fuels. Thorium is four...diameters (1/4 – 3/8”) (Mann & Thompson, 2010). The 99.99% ThO2 powder was placed into the ampoule with a basic mineralizer such as cesium fluoride...conversion ranging from 1 pA/V to 1 mA/V. The electrical noise is further reduced by cooling the PMT housing unit with liquid nitrogen as seen in

  17. Low temperature annealing and cathodoluminescence studies of type 1 chondrule compositions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehart, John M.; Lofgren, Gary E.

    1991-01-01

    Preliminary results indicate that the yellow luminescing mesostases in type I chondrules can be altered by the effects of the low level thermal metamorphism. Although heat alone was insufficient to alter the CL, reheating for geologically relevant periods could have the same results as we obtained in a second series of experiments with water present. It is known that both water and solutions of sodium metasilicate greatly accelerate the devitrification of glasses. The results of the experiments that will be repeated should further clarify how the CL changes with increased thermal alteration.

  18. Thermal growth and cathodoluminescence of Bi doped ZnO nanowires and rods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aleman, B; Hidalgo, P; Fernandez, P; Piqueras, J

    2009-01-01

    Bi doped ZnO nanowires and rods have been grown by a catalyst free evaporation-deposition method with precursors containing either ZnO and Bi 2 O 3 or ZnS and Bi 2 O 3 powders. The use of ZnS as a precursor was found to lead to a higher density of nano- and microstructures at lower temperatures than by using ZnO. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) shows that the Bi content in the wires and rods is in the range 0.15-0.35 at%. Bi incorporation was found to induce a red shift of the near band gap luminescence but no quantitative correlation between the shift and the amount of Bi, as measured by EDS, was observed. The I-V curves of single Bi doped wires had linear behaviour at low current and non-linear behaviour for high currents, qualitatively similar to that of undoped wires.

  19. Thermal growth and cathodoluminescence of Bi doped ZnO nanowires and rods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aleman, B; Hidalgo, P; Fernandez, P; Piqueras, J, E-mail: balemanl@fis.ucm.e [Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias FIsicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid, 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2009-11-21

    Bi doped ZnO nanowires and rods have been grown by a catalyst free evaporation-deposition method with precursors containing either ZnO and Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} or ZnS and Bi{sub 2}O{sub 3} powders. The use of ZnS as a precursor was found to lead to a higher density of nano- and microstructures at lower temperatures than by using ZnO. Energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS) shows that the Bi content in the wires and rods is in the range 0.15-0.35 at%. Bi incorporation was found to induce a red shift of the near band gap luminescence but no quantitative correlation between the shift and the amount of Bi, as measured by EDS, was observed. The I-V curves of single Bi doped wires had linear behaviour at low current and non-linear behaviour for high currents, qualitatively similar to that of undoped wires.

  20. Cathodoluminescence investigations on quartz cement in sandstones of Khabour Formation from Iraqi Kurdistan region, northern Iraq

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omer, Muhamed Fakhri; Friis, Henrik

    in silica supply which were classified as very early and early, derived from dissolved biogenic silica that precipitated as opal/microquartz, possibly pre-compactional and of non-luminescent quartz overgrowth type. This was followed by phases whose silica supply derived from pressure solution of quartz...

  1. Band Gap Transition Studies of U:ThO2 Using Cathodoluminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-03-27

    regarding x-ray fluorescence. 2.1 Atomic Properties of Ux:Th1−xO2 Thorium and uranium dioxide are metal oxides with the fluorite crystal structure...thorium oxide is a material upon which few studies have been performed. The goal of this research is to determine how the insertion of uranium atoms into...doped thorium oxide crystal, 041 TU, with uranium mass concentration of 22.7% before chemical cleaning. Mass pre-cleaning: 0.341 g. 7 Figure 1.5

  2. Cathodoluminescence of silicified trunks from the Permo-Carboniferous basins in eastern Bohemia, Czech Republic

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matysová, Petra; Leichmann, J.; Grygar, Tomáš; Rössler, R.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 20, č. 2 (2008), s. 217-231 ISSN 0935-1221 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA300460510 Grant - others:GA AV(CZ) KJB301110704 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z30460519; CEZ:AV0Z40320502 Keywords : petrified stems * silicified wood * silica texture Subject RIV: DB - Geology ; Mineralogy Impact factor: 1.220, year: 2008 http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/schweiz/ejm/2008/00000020/00000002/art00007

  3. Cathodoluminescence and LA-ICP-MS chemistry of silicified wood enclosing wakefieldite - REEs and V migration during complex diagenetic evolution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Matysová, Petra; Götze, J.; Leichmann, J.; Škoda, R.; Strnad, L.; Drahota, P.; Matys Grygar, Tomáš

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 28, č. 5 (2016), s. 869-887 ISSN 0935-1221 Institutional support: RVO:67985891 ; RVO:61388980 Keywords : wakefieldite * xenotime * silicified wood * quartz * trace elements * REE * vanadium Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry; DD - Geochemistry (UACH-T) Impact factor: 1.362, year: 2016

  4. Cathodoluminescence investigations on quartz cement in the sandstones of Khabour Formation from Iraqi Kurdistan Region, Northern Iraq

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Omer, Muhamed Fakhri; Friis, Henrik

    2014-01-01

    in silica supply which were classified as very early and early, derived from dissolved biogenic silica that precipitated as opal/microquartz, possibly pre-compactional and of non-luminescent quartz overgrowth type. This was followed by phases whose silica supply derived from pressure solution of quartz...

  5. The influence of Pr3+ co-doping on the photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence properties of SiO2:Eu3+/Tb3+

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mhlongo, GH

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Tb3+-Pr3+, and Eu3+-Pr3+ ion pairs co-doped in a SiO2 matrix were prepared by a sol-gel method. Co-doping of Eu3+ and Tb3+ ions with Pr3+ in SiO2 resulted in the quenching of Eu3+ and Tb3+ emissions with increasing Pr3+ concentrations. The quenching...

  6. Characteristics and origin of agates from Płóczki Górne (Lower Silesia, Poland): A combined microscopic, micro-Raman, and cathodoluminescence study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumańska-Słowik, Magdalena; Powolny, Tomasz; Sikorska-Jaworowska, Magdalena; Gaweł, Adam; Kogut, Lucyna; Poloński, Krzysztof

    2018-03-01

    Agates from Płóczki Górne hosted by Permian basaltic rocks are predominantly made of length-fast chalcedony, and subordinately megaquartz and quartzine. Moganite occurs in traces mainly in transparent, outer, darker regions of white-grey coloured agates. Silica matrix of agates comprises a wide variety of solid inclusions represented by celadonite, plagioclases, hematite, goethite, barite, calcite, heulandite-clinoptyloite, nontronite-saponite, and Mn-dioxides (ramsdellite). Mineral phases are locally accompanied by black aggregations of carbonaceous matter, which gives a Raman signature of disordered carbon. These organic components were probably deposited from a hydrothermal fluids at low-temperature conditions and originated from sedimentary rocks found in the surrounding area of Płóczki Górne. The abundance of various SiO2 phases, mineral inclusions as well as various micro-textures (colloform, comb, feathery, and jigsaw-puzzle) in agates resulted from physicochemical fluctuations of SiO2-bearing mineralizing solutions at various stages of these gems formation. Agates from Płóczki Górne formed during post-magmatic stage of basaltic host rocks evolution. Not only were the hydrothermal fluids enriched in silica, but also they contained other elements such as Na, Ca, Al, Mg, Mn, Fe, Ba, SO4, and CO2, which were mobilized from host rocks or surrounding area.

  7. Effects of Ce3+ concentration, beam voltage and current on the cathodoluminescence intensity of SiO2: Pr3+–Ce3+ nanophosphor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mhlongo, GH

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available SiO2:Pr3+–Ce3+ phosphor powders were successfully prepared using a sol–gel process. The concentration of Pr3+ was fixed at 0.2 mol% while that of Ce3+ was varied in the range of 0.2–2 mol%. High resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM...

  8. Genesis of diamond inclusions: An integrated cathodoluminescence (CL) and Electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) study on eclogitic and peridotitic inclusions and their diamond host.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Heuvel, Quint; Matveev, Sergei; Drury, Martyn; Gress, Michael; Chinn, Ingrid; Davies, Gareth

    2017-04-01

    Diamond inclusions are potentially fundamental to understanding the formation conditions of diamond and the volatile cycles in the deep mantle. In order to fully understand the implications of the compositional information recorded by inclusions it is vital to know whether the inclusions are proto-, syn-, or epigenetic and the extent to which they have equilibrated with diamond forming fluids. In previous studies, the widespread assumption was made that the majority of diamond inclusions are syngenetic, based upon observation of cubo-octahedral morphology imposed on the inclusions. Recent work has reported the crystallographic relationship between inclusions and the host diamond to be highly complex and the lack of crystallographic relationships between inclusions and diamonds has led some to question the significance of imposed cubo-octahedral morphology. This study presents an integrated EBSD and CL study of 9 diamonds containing 20 pyropes, 2 diopsides, 1 forsterite and 1 rutile from the Jwaneng and Letlhakane kimberlite clusters, Botswana. A new method was developed to analyze the crystallographic orientation of the host diamond and the inclusions with EBSD. Diamonds plates were sequentially polished to expose inclusions at different levels in the diamond. CL imaging at different depths was performed in order to produce a 3D view of diamond growth zones around the inclusions. Standard diamond polishing techniques proved too aggressive for silicate inclusions as they were damaged to such a degree that EBSD measurements on the inclusions were impossible. The inclusions were milled with a Ga+ focused ion beam (FIB) at a 12° angle to clean the surface for EBSD measurements. Of the 24 inclusions, 9 have an imposed cubo-octahedral morphology. Of these inclusions, 6 have faces orientated parallel to diamond growth zones and/or appear to have nucleated on a diamond growth surface, implying syngenesis. In contrast, other diamonds record resorption events such that inclusions now cut diamond growth zones. In most cases, the growth zonation around inclusions is not well defined due to CL haloes but some inclusions clearly disrupt diamond growth. Crystallographic orientations of diamond and the inclusions, determined using EBSD, revealed that each inclusion has a homogeneous orientation and record no compositional zonation. The diamonds also showed no angular deviations despite many having multiple growth and resorption zones; implying epitaxial growth of diamond. Crystallographic alignment between diamond and inclusions was not recorded for the principle planes and limited to 3 possible coincidences on minor planes from the 24 inclusions studied. The CL data show no evidence of syngenesis for these 3 inclusions. Analyses of two diamonds with inclusion clusters in different growth zones, 400 µm apart, revealed the same chemical composition and orientation, potentially implying they originated from an original larger inclusion. Combined EBSD and CL data suggest that there is no direct orientational correlation (epitaxial growth) between silicate inclusions and the host diamond, even when the mineral phases are of the same symmetry group. The presentation will provide a detailed evaluation of the genesis of individual inclusions.

  9. Cathodoluminescent characteristics and light technical parameters of thin-film screens based on oxides and oxysulfides of rare-earth elements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bondar, Vyacheslav D.; Grytsiv, Myroslav; Groodzinsky, Arkady; Vasyliv, Mykhailo

    1995-11-01

    Results on creation of thin-film single-crystal high-resolution screens with energy control of luminescence color are presented. In order to create phosphor films ion-plasma technology for deposition of yttrium and lanthanum oxides and oxysulfides activated by rare earth elements has been developed. The screen consists of phosphor film on phosphor substrate with different colors of luminescence (e.g. Y2O3-Eu film with red color on Y3Al5O12- Tb, Ce substrate with green color of luminescence). Electron irradiation causes luminescence with color that depends on energy of the electron beam. The physical reason for color change is that electron beam energy defines electron penetration depth. If the energy is weak, only the film is excited. More powerful beam penetrates into the substrate and thus changes the color of luminescence.

  10. Identification of purple dye from molluscs on an excavated textile by non-destructive analytical techniques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Margariti, Christina; Protopapas, Stavros; Allen, Norman

    2013-01-01

    been preserved in association with copper. The techniques applied were Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive X-Ray (EDX) analysis, Cathodoluminescence and micro Raman. For the first time Cathodoluminescence from an indigoid compound is reported. Comparison of the analysis results...

  11. Bankole et al (3)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DELL

    mineralogically matured, suggesting a high degree of chemical weathering. Keywords: ... provenance and cathodoluminescence colours of quartz over the years (e.g. Götze ... The origin of the Anambra Basin is linked to the tectonic processes ...

  12. Phase characterization of precipitated zirconia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gutzov, S.; Ponahlo, J.; Lengauer, C.L.; Beran, A.

    1994-01-01

    The phase compositions of undoped and europium-doped zirconia samples, obtained by precipitation and thermal treatment from 350 to 1,000 C, have been investigated by powder X-ray diffractometry, infrared spectroscopy, and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. The low-temperature stabilization of tetragonal zirconia is mainly controlled by the presence of anion additives, such as ammonium chloride. The influences of the crystallite size is less important. Cathodoluminescence spectra show a structural similarity between tetragonal and amorphous zirconia

  13. Exciton diffusion coefficient measurement in ZnO nanowires under electron beam irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donatini, Fabrice; Pernot, Julien

    2018-03-01

    In semiconductor nanowires (NWs) the exciton diffusion coefficient can be determined using a scanning electron microscope fitted with a cathodoluminescence system. High spatial and temporal resolution cathodoluminescence experiments are needed to measure independently the exciton diffusion length and lifetime in single NWs. However, both diffusion length and lifetime can be affected by the electron beam bombardment during observation and measurement. Thus, in this work the exciton lifetime in a ZnO NW is measured versus the electron beam dose (EBD) via a time-resolved cathodoluminescence experiment with a temporal resolution of 50 ps. The behavior of the measured exciton lifetime is consistent with our recent work on the EBD dependence of the exciton diffusion length in similar NWs investigated under comparable SEM conditions. Combining the two results, the exciton diffusion coefficient in ZnO is determined at room temperature and is found constant over the full span of EBD.

  14. Study of the parameters of nanoscale layers in nanoheterostructures based on II–VI semiconductor compounds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karavaev, M. B., E-mail: estonianchameleon@gmail.com; Kirilenko, D. A.; Ivanova, E. V.; Popova, T. B.; Sitnikova, A. A.; Sedova, I. V.; Zamoryanskaya, M. V. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Ioffe Physical–Technical Institute (Russian Federation)

    2017-01-15

    Wide-gap ZnSe-based nanoheterostructures grown by molecular-beam epitaxy are studied by local cathodoluminescence and X-ray microanalysis. It is shown that the used methods allow nondestructive determination of the depth, elemental composition, and geometrical parameters of the nanoscale ZnCdSe layer. The accuracy of the results is verified by transmission electron microscopy. The research techniques are based on the possibility of varying the primary electron-beam energy, which results in changes in the regions of characteristic X-ray and cathodoluminescence generation.

  15. Identification of conduction and hot electron property in ZnS, ZnO and SiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Jinzhao; Xu Zheng; Zhao Suling; Li Yuan; Yuan Guangcai; Wang Yongsheng; Xu Xurong

    2007-01-01

    The impact excitation and ionization is the most important process in layered optimization scheme and solid state cathodoluminescence. The conduction property (semiconductor property) of SiO 2 , ZnS and ZnO is studied based on organic/inorganic electroluminescence. The hot electron property (acceleration and multiplication property) of SiO 2 and ZnS is investigated based on the solid state cathodoluminescence. The results show that the SiO 2 has the fine hot electron property and the conduction property is not as good as ZnO and ZnS

  16. Trace element composition of quartz from the Variscan Altenberg–Teplice caldera (Krušné hory/Erzgebirge Mts, Czech Republic/Germany): Insights into the volcano-plutonic complex evolution

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Breiter, Karel; Svojtka, Martin; Ackerman, Lukáš; Švecová, K.

    326/327, 9 October (2012), s. 36-50 ISSN 0009-2541 R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP210/10/1105 Institutional support: RVO:67985831 Keywords : Quartz * Laser-ablation ICP-MS * Cathodoluminescence * Ti-in-Quartz thermobarometry * Variscan magmatites * Erzgebirge Subject RIV: DD - Geochemistry Impact factor: 3.154, year: 2012

  17. Aplikace nízkých teplot pro zvýšení katodoluminiscenčního signálu v rastrovacím elektronovém mikroskopu

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vaškovicová, Naděžda; Skoupý, Radim; Krzyžánek, Vladislav

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 62, č. 10 (2017), s. 260-263 ISSN 0447-6441 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LO1212 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 Keywords : scanning electron microscopy * cathodoluminescence * diamonds * CL spectrums * cryo-SEM * contamination Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering OBOR OECD: Electrical and electronic engineering

  18. Scintillation response of Ce3+ doped GdGa-LuAG multicomponent garnet films under e-beam excitation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Kučera, M.; Onderišinová, Z.; Bok, Jan; Hanuš, M.; Schauer, Petr; Nikl, Martin

    169 Part B, JAN 2016 (2016), s. 674-677 ISSN 0022-2313 Institutional support: RVO:68081731 ; RVO:68378271 Keywords : multicomponent garnets * cathodoluminescence * LuAG:Ce * scintillation * liquidphaseepitaxy Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 2.686, year: 2016

  19. Micron-scale variations in coupled δ13C-N abundance core-rim traverses in octahedral diamonds: insights into the processes and sources of episodic diamond formation beneath the Siberian craton

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wiggers de Vries, D.F.; Bulanova, G.; de Corte, K.; Pearson, D.G.; Davies, G.R.

    2013-01-01

    The internal structure and growth history of six macro-diamonds from kimberlite pipes in Yakutia (Russia) were investigated with cathodoluminescence imaging and coupled carbon isotope and nitrogen abundance analyses along detailed core to rim traverses. The diamonds are characterised by octahedral

  20. Light emitting structures porous silicon-silicon substrate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monastyrskii, L.S.; Olenych, I.B.; Panasjuk, M.R.; Savchyn, V.P.

    1999-01-01

    The research of spectroscopic properties of porous silicon has been done. Complex of photoluminescence, electroluminescence, cathodoluminescence, thermostimulated depolarisation current analyte methods have been applied to study of geterostructures and free layers of porous silicon. Light emitting processes had tendency to decrease. The character of decay for all kinds of luminescence were different

  1. Sensitizing effects of ZnO quantum dots on red-emitting Pr3+-doped SiO2 phosphor

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mbule, PS

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this study, red cathodoluminescence (CL) ( emission=614 nm) was observed from Pr3+ ions in a glassy (amorphous) SiO2 host. This emission was enhanced considerably when ZnO quantum dots (QDs) were incorporated in the SiO2:Pr3+ suggesting...

  2. High Efficiency Light Emission Through Carrier Localization in AlGaN Alloys and Active Regions: Toward Viable Ultraviolet Light Sources for the Objective Force Warrior

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wraback, M; Shen, H; Collins, C. J; Sampath, A. V; Garrett, G. A; Sarney, W. L; Nikiforov, A. Y; Cargill, G. S; Dierolf, V

    2004-01-01

    ...) comparable to that seen in low defect density (̂10(exp 8)/sq cm) GaN. Room temperature monochromatic scanning cathodoluminescence images at the red-shifted peak reveal spatially non-uniform emission similar to that observed in In(Al...

  3. Raman-in-SEM, a multimodal and multiscale analytical tool: performance for materials and expertise.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Guillaume; Bourrat, Xavier; Maubec, Nicolas; Lahfid, Abdeltif

    2014-12-01

    The availability of Raman spectroscopy in a powerful analytical scanning electron microscope (SEM) allows morphological, elemental, chemical, physical and electronic analysis without moving the sample between instruments. This paper documents the metrological performance of the SEMSCA commercial Raman interface operated in a low vacuum SEM. It provides multiscale and multimodal analyses as Raman/EDS, Raman/cathodoluminescence or Raman/STEM (STEM: scanning transmission electron microscopy) as well as Raman spectroscopy on nanomaterials. Since Raman spectroscopy in a SEM can be influenced by several SEM-related phenomena, this paper firstly presents a comparison of this new tool with a conventional micro-Raman spectrometer. Then, some possible artefacts are documented, which are due to the impact of electron beam-induced contamination or cathodoluminescence contribution to the Raman spectra, especially with geological samples. These effects are easily overcome by changing or adapting the Raman spectrometer and the SEM settings and methodology. The deletion of the adverse effect of cathodoluminescence is solved by using a SEM beam shutter during Raman acquisition. In contrast, this interface provides the ability to record the cathodoluminescence (CL) spectrum of a phase. In a second part, this study highlights the interest and efficiency of the coupling in characterizing micrometric phases at the same point. This multimodal approach is illustrated with various issues encountered in geosciences. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Band alignment and defects of the diamond zinc oxide heterojunction; Bandstruktur und Defekte der Diamant-Zinkoxid-Heterostruktur

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geithner, Peter

    2008-09-12

    Zinc oxide films were grown on diamond single crystals by rf sputtering of zinc oxide. The valence and conduction band offset was determined by photoelectron spectroscopy. A deep defect occurring in the zinc oxide films on diamond was characterized by cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. (orig.)

  5. The influence of post-deposition annealing on the structure, morphology and luminescence properties of pulsed laser deposited La0.5Gd1.5SiO5 doped Dy3+ thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogugua, Simon N.; Swart, Hendrik C.; Ntwaeaborwa, Odireleng M.

    2018-04-01

    The influence of post-deposition annealing on the structure, particle morphology and photoluminescence properties of dysprosium (Dy3+) doped La0.5Gd1.5SiO5 thin films grown on Si(111) substrates at different substrate temperatures using pulsed laser deposition (PLD) technique were studied. The X-ray diffractometer results showed an improved crystallinity after post-annealing. The topography and morphology of the post-annealed films were studied using atomic force microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy respectively. The elemental composition in the surface region of the films were analyzed using energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The photoluminescence studies showed an improved luminescent after post-annealing. The cathodoluminescence properties of the films are also reported. The CIE colour coordinates calculated from the photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence data suggest that the films can have potential application in white light emitting diode (LED) and field emission display (FED) applications.

  6. Induced defects in neutron irradiated GaN single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, I. W.; Koh, E. K.; Kim, Y. M.; Choh, S. H.; Park, S. S.; Kim, B. G.; Sohn, J. M.

    2005-01-01

    The local structure of defects in undoped, Si-doped, and neutron irradiated free standing GaN bulk crystals, grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy, has been investigated by employing Raman scattering and cathodoluminescence. The GaN samples were irradiated to a dose of 2 x 10 17 neutrons in an atomic reactor at Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute. There was no appreciable change in the Raman spectra for undoped GaN samples before and after neutron irradiation. However, a forbidden transition, A 1 (TO) mode, appeared for a neutron irradiated Si-doped GaN crystal. Cathodoluminescence spectrum for the neutron irradiated Si-doped GaN crystal became much more broadened than that for the unirradiated one. The experimental results reveal the generation of defects with locally deformed structure in the wurtzite Si-doped GaN single crystal

  7. Electronic fine structure and recombination dynamics in single InAs quantum dots

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seguin, R.

    2008-01-28

    In the work at hand single InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) are examined via cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. A thorough analysis of the spectra leads to an unambiguous assignment of the lines to the decay of specific excitonic complexes. A special aspect of the Coulomb interaction, the exchange interaction, gives rise to a fine structure in the initial and final states of an excitonic decay. This leads to a fine structure in the emission spectra that again is unique for every excitonic complex. The exchange interaction is discussed in great detail in this work.QDs of different sizes are investigated and the influence on the electronic properties is monitored. Additionally, the structure is modified ex situ by a thermal annealing process. The changes of the spectra under different annealing temperatures are traced. Finally, recombination dynamics of different excitonic complexes are examined by performing time-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. (orig.)

  8. Critical issues in enhancing brightness in thin film phosphors for flat-panel display applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, R.K.; Chen, Z.; Kumar, D.; Cho, K.; Ollinger, M.

    2002-01-01

    Thin film phosphors have potential applications in field emission flat-panel displays. However, they are limited by the lower cathodoluminescent brightness in comparison to phosphor powders. In this paper, we have investigated the critical parameters that need to be optimized to increase the brightness of phosphor thin films. Specifically, we studied the role of surface roughness and optical properties of the substrate on the brightness of the phosphor films. Thin Y 2 O 3 :Eu phosphor films were deposited on various substrates (lanthanum aluminate, quartz, sapphire, and silicon) with thicknesses varying from 50 to 500 nm. A model that accounts for diffuse and specular or scattering effects has been developed to understand the effects of the microstructure on the emission characteristics of the cathodoluminescent films. The results from the model show that both the optical properties of the substrate and the surface roughness of the films play a critical role in controlling the brightness of laser deposited phosphor films

  9. Fabrication and characterization of thin-film phosphor combinatorial libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordkovich, V. Z.; Jin, Zhengwu; Yamada, Y.; Fukumura, T.; Kawasaki, M.; Koinuma, H.

    2002-05-01

    The laser molecular beam epitaxy method was employed to fabricate thin-film combinatorial libraries of ZnO-based phosphors on different substrates. Fabrication of both pixel libraries, on the example of Fe-doped ZnO, and spread libraries, on the example of Eu-doped ZnO, has been demonstrated. Screening of the Fe-doped ZnO libraries led to the discovery of weak green cathodoluminescence with the maximum efficiency at the Fe content of 0.58 mol %. Screening of the Eu-doped ZnO libraries led to the discovery of unusual reddish-violet cathodoluminescence which is observed in a broad range of Eu concentration. No photoluminescence was registered in either system.

  10. Electronic fine structure and recombination dynamics in single InAs quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seguin, R.

    2008-01-01

    In the work at hand single InAs/GaAs quantum dots (QDs) are examined via cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. A thorough analysis of the spectra leads to an unambiguous assignment of the lines to the decay of specific excitonic complexes. A special aspect of the Coulomb interaction, the exchange interaction, gives rise to a fine structure in the initial and final states of an excitonic decay. This leads to a fine structure in the emission spectra that again is unique for every excitonic complex. The exchange interaction is discussed in great detail in this work.QDs of different sizes are investigated and the influence on the electronic properties is monitored. Additionally, the structure is modified ex situ by a thermal annealing process. The changes of the spectra under different annealing temperatures are traced. Finally, recombination dynamics of different excitonic complexes are examined by performing time-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. (orig.)

  11. Evolution of the near-UV emission spectrum associated with the reduction process in microwave iron making.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsubara, Akihiro; Takayama, Sadatsugu; Okajima, Shigeki; Sato, Motoyasu

    2008-01-01

    The structure of the emission spectrum in the near-UV range (240 nm-310 nm) changes drastically from the continuous spectrum to a discrete line spectrum with increasing sample temperature during the carbothermic reduction of magnetite in a 2.45 GHz microwave multimode furnace. The continuous spectrum can be assigned as a cathodoluminescence of magnetite. The dynamic evolution of the spectrum from continuous to discrete represents the progress of the reduction from magnetite to iron.

  12. Detektion von infraroter Strahlung zur Beurteilung der Materialqualität von Solar-Silizium

    OpenAIRE

    Schubert, Martin C.

    2008-01-01

    This work presents various infrared methods for the characterization of crystalline silicon for solar cells. Among these methods are Carrier Density Imaging (CDI), Photoluminescence Imaging (PLI), Photoluminescence Spectroscopy, and Cathodoluminescence Spectroscopy, in order to detect the carrier lifetime, trap density and defect luminescence.The focus of this work is on interpretation and calibration as well as on the application of the methods to material specific questions.

  13. Vacancy defect and defect cluster energetics in ion-implanted ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Yufeng; Tuomisto, F.; Svensson, B. G.; Kuznetsov, A. Yu.; Brillson, Leonard J.

    2010-02-01

    We have used depth-resolved cathodoluminescence, positron annihilation, and surface photovoltage spectroscopies to determine the energy levels of Zn vacancies and vacancy clusters in bulk ZnO crystals. Doppler broadening-measured transformation of Zn vacancies to vacancy clusters with annealing shifts defect energies significantly lower in the ZnO band gap. Zn and corresponding O vacancy-related depth distributions provide a consistent explanation of depth-dependent resistivity and carrier-concentration changes induced by ion implantation.

  14. Effect of thermal annealing on the optical and structural properties of silicon implanted with a high hydrogen fluence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kling, A.; Soares, J.C.; Rodriguez, A.; Rodriguez, T.; Avella, M.; Jimenez, J.

    2006-01-01

    Silicon capped by thermal oxide has been implanted with 1 x 10 17 H/cm 2 and the implant profile peaking at the interface. Samples were subjected to thermal annealing and characterized by ERD, FTIR, RBS/channeling, UV/VIS reflectance and cathodoluminescence regarding H-content, crystalline quality and light emission. The results show that the luminescent properties are independent of the hydrogen content but are strongly related with the present damage

  15. Thermoluminescence spectra of amethyst

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Q. [Suzhou Railway Teachers College (China). Dept. of Physics; Yang, B. [Beijing Normal University (China). Dept. of Physics; Wood, R.A.; White, D.R.R.; Townsend, P.D.; Luff, B.J. [Sussex Univ., Brighton (United Kingdom). School of Mathematical and Physical Sciences

    1994-04-01

    Thermoluminescence and cathodoluminescence data from natural and synthetic amethyst and synthetic quartz samples are compared. The spectra include features from the quartz host lattice and from impurity-generated recombination sites. Emission features exist throughout the wavelength range studied, 250-800 nm. The near infrared emission at 740-750 nm appears to be characteristic of the amethyst and is proposed to be due to Fe ion impurity. (Author).

  16. Luminescence of natural IIa diamond implanted with nitrogen ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Varichenko, V.S.; Zaitsev, A.M.; Stelmakh, V.F.

    1986-01-01

    Investigations on the influence of defect environment in the irradiated diamond lattice are presented. The N + implantation with energies from 60 keV up to 60 MeV was used both as method of introducing nitrogen containing defects into the diamond and as a good tool to create different environment of these defects. Photoluminescence, cathodoluminescence, and annealing measurements show that the action of defect environment is revealed through the effective pressure affecting the thermal stability of defects and their inhomogeneous distortion

  17. Structure, chemistry and luminescence properties of dielectric La{sub x}Hf{sub 1-x}O{sub y} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaichev, V.V., E-mail: vvk@catalysis.ru [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Smirnova, T.P.; Yakovkina, L.V. [Nikolaev Institute of Inorganic Chemistry, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Ivanova, E.V.; Zamoryanskaya, M.V. [Ioffe Physical-Technical Institute, St. Petersburg (Russian Federation); Saraev, A.A. [Boreskov Institute of Catalysis, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Pustovarov, V.A. [Ural State Technical University, Ekaterinburg (Russian Federation); Perevalov, T.V.; Gritsenko, V.A. [Novosibirsk State University, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation); Rzhanov Institute of Semiconductor Physics, Novosibirsk (Russian Federation)

    2016-06-01

    Dielectric films of La{sub 2}O{sub 3}, HfO{sub 2}, and La{sub x}Hf{sub 1-x}O{sub y} were synthesized by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. Structural, chemical, and luminescence properties of the films were studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, methods of X-ray diffraction and selected area electron diffraction, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and a cathodoluminescence technique. It was found that doping of hafnium oxide with lanthanum leads to the formation of a continuous series of solid solutions with a cubic structure. This process is accompanied by the formation of oxygen vacancies in the HfO{sub 2} lattice. Cathodoluminescence spectra of the La{sub x}Hf{sub 1-x}O{sub y}/Si films exhibited a wide band with the maximum near 2.4–2.5 eV, which corresponds to the blue emission. Quantum-chemical calculations showed that this blue band is due to oxygen vacancies in the HfO{sub 2} lattice. - Highlights: • HfO{sub 2} and solid solution La{sub x}Hf{sub 1-x}O{sub y} films were synthesized by MOCVD. • The continuous series of solid solutions with a cubic structure was formed at La doping of HfO{sub 2}. • Cathodoluminescence band at 2.4–2.5 eV is observed due to the oxygen vacancies in La{sub x}Hf{sub 1-x}O{sub y}. • The cathodoluminescence decreases in intensity when the La concentration increases.

  18. Optimization of decay kinetics of YAG:Ce single crystal scintillators for S(T)EM electron detectors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Schauer, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 269, č. 21 (2011), s. 2572-2577 ISSN 0168-583X R&D Projects: GA ČR GAP102/10/1410 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20650511 Keywords : scintillation detector * electron microscope * cathodoluminescence * YAG:Ce single crystal scintillator * decay time * afterglow * kinetic model * SEM * STEM Subject RIV: JA - Electronics ; Optoelectronics, Electrical Engineering Impact factor: 1.211, year: 2011

  19. Luminescent characteristics of praseodymium-doped zinc aluminate powders

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hernandez-Perez, C.D.; Garcia-Hipolito, M.; Alvarez-Fregoso, O. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Coyoacan, DF (Mexico); Alvarez-Perez, M.A. [Facultad de Odontologia, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Coyoacan, DF (Mexico); Ramos-Brito, F. [Laboratorio de Materiales Optoelectronicos, DIDe, Centro de Ciencias de Sinaloa, Av. De las Americas No. 2771 Nte. Col. Villa Universidad, Culiacan, Sinaloa (Mexico); Falcony, C. [Centro de Investigaciones y Estudios Avanzados del IPN, Departamento de Fisica, Mexico, DF (Mexico)

    2010-02-15

    In this research, we report the cathodoluminescence (CL) and preliminary photoluminescence (PL) properties of praseodymium-doped zinc aluminate powders. ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}:Pr powders were synthesized by a very simple chemical process. X-ray diffraction spectra indicated a cubic spinel crystalline structure with an average crystallite size of 15 nm. CL properties of the powders were studied as a function of the praseodymium concentration and electron-accelerating potential. In this case, all the cathodoluminescent emission spectra showed main peaks located at 494, 535, 611, 646, and 733 nm, which were associated to the electronic transitions {sup 3}P{sub 0}{yields}{sup 3}H{sub 4}, {sup 3}P{sub 0}{yields}{sup 3}H{sub 5}, {sup 3}P{sub 0}{yields}{sup 3}H{sub 6}, {sup 3}P{sub 0}{yields}{sup 3}F{sub 2}, and {sup 3}P{sub 0}{yields}{sup 3}F{sub 4} of the Pr{sup 3+} ions, respectively. A quenching of the CL, with increasing doping concentration, was observed. Also, an increment on cathodoluminescent emission intensity was observed as the accelerating voltage increased. The PL emission spectrum showed similar characteristics to those of the CL spectra. The chemical composition of the powders, as determined by energy dispersive spectroscopy, is also reported. In addition, the surface morphology characteristics of the powders are shown. (Abstract Copyright [2010], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  20. Dual emitter IrQ(ppy)2 for OLED applications: Synthesis and spectroscopic analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ciobotaru, I.C.; Polosan, S.; Ciobotaru, C.C.

    2014-01-01

    The synthesis of organometallic compound with iridium and two types of ligands, quinoline and phenylpyridine, was done successfully. The absorption spectra of this compound have shown broad peaks in a visible region assigned to metal-to-ligands charge transfer and in UV region assigned to intraligand absorptions. The photoluminescence spectra exhibit dual character in which the red emission is more intense than the green one. In cathodoluminescence measurements, under electron beam, the powder obtained after recrystallization from dichloromethane, shows similar behaviors with photoluminescence spectra. The cathodoluminescence images have shown a luminescent crystalline powder with triclinic structure. This compound exhibits combined vibrational modes, which proves the presence in the same molecule of both ligands. Density Functional Theory calculation was involved in order to identify the main vibrations of this compound. Highlights: • Mixed-ligand of IrQ(ppy) 2 synthesis which gives green and red phosphorescence due to the MCLT processes coming from two types of ligands. • Absorption, photoluminescence, infrared spectroscopy and cathodoluminescence measurements for characterization of IrQ(ppy) 2 organometallic compound. • Experimental results have been compared with the output files obtained from Density Functional Theory by using the Gaussian 03W software

  1. Current-Fluctuation Mechanism of Field Emitters Using Metallic Single-Walled Carbon Nanotubes with High Crystallinity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norihiro Shimoi

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Field emitters can be used as a cathode electrode in a cathodoluminescence device, and single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs that are synthesized by arc discharge are expected to exhibit good field emission (FE properties. However, a cathodoluminescence device that uses field emitters radiates rays whose intensity considerably fluctuates at a low frequency, and the radiant fluctuation is caused by FE current fluctuation. To solve this problem, is very important to obtain a stable output for field emitters in a cathodoluminescence device. The authors consider that the electron-emission fluctuation is caused by Fowler–Nordheim electron tunneling and that the electrons in the Fowler–Nordheim regime pass through an inelastic potential barrier. We attempted to develop a theoretical model to analyze the power spectrum of the FE current fluctuation using metallic SWCNTs as field emitters, owing to their electrical conductivity by determining their FE properties. Field emitters that use metallic SWCNTs with high crystallinity were successfully developed to achieve a fluctuating FE current from field emitters at a low frequency by employing inelastic electron tunneling. This paper is the first report of the successful development of an inelastic-electron-tunneling model with a Wentzel–Kramers–Brillouin approximation for metallic SWCNTs based on the evaluation of FE properties.

  2. Characterization and luminescent properties of thermally annealed olivines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colin-Garcia, Maria; Correcher, Virgilio; Garcia-Guinea, Javier; Heredia-Barbero, Alejandro; Roman-Lopez, Jesus; Ortega-Gutierrez, Fernando; Negron-Mendoza, Alicia; Ramos-Bernal, Sergio

    2013-01-01

    Olivine is an iron-magnesium solid solution silicate (Mg,Fe) 2 SiO 4 and it is probably one of the most abundant mineral phase in the Solar System, it is present in the primitive carbonaceous meteorites (i.e Allende), and in ordinary chondritic meteorite, comets or terrestrial planets. The olivine grains in those bodies have been exposed to different radiation sources like UV, electrons, cosmic radiation, etc. Here, we explore the effect of ionizing and non ionizing radiation on the luminescence emission of the two well-characterised olivine samples from Mexico and Spain by means of cathodoluminescence and thermoluminescence. The analyses by X-ray dispersive energies in the scanning electron microscopy show differences between the samples in the amount of iron and magnesium and also show traces of rare elements. Olivine exhibits spectral cathodoluminescence emissions of low intensity, explained for the quenching of the luminescence of the iron, and sharp signals assigned as impurities. Cathodoluminescence and thermoluminescence glow curves of the natural, and UV induced olivine samples were obtained. Our results show that thermal treatments at 1100 °C change the mineral molecular structure and the luminescence properties of this mineral phase. These results confirm an active participation of physical factors influencing the luminescent properties of olivine. -- Highlights: ► Luminescent properties of two olivines samples (Mexican and Spanish) were explored. ► EDS show different iron and magnesium content and traces of rare elements on both. ► Olivine exhibits spectral CL emissions of low intensity due to the quenching of iron. ► Treatments at 1100 °C change the mineral structure and its response to UV radiation

  3. Scanning electron microscopy of semiconductor materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bresse, J.F.; Dupuy, M.

    1978-01-01

    The use of scanning electron microscopy in semiconductors opens up a large field of use. The operating modes lending themselves to the study of semiconductors are the induced current, cathodoluminescence and the use of the potential contrast which can also be applied very effectively to the study of the devices (planar in particular). However, a thorough knowledge of the mechanisms of the penetration of electrons, generation and recombination of generated carriers in a semiconductor is necessary in order to attain a better understanding of the operating modes peculiar to semiconductors [fr

  4. 87Sr/86Sr ratios in permo-carboniferous sea water from the analyses of well-preserved brachiopod shells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Popp, B.N.; Anderson, T.F.

    1986-01-01

    Sr isotopic analyses of well-preserved portions of Permo-Carboniferous brachiopods distributed globally confirm the general shape of the Sr isotope age curve established by previous workers for this time interval. There is little variation between the SR isotopic composition of unaltered portions of brachiopods and that of portions of the same shell interpreted to be diagenetically altered (based on cathodoluminescence, elemental, and stable isotopic data). However, the Sr isotopic composition in diagenetically altered micritic matrix adjacent to the shell is more radiogenic. The Sr isotopic composition in the unaltered portions of calcitic megafossils has potential as a stratigraphic tool. (author)

  5. Study of thermal treated a-Si implanted with Er and O ions

    CERN Document Server

    Plugaru, R; Piqueras, J; Tate, T J

    2002-01-01

    Visible luminescence of amorphous silicon layers either implanted with Er or co-implanted with Er and O and subsequently annealed in nitrogen has been investigated by cathodoluminescence (CL) in a scanning electron microscope. Co-implanted samples show a more intense luminescence, which is revealed by annealing at lower temperatures than the samples implanted only with erbium. Thermal treatments cause the formation of erbium oxide as well as Er-Si complexes or precipitates. Violet-blue luminescence has been found from CL images and spectra to be related to Er-Si precipitates. Emission in the green-red range is attributed to oxide species.

  6. Ferroan dolomite cement in Cambrian sandstones: burial history and hydrocarbon generation of the Baltic sedimentary basin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sliaupa, S.; Cyziene, J.; Molenaar, Nicolaas

    2008-01-01

    The conditions and timing of carbonate cementation in Cambrian sandstones of the Baltic sedimentary basin were determined by oxygen and carbon stable isotope and chemical data in combination with optical and cathodoluminescence petrographic studies. Studied samples represent a range in present...... burial depth from 340 to 2150 m. The carbonate cement is dominantly ferroan dolomite that occurs as dispersed patches of poikilotopic crystals. Temperatures of dolomite precipitation, based on delta O-18 values, range from 27 degrees C in the shallow buried to 95 degrees C in the deep buried sandstones...

  7. The condensed matter physics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sapoval, B.

    1988-01-01

    The 1988 progress report of the laboratory of the Condensed Matter Physics (Polytechnic School, France), is presented. The Laboratory activities are related to the physics of semiconductors and disordered phases. The electrical and optical properties of the semiconductors, mixed conductor, superionic conductors and ceramics, are studied. Moreover, the interfaces of those systems and the sol-gel inorganic polymerization phenomena, are investigated. The most important results obtained, concern the following investigations: the electrochemical field effect transistor, the cathodoluminescence, the low energy secondary electrons emission, the fluctuations of a two-dimensional diffused junction and the aerogels [fr

  8. Solid-phase data from cores at the proposed Dewey Burdock uranium in-situ recovery mine, near Edgemont, South Dakota

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Raymond H.; Diehl, Sharon F.; Benzel, William M.

    2013-01-01

    This report releases solid-phase data from cores at the proposed Dewey Burdock uranium in-situ recovery site near Edgemont, South Dakota. These cores were collected by Powertech Uranium Corporation, and material not used for their analyses were given to the U.S. Geological Survey for additional sampling and analyses. These additional analyses included total carbon and sulfur, whole rock acid digestion for major and trace elements, 234U/238U activity ratios, X-ray diffraction, thin sections, scanning electron microscopy analyses, and cathodoluminescence. This report provides the methods and data results from these analyses along with a short summary of observations.

  9. Design of titania nanotube structures by focused laser beam direct writing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enachi, Mihai; Stevens-Kalceff, Marion A.; Sarua, Andrei; Ursaki, Veaceslav; Tiginyanu, Ion

    2013-01-01

    In this work, we report on electrochemical fabrication of titania films consisting of nanotubes (NTs) and their treatment by focused laser beam. The results of sample characterization by optical and scanning electron microscopy, cathodoluminescence imaging, and Raman scattering scanning spectroscopy are compared to those inherent to specimens subjected to thermal treatment in a furnace. The obtained data demonstrate possibilities for controlling crystallographic structure of TiO 2 NTs by focused laser beam direct writing. These findings open new prospects for the design and fabrication of spatial architectures based on titania nanotubes

  10. Direct correlations of structural and optical properties of three-dimensional GaN/InGaN core/shell micro-light emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sadat Mohajerani, Matin; Müller, Marcus; Hartmann, Jana; Zhou, Hao; Wehmann, Hergo-H.; Veit, Peter; Bertram, Frank; Christen, Jürgen; Waag, Andreas

    2016-05-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) InGaN/GaN quantum-well (QW) core-shell light emitting diodes (LEDs) are a promising candidate for the future solid state lighting. In this contribution, we study direct correlations of structural and optical properties of the core-shell LEDs using highly spatially-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy (CL) in combination with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM). Temperature-dependent resonant photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy has been performed to understand recombination mechanisms and to estimate the internal quantum efficiency (IQE).

  11. Obtainment and characterization of pure and doped gadolinium oxy ortho silicates with terbium III, precursor of luminescent silicates with sulphur

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simoneti, J.A.

    1992-01-01

    Silicate and sulfide lattices are uniquely efficient luminescent materials to excitation by cathodic rays and furthermore the cathodoluminescence study of these compounds have been few investigated. In this work it has been prepared, characterized and investigated some spectroscopic properties of pure and Tb a+ - activated Gd 2 Si O 3 system and it has been tried to substitute oxygen by sulphur in order to obtain this or sulfide-silicate lattices. Products were characterized by vibrational infrared spectroscopy, powder X-ray diffraction patterns and electronic emission in UV-VIS region. (author)

  12. Acceptors in cadmium telluride. Identification and electronic structure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molva, E.

    1983-11-01

    It is shown that electronic properties of CdTe are determined by impurities more than by intrinsic defects like vacancies or interstitials in Cd or Te contrary to classical theories. These results are based on annealing, diffusion, implantation and electron irradiation at 4 K. Centers appearing in treated samples are accurately identified by photoluminescence, cathodoluminescence infra-red absorption, electrical measurements and magneto-optic properties. Acceptors identified are Li, Na, Cu, Ag and Au impurities in Cd and N, P and As in Te. Energy levels of all acceptors and fine structure of excitons are determined [fr

  13. Label-free cellular structure imaging with 82 nm lateral resolution using an electron-beam excitation-assisted optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuta, Masahiro; Masuda, Yuriko; Inami, Wataru; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2016-07-25

    We present label-free and high spatial-resolution imaging for specific cellular structures using an electron-beam excitation-assisted optical microscope (EXA microscope). Images of the actin filament and mitochondria of stained HeLa cells, obtained by fluorescence and EXA microscopy, were compared to identify cellular structures. Based on these results, we demonstrated the feasibility of identifying label-free cellular structures at a spatial resolution of 82 nm. Using numerical analysis, we calculated the imaging depth region and determined the spot size of a cathodoluminescent (CL) light source to be 83 nm at the membrane surface.

  14. Spectroscopic Evidence for Exceptional Thermal Contribution to Electron-Beam Induced Fragmentation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caldwell, Marissa A.; Haynor, Ben; Aloni, Shaul; Ogletree, D. Frank; Wong, H.-S. Philip; Urban, Jeffrey J.; Milliron, Delia J.

    2010-11-16

    While electron beam induced fragmentation (EBIF) has been reported to result in the formation of nanocrystals of various compositions, the physical forces driving this phenomenon are still poorly understood. We report EBIF to be a much more general phenomenon than previously appreciated, operative across a wide variety of metals, semiconductors and insulators. In addition, we leverage the temperature dependent bandgap of several semiconductors to quantify -- using in situ cathodoluminescence spectroscopy -- the thermal contribution to EBIF, and find extreme temperature rises upwards of 1000K.

  15. On the correlations between the excitonic luminescence efficiency and the QW numbers in multiple InGaN/GaN QW structure

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Hospodková, Alice; Oswald, Jiří; Zíková, Markéta; Pangrác, Jiří; Kuldová, Karla; Blažek, K.; Ledoux, G.; Dujardin, C.; Nikl, Martin

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 121, č. 21 (2017), 1-8, č. článku 214505. ISSN 0021-8979 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1603; GA ČR GA16-15569S EU Projects: European Commission(XE) CZ.2.16/3.1.00/24510; European Commission(XE) 690599 - ASCIMAT Institutional support: RVO:68378271 Keywords : InGaN/GaN heterostructure * scintillators * photoluminescence * cathodoluminescence Subject RIV: BM - Solid Matter Physics ; Magnetism OBOR OECD: Condensed matter physics (including formerly solid state physics , supercond.) Impact factor: 2.068, year: 2016

  16. Optical lines in europium-terbium double activated calcium tungstate phosphor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarov, M.V. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of); Tsukerblat, B.S. [Department of Chemistry, Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, 84105 Beer-Sheva (Israel)]. E-mail: tsuker@bgumail.bgu.ac.il; Popovici, E.-J. [' Raluca Ripan' Institute for Research in Chemistry, Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Jeon, D.Y. [Department of Material Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, 373-1 Guseong-dong, Yuseong-gu, Daejeon 305-701 (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-09-20

    The Letter is devoted to the problem of the optical anisotropy of the rare-earth ions occupying low-symmetry positions in crystals. The crystal field multiplets arising from LSJ terms of Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} ions in the crystal field of calcium tungstate scheelite (CaWO{sub 4}) are analyzed with regard to the experimental data on the low temperature photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence spectra. The selection rules as well as an angular (polarization) dependence of the two-photon absorption are discussed.

  17. Effect of radiation damage on luminescence of erbium-implanted SiO sub 2 /Si studied by slow positron beam

    CERN Document Server

    Kawasuso, A; Hirata, K; Sekiguchi, T; Kobayashi, Y; Okada, S

    2000-01-01

    The effect of damage on 1.54 mu m luminescence for 30 keV-Er-implanted SiO sub 2 films has been studied by positron annihilation and cathodoluminescence. It was found that S-parameter in the films decreased after implantation, indicating the suppression of positronium formation. The luminescence appeared with the recovery of the S-parameter after 600 deg. C annealing. The intensity reached a maximum at 900 deg. C annealing whereas the S-parameter did not change significantly. It seems that most damages recover at 600 deg. C and thereafter Er ions transform to an optically active state at 900 deg. C.

  18. Improved interface quality and luminescence capability of InGaN/GaN quantum wells with Mg pretreatment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Zhengyuan; Shen, Xiyang; Xiong, Huan; Li, Qingfei; Kang, Junyong; Fang, Zhilai [Xiamen University, Collaborative Innovation Center for Optoelectronic Semiconductors and Efficient Devices, Department of Physics, Xiamen (China); Lin, Feng; Yang, Bilan; Lin, Shilin [San' an Optoelectronics Co., Ltd, Xiamen (China); Shen, Wenzhong [Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Key Laboratory of Artificial Structures and Quantum Control (Ministry of Education), Department of Physics, Shanghai (China); Zhang, Tong-Yi [Shanghai University, Shanghai University Materials Genome Institute and Shanghai Materials Genome Institute, Shanghai (China)

    2016-02-15

    Interface modification of high indium content InGaN/GaN quantum wells was carried out by Mg pretreatment of the GaN barrier surface. The indium in the Mg-pretreated InGaN layer was homogeneously distributed, making the interfaces abrupt. The improved interface quality greatly enhanced light emission capacity. The cathodoluminescence intensity of the Mg-pretreated InGaN/GaN quantum wells was correspondingly much stronger than those of the InGaN/GaN quantum wells without Mg pretreatment. (orig.)

  19. Multi-color imaging of fluorescent nanodiamonds in living HeLa cells using direct electron-beam excitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nawa, Yasunori; Inami, Wataru; Lin, Sheng; Kawata, Yoshimasa; Terakawa, Susumu; Fang, Chia-Yi; Chang, Huan-Cheng

    2014-03-17

    Multi-color, high spatial resolution imaging of fluorescent nanodiamonds (FNDs) in living HeLa cells has been performed with a direct electron-beam excitation-assisted fluorescence (D-EXA) microscope. In this technique, fluorescent materials are directly excited with a focused electron beam and the resulting cathodoluminescence (CL) is detected with nanoscale resolution. Green- and red-light-emitting FNDs were employed for two-color imaging, which were observed simultaneously in the cells with high spatial resolution. This technique could be applied generally for multi-color immunostaining to reveal various cell functions. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  20. Thallium occurrence and partitioning in soils and sediments affected by mining activities in Madrid province (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gomez-Gonzalez, M.A.; Garcia-Guinea, J.; Laborda, F.; Garrido, F.

    2015-01-01

    Thallium (Tl) and its compounds are toxic to biota even at low concentrations but little is known about Tl concentration and speciation in soils. An understanding of the source, mobility, and dispersion of Tl is necessary to evaluate the environmental impact of Tl pollution cases. In this paper, we examine the Tl source and dispersion in two areas affected by abandoned mine facilities whose residues remain dumped on-site affecting to soils and sediments of natural water courses near Madrid city (Spain). Total Tl contents and partitioning in soil solid phases as determined by means of a sequential extraction procedure were also examined in soils along the riverbeds of an ephemeral and a permanent streams collecting water runoff and drainage from the mines wastes. Lastly, electronic microscopy and cathodoluminescence probe are used as a suitable technique for Tl elemental detection on thallium-bearing phases. Tl was found mainly bound to quartz and alumino-phyllosilicates in both rocks and examined soils. Besides, Tl was also frequently found associated to organic particles and diatom frustules in all samples from both mine scenarios. These biogenic silicates may regulate the transfer of Tl into the soil-water system. - Highlights: • Abandoned mine residues are Tl sources in soils of Madrid catchment area. • Tl was associated to quartz and aluminosilicates in both rocks and soils. • Tl was frequently found associated to organic particles and diatom frustules. • Cathodoluminescence is a suitable technique for Tl detection on soils and rocks

  1. Thallium occurrence and partitioning in soils and sediments affected by mining activities in Madrid province (Spain)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Gonzalez, M.A.; Garcia-Guinea, J. [National Museum of Natural Sciences, CSIC, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Laborda, F. [Group of Analytical Spectroscopy and Sensors Group, Institute of Environmental Sciences, University of Zaragoza, Pedro Cerbuna 12, 50009 Zaragoza (Spain); Garrido, F., E-mail: fernando.garrido@mncn.csic.es [National Museum of Natural Sciences, CSIC, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-12-01

    Thallium (Tl) and its compounds are toxic to biota even at low concentrations but little is known about Tl concentration and speciation in soils. An understanding of the source, mobility, and dispersion of Tl is necessary to evaluate the environmental impact of Tl pollution cases. In this paper, we examine the Tl source and dispersion in two areas affected by abandoned mine facilities whose residues remain dumped on-site affecting to soils and sediments of natural water courses near Madrid city (Spain). Total Tl contents and partitioning in soil solid phases as determined by means of a sequential extraction procedure were also examined in soils along the riverbeds of an ephemeral and a permanent streams collecting water runoff and drainage from the mines wastes. Lastly, electronic microscopy and cathodoluminescence probe are used as a suitable technique for Tl elemental detection on thallium-bearing phases. Tl was found mainly bound to quartz and alumino-phyllosilicates in both rocks and examined soils. Besides, Tl was also frequently found associated to organic particles and diatom frustules in all samples from both mine scenarios. These biogenic silicates may regulate the transfer of Tl into the soil-water system. - Highlights: • Abandoned mine residues are Tl sources in soils of Madrid catchment area. • Tl was associated to quartz and aluminosilicates in both rocks and soils. • Tl was frequently found associated to organic particles and diatom frustules. • Cathodoluminescence is a suitable technique for Tl detection on soils and rocks.

  2. Luminescence properties of calcium doped zinc oxide nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Mir, L., E-mail: Lassaad.ElMir@fsg.rnu.tn [Al Imam Mohammad Ibn Saud Islamic University (IMSIU), College of Sciences, Department of Physics, Riyadh 11623 (Saudi Arabia); Laboratory of Physics of Materials and Nanomaterials Applied at Environment (LaPhyMNE), Gabes University, Faculty of Sciences in Gabes, Gabes (Tunisia)

    2017-06-15

    Aerogel nanopowder of calcium-doped zinc oxide (ZnO:Ca) was synthesized by modified sol-gel method. In this process, hydrolyses was slowly released and followed by a thermal drying in supercritical conditions or ethyl alcohol. The obtained nanopowder was characterized by various techniques such as X-ray diffraction (XRD), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), Cathodoluminescence (CL) and photoluminescence (PL). XRD data showed that Ca-doped ZnO sample has a hexagonal wurtzite structure with a slight distortion of ZnO lattice and no extra secondary phases, suggesting the substitution of Ca ions in the ZnO structure. SEM micrograph shows spherical microparticles having a rough porous fine-grained. From TEM micrograph, the samples are composed by single particles having an inhomogeneous size distribution, with most of them having a dimension in the range between 20 and 50 nm. This powder presents a strong photoluminescence band in the visible range. From photoluminescence excitation (PLE) the energy position of the obtained PL band depends on the wavelength of excitation. The luminescence results are also confirmed by cathodoluminescence technique and suggests the presence of photo-active centers in ZnO:Ca as deduced from new published works for visible photo-activated gas sensors and photo-catalysis of dyes degradation. We hope that this work provides some answers to the scientific community concerning the effect of doping in the creation of optical active centers in ZnO, promising for many technological applications.

  3. Luminescence from Ce in sol-gel SiO{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kroon, R.E., E-mail: KroonRE@ufs.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, IB51, Box 339, Bloemfontein 9300 (South Africa); Seed Ahmed, H.A.A.; Ntwaeaborwa, O.M. [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, IB51, Box 339, Bloemfontein 9300 (South Africa); Koao, L.F. [Department of Physics, University of the Free State (Qwaqwa Campus), Private Bag X13, Phuthaditjhaba 9866 (South Africa); Nagpure, I.M.; Gusowski, M.A. [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, IB51, Box 339, Bloemfontein 9300 (South Africa); Botha, J.R. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Swart, H.C. [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, IB51, Box 339, Bloemfontein 9300 (South Africa)

    2012-05-15

    The sol-gel process provides an attractive low temperature alternative to the melt process for producing Ce-doped silica, but reports of the emission wavelength have not been consistent. In this paper, luminescence measurements using a variety of excitation methods, including cathodoluminescence not yet reported by other researchers, are compared and evaluated in the light of previously published data. Several papers report luminescence around 350 nm but emission near this wavelength was not found from our samples. This luminescence originates from Ce that has not yet been incorporated in the silica and is found in samples that have not undergone high temperature annealing. Our photoluminescence results from samples annealed in a reducing atmosphere suggest that emission from Ce incorporated in the silica lattice occurs near 455 nm, and some indication of the emission from Ce in amorphous clusters at 400 nm is also found. However, our results also confirm earlier indications that intrinsic defects in silica can create photoluminescence near both these wavelengths, which can make identification of the luminescence due to Ce difficult. Finally, it has been found that samples which have been annealed in air, and therefore display poor photoluminescence because most of the Ce occurs in the tetravalent form, are luminescent under electron beam excitation. It is suggested that during cathodoluminescence measurements Ce{sup 4+} ions capture electrons to form excited Ce{sup 3+} ions from which the luminescence originates.

  4. New SHRIMP U-Pb zircon ages of the metapelitic granulites from NW of Madurai, Southern India

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prakash, D.

    2010-01-01

    Zircon cathodoluminescent imaging and SHRIMP U-Pb dating were carried out for metapelitic rocks (sapphirine-hearing granulites and garnet-cordierite gneisses) from the NW of Madurai, Southern India. The cathodoluminescence images reveal the complex, inhomogeneous internal structure having irregular-shaped core and overgrowths. Zircon grains have obliterated oscillatory zoning. SHRIMP U-Pb chronological results yield ages of 550 ± 15 Ma and 530 ± 50 Ma as a time of metamorphic overprint, and the age of 2509 ± 12 Ma and 2509 ± 30 Ma corresponding to a timing of protolith formation for sapphirine-bearing granulites and garnet-cordierite gneisses respectively. Zircon ages reflect that continental crust in the NW of Madurai region resulted from the recycling of Archaean protolith of an igneous origin similar to the preserved crust in the southern part of Dharwar craton. The present SHRIMP U-Pb zircon ages are in close agreement with earlier published Nd isotopic data which suggest an extended precrustal history of their protoliths. The abraded zircon grains indicate multiple recycling and repeated metamorphism that has ultimately resulted in present day continental crust exposed in Madurai region. These SHRIMP U-Pb zircon ages from metapelitic UHT granulites are also significant to understanding the architecture of the SGT during the amalgamation of Gondwana in Neoproterozoic time. (author)

  5. Preparing nano-hole arrays by using porous anodic aluminum oxide nano-structural masks for the enhanced emission from InGaN/GaN blue light-emitting diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nguyen, Hoang-Duy; Nguyen, Hieu Pham Trung; Lee, Jae-jin; Mho, Sun-Il

    2012-01-01

    We report on the achievement of the enhanced cathodoluminescence (CL) from InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) by using roughening surface. Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) mask was utilized to form nano-hole arrays on the surface of InGaN/GaN LEDs. AAO membranes with ordered hexagonal structures were fabricated from aluminum foils by a two-step anodization method. The average pore densities of ∼1.0 × 10 10 cm −2 and 3.0 × 10 10 cm −2 were fabricated with the constant anodization voltages of 25 and 40 V, respectively. Anodic porous alumina film with a thickness of ∼600 nm has been used as a mask for the induced couple plasma etching process to fabricate nano-hole arrays on the LED surface. Diameter and depth of nano-holes can be controlled by varying the etching duration and/or the diameter of AAO membranes. Due to the reduction of total internal reflection obtained in the patterned samples, we have observed that the cathodoluminescence intensity of LEDs with nanoporous structures is increased up to eight times compared to that of samples without using nanoporous structure. (paper)

  6. Preparing nano-hole arrays by using porous anodic aluminum oxide nano-structural masks for the enhanced emission from InGaN/GaN blue light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Hoang-Duy; Nguyen, Hieu Pham Trung; Lee, Jae-jin; Mho, Sun-Il

    2012-12-01

    We report on the achievement of the enhanced cathodoluminescence (CL) from InGaN/GaN light-emitting diodes (LEDs) by using roughening surface. Nanoporous anodic aluminum oxide (AAO) mask was utilized to form nano-hole arrays on the surface of InGaN/GaN LEDs. AAO membranes with ordered hexagonal structures were fabricated from aluminum foils by a two-step anodization method. The average pore densities of ˜1.0 × 1010 cm-2 and 3.0 × 1010 cm-2 were fabricated with the constant anodization voltages of 25 and 40 V, respectively. Anodic porous alumina film with a thickness of ˜600 nm has been used as a mask for the induced couple plasma etching process to fabricate nano-hole arrays on the LED surface. Diameter and depth of nano-holes can be controlled by varying the etching duration and/or the diameter of AAO membranes. Due to the reduction of total internal reflection obtained in the patterned samples, we have observed that the cathodoluminescence intensity of LEDs with nanoporous structures is increased up to eight times compared to that of samples without using nanoporous structure.

  7. Luminescence behaviour of room temperature chemical processed all-inorganic CsPbCl3 perovskite cubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paul, T.; Chatterjee, B. K.; Maiti, S.; Besra, N.; Thakur, S.; Sarkar, S.; Chanda, K.; Das, A.; Sarkar, P. K.; Sardar, K.; Chattopadhyay, K. K.

    2018-05-01

    All inorganic perovskites with different halide constituent have recently truncated the eyes of researchers owing to their intriguing optoelectronic features and thereby their usage perspective in photovoltaic applications, light emitting didoes and lasing devices. Here, adopting a simple, environment benign ambient conditioned chemical synthesis approach we have realized high quality cesium lead halide perovskite (CsPbCl3) cube. The crystallinity and morphological characterizations were performed by X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscope measurements respectively while the chemical composition were examined via energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopic measurement. The as synthesized cubes crystallized in cubic phase and exhibited intense photoluminescence emission at ˜418 nm with a small FWHM value and prolonged photoluminescence decay time˜41 ns. Besides photoluminescence, these cubes displayed strong cathodoluminescence also. Accelerating voltage dependent cathodoluminescence study showed discernable differences in luminescence behaviour. We expect this synthetic strategy to be promising as it can be easily scaled up to produce bulk quantity nanoforms of different inorganic perovskites in subtle manner for the realization of several types of nanoscale devices.

  8. Tunable white light emission from hafnium oxide films co-doped with trivalent terbium and europium ions deposited by Pyrosol technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guzman-Olguin, J.C.; Montes, E.; Guzman-Mendoza, J. [Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada del Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Unidad Legaria (Mexico); Baez-Rodriguez, A.; Zamora-Peredo, L. [Centro de Investigacion en Micro y Nanotecnologia, Universidad Veracruzana, Boca del Rio, Ver (Mexico); Garcia-Hipolito, M.; Alvarez-Fregoso, O. [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Circuito Exterior, Ciudad Universitaria, Coyoacan (Mexico); Martinez-Merlin, I.; Falcony, C. [Centro de Investigacion y de Estudios Avanzados del Instituto Politecnico Nacional (Mexico)

    2017-10-15

    In this paper, the photo and cathodoluminescent properties of HfO{sub 2} films optically activated with different atomic concentrations of Tb{sup 3+} and Eu{sup 3+} ions, deposited by the Pyrosol technique, are reported. These films were deposited at temperatures from 400 to 600 C, using chlorides as raw materials. The surface morphologies of all deposited films were rough and dense. X-ray diffraction analysis showed that the films deposited at 600 C were polycrystalline exhibiting the HfO{sub 2} monoclinic phase. The tuning by the means of the excitation wavelength generates photoluminescence spectra, for co-doped films, in several emissions from blue to yellow (including white light) due to the characteristic electronic transitions of Tb{sup 3+} (green), Eu{sup 3+}(red) ions and the violet-blue emission associated to the host lattice (HfO{sub 2}). According to the chromaticity diagram, the best white light is reached for the sample S2 excited with 382 nm (x = 0.3343, y = 0.3406). The cathodoluminescence emission spectra for co-doped films showed emissions from green to red (including yellow, orange and other intermediate emissions). The averaged quantum efficiency values of the sample labeled as S2 resulted between 47 and 78% depending on the excitation wavelength. In addition, XPS, TEM, SEM and decay times were performed to characterize these films. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Thermal and electron stimulated luminescence of natural bones, commercial hydroxyapatite and collagen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roman-Lopez, J; Correcher, V; Garcia-Guinea, J; Rivera, T; Lozano, I B

    2014-01-01

    The luminescence (cathodoluminescence and thermoluminescence) properties of natural bones (Siberian mammoth and adult elephant), commercial hydroxyapatite and collagen were analyzed. Chemical analyses of the natural bones were determined using by Electron Probe Micro-Analysis (EMPA). Structural, molecular and thermal characteristics were determined by X-ray Diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and Differential Thermal and Thermogravimetric analysis (DTA-TG). Cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra of natural bones and collagen showed similar intense broad bands at 440 and 490 nm related to luminescence of the tetrahedral anion [Formula: see text] or structural defects. A weaker luminescence exhibited at 310 nm could be attributed to small amount of rare earth elements (REEs). Four luminescent bands at 378, 424, 468 and 576 nm were observed in the commercial hydroxyapatite (HAP). Both natural bones and collagen samples exhibited natural thermoluminescence (NTL) with well-defined glow curves whereas that the induced thermoluminescence (ITL) only appears in the samples of commercial hydroxyapatite and collagen. Additional explanations for the TL anomalous fading of apatite, as a crucial difficulty performing dosimetry and dating, are also considered. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. Hydrogenation of GaAs covered by GaAlAs and subgrain boundary passivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djemel, A.; Castaing, J.; Chevallier, J.; Henoc, P.

    1992-12-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) has been performed to study the influence of hydrogen on electronic properties of GaAs with and without a GaAlAs layer. Recombination at sub-boundaries has been examined. These extended defects have been introduced by high temperature plastic deformation. The results show that they are passivated by hydrogen. The penetration of hydrogen is slowed down by the GaAlAs layer. La cathodoluminescence (CL) a été utilisée pour étudier l'influence de l'hydrogène sur les propriétés électroniques de GaAs nu et recouvert d'une couche de GaAlAs. Le caractère recombinant des sous-joints de grains a été examiné. Ces défauts étendus ont été introduits par déformation plastique à chaud. Les résultats montrent que l'hydrogène passive ces défauts. La pénétration de l'hydrogène à l'intérieur de GaAs est retardée par la présence de la couche de GaAlAs.

  11. The identification of growth lines in abalone shell using a nuclear microprobe

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bettiol, A.A.; Yang, C.; Hawkes, G.P.; Jamieson, D.N.; Malmqvist, K.G.; Day, R.W.

    1999-01-01

    Ionoluminescence (IL) combined with particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) imaging has been employed to identify intrinsic growth bands in the spire region, and extrinsic bands at the growth edge of Australian Black-lip abalone shell (Haliotis rubra). Previous studies using optical flood cathodoluminescence, scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) and Raman spectroscopy on samples from the same population suggest that the visible luminescence is due to Mn 2+ activated calcium carbonate. In this study we confirm Mn 2+ as the activator in both the spire and growth edge regions of the shell. The sensitivity of ionoluminescence to the co-ordination environment of the Mn 2+ activators in the shell allows for the spatial identification of the calcium carbonate polymorph responsible for the growth lines observed optically. Furthermore the detection and mapping of trace elements such as Mn and Sr with the PIXE technique enables comparisons to be made between calcite and aragonite biomineralized in the wild and under laboratory conditions

  12. The identification of growth lines in abalone shell using a nuclear microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, A.A.; Yang, C.; Hawkes, G.P.; Jamieson, D.N. E-mail: dnj@physics.unimelb.edu.au; Malmqvist, K.G.; Day, R.W

    1999-09-02

    Ionoluminescence (IL) combined with particle induced X-ray emission (PIXE) imaging has been employed to identify intrinsic growth bands in the spire region, and extrinsic bands at the growth edge of Australian Black-lip abalone shell (Haliotis rubra). Previous studies using optical flood cathodoluminescence, scanning electron microscope cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) and Raman spectroscopy on samples from the same population suggest that the visible luminescence is due to Mn{sup 2+} activated calcium carbonate. In this study we confirm Mn{sup 2+} as the activator in both the spire and growth edge regions of the shell. The sensitivity of ionoluminescence to the co-ordination environment of the Mn{sup 2+} activators in the shell allows for the spatial identification of the calcium carbonate polymorph responsible for the growth lines observed optically. Furthermore the detection and mapping of trace elements such as Mn and Sr with the PIXE technique enables comparisons to be made between calcite and aragonite biomineralized in the wild and under laboratory conditions.

  13. Effect of particle size and morphology on the properties of luminescence in ZnWO4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lisitsyn, V.M.; Valiev, D.T.; Tupitsyna, I.A.; Polisadova, E.F.; Oleshko, V.I.; Lisitsyna, L.A.; Andryuschenko, L.A.; Yakubovskaya, A.G.; Vovk, O.M.

    2014-01-01

    We investigated pulsed photoluminescence and pulsed cathodoluminescence in ZnWO 4 crystals and composite materials based on dispersed powders of zinc tungstate in the polymer matrix. It is shown that the size of crystal particles affects the luminescence decay time in excitation by electron and laser radiation. The decay time obtained for the composite material with nanoparticles 25 nm and 100 nm in size is equal to 5 µs and 7 µs, respectively. Relative values of the light yield of composite containing zinc tungstate crystals in the form of rods are found to be larger in comparison with crystallites in the form of grains. The mechanisms of luminescence recombination in laser and electron excitation are discussed. - Highlights: • Pulsed photoluminescence and pulsed cathodoluminescence spectra and decay kinetics of nano- and microcrystals of zinc tungstate in the organosilicic matrix compared to a single crystal were studied. • The luminescence decay kinetics and life-time of the excited state depend on the size of particles in the composite materials and on the type of excitation. • The probability of excitation of luminescence centers responsible for the band at 490 nm is higher which is apparently due to the larger capture cross-section and quantum yield

  14. Photo and cathode luminescence emission in oxide silicium films implanted with silicium; Emision de foto y catodoluminiscencia en peliculas de oxido de silicio termico implantadas con silicio

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flores, F; Aceves, M. [Instituto Nacional de Astrofisica Optica y Electronica, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico); Carrillo, J. [Benemrita Universidad Autonoma de Puebla, Puebla (Mexico); Dominguez, C. [Universida Autonoma de Barcelona, Barcelona (Spain); Falcony, C. [Instituto Politecnico Nacional, Mexico, D.F. (Mexico)

    2001-10-01

    We studied the photo and cathodoluminescence of Silicon Rich Oxides (SRO) obtained by ion implant of Si in thermal oxides. Doses of 10{sup 1}6 cm{sup -}2 (low dose) and 10{sup 1}7 cm{sup -}2 (high dose) and implant energy of 150 keV were used. The films were annealed for 30, 60 and 180 minutes in nitrogen at 1100 Celsius degrees. The spectra show photo and cathodoluminescence emission in the visible range, the bands in the spectra change with the conditions of ion implant and annealing. The films without thermal treatment in both dose present photoluminescence bands around 1.9 eV (band B) and 2.4 eV (band C). With the thermal treatments, the band B disappears. In the case of the films with low dose, the band C shows a blue shift and a decrease in intensity. The high dose films have a band centered in 1.7 eV (band A) that increases its intensity with annealings. The cathodoluminescence bands in all the cases are in 2.7 eV (band D) and they present changes with the thermal treatments that it seems they depend on the variation in the implant parameters. [Spanish] Se estudian las propiedades de foto y la catodoluminiscencia de peliculas de oxidos de silicio ricos en Si (Silicon Rich Oxide SRO) obtenidas por implantacion ionica de Si en oxidos termicos. Se usaron dosis de 10{sup 1}6 cm{sup -}2 (dosis baja) y 10{sup 1}7 cm{sup -}2 (dosis alta) y energia de implantacion de 150 keV. Las peliculas se sometieron a tratamientos termicos por 30, 60 y 180 minutos en nitrogeno de 1100 grados centigrados. Se encontro emision foto y catodoluminiscente en el rango visible, las bandas en los espectros cambian con las condiciones de implantacion ionica y con los tratamientos termicos. Las peliculas sin tratamiento termico en ambas dosis presentan bandas de fotoluminiscencia alrededor de 1.9 eV (banda B) y 2.4 eV (banda C). Con los tratamientos termicos, la banda B desaparece. En el caso de las peliculas con dosis baja, la banda C muestra un corrimiento hacia el azul junto con una

  15. Excitonic localization in AlN-rich AlxGa1−xN/AlyGa1−yN multi-quantum-well grain boundaries

    KAUST Repository

    Ajia, Idris A.

    2014-09-22

    AlGaN/AlGaN multi-quantum-wells (MQW) with AlN-rich grains have been grown by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. The grains are observed to have strong excitonic localization characteristics that are affected by their sizes. The tendency to confine excitons progressively intensifies with increasing grain boundary area. Photoluminescence results indicate that the MQW have a dominant effect on the peak energy of the near-bandedge emission at temperatures below 150 K, with the localization properties of the grains becoming evident beyond 150 K. Cathodoluminescence maps reveal that the grain boundary has no effect on the peak intensities of the AlGaN/AlGaN samples.

  16. Formation of (Xe2H)* centers in solid Xe via recombination: nonstationary luminescence and 'internal electron emission'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Savchenko, E.V.; Khyzhniy, I.V.; Uyutov, S.A.; Gumenchuk, G.B.; Ponomarev, A.N.; Bondybey, V.E.; Beyer, M.K.

    2010-01-01

    The formation of excimers (Xe 2 H) * in solid Xe doped with molecular hydrogen under electron beam is studied using the original two-stage technique of nonstationary (NS) cathodoluminescence (CL) in combination with the current activation spectroscopy method - thermally stimulated exoelectron emission (TSEE). Charged species were generated using a high-density electron beam. The species produced were then probed with a low density beam on gradual sample heating. The near UV emission of the (Xe 2 H) * was used to monitor the neutralization process. It is found that the temperature behavior of the NS CL band of (Xe 2 H) * clearly correlates with the yield of TSEE measured after identical pre-irradiation of the sample. The fingerprints of the thermally stimulated detrapping of electrons - 'internal electron emission' in the spectrum of NS CL point to the essential role of neutralization reaction in the stability of the proton solvated by rare-gas atoms.

  17. Investigation of ceramic devices by analytical electron microscopy techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiojiri, M.; Saijo, H.; Isshiki, T.; Kawasaki, M.; Yoshioka, T.; Sato, S.; Nomura, T.

    1999-01-01

    Ceramics are widely used as capacitors and varistors. Their electrical properties depend on the structure, which is deeply influenced not only by the composition of raw materials and additives but also by heating treatments in the production process. This paper reviews our investigations of SrTiO 3 ceramic devices, which have been performed using various microscopy techniques such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM), cathodoluminescence scanning electron microscopy (CLSEM), field emission SEM (FE-SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), electron energy-loss spectroscopy (EELS) and high angle annular dark field (HAADF) imaging method in a FE-(scanning) transmission electron microscope(FE-(S)TEM). (author)

  18. Characterization of submonolayer film composed of soft-landed copper nanoclusters on HOPG

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondal, Shyamal, E-mail: shyamal.mondal@saha.ac.in; Das, Pabitra; Chowdhury, Debasree; Bhattacharyya, S. R. [Saha Institute of Nuclear Physics, 1/AF Bidhan Nagar, Kolkata-700 064 (India)

    2015-06-24

    Preformed Copper nanoclusters are deposited on highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) at very low energy. For the study of chemical composition X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS) is performed for a wide range of binding energy without exposing the sample in the ambient. Morphological aspects of the supported clusters are characterized employing high resolution scanning electron microscope (SEM). Different types of morphology are observed depending on the nature of the substrate surface. Big fractal islands are formed on terraces while at the step edges small islands are found to form. Ex-situ cathodoluminescence (CL) measurement shows peak at 558 nm wavelength which corresponds to the band gap of 2.22 eV which is due to Cu{sub 2}O nanocrystals formed due to oxidation of the deposited film in ambient.

  19. Decoration of ZnO Nanorods with Coral Reefs like NiO Nanostructures by the Hydrothermal Growth Method and Their Luminescence Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mazhar Ali Abbasi

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Composite nanostructures of coral reefs like p-type NiO/n-type ZnO were synthesized on fluorine-doped tin oxide glass substrates by hydrothermal growth. Structural characterization was performed by field emission scanning electron microscopy, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and X-ray diffraction techniques. This investigation shows that the adopted synthesis leads to high crystalline quality nanostructures. The morphological study shows that the coral reefs like nanostructures are densely packed on the ZnO nanorods. Cathodoluminescence (CL spectra for the synthesized composite nanostructures are dominated mainly by a broad interstitial defect related luminescence centered at ~630 nm. Spatially resolved CL images reveal that the luminescence of the decorated ZnO nanostructures is enhanced by the presence of the NiO.

  20. N+ ion-implantation-induced defects in ZnO studied with a slow positron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z Q; Sekiguchi, T; Yuan, X L; Maekawa, M; Kawasuso, A

    2004-01-01

    Undoped ZnO single crystals were implanted with multiple-energy N + ions ranging from 50 to 380 keV with doses from 10 12 to 10 14 cm -2 . Positron annihilation measurements show that vacancy defects are introduced in the implanted layers. The concentration of the vacancy defects increases with increasing ion dose. The annealing behaviour of the defects can be divided into four stages, which correspond to the formation and recovery of large vacancy clusters and the formation and disappearance of vacancy-impurity complexes, respectively. All the implantation-induced defects are removed by annealing at 1200 deg. C. Cathodoluminescence measurements show that the ion-implantation-induced defects act as nonradiative recombination centres to suppress the ultraviolet (UV) emission. After annealing, these defects disappear gradually and the UV emission reappears, which coincides with positron annihilation measurements. Hall measurements reveal that after N + implantation, the ZnO layer still shows n-type conductivity

  1. Correlation between dislocations and leakage current of p-n diodes on a free-standing GaN substrate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Usami, Shigeyoshi; Ando, Yuto; Tanaka, Atsushi; Nagamatsu, Kentaro; Deki, Manato; Kushimoto, Maki; Nitta, Shugo; Honda, Yoshio; Amano, Hiroshi; Sugawara, Yoshihiro; Yao, Yong-Zhao; Ishikawa, Yukari

    2018-04-01

    Dislocations that cause a reverse leakage current in vertical p-n diodes on a GaN free-standing substrate were investigated. Under a high reverse bias, dot-like leakage spots were observed using an emission microscope. Subsequent cathodoluminescence (CL) observations revealed that the leakage spots coincided with part of the CL dark spots, indicating that some types of dislocation cause reverse leakage. When etch pits were formed on the dislocations by KOH etching, three sizes of etch pits were obtained (large, medium, and small). Among these etch pits, only the medium pits coincided with leakage spots. Additionally, transmission electron microscopy observations revealed that pure screw dislocations are present under the leakage spots. The results revealed that 1c pure screw dislocations are related to the reverse leakage in vertical p-n diodes.

  2. Current path in light emitting diodes based on nanowire ensembles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limbach, F; Hauswald, C; Lähnemann, J; Wölz, M; Brandt, O; Trampert, A; Hanke, M; Jahn, U; Calarco, R; Geelhaar, L; Riechert, H

    2012-01-01

    Light emitting diodes (LEDs) have been fabricated using ensembles of free-standing (In, Ga)N/GaN nanowires (NWs) grown on Si substrates in the self-induced growth mode by molecular beam epitaxy. Electron-beam-induced current analysis, cathodoluminescence as well as biased μ-photoluminescence spectroscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and electrical measurements indicate that the electroluminescence of such LEDs is governed by the differences in the individual current densities of the single-NW LEDs operated in parallel, i.e. by the inhomogeneity of the current path in the ensemble LED. In addition, the optoelectronic characterization leads to the conclusion that these NWs exhibit N-polarity and that the (In, Ga)N quantum well states in the NWs are subject to a non-vanishing quantum confined Stark effect. (paper)

  3. Self-Catalyzed CdTe Wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tom Baines

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available CdTe wires have been fabricated via a catalyst free method using the industrially scalable physical vapor deposition technique close space sublimation. Wire growth was shown to be highly dependent on surface roughness and deposition pressure, with only low roughness surfaces being capable of producing wires. Growth of wires is highly (111 oriented and is inferred to occur via a vapor-solid-solid growth mechanism, wherein a CdTe seed particle acts to template the growth. Such seed particles are visible as wire caps and have been characterized via energy dispersive X-ray analysis to establish they are single phase CdTe, hence validating the self-catalysation route. Cathodoluminescence analysis demonstrates that CdTe wires exhibited a much lower level of recombination when compared to a planar CdTe film, which is highly beneficial for semiconductor applications.

  4. Chemical characterization of extra layers at the interfaces in MOCVD InGaP/GaAs junctions by electron beam methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shakhmin Alexey

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Electron beam methods, such as cathodoluminescence (CL that is based on an electron-probe microanalyser, and (200 dark field and high angle annular dark field (HAADF in a scanning transmission electron microscope, are used to study the deterioration of interfaces in InGaP/GaAs system with the GaAs QW on top of InGaP. A CL emission peak different from that of the QW was detected. By using HAADF, it is found that the GaAs QW does not exist any longer, being replaced by extra interlayer(s that are different from GaAs and InGaP because of atomic rearrangements at the interface. The nature and composition of the interlayer(s are determined by HAADF. Such changes of the nominal GaAs QW can account for the emission observed by CL.

  5. Effects of ancient porosity and permeability on formation of sedimentary dolomites: Devonian Jefferson Formation (Frasnian), south-central Montana

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, T.M.; Dorobek, S.L.

    1987-08-01

    Petrographic and geochemical evidence indicates that multiple dolomitization and dolomite stabilization events affected the Devonian Jefferson Formation (Frasnian) in south-central Montana. Several types of dolomite occur, defined by cathodoluminescence: nonzoned, dully luminescent subhedral-anhedral mosaics (most common), euhedral nonzoned and zoned dolomites, zoned dolomite cements, and irregularly luminescent dolomites (dully luminescent with irregularly luminescent regions). The irregularly luminescent fabrics probably represent partial replacement of early dolomite phases with later dolomite phases. Nonzoned, Ca-enriched, euhedral dolomites occur in calcite-cemented, coarse-grained limestone layers. These permeable layers probably were conduits for early meteoric waters, that occluded porosity in the limestones and prevented later dolomite stabilization. Irregularly luminescent dolomites are interpreted as intermediate fabrics in the dolomite stabilization process. Later calcite cements which occlude intercrystalline porosity prevented further dolomite replacement. Total recrystallization of remaining dolomites and formation of final dully luminescent mosaics occurred prior to brecciation and stylolitization.

  6. MgxZn1-xO(0≤x<0.2) nanowire arrays on sapphire grown by high-pressure pulsed-laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lorenz, M.; Kaidashev, E.M.; Rahm, A.; Nobis, Th.; Lenzner, J.; Wagner, G.; Spemann, D.; Hochmuth, H.; Grundmann, M.

    2005-01-01

    Mg x Zn 1-x O nanowires with Mg-content x from 0 to 0.2 have been grown by high-pressure pulsed-laser deposition (PLD) on gold-covered sapphire single crystals. The PLD process allows for a unique wide-range control of morphology, diameter, and composition of the Mg x Zn 1-x O nanowires. The diameter of single ZnO wires could be varied between about 50 and 3000 nm, and the Mg content x of Mg x Zn 1-x O wire arrays was controlled via the PLD gas pressure. The microscopic homogeneity of Mg content is displayed by cathodoluminescence (CL) imaging of the excitonic peak energy. The fluctuation of CL peak energy between individual wires is about an order of magnitude smaller than the alloy broadening

  7. Phosphorus acceptor doped ZnO nanowires prepared by pulsed-laser deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cao, B Q; Lorenz, M; Rahm, A; Wenckstern, H von; Czekalla, C; Lenzner, J; Benndorf, G; Grundmann, M

    2007-01-01

    Phosphorus-doped ZnO (ZnO:P) nanowires were successfully prepared by a novel high-pressure pulsed-laser deposition process using phosphorus pentoxide as the dopant source. Detailed cathodoluminescence studies of single ZnO:P nanowires revealed characteristic phosphorus acceptor-related peaks: neutral acceptor-bound exciton emission (A 0 , X, 3.356 eV), free-to-neutral-acceptor emission (e, A 0 , 3.314 eV), and donor-to-acceptor pair emission (DAP, ∼3.24 and ∼3.04 eV). This means that stable acceptor levels with a binding energy of about 122 meV have been induced in the nanowires by phosphorus doping. Moreover, the induced acceptors are distributed homogeneously along the doped nanowires

  8. Boron nitride: A new photonic material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chubarov, M.; Pedersen, H.; Högberg, H.; Filippov, S.; Engelbrecht, J.A.A.; O'Connel, J.; Henry, A.

    2014-01-01

    Rhombohedral boron nitride (r-BN) layers were grown on sapphire substrate in a hot-wall chemical vapor deposition reactor. Characterization of these layers is reported in details. X-ray diffraction (XRD) is used as a routine characterization tool to investigate the crystalline quality of the films and the identification of the phases is revealed using detailed pole figure measurements. Transmission electron microscopy reveals stacking of more than 40 atomic layers. Results from Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy measurements are compared with XRD data showing that FTIR is not phase sensitive when various phases of sp 2 -BN are investigated. XRD measurements show a significant improvement of the crystalline quality when adding silicon to the gas mixture during the growth; this is further confirmed by cathodoluminescence which shows a decrease of the defects related luminescence intensity.

  9. Boron nitride: A new photonic material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chubarov, M., E-mail: mihcu@ifm.liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Pedersen, H., E-mail: henke@ifm.liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Högberg, H., E-mail: hanho@ifm.liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Filippov, S., E-mail: stafi@ifm.liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Engelbrecht, J.A.A., E-mail: Japie.Engelbrecht@nmmu.ac.za [Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); O' Connel, J., E-mail: jacques.oconnell@gmail.com [Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Port Elizabeth (South Africa); Henry, A., E-mail: anne.henry@liu.se [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2014-04-15

    Rhombohedral boron nitride (r-BN) layers were grown on sapphire substrate in a hot-wall chemical vapor deposition reactor. Characterization of these layers is reported in details. X-ray diffraction (XRD) is used as a routine characterization tool to investigate the crystalline quality of the films and the identification of the phases is revealed using detailed pole figure measurements. Transmission electron microscopy reveals stacking of more than 40 atomic layers. Results from Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy measurements are compared with XRD data showing that FTIR is not phase sensitive when various phases of sp{sup 2}-BN are investigated. XRD measurements show a significant improvement of the crystalline quality when adding silicon to the gas mixture during the growth; this is further confirmed by cathodoluminescence which shows a decrease of the defects related luminescence intensity.

  10. Changes in luminescence properties induced by thermal treatments; a case study at Si pan and Trujillo Moche sites (Peru)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roque, Celine; Guibert, Pierre E-mail: guibert@u-bordeaux3.fr; Vartanian, Mmanuel; Vieillevigne, Emmanuelle; Bechtel, Francoise

    2004-02-01

    TL-dating studies were carried out on pre hispanic pottery attributed to he Moche culture of Peru (from BC 200 to AD 800 according to the previously known chronology). A greater than expected scatter in ages was found for samples known, from archaeological considerations, to have been contemporaneous. This was related to applying a fixed, but inappropriate, annealing temperature to the grains prior to their irradiation to regenerate he TL growth curve. The dependence of growth of TL and equivalent dose valuation on this annealing temperature was tested in the range 400-1000 eg. C. A combined cathodoluminescence/TL study was used to select the appropriate thermal treatment for evaluation of the final equivalent dose. his procedure, which we suggest can be generally applied in pottery dating, resulted in a reduction of age dispersion when applied to groups of contemporaneous ceramics.

  11. In situ monitoring of stacking fault formation and its carrier lifetime mediation in p-type 4H-SiC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Bin, E-mail: chenbinmse@gmail.com; Chen, Jun; Yao, Yuanzhao; Sekiguchi, Takashi [National Institute for Materials Science, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Matsuhata, Hirofumi; Okumura, Hajime [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-8568 (Japan)

    2014-07-28

    Using the fine control of an electron beam (e-beam) in scanning electron microscopy with the capabilities of both electrical and optical imaging, the stacking fault (SF) formation together with its tuning of carrier lifetime was in situ monitored and investigated in p-type 4H-SiC homoepitaxial films. The SFs were formed through engineering basal plane dislocations with the energy supplied by the e-beam. The e-beam intensity required for the SF formation in the p-type films was ∼100 times higher than that in the n-type ones. The SFs reduced the minority-carrier lifetime in the p-type films, which was opposite to that observed in the n-type case. The reason for the peculiar SF behavior in the p-type 4H-SiC is discussed with the cathodoluminescence results.

  12. The Formation and Characterization of GaN Hexagonal Pyramids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi-Ying; Xiu, Xiang-Qian; Lin, Zeng-Qin; Hua, Xue-Mei; Xie, Zi-Li; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, You-Dou

    2013-05-01

    GaN with hexagonal pyramids is fabricated using the photo-assisted electroless chemical etching method. Defective areas of the GaN substrate are selectively etched in a mixed solution of KOH and K2S2O8 under ultraviolet illumination, producing submicron-sized pyramids. Hexagonal pyramids on the etched GaN with well-defined {101¯1¯} facets and very sharp tips are formed. High-resolution x-ray diffraction shows that etched GaN with pyramids has a higher crystal quality, and micro-Raman spectra reveal a tensile stress relaxation in GaN with pyramids compared with normal GaN. The cathodoluminescence intensity of GaN after etching is significantly increased by three times, which is attributed to the reduction in the internal reflection, high-quality GaN with pyramids and the Bragg effect.

  13. Investigation of InGaN/GaN laser degradation based on luminescence properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wen, Pengyan; Zhang, Shuming, E-mail: smzhang2010@sinano.ac.cn; Liu, Jianping; Li, Deyao; Zhang, Liqun; Sun, Qian; Tian, Aiqin; Zhou, Kun; Yang, Hui [Key Laboratory of Nanodevices and Applications, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou 215123 (China); Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou 215123 (China); Zhou, Taofei [Suzhou Institute of Nano-Tech and Nano-Bionics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2016-06-07

    Degradation of InGaN/GaN laser diode (LD) is investigated based on the luminescence properties. Gradual degradation of the LD is presented with the threshold current increase and the slope efficiency decrease. The cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence characterizations of the LD show a dislocation independent degradation of the active region under the ridge. Detailed studies on the temperature-dependent micro-photoluminescence and the electroluminescence indicate that the degradation of the LD is attributed to the generation of non-radiative recombination centers in the local multiple quantum well regions with lower indium content. The activation energy of the non-radiative recombination centers is about 10.2 meV.

  14. Circularly photostimulated electrogyration in europium- and terbium-doped GaN nanocrystals embedded in a silica xerogel matrix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kityk, I V; Nyk, M; Strek, W; Jablonski, J M; Misiewicz, J

    2005-01-01

    Circularly polarized optical poling was proposed and discovered for GaN nanocrystallites embedded in a silica xerogel matrix. The method consists of the creation of screw-like polarization of the medium during the interaction of two circularly polarized coherent bicolour beams. It was shown that doping of the GaN nanocrystallites by Tb 3+ and Eu 3+ ions leads to substantial enhancement of the electrogyration. The effect observed is a consequence of the superposition of nanoconfined effects and the contribution of the localized rare-earth 4f levels. The role of the anharmonic electron-phonon interaction is discussed. The photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence spectra of the GaN composites were investigated. It was demonstrated that the Eu-doped nanocrystallites give a substantially higher effect of the electrogyration compared to the Tb-doped and non-doped ones

  15. Suppression of concentration quenching of Er-related luminescence in Er-doped GaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen Shaoqiang; Tomita, Shigeo; Kudo, Hiroshi; Akimoto, Katsuhiro; Dierre, Benjamin; Lee, Woong; Sekiguchi, Takashi

    2010-01-01

    Erbium-doped GaN with different doping concentrations were grown by ammonia-source molecular beam epitaxy. The intra-4f-shell transitions related green luminescence were observed by both photoluminescence (PL) and cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements. It was found that concentration quenching of Er-related luminescence was observed in PL measurements while not in CL measurements. The different excitation and relaxation processes are suggested as the cause of the concentration quenching characteristics between PL and CL. The strong Er-related CL intensity in highly doped GaN demonstrates that high energy excitation is a promising approach to suppress the concentration quenching in Er-doped GaN.

  16. Characterization of GaN quantum discs embedded in AlxGa1-xN nanocolumns grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristic, J.; Calleja, E.; Sanchez-Garcia, M.A.; Ulloa, J.M.; Sanchez-Paramo, J.; Calleja, J.M.; Jahn, U.; Trampert, A.; Ploog, K.H.

    2003-01-01

    GaN quantum discs embedded in AlGaN nanocolumns with outstanding crystal quality and very high luminescence efficiency were grown on Si(111) substrates by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy under highly N-rich conditions. Nanocolumns with diameters in the range of 30-150 nm, with no traces of any extended defects, as confirmed by transmission electron microscopy, were obtained. GaN quantum discs, 2 and 4 nm thick, were grown embedded in AlGaN nanocolumns by switching on and off the Al flux during variable time spans. Strong optical emissions from GaN quantum discs, observed by photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence measurements, reveal quantum confinement effects. While Raman data indicate that the nanocolumns are fully relaxed, the quantum discs appear to be fully strained. These nanostructures have a high potential for application in efficient vertical cavity emitters

  17. Morphological dependent Indium incorporation in InGaN/GaN multiple quantum wells structure grown on 4° misoriented sapphire substrate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teng Jiang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The epitaxial layers of InGaN/GaN MQWs structure were grown on both planar and vicinal sapphire substrates by metal organic chemical vapor deposition. By comparing the epitaxial layers grown on planar substrate, the sample grown on 4° misoriented from c-plane toward m-plane substrate exhibited many variations both on surface morphology and optical properties according to the scanning electronic microscopy and cathodoluminescence (CL spectroscopy results. Many huge steps were observed in the misoriented sample and a large amount of V-shape defects located around the boundary of the steps. Atoms force microscopy images show that the steps were inclined and deep grooves were formed at the boundary of the adjacent steps. Phase separation was observed in the CL spectra. CL mapping results also indicated that the deep grooves could effectively influence the localization of Indium atoms and form an In-rich region.

  18. Changes in luminescence properties induced by thermal treatments; a case study at Si pan and Trujillo Moche sites (Peru)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roque, Celine; Guibert, Pierre; Vartanian, Mmanuel; Vieillevigne, Emmanuelle; Bechtel, Francoise

    2004-01-01

    TL-dating studies were carried out on pre hispanic pottery attributed to he Moche culture of Peru (from BC 200 to AD 800 according to the previously known chronology). A greater than expected scatter in ages was found for samples known, from archaeological considerations, to have been contemporaneous. This was related to applying a fixed, but inappropriate, annealing temperature to the grains prior to their irradiation to regenerate he TL growth curve. The dependence of growth of TL and equivalent dose valuation on this annealing temperature was tested in the range 400-1000 eg. C. A combined cathodoluminescence/TL study was used to select the appropriate thermal treatment for evaluation of the final equivalent dose. his procedure, which we suggest can be generally applied in pottery dating, resulted in a reduction of age dispersion when applied to groups of contemporaneous ceramics

  19. Influence of band-gap grading on luminescence properties of Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haarstrich, Jakob; Metzner, Heiner; Ronning, Carsten [Institut fuer Festkoerperphysik, Friedrich Schiller Universitaet Jena, Max-Wien-Platz 1, 07743 Jena (Germany); Rissom, Thorsten; Kaufmann, Christian A.; Schock, Hans-Werner [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin fuer Materialien und Energie, Solar Energy Research, Institute for Technology, Lise-Meitner-Campus, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, 14109 Berlin (Germany); Undisz, Andreas [Institute for Material Science and Technology, Metallic Materials, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, Loebdergraben 32, 07743 Jena (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) has been measured on Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} with Ga-grading as it is used in high-efficiency thin-film solar cells at 10 K in both cross-section and plain view configuration. In cross-section geometry, we show that the vertical profile of the emission energy represents the Ga-profile in the film and, thus, we are able to measure the band-gap grading present by means of CL methods. At the same time, we observe a strong drift of excited charge carriers towards the minimum of the band-gap which can be explained by the Ga-grading. It is shown by voltage-dependent CL, how these results directly influence the interpretation of luminescence spectra obtained on Ga-graded Cu(In,Ga)Se{sub 2} and, thus, they will have to be considered as a basis for all forthcoming investigations on this topic.

  20. Impact of Mg content on native point defects in Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}O (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.56)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perkins, J.; Foster, G. M. [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, 191 West Woodruff Ave., Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Myer, M.; Mehra, S. [Columbus School for Girls, 56 S. Columbia Ave., Columbus, Ohio 43209 (United States); Chauveau, J. M. [Centre de Recherche sur l’Hetero-Epitaxie et ses Applications, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique (CRHEA-CNRS), Rue B. Gregory, F-06560 Valbonne Sophia Antipolis (France); University of Nice Sophia Antipolis, Parc Valrose, F-06102 Nice Cedex 2 (France); Hierro, A. [Dpto. Ingeniería Electrónica and ISOM, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid, Ciudad Universitaria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Redondo-Cubero, A. [Dpto. Física Aplicada y Centro de Micro-Análisis de Materiales, Universidad Autónoma de Madrid, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Windl, W. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2041 College Road N., Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Brillson, L. J., E-mail: brillson.1@osu.edu [Department of Physics, The Ohio State University, 191 West Woodruff Ave., Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States); Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The Ohio State University, 2015 Neil Avenue, Columbus, Ohio 43210-1272 (United States); Center for Materials Research, The Ohio State University, Columbus, Ohio 43210 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    We used depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy and surface photovoltage spectroscopy to measure the densities, energy levels, and spatial distributions of zinc/magnesium cation and oxygen vacancies in isostructural, single-phase, non-polar Mg{sub x}Zn{sub 1−x}O alloys over a wide (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.56) range. Within this wide range, both defect types exhibit strong Mg content-dependent surface segregation and pronounced bulk density minima corresponding to unit cell volume minima, which can inhibit defect formation due to electrostatic repulsion. Mg in ZnO significantly reduces native defect densities and their non-polar surface segregation, both major factors in carrier transport and doping of these oxide semiconductors.

  1. Electroluminescence from a n-ZnO/p-GaN hybrid LED

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Behrends, Arne; Bakin, Andrey; Waag, Andreas [Institute of Semiconductor Technology, Hans-Sommer Str. 66, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Kwack, Ho-Sang; Dang, Le Si [Institut Neel, CNRS-UJF, 25, rue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble (France)

    2010-06-15

    In this work we report on the fabrication and characterization of a n-ZnO/p-GaN heterojunction LED. The p-GaN layer was fabricated using MOCVD on Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} with Mg as the acceptor whereas the ZnO nanostructures were grown in a very simple vapor transport system without any additionally doping. Room temperature electroluminescence (EL) measurements show green deep band emission centered at 2.3 eV which is clearly visible with the naked eye when the structure is forward biased. Cathodoluminescence mapping was performed to explain the absence of the band edge emission in the EL spectrum. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  2. Gallium nitride heterostructures on 3D structured silicon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fündling, Sönke; Sökmen, Unsal; Peiner, Erwin; Weimann, Thomas; Hinze, Peter; Jahn, Uwe; Trampert, Achim; Riechert, Henning; Bakin, Andrey; Wehmann, Hergo-Heinrich; Waag, Andreas

    2008-10-08

    We investigated GaN-based heterostructures grown on three-dimensionally patterned Si(111) substrates by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy, with the goal of fabricating well controlled high quality, defect reduced GaN-based nanoLEDs. The high aspect ratios of such pillars minimize the influence of the lattice mismatched substrate and improve the material quality. In contrast to other approaches, we employed deep etched silicon substrates to achieve a controlled pillar growth. For that a special low temperature inductively coupled plasma etching process has been developed. InGaN/GaN multi-quantum-well structures have been incorporated into the pillars. We found a pronounced dependence of the morphology of the GaN structures on the size and pitch of the pillars. Spatially resolved optical properties of the structures are analysed by cathodoluminescence.

  3. Gallium nitride heterostructures on 3D structured silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuendling, Soenke; Soekmen, Uensal; Peiner, Erwin; Bakin, Andrey; Wehmann, Hergo-Heinrich; Waag, Andreas [Institut fuer Halbleitertechnik, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 66, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Weimann, Thomas; Hinze, Peter [Physikalisch Technische Bundesanstalt, Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Jahn, Uwe; Trampert, Achim; Riechert, Henning [Paul-Drude-Institut fuer Festkoerperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: s.fuendling@tu-bs.de

    2008-10-08

    We investigated GaN-based heterostructures grown on three-dimensionally patterned Si(111) substrates by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy, with the goal of fabricating well controlled high quality, defect reduced GaN-based nanoLEDs. The high aspect ratios of such pillars minimize the influence of the lattice mismatched substrate and improve the material quality. In contrast to other approaches, we employed deep etched silicon substrates to achieve a controlled pillar growth. For that a special low temperature inductively coupled plasma etching process has been developed. InGaN/GaN multi-quantum-well structures have been incorporated into the pillars. We found a pronounced dependence of the morphology of the GaN structures on the size and pitch of the pillars. Spatially resolved optical properties of the structures are analysed by cathodoluminescence.

  4. Ultraviolet photodetectors made from SnO2 nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wu, Jyh-Ming; Kuo, Cheng-Hsiang

    2009-01-01

    SnO 2 nanowires can be synthesized on alumina substrates and formed into an ultraviolet (UV) photodetector. The photoelectric current of the SnO 2 nanowires exhibited a rapid photo-response as a UV lamp was switched on and off. The ratio of UV-exposed current to dark current has been investigated. The SnO 2 nanowires were synthesized by a vapor-liquid-solid process at a temperature of 900 o C. It was found that the nanowires were around 70-100 nm in diameter and several hundred microns in length. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM) image indicated that the nanowires grew along the [200] axis as a single crystallinity. Cathodoluminescence (CL), thin-film X-ray diffractometry, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were used to characterize the as-synthesized nanowires.

  5. Analyses of compensation related defects in II-VI compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaldini, A.; Cavallini, A.; Fraboni, B.; Fernandez, P.; Piqueras, J.

    1998-01-01

    The deep levels present in semiconducting CdTe and semi-insulating (SI) CdTe:Cl and Cd 0.8 Zn 0.2 Te have been investigated by means of cathodoluminescence (CL), deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS), photo-DLTS (PDLTS) and photo induced current transient spectroscopy (PICTS). PICTS and PDLTS can be applied to SI materials and allowed to determine whether the observed deep levels are hole or electron traps. Among the observed deep centers, the authors have focused their attention on those involved in the compensation process such as the so called center A and the deep traps located near midgap. They have identified a deep acceptor, labelled H, and a deep donor, labelled E, the latter is peculiar to CdTe:Cl and can be a good candidate for the deep donor level needed to explain the compensation process in SI CdTe:Cl

  6. Atomic Scale Chemical and Structural Characterization of Ceramic Oxide Heterostructure Interfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, R. K.

    2003-04-16

    The research plan was divided into three tasks: (a) growth of oxide heterostructures for interface engineering using standard thin film deposition techniques, (b) atomic level characterization of oxide heterostructure using such techniques as STEM-2 combined with AFM/STM and conventional high-resolution microscopy (HRTEM), and (c) property measurements of aspects important to oxide heterostructures using standard characterization methods, including dielectric properties and dynamic cathodoluminescence measurements. Each of these topics were further classified on the basis of type of oxide heterostructure. Type I oxide heterostructures consisted of active dielectric layers, including the materials Ba{sub x}Sr{sub 1-x}TiO{sub 3} (BST), Y{sub 2}O{sub 3} and ZrO{sub 2}. Type II heterostructures consisted of ferroelectric active layers such as lanthanum manganate and Type III heterostructures consist of phosphor oxide active layers such as Eu-doped Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}.

  7. Decay dynamics of neutral and charged excitonic complexes in single InAs/GaAs QDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feucker, Max; Seguin, Robert; Rodt, Sven; Poetschke, Konstantin; Bimberg, Dieter

    2008-01-01

    Across the inhomogeneously broadened lineshape of a quantum dot (QD) ensemble the decay times are expected to vary since the wavefunctions and the oscillator strengths are sensitive to the actual geometry of the QD. We performed time-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy of 26 different single InAs/GaAs QDs to investigate the decay dynamics of neutral and charged excitonic complexes. The largest decay rate was found for the XX + , followed by XX, X + and finally the X. We will show that the ratios of lifetimes of the different excitonic complexes are mainly governed by the number of involved recombination channels. There is excellent agreement between the measured and predicted values for the lifetime ratios of the neutral (X/XX) and the positively charged (X + /XX + ) complexes. Surprisingly the lifetime of the exciton (X) shows a much larger yet unexplained scatter than that of all the other complexes

  8. Emission spectra from AlN and GaN doped with rare earth elements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choi, Sung Woo; Emura, Shuichi; Kimura, Shigeya; Kim, Moo Seong; Zhou Yikai; Teraguchi, Nobuaki; Suzuki, Akira; Yanase, Akira; Asahi, Hajime

    2006-01-01

    Luminescent properties of GaN and AlN based semiconductors containing rare earth metals of Gd and Dy are studied. Cathodoluminescent spectra from AlGdN show a clear and sharp peak at 318 nm following LO phonon satellites. Photoluminescence spectra from GaDyN by the above-gap excitation also show several peaks in addition to the broad luminescence band emission. For GaGdN, the sharp PL peaks are also observed at 650 and 670 nm, and they are assigned to the intra-f orbital transitions by their time decay measurements. The broad band at around 365 nm for AlGdN, 505 nm for GaGdN and GaDyN are commonly observed. The origin of these broad bands is discussed

  9. InGaN/GaN quantum well improved by in situ SiN{sub x} pretreatment of GaN template

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Demeng; Wu, Zhengyuan; Fang, Zhilai [Department of Physics, Collaborative Innovation Center for Optoelectronic Semiconductors and Efficient Devices, Xiamen University (China)

    2016-12-15

    In situ SiN{sub x} pretreatment was employed to modify the growth behavior and optical properties of InGaN/GaN quantum wells (QWs). With moderate SiN{sub x} pretreatment surface smoothness of InGaN/GaN QWs was improved and attributed to enhanced layer growth by Ga surfactant effect. Significant increase of photoluminescence peak intensity and relatively uniform and bright cathodoluminescence images were observed, which were attributed to the improvement in crystalline quality and strain reduction for the InGaN/GaN QWs with moderate SiN{sub x} pretreatment. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  10. Red-emitting SrIn{sub 2}O{sub 4} : Eu{sup 3+} phosphor powders for applications in solid state white lamps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Garcia, C E [Physics of Materials Graduate Program, CICESE-UNAM, Km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada, B. C., 22860 (Mexico); Perea-Lopez, N; Hirata, G A [Center for Nanoscience and Nanotechnology-UNAM, Km 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, Ensenada, B. C., 22860 (Mexico); Baars, S P den [Solid State Lighting and Energy Center, University of California at Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara, CA 93106 (United States)], E-mail: ghirata@engineering.ucsb.edu

    2008-05-07

    Red-emitting phosphor powders of SrIn{sub 2}O{sub 4} activated with Eu{sup 3+} ions were fabricated by high pressure assisted combustion synthesis. X-ray diffraction analysis of these oxide phosphors revealed the formation of single-phase orthorhombic SrIn{sub 2}O{sub 4} for concentrations up to 4 at% Eu. A detailed photoluminescence (PL) and cathodoluminescence study showed bright red emission originated within the {sup 5} D{sub 0} {yields} {sup 7}F{sub J} intra-shell transitions of Eu{sup 3+}. Furthermore, PL excitation spectroscopy revealed that an efficient energy transfer from the SrIn{sub 2}O{sub 4} host lattice onto the Eu ions is accomplished in addition to the excitation band peaked at 396 nm that directly excites the Eu ions, making this material an excellent candidate for applications in solid state white lamps. (fast track communication)

  11. Red-emitting SrIn2O4 : Eu3+ phosphor powders for applications in solid state white lamps

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rodriguez-Garcia, C E; Perea-Lopez, N; Hirata, G A; Baars, S P den

    2008-01-01

    Red-emitting phosphor powders of SrIn 2 O 4 activated with Eu 3+ ions were fabricated by high pressure assisted combustion synthesis. X-ray diffraction analysis of these oxide phosphors revealed the formation of single-phase orthorhombic SrIn 2 O 4 for concentrations up to 4 at% Eu. A detailed photoluminescence (PL) and cathodoluminescence study showed bright red emission originated within the 5 D 0 → 7 F J intra-shell transitions of Eu 3+ . Furthermore, PL excitation spectroscopy revealed that an efficient energy transfer from the SrIn 2 O 4 host lattice onto the Eu ions is accomplished in addition to the excitation band peaked at 396 nm that directly excites the Eu ions, making this material an excellent candidate for applications in solid state white lamps. (fast track communication)

  12. Selective propagation and beam splitting of surface plasmons on metallic nanodisk chains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Yuhui; Zhao, Di; Wang, Zhenghan; Chen, Fei; Xiong, Xiang; Peng, Ruwen; Wang, Mu

    2017-05-01

    Manipulating the propagation of surface plasmons (SPs) on a nanoscale is a fundamental issue of nanophotonics. By using focused electron beam, SPs can be excited with high spatial accuracy. Here we report on the propagation of SPs on a chain of gold nanodisks with cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy. Experimental evidence for the propagation of SPs excited by the focused electron beam is demonstrated. The wavelength of the transmitted SPs depends on the geometrical parameters of the nanodisk chain. Furthermore, we design and fabricate a beam splitter, which selectively transmits SPs of certain wavelengths to a specific direction. By scanning the sample surface point by point and collecting the CL spectra, we obtain the spectral mapping and identify that the chain of the smaller nanodisks can efficiently transport SPs at shorter wavelengths. This Letter provides a unique approach to manipulate in-plane propagation of SPs.

  13. Formation of crystalline InGaO₃(ZnO)n nanowires via the solid-phase diffusion process using a solution-based precursor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Yujie; Van Bilzen, Bart; Locquet, Jean Pierre; Seo, Jin Won

    2015-12-11

    One-dimensional single crystalline InGaO3(ZnO)n (IGZO) nanostructures have great potential for various electrical and optical applications. This paper demonstrates for the first time, to our knowledge, a non-vacuum route for the synthesis of IGZO nanowires by annealing ZnO nanowires covered with solution-based IGZO precursor. This method results in nanowires with highly periodic IGZO superlattice structure. The phase transition of IGZO precursor during thermal treatment was systematically studied. Transmission electron microscopy studies reveal that the formation of the IGZO structure is driven by anisotropic inter-diffusion of In, Ga, and Zn atoms, and also by the crystallization of the IGZO precursor. Optical measurements using cathodoluminescence and UV-vis spectroscopy confirm that the nanowires consist of the IGZO compound with wide optical band gap and suppressed luminescence.

  14. Formation of crystalline InGaO_3(ZnO)_n nanowires via the solid-phase diffusion process using a solution-based precursor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo, Yujie; Seo, Jin Won; Bilzen, Bart Van; Locquet, Jean Pierre

    2015-01-01

    One-dimensional single crystalline InGaO_3(ZnO)_n (IGZO) nanostructures have great potential for various electrical and optical applications. This paper demonstrates for the first time, to our knowledge, a non-vacuum route for the synthesis of IGZO nanowires by annealing ZnO nanowires covered with solution-based IGZO precursor. This method results in nanowires with highly periodic IGZO superlattice structure. The phase transition of IGZO precursor during thermal treatment was systematically studied. Transmission electron microscopy studies reveal that the formation of the IGZO structure is driven by anisotropic inter-diffusion of In, Ga, and Zn atoms, and also by the crystallization of the IGZO precursor. Optical measurements using cathodoluminescence and UV-vis spectroscopy confirm that the nanowires consist of the IGZO compound with wide optical band gap and suppressed luminescence. (paper)

  15. Emission from Crystals Irradiated with a Beam of Runaway Electrons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buranchenko, A. G.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Beloplotov, D. V.; Baksht, E. Kh.

    2018-01-01

    An investigation of the spectral and amplitude-temporal characteristics of emission from different crystals, promising in terms of their application as detectors of runaway electrons, is performed. This emission is excited by subnanosecond electron beams generated in a gas diode. It is found out that at the electron energies of tens-hundreds of kiloelectronvolts, the main contribution into the emission from CsI, ZnS, type IIa artificial and natural diamonds, sapphire, CaF2, ZrO2, Ga2O3, CaCO3, CdS, and ZnSe crystals comes from the cathodoluminescence; the radiation pulse duration depends on the crystal used and sufficiently exceeds the Cherenkov radiation pulse duration. It is demonstrated that the latter radiation exhibits low intensity and can be detected in the short-wave region of the spectrum in the cases where a monochromator and a high-sensitivity photomultiplier tube (PMT) are used.

  16. A structure development in electron-irradiated type Ia diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novikov, N.V.; Ositinskaya, T.D.; Tkach, V.N.

    1998-01-01

    A type Ia diamond crystal with nitrogen impurity in different forms was irradiated by 3.5 MeV electrons with increasing doses 5 centre dot 10 16 , 2 centre dot 10 17 , 4 centre dot 10 17 , 2 centre dot 10 18 e/cm 2 and investigated before and after each dose by positron annihilation, EPR, and optical spectroscopy. After irradiation with the highest dose, the effect of development of a visible defective structure of the crystal is revealed. A description of this effect and data of EPR and IR-measurements depending on irradiation doses are presented. First results of cathodoluminescence (CL) studies in the form CL-topograms and CL-spectra for difference zones of the crystal are also given

  17. Quantitative assessment of alkali-reactive aggregate mineral content through XRD using polished sections as a supplementary tool to RILEM AAR-1 (petrographic method)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castro, Nélia; Sorensen, Bjørn E.; Broekmans, Maarten A.T.M.

    2012-01-01

    The mineral content of 5 aggregate samples from 4 different countries, including reactive and non-reactive aggregate types, was assessed quantitatively by X-ray diffraction (XRD) using polished sections. Additionally, electron probe microanalyzer (EPMA) mapping and cathodoluminescence (CL) were used to characterize the opal-CT identified in one of the aggregate samples. Critical review of results from polished sections against traditionally powdered specimen has demonstrated that for fine-grained rocks without preferred orientation the assessment of mineral content by XRD using polished sections may represent an advantage over traditional powder specimens. Comparison of data on mineral content and silica speciation with expansion data from PARTNER project confirmed that the presence of opal-CT plays an important role in the reactivity of one of the studied aggregates. Used as a complementary tool to RILEM AAR-1, the methodology suggested in this paper has the potential to improve the strength of the petrographic method.

  18. Growth of cubic GaN on a nitrided AlGaAs (001) substrate by using hydried vapor phase epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, H. J.; Yang, M.; Ahn, H. S.; Kim, K. H.; Yi, J. Y.; Jang, K. S.; Chang, J. H.; Kim, H. S.; Cho, C. R.; Kim, S. W.

    2006-01-01

    GaN layers were grown on AlGaAs (001) substrates by using hydride vapor phase epitaxy (HVPE). Growth parameters such as the nitridation temperature of the AlGaAs substrate and the growth rate of the GaN layer were found to be critical determinants for the growth of cubic GaN layer. Nitridation of the AlGaAs surface was performed in a NH 3 atmosphere at a temperature range of 550 - 700 .deg. C. GaN layers were grown at different growth rates on the nitrided AlGaAs substrates. The surface morphologies and the chemical constituents of the nitrided AlGaAs layers were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). For the optical and the crystalline characterization of the GaN films, cathodoluminescence (CL) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were carried out.

  19. Origin of the visible emission of black silicon microstructures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fabbri, Filippo; Lin, Yu-Ting; Bertoni, Giovanni; Rossi, Francesca; Salviati, Giancarlo; Smith, Matthew J.; Gradečak, Silvija; Mazur, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Silicon, the mainstay semiconductor in microelectronics, is considered unsuitable for optoelectronic applications due to its indirect electronic band gap that limits its efficiency as light emitter. Here, we univocally determine at the nanoscale the origin of visible emission in microstructured black silicon by cathodoluminescence spectroscopy and imaging. We demonstrate the formation of amorphous silicon oxide microstructures with a white emission. The white emission is composed by four features peaking at 1.98 eV, 2.24 eV, 2.77 eV, and 3.05 eV. The origin of such emissions is related to SiO x intrinsic point defects and to the sulfur doping due to the laser processing. Similar results go in the direction of developing optoelectronic devices suitable for silicon-based circuitry

  20. Enhancement of the core near-band-edge emission induced by an amorphous shell in coaxial one-dimensional nanostructure: the case of SiC/SiO{sub 2} core/shell self-organized nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fabbri, Filippo; Rossi, Francesca; Attolini, Giovanni; Salviati, Giancarlo; Iannotta, Salvatore [IMEM-CNR Institute, Viale Usberti 37/A, I-43124 Parma (Italy); Aversa, Lucrezia; Verucchi, Roberto; Nardi, Marco [IFN-CNR Institute, Via alla Cascata 56/C-Povo, I-38123 Trento (Italy); Fukata, Naoki [International Center for Materials Nanoarchitectonics, National Institute for Materials Science and PRESTO JST, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan); Dierre, Benjamin; Sekiguchi, Takashi [Nano Device Characterization Group, Advanced Electronic Materials Center, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-1 Namiki, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0044 (Japan)

    2010-08-27

    We report the influence of the native amorphous SiO{sub 2} shell on the cathodoluminescence emission of 3C-SiC/SiO{sub 2} core/shell nanowires. A shell-induced enhancement of the SiC near-band-edge emission is observed and studied as a function of the silicon dioxide thickness. Since the diameter of the investigated SiC cores rules out any direct bandgap optical transitions due to confinement effects, this enhancement is ascribed to a carrier diffusion from the shell to the core, promoted by the alignment of the SiO{sub 2} and SiC bands in a type I quantum well. An accurate correlation between the optical emission and structural and SiO{sub 2}-SiC interface properties is also reported.

  1. ZnO-nanorod-array/p-GaN high-performance ultra-violet light emitting devices prepared by simple solution synthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Shrawan Kumar; Luan, Chunyan; To, Chap Hang; Kutsay, Oleksandr; Kováč, Jaroslav; Zapien, Juan Antonio; Bello, Igor; Lee, Shuit-Tong

    2012-11-01

    Pure ultra-violet (UV) (378 nm) electroluminescence (EL) from zinc oxide (ZnO)-nanorod-array/p-gallium nitride (GaN) light emitting devices (LEDs) is demonstrated at low bias-voltages (˜4.3 V). Devices were prepared merely by solution-synthesis, without any involvement of sophisticated material growth techniques or preparation methods. Three different luminescence characterization techniques, i.e., photo-luminescence, cathodo-luminescence, and EL, provided insight into the nature of the UV emission mechanism in solution-synthesized LEDs. Bias dependent EL behaviour revealed blue-shift of EL peaks and increased peak sharpness, with increasing the operating voltage. Accelerated bias stress tests showed very stable and repeatable electrical and EL performance of the solution-synthesized nanorod LEDs.

  2. Effect of the quantum well thickness on the performance of InGaN photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Redaelli, L.; Mukhtarova, A.; Valdueza-Felip, S.; Ajay, A.; Durand, C.; Eymery, J.; Monroy, E. [Université Grenoble Alpes, 38000 Grenoble (France); CEA-CNRS Group «Nanophysique et semiconducteurs», CEA-Grenoble, INAC/SP2M, 17 avenue des Martyrs, 38054 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Bougerol, C.; Himwas, C. [Université Grenoble Alpes, 38000 Grenoble (France); CEA-CNRS Group «Nanophysique et semiconducteurs», Institut Néel-CNRS, 25 avenue des Martyrs, 38042 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Faure-Vincent, J. [Université Grenoble Alpes, 38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, INAC-SPRAM, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC-SPRAM, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2014-09-29

    We report on the influence of the quantum well thickness on the effective band gap and conversion efficiency of In{sub 0.12}Ga{sub 0.88}N/GaN multiple quantum well solar cells. The band-to-band transition can be redshifted from 395 to 474 nm by increasing the well thickness from 1.3 to 5.4 nm, as demonstrated by cathodoluminescence measurements. However, the redshift of the absorption edge is much less pronounced in absorption: in thicker wells, transitions to higher energy levels dominate. Besides, partial strain relaxation in thicker wells leads to the formation of defects, hence degrading the overall solar cell performance.

  3. Ion beam induced luminescence from diamond using an MeV ion microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, A A; Jamieson, D N; Prawer, S; Allen, M G [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1994-12-31

    Analysis of the luminescence induced by a MeV ion beam offers the potential to provide useful information about the chemical properties of atoms in crystals to complement the information provided by more traditional Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) such as Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), ion channeling and Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). Furthermore, the large penetration depth of the MeV ion beam offers several advantages over the relatively shallow penetration of keV electrons typically employed in cathodoluminescence. An Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL) detection system was developed for the Melbourne microprobe that allows the spatial mapping of the luminescence signal along with the signals from RBS and PIXE. Homoepitaxial diamond growth has been studied and remarkable shifts in the characteristic blue luminescence of diamond towards the green were observed in the overgrowth. This has been tentatively identified as being due to transition metal inclusions in the epitaxial layers. 8 refs., 2 refs.

  4. Fluid inclusions study in thermal gradient wells, Nevado del Ruiz Volcano

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uruena Suarez, Cindy L; Zuluaga, Carlos A; Molano, Juan Carlos

    2012-01-01

    A fluid inclusions study in the Nevado del Ruiz volcano hydrothermal system allowed to characterize fluids involved in the evolution of the geothermal system. Fluid inclusions hosted in quartz, plagioclase and carbonate from samples of the deepest parts of three thermal gradient wells were analyzed to understand fluid-rock interaction. Fluid inclusions hosted in carbonate veins with coloform microestructure represent hydrothermal fluids with temperatures higher than 250 Celsius degrade. This interpretation is supported by microprobe and cathodoluminescence analysis that also indicate a hydrothermal origin for the veins. Fluid inclusions hosted in quartz (mylonite) were originated by metamorphic fluids and fluid inclusions hosted in plagioclase (andesitic lavas) are considered to be originated from magmatic fluids (H 2 O + CO 2 system).

  5. Impact of Mg content on native point defects in MgxZn1−xO (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.56

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Perkins

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We used depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy and surface photovoltage spectroscopy to measure the densities, energy levels, and spatial distributions of zinc/magnesium cation and oxygen vacancies in isostructural, single-phase, non-polar MgxZn1−xO alloys over a wide (0 ≤ x ≤ 0.56 range. Within this wide range, both defect types exhibit strong Mg content-dependent surface segregation and pronounced bulk density minima corresponding to unit cell volume minima, which can inhibit defect formation due to electrostatic repulsion. Mg in ZnO significantly reduces native defect densities and their non-polar surface segregation, both major factors in carrier transport and doping of these oxide semiconductors.

  6. Nanocrystalline silicon as the light emitting material of a field emission display device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biaggi-Labiosa, A; Sola, F; Resto, O; Fonseca, L F; Gonzalez-BerrIos, A; Jesus, J De; Morell, G

    2008-01-01

    A nanocrystalline Si-based paste was successfully tested as the light emitting material in a field emission display test device that employed a film of carbon nanofibers as the electron source. Stable emission in the 550-850 nm range was obtained at 16 V μm -1 . This relatively low field required for intense cathodoluminescence (CL) from the PSi paste may lead to longer term reliability of both the electron emitting and the light emitting materials, and to lower power consumption. Here we describe the synthesis, characterization, and analyses of the light emitting nanostructured Si paste and the electron emitting C nanofibers used for building the device, including x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and Raman spectroscopy. The corresponding spectra and field emission curves are also shown and discussed

  7. Defect characterization in compositionally graded InGaAs layers on GaAs(001) grown by MBE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sasaki, Takuo; Takahasi, Masamitu; Norman, Andrew G.; Romero, Manuel J.; Al-Jassim, Mowafak M.; Kojima, Nobuaki; Ohshita, Yoshio; Yamaguchi, Masafumi

    2013-01-01

    Defect characterization in molecular beam epitaxial (MBE) compositionally-graded In x Ga 1-x As layers on GaAs substrates consisting different thickness of overshooting (OS) layers was carried out using cathodoluminescence (CL) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). We found that the thickness of the OS layer influences not only stress but also lattice defects generated in a top InGaAs layer. While the top InGaAs layer with a thin OS layer is under compression and has mainly threading dislocations, the top layer with a thick OS layer is under tension and exhibits inhomogeneous strain associating with phase separation. We will discuss the mechanisms of defect generation and their in-plane distribution based on strain relaxation at the top and OS layers. (copyright 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  8. Optical characterization of InAs quantum wells and dots grown radially on wurtzite InP nanowires

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindgren, David; Kawaguchi, Kenichi; Heurlin, Magnus; Borgström, Magnus T; Pistol, Mats-Erik; Samuelson, Lars; Gustafsson, Anders

    2013-01-01

    Correlated micro-photoluminescence (μPL) and cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements are reported for single core–shell InP–InAs wurtzite nanowires grown using metal–organic vapor phase epitaxy. Samples covering a radial InAs shell thickness of 1–12 ML were investigated. The effective masses for the wurtzite material were determined from the transition energy dependence of the InAs shell thickness, using a model based on linear deformation potential theory. InP cores with segments of mixed zincblende and wurtzite, on which quantum dots nucleated selectively, were also investigated. Narrow peaks were observed by μPL and the spatial origin of the emission was identified with CL imaging. (paper)

  9. Study of carrier concentration in single InP nanowires by luminescence and Hall measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindgren, David; Hultin, Olof; Heurlin, Magnus; Storm, Kristian; Borgström, Magnus T; Samuelson, Lars; Gustafsson, Anders

    2015-01-01

    The free electron carrier concentrations in single InP core–shell nanowires are determined by micro-photoluminescence, cathodoluminescence (CL) and Hall effect measurements. The results from luminescence measurements were obtained by solving the Fermi–Dirac integral, as well as by analyzing the peak full width at half maximum (FWHM). Furthermore, the platform used for Hall effect measurements, combined with spot mode CL spectroscopy, is used to determine the carrier concentrations at specific positions along single nanowires. The results obtained via luminescence measurements provide an accurate and rapid feedback technique for the epitaxial development of doping incorporation in nanowires. The technique has been employed on several series of samples in which growth parameters, such as V/III-ratio, temperature and dopant flows, were investigated in an optimization procedure. The correlation between the Hall effect and luminescence measurements for extracting the carrier concentration of different samples were in excellent agreement. (paper)

  10. Cross-Sectional Transport Imaging in a Multijunction Solar Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Haegel, Nancy M.; Ke, Chi-Wen; Taha, Hesham; Guthrey, Harvey; Fetzer, C. M.; King, Richard

    2015-06-14

    Combining highly localized electron-beam excitation at a point with the spatial resolution capability of optical near-field imaging, we have imaged carrier transport in a cross-sectioned multijunction (GaInP/GaInAs/Ge) solar cell. We image energy transport associated with carrier diffusion throughout the full width of the middle (GaInAs) cell and luminescent coupling from point excitation in the top cell GaInP to the middle cell. Supporting cathodoluminescence and near-field photoluminescence measurements demonstrate excitation-dependent Fermi level splitting effects that influence cross-sectioned spectroscopy results as well as transport limitations on the spatial resolution of cross-sectional measurements.

  11. Growth, Structural and Optical Characterization of ZnO Nanotubes on Disposable-Flexible Paper Substrates by Low-Temperature Chemical Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Y. Soomro

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We report the synthesis of vertically aligned ZnO nanotubes (NTs on paper substrates by low-temperature hydrothermal method. The growth of ZnO NTs on the paper substrate is discussed; further, the structural and optical properties are investigated by scanning electron microscope (SEM, transmission electron microscopy (TEM, X-ray diffraction (XRD, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS, and cathodoluminescence (CL, and it was found that the ZnO NTs on paper substrate fulfill the structural and optical properties of ZnO NTs grown on other conventional substrates. This will be more beneficial in future usage of ZnO NTs in different fields and applications. Particularly, this approach opens the ways in research and development for high volume manufacturing of low-cost, flexible optoelectronics devices on disposable paper substrates and can be used in the future miniaturization trends.

  12. Study of GaN nanorods converted from β-Ga2O3

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuewen; Xiong, Zening; Zhang, Dongdong; Xiu, Xiangqian; Liu, Duo; Wang, Shuang; Hua, Xuemei; Xie, Zili; Tao, Tao; Liu, Bin; Chen, Peng; Zhang, Rong; Zheng, Youdou

    2018-05-01

    We report here high-quality β-Ga2O3 nanorods (NRs) grown on sapphire substrates by hydrothermal method. Ammoniating the β-Ga2O3 NRs results in strain-free wurtzite gallium nitride (GaN) NRs. It was shown by XRD and Raman spectroscopy that β-Ga2O3 was partially converted to GaN/β-Ga2O3 at 1000 °C and then completely converted to GaN NRs at 1050 °C, as confirmed by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HRTEM). There is no band-edge emission of β-Ga2O3 in the cathodoluminescence spectrum, and only a deep-level broad emission observed at 3.68-3.73 eV. The band edge emission (3.39 eV) of GaN NRs converted from β-Ga2O3 can also be observed.

  13. Effect of 1.5 MeV electron irradiation on β-Ga2O3 carrier lifetime and diffusion length

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jonathan; Flitsiyan, Elena; Chernyak, Leonid; Yang, Jiancheng; Ren, Fan; Pearton, Stephen J.; Meyler, Boris; Salzman, Y. Joseph

    2018-02-01

    The influence of 1.5 MeV electron irradiation on minority transport properties of Si doped β-Ga2O3 vertical Schottky rectifiers was observed for fluences up to 1.43 × 1016 cm-2. The Electron Beam-Induced Current technique was used to determine the minority hole diffusion length as a function of temperature for each irradiation dose. This revealed activation energies related to shallow donors at 40.9 meV and radiation-induced defects with energies at 18.1 and 13.6 meV. Time-resolved cathodoluminescence measurements showed an ultrafast 210 ps decay lifetime and reduction in carrier lifetime with increased irradiation.

  14. Stoichiometric control for heteroepitaxial growth of smooth ɛ-Ga2O3 thin films on c-plane AlN templates by mist chemical vapor deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tahara, Daisuke; Nishinaka, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Shota; Yoshimoto, Masahiro

    2017-07-01

    Epitaxial ɛ-Ga2O3 thin films with smooth surfaces were successfully grown on c-plane AlN templates by mist chemical vapor deposition. Using X-ray diffraction 2θ-ω and φ scans, the out-of-plane and in-plane epitaxial relationship was determined to be (0001) ɛ-Ga2O3 [10\\bar{1}0] ∥ (0001)AlN[10\\bar{1}0]. The gallium/oxygen ratio was controlled by varying the gallium precursor concentration in the solution. While scanning electron microscopy showed the presence of large grains on the surfaces of the films formed for low concentrations of oxygen species, no large grains were observed under stoichiometric conditions. Cathodoluminescence measurements showed a deep-level emission ranging from 1.55-3.7 eV; however, no band-edge emission was observed.

  15. Luminescence of Ga2O3 Crystals Excited with a Runaway Electron Beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burachenko, A. G.; Beloplotov, D. V.; Prudaev, I. A.; Sorokin, D. A.; Tarasenko, V. F.; Tolbanov, O. P.

    2017-12-01

    The spectra and amplitude-time characteristics of the radiation of studied Sn and Fe-doped Ga2O3 crystals excited with a runaway electron beam and an excilamp with a wavelength of 222 nm were investigated. The main contribution to the luminescence of samples in the region of 280-900 nm under excitation with a beam was shown to be made by cathodoluminescence. In the Fe-doped crystal, a new cathodeand photoluminescence band was detected within a wavelength range of 650-850 nm. In the Sn-doped crystal, Vavilov-Cherenkov radiation was detected in the region of 280-300 nm using a monochromator and a photomultiplier.

  16. Luminescence properties and energy transfer processes in YAG:Yb,Er single crystalline films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorenko, Yu.; Gorbenko, V.; Savchyn, V.; Batentschuk, M.; Osvet, A.; Brabec, C.

    2013-01-01

    The paper is dedicated to the study of the optical properties of YAG:Yb,Er single-crystalline films (SCF) grown by liquid phase epitaxy. The absorption, cathodoluminescence and time-resolved photoluminescence spectra and photoluminescence decay curves were measured for the SCFs with different doping levels of Er 3+ (from 0.6 to 4.2 at.%) and Yb 3+ (from 0.1 to 0.6 at.%). The spectra, excited by synchrotron radiation in the fundamental absorption range of the YAG and in the intraionic absorption bands of both dopants, reveal energy transfer from the YAG host to the Er 3+ and Yb 3+ ions and between these ions. -- Highlights: •Growth of YAG:Yb,Er single crystalline films by LPE method. •Peculiarities of luminescence of YAG:Yb,Er films with different Er–Yb content. •Yb–Er energy transfer processes in YAG hosts

  17. Luminescence of Bi3+ ions in Y3Al5O12:Bi single crystalline films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zorenko, Yu.; Gorbenko, V.; Voznyak, T.; Vistovsky, V.; Nedilko, S.; Nikl, M.

    2007-01-01

    The absorption and cathodoluminescence spectra of single crystalline films (SCF) of Y 3 Al 5 O 12 :Bi garnet depending on Bi concentration were analyzed. For consideration of the nature of the UV and visible Bi-related emission bands the time-resolved luminescence of Bi 3+ (ns 2 ) ions in YAG:Bi SCF was studied at 10 K under excitation by synchrotron radiation. The difference in the excitation spectra and emission decay of the UV and visible bands has been explained via radiative relaxation from the 3 P 1,0 excited states to the 1 S 0 ground state of the isolated and pair/clustered Bi 3+ emission centers in the garnet lattice, respectively

  18. Barrier inhomogeneities limited current and 1/f noise transport in GaN based nanoscale Schottky barrier diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Heilmann, M.; Latzel, Michael; Kapoor, Raman; Sharma, Intu; Göbelt, M.; Christiansen, Silke H.; Kumar, Vikram; Singh, Rajendra

    2016-01-01

    The electrical behaviour of Schottky barrier diodes realized on vertically standing individual GaN nanorods and array of nanorods is investigated. The Schottky diodes on individual nanorod show highest barrier height in comparison with large area diodes on nanorods array and epitaxial film which is in contrast with previously published work. The discrepancy between the electrical behaviour of nanoscale Schottky diodes and large area diodes is explained using cathodoluminescence measurements, surface potential analysis using Kelvin probe force microscopy and 1ow frequency noise measurements. The noise measurements on large area diodes on nanorods array and epitaxial film suggest the presence of barrier inhomogeneities at the metal/semiconductor interface which deviate the noise spectra from Lorentzian to 1/f type. These barrier inhomogeneities in large area diodes resulted in reduced barrier height whereas due to the limited role of barrier inhomogeneities in individual nanorod based Schottky diode, a higher barrier height is obtained. PMID:27282258

  19. Ion beam induced luminescence from diamond using an MeV ion microprobe

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bettiol, A.A.; Jamieson, D. N.; Prawer, S.; Allen, M.G. [Melbourne Univ., Parkville, VIC (Australia). School of Physics

    1993-12-31

    Analysis of the luminescence induced by a MeV ion beam offers the potential to provide useful information about the chemical properties of atoms in crystals to complement the information provided by more traditional Ion Beam Analysis (IBA) such as Rutherford Backscattering Spectrometry (RBS), ion channeling and Particle Induced X-ray Emission (PIXE). Furthermore, the large penetration depth of the MeV ion beam offers several advantages over the relatively shallow penetration of keV electrons typically employed in cathodoluminescence. An Ion Beam Induced Luminescence (IBIL) detection system was developed for the Melbourne microprobe that allows the spatial mapping of the luminescence signal along with the signals from RBS and PIXE. Homoepitaxial diamond growth has been studied and remarkable shifts in the characteristic blue luminescence of diamond towards the green were observed in the overgrowth. This has been tentatively identified as being due to transition metal inclusions in the epitaxial layers. 8 refs., 2 refs.

  20. CL from ZnO nanowires and microneedles Co-doped with N and Mn

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herrera, M; Morales, A; Díaz, J A

    2014-01-01

    Cathodoluminescence (CL) was used to study the luminescence emission of ZnO : N, Mn nanowires and microneedles grown by thermal evaporation. CL spectra acquired at room temperature showed the presence of near band edge and defect-related emissions. The defect related emission comprised two bands centered at 2.28 and 2.5 eV. The first component was attributed to the formation of spinel ZnMn 2 O 4  and the second to the well-known ZnO green emission. CL spectra acquired at 100 K showed two emissions centered at 3.22 and 3.25 eV that were attributed to donor–acceptor pair (DAP) and FA transitions, respectively. It was proposed that substitutional nitrogen (N O ) and zinc interstitial (Zn i ) were acceptor and shallow-donor centers in the DAP transition. (paper)

  1. Influence of Si-doping on heteroepitaxially grown a-plane GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wieneke, Matthias; Bastek, Barbara; Noltemeyer, Martin; Hempel, Thomas; Rohrbeck, Antje; Witte, Hartmut; Veit, Peter; Blaesing, Juergen; Dadgar, Armin; Christen, Juergen; Krost, Alois [Otto-von-Guericke-Universitaet Magdeburg, FNW/IEP, Universitaetsplatz 2, 39106 Magdeburg (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    Si-doped a-plane GaN samples with nominal doping levels up to 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} were grown on r-plane sapphire by metal organic vapor phase epitaxy. Silane flow rates higher than 59 nmol/min lead to three dimensional grown crystallites as revealed by scanning electron microscopy. High resolution X-ray diffraction, photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence suggest considerably reduced defect densities in the large micrometer-sized GaN crystallites. Especially, transmission electron microscopy images verify a very low density of basal plane stacking faults less than 10{sup 4} cm{sup -1} in these crystallites consisting of heteroepitaxially grown a-plane GaN. In our presentation the influence of the Si doping on the basal plane stacking faults will be discussed.

  2. Study on ECR dry etching and selective MBE growth of AlGaN/GaN for fabrication of quantum nanostructures on GaN (0001) substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oikawa, Takeshi; Ishikawa, Fumitaro; Sato, Taketomo; Hashizume, Tamotsu; Hasegawa, Hideki

    2005-01-01

    This paper attempts to form AlGaN/GaN quantum wire (QWR) network structures on patterned GaN (0001) substrates by selective molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) growth. Substrate patterns were prepared along - and -directions by electron cyclotron resonance assisted reactive-ion beam etching (ECR-RIBE) process. Selective growth was possible for both directions in the case of GaN growth, but only in the -direction in the case of AlGaN growth. A hexagonal QWR network was successfully grown on a hexagonal mesa pattern by combining the -direction and two other equivalent directions. AFM observation confirmed excellent surface morphology of the grown network. A clear cathodoluminescence (CL) peak coming from the embedded AlGaN/GaN QWR structure was clearly identified

  3. Iron clustering in GaSe epilayers grown on GaAs(111)B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moraes, A R de; Mosca, D H; Mattoso, N; Guimaraes, J L; Klein, J J; Schreiner, W H; Souza, P E N de; Oliveira, A J A de; Vasconcellos, M A Z de; Demaille, D; Eddrief, M; Etgens, V H

    2006-01-01

    In this paper we report on the structural, morphological and magnetic properties of semiconducting GaSe epilayers, grown by molecular beam epitaxy, doped to different iron contents (ranging from 1 to 22 at.% Fe). Our results indicate that iron forms metallic Fe nanoparticles with diameters ranging from 1 to 20 nm embedded in the crystalline GaSe matrix. The Fe incorporation proceeds by segregation and agglomeration and induces a progressive disruption of the lamellar GaSe epilayers. The magnetization as a function of the temperature for zero-field cooling with the magnetic field parallel to the surface of the sample provides evidence of superparamagnetic behaviour of the nanoparticles. Cathodoluminescence experiments performed at room temperature reveal semiconducting behaviour even for samples with Fe concentrations as high as 20 at.%

  4. Probing plasmons in three dimensions by combining complementary spectroscopies in a scanning transmission electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hachtel, J A; Haglund, R F; Pantelides, S T; Marvinney, C; Mayo, D; Mouti, A; Lupini, A R; Chisholm, M F; Mu, R; Pennycook, S J

    2016-01-01

    The nanoscale optical response of surface plasmons in three-dimensional metallic nanostructures plays an important role in many nanotechnology applications, where precise spatial and spectral characteristics of plasmonic elements control device performance. Electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and cathodoluminescence (CL) within a scanning transmission electron microscope have proven to be valuable tools for studying plasmonics at the nanoscale. Each technique has been used separately, producing three-dimensional reconstructions through tomography, often aided by simulations for complete characterization. Here we demonstrate that the complementary nature of the two techniques, namely that EELS probes beam-induced electronic excitations while CL probes radiative decay, allows us to directly obtain a spatially- and spectrally-resolved picture of the plasmonic characteristics of nanostructures in three dimensions. The approach enables nanoparticle-by-nanoparticle plasmonic analysis in three dimensions to aid in the design of diverse nanoplasmonic applications. (paper)

  5. Process dependence of H passivation and doping in H-implanted ZnO

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang, Z; Brillson, L J; Look, D C; Schifano, R; Johansen, K M; Svensson, B G

    2013-01-01

    We used depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy (DRCLS), photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy and temperature-dependent Hall-effect (TDHE) measurements to describe the strong dependence of H passivation and doping in H-implanted ZnO on thermal treatment. Increasing H implantation dose increases passivation of Zn and oxygen vacancy-related defects, while reducing deep level emissions. Over annealing temperatures of 100-400 °C at different times, 1 h annealing at 200 °C yielded the lowest DRCLS deep level emissions, highest TDHE carrier mobility, and highest near band-edge PL emission. These results describe the systematics of dopant implantation and thermal activation on H incorporation in ZnO and their effects on its electrical properties.

  6. Diffraction-unlimited optical imaging of unstained living cells in liquid by electron beam scanning of luminescent environmental cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyazaki, Hideki T; Kasaya, Takeshi; Takemura, Taro; Hanagata, Nobutaka; Yasuda, Takeshi; Miyazaki, Hiroshi

    2013-11-18

    An environmental cell with a 50-nm-thick cathodoluminescent window was attached to a scanning electron microscope, and diffraction-unlimited near-field optical imaging of unstained living human lung epithelial cells in liquid was demonstrated. Electrons with energies as low as 0.8 - 1.2 kV are sufficiently blocked by the window without damaging the specimens, and form a sub-wavelength-sized illumination light source. A super-resolved optical image of the specimen adhered to the opposite window surface was acquired by a photomultiplier tube placed below. The cells after the observation were proved to stay alive. The image was formed by enhanced dipole radiation or energy transfer, and features as small as 62 nm were resolved.

  7. Influence of substrate miscut angle on surface morphology and luminescence properties of AlGaN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusch, Gunnar; Edwards, Paul R.; Bruckbauer, Jochen; Martin, Robert W.; Li, Haoning; Parbrook, Peter J.; Sadler, Thomas C.

    2014-01-01

    The influence of substrate miscut on Al 0.5 Ga 0.5  N layers was investigated using cathodoluminescence (CL) hyperspectral imaging and secondary electron imaging in an environmental scanning electron microscope. The samples were also characterized using atomic force microscopy and high resolution X-ray diffraction. It was found that small changes in substrate miscut have a strong influence on the morphology and luminescence properties of the AlGaN layers. Two different types are resolved. For low miscut angle, a crack-free morphology consisting of randomly sized domains is observed, between which there are notable shifts in the AlGaN near band edge emission energy. For high miscut angle, a morphology with step bunches and compositional inhomogeneities along the step bunches, evidenced by an additional CL peak along the step bunches, are observed

  8. Metastable phases freezing from melts of reciprocal systems PbX + CdI2=CdX + PbI2 (X=S, Se, Te)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Odin, I.N.; Chukichev, M.V.

    2001-01-01

    The transformations in the mutual PbX + CdI 2 =CdX + PbI 2 (X=S, Se, Te) systems leading to the crystallization of metastable polytypical modifications of lead iodide in metastable ternary compounds are studied for the first time. Microstructural and X-ray diffraction analyses were conducted. Their phase diagrams were constructed. The luminescence properties of the stable and metastable modifications of the lead iodide and the metastable compound Pb 4 SeI 6 were investigated. The lines 504 and 512 nm are noted in the 2H-PbI 2 cathodoluminescence spectra. The close lines - 508 and 516 nm provide for the 6R-PbI 2 modification. The metastable compound Pb 4 SeI 6 is characterized by the 769 and 868 nm lines [ru

  9. Defect-driven inhomogeneities in Ni /4H-SiC Schottky barriers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumakha, S.; Ewing, D. J.; Porter, L. M.; Wahab, Q.; Ma, X.; Sudharshan, T. S.; Brillson, L. J.

    2005-12-01

    Nanoscale depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy (DRCLS) of Ni diode arrays on 4H-SiC epitaxial wafers reveals a striking correspondence between deep level defects and electrical transport measurements on a diode-by-diode basis. Current-voltage measurements display both ideal and nonideal diode characteristics due to multiple barriers within individual contacts. Near-interface DRCLS demonstrates the presence of three discrete midgap defect levels with 2.2, 2.45, and 2.65eV emission energies whose concentrations vary on a submicron scale among and within individual diodes, correlating with barrier inhomogeneity. These results also suggest that SiC native defect levels can account for the maximum range of n-type barrier heights.

  10. Controlling magnetic and electric dipole modes in hollow silicon nanocylinders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van de Haar, Marie Anne; van de Groep, Jorik; Brenny, Benjamin J M; Polman, Albert

    2016-02-08

    We propose a dielectric nanoresonator geometry consisting of hollow dielectric nanocylinders which support geometrical resonances. We fabricate such hollow Si particles with an outer diameter of 108-251 nm on a Si substrate, and determine their resonant modes with cathodo-luminescence (CL) spectroscopy and optical dark-field (DF) scattering measurements. The scattering behavior is numerically investigated in a systematic fashion as a function of wavelength and particle geometry. We find that the additional design parameter as a result of the introduction of a center gap can be used to control the relative spectral spacing of the resonant modes, which will enable additional control over the angular radiation pattern of the scatterers. Furthermore, the gap offers direct access to the enhanced magnetic dipole modal field in the center of the particle.

  11. One-step synthesis and scale-dependent luminescence properties of 1D Zn0.9Cd0.1S nanostructures prepared by PVD

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jin, Changqing; Zhu, Kexin; Jian, Zengyun; Wei, Yongxing; Ge, Chenghai; Peterson, George

    2017-01-01

    1D Zn 0.9 Cd 0.1 S nanostructures were successfully synthesized via one-step physical vapor deposition. The separation of ultraviolet (UV) emission peaks in the cathodoluminescence (CL) curves, taken in combination with x-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns, proves the coexistence of wurtzite and zincblende phases. The diversity of morphology in nanostuctures originates from Au catalyst splitting during the growth process. The similar photoluminescence spectrums at different positions prove that the composition and defect types were homogeneous, and that defect distribution and density have very small fluctuation at the micron scale. In contrast, the CL curves taken from different locations showed that the defect types and distribution were not uniform on the nanoscale level. (paper)

  12. Optical and structural characterisation of epitaxial nanoporous GaN grown by CVD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mena, Josué; Carvajal, Joan J; Martínez, Oscar; Jiménez, Juan; Zubialevich, Vitaly Z; Parbrook, Peter J; Diaz, Francesc; Aguiló, Magdalena

    2017-09-15

    In this paper we study the optical properties of nanoporous gallium nitride (GaN) epitaxial layers grown by chemical vapour deposition on non-porous GaN substrates, using photoluminescence, cathodoluminescence, and resonant Raman scattering, and correlate them with the structural characteristic of these films. We pay special attention to the analysis of the residual strain of the layers and the influence of the porosity in the light extraction. The nanoporous GaN epitaxial layers are under tensile strain, although the strain is progressively reduced as the deposition time and the thickness of the porous layer increases, becoming nearly strain free for a thickness of 1.7 μm. The analysis of the experimental data point to the existence of vacancy complexes as the main source of the tensile strain.

  13. Selective heteroepitaxy on deeply grooved substrate: A route to low cost semipolar GaN platforms of bulk quality

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tendille, Florian, E-mail: florian.tendille@crhea.cnrs.fr; Vennéguès, Philippe; De Mierry, Philippe [CRHEA - CNRS (Centre de Recherche sur l' Hétéro-Epitaxie et ses Applications), Rue Bernard Gregory, Parc de Sophia Antipolis, 06560 Valbonne (France); Martin, Denis; Grandjean, Nicolas [Institute of Physics, EPFL, CH-1015 Lausanne (Switzerland)

    2016-08-22

    Semipolar GaN crystal stripes larger than 100 μm with dislocation densities below 5 × 10{sup 6} cm{sup −2} are achieved using a low cost fabrication process. An original sapphire patterning procedure is proposed, enabling selective growth of semipolar oriented GaN stripes while confining the defects to specific areas. Radiative and non-radiative crystalline defects are investigated by cathodoluminescence and can be correlated to the development of crystal microstructure during the growth process. A dislocation reduction mechanism, supported by transmission electron microscopy, is proposed. This method represents a step forward toward low-cost quasi-bulk semipolar GaN epitaxial platforms with an excellent structural quality which will allow for even more efficient III-nitride based devices.

  14. Mineralogical characterization of diamonds from Roosevelt Indigenous Reserve, Brazil, using non-destructive methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borges, M. P. A. C.; Moura, M. A.; Lenharo, S. L. R.; Smith, C. B.; Araujo, D. P.

    2016-11-01

    In this study, 660 diamonds from Igarapé Lajes Diggings (Roosevelt and Aripuanã Park indigenous areas), in Amazonian craton, Rondônia State, Brazil, were investigated. Their morphological, optical and surface characteristics were described using optical and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), cathodoluminescence (CL) and infrared spectroscopy (FTIR). The results demonstrated a predominance of resorbed crystals with many surface corrosion features, generally colorless, and led to the identification of four distinct groups: G1, G2, G3 and G4. Group G1 presents features of secondary sources while G2 and G4 show only primary features, some of which are not described in literature. Group G3 is similar to the other groups, however, is composed of less resorbed specimens with primary octahedral morphology relatively well preserved, indicating shorter time of exposure to dissolution effects. Cathodoluminescence in G2 is attributed to features of plastic deformation and to low contents of nitrogen (< 100 ppm, Type II) and high aggregation (IaB). G4 shows homogeneous blue CL, high contents of nitrogen (700 to 1000 ppm) and intermediate aggregation (IaAB). G1 presents luminescence influenced by radiation effects and populations with N contents and aggregation in the same ranges of G2 and G4, suggesting that the primary sources of the three groups can be the same. The relationship of nitrogen content versus aggregation state indicates higher temperatures of formation for G2 and lower for G4. The obtained data suggests that diamonds of G2 originated in sublithospheric mantle as has also been reported in nearby deposits (Machado River and Juína). The employed techniques were also effective in distinguishing diamonds from Roosevelt Reserve and from other localities, indicating that they could be used for improvement of certification procedures of diamonds of unknown origin.

  15. Assessment of diagenetic alteration of dinosaur eggshells through petrography and geochemical analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enriquez, M. V.; Eagle, R.; Eiler, J. M.; Tripati, A. K.; Ramirez, P. C.; Loyd, S. J.; Chiappe, L.; Montanari, S.; Norell, M.; Tuetken, T.

    2012-12-01

    Carbonate clumped isotope analysis of fossil eggshells has the potential to constrain both the physiology of extinct animals and, potentially, paleoenvironmental conditions, especially when coupled with isotopic measurements of co-occurring soil carbonates. Eggshell samples from both modern vertebrates and Cretaceous Hadrosaurid, Oviraptorid, Titanosaur, Hypselosaurus, Faveoolithus, dinosaur fossils have been collected from Auca Mahuevo, Argentina and Rousett, France, amongst other locations, for geochemical analysis to determine if isotopic signatures could be used to indicate warm- or cold-bloodedness. In some locations soil carbonates were also analyzed to constrain environmental temperatures. In order to test the validity of the geochemical results, an extensive study was undertaken to establish degree of diagenetic alteration. Petrographic and cathodoluminescence characterization of the eggshells were used to assess diagenetic alteration. An empirical 1-5 point scale was used to assign each sample an alteration level, and the observations were then compared with the geochemical results. Specimens displayed a wide range of alteration states. Some of which were well preserved and others highly altered. Another group seemed to be structural intact and only under cathodoluminescence was alteration clearly observed. In the majority of samples, alteration level was found to be predictably related to geochemical results. From specimens with little evidence for diagenesis, carbonate clumped isotope signatures support high (37-40°C) body temperature for Titanosaurid dinosaurs, but potentially lower body temperatures for other taxa. If these data do, in fact, represent original eggshell growth temperatures, these results support variability in body temperature amongst Cretaceous dinosaurs and potentially are consistent with variations between adult body temperature and size — a characteristic of 'gigantothermy'.

  16. Luminescence and electron degradation properties of Bi doped CaO phosphor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yousif, A. [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, P.O. Box 339, Bloemfontein, ZA 9300 (South Africa); Department of Physics, Faculty of Education, University of Khartoum, P.O. Box 321, 11115 Omdurman (Sudan); Kroon, R.E.; Coetsee, E.; Ntwaeaborwa, O.M. [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, P.O. Box 339, Bloemfontein, ZA 9300 (South Africa); Seed Ahmed, H.A.A. [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, P.O. Box 339, Bloemfontein, ZA 9300 (South Africa); Department of Physics, Faculty of Education, University of Khartoum, P.O. Box 321, 11115 Omdurman (Sudan); Swart, H.C., E-mail: swarthc@ufs.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, P.O. Box 339, Bloemfontein, ZA 9300 (South Africa)

    2015-11-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Blue emitting Ca{sub 1−x}O:Bi{sub x=0.5%} phosphor powder was successfully prepared. • Strong blue near-UV emission was obtained. • Electron beam induced cathodoluminescence intensity degradation occurred. • XPS was successfully used to explain the degradation process. - Abstract: Ca{sub 1−x}O:Bi{sub x=0.5%} phosphor powder was successfully synthesized by the sol-gel combustion method. The structure, morphology and luminescent properties of the phosphor were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy. The results showed that the Ca{sub 1−x}O:Bi{sub x=0.5%} consisted of single face-centred cubic crystals and that the phosphor particles were uniformly distributed. When the phosphor was excited by a xenon lamp at 355 nm, or a 325 nm He–Cd laser, or electron beam, it emitted strongly in the blue near-UV range with a wavelength of 395 nm ({sup 3}P{sub 1} → {sup 1}S{sub 0} transition of Bi{sup 3+}). The CL intensity was monitored as a function of the accelerating voltage and also as a function of the beam current. The powder was also subjected to a prolonged electron beam irradiation to study the electron beam induced CL intensity degradation. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy was used to analyze the Ca{sub 1−x}O:Bi{sub x=0.5%} phosphor sample surface before and after degradation.

  17. Microwave plasma chemical synthesis of nanocrystalline carbon film structures and study their properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bushuev, N.; Yafarov, R.; Timoshenkov, V.; Orlov, S.; Starykh, D.

    2015-08-01

    The self-organization effect of diamond nanocrystals in polymer-graphite and carbon films is detected. The carbon materials deposition was carried from ethanol vapors out at low pressure using a highly non-equilibrium microwave plasma. Deposition processes of carbon film structures (diamond, graphite, graphene) is defined. Deposition processes of nanocrystalline structures containing diamond and graphite phases in different volume ratios is identified. The solid film was obtained under different conditions of microwave plasma chemical synthesis. We investigated the electrical properties of the nanocrystalline carbon films and identified it's from various factors. Influence of diamond-graphite film deposition mode in non-equilibrium microwave plasma at low pressure on emission characteristics was established. This effect is justified using the cluster model of the structure of amorphous carbon. It was shown that the reduction of bound hydrogen in carbon structures leads to a decrease in the threshold electric field of emission from 20-30 V/m to 5 V/m. Reducing the operating voltage field emission can improve mechanical stability of the synthesized film diamond-graphite emitters. Current density emission at least 20 A/cm2 was obtained. Nanocrystalline carbon film materials can be used to create a variety of functional elements in micro- and nanoelectronics and photonics such as cold electron source for emission in vacuum devices, photonic devices, cathodoluminescent flat display, highly efficient white light sources. The obtained graphene carbon net structure (with a net size about 6 μm) may be used for the manufacture of large-area transparent electrode for solar cells and cathodoluminescent light sources

  18. Influence of the spray pyrolysis seeding and growth parameters on the structure and optical properties of ZnO nanorod arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodríguez, Juan, E-mail: jrodriguez@uni.edu.pe [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Ingeniería, P.O. Box 31-139, Lima 31 (Peru); Feuillet, Guy [CEA Grenoble/LETI, 17 rue des Martyrs, F-38054 Grenoble Cedex 9 (France); Donatini, Fabrice [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, Inst NEEL, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, Inst NEEL, F-38042 Grenoble (France); Onna, Diego [DQIAQF-INQUIMAE, FCEyN-Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pab. II, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Sanchez, Luis [Facultad de Ciencias, Universidad Nacional de Ingeniería, P.O. Box 31-139, Lima 31 (Peru); Candal, Roberto [DQIAQF-INQUIMAE, FCEyN-Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pab. II, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); ECyT, 3iA, Universidad Nacional de San Martín, Martín de Irigoyen N° 3100 (1650), San Martín, Pcia de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Marchi, M. Claudia [DQIAQF-INQUIMAE, FCEyN-Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pab. II, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); CMA, FCEyN-Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pab. I, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bilmes, Sara A. [DQIAQF-INQUIMAE, FCEyN-Universidad de Buenos Aires, Ciudad Universitaria, Pab. II, 1428 Buenos Aires (Argentina); Chandezon, Frédéric [University Grenoble Alpes, INAC-SPRAM, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CNRS, INAC-SPRAM, F-38000 Grenoble (France); CEA, INAC-SPRAM, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2015-02-01

    ZnO nanorods (NRs) were grown on fluorine doped tin oxide (FTO) substrates at low temperatures (90 °C) from Zn{sup 2+} precursors in alkaline media previously seeded with ZnO nanoparticles. These were deposited onto the FTO substrate heated at 350 °C by spray pyrolysis of a Zn acetate solution in a water ethanol mixture. The structure of seeds was tuned by the ethanol to water ratio, Γ, which controls the solvent evaporation rate of drops impinging the substrate. From a detailed characterization using a combination of scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, UV–visible absorption and cathodoluminescence spectroscopies, the dependence of the morphology and optical properties of the ZnO NRs on the seeding conditions was demonstrated. NRs grown on seeds deposited from solutions with Γ in the 0.03–0.06 range – i.e. when the surface excess of ethanol in the water–ethanol mixture has a maximum – show thinner average diameters and stacking faults due to the presence of zinc blende domains embedded into an overall wurtzite NR. They furthermore exhibit blue-shifted near band edge emission peak and a high deep level emission in cathodoluminescence. All these findings support the use of spray pyrolysis as a simple and reproducible way to control the seeds deposition, influencing the growth, the structure and the optical properties of the final ZnO NRs. - Highlights: • ZnO pyrolytic seeds tuned by the rate of solvent evaporation. • ZnO NRs grown from tuned pyrolytic seed's structure shows diameter dependence. • ZnO NRs show stacking faults due to the presence of zinc blende domains.

  19. Luminescence spectra of lead tungstate, spodumene and topaz crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramachandran, Vasuki

    2002-01-01

    A detailed set of thermoluminescence, cathodoluminescence and radioluminescence (TL, CLTL and RLTL) data of lead tungstate, Spodumene and Topaz have been reported for the first time over a wide temperature range from 25 to 500K. Lead tungstate (PbWO 4 ), a widely known scintillating material, gives TL glow peaks which are related to complex defect centres. Doping of this crystal with trivalent rare earth ions (La 3+ , Y 3+ ) reduces the slow component of the emission thereby making it more suitable for its applications. The pentavalent dopants on the other hand, enhance the green emission and quench the blue emission at temperatures 100K. The origin and the irradiation temperature definitely have an effect on the spectrum. No strong relationship could be derived from the dose dependence data. Two less studied minerals, Spodumene and Topaz have also been investigated with the luminescence techniques. The glow peak near 250degC is thought to have originated from Mn 2+ centres. As there are no ESR data available, the assignment of defect centres is rather difficult. Cr + acts as the quencher in green spodumene. Topaz had the same treatment as the other two sets of samples and the defect centre characterisation looks complex as each coloured sample gave different patterns of glow peaks. Cathodoluminescence whilst heating (CLTL) of all these samples showed some unusual features in the form of a luminescence intensity step which is believed to have originated from the presence of ice. Water, in nanoparticle size quantities, is present as a contaminant in the lattice and undergoes a phase transition at 170K from hexagonal to cubic structures. This phase change influences the luminescence efficiency of the host material and is reflected in the spectrum as a discontinuity in intensity. (author)

  20. Microstructural analysis and calcite piezometry on hydrothermal veins: Insights into the deformation history of the Cocos Plate at Site U1414 (IODP Expedition 344).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brandstätter, Jennifer; Kurz, Walter; Rogowitz, Anna

    2017-08-01

    In this study we present microstructural data from hydrothermal veins in the sedimentary cover and the igneous basement recovered from Hole U1414A, Integrated Ocean Drilling Program (IODP) Expedition 344 (Costa Rica Seismogenesis Project), to constrain deformation mechanism operating in the subducting Cocos Plate. Cathodoluminescence studies, mechanical e-twin piezometry and electron backscatter diffraction (EBSD) analyses of carbonate veins were used to give insights into the deformation conditions and to help to understand the tectonic deformation history of the Cocos Plate offshore Costa Rica. Analyses of microstructures in the sedimentary rocks and in the basalt of the igneous basement reveal brittle deformation, as well as crystal-plastic deformation of the host rock and the vein material. Cathodoluminescence images showed that in the basalt fluid flow and related precipitation occurred over several episodes. The differential stresses, obtained from two different piezometers using the same parameter (twin density), indicate various mean differential stresses of 49 ± 11 and 69 ± 30 MPa and EBSD mapping of calcite veins reveals low-angle subgrain boundaries. Deformation temperatures are restricted to the range from 170°C to 220°C, due to the characteristics of the existing twins and the lack of high-temperature intracrystalline deformation mechanisms (>220°C). The obtained results suggest that deformation occurred over a period associated with changes of ambient temperatures, occurrence of fluids and hydrofracturing, induced differential stresses due to the bending of the plate at the trench, and related seismic activity.

  1. Coeval Formation of Zircon Megacrysts and Host Magmas in the Eifel Volcanic Field (Germany) Based on High Spatial Resolution Petrochronology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Axel; Klitzke, Malte; Gerdes, Axel; Ludwig, Thomas; Schäfer, Christof

    2017-04-01

    Zircon megacrysts (approx. 0.5-6 mm in diameter) from the Quaternary West and East Eifel volcanic fields, Germany, occur as euhedral crystals in porous K-spar rich plutonic ejecta clasts, and as partially resorbed xenocrysts in tephrite lava. Their relation to the host volcanic rocks has remained contentious because the dominantly basanitic to phonolitic magma compositions in the Eifel are typically zircon undersaturated. We carried out a detailed microanalytical study of zircon megacrysts from seven locations (Emmelberg and Rockeskyll in the West Eifel; Bellerberg, Laacher See, Mendig, Rieden, and Wehr in the East Eifel). Crystals were embedded in epoxy, sectioned to expose interiors through grinding with abrasives, diamond-polished, and mapped by optical microscopy, backscattered electron, and cathodoluminescence imaging. Subsequently, isotope-specific analysis using secondary ionization mass spectrometry (SIMS) and laser ablation inductively coupled mass spectrometry (LA-ICP-MS) was carried out placing 100 correlated spots on 20 selected crystals. Concordant U-Th disequilibrium and U-Pb ages determined by SIMS are between ca. 430 ka (Rieden) and 170 ka (Mendig) and indicate that the megacryst zircons crystallized almost always briefly before eruption. A significant gap between zircon megacryst crystallization (ca. 230 ka) and eruption (ca. 45 ka) ages was only detected for the Emmelberg location. SIMS trace element abundances (e.g., rare earth elements) vary by orders-of-magnitude and correlate with domain boundaries visible in cathodoluminescence; trace element patterns match those reported for zircon from syenitic origins. Isotopic compositions are homogeneous within individual crystals, but show some heterogeneity between different crystals from the same locality. Average isotopic values (δ18O SMOW = +5.3±0.6 ‰ by SIMS; present-day ɛHf = +1.7±2.5 ‰ by LA-ICP-MS; 1 standard deviation), however, are consistent with source magmas being dominantly mantle

  2. Blue and green emissions with high color purity from nanocrystalline Ca2Gd8Si6O26:Ln (Ln = Tm or Er) phosphors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seeta Rama Raju, G.; Park, Jin Young; Jung, Hong Chae; Pavitra, E.; Moon, Byung Kee; Jeong, Jung Hyun; Yu, Jae Su; Kim, Jung Hwan; Choi, Haeyoung

    2011-01-01

    Graphical abstract: Highlights: → Nanocrystalline Ca 2 Gd 8 Si 6 O 26 (CGS):Tm 3+ and CGS:Er 3+ phosphors were prepared by solvothermal reaction method. → The visible luminescence properties of phosphors were investigated by exciting with ultraviolet (UV) or near-UV light and low voltage electron beam (0.5-5 kV). → The photoluminescence spectra of CGS:Tm 3+ under 359 nm excitation and CGS:Er 3+ under 380 nm excitation showed the strong blue ( 1 D 2 → 3 F 4 at 456 nm) and green ( 4 S 3/2 → 4 I 15/2 at 550 nm) colors with the color purity 87% and 96%, respectively → The low accelerating voltage cathodoluminescence spectra of CGS:Tm 3+ and CGS:Er 3+ showed the strong blue and green emissions with the high color purity 95% and 96%, respectively. → The obtained results are hint at the promising applications to produce high quality LEDs and FED devices. - Abstract: Blue and green light emissive nanocrystalline Ca 2 Gd 8 Si 6 O 26 (CGS):Tm 3+ and CGS:Er 3+ phosphors with high color purity were prepared by solvothermal reaction method. The structural and morphological properties of these phosphors were evaluated by the powder X-ray diffraction (XRD) and scanning electron microscopy, respectively. From the XRD results, Tm 3+ :CGS and Er 3+ :CGS phosphors had the characteristic peaks of oxyapatite in the hexagonal lattice structure. The visible luminescence properties of phosphors were obtained by ultraviolet (UV) or near-UV light and low voltage electron beam (0.5-5 kV) excitation. The photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence properties were investigated by changing the variation of Tm 3+ or Er 3+ concentrations and the acceleration voltage, respectively. The CGS:Tm 3+ phosphors exhibited the blue emission due to 1 D 2 → 3 F 4 transition, while the CGS:Er 3+ phosphors showed the green emission due to 4 S 3/2 → 4 I 15/2 transition. The color purity and chromaticity coordinates of the fabricated phosphors are comparable to or better than those of standard

  3. Diagenesis of echinoderm skeletons: Constraints on paleoseawater Mg/Ca reconstructions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorzelak, Przemysław; Krzykawski, Tomasz; Stolarski, Jarosław

    2016-09-01

    One of the most profound environmental changes thought to be reflected in chemical composition of numerous geological archives is Mg/Ca ratio of the seawater, which has varied dramatically throughout the Phanerozoic. Echinoderms that today typically form high magnesium calcite skeletons are increasingly being utilized as a proxy for interpreting secular changes in seawater chemistry. However, accurate characterization of the diagenetic changes of their metastable high magnesium calcite skeletons is a prerequisite for assessing their original, major-element geochemical composition. Here we expand the existing models of diagenesis of echinoderm skeleton by integration of various analytical methods that up to now rarely have been used to assess the diagenetic changes of fossil echinoderms. We validated the preservation of a suite of differently preserved echinoderm ossicles, mostly crinoids, ranging in age from the Cambrian through Recent. In 13 of 99 fossil echinoderm ossicles we found well-preserved porous microstructure (stereom), non-luminescent behaviour or blotchy dark color in cathodoluminescence, and distinct nanostructural features (layered and nanocomposite structure). Moreover, in representatives of such preserved samples, distribution of sulphates associated with organic matter is identical to those in Recent echinoderms. Only such ossicles, despite of local micrometer-scale diagenetic changes, were herein considered well-preserved, retaining their original major-element skeletal composition. By contrast, majority of samples show transformation to the stable low magnesium calcite that leads to obliteration of the primary geochemical and micro/nanostructural features and is accompanied with increase in cathodoluminescence emission intensity. Using only well-preserved fossil echinoderm samples, we found purely random variation in Mg/Ca in echinoderm skeletons through the observed time series; any periodicities in echinoderm skeletal Mg/Ca ratio which might

  4. Compositions of isolated forsterites in Ornans (C3O)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Steele, I.M.

    1989-01-01

    Luminescing forsterite with FeO between 0.25 and 2.0 wt% occurs as cores of isolated grains and within an Fe-rich porphyritic chondrule in the Ornans (C3O) carbonaceous chondrite. The color variation of the cathodoluminescence depends on the relative intensity of a red emission caused by Cr and a blue emission most intense when transition metal impurities are at the lowest levels. For Ornans forsterite, the blue emission is quenched by Fe t 0.75 wt% and the red at 2.0 wt%. Compositional profiles from core to rim of five isolated forsterites show details of Al, Ca, Sc, Ti, V, Cr, Mn and Fe zoning with respect to position and cathodoluminescence color. FeO shows normal zoning within the core of the five grains, reaching values of 0.75 wt%, at which point rapid enrichment in FeO occurs, reaching FeO values of 20-30 wt% at the grain edge. Titanium and Al are linearly correlated but show erratic changes within each grain; TiO 2 ranges from 500 to 600 ppmw in the core to 100 ppmw in the rim; Al 2 O 3 varies from 0.6 wt% in the core to below 0.1 wt% in the rim; CaO is near constant at 0.70 wt% within the blue luminescing core and below 0.4 wt% in the rim; Sc 2 O 3 is present in two grains up to 130 ppmw; V 2 O 3 shows 500 ppmw at the core and 100 ppmw at the rim. Evidence is presented for growth of euhedral forsterite either from a liquid or gas, subsequent fracturing, precipitation of Fe-metal, and growth of progressively more Fe-rich rims. Diffusion has affected these grains to give halos around metal and diffuse CL boundaries in some crystallographic directions. Some forsterite grains have been incorporated into an Fe-rich assemblage to form chondrules which retain evidence of their origin in the form of these relic grains

  5. Optical investigations on the wide bandgap semiconductors diamond and aluminum nitride

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teofilov, Nikolai

    2007-07-01

    In the context of this thesis, new results about optical defects and intrinsic properties of diamond, AlN and AlGaN alloys have been obtained. The main experimental techniques used were low temperature cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence spectroscopy. First, different aspects of intentional and background doping of diamond were discussed. Thus, the most commonly observed green luminescence emission from boron doped HPHT diamonds has been studied by means of temperature dependent CL in a wide temperature range from 10 K to 450 K. One further subject, addressing deep defect nitrogen related luminescence was a study of nitrogen addition in combustion flame grown CVD diamond layers. Two further topics concern intrinsic excitations in diamond, free excitons and electron-hole drops. Several important parameters like the critical density, the critical temperature, and the low-temperature density inside the drops were evaluated. The ground state density of the electron-hole condensate in diamond is about {approx} 42 times larger than that in Si, and the critical temperature takes very high values in the range of 165K.. 173K. Cathodoluminescence investigations on epitaxial wurtzite AlN layers grown on sapphire, SiC, and Si substrates, have shown that although the material is generally of good optical quality, deep level luminescence are still dominating the spectra. Relatively sharp near-band-edge transitions have been observed in all three samples that exhibit significantly reduced line widths for the AlN/sapphire and the AlN/SiC samples. Much broader emission lines in the near band-gap region have been observed for the first time from the AlN sample grown on Si (111) substrate. Temperature dependent CL measurements and numerical line decompositions reveal complicated substructures in the excitonic lines. The temperature dependence of the energy positions and broadening parameters of the transition have been studied and compared with the other materials. Epitaxial Al

  6. Impact of Quaternary Climate on Seepage at Yucca Mountain, Nevada

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    J.F. Whelan; J.B. Paces; L.A. Neymark; A.K. Schmitt; M. Grove

    2006-01-01

    Uranium-series ages, oxygen-isotopic compositions, and uranium contents were determined in outer growth layers of opal and calcite from 0.5- to 3-centimeter-thick mineral coatings hosted by lithophysal cavities in the unsaturated zone at Yucca Mountain, Nevada, the proposed site of a permanent repository for high-level radioactive waste. Micrometer-scale growth layering in the minerals was imaged using a cathodoluminescence detector on a scanning electron microscope. Determinations of the chemistry, ages, and delta oxygen-18 values of the growth layers were conducted by electron microprobe analysis and secondary ion mass spectrometry techniques at spatial resolutions of 1 to about 20 micrometers ((micro)m) and 25 to 40 micrometers, respectively. Growth rates for the last 300 thousand years (k.y.) calculated from about 300 new high-resolution uranium-series ages range from approximately 0.5 to 1.5 (micro)m/k.y. for 1- to 3-centimeter-thick coatings, whereas coatings less than about I-centimeter-thick have growth rates less than 0.5 (micro)m/k.y. At the depth of the proposed repository, correlations of uranium concentration and delta oxygen-18 values with regional climate records indicate that unsaturated zone percolation and seepage water chemistries have responded to changes in climate during the last several hundred thousand years

  7. Magnetic, thermal and luminescence properties in room-temperature nanosecond electron-irradiated various metal oxide nanopowders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sokovnin, S. Yu; Balezin, M. E.; Il’ves, V. G.

    2018-03-01

    By means of pulsed electron beam evaporation in vacuum of targets non-magnetic, in bulk state, Al2O3 and YSZ (ZrO2-8% Y2O3) oxides, magnetic nanopowders (NPs) with a high specific surface were produced. The NPs were subsequently irradiated in air by electrons with energy of 700 keV, using a URT-1 accelerator for 15 and 30 minutes. The magnetic, thermal, and pulsed cathodoluminescence (PCL) characteristics of NPs were measured before and after irradiation. It was established that the electron irradiation non-monotonically changes the magnetization of the pristine samples. To the contrary, a clear correlation between the intensity of PCL and the irradiation doses is found in the oxides. There was a decrease in the intensity of PCL after irradiation. Luminescent and thermal properties reflect the transformation of structural defects in NPs more strongly after the exposure to a pulsed electron beam in comparison with corresponding changes of the NPs magnetic response.

  8. Atmospheric scanning electron microscope for correlative microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Ian E G; Dennison, Clare L; Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Suga, Mitsuo; Sato, Chikara; Yarwood, Andrew; O'Toole, Peter J

    2012-01-01

    The JEOL ClairScope is the first truly correlative scanning electron and optical microscope. An inverted scanning electron microscope (SEM) column allows electron images of wet samples to be obtained in ambient conditions in a biological culture dish, via a silicon nitride film window in the base. A standard inverted optical microscope positioned above the dish holder can be used to take reflected light and epifluorescence images of the same sample, under atmospheric conditions that permit biochemical modifications. For SEM, the open dish allows successive staining operations to be performed without moving the holder. The standard optical color camera used for fluorescence imaging can be exchanged for a high-sensitivity monochrome camera to detect low-intensity fluorescence signals, and also cathodoluminescence emission from nanophosphor particles. If these particles are applied to the sample at a suitable density, they can greatly assist the task of perfecting the correlation between the optical and electron images. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Nanodiamonds as multi-purpose labels for microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemelaar, S R; de Boer, P; Chipaux, M; Zuidema, W; Hamoh, T; Martinez, F Perona; Nagl, A; Hoogenboom, J P; Giepmans, B N G; Schirhagl, R

    2017-04-07

    Nanodiamonds containing fluorescent nitrogen-vacancy centers are increasingly attracting interest for use as a probe in biological microscopy. This interest stems from (i) strong resistance to photobleaching allowing prolonged fluorescence observation times; (ii) the possibility to excite fluorescence using a focused electron beam (cathodoluminescence; CL) for high-resolution localization; and (iii) the potential use for nanoscale sensing. For all these schemes, the development of versatile molecular labeling using relatively small diamonds is essential. Here, we show the direct targeting of a biological molecule with nanodiamonds as small as 70 nm using a streptavidin conjugation and standard antibody labelling approach. We also show internalization of 40 nm sized nanodiamonds. The fluorescence from the nanodiamonds survives osmium-fixation and plastic embedding making them suited for correlative light and electron microscopy. We show that CL can be observed from epon-embedded nanodiamonds, while surface-exposed nanoparticles also stand out in secondary electron (SE) signal due to the exceptionally high diamond SE yield. Finally, we demonstrate the magnetic read-out using fluorescence from diamonds prior to embedding. Thus, our results firmly establish nanodiamonds containing nitrogen-vacancy centers as unique, versatile probes for combining and correlating different types of microscopy, from fluorescence imaging and magnetometry to ultrastructural investigation using electron microscopy.

  10. Recombination-related properties of a-screw dislocations in GaN: A combined CL, EBIC, TEM study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medvedev, O. S., E-mail: o.s.medvedev@spbu.ru; Mikhailovskii, V. Yu. [V.A. Fok Institute of Physics, St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation); IRC for Nanotechnology, Research Park, St.-Petersburg State University (Russian Federation); Vyvenko, O. F.; Bondarenko, A. S.; Ubyivovk, E. V. [V.A. Fok Institute of Physics, St. Petersburg State University (Russian Federation); Peretzki, P.; Seibt, M. [IV. Physikalisches Institut Georg-August Universität Göttingen (Germany)

    2016-06-17

    Cathodoluminescence (CL), electron beam current (EBIC) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) techniques have been applied to investigate recombination properties and structure of freshly introduced dislocations in low-ohmic GaN crystals. It was confirmed that the only a-screw dislocations exhibited an intense characteristic dislocation-related luminescence (DRL) which persisted up to room temperature and was red-shifted by about 0.3 eV with respect to the band gap energy not only in HVPE but also in MOCVD grown samples. EBIC contrast of the dislocations was found to be temperature independent indicating that the dislocation-related recombination level is situated below 200 meV with respect of conduction band minimum. With the increasing of the magnification of the dislocation TEM cross-sectional images they were found to disappear, probably, due to the recombination enhanced dislocation glide (REDG) under electron beam exposure which was immediately observed in CL investigations on a large scale. The stacking fault ribbon in the core of dissociated a-screw dislocation which form a quantum well for electrons was proposed to play an important role both in DRL spectrum formation and in REDG.

  11. Effect of V-pits embedded InGaN/GaN superlattices on optical and electrical properties of GaN-based green light-emitting diodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhou, Shengjun [School of Power and Mechanical Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); School of Mechanical Engineering, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Liu, Xingtong [School of Power and Mechanical Engineering, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2017-05-15

    We investigated effects of V-pits embedded InGaN/GaN superlattices (SL) on optical and electrical properties of high power green LEDs by changing the number of SL period and SL growth temperature. Surface morphology of V-pits embedded InGaN/GaN SL with various periods and growth temperatures was evaluated by using atomic force microscopy (AFM). It was found that density and size of V-pit increase with decreasing SL growth temperature and increasing SL periods. Experimental studies using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) equipped with cathodoluminescence (CL) indicated that SL with larger V-pits appear to be more effective in suppressing the lateral diffusion of carriers into threading dislocations (TD). Compared to c-plane quantum wells, narrower quantum wells on the V-pit sidewall were clearly observed by performing high-angle annular dark-field scanning transmission electron microscopy (HAADF-STEM). The external quantum efficiency (EQE) and the efficiency droop of green LEDs grown on underlying SL with larger V-pits are improved at high injection current regime, which is attributed to a more efficient hole injection into multiple quantum well, and also to a higher V-pit potential barrier height that could more effectively suppress the lateral diffusion of carriers into non-radiative recombination centers of TDs. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  12. Structural and luminescence effects of Ga co-doping on Ce-doped yttrium aluminate based phosphors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayvacikli, M. [Celal Bayar University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, Muradiye, Manisa (Turkey); Canimoglu, A. [Nigde University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Physics Department, Nigde (Turkey); Muresan, L.E., E-mail: laura_muresan2003@yahoo.com [Babes Bolyai University, Raluca Ripan Institute for Research in Chemistry, Fantanele 30, 400294 Cluj-Napoca (Romania); Barbu Tudoran, L. [Babes Bolyai University, Electronic Microscopy Centre, Clinicilor 37, 400006 Cluj Napoca (Romania); Garcia Guinea, J. [Museo Nacional Ciencias Naturales, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Karabulut, Y. [Celal Bayar University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, Muradiye, Manisa (Turkey); Jorge, A. [Museo Nacional Ciencias Naturales, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid 28006 (Spain); Karali, T. [Ege University, Institute of Nuclear Sciences, 35100 Bornova, İzmir (Turkey); Can, N., E-mail: cannurdogan@yahoo.com [Celal Bayar University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, Muradiye, Manisa (Turkey); Jazan University, Physics Department, P.O. Box 114, 45142 Jazan (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-05-05

    Herein, we primarily focus on luminescence spectrum measurements of various types of green emitting yttrium aluminate phosphors modified with gallium (Y{sub 3}Al{sub 5-x}Ga{sub x}O{sub 12}) synthesised by solid state reaction. The luminescent emission of samples depends on sample temperature and excitation radiation such as incident X-ray, electron and laser beam. Here, we measured radioluminescence (RL), cathodoluminescence (CL), photoluminescence (PL) along with XRD in order to clarify relationship between lattice defects and the spectral luminescence emissions. The RL and CL spectra of YAG:Ce exhibit an emission band ranging from 300 to 450 nm related to Y{sub Al} antisite defects. The broad emission band of garnet phosphors is shifted from 526 nm to 498 nm with increasing of Ga{sup 3+} content, while full width at half maximum (FWHM) of the band tends to be greater than the width of unmodified YAG:Ce garnet. Deconvolution of the spectrum reveals that three emission bands centred at 139, 234 and 294 °C occur in aluminate host garnets. - Highlights: • We present preparation of YAG:Ce{sup 3+}, Ga{sup 3+} phosphors by a solid state reaction method. • The shape and size of phosphor particles were investigated. • The luminescence properties were studied by different excitation sources.

  13. Grassy Silica Nanoribbons and Strong Blue Luminescence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Shengping; Xie, Shuang; Huang, Guowei; Guo, Hongxuan; Cho, Yujin; Chen, Jun; Fujita, Daisuke; Xu, Mingsheng

    2016-09-01

    Silicon dioxide (SiO2) is one of the key materials in many modern technological applications such as in metal oxide semiconductor transistors, photovoltaic solar cells, pollution removal, and biomedicine. We report the accidental discovery of free-standing grassy silica nanoribbons directly grown on SiO2/Si platform which is commonly used for field-effect transistors fabrication without other precursor. We investigate the formation mechanism of this novel silica nanostructure that has not been previously documented. The silica nanoribbons are flexible and can be manipulated by electron-beam. The silica nanoribbons exhibit strong blue emission at about 467 nm, together with UV and red emissions as investigated by cathodoluminescence technique. The origins of the luminescence are attributed to various defects in the silica nanoribbons; and the intensity change of the blue emission and green emission at about 550 nm is discussed in the frame of the defect density. Our study may lead to rational design of the new silica-based materials for a wide range of applications.

  14. Giant coercivity in ferromagnetic Co doped ZnO single crystal thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Loukya, B.; Negi, D.S.; Dileep, K.; Kumar, N.; Ghatak, Jay; Datta, R.

    2013-01-01

    The origin of ferromagnetism in ZnO doped with transition metal impurities has been discussed extensively and appeared to be a highly controversial and challenging topic in today's solid state physics. Magnetism observed in this system is generally weak and soft. We have grown Co:ZnO up to 30 at% Co in single crystal thin film form on c-plane sapphire. A composition dependent coercivity is observed in this system which reaches peak value at 25 at% Co, the values are 860 Oe and 1149 Oe with applied field along parallel and perpendicular to the film substrate interface respectively. This giant coercivity might pave the way to exploit this material as a magnetic semiconductor with novel logic functionalities. The findings are explained based on defect band itinerant ferromagnetism and its partial interaction with localized d electrons of Co through charge transfer. Besides large coercivity, an increase in the band gap with Co concentration has also been observed along with blue emission peak with long tail confirming the formation of extended point defect levels in the host lattice band gap. - Highlights: • Co doped ZnO ferromagnetic single crystal thin film. • Giant coercivity in Co:ZnO thin film which may help to turn this material into application. • Cathodoluminescence (CL) data showing increase in band gap with Co concentrations. • A theoretical proposal is made to explain the observed giant coercivity

  15. Probing defect states in polycrystalline GaN grown on Si(111) by sub-bandgap laser-excited scanning tunneling spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, F.-M.; Schnedler, M.; Portz, V.; Huang, Y.-C.; Huang, B.-C.; Shih, M.-C.; Chang, C.-W.; Tu, L.-W.; Eisele, H.; Dunin-Borkowski, R. E.; Ebert, Ph.; Chiu, Y.-P.

    2017-01-01

    We demonstrate the potential of sub-bandgap laser-excited cross-sectional scanning tunneling microscopy and spectroscopy to investigate the presence of defect states in semiconductors. The characterization method is illustrated on GaN layers grown on Si(111) substrates without intentional buffer layers. According to high-resolution transmission electron microscopy and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy, the GaN layers consist of nanoscale wurtzite and zincblende crystallites with varying crystal orientations and hence contain high defect state densities. In order to discriminate between band-to-band excitation and defect state excitations, we use sub-bandgap laser excitation. We probe a clear increase in the tunnel current at positive sample voltages during sub-bandgap laser illumination for the GaN layer with high defect density, but no effect is found for high quality GaN epitaxial layers. This demonstrates the excitation of free charge carriers at defect states. Thus, sub-bandgap laser-excited scanning tunneling spectroscopy is a powerful complimentary characterization tool for defect states.

  16. High-pressure polymorphs in Yamato-790729 L6 chondrite and their significance for collisional conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Yukako; Sekine, Toshimori; Kayama, Masahiko; Miyahara, Masaaki; Yamaguchi, Akira

    2017-12-01

    Shock pressure recorded in Yamato (Y)-790729, classified as L6 type ordinary chondrite, was evaluated based on high-pressure polymorph assemblages and cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra of maskelynite. The host-rock of Y-790729 consists mainly of olivine, low-Ca pyroxene, plagioclase, metallic Fe-Ni, and iron-sulfide with minor amounts of phosphate and chromite. A shock-melt vein was observed in the hostrock. Ringwoodite, majorite, akimotoite, lingunite, tuite, and xieite occurred in and around the shock-melt vein. The shock pressure in the shock-melt vein is about 14-23 GPa based on the phase equilibrium diagrams of high-pressure polymorphs. Some plagioclase portions in the host-rock occurred as maskelynite. Sixteen different CL spectra of maskelynite portions were deconvolved using three assigned emission components (centered at 2.95, 3.26, and 3.88 eV). The intensity of emission component at 2.95 eV was selected as a calibrated barometer to estimate shock pressure, and the results indicate pressures of about 11-19 GPa. The difference in pressure between the shock-melt vein and host-rock might suggest heterogeneous shock conditions. Assuming an average shock pressure of 18 GPa, the impact velocity of the parent-body of Y-790729 is calculated to be 1.90 km s-1. The parent-body would be at least 10 km in size based on the incoherent formation mechanism of ringwoodite in Y-790729.

  17. Morphologies and optical and electrical properties of InGaN/GaN micro-square array light-emitting diode chips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Dan; Ma, Shufang; Jia, Zhigang; Liu, Peizhi; Jia, Wei; Shang, Lin; Zhai, Guangmei; Xu, Bingshe

    2018-04-10

    InGaN/GaN micro-square array light-emitting diode (LED) chips (micro-chips) have been prepared via the focused ion beam (FIB) etching technique, which can not only reduce ohmic contact degradation but also control the aspect ratio precisely in three-dimensional (3D) structure LED (3D-LED) device fabrication. The effects of FIB beam current and micro-square array depth on morphologies and optical and electrical properties of the micro-chips have been studied. Our results show that sidewall surface morphology and optical and electrical properties of the micro-chips degrade with increased beam current. After potassium hydroxide etching with different times, an optimal current-voltage and luminescence performance can be obtained. Combining the results of cathodoluminescence mappings and light output-current characteristics, the light extraction efficiency of the micro-chips is reduced as FIB etch depth increases. The mechanisms of micro-square depth on light extraction have been revealed by 3D finite difference time domain.

  18. Trace Element Compositions and Defect Structures of High-Purity Quartz from the Southern Ural Region, Russia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jens Götze

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Quartz samples of different origin from 10 localities in the Southern Ural region, Russia have been investigated to characterize their trace element compositions and defect structures. The analytical combination of cathodoluminescence (CL microscopy and spectroscopy, electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR spectroscopy, and trace-element analysis by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS revealed that almost all investigated quartz samples showed very low concentrations of trace elements (cumulative concentrations of <50 ppm with <30 ppm Al and <10 ppm Ti and low abundances of paramagnetic defects, defining them economically as “high-purity” quartz (HPQ suitable for high-tech applications. EPR and CL data confirmed the low abundances of substitutional Ti and Fe, and showed Al to be the only significant trace element structurally bound in the investigated quartz samples. CL microscopy revealed a heterogeneous distribution of luminescence centres (i.e., luminescence active trace elements such as Al as well as features of deformation and recrystallization. It is suggested that healing of defects due to deformation-related recrystallization and reorganization processes of the quartz lattice during retrograde metamorphism resulted in low concentrations of CL activator and other trace elements or vacancies, and thus are the main driving processes for the formation of HPQ deposits in the investigated area.

  19. Selective formation of GaN-based nanorod heterostructures on soda-lime glass substrates by a local heating method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Young Joon; Kim, Yong-Jin [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, POSTECH, Pohang, Gyeongbuk 790-784 (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Jong-Myeong; Kim, Miyoung; Choi, Jun Hee [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Baik, Chan Wook; Kim, Sun Il; Park, Sung Soo; Kim, Jong Min [Frontier Research Laboratory, Samsung Advanced Institute of Technology, PO Box 111, Kiheung 446-712 (Korea, Republic of); Yi, Gyu-Chul, E-mail: joonie.choi@samsung.com, E-mail: gcyi@snu.ac.kr [National Creative Research Initiative Center for Semiconductor Nanorods, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Seoul National University, Seoul 151-747 (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-05-20

    We report on the fabrication of high-quality GaN on soda-lime glass substrates, heretofore precluded by both the intolerance of soda-lime glass to the high temperatures required for III-nitride growth and the lack of an epitaxial relationship with amorphous glass. The difficulties were circumvented by heteroepitaxial coating of GaN on ZnO nanorods via a local microheating method. Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of ZnO nanorods and GaN layers using the microheater arrays produced high-quality GaN/ZnO coaxial nanorod heterostructures at only the desired regions on the soda-lime glass substrates. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy examination of the coaxial nanorod heterostructures indicated the formation of an abrupt, semicoherent interface. Photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy was also applied to confirm the high optical quality of the coaxial nanorod heterostructures. Mg-doped GaN/ZnO coaxial nanorod heterostructure arrays, whose GaN shell layers were grown with various different magnesocene flow rates, were further investigated by using photoluminescence spectroscopy for the p-type doping characteristics. The suggested method for fabrication of III-nitrides on glass substrates signifies potentials for low-cost and large-size optoelectronic device applications.

  20. REE Partitioning in Lunar Minerals

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapp, J. F.; Lapen, T. J.; Draper, D. S.

    2015-01-01

    Rare earth elements (REE) are an extremely useful tool in modeling lunar magmatic processes. Here we present the first experimentally derived plagioclase/melt partition coefficients in lunar compositions covering the entire suite of REE. Positive europium anomalies are ubiquitous in the plagioclase-rich rocks of the lunar highlands, and complementary negative Eu anomalies are found in most lunar basalts. These features are taken as evidence of a large-scale differentiation event, with crystallization of a global-scale lunar magma ocean (LMO) resulting in a plagioclase flotation crust and a mafic lunar interior from which mare basalts were subsequently derived. However, the extent of the Eu anomaly in lunar rocks is variable. Fagan and Neal [1] reported highly anorthitic plagioclase grains in lunar impact melt rock 60635,19 that displayed negative Eu anomalies as well as the more usual positive anomalies. Indeed some grains in the sample are reported to display both positive and negative anomalies. Judging from cathodoluminescence images, these anomalies do not appear to be associated with crystal overgrowths or zones.

  1. Microscopic investigations of the optical and structural properties of nonpolar InGaN MQWs on a-plane GaN ELOG structures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Torsten; Bastek, Barbara; Hempel, Thomas; Veit, Peter; Christen, Juergen [Institute of Experimental Physics, Otto-von-Guericke-University Magdeburg (Germany); Wernicke, Tim; Weyers, Markus [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Berlin (Germany); Kneissl, Michael [Ferdinand-Braun-Institut fuer Hoechstfrequenztechnik, Berlin (Germany); Institute of Solid State Physics, Technical University Berlin (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    We present the optical and structural properties of InGaN MQWs which were grown by MOVPE on fully coalesced lateral epitaxially overgrown (ELOG) a-plane GaN on r-plane sapphire substrate and stripe masks orientated in the [0110] direction. Photoluminescence (PL) measurements exhibit a strong emission from the InGaN MQW at 3.109 eV at 4 K dominating the GaN (D{sup 0},X) emission at 3.488 eV by two orders of magnitude. The emission from basal plane stacking faults (BSF) was even more suppressed. Transmission electron microscopy showed a drastic reduction of the BSF in the lateral overgrown area (I) compared to the area of coherent growth (II). {mu}-PL and highly spatially resolved cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements revealed an intensity increase of the MQW emission by a factor of two for the defect reduced region (I) compared to the defective region (II). Also a blue shift by 20 meV of the MQW peak emission wavelength in the area (I) in comparison with defective area (II) was observed.

  2. Nondestructive mapping of chemical composition and structural qualities of group III-nitride nanowires using submicron beam synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonanno, P.L., E-mail: plb2@njit.edu [Georgia Institute of Technology/GTL, UMI 2958 Georgia Tech-CNRS, 57070 Metz (France); Gautier, S. [LMOPS + UMI: Laboratoire Matériaux Optiques, Photonique et micro-nano Systèmes, UMR CNRS 7132, Université de Metz et SUPELEC, 2 rue E. Belin, 57070 Metz, France, UMI 2958 Georgia Tech-CNRS, 57070 Metz (France); Gmili, Y.El.; Moudakir, T. [UMI 2958 Georgia Tech-CNRS, 57070 Metz (France); Sirenko, A.A. [Department of Physics, New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ 07102 (United States); Kazimirov, A. [Cornell High Energy Synchrotron Source (CHESS), Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853 (United States); Cai, Z.-H. [Advanced Photon Source, 9700 S. Cass Avenue, Argonne, IL 60439 (United States); Martin, J. [LMOPS + UMI: Laboratoire Matériaux Optiques, Photonique et micro-nano Systèmes, UMR CNRS 7132, Université de Metz et SUPELEC, 2 rue E. Belin, 57070 Metz, France, UMI 2958 Georgia Tech-CNRS, 57070 Metz (France); Goh, W.H. [Georgia Institute of Technology/GTL, UMI 2958 Georgia Tech-CNRS, 57070 Metz (France); Martinez, A.; Ramdane, A.; Le Gratiet, L. [Laboratoire de Photonique et de Nanostructures, UPR CNRS 20, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Maloufi, N. [Laboratoire d' Etude des Textures et Application aux Matériaux UMR CNRS 7078 Ile du Saulcy 57045 METZ cedex 1 (France); Assouar, M.B. [Laboratoire de Physique des Milieux Ionisés et Applications, Nancy University, CNRS, BP 239, F-54506 Vandoeuvre-lès-Nancy Cédex (France); Ougazzaden, A. [Georgia Institute of Technology/GTL, UMI 2958 Georgia Tech-CNRS, 57070 Metz (France)

    2013-08-31

    Submicron beam synchrotron-based X-ray diffraction (XRD) techniques have been developed and used to accurately and nondestructively map chemical composition and material quality of selectively grown group III-nitride nanowires. GaN, AlGaN, and InGaN multi-quantum-well nanowires have been selectively grown on lattice matched and mismatched substrates, and the challenges associated with obtaining and interpreting submicron beam XRD results are addressed and solved. Nanoscale cathodoluminescence is used to examine exciton behavior, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy is used to verify chemical composition. Scanning transmission electron microscopy is later used to paint a more complete picture. The advantages of submicron beam XRD over other techniques are discussed in the context of this challenging material system. - Highlights: ► We used nano selective area growth to create nanowires of GaN, AlGaN and InGaN/GaN. ► We characterized them by synchrotron-based submicron beam X-ray diffraction (XRD). ► This technique accurately determined chemical and crystallographic properties. ► Challenges of XRD are addressed in the context of this challenging material system. ► Advantages of XRD over other characterization methods are discussed.

  3. Effect of laser pulsed radiation on the properties of implanted layers of silicon carbide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Violin, Eh.E.; Voron'ko, O.N.; Nojbert, F.; Potapov, E.N.

    1984-01-01

    Results are presented of investigation into pulsed laser radiation effects on the layers of GH polytype silicon carbide converted to amorphous state by implantation of boron and aluminium ions. The implantation doses were selected to be 5x10 16 for boron and 5x10 15 cm -2 for aluminium, with the ion energies being 60 and 80 keV, respectively. The samples annealed under nanosecond regime are stated to posseys neither photoluminescence (PL) nor cathodoluminescence (CL). At the same time the layers annealed in millisecond regime have a weak PL at 100 K and CL at 300 K. The PL and CL are observed in samples, laser-annealed at radiation energy density above 150-160 J/cm 2 in case of boron ion implantation and 100-120 J/cm 2 in case of aluminium ion implantation. Increasing the radiation energy density under the nanosecond regime of laser annealing results in the surface evaporation due to superheating of amorphous layers. Increasing the energy density above 220-240 J/cm 2 results in destruction of the samples

  4. Determination of carrier diffusion length in p- and n-type GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz, Shopan; Metzner, Sebastian; Zhang, Fan; Monavarian, Morteza; Avrutin, Vitaliy; Morkoç, Hadis; Karbaum, Christopher; Bertram, Frank; Christen, Jürgen; Gil, Bernard; Özgür, Ümit

    2014-03-01

    Diffusion lengths of photo-excited carriers along the c-direction were determined from photoluminescence (PL) measurements in p- and n-type GaN epitaxial layers grown on c-plane sapphire by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The investigated samples incorporate a 6 nm thick In0.15Ga0.85N active layer capped with either 500 nm p- GaN or 1300 nm n-GaN. The top GaN layers were etched in steps and PL from the InGaN active region and the underlying layers was monitored as a function of the top GaN thickness upon photogeneration near the surface region by above bandgap excitation. Taking into consideration the absorption in the active and underlying layers, the diffusion lengths at 295 K and at 15 K were measured to be about 92 ± 7 nm and 68 ± 7 nm for Mg-doped p-type GaN and 432 ± 30 nm and 316 ± 30 nm for unintentionally doped n-type GaN, respectively. Cross-sectional cathodoluminescence line-scan measurement was performed on a separate sample and the diffusion length in n-type GaN was measured to be 280 nm.

  5. Optical properties of m-plane GaN grown on patterned Si(112) substrates by MOCVD using a two-step approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izyumskaya, N.; Okur, S.; Zhang, F.; Monavarian, M.; Avrutin, V.; Özgür, Ü.; Metzner, S.; Karbaum, C.; Bertram, F.; Christen, J.; Morkoç, H.

    2014-03-01

    Nonpolar m-plane GaN layers were grown on patterned Si (112) substrates by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). A two-step growth procedure involving a low-pressure (30 Torr) first step to ensure formation of the m-plane facet and a high-pressure step (200 Torr) for improvement of optical quality was employed. The layers grown in two steps show improvement of the optical quality: the near-bandedge photoluminescence (PL) intensity is about 3 times higher than that for the layers grown at low pressure, and deep emission is considerably weaker. However, emission intensity from m-GaN is still lower than that of polar and semipolar (1 100 ) reference samples grown under the same conditions. To shed light on this problem, spatial distribution of optical emission over the c+ and c- wings of the nonpolar GaN/Si was studied by spatially resolved cathodoluminescence and near-field scanning optical microscopy.

  6. Experimental and numerical optical characterization of plasmonic copper nanoparticles embedded in ZnO fabricated by ion implantation and annealing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le, Khai Q. [Faculty of Science and Technology, Hoa Sen University, Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Jazan University, P.O. Box 114, 45142 Jazan (Saudi Arabia); Nguyen, Hieu P.T. [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, New Jersey Institute of Technology, NJ 07102 (United States); Ngo, Quang Minh [Institute of Material Sciences, Vietnam Academy of Science and Technology, 18 Hoang Quoc Viet Road, Cau Giay, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Canimoglu, Adil [Nigde University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Physics Department, Nigde (Turkey); Can, Nurdogan, E-mail: cannurdogan@yahoo.com [Celal Bayar University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Department of Physics, Muradiye, Manisa (Turkey); Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Jazan University, P.O. Box 114, 45142 Jazan (Saudi Arabia)

    2016-06-05

    Here we describe the successfully fabrication of metal nanoparticle crystals by implanting copper (Cu) ions into single zinc oxide (ZnO) crystals with ion energy of 400 keV at ion doses of 1 × 10{sup 16} to 1 × 10{sup 17} ions/cm{sup 2}. After implantation and post-annealing treatment, the Cu implanted ZnO produces a broad range of luminescence emissions, ranging from green to yellow. A green luminescence peak at 550 nm could be ascribed to the isolated Cu ions. The changes in luminescence emission bands between the initial implant and annealed suggest that the implants give rise to clustering Cu nanoparticles in the host matrix but that the annealing process dissociates these. Numerical modelling of the Cu nanoparticles was employed to simulate their optical properties including the extinction cross section, electron energy loss spectroscopy and cathodoluminescence. We demonstrate that the clustering of nanoparticles generates Fano resonances corresponding to the generation of multiple resonances, while the isolation of nanoparticles results in intensity amplification. - Highlights: • We present the fabrication of metal nanoparticle crystals by implanting Cu into ZnO. • The luminescence properties were studied at different annealing temperature. • Numerical modelling of the Cu nanoparticles was employed. • We demonstrate that the clustering of nanoparticles generates Fano resonances.

  7. {sup 5}D{sub 3}{yields}{sup 7}F{sub J} emission of Tb doped sol-gel silica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seed Ahmed, H.A.A.; Ntwaeaborwa, O.M.; Gusowski, M.A. [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, IB51, Box 339, Bloemfontein 9300 (South Africa); Botha, J.R. [Department of Physics, Nelson Mandela Metropolitan University, Box 77000, Port Elizabeth 6031 (South Africa); Kroon, R.E., E-mail: KroonRE@ufs.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, IB51, Box 339, Bloemfontein 9300 (South Africa)

    2012-05-15

    Amorphous silica samples doped with 0.1 and 1 mol% of terbium (Tb) were synthesized by the sol-gel method. In addition to the green light associated with {sup 5}D{sub 4}{yields}{sup 7}F{sub J} transitions of Tb{sup 3+}, the sample containing 0.1 mol% also emitted blue light as a result of {sup 5}D{sub 3}{yields}{sup 7}F{sub J} transitions during photoluminescence (PL) measurements. As a result of concentration quenching this blue emission was not observed for the samples doped with the higher concentration (1 mol%). However the blue {sup 5}D{sub 3} {yields}{sup 7}F{sub J} emission was observed in the 1 mol% doped samples during cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements. Since a rough calculation indicated that the excitation rate in the CL system where the blue emission is observed may be similar to a laser PL system under conditions where the blue emission is not observed, the difference is attributed to the nature of the excitation sources. It is suggested that during the CL excitation incident electrons can reduce non-luminescent Tb{sup 4+} ions in the silica, substituting for Si{sup 4+} ions, to the excited (Tb{sup 3+}) Low-Asterisk state and that these are responsible for the blue emission, which does not occur during PL excitation.

  8. Growth of Bi doped cadmium zinc telluride single crystals by Bridgman oscillation method and its structural, optical, and electrical analyses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carcelen, V.; Rodriguez-Fernandez, J.; Dieguez, E.; Hidalgo, P.

    2010-01-01

    The II-VI compound semiconductor cadmium zinc telluride (CZT) is very useful for room temperature radiation detection applications. In the present research, we have successfully grown Bi doped CZT single crystals with two different zinc concentrations (8 and 14 at. %) by the Bridgman oscillation method, in which one experiment has been carried out with a platinum (Pt) tube as the ampoule support. Pt also acts as a cold finger and reduces the growth velocity and enhances crystalline perfection. The grown single crystals have been studied with different analysis methods. The stoichiometry was confirmed by energy dispersive by x-ray and inductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy analyses and it was found there is no incorporation of impurities in the grown crystal. The presence of Cd and Te vacancies was determined by cathodoluminescence studies. Electrical properties were assessed by I-V analysis and indicated higher resistive value (8.53x10 8 Ω cm) for the crystal grown with higher zinc concentration (with Cd excess) compare to the other (3.71x10 5 Ω cm).

  9. Crystal field analysis of Pm$^{3+}$ (4$^{f4}) and Sm$^{3+}$ (4$^{f5}) and lattice location studies of $^{147}$Nd and $^{147}$Pm in w-AlN

    CERN Document Server

    Vetter, Ulrich; Nijjar, Anmol S; Zandi, Bahram; Öhl, Gregor; Wahl, Ulrich; De Vries, Bart; Hofsäss, Hans; Dietrich, Marc

    2006-01-01

    We report a detailed crystal field analysis of Pm3+ and Sm3+ as well as lattice location studies of 147Pm and 147Nd in 2H-aluminum nitride (w-AlN). The isotopes of mass 147 were produced by nuclear fission and implanted at an energy of 60 keV. The decay chain of interest in this work is 147Nd→147Pm→147Sm (stable). Lattice location studies applying the emission channeling technique were carried out using the β− particles and conversion electrons emitted in the radioactive decay of 147Nd→147Pm. The samples were investigated as implanted, and also they were investigated after annealing to temperatures of 873 K as well as 1373 K. The main fraction of about 60% of both 147Pm as well as 147Nd atoms was located on substitutional Al sites in the AlN lattice; the remainder of the ions were located randomly within the AlN lattice. Following radioactive decay of 147Nd, the cathodoluminescence spectra of Pm3+ and Sm3+ were obtained between 500 nm and 1050 nm at sample temperatures between 12 K and 300 K. High-re...

  10. Petrological features of selected components of the Cergowa sandstones (Outer Carpathians) recorded by scanning electron microscopy - preliminary study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pszonka, Joanna

    2017-11-01

    The scanning electron microscope analysis of the Cergowa sandstones brings new data on their petrological features and chemical composition. Previous work in standard petrographic examination, e.g. polarising (PL) or cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy, displayed limited information on grain surface topography and only assumptions to their geochemistry. Both identification and characterisation of minerals are fundamental in the progress of mining and minerals processing systems. Detrital grains of the Cergowa sandstones are bound by calcite and dolomitic cement and commonly corroded by diagenetic fluids, however, in varying degrees, which is illustrated here by feldspar, quartz and dolomite minerals. Dissolution processes of marginal parts of these mineral grains resulted in corrosion, which increased the contact surface between the grains and the cement. The difference in resistance to these processes was observed not only among distinct groups of minerals, but also within the group of feldspars: between K-feldspars and minerals of plagioclase. That combination resulted in exceptionally strong cementation of the Cergowa sandstones, which is expressed by their high hardness and resistance to abrasion, freezing, and thawing. Inherent parameters of sandstones are characterised by their petrographical properties.

  11. Petrological features of selected components of the Cergowa sandstones (Outer Carpathians recorded by scanning electron microscopy – preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pszonka Joanna

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The scanning electron microscope analysis of the Cergowa sandstones brings new data on their petrological features and chemical composition. Previous work in standard petrographic examination, e.g. polarising (PL or cathodoluminescence (CL microscopy, displayed limited information on grain surface topography and only assumptions to their geochemistry. Both identification and characterisation of minerals are fundamental in the progress of mining and minerals processing systems. Detrital grains of the Cergowa sandstones are bound by calcite and dolomitic cement and commonly corroded by diagenetic fluids, however, in varying degrees, which is illustrated here by feldspar, quartz and dolomite minerals. Dissolution processes of marginal parts of these mineral grains resulted in corrosion, which increased the contact surface between the grains and the cement. The difference in resistance to these processes was observed not only among distinct groups of minerals, but also within the group of feldspars: between K–feldspars and minerals of plagioclase. That combination resulted in exceptionally strong cementation of the Cergowa sandstones, which is expressed by their high hardness and resistance to abrasion, freezing, and thawing. Inherent parameters of sandstones are characterised by their petrographical properties.

  12. Assessing the shock state of the lunar highlands: Implications for the petrogenesis and chronology of crustal anorthosites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pernet-Fisher, J F; Joy, K H; Martin, D J P; Donaldson Hanna, K L

    2017-07-19

    Our understanding of the formation and evolution of the primary lunar crust is based on geochemical systematics from the lunar ferroan anorthosite (FAN) suite. Recently, much effort has been made to understand this suite's petrologic history to constrain the timing of crystallisation and to interpret FAN chemical diversity. We investigate the shock histories of lunar anorthosites by combining Optical Microscope (OM) 'cold' cathodoluminescence (CL)-imaging and Fourier Transform Infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy analyses. In the first combined study of its kind, this study demonstrates that over ~4.5 Ga of impact processing, plagioclase is on average weakly shocked (30 GPa; maskelynite) are uncommon. To investigate how plagioclase trace-element systematics are affected by moderate to weak shock (~5 to 30 GPa) we couple REE+Y abundances with FTIR analyses for FAN clasts from lunar meteorite Northwest Africa (NWA) 2995. We observe weak correlations between plagioclase shock state and some REE+Y systematics (e.g., La/Y and Sm/Nd ratios). This observation could prove significant to our understanding of how crystallisation ages are evaluated (e.g., plagioclase-whole rock Sm-Nd isochrons) and for what trace-elements can be used to differentiate between lunar lithologies and assess magma source compositional differences.

  13. Structural and optical inhomogeneities of Fe doped GaN grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malguth, E.; Hoffmann, A.; Phillips, M. R.

    2008-12-01

    We present the results of cathodoluminescence experiments on a set of Fe doped GaN samples with Fe concentrations of 5×1017, 1×1018, 1×1019, and 2×1020 cm-3. These specimens were grown by hydride vapor phase epitaxy with different concentrations of Fe. The introduction of Fe is found to promote the formation of structurally inhomogeneous regions of increased donor concentration. We detect a tendency of these regions to form hexagonal pits at the surface. The locally increased carrier concentration leads to enhanced emission from the band edge and the internal T41(G)-A61(S) transition of Fe3+. In these areas, the luminescence forms a finely structured highly symmetric pattern, which is attributed to defect migration along strain-field lines. Fe doping is found to quench the yellow defect luminescence band and to enhance the blue luminescence band due to the lowering of the Fermi level and the formation of point defects, respectively.

  14. Morphological and luminescent characteristics of GaN dots deposited on AlN by alternate supply of TMG and NH3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsai, Y.-L.; Gong, J.-R.; Lin, T.-Y.; Lin, H.-Y.; Chen, Yang-Fang; Lin, K.-M.

    2006-01-01

    GaN dots were deposited on AlN underlayers by alternate supply of trimethylgallium (TMG) and ammonia (NH 3 ) in an inductively heated quartz reactor operated at atmospheric pressure. Various growth parameters including deposition temperature, TMG admittance and pulse time between TMG and NH 3 exposures were proposed to investigate the influence of growth parameters on the size distribution of GaN dots. It appears that GaN dots with uniform size distribution can be achieved under certain growth conditions. Based on the study of atomic force microscopy (AFM), high deposition temperature was found to be in favor of forming large GaN dots with small dot density. Decrement of TMG flow rate or reduction in the number of growth cycle tends to enable the formation of GaN dots with small dot sizes. The results of room temperature (RT) cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements of the GaN dots exhibit an emission peak at 3.735 eV. A remarkable blue shift of GaN dot emission was observed by reduced temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurements

  15. Generated carrier dynamics in V-pit enhanced InGaN/GaN light emitting diode

    KAUST Repository

    Ajia, Idris A.

    2017-12-18

    We investigate the effects of V-pits on the optical properties of a state-of-the art highly efficient, blue InGaN/GaN multi-quantum-well (MQW) light emitting diode (LED) with high internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of > 80%. The LED is structurally enhanced by incorporating pre-MQW InGaN strain-relief layer with low InN content and patterned sapphire substrate. For comparison, a conventional (unenhanced) InGaN/GaN MQW LED (with IQE of 46%) grown under similar conditions was subjected to the same measurements. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) reveals the absence of V-pits in the unenhanced LED, whereas in the enhanced LED, V-pits with {10-11} facets, emerging from threading dislocations (TDs) were prominent. Cathodoluminescence mapping reveals the luminescence properties near the V-pits, showing that the formation of V-pit defects can encourage the growth of defect-neutralizing barriers around TD defect states. The diminished contribution of TDs in the MQWs allows indium-rich localization sites to act as efficient recombination centers. Photoluminescence and time-resolved spectroscopy measurements suggest that the V-pits play a significant role in the generated carrier rate and droop mechanism, showing that the quantum confined Stark effect is suppressed at low generated carrier density, after which the carrier dynamics and droop are governed by the carrier overflow effect.

  16. Nanoselective area growth and characterization of dislocation-free InGaN nanopyramids on AlN buffered Si(111) templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sundaram, S.; El Gmili, Y. [CNRS, UMI 2958 Georgia Tech-CNRS, 2 Rue Marconi, 57070 Metz (France); Puybaret, R.; Li, X.; Bonanno, P. L.; Voss, P. L.; Ougazzaden, A., E-mail: abdallah.ougazzaden@georgiatech-metz.fr [CNRS, UMI 2958 Georgia Tech-CNRS, 2 Rue Marconi, 57070 Metz (France); School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, GT Lorraine, 57070 Metz (France); Pantzas, K.; Patriarche, G. [CNRS, UPR LPN, Route de Nozay, 91460 Marcoussis (France); Salvestrini, J. P. [Universite de Lorraine, Centrale Supelec, LMOPS, EA 4423, 2 rue E. Belin, 57070 Metz (France)

    2015-09-14

    We report the metal organic chemical vapor deposition growth of dislocation-free 100 nm thick hexagonal InGaN nanopyramid arrays with up to 33% of indium content by nano-selective area growth on patterned AlN/Si (111) substrates. InGaN grown on SiO{sub 2} patterned templates exhibit high selectivity. Their single crystal structure is confirmed by scanning transmission electron microscope combined with an energy dispersive X-ray analysis, which also reveals the absence of threading dislocations in the InGaN nanopyramids due to elastic strain relaxation mechanisms. Cathodoluminescence measurements on a single InGaN nanopyramid clearly show an improvement of the optical properties when compared to planar InGaN grown under the same conditions. The good structural, morphological, and optical quality of the InGaN nanostructures grown on AlN/Si indicates that the nano-selective area growth technology is attractive for the realization of site-controlled indium-rich InGaN nanostructure-based devices and can also be transferred to other highly mismatched substrates.

  17. Surface chemical reactions during electron beam irradiation of nanocrystalline CaS:Ce3+ phosphor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Vinay; Pitale, Shreyas S.; Nagpure, I. M.; Coetsee, E.; Ntwaeaborwa, O. M.; Terblans, J. J.; Swart, H. C.; Mishra, Varun

    2010-01-01

    The effects of accelerating voltage (0.5-5 keV) on the green cathodoluminescence (CL) of CaS:Ce 3+ nanocrystalline powder phosphors is reported. An increase in the CL intensity was observed from the powders when the accelerating voltage was varied from 0.5 to 5 keV, which is a relevant property for a phosphor to be used in field emission displays (FEDs). The CL degradation induced by prolonged electron beam irradiation was analyzed using CL spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and Auger electron spectroscopy (AES). The AES data showed the decrease in the S peak intensity and an increase in the O peak intensity during electron bombardment. The CL intensity was found to decrease to 30% of its original intensity after about 50 C/cm 2 . XPS was used to study the chemical composition of the CaS:Ce 3+ nanophosphor before and after degradation. The XPS data confirms that a nonluminescent CaSO 4 layer has formed on the surface during the degradation process, which may partially be responsible for the CL degradation. The electron stimulated surface chemical reaction mechanism was used to explain the effects of S desorption and the formation of the nonluminescent CaSO 4 layer on the surface.

  18. Electron beam induced green luminescence and degradation study of CaS:Ce nanocrystalline phosphors for FED applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, Vinay, E-mail: vinaykdhiman@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, P.O. Box 339, Bloemfontein 9300 (South Africa); Mishra, Varun [Department of Physics, Lovely Professional University, Phagwara 144 402, Punjab (India); Biggs, M.M.; Nagpure, I.M.; Ntwaeaborwa, O.M.; Terblans, J.J. [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, P.O. Box 339, Bloemfontein 9300 (South Africa); Swart, H.C., E-mail: swarthc.sci@ufs.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, P.O. Box 339, Bloemfontein 9300 (South Africa)

    2010-01-01

    Green luminescence and degradation of Ce{sup 3+} doped CaS nanocrystalline phosphors were studied with a 2 keV, 10 {mu}A electron beam in an O{sub 2} environment. The nanophosphors were synthesized by the co-precipitation method. The samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction, Transmission electron microscopy, Scanning electron microscopy/electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Cubic CaS with an average particle size of 42 {+-} 2 nm was obtained. PL emission was observed at 507 nm and a shoulder at 560 nm with an excitation wavelength of 460 nm. Auger electron spectroscopy and Cathodoluminescence (CL) were used to monitor the changes in the surface composition of the CaS:Ce{sup 3+} nanocrystalline phosphors during electron bombardment in an O{sub 2} environment. The effect of different oxygen pressures ranging from 1 x 10{sup -8} to 1 x 10{sup -6} Torr on the CL intensity was also investigated. A CaSO{sub 4} layer was observed on the surface after the electron beam degradation. The CL intensity was found to decrease up to 30% of its original intensity at 1 x 10{sup -6} Torr oxygen pressure after an electron dose of 50 C/cm{sup 2}. The formation of oxygen defects during electron bombardment may also be responsible for the decrease in CL intensity.

  19. Electron beam induced green luminescence and degradation study of CaS:Ce nanocrystalline phosphors for FED applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumar, Vinay; Mishra, Varun; Biggs, M.M.; Nagpure, I.M.; Ntwaeaborwa, O.M.; Terblans, J.J.; Swart, H.C.

    2010-01-01

    Green luminescence and degradation of Ce 3+ doped CaS nanocrystalline phosphors were studied with a 2 keV, 10 μA electron beam in an O 2 environment. The nanophosphors were synthesized by the co-precipitation method. The samples were characterized using X-ray diffraction, Transmission electron microscopy, Scanning electron microscopy/electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and Photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy. Cubic CaS with an average particle size of 42 ± 2 nm was obtained. PL emission was observed at 507 nm and a shoulder at 560 nm with an excitation wavelength of 460 nm. Auger electron spectroscopy and Cathodoluminescence (CL) were used to monitor the changes in the surface composition of the CaS:Ce 3+ nanocrystalline phosphors during electron bombardment in an O 2 environment. The effect of different oxygen pressures ranging from 1 x 10 -8 to 1 x 10 -6 Torr on the CL intensity was also investigated. A CaSO 4 layer was observed on the surface after the electron beam degradation. The CL intensity was found to decrease up to 30% of its original intensity at 1 x 10 -6 Torr oxygen pressure after an electron dose of 50 C/cm 2 . The formation of oxygen defects during electron bombardment may also be responsible for the decrease in CL intensity.

  20. Characterization of novel powder and thin film RGB phosphors for field emissions display application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chakhovskoi, A.G.; Hunt, C.E.

    1996-01-01

    The spectral response, brightness and outgassing characteristics of new, low-voltage phosphors for application in field-emission flat-panel displays, are presented. The tested phosphor materials include combustion synthesized powders and thin films prepared by RF-diode or magnetron sputtering, laser ablation and molecular beam epitaxy. These cathodoluminescent materials are tested with e-beam excitation at currents up to 50 μA within the 200-2000V (e.g. open-quotes low-voltageclose quotes) and 3-8 kV (e.g. open-quotes medium voltageclose quotes) ranges. The spectral coordinates are compared to commercial low-voltage P22 phosphors. Phosphor outgassing, as a function of time is measured with a residual gas analyzer at fixed 50 μA beam current in the low-voltage range. We find that levels of outgassing stabilize to low values after the first few hours of excitation. The desorption rates measured for powder phosphor layers with different thickness are compared to desorption from thin films

  1. Luminescence properties of Ce3+ and Tb3+ co-activated ZnAl2O4 phosphor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tshabalala, K.G.; Cho, S.-H.; Park, J.-K.; Pitale, Shreyas S.; Nagpure, I.M.; Kroon, R.E.; Swart, H.C.; Ntwaeaborwa, O.M.

    2012-01-01

    In this study, a solution combustion method was used to prepare green emitting Ce 3+ –Tb 3+ co-activated ZnAl 2 O 4 phosphor. The samples were annealed at 700 °C in air or hydrogen atmosphere to improve their crystallinity and optical properties. X-ray diffraction study confirmed that both as-prepared and post-preparation annealed samples crystallized in the well known cubic spinel structure of ZnAl 2 O 4 . An agglomeration of irregular platelet-like particles whose surfaces were encrusted with smaller spheroidal particles was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The fluorescence data collected from the annealed samples with different concentrations of Ce 3+ and Tb 3+ show the enhanced green emission at 543 nm associated with 5 D 4 → 7 F 5 transitions of Tb 3+ . The enhancement was attributed to energy transfer from Ce 3+ to Tb 3+ . Possible mechanism of energy transfer via a down conversion process is discussed. Furthermore, cathodoluminescence (CL) intensity degradation of this phosphor was also investigated and the degradation data suggest that the material was chemically stable and the CL intensity was also stable after 10 h of irradiation by a beam of high energy electrons.

  2. A Possible Late Paleocene-Early Eocene Ocean Acidification Event Recoded in the Adriatic Carbonate Platform

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, A.; Martindale, R. C.; Kosir, A.; Oefinger, J.

    2017-12-01

    The Paleocene-Eocene Thermal Maximum (PETM) event ( 56.3 Ma) was a period of massive carbon release into the Earth system, resulting in significant shifts in ocean chemistry. It has been proposed that ocean acidification - a decrease in the pH and carbonate saturation state of the water as a result of dissolved carbon dioxide in sea water - occurred in both the shallow and deep marine realms. Ocean acidification would have had a devastating impact on the benthic ecosystem, and has been proposed as the cause of decreased carbonate deposition in marine sections and coral reef collapse during the late Paleocene. To date, however, the only physical evidence of Paleocene-Eocene ocean acidification has been shown for offshore sites (i.e., a shallow carbonate compensation depth), but isotope analysis (i.e. B, I/Ca) suggests that acidification occurred in the shallow shelves as well. Several sites in the Kras region of Slovenia, has been found to contain apparent erosion surfaces coeval with the Paleocene-Eocene Boundary. We have investigated these potentially acidified horizons using petrography, stable carbon isotopes, cathodoluminescence, and elemental mapping. These datasets will inform whether the horizons formed by seafloor dissolution in an acidified ocean, or are due to subaerial exposure, or burial diagenesis (i.e. stylotization). Physical erosion and diagenesis can easily be ruled out based on field relationships and petrography, but the other potential causes must be analyzed more critically.

  3. Studies on the optoelectronic properties of the thermally evaporated tin-doped indium oxide nanostructures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, Ko-Ying [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, Liang-Da [Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Chinese Culture University, Taipei 111, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chang, Li-Wei [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan, ROC (China); Shih, Han C., E-mail: hcshih@mx.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu 300, Taiwan, ROC (China); Institute of Materials Science and Nanotechnology, Chinese Culture University, Taipei 111, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-05-15

    Indium oxide (In{sub 2}O{sub 3}) nanorods, nanotowers and tin-doped (Sn:In = 1:100) indium oxide (ITO) nanorods have been fabricated by thermal evaporation. The morphology, microstructure and chemical composition of these three nanoproducts are characterized by FE-SEM, HRTEM and XPS. To further investigate the optoelectronic properties, the I–V curves and cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra are measured. The electrical resistivity of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanorods, nanotowers and ITO nanorods are 1.32 kΩ, 0.65 kΩ and 0.063 kΩ, respectively. CL spectra of these three nanoproducts clearly indicate that tin-doped (Sn:In = 1:100) indium oxide (ITO) nanorods cause a blue shift. No doubt ITO nanorods obtain the highest performance among these three nanoproducts, and this also means that Sn-doped In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanostructures would be the best way to enhance the optoelectronic properties. Additionally, the growing mechanism and the optoelectronic properties of these three nanostructures are discussed. This study is beneficial to the applications of In{sub 2}O{sub 3} nanorods, nanotowers and ITO nanorods in optoelectronic nanodevices.

  4. Morphology and optical properties of ternary Zn-Sn-O semiconductor nanowires with catalyst-free growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Yuan-Chang, E-mail: yuanvictory@gmail.com [Institute of Materials Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung 20224, Taiwan (China); Huang, Chiem-Lum; Hu, Chia-Yen; Deng, Xian-Shi; Zhong, Hua [Institute of Materials Engineering, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung 20224, Taiwan (China)

    2012-10-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} nanowires with various morphologies were successfully synthesized by thermal evaporation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The as-synthesized Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} nanowires have a face-centered cubic crystal structure. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thermal annealing of Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} nanowires changes the properties of the visible emission band. - Abstract: This study reports the synthesis of Zn{sub 2}SnO{sub 4} (ZTO) nanowires with various morphologies using thermal evaporation without a metal catalyst. X-ray diffraction patterns show that the structure of the as-synthesized ZTO nanowires is a face-centered cubic spinel phase. Scanning electron microscopy images exhibit that the as-synthesized nanowires have various morphologies, and homogeneously cover the area of interest. High-resolution transmittance electron microscopy reveals that these ZTO nanowires have single crystalline microstructures with four morphologies. The results of low-temperature cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements show the crystal defects of oxygen vacancies and interstitials may contribute to blue-green and yellow-orange emissions, respectively, for the as-synthesized single nanowire. This study also discusses the effects of thermal annealing under oxygen-rich and reducing ambient on the CL properties of the single ZTO nanowire.

  5. Epitaxial GaN around ZnO nanopillars

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fikry, Mohamed; Scholz, Ferdinand [Institut fuer Optoelektronik, Universitaet Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 45, 89081 Ulm (Germany); Madel, Manfred; Tischer, Ingo; Thonke, Klaus [Institut fuer Quantenmaterie, Universitaet Ulm, Albert-Einstein-Allee 45, 89081 Ulm (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    We report on an investigation of the epitaxial quality of GaN layers overgrown coaxially around ZnO nanopillars. In a first step, regularly arranged ZnO nanopillars were grown using pre-patterning by e-beam lithography or self-organized hexagonal polystyrene sphere masks. Alternatively, ZnO pillars were also successfully grown on top of GaN pyramids. In a second step, GaN layers were grown around the ZnO pillars by Metal Organic Vapor Phase Epitaxy. At growth temperatures above 800 C, the ZnO pillars are dissolved by the hydrogen carrier gas leaving hollow GaN nanotubes. Characterization involved photoluminescence (PL), scanning electron microscopy and cathodoluminescence. The fair quality of the deposited GaN layers is confirmed by a sharp low temperature PL peak at 3.48 eV attributed to the donor bound exciton emission. Further peaks at 3.42 eV and 3.29 eV show the possible existence of basal plane and prismatic stacking faults.

  6. Determination of carrier diffusion length in GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hafiz, Shopan; Zhang, Fan; Monavarian, Morteza; Avrutin, Vitaliy; Morkoç, Hadis; Özgür, Ümit; Metzner, Sebastian; Bertram, Frank; Christen, Jürgen; Gil, Bernard

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion lengths of photo-excited carriers along the c-direction were determined from photoluminescence (PL) and cross-sectional cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements in p- and n-type GaN epitaxial layers grown on c-plane sapphire by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition. The investigated samples incorporate a 6 nm thick In0.15Ga0.85N active layer capped with either 500 nm p-GaN or 1500 nm n-GaN. The top GaN layers were etched in steps and PL from the InGaN active region and the underlying layers was monitored as a function of the top GaN thickness upon photo-generation near the surface region by above bandgap excitation. Taking into consideration the absorption in the top GaN layer as well as active and underlying layers, the diffusion lengths at 295 K and at 15 K were measured to be 93 ± 7 nm and 70 ± 7 nm for Mg-doped p-type GaN and 432 ± 30 nm and 316 ± 30 nm for unintentionally doped n-type GaN, respectively, at photogenerated carrier densities of 4.2 × 1018 cm-3 using PL spectroscopy. CL measurements of the unintentionally doped n-type GaN layer at much lower carrier densities of 1017 cm-3 revealed a longer diffusion length of 525 ± 11 nm at 6 K.

  7. Hall-effect measurements of metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy-grown p-type homoepitaxial GaN layers with various Mg concentrations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horita, Masahiro; Takashima, Shinya; Tanaka, Ryo; Matsuyama, Hideaki; Ueno, Katsunori; Edo, Masaharu; Takahashi, Tokio; Shimizu, Mitsuaki; Suda, Jun

    2017-03-01

    Mg-doped p-type gallium nitride (GaN) layers with doping concentrations in the range from 6.5 × 1016 cm-3 (lightly doped) to 3.8 × 1019 cm-3 (heavily doped) were investigated by Hall-effect measurement for the analysis of hole concentration and mobility. p-GaN was homoepitaxially grown on a GaN free-standing substrate by metalorganic vapor-phase epitaxy. The threading dislocation density of p-GaN was 4 × 106 cm-2 measured by cathodoluminescence mapping. Hall-effect measurements of p-GaN were carried out at a temperature in the range from 130 to 450 K. For the lightly doped p-GaN, the acceptor concentration of 7.0 × 1016 cm-3 and the donor concentration of 3.2 × 1016 cm-3 were obtained, where the compensation ratio was 46%. We also obtained the depth of the Mg acceptor level to be 220 meV. The hole mobilities of 86, 31, 14 cm2 V-1 s-1 at 200, 300, 400 K, respectively, were observed in the lightly doped p-GaN.

  8. Optical properties of C-doped bulk GaN wafers grown by halide vapor phase epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khromov, S.; Hemmingsson, C.; Monemar, B.; Hultman, L.; Pozina, G.

    2014-01-01

    Freestanding bulk C-doped GaN wafers grown by halide vapor phase epitaxy are studied by optical spectroscopy and electron microscopy. Significant changes of the near band gap (NBG) emission as well as an enhancement of yellow luminescence have been found with increasing C doping from 5 × 10 16 cm −3 to 6 × 10 17 cm −3 . Cathodoluminescence mapping reveals hexagonal domain structures (pits) with high oxygen concentrations formed during the growth. NBG emission within the pits even at high C concentration is dominated by a rather broad line at ∼3.47 eV typical for n-type GaN. In the area without pits, quenching of the donor bound exciton (DBE) spectrum at moderate C doping levels of 1–2 × 10 17 cm −3 is observed along with the appearance of two acceptor bound exciton lines typical for Mg-doped GaN. The DBE ionization due to local electric fields in compensated GaN may explain the transformation of the NBG emission

  9. Selective formation of GaN-based nanorod heterostructures on soda-lime glass substrates by a local heating method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Young Joon; Kim, Yong-Jin; Jeon, Jong-Myeong; Kim, Miyoung; Choi, Jun Hee; Baik, Chan Wook; Kim, Sun Il; Park, Sung Soo; Kim, Jong Min; Yi, Gyu-Chul

    2011-05-20

    We report on the fabrication of high-quality GaN on soda-lime glass substrates, heretofore precluded by both the intolerance of soda-lime glass to the high temperatures required for III-nitride growth and the lack of an epitaxial relationship with amorphous glass. The difficulties were circumvented by heteroepitaxial coating of GaN on ZnO nanorods via a local microheating method. Metal-organic chemical vapor deposition of ZnO nanorods and GaN layers using the microheater arrays produced high-quality GaN/ZnO coaxial nanorod heterostructures at only the desired regions on the soda-lime glass substrates. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy examination of the coaxial nanorod heterostructures indicated the formation of an abrupt, semicoherent interface. Photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy was also applied to confirm the high optical quality of the coaxial nanorod heterostructures. Mg-doped GaN/ZnO coaxial nanorod heterostructure arrays, whose GaN shell layers were grown with various different magnesocene flow rates, were further investigated by using photoluminescence spectroscopy for the p-type doping characteristics. The suggested method for fabrication of III-nitrides on glass substrates signifies potentials for low-cost and large-size optoelectronic device applications.

  10. Increased p-type conductivity through use of an indium surfactant in the growth of Mg-doped GaN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kyle, Erin C. H.; Kaun, Stephen W.; Young, Erin C.; Speck, James S.

    2015-06-01

    We have examined the effect of an indium surfactant on the growth of p-type GaN by ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy. p-type GaN was grown at temperatures ranging from 700 to 780 °C with and without an indium surfactant. The Mg concentration in all films in this study was 4.5-6 × 1019 cm-3 as measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy. All p-type GaN films grown with an indium surfactant had higher p-type conductivities and higher hole concentrations than similar films grown without an indium surfactant. The lowest p-type GaN room temperature resistivity was 0.59 Ω-cm, and the highest room temperature carrier concentration was 1.6 × 1018 cm-3. Fits of the temperature-dependent carrier concentration data showed a one to two order of magnitude lower unintentional compensating defect concentration in samples grown with the indium surfactant. Samples grown at higher temperature had a lower active acceptor concentration. Improvements in band-edge luminescence were seen by cathodoluminescence for samples grown with the indium surfactant, confirming the trends seen in the Hall data.

  11. A carbon fiber-ZnS nanocomposite for dual application as an efficient cold cathode as well as a luminescent anode for display technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Arunava; Sarkar, Sudipta Kumar; Sen, Dipayan; Chattopadhyay, K. K.

    2015-01-01

    In the current work we present a simple technique to develop a carbon nanofiber (CNF)/zinc sulfide (ZnS) composite material for excellent FED application. CNFs and ZnS microspheres were synthesized by following a simple thermal chemical vapor deposition and hydrothermal procedure, respectively. A rigorous chemical mixture of CNF and ZnS was prepared to produce the CNF-ZnS composite material. The cathodo-luminescence intensity of the composite improved immensely compared to pure ZnS, also the composite material showed better field emission than pure CNFs. For pure CNF the turn-on field was found to be 2.1 V μm-1 whereas for the CNF-ZnS composite it reduced to a value of 1.72 V μm-1. Altogether the composite happened to be an ideal element for both the anode and cathode of a FED system. Furthermore, simulation of our CNF-ZnS composite system using the finite element modeling method also ensured the betterment of field emission from CNF after surface attachment of ZnS nanoclusters.

  12. X-ray topographic studies and measurement of lattice parameter differences within synthetic diamonds grown by the reconstitution technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wierzchowski, W.; Moore, M.; Makepeace, A. P. W.; Yacoot, A.

    1991-10-01

    A 4 x 4 x 1.5 cu mm cuboctahedral diamond and two 0.7 mm thick slabs cut from a truncated octahedral diamond grown by the reconstitution technique were studied in different double-crystal arrangements with both conventional and synchrotron X-ray sources. The back-reflection double crystal topographs of large polished 001-plane-oriented faces intersecting different growth sectors, together with cathodoluminescence patterns, allowed identification of these sectors. A double-crystal arrangement, employing the -3 2 5 quartz reflection matching the symmetrical 004 diamond reflection in CuK(alpha 1) radiation, was used for measurement of lattice parameter differences with an accuracy of one and a half parts per million. The simultaneous investigation by means of Lang projection and section topography provided complementary information about the crystallographic defects and internal structures of growth sectors. Observation of the cuboctahedral diamond with a filter of peak transmittance at 430 nm revealed a 'Maltese cross' growth feature in the central (001) growth sector, which also affected the birefringence pattern. However, this feature only very slightly affected the double-crystal topographs.

  13. Thermoluminescent properties of ZnS:Mn nanocrystalline powders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ortiz-Hernández, Arturo Agustín; Méndez García, Víctor Hugo; Pérez Arrieta, María Leticia; Ortega Sígala, José Juan

    2015-01-01

    Thermoluminescent ZnS nanocrystals doped with Mn 2+ ions were synthesized by chemical co-precipitation method. From X-ray diffraction studies it was observed that the synthesized nanoparticles have cubic zinc blende structure with average sizes of about 40–50 nm. Morphology was analyzed by TEM. Photoluminescence studies showed two transitions, one of them close to 396 nm and other close to 598 nm, which is enhanced with increasing dopant concentration, this behavior was also observed in the cathodoluminescence spectrum. The thermoluminescence gamma dose-response has linear behavior over dose range 5–100 mGy, the glow curve structure shows two glow peaks at 436 K and at 518 K that were taken into account to calculate the kinetic parameters using the Computerized Glow Curve Deconvolution procedure. - Highlights: • Nanocrystals in powder of ZnS:Mn were synthesized using the co-precipitation method. • The integrated TL spectra has a linear behavior on the dose range 5–100 mGy of γ-radiation. • The kinetic parameters were obtained by the CGCD procedure. • Results support the possible use of nanocrystalline ZnS:Mn as a new γ-dose nanoTLD

  14. Amplitude of late Miocene sea-level fluctuations from karst development in reef-slope deposits (SE Spain)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reolid, Jesús; Betzler, Christian; Braga, Juan Carlos

    2016-11-01

    A prograding late Miocene carbonate platform in southern Spain revealing different sea-level pinning points was analysed with the aim to increase the accuracy of reconstruction of past sea-level changes. These pinning points are distinct diagenetic zones (DZ) and the position of reef-framework deposits. DZ1 is defined by the dissolution of bioclastic components and DZ2 by calcitic cement precipitation in dissolution pores. Calcite cements are granular and radiaxial fibrous, and are of meteoric origin as deduced from cathodoluminescence, EDX spectroscopy, as well as from δ13C and δ18O isotope analyses. DZ3 has moldic porosity after aragonitic bioclasts with minor granular calcitic cements. DZ1 and DZ2 indicate karstification and the development of a coastal palaeoaquifer during a sea-level lowstand. DZ3 diagenetic features are related to the final subaerial exposure of the section during the Messinian Salinity Crisis. Facies and diagenetic data reveal a complete cycle of sea-level fall (23 ± 1 m) and rise (31 ± 1 m). A robust age model based on magneto- and cyclostratigraphy for these deposits places this cycle between 5.89 and 5.87 Ma. Therefore, for the first time, this work allows a direct comparison of an outcrop with a pelagic marine proxy record of a specific Neogene sea-level fluctuation.

  15. Optical properties of oxygen-implanted CdS:O layers in terms of band anticrossing theory

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morozova, N. K., E-mail: MorozovaNK@mail.ru; Kanakhin, A. A.; Miroshnikova, I. N. [Moscow Power Engineering Institute, National Research University (Russian Federation); Galstyan, V. G. [Russian Academy of Sciences, Shubnikov Institute of Crystallography (Russian Federation)

    2013-08-15

    The microcathodoluminescence (MCL) and photoreflection spectra of CdS:O layers implanted with oxygen ions to 4 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 20} cm{sup -3} are investigated. Used method of MCL spectroscopy yields information only about the implanted-layer volume. Exciton MCL spectra, which allow one to determine the concentration of dissolved oxygen in the CdS:O layers and the influence of deviation of the substrates from stoichiometry, are recorded. The homogeneity of the ion-implanted layers is studied by cathodoluminescence (CL) scanning electron microscopy. The relationship between light-emitting areas and the luminescence band at {approx}630 nm is established. The reason for enhancement of this band upon radiation annealing is revealed and its nature as the luminescence of F{sup +} centers in CdS is confirmed. New photoreflection spectroscopy data are obtained, which describe the specific behavioral features of oxygen on the layer surface as an isoelectronic impurity in highly mismatched alloys (HMAs). It is shown that sulfur completely bonds and removes oxygen from CdS:O. Oxygen-free CdS remains on the surface in the form of nanoparticles, the size of which depends on the oxygen concentration in the CdS:O layer bulk. The results obtained are in agreement with the predictions of band anticrossing theory.

  16. Natural defects and defects created by ionic implantation in zinc tellurium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Roche, J.P.; Dupuy, M.; Pfister, J.C.

    1977-01-01

    Various defects have been studied in ZnTe crystals by transmission electron microscope and by scanning electron microscope in cathodo-luminescence mode: grain boundaries, sub-grain boundaries, twins. Ionic implants of boron (100 keV - 2x10 14 and 10 15 ions cm -2 ) were made on these crystals followed by isochrone annealing (30 minutes) of zinc under partial pressure at 550, 650 and 750 0 C. The nature of the defects was determined by transmission electron microscope: these are interstitial loops (b=1/3 ) the size of which varies between 20 A (non-annealed sample) and 180A (annealed at 750 0 C). The transmission electron microscope was also used to make concentration profiles of defects depending on depth. It is found that for the same implant (2x10 14 ions.cm -2 ), the defect peak moves towards the exterior of the crystal as the annealing temperature rises (400 - 1000 and 7000 A for the three annealings). These results are explained from a model which allows for the coalescence of defects and considers the surface of the sample as being the principal source of vacancies. During the annealings, the migration of vacancies brings about the gradual annihilation of the implant defects. The adjustment of certain calculation parameters on the computer result in giving 2 eV as energy value for the formation of vacancies [fr

  17. n-type diamond growth by phosphorus doping on (0 0 1)-oriented surface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kato, Hiromitsu; Makino, Toshiharu; Yamasaki, Satoshi; Okushi, Hideyo

    2007-01-01

    The properties of phosphorus incorporation for n-type doping of diamond are discussed and summarized. Doping of (0 0 1)-oriented diamond is introduced and compared with results achieved on (1 1 1) diamond. This review describes detailed procedures and conditions of plasma-enhanced chemical vapour deposition (CVD) growth and characteristics of electrical properties of phosphorus-doped diamond. The phosphorus incorporation was characterized by SIMS analysis including mapping. n-type conductivity is evaluated by Hall-effect measurements over a temperature regime of 300-1000 K. The crystal perfection of (0 0 1)-oriented n-type diamond is also evaluated by x-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy, reflection high-energy electron diffraction and cathodoluminescence analyses. The results show that phosphorus atoms are incorporated into the diamond network during (0 0 1) CVD diamond growth and that phosphorus acts as a donor as in (1 1 1)-oriented diamond. This result eliminates the restriction on substrate orientation, which had previously created a bottleneck in the development of diamond electronic devices. (review article)

  18. Microfracture spacing distributions and the evolution of fracture patterns in sandstones

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hooker, J. N.; Laubach, S. E.; Marrett, R.

    2018-03-01

    Natural fracture patterns in sandstone were sampled using scanning electron microscope-based cathodoluminescence (SEM-CL) imaging. All fractures are opening-mode and are fully or partially sealed by quartz cement. Most sampled fractures are too small to be height-restricted by sedimentary layers. At very low strains ( 100) datasets show spacings that are best fit by log-normal size distributions, compared to exponential, power law, or normal distributions. The clustering of fractures suggests that the locations of natural factures are not determined by a random process. To investigate natural fracture localization, we reconstructed the opening history of a cluster of fractures within the Huizachal Group in northeastern Mexico, using fluid inclusions from synkinematic cements and thermal-history constraints. The largest fracture, which is the only fracture in the cluster visible to the naked eye, among 101 present, opened relatively late in the sequence. This result suggests that the growth of sets of fractures is a self-organized process, in which small, initially isolated fractures grow and progressively interact, with preferential growth of a subset of fractures developing at the expense of growth of the rest. Size-dependent sealing of fractures within sets suggests that synkinematic cementation may contribute to fracture clustering.

  19. GaN and LED structures grown on pre-patterned silicon pillar arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Shunfeng; Fuendling, Soenke; Soekmen, Uensal; Merzsch, Stephan; Neumann, Richard; Peiner, Erwin; Wehmann, Hergo-Heinrich; Waag, Andreas [Institut fuer Halbleitertechnik, TU Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 66, 38106 Braunschweig (Germany); Hinze, Peter; Weimann, Thomas [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Bundesallee 100, 38116 Braunschweig (Germany); Jahn, Uwe; Trampert, Achim; Riechert, Henning [Paul-Drude-Institut fuer Festkoerperelektronik, Hausvoigteiplatz 5-7, 10117 Berlin (Germany)

    2010-01-15

    GaN nanorods (or nanowires) have attracted great interest in a variety of applications, e.g. high-efficiency light emitting diodes, monolithic white light emission and optical interconnection due to their superior properties. In contrast to the mostly investigated self-assembled growth of GaN nanorods, we performed GaN nanorod growth by pre-patterning of the Si substrates. The pattern was transferred to Si substrates by photolithography and cryo-temperature inductively-coupled plasma etching. These Si templates then were used for further GaN nanorod growth by metal-organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE). The low temperature AlN nucleation layer had to be optimized since it differs from its 2D layer counterpart on the surface area and orientations. We found a strong influence of diffusion processes, i.e. the GaN grown on top of the Si nanopillars can deplete the GaN around the Si pillars. Transmission electron microscopy measurements demonstrated clearly that the threading dislocations bend to the side facets of the pyramidal GaN nanostructures and terminate. Cathodoluminescence measurements reveal a difference of In composition and/or thickness of InGaN quantum wells on the different facets of the pyramidal GaN nanostructures. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Three-dimensionally structured silicon as a substrate for the MOVPE growth of GaN nanoLEDs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fuendling, Soenke; Li, Shunfeng; Soekmen, Uensal; Merzsch, Stephan; Peiner, Erwin; Wehmann, Hergo-Heinrich; Waag, Andreas [Institut fuer Halbleitertechnik, TU Braunschweig, Braunschweig (Germany); Hinze, Peter; Weimann, Thomas [Physikalisch-Technische Bundesanstalt (PTB), Braunschweig (Germany); Jahn, Uwe; Trampert, Achim; Riechert, Henning [Paul-Drude-Institut fuer Festkoerperelektronik, Berlin (Germany)

    2009-06-15

    Three-dimensionally patterned Si(111) substrates are used to grow GaN based heterostructures by metalorganic vapour phase epitaxy, with the goal of fabricating well controlled, defect reduced GaN-based nanoLEDs. In contrast to other approaches to achieve GaN nanorods, we employed silicon substrates with deep etched nanopillars to control the GaN nanorods growth by varying the size and distance of the Si pillars. The small footprint of GaN nanorods grown on Si pillars minimise the influence of the lattice mismatched substrate and improve the material quality. For the Si pillars an inductively coupled plasma dry-etching process at cryogenic temperature has been developed. An InGaN/GaN multi quantum well (MQW) structure has been incorporated into the GaN nanorods. We found GaN nanostructures grown on top of the silicon pillars with a pyramidal shape. This shape results from a competitive growth on different facets as well as from surface diffusion of the growth species. Spatially resolved optical properties of the structures are analysed by cathodoluminescence. Strongly spatial-dependent MQW emission spectra indicate the growth rate differences on top of the rods. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  1. Continuous-flux MOVPE growth of position-controlled N-face GaN nanorods and embedded InGaN quantum wells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bergbauer, W; Strassburg, M; Koelper, Ch; Linder, N [Osram Opto Semiconductors GmbH, Leibnizstrasse 4, D-93055 Regensburg (Germany); Roder, C; Laehnemann, J; Trampert, A [Paul-Drude-Institut fuer Festkoerperelektronik, Hausvogteiplatz 5-7, D-10117 Berlin (Germany); Fuendling, S; Li, S F; Wehmann, H-H; Waag, A, E-mail: werner.bergbauer@osram-os.com [Institut fuer Halbleitertechnik, TU Braunschweig, Hans-Sommer-Strasse 66, D-38106 Braunschweig (Germany)

    2010-07-30

    We demonstrate the fabrication of N-face GaN nanorods by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE), using continuous-flux conditions. This is in contrast to other approaches reported so far, which have been based on growth modes far off the conventional growth regimes. For position control of nanorods an SiO{sub 2} masking layer with a dense hole pattern on a c-plane sapphire substrate was used. Nanorods with InGaN/GaN heterostructures have been grown catalyst-free. High growth rates up to 25 {mu}m h{sup -1} were observed and a well-adjusted carrier gas mixture between hydrogen and nitrogen enabled homogeneous nanorod diameters down to 220 nm with aspect ratios of approximately 8:1. The structural quality and defect progression within nanorods were determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Different emission energies for InGaN quantum wells (QWs) could be assigned to different side facets by room temperature cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements.

  2. Position-controlled MOVPE growth and electro-optical characterization of core-shell InGaN/GaN microrod LEDs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schimpke, Tilman; Lugauer, H.-J.; Avramescu, A.; Varghese, T.; Koller, A.; Hartmann, J.; Ledig, J.; Waag, A.; Strassburg, M.

    2016-03-01

    Today's InGaN-based white LEDs still suffer from a significant efficiency reduction at elevated current densities, the so-called "Droop". Core-shell microrods, with quantum wells (QWs) covering their entire surface, enable a tremendous increase in active area scaling with the rod's aspect ratio. Enlarging the active area on a given footprint area is a viable and cost effective route to mitigate the droop by effectively reducing the local current density. Microrods were grown in a large volume metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy (MOVPE) reactor on GaN-on-sapphire substrates with a thin, patterned SiO2 mask for position control. Out of the mask openings, pencil-shaped n-doped GaN microrod cores were grown under conditions favoring 3D growth. In a second growth step, these cores are covered with a shell containing a quantum well and a p-n junction to form LED structures. The emission from the QWs on the different facets was studied using resonant temperature-dependent photoluminescence (PL) and cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements. The crystal quality of the structures was investigated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) showing the absence of extended defects like threading dislocations in the 3D core. In order to fabricate LED chips, dedicated processes were developed to accommodate for the special requirements of the 3D geometry. The electrical and optical properties of ensembles of tens of thousands microrods connected in parallel are discussed.

  3. Continuous-flux MOVPE growth of position-controlled N-face GaN nanorods and embedded InGaN quantum wells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergbauer, W.; Strassburg, M.; Kölper, Ch; Linder, N.; Roder, C.; Lähnemann, J.; Trampert, A.; Fündling, S.; Li, S. F.; Wehmann, H.-H.; Waag, A.

    2010-07-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of N-face GaN nanorods by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE), using continuous-flux conditions. This is in contrast to other approaches reported so far, which have been based on growth modes far off the conventional growth regimes. For position control of nanorods an SiO2 masking layer with a dense hole pattern on a c-plane sapphire substrate was used. Nanorods with InGaN/GaN heterostructures have been grown catalyst-free. High growth rates up to 25 µm h - 1 were observed and a well-adjusted carrier gas mixture between hydrogen and nitrogen enabled homogeneous nanorod diameters down to 220 nm with aspect ratios of approximately 8:1. The structural quality and defect progression within nanorods were determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Different emission energies for InGaN quantum wells (QWs) could be assigned to different side facets by room temperature cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements.

  4. Relaxation electron excitations in Al2O3, Y3Al5O12 and YAlO3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuznetsov, A.I.; Namozov, B.R.; Myurk, V.V.

    1985-01-01

    Excitation spectra of short-wave Al 2 O 3 , YAlO 3 and Y 3 Al 5 O 12 crystal luminescence, cathodoluminescence (including time resolution) and lay-temperature thermoluminescence are investigated. Analysis of experimental data permits to distingnish among these objects pairs of bands of supposedly characteristic luminescences: 7.5 and 3.8 eV (Al 2 O 3 ), 5.9 and 4.2 eV (YAlO 3 ), and 4.9 and 4.2 eV (Y 3 Al 5 O 12 ), where recombination luminescence is characteristic for long-wave ones, at that time exciton-like luminescence - for short-wave ones. A hypothesis about strong difference between states of an autolocalized exciton and ''autolocalized hole + electron'' (responsible for short-wave and long-wave bands of characteristic luminescence) is expressed; the difference is based on their genetic origin from different regions of a valent zone (in particular, long-wave bands - from the subzone of heavy holes of a valent zone ceiling, originating from nonbinding 2p-orbitals of oxygen)

  5. Continuous-flux MOVPE growth of position-controlled N-face GaN nanorods and embedded InGaN quantum wells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bergbauer, W; Strassburg, M; Koelper, Ch; Linder, N; Roder, C; Laehnemann, J; Trampert, A; Fuendling, S; Li, S F; Wehmann, H-H; Waag, A

    2010-01-01

    We demonstrate the fabrication of N-face GaN nanorods by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy (MOVPE), using continuous-flux conditions. This is in contrast to other approaches reported so far, which have been based on growth modes far off the conventional growth regimes. For position control of nanorods an SiO 2 masking layer with a dense hole pattern on a c-plane sapphire substrate was used. Nanorods with InGaN/GaN heterostructures have been grown catalyst-free. High growth rates up to 25 μm h -1 were observed and a well-adjusted carrier gas mixture between hydrogen and nitrogen enabled homogeneous nanorod diameters down to 220 nm with aspect ratios of approximately 8:1. The structural quality and defect progression within nanorods were determined by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Different emission energies for InGaN quantum wells (QWs) could be assigned to different side facets by room temperature cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements.

  6. Self-assembly of single "square" quantum rings in gold-free GaAs nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zha, Guowei; Shang, Xiangjun; Su, Dan; Yu, Ying; Wei, Bin; Wang, Li; Li, Mifeng; Wang, Lijuan; Xu, Jianxing; Ni, Haiqiao; Ji, Yuan; Sun, Baoquan; Niu, Zhichuan

    2014-03-21

    Single nanostructures embedded within nanowires (NWs) represent one of the most promising technologies for applications in quantum photonics. However, fabrication imperfections and etching-induced defects are inevitable for top-down fabrications, whereas self-assembly bottom-up approaches cannot avoid the difficulties of its stochastic nature and are limited to restricted heterogeneous material systems. Here we demonstrate the versatile self-assembly of single "square" quantum rings (QR) on the sidewalls of gold-free GaAs NWs for the first time. By tuning the deposition temperature, As overpressure and amount of gallium-droplets, we were able to control the density and morphology of the structure, yielding novel single quantum dots, QR, coupled QRs, and nano-antidots. A proposed model based on a strain-driven, transport-dependent nucleation of gallium droplets at high temperature accounts for the formation mechanism of these structures. We achieved a single-QR-in-NW structure, of which the optical properties were analyzed using micro-photoluminescence at 10 K and a spatially resolved cathodoluminescence technique at 77 K. The spectra show sharp discrete peaks; of these peaks, the narrowest linewidth (separation) was 578 μeV (1-3 meV), reflecting the quantized nature of the ring-type electronic states.

  7. Luminescence behaviour of beryl (aquamarine variety) from Turkey

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Katı, M.I.; Türemis, M.; Keskin, I.C.; Tastekin, B.; Kibar, R.; Çetin, A.; Can, N.

    2012-01-01

    Natural blue-green beryl from Turkey has been investigated using scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Cathodoluminescence (CL). Beryl has the chemical formula Be 3 Al 2 Si 6 O 18 and is hexagonal with space group P6/mcc. Chemical analyses of the beryl sample utilised inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) for major oxides and trace elements. It shows that the beryl sample is rich in Cs (531 ppm) and contains low concentrations of transition-metal ions, in total 2.29 wt.% Fe, 269 ppm Mn, V<5 ppm and Cr 20 ppm. Ideas on the origin of the green colour of this mineral are presented. The CL spectrum of the bulk sample display intense broad band emission from ∼360 to ∼800 nm. - Highlights: ► Natural blue-green beryl from Turkey were investigated by SEM-EDS, XRD, CL. ► Luminescence behaviour of Natural blue-green beryl. ► The samples exhibit an intense broad band emission from ∼360 to ∼800 nm.

  8. Luminescence behaviour of beryl (aquamarine variety) from Turkey

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kat Latin-Small-Letter-Dotless-I , M.I.; Tueremis, M.; Keskin, I.C.; Tastekin, B.; Kibar, R.; Cetin, A. [Celal Bayar University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Physics Department, 45140 Manisa (Turkey); Can, N., E-mail: cannurdogan@yahoo.com [Celal Bayar University, Faculty of Arts and Sciences, Physics Department, 45140 Manisa (Turkey)

    2012-10-15

    Natural blue-green beryl from Turkey has been investigated using scanning electron microscopy-energy-dispersive spectroscopy (SEM-EDS), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and Cathodoluminescence (CL). Beryl has the chemical formula Be{sub 3}Al{sub 2}Si{sub 6}O{sub 18} and is hexagonal with space group P6/mcc. Chemical analyses of the beryl sample utilised inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectroscopy (ICP-AES) for major oxides and trace elements. It shows that the beryl sample is rich in Cs (531 ppm) and contains low concentrations of transition-metal ions, in total 2.29 wt.% Fe, 269 ppm Mn, V<5 ppm and Cr 20 ppm. Ideas on the origin of the green colour of this mineral are presented. The CL spectrum of the bulk sample display intense broad band emission from {approx}360 to {approx}800 nm. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Natural blue-green beryl from Turkey were investigated by SEM-EDS, XRD, CL. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Luminescence behaviour of Natural blue-green beryl. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The samples exhibit an intense broad band emission from {approx}360 to {approx}800 nm.

  9. Ionising radiation effect on the luminescence emission of inorganic and biogenic calcium carbonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boronat, C.; Correcher, V.; Virgos, M. D.; Garcia-Guinea, J.

    2017-06-01

    As known, the luminescence emission of mineral phases could be potentially employed for dosimetric purposes in the case of radiological terrorism or radiation accident where conventional monitoring is not available. In this sense, this paper reports on the thermo- (TL) and cathodoluminescence (CL) emission of both biogenic (common periwinkle - littorina littorera - shell made of calcite 90% and aragonite 10%) and inorganic (aragonite 100%) Ca-rich carbonates previously characterized by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Whereas the aragonite sample displays the main CL waveband peaked in the red region (linked to point defects), the more intense emission obtained from the common periwinkle shell appears at higher energies (mainly associated with structural defects). The UV-blue TL emission of the samples, regardless of the origin, displays (i) an acceptable ionizing radiation sensitivity, (ii) linear dose response in the range of interest (up to 8 Gy), (iii) reasonable stability of the TL signal after 700 h of storage with an initial decay of ca. 88% for the mineral sample and 60% for the biogenic sample and maintaining the stability from 150 h onwards. (iv) The tests of thermal stability of the TL emission performed in the range of 180-320 °C confirm a continuum in the trap system.

  10. TL and radiocarbon dating of neolithic sepultures from Sudan: intercomparison of results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guibert, P.; Ney, C.; Bechtel, F.; Schvoerer, M.; Geus, F.

    1994-01-01

    Thermoluminescence dating of a set of 29 pottery sherds excavated at the neolithic sites of El Kadada and El Ghaba (near Shendi, Central Sudan) was carried out at Bordeaux University. The archaeological dose was measured using the fine grain technique. The annual dose was determined by analytical techniques (neutron activation analysis, ICP spectrometry, XRF, low background gamma spectrometry) and by ''on-site'' measurements of the environmental radioactivity (gammametry). The crystalline inclusions of the samples were characterized by optical microscopy and cathodoluminescence: the TL minerals mainly consist of quartz and K-feldspar crystals. In some cases, radioactive inclusions of zircons and monazites are observed. The TL and the radiocarbon dates show a good agreement, verifying the validity of the radiocarbon ages which were suspected to be too old because of the nature of the dated material (shells). Taking into account all the chronological data, it is shown that El Ghaba and El Ghaba necropolis were used respectively within the 4800-3300 B.C. and 4200-3000 B.C. date-ranges for neolithic cultures, the occupation of El Kadada starting five or six centuries later than El Ghaba. (Author)

  11. Facile synthesis of Bi/BiOCl composite with selective photocatalytic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Dongling; Zhang, Min; Lu, Qiuju; Chen, Junfang; Liu, Bitao; Wang, Zhaofeng

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a novel and facile method to fabricate Bi/BiOCl composites with dominant (001) facets in situ via a microwave reduction route. Different characterization techniques, including X-ray diffraction (XRD), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM), transmission scanning electron microscopy (TEM), UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectrometry (DRS), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), electron spin resonance spectroscopy (ESR), cathodoluminescence spectrum (CL), and lifetime, have been employed to investigate the structure, optical and electrical properties of the Bi/BiOCl composites. The experimental results show that the introduction of Bi particles can efficiently enhance the photocatalytic performance of BiOCl for the degradation of several dyes under ultraviolet (UV) light irradiation, especially for negative charged methyl orange (MO). Unlike the UV photocatalytic performance, such Bi/BiOCl composite shows higher degradation efficiency towards rhodamine B (RhB) than MO and methylene blue (MB) under visible light irradiation. This special photocatalytic performance can be ascribed to the synergistic effect between oxygen vacancies and Bi particles. This work provides new insights about the photodegradation mechanisms of MO, MB and RhB under UV and visible light irradiation, which would be helpful to guide the selection of an appropriate catalyst for other pollutants. - Highlights: • Bi/BiOCl composites were synthesized via a microwave reduction. • Tunable selectivity photocatalytic activity can be achieved. • Photodegradation mechanism under UV and visible light were proposed

  12. Eu{sup 3+} activated GaN thin films grown on sapphire by pulsed laser deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perea-Lopez, Nestor; Tao, Jonathan H. [Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); McKittrick, Joanna [Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Talbot, Jan B. [Materials Science and Engineering Program, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Department of Nanoengineering, University of California at San Diego, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Raukas, M.; Laski, J.; Mishra, K.C. [OSRAM SYLVANIA Central Research, Beverly, MA 01915-1068 (United States); Hirata, Gustavo [CCMC-UNAM, Km. 107 Carretera Tijuana-Ensenada, C. P. 22800 Ensenada Baja California (Mexico)

    2008-07-01

    By means of pulsed laser deposition, polycrystalline thin films of GaN doped with Eu{sup 3+} were grown on sapphire. The PLD target was formed in three steps. First, stoichiometric amounts of Ga{sub 2}O{sub 3} and Eu{sub 2}O{sub 3} were dissolved in nitric acid, which produces Ga{sub (1-x)}Eu{sub x} (NO{sub 3}){sub 3}. Next, the nitrates were oxidized in a tubular furnace with O{sub 2} flow forming Ga{sub 2(1-x)}Eu{sub 2x}O{sub 3}. Finally, the oxide powder was flushed with anhydrous ammonia to produce the desired nitride product: Ga{sub (1-x)}Eu{sub x}N. Film growth was done in a stainless steel vacuum chamber partially filled with N{sub 2} (400 mTorr). For the deposit, the 3{sup rd} harmonic of a Nd:YAG laser ({lambda}=355 nm) was focused on the surface of the target. After deposition, annealing in NH{sub 3} was required to produce films with pure GaN hexagonal phase. The luminescence of the film was characterized by photo- and cathodoluminescence. In addition, the chemical and structural properties were analyzed by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive spectroscopy. (copyright 2008 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  13. Effect of precursor solutions stirring on deep level defects concentration and spatial distribution in low temperature aqueous chemical synthesis of zinc oxide nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alnoor, Hatim, E-mail: hatim.alnoor@liu.se; Chey, Chan Oeurn; Pozina, Galia; Willander, Magnus; Nur, Omer [Department of Science and Technology (ITN), Campus Norrköping, Linköping University, SE-601 74 Norrköping (Sweden); Liu, Xianjie; Khranovskyy, Volodymyr [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-583 81 Linköping (Sweden)

    2015-08-15

    Hexagonal c-axis oriented zinc oxide (ZnO) nanorods (NRs) with 120-300 nm diameters are synthesized via the low temperature aqueous chemical route at 80 °C on silver-coated glass substrates. The influence of varying the precursor solutions stirring durations on the concentration and spatial distributions of deep level defects in ZnO NRs is investigated. Room temperature micro-photoluminesnce (μ-PL) spectra were collected for all samples. Cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra of the as-synthesized NRs reveal a significant change in the intensity ratio of the near band edge emission (NBE) to the deep-level emission (DLE) peaks with increasing stirring durations. This is attributed to the variation in the concentration of the oxygen-deficiency with increasing stirring durations as suggested from the X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy analysis. Spatially resolved CL spectra taken along individual NRs revealed that stirring the precursor solutions for relatively short duration (1-3 h), which likely induced high super saturation under thermodynamic equilibrium during the synthesis process, is observed to favor the formation of point defects moving towards the tip of the NRs. In contrary, stirring for longer duration (5-15 h) will induce low super saturation favoring the formation of point defects located at the bottom of the NRs. These findings demonstrate that it is possible to control the concentration and spatial distribution of deep level defects in ZnO NRs by varying the stirring durations of the precursor solutions.

  14. Sn-doped polyhedral In2O3 particles: Synthesis, characterization, and origins of luminous emission in wide visible range

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhu Yunqing; Chen Yiqing

    2012-01-01

    Sn-doped octahedronal and tetrakaidecahedronal In 2 O 3 particles were successfully synthesized by simple thermal evaporation of indium grains using SnO as dopant. Structural characterization results demonstrated that the Sn-doped tetrakaidecahedronal In 2 O 3 particle had additional six {001} crystal surfaces compared with the octahedronal one. The luminous properties of both samples were characterized by photoluminescence (PL) and cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy. A broad visible luminous emission around 570 nm was observed. Studies revealed that the emission consisted of three peaks of 511 nm, 564 nm, and 622 nm, which were attributed to radioactive recombination centers such as single ionized oxygen vacancy, indium interstitial, and antisite oxygen, respectively. We believe that the Sn donor level plays an important role in the visible luminous emission. - Graphical abstract: With more oxygen vacancies and tin doping. ITO particles can exhibit a better CL performance. Sn donor level near the conduction band edge plays an important role in luminous emission in wide visible range. Highlights: ► Polyhedral ITO particles synthesized by thermal evaporation using SnO as dopant. ► Broad visible luminous emission around 570 nm. ► Sn donor level plays an important role in the visible emission. ► ITO particles with more oxygen vacancies have better CL performance in visible range.

  15. Influence of barrier layer indium on efficiency and wavelength of InGaN multiple quantum well (MQW) with and without semi-bulk InGaN buffer for blue to green regime emission

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alam, Saiful [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Georgia Tech-CNRS, UMI 2958, Metz (France); CEA-LETI, Minatec Campus, Grenoble (France); Sundaram, Suresh; Li, Xin; El Gmili, Youssef [Georgia Tech-CNRS, UMI 2958, Metz (France); Jamroz, Miryam E.; Robin, Ivan C. [CEA-LETI, Minatec Campus, Grenoble (France); Voss, Paul L.; Ougazzaden, Abdallah [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Georgia Tech-CNRS, UMI 2958, Metz (France); Salvestrini, Jean-Paul [Georgia Tech-CNRS, UMI 2958, Metz (France); LMOPS, University of Lorraine, EA4423, Metz (France)

    2017-08-15

    The effect of indium (In) in the barrier of InGaN/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) has been studied for MQWs with and without semi-bulk InGaN buffer. From simulation, the optimum In content in the barrier with 3-5 nm width is 5-7% to get the optimal material quality and internal quantum efficiency (IQE) of ∝65% for 450-480 nm emission range. Simulation shows a reduction of the potential barrier due to band flattening, a more homogeneous distribution of electrons and holes in the active region and subsequently, a more radiative recombination rate with InGaN as barrier layer. Both cathodoluminescence (CL) and photoluminescence (PL) experimental results show a blue-shift of emission wavelength along with an enhancement in the emission intensity when GaN barrier is replaced with InGaN barrier, for a MQW structure both with and without the semi-bulk InGaN buffer. We attribute this blue shift to the reduced polarization mismatch and increased effective bandgap. This InGaN barrier-related improvement in IQE and efficiency droop could be useful for the realization of longer wavelength ''green-gap'' range LEDs where poor IQE and efficiency droop are more prominent due to high indium (In) in the active region. (copyright 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  16. Controlled 1.1-1.6 μm luminescence in gold-free multi-stacked InAs/InP heterostructure nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Guoqiang; Tateno, Kouta; Birowosuto, Muhammad Danang; Notomi, Masaya; Sogawa, Tetsuomi; Gotoh, Hideki

    2015-03-20

    We report controlled 1.1-1.6 μm luminescence in gold-free multi-stacked InAs/InP heterostructure nanowires (NWs). We realized the NWs by using an indium-particle-assisted vapor-liquid-solid synthesis approach. The growth temperature, as low as 320 °C, enables the formation of an atomically abrupt InP/InAs interface by supressing the diffusion and weakening the reservoir effect in the indium droplet. The low growth temperature also enables us to grow multi-stacked InAs/InP NWs in the axial direction without any growth on the NW side face. The high controllability of the growth technology ensures that the luminescence can be tailored by the thickness of InAs segment in InP NWs and cover the 1.3-1.5 μm telecommunication window range. By using the nanoscale-spatial-resolution technology combing cathodoluminescence with scanning electron microscopy, we directly correlated the site of different-thickness InAs segments with its luminescence property in a single NW and demonstrate the InAs-thickness-controlled energy of optical emission in 1.1-1.6 μm.

  17. Synthesis, structure, and luminescence properties of SrSiAl2O3N2:Eu(2+) phosphors for light-emitting devices and field emission displays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xicheng; Zhao, Zhengyan; Wu, Quansheng; Li, Yanyan; Wang, Chuang; Mao, Aijun; Wang, Yuhua

    2015-06-28

    A series of SrSiAl2O3N2:Eu(2+) (0.005 ≤x≤ 0.05) phosphors were successfully synthesized through a pressureless, facile, and efficient solid state route. The crystal structure, band structure, and their photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence properties were investigated in detail. The phosphors exhibit rod shape morphology with a uniform Eu(2+) distribution. Under n-UV excitation the emission spectra shift from 477 to 497 nm with an increase of Eu(2+) concentration. The concentration quenching mechanism of Eu(2+) emission was dominated by the dipole-dipole interaction. The thermal stability is comparable to that of the commercial Ba2SiO4:Eu(2+) phosphor. The phosphor also exhibits high current saturation and high resistance under low voltage electron bombardment. All the results indicate that the SrSiAl2O3N2:Eu(2+) phosphors can be considered as candidates for application in both white LEDs and FEDs.

  18. SrAl2O4:Eu2+ (1%) luminescence under UV, VUV and electron beam excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nazarov, M.; Mammadova, S.; Spassky, D.; Vielhauer, S.; Abdullayeva, S.; Huseynov, A.; Jabbarov, R.

    2018-01-01

    This paper reports the luminescence properties of nanosized SrAl2O4:Eu2+ (1%) phosphors. The samples were prepared by combustion method at 600 °C, followed by annealing of the resultant combustion ash at 1000 °C in a reductive (Ar + H2) atmosphere. X-ray diffraction (XRD), photo luminescence (PL) and cathodoluminescence (CL) analysis and thermal stimulated luminescence (TSL) method were applied to characterize the phosphor. For the first time a peak at 375 nm was observed in CL spectra of SrAl2O4:Eu2+ (1%) nanophosphors. Luminescence excitation spectra analysis have shown that this peak is related to crystal defects. Also in TSL curve one strong peak was observed in the region above room temperature (T = 325 K), which is attributed to lattice defects, namely oxygen vacancies. A green LED was fabricated by the combination of the SrAl2O4:Eu2+ (1%) nanosized phosphor and a 365 nm UV InGaN chip.

  19. Preparation, structural and luminescent properties of nanocrystalline ZnO films doped Ag by close space sublimation method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khomchenko, Viktoriya; Mazin, Mikhail; Sopinskyy, Mykola; Lytvyn, Oksana; Dan'ko, Viktor; Piryatinskii, Yurii; Demydiuk, Pavlo

    2018-05-01

    The simple way for silver doping of ZnO films is presented. The ZnO films were prepared by reactive rf-magnetron sputtering on silicon and sapphire substrates. Ag doping is carried out by sublimation of the Ag source located at close space at atmospheric pressure in air. Then the ZnO and ZnO-Ag films were annealed in wet media. The microstructure and optical properties of the films were compared and studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), photoluminescence (PL) and cathodoluminescence (CL). XRD results indicated that all the ZnO films have a polycrystalline hexagonal structure and a preferred orientation with the c-axis perpendicular to the substrate. The annealing and Ag doping promote increasing grain's sizes and modification of grain size distribution. The effect of substrate temperature, substrate type, Ag doping and post-growth annealing of the films was studied by PL spectroscopy. The effect of Ag doping was obvious and identical for all the films, namely the wide visible bands of PL spectra are suppressed by Ag doping. The intensity of ultraviolet band increased 15 times as compared to their reference films on sapphire substrate. The ultraviolet/visible emission ratio was 20. The full width at half maximum (FWHM) for a 380 nm band was 14 nm, which is comparable with that of epitaxial ZnO. The data implies the high quality of ZnO-Ag films. Possible mechanisms to enhance UV emission are discussed.

  20. Quantitative analysis of complexes in electron irradiated CZ silicon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inoue, N.; Ohyama, H.; Goto, Y.; Sugiyama, T.

    2007-01-01

    Complexes in helium or electron irradiated silicon are quantitatively analyzed by highly sensitive and accurate infrared (IR) absorption spectroscopy. Carbon concentration (1x10 15 -1x10 17 cm -3 ) and helium dose (5x10 12 -5x10 13 cm -2 ) or electron dose (1x10 15 -1x10 17 cm -2 ) are changed by two orders of magnitude in relatively low regime compared to the previous works. It is demonstrated that the carbon-related complex in low carbon concentration silicon of commercial grade with low electron dose can be detected clearly. Concentration of these complexes is estimated. It is clarified that the complex configuration and thermal behavior in low carbon and low dose samples is simple and almost confined within the individual complex family compared to those in high concentration and high dose samples. Well-established complex behavior in electron-irradiated sample is compared to that in He-irradiated samples, obtained by deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) or cathodoluminescence (CL), which had close relation to the Si power device performance

  1. A complex investigation of building sandstones from Saxony (Germany)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goetze, Jens; Siedel, Heiner

    2007-01-01

    The present paper provides a methodology for the investigation and characterization of building sandstones. This analytical scheme was designed for distinguishing mature arenites, which in general show very similar properties and are difficult to distinguish. This is shown for Cretaceous sandstones from various occurrences in Saxony (Germany), which have been used for centuries as building materials. The procedure is mainly based on the combination of macroscopic rock description, thin section polarizing microscopy (phase composition, texture, grain-size distribution) and cathodoluminescence (CL) microscopy (quartz types, feldspar and kaolinite content) coupled with image analysis, scanning electron microscopy (accessories, pore cement, diagenetic grain surface features), and analysis of pore space data. Sometimes, additional data from X-ray diffraction or chemical analyses (major and trace elements) can be used. Especially in the case of quartz rich arenites, CL is a powerful tool for provenance analysis. The detailed analysis of sandstone material in most cases allows us to assign historically used building material to a specific sandstone occurrence. These results are important for both interpreting the weathering behaviour of the building material and the conservation, reconstruction and stone replacement of historical monuments

  2. Microstructural dependency of optical properties of m-plane InGaN multiple quantum wells grown on 2° misoriented bulk GaN substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tang, Fengzai; Barnard, Jonathan S.; Zhu, Tongtong; Oehler, Fabrice; Kappers, Menno J.; Oliver, Rachel A., E-mail: rao28@cam.ac.uk [Department of Materials Science and Metallurgy, University of Cambridge, 27 Charles Babbage Road, Cambridge CB3 0FS (United Kingdom)

    2015-08-24

    A non-polar m-plane structure consisting of five InGaN/GaN quantum wells (QWs) was grown on ammonothermal bulk GaN by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. Surface step bunches propagating through the QW stack were found to accommodate the 2° substrate miscut towards the -c direction. Both large steps with heights of a few tens of nanometres and small steps between one and a few atomic layers in height are observed, the former of which exhibit cathodoluminescence at longer wavelengths than the adjacent m-plane terraces. This is attributed to the formation of semi-polar facets at the steps on which the QWs are shown to be thicker and have higher Indium contents than those in the adjacent m-plane regions. Discrete basal-plane stacking faults (BSFs) were occasionally initiated from the QWs on the main m-plane terraces, but groups of BSFs were frequently observed to initiate from those on the large steps, probably related to the increased strain associated with the locally higher indium content and thickness.

  3. Effect of high temperature annealing on defects and optical properties of ZnO single crystals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, M.; Wang, D.D.; Zou, B.; Chen, Z.Q.; Kawasuso, A.; Sekiguchi, T.

    2012-01-01

    Hydrothermal grown ZnO single crystals were annealed in N 2 or O 2 between 900 and 1300 C. Positron lifetime measurements reveal a single lifetime in all the ZnO samples before and after annealing. The positron lifetime is about 181 ps after annealing at 900 C in either N 2 or O 2 atmosphere. However, increase of the positron lifetime is observed after further annealing the sample at higher temperatures up to 1300 C, and it has a faster increase in O 2 ambient. Temperature dependence measurements show that the positron lifetime has very slight increase with temperature for the 900 C annealed sample, while it shows notable variation for the sample annealed at 1300 C. This implied that annealing at high temperature introduces additional defects. These defects are supposed to be Zn vacancy-related defects. Cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements indicates enhancement of both UV and green emission after annealing, and the enhancement of green emission is much stronger for the samples annealed in O 2 ambient. The possible origin of green emission is tentatively discussed. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  4. Hybrid fluorescence and electron cryo-microscopy for simultaneous electron and photon imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iijima, Hirofumi; Fukuda, Yoshiyuki; Arai, Yoshihiro; Terakawa, Susumu; Yamamoto, Naoki; Nagayama, Kuniaki

    2014-01-01

    Integration of fluorescence light and transmission electron microscopy into the same device would represent an important advance in correlative microscopy, which traditionally involves two separate microscopes for imaging. To achieve such integration, the primary technical challenge that must be solved regards how to arrange two objective lenses used for light and electron microscopy in such a manner that they can properly focus on a single specimen. To address this issue, both lateral displacement of the specimen between two lenses and specimen rotation have been proposed. Such movement of the specimen allows sequential collection of two kinds of microscopic images of a single target, but prevents simultaneous imaging. This shortcoming has been made up by using a simple optical device, a reflection mirror. Here, we present an approach toward the versatile integration of fluorescence and electron microscopy for simultaneous imaging. The potential of simultaneous hybrid microscopy was demonstrated by fluorescence and electron sequential imaging of a fluorescent protein expressed in cells and cathodoluminescence imaging of fluorescent beads. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Reassessing the improbability of a muscular crinoid stem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gorzelak, Przemysław; Głuchowski, Edward; Salamon, Mariusz A.

    2014-08-01

    Muscular articulations in modern stalked crinoids are only present in the arms. Although it has been suggested that certain coiled-stemmed fossil taxa may have been functionally adapted to utilize muscles, evidence supporting this interpretation is lacking. Here, we use cathodoluminescence and SEM to reveal the skeletal microstructure of the enigmatic coiled-stemmed taxon Ammonicrinus (Flexibilia). Based on the well-established link between skeletal microstructure and the nature of infilling soft tissues in modern echinoderms, we reconstructed the palaeoanatomy of the Middle Devonian ammonicrinids. We show that their median columnals with elongated lateral columnal enclosure extensions (LCEE) have stereom microstructure unexpectedly resembling that in the crinoid muscular arm plates. In particular, large ligamentary facets, that are present on each side of a transverse ridge, are mainly comprised of fine galleried stereom that is indicative of the mutable collagenous tissues. In contrast, fine labyrinthic stereom, commonly associated with muscles, is situated in the periphery on each side of the surface of elongated LCEE. Our findings thus strongly suggest that the muscles may have also been present in the stem of ammonicrinids. These results reassess the previous hypotheses about evolution of muscles in crinoids and provide new insights into the mode of life of Ammonicrinus.

  6. ZnO synthesized in air by fs laser irradiation on metallic Zn thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esqueda-Barrón, Y.; Herrera, M.; Camacho-López, S.

    2018-05-01

    We present results on rapid femtosecond laser synthesis of nanostructured ZnO. We used metallic Zn thin films to laser scan along straight tracks, until forming nanostructured ZnO. The synthesis dependence on laser irradiation parameters such as the per pulse fluence, integrated fluence, laser scan speed, and number of scans were explored carefully. SEM characterization showed that the morphology of the obtained ZnO is dictated by the integrated fluence and the laser scan speed; micro Raman and XRD results allowed to identify optimal laser processing conditions for getting good quality ZnO; and cathodoluminescence measurements demonstrated that a single laser scan at high per pulse laser fluence, but a medium integrated laser fluence and a medium laser scan speed favors a low density of point-defects in the lattice. Electrical measurements showed a correlation between resistivity of the laser produced ZnO and point-defects created during the synthesis. Transmittance measurements showed that, the synthesized ZnO can reach down to the supporting fused silica substrate under the right laser irradiation conditions. The physical mechanism for the formation of ZnO, under ultrashort pulse laser irradiation, is discussed in view of the distinct times scales given by the laser pulse duration and the laser pulse repetition rate.

  7. Zinc oxide nanostructures and its nano-compounds for efficient visible light photo-catalytic processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, Rania E.; Alnoor, Hatim; Elhag, Sami; Nur, Omer; Willander, Magnus

    2017-02-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO) in its nanostructure form is a promising material for visible light emission/absorption and utilization in different energy efficient photocatalytic processes. We will first present our recent results on the effect of varying the molar ratio of the synthesis nutrients on visible light emission. Further we will use the optimized conditions from the molar ration experiments to vary the synthesis processing parameters like stirring time etc. and the effect of all these parameters in order to optimize the efficiency and control the emission spectrum are investigated using different complementary techniques. Cathodoluminescence (CL) is combined with photoluminescence (PL) and electroluminescence (EL) as the techniques to investigate and optimizes visible light emission from ZnO/GaN light emitting diodes. We will then show and discuss our recent finding of the use of high quality ZnO nanoparticles (NPs) for efficient photo-degradation of toxic dyes using the visible spectra, namely with a wavelength up to 800 nm. In the end, we show how ZnO nanorods (NRs) are used as the first template to be transferred to bismuth zinc vanadate (BiZn2VO6). The BiZn2VO6 is then used to demonstrate efficient and cost effective hydrogen production through photoelectrochemical water splitting using solar radiation.

  8. Lapis lazuli provenance study by means of micro-PIXE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Re, Alessandro, E-mail: alessandro.re@to.infn.it [Dipartimento di Fisica Sperimentale, Universita di Torino, Via Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); INFN Sezione di Torino and Centre of Excellence ' Nanostructured Interfaces and Surfaces' , Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Giudice, Alessandro Lo [Dipartimento di Fisica Sperimentale, Universita di Torino, Via Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); INFN Sezione di Torino and Centre of Excellence ' Nanostructured Interfaces and Surfaces' , Universita di Torino, Via P. Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Angelici, Debora [Dipartimento di Fisica Sperimentale, Universita di Torino, Via Giuria 1, 10125 Torino (Italy); Calusi, Silvia; Giuntini, Lorenzo; Massi, Mirko [Dipartimento di Fisica, Universita and INFN Sezione di Firenze, Via Sansone 1, 50019 Sesto Fiorentino, Firenze (Italy); Pratesi, Giovanni [Dipartimento di Scienze della Terra and Museo di Storia Naturale, Universita di Firenze, Via G. La Pira 4, 50121 Firenze (Italy)

    2011-10-15

    In this paper we report about the micro-PIXE characterisation of lapis lazuli, for a provenance study of this semi-precious stone, used for glyptic as early as 7000 years ago. The final aim is to find markers permitting to identify the origin of the raw material coming from three quarries in regions of historical importance: Afghanistan, Pamir Mountains and Siberia. This may help to reconstruct trade routes, especially for ancient objects for which written testimonies are scanty or absent at all. Due to the heterogeneity of lapis lazuli we concentrate our attention on single phases instead of the whole stone; in particular we focused on two of the main phases: lazurite, responsible for the blue colour, and diopside, the most frequent accessory mineral. This study was preceded and completed by means of microanalysis with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM-EDX) and Cold-Cathodoluminescence (cold-CL) analysis. Despite the limited number of analysed samples, results are sufficient to exclude/suggest a few features as provenance markers, partly confirming what has been previously published in literature.

  9. Lapis lazuli provenance study by means of micro-PIXE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Re, Alessandro; Giudice, Alessandro Lo; Angelici, Debora; Calusi, Silvia; Giuntini, Lorenzo; Massi, Mirko; Pratesi, Giovanni

    2011-01-01

    In this paper we report about the micro-PIXE characterisation of lapis lazuli, for a provenance study of this semi-precious stone, used for glyptic as early as 7000 years ago. The final aim is to find markers permitting to identify the origin of the raw material coming from three quarries in regions of historical importance: Afghanistan, Pamir Mountains and Siberia. This may help to reconstruct trade routes, especially for ancient objects for which written testimonies are scanty or absent at all. Due to the heterogeneity of lapis lazuli we concentrate our attention on single phases instead of the whole stone; in particular we focused on two of the main phases: lazurite, responsible for the blue colour, and diopside, the most frequent accessory mineral. This study was preceded and completed by means of microanalysis with Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM-EDX) and Cold-Cathodoluminescence (cold-CL) analysis. Despite the limited number of analysed samples, results are sufficient to exclude/suggest a few features as provenance markers, partly confirming what has been previously published in literature.

  10. Hollow-anode plasma source for molecular beam epitaxy of gallium nitride

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anders, A.; Newman, N.; Rubin, M.; Dickinson, M.; Jones, E.; Phatak, P.; Gassmann, A.

    1996-01-01

    GaN films have been grown by molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) using a hollow-anode nitrogen plasma source. The source was developed to minimize defect formation as a result of contamination and ion damage. The hollow-anode discharge is a special form of glow discharge with very small anode area. A positive anode voltage drop of 30 endash 40 V and an increased anode sheath thickness leads to ignition of a relatively dense plasma in front of the anode hole. Driven by the pressure gradient, the open-quote open-quote anode close-quote close-quote plasma forms a bright plasma jet streaming with supersonic velocity towards the substrate. Films of GaN have been grown on (0001) SiC and (0001) Al 2 O 3 at 600 endash 800 degree C. The films were investigated by photoluminescence, cathodoluminescence, x-ray diffraction, Rutherford backscattering, and particle-induced x-ray emission. The film with the highest structural quality had a rocking curve width of 5 arcmin, the lowest reported value for MBE growth to date. copyright 1996 American Institute of Physics

  11. Properties and behavior of quartz for the silicon process

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aasly, Kurt

    2008-07-01

    fluorescence light microscopy of polished thin sections, cathodoluminescence microscopy and spectroscopy and x-ray diffraction. Combining high-temperature microthermometry and shock-heating investigations has proved to provide useful knowledge about the effects of high temperatures on quartz. Results from earlier research have been confirmed showing that mica is the cause of the effects seen in the temperature interval 900 - 1000 degrees Celsius. This has been shown by the total absence of tridimite in the samples and the fact that mica has been seen in the unheated reference samples. Cathodoluminescence microscopy and spectroscopy was used to investigate sample from shock-heating experiments and corresponding reference samples. These investigations show that cathodoluminescence is a useful tool for petrographic investigations of quartz. The shock-heated samples showed a significant change in cathodoluminescence characteristics that need to be investigated further to understand the cause of these changes. A spotted red luminescence was seen in two of the samples indicating the formation of cristobalite or the transition phase within these samples. Cristobalite has been shown in samples after heating to different temperatures in the interval 1250 to 1550 degrees Celsius, although in different amount in the different types of quartz. However, the transformation rates seem to be more similar after prolonged heating at the highest temperature. Experiments also indicate that the quartzcristobalite transformation may be a cause of the disintegration of quartz at high temperatures. This is related to the severe volume expansion as the quartz transforms to cristobalite via the amorphous intermediate transition phase. The last paper presented in the thesis presents investigations of two furnaces that have been producing ferrosilicon and silicon metal respectively. The results from these investigations show that cristobalite is formed relatively rapidly inside the furnace, however

  12. N{sup +} ion-implantation-induced defects in ZnO studied with a slow positron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z Q [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292, Japan (Japan); Sekiguchi, T [Nanomaterials Laboratory, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Yuan, X L [Nanomaterials Laboratory, National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0047 (Japan); Maekawa, M [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292, Japan (Japan); Kawasuso, A [Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, 1233 Watanuki, Takasaki, Gunma 370-1292, Japan (Japan)

    2004-01-21

    Undoped ZnO single crystals were implanted with multiple-energy N{sup +} ions ranging from 50 to 380 keV with doses from 10{sup 12} to 10{sup 14} cm{sup -2}. Positron annihilation measurements show that vacancy defects are introduced in the implanted layers. The concentration of the vacancy defects increases with increasing ion dose. The annealing behaviour of the defects can be divided into four stages, which correspond to the formation and recovery of large vacancy clusters and the formation and disappearance of vacancy-impurity complexes, respectively. All the implantation-induced defects are removed by annealing at 1200 deg. C. Cathodoluminescence measurements show that the ion-implantation-induced defects act as nonradiative recombination centres to suppress the ultraviolet (UV) emission. After annealing, these defects disappear gradually and the UV emission reappears, which coincides with positron annihilation measurements. Hall measurements reveal that after N{sup +} implantation, the ZnO layer still shows n-type conductivity.

  13. Post-growth annealing induced change of conductivity in As-doped ZnO grown by radio frequency magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    To, C. K.; Yang, B.; Su, S. C.; Ling, C. C.; Beling, C. D.; Fung, S. [Department of Physics, University of Hong Kong, Pokfulam Road (Hong Kong)

    2011-12-01

    Arsenic-doped ZnO films were fabricated by radio frequency magnetron sputtering method at a relatively low substrate temperature of 200 deg. C. Post-growth annealing in air was carried out up to a temperature of 1000 deg. C. The samples were characterized by Hall measurement, positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS), secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), and cathodoluminescence (CL). The as-grown sample was of n-type and it converted to p-type material after the 400 deg. C annealing. The resulting hole concentration was found to increase with annealing temperature and reached a maximum of 6 x 10{sup 17} cm{sup -3} at the annealing temperature of 600 deg. C. The origin of the p-type conductivity was consistent with the As{sub Zn}(V{sub Zn}){sub 2} shallow acceptor model. Further increasing the annealing temperature would decrease the hole concentration of the samples finally converted the sample back to n-type. With evidence, it was suggested that the removal of the p-type conductivity was due to the dissociation of the As{sub Zn}(V{sub Zn}){sub 2} acceptor and the creation of the deep level defect giving rise to the green luminescence.

  14. Evolution of voids in Al+-implanted ZnO probed by a slow positron beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Z.Q.; Maekawa, M.; Yamamoto, S.; Kawasuso, A.; Yuan, X.L.; Sekiguchi, T.; Suzuki, R.; Ohdaira, T.

    2004-01-01

    Undoped ZnO single crystals were implanted with aluminum ions up to a dose of 10 15 Al + /cm 2 . Vacancy defects in the implanted layers were detected using positron lifetime and Doppler broadening measurements with slow positron beams. It shows that vacancy clusters, which are close to the size of V 8 , are generated by implantation. Postimplantation annealing shows that the Doppler broadening S parameter increases in the temperature range from 200 deg. C to 600 deg. C suggesting further agglomeration of vacancy clusters to voids. Detailed analyses of Doppler broadening spectra show formation of positronium after 600 deg. C annealing of the implanted samples with doses higher than 10 14 Al + /cm 2 . Positron lifetime measurements further suggest that the void diameter is about 0.8 nm. The voids disappear and the vacancy concentration reaches the detection limit after annealing at 600-900 deg. C. Hall measurement shows that the implanted Al + ions are fully activated with improved carrier mobility after final annealing. Cathodoluminescence measurements show that the ultraviolet luminescence is much stronger than the unimplanted state. These findings also suggest that the electrical and optical properties of ZnO become much better by Al + implantation and subsequent annealing

  15. Post-growth annealing induced change of conductivity in As-doped ZnO grown by radio frequency magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    To, C. K.; Yang, B.; Su, S. C.; Ling, C. C.; Beling, C. D.; Fung, S.

    2011-12-01

    Arsenic-doped ZnO films were fabricated by radio frequency magnetron sputtering method at a relatively low substrate temperature of 200 °C. Post-growth annealing in air was carried out up to a temperature of 1000 °C. The samples were characterized by Hall measurement, positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS), secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), and cathodoluminescence (CL). The as-grown sample was of n-type and it converted to p-type material after the 400 °C annealing. The resulting hole concentration was found to increase with annealing temperature and reached a maximum of 6 × 1017 cm-3 at the annealing temperature of 600 °C. The origin of the p-type conductivity was consistent with the AsZn(VZn)2 shallow acceptor model. Further increasing the annealing temperature would decrease the hole concentration of the samples finally converted the sample back to n-type. With evidence, it was suggested that the removal of the p-type conductivity was due to the dissociation of the AsZn(VZn)2 acceptor and the creation of the deep level defect giving rise to the green luminescence.

  16. Post-growth annealing induced change of conductivity in As-doped ZnO grown by radio frequency magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To, C. K.; Yang, B.; Su, S. C.; Ling, C. C.; Beling, C. D.; Fung, S.

    2011-01-01

    Arsenic-doped ZnO films were fabricated by radio frequency magnetron sputtering method at a relatively low substrate temperature of 200 deg. C. Post-growth annealing in air was carried out up to a temperature of 1000 deg. C. The samples were characterized by Hall measurement, positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS), secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS), and cathodoluminescence (CL). The as-grown sample was of n-type and it converted to p-type material after the 400 deg. C annealing. The resulting hole concentration was found to increase with annealing temperature and reached a maximum of 6 x 10 17 cm -3 at the annealing temperature of 600 deg. C. The origin of the p-type conductivity was consistent with the As Zn (V Zn ) 2 shallow acceptor model. Further increasing the annealing temperature would decrease the hole concentration of the samples finally converted the sample back to n-type. With evidence, it was suggested that the removal of the p-type conductivity was due to the dissociation of the As Zn (V Zn ) 2 acceptor and the creation of the deep level defect giving rise to the green luminescence.

  17. Thermal process induced change of conductivity in As-doped ZnO

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, S. C.; Fan, J. C.; Ling, C. C.

    2012-02-01

    Arsenic-doped ZnO films were fabricated by radio frequency magnetron sputtering method with different substrate temperature TS. Growing with the low substrate temperature of TS=200°C yielded n-type semi-insulating sample. Increasing the substrate temperature would yield p-type ZnO film and reproducible p-type film could be produced at TS~450°C. Post-growth annealing of the n-type As-doped ZnO sample grown at the low substrate temperature (TS=200°C) in air at 500°C also converted the film to p-type conductivity. Further increasing the post-growth annealing temperature would convert the p-type sample back to n-type. With the results obtained from the studies of positron annihilation spectroscopy (PAS), photoluminescence (PL), cathodoluminescence (CL), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), secondary ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) and nuclear reaction analysis (NRA), we have proposed mechanisms to explain for the thermal process induced conduction type conversion as observed in the As-doped ZnO films.

  18. Morphological and luminescent characteristics of GaN dots deposited on AlN by alternate supply of TMG and NH{sub 3}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsai, Y.-L. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China); Gong, J.-R. [Institute of Opto-Mechatronics, National Chung Cheng University, Chiayi 621, Taiwan (China); Lin, T.-Y. [Institute of Optoelectronic Sciences, National Taiwan Ocean University, Keelung 202, Taiwan (China); Lin, H.-Y. [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Chen, Yang-Fang [Department of Physics, National Taiwan University, Taipei 106, Taiwan (China); Lin, K.-M. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Feng Chia University, Taichung 407, Taiwan (China)

    2006-03-15

    GaN dots were deposited on AlN underlayers by alternate supply of trimethylgallium (TMG) and ammonia (NH{sub 3}) in an inductively heated quartz reactor operated at atmospheric pressure. Various growth parameters including deposition temperature, TMG admittance and pulse time between TMG and NH{sub 3} exposures were proposed to investigate the influence of growth parameters on the size distribution of GaN dots. It appears that GaN dots with uniform size distribution can be achieved under certain growth conditions. Based on the study of atomic force microscopy (AFM), high deposition temperature was found to be in favor of forming large GaN dots with small dot density. Decrement of TMG flow rate or reduction in the number of growth cycle tends to enable the formation of GaN dots with small dot sizes. The results of room temperature (RT) cathodoluminescence (CL) measurements of the GaN dots exhibit an emission peak at 3.735 eV. A remarkable blue shift of GaN dot emission was observed by reduced temperature photoluminescence (PL) measurements.

  19. Self-Healing Thermal Annealing: Surface Morphological Restructuring Control of GaN Nanorods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Conroy, Michele; Li, Haoning; Zubialevich, Vitaly Z.; Kusch, Gunnar; Schmidt, Michael; Collins, Timothy; Glynn, Colm; Martin, Robert W.; O’Dwyer, Colm; Morris, Michael D.; Holmes, Justin D.; Parbrook, Peter J.

    2016-12-07

    With advances in nanolithography and dry etching, top-down methods of nanostructuring have become a widely used tool for improving the efficiency of optoelectronics. These nano dimensions can offer various benefits to the device performance in terms of light extraction and efficiency, but often at the expense of emission color quality. Broadening of the target emission peak and unwanted yellow luminescence are characteristic defect-related effects due to the ion beam etching damage, particularly for III–N based materials. In this article we focus on GaN based nanorods, showing that through thermal annealing the surface roughness and deformities of the crystal structure can be “self-healed”. Correlative electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy show the change from spherical nanorods to faceted hexagonal structures, revealing the temperature-dependent surface morphology faceting evolution. The faceted nanorods were shown to be strain- and defect-free by cathodoluminescence hyperspectral imaging, micro-Raman, and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). In-situ TEM thermal annealing experiments allowed for real time observation of dislocation movements and surface restructuring observed in ex-situ annealing TEM sampling. This thermal annealing investigation gives new insight into the redistribution path of GaN material and dislocation movement post growth, allowing for improved understanding and in turn advances in optoelectronic device processing of compound semiconductors.

  20. Deciphering fluid inclusions in high-grade rocks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfons van den Kerkhof

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available The study of fluid inclusions in high-grade rocks is especially challenging as the host minerals have been normally subjected to deformation, recrystallization and fluid-rock interaction so that primary inclusions, formed at the peak of metamorphism are rare. The larger part of the fluid inclusions found in metamorphic minerals is typically modified during uplift. These late processes may strongly disguise the characteristics of the “original” peak metamorphic fluid. A detailed microstructural analysis of the host minerals, notably quartz, is therefore indispensable for a proper interpretation of fluid inclusions. Cathodoluminescence (CL techniques combined with trace element analysis of quartz (EPMA, LA-ICPMS have shown to be very helpful in deciphering the rock-fluid evolution. Whereas high-grade metamorphic quartz may have relatively high contents of trace elements like Ti and Al, low-temperature re-equilibrated quartz typically shows reduced trace element concentrations. The resulting microstructures in CL can be basically distinguished in diffusion patterns (along microfractures and grain boundaries, and secondary quartz formed by dissolution-reprecipitation. Most of these textures are formed during retrograde fluid-controlled processes between ca. 220 and 500 °C, i.e. the range of semi-brittle deformation (greenschist-facies and can be correlated with the fluid inclusions. In this way modified and re-trapped fluids can be identified, even when there are no optical features observed under the microscope.

  1. Defect Characterization, Imaging, and Control in Wide-Bandgap Semiconductors and Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brillson, L. J.; Foster, G. M.; Cox, J.; Ruane, W. T.; Jarjour, A. B.; Gao, H.; von Wenckstern, H.; Grundmann, M.; Wang, B.; Look, D. C.; Hyland, A.; Allen, M. W.

    2018-03-01

    Wide-bandgap semiconductors are now leading the way to new physical phenomena and device applications at nanoscale dimensions. The impact of defects on the electronic properties of these materials increases as their size decreases, motivating new techniques to characterize and begin to control these electronic states. Leading these advances have been the semiconductors ZnO, GaN, and related materials. This paper highlights the importance of native point defects in these semiconductors and describes how a complement of spatially localized surface science and spectroscopy techniques in three dimensions can characterize, image, and begin to control these electronic states at the nanoscale. A combination of characterization techniques including depth-resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy, surface photovoltage spectroscopy, and hyperspectral imaging can describe the nature and distribution of defects at interfaces at both bulk and nanoscale surfaces, their metal interfaces, and inside nanostructures themselves. These features as well as temperature and mechanical strain inside wide-bandgap device structures at the nanoscale can be measured even while these devices are operating. These advanced capabilities enable several new directions for describing defects at the nanoscale, showing how they contribute to device degradation, and guiding growth processes to control them.

  2. Synthesis of Y{sub 2}O{sub 3}:(Li,Eu) films using phosphor powders coated with SiO{sub 2} nano particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, In-Gyu; Park, Sangmoon [Center for Green Fusion Technology and Department of Engineering in Energy and Applied Chemistry, Silla University, Busan 617-736 (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Seong-Gu [Department of Chemical Engineering, Hoseo University, Chungnam 336-795 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Jung-Chul, E-mail: parkjc@silla.ac.k [Center for Green Fusion Technology and Department of Engineering in Energy and Applied Chemistry, Silla University, Busan 617-736 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    Y{sub 1.9-x}Li{sub 0.1}Eu{sub x}O{sub 3} (x=0.02, 0.05, 0.08, and 0.12) films were fabricated by spin-coating method. A colloidal silica suspension with Y{sub 1.9-x}Li{sub 0.1}Eu{sub x}O{sub 3} phosphor powder was exploited to obtain the highly stable and effective luminescent films onto the glass substrate. After heating as-prepared Y{sub 1.9-x}Li{sub 0.1}Eu{sub x}O{sub 3} films at 700 {sup o}C for 1 h, the phosphor films exhibit a high luminescent brightness as well as a strong adhesiveness on the glass substrate. The emission spectra of spin-coated and pulse-laser deposited Y{sub 1.82}Li{sub 0.1}Eu{sub 0.08}O{sub 3} films were compared. The cathodoluminescence of the phosphor films was carried out at the anode voltage 1 kV.

  3. Critical thickness of atomically ordered III-V alloys

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    France, R. M.; McMahon, W. E.; Guthrey, H. L. [National Renewable Energy Laboratory, 15013 Denver West Parkway, Golden, Colorado 80401 (United States)

    2015-10-12

    The critical thickness model is modified with a general boundary energy that describes the change in bulk energy as a dislocation regularly alters the atomic structure of an ordered material. The model is evaluated for dislocations gliding through CuPt-ordered GaInP and GaInAs, where the boundary energy is negative and the boundary is stable. With ordering present, the critical thickness is significantly lowered and remains finite as the mismatch strain approaches zero. The reduction in critical thickness is most significant when the order parameter is greatest and the amount of misfit energy is low. The modified model is experimentally validated for low-misfit GaInP epilayers with varying order parameters using in situ wafer curvature and ex situ cathodoluminescence. With strong ordering, relaxation begins at a lower thickness and occurs at a greater rate, which is consistent with a lower critical thickness and increased glide force. Thus, atomic ordering is an important consideration for the stability of lattice-mismatched devices.

  4. Thallium occurrence and partitioning in soils and sediments affected by mining activities in Madrid province (Spain).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Gonzalez, M A; Garcia-Guinea, J; Laborda, F; Garrido, F

    2015-12-01

    Thallium (Tl) and its compounds are toxic to biota even at low concentrations but little is known about Tl concentration and speciation in soils. An understanding of the source, mobility, and dispersion of Tl is necessary to evaluate the environmental impact of Tl pollution cases. In this paper, we examine the Tl source and dispersion in two areas affected by abandoned mine facilities whose residues remain dumped on-site affecting to soils and sediments of natural water courses near Madrid city (Spain). Total Tl contents and partitioning in soil solid phases as determined by means of a sequential extraction procedure were also examined in soils along the riverbeds of an ephemeral and a permanent streams collecting water runoff and drainage from the mines wastes. Lastly, electronic microscopy and cathodoluminescence probe are used as a suitable technique for Tl elemental detection on thallium-bearing phases. Tl was found mainly bound to quartz and alumino-phyllosilicates in both rocks and examined soils. Besides, Tl was also frequently found associated to organic particles and diatom frustules in all samples from both mine scenarios. These biogenic silicates may regulate the transfer of Tl into the soil-water system. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  5. Chemically vapor deposited diamond films as dosimetric material for potential clinical applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kabacińska Renata

    2018-03-01

    Full Text Available Thermally stimulated luminescence (TL, cathodoluminescence (CL and Raman spectroscopy of CVD diamond films grown on silicon substrates have been studied in order to obtain information on defects created during the growth, which induce the levels within the gap. TL between 300 K and 700 K, and CL from 200 nm to 1200 nm have been teasured. The glow curves show a peak located around 610 K with different intensities, depending on the sample thickness, associated with a trap of energy, equal to 0.83 eV and with attempt-to-escape-time of the order of 108 s-1. Broad CL bands observed at 428±1 nm (2.90 ±0.01 eV and 500±1 nm (2.47±0.004 eV are attributed to closely spaced and widely separated donor-acceptor (D-A pairs, respectively. The TL and CL results were correlated with diamond quality estimated from Raman spectroscopy measurements.

  6. CVD diamond substrates for electronic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Holzer, H.

    1996-03-01

    In this study the applicability of chemical vapor deposition (CVD) diamond as a material for heat spreaders was investigated. Economical evaluations on the production of heat spreaders were also performed. For the diamond synthesis the hot-filament and microwave method were used respectively. The deposition parameters were varied in a way that free standing diamond layers with a thickness of 80 to 750 microns and different qualities were obtained. The influence of the deposition parameters on the relevant film properties was investigated and discussed. With both the hot-filament and microwave method it was possible to deposit diamond layers having a thermal conductivity exceeding 1200 W/mK and therefore to reach the quality level for commercial uses. The electrical resistivity was greater than 10 12 Ωcm. The investigation of the optical properties was done by Raman-, IR- and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. Because of future applications of diamond-aluminium nitride composites as highly efficient heat spreaders diamond deposition an AIN was investigated. An improved substrate pretreatment prior to diamond deposition showed promising results for better performance of such composite heat spreaders. Both free standing layers and diamond-AIN composites could be cut by a CO2 Laser in Order to get an exact size geometry. A reduction of the diamond surface roughness was achieved by etching with manganese powder or cerium. (author)

  7. Increased p-type conductivity through use of an indium surfactant in the growth of Mg-doped GaN

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kyle, Erin C. H., E-mail: erinkyle@engineering.ucsb.edu; Kaun, Stephen W.; Young, Erin C.; Speck, James S. [Materials Department, University of California, Santa Barbara, California 93106 (United States)

    2015-06-01

    We have examined the effect of an indium surfactant on the growth of p-type GaN by ammonia-based molecular beam epitaxy. p-type GaN was grown at temperatures ranging from 700 to 780 °C with and without an indium surfactant. The Mg concentration in all films in this study was 4.5–6 × 10{sup 19} cm{sup −3} as measured by secondary ion mass spectroscopy. All p-type GaN films grown with an indium surfactant had higher p-type conductivities and higher hole concentrations than similar films grown without an indium surfactant. The lowest p-type GaN room temperature resistivity was 0.59 Ω-cm, and the highest room temperature carrier concentration was 1.6 × 10{sup 18} cm{sup −3}. Fits of the temperature-dependent carrier concentration data showed a one to two order of magnitude lower unintentional compensating defect concentration in samples grown with the indium surfactant. Samples grown at higher temperature had a lower active acceptor concentration. Improvements in band-edge luminescence were seen by cathodoluminescence for samples grown with the indium surfactant, confirming the trends seen in the Hall data.

  8. Diamonds from Zarnitsa and Dalnaya Kimberlites (Yakutia); their nature, growth history, and lithospheric mantle source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bulanova, G.P.; Davies, R.M.

    2000-01-01

    This paper presents the results of study of diamonds from two pipes of the Daldyn-Alakit kimberlite field (Yakutia). Zarnitsa ('Flash of Summer Lightning'), the first kimberlite discovered in Siberia, is located 15 km E of Udachnaya. Dalnaya is a small pipe in the southern part of the Daldyn Field. No information on diamond parageneses from these late Devonian pipes has been published previously. About 45 diamonds (-4+2 and -8+4 mm) with mineral inclusions were selected from each pipe and their morphology and surface features were studied using a binocular microscope. Cathodoluminescence (CL) images and Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) measurements were done on the whole stones first. 22 stones from Dalnaya and 32 from Zarnitsa were then sawn by laser or polished mechanically parallel to the planes (110) or (100). Polished central plates have been prepared for some stones; others were polished down to expose inclusions. The internal morphology of the diamonds and the location of inclusions were studied by birefringence (BR) and CL. Inclusions were analysed in situ on the polished diamond surfaces for major element composition by electron microprobe and for trace elements by proton and laser microprobes. A few central inclusions (seeds) were studied by SEM imagery and analysis. Hydrogen and nitrogen concentrations and N aggregation state were investigated in the central diamond plates by FTIR. Carbon isotopic composition was determined by mass spectrometry for 20 stones, using fragments of diamond off-cuts

  9. Characterization of luminescent samarium doped HfO2 coatings synthesized by spray pyrolysis technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chacon-Roa, C; Guzman-Mendoza, J; Aguilar-Frutis, M; Garcia-Hipolito, M; Alvarez-Fragoso, O; Falcony, C

    2008-01-01

    Trivalent samarium (Sm 3+ ) doped hafnium oxide (HfO 2 ) films were deposited using the spray pyrolysis deposition technique. The films were deposited on Corning glass substrates at temperatures ranging from 300 to 550 deg. C using chlorides as raw materials. Films, mostly amorphous, were obtained when deposition temperatures were below 350 deg. C. However, for temperatures higher than 400 deg. C, the films became polycrystalline, presenting the HfO 2 monoclinic phase. Scanning electron microscopy of the films revealed a rough surface morphology with spherical particles. Also, electron energy dispersive analysis was performed on these films. The photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence characteristics of the HfO 2 : SmCl 3 films, measured at room temperature, exhibited four main bands centred at 570, 610, 652 and 716 nm, which are due to the well-known intra-4f transitions of the Sm 3+ ion. It was found that the overall emission intensity rose as the deposition temperature was increased. Furthermore, a concentration quenching of the luminescence intensity was also observed

  10. GaAs nanowire array solar cells with axial p-i-n junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yao, Maoqing; Huang, Ningfeng; Cong, Sen; Chi, Chun-Yung; Seyedi, M Ashkan; Lin, Yen-Ting; Cao, Yu; Povinelli, Michelle L; Dapkus, P Daniel; Zhou, Chongwu

    2014-06-11

    Because of unique structural, optical, and electrical properties, solar cells based on semiconductor nanowires are a rapidly evolving scientific enterprise. Various approaches employing III-V nanowires have emerged, among which GaAs, especially, is under intense research and development. Most reported GaAs nanowire solar cells form p-n junctions in the radial direction; however, nanowires using axial junction may enable the attainment of high open circuit voltage (Voc) and integration into multijunction solar cells. Here, we report GaAs nanowire solar cells with axial p-i-n junctions that achieve 7.58% efficiency. Simulations show that axial junctions are more tolerant to doping variation than radial junctions and lead to higher Voc under certain conditions. We further study the effect of wire diameter and junction depth using electrical characterization and cathodoluminescence. The results show that large diameter and shallow junctions are essential for a high extraction efficiency. Our approach opens up great opportunity for future low-cost, high-efficiency photovoltaics.

  11. Structural evolvement and the capability of resistance to γ-ray irradiation on zircon originating from nyainqentanglha granite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cui Chunlong; Zhang Dong; Kang Houjun; Wang Xiaoli; Zhou Yulin; Yi Facheng; Lu Xirui; Tang Jingyou

    2010-01-01

    In order to investigate the structural evolvement and the capability of resistance to γ-ray irradiation on zircon as mothball waste forms of radionuclide, the zircon crystals (11.01±0.24 M) were studied as investigative object, which were collected from nyainqentanglha granite. All the samples were irradiated using a 60 Co y-ray source with 576 kGy doses. Phases, structures and microstructures of the as-gained samples before and after y-ray irradiation were characterized by means of a multi-functional microscope, cathodoluminescence (CL), backscattered electron microprobe (BEM), X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy (Raman), infrared spectroscopy (IR) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and so on. Moreover, the geological backgrounds and chemical compositions of zircons originating from natural rocks were analyzed as well. The results indicated that the as-gained crystals came from magmatic rock which undergone near 11 million years geological evolvement and still contain UO 2 and ThO 2 with the contents of 0.5729 wt%. The alteration of 10 -3 nm magnitude in the crystal cell parameters was measured (of the standard XRD card of zircon). The irradiation on the crystalline samples using γ-ray induced to the alteration of 10 -4 nm magnitude for their crystal cell parameters. The conclusion shows that zircon crystals with a certain amount of UO 2 and ThO 2 have better structural stability for the y-ray irradiation. (authors)

  12. E-beam-pumped semiconductor lasers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rice, Robert R.; Shanley, James F.; Ruggieri, Neil F.

    1995-04-01

    The collapse of the Soviet Union opened many areas of laser technology to the West. E-beam- pumped semiconductor lasers (EBSL) were pursued for 25 years in several Soviet Institutes. Thin single crystal screens of II-VI alloys (ZnxCd1-xSe, CdSxSe1-x) were incorporated in laser CRTs to produce scanned visible laser beams at average powers greater than 10 W. Resolutions of 2500 lines were demonstrated. MDA-W is conducting a program for ARPA/ESTO to assess EBSL technology for high brightness, high resolution RGB laser projection application. Transfer of II-VI crystal growth and screen processing technology is underway, and initial results will be reported. Various techniques (cathodoluminescence, one- and two-photon laser pumping, etc.) have been used to assess material quality and screen processing damage. High voltage (75 kV) video electronics were procured in the U.S. to operate test EBSL tubes. Laser performance was documented as a function of screen temperature, beam voltage and current. The beam divergence, spectrum, efficiency and other characteristics of the laser output are being measured. An evaluation of the effect of laser operating conditions upon the degradation rate is being carried out by a design-of-experiments method. An initial assessment of the projected image quality will be performed.

  13. Influence of a major exposure surface on the development of microporous micritic limestones - Example of the Upper Mishrif Formation (Cenomanian) of the Middle East

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deville de Periere, M.; Durlet, C.; Vennin, E.; Caline, B.; Boichard, R.; Meyer, A.

    2017-05-01

    Microporous platform top limestones of the Cenomanian Mishrif Formation (offshore Qatar) were studied in order to investigate the diagenetic processes associated with the top-Mishrif subaerial unconformity and its influence on the development of microporosity in underlying carbonates. Petrographical and stable isotope results indicate that complex diagenetic changes occurred during subaerial exposure of the Mishrif Formation, including pervasive dissolution and meteoric cementation, as well as neomorphism of the micritic matrix. Micrites at the top of the Mishrif Formation are coarse (i.e. > 2 μm), sub-rounded and very dull luminescent under cathodoluminescence. In this uppermost part of the studied interval, the limestone matrix first underwent dissolution of unstable grains in the vadose zone, with subsequent precipitation of low-magnesium calcite (LMC) overgrowths within an oxidising phreatic setting. This process explains the poor luminescence of the micrite crystals and their relatively coarse crystallometry which results in the present day in relatively good reservoir properties. δ13C ratios within the microporous limestones are negative (up to - 4‰ V-PDB) due to the incorporation of isotopically light carbon derived from palaeosols which developed during exposure. By contrast, fine (i.e. aquifer associated with the Top-Mishrif Unconformity, and were precipitated from meteoric or mixed dysoxic waters which were slightly supersaturated with respect to calcite.

  14. Study of the ionoluminescence behavior of the gemstones: Beryl (aquamarine variety), opal, and topaz

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikbakht, T., E-mail: tnikbakht@aeoi.org.ir; Kakuee, O.; Lamehi-Rachti, M.

    2016-03-15

    Ion beam induced luminescence (IBIL) is introduced as a powerful luminescence technique for analyzing the gemstones. Although IBIL is basically comparable to cathodoluminescence (CL), as a well-known luminescence method for studying the gemstones, its high energy density, superior flexibility in depth resolving and fast ionization rate, qualify it for studying weakly luminescent, multi-layer, and precious samples. In order to examine the potential of IBIL in analyzing the gemstones, three samples of beryl (aquamarine variety), opal, and topaz, with different luminosities, were studied through simulations and experiments. The results of the Monte Carlo simulations of the proton beam in interaction with the mentioned gemstones, displayed the capabilities of IBIL, especially in comparison to the well-known technique of CL. The in-air ion beam induced luminescence experiments of the natural samples were performed at room temperature. Also, the complementary technique of microPIXE was applied for elemental analyses of the samples. The promising results of the IBIL experiments exhibit the ability of the technique for analyzing weakly luminescent gemstones, such as aquamarine. The IBIL spectra also exhibit some unknown luminescence bands, which are mostly located in the UV part of the spectra. These new bands disclose the existence of the unknown luminescence activators in the samples. Possible ideas on the origins of these new bands are proposed.

  15. Site controlled Red-Yellow-Green light emitting InGaN Quantum Discs on nano-tipped GaN rods

    KAUST Repository

    Conroy, Michele Ann; Li, Haoning; Kusch, Gunnar; Zhao, Chao; Ooi, Boon S.; Paul, Edwards; Martin, Robert; Holmes, Justin D.; Parbrook, Peter

    2016-01-01

    We report a method of growing site controlled InGaN multiple quantum discs (QDs) at uniform wafer scale on coalescence free ultra-high density (>80%) nanorod templates by metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD). The dislocation and coalescence free nature of the GaN space filling nanorod arrays eliminates the well-known emission problems seen in InGaN based visible light sources that these types of crystallographic defects cause. Correlative scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) mapping and cathodoluminescence (CL) hyperspectral imaging illustrates the controlled site selection of the red, yellow and green (RYG) emission at these nano tips. This article reveals that the nanorod tips’ broad emission in the RYG visible range is in fact achieved by manipulating the InGaN QD’s confinement dimensions, rather than significantly increasing the In%. This article details the easily controlled method of manipulating the QDs dimensions producing high crystal quality InGaN without complicated growth conditions needed for strain relaxation and alloy compositional changes seen for bulk planar GaN templates.

  16. Structural evolution and optical properties of oxidized ZnS microrods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trung, D.Q. [Advanced Institute for Science and Technology (AIST), Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST), Hanoi 10000 (Viet Nam); Quang Ninh University of Industry, Yen Tho-Dong Trieu District, Quang Ninh Province (Viet Nam); Thang, P.T.; Hung, N.D. [Advanced Institute for Science and Technology (AIST), Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST), Hanoi 10000 (Viet Nam); Huy, P.T., E-mail: huy.phamthanh@hust.edu.vn [Advanced Institute for Science and Technology (AIST), Hanoi University of Science and Technology (HUST), Hanoi 10000 (Viet Nam)

    2016-08-15

    In this study, we present a simple and versatile way to growth and modify photoemission of high quality ZnS microrods by thermal evaporation method in combination with post oxidation in oxygen environment. The as-grown ZnS microrods show strong near edge luminescence doublets at room temperature indicating the high crystalline quality. Using ultrahigh-resolution scanning electron microscope integrated with energy microanalysis and cathodoluminescence capacity we elucidate the effect of oxidation temperature on microstructure surface, chemical composition and emission spectra of ZnS microrods. Under appropriate oxidation condition, the initial high quality ZnS microrods can be converted into ZnS/ZnO microrod heterostructures or optically active porous ZnO microrods. More particularly, we demonstrate that the emission wavelength of an oxygen-related defect could be tuned in between optical band-gap of ZnS and ZnO upon increasing the oxidation temperature. This research introduces a simple approach to synthesize and tune optical property of high quality ZnS crystals. - Highlights: • High quality optically defect free ZnS microrods were synthesized in large scale. • The structural evolution and changes in optical emission upon oxidation were disclosed. • Luminescence of oxygen-related defect can be tuned using oxidation temperature. • The initial ZnS microrods can be converted into ZnS/ZnO heterostructure. • Porous ZnO microrods with negligible defect emissions were achieved.

  17. Effect of the growth temperature and the AlN mole fraction on In incorporation and properties of quaternary III-nitride layers grown by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez-Garrido, S.; Pereiro, J.; Munoz, E.; Calleja, E.; Redondo-Cubero, A.; Gago, R.; Bertram, F.; Christen, J.; Luna, E.; Trampert, A.

    2008-01-01

    Indium incorporation into wurtzite (0001)-oriented In x Al y Ga 1-x-y N layers grown by plasma-assisted molecular beam epitaxy was studied as a function of the growth temperature (565-635 deg. C) and the AlN mole fraction (0.01< y<0.27). The layer stoichiometry was determined by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS). RBS shows that indium incorporation decreased continuously with increasing growth temperature due to thermally enhanced dissociation of In-N bonds and for increasing AlN mole fractions. High resolution x-ray diffraction and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) measurements did not show evidence of phase separation. The mosaicity of the quaternary layers was found to be mainly determined by the growth temperature and independent on alloy composition within the range studied. However, depending on the AlN mole fraction, nanometer-sized composition fluctuations were detected by TEM. Photoluminescence spectra showed a single broad emission at room temperature, with energy and bandwidth S- and W-shaped temperature dependences typical of exciton localization by alloy inhomogeneities. Cathodoluminescence measurements demonstrated that the alloy inhomogeneities, responsible of exciton localization, occur on a lateral length scale below 150 nm, which is corroborated by TEM

  18. Optimization of the luminescence emission of Si nanocrystals synthesized from non-stoichiometric Si oxides using a Central Composite Design of the deposition process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morana, B.; Sande, J.C.G. de; Rodriguez, A.; Sangrador, J.; Rodriguez, T.; Avella, M.; Jimenez, J.

    2008-01-01

    Si oxide films with a controlled excess of Si were deposited on Si wafers by LPCVD using Si 2 H 6 and O 2 , thermally annealed to 1100 deg. C for 1 h to form Si nanocrystals embedded in SiO 2 and subsequently annealed at 450 deg. C in forming gas. The samples were characterized by Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, spectroscopic ellipsometry and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. The excess of Si in the as-deposited samples, ranging from 0 to 70% in volume, was obtained from the ellipsometry data analysis. After annealing at 1100 deg. C, the samples show a luminescence band (peaking at 665 nm) at 80 K and at room temperature which is associated to the presence of Si nanocrystals. The growth rate, the excess of Si incorporated to the films and the intensity of the luminescence band were modelled using a Face-Centered Central Composite Design as a function of the main deposition variables (pressure, 185-300 mTorr; temperature, 250-400 deg. C; Si 2 H 6 /O 2 flow ratio, 2-5) aiming to control the growth process and the incorporation of Si in excess as well as to determine the experimental conditions that yield the samples with the maximum intensity of the luminescence emission

  19. Influence of the crystallization process on the luminescence of multilayers of SiGe nanocrystals embedded in SiO2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Avella, M.; Prieto, A.C.; Jimenez, J.; Rodriguez, A.; Sangrador, J.; Rodriguez, T.; Ortiz, M.I.; Ballesteros, C.

    2008-01-01

    Multilayers of SiGe nanocrystals embedded in an oxide matrix have been fabricated by low-pressure chemical vapor deposition of SiGe and SiO 2 onto Si wafers (in a single run at 390 deg. C and 50 mTorr, using GeH 4 , Si 2 H 6 and O 2 ) followed by a rapid thermal annealing treatment to crystallize the SiGe nanoparticles. The main emission band is located at 400 nm in both cathodoluminescence and photoluminescence experiments at 80 K and also at room temperature. The annealing conditions (temperatures ranging from 700 to 1000 deg. C and for times of 30 and 60 s) have been investigated in samples with different diameter of the nanoparticles (from ∼3 to ≥5 nm) and oxide interlayer thickness (15 and 35 nm) in order to establish a correlation between the crystallization of the nanoparticles, the degradation of their composition by Ge diffusion and the intensity of the luminescence emission band. Structures with small nanoparticles (3-4.5 nm) separated by thick oxide barriers (∼35 nm) annealed at 900 deg. C for 60 s yield the maximum intensity of the luminescence. An additional treatment at 450 deg. C in forming gas for dangling-bond passivation increases the intensity of the luminescence band by 25-30%

  20. Fabrication of bright and thin Zn₂SiO₄ luminescent film for electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Taichi; Kanamori, Satoshi; Fukuta, Masahiro; Nawa, Yasunori; Kominami, Hiroko; Nakanishi, Yoichiro; Sugita, Atsushi; Inami, Wataru; Kawata, Yoshimasa

    2015-07-13

    We fabricated a bright and thin Zn₂SiO₄ luminescent film to serve as a nanometric light source for high-spatial-resolution optical microscopy based on electron beam excitation. The Zn₂SiO₄ luminescent thin film was fabricated by annealing a ZnO film on a Si₃N₄ substrate at 1000 °C in N₂. The annealed film emitted bright cathodoluminescence compared with the as-deposited film. The film is promising for nano-imaging with electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscopy. We evaluated the spatial resolution of a microscope developed using this Zn₂SiO₄ luminescent thin film. This is the first report of the investigation and application of ZnO/Si₃N₄ annealed at a high temperature (1000 °C). The fabricated Zn₂SiO₄ film is expected to enable high-frame-rate dynamic observation with ultra-high resolution using our electron beam excitation-assisted optical microscopy.

  1. Optical and Optoelectronic Property Analysis of Nanomaterials inside Transmission Electron Microscope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernando, Joseph F S; Zhang, Chao; Firestein, Konstantin L; Golberg, Dmitri

    2017-12-01

    In situ transmission electron microscopy (TEM) allows one to investigate nanostructures at high spatial resolution in response to external stimuli, such as heat, electrical current, mechanical force and light. This review exclusively focuses on the optical, optoelectronic and photocatalytic studies inside TEM. With the development of TEMs and specialized TEM holders that include in situ illumination and light collection optics, it is possible to perform optical spectroscopies and diverse optoelectronic experiments inside TEM with simultaneous high resolution imaging of nanostructures. Optical TEM holders combining the capability of a scanning tunneling microscopy probe have enabled nanomaterial bending/stretching and electrical measurements in tandem with illumination. Hence, deep insights into the optoelectronic property versus true structure and its dynamics could be established at the nanometer-range precision thus evaluating the suitability of a nanostructure for advanced light driven technologies. This report highlights systems for in situ illumination of TEM samples and recent research work based on the relevant methods, including nanomaterial cathodoluminescence, photoluminescence, photocatalysis, photodeposition, photoconductivity and piezophototronics. © 2017 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  2. Midgap traps related to compensation processes in CdTe alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaldini, A.; Cavallini, A.; Fraboni, B.; Fernandez, P.; Piqueras, J.

    1997-01-01

    We study, by cathodoluminescence and junction spectroscopy methods, the deep traps located near midgap in semiconducting and semi-insulating II-VI compounds, namely, undoped CdTe, CdTe:Cl, and Cd 0.8 Zn 0.2 Te. In order to understand the role such deep levels play in the control of the electrical properties of the material, it appears necessary to determine their character, donor, or acceptor, in addition to their activation energy and capture cross section. Photoinduced-current transient spectroscopy and photo deep-level transient spectroscopy are used to investigate the semi-insulating (SI) samples, and a comparison of the complementary results obtained allows us to identify an acceptor trap, labeled H, and an electron trap, labeled E. Level H is common to all investigated compounds, while E is present only in CdTe:Cl samples. This provides clear experimental evidence of the presence of a deep trap in CdTe:Cl, which could be a good candidate for the deep donor level needed to explain the compensation process of SI CdTe:Cl. copyright 1997 The American Physical Society

  3. Evolution of optical properties and band structure from amorphous to crystalline Ga2O3 films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabi Zhang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available The optical properties and band structure evolution from amorphous to crystalline Ga2O3 films was investigated in this work. Amorphous and crystalline Ga2O3 films were obtained by changing the growth substrate temperatures of pulsed laser deposition and the crystallinity increase with the rising of substrate temperature. The bandgap value and ultraviolet emission intensity of the films increase with the rising of crystallinity as observed by means of spectrophotometer and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. Abrupt bandgap value and CL emission variations were observed when amorphous to crystalline transition took place. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy core level spectra reveal that more oxygen vacancies and disorders exist in amorphous Ga2O3 film grown at lower substrate temperature. The valence band spectra of hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy present the main contribution from Ga 4sp for crystalline film deposited at substrate temperature of 500 oC, while extra subgap states has been observed in amorphous film deposited at 300 oC. The oxygen vacancy and the extra subgap density of states are suggested to be the parts of origin of bandgap and CL spectra variations. The experimental data above yields a realistic picture of optical properties and band structure variation for the amorphous to crystalline transition of Ga2O3 films.

  4. Doping β-Ga2O3 with europium: influence of the implantation and annealing temperature

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peres, M.; Lorenz, K.; Alves, E.; Nogales, E.; Méndez, B.; Biquard, X.; Daudin, B.; Víllora, E. G.; Shimamura, K.

    2017-08-01

    β-Ga2O3 bulk single crystals were doped by ion implantation at temperatures from room temperature to 1000 °C, using a 300 keV Europium beam with a fluence of 1  ×  1015 at cm-2. Rising the implantation temperature from room temperature to 400-600 °C resulted in a significant increase of the substitutional Eu fraction and of the number of Eu ions in the 3+  charge state as well as in a considerable decrease of implantation damage. Eu is found in both charge states 2+  and 3+  and their relative fractions are critically dependent on the implantation and annealing temperature, suggesting that defects play an important role in stabilizing one of the charge states. The damage recovery during post-implant annealing is a complex process and typically defect levels first increase for intermediate annealing temperatures and a significant recovery of the crystal only starts around 1000 °C. Cathodoluminescence spectra are dominated by the sharp Eu3+ related intra-ionic 4f transition lines in the red spectral region. They show a strong increase of the emission intensity with increasing annealing temperature, in particular for samples implanted at elevated temperature, indicating the optical activation of Eu3+ ions. However, no direct correlation of emission intensity and Eu3+ fraction was found, again pointing to the important role of defects on the physical properties of these luminescent materials.

  5. Evolution of optical properties and band structure from amorphous to crystalline Ga2O3 films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fabi; Li, Haiou; Cui, Yi-Tao; Li, Guo-Ling; Guo, Qixin

    2018-04-01

    The optical properties and band structure evolution from amorphous to crystalline Ga2O3 films was investigated in this work. Amorphous and crystalline Ga2O3 films were obtained by changing the growth substrate temperatures of pulsed laser deposition and the crystallinity increase with the rising of substrate temperature. The bandgap value and ultraviolet emission intensity of the films increase with the rising of crystallinity as observed by means of spectrophotometer and cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. Abrupt bandgap value and CL emission variations were observed when amorphous to crystalline transition took place. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy core level spectra reveal that more oxygen vacancies and disorders exist in amorphous Ga2O3 film grown at lower substrate temperature. The valence band spectra of hard X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy present the main contribution from Ga 4sp for crystalline film deposited at substrate temperature of 500 oC, while extra subgap states has been observed in amorphous film deposited at 300 oC. The oxygen vacancy and the extra subgap density of states are suggested to be the parts of origin of bandgap and CL spectra variations. The experimental data above yields a realistic picture of optical properties and band structure variation for the amorphous to crystalline transition of Ga2O3 films.

  6. Self-assembled GaN nano-column grown on Si(111) substrate using Au+Ga alloy seeding method by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shim, Byung-Young; Ko, Eun-A; Song, Jae-Chul; Kang, Dong-Hun; Kim, Dong-Wook; Lee, In-Hwan; Kannappan, Santhakumar; Lee, Cheul-Ro

    2007-01-01

    Single-crystal GaN nano-column arrays were grown on Au-coated silicon (111) substrate by Au-Ga alloy seeding method using metalorganic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD). The nano-column arrays were studied as a function of growth parameters and Au thin film thickness. The diameter and length of the as-grown nano-column vary from 100 to 500 nm and 4 to 6 μm, respectively. The surface morphology and optical properties of the nano-columns were investigated using scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX), cathodoluminescence (CL) and photoluminescence (PL). The Au+Ga alloy droplets were found to be uniformly distributed on silicon surface. Further, SEM image reveals a vertical growth and cylindrical in shape GaN nano-column. The chemical composition of the nano-column, which composed of gallium and nitrogen ions, was estimated by EDX. CL reveals a strong band edge emission from the GaN nano-column. PL spectra show a peak at 365.7 nm with a full-width half maximum (FWHM) of 65 meV which indicates good optical quality GaN nano-column with low dislocation density. Our results suggest that single crystal GaN nano-column can be grown on Au+Ga alloy on silicon substrate with a low dislocation density for better device performances. (author)

  7. Nanoscale conductive pattern of the homoepitaxial AlGaN/GaN transistor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Tomás, A; Catalàn, G; Fontserè, A; Iglesias, V; Chen, H; Gammon, P M; Jennings, M R; Thomas, M; Fisher, C A; Sharma, Y K; Placidi, M; Chmielowska, M; Chenot, S; Porti, M; Nafría, M; Cordier, Y

    2015-03-20

    The gallium nitride (GaN)-based buffer/barrier mode of growth and morphology, the transistor electrical response (25-310 °C) and the nanoscale pattern of a homoepitaxial AlGaN/GaN high electron mobility transistor (HEMT) have been investigated at the micro and nanoscale. The low channel sheet resistance and the enhanced heat dissipation allow a highly conductive HEMT transistor (Ids > 1 A mm(-1)) to be defined (0.5 A mm(-1) at 300 °C). The vertical breakdown voltage has been determined to be ∼850 V with the vertical drain-bulk (or gate-bulk) current following the hopping mechanism, with an activation energy of 350 meV. The conductive atomic force microscopy nanoscale current pattern does not unequivocally follow the molecular beam epitaxy AlGaN/GaN morphology but it suggests that the FS-GaN substrate presents a series of preferential conductive spots (conductive patches). Both the estimated patches density and the apparent random distribution appear to correlate with the edge-pit dislocations observed via cathodoluminescence. The sub-surface edge-pit dislocations originating in the FS-GaN substrate result in barrier height inhomogeneity within the HEMT Schottky gate producing a subthreshold current.

  8. Estimation of the intrinsic stresses in α-alumina in relation with its elaboration mode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boumaza, A.; Djelloul, A.

    2010-01-01

    The specific signatures of α-Al 2 O 3 by Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy were investigated to estimate the intrinsic stress in this compound according to its elaboration mode. Thus, α-alumina was prepared either by calcination of boehmite or gibbsite and also generated by oxidation of a metallic FeCrAl alloy. FTIR results were mainly supported by X-ray diffraction (XRD) patterns that allowed to determine the crystallite size and the strain in the various alpha aluminas. Moreover, the infrared peak at 378.7 cm -1 was used as a reference for stress free α-alumina and the shift of this peak allowed to estimate intrinsic stresses, which were related to the morphology and to the specific surface area of aluminas according to their elaboration mode. These interpretations were confirmed by results obtained by cathodoluminescence experiments. - Graphical abstract: The infrared peak at 378.7 cm -1 was used as a reference for stress free α-alumina and the shift of this peak allowed to estimate intrinsic stresses, which were related to the morphology and to the specific surface area of aluminas according to their elaboration mode.

  9. Pressure–Temperature–Fluid Constraints for the Poona Emerald Deposits, Western Australia: Fluid Inclusion and Stable Isotope Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Marshall

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Emerald from the deposits at Poona shows micrometre-scale chemical, optical, and cathodoluminescence zonation. This zonation, combined with fluid inclusion and isotope studies, indicates early emerald precipitation from a single-phase saline fluid of approximately 12 weight percent NaCl equivalent, over the temperature range of 335–525 °C and pressures ranging from 70 to 400 MPa. The large range in pressure and temperature likely reflects some post entrapment changes and re-equilibration of oxygen isotopes. Secondary emerald-hosted fluid inclusions indicate subsequent emerald precipitation from higher salinity fluids. Likewise, the δ18O-δD of channel fluids extracted from Poona emerald is consistent with multiple origins yielding both igneous and metamorphic signatures. The combined multiple generations of emerald precipitation, different fluid compositions, and the presence of both metamorphic and igneous fluids trapped in emerald, likely indicate a protracted history of emerald precipitation at Poona conforming to both an igneous and a metamorphic origin at various times during regional lower amphibolite to greenschist facies metamorphism over the period ~2710–2660 Ma.

  10. Diamond-based photoconductors for deep UV detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balducci, A.; Bruzzi, M.; De Sio, A.; Donato, M.G.; Faggio, G.; Marinelli, M.; Messina, G.; Milani, E.; Morgada, M.E.; Pace, E.; Pucella, G.; Santangelo, S.; Scoccia, M.; Scuderi, S.; Tucciarone, A.; Verona-Rinati, G.

    2006-01-01

    This work reports on the development and characterization of bi-dimensional deep-UV sensor arrays based on synthetic diamond to address the requirements of space-born astrophysical experiments. The material was synthesized at the University of Rome 'Tor Vergata' where both heteroepitaxial polycrystalline diamond films and homoepitaxial single-crystal diamonds are grown using a tubular MWCVD reactor. The quality of chemical vapour deposited diamond was characterized by cathodoluminescence, photoluminescence, Raman spectroscopy and thermally stimulated currents. Then, suitable samples were selected and used to fabricate photoconductive single-pixel and 2D array devices by evaporating metal contacts on the growth surface. The electro-optical characterization of the devices was carried out in a wide spectral region, ranging from 120 to 2400 nm. A deuterium lamp and a 0.5 m vacuum monochromator were used to measure the detector responsivity under continuous monochromatic irradiation in the 120-250 nm spectral range, while an optical parametric oscillator tunable laser producing 5 ns pulses was used as light source from 210 up to 2400 nm. Time response, signal-to-noise ratio, responsivity and visible rejection factor were evaluated and the results are hereafter summarized

  11. Hydrothermal dolomite reservoir facies in the Sinian Dengying Fm, central Sichuan Basin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuqiang Jiang

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The Upper Sinian Dengying Fm is the focus of natural gas exploration in the central part of the Sichuan Basin (central Sichuan Basin in recent years. Especially, epigenic karstification and its resulted reservoir-seepage spaces have always been the focal points in researches. Based on the petrographic characteristics of drilling cuttings and core samples, and through experimental analysis by using trace elements, isotopes, and cathodoluminescence, the Dengying Fm dolomite was demonstrated to have matrix recrystallized dolomite (MRD, filled saddle dolomite (FSD (the mean homogenization temperature of inclusion: 178.5 °C, high concentrations of Fe & Mn, slightly positive 87Sr/86Sr value and hydrothermal minerals combination (including sphalerite, galena, pyrite, and quartz, etc.. Thus, it was proposed that hydrothermal dolomite reservoir facies (HDRF exist in the Dengying Fm dolomite, in other words, the dolomite reservoir is composed of hydrothermal dissolved pores, intercrystalline pores of hydrothermal origin, hydrothermal caverns and expanded fractures, and was formed due to the reworking of hydrothermal fluid on tight matrix dolomite. Identification marks are presented in terms of petrography and geochemistry so that hydrothermal dolomite reservoir facies can be effectively recognized and identified. It is concluded that the development of hydrothermal dolomite reservoir facies in this area are preliminary controlled by deep and large basement faults and the strength of hydrothermal fluids.

  12. Ultraviolet emitting (Y1-xGd x)2O3-δ thin films deposited by radio frequency magnetron sputtering; structure-property-thin film processing relationships

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fowlkes, J.D.; Fitz-Gerald, J.M.; Rack, P.D.

    2007-01-01

    The effects that the oxygen partial pressure, substrate temperature and annealing temperature have on the cathodoluminescence (CL) efficiency of radio frequency magnetron sputter deposited Gd-doped Y 2 O 3 thin films is investigated. Furthermore these sputtering parameters are correlated to the degree of crystallinity, the phases present (cubic (α) versus monoclinic (β) Y 2 O 3 ), and the stoichiometry of the thin films. Films deposited at room temperature (RT) did not CL, however, the films were activated by a post-deposition anneal at 1273 K for 6 h. Films deposited at 873 K had a very low CL efficiency which was significantly enhanced by a post-deposition anneal. For RT deposited films the external CL efficiency increased with increasing oxygen partial pressure for the range studied, however the opposite trend was observed for the 873 K deposited films. Examination of the morphology and grain size of the high temperature deposited films revealed that the average grain size increased with decreasing partial pressure and the observed increase in the external CL efficiency was attributed to enhanced anomalous diffraction. An intrinsic CL efficiency term was determined to circumvent the effects of the enhanced anomalous diffraction, and the CL efficiency was correlated to the integrated intensity of the (222) of the cubic α-Y 2 O 3 phase

  13. Characterizing the hypersiliceous rocks of Belgium used in (pre-)history: a case study on sourcing sedimentary quartzites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Veldeman, Isis; Baele, Jean-Marc; De Doncker, H W J A; Goemaere, Eric; Deceukelaire, Marleen; Dusar, Michiel

    2012-01-01

    Tracking raw material back to its extraction source is a crucial step for archaeologists when trying to deduce migration patterns and trade contacts in (pre-)history. Regarding stone artefacts, the main rock types encountered in the archaeological record of Belgium are hypersiliceous rocks. This is a newly introduced category of rock types comprising those rocks made of at least 90% silica. These are strongly silicified quartz sands or sedimentary quartzites, siliceous rocks of chemical and biochemical origin (e.g. flint), very pure metamorphic quartzites and siliceous volcanic rocks (e.g. obsidian). To be able to distinguish between different extraction sources, ongoing research was started to locate possible extraction sources of hypersiliceous rocks and to characterize rocks collected from these sources. Characterization of these hypersiliceous rocks is executed with the aid of optical polarizing microscopy, optical cold cathodoluminescence and scanning-electron microscopy combined with energy-dispersive x-ray spectrometry and with back-scatter electron imaging. In this paper, we focus on various sedimentary quartzites of Paleogene stratigraphical level. (paper)

  14. Influence of oxygen incorporation on the defect structure of GaN microrods and nanowires. An XPS and CL study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guzmán, G; Herrera, M; Silva, R; Vásquez, G C; Maestre, D

    2016-01-01

    We report a cathodoluminescence (CL) and x-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study of the influence of oxygen incorporation on the defect structure of GaN microrods and nanowires. The micro- and nanostructures were synthesized by a thermal evaporation method, which enables us to incorporate oxygen at different concentrations by varying the growth temperature. HR-TEM measurements revealed that oxygen generates stacking fault defects and edge dislocations along the GaN nanowires. Amorphous GaO x N y compounds were segregated on the surface of the nanowires. XPS, XRD and CL measurements suggests that the microrods and nanowires were composed of amorphous oxynitride compounds at their surface and GaN at their inner region. CL measurements revealed that the nanostructures generated an emission of 2.68 eV that increased in intensity proportionally to their oxygen content. We have attributed this emission to electronic transitions between donor substitutional-oxygen (O N ) and acceptor interstitial-oxygen (O i ) state levels. (paper)

  15. Microstructural dependency of optical properties of m-plane InGaN multiple quantum wells grown on 2° misoriented bulk GaN substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tang, Fengzai; Barnard, Jonathan S.; Zhu, Tongtong; Oehler, Fabrice; Kappers, Menno J.; Oliver, Rachel A.

    2015-01-01

    A non-polar m-plane structure consisting of five InGaN/GaN quantum wells (QWs) was grown on ammonothermal bulk GaN by metal-organic vapor phase epitaxy. Surface step bunches propagating through the QW stack were found to accommodate the 2° substrate miscut towards the -c direction. Both large steps with heights of a few tens of nanometres and small steps between one and a few atomic layers in height are observed, the former of which exhibit cathodoluminescence at longer wavelengths than the adjacent m-plane terraces. This is attributed to the formation of semi-polar facets at the steps on which the QWs are shown to be thicker and have higher Indium contents than those in the adjacent m-plane regions. Discrete basal-plane stacking faults (BSFs) were occasionally initiated from the QWs on the main m-plane terraces, but groups of BSFs were frequently observed to initiate from those on the large steps, probably related to the increased strain associated with the locally higher indium content and thickness

  16. ZnO nanopowder induced light scattering for improved visualization of emission sites in carbon nanotube films and arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meško, Marcel; Ou, Qiongrong; Matsuda, Takafumi; Ishikawa, Tomokazu; Veis, Martin; Antoš, Roman; Ogino, Akihisa; Nagatsu, Masaaki

    2009-06-01

    We report on ZnO nanopowder induced light scattering for improved visualization of emission sites in carbon nanotube films and arrays. We observed a significant reduction of the internal multiple light scattering phenomena, which are characteristic for ZnO micropowders. The microsized grains of the commercially available ZnO:Zn (P 15) were reduced to the nanometre scale by pulsed laser ablation at an oxygen ambient pressure of 10 kPa. Our investigations show no crystalline change and no shift of the broad green emission peak at 500 nm for the ZnO nanopowder. For the application in field emission displays, we demonstrate the possibility of achieving cathodoluminescence with a fine pitch size of 100 µm of the patterned pixels without requiring additional electron beam focusing and without a black matrix. Moreover, the presented results show the feasibility of employing ZnO nanopowder as a detection material for the phosphorus screen method, which is able to localize emission sites of carbon nanotube films and arrays with an accuracy comparable to scanning anode field emission microscopy.

  17. ZnO nanopowder induced light scattering for improved visualization of emission sites in carbon nanotube films and arrays

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mesko, Marcel; Ou Qiongrong; Matsuda, Takafumi; Ishikawa, Tomokazu; Ogino, Akihisa; Nagatsu, Masaaki; Veis, Martin; Antos, Roman

    2009-01-01

    We report on ZnO nanopowder induced light scattering for improved visualization of emission sites in carbon nanotube films and arrays. We observed a significant reduction of the internal multiple light scattering phenomena, which are characteristic for ZnO micropowders. The microsized grains of the commercially available ZnO:Zn (P 15) were reduced to the nanometre scale by pulsed laser ablation at an oxygen ambient pressure of 10 kPa. Our investigations show no crystalline change and no shift of the broad green emission peak at 500 nm for the ZnO nanopowder. For the application in field emission displays, we demonstrate the possibility of achieving cathodoluminescence with a fine pitch size of 100 μm of the patterned pixels without requiring additional electron beam focusing and without a black matrix. Moreover, the presented results show the feasibility of employing ZnO nanopowder as a detection material for the phosphorus screen method, which is able to localize emission sites of carbon nanotube films and arrays with an accuracy comparable to scanning anode field emission microscopy.

  18. Characterisation of defects in p-GaN by admittance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elsherif, O.S.; Vernon-Parry, K.D.; Evans-Freeman, J.H.; Airey, R.J.; Kappers, M.; Humphreys, C.J.

    2012-01-01

    Mg-doped GaN films have been grown on (0 0 0 1) sapphire using metal organic vapour phase epitaxy. Use of different buffer layer strategies caused the threading dislocation density (TDD) in the GaN to be either approximately 2×10 9 cm -2 or 1×10 10 cm -2 . Frequency-dependent capacitance and conductance measurements at temperatures up to 450 K have been used to study the electronic states associated with the Mg doping, and to determine how these are affected by the TDD. Admittance spectroscopy of the films finds a single impurity-related acceptor level with an activation energy of 160±10 meV for [Mg] of about 1×10 19 cm -3 , and 120±10 eV as the Mg precursor flux decreased. This level is thought to be associated with the Mg acceptor state. The TDD has no discernible effect on the trap detected by admittance spectroscopy. We compare these results with cathodoluminescence measurements reported in the literature, which reveal that most threading dislocations are non-radiative recombination centres, and discuss possible reasons why our admittance spectroscopy have not detected electrically active defects associated with threading dislocations.

  19. Luminescence of yttrium niobium-tantalate doubly activated by europium and/or terbium under X-ray and electron beam excitation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arellano, I.D., E-mail: arellano@utp.edu.co [Department of Physics, Technological University of Pereira, Vereda La Julita, Pereira (Colombia); Nazarov, M.V. [Institute of Applied Physics, Academy of Sciences of Moldova, Republic of Moldova (Moldova, Republic of); School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia); Cortes, J.A. [Department of Physics, Technological University of Pereira, Vereda La Julita, Pereira (Colombia); Ahmad Fauzi, M.N [School of Materials and Mineral Resources Engineering Universiti Sains Malaysia, 14300 Nibong Tebal, Penang (Malaysia)

    2012-09-15

    This paper reports the luminescence emission spectra of Y(Ta,Nb)O{sub 4} activated by rare earth ions such as Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+}. The influence of these rare earth ions on the luminescence of yttrium niobium-tantalate phosphors was investigated. The luminescent properties were studied under X-ray and electron beam excitations. Under these excitations, the emission centers of the rare earth activators (Eu{sup 3+},Tb{sup 3+}) were found to contribute efficiently to the overall luminescence. Changing the mol concentration of the incorporated activators resulted in a broad variation of visible photoluminescence. Color cathodoluminescence images showed clearly the dependence of chromaticity on the different activators. With their various luminescence chromaticities, these rare earth activated phosphors are promising materials for solid-state lighting applications as well as for X-ray intensifying screens in medical diagnosis, providing a broad variation of visible photoluminescence from blue to red. - Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The Y(Ta,Nb)O{sub 4} phosphors were activated by rare earth ions such as Eu{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+}. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The phosphors were studied under X-ray and electron beam excitations. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The emission centers contribute efficiently to the overall luminescence. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Changing the concentration of the activators resulted in a broad luminescence.

  20. Site controlled Red-Yellow-Green light emitting InGaN Quantum Discs on nano-tipped GaN rods

    KAUST Repository

    Conroy, Michele Ann

    2016-03-10

    We report a method of growing site controlled InGaN multiple quantum discs (QDs) at uniform wafer scale on coalescence free ultra-high density (>80%) nanorod templates by metal organic chemical vapour deposition (MOCVD). The dislocation and coalescence free nature of the GaN space filling nanorod arrays eliminates the well-known emission problems seen in InGaN based visible light sources that these types of crystallographic defects cause. Correlative scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) mapping and cathodoluminescence (CL) hyperspectral imaging illustrates the controlled site selection of the red, yellow and green (RYG) emission at these nano tips. This article reveals that the nanorod tips’ broad emission in the RYG visible range is in fact achieved by manipulating the InGaN QD’s confinement dimensions, rather than significantly increasing the In%. This article details the easily controlled method of manipulating the QDs dimensions producing high crystal quality InGaN without complicated growth conditions needed for strain relaxation and alloy compositional changes seen for bulk planar GaN templates.

  1. Recombination luminescence of Cu and/or Ag doped lithium tetraborate single crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Romet, I. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, W. Ostwaldi Str. 1, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Aleksanyan, E. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, W. Ostwaldi Str. 1, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); A. Alikhanyan National Science Laboratory, 2 Br. Alikhanyan Str., 0036 Yerevan (Armenia); Brik, M.G. [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, W. Ostwaldi Str. 1, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); College of Sciences, Chongqing University of Posts and Telecommunications, 400065 Chongqing (China); Institute of Physics, Jan Dlugosz University, Armii Krajowej 13/15, PL-42200 Czestochowa (Poland); Corradi, G. [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Konkoly-Thege M. út 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary); Kotlov, A. [Photon Science at DESY, Notkestrasse 85, 22607 Hamburg (Germany); Nagirnyi, V., E-mail: vitali.nagirnoi@ut.ee [Institute of Physics, University of Tartu, W. Ostwaldi Str. 1, 50411 Tartu (Estonia); Polgár, K. [Institute for Solid State Physics and Optics, Wigner Research Centre for Physics, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, Konkoly-Thege M. út 29-33, H-1121 Budapest (Hungary)

    2016-09-15

    Complex investigations of thermostimulated luminescence (TSL) and radioluminescence properties of Li{sub 2}B{sub 4}O{sub 7} (LTB), LTB:Cu, LTB:Ag and LTB:Cu, Ag crystals suitable for tissue equivalent dosimeters were carried out in the temperature range 4.2–700 K. TSL, cathodoluminescence and X-ray excited luminescence spectra are compared to those measured under photoexcitation. The emission band at 4.6 eV in LTB:Ag is reliably related to Ag{sup +} ions based on the comparison of the results of optical spectroscopy studies and first principle calculations. Energy transfer from the relaxed exited state of the Ag{sup +} ion to the Cu{sup +} ion in double-doped LTB:Cu, Ag crystals is demonstrated. Thermostimulated recombination of charge carriers in irradiated crystals is seen to take place mainly at oxygen sites at low temperatures and at impurity sites at high temperatures. For the first time, the appearance of the low-temperature TSL peak at 90 K is assigned to ionic processes in LTB crystals. The appearance of pyroelectric flashes due to the lattice relaxation in the temperature region 90–240 K is demonstrated and their surface-related nature clarified. In accordance with EPR studies the dosimetric TSL peaks in copper and silver doped LTB crystals are attributed to thermally released electrons recombining with Cu{sup 2+} and Ag{sup 2+} centres.

  2. Dislocations in AlGaN: Core Structure, Atom Segregation, and Optical Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Massabuau, Fabien C-P; Rhode, Sneha L; Horton, Matthew K; O'Hanlon, Thomas J; Kovács, András; Zielinski, Marcin S; Kappers, Menno J; Dunin-Borkowski, Rafal E; Humphreys, Colin J; Oliver, Rachel A

    2017-08-09

    We conducted a comprehensive investigation of dislocations in Al 0.46 Ga 0.54 N. Using aberration-corrected scanning transmission electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, the atomic structure and atom distribution at the dislocation core have been examined. We report that the core configuration of dislocations in AlGaN is consistent with that of other materials in the III-Nitride system. However, we observed that the dissociation of mixed-type dislocations is impeded by alloying GaN with AlN, which is confirmed by our experimental observation of Ga and Al atom segregation in the tensile and compressive parts of the dislocations, respectively. Investigation of the optical properties of the dislocations shows that the atom segregation at dislocations has no significant effect on the intensity recorded by cathodoluminescence in the vicinity of the dislocations. These results are in contrast with the case of dislocations in In 0.09 Ga 0.91 N where segregation of In and Ga atoms also occurs but results in carrier localization limiting non-radiative recombination at the dislocation. This study therefore sheds light on why InGaN-based devices are generally more resilient to dislocations than their AlGaN-based counterparts.

  3. Study of luminescence and optical resonances in Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} micro- and nanotriangles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cebriano, Teresa; Mendez, Bianchi, E-mail: bianchi@fis.ucm.es; Piqueras, Javier [Universidad Complutense de Madrid, Departamento de Fisica de Materiales, Facultad de Ciencias Fisicas (Spain)

    2012-10-15

    Luminescence of micro- and nanotriangles of cubic antimony oxide, Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} has been investigated by cathodoluminescence (CL) in scanning electron microscope and by photoluminescence (PL) in a laser confocal microscope. The triangles were grown by a thermal evaporation-deposition process with pure antimony powders as precursor, and present a self assembled arrangement covering extended areas of the samples. CL spectra of the triangles show bands at 2-2.5 and 3.1 eV, the latter is not observed in the Sb{sub 2}O{sub 3} initial powder. PL excited by 325 nm laser shows a band at 2.4 eV with a shoulder at 2.75 eV, as well as resonance modes suggesting optical cavity behavior of the triangles. The separation between resonant peaks from different triangles has been correlated with the triangle side length and possible optical paths were obtained according to the Fabry-Perot relationship. These results along with the optical images suggest that not only Fabry-Perot cavity modes, but also whispering gallery modes may occur inside the micro- and nanotriangle structures.

  4. The complex systematics of zircons in migmatitic gneisses: An example from an Archean migmatite along the Patos Shear Zone, Borborema Province, NE Brazil

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Costa, A.C.D; Hackspacher, P.C; Dantas, E.L; Fetter, A.H.

    2001-01-01

    The Northem Tectonic Domain Borborema Province, in Northeast of Brazil records a complex history of tectonic activity ranging from 3.4 Ga to 0.6 Ga (Brito Neves, 1995 and Dantas, 1996). U-Pb systematics of zircons from a migmatitic gneiss just north of the Patos Shear Zone provide an excellent example of the difficulties encountered using conventional single-grain U/Pb zircon geochronology in polydeformed gneiss terranes. Our conventional single grain zircon analyses of a migmatite yielded Archean ages between ca. 3.3 at 2.8 a, as well as some highly discordant Paleoproterozoic ages. Subsequent cathodoluminescence images of these zircon grains showed complex internal structures that possibly record up to 4 separate stages of zircon growth. With such internal complexity, is impossible resolve primary crystallization ages as well as the ages of subsequent overgrowth events using conventional single grain analyses. Such resolution will require analyses of the individual grain domains using the SHRIMP method (au)

  5. Characterisation and luminescence studies of Tm and Na doped magnesium borate phosphors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekdal, E; Garcia Guinea, J; Karabulut, Y; Canimoglu, A; Harmansah, C; Jorge, A; Karali, T; Can, N

    2015-09-01

    In this study, structural and luminescence properties of magnesium borate of the form MgB4O7 doped with Tm and Na were investigated by X-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy and cathodoluminescence (CL). The morphologies of the synthetised compounds exhibit clustered granules and road-like materials. As doping trivalent ions into a host with divalent cations requires charge compensation, this effect is discussed. The CL spectra of undoped MgB4O7 shows a broad band emission centred around 350 nm which is postulated to be produced by self-trapped excitons and some other defects. From the CL emission spectrum, main emission bands centred at 360, 455, 475 nm due to the respective transitions of (1)D2→(3)H6,(1)D2→(3)F4 and (1)G4→(3)H6 suggest the presence of Tm(3+) ion in MgB4O7 lattice site. CL mechanism was proposed to explain the observed phenomena which are valuable in possibility of the developing new luminescent materials for different applications. In addition, the experimental Raman spectrum of doped and undoped MgB4O7 were reported and discussed. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Optical characterization of magnesium incorporation in p-GaN layers for core–shell nanorod light-emitting diodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gîrgel, I.; Šatka, A.; Priesol, J.; Coulon, P.-M.; Le Boulbar, E. D.; Batten, T.; Allsopp, D. W. E.; Shields, P. A.

    2018-04-01

    III-nitride nanostructures are of interest for a new generation of light-emitting diodes (LEDs). However, the characterization of doping incorporation in nanorod (NR) structures, which is essential for creating the p-n junction diodes, is extremely challenging. This is because the established electrical measurement techniques (such as capacitance–voltage or Hall-effect methods) require a simple sample geometry and reliable ohmic contacts, both of which are difficult to achieve in nanoscale devices. The need for homogenous, conformal n-type or p-type layers in core–shell nanostructures magnifies these challenges. Consequently, we demonstrate how a combination of non-contact methods (micro-photoluminescence, micro-Raman and cathodoluminescence), as well as electron-beam-induced-current, can be used to analyze the uniformity of magnesium incorporation in core–shell NRs and make a first estimate of doping levels by the evolution of band transitions, strain and current mapping. These techniques have been used to optimize the growth of core–shell nanostructures for electrical carrier injection, a significant milestone for their use in LEDs.

  7. A new approach to correlate transport processes and optical efficiency in GaN-based LEDs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pavesi, M; Manfredi, M; Rossi, F; Salviati, G; Meneghini, M; Zanoni, E

    2009-01-01

    Carrier injection and non-radiative processes are determinants of the optical efficiency of InGaN/GaN LEDs. Among transport mechanisms, tunnelling is crucial for device functioning, but other contributions can be decisive on a varying bias. It is not easy to identify the weights and roles of these terms by a simple current-voltage characterization, so it needs a careful investigation by means of complementary experimental techniques. The correlation between luminescence and microscopic transport processes in InGaN/GaN LEDs has been investigated by means of a set of techniques: electroluminescence, cathodoluminescence, current-voltage dc measurements and thermal admittance spectroscopy. Green and blue LEDs, designed with a multi-quantum-well injector layer and an optically active single-quantum-well, have been tested. They showed distinctive current and temperature dependences of the optical efficiency, with a better performance at room temperature observed for green devices. This was discussed in terms of the carrier injection efficiency controlled by electrically active traps. The comparative analysis of the optical and electrical experimental data comes in handy as a methodological approach to correlate the emission properties with the carrier injection mechanisms and to improve the functionality in a large number of quantum well heterostructures for lighting applications.

  8. Time-resolved spectroscopy of CsI(CO{sub 3}) scintillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yakovlev, V. [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Avenue, Tomsk 634034 (Russian Federation); Trefilova, L., E-mail: laratrefilova@ukr.net [National University of Civil Protection, 94 Chernyshevska Street, Kharkiv 61023 (Ukraine); Lebedinsky, A.; Daulet, Z. [National Research Tomsk Polytechnic University, 30 Lenin Avenue, Tomsk 634034 (Russian Federation); Dubtsov, I. [Institute for Scintillation Materials, NAS of Ukraine, 60 Lenin Avenue, Kharkiv 61001 (Ukraine)

    2016-05-15

    The spectral-kinetics characteristics of short-living absorption and luminescence induced by an electron pulse irradiation (E{sub e}=0.25 MeV, t{sub 1/2}= 7ns, W=2×10{sup 10}÷4×10{sup 12} electron/cm{sup 2}) in CsI(CO{sub 3}) crystal are studied. It is shown that the scintillation pulse of CsI(CO{sub 3}) crystal is caused by the radiative annihilation of perturbed two-halogen excitons of two types, which are located in nearby impurity-vacancy dipole [CO{sub 3}{sup 2–}−υ{sub a}{sup +}] anion sites. The processes responsible for post-radiation rise and decay of both CO{sub 3}{sup 2–}-related luminescence bands with maxima at 2.8 and 3.2 eV are monomolecular with the thermal activation energy E{sub rise}=0.1 eV and E{sub decay}=0.05 eV. The cathodoluminescence pulse kinetics is discussed in the terms of the thermally assistant release of holes captured by CO{sub 3}{sup 2–}-ions and the formation of CO{sub 3}{sup 2–}-perturbed two-halide excitons.

  9. Optical and structural characterization of self-organized stacked GaN/AlN quantum dots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Salviati, G; Rossi, F; Armani, N; Grillo, V; Martinez, O; Vinattieri, A; Damilano, B; Matsuse, A; Grandjean, N

    2004-01-01

    Self-organized GaN/AlN stacked quantum dots (QDs) have been studied by means of cathodoluminescence (CL), near field scanning optical microscopy (NSOM), photoluminescence, μ-Raman, and transmission electron microscopy. Assignment of the optical emissions was made on the basis of the structural parameters, power-dependent optical studies and depth-resolved CL. Power-dependent studies allowed us to distinguish between quantum confined and buffer emissions. On increasing the power injection conditions, a QD-size-dependent blue shift due to the screening of the internal electric fields was found together with a trend to saturation observed in the high injection limit. The possible evidence of excited states has also been shown by power-dependent photoluminescence and CL. Different blue shifts in specimens with different numbers of stacked layers suggested possible different residual strain values as confirmed by μ-Raman studies. Depth-resolved CL investigations performed at constant power injection per unit volume allowed us to distinguish between QD layers with different nominal GaN coverages and a linear dependence of peak energy versus GaN monolayer number has also been found. Adding 1 ML of GaN resulted in an average shift of about 150 meV. The existence of QDs with different size distributions along the growth axis was also found. The observations were confirmed by NSOM spectroscopy

  10. Scanning electron microscopy of bone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyde, Alan

    2012-01-01

    This chapter described methods for Scanning Electron Microscopical imaging of bone and bone cells. Backscattered electron (BSE) imaging is by far the most useful in the bone field, followed by secondary electrons (SE) and the energy dispersive X-ray (EDX) analytical modes. This chapter considers preparing and imaging samples of unembedded bone having 3D detail in a 3D surface, topography-free, polished or micromilled, resin-embedded block surfaces, and resin casts of space in bone matrix. The chapter considers methods for fixation, drying, looking at undersides of bone cells, and coating. Maceration with alkaline bacterial pronase, hypochlorite, hydrogen peroxide, and sodium or potassium hydroxide to remove cells and unmineralised matrix is described in detail. Attention is given especially to methods for 3D BSE SEM imaging of bone samples and recommendations for the types of resin embedding of bone for BSE imaging are given. Correlated confocal and SEM imaging of PMMA-embedded bone requires the use of glycerol to coverslip. Cathodoluminescence (CL) mode SEM imaging is an alternative for visualising fluorescent mineralising front labels such as calcein and tetracyclines. Making spatial casts from PMMA or other resin embedded samples is an important use of this material. Correlation with other imaging means, including microradiography and microtomography is important. Shipping wet bone samples between labs is best done in glycerol. Environmental SEM (ESEM, controlled vacuum mode) is valuable in eliminating -"charging" problems which are common with complex, cancellous bone samples.

  11. Luminescence properties of Ce{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} co-activated ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} phosphor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tshabalala, K.G. [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, ZA 9300 (South Africa); Cho, S.-H.; Park, J.-K. [Nano-Materials Center, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Cheongryang, Seoul 130-650 (Korea, Republic of); Pitale, Shreyas S.; Nagpure, I.M.; Kroon, R.E.; Swart, H.C. [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, ZA 9300 (South Africa); Ntwaeaborwa, O.M., E-mail: ntwaeab@ufs.ac.za [Department of Physics, University of the Free State, Bloemfontein, ZA 9300 (South Africa)

    2012-05-15

    In this study, a solution combustion method was used to prepare green emitting Ce{sup 3+}-Tb{sup 3+} co-activated ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4} phosphor. The samples were annealed at 700 Degree-Sign C in air or hydrogen atmosphere to improve their crystallinity and optical properties. X-ray diffraction study confirmed that both as-prepared and post-preparation annealed samples crystallized in the well known cubic spinel structure of ZnAl{sub 2}O{sub 4}. An agglomeration of irregular platelet-like particles whose surfaces were encrusted with smaller spheroidal particles was confirmed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The fluorescence data collected from the annealed samples with different concentrations of Ce{sup 3+} and Tb{sup 3+} show the enhanced green emission at 543 nm associated with {sup 5}D{sub 4}{yields}{sup 7}F{sub 5} transitions of Tb{sup 3+}. The enhancement was attributed to energy transfer from Ce{sup 3+} to Tb{sup 3+}. Possible mechanism of energy transfer via a down conversion process is discussed. Furthermore, cathodoluminescence (CL) intensity degradation of this phosphor was also investigated and the degradation data suggest that the material was chemically stable and the CL intensity was also stable after 10 h of irradiation by a beam of high energy electrons.

  12. Broad range tuning of structural and optical properties of Znx Mg1−x O nanostructures grown by vapor transport method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vanjaria, Jignesh V; Azhar, Ebraheem Ali; Yu, Hongbin

    2016-01-01

    One-dimensional (1D) Zn x Mg 1−x O nanomaterials have drawn global attention due to their remarkable chemical and physical properties, and their diverse current and future technological applications. In this work, 1D ZnMgO nanostructures with different magnesium concentrations and different morphologies were grown directly on zinc oxide-coated silicon substrates by thermal evaporation of zinc oxide, magnesium boride and graphite powders. Highly well-defined Mg-rich ZnMgO nanorods with a rock salt structure and Zn-rich ZnMgO nanostructures with a wurtzite structure have been deposited individually by careful optimization of the source mixture and process parameters. Structural and optical properties of the deposited products were studied by scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive x-ray spectroscopy, x-ray diffraction, and Raman spectroscopy. Cathodoluminescence measurements demonstrate strong dominant peaks at 3.3 eV in Mg poor ZnMgO nanostructures and 4.8 eV in Mg rich nanostructures implying that the ZnMgO nanostructures can be used for the fabrication of deep UV optoelectronic devices. A mechanism for the formation and achieved diverse morphology of the ZnMgO nanostructures was proposed based on the characterization results. (paper)

  13. Luminescence properties of In/sub 1-x/PGa/sub x/ layers (0,6 (<=) x (<=) 0. 7) produced by liquid epitaxy on GaAs/sub 1-y/P/sub y/ substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ermakov, O N; Ignatkina, R S; Sushkov, V P; Chukichev, M V

    1977-06-01

    Photoluminescence (PL) and cathodoluminescence (CL) of Insub(1-x)Gasub(x)P (0.6 <=) x (<=) 0.7) layers grown by the method of liquid epitaxy on GaAssub(1-y)Psub(y) (0.2 (<=) y (<=) 0.4) substrates oriented in the (111)-B plane have been investigated. Spectral distribution of PL and CL of the n- and p-type Insub(1-x)Gasub(x)P layers has been studied over the temperature range from 300 to 65 K and at different excitation levels. Radiative ''band-band'' recombination has been shown to participate in formation of the A line. The B line in the luminescence spectra of specially nondoped Insub(1-x)Gasub(x)P is related to recombination through an uncontrolled acceptor centre. The arising of the C band in the CL spectra of Insub(1-x)Gasub(x)P doped with zinc and tellurium is ascribed to donor-acceptor recombination. The external yield of CL of the Insub(0.33)Gasub(0.67)P n-type (specially nondoped) and p-type (doped with Zn adn Te) layers has been determined at 300 K.

  14. Bright, water-soluble CeF{sub 3} photo-, cathodo-, and X-ray luminescent nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clement, Sandhya; Deng, Wei; Drozdowicz-Tomsia, Krystyna; Liu, Deming [Macquarie University, Centre for Nanoscale BioPhotonics, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Australia); Zachreson, Cameron [University of Technology Sydney, School of Physics and Advanced Materials (Australia); Goldys, Ewa M., E-mail: ewa.goldys@mq.edu.au [Macquarie University, Centre for Nanoscale BioPhotonics, Department of Physics and Astronomy (Australia)

    2015-01-15

    Bright, water-soluble CeF{sub 3} nanoparticles with small size and narrow size distribution have been synthesized using a simple co-precipitation method without any ligands. Size control of nanoparticles from 13 ± 2 to 9 ± 2 nm was achieved by varying the reaction time. Colloidal properties have been found to vary with pH and, independently, with dilution. The photoluminescence of the as-synthesized nanoparticles shows a highly photostable UV/Visible fluorescence band due to allowed 5d–4f transitions, also observed in the X-ray luminescence spectrum. This band is suitable for X-ray excitation of a range of photosensitizers. The photoluminescence quantum yield of nanoparticles was also determined to be 31 %. Using the measured fluorescence decay time of 25 ns, the radiative lifetime of Ce in CeF{sub 3} was found to be 80.6 ns. Both photoluminescence and cathodoluminescence emission are affected by the reaction time and measurement temperature. Electron-beam-induced defect annealing is also observed.

  15. Fungal Ferromanganese Mineralisation in Cretaceous Dinosaur Bones from the Gobi Desert, Mongolia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Owocki, Krzysztof; Kremer, Barbara; Wrzosek, Beata; Królikowska, Agata; Kaźmierczak, Józef

    2016-01-01

    Well-preserved mycelia of fungal- or saprolegnia-like biota mineralised by ferromanganese oxides were found for the first time in long bones of Late Cretaceous dinosaurs from the Gobi Desert (Nemegt Valley, Mongolia). The mycelia formed a biofilm on the wall of the bone marrow cavity and penetrated the osteon channels of the nearby bone tissue. Optical microscopy, Raman, SEM/EDS, SEM/BSE, electron microprobe and cathodoluminescence analyses revealed that the mineralisation of the mycelia proceeded in two stages. The first stage was early post-mortem mineralisation of the hyphae by Fe/Mn-oxide coatings and microconcretions. Probably this proceeded in a mildly acidic to circumneutral environment, predominantly due to heterotrophic bacteria degrading the mycelial necromass and liberating Fe and Mn sorbed by the mycelia during its lifetime. The second stage of mineralisation, which proceeded much later following the final burial of the bones in an alkaline environment, resulted from the massive precipitation of calcite and occasionally barite on the iron/manganese-oxide-coated mycelia. The mineral phases produced by fungal biofilms colonising the interiors of decaying dinosaur bones not only enhance the preservation (fossilisation) of fungal remains but can also be used as indicators of the geochemistry of the dinosaur burial sites.

  16. Forensic Scanning Electron Microscope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keeley, R. H.

    1983-03-01

    The scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray spectrometer is a versatile instrument which has many uses in the investigation of crime and preparation of scientific evidence for the courts. Major applications include microscopy and analysis of very small fragments of paint, glass and other materials which may link an individual with a scene of crime, identification of firearms residues and examination of questioned documents. Although simultaneous observation and chemical analysis of the sample is the most important feature of the instrument, other modes of operation such as cathodoluminescence spectrometry, backscattered electron imaging and direct x-ray excitation are also exploited. Marks on two bullets or cartridge cases can be compared directly by sequential scanning with a single beam or electronic linkage of two instruments. Particles of primer residue deposited on the skin and clothing when a gun is fired can be collected on adhesive tape and identified by their morphology and elemental composition. It is also possible to differentiate between the primer residues of different types of ammunition. Bullets may be identified from the small fragments left behind as they pass through the body tissues. In the examination of questioned documents the scanning electron microscope is used to establish the order in which two intersecting ink lines were written and to detect traces of chemical markers added to the security inks on official documents.

  17. Degradation of Methylammonium Lead Iodide Perovskite Structures through Light and Electron Beam Driven Ion Migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-01-01

    Organometal halide perovskites show promising features for cost-effective application in photovoltaics. The material instability remains a major obstacle to broad application because of the poorly understood degradation pathways. Here, we apply simultaneous luminescence and electron microscopy on perovskites for the first time, allowing us to monitor in situ morphology evolution and optical properties upon perovskite degradation. Interestingly, morphology, photoluminescence (PL), and cathodoluminescence of perovskite samples evolve differently upon degradation driven by electron beam (e-beam) or by light. A transversal electric current generated by a scanning electron beam leads to dramatic changes in PL and tunes the energy band gaps continuously alongside film thinning. In contrast, light-induced degradation results in material decomposition to scattered particles and shows little PL spectral shifts. The differences in degradation can be ascribed to different electric currents that drive ion migration. Moreover, solution-processed perovskite cuboids show heterogeneity in stability which is likely related to crystallinity and morphology. Our results reveal the essential role of ion migration in perovskite degradation and provide potential avenues to rationally enhance the stability of perovskite materials by reducing ion migration while improving morphology and crystallinity. It is worth noting that even moderate e-beam currents (86 pA) and acceleration voltages (10 kV) readily induce significant perovskite degradation and alter their optical properties. Therefore, attention has to be paid while characterizing such materials using scanning electron microscopy or transmission electron microscopy techniques. PMID:26804213

  18. Advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography for deterministic nanophotonic device processing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaganskiy, Arsenty; Gschrey, Manuel; Schlehahn, Alexander; Schmidt, Ronny; Schulze, Jan-Hindrik; Heindel, Tobias; Rodt, Sven, E-mail: srodt@physik.tu-berlin.de; Reitzenstein, Stephan [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstraße 36, D-10623 Berlin (Germany); Strittmatter, André [Institut für Festkörperphysik, Technische Universität Berlin, Hardenbergstraße 36, D-10623 Berlin (Germany); Otto-von-Guericke Universität Magdeburg, Universitätsplatz 2, D-39106 Magdeburg (Germany)

    2015-07-15

    We report on an advanced in-situ electron-beam lithography technique based on high-resolution cathodoluminescence (CL) spectroscopy at low temperatures. The technique has been developed for the deterministic fabrication and quantitative evaluation of nanophotonic structures. It is of particular interest for the realization and optimization of non-classical light sources which require the pre-selection of single quantum dots (QDs) with very specific emission features. The two-step electron-beam lithography process comprises (a) the detailed optical study and selection of target QDs by means of CL-spectroscopy and (b) the precise retrieval of the locations and integration of target QDs into lithographically defined nanostructures. Our technology platform allows for a detailed pre-process determination of important optical and quantum optical properties of the QDs, such as the emission energies of excitonic complexes, the excitonic fine-structure splitting, the carrier dynamics, and the quantum nature of emission. In addition, it enables a direct and precise comparison of the optical properties of a single QD before and after integration which is very beneficial for the quantitative evaluation of cavity-enhanced quantum devices.

  19. Nitride-based quantum structures and devices on modified GaN substrates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perlin, Piotr; Leszczynski, Mike; Grzegory, Izabella; Franssen, Gijs; Targowski, Grzegorz; Krysko, Marcin; Nowak, Grzegorz; Litwin-Staszewska, Elzbieta; Piotrzkowski, Ryszard; Lucznik, Bolek; Suski, Tadek; Szeszko, Justyna; Czernecki, R.; Grzanka, Szymon; Jakiela, Rafal; Albrecht, Martin

    2009-01-01

    We have studied the properties of InGaN layers and quantum wells grown on gallium nitride substrates with intentional surface misorientation with respect to its crystalline c-axis. Misorientation varied in the range from 0 up to 2 degree. The indium content was changed by using the different growth temperature (between 750 C and 820 C) during metalorganic vapor phase epitaxy. With increasing misorientation angle the average indium content decreased significantly. This effect was accompanied by the strong increase of the emission line bandwidth suggesting more pronounced indium segregation. The results of cathodoluminescence measurements show that these effects correspond to different number of atomic steps/terraces existing on the surface of gallium nitride substrate. Very interesting result is also demonstrated concerning p-type GaN layers. With increasing misorientation, the free hole density drastically increases above 10 18 cm -3 . This improvement in p-type doping is not related to the increased Mg concentration but to the reduction in the compensating donor density. Using this advantage we demonstrate nitride light emitters with improved electrical properties. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  20. Growth of strained InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells and index guided injection lasers over nonplanar substrates by molecular beam epitaxy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arent, D.J.; Galeuchet, Y.D.; Nilsson, S.; Meier, H.P.

    1990-01-01

    Strained InGaAs/GaAs quantum wells were grown on nonplanar substrates by molecular beam epitaxy and studied by scanning electron microscopy and low temperature spatially and spectrally resolved cathodoluminescence spectroscopy. For (100) ridges and grooves formed with (311)A sidewalls, almost complete removal of In from the strained quantum wells on the (311)A facet is observed. Corresponding increases of In content in the quantum wells grown on the (100) facets indicate that most if not all of the In is displaced from the (311)A facet via interplanar adatom migration. Ga adatom migration is also observed under our growth conditions such that quantum wells grown nominally near the critical layer thickness on structures less than ≅2.5 μm wide are no longer pseudomorphically strained, as detected by luminescence linewidth analysis. We present the first results of strained InGaAs/GaAs index guided injection lasers grown by single-step molecular beam epitaxy over nonplanar substrates and show that differences greater than 50 meV in the effective band gap of a 70 A quantum well can be achieved between the gain region and the nonabsorbing waveguide without relaxing the strain. Room temperature threshold currents as low as 6 mA for 4 μmx750 μm uncoated devices lasing continuously at a wavelength of 1.01 μm have been achieved

  1. Thallium and manganese complexes involved in the luminescence emission of potassium-bearing aluminosilicates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gomez-Gonzalez, Miguel A., E-mail: miguel.gomez@mncn.csic.es [Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid E-28006 (Spain); Garcia-Guinea, Javier, E-mail: guinea@mncn.csic.es [Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid E-28006 (Spain); Garrido, Fernando, E-mail: fernando.garrido@mncn.csic.es [Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, CSIC, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, Madrid E-28006 (Spain); Townsend, Peter D., E-mail: pdtownsend@gmail.com [School of Science and Technology, University of Sussex, Brighton BN1 9QH (United Kingdom); Marco, Jose-Francisco, E-mail: jfmarco@iqfr.csic.es [Instituto de Química-Física Rocasolano, CSIC, Calle Serrano 119, Madrid E-28006 (Spain)

    2015-03-15

    The luminescence emission at 285 nm in natural K-feldspar has been studied by Russian groups and associated with thallium ions in structural positions of K{sup +} sites as artificially thallium-doped feldspars display the same emission band. Here attention is focussed on spectra of CL emission bands centered near 285 and 560 nm from paragenetic adularia, moscovite and quartz micro-inclusions. With accesorial thallium they show clear resemblances to each other. Associated sedimentary and hydrothermal aluminosilicate samples collected from Guadalix (Madrid, Spain) were analyzed with a wide range of experimental techniques including Environmental Scanning Electron Microscopy (ESEM) with an attached X-Ray Energy-Dispersive Spectrometer (EDS) and a cathodoluminescence probe (CL) and Electron Probe Microanalysis (EPMA), X-Ray Fluorescence Spectrometry (XRF), Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES), Differential and Thermogravimetric Analyses (DTA-TG), radioluminescence (RL), Mössbauer spectroscopy and X-Ray Photoelectron Spectrometry (XPS). The luminescence emission bands at 285 and 560 nm seem to be associated with hydrous thallium–manganese complexes bonded to potassium-bearing aluminosilicates since various minerals such as K-feldspar, moscovite and quartz micro-inclusions display similar CL spectra, accesorial thallium and hydroxyl groups. The presence of iron introduces a brown color which is attributed to submicroscopic iron oxides detectable in the optical and chemical microanalysis, but this does not contribute to the luminescence emission. The XPS Mn 2p spectrum of the adularia sample at room temperature is composed of a spin–orbit doublet plus clear shake-up satellite structure ∼4 eV above the main photoemision lines and is consistent with Mn{sup 2+} in good agreement with the observed luminescence emission at 560 nm for aluminosilicates produced by a {sup 4}T1({sup 4}G)→{sup 6}A1({sup 6}S) transition in tetrahedrally

  2. Forms of uranium associated to silica in the environment of the Nopal deposit (Mexico)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allard, T.; Othmane, G.; Menguy, N.; Vercouter, T.; Morin, G.; Calas, G.; Fayek, M.

    2011-12-01

    The understanding of the processes that control the transfers of uranium in the environment is necessary for the safety assessement of nuclear waste repositories. In particular, several poorly ordered phases (e.g. Fe oxihydroxides) are expected to play an important role in trapping uranium from surface waters. Among them, natural systems containing amorphous silica are poorly documented. A former study from the environment of the Peny mine (France) showed the importance of silica in uranium speciation [1]. The Nopal uranium deposit is located in volcanic tuff from tertiary period. It hosted several hydrothermal alteration episodes responsible for clay minerals formation. A primary uranium mineralisation occurred in a breccia pipe, consisting in uraninite, subsequently altered in secondary uranium minerals among which several silicates. Eventually, opal was formed and coated uranyl silicates such as uranophane and weeksite [2], [3]. Opals also contain minor amounts of uranium. The Nopal deposit is still considered as a natural analogue of high level nuclear waste repository located in volcanic tuff. It may be used to reveal the low temperature conditions of trapping of uranium in systems devoid of iron oxides such as silica-containing ones. The aim of this study is then to determine the uranium speciation, and its possible complexity, associated to these opals that represent a late trapping episode. It will provide insights ranging from the micrometer scale of electron microscopies to the molecular scale provided by fluorescence spectroscopy. Three samples of green or yellow opals have been analysed by a combination of complementary tools including scanning electron microscopy (SEM) on cross-sections, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) on focused ion beam (FIB) films, cathodoluminescence and time-resolved laser fluorescence spectroscopy (TRLFS). Uranium speciation was found to be complex. We first evidence U-bearing microparticles of beta-uranophane Ca[(UO2)(Si

  3. Cretaceous honeycomb oysters (Pycnodonte vesicularis) as palaeoseasonality records: A multi-proxy study

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Winter, Niels J.; Vellekoop, Johan; Vorsselmans, Robin; Golreihan, Asefeh; Petersen, Sierra V.; Meyer, Kyle W.; Speijer, Robert P.; Claeys, Philippe

    2017-04-01

    Pycnodonte or "honeycomb-oysters" (Bivalvia: Gryphaeidea) is an extinct genus of calcite-producing bivalves which is found in abundance in Cretaceous to Pleistocene fossil beds worldwide. As such, Pycnodonte shells could be ideal tracers of palaeoclimate through time, with the capability to reconstruct sea water conditions and palaeotemperatures in a range of palaeoenvironmental settings. Only few studies have attempted to reconstruct palaeoclimate based on Pycnodonte shells and with variable degrees of success (e.g. Videt, 2003; Huyge et al., 2015). Our study investigates the shell growth, structure and chemical characteristics of Maastrichtian Pycnodonte vesicularis from Bajada de Jaguel in Argentina and aims to rigorously test the application of multiple palaeoenvironmental proxies on the shells of several Maastrichtian Pycnodonte oysters for palaeoclimate reconstruction. The preservation state of four calcite shells was assessed by fluorescence microscopy, cathodoluminescence and micro X-Ray Fluorescence (XRF) mapping. Their shell structure was investigated using a combination of XRF mapping, high-resolution color scanning and microCT scanning. Long integration time point-by-point XRF line scanning yielded high-resolution trace element profiles through the hinge of all shells. Microdrilled samples from the same locations on the shell were analyzed for trace element composition by ICP-MS and for stable carbon and oxygen isotopes by IRMS. Preservation of the calcite microstructure was found to be of sufficient quality to allow discussion of original shell porosity, annual growth increments and pristine chemical signatures of the bivalves. The combination of fluorescence and cathodoluminescence microscopy with XRF mapping and microCT scanning sheds light on the characteristic internal "honeycomb" structure of these extinct bivalves and allows comparison with that of the related extant Neopycnodonte bivalves (Wisshak et al., 2009). Furthermore, high resolution

  4. Dissolution-precipitation creep at mid-crustal levels of the Scandian Caledonides: the COSC-1 case study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntoli, Francesco; Menegon, Luca; Warren, Clare

    2017-04-01

    The thermo-mechanical properties of the middle and lower crust exert a fundamental control on the structure of orogenic belts, and on the amount and style of shortening during continental collision. By virtue of the deep erosional level, the internal parts of the Scandinavian Caledonides expose middle and lower crustal sections involved in subduction-exhumation history and nappe stacking. In this study we analysed the development of a mylonitic microstructure and the associated deformation mechanisms in amphibolites from the middle portion (1.5-2.2 km of depth) of the COSC-1 drill core, central Sweden. Mylonitic amphibolites are common in the drill core. They are composed of hornblende, plagioclase, chlorite, quartz, epidote, carbonate and ilmenite. The plagioclase displays two generations: (1) fractured millimetric porphyroclast cores (Plag1; Ab 99), which are wrapped by the foliation and are dark in the SEM-cathodoluminescence images, and (2) rims (Plag2; Ab 80-90), some tens of microns in size, are bright in the cathodoluminescence images, heal the fractures and overgrow the cores of Plag1. Plag2 grows syn-deformationally, as it is commonly found in strain shadows around Plag1 porphyroclasts. The hornblende preserves corroded cores (Amp1) with higher Mg number compared to the rims (Amp2). The Amp2 is lengthened as the foliation and shows intergrowths with Plag2 and chlorite in strain shadows. Amphibole crystals are commonly boudinaged parallel to the foliation, with chlorite filling the boudin necks. Preliminary pressure and temperature estimates, using Amp2 and Plag2 pairs, constrain their growth at 600°C and 1GPa. EBSD analysis indicates a homogeneous orientation of the porphyroclastic Plag1 without the development of low-angle boundaries, suggesting that Plag1 crystals are strain free. Furthermore, the fractures are sealed by the Plag2 with the same crystallographic orientation as the plagioclase core. The Plag2 grains have their [100] axes oriented

  5. Provenance of detrital zircons from the Ribeira and Dom Feliciano Belts, comparison with African equivalents and implications on western Gondwana amalgamation. Geological Society of London-2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basei, M.; Frimmel, H.E.; Nutman, A.P.; Preciozzi, F.

    2005-01-01

    The geologic make-up of southern Brazil has been defined by processes related to the Brasiliano orogenic cycle and, in particular, to con tractional tectonic events that led to the amalgamation of different terranes, which culminated in the formation of Western Gondwana (Campos Neto and Figueiredo, 1995; Brito Neves and Cordani,1991; Brito Neves et al, 1999, Campos Neto, 2000). Polycyclic deformation and metamorphism that masked the characteristics, including the age records, of the protoliths were associated with the juxtaposition of these different terranes. Ophiolitic remains and magmatic arc roots signal the existence of fossil subduction and collision zones, whereas intense post-tectonic to an orogenic granitic magmatism marks the end of the orogenic cycle towards the end of the Neoproterozoic Era. U-Pb dating of domains within single zircon grains has proven to be a very powerful tool for the unraveling of the complex tecto no-thermal evolution as well as in characterizing the provenance of the original sediments. This is due to the high resistance to weathering and to high closure temperatures with respect to the U-Pb isotope system in zircon. Over the past decade, the standard technique for this analytical approach has become the analyses of U-Pb isotope ratios by SHRIMP,preceded by cathodoluminescence analysis (McClaren et al 1994). In this study, a set of 11 new SHRIMP analyses on detrital zircon grains from the major metasedimentary units of the Ribeira and Dom Feliciano Belts of the southeastern portion of South America is presented and the data are compared with available analyses for the Gariep Belt (Basei et al. 2005) and a new analysis for the Damara Belt. Combined with available Sm-Nd bulk rock isotope data, the results will form the basis for a revised tectonic model for the formation of Western Gondwana

  6. Provenance of detrital zircons from the Ribeira and Dom Feliciano Belts, comparison with African equivalents and implications on Western Gondwana amalgamation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Basei, M.; Frimmel, H.E.; Nutman, A.P.; Preciozzi, F.

    2008-01-01

    The geologic make-up of southern Brazil has been defined by processes related to the Brasiliano orogenic cycle and, in particular, to con tractional tectonic events that led to the amalgamation of different terranes, which culminated in the formation of Western Gondwana (Campos Neto and Figueiredo, 1995; Brito Neves and Cordani, 1991; Brito Neves et al, 1999, Campos Neto, 2000). Polycyclic deformation and metamorphism that masked the characteristics, including the age records, of the protoliths were associated with the juxtaposition of these different terranes. Ophiolitic remains and magmatic arc roots signal the existence of fossil subduction and collision zones, whereas intense post-tectonic to an orogenic granitic magmatism marks the end of the orogenic cycle towards the end of the Neoproterozoic Era. U-Pb dating of domains within single zircon grains has proven to be a very powerful tool for the unraveling of the complex tecto no-thermal evolution as well as in characterizing the provenance of the original sediments. This is due to the high resistance to weathering and to high closure temperatures with respect to the U-Pb isotope system in zircon. Over the past decade, the standard technique for this analytical approach has become the analyses of U-Pb isotope ratios by SHRIMP, preceded by cathodoluminescence analysis (McClaren et al 1994). In this study, a set of 11 new SHRIMP analyses on detrital zircon grains from the major metasedimentary units of the Ribeira and Dom Feliciano Belts of the southeastern portion of South America is presented and the data are compared with available analyses for the Gariep Belt (Basei et al. 2005) and a new analysis for the Damara Belt. Combined with available Sm-Nd bulk rock isotope data, the results will form the basis for a revised tectonic model for the formation of Western Gondwana

  7. Atmospheric scanning electron microscope system with an open sample chamber: Configuration and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nishiyama, Hidetoshi; Koizumi, Mitsuru; Ogawa, Koji; Kitamura, Shinich; Konyuba, Yuji; Watanabe, Yoshiyuki; Ohbayashi, Norihiko; Fukuda, Mitsunori; Suga, Mitsuo; Sato, Chikara

    2014-01-01

    An atmospheric scanning electron microscope (ASEM) with an open sample chamber and optical microscope (OM) is described and recent developments are reported. In this ClairScope system, the base of the open sample dish is sealed to the top of the inverted SEM column, allowing the liquid-immersed sample to be observed by OM from above and by SEM from below. The optical axes of the two microscopes are aligned, ensuring that the same sample areas are imaged to realize quasi-simultaneous correlative microscopy in solution. For example, the cathodoluminescence of ZnO particles was directly demonstrated. The improved system has (i) a fully motorized sample stage, (ii) a column protection system in the case of accidental window breakage, and (iii) an OM/SEM operation system controlled by a graphical user interface. The open sample chamber allows the external administration of reagents during sample observation. We monitored the influence of added NaCl on the random motion of silica particles in liquid. Further, using fluorescence as a transfection marker, the effect of small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of endogenous Varp on Tyrp1 trafficking in melanocytes was examined. A temperature-regulated titanium ASEM dish allowed the dynamic observation of colloidal silver nanoparticles as they were heated to 240 °C and sintered. - Highlights: • Atmospheric SEM (ASEM) allows observation of samples in liquid or gas. • Open sample chamber allows in situ monitoring of evaporation and sintering processes. • in situ monitoring of processes during reagent administration is also accomplished. • Protection system for film breakage is developed for ASEM. • Usability of ASEM has been improved significantly including GUI control

  8. First description of Phanerozoic radiaxial fibrous dolomite

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, D. K.; Heinrich, F.; Geske, A.; Neuser, R. D.; Gies, H.; Immenhauser, A.

    2014-05-01

    The petrographic analysis and crystallographic analysis of concretionary carbonate cements ("coal balls") from Carboniferous paralic swamp deposits reveal the presence of (length fast) radiaxial fibrous dolomite (RFD), a fabric not previously reported from the Phanerozoic. This finding is of significance as earlier reports of Phanerozoic radiaxial fibrous carbonates are exclusively of calcite mineralogy. Dolomite concretions described here formed beneath marine transgressive intervals within palustrine coal seams. This is of significance as seawater was arguably the main source of Mg2 + ions for dolomite formation. Here, data from optical microscopy, cathodoluminescence, electron backscattered diffraction, X-ray diffraction and geochemical analyses are presented to characterize three paragenetic dolomite phases and one calcite phase in these concretions. The main focus is on the earliest diagenetic, non-stoichiometric (degree of order: 0.41-0.46) phase I, characterized by botryoidal dolomite constructed of fibres up to 110 μm wide with a systematic undulatory extinction and converging crystal axes. Petrographic and crystallographic evidence clearly qualifies phase I dolomite as radiaxial fibrous. Conversely, fascicular optical fabrics were not found. Carbon-isotope ratios (δ13C) are depleted (between - 11.8 and - 22.1‰) as expected for carbonate precipitation from marine pore-fluids in organic-matter-rich, paralic sediment. Oxygen isotope (δ18O) ratios range between - 1.3 and - 6.0‰. The earliest diagenetic nature of these cements is documented by the presence of ubiquitous, non-compacted fossil plant remains encased in phase I dolomite as well as by the complex zoned luminescence patterns in the crystals and is supported by crystallographic and thermodynamic considerations. It is argued that organic matter, and specifically carboxyl groups, reduced thermodynamic barriers for dolomite formation and facilitated Mg/CaCO3 precipitation. The data shown here

  9. Ionising radiation effect on the luminescence emission of inorganic and biogenic calcium carbonates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boronat, C. [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 40, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Correcher, V., E-mail: v.correcher@ciemat.es [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 40, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Virgos, M.D. [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 40, Madrid 28040 (Spain); Garcia-Guinea, J. [CSIC, Museo Nacional Ciencias Naturales, José Gutiérrez Abascal 2, Madrid 28006 (Spain)

    2017-06-15

    Highlights: • Aragonite and biogenic Ca-carbonates could be used as a TL dosimeters. • TL can be employed for retrospective dosimetry purposes. • Calcium carbonates show an acceptable ionizing radiation sensitivity. • The stability of the radiation–induced TL remains, at least, till 700 h. - Abstract: As known, the luminescence emission of mineral phases could be potentially employed for dosimetric purposes in the case of radiological terrorism or radiation accident where conventional monitoring is not available. In this sense, this paper reports on the thermo- (TL) and cathodoluminescence (CL) emission of both biogenic (common periwinkle – littorina littorera – shell made of calcite 90% and aragonite 10%) and inorganic (aragonite 100%) Ca-rich carbonates previously characterized by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Whereas the aragonite sample displays the main CL waveband peaked in the red region (linked to point defects), the more intense emission obtained from the common periwinkle shell appears at higher energies (mainly associated with structural defects). The UV-blue TL emission of the samples, regardless of the origin, displays (i) an acceptable ionizing radiation sensitivity, (ii) linear dose response in the range of interest (up to 8 Gy), (iii) reasonable stability of the TL signal after 700 h of storage with an initial decay of ca. 88% for the mineral sample and 60% for the biogenic sample and maintaining the stability from 150 h onwards. (iv) The tests of thermal stability of the TL emission performed in the range of 180–320 °C confirm a continuum in the trap system.

  10. Luminescence characterization of dental ceramics for individual retrospective dosimetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Correcher, V.; Gomesdarocha, R. [CIEMAT, Av. Complutense 40, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Garcia G, J. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Museo Nacional de Ciencias Naturales, Jose Gutierrez Abascal 2, 28006 Madrid (Spain); Rivera M, T., E-mail: v.correcher@ciemat.es [IPN, Centro de Investigacion en Ciencia Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Av. Legaria 694, 11500 Mexico D. F. (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Full text: Ceramic materials in general and dental crowns in particular exhibit thermoluminescence (Tl) properties and are of interest in the field of individual retrospective dosimetry. This property could be potentially employed to provide a means of determining cumulative exposure to external gamma radiation arising from accidents or large-scale incidents (radiological terrorism) involving population groups where conventional monitoring has not been established. The thermal stability and dose effect of the UV-blue Tl emission of a well characterized Spanish samples (by means of cathodoluminescence and electron-probe microanalysis) are here reported. It displays (i) an excellent linearity in the range of 0.12 - 9.6 Gy, (II) good stability of the Tl signal of 0.6, 1.2 and 2.4 Gy irradiated samples after 6 months of storage showing an initial rapid decay (ca. 30%) maintaining the stability from 30 days onwards. It means that the electron population decreases asymptotically by the X - axis and the involved electrons are located in deeper traps at room temperature. (III) The reusability performed on the dental ceramic, involving successive cycles of irradiation (1.2 Gy) followed by readout (up to 500 degrees C), exhibited a negligible variation in the Tl response, when measured six times. (IV) The tests of thermal stability at different temperatures (in the range of 100-240 degrees C) confirms a continuum in the trap distribution with progressive changes in the glow curve shape, intensity and temperature position of the maximum peak. Therefore, these preliminary results suggest that dental ceramics could be used as suitable dosimeters in retrospective conditions. (Author)

  11. Optical spectroscopy of the Ce-doped multicomponent garnets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canimoglu, A.; Karabulut, Y.; Ayvacikli, M.; Muresan, L.E.; Perhaita, I.; Barbu-Tudoran, L.; Garcia Guinea, J.; Karali, T.; Can, N.

    2016-01-01

    Here, we report our results referring to the preparation of Ce doped Y 2.22 MgGa 2 Al 2 SiO 12 , Y 1.93 MgAl 4 SiO 12 and Y 2.22 Gd 0.75 Ga 2 Al 3 O 12 using solid state reaction at high temperature. Several complementary methods (i.e. powder x-ray diffraction (XRPD), energy dispersive analysis of X-rays (EDX), scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR)) were studied to examine the effects of the synthesis procedure on the morphology and structure. XRD analyses revealed that all compounds include yttrium aluminate phase with garnet structure. Cathodoluminescence (CL), radioluminescence (RL) and photoluminescence (PL) measurements were carried out for clarification of relationship between host lattice defects and the spectral luminescence emissions. Luminescence emission of phosphors is peaked at 530 nm assigned to 5d-4f transitions of the dopant Ce 3+ ions with a broad emission band in 400–700 nm range. Under electron irradiation, the emission spectrum of Ce doped (YGd) 3 Ga 2 Al 3 O 12 is well defined and has a characteristic fairly narrow and sharp emission band peaking at 312 nm and 624 nm corresponding to transition of 6 P 7/2 → 8 S 7/2 and 6 G J → 6 P J (Gd 3+ ), respectively. We suggest some of phosphors might be excellent phototherapy phosphor materials under electron excitation. - Highlights: • Ce-doped Multicomponent Garnets were prepared solid state reaction method. • The shape and size of phosphor particles were examined. • The narrow band UV B emission due to Gd 3+ ions were observed.

  12. Structural and magnetic characterization of mixed valence Co(II, III)xZn1−xO epitaxial thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Negi, D.S.; Loukya, B.; Dileep, K.; Sahu, R.; Shetty, S.; Kumar, N.; Ghatak, J.; Pachauri, N.; Gupta, A.; Datta, R.

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we report on the Co atom incorporation, secondary phase formation and composition-dependent magnetic and optical properties of mixed valence Co(II, III) x Zn 1−x O epitaxial thin films grown by pulsed laser deposition. The intended total Co concentration is varied between ∼6–60 at.% with relatively higher concentration of +3 over +2 charge state. Mixed valence Co(II, III) shows high solubility in ZnO (up to 38 at.%) and ferromagnetism is observed in samples with total Co incorporation of ∼29 and 38 at.%. Electron diffraction pattern and high resolution transmission electron microscopy images reveal single crystalline nature of the thin films with wurtzite structure. Co oxide interlayer, with both rock salt and spinel structure, are observed to be formed between the substrate and wurtzite film for total Co concentration at ∼17 at.% and above. Magnetization shows composition dependence with a saturation moment value of ∼93 emu cm −3 and a coercive field of ∼285 Oe observed for ∼38 at.% Co:ZnO films. Ferromagnetism was not observed for films with Co concentration 17 and 9 at.%. The Co oxide interlayer does not show any ferromagnetism. All the films are n-type with carrier concentration ∼10 19 cm −3 . The observed magnetism is probably resulting from direct antiferromagntic exchange interaction between Co 2+ and Co 3+ ions favored by heavy Co alloying giving rise to ferrimagnetism in the system. - Highlights: • Mixed valence Co doped ZnO ferromagnetic single crystal thin film. • Secondary phase formation in terms of CoO and Co3O4 and magnetism is observed only for high Co alloying. • Cathodoluminescence (CL) data showing increase in band gap with Co concentrations

  13. Controlled hydrothermal synthesis of BiOxCly/BiOmIn composites exhibiting visible-light photocatalytic degradation of crystal violet

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang, Yu-Rou; Lin, Ho-Pan; Chung, Wen-Hsin; Dai, Yong-Ming; Lin, Wan-Yu; Chen, Chiing-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • This is the first report on a series of BiO x Cl y /BiO m I n heterojunctions. • The BiO x Cl y /BiO m I n composition was controlled by adjusting the growth parameters. • The BiO x Cl y /BiO m I n were indirect semiconductors with a 1.78–2.95-eV bandgap. • The new photocatalysts removed CV at a much faster rate than TiO 2 . • Mechanisms were determined by separating the intermediates using HPLC-MS. - Abstract: A series of BiO x Cl y /BiO m I n composites were prepared using autoclave hydrothermal methods. The composition and morphologies of the BiO x Cl y /BiO m I n composites were controlled by adjusting the experimental conditions: the reaction pH value, temperature, and KCl/KI molar ratio. The products were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy-electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller specific surface areas, cathodoluminescence, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The photocatalytic efficiencies of composite powder suspensions were evaluated by monitoring the crystal violet (CV) concentrations. In addition, the quenching effects of various scavengers indicated that the reactive O 2 · − played a major role, and OH· or h + played a minor role in CV degradation. The intermediates formed during the decomposition process were isolated, identified, and characterized using high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry to elucidate the CV decomposition mechanism

  14. Controlled hydrothermal synthesis of BiO{sub x}Cl{sub y}/BiO{sub m}I{sub n} composites exhibiting visible-light photocatalytic degradation of crystal violet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiang, Yu-Rou; Lin, Ho-Pan [Department of Science Application and Dissemination, National Taichung University of Education, Taichung 403, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chung, Wen-Hsin [Department of Plant Pathology, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan, ROC (China); Dai, Yong-Ming [Department of Science Application and Dissemination, National Taichung University of Education, Taichung 403, Taiwan, ROC (China); Lin, Wan-Yu [Department of Plant Pathology, National Chung Hsing University, Taichung 402, Taiwan, ROC (China); Chen, Chiing-Chang, E-mail: ccchen@ms3.ntcu.edu.tw [Department of Science Application and Dissemination, National Taichung University of Education, Taichung 403, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2015-02-11

    Highlights: • This is the first report on a series of BiO{sub x}Cl{sub y}/BiO{sub m}I{sub n} heterojunctions. • The BiO{sub x}Cl{sub y}/BiO{sub m}I{sub n} composition was controlled by adjusting the growth parameters. • The BiO{sub x}Cl{sub y}/BiO{sub m}I{sub n} were indirect semiconductors with a 1.78–2.95-eV bandgap. • The new photocatalysts removed CV at a much faster rate than TiO{sub 2}. • Mechanisms were determined by separating the intermediates using HPLC-MS. - Abstract: A series of BiO{sub x}Cl{sub y}/BiO{sub m}I{sub n} composites were prepared using autoclave hydrothermal methods. The composition and morphologies of the BiO{sub x}Cl{sub y}/BiO{sub m}I{sub n} composites were controlled by adjusting the experimental conditions: the reaction pH value, temperature, and KCl/KI molar ratio. The products were characterized using X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy-electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, UV–vis diffuse reflectance spectroscopy, Brunauer–Emmett–Teller specific surface areas, cathodoluminescence, high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, and high-resolution X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. The photocatalytic efficiencies of composite powder suspensions were evaluated by monitoring the crystal violet (CV) concentrations. In addition, the quenching effects of various scavengers indicated that the reactive O{sub 2}·{sup −} played a major role, and OH· or h{sup +} played a minor role in CV degradation. The intermediates formed during the decomposition process were isolated, identified, and characterized using high performance liquid chromatography-photodiode array-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry to elucidate the CV decomposition mechanism.

  15. Luminescence characterization of dental ceramics for individual retrospective dosimetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Correcher, V.; Gomesdarocha, R.; Garcia G, J.; Rivera M, T.

    2015-10-01

    Full text: Ceramic materials in general and dental crowns in particular exhibit thermoluminescence (Tl) properties and are of interest in the field of individual retrospective dosimetry. This property could be potentially employed to provide a means of determining cumulative exposure to external gamma radiation arising from accidents or large-scale incidents (radiological terrorism) involving population groups where conventional monitoring has not been established. The thermal stability and dose effect of the UV-blue Tl emission of a well characterized Spanish samples (by means of cathodoluminescence and electron-probe microanalysis) are here reported. It displays (i) an excellent linearity in the range of 0.12 - 9.6 Gy, (II) good stability of the Tl signal of 0.6, 1.2 and 2.4 Gy irradiated samples after 6 months of storage showing an initial rapid decay (ca. 30%) maintaining the stability from 30 days onwards. It means that the electron population decreases asymptotically by the X - axis and the involved electrons are located in deeper traps at room temperature. (III) The reusability performed on the dental ceramic, involving successive cycles of irradiation (1.2 Gy) followed by readout (up to 500 degrees C), exhibited a negligible variation in the Tl response, when measured six times. (IV) The tests of thermal stability at different temperatures (in the range of 100-240 degrees C) confirms a continuum in the trap distribution with progressive changes in the glow curve shape, intensity and temperature position of the maximum peak. Therefore, these preliminary results suggest that dental ceramics could be used as suitable dosimeters in retrospective conditions. (Author)

  16. High-quality uniaxial In(x)Ga(1-x)N/GaN multiple quantum well (MQW) nanowires (NWs) on Si(111) grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) and light-emitting diode (LED) fabrication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ra, Yong-Ho; Navamathavan, R; Park, Ji-Hyeon; Lee, Cheul-Ro

    2013-03-01

    This article describes the growth and device characteristics of vertically aligned high-quality uniaxial p-GaN/InxGa1-xN/GaN multiple quantum wells (MQW)/n-GaN nanowires (NWs) on Si(111) substrates grown by metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) technique. The resultant nanowires (NWs), with a diameter of 200-250 nm, have an average length of 2 μm. The feasibility of growing high-quality NWs with well-controlled indium composition MQW structure is demonstrated. These resultant NWs grown on Si(111) substrates were utilized for fabricating vertical-type light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The steep and intense photoluminescence (PL) and cathodoluminescence (CL) spectra are observed, based on the strain-free NWs on Si(111) substrates. High-resolution transmission electron microscopy (HR-TEM) analysis revealed that the MQW NWs are grown along the c-plane with uniform thickness. The current-voltage (I-V) characteristics of these NWs exhibited typical p-n junction LEDs and showed a sharp onset voltage at 2.75 V in the forward bias. The output power is linearly increased with increasing current. The result indicates that the pulsed MOCVD technique is an effective method to grow uniaxial p-GaN/InxGa1-xN/GaN MQW/n-GaN NWs on Si(111), which is more advantageous than other growth techniques, such as molecular beam epitaxy. These results suggest the uniaxial NWs are promising to allow flat-band quantum structures, which can enhance the efficiency of LEDs.

  17. Characterization and uranium-series dating of travertine from Suettoe in Hungary

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sierralta, M; Geldern, R van; Frechen, M [Leibniz Institute for Applied Geosciences, Hannover (Germany); Kele, S [Hungarian Academy of Sciences (Hungary); Melcher, F Author [Federal Institute for Geosciences and Natural Resources (Germany)

    2007-07-01

    Full text: Terrestrial carbonate formations, such as travertines, speleothems and lake sediments, are archives of terrestrial climate forcing. At the Suettoe section in Hungary, a succession of travertine is covered by a loess-palaeosol sequence; both are high resolution terrestrial archives of climate and environment change. Uranium-series ({sup 230}Th/U) dating using thermal ionisation mass spectroscopy was carried out to set up a reliable chronological frame for the travertine. As the growth of travertine is complex, pore cements may cause serious problems for precise dating. Therefore, we applied microscopic, mineralogical and geochemical methods to determine the abundance of secondary calcite. The state of alteration of primary spar and micrite was characterized by cathodoluminescence and microprobe analyzes. The travertine from Suettoe showed homogeneous phases of primary calcite, minor micropores and rare pore cements. Stable carbon and oxygen isotope analyzes were carried out to characterize the depositional environment of the Suettoe travertines. The carbon isotopic composition indicated that the source of carbon was a mixture of atmospheric and soil derived CO{sub 2}. Calculated water temperatures based on oxygen isotope data ranged from 22{sup o}C to 31{sup o}C. For uranium-series dating bulk samples were prepared from areas with mainly micrite and spar. {sup 230}Th/U ages were determined applying an isochron approach. As the dense travertine deposits had a dense structure, the bulk sampling method was successfully applied in determining uranium-series ages with much higher precision than former studies with alpha spectrometry could achieve. Travertines from Suettoe yielded Mid-Pleistocene ages ranging from the antepenultimate glacial to the penultimate interglacial (310-240 ka). These results are in agreement with those from OSL and AAR dating of the overlying sediment indicating at least an MIS 7 age for the travertine. (author)

  18. 14C chronology of the oldest Scandinavian church in use. An AMS/PIXE study of lime lump carbonate in the mortar

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lindroos, Alf; Ranta, Heikki; 14C Dating Laboratory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus (Denmark))" data-affiliation=" (AMS 14C Dating Laboratory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus (Denmark))" >Heinemeier, Jan; Lill, Jan-Olof

    2014-01-01

    Mortar dating was applied to newly revealed, original mortar in the church of Dalby in Scania, southern Sweden which is considered to be the oldest still standing church in Scandinavia. Small white lime lumps were sampled by chipping from the supporting pillars in the interior of the church. Special emphasis was in sampling lime lumps because the church is situated in the Scania limestone area and aggregate limestone contamination was anticipated in the bulk mortars. Earlier studies have, however, shown that lime lumps do not contain aggregate material but only possible limestone rests from incomplete calcination. The sampled material was prepared for radiocarbon AMS dating. The carbonate in the lime lumps was hydrolyzed according to the sequential leaching technique developed for the Århus 14 C laboratory in Denmark. Prior to the hydrolysis the lime lumps were examined for dead-carbon contamination using a stereo microscope and cathodoluminescence. The lime lumps displayed heterogeneous carbonate luminescence. This is, however, common and it was not considered a problem because carbonate growth in changing pH/Eh conditions often leads to changing luminescence colors. Two lumps had little dead carbon contamination and an early second millennium 14 C signature. One lump, however, seemed to be heavily contaminated with dead carbon. Since the sample passed the microscopic screening, the leftovers of the lump was subjected to PIXE analysis and compared with the other two lumps. The well-defined, early 2nd millennium 14 C age of the lime lumps of this particular church is an important contribution to the discussion on stone church chronology in Scandinavia

  19. {sup 14}C chronology of the oldest Scandinavian church in use. An AMS/PIXE study of lime lump carbonate in the mortar

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lindroos, Alf, E-mail: alf.lindroos@abo.fi [Geology and Mineralogy, Department of Natural Sciences, Åbo Akademi University (Finland); Art History, Faculty of Art, Åbo Akademi University (Finland); Ranta, Heikki [Diocese of Lund, Church of Sweden (Sweden); Heinemeier, Jan [AMS " 1" 4C Dating Laboratory, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Aarhus (Denmark); Lill, Jan-Olof [Accelerator Laboratory, Turku PET Centre, Åbo Akademi University (Finland)

    2014-07-15

    Mortar dating was applied to newly revealed, original mortar in the church of Dalby in Scania, southern Sweden which is considered to be the oldest still standing church in Scandinavia. Small white lime lumps were sampled by chipping from the supporting pillars in the interior of the church. Special emphasis was in sampling lime lumps because the church is situated in the Scania limestone area and aggregate limestone contamination was anticipated in the bulk mortars. Earlier studies have, however, shown that lime lumps do not contain aggregate material but only possible limestone rests from incomplete calcination. The sampled material was prepared for radiocarbon AMS dating. The carbonate in the lime lumps was hydrolyzed according to the sequential leaching technique developed for the Århus {sup 14}C laboratory in Denmark. Prior to the hydrolysis the lime lumps were examined for dead-carbon contamination using a stereo microscope and cathodoluminescence. The lime lumps displayed heterogeneous carbonate luminescence. This is, however, common and it was not considered a problem because carbonate growth in changing pH/Eh conditions often leads to changing luminescence colors. Two lumps had little dead carbon contamination and an early second millennium {sup 14}C signature. One lump, however, seemed to be heavily contaminated with dead carbon. Since the sample passed the microscopic screening, the leftovers of the lump was subjected to PIXE analysis and compared with the other two lumps. The well-defined, early 2nd millennium {sup 14}C age of the lime lumps of this particular church is an important contribution to the discussion on stone church chronology in Scandinavia.

  20. Light volatiles in diamond: Physical interpretation and genetic significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sellschop, J.P.F.; Madiba, C.C.P.; Annegarn, H.J.

    1980-01-01

    Natural diamond is characterised in terms of features in the infra-red and ultra-violet spectra. Additionally electron spin resonance, X-ray diffraction and topography, cathodoluminescence, mechanical and electrical measurements have been used to give more detail to such specification. It had been concluded that the major impurity in diamond was nitrogen and hence most physical phenomena have been interpreted as a manifestation of the mode(s) of occurence of nitrogen. From neutron activation analysis studies some 58 elements have been identified in diamond, many of course at trace levels. It has been shown that these data reveal a distinctive trace and minor element chemistry for diamond. Recently ion beam analyses have quantified the role of nitrogen in diamond characterisation. Most recently ion beam analysis has revealed that hydrogen, nitrogen and oxygen are all major impurities in diamond. Quantitative studies have been made using ( 19 Fe,α), (α,n) and ( 3 He,p) reactions. High temperature annealing in ultra-high vacuum conditions results in a substantial increase in the hydrogen measured as well as in the shape of the depth profile. Hydrogen is released from defect centres and diffuses rapidly through the diamond. Some of these hydrogen atoms are trapped at defect sites which are concentrated near surface as a result of the ion beam bombardement. A lesser response to the annealing treatment is found for oxygen and the smallest change for nitrogen. These ion beam data lend independent support to our earlier interpretation of the neutron activation data that all diamonds contain defects distributed fairly uniformly and consisting of sub-microscopic inclusions, the elemental composition of which suggests that each is a magma droplet from the upper mantle in which the diamond crystallized. The water-richness of the magma is an essential feature of the diamond genesis conditions. (orig.)