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Sample records for cathodic stripping voltammetric

  1. Adsorptive Cathodic Stripping Voltammetric Determination of Cefoperazone in Bulk Powder, Pharmaceutical Dosage Forms, and Human Urine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vu Dang Hoang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The electroreduction behaviour and determination of cefoperazone using a hanging mercury drop electrode were investigated. Cyclic voltammograms of cefoperazone recorded in universal Britton-Robinson buffers pH 3–6 exhibited a single irreversible cathodic peak. The process was adsorption-controlled. Britton-Robinson buffer 0.04 M pH 4.0 was selected as a supporting electrolyte for quantitative purposes by differential pulse and square wave adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry. The experimental voltammetric conditions were optimized using Central Composite Face design. A reduction wave was seen in the range from −0.7 to −0.8 V. These voltammetric techniques were successfully validated as per ICH guidelines and applied for the determination of cefoperazone in its single and sulbactam containing powders for injection and statistically comparable to USP-HPLC. They were further extended to determine cefoperazone in spiked human urine with no matrix effect.

  2. Cathodic adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of Ribavirin in pharmaceutical dosage form, urine and serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed A. Abdel Gaber

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available A sensitive, simple and rapid square-wave adsorptive stripping voltammetric method was developed and validated for the determination of Ribavirin in pharmaceutical formulations. The proposed method was based on the electrochemical reduction of Ribavirin at a hanging mercury drop electrode in Britton Robinson buffer at pH 10. A well-defined peak was observed at 880 mV with 30 s of accumulation time and 50 mV of accumulation potential. Under these optimized conditions, the square-wave adsorptive stripping voltammetric peak current showed a linear correlation on drug concentration over the range of 1 × 10−10–2 × 10−7 mol L−1 with a correlation coefficient of 0.9995 for the proposed method. The detection and quantitation limits for this method were 2.02 × 10−10 and 6.80 × 10−10 mol L−1, respectively. The results obtained for intra-day and inter-day precision (as RSD % were between 0.447% and 1.024%. This method was applied successfully for the determination of Ribavirin in its pharmaceutical dosage forms with mean recoveries of 99.68 ± 0.13 with RSD % of 0.81% and 99.20 ± 0.24 with RSD % of 0.49% for two concentrations 5 × 10−9 and 5 × 10−8 mol L−1, respectively for 200 mg capsules. The results obtained from the developed square-wave adsorptive stripping voltammetric method were compared with those obtained by the analytical method reported in the literature.

  3. Cathodic stripping voltammetric determination of arsenic in sugarcane brandy at a modified carbon nanotube paste electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira, Meryene C; Tavares, Elisângela de F L; Saczk, Adelir A; Okumura, Leonardo L; Cardoso, Maria das Graças; Magriotis, Zuy M; de Oliveira, Marcelo F

    2014-07-01

    We have developed an eletroanalytical method that employs Cu(2+) solutions to determine arsenic in sugarcane brandy using an electrode consisting of carbon paste modified with carbon nanotubes (CNTPE) and polymeric resins. We used linear sweep (LSV) and differential-pulse (DPV) voltammetry with cathodic stripping for CNTPE containing mineral oil or silicone as binder. The analytical curves were linear from 30 to 110μgL(-1) and from 10 to 110μgL(-1) for LSV and DPV, respectively. The limits of detection (L.O.D.) and quantification (L.O.Q.) of CNTPE were 10.3 and 34.5μgL(-1) for mineral oil and 3.4 and 11.2μgL(-1) for silicone. We applied this method to determine arsenic in five commercial sugarcane brandy samples. The results agreed well with those obtained by hydride generation combined with atomic absorption spectrometry (HG AAS). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Imprinted polymer-modified hanging mercury drop electrode for differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetric analysis of creatine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lakshmi, Dhana; Sharma, Piyush S; Prasad, Bhim B

    2007-06-15

    The molecularly imprinted polymer [poly(p-aminobenzoicacid-co-1,2-dichloroethane)] film casting was made on the surface of a hanging mercury drop electrode by drop-coating method for the selective and sensitive evaluation of creatine in water, blood serum and pharmaceutical samples. The molecular recognition of creatine by the imprinted polymer was found to be specific via non-covalent (electrostatic) imprinting. The creatine binding could easily be detected by differential pulse, cathodic stripping voltammetric signal at optimised operational conditions: accumulation potential -0.01 V (versus Ag/AgCl), polymer deposition time 15s, template accumulation time 60s, pH 7.1 (supporting electrolyte< or =5 x 10(-4)M NaOH), scan rate 10 mV s(-1), pulse amplitude 25 mV. The modified sensor in the present study was found to be highly reproducible and selective with detection limit 0.11 ng mL(-1) of creatine. Cross-reactivity studies revealed no response to the addition of urea, creatinine and phenylalanine; however, some insignificant magnitude of current was observed for tryptophan and histidine in the test samples.

  5. Differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetric determination of uranium with arsenazo-III at the hanging mercury dropping electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kadi, M.W.; El-Shahawi, M.S. [Chemistry Dept., King Abdulaziz Univ., Jeddah (Saudi Arabia)

    2009-07-01

    An accurate, inexpensive and less laborious controlled adsorptive accumulation of uranium(VI)-arsenazo-III on a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) has been developed for uranium(VI) determination. The method is based upon the collection of uranium(VI)-arsenazo-III complex at pH 5-6 at the HMDE and subsequent direct stripping measurement of the element in the nanomolar concentration level. The cathodic peak current (i{sub p,c}) of the adsorbed complex ions of uranium(VI) was measured at -0.35 V vs. Ag/AgCl reference electrode by differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry (DP-CSV), proceeded by an accumulation period of 150s2.5 in Britton-Robinson buffer of pH 5. The plot of the resulting i{sub p,c} vs. uranium(VI) concentration was linear in the range 2.1 x 10{sup -9} to 9.60 x 10{sup -7} mol L{sup -1} uranium(VI) and tended to level off at above 9.6 x 10{sup -7} mol L{sup -1}. The limits of detection and quantification of uranium(VI) were found to be 4.7 x 10{sup -10} and 1.5 x 10{sup -9} mol L{sup -1}, respectively. A relative standard deviation of {+-}2.39% (n = 5) at 8.5 x 10{sup -7} mol L{sup -1} uranium(VI) was obtained. The method was validated by comparing the results with that obtained by ICP-MS method with RSD less than {+-}3.3%. The method was applied successfully for the analysis of uranium in certified reference material (IAEA soil-7), and in phosphate fertilizers. (orig.)

  6. Cathodic stripping voltammetric determination of chromium in coastal waters on cubic Nano-titanium carbide loaded gold nanoparticles modified electrode

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    Haitao eHan

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The novel cubical nano-titanium carbide loaded gold nanoparticles modified electrode for selective and sensitive detection of trace chromium (Cr in coastal water was established based on a simple approach. Nano-titanium carbide is used as the typical cubical nanomaterial with wonderful catalytic activity towards the reduction of Cr(VI. Gold nanoparticles with excellent physical and chemical properties can facilitate electron transfer and enhance the catalytic activity of the modified electrode. Taking advantage of the synergistic effects of nano-titanium carbide and gold nanoparticles, the excellent cathodic signal responses for the stripping determination of Cr(VI can be obtained. The detection limit of this method is calculated as 2.08 μg L-1 with the linear calibration curve ranged from 5.2 to 1040 μg L-1. This analytical method can be used to detect Cr(VI effectively without using any complexing agent. The fabricated electrode was successfully applied for the detection of chromium in coastal waters collected from the estuary giving Cr concentrations between 12.48 and 22.88 μg L-1 with the recovery between 96% and 105%.

  7. Sensitive Bioanalysis Based on in-Situ Droplet Anodic Stripping Voltammetric Detection of CdS Quantum Dots Label after Enhanced Cathodic Preconcentration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoli Qin

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We report a protocol of CdS-labeled sandwich-type amperometric bioanalysis with high sensitivity, on the basis of simultaneous chemical-dissolution/cathodic-enrichment of the CdS quantum dot biolabel and anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV detection of Cd directly on the bioelectrode. We added a microliter droplet of 0.1 M aqueous HNO3 to dissolve CdS on the bioelectrode and simultaneously achieved the potentiostatic cathodic preconcentration of Cd by starting the potentiostatic operation before HNO3 addition, which can largely increase the ASV signal. Our protocol was used for immunoanalysis and aptamer-based bioanalysis of several proteins, giving limits of detection of 4.5 fg·mL−1 for human immunoglobulin G, 3.0 fg·mL−1 for human carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA, 4.9 fg·mL−1 for human α-fetoprotein (AFP, and 0.9 fM for thrombin, which are better than many reported results. The simultaneous and sensitive analysis of CEA and AFP at two screen-printed carbon electrodes was also conducted by our protocol.

  8. Adsorptive Cathodic Stripping Voltammetric Determination of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    International Pharmaceutical Abstract, Chemical Abstracts, Embase, Index Copernicus, EBSCO, African. Index Medicus ... The bioavailable salt forms of ciprofloxacin in the market are ... A standard stock solution of 500 ... CyberScan pH 510 (Eutech Instruments Pte Ltd., .... variation (5%) of the most important variables i.e..

  9. Adsorptive Cathodic Stripping Voltammetric Determination of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    in spiked human urine with no matrix effect (i.e. LLOQ 0.01 μg/ml, precision (RSD < 15%) and accuracy. (85 – 115%)) ... use in quality control and pharmacokinetics studies. ... subsequently approved by US Food and Drug ... high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) ... factors, the optimizer function of Modde software.

  10. Adsorptive Cathodic Stripping Voltammetric Determination of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Department of Analytical Chemistry and Toxicology, Hanoi University of Pharmacy, 13-15 Le .... factors, the optimizer function of Modde software ... implementing this experiment design, other ... influence of the interaction of buffer pH with.

  11. Adsorptive stripping voltammetric methods for determination of aripiprazole

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    Derya Aşangil

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Anodic behavior of aripiprazole (ARP was studied using electrochemical methods. Charge transfer, diffusion and surface coverage coefficients of adsorbed molecules and the number of electrons transferred in electrode mechanisms were calculated for quasi-reversible and adsorption-controlled electrochemical oxidation of ARP at 1.15 V versus Ag/AgCl at pH 4.0 in Britton–Robinson buffer (BR on glassy carbon electrode. Voltammetric methods for direct determination of ARP in pharmaceutical dosage forms and biological samples were developed. Linearity range is found as from 11.4 μM (5.11 mg/L to 157 μM (70.41 mg/L without stripping mode and it is found as from 0.221 μM (0.10 mg/L to 13.6 μM (6.10 mg/L with stripping mode. Limit of detection (LOD was found to be 0.11 μM (0.05 mg/L in stripping voltammetry. Methods were successfully applied to assay the drug in tablets, human serum and human urine with good recoveries between 95.0% and 104.6% with relative standard deviation less than 10%. Keywords: Adsorptive stripping voltammetry, Aripiprazole, Electrochemical behavior, Human serum and urine, Pharmaceuticals

  12. Adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of uranium with cephradine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ali, A.M.M.; Ghandour, M.A.; Khodari, M.

    1995-01-01

    Uranium adsorbed with cephradine is reduced on a hanging mercury drop electrode. This property was exploited in developing a highly sensitive stripping voltammetric procedure for the determination of uranium. A detection limit 2 x 10 -9 mol I -1 (0.5 μg I -1 ) of uranium ion is obtained with an 180 s accumulation time. Cyclic voltammetry was used to characterize the interfacial and redox behaviour. The effects of various parameters are discussed. Experimental conditions include the use of 5 x 10 -6 mol I -1 cephradine in 0.05 mol I -1 sodium perchlorate (pH ''approx ='' 6.5), an accumulation potential of 0.0 V versus SCE and a direct current stripping technique. The response is linear up to 5 x 10 -6 mol I -1 uranium and the relative standard deviation at 1 x 10 -7 mol I -1 ) UO 2+ is 4.4%. The effect of other metal ions was investigated. (author)

  13. Cathode readout with stripped resistive drift tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, V.N.; Kekelidze, G.D.; Novikov, E.A.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Shafranov, M.D.; Zhiltsov, V.E.

    1995-01-01

    A straw tube drift chamber prototype has been constructed and tested. The straw tube material is mylar film covered with a carbon layer with a resistivity of 0.5, 30 and 70 kΩ/□. Both the anode wire and the cathode strip signals were detected to study the behaviour of the chamber in the presence of X-ray ionization. The construction and the results of the study are presented. (orig.)

  14. Cathode readout with stripped resistive drift tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bychkov, V. N.; Kekelidze, G. D.; Novikov, E. A.; Peshekhonov, V. D.; Shafranov, M. D.; Zhiltsov, V. E.

    1995-12-01

    A straw tube drift chamber prototype has been constructed and tested. The straw tube material is mylar film covered with a carbon layer with a resistivity of 0.5, 30 and 70 kΩ/□. Both the anode wire and the cathode strip signals were detected to study the behaviour of the chamber in the presence of X-ray ionization. The construction and the results of the study are presented.

  15. Adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of trace amounts of lead in environmental water samples with complicated matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grabarczyk M.

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available A sensitive, simple and fast adsorptive stripping voltammetric procedure for trace determination of lead in environmental water samples has been developed. The method is based on adsorptive accumulation of the Pb(II-cupferron complex onto a hanging mercury drop electrode, followed by the reduction of the adsorbed species by a voltammetric scan using differential pulse modulation. The interference from surface active substances was eliminated by adsorption of interferents onto an Amberlite XAD-16 resin. Optimumconditions for removing the surfactants by mixing the analysed sample with resin were evaluated. The accuracy of the method was tested by analyzing certified reference material (SPS-WW1 Waste Water.

  16. The 'KATOD-1' strip readout ASIC for cathode strip chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Golutvin, I.A.; Gorbunov, N.V.; Karzhavin, V.Yu.; Khabarov, V.S.; Movchan, S.A.; Smolin, D.A.; Dvornikov, O.V.; Shumejko, N.M.; Chekhovskij, V.A.

    2001-01-01

    The 'KATOD-1', a 16-channels readout ASIC, has been designed to perform tests of P3 and P4 full-scale prototypes of the cathode strip chamber for the ME1/1 forward muon station of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment. The ASIC channel consists of two charge-sensitive preamplifiers, a three-stage shaper with cancellation, and an output driver. The ASIC is instrumented with control of gain, in the range of (-4.2 : +5.0) mV/fC, and control of output pulse-shape. The equivalent input noise is equal to 2400 e with the slope of 12 e/pF for detector capacity up to 200 pF. The peaking time is 100 ns for the chamber signal. The ASIC has been produced by a microwave Bi-jFET technology

  17. The "KATOD-1" Strip Readout ASIC for Cathode Strip Chamber

    CERN Document Server

    Golutvin, I A; Karjavin, V Yu; Khabarov, V S; Movchan, S A; Smolin, D A; Dvornikov, O V; Shumeiko, N M; Tchekhovski, V A

    2001-01-01

    The "KATOD-1", a 16-channels readout ASIC, has been designed to perform tests of P3 and P4 full-scale prototypes of the cathode strip chamber for the ME1/1 forward muon station of the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) experiment. The ASIC channel consists of two charge-sensitive preamplifiers, a three-stage shaper with tail cancellation, and an output driver. The ASIC is instrumented with control of gain, in the range of (-4.2\\div +5.0) mV/fC, and control of output pulse-shape. The equivalent input noise is equal to 2400 e with the slope of 12 e/pF for detector capacity up to 200 pF. The peaking time is 100 ns for the chamber signal. The ASIC has been produced by a microwave Bi-jFET technology.

  18. Adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of triprolidine hydrochloride in pharmaceutical tablets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zayed, S I M; Habib, I H I

    2005-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of antihistaminic drug, viz. triprolidine hydrochloride (TripCl), at a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) is investigated. Chemical and electrical parameters affecting the adsorptive voltammetric measurements are optimized. Different modes of sweep, viz. direct current DC, normal pulse NP, differential pulse DP and square wave SW modes, over the potential range from -800 to -1400 mV, are used in the presence of 0.04 M Britton-Robinson buffer pH 11, with accumulation time 30 s, scan rate 50 mV/s and pulse amplitude 50 mV. The reduction process is irreversible and involved the transfer of two electrons and two protons. Their responses are linear over the concentration range 15-157 ng/ml with average correlation coefficient 0.9998, while the detection limit is 2.64, 6.24, 8.80 and 2.12 ng/ml for DC, DP, SW and NP mode, respectively. The differential pulse method has been applied successfully for the determination of the drug in Egyptian pharmaceutical preparation with mean recovery 99.55+/-0.67%.

  19. SQUARE WAVE CATHODIC STRIPPING VOLTAMMETRY ADSORPTIVE FOR NICKEL AND COBALT ANALYSIS

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    Saryati Saryati

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of Ni and Co based on adsorption of the Ni/Co and dimethylglioxime (DMG complex on a hanging mercury drop electrode is studied. The reduction current of the adsorbed DMG complex is measured by square wave cathodic stripping voltammetry method. The effect of various parameters such as ligand concentration, pH of supporting electrolytic, adsorption potential and adsorption time on the current peak of Ni and Co voltammogram were studied. Optimum condition of this method are supporting electrolyte pH 9, DMG concentration 5×10 -4 M, adsorption potential -0.7 V vs Ag/AgCl and adsorption time 180 second. A linier relationship between the current peak and Ni or Co concentration was obtained in the range 5 - 30 ng/mL and the detection limit 0.6 ng/ml for both Ni and Co. The recovery of Ni and Co were 98.11-104.17% using standard biological materials with RSD 2.59 - 10.37%. Based on ";t"; test can be conclude that the result are nearly equal to the standard reference material.   Keywords: adsorptive stripping voltammetric, dimethylglioxime complex, nickel, cobalt

  20. Stripping voltammetric behavior of technetium at various chemically modified electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dick, R.

    1990-09-01

    In monitoring of nuclear processing plants and storage facilities the necessity arises of assaying traces of the artificial radioactive element technetium. The oxidation states IV and VII are of particular interest. Stripping voltammetry is among the methods of assay which are suited for this purpose. It allows an enhanced selectivity to be achieved by preconcentration of the analyte and of an oxidation state of the analyte, respectively, at the electrode used. This specific enrichment is successful after appropriate chemical modification of the electrode through immobilization of a Tc-specific reagent. When various approaches of chemical modification of a glassy carbon electrode were examined, the tetraphenylarsonium chloride extractant, which is highly selective with respect to technetium, proved to be the best suited reagent, capable of fixation both by ionic and by covalent bonding on an electrodeposited polymer film. For ionic immobilization the reagent was reacted to m-sulfophenyltriphenyl arsonium and then bound to a copolymer of vinylferrocene and vinylpyridine, which had been provided with cations. It was possible to enrich Tc(VII) at such an electrode and to determine it by stripping voltammetry down to a concentration of 1x10 -8 M after 5 minutes enrichment time. (orig./EF) [de

  1. Differential pulse polarography of cadmium-and lead-urate and adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of uric acid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gandour, M A; Ensaf-Aboul-Kasim; Amrallah, A H; Farghaly, O A

    1994-03-01

    The complex formation between uric acid and zinc, cadmium and lead ions has been investigated using differential pulse polarography in 0.01M NaNO(3). It is found that the complexes formed by Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions with uric acid have the stoichiometry of 1:2 and the logarithmic values of the apparent stability constant are 9.47 and 11.7, respectively. On the other hand, zinc(II) ions do not give any indication of complexation with uric acid. A sensitive voltammetric method is developed for the quantitative determination of uric acid. This method is based on controlled adsorptive preconcentration of uric acid on the hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE), followed by tracing the voltammogram in the cathodic going potential scan. The modes used are direct current stripping voltammetry (DCSV) and differential pulse stripping voltammetry (DPSV). The detection limits found were 8 x 10(-9)M (quiescent period 15 sec) by DPSV and 1.6 x 10(-8)M by DCSV.

  2. Emerging trends in biosensing using stripping voltammetric detection of metal-containing nanolabels – A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kokkinos, Christos; Economou, Anastasios, E-mail: aeconomo@chem.uoa.gr

    2017-04-08

    Over the last years, nanomaterials have found many applications in the development of electrochemical biosensors. Among other functions, metal nanoparticles (NPs) and quantum dots (QDs) (semiconducting nanocrystals composed of metal salts) are increasingly being used as voltammetric labels in affinity biosensing. Labeling is based on the attachment of the label(s) on the target biomolecules or on a biorecognition reporting probe. After an appropriate specific affinity interaction between the target and the reporting probe, the metallic nanolabels are converted to the respective cations which are quantified by a voltammetric technique. The very use of metal-containing nanoprobes as labels provides a first amplification step since each nanoprobe can release a very significant number of detectable cations. When anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) (in which a preconcentration step precedes the actual voltammetric scan) is further employed as the detection format, ultra-sensitive bioassays can be developed. The present paper reviews the emerging trends in affinity biosensing using ASV detection of metal-containing nanolabels. It provides a critical discussion of recent developments in ASV transduction and electrodes, novel strategies for signal enhancement, approaches for multiplexed detection as well as fluidics, paper-based and lab-on-a-chip devices. - Highlights: • This paper reviews the use of ASV for affinity biosensing with metal-containing nanolabels. • Both metal nanoparticles and quantum dots applications are considered. • Transducers and new electrode materials are covered. • Signal enhancement and multiplexing strategies are discussed. • Sensor arrays, paper-based, fluidic and lab-on-chip applications are described.

  3. Dual Approach to Amplify Anodic Stripping Voltammetric Signals Recorded Using Screen Printed Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka KRÓLICKA

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Screen printed electrodes plated with bismuth were used to record anodic stripping voltammograms of Pb(II, In(III and Cd(II. Using two bismuth precursors: Bi2O3 dispersed in the electrode body and Bi(III ions spiked into the tested solution it was possible to deposit bismuth layers, demonstrating exceptional ability to accumulate metals forming alloys with bismuth. The voltammetric signals were amplified by adjusting the electrode location with respect to rotating magnetic field. The electrode response was influenced by vertical and horizontal distance between the magnet center and the sensing area of screen printed electrode as well as the angle between the magnet surface and the electrode. When the electrode was moved away from the magnet center the recorded peaks were increasingly smaller and almost not affected by the presence of bismuth ions. It was shown that to obtain well-shaped signals a favourable morphology of bismuth deposits is of key importance. Hypotheses explaining processes responsible for the amplification of voltammetric signals were proposed.

  4. Cathode Readout with Stripped Resistive Drift Tubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, V.N.; Kekelidze, G.D.; Novikov, E.A.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Shafranov, M.D.; Zhil'tsov, V.E.

    1994-01-01

    A straw tube drift chamber prototype has been constructed and tested. The straw tube material is mylar film covered with carbon layer of resistivity 0.5, 30 and 70 k Ohm/sq. The gas mixture used was Ar/CH 4 . Both the anode wire and cathode signals were detected in order to study the behaviour of the chamber in the presence of X-ray ionization. The construction and the results of the study are presented. 7 refs., 11 figs., 1 tab

  5. Web-Based Cathode Strip Chamber Data Display

    CERN Multimedia

    Firmansyah, M

    2013-01-01

    Cathode Strip Chamber (CSC) is a detector that uses gas and high electric field to detect particles. When a particle goes through CSC, it will ionize gas particles and generate electric signal in the anode and cathode of the detector. Analysis of the electric signal data can help physicists to reconstruct path of the particles and determine what happen inside the detector. Using data display, analysis of CSC data becomes easier. One can determine which data is interesting, unusual, or maybe only contain noise.\

  6. Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetric Determination of Hydroquinone using an Electrochemically Pretreated Glassy Carbon Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdul Niaz1,

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available A simple and efficient adsorptive stripping voltammetric (AdSV method was developed for the determination of hydroquinone at an electrochemically pretreated glassy carbon (GC electrode in waste water. Various parameters such as solvent system, accumulation potential, accumulation time and scan rate were optimized. The electrochemically pretreated GC electrode showed good response towards hydroquinone determination by using AdSV. Under the optimized conditions the peak current showed good linear relationship with the hydroquinone concentration in the range of 0.5-4.0mg L-1 and 5-30mg L-1. The 60/40 methanol/water composition was found to be the best solvent system and 0.05mol L-1 H2SO4 was found as useful supporting electrolyte concentration. The accumulation time was 60 s and the detection limit was 50µg L-1. The developed method was successfully applied for the determination of hydroquinone in polymeric industrial discharge samples waste photographic developer solution and cream sample without any significant effect of surface fouling.

  7. Anodic stripping voltammetric determination of silver ion at a carbon paste electrode modified with carbon nanotubes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tashkhourian, J.; Javadi, S.; Ana, F.N.

    2011-01-01

    A carbon paste electrode (CPE) was modified with multi-wall carbon nanotubes and successfully applied to the determination of silver ion by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry. Compared to a conventional CPE, a remarkably improved peak current response and sensitivity is observed. The analytical procedure consisted of an open circuit accumulation step for 2 min in -0.4 V, this followed by an anodic potential scan between +0.2 and + 0.6 V to obtain the voltammetric peak. The oxidation peak current is proportional to the concentration of silver ion in the range from 1.0 x 10 -8 to 1.0 x 10 -5 mol L -1 , with a detection limit of 1.8 x 10 -9 mol L -1 after an accumulation time of 120 s. The relative standard deviation for 7 successive determinations of Ag(I) at 0.1 μM concentration is 1.99%. The procedure was validated by determining Ag(I) in natural waters. (author)

  8. Optimisation of the conditions for stripping voltammetric analysis at liquid-liquid interfaces supported at micropore arrays: a computational simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strutwolf, Jörg; Arrigan, Damien W M

    2010-10-01

    Micropore membranes have been used to form arrays of microinterfaces between immiscible electrolyte solutions (µITIES) as a basis for the sensing of non-redox-active ions. Implementation of stripping voltammetry as a sensing method at these arrays of µITIES was applied recently to detect drugs and biomolecules at low concentrations. The present study uses computational simulation to investigate the optimum conditions for stripping voltammetric sensing at the µITIES array. In this scenario, the diffusion of ions in both the aqueous and the organic phases contributes to the sensing response. The influence of the preconcentration time, the micropore aspect ratio, the location of the microinterface within the pore, the ratio of the diffusion coefficients of the analyte ion in the organic and aqueous phases, and the pore wall angle were investigated. The simulations reveal that the accessibility of the microinterfaces during the preconcentration period should not be hampered by a recessed interface and that diffusional transport in the phase where the analyte ions are preconcentrated should be minimized. This will ensure that the ions are accumulated within the micropores close to the interface and thus be readily available for back transfer during the stripping process. On the basis of the results, an optimal combination of the examined parameters is proposed, which together improve the stripping voltammetric signal and provide an improvement in the detection limit.

  9. Performance of the CMS Cathode Strip Chambers with Cosmic Rays

    CERN Document Server

    Chatrchyan, S; Sirunyan, A M; Adam, W; Arnold, B; Bergauer, H; Bergauer, T; Dragicevic, M; Eichberger, M; Erö, J; Friedl, M; Frühwirth, R; Ghete, V M; Hammer, J; Hänsel, S; Hoch, M; Hörmann, N; Hrubec, J; Jeitler, M; Kasieczka, G; Kastner, K; Krammer, M; Liko, D; Magrans de Abril, I; Mikulec, I; Mittermayr, F; Neuherz, B; Oberegger, M; Padrta, M; Pernicka, M; Rohringer, H; Schmid, S; Schöfbeck, R; Schreiner, T; Stark, R; Steininger, H; Strauss, J; Taurok, A; Teischinger, F; Themel, T; Uhl, D; Wagner, P; Waltenberger, W; Walzel, G; Widl, E; Wulz, C E; Chekhovsky, V; Dvornikov, O; Emeliantchik, I; Litomin, A; Makarenko, V; Marfin, I; Mossolov, V; Shumeiko, N; Solin, A; Stefanovitch, R; Suarez Gonzalez, J; Tikhonov, A; Fedorov, A; Karneyeu, A; Korzhik, M; Panov, V; Zuyeuski, R; Kuchinsky, P; Beaumont, W; Benucci, L; Cardaci, M; De Wolf, E A; Delmeire, E; Druzhkin, D; Hashemi, M; Janssen, X; Maes, T; Mucibello, L; Ochesanu, S; Rougny, R; Selvaggi, M; Van Haevermaet, H; Van Mechelen, P; Van Remortel, N; Adler, V; Beauceron, S; Blyweert, S; D'Hondt, J; De Weirdt, S; Devroede, O; Heyninck, J; Kalogeropoulos, A; Maes, J; Maes, M; Mozer, M U; Tavernier, S; Van Doninck, W; Van Mulders, P; Villella, I; Bouhali, O; Chabert, E C; Charaf, O; Clerbaux, B; De Lentdecker, G; Dero, V; Elgammal, S; Gay, A P R; Hammad, G H; Marage, P E; Rugovac, S; Vander Velde, C; Vanlaer, P; Wickens, J; Grunewald, M; Klein, B; Marinov, A; Ryckbosch, D; Thyssen, F; Tytgat, M; Vanelderen, L; Verwilligen, P; Basegmez, S; Bruno, G; Caudron, J; Delaere, C; Demin, P; Favart, D; Giammanco, A; Grégoire, G; Lemaitre, V; Militaru, O; Ovyn, S; Piotrzkowski, K; Quertenmont, L; Schul, N; Beliy, N; Daubie, E; Alves, G A; Pol, M E; Souza, M H G; Carvalho, W; De Jesus Damiao, D; De Oliveira Martins, C; Fonseca De Souza, S; Mundim, L; Oguri, V; Santoro, A; Silva Do Amaral, S M; Sznajder, A; Fernandez Perez Tomei, T R; Ferreira Dias, M A; Gregores, E M; Novaes, S F; Abadjiev, K; Anguelov, T; Damgov, J; Darmenov, N; Dimitrov, L; Genchev, V; Iaydjiev, P; Piperov, S; Stoykova, S; Sultanov, G; Trayanov, R; Vankov, I; Dimitrov, A; Dyulendarova, M; Kozhuharov, V; Litov, L; Marinova, E; Mateev, M; Pavlov, B; Petkov, P; Toteva, Z; Chen, G M; Chen, H S; Guan, W; Jiang, C H; Liang, D; Liu, B; Meng, X; Tao, J; Wang, J; Wang, Z; Xue, Z; Zhang, Z; Ban, Y; Cai, J; Ge, Y; Guo, S; Hu, Z; Mao, Y; Qian, S J; Teng, H; Zhu, B; Avila, C; Baquero Ruiz, M; Carrillo Montoya, C A; Gomez, A; Gomez Moreno, B; Ocampo Rios, A A; Osorio Oliveros, A F; Reyes Romero, D; Sanabria, J C; Godinovic, N; Lelas, K; Plestina, R; Polic, D; Puljak, I; Antunovic, Z; Dzelalija, M; Brigljevic, V; Duric, S; Kadija, K; Morovic, S; Fereos, R; Galanti, M; Mousa, J; Papadakis, A; Ptochos, F; Razis, P A; Tsiakkouri, D; Zinonos, Z; Hektor, A; Kadastik, M; Kannike, K; Müntel, M; Raidal, M; Rebane, L; Anttila, E; Czellar, S; Härkönen, J; Heikkinen, A; Karimäki, V; Kinnunen, R; Klem, J; Kortelainen, M J; Lampén, T; Lassila-Perini, K; Lehti, S; Lindén, T; Luukka, P; Mäenpää, T; Nysten, J; Tuominen, E; Tuominiemi, J; Ungaro, D; Wendland, L; Banzuzi, K; Korpela, A; Tuuva, T; Nedelec, P; Sillou, D; Besancon, M; Chipaux, R; Dejardin, M; Denegri, D; Descamps, J; Fabbro, B; Faure, J L; Ferri, F; Ganjour, S; Gentit, F X; Givernaud, A; Gras, P; Hamel de Monchenault, G; Jarry, P; Lemaire, M C; Locci, E; Malcles, J; Marionneau, M; Millischer, L; Rander, J; Rosowsky, A; Rousseau, D; Titov, M; Verrecchia, P; Baffioni, S; Bianchini, L; Bluj, M; Busson, P; Charlot, C; Dobrzynski, L; Granier de Cassagnac, R; Haguenauer, M; Miné, P; Paganini, P; Sirois, Y; Thiebaux, C; Zabi, A; Agram, J L; Besson, A; Bloch, D; Bodin, D; Brom, J M; Conte, E; Drouhin, F; Fontaine, J C; Gelé, D; Goerlach, U; Gross, L; Juillot, P; Le Bihan, A C; Patois, Y; Speck, J; Van Hove, P; Baty, C; Bedjidian, M; Blaha, J; Boudoul, G; Brun, H; Chanon, N; Chierici, R; Contardo, D; Depasse, P; Dupasquier, T; El Mamouni, H; Fassi, F; Fay, J; Gascon, S; Ille, B; Kurca, T; Le Grand, T; Lethuillier, M; Lumb, N; Mirabito, L; Perries, S; Vander Donckt, M; Verdier, P; Djaoshvili, N; Roinishvili, N; Roinishvili, V; Amaglobeli, N; Adolphi, R; Anagnostou, G; Brauer, R; Braunschweig, W; Edelhoff, M; Esser, H; Feld, L; Karpinski, W; Khomich, A; Klein, K; Mohr, N; Ostaptchouk, A; Pandoulas, D; Pierschel, G; Raupach, F; Schael, S; Schultz von Dratzig, A; Schwering, G; Sprenger, D; Thomas, M; Weber, M; Wittmer, B; Wlochal, M; Actis, O; Altenhöfer, G; Bender, W; Biallass, P; Erdmann, M; Fetchenhauer, G; Frangenheim, J; Hebbeker, T; Hilgers, G; Hinzmann, A; Hoepfner, K; Hof, C; Kirsch, M; Klimkovich, T; Kreuzer, P; Lanske, D; Merschmeyer, M; Meyer, A; Philipps, B; Pieta, H; Reithler, H; Schmitz, S A; Sonnenschein, L; Sowa, M; Steggemann, J; Szczesny, H; Teyssier, D; Zeidler, C; Bontenackels, M; Davids, M; Duda, M; Flügge, G; Geenen, H; Giffels, M; Haj Ahmad, W; Hermanns, T; Heydhausen, D; Kalinin, S; Kress, T; Linn, A; Nowack, A; Perchalla, L; Poettgens, M; Pooth, O; Sauerland, P; Stahl, A; Tornier, D; Zoeller, M H; Aldaya Martin, M; Behrens, U; Borras, K; Campbell, A; Castro, E; Dammann, D; Eckerlin, G; Flossdorf, A; Flucke, G; Geiser, A; Hatton, D; Hauk, J; Jung, H; Kasemann, M; Katkov, I; Kleinwort, C; Kluge, H; Knutsson, A; Kuznetsova, E; Lange, W; Lohmann, W; Mankel, R; Marienfeld, M; Meyer, A B; Miglioranzi, S; Mnich, J; Ohlerich, M; Olzem, J; Parenti, A; Rosemann, C; Schmidt, R; Schoerner-Sadenius, T; Volyanskyy, D; Wissing, C; Zeuner, W D; Autermann, C; Bechtel, F; Draeger, J; Eckstein, D; Gebbert, U; Kaschube, K; Kaussen, G; Klanner, R; Mura, B; Naumann-Emme, S; Nowak, F; Pein, U; Sander, C; Schleper, P; Schum, T; Stadie, H; Steinbrück, G; Thomsen, J; Wolf, R; Bauer, J; Blüm, P; Buege, V; Cakir, A; Chwalek, T; De Boer, W; Dierlamm, A; Dirkes, G; Feindt, M; Felzmann, U; Frey, M; Furgeri, A; Gruschke, J; Hackstein, C; Hartmann, F; Heier, S; Heinrich, M; Held, H; Hirschbuehl, D; Hoffmann, K H; Honc, S; Jung, C; Kuhr, T; Liamsuwan, T; Martschei, D; Mueller, S; Müller, Th; Neuland, M B; Niegel, M; Oberst, O; Oehler, A; Ott, J; Peiffer, T; Piparo, D; Quast, G; Rabbertz, K; Ratnikov, F; Ratnikova, N; Renz, M; Saout, C; Sartisohn, G; Scheurer, A; Schieferdecker, P; Schilling, F P; Schott, G; Simonis, H J; Stober, F M; Sturm, P; Troendle, D; Trunov, A; Wagner, W; Wagner-Kuhr, J; Zeise, M; Zhukov, V; Ziebarth, E B; Daskalakis, G; Geralis, T; Karafasoulis, K; Kyriakis, A; Loukas, D; Markou, A; Markou, C; Mavrommatis, C; Petrakou, E; Zachariadou, A; Gouskos, L; Katsas, P; Panagiotou, A; Evangelou, I; Kokkas, P; Manthos, N; Papadopoulos, I; Patras, V; Triantis, F A; Bencze, G; Boldizsar, L; Debreczeni, G; Hajdu, C; Hernath, S; Hidas, P; Horvath, D; Krajczar, K; Laszlo, A; Patay, G; Sikler, F; Toth, N; Vesztergombi, G; Beni, N; Christian, G; Imrek, J; Molnar, J; Novak, D; Palinkas, J; Szekely, G; Szillasi, Z; Tokesi, K; Veszpremi, V; Kapusi, A; Marian, G; Raics, P; Szabo, Z; Trocsanyi, Z L; Ujvari, B; Zilizi, G; Bansal, S; Bawa, H S; Beri, S B; Bhatnagar, V; Jindal, M; Kaur, M; Kaur, R; Kohli, J M; Mehta, M Z; Nishu, N; Saini, L K; Sharma, A; Singh, A; Singh, J B; Singh, S P; Ahuja, S; Arora, S; Bhattacharya, S; Chauhan, S; Choudhary, B C; Gupta, P; Jain, S; Jha, M; Kumar, A; Ranjan, K; Shivpuri, R K; Srivastava, A K; Choudhury, R K; Dutta, D; Kailas, S; Kataria, S K; Mohanty, A K; Pant, L M; Shukla, P; Topkar, A; Aziz, T; Guchait, M; Gurtu, A; Maity, M; Majumder, D; Majumder, G; Mazumdar, K; Nayak, A; Saha, A; Sudhakar, K; Banerjee, S; Dugad, S; Mondal, N K; Arfaei, H; Bakhshiansohi, H; Fahim, A; Jafari, A; Mohammadi Najafabadi, M; Moshaii, A; Paktinat Mehdiabadi, S; Rouhani, S; Safarzadeh, B; Zeinali, M; Felcini, M; Abbrescia, M; Barbone, L; Chiumarulo, F; Clemente, A; Colaleo, A; Creanza, D; Cuscela, G; De Filippis, N; De Palma, M; De Robertis, G; Donvito, G; Fedele, F; Fiore, L; Franco, M; Iaselli, G; Lacalamita, N; Loddo, F; Lusito, L; Maggi, G; Maggi, M; Manna, N; Marangelli, B; My, S; Natali, S; Nuzzo, S; Papagni, G; Piccolomo, S; Pierro, G A; Pinto, C; Pompili, A; Pugliese, G; Rajan, R; Ranieri, A; Romano, F; Roselli, G; Selvaggi, G; Shinde, Y; Silvestris, L; Tupputi, S; Zito, G; Abbiendi, G; Bacchi, W; Benvenuti, A C; Boldini, M; Bonacorsi, D; Braibant-Giacomelli, S; Cafaro, V D; Caiazza, S S; Capiluppi, P; Castro, A; Cavallo, F R; Codispoti, G; Cuffiani, M; D'Antone, I; Dallavalle, G M; Fabbri, F; Fanfani, A; Fasanella, D; Giacomelli, P; Giordano, V; Giunta, M; Grandi, C; Guerzoni, M; Marcellini, S; Masetti, G; Montanari, A; Navarria, F L; Odorici, F; Pellegrini, G; Perrotta, A; Rossi, A M; Rovelli, T; Siroli, G; Torromeo, G; Travaglini, R; Albergo, S; Costa, S; Potenza, R; Tricomi, A; Tuve, C; Barbagli, G; Broccolo, G; Ciulli, V; Civinini, C; D'Alessandro, R; Focardi, E; Frosali, S; Gallo, E; Genta, C; Landi, G; Lenzi, P; Meschini, M; Paoletti, S; Sguazzoni, G; Tropiano, A; Benussi, L; Bertani, M; Bianco, S; Colafranceschi, S; Colonna, D; Fabbri, F; Giardoni, M; Passamonti, L; Piccolo, D; Pierluigi, D; Ponzio, B; Russo, A; Fabbricatore, P; Musenich, R; Benaglia, A; Calloni, M; Cerati, G B; D'Angelo, P; De Guio, F; Farina, F M; Ghezzi, A; Govoni, P; Malberti, M; Malvezzi, S; Martelli, A; Menasce, D; Miccio, V; Moroni, L; Negri, P; Paganoni, M; Pedrini, D; Pullia, A; Ragazzi, S; Redaelli, N; Sala, S; Salerno, R; Tabarelli de Fatis, T; Tancini, V; Taroni, S; Buontempo, S; Cavallo, N; Cimmino, A; De Gruttola, M; Fabozzi, F; Iorio, A O M; Lista, L; Lomidze, D; Noli, P; Paolucci, P; Sciacca, C; Azzi, P; Bacchetta, N; Barcellan, L; Bellan, P; Bellato, M; Benettoni, M; Biasotto, M; Bisello, D; Borsato, E; Branca, A; Carlin, R; Castellani, L; Checchia, P; Conti, E; Dal Corso, F; De Mattia, M; Dorigo, T; Dosselli, U; Fanzago, F; Gasparini, F; Gasparini, U; Giubilato, P; Gonella, F; Gresele, A; Gulmini, M; Kaminskiy, A; Lacaprara, S; Lazzizzera, I; Margoni, M; Maron, G; Mattiazzo, S; Mazzucato, M; Meneghelli, M; Meneguzzo, A T; Michelotto, M; Montecassiano, F; Nespolo, M; Passaseo, M; Pegoraro, M; Perrozzi, L; Pozzobon, N; Ronchese, P; Simonetto, F; Toniolo, N; Torassa, E; Tosi, M; Triossi, A; Vanini, S; Ventura, S; Zotto, P; Zumerle, G; Baesso, P; Berzano, U; Bricola, S; Necchi, M M; Pagano, D; Ratti, S P; Riccardi, C; Torre, P; Vicini, A; Vitulo, P; Viviani, C; Aisa, D; Aisa, S; Babucci, E; Biasini, M; Bilei, G M; Caponeri, B; Checcucci, B; Dinu, N; Fanò, L; Farnesini, L; Lariccia, P; Lucaroni, A; Mantovani, G; Nappi, A; Piluso, A; Postolache, V; Santocchia, A; Servoli, L; Tonoiu, D; Vedaee, A; Volpe, R; Azzurri, P; Bagliesi, G; Bernardini, J; Berretta, L; Boccali, T; Bocci, A; Borrello, L; Bosi, F; Calzolari, F; Castaldi, R; Dell'Orso, R; Fiori, F; Foà, L; Gennai, S; Giassi, A; Kraan, A; Ligabue, F; Lomtadze, T; Mariani, F; Martini, L; Massa, M; Messineo, A; Moggi, A; Palla, F; Palmonari, F; Petragnani, G; Petrucciani, G; Raffaelli, F; Sarkar, S; Segneri, G; Serban, A T; Spagnolo, P; Tenchini, R; Tolaini, S; Tonelli, G; Venturi, A; Verdini, P G; Baccaro, S; Barone, L; Bartoloni, A; Cavallari, F; Dafinei, I; Del Re, D; Di Marco, E; Diemoz, M; Franci, D; Longo, E; Organtini, G; Palma, A; Pandolfi, F; Paramatti, R; Pellegrino, F; Rahatlou, S; Rovelli, C; Alampi, G; Amapane, N; Arcidiacono, R; Argiro, S; Arneodo, M; Biino, C; Borgia, M A; Botta, C; Cartiglia, N; Castello, R; Cerminara, G; Costa, M; Dattola, D; Dellacasa, G; Demaria, N; Dughera, G; Dumitrache, F; Graziano, A; Mariotti, C; Marone, M; Maselli, S; Migliore, E; Mila, G; Monaco, V; Musich, M; Nervo, M; Obertino, M M; Oggero, S; Panero, R; Pastrone, N; Pelliccioni, M; Romero, A; Ruspa, M; Sacchi, R; Solano, A; Staiano, A; Trapani, P P; Trocino, D; Vilela Pereira, A; Visca, L; Zampieri, A; Ambroglini, F; Belforte, S; Cossutti, F; Della Ricca, G; Gobbo, B; Penzo, A; Chang, S; Chung, J; Kim, D H; Kim, G N; Kong, D J; Park, H; Son, D C; Bahk, S Y; Song, S; Jung, S Y; Hong, B; Kim, H; Kim, J H; Lee, K S; Moon, D H; Park, S K; Rhee, H B; Sim, K S; Kim, J; Choi, M; Hahn, G; Park, I C; Choi, S; Choi, Y; Goh, J; Jeong, H; Kim, T J; Lee, J; Lee, S; Janulis, M; Martisiute, D; Petrov, P; Sabonis, T; Castilla Valdez, H; Sánchez Hernández, A; Carrillo Moreno, S; Morelos Pineda, A; Allfrey, P; Gray, R N C; Krofcheck, D; Bernardino Rodrigues, N; Butler, P H; Signal, T; Williams, J C; Ahmad, M; Ahmed, I; Ahmed, W; Asghar, M I; Awan, M I M; Hoorani, H R; Hussain, I; Khan, W A; Khurshid, T; Muhammad, S; Qazi, S; Shahzad, H; Cwiok, M; Dabrowski, R; Dominik, W; Doroba, K; Konecki, M; Krolikowski, J; Pozniak, K; Romaniuk, Ryszard; Zabolotny, W; Zych, P; Frueboes, T; Gokieli, R; Goscilo, L; Górski, M; Kazana, M; Nawrocki, K; Szleper, M; Wrochna, G; Zalewski, P; Almeida, N; Antunes Pedro, L; Bargassa, P; David, A; Faccioli, P; Ferreira Parracho, P G; Freitas Ferreira, M; Gallinaro, M; Guerra Jordao, M; Martins, P; Mini, G; Musella, P; Pela, J; Raposo, L; Ribeiro, P Q; Sampaio, S; Seixas, J; Silva, J; Silva, P; Soares, D; Sousa, M; Varela, J; Wöhri, H K; Altsybeev, I; Belotelov, I; Bunin, P; Ershov, Y; Filozova, I; Finger, M; Finger, M., Jr.; Golunov, A; Golutvin, I; Gorbounov, N; Kalagin, V; Kamenev, A; Karjavin, V; Konoplyanikov, V; Korenkov, V; Kozlov, G; Kurenkov, A; Lanev, A; Makankin, A; Mitsyn, V V; Moisenz, P; Nikonov, E; Oleynik, D; Palichik, V; Perelygin, V; Petrosyan, A; Semenov, R; Shmatov, S; Smirnov, V; Smolin, D; Tikhonenko, E; Vasil'ev, S; Vishnevskiy, A; Volodko, A; Zarubin, A; Zhiltsov, V; Bondar, N; Chtchipounov, L; Denisov, A; Gavrikov, Y; Gavrilov, G; Golovtsov, V; Ivanov, Y; Kim, V; Kozlov, V; Levchenko, P; Obrant, G; Orishchin, E; Petrunin, A; Shcheglov, Y; Shchetkovskiy, A; Sknar, V; Smirnov, I; Sulimov, V; Tarakanov, V; Uvarov, L; Vavilov, S; Velichko, G; Volkov, S; Vorobyev, A; Andreev, Yu; Anisimov, A; Antipov, P; Dermenev, A; Gninenko, S; Golubev, N; Kirsanov, M; Krasnikov, N; Matveev, V; Pashenkov, A; Postoev, V E; Solovey, A; Toropin, A; Troitsky, S; Baud, A; Epshteyn, V; Gavrilov, V; Ilina, N; Kaftanov, V; Kolosov, V; Kossov, M; Krokhotin, A; Kuleshov, S; Oulianov, A; Safronov, G; Semenov, S; Shreyber, I; Stolin, V; Vlasov, E; Zhokin, A; Boos, E; Dubinin, M; Dudko, L; Ershov, A; Gribushin, A; Klyukhin, V; Kodolova, O; Lokhtin, I; Petrushanko, S; Sarycheva, L; Savrin, V; Snigirev, A; Vardanyan, I; Dremin, I; Kirakosyan, M; Konovalova, N; Rusakov, S V; Vinogradov, A; Akimenko, S; Artamonov, A; Azhgirey, I; Bitioukov, S; Burtovoy, V; Grishin, V; Kachanov, V; Konstantinov, D; Krychkine, V; Levine, A; Lobov, I; Lukanin, V; Mel'nik, Y; Petrov, V; Ryutin, R; Slabospitsky, S; Sobol, A; Sytine, A; Tourtchanovitch, L; Troshin, S; Tyurin, N; Uzunian, A; Volkov, A; Adzic, P; Djordjevic, M; Jovanovic, D; Krpic, D; Maletic, D; Puzovic, J; Smiljkovic, N; Aguilar-Benitez, M; Alberdi, J; Alcaraz Maestre, J; Arce, P; Barcala, J M; Battilana, C; Burgos Lazaro, C; Caballero Bejar, J; Calvo, E; Cardenas Montes, M; Cepeda, M; Cerrada, M; Chamizo Llatas, M; Clemente, F; Colino, N; Daniel, M; De La Cruz, B; Delgado Peris, A; Diez Pardos, C; Fernandez Bedoya, C; Fernández Ramos, J P; Ferrando, A; Flix, J; Fouz, M C; Garcia-Abia, P; 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D'Enterria, D; Everaerts, P; Gomez Ceballos, G; Hahn, K A; Harris, P; Jaditz, S; Kim, Y; Klute, M; Lee, Y J; Li, W; Loizides, C; Ma, T; Miller, M; Nahn, S; Paus, C; Roland, C; Roland, G; Rudolph, M; Stephans, G; Sumorok, K; Sung, K; Vaurynovich, S; Wenger, E A; Wyslouch, B; Xie, S; Yilmaz, Y; Yoon, A S; Bailleux, D; Cooper, S I; Cushman, P; Dahmes, B; De Benedetti, A; Dolgopolov, A; Dudero, P R; Egeland, R; Franzoni, G; Haupt, J; Inyakin, A; Klapoetke, K; Kubota, Y; Mans, J; Mirman, N; Petyt, D; Rekovic, V; Rusack, R; Schroeder, M; Singovsky, A; Zhang, J; Cremaldi, L M; Godang, R; Kroeger, R; Perera, L; Rahmat, R; Sanders, D A; Sonnek, P; Summers, D; Bloom, K; Bockelman, B; Bose, S; Butt, J; Claes, D R; Dominguez, A; Eads, M; Keller, J; Kelly, T; Kravchenko, I; Lazo-Flores, J; Lundstedt, C; Malbouisson, H; Malik, S; Snow, G R; Baur, U; Iashvili, I; Kharchilava, A; Kumar, A; Smith, K; Strang, M; Alverson, G; Barberis, E; Boeriu, O; Eulisse, G; Govi, G; McCauley, T; Musienko, Y; Muzaffar, S; 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Neumeister, N; Sedov, A; Shipsey, I; Yoo, H D; Zheng, Y; Jindal, P; Parashar, N; Cuplov, V; Ecklund, K M; Geurts, F J M; Liu, J H; Maronde, D; Matveev, M; Padley, B P; Redjimi, R; Roberts, J; Sabbatini, L; Tumanov, A; Betchart, B; Bodek, A; Budd, H; Chung, Y S; de Barbaro, P; Demina, R; Flacher, H; Gotra, Y; Harel, A; Korjenevski, S; Miner, D C; Orbaker, D; Petrillo, G; Vishnevskiy, D; Zielinski, M; Bhatti, A; Demortier, L; Goulianos, K; Hatakeyama, K; Lungu, G; Mesropian, C; Yan, M; Atramentov, O; Bartz, E; Gershtein, Y; Halkiadakis, E; Hits, D; Lath, A; Rose, K; Schnetzer, S; Somalwar, S; Stone, R; Thomas, S; Watts, T L; Cerizza, G; Hollingsworth, M; Spanier, S; Yang, Z C; York, A; Asaadi, J; Aurisano, A; Eusebi, R; Golyash, A; Gurrola, A; Kamon, T; Nguyen, C N; Pivarski, J; Safonov, A; Sengupta, S; Toback, D; Weinberger, M; Akchurin, N; Berntzon, L; Gumus, K; Jeong, C; Kim, H; Lee, S W; Popescu, S; Roh, Y; Sill, A; Volobouev, I; Washington, E; Wigmans, R; Yazgan, E; Engh, D; Florez, C; Johns, W; Pathak, S; Sheldon, P; Andelin, D; Arenton, M W; Balazs, M; Boutle, S; Buehler, M; Conetti, S; Cox, B; Hirosky, R; Ledovskoy, A; Neu, C; Phillips II, D; Ronquest, M; Yohay, R; Gollapinni, S; Gunthoti, K; Harr, R; Karchin, P E; Mattson, M; Sakharov, A; Anderson, M; Bachtis, M; Bellinger, J N; Carlsmith, D; Crotty, I; Dasu, S; Dutta, S; Efron, J; Feyzi, F; Flood, K; Gray, L; Grogg, K S; Grothe, M; Hall-Wilton, R; Jaworski, M; Klabbers, P; Klukas, J; Lanaro, A; Lazaridis, C; Leonard, J; Loveless, R; Magrans de Abril, M; Mohapatra, A; Ott, G; Polese, G; Reeder, D; Savin, A; Smith, W H; Sourkov, A; Swanson, J; Weinberg, M; Wenman, D; Wensveen, M; White, A

    2010-01-01

    The Cathode Strip Chambers (CSCs) constitute the primary muon tracking device in the CMS endcaps. Their performance has been evaluated using data taken during a cosmic ray run in fall 2008. Measured noise levels are low, with the number of noisy channels well below 1%. Coordinate resolution was measured for all types of chambers, and fall in the range 47 microns to 243 microns. The efficiencies for local charged track triggers, for hit and for segments reconstruction were measured, and are above 99%. The timing resolution per layer is approximately 5 ns.

  10. Adsorptive stripping voltammetric behaviour of copper complexes of some heterocyclic azo compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farias, P A; Ferreira, S L; Ohara, A K; Bastos, M B; Goulart, M S

    1992-10-01

    Controlled adsorptive accumulation of copper complexed with TAN, TAC, TAR and TAM (heterocyclic azo-compounds) on a static mercury drop electrode provides the basis for the direct stripping measurement of this element in the nanomolar concentration level. The ligand TAN exhibited great sensitivity and better separation of the peak current of the ligand in relation to the complex. The reduction current of adsorbed complex ions of copper is measured by linear scan cathodic stripping voltammetry, preceded by a period of accumulation of a few minutes. The peak potential is at approximately -0.37 V vs. Ag/AgCl. Optimal experimental parameters were found to be a TAN concentration of 1 x 10(-5)M, an accumulation potential of -0.22 V, and a solution pH of 3.7 (acetate buffer). The detection limit is 0.8nM after a 5-min accumulation with a stirred solution, and the response is linear up to 50 mug/l. Many common cations and anions do not interfere in the determination of copper. The interference of titanium is eliminated by addition of fluoride ion. Results are reported for a fresh water sample.

  11. Linear read out electronics associated with MWPC cathode strips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hrisoho, A.; Truong, K.

    1979-10-01

    Low-cost linear chain for MWPC cathode strip charge read-out is described. Some simple relations for noise calculation of the preamplifier (which is a fast low-noise current amplifier) are given. Due to space restriction on the detector, hybrid technique for the preamplifier realization is adopted. The problem of transmission of linear signals (60 m) using twisted pairs, are discussed. 0.2% of cross-talk is achieved. Fast differential input line receiver with shortening filter is used in order to compensate the integration of the transmission line. The cross-talk and the noise pick-up are reduced by assuming a good symmetry and using charge sensing ADC for digitalization of the analog signal

  12. Electrochemical behavior of the antituberculosis drug isoniazid and its square-wave adsorptive stripping voltammetric estimation in bulk form, tablets and biological fluids at a mercury electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoneim, M M; el-Baradie, K Y; Tawfik, A

    2003-11-24

    Isoniazid, pyridine-4-carboxylic acid hydrazide, is an antituberculosis-agent, which is used to prevent the development of clinical tuberculosis. A validated square-wave adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetric procedure for the trace determination of the bulk drug at the hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) has been developed. Under the optimized conditions, (accumulation potential=-0.9 V, accumulation time=50-300 s, scan increment=8 mV, pulse-amplitude=25 mV, frequency=120 Hz and acetate buffer at pH 5.5) isoniazed generated two irreversible cathodic peaks. The first peak current showed a linear dependence with the drug concentration over the range 5 x 10(-10)-21 x 0(-6) M. The mean percentage recoveries, based on the average of five replicate measurements, for 7 x 10(-9) and 5 x 10(-8) M isoniazid were 97.71+/-2.93 and 99.76+/-0.77, respectively. The achieved limits of detection (LOD) and quantitation (LOQ) were 1.18 x 10(-10) and 3.93 x 10(-10) M isoniazid, respectively. The procedure was applied to the assay of the drug in tablets (Isocid and T.B. Zide), spiked human serum and urine with mean percentage recoveries of 97.81+/-1.49, 97.45+/-2.09, and 97.08+/-1.06, respectively. The limits of detection of 1.47 x 10(-9) and 2.4 x 10(-8) M, and quantitation of 4.9 x 10(-9) and 8 x 10(-8) M drug in human serum and urine, respectively, were achieved. The mean values of the various pharmackinetic parameters of isoniazid (C(max), T(max), t(1/2), AUC, and K(e)), estimated from analysis of plasma of two volunteers by means of the proposed procedure were similar to literature values.

  13. Solar UV-treatment of water samples for stripping-voltammetric determination of trace heavy metals in Awash river, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gelaneh Woldemichael

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available We report about testing a new mobile and sustainable water sample digestion method in a preliminary field trial in Ethiopia. In order to determine heavy metals at the ultra-trace level by stripping voltammetric techniques in water samples from Awash River, we applied our new method of solar UV-assisted sample pretreatment to destroy the relevant interfering dissolved organic matter. The field tests revealed that 24 h of solar UV irradiation were sufficient to achieve the same sample pretreatment results as with classic digestion method based on intense and hard UV. Analytical results of this study suggest that both a hydroelectric power station and agrichemical applications at Koka Lake have increased the levels of the investigated metals zinc, cadmium, lead, copper, cobalt, nickel, and uranium.

  14. Square-wave stripping voltammetric determination of caffeic acid on electrochemically reduced graphene oxide-Nafion composite film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filik, Hayati; Çetintaş, Gamze; Avan, Asiye Aslıhan; Aydar, Sevda; Koç, Serkan Naci; Boz, İsmail

    2013-11-15

    An electrochemical sensor composed of Nafion-graphene nanocomposite film for the voltammetric determination of caffeic acid (CA) was studied. A Nafion graphene oxide-modified glassy carbon electrode was fabricated by a simple drop-casting method and then graphene oxide was electrochemically reduced over the glassy carbon electrode. The electrochemical analysis method was based on the adsorption of caffeic acid on Nafion/ER-GO/GCE and then the oxidation of CA during the stripping step. The resulting electrode showed an excellent electrocatalytical response to the oxidation of caffeic acid (CA). The electrochemistry of caffeic acid on Nafion/ER-GO modified glassy carbon electrodes (GCEs) were studied by cyclic voltammetry and square-wave adsorption stripping voltammetry (SW-AdSV). At optimized test conditions, the calibration curve for CA showed two linear segments: the first linear segment increased from 0.1 to 1.5 and second linear segment increased up to 10 µM. The detection limit was determined as 9.1×10(-8) mol L(-1) using SW-AdSV. Finally, the proposed method was successfully used to determine CA in white wine samples. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Rapid, quantitative and sensitive immunochromatographic assay based on stripping voltammetric detection of a metal ion label

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Fang; Wang, Kaihua; Lin, Yuehe

    2005-10-10

    A novel, sensitive immunochromatographic electrochemical biosensor (IEB) which combines an immunochromatographic strip technique with an electrochemical detection technique is demonstrated. The IEB takes advantages of the speed and low-cost of the conventional immunochromatographic test kits and high-sensitivity of stripping voltammetry. Bismuth ions (Bi3+) have been coupled with the antibody through the bifunctional chelating agent diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid (DTPA). After immunoreactions, Bi3+ was released and quantified by anodic stripping voltammetry at a built-in single-use screen-printed electrode. As an example for the applications of such novel device, the detection of human chorionic gonadotronphin (HCG) in a specimen was performed. This biosensor provides a more user-friendly, rapid, clinically accurate, and less expensive immunoassay for such analysis in specimens than currently available test kits.

  16. Application of graphene for preconcentration and highly sensitive stripping voltammetric analysis of organophosphate pesticide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu Shuo, E-mail: wushuo@dlut.edu.cn [School of Chemistry, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China); Lan Xiaoqin; Cui Lijun; Zhang Lihui; Tao Shengyang; Wang Hainan; Han Mei; Liu Zhiguang; Meng Changgong [School of Chemistry, Dalian University of Technology, Dalian 116023 (China)

    2011-08-12

    Highlights: {yields} An electrochemical sensor is fabricated based on {beta}-CD dispersed graphene. {yields} The sensor could selectively detect organophosphate pesticide with high sensitivity. {yields} The {beta}-CD dispersed graphene owns large adsorption capacity for MP and superconductivity. {yields} The {beta}-CD dispersed graphene is superior to most of the porous sorbents ever known. - Abstract: Electrochemical reduced {beta}-cyclodextrin dispersed graphene ({beta}-CD-graphene) was developed as a sorbent for the preconcentration and electrochemical sensing of methyl parathion (MP), a representative nitroaromatic organophosphate pesticide with good redox activity. Benefited from the ultra-large surface area, large delocalized {pi}-electron system and the superconductivity of {beta}-CD-graphene, large amount of MP could be extracted on {beta}-CD-graphene modified electrode via strong {pi}-{pi} interaction and exhibited fast accumulation and electron transfer rate. Combined with differential pulse voltammetric analysis, the sensor shows ultra-high sensitivity, good selectivity and fast response. The limit of detection of 0.05 ppb is more than 10 times lower than those obtained from other sorbent based sensors. The method may open up a new possibility for the widespread use of electrochemical sensors for monitoring of ultra-trace OPs.

  17. Adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of nitroimidazole derivative on multiwalled carbon nanotube modified electrodes: influence of size and functionalization of nanotubes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jara-Ulloa, Paola; Canete-Rosales, Paulina; Nunez-Vergara, Luis J; Squella, Juan A., E-mail: asquella@ciq.uchile.c [University of Chile, Santiago (Chile). Chemical and Pharmaceutical Sciences Faculty. Bioelectrochemistry Lab.

    2011-07-01

    1-Methyl-4-nitro-2-bromine methylimidazole (4-NimMeBr), was electrochemically reduced on mercury, glassy carbon and multiwalled carbon nanotubes (MWCNT) modified electrodes. 4-NimMeBr was adsorbed on the MWCNT modified electrode thus permitting the implementation of an adsorptive stripping voltammetric (ASV) method. We have used 4-NimMeBr as a prototype electroactive nitro compound to study the effect of both the size of the nanotubes and its functionalization by oxidation. The oxidized MWCNT forms better dispersions than the non-oxidized, producing electrode surface with higher density of MWCNT as was determined by electrochemical mapping using scanning electrochemical microscopy (SECM). Under the optimized conditions, the peak current was proportional to the concentration of 4-NimMeBr in the range of 10{sup -6} mol L{sup -1} to 10{sup -4} mol L{sup -1} with detection and quantification limits of 4.41 x 10{sup -6} mol L{sup -1} and 6.21 x 10{sup -6} mol L{sup -1}, respectively. The sensibility of bare electrode was 0.01 {mu}A per mmol L{sup -1}, which was lower than the value of 5.34 and 6.97 mA per mmol L{sup -1} obtained using short and large oxidized MWCNT, respectively. (author)

  18. Anodic stripping voltammetric determination of heavy metals in solutions containing humic acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labuda, J.; Saur, D.; Neeb, R.

    1994-01-01

    Various simultaneous effects of humic acids on the current and potential of differential pulse anodic stripping peaks of copper, lead, cadmium and zinc in weakly alkaline and acidic (pH 2) solutions have been investigated and interpreted with regard to metal complexation and the adsorption of humic acid on the mercury electrode. The applicability of the standard additions method for metal quantitation and the experimental conditions for UV-photolysis with a high-pressure mercury lamp have been examined in model as well as real water samples. (orig.)

  19. The redox behaviour of diazepam (Valium®) using a disposable screen-printed sensor and its determination in drinks using a novel adsorptive stripping voltammetric assay.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honeychurch, Kevin C; Crew, Adrian; Northall, Hannah; Radbourne, Stuart; Davies, Owian; Newman, Sam; Hart, John P

    2013-11-15

    In this study we investigated the possibility of applying disposable electrochemical screen-printed carbon sensors for the rapid identification and quantitative determination of diazepam in beverages. This was achieved utilising a previously unreported oxidation peak. The origin of this peak was investigated further by cyclic voltammetry and gas chromatography/mass spectroscopy. At pH 6 the voltammetric behaviour of this oxidation process was found to involve adsorption of the drug allowing for the development of an adsorptive stripping voltammetric assay. Experimental conditions were then optimised for the determination of diazepam in a beverage sample using a medium exchange technique. It was shown that no elaborate extraction procedures were required as the calibration plots obtained in the absence and presence of the beverage were very similar. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Using of multi-walled carbon nanotubes electrode for adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of ultratrace levels of RDX explosive in the environmental samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Behzad; Damiri, Sajjad

    2010-11-15

    A study of the electrochemical behavior and determination of RDX, a high explosive, is described on a multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) using adsorptive stripping voltammetry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) techniques. The results indicated that MWCNTs electrode remarkably enhances the sensitivity of the voltammetric method and provides measurements of this explosive down to the sub-mg/l level in a wide pH range. The operational parameters were optimized and a sensitive, simple and time-saving cyclic voltammetric procedure was developed for the analysis of RDX in ground and tap water samples. Under optimized conditions, the reduction peak have two linear dynamic ranges of 0.6-20.0 and 8.0-200.0 mM with a detection limit of 25.0 nM and a precision of <4% (RSD for 8 analysis). Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Comparison of gap frame designs and materials for precision cathode strip chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, J.A.; Pratuch, S.M.; Belser, F.C.

    1993-01-01

    Precision cathode strip chamber perimeter designs that incorporate either continuous or discrete-post gap frames are analyzed. The effects of ten design and material combinations on gravity sag, mass, stress, and deflected shape are evaluated. Procedures are recommended for minimizing mass in the chamber perimeter region while retaining structural integrity and electrical design latitude

  2. A square-wave adsorptive stripping voltammetric method for the determination of Amaranth, a food additive dye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alghamdi, Ahmad H

    2005-01-01

    Square-wave adsorptive stripping voltammetric (AdSV) determinations of trace concentrations of the azo coloring agent Amaranth are described. The analytical methodology used was based on the adsorptive preconcentration of the dye on the hanging mercury drop electrode, followed by initiation of a negative sweep. In a pH 10 carbonate supporting electrolyte, Amaranth gave a well-defined and sensitive AdSV peak at -518 mV. The electroanalytical determination of this azo dye was found to be optimal in carbonate buffer (pH 10) under the following experimental conditions: accumulation time, 120 s; accumulation potential, 0.0 V; scan rate, 600 mV/s; pulse amplitude, 90 mV; and frequency, 50 Hz. Under these optimized conditions the AdSV peak current was proportional over the concentration range 1 x 10(-8)-1.1 x 10(-7) mol/L (r = 0.999) with a detection limit of 1.7 x 10(-9) mol/L (1.03 ppb). This analytical approach possessed enhanced sensitivity, compared with conventional liquid chromatography or spectrophotometry and it was simple and fast. The precision of the method, expressed as the relative standard deviation, was 0.23%, whereas the accuracy, expressed as the mean recovery, was 104%. Possible interferences by several substances usually present as food additive azo dyes (E110, E102), gelatin, natural and artificial sweeteners, preservatives, and antioxidants were also investigated. The developed electroanalyticals method was applied to the determination of Amaranth in soft drink samples, and the results were compared with those obtained by a reference spectrophotometric method. Statistical analysis (paired t-test) of these data showed that the results of the 2 methods compared favorably.

  3. Detection of mercury ions using L-cysteine modified electrodes by anodic stripping voltammetric method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanitha, M.; Balasubramanian, N.; Joni, I. Made; Panatarani, Camellia

    2018-02-01

    The detection of contaminants in wastewater is of massive importance in today's situation as they pose a serious threat to the environment as well as humans. One such vital contaminants is mercury and its compound, the reported mercury detectors grieve from low sensitivity, high cost and slow response. In the present work graphene based electrode material is developed for sensing mercury contaminants in wastewater using electrochemical technique. The synthesized material graphene oxide (GO) modified with L-Cysteine in presence of polyvinylpyrrolidone (PVP) as capping agent was characterized using SEM, TEM and Raman Spectroscopic analysis. It is ascertained from the morphological characterization that the nanocomposite exhibits a spherical morphology. The L-cysteine modified graphene oxide electrode is electrochemically characterized using redox couple [Fe(CN)63-/4-] and electrochemical impedance spectroscopic (EIS) analysis. Electrochemical sensing of Hg (II) ions in solution was done using Square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV). The incorporation of graphene significantly increases the sensitivity and selectivity towards mercury sensing.

  4. A novel tin-bismuth alloy electrode for anodic stripping voltammetric determination of zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pan, D.; Yin, T.; Qin, W.; Zhang, L.; Zhuang, J.

    2012-01-01

    We report on a novel tin-bismuth alloy electrode (SnBiE) for the determination of trace concentrations of zinc ions by square-wave anodic stripping voltammetry without deoxygenation. The SnBiE has the advantages of easy fabrication and low cost, and does not require a pre-treatment (in terms of modification) prior to measurements. A study on the potential window of the electrode revealed a high hydrogen overvoltage though a limited anodic range due to the oxidation of tin. The effects of pH value, accumulation potential, and accumulation time were optimized with respect to the determination of trace zinc(II) at pH 5. 0. The response of the SnBiE to zinc(II) ion is linear in the 0.5-25 μM concentration range. The detection limit is 50 nM (after 60 s of accumulation). The SnBiE was applied to the determination of zinc(II) in wines and honeys, and the results were consistent with those of AAS. (author)

  5. Study of fast operating readout electronics and charge interpolation technique for micro cathode strip chambers (MCSC)

    CERN Document Server

    Kashchuk, A; Sagidova, Nailia

    1998-01-01

    Study of the factors limiting the spatial resolution of the MCSC caused by nonlinearity of the cathode-charge interpolation technique has been carried out using a special test arrangement that imitates the charge distribution on the cathode strips as a real MCSC and allows high precision comparison of the coordinates determined by the charge interpolation technique with the known values. We considered a MCSC with a 0.6 mm gap between the anode and the cathode strip planes and with the strip pitch of 0.9 mm. Various charge interpolation algorithms have been tested. It was demonstrated that the systematics errors in the coordinate measurements as low as 5 microns can be achieved, after applying some simple corrections, even with rather coarse sampling, when the coordinates is determined only by 2 or 3 adjacent strips. These results have been obtained with the readout electronics specially designed for fast operation of the MCSCs with the signal peaking time of 20 ns. The equivalent noise charge ss 1600e (r.m.s....

  6. Monte Carlo studies on Cathode Strip/Pad Chambers for the ALICE Di-Muon Arm

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wurzinger, R.; Le Bornec, Y.; Willis, N.

    1996-04-01

    A general overview about the properties of Cathode Strip and Pad Chambers is given. Position finding methods are discussed and compared within Monte Carlo studies. Noise contributions and their minimization are discussed. Pad chambers allow a two-dimensional readout with spatial resolution of {sigma} < 100 {mu}m in direction parallel to the anode wire. The resolution normal to the anode wire depends mainly on the wire spacing. Special attention is paid on the double-hit resolution capability of the pad chamber. An outlook is given on the possible utilisation of Cathode Pad Chambers in the Di-Muon Arm of the ALICE detector at LHC. (author). 44 refs.

  7. Monolithic front-end ICs for interpolating cathode pad and strip detectors for GEM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    O'Connor, P.

    1993-05-01

    We are developing CMOS circuits for readout of interpolating cathode strip and pad chambers for the GEM experiment at the SSC. Because these detectors require position resolution of about 1% of the strip pitch, the electronic noise level must be less than 2000 electrons. Several test chips have been fabricated to demonstrate the feasibility of achieving the combination of low noise, speed, and wide dynamic range in CMOS. Results to date show satisfactory noise and linearity performance. Future development will concentrate on radiation-hardening the central tracker ASIC design, optimizing the shaper peaking time and noise contribution, providing more user-configurable output options, and packaging and test issues

  8. Arsenic speciation study using x ray fluorescence and cathodic stripping voltammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valcarcel, Lino; Montero, Alfredo; Estevez, Juan; Pupo, Ivan

    2006-01-01

    Two methods for the determination of total As concentration and its inorganic species by Energy Dispersive X Ray Fluorescence (EDXRF) and Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry (CSV) were developed. The effect of pH on As (III) recovery after precipitation with APDC and EDXRF measurement was studied. Quantification of As was done using the thin layer approach. A reduction of As(V) to As(III) with sodium thiosulphate was necessary in order to determine the total As concentration. The effect of the amount of reducing agent on the recovery was also studied. As(V) concentration was calculated by difference between total As and As(III) concentration. On the other hand, a polarographic method, using the cathodic stripping mode was implemented. As(III) deposition on the electrode was enhanced by addition of Se(IV). Factors affecting As determination (selenium concentration, deposition potential, deposition time) were studied

  9. Gravity sag of sandwich panel assemblies as applied to precision cathode strip chamber structural design

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horvath, J.

    1993-01-01

    The relationship between gravity sag of a precision cathode strip chamber and its sandwich panel structural design is explored parametrically. An algorithm for estimating the dominant component of gravity sag is defined. Graphs of normalized gravity sag as a function of gap frame width and material, sandwich core edge filler width and material, panel skin thickness, gap height, and support location are calculated using the gravity sag algorithm. The structural importance of the sandwich-to-sandwich ''gap frame'' connection is explained

  10. A New Segment Building Algorithm for the Cathode Strip Chambers in the CMS Experiment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golutvin I.

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A new segment building algorithm for the Cathode Strip Chambers in the CMS experiment is presented. A detailed description of the new algorithm is given along with a comparison with the algorithm used in the CMS software. The new segment builder was tested with different Monte-Carlo data samples. The new algorithm is meant to be robust and effective for hard muons and the higher luminosity that is expected in the future at the LHC.

  11. Timing characteristics of a two-dimensional multi-wire cathode strip detector for fission fragments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vind, R.P.; Joshi, B.N.; Jangale, R.V.; Inkar, A.L.; Prajapati, G.K.; John, B.V.; Biswas, D.C.

    2014-01-01

    In the recent past, a gas filled two-dimensional multi-wire cathode strip detector (MCSD) was developed for the detection of fission fragments (FFs). The position resolution was found to be about 1.0 and 1.5 mm in X and Y directions respectively. The detector has three electrode planes consisting of cathode strip (X-plane), anode wires and split-cathode wires (Y-plane). Each thin wire of the anode plane placed between the two cathode planes is essentially independent and behaves like a proportional counter. The construction of the detector in detail has been given in our earlier paper. The position information has been obtained by employing high impedance discrete delay line read out method for extracting position information in X and Y-directions. In this work, the timing characteristics of MCSD detector are reported to explore the possible use of this detector for the measurement of the mass of the fission fragments produced in heavy ion induced fission reactions

  12. Anodic stripping voltammetric determination of traces of Pb(II) and Cd(II) using a glassy carbon electrode modified with bismuth nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Die; Wang, Liang; Chen, Zuliang; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    We report on a glassy carbon electrode modified with bismuth nanoparticles (NanoBiE) for the simultaneous determination Pb 2+ and Cd 2+ by anodic stripping voltammetry. Operational parameters such as bismuth nanoparticles labelling amount, deposition potential, deposition time and stripping parameters were optimized with respect to the determination of Pb 2+ and Cd 2+ in 0.1 M acetate buffer solution (pH 4.5). The NanoBiE gives well-defined, reproducible and sharp stripping peaks. The peak current response increases linearly with the metal concentration in a range of 5.0–60.0 μg L −1 , with a detection limit of 0.8 and 0.4 μg L −1 for Pb 2+ and Cd 2+ , respectively. The morphology and composition of the modified electrode before and after voltammetric measurements were analysed by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. The NanoBiE was successfully applied to analysis of Pb 2+ and Cd 2+ in real water samples and the method was validated by ICP-MS technique, suggesting that the electrode can be considered as an interesting alternative to the bismuth film electrode for possible use in electrochemical studies and electro analysis. (author)

  13. Voltammetric method to determine chromium (III) in potable water at level of ultra plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jimenez B, Irene; Alvarado G, Ana L.

    2004-01-01

    It was established an analytical methodology to determine Cr (III) in drinking water using a voltammetric technique of Differential Pulse Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry with an Adsorptive Preconcentration of a complex Cr(III)-diethiltriaminpentaceticacid (Cr-DTPA) in a mercury drop. A dissolution of sodium nitrate was used as a supporting electrolyte. The optimized voltammetric parameters were: adsorption time, scan rate, absorption potential, p H, complex agent and sodium nitrate concentration. The linear range of the methodology is between 20 ng/L and 60 ng/L and the detection and quantification limits are 13 ng/L and 20 ng/L respectively. (Author) [es

  14. Expert System for the LHC CMS Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) detector

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rapsevicius, Valdas, E-mail: valdas.rapsevicius@cern.ch [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States); Vilnius University, Didlaukio g. 47-325, LT-08303 Vilnius (Lithuania); Juska, Evaldas, E-mail: evaldas.juska@cern.ch [Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, Batavia, IL (United States)

    2014-02-21

    Modern High Energy Physics experiments are of high demand for a generic and consolidated solution to integrate and process high frequency data streams by applying experts' knowledge and inventory configurations. In this paper we present the Expert System application that was built for the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) detector at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) aiming to support the detector operations and to provide integrated monitoring. The main building blocks are the integration platform, rule-based complex event processing engine, ontology-based knowledge base, persistent storage and user interfaces for results and control.

  15. Copper-based electrochemical sensor with palladium electrode for cathodic stripping voltammetry of manganese.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Wenjing; Pei, Xing; Bange, Adam; Haynes, Erin N; Heineman, William R; Papautsky, Ian

    2014-12-16

    In this work, we report on the development of a palladium-based, microfabricated point-of-care electrochemical sensor for the determination of manganese using square wave cathodic stripping voltammetry. Heavy metals require careful monitoring, yet current methods are too complex for a point-of-care system. Voltammetry offers an attractive approach to metal detection on the microscale, but traditional carbon, gold, or platinum electrodes are difficult or expensive to microfabricate, preventing widespread use. Our sensor uses palladium working and auxiliary electrodes and integrates them with a copper-based reference electrode for simple fabrication and compatibility with microfabrication and printed circuit board processing, while maintaining competitive performance in electrochemical detection. Copper electrodes were prepared on glass substrate using a combination of microfabrication procedures followed by electrodeposition of palladium. The disposable sensor system was formed by bonding a poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) well to the glass substrate. Cathodic stripping voltammetry of manganese using our new disposable palladium-based sensors exhibited 334 nM (18.3 ppb) limit of detection in borate buffer. The sensor was used to demonstrate manganese determination in natural water samples from a pond in Burnet Woods, located in Cincinnati, OH, and the Ohio River.

  16. Completion of cathode strip chamber (CSC) installation on the so-called YE+2 wheel of CMS on March 2005.

    CERN Multimedia

    Tejinder S. Virdee

    2005-01-01

    The pictures have been taken in the CMS construction hall in Cessy (neighbouring France), called SX5, in March 2005 and show the status of cathode strip chamber (CSC) assembly on the yoke disk YE+2. The chambers are labelled ME+3 and their installation has been completed on March 16th, 2005.

  17. Stripping voltammetric determination of palladium, platinum and rhodium in freshwater and sediment samples from South African water resources

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Van der Horst, C

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Stripping voltammetry as technique has proved to be very useful in the analysis of heavy and other metal ions due to its excellent detection limits and its sensitivity in the presence of different metal species or interfering ions. Recent...

  18. Direct determination of molybdenum in seawater by adsorption cathodic stripping square-wave voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y C; Mierzwa, J; Lan, C R

    2000-06-30

    A reliable and very sensitive procedure for the determination of trace levels of molybdenum in seawater is proposed. The complex of molybdenum with 8-hydroxyquinoline (Oxine) is analyzed by cathodic stripping square-wave voltammetry based on the adsorption collection onto a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE). This procedure of molybdenum determination was found to be more favorable than differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry because of inherently faster scan rate and much better linearity obtained through the one-peak (instead of one-of-two peaks) calibration. The variation of polarographic peak and peak current with a pH, adsorption time, adsorption potential, and some instrumental parameters such as scan rate and pulse height were optimized. The alteration of polarographic wave and its likely mechanism are also discussed. The relationship between peak current and molybdenum concentration is linear up to 150 mug l(-1). Under the optimal analytical conditions, the determination limit of 0.5 mug l(-1) Mo was reached after 60 s of the stirred collection. The estimated detection limit is better than 0.1 mug l(-1) of Mo. The applicability of this method to analysis of seawater was assessed by the determination of molybdenum in two certified reference seawater samples (CASS-2 and NASS-2) and the comparison of the analytical results for real seawater samples (study on a vertical distribution of Mo in the seawater column) with the results obtained by Zeeman-corrected electrothermal atomization atomic absorption spectrometry (Zeeman ETAAS). A good agreement between two used methods of molybdenum determination was obtained.

  19. Increased sensitivity of anodic stripping voltammetry at the hanging mercury drop electrode by ultracathodic deposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, José A; Rodrigues, Carlos M; Almeida, Paulo J; Valente, Inês M; Gonçalves, Luís M; Compton, Richard G; Barros, Aquiles A

    2011-09-09

    An improved approach to the anodic stripping voltammetric (ASV) determination of heavy metals, using the hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE), is reported. It was discovered that using very cathodic accumulation potentials, at which the solvent reduction occurs (overpotential deposition), the voltammetric signals of zinc(II), cadmium(II), lead(II) and copper(II) increase. When compared with the classical methodology a 5 to 10-fold signal increase is obtained. This effect is likely due to both mercury drop oscillation at such cathodic potentials and added local convection at the mercury drop surface caused by the evolution of hydrogen bubbles. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Stripping analysis of nanomolar perchlorate in drinking water with a voltammetric ion-selective electrode based on thin-layer liquid membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yushin; Amemiya, Shigeru

    2008-08-01

    A highly sensitive analytical method is required for the assessment of nanomolar perchlorate contamination in drinking water as an emerging environmental problem. We developed the novel approach based on a voltammetric ion-selective electrode to enable the electrochemical detection of "redox-inactive" perchlorate at a nanomolar level without its electrolysis. The perchlorate-selective electrode is based on the submicrometer-thick plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) membrane spin-coated on the poly(3-octylthiophene)-modified gold electrode. The liquid membrane serves as the first thin-layer cell for ion-transfer stripping voltammetry to give low detection limits of 0.2-0.5 nM perchlorate in deionized water, commercial bottled water, and tap water under a rotating electrode configuration. The detection limits are not only much lower than the action limit (approximately 246 nM) set by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency but also are comparable to the detection limits of the most sensitive analytical methods for detecting perchlorate, that is, ion chromatography coupled with a suppressed conductivity detector (0.55 nM) or electrospray ionization mass spectrometry (0.20-0.25 nM). The mass transfer of perchlorate in the thin-layer liquid membrane and aqueous sample as well as its transfer at the interface between the two phases were studied experimentally and theoretically to achieve the low detection limits. The advantages of ion-transfer stripping voltammetry with a thin-layer liquid membrane against traditional ion-selective potentiometry are demonstrated in terms of a detection limit, a response time, and selectivity.

  1. An environmental friendly electrode and extended cathodic potential window for anodic stripping voltammetry of zinc detection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dueraning, Anisah; Kanatharana, Proespichaya; Thavarungkul, Panote; Limbut, Warakorn

    2016-01-01

    This work reports on a novel polyeriochrome black T (poly(EBT) modified electrode for use as an environmentally-friendly electrode material that extends the cathodic potential window and improves the sensitivity and repeatability to detect zinc in industrial wastewater. The poly(EBT) film on the GCE surface was fabricated by electropolymerization. The surface morphology and electrochemical behavior of the modified electrode were characterized by scanning electron microscopy, fourier transform infrared spectroscopy and anodic stripping voltammetry. Under optimal conditions, the poly(EBT)/GCE exhibited a high hydrogen overvoltage (extended cathodic potential window). It provided a high sensitivity, a wide linear range (1.0 to 400.0 μg L −1 ), a low detection limit (0.9 μg L −1 ), had excellent repeatability and good recoveries (95% to 105%). This proposed modified electrode was applied to the determination of zinc in wastewater samples, and the results were consistent with those of an inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectroscopy analysis.

  2. Anode front-end electronics for the cathode strip chambers of the CMS Endcap Muon detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, T.; Bondar, N.; Golyash, A.; Sedov, V.; Terentiev, N.; Vorobiev, I.

    2005-01-01

    The front-end electronics system for the anode signals of the CMS Endcap Muon cathode strip chambers has about 183,000 channels. The purposes of the anode front-end electronics are to acquire precise muon timing information for bunch crossing number identification at the Level-1 muon trigger system and to provide a coarse radial position of the muon track. Each anode channel consists of an input protection network, amplifier, shaper, constant-fraction discriminator, and a programmable delay. The essential parts of the electronics include a 16-channel amplifier-shaper-discriminator ASIC CMP16 and a 16-channel ASIC D16G providing programmable time delay. The ASIC CMP16 was optimized for the large cathode chamber size (up to 3x2.5 m 2 ) and for the large input capacitance (up to 200 pF). The ASIC combines low power consumption (30 mW/channel) with good time resolution (2-3 ns). The delay ASIC D16G makes possible the alignment of signals with an accuracy of 2.2 ns. This paper presents the anode front-end electronics structure and results of the preproduction and the mass production tests, including radiation resistance and reliability tests. The special set of test equipment, techniques, and corresponding software developed and used in the test procedures are also described

  3. Anodic stripping voltammetric determination of mercury using multi-walled carbon nanotubes film coated glassy carbon electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Hongchao [Department of Environmental Engineering, Hubei Agriculture College, 434103, Jingzhou (China)

    2003-10-01

    An electrochemical method for the determination of trace levels of mercury based on a multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWNT) film coated glassy carbon electrode (GCE) is described. In 0.1 mol L{sup -1} HCl solution containing 0.02 mol L{sup -1} KI, Hg{sup 2+} was firstly preconcentrated at the MWNT film and then reduced at -0.60 V. During the anodic potential sweep, reduced mercury was oxidized, and then a sensitive and well-defined stripping peak at about -0.20 V appeared. Under identical conditions, a MWNT film coated GCE greatly enhances the stripping peak current of mercury in contrast to a bare GCE. Low concentrations of I{sup -} remarkably improve the determining sensitivity, since this increases the accumulation efficiency of Hg{sup 2+} at the MWNT film coated GCE. The stripping peak current is proportional to the concentration of Hg{sup 2+} over the range 8 x 10{sup -10}-5 x 10{sup -7} mol L{sup -1}. The lowest detectable concentration of Hg{sup 2+} is 2 x 10{sup -10} mol L{sup -1} at 5 min accumulation. The relative standard deviation (RSD) at 1 x 10{sup -8} mol L{sup -1} Hg{sup 2+} was about 6% (n=10). By using this proposed method, Hg{sup 2+} in some water samples was determined, and the results were compared with those obtained by atomic absorption spectrometry (AAS). The two results are similar, suggesting that the MWNT-film coated GCE has great potential in practical analysis. (orig.)

  4. Use of hydrogen peroxide to achieve interference-free stripping voltammetric determination of copper at the bismuth-film electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacheco, Wagner F.; Miguel, Eliane M.; Ramos, Gabriel V.; Cardoso, Carlos E.; Farias, Percio A.M.; Aucelio, Ricardo Q.

    2008-01-01

    In this work, a new approach is presented to allow interference-free determination of Cu (II) by stripping voltammetry using the bismuth-film electrode. The addition of hydrogen peroxide to the electroanalytical cell has promoted complete resolution between re-dissolution peaks of Bi (III) and Cu (II). The absence of interference could be evaluated by the correlation coefficient (r > 0.99) between Cu (II) concentration and its shifted current peak (at +212 mV) while achieving a slightly fluctuation of the bismuth current peak at -180 mV. Studies were performed aiming towards the optimum conditions for trace determination of Cu (II) using hydrogen peroxide. The methodology was applied to a real sample (sugarcane spirits) and the results were compared to those from graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry. The analytical parameters of merit and the results of the analysis indicated that the analytical methodology could be readily used for trace determination of Cu (II)

  5. Simultaneous determination of copper, lead and cadmium by cathodic adsorptive stripping voltammetry using artificial neural network

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ensafi, Ali A.; Khayamian, T.; Benvidi, A.; Mirmomtaz, E.

    2006-01-01

    In this work, simultaneous determination of two groups of elements consisting of Pb(II)-Cd(II) and Cu(II)-Pb(II)-Cd(II) using adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry are described. The method is based on accumulation of these metal ions on mercury electrode using xylenol orange as a suitable complexing agent. The potential was scanned to the negative direction and the differential pulse stripping voltammograms were recorded. The instrumental and chemical factors were optimized using artificial neural network. The optimized conditions were obtained in pH of 5.5, xylenol orange concentration of 4.0 μM, accumulation potential of -0.50 V, accumulation time of 30 s, scan rate of 10 mV/s and pulse height of 70 mV. The relationship between the peak current versus concentration was linear over the range of 5.0-150.0 ng ml -1 for cadmium and 5.0-150.0 ng ml -1 for lead. The limits of detection were 0.98 and 1.18 ng ml -1 for lead and cadmium ions, respectively. In simultaneous determination of Cu(II), Pb(II) and Cd(II) there are inter-metallic interactions, which result a non-linear relationship between the peak current and the ionic concentration for each of the element. Therefore, an artificial neural network was used as the multivariate calibration method. The ANN was constructed with three neurons as the output layer for the simultaneous determination of the three elements. The constructed model was able to predict the concentration of the elements in the ranges of 1.0-50.0, 5.0-200.0 and 10.0-200.0 ng ml -1 , for Cu(II), Pb(II) and Cd(II), respectively

  6. Voltammetric detection of antimony in natural water on cathodically pretreated microcrystalline boron doped diamond electrode: A possibility how to eliminate interference of arsenic without surface modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukáčová-Chomisteková, Zuzana; Culková, Eva; Bellová, Renata; Melicherčíková, Danica; Durdiak, Jaroslav; Beinrohr, Ernest; Rievaj, Miroslav; Tomčík, Peter

    2018-02-01

    Very simple and fast electroanalytical method for the detection Sb(III) on chemically unmodified boron-doped diamond electrode (BDDE) has been developed. Voltammetric behavior of antimony was investigated in various acidic supporting electrolytes and the most suitable medium for the determination of Sb(III) on bare BDDE has been 6molL -1 HClO 4 solution. The analytical performance was studied with differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) with optimized conditions (deposition potential -1V vs. Ag/ AgCl and deposition time 240s). An analysis of possible effects due to the presence of other metal ions (especially As(III)) in the solution was eliminated using NaH 2 PO 4 as supporting electrolyte with addition EDTA as selective complexing agent for Sb(III). Speciation of antimony was also investigated. The detection limit of this analytical strategy achieved value of 1.08 × 10 -7 molL -1 . The proposed method was validated and applied for natural water from former antimony mines as real samples. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Upgrade of the cathode strip chamber level 1 trigger optical links at CMS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ecklund, K; Liu, J; Matveev, M; Padley, P; Madorsky, A

    2012-01-01

    At the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN, the CMS experiment's Level 1 Trigger system for the endcap Cathode Strip Chambers (CSC) has 180 optical links to transmit Level 1 trigger primitives from 60 peripheral crates to the CSC Track Finder (CSCTF) which reconstructs muon candidates. Currently there is a limit of 3 trigger primitives per crate serving a cluster of 9 chambers. With the anticipated LHC luminosity increase up to 10 35 cm −2 s −1 at full energy of 7 TeV/beam the Muon Port Card (MPC), which transmits the primitives, the receiver in the CSCTF (Sector Processor) and the optical transmission system itself need to be upgraded. At the same time it is very desirable to preserve all the old optical links intact for compatibility with the present Track Finder during transition period. We present here the results of our efforts in the past two years to upgrade the MPC board, including the hardware developments, data transmission tests and latency measurements.

  8. Monitoring of labile copper and zinc in estuarine waters using cathodic stripping chronopotentiometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Berg, C.M.G.

    1991-01-01

    Cathodic stripping chronopotentiometry (CSC) is readily suitable for automation, and sensitivity is often not affected by variations in major ion concentration (salinity) or by the dissolved concentration of oxygen. So this technique is very suitable for automated monitoring of certain trace elements in natural waters, including estuarine waters. The suitability of CSC for monitoring is demonstrated by measuring the concentrations of copper and zinc in the Tamar estuary in-line and automatically. The measuring rate was approximately 90h -1 . The concentrations of zinc and copper in the Tamar estuary were shown to behave in agreement with the findings of previous studies; the labile metal concentrations increased in the turbidity maximum and decreased immediately after it (at higher salinities) as a result of particle scavenging; gradual increase was apparent at intermediate salinities as result of pore-water injection, and the metal concentrations followed a dilution pattern with seawater at high salinities. In-line measurements provided a detailed picture of metal behaviour in this estuary and elucidated local inputs. The sensitivity (down to approximately 5 nM Cu and 6 nM Zn) allows monitoring of copper and zinc at levels common in estuarine and coastal waters, but is insufficient to monitor these metals in uncontaminated seawater. (author). 22 refs.; 4 figs

  9. Determination of Selenium in infant formula by differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    "Oveisi MR

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Selenium as a nonmetallic chemical element has received high attention of biologists because of its dual role as an essential trace nutrient and a toxic element. This interest has created a need for reliable analytical methods for determination of selenium. In this investigation determination of selenium by differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry and the influence of various parameters such as deposition potentials, deposition time. Cu concentration pH, etc. on selenium peak in voltammogram are described. Determination of selenium was accomplished in mixture of acetic acid, hydrochloric acid and sodium chloride buffer (pH=1 with a scan rate of 60 mv/s and a pulse height of 100 my by hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE as working electrode. The solution was stirred during pre-electrolysis at - 350 mv (vs SCE for 30 s and the potential was scanned between - 350 mv and - 800 mv. The determination limit of the method was 0.005 mg/kg for the sample. The calibration curves were linear in the range of 0-30 μg/L (R2=0.996, p<0.001. Repeatability of the method at concentrations of 30 and 0.5 μg/L were 2.5 and 10.5% respectively.

  10. Adsorptive stripping differential pulse voltammetric determination of venlafaxine and desvenlafaxine employing Nafion-carbon nanotube composite glassy carbon electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanghavi, Bankim J. [Department of Chemistry, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari, Santacruz (East), Mumbai 400 098, Maharashtra (India); Srivastava, Ashwini K., E-mail: aksrivastava@chem.mu.ac.i [Department of Chemistry, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari, Santacruz (East), Mumbai 400 098, Maharashtra (India)

    2011-04-15

    A Nafion-carbon nanotube-modified glassy carbon electrode (NAF-CNT-GCE) was developed for the determination of venlafaxine (VF) and desvenlafaxine (DVF). The electrochemical behavior of both these molecules was investigated employing cyclic voltammetry (CV), chronocoulometry (CC), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and adsorptive stripping differential pulse voltammetry (AdSDPV). The surface morphology of the electrodes has been studied by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM). These studies revealed that the oxidation of VF and DVF is facilitated at NAF-CNT-GCE. After optimization of analytical conditions employing this electrode at pH 7.0 in Britton-Robinson buffer (0.05 M) for VF and pH 5.0 in acetate buffer (0.1 M) for DVF, the peak currents for both the molecules were found to vary linearly with their concentrations in the range of 3.81 x 10{sup -8}-6.22 x 10{sup -5} M for VF and 5.33 x 10{sup -8}-3.58 x 10{sup -5} M for DVF. The detection limits (S/N = 3) of 1.24 x 10{sup -8} and 2.11 x 10{sup -8} M were obtained for VF and DVF, respectively, using AdSDPV. The prepared modified electrode showed several advantages, such as simple preparation method, high sensitivity, very low detection limits and excellent reproducibility. The proposed method was employed for the determination of VF and DVF in pharmaceutical formulations, urine and blood serum samples.

  11. Cathodic adsorptive stripping voltammetry of an anti-emetic agent Granisetron in pharmaceutical formulation and biological matrix

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Jain

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Granisetron showed one well-defined reduction peak at Hanging Mercury Drop Electrode (HMDE in the potential range from −1.3 to −1.5 V due to reduction of C=N bond. Solid-phase extraction technique was employed for extraction of Granisetron from spiked human plasma. Granisetron showed peak current enhancement of 4.45% at square-wave voltammetry and 5.33% at cyclic voltammetry as compared with the non stripping techniques. The proposed voltammetric method allowed quantification of Granisetron in pharmaceutical formulation over the target concentration range of 50–200 ng/mL with detection limit 13.63 ng/mL, whereas in human plasma 50–225 ng/mL with detection limit 11.75 ng/mL. Keywords: Granisetron, Human plasma, Solid-phase extraction, Pharmaceutical formulation, Voltammetry, Hanging mercury drop electrode

  12. Facile stripping voltammetric determination of haloperidol using a high performance magnetite/carbon nanotube paste electrode in pharmaceutical and biological samples

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bagheri, Hasan, E-mail: h.bagheri@srbiau.ac.ir [Chemical Injuries Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Afkhami, Abbas [Faculty of Chemistry, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Panahi, Yunes [Chemical Injuries Research Center, Baqiyatallah University of Medical Sciences, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khoshsafar, Hosein; Shirzadmehr, Ali [Faculty of Chemistry, Bu-Ali Sina University, Hamedan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-04-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes decorated with Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles were prepared to construct a novel sensor for the determination of haloperidol (Hp) by voltammetric methods. The morphology and properties of electrode surface were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. This modified sensor was used as a selective electrochemical sensor for the determination of trace amounts of Hp. The peak currents of differential pulse and square wave voltammograms of Hp increased linearly with its concentration in the ranges of 1.2 × 10{sup −3}–0.52 and 6.5 × 10{sup −4}–0.52 μmol L{sup −1}, respectively. The detection limits for Hp were 7.02 × 10{sup −4} and 1.33 × 10{sup −4} μmol L{sup −1} for differential pulse and square wave voltammetric methods, respectively. The results show that the combination of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4} nanoparticles causes a dramatic enhancement in the sensitivity of Hp quantification. This sensor was successfully applied to determine Hp in pharmaceutical samples and biological fluids. The fabricated electrode showed excellent reproducibility, repeatability and stability. - Highlights: • A sensitive paste using Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/multi-walled carbon nanotubes was fabricated. • Haloperidol determination is based on its adsorption on the surface of Fe{sub 3}O{sub 4}/MWCNTs. • Different electrochemical methods and impedance spectroscopy were used for this study. • Haloperidol was determined in pharmaceutical and biological samples. • In comparison to other conventional methods, this method is simple, rapid, selective and cost-effective.

  13. Facile stripping voltammetric determination of haloperidol using a high performance magnetite/carbon nanotube paste electrode in pharmaceutical and biological samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bagheri, Hasan; Afkhami, Abbas; Panahi, Yunes; Khoshsafar, Hosein; Shirzadmehr, Ali

    2014-01-01

    Multi-walled carbon nanotubes decorated with Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles were prepared to construct a novel sensor for the determination of haloperidol (Hp) by voltammetric methods. The morphology and properties of electrode surface were characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. This modified sensor was used as a selective electrochemical sensor for the determination of trace amounts of Hp. The peak currents of differential pulse and square wave voltammograms of Hp increased linearly with its concentration in the ranges of 1.2 × 10 −3 –0.52 and 6.5 × 10 −4 –0.52 μmol L −1 , respectively. The detection limits for Hp were 7.02 × 10 −4 and 1.33 × 10 −4 μmol L −1 for differential pulse and square wave voltammetric methods, respectively. The results show that the combination of multi-walled carbon nanotubes and Fe 3 O 4 nanoparticles causes a dramatic enhancement in the sensitivity of Hp quantification. This sensor was successfully applied to determine Hp in pharmaceutical samples and biological fluids. The fabricated electrode showed excellent reproducibility, repeatability and stability. - Highlights: • A sensitive paste using Fe 3 O 4 /multi-walled carbon nanotubes was fabricated. • Haloperidol determination is based on its adsorption on the surface of Fe 3 O 4 /MWCNTs. • Different electrochemical methods and impedance spectroscopy were used for this study. • Haloperidol was determined in pharmaceutical and biological samples. • In comparison to other conventional methods, this method is simple, rapid, selective and cost-effective

  14. Depletive stripping chronopotentiometry : a major step forward in electrochemical stripping techniques for metal ion speciation analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Town, R.M.; Leeuwen, van H.P.

    2004-01-01

    A comparative evaluation of the utility of the various modes of stripping chronopotentiometry (SCP) for trace metal speciation analysis is presented in the broad context of stripping voltammetric techniques. The remarkable fundamental advantages of depletive SCP at scanned deposition potential

  15. Voltammetric behaviour at gold electrodes immersed in the BCR sequential extraction scheme media Application of underpotential deposition-stripping voltammetry to determination of copper in soil extracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beni, Valerio; Newton, Hazel V.; Arrigan, Damien W.M.; Hill, Martin; Lane, William A.; Mathewson, Alan

    2004-01-30

    The development of mercury-free electroanalytical systems for in-field analysis of pollutants requires a foundation on the electrochemical behaviour of the chosen electrode material in the target sample matrices. In this work, the behaviour of gold working electrodes in the media employed in the BCR sequential extraction protocol, for the fractionation of metals in solid environmental matrices, is reported. All three of the BCR sequential extraction media are redox active, on the basis of acidity and oxygen content as well as the inherent reducing or oxidising nature of some of the reagents employed: 0.11 M acetic acid, 0.1 M hydroxylammonium chloride (adjusted to pH 2) and 1 M ammonium acetate (adjusted to pH 2) with added trace hydrogen peroxide. The available potential ranges together with the demonstrated detection of target metals in these media are presented. Stripping voltammetry of copper or lead in the BCR extract media solutions reveal a multi-peak behaviour due to the stripping of both bulk metal and underpotential metal deposits. A procedure based on underpotential deposition-stripping voltammetry (UPD-SV) was evaluated for application to determination of copper in 0.11 M acetic acid soil extracts. A preliminary screening step in which different deposition times are applied to the sample enables a deposition time commensurate with UPD-SV to be selected so that no bulk deposition or stripping occurs thus simplifying the shape and features of the resulting voltammograms. Choice of the suitable deposition time is then followed by standards addition calibration. The method was validated by the analysis of a number of BCR 0.11 M acetic acid soil extracts. Good agreement was obtained been the UPD-SV method and atomic spectroscopic results.

  16. Voltammetric behaviour at gold electrodes immersed in the BCR sequential extraction scheme media Application of underpotential deposition-stripping voltammetry to determination of copper in soil extracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Beni, Valerio; Newton, Hazel V.; Arrigan, Damien W.M.; Hill, Martin; Lane, William A.; Mathewson, Alan

    2004-01-01

    The development of mercury-free electroanalytical systems for in-field analysis of pollutants requires a foundation on the electrochemical behaviour of the chosen electrode material in the target sample matrices. In this work, the behaviour of gold working electrodes in the media employed in the BCR sequential extraction protocol, for the fractionation of metals in solid environmental matrices, is reported. All three of the BCR sequential extraction media are redox active, on the basis of acidity and oxygen content as well as the inherent reducing or oxidising nature of some of the reagents employed: 0.11 M acetic acid, 0.1 M hydroxylammonium chloride (adjusted to pH 2) and 1 M ammonium acetate (adjusted to pH 2) with added trace hydrogen peroxide. The available potential ranges together with the demonstrated detection of target metals in these media are presented. Stripping voltammetry of copper or lead in the BCR extract media solutions reveal a multi-peak behaviour due to the stripping of both bulk metal and underpotential metal deposits. A procedure based on underpotential deposition-stripping voltammetry (UPD-SV) was evaluated for application to determination of copper in 0.11 M acetic acid soil extracts. A preliminary screening step in which different deposition times are applied to the sample enables a deposition time commensurate with UPD-SV to be selected so that no bulk deposition or stripping occurs thus simplifying the shape and features of the resulting voltammograms. Choice of the suitable deposition time is then followed by standards addition calibration. The method was validated by the analysis of a number of BCR 0.11 M acetic acid soil extracts. Good agreement was obtained been the UPD-SV method and atomic spectroscopic results

  17. Increased sensitivity of anodic stripping voltammetry at the hanging mercury drop electrode by ultracathodic deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodrigues, Jose A.; Rodrigues, Carlos M.; Almeida, Paulo J.; Valente, Ines M.; Goncalves, Luis M. [Requimte - Departamento de Quimica e Bioquimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, no. 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal); Compton, Richard G. [Department of Chemistry, Physical and Theoretical Chemistry Laboratory, Oxford University, South Parks Road, Oxford OX1 3QZ (United Kingdom); Barros, Aquiles A., E-mail: ajbarros@fc.up.pt [Requimte - Departamento de Quimica e Bioquimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade do Porto, Rua do Campo Alegre, no. 687, 4169-007 Porto (Portugal)

    2011-09-09

    Highlights: {yields} At very cathodic accumulation potentials (overpotential deposition) the voltammetric signals of Zn{sup 2+}, Cd{sup 2+}, Pb{sup 2+} and Cu{sup 2+} increase. {yields} 5 to 10-fold signal increase is obtained. {yields} This effect is likely due to mercury drop oscillation at such cathodic potentials. {yields} This effect is also likely due to added local convection at the mercury drop surface caused by the evolution of hydrogen bubbles. - Abstract: An improved approach to the anodic stripping voltammetric (ASV) determination of heavy metals, using the hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE), is reported. It was discovered that using very cathodic accumulation potentials, at which the solvent reduction occurs (overpotential deposition), the voltammetric signals of zinc(II), cadmium(II), lead(II) and copper(II) increase. When compared with the classical methodology a 5 to 10-fold signal increase is obtained. This effect is likely due to both mercury drop oscillation at such cathodic potentials and added local convection at the mercury drop surface caused by the evolution of hydrogen bubbles.

  18. Stripping Voltammetric Determination Of Zinc, Cadmium, Lead And Copper In Blood Samples Of Children Aged Between 3 Months And 6 years

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rakesh Kumar Mahajan

    2005-05-01

    Full Text Available Blood samples of 160 children, ranging age between 3 months and 6 years were selected from five different parts of Amritsar district of Punjab (India and were analyzed for Zn, Cd, Pb and Cu using anodic stripping voltammetry. Large variations in the results have been correlated to the area inhabited, age differences and other factors. It was found that the areas, more prone to environmental stress, had shown more quantities of these metals in blood samples in comparison to those which were taken from safer sites. Similarly the younger children lesser exposed to environmental pollution had shown comparatively lesser quantity of these metals in comparison to older objects.

  19. Li2S/Carbon Nanocomposite Strips from a Low-Temperature Conversion of Li2SO4 as High-Performance Lithium-Sulfur Cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Fangmin; Noh, Hyungjun; Lee, Jin Hong; Lee, Hongkyung; Kim, Hee-Tak

    2018-03-12

    Carbothermal conversion of Li2SO4 provides a cost-effective strategy to fabricate high-capacity Li2S cathodes, however, Li2S cathodes derived from Li2SO4 at high temperatures (> 800 oC), having high crystallinity and large crystal size, result in a low utilization of Li2S. Here, we report a Li2SO4/poly(vinyl alcohol)-derived Li2S/Carbon nanocomposite (Li2S@C) strips at a record low temperature of 635 oC. These Li2S@C nanocomposite strips as a cathode shows a low initial activation potential (2.63 V), a high initial discharge capacity (805 mAh g-1 Li2S) and a high cycling stability (0.2 C and 1 C). These improvedresults could be ascribed to the nano-sized Li2S particles as well as their low crystallinity due to the PVA-induced carbon network and the low conversion temperature, respectively. An XPS analysis reveals that the C=C and C=O bonds derived from the carbonization of PVA can promote the conversion of Li2SO4 at the low temperature.

  20. Determination of mobile form contents of Zn, Cd, Pb and Cu in soil extracts by combined stripping voltammetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nedeltcheva, T. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8 Kl. Ohridsi Blvd., 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria)]. E-mail: nedel@uctm.edu; Atanassova, M. [Department of Analytical Chemistry, University of Chemical Technology and Metallurgy, 8 Kl. Ohridsi Blvd., 1756 Sofia (Bulgaria); Dimitrov, J. [N. Pushkarov Institute of Soil Science and Agroecology, 7 Shosse Bankya St., 1080 Sofia (Bulgaria); Stanislavova, L. [N. Pushkarov Institute of Soil Science and Agroecology, 7 Shosse Bankya St., 1080 Sofia (Bulgaria)

    2005-01-10

    The amount of mobile forms of Zn, Pb, Cd and Cu in extracts obtained by treating soil samples with ammonium nitrate were determined by an appropriate combination of anodic and cathodic stripping voltammetry with hanging mercury drop electrode. Every analysis required three mercury drops: on the first one, zinc was determined; on the second, cadmium and lead; on the third, copper was determined. Zinc, lead and cadmium were determined by conventional differential-pulse anodic stripping voltammetry. For copper determination, adsorptive differential-pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry with amalgamation using chloride ions as a complexing agent was applied. The standard deviation of the results was from 1 to 10% depending on the metal content in the sample. Voltammetric results were in good agreement with the AAS analysis. No microwave digestion of soil extracts was necessary.

  1. Determination of mobile form contents of Zn, Cd, Pb and Cu in soil extracts by combined stripping voltammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nedeltcheva, T.; Atanassova, M.; Dimitrov, J.; Stanislavova, L.

    2005-01-01

    The amount of mobile forms of Zn, Pb, Cd and Cu in extracts obtained by treating soil samples with ammonium nitrate were determined by an appropriate combination of anodic and cathodic stripping voltammetry with hanging mercury drop electrode. Every analysis required three mercury drops: on the first one, zinc was determined; on the second, cadmium and lead; on the third, copper was determined. Zinc, lead and cadmium were determined by conventional differential-pulse anodic stripping voltammetry. For copper determination, adsorptive differential-pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry with amalgamation using chloride ions as a complexing agent was applied. The standard deviation of the results was from 1 to 10% depending on the metal content in the sample. Voltammetric results were in good agreement with the AAS analysis. No microwave digestion of soil extracts was necessary

  2. Square-wave anodic-stripping voltammetric determination of Cd, Pb and Cu in wine: Set-up and optimization of sample pre-treatment and instrumental parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Illuminati, Silvia; Annibaldi, Anna; Truzzi, Cristina; Finale, Carolina; Scarponi, Giuseppe

    2013-01-01

    For the first time, square-wave anodic-stripping voltammetry (SWASV) was set up and optimized for the determination of Cd, Pb and Cu in white wine after UV photo-oxidative digestion of the sample. The best procedure for the sample pre-treatment consisted in a 6-h UV irradiation of diluted, acidified wine, with the addition of ultrapure H 2 O 2 (three sequential additions during the irradiation). Due to metal concentration differences, separate measurements were carried out for Cd (deposition potential −950 mV vs. Ag/AgCl/3 M KCl deposition time 15 min) and simultaneously for Pb and Cu (E d −750 mV, t d 30 s). The optimum set-up of the main instrumental parameters, evaluated also in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio, were as follows: E SW 20 mV, f 100 Hz, ΔE step 8 mV, t step 100 ms, t wait 60 ms, t delay 2 ms, t meas 3 ms. The electrochemical behaviour was reversible bielectronic for Cd and Pb, and kinetically controlled monoelectronic for Cu. Good accuracy was found both when the recovery procedure was used and when the results were compared with data obtained by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry. The linearity of the response was verified up to ∼4 μg L −1 for Cd and Pb and ∼15 μg L −1 for Cu. The detection limits for t d = 5 min in the 10 times diluted, UV digested sample were (ng L −1 ): Cd 7.0, Pb 1.2 and Cu 6.6, which are well below currently applied methods. Application to a Verdicchio dei Castelli di Jesi white wine revealed concentration levels of Cd ∼0.2, Pb ∼10, Cu ∼30 μg L −1 with repeatabilities of (±RSD%) Cd ±6%, Pb ±5%, Cu ±10%

  3. Differential pulse adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of nanomolar levels of atorvastatin calcium in pharmaceutical and biological samples using a vertically aligned carbon nanotube/graphene oxide electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Tiago Almeida; Zanin, Hudson; Vicentini, Fernando Campanhã; Corat, Evaldo José; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando

    2014-06-07

    A novel vertically aligned carbon nanotube/graphene oxide (VACNT-GO) electrode is proposed, and its ability to determine atorvastatin calcium (ATOR) in pharmaceutical and biological samples by differential pulse adsorptive stripping voltammetry (DPAdSV) is evaluated. VACNT films were prepared on a Ti substrate by a microwave plasma chemical vapour deposition method and then treated with oxygen plasma to produce the VACNT-GO electrode. The oxygen plasma treatment exfoliates the carbon nanotube tips exposing graphene foils and inserting oxygen functional groups, these effects improved the VACNT wettability (super-hydrophobic) which is crucial for its electrochemical application. The electrochemical behaviour of ATOR on the VACNT-GO electrode was studied by cyclic voltammetry, which showed that it underwent an irreversible oxidation process at a potential of +1.08 V in pHcond 2.0 (0.2 mol L(-1) buffer phosphate solution). By applying DPAdSV under optimized experimental conditions the analytical curve was found to be linear in the ATOR concentration range of 90 to 3.81 × 10(3) nmol L(-1) with a limit of detection of 9.4 nmol L(-1). The proposed DPAdSV method was successfully applied in the determination of ATOR in pharmaceutical and biological samples, and the results were in close agreement with those obtained by a comparative spectrophotometric method at a confidence level of 95%.

  4. Anodic Stripping Voltammetric Detection of Arsenic(III) at Platinum-Iron(III) Nanoparticle Modified Carbon Nanotube on Glassy Carbon Electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shin, Seung Hyun; Hong, Hun Gi

    2010-01-01

    The electrochemical detection of As(III) was investigated on a platinum-iron(III) nanoparticles modified multiwalled carbon nanotube on glassy carbon electrode(nanoPt-Fe(III)/MWCNT/GCE) in 0.1 M H 2 SO 4 . The nanoPt-Fe(III)/ MWCNT/GCE was prepared via continuous potential cycling in the range from .0.8 to 0.7 V (vs. Ag/AgCl), in 0.1 M KCl solution containing 0.9 mM K 2 PtCl 6 and 0.6 mM FeCl 3 . The Pt nanoparticles and iron oxide were co-electrodeposited into the MWCNT-Nafion composite film on GCE. The resulting electrode was examined by cyclic voltammetry (CV), scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). For the detection of As(III), the nanoPt-Fe(III)/MWCNT/GCE showed low detection limit of 10 nM (0.75 ppb) and high sensitivity of 4.76 μAμM -1 , while the World Health Organization's guideline value of arsenic for drinking water is 10 ppb. It is worth to note that the electrode presents no interference from copper ion, which is the most serious interfering species in arsenic detection

  5. The construction and operating characteristics of a cathode strip chamber system designed to measure the reaction vertices of a stopping kaon beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    M.W. Ahmed; D. Androic; I. Bertovic; J. Bjoraker; R. Chrien; X. Cui; D. Dehnhard; Anton Empl; M. Furic; J. Gerald; R. Gill; E.V. Hungerford; H. Jungst; K.J. Lan; Jinghua Liu; C.L. Morris; J.M. O'Donnell; J.C. Peng; T. Petkovic; P. Pile; M. Planinic; C.M. Riedel; A. Rusek; R. Sutter; Liguang Tang; H.A. Thiessen; M. Youn; V. Zeps

    2001-01-01

    The design, construction, and performance of a segmented-target, cathode-strip, tracking-detector is discussed. The chamber was made of low-Z materials in order to allow photons to leave the target region. It was used to determine the reaction vertex of stopping kaons, and was successfully operated in a high-intensity kaon beamline at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The vertical and horizontal resolutions of the stopping kaon reaction positions were sigma X∼ 0.454mm and sigma Y∼ 1.180mm, respectively. The uncertainty in the longitudinal (Z) direction is given by one-half the thickness of a target segment

  6. Linear scan voltammetric indirect determination of Al(III) by the catalytic cathodic response of norepinephrine at the hanging mercury drop electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fuping; Ji, Ming; Xu, Quan; Yang, Li; Bi, Shuping

    2005-09-01

    The biological effects of aluminum (Al) have received much attention in recent years. Al is of basic relevance as concern with its reactivity and bioavailability. In this paper, the electrochemical behaviors of norepinephrine (NE) in the absence and presence of Al(III) at the hanging mercury drop electrode have been studied and applied to the practical analysis. Highly selective catalytic cathodic peak of NE is yielded by linear scan voltammetry (LSV) at -1.32 V (vs. SCE). A linear relationship holds between the cathodic peak current and the Al(III) concentration. It has been successfully applied to the determination of Al(III) in real waters and synthetic biological samples with satisfying results, which are in accordance with those obtained by ICP-AES method. The electrochemical properties and the mechanisms of the peaks in the presence and absence of Al(III) have been explored. The results show that they are irreversible adsorptive hydrogen catalytic waves. These studies not only enrich the methods of determining Al, but also lay foundations of further understanding of the mechanisms of neurodementia.

  7. Evaluation of circulating cathodic antigen (CCA strip for diagnosis of urinary schistosomiasis in Hassoba school children, Afar, Ethiopia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayele B.

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available A total of 206 urine samples collected from Hassoba Elementary schoolchildren, Afar, Ethiopia, a low Schistosoma haematobium endemic setting, was diagnosed to evaluate the performance of CCA strip using double references, urine filtration technique and urinalysis dipstick (Combur 10 Test® that detect schistosome eggs and blood in urine, respectively. The former was used as a gold standard reference method. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values for the CCA were 52%, 63.8%, 56.7% and 59% respectively, with reference to urine filtration technique whereas these parameters were 50.4%, 62.4%, 55.6% and 57.5% respectively, with reference to Combur 10 Test®. 47 S. haematobium egg-positive children were found negative by CCA strip while 38 egg-negative children were found positive by CCA strip. Moreover, among the pre-tests done in duplicate, inconsistent results were also recorded. Assays were also compared with regard to the cost of equipment and reagents, speed and simplicity of use. Though CCA strip was found to be rapid and could be performed with minimal training, it was found to be expensive (US $ 4.95 per test to use it for large-scale field use even if its diagnostic value would have been satisfactory. Further development and standardization of the CCA strip are required for its applicability for field use. It is also recommended that its cost per strip should be substantially cut down if it is to be used in poor schistosomiasis endemic countries.

  8. The construction and operating characteristics of a cathode strip chamber system designed to measure the reaction vertices of a stopping kaon beam

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, M.W.; Androic, D.; Bertovic, I.; Bjoraker, J.; Chrien, R.; Cui, X.; Dehnhard, D.; Empl, A.; Furic, M.; Gerald, J.; Gill, R.; Hungerford, E.V.; Juengst, H.; Lan, K.J.; Liu, J.H.; Morris, C.L.; O'Donnell, J.M.; Peng, J.C.; Petkovic, T.; Pile, P.; Planinic, M.; Riedel, C.M.; Rusek, A.; Sutter, R.; Tang, L.; Thiessen, H.A.; Youn, M.; Zeps, V.

    2001-01-01

    The design, construction, and performance of a segmented-target, cathode-strip, tracking-detector is discussed. The chamber was made of low-Z materials in order to allow photons to leave the target region. It was used to determine the reaction vertex of stopping kaons, and was successfully operated in a high-intensity kaon beamline at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The vertical and horizontal resolutions of the stopping kaon reaction positions were σ X ∼0.454 mm and σ Y ∼1.180 mm, respectively. The uncertainty in the longitudinal (Z) direction is given by one-half the thickness of a target segment

  9. The construction and operating characteristics of a cathode strip chamber system designed to measure the reaction vertices of a stopping kaon beam

    CERN Document Server

    Ahmed, M W; Bertovic, I; Bjoraker, J; Chrien, R; Cui, X; Dehnhard, D; Empl, A; Furic, M; Gerald, J; Gill, R; Hungerford, E V; Juengst, H; Lan, K J; Liu, J H; Morris, C L; O'donnell, J M; Peng, J C; Petkovic, T; Pile, P; Planinic, M; Riedel, C M; Rusek, A; Sutter, R; Tang, L; Thiessen, H A; Youn, M; Zeps, V

    2001-01-01

    The design, construction, and performance of a segmented-target, cathode-strip, tracking-detector is discussed. The chamber was made of low-Z materials in order to allow photons to leave the target region. It was used to determine the reaction vertex of stopping kaons, and was successfully operated in a high-intensity kaon beamline at the Alternating Gradient Synchrotron at Brookhaven National Laboratory. The vertical and horizontal resolutions of the stopping kaon reaction positions were sigma sub X approx 0.454 mm and sigma sub Y approx 1.180 mm, respectively. The uncertainty in the longitudinal (Z) direction is given by one-half the thickness of a target segment.

  10. Evaluation of circulating cathodic antigen (CCA) strip for diagnosis of urinary schistosomiasis in Hassoba school children, Afar, Ethiopia

    OpenAIRE

    Ayele B.; Erko B.; Legesse M.; Hailu A.; Medhin G.

    2008-01-01

    A total of 206 urine samples collected from Hassoba Elementary schoolchildren, Afar, Ethiopia, a low Schistosoma haematobium endemic setting, was diagnosed to evaluate the performance of CCA strip using double references, urine filtration technique and urinalysis dipstick (Combur 10 Test®) that detect schistosome eggs and blood in urine, respectively. The former was used as a gold standard reference method. Sensitivity, specificity, positive and negative predictive values for the CCA were 52%...

  11. Enrichment and stripping voltametric behavior of technetium traces at a carbon paste electrode modified with TTA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dick, R.; Ruf, H.; Ache, H.J.

    1988-06-01

    The possibility of enrichment as well as the stripping voltammetric behavior of technetium traces at a carbon paste electrode modified with thenoyltrifluoroacetone (TTA) was studied. Accumulation of Tc(IV) on the electrode surface occurs without application of a deposition voltage due to complex formation with TTA, probably resulting Tc(TTA) 4 . During the following cathodic potential scan made with the differential pulse mode a characteristic current peak is obtained at -40 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) which increases with Tc concentration and deposition time. However, Tc(IV) gives much more sensitive stripping current signals if a reductive deposition potential of -0.4 V is applied, presumably on account of the formation of Tc(TTA) 3 . In this case an anodic voltammetric scan was applied resulting a stripping peak at about +30 mV, the height of which is related to the concentration of Tc in solution as well as to the time of deposition. Calibration graphs revealed good reproducibility for analytical application. The lower detection limit for Tc(IV) achieved for 1 M sodium chloride solutions 4.6 x 10 -9 M. Tc(VII) is not enriched in the absence of reduction which takes place only from about -0.6 V on with the pH optimally set at 3.5. Therefore it is basically possible to discriminate Tc(IV) from Tc(VII). (orig.) [de

  12. Voltammetric methods for determination and speciation of inorganic arsenic in the environment-A review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mays, Douglas E. [Centre for Clean Water and Sustainable Technologies, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 20120 (United States); Hussam, Abul, E-mail: ahussam@gmu.edu [Centre for Clean Water and Sustainable Technologies, Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, George Mason University, Fairfax, VA 20120 (United States)

    2009-07-30

    The measurement of inorganic arsenic in the environment has received considerable attention over the past 40+ years due to its toxicity and prevalence in drinking water. This paper provides an overview of voltammetric techniques used since 2001. More than fifty papers from refereed analytical chemistry journals on the speciation and measurement of inorganic arsenic (As(III) and As(V)) in practical and environmental samples are included. The present review shows that stripping voltammetry is a sensitive and inexpensive technique. The new approaches include development of novel measurement protocols through media variation, development and use of new boron doped diamond electrodes modified with metals, nano Au-modified electrodes on carbon or carbon nano-tubes, novel rotating disc and vibrating electrodes to enhance mass transfer, and modified Hg(l) and thin film Bi on carbon for cathodic stripping voltammetry are discussed. Although, majority of the papers were of exploratory in nature, the trend towards developing a commercial standalone instrument for field use is still in progress.

  13. Stripping Voltammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lovrić, Milivoj

    Electrochemical stripping means the oxidative or reductive removal of atoms, ions, or compounds from an electrode surface (or from the electrode body, as in the case of liquid mercury electrodes with dissolved metals) [1-5]. In general, these atoms, ions, or compounds have been preliminarily immobilized on the surface of an inert electrode (or within it) as the result of a preconcentration step, while the products of the electrochemical stripping will dissolve in the electrolytic solution. Often the product of the electrochemical stripping is identical to the analyte before the preconcentration. However, there are exemptions to these rules. Electroanalytical stripping methods comprise two steps: first, the accumulation of a dissolved analyte onto, or in, the working electrode, and, second, the subsequent stripping of the accumulated substance by a voltammetric [3, 5], potentiometric [6, 7], or coulometric [8] technique. In stripping voltammetry, the condition is that there are two independent linear relationships: the first one between the activity of accumulated substance and the concentration of analyte in the sample, and the second between the maximum stripping current and the accumulated substance activity. Hence, a cumulative linear relationship between the maximum response and the analyte concentration exists. However, the electrode capacity for the analyte accumulation is limited and the condition of linearity is satisfied only well below the electrode saturation. For this reason, stripping voltammetry is used mainly in trace analysis. The limit of detection depends on the factor of proportionality between the activity of the accumulated substance and the bulk concentration of the analyte. This factor is a constant in the case of a chemical accumulation, but for electrochemical accumulation it depends on the electrode potential. The factor of proportionality between the maximum stripping current and the analyte concentration is rarely known exactly. In fact

  14. Direct determination of tellurium and its redox speciation at the low nanogram level in natural waters by catalytic cathodic stripping voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biver, Marc; Quentel, François; Filella, Montserrat

    2015-11-01

    Tellurium is one of the elements recently identified as technologically critical and is becoming a new emergent contaminant. No reliable method exists for its determination in environmental samples such as natural waters. This gap is filled by the method described here; it allows the rapid detection of trace concentrations of Te(IV) and Te(VI) in surface waters by differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry. It is based on the proton reduction catalysed by the absorption of Te(IV) on the mercury electrode. Under our conditions (0.1 mol L(-1) HCl) a detection limit of about 5 ng L(-1) for a deposition time of 300 s is achieved. Organic matter does not represent a problem at low concentrations; higher concentrations are eliminated by adsorptive purification. Tellurium occurs primarily as Te(IV) and Te(VI) in natural waters. Thus, determining total Te requires the reduction of Te(VI) that it is not electroactive. A number of reduction procedures have been carefully evaluated and a method based on the addition of TiCl3 to the acidified samples has been proven to reduce Te(VI) at the trace level to Te(IV) reliably and quantitatively. Therefore, the procedure described allows the direct determination of total Te and its redox speciation. It is flexible, reliable and cost effective compared to any possible alternative method based on the common preconcentration-ICPMS approach. It is readily implementable as a routine method and can be deployed in the field with relative ease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Sensitive stripping voltammetric determination of Cd(II) and Pb(II) by a Bi/multi-walled carbon nanotube-emeraldine base polyaniline-Nafion composite modified glassy carbon electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, Guo; Yin, Yuan; Wang, Hui; Liu, Gang; Wang, Zhiqiang

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • A MWCNT-EBP-NA composite film modified GCE was fabricated and characterized. • The GCE modified with the MWCNT-EBP-NA composite film exhibited excellent performance in the analysis of Cd(II) and Pb(II) by SWASV. • The Cd(II) and Pb(II) detection limits of the developed electrode were approximately 0.06 μg/L and 0.08 μg/L, respectively. • Bi/MWCNT-EBP-NA/GCE was successfully used to determine metal ions in soil samples. - Abstract: In this study, a multi-walled carbon nanotube (MWCNT)-emeraldine base polyaniline (EBP)-Nafion (NA) composite modified glassy carbon electrode (MWCNT-EBP-NA/GCE) was prepared and used for the sensitive detection of trace Pb(II) and Cd(II), with a detection limit of 0.06 μg/L for Cd(II) and 0.08 μg/L for Pb(II) (S/N = 3), by square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV). A bismuth film was prepared through the in situ plating of bismuth on the MWCNT-EBP-NA/GCE. The morphologies and electrochemical properties of the modified electrode were characterized by SWASV, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry (CV). The parameters affecting the stripping current response were investigated and optimized. The formed MWCNTs in the composite film enlarged the specific surface area of the electrode and significantly promoted electron transferring, and the formed polyaniline (PANI) enhanced the ion-exchange capacity and prevented the macromolecules in real samples from absorbing onto the surface of the electrode. The presence of NA effectively increased the stability and adhesion of the composite film, enhanced the cation-exchange capacity and improved the ability to preconcentrate metal ions. Under the optimized conditions, a linear range of 1.0 to 50.0 μg/L was achieved for both metal ions, with a detection limit of 0.06 μg/L for Cd(II) and 0.08 μg/L for Pb(II) (S/N = 3), offering good repeatability. Finally, the Bi/MWCNT-EBP-NA/GCE was used for the

  16. Square-wave adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of nanomolar levels of bezafibrate using a glassy carbon electrode modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes within a dihexadecyl hydrogen phosphate film.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ardila, Jorge Armando; Oliveira, Geiser Gabriel; Medeiros, Roberta Antigo; Fatibello-Filho, Orlando

    2014-04-07

    A highly sensitive method for bezafibrate determination using a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with multi-walled carbon nanotubes within a dihexadecyl hydrogen phosphate film based on square-wave adsorptive stripping voltammetry (SWAdSV) is proposed. The electrochemical behaviour of bezafibrate has been studied by cyclic voltammetry, showing an irreversible anodic peak at a potential of 1.09 V in 0.1 mol L(-1) phosphate buffer solution (pH 2.0). A study of the scan rate showed that the oxidation of bezafibrate is an adsorptive-controlled process, involving the transfer of two electrons and two protons per molecule. The analytical curve was linear over a bezafibrate concentration range from 50 to 910 nmol L(-1), with a detection limit of 16 nmol L(-1). This analytical method was successfully applied for benzafibrate determination in pharmaceutical formulations, with results showing good agreement with those obtained using a comparative spectrophotometric method, and has the potential for field application.

  17. Square-wave anodic-stripping voltammetric determination of Cd, Pb, and Cu in a hydrofluoric acid solution of siliceous spicules of marine sponges (from the Ligurian Sea, Italy, and the Ross Sea, Antarctica)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Truzzi, C.; Annibaldi, A.; Illuminati, S.; Bassotti, E.; Scarponi, G. [Polytechnic University of Marche, Ancona (Italy). Department of Marine Science

    2008-09-15

    Square-wave anodic-stripping voltammetry (SWASV) was set up and optimized for simultaneous determination of cadmium, lead, and copper in siliceous spicules of marine sponges, directly in the hydrofluoric acid solution ({proportional_to}0.55 mol L{sup -1} HF, pH {proportional_to}1.9). A thin mercury-film electrode (TMFE) plated on to an HF-resistant epoxy-impregnated graphite rotating-disc support was used. The optimum experimental conditions, evaluated also in terms of the signal-to-noise ratio, were as follows: deposition potential -1100 mV vs. Ag/AgCl, KCl 3 mol L{sup -1}, deposition time 3-10 min, electrode rotation 3000 rpm, SW scan from -1100 mV to +100 mV, SW pulse amplitude 25 mV, frequency 100 Hz, {delta}E{sub step} 8 mV, t{sub step} 100 ms, t{sub wait} 60 ms, t{sub delay} 2 ms, t{sub meas} 3 ms. Under these conditions the metal peak potentials were Cd -654{+-}1 mV, Pb -458 {+-} 1 mV, Cu -198{+-}1 mV. The electrochemical behaviour was reversible for Pb, quasi-reversible for Cd, and kinetically controlled (possibly following chemical reaction) for Cu. The linearity of the response with concentration was verified up to {proportional_to}4 {mu}g L{sup -1} for Cd and Pb and {proportional_to}20 {mu}g L{sup -1} for Cu. The detection limits were 5.8 ng L{sup -1}, 3.6 ng L{sup -1}, and 4.3 ng L{sup -1} for Cd, Pb, and Cu, respectively, with t{sub d}=5 min. The method was applied for determination of the metals in spicules of two specimens of marine sponges (Demosponges) from the Portofino natural reserve (Ligurian Sea, Italy, Petrosia ficiformis) and Terra Nova Bay (Ross Sea, Antarctica, Sphaerotylus antarcticus). The metal contents varied from tens of ng g{sup -1} to {proportional_to}1 {mu}g g{sup -1}, depending on the metal considered and with significant differences between the two sponge species. (orig.)

  18. A Latent Markov Modelling approach to the evaluation of Circulating Cathodic Antigen strips for Schistosomiasis diagnosis pre- and post-praziquantel treatment in Uganda

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koukounari, Artemis; Donnelly, Christl A.; Moustaki, Irini

    2013-01-01

    Markov Models (LMMs). The aim was to evaluate the diagnostic accuracy of Circulating Cathodic Antigen (CCA) and of double Kato-Katz (KK) faecal slides over three consecutive days for Schistosoma mansoni infection simultaneously by age group at baseline and at two follow-up times post treatment...

  19. VOLTAMMETRIC INVESTIGATION OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    VOLTAMMETRIC INVESTIGATION OF THE DISTRIBUTION OF HYDROXO-, CHLORO-, EDTA AND CARBOHYDRATE COMPLEXES OF LEAD, CHROMIUM, ZINC, CADMIUM AND COPPER: POTENTIAL APPLICATION TO METAL SPECIATION STUDIES IN BREWERY WASTEWATER.

  20. Voltammetric behavior and determination of the macrolide antibiotics azithromycin, clarithromycin and roxithromycin at a renewable silver – amalgam film electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vajdle, Olga; Guzsvány, Valéria; Škorić, Dušan; Csanádi, János; Petković, Miloš; Avramov-Ivić, Milka; Kónya, Zoltán; Petrović, Slobodan

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: • Voltammetric characterization of AZI, CLA and ROX at Hg(Ag)FE was performed. • AZI, CLA and ROX were determined via optimized SWV and SW-AdSV procedures. • Protonated forms of AZI, CLA and ROX favored their adsorption on Hg(Ag)FE. • 1 H NMR chemical shift dependence of N-methyl proton signals from pH. • Optimized SW-AdSV procedure was applied to determine ROX in Runac ® tablet. - Abstract: The renewable silver-amalgam film electrode (Hg(Ag)FE) was applied for voltammetric characterization and determination of semi-synthetic macrolide antibiotics azithromycin (AZI), clarithromycin (CLA) and roxithromycin (ROX) in the Britton-Robinson buffer as supporting electrolyte ranging the pH from 4.0 to 11.9. All three macrolides showed reduction signals in fairly negative potential range. During direct cathodic square wave voltammetric (SWV) investigations conducted over the potential range from −0.75 V to −2.00 V vs SCE, either one or two reduction peaks were obtained in the potential range from −1.5 to −1.9 V. The shapes and intensities of the signals depend on the applied pH values in wider pH ranges. For analytical purposes concerning the development of direct cathodic SWV and adsorptive stripping SWV (SW-AdSV) methods the neutral and slightly alkaline media were suitable as pH 7.2, pH 7.4 and pH 7.0 for AZI, CLA and ROX, respectively. Based on the cyclic voltammograms recorded at these pH values, adsorption-controlled electrode kinetics process can be proposed for all three macrolides. Furthermore, the water suppressed 1 H NMR measurements in the pH range between 6.0 and 10.5 indicated that the macrolide molecules at the optimal analytical conditions are predominantly in protonated form via their tertiary amino groups which supported in all three cases their adsorption on the appropriately polarized Hg(Ag)FE electrode. The optimized direct cathodic SWV methods showed good linearity in concentration ranges 4.81–23.3 μg mL −1 , 1.96

  1. Voltammetric technique, a panacea for analytical examination of environmental samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zahir, E.; Mohiuddin, S.; Naqvi, I.I.

    2012-01-01

    Voltammetric methods for trace metal analysis in environmental samples of marine origin like mangrove, sediments and shrimps are generally recommended. Three different electro-analytical techniques i.e. polarography, anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) and adsorptive stripping voltammetry (ADSV) have been used. Cd/sub 2/+, Pb/sub 2/+, Cu/sub 2/+ and Mn/sub 2/+ were determined through ASV, Cr/sub 6/+ was analyzed by ADSV and Fe/sub 2/+, Zn/sub 2/+, Ni/sub 2/+ and Co/sub 2/+ were determined through polarography. Out of which pairs of Fe/sub 2/+Zn/sub 2/+ and Ni/sub 2/+Co/sub 2/+ were determined in two separate runs while Cd/sub 2/+, Pb/sub 2/+, Cu/sub 2/+ were analyzed in single run of ASV. Sensitivity and speciation capabilities of voltammetric methods have been employed. Analysis conditions were optimized that includes selection of supporting electrolyte, pH, working electrodes, sweep rate etc. Stripping voltammetry was adopted for analysis at ultra trace levels. Statistical parameters for analytical method development like selectivity factor, interference, repeatability (0.0065-0.130 macro g/g), reproducibility (0.08125-1.625 macro g/g), detection limits (0.032-5.06 macro g/g), limits of quantification (0.081-12.652 macro g/g), sensitivities (5.636-2.15 nA mL macro g-1) etc. were also determined. The percentage recoveries were found in between 95-105% using certified reference materials. Real samples of complex marine environment from Karachi coastline were also analyzed. The standard addition method was employed where any matrix effect was evidenced. (author)

  2. Electrochemistry of moexipril: experimental and computational approach and voltammetric determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taşdemir, Hüdai I; Kiliç, E

    2014-09-01

    The electrochemistry of moexipril (MOE) was studied by electrochemical methods with theoretical calculations performed at B3LYP/6-31 + G (d)//AM1. Cyclic voltammetric studies were carried out based on a reversible and adsorption-controlled reduction peak at -1.35 V on a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE). Concurrently irreversible diffusion-controlled oxidation peak at 1.15 V on glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was also employed. Potential values are according to Ag/AgCI, (3.0 M KCI) and measurements were performed in Britton-Robinson buffer of pH 5.5. Tentative electrode mechanisms were proposed according to experimental results and ab-initio calculations. Square-wave adsorptive stripping voltammetric methods have been developed and validated for quantification of MOE in pharmaceutical preparations. Linear working range was established as 0.03-1.35 microM for HMDE and 0.2-20.0 microM for GCE. Limit of quantification (LOQ) was calculated to be 0.032 and 0.47 microM for HMDE and GCE, respectively. Methods were successfully applied to assay the drug in tablets by calibration and standard addition methods with good recoveries between 97.1% and 106.2% having relative standard deviation less than 10%.

  3. Electrodeposition of uranium and transuranic metals (Pu) on solid cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laplace, A. F.; Lacquement, J.; Willitt, J. L.; Finch, R. A.; Fletcher, G. A.; Williamson, M. A.

    2008-01-01

    The results from a study of U and Pu metal electrodeposition from molten eutectic LiCl-KCl on a solid inert cathode are presented. This study has been conducted using ∼ to 50 g of U-Pu together with rare earths (mostly Nd) and 1.5 kg of salt. The introduction of a three-electrode probe with an Ag/AgCl reference electrode has allowed voltammetric measurement during electrolysis and control of the cathode potential versus the reference. Cyclic and square-wave voltammetric measurements proved to be very useful tools for monitoring the electrolysis as well as selecting the cathode versus reference potential to maximize the separation between actinides and rare earths. The voltammetric data also highlighted the occurrence of back reactions between the cathode deposit and oxidizing equivalents formed at the anode that remained in the molten salt electrolyte. Any further electrolysis test needs to be conducted continuously and followed by immediate removal of the cathode to minimize those back reactions. (authors)

  4. QUANTIFICATION OF LEAD AND CADMIUM IN POULTRY AND BIRD GAME MEAT BY SQUARE WAVE ANODIC STRIPPING VOLTAMMETRY

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Abstract A Square Wave Anodic Stripping Voltammetric method for the analysis of lead and cadmium in chicken muscle and liver was developed and validated, and the results of a monitoring study relative to chicken and pigeon meat are reported. The voltammetric method allows the analysis of lead and cadmium at the same time in samples after acid digestion. The use of perchloric acid for digestion and of acetate buffer in the supporting electrolyte have been found suitable to reduce ma...

  5. Electrochemistry of Pt (100) in alkaline media: A voltammetric study

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Vliet, Dennis F.; Koper, Marc T. M.

    2010-10-01

    Pt (100) is one of the fcc metal surface planes that reconstruct upon annealing at high temperatures. The state of the surface is important in electrochemistry, in order to correlate catalytic behavior with surface structure. Therefore, the behavior of single crystalline Pt (100) in alkaline media was investigated, with particular attention paid to surface long-range order. It was found that, in line with previous results, the manner of cooling the crystal after annealing influenced the state of surface significantly, with a profound effect on blank cyclic voltammetry as well as on carbon monoxide oxidation. Different ratios of inert and reductive gases were used to see if an optimal mixture could be obtained. Using air, argon, hydrogen, CO, and combinations of these gases gave rise to different states of the surface, with clear observable differences in blank voltammetric behavior and CO stripping. Also, the effect of alkali-metal cations and bromide on the blank and CO stripping voltammetry was investigated. Our main conclusion is that cooling in a carbon monoxide containing gas gives a clean, almost defect-free surface with long-range 1 × 1 symmetry. A similar surface can also be prepared with a hydrogen-containing cooling gas, but the content of hydrogen in that stream is critical.

  6. Sulfonated Polyaniline Coated Mercury Film Electrodes for Voltammetric Analysis of Metals in Water

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Denise Alves Fungaro

    2001-11-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical polymerization of 2-aminobenzenesulfonic acid with and without aniline has been carried by cyclic potencial sweep in sulfuric acid solution at the glassy carbon electrode. The polymer and copolymer formed have been characterized voltammetrically. The sulfonated polyaniline coated mercury thin-film electrodes have been evaluated for use with anodic stripping voltammetry. The electrodes were tested and compared with a conventional thin-film mercury electrode. Calibration plots showed linearity up to 10-7 mol L-1. Detection limits for zinc, lead and cadmium test species are very similar at around 12 nmol L-1. Applications to analysis of waters samples are demonstrated.

  7. On the use of voltammetric methods to determine electrochemical stability limits for lithium battery electrolytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georén, Peter; Lindbergh, Göran

    In previous studies a novel amphiphilic co-polymer was developed for use in lithium-ion batteries. In order to evaluate the electrochemical stability of that electrolyte and compare it with others, a voltammetric method was applied on a set of electrolytes with different salts, solvents and polymers. However, initially the voltammetric methodology was studied. Platinum was found to be the most suited electrode material, experiencing no significant interfering reactions and a proper diffusion-controlled kinetic behaviour when sweep rate was varied. Furthermore, the influence on the voltammograms of adding water traces to the electrolytes was studied. It could be established that the oxidation peak around 3.8 V versus Li was related to water reactions. It was concluded that quantitative voltage values of the stability limits were difficult to assess using voltammetry. On the other hand, the method seemed well suited for comparison of electrolytes and to investigate the influences of electrolyte components on the stability. The voltammetric results varied little between the different electrolytes evaluated and the anodic and cathodic limits, as defined here, were in the range of 1 and 4.5 V vs. Li, respectively. Although the novel polymer did not affect the stability limit significantly it seemed to promote the breakdown reaction rate in all electrolytes tested. Furthermore, the use of LiTFSI salt reduced the stability window.

  8. VOLTAMMETRIC DETERMINATION OF NICOTINE IN CIGARETTE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

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    determination of nicotine in two brands of commercial cigarettes and ... to disruption of arteries and cardiovascular risk factors [8, 9]. Smoking .... e d. Figure 2. Cyclic voltammetric response (scan rate of 100 mV/s) of 1.0 mM nicotine at AGCE in.

  9. Voltammetric Investigation Of Hydrothermal Iron Speciation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charlotte eKleint

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hydrothermal vent fluids are highly enriched in iron (Fe compared to ambient seawater, and organic ligands may play a role in facilitating the transport of some hydrothermal Fe into the open ocean. This is important since Fe is a limiting micronutrient for primary production in large parts of the world`s surface ocean. We have investigated the concentration and speciation of Fe in several vent fluid and plume samples from the Nifonea vent field, Coriolis Troughs, New Hebrides Island Arc, South Pacific Ocean using competitive ligand exchange - adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry (CLE - AdCSV with salicylaldoxime (SA as the artificial ligand. Our results for total dissolved Fe (dFe in the buoyant hydrothermal plume samples showed concentrations up to 3.86 µM dFe with only a small fraction between 1.1% and 11.8% being chemically labile. Iron binding ligand concentrations ([L] were found in µM level with strong conditional stability constants up to log K[L],Fe3+ of 22.9. Within the non-buoyant hydrothermal plume above the Nifonea vent field, up to 84.7% of the available Fe is chemically labile and [L] concentrations up to 97 nM were measured. [L] was consistently in excess of Felab, indicating that all available Fe is being complexed, which in combination with high Felab values in the non-buoyant plume, signifies that a high fraction of hydrothermal dFe is potentially being transported away from the plume into the surrounding waters, contributing to the global oceanic Fe budget.

  10. Voltammetric method for the determination of sildenafil citrate (Viagra) in pure form and in pharmaceutical formulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyszczuk, Katarzyna; Korolczuk, Mieczyslaw

    2010-06-01

    A highly sensitive and simple voltammetric method for the determination of sildenafil citrate (SC) was developed. The method is based on the accumulation by adsorption of SC on a lead film modified glassy carbon electrode (LF/GCE) and then the reduction of SC throughout the stripping step. During the determinations of SC at the lead film electrode three adsorptive stripping voltammetric peaks at -1.2, -1.33 and -1.45V were observed. The respective response selected for identification and quantification has been evaluated with respect to the composition and pH of the supporting electrolyte, the potential and the time of the lead film formation, the potential and the time of the SC accumulation and other variables. Experimental results indicate an excellent linear correlation between the peak current and concentration in the range of 2x10(-9)-1.5x10(-7)mol/L (for peaks 1 and 2) and 1x10(-8)-1.5x10(-7)mol/L (for the peak 3). The detection limits (LOD) for SC following 30s of accumulation time were equal to 9x10(-10)mol/L (for peaks 1 and 2) and 4.5x10(-9)mol/L (for the peak 3). The method was successfully applied to the determination of SC in the tablets (Viagra 25 and Viagra 50) and average the contents were in close agreement with those quoted by the manufacturer and with those obtained by the reported spectrophotometric method and voltammetric method using a hanging mercury drop electrode. Copyright 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. High precision straw tube chamber with cathode readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, V.N.; Golutvin, I.A.; Ershov, Yu.V.

    1992-01-01

    The high precision straw chamber with cathode readout was constructed and investigated. The 10 mm straws were made of aluminized mylar strip with transparent longitudinal window. The X coordinate information has been taken from the cathode strips as induced charges and investigated via centroid method. The spatial resolution σ=120 μm has been obtained with signal/noise ratio about 60. The possible ways for improving the signal/noise ratio have been described. 7 refs.; 8 figs

  12. Freestanding and flexible graphene papers as bioelectrochemical cathode for selective and efficient CO2 conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aryal, Nabin; Halder, Arnab; Zhang, Minwei

    2017-01-01

    During microbial electrosynthesis (MES) driven CO2 reduction, cathode plays a vital role by donating electrons to microbe. Here, we exploited the advantage of reduced graphene oxide (RGO) paper asnovel cathode material to enhance electron transfer between the cathode and microbe, which in turn...... facilitated CO2 reduction. The acetate production rate of Sporomusa ovata-driven MES reactors was 168.5 ± 22.4 mmol m−2 d−1 with RGO paper cathodes poised at −690 mV versus standard hydrogen electrode. This rate was approximately 8 fold faster than for carbon paper electrodes of the same dimension....... The current density with RGO paper cathodes of 2580 ± 540 mA m−2 was increased 7 fold compared to carbon paper cathodes. This also corresponded to a better cathodic current response on their cyclic voltammetric curves. The coulombic efficiency for the electrons conversion into acetate was 90.7 ± 9.3% with RGO...

  13. Voltammetric determination of zirconium using azo compounds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orshulyak, O.O.; Levitskaya, G.D.

    2008-01-01

    The optimum conditions for zirconium complexation with azo compounds are found. The applicability of Eriochrome Red B, Calcon, and Calcion to the voltammetric determination of zirconium, total Zr(IV) and Hf(IV), and Zr(IV) in the presence of Zn(II), Cu(II), Cd(II), Ni(II), or Ti(IV) is demonstrated. The developed procedures are used to determine zirconium in a terbium alloy and in an alloy for airplane wheel drums [ru

  14. Penicillamine-modified sensor for the voltammetric determination of Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions in natural samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ràfols, Clara; Serrano, Núria; Díaz-Cruz, José Manuel; Ariño, Cristina; Esteban, Miquel

    2015-11-01

    A new penicillamine-GCE was developed based on the immobilization of d-penicillamine on aryl diazonium salt monolayers anchored to the glassy carbon electrode (GCE) surface and it was applied for the first time to the simultaneous determination of Cd(II) and Pb(II) ions by stripping voltammetric techniques. The detection and quantification limits at levels of µg L(-1) suggest that the penicillamine-GCE could be fully suitable for the determination of the considered ions in natural samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Electrochemistry of cefditoren pivoxil and its voltammetric determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim Hüdai Taşdemir

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrochemical behavior of cefditoren pivoxil (CTP was studied via experimental electrochemical methods and theoretical calculations performed at B3LYP/6-31+G(d//AM1 level. Experimental studies were carried out based on an irreversible 4e−/4H+ reduction peak at ca. −0.8 V on hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE and irreversible 1e−/1H+ oxidation of CTP at ca. 0.8 V on glassy carbon electrode (GCE versus Ag/AgCl, KCl (3.0 M in Britton–Robinson buffer at pH 6.0 and 4.0, respectively. Tentative reduction and oxidation mechanisms were proposed based on computational and experimental results. Square-wave adsorptive stripping voltammetric methods have been developed and validated for quantification of CTP in different samples. Linear working range was established as 0.15–15.0 μM for HMDE and 1.0–50.0 μM for GCE. Limit of quantification (S/N = 10 was calculated to be (0.10 ± 0.02 μM and (0.80 ± 0.03 μM for HMDE and GCE, respectively. Methods were successfully applied to assay the drug in tablets and human serum with good recoveries between (99.2 ± 11.6 % and (102.5 ± 9.5 % having relative standard deviation less than 10%.

  16. Electrochemistry and determination of cefdinir by voltammetric and computational approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    İbrahim Hüdai Taşdemir

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The oxidation and reduction behavior of cefdinir (CEF was studied by experimental methods and computational calculations at B3LYP/6-31+G (d//AM1. Voltammetric studies were carried out based on two irreversible reduction peaks at approximately −0.5 and −1.2 V on a hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE and on one irreversible oxidation peak at approximately 1.0 V on a glassy carbon electrode (GCE versus Ag/AgCl, KCl (3.0M in Britton–Robinson (BR buffer at pH 4.2 and 5.0, respectively. Differential pulse adsorptive stripping voltammetric methods have been developed and validated for determination of CEF in different samples. The linear range was established as 0.25–40.0 μM for HMDE and 0.40–10.0 μM for GCE. Limit of quantification was calculated to be 0.20 and 0.26 μM for HMDE and GCE, respectively. These methods were successfully applied to assay the drug in tablets and human serum with good recoveries between 92.7% and 107.3% having relative standard deviation less than 10%.

  17. Voltammetric behavior of sedative drug midazolam at glassy carbon electrode in solubilized systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Jain

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Redox behavior of midazolam was studied at a glassy carbon electrode in various buffer systems, supporting electrolytes and pH using differential pulse, square-wave and cyclic voltammetry. Based on its reduction behavior, a direct differential pulse voltammetric method has been developed and validated for the determination of midazolam in parenteral dosage. Three well-defined peaks were observed in 0.1% SLS, Britton–Robinson (BR buffer of pH 2.5. The effect of surfactants like sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS, cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB and Tween 20 was studied. Among these surfactants SLS showed significant enhancement in reduction peak. The cathodic peak currents were directly proportional to the concentration of midazolam with correlation coefficient of 0.99. Keywords: Midazolam, Voltammetry, Surfactant, Glassy carbon electrode, Parenteral dosage form

  18. Voltammetric behavior of sedative drug midazolam at glassy carbon electrode in solubilized systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Rajeev; Yadav, Rajeev Kumar

    2012-04-01

    Redox behavior of midazolam was studied at a glassy carbon electrode in various buffer systems, supporting electrolytes and pH using differential pulse, square-wave and cyclic voltammetry. Based on its reduction behavior, a direct differential pulse voltammetric method has been developed and validated for the determination of midazolam in parenteral dosage. Three well-defined peaks were observed in 0.1% SLS, Britton-Robinson (BR) buffer of pH 2.5. The effect of surfactants like sodium lauryl sulfate (SLS), cetyl trimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB) and Tween 20 was studied. Among these surfactants SLS showed significant enhancement in reduction peak. The cathodic peak currents were directly proportional to the concentration of midazolam with correlation coefficient of 0.99.

  19. Square Wave Voltammetric Determination of 2-Thiouracil in Pharmaceuticals and Real Samples Using Glassy Carbon Electrode

    OpenAIRE

    Naveen M. Gokavi; Vijay P. Pattar; Atmanand M. Bagoji; Sharanappa T. Nandibewoor

    2013-01-01

    A simple and rapid method was developed using cyclic and square wave voltammetric techniques for the determination of trace-level sulfur containing compound, 2-thiouracil, at a glassy carbon electrode. 2-thiouracil produced two anodic peaks at 0.334 V and 1.421 V and a cathodic peak at −0.534 V. The square wave voltammetry of 2-thiouracil gave a good linear response in the range of 1–20 μM with a detection limit of 0.16 μM and quantification limit of 0.53 μM (0.0679 μg/g), which is in good ag...

  20. Voltammetric Determination of a Benzimidazole Anthelmintic Mixture ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2002-10-17

    Oct 17, 2002 ... Electrochemistry, square-wave voltammetry, benzimidazole anthelmintics, ... potential application, cathodic reduction/anodic oxidation, the type of the electrode ... benzimidazole anthelmintic in 10 cm3 of methanol-formic acid.

  1. Voltammetric analysis of N-containing drugs using the hanging galinstan drop electrode (HGDE).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Channaa, H; Surmann, P

    2009-03-01

    The electrochemical behaviour of several N-containing voltammetric active drugs such as 1,4-benzodiazepines (chlordiazepoxide, nitrazepam and diazepam) as well as one nitro-compound (nitrofurantoin) and one azo-compound (phenazopyridine) is described using a new kind of liquid electrode, the hanging galinstan drop electrode. Concentrations of 10(-5) - 10(-8) mol L(-1) are generally measurable. Differential pulse and adsorptive stripping voltammograms are recorded in different supporting electrolytes, like 0.1 M KNO3, acetate buffer solution pH = 4.6 and phosphate buffer solution pH = 7.0. The effects of varying the starting potentials, U(start) for DPV and accumulation times, t(acc) for AdSV are considered. Briefly, it is shown that the novel galinstan electrode is suitable for reducing several functional groups in organic substances, here presented for N-oxide-, azomethine-, nitro- and azo-groups.

  2. Development of Voltammetric Double-Polymer-Modified Electrodes for Nanomolar Ion Detection for Environmental and Biological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yushin

    Qualitative and quantitative electrochemical methods for trace ion analysis of organic and inorganic species with environmental and biological attention have been developed and reported during past decades. The development of fast and accurate electrochemical methods is critical for field applications with various blocking contaminants. Voltammetric method is attractive not only to analyze selective ion species due to its characteristic based on ion lipophilicity, but also to lower the limit of detection by combining with stripping analysis. In my PhD work, I have developed and studied a highly selective and sensitive electrochemical method that can be used to characterize fundamental transport dynamics and to develop electrochemical sensors at liquid/liquid interfaces based on electrochemically-controlled ion transfer and recognition. The understanding of the kinetic and thermodynamic properties of the voltammetric ion transfer through polymer-modified ion-selective electrodes leads to realize the highly selective and sensitive analytical method. The ultrathin polymer membrane is used to maximize a current response by complete exhaustion of preconcentrated ions. Therefore, nanomolar detection is achieved and confirmed by a thermodynamic mechanism that controls the detection limit. It was also demonstrated experimentally and theoretically that more lipophilic ionic species gives a significantly lower detection limit. The voltammetric method was expanded into inexpensive and disposable applications based on pencil lead modified with the thin polymer membrane. In the other hand, micropipet/nanopipet voltammetry as an artificial cell membrane was used to study the interface between two immiscible solutions for environmental and biomedical applications. It is very useful to get quantitative kinetic and thermodynamic information by studying numerical simulations of ion transfer and diffusion. Molecular recognition and transport of heparin and low

  3. Extraction or adsorption? Voltammetric assessment of protamine transfer at ionophore-based polymeric membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garada, Mohammed B; Kabagambe, Benjamin; Amemiya, Shigeru

    2015-01-01

    Cation-exchange extraction of polypeptide protamine from water into an ionophore-based polymeric membrane has been hypothesized as the origin of a potentiometric sensor response to this important heparin antidote. Here, we apply ion-transfer voltammetry not only to confirm protamine extraction into ionophore-doped polymeric membranes but also to reveal protamine adsorption at the membrane/water interface. Protamine adsorption is thermodynamically more favorable than protamine extraction as shown by cyclic voltammetry at plasticized poly(vinyl chloride) membranes containing dinonylnaphthalenesulfonate as a protamine-selective ionophore. Reversible adsorption of protamine at low concentrations down to 0.038 μg/mL is demonstrated by stripping voltammetry. Adsorptive preconcentration of protamine at the membrane/water interface is quantitatively modeled by using the Frumkin adsorption isotherm. We apply this model to ensure that stripping voltammograms are based on desorption of all protamine molecules that are transferred across the interface during a preconcentration step. In comparison to adsorption, voltammetric extraction of protamine requires ∼0.2 V more negative potentials, where a potentiometric super-Nernstian response to protamine is also observed. This agreement confirms that the potentiometric protamine response is based on protamine extraction. The voltammetrically reversible protamine extraction results in an apparently irreversible potentiometric response to protamine because back-extraction of protamine from the membrane extremely slows down at the mixed potential based on cation-exchange extraction of protamine. Significantly, this study demonstrates the advantages of ion-transfer voltammetry over potentiometry to quantitatively and mechanistically assess protamine transfer at ionophore-based polymeric membranes as foundation for reversible, selective, and sensitive detection of protamine.

  4. Direct voltammetric specific recognition of dopamine using AlIII-DA complexes at the hanging mercury drop electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Fuping; Zhang, Min; Cheng, Jiongjia; Yang, Li; Ji, Ming; Bi, Shuping

    2007-11-01

    In this paper, we firstly report the direct voltammetric recognition and determination of dopamine (DA) by using Al(III)-DA complexes at the hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE). A new sensitive cathodic peak of Al(III)-DA can be detected at -900 mV (vs. SCE) in 0.1 M NH(4)Cl-NH(3).H(2)O-0.1 M KCl buffer solution at pH 8.5. This unique -900 mV cathodic peak arises from the specific interaction between Al(III) and DA on the HMDE, whereas other substances with similar structures, such as L-dopa, epinephrine (EP), norepinephrine (NE), catechols, caffeic acid (CA), trihydric phenols and tiron, do not yield any new peak on the voltammograms in the potential range from -100 to -1200 mV when Al(III) is added. The distinct voltammetric characteristic of the recognition of DA can effectively inhibit the interferences of both ascorbic acid and uric acid in the DA determination by the direct electrochemistry, which is a major difficulty when a solid electrode is used. The proposed method can be anticipated as an effective means for the recognition of DA in the elucidation of the mechanisms of Parkinson's disease (PD) and Alzheimer's disease (AD) in the presence of Al(III).

  5. application of ascorbic acid 2-phosphate as a new voltammetric

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    a

    acid 2-phosphate (AAP) as a new voltammetric substrate has been described in this paper. In the alkaline buffer .... ALP labeled goat anti-rabbit ..... Classical Michaelis-Menten kinetic experiments were carried out to measure the maximum.

  6. Voltammetric Behaviour of Metronidazole at Mercury Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    La-Scalea Mauro A.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Metronidazole is the most important drug of the group of 5-nitroimidazoles and possesses toxicity to anaerobic micro-organisms DNA being the main target for their biological action. The mechanism of biological action of metronidazole is dependent upon the nitro group reduction process. The reduction of metronidazole is pH dependent in acid medium and four electrons are involved in the complete reduction to the hydroxylamine derivative. In aprotic medium the reduction of the metronidazole occurs in two steps, the first involving one electron to form the nitro radical and the second step involving three more electrons until the formation of the hydroxylamine derivative. In this paper the mechanism of reduction of metronidazole was studied by using the voltammetric techniques: d.c. polarography, differential pulse polarography and cyclic voltammetry using the mercury drop as the working electrode.

  7. Voltammetric Determination of Lead (II) and Cadmium (II) Using a Bismuth Film Electrode Modified with Mesoporous Silica Nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Die; Wang, Liang; Chen, Zuliang; Megharaj, Mallavarapu; Naidu, Ravi

    2014-01-01

    A new chemically modified glassy carbon electrode based on bismuth film coated mesoporous silica nanoparticles was developed and evaluated for reliable quantification of trace Pb 2+ and Cd 2+ by anodic stripping square wave voltammetry in natural water samples. Compared with conventional bismuth film electrodes or bismuth nanoparticles modified electrodes, this electrode exhibited significantly improved sensitivity and stability for Pb 2+ and Cd 2+ detection. The key experimental parameters related to the fabrication of the electrode and the voltammetric measurements were optimized on the basis of the stripping signals, where the peak currents increased linearly with the metal concentrations in a range of 2-150 μg L −1 with a detect limit of 0.2 μg L −1 for Pb 2+ , and 0.6 μg L −1 for Cd 2+ for 120s deposition. Good reproducibility was achieved on both single and equally prepared electrodes. In addition, scanning electron microscopy reveals that fibril-like bismuth structures were formed on silica nanoparticles, which could be responsible for the improved voltammetric performance due to the enhanced surface area. Finally, the developed electrode was applied to determine Pb 2+ and Cd 2+ in water samples, indicating that this electrode was sensitive, reliable and effective for the simultaneous determination of Pb 2+ and Cd 2+

  8. Varicose vein stripping

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... stripping; Venous reflux - vein stripping; Venous ulcer - veins Patient Instructions Surgical wound care - open Varicose veins - what to ask your doctor Images Circulatory system References American Family Physician. Management of varicose veins. www.aafp.org/afp/2008/ ...

  9. Study and Elimination of the Interference of Aluminium on the Voltammetric Determination of Uranium with Chloranilic Acid. Application to the Determination of Uranium in Waters and Geological Samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernandez, C.; Sanchez, M.; Ballesteros, O.; Fernandez, M.; Clavero, M. A.; Gonzalez, A. M.

    2000-01-01

    The interference of aluminium during the voltammetric determination of uranium with 2,5-dichloro-3,6-dihydroxy-1,4-benzoquinone (chloranilic acid) has been investigated. The presence of aluminium originates a voltammetric signal due to its chloranilic acid complex at the same potential range as the uranium analytical signal appears. The interference of aluminium can be overcome by addition of an appropriate amount of sodium fluoride as complexing reagent. The determination of uranium by adsorptive stripping voltammetry (AdSV) can be carried out at concentration levels as low as 1 μg/L in the presence of 100 μg/L aluminium after the addition of 100μL of 0.1 mol/L NaF. The method can be applied to the determination of uranium in aluminium-containing waters and geological samples containing high aluminium levels. (Author) 19 refs

  10. Complexation-Based Detection of Nickel(II at a Graphene-Chelate Probe in the Presence of Cobalt and Zinc by Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keagan Pokpas

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The adsorptive stripping voltammetric detection of nickel and cobalt in water samples at metal film electrodes has been extensively studied. In this work, a novel, environmentally friendly, metal-free electrochemical probe was constructed for the ultra-trace determination of Ni2+ in water samples by Adsorptive Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry (AdCSV. The electrochemical platform is based on the adsorptive accumulation of Ni2+ ions directly onto a glassy carbon electrode (GCE modified with dimethylglyoxime (DMG as chelating agent and a Nafion-graphene (NGr nanocomposite to enhance electrode sensitivity. The nafion-graphene dimethylglyoxime modified glassy carbon electrode (NGr-DMG-GCE shows superior detection capabilities as a result of the improved surface-area-to-volume ratio and enhanced electron transfer kinetics following the incorporation of single layer graphene, while limiting the toxic effects of the sensor by removal of the more common mercury, bismuth and lead films. Furthermore, for the first time the NGr-DMG-GCE, in the presence of common interfering metal ions of Co2+ and Zn2+ demonstrates good selectivity and preferential binding towards the detection of Ni2+ in water samples. Structural and morphological characterisation of the synthesised single layer graphene sheets was conducted by Raman spectrometry, HRTEM and HRSEM analysis. The instrumental parameters associated with the electrochemical response, including accumulation potential and accumulation time were investigated and optimised in addition to the influence of DMG and graphene concentrations. The NGr-DMG-GCE demonstrated well resolved, reproducible peaks, with RSD (% below 5% and a detection limit of 1.5 µg L−1 for Ni2+ reduction at an accumulation time of 120 s., the prepared electrochemical sensor exhibited good detection and quantitation towards Ni2+ detection in tap water samples, well below 0.1 mg L−1 set by the WHO and EPA standards. This comparable to the South

  11. Complexation-Based Detection of Nickel(II) at a Graphene-Chelate Probe in the Presence of Cobalt and Zinc by Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pokpas, Keagan; Jahed, Nazeem; Baker, Priscilla G; Iwuoha, Emmanuel I

    2017-07-25

    The adsorptive stripping voltammetric detection of nickel and cobalt in water samples at metal film electrodes has been extensively studied. In this work, a novel, environmentally friendly, metal-free electrochemical probe was constructed for the ultra-trace determination of Ni 2+ in water samples by Adsorptive Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry (AdCSV). The electrochemical platform is based on the adsorptive accumulation of Ni 2+ ions directly onto a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with dimethylglyoxime (DMG) as chelating agent and a Nafion-graphene (NGr) nanocomposite to enhance electrode sensitivity. The nafion-graphene dimethylglyoxime modified glassy carbon electrode (NGr-DMG-GCE) shows superior detection capabilities as a result of the improved surface-area-to-volume ratio and enhanced electron transfer kinetics following the incorporation of single layer graphene, while limiting the toxic effects of the sensor by removal of the more common mercury, bismuth and lead films. Furthermore, for the first time the NGr-DMG-GCE, in the presence of common interfering metal ions of Co 2+ and Zn 2+ demonstrates good selectivity and preferential binding towards the detection of Ni 2+ in water samples. Structural and morphological characterisation of the synthesised single layer graphene sheets was conducted by Raman spectrometry, HRTEM and HRSEM analysis. The instrumental parameters associated with the electrochemical response, including accumulation potential and accumulation time were investigated and optimised in addition to the influence of DMG and graphene concentrations. The NGr-DMG-GCE demonstrated well resolved, reproducible peaks, with RSD (%) below 5% and a detection limit of 1.5 µg L -1 for Ni 2+ reduction at an accumulation time of 120 s., the prepared electrochemical sensor exhibited good detection and quantitation towards Ni 2+ detection in tap water samples, well below 0.1 mg L -1 set by the WHO and EPA standards. This comparable to the South African

  12. Active voltammetric microsensors with neural signal processing.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogt, M. C.

    1998-12-11

    Many industrial and environmental processes, including bioremediation, would benefit from the feedback and control information provided by a local multi-analyte chemical sensor. For most processes, such a sensor would need to be rugged enough to be placed in situ for long-term remote monitoring, and inexpensive enough to be fielded in useful numbers. The multi-analyte capability is difficult to obtain from common passive sensors, but can be provided by an active device that produces a spectrum-type response. Such new active gas microsensor technology has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The technology couples an electrocatalytic ceramic-metallic (cermet) microsensor with a voltammetric measurement technique and advanced neural signal processing. It has been demonstrated to be flexible, rugged, and very economical to produce and deploy. Both narrow interest detectors and wide spectrum instruments have been developed around this technology. Much of this technology's strength lies in the active measurement technique employed. The technique involves applying voltammetry to a miniature electrocatalytic cell to produce unique chemical ''signatures'' from the analytes. These signatures are processed with neural pattern recognition algorithms to identify and quantify the components in the analyte. The neural signal processing allows for innovative sampling and analysis strategies to be employed with the microsensor. In most situations, the whole response signature from the voltammogram can be used to identify, classify, and quantify an analyte, without dissecting it into component parts. This allows an instrument to be calibrated once for a specific gas or mixture of gases by simple exposure to a multi-component standard rather than by a series of individual gases. The sampled unknown analytes can vary in composition or in concentration, the calibration, sensing, and processing methods of these active voltammetric microsensors can

  13. Active voltammetric microsensors with neural signal processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vogt, Michael C.; Skubal, Laura R.

    1999-02-01

    Many industrial and environmental processes, including bioremediation, would benefit from the feedback and control information provided by a local multi-analyte chemical sensor. For most processes, such a sensor would need to be rugged enough to be placed in situ for long-term remote monitoring, and inexpensive enough to be fielded in useful numbers. The multi-analyte capability is difficult to obtain from common passive sensors, but can be provided by an active device that produces a spectrum-type response. Such new active gas microsensor technology has been developed at Argonne National Laboratory. The technology couples an electrocatalytic ceramic-metallic (cermet) microsensor with a voltammetric measurement technique and advanced neural signal processing. It has been demonstrated to be flexible, rugged, and very economical to produce and deploy. Both narrow interest detectors and wide spectrum instruments have been developed around this technology. Much of this technology's strength lies in the active measurement technique employed. The technique involves applying voltammetry to a miniature electrocatalytic cell to produce unique chemical 'signatures' from the analytes. These signatures are processed with neural pattern recognition algorithms to identify and quantify the components in the analyte. The neural signal processing allows for innovative sampling and analysis strategies to be employed with the microsensor. In most situations, the whole response signature from the voltammogram can be used to identify, classify, and quantify an analyte, without dissecting it into component parts. This allows an instrument to be calibrated once for a specific gas or mixture of gases by simple exposure to a multi-component standard rather than by a series of individual gases. The sampled unknown analytes can vary in composition or in concentration; the calibration, sensing, and processing methods of these active voltammetric microsensors can detect, recognize, and

  14. Voltammetric determination of arsenic in high iron and manganese groundwaters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbon-Walsh, Kristoff; Salaün, Pascal; Uroic, M Kalle; Feldmann, Joerg; McArthur, John M; van den Berg, Constant M G

    2011-09-15

    Determination of the speciation of arsenic in groundwaters, using cathodic stripping voltammetry (CSV), is severely hampered by high levels of iron and manganese. Experiments showed that the interference is eliminated by addition of EDTA, making it possible to determine the arsenic speciation on-site by CSV. This work presents the CSV method to determine As(III) in high-iron or -manganese groundwaters in the field with only minor sample treatment. The method was field-tested in West-Bengal (India) on a series of groundwater samples. Total arsenic was subsequently determined after acidification to pH 1 by anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV). Comparative measurements by ICP-MS as reference method for total As, and by HPLC for its speciation, were used to corroborate the field data in stored samples. Most of the arsenic (78±0.02%) was found to occur as inorganic As(III) in the freshly collected waters, in accordance with previous studies. The data shows that the modified on-site CSV method for As(III) is a good measure of water contamination with As. The EDTA was also found to be effective in stabilising the arsenic speciation for longterm sample storage at room temperature. Without sample preservation, in water exposed to air and sunlight, the As(III) was found to become oxidised to As(V), and Fe(II) oxidised to Fe(III), removing the As(V) by adsorption on precipitating Fe(III)-hydroxides within a few hours. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Development of extruded resistive plastic tubes for proportional chamber cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, K.

    1982-01-01

    Carbon mixed plastic tubes with resistivity of 10 3 approx. 10 4 Ωcm have been molded with an extrusion method and used for the d.c. cathode of a proportional counter and a multi-wire proportional chamber. The signal by gas multiplication was picked up from a strip r.f. cathode set outside the tube. The characteristics of the counter in the proportional and limited streamer modes have been studied

  16. A high precision straw tube chamber with cathode readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bychkov, V.N.; Golutvin, I.A.; Ershov, Yu.V.; Zubarev, E.V.; Ivanov, A.B.; Lysiakov, V.N.; Makhankov, A.V.; Movchan, S.A.; Peshekhonov, V.D.; Preda, T.

    1993-01-01

    The high precision straw chamber with cathode readout was constructed and investigated. The 10 mm diameter straws were made of aluminized Mylar with transparent longitudinal window. The X-coordinate information has been taken from cathode strips as induced charges and investigated with the centroid method. The spatial resolution σ x =103 μm was obtained at a signal-to-noise ratio of about 70. The possible ways to improve the signal-to-noise ratio are discussed. (orig.)

  17. STUDY OF ELECTROPOLIMERIZATION PROCESSES OF PYRROLE BY CYCLIC VOLTAMMETRIC TECHNIQUE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adhitasari Suratman

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Electropolymerization processes and electrochemical properties of polypyrrole as electroactive polymer have been studied by cyclic voltammetric technique. Pyrrole was electropolymerized to form polypyrrole in water-based solvent containing sodium perchlorate as supporting electrolyte in several pH values. The pH of the solutions were varied by using Britton Robinson buffer. The results showed that oxidation potential limit of electropolymerization processes of pyrrole was 1220 mV vs Ag/AgCl reference electrode. It can be seen that cyclic voltammetric respon of polypyrrole membrane that was prepared by electropolymerization processes of pyrrole at the scanning rate of 100 mV/s was stable. While the processes of pyrrole electropolymerization carried out at the variation of pH showed that the best condition was at the pH range of 2 - 6.   Keywords: polypyrolle, electropolymer, voltammetric technique

  18. Nanotube cathodes.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-11-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  19. Nanotube cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Overmyer, Donald L.; Lockner, Thomas Ramsbeck; Siegal, Michael P.; Miller, Paul Albert

    2006-01-01

    Carbon nanotubes have shown promise for applications in many diverse areas of technology. In this report we describe our efforts to develop high-current cathodes from a variety of nanotubes deposited under a variety of conditions. Our goal was to develop a one-inch-diameter cathode capable of emitting 10 amperes of electron current for one second with an applied potential of 50 kV. This combination of current and pulse duration significantly exceeds previously reported nanotube-cathode performance. This project was planned for two years duration. In the first year, we tested the electron-emission characteristics of nanotube arrays fabricated under a variety of conditions. In the second year, we planned to select the best processing conditions, to fabricate larger cathode samples, and to test them on a high-power relativistic electron beam generator. In the first year, much effort was made to control nanotube arrays in terms of nanotube diameter and average spacing apart. When the project began, we believed that nanotubes approximately 10 nm in diameter would yield sufficient electron emission properties, based on the work of others in the field. Therefore, much of our focus was placed on measured field emission from such nanotubes grown on a variety of metallized surfaces and with varying average spacing between individual nanotubes. We easily reproduced the field emission properties typically measured by others from multi-wall carbon nanotube arrays. Interestingly, we did this without having the helpful vertical alignment to enhance emission; our nanotubes were randomly oriented. The good emission was most likely possible due to the improved crystallinity, and therefore, electrical conductivity, of our nanotubes compared to those in the literature. However, toward the end of the project, we learned that while these 10-nm-diameter CNTs had superior crystalline structure to the work of others studying field emission from multi-wall CNT arrays, these nanotubes still

  20. Adsorptive stripping voltammetric study of vitamin B1 at multi-walled carbon nanotube paste electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pradeep Kumar Brahman

    2016-11-01

    The reduction peak current varies linearly with the concentration of vitamin B1 over the range of 1.0 × 10−7–1.0 × 10−6 M. The limits of detection and quantification of the pure drug are 1.1 × 10−10 M and 2.0 × 10−9 M, with the correlation coefficient, r = 0.997 and the relative standard deviation, RSD = 1.2% (n = 5. Experimental results reveal that the MWCNTPE has advantages of small background current, high signal to background current ratio and good reproducibility.

  1. The Voltammetric Analysis of Selenium Electrodeposition from H2SeO3 Solution on Gold Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kowalik R.

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available The different voltammetry techniques were applied to understand the process of selenium deposition from sulfate solution on gold polycrystalline electrode. By applying the cycling voltammetry with different scan limits as well as the chronoamper-ometry combined with the cathodic and anodic linear stripping voltammetry, the different stages of the deposition of selenium were revealed. It was found that the process of reduction of selenous acid on gold surface exhibits a multistage character. The cyclic voltammetry results showed four cathodic peaks which are related to the surface limited phenomena and which coincide with the bulk deposition process. The fifth cathodic peak is related to the reduction of bulk deposited Se0 to Se-2 ions. Furthermore, the connection of anodic peaks with cathodic ones confirmed the surface limited process of selenium deposition, bulk deposition and reduction to Se-2. Additionally, the cathodic linear stripping voltammetry confirms the process of H2SeO3 adsorption on gold surface. The experiments confirmed that classical voltammetry technique proved to be a very powerful tool for analyzing the electrochemical processes related with interfacial phenomena and electrodeposition.

  2. Disposable Electrochemical Immunosensor Diagnosis Device Based on Nanoparticle Probe and Immunochromatographic Strip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Guodong; Lin, Ying-Ying; Wang, Jun; Wu, Hong; Wai, Chien M.; Lin, Yuehe

    2007-10-15

    We describe a disposable electrochemical immunosensor diagnosis device that is based on the immunochromatographic strip technique and an electrochemical immunoassay based on quantum dot (QD, CdS@ZnS) labels. The device takes advantage of the speed and low-cost of the conventional immunochromatographic strip test and the high-sensitivity of the nanoparticle-based electrochemical immunoassay. A sandwich immunoreaction was performed on the immunochromatographic strip, and the captured QD labels in the test zone were determined by highly sensitive stripping voltammetric measurement of the dissolved metallic component (cadmium) with a disposable-screen-printed electrode, which is embedded underneath the membrane on the test zone. The new device coupled with a portable electrochemical analyzer shows great promise for in-field and point-of-care quantitative testing of disease-related protein biomarkers. The parameters (e.g., voltammetric measurement of QD labels, antibody immobilization, the loading amount of QD-antibody, and the immunoreaction time) that govern the sensitivity and reproducibility of the device were optimized with IgG model analyte. The voltammetric response of the optimized device is highly linear over the range of 0.1 to 10 ng mL-1 IgG, and the limit of detection is estimated to be 30 pg mL-1 in association with a 7-min immunoreaction time. The detection limit was improved to 10 pg mL-1 using a 20-min immunoreaction time. The new disposable electrochemical diagnosis device thus provides a more user-friendly, rapid, clinically accurate, less expensive, and quantitative tool for protein detection.

  3. Voltammetric Studies on Vitamins D2 and D3 in Organic Solvents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chan, Ya Yun; Yue, Yanni; Webster, Richard D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • Vitamins D 2 and D 3 undergo a chemically irreversible oxidation process. • The electrochemical oxidation occurs via one-electron on short (CV) time-scales. • On long time scales (electrolysis) the oxidation occurs via two-electrons. • Chemical oxidation was performed using two molar equivalents of NO + . • Oxidation occurs at the triene moiety. - Abstract: The electrochemical behavior of vitamins D 2 and D 3 were examined by performing cyclic voltammetry (CV), rotating disk electrode voltammetry, controlled potential electrolysis and chemical oxidation in aprotic organic solvents. Both vitamins were electrochemically oxidized in dichloromethane and acetonitrile (E p ox ∼ +0.8 vs. (Fc/Fc + )/V, where E p ox is the anodic peak potential and Fc = ferrocene) via a one-electron chemically irreversible process on the short voltammetric time scale (≤ seconds). Varying the scan rate (0.1 V s −1 to 20 V s −1 ) and temperature (233 K to 293 K) did not strongly affect the voltammetric response recorded on platinum and glassy carbon electrode surfaces with the oxidation process remaining chemically irreversible over the range of scan rates and temperatures tested, indicating that the initially formed cation radical was not long-lived. Repetitive CV experiments indicated that the oxidized product partially adsorbed onto the electrode surface, resulting in diminishing peak currents with multiple scans. Bulk controlled potential electrolysis of the vitamin D compounds performed by alternating several cycles of oxidative electrolysis and reductive pulsed stripping proved to be effective in stripping the adsorbed species off the electrode surfaces. Longer time scale bulk electrolysis experiments led to the detection of a new oxidation peak appearing at less positive potentials as the electrolysis progressed, suggesting that the compounds underwent oxidation on long time scales (minutes to hours) via a two electron process. The vitamins were most

  4. The Strip Module

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Tommy

    1996-01-01

    When the behaviour of a ship in waves is to be predicted it is convenient to have a tool which includes different approaches to the problem.The aim of this project is to develop such a tool named the strip theory module. The strip theory module will consist of submodules dependent on the I...

  5. Science Comic Strips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Dae Hyun; Jang, Hae Gwon; Shin, Dong Sun; Kim, Sun-Ja; Yoo, Chang Young; Chung, Min Suk

    2012-01-01

    Science comic strips entitled Dr. Scifun were planned to promote science jobs and studies among professionals (scientists, graduate and undergraduate students) and children. To this end, the authors collected intriguing science stories as the basis of scenarios, and drew four-cut comic strips, first on paper and subsequently as computer files.…

  6. Anatomy Comic Strips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jin Seo; Kim, Dae Hyun; Chung, Min Suk

    2011-01-01

    Comics are powerful visual messages that convey immediate visceral meaning in ways that conventional texts often cannot. This article's authors created comic strips to teach anatomy more interestingly and effectively. Four-frame comic strips were conceptualized from a set of anatomy-related humorous stories gathered from the authors' collective…

  7. Voltammetric determination of nicotine in cigarette tobacco at ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The electrochemical behavior of nicotine was investigated using cyclic and square wave voltammetric techniques. Electrochemical activation of glassy carbon electrode significantly increased the oxidation peak current of nicotine compared to the bare glassy carbon. At the activated glassy carbon electrode, the square ...

  8. The construction and performance of a large cylindrical wire chamber with cathode readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deiters, K.; Donat, A.; Friebel, W.; Heller, R.; Kirsch, S.; Krankenhagen, R.; Lange, W.; Leiste, R.; Lohmann, W.; Lustermann, W.; Peng, Y.; Roeser, U.; Tonisch, F.; Trowitzsch, G.; Vogt, H.; Wilhelmi, M.

    1991-12-01

    The construction and performance of two large coaxial cylindrical multiwire proportional chambers with cathode readout, denoted as Z-Detector, forming the outer part of the L3 central tracking detector, are described. Three self supporting cylinders of about 1 m length and 1 m diameter, constructed as a sandwich of Kapton foil and foam, form the mechanical frame. It represents 2% of a radiation length. In each chamber one cathode layer is subdivided in helical strips and the other one in rings. The readout of the charges induced on the cathode strips and the other one in rings. The readout of the charges induced on the cathode strips provides the avalanche position along the beam (z-) direction. The detector has been running in the L3 experiment at LEP for nearly two years. The resolution of the z-measurement is 320 μm, the double track resolution is about 10 mm. The efficiency of each chamber is 96%. (orig.)

  9. Cathodic protection -- Rectifier 46

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the cathodic protection system functions as required by project criteria. The cathodic protection system is for the tank farms on the Hanford Reservation. The tank farms store radioactive waste

  10. Cathodic protection -- Rectifier 47

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lane, W.M.

    1995-01-01

    This Acceptance Test Procedure (ATP) has been prepared to demonstrate that the cathodic protection system functions as required by project criteria. The cathodic protection system is for the tank farms at the Hanford Reservation. The tank farms store radioactive waste

  11. The Voltammetric Analysis of Selenium Electrodeposition from H2SeO3 Solution on Gold Electrode

    OpenAIRE

    Kowalik R.

    2015-01-01

    The different voltammetry techniques were applied to understand the process of selenium deposition from sulfate solution on gold polycrystalline electrode. By applying the cycling voltammetry with different scan limits as well as the chronoamper-ometry combined with the cathodic and anodic linear stripping voltammetry, the different stages of the deposition of selenium were revealed. It was found that the process of reduction of selenous acid on gold surface exhibits a multistage character. T...

  12. The Honeycomb Strip Chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graaf, Harry van der; Buskens, Joop; Rewiersma, Paul; Koenig, Adriaan; Wijnen, Thei

    1991-06-01

    The Honeycomb Strip Chamber (HSC) is a new position sensitive detector. It consists of a stack of folded foils, forming a rigid honeycomb structure. In the centre of each hexagonal cell a wire is strung. Conducting strips on the foils, perpendicular to the wires, pick up the induced avalanche charge. Test results of a prototype show that processing the signals form three adjacent strips nearest to the track gives a spatial resolution better than 64 μm for perpendicular incident tracks. The chamber performance is only slightly affected by a magnetic field. (author). 25 refs.; 21 figs

  13. Voltammetric behavior of erythromycin ethylsuccinate at a renewable silver-amalgam film electrode and its determination in urine and in a pharmaceutical preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vajdle, Olga; Guzsvány, Valéria; Škorić, Dušan; Anojčić, Jasmina; Jovanov, Pavle; Avramov-Ivić, Milka; Csanádi, János; Kónya, Zoltán

    2016-01-01

    Highlights: • Voltammetric characterization of erythromycin ethylsuccinate (EES) on Hg(Ag)FE. • Trace level determination of EES by electroreduction based SWV and SW-AdSV methods. • Protonation of the tertiary amino group supports the adsorption of EES on Hg(Ag)FE. • 1 H NMR confirms chemical shifting of tertiary amine methyl proton signals with pH. • Comparative HPLC-DAD measurements were performed for the validation of the methods. - Abstract: Erythromycin, a macrolide antibiotic, has similar antimicrobial spectrum to penicillin and it is widely used, especially in the treatment of patients who are allergic to penicillin. In this work, the application of a renewable silver-amalgam film electrode (Hg(Ag)FE) for the characterization and determination of erythromycin ethylsuccinate (EES), a widely used esterified form of this antibiotic, by means of cyclic voltammetry (CV) and square wave voltammetry (SWV) is presented. In the aqueous Britton-Robinson buffer (pH 5.0–9.0) that served as the supporting electrolyte, one reduction peak of EES was observed in the investigated potential range between −0.75 V and −1.80 V vs SCE, with peak potential maxima ranging from −1.59 V to −1.70 V, which strongly depended on the applied pH, as did the peak shape. For the analytical purposes the pH of 7.0 was selected, since in this electrolyte the EES peak was well-shaped and separated from the background current of the supporting electrolyte in both cases; in the direct cathodic SWV and in the case of square wave adsorptive stripping voltammetry (SW-AdSV). It was established, by the E p -pH correlation, that protons strongly influenced the electrochemical reduction of EES. The CVs recorded between 0.025–0.50 V s −1 at pH 7.0 confirmed that the electrode reaction is adsorption-controlled. Based on the series of 1 H NMR measurements it is proved that the tertiary amino group of EES is mainly in its protonated form at pH 7.0 which may lead, at appropriate

  14. Square Wave Voltammetric Determination of 2-Thiouracil in Pharmaceuticals and Real Samples Using Glassy Carbon Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naveen M. Gokavi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available A simple and rapid method was developed using cyclic and square wave voltammetric techniques for the determination of trace-level sulfur containing compound, 2-thiouracil, at a glassy carbon electrode. 2-thiouracil produced two anodic peaks at 0.334 V and 1.421 V and a cathodic peak at −0.534 V. The square wave voltammetry of 2-thiouracil gave a good linear response in the range of 1–20 μM with a detection limit of 0.16 μM and quantification limit of 0.53 μM (0.0679 μg/g, which is in good agreement as per IUPAC definition of trace component analysis (100 μg/g. The obtained recoveries range from 98.10% to 102.1%. The proposed method was used successfully for its quantitative determination in pharmaceutical formulations and urine as real samples.

  15. Studies on voltammetric determination of cadmium in samples containing native and digested proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Drozd, Marcin; Pietrzak, Mariusz, E-mail: mariusz@ch.pw.edu.pl; Malinowska, Elżbieta

    2014-03-01

    Highlights: • Proteins exhibit diverse impact on the DPASV cadmium signals. • Proteins subjected to HNO{sub 3} introduce less interference, than the native ones. • Optimal amount of SDS depends on the kind of protein. • Presence of thiolated coating agents of QDs do not influence the analysis. - Abstract: This work focuses on determination of cadmium ions using anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) on thin film mercury electrode in conditions corresponding to those obtained after digestion of cadmium-based quantum dots and their conjugates. It presents the impact of selected proteins, including potential receptors and surface blocking agents on the voltammetric determination of cadmium. Experiments regarding elimination of interferences related to proteins presence using sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) are also shown. Effect of SDS on selected analytical parameters and simplicity of analyses carried out was investigated in the framework of current studies. The significant differences of influence among tested proteins on ASV cadmium determination, as well as the variability in SDS effectiveness as the antifouling agent were observed and explained. This work is especially important for those, who design new bioassays and biosensors with a use of quantum dots as electrochemical labels, as it shows what problems may arise from presence of native and digested proteins in tested samples.

  16. Anodic stripping voltammetry – ASV for determination of heavy metals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barón-Jaimez, J; Joya, M R; Barba-Ortega, J

    2013-01-01

    Although voltammetric methods presented a number of difficulties in its early stages, nowadays ''ASV'' anodic stripping voltammetry is considered one of the most sensitive electro-analytical and suitable for trace-level determination of many metals and compounds in environmental samples, clinical and industrial. Its sensitivity is attributed to the combination of a step of pre-concentration effective together with an electrochemical advanced measurement of accumulated analyte. This paper presents an overview of the voltammetry, which includes a group of electro-analytical methods, in them the information about analyte is obtained from measurements of the current flowing in an electrochemical cell when applied a potential difference to an suitable electrode system

  17. Factors influencing the performances of micro-strips gas chambers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mack, V.; Brom, J.M.; Fang, R.; Fontaine, J.C.; Huss, D.; Kachelhoffer, T.; Kettunen, H.; Levy, J.M.; Pallares, A.; Bergdolt, A.M.; Cailleret, J.; Christophel, E.; Coffin, J.; Eberle, H.; Osswald, F.; Sigward, M.H.

    1995-01-01

    Damages to MSGCs (Micro-Strips Gas Chambers) induced by discharges have been investigated. Optimization of electrode shapes and/or deposition of a protective coating allows the potential difference between anode and cathode, thus increasing the gain. For prototypes of MSGCs made at the Centre de Recherches Nucleaires, each step of the manufacturing processes was carefully controlled. Results are presented on the influence of cleaning processes on the surface resistance of glass substrates. (author). 21 refs., 8 figs., 2 tabs

  18. Voltammetric estimation of the content of antibiotics in veterinary preparations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Slepchenko Galina

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The voltammetric method for determination of tylosin tartrate, gentamicin sulfate, and cefalexin in veterinary preparations was for the first time developed. Electrochemical behavior of these antibiotics on the mercury film electrode was studied, and the working conditions (background electrolyte, deposition potential were defined for getting analytical signals using the voltammetry. The methods of real objects preparation for determination of tylosin tartrate, gentamicin sulfate, and cefalexin were offered. The techniques for the voltammetric determination of antibiotics in the veterinary preparations may be used in cefalexin ranging from 0.1 to 2.0 g/dm3, tylosin tartrate in the range from 0.1 to 1.7 g/dm3, and gentamicin sulfate from 0.1 to 1.5 g/dm3 (Sr is not more than 25 %

  19. Voltammetric quantitation of nitazoxanide by glassy carbon electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajeev Jain

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The present study reports voltammetric reduction of nitazoxanide in Britton–Robinson (B–R buffer by cyclic and square-wave voltammetry at glassy carbon electrode. A versatile fully validated voltammetric method for quantitative determination of nitazoxanide in pharmaceutical formulation has been proposed. A squrewave peak current was linear over the nitazoxanide concentration in the range of 20–140 µg/mL. The limit of detection (LOD and limit of quantification (LOQ was calculated to be 5.23 μg/mL and 17.45 μg/mL, respectively. Keywords: Nitazoxanide, Squarewave voltammetry, Glassy carbon electrode, Pharmaceutical formulation

  20. New molecular imprinted voltammetric sensor for determination of ochratoxin A

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yola, Mehmet Lütfi, E-mail: mehmetyola@gmail.com [Department of Metallurgical and Materials Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Sinop University, Sinop (Turkey); Gupta, Vinod Kumar, E-mail: vinodfcy@iitr.ac.in [Indian Institute of Technology, Department of Chemistry, Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India); Department of Applied Chemistry, University of Johannesburg, Johannesburg (South Africa); Atar, Necip [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Pamukkale University, Denizli (Turkey)

    2016-04-01

    In this report, a novel molecular imprinted voltammetric sensor based on silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) involved in a polyoxometalate (H{sub 3}PW{sub 12}O{sub 40}, POM) functionalized reduced graphene oxide (rGO) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was presented for determination of ochrattoxin A (OCH). The developed surfaces were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. OCH imprinted GCE was prepared via electropolymerization process of 100 mM phenol as monomer in the presence of phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.0) containing 25 mM OCH. The linearity range and the detection limit of the method were calculated as 5.0 × 10{sup −11} − 1.5 × 10{sup −9} M and 1.6 × 10{sup −11} M, respectively. The voltammetric sensor was applied to grape juice and wine samples with good selectivity and recovery. The stability of the voltammetric sensor was also reported. - Highlights: • Ochratoxin A-imprinted electrochemical sensor is developed for the sensitive detection of ochratoxin A • The nanomaterial and ochratoxin A-imprinted surfaces were characterized by several methods • Ochratoxin A-imprinted electrochemical sensor is sensitive and selective in analysis of food • Ochratoxin A-imprinted electrochemical sensor is preferred to the other methods.

  1. New molecular imprinted voltammetric sensor for determination of ochratoxin A.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yola, Mehmet Lütfi; Gupta, Vinod Kumar; Atar, Necip

    2016-04-01

    In this report, a novel molecular imprinted voltammetric sensor based on silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) involved in a polyoxometalate (H3PW12O40, POM) functionalized reduced graphene oxide (rGO) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was presented for determination of ochrattoxin A (OCH). The developed surfaces were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. OCH imprinted GCE was prepared via electropolymerization process of 100mM phenol as monomer in the presence of phosphate buffer solution (pH6.0) containing 25 mM OCH. The linearity range and the detection limit of the method were calculated as 5.0 × 10(-11) - 1.5 × 10(-9)M and 1.6 × 10(-11) M, respectively. The voltammetric sensor was applied to grape juice and wine samples with good selectivity and recovery. The stability of the voltammetric sensor was also reported. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. New molecular imprinted voltammetric sensor for determination of ochratoxin A

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yola, Mehmet Lütfi; Gupta, Vinod Kumar; Atar, Necip

    2016-01-01

    In this report, a novel molecular imprinted voltammetric sensor based on silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) involved in a polyoxometalate (H_3PW_1_2O_4_0, POM) functionalized reduced graphene oxide (rGO) modified glassy carbon electrode (GCE) was presented for determination of ochrattoxin A (OCH). The developed surfaces were characterized using scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) method. OCH imprinted GCE was prepared via electropolymerization process of 100 mM phenol as monomer in the presence of phosphate buffer solution (pH 6.0) containing 25 mM OCH. The linearity range and the detection limit of the method were calculated as 5.0 × 10"−"1"1 − 1.5 × 10"−"9 M and 1.6 × 10"−"1"1 M, respectively. The voltammetric sensor was applied to grape juice and wine samples with good selectivity and recovery. The stability of the voltammetric sensor was also reported. - Highlights: • Ochratoxin A-imprinted electrochemical sensor is developed for the sensitive detection of ochratoxin A • The nanomaterial and ochratoxin A-imprinted surfaces were characterized by several methods • Ochratoxin A-imprinted electrochemical sensor is sensitive and selective in analysis of food • Ochratoxin A-imprinted electrochemical sensor is preferred to the other methods

  3. Position resolution of MSGCs with cathode readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amos, N.; Cremaldi, L.; Finocchiaro, G.; Gobbi, B.; Ng, K.K.; Manzella, V.; Peskov, V.; Rajagopalan, S.; Rubinov, P.; Schamberger, D.; Sellberg, G.; Steffens, J.; Tilden, R.; Wang, P.; Yu, Y.

    1997-01-01

    The performance of a telescope of micro-strip gas chambers (MSGC) has been studied in a beam of pions. Detectors with different anode pitch and with different substrates have been operated using several gas mixtures. The position resolutions obtained by reading out the cathodes for the 200 μm pitch is 42 μm. For the 400 μm pitch detectors the resolution is 42 μm after correcting the centroid positions with a function derived from the data. (orig.)

  4. Polyaniline Langmuir-Blodgett film modified glassy carbon electrode as a voltammetric sensor for determination of Ag+ ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Qiongyan; Wang Fei; Qiao Yonghui; Zhang Shusheng; Ye Baoxian

    2010-01-01

    A highly sensitive electrochemical sensor made of a glassy carbon electrode (GCE) coated with a Langmuir-Blodgett film (LB) containing polyaniline (PAn) doped with p-toluenesulfonic acid (PTSA) (LB/PAn-PTSA/GCE) has been used for the detection of trace concentrations of Ag + . UV-vis absorption spectra indicated that the PAn was doped by PTSA. The surface morphology of the PAn LB film was characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM). The electrochemical properties of this LB/PAn-PTSA/GCE were studied using electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and cyclic voltammetry. The LB/PAn-PTSA/GCE was used as a voltammetric sensor for determination of trace Ag + at pH 5.0 using linear scanning stripping voltammetry. Under the optimal experimental conditions, the stripping current was proportional to the Ag + concentration over the range from 6.0 x 10 -10 mol L -1 to 1.0 x 10 -6 mol L -1 , with a detection limit of 4.0 x 10 -10 mol L -1 . The high sensitivity, selectivity, and stability of this LB/PAn-PTSA/GCE also demonstrated its practical utility for simple, rapid and economical determination of Ag + in water samples.

  5. Cathodic Protection Model Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Performs Navy design and engineering of ship and submarine impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems for underwater hull corrosion control and...

  6. micro strip gas chamber

    CERN Multimedia

    1998-01-01

    About 16 000 Micro Strip Gas Chambers like this one will be used in the CMS tracking detector. They will measure the tracks of charged particles to a hundredth of a millimetre precision in the region near the collision point where the density of particles is very high. Each chamber is filled with a gas mixture of argon and dimethyl ether. Charged particles passing through ionise the gas, knocking out electrons which are collected on the aluminium strips visible under the microscope. Such detectors are being used in radiography. They give higher resolution imaging and reduce the required dose of radiation.

  7. Study of position resolution for cathode readout MWPC with measurement of induced charge distribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiba, J.; Iwasaki, H.; Kageyama, T.; Kuribayashi, S.; Nakamura, K.; Sumiyoshi, T.; Takeda, T.

    1983-01-01

    A readout technqiue of multiwire proportional chambers by measurement of charges induced on cathode strips, orthogonal to anode wires, requires an algorithm to relate the measured charge distribution to the avalanche position. With given chamber parameters and under the influence of noise, resolution limits depend on the chosen algorithm. We have studied the position resolution obtained by the centroid method and by the charge-ratio method, both using three consecutive cathode strips. While the centroid method uses a single number, the center of gravity of the measured charges, the charge-ratio method uses the ratios of the charges Qsub(i-1)/Qsub(i) and Qsub(i+1)/Qsub(i) where Qsub(i) is the largest. To obtain a given resolution, the charge-ratio method generally allows wider cathode strips and therefore a smaller number of readout channels than the centroid method. (orig.)

  8. Selective chemical stripping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malavallon, Olivier

    1995-04-01

    At the end of the 80's, some of the large European airlines expressed a wish for paint systems with improved strippability on their aircraft, allowing the possibility to strip down to the primer without altering it, using 'mild' chemical strippers based on methylene chloride. These improvements were initially intended to reduce costs and stripping cycle times while facilitating rapid repainting, and this without the need to change the conventionally used industrial facilities. The level of in-service performance of these paint systems was to be the same as the previous ones. Requirements related to hygiene safety and the environment were added to these initial requirements. To meet customers' expectations, Aerospatiale, within the Airbus Industry GIE, formed a work group. This group was given the task of specifying, following up the elaboration and qualifying the paint systems allowing requirements to be met, in relation with the paint suppliers and the airlines. The analysis made in this report showed the interest of transferring as far upstream as possible (to paint conception level) most of the technical constraints related to stripping. Thus, the concept retained for the paint system, allowing selective chemical stripping, is a 3-coat system with characteristics as near as possible to the previously used paints.

  9. ALICE Silicon Strip Detector

    CERN Multimedia

    Nooren, G

    2013-01-01

    The Silicon Strip Detector (SSD) constitutes the two outermost layers of the Inner Tracking System (ITS) of the ALICE Experiment. The SSD plays a crucial role in the tracking of the particles produced in the collisions connecting the tracks from the external detectors (Time Projection Chamber) to the ITS. The SSD also contributes to the particle identification through the measurement of their energy loss.

  10. Strip interpolation in silicon and germanium strip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wulf, E. A.; Phlips, B. F.; Johnson, W. N.; Kurfess, J. D.; Lister, C. J.; Kondev, F.; Physics; Naval Research Lab.

    2004-01-01

    The position resolution of double-sided strip detectors is limited by the strip pitch and a reduction in strip pitch necessitates more electronics. Improved position resolution would improve the imaging capabilities of Compton telescopes and PET detectors. Digitizing the preamplifier waveform yields more information than can be extracted with regular shaping electronics. In addition to the energy, depth of interaction, and which strip was hit, the digitized preamplifier signals can locate the interaction position to less than the strip pitch of the detector by looking at induced signals in neighboring strips. This allows the position of the interaction to be interpolated in three dimensions and improve the imaging capabilities of the system. In a 2 mm thick silicon strip detector with a strip pitch of 0.891 mm, strip interpolation located the interaction of 356 keV gamma rays to 0.3 mm FWHM. In a 2 cm thick germanium detector with a strip pitch of 5 mm, strip interpolation of 356 keV gamma rays yielded a position resolution of 1.5 mm FWHM

  11. Design and performance of the new cathode readout proportional chambers in LASS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aiken, G.; Aston, D.; Dunwoodie, W.

    1980-10-01

    The design and construction of a new proportional chamber system for the LASS spectrometer are discussed. This system consists of planar and cylindrical chambers employing anode wire and cathode strip readout techniques. The good timing characteristics of anode readout combine with the excellent spatial resolution of cathode readout to provide powerful and compact detectors. Preliminary resolution data are presented along with operating characteristics of the various devices

  12. Photosensitive Strip RETHGEM

    CERN Document Server

    Peskov, Vladimir; Nappi, E.; Oliveira, R.; Paic, G.; Pietropaolo, F.; Picchi, P.

    2008-01-01

    An innovative photosensitive gaseous detector, consisting of a GEM like amplification structure with double layered electrodes (instead of commonly used metallic ones) coated with a CsI reflective photocathode, is described. In one of our latest designs, the inner electrode consists of a metallic grid and the outer one is made of resistive strips; the latter are manufactured by a screen printing technology on the top of the metallic strips grid The inner metallic grid is used for 2D position measurements whereas the resistive layer provides an efficient spark protected operation at high gains - close to the breakdown limit. Detectors with active areas of 10cm x10cm and 10cm x20cm were tested under various conditions including the operation in photosensitive gas mixtures containing ethylferrocene or TMAE vapors. The new technique could have many applications requiring robust and reliable large area detectors for UV visualization, as for example, in Cherenkov imaging devices.

  13. Voltammetric detection of biological molecules using chopped carbon fiber.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugawara, Kazuharu; Yugami, Asako; Kojima, Akira

    2010-01-01

    Voltammetric detection of biological molecules was carried out using chopped carbon fibers produced from carbon fiber reinforced plastics that are biocompatible and inexpensive. Because chopped carbon fibers normally are covered with a sizing agent, they are difficult to use as an electrode. However, when the surface of a chopped carbon fiber was treated with ethanol and hydrochloric acid, it became conductive. To evaluate the functioning of chopped carbon fibers, voltammetric measurements of [Fe(CN)(6)](3-) were carried out. Redoxes of FAD, ascorbic acid and NADH as biomolecules were recorded using cyclic voltammetry. The sizing agents used to bundle the fibers were epoxy, polyamide and polyurethane resins. The peak currents were the greatest when using the chopped carbon fibers that were created with epoxy resins. When the electrode response of the chopped carbon fibers was compared with that of a glassy carbon electrode, the peak currents and the reversibility of the electrode reaction were sufficient. Therefore, the chopped carbon fibers will be useful as disposable electrodes for the sensing of biomolecules.

  14. Nanostructured sulfur cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Rechargeable Li/S batteries have attracted significant attention lately due to their high specific energy and low cost. They are promising candidates for applications, including portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid-level energy storage. However, poor cycle life and low power capability are major technical obstacles. Various nanostructured sulfur cathodes have been developed to address these issues, as they provide greater resistance to pulverization, faster reaction kinetics and better trapping of soluble polysulfides. In this review, recent developments on nanostructured sulfur cathodes and mechanisms behind their operation are presented and discussed. Moreover, progress on novel characterization of sulfur cathodes is also summarized, as it has deepened the understanding of sulfur cathodes and will guide further rational design of sulfur electrodes. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  15. Arcjet cathode phenomena

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curran, Francis M.; Haag, Thomas W.; Raquet, John F.

    1989-01-01

    Cathode tips made from a number of different materials were tested in a modular arcjet thruster in order to examine cathode phenomena. Periodic disassembly and examination, along with the data collected during testing, indicated that all of the tungsten-based materials behaved similarly despite the fact that in one of these samples the percentage of thorium oxide was doubled and another was 25 percent rhenium. The mass loss rate from a 2 percent thoriated rhenium cathode was found to be an order of magnitude greater than that observed using 2 percent thoriated tungsten. Detailed analysis of one of these cathode tips showed that the molten crater contained pure tungsten to a depth of about 150 microns. Problems with thermal stress cracking were encountered in the testing of a hafnium carbide tip. Post test analysis showed that the active area of the tip had chemically reacted with the propellant. A 100 hour continuous test was run at about 1 kW. Post test analysis revealed no dendrite formation, such as observed in a 30 kW arcjet lifetest, near the cathode crater. The cathodes from both this test and a previously run 1000 hour cycled test displayed nearly identical arc craters. Data and calculations indicate that the mass losses observed in testing can be explained by evaporation.

  16. Nafion/2,2'-bipyridyl-modified bismuth film electrode for anodic stripping voltammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torma, Ferenc; Kadar, Mihaly; Toth, Klara; Tatar, Eniko

    2008-01-01

    This paper describes the fabrication, characterisation and the application of a Nafion/2,2'-bipyridyl/bismuth composite film-coated glassy carbon electrode (NC(Bpy)BiFE) for the anodic stripping voltammetric determination of trace metal ions (Zn 2+ , Cd 2+ and Pb 2+ ). The NC(Bpy)BiFE electrode is prepared by first applying a 2.5 mm 3 drop of a coating solution containing 0.5 wt% Nafion and 0.1% (w/v) 2,2'-bipyridil (Bpy) onto the surface of a glassy carbon electrode, while the Bi film was plated in situ simultaneously with the target metal ions at -1.4 V. The main advantage of the polymer coated bismuth film electrode is that the sensitivity of the stripping responses is increased considerably due to the incorporation of the neutral chelating agent of 2,2'-bipyridyl (Bpy) in the Nafion film, while the Nafion coating improved the mechanical stability of the bismuth film and its resistance to the interference of surfactants. The key experimental parameters relevant to both the electrode fabrication and the voltammetric measurement were optimized on the basis of the stripping signals. With a 2 min deposition time in the presence of oxygen, linear calibration curves were obtained in a wide concentration range (about 2-0.001 μM) with detection limits of 8.6 nM (0.56 μg dm -3 ) for Zn 2+ , 1.1 nM (0.12 μg dm -3 ) for Cd 2+ and 0.37 nM (0.077 μg dm -3 ) for Pb 2+ . For nine successive preconcentration/determination/electrode renewal experiments the standard deviations were between 3 and 5% at 1.2 μM for zinc and 0.3-0.3 μM concentration level for lead and cadmium, respectively, and the method exhibited excellent selectivity in the presence of the excess of several potential interfering metal ions. The analytical utility of the stripping voltammetric method elaborated was tested in the assay of heavy metals in some real samples and the method was validated by ICP-MS technique

  17. Dynamic Underground Stripping Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aines, R.; Newmark, R.; McConachie, W.; Udell, K.; Rice, D.; Ramirez, A.; Siegel, W.; Buettner, M.; Daily, W.; Krauter, P.; Folsom, E.; Boegel, A.J.; Bishop, D.; Udell, K.

    1992-01-01

    LLNL is collaborating with the UC Berkeley College of Engineering to develop and demonstrate a system of thermal remediation and underground imaging techniques for use in rapid cleanup of localized underground spills. Called ''Dynamic Stripping'' to reflect the rapid and controllable nature of the process, it will combine steam injection, direct electrical heating, and tomographic geophysical imaging in a cleanup of the LLNL gasoline spill. In the first 8 months of the project, a Clean Site engineering test was conducted to prove the field application of the techniques before moving the contaminated site in FY 92

  18. Cathode materials review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Claus, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Mohanty, Debasish, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Li, Jianlin, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Wood, David L., E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, MS6472 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6472 (United States)

    2014-06-16

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO{sub 2} cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  19. Cathode materials review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daniel, Claus; Mohanty, Debasish; Li, Jianlin; Wood, David L.

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO 2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research

  20. Cathode materials review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Claus; Mohanty, Debasish; Li, Jianlin; Wood, David L.

    2014-06-01

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  1. Strip casting apparatus and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R.S.; Baker, D.F.

    1988-09-20

    Strip casting apparatus including a molten-metal-holding container and a nozzle to deposit molten metal onto a moving chill drum to directly cast continuous metallic strip. The nozzle body includes a slot bounded between a back and a front lip. The slot width exceeds about 20 times the gap distance between the nozzle and the chill drum surface. Preferably, the slot width exceeds 0.5 inch. This method of strip casting minimizes pressure drop, insuring better metal-to-chill-drum contact which promotes heat transfer and results in a better quality metallic strip. 6 figs.

  2. Cyclic voltammetric study of electro-oxidation of methanol on platinum electrode in acidic and neutral media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, A.S.A.; Ahmed, R.; Mirza, M.L.

    2007-01-01

    The electro-oxidation of methanol on electrochemically treated platinum foil was investigated in acidic and neutral media for comparison of cyclic voltammetric characteristics and elucidation of mechanism of electro-oxidation of methanol. The surface area and roughness factor of platinum electrode was calculated. The electro-oxidation of mathanol is an irreversible process giving. anodic peaks in both anodic and cathodic sweep. The characteristic peaks of electrooxidation of methanol appeared at almost the same potential region in both acidic and neutral media. In neutral medium, certain additional cathodic/anodic peaks appeared which were confirmed to arise by the reduction/oxidation of hydrogen ions. The exchange current density and heterogeneous electron transfer rate constant was higher in neutral medium as. compared with acidic medium. The thermodynamic parameters delta H, delta S, and delta G/sub 298/ were calculated. The values of delta H and delta G/sub 298/were positive which indicated that the process of electro-oxidation of methanol is an endothermic and nonspontaneous. The mechanism of electro-oxidation of methanol was same in both acidic and neutral media involving the formation of various adsorbed intermediate species through dissociative adsorption steps leading to the formation of Co adsorbed radicals, which are removed. during interaction with adsorbed hydrous oxides provided by the oxidation of adsorbed water molecules. The higher rate of electro-oxidation of methanol in neutral medium was interpreted in the tight of electrochemical mechanism and was attributed to the presence of comparatively small amount of hydrogen ions only along the surface of working electrode, which are produced during electro-oxidation of methanol. (author)

  3. Determination of fenitrothion in water using a voltammetric sensor based on a polymer-modified glassy carbon electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amare, Meareg; Abicho, Samuel; Admassie, Shimelis

    2014-01-01

    A glassy carbon electrode (GCE) modified with poly(4-amino-3-hydroxynaphthalene sulfonic acid) (poly-AHNSA) was used for the selective and sensitive determination of fenitrothion (FT) organophosphorus pesticide in water. The electrochemical behavior of FT at the bare GCE and the poly-AHNSA/GCE were compared using cyclic voltammetry. Enhanced peak current response and shift to a lower potential at the polymer-modified electrode indicated the electrocatalytic activity of the polymer film towards FT. Under optimized solution and method parameters, the adsorptive stripping square wave voltammetric reductive peak current of FT was linear to FT concentration in the range of 0.001 to 6.6 x 10(-6) M, and the LOD obtained (3delta/m) was 7.95 x 10(-10) M. Recoveries in the range 96-98% of spiked FT in tap water and reproducible results with RSD of 2.6% (n = 5) were obtained, indicating the potential applicability of the method for the determination of trace levels of FT in environmental samples.

  4. Voltammetric behavior, biocidal effect and synthesis of some new nanomeric fused cyclic thiosemicarbazones and their mercuric(II salts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.S.T. Makki

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available New nanomeric 3-thioxo-5-methoxy-4,5-dihydro-6-methyl-9-unsubstituted/substituted-1,2,4-triazino[5,6-b]indoles (2a–c and 3-thioxo-5-methoxy-4,5-dihydro-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,4-triaino[5,6]-cyclobut-6-ene (3 were prepared via reaction of thiosemicarbazide with 5-unsubstitutedand/substituted-indol-2,3-diones and/or 3,4-dihydroxycyclobutane-1,2-dione in methanol–concentrated HCl at room temperature. A series of mercury(II–ligand salts e.g. compound 4b and Hg(II complexes 5a,b and 6 of cyclic Schiff base were prepared. Structures of these compounds were established by elemental analysis and spectral measurements. The redox characteristics of selected compounds were studied for use as chelating agents for stripping voltammetric determination of mercuric(II ions in aqueous media. The compounds were also screened for their use as molluscicidal agents against Biomophalaria Alexandrina Snails responsible for Bilhariziasis.

  5. Filtered cathodic arc source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Falabella, S.; Sanders, D.M.

    1994-01-01

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge is described. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45 degree to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles. 3 figures

  6. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2013-07-23

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  7. Smart cathodic protection systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Leggedoor, J.; Schuten, G.; Sajna, S.; Kranjc, A.

    2010-01-01

    Cathodic protection delivers corrosion protection in concrete structures exposed to aggressive environments, e.g. in de-icing salt and marine climates. Working lives of a large number of CP systems are at least more than 13 years and probably more than 25 years, provided a minimum level of

  8. MWPC with highly segmented cathode pad readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Debbe, R.; Fischer, J.; Lissauer, D.

    1989-01-01

    Experiments being conducted with high energy heavy ion beams at Brookhaven National Laboratory and at CERN have shown the importance of developing position sensitive detectors capable of handling events with high multiplicity in environments of high track density as will also be the case in future high luminosity colliders like SSC and RHIC. In addition, these detectors are required to have a dynamic range wide enough to detect minimum ionizing particles and heavy ions like oxygen or silicon. We present here a description of work being done on a prototype of such a detector at BNL. Results from a similar counter are also presented in this Conference. The ''pad chamber'' is a detector with a cathode area subdivided into a very large number of pixel-like elements such that a charged particle traversing the detector at normal incidence leaves an induced charge on a few localized pads. The pads are interconnected by a resistive strip, and readout amplifiers are connected to the resistive strip at appropriate, carefully determined spacings. The pattern of tracks in a multi-hit event is easily recognized, and a centroid-finding readout system allows position determination to a small fraction of the basic cell size. 5 refs., 9 figs

  9. Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetric Determination of Amaranth and Tartrazine in Drinks and Gelatins Using a Screen-Printed Carbon Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdomo, Yeny; Arancibia, Verónica; Nagles, Edgar

    2017-01-01

    A fast, sensitive, and selective method for the simultaneous determination of one pair of synthetic colorants commonly found mixed in food products, Amaranth (AM) and Tartrazine (TZ), based on their adsorption and oxidation on a screen-printed electrode (SPE) is presented. The variation of peak current with pH, supporting electrolyte, adsorption time, and adsorption potential were optimized using square wave adsorptive voltammetry. The optimal conditions were found to be: pH 3.2 (PBS), Eads 0.00 V, and tads 30 s. Under these conditions, the AM and TZ signals were observed at 0.56 and 0.74 V, respectively. A linear response were found over the 0.15 to 1.20 µmol L−1 and 0.15 to 0.80 µmol L−1 concentrations, with detection limits (3σ/slope) of 26 and 70 nmol L−1 for AM and TZ, respectively. Reproducibility for 17.7 µmol L–1 AM and TZ solutions were 2.5 and 3.0% (n = 7), respectively, using three different electrodes. The method was validated by determining AM and TZ in spiked tap water and unflavored gelatin spiked with AM and TZ. Because a beverage containing both AM and TZ was not found, the method was applied to the determination of AM in a kola soft drink and TZ in an orange jelly and a soft drink powder. PMID:29156561

  10. Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetric Determination of Amaranth and Tartrazine in Drinks and Gelatins Using a Screen-Printed Carbon Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yeny Perdomo

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available A fast, sensitive, and selective method for the simultaneous determination of one pair of synthetic colorants commonly found mixed in food products, Amaranth (AM and Tartrazine (TZ, based on their adsorption and oxidation on a screen-printed electrode (SPE is presented. The variation of peak current with pH, supporting electrolyte, adsorption time, and adsorption potential were optimized using square wave adsorptive voltammetry. The optimal conditions were found to be: pH 3.2 (PBS, Eads 0.00 V, and tads 30 s. Under these conditions, the AM and TZ signals were observed at 0.56 and 0.74 V, respectively. A linear response were found over the 0.15 to 1.20 µmol L−1 and 0.15 to 0.80 µmol L−1 concentrations, with detection limits (3σ/slope of 26 and 70 nmol L−1 for AM and TZ, respectively. Reproducibility for 17.7 µmol L–1 AM and TZ solutions were 2.5 and 3.0% (n = 7, respectively, using three different electrodes. The method was validated by determining AM and TZ in spiked tap water and unflavored gelatin spiked with AM and TZ. Because a beverage containing both AM and TZ was not found, the method was applied to the determination of AM in a kola soft drink and TZ in an orange jelly and a soft drink powder.

  11. Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetric Determination of Amaranth and Tartrazine in Drinks and Gelatins Using a Screen-Printed Carbon Electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perdomo, Yeny; Arancibia, Verónica; García-Beltrán, Olimpo; Nagles, Edgar

    2017-11-18

    A fast, sensitive, and selective method for the simultaneous determination of one pair of synthetic colorants commonly found mixed in food products, Amaranth (AM) and Tartrazine (TZ), based on their adsorption and oxidation on a screen-printed electrode (SPE) is presented. The variation of peak current with pH, supporting electrolyte, adsorption time, and adsorption potential were optimized using square wave adsorptive voltammetry. The optimal conditions were found to be: pH 3.2 (PBS), E ads 0.00 V, and t ads 30 s. Under these conditions, the AM and TZ signals were observed at 0.56 and 0.74 V, respectively. A linear response were found over the 0.15 to 1.20 µmol L -1 and 0.15 to 0.80 µmol L -1 concentrations, with detection limits (3σ/slope) of 26 and 70 nmol L -1 for AM and TZ, respectively. Reproducibility for 17.7 µmol L -1 AM and TZ solutions were 2.5 and 3.0% ( n = 7), respectively, using three different electrodes. The method was validated by determining AM and TZ in spiked tap water and unflavored gelatin spiked with AM and TZ. Because a beverage containing both AM and TZ was not found, the method was applied to the determination of AM in a kola soft drink and TZ in an orange jelly and a soft drink powder.

  12. Differential Pulse Anodic Stripping Voltammetry for Mercury Determination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vereștiuc Paul C.

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In the present work voltammetric investigations have been performed on HgCl2 aqueous solutions prepared from a Cz 9024 reagent. Carbon paste electrode (CPE, eriochrome black T modified carbon paste electrode (MCPE/EBT and KCl 1M as background electrolyte, were involved within the experimental procedures. Cyclic voltammetry (CV has been performed in order to compare the behaviour of the two electrodes in both K3[Fe(CN6] and mercury calibration aqueous solution. Differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV was used to determine the most suitable parameters for mercury determination. All experiments were performed at 25 ± 1 ℃, using an electrochemical cell with three-electrodes connected to an Autolab PG STAT 302N (Metrohm-Autolab potentiostat that is equipped with Nova 1.11 software. The measured potential values were generated by using the silver chloride electrode (AgClE as reference and a platinum wire electrode as auxiliary. A series of time depending equations for the pre-concentration and concentration steps were established, with the observation that a higher sensitivity can be obtained while increasing the pre-concentration time. DPASV were drawn using the CPE in 11.16 % coriander, as mercury complex, the voltamograms signals indicating mercury oxidation, with signal intensity increasing in time.

  13. Characterization of galvannealed strip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreas, G.; Hardy, Y.

    1999-01-01

    With the aim of enhancing coating quality control during galvannealing process, an online microscopic image acquisition sensor has been developed at CRM. In galvannealing process, the ζ phase surface density is a coating quality characteristic, and the on-line microscope, equipped with optics placed at 20 mm from the surface, grabs 250 μm x 190 μm images on which ζ crystals (approximate dimensions: 1 μm x 10 μm) can be clearly identified. On-line, the sensor is mounted in front of a roll where the strip has a stable position. The coating surface to sensor optics distance is continuously measured by an accurate triangulation sensor (1 μm repeatability) and is adjusted in such a way that, due to roll eccentricity, the image is focused at least twice per revolution. When focused, image of moving product is frozen by a short (10 ns) laser light pulse and is grabbed. The obtained image is then processed to extract ζ phase percentage and allows adjustment of process parameters to reach the desired coating characteristics. (author)

  14. Buffers and vegetative filter strips

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthew J. Helmers; Thomas M. Isenhart; Michael G. Dosskey; Seth M. Dabney

    2008-01-01

    This chapter describes the use of buffers and vegetative filter strips relative to water quality. In particular, we primarily discuss the herbaceous components of the following NRCS Conservation Practice Standards.

  15. Thrombin-Binding Aptamer Quadruplex Formation: AFM and Voltammetric Characterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Constantin Diculescu

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The adsorption and the redox behaviour of thrombin-binding aptamer (TBA and extended TBA (eTBA were studied using atomic force microscopy and voltammetry at highly oriented pyrolytic graphite and glassy carbon. The different adsorption patterns and degree of surface coverage were correlated with the sequence base composition, presence/absence of K+, and voltammetric behaviour of TBA and eTBA. In the presence of K+, only a few single-stranded sequences present adsorption, while the majority of the molecules forms stable and rigid quadruplexes with no adsorption. Both TBA and eTBA are oxidized and the only anodic peak corresponds to guanine oxidation. Upon addition of K+ ions, TBA and eTBA fold into a quadruplex, causing the decrease of guanine oxidation peak and occurrence of a new peak at a higher potential due to the oxidation of G-quartets. The higher oxidation potential of G-quartets is due to the greater difficulty of electron transfer from the inside of the quadruplex to the electrode surface than electron transfer from the more flexible single strands.

  16. Electropolymerized supramolecular tetraruthenated porphyrins applied as a voltammetric sensor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Silva, Monize M. da; Ribeiro, Gabriel H.; Faria, Anizio M. de; Bogado, Andre L.; Dinelli, Luis R., E-mail: dinelli@pontal.ufu.br [Universidade Federal de Uberlandia (UFU), Ituiutaba, MG (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Integradas do Pontal; Batista, Alzir A. [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica

    2013-11-15

    Porphyrin 5,10,15,20-Tetra(4-pyridyl)manganese(III), [Mn-TPyP(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}]PF{sub 6}, and electropolymerized supramolecular porphyrins (ESP), {l_brace}Mn-TPyP(H{sub 2}O){sub 2}[RuCl{sub 3}(dppb)]{sub 4}{r_brace}PF{sub 6} (dppb = 1,4-bis(diphenylphosphine)butane), were synthesized and characterized. A thin solid film of ESP was obtained on a glass carbon electrode surface by a cyclic voltammetry method. The peak current increased with the number of voltammetric cycles, which shows a typical behavior of the species being adsorbed on the surface of the electrode. Cyclic voltammetry was also employed for acetaminophen quantification using an ESP modified electrode. The modified electrode shows a linear relationship between the anodic peak current and the concentration of acetaminophen (in the rage 0.05 to 0.7 mmol L{sup -1}. The performance of the modified electrode was verified by the determination of acetaminophen in a commercial pharmaceutical product and the results were in good agreement with those obtained by a control HPLC method. (author)

  17. Determination of picomolar silver concentrations by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry at a carbon paste electrode modified with phenylthiourea-functionalized high ordered nanoporous silica gel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Javanbakht, Mehran; Divsar, Faten; Badiei, Alireza; Fatollahi, Fatemeh; Khaniani, Yeganeh; Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Norouzi, Parviz; Chaloosi, Marzieh; Ziarani, Ghodsi Mohammadi

    2009-01-01

    This study introduces the design of an anodic stripping voltammetric (ASV) method for the silver ion determination at a carbon paste electrode (CPE), chemically modified with phenylthiourea-nanoporous silica gel (Tu-SBA-15-CPE). The electroanalytical pro includes two steps: preconcentration of metal ions at an electrode surface, followed by quantification of the accumulated species by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetric methods. Factors affecting the performance of the anodic stripping were investigated, including the modifier quantity in the paste, the electrolyte concentrations, the solution pH and the accumulation potential or time. The most sensitive and reliable electrode contained 10% Tu-SBA-15 and 90% carbon paste. The accumulation potential and time were set at, -200 mV and 300 s, respectively, and the scan rate at 50 mV s -1 in the scan range of -200 to 700 mV. The resulting electrode demonstrated a linear response over range of silver ion concentration of 8.0-80 pmol/L with detection limit (S/N = 3) of 5 pmol/L. The prepared electrodes were used for the silver determination in sea and tap water samples and very good recovery results were obtained. The accuracy was assessed through recovery experiments and independent analysis by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

  18. Determination of picomolar silver concentrations by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry at a carbon paste electrode modified with phenylthiourea-functionalized high ordered nanoporous silica gel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Javanbakht, Mehran [Department of Chemistry, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Nano Science and Technology Research Center, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)], E-mail: mehranjavanbakht@gmail.com; Divsar, Faten [Department of Chemistry, University of Tarbiat Moallem, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Badiei, Alireza [School of Chemistry, University College of Science, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Fatollahi, Fatemeh [Department of Chemistry, Amirkabir University of Technology, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Khaniani, Yeganeh [School of Chemistry, University College of Science, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ganjali, Mohammad Reza; Norouzi, Parviz [Center of Excellence in Electrochemistry, Faculty of Chemistry, University of Tehran, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Chaloosi, Marzieh [Department of Chemistry, University of Tarbiat Moallem, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Ziarani, Ghodsi Mohammadi [Department of Chemistry, University of Alzahra, Tehran (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2009-09-30

    This study introduces the design of an anodic stripping voltammetric (ASV) method for the silver ion determination at a carbon paste electrode (CPE), chemically modified with phenylthiourea-nanoporous silica gel (Tu-SBA-15-CPE). The electroanalytical pro includes two steps: preconcentration of metal ions at an electrode surface, followed by quantification of the accumulated species by differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetric methods. Factors affecting the performance of the anodic stripping were investigated, including the modifier quantity in the paste, the electrolyte concentrations, the solution pH and the accumulation potential or time. The most sensitive and reliable electrode contained 10% Tu-SBA-15 and 90% carbon paste. The accumulation potential and time were set at, -200 mV and 300 s, respectively, and the scan rate at 50 mV s{sup -1} in the scan range of -200 to 700 mV. The resulting electrode demonstrated a linear response over range of silver ion concentration of 8.0-80 pmol/L with detection limit (S/N = 3) of 5 pmol/L. The prepared electrodes were used for the silver determination in sea and tap water samples and very good recovery results were obtained. The accuracy was assessed through recovery experiments and independent analysis by graphite furnace atomic absorption spectrometry.

  19. Magnetic stripping studies for SPL

    CERN Document Server

    Posocco, P; CERN. Geneva. BE Department

    2010-01-01

    Magnetic stripping of H- can seriously enhance the beam losses along the SPL machine. These losses depend on the beam energy, on the beam transverse distribution and on the intensity of the magnetic field. For radioprotection issues the losses must be limited to 1 W/m. In this paper we will concentrate on the stripping phenomena inside the quadrupole magnets with the aim of defining the quadrupole range for the design phase of SPL.

  20. Air cathode structure manufacture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Momyer, William R.; Littauer, Ernest L.

    1985-01-01

    An improved air cathode structure for use in primary batteries and the like. The cathode structure includes a matrix active layer, a current collector grid on one face of the matrix active layer, and a porous, nonelectrically conductive separator on the opposite face of the matrix active layer, the collector grid and separator being permanently bonded to the matrix active layer. The separator has a preselected porosity providing low IR losses and high resistance to air flow through the matrix active layer to maintain high bubble pressure during operation of the battery. In the illustrated embodiment, the separator was formed of porous polypropylene. A thin hydrophobic film is provided, in the preferred embodiment, on the current collecting metal grid.

  1. Lead migration from toys by anodic stripping voltammetry using a bismuth film electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, M Fernanda C; Catarino, Rita I L; Pimenta, Adriana M; Souto, M Renata S; Afonso, Christelle S; Fernandes, Ana F Q

    2016-09-02

    Metals may be released from toys via saliva during mouthing, via sweat during dermal contact, or via gastric and intestinal fluids after partial or whole ingestion. In this study, we determined the lead migration from toys bought on the Portuguese market for children below 3 years of age. The lead migration was performed according to the European Committee for Standardization EN 71-3, which proposes a 2-hour migration test that simulates human gastric conditions. The voltammetric determination of migrated lead was performed by anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) at a bismuth film electrode (BiFE). For all the analyzed toys, the values of migrated lead did not exceed the limits imposed by the European Committee for Standardization EN 71-3 (90 mg kg -1 ) and by the EU Directive 2009/48/EC (13.5 mg kg -1 ) on the safety of toys.

  2. Trace determination of yttrium and some heavy rare-earths by adsorptive stripping voltammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, J.; Zadeii, J.M.

    1986-01-01

    The interfacial and redox behaviour of rare-earth chelates the Solochrome Violet RS are exploited for developing a sensitive adsorptive stripping procedure. Yttrium and heavy rare earths such as dysprosium, holmium and ytterbium can thus be measured at ng/ml levels and below, by controlled adsorptive accumulation of the metal chelate at the hanging mercury drop electrode, followed by voltammetric measurement of the surface species. With a 3-min preconcentration time, the detection limit ranges from 5 x 10 -10 to 1.4 x 10 -9 M. The relative standard deviation at the 7 ng/ml level ranges from 4 to 7%. A separation method is required to differentiate between the individual rare-earth metals. (author)

  3. Cathode ray tube screens

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cockayne, B.; Robbins, D.J.; Glasper, J.L.

    1982-01-01

    An improved cathode ray tube screen is described which consists of a single- or a poly-crystalline slice of a material such as yttrium aluminium garnet in which dopants such as Tb 3 + , Eu 3 + , Ce 3 + or Tm 3 + are ion implanted to different depths or in different areas of the screen. Annealing the screen removes lattice damage caused by the ion implanting and assists the diffusion of the dopant into the crystal. (U.K.)

  4. Arc cathode spots

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schrade, H.O.

    1989-01-01

    Arc spots are usually highly unstable and jump statistically over the cathode surface. In a magnetic field parallel to the surface, preferably they move in the retrograde direction; i.e., opposite to the Lorentzian rule. If the field is inclined with respect to the surface, the spots drift away at a certain angle with respect to the proper retrograde direction (Robson drift motion). These well-known phenomena are explained by one stability theory

  5. Cathode ray tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1979-01-01

    A cathode ray tube comprises two electron lens means in combination to crossover the electron beam at a second crossover between the two electron lens means with one of the two lens means having a variable voltage applied thereto to control the location of the beam crossover in order to focus the beam onto a display screen at any location away from the screen center. (Auth.)

  6. Thick-film voltammetric pH-sensors with internal indicator and reference species

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Musa, Arnaud Emmanuel; Alonso-Lomillo, María Asunción; del Campo, Francisco Javier

    2012-01-01

    , low cost and ease of fabrication. More importantly, as opposed to conventional voltammetric systems where the height of the voltammetric peaks is taken into account to quantify the amount of a species of interest, here, the difference between the peak potential of the indicator species and the peak...... potential of the reference species is used. Thus, this measurement principle makes the electrochemical system presented here less dependent on the potential of the reference electrode (RE), as is often the case in other electrochemical systems. The developed system displays very promising performances...

  7. Depression cathode structure for cathode ray tubes having surface smoothness and method for producing same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rychlewski, T.V.

    1984-01-01

    Depression cathode structures for cathode ray tubes are produced by dispensing liquid cathode material into the depression of a metallic supporting substrate, removing excess cathode material by passing a doctor blade across the substrate surface and over the depression, and drying the cathode layer to a substantially immobile state. The cathode layer may optionally be further shaped prior to substantially complete drying thereof

  8. Creating intense polarized electron beam via laser stripping and spin-orbit interaction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Danilov, V.; Ptitsyn, V.; Gorlov, T.

    2010-01-01

    The recent advance in laser field make it possible to excite and strip electrons with definite spin from hydrogen atoms. The sources of hydrogen atoms with orders of magnitude higher currents (than that of the conventional polarized electron cathods) can be obtained from H - sources with good monochromatization. With one electron of H - stripped by a laser, the remained electron is excited to upper state (2P 3/2 and 2P 1/2 ) by a circular polarization laser light from FEL. Then, it is excited to a high quantum number (n=7) with mostly one spin direction due to energy level split of the states with a definite direction of spin and angular momentum in an applied magnetic field and then it is stripped by a strong electric field of an RF cavity. This paper presents combination of lasers and fields to get high polarization and high current electron source.

  9. Comparison of analytical possibilities of inversion voltammetry of tellurium with cathodic and anodic potential scanning taking layer-by-layer analysis of GaAs-Te films as example

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaplin, A.A.; Portnyagina, Eh.O.; Gridaev, V.F.

    1979-01-01

    Possibility of application in analytical purposes of the process of tellurium precipitation electrosolution from the surfaces of graphite and mercury-graphite electrodes at the cathode scanning of the potential is shown. As a result of comparison of direct and inversion scanning with cathodic and anodic scanning of the potential, variants of voltammetric method of tellurium determination in artificial solutions and, taking the developed method of layer-by-layer analysis of the GaAsTe films as an example, advantage of mercury-graphite electrode with cathodic scanning as compared to graphite electrode with cathode scanning of the potential is shown. Reproducibility of the GaAs film analysis results according to anodic and cathodic tellurium peaks is satisfactory. Maximum deviation from the results of analysis of oxidation peaks and tellurium peduction does not exceed 15 rel. %. Thus, for tellurium concentrations, exceeding 5x10 -6 g-ion/l, both anodic and cathodic scanning of the potential can be used, though error in tellurium determination according to cathodic peaks is 1.5-2.0 times higher. At tellurium amounts lower 5x10 -6 g-ion/l the determination should be carried out according to the peaks of tellurium anodic oxidation from the surface of graphite electrode or according to the peaks of tellurium cathodic reduction from the surface of mercury-graphite electrode

  10. Magnetic ring for stripping enhancement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selph, F.

    1992-10-01

    A ring designed to recycle ions through a stripping medium offers the possibility for increasing output of the desired charge state by up to 4x. This could be a very important component of a Radioactive Nuclear Beam Facility. In order for such a ring to work effectively it must satisfy certain design conditions. These include achromaticity at the stripper, a dispersed region for an extraction magnet, and a number of first and higher order optics constraints which are necessary to insure that the beam emittance is not degraded unduly by the ring. An example is given of a candidate design of a stripping ring

  11. Nanostructured lanthanum manganate composite cathode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wei Guo; Liu, Yi-Lin; Barfod, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    that the (La1-xSrx)(y)MnO3 +/-delta (LSM) composite cathodes consist of a network of homogenously distributed LSM, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), and pores. The individual grain size of LSM or YSZ is approximately 100 nm. The degree of contact between cathode and electrolyte is 39% on average. (c) 2005...

  12. Electrochemical properties of LiMn2O4 cathode material doped with an actinide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eftekhari, Ali; Moghaddam, Abdolmajid Bayandori; Solati-Hashjin, Mehran

    2006-01-01

    Metal substation as an efficient approach for improvement of battery performance of LiMn 2 O 4 was performed by an actinide dopant. Uranium as the last natural element and most common actinide was employed for this purpose. Cyclic voltammetric studies revealed that incorporation of uranium into LiMn 2 O 4 spinel significantly improves electrochemical performance. It also strengthens the spinel stability to exhibit better cycleability. Surprisingly, the capacity increases upon cycling of LiU 0.01 Mn 1.99 O 4 cathode. This inverse behavior is attributed to uniform distribution of dopant during insertion/extraction process. In other words, this is an electrochemical refinement of the nanostructure which is not detectable in microscale morphology, as rearrangement of dopant in nanoscale occurs and this is an unexceptional nanostructural ordering. In addition, uranium doping strengthens the Li diffusion, particularly at redox potentials

  13. Discrimination of Rice with Different Pretreatment Methods by Using a Voltammetric Electronic Tongue

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available In this study, an application of a voltammetric electronic tongue for discrimination and prediction of different varieties of rice was investigated. Different pretreatment methods were selected, which were subsequently used for the discrimination of different varieties of rice and prediction of unknown rice samples. To this aim, a voltammetric array of sensors based on metallic electrodes was used as the sensing part. The different samples were analyzed by cyclic voltammetry with two sample-pretreatment methods. Discriminant Factorial Analysis was used to visualize the different categories of rice samples; however, radial basis function (RBF artificial neural network with leave-one-out cross-validation method was employed for prediction modeling. The collected signal data were first compressed employing fast Fourier transform (FFT and then significant features were extracted from the voltammetric signals. The experimental results indicated that the sample solutions obtained by the non-crushed pretreatment method could efficiently meet the effect of discrimination and recognition. The satisfactory prediction results of voltammetric electronic tongue based on RBF artificial neural network were obtained with less than five-fold dilution of the sample solution. The main objective of this study was to develop primary research on the application of an electronic tongue system for the discrimination and prediction of solid foods and provide an objective assessment tool for the food industry.

  14. VOLTAMMETRIC BEHAVIOR OF SOME STEELS IN AQUEOUS SOLUTIONS OF HNO3

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gheorghe Nemtoi

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion process of some steels immersed in HNO3 solutions of different concentrations by means of voltammetric measurements was investigated. For different values of the corrosion potential, or of the contact time: solid steel-aggressive medium, several equations of the type: I = f (E were proposed, only for linear domains of the voltammograms.

  15. Combined Voltammetric-Potentiometric Sensor with the Silver Solid Amalgam Link for Electroanalytical Measurements

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Josypčuk, Bohdan; Novotný, Ladislav

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 14, č. 24 (2002), s. 1739-1741 ISSN 1040-0397 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV204/97/K084 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : combined voltammetric-potentiometric sensors * solid amalgam Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 1.783, year: 2002

  16. Novel acyclonucleoside analog bearing a 1,2,4-triazole–Schiff base: Synthesis, characterization and analytical studies using square wave-adsorptive stripping voltammetry and HPLC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali F. Alghamdi

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available New acyclonucleoside analogs tethered by a 1,2,4-triazole scaffold were synthesized through the condensation of 4-amino-5-(2-phenyleth-1-yl-2,4-dihydro-3H-1,2,4-triazole-3-thione (2 with benzaldehyde followed by the alkylation of the resulting Schiff base (3with 2-bromoethanol, 3-chloropropanol and/or 3-chloropropan-1,2-diol. Voltammetric studies were carried out for the analysis of 1 × 10−6 mol L−1 of the newly synthesized acyclonucleoside analogs (4–6 using square wave-adsorptive stripping voltammetry (SW-AdSV. The sharp voltammetric peak and high reduction current were recorded using a Britton–Robinson B–R pH 10 buffer at Ep = −1250 mV on the hanging mercury drop surface (HMDE and Ag/AgCl reference electrode. Several experimental conditions were studied, such as the supporting electrolytes, the pH, and the accumulation time, as well as the potential, the scan rate, the frequency and the step potential for 4-benzylideneamino-5-(2-phenyleth-1-yl-3-[(2,3-dihydroxyprop-1-ylthio]-1,2,4-triazole (6. The analytical performance of the voltammetric technique was investigated through the analysis of the calibration curve, the detection limit, the recovery and the stability. The voltammetric analytical applications were evaluated by the recovery of compound (6 in the urine and plasma samples. The HPLC technique was also applied for the separation of compound (6 from interference using a C-18 (5 μm column with UV detection at 254 nm.

  17. The voltammetric responses of nanometer-sized electrodes in weakly supported electrolyte: A theoretical study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Yuwen; Zhang Qianfan; Chen Shengli

    2010-01-01

    The effect of the supporting electrolyte concentration on the interfacial profiles and voltammetric responses of nanometer-sized disk electrodes have been investigated theoretically by combining the Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) theory and Butler-Volmer (BV) equation. The PNP-theory is used to treat the nonlinear couplings of electric field, concentration field and dielectric field at electrochemical interface without the electroneutrality assumption that has been long adopted in various voltammetric theories for macro/microelectrodes. The BV equation is modified by using the Frumkin correction to account for the effect of the diffuse double layer potential on interfacial electron-transfer (ET) rate and by including a distance-dependent ET probability in the expression of rate constant to describe the radial heterogeneity of the ET rate constant at nanometer-sized disk electrodes. The computed voltammetric responses for disk electrodes larger than 200 nm in radii in the absence of the excess of the supporting electrolyte using the present theoretical scheme show reasonable agreements with the predications of the conventional microelectrode voltammetric theory which uses the combined Nernst-Planck equation and electroneutrality equation to describe the mixed electromigration-diffusion mass transport without including the possible effects of the diffuse double layer (Amatore et al. ). For electrodes smaller than 200 nm, however, the voltammetric responses predicated by the present theory exhibit significant deviation from the microelectrode theory. It is shown that the deviations are mainly resulted from the overlap between the diffuse double layer and the concentration depletion layer (CDL) at nanoscale electrochemical interfaces in weakly supported media, which will result in the invalidation of the electroneutrality condition in CDL, and from the radial inhomogeneity of ET probability at nanometer-sized disk electrodes.

  18. The voltammetric responses of nanometer-sized electrodes in weakly supported electrolyte: A theoretical study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu Yuwen; Zhang Qianfan [Hubei Electrochemical Power Sources Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China); Chen Shengli, E-mail: slchen@whu.edu.c [Hubei Electrochemical Power Sources Key Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Analytical Chemistry for Biology and Medicine (Ministry of Education), Department of Chemistry, Wuhan University, Wuhan 430072 (China)

    2010-11-30

    The effect of the supporting electrolyte concentration on the interfacial profiles and voltammetric responses of nanometer-sized disk electrodes have been investigated theoretically by combining the Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) theory and Butler-Volmer (BV) equation. The PNP-theory is used to treat the nonlinear couplings of electric field, concentration field and dielectric field at electrochemical interface without the electroneutrality assumption that has been long adopted in various voltammetric theories for macro/microelectrodes. The BV equation is modified by using the Frumkin correction to account for the effect of the diffuse double layer potential on interfacial electron-transfer (ET) rate and by including a distance-dependent ET probability in the expression of rate constant to describe the radial heterogeneity of the ET rate constant at nanometer-sized disk electrodes. The computed voltammetric responses for disk electrodes larger than 200 nm in radii in the absence of the excess of the supporting electrolyte using the present theoretical scheme show reasonable agreements with the predications of the conventional microelectrode voltammetric theory which uses the combined Nernst-Planck equation and electroneutrality equation to describe the mixed electromigration-diffusion mass transport without including the possible effects of the diffuse double layer (Amatore et al. ). For electrodes smaller than 200 nm, however, the voltammetric responses predicated by the present theory exhibit significant deviation from the microelectrode theory. It is shown that the deviations are mainly resulted from the overlap between the diffuse double layer and the concentration depletion layer (CDL) at nanoscale electrochemical interfaces in weakly supported media, which will result in the invalidation of the electroneutrality condition in CDL, and from the radial inhomogeneity of ET probability at nanometer-sized disk electrodes.

  19. Acquisition and calibration electronics of a MWPC with a cathodic read-out

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carbonara, F; Chiefari, G; Drago, E; Ereditato, A; Lanzano, S; Napolitano, M; Sciacca, G [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Naples (Italy); Naples Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica Sperimentale)

    1982-02-01

    A periodic calibration of the electronics associated with the cathodic strips of a MWPC is necessary for a correct computation of the centroid of the induced charge. We describe here a method, based on computer controlled analog demultiplexers, which permits the injection of variable amounts of charge into each amplifier. The serial scanning along all the channels produces the complete set of pedestals and slopes which, stored on disk and subsequently read, is used for the conversion of ADC outputs.

  20. Electron emission from pseudospark cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anders, A.; Anders, S.; Gundersen, M.A.

    1994-01-01

    The pseudospark cathode has the remarkable property of macroscopically homogeneous electron emission at very high current density (>1 kA/cm 2 ) over a large area (some cm 2 ). The model of electron emission presented here is based on the assumption that the pseudospark microscopically utilizes explosive arc processes, as distinct from earlier models of ''anomalous emission in superdense glow discharges.'' Explosive emission similar to vacuum are cathode spots occurs rapidly when the field strength is sufficiently high. The plasma remains macroscopically homogeneous since the virtual plasma anode adapts to the cathode morphology so that the current is carried by a large number of homogeneously distributed cathode spots which are similar to ''type 1'' and ''type 2'' spots of vacuum arc discharges. The net cathode erosion is greatly reduced relative to ''spark gap-type'' emission. At very high current levels, a transition to highly erosive spot types occurs, and this ''arcing'' leads to a significant reduction in device lifetime. Assuming vacuum-arc-like cathode spots, the observed current density and time constants can be easily explained. The observed cathode erosion rate and pattern, recent fast-camera data, laser-induced fluorescence, and spectroscopic measurements support this approach. A new hypothesis is presented explaining current quenching at relatively low currents. From the point of view of electron emission, the ''superdense glow'' or ''superemissive phase'' of pseudosparks represents an arc and not a glow discharge even if no filamentation or ''arcing'' is observed

  1. Using Comic Strips in Language Classes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csabay, Noémi

    2006-01-01

    The author believes that using comic strips in language-learning classes has three main benefits. First, comic strips motivate younger learners. Second, they provide a context and logically connected sentences to help language learning. Third, their visual information is helpful for comprehension. The author argues that comic strips can be used in…

  2. Improvements in or relating to methods of and apparatus for coating wire, rod or strip material by sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wareing, J.B.

    1976-01-01

    A method and apparatus are described for coating wire, rod or strip material comprising first subjecting the material to electron bombardment in a glow discharge to heat and activate the surface and then subjecting it to sputtering by use of a soft cathode discharge. The apparatus comprises a low pressure gas chamber through which the material is passed, and containing a glow discharge electron gun having a tubular cathode shaped so that the material can be passed axially through it, and an anode surrounding the cathode. The cathode is formed in two parts, the first part at one end, being made of material of low sputtering yield, and the second part being formed at least partially of the required coating material. The first part of the cathode may be of stainless steel or Al. The two parts of the cathode are electrically isolated with means provided for applying a lower negative potential, with respect to the anode, to the second part compared with the first part. The voltage applied to the second part may be controlled so as to control the sputtering rate. The gas pressure in the chamber is also controllable. The coating material may be arranged as inserts in the fixed cathode structure or as segments around the surface to be coated, and may be composed of Pb, Zn or Cu. (U.K.)

  3. Modified electrode voltammetric sensors for trace metals in environmental samples

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brett Christopher M.A.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Nafion-modified mercury thin film electrodes have been investigated for the analysis of trace metals in environmental samples of waters and effluent by batch injection analysis with square wave anodic stripping voltammetry. The method, involving injection over the detector electrode of untreated samples of volume of the order of 50 microlitres has fast response, blocking and fouling of the electrode is minimum as shown by studies with surface-active components. Comparison is made between glassy carbon substrate electrodes and carbon fibre microelectrode array substrates, the latter leading to a small sensitivity enhancement. Application to analysis of river water and industrial effluent for labile zinc, cadmium, lead and copper ions is demonstrated in collected samples and after acid digestion.

  4. Estimation of uranium in different types of water and sand samples by adsorptive stripping voltammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhalke, Sunil; Raghunath, Radha; Mishra, Suchismita; Suseela, B.; Tripathi, R.M.; Pandit, G.G.; Shukla, V.K.; Puranik, V.D.

    2005-01-01

    A method is standardized for the estimation of uranium by adsorptive stripping voltammetry using chloranilic acid (CAA) as complexing agent. The optimum parameters to get best sensitivity and good reproducibility for uranium were 60s adsorption time, pH 1.8, chloranilic acid (2x10 -4 M) and 0.002M EDTA. The peak potential under this condition was found to be -0.03 V. With these optimum parameters a sensitivity of 1.19 nA/nM uranium was observed. Detection limit for this optimum parameter was found to be 0.55 nM. This can be further improved by increasing adsorption time. Using this method, uranium was estimated in different type of water samples such as seawater, synthetic seawater, stream water, tap water, well water, bore well water and process water. This method has also been used for estimation of uranium in sand, organic solvent used for extraction of uranium from phosphoric acid and its raffinate. Sample digestion procedures used for estimation of uranium in various matrices are discussed. It has been observed from the analysis that the uranium peak potentials changes with matrix of the sample, hence, standard addition method is the best method to get reliable and accurate results. Quality assurance of the standardized method is verified by analyzing certified reference water sample from USDOE, participating intercomparison exercises and also by estimating uranium content in water samples both by differential pulse adsorptive stripping voltammetric and laser fluorimetric techniques. (author)

  5. Adsorptive Stripping Determination of Trace Nickel Using Bismuth Modified Mesoporous Carbon Composite Electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Ruizhuo; Feng, Kai; Su, Yongfu; Zong, Tianyu; Zhou, Xia; Lei, Tian; Jia, Pengpeng; Cao, Penghui; Zhao, Yuefeng; Guo, Ning; Chang, Haizhou; Miao, Yuqing; Zhou, Shuang

    Novel bismuth nanoparticle-modified mesoporous carbon (MPC) was successfully prepared on a glassy carbon electrode (Bi@MPC/GCE) for the adsorptive stripping voltammetric determination of nickel by complexing with dimethylglyoxime (DMG). The presence of MPC obviously improved the properties of Bi particles like the electron transfer ability, particle size and hydrophicility, important parameters to achieve preferable analytical performances of Bi@MPC/GCE toward Ni(II). The best electrochemical behaviors of Bi@MPC/GCE was obtained for the stripping determination of Ni(II), compared with electrodes individually modified with Bi and MPC. The synergic effect between metallic Bi and ordered MPC (forming a 3D array like Bi microelectrodes) made major contribution to such improved electrochemical properties of Bi@MPC/GCE for Ni(II) sensing. The good linear analytical curve was achieved in a Ni(II) concentration range from 0.1μM to 5.0μM with a correlation coefficient of 0.9995. The detection limit and sensitivity were calculated to be 1.2nM (S/N=3) and 1410μAmM-1cm-2, respectively. The new method was successfully applied to Ni(II) determination in soybean samples with recoveries higher than 99% and proved to be a simple, efficient alternative for Ni(II) monitoring in real samples.

  6. Electrochemical determination of resveratrol in dietary supplements at a boron-doped diamond electrode in the presence of hexadecyltrimethylammonium bromide using square-wave adsorptive stripping voltammetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yardim Yavuz

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available A sensitive electroanalytical methodology for the determination of resveratrol is presented for the first time using adsorptive stripping voltammetry at a bare boron-doped diamond (BDD electrode. In cyclic voltammetry, resveratrol shows one irreversible and an adsorption-controlled oxidation peak at a BDD electrode. The voltammetric results indicated that in the presence of hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide, the BDD electrode remarkably enhanced the oxidation of resveratrol, which leads to an improvement in the peak current with a shift of the peak potential to more positive values. Using the square-wave stripping mode, the compound yielded a well-defined voltammetric response in 0.1 M nitric acid solution containing 100 μmol L-1 hexadecyl trimethyl ammonium bromide at 0.74 V (vs. Ag/AgCl, after 60 s accumulation at the open-circuit condition. A linear calibration graph was obtained in the concentration range 0.025 to 60.0 μg mL-1, with a detection limit of 0.0063 μg mL-1. The applicability of the proposed method was verified by analysis of resveratrol in commercial dietary supplements.

  7. Performance of MSGCs with cathode readout

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cremaldi, L.; Finocchiaro, G.; Rajagopalan, S.; Schamberger, D.

    1996-01-01

    The performance of a telescope of Micro-Strip Gas Chambers (MSGC) has been studied in a beam of minimum ionizing particles. Detectors of two different pitches have been studied. The position resolutions is obtained by reading out the cathodes and interpolating based on the amplitude of the signals. The position of the hit in the chamber is found to differ systematically from the cluster centroid position. A correction method is derived from the data and applied to improve the resolution. After correction, the spatial resolution of chambers with 200 μm pitch is found to be 42 μm, and for the 400 μm pitch detectors the resolution is 42 μm. The improved interpolation for the 400 μm pitch chamber can be understood in terms of the better signal to noise observed for the 400 μm pitch detectors. The degradation in resolution as a function of angle of track incidence is also expected to be less for the larger pitch chambers

  8. Research on an improved explosive emission cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Guozhi; Sun Jun; Shao Hao; Chen Changhua; Zhang Xiaowei

    2009-01-01

    This paper presents a physical description of the cathode plasma process of an explosive emission cathode (EEC) and experimental results on a type of oil-immersed graphite EEC. It is believed that the generation of a cathode plasma is mainly dependent on the state of the cathode surface, and that adsorbed gases and dielectrics on the cathode surface play a leading role in the formation of the cathode plasma. Based on these ideas, a type of oil-immersed graphite EEC is proposed and fabricated. The experiments indicate that the oil-immersed cathodes have improved emissive properties and longer lifetimes.

  9. Electrochemical behavior of folic acid at calixarene based chemically modified electrodes and its determination by adsorptive stripping voltammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vaze, Vishwanath D.; Srivastava, Ashwini K.

    2007-01-01

    Voltammetric behavior of folic acid at plain carbon paste electrode and electrode modified with calixarenes has been studied. Two peaks for irreversible oxidation were observed. Out of the three calixarenes chosen for modification of the electrodes, p-tert-butyl-calix[6]arene modified electrode (CME-6) was found to have better sensitivity for folic acid. Chronocoulometric and differential pulse voltammetric studies reveal that folic acid can assemble at CME-6 to form a monolayer whose electron transfer rate is 0.00273 s -1 with 2-electron/2-proton transfer for the peak at +0.71 V against SCE. An adsorption equilibrium constant of 5 x 10 3 l/mol for maximum surface coverage of 2.89 x 10 -10 mol/cm 2 was obtained. The current is found to be rectilinear with concentration by differential pulse voltammetry. However, linearity in the lower range of concentration 8.79 x 10 -12 M to 1.93 x 10 -9 M with correlation coefficient of 0.9920 was achieved by adsorptive stripping voltammetry. The limit of detection obtained was found to be 1.24 x 10 -12 M. This method was used for the determination of folic acid in a variety of samples, viz. serum, asparagus, spinach, oranges and multivitamin preparations

  10. Electrochemical behavior of folic acid at calixarene based chemically modified electrodes and its determination by adsorptive stripping voltammetry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaze, Vishwanath D. [Department of Chemistry, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari, Santacruz (East), Mumbai 400098 (India); Srivastava, Ashwini K. [Department of Chemistry, University of Mumbai, Vidyanagari, Santacruz (East), Mumbai 400098 (India)], E-mail: aksrivastava@chem.mu.ac.in

    2007-12-31

    Voltammetric behavior of folic acid at plain carbon paste electrode and electrode modified with calixarenes has been studied. Two peaks for irreversible oxidation were observed. Out of the three calixarenes chosen for modification of the electrodes, p-tert-butyl-calix[6]arene modified electrode (CME-6) was found to have better sensitivity for folic acid. Chronocoulometric and differential pulse voltammetric studies reveal that folic acid can assemble at CME-6 to form a monolayer whose electron transfer rate is 0.00273 s{sup -1} with 2-electron/2-proton transfer for the peak at +0.71 V against SCE. An adsorption equilibrium constant of 5 x 10{sup 3} l/mol for maximum surface coverage of 2.89 x 10{sup -10} mol/cm{sup 2} was obtained. The current is found to be rectilinear with concentration by differential pulse voltammetry. However, linearity in the lower range of concentration 8.79 x 10{sup -12} M to 1.93 x 10{sup -9} M with correlation coefficient of 0.9920 was achieved by adsorptive stripping voltammetry. The limit of detection obtained was found to be 1.24 x 10{sup -12} M. This method was used for the determination of folic acid in a variety of samples, viz. serum, asparagus, spinach, oranges and multivitamin preparations.

  11. Method of stripping solid particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1980-01-01

    A method of stripping loaded solid particles is specified in which uniform batches of the loaded particles are passed successively upwardly through an elution column in the form of discrete plugs, the particles of which do not intermingle substantially with the particles of the vertically adjacent plug(s), and are contacted therein with eluant liquid flowed downwardly, strong eluate being withdrawn from the lower region of the column, the loaded particles being supplied as a slurry in a carrier liquid, and successive batches of loaded particles being isolated as measured batches and being separated from their carrier liquid before being contacted with strong eluate and slurried with the strong eluate into the lower region of the column. An example describes the stripping of ion exchange resin particles loaded with complex uranium ions. (author)

  12. Electrochemical stripping determination of traces of copper, lead, cadmium and zinc in zirconium metal and zirconium dioxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stulik, K.; Beran, P.; Dolezal, J.; Opekar, F.

    1978-01-01

    Procedures have been developed for the determination of copper, lead, cadmium and zinc in zirconium metal and zirconium dioxide, at concentrations of 1ppm or less. Zirconium metal was dissolved in sulphuric acid, and zirconium dioxide decomposed under pressure with hydrofluoric acid. Sample solutions were prepared in dilute sulphuric acid. For the stripping determination, the sample solution was either mixed with a complexing tartrate base electrolyte or the pre-electrolysis was carried out in acid solution, with the acid solution being exchanged for a pure base electrolyte (e.g. an acetate buffer) for the stripping step. The stripping step was monitored by d.c., differential pulse and Kalousek commutator voltammetry and the three methods were compared. A stationary mercury-drop electrode can generally be used for all the methods, whereas a mercury-film electrode is suitable only for the d.c. voltammetric determination of copper, lead and cadmium, as pulse measurements with films are poorly reproducible and the electrodes are easily damaged. The relative standard deviation does not exceed 20%. Some samples contained relatively large amounts of copper, which is best separated by electrodeposition on a platinum electrode. (author)

  13. Collisional stripping of planetary crusts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Philip J.; Leinhardt, Zoë M.; Elliott, Tim; Stewart, Sarah T.; Walter, Michael J.

    2018-02-01

    Geochemical studies of planetary accretion and evolution have invoked various degrees of collisional erosion to explain differences in bulk composition between planets and chondrites. Here we undertake a full, dynamical evaluation of 'crustal stripping' during accretion and its key geochemical consequences. Crusts are expected to contain a significant fraction of planetary budgets of incompatible elements, which include the major heat producing nuclides. We present smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulations of collisions between differentiated rocky planetesimals and planetary embryos. We find that the crust is preferentially lost relative to the mantle during impacts, and we have developed a scaling law based on these simulations that approximates the mass of crust that remains in the largest remnant. Using this scaling law and a recent set of N-body simulations of terrestrial planet formation, we have estimated the maximum effect of crustal stripping on incompatible element abundances during the accretion of planetary embryos. We find that on average approximately one third of the initial crust is stripped from embryos as they accrete, which leads to a reduction of ∼20% in the budgets of the heat producing elements if the stripped crust does not reaccrete. Erosion of crusts can lead to non-chondritic ratios of incompatible elements, but the magnitude of this effect depends sensitively on the details of the crust-forming melting process on the planetesimals. The Lu/Hf system is fractionated for a wide range of crustal formation scenarios. Using eucrites (the products of planetesimal silicate melting, thought to represent the crust of Vesta) as a guide to the Lu/Hf of planetesimal crust partially lost during accretion, we predict the Earth could evolve to a superchondritic 176Hf/177Hf (3-5 parts per ten thousand) at present day. Such values are in keeping with compositional estimates of the bulk Earth. Stripping of planetary crusts during accretion can lead to

  14. A selective and regenerable voltammetric aptasensor for determination of homocysteine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saeed, Jaber; Mirzaei, Mohammad; Torkzadeh-Mahani, Masoud

    2016-01-01

    We describe an electrochemical aptasensor for the amino acid homocysteine (hCys). A gold electrode was modified with a highly specific aptamer against hCys (a 66-base DNA oligonucleotide) acting as the recognition probe. The method is highly selective over cysteine and methionine. The effects of accumulation time, type and concentration of accumulation buffer and pH, type and concentration of stripping buffer were studied. Under optimized conditions and a working potential of 1.07 V (vs. Ag/AgCl), the response to hCys is linear in the 0.2 to 10 μM concentration range. The detection limit is 10 nM, and the relative standard deviation is 3.1 % (at 1 μM of hCys). The electrode can be regenerated by immersing it into a 3 M solution of urea solution. The method was applied to the determination of hCys in (spiked) serum and urine and gave recoveries of 88.5 and 96.5 %, respectively. (author)

  15. Speciation of cadmium in seawater - a direct voltammetric approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Helmers, E.

    1994-01-01

    The present report deals with differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry (DPASV) applied for the analysis of cadmium in open ocean seawater. Evaluation of different Cd species can generate information about distribution and speciation of Cd in the open ocean. Distribution of Cd was investigated in surface waters of the Atlantic Ocean over a wide geographical range as well as in the water column. Surface water sampling on board the research vessel Polarstern was performed from the bow boom of the ship as well as with a snorkel system which allowed continuous sample-taking. Two different Cd species could be differentiated in the voltammograms. UV-irradiation experiments allowed the identification of an inorganic and organic Cd form, the latter caused by the association between Cd and organic matter as e.g. humic substances (HS). Atlantic ocean surface seawater normally contains between 2 and 4 ng organically complexed Cd/kg and no detectable inorganic Cd. Some areas however showed readings of up to 14 ng inorganic Cd/kg in addition. Water column samples exhibited an enrichment of inorganic Cd by depth. Occurrence of inorganic Cd at the surface could be related to specific oceanographical conditions. Together with analytical results of trace metal contents in the particulate phases of surface seawater, new aspects could be established about the biogeochemical cycling of Cd in the sea. (orig.)

  16. Direct voltammetric analysis of DNA modified with enzymatically incorporated 7-deazapurines

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pivoňková, Hana; Horáková Brázdilová, Petra; Fojtová, Miloslava; Fojta, Miroslav

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 82, č. 16 (2010), s. 6807-6813 ISSN 0003-2700 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400040901; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06035 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50040507; CEZ:AV0Z50040702 Keywords : modified DNA * 7-deazapurines * voltammetric analysis Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 5.874, year: 2010

  17. Determination of total polyphenol index in wines employing a voltammetric electronic tongue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cetó, Xavier; Gutiérrez, Juan Manuel; Gutiérrez, Manuel; Céspedes, Francisco; Capdevila, Josefina; Mínguez, Santiago; Jiménez-Jorquera, Cecilia; Valle, Manel del

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Array of voltammetric sensors modified with nanoparticles or conducting polymers. ► It has been applied in wine analysis to predict polyphenol content index. ► Uses data processing tools such as discrete wavelet transform and artificial neural network. ► Identification of phenolics like gallic acid, catechin, caffeic acid, catechol. ► Predicted polyphenol index agrees with Folin–Ciocalteau method and I 280 index. - Abstract: This work reports the application of a voltammetric electronic tongue system (ET) made from an array of modified graphite-epoxy composites plus a gold microelectrode in the qualitative and quantitative analysis of polyphenols found in wine. Wine samples were analyzed using cyclic voltammetry without any sample pretreatment. The obtained responses were preprocessed employing discrete wavelet transform (DWT) in order to compress and extract significant features from the voltammetric signals, and the obtained approximation coefficients fed a multivariate calibration method (artificial neural network-ANN-or partial least squares-PLS-) which accomplished the quantification of total polyphenol content. External test subset samples results were compared with the ones obtained with the Folin–Ciocalteu (FC) method and UV absorbance polyphenol index (I 280 ) as reference values, with highly significant correlation coefficients of 0.979 and 0.963 in the range from 50 to 2400 mg L −1 gallic acid equivalents, respectively. In a separate experiment, qualitative discrimination of different polyphenols found in wine was also assessed by principal component analysis (PCA).

  18. Electron emission mechanism of carbon fiber cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu Lie; Li Limin; Wen Jianchun; Wan Hong

    2005-01-01

    Models of electron emission mechanism are established concerning metal and carbon fiber cathodes. Correctness of the electron emission mechanism was proved according to micro-photos and electron scanning photos of cathodes respectively. The experimental results and analysis show that the surface flashover induces the electron emission of carbon fiber cathode and there are electron emission phenomena from the top of the carbon and also from its side surface. In addition, compared with the case of the stainless steel cathode, the plasma expansion velocity for the carbon fiber cathode is slower and the pulse duration of output microwave can be widened by using the carbon fiber cathode. (authors)

  19. 3D silicon strip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parzefall, Ulrich; Bates, Richard; Boscardin, Maurizio; Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco; Eckert, Simon; Eklund, Lars; Fleta, Celeste; Jakobs, Karl; Kuehn, Susanne; Lozano, Manuel; Pahn, Gregor; Parkes, Chris; Pellegrini, Giulio; Pennicard, David; Piemonte, Claudio; Ronchin, Sabina; Szumlak, Tomasz; Zoboli, Andrea; Zorzi, Nicola

    2009-01-01

    While the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN has started operation in autumn 2008, plans for a luminosity upgrade to the Super-LHC (sLHC) have already been developed for several years. This projected luminosity increase by an order of magnitude gives rise to a challenging radiation environment for tracking detectors at the LHC experiments. Significant improvements in radiation hardness are required with respect to the LHC. Using a strawman layout for the new tracker of the ATLAS experiment as an example, silicon strip detectors (SSDs) with short strips of 2-3 cm length are foreseen to cover the region from 28 to 60 cm distance to the beam. These SSD will be exposed to radiation levels up to 10 15 N eq /cm 2 , which makes radiation resistance a major concern for the upgraded ATLAS tracker. Several approaches to increasing the radiation hardness of silicon detectors exist. In this article, it is proposed to combine the radiation hard 3D-design originally conceived for pixel-style applications with the benefits of the established planar technology for strip detectors by using SSDs that have regularly spaced doped columns extending into the silicon bulk under the detector strips. The first 3D SSDs to become available for testing were made in the Single Type Column (STC) design, a technological simplification of the original 3D design. With such 3D SSDs, a small number of prototype sLHC detector modules with LHC-speed front-end electronics as used in the semiconductor tracking systems of present LHC experiments were built. Modules were tested before and after irradiation to fluences of 10 15 N eq /cm 2 . The tests were performed with three systems: a highly focused IR-laser with 5μm spot size to make position-resolved scans of the charge collection efficiency, an Sr 90 β-source set-up to measure the signal levels for a minimum ionizing particle (MIP), and a beam test with 180 GeV pions at CERN. This article gives a brief overview of the results obtained with 3D-STC-modules.

  20. 3D silicon strip detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parzefall, Ulrich [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany)], E-mail: ulrich.parzefall@physik.uni-freiburg.de; Bates, Richard [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Boscardin, Maurizio [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Dalla Betta, Gian-Franco [INFN and Universita' di Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Eckert, Simon [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Eklund, Lars; Fleta, Celeste [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Jakobs, Karl; Kuehn, Susanne [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Lozano, Manuel [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, IMB-CNM, CSIC, Barcelona (Spain); Pahn, Gregor [Physikalisches Institut, Universitaet Freiburg, Hermann-Herder-Str. 3, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Parkes, Chris [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Pellegrini, Giulio [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona, IMB-CNM, CSIC, Barcelona (Spain); Pennicard, David [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Piemonte, Claudio; Ronchin, Sabina [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Szumlak, Tomasz [University of Glasgow, Department of Physics and Astronomy, Glasgow G12 8QQ (United Kingdom); Zoboli, Andrea [INFN and Universita' di Trento, via Sommarive 14, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy); Zorzi, Nicola [FBK-irst, Center for Materials and Microsystems, via Sommarive 18, 38050 Povo di Trento (Italy)

    2009-06-01

    While the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) at CERN has started operation in autumn 2008, plans for a luminosity upgrade to the Super-LHC (sLHC) have already been developed for several years. This projected luminosity increase by an order of magnitude gives rise to a challenging radiation environment for tracking detectors at the LHC experiments. Significant improvements in radiation hardness are required with respect to the LHC. Using a strawman layout for the new tracker of the ATLAS experiment as an example, silicon strip detectors (SSDs) with short strips of 2-3 cm length are foreseen to cover the region from 28 to 60 cm distance to the beam. These SSD will be exposed to radiation levels up to 10{sup 15}N{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}, which makes radiation resistance a major concern for the upgraded ATLAS tracker. Several approaches to increasing the radiation hardness of silicon detectors exist. In this article, it is proposed to combine the radiation hard 3D-design originally conceived for pixel-style applications with the benefits of the established planar technology for strip detectors by using SSDs that have regularly spaced doped columns extending into the silicon bulk under the detector strips. The first 3D SSDs to become available for testing were made in the Single Type Column (STC) design, a technological simplification of the original 3D design. With such 3D SSDs, a small number of prototype sLHC detector modules with LHC-speed front-end electronics as used in the semiconductor tracking systems of present LHC experiments were built. Modules were tested before and after irradiation to fluences of 10{sup 15}N{sub eq}/cm{sup 2}. The tests were performed with three systems: a highly focused IR-laser with 5{mu}m spot size to make position-resolved scans of the charge collection efficiency, an Sr{sup 90}{beta}-source set-up to measure the signal levels for a minimum ionizing particle (MIP), and a beam test with 180 GeV pions at CERN. This article gives a brief overview of

  1. Dynamic Underground Stripping Demonstration Project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aines, R.; Newmark, R.; McConachie, W.; Rice, D.; Ramirez, A.; Siegel, W.; Buettner, M.; Daily, W.; Krauter, P.; Folsom, E.; Boegel, A.J.; Bishop, D.; udel, K.

    1992-03-01

    LLNL is collaborating with the UC Berkeley College of Engineering to develop and demonstrate a system of thermal remediation and underground imaging techniques for use in rapid cleanup of localized underground spills. Called ''Dynamic Stripping'' to reflect the rapid and controllable nature of the process, it will combine steam injection, direct electrical heating, and tomographic geophysical imaging in a cleanup of the LLNL gasoline spill. In the first 8 months of the project, a Clean Site engineering test was conducted to prove the field application of the techniques before moving to the contaminated site in FY 92

  2. Hydrogen production by electrolysis of a phosphate solution on a stainless steel cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Silva Munoz, L.; Bergel, A.; Basseguy, R.; Feron, D.

    2010-01-01

    The catalytic properties of phosphate species, already shown on the reduction reaction in anaerobic corrosion of steels, are exploited here for hydrogen production. Phosphate species work as a homogeneous catalyst that enhances the cathodic current at mild pH values. A voltammetric study of the hydrogen evolution reaction is performed using phosphate solutions at different concentrations on 316L stainless steel and platinum rotating disk electrodes. Then, hydrogen is produced in an electrolytic cell using a phosphate solution as the catholyte. Results show that 316L stainless steel electrodes have a stable behaviour as cathodes in the electrolysis of phosphate solutions. Phosphate (1 M, pH 4. 0/5. 0) as the catholyte can equal the performance of a KOH 25%w solution with the advantage of working at mild pH values. The use of phosphate and other weak acids as catalysts of the hydrogen evolution reaction could be a promising technology in the development of electrolysis units that work at mild pH values with low-cost electrodes and construction materials. (authors)

  3. Potential profile in a conducting polymer strip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bay, Lasse; West, Keld; Vlachopoulos, Nikolaos

    2002-01-01

    Many conjugated polymers show an appreciable difference in volume between their oxidized and reduced forms. This property can be utilized in soft electrochemically driven actuators, "artificial muscles". Several geometries have been proposed for the conversion of the volume expansion into useful...... mechanical work. In a particularly simple geometry, the length change of polymer strips is exploited. The polymer strips are connected to the driving circuit at the end of the strip that is attached to the support of the device. The other end of the strip is connected to the load. The advantage of this set...

  4. Optimizing the Stripping Procedure for LHCb

    CERN Document Server

    Richardson, Rachel

    2017-01-01

    The LHCb experiment faces a major challenge from the large amounts of data received while the LHC is running. The ability to sort this information in a useful manner is important for working groups to perform physics analyses. Both hardware and software triggers are used to decrease the data rate and then the stripping process is used to sort the data into streams and further into stripping lines. This project studies the hundreds of stripping lines to look for overlaps between them in order to make the stripping process more efficient.

  5. Study on lifetime of C stripping foils

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Hongbin; Lu Ziwei; Zhao Yongtao; Li Zhankui; Xu Hushan; Xiao Guoqing; Wang Yuyu; Zhang Ling; Li Longcai; Fang Yan

    2007-01-01

    The carbon stripping foils can be prepared with the AC and DC arc discharge methods, or even sandwiched with AC-DC alternative layers. The lifetime of the carbon stripping foils of 19 μg/cm 2 prepared with different methods and/or structures was measured. The factors affecting the bombarding lifetime of the carbon stripping foils, especially the method of the foil preparation and the structure of the carbon stripping foils, were discussed. It is observed that the foils prepared with the DC arc discharge method have a longer bombarding lifetime than those prepared with the AC arc discharge method. (authors)

  6. The Whipple Strip Sky Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kertzman, M. P.

    As part of the normal operation of the Whipple 10m Gamma Ray telescope, ten minute drift scan “zenith” runs are made each night of observation for use as calibration. Most of the events recorded during a zenith run are due to the background of cosmic ray showers. However, it would be possible for a hitherto unknown source of gamma rays to drift through the field. This paper reports the results of a search for serendipitous high energy gamma ray sources in the Whipple 10m nightly calibration zenith data. From 2000-2004 nightly calibration runs were taken at an elevation of 89 º. A 2- D analysis of these drift scan runs produces a strip of width ~ 3.5º in declination and spanning the full range of right ascension. In the 2004-05 observing season the calibration runs were taken at elevations of 86° and 83°. Beginning in the 2005-06 season, the nightly calibration runs were taken at an elevation of 80º. Collectively, these drift scans cover a strip approximately 12.5º wide in declination, centered at declination 37.18º, and spanning the full range of RA. The analysis procedures developed for drift scan data, the sensitivity of the method, and the results will be presented.

  7. Plasma Deposition of Oxide-Coated Cathodes

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Umstattd, Ryan

    1998-01-01

    ...; such cathodes may also have applicability for lower current density continuous wave devices. This novel approach to manufacturing an oxide cathode eliminates the binders that may subsequently (and unpredictably...

  8. Incomplete charge collection in an HPGe double-sided strip detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hayward, Jason; Wehe, David

    2008-01-01

    For gamma-ray detection, high-purity germanium (HPGe) has long been the standard for energy resolution, and double-sided strip detectors (DSSDs) offer the possibility of sub-millimeter position resolution. Our HPGe DSSD is 81 mm in diameter, 11-mm thick, and has 3-mm strip pitch with a gap width of 500 μm. In this work, we focus on characterizing just the interactions that occur between collecting strips. Simulation and measurement results for our HPGe DSSD show that the gap between strips is the most position-sensitive region. But, spectra collected from events that occur in and near the gaps are complicated by: (1) incomplete charge-carrier collection, or charge loss; (2) signal variance introduced by charge-carrier cloud size, orientation, and lateral spreading; and (3) the difficulty of distinguishing single interactions from multiple close interactions. Using tightly, collimated beams of monoenergetic gamma rays, the measured energy spectra at the gap center show that incomplete charge collection is significant in our detector at 356 and 662 keV, resulting in degradation of the photopeak efficiency. Additionally, close interactions are identifiable in the spectra. Thus, close interactions must be identified on an event-by-event basis in order to precisely identify gap interaction position or make charge-loss corrections at these energies. Furthermore, spectral differences are observed between anode and cathode gaps, and a possible reason for this asymmetry is proposed

  9. Mechanistic Enhancement of SOFC Cathode Durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachsman, Eric [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Durability of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) under “real world” conditions is an issue for commercial deployment. In particular cathode exposure to moisture, CO2, Cr vapor (from interconnects and BOP), and particulates results in long-term performance degradation issues. Here, we have conducted a multi-faceted fundamental investigation of the effect of these contaminants on cathode performance degradation mechanisms in order to establish cathode composition/structures and operational conditions to enhance cathode durability.

  10. Mechanical behaviour of a creased thin strip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Liu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available In this study the mechanical behaviour of a creased thin strip under opposite-sense bending was investigated. It was found that a simple crease, which led to the increase of the second moment of area, could significantly alter the overall mechanical behaviour of a thin strip, for example the peak moment could be increased by 100 times. The crease was treated as a cylindrical segment of a small radius. Parametric studies demonstrated that the geometry of the strip could strongly influence its flexural behaviour. We showed that the uniform thickness and the radius of the creased segment had the greatest and the least influence on the mechanical behaviour, respectively. We further revealed that material properties could dramatically affect the overall mechanical behaviour of the creased strip by gradually changing the material from being linear elastic to elastic-perfect plastic. After the formation of the fold, the moment of the two ends of the strip differed considerably when the elasto-plastic materials were used, especially for materials with smaller tangent modulus in the plastic range. The deformation patterns of the thin strips from the finite element simulations were verified by physical models made of thin metal strips. The findings from this study provide useful information for designing origami structures for engineering applications using creased thin strips.

  11. Nuclear reactor spring strip grid spacer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, J.F.; Flora, B.S.

    1978-01-01

    A bimetallic grid spacer is described comprising a grid structure of zircaloy formed by intersecting striplike members which define fuel element openings for receiving fuel elements and spring strips made of Inconel positioned within the grid structure for cooperating with the fuel elements to maintain them in their desired position. A plurality of these spring strips extend longitudinally between sides of the grid structure, being locked in position by the grid retaining strips. The fuel rods, which are disposed in the fuel openings formed in the grid structure, are positioned by means of the springs associated with the spring strips and a plurality of dimples which extend from the zircaloy grid structure into the openings. In one embodiment the strips are disposed in a plurality of arrays with those spring strip arrays situated in opposing diagonal quadrants of the grid structure extending in the same direction and adjacent spring strip arrays in each half of the spacer extending in relatively perpendicular directions. Other variations of the spring strip arrangements for a particular fuel design are disclosed herein

  12. CMS Silicon Strip Tracker Performance

    CERN Document Server

    Agram, Jean-Laurent

    2012-01-01

    The CMS Silicon Strip Tracker (SST), consisting of 9.6 million readout channels from 15148 modules and covering an area of 198 square meters, needs to be precisely calibrated in order to correctly reconstruct the events recorded. Calibration constants are derived from different workflows, from promptly reconstructed events with particles as well as from commissioning events gathered just before the acquisition of physics runs. The performance of the SST has been carefully studied since the beginning of data taking: the noise of the detector, data integrity, signal-over-noise ratio, hit reconstruction efficiency and resolution have been all investigated with time and for different conditions. In this paper we describe the reconstruction strategies, the calibration procedures and the detector performance results from the latest CMS operation.

  13. The CMS silicon strip tracker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Focardi, E.; Albergo, S.; Angarano, M.; Azzi, P.; Babucci, E.; Bacchetta, N.; Bader, A.; Bagliesi, G.; Bartalini, P.; Basti, A.; Biggeri, U.; Bilei, G.M.; Bisello, D.; Boemi, D.; Bosi, F.; Borrello, L.; Bozzi, C.; Braibant, S.; Breuker, H.; Bruzzi, M.; Candelori, A.; Caner, A.; Castaldi, R.; Castro, A.; Catacchini, E.; Checcucci, B.; Ciampolini, P.; Civinini, C.; Creanza, D.; D'Alessandro, R.; Da Rold, M.; Demaria, N.; De Palma, M.; Dell'Orso, R.; Marina, R. Della; Dutta, S.; Eklund, C.; Elliott-Peisert, A.; Feld, L.; Fiore, L.; French, M.; Freudenreich, K.; Fuertjes, A.; Giassi, A.; Giraldo, A.; Glessing, B.; Gu, W.H.; Hall, G.; Hammerstrom, R.; Hebbeker, T.; Hrubec, J.; Huhtinen, M.; Kaminsky, A.; Karimaki, V.; Koenig, St.; Krammer, M.; Lariccia, P.; Lenzi, M.; Loreti, M.; Luebelsmeyer, K.; Lustermann, W.; Maettig, P.; Maggi, G.; Mannelli, M.; Mantovani, G.; Marchioro, A.; Mariotti, C.; Martignon, G.; Evoy, B. Mc; Meschini, M.; Messineo, A.; My, S.; Paccagnella, A.; Palla, F.; Pandoulas, D.; Parrini, G.; Passeri, D.; Pieri, M.; Piperov, S.; Potenza, R.; Raffaelli, F.; Raso, G.; Raymond, M.; Santocchia, A.; Schmitt, B.; Selvaggi, G.; Servoli, L.; Sguazzoni, G.; Siedling, R.; Silvestris, L.; Skog, K.; Starodumov, A.; Stavitski, I.; Stefanini, G.; Tempesta, P.; Tonelli, G.; Tricomi, A.; Tuuva, T.; Vannini, C.; Verdini, P.G.; Viertel, G.; Xie, Z.; Wang, Y.; Watts, S.; Wittmer, B.

    1999-01-01

    The Silicon Strip Tracker (SST) is the intermediate part of the CMS Central Tracker System. SST is based on microstrip silicon devices and in combination with pixel detectors and the Microstrip Gas Chambers aims at performing pattern recognition, track reconstruction and momentum measurements for all tracks with p T ≥2 GeV/c originating from high luminosity interactions at √s=14 TeV at LHC. We aim at exploiting the advantages and the physics potential of the precise tracking performance provided by the microstrip silicon detectors on a large scale apparatus and in a much more difficult environment than ever. In this paper we describe the actual SST layout and the readout system. (author)

  14. Ultrasonic examination of JBK-75 strip material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cook, K.V.; Cunningham, R.A. Jr.; Lewis, J.C.; McClung, R.W.

    1982-12-01

    An ultrasonic inspection system was assembled to inspect the JBK-75 stainless steel sheath material (for the Large Coil Project) for the Westinghouse-Airco superconducting magnet program. The mechanical system provided for handling the 180-kg (400-lb) coils of strip material [1.6 mm thick by 78 mm wide by 90 to 120 m long (0.064 by 3.07 in. by 300 to 400 ft)], feeding the strip through the ultrasonic inspection and cleaning stations, and respooling the coils. We inspected 54 coils of strip for both longitudinal and laminar flaws. Simulated flaws were used to calibrate both inspections. Saw-cut notches [0.28 mm deep (0.011 in., about 17% of the strip thickness)] were used to calibrate the longitudinal flaw inspections; 1.59-mm-diam (0.063-in.) flat-bottom holes drilled halfway through a calibration strip were used to calibrate the laminar flaw tests

  15. Model for prediction of strip temperature in hot strip steel mill

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panjkovic, Vladimir

    2007-01-01

    Proper functioning of set-up models in a hot strip steel mill requires reliable prediction of strip temperature. Temperature prediction is particularly important for accurate calculation of rolling force because of strong dependence of yield stress and strip microstructure on temperature. A comprehensive model was developed to replace an obsolete model in the Western Port hot strip mill of BlueScope Steel. The new model predicts the strip temperature evolution from the roughing mill exit to the finishing mill exit. It takes into account the radiative and convective heat losses, forced flow boiling and film boiling of water at strip surface, deformation heat in the roll gap, frictional sliding heat, heat of scale formation and the heat transfer between strip and work rolls through an oxide layer. The significance of phase transformation was also investigated. Model was tested with plant measurements and benchmarked against other models in the literature, and its performance was very good

  16. Model for prediction of strip temperature in hot strip steel mill

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panjkovic, Vladimir [BlueScope Steel, TEOB, 1 Bayview Road, Hastings Vic. 3915 (Australia)]. E-mail: Vladimir.Panjkovic@BlueScopeSteel.com

    2007-10-15

    Proper functioning of set-up models in a hot strip steel mill requires reliable prediction of strip temperature. Temperature prediction is particularly important for accurate calculation of rolling force because of strong dependence of yield stress and strip microstructure on temperature. A comprehensive model was developed to replace an obsolete model in the Western Port hot strip mill of BlueScope Steel. The new model predicts the strip temperature evolution from the roughing mill exit to the finishing mill exit. It takes into account the radiative and convective heat losses, forced flow boiling and film boiling of water at strip surface, deformation heat in the roll gap, frictional sliding heat, heat of scale formation and the heat transfer between strip and work rolls through an oxide layer. The significance of phase transformation was also investigated. Model was tested with plant measurements and benchmarked against other models in the literature, and its performance was very good.

  17. Operation of cold-cathode gauges in high magnetic fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thomas, S.R. Jr.; Goerz, D.A.; Pickles, W.L.

    1985-01-01

    The Mirror Fusion Test Facility (MFTF-B), under construction at LLNL, requires measurement of the neutral gas density in high magnetic fields near the plasma at several axial regions. This Background Gas Pressure (BGP) diagnostic will help us understand the role of background neutrals in particle and power balance, particularly in the maintenance of the cold halo plasma that shields the hot core plasma from the returning neutrals. It consists of several cold-cathode, magnetron-type gauges stripped of their permanent magnets, and utilizes the MFTF-B ambient B-field in strengths of 5 to 25 kG. Similar gauges have operated in TMX-U in B-fields up to 3 kG. To determine how well the gauges will perform, we assembled a test stand which operated magnetron gauges in an external, uniform magnetic field of up to 30 kG, over a pressure range of 1E-8 T to 1E-5 T, at several cathode voltages. This paper describes the test stand and presents the results of the tests

  18. Fusion of Potentiometric & Voltammetric Electronic Tongue for Classification of Black Tea Taste based on Theaflavins (TF) Content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhattacharyya, Nabarun; Legin, Andrey; Papieva, Irina; Sarkar, Subrata; Kirsanov, Dmitry; Kartsova, Anna; Ghosh, Arunangshu; Bandyopadhyay, Rajib

    2011-09-01

    Black tea is an extensively consumed beverage worldwide with an expanding market. The final quality of black tea depends upon number of chemical compounds present in the tea. Out of these compounds, theaflavins (TF), which is responsible for astringency in black tea, plays an important role in determining the final taste of the finished black tea. The present paper reports our effort to correlate the theaflavins contents with the voltammetric and potentiometric electronic tongue (e-tongue) data. Noble metal-based electrode array has been used for collecting data though voltammetric electronic tongue where as liquid filled membrane based electrodes have been used for potentiometric electronic tongue. Black tea samples with tea taster score and biochemical results have been collected from Tea Research Association, Tocklai, India for the analysis purpose. In this paper, voltammetric and potentiometric e-tongue responses are combined to demonstrate improvement of cluster formation among tea samples with different ranges of TF values.

  19. Infrared spectroscopic and voltammetric study of adsorbed CO on stepped surfaces of copper monocrystalline electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koga, O.; Teruya, S.; Matsuda, K.; Minami, M.; Hoshi, N.; Hori, Y.

    2005-01-01

    Voltammetric and infrared (IR) spectroscopic measurements were carried out to study adsorbed CO on two series of copper single crystal electrodes n(111)-(111) and n(111)-(100) in 0.1M KH 2 PO 4 +0.1M K 2 HPO 4 at 0 o C. Reversible voltammetric waves were observed below -0.55V versus SHE for adsorption of CO which displaces preadsorbed phosphate anions. The electric charge of the redox waves is proportional to the step atom density for both single crystal series. This fact indicates that phosphate anions are specifically adsorbed on the step sites below -0.55V versus SHE. Voltammetric measurements indicated that (111) terrace of Cu is covered with adsorbed CO below -0.5V versus SHE. Nevertheless, no IR absorption band of adsorbed CO is detected from (111) terrace. Presence of adsorbed CO on (111) terrace is presumed which is not visible by the potential difference spectroscopy used in the present work. IR spectroscopic measurements showed that CO is reversibly adsorbed with an on-top manner on copper single crystal electrodes of n(111)-(111) and n(111)-(100) with approximately same wavenumber of C?O stretching vibration of 2070cm -1 . The IR band intensity is proportional to the step atom density. Thus CO is adsorbed on (111) or (100) steps on the single crystal surfaces. An analysis of the IR band intensity suggested that one CO molecule is adsorbed on every two or more Cu step atom of the monocrystalline surface. The spectroscopic data were compared with those reported for uhv system. The C-O stretching wavenumber of adsorbed CO in the electrode-electrolyte system is 30-40cm -1 lower than those in uhv system

  20. Novel approach for the voltammetric evaluation of antioxidant activity using DPPH·-modified electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ziyatdinova, Guzel; Snegureva, Yulia; Budnikov, Herman

    2017-01-01

    Highlights: •Voltammetric characteristics of DPPH· immobilized on the electrode surface is studied. •DPPH·/CeO 2 -CPB/GCE gives reversible one electron highly sensitive radical reduction. •DPV on DPPH·/CeO 2 -CPB/GCE is developed for the antioxidants activity evaluation. •Natural phenolic antioxidants and medicinal herbs extracts are investigated. •Good agreement of DPV and standard method data is obtained. -- Abstract: The electrochemical behavior of 2,2-diphenyl-1-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH·) immobilized on the electrode surface has been studied. Bare glassy carbon electrode (GCE) and modified with dispersions of CeO 2 nanoparticles in water (CeO 2 -H 2 O/GCE) and cationic surfactant cetylpyridinium bromide medium (CeO 2 -CPB/GCE) has been investigated as a platform for the DPPH· immobilization. The best voltammetric characteristics (peak potential separation of 70 mV, system reversibility with currents ratio of 0.98 and the highest peaks currents) have been observed on CeO 2 -CPB/GCE. The effect of CeO 2 nanoparticles concentration has been evaluated. Scanning electron microscopy and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy have been applied for the electrode characterization. DPPH·/CeO 2 -CPB/GCE has been used for the estimation of the antioxidants activity of natural phenolic antioxidants (quercetin, tannin, catechin and ferulic acid) expressed as the EC 50 parameter according to differential pulse voltammetric (DPV) data. The EC 50 decreased in the following order: quercetin (29 ± 1 μM), tannin (29 ± 4 μM), catechin (117 ± 4 μM) and ferulic acid (731 ± 17 μM). These data are in a good agreement with the results of standard spectrophotometric determination. The developed approach has been successfully applied for the antioxidant activity evaluation of medicinal herbs tinctures, infusions and decoctions.

  1. Determination of total polyphenol index in wines employing a voltammetric electronic tongue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ceto, Xavier [Sensors and Biosensors Group, Department of Chemistry, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Edifici Cn, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Gutierrez, Juan Manuel [Bioelectronics Section, Department of Electrical Engineering, CINVESTAV, 07360 Mexico D.F. (Mexico); Gutierrez, Manuel [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona (IMB-CNM), CSIC, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Cespedes, Francisco [Sensors and Biosensors Group, Department of Chemistry, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Edifici Cn, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Capdevila, Josefina; Minguez, Santiago [Estacio de Viticultura i Enologia, INCAVI, Vilafranca del Penedes (Spain); Jimenez-Jorquera, Cecilia [Instituto de Microelectronica de Barcelona (IMB-CNM), CSIC, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain); Valle, Manel del, E-mail: manel.delvalle@uab.cat [Sensors and Biosensors Group, Department of Chemistry, Universitat Autonoma de Barcelona, Edifici Cn, 08193 Bellaterra (Spain)

    2012-06-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Array of voltammetric sensors modified with nanoparticles or conducting polymers. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer It has been applied in wine analysis to predict polyphenol content index. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Uses data processing tools such as discrete wavelet transform and artificial neural network. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Identification of phenolics like gallic acid, catechin, caffeic acid, catechol. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Predicted polyphenol index agrees with Folin-Ciocalteau method and I{sub 280} index. - Abstract: This work reports the application of a voltammetric electronic tongue system (ET) made from an array of modified graphite-epoxy composites plus a gold microelectrode in the qualitative and quantitative analysis of polyphenols found in wine. Wine samples were analyzed using cyclic voltammetry without any sample pretreatment. The obtained responses were preprocessed employing discrete wavelet transform (DWT) in order to compress and extract significant features from the voltammetric signals, and the obtained approximation coefficients fed a multivariate calibration method (artificial neural network-ANN-or partial least squares-PLS-) which accomplished the quantification of total polyphenol content. External test subset samples results were compared with the ones obtained with the Folin-Ciocalteu (FC) method and UV absorbance polyphenol index (I{sub 280}) as reference values, with highly significant correlation coefficients of 0.979 and 0.963 in the range from 50 to 2400 mg L{sup -1} gallic acid equivalents, respectively. In a separate experiment, qualitative discrimination of different polyphenols found in wine was also assessed by principal component analysis (PCA).

  2. Synopsis of Cathode No.4 Activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwan, Joe; Ekdahl, C.; Harrison, J.; Kwan, J.; Leitner, M.; McCruistian, T.; Mitchell, R.; Prichard, B.; Roy, P.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this report is to describe the activation of the fourth cathode installed in the DARHT-II Injector. Appendices have been used so that an extensive amount of data could be included without danger of obscuring important information contained in the body of the report. The cathode was a 612 M type cathode purchased from Spectra-Mat. Section II describes the handling and installation of the cathode. Section III is a narrative of the activation based on information located in the Control Room Log Book supplemented with time plots of pertinent operating parameters. Activation of the cathode was performed in accordance with the procedure listed in Appendix A. The following sections provide more details on the total pressure and constituent partial pressures in the vacuum vessel, cathode heater power/filament current, and cathode temperature

  3. Cathodic Stripping Voltammetry of Cysteine Using Silver and Copper Solid Amalgam Electrodes

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Josypčuk, Bohdan; Novotný, Ladislav

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 56, č. 5 (2002), s. 971-976 ISSN 0039-9140 R&D Projects: GA ČR GV204/97/K084 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4040901 Keywords : silver or copper solid amalgam electrode * cysteine * voltammetry Subject RIV: CG - Electrochemistry Impact factor: 2.054, year: 2002

  4. Cyclic Voltammetric Investigation of Dopamine at Poly-(Gabapentin Modified Carbon Paste Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. T. Shreenivas

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The poly (gabapentin film was prepared on the surface of carbon paste electrode by electrochemical method using cyclic voltammetric technique. The poly (gabapentin film-modified carbon paste electrode was calibrated with standard potassium ferrocyanide solution in 1 M KCl as a supporting electrolyte. The prepared poly (gabapentin film-coated electrode exhibits excellent electrocatalytic activity towards the detection of dopamine at physiological pH. The scan rate effect was found to be diffusion-controlled electrode process. The concentration effect of dopamine was studied, and the redox peak potentials of dopamine were dependant on pH.

  5. Voltammetric behavior of sedative drug midazolam at glassy carbon electrode in solubilized systems

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Rajeev; Yadav, Rajeev Kumar

    2012-01-01

    Redox behavior of midazolam was studied at a glassy carbon electrode in various buffer systems, supporting electrolytes and pH using differential pulse, square-wave and cyclic voltammetry. Based on its reduction behavior, a direct differential pulse voltammetric method has been developed and validated for the determination of midazolam in parenteral dosage. Three well-defined peaks were observed in 0.1% SLS, BrittonâRobinson (BR) buffer of pH 2.5. The effect of surfactants like sodium lauryl ...

  6. Voltammetric behavior of sedative drug midazolam at glassy carbon electrode in solubilized systems

    OpenAIRE

    Jain, Rajeev; Yadav, Rajeev Kumar

    2011-01-01

    Redox behavior of midazolam was studied at a glassy carbon electrode in various buffer systems, supporting electrolytes and pH using differential pulse, square-wave and cyclic voltammetry. Based on its reduction behavior, a direct differential pulse voltammetric method has been developed and validated for the determination of midazolam in parenteral dosage. Three well-defined peaks were observed in 0.1% SLS, Britton–Robinson (BR) buffer of pH 2.5. The effect of surfactants like sodium lauryl ...

  7. Voltammetric behavior of amfepramone (diethylpropion) at the hanging mercury drop electrode and its analytical determination in pharmaceutical formulations

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Leandro M. de; Nascimento, Paulo C. do; Bohrer, Denise; Correia, Daniele; Bairros, André V. de; Pomblum, Valdeci J.; Pomblum, Solange G.

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes a systematic study of the voltammetric behavior of amfepramone at the hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE) by cyclic (CV) and alternating current (AC) voltammetric methods. The studies showed the adsorptive behavior of amfepramone at the HMDE and were performed in H2SO4 0.1 mol L-1 (pH 1.0) and Ringer buffer (pH 11.0) as supporting electrolytes. The linear range for the amfepramone determination by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) was 0.05 to 2.0 mg L-1 (r = 0.998) i...

  8. Prototype Strip Barrel Modules for the ATLAS ITk Strip Detector

    CERN Document Server

    Sawyer, Craig; The ATLAS collaboration

    2017-01-01

    The module design for the Phase II Upgrade of the new ATLAS Inner Tracker (ITk) detector at the LHC employs integrated low mass assembly using single-sided flexible circuits with readout ASICs and a powering circuit incorporating control and monitoring of HV, LV and temperature on the module. Both readout and powering circuits are glued directly onto the silicon sensor surface resulting in a fully integrated, extremely low radiation length module which simultaneously reduces the material requirements of the local support structure by allowing a reduced width stave structure to be employed. Such a module concept has now been fully demonstrated using so-called ABC130 and HCC130 ASICs fabricated in 130nm CMOS technology to readout ATLAS12 n+-in-p silicon strip sensors. Low voltage powering for these demonstrator modules has been realised by utilising a DCDC powerboard based around the CERN FEAST ASIC. This powerboard incorporates an HV multiplexing switch based on a Panasonic GaN transistor. Control and monitori...

  9. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlan U. Anderson; Fatih Dogan; Vladimir Petrovsky

    2002-03-31

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. This period has continued to address the problem of making dense 1/2 to 5 {micro}m thick dense layers on porous substrates (the cathode LSM). Our current status is that we are making structures of 2-5 cm{sup 2} in area, which consist of either dense YSZ or CGO infiltrated into a 2-5 {micro}m thick 50% porous layer made of either nanoncrystalline CGO or YSZ powder. This composite structure coats a macroporous cathode or anode; which serves as the structural element of the bi-layer structure. These structures are being tested as SOFC elements. A number of structures have been evaluated both as symmetrical and as button cell configuration. Results of this testing indicates that the cathodes contribute the most to cell losses for temperatures below 750 C. In this investigation different cathode materials were studied using impedance spectroscopy of symmetric cells and IV characteristics of anode supported fuel cells. Cathode materials studied included La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (LSCF), La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LSM), Pr{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (PSCF), Sm{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF), and Yb{sub .8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF). A new technique for filtering the Fourier transform of impedance data was used to increase the sensitivity of impedance analysis. By creating a filter specifically for impedance spectroscopy the resolution was increased. The filter was tailored to look for specific circuit elements like R//C, Warburg, or constant phase elements. As many as four peaks can be resolved using the filtering technique on symmetric cells. It may be possible to relate the different peaks to material parameters, like the oxygen exchange coefficient. The cathode grouped in order from lowest to highest ASR is

  10. Charge collection in silicon strip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kraner, H.W.; Beuttenmuller, R.; Ludlam, T.; Hanson, A.L.; Jones, K.W.; Radeka, V.; Heijne, E.H.M.

    1982-11-01

    The use of position sensitive silicon detectors as very high resolution tracking devices in high energy physics experiments has been a subject of intense development over the past few years. Typical applications call for the detection of minimum ionizing particles with position measurement accuracy of 10 μm in each detector plane. The most straightforward detector geometry is that in which one of the collecting electrodes is subdivided into closely spaced strips, giving a high degree of segmentation in one coordinate. Each strip may be read out as a separate detection element, or, alternatively, resistive and/or capacitive coupling between adjacent strips may be exploited to interpolate the position via charge division measrurements. With readout techniques that couple several strips, the numer of readout channels can, in principle, be reduced by large factors without sacrificing the intrinsic position accuracy. The testing of individual strip properties and charge division between strips has been carried out with minimum ionizing particles or beams for the most part except in one case which used alphs particless scans. This paper describes the use of a highly collimated MeV proton beam for studies of the position sensing properties of representative one dimensional strip detectors

  11. Transfusion and blood donation in comic strips.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lefrère, Jean-Jacques; Danic, Bruno

    2013-07-01

    The representation of blood transfusion and donation of blood in the comic strip has never been studied. The comic strip, which is a relatively recent art, emerged in the 19th century before becoming a mass medium during the 20th century. We have sought, by calling on collectors and using the resources of Internet, comic strips devoted, wholly or in part, to the themes of transfusion and blood donation. We present some of them here in chronologic order, indicating the title, country of origin, year of publication, and names of authors. The theme of the superhero using transfusion to transmit his virtues or his powers is repeated throughout the 20th century in North American comic strips. More recently, comic strips have been conceived from the outset with a promotional aim. They perpetuate positive images and are directed toward a young readership, wielding humor to reduce the fear of venipuncture. Few comic strips denounce the abuse of the commercialization of products derived from the human body. The image of transfusion and blood donation given by the comic strips is not to be underestimated because their readership is primarily children, some of whom will become blood donors. Furthermore, if some readers are transfused during their lives, the impact of a memory more or less conscious of these childhood readings may resurface, both in hopes and in fears. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Zinc (Zn Analysis in Milk by Microwave Oven Digestion and Differential Pulse Anodic Stripping Voltametry (DPASV Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohineesh

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Milk is very important component of human diet. The presence of over limit of heavy metal in milk may create significant health problems. In the present study, the direct determination of Zinc (Zn heavy metal in milk samples of different brands was carried out by differential pulse anodic stripping Voltammetric technique at Hanging Mercury Drop Electrode (HMDE. Milk samples were processed by microwave oven digestion using HP/VHP Vessels and TFM Liners and nitric acid (HNO3.Determination of Zn was made in acetate buffer (pH 4.6 with a sweep rate (scan rate of 59.5 mV/s and pulse amplitude 50mV by HMDE by standard addition method. The solution was stirred during pre-electrolysis at -1150mV (vs. Ag/AgCl for 90 seconds and the potential was scanned from -1150V to +100V (vs. Ag/AgCl. The zinc ions were deposited by reduction at -1150 mV on HMDE. The stripping current arising from the oxidation of metal was correlated with the concentration the metal in the sample. .As a result the minimum level of Zn observed in the milk sample of different brands was determined as 2.28 mgL−1.

  13. Trace analysis of Cd, Cu, Pb and Zn in various materials using differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ahmed, R.; Viqar-un-Nisa; Tanwir, R.

    1988-09-01

    Sampling and sample preparation methods have been described. Digestion methods for different types of materials and acid purification systems have been developed. For trace analysis purposes cleaning methods for glassware etc. have been described. Differential pulse anodic stripping voltametric (DPASV) method has been worked out for the trace analysis of zn, cd, pb and Cu in different types of materials. Linearity of the method has been checked by drawing concentration versus currents (peak height) curves. Precision of the method has been checked by analysing a number of actual samples. of the method has been verified by analysing standards of U.S.A. Comparative studies have been done between Differential pulse anodic stripping voltammetric method and Atomic Absorption spectroscopic method. Problems of contamination and systematic errors during trace and ultra-trace analysis have been discussed. A variety of samples including soil, spinach, wheat flour, rice flour, dry milk, coriander, kidney stones, bladder stones etc. have been analysed and preliminary results have been reported. (author)

  14. Comparison of adsorptive with extractive stripping voltammetry in electrochemical determination of retinol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Milan Sýs

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Adsorptive stripping voltammetry (AdSV of retinol at solid glassy carbon electrode (GCE, carbon paste electrode (CPE covered by thin layer of multi-wall carbon nanotubes (CPE/MWCNTs and carbon paste electrode covered by thin layer of single layer graphene (CPE/Graphene was compared with an extractive stripping voltammetry (ExSV into silicone oil (SO as lipophilic binder of glassy carbon paste electrode (GCPE. All types of selected working electrodes were characterized by a scanning electron microscopy to determine overall morphology of electrode surfaces together with spatial arrangement of used carbon particles. The retinol, also known as vitamin A1, was chosen as a model analyte because it is the most biologically active representative of retinoids which are classified as a significant group of lipophilic vitamins. Based on this comparison, it was observed that electrochemical method with high sensitivity (ExSV at GPCE is generally characterized by shorter linear range of the calibration curve than in case of AdSV at CPE/MWCNTs or CPE/Graphene. Unlike AdSV at solid GCE, all other tested electrochemical methods could represent suitable analytical tools for monitoring of retinoids in different types of foodstuffs. Especially, content of retinol up to tenths milligrams can be easily determined using ExSV. Additionally, negative interference of chemical species present in real samples is minimal in comparison with direct voltammetric methods performed in supporting electrolytes based on organic solvents due to application of accumulation step in "ex-situ" mode.

  15. Stripping voltammetry in environmental and food analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brainina, K Z; Malakhova, N A; Stojko, N Y

    2000-10-01

    The review covers over 230 papers published mostly in the last 5 years. The goal of the review is to attract the attention of researchers and users to stripping voltammetry in particular, its application in environmental monitoring and analysis of foodstuffs. The sensors employed are impregnated graphite, carbon paste, thick film carbon/graphite and thin film metallic electrodes modified in-situ or beforehand. Hanging mercury drop electrodes and mercury coated glassy carbon electrodes are also mentioned. Strip and long-lived sensors for portable instruments and flow through systems are discussed as devices for future development and application of stripping voltammetry.

  16. Hardness of approximation for strip packing

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Adamaszek, Anna Maria; Kociumaka, Tomasz; Pilipczuk, Marcin

    2017-01-01

    Strip packing is a classical packing problem, where the goal is to pack a set of rectangular objects into a strip of a given width, while minimizing the total height of the packing. The problem has multiple applications, for example, in scheduling and stock-cutting, and has been studied extensively......)-approximation by two independent research groups [FSTTCS 2016,WALCOM 2017]. This raises a questionwhether strip packing with polynomially bounded input data admits a quasi-polynomial time approximation scheme, as is the case for related twodimensional packing problems like maximum independent set of rectangles or two...

  17. Determination of Sudan I in drinks containing Sunset yellow by adsorptive stripping voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez, Marisol; Arancibia, Verónica; Aliaga, Margarita; Núñez, Claudia; Rojas-Romo, Carlos

    2016-12-01

    An efficient, fast and sensitive method for the determination of Sudan I (SI) in drinks containing Sunset yellow (Sy) is developed and validated using an adsorptive stripping voltammetric procedure. Sy is currently added to a large number of foods; however during their synthesis SI may be produced. The determination is based on adsorption of Sy and SI onto HMDE and later reduction of the azo group at -0.71 and -0.82V, respectively. Using the best set of the experimental conditions (pH 12.3; Eads: -0.40V) for the determination of SI in Sy, a linear response for SI in the concentration range 0.5-27.2μgL(-1) was found, with a detection limit of 1.5μgL(-1) in a tads of only 30s. The method was applied to the determination of SI in commercial drinks with satisfactory results. The presence of SI was confirmed by mass spectrometry. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Stripping voltammetry of technetium using a TOA modified carbon paste electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruf, H.; Schorb, K.

    1989-10-01

    Low concentrations of technetium have been measured DP-stripping-voltammetrically using a carbon paste electrode modified with tri-n-octylamine (TOA-CPE). Preconcentration of the metal ion on the electrode surface accomplished by dipping of the latter in the sample solution which is 2M in HCl, relies on the chemical reaction with the amine acting as a liquid anion exchanger. Both, Tc-IV occurring as the TcCl 6 2- ion in chloride solutions as well as Tc-VII hereby are deposited. Measurements following deposition yield voltammograms of essentially different shapes for the two Tc species. With Tc-IV a characteristic curve with a prominent current signal at -280 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) is obtained which can be evaluated for Tc quantitation. However, starting from Tc-VII, complex voltammograms are registered not allowing direct technetium assays. Nevertheless, after reduction to Tc-IV, e.g. by means of ascorbic acid, also Tc-VII can be quantified reliably by the method described, the lower detection limit for both oxidation states being about 4x10 -8 M. (orig.) [de

  19. Carbon paste electrode modified molecularly imprinted polymer as a sensor for creatinine analysis by stripping voltammetry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khasanah, M.; Darmokoesoemo, H.; Rizki, D. A.

    2017-09-01

    Modification of carbon paste electrode with molecularly imprinted polymer (CP-MIP) as a voltammetric sensor for creatinine has been developed. MIP was synthesized by reacting melamine, chloranil and creatinine with a mole ratio of 1:1:0.1. Creatinine was extracted from polymer chain by using hot water to form a specific imprinted for creatinine molecule. Carbon paste-MIP electrode was prepared by mixing activated carbon, solid paraffin, and MIP in a 45:40:15(w/w %) ratio. The optimum conditions of creatinine analysis by differential pulse stripping voltammetry (DPSV) using the developed electrode were the accumulation potential -1000 mV during 90 s at pH 5. The precision of the method for 0.1-0.5 μlg/L creatinine was 88.7-96.3%, while the detection limit of this method was 0.0315 μlg/L. The accuracy compared by spectrophotometric method was 95.3-103.6%

  20. Small-Strip Thin Gap Chambers for the Muon Spectrometer Upgrade of the ATLAS Experiment

    CERN Document Server

    Perez Codina, Estel; The ATLAS collaboration

    2015-01-01

    For the forthcoming Phase-I upgrade to the LHC (2018/19), the first station of the ATLAS muon end-cap system, Small Wheel, needs to be replaced. The New Small Wheel (NSW) will have to operate in a high background radiation region while reconstructing muon tracks with high precision and providing information for the Level-1 trigger. In particular, the precision reconstruction of tracks requires a spatial resolution of about 100 μm, and the Level-1 trigger track segments have to be reconstructed with an angular resolution of approximately 1 mrad. The NSWs consist of eight layers each of Micromegas and small-strip Thin Gap Chambers (sTGC), both providing trigger and tracking capabilities. The single sTGC planes of a quadruplet consists of an anode layer of 50μm gold plated tungsten wire sandwiched between two resistive cathode layers. Behind one of the resistive cathode layers, a PCB with precise machined strips (thus the name sTGC) spaced every 3.2mm allows to achieve a position resolution that ranges from 70...

  1. Determination of copper in whole blood by differential pulse adsorptive stripping voltammetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarik Attar

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available A selective and sensitive method for determination of copper in blood by adsorptive differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry is presented. The method is based on adsorptive accumulation of the complexes of Cu (II ions with benzenesulfonyl hydrazide onto hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE, followed by the reduction of the adsorbed species by differential pulse cathodic stripping voltammetry. The effect of various parameters such as supporting electrolyte, concentration of benzenesulfonyl hydrazide, accumulation potential, accumulation time and stirring rate on the selectivity and sensitivity were studied. The optimum conditions for determination of copper include perchloric acid 0.03 M, concentration of benzenesulfonyl hydrazide 7.5×10-5 M, the accumulation potential of -350 mV (vs. Ag/AgCl, the accumulation time of 50 s, and the scan rate of 50 mV s-1. Under optimized conditions, linear calibration curves were established for the concentration of Cu (II in the range of 0.62-275 ng mL-1, with detection limit of 0.186 ng mL-1 for Cu (II. The procedure was successfully applied to the determination of copper ion in whole blood samples.

  2. Barium-Dispenser Thermionic Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wintucky, Edwin G.; Green, M.; Feinleib, M.

    1989-01-01

    Improved reservoir cathode serves as intense source of electrons required for high-frequency and often high-output-power, linear-beam tubes, for which long operating lifetime important consideration. High emission-current densities obtained through use of emitting surface of relatively-low effective work function and narrow work-function distribution, consisting of coat of W/Os deposited by sputtering. Lower operating temperatures and enhanced electron emission consequently possible.

  3. Spray rolling aluminum alloy strip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McHugh, Kevin M.; Delplanque, J.-P.; Johnson, S.B.; Lavernia, E.J.; Zhou, Y.; Lin, Y

    2004-10-10

    Spray rolling combines spray forming with twin-roll casting to process metal flat products. It consists of atomizing molten metal with a high velocity inert gas, cooling the resultant droplets in flight and directing the spray between mill rolls. In-flight convection heat transfer from atomized droplets teams with conductive cooling at the rolls to rapidly remove the alloy's latent heat. Hot deformation of the semi-solid material in the rolls results in fully consolidated, rapidly solidified product. While similar in some ways to twin-roll casting, spray rolling has the advantage of being able to process alloys with broad freezing ranges at high production rates. This paper describes the process and summarizes microstructure and tensile properties of spray-rolled 2124 and 7050 aluminum alloy strips. A Lagrangian/Eulerian poly-dispersed spray flight and deposition model is described that provides some insight into the development of the spray rolling process. This spray model follows droplets during flight toward the rolls, through impact and spreading, and includes oxide film formation and breakup when relevant.

  4. The Panda Strip Asic: Pasta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, A.

    2018-01-01

    PASTA is the 64 channel front-end chip, designed in a 110 nm CMOS technology to read out the strip sensors of the Micro Vertex Detector (MVD) of the PANDA experiment. This chip provides high resolution timestamp and deposited charge information by means of the time-over-threshold technique. Its working principle is based on a predecessor, the TOFPET ASIC, that was designed for medical applications. A general restructuring of the architecture was needed, in order to meet the specific requirements imposed by the physics programme of PANDA, especially in terms of radiation tolerance, spatial constraints, and readout in absence of a first level hardware trigger. The first revision of PASTA is currently under evaluation at the Forschungszentrum Jülich, where a data acquisition system dedicated to the MVD prototypes has been developed. This paper describes the main aspect of the chip design, gives an overview of the data acquisition system used for the verification, and shows the first results regarding the performance of PASTA.

  5. Dynamic underground stripping demonstration project

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newmark, R.L.

    1992-04-01

    LLNL is collaborating with the UC Berkeley College of Engineering to develop and demonstrate a system of thermal remediation techniques for rapid cleanup of localized underground spills. Called dynamic stripping to reflect the rapid and controllable nature of the process, it will combine steam injection, direct electrical heating, and tomographic geophysical imaging in a cleanup of the LLNL gasoline spill. In the first eight months of the project, a Clean Site engineering test was conducted to prove the field application of the techniques. Tests then began on the contaminated site in FY 1992. This report describes the work at the Clean Site, including design and performance criteria, test results, interpretations, and conclusions. We fielded 'a wide range of new designs and techniques, some successful and some not. In this document, we focus on results and performance, lessons learned, and design and operational changes recommended for work at the contaminated site. Each section focuses on a different aspect of the work and can be considered a self-contained contribution

  6. PDC: A wire chamber cathode read-out on 6-bit fast ADC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De Giorgi, M; Gasparini, F; Meneguzzo, A T; Pitacco, G [Istituto Nazionale di Fisica Nucleare, Padua (Italy); Padua Univ. (Italy). Ist. di Fisica)

    1984-06-01

    A read-out for MWPC and drift chamber is presented in which the coordinate along the sense wires is obtained by measuring the centre of gravity (CoG) of the charge induced on cathode strips or pads. The peak value of the signals coming from subsets of 8-pad cathodes are recorded by a parallel sample and hold, strobed by their own OR, and then serially digitized by one 6-bit fast ADC (FADC). The basic module of the system is a peak detector and converter (PDC) built in CAMAC cards, which could be an interesting approach to the analog signal acquisition of large particle detectors. The system has been designed to equip the central detector in an experiment at the CERN LEAR facility. A prototype of a card will be described and the results of some tests will be presented.

  7. Electron source with a carbon-fibrous cathode for radiation-technology accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenev, S.A.

    1994-01-01

    The paper analyses the circuit of a full operating voltage electron source which is a direct-action electron accelerator. The electron source consists of a power supply, high-voltage multiplier-rectifier, vacuum planar diode, vacuum system and control system. The vacuum electron diode contains an autoemission carbon-fibrous cathode and beryllium foil strip anode. The results of measurements of emission characteristics of alumosilicate and carbon-fibrous cathodes are presented. The investigations into test electron source show that it can be used as a basis for creating an electron accelerator which will be capable of generating 1 MW electron beams of 1-2 MeV energy and 1 A current. 3 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab

  8. Voltammetric studies on the electrochemical determination of methylmercury in chloride medium at carbon microelectrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ribeiro, F. [Centro de Electroquimica e Cinetica da Universidade de Lisboa, Departamento de Quimica e Bioquimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Ed. C8, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); Neto, M.M.M. [Centro de Electroquimica e Cinetica da Universidade de Lisboa, Departamento de Quimica e Bioquimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Ed. C8, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal) and Departamento de Quimica Agricola e Ambiental, Instituto Superior de Agronomia, Tapada da Ajuda, 1349-017 Lisbon (Portugal)]. E-mail: mm.neto@netcabo.pt; Rocha, M.M. [Centro de Electroquimica e Cinetica da Universidade de Lisboa, Departamento de Quimica e Bioquimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Ed. C8, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal); Fonseca, I.T.E. [Centro de Electroquimica e Cinetica da Universidade de Lisboa, Departamento de Quimica e Bioquimica, Faculdade de Ciencias, Universidade de Lisboa, Campo Grande, Ed. C8, 1749-016 Lisbon (Portugal)

    2006-10-10

    Electroanalytical techniques have been used to determine methylmercury at low levels in environmental matrices. The electrochemical behaviour of methylmercury at carbon microelectrodes in a hydrochloric acid medium using cyclic, square wave and fast-scan linear-sweep voltammetric techniques has been investigated. The analytical utility of the methylmercury reoxidation peak has been explored, but the recorded peak currents were found to be poorly reproducible. This is ascribed to two factors: the adsorption of insoluble chloromercury compounds on the electrode surface, which appears to be an important contribution to hinder the voltammetric signal of methylmercury; and the competition between the reoxidation of the methylmercury radical and its dimerization reaction, which limits the reproducibility of the methylmercury peak. These problems were successfully overcome by adopting the appropriate experimental conditions. Fast-scan rates were employed and an efficient electrochemical regeneration procedure of the electrode surface was achieved, under potentiostatic conditions in a mercury-free solution containing potassium thiocyanate-a strong complexing agent. The influence of chloride ion concentration was analysed. Interference by metals, such as lead and cadmium, was considered. Calibration plots were obtained in the micromolar and submicromolar concentration ranges, allowing the electrochemical determination of methylmercury in trace amounts. An estuarine water sample was analysed using the new method with a glassy carbon microelectrode.

  9. Classification of monofloral honeys by voltammetric electronic tongue with chemometrics method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wei Zhenbo [Department of Bio-systems Engineering, Zhejiang University, 268 Kaixuan Road, Hangzhou 310029, Zhejiang (China); Wang Jun, E-mail: jwang@zju.edu.cn [Department of Bio-systems Engineering, Zhejiang University, 268 Kaixuan Road, Hangzhou 310029, Zhejiang (China)

    2011-05-01

    Highlights: > We self-developed a voltammetric electronic tongue based on new sensors array. > We advanced a new method to extract eigenvalues from signals obtained by VE-tongue. > We first detected the monofloral honeys of different floral origins using VE-tongue. - Abstract: A voltammetric electronic tongue (VE-tongue) based on multifrequency large amplitude pulse voltammetry (MLAPV) was developed to classify monofloral honeys of seven kinds of floral origins. The VE-tongue was composed of six working electrodes (gold, silver, platinum, palladium, tungsten, and titanium) in a standard three-electrode configuration. The applied waveform of MLAPV was composed of four individual frequencies: 1 Hz, 10 Hz, 100 Hz, and 1000 Hz. Two eigenvalues (the maximum value and the minimum value) of each cycle were extracted for building the first database (FDB); four eigenvalues (the maximum value, the minimum value, and two inflexion values) were exacted for building the second database (SDB). The two databases were analyzed by three-pattern recognition techniques: principal component analysis (PCA), discriminant function analysis (DFA) and cluster analysis (CA), respectively. It was possible to discriminate the seven kinds of honeys of different floral origins completely based on FDB and SDB by PCA, DFA and CA, and FDB was certificated as an efficient database by contrasting with the SDB. Moreover, the effective working electrodes and frequencies were picked out as the best experimental project for the further study.

  10. Polyurethane Ionophore-Based Thin Layer Membranes for Voltammetric Ion Activity Sensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuartero, Maria; Crespo, Gaston A; Bakker, Eric

    2016-06-07

    We report on a plasticized polyurethane ionophore-based thin film material (of hundreds of nanometer thickness) for simultaneous voltammetric multianalyte ion activity detection triggered by the oxidation/reduction of an underlying poly(3-octylthiophene) film. This material provides excellent mechanical, physical, and chemical robustness compared to other polymers. Polyurethane films did not exhibit leaching of lipophilic additives after rinsing with a direct water jet and exhibited resistance to detachment from the underlying electrode surface, resulting in a voltammetric current response with less than acrylate) ionophore-based membranes of the same thickness and composition exhibited a significant deterioration of the signal after identical treatment. While previously reported works emphasized fundamental advancement of multi-ion detection with multi-ionophore-based thin films, polyurethane thin membranes allow one to achieve real world measurements without sacrificing analytical performance. Indeed, polyurethane membranes are demonstrated to be useful for the simultaneous determination of potassium and lithium in undiluted human serum and blood with attractive precision.

  11. Manganese dioxide-graphene nanocomposite film modified electrode as a sensitive voltammetric sensor of indomethacin detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yuxia; Zhang, Zhenfa; Zhang, Cuizong; Huang, Wei; Liang, Caiyun; Peng, Jinyun [Guangxi Normal University for Nationalities, Chongzuo (China)

    2016-08-15

    Excess amount of analgesic and anti-inflammatory drug, such as indomethacin, often leads to serious gastrointestinal complications; therefore, amount of such active compound should be regulated in commercial drugs. This study proposes an efficient analytical technique to detect indomethacin selectively. We prepared and investigated electrochemical properties of a manganese dioxide-graphene nanocomposite film modified glassy carbon electrode (MnO{sub 2}-Gr/GCE). The behavior of the modified electrode as electrocatalyst towards indomethacin oxidation was also examined. The cyclic voltammetric results reveal that the electrocatalytic activity for the oxidation of indomethacin can significantly be enhanced on the MnO{sub 2}-Gr/GCE. Indomethacin exhibited a sensitive anodic peak at about 0.90 V at MnO{sub 2}-Gr/GCE. The data obtained from differential pulse voltammetry showed that the anodic peak currents were linearly dependent on the indomethacin concentrations in the range of 1.0 X 10{sup -7} to 2.5 X 10{sup -5} mol/L with a detection limit of 3.2 X 10{sup -8} mol/L (S/N = 3). Most importantly, the proposed method shows efficient and selective sensing of indomethacin in commercial harmaceutical formulations. This is the first report of a voltammetric sensor for indomethacin using MnO{sub 2}-Gr/GCE. We believe that this new method can be commercialized for routine applications in laboratories.

  12. Anodic Voltammetric determination of gemifloxacin using screen-printed carbon electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abd-Elgawad Radi

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical oxidation behavior and voltammetric assay of gemifloxacin were investigated using differential-pulse and cyclic voltammetry on a screen-printed carbon electrode. The effects of pH, scan rates, and concentration of the drug on the anodic peak current were studied. Voltammograms of gemifloxacin in Tris–HCl buffer (pH 7.0 exhibited a well-defined single oxidation peak. A differential-pulse voltammetric procedure for the quantitation of gemifloxacin has been developed and suitably validated with respect to linearity, limits of detection and quantification, accuracy, precision, specificity, and robustness. The calibration was linear from 0.5 to 10.0 μM, and the limits of detection and quantification were 0.15 and 5.0 μM. Recoveries ranging from 96.26% to 103.64% were obtained. The method was successfully applied to the determination of gemifloxacin in pharmaceutical tablets without any pre-treatment. Excipients present in the tablets did not interfere in the assay. Keywords: Screen-printed carbon electrode, Voltammetry, Gemifloxacin, Pharmaceutical analysis

  13. Voltammetric determination of copper in selected pharmaceutical preparations--validation of the method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutka, Anna; Maruszewska, Małgorzata

    2011-01-01

    It were established and validated the conditions of voltammetric determination of copper in pharmaceutical preparations. The three selected preparations: Zincuprim (A), Wapń, cynk, miedź z wit. C (B), Vigor complete (V) contained different salts and different quantity of copper (II) and increasing number of accompanied ingredients. For the purpose to transfer copper into solution, the samples of powdered tablets of the first and second preparation were undergone extraction and of the third the mineralization procedures. The concentration of copper in solution was determined by differential pulse voltammetry (DP) using comparison with standard technique. In the validation process, the selectivity, accuracy, precision and linearity of DP determination of copper in three preparations were estimated. Copper was determined within the concentration range of 1-9 ppm (1-9 microg/mL): the mean recoveries approached 102% (A), 100% (B), 102% (V); the relative standard deviations of determinations (RSD) were 0.79-1.59% (A), 0.62-0.85% (B) and 1.68-2.28% (V), respectively. The mean recoveries and the RSDs of determination satisfied the requirements for the analyte concentration at the level 1-10 ppm. The statistical verification confirmed that the tested voltammetric method is suitable for determination of copper in pharmaceutical preparation.

  14. Vapor permeation-stepwise injection simultaneous determination of methanol and ethanol in biodiesel with voltammetric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shishov, Andrey; Penkova, Anastasia; Zabrodin, Andrey; Nikolaev, Konstantin; Dmitrenko, Maria; Ermakov, Sergey; Bulatov, Andrey

    2016-02-01

    A novel vapor permeation-stepwise injection (VP-SWI) method for the determination of methanol and ethanol in biodiesel samples is discussed. In the current study, stepwise injection analysis was successfully combined with voltammetric detection and vapor permeation. This method is based on the separation of methanol and ethanol from a sample using a vapor permeation module (VPM) with a selective polymer membrane based on poly(phenylene isophtalamide) (PA) containing high amounts of a residual solvent. After the evaporation into the headspace of the VPM, methanol and ethanol were transported, by gas bubbling, through a PA membrane to a mixing chamber equipped with a voltammetric detector. Ethanol was selectively detected at +0.19 V, and both compounds were detected at +1.20 V. Current subtractions (using a correction factor) were used for the selective determination of methanol. A linear range between 0.05 and 0.5% (m/m) was established for each analyte. The limits of detection were estimated at 0.02% (m/m) for ethanol and methanol. The sample throughput was 5 samples h(-1). The method was successfully applied to the analysis of biodiesel samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Sensitive voltammetric detection of yeast RNA based on its interaction with Victoria Blue B

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    WEI SUN

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Voltammetric studies of the interaction of yeast RNA (y-RNA with Victoria Blue B (VBB are described in this paper. Furthermore, a linear sweep voltammetric method for the detection of y-RNA was established. The reaction conditions, such as acidity and amount of buffer solution, the concentration of VBB, the reaction time and temperature, etc., were carefully investigated by second order derivative linear sweep voltammetry. Under the optimal conditions, the reduction peak current of VBB at –0.75 V decreased greatly after the addition of y-RNA to the solution without any shift of the reduction peak potential. Based on the decrease of the peak current, a new quantitative method for the determination of y-RNA was developed. The effects of co-existing substances on the determination were carefully investigated and three synthetic samples were determined with satisfactory results. The stoichiometry of the VBB–y-RNA complex was calculated by linear sweep voltammetry and the interaction mechanism is discussed.

  16. Voltammetric studies on the electrochemical determination of methylmercury in chloride medium at carbon microelectrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ribeiro, F.; Neto, M.M.M.; Rocha, M.M.; Fonseca, I.T.E.

    2006-01-01

    Electroanalytical techniques have been used to determine methylmercury at low levels in environmental matrices. The electrochemical behaviour of methylmercury at carbon microelectrodes in a hydrochloric acid medium using cyclic, square wave and fast-scan linear-sweep voltammetric techniques has been investigated. The analytical utility of the methylmercury reoxidation peak has been explored, but the recorded peak currents were found to be poorly reproducible. This is ascribed to two factors: the adsorption of insoluble chloromercury compounds on the electrode surface, which appears to be an important contribution to hinder the voltammetric signal of methylmercury; and the competition between the reoxidation of the methylmercury radical and its dimerization reaction, which limits the reproducibility of the methylmercury peak. These problems were successfully overcome by adopting the appropriate experimental conditions. Fast-scan rates were employed and an efficient electrochemical regeneration procedure of the electrode surface was achieved, under potentiostatic conditions in a mercury-free solution containing potassium thiocyanate-a strong complexing agent. The influence of chloride ion concentration was analysed. Interference by metals, such as lead and cadmium, was considered. Calibration plots were obtained in the micromolar and submicromolar concentration ranges, allowing the electrochemical determination of methylmercury in trace amounts. An estuarine water sample was analysed using the new method with a glassy carbon microelectrode

  17. Rapid voltammetric monitoring of melatonin in the presence of tablet excipients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ball, Andrew T.; Patel, Bhavik Anil

    2012-01-01

    Melatonin is an important neurohormonal chemical that is responsible for regulating sleep. Melatonin dietary supplements are available and utilised to counteract the effects of jet-lag or to aid sleep. Voltammetric detection with a boron-doped diamond electrode was utilised for the rapid monitoring of individual melatonin tablets. Melatonin was oxidised at a potential of +0.8 V vs. Ag|AgCl. Voltammetric measurements were carried out without the need of excessive sample preparation steps such as filtration. However dicalcium phosphate and carboxymethyl cellulose were shown to alter the electrochemical response. Calibration responses were linear over a concentration of 2–4 mg/25 ml of melatonin and a limit of detection of 0.06 mg/25 ml was observed. Volammetric recordings were only stable for one measurement, but the electrode surface could be replenished following a single wipe of an ethanol soaked lens cloth. This new assay was capable of analysing individual melatonin tablets within a total analysis time of 2.5 min. Overall this approach provides the basis for rapid electrochemical monitoring of pharmaceutical and dietary tablets without the need for extensive sample preparation.

  18. Gas proportional detectors with interpolating cathode pad readout for high track multiplicities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Bo.

    1991-12-01

    New techniques for position encoding in very high rate particle and photon detectors will be required in experiments planned for future particle accelerators such as the Superconducting Super Collider and new, high intensity, synchrotron sources. Studies of two interpolating cathode ''pad'' readout systems are described in this thesis. They are well suited for high multiplicity, two dimensional unambiguous position sensitive detection of minimum ionizing particles and heavy ions as well as detection of x-rays at high counting rates. One of the readout systems uses subdivided rows of pads interconnected by resistive strips as the cathode of a multiwire proportional chamber (MWPC). A position resolution of less than 100 μm rms, for 5.4 keV x-rays, and differential non-linearity of 12% have been achieved. Low mass (∼0.6% of a radiation length) detector construction techniques have been developed. The second readout system uses rows of chevron shaped cathode pads to perform geometrical charge division. Position resolution (FWHM) of about 1% of the readout spacing and differential non-linearity of 10% for 5.4 keV x-rays have been achieved. A review of other interpolating methods is included. Low mass cathode construction techniques are described. In conclusion, applications and future developments are discussed. 54 refs

  19. Comparative limnology of strip-mine lakes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Parsons, J D

    1964-01-01

    Lakes were classified according to chemical properties. The concentration of the ferric iron oxides was responsible for a reddish-black turbidity which, in turn, played a major role in the thermal stratification of red strip-mine lakes. Owing to the lack of measurable turbidity and as a result of selective absorption of visible solar radiation, other strip-mine lakes appeared blue in color. The annual heat budget and the summer heat budget are essentially equivalent under saline conditions. Regardless of the physical and chemical conditions of the strip-mine lakes, heat income was a function of the circulating water mass. The progressive oxidation and precipitation of the iron oxides is the key to the classification of strip-mine lakes.

  20. Buffer Strips for Riparian Zone Management

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    1991-01-01

    This study provides a review of technical literature concerning the width of riparian buffer strips needed to protect water quality and maintain other important values provided by riparian ecosystem...

  1. Mesoporous film of WO{sub 3}–the “sunlight” assisted decomposition of surfactant in wastewater for voltammetric determination of Pb

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krasnodębska-Ostręga, Beata, E-mail: bekras@chem.uw.edu.pl; Bielecka, Agnieszka; Biaduń, Ewa; Miecznikowski, Krzysztof, E-mail: kmiecz@chem.uw.edu.pl

    2016-12-01

    Highlights: • The “sun light” decomposed of surfactants: Sodium dodecyl sulfate and Triton™X-114 in the presence of WO{sub 3}. • Mesoporous WO{sub 3} films use for the degradation of surfactant without any reagents. • The developed procedure is suggested to be a no-reagents method of decomposition of added SDS leads to 100% recovery of added Pb (II). - Abstract: In this paper we present the application of “sunlight” assisted digestion in the presence of WO{sub 3} to the decomposition of dissolved organic matter, using the anionic surfactant sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS) and the nonionic surfactant (1,1,3,3-tetramethylbutyl)phenyl-polyethylene glycol (Triton™X-114) in natural water samples, prior to the determination of traces residues of lead by stripping voltammetry methods. The results of the study showed firstly that the preparation of reproducible WO{sub 3} layers characterized by high mechanical and chemical resistance was possible, and secondly that it was also possible to obtain a high efficiency of decomposition, equal in efficiency to that of the reference method, which was the hydrogen peroxide oxidation assisted by UV, with evaporation nearly to dryness. The developed procedure is suggested to be a no-reagents method for the decomposition of added SDS, leading to 100% recovery of added Pb (II). The anodic stripping voltammetric curves recorded in solution after 4 h irradiation with UV assisted by WO{sub 3} were repeatable and increased linearly with standard additions, but the data finally obtained were incorrect. The curves recorded in solution after “sunlight” assisted digestion in the presence of WO{sub 3} were repeatable, and increased linearly with an increasing of concentration of standard additions (100% recovery of Pb). In the case of a nonionic surfactant, the decomposition time is at least 6 h. The advantage of the proposed method is the fact that the digestion process does not need the addition of any chemicals for the

  2. Deuteron stripping reactions using dirac phenomenology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawk, E. A.; McNeil, J. A.

    2001-04-01

    In this work deuteron stripping reactions are studied using the distorted wave born approximation employing dirac phenomenological potentials. In 1982 Shepard and Rost performed zero-range dirac phenomenological stripping calculations and found a dramatic reduction in the predicted cross sections when compared with similar nonrelativistic calculations. We extend the earlier work by including full finite range effects as well as the deuteron's internal D-state. Results will be compared with traditional nonrelativistic approaches and experimental data at low energy.

  3. Flexible strip supercapacitors for future energy storage

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, R-R; Xu, Y-M; Harrison, D; Fyson, J; Qiu, F-L; Southee, D

    2015-01-01

    Flexible strip supercapacitors are developed and their electrochemical properties are characterized. Activated carbon is used as the electrode material and it is found to have a good porous structure which provides a large surface area for energy storage. Furthermore, this activated carbon performs well. The manufacturing processes for the supercapacitors are described in detail and the preparation process has good reproducibility. The strip supercapacitors are combined in series and parallel...

  4. The charge collection in silicon strip detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boehringer, T.; Hubbeling, L.; Weilhammer, P.; Kemmer, J.; Koetz, U.; Riebesell, M.; Belau, E.; Klanner, R.; Lutz, G.; Neugebauer, E.; Seebrunner, H.J.; Wylie, A.

    1983-02-01

    The charge collection in silicon detectors has been studied, by measuring the response to high-energy particles of a 20μm pitch strip detector as a function of applied voltage and magnetic field. The results are well described by a simple model. The model is used to predict the spatial resolution of silicon strip detectors and to propose a detector with optimized spatial resolution. (orig.)

  5. LYCORIS - A Large Area Strip Telescope

    CERN Document Server

    Krämer, U; Stanitzki, M; Wu, M

    2018-01-01

    The LYCORIS Large Area Silicon Strip Telescope for the DESY II Test Beam Facility is presented. The DESY II Test Beam Facility provides elec- tron and positron beams for beam tests of up to 6 GeV. A new telescope with a large 10 × 20 cm2 coverage area based on a 25 μm pitch strip sensor is to be installed within the PCMAG 1 T solenoid. The current state of the system is presented.

  6. Quantitative comparison of 3 enamel-stripping devices in vitro: how precisely can we strip teeth?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johner, Alexander Marc; Pandis, Nikolaos; Dudic, Alexander; Kiliaridis, Stavros

    2013-04-01

    In this in-vitro study, we aimed to investigate the predictability of the expected amount of stripping using 3 common stripping devices on premolars. One hundred eighty extracted premolars were mounted and aligned in silicone. Tooth mobility was tested with Periotest (Medizintechnik Gulden, Modautal, Germany) (8.3 ± 2.8 units). The selected methods for interproximal enamel reduction were hand-pulled strips (Horico, Hapf Ringleb & Company, Berlin, Germany), oscillating segmental disks (O-drive-OD 30; KaVo Dental, Biberach, Germany), and motor-driven abrasive strips (Orthofile; SDC Switzerland, Lugano-Grancia, Switzerland). With each device, the operator intended to strip 0.1, 0.2, 0.3, or 0.4 mm on the mesial side of 15 teeth. The teeth were scanned before and after stripping with a 3-dimensional laser scanner. Superposition and measurement of stripped enamel on the most mesial point of the tooth were conducted with Viewbox software (dHal Software, Kifissia, Greece). The Wilcoxon signed rank test and the Kruskal-Wallis test were applied; statistical significance was set at alpha ≤ 0.05. Large variations between the intended and the actual amounts of stripped enamel, and between stripping procedures, were observed. Significant differences were found at 0.1 mm of intended stripping (P ≤ 0.05) for the hand-pulled method and at 0.4 mm of intended stripping (P ≤ 0.001 to P = 0.05) for all methods. For all scenarios of enamel reduction, the actual amount of stripping was less than the predetermined and expected amount of stripping. The Kruskal-Wallis analysis showed no significant differences between the 3 methods. There were variations in the stripped amounts of enamel, and the stripping technique did not appear to be a significant predictor of the actual amount of enamel reduction. In most cases, actual stripping was less than the intended amount of enamel reduction. Copyright © 2013 American Association of Orthodontists. Published by Mosby, Inc. All rights

  7. Electron beam generation form a superemissive cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hsu, T.-Y.; Liou, R.-L.; Kirkman-Amemiya, G.; Gundersen, M.A.

    1991-01-01

    An experimental study of electron beams produced by a superemissive cathode in the Back-Lighted Thyratron (BLT) and the pseudospark is presented. This work is motivated by experiments demonstrating very high current densities (≥10 kA/cm 2 over an area of 1 cm 2 ) from the pseudospark and BLT cathode. This high-density current is produced by field-enhanced thermionic emission from the ion beam-heated surface of a molybdenum cathode. This work reports the use of this cathode as a beam source, and is to be distinguished from previous work reporting hollow cathode-produced electron beams. An electron beam of more than 260 A Peak current has been produced with 15 kV applied voltage. An efficiency of ∼10% is estimated. These experimental results encourage further investigation of the super-emissive cathode as an intense electron beam source for applications including accelerator technology

  8. Reflective article having a sacrificial cathodic layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabagambe, Benjamin; Buchanan, Michael J.; Scott, Matthew S.; Rearick, Brian K.; Medwick, Paul A.; McCamy, James W.

    2017-09-12

    The present invention relates to reflective articles, such as solar mirrors, that include a sacrificial cathodic layer. The reflective article, more particularly includes a substrate, such as glass, having a multi-layered coating thereon that includes a lead-free sacrificial cathodic layer. The sacrificial cathodic layer includes at least one transition metal, such as a particulate transition metal, which can be in the form of flakes (e.g., zinc flakes). The sacrificial cathodic layer can include an inorganic matrix formed from one or more organo-titanates. Alternatively, the sacrificial cathodic layer can include an organic polymer matrix (e.g., a crosslinked organic polymer matrix formed from an organic polymer and an aminoplast crosslinking agent). The reflective article also includes an outer organic polymer coating, that can be electrodeposited over the sacrificial cathodic layer.

  9. Quantification of lead and cadmium in poultry and bird game meat by square-wave anodic-stripping voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trevisani, M; Cecchini, M; Taffetani, L; Vercellotti, L; Rosmini, R

    2011-02-01

    A square-wave anodic-stripping voltammetric method for the analysis of lead and cadmium in chicken muscle and liver was developed and validated, and the results of a monitoring study relative to chicken and pigeon meat are reported. The voltammetric method allows the analysis of lead and cadmium at the same time in samples after acid digestion. The use of perchloric acid for digestion and of acetate buffer in the supporting electrolyte are suitable to reduce matrix interferences and obtain limits of quantification which were below 10 ng g⁻¹ for meat and liver samples. The regression between the analytical signal and the concentration of the target analytes in spiked samples and Certified Reference Materials proved to be linear within the 10-100 ng g⁻¹ range for meat and within the 50-500 ng g⁻¹ range for liver. The analytical method was verified using available Certified Reference Materials BCR-184 (cattle meat) and BCR-185R (cattle liver) as well as with spiked chicken samples. Precision (i.e. repeatability and intermediate precision) and accuracy (percentage recovery and bias) were of the order of 0.3-4.5% for both lead and cadmium The level of lead in muscle was in the range between 6.4 and 59.8 ng g⁻¹ in chickens and between 7.9 and 63.6 ng g⁻¹ in farmed pigeons, whereas it was between 8.0 and 84.4 ng g⁻¹ in chicken liver. The cadmium concentration was 0.4-10.4 ng g⁻¹ in chicken muscle, 10.4-90.6 ng g⁻¹ in chicken liver and 2.2-8.0 ng g⁻¹ in farmed pigeons.

  10. Application of ascorbic acid 2-phosphate as a new voltammetric substrate for alkaline phosphatase determination in human serum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Sun

    2005-12-01

    Full Text Available An electrochemical assay of the enzyme alkaline phosphatase (ALP using ascorbic acid 2-phosphate (AAP as a new voltammetric substrate has been described in this paper. In the alkaline buffer solution the ALP enzymatic hydrolysis product of AAP was ascorbic acid (AA, which was an electro-active substance and had a sensitive differential pulse voltammetric (DPV oxidative response on glassy carbon electrode (GCE at +380 mV (versus Ag/AgCl, so the activity of ALP could be monitored voltammetrically of the oxidative peak current of AA. The electrochemical behaviours of AA were carefully studied and the AA standard solution could be measured by DPV method in the linear range from 10.0 to 1000.0 μmol/L with the detection limit of 8.0 μmol/L. The optimal conditions for ALP enzymatic reaction and the voltammetric detection were optimized. Under the optimal conditions the calibration curve for ALP assay exhibited a linear range from 0.4 to 2000.0 U/L with a detection limit of 0.3 U/L. This proposed method was further applied to determine the ALP content in healthy human serum and the results were in good agreement with the traditional p-nitrophenyl phosphate spectrophotometric method. The kinetic constants of enzymatic reaction were also investigated with the apparent kinetic constant Km as 2.77 mmol/L and the maximum velocity Vmax as 0.33 mol/min.

  11. Preventing Corrosion by Controlling Cathodic Reaction Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-25

    3. DATES COVERED (From - To) 09/23/15 - 04/22/16 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Preventing Corrosion by Controlling Cathodic Reaction...Preventing corrosion by controlling cathodic reaction kinetics Progress Report for Period: 1 SEP 2015-31 MAR 2016 John Keith Department of...25 March 2016 Preventing corrosion by controlling cathodic reaction kinetics Annual Summary Report: FY16 PI: John Keith, 412-624-7016,jakeith

  12. Hollow cathode for positive ion sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schechter, D.E.; Kim, J.; Tsai, C.C.

    1979-01-01

    Development to incorporate hollow cathodes into high power ion sources for neutral beam injection systems is being pursued. Hollow tube LaB 6 -type cathodes, similar to a UCLA design, have been constructed and tested in several ORNL ion source configurations. Results of testing include arc discharge parameters of >1000 and 500 amps for 0.5 and 10 second pulse lengths, respectively. Details of cathode construction and additional performance results are discussed

  13. Cold cathode arc model in mercury discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Y.M.; Byszewski, W.W.; Budinger, A.B.

    1990-01-01

    Voltage/current characteristics measured during the starting of metal halide lamps indicate a low voltage discharge when condensates (mainly mercury) are localized on the electrodes. In this case, even with a cold cathode which does not emit electrons, the current is very high and voltage across the lamp drops to about 15 to 20 V. This type of discharge is similar to the cold cathode mercury vapor arc found in mercury pool rectifiers. The cathode sheath in the mercury vapor arc is characterized by very small cathode spot size, on the order of 10 -c cm 2 , very high current density of about 10 6 A/cm 2 and very low cathode fall of approximately 10 volts. The discharge is modified and generalized to describe the cathode phenomena in the cold cathode mercury vapor arc. The sensitivity of calculated discharge parameters with respect to such modifications were examined. Results show that the cathode fall voltage remains fairly constant (7-8 volts) with large fractional variations of metastable mercury atoms bombarding the cathode. This result compares very well with experimental waveforms when anode fall and plasma voltage approximations are incorporated

  14. Two-beam virtual cathode accelerator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peter, W.

    1992-01-01

    A proposed method to control the motion of a virtual cathode is investigated. Applications to collective ion acceleration and microwave generation are indicated. If two counterstreaming relativistic electron beams of current I are injected into a drift tube of space-charge-limiting current I L = 2I, it is shown that one beam can induce a moving virtual cathode in the other beam. By dynamically varying the current injected into the drift tube region, the virtual cathode can undergo controlled motion. For short drift tubes, the virtual cathodes on each end are strongly-coupled and undergo coherent large-amplitude spatial oscillations within the drift tube

  15. Cathode materials: A personal perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodenough, John B. [Texas Materials Institute, University of Texas at Austin, ETC 9.102, 1 University Station, Austin, TX 78712-1063 (United States)

    2007-12-06

    A thermodynamically stable rechargeable battery has a voltage limited by the window of the electrolyte. An aqueous electrolyte has a window of 1.2 eV, which prevents achieving the high energy density desired for many applications. A non-aqueous electrolyte with a window of 5 eV requires Li{sup +} rather than H{sup +} as the working ion. Early experiments with Li{sub x}TiS{sub 2} cathodes showed competitive capacity and rate capability, but problems with a lithium anode made the voltage of a safe cell based on a sulfide cathode too low to be competitive with a nickel/metal-hydride battery. Transition-metal oxides can give voltages of 4.5 V versus Li{sup +}/Li{sup 0}. However, the challenge with oxides has been to obtain a competitive capacity and rate capability while retaining a high voltage with low-cost, environmentally friendly cathode materials. Comparisons will be made between layered Li{sub 1-x}MO{sub 2}, spinels Li{sub 1-x}[M{sub 2}]O{sub 4}, and olivines Li{sub 1-x}MPO{sub 4} having 0 < x < 1. Although higher capacities can be obtained with layered Li{sub 1-x}MO{sub 2} compounds, which have enabled the wireless revolution, their metastability makes them unlikely to be used in power applications. The spinel and olivine framework structures have been shown to be capable of charge/discharge rates of over 10C with a suitable temperature range for plug-in hybrid vehicles. (author)

  16. Fundamental aspects of cathodic sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Harman, R.

    1979-01-01

    The main fundamental aspects and problems of cathodic sputtering used mainly for thin film deposition and sputter etching are discussed. Among many types of known sputtering techniques the radiofrequency /RF/ diode sputtering is the most universal one and is used for deposition of metals, alloys, metallic compounds, semiconductors and insulators. It seems that nowadays the largest number of working sputtering systems is of diode type. Sometimes also the dc or rf triode sputtering systems are used. The problems in these processes are practically equivalent and comparable with the problems in the diode method and therefore our discussion will be, in most cases applicable for both, the diode and triode methods

  17. Cathode-follower power amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Giordano, S.; Puglisi, M.

    1983-01-01

    In circular accelerators and particularly in storage rings it is essential that the total impedance, as seen by the beam, be kept below some critical value. A model of the accelerating system was built using a single-ended cathode-follower amplifier driving a ferrite-loaded cavity. The system operated at 234.5 kHz with a peak output voltage of +-10 kV on the gap. The dynamic output impedance, as measured on the gap, was < 15 ohms

  18. Ultrasensitive and Fast Voltammetric Determination of Iron in Seawater by Atmospheric Oxygen Catalysis in 500 μL Samples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caprara, Salvatore; Laglera, Luis M; Monticelli, Damiano

    2015-06-16

    A new method based on adsorptive cathodic stripping voltammetry with catalytic enhancement for the determination of total dissolved iron in seawater is reported. It was demonstrated that iron detection at the ultratrace level (0.1 nM) may be achieved in small samples (500 μL) with high sensitivity, no need for purging, no added oxidant, and a limit of detection of 5 pM. The proposed method is based on the adsorption of the complex Fe/2,3-dihydroxynaphthalene (DHN) exploiting the catalytic effect of atmospheric oxygen. As opposite to the original method (Obata, H.; van den Berg, C. M. Anal. Chem. 2001, 73, 2522-2528), atmospheric oxygen dissolved in solution replaced bromate ions in the oxidation of the iron complex: removing bromate reduces the blank level and avoids the use of a carcinogenic species. Moreover, the new method is based on a recently introduced hardware that enables the determinations to be performed in 500 μL samples. The analyses were carried out on buffered samples (pH 8.15, HEPPS 0.01 M), 10 μM DHN and iron quantified by the standard addition method. The sensitivity is 49 nA nM(-1) min(-1) with 30 s deposition time and the LOD is equal to 5 pM. As a result, the whole procedure for the quantification of iron in one sample requires around 7.5 min. The new method was validated via analysis on two reference samples (SAFe S and SAFe D2) with low iron content collected in the North Pacific Ocean.

  19. Development of floating strip micromegas detectors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bortfeldt, Jonathan

    2014-04-28

    Micromegas are high-rate capable, high-resolution micro-pattern gaseous detectors. Square meter sized resistive strip Micromegas are foreseen as replacement of the currently used precision tracking detectors in the Small Wheel, which is part of the forward region of the ATLAS muon spectrometer. The replacement is necessary to ensure tracking and triggering performance of the muon spectrometer after the luminosity increase of the Large Hadron Collider beyond its design value of 10{sup 34} cm{sup -2}s{sup -1} around 2020. In this thesis a novel discharge tolerant floating strip Micromegas detector is presented and described. By individually powering copper anode strips, the effects of a discharge are confined to a small region of the detector. This reduces the impact of discharges on the efficiency by three orders of magnitude, compared to a standard Micromegas. The physics of the detector is studied and discussed in detail. Several detectors are developed: A 6.4 x 6.4 cm{sup 2} floating strip Micromegas with exchangeable SMD capacitors and resistors allows for an optimization of the floating strip principle. The discharge behavior is investigated on this device in depth. The microscopic structure of discharges is quantitatively explained by a detailed detector simulation. A 48 x 50 cm{sup 2} floating strip Micromegas is studied in high energy pion beams. Its homogeneity with respect to pulse height, efficiency and spatial resolution is investigated. The good performance in high-rate background environments is demonstrated in cosmic muon tracking measurements with a 6.4 x 6.4 cm{sup 2} floating strip Micromegas under lateral irradiation with 550 kHz 20 MeV proton beams. A floating strip Micromegas doublet with low material budget is developed for ion tracking without limitations from multiple scattering in imaging applications during medical ion therapy. Highly efficient tracking of 20 MeV protons at particle rates of 550 kHz is possible. The reconstruction of the

  20. Development of floating strip micromegas detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bortfeldt, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Micromegas are high-rate capable, high-resolution micro-pattern gaseous detectors. Square meter sized resistive strip Micromegas are foreseen as replacement of the currently used precision tracking detectors in the Small Wheel, which is part of the forward region of the ATLAS muon spectrometer. The replacement is necessary to ensure tracking and triggering performance of the muon spectrometer after the luminosity increase of the Large Hadron Collider beyond its design value of 10 34 cm -2 s -1 around 2020. In this thesis a novel discharge tolerant floating strip Micromegas detector is presented and described. By individually powering copper anode strips, the effects of a discharge are confined to a small region of the detector. This reduces the impact of discharges on the efficiency by three orders of magnitude, compared to a standard Micromegas. The physics of the detector is studied and discussed in detail. Several detectors are developed: A 6.4 x 6.4 cm 2 floating strip Micromegas with exchangeable SMD capacitors and resistors allows for an optimization of the floating strip principle. The discharge behavior is investigated on this device in depth. The microscopic structure of discharges is quantitatively explained by a detailed detector simulation. A 48 x 50 cm 2 floating strip Micromegas is studied in high energy pion beams. Its homogeneity with respect to pulse height, efficiency and spatial resolution is investigated. The good performance in high-rate background environments is demonstrated in cosmic muon tracking measurements with a 6.4 x 6.4 cm 2 floating strip Micromegas under lateral irradiation with 550 kHz 20 MeV proton beams. A floating strip Micromegas doublet with low material budget is developed for ion tracking without limitations from multiple scattering in imaging applications during medical ion therapy. Highly efficient tracking of 20 MeV protons at particle rates of 550 kHz is possible. The reconstruction of the track inclination in a single

  1. The contents of sesamol and related lignans in sesame, tahina and halva as determined by a newly developed polarographic and stripping voltammetric analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tokusoglu, O.; Kocak, S.; Aycan, S.

    2009-07-01

    The contents of antioxidant lignans (Sesamol) in sesame, commercial formulations of tahina and halva, which are processed tahina foods, were determined by Differential Pulse Polarography (DPP) with a capillary hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE). A platinum wire was used as the counter electrode and Ag/AgCl was the reference electrode. Samples have been analyzed by standard addition procedures and found to be quantitative (p<0.01). Due to the fact that sesamol is an oil-soluble phenolic compound , it was found in the oil levels of sesame, tahina and halvas. Sesame samples contained 51.05-56.46 % in oil whereas tahina samples contained 52.12-53.79 % in oil. The oil percentage of plain halva was found to be 28.79 - 30.13 % (p<0.01). Phenolic lignans sesamol in sesame was 0.26-0.32 mg/100g oil, whereas the sesamol in tahina was 10.98-12.33 mg/100g oil. The sesamol in commercial plain halva samples and the open marketed plain halva samples contained 8.24-9.12 mg/100g oil and 4.97 mg sesamol /100g oil, respectively (R{sup 2}=0.9999) (p<0.01). The proposed Differential Pulse Polarographic (DPP) method is a rapid, reproducible procedure for the simultaneous determination of phenolic lignans in sesame and food products with sesame. It provides an adequate, sensitive, quantitative detection of these nutraceuticals in the commercial food industry. (Author) 26 refs.

  2. The contents of sesamol and related lignans in sesame, tahina and halva as determined by a newly developed polarographic and stripping voltammetric analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available The contents of antioxidant lignans (Sesamol in sesame, commercial formulations of tahina and halva, which are processed tahina foods, were determined by Differential Pulse Polarography (DPP with a capillary hanging mercury drop electrode (HMDE. A platinum wire was used as the counter electrode and Ag/AgCl was the reference electrode. Samples have been analyzed by standard addition procedures and found to be quantitative (p2=0.9999 (pSe determinó el contenido del lignano antioxidante (Sesamol en sésamo, formulaciones comerciales de tahina y halva, que es el producto procesado de tahina, por polarografía de pulsos diferencial (DPP con un capilar conteniendo un electrodo de gota de mercurio (HMDE. Un hilo de platino fué usado como el electrodo contador y Ag/AgCl como electrodo de referencia. Las muestras fueron analizadas por procedimientos de adición de patrones y se encontró que wl procedimiento era cuantitativo (p2= 0.9999 (p< 0.01. El método polarográfico propuesto (DPP es un método rápido y reproducible para la determinación simultánea de lignanos fenólicos en sésamo y otros productos alimentarios que contienen sésamo. Éste proporciona una detección cuantitativa adecuada y sensible de este compuesto nutraceútico en alimentos comerciales.

  3. Construction and evaluation of a carbon paste electrode modified with polyaniline-co-poly(dithiodianiline) for enhanced stripping voltammetric determination of metal ions

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Somerset, V

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available pH, deposition potential (E(subd)) and time (t(subd)), set at -0.6 V vs. ref. for Pb(sup2+) and -0.8 V for Cd(sup2+); both kept for td = 120 s. The results with the CPE/PANI-co-PDTDA sensor have revealed the linear range within the range of 0.15 – 0...

  4. Superconducting nano-strip particle detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cristiano, R; Ejrnaes, M; Casaburi, A; Zen, N; Ohkubo, M

    2015-01-01

    We review progress in the development and applications of superconducting nano-strip particle detectors. Particle detectors based on superconducting nano-strips stem from the parent devices developed for single photon detection (SSPD) and share with them ultra-fast response times (sub-nanosecond) and the ability to operate at a relatively high temperature (2–5 K) compared with other cryogenic detectors. SSPDs have been used in the detection of electrons, neutral and charged ions, and biological macromolecules; nevertheless, the development of superconducting nano-strip particle detectors has mainly been driven by their use in time-of-flight mass spectrometers (TOF-MSs) where the goal of 100% efficiency at large mass values can be achieved. Special emphasis will be given to this case, reporting on the great progress which has been achieved and which permits us to overcome the limitations of existing mass spectrometers represented by low detection efficiency at large masses and charge/mass ambiguity. Furthermore, such progress could represent a breakthrough in the field. In this review article we will introduce the device concept and detection principle, stressing the peculiarities of the nano-strip particle detector as well as its similarities with photon detectors. The development of parallel strip configuration is introduced and extensively discussed, since it has contributed to the significant progress of TOF-MS applications. (paper)

  5. Factors affecting hydrocarbon removal by air stripping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McFarland, W.E.

    1992-01-01

    This paper includes an overview of the theory of air stripping design considerations and the factors affecting stripper performance. Effects of temperature, contaminant characteristics, stripping tower geometry and air/water ratios on removal performance are discussed. The discussion includes treatment of groundwater contaminated with petroleum hydrocarbons and chlorinated solvents such as TCE and PCE. Control of VOC emissions from air strippers has become a major concern in recent years, due to more stringent restrictions on air quality in many areas. This paper includes an overview of available technology to control air emissions (including activated carbon adsorption, catalytic oxidation and steam stripping) and the effects of air emission control on overall efficiency of the treatment process. The paper includes an overview of the relative performance of various packing materials for air strippers and explains the relative advantages and disadvantages of comparative packing materials. Field conditions affecting selection of packing materials are also discussed. Practical guidelines for the design of air stripping systems are presented, as well as actual case studies of full-scale air stripping projects

  6. Properties isotropy of magnesium alloy strip workpieces

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Р. Кавалла

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper discusses the issue of obtaining high quality cast workpieces of magnesium alloys produced by strip roll-casting. Producing strips of magnesium alloys by combining the processes of casting and rolling when liquid melt is fed continuously to fast rolls is quite promising and economic. In the process of sheet stamping considerable losses of metal occur on festoons formed due to anisotropy of properties of foil workpiece, as defined by the macro- and microstructure and modes of rolling and annealing. The principal causes of anisotropic mechanical properties of metal strips produced by the combined casting and rolling technique are the character of distribution of intermetallic compounds in the strip, orientation of phases of metal defects and the residual tensions. One of the tasks in increasing the output of fit products during stamping operations consists in minimizing the amount of defects. To lower the level of anisotropy in mechanical properties various ways of treating the melt during casting are suggested. Designing the technology of producing strips of magnesium alloys opens a possibility of using them in automobile industry to manufacture light-weight body elements instead of those made of steel.

  7. Area specific stripping factors for AGS. A method for extracting stripping factors from survey data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aage, H.K.; Korsbech, U. [Technical Univ. of Denmark (Denmark)

    2006-04-15

    In order to use Airborne Gamma-ray Spectrometry (AGS) for contamination mapping, for source search etc. one must to be able to eliminate the contribution to the spectra from natural radioactivity. This in general is done by a stripping technique. The parameters for performing a stripping have until recently been measured by recording gamma spectra at special calibration sites (pads). This may be cumbersome and the parameters may not be correct when used at low gamma energies for environmental spectra. During 2000-2001 DTU tested with success a new technique for Carborne Gamma-ray Spectrometry (CGS) where the spectra from the surveyed area (or from a similar area) were used for calculating the stripping parameters. It was possible to calculate usable stripping ratios for a number of low energy windows - and weak source signals not detectable by other means were discovered with the ASS technique. In this report it is shown that the ASS technique also works for AGS data, and it has been used for recent Danish AGS tests with point sources. (Check of calibration of AGS parameters.) By using the ASS technique with the Boden data (Barents Rescue) an exercise source was detected that has not been detected by any of the teams during the exercise. The ASS technique therefore seems to be better for search for radiation anomalies than any other method known presently. The experiences also tell that although the stripping can be performed correctly at any altitude there is a variation of the stripping parameters with altitude that has not yet been quite understood. However, even with the oddly variations the stripping worked as expected. It was also observed that one might calculate a single common set of usable stripping factors for all altitudes from the entire data set i.e. some average a, b and c values. When those stripping factors were used the stripping technique still worked well. (au)

  8. Cathodic hydrogen charging of zinc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Panagopoulos, C.N.; Georgiou, E.P.; Chaliampalias, D.

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: •Incorporation of hydrogen into zinc and formation of zinc hydrides. •Investigation of surface residual stresses due to hydrogen diffusion. •Effect of hydrogen diffusion and hydride formation on mechanical properties of Zn. •Hydrogen embrittlement phenomena in zinc. -- Abstract: The effect of cathodic hydrogen charging on the structural and mechanical characteristics of zinc was investigated. Hardening of the surface layers of zinc, due to hydrogen incorporation and possible formation of ZnH 2 , was observed. In addition, the residual stresses brought about by the incorporation of hydrogen atoms into the metallic matrix, were calculated by analyzing the obtained X-ray diffraction patterns. Tensile testing of the as-received and hydrogen charged specimens revealed that the ductility of zinc decreased significantly with increasing hydrogen charging time, for a constant value of charging current density, and with increasing charging current density, for a constant value of charging time. However, the ultimate tensile strength of this material was slightly affected by the hydrogen charging procedure. The cathodically charged zinc exhibited brittle transgranular fracture at the surface layers and ductile intergranular fracture at the deeper layers of the material

  9. Ion source with plasma cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yabe, E.

    1987-01-01

    A long lifetime ion source with plasma cathode has been developed for use in ion implantation. In this ion source, a plasma of a nonreactive working gas serves as a cathode in place of a thermionic tungsten filament used in the Freeman ion source. In an applied magnetic field, the plasma is convergent, i.e., filamentlike; in zero magnetic field, it turns divergent and spraylike. In the latter case, the plasma exhibits a remarkable ability when the working gas has an ionization potential larger than the feed gas. By any combination of a working gas of either argon or neon and a feed gas of AsF 5 or PF 5 , the lifetime of this ion source was found to be more than 90 h with an extraction voltage of 40 kV and the corresponding ion current density 20 mA/cm 2 . Mass spectrometry results show that this ion source has an ability of generating a considerable amount of As + and P + ions from AsF 5 and PF 5 , and hence will be useful for realizing a fully cryopumped ion implanter system. This ion source is also eminently suitable for use in oxygen ion production

  10. Unique, Voltammetric Electrochemical Sensors for Organic Contaminants, with Excellent Discrimination, Based on Conducting Polymer-, Aptamer- and Other-Functionalized Sensing Electrodes, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — In ongoing and recent prior work for the Army, this firm has developed a unique, patented technology for voltammetric electrochemical detection of toxic gases,...

  11. Pipelines cathodic protection design methodologies for impressed ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Several inadequate designs of cathodically polarized offshore and onshore pipelines have been reported in Nigeria owing to design complexity and application of the cathodic protection system. The present study focused on critical and detailed approach in impressed current and sacrificial anode design calculation ...

  12. Cyclic Voltammetric Study of Complexes of Fe (III) with Saponins Isolated from Cicer aritinum and Glycyrrhizin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, S.S.; Kazmi, S.A.; Anwar, H

    2013-01-01

    Cyclic voltammetric study was used to analyze three new saponins (isolated from the seeds of Cicer aritinum) along with a known saponin soyasaponin I and beta sitosterol glycoside isolated saponins as well as glycyrrhizin. These studies were carried out in aqueous medium at Glassy carbon (GCE) electrode vs. AgCl reference electrode. Results revealed that the voltammograms of Fe(III) with isolated saponins are irreversible while that of Fe(III)-glycyrrhizin complex is reversible. Even though precise Eo values of their Fe(III) complex could not be determined, it is clearly indicated that Fe(III) forms complexes with these saponins. The ability to form strong complexes with Fe(III) therefore reduces the availability of Fe(III) by saponins. (author)

  13. Voltammetric, in-situ spectroelectrochemical and in-situ electrocolorimetric characterization of phthalocyanines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koca, Atif [Department of Chemical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, Marmara University, Goeztepe, 34722 Istanbul (Turkey)], E-mail: akoca@eng.marmara.edu.tr; Bayar, Serife; Dincer, Hatice A. [Department of Chemistry, Technical University of Istanbul, Maslak, 34469 Istanbul (Turkey); Gonca, Erguen [Department of Chemistry, Fatih University, TR34500 B.Cekmece, Istanbul (Turkey)

    2009-04-01

    In this work, electrochemical, and in-situ spectroelectrochemical characterization of the metallophthalocyanines bearing tetra-(1,1-(dicarbethoxy)-2-(2-methylbenzyl))-ethyl 3,10,17,24-tetra chloro groups were performed. Voltammetric and in-situ spectroelectrochemical measurements show that while cobalt phthalocyanine complex gives both metal-based and ring-based redox processes, zinc and copper phthalocyanines show only ring-based reduction and oxidation processes. The redox processes are generally diffusion-controlled, reversible and one-electron transfer processes. Differently lead phthalocyanine demetallized during second oxidation reaction while it was stable during reduction processes. An in-situ electrocolorimetric method, based on the 1931 CIE (Commission Internationale de l'Eclairage) system of colorimetry, has been applied to investigate the color of the electro-generated anionic and cationic forms of the complexes for the first time in this study.

  14. Direct voltammetric determination of redox-active iron in carbon nanotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teo, Wei Zhe; Pumera, Martin

    2014-12-01

    With the advances in nanotechnology over the past decade, consumer products are increasingly being incorporated with carbon nanotubes (CNTs). As the harmful effects of CNTs are suggested to be primarily due to the bioavailable amounts of metallic impurities, it is vital to detect and quantify these species using sensitive and facile methods. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the possibility of quantifying the amount of redox-available iron-containing impurities in CNTs with voltammetric techniques such as cyclic voltammetry. We examined the electrochemistry of Fe3 O4 nanoparticles in phosphate buffer solution and discovered that its electrochemical behavior could be affected by pH of the electrolyte. By utilizing the unique redox reaction between the iron and phosphate species, the redox available iron content in CNTs was determined successfully using voltammetry. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  15. Voltammetric sensor for caffeine based on a glassy carbon electrode modified with Nafion and graphene oxide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhao, F.; Wang, F.; Zhao, W.; Zhou, J.; Liu, Y.; Zou, L.; Ye, B.

    2011-01-01

    We report on a voltammetric sensor for caffeine that is based on a glassy carbon electrode modified with Nafion and graphene oxide (GO). It exhibits a good affinity for caffeine (resulting from the presence of Nafion), and excellent electrochemical response (resulting from the pressence of GO) for the oxidation of caffeine. The electrode enables the determination of caffeine in the range from 4.0 x 10 -7 to 8.0 x 10 -5 mol L -1 , with a detection limit of 2.0 x 10 -7 mol L -1 . The sensor displays good stability, reproducibility, and high sensitivity. It was successfully applied to the quantitative determination of caffeine in beverages. (author)

  16. Rapid screening and guided extraction of antioxidants from microalgae using voltammetric methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goiris, Koen; De Vreese, Peter; De Cooman, Luc; Muylaert, Koenraad

    2012-08-01

    Currently, microalgae draw much attention as a promising source of natural antioxidants to replace synthetic antioxidants for food applications. In this paper, the use of voltammetric techniques as a fast alternative for chemical assays to determine the antioxidant power of microalgal biomass is discussed. It was found that antioxidant activities determined by square wave voltammetry correlate well with the results from other established antioxidant assays, such as Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity (R(2) = 0.737), ferric reducing antioxidant potential (R(2) = 0.729), and AAPH-induced oxidation of linoleic acid (R(2) = 0.566). Besides yielding quantitative data on the antioxidant activity, square wave voltammetry provides additional information on the antioxidant profile of microalgal biomass as the peak potentials of antioxidant components are determined. Consequently, square wave voltammetry can be used as a tool for optimizing the extraction processes to recover antioxidant components from microalgae.

  17. Discrimination of Apple Liqueurs (Nalewka) Using a Voltammetric Electronic Tongue, UV-Vis and Raman Spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Śliwińska, Magdalena; Garcia-Hernandez, Celia; Kościński, Mikołaj; Dymerski, Tomasz; Wardencki, Waldemar; Namieśnik, Jacek; Śliwińska-Bartkowiak, Małgorzata; Jurga, Stefan; Garcia-Cabezon, Cristina; Rodriguez-Mendez, Maria Luz

    2016-10-09

    The capability of a phthalocyanine-based voltammetric electronic tongue to analyze strong alcoholic beverages has been evaluated and compared with the performance of spectroscopic techniques coupled to chemometrics. Nalewka Polish liqueurs prepared from five apple varieties have been used as a model of strong liqueurs. Principal Component Analysis has demonstrated that the best discrimination between liqueurs prepared from different apple varieties is achieved using the e-tongue and UV-Vis spectroscopy. Raman spectra coupled to chemometrics have not been efficient in discriminating liqueurs. The calculated Euclidean distances and the k-Nearest Neighbors algorithm (kNN) confirmed these results. The main advantage of the e-tongue is that, using PLS-1, good correlations have been found simultaneously with the phenolic content measured by the Folin-Ciocalteu method (R² of 0.97 in calibration and R² of 0.93 in validation) and also with the density, a marker of the alcoholic content method (R² of 0.93 in calibration and R² of 0.88 in validation). UV-Vis coupled with chemometrics has shown good correlations only with the phenolic content (R² of 0.99 in calibration and R² of 0.99 in validation) but correlations with the alcoholic content were low. Raman coupled with chemometrics has shown good correlations only with density (R² of 0.96 in calibration and R² of 0.85 in validation). In summary, from the three holistic methods evaluated to analyze strong alcoholic liqueurs, the voltammetric electronic tongue using phthalocyanines as sensing elements is superior to Raman or UV-Vis techniques because it shows an excellent discrimination capability and remarkable correlations with both antioxidant capacity and alcoholic content-the most important parameters to be measured in this type of liqueurs.

  18. Voltammetric determination of heparin based on its interaction with malachite green

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueliang Niu

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In this paper malachite green (MG was used as a bioprobe to determine heparin concentration by linear sweep voltammetry on the dropping mercury working electrode (DME. In Britton-Robinson (B-R buffer solution of pH 1.5, MG had a well-defined second order derivative linear sweep voltammetric reductive peak at –0.618 V (vs. SCE. After the addition of heparin into the MG solution, the reductive peak current decreased apparently without the movement of peak potential. Based on the difference of the peak current, a new voltammetric method for the determination of heparin was established. The conditions for the binding reaction and the electrochemical detection were optimized. Under the selected experimental conditions the difference of peak current was directly proportional to the concentration of heparin in the range from 0.3 to 10.0 mg/L with the linear regression equation as ∆ip″ (nA = 360.19 C (mg/L + 178.88 (n = 15, γ = 0.998 and the detection limit as 0.28 mg/L (3σ. The effects of coexisting substances such as metal ions, amino acids on the determination of heparin were investigated and the results showed that this method had good selectivity. This method was further applied to determine the heparin content in heparin sodium injection samples with satisfactory results and good recovery. The stoichiometry of the biocomplex was calculated by the electrochemical method and the binding mechanism was further discussed.

  19. Influence of the acidity level change in aprotic media on the voltammetric behavior of nitrogabacinamamides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bautista-Martinez, J.A.; Gonzalez, I.; Aguilar-Martinez, M.

    2004-01-01

    This work presents a comparative voltammetric study of o-, m- and p-nitrogabacinamamides (N-[3(X-nitrophenyl)-(2E)-propenyl]-4-aminobutanoic acids), NG, in acetonitrile. These compounds, a HDR-NO 2 nitro compounds type, display three reduction waves, two of them are waves similar to those appearing in the reduction of the nitro compounds lacking a proton donor group and one new wave at less negative potentials, associated with the nitro-to-hydroxylamine reduction through a self-protonation reaction. Experiments were carried out in the presence of different chemical species giving an acidity level control by homogeneous buffer systems. The presence of tetraethylammonium phenolate achieves complete inhibition of self-protonation reactions, thus recovering the behavior established by ( - DR-NO 2 / - DR-NO 2 · - ) system. When the conjugated acid of the above mentioned base is added to the acetonitrile solution, where the acidity level was controlled by the phenol/phenolate system (acidity level buffer), only the second electroreduction wave ( - DR-NO 2 · - /HDR-NHOH) shows to be affected by the presence of phenol in the electrolytic medium and displaces towards less negative potential values. On the other hand, in the benzoic acid (HBz)/benzoate (Bz - ) medium, the electrochemical behavior of these nitro compounds changes completely passing from ( - DR-NO 2 / - DR-NO 2 · - ) system to (HDR-NO 2 + 4HBz/HDR-NHOH + 4Bz - ) type system, in which both the stoichiometry of the electroreduction process and the energetic requirement for its realization are changed. The comparison of the different voltammetric behavior in the presence of the different acidic and basic additives allowed constructing an acidity level scale where the different acid base couples of the intermediaries of the NG electroreduction were placed. This kind of scale allows choosing the chemical conditions necessaries to drive the pathway of the electrochemical transformation of nitro compounds

  20. Voltammetric Behaviour of Sulfamethoxazole on Electropolymerized-Molecularly Imprinted Overoxidized Polypyrrole

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yücel Sahin

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available In this work, preparation of a molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP film and its recognition properties for sulfamethoxazolewere investigated. The overoxidized polypyrrole (OPPy film was prepared by the cyclic voltammetric deposition of pyrrole (Py in the presence of supporting electrolyte (tetrabutylammonium perchlorate-TBAP with and without a template molecule (sulfamethoxazole on a pencil graphite electrode (PGE. The voltammetric behaviour of sulfamethoxazole on imprinted and non-imprinted (NIP films was investigated by differential pulse voltammetry (DPV in Britton-Robinson (BR buffer solutions prepared in different ratio of acetonitrile-water binary mixture, between the pH 1.5 and 7.0. The effect of the acetonitrile-water ratio and pH, monomer and template concentrations, electropolymerization cycles on the performance of the MIP electrode was investigated and optimized. The MIP electrode exhibited the best reproducibility and highest sensitivity. The results showed that changing acetonitrile-water ratio and pH of BR buffer solution changes the oxidation peak current values. The highest anodic signal of sulfamethoxazole was obtained in BR buffer solution prepared in 50% (v/v acetonitrile-water at pH 2.5. The calibration curve for sulfamethoxazole at MIP electrode has linear region for a concentration range of 25.10-3 to 0.75 mM (R2=0.9993. The detection limit of sulfamethoxazole was found as 3.59.10-4 mM (S/N=3. The same method was also applied to determination of sulfamethoxazole in commercial pharmaceutical samples. Method precision (RSD87% were satisfactory. The proposed method is simple and quick. The polypyrrole (PPy electrodes have low response time, good mechanical stability and are disposable simple to construct.

  1. Model of dopant action in oxide cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelsen, Daniel den; Gaertner, Georg

    2005-01-01

    The paper describes an electrochemical model, which largely explains the formation of Ba in the oxide cathode at activation and normal operation. In a non-doped oxide cathode electrolysis of BaO is, besides the exchange reaction from the activators in the cathode nickel, an important source of Ba. By doping with rare earth oxides the conductivity of the oxide layer increases, which implies that the potential difference during current drawing over the oxide layer becomes lower and electrolysis of BaO is suppressed. This implies that the part of the electronic conductivity of the (Ba,Sr)O layer induced by the dopants also controls the sensitivity for poisoning: the higher the dopant level, the larger the sensitivity for poisoning. Furthermore, the suppression of electrolysis during normal operation largely explains why doped oxide cathodes have a better life performance than non-doped cathodes. Finally a hypothesis on the enhancement of sintering upon doping is presented

  2. Cathode Effects in Cylindrical Hall Thrusters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Granstedt, E.M.; Raitses, Y.; Fisch, N. J.

    2008-09-12

    Stable operation of a cylindrical Hall thruster (CHT) has been achieved using a hot wire cathode, which functions as a controllable electron emission source. It is shown that as the electron emission from the cathode increases with wire heating, the discharge current increases, the plasma plume angle reduces, and the ion energy distribution function shifts toward higher energies. The observed effect of cathode electron emission on thruster parameters extends and clarifies performance improvements previously obtained for the overrun discharge current regime of the same type of thruster, but using a hollow cathode-neutralizer. Once thruster discharge current saturates with wire heating, further filament heating does not affect other discharge parameters. The saturated values of thruster discharge parameters can be further enhanced by optimal placement of the cathode wire with respect to the magnetic field.

  3. Analysis of 'Coma strip' galaxy redshift catalog

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klypin, A.A.; Karachentsev, I.D.; Lebedev, V.S.

    1990-01-01

    We present results of the analysis of a galaxy redshift catalog made at the 6-m telescope by Karachentsev and Kopylov (1990. Mon. Not. R. astr. Soc., 243, 390). The catalog covers a long narrow strip on the sky (10 arcmin by 63 0 ) and lists 283 galaxies up to limiting blue magnitude m B = 17.6. The strip goes through the core of Coma cluster and this is called the 'Coma strip' catalog. The catalog is almost two times deeper than the CfA redshift survey and creates the possibility of studying the galaxy distribution on scales of 100-250 Mpc. Due to the small number of galaxies in the catalog, we were able to estimate only very general and stable parameters of the distribution. (author)

  4. Cathodic protection of steel by electrodeposited zinc-nickel alloy coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baldwin, K.R.; Smith, C.J.E. [Defence Research Agency, Farnborough (United Kingdom). Structural Materials Centre; Robinson, M.J. [Cranfield Univ. (United Kingdom). School of Industrial and Manufacturing Science

    1995-12-01

    The ability of electrodeposited zinc-nickel alloy coatings to cathodically protect steel was studied in dilute chloride solutions. The potential distribution along steel strips partly electroplated with zinc-nickel alloys was determined, and the length of exposed steel that was held below the minimum protection potential (E{sub prot}) was taken as a measure of the level of cathodic protection (CP) provided by the alloy coatings. The level of CP afforded by zinc alloy coatings was found to decrease with increasing nickel content. When nickel content was increased to {approx} {ge} 21 wt%, no CP was obtained. Surface analysis of uncoupled zinc-nickel alloys that were immersed in sodium chloride (NaCl) solutions showed the concentration of zinc decreased in the surface layers while the concentration of nickel increased, indicating that the alloys were susceptible to dezincification. The analysis of zinc-nickel alloy coatings on partly electroplated steel strips that were immersed in chloride solution showed a significantly higher level of dezincification than that found for uncoupled alloy coatings. This effect accounted for the rapid loss of CP afforded to steel by some zinc alloy coatings, particularly those with high initial nickel levels.

  5. Test strip and method for its use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1981-01-01

    A test strip device is described which is useful in performing binding assays involving antigens, antibodies, hormones, vitamins, metabolites or pharmacological agents. The device is capable of application to analytical methods in which a set of sequential test reactions is involved and in which a minute sample size may be used. This test strip is particularly useful in radioimmunoassays. The use of the device is illustrated in radioimmunoassays for 1) thyroxine in serum, 2) the triiodothyronine binding capacity of serum and 3) folic acid and its analogues in serum. (U.K.)

  6. Stage- vs. Channel-strip Metaphor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gelineck, Steven; Korsgaard, Dannie Michael; Büchert, Morten

    2015-01-01

    This study compares the stage metaphor and the channel strip metaphor in terms of performance. Traditionally, music mixing consoles employ a channels strip control metaphor for adjusting parameters such as volume and panning of each track. An alternative control metaphor, the so-called stage meta...... is surprisingly similar and thus we are not able to detect any significant difference in performance between the two interfaces. Qualitative data however, suggests that the stage metaphor is largely favoured for its intuitive interaction - confirming earlier studies....

  7. slice of LEP beamtube with getter strip

    CERN Multimedia

    1989-01-01

    A section of the LEP beam pipe. This is the chamber in which LEP's counter-rotating electron and positron beams travel. It is made of lead-clad aluminium. The beams circulate in the oval cross-section part of the chamber. In the rectangular cross-section part, LEP's innovative getter-strip vacuum pump is installed. After heating to purify the surface of the getter, the strip acts like molecular sticky tape, trapping any stray molecules left behind after the accelerator's traditional vacuum pumps have done their job.

  8. Comparative characteristics of polystyrene scintillation strips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gapienko, V.A.; Denisov, A.G.; Mel'nikov, E.A.

    1992-01-01

    Results are provided for a study of the main characteristics of polystyrene scintillation strips with a cross-section of 200 x 10 mm with two different scintillation-additive compositions: 1.5% p-terphenyl + 0.01% POPOP and 1.5% p-terphenyl + 0.01% DBP. The mean light-attenuation lengths are 180 cm and 260 cm, respectively, for strips with POPOP and DBP. The emittances of the polystyrene scintillators with DBP and POPOP additives have a ratio of 0.8:1.0 as recorded by an FEU-110 photomultiplier. 2 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs

  9. Wide Strip Casting Technology of Magnesium Alloys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, W.-J.; Kim, J. J.; Kim, I. J.; Choo, D.

    Extensive investigations relating to the production of high performance and low cost magnesium sheet by strip casting have been performed for the application to automotive parts and electronic devices. Research on magnesium sheet production technology started in 2004 by Research Institute of Industrial Science and Technology (RIST) with support of Pohang Iron and Steel Company (POSCO). POSCO has completed the world's first plant to manufacture magnesium coil. Another big project in order to develop wide strip casting technology for the automotive applications of magnesium sheets was started in succession.

  10. Asset Stripping in a Mature Market Economy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarskov Jeppesen, Kim; Møller, Ulrik Gorm

    2011-01-01

    Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to document a Danish fraud scheme, in which a large number of limited companies were stripped of their assets leaving them with nothing but tax debt, eventually causing the Danish Tax and Customs Administration to lose large sums. Furthermore, the purpose...... indicates that asset stripping may take place in mature market economies to the extent that perpetrators are able to circumvent the corporate governance system by giving lawyers, public accountants and banks incentives to act less critically towards dubious business transactions. Research limitations...

  11. Non-conductive nanomaterial enhanced electrochemical response in stripping voltammetry: The use of nanostructured magnesium silicate hollow spheres for heavy metal ions detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ren-Xia; Yu, Xin-Yao; Gao, Chao; Jiang, Yu-Jing; Han, Dong-Dong; Liu, Jin-Huai; Huang, Xing-Jiu

    2013-08-06

    Nanostructured magnesium silicate hollow spheres, one kind of non-conductive nanomaterials, were used in heavy metal ions (HMIs) detection with enhanced performance for the first time. The detailed study of the enhancing electrochemical response in stripping voltammetry for simultaneous detection of ultratrace Cd(2+), Pb(2+), Cu(2+) and Hg(2+) was described. Electrochemical properties of modified electrodes were characterized by cyclic voltammetry (CV) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The operational parameters which have influence on the deposition and stripping of metal ions, such as supporting electrolytes, pH value, and deposition time were carefully studied. The anodic stripping voltammetric performance toward HMIs was evaluated using square wave anodic stripping voltammetry (SWASV) analysis. The detection limits achieved (0.186nM, 0.247nM, 0.169nM and 0.375nM for Cd(2+), Pb(2+), Cu(2+) and Hg(2+)) are much lower than the guideline values in drinking water given by the World Health Organization (WHO). In addition, the interference and stability of the modified electrode were also investigated under the optimized conditions. An interesting phenomenon of mutual interference between different metal ions was observed. Most importantly, the sensitivity of Pb(2+) increased in the presence of certain concentrations of other metal ions, such as Cd(2+), Cu(2+) and Hg(2+) both individually and simultaneously. The proposed electrochemical sensing method is thus expected to open new opportunities to broaden the use of SWASV in analysis for detecting HMIs in the environment. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Analysis of cathode geometry to minimize cathode erosion in direct current microplasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Causa, Federica [Dipartimento di Scienze dell' Ambiente, della Sicurezza, del Territorio, degli Alimenti e della Salute, Universita degli studi di Messina, 98122 Messina (Italy); Ghezzi, Francesco; Caniello, Roberto; Grosso, Giovanni [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Via R. Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Dellasega, David [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Via R. Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, Via Ponzio 34/3, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    Microplasma jets are now widely used for deposition, etching, and materials processing. The present study focuses on the investigation of the influence of cathode geometry on deposition quality, for microplasma jet deposition systems in low vacuum. The interest here is understanding the influence of hydrogen on sputtering and/or evaporation of the electrodes. Samples obtained with two cathode geometries with tapered and rectangular cross-sections have been investigated experimentally by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy. Samples obtained with a tapered-geometry cathode present heavy contamination, demonstrating cathode erosion, while samples obtained with a rectangular-cross-section cathode are free from contamination. These experimental characteristics were explained by modelling results showing a larger radial component of the electric field at the cathode inner wall of the tapered cathode. As a result, ion acceleration is larger, explaining the observed cathode erosion in this case. Results from the present investigation also show that the ratio of radial to axial field components is larger for the rectangular geometry case, thus, qualitatively explaining the presence of micro-hollow cathode discharge over a wide range of currents observed in this case. In the light of the above findings, the rectangular cathode geometry is considered to be more effective to achieve cleaner deposition.

  13. Batteries: Overview of Battery Cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doeff, Marca M

    2010-07-12

    The very high theoretical capacity of lithium (3829 mAh/g) provided a compelling rationale from the 1970's onward for development of rechargeable batteries employing the elemental metal as an anode. The realization that some transition metal compounds undergo reductive lithium intercalation reactions reversibly allowed use of these materials as cathodes in these devices, most notably, TiS{sub 2}. Another intercalation compound, LiCoO{sub 2}, was described shortly thereafter but, because it was produced in the discharged state, was not considered to be of interest by battery companies at the time. Due to difficulties with the rechargeability of lithium and related safety concerns, however, alternative anodes were sought. The graphite intercalation compound (GIC) LiC{sub 6} was considered an attractive candidate but the high reactivity with commonly used electrolytic solutions containing organic solvents was recognized as a significant impediment to its use. The development of electrolytes that allowed the formation of a solid electrolyte interface (SEI) on surfaces of the carbon particles was a breakthrough that enabled commercialization of Li-ion batteries. In 1990, Sony announced the first commercial batteries based on a dual Li ion intercalation system. These devices are assembled in the discharged state, so that it is convenient to employ a prelithiated cathode such as LiCoO{sub 2} with the commonly used graphite anode. After charging, the batteries are ready to power devices. The practical realization of high energy density Li-ion batteries revolutionized the portable electronics industry, as evidenced by the widespread market penetration of mobile phones, laptop computers, digital music players, and other lightweight devices since the early 1990s. In 2009, worldwide sales of Li-ion batteries for these applications alone were US$ 7 billion. Furthermore, their performance characteristics (Figure 1) make them attractive for traction applications such as

  14. Emerging approach for analytical characterization and geographical classification of Moroccan and French honeys by means of a voltammetric electronic tongue.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Alami El Hassani, Nadia; Tahri, Khalid; Llobet, Eduard; Bouchikhi, Benachir; Errachid, Abdelhamid; Zine, Nadia; El Bari, Nezha

    2018-03-15

    Moroccan and French honeys from different geographical areas were classified and characterized by applying a voltammetric electronic tongue (VE-tongue) coupled to analytical methods. The studied parameters include color intensity, free lactonic and total acidity, proteins, phenols, hydroxymethylfurfural content (HMF), sucrose, reducing and total sugars. The geographical classification of different honeys was developed through three-pattern recognition techniques: principal component analysis (PCA), support vector machines (SVMs) and hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA). Honey characterization was achieved by partial least squares modeling (PLS). All the PLS models developed were able to accurately estimate the correct values of the parameters analyzed using as input the voltammetric experimental data (i.e. r>0.9). This confirms the potential ability of the VE-tongue for performing a rapid characterization of honeys via PLS in which an uncomplicated, cost-effective sample preparation process that does not require the use of additional chemicals is implemented. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Design Of Photovoltaic Powered Cathodic Protection System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Golina Samir Adly

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The corrosion caused by chemical reaction between metallic structures and surrounding mediums such as soil or water .the CP cathodic protection system is used to protect metallic structure against corrosion. Cathodic protection CP used to minimize corrosion by utilizing an external source of electrical current which forces the entire structure to become a cathode. There are two Types of cathodic protection system Galvanic current Impressed current.the Galvanic current is called a sacrificial anode is connected to the protected structure cathode through a DC power supply. In Galvanic current system a current passes from the sacrificing anode to the protected structure .the sacrificial anode is corroded rather than causing the protected structure corrosion .protected structure requires a constant current to stop the corrosion which determined by area structure metal and the surrounding medium. The rains humidity are decrease soil resistivity and increase the DC current .The corrosion and over protection resulting from increase in the DC current is harmful for the metallic structure. This problem can be solved by conventional cathodic protection system by manual adjustment of DC voltage periodically to obtain a constant current .the manual adjustment of DC voltage depends on experience of the technician and using the accuracy of the measuring equipment. The errors of measuring current depend on error from the technician or error from the measuring equipment. the corrosion of structure may occur when the interval between two successive adjustment is long .An automatically regulated cathodic protection system is used to overcome problems from conventional cathodic protection system .the regulated cathodic protection system adjust the DC voltage of the system automatically when it senses the variations of surrounding medium resistivity so the DC current is constant at the required level.

  16. Linear sweep anodic stripping voltammetry: Determination of ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The aim of this work is to determine Cr(VI) in water resources by anodic stripping voltammetry using SPE-. AuNPs modified electrode .... surface area about 4 fold). 3.2 Optimization of Parameters ..... in water samples. The above system offers a.

  17. Physical distribution of oak strip flooring 1969

    Science.gov (United States)

    William C. Miller; William C. Miller

    1971-01-01

    As an aid to the marketing of oak strip flooring, a study was made of the distribution process for this product, from manufacture to consumer-where the flooring came from, where it went, how much was shipped, and who handled it.

  18. The Advantages of Lateral Tarsal Strip Procedure

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Generally in surgery, an ideal operation should be effective, cause minimal discomfort and morbidity, give an aesthetic result, and have a lasting effect.[4]. Lateral strip procedure (LSP) has those characteristics and it does restore normal lid function and give a rapid rehabilitation with few complications and excellent.

  19. Nuclear reactor spring strip grid spacer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, J.F.; Flora, B.S.

    1980-01-01

    An improved and novel grid spacer for maintaining the fuel rods of a nuclear reactor fuel assembly in substantially parallel array is described. The invention provides for spring strips to maintain the fuel elements in their desired orientation which have more positive alignment than previous types while allowing greater flexibility to counterbalance the effects of differential thermal expansion. (UK)

  20. Nanoscale Test Strips for Multiplexed Blood Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Eugene

    2015-01-01

    A critical component of the DNA Medicine Institute's Reusable Handheld Electrolyte and Lab Technology for Humans (rHEALTH) sensor are nanoscale test strips, or nanostrips, that enable multiplexed blood analysis. Nanostrips are conceptually similar to the standard urinalysis test strip, but the strips are shrunk down a billionfold to the microscale. Each nanostrip can have several sensor pads that fluoresce in response to different targets in a sample. The strips carry identification tags that permit differentiation of a specific panel from hundreds of other nanostrip panels during a single measurement session. In Phase I of the project, the company fabricated, tested, and demonstrated functional parathyroid hormone and vitamin D nanostrips for bone metabolism, and thrombin aptamer and immunoglobulin G antibody nanostrips. In Phase II, numerous nanostrips were developed to address key space flight-based medical needs: assessment of bone metabolism, immune response, cardiac status, liver metabolism, and lipid profiles. This unique approach holds genuine promise for space-based portable biodiagnostics and for point-of-care (POC) health monitoring and diagnostics here on Earth.

  1. KRITIK SOSIAL DALAM KOMIK STRIP PAK BEI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yudhi Novriansyah

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available This research aimed to do interpret the marking which flange social criticism and know laboring ideology in story of Comic Strip Pak Bei. Research based on theory of structural semiotic according to Ferdinand De Saussure. Using analysis of Syntagmatic as first level of meaning to the text network and also picture, and analysis of Paradigmatic as second level of meaning or implicit meaning (connota-tion, myth, ideology Analysis done to six Comic choice edition of Strip Pak Bei period of November 2004 - Februari 2005 which tend to flange social criticism. At band of syntagmatic, result of research indicate that story theme lifted from social problems that happened in major society. The fact clear progressively when connected by Intertextual with information and texts which have preexisted. At band of Paradigmatic, social criticism tend to emerge dimly, is not transparent. Because of Comic Strip Pak Bei expand in the middle of Java cultural domination that developing myth of criticize as action menacing compatibility and orderliness of society. Story of Comic Strip Pak Bei also confirm dominant ideology in Java society culture, namely ideology of Patriarkhi and Feudalism which still go into effect until now. This prove ideology idea according to Louis Althusser which not again opposition between class, but have been owned and practiced by all social class.

  2. Polymer Inclusion Membranes with Strip Dispersion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yueh-Hsien Li

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The present work investigated the permeation of indium ions through a polymer inclusion membrane (PIM, prepared with cellulose triacetate (CTA as the base polymer, tris(2-butoxyethyl phosphate (TBEP as the plasticizer and di-(2-ethylhexylphosphoric acid (D2EHPA as the extractant. With 5 M HCl aqueous solution as the strip solution, we observed an initial indium permeability of 2.4 × 10−4 m/min. However, the permeability decreases with time, dropping to about 3.4 × 10−5 m/min after 200 min of operation. Evidence was obtained showing that hydrolysis of CTA occurred, causing a dramatic decrease in the feed pH (protons transported from strip to feed solutions and a loss of extractant and plasticizer from the membrane, and then leading to the loss of indium permeability. To alleviate the problem of hydrolysis, we proposed an operation scheme called polymer inclusion membranes with strip dispersion: dispersing the strip solution in extractant-containing oil and then bringing the dispersion to contact with the polymer membrane. Since the strong acid was dispersed in oil, the membrane did not directly contact the strong acid at all times, and membrane hydrolysis was thus alleviated and the loss of indium permeability was effectively prevented. With the proposed scheme, a stable indium permeability of 2.5 × 10−4 m/min was obtained during the whole time period of the permeation experiment.

  3. Comic Strips to Accompany Science Museum Exhibits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Beom Sun; Park, Eun-mi; Kim, Sang-Hee; Cho, Sook-kyoung; Chung, Min Suk

    2016-01-01

    Science museums make the effort to create exhibits with amusing explanations. However, existing explanation signs with lengthy text are not appealing, and as such, visitors do not pay attention to them. In contrast, conspicuous comic strips composed of simple drawings and humors can attract science museum visitors. This study attempted to reveal…

  4. Ductility of reinforced concrete columns confined with stapled strips

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tahir, M.F.; Khan, Q.U.Z.; Shabbir, F.; Sharif, M.B.; Ijaz, N.

    2015-01-01

    Response of three 150x150x450mm short reinforced concrete (RC) columns confined with different types of confining steel was investigated. Standard stirrups, strips and stapled strips, each having same cross-sectional area, were employed as confining steel around four comer column bars. Experimental work was aimed at probing into the affect of stapled strip confinement on post elastic behavior and ductility level under cyclic axial load. Ductility ratios, strength enhancement factor and core concrete strengths were compared to study the affect of confinement. Results indicate that strength enhancement in RC columns due to strip and stapled strip confinement was not remarkable as compared to stirrup confined column. It was found that as compared to stirrup confined column, stapled strip confinement enhanced the ductility of RC column by 183% and observed axial capacity of stapled strip confined columns was 41 % higher than the strip confined columns. (author)

  5. Strip reduction testing of lubricants developed during ENFORM project

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gazvoda, S.; Andreasen, Jan Lasson; Olsson, David Dam

    Strip reduction testing of lubricants developed during ENFORM project. Experiments were conducted with the strip reduction test [1] in order to classify experimental lubricants, developed during concerned project. One reference lubricant was used during testing....

  6. Refuges, flower strips, biodiversity and agronomic interest.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Grégory; Wateau, Karine; Legrand, Mickaël; Oste, Sandrine

    2008-01-01

    Several arthropods are natural predators of pests, and they are able to reduce and control their population development. FREDON Nord Pas-de-Calais (Federation Regionate de Defense contre les Organismes Nuisibles = Regional Federation for Pest Control) has begun for a long time to form farmers to the recognition of beneficial arthropods and to show them their usefulness. These beneficial insects or arachnids are present everywhere, in orchards and even in fields which are areas relatively poor in biodiversity. Adults feed in the flower strips instead larvae and some adults feed on preys such as aphids or caterpillars. Most of the time, beneficial insects can regulate pest but sometimes, in agricultural area, they can't make it early enough and efficiently. Their action begin too late and there biodiversity and number are too low. It's possible to enhance their action by manipulating the ecological infrastructures, like sewing flower strips or installing refuges. Flower strips increase the density of natural enemies and make them be present earlier in the field in order to control pests. Refuges permit beneficial's to spend winter on the spot. So they're able to be active and to grow in number earlier. From 2004 to 2007, on the one hand, FREDON Nord Pas-de-Calais has developed a research program. Its purpose was to inventory practices and also tools and means available and to judge the advisability of using such or such beneficial refuge in orchards. On the second hand, it studied the impact in orchard of refuges on population of beneficial's and the difference there were between manufactured refuges and homemade refuges. Interesting prospects were obtained with some of them. Otherwise, since 2003, FREDON has studied flower strips influence on beneficial population and their impact on pest control. In cabbage fields, results of trials have shown that flower strips lead to a reduction of aphid number under acceptable economic level, up to 50 meters from flower strips

  7. Cathodic behavior of zirconium in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hine, F.; Yasuda, M.; Sato, H.

    1977-01-01

    The electrochemical behavior of Zr was studied by polarization measurements. The surface oxide and zirconium hydride formed by cathodic polarization of Zr have been examined by X-ray, SEM, and a hardness tester. Zirconium hydride would form on Zr cathode after the surface oxide is reduced at the potential, which is several hundred mV more noble than the predicted value shown by the Pourbaix diagram. The parameters for the hydrogen evolution reaction on the hydride formed Zr cathode differs from that on the oxide covered surface, which means that hydrogen evolution takes place on both surfaces under a different mechanism, while details are still veiled at present

  8. Rechargeable lithium/polymer cathode batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osaka, Tetsuya; Nakajima, Toshiki; Shiota, Koh; Owens, Boone B.

    1989-06-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) and polyaniline (PAn) were investigated for cathode materials of rechargeable lithium batteries. PPy films prepared with PF6(-) anion and/or platinum substrate precoated with nitrile butadiene rubber (NBR) were excellent cathode materials because of rough and/or highly oriented film structure. PAn films were successfully prepared from non-aqueous propylene carbonate solution containing aniline, CF3COOH and lithium perchlorate. Its acidity strongly affects the anion doping-undoping behavior. The PAn cathode prepared in high acidic solution (e.g., 4:1 ratio of acid:aniline) gives the excellent battery performance.

  9. Numerical study on rectangular microhollow cathode discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    He Shoujie; Ouyang Jiting; He Feng; Li Shang

    2011-01-01

    Rectangular microhollow cathode discharge in argon is investigated by using two-dimensional time-dependent self-consistent fluid model. The electric potential, electric field, particle density, and mean electron energy are calculated. The results show that hollow cathode effect can be onset in the present configuration, with strong electric field and high mean electron energy in the cathode fall while high density and quasineutral plasma in the negative glow. The potential well and electric filed reversal are formed in the negative glow region. It is suggested that the presence of large electron diffusion flux necessitates the field reversal and potential well.

  10. Cold cathode diode X-ray source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cooperstein, G.; Lanza, R.C.; Sohval, A.R.

    1983-01-01

    A cold cathode diode X-ray source for radiation imaging, especially computed tomography, comprises a rod-like anode and a generally cylindrical cathode, concentric with the anode. The spacing between anode and cathode is so chosen that the diode has an impedance in excess of 100 ohms. The anode may be of tungsten, or of carbon with a tungsten and carbon coating. An array of such diodes may be used with a closely packed array of detectors to produce images of rapidly moving body organs, such as the beating heart. (author)

  11. Plasma distribution of cathodic ARC deposition system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anders, S.; Raoux, S.; Krishnan, K.; MacGill, R.A.; Brown, I.G.

    1996-01-01

    The plasma distribution using a cathodic arc plasma source with and without magnetic macroparticle filter has been determined by depositing on a transparent plastic substrate and measuring the film absorption. It was found that the width of the distribution depends on the arc current, and it also depends on the cathode material which leads to a spatial separation of the elements when an alloy cathode is used. By applying a magnetic multicusp field near the exit of the magnetic filter, it was possible to modify the plasma distribution and obtain a flat plasma profile with a constant and homogeneous elemental distribution

  12. Cathode protection for underground steel tanks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angelovski, Zoran

    1998-01-01

    Cathodic protection of underground petroleum storage tanks and piping systems is acceptable for both economic and ecological reasons. With out the cathodic protection of underground steel reservoirs, short time after the exploitation, there was a bore as a result of underground corrosion. The bore causes ecological consequences and at the same time its repair needs big investments. Furthermore, there are great number of tanks placed near cities, so in the future this problem needs a special attention in order to preserve ecological surrounding. The topic of this paper is underground corrosion as well as cathodic protection of steel tanks for oil derivatives storage. (author)

  13. Cyclotron resonance in a cathode ray tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gherbanovschi, N.; Tanasa, M.; Stoican, O.

    2002-01-01

    Absorption of the RF energy by the electron beam in a cathode ray tube due to the cyclotron resonance is described. The cathode ray tube is placed within a Helmholtz coils system supplied by a sawtooth current generator. In order to generate RF field and to detect RF absorption a gate dip-meter equipped with a FET transistor is used. The bias voltage variations of the FET transistors as a function of the magnetic field are recorded. The operating point of the cathode ray tube has been chosen so that the relaxation oscillations of the detection system can be observed. (authors)

  14. Parallel superconducting strip-line detectors: reset behaviour in the single-strip switch regime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casaburi, A; Heath, R M; Tanner, M G; Hadfield, R H; Cristiano, R; Ejrnaes, M; Nappi, C

    2014-01-01

    Superconducting strip-line detectors (SSLDs) are an important emerging technology for the detection of single molecules in time-of-flight mass spectrometry (TOF-MS). We present an experimental investigation of a SSLD laid out in a parallel configuration, designed to address selected single strip-lines operating in the single-strip switch regime. Fast laser pulses were tightly focused onto the device, allowing controllable nucleation of a resistive region at a specific location and study of the subsequent device response dynamics. We observed that in this regime, although the strip-line returns to the superconducting state after triggering, no effective recovery of the bias current occurs, in qualitative agreement with a phenomenological circuit simulation that we performed. Moreover, from theoretical considerations and by looking at the experimental pulse amplitude distribution histogram, we have the first confirmation of the fact that the phenomenological London model governs the current redistribution in these large area devices also after detection events. (paper)

  15. Study the Z-Plane Strip Capacitance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parikh, H.; Swain, S.

    2005-01-01

    The BaBaR detector at the Stanford Linear Accelerator Center is currently undergoing an upgrade to improve its muon and neutral hadron detection system. The Resistive Plate Chambers (RPCs) that had been used till now have deteriorated in performance over the past few years and are being replaced by Limited Streamer Tube (LSTs). Each layer of the system consists of a set of up to 10 streamer tube modules which provide one coordinate (φ coordinate) and a single ''Z-plane'' which provides the Z coordinate of the hit. The large area Z-planes (up to 12m 2 ) are 1mm thick and contain 96 copper strips that detect the induced charge from avalanches created in the streamer tube wires. All the Z-planes needed for the upgrade have already been constructed, but only a third of the planes were installed last summer. After installing the 24 Z-planes last year, it was learned that 0.7% of the strips were dead when put inside the detector. This was mainly due to the delicate solder joint between the read-out cable and the strip, and since it is difficult to access or replace the Z-planes inside the detector, it is very important to perform various tests to make sure that the Z-planes will be efficient and effective in the long term. We measure the capacitance between the copper strips and the ground plane, and compare it to the theoretical value that we expect. Instead of measuring the capacitance channel by channel, which would be a very tedious job, we developed a more effective method of measuring the capacitance. Since all the Z-planes were built at SLAC, we also built a smaller 46 cm by 30 cm Z-plane with 12 strips just to see how they were constructed and to gain a better understanding about the solder joints

  16. Advection endash diffusion past a strip. II. Oblique incidence

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knessl, C.; Keller, J.B.

    1997-01-01

    Advection and diffusion of particles past an impenetrable strip is considered when the strip is oblique to the advection or drift velocity. The particle concentration p(x,y) is determined asymptotically for large values of vL/D, where v is the drift velocity, D is the diffusion coefficient, and 2L is the width of the strip. The results complement those of Part I, which treated a strip normal to the drift velocity. copyright 1997 American Institute of Physics

  17. Testbeam evaluation of silicon strip modules for ATLAS Phase - II Strip Tracker Upgrade

    CERN Document Server

    Blue, Andrew; The ATLAS collaboration; Ai, Xiaocong; Allport, Phillip; Arling, Jan-Hendrik; Atkin, Ryan Justin; Bruni, Lucrezia Stella; Carli, Ina; Casse, Gianluigi; Chen, Liejian; Chisholm, Andrew; Cormier, Kyle James Read; Cunningham, William Reilly; Dervan, Paul; Diez Cornell, Sergio; Dolezal, Zdenek; Dopke, Jens; Dreyer, Etienne; Dreyling-Eschweiler, Jan Linus Roderik; Escobar, Carlos; Fabiani, Veronica; Fadeyev, Vitaliy; Fernandez Tejero, Javier; Fleta Corral, Maria Celeste; Gallop, Bruce; Garcia-Argos, Carlos; Greenall, Ashley; Gregor, Ingrid-Maria; Greig, Graham George; Guescini, Francesco; Hara, Kazuhiko; Hauser, Marc Manuel; Huang, Yanping; Hunter, Robert Francis Holub; Keller, John; Klein, Christoph; Kodys, Peter; Koffas, Thomas; Kotek, Zdenek; Kroll, Jiri; Kuehn, Susanne; Lee, Steven Juhyung; Liu, Yi; Lohwasser, Kristin; Meszarosova, Lucia; Mikestikova, Marcela; Mi\\~nano Moya, Mercedes; Mori, Riccardo; Moser, Brian; Nikolopoulos, Konstantinos; Peschke, Richard; Pezzullo, Giuseppe; Phillips, Peter William; Poley, Anne-luise; Queitsch-Maitland, Michaela; Ravotti, Federico; Rodriguez Rodriguez, Daniel

    2018-01-01

    The planned HL-LHC (High Luminosity LHC) is being designed to maximise the physics potential of the LHC with 10 years of operation at instantaneous luminosities of \\mbox{$7.5\\times10^{34}\\;\\mathrm{cm}^{-2}\\mathrm{s}^{-1}$}. A consequence of this increased luminosity is the expected radiation damage requiring the tracking detectors to withstand hadron equivalences to over $1x10^{15}$ 1 MeV neutron equivalent per $cm^{2}$ in the ATLAS Strips system. The silicon strip tracker exploits the concept of modularity. Fast readout electronics, deploying 130nm CMOS front-end electronics are glued on top of a silicon sensor to make a module. The radiation hard n-in-p micro-strip sensors used have been developed by the ATLAS ITk Strip Sensor collaboration and produced by Hamamatsu Photonics. A series of tests were performed at the DESY-II test beam facility to investigate the detailed performance of a strip module with both 2.5cm and 5cm length strips before irradiation. The DURANTA telescope was used to obtain a pointing...

  18. 7 CFR 29.6128 - Straight Stripped (X Group).

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 7 Agriculture 2 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Straight Stripped (X Group). 29.6128 Section 29.6128... REGULATIONS TOBACCO INSPECTION Standards Grades § 29.6128 Straight Stripped (X Group). This group consists of..., and tolerances X1 Fine Quality Straight Stripped. Heavy, ripe, firm, semielastic, normal strength and...

  19. Determination of tryptamine in foods using square wave adsorptive stripping voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Daniel J E; Martínez, Ana M; Ribeiro, Williame F; Bichinho, Kátia M; Di Nezio, María Susana; Pistonesi, Marcelo F; Araujo, Mario C U

    2016-07-01

    Tryptamine, a biogenic amine, is an indole derivative with an electrophilic substituent at the C3 position of the pyrrole ring of the indole moiety. The electrochemical oxidation of tryptamine was investigated using glassy carbon electrode (GCE), and focusing on trace level determination in food products by square wave adsorptive stripping voltammetry (SWAdSV). The electrochemical responses of tryptamine were evaluated using differing voltammetric techniques over a wide pH range, a quasi-reversible electron-transfer to redox system represented by coupled peaks P1-P3, and an irreversible reaction for peak P2 were demonstrated. The proton and electron counts associated with the oxidation reactions were estimated. The nature of the mass transfer process was predominantly diffusion-limited for the oxidation process of P1, the most selective and sensitive analytical response (acetate buffer solution pH 5.3), being used for the development of SWAdSV method, under optimum conditions. The excellent response allowed the development of an electroanalytical method with a linear response range of from 4.7-54.5)×10(-)(8)molL(-1), low detection limit (0.8×10(-)(9)molL(-)(1)), and quantification limit (2.7×10(-9)molL(-1)), and acceptable levels of repeatability (3.6%), and reproducibility (3.8%). Tryptamine content was determined in bananas, tomatoes, cheese (mozzarella and gorgonzola), and cold meats (chicken sausage and pepperoni sausage), yielding recoveries above 90%, with excellent analytical performance using simple and low cost instrumentation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Modeling High Pressure Micro Hollow Cathode Discharges

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Boeuf, Jean-Pierre; Pitchford, Leanne

    2004-01-01

    This report results from a contract tasking CPAT as follows: The Grantee will perform theoretical modeling of point, surface, and volume high-pressure plasmas created using Micro Hollow Cathode Discharge sources...

  1. RF Electron Gun with Driven Plasma Cathode

    CERN Document Server

    Khodak, Igor

    2005-01-01

    It's known that RF guns with plasma cathodes based on solid-state dielectrics are able to generate an intense electron beam. In this paper we describe results of experimental investigation of the single cavity S-band RF gun with driven plasma cathode. The experimental sample of the cathode based on ferroelectric ceramics has been designed. Special design of the cathode permits to separate spatially processes of plasma development and electron acceleration. It has been obtained at RF gun output electron beam with particle energy ~500 keV, pulse current of 4 A and pulse duration of 80 ns. Results of experimental study of beam parameters are referred in. The gun is purposed to be applied as the intense electron beam source for electron linacs.

  2. Rare earth oxide doping in oxide cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Engelsen, Daniel den; Gaertner, Georg

    2006-01-01

    The effect on life performance and poisoning with O 2 by doping oxide cathodes with rare earth oxides and pseudo rare earth oxides, notably yttria, is qualitatively explained in terms of electrolysis of BaO during emission of electrons. Doped cathodes show less electrolysis and consume therefore less Ba during life: consequently, doped cathodes have a better life performance. However, the lower Ba-production makes doped cathodes more sensitive to oxygen poisoning. The experimentally found relation between conductivity and yttria concentration was the motive to propose a new model for the crystal imperfections in BaO. In this new imperfection model most Y 3+ -ions will combine with barium vacancies, therefore, the increase of the conductivity is modest and also the effect on the position of the Fermi level is modest. By assuming a combination of bulk and surface conductivity, the agreement between experiment and theory can be improved further

  3. Concentration changes due to cathodic protection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gellings, P.J.

    1978-01-01

    By solving the appropriate diffusion equations the concentration changes are calculated in the environment of underground structures protected cathodically. It is shown that these changes are negligible under all practical circumstances.

  4. Electrodeposition of uranium in stirred liquid cadmium cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koyama, T.; Tanaka, H.

    1997-01-01

    The electrodeposition of U in a liquid Cd cathode was known to be hampered by the formation of dendritic U on the Cd surface. Electrotransports of uranium to the stirred liquid Cd cathode were carried out at 773 K for different cathode current densities and different Reynolds number of stirring. The maximum amount of U taken in the liquid Cd cathode without forming dendrites was found to increase with an increasing Reynolds number of stirring and decrease with increasing cathode current density. (orig.)

  5. Plasma generation using the hollow cathod

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moon, K.J.

    1983-01-01

    A hollow cathode of tungsten was adapted to an University of California, Berkely, LBL bucket ion source to investigate ion density fluctuations at the extractior grid. Fluctuations in plasma ion density are observed to range between 100kHz to 2 MHz. The observed fluctuation frequencies of plasma ion density are found to be inversely proportional to the square root of ion masses. It is guessed that the plasma fluctuation are also correlated with the hollow cathode length. (Author)

  6. Direct in situ measurement of dissolved zinc in the presence of zinc oxide nanoparticles using anodic stripping voltammetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Chuanjia; Hsu-Kim, Heileen

    2014-11-01

    The wide use of metal-based nanomaterials such as zinc oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles (NPs) has generated concerns regarding their environmental and health risks. For ZnO NPs, their toxicity in aquatic systems often depends on the release of dissolved zinc species, and the rate of dissolution is influenced by water chemistry, including the presence of zinc-chelating ligands. A challenge, however, remains in quantifying the dissolution of ZnO NPs, particularly for time scales that are short enough to determine rates. This paper reports the application of anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) with a hanging mercury drop electrode to directly measure the concentration of dissolved zinc in ZnO NP suspensions, without separation of the ZnO NPs from the aqueous phase. The effects of the deposition time and the electrochemical potential scan rate on the ASV measurement were consistent with expectations for dissolved phase measurements. The dissolved zinc concentration measured by ASV ([Zn]ASV) was compared with that measured by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) after ultracentrifugation ([Zn]ICP-MS), for four types of ZnO NPs with different coatings and primary particle diameters. For small ZnO NPs (4-5 nm), [Zn]ASV was 20% higher than [Zn]ICP-MS, suggesting that these small NPs contributed to the voltammetric measurement. For larger ZnO NPs (approximately 20 nm), [Zn]ASV was (79 ± 19)% of [Zn]ICP-MS, despite the high concentrations of ZnO NPs in suspension. Using ASV, the dissolution of ZnO NPs was studied, with or without Suwannee River Fulvic Acid (SRFA). Although SRFA diminished the ASV stripping current, dissolution of 20 nm ZnO NPs was significantly promoted at high fulvic acid to ZnO NP ratios. The ASV method described in this paper provides a useful tool for studying the dissolution kinetics of ZnO NPs in complex environmental matrices.

  7. Development of plasma cathode electron guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oks, Efim M.; Schanin, Peter M.

    1999-05-01

    The status of experimental research and ongoing development of plasma cathode electron guns in recent years is reviewed, including some novel upgrades and applications to various technological fields. The attractiveness of this kind of e-gun is due to its capability of creating high current, broad or focused beams, both in pulsed and steady-state modes of operation. An important characteristic of the plasma cathode electron gun is the absence of a thermionic cathode, a feature which leads to long lifetime and reliable operation even in the presence of aggressive background gas media and at fore-vacuum gas pressure ranges such as achieved by mechanical pumps. Depending on the required beam parameters, different kinds of plasma discharge systems can be used in plasma cathode electron guns, such as vacuum arcs, constricted gaseous arcs, hollow cathode glows, and two kinds of discharges in crossed E×B fields: Penning and magnetron. At the present time, plasma cathode electron guns provide beams with transverse dimension from fractional millimeter up to about one meter, beam current from microamperes to kiloamperes, beam current density up to about 100 A/cm2, pulse duration from nanoseconds to dc, and electron energy from several keV to hundreds of keV. Applications include electron beam melting and welding, surface treatment, plasma chemistry, radiation technologies, laser pumping, microwave generation, and more.

  8. Metal ion analysis in contaminated water samples using anodic stripping voltammetry and a nanocrystalline diamond thin-film electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonthalia, Prerna; McGaw, Elizabeth; Show, Yoshiyuki; Swain, Greg M.

    2004-01-01

    Boron-doped nanocrystalline diamond thin-film electrodes were employed for the detection and quantification of Ag (I), Cu (II), Pb (II), Cd (II), and Zn (II) in several contaminated water samples using anodic stripping voltammetric (ASV). Diamond is an alternate electrode that possesses many of the same attributes as Hg and, therefore, appears to be a viable material for this electroanalytical measurement. The nanocrystalline form has been found to perform slightly better than the more conventional microcrystalline form of diamond in this application. Differential pulse voltammetry (DPASV) was used to detect these metal ions in lake water, well water, tap water, wastewater treatment sludge, and soil. The electrochemical results were compared with data from inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometric (ICP-MS) and or atomic absorption spectrometric (AAS) measurements of the same samples. Diamond is shown to function well in this electroanalytical application, providing a wide linear dynamic range, a low limit of quantitation, excellent response precision, and good response accuracy. For the analysis of Pb (II), bare diamond provided a response nearly identical to that obtained with a Hg-coated glassy carbon electrode

  9. Solar UV-assisted sample preparation of river water for ultra-trace determination of uranium by adsorptive stripping voltammetry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Woldemichael, G.; Tulu, T.; Flechsig, G.-U.

    2012-01-01

    The article describes how solar ultraviolet-A radiation can be used to digest samples as needed for voltammetric ultratrace determination of uranium(VI) in river water. We applied adsorptive stripping voltammetry (AdSV) using chloranilic acid as the complexing agent. Samples from the river Warnow in Rostock (Germany) were pretreated with either soft solar UV or wit artificial hard UV from a 30-W source emitting 254-nm light. Samples were irradiated for 12 h, and both methods yielded the same results. We were able to detect around 1 μg.L -1 of uranium(VI) in a sample of river water that also contained dissolved organic carbon at a higher mg.L -1 levels. No AdSV signal was obtained for U(VI) without any UV pre-treatment. Pseudo-polarographic experiments confirmed the dramatic effect of both digestion techniques the the AdSV response. The new method is recommended for use in mobile ultratrace voltammetry of heavy metals for most kinds of natural water samples including tap, spring, ground, sea, and river waters. The direct use of solar radiation for sample pre-treatment represents a sustainable technique for sample preparation that does not consume large quantities of chemicals or energy. (author)

  10. Determination of Xanthine in the Presence of Hypoxanthine by Adsorptive Stripping Voltammetry at the Mercury Film Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Percio Augusto Mardini Farias

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A stripping method for the determination of xanthine in the presence of hypoxanthine at the submicromolar concentration levels is described. The method is based on controlled adsorptive accumulation at the thin-film mercury electrode followed by a fast linear scan voltammetric measurement of the surface species. Optimum experimental conditions were found to be the use of 1.0 × 10 −3 mol L −1 NaOH solution as supporting electrolyte, an accumulation potential of 0.00 V for xanthine and −0.50 V for hypoxanthine–copper, and a linear scan rate of 200 mV second −1 . The response of xanthine is linear over the concentration ranges of 20-140 ppb. For an accumulation time of 30 minutes, the detection limit was found to be 36 ppt (2.3 × 10 −10 mol L −1 . Adequate conditions for measuring the xanthine in the presence of hypoxanthine, copper and other metals, uric acid, and other nitrogenated bases were also investigated. The utility of the method is demonstrated by the presence of xanthine associated with hypoxanthine, uric acid, nitrogenated bases, ATP, and ssDNA.

  11. Hydrothermal synthesis of cathode materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jiajun; Wang, Shijun; Whittingham, M. Stanley

    A number of cathodes are being considered for the next generation of lithium ion batteries to replace the expensive LiCoO 2 presently used. Besides the layered oxides, such as LiNi yMn yCo 1-2 yO 2, a leading candidate is lithium iron phosphate with the olivine structure. Although this material is inherently low cost, a manufacturing process that produces electrochemically active LiFePO 4 at a low cost is also required. Hydrothermal reactions are one such possibility. A number of pure phosphates have been prepared using this technique, including LiFePO 4, LiMnPO 4 and LiCoPO 4; this method has also successfully produced mixed metal phosphates, such as LiFe 0.33Mn 0.33Co 0.33PO 4. Ascorbic acid was found to be better than hydrazine or sugar at preventing the formation of ferric ions in aqueous media. When conductive carbons are added to the reaction medium excellent electrochemical behavior is observed.

  12. Performance of CdZnTe strip detectors as sub-millimeter resolution imaging gamma radiation spectrometers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mayer, M.; Boykin, D.V.; Drake, A.

    1996-01-01

    We report γ-ray detection performance measurements and computer simulations of a sub-millimeter pitch CdZnTe strip detector. The detector is a prototype for γ-ray astronomy measurements in the range of 20-200 keV. The prototype is a 1.5 mm thick, 64 x 64 orthogonal stripe CdZnTe detector of 0.375 mm pitch in both dimensions, with approximately one square inch of sensitive area. Using discrete laboratory electronics to process signals from 8 x 8 stripe region of the prototype we measured good spectroscopic uniformity and sub-pitch (∼ 0.2 mm) spatial resolution in both x and y dimensions. We present below measurements of the spatial uniformity, relative timing and pulse height of the anode and cathode signals, and the photon detection efficiency. We also present a technique for determining the location of the event in the third dimension (depth). We simulated the photon interactions and signal generation in the strip detector and the test electronics and we compare these results with the data. The data indicate that cathode signal - as well as the anode signal - arises more strongly from the conduction electrons rather than the holes

  13. Plasma processes inside dispenser hollow cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Polk, James E.; Jameson, Kristina K.

    2006-01-01

    A two-dimensional fluid model of the plasma and neutral gas inside dispenser orificed hollow cathodes has been developed to quantify plasma processes that ultimately determine the life of the porous emitters inserted in these devices. The model self-consistently accounts for electron emission from the insert as well as for electron and ion flux losses from the plasma. Two cathodes, which are distinctively different in size and operating conditions, have been simulated numerically. It is found that the larger cathode, with outer tube diameter of 1.5 cm and orifice diameter of 0.3 cm, establishes an effective emission zone that spans approximately the full length of the emitter when operated at a discharge current of 25 A and a flow rate of 5.5 sccm. The net heating of the emitter is caused by ions that are produced by ionization of the neutral gas inside the tube and are then accelerated by the sheath along the emitter. The smaller cathode, with an outer diameter of 0.635 cm and an orifice diameter of 0.1 cm, does not exhibit the same operational characteristics. At a flow rate of 4.25 sccm and discharge current of 12 A, the smaller cathode requires 4.5 times the current density near the orifice and operates with more than 6 times the neutral particle density compared to the large cathode. As a result, the plasma particle density is almost one order of magnitude higher compared to the large cathode. The plasma density in this small cathode is high enough such that the Debye length is sufficiently small to allow 'sheath funneling' into the pores of the emitter. By accessing areas deeper into the insert material, it is postulated that the overall emission of electrons is significantly enhanced. The maximum emission current density is found to be about 1 A/mm 2 in the small cathode, which is about one order of magnitude higher than attained in the large cathode. The effective emission zone in the small cathode extends to about 15% of the emitter length only, and the

  14. The extent of the stop coannihilation strip

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, John [King' s College London, Theoretical Particle Physics and Cosmology Group, Department of Physics, London (United Kingdom); CERN, Theory Division, Geneva 23 (Switzerland); Olive, Keith A. [University of Minnesota, School of Physics and Astronomy, Minneapolis, MN (United States); University of Minnesota, William I. Fine Theoretical Physics Institute, School of Physics and Astronomy, Minneapolis, MN (United States); Zheng, Jiaming [University of Minnesota, School of Physics and Astronomy, Minneapolis, MN (United States)

    2014-07-15

    Many supersymmetric models such as the constrained minimal supersymmetric extension of the Standard Model (CMSSM) feature a strip in parameter space where the lightest neutralino χ is identified as the lightest supersymmetric particle, the lighter stop squark t{sub 1} is the next-to-lightest supersymmetric particle (NLSP), and the relic χ cold darkmatter density is brought into the range allowed by astrophysics and cosmology by coannihilation with the lighter stop squark t{sub 1} NLSP. We calculate the stop coannihilation strip in the CMSSM, incorporating Sommerfeld enhancement effects, and we explore the relevant phenomenological constraints and phenomenological signatures. In particular, we show that the t{sub 1} may weigh several TeV, and its lifetime may be in the nanosecond range, features that are more general than the specific CMSSM scenarios that we study in this paper. (orig.)

  15. Strip-till seeder for sugar beets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Schulze Lammers

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Strip-till save costs by reducing tillage on the area of sugar beet rows only. The seeding system is characterized by a deep loosening of soil with a tine combined with a share and by following tools generating fine-grained soil as seed bed. In cooperation with the Kverneland company group Soest/Germany a strip tiller combined with precision seeder was designed and tested in field experiments. Tilling and seeding was performed in one path on fields with straw and mustard mulch. Even the plant development was slower as compared to conventional sawn sugar beets the yield was on equivalent level. Further field experiments are planned to attest constant yield, cost and energy efficiency of the seeding system.

  16. Dual deflectable beam strip engine development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulgeroff, C. R.; Zuccaro, D. E.; Kami, S.; Schnelker, D. E.; Ward, J. W.

    1972-01-01

    This paper describes a dual beam thruster that has been designed, constructed, and tested. The system is suitable for two-axes attitude control and is comprised of two orthogonal strips, each capable of producing 0.30 mlb thrust and beam deflections of more than plus or minus 20 deg. The nominal specific impulse for the thruster is 5000 sec, and the thrust level from each strip can be varied from 0 to 100%. Neutralizer filaments that were developed and life tested over 2000 hours producing more than 40 mA of electron emission per watt of input power are also discussed. The system power required for clean ionizers is approximately 200 W.

  17. L-strip proximity fed ga

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ashish Singh

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available In this article, the analysis of dualband L-strip fed compact semi-circular disk microstrip patch antenna has been presented using circuit theory concept. The antenna parameters such as return loss, VSWR and radiation pattern are calculated. The effect of geometric dimensions of the proposed antenna such as length of vertical and horizontal portion of L-strip is investigated. It is found that antenna resonate at two distinct modes i.e. 1.3 GHz and 6.13 GHz for lower and upper resonance frequencies respectively. The bandwidth of the proposed antenna at lower resonance frequency is 6.61% (simulated and 10.64% (theoretical whereas at upper resonance frequency, it is 6.02% (simulated and 9.06 % (theoretical. The theoretical results are compared with IE3D simulation results as well as experimental results and they are in close agreement.

  18. Nuclear reactor spring strip grid spacer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterson, J.F.; Flora, B.S.

    1980-01-01

    An improved and novel grid spacer was developed for use in nuclear reactor fuel assemblies. It is comprised of a series of intersecting support strips and a peripheral support band attached to the ends of the support strips. Each of the openings into which the fuel element is inserted has a number of protruding dimples and springs extending in different directions. The dimples coact with the springs to secure the fuel rods in the openings. Compared with previous designs, this design gives more positive alignment of the support stips while allowing greater flexibility to counterbalance the effects of thermal expansion. The springs are arranged in alternating directions so that the reaction forces tend to counterbalance each other, which in turn minimizes the reaction loads on the supporting structure. (D.N.)

  19. Electron capture by highly stripped ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Greenland, P.T.

    1981-06-01

    This review describes theories of electron capture suitable for the description of rearrangement collisions between atomic hydrogen and completely stripped projectiles with charge greater than unity. The region of impact velocity considered lies between 0.05 and 3 au, which is of technological importance in fusion power devices. The semiclassical, impact parameter formalism is discussed and the use of atomic expansions at medium impact velocity is described. Experimental results for both completely and partially stripped projectiles are reviewed. The use of a molecular basis at low energy, and the role of pseudocrossings peculiar to the two centre Coulomb interaction are described. Finally, purely classical techniques, in which the electron wavefunction is represented by an ensemble of Kepler orbits are considered. The review was completed in February 1981. (author)

  20. Continuous liquid sheet generator for ion stripping

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gavin, B.; Batson, P.; Leemann, B.; Rude, B.

    1984-10-01

    Many of the technical problems of generating a large thin liquid sheet from 0.02 to 0.20 μm thick (3 to 40 μgm/cm 2 ) have been solved. It is shown that this perennial sheet is stable and consonant in dimension. Several ion beam species from the SuperHILAC have been used for evaluation; at 0.11 MeV/n. In one of three modes this sheet serves as an equivalent substitute for a carbon foil. The second mode is characterized by a solid-like charge state distribution but with a varying fraction of unstripped ions. The third mode gives stripping performance akin to a vapor stripping medium. 9 references, 7 figures

  1. Large strip RPCs for the LEPS2 TOF system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tomida, N., E-mail: natsuki@scphys.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Niiyama, M. [Department of Physics, Kyoto University, Kyoto 606-8502 (Japan); Ohnishi, H. [RIKEN (The Institute of Physical and Chemical Research), Wako, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tran, N. [Research Center for Nuclear Physics (RCNP), Osaka University, Ibaraki, Osaka 567-0047 (Japan); Hsieh, C.-Y.; Chu, M.-L.; Chang, W.-C. [Institute of Physics, Academia Sinica, Nankang, Taipei 11529, Taiwan (China); Chen, J.-Y. [National Synchrotron Radiation Research Center (NSRRC), Hsinchu 30076, Taiwan (China)

    2014-12-01

    High time-resolution resistive plate chambers (RPCs) with large-size readout strips are developed for the time-of-flight (TOF) detector system of the LEPS2 experiment at SPring-8. The experimental requirement is a 50-ps time resolution for a strip size larger than 100 cm{sup 2}/channel. We are able to achieve 50-ps time resolutions with 2.5×100 cm{sup 2} strips by directly connecting the amplifiers to strips. With the same time resolution, the number of front-end electronics (FEE) is also reduced by signal addition. - Highlights: • Find a way to achieve a good time resolution with a large strip RPC. • 2.5 cm narrow strips have better resolutions than 5.0 cm ones. • The 0.5 mm narrow strip interval shows flat time resolutions between strips. • FEEs directly connected to strips make the signal reflection at the strip edge small. • A time resolution of 50 ps was achieved with 2.5 cm×100 cm strips.

  2. Moving strip technique of electron beam therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsushima, Kishio; Wakasa, Hiroyuki; Oguri, Nobuhiro; Kitayama, Takuichi; Nakagiri, Yoshitada; Mikami, Yasutaka; Hashimoto, Keiji; Hiraki, Yoshio; Aono, Kaname

    1984-12-01

    The fieldsize in electron beam therapy is determined by the cone size. In case of skin metastasis of a malignant tumor and so on, which need a large field size and whose area is much larger than the size of the cone, a large field size is usually produced by dividing the portals. However, the dose distribution at the border of the field becomes unequal, and hot and cold dose areas are produced according to the distance between portals. We tried the strip field technique in a large field along the long axis of the body in order to flatten the dose of the border employing the moving strip used for whole abdominal irradiation in ovarian cancer. We set the film in Mix-DP and used the strip field technique with 2.5cm steps. We discussed the relationship between the interval (distance between portals) and the flattening of the dose within the field. Skin movement due to breathing and influences on the flattening of the dose were considered. The proper flatness was obtained at depths of 0,1,2, and 3cm by setting the interval at 0.5cm. When skin movement was produced by breathing in +-1.5mm, the proper flaness was obtained also at a 0.5-cm interval. It seems that smoothing is increased by breathing. An ''electron beam moving strip'' with a 2.5-cm step and 0.5-cm interval was clinically effective in the treatment of patients with skin metastasis of colon cancer. (author).

  3. Ram pressure stripping of tilted galaxies

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jáchym, Pavel; Köppen, J.; Palouš, Jan; Combes, F.

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 500, č. 2 (2009), s. 693-703 ISSN 0004-6361 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC06014; GA ČR GP205/08/P556 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z10030501 Keywords : interstellar medium * clusters of galaxies * gas stripping Subject RIV: BN - Astronomy, Celestial Mechanics, Astrophysics Impact factor: 4.179, year: 2009

  4. Simultaneous Voltammetric/Amperometric Determination of Sulfide and Nitrite in Water at BDD Electrode

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anamaria Baciu

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available This work reported new voltammetric/amperometric-based protocols using a commercial boron-doped diamond (BDD electrode for simple and fast simultaneous detection of sulfide and nitrite from water. Square-wave voltammetry operated under the optimized working conditions of 0.01 V step potential, 0.5 V modulation amplitude and 10 Hz frequency allowed achieving the best electroanalytical parameters for the simultaneous detection of nitrite and sulfide. For practical in-field detection applications, the multiple-pulsed amperometry technique was operated under optimized conditions, i.e., −0.5 V/SCE for a duration of 0.3 s as conditioning step, +0.85 V/SCE for a duration of 3 s that assure the sulfide oxidation and +1.25 V/SCE for a duration of 0.3 s, where the nitrite oxidation occurred, which allowed the simultaneously detection of sulfide and nitrite without interference between them. Good accuracy was found for this protocol in comparison with standardized methods for each anion. Also, no interference effect was found for the cation and anion species, which are common in the water matrix.

  5. Development and characterization of a voltammetric carbon-fiber microelectrode pH sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makos, Monique A; Omiatek, Donna M; Ewing, Andrew G; Heien, Michael L

    2010-06-15

    This work describes the development and characterization of a modified carbon-fiber microelectrode sensor capable of measuring real-time physiological pH changes in biological microenvironments. The reagentless sensor was fabricated under ambient conditions from voltammetric reduction of the diazonium salt Fast Blue RR onto a carbon-fiber surface in aprotic media. Fast-scan cyclic voltammetry was used to probe redox activity of the p-quinone moiety of the surface-bound molecule as a function of pH. In vitro calibration of the sensor in solutions ranging from pH 6.5 to 8.0 resulted in a pH-dependent anodic peak potential response. Flow-injection analysis was used to characterize the modified microelectrode, revealing sensitivity to acidic and basic changes discernible to 0.005 pH units. Furthermore, the modified electrode was used to measure dynamic in vivo pH changes evoked during neurotransmitter release in the central nervous system of the microanalytical model organism Drosophila melanogaster.

  6. Voltammetric Perspectives on the Acidity Scale and H+/H2 Process in Ionic Liquid Media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bentley, Cameron L; Bond, Alan M; Zhang, Jie

    2018-03-19

    Nonhaloaluminate ionic liquids (ILs) have received considerable attention as alternatives to molecular solvents in diverse applications spanning the fields of physical, chemical, and biological science. One important and often overlooked aspect of the implementation of these designer solvents is how the properties of the IL formulation affect (electro)chemical reactivity. This aspect is emphasized herein, where recent (voltammetric) studies on the energetics of proton (H + ) transfer and electrode reaction mechanisms of the H + H 2 process in IL media are highlighted and discussed. The energetics of proton transfer, quantified using the pK 3 a (minus logarithm of acidity equilibrium constant, K a ) formalism, is strongly governed by the constituent IL anion, and to a lesser extent, the IL cation. The H + /H 2 process, a model inner-sphere reaction, also displays electrochemical characteristics that are strongly IL-dependent. Overall, these studies highlight the need to carry out systematic investigations to resolve IL structure and function relationships in order to realize the potential of these diverse and versatile solvents. Expected final online publication date for the Annual Review of Analytical Chemistry Volume 11 is June 12, 2018. Please see http://www.annualreviews.org/page/journal/pubdates for revised estimates.

  7. Voltammetric investigation of avidin-biotin complex formation using an electroactive bisbiotinyl compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sugawara, Kazuharu; Shirotori, Tatsuya; Hirabayashi, George; Kamiya, Naoto; Kuramitz, Hideki; Tanaka, Shunitz

    2004-01-01

    Formation of avidin-biotin complex was investigated using bisbiotinyl thionine (BBT) by means of voltammetric techniques. Thionine is an electroactive compound and has two amino groups that are necessary for the reaction with a biotinylation reagent. The biotinylation of thionine produces a new reagent with two biotin moieties at each end of thionine. Three BBTs of different lengths of the spacer that connects the biotin moiety to the thionine moiety were prepared. The avidin-biotin binding assay was achieved by measuring the electrode response of the thionine moiety in BBT. The binding affinity and the conformation of complex, which depended on the length of spacer, are discussed. BBT in which the spacer is shortest (BBT-S, distance between carbonyl group of the two biotin moieties: 11 A) binds with only one avidin molecule. BBT with medium length of spacer (BBT-M, 28.8 A) forms the complex with two avidin molecules. BBT with the longest spacer (BBT-L, 46.6 A) allows binding with two avidin molecules as well as intramolecular binding within one avidin molecule. The affinity constants of BBT-S, BBT-M and BBT-L for avidin were estimated to be 7.0 x 10 12 M -1 , 3.2 x 10 12 M -1 and 4.0 x 10 12 M -1 , respectively

  8. Voltammetric enzyme sensor for urea using mercaptohydroquinone-modified gold electrode as the base transducer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mizutani, F; Yabuki, S; Sato, Y

    1997-01-01

    A voltammetric urea-sensing electrode was prepared by combining a lipid-attached urease layer with a 2,5-dihydroxythiophenol-modified gold electrode. A self-assembled monolayer of dihydroxythiophenol was prepared on the gold surface by soaking the electrode into an ethanolic solution containing the modifier. A layer of the lipid-attached enzyme and that of acetyl cellulose overcoat were successively made on the dihydroxythiophenol-modified electrode by applying a dip-coating procedure. The addition of urea in a test solution (10 mM phosphate buffer, pH 7.0) brought about an increase of pH near the urease layer. The pH shift accompanied a negative shift of the anodic peak, which corresponded to the electro-oxidation of dihydroxyphenol moiety to form quinone, on the linear sweep voltammograms for the urease/dihydroxythiophenol electrode. The concentration of urea (0.2-5 mM) could be determined by measuring the electrode current at -0.05 V versus Ag/AgCl from the voltammogram. The electrode was applied to the determination of urea in human urine; the measurement of electrode current at such a low potential provided the urea determination without any electrochemical interference from L-ascorbic acid and uric acid.

  9. Voltammetric electronic tongue and support vector machines for identification of selected features in Mexican coffee.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domínguez, Rocio Berenice; Moreno-Barón, Laura; Muñoz, Roberto; Gutiérrez, Juan Manuel

    2014-09-24

    This paper describes a new method based on a voltammetric electronic tongue (ET) for the recognition of distinctive features in coffee samples. An ET was directly applied to different samples from the main Mexican coffee regions without any pretreatment before the analysis. The resulting electrochemical information was modeled with two different mathematical tools, namely Linear Discriminant Analysis (LDA) and Support Vector Machines (SVM). Growing conditions (i.e., organic or non-organic practices and altitude of crops) were considered for a first classification. LDA results showed an average discrimination rate of 88% ± 6.53% while SVM successfully accomplished an overall accuracy of 96.4% ± 3.50% for the same task. A second classification based on geographical origin of samples was carried out. Results showed an overall accuracy of 87.5% ± 7.79% for LDA and a superior performance of 97.5% ± 3.22% for SVM. Given the complexity of coffee samples, the high accuracy percentages achieved by ET coupled with SVM in both classification problems suggested a potential applicability of ET in the assessment of selected coffee features with a simpler and faster methodology along with a null sample pretreatment. In addition, the proposed method can be applied to authentication assessment while improving cost, time and accuracy of the general procedure.

  10. Voltammetric pH sensing using carbon electrodes: glassy carbon behaves similarly to EPPG.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Min; Compton, Richard G

    2014-09-21

    Developing and building on recent work based on a simple sensor for pH determination using unmodified edge plane pyrolytic graphite (EPPG) electrodes, we present a voltammetric method for pH determination using a bare unmodified glassy carbon (GC) electrode. By exploiting the pH sensitive nature of quinones present on carbon edge-plane like sites within the GC, we show how GC electrodes can be used to measure pH. The electro-reduction of surface quinone groups on the glassy carbon electrode was characterised using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and optimised with square-wave voltammetry (SWV) at 298 K and 310 K. At both temperatures, a linear correlation was observed, corresponding to a 2 electron, 2 proton Nernstian response over the aqueous pH range 1.0 to 13.1. As such, unmodified glassy carbon electrodes are seen to be pH dependent, and the Nernstian response suggests its facile use for pH sensing. Given the widespread use of glassy carbon electrodes in electroanalysis, the approach offers a method for the near-simultaneous measurement and monitoring of pH during such analyses.

  11. Electrochemical Investigation of Catechol at Poly(niacinamide Modified Carbon Paste Electrode: A Voltammetric Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Teradale

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A polymeric thin film modified electrode, that is, poly(niacinamide modified carbon paste electrode (MCPE, was developed for the electrochemical determination of catechol (CC by using cyclic voltammetric technique. Compared to bare carbon paste electrode (BCPE, the poly(niacinamide MCPE shows good electrocatalytic activity towards the oxidation of catechol in phosphate buffer solution (PBS of physiological pH 7.4. All experimental parameters were optimized. Poly(niacinamide modified carbon paste electrode gave a linear response between concentration of CC and its anodic peak current in the range within 20.6–229.0 μM. The limit of detection (3S/M and limit of quantification (10S/M were 1.497 μM and 4.99 μM, respectively. From the study of scan rate variation, the electrode process was found to be adsorption-controlled. The involvement of protons and electrons in the oxidation of CC was found to be equal. The probable electropolymerisation mechanism of niacinamide was proposed. Finally, this method can be used in development of a sensor for sensitive determination of CC.

  12. Voltammetric study of chromium(VI)-ammonia/ammonium chloride solutions in the presence of dimethylglyoxime

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ginzburg, V.G.; Salikhdzhanova, R.M.F.

    1987-01-01

    The authors believed complexation to be possible in the system Cr(VI)-dimethylglyoxime (DMG, H 2 D) by reduction of Cr(VI) to Cr(III) on a mercury electrode. The DMG can be used in chromium voltammetry and is promising for a number of reasons: The Cr(III) has an affinity for donor nitrogen atoms in the DMG molecule. Insertion of the H 2 D into the inner sphere of the complex is expected to weaken the bond between the Cr(III) and the hydroxyl group, slow down formation of the insoluble hydroxide Cr(OH) 3 , and lower the rate of the electrode reaction Cr(III) → Cr(II). Molecules of H 2 D adsorb on a mercury electrode. It is therefore possible to accelerate the electrode process by including adsorptive preconcentration of the chromium and thus lowering its detection limit. This paper reports the voltammetric behavior of the system Cr(VI)-DMG-NH 4 + (proton donor) for the purpose of lowering the chromium detection limit

  13. Voltammetric and Mathematical Evidence for Dual Transport Mediation of Serotonin Clearance In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wood, Kevin M.; Zeqja, Anisa; Nijhout, H. Frederik; Reed, Michael C.; Best, Janet; Hashemi, Parastoo

    2014-01-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin underlies many of the brain’s functions. Understanding serotonin neurochemistry is important for improving treatments for neuropsychiatric disorders such as depression. Antidepressants commonly target serotonin clearance via serotonin transporters (SERTs) and have variable clinical effects. Adjunctive therapies, targeting other systems including serotonin autoreceptors, also vary clinically and carry adverse consequences. Fast scan cyclic voltammetry (FSCV) is particularly well suited for studying antidepressant effects on serotonin clearance and autoreceptors by providing real-time chemical information on serotonin kinetics in vivo. However, the complex nature of in vivo serotonin responses makes it difficult to interpret experimental data with established kinetic models. Here, we electrically stimulated the mouse medial forebrain bundle (MFB) to provoke and detect terminal serotonin in the substantia nigra reticulata (SNr). In response to MFB stimulation we found three dynamically distinct serotonin signals. To interpret these signals we developed a computational model that supports two independent serotonin reuptake mechanisms (high affinity, low efficiency reuptake mechanism and low affinity, high efficiency reuptake system) and bolsters an important inhibitory role for the serotonin autoreceptors. Our data and analysis, afforded by the powerful combination of voltammetric and theoretical methods, gives new understanding of the chemical heterogeneity of serotonin dynamics in the brain. This diverse serotonergic matrix likely contributes to clinical variability of antidepressants. PMID:24702305

  14. Multi-spectroscopic and voltammetric evidences for binding, conformational changes of bovine serum albumin with thiamine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagoji, Atmanand M; Gowda, Jayant I; Gokavi, Naveen M; Nandibewoor, Sharanappa T

    2017-08-01

    The interaction between thiamine hydrochloride (TA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) was investigated by fluorescence, FTIR, UV-vis spectroscopic and cyclic voltammetric techniques under optimised physiological condition. The fluorescence intensity of BSA is gradually decreased upon addition of TA due to the formation of a BSA-TA complex. The binding parameters were evaluated and their behaviour at different temperatures was analysed. The quenching constants (K sv ) obtained were 2.6 × 10 4 , 2.2 × 10 4 and 2.0 × 10 4  L mol -1 at 288, 298 and 308 K, respectively. The binding mechanism was static-type quenching. The values of ΔH° and ΔS° were found to be 26.87 kJ mol -1 and 21.3 J K -1  mol -1 , and indicated that electrostatic interaction was the principal intermolecular force. The changes in the secondary structure of BSA upon interaction with TA were confirmed by synchronous and 3-D spectral results. Site probe studies reveal that TA is located in site I of BSA. The effects of some common metal ions on binding of BSA-TA complex were also investigated.

  15. A voltammetric electronic tongue as tool for water quality monitoring in wastewater treatment plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Inmaculada; Alcañiz, Miguel; Aguado, Daniel; Barat, Ramón; Ferrer, José; Gil, Luis; Marrakchi, Mouna; Martínez-Mañez, Ramón; Soto, Juan; Vivancos, José-Luis

    2012-05-15

    The use of a voltammetric electronic tongue as tool for the prediction of concentration levels of certain water quality parameters from influent and effluent wastewater from a Submerged Anaerobic Membrane Bioreactor pilot plant applied to domestic wastewater treatment is proposed here. The electronic tongue consists of a set of noble (Au, Pt, Rh, Ir, and Ag) and non-noble (Ni, Co and Cu) electrodes that were housed inside a stainless steel cylinder which was used as the body of the electronic tongue system. As a previous step an electrochemical study of the response of the ions sulphate, orthophosphate, acetate, bicarbonate and ammonium was carried out in water using the electrodes contained in the electronic tongue. The second part of the work was devoted to the application of the electronic tongue to the characterization of the influent and effluent waters from the wastewater treatment plant. Partial Least Squares analysis was used to obtain a correlation between the data from the tongue and the pollution parameters measured in the laboratory such as soluble chemical oxygen demand (CODs), soluble biological oxygen demand (BODs), ammonia (NH(4)-N), orthophosphate (PO(4)-P), Sulphate (SO(4)-S), acetic acid (HAC) and alkalinity (Alk). A total of 28 and 11 samples were used in the training and the validation steps, respectively, for both influent and effluent water samples. The electronic tongue showed relatively good predictive power for the determination of BOD, COD, NH(4)-N, PO(4)-P, SO(4)-S, and Alk. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Honey adulteration detection: voltammetric e-tongue versus official methods for physicochemical parameter determination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oroian, Mircea; Paduret, Sergiu; Ropciuc, Sorina

    2018-02-10

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a voltammetric e-tongue (three electrodes: reference electrode (Ag/AgCl), counter electrode (glassy carbon electrode rod) and working electrode (Au, Ag, Pt and glass electrode)) for honey adulteration detection. For this purpose, 55 samples of authentic honey (acacia, honeydew, sunflower, Tilia and polyfloral) and 150 adulterated ones were analyzed. The adulteration was made using fructose, glucose, inverted sugar, hydrolyzed inulin syrup and malt wort at different percentages: 5%, 10%, 20%, 30%, 40% and 50%, respectively. The e-tongue has been compared with the physicochemical parameters (pH, free acidity, electrical conductivity (EC) and CIEL*a*b* parameters (L*, a* and b*)) in order to achieve a suitable method for the classification of authentic and adulterated honeys. The e-tongue and physicochemical parameters reached a 97.50% correct classification of the authentic and adulterated honeys. In the case of the adulterated honey samples, the e-tongue achieved 83.33% correct classifications whereas the physicochemical parameters only achieved 73.33%. The e-tongue is a fast, easy and accurate method for honey adulteration detection which can be used in situ by beekeepers and provide useful information on EC and free acidity. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2018 Society of Chemical Industry.

  17. Multiple Electron Stripping of Heavy Ion Beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, D.; Grisham, L.; Kaganovich, I.; Watson, R. L.; Horvat, V.; Zaharakis, K. E.; Peng, Y.

    2002-01-01

    One approach being explored as a route to practical fusion energy uses heavy ion beams focused on an indirect drive target. Such beams will lose electrons while passing through background gas in the target chamber, and therefore it is necessary to assess the rate at which the charge state of the incident beam evolves on the way to the target. Accelerators designed primarily for nuclear physics or high energy physics experiments utilize ion sources that generate highly stripped ions in order to achieve high energies economically. As a result, accelerators capable of producing heavy ion beams of 10 to 40 Mev/amu with charge state 1 currently do not exist. Hence, the stripping cross-sections used to model the performance of heavy ion fusion driver beams have, up to now, been based upon theoretical calculations. We have investigated experimentally the stripping of 3.4 Mev/amu Kr 7+ and Xe +11 in N2; 10.2 MeV/amu Ar +6 in He, N2, Ar and Xe; 19 MeV/amu Ar +8 in He, N2, Ar and Xe; 30 MeV He 1 + in He, N2, Ar and Xe; and 38 MeV/amu N +6 in He, N2, Ar and Xe. The results of these measurements are compared with the theoretical calculations to assess their applicability over a wide range of parameters

  18. Deuteron stripping reactions with Tabakin potential

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Osman, A.

    1976-05-01

    Deuteron stripping reactions are considered. Due to the strong repulsion between nucleons at very short distances, we have investigated the nuclear short-range correlations. The neutron proton nuclear potential in the deuteron is taken as a short-range repulsive core surrounded by a long-range attractive potential. The neutron-proton potential is taken as the Tabakin separable potential to take into account the short-range correlations. The differential cross-sections for deuteron stripping reactions have been calculated in two different cases by taking Yamaguchi or Breit et al type parameters for the Tabakin potential used. The angular distributions for different (d,p) stripping reactions on the different target nuclei 28 Si, 32 , 34 S, 36 Ar, 40 , 48 Ca, 50 , 52 , 54 Cr have been calculated using the DWBA calculations. Our present theoretical calculations for the angular distributions of the different reactions cosidered have been fitted to the experimental data, where good agreement is obtained. The extracted spectroscopic factors from the present work are found to be more reliable

  19. The Argonne silicon strip-detector array

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wuosmaa, A H; Back, B B; Betts, R R; Freer, M; Gehring, J; Glagola, B G; Happ, Th; Henderson, D J; Wilt, P [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Bearden, I G [Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (United States). Dept. of Physics

    1992-08-01

    Many nuclear physics experiments require the ability to analyze events in which large numbers of charged particles are detected and identified simultaneously, with good resolution and high efficiency, either alone, or in coincidence with gamma rays. The authors have constructed a compact large-area detector array to measure these processes efficiently and with excellent energy resolution. The array consists of four double-sided silicon strip detectors, each 5x5 cm{sup 2} in area, with front and back sides divided into 16 strips. To exploit the capability of the device fully, a system to read each strip-detector segment has been designed and constructed, based around a custom-built multi-channel preamplifier. The remainder of the system consists of high-density CAMAC modules, including multi-channel discriminators, charge-sensing analog-to-digital converters, and time-to-digital converters. The array`s performance has been evaluated using alpha-particle sources, and in a number of experiments conducted at Argonne and elsewhere. Energy resolutions of {Delta}E {approx} 20-30 keV have been observed for 5 to 8 MeV alpha particles, as well as time resolutions {Delta}T {<=} 500 ps. 4 figs.

  20. CLOSED-LOOP STRIPPING ANALYSIS (CLSA) OF ...

    Science.gov (United States)

    Synthetic musk compounds have been found in surface water, fish tissues, and human breast milk. Current techniques for separating these compounds from fish tissues require tedious sample clean-upprocedures A simple method for the deterrnination of these compounds in fish tissues has been developed. Closed-loop stripping of saponified fish tissues in a I -L Wheaton purge-and-trap vessel is used to strip compounds with high vapor pressures such as synthetic musks from the matrix onto a solid sorbent (Abselut Nexus). This technique is useful for screening biological tissues that contain lipids for musk compounds. Analytes are desorbed from the sorbent trap sequentially with polar and nonpolar solvents, concentrated, and directly analyzed by high resolution gas chromatography coupled to a mass spectrometer operating in the selected ion monitoring mode. In this paper, we analyzed two homogenized samples of whole fish tissues with spiked synthetic musk compounds using closed-loop stripping analysis (CLSA) and pressurized liquid extraction (PLE). The analytes were not recovered quantitatively but the extraction yield was sufficiently reproducible for at least semi-quantitative purposes (screening). The method was less expensive to implement and required significantly less sample preparation than the PLE technique. The research focused on in the subtasks is the development and application of state-of the-art technologies to meet the needs of the public, Office of Water,

  1. LabVIEW-based sequential-injection analysis system for the determination of trace metals by square-wave anodic and adsorptive stripping voltammetry on mercury-film electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Economou, Anastasios; Voulgaropoulos, Anastasios

    2003-01-01

    The development of a dedicated automated sequential-injection analysis apparatus for anodic stripping voltammetry (ASV) and adsorptive stripping voltammetry (AdSV) is reported. The instrument comprised a peristaltic pump, a multiposition selector valve and a home-made potentiostat and used a mercury-film electrode as the working electrodes in a thin-layer electrochemical detector. Programming of the experimental sequence was performed in LabVIEW 5.1. The sequence of operations included formation of the mercury film, electrolytic or adsorptive accumulation of the analyte on the electrode surface, recording of the voltammetric current-potential response, and cleaning of the electrode. The stripping step was carried out by applying a square-wave (SW) potential-time excitation signal to the working electrode. The instrument allowed unattended operation since multiple-step sequences could be readily implemented through the purpose-built software. The utility of the analyser was tested for the determination of copper(II), cadmium(II), lead(II) and zinc(II) by SWASV and of nickel(II), cobalt(II) and uranium(VI) by SWAdSV.

  2. Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Ronald; Goebel, Dan; Hofer, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-current, hollow cathode utilizing a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) thermionic electron emitter has been developed for use with high-power Hall thrusters and ion thrusters. LaB6 cathodes are being investigated due to their long life, high current capabilities, and less stringent xenon purity and handling requirements compared to conventional barium oxide (BaO) dispenser cathodes. The new cathode features a much smaller diameter than previously developed versions that permit it to be mounted on axis of a Hall thruster ( internally mounted ), as opposed to the conventional side-mount position external to the outer magnetic circuit ("externally mounted"). The cathode has also been reconfigured to be capable of surviving vibrational loads during launch and is designed to solve the significant heater and materials compatibility problems associated with the use of this emitter material. This has been accomplished in a compact design with the capability of high-emission current (10 to 60 A). The compact, high-current design has a keeper diameter that allows the cathode to be mounted on the centerline of a 6- kW Hall thruster, inside the iron core of the inner electromagnetic coil. Although designed for electric propulsion thrusters in spacecraft station- keeping, orbit transfer, and interplanetary applications, the LaB6 cathodes are applicable to the plasma processing industry in applications such as optical coatings and semiconductor processing where reactive gases are used. Where current electrical propulsion thrusters with BaO emitters have limited life and need extremely clean propellant feed systems at a significant cost, these LaB6 cathodes can run on the crudest-grade xenon propellant available without impact. Moreover, in a laboratory environment, LaB6 cathodes reduce testing costs because they do not require extended conditioning periods under hard vacuum. Alternative rare earth emitters, such as cerium hexaboride (CeB6) can be used in this

  3. Noise analysis due to strip resistance in the ATLAS SCT silicon strip module

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kipnis, I.

    1996-08-01

    The module is made out of four 6 cm x 6 cm single sided Si microstrip detectors. Two detectors are butt glued to form a 12 cm long mechanical unit and strips of the two detectors are electrically connected to form 12 cm long strips. The butt gluing is followed by a back to back attachment. The module in this note is the Rφ module where the electronics is oriented parallel to the strip direction and bonded directly to the strips. This module concept provides the maximum signal-to-noise ratio, particularly when the front-end electronics is placed near the middle rather than at the end. From the noise analysis, it is concluded that the worst-case ΔENC (far-end injection) between end- and center-tapped modules will be 120 to 210 el. rms (9 to 15%) for a non-irradiated detector and 75 to 130 el. rms (5 to 9%) for an irradiated detector, for a metal strip resistance of 10 to 20 Ω/cm

  4. 2013 Estorm - Invited Paper - Cathode Materials Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Claus [ORNL; Mohanty, Debasish [ORNL; Li, Jianlin [ORNL; Wood III, David L [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403 431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783 789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  5. Differential Pulse Anodic Stripping Voltammetry for Mercury Determination

    OpenAIRE

    Vereștiuc Paul C.; Tucaliuc Oana-Maria; Breabăn Iuliana G.; Crețescu Igor; Nemțoi Gheorghe

    2015-01-01

    In the present work voltammetric investigations have been performed on HgCl2 aqueous solutions prepared from a Cz 9024 reagent. Carbon paste electrode (CPE), eriochrome black T modified carbon paste electrode (MCPE/EBT) and KCl 1M as background electrolyte, were involved within the experimental procedures. Cyclic voltammetry (CV) has been performed in order to compare the behaviour of the two electrodes in both K3[Fe(CN)6] and mercury calibration aqueous solution. Differential pulse anodic st...

  6. Cyclic voltammetric response of nicotinic acid and nicotinamide on a polycrystalline gold electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang Xiaoxia; Yang Nianjun; Wan Qijin

    2006-01-01

    The oxidation of nicotinic acid and nicotinamide on a polycrystalline gold electrode occurred at almost same potentials but their reduction did at different peak potentials. The redox reaction mechanisms of nicotinic acid and nicotinamide were rationalized by the formation/disappearance of the new nitrogen-oxygen bonds in the pyridine rings by means of cyclic voltammetry and bulk electrolysis. The anodic currents of nicotinic acid and nicotinamide were controlled by diffusion, while the cathodic ones by adsorption. The difference in the cathodic peak potentials of nicotinic acid and nicotinamide on the polycrystalline gold electrode is attributed to the effect of the electron densities of remote substituents on the pyridine rings. The cathodic peak currents at about 0.20 V were linear with their concentrations in the range of 2.4 mM to 2.7 μM and 2.4 mM to 3.3 μM with detection limits of 0.27 and 0.33 μM for nicotinic acid and nicotinamide, respectively. Voltammetry was then adopted for the selective monitoring the content of nicotinic acid and nicotinamide in pharmaceuticals

  7. Comparative voltammetric study and determination of carbamate pesticide residues in soil at carbon nanotubes paste electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    THOMMANDRU RAVEENDRANATH BAB

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available In this investigation, the persistence of carbamate pesticides in soil samples was investigated. A simple and selective differential pulse adsorptive stripping voltammetry was selected for this investigation. Carbon nanotubes paste electrodes were used as working electrodes for differential pulse adsorptive stripping voltammetry and cyclic voltammetry. A symmetric study of the various operational parameters that affect the stripping response was carried out by differential pulse voltammetry. Peak currents were linear over the concentration range of 10-5 to 10-10 M with an accumulation potential of -0.6 V and a 70 s accumulation time with lower detection limits of 1.09 x 10-7 M, 1.07 × 10-7M, 1.09×10-7 M for chlorphropham, thiodicarb, aldicarb. The relative standard deviation (n=10 and correlation coefficient values were 1.15 %, 0.988; 1.13 %, 0.978; and 1.14 %, 0.987, respectively. Universal buffer with pH range 2.0 - 6.0 was used as sup­porting electrolyte. The solutions with uniform concentration (10-5 M were used in all deter­minations. Calculations were made by standard addition method.

  8. Beryllium electrodeposition on aluminium cathode from chloride melts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nichkov, I.F.; Novikov, E.A.; Serebryakov, G.A.; Kanashin, Yu.P.; Sardyko, G.N.

    1980-01-01

    Cathodic processes during beryllium deposition on liquid and solid aluminium cathodes are investigated. Mixture of sodium, potassium and beryllium chloride melts served as an lectrolyte. Beryllium ion discharge at the expense of alloy formation takes place at more positive potentials than on an indifferent cathode at low current densities ( in the case of liquid aluminium cathode). Metallographic analysis and measurements of microhardness have shown, that the cathodic product includes two phases: beryllium solid solution in aluminium and metallic beryllium. It is concluded, that aluminium-beryllium alloys with high cathodic yield by current can be obtained by the electrolytic method

  9. A voltammetric method for Fe(iii) in blood serum using a screen-printed electrode modified with a Schiff base ionophore.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittal, Susheel K; Rana, Sonia; Kaur, Navneet; Banks, Craig E

    2018-05-23

    Herein, a potent electrochemical ionophore (SMS-2) based on a Schiff base has been used for the modification of a screen-printed electrode (SPE). The modified disposable electrode can selectively detect ferric ions in an aqueous medium. Redox behavior of the proposed strip was characterized using cyclic voltammetry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV). Incorporation of the ligand in the ink of the SPE enhanced the analytical performance of the electrode, and its surface modification was confirmed by SEM and EDX analysis. Shifting/quenching of the cathodic peak potential of the ionophore after binding with Fe(iii) ions was used to detect and measure the ferric ion concentration. This sensor can identify Fe(iii) in the detection range from 0.625 μM to 7.5 μM. The modified SPE can selectively detect ferric ions in the presence of many other interfering ions and has been successfully used to determine the Fe(iii) content in blood serum samples. The metal-ionophore complex structure was optimized using DFT calculations to study the energetics of the metal-ionophore interactions.

  10. Comparison of hollow cathode discharge plasma configurations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farnell, Casey C; Farnell, Cody C; Williams, John D

    2011-01-01

    Hollow cathodes used in plasma contactor and electric propulsion devices provide electrons for sustaining plasma discharges and enabling plasma bridge neutralization. Life tests show erosion on hollow cathodes exposed to the plasma environment produced in the region downstream of these devices. To explain the observed erosion, plasma flow field measurements are presented for hollow cathode generated plasmas using both directly immersed probes and remotely located plasma diagnostics. Measurements on two cathode discharge configurations are presented: (1) an open, no magnetic field configuration and (2) a setup simulating the discharge chamber environment of an ion thruster. In the open cathode configuration, large amplitude plasma potential oscillations, ranging from 20 to 85 V within a 34 V discharge, were observed using a fast response emissive probe. These oscillations were observed over a dc potential profile that included a well-defined potential hill structure. A remotely located electrostatic analyzer (ESA) was used to measure the energy of ions produced within the plasma, and energies were detected that met, and in some cases exceeded, the peak oscillatory plasma potentials detected by the emissive probe. In the ion thruster discharge chamber configuration, plasma potentials from the emissive probe again agreed with ion energies recorded by the remotely located ESA; however, much lower ion energies were detected compared with the open configuration. A simplified ion-transit model that uses temporal and spatial plasma property measurements is presented and used to predict far-field plasma streaming properties. Comparisons between the model and remote measurements are presented.

  11. Investigations Of A Pulsed Cathodic Vacuum Arc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oates, T. W. H.; Pigott, J.; Denniss, P.; Mckenzie, D. R.; Bilek, M. M. M.

    2003-06-01

    Cathodic vacuum arcs are well established as a method for producing thin films for coatings and as a source of metal ions. Research into DC vacuum arcs has been going on for over ten years in the School of Physics at the University of Sydney. Recently a project was undertaken in the school to design and build a pulsed CVA for use in the investigation of plasma sheaths and plasma immersion ion implantation. Pulsed cathodic vacuum arcs generally have a higher current and plasma density and also provide a more stable and reproducible plasma density than their DC counterparts. Additionally it has been shown that if a high repetition frequency can be established the deposition rate of pulsed arcs is equal to or greater than that of DC arcs with a concomitant reduction in the rate of macro-particle formation. We present here results of our investigations into the building of a center-triggered pulsed cathodic vacuum arc. The design of the power supply and trigger mechanism and the geometry of the anode and cathode are examined. Observations of type I and II arc spots using a CCD camera, and cathode spot velocity dependence on arc current will be presented. The role of retrograde motion in a high current pulsed arc is discussed.

  12. Manganese Dioxide As Rechargeable Magnesium Battery Cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ling, Chen; Zhang, Ruigang

    2017-01-01

    Rechargeable magnesium battery (rMB) has received increased attention as a promising alternative to current Li-ion technology. However, the lack of appropriate cathode that provides high-energy density and good sustainability greatly hinders the development of practical rMBs. To date, the successful Mg 2+ -intercalation was only achieved in only a few cathode hosts, one of which is manganese dioxide. This review summarizes the research activity of studying MnO 2 in magnesium cells. In recent years, the cathodic performance of MnO 2 was impressively improved to the capacity of >150–200 mAh g −1 at voltage of 2.6–2.8 V with cyclability to hundreds or more cycles. In addition to reviewing electrochemical performance, we sketch a mechanistic picture to show how the fundamental understanding about MnO 2 cathode has been changed and how it paved the road to the improvement of cathode performance.

  13. Manganese Dioxide As Rechargeable Magnesium Battery Cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ling, Chen, E-mail: chen.ling@toyota.com; Zhang, Ruigang [Toyota Research Institute of North America, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2017-11-03

    Rechargeable magnesium battery (rMB) has received increased attention as a promising alternative to current Li-ion technology. However, the lack of appropriate cathode that provides high-energy density and good sustainability greatly hinders the development of practical rMBs. To date, the successful Mg{sup 2+}-intercalation was only achieved in only a few cathode hosts, one of which is manganese dioxide. This review summarizes the research activity of studying MnO{sub 2} in magnesium cells. In recent years, the cathodic performance of MnO{sub 2} was impressively improved to the capacity of >150–200 mAh g{sup −1} at voltage of 2.6–2.8 V with cyclability to hundreds or more cycles. In addition to reviewing electrochemical performance, we sketch a mechanistic picture to show how the fundamental understanding about MnO{sub 2} cathode has been changed and how it paved the road to the improvement of cathode performance.

  14. Investigations Of A Pulsed Cathodic Vacuum Arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oates, T.W.H.; Pigott, J.; Denniss, P.; Mckenzie, D.R.; Bilek, M.M.M.

    2003-01-01

    Cathodic vacuum arcs are well established as a method for producing thin films for coatings and as a source of metal ions. Research into DC vacuum arcs has been going on for over ten years in the School of Physics at the University of Sydney. Recently a project was undertaken in the school to design and build a pulsed CVA for use in the investigation of plasma sheaths and plasma immersion ion implantation. Pulsed cathodic vacuum arcs generally have a higher current and plasma density and also provide a more stable and reproducible plasma density than their DC counterparts. Additionally it has been shown that if a high repetition frequency can be established the deposition rate of pulsed arcs is equal to or greater than that of DC arcs with a concomitant reduction in the rate of macro-particle formation. We present here results of our investigations into the building of a center-triggered pulsed cathodic vacuum arc. The design of the power supply and trigger mechanism and the geometry of the anode and cathode are examined. Observations of type I and II arc spots using a CCD camera, and cathode spot velocity dependence on arc current will be presented. The role of retrograde motion in a high current pulsed arc is discussed

  15. Study of the physical processes involved in the operating mode of the micro-strips gas detector Micromegas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barouch, G.

    2001-04-01

    Micromegas is a micro-strip gaseous detector invented in 1996. It consists of two volumes of gas separated by a micro-mesh. The first volume of gas, 3 mm thick, is used to liberate ionization electrons from the incident charged particle. In the second volume, only 100 μm thick, an avalanche phenomenon amplifies the electrons produced in the first volume. Strips printed on an insulating substrate collect the electrons from the avalanche. The geometrical configuration of Micromegas showed many advantages. The short anode-cathode distance combined with a high granularity provide high rate capabilities due to a fast collection of ions produced during the avalanche development. Moreover, the possibility to localize the avalanche with strips printed about every hundreds of micrometers allows to measure the position of the incident particle with a good resolution. In this work, experimental tests of Micromegas are presented along with detailed Monte Carlo simulations used to understand and optimize the detector's performances. The prototypes were tested several times at the PS accelerator at CERN. The analysis of the date showed a stable and efficient behavior of Micromegas combined with an excellent space resolution. In fact, spatial resolutions of less than 15 μm were obtained. In parallel with the in-beam tests, several simulations have been developed in order to gain a better understanding of the detector's response. (author)

  16. The influence of cathode excavation of cathodic arc evaporator on thickness uniformity and erosion products angle distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Duhopel'nikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cathodic arc evaporators are used for coating with functional films. Prolonged or buttend evaporators may be used for this purposes. In butt-end evaporator the cathode spots move continuously on the cathode work surface and evaporate cathode material. High depth excavation profile forms on the cathode work surface while the thick coating precipitation (tens or hundreds of microns. The cathode excavation profile is shaped like a “cup” with high walls for electrostatic discharge stabilization systems with axial magnetic fields. Cathode spots move on the bottom of the “cup”. It is very likely that high “cup” walls are formed as a result of lasting work time influence on the uniformity of precipitated films.In the present work the influence of excavation profile walls height on the uniformity of precipitated coating was carried out. The high profile walls are formed due to lasting work of DC vacuum arc evaporator. The cathode material used for tests was 3003 aluminum alloy. The extended substrate was placed parallel to the cathode work surface. Thickness distribution along the substrate length with the new cathode was obtained after 6 hours and after 12 hours of continuous operation.The thickness distribution of precipitated coating showed that the cathode excavation has an influence on the angular distribution of the matter escaping the cathode. It can be clearly seen from the normalized dependence coating thickness vs the distance from the substrate center. Also the angular distribution of the matter flow from the cathode depending on the cathode working time was obtained. It was shown that matter flow from the cathode differs from the LambertKnudsen law. The more the cathode excavation the more this difference.So, cathode excavation profile has an influence on the uniformity of precipitated coating and it is necessary to take in account the cathode excavation profile while coating the thick films.

  17. Oxide cathodes produced by plasma deposition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scheitrum, G.; Caryotakis, G.; Pi, T.; Umstattd, R.; Brown, I.; Montiero, O.

    1997-01-01

    These are two distinct applications for high-current-density, long-life thermionic cathodes. The first application is as a substitute for explosive emission cathodes used in high-power microwave (HPM) devices being developed for Air Force programs. The second application is in SLAC's X-band klystrons for the Next Linear Collider (NLC). SLAC, UCD, and LBL are developing a plasma deposition process that eliminates the problems with binders, carbonate reduction, peeling, and porosity. The emission layer is deposited using plasma deposition of metallic barium in vacuum with an oxygen background gas. An applied bias voltage drives the oxide plasma into the nickel surface. Since the oxide is deposited directly, it does not have problems with poisoning from a hydrocarbon binder. The density of the oxide layer is increased from the 40--50% for standard oxide cathodes to nearly 100% for plasma deposition

  18. Synchrotron Investigations of SOFC Cathode Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idzerda, Yves

    2013-09-30

    The atomic variations occurring in cathode/electrolyte interface regions of La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3-δ} (LSCF) cathodes and other SOFC related materials have been investigated and characterized using soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) and diffuse soft X-ray Resonant Scattering (XRS). X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy in the soft X-ray region (soft XAS) is shown to be a sensitive technique to quantify the disruption that occurs and can be used to suggest a concrete mechanism for the degradation. For LSC, LSF, and LSCF films, a significant degradation mechanism is shown to be Sr out-diffusion. By using the XAS spectra of hexavalent Cr in SrCrO4 and trivalent Cr in Cr2O3, the driving factor for Sr segregation was identified to be the oxygen vacancy concentration at the anode and cathode side of of symmetric LSCF/GDC/LSCF heterostructures. This is direct evidence of vacancy induced cation diffusion and is shown to be a significant indicator of cathode/electrolyte interfacial degradation. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is used to identify the occupation of the A-sites and B-sites for LSC, LSF, and LSCF cathodes doped with other transition metals, including doping induced migration of Sr to the anti-site for Sr, a significant cathode degradation indicator. By using spatially resolved valence mapping of Co, a complete picture of the surface electrochemistry can be determined. This is especially important in identifying degradation phenomena where the degradation is spatially localized to the extremities of the electrochemistry and not the average. For samples that have electrochemical parameters that are measured to be spatially uniform, the Co valence modifications were correlated to the effects of current density, overpotential, and humidity.

  19. Simultaneous voltammetric determination of tramadol and acetaminophen using carbon nanoparticles modified glassy carbon electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ghorbani-Bidkorbeh, Fatemeh; Shahrokhian, Saeed; Mohammadi, Ali; Dinarvand, Rassoul

    2010-01-01

    A sensitive and selective electrochemical sensor was fabricated via the drop-casting of carbon nanoparticles (CNPs) suspension onto a glassy carbon electrode (GCE). The application of this sensor was investigated in simultaneous determination of acetaminophen (ACE) and tramadol (TRA) drugs in pharmaceutical dosage form and ACE determination in human plasma. In order to study the electrochemical behaviors of the drugs, cyclic and differential pulse voltammetric studies of ACE and TRA were carried out at the surfaces of the modified GCE (MGCE) and the bare GCE. The dependence of peak currents and potentials on pH, concentration and the potential scan rate were investigated for these compounds at the surface of MGCE. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) was used for the characterization of the film modifier and its morphology on the surface of GCE. The results of the electrochemical investigations showed that CNPs, via a thin layer model based on the diffusion within a porous layer, enhanced the electroactive surface area and caused a remarkable increase in the peak currents. The thin layer of the modifier showed a catalytic effect and accelerated the rate of the electron transfer process. Application of the MGCE resulted in a sensitivity enhancement and a considerable decrease in the anodic overpotential, leading to negative shifts in peak potentials. An optimum electrochemical response was obtained for the sensor in the buffered solution of pH 7.0 and using 2 μL CNPs suspension cast on the surface of GCE. Using differential pulse voltammetry, the prepared sensor showed good sensitivity and selectivity for the determination of ACE and TRA in wide linear ranges of 0.1-100 and 10-1000 μM, respectively. The resulted detection limits for ACE and TRA was 0.05 and 1 μM, respectively. The CNPs modified GCE was successfully applied for ACE and TRA determinations in pharmaceutical dosage forms and also for the determination of ACE in human plasma.

  20. Monitoring of quality and storage time of unsealed pasteurized milk by voltammetric electronic tongue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wei, Zhenbo; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Xi

    2013-01-01

    A voltammetric electronic tongue (VE-tongue) was self-developed and applied to monitor the quality and storage time of unsealed pasteurized milk. The VE-tongue comprised four working electrodes: gold, silver, platinum, and palladium electrode. Two potential waveforms: Multi-frequency rectangle pulse voltammetry (MRPV) and multi-frequency staircase pulse voltammetry (MSPV) were applied to working electrodes in the study, and both of MRPV and MSPV consisted of three frequency segments: 1 Hz, 10 Hz, and 100 Hz. The total areas under the corresponding curves obtained by VE-tongue in the three frequencies were applied as characteristic data, which were evaluated by the principal component analysis (PCA) and cluster analysis (CA). The results of PCA and CA indicate that the milk samples of different storage time could be successfully classified by the VE-tongue based on MRPV and MSPV, respectively. Combining the areas obtained by the VE-tongue based on MRPV and MSPV, the classification results of PCA and CA were improved evidently. The total bacterial count, acidity and viscosity of the milk samples were also measured during the storage, and those physicochemical characteristics showed regular configuration in PCA and CA plots. Furthermore, the total bacterial count and viscosity properties were predicted by partial least squares regression (PLSR) and least squares-support vector machines (LS-SVM), and the combination of the areas obtained by the VE-tongue based on the MRPV and MSPV were applied as the input data of PLSR and LS-SVM. Both the prediction techniques performed well in predicting viscosity and total bacterial count, and the prediction results of LS-SVM were better than that of PLSR. Those results demonstrate that the VE-tongue could be applied to monitor the quality storage time of unsealed pasteurized milk

  1. Tritium stripping by a catalytic exchange stripper

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heung, L.K.; Gibson, G.W.; Ortman, M.S.

    1991-01-01

    A catalytic exchange process for stripping elemental tritium from gas streams has been demonstrated. The process uses a catalyzed isotopic exchange reaction between tritium in the gas phase and protium or deuterium in the solid phase on alumina. The reaction is catalyzed by platinum deposited on the alumina. The process has been tested with both tritium and deuterium. Decontamination factors (ration of inlet and outlet tritium concentrations) as high as 1000 have been achieved, depending on inlet concentration. The test results and some demonstrated applications are presented

  2. High pressure water jet cutting and stripping

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoppe, David T.; Babai, Majid K.

    1991-01-01

    High pressure water cutting techniques have a wide range of applications to the American space effort. Hydroblasting techniques are commonly used during the refurbishment of the reusable solid rocket motors. The process can be controlled to strip a thermal protective ablator without incurring any damage to the painted surface underneath by using a variation of possible parameters. Hydroblasting is a technique which is easily automated. Automation removes personnel from the hostile environment of the high pressure water. Computer controlled robots can perform the same task in a fraction of the time that would be required by manual operation.

  3. Nonlinear optical model for strip plasmonic waveguides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lysenko, Oleg; Bache, Morten; Lavrinenko, Andrei

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a theoretical model of nonlinear optical properties for strip plasmonic waveguides. The particular waveguides geometry that we investigate contains a gold core, adhesion layers, and silicon dioxide cladding. It is shown that the third-order susceptibility of the gold core...... significantly depends on the layer thickness and has the dominant contribution to the effective third-order susceptibility of the long-range plasmon polariton mode. This results in two nonlinear optical effects in plasmonic waveguides, which we experimentally observed and reported in [Opt. Lett. 41, 317 (2016...... approaches. (C) 2016 Optical Society of America...

  4. Energy Fuels Nuclear, Inc. Arizona Strip Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pool, T.C.

    1993-01-01

    Founded in 1975 by uranium pioneer, Robert W. Adams, Energy Fuels Nuclear, Inc. (EFNI) emerged as the largest US uranium mining company by the mid-1980s. Confronting the challenges of declining uranium market prices and the development of high-grade ore bodies in Australia and Canada, EFNI aggressively pursued exploration and development of breccia-pipe ore bodies in Northwestern Arizona. As a result, EFNI's production for the Arizona Strip of 18.9 million pounds U 3 O 8 over the period 1980 through 1991, maintained the company's status as a leading US uranium producer

  5. Ferroelectric Cathodes in Transverse Magnetic Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alexander Dunaevsky; Yevgeny Raitses; Nathaniel J. Fisch

    2002-01-01

    Experimental investigations of a planar ferroelectric cathode in a transverse magnetic field up to 3 kGs are presented. It is shown that the transverse magnetic field affects differently the operation of ferroelectric plasma cathodes in ''bright'' and ''dark'' modes in vacuum. In the ''bright'' mode, when the surface plasma is formed, the application of the transverse magnetic field leads to an increase of the surface plasma density. In the ''dark'' mode, the magnetic field inhibits the development of electron avalanches along the surface, as it does similarly in other kinds of surface discharges in the pre-breakdown mode

  6. Cathode architectures for alkali metal / oxygen batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Visco, Steven J; Nimon, Vitaliy; De Jonghe, Lutgard C; Volfkovich, Yury; Bograchev, Daniil

    2015-01-13

    Electrochemical energy storage devices, such as alkali metal-oxygen battery cells (e.g., non-aqueous lithium-air cells), have a cathode architecture with a porous structure and pore composition that is tailored to improve cell performance, especially as it pertains to one or more of the discharge/charge rate, cycle life, and delivered ampere-hour capacity. A porous cathode architecture having a pore volume that is derived from pores of varying radii wherein the pore size distribution is tailored as a function of the architecture thickness is one way to achieve one or more of the aforementioned cell performance improvements.

  7. DARHT 2 kA Cathode Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henestroza, E.; Houck, T.; Kwan, J.W.; Leitner, M.; Miram, G.; Prichard, B.; Roy, P.K.; Waldron, W.; Westenskow, G.; Yu, S.; Bieniosek, F.M.

    2009-03-09

    In the campaign to achieve 2 kA of electron beam current, we have made several changes to the DARHT-II injector during 2006-2007. These changes resulted in a significant increase in the beam current, achieving the 2 kA milestone. Until recently (before 2007), the maximum beam current that was produced from the 6.5-inch diameter (612M) cathode was about 1300 A when the cathode was operating at a maximum temperature of 1140 C. At this temperature level, the heat loss was dominated by radiation which is proportional to temperature to the fourth power. The maximum operating temperature was limited by the damage threshold of the potted filament and the capacity of the filament heater power supply, as well as the shortening of the cathode life time. There were also signs of overheating at other components in the cathode assembly. Thus it was clear that our approach to increase beam current could not be simply trying to run at a higher temperature and the preferred way was to operate with a cathode that has a lower work function. The dispenser cathode initially used was the type 612M made by SpectraMat. According to the manufacturer's bulletin, this cathode should be able to produce more than 10 A/cm{sup 2} of current density (corresponding to 2 kA of total beam current) at our operating conditions. Instead the measured emission (space charge limited) was 6 A/cm{sup 2}. The result was similar even after we had revised the activation and handling procedures to adhere more closely to the recommend steps (taking longer time and nonstop to do the out-gassing). Vacuum was a major concern in considering the cathode's performance. Although the vacuum gauges at the injector vessel indicated 10{sup -8} Torr, the actual vacuum condition near the cathode in the central region of the vessel, where there might be significant out-gassing from the heater region, was never determined. Poor vacuum at the surface of the cathode degraded the emission (by raising the work function

  8. DARHT 2 kA Cathode Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Henestroza, E.; Houck, T.; Kwan, J.W.; Leitner, M.; Miram, G.; Prichard, B.; Roy, P.K.; Waldron, W.; Westenskow, G.; Yu, S.; Bieniosek, F.M.

    2009-01-01

    In the campaign to achieve 2 kA of electron beam current, we have made several changes to the DARHT-II injector during 2006-2007. These changes resulted in a significant increase in the beam current, achieving the 2 kA milestone. Until recently (before 2007), the maximum beam current that was produced from the 6.5-inch diameter (612M) cathode was about 1300 A when the cathode was operating at a maximum temperature of 1140 C. At this temperature level, the heat loss was dominated by radiation which is proportional to temperature to the fourth power. The maximum operating temperature was limited by the damage threshold of the potted filament and the capacity of the filament heater power supply, as well as the shortening of the cathode life time. There were also signs of overheating at other components in the cathode assembly. Thus it was clear that our approach to increase beam current could not be simply trying to run at a higher temperature and the preferred way was to operate with a cathode that has a lower work function. The dispenser cathode initially used was the type 612M made by SpectraMat. According to the manufacturer's bulletin, this cathode should be able to produce more than 10 A/cm 2 of current density (corresponding to 2 kA of total beam current) at our operating conditions. Instead the measured emission (space charge limited) was 6 A/cm 2 . The result was similar even after we had revised the activation and handling procedures to adhere more closely to the recommend steps (taking longer time and nonstop to do the out-gassing). Vacuum was a major concern in considering the cathode's performance. Although the vacuum gauges at the injector vessel indicated 10 -8 Torr, the actual vacuum condition near the cathode in the central region of the vessel, where there might be significant out-gassing from the heater region, was never determined. Poor vacuum at the surface of the cathode degraded the emission (by raising the work function value). We reexamined

  9. Studies on pulsed hollow cathode capillary discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choi, P; Dumitrescu-Zoita, C; Larour, J; Rous, J [Ecole Polytechnique, 91 - Palaiseau (France). Lab. de Physique des Milieux Ionises; Favre, M; Moreno, J; Chuaqui, H; Wyndham, E [Pontificia Univ. Catolica de Chile, Santiago (Chile). Facultad de Fisica; Zambra, M [Comision Chilena de Energia Nuclear, Santiago (Chile); Wong, C S [Univ. of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia). Plasma Research Lab

    1997-12-31

    Preliminary results on radiation characteristics of pulsed hollow cathode capillary discharges are presented. The device combines the on axis electron beam assisted ionization capabilities of the transient hollow cathode discharge with a novel high voltage low inductance geometrical design, which integrates the local energy storage into the electrode system. A nanosecond regime high temperature plasma is produced in a long, high aspect ratio capillary, with light emission in the UV to XUV region. The discharge is operated from near vacuum to pressure in the 1000 mTorr range. (author). 2 figs., 7 refs.

  10. Cathode characterization system: preliminary results with (Ba,Sr,Ca) O coated cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nono, M.C.A.; Goncalves, J.A.N.; Barroso, J.J.; Dallaqua, R.S.; Spassovsky, I.

    1993-01-01

    The performance of a cathode characterization system for studying the emission parameters of thermal electron emitters is reported. The system consists of vacuum chamber, power supplies and equipment for measuring and control. Measurements have been taken of the emission current as function of cathode temperature and anode voltage. Several (Ba, Sr) O coated cathodes were tested and the results have shown good agreement with Child's and Richardson's laws. The experimental work function is between 1.0 and 2.0 e V. All emission parameters measured are consistent with international literature data. (author)

  11. A Novel Cathode Material for Cathodic Dehalogenation of 1,1-Dibromo Cyclopropane Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gütz, Christoph; Selt, Maximilian; Bänziger, Markus; Bucher, Christoph; Römelt, Christina; Hecken, Nadine; Gallou, Fabrice; Galvão, Tomás R; Waldvogel, Siegfried R

    2015-09-28

    Leaded bronze turned out to be an excellent cathode material for the dehalogenation reaction of cyclopropanes without affecting the strained molecular entity. With this particular alloy, beneficial properties of lead cathodes are conserved, whereas the corrosion of cathode is efficiently suppressed. The solvent in the electrolyte determines whether a complete debromination reaction is achieved or if the process can be selectively stopped at the monobromo cyclopropane intermediate. The electroorganic conversion tolerates a variety of functional groups and can be conducted at rather complex substrates like cyclosporine A. This approach allows the sustainable preparation of cyclopropane derivatives. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Li- and Mn-Rich Cathode Materials: Challenges to Commercialization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zheng, Jianming [Energy and Environmental Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Myeong, Seungjun [School of Energy and Chemical Engineering, Green Energy Materials Development Center, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Korea 689-798; Cho, Woongrae [School of Energy and Chemical Engineering, Green Energy Materials Development Center, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Korea 689-798; Yan, Pengfei [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Xiao, Jie [Energy and Environmental Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Wang, Chongmin [Environmental Molecular Sciences Laboratory, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA; Cho, Jaephil [School of Energy and Chemical Engineering, Green Energy Materials Development Center, Ulsan National Institute of Science and Technology (UNIST), Korea 689-798; Zhang, Ji-Guang [Energy and Environmental Directorate, Pacific Northwest National Laboratory, 902 Battelle Boulevard Richland WA 99354 USA

    2016-12-14

    The lithium- and manganese-rich (LMR) layered structure cathode exhibit one of the highest specific energy (~900 Wh kg-1) among all the cathode materials. However, the practical applications of LMR cathodes are still hindered by several significant challenges including voltage fade, large initial capacity loss, poor rate capability and limited cycle life. Herein, we review the recent progresses and understandings on the application of LMR cathode materials from practical point of view. Several key parameters of LMR cathodes that affect the LMR/graphite full cell operation are systematically analysed. These factors include the first cycle capacity loss, voltage fade, powder tap density, electrode density of LMR based cathode etc. New approaches to minimize the detrimental effect of these factors are highlighted in this work. We also provided the perspectives for the future research on LMR cathode materials, focusing on addressing the fundamental problems of LMR cathodes while always keeping practical considerations in mind.

  13. Reservoir Cathode for Electric Space Propulsion, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a hollow reservoir cathode to improve performance in ion and Hall thrusters. We will adapt our existing reservoir cathode technology to this purpose....

  14. Impressed current cathodic protection of deep water structures

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Venkatesan, R.

    that the cathodic protection design approaches for shallow water may not be adequate for deeper water. This paper discusses on environmental factors encountered in deep water and their effect on cathodic protection behaviour of steel. Further, current CP design...

  15. Long Life Cold Cathodes for Hall effect Thrusters, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An electron source incorporating long life, high current density cold cathodes inside a microchannel plate for use with ion thrusters is proposed. Cathode lifetime...

  16. Apparatus for measuring profile thickness of strip material

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hold, A.C.

    1982-01-01

    Apparatus for measuring the thickness profile of steel strip comprises a radiation source reciprocally movable in a stepwise fashion (by a belt) across the strip width on one side thereof and a single elongated detector on the other side of the strip aligned with the scanning source. This detector may be a fluorescent scintillator detector or an ionisation chamber. Means are provided for sensing the degree of excitation in the detector in synchronism with the scanning source whereby to provide an output representative of the thickness profile of the strip. (author)

  17. Stability of barotropic vortex strip on a rotating sphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Sung-Ik; Sakajo, Takashi; Kim, Sun-Chul

    2018-02-01

    We study the stability of a barotropic vortex strip on a rotating sphere, as a simple model of jet streams. The flow is approximated by a piecewise-continuous vorticity distribution by zonal bands of uniform vorticity. The linear stability analysis shows that the vortex strip becomes stable as the strip widens or the rotation speed increases. When the vorticity constants in the upper and the lower regions of the vortex strip have the same positive value, the inner flow region of the vortex strip becomes the most unstable. However, when the upper and the lower vorticity constants in the polar regions have different signs, a complex pattern of instability is found, depending on the wavenumber of perturbations, and interestingly, a boundary far away from the vortex strip can be unstable. We also compute the nonlinear evolution of the vortex strip on the rotating sphere and compare with the linear stability analysis. When the width of the vortex strip is small, we observe a good agreement in the growth rate of perturbation at an early time, and the eigenvector corresponding to the unstable eigenvalue coincides with the most unstable part of the flow. We demonstrate that a large structure of rolling-up vortex cores appears in the vortex strip after a long-time evolution. Furthermore, the geophysical relevance of the model to jet streams of Jupiter, Saturn and Earth is examined.

  18. Strip type radiation detector and method of making same

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jantsch, O.; Feigt, I.; Willig, W.R.

    1976-01-01

    An improved strip detector and a method for making such a detector in which a high resistivity N conduction semiconductor body has electrode strips formed thereon by diffusion is described. The strips are formed so as to be covered by an oxide layer at the surface point of the PN junction and in which the opposite side of the semiconductor body then has a substantial amount of material etched away to form a thin semiconductor upon which strip electrodes which are perpendicular to the electrodes on the first side are then placed

  19. Stability of barotropic vortex strip on a rotating sphere.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Sung-Ik; Sakajo, Takashi; Kim, Sun-Chul

    2018-02-01

    We study the stability of a barotropic vortex strip on a rotating sphere, as a simple model of jet streams. The flow is approximated by a piecewise-continuous vorticity distribution by zonal bands of uniform vorticity. The linear stability analysis shows that the vortex strip becomes stable as the strip widens or the rotation speed increases. When the vorticity constants in the upper and the lower regions of the vortex strip have the same positive value, the inner flow region of the vortex strip becomes the most unstable. However, when the upper and the lower vorticity constants in the polar regions have different signs, a complex pattern of instability is found, depending on the wavenumber of perturbations, and interestingly, a boundary far away from the vortex strip can be unstable. We also compute the nonlinear evolution of the vortex strip on the rotating sphere and compare with the linear stability analysis. When the width of the vortex strip is small, we observe a good agreement in the growth rate of perturbation at an early time, and the eigenvector corresponding to the unstable eigenvalue coincides with the most unstable part of the flow. We demonstrate that a large structure of rolling-up vortex cores appears in the vortex strip after a long-time evolution. Furthermore, the geophysical relevance of the model to jet streams of Jupiter, Saturn and Earth is examined.

  20. Strip defect recognition in electrical tests of silicon microstrip sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Valentan, Manfred, E-mail: valentan@mpp.mpg.de

    2017-02-11

    This contribution describes the measurement procedure and data analysis of AC-coupled double-sided silicon microstrip sensors with polysilicon resistor biasing. The most thorough test of a strip sensor is an electrical measurement of all strips of the sensor; the measured observables include e.g. the strip's current and the coupling capacitance. These measurements are performed to find defective strips, e.g. broken capacitors (pinholes) or implant shorts between two adjacent strips. When a strip has a defect, its observables will show a deviation from the “typical value”. To recognize and quantify certain defects, it is necessary to determine these typical values, i.e. the values the observables would have without the defect. As a novel approach, local least-median-of-squares linear fits are applied to determine these “would-be” values of the observables. A least-median-of-squares fit is robust against outliers, i.e. it ignores the observable values of defective strips. Knowing the typical values allows to recognize, distinguish and quantify a whole range of strip defects. This contribution explains how the various defects appear in the data and in which order the defects can be recognized. The method has been used to find strip defects on 30 double-sided trapezoidal microstrip sensors for the Belle II Silicon Vertex Detector, which have been measured at the Institute of High Energy Physics, Vienna (Austria).

  1. Pavement Stripping in Saudi Arabia: Prediction and Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H.I. Al-Abdul Wahhab

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Pavement weathering or stripping is a major distress in highway networks in arid regions. Using the Saudi Arabian road network as a case study area, seventeen road test sections were selected, out of which eight were stripped and nine were non-stripped. Aggregates from quarries used to build these sections were also collected and subjected to detailed physical and chemical tests to evaluate the ability of these tests to distinguish between stripped and non-stripped sections. The modified Lottman test was used to distinguish between compacted mixes. In addition, the Swedish Rolling Bottle test, was also found to be effective in being able to distinguish between different asphalt-aggregates for stripping potential. Eleven anti-stripping liquid additives, lime and cement, in addition to two polymers, were evaluated for their ability to reduce/eliminate stripping potential of stripping-prone aggregates. It was found that EE-2 Polymer, Portland cement, and their combination were effective with all aggregate sources.

  2. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlan U. Anderson

    2000-03-31

    . However, they have the potential of being useful as an interface on the anode side of the electrolyte. NexTech has focused much of its effort during the past few months on establishing tape casting methods for porous LSM substrates. This work, performed under a separate DOE-funded program, involved tape casting formulations comprising LSM powders with bi-modal particle size distributions and fugitive pore forming additives. Sintered LSM substrates with porosities in the 30 to 40 vol% range, and pore sizes of 10 {approx} 20 microns have been prepared. In addition, tape casting formulations involving composite mixtures of LSM and Sm-doped ceria (SDC) have been evaluated. The LSM/SDC cathode substrates are expected to provide better performance at low temperatures. Characterization of these materials is currently underway.

  3. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlan U. Anderson; Wayne Huebner; Igor Kosacki

    2001-09-30

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. In this portion of study we have focused on producing YSZ films on porous LSM substrates. When using the polymer precursor there are a number of obstacles to overcome in order to form dense electrolyte layers on porous substrates (cathode or anode). Probably the most difficult problems are: (1) Extreme penetration of the polymer into the substrate must be prevented. (2) Shrinkage cracking must be avoided. (3) Film thickness in the 1 to 5{micro}m range must be achieved. We have demonstrated that cracking due to shrinkage involved during the elimination of solvents and organic matter and densification of the remaining oxide is not a problem as long as the resulting oxide film is < {approx} 0.15 {micro}m in thickness. We have also shown that we can make thicker films by making multiple depositions if the substrate is smooth (roughness {le} 0.1 {micro}m) and contains no surface pores > 0.2 {micro}m. The penetration of the polymer into the porous substrate can be minimized by increasing the viscosity of the polymer and reducing the largest pore at the surface of the substrate to {le} 0.2 {micro}m. We have shown that this can be done, but we have also shown that it is difficult to make dense films that are defect free with areas > 1 cm{sup 2}. This is because of the roughness of the substrate and the difficulty in making a substrate which does not have surface voids > 0.2 {micro}m. Thus the process works well for dense, smooth substrates for films < 1 {micro}m thick, but is difficult to apply to rough, porous surfaces and to make film thickness > 1 {micro}m. As a result of these problems, we have been addressing the issue of how to make dense films in the thickness range of 1 to 5 {micro}m on sintered porous substrates without introducing cracks and holes due to shrinkage and surface voids? These

  4. Monitoring the CMS strip tracker readout system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mersi, S; Bainbridge, R; Cripps, N; Fulcher, J; Wingham, M; Baulieu, G; Bel, S; Delaere, C; Drouhin, F; Mirabito, L; Cole, J; Giassi, A; Gross, L; Hahn, K; Nikolic, M; Tkaczyk, S

    2008-01-01

    The CMS Silicon Strip Tracker at the LHC comprises a sensitive area of approximately 200 m 2 and 10 million readout channels. Its data acquisition system is based around a custom analogue front-end chip. Both the control and the readout of the front-end electronics are performed by off-detector VME boards in the counting room, which digitise the raw event data and perform zero-suppression and formatting. The data acquisition system uses the CMS online software framework to configure, control and monitor the hardware components and steer the data acquisition. The first data analysis is performed online within the official CMS reconstruction framework, which provides many services, such as distributed analysis, access to geometry and conditions data, and a Data Quality Monitoring tool based on the online physics reconstruction. The data acquisition monitoring of the Strip Tracker uses both the data acquisition and the reconstruction software frameworks in order to provide real-time feedback to shifters on the operational state of the detector, archiving for later analysis and possibly trigger automatic recovery actions in case of errors. Here we review the proposed architecture of the monitoring system and we describe its software components, which are already in place, the various monitoring streams available, and our experiences of operating and monitoring a large-scale system

  5. Microwave assisted synthesis of hydroxyapatite nano strips

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruban Kumar, A.; Kalainathan, S.; Saral, A.M. [School of Advanced Sciences, VIT University, Vellore 632014, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2010-07-15

    Synthesis of hydroxyapatite (HAP) nano strips was carried out by chemical precipitation method followed by microwave irradiation. The microwave assisted reactions proceed at fast rates. It is found that the presence of the complex reagent EDTA plays an important role in the morphological changes of nanostructure hydroxyapatite. EDTA acts as a hexadentate unit by wrapping itself around the Ca{sup 2+} metal ion with, four oxygen and two nitrogen atoms and forms several five member chelate rings. The relative specific surface energies associated with the facets of the crystal determines the shape of the crystal. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the presence of hydroxyapatite nano strips with the range 50-100 nm in EDTA influenced HAP powders. Fourier transform-infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) result combined with the X-ray diffraction (XRD) indicates the presence of amorphous hydroxyapatite (HAP) in the as-prepared material. X-ray patterns collected on the powder after heat-treatment at 1100 C for 2 h in air exhibits single phase of HAP. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. The structure of the Cepheid instability strip

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fernie, J.D.

    1990-01-01

    About 100 classical Cepheids having color excesses on a homogeneous system with standard errors of 0.02 or less mag are used with the Feast-Walker period-luminosity-color relation to study the distribution of such stars in the instability strip. It is found that mean (B-V)mag is a better indicator of mean effective temperature than is mean B(i) - mean V(i)(i). The blue edge of the color-magnitude distribution is consistent with the theoretical blue edge for Y = 0.28 and Z = 0.02. Although the highest amplitude stars are found near the center of the period-color array, high- and low-amplitude stars can intermingle, and both kinds are to be found near the edges of the distribution. The same is true on the C-M array. Finally, it is pointed out that the Cepheids do not populate the instability strip uniformly if the red edge is taken to be parallel to the theoretical blue edge. Rather, the local instability region runs as a parallelogram in the C-M array from the theoretical blue edge upward and to the red. 24 refs

  7. Polymer coatings as separator layers for microbial fuel cell cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Watson, Valerie J.; Saito, Tomonori; Hickner, Michael A.; Logan, Bruce E.

    2011-01-01

    and increased coulombic efficiency (CE = 56-64%) relative to an uncoated cathode (29 ± 8%), but decreased power production (255-574 mW m-2). Electrochemical characterization of the cathodes ex situ to the MFC showed that the cathodes with the lowest charge

  8. Coating for lithium anode, thionyl chloride active cathode electrochemical cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catanzarite, V.O.

    1983-01-04

    Electrochemical power cells having a cathode current collector, a combination liquid active cathode depolarizer electrolyte solvent and an anode that forms surface compounds when in intimate contact with the liquid cathode are enhanced by the addition of a passivation limiting film contiguous to said anode. The passivating film is a member of the cyanoacrilate family of organic compounds.

  9. Coating for lithium anode, thionyl chloride active cathode electrochemical cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catanzarite, V.O.

    1981-10-20

    Electrochemical power cells having a cathode current collector, a combination liquid active cathode depolarizer electrolyte solvent and an anode that forms surface compounds when in intimate contact with the liquid cathode are enhanced by the addition of a passivation limiting film contiguous to said anode. The passivating film is a member of the cyanoacrilate family of organic compounds.

  10. Cold cathodes on ultra-dispersed diamond base

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alimova, A.N.; Zhirnov, V.V.; Chubun, N.N.; Belobrov, P.I.

    1998-01-01

    Prospects of application of nano diamond powders for fabrication of cold cathodes are discussed.Cold cathodes based on silicon pointed structures with nano diamond coatings were prepared.The deposition technique of diamond coating was dielectrophoresis from suspension of nano diamond powder in organic liquids.The cathodes were tested in sealed prototypes of vacuum electronic devices

  11. Explosive-emission cathode fabricated using track method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akap'ev, G.N.; Korenev, S.A.

    1989-01-01

    Fabrication technique for large area multipoint cathodes is described. The technique is based on channels filling with metal in the ion-irradiated dielectric film producted after channel etching. It is shown, that cathode may be used under explosive emission conditions. Characteristics of diode with the mentioned type cathodes are measured

  12. RF Photoelectric injectors using needle cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lewellen, J.W.; Brau, C.A.

    2003-01-01

    Photocathode RF guns, in various configurations, are the injectors of choice for both current and future applications requiring high-brightness electron beams. Many of these applications, such as single-pass free-electron lasers, require beams with high brilliance but not necessarily high charge per bunch. Field-enhanced photoelectric emission has demonstrated electron-beam current density as high as 10 10 A/m 2 , with a quantum efficiency in the UV that approaches 10% at fields on the order of 10 10 V/m. Thus, the use of even a blunt needle holds promise for increasing cathode quantum efficiency without sacrificing robustness. We present an initial study on the use of needle cathodes in photoinjectors to enhance beam brightness while reducing beam charge. Benefits include lower drive-laser power requirements, easier multibunch operation, lower emittance, and lower beam degradation due to charge-dependent effects in the postinjector accelerator. These benefits result from a combination of a smaller cathode emission area, greatly enhanced RF field strength at the cathode, and the charge scaling of detrimental postinjector linac effects, e.g., transverse wakefields and CSR

  13. RF Photoelectric injectors using needle cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewellen, J. W.; Brau, C. A.

    2003-07-01

    Photocathode RF guns, in various configurations, are the injectors of choice for both current and future applications requiring high-brightness electron beams. Many of these applications, such as single-pass free-electron lasers, require beams with high brilliance but not necessarily high charge per bunch. Field-enhanced photoelectric emission has demonstrated electron-beam current density as high as 10 10 A/m 2, with a quantum efficiency in the UV that approaches 10% at fields on the order of 10 10 V/m. Thus, the use of even a blunt needle holds promise for increasing cathode quantum efficiency without sacrificing robustness. We present an initial study on the use of needle cathodes in photoinjectors to enhance beam brightness while reducing beam charge. Benefits include lower drive-laser power requirements, easier multibunch operation, lower emittance, and lower beam degradation due to charge-dependent effects in the postinjector accelerator. These benefits result from a combination of a smaller cathode emission area, greatly enhanced RF field strength at the cathode, and the charge scaling of detrimental postinjector linac effects, e.g., transverse wakefields and CSR.

  14. Barium depletion in hollow cathode emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polk, James E.; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Capece, Angela M.

    2016-01-01

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of Ba released by BaO-CaO-Al 2 O 3 source material in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. The examination of cathode emitters from long duration tests shows deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of Ba from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of Ba transport in the cathode plasma indicates that the Ba partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant Ba-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress Ba loss in the upstream part of the emitter. New measurements of the Ba depletion depth from a cathode insert operated for 8200 h reveal that Ba loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis. The Ba transport model was modified to predict the depletion depth with time. A comparison of the calculated and measured depletion depths gives excellent qualitative agreement, and quantitative agreement was obtained assuming an insert temperature 70 °C lower than measured beginning-of-life values

  15. Cathode follower RF system with frequency modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irie, Y.; Yano, Y.; Kaneko, N.; Kobayashi, Y.

    1994-01-01

    A model RF system with a cathode follower was tested under frequency modulation in the 1-3.5 MHz range. The repetition rate was 40 Hz. The oscillation was stable, and the output impedance was measured to be around 20 ohm. (author)

  16. Renovation of the cathodic protection system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuten, G.; Leggedoor, J.; Polder, R.B.; Peelen, W.H.A.

    2003-01-01

    The first system for Cathodic Protection of concrete in the Netherlands was applied to a one bicycle lane of a bridge suffering corrosion due to de-icing salt penetration in 1986. This CP system was based on the Ferex 100S conducting polymer cable anode in a cementitious overlay. Its functioning was

  17. Evaluation of silicon micro strip detectors with large read-out pitch

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Senyo, K.; Yamamura, K.; Tsuboyama, T.; Avrillon, S.; Asano, Y.; Bozek, A.; Natkaniec, Z.; Palka, H.; Rozanska, M.; Rybicki, K.

    1996-01-01

    For the development of the silicon micro-strip detector with the pitch of the readout strips as large as 250 μm on the ohmic side, we made samples with different structures. Charge collection was evaluated to optimize the width of implant strips, aluminum read-out strips, and/or the read-out scheme among strips. (orig.)

  18. Differential pulse voltammetric determination of nanomolar concentrations of antiviral drug acyclovir at polymer film modified glassy carbon electrode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorraji, Parisa S.; Jalali, Fahimeh, E-mail: fjalali@razi.ac.ir

    2016-04-01

    An electrochemical sensor for the sensitive detection of acyclovir was developed by the electropolymerization of Eriochrome black T at a pretreated glassy carbon electrode. The surface morphology of the modified electrode was characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Under the optimized conditions, a significant electrochemical improvement was observed toward the electrooxidation of acyclovir on the modified electrode surface relative to the unmodified electrode. The detection limit of 12 nM and two linear calibration ranges of 0.03–0.3 μM and 0.3–1.5 μM were obtained for acyclovir determination using a differential pulse voltammetric method in acetate buffer (0.1 M, pH 4.0). Real sample studies were carried out in human blood serum and pharmaceutical formulations, which offered good recovery (98–102%). The electrode showed excellent reproducibility, selectivity and antifouling effects. - Graphical abstract: Eriochrome black T (EBT) was electropolymerized at the surface of a pretreated glassy carbon electrode. The modified electrode enhanced the oxidation current of acyclovir, significantly. The sensor was used in the determination of acyclovir in human blood serum samples and pharmaceutical dosages. - Highlights: • Construction of a voltammetric sensor for acyclovir is described. • Eriochrome black T was electropolymerized at the electrode surface. • The sensor improved the sensitivity of the electrode for monitoring acyclovir. • The recoveries and standard deviations were acceptable in spiked human blood serum. • The proposed sensor had good lifetime to be used in biological matrices.

  19. Differential pulse voltammetric determination of nanomolar concentrations of antiviral drug acyclovir at polymer film modified glassy carbon electrode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dorraji, Parisa S.; Jalali, Fahimeh

    2016-01-01

    An electrochemical sensor for the sensitive detection of acyclovir was developed by the electropolymerization of Eriochrome black T at a pretreated glassy carbon electrode. The surface morphology of the modified electrode was characterized by field emission scanning electron microscopy. Under the optimized conditions, a significant electrochemical improvement was observed toward the electrooxidation of acyclovir on the modified electrode surface relative to the unmodified electrode. The detection limit of 12 nM and two linear calibration ranges of 0.03–0.3 μM and 0.3–1.5 μM were obtained for acyclovir determination using a differential pulse voltammetric method in acetate buffer (0.1 M, pH 4.0). Real sample studies were carried out in human blood serum and pharmaceutical formulations, which offered good recovery (98–102%). The electrode showed excellent reproducibility, selectivity and antifouling effects. - Graphical abstract: Eriochrome black T (EBT) was electropolymerized at the surface of a pretreated glassy carbon electrode. The modified electrode enhanced the oxidation current of acyclovir, significantly. The sensor was used in the determination of acyclovir in human blood serum samples and pharmaceutical dosages. - Highlights: • Construction of a voltammetric sensor for acyclovir is described. • Eriochrome black T was electropolymerized at the electrode surface. • The sensor improved the sensitivity of the electrode for monitoring acyclovir. • The recoveries and standard deviations were acceptable in spiked human blood serum. • The proposed sensor had good lifetime to be used in biological matrices.

  20. Preparation and voltammetric characterization of electrodes coated with Langmuir-Schaefer ultrathin films of Nafion®

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bertoncello Paolo

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Ultrathin films of Nafion® perfluorinated polymer were deposited on indium-tin oxide electrodes (ITO by using Langmuir-Schaefer (LS technique, after optimization of the subphase composition conditions. Morphological characteristics of these coatings were obtained by Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM. Nafion® LS films showed a good uniformity and complete coverage of the electrode surface, however a different organization degree of the polymer layer was evidenced with respect to thin films deposited by spin-coating. ITO electrodes modified with Nafion® LS coatings preconcentrate by ion-exchange electroactive cations, such as Ru[(NH36]3+, dissolved in diluted solutions. The electroactive species is retained by the Nafion® LS coated ITO also after transfer of the modified electrode into pure supporting electrolyte. This allowed the use of the ruthenium complex as voltammetric probe to test diffusion phenomena within the Nafion® LS films. Apparent diffusion coefficients (Dapp of Ru[(NH36]3+ incorporated in Nafion® LS films were obtained by voltammetric measurements. Dapp values decrease slightly by increasing the amount of ruthenium complex incorporated in the ultrathin film. They are significantly lower than values typical for recasted Nafion® films, in agreement with the highly condensed nature of the Nafion® LS fims.

  1. Improved Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    An improvement has been made to the design of the hollow cathode geometry that was created for the rare-earth electron emitter described in Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode (NPO-44923), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 3 (March 2010), p. 52. The original interior assembly was made entirely of graphite in order to be compatible with the LaB6 material, which cannot be touched by metals during operation due to boron diffusion causing embrittlement issues in high-temperature refractory materials. Also, the graphite tube was difficult to machine and was subject to vibration-induced fracturing. This innovation replaces the graphite tube with one made out of refractory metal that is relatively easy to manufacture. The cathode support tube is made of molybdenum or molybdenum-rhenium. This material is easily gun-bored to near the tolerances required, and finish machined with steps at each end that capture the orifice plate and the mounting flange. This provides the manufacturability and robustness needed for flight applications, and eliminates the need for expensive e-beam welding used in prior cathodes. The LaB6 insert is protected from direct contact with the refractory metal tube by thin, graphite sleeves in a cup-arrangement around the ends of the insert. The sleeves, insert, and orifice plate are held in place by a ceramic spacer and tungsten spring inserted inside the tube. To heat the cathode, an insulating tube is slipped around the refractory metal hollow tube, which can be made of high-temperature materials like boron nitride or aluminum nitride. A screw-shaped slot, or series of slots, is machined in the outside of the ceramic tube to constrain a refractory metal wire wound inside the slot that is used as the heater. The screw slot can hold a single heater wire that is then connected to the front of the cathode tube by tack-welding to complete the electrical circuit, or it can be a double slot that takes a bifilar wound heater with both leads coming out

  2. Lithium recycling and cathode material regeneration from acid leach liquor of spent lithium-ion battery via facile co-extraction and co-precipitation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yue; Xu, Shengming; He, Yinghe

    2017-06-01

    A novel process for extracting transition metals, recovering lithium and regenerating cathode materials based on facile co-extraction and co-precipitation processes has been developed. 100% manganese, 99% cobalt and 85% nickel are co-extracted and separated from lithium by D2EHPA in kerosene. Then, Li is recovered from the raffinate as Li 2 CO 3 with the purity of 99.2% by precipitation method. Finally, organic load phase is stripped with 0.5M H 2 SO 4 , and the cathode material LiNi 1/3 Co 1/3 Mn 1/3 O 2 is directly regenerated from stripping liquor without separating metal individually by co-precipitation method. The regenerative cathode material LiNi 1/3 Co 1/3 Mn 1/3 O 2 is miro spherical morphology without any impurities, which can meet with LiNi 1/3 Co 1/3 Mn 1/3 O 2 production standard of China and exhibits good electrochemical performance. Moreover, a waste battery management model is introduced to guarantee the material supply for spent battery recycling. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Progress of air-breathing cathode in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zejie; Mahadevan, Gurumurthy Dummi; Wu, Yicheng; Zhao, Feng

    2017-07-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) is an emerging technology to produce green energy and vanquish the effects of environmental contaminants. Cathodic reactions are vital for high electrical power density generated from MFCs. Recently tremendous attentions were paid towards developing high performance air-breathing cathodes. A typical air-breathing cathode comprises of electrode substrate, catalyst layer, and air-diffusion layer. Prior researches demonstrated that each component influenced the performance of air-breathing cathode MFCs. This review summarized the progress in development of the individual component and elaborated main factors to the performance of air-breathing cathode.

  4. Cathode Composition in a Saltwater Metal-Air Battery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Shen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metal-air batteries consist of a solid metal anode and an oxygen cathode of ambient air, typically separated by an aqueous electrolyte. Here, simple saltwater-based models of aluminum-air and zinc-air cells are used to determine the differences between theoretical cell electric potentials and experimental electric potentials. A substantial difference is observed. It is also found that the metal cathode material is crucial to cell electric potential, despite the cathode not participating in the net reaction. Finally, the material composition of the cathode appears to have a more significant impact on cell potential than the submerged surface area of the cathode.

  5. Emission ability of La-Sc-Mo cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang Jiancan; Nie Zuoren; Xi Xiaoli; Wang Yiman

    2004-01-01

    In this paper La-Sc-Mo cathode has been prepared and its electron emission ability was measured. This type of cathode shows good electron emission performance that the saturated current density is 6.74 A cm -1 and the work function is about 2.59 eV at 1300 deg. C, which is much lower than thoriated tungsten cathode (Th-W). So it is a potential cathode to replace the Th-W cathode with radioactive pollution. Surface analysis shows that good emission ability due to the 20 nm surplus La layer and the element Sc may do good to the La diffusion to the surface

  6. Explosive emission cathode on the base of carbon plastic fibre

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Korenev, S.A.; Baranov, A.M.; Kostyuchenko, S.V.; Chernenko, N.M.

    1989-01-01

    A fabrication process for explosive emission cathodes on the base of carbon plastic fibre of practically any geometrical shape and dimensions is developed. Experimental studies of electron beam current collection from cathodes, 2cm in diameter, at voltages across the diode of 10 and 150-250kV. It is shown that the ignition voltage for cathode plasma is ∼2kV at the interelectrode diode gap of 5mm and residual gas pressure of ∼5x10 -5 Torr. The carbon-fibre cathode, fabricated in this way, provides more stable current collection of an electron beam (without oscillations) than other cathodes

  7. Co-deposition of metallic actinides on a solid cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Limmer, S. J.; Williamson, M. A.; Willit, J. L. [Argonne National Laboratory, Argonne (United States)

    2008-08-15

    The amount of rare earth contamination that will be found in a co-deposit of actinides is a function of the type of cathode used. A non-alloying solid cathode will result in a significantly lower rare earth contamination in the actinide co-deposit than a liquid cadmium cathode. With proper control of the cathode potential vs. a stable reference electrode, co-deposition of uranium with other more electroactive metals has been demonstrated using a non-alloying solid cathode.

  8. Co-deposition of metallic actinides on a solid cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limmer, S. J.; Williamson, M. A.; Willit, J. L.

    2008-01-01

    The amount of rare earth contamination that will be found in a co-deposit of actinides is a function of the type of cathode used. A non-alloying solid cathode will result in a significantly lower rare earth contamination in the actinide co-deposit than a liquid cadmium cathode. With proper control of the cathode potential vs. a stable reference electrode, co-deposition of uranium with other more electroactive metals has been demonstrated using a non-alloying solid cathode

  9. Do repeated rumble strip hits improve driver alertness?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Watling, C.N.; Akerstedt, T.; Kecklund, L.G.; Anund, A.

    2016-01-01

    Driving while sleepy is associated with increased crash risk. Rumble strips are designed to alert a sleepy or inattentive driver when they deviate outside their driving lane. The current study sought to examine the effects of repeated rumble strip hits on levels of physiological and subjective

  10. Metal films with imprinted nanostructures by template stripping

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, René Lynge; Pors, Anders; Dreier, Jes

    We present a novel template stripping procedure for fabricating metal films with imprinted nanostructures. The basic idea is to deposit a gold film onto a nano-structured substrate and subsequently strip the film from the substrate surface thereby revealing imprinted nanostructures in the film...... result is a thin gold film with imprinted nano-cavities....

  11. Reforestation of strip-mined lands in West Virginia

    Science.gov (United States)

    H. Spencer Potter; Sidney Weitzman; George R., Jr. Trimble

    1951-01-01

    The early 1940's witnessed a striking increase in strip-mining throughout the eastern coal region. West Virginia, with its extensive coal resources, naturally was caught in the full current of this shift in mining methods. Today the raw gash on the hillside - almost infallibly the mark of a strip-mine operation - is a familiar sight in the State.

  12. Micro-strip sensors based on CVD diamond

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adam, W.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bertuccio, G.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; D' Angelo, P.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Hallewell, G.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Kass, R.; Koeth, T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Mac Lynne, L.; Manfredotti, C.; Meier, D. E-mail: dirk.meier@cern.ch; Mishina, M.; Moroni, L.; Oh, A.; Pan, L.S.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Perera, L.; Pirollo, S.; Procario, M.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Rousseau, L.; Rudge, A.; Russ, J.; Sala, S.; Sampietro, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Trischuk, W.; Tromson, D.; Vittone, E.; Walsh, A.M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; Wetstein, M.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Zoeller, M

    2000-10-11

    In this article we present the performance of recent chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond micro-strip sensors in beam tests. In addition, we present the first comparison of a CVD diamond micro-strip sensor before and after proton irradiation.

  13. Micro-strip sensors based on CVD Diamond

    CERN Document Server

    Adam, W; Bergonzo, P; Bertuccio, G; Bogani, F; Borchi, E; Brambilla, A; Bruzzi, Mara; Colledani, C; Conway, J; D'Angelo, P; Dabrowski, W; Delpierre, P A; Deneuville, A; Dulinski, W; van Eijk, B; Fallou, A; Fizzotti, F; Foulon, F; Friedl, M; Gan, K K; Gheeraert, E; Hallewell, G D; Han, S; Hartjes, F G; Hrubec, Josef; Husson, D; Kagan, H; Kania, D R; Kaplon, J; Kass, R; Koeth, T W; Krammer, Manfred; Lo Giudice, A; Lü, R; MacLynne, L; Manfredotti, C; Meier, D; Mishina, M; Moroni, L; Oh, A; Pan, L S; Pernicka, Manfred; Peitz, A; Perera, L P; Pirollo, S; Procario, M; Riester, J L; Roe, S; Rousseau, L; Rudge, A; Russ, J; Sala, S; Sampietro, M; Schnetzer, S R; Sciortino, S; Stelzer, H; Stone, R; Suter, B; Tapper, R J; Tesarek, R J; Trischuk, W; Tromson, D; Vittone, E; Walsh, A M; Wedenig, R; Weilhammer, Peter; Wetstein, M; White, C; Zeuner, W; Zoeller, M M

    2000-01-01

    In this article we present the performance of recent chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond micro-strip sensors in beam tests. In addition we present the first comparison of a CVD diamond micro-strip sensor before and after proton irradiation.

  14. Micro-strip sensors based on CVD diamond

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, W.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bertuccio, G.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; D'Angelo, P.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; Eijk, B. van; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K.K.; Gheeraert, E.; Hallewell, G.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Kass, R.; Koeth, T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; Mac Lynne, L.; Manfredotti, C.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Moroni, L.; Oh, A.; Pan, L.S.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Perera, L.; Pirollo, S.; Procario, M.; Riester, J.L.; Roe, S.; Rousseau, L.; Rudge, A.; Russ, J.; Sala, S.; Sampietro, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R.J.; Tesarek, R.; Trischuk, W.; Tromson, D.; Vittone, E.; Walsh, A.M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; Wetstein, M.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Zoeller, M.

    2000-01-01

    In this article we present the performance of recent chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond micro-strip sensors in beam tests. In addition, we present the first comparison of a CVD diamond micro-strip sensor before and after proton irradiation

  15. Micro-strip sensors based on CVD diamond

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adam, W.; Berdermann, E.; Bergonzo, P.; Bertuccio, G.; Bogani, F.; Borchi, E.; Brambilla, A.; Bruzzi, M.; Colledani, C.; Conway, J.; D'Angelo, P.; Dabrowski, W.; Delpierre, P.; Deneuville, A.; Dulinski, W.; van Eijk, B.; Fallou, A.; Fizzotti, F.; Foulon, F.; Friedl, M.; Gan, K. K.; Gheeraert, E.; Hallewell, G.; Han, S.; Hartjes, F.; Hrubec, J.; Husson, D.; Kagan, H.; Kania, D.; Kaplon, J.; Kass, R.; Koeth, T.; Krammer, M.; Logiudice, A.; Lu, R.; mac Lynne, L.; Manfredotti, C.; Meier, D.; Mishina, M.; Moroni, L.; Oh, A.; Pan, L. S.; Pernicka, M.; Peitz, A.; Perera, L.; Pirollo, S.; Procario, M.; Riester, J. L.; Roe, S.; Rousseau, L.; Rudge, A.; Russ, J.; Sala, S.; Sampietro, M.; Schnetzer, S.; Sciortino, S.; Stelzer, H.; Stone, R.; Suter, B.; Tapper, R. J.; Tesarek, R.; Trischuk, W.; Tromson, D.; Vittone, E.; Walsh, A. M.; Wedenig, R.; Weilhammer, P.; Wetstein, M.; White, C.; Zeuner, W.; Zoeller, M.; RD42 Collaboration

    2000-10-01

    In this article we present the performance of recent chemical vapour deposition (CVD) diamond micro-strip sensors in beam tests. In addition, we present the first comparison of a CVD diamond micro-strip sensor before and after proton irradiation.

  16. Determination of residual stresses in roll compacted titanium strips

    CSIR Research Space (South Africa)

    Mothosi, KL

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available residual stresses using x-ray diffraction (XRD) surface probing technique. Preliminary results were obtained for the surface residual stress at the center of the titanium strips for the 100 and 325 mesh strips rolled at 0.1 roll gap for 20 and 50 mm set...

  17. Stripping foils for the PSB H- injection system

    CERN Document Server

    Aiba, M; Goddard, B; Weterings, W

    2009-01-01

    Beam physics considerations for the stripping foil of the PSB H- injection system are described, including the arguments for the foil type, thickness, geometry and positioning. The foil performance considerations are described, including expected stripping efficiency, emittance growth, energy straggling, temperature and lifetime. The required movement ranges and tolerances are detailed, together with the assumptions used.

  18. Electrode/Dielectric Strip For High-Energy-Density Capacitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yen, Shiao-Ping S.

    1994-01-01

    Improved unitary electrode/dielectric strip serves as winding in high-energy-density capacitor in pulsed power supply. Offers combination of qualities essential for high energy density: high permittivity of dielectric layers, thinness, and high resistance to breakdown of dielectric at high electric fields. Capacitors with strip material not impregnated with liquid.

  19. Laser stripping of relativistic H- ions with practical considerations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomlin, R.

    1995-12-01

    This paper describes laser stripping of H - ions. Some applications are suggested for HEP including stripping 2GeV ions circulating in an accelerator with radius 75 meters where laser meets ion head on in a three meter interaction region. The paper describes photoionizaton cross section, laser power calculation, and how to generate the 5 micrometer light

  20. Using Comic Strips as a Book Report Alternative

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reading Teacher, 2012

    2012-01-01

    Comic strips are great to share with parents, younger students, and peers. This article presents an activity where students use a six-paneled comic strip to summarize a story. This activity allows for multiple interpretations and enhances comprehension by drawing attention to story elements.