WorldWideScience

Sample records for cathode sputtering

  1. Sputter deposition of BSCCO films from a hollow cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-Tc superconducting thin films were deposited onto MgO single crystal substrates from a hollow cathode onto ceramic targets with the nominal composition of Bi2Sr2CaCu2Ox. Films similar in composition to those used for the targets were deposited on MgO substrates by rf sputtering. The effects of sputtering time, rf power, and post-annealing on film microstructure and properties were studied in detail. Substrate temperature was found to have a significant influence on the film characteristics. Initial results show that deposition rates from a hollow cathode are an order of magnitude higher than those of a planar magnetron source at equivalent power levels. Large deposition rates allow for the coating of long lengths of wire

  2. Contribution to crystallographical and mechanical analysis of molybdenum coatings prepared by magnetron cathode sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molybdenum coatings with different compression stresses are obtained by magnetron cathode sputtering by varying negative voltage applied to the substrate during deposition. Stress evolution, crystal texture and argon content are studied

  3. Mass distribution of sputtered cathode material in the reflex discharge along the magnetic field mirror configuration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    he paper is concerned with the distribution of cathode material sputtered under the action of the pulsed reflex discharge plasma and deposited on the anode surface (vacuum chamber) by means of a set of discrete receiving plates. Correlative relationship has been found between the weight gain increase of the receiving plates due to the deposition of cathode material (Ti) particles on them and the increasing magnetic field regions. The maximum possible sputtering yield Ycurr has been evaluated. The authors have deduced parametric dependences of the sputtering ratio on the power function exponent that determines the shape of the radial plasma-density profile, and also, on the magnetic field induction value

  4. A cathodic arc enhanced middle-frequency magnetron sputter system for deposition of hard protective coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new cathode arc enhanced magnetron sputter system for deposition of hard protective coatings is reported in this article. This system consists of eight targets: four outer targets are mounted on the wall of the chamber and four inner targets are placed around the center of the chamber. The outer and inner targets form four pair targets and are powered by four middle frequency power supplies. One of the outer targets can run either in the cathode arc mode or in the magnetron sputter mode. The Ti-containing diamond-like carbon nanocomposite coatings were deposited by using this system. The prepared coating exhibits high hardness (∼20 GPa), good adhesion (critical load is 50 N), very low friction coefficient (∼0.07); and excellent tribological performance with a wear rate of 1.4 x 10-16 m3·N-l·m-1. (authors)

  5. Contribution to mechanical and crystallographic analysis of molyledenum layers prepared by magnetron cathode sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molybdenum coatings presenting different compression stresses are elaborated by magnetron cathode sputtering by varying the negative voltage of the substrate during deposition. Stress evolution is accompanied by crystal texture evolution and argon content incorporated in the layers. Crystallite orientation is explained by a phenomenon similar to canalisation observed in ion implantation. In a same deposit each component presents its own deformations different from neighbouring components

  6. Surface analysis by glow discharge spectrometry: cathode zone and sputtering yield

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Applications of the glow discharge optical spectroscopy for surface analysis are numerous. Moreover, this method enables to get qualitative and semi-quantitative results which are already significant. However, we should improve our knowledge of the physical parameters involved in the glow discharge lamp mechanisms and learn to handle such phenomena. The problems can be divided into two categories: sputtering of the target under argon ions accelerated in the cathode dark space, and luminous emission of torn away species which reach the negative glow region. Our aim was to take stock of the present theoretical knowledge which can be applied to the specific self-maintained glow discharge plasma. Moreover, we tried to link together (often roughly) the basic discharge parameters, i.e. current intensity I, voltage of the lamp Vg, pressure of the gas p. Specially a comparison between theoretical and experimental results was established concerning the pure target sputtering yields. The contribution of the argon ions striking the cathode is estimated taking into account their energetic distribution. The role of the fast argon neutrals produced by charge exchange with the ions is important; we evaluated their energetic distribution and their contribution to sputtering. The total theoretical sputtering yield is inferred: the comparison with experimental results is presented. The role of the gas temperature is emphasized

  7. Suppression of Cross Contamination in Multi-Layer Thin Film Prepared by Using Rotating Hexagonal Sputtering Cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Se Yeon; Choi, Bum Ho; Lee, Jong Ho

    2015-01-01

    In this study, single- and multi-layered thin films were prepared on a glass substrate using a newly developed rotating hexagonal sputtering cathode in a single chamber. The rotatinghexagonal sputtering cathode can install up to six different sputtering targets or six single targets in a cathode. Using the rotating hexagonal cathode, we prepared a single-layered AZO film and a multi-layer film to evaluate the performance of hexagonal gun. Cross-contamination, which is often observed in multi-layer thin film preparation, was suppressed to nearly zero by controlling process parameters and revising hardware. Energy-saving effects of five-layered glass were also verified by measuring the temperature.

  8. Structure and optical properties of CdS:O films by cathode sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Masahiro; Asaba, Ryo; Suzuki, Akinori; Wakita, Kazuki [Department of Electrical, Electronics and Computer Engineering, Chiba Institute of Technology, 2-17-1, Tsudanuma, Narashino, Chiba 275-0016 (Japan); Shim, Yong-Gu [Department of Physics and Electronics, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Nakaku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Khalilova, Kh.; Mamedov, Nazim; Bayramov, Ayaz; Huseynov, Emil [Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan National Academy of Science, H. Javid ave. 33, Baku 1143 (Azerbaijan)

    2015-06-15

    We have studied the structure and optical properties of CdS:O films deposited on SLG (soda lime glass) substrates by cathode sputtering in the atmosphere of oxygen/argon gases. According to X-ray diffraction (XRD) and confocal Raman scattering data, the films annealed in vacuum at temperatures above 300 C exhibited crystalline structure of CdS. On the other hand, XRD, confocal Raman scattering, AFM (atomic force microscopy) and TEM (transmission electron microscopy) data indicated amorphous structure nano-crystallization in CdS:O films annealed in vacuum at 400 C. For the films, the emissions located at 3.35 eV were evident from photoluminescence measurements. The origin of this energy gap is discussed by taking into account redistribution of electronic density of states in the amorphous phase and quantum-size effect. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. Radioactive sputter cathodes for {sup 32}P plasma-based ion implantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortin, M.A. [INRS-EMT (Universite du Quebec), 1650 boul. Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S2 (Canada)]. E-mail: fortin@bms.uu.se; Paynter, R.W. [INRS-EMT (Universite du Quebec), 1650 boul. Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S2 (Canada); Sarkissian, A. [Plasmionique Inc., 1650 boul. Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S2 (Canada); Stansfield, B.L. [INRS-EMT (Universite du Quebec), 1650 boul. Lionel Boulet, Varennes, Quebec, J3X 1S2 (Canada)

    2006-05-15

    The development of clinical treatments involving the use of beta-emitting millimetric and sub-millimetric devices has been a continuing trend in nuclear medicine. Implanted a few nanometers below the surface of endovascular implants, seeds or beads, beta-emitting radioisotopes can be used in a variety of biomedical applications. Recently, new technologies have emerged to enable the rapid and efficient activation of such devices. A pulsed, coaxial electron cyclotron resonance plasma reactor was designed and tested to demonstrate the feasibility of plasma-based radioactive ion implantation (PBRII). It has been shown that such plasma reactors allow for the implantation of radioisotopes ({sup 32}P) into biomedical devices with higher efficiencies than those obtained with conventional ion beams. Fragments containing radioactive atoms are produced in the implanter by means of a negatively biased solid sputter cathode that is inserted into an argon plasma. Dilute orthophosphoric acid solutions (H{sub 3} {sup 32}PO{sub 4}) are used for the fabrication of flat sputter targets, since they offer a high radioisotope content. However, the aggregation of the radioactive solute into highly hygroscopic ring-like deposits rather than flat, thin radioactive films is observed on certain substrates. This article describes the effect of this nonuniform distribution of the radioisotopes on the efficiency of PBRII, and presents a technique which enables a better distribution of {sup 32}P by coating the substrates with iron. The iron coating is shown to enable optimal radioisotope sputtering rates, which are essential in {sup 32}P-PBRII for the efficient activation of millimetric biomedical devices such as stents or coils.

  10. Growth of microscopic cones on titanium cathodes of sputter-ion pumps driven by sorption of large argon quantities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porcelli, Tommaso, E-mail: tommaso-porcelli@saes-group.com [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria, 16, 20133 Milano, Italy and SAES Getters S.p.A., viale Italia, 77, 20020 Lainate, Milan (Italy); Siviero, Fabrizio; Bongiorno, Gero A. [SAES Getters S.p.A., viale Italia, 77, 20020 Lainate, Milan (Italy); Michelato, Paolo [INFN-LASA, via fratelli Cervi, 201, 20090 Segrate, Milan (Italy); Pagani, Carlo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria, 16, 20133 Milano, Italy and INFN-LASA, via fratelli Cervi, 201, 20090 Segrate, Milan (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    Microscopic cones have been observed on titanium cathodes of sputter-ion pumps (SIPs) after pump operation. The cones were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analysis. Size and morphology of these cones are clearly correlated with the nature and the relative amount of each gas species pumped by each SIP during its working life. In particular, their growth was found to be fed by sputtering mechanisms, mostly during Ar pumping, and to be driven by the electromagnetic field applied to the Penning cells of each SIP. Experimental findings suggest that the formation and extent of such conic structures on cathode surfaces might play a leading role in the onset of phenomena typically related to the functioning of SIPs, e.g., the so-called argon instability.

  11. Effect of the thickness of sputtered gadolinia-doped ceria as a cathodic interlayer in solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Taehyun; Lee, Yoon Ho; Cho, Gu Young [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Gwanak-ro 1, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Ji, Sanghoon [Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, 864-1 Iui-dong, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Joonho [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Gwanak-ro 1, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Ikwhang [Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, 864-1 Iui-dong, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Suk Won, E-mail: swcha@snu.ac.kr [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Gwanak-ro 1, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, 864-1 Iui-dong, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-01

    Sputtered gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) film was introduced as the cathodic interlayer between an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) pellet and a Pt cathode in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The fuel cells with none, 50, 100 and 150 nm thick GDC interlayers were fabricated to investigate the effect of the thickness of the GDC interlayer. The performances of the SOFCs with the 100 and 150 nm thick GDC interlayers operated at 450 °C showed the highest performance. Through electrochemical impedance analysis, it was visualized that the GDC interlayer significantly reduced the faradaic resistance of the SOFC. The degradation of the performance from the increased ohmic resistance by adding the GDC interlayer was negligible. From the topographical images scanned by atomic force microscope, it was observed that the 50 nm thick GDC interlayer did not perfectly cover the surface of the YSZ pellet, resulting in incomplete performance enhancement by the sputtered GDC. - Highlights: • Gadolinia-doped ceria was used as a cathodic interlayer in solid oxide fuel cells. • Sputter was used to deposit gadolinia-doped ceria. • Gadolinia-doped ceria interlayer improved the electrochemical performance. • 100 nm or thicker gadolinia-doped ceria showed a full functionality as interlayer.

  12. Effect of the thickness of sputtered gadolinia-doped ceria as a cathodic interlayer in solid oxide fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sputtered gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) film was introduced as the cathodic interlayer between an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) pellet and a Pt cathode in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The fuel cells with none, 50, 100 and 150 nm thick GDC interlayers were fabricated to investigate the effect of the thickness of the GDC interlayer. The performances of the SOFCs with the 100 and 150 nm thick GDC interlayers operated at 450 °C showed the highest performance. Through electrochemical impedance analysis, it was visualized that the GDC interlayer significantly reduced the faradaic resistance of the SOFC. The degradation of the performance from the increased ohmic resistance by adding the GDC interlayer was negligible. From the topographical images scanned by atomic force microscope, it was observed that the 50 nm thick GDC interlayer did not perfectly cover the surface of the YSZ pellet, resulting in incomplete performance enhancement by the sputtered GDC. - Highlights: • Gadolinia-doped ceria was used as a cathodic interlayer in solid oxide fuel cells. • Sputter was used to deposit gadolinia-doped ceria. • Gadolinia-doped ceria interlayer improved the electrochemical performance. • 100 nm or thicker gadolinia-doped ceria showed a full functionality as interlayer

  13. Electrical Properties of (Pb, La)TiO3 Thin Films Fabricated by Multiple Cathode Sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiwa, Hiroshi; Ichinose, Noboru; Okazaki, Kiyoshi

    1994-11-01

    (Pb, La)TiO3 (PLT, La/Ti=0.17) thin films were prepared by multiple cathode rf-magnetron sputtering. The electrical properties of these films were investigated. The PLT thin films deposited on Pt/MgO substrates exhibited higher crystallinity and better ferroelectric properties, compared to the films deposited on Pt/SiO2/Si substrates. The hysteresis loops of the PLT films on RuO2/Ru/SiO2/Si or RuO2/Ru/MgO were narrow compared to that of film deposited on platinum electrodes. The dielectric constant of PLT films deposited at 540° C decreased with decreasing film thickness. Existence of a Pb-deficient layer near the film/substrate interface was observed by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. By lowering the substrate temperature to 515° C, Pb re-evaporation from the substrate decreased, and ferroelectric properties were improved. By controlling the Pb/Ti incident ratio, thin films with different Pb contents of the interface layer were formed. With an increase in the Pb content near the film/substrate interface, the fatigue resistance increased.

  14. Epitaxy of Pb(Zr, Ti)O3 films on Ir/YSZ/Si under conditions of cathode sputtering: The effect of reactive gas composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beshenkov, V. G.; Burlakov, A. A.; Znamenskii, A. G.; Marchenko, V. A.

    2014-08-01

    The peculiarities of the growth of PZT films on heteroepitaxial Ir/YSZ/Si structures under conditions of cathode radio-frequency sputtering of a ceramic target in argon-oxygen mixtures have been studied. It is shown that sputtering in a gas mixture with a high partial pressure of oxygen results in crystallization of the PZT films in a metastable pyrochlore structure, while sputtering in argon or the use of argon in the initial phase of the sputtering yields PZT films with an equilibrium perovskite structure.

  15. Structure and mechanical properties of Ti-Al-N coatings deposited by combined cathodic arc middle frequency magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → Ti-Al-N coatings were deposited on Si and WC substrates by combined cathodic arc middle-frequency magnetron (MF) sputtering under a Ti arc power of 10 kW with different Al MF targets currents. The hardness of the Ti-Al-N coatings was in the range of 23-32 GPa, whereas the Young modulus values were in the range of 420-540 GPa. - Abstract: Ti-Al-N coatings were deposited on Si (1 1 1) and WC substrates by combined cathodic arc middle-frequency magnetron (MF) sputtering under a Ti arc power of 10 kW and with different Al MF targets currents. X-ray diffraction patterns (XRD) showed that the Ti-Al-N coatings were polycrystallize with a preferred (1 1 1) orientation at 2θ = 43.7o. The (1 1 1) diffraction showed a decrease in peak intensity but a increase in FWHM values with the increasing of Al contents. Nano-meter sized TiN crystal grains distinguished by the lattice fringe contrast were verified by plan-view transmission electron (TEM) and selected area electron diffraction (SAED) images. With the increasing of MF sputter currents from 5 to 20 A, the Al contents in the Ti-Al-N coatings monotonically increased from 4.8 to 10.8 at.%, whereas the N and O contents were nearly constant. The hardness of the Ti-Al-N coatings was in the range of 23-32 GPa, and the Young modulus values were in the range of 420-540 GPa.

  16. Structure and Properties of Ti-Si-N Coatings Synthesized by Combining Cathode Arc and Middle-frequency Magnetron Sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Zhongtian; ZHU Liya; YANG Bing; GUO Liping; FU Dejun

    2009-01-01

    Ti-Si-N composite coatings were synthesized on a novel combining cathode and middle-frequency magnetron sputtering system,designed on an industrial scale.Ti was produced from the arc target and Si from magnetron target during deposition.The influences of negative bias voltage and Si content on the hardness and microstructure of the coatings were investigated.The composite coatings prepared under optimized conditions were characterized to be nc-TiN/a-Si_3N_4 structure with grain sizes of TiN ranging from 8-15 nm and exhibited a high hardness of 40 GPa.The enhancement of the hardness is suggested to be caused by the nanograin-amorphous structure effects.

  17. Friction properties of amorphous carbon ultrathin films deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc and radio-frequency sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The friction properties of ultrathin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) deposited on Si(100) substrates by filtered cathodic vacuum arc and radio-frequency sputtering were investigated by surface force microscopy. Deposition parameters yielding a-C films with high sp3 content were used to deposit films of thickness between 5 and 35 nm. The coefficient of friction of both types of a-C films was measured with a 1-μm-radius conical diamond tip and normal loads in the range of 20–640 μN. The results show a strong dependence of the friction properties on the surface roughness, thickness, and structure of the a-C films, which are influenced by the intricacies of the deposition method. The dependence of the coefficient of friction on normal load and the dominance of adhesion and plowing friction mechanisms are interpreted in terms of the through-thickness variation of carbon atom hybridization of the a-C films. - Highlights: • Comparison of nanoscale friction properties of ultrathin amorphous carbon films. • Friction dependence on film roughness, thickness, and structure (hybridization). • Effect of through-thickness changes in carbon atom hybridization on film friction. • Explanation of film friction trends in terms of competing friction mechanisms

  18. Friction properties of amorphous carbon ultrathin films deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc and radio-frequency sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlak, J.; Komvopoulos, K., E-mail: kyriakos@me.berkeley.edu

    2015-03-31

    The friction properties of ultrathin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) deposited on Si(100) substrates by filtered cathodic vacuum arc and radio-frequency sputtering were investigated by surface force microscopy. Deposition parameters yielding a-C films with high sp{sup 3} content were used to deposit films of thickness between 5 and 35 nm. The coefficient of friction of both types of a-C films was measured with a 1-μm-radius conical diamond tip and normal loads in the range of 20–640 μN. The results show a strong dependence of the friction properties on the surface roughness, thickness, and structure of the a-C films, which are influenced by the intricacies of the deposition method. The dependence of the coefficient of friction on normal load and the dominance of adhesion and plowing friction mechanisms are interpreted in terms of the through-thickness variation of carbon atom hybridization of the a-C films. - Highlights: • Comparison of nanoscale friction properties of ultrathin amorphous carbon films. • Friction dependence on film roughness, thickness, and structure (hybridization). • Effect of through-thickness changes in carbon atom hybridization on film friction. • Explanation of film friction trends in terms of competing friction mechanisms.

  19. Magnetron sputtering source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; McKernan, Mark A.; Grabner, R. Fred; Ramsey, Philip B.

    1994-01-01

    A magnetron sputtering source for sputtering coating substrates includes a high thermal conductivity electrically insulating ceramic and magnetically attached sputter target which can eliminate vacuum sealing and direct fluid cooling of the cathode assembly. The magnetron sputtering source design results in greater compactness, improved operating characteristics, greater versatility, and low fabrication cost. The design easily retrofits most sputtering apparatuses and provides for safe, easy, and cost effective target replacement, installation, and removal.

  20. Porous NASICON-Type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 Thin Film Deposited by RF Sputtering as Cathode Material for Li-Ion Microbatteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiawati, Vinsensia Ade; Vacandio, Florence; Eyraud, Marielle; Knauth, Philippe; Djenizian, Thierry

    2016-08-01

    We report the electrochemical performance of porous NASICON-type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 thin films to be used as a cathode for Li-ion microbatteries. Crystalline porous NASICON-type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 layers were obtained by radio frequency sputtering with an annealing treatment. The thin films were characterized by XRD, SEM, and electrochemical techniques. The chronoamperometry experiments showed that a discharge capacity of 88 mAhg-1 (23 μAhcm-2) is attained for the first cycle at C/10 to reach 65 mAhg-1 (17 μAhcm-2) after 10 cycles with a good stability over 40 cycles.

  1. Structure and tribological properties of Ti-containing amorphous carbon coatings prepared by cathode arc-enhanced middle-frequency magnetron sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Ti-containing amorphous carbon (Ti-aC) coatings were deposited on cemented carbide and Si substrates by cathode-arc-enhanced closed field middle-frequency unbalanced magnetron sputtering. The coatings were studied by using atomic force microscopy, Raman scattering, nanoindentation, and pin-on-disk testing. The measurements showed that the hardness of the coatings increased from 12 GPa at a Ti content of 1 at.% to 27 GPa at 31 at.%. The coatings exhibited different friction behaviors when facing different mating materials and changed with increasing Ti content. The coating with 4 at.% Ti exhibited excellent tribological performance with a low friction coefficient of 0.07when facing the cemented carbide.

  2. Porous NASICON-Type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 Thin Film Deposited by RF Sputtering as Cathode Material for Li-Ion Microbatteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiawati, Vinsensia Ade; Vacandio, Florence; Eyraud, Marielle; Knauth, Philippe; Djenizian, Thierry

    2016-12-01

    We report the electrochemical performance of porous NASICON-type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 thin films to be used as a cathode for Li-ion microbatteries. Crystalline porous NASICON-type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 layers were obtained by radio frequency sputtering with an annealing treatment. The thin films were characterized by XRD, SEM, and electrochemical techniques. The chronoamperometry experiments showed that a discharge capacity of 88 mAhg(-1) (23 μAhcm(-2)) is attained for the first cycle at C/10 to reach 65 mAhg(-1) (17 μAhcm(-2)) after 10 cycles with a good stability over 40 cycles.

  3. Development of thin film cathodes for lithium-ion batteries in the material system Li–Mn–O by r.f. magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, J., E-mail: julian.fischer@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials, Applied Materials Physics (IAM-AWP), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Adelhelm, C.; Bergfeldt, T. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials, Applied Materials Physics (IAM-AWP), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Chang, K. [RWTH Aachen University, Materials Chemistry, Kopernikusstrasse 10, 46 52074 Aachen (Germany); Ziebert, C.; Leiste, H.; Stüber, M.; Ulrich, S. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials, Applied Materials Physics (IAM-AWP), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Music, D.; Hallstedt, B. [RWTH Aachen University, Materials Chemistry, Kopernikusstrasse 10, 46 52074 Aachen (Germany); Seifert, H.J. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials, Applied Materials Physics (IAM-AWP), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2013-01-01

    Today most commercially available lithium ion batteries are still based on the toxic and expensive LiCoO{sub 2} as a standard cathode material. However, lithium manganese based cathode materials are cheaper and environmentally friendlier. In this work cubic-LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} spinel, monoclinic-Li{sub 2}MnO{sub 3} and orthorhombic-LiMnO{sub 2} thin films have been synthesized by non-reactive r.f. magnetron sputtering from two ceramic targets (LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}, LiMnO{sub 2}) in a pure argon discharge. The deposition parameters, namely target power and working gas pressure, were optimized in a combination with a post deposition heat treatment with respect to microstructure and electrochemical behavior. The chemical composition was determined using inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy and carrier gas hot extraction. The films' crystal structure, phase evolution and morphology were investigated by X-ray diffraction, micro Raman spectroscopy and scanning electron microscopy. Due to the fact that these thin films consist of the pure active material without any impurities, such as binders or conductive additives like carbon black, they are particularly well suited for measurements of the intrinsic physical properties, which is essential for fundamental understanding. The electrochemical behavior of the cubic and the orthorhombic films was investigated by galvanostatic cycling in half cells against metallic lithium. The cubic spinel films exhibit a maximum specific capacity of ∼ 82 mAh/g, while a specific capacity of nearly 150 mAh/g can be reached for the orthorhombic counterparts. These films are promising candidates for future all solid state battery applications. - Highlights: ► Synthesis of 3 Li–Mn–O structures by one up-scalable thin film deposition method ► Formation of o-LiMnO{sub 2} by r.f. magnetron sputtering in combination with post-annealing ► Discharge capacity with o-LiMnO{sub 2} cathodes twice as high as for c

  4. Natural and gamma radiation-induced conduction of silica and metaphosphate glass layers deposed by radiofrequency cathode sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a study of natural and 60Co induced conductions in radiofrequency sputtering deposed layers. Capacimetry and electronic microscopy observations permit a knowledge of the physical characteristics, mainly: homogeneity and thickness of these layers. A study of the natural current permit to characterise electrically the deposited films, the electrode and bulk insulator effects. In induced conduction, the behaviour of currents as a function of dose rate is interpreted in terms of ROSE'S and FOWLER'S photoconductivity theories. Induced currents versus applied fields are observed and compared with these obtained in the case of dielectric liquids and glasses. (author)

  5. Preparation and characterization of magnetic nanostructures based on FeCo / IrMn deposited by cathode sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spintronic devices based in the transport of spin polarized current, spin's torque and other related phenomena represent big promises in the scenery of the technological miniaturization of current electronic devices. Magnetic materials of great technological relevance for different areas deal with, despite some exceptions, films and multilayered structures with high complexity. Advances on these fields require the control of those structures in atomic scale, in order to be able to tailor their physical properties. The purpose of this work is the preparation of multilayered structures by sputtering, as well the study of magnetic phenomena involved in this structures. The aim is to produce a spin valve. This is a multilayer structure composed of two ferromagnetic layers, separated by a non magnetic spacer. The magnetisation of one of the ferromagnetic layers is free to rotate under the effect of small external fields, whilst the magnetisation of the other ferromagnetic layer remains fixed by means exchange coupling to a antiferromagnetic layer. The structure is tailored to allow the small applied magnetic fields to switch the magnetisation of the ferromagnetic layers from antiparallel state to a parallel state resulting in the variation of the electrical resistivity of the structure (GMR effect). Optimization of deposition conditions was required to obtain structures with exchange bias coupling, and antiferromagnetic coupling through a non magnetic spacer. The correlation between the deposition conditions and the magnetic properties of the films was studied. The work presented in this dissertation has contributed to the characterisation of both magnetic thin films, which can be used on the production of magnetic sensors, and the new sputtering system assembled in the Applied Physics Laboratory of CDTN. (author)

  6. Structural transformation of sputtered o-LiMnO{sub 2} thin-film cathodes induced by electrochemical cycling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, J., E-mail: Julian.Fischer@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics (IAM-AWP), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Chang, K. [RWTH Aachen University, Materials Chemistry, Kopernikusstrasse 10, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Ye, J.; Ulrich, S.; Ziebert, C. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics (IAM-AWP), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Music, D.; Hallstedt, B. [RWTH Aachen University, Materials Chemistry, Kopernikusstrasse 10, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Seifert, H.J. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials – Applied Materials Physics (IAM-AWP), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2013-12-31

    Orthorhombic LiMnO{sub 2} (o-LiMnO{sub 2}) thin films were produced by non-reactive r.f. magnetron sputtering in combination with thermal post-annealing. Oxide phase formation was investigated by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. In order to assign the X-ray signals and estimate the grain size, a simulation of the diffraction pattern was performed and compared with experimental data. The density of the films was determined to be 3.39 g/cm{sup 3} using X-ray reflectivity. Electrochemical characterization was carried out by galvanostatic cycling and cyclic voltammetry of Li/o-LiMnO{sub 2} half cells. There are distinct redox reactions at approx. 3 V and 4 V, whereas the latter splits into multiple peaks. Using ab initio calculations and thermodynamic models, Gibbs energies of o-LiMnO{sub 2} and c-LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} were determined. The relation between these energies explains the irreversible phase transformation that has been observed during the cycling of the Li/o-LiMnO{sub 2} half cell. - Highlights: • Quantitative, thermodynamic modeling of the o-LiMnO{sub 2}/c-LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4} phase transformation • First CV-investigations on magnetron sputtered nanocrystalline o-LiMnO{sub 2} thin films • Synthesis of o-LiMnO{sub 2} planar model systems for protective coating and SEI development.

  7. Effect of oxygen incorporation on the structure and elasticity of Ti-Al-O-N coatings synthesized by cathodic arc and high power pulsed magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans, M., E-mail: hans@mch.rwth-aachen.de; Baben, M. to; Music, D.; Ebenhöch, J.; Schneider, J. M. [Materials Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, Kopernikusstr. 10, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Primetzhofer, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Lägerhyddsvägen 1, S-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Kurapov, D.; Arndt, M.; Rudigier, H. [Oerlikon Balzers Coating AG, Iramali 18, LI-9496 Balzers, Principality of Liechtenstein (Liechtenstein)

    2014-09-07

    Ti-Al-O-N coatings were synthesized by cathodic arc and high power pulsed magnetron sputtering. The chemical composition of the coatings was determined by means of elastic recoil detection analysis and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The effect of oxygen incorporation on the stress-free lattice parameters and Young's moduli of Ti-Al-O-N coatings was investigated by X-ray diffraction and nanoindentation, respectively. As nitrogen is substituted by oxygen, implications for the charge balance may be expected. A reduction in equilibrium volume with increasing O concentration is identified by X-ray diffraction and density functional theory calculations of Ti-Al-O-N supercells reveal the concomitant formation of metal vacancies. Hence, the oxygen incorporation-induced formation of metal vacancies enables charge balancing. Furthermore, nanoindentation experiments reveal a decrease in elastic modulus with increasing O concentration. Based on ab initio data, two causes can be identified for this: First, the metal vacancy-induced reduction in elasticity; and second, the formation of, compared to the corresponding metal nitride bonds, relatively weak Ti-O and Al-O bonds.

  8. Growth of cerium oxide thin layers for the manufacture of dosemeters and/or irradiation detectors by magnetron RF cathodic sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oxide thin films deposited on silicon substrate are interesting for the manufacture of dosemeters and detectors of gas, humidity, temperature and irradiation. The irradiation dose measurement is required for assessing the risks and advantages of the use of ionizing radiations in fields such as biology, medicine and more generally in all the civil and military nuclear applications. According to literature, cerium oxide seems to be potentially interesting for the manufacture of dosemeters and/or irradiation detectors. The influence of the deposition parameters, such as the inter-electrodes distance, the temperature, the RF power, the work pressure, on the crystalline quality of the CeO2 layers deposited on a silicon (111) substrate by magnetron RF cathodic sputtering has been studied. All these thin films have been characterized by X-ray diffraction and by Raman spectroscopy. At the present time, studies are carried out on 'flash' annealing in order to improve the crystalline state of the thin layers. The aim is to study the influence of gamma and neutrons irradiations on the electric properties of capacities made of CeO2 thin films. (O.M.)

  9. The use of segmented cathodes to determine the spoke current density distribution in high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasmas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poolcharuansin, Phitsanu [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L69 3GJ (United Kingdom); The Technological Plasma Research Unit, Department of Physics, Mahasarakham University, Maha Sarakham 44150 (Thailand); Estrin, Francis Lockwood; Bradley, James W., E-mail: j.w.bradley@liverpool.ac.uk [Department of Electrical Engineering and Electronics, University of Liverpool, Brownlow Hill, Liverpool L69 3GJ (United Kingdom)

    2015-04-28

    The localized target current density associated with quasi-periodic ionization zones (spokes) has been measured in a high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge using an array of azimuthally separated and electrical isolated probes incorporated into a circular aluminum target. For a particular range of operating conditions (pulse energies up to 2.2 J and argon pressures from 0.2 to 1.9 Pa), strong oscillations in the probe current density are seen with amplitudes up to 52% above a base value. These perturbations, identified as spokes, travel around the discharge above the target in the E×B direction. Using phase information from the angularly separated probes, the spoke drift speeds, angular frequencies, and mode number have been determined. Generally, at low HiPIMS pulse energies E{sub p} < 0.8 J, spokes appear to be chaotic in nature (with random arrival times), however as E{sub p} increases, coherent spokes are observed with velocities between 6.5 and 10 km s{sup −1} and mode numbers m = 3 or above. At E{sub p} > 1.8 J, the plasma becomes spoke-free. The boundaries between chaotic, coherent, and no-spoke regions are weakly dependent on pressure. During each HiPIMS pulse, the spoke velocities increase by about 50%. Such an observation is explained by considering spoke velocities to be determined by the critical ionization velocity, which changes as the plasma composition changes during the pulse. From the shape of individual current density oscillations, it appears that the leading edge of the spoke is associated with a slow increase in local current density to the target and the rear with a more rapid decrease. The measurements show that the discharge current density associated with individual spokes is broadly spread over a wide region of the target.

  10. The use of segmented cathodes to determine the spoke current density distribution in high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasmas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The localized target current density associated with quasi-periodic ionization zones (spokes) has been measured in a high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge using an array of azimuthally separated and electrical isolated probes incorporated into a circular aluminum target. For a particular range of operating conditions (pulse energies up to 2.2 J and argon pressures from 0.2 to 1.9 Pa), strong oscillations in the probe current density are seen with amplitudes up to 52% above a base value. These perturbations, identified as spokes, travel around the discharge above the target in the E×B direction. Using phase information from the angularly separated probes, the spoke drift speeds, angular frequencies, and mode number have been determined. Generally, at low HiPIMS pulse energies Ep < 0.8 J, spokes appear to be chaotic in nature (with random arrival times), however as Ep increases, coherent spokes are observed with velocities between 6.5 and 10 km s−1 and mode numbers m = 3 or above. At Ep > 1.8 J, the plasma becomes spoke-free. The boundaries between chaotic, coherent, and no-spoke regions are weakly dependent on pressure. During each HiPIMS pulse, the spoke velocities increase by about 50%. Such an observation is explained by considering spoke velocities to be determined by the critical ionization velocity, which changes as the plasma composition changes during the pulse. From the shape of individual current density oscillations, it appears that the leading edge of the spoke is associated with a slow increase in local current density to the target and the rear with a more rapid decrease. The measurements show that the discharge current density associated with individual spokes is broadly spread over a wide region of the target

  11. In-situ sputtering apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Mark R.; Poole, Henry J.; Custer, III, Arthur W.; Hershcovitch, Ady

    2015-06-09

    A sputtering apparatus that includes at least a target presented as an inner surface of a confinement structure, the inner surface of the confinement structure is preferably an internal wall of a circular tube. A cathode is disposed adjacent the internal wall of the circular tube. The cathode preferably provides a hollow core, within which a magnetron is disposed. Preferably, an actuator is attached to the magnetron, wherein a position of the magnetron within the hollow core is altered upon activation of the actuator. Additionally, a carriage supporting the cathode and communicating with the target is preferably provided, and a cable bundle interacting with the cathode and linked to a cable bundle take up mechanism provided power and coolant to the cathode, magnetron, actuator and an anode of the sputtering apparatus.

  12. Effect of the energy transfer collision between noble gas and sputtered metal atom on the voltage-current curve of a hollow-cathode discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The voltage-current curves and the optogalvanic signals of hollow-cathode discharge tubes were measured. Attention was focused on the existence of negative dynamic resistance properties for argon and neon discharges. Three hollow-cathodes, each was made of gadolinium, uranium, and copper, were used with both the noble gases. The negative dynamic resistance regions were observed only in Ar/U, Ar/Gd, and Ne/Cu discharges. These results suggest that resonant Penning ionization is one of the main reactions producing the negative dynamic resistance characteristics in hollow cathode discharges

  13. Sputter process diagnostics by negative ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeuner, Michael; Neumann, Horst; Zalman, Jan; Biederman, Hynek

    1998-05-01

    We measured the energy distributions of negative ions during reactive sputtering of silicon in oxygen. Various oxygen containing negative ions are formed in the cathode sheath or directly at the sputter target, respectively. These negative ions are accelerated away from the cathode by the electrical field, and can be detected using a mass spectrometer facing the sputter magnetron. The origin of each ion can be determined from peak structures in the energy distribution. Additionally the flux of different negative ions provides information on poisoning of the target by oxide films.

  14. Improved high-voltage and high-temperature electrochemical performances of LiCoO2 cathode by electrode sputter-coating with Li3PO4

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Aijun; Xu, Jin; Dai, Xinyi; Yang, Bin; Lu, Yanting; Wang, Liping; Fan, Cong; Li, Jingze

    2016-08-01

    Surface coating has long been an important strategy to improve the electrochemical performances of electrode materials for Li-ion batteries. In this work, an amorphous Li3PO4 (LPO) layer, which is a poor electronic conductor but good ionic conductor, is coated directly on LiCoO2 composite electrodes by magnetron sputtering. The battery performances of the electrodes are studied at both room temperature (RT) and 50 °C. The LPO sputter-coating allows significant improvement of the electrode's cycling stability at both temperatures. With an optimum coating thickness of ∼60 nm, the electrode's capacity after 100 cycles at 1 C can reach 146 mAh g-1 (79.3% retention) and 140 mAh g-1 (78.2% retention) at RT and 50 °C, which are improved by 30% and 200%, respectively, compared to those of the bare LCO electrode. More impressively, the rate capability is also greatly enhanced by LPO-coating, and the observed high-temperature rate capability is even superior to the room-temperature one. The remarkable improvement of the LPO-coated electrodes is mainly attributed to the high chemical stability and temperature-enhanced electrochemical activity of the LPO coating layer, which synergistically serves as a physiochemical protection layer and an efficient pathway for Li+ transport.

  15. Industry-relevant magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc ultra-high vacuum deposition system for in situ x-ray diffraction studies of thin film growth using high energy synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, J L; Thomson, W; Howard, B; Schell, N; Näslund, L-Å; Rogström, L; Johansson-Jõesaar, M P; Ghafoor, N; Odén, M; Nothnagel, E; Shepard, A; Greer, J; Birch, J

    2015-09-01

    We present an industry-relevant, large-scale, ultra-high vacuum (UHV) magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc deposition system purposefully designed for time-resolved in situ thin film deposition/annealing studies using high-energy (>50 keV), high photon flux (>10(12) ph/s) synchrotron radiation. The high photon flux, combined with a fast-acquisition-time (<1 s) two-dimensional (2D) detector, permits time-resolved in situ structural analysis of thin film formation processes. The high-energy synchrotron-radiation based x-rays result in small scattering angles (<11°), allowing large areas of reciprocal space to be imaged with a 2D detector. The system has been designed for use on the 1-tonne, ultra-high load, high-resolution hexapod at the P07 High Energy Materials Science beamline at PETRA III at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron in Hamburg, Germany. The deposition system includes standard features of a typical UHV deposition system plus a range of special features suited for synchrotron radiation studies and industry-relevant processes. We openly encourage the materials research community to contact us for collaborative opportunities using this unique and versatile scientific instrument.

  16. Sputter target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gates, Willard G.; Hale, Gerald J.

    1980-01-01

    The disclosure relates to an improved sputter target for use in the deposition of hard coatings. An exemplary target is given wherein titanium diboride is brazed to a tantalum backing plate using a gold-palladium-nickel braze alloy.

  17. Development and testing of large-area insulating and superconducting multilayer systems for H.F. applications. Sub-project: High-vacuum hollow cathode sputtering device for large-area high-Tc/insulator systems and their application in microelectronic devices and microwave systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of the research is the deposition of large-area YBa2Cu3O7-x/insulator multilayer systems for microelectronic devices and microwave applications. The sputtering device with the linear hollow cathode and the substrate movement for the deposition of 3''-wafers are described. We've found out that our method is suitable for the deposition of such large area YBa2Cu3O7-x films. Due to in- or out-diffusion of oxygen within the target by using a great ratio of length to width of the linear hollow cathode, the discharge may take place not over the whole slot length. This results in a decreased homogenity of the large area deposition. For a carefully directed annealing procedure in order to decrease the oxygen content of the films from 7 to 6.4, we've done in-situ measurements of the resistivity. Persistent photoconductivity at films with an oxygen content nearby 6.4 was clearly observable. The excess conductivity yields an increase of the critical temperature of about 4K. The relaxation times, which are at room temperature in the order of hours can be reduced through heating. The contactless characterization of the films could be extended to the determination of the critical current density after calculating the magnetic field above the film. (orig.)

  18. Magnetron sputtering system stabilisation for high rate desposition of AlN films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomin, A; Akhmatov, Vladislav; Selishchev, S

    1998-01-01

    The stabilisation of a planar magnetron sputtering system for reactive sputtering of AlN in a gaseous mixture of Ar and highly active NH3 was examined. The helical instability in the cathode plasma sheath was observed and methods for its damping were proposed. It was found that the deposition of c...

  19. Analysis of cathode geometry to minimize cathode erosion in direct current microplasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Causa, Federica [Dipartimento di Scienze dell' Ambiente, della Sicurezza, del Territorio, degli Alimenti e della Salute, Universita degli studi di Messina, 98122 Messina (Italy); Ghezzi, Francesco; Caniello, Roberto; Grosso, Giovanni [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Via R. Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Dellasega, David [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Via R. Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, Via Ponzio 34/3, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    Microplasma jets are now widely used for deposition, etching, and materials processing. The present study focuses on the investigation of the influence of cathode geometry on deposition quality, for microplasma jet deposition systems in low vacuum. The interest here is understanding the influence of hydrogen on sputtering and/or evaporation of the electrodes. Samples obtained with two cathode geometries with tapered and rectangular cross-sections have been investigated experimentally by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy. Samples obtained with a tapered-geometry cathode present heavy contamination, demonstrating cathode erosion, while samples obtained with a rectangular-cross-section cathode are free from contamination. These experimental characteristics were explained by modelling results showing a larger radial component of the electric field at the cathode inner wall of the tapered cathode. As a result, ion acceleration is larger, explaining the observed cathode erosion in this case. Results from the present investigation also show that the ratio of radial to axial field components is larger for the rectangular geometry case, thus, qualitatively explaining the presence of micro-hollow cathode discharge over a wide range of currents observed in this case. In the light of the above findings, the rectangular cathode geometry is considered to be more effective to achieve cleaner deposition.

  20. Understanding deposition rate loss in high power impulse magnetron sputtering: I. Ionization-driven electric fields

    OpenAIRE

    Brenning, N; C. Huo; Lundin, Daniel; Raadu, M.A.; Vitelaru, C; Stancu, G. D.; Minea, T.; Helmersson, Ulf

    2012-01-01

    The lower deposition rate for high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) compared with direct current magnetron sputtering for the same average power is often reported as a drawback. The often invoked reason is back-attraction of ionized sputtered material to the target due to a substantial negative potential profile, sometimes called an extended presheath, from the location of ionization toward the cathode. Recent studies in HiPIMS devices, using floating-emitting and swept-Langmuir pr...

  1. Calculated and measured emittance of sputter-type negative-ion source

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for calculating the beam current and emittance of a negative ion beam from a sputter-type source is described. Calculations are compared to measured emittance. The dependence of the emittance on ion source parameters such as cathode shape, exit aperture diameter, and cathode voltage is discussed

  2. Solar system sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombrello, T. A.

    1982-01-01

    The sites and materials involved in solar system sputtering of planetary surfaces are reviewed, together with existing models for the processes of sputtering. Attention is given to the interaction of the solar wind with planetary atmospheres in terms of the role played by the solar wind in affecting the He-4 budget in the Venus atmosphere, and the erosion and differentiation of the Mars atmosphere by solar wind sputtering. The study is extended to the production of isotopic fractionation and anomalies in interplanetary grains by irradiation, and to erosion effects on planetary satellites with frozen volatile surfaces, such as with Io, Europa, and Ganymede. Further measurements are recommended of the molecular form of the ejected material, the yields and energy spectra of the sputtered products, the iosotopic fractionation sputtering causes, and the possibility of electronic sputtering enhancement with materials such as silicates.

  3. Reactive sputter deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Mahieu, Stijn

    2008-01-01

    In this valuable work, all aspects of the reactive magnetron sputtering process, from the discharge up to the resulting thin film growth, are described in detail, allowing the reader to understand the complete process. Hence, this book gives necessary information for those who want to start with reactive magnetron sputtering, understand and investigate the technique, control their sputtering process and tune their existing process, obtaining the desired thin films.

  4. Denton Vacuum Discovery-550 Sputterer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: CORAL Name: Sputter 2 Similar to the existing 4-Gun Denton Discovery 22 Sputter system, with the following enhancements: Specifications / Capabilities:...

  5. Self-sputtering and reflection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Self-sputtering and reflection are investigated with the Monte Carlo program TRIMSP. The results include particle and energy reflection coefficients, sputtering yields and sputtered energy versus incident angle and energy. Angular and energy distributions of reflected and sputtered particles are also given. Reflection and sputtering values are compared to show their contributions to selfsputtering. A comparison of calculated sputtering yields and sputtering efficiencies (sputtering energy) with experimental data is carried out. The systems investigated are mainly the bombardment of C, Ni, and W with self-ions. (orig.)

  6. Three-electrode current-voltage measurements on erbia-stabilized bismuth oxide with sputtered noble metal electrodes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vinke, I.C.; Boukamp, B.A.; Vries, de K.J.; Burggraaf, A.J.

    1992-01-01

    The anodic and cathodic polarization behaviour of sputtered porous gold electrodes on (Bi2O3)0.75(Er2O3)0.25 (abbreviated BE25) was studied as function of temperature and oxygen partial pressure using a three-electrode cell. The anodic polarization is smaller than the cathodic polarization, allowing

  7. Sputtering of water ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baragiola, R.A.; Vidal, R.A.; Svendsen, W.;

    2003-01-01

    We present results of a range of experiments of sputtering of water ice together with a guide to the literature. We studied how sputtering depends on the projectile energy and fluence, ice growth temperature, irradiation temperature and external electric fields. We observed luminescence from...

  8. Magnetron sputtered gadolinia-doped ceria diffusion barriers for metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderby, Steffen; Klemensø, Trine; Christensen, Bjarke H.;

    2014-01-01

    Gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) thin films are deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering in an industrial-scale setup and implemented as barrier layers between the cathode and electrolyte in metal-based solid oxide fuel cells consisting of a metal support, an electrolyte of ZrO2 co-doped with Sc2O3...

  9. Cathodic arc grown niobium films for RF superconducting cavity applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catani, L.; Cianchi, A.; Lorkiewicz, J.; Tazzari, S.; Langner, J.; Strzyzewski, P.; Sadowski, M.; Andreone, A.; Cifariello, G.; Di Gennaro, E.; Lamura, G.; Russo, R.

    2006-07-01

    Experimental results on the characterization of the linear and non-linear microwave properties of niobium film produced by UHV cathodic arc deposition are presented. Surface impedance Zs as a function of RF field and intermodulation distortion (IMD) measurement have been carried out by using a dielectrically loaded resonant cavity operating at 7 GHz. The experimental data show that these samples have a lower level of intrinsic non-linearities at low temperature and low circulating power in comparison with Nb samples grown by sputtering. These results make UHV cathodic arc deposition a promising technique for the improvement of RF superconducting cavities for particle accelerators.

  10. Cathodic arc grown niobium films for RF superconducting cavity applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Catani, L. [INFN-Roma2, Rome (Italy); Cianchi, A. [INFN-Roma2, Rome (Italy); Lorkiewicz, J. [INFN-Roma2, Rome (Italy); Tazzari, S. [Universita di Roma ' Tor Vergata' and INFN-Roma2, Rome (Italy); Langner, J. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Swierk (Poland); Strzyzewski, P. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Swierk (Poland); Sadowski, M. [Soltan Institute for Nuclear Studies, Swierk (Poland); Andreone, A. [University of Napoli ' Federico II' and INFN-NA, Naples (Italy); Cifariello, G. [University of Napoli ' Federico II' and INFN-NA, Naples (Italy); Di Gennaro, E. [University of Napoli ' Federico II' and INFN-NA, Naples (Italy); Lamura, G. [University of Napoli ' Federico II' and INFN-NA, Naples (Italy); Russo, R. [Seconda Universita di Napoli, INFN-NA, Naples (Italy)

    2006-07-15

    Experimental results on the characterization of the linear and non-linear microwave properties of niobium film produced by UHV cathodic arc deposition are presented. Surface impedance Z {sub s} as a function of RF field and intermodulation distortion (IMD) measurement have been carried out by using a dielectrically loaded resonant cavity operating at 7 GHz. The experimental data show that these samples have a lower level of intrinsic non-linearities at low temperature and low circulating power in comparison with Nb samples grown by sputtering. These results make UHV cathodic arc deposition a promising technique for the improvement of RF superconducting cavities for particle accelerators.

  11. Characteristics of a toroidal planar hollow cathode and its use for the preparation of Bi nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, A.; Luna, A. T.; Muhl, S.

    2013-12-01

    Using ideas from the sputter deposition by gas flow hollow cathode (GFHC) we have designed a new version in the form of a toroidal planar hollow cathode. Here the flow of gas is used to entrain the sputtered atoms and nanoparticles formed by agglomeration in the gas phase, through the cathode central exit aperture towards the substrate. We have studied the characteristics of the deposit as a function of the applied pulsed dc electrical power, the argon gas pressure and flow. By varying the different operating parameters, such as pressure (6.7-267 Pa), power (40-120 W) and gas flow (20-140 sccm), it was possible to control the size of the nanoparticles (10-150 nm) and the deposition rate (0.4-4.0 nm min-1). We demonstrate that the nanoparticles are of crystalline bismuth, even though the cathode is made of graphite with small added pieces of bismuth.

  12. Research and Development of a New Field Enhanced Low Temperature Thermionic Cathode that Enables Fluorescent Dimming and Loan Shedding without Auxiliary Cathode Heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Jin

    2009-01-07

    This is the final report for project entitled 'Research and development of a new field enhanced low temperature thermionic cathode that enables fluorescent dimming and load shedding without auxiliary cathode heating', under Agreement Number: DE-FC26-04NT-42329. Under this project, a highly efficient CNT based thermionic cathode was demonstrated. This cathode is capable of emitting electron at a current density two order of magnitude stronger then a typical fluorescent cathode at same temperatures, or capable of emitting at same current density but at temperature about 300 C lower than that of a fluorescent cathode. Detailed fabrication techniques were developed including CVD growth of CNTs and sputter deposition of oxide thin films on CNTs. These are mature technologies that have been widely used in industry for large scale materials processing and device fabrications, thus, with further development work, the techniques developed in this project can be scaled-up in manufacturing environment. The prototype cathodes developed in this project were tested in lighting plasma discharge environment. In many cases, they not only lit and sustain the plasma, but also out perform the fluorescent cathodes in key parameters such like cathode fall voltages. More work will be needed to further evaluate more detailed and longer term performance of the prototype cathode in lighting plasma.

  13. Multilayer optical coating fabrication by dc magnetron reactive sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A conventional box coating chamber has been equipped with three dc magnetron sputtering cathodes, reactive gas (O2, N2, H2) pressure and flow control, planetary substrate holder, and optical monitoring to produce a low-temperature batch coating system for multilayer optical coating fabrication using oxides, nitrides, semiconductors and semitransparent metals. The system realizes the benefits traditionally derived from this geometry: maximum area of uniform coating thickness, spatially-averaged coating flux impingement angles, and precise thickness monitoring. The use of sputtering cathodes adds the benefits of increased flexibility in choice of materials deposited, increased adatom energy at the substrate, and increased chemical reactivity in a gas discharge. Dense, durable, fully-reacted dielectric coatings are achieved at low processing temperatures. Metal targets (sources) are used for ease of fabrication, and dc power avoids radio-frequency impedance matching requirements. The chamber and components are described and operation of the cathodes explained. Thickness uniformity profiles, deposition rates, and substrate temperature data are related. A list of materials investigated to date is presented with pertinent optical properties and intrinsic mechanical stress values. Illustrative performance examples for multilayer coatings on glasses and plastics are included

  14. Cathodic Protection Model Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Performs Navy design and engineering of ship and submarine impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems for underwater hull corrosion control and...

  15. Very low pressure high power impulse triggered magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Andre; Andersson, Joakim

    2013-10-29

    A method and apparatus are described for very low pressure high powered magnetron sputtering of a coating onto a substrate. By the method of this invention, both substrate and coating target material are placed into an evacuable chamber, and the chamber pumped to vacuum. Thereafter a series of high impulse voltage pulses are applied to the target. Nearly simultaneously with each pulse, in one embodiment, a small cathodic arc source of the same material as the target is pulsed, triggering a plasma plume proximate to the surface of the target to thereby initiate the magnetron sputtering process. In another embodiment the plasma plume is generated using a pulsed laser aimed to strike an ablation target material positioned near the magnetron target surface.

  16. Dynamic behavior of thermionic dispenser cathodes under ion bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortenraad, R.; van der Gon, A. W. Denier; Brongersma, H. H.; Gärtner, G.; Raasch, D.; Manenschijn, A.

    2001-04-01

    We have investigated the surface coverage and electron emission of thermionic dispenser cathodes during 3 keV Ar+ ion bombardment, thereby simulating the bombardment of the cathodes by residual gases that takes place in cathode-ray tubes as used in television sets. During the ion bombardment at the operating temperature of 1030 °C, a dynamic equilibrium is established between the sputter removal and resupply mechanisms of the Ba and O atoms that form the dipole layer on the cathode substrate. We demonstrated that the performance of the cathodes under ion bombardment is governed by the O removal and resupply rates. It was found that the Ba resupply rate is almost an order of magnitude higher than the O resupply rate, but that the Ba can only be present on the surface bound to O atoms. Therefore, the Ba/O ratio is approximately equal to unity during the ion bombardment. Based on the investigations of the removal and resupply processes, we proposed a model that accurately describes the surface coverage and electron emission during the ion bombardment, including the dependence of the ion flux and cathode temperature.

  17. Ion and neutral energy flux distributions to the cathode in glow discharges in Ar/Ne and Xe/Ne mixtures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capdeville, H.; Pédoussat, C.; Pitchford, L. C.

    2002-02-01

    The work presented in the article is a study of the heavy particle (ion and neutral) energy flux distributions to the cathode in conditions typical of discharges used for luminous signs for advertising ("neon" signs). The purpose of this work is to evaluate the effect of the gas mixture on the sputtering of the cathode. We have combined two models for this study: a hybrid model of the electrical properties of the cathode region of a glow discharge and a Monte Carlo simulation of the heavy particle trajectories. Using known sputtering yields for Ne, Ar, and Xe on iron cathodes, we estimate the sputtered atom flux for mixtures of Ar/Ne and Xe/Ne as a function of the percent neon in the mixture.

  18. Beam optics optimization of a negative-ion sputter source

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F Osswald; R Rebmeister

    2002-11-01

    A negative-ion sputter source has been studied in order to increase the beam intensity delivered by the Vivitron tandem injector. The aim was to characterize the influence on the beam intensity of some factors related to the configuration of the source such as the shape of the target holder, the target surface topography and the anode/cathode voltage. The paper reports the results carried out by experimentation on a test facility and on the injector itself as well as the investigations performed with computer simulations.

  19. Application of Magnetron Sputtering in Fabricating MEMS Microbatteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Wan; YANG Zhi-min; XING Guang-jian; MAO Chang-hui; DU Jun

    2004-01-01

    With the development of MEMS and the electronic devices's miniaturization and integration, a new kind of power sources that can satisfy the need for high energy density is required. Microbatteries are being researched abroad for their advantages of extreme thinness and long-term power supply. The development of MEMS microbatteries are reviewed and suggestedmagnetron sputtering in fabricating a high-performance microbattery. The technics as annealing are analyzed. The microbattery with a LiNi1-x Cox O2 cathode exhibited stable cycle ability and a high specific discharge capacity, which was attributed to the alloying effect of the LiNiO2and LiCoO2.

  20. Novel matching lens and spherical ionizer for a cesium sputter ion source

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D C Weisser; N R Lobanov; P A Hausladen; L K Fifield; H J Wallace; S G Tims; E G Apushkinsky

    2002-12-01

    The beam optics of a multi-sample sputter ion source, based on the NEC MCSNICS, has been modified to accommodate cathode voltages higher than 5 kV and dispenses with the nominal extractor. The cathode voltage in Cs sputter sources plays the role of the classical extractor accomplishing the acceleration of beam particles from eV to keV energy, minimizing space charge effects and interactions between the beam and residual gas. The higher the cathode voltage, the smaller are these contributions to the emittance growth. The higher cathode voltage also raises the Child’s law limit on the Cs current resulting in substantially increased output. The incidental focusing role of the extractor is reallocated to a deceleration Einzel lens and the velocity change needed to match to the pre-acceleration tube goes to a new electrode at the tube entrance. All electrodes are large enough to ensure that the beam fills less than 30% of the aperture to minimize aberrations. The improvements are applicable to sputter sources generally.

  1. Laser spectroscopy of sputtered atoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of laser radiation to study the sputtering process is of relatively recent origin. Much has been learned from this work about the basic physics of the sputtering process itself through measurements of velocity and excited state distributions of sputtered atoms and the effects of adsorbates on substrate sputtering yields. Furthermore, the identification, characterization, and sensitive detection of sputtered atoms by laser spectroscopy has led to the development of in situ diagnostics for impurity fluxes in the plasma edge regions of tokamaks and of ultrasensitive methods (ppB Fe in Si) for surface analysis with ultralow (picocoulomb) ion fluences. The techniques involved in this work, laser fluorescence and multiphoton resonance ionization spectroscopy, will be described and illustrations given of results achieved up to now. 55 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab

  2. Role of cathode identity in liquid chromatography particle beam glow discharge mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishna, M.V. Balarama [Department of Chemistry, Biosystems Research Complex, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-1905 (United States); Marcus, R.K. [Department of Chemistry, Biosystems Research Complex, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-1905 (United States)], E-mail: marcusr@clemson.edu

    2008-06-15

    A detailed evaluation of the role of cathode identity on the analytical and spectral characteristics of various organic, organometallic and metal analytes using liquid chromatography-particle beam/glow discharge mass spectrometry (LC-PB/GDMS) has been carried out. A d.c. discharge, operating with argon as the support gas, was used throughout this work. In this study, Cu which has a relatively high sputtering rate, Ni which has moderate sputtering rate and Ta which has very low sputtering rate, are taken as cathode materials to study the ionization, fragmentation, and analytical characteristics of organic (caffeine, epigallocatechin gallate, peptide as representative compounds), organometallic (selenomethionine, triethyl lead chloride as representative compounds) and metal (Fe, La, Cs and Pb) species. A range of discharge gas pressures (26.6-106.4 Pa) and currents (0.2-1.5 mA) were investigated with the test cathodes to determine their influence on the spectral composition and overall analytical response for the various test species. Calibration plots were obtained for all of the species for each of the three cathodes to determine the respective limits of detection. Relative detection limits in the range of 0.02 to 15 ng mL{sup -1} (0.002-1.5 ng, absolute) for the test species were found to be in the order of Cu > Ni > Ta; which follows the order of the sputtering characteristics of the respective cathodes. These studies rendered information about the respective discharge parameters' role in choosing the most appropriate cathode identity in PB-GDMS for application in the areas of organic, organometallic and inorganic species analysis.

  3. Color center laser optogalvanic spectroscopy of lithium, barium, neon and argon Rydberg states in hollow cathode discharges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerous infrared transitions between Rydberg states of neon and argon have been measured by optogalvanic spectroscopy in commercial hollow cathode lamps using a color center laser operating in the range 3600-4100 cm-1. Transitions in lithium and barium atoms sputtered from the cathodes were also detected. The generality and high sensitivity of this technique indicates potential applications for frequency calibration in the infrared, atomic and molecular spectroscopy, and plasma diagnostics. (orig.)

  4. Cathodes - Technological review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cherkouk, Charaf; Nestler, Tina [Institut für Experimentelle Physik, Technische Universität Bergakademie Freiberg, Leipziger Straße 23, 09596 Freiberg (Germany)

    2014-06-16

    Lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO{sub 2}) was already used in the first commercialized Li-ion battery by SONY in 1990. Still, it is the most frequently used cathode material nowadays. However, LiCoO{sub 2} is intrinsically unstable in the charged state, especially at elevated temperatures and in the overcharged state causing volume changes and transport limitation for high power batteries. In this paper, some technological aspects with large impact on cell performance from the cathode material point of view will be reviewed. At first it will be focused on the degradation processes and life-time mechanisms of the cathode material LiCoO{sub 2}. Electrochemical and structural results on commercial Li-ion batteries recorded during the cycling will be discussed. Thereafter, advanced nanomaterials for new cathode materials will be presented.

  5. Nanostructured sulfur cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Rechargeable Li/S batteries have attracted significant attention lately due to their high specific energy and low cost. They are promising candidates for applications, including portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid-level energy storage. However, poor cycle life and low power capability are major technical obstacles. Various nanostructured sulfur cathodes have been developed to address these issues, as they provide greater resistance to pulverization, faster reaction kinetics and better trapping of soluble polysulfides. In this review, recent developments on nanostructured sulfur cathodes and mechanisms behind their operation are presented and discussed. Moreover, progress on novel characterization of sulfur cathodes is also summarized, as it has deepened the understanding of sulfur cathodes and will guide further rational design of sulfur electrodes. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  6. Cathodes - Technological review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2) was already used in the first commercialized Li-ion battery by SONY in 1990. Still, it is the most frequently used cathode material nowadays. However, LiCoO2 is intrinsically unstable in the charged state, especially at elevated temperatures and in the overcharged state causing volume changes and transport limitation for high power batteries. In this paper, some technological aspects with large impact on cell performance from the cathode material point of view will be reviewed. At first it will be focused on the degradation processes and life-time mechanisms of the cathode material LiCoO2. Electrochemical and structural results on commercial Li-ion batteries recorded during the cycling will be discussed. Thereafter, advanced nanomaterials for new cathode materials will be presented

  7. Sputtering. [as deposition technique in mechanical engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvins, T.

    1976-01-01

    This paper primarily reviews the potential of using the sputtering process as a deposition technique; however, the manufacturing and sputter etching aspects are also discussed. Since sputtering is not regulated by classical thermodynamics, new multicomponent materials can be developed in any possible chemical composition. The basic mechanism for dc and rf sputtering is described. Sputter-deposition is described in terms of the unique advantageous features it offers such as versatility, momentum transfer, stoichiometry, sputter-etching, target geometry (coating complex surfaces), precise controls, flexibility, ecology, and sputtering rates. Sputtered film characteristics, such as strong adherence and coherence and film morphology, are briefly evaluated in terms of varying the sputtering parameters. Also described are some of the specific industrial areas which are turning to sputter-deposition techniques.

  8. Cathode materials review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Claus, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Mohanty, Debasish, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Li, Jianlin, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Wood, David L., E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, MS6472 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6472 (United States)

    2014-06-16

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO{sub 2} cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  9. Cathode materials review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Claus; Mohanty, Debasish; Li, Jianlin; Wood, David L.

    2014-06-01

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  10. Cathode materials review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research

  11. A cross-corner effect in a rectangular sputtering magnetron

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron trajectories, ionization distribution, and magnetic field in a conventional rectangular sputtering magnetron cathode are simulated in order to understand the mechanism of a cross-corner effect, which is a common phenomenon associated with rectangular magnetron cathodes and which limits the target utilization. It is found that once the magnetic field in end region of the cathode is different from that in straightway, the cross-corner effect exists. Using a fourth-order Runge-Kutta method, the electron trajectories are simulated, showing that the electrons may drift much faster in the end region than in the straightway and pass quickly to cross-corner region. A Monte-Carlo method is employed to simulate ionization distribution and to quantitatively predict target erosion. The results show denser ionization in the cross-corner region, causing more intensive erosion in that area. We demonstrate that by properly modifying the magnet field in the end region, the electron drift velocity and ionization distribution can be controlled and the cross-corner effect may be significantly reduced

  12. Highly Efficient Micro Cathode Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek Company, Inc. proposes to develop a micro thermionic cathode that requires extremely low power and provides long lifetime. The basis for the cathode is a...

  13. Advanced Cathode Electrolyzer (ACE) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a static, cathode-fed, 2000 psi, balanced-pressure Advanced Cathode Electrolyzer (ACE) based on PEM electrolysis technology. It...

  14. Transport of Sputtered Particles in Capacitive Sputter Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Trieschmann, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The transport of sputtered aluminum inside a multi frequency capacitively coupled plasma chamber is simulated by means of a kinetic test multi-particle approach. A novel consistent set of scattering parameters obtained for a modified variable hard sphere collision model is presented for both argon and aluminum. An angular dependent Thompson energy distribution is fitted to results from Monte-Carlo simulations and used for the kinetic simulation of the transport of sputtered aluminum. For the proposed configuration the transport of sputtered particles is characterized under typical process conditions at a gas pressure of p = 0.5 Pa. It is found that - due to the peculiar geometric conditions - the transport can be understood in a one dimensional picture, governed by the interaction of the imposed and backscattered particle fluxes. It is shown that the precise geometric features play an important role only in proximity to the electrode edges, where the effect of backscattering from the outside chamber volume be...

  15. Process-structure-property correlations in pulsed dc reactive magnetron sputtered vanadium oxide thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cathode hysteresis in the reactive pulsed dc sputtering of a vanadium metal target was investigated to correlate the structural and electrical properties of the resultant vanadium oxide thin films within the framework of Berg's model [Berg et al., J. Vac. Sci. Technol. A 5, 202 (1987)]. The process hysteresis during reactive pulsed dc sputtering of a vanadium metal target was monitored by measuring the cathode (target) current under different total gas flow rates and oxygen-to-argon ratios for a power density of ∼6.6.W/cm2. Approximately 20%-25% hysteretic change in the cathode current was noticed between the metallic and oxidized states of the V-metal target. The extent of the hysteresis varied with changes in the mass flow of oxygen as predicted by Berg's model. The corresponding microstructure of the films changed from columnar to equiaxed grain structure with increased oxygen flow rates. Micro-Raman spectroscopy indicates subtle changes in the film structure as a function of processing conditions. The resistivity, temperature coefficient of resistance, and charge transport mechanism, obeying the Meyer-Neldel relation [Meyer and Neldel, Z. Tech. Phys. (Leipzig) 12, 588 (1937)], were correlated with the cathode current hysteric behavior.

  16. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2013-07-23

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  17. Smart cathodic protection systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Leggedoor, J.; Schuten, G.; Sajna, S.; Kranjc, A.

    2010-01-01

    Cathodic protection delivers corrosion protection in concrete structures exposed to aggressive environments, e.g. in de-icing salt and marine climates. Working lives of a large number of CP systems are at least more than 13 years and probably more than 25 years, provided a minimum level of maintenan

  18. Study of the three-step photoionization of uranium using a hollow cathode discharge tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hollow cathode discharge (HCD) tube as a spectral light source has been developed. Because any element including refractory metals can be atomized by the cathode sputtering effect in HCD, a simple and reliable atomic vapor source produced by HCD has been widely used in laser spectroscopy. To the authors' knowledge, there is no previous work on the photoionization processes of metal atoms using an HCD tube. Here the authors report their study of the resonant three-step ionization of U in a homemade HCD tube

  19. Laser sputter neutral mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, B.V.; Clarke, M.; Hu, H.; Betz [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1993-12-31

    Laser sputter neutral mass spectrometry (LSNMS) is an emerging technique for highly sensitive surface analysis. In this technique a target is bombarded with a pulsed beam of keV ions. The sputtered particles are intercepted by a high intensity pulsed laser beam above the surface and ionised with almost 100% efficiency. The photions may then be mass analysed using a quadrupole or, more commonly, using time of flight (TOF) techniques. In this method photoions are extracted from the ionisation region, accelerated to a known energy E{sub o} and strike a channelplate detector a distance `d` away. The flight time `t` of the photoions is then related to their mass by `d` {radical}m / {radical} 2E{sub o} so measurement of `t` allows mass spectra to be obtained. It is found that LSNMS is an emerging technique of great sensitivity and flexibility, useful for both applied analysis and to investigate basic sputtering processes. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  20. Pipeline integrity through cathodic protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kumar, N. [Gas Authority India Ltd., New Delhi (India); Khanna, A.S. [Indian Inst. of Technology, Bombay (India)

    2008-07-01

    Pipeline integrity management is defined as a process for assessing and mitigating pipeline risks in an effort to reduce both the likelihood and consequences of incidents. Defects on pipelines result in production losses, environmental losses, as well as loss of goodwill and subsequent financial losses. This presentation addressed pipeline integrity through cathodic protection. It noted that pipeline integrity can be strengthened by successfully controlling, monitoring and mitigating corrosion strategies. It can also be achieved by avoiding external and internal corrosion failures. A good coating offers the advantages of low current density; lower power consumption; low wear of anodes; larger spacing between cathodic protection stations; and minimization of interference problems. The presentation reviewed cathodic protection of cross-country pipelines; a sacrificial cathodic protection system; and an impressed current cathodic protection system. The efficiency of a cathodic system was shown to depend on the use of reliable power sources; proper protection criterion; efficient and effective monitoring of cathodic protection; proper maintenance of the cathodic protection system; and effective remedial measures. Selection criteria, power sources, and a comparison of cathodic protection sources were also presented. Last, the presentation addressed protection criteria; current interruption circuits; monitoring of the cathodic protection system; use of corrosion coupons; advantages of weightless coupons; checking the insulating flanges for shorted bolts; insulated/short casings; anodic and cathodic interference; common corridor problems; and intelligent pigging. tabs., figs.

  1. Formation and stability of sputtered clusters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current theory for the formation of sputtered clusters states that either atoms are sputtered individually and aggregate after having left the surface or they are sputtered as complete clusters. There is no totally sharp boundary between the two interpretations, but experimental evidence is mainly thought to favour the latter model. Both theories demand a criterion for the stability of the clusters. In computer simulations of sputtering, the idea has been to use the same interaction potential as in the lattice computations to judge the stability. More qualitatively, simple geometrical shapes have also been looked for. It is found here, that evidence for 'magic numbers' and electron parity effects in clusters have existed in the sputtering literature for a long time, making more sophisticated stability criteria necessary. The breakdown of originally sputtered metastable clusters into stable clusters gives strong support to the 'sputtered as clusters' hypothesis. (author)

  2. Sputtering technology in solid film lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvins, T.

    1978-01-01

    Potential and present sputtering technology is discussed as it applies to the deposition of solid film lubricants particularly MoS2, WS2, and PTFE. Since the sputtered films are very thin, the selection of the sputtering parameters and substrate condition is very critical as reflected by the lubricating properties. It was shown with sputtered MoS2 films that the lubricating characteristics are directly affected by the selected sputtering parameters (power density, pressure, sputter etching, dc-biasing, etc.) and the substrate temperature, chemistry, topography and the environmental conditions during the friction tests. Electron microscopy and other surface sensitive analytical techniques illustrate the resulting changes in sputtered MoS2 film morphology and chemistry which directly influence the film adherence and frictional properties.

  3. The cathode plasma simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suksila, Thada

    Since its invention at the University of Stuttgart, Germany in the mid-1960, scientists have been trying to understand and explain the mechanism of the plasma interaction inside the magnetoplasmadynamics (MPD) thruster. Because this thruster creates a larger level of efficiency than combustion thrusters, this MPD thruster is the primary cadidate thruster for a long duration (planetary) spacecraft. However, the complexity of this thruster make it difficult to fully understand the plasma interaction in an MPD thruster while operating the device. That is, there is a great deal of physics involved: the fluid dynamics, the electromagnetics, the plasma dynamics, and the thermodynamics. All of these physics must be included when an MPD thruster operates. In recent years, a computer simulation helped scientists to simulate the experiments by programing the physics theories and comparing the simulation results with the experimental data. Many MPD thruster simulations have been conducted: E. Niewood et al.[5], C. K. J. Hulston et al.[6], K. D. Goodfellow[3], J Rossignol et al.[7]. All of these MPD computer simulations helped the scientists to see how quickly the system responds to the new design parameters. For this work, a 1D MPD thruster simulation was developed to find the voltage drop between the cathode and the plasma regions. Also, the properties such as thermal conductivity, electrical conductivity and heat capacity are temperature and pressure dependent. These two conductivity and heat capacity are usually definded as constant values in many other models. However, this 1D and 2D cylindrical symmetry MPD thruster simulations include both temperature and pressure effects to the electrical, thermal conductivities and heat capacity values interpolated from W. F. Ahtye [4]. Eventhough, the pressure effect is also significant; however, in this study the pressure at 66 Pa was set as a baseline. The 1D MPD thruster simulation includes the sheath region, which is the

  4. Microstructure and properties of sputtered thermal barrier coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Gao; Lun Xie; Feng Pan; Mengcheng Chen

    2004-01-01

    A 3 kW radio frequency (RF) magnetron-sputtering unit was used to produce zirconia ceramic coatings on hollow turbine blades and vanes, which had been deposited a NiCrAlY bond coat layer by cathodic arc deposition. The NiCrAlY coating surface was shot-peened, and the residual stress in the bond coat layer and the effects of heat treatment on the residual stress are presented.After shot peening porosities and microgaps disappear in the NiCrAlY bond coat, the whole depth profile is residual compressive stress. Coarseness tests show that the roughness value (Rz) decreases from 16.4 to 3.3 μm. The microstructure and phase composition of the coatings were investigated using electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that the NiCrAlY bond coat is composed of γ' and Cr phases, and the Al2O3 scales are formed near the interface between the ZrO2 ceramic layer and the NiCrAlY bond coat. No degradation occurred to RF sputtered ceramic coatings after oxidating at 1150℃ for 100 h,heating at 1150℃ for 5 min and then air-cooling for 500 thermal cycles.

  5. Deposition of chromium nitrides, oxy-nitrides and titanium carbides on steel substrates by DC magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present paper deals with the deposition of chromium and titanium nitrides, oxynitrides, carbides and carbonitrides onto low carbon steel by reactive magnetron sputtering. The films were obtained by using different reactive gases (02, N2, CH4,). The process advancement and the corresponding film composition variations were investigated as a function of the specific reactivity of each gas. In addition, the cathode poisoning phenomena were studied. (author). 4 refs., 6 figs

  6. The Fabrication of Flow Field Plates for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Using Lithography and Radio Frequency Sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ho; Kao, Mu-Jung; Chen, Chih-Hao; Cho, Kun-Ching; Hsu, Chun-Yao; Chen, Zhi-Lun

    2015-08-01

    This study uses lithography to etch flow fields on a single side of a printed circuit board (PCB) and combines a flow field plate with a collector plate to make innovative anode flow field plates and cathode flow field plates for a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). TiO2 thin film is also sputtered on the anode flow field plate using radio frequency (RF) sputtering. The experimental results show that the prepared DMFC has a better maximum power density of 11.928 mW/cm2. Furthermore, when a TiO2 thin film is sputtered on the flow field plate of the assembled DMFC, the maximum power density is 14.426 mW/cm2, which is actually 21% more than that for a DMFC with no TiO2 thin film coated on the flow field plate.

  7. A 10B-based neutron detector with stacked Multiwire Proportional Counters and macrostructured cathodes

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanescu, I; Birch, J; Defendi, I; Hall-Wilton, R; Hoglund, C; Hultman, L; Zee, M; Zeitelhack, K

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of the measurements of the detection efficiency for a 4.7 \\r{A} neutron beam incident upon a detector incorporating a stack of up to five MultiWire Proportional Counters (MWPC) with Boron-coated cathodes. The cathodes were made of Aluminum and had a surface exhibiting millimeter-deep V-shaped grooves of 45{\\deg}, upon which the thin Boron film was deposited by DC magnetron sputtering. The incident neutrons interacting with the converter layer deposited on the sidewalls of the grooves have a higher capture probability, owing to the larger effective absorption film thickness. This leads to a higher overall detection efficiency for the grooved cathode when compared to a cathode with a flat surface. Both the experimental results and the predictions of the GEANT4 model suggests that a 5-counter detector stack with coated grooved cathodes has the same efficiency as a 7-counter stack with flat cathodes. The reduction in the number of counters in the stack without altering the detection efficie...

  8. Collision-spike Sputtering of Au Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M

    2015-12-01

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For the particular case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31 % of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remainder is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80 % of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.

  9. Nanostructured lanthanum manganate composite cathode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wei Guo; Liu, Yi-Lin; Barfod, Rasmus;

    2005-01-01

    that the (La1-xSrx)(y)MnO3 +/-delta (LSM) composite cathodes consist of a network of homogenously distributed LSM, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), and pores. The individual grain size of LSM or YSZ is approximately 100 nm. The degree of contact between cathode and electrolyte is 39% on average. (c) 2005...

  10. Virtual cathode microwave devices -- Basics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thode, L.E.; Snell, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    Unlike a conventional microwave tube, a virtual-cathode device operates above the space-charge limit where the depth of the space-charge potential can cause electron reflection. The region associated with this electron reflection is referred to as a virtual cathode. Microwaves can be generated through oscillations in the position of the virtual cathode and through the bunching of electrons trapped in a potential well between the real and virtual cathodes. These two mechanisms are competitive. There are three basic classes of virtual cathode devices: (1) reflex triode; (2) reditron and side-shoot vircator; and (3) reflex diode or vircator. The reflex diode is the highest power virtual-cathode device. For the reflex diode the energy exchange between the beam and electromagnetic wave occurs in both the axial and radial directions. In some designs the oscillating-virtual-cathode frequency exceeds the reflexing-electron frequency exceeds the oscillating-virtual-cathode frequency. For the flex diode a periodic disruption in magnetic insulation can modulate the high- frequency microwave power. Overall, particle-in-cell simulation predictions and axial reflex diode experiments are in good agreement. Although frequency stability and phase locking of the reflex diode have been demonstrated, little progress has been made in efficiency enhancement. 58 refs., 11 figs.

  11. Virtual cathode microwave devices: Basics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thode, L. E.; Snell, C. M.

    Unlike a conventional microwave tube, a virtual-cathode device operates above the space-charge limit where the depth of the space-charge potential can cause electron reflection. The region associated with this electron reflection is referred to as a virtual cathode. Microwaves can be generated through oscillations in the position of the virtual cathode and through the bunching of electrons trapped in a potential well between the real and virtual cathodes. These two mechanisms are competitive. There are three basic classes of virtual cathode devices: (1) reflex triode; (2) reditron and side-shoot vircator; and (3) reflex diode or vircator. The reflex diode is the highest power virtual-cathode device. For the reflex diode the energy exchange between the beam and electromagnetic wave occurs in both the axial and radial directions. In some designs the oscillating virtual-cathode frequency exceeds the reflexing-electron frequency while in other designs the reflexing-electron frequency exceeds the oscillating virtual-cathode frequency. For the flex diode, a periodic disruption in magnetic insulation can modulate the high-frequency microwave power. Overall, particle-in-cell simulation predictions and axial reflex diode experiments are in good agreement. Although frequency stability and phase locking of the reflex diode have been demonstrated, little progress has been made in efficiency enhancement.

  12. Particle visualization in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering. I. 2D density mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britun, Nikolay, E-mail: nikolay.britun@umons.ac.be; Palmucci, Maria; Konstantinidis, Stephanos [Chimie des Interactions Plasma-Surface (ChIPS), CIRMAP, Université de Mons, 23 Place du Parc, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Snyders, Rony [Chimie des Interactions Plasma-Surface (ChIPS), CIRMAP, Université de Mons, 23 Place du Parc, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Materia Nova Research Center, Parc Initialis, B-7000 Mons (Belgium)

    2015-04-28

    Time-resolved characterization of an Ar-Ti high-power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge has been performed. This paper deals with two-dimensional density mapping in the discharge volume obtained by laser-induced fluorescence imaging. The time-resolved density evolution of Ti neutrals, singly ionized Ti atoms (Ti{sup +}), and Ar metastable atoms (Ar{sup met}) in the area above the sputtered cathode is mapped for the first time in this type of discharges. The energetic characteristics of the discharge species are additionally studied by Doppler-shift laser-induced fluorescence imaging. The questions related to the propagation of both the neutral and ionized discharge particles, as well as to their spatial density distributions, are discussed.

  13. Disorder-free sputtering method on graphene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xue Peng Qiu

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Deposition of various materials onto graphene without causing any disorder is highly desirable for graphene applications. Especially, sputtering is a versatile technique to deposit various metals and insulators for spintronics, and indium tin oxide to make transparent devices. However, the sputtering process causes damage to graphene because of high energy sputtered atoms. By flipping the substrate and using a high Ar pressure, we demonstrate that the level of damage to graphene can be reduced or eliminated in dc, rf, and reactive sputtering processes.

  14. Nitrogen dissociation during RF sputtering of Lipon electrolyte for all-solid-states batteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamate, Eugen; Christiansen, Ane Sælland; Holtappels, Peter

    2013-01-01

    phosphorus oxynitride (Lipon), that can be compacted with the anode and cathode electrodes in an all-solid-states structure where the nitrogen incorporation is considered one of the key parameters for controlling the ionic conductivity. In this work the nitrogen dissociation during RF sputtering of Lipon......Small size and high power density secondary batteries are desired for a large number of applications based on miniature wireless devices and sensors that need to be compatible with the microelectronic fabrication technology. This fact resulted in the development of solid electrolytes, like lithium...

  15. New oxygen radical source using selective sputtering of oxygen atoms for high rate deposition of TiO{sub 2} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, Yoji; Lei, Hao; Hoshi, Yoichi [Department of Electronics and Information Technology, Tokyo Polytechnic University, Kanagawa 243-0297 (Japan); State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Surface Engineering of Materials Division, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Department of Electronics and Information Technology, Tokyo Polytechnic University, Kanagawa 243-0297 (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    We have developed a new oxygen radical source based on the reactive sputtering phenomena of a titanium target for high rate deposition of TiO{sub 2} films. In this oxygen radical source, oxygen radicals are mainly produced by two mechanisms: selective sputter-emission of oxygen atoms from the target surface covered with a titanium oxide layer, and production of high-density oxygen plasma in the space near the magnetron-sputtering cathode. Compared with molecular oxygen ions, the amount of atomic oxygen radicals increased significantly with an increase in discharge current so that atomic oxygen radicals were mainly produced by this radical source. It should be noted that oxygen atoms were selectively sputtered from the target surface, and titanium atoms sputter-emitted from the target cathode were negligibly small. The amount of oxygen radicals supplied from this radical source increased linearly with increasing discharge current, and oxygen radicals of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} atoms/s/cm{sup 2} were supplied to the substrate surface at a discharge current of 1.2 A. We conclude that our newly developed oxygen radical source can be a good tool to achieve high rate deposition and to control the structure of TiO{sub 2} films for many industrial design applications.

  16. Low yield sputtering of monocrystalline metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, A. van; Fluit, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    Sputtering of monocrystalline metals by light noble gas ions is studied experimentally and theoretically at low primary ion energy. Evidence is found for a multiple collision process in which surface atoms are sputtered by backscattered ions. The introduction of the maximum recoil energy EM in the s

  17. STUDY ON THE TANTALIZING ON THE SURFACE OF TITANIUM ALLOY BY NET-SHAPE CATHODE GLOW DISCHARGING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F. Chen; H. Zhou; Y.F. Zhang; J.D. Pan

    2005-01-01

    A new net-shape cathode sputtering target which has a simple structure and a high sputtering was put forward. The multiple-structure made of alloying and coating layers of tantalum was achieved on the surface of TC4 (Ti6Al4V) using this method in double glow surface alloying process. The tantalized samples were investigated by SEM, XRD and electrochemical corrosion method .Results show the complicated tissue of pure tantalizing layer and diffusion layer was successfully formed on the surface of TC4 with the method of net-shape cathode glow discharge, which further improved the corrosion-resistance of TC4 and formed good corrosion-resistant alloys.

  18. Confined ion beam sputtering device and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, D.J.

    1986-03-25

    A hollow cylindrical target, lined internally with a sputter deposit material and open at both ends, surrounds a substrate on which sputtered deposition is to be obtained. An ion beam received through either one or both ends of the open cylindrical target is forced by a negative bias applied to the target to diverge so that ions impinge at acute angles at different points of the cylindrical target surface. The ion impingement results in a radially inward and downstream directed flux of sputter deposit particles that are received by the substrate. A positive bias applied to the substrate enhances divergence of the approaching ion beams to generate a higher sputtered deposition flux rate. Alternatively, a negative bias applied to the substrate induces the core portion of the ion beams to reach the substrate and provide ion polishing of the sputtered deposit thereon.

  19. Hydrogen-ion sputtering of borated graphite

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development and choice of material for the first wall and other energy-stressed parts of the discharge chamber are an important aspect of fusion reactor construction. In particular, carbon-graphite materials are proposed for making limiters and protective shields of the first wall and receiving plates of diverter devices. Sputtering under ion bombardment is one of the main mechanisms of material erosion; in addition, in the case of carbon-graphite materials chemical sputtering also occurs as a result of the formation of highly volatile hydrocarbon compounds during the reaction with ions of hydrogen isotopes. Sputtering MPG carbon-graphite materials and USB-15 carbon-fiber-reinforced glass ceramic has been well studied and experimental data have been obtained on the coefficients of physical and chemical sputtering. It has been determined that hydrogen-ion sputtering of USB-15 in the range from room temperature to 1070 K is less than that of MPG-8 graphite a factor of 2-10. Bulk doping of graphite with boron substantially reduces chemical sputtering. Since processes in the surface layers are crucially important in sputtering, the possibility of reducing chemical sputtering by surface boration of carbon-graphite materials has been explored. The objective of this work was to continue the experimental investigation to determine the physical processes of sputtering of surface-borated graphite under hydrogen-ion bombardment in the temperature range corresponding to maximum chemical sputtering. Surface boration of MPG-8 and USB-15 samples was carried out by vapor-phase isothermal deposition mediated by gaseous iodine at 1223 K for 4 h (the sample was placed in a pure boron stock). The mass transfer during the vapor-phase deposition is based on the difference of the chemical potentials of iodine and carbon under isothermal conditions. The samples of the initial and borated carbon-graphite materials irradiated with a poly-energetic beam of hydrogen ions

  20. Kinetic Behavior of LiFePO4/C Thin Film Cathode Material for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Kucinskis, G; Bajārs, G; Kleperis, J.; Smits, J.

    2010-01-01

    LiFePO4 was prepared in a solid state synthesis with various levels of carbon content. LiFePO4/C thin films were obtained via magnetron sputtering. The surface morphology and structure was examined. Electrochemical properties of LiFePO4/C were studied, by using cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Thin films acquired show a potential use as a cathode in lithium ion batteries, displaying charge capacity up to 34 mAh g-1.

  1. Hollow Cathode With Multiple Radial Orifices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Improved hollow cathode serving as source of electrons has multiple radial orifices instead of single axial orifice. Distributes ion current more smoothly, over larger area. Prototype of high-current cathodes for ion engines in spacecraft. On Earth, cathodes used in large-diameter ion sources for industrial processing of materials. Radial orientation of orifices in new design causes current to be dispersed radially in vicinity of cathode. Advantageous where desireable to produce plasma more nearly uniform over wider region around cathode.

  2. Boron ion beam generation utilizing lanthanum hexaboride cathodes: Comparison of vacuum arc and planar magnetron glow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Boron ion beams are widely used for semiconductor ion implantation and for surface modification for improving the operating parameters and increasing the lifetime of machine parts and tools. For the latter application, the purity requirements of boron ion beams are not as stringent as for semiconductor technology, and a composite cathode of lanthanum hexaboride may be suitable for the production of boron ions. We have explored the use of two different approaches to boron plasma production: vacuum arc and planar high power impulse magnetron in self-sputtering mode. For the arc discharge, the boron plasma is generated at cathode spots, whereas for the magnetron discharge, the main process is sputtering of cathode material. We present here the results of comparative test experiments for both kinds of discharge, aimed at determining the optimal discharge parameters for maximum yield of boron ions. For both discharges, the extracted ion beam current reaches hundreds of milliamps and the fraction of boron ions in the total extracted ion beam is as high as 80%

  3. Boron ion beam generation utilizing lanthanum hexaboride cathodes: Comparison of vacuum arc and planar magnetron glow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolaev, A. G.; Vizir, A. V.; Yushkov, G. Yu., E-mail: gyushkov@mail.ru; Frolova, V. P. [High Current Electronics Institute, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Oks, E. M. [High Current Electronics Institute, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    Boron ion beams are widely used for semiconductor ion implantation and for surface modification for improving the operating parameters and increasing the lifetime of machine parts and tools. For the latter application, the purity requirements of boron ion beams are not as stringent as for semiconductor technology, and a composite cathode of lanthanum hexaboride may be suitable for the production of boron ions. We have explored the use of two different approaches to boron plasma production: vacuum arc and planar high power impulse magnetron in self-sputtering mode. For the arc discharge, the boron plasma is generated at cathode spots, whereas for the magnetron discharge, the main process is sputtering of cathode material. We present here the results of comparative test experiments for both kinds of discharge, aimed at determining the optimal discharge parameters for maximum yield of boron ions. For both discharges, the extracted ion beam current reaches hundreds of milliamps and the fraction of boron ions in the total extracted ion beam is as high as 80%.

  4. Sputtering properties of redeposited graphite surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sputtering yields for carbon redeposited films, put down in the presence of high neutral hydrogen and helium background concentrations, have been measured. The data were obtained using the ion-surface interaction system (ISIS) which is an ion beam sputtering system capable of creating redeposited films and measuring sputtering yields. Yields were determined by calibrated collection of a portion of the sputtered material onto a quartz-crystal-microbalance. Incident ion beam energies ranged from 100 eV up to 10 keV. Sputtering yields for hydrogen and helium bombardment of redeposited films created in ISIS from targets of Union Carbide ATJ graphite are reported. In addition, yields obtained from ISIS proton and deuteron bombardment of Poco AXF-5Q graphite surfaces previously modified in PISCES are also presented. Measurements of sputtering yields from pristine, bulk samples are reported for comparison. Hydrogen sputtering yields from redeposited films generated in ISIS are 2.5 times higher than those of pristine ATJ at an incident energy of 100 eV. Above 200 eV, the hydrogen yields are a factor of 1.4 higher for the redeposited material. Helium yields are 34 times greater for redeposited films at 100 eV and remain as much as 10 times greater above 500 eV. Curve-fits to the data, obtained by incorporating an effective surface binding energy for the redeposited film into a semi-empirical yield expression, are also presented. (orig.)

  5. Sputtering erosion in ion and plasma thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Pradosh K.

    1995-08-01

    An experimental set-up to measure low-energy (below 1 keV) sputtering of materials is described. The materials to be bombarded represent ion thruster components as well as insulators used in the stationary plasma thruster. The sputtering takes place in a 9 inch diameter spherical vacuum chamber. Ions of argon, krypton and xenon are used to bombard the target materials. The sputtered neutral atoms are detected by a secondary neutral mass spectrometer (SNMS). Samples of copper, nickel, aluminum, silver and molybdenum are being sputtered initially to calibrate the spectrometer. The base pressure of the chamber is approximately 2 x 10(exp -9) Torr. the primary ion beam is generated by an ion gun which is capable of delivering ion currents in the range of 20 to 500 nA. The ion beam can be focused to a size approximately 1 mm in diameter. The mass spectrometer is positioned 10 mm from the target and at 90 deg angle to the primary ion beam direction. The ion beam impinges on the target at 45 deg. For sputtering of insulators, charge neutralization is performed by flooding the sample with electrons generated from an electron gun. Preliminary sputtering results, methods of calculating the instrument response function of the spectrometer and the relative sensitivity factors of the sputtered elements will be discussed.

  6. Ion beam sputter implantation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    By means of ion beam atomizing or sputtering an integrally composed coating, the composition of which continuously changes from 100% of the substrate to 100% of the coating, can be surfaced on a substrate (e.g. molten quartz on plastic lenses). In order to do this in the facility there is directed a primary beam of accelerated noble gas ions on a target from the group of the following materials: SiO2, Al2O3, Corning Glass 7070, Corning Glass 7740 or borosilicate glass. The particles leaving the target are directed on the substrate by means of an acceleration potential of up to 10 KV. There may, however, be coated also metal layers (Ni, Co) on a mylar film resulting in a semireflecting metal film. (RW)

  7. Sputtering of Surfaces of the Solid Hydrogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Thestrup Nielsen, Birgitte; Svendsen, Winnie Edith;

    1998-01-01

    Sputtering of the solid hydrogens by electrons and ions exhibits features that may be related to quantum properties of these solids, i.e. a drastic enhancement of the yield for electron–bombarded thick deuterium films and a thermal peak at low ejection energies in the energy distribution of the s......Sputtering of the solid hydrogens by electrons and ions exhibits features that may be related to quantum properties of these solids, i.e. a drastic enhancement of the yield for electron–bombarded thick deuterium films and a thermal peak at low ejection energies in the energy distribution...... of the sputtered particles....

  8. Composition of sputtered material from CuNi alloy during Xe + ion sputtering at elevated temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sekine, Shigeyuki; Shimizu, Hazime; Ichimura, Singo

    1995-04-01

    Polycrystalline CuNi alloys were sputtered by 3 kV Xe + ions at elevated temperatures to analyze the ion-beam-induced diffusion. The time evolution of the composition of the sputtered materials from the start of the sputtering was measured by TOF-SNMS (time-of-flight sputtered neutral mass spectrometry). During removal of the Gibbsian segregation layer of copper, the sputtered flux consisted of almost only copper atoms. Then, the copper content gradually decreased due to the formation of a sputter-induced copper-depleted surface layer, and reached an almost steady state with still higher copper content than the bulk composition. From the temperature dependence of the composition at the quasi-steady state the activation energy of copper transportation through a high diffusivity path was derived to be 54 kJ mol -1 (0.56 eV). The high diffusivity path was assigned to copper diffusion through grain boundaries.

  9. Deposition of Aluminium Oxide Films by Pulsed Reactive Sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinhui MAO; Bingchu CAI; Maosong WU; Guoping CHEN

    2003-01-01

    Pulsed reactive sputtering is a novel process used to deposit some compound films, which are not deposited by traditional D.C. reactive sputtering easily. In this paper some experimental results about the deposition of Al oxide films by pulsed reactive sputtering are presented. The hysteresis phenomenon of the sputtering voltage and deposition rate with the change of oxygen flow during sputtering process are discussed.

  10. Plasma-Surface Interactions in Hollow Cathode Discharges for Electric Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capece, Angela Maria

    surface state cannot be obtained because of the cathode geometry and high particles fluxes, measurements of the emitter temperature using a two-color pyrometer were used to determine the oxygen surface coverage and characterize the rate processes that occur during poisoning. A model describing the material transport in the plasma discharge was developed and is used to predict the barium and oxygen fluxes to the emitter surface during cathode operation by solving the species continuity and momentum equations. The dominant ionization process for molecular oxygen in the plasma gas is resonant charge exchange with xenon ions. Barium is effectively recycled in the plasma; however, BaO and O2 are not. The model shows that the oxygen flux to the surface is not diffusion limited. Experimental results indicate that the oxygen poisoning rate is slow and that the oxygen poisoning coverage on the emitter surface is less than 3%. A time-dependent model of the reaction kinetics of oxygen and barium at the tungsten surface was developed using the experimental results. The experiments and kinetics model indicate that the dominant processes at the emitter surface are dissociative adsorption of O2, sputtering of the O2 precursor, and desorption of O. Ion sputtering of the weakly bound O2 precursor state limits the poisoning rate and yields low oxygen coverage. Removal of chemisorbed atomic oxygen is dominated by thermal processes. Based on the low oxygen coverage and long poisoning transients, plasma cathodes appear to be able to withstand higher oxygen concentrations than vacuum cathodes.

  11. Chemically enhanced self-sputtering of carbon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    New results obtained for graphite self-sputtering, in the presence of thermal atomic hydrogen, show that Chemically Enhanced Self-Sputtering (CES) can exceed unity erosion yield even at normal angles of incidence. CES yields were found to depend on the ΦC+/ΦHo flux ratio and graphite temperature, with peak erosion occurring at about 800K. No dependence on angle of incidence was observed

  12. Heavy particle transport in sputtering systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieschmann, Jan

    2015-09-01

    This contribution aims to discuss the theoretical background of heavy particle transport in plasma sputtering systems such as direct current magnetron sputtering (dcMS), high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS), or multi frequency capacitively coupled plasmas (MFCCP). Due to inherently low process pressures below one Pa only kinetic simulation models are suitable. In this work a model appropriate for the description of the transport of film forming particles sputtered of a target material has been devised within the frame of the OpenFOAM software (specifically dsmcFoam). The three dimensional model comprises of ejection of sputtered particles into the reactor chamber, their collisional transport through the volume, as well as deposition of the latter onto the surrounding surfaces (i.e. substrates, walls). An angular dependent Thompson energy distribution fitted to results from Monte-Carlo simulations is assumed initially. Binary collisions are treated via the M1 collision model, a modified variable hard sphere (VHS) model. The dynamics of sputtered and background gas species can be resolved self-consistently following the direct simulation Monte-Carlo (DSMC) approach or, whenever possible, simplified based on the test particle method (TPM) with the assumption of a constant, non-stationary background at a given temperature. At the example of an MFCCP research reactor the transport of sputtered aluminum is specifically discussed. For the peculiar configuration and under typical process conditions with argon as process gas the transport of aluminum sputtered of a circular target is shown to be governed by a one dimensional interaction of the imposed and backscattered particle fluxes. The results are analyzed and discussed on the basis of the obtained velocity distribution functions (VDF). This work is supported by the German Research Foundation (DFG) in the frame of the Collaborative Research Centre TRR 87.

  13. Sputtering of sodium on the planet Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgrath, M. A.; Johnson, R. E.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown here that ion sputtering cannot account for the observed neutral sodium vapor column density on Mercury, but that it is an important loss mechanism for Na. Photons are likely to be the dominant stimulus, both directly through photodesorption and indirectly through thermal desorption of absorbed Na. It is concluded that the atmosphere produced is characterized by the planet's surface temperature, with the ion-sputtered Na contributing to a lesser, but more extended, component of the atmosphere.

  14. Sputtering graphite coating to improve the elevated-temperature cycling ability of the LiMn2O4 electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiexi; Zhang, Qiaobao; Li, Xinhai; Wang, Zhixing; Guo, Huajun; Xu, Daguo; Zhang, Kaili

    2014-08-14

    To improve the cycle performance of LiMn2O4 at elevated temperature, a graphite layer is introduced to directly cover the surface of a commercial LiMn2O4-based electrode via room-temperature DC magnetron sputtering. The as-modified cathodes display improved capacity retention as compared to the bare LiMn2O4 cathode (BLMO) at 55 °C. When sputtering graphite for 30 min, the sample shows the best cycling performance at 55 °C, maintaining 96.2% capacity retention after 200 cycles. Reasons with respect to the graphite layer for improving the elevated-temperature performance of LiMn2O4 are systematically investigated via the methods of cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectrometry, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. The results demonstrate that the graphite coated LiMn2O4 cathode has much less increased electrode polarization and electrochemical impedance than BLMO during the elevated-temperature cycling process. Furthermore, the graphite layer is able to alleviate the severe dissolution of manganese ions into the electrolyte and mitigate the morphological and structural degradation of LiMn2O4 during cycling. A model for the electrochemical kinetics process is also suggested for explaining the roles of the graphite layer in suppressing the Mn dissolution.

  15. Reservoir Cathode for Electric Space Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a reservoir cathode to improve performance in both ion and Hall-effect thrusters. We propose to adapt our existing reservoir cathode technology to this...

  16. Reservoir Cathode for Electric Space Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a hollow reservoir cathode to improve performance in ion and Hall thrusters. We will adapt our existing reservoir cathode technology to this purpose....

  17. Hollow cathode arc: effect of the cathode material on the internal plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In discharges with hollow cathodes functioning in the arc regime, the cathode emits thermionic electrons which ionize the gas. To reduce the electrical power consumed by these discharges, cathodes made of thoriated tungsten and lathanum hexaboride have been used. The parameters of the plasma generated into the cathode have been measured with electrostatic probes. (Auth.)

  18. Mechanistic Enhancement of SOFC Cathode Durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachsman, Eric [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Durability of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) under “real world” conditions is an issue for commercial deployment. In particular cathode exposure to moisture, CO2, Cr vapor (from interconnects and BOP), and particulates results in long-term performance degradation issues. Here, we have conducted a multi-faceted fundamental investigation of the effect of these contaminants on cathode performance degradation mechanisms in order to establish cathode composition/structures and operational conditions to enhance cathode durability.

  19. Sputtered film thermistor IR detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliga, Shankar B.; Rost, Martin R.; Doctor, Alan P.

    1994-07-01

    The thermistor infrared detector or bolometer is the detector of choice in many classical remote sensing applications such as horizon sensing, noncontact thermometry, and industrial applications. In recent years, the authors have developed a thin film process where the thermistor material is deposited from a target directly onto the substrate. This is an advance over the labor intensive ceramic technology, where sintered flakes of the thermistor are bonded to the substrate. The thin film technique permits a variety of device constructions and configurations. Detectors fabricated on heat-sunk ceramic substrates can withstand high operating temperatures and large incident optical power, in both pulsed and CW laser measurements. For dc or low frequency measurements, the films can be deposited onto a thermally isolated membrane with applications in motion sensing, gas detection, and temperature measurement. Utilizing advances in micromachining a 2D array of thermally isolated microbolometer sensors, integrated onto a silicon wafer containing readout circuitry may be achieved. This paper describes the construction of the sputtered film thermistor detectors, their operation, and applications.

  20. Laser-induced fluorescence monitoring of the gas phase in a glow discharge during reactive sputtering of vanadium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khvostikov, V. A.; Grazhulene, S. S.; Burmii, Zh. P.; Marchenko, V. A.

    2011-11-01

    Processes in the gas phase of a glow discharge during diode and magnetron reactive sputtering of vanadium in an Ar-O2 atmosphere have been investigated by laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) as a function of the parameters of the glow discharge and the composition of the atmosphere. The intensity of the fluorescence spectra increased by 1.5-2.0 orders of magnitude in the magnetron sputtering process compared with that of diode sputtering. Under continuous sputtering conditions, the dependences of the intensities and relative compositions of the fluorescence spectra on the discharge parameters (discharge voltage and current) have been investigated. In pulsed mode of the glow discharge, the dynamics of changes in the spectra have been studied versus variations in the discharge duration and the lag time for recording the fluorescence signal. The dependence of the spectral line intensities on the partial pressure of oxygen has been found for vanadium and its oxide. The cathode surface at pressures of 0.03-0.04 Pa was shown to convert to the oxidized state.

  1. Novel Cathodes Prepared by Impregnation Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eduardo Paz

    2006-09-30

    (1) We showed that similar results were obtained when using various LSM precursors to produce LSM-YSZ cathodes. (2) We showed that enhanced performance could be achieved by adding LSCo to LSMYSZ cathodes. (3) We have preliminary results showing that there is a slow deactivation with LSFYSZ cathodes.

  2. Computer simulation of sputtering of graphite target in magnetron sputtering device with two zones of erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanov R.V.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A computer simulation program for discharge in a magnetron sputtering device with two erosion zones was developed. Basic laws of the graphite target sputtering process and transport of sputtered material to the substrate were taken into account in the Monte Carlo code. The results of computer simulation for radial distributions of density and energy flux of carbon atoms on the substrate (at different values of discharge current and pressure of the working gas confirmed the possibility of obtaining qualitative homogeneous films using this magnetron sputtering device. Also the discharge modes were determined for this magnetron sputtering device, in which it was possible to obtain such energy and density of carbon atoms fluxes, which were suitable for deposition of carbon films containing carbon nanotubes and other nanoparticles.

  3. Energetic deposition of metal ions: Observation of self-sputtering and limited sticking for off-normal angles of incidence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wu, Hongchen; Anders, Andre

    2009-09-15

    The deposition of films under normal and off-normal angle of incidence has been investigated to show the relevance of non-sticking of and self-sputtering by energetic ions, leading to the formation of neutral atoms. The flow of energetic ions was obtained using a filtered cathodic arc system in high vacuum and therefore the ion flux had a broad energy distribution of typically 50-100 eV per ion. The range of materials included Cu, Ag, Au, Ti, and Ni. Consistent with molecular dynamics simulations published in the literature, the experiments show, for all materials, that the combined effects of non-sticking and self-sputtering are very significant, especially for large off-normal angles. Modest heating and intentional introduction of oxygen background affect the results.

  4. Influence of temperature on the microstructure of V2O5 film prepared by DC magnetron sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Qing; PAN Xiaojun; XIE Erqing; WANG Yinyue; QIU Jiawen; LIU Xueqin

    2006-01-01

    V2O5 films were prepared on silicon wafers by DC magnetron sputtering and post-annealing under various conditions. The influence of depositing and post-annealing temperatures on microstructure of V2O5 films was studied by XRD and Raman scattering measurements. The results reveal that sputtered V2O5 films show preferred growth orientation along (001) planes and the c -axis is perpendicular to the silicon substrate surface. It is interesting to find that both the V2O5 film deposited at temperature of 511 ℃ and the one annealed at 500℃ exhibit desirable layer-type structure of orthorhombic symmetry. Such layer-typed V2O5 films are promising candidates for cathodes of rechargeable lithiumor magnesium thin-film batteries.

  5. The pumping of hydrogen and helium by sputter-ion pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, K.M.; Pate, D.J.; Todd, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    The pumping of hydrogen in diode and triode sputter-ion pumps is discussed. The type of cathode material used in these pumps is shown to have a significant impact on the effectiveness with which hydrogen is pumped. Examples of this include data for pumps with aluminum and titanium-alloy cathodes. Diode pumps with aluminum cathodes are shown to be no more effective in the pumping of hydrogen than in the pumping of helium. The use of titanium or titanium alloy anodes is also shown to measurably impact on the speed of these pumps at.very low pressures. This stems from the fact that hydrogen is [times]10[sup 6] more soluble in titanium than in stainless steel. Hydrogen becomes resident in the anodes because of fast neutral burial. Lastly, quantitative data are given for the He speeds and capacities of both noble and conventional diode and triode pumps. The effectiveness of various pump regeneration procedures, subsequent to the pumping of He, is reported.These included bakeout and N[sub 2] glow discharge cleaning. The comparative desorption of He with the subsequent pumping of N[sub 2] is reported on. The N[sub 2] speed of these pumps was used as the benchmark for defining the size of the pumps vs. their respective He speeds.

  6. The pumping of hydrogen and helium by sputter-ion pumps. Revision 3/93

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, K.M.; Pate, D.J.; Todd, R.J.

    1992-12-31

    The pumping of hydrogen in diode and triode sputter-ion pumps is discussed. The type of cathode material used in these pumps is shown to have a significant impact on the effectiveness with which hydrogen is pumped. Examples of this include data for pumps with aluminum and titanium-alloy cathodes. Diode pumps with aluminum cathodes are shown to be no more effective in the pumping of hydrogen than in the pumping of helium. The use of titanium or titanium alloy anodes is also shown to measurably impact on the speed of these pumps at.very low pressures. This stems from the fact that hydrogen is {times}10{sup 6} more soluble in titanium than in stainless steel. Hydrogen becomes resident in the anodes because of fast neutral burial. Lastly, quantitative data are given for the He speeds and capacities of both noble and conventional diode and triode pumps. The effectiveness of various pump regeneration procedures, subsequent to the pumping of He, is reported.These included bakeout and N{sub 2} glow discharge cleaning. The comparative desorption of He with the subsequent pumping of N{sub 2} is reported on. The N{sub 2} speed of these pumps was used as the benchmark for defining the size of the pumps vs. their respective He speeds.

  7. Ion beam sputtering of Ag – Angular and energetic distributions of sputtered and scattered particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feder, René, E-mail: rene.feder@iom-leipzig.de; Bundesmann, Carsten; Neumann, Horst; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2013-12-01

    Ion beam sputter deposition (IBD) provides intrinsic features which influence the properties of the growing film, because ion properties and geometrical process conditions generate different energy and spatial distribution of the sputtered and scattered particles. A vacuum deposition chamber is set up to measure the energy and spatial distribution of secondary particles produced by ion beam sputtering of different target materials under variation of geometrical parameters (incidence angle of primary ions and emission angle of secondary particles) and of primary ion beam parameters (ion species and energies). A representative set of Ag thin films is deposited arranged on a substrate holder equatorial to the Ag target in steps of 10° and characterized concerning their film thickness by profilometry to determine the angular distribution of the sputtered particles. The film thickness distributions show a tilted, cosine-like shape and a shifting of the maximum position depending on the primary particle energy and incidence angle of the primary ions. The energy distributions of sputtered and scattered ions and of sputtered neutrals are measured with an energy-selective mass spectrometer. The average energy of the sputtered ions increases with increasing emission angle and also increases with increasing incidence angle of the primary ions. In contrast, the average energy of the sputtered ions is nearly unaffected by the primary particle energy and particle species. The energy distribution of the scattered Ar ions reveals high energetic maxima which shift with increasing emission angle to higher energies. These maxima are not observed for Xe bombardment. The total energies of sputtered and scattered ions show significant differences between the two bombarding species. The maximum of the energy distribution of sputtered Ag neutrals is used to conclude on the surface binding energy of Ag (2.72 eV). All experimental data are compared with Monte Carlo simulations done with

  8. Optical properties of diamond like carbon films containing copper, grown by high power pulsed magnetron sputtering and direct current magnetron sputtering: Structure and composition effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study chemical composition, structure and optical properties of hydrogenated diamond like carbon films containing copper (DLC:Cu films) deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering were studied. Different modes of deposition — direct current (DC) sputtering and high power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) as well as two configurations of the magnetron magnetic field (balanced and unbalanced) were applied. X-ray diffractometry, Raman scattering spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to study the structure and composition of the films. It was shown that by using HIPIMS mode contamination of the cathode during the deposition of DLC:Cu films can be suppressed. In all cases oxygen atomic concentration in the films was in 5–10 at.% range and it increased with the copper atomic concentration. The highest oxygen content was observed in the films deposited employing low ion/neutral ratio balanced DC magnetron sputtering process. According to the analysis of the parameters of Raman scattering spectra, sp3/sp2 bond ratio decreased with the increase of Cu atomic concentration in the DLC films. Clear dependence of the extinction, absorbance and reflectance spectra on copper atomic concentration in the films was observed independently of the method of deposition. Surface plasmon resonance effect was observed only when Cu atomic concentration in DLC:Cu film was at least 15 at.%. The maximum of the surface plasmon resonance peak of the absorbance spectra of DLC:Cu films was in 600–700 nm range and redshifted with the increase of Cu amount. The ratio between the intensities of the plasmonic peak and hydrogenated amorphous carbon related peak at ~ 220 nm both in the extinction and absorbance spectra as well as peak to background ratio of DLC:Cu films increased linearly with Cu amount in the investigated 0–40 at.% range. Reflectance of the plasmonic DLC:Cu films was in 30–50% range that could be important in

  9. Cathodic protection to control microbiologically influenced corrosion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information about the cathodic protection performance in environments with microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC) effects is very fragmented and often contradictory. Not enough is known about the microbial effects on cathodic protection effectiveness, criteria, calcareous deposits, corrosion rates and possible hydrogen embrittlement of titanium and some stainless steel condenser tubes. This paper presents a review of cathodic protection systems, describes several examples of cathodic protection in environments with MIC effects and provides preliminary conclusions about cathodic protection design parameters, criteria and effectiveness in MIC environments. 30 refs

  10. Cathodes for molten-salt batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Argade, Shyam D.

    1993-02-01

    Viewgraphs of the discussion on cathodes for molten-salt batteries are presented. For the cathode reactions in molten-salt cells, chlorine-based and sulfur-based cathodes reactants have relatively high exchange current densities. Sulfur-based cathodes, metal sulfides, and disulfides have been extensively investigated. Primary thermal batteries of the Li-alloy/FeS2 variety have been available for a number of years. Chlorine based rechargable cathodes were investigated for the pulse power application. A brief introduction is followed by the experimental aspects of research, and the results obtained. Performance projections to the battery system level are discussed and the presentation is summarized with conclusions.

  11. Magnetron sputtered lithium niobate films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The preparation of lithium niobate films on Corning 7059 glass by rf planar magnetron sputtering in an Ar + 40% 02 mixture has been studied at 2 mtorr. Films deposited on unheated substrates became crazed by release of a tensile stress arising from the difference between the expansion coefficient of the glass and the coating. Improvement of surface cleanliness by discharge cleaning or solvent degreasing using iso-propyl alcohol in a Soxhlet extractor enhanced the film/substrate adhesion. This prevented crazing, but the transparent films produced were still under stress. Glass surfaces cleaned sufficiently for high film adhesion had a coefficient of static friction, glass on glass, of greater than of the order of 0.8. A lithium niobate powder target was used because the uneven heating arising from magnetron discharge localization resulted in fracture of single crystal material. Care was taken to remove all water vapour from the discharge atmosphere using liquid nitrogen traps, for without these the coatings produced were optically absorbing, due to oxide reduction, presumably formed by an active hydrogen reaction. The refractive index of the films, as determined from their waveguiding characteristics, was in the region of 2.10-2.20. Trial coatings grown at 380degC and above had indices in the region of 2.19; these high temperature films were also transparent but under tensile stress. The growth rates ranged from 9.5 A min-1 for a substrate temperature of 3800C to 11.5 A min-1 for a substrate temperature of 4700C. (author)

  12. Synopsis of Cathode No.4 Activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this report is to describe the activation of the fourth cathode installed in the DARHT-II Injector. Appendices have been used so that an extensive amount of data could be included without danger of obscuring important information contained in the body of the report. The cathode was a 612 M type cathode purchased from Spectra-Mat. Section II describes the handling and installation of the cathode. Section III is a narrative of the activation based on information located in the Control Room Log Book supplemented with time plots of pertinent operating parameters. Activation of the cathode was performed in accordance with the procedure listed in Appendix A. The following sections provide more details on the total pressure and constituent partial pressures in the vacuum vessel, cathode heater power/filament current, and cathode temperature

  13. Hybrid microwave oscillators with a virtual cathode

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A review is given of the developments and theoretical investigations of a fundamentally new class of microwave devices, namely, hybrid microwave oscillators with a virtual cathode, which combine the useful properties of virtual cathodes with the advantages of those traditional microwave oscillators that operate with subcritical-current beams and have a high efficiency in generating ultrarelativistic electron beams. Among such devices are the following: a hybrid diffractional microwave oscillator with a virtual cathode, a hybrid gyro-device with a virtual cathode, a hybrid beam-plasma vircator, a hybrid gyrocon with a virtual cathode, a hybrid Cherenkov oscillator with a virtual cathode, a hybrid microwave oscillator of the 'vircator + traveling-wave tube' type, an original two-beam tube with a virtual cathode, and a klystron-like vircator

  14. Magnetron sputtering of transparent conductive zinc oxide: relation between the sputtering parameters and the electronic properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetron sputtering of transparent conductive oxides (zinc oxide, indium tin oxide, tin oxide) is a promising technique which allows the deposition of films at low temperatures with good optical and electronic properties. A special advantage is the scalability to large areas. The principles underlying magnetron sputtering are reviewed in this paper. The growth process during magnetron sputtering is characterized by the bombardment of the growing film with species from the sputtering target and from the plasma. In addition to sputtered atoms with energies in the eV range, ions from the plasma (mostly argon) and neutral atoms (also argon) reflected at the target hit the growing film. Depending on the energy of these species and on the ion-to-neutral ratio the properties of the films vary. High energies (≥100 eV), which occur mainly at low sputtering pressures lead to damage of the growing film, connected with mechanical stress, small crystallites and bad electrical parameters. Ion assisted growth with low ion energies (below about 50 eV) is advantageous as is a high ion-to-neutral ratio. A compilation of resistivities of magnetron sputtered zinc oxide films yields a limiting resistivity of 2x10-4 Ω cm for polycrystalline films. Based on the correlation between plasma parameters and film properties new search fields are anticipated. (author)

  15. Numerical Study of Hall Thruster Plume and Sputtering Erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Potential sputtering erosion caused by the interactions between spacecraft and plasma plume of Hall thrusters is a concern for electric propulsion. In this study, calculation model of Hall thruster’s plume and sputtering erosion is presented. The model is based on three dimensional hybrid particle-in-cell and direct simulation Monte Carlo method (PIC/DSMC method which is integrated with plume-wall sputtering yield model. For low-energy heavy-ion sputtering in Hall thruster plume, the Matsunami formula for the normal incidence sputtering yield and the Yamamura angular dependence of sputtering yield are used. The validation of the simulation model is realized through comparing plume results with the measured data. Then, SPT-70’s sputtering erosion on satellite surfaces is assessed and effect of mass flow rate on sputtering erosion is analyzed.

  16. CME impact on Mercury's sputtered exospheric environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfleger, M.; Lichtenegger, H. I. M.; Lammer, H.; Mura, A.; Wurz, P.; Martin-Fernandez, J. A.

    2013-09-01

    Solar wind and magnetospheric plasma precipitation onto the surface of Mercury triggers the formation of exospheric particle populations by sputtering processes. Numerical modeling of Mercury's magnetosphere has shown that the weak intrinsic magnetic field of the planet is sufficient to prevent the equatorial regions from being impacted by solar wind ions during moderate solar wind conditions. However, intense fluxes of protons are expected to hit the auroral regions, giving rise to the release of surface elements at high latitudes by ion sputtering. During high solar wind dynamic pressure conditions in the case of CME events, the solar wind protons will have access to Mercury's entire dayside surface, which may result in a considerable filling of the exosphere by sputtered surface material.

  17. Sputtering and mixing of supported nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiménez-Sáez, J.C., E-mail: jc.jimenez@upm.es [Dept. Física y Química Aplicadas a la Técnica Aeronaútica, ETSIAE, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM), 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pérez-Martín, A.M.C.; Jiménez-Rodríguez, J.J. [Dept. Física Aplicada III (Electricidad y Electrónica), Facultad de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-12-01

    Sputtering and mixing of Co nanoparticles supported in Cu(0 0 1) under 1-keV argon bombardment are studied using molecular-dynamics simulations. Particles of different initial size have been considered. The cluster height decreases exponentially with increasing fluence. In nanoparticles, sputtering yield is significantly enhanced compared to bulk. In fact, the value of this magnitude depends on the cluster height. A theoretical model for sputtering is introduced with acceptable results compared to those obtained by simulation. Discrepancies happen mainly for very small particles. Mixing rate at the interface is quantified; and besides, the influence of border effects for clusters of different initial size is assessed. Mixing rate and border length–surface area ratio for the initial interface show a proportionality relation. The phenomenon of ion-induced burrowing of metallic nanoparticles is analysed.

  18. Electrochemical Behaviour of Sputtering Deposited DLC Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUErjia; ZENGA; LIULX

    2003-01-01

    Diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were deposited via magnetron sputtering process. The energetic ion hombardment on the surface of growing film is one of the major parameters that control the atom mobility on the flirt1 surface and further the physical and chemical characteristics of the films. In this study, the energy of carbon ions was monitored by changing sputtering powerdensity, and its effect on the electrochemical performance of the films was investigated. For the deposition at a higher sputtering power density, a higher sp3 content in the DLC films was achieved with denser structure and increased film-substrate adhesion. The impedance at the interface of Si substrate/sulfufic acid solution was significantly enhanced, and at the same time higher film resistance, lower capacitance, higher breakdown potential and longer breakdown time were observed, which were related to the significant sp3 content of the DLC films.

  19. Electrochemical Behaviour of Sputtering Deposited DLC Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Erjia; ZENG A,LIU L X

    2003-01-01

    Diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were deposited via magnetron sputtering process. The energetic ion bombardment on the surface of growing film is one of the major parameters that control the atom mobility on the film surface and further the physical and chemical characteristics of the films. In this study, the energy of carbon ions was monitored by changing sputtering power density, and its effect on the electrochemical performance of the films was investigated. For the deposition at a higher sputtering power density, a higher sp3 content in the DLC films was achieved with denser structure and increased film-substrate adhesion. The impedance at the interface of Si substrate/sulfuric acid solution was significantly enhanced, and at the same time higher film resistance, lower capacitance, higher breakdown potential and longer breakdown time were observed, which were related to the significant sp3 content of the DLC films.

  20. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlan U. Anderson; Fatih Dogan; Vladimir Petrovsky

    2002-03-31

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. This period has continued to address the problem of making dense 1/2 to 5 {micro}m thick dense layers on porous substrates (the cathode LSM). Our current status is that we are making structures of 2-5 cm{sup 2} in area, which consist of either dense YSZ or CGO infiltrated into a 2-5 {micro}m thick 50% porous layer made of either nanoncrystalline CGO or YSZ powder. This composite structure coats a macroporous cathode or anode; which serves as the structural element of the bi-layer structure. These structures are being tested as SOFC elements. A number of structures have been evaluated both as symmetrical and as button cell configuration. Results of this testing indicates that the cathodes contribute the most to cell losses for temperatures below 750 C. In this investigation different cathode materials were studied using impedance spectroscopy of symmetric cells and IV characteristics of anode supported fuel cells. Cathode materials studied included La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (LSCF), La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LSM), Pr{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (PSCF), Sm{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF), and Yb{sub .8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF). A new technique for filtering the Fourier transform of impedance data was used to increase the sensitivity of impedance analysis. By creating a filter specifically for impedance spectroscopy the resolution was increased. The filter was tailored to look for specific circuit elements like R//C, Warburg, or constant phase elements. As many as four peaks can be resolved using the filtering technique on symmetric cells. It may be possible to relate the different peaks to material parameters, like the oxygen exchange coefficient. The cathode grouped in order from lowest to highest ASR is

  1. The sputter generation of negative ion beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief review is given of recent progress toward a quantitative understanding of negative ion formation by sputtering from surfaces covered with fractional layers of highly electropositive adsorbates. Practical models developed for estimating changes in work functions Δφ by electropositive adsorbates are described. The secondary negative ion generation process is examined through the use of composite energy/velocity dependent analytical models. These models are used to illustrate the effect of work function on the energy distributions of negative ions sputter ejected from a polycrystalline molybdenum surface covered with fractional layers of cesium. Predictions are also made of the functional dependence of the probability for negative ion formation on cesium coverage. The models predict energy distributions which are in basic disagreement with experimental observations, implying their inappropriateness for describing the sputter negative ion generation process. We have also developed a model for calculating sputter ratios based on the use of simple scaling procedures to bring Sigmund theory into close agreement with experimental observation accounting for the threshold effect. Scaling factors for projectile energies E > 1000 eV are found to be independent of energy while those for projectile energies Eth < E < 1000 eV were found to be energy dependent. In this study, the model and scaling techniques utilized to bring Sigmund theory into agreement with experiment are discussed in detail and several examples provided which illustrate the versatility, accuracy and utility of the model. In the present report, we describe the model and apply it to the case of sputtering a selected number of metals with energetic cesium ions. In particular, we present sputter ratio information for a number of Cs-projectile/metal-target combinations; the targets are bombarded at normal incidence to the surface

  2. Characterization of Hydroxyapatite Film on Titanium Substrate by Sputtering Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Radiofrequent magnetron sputtering technique was used to produce calcium phosphate coated on the titanium substrates, and the sputtered coating films were crystallized in an autoclave at 110 ℃ using a low temperature hydrothermal technique. The crystallization of as- sputtered coating film on the titanium substrates were amorphous calcium phosphate film. However, after the hydrothermal technique, calcium phosphate crystals grew and these were columnar crystal. The Ca/ P ratio of sputtered coating films in 1.6 to 2.0.

  3. Qualitative criterion for atom sputtering angle distributions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model is introduced to explain the shape of atom polar emission angle distributions for monocomponent targets sputtered by normally incident keV - energy ions. Analytical expressions are obtained from the model which make it possible to identify three known kinds of the angle distributions - subcosinus, isotropic and supracosinus, for given ion energies and target-ion pairs. Furthermore the fourth, hybrid false-isotropic distribution is found, which is superposition of supracosinus and subcosinus distributions. The theoretical predictions of the angle distributions shape agree with the numerical modeling for sputtering of carbon and platinum by 0.1-10 keV Ar+ ions

  4. Collimated Magnetron Sputter Deposition for Mirror Coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vickery, A.; Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Christensen, Finn Erland;

    2008-01-01

    At the Danish National Space Center (DNSC), a planar magnetron sputtering chamber has been established as a research and production coating facility for curved X-ray mirrors for hard X-ray optics for astronomical X-ray telescopes. In the following, we present experimental evidence...... that a collimation of the sputtered particles is an efficient way to suppress the interfacial roughness of the produced multilayer. We present two different types of collimation optimized for the production of low roughness curved mirrors and flat mirrors, respectively....

  5. Magnetospheric Sputtering Source of the Moon's Exosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, L. E.; Wilson, J. K.; Mendillo, M.

    2002-09-01

    Observations of lunar eclipses over the past decade have revealed that the Moon's transient sodium atmosphere at full Moon is both denser and more extended near equinox than it is near solstice. This fact suggests the presence of a variable magnetospheric source of sodium. An investigation of this source is carried out by modeling combinations of two sources: a constant source from micrometeor sputtering and photon-stimulated desorption, and a variable source (presumably plasma sputtering), which is higher during equinox conditions and lower during solstice conditions.

  6. Sputtering of dimers off a silicon surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nietiadi, Maureen L.; Rosandi, Yudi; Kopnarski, Michael; Urbassek, Herbert M.

    2012-10-01

    We present experimental and molecular-dynamics simulation results of the sputtering of a Si surface by 2 keV Ar ions. Results on both the monomer and dimer distributions are presented. In simulation, these distributions follow a generalized Thompson law with power exponent n=2 and n=3, respectively. The experimental data, obtained via plasma post-ionization in an SNMS (secondary neutral mass spectrometry) apparatus, show good agreement with respect to the dimer fraction, and the relative energy distributions of dimers and monomers. The consequences for the dimer sputtering mechanism are discussed.

  7. Sputtering of dimers off a silicon surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nietiadi, Maureen L. [Physics Department, University Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Strasse, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Research Center OPTIMAS, University Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Strasse, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Rosandi, Yudi [Physics Department, University Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Strasse, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Research Center OPTIMAS, University Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Strasse, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Department of Physics, Universitas Padjadjaran, Jatinangor, Sumedang 45363 (Indonesia); Kopnarski, Michael [Physics Department, University Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Strasse, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Research Center OPTIMAS, University Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Strasse, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Institut fuer Oberflaechen- und Schichtanalytik IFOS GmbH, Trippstadter Strasse 120, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Urbassek, Herbert M., E-mail: urbassek@rhrk.uni-kl.de [Physics Department, University Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Strasse, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Research Center OPTIMAS, University Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Strasse, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    We present experimental and molecular-dynamics simulation results of the sputtering of a Si surface by 2 keV Ar ions. Results on both the monomer and dimer distributions are presented. In simulation, these distributions follow a generalized Thompson law with power exponent n=2 and n=3, respectively. The experimental data, obtained via plasma post-ionization in an SNMS (secondary neutral mass spectrometry) apparatus, show good agreement with respect to the dimer fraction, and the relative energy distributions of dimers and monomers. The consequences for the dimer sputtering mechanism are discussed.

  8. Cross-field diode sputtering target assembly

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An improved cross-field diode sputtering target assembly adapted for sputtering a selected material having an ion target wherein a selected surface is formed of a selected material in a predetermined closed loop pattern having a central opening therein, and wherein the selected surface has spaced edges and is formed of a material adapted to be controllably eroded in a diode sputtering process, walls positioned contiguous or adjacent to each of the spaced edges of the selected surface wherein each of the walls extend substantially normal from and beyond each spaced edge of the selected surface of the ion target and a magnetic member having poles positioned in an opposed spaced relationship to each other and enclosing the walls and the ion target for providing a linear magnetic field through the walls, over the selected surface and through the ion target and wherein the magnetic member has a linear magnetic field of sufficient strength for plasma entrapment between the walls and over the selected surface wherein the selected surface is adapted to have an electric field applied thereacross at a direction substantially normal to the magnetic field to develop a BXE field and to entrap secondary electrons at the selected surface to control the erosion pattern thereof is shown. A method for utilizing the improved cross-field diode sputtering target assembly is also shown

  9. Lithium insertion in sputtered vanadium oxide film

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    West, K.; Zachau-Christiansen, B.; Skaarup, S.V.;

    1992-01-01

    were oxygen deficient compared to V2O5. Films prepared in pure argon were reduced to V(4) or lower. The vanadium oxide films were tested in solid-state lithium cells. Films sputtered in oxygen showed electrochemical properties similar to crystalline V2O5. The main differences are a decreased capacity...

  10. RF Sputtering of Gold Contacts On Niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    Reliable gold contacts are deposited on niobium by combination of RF sputtering and photolithography. Process results in structures having gold only where desired for electrical contact. Contacts are stable under repeated cycling from room temperature to 4.2 K and show room-temperature contact resistance as much as 40 percent below indium contacts made by thermalcompression bonding.

  11. A pulsed cathodic arc spacecraft propulsion system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, P. R. C.; Bilek, M. M. M.; Tarrant, R. N.; McKenzie, D. R.

    2009-11-01

    We investigate the use of a centre-triggered cathodic arc as a spacecraft propulsion system that uses an inert solid as a source of plasma. The cathodic vacuum arc produces almost fully ionized plasma with a high exhaust velocity (>104 m s-1), giving a specific impulse competitive with other plasma or ion thrusters. A centre trigger design is employed that enables efficient use of cathode material and a high pulse-to-pulse repeatability. We compare three anode geometries, two pulse current profiles and two pulse durations for their effects on impulse generation, energy and cathode material usage efficiency. Impulse measurement is achieved through the use of a free-swinging pendulum target constructed from a polymer material. Measurements show that impulse is accurately controlled by varying cathode current. The cylindrical anode gave the highest energy efficiency. Cathode usage is optimized by choosing a sawtooth current profile. There is no requirement for an exhaust charge neutralization system.

  12. Characterization of sputtered ZnO films under different sputter-etching time of substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Cui-ping; YANG Bao-he; QIAN Li-rong; XU Sheng; DAI Wei; LI Ming-ji; LI Xiao-wei; GAO Cheng-yao

    2011-01-01

    Polycrystalline ZnO films are prepared using radio frequency magnetron sputtering on glass substrates which are sputteretched for different time.Both the size of ZnO grains and the root-mean-square (RMS) roughness decrease,as the sputteretching time of the substrate increases.More Zn atoms are bound to O atoms in the films,and the defect concentration is decreased with increasing sputter-etching time of substrate.Meanwhile,the crystallinity and c-axis orientation are improved at longer sputter-etching time of the substrate.The Raman peaks at 99 cm-1,438 cm-1 and 589 cm-1 are identified as E2(low),E2(high) and E1(LO) modes,respectively,and the position of E1(LO) peak blue shifts at longer sputter-etching time.The transmittances of the films,which are deposited on the substrate and etched for 10 min and 20 min,are higher in the visible region than that of the films deposited under longer sputter-etching time of 30 min.The bandgap increases from 3.23 eV to 3.27 eV with the increase of the sputter-etching time of substrate.

  13. Cathode materials: A personal perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodenough, John B. [Texas Materials Institute, University of Texas at Austin, ETC 9.102, 1 University Station, Austin, TX 78712-1063 (United States)

    2007-12-06

    A thermodynamically stable rechargeable battery has a voltage limited by the window of the electrolyte. An aqueous electrolyte has a window of 1.2 eV, which prevents achieving the high energy density desired for many applications. A non-aqueous electrolyte with a window of 5 eV requires Li{sup +} rather than H{sup +} as the working ion. Early experiments with Li{sub x}TiS{sub 2} cathodes showed competitive capacity and rate capability, but problems with a lithium anode made the voltage of a safe cell based on a sulfide cathode too low to be competitive with a nickel/metal-hydride battery. Transition-metal oxides can give voltages of 4.5 V versus Li{sup +}/Li{sup 0}. However, the challenge with oxides has been to obtain a competitive capacity and rate capability while retaining a high voltage with low-cost, environmentally friendly cathode materials. Comparisons will be made between layered Li{sub 1-x}MO{sub 2}, spinels Li{sub 1-x}[M{sub 2}]O{sub 4}, and olivines Li{sub 1-x}MPO{sub 4} having 0 < x < 1. Although higher capacities can be obtained with layered Li{sub 1-x}MO{sub 2} compounds, which have enabled the wireless revolution, their metastability makes them unlikely to be used in power applications. The spinel and olivine framework structures have been shown to be capable of charge/discharge rates of over 10C with a suitable temperature range for plug-in hybrid vehicles. (author)

  14. Cathode-follower power amplifier

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In circular accelerators and particularly in storage rings it is essential that the total impedance, as seen by the beam, be kept below some critical value. A model of the accelerating system was built using a single-ended cathode-follower amplifier driving a ferrite-loaded cavity. The system operated at 234.5 kHz with a peak output voltage of +-10 kV on the gap. The dynamic output impedance, as measured on the gap, was < 15 ohms

  15. A novel sputtered Pd mesh architecture as an advanced electrocatalyst for highly efficient hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lucas-Consuegra, Antonio; de la Osa, Ana R.; Calcerrada, Ana B.; Linares, José J.; Horwat, David

    2016-07-01

    This study reports the preparation, characterization and testing of a sputtered Pd mesh-like anode as an advanced electrocatalyst for H2 production from alkaline ethanol solutions in an Alkaline Membrane Electrolyzer (AEM). Pd anodic catalyst is prepared by magnetron sputtering technique onto a microfiber carbon paper support. Scanning Electron Microscopy images reveal that the used preparation technique enables to cover the surface of the carbon microfibers exposed to the Pd target, leading to a continuous network that also maintains part of the original carbon paper macroporosity. Such novel anodic architecture (organic binder free) presents an excellent electro-chemical performance, with a maximum current density of 700 mA cm-2 at 1.3 V, and, concomitantly, a large H2 production rate with low energy requirement compared to water electrolysis. Potassium hydroxide emerges as the best electrolyte, whereas temperature exerts the expected promotional effect up to 90 °C. On the other hand, a 1 mol L-1 ethanol solution is enough to guarantee an efficient fuel supply without any mass transfer limitation. The proposed system also demonstrates to remain stable over 150 h of operation along five consecutives cycles, producing highly pure H2 (99.999%) at the cathode and potassium acetate as the main anodic product.

  16. Structural and electrical characterization of magnetron sputtered MoO3 thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin films of molybdenum oxide were deposited on glass and crystalline silicon substrates using dc magnetron sputtering method by sputtering of molybdenum target in the presence of oxygen and argon gas mixture under various oxygen partial pressures in the range 8x10-5 - 8x10-4 mbar. The glow discharge characteristics of the molybdenum cathode under various oxygen partial pressures were studied. The effect of oxygen partial pressure on the core level binding energy, structure, mechanical and electrical properties of the films was systematically studied. The films formed at oxygen partial pressures -4 mbar contained the MoO3 and MoO3-x phases. The films deposited at oxygen partial pressures of 2x10-4 mbar were stoichiometric with single phase orthorhombic α- MoO3. The electrical conductivity of films decreased from 4x10-5 to 1.6x10-6 Ω-1cm-1 with increase of oxygen partial pressure from 8x10-5 to 8x10-4 mbar.

  17. Structure and electron emission characteristics of sputtered rare-earth hexaboride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thermionic coatings based on the hexaborides of rare-earth elements were deposited onto molybdenum and tungsten substrates using dc magnetron sputtering from LaB6, CeB6, SmB6 and YB6 targets. Films were investigated by means of scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. The work function and electron emission characteristics of the coatings were studies by the thermionic emission method and by the contact potential method. After optimization of the sputtering parameters extremely fine-columnar coatings consisting of predominantly (100) oriented La-B, Ce-B and Sm-B crystals were obtained. The Y-b films showed nearly amorphous film growth. The work function was measured to be in the range of 2.6 to 3.3 eV. Coated cathodes worked with comparable electron emission current at temperatures approximately 1000 deg C below the operating temperature of uncoated tungsten filaments. (author). 9 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab., 4 photos

  18. A comparative research on magnetron sputtering and arc evaporation deposition of Ti-Al-N coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ti-Al-N coating has been proven to be an effective protective coating for machining applications. Here, the differences of cubic Ti-Al-N coatings with a similar Ti/Al atomic ratio of 1 deposited by magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc evaporation have been studied in detail. Main emphasis was laid on the characterization of thermal stability and cutting performance. Both coatings during annealing exhibit a structural transformation into stable phases c-TiN and h-AlN via an intermediate step of spiondal decomposition with the precipitation of c-AlN, however, a difference in decomposition process. Compared to sputtered coating inserts, an increase of tool life-time by 42% is obtained by evaporated coating inserts at the higher speed of 200 m/min, whereas the similar cutting life is observed at the speed of 160 m/min. It is attributed to the better stability of evaporated coating due to its later structural transformation at elevated temperature. A post-deposition vacuum annealing of both coated inserts in their corresponding temperature range of spiondal decomposition improves their cutting performance due to an increase in hardness arising from the precipitation of coherent cubic-phase nanometer-size c-AlN domains. Additionally, the sputtered coating behaves in worse oxidation resistance due to its more open structure. These behaviors can be understood considering the difference in microstructure and morphology of as deposited coatings originating from adatom mobility of deposited particles, where arc evaporation technique with higher ion to neutral ratio shows higher adatom mobility.

  19. Hollow cathode lamp-construction aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The hollow cathode discharge is a source used for absorption and fluorescence atomic spectrophotometry. In this paper various aspect like construction, cleanliness and operation have been described. The life time of the hollow cathode discharge for specific current is about 500 hs. The range of current for the non significant self-absorption of the recommended wavelenght has been determinated. (Author)

  20. Klystron Amplifier Utilizing Scandate Cathode and Electrostatic Focusing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to build an electrostatically focused klystron that exploits recent breakthroughs in scandate cathode technology. We have built cathodes with greater...

  1. Characterization of the plasma in a radio-frequency magnetron sputtering system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to understand the fundamental mechanisms in a radio-frequency magnetron sputtering system, the main properties of the argon plasma used in the process have been measured. A complete three-dimensional map of the ion density, electron temperature, and plasma potential has been obtained using a Langmuir probe. The electron temperature as well as the ion density have been found to increase in the region of the so called race track at the cathode. Furthermore, from the plasma potential map, the time-averaged local electric field has been obtained, pointing out the race track as the region where the most intense ion bombardment takes place. Besides, only the ions produced near the race track are accelerated towards the cathode, whereas those produced in the remaining volume move towards the anode. Finally, the dependence of the plasma quantities on the incident radio-frequency power and deposition pressure has been studied. The plasma potential measured using the Langmuir probe has been found to agree with that determined using an energy resolved mass spectrometer in all studied conditions

  2. Sputter-initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new technique, sputter-initiated resonance ionization spectroscopy (SIRIS), which provides an ultrasensitive analysis of solid samples for all elements except helium and neon is described in this paper. Sensitivities down to 1 part in 1012 should be available in routine SIRIS analysis, and greater sensitivities should be available for special cases. The basic concepts of this technology and early results in the development of the new SIRIS process and apparatus are presented. (Auth.)

  3. Magnetron sputtering of thin nitride films

    OpenAIRE

    Kola, Prashanthi V

    1995-01-01

    The objective in this investigation was to design and commission a magnetron sputter deposition system and investigate the properties of hard coatings for mechanical and biomedical applications. The deposition of titanium (Ti) and titanium nitride (TiN) was undertaken as part of the commissioning tests and further work was conducted on the effect of the deposition parameters on the properties of TiN, specifically for biocompatible applications. A thorough understanding of the deposition proce...

  4. Niobium sputter deposition on quarter wave resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Viswanadham, C; Jayaprakash, D; Mishra, R L

    2003-01-01

    Niobium sputter deposition on quarter wave copper R.F resonators, have been taken up in our laboratory, An ultra high vacuum system was made for this purpose. Niobium exhibits superconducting properties at liquid Helium temperature. A uniform coating of about 1.5 mu m of niobium on the internal surfaces of the copper resonant cavities is desired. Power dissipation in the resonators can be greatly reduced by making the internal surfaces of the R.F cavity super conducting. (author)

  5. Sputter coating of microspherical substrates by levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, A.T.; Hosford, C.D.

    Microspheres are substantially uniformly coated with metals or nonmetals by simltaneously levitating them and sputter coating them at total chamber pressures less than 1 torr. A collimated hole structure comprising a parallel array of upwardly projecting individual gas outlets is machined out to form a dimple. Glass microballoons,, which are particularly useful in laser fusion applications, can be substantially uniformly coated using the coating method and apparatus.

  6. GaAs Films Prepared by RF-Magnetron Sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.H. Ouyang; D.L. Rode; T. Zulkifli; B. Abraham-Shrauner; N. Lewis; M.R. Freeman

    2001-08-01

    The authors reported on the optical absorption, adhesion, and microstructure of RF-magnetron sputtered films of hydrogenated amorphous and microcrystalline GaAs films for the 1 to 25 {micro}m infrared wavelength rate. Sputtering parameters which were varied include sputtering power, temperature and pressure, and hydrogen sputtering-gas concentration. TEM results show a sharp transition from purely amorphous GaAs to a mixture of microcrystalline GaAs in an amorphous matrix at 34 {+-} 2 C. By optimizing the sputtering parameters, the optical absorption coefficient can be decreased below 100 cm{sup -1} for wavelengths greater than about 1.25 {micro}m. These results represent the lowest reported values of optical absorption for sputtered films of GaAs directly measured by spectrophotometry for the near-infrared wavelength region.

  7. SPUTTERING FROM A POROUS MATERIAL BY PENETRATING IONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Nieva, J. F. [Instituto Balseiro, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina); Bringa, E. M. [CONICET and Instituto de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, 5500 Mendoza (Argentina); Cassidy, T. A. [CalTech/JPL, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Johnson, R. E.; Fama, M.; Baragiola, R. A. [Laboratory for Atomic and Surface Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Caro, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 94551 (United States); Loeffler, M. J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Astrochemistry Branch, Code 691, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Farkas, D. [Department of Materials Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2011-12-10

    Porous materials are ubiquitous in the universe and weathering of porous surfaces plays an important role in the evolution of planetary and interstellar materials. Sputtering of porous solids in particular can influence atmosphere formation, surface reflectivity, and the production of the ambient gas around materials in space. Several previous studies and models have shown a large reduction in the sputtering of a porous solid compared to the sputtering of the non-porous solid. Using molecular dynamics simulations we study the sputtering of a nanoporous solid with 55% of the solid density. We calculate the electronic sputtering induced by a fast, penetrating ion, using a thermal spike representation of the deposited energy. We find that sputtering for this porous solid is, surprisingly, the same as that for a full-density solid, even though the sticking coefficient is high.

  8. Sputtering from a Porous Material by Penetrating Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Nieva, J. F.; Bringa, E. M.; Cassidy, T. A.; Johnson, R. E.; Caro, A.; Fama, M.; Loeffler, M. J.; Baragiola, R. A.; Farkas, D.

    2011-12-01

    Porous materials are ubiquitous in the universe and weathering of porous surfaces plays an important role in the evolution of planetary and interstellar materials. Sputtering of porous solids in particular can influence atmosphere formation, surface reflectivity, and the production of the ambient gas around materials in space. Several previous studies and models have shown a large reduction in the sputtering of a porous solid compared to the sputtering of the non-porous solid. Using molecular dynamics simulations we study the sputtering of a nanoporous solid with 55% of the solid density. We calculate the electronic sputtering induced by a fast, penetrating ion, using a thermal spike representation of the deposited energy. We find that sputtering for this porous solid is, surprisingly, the same as that for a full-density solid, even though the sticking coefficient is high.

  9. Closed field magnetron sputtering: new generation sputtering process for optical coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, D. R.; Brinkley, I.; Waddell, E. M.; Walls, J. M.

    2008-09-01

    "Closed field" magnetron (CFM) sputtering offers a flexible and high throughput deposition process for optical coatings and thin films. CFM sputtering uses two or more different metal targets to deposit multilayers comprising a wide range of dielectrics, metals and conductive oxides. Moreover, CFM provides a room temperature deposition process with high ion current density, low bias voltage and reactive oxidation in the entire volume around the rotating substrate drum carrier, thereby producing films over a large surface area at high deposition rate with excellent and reproducible optical properties. Machines based on the Closed Field are scaleable to meet a range of batch and in-line size requirements. Typically, thin film thickness control to designed rotating shutter mechanism. This paper presents data on optical properties for CFM deposited optical coatings, including anti-reflection, thermal control filters, graded coatings, narrowband filters as well as conductive transparent oxides such as indium tin oxide and carbide films. Benefits of the CFM sputter process are described.

  10. Reactive magnetron sputtering : from fundamentals to high deposition rate processes

    OpenAIRE

    Kubart, Tomas

    2013-01-01

    Reactive magnetron sputtering is widely used for synthesis of various compound thin films. The technique is very versatile and scalable. Especially in industry, high productivity is essential and there is a need for processes with high deposition rates. Achieving high deposition rate and true compound stoichiometry of the deposited film is, however, challenging in reactive sputtering. As a consequence of complex interaction between the reactive gas and the sputtered metal, the relation betwee...

  11. Improvement in luminance efficiency of organic light emitting diodes by suppression of secondary electron bombardment of substrate during sputter deposition of top electrode films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaguchi, Daichi; Kobayashi, Shin-ichi; Uchida, Takayuki; Sawada, Yutaka; Lei, Hao; Hoshi, Yoichi

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the degradation mechanisms of the luminance performance of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) when their top electrode films were deposited by sputter deposition process. During the sputter deposition of the top electrode films, the suppression of the incidence of high-energy electrons on the substrate was attempted using various methods. As a result, we found that during electrode deposition, the incidence of the high-energy secondary electrons, which were emitted from the target surface, on the substrate was the main cause of the significant degradation of the luminance performance. It was also found that the application of a magnetic field by setting permanent magnets near the substrate holder and the insertion of a shield plate near the target cathode were effective in suppressing the incidence of secondary electrons on the substrate.

  12. Hall-effect thruster--Cathode coupling: The effect of cathode position and magnetic field topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerville, Jason D.

    2009-12-01

    Hall-effect thruster (HET) cathodes are responsible for the generation of the free electrons necessary to initiate and sustain the main plasma discharge and to neutralize the ion beam. The position of the cathode relative to the thruster strongly affects the efficiency of thrust generation. However, the mechanisms by which the position affects the efficiency are not well understood. This dissertation explores the effect of cathode position on HET efficiency. Magnetic field topology is shown to play an important role in the coupling between the cathode plasma and the main discharge plasma. The position of the cathode within the magnetic field affects the ion beam and the plasma properties of the near-field plume, which explains the changes in efficiency of the thruster. Several experiments were conducted which explored the changes of efficiency arising from changes in cathode coupling. In each experiment, the thrust, discharge current, and cathode coupling voltage were monitored while changes in the independent variables of cathode position, cathode mass flow and magnetic field topology were made. From the telemetry data, the efficiency of the HET thrust generation was calculated. Furthermore, several ion beam and plasma properties were measured including ion energy distribution, beam current density profile, near-field plasma potential, electron temperature, and electron density. The ion beam data show how the independent variables affected the quality of ion beam and therefore the efficiency of thrust generation. The measurements of near-field plasma properties partially explain how the changes in ion beam quality arise. The results of the experiments show that cathode position, mass flow, and field topology affect several aspects of the HET operation, especially beam divergence and voltage utilization efficiencies. Furthermore, the experiments show that magnetic field topology is important in the cathode coupling process. In particular, the magnetic field

  13. Sputtering materials for VLSI and thin film devices

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkar, Jaydeep

    2010-01-01

    An important resource for students, engineers and researchers working in the area of thin film deposition using physical vapor deposition (e.g. sputtering) for semiconductor, liquid crystal displays, high density recording media and photovoltaic device (e.g. thin film solar cell) manufacturing. This book also reviews microelectronics industry topics such as history of inventions and technology trends, recent developments in sputtering technologies, manufacturing steps that require sputtering of thin films, the properties of thin films and the role of sputtering target performance on overall p

  14. Modeling and stability analysis of the nonlinear reactive sputtering process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    György Katalin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The model of the reactive sputtering process has been determined from the dynamic equilibrium of the reactive gas inside the chamber and the dynamic equilibrium of the sputtered metal atoms which form the compound with the reactive gas atoms on the surface of the substrate. The analytically obtained dynamical model is a system of nonlinear differential equations which can result in a histeresis-type input/output nonlinearity. The reactive sputtering process has been simulated by integrating these differential equations. Linearization has been applied for classical analysis of the sputtering process and control system design.

  15. Batteries: Overview of Battery Cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doeff, Marca M

    2010-07-12

    The very high theoretical capacity of lithium (3829 mAh/g) provided a compelling rationale from the 1970's onward for development of rechargeable batteries employing the elemental metal as an anode. The realization that some transition metal compounds undergo reductive lithium intercalation reactions reversibly allowed use of these materials as cathodes in these devices, most notably, TiS{sub 2}. Another intercalation compound, LiCoO{sub 2}, was described shortly thereafter but, because it was produced in the discharged state, was not considered to be of interest by battery companies at the time. Due to difficulties with the rechargeability of lithium and related safety concerns, however, alternative anodes were sought. The graphite intercalation compound (GIC) LiC{sub 6} was considered an attractive candidate but the high reactivity with commonly used electrolytic solutions containing organic solvents was recognized as a significant impediment to its use. The development of electrolytes that allowed the formation of a solid electrolyte interface (SEI) on surfaces of the carbon particles was a breakthrough that enabled commercialization of Li-ion batteries. In 1990, Sony announced the first commercial batteries based on a dual Li ion intercalation system. These devices are assembled in the discharged state, so that it is convenient to employ a prelithiated cathode such as LiCoO{sub 2} with the commonly used graphite anode. After charging, the batteries are ready to power devices. The practical realization of high energy density Li-ion batteries revolutionized the portable electronics industry, as evidenced by the widespread market penetration of mobile phones, laptop computers, digital music players, and other lightweight devices since the early 1990s. In 2009, worldwide sales of Li-ion batteries for these applications alone were US$ 7 billion. Furthermore, their performance characteristics (Figure 1) make them attractive for traction applications such as

  16. Batteries: Overview of Battery Cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doeff, Marca M

    2010-07-12

    The very high theoretical capacity of lithium (3829 mAh/g) provided a compelling rationale from the 1970's onward for development of rechargeable batteries employing the elemental metal as an anode. The realization that some transition metal compounds undergo reductive lithium intercalation reactions reversibly allowed use of these materials as cathodes in these devices, most notably, TiS{sub 2}. Another intercalation compound, LiCoO{sub 2}, was described shortly thereafter but, because it was produced in the discharged state, was not considered to be of interest by battery companies at the time. Due to difficulties with the rechargeability of lithium and related safety concerns, however, alternative anodes were sought. The graphite intercalation compound (GIC) LiC{sub 6} was considered an attractive candidate but the high reactivity with commonly used electrolytic solutions containing organic solvents was recognized as a significant impediment to its use. The development of electrolytes that allowed the formation of a solid electrolyte interface (SEI) on surfaces of the carbon particles was a breakthrough that enabled commercialization of Li-ion batteries. In 1990, Sony announced the first commercial batteries based on a dual Li ion intercalation system. These devices are assembled in the discharged state, so that it is convenient to employ a prelithiated cathode such as LiCoO{sub 2} with the commonly used graphite anode. After charging, the batteries are ready to power devices. The practical realization of high energy density Li-ion batteries revolutionized the portable electronics industry, as evidenced by the widespread market penetration of mobile phones, laptop computers, digital music players, and other lightweight devices since the early 1990s. In 2009, worldwide sales of Li-ion batteries for these applications alone were US$ 7 billion. Furthermore, their performance characteristics (Figure 1) make them attractive for traction applications such as

  17. Tribological and structural properties of titanium nitride and titanium aluminum nitride coatings deposited with modulated pulsed power magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Logan

    The demand for economical high-performance materials has brought attention to the development of advanced coatings. Recent advances in high power magnetron sputtering (HPPMS) have shown to improve tribological properties of coatings. These coatings offer increased wear and oxidation resistance, which may facilitate the use of more economical materials in harsh applications. This study demonstrates the use of novel forms of HPPMS, namely modulated pulsed-power magnetron sputtering (MPPMS) and deep oscillation magnetron sputtering (DOMS), for depositing TiN and Ti1-xAlxN tribological coatings on commonly used alloys, such as Ti-6Al-4V and Inconel 718. Both technologies have been shown to offer unique plasma characteristics in the physical vapor deposition (PVD) process. High power pulses lead to a high degree of ionization compared to traditional direct-current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) and pulsed magnetron sputtering (PMS). Such a high degree of ionization was previously only achievable by cathodic arc deposition (CAD); however, CAD can lead to increased macroparticles that are unfavorable in high friction and corrosive environments. MPPMS, DOMS, and other HPPMS techniques offer unique plasma characteristics and have been shown to produce coatings with refined grain structure, improved density, hardness, adhesion, and wear resistance. Using DOMS and MPPMS, TiN and Ti1-xAlxN coatings were deposited using PMS to compare microstructures and tribological performance. For Ti1-xAlxN, two sputtering target compositions, Ti 0.5Al0.5 and Ti0.3Al0.7, were used to evaluate the effects of MPPMS on the coating's composition and tribological properties. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize microstructure and crystallographic texture. Several tribological properties were evaluated including: wear rate, coefficient of friction, adhesion, and nanohardness. Results show that substrate

  18. Plasma distribution of cathodic ARC deposition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, S.; Raoux, S.; Krishnan, K.; MacGill, R.A.; Brown, I.G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The plasma distribution using a cathodic arc plasma source with and without magnetic macroparticle filter has been determined by depositing on a transparent plastic substrate and measuring the film absorption. It was found that the width of the distribution depends on the arc current, and it also depends on the cathode material which leads to a spatial separation of the elements when an alloy cathode is used. By applying a magnetic multicusp field near the exit of the magnetic filter, it was possible to modify the plasma distribution and obtain a flat plasma profile with a constant and homogeneous elemental distribution.

  19. Cyclotron resonance in a cathode ray tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Absorption of the RF energy by the electron beam in a cathode ray tube due to the cyclotron resonance is described. The cathode ray tube is placed within a Helmholtz coils system supplied by a sawtooth current generator. In order to generate RF field and to detect RF absorption a gate dip-meter equipped with a FET transistor is used. The bias voltage variations of the FET transistors as a function of the magnetic field are recorded. The operating point of the cathode ray tube has been chosen so that the relaxation oscillations of the detection system can be observed. (authors)

  20. High power microwave generation from coaxial virtual cathode oscillator using graphite and velvet cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Rakhee; Roy, Amitava; Singh, S. K.; Mitra, S.; Sharma, Vishnu; Kumar, Senthil; Sharma, Archana; Nagesh, K. V.; Mittal, K. C.; Chakravarthy, D. P.

    2010-05-01

    High power microwave (HPM) generation studies were carried out in KALI-5000 pulse power system. The intense relativistic electron beam was utilized to generate HPMs using a coaxial virtual cathode oscillator. The typical electron beam parameters were 350 kV, 25 kA, and 100 ns, with a few hundreds of ampere per centimeter square current density. Microwaves were generated with graphite and polymer velvet cathode at various diode voltage, current, and accelerating gaps. A horn antenna setup with diode detector and attenuators was used to measure the microwave power. It was observed that the microwave power increases with the diode voltage and current and reduces with the accelerating gap. It was found that both the peak power and width of the microwave pulse is larger for the velvet cathode compared to the graphite cathode. In a coaxial vircator, velvet cathode is superior to the graphite cathode due to its shorter turn on time and better electron beam uniformity.

  1. Niobium sputter-coated copper resonators

    CERN Document Server

    Benvenuti, Cristoforo; Campisi, I E; Darriulat, Pierre; Durand, C; Peck, M A; Russo, R; Valente, A M

    1998-01-01

    Niobium sputter-coated copper resonators are successfully employed in operating particle accelerators, the most outstanding example being LEP2 at CERN. In this review we present recent progress in the understanding of the basic principles governing their behaviour, based on an extensive R&D programme carried out at CERN on 1.5 GHz resonators operated in the TM010 mode. At the present stage of the s tudy, no fundamental limitation has been found which would prevent the use of this technology for future high-field, high-Q accelerating cavities.

  2. Coating metals on micropowders by magnetron sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Magnetron sputtering was used to coat various metals on micropowder surfaces. By using this method, the fine particles are better dispersed and can therefore be coated more homogeneously. The micro-powders used include cenospheres from fly ash of coal-burning electric power plants (diameter 40-200 μm and particle density 0.7±0.1 g/cm3), as well as carborundum particles of different sizes. Aluminum, silver, copper, cobalt and nickel were used as the coating metals. Tests showed that the coated metal film was compact adhering tightly on the base powders, and the coated powders possess adequate flow properties.

  3. RF Electron Gun with Driven Plasma Cathode

    CERN Document Server

    Khodak, Igor

    2005-01-01

    It's known that RF guns with plasma cathodes based on solid-state dielectrics are able to generate an intense electron beam. In this paper we describe results of experimental investigation of the single cavity S-band RF gun with driven plasma cathode. The experimental sample of the cathode based on ferroelectric ceramics has been designed. Special design of the cathode permits to separate spatially processes of plasma development and electron acceleration. It has been obtained at RF gun output electron beam with particle energy ~500 keV, pulse current of 4 A and pulse duration of 80 ns. Results of experimental study of beam parameters are referred in. The gun is purposed to be applied as the intense electron beam source for electron linacs.

  4. Hollow cathode ion source without magnetic field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On the base of the IBM-4 ion source a hollow cathode source operating in the continuous regime is developed. The gas discharge chamber diameter equals 100 mm, chamber height - 50 mm. A hollow cathode represents a molybdenum tube with an internal diameter 13 mm and wall thickness 0,7-0,8 mm. An emitter is manufactured from zirconium carbide and lanthanum hexaboride. The investigations of the source operation have shown both cathodes operated efficiency. Electron emission density consitutes 25 A/cm2. At the 50 A discharge current ion current density in a center of plasma emitter constitutes 120 mA/cm2. As a result of the investigations carried out the compatibility of the hollow cathode and the IBM-type source is shown

  5. Reservoir Scandate Cathode for Electric Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to combine two revolutionary cathode technologies into a single device for use in electric space propulsion. This will overcome problems that both...

  6. High current density cathode for electrorefining in molten electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shelly X.

    2010-06-29

    A high current density cathode for electrorefining in a molten electrolyte for the continuous production and collection of loose dendritic or powdery deposits. The high current density cathode eliminates the requirement for mechanical scraping and electrochemical stripping of the deposits from the cathode in an anode/cathode module. The high current density cathode comprises a perforated electrical insulated material coating such that the current density is up to 3 A/cm.sup.2.

  7. Salt taste inhibition by cathodal current

    OpenAIRE

    Hettinger, Thomas P.; Frank, Marion E.

    2009-01-01

    Effects of cathodal current, which draws cations away from the tongue and drives anions toward the tongue, depend on the ionic content of electrolytes through which the current is passed. To address the role of cations and anions in human salt tastes, cathodal currents of −40 to −80 µA were applied to human subjects’ tongues through supra-threshold salt solutions. The salts were sodium chloride, sodium bromide, potassium chloride, ammonium chloride, calcium chloride, sodium nitrate, sodium su...

  8. Co-Flow Hollow Cathode Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Richard R.; Goebel, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    Hall thrusters utilize identical hollow cathode technology as ion thrusters, yet must operate at much higher mass flow rates in order to efficiently couple to the bulk plasma discharge. Higher flow rates are necessary in order to provide enough neutral collisions to transport electrons across magnetic fields so that they can reach the discharge. This higher flow rate, however, has potential life-limiting implications for the operation of the cathode. A solution to the problem involves splitting the mass flow into the hollow cathode into two streams, the internal and external flows. The internal flow is fixed and set such that the neutral pressure in the cathode allows for a high utilization of the emitter surface area. The external flow is variable depending on the flow rate through the anode of the Hall thruster, but also has a minimum in order to suppress high-energy ion generation. In the co-flow hollow cathode, the cathode assembly is mounted on thruster centerline, inside the inner magnetic core of the thruster. An annular gas plenum is placed at the base of the cathode and propellant is fed throughout to produce an azimuthally symmetric flow of gas that evenly expands around the cathode keeper. This configuration maximizes propellant utilization and is not subject to erosion processes. External gas feeds have been considered in the past for ion thruster applications, but usually in the context of eliminating high energy ion production. This approach is adapted specifically for the Hall thruster and exploits the geometry of a Hall thruster to feed and focus the external flow without introducing significant new complexity to the thruster design.

  9. Lattice dynamics during electronic sputtering of solid Ne

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutkiewicz, L.; Pedrys, R.; Schou, Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    Electronic sputtering of solid neon has been studied with molecular dynamics. The cavity formation around an excited atom and particle migration in the surface region, as well as the sputtering process have been studied. A single atomic exciton has been observed to produce a desorption of up...

  10. Growth of brass nanofilms sputtered on organic substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhen-xing; WANG Ling-sen; HUANG Bai-yun

    2005-01-01

    The growth of brass nanofilms sputtered on acrylics substrate was studied through experimental investigation of the effect of sputtering voltage, target-to-substrate distance, chamber pressure and sputtering time on the content, growth rate and surface morphology of brass nanofilms. The results show that compared with original brass target, Cu content in brass nanofilms changes by no more than 6.23% (mass fraction). High sputtering voltage and short target-to-substrate distance help to improve brass nanofilm deposition rate. There exists an optimal chamber pressure where deposition rate of nanofilm reaches the maximum. The key factor affecting surface morphology is the kinetic energy of sputtering particles. Low sputtering voltage, large target-to-substrate distance and low chamber pressure are very important for the formation of the high-quality brass nanofilms. The brass films prepared under the conditions of sputtering voltage 1.6 kV, target-to-substrate distance 2.5 cm, chamber pressure 10 Pa and sputtering time 20 min, possess following characteristics: smooth and uniform surface, thickness of 41 nm and Cu content of 71.0% (mass fraction).

  11. Sputtering of solid nitrogen by keV helium ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, O.; Schou, Jørgen; Sørensen, H.;

    1993-01-01

    Solid nitrogen has become a standard material among the frozen molecular gases for electronic sputtering. We have combined measurements of sputtering yields and energy spectra from nitrogen bombarded by 4-10 keV helium ions. The data show that the erosion is electronic rather than knockon...

  12. Sputtering of the most volatile solids: The solid hydrogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Stenum, B.; Ellegaard, O.;

    1995-01-01

    Electronic sputtering of the three stable hydrogenic solids, H-2, HD and D-2 by keV hydrogen and deuterium ions has been studied at the low-temperature setup at Riso. The yield of the sputtered particles has been determined for hydrogenic films of thicknesses ranging from 0.1 X 10(18) up to 10 X 10...

  13. Sputtering of Ge(001): transition between dynamic scaling regimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smilgies, D.-M.; Eng, P.J.; Landemark, E.;

    1997-01-01

    We have studied the dynamic behavior of the Ge(001) surface during sputtering in situ and in real time using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. We find two dynamic regimes as a function of surface temperature and sputter current which are separated by a sharp transition. The boundary between these two...

  14. Sputtering of Thick Deuterium Films by KeV Electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thestrup Nielsen, Birgitte; Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Schou, Jørgen;

    1994-01-01

    Sputtering of thick films of solid deuterium up to several μm by keV electrons is reported for the first time. The sputtering yield increases within a narrow range of thicknesses around 1.6 μm by about 2 orders of magnitude for 1.5 keV electrons. A similar behavior has not been observed for ion...

  15. Development of plasma cathode electron guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oks, Efim M.; Schanin, Peter M.

    1999-05-01

    The status of experimental research and ongoing development of plasma cathode electron guns in recent years is reviewed, including some novel upgrades and applications to various technological fields. The attractiveness of this kind of e-gun is due to its capability of creating high current, broad or focused beams, both in pulsed and steady-state modes of operation. An important characteristic of the plasma cathode electron gun is the absence of a thermionic cathode, a feature which leads to long lifetime and reliable operation even in the presence of aggressive background gas media and at fore-vacuum gas pressure ranges such as achieved by mechanical pumps. Depending on the required beam parameters, different kinds of plasma discharge systems can be used in plasma cathode electron guns, such as vacuum arcs, constricted gaseous arcs, hollow cathode glows, and two kinds of discharges in crossed E×B fields: Penning and magnetron. At the present time, plasma cathode electron guns provide beams with transverse dimension from fractional millimeter up to about one meter, beam current from microamperes to kiloamperes, beam current density up to about 100 A/cm2, pulse duration from nanoseconds to dc, and electron energy from several keV to hundreds of keV. Applications include electron beam melting and welding, surface treatment, plasma chemistry, radiation technologies, laser pumping, microwave generation, and more.

  16. Monte Carlo simulations of nanoscale focused neon ion beam sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timilsina, Rajendra; Rack, Philip D

    2013-12-13

    A Monte Carlo simulation is developed to model the physical sputtering of aluminum and tungsten emulating nanoscale focused helium and neon ion beam etching from the gas field ion microscope. Neon beams with different beam energies (0.5-30 keV) and a constant beam diameter (Gaussian with full-width-at-half-maximum of 1 nm) were simulated to elucidate the nanostructure evolution during the physical sputtering of nanoscale high aspect ratio features. The aspect ratio and sputter yield vary with the ion species and beam energy for a constant beam diameter and are related to the distribution of the nuclear energy loss. Neon ions have a larger sputter yield than the helium ions due to their larger mass and consequently larger nuclear energy loss relative to helium. Quantitative information such as the sputtering yields, the energy-dependent aspect ratios and resolution-limiting effects are discussed.

  17. Plasma debris sputter resistant x-ray mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Sho; Inoue, Tomoaki; Harada, Tetsuo

    2013-06-01

    A diamond-like carbon (DLC) mirror, used as a grazing incident mirror in a plasma x-ray source, exhibits a high resistance to plasma debris sputtering. Good mirror reflectivity at a wavelength of 13.5 nm was confirmed using synchrotron radiation at the NewSUBARU facility. The erosion rate due to plasma debris sputtered at the incident debris angle of 20° was measured using a laser-produced Xe plasma source developed by the authors. The results indicate that the DLC film has a 5- and 15-fold higher sputtering resistance compared to films made of the traditional mirror materials Ru and Au, respectively. Because the DLC mirror retains a high sputtering resistance to Sn ions, it may be effective in Sn plasma source applications. We conclude that a grazing incident x-ray mirror coated with DLC can be of use as a plasma debris sputtering resistant mirror.

  18. Determination of Nd, Ho, Er, Tm and Y in solutions by hollow cathode discharge with copper cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hollow cathode discharge has been applied to the determination of Nd, Ho, Er, Tm and Y in solutions using copper cathodes and argon as a carrier gas. The solutions were evaporated to dryness in the cathodes without a pretreatment. Absolute detection limit for the elements studied here were found to be lower in the copper cathode by about one order than those obtained in previous studies in graphite hollow cathodes

  19. Sputtering effect of low-energy ions on biological target: The analysis of sputtering product of urea and capsaicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lili [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-Engineering, Institute of Technical Biology and Agriculture Engineering of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shushanhu Road 350, Hefei 230031 (China); Xu, Xue [Rice Research Institute, Anhui Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nongke South Road 40, Hefei 230031 (China); Wu, Yuejin, E-mail: yjwu@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-Engineering, Institute of Technical Biology and Agriculture Engineering of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shushanhu Road 350, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2013-08-01

    Sputtering is a process whereby atoms are ejected from a solid target material due to bombardment of the target by energetic particles. Recent years, ion implantation was successfully applied to biological research based on the fragments sputtering and form open paths in cell structure caused by ion sputtering. In this study, we focused on urea and chilli pepper pericarp samples implanted with N{sup +} and Ar{sup +} ions. To investigate the sputtering effect, we designed a collecting unit containing a disk sample and a glass pipe. The urea content and capsaicin content recovered from glass pipes were adopted to represent the sputtering product. The result of urea showed that the sputtering effect is positively correlated with the ion energy and dose, also affected by the ion type. The result of capsaicin was different from that of urea at 20 keV and possibly due to biological complex composition and structure. Therefore the sputtering yield depended on both the parameters of incident ions and the state of target materials. The sputtering yield of urea was also simulated by computational method achieved through the TRIM program. The trajectories of primary and recoiled atoms were calculated on the basis of the binary collision approximation using Monte Carlo method. The experimental results were much higher than the calculated results. The possible explanation is that in the physical model the target were assumed as a disordered lattice and independent atoms, which is much less complicated than that of the biological models.

  20. Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Ronald; Goebel, Dan; Hofer, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-current, hollow cathode utilizing a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) thermionic electron emitter has been developed for use with high-power Hall thrusters and ion thrusters. LaB6 cathodes are being investigated due to their long life, high current capabilities, and less stringent xenon purity and handling requirements compared to conventional barium oxide (BaO) dispenser cathodes. The new cathode features a much smaller diameter than previously developed versions that permit it to be mounted on axis of a Hall thruster ( internally mounted ), as opposed to the conventional side-mount position external to the outer magnetic circuit ("externally mounted"). The cathode has also been reconfigured to be capable of surviving vibrational loads during launch and is designed to solve the significant heater and materials compatibility problems associated with the use of this emitter material. This has been accomplished in a compact design with the capability of high-emission current (10 to 60 A). The compact, high-current design has a keeper diameter that allows the cathode to be mounted on the centerline of a 6- kW Hall thruster, inside the iron core of the inner electromagnetic coil. Although designed for electric propulsion thrusters in spacecraft station- keeping, orbit transfer, and interplanetary applications, the LaB6 cathodes are applicable to the plasma processing industry in applications such as optical coatings and semiconductor processing where reactive gases are used. Where current electrical propulsion thrusters with BaO emitters have limited life and need extremely clean propellant feed systems at a significant cost, these LaB6 cathodes can run on the crudest-grade xenon propellant available without impact. Moreover, in a laboratory environment, LaB6 cathodes reduce testing costs because they do not require extended conditioning periods under hard vacuum. Alternative rare earth emitters, such as cerium hexaboride (CeB6) can be used in this

  1. 2013 Estorm - Invited Paper - Cathode Materials Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Claus [ORNL; Mohanty, Debasish [ORNL; Li, Jianlin [ORNL; Wood III, David L [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403 431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783 789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  2. Discharge Physics of High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2010-10-13

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) is pulsed sputtering where the peak power exceeds the time-averaged power by typically two orders of magnitude. The peak power density, averaged over the target area, can reach or exceed 107 W/m2, leading to plasma conditions that make ionization of the sputtered atoms very likely. A brief review of HIPIMS operation is given in a tutorial manner, illustrated by some original data related to the self-sputtering of niobium in argon and krypton. Emphasis is put on the current-voltage-time relationships near the threshold of self-sputtering runaway. The great variety of current pulse shapes delivers clues on the very strong gas rarefaction, self-sputtering runaway conditions, and the stopping of runaway due to the evolution of atom ionization and ion return probabilities as the gas plasma is replaced by metal plasma. The discussions are completed by considering instabilities and the special case of ?gasless? self-sputtering.

  3. Preparation of nanocomposite thoriated tungsten cathode by swaging technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王发展; 诸葛飞; 张晖; 丁秉钧

    2002-01-01

    By using the high energy ball milling method,the nanosized ThO2 powders were obtained.Through mixing powders,sintering and hot swaging processing,a nanocomposite thoriated tungsten cathode was fabricated.The relative density of the nanocomposite material is near 100%.The microstructure of nanocomposite cathode is quite different from that of conventional thoriated tungsten cathode.Most of thoria particles are less than 100 nm in diameter,and distribute on the boundaries of tungsten grains.The nanocomposite cathode shows a much lower arc starting field than that of conventional cathode,which will improve the performance of the cathode significantly.

  4. Intrinsic stress analysis of sputtered carbon film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liqin Liu; Zhanshan Wang; Jingtao Zhu; Zhong Zhang; Moyan Tan; Qiushi Huang; Rui Chen; Jing Xu; Lingyan Chen

    2008-01-01

    Intrinsic stresses of carbon films deposited by direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering were investigated.The bombardments of energetic particles during the growth of films were considered to be the main reason for compressive intrinsic stresses.The values of intrinsic stresses were determined by measuring the radius of curvature of substrates before and after film deposition.By varying argon pressure and target-substrate distance,energies of neutral carbon atoms impinging on the growing films were optimized to control the intrinsic stresses level.The stress evolution in carbon films as a function of film thickness was investigated and a void-related stress relief mechanism was proposed to interpret this evolution.

  5. Magnetization relaxation in sputtered thin permalloy films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, R. C.; Rodríguez-Suárez, R. L.; Aguiar, F. M. De; Rezende, S. M.; Fermin, J. R.; Azevedo, A.

    2004-05-01

    In order to understand the underlying phenomena of magnetization damping in metallic thin films, samples of permalloy films were grown by magnetron sputtering, and their 8.6-GHz ferromagnetic resonance linewidth ΔH has been measured as a function of the Permalloy (Py) film thickness t, at room temperature. We made samples of Py(t)/Si(001) and X/Py(t)/X/Si(001), with X=Pd (40Å), and Cr (25Å), with 20Å < t < 200Å. While ΔH scales with t-2 in the bare Py/Si series, it is shown that the damping behavior strongly depends on X in the sandwich samples.

  6. Structure adhesion and corrosion resistance study of tungsten bisulfide doped with titanium deposited by DC magnetron co-sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De La Roche, J. [Laboratorio de Física del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 vía al aeropuerto, Campus La Nubia, Manizales (Colombia); González, J.M. [Laboratorio de Recubrimientos Duros y Aplicaciones Industriales – RDAI, Universidad del Valle, Calle 13 N° 100-00 Ciudadela Meléndez, Cali (Colombia); Restrepo-Parra, E., E-mail: erestrepop@unal.edu.co [Laboratorio de Física del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 vía al aeropuerto, Campus La Nubia, Manizales (Colombia); Sequeda, F. [Laboratorio de Recubrimientos Duros y Aplicaciones Industriales – RDAI, Universidad del Valle, Calle 13 N° 100-00 Ciudadela Meléndez, Cali (Colombia); Alleh, V.; Scharf, T.W. [The University of North Texas, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Denton, TX 76203 (United States)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • Ti-doped WS{sub 2} films were grown via the magnetron co-sputtering technique. • At a high Ti percentage, the crystalline structure of WS{sub 2} coatings tends to be amorphous. • As the Ti percentage increases in WS{sub 2} coatings, nanocomposites tend to form. • Ti-doped WS{sub 2} films have elastic behavior compared with the plastic response of pure WS{sub 2} films. • A high Ti percentage increases the corrosion resistance of WS{sub 2} films. - Abstract: Titanium-doped tungsten bisulfide thin films (WS{sub 2}-Ti) were grown using a DC magnetron co-sputtering technique on AISI 304 stainless steel and silicon substrates. The films were produced by varying the Ti cathode power from 0 to 25 W. Using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), the concentration of Ti in the WS{sub 2} was determined, and a maximum of 10% was obtained for the sample grown at 25 W. Moreover, the S/W ratio was calculated and determined to increase as a function of the Ti cathode power. According to transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results, at high titanium concentrations (greater than 6%), nanocomposite formation was observed, with nanocrystals of Ti embedded in an amorphous matrix of WS{sub 2}. Using the scratch test, the coatings’ adhesion was analyzed, and it was observed that as the Ti percentage was increased, the critical load (Lc) also increased. Furthermore, the failure type changed from plastic to elastic. Finally, the corrosion resistance was evaluated using the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique, and it was observed that at high Ti concentrations, the corrosion resistance was improved, as Ti facilitates coating densification and generates a protective layer.

  7. Hydrogenated amorphous silicon deposited by ion-beam sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowe, V. E.; Henin, N.; Tu, C.-W.; Tavakolian, H.; Sites, J. R.

    1981-01-01

    Hydrogenated amorphous silicon films 1/2 to 1 micron thick were deposited on metal and glass substrates using ion-beam sputtering techniques. The 800 eV, 2 mA/sq cm beam was a mixture of argon and hydrogen ions. The argon sputtered silicon from a pure (7.6 cm) single crystal wafer, while the hydrogen combined with the sputtered material during the deposition. Hydrogen to argon pressure ratios and substrate temperatures were varied to minimize the defect state density in the amorphous silicon. Characterization was done by electrical resistivity, index of refraction and optical absorption of the films.

  8. Porous, High Capacity Coatings for Solid Phase Microextraction by Sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, Anubhav; Singh, Bhupinder; Roychowdhury, Tuhin; Yan, DanDan; Tedone, Laura; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Paull, Brett; Sevy, Eric T; Shellie, Robert A; Kaykhaii, Massoud; Linford, Matthew R

    2016-02-01

    We describe a new process for preparing porous solid phase microextraction (SPME) coatings by the sputtering of silicon onto silica fibers. The microstructure of these coatings is a function of the substrate geometry and mean free path of the silicon atoms, and the coating thickness is controlled by the sputtering time. Sputtered silicon structures on silica fibers were treated with piranha solution (a mixture of concd H2SO4 and 30% H2O2) to increase the concentration of silanol groups on their surfaces, and the nanostructures were silanized with octadecyldimethylmethoxysilane in the gas phase. The attachment of this hydrophobic ligand was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and contact angle goniometry on model, planar silicon substrates. Sputtered silicon coatings adhered strongly to their surfaces, as they were able to pass the Scotch tape adhesion test. The extraction time and temperature for headspace extraction of mixtures of alkanes and alcohols on the sputtered fibers were optimized (5 min and 40 °C), and the extraction performances of SPME fibers with 1.0 or 2.0 μm of sputtered silicon were compared to those from a commercial 7 μm poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) fiber. For mixtures of alcohols, aldehydes, amines, and esters, the 2.0 μm sputtered silicon fiber yielded signals that were 3-9, 3-5, 2.5-4.5, and 1.5-2 times higher, respectively, than those of the commercial fiber. For the heavier alkanes (undecane-hexadecane), the 2.0 μm sputtered fiber yielded signals that were approximately 1.0-1.5 times higher than the commercial fiber. The sputtered fibers extracted low molecular weight analytes that were not detectable with the commercial fiber. The selectivity of the sputtered fibers appears to favor analytes that have both a hydrophobic component and hydrogen-bonding capabilities. No detectable carryover between runs was noted for the sputtered fibers. The repeatability (RSD%) for a fiber (n = 3) was less than 10% for all analytes tested

  9. A hollow cathode ion source for production of primary ions for the BNL electron beam ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessi, James; Beebe, Edward; Carlson, Charles; McCafferty, Daniel; Pikin, Alexander; Ritter, John

    2014-02-01

    A hollow cathode ion source, based on one developed at Saclay, has been modified significantly and used for several years to produce all primary 1+ ions injected into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) at Brookhaven. Currents of tens to hundreds of microamperes have been produced for 1+ ions of He, C, O, Ne, Si, Ar, Ti, Fe, Cu, Kr, Xe, Ta, Au, and U. The source is very simple, relying on a glow discharge using a noble gas, between anode and a solid cathode containing the desired species. Ions of both the working gas and ionized sputtered cathode material are extracted, and then the desired species is selected using an ExB filter before being transported into the EBIS trap for charge breeding. The source operates pulsed with long life and excellent stability for most species. Reliable ignition of the discharge at low gas pressure is facilitated by the use of capacitive coupling from a simple toy plasma globe. The source design, and operating experience for the various species, is presented.

  10. A hollow cathode ion source for production of primary ions for the BNL electron beam ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alessi, James, E-mail: alessi@bnl.gov; Beebe, Edward; Carlson, Charles; McCafferty, Daniel; Pikin, Alexander; Ritter, John [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    A hollow cathode ion source, based on one developed at Saclay, has been modified significantly and used for several years to produce all primary 1+ ions injected into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) at Brookhaven. Currents of tens to hundreds of microamperes have been produced for 1+ ions of He, C, O, Ne, Si, Ar, Ti, Fe, Cu, Kr, Xe, Ta, Au, and U. The source is very simple, relying on a glow discharge using a noble gas, between anode and a solid cathode containing the desired species. Ions of both the working gas and ionized sputtered cathode material are extracted, and then the desired species is selected using an ExB filter before being transported into the EBIS trap for charge breeding. The source operates pulsed with long life and excellent stability for most species. Reliable ignition of the discharge at low gas pressure is facilitated by the use of capacitive coupling from a simple toy plasma globe. The source design, and operating experience for the various species, is presented.

  11. Sheet Plasma Produced by Hollow Cathode Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张龙; 张厚先; 杨宣宗; 冯春华; 乔宾; 王龙

    2003-01-01

    A sheet plasma is produced by a hollow cathode discharge under an axial magnetic field.The plasma is about 40cm in length,4 cm in width and 1cm in thickness.The electron density is about 108cm-3.The hollow cathode is made to be shallow with a large opening,which is different from the ordinary deep hollow cathode.A Langmuir probe is used to detect the plasma.The electron density and the spatial distribution of the plasma change when voltage,pressure and the magnetic field vary.A peak and a data fluctuation at about 200 G-300 G are observed in the variation of electron density(or thickness of the sheet plasma)with the magnetic field.Our work will be helpful in characterizing the sheet plasma and will make the production of dense sheet plasma more controllable.

  12. Sheet plasma produced by hollow cathode discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sheet plasma is produced by a hollow cathode discharge under an axial magnetic field. The plasma is about 40 cm in length, 4 cm in width and 1 cm in thickness. The electron density is about 108 cm-3. The hollow cathode is made to be shallow with a large opening, which is different from the ordinary deep hollow cathode. A Langmuir probe is used to detect the plasma. The electron density and the spatial distribution of the plasma change when voltage, pressure and the magnetic field vary. A peak and a data fluctuation at about 200 G - 300 G are observed in the variation of electron density (or thickness of the sheet plasma) with the magnetic field. Our work will be helpful in characterizing the sheet plasma and will make the production of dense sheet plasma more controllable

  13. Laser bonding characteristics of sputtered titanium on glass with polymeric films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lubna, Nusrat J.

    For miniaturized biomedical devices, laser joining of dissimilar materials offer excellent potential to make precise joints. An important system for consideration is Ti coated glass joined with biocompatible polymers. It is known that thin film characteristics (such as Ti thin film on glass) are strongly influenced by surface morphology and film thickness. In this investigation we studied sputtered Ti coated glass and examine the bonding characteristics of two polymers, they are polyimide and Teflon fluorinated ethylene-propylene (FEP) Polymer. Comparison of sputtered method to that of cathodic arc physical vapor deposition (CA-PVD) are made and found that sputtered deposition technique provides better film quality and better bond strength over CA-PVD technique. We have clearly observed formation of macro-droplets for CA-PVD for the various film thicknesses of titanium (50˜400nm), which is undesirable for good bonding. It has been observed that higher thickness and roughness of film significantly improves bond quality. For stronger bond with higher thickness mixed mode failure are observed- cohesive failure of polymer, interface failure of Ti/glass and failure on the glass itself. On the other hand for weak bond with thinner film mostly interface failure observed for this system of Ti coated glass/imidex. For thicker film chemical bond of Ti-C and Ti-O are observed. Also presence of imidex on Ti surface is confirmed by the N spectrum of XPS. We investigated the role of both surface characteristics and chemical bonding for laser joints using advanced techniques such as Optical Microscopy, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy (XPS), Scanning Electron Microscopy (SEM), Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) and Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES), Positron Annihilation Lifetime Spectroscopy (PALS). A comprehensive three dimensional (3D) transient model for thermal analysis using the finite element (FE) code ABAQUS has been used. A comparison

  14. Synchrotron Investigations of SOFC Cathode Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idzerda, Yves

    2013-09-30

    The atomic variations occurring in cathode/electrolyte interface regions of La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3-δ} (LSCF) cathodes and other SOFC related materials have been investigated and characterized using soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) and diffuse soft X-ray Resonant Scattering (XRS). X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy in the soft X-ray region (soft XAS) is shown to be a sensitive technique to quantify the disruption that occurs and can be used to suggest a concrete mechanism for the degradation. For LSC, LSF, and LSCF films, a significant degradation mechanism is shown to be Sr out-diffusion. By using the XAS spectra of hexavalent Cr in SrCrO4 and trivalent Cr in Cr2O3, the driving factor for Sr segregation was identified to be the oxygen vacancy concentration at the anode and cathode side of of symmetric LSCF/GDC/LSCF heterostructures. This is direct evidence of vacancy induced cation diffusion and is shown to be a significant indicator of cathode/electrolyte interfacial degradation. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is used to identify the occupation of the A-sites and B-sites for LSC, LSF, and LSCF cathodes doped with other transition metals, including doping induced migration of Sr to the anti-site for Sr, a significant cathode degradation indicator. By using spatially resolved valence mapping of Co, a complete picture of the surface electrochemistry can be determined. This is especially important in identifying degradation phenomena where the degradation is spatially localized to the extremities of the electrochemistry and not the average. For samples that have electrochemical parameters that are measured to be spatially uniform, the Co valence modifications were correlated to the effects of current density, overpotential, and humidity.

  15. Auger electron spectroscopy in sputtering measurements: Application to low-energy Ar+ sputtering of Ag and Nb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sputtering of Ag and Nb by Ar+ in the energy range from 0.5 to 1.5 keV has been measured. The agreement with extant data, where available, is good. The experimental technique is a new adaptation of certain earlier methods and employs Auger electron spectroscopy of a continuously sputtered area of a thin-film composite structure, produced by vapor deposition. This new method should permit very low sputter yields (Sapproximately-less-than10-3) to be measured in subsequent experiments

  16. DARHT 2 kA Cathode Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henestroza, E.; Houck, T.; Kwan, J.W.; Leitner, M.; Miram, G.; Prichard, B.; Roy, P.K.; Waldron, W.; Westenskow, G.; Yu, S.; Bieniosek, F.M.

    2009-03-09

    In the campaign to achieve 2 kA of electron beam current, we have made several changes to the DARHT-II injector during 2006-2007. These changes resulted in a significant increase in the beam current, achieving the 2 kA milestone. Until recently (before 2007), the maximum beam current that was produced from the 6.5-inch diameter (612M) cathode was about 1300 A when the cathode was operating at a maximum temperature of 1140 C. At this temperature level, the heat loss was dominated by radiation which is proportional to temperature to the fourth power. The maximum operating temperature was limited by the damage threshold of the potted filament and the capacity of the filament heater power supply, as well as the shortening of the cathode life time. There were also signs of overheating at other components in the cathode assembly. Thus it was clear that our approach to increase beam current could not be simply trying to run at a higher temperature and the preferred way was to operate with a cathode that has a lower work function. The dispenser cathode initially used was the type 612M made by SpectraMat. According to the manufacturer's bulletin, this cathode should be able to produce more than 10 A/cm{sup 2} of current density (corresponding to 2 kA of total beam current) at our operating conditions. Instead the measured emission (space charge limited) was 6 A/cm{sup 2}. The result was similar even after we had revised the activation and handling procedures to adhere more closely to the recommend steps (taking longer time and nonstop to do the out-gassing). Vacuum was a major concern in considering the cathode's performance. Although the vacuum gauges at the injector vessel indicated 10{sup -8} Torr, the actual vacuum condition near the cathode in the central region of the vessel, where there might be significant out-gassing from the heater region, was never determined. Poor vacuum at the surface of the cathode degraded the emission (by raising the work function

  17. DARHT 2 kA Cathode Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the campaign to achieve 2 kA of electron beam current, we have made several changes to the DARHT-II injector during 2006-2007. These changes resulted in a significant increase in the beam current, achieving the 2 kA milestone. Until recently (before 2007), the maximum beam current that was produced from the 6.5-inch diameter (612M) cathode was about 1300 A when the cathode was operating at a maximum temperature of 1140 C. At this temperature level, the heat loss was dominated by radiation which is proportional to temperature to the fourth power. The maximum operating temperature was limited by the damage threshold of the potted filament and the capacity of the filament heater power supply, as well as the shortening of the cathode life time. There were also signs of overheating at other components in the cathode assembly. Thus it was clear that our approach to increase beam current could not be simply trying to run at a higher temperature and the preferred way was to operate with a cathode that has a lower work function. The dispenser cathode initially used was the type 612M made by SpectraMat. According to the manufacturer's bulletin, this cathode should be able to produce more than 10 A/cm2 of current density (corresponding to 2 kA of total beam current) at our operating conditions. Instead the measured emission (space charge limited) was 6 A/cm2. The result was similar even after we had revised the activation and handling procedures to adhere more closely to the recommend steps (taking longer time and nonstop to do the out-gassing). Vacuum was a major concern in considering the cathode's performance. Although the vacuum gauges at the injector vessel indicated 10-8 Torr, the actual vacuum condition near the cathode in the central region of the vessel, where there might be significant out-gassing from the heater region, was never determined. Poor vacuum at the surface of the cathode degraded the emission (by raising the work function value). We reexamined all

  18. Cathode architectures for alkali metal / oxygen batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visco, Steven J; Nimon, Vitaliy; De Jonghe, Lutgard C; Volfkovich, Yury; Bograchev, Daniil

    2015-01-13

    Electrochemical energy storage devices, such as alkali metal-oxygen battery cells (e.g., non-aqueous lithium-air cells), have a cathode architecture with a porous structure and pore composition that is tailored to improve cell performance, especially as it pertains to one or more of the discharge/charge rate, cycle life, and delivered ampere-hour capacity. A porous cathode architecture having a pore volume that is derived from pores of varying radii wherein the pore size distribution is tailored as a function of the architecture thickness is one way to achieve one or more of the aforementioned cell performance improvements.

  19. Hollow-Cathode Source Generates Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deininger, W. D.; Aston, G.; Pless, L. C.

    1989-01-01

    Device generates argon, krypton, or xenon plasma via thermionic emission and electrical discharge within hollow cathode and ejects plasma into surrounding vacuum. Goes from cold start up to full operation in less than 5 s after initial application of power. Exposed to moist air between operations without significant degradation of starting and running characteristics. Plasma generated by electrical discharge in cathode barrel sustained and aided by thermionic emission from emitter tube. Emitter tube does not depend on rare-earth oxides, making it vulnerable to contamination by exposure to atmosphere. Device modified for use as source of plasma in laboratory experiments or industrial processes.

  20. Ferroelectric Cathodes in Transverse Magnetic Fields

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental investigations of a planar ferroelectric cathode in a transverse magnetic field up to 3 kGs are presented. It is shown that the transverse magnetic field affects differently the operation of ferroelectric plasma cathodes in ''bright'' and ''dark'' modes in vacuum. In the ''bright'' mode, when the surface plasma is formed, the application of the transverse magnetic field leads to an increase of the surface plasma density. In the ''dark'' mode, the magnetic field inhibits the development of electron avalanches along the surface, as it does similarly in other kinds of surface discharges in the pre-breakdown mode

  1. Long Life Cold Cathodes for Hall effect Thrusters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An electron source incorporating long life, high current density cold cathodes inside a microchannel plate for use with ion thrusters is proposed. Cathode lifetime...

  2. Nano-Particle Scandate Cathode for Space Communications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose an improved cathode based on our novel theory of the role of scandium oxide in enhancing emission in tungsten impregnate cathodes. Recent results have...

  3. Investigation of kinetics model of dc reactive sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱圣龙; 王福会; 吴维叓

    1996-01-01

    A novel physical sputtering kinetics model for reactive sputtering is presented.Reactive gas gettering effects and interactions among the characteristic parameters have been taken into account in the model.The data derived from the model accorded fairly well with experimental results.The relationship between the values of initial oxide coverage on the target and the ready states was depicted in the model.This relationship gives reasons for the difference of the threshold of reactive gas fluxes (Q) from the metal sputtering region to the oxide sputtering region and in reverse direction.The discontinuities in oxide coverage on the target surface (θ) versus reactive gas fluxes (Q) are referred to as the effects of reactive gas partial pressure (p) upon the forming rates of oxide on the surfaces of target (V0).The diversity of the oxygen flux threshold results from the variance of the initial values of oxide coverage on target.

  4. Sputter-Resistant Materials for Electric Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase 2 project shall develop sputter-resistant materials for use in electric propulsion test facilities and for plume shields on spacecraft using...

  5. Sputtering System for QWR Cavity in BRIF Project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>1 Introduction Four superconducting QWR cavities will be used in HI-13 tandem accelerator upgrade project (BRIF). These niobium coated cavities will be produced by CIAE. Up to now, a niobium sputtering

  6. RF Sputtering for preparing substantially pure amorphous silicon monohydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, Frank R.; Shanks, Howard R.

    1982-10-12

    A process for controlling the dihydride and monohydride bond densities in hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by reactive rf sputtering of an amorphous silicon target. There is provided a chamber with an amorphous silicon target and a substrate therein with the substrate and the target positioned such that when rf power is applied to the target the substrate is in contact with the sputtering plasma produced thereby. Hydrogen and argon are fed to the chamber and the pressure is reduced in the chamber to a value sufficient to maintain a sputtering plasma therein, and then rf power is applied to the silicon target to provide a power density in the range of from about 7 watts per square inch to about 22 watts per square inch to sputter an amorphous silicon hydride onto the substrate, the dihydride bond density decreasing with an increase in the rf power density. Substantially pure monohydride films may be produced.

  7. Sputter deposition of aluminium on colloidal polymer templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gehrke, Rainer; Buffet, Adeline; Couet, Sebastien; Schlage, Kai; Roth, Stephan V.; Roehlsberger, Ralf [HASYLAB, DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Herzog, Gerd [HASYLAB, DESY, Hamburg (Germany); Inst. f. Exp. Phys., Univ. Hamburg (Germany); Kaune, Gunar; Koerstgens, Volker; Meier, Robert; Metwalli, Ezzeldin; Mueller-Buschbaum, Peter [TU Muenchen, Physik-Department, Garching (Germany); Wurth, Wilfried [Inst. f. Exp. Phys., Univ. Hamburg (Germany)

    2009-07-01

    This work addresses an approach to the formation of metal nanowire meshes on surfaces. Colloidal dispersions of 100 nm polystyrene spheres were spincoated on silicon. Islands of packed layers of spheres were formed which served as template for sputter deposition of aluminium. Structure formation was investigated with grazing incidence small angle X-ray scattering at beamline BW4 at HASYLAB/DESY using an in-situ sputtering chamber, thus scattering could be observed during metal deposition. The measurements indicate, that at the beginning of the deposition the metal atoms assemble in the indentations between the spheres, only after longer sputtering times the surface becomes completely covered with aluminium. If an unsputtered sample was heated beyond the glass transition temperature the lateral ordering vanished, if sputtering was stopped before complete metal coverage ordering remained upon heating. This indicates that the metal forms a stable structure separating the polymer spheres from each other.

  8. Hydorgen sputtering of carbon thin films deposited on platinum

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon has been suggested as a suitable low Z element for the lining of the first walls of controlled thermonuclear reactors in order to reduce radiative plasma losses due to sputtering. In this paper the measurement of sputtering of carbon thin films by protons in the energy range 0.6-10.0 keV, is described. H2+ or H3+ ions were used as bombarding ions to obtain equivalent H+ sputtering yields at energies below that at which the ion source provides sufficient proton current. The sputter yield was found to range from 7x10-3-1.5x10-2 atoms/proton with a broad maximum in the 2.0 keV region with the carbon film kept near ambient temperature. (B.D.)

  9. Magnetospheric ion sputtering and water ice grain size at Europa

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassidy, T. A.; Paranicas, C. P.; Shirley, J. H.; Dalton, J. B., III; Teolis, B. D.; Johnson, R. E.; Kamp, L.; Hendrix, A. R.

    2013-03-01

    We present the first calculation of Europa's sputtering (ion erosion) rate as a function of position on Europa's surface. We find a global sputtering rate of 2×1027 H2O s-1, some of which leaves the surface in the form of O2 and H2. The calculated O2 production rate is 1×1026 O2 s-1, H2 production is twice that value. The total sputtering rate (including all species) peaks at the trailing hemisphere apex and decreases to about 1/3rd of the peak value at the leading hemisphere apex. O2 and H2 sputtering, by contrast, is confined almost entirely to the trailing hemisphere. Most sputtering is done by energetic sulfur ions (100s of keV to MeV), but most of the O2 and H2 production is done by cold oxygen ions (temperature ∼ 100 eV, total energy ∼ 500 eV). As a part of the sputtering rate calculation we compared experimental sputtering yields with analytic estimates. We found that the experimental data are well approximated by the expressions of Famá et al. for ions with energies less than 100 keV (Famá, M., Shi, J., Baragiola, R.A., 2008. Sputtering of ice by low-energy ions. Surf. Sci. 602, 156-161), while the expressions from Johnson et al. fit the data best at higher energies (Johnson, R.E., Burger, M.H., Cassidy, T.A., Leblanc, F., Marconi, M., Smyth, W.H., 2009. Composition and Detection of Europa's Sputter-Induced Atmosphere, in: Pappalardo, R.T., McKinnon, W.B., Khurana, K.K. (Eds.), Europa. University of Arizona Press, Tucson.). We compare the calculated sputtering rate with estimates of water ice regolith grain size as estimated from Galileo Near-Infrared Mapping Spectrometer (NIMS) data, and find that they are strongly correlated as previously suggested by Clark et al. (Clark, R.N., Fanale, F.P., Zent, A.P., 1983. Frost grain size metamorphism: Implications for remote sensing of planetary surfaces. Icarus 56, 233-245.). The mechanism responsible for the sputtering rate/grain size link is uncertain. We also report a surface composition estimate using

  10. Optimized high-temperature cathode-heating unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Description of structure and test results of cathode-heating unit for electron accelerators are presented. In the given cathode unit LaB6 cathode area is enlarged, efficient heat isolations are used, heating element stiffness and strength are increased. Compact shild packets are used in a cathode unit. The heating element is made in the form of concentric rings. The unit heat efficiency is >80%, nonisothermality ΔT2 emitter area at T=2050 K constituted 700 h

  11. Uniform large-area thermionic cathode for SCALPEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsap, Victor; Sewell, Peter B.; Waskiewicz, Warren K.; Zhu, Wei

    1999-11-01

    An electron beam lithography tool, which employs the SCALPEL technique, requires an extremely uniform beam to illuminate the scattering Mask, with the cathode operating in the temperature limited mode. It has been previously shown that LaB6 cathodes are not stable in this mode of operation. We have explored the possibility of implementing refined Tantalum-based emitters in the SCALPEL source cathode, and have developed large-area flat cathodes featuring suitably high emission uniformity under temperature limited operation.

  12. Feature of "Cold" Fusion Reaction in a Deuterated Complex Cathode

    OpenAIRE

    ARATA, Yoshiaki; ZHANG, Yue-Chang

    1992-01-01

    [Abstract] In order to corroborate the evidence of "cold" fusion reaction, a new-type, complex cathode was developed, consisting of a Ni rod with a Pd layer applied by plasma spraying. High reproducibility of a "cold" fusion reaction was confirmed, using a deuterated complex cathode. The Pd layer showed to have activated the surface functions of the deuterated cathode, and a reliable evidence was obtained that a new type of heat generation occurred in the complex cathode.

  13. Sputter initiated RIS (SIRIS) for analysis of semiconductor impurities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the technique, Sputter Initiated Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy (SIRIS), being developed for commercial analysis by Atom Sciences, Inc. This technique uses Resonance Ionization Spectroscopy to selectively ionize atoms of a sample sputtered by an energetic ion beam. The efficiency and selectivity of the RIS process provides results which are ultrasensitive and unambiguous to interpret. The SIRIS instrument being developed by Atom Sciences and recent results showing the present sensitivity limit of 2 ppb will be discussed. (author)

  14. Transition from linear to nonlinear sputtering of solid xenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutkiewicz, L.; Pedrys, R.; Schou, Jørgen;

    1995-01-01

    Self-sputtering of solid xenon has been studied with molecular dynamics simulations as a model system for the transition from dominantly linear to strongly nonlinear effects. The simulation covered the projectile energy range from 20 to 750 eV. Within a relatively narrow range from 30 to 250 e......V, nonlinear features such as high collision densities in the sputtering volume, amorphization of the crystalline structure, and an enhanced emission of low-energy atoms occur gradually....

  15. Sputtering Yield Calculation of Some Candidate PFC Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENGBaiquan; YANJiancheng; HUANGJinhua

    2001-01-01

    In order to estimate the erosion rates of some plasma facing component materials, the sputtering yields of Mo, W and Li bombarded by charged particles H+, D+, T+ and He+ are calculated by application of sputtering theory based on bipartition model of ion transport. The comparisons with Monte-Carlo calculation results are made. These data might be useful to estimate the lifetime of plasma facing components and to analyze the impurity level in core plasma of fusion reactors.

  16. Radial profiles of electron density and current components at cathode surface in LaB6 hollow cathode arc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Experimental studies on a hydrogen-fed LaB6 hollow cathode arc have been pursued. The plasma parameter in the cathode has been measured by a Langmuir probe. The radial variation in the electron density inside the cathode was calculated using the continuity and momentum equations, showing good agreement with the experimental results. The electron density at the cathode surface was estimated to be 15 % - 20 % of that at the cathode axis. It was also found from the current balance that the arc current components at the cathode surface consist of a thermionic current which takes into account the Schottky effect, the ion current and the secondary electron current induced by ion bombardment. The ion current and the cathode surface is larger than the electron current emitted from the cathode. (author)

  17. High-voltage virtual-cathode microwave simulations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thode, L.; Snell, C.M.

    1991-01-01

    In contrast to a conventional microwave tube, a virtual-cathode device operates above the space-charge limit where the depth of the space-charge potential is sufficiently large to cause electron reflection. The region associated with electron reflection is referred to as a virtual cathode. Microwaves can be generated through oscillations in the position of the virtual cathode and by reflexing electrons trapped in the potential well formed between the real and virtual cathodes. A virtual-cathode device based on the first mechanism is a vircator while one based on latter mechanism is a reflex diode. A large number of low-voltage virtual-cathode microwave configurations have been investigated. Initial simulations of a high-voltage virtual-cathode device using a self-consistent particle-in-cell code indicated reasonable conversion efficiency with no frequency chirping. The nonchirping character of the high-voltage virtual-cathode device lead to the interesting possibility of locking four very-high-power microwave devices together using the four transmission lines available at Aurora. Subsequently, in support of two high-voltage experiments, simulations were used to investigate the effect of field-emission threshold and velvet position on the cathode; anode and cathode shape; anode-cathode gap spacing; output waveguide radius; diode voltage; a cathode-coaxial-cavity resonator; a high-frequency ac-voltage drive; anode foil scattering and energy loss; and ion emission on the microwave frequency and power. Microwave

  18. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlan U. Anderson

    2000-03-31

    . However, they have the potential of being useful as an interface on the anode side of the electrolyte. NexTech has focused much of its effort during the past few months on establishing tape casting methods for porous LSM substrates. This work, performed under a separate DOE-funded program, involved tape casting formulations comprising LSM powders with bi-modal particle size distributions and fugitive pore forming additives. Sintered LSM substrates with porosities in the 30 to 40 vol% range, and pore sizes of 10 {approx} 20 microns have been prepared. In addition, tape casting formulations involving composite mixtures of LSM and Sm-doped ceria (SDC) have been evaluated. The LSM/SDC cathode substrates are expected to provide better performance at low temperatures. Characterization of these materials is currently underway.

  19. The double sheath on cathodes of discharges burning in cathode vapour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benilov, M S; Benilova, L G [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade da Madeira, Largo do MunicIpio, 9000 Funchal (Portugal)

    2010-09-01

    The model of a collisionless near-cathode space-charge sheath with ionization of atoms emitted by the cathode surface is considered. Numerical calculations showed that the mathematical problem is solvable and its solution is unique. In the framework of this model, the sheath represents a double layer with a potential maximum, with the ions which are produced before the maximum returning to the cathode surface and those produced after the maximum escaping into the plasma. Numerical results are given in a form to be readily applicable in analysis of discharges burning in cathode vapour, such as vacuum arcs. In particular, the results indicate that the ion backflow coefficient in such discharges exceeds 0.5, in agreement with values extracted from the experiment.

  20. Barium depletion in hollow cathode emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polk, James E., E-mail: james.e.polk@jpl.nasa.gov; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States); Capece, Angela M. [Graduate Aerospace Laboratories, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2016-01-14

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of Ba released by BaO-CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} source material in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. The examination of cathode emitters from long duration tests shows deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of Ba from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of Ba transport in the cathode plasma indicates that the Ba partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant Ba-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress Ba loss in the upstream part of the emitter. New measurements of the Ba depletion depth from a cathode insert operated for 8200 h reveal that Ba loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis. The Ba transport model was modified to predict the depletion depth with time. A comparison of the calculated and measured depletion depths gives excellent qualitative agreement, and quantitative agreement was obtained assuming an insert temperature 70 °C lower than measured beginning-of-life values.

  1. Renovation of the cathodic protection system

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuten, G.; Leggedoor, J.; Polder, R.B.; Peelen, W.H.A.

    2003-01-01

    The first system for Cathodic Protection of concrete in the Netherlands was applied to a one bicycle lane of a bridge suffering corrosion due to de-icing salt penetration in 1986. This CP system was based on the Ferex 100S conducting polymer cable anode in a cementitious overlay. Its functioning was

  2. Barium depletion in hollow cathode emitters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of Ba released by BaO-CaO-Al2O3 source material in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. The examination of cathode emitters from long duration tests shows deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of Ba from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of Ba transport in the cathode plasma indicates that the Ba partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant Ba-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress Ba loss in the upstream part of the emitter. New measurements of the Ba depletion depth from a cathode insert operated for 8200 h reveal that Ba loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis. The Ba transport model was modified to predict the depletion depth with time. A comparison of the calculated and measured depletion depths gives excellent qualitative agreement, and quantitative agreement was obtained assuming an insert temperature 70 °C lower than measured beginning-of-life values

  3. Improved cathodes for a dense plasma focus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of modified cathodes have been tested in our ultra-high vacuum dense plasma focus (DPF) device in an effort to improve both neutron output and shot-to-shot reproducibility. Inspiration for these modifications originated from time resolved photographs of the initial current sheet as it approaches the cathode. In particular, the current sheet develops a slight annular protrusion, or ''bump'', that contacts the inside wall of the cathode at a distance from the breach approximately coincident with the end of the insulator. In an attempt to take advantage of this protrusion, a series of modified cathodes was provided with a decreased waist diameter in the vicinity of the end of the insulator. As previously discussed, this DPF device is constructed from high vacuum components using metal-to-metal and ceramic (Al2O3)-to-metal seals; the entire assembly is given a vacuum bake at 2500C resulting in a pre-fill vacuum of approx. =5 x 10-9 Torr. The DPF is powered by a 7 μf capacitor bank. The short circuit ringing frequency is 412 kHz corresponding to a free circuit inductance of 21 nH. With the DPF in operation at 20 kV, a current peak of 200 kA occurs at 0.8 μs. Neutron output was measured side on with a silver activation counter, and end on with an arsenic activation counter

  4. Influence of sputtering pressure on the structural, optical and hydrophobic properties of sputtered deposited HfO{sub 2} coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dave, V. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India); Institute Instrumentation Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India); Dubey, P. [Institute Instrumentation Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India); Gupta, H.O. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India); Chandra, R. [Institute Instrumentation Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India)

    2013-12-31

    The aim of this work is to develop hydrophobic coatings for outdoor insulators using sputtering technique. Hafnium oxide is characterized by high dielectric constant, large band gap (5.6 eV), high refractive index (2.1) and good mechanical, thermal and chemical properties. Hence HfO{sub 2} is suitable as a protective coating for outdoor insulators used in the transmission line and transformers. Hafnium oxide coatings were deposited on glass substrates by DC magnetron sputtering technique at a sputtering pressure of 5 mTorr, 10 mTorr, 15 mTorr, 20 mTorr and 25 mTorr. The deposited films were characterized by techniques like X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), water contact angle goniometry and UV–vis-NIR spectrophotometer. The average crystallite size calculated from XRD peaks shows that it increases with increase in sputtering pressure up to 15 mTorr and then it starts decreasing. The roughness calculated from AFM images shows the similar trend. The deposited films were found to be hydrophobic and transparent. The hydrophobicity of the films was correlated with the roughness calculated from AFM. The effect of sputtering pressure was also investigated on optical band gap and refractive index calculated from transmission and absorption data. The electrical resistivity was found to be high, thus ensuring insulating property of the deposited films. - Highlights: • Outdoor Insulators are suffering from environment pollution problem. • To mitigate problem, hydrophobic coating of HfO{sub 2} was synthesized by DC sputtering. • Effect of sputtering pressure was studied on structural, optical and hydrophobic properties of HfO{sub 2} • Optimum results were obtained at a sputtering pressure of 15 mTorr.

  5. Influence of sputtering pressure on the structural, optical and hydrophobic properties of sputtered deposited HfO2 coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to develop hydrophobic coatings for outdoor insulators using sputtering technique. Hafnium oxide is characterized by high dielectric constant, large band gap (5.6 eV), high refractive index (2.1) and good mechanical, thermal and chemical properties. Hence HfO2 is suitable as a protective coating for outdoor insulators used in the transmission line and transformers. Hafnium oxide coatings were deposited on glass substrates by DC magnetron sputtering technique at a sputtering pressure of 5 mTorr, 10 mTorr, 15 mTorr, 20 mTorr and 25 mTorr. The deposited films were characterized by techniques like X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), water contact angle goniometry and UV–vis-NIR spectrophotometer. The average crystallite size calculated from XRD peaks shows that it increases with increase in sputtering pressure up to 15 mTorr and then it starts decreasing. The roughness calculated from AFM images shows the similar trend. The deposited films were found to be hydrophobic and transparent. The hydrophobicity of the films was correlated with the roughness calculated from AFM. The effect of sputtering pressure was also investigated on optical band gap and refractive index calculated from transmission and absorption data. The electrical resistivity was found to be high, thus ensuring insulating property of the deposited films. - Highlights: • Outdoor Insulators are suffering from environment pollution problem. • To mitigate problem, hydrophobic coating of HfO2 was synthesized by DC sputtering. • Effect of sputtering pressure was studied on structural, optical and hydrophobic properties of HfO2 • Optimum results were obtained at a sputtering pressure of 15 mTorr

  6. Improved Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    An improvement has been made to the design of the hollow cathode geometry that was created for the rare-earth electron emitter described in Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode (NPO-44923), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 3 (March 2010), p. 52. The original interior assembly was made entirely of graphite in order to be compatible with the LaB6 material, which cannot be touched by metals during operation due to boron diffusion causing embrittlement issues in high-temperature refractory materials. Also, the graphite tube was difficult to machine and was subject to vibration-induced fracturing. This innovation replaces the graphite tube with one made out of refractory metal that is relatively easy to manufacture. The cathode support tube is made of molybdenum or molybdenum-rhenium. This material is easily gun-bored to near the tolerances required, and finish machined with steps at each end that capture the orifice plate and the mounting flange. This provides the manufacturability and robustness needed for flight applications, and eliminates the need for expensive e-beam welding used in prior cathodes. The LaB6 insert is protected from direct contact with the refractory metal tube by thin, graphite sleeves in a cup-arrangement around the ends of the insert. The sleeves, insert, and orifice plate are held in place by a ceramic spacer and tungsten spring inserted inside the tube. To heat the cathode, an insulating tube is slipped around the refractory metal hollow tube, which can be made of high-temperature materials like boron nitride or aluminum nitride. A screw-shaped slot, or series of slots, is machined in the outside of the ceramic tube to constrain a refractory metal wire wound inside the slot that is used as the heater. The screw slot can hold a single heater wire that is then connected to the front of the cathode tube by tack-welding to complete the electrical circuit, or it can be a double slot that takes a bifilar wound heater with both leads coming out

  7. Non-conventional photocathodes based on Cu thin films deposited on Y substrate by sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrone, A. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, 73100 Lecce (Italy); National Institute of Nuclear Physics and University of Salento, 73100 Lecce (Italy); D’Elia, M. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Gontad, F., E-mail: francisco.gontad@le.infn.it [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, 73100 Lecce (Italy); National Institute of Nuclear Physics and University of Salento, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Di Giulio, M.; Maruccio, G. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Cola, A. [National Council Research, Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Stankova, N.E. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Kovacheva, D.G. [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Broitman, E. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    Copper (Cu) thin films were deposited on yttrium (Y) substrate by sputtering. During the deposition, a small central area of the Y substrate was shielded to avoid the film deposition and was successively used to study its photoemissive properties. This configuration has two advantages: the cathode presents (i) the quantum efficiency and the work function of Y and (ii) high electrical compatibility when inserted into the conventional radio-frequency gun built with Cu bulk. The photocathode was investigated by scanning electron microscopy to determine surface morphology. X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy studies were performed to compare the structure and surface properties of the deposited film. The measured electrical resistivity value of the Cu film was similar to that of high purity Cu bulk. Film to substrate adhesion was also evaluated using the Daimler–Benz Rockwell-C adhesion test method. Finally, the photoelectron performance in terms of quantum efficiency was obtained in a high vacuum photodiode cell before and after laser cleaning procedures. A comparison with the results obtained with a twin sample prepared by pulsed laser deposition is presented and discussed.

  8. Innovative technique for tailoring intrinsic stress in reactively sputtered piezoelectric aluminum nitride films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Novel technical and technological solutions enabling effective stress control in highly textured polycrystalline aluminum nitride (AlN) thin films deposited with ac (40 kHz) reactive sputtering processes are discussed. Residual stress in the AlN films deposited by a dual cathode S-Gun magnetron is well controlled by varying Ar gas pressure, however, since deposition rate and film thickness uniformity depend on gas pressure too, an independent stress control technique has been developed. The technique is based on regulation of the flux of the charged particles from ac plasma discharge to the substrate. In the ac powered S-Gun, a special stress adjustment unit (SAU) is employed for reducing compressive stress in the film by means of redistribution of discharge current between electrodes of the S-Gun leading to controllable suppression of bombardment of the growing film. This technique is complementary to AlN deposition with rf substrate bias which increases ion bombardment and shifts stress in the compressive direction, if required. Using SAU and rf bias functions ensures tailoring intrinsic stress in piezoelectric AlN films for a particular application from high compressive -700 MPa to high tensile +300 MPa and allows the gas pressure to be adjusted independently to fine control the film uniformity. The AlN films deposited on Si substrates and Mo electrodes have strong (002) texture with full width at half maximum ranging from 2 degree sign for 200 nm to 1 degree sign for 2000 nm thick films.

  9. Low friction coefficient coatings Ni-Cr by magnetron sputtering, DC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Hernandez, J.; Mandujano-Ruiz, A.; Torres-Gonzalez, J.; Espinosa-Beltran, F. J.; Herrera-Hernandez, H.

    2015-07-01

    Magnetron Sputter Deposition technique with DC was used for the deposition of Ni-Cr coatings on AISI 316 SS like substrate. The cathode with a nominal composition Ni-22 at% Cr was prepared by Mechanical Alloying (MA) technique, with a maximum milling time of 16 hours and, with a high energy SPEX 8000 mill. The coatings were made under Argon atmosphere at room temperature with a power of 100 W at different times of growth. Chemical composition, microstructure, topography, nano hardness and wear of the coatings were evaluated using the techniques of microanalysis by energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDAX), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Nano-indentation and pin-on-Disk, respectively. After milling, was not detected contamination in the mixtures. XRD analysis revealed that the microstructure of the Ni-Cr alloy was maintained in the coatings with respect to MA powders, with some degree of recrystallization. Nano hardness values were in the order of 8.8 GPa with a Youngs modulus of 195 GPa. The adhesion of the films was evaluated according to their resistance to fracture when these were indented at different loads using Vickers microhardness. The wear test results showed a decrease in the friction coefficient with respect to the increase of thickness films, getting a minimum value of 0.08 with a thickness of 1 μm and which correspond with the maximum growing time. (Author)

  10. Estimation of Sputtering Damages on a Magnetron H- Ion Source Induced by Cs+ and H+ Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, H; Alessi, J; Kalvas, t

    2013-01-01

    An H− ion source is being developed for CERN’s Linac4 accelerator. A beam current requirement of 80 mA and a reliability above 99% during 1 year with 3 month uninterrupted operation periods are mandatory. To design a low-maintenance long life-time source, it is important to investigate and understand the wear mechanisms. A cesiated plasma discharge ion source, such as the BNL magnetron source, is a good candidate for the Linac4 ion source. However, in the magnetron source operated at BNL, the removal of material from the molybdenum cathode and the stainless steel anode cover plate surfaces is visible after extended operation periods. The observed sputtering traces are shown to result from cesium vapors and hydrogen gas ionized in the extraction region and subsequently accelerated by the extraction field. This paper presents a quantitative estimate of the ionization of cesium and hydrogen by the electron and H− beams in the extraction region of BNL’s magnetron ion source. The respective contributions o...

  11. Estimates of Sputter Yields of Solar-Wind Heavy Ions of Lunar Regolith Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouty, Abdulmasser F.; Adams, James H., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    At energies of approximately 1 keV/amu, solar-wind protons and heavy ions interact with the lunar surface materials via a number of microscopic interactions that include sputtering. Solar-wind induced sputtering is a main mechanism by which the composition of the topmost layers of the lunar surface can change, dynamically and preferentially. This work concentrates on sputtering induced by solar-wind heavy ions. Sputtering associated with slow (speeds the electrons speed in its first Bohr orbit) and highly charged ions are known to include both kinetic and potential sputtering. Potential sputtering enjoys some unique characteristics that makes it of special interest to lunar science and exploration. Unlike the yield from kinetic sputtering where simulation and approximation schemes exist, the yield from potential sputtering is not as easy to estimate. This work will present a preliminary numerical scheme designed to estimate potential sputtering yields from reactions relevant to this aspect of solar-wind lunar-surface coupling.

  12. Polymer coatings as separator layers for microbial fuel cell cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Watson, Valerie J.

    2011-03-01

    Membrane separators reduce oxygen flux from the cathode into the anolyte in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), but water accumulation and pH gradients between the separator and cathode reduces performance. Air cathodes were spray-coated (water-facing side) with anion exchange, cation exchange, and neutral polymer coatings of different thicknesses to incorporate the separator into the cathode. The anion exchange polymer coating resulted in greater power density (1167 ± 135 mW m-2) than a cation exchange coating (439 ± 2 mW m-2). This power output was similar to that produced by a Nafion-coated cathode (1114 ± 174 mW m-2), and slightly lower than the uncoated cathode (1384 ± 82 mW m-2). Thicker coatings reduced oxygen diffusion into the electrolyte and increased coulombic efficiency (CE = 56-64%) relative to an uncoated cathode (29 ± 8%), but decreased power production (255-574 mW m-2). Electrochemical characterization of the cathodes ex situ to the MFC showed that the cathodes with the lowest charge transfer resistance and the highest oxygen reduction activity produced the most power in MFC tests. The results on hydrophilic cathode separator layers revealed a trade off between power and CE. Cathodes coated with a thin coating of anion exchange polymer show promise for controlling oxygen transfer while minimally affecting power production. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Emission current control system for multiple hollow cathode devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beattie, John R. (Inventor); Hancock, Donald J. (Inventor)

    1988-01-01

    An emission current control system for balancing the individual emission currents from an array of hollow cathodes has current sensors for determining the current drawn by each cathode from a power supply. Each current sensor has an output signal which has a magnitude proportional to the current. The current sensor output signals are averaged, the average value so obtained being applied to a respective controller for controlling the flow of an ion source material through each cathode. Also applied to each controller are the respective sensor output signals for each cathode and a common reference signal. The flow of source material through each hollow cathode is thereby made proportional to the current drawn by that cathode, the average current drawn by all of the cathodes, and the reference signal. Thus, the emission current of each cathode is controlled such that each is made substantially equal to the emission current of each of the other cathodes. When utilized as a component of a multiple hollow cathode ion propulsion motor, the emission current control system of the invention provides for balancing the thrust of the motor about the thrust axis and also for preventing premature failure of a hollow cathode source due to operation above a maximum rated emission current.

  14. Influence of the sputtering pressure on the properties of transparent conducting zirconium-doped zinc oxide films prepared by RF magnetron sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘汉法; 张化福; 类成新; 袁长坤

    2009-01-01

    Transparent conducting zirconium-doped zinc oxide films with high transparency and relatively low re-sistivity have been successfully prepared on water-cooled glass substrate by radio frequency magnetron sputtering at room temperature. The Ar sputtering pressure was varied from 0.5 to 3 Pa. The crystallinity increases and the electri-cal resistivity decreases when the sputtering pressure increases from 0.5 to 2.5 Pa. The cystallinity decreases and the electrical resistivity increases when the sputtering pressure increases from 2.5 to 3 Pa. When the sputtering pressure The deposited films are polycrystalline with a hexagonal structure and a preferred orientation perpendicular to the substrate.

  15. Emission mechanism in high current hollow cathode arcs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large (2 cm-diameter) hollow cathodes have been operated in a magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) arc over wide ranges of current (0.25 to 17 kA) and mass flow (10-3 to 8 g/sec), with orifice current densities and mass fluxes encompassing those encountered in low current steady-state hollow cathode arcs. Detailed cathode interior measurements of current and potential distributions show that maximum current penetration into the cathode is about one diameter axially upstream from the tip, with peak inner surface current attachment up to one cathode diameter upstream of the tip. The spontaneous attachment of peak current upstream of the cathode tip is suggested as a criterion for characteristic hollow cathode operation. This empirical criterion is verified by experiment

  16. Design of ANSYS-based Cathode with Complex Groove

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范植坚; 赵刚刚; 张丽娟

    2012-01-01

    The profile of cathode with complex groove needs to be modified time after time during design of electrochemical machining (ECM) cathode.A design scheme using finite element method (FEM) for cathode with complex profile is put forward to shorten the period of cathode design.Based on Laplace equation,the potential distribution on parameter-transformation model was calculated by using ANSYS,which is compared to the potential distribution calculated by substituting conductivity and current efficiency into Laplace equation.According to the difference between the results calculated and simulated by ANSYS,the cathode profile was modified by adjusting the cathode boundary.The experiments show that the dimensions and shape of workpiece machined by numerically simulated cathode conform well with the blueprint.

  17. Effect of sputtering target's grain size on the sputtering yield, particle size and coercivity (Hc) of Ni and Ni20Al thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reza, M.; Sajuri, Z.; Yunas, J.; Syarif, J.

    2016-02-01

    Researches on magnetic thin films concentrated mainly on optimizing the sputtering parameters to obtain the desired thin film's properties. However, the effect of the sputtering target's properties towards the thin film's properties is not well established. This study is focused on analysing the effect of sputtering target's grain size towards the sputtering yield, particle size and the magnetic coercivity (Hc) of thin film. Two sets of sputtering targets; pure Ni (magnetic) and Ni20Al (at.%) (non-magnetic) were prepared. Each target has 2 sets of samples with different grain sizes; (a) 30 to 50μm and (b) 80 to 100μm. Thin films from each target were sputtered onto glass substrates under fixed sputtering parameters. The initial results suggested that the sputtering target's grain size has significant effect on the thin film's sputtering yield, particle size and Hc. Sputtering target with smaller grain size has 12% (pure Ni) to 60% (Ni20Al) higher sputtering yield, which produces thin films with smaller particle size and larger Hc value. These initial findings provides a basis for further magnetic thin film research, particularly for the seed layer in hard disk drive (HDD) media, where seed layer with smaller particle size is essential in reducing signal-to-noise ratio (SNR).

  18. Erosion behaviour of composite Al-Cr cathodes in cathodic arc plasmas in inert and reactive atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Franz, Robert; Hawranek, Gerhard; Polcik, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Al$_{x}$Cr$_{1-x}$ composite cathodes with Al contents of x = 0.75, 0.5 and 0.25 were exposed to cathodic arc plasmas in Ar, N$_2$ and O$_2$ atmospheres and their erosion behaviour was studied. Cross-sectional analysis of the elemental distribution of the near-surface zone in the cathodes by scanning electron microscopy revealed the formation of a modified layer for all cathodes and atmospheres. Due to intermixing of Al and Cr in the heat-affected zone, intermetallic Al-Cr phases formed as evidenced by X-ray diffraction analysis. Cathode poisoning effects in the reactive N$_2$ and O$_2$ atmospheres were non-uniform as a result of the applied magnetic field configuration. With the exception of oxide islands on Al-rich cathodes, reactive layers were absent in the circular erosion zone, while nitrides and oxides formed in the less eroded centre region of the cathodes.

  19. EMI shielding using composite materials with two sources magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziaja, J.; Jaroszewski, M.; Lewandowski, M.

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the preparation composite materials for electromagnetic shields using two sources magnetron sputtering DC-M is presented. A composite material was prepared by coating a nonwoven polypropylene metallic layer in sputtering process of targets Ti (purity 99%) and brass alloy MO58 (58%Cu, 40%Zn, 2%Pb) and ϕ diameter targets = 50 mm, under argon atmosphere. The system with magnetron sputtering sources was powered using switch-mode power supply DPS (Dora Power System) with a maximum power of 16 kW and a maximum voltage of 1.2 kV with group frequency from 50 Hz to 5 kHz. The influence of sputtering time of individual targets on the value of the EM field attenuation SE [dB] was investigated for the following supply conditions: pressure pp = 2x10-3 Torr, sputtering power P = 750 W, the time of applying a layer t = 5 min, group frequency fg = 2 kHz, the frequency of switching between targets fp = 1 Hz.

  20. Projectile charge state dependent sputtering of solid surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Hayderer, G

    2000-01-01

    dependence on the ion kinetic energy. This new type of potential sputtering not only requires electronic excitation of the target material, but also the formation of a collision cascade within the target in order to initiate the sputtering process and has therefore been termed kinetically assisted potential sputtering. In order to study defects induced by potential sputtering on the atomic scale we performed measurements of multiply charged Ar ion irradiated HOPG (highly oriented pyrolitic graphite) samples with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The only surface defects found in the STM images are protrusions. The mean diameter of the defects increases with projectile charge state while the height of the protrusions stays roughly the same indicating a possible pre-equilibrium effect of the stopping of slow multiply charged projectiles in HOPG. Total sputter yields for impact of slow singly and multiply charged ions on metal- (Au), oxide- (Al2O3, MgO) and alkali-halide surfaces (LiF) have been measured as a...

  1. The coated cathode conductive layer chamber

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We describe a gaseous detector consisting of thin anode strips vacuum-evaporated on one side of a 100 μ thick plastic layer, alternating on the back side of the same foil with wider parallel cathode strips. Ionizatin released in a drift space on the anode side is amplified and detected much in the same way as in the microstrip gas chamber; in our detector however spontaenous breakdown due to surface currents is completely avoided by the presence of the insulating layer between anodes and cathodes. To reduce surface and volume charging up, we have used polymer foils with a moderate volume resistivity. The first results show good efficiency, good plateaux and time resolution in detecting low-rate minimum ionizing electrons. Although not suited for high rate or good energy resolution applications, this kind of detector seems rather promising for realizing cheaply large active surfaces. (orig.)

  2. The dependence of vircator oscillation mode on cathode material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Limin; Liu, Lie; Cheng, Guoxin; Xu, Qifu; Wan, Hong; Chang, Lei; Wen, Jianchun

    2009-06-01

    This paper presents the effects of cathode materials on the oscillation mode of a virtual cathode oscillator (vircator). In the case of the stainless steel cathode, an oscillation mode hopping appeared with two separate frequencies. Interestingly, the vircator using the carbon fiber cathode exhibited an almost unchanged microwave frequency throughout the microwave pulse. To understand this phenomenon, several parameters are compared, including the diode voltage, accelerating gap, emitting area, and beam uniformity. It was found that a flat-top voltage and a relatively stable gap will provide a possibility of generating a constant microwave frequency. Further, the cathode operated in a regime where the beam current was between the space-charge limited current determined by Child-Langmuir law and the bipolar flow. On the cathode surface, the electron emission is initiated from discrete plasma spots and next from a continuing area, while there is a liberation process of multilayer gases on the anode surface. The changes in the emitting area of carbon fiber cathode showed a self-quenching process, which is not observed in the case of stainless steel cathode. The two-dimensional effect of microwave frequency is introduced, and the obtained results supported the experimental observations on the oscillation mode. By examining the cross section of electron beam, the electron beam for carbon fiber cathode was significantly centralized, while the discrete beam spots appeared for stainless steel cathode. These results show that the slowed diode closure, high emission uniformity, and stable microwave frequency tend to be closely tied.

  3. Review of strategies for a comprehensive simulation in sputtering devices

    CERN Document Server

    Gentile, Antonio A

    2012-01-01

    The development of sputtering facilities, at the moment, is mainly pursued through experimental tests, or simply by expertise in the field, and relies much less on numerical simulation of the process environment. This leads to great efforts and empirically, roughly optimized solutions: in fact, the simulation of these devices, at the state of art, is quite good in predicting the behavior of single steps of the overall deposition process, but it seems still ahead a full integration among the tools simulating the various phenomena involved in a sputter. We summarize here the techniques and codes already available for problems of interest in sputtering facilities, and we try to outline the possible features of a comprehensive simulation framework. This framework should be able to integrate the single paradigms, dealing with aspects going from the plasma environment up to the distribution and properties of the deposited film, not only on the surface of the substrate, but also on the walls of the process chamber.

  4. Sputtering of W-Mo alloy under ion bombardment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The distribution of plasma density in the vicinity of the W-Mo alloy source in the process of dou ble-glow discharge plasma surface alloying was diagnosed using the moveable Langmuir probe. The sputtering law, surface composition and morphological variation of the W-Mo alloy source was studied. The experimental results show that there exists obvious preferential sputtering on the surface of the W-Mo alloy source under the argon ion bombardment; the stable period is reached after a transitional period, and the preferential sputtering occurs in a definite range of composition(mole fraction): 70 % ~ 75 % Mo, 22 % ~ 25 % W; there appears segregation on the surface of the W-Mo alloy source.

  5. Anion formation in sputter ion sources by neutral resonant ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, J. S., E-mail: johnsvogel@yahoo.com [University of California, 8300 Feliz Creek Dr., Ukiah, California 95482 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Focused Cs{sup +} beams in sputter ion sources create mm-diameter pits supporting small plasmas that control anionization efficiencies. Sputtering produces overwhelmingly neutral products that the plasma can ionize as in a charge-change vapor. Electron capture between neutral atoms rises as the inverse square of the difference between the ionization potential of the Cs state and the electron affinity of the sputtered atom, allowing resonant ionization at very low energies. A plasma collision-radiation model followed electronic excitation up to Cs(7d). High modeled Cs(7d) in a 0.5 mm recess explains the 80 μA/mm{sup 2} C{sup −} current density compared to the 20 μA/mm{sup 2} from a 1 mm recess.

  6. Oxidation Behaviour of Sputtered Ni-3Cr-20Al Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of sputtered Ni-3Cr-20Al coating at 900°C in air was investigated. A dense Al2O3 layer was formed on the sputtered Ni-3Cr-20Al coating after 200 h oxidation.However, owing to the segregation of Ni3Al during oxidation Focess at high temperature, the spinel NiAl2O4 was also formed in the Al2O3 layer. It was found that the formation of NiAl2O4had no detrimental effect on the oxidation resistance of the sputtered Ni-3Cr-20Al coating due to the excellent adhesion shown by the Al2O3 and NiAl2O4 complex oxide scale.

  7. Oxygen Recovery in Hf Oxide Films Fabricated by Sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ran; LI Zi-Feng

    2009-01-01

    The chemical structure of ultrathin Hf oxide films (< 10 nm) fabricated by a standard sputtering method is investigated using x-ray spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. According to the experiments,oxygen species are impacted to the HfO2/Si interface during the initial sputtering, and then released back to the upper Hf02 region driven by the oxygen concentration grads. A vacuum annealing can greatly enhance this recovery process. Additionally, significant SiO2 reduction in the interface is observed after the vacuum annealing for the thick HfO2 films in our experiment. It might be an effective method to confine the interracial layer thickness by sputtering thick HfO2 in no-oxygen ambient.

  8. Energy dependence of sputtering yields of monatomic solids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experimental data on the sputtering of solids by ion bombardment have been accumulated. This paper presents the compilation of the experimental data on the energy dependence of the sputtering yield at normal incidence for all available combination of incident ions and target atoms. For each combination, the data are fitted to an empirical equation based on the modified Sigmund equation. The best fit values of two empirical parameters are tabulated. The elastic stopping cross section was obtained. The deviation of the experimental values from the best fit curves in remarkable for heavier incident ions and for heavier target atoms. The approximate sputtering yield of any combination as a function of energy is easily obtained. (Kato, T.)

  9. Anion formation in sputter ion sources by neutral resonant ionization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Focused Cs+ beams in sputter ion sources create mm-diameter pits supporting small plasmas that control anionization efficiencies. Sputtering produces overwhelmingly neutral products that the plasma can ionize as in a charge-change vapor. Electron capture between neutral atoms rises as the inverse square of the difference between the ionization potential of the Cs state and the electron affinity of the sputtered atom, allowing resonant ionization at very low energies. A plasma collision-radiation model followed electronic excitation up to Cs(7d). High modeled Cs(7d) in a 0.5 mm recess explains the 80 μA/mm2 C− current density compared to the 20 μA/mm2 from a 1 mm recess

  10. CO2 gas sensitivity of sputtered zinc oxide thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Samarasekara; N U S Yapa; N T R N Kumara; M V K Perera

    2007-04-01

    For the first time, sputtered zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films have been used as a CO2 gas sensor. Zinc oxide thin films have been synthesized using reactive d.c. sputtering method for gas sensor applications, in the deposition temperature range from 130–153°C at a chamber pressure of 8.5 mbar for 18 h. Argon and oxygen gases were used as sputtering and reactive gases, respectively. ZnO phase could be crystallized using a pure metal target of zinc. The structure of the films determined by means of X-ray diffraction method indicates that the zinc oxide single phase can be fabricated in this substrate temperature range. The sensitivity of the film synthesized at substrate temperature of 130°C is 2.17 in the presence of CO2 gas at a measuring temperature of 100°C.

  11. Study of the chemical sputtering in Tore-Supra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The work presented in this thesis focuses on the interactions between energetic particles coming from thermonuclear plasma and the inner components of a fusion machine. This interaction induces two major problems: erosion of the wall, and tritium retention. This report treats the erosion of carbon based materials. The first part is devoted to chemical sputtering, that appears to be the principal erosion mechanism, compared to physical sputtering and radiation enhanced sublimation that both can be limited. Chemical sputtering has been studied in situ in the tokamak Tore-Supra for ohmic and lower hybrid (LH) heated discharges, by means of mass spectrometry and optical spectroscopy. We have shown that it is necessary to take into account both methane and heavier hydrocarbons (C2Dx and C3Dy) in the determination of the chemical sputtering yield. It is found that for the ohmic discharges, the sputtering yield of CD4 (YCD4) is highly flux (φ) dependent, showing a variation of the form: YCD4 ∝ φ-0.23. The experimental study also reveals that an increase of the surface temperature induces an augmentation of YCD4. The interpretation and the modelling of the experimental results have been performed with a Monte Carlo code (BBQ. In the second part of this work, we have developed and installed an infrared spectroscopy diagnostic in the 0.8-1.6, μm wavelength range dedicated to the measurement of surface temperature, and the identification of atomic and molecular lines emitted during plasma/wall interactions. In the third part, we present the feasibility study of an in situ tungsten deposition process at low temperature(<80 deg C) in order to suppress the chemical sputtering. This study shows that, with this method call Plasma Assisted Chemical Vapor Deposition (PACVD), we are able to coat the whole inner vessel of a tokamak with 1 μm of tungsten. (author)

  12. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy of nano-multilayered Zr-O/Al-O coatings deposited by cathodic vacuum arc plasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nano-multilayered Zr-O/Al-O coatings with alternating Zr-O and Al-O layers having a bi-layer period of 6-7 nm and total coating thickness of 1.0-1.2 μm were deposited using a cathodic vacuum arc plasma process on rotating Si substrates. Plasmas generated from two cathodes, Zr and Al, were deposited simultaneously in a mixture of Ar and O2 background gases. The Zr-O/Al-O coatings, as well as bulk ZrO2 and Al2O3 reference samples, were studied using X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The XPS spectra were analyzed on the surface and after sputtering with a 4 kV Ar+ ion gun. High resolution angle resolved spectra were obtained at three take-off angles: 15o, 45o and 75o relative to the sample surface. It was shown that preferential sputtering of oxygen took place during XPS of bulk reference ZrO2 samples, producing ZrO and free Zr along with ZrO2 in the XPS spectra. In contrast, no preferential sputtering was observed with Al2O3 reference samples. The Zr-O/Al-O coatings contained a large amount of free metals along with their oxides. Free Zr and Al were observed in the coating spectra both before and after sputtering, and thus cannot be due solely to preferential sputtering. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that the Zr-O/Al-O coatings had a nano-multilayered structure with well distinguished alternating layers. However, both of the alternating layers of the coating contained of a mixture of aluminum and zirconium oxides and free Al and Zr metals. The concentration of Zr and Al changed periodically with distance normal to the coating surface: the Zr maximum coincided with the Al minimum and vice versa. However the concentration of Zr in both alternating layers was significantly larger than that of Al. Despite the large free metal concentration, the Knoop hardness, 21.5 GPa, was relatively high, which might be attributed to super-lattice formation or formation of a metal-oxide nanocomposite within the layers.

  13. Characterization of the Be-Ag interfacial region of silver films deposited onto beryllium using a hot hollow cathode discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silver films are physically vapor deposited onto beryllium substrates using a hot hollow cathode discharge. To obtain high Be-Ag adhesion strengths, an atomically 'clean' surface is obtained by ion bombardment cleaning. In this investigation, the relationship of the ion cleaning parameters to contaminants in the Be-Ag interfacial region and their effect on adhesion strength were evaluated. Specimens were ion cleaned at various bombardment parameters and then flash coated with silver. In-depth film profiles were taken by sputter etching in argon and monitoring the Auger electron peak-to-peak heights. The interface was also analyzed by taking a complete spectrum at the edge of the sputter crater. Impurities found at the interface were tantalum, copper and oxygen. The results for adhesion strengths showed that a small amount of oxygen (about 2 at.%) left in the Be-Ag interface will reduce the adhesion strength of the coating. Silver films deposited in an air leak that was greater than a leak which is easily detectable by residual gas analysis contained only about 0.5 at.% O with no reduction in film adherence strengths. (Auth.)

  14. Argon Cluster Sputtering Source for ToF-SIMS Depth Profiling of Insulating Materials: High Sputter Rate and Accurate Interfacial Information

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Zhaoying; Liu, Bingwen; Zhao, Evan; Jin, Ke; Du, Yingge; Neeway, James J.; Ryan, Joseph V.; Hu, Dehong; Zhang, Hongliang; Hong, Mina; Le Guernic, Solenne; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Wang, Fuyi; Zhu, Zihua

    2015-08-01

    For the first time, the use of an argon cluster ion sputtering source has been demonstrated to perform superiorly relative to traditional oxygen and cesium ion sputtering sources for ToF-SIMS depth profiling of insulating materials. The superior performance has been attributed to effective alleviation of surface charging. A simulated nuclear waste glass, SON68, and layered hole-perovskite oxide thin films were selected as model systems due to their fundamental and practical significance. Our study shows that if the size of analysis areas is same, the highest sputter rate of argon cluster sputtering can be 2-3 times faster than the highest sputter rates of oxygen or cesium sputtering. More importantly, high quality data and high sputter rates can be achieved simultaneously for argon cluster sputtering while this is not the case for cesium and oxygen sputtering. Therefore, for deep depth profiling of insulating samples, the measurement efficiency of argon cluster sputtering can be about 6-15 times better than traditional cesium and oxygen sputtering. Moreover, for a SrTiO3/SrCrO3 bi-layer thin film on a SrTiO3 substrate, the true 18O/16O isotopic distribution at the interface is better revealed when using the argon cluster sputtering source. Therefore, the implementation of an argon cluster sputtering source can significantly improve the measurement efficiency of insulating materials, and thus can expand the application of ToF-SIMS to the study of glass corrosion, perovskite oxide thin films, and many other potential systems.

  15. Heteroepitaxial Ge-on-Si by DC magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The growth of Ge on Si(100) by DC Magnetron Sputtering at various temperatures is studied by Spectroscopic Ellipsometry and Transmission Electron Microscopy. Smooth heteroepitaxial Ge films are prepared at relatively low temperatures of 380°C. Typical Stransky-Krastanov growth is observed at 410°C. At lower temperatures (320°C), films are essentially amorphous with isolated nanocrystallites at the Si-Ge interface. A minor oxygen contamination at the interface, developing after ex-situ oxide removal, is not seen to hinder epitaxy. Compensation of dislocation-induced acceptors in Ge by sputtering from n-doped targets is proposed.

  16. Mechanical and structural properties of sputtered Ni/Ti multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senthil Kumar, M.; Boeni, P.; Tixier, S.; Clemens, D.; Horisberger, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Ni/Ti bilayers have been prepared by dc-magnetron sputtering in order to study their mechanical and structural properties. A remarkable reduction of stress is observed when the Ni layers are sputtered reactively in argon with a high partial pressure of air. The high angle x-ray diffraction studies show a tendency towards amorphisation of the Ni layers with increasing air flow. The low angle measurements indicate a substantial reduction of interdiffusion resulting in smoother interfaces with increasing air content. (author) 2 figs., 2 refs.

  17. Discharge current modes of high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongzhen Wu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on the production and disappearance of ions and electrons in the high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasma near the target, the expression of the discharge current is derived. Depending on the slope, six possible modes are deduced for the discharge current and the feasibility of each mode is discussed. The discharge parameters and target properties are simplified into the discharge voltage, sputtering yield, and ionization energy which mainly affect the discharge plasma. The relationship between these factors and the discharge current modes is also investigated.

  18. New Description Model of Sputtering on Material Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓柏权; 严建成; 黄锦华; 彭利林

    2003-01-01

    In order to estimate the erosion rates of some plasma facing component materials, the sputtering yields of Mo, W and deuterium-saturated Li bombarded by fusion charged particles are calculated by application of new sputtering physics description methods based on the bipartition model of ion transport theory. The comparisons with Monte Carlo calculation and experimental results are made. These data might be useful to estimate the lifetime of plasma facing components and to analyse the impurity level in core plasma of fusion reactors.

  19. Advances in sputtered and ion plated solid film lubrication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvins, T.

    1985-01-01

    The glow discharge or ion assisted vacuum deposition techniques, primarily sputtering and ion plating, have rapidly emerged and offer great potential to deposit solid lubricants. The increased energizing of these deposition processes lead to improved adherence and coherence, favorable morphological growth, higher density, and reduced residual stresses in the film. These techniques are of invaluable importance where high precision machines tribo-components require very thin, uniform lubricating films (0.2 m), which do not interface with component tolerances. The performance of sputtered MoS2 films and ion plated Au and Pb films are described in terms of film thickness, coefficient of friction, and wear lives.

  20. Inverted spherical ioniser sputter ion source (IS3)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reflected beam sputter ion source has been found to have an inherent need for frequent readjustment of several voltages during use. Its lack of cylindrical symmetry is reflected in the asymmetry of its beam, and the position and shape of the sputtering Cs+ beam have been shown to depend strongly on the Cs+ current because of space charge effects. There has been a tendency for ion source designs starting from a simple concept to be subjected to continual improvement a process which, while improving one feature, often complicates the originally simple concept, and makes operation more complex

  1. Sputtering measurements on CTR materials using Auger electron spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The sputter yield of Nb, W, C, and Ag by Ar+ in the energy range from 0.5 to 1.5 keV was measured. In addition, the sputter yield for W, C and Ag by H+ at 11.0 keV has been determined. With the exception of carbon, the data are in general agreement with earlier work. For carbon, some discrepancies between the present work and earlier studies are found. It is suggested that major factors contributing to these discrepancies are structural and/or chemical in nature

  2. Scanning optical pyrometer for measuring temperatures in hollow cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Life-limiting processes in hollow cathodes are determined largely by the temperature of the electron emitter. To support cathode life assessment, a noncontact temperature measurement technique which employs a stepper motor-driven fiber optic probe was developed. The probe is driven inside the hollow cathode and collects light radiated by the hot interior surface of the emitter. Ratio pyrometry is used to determine the axial temperature profile. Thermocouples on the orifice plate provide measurements of the external temperature during cathode operation and are used to calibrate the pyrometer system in situ with a small oven enclosing the externally heated cathode. The diagnostic method and initial measurements of the temperature distribution in a hollow cathode are discussed

  3. Cathodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating at Low Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Alfred Junio

    This dissertation focuses on the development of nanostructured cathodes for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and their performance at low operating temperatures. Cathodes were mainly fabricated by the infiltration method, whereby electrocatalysts are introduced onto porous, ionic conducting backbones......degreeC. The most promising cathode was integrated onto an anode supported cell and it was found that the cell exhibits electrochemical stability with no measureable degradation during 1500 h operation at 700degreeC. LaCoO3 and Co3O4 infiltrated - CGO cathodes were also investigated and revealed...... that these nanoparticulate infiltrates have good oxygen reduction capabilities. The significance of the choice of ionic conducting backbone was also addressed by replacing the CGO with Bi2V0.9Cu0.1O5.35 (BICUVOX). Cathodes with a BICUVOX backbone exhibit performance degradation not observed in LSC infiltrated - CGO cathodes...

  4. Preliminary experimental study of a carbon fiber array cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, An-kun; Fan, Yu-wei

    2016-08-01

    The preliminary experimental results of a carbon fiber array cathode for the magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) operations are reported. When the diode voltage and diode current were 480 kV and 44 kA, respectively, high-power microwaves with a peak power of about 3 GW and a pulse duration of about 60 ns were obtained in a MILO device with the carbon fiber array cathode. The preliminary experimental results show that the shot-to-shot reproducibility of the diode current and the microwave power is stable until 700 shots. No obvious damage or deterioration can be observed in the carbon fiber surface morphology after 700 shots. Moreover, the cathode performance has no observable deterioration after 700 shots. In conclusion, the maintain-free lifetime of the carbon fiber array cathode is more than 700 shots. In this way, this carbon fiber array cathode offers a potential replacement for the existing velvet cathode.

  5. Effect of cathodic protection on the state of steel reinforcement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damage of reinforced concrete structures is mainly caused by chloride or carbonation induced corrosion of steel. Cathodic protection is a very effective measure for corrosion control of steel in concrete, especially in chloride contaminated concrete. In this paper, effect of cathodic protection on the state of steel reinforcement is presented. Cathodic polarization of reinforcements in concrete was done under different submerged conditions. Cyclic potentiodynamic tests were used to determine the effect of cathodic protection on the behavior of the steel. Pitting appeared on the non-protected steel, but was not observed on the cathodically protected steel. microscopic photographs show that a close film exists on the protected steel, while the non-protected steel's film is loose. Investigated results have proved the effect of cathodic protection in restoring or strengthening passive film on the steel reinforcement

  6. Cathodic phosphate coating containing nano zinc particles on magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A technology for preparation of a cathodic phosphate coating mainly containing nano metallic zinc particles and phosphate compounds on magnesium alloy was developed.The influence of cathodic current density on the microstructure of the cathodic phosphate coating Was investigated.The results show that the crystals of the coating are finer and the microstructures of the outer surface of the coatings are zigzag at the cathodic density of 0.2-0.5 A/dm2.The content of nano metallic zinc particles in the coating decreases with the increase of the thickness of the coatings and tends to be zero when the coating thickness is 4.14 μm.The cathodic phosphate coating was applied to be a transition coating for improving the adhesion between the paints and the magnesium alloys.The formation mechanism of the cathodic phosphate coating was investigated as well.

  7. In situ plasma diagnostics study of a commercial high-power hollow cathode magnetron deposition tool

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Using a newly designed and built plasma diagnostic system, the plasma parameters were investigated on a commercial 200 mm high-power hollow cathode magnetron (HCM) physical vapor deposition tool using Ta target under argon plasma. A three dimensional (3D) scanning radio frequency (rf)-compensated Langmuir probe was constructed to measure the spatial distribution of the electron temperature (Te) and electron density (ne) in the substrate region of the HCM tool at various input powers (2-15 kW) and pressures (10-70 mTorr). The Te was in the range of 1-3 eV, scaling with decreasing power and decreasing pressure. Meanwhile, ne was in the range of 4x1010-1x1012 cm-3 scaling with increasing power and decreasing pressure. As metal deposits on the probe during the probe measurements, a self-cleaning plasma cup was designed and installed in the chamber to clean the tungsten probe tip. However, its effectiveness in recovering the measured plasma parameters was hindered by the metal layer deposited on the insulating probe tube which was accounted for the variation in the plasma measurements. Using a quartz crystal microbalance combined with electrostatic filters, the ionization fraction of the metal flux was measured at various input power of 2-16 kW and pressure of 5-40 mTorr. The metal ionization fraction reduced significantly with the increasing input power and decreasing gas pressure which were attributed to the corresponding variation in the ionization cross section and the residence time of the sputtered atoms in the plasma, respectively. Both the metal neutral and ion flux increased at higher power and lower pressure. The 3D measurements further showed that the ionization fraction decreased when moving up from the substrate to the cathode.

  8. ERDA characterization of carbon nitride films deposited by hollow cathode discharge process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The interest in carbon nitride (CN) thin films stems from the theoretical work of Liu and Cohen predicting the extreme hardness of this material, comparable to or greater than that of diamond. The growth of CN thin films employing various deposition techniques such as plasma chemical vapor deposition, sputtering, laser ablation, ion assisted dynamic mixing and low energy ion implantation has been reported. This contribution presents some results about the characterization of CNx films using elastic recoil detection analysis (ERDA) technique. CN films were deposited on silicon substrates by electron beam evaporation of pure graphite in a nitrogen environment. A hollow cathode discharge in arc regime was used both for evaporating a graphite target and for generating a high density plasma in the vicinity of the substrate. The main deposition parameters were as follows: gas (N2) pressure, 10-2 - 5.10-2 mbar; hollow cathode discharge power, 2.5 - 5 kW; substrate negative bias voltage, 0-150 V; graphite evaporation rate, 0.08 - 0.2 g/min; deposition duration, 15-60 min. The ERDA measurements were carried out at the Tandem accelerator of IFIN-HH using a 63Cu10+ beam at 80 MeV. The samples were mounted in a scattering target chamber with a vacuum higher than 5 x 10-5 Torr. The detector consisted in a compact ΔE(gas)-E(solid) telescope, placed at 30 angle with respect to the beam. The elements of the main interests were C and N. The measured Δ E -E spectra for two samples prepared in different conditions are presented. A quantitative analysis of the C and N energy spectra using our program SURFAN have been carried out for the these samples. It shows that the nitrogen to carbon atomic concentration ratio is close to 0.3. The nitrogen content is lower than that expected for the ideal β - C3N4 solid. (authors)

  9. Work function measurements of dispenser cathodes by retarding potential method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khairnar, Rajendra S.; Chopra, A. K.

    1992-11-01

    The work function of dispenser cathode pellets has been determined by means of the retarding potential technique. A low-energy electron gun was fabricated which delivers a collimated beam of electrons on the pellet surface at normal incidence. The set up is calibrated by employing samples of known work function such as gold and tungsten, prior to determining the work function of the cathode pellets. This set up provides a rapid determination of the work function of cathode pellets.

  10. Scanning optical pyrometer for measuring temperatures in hollow cathodes

    OpenAIRE

    Polk, J. E.; Marrese-Reading, C. M.; Thornber, B.; Dang, L.; Johnson, L. K.; Katz, I

    2007-01-01

    Life-limiting processes in hollow cathodes are determined largely by the temperature of the electron emitter. To support cathode life assessment, a noncontact temperature measurement technique which employs a stepper motor-driven fiber optic probe was developed. The probe is driven inside the hollow cathode and collects light radiated by the hot interior surface of the emitter. Ratio pyrometry is used to determine the axial temperature profile. Thermocouples on the orifice plate provide measu...

  11. Molten carbonate fuel cell cathode with mixed oxide coating

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hilmi, Abdelkader; Yuh, Chao-Yi

    2013-05-07

    A molten carbonate fuel cell cathode having a cathode body and a coating of a mixed oxygen ion conductor materials. The mixed oxygen ion conductor materials are formed from ceria or doped ceria, such as gadolinium doped ceria or yttrium doped ceria. The coating is deposited on the cathode body using a sol-gel process, which utilizes as precursors organometallic compounds, organic and inorganic salts, hydroxides or alkoxides and which uses as the solvent water, organic solvent or a mixture of same.

  12. Influence of Oxygen in Sputtering and Annealing Processes on Properties of ZnO:Ag Films Deposited by rf Sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Li; GAO Wei

    2011-01-01

    ZnO:Ag films were prepared by rf sputtering on Si substrates.A detailed study on as-grown and annealed films was carried out using x-ray diffraction(XRD).The results indicate that the film crystalline quality and the Ag doping efficiency were both influenced by oxygen in the sputtering and annealing atmosphere.The optimum conditions are found. Ultraviolet and green emissions of annealed ZnO:Ag films were observed at room temperature.Photoluminescence results show that oxygen in annealing atmosphere reduces the deep-level defects in ZnO:Ag and increases the film quality .

  13. Surface Characterization of the LCLS RF Gun Cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brachmann, Axel; /SLAC; Decker, Franz-Josef; /SLAC; Ding, Yuantao; /SLAC; Dowell, David; /SLAC; Emma, Paul; /SLAC; Frisch, Josef; /SLAC; Gilevich, Sasha; /SLAC; Hays, Gregory; /SLAC; Hering, Philippe; /SLAC; Huang, Zhirong; /SLAC; Iverson, Richard; /SLAC; Loos, Henrik; /SLAC; Miahnahri, Alan; /SLAC; Nordlund, Dennis; /SLAC; Nuhn, Heinz-Dieter; /SLAC; Pianetta, Piero; /SLAC; Turner, James; /SLAC; Welch, James; /SLAC; White, William; /SLAC; Wu, Juhao; /SLAC; Xiang, Dao; /SLAC

    2012-06-25

    The first copper cathode installed in the LCLS RF gun was used during LCLS commissioning for more than a year. However, after high charge operation (> 500 pC), the cathode showed a decline of quantum efficiency within the area of drive laser illumination. They report results of SEM, XPS and XAS studies that were carried out on this cathode after it was removed from the gun. X-ray absorption and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveal surface contamination by various hydrocarbon compounds. In addition they report on the performance of the second installed cathode with emphasis on the spatial distribution of electron emission.

  14. Apparatuses for making cathodes for high-temperature, rechargeable batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Coffey, Gregory W.

    2016-09-13

    The approaches and apparatuses for fabricating cathodes can be adapted to improve control over cathode composition and to better accommodate batteries of any shape and their assembly. For example, a first solid having an alkali metal halide, a second solid having a transition metal, and a third solid having an alkali metal aluminum halide are combined into a mixture. The mixture can be heated in a vacuum to a temperature that is greater than or equal to the melting point of the third solid. When the third solid is substantially molten liquid, the mixture is compressed into a desired cathode shape and then cooled to solidify the mixture in the desired cathode shape.

  15. Argon Cluster Sputtering Source for ToF-SIMS Depth Profiling of Insulating Materials: High Sputter Rate and Accurate Interfacial Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaoying; Liu, Bingwen; Zhao, Evan W; Jin, Ke; Du, Yingge; Neeway, James J; Ryan, Joseph V; Hu, Dehong; Zhang, Kelvin H L; Hong, Mina; Le Guernic, Solenne; Thevuthasan, Suntharampilai; Wang, Fuyi; Zhu, Zihua

    2015-08-01

    The use of an argon cluster ion sputtering source has been demonstrated to perform superiorly relative to traditional oxygen and cesium ion sputtering sources for ToF-SIMS depth profiling of insulating materials. The superior performance has been attributed to effective alleviation of surface charging. A simulated nuclear waste glass (SON68) and layered hole-perovskite oxide thin films were selected as model systems because of their fundamental and practical significance. Our results show that high sputter rates and accurate interfacial information can be achieved simultaneously for argon cluster sputtering, whereas this is not the case for cesium and oxygen sputtering. Therefore, the implementation of an argon cluster sputtering source can significantly improve the analysis efficiency of insulating materials and, thus, can expand its applications to the study of glass corrosion, perovskite oxide thin film characterization, and many other systems of interest.

  16. Sputtering of solid neon by keV hydrogen ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Ole; Schou, Jørgen; Sørensen, H.

    1986-01-01

    Sputtering of solid Ne with the hydrogen ions H+1, H+2 and H+3 in the energy range 1–10 keV/atom has been studied by means of a quartz microbalance technique. No enhancement in the yield per atom for molecular ions was found. The results for hydrogen ions are compared with data for keV electrons....

  17. Elementary surface processes during reactive magnetron sputtering of chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monje, Sascha; Corbella, Carles, E-mail: carles.corbella@rub.de; Keudell, Achim von [Research Group Reactive Plasmas, Ruhr-University Bochum, Universitystr. 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2015-10-07

    The elementary surface processes occurring on chromium targets exposed to reactive plasmas have been mimicked in beam experiments by using quantified fluxes of Ar ions (400–800 eV) and oxygen atoms and molecules. For this, quartz crystal microbalances were previously coated with Cr thin films by means of high-power pulsed magnetron sputtering. The measured growth and etching rates were fitted by flux balance equations, which provided sputter yields of around 0.05 for the compound phase and a sticking coefficient of O{sub 2} of 0.38 on the bare Cr surface. Further fitted parameters were the oxygen implantation efficiency and the density of oxidation sites at the surface. The increase in site density with a factor 4 at early phases of reactive sputtering is identified as a relevant mechanism of Cr oxidation. This ion-enhanced oxygen uptake can be attributed to Cr surface roughening and knock-on implantation of oxygen atoms deeper into the target. This work, besides providing fundamental data to control oxidation state of Cr targets, shows that the extended Berg's model constitutes a robust set of rate equations suitable to describe reactive magnetron sputtering of metals.

  18. Sodium tungsten bronze thin films by rf sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderegg, J.W.

    1977-03-01

    Polycrystalline Na/sub x/WO/sub 3/ films were produced by rf sputtering. Films of low x-value resulted when co-sputtering WO/sub 3/ on a Na/sub 0.83/WO/sub 3/ target, and Na/sub 0/./sub 83/ on WO/sub 3/ target. Films of high x and of mixed phase were produced by sputtering a powder mixture of Na/sub 2/WO/sub 4/ and WO/sub 3/ on a tungsten target. Of the sputtering parameters studied, the substrate temperature is the most critical with temperatures above 500/sup 0/C producing films which were cubic in structure with only a small amount of Tetragonal I. The presence of oxygen up to 3 percent by volume had minimal effect on film quality or x-value. Auger, electron microprobe, SIMS, SEM, x-ray diffraction, and sheet resistivity techniques were used in characterizing these films. Resistivity of the films was a factor of 10 higher than the bulk crystalline data for Na/sub 0/./sub 83/WO/sub 3/.

  19. Sputtered thin films for high density tape recording

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, L.T.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes the investigation of sputtered thin film media for high density tape recording. As discussed in Chapter 1, to meet the tremendous demand of data storage, the density of recording tape has to be increased continuously. For further increasing the bit density the key factors are:

  20. Some New Views on the Principles of Magnetron Sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jia-xue; FANG Kai-ming; TONG Hong-hui

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, some common phenomena in magnetron sputtering are freshly analyzed and discussed on the basis of the motion of electrons in non-uniform orthogonal electric and magnetic fields. There exist magnetic confinements in three spatial dimensions on moving charged particles (including electrons) in this kind of non-uniform field. They are the longitudinal cycloidal motion, the horizontal simple harmonic-like motion (with varying amplitudes), and the vertical repelling action. The horizontal magnetic confinement in a mirror-like magnetic field keeps glow discharge lane completely parallel to the corridor of magnetic force lines, therefore only an effectively closed magnet array structure can form a relatively uniform and closed discharge lane. The main reasons for electrons' releasing from magnetic confinement are the vertical magnetic repelling force as well as a more and more weak confinement action in outer range etc. The dominant reasons for a comparatively low increase of substrate's temperature are that the density of bombarding electrons near the substrate is relatively low and their spatial distribution is relatively uniform (compared with that near the target surface). The erosion lane with an inverted Gauss's distribution shape on a magnetron sputtered target is due to that,with sputtering, the distribution width of the critical density of electrons shrinks continuously but the sputtering effect in the centerline of the corridor is always the most powerful.

  1. Particle dynamics during electronic sputtering of solid krypton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutkiewicz, L.; Pedrys, R.; Schou, Jørgen

    1995-01-01

    We have modeled electronic sputtering of solid krypton by excimer production with molecular dynamics. Both excimer evolution in the solid and deexcitation processes have been incorporated in the simulation. The excimer dynamics in the lattice has been analyzed: the excimers formed near the surface...

  2. Sputtering of solid deuterium by He-ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Stenum, B.; Pedrys, R.

    2001-01-01

    Sputtering of solid deuterium by bombardment of 3He+ and 4He+ ions was studied. Some features are similar to hydrogen ion bombardment of solid deuterium, but for the He-ions a significant contribution of elastic processes to the total yield can be identified. The thin-film enhancement is more...

  3. Sputtering of Oxygen Ice by Low Energy Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Muntean, E A; Field, T A; Fitzsimmons, A; Hunniford, C A; McCullough, R W

    2015-01-01

    Naturally occurring ices lie on both interstellar dust grains and on celestial objects, such as those in the outer solar system. These ices are continu- ously subjected to irradiation by ions from the solar wind and/or cosmic rays, which modify their surfaces. As a result, new molecular species may form which can be sputtered off into space or planetary atmospheres. We determined the experimental values of sputtering yields for irradiation of oxygen ice at 10 K by singly (He+, C+, N+, O+ and Ar+) and doubly (C2+, N2+ and O2+) charged ions with 4 keV kinetic energy. In these laboratory experiments, oxygen ice was deposited and irradiated by ions in an ultra high vacuum chamber at low temperature to simulate the environment of space. The number of molecules removed by sputtering was observed by measurement of the ice thickness using laser interferometry. Preliminary mass spectra were taken of sputtered species and of molecules formed in the ice by temperature programmed desorption (TPD). We find that the experi...

  4. Modular design of AFM probe with sputtered silicon tip

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Peter; Thaysen, Jacob; Bouwstra, Siebe;

    2001-01-01

    of the thin films constituting the cantilever. The AFM probe has an integrated tip made of a thick sputtered silicon layer, which is deposited after the probe has been defined and just before the cantilevers are released. The tips are so-called rocket tips made by reactive ion etching. We present probes...

  5. RF Reactive Magnetron Sputter Deposition of Silicon Sub-Oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hattum, E.D. van

    2007-01-01

    RF reactive magnetron plasma sputter deposition of silicon sub oxide E.D. van Hattum Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Utrecht University The work described in the thesis has been inspired and stimulated by the use of SiOx layers in the direct inductive printing technology, w

  6. Effects of oxygen pressure in reactive ion beam sputter deposition of zirconium oxides

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The mechanism of reactive ion beam sputtering is investigated. The experimental results indicate that the pressure decrease during sputtering, the properties of Zr--O films, and the deposition rate are all strongly influenced by oxygen partial pressure. A new model which takes into account the gettering action of the deposition material and deals with the number of sputtered and gaseous particles is presented for reactive ion beam sputtering of metal. The theoretical values are compared with experimental results of the reactive ion beam sputtering. It is found that the calculated values agree extremely well with the oxygen partial pressure decrease and the deposition rate measured experimentally

  7. Angular distribution of sputtered atoms induced by low-energy heavy ion bombardment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lai; ZHANG Zhu-Lin

    2004-01-01

    The sputtering yield angular distributions have been calculated based on the ion energy dependence of total sputtering yields for Ni and Motargets bombarded by low-energy Hg+ ion. The calculated curves show excellent agreement with the corresponding Wehner's experimental results of sputtering yield angular distribution. The fact clearly demonstrated the intrinsic relation between the ion energy dependence of total sputtering yields and the sputtering yield angular distribution. This intrinsic relation had been ignored in Yamamura's papers (1981,1982) due to some obvious mistakes.

  8. Effects of three-dimensional cathode microstructure on the performance of lithium-ion battery cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Segments of Li-ion battery cathodes are reconstructed from FIB-SEM experiments. ► The three-dimensional reconstructed cathode is discretized using a cut-cell approach. ► A Three-dimensional model of cathode performance is developed. ► Three-dimensional simulations reveal significant spatial variations in concentrations and voltage. -- Abstract: This paper develops a computational model that resolves the complex three-dimensional microstructure of Li-ion battery cathodes. The microstructural geometry is reconstructed from focused-ion-beam–scanning-electron-microscopy (FIB-SEM) experiments. Raw data from FIB-SEM experiments are processed into finite-volume discretizations that are directly suited for three-dimensional computational simulation. The model represents transport and electrochemistry within the solid phase of the electrode structure. The results predict the temporally and spatially varying Li concentrations and electrostatic potentials within the solid-phase electrode material (e.g., LiCoO2) as functions of discharge rate. The models predict global discharge characteristics that are consistent with experiment. Moreover, the results reveal significant three-dimensional spatial variations within the actual electrode structure that cannot be predicted with models based on idealized microstructures such as spherical electrode particles

  9. Evaluation of microbial fuel cell operation using algae as an oxygen supplier: carbon paper cathode vs. carbon brush cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakarla, Ramesh; Min, Booki

    2014-12-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) and its cathode performances were compared with use of carbon fiber brush and plain carbon paper cathode electrodes in algae aeration. The MFC having carbon fiber brush cathode exhibited a voltage of 0.21 ± 0.01 V (1,000 Ω) with a cathode potential of around -0.14 ± 0.01 V in algal aeration, whereas MFC with plain carbon paper cathode resulted in a voltage of 0.06 ± 0.005 V with a cathode potential of -0.39 ± 0.01 V. During polarizations, MFC equipped with carbon fiber brush cathode showed a maximum power density of 30 mW/m(2), whereas the MFC equipped with plain carbon paper showed a power density of 4.6 mW/m(2). In algae aeration, the internal resistance with carbon fiber brush cathode was 804 Ω and with plain carbon paper it was 1,210 Ω. The peak currents of MFC operation with carbon fiber brush and plain carbon paper cathodes were -31 mA and -850 µA, respectively. PMID:24890136

  10. Organic Cathode Materials for Rechargeable Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Ruiguo; Qian, Jiangfeng; Zhang, Jiguang; Xu, Wu

    2015-06-28

    This chapter will primarily focus on the advances made in recent years and specify the development of organic electrode materials for their applications in rechargeable lithium batteries, sodium batteries and redox flow batteries. Four various organic cathode materials, including conjugated carbonyl compounds, conducting polymers, organosulfides and free radical polymers, are introduced in terms of their electrochemical performances in these three battery systems. Fundamental issues related to the synthesis-structure-activity correlations, involved work principles in energy storage systems, and capacity fading mechanisms are also discussed.

  11. Intermediate-Temperature Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells with a Gadolinium-Doped Ceria Anodic Functional Layer Deposited via Radio-Frequency Sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanveer, Waqas Hassan; Ji, Sanghoon; Yu, Wonjong; Cho, Gu Young; Lee, Yoon Ho; Cha, Suk Won

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the effects of the insertion of a gadolinium-doped ceria (GDC) anodic functional layer (AFL) on the electrochemical performance of intermediate-temperature solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Fully stabilized yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was used as an oxygen-ion-conducting and support material. Nickel-Samaria-doped ceriathin film was used as an anode material, while screen-printed lanthanum strontium magnetite served as a cathode material. In order to enhance the interfacial reaction on the anode side, a GDC-AFL with a thickness of about 140 nm, deposited via radio-frequency sputtering, was inserted into the anode-electrolyte interface. SOFCs with and without a GDC-AFL were electrochemically characterized. In an intermediate temperature range of about 700 - 800 degrees C, the application of the GDC-AFL led to an increase in the peak power density of approximately 16%.

  12. Improving the performance of stainless-steel DC high voltage photoelectron gun cathode electrodes via gas conditioning with helium or krypton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gas conditioning was shown to eliminate field emission from cathode electrodes used inside DC high voltage photoelectron guns, thus providing a reliable means to operate photoguns at higher voltages and field strengths. Measurements and simulation results indicate that gas conditioning eliminates field emission from cathode electrodes via two mechanisms: sputtering and implantation, with the benefits of implantation reversed by heating the electrode. We have studied five stainless steel electrodes (304L and 316LN) that were polished to approximately 20 nm surface roughness using diamond grit, and evaluated inside a high voltage apparatus to determine the onset of field emission as a function of voltage and field strength. The field emission characteristics of each electrode varied significantly upon the initial application of voltage but improved to nearly the same level after gas conditioning using either helium or krypton, exhibiting less than 10 pA field emission at −225 kV bias voltage with a 50 mm cathode/anode gap, corresponding to a field strength of ∼13 MV/m. Field emission could be reduced with either gas, but there were conditions related to gas choice, voltage and field strength that were more favorable than others

  13. Assessments of Hollow Cathode Wear in the Xenon Ion Propulsion System (XIPs(c)) by Numerical Analyses and Wear Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Polk, James E.

    2008-01-01

    The standard approach presently followed by NASA to qualify electric propulsion for the required mission throughput has been based largely on life tests, which can be costly and time consuming. Revised electric propulsion lifequalification approaches are being formulated that combine analytical and/or computational methods with (shorter-duration) wear tests. As a model case, a wear test is being performed at JPL to assess the lifetime of the discharge hollow cathode in the Xenon Ion Propulsion System (XIPS(c)), a 25-cm ion engine developed by L-3 Communications Electron Technologies, Inc. for commercial applications. Wear and plasma data accumulated throughout this life-assessment program are being used to validate the existing 2-D hollow cathode code OrCa2D. We find that the OrCa2D steady-state solution predicts very well the time-averaged plasma data and the keeper voltage after 5500 hrs of operation in high-power mode. When the wave motion that occurs naturally in these devices is accounted for, based on an estimate of the maximum wave amplitude, the molybdenum-keeper erosion profile observed in the XIPS(c) discharge cathode is also reproduced within a factor of two of the observation. When the same model is applied to predict the erosion of a tantalum keeper we find that erosion is reduced by more than two orders of magnitude compared to the molybdenum keeper due the significantly lower sputtering yield of tantalum. A tantalum keeper would therefore allow keeper lifetimes that greatly exceed the present requirements for deep-space robotic missions considered by NASA. Moreover, such large reduction of the erosion renders the largest uncertainties in the models, which are associated with the wave amplitude estimates and the electron transport model, negligible.

  14. Experimental and ab initio investigations on textured Li–Mn–O spinel thin film cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, J., E-mail: Julian.Fischer@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials (IAM), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Music, D. [RWTH Aachen University, Materials Chemistry, Kopernikusstrasse 10, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Bergfeldt, T.; Ziebert, C.; Ulrich, S.; Seifert, H.J. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials (IAM), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes the tailored preparation of nearly identical lithium–manganese–oxide thin film cathodes with different global grain orientations. The thin films were synthesized by rf magnetron sputtering from a LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}-target in a pure argon plasma. Under appropriate processing conditions, thin films with a cubic spinel structure and a nearly similar density and surface topography but different grain orientation, i.e. (111)- and (440)-textured films, were achieved. The chemical composition was determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy and carrier gas hot extraction. The constitution- and microstructure were evaluated by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The surface morphology and roughness were investigated by scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. The differently textured films represent an ideal model system for studying potential effects of grain orientation on the lithium ion diffusion and electrochemical behavior in LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}-based thin films. They are nearly identical in their chemical composition, atomic bonding behavior, surface-roughness, morphology and thickness. Our initial ab initio molecular dynamics data indicate that Li ion transport is faster in (111)-textured structure than in (440)-textured one. - Highlights: • Thin film model system of differently textured cubic Li–Mn–O spinels. • Investigation of the Li–Mn–O thin film mass density by X-ray reflectivity. • Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation on Li ion diffusion in LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}.

  15. Experimental and ab initio investigations on textured Li–Mn–O spinel thin film cathodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the tailored preparation of nearly identical lithium–manganese–oxide thin film cathodes with different global grain orientations. The thin films were synthesized by rf magnetron sputtering from a LiMn2O4-target in a pure argon plasma. Under appropriate processing conditions, thin films with a cubic spinel structure and a nearly similar density and surface topography but different grain orientation, i.e. (111)- and (440)-textured films, were achieved. The chemical composition was determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy and carrier gas hot extraction. The constitution- and microstructure were evaluated by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The surface morphology and roughness were investigated by scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. The differently textured films represent an ideal model system for studying potential effects of grain orientation on the lithium ion diffusion and electrochemical behavior in LiMn2O4-based thin films. They are nearly identical in their chemical composition, atomic bonding behavior, surface-roughness, morphology and thickness. Our initial ab initio molecular dynamics data indicate that Li ion transport is faster in (111)-textured structure than in (440)-textured one. - Highlights: • Thin film model system of differently textured cubic Li–Mn–O spinels. • Investigation of the Li–Mn–O thin film mass density by X-ray reflectivity. • Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation on Li ion diffusion in LiMn2O4

  16. Oxide diffusion in innovative SOFC cathode materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Y; Thoréton, V; Pirovano, C; Capoen, E; Bogicevic, C; Nuns, N; Mamede, A-S; Dezanneau, G; Vannier, R N

    2014-01-01

    Oxide diffusion was studied in two innovative SOFC cathode materials, Ba(2)Co(9)O(14) and Ca(3)Co(4)O(9)+δ derivatives. Although oxygen diffusion was confirmed in the promising material Ba(2)Co(9)O(14), it was not possible to derive accurate transport parameters because of an oxidation process at the sample surface which has still to be clarified. In contrast, oxygen diffusion in the well-known Ca(3)Co(4)O(9)+δ thermoelectric material was improved when calcium was partly substituted with strontium, likely due to an increase of the volume of the rock salt layers in which the conduction process takes place. Although the diffusion coefficient remains low, interestingly, fast kinetics towards the oxygen molecule dissociation reaction were shown with surface exchange coefficients higher than those reported for the best cathode materials in the field. They increased with the strontium content; the Sr atoms potentially play a key role in the mechanism of oxygen molecule dissociation at the solid surface. PMID:25407246

  17. Scandia doped tungsten matrix for impregnated cathode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jinshu; WANG Yanchun; LIU Wei; LI Hongyi; ZHOU Meiling

    2008-01-01

    As a matrix for Sc-type impregnated cathode,scandia doped tungsten with a uniform ldistribution of SC2O3 was obtained by powder metallurgy combined with the liquid-solid doping method.The microstructure and composition of the powder and the anti-ion bombardment behavior of scandium in the matrix were studied by means of SEM,EDS,XRD,and in-situ AES methods.Tungsten powder covered with scandium oxide,an ideal scandium oxide-doped tungsten powder for the preparation of Sc-type impregnated cathode,was obtained using the liquid-solid doping method.Compared with the matrix prepared with the mechanically mixed powder of tungsten and scandium oxide,SC2O3-W matrix prepared with this kind of powder had smaller grain size and uniform distribution of scandium.Sc on the surface of Sc2O3 doped tungsten mauix had good high temperature stability and good anti-ion bombardment capability.

  18. Tests of Cathode Strip Chamber Prototypes

    CERN Document Server

    Bonushkin, Yuri; Chrisman, David; Durkin, S; Ferguson, Thomas; Giacomelli, Paolo; Gorn, William; Hauser, Jay; Hirschfelder, J; Hoftiezer, John; Hoorani, Hafeez R; Kisselev, Oleg; Klem, Daniel; Korytov, Andrey; Layter, John G; Lennous, Paul; Ling, Ta-Yung; Matthey, Christina; Medved, Serguei; Minor, C; Mitselmakher, Guenakh; Müller, Thomas; Otwinowski, Stanislaw; Preston, L; Prokofiev, O E; Rush, Chuck J; Schenk, P; Sedykh, Yu; Smirnov, Igor; Soulimov, V; Vaniachine, A; Vercelli, T; Wuest, Craig R; Zeng, Ji-Yang; von Goeler, Eberhard

    1997-01-01

    We report on the results of testing two six-layer 0.6 x 0.6 cm^2 cathode strip chamber ( CSC) prototypes in a muon beam at CERN. The prototypes were designed to simulate sections of the end-cap muon system of the Compact Muon Solenoid ( CMS) detector which will be installed at the Large Hadron Collider ( LHC). We measured the spatial and time resolutions of each chamber for different gains, different orientations with respect to the beam direction and different strength magnetic fields. The single-layer spatial resolution of a prototype with a strip pitch of 15.88 mm ranged from 78 micron to 468 micron, depending on whether the particle passed between two cathode strips or through the center of a strip; its six-layer resolution was found to be 44 micron. The single-layer spatial resolution of a prototype with a strip pitch of 6.35 mm ranged from 54 to 66 micron; its six-layer resolution w as found to be 23 micron. The efficiency for collecting an anode wire signal from one of six layers within a 20 ns time wi...

  19. Development of cathode material for lithium-ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rustam Mukhtaruly Turganaly

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical characteristics of the cathode material coated with carbon layer has been developed. Various carbon coating methods. There  has been carried out a comparative electrochemical analysis of the coated and uncoated with carbon cathode material. 

  20. Effects of Humidity on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, John S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stevenson, Jeffry W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Singh, Prabhakar [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Mahapatra, Manoj K. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Wachsman, E. D. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Liu, Meilin [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Gerdes, Kirk R. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2015-03-17

    This report summarizes results from experimental studies performed by a team of researchers assembled on behalf of the Solid-state Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Core Technology Program. Team participants employed a variety of techniques to evaluate and mitigate the effects of humidity in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode air streams on cathode chemistry, microstructure, and electrochemical performance.

  1. The Effect of Substrate Topography on Coating Cathodic Delamination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinell, Claus E.; Sørensen, Per A.; Kiil, Søren

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the effect of steel substrate topography on coating cathodic delamination. The study showed that the surface preparation can be used to control and minimize the rate of cathodic delamination. The coating should have maximum wetting properties so that substrates with high...

  2. Tandem cathode for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siahrostami, Samira; Björketun, Mårten E.; Strasser, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    The efficiency of proton exchange membrane fuel cells is limited mainly by the oxygen reduction reaction at the cathode. The large cathodic overpotential is caused by correlations between binding energies of reaction intermediates in the reduction of oxygen to water. This work introduces a novel...

  3. The Cathode Ramper: Application for the Duoplasmatron Ion Source

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez-Conejo, J

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the Cathode Ramper Application is to heat the Linac 2 duoplasmatron ion source cathode up to a desired temperature selected by the user. The application has been developed in Java, making use of the Java Development Kit 1.4 and the PS Java environment.

  4. Microbial Fuel Cell Performance with a Pressurized Cathode Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) power densities are often constrained by the oxygen reduction reaction rate on the cathode electrode. One important factor for this is the normally low solubility of oxygen in the aqueous cathode solution creating mass transport limitations, which hinder oxygen reduction a...

  5. Impressed current cathodic protection of deep water structures

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Venkatesan, R.

    Of all the various anti-corrosion systems usEd. by offshore structures and ship-building industry to reduce the ravages of sea-water corrosion, cathodic protection is one of the most important. Impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP...

  6. Cathodic disbonding of organic coatings on submerged steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knudsen, Ole oeystein

    1998-12-31

    In offshore oil production, submerged steel structures are commonly protected by an organic coating in combination with cathodic protection. The main advantage is that the coating decreases the current demand for cathodic protection. But the coating degrades with time. This thesis studies one of the most important mechanisms for coating degradation in seawater, cathodic disbonding. Seven commercial coatings and two model coatings with various pigmentations have been studied. Parameter studies, microscopy and studies of free films were used in the mechanism investigations. Exposure to simulated North Sea conditions was used in the performance studies. The effect of aluminium and glass barrier pigments on cathodic disbonding was investigated. The mechanism for the effect of the aluminium pigments on cathodic disbonding was also investigated. The transport of charge and oxygen to the steel/coating interface during cathodic disbonding was studied for two epoxy coatings. Cathodic disbonding, blistering and current demand for cathodic protection was measured for nine commercial coatings for submerged steel structures, using the ASTM-G8 standard test and a long term test under simulated North Sea conditions. The relevance of the ASTM-G8 test as a prequalification test was evaluated. 171 refs., 40 figs., 6 tabs.

  7. Ion beam sputtering of Ti: Influence of process parameters on angular and energy distribution of sputtered and backscattered particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautenschläger, T.; Feder, R.; Neumann, H.; Rice, C.; Schubert, M.; Bundesmann, C.

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, the influence of ion energy and geometrical parameters onto the angular and energy distribution of secondary particles for sputtering a Ti target with Ar ions is investigated. The angular distribution of the particle flux of the sputtered Ti atoms was determined by the collection method, i.e. by growing Ti films and measuring their thickness. The formal description of the particle flux can be realized by dividing it into an isotropic and an anisotropic part. The experimental data show that increasing the ion energy or decreasing the ion incidence angle lead to an increase of the isotropic part, which is in good agreement with basic sputtering theory. The energy distribution of the secondary ions was measured using an energy-selective mass spectrometer. The energy distribution of the sputtered target ions shows a maximum at an energy between 10 eV and 20 eV followed by a decay proportional to E-n, which is in principle in accordance with Thompson's theory, followed by a high energetic tail. When the sum of incidence angle and emission angle is increased, the high-energetic tail expands to higher energies and an additional peak due to direct sputtering events may occur. In the case of backscattered primary Ar ions, a maximum at an energy between 5 eV and 10 eV appears and, depending on the scattering geometry, an additional broad peak at a higher energy due to direct scattering events is observed. The center energy of the additional structure shifts systematically to higher energies with decreasing scattering angle or increasing ion energy. The experimental results are compared to calculations based on simple elastic two-particle-interaction theory and to simulations done with the Monte Carlo code SDTrimSP. Both confirm in principle the experimental findings.

  8. Kinetic and Potential Sputtering of Lunar Regolith: The Contribution of the Heavy Highly Charged (Minority) Solar Wind Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, F. W.; Barghouty, A. F.

    2012-01-01

    Solar wind sputtering of the lunar surface helps determine the composition of the lunar exosphere and contributes to surface weathering. To date, only the effects of the two dominant solar wind constituents, H+ and He+, have been considered. The heavier, less abundant solar wind constituents have much larger sputtering yields because they have greater mass (kinetic sputtering) and they are highly charged (potential sputtering) Their contribution to total sputtering can therefore be orders of magnitude larger than their relative abundances would suggest

  9. Investigation of Endurance Performance of Carbon Nanotube Cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Nanako; Yamagiwa, Yoshiki; Ohkawa, Yasushi; Nishida, Shin-Ichiro; Kitamura, Shoji

    The Aerospace Research and Development Directorate of the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) is considering a demonstration of electrodynamic tether (EDT) systems in low Earth orbit (LEO). Carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have some advantages as electron sources compared to conventional Spindt type emitters, and so are expected to be useful in EDT systems. Experiments to investigate the durability of CNT cathodes in a space environment had been conducted in a diode mode, but it was found that electron extraction tests, in which the cathode with a gate electrode is used, are necessary to evaluate the endurance of CNTs more accurately. In this paper, we conducted long duration operating tests of a cathode with a gate. It was found that there was almost no change in cathode performance at current densities below 100 A/m2 even after the cathode was operated for over 500 hours in the high vacuum environment.

  10. Hollow cathode ion source for application to an implanter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hollow cathode ion source has been studied in order to improve the life-time of an ion source for an ion implanter. Both volatile and refractory elements are shown to be ionized using two types of discharge state of the hollow cathode namely hot and cold cathode discharge. The life-time of LaB6 as the hot cathode is more than 150 h and the ion beam currents reach more than 10 mA cm-2 at the extraction voltage of 10 kV. For the cold cathode operation, stable currents of approx. 40 to 70 μA are extracted of refractory metal ions such as W and Mo. (author)

  11. Focused cathode design to reduce anode heating during vircator operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lynn, Curtis F.; Dickens, James C.; Neuber, Andreas A.

    2013-10-01

    Virtual cathode oscillators, or vircators, are a type of high power microwave device which operates based on the instability of a virtual cathode, or cloud of electrons, which forms when electron current injected into the drift tube exceeds the space charge limited current within the drift tube. Anode heating by the electron beam during vircator operation ultimately limits achievable pulse lengths, repetition rates, and the duration of burst mode operation. This article discusses a novel cathode design that focuses electrons through holes in the anode, thus significantly reducing anode heating by the electrons emitted from the cathode during the first transit through the A-K gap. Reflexing electrons continue to deposit energy on the anode; however, the discussed minimization of anode heating by main beam electrons has the potential to enable higher repetition rates as well as efficiency and longer diode lifetime. A simulation study of this type of cathode design illustrates possible advantages.

  12. Focused cathode design to reduce anode heating during vircator operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lynn, Curtis F.; Dickens, James C.; Neuber, Andreas A. [Center for Pulsed Power and Power Electronics, Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas Tech University, Lubbock, Texas 79409 (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Virtual cathode oscillators, or vircators, are a type of high power microwave device which operates based on the instability of a virtual cathode, or cloud of electrons, which forms when electron current injected into the drift tube exceeds the space charge limited current within the drift tube. Anode heating by the electron beam during vircator operation ultimately limits achievable pulse lengths, repetition rates, and the duration of burst mode operation. This article discusses a novel cathode design that focuses electrons through holes in the anode, thus significantly reducing anode heating by the electrons emitted from the cathode during the first transit through the A-K gap. Reflexing electrons continue to deposit energy on the anode; however, the discussed minimization of anode heating by main beam electrons has the potential to enable higher repetition rates as well as efficiency and longer diode lifetime. A simulation study of this type of cathode design illustrates possible advantages.

  13. Focused cathode design to reduce anode heating during vircator operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virtual cathode oscillators, or vircators, are a type of high power microwave device which operates based on the instability of a virtual cathode, or cloud of electrons, which forms when electron current injected into the drift tube exceeds the space charge limited current within the drift tube. Anode heating by the electron beam during vircator operation ultimately limits achievable pulse lengths, repetition rates, and the duration of burst mode operation. This article discusses a novel cathode design that focuses electrons through holes in the anode, thus significantly reducing anode heating by the electrons emitted from the cathode during the first transit through the A-K gap. Reflexing electrons continue to deposit energy on the anode; however, the discussed minimization of anode heating by main beam electrons has the potential to enable higher repetition rates as well as efficiency and longer diode lifetime. A simulation study of this type of cathode design illustrates possible advantages

  14. Robust Low-Cost Cathode for Commercial Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patterson, Michael J.

    2007-01-01

    Under funding from the NASA Commercial Technology Office, a cathode assembly was designed, developed, fabricated, and tested for use in plasma sources for ground-based materials processing applications. The cathode development activity relied on the large prior NASA investment and successful development of high-current, high-efficiency, long-life hollow cathodes for use on the International Space Station Plasma Contactor System. The hollow cathode was designed and fabricated based on known engineering criteria and manufacturing processes for compatibility with the requirements of the plasma source. The transfer of NASA GRC-developed hollow cathode technology for use as an electron emitter in the commercial plasma source is anticipated to yield a significant increase in process control, while eliminating the present issues of electron emitter lifetime and contamination.

  15. Electrical properties of resistive switches based on Ba1-χSrχTiO3 thin films prepared by RF co-sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, was proposed the use of Ba1-χSrχTiO3(0≤x≤1) thin films for the construction of metal-insulator-metal heterostructures; and their great potential for the development of non-volatile resistance memories (ReRAM) is shown. The deposition of Ba1-χSrχTiO3 thin films was done by the RF co-sputtering technique using two magnetron sputtering cathodes with BaTiO3 and SrTiO3 targets. The chemical composition (x parameter) in the deposited Ba1-χSrχTiO3 thin films was varied through the RF powder applied to the targets. The constructed metal-insulator-metal heterostructures were Al/Ba1-χSrχTiO3/nichrome. The I-V measurements of the heterostructures showed that their hysteretic characteristics change depending on the Ba/Sr ratio of the Ba1-χSrχTiO3 thin films; the Ba/Sr ratio was determined by employing the energy dispersive spectroscopy; Sem micrographs showed that Ba1-χSrχTiO3 thin films were uniform without cracks or pinholes. Additionally, the analysis of the X-ray diffraction results indicated the substitutional incorporation of Sr into the BaTiO3 lattice and the obtainment of crystalline films for the entire range of the x values. (Author)

  16. Air humidity and water pressure effects on the performance of air-cathode microbial fuel cell cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Ahn, Yongtae

    2014-02-01

    To better understand how air cathode performance is affected by air humidification, microbial fuel cells were operated under different humidity conditions or water pressure conditions. Maximum power density decreased from 1130 ± 30 mW m-2 with dry air to 980 ± 80 mW m -2 with water-saturated air. When the cathode was exposed to higher water pressures by placing the cathode in a horizontal position, with the cathode oriented so it was on the reactor bottom, power was reduced for both with dry (1030 ± 130 mW m-2) and water-saturated (390 ± 190 mW m-2) air. Decreased performance was partly due to water flooding of the catalyst, which would hinder oxygen diffusion to the catalyst. However, drying used cathodes did not improve performance in electrochemical tests. Soaking the cathode in a weak acid solution, but not deionized water, mostly restored performance (960 ± 60 mW m-2), suggesting that there was salt precipitation in the cathode that was enhanced by higher relative humidity or water pressure. These results showed that cathode performance could be adversely affected by both flooding and the subsequent salt precipitation, and therefore control of air humidity and water pressure may need to be considered for long-term MFC operation. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Correlation of cathode parameters of high power grid tubes with material characteristics of cathode-grid units

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One way to increase the longevity of dispenser cathodes is based on reducing the Barium evaporation. This can be achieved by the decrease of the reaction 'activity' of the emitter impregnant with the porous tungsten (W) body, which supplies free Barium from the interior of the porous cathode to its surface

  18. Cationic fluorinated polymer binders for microbial fuel cell cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Guang

    2012-01-01

    Fluorinated quaternary ammonium-containing polymers were used as catalyst binders in microbial fuel cell (MFC) cathodes. The performance of the cathodes was examined and compared to NAFION ® and other sulfonated aromatic cathode catalyst binders using linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), impedance spectroscopy, and performance tests in single chamber air-cathode MFCs. The cathodes with quaternary ammonium functionalized fluorinated poly(arylene ether) (Q-FPAE) binders showed similar current density and charge transfer resistance (R ct) to cathodes with NAFION ® binders. Cathodes containing either of these fluorinated binders exhibited better electrochemical responses than cathodes with sulfonated or quaternary ammonium-functionalized RADEL ® poly(sulfone) (S-Radel or Q-Radel) binders. After 19 cycles (19 d), the power densities of all the MFCs declined compared to the initial cycles due to biofouling at the cathode. MFC cathodes with fluorinated polymer binders (1445 mW m -2, Q-FPAE-1.4-H; 1397 mW m -2, Q-FPAE-1.4-Cl; 1277 mW m -2, NAFION ®; and 1256 mW m -2, Q-FPAE-1.0-Cl) had better performance than those with non-fluorinated polymer binders (880 mW m -2, S-Radel; 670 mW m -2, Q-Radel). There was a 15% increase in the power density using the Q-FPAE binder with a 40% higher ion exchange capacity (Q-FPAE-1.4-H compared to Q-FPAE-1.0-Cl) after 19 cycles of operation, but there was no effect on the power production due to counter ions in the binder (Cl -vs. HCO 3 -). The highest-performance cathodes (NAFION ® and Q-FPAE binders) had the lowest charge transfer resistances (R ct) in fresh and in fouled cathodes despite the presence of thick biofilms on the surface of the electrodes. These results show that fluorinated binders may decrease the penetration of the biofilm and associated biopolymers into the cathode structure, which helps to combat MFC performance loss over time. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  19. Localized deposition and sputtering of Jovian ionospheric sodium on Io

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, T. W.; Dessler, A. J.; Fanale, F. P.

    1979-01-01

    Because of relative motion between the innermost Galilean satellite Io and Jupiter's ionosphere, a current is drawn from the ionosphere that can be a source of both deposition on, and sputtering from, the surface of Io. It is shown that the ions in this current strike Io in a localized region in the quadrant bounded by a line connecting Io and Jupiter and a tangent line extended in the direction of Io's orbital motion. If these ions are the principal source of sodium that is sputtered from Io, then this current provides a simple explanation of the observation of a localized area from which sodium ions escape from Io. The geometry of this current may also affect the optical surface of Io. Several experimental tests are suggested that can determine the compatibility of this hypothesis with the directly observable properties of Io's surface.

  20. Biopolymer nanostructures induced by plasma irradiation and metal sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Modification based on polymer surface exposure to plasma treatment exhibits an easy and cheap technique for polymer surface nanostructuring. The influence of argon plasma treatment on biopolymer poly(L-lactide acid (PLLA) will be presented in this paper. The combination of Ar+ ion irradiation, consequent sputter metallization (platinum) and thermal annealing of polymer surface will be summarized. The surface morphology was studied using atomic force microscopy. The Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy and X-ray Photoelectron Spectroscopy were used as analytical methods. The combination of plasma treatment with consequent thermal annealing and/or metal sputtering led to the change of surface morphology and its elemental ratio. The surface roughness and composition has been strongly influenced by the modification parameters and metal layer thickness. By plasma treatment of polymer surface combined with consequent annealing or metal deposition can be prepared materials applicable both in tissue engineering as cell carriers, but also in integrated circuit manufacturing

  1. Molecular dynamic simulations of the sputtering of multilayer organic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Postawa, Z; Piaskowy, J; Krantzman, K; Winograd, N; Garrison, B J

    2003-01-01

    Sputtering of organic overlayers has been modeled using molecular dynamics computer simulations. The investigated systems are composed of benzene molecules condensed into one, two and three layers on an Ag left brace 1 1 1 right brace surface. The formed organic overlayers were bombarded with 4 keV Ar projectiles at normal incidence. The development of the collision cascade in the organic overlayer was investigated. The sputtering yield, mass, internal and kinetic energy distributions of ejected particles have been analyzed as a function of the thickness of the organic layer. The results show that all emission characteristics are sensitive to the variation of layer thickness. Although most of the ejected intact benzene molecules originate from the topmost layer, the emission of particles located initially in second and third layers is significant. The analysis indicates that the metallic substrate plays a dominant role in the ejection of intact organic molecules.

  2. Molybdenum sputtering film characterization for high gradient accelerating structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.Bini; B.Spataro; A.Marcelli; S.Sarti; V.A.Dolgashev; S.Tantawi; A.D.Yeremian

    2013-01-01

    Technological advancements are strongly required to fulfill the demands of new accelerator devices with the highest accelerating gradients and operation reliability for the future colliders.To this purpose an extensive R&D regarding molybdenum coatings on copper is in progress.In this contribution we describe chemical composition,deposition quality and resistivity properties of different molybdenum coatings obtained via sputtering.The deposited films are thick metallic disorder layers with different resistivity values above and below the molibdenum dioxide reference value.Chemical and electrical properties of these sputtered coatings have been characterized by Rutherford backscattering,XANES and photoemission spectroscopy.We will also consider multiple cells standing wave section coated by a molybdenum layer designed to improve the performance of X-Band accelerating systems.

  3. Nb Sputtered Quarter Wave Resonators for the HIE-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Venturini Delsolaro, W; Delaup, B; D'Elia, A; Jecklin, N M; Kadi, Y; Keppel, G; Lespinasse, D; Maesen, P; Mondino, I; Palmieri, V; Stark, S; Sublet, A R M; Therasse, M

    2013-01-01

    The HIE-ISOLDE superconducting linac will be based on quarter wave resonators (QWRs), made by niobium sputtering on copper. The operating frequency at 4.5 K is 101.28 MHz and the required performance for the high beta cavity is 6 MV/m accelerating field for 10 W maximum power dissipation. These challenging specifications were recently met at CERN at the end of a vigorous development program. The paper reports on the progress of the cavity RF performance with the evolution of the sputtering process; it equally illustrates the parallel R&D which is on-going at CERN and at INFN in the quest for even higher performances.

  4. A COMPLEX—TYPE FOCUSSED MAGNTRON FOR SPUTTERING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑思孝

    1994-01-01

    The design of a small complex-type focussed magnetron with a long target-life used for excited multi-atoms beam film deposition in hard coatings is described.The magnetron tunnel of the magentron source was constructed by a planar unbalanced magnetic annulus,which comes from the extended co-axial magnetron principle and inside cylindrical magnet tunnel.The use efficinecy of inside circular cone sputtering target area is high up to 62%.The inside-inversion cone sputtering target has a long life and results in a higher deposition rate 35nm/min for Ti at a 2.5Pa Ar pressure.A better focussing direction of ejecting atom beam has been achieved,and the are power input is 300W for Ti target.

  5. PREFERENTIAL SPUTTERING OF Cu76Ni15Sn9

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王震遐; 王传珊; 等

    1995-01-01

    Using collection film technique combined with Auger electron spectroscopy is analysis,the preferential sputtering of the ternary alloy Cu76Ni15Sn9 bombarded with 27keV Ar+ at normal incidence is studied.After bombardment,the target surface is examined with SEM,and the surface composition of different topographical feature areas is measured with electron probe micro-analyser(EPMA),The experiment results show that Cu atoms are preferentially ejected compared with Ni atoms,and Sn atoms come third within the ejection angle range from 0°to 60°.The results are discussed from the viewpoint of sputtering from a very rough surface.

  6. Novel High Rate Lithium Intercalation Cathode Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Application of amorphous V2O5/carbon/neodymium oxide (Nd2O3) composite is one of ways to surmount the lower electrical conductivity of V2O5. A new type of V2O5/carbon/Nd2O3 composite was prepared by mixing vanadium oxide hydrosol, acetone, carbon and Nd2O3 powder. High rate discharge/charge property of the composite electrode was tested electrochemically. This composite with Nd2O3 added shows the improvement of not only the discharge capacity but also cycle durability discharge capacity. The rate capability of the composite cathode also increases with the addition of Nd2O3.and cycle life are probably caused by the increase in porosity of open pores and short diffusion length of the active material on the lithium-ion insertion.

  7. Cathodic Cage Plasma Nitriding: An Innovative Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. M. de Sousa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cylindrical samples of AISI 1020, AISI 316, and AISI 420 steels, with different heights, were simultaneously treated by a new technique of ionic nitriding, entitled cathodic cage plasma nitriding (CCPN, in order to evaluate the efficiency of this technique to produce nitrided layers with better properties compared with those obtained using conventional ionic nitriding technique. This method is able to eliminate the edge effect in the samples, promoting a better uniformity of temperature, and consequently, a smaller variation of the thickness/height relation can be obtained. The compound layers were characterized by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and microhardness test profile. The results were compared with the properties of samples obtained with the conventional nitriding, for the three steel types. It was verified that samples treated by CCPN process presented, at the same temperature, a better uniformity in the thickness and absence of the edge effect.

  8. Catadioptric aberration correction in cathode lens microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tromp, R.M. [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, PO Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden Institute of Physics, Niels Bohrweg 2, 2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2015-04-15

    In this paper I briefly review the use of electrostatic electron mirrors to correct the aberrations of the cathode lens objective lens in low energy electron microscope (LEEM) and photo electron emission microscope (PEEM) instruments. These catadioptric systems, combining electrostatic lens elements with a reflecting mirror, offer a compact solution, allowing simultaneous and independent correction of both spherical and chromatic aberrations. A comparison with catadioptric systems in light optics informs our understanding of the working principles behind aberration correction with electron mirrors, and may point the way to further improvements in the latter. With additional developments in detector technology, 1 nm spatial resolution in LEEM appears to be within reach. - Highlights: • The use of electron mirrors for aberration correction in LEEM/PEEM is reviewed. • A comparison is made with similar systems in light optics. • Conditions for 1 nm spatial resolution are discussed.

  9. Catadioptric aberration correction in cathode lens microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper I briefly review the use of electrostatic electron mirrors to correct the aberrations of the cathode lens objective lens in low energy electron microscope (LEEM) and photo electron emission microscope (PEEM) instruments. These catadioptric systems, combining electrostatic lens elements with a reflecting mirror, offer a compact solution, allowing simultaneous and independent correction of both spherical and chromatic aberrations. A comparison with catadioptric systems in light optics informs our understanding of the working principles behind aberration correction with electron mirrors, and may point the way to further improvements in the latter. With additional developments in detector technology, 1 nm spatial resolution in LEEM appears to be within reach. - Highlights: • The use of electron mirrors for aberration correction in LEEM/PEEM is reviewed. • A comparison is made with similar systems in light optics. • Conditions for 1 nm spatial resolution are discussed

  10. Nanostructured cathode materials for rechargeable lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myung, Seung-Taek; Amine, Khalil; Sun, Yang-Kook

    2015-06-01

    The prospect of drastic climate change and the ceaseless fluctuation of fossil fuel prices provide motivation to reduce the use of fossil fuels and to find new energy conversion and storage systems that are able to limit carbon dioxide generation. Among known systems, lithium-ion batteries are recognized as the most appropriate energy storage system because of their high energy density and thus space saving in applications. Introduction of nanotechnology to electrode material is beneficial to improve the resulting electrode performances such as capacity, its retention, and rate capability. The nanostructure is highly available not only when used alone but also is more highlighted when harmonized in forms of core-shell structure and composites with carbon nanotubes, graphene or reduced graphene oxides. This review covers syntheses and electrochemical properties of nanoscale, nanosized, and nanostructured cathode materials for rechargeable lithium batteries.

  11. Using cathode spacers to minimize reactor size in air cathode microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Qiao

    2012-04-01

    Scaling up microbial fuel cells (MFCs) will require more compact reactor designs. Spacers can be used to minimize the reactor size without adversely affecting performance. A single 1.5mm expanded plastic spacer (S1.5) produced a maximum power density (973±26mWm -2) that was similar to that of an MFC with the cathode exposed directly to air (no spacer). However, a very thin spacer (1.3mm) reduced power by 33%. Completely covering the air cathode with a solid plate did not eliminate power generation, indicating oxygen leakage into the reactor. The S1.5 spacer slightly increased columbic efficiencies (from 20% to 24%) as a result of reduced oxygen transfer into the system. Based on operating conditions (1000ς, CE=20%), it was estimated that 0.9Lh -1 of air would be needed for 1m 2 of cathode area suggesting active air flow may be needed for larger scale MFCs. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  12. VUV fluorescence diagnostics of sputtered oxygen and carbide materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sputtering of oxygen, carbon, boron and silicon atoms and detection with laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) spectroscopy in the vacuum ultraviolet (VUV) is described. The necessary pump radiation at λ=130 nm (O) and λ=166 nm (C, B, Si) is generated by stimulated Raman scattering (SRS) in H2. The generation of the VUV pump radiation by SRS is briefly described. Measurements of velocity distributions and resulting surface binding energies as well as concentrations and yields are reported. (orig.)

  13. RF sputtering: A viable tool for MEMS fabrication

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sudhir Chandra; Vivekanand Bhatt; Ravindra Singh

    2009-08-01

    Fabrication of Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) requires deposition of films such as SiO2, Si34, ZnO, polysilicon, phosphosilicate glass (PSG), Al, Cr-Au, Pt, etc. for use as structural, sacrificial, piezoelectric and conducting material. Deposition of these materials at low temperature is desirable for fabricating sensors/actuators on temperature-sensitive substrates and also for integrating MEMS structures on silicon in post-CMOS processing procedures. Plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) and sputtering are amongst potential techniques for preparing films for MEMS fabrication at comparatively low temperatures. The sputtering technique has an added advantage that the process is carried out in an inert ambient (argon) and chemically sensitive substrate/sacrificial layers can be used in realization of MEMS. Furthermore, the same system can be used for depositing dielectric, piezoelectric and conducting materials as per requirement in the fabrication sequence. This enables rapid low-cost prototyping of MEMS with minimum fabrication facilities. In the present work, we report preparation, characterization and application of RF sputtered SiO2, Si34 and ZnO films for MEMS fabrication. The effect of RF power, sputtering pressure and target-to-substrate spacing was investigated on the structural and other properties of the films. The residual stress in the films was obtained using wafer curvature measurement technique. The deposition parameters are optimized to obtain low stress films of SiO2 and Si34. The self-heating of the substrate during deposition was advantageously exploited to obtain highly -axis oriented films of ZnO without any external heating. A variety of MEMS structures such as cantilever beams, micro-bridges, diaphragms, etc. are demonstrated using bulk, surface and surface-bulk micromachining techniques.

  14. Method and apparatus for improved high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Andre

    2013-11-05

    A high power impulse magnetron sputtering apparatus and method using a vacuum chamber with a magnetron target and a substrate positioned in the vacuum chamber. A field coil being positioned between the magnetron target and substrate, and a pulsed power supply and/or a coil bias power supply connected to the field coil. The pulsed power supply connected to the field coil, and the pulsed power supply outputting power pulse widths of greater that 100 .mu.s.

  15. In vitro flow measurements in ion sputtered hydrocephalus shunts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y. I.; Back, L. H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental procedure for accurate measurements of the pressure-drop/flow rate relationship in hydrocephalus shunts. Using a fish-hook arrangement, small flow rates in a perforated ion-sputtered Teflon microtubule were measured in vitro in a pressured system and were correlated with pressure in the system. Results indicate that appropriate drainage rates could be obtained in the physiological range for hydrocephalus shunts.

  16. Preparation and characterization of RF sputtered ITO thin films

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thin films of tin doped indium oxide have been prepared on glass substrates using RF sputtering technique. Prepared films have been characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and Energy dispersive analysis by X-rays (EDAX). Optical absorption is analysis (UV) showed that the deposited film possessed a direct band gap value of 3.5 eV. (author)

  17. Ion-Induced Surface Diffusion in Ion Sputtering

    OpenAIRE

    Makeev, Maxim A.; Barabasi, Albert-Laszlo

    1997-01-01

    Ion bombardment is known to enhance surface diffusion and affect the surface morphology. To quantify this phenomenon we calculate the ion-induced diffusion constant and its dependence on the ion energy, flux and angle of incidence. We find that ion bombardment can both enhance and suppress diffusion and that the sign of the diffusion constant depends on the experimental parameters. The effect of ion-induced diffusion on ripple formation and roughening of ion-sputtered surfaces is discussed an...

  18. Segmented cell testing for cathode parameter investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanasini, Pietro; Schuler, J. Andreas; Wuillemin, Zacharie; Ameur, Myriam L. Ben; Comninellis, Christos; Van herle, Jan

    The increasing quality and durability of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) state-of-the-art materials renders the long-term testing of fuel cells difficult since considerably long equipment times are needed to obtain valuable results. Moreover, reproducibility issues are common due to the high sensitivity of the performance and degradation on the testing conditions. An original segmented cell configuration has been adopted in order to carry out four tests in parallel, thus decreasing the total experimental time and ensuring the same operating conditions for the four segments. The investigation has been performed on both anode-supported cells and symmetrical Lanthanum-Strontium Manganite-Yttria-stabilized Zirconia (LSM-YSZ) electrolyte-supported cells. In separate tests, the influence of variables like cathode thickness, current density and cathode composition on performance and degradation have been explored on anode-supported cells. Furthermore, the effect of chromium poisoning has been studied on electrolyte-supported symmetric cells by contacting one segment with a chromium-iron interconnect material. Long-term polarization of the segments is controlled with a multi-channel galvanostatic device designed in-house. Electrochemical characterization has been performed through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) at different H 2 partial pressures, temperatures and bias current, effectively demonstrating the direct impact of each studied variable on the cell performance and degradation behavior. Segmented cell testing has been proven to be an effective strategy to achieve better reproducibility for SOFC measurements since it avoids the inevitable fluctuations found in a series of successively run tests. Moreover, simultaneous testing increased n-fold the data output per experiment, implying a considerable economy of time.

  19. Plasma characterization on carbon fiber cathode by spectroscopic diagnostics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Lie; Li Li-Min; Xu Qi-Fu; Chang Lei; Wen Jian-Chun

    2009-01-01

    This paper mainly investigates plasma characterization on carbon fiber cathodes with and without cesium iodide (CsI) coating powered by a~300 ns,~200 kV accelerating pulse. It was found that the CsI layers can not only improve the diode voltage,but also maintain a stable perveance.This indicates a slowly changed diode gap or a low cathode plasma expansion velocity.By spectroscopic diagnostics,in the vicinity of the cathode surface the average plasma density and temperature were found to be~3×1014 cm-3 and~5 eV,respectively,for an electron current density of~40 A/cm2.Furthermore,there exists a multicomponent plasma expansion toward the anode.The plasma expansion velocity,corresponding to the carbon and hydrogen ions,is estimated to be~1.5 cm/μs.Most notably,Cs spectroscopic line was obtained only at the distance ≤0.5 mm from the cathode surface.Carbon and hydrogen ions are obtained up to the distance of 2.5 mm from the cathode surface.Cs ions almost remain at the vicinity of the cathode surface.These results show that the addition of Cal enables a slow cathode plasma expansion toward the anode,providing a positive prospect for developing long-pulse electron beam sources.

  20. High Performance Cathodes for Li-Air Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Yangchuan

    2013-08-22

    The overall objective of this project was to develop and fabricate a multifunctional cathode with high activities in acidic electrolytes for the oxygen reduction and evolution reactions for Li-air batteries. It should enable the development of Li-air batteries that operate on hybrid electrolytes, with acidic catholytes in particular. The use of hybrid electrolytes eliminates the problems of lithium reaction with water and of lithium oxide deposition in the cathode with sole organic electrolytes. The use of acid electrolytes can eliminate carbonate formation inside the cathode, making air breathing Li-air batteries viable. The tasks of the project were focused on developing hierarchical cathode structures and bifunctional catalysts. Development and testing of a prototype hybrid Li-air battery were also conducted. We succeeded in developing a hierarchical cathode structure and an effective bifunctional catalyst. We accomplished integrating the cathode with existing anode technologies and made a pouch prototype Li-air battery using sulfuric acid as catholyte. The battery cathodes contain a nanoscale multilayer structure made with carbon nanotubes and nanofibers. The structure was demonstrated to improve battery performance substantially. The bifunctional catalyst developed contains a conductive oxide support with ultra-low loading of platinum and iridium oxides. The work performed in this project has been documented in seven peer reviewed journal publications, five conference presentations, and filing of two U.S. patents. Technical details have been documented in the quarterly reports to DOE during the course of the project.

  1. High rate sputtering of corrosion-resistant alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High corrosion-resitant films of amorphous Fe sub(80-X)Cr sub(X)P sub(13)C sub(7), Fe45Cr30Mo5P13C7, Cr70C30, Cr75B25 and Ti75B25 were deposited by dc-triode sputtering on water-cooled copper substrate. X-ray diffractometry showed a few diffraction patterns that characterize the amorphous structure for deposited films. High sputtering rate of about 0.1 μm/min was achieved by applying high ion current densities to the sputtering target under 10-2 Torr of Ar gas. The high dense Ar plasma ions were produced using a plasma generator. The microhardness of amorphous Cr70C30, Cr75B25 and Ti75B25 were 1288, 1168 and 1081, respectively. The films, which contain high corrosion resitant alloying elements such as Cr and Ti, show extremely high corrosion resistance, particularly pitting corrosion resistance in IN HCI. The high corrosion resistance of these films is attributable to the enrichment of Cr and Ti in the passive films. (author)

  2. Stress dependent oxidation of sputtered niobium and effects on superconductivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on the suppression of room temperature oxidation of DC sputtered niobium films and the effects upon the superconductive transition temperature, Tc. Niobium was sputter-deposited on silicon dioxide coated 150 mm wafers and permitted to oxidize at room temperature and pressure for up to two years. Resistivity and stress measurements indicate that tensile films greater than 400 MPa resist bulk oxidation with measurements using transmission electron microscope, electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectric spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry confirming this result. Although a surface oxide, Nb2O5, consumed the top 6–10 nm, we measure less than 1 at. % oxygen and nitrogen in the bulk of the films after the oxidation period. Tc measurements using a SQUID magnetometer indicate that the tensile films maintained a Tc approaching the dirty superconductive limit of 8.4 K after two years of oxidation while maintaining room temperature sheet resistance. This work demonstrates that control over niobium film stress during deposition can prevent bulk oxidation by limiting the vertical grain boundaries ability to oxidize, prolonging the superconductive properties of sputtered niobium when exposed to atmosphere

  3. Stress dependent oxidation of sputtered niobium and effects on superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Henry, M.; Wolfley, Steve; Monson, Todd; Clark, Blythe G.; Shaner, Eric; Jarecki, Robert

    2014-02-01

    We report on the suppression of room temperature oxidation of DC sputtered niobium films and the effects upon the superconductive transition temperature, Tc. Niobium was sputter-deposited on silicon dioxide coated 150 mm wafers and permitted to oxidize at room temperature and pressure for up to two years. Resistivity and stress measurements indicate that tensile films greater than 400 MPa resist bulk oxidation with measurements using transmission electron microscope, electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectric spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry confirming this result. Although a surface oxide, Nb2O5, consumed the top 6-10 nm, we measure less than 1 at. % oxygen and nitrogen in the bulk of the films after the oxidation period. Tc measurements using a SQUID magnetometer indicate that the tensile films maintained a Tc approaching the dirty superconductive limit of 8.4 K after two years of oxidation while maintaining room temperature sheet resistance. This work demonstrates that control over niobium film stress during deposition can prevent bulk oxidation by limiting the vertical grain boundaries ability to oxidize, prolonging the superconductive properties of sputtered niobium when exposed to atmosphere.

  4. Sputter deposited Terfenol-D thin films for multiferroic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanchandra, K. P.; Prikhodko, S. V.; Wetzlar, K. P.; Sun, W. Y.; Nordeen, P.; Carman, G. P.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we study the sputter deposition and crystallization process to produce high quality Terfenol-D thin film (100 nm) with surface roughness below 1.5 nm. The Terfenol-D thin film was produced using DC magnetron sputtering technique with various sputtering parameters and two different crystallization methods, i.e. substrate heating and post-annealing. Several characterization techniques including WDS, XRD, TEM, AFM, SQUID and MOKE were used to determine the physical and magnetic properties of the Terfenol-D films. TEM studies reveal that the film deposited on the heated substrate has large grains grown along the film thickness producing undesirable surface roughness while the film crystallized by post-annealing method shows uniformly distributed small grains producing a smooth surface. The Terfenol-D film was also deposited onto (011) cut PMN-PT single crystal substrate. With the application of an electric field the film exhibited a 1553 Oe change in coercivity with an estimated saturation magnetostriction of λs = 910 x 10-6.

  5. Functional nanostructured titanium nitride films obtained by sputtering magnetron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, O. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz no3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: olgas@icmm.csic.es; Hernandez-Velez, M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), or Juana Ines de la Cruz no3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Dept. Fisica Aplicada C-XII, Universidad Autonoma, Cantoblanco 28049 Madrid (Spain); Navas, D. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz no3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Auger, M.A. [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas (CENIM-CSIC), Avda. Gregorio, del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Baldonedo, J.L. [Centro de Microscopia Electronica y Citometria de la Universidad Complutense de, Madrid (Spain); Sanz, R. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz no3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Pirota, K.R. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), or Juana Ines de la Cruz no3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Vazquez, M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz no3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-01-20

    Development of new methods in the formation of hollow structures, in particular, nanotubes and nanocages are currently generating a great interest as a consequence of the growing relevance of these nanostructures on many technological fields, ranging from optoelectronics to biotechnology. In this work, we report the formation of titanium nitride (TiN) nanotubes and nanohills via reactive sputtering magnetron processes. Anodic Alumina Membranes (AAM) were used as template substrates to grow the TiN nanostructures. The AAM were obtained through electrochemical anodization processes by using oxalic acid solutions as electrolytes. The nanotubes were produced at temperatures below 100 deg. C, and using a pure titanium (99.995%) sputtering target and nitrogen as reactive gas. The obtained TiN thin films showed surface morphologies adjusted to pore diameter and interpore distance of the substrates, as well as ordered arrays of nanotubes or nanohills depending on the sputtering and template conditions. High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy (HRSEM) was used to elucidate both the surface order and morphology of the different grown nanostructures. The crystalline structure of the samples was examined using X-ray Diffraction (XRD) patterns and their qualitative chemical composition by using X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (XEDS) in a scanning electron microscopy.

  6. Sputter deposited Terfenol-D thin films for multiferroic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. P. Mohanchandra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the sputter deposition and crystallization process to produce high quality Terfenol-D thin film (100 nm with surface roughness below 1.5 nm. The Terfenol-D thin film was produced using DC magnetron sputtering technique with various sputtering parameters and two different crystallization methods, i.e. substrate heating and post-annealing. Several characterization techniques including WDS, XRD, TEM, AFM, SQUID and MOKE were used to determine the physical and magnetic properties of the Terfenol-D films. TEM studies reveal that the film deposited on the heated substrate has large grains grown along the film thickness producing undesirable surface roughness while the film crystallized by post-annealing method shows uniformly distributed small grains producing a smooth surface. The Terfenol-D film was also deposited onto (011 cut PMN-PT single crystal substrate. With the application of an electric field the film exhibited a 1553 Oe change in coercivity with an estimated saturation magnetostriction of λs = 910 x 10−6.

  7. Tribological properties of sputtered tungsten and tungsten nitride thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wong; K.M.; ShenY.G.; Wong; P.L.

    2001-01-01

    The surface roughness, hardness and tribological properties of tungsten (W) and tung-sten nitride (WNx) thin films prepared by dc magnetron sputtering and reactive magnetron sputter-ing in Ar-N2 gas mixtures have been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM), nanoindenta-tion measurements and ball-on-disc wear testing. A pronounced surface roughness was observedonly for films under compressive strains. The surface was flat under tension but rough under com-pression. Similar hardness with value about 20 GPa were observed in the W and WNx (x=0.3)films. This is thought to be due to the fact the grains are restricted to a very small size in the coat-ings. The higher coefficients of friction (0.4 for W and 0.9 for WN0.3) suggest that WN0.3 is not theoptimum phase. Finally, discussions are made with tribological test results.

  8. C60 ion sputtering of layered organic materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two different organic materials, Irganox1010 and Irganox3114, were vacuum deposited as alternating layers. The layers of Irganox3114 were thin (∼2.5 nm) in comparison to the Irganox1010 (∼55 or ∼90 nm); we call these 'organic delta layers'. Both materials are shown to have identical sputtering yields and the alternating layers may be used to determine some of the important metrological parameters for cluster ion beam depth profiling of organic materials. The sputtering yield for C60 ions is shown to diminish with ion dose. Comparison with atomic force microscopy data from films of pure Irganox1010, demonstrates that the depth resolution is limited by the development of topography. Secondary ion intensities are a well-behaved function of sputtering yield and may be employed to obtain useful analytical information. Organic delta layers are shown to be valuable reference materials for comparing the capabilities of different cluster ion sources and experimental arrangements for the depth profiling of organic materials.

  9. Neutral hydrophilic cathode catalyst binders for microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Saito, Tomonori

    2011-01-01

    Improving oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cell (MFC) cathodes requires a better understanding of the effects of the catalyst binder chemistry and properties on performance. A series of polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-b-PEO) polymers with systematically varying hydrophilicity were designed to determine the effect of the hydrophilic character of the binder on cathode performance. Increasing the hydrophilicity of the PS-b-PEO binders enhanced the electrochemical response of the cathode and MFC power density by ∼15%, compared to the hydrophobic PS-OH binder. Increased cathode performance was likely a result of greater water uptake by the hydrophilic binder, which would increase the accessible surface area for oxygen reduction. Based on these results and due to the high cost of PS-b-PEO, the performance of an inexpensive hydrophilic neutral polymer, poly(bisphenol A-co-epichlorohydrin) (BAEH), was examined in MFCs and compared to a hydrophilic sulfonated binder (Nafion). MFCs with BAEH-based cathodes with two different Pt loadings initially (after 2 cycles) had lower MFC performance (1360 and 630 mW m-2 for 0.5 and 0.05 mg Pt cm-2) than Nafion cathodes (1980 and 1080 mW m -2 for 0.5 and 0.05 mg Pt cm-2). However, after long-term operation (22 cycles, 40 days), power production of each cell was similar (∼1200 and 700-800 mW m-2 for 0.5 and 0.05 mg Pt cm-2) likely due to cathode biofouling that could not be completely reversed through physical cleaning. While binder chemistry could improve initial electrochemical cathode performance, binder materials had less impact on overall long-term MFC performance. This observation suggests that long-term operation of MFCs will require better methods to avoid cathode biofouling. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  10. Explosive emission cathode plasmas in intense relativistic electron beam diodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An experimental study of cathode plasmas in planar diodes driven by a Sandia Nereus accelerator (270 kV, 60 kA, 70 ns), with particular attention devoted to plasma uniformity and expansion velocity, has been carried out. This diode current density was varied over a factor of ten and the rate of rise of the applied field dE/dt was varied over a factor of six. Different cathode materials, coatings, and surface roughnesses were used and the effects of glow discharge cleaning and in situ heating of the cathode were examined. Framing photography, electron beam dosimetry, perveance measurements, optical interferometry, and (spatially and temporally resolved) spectroscopy were used to diagnose the plasma uniformity, electron beam uniformity, plasma front motion, electron density, plasma composition, motion of distinct species, electron temperature, and ion (and neutral) densities. Electron beam uniformity is seen to be related to cathode plasma uniformity; this uniformity is enhanced by a high value of (the microscopic) dE/dt, which is determined both by the rise time of the applied field and by the cathode surface roughness. The significance of dE/dt is believed to be related to the screening effect of emitted electrons. The motion of the plasma front is seen to be affected by two phenomena. To begin with, all species of the cathode plasma are seen to expand at the same rate. The ions are believed to be accelerated to velocities on the order of 2 to 3 cm/μs in dense cathode spot regions at the cathode surface. Plasma expansion is also influenced by electric pressure effects, which are determined by the shape of the driving power pulse. A simple cathode plasma model, which explains the similarity of plasmas in diodes with greatly differing parameters, is proposed. The relevance of these results to inductively driven diodes, repetitively pulsed diodes, and magnetically insulated transmission lines is also discussed

  11. Magnetron sputtered TiO/sub 2/ and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ antireflection coatings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The optical and structural properties of single- and double-layer films from TiO/sub 2/ and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/, obtained by the method of reactive magnetron sputtering at direct current are investigated with values of a discharge current density 5, 10 and 20 mA/cm/sup 2/ and partial oxygen presence P=8.7*10/sup -2/ Pa. The films were deposited on the silicon and quartz substrates using pipeline type magnetron apparatus with three magnetrons. The Ti- and Al - targets were installed on the magnetron's cathodes. The results of X-ray diffraction (RXD) evidence that the TiO/sub 2/ films have structure of anatase modification and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ films were amorphous. With the growth of the discharge current density the films with higher values of refraction coefficient were deposited. Computer simulation showed that the utilisation of the obtained TiO/sub 2/ and Al/sub 2/O/sub 3/ films one can be make double-layer antireflection coating. (AC) with an average value of the reflection coefficient not exceeding 3% within the spectral range of 0.4 - 1.1 mu m. (author)

  12. Sputtering Preparation and Magneto-optical Properties of GdTbFeCo Thin Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zhixin; YU Weijun

    2012-01-01

    Amorphous GdTbFeCo magnetic thin films were successfully prepared on glass substrates by RF magnetron sputtering system from a mosaic target.The influences of sputtering parameters on the magnetooptical properties GdTbFeCo thin film were investigated by the variable control method.And the influence mechanism was analyzed in detail.After the sputtering parameters were optimized,it was found that when the distance between target and substrate was 72 mm,the thin film thickness was 120 nm,and the sputtering power,sputtering pressure and sputtering time was 75 W,0.5 Pa and 613 s,respectively,the coercivity with perpendicular anisotropy could be as high as 6735 Oe,and the squareness ratio of the hysteresis loop was almost equal to 1.

  13. Studies on Stability of a Novel Cathode Material for MCFC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The stability of NiO and oxidized nickel-niobium surface alloy electrode under various molten carbonate fuel cell(MCFC) cathode conditions were investigated by determination of equilibrium solubility of nickel ions in the carbonate melt of the two electrode materials.It is found that under MCFC cathode conditions the stability of NiO electrode is improved significantly by the deposition of niobium.As far as stability is concerned,oxidized nickel-niobium alloy electrode can be considered as a candidate for cathode material of MCFC.

  14. Resonant cavity operation of a virtual cathode oscillator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gigawatt level virtual cathode sources have been proposed for several applications. These include microwave weapons and drivers for high-energy particle accelerators. Both of these require a microwave source with very high power output that is controllable in frequency and phase. A conventional virtual cathode oscillator will not meet these requirements. The addition of a resonant cavity surrounding the oscillating virtual cathode either alone or pumped with a low-power injection signal, causing it to operate as an amplifier, could greatly influence the performance of this type of source making it more practical for accelerator and weapon applications. The progress on an experiment to test these concepts will be discussed

  15. Lanthanum hexaboride hollow cathode for dense plasma production

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hollow tube cathode using lanthanum hexaboride as the electron emitter has been designed and constructed. Tests in both argon and hydrogen indicate that this cathode is capable of producing over 800 A of electron current continuously, corresponding to over 25 A/cm2 from the LaB6. The cathode has been operated for over 300 h and exposed to air more than 100 times with no deterioration in emission. Projected lifetime is in excess of 3500 h for the sintered LaB6 piece tested in this configuration. Construction details, performance characteristics, and discussions of space charge limits on emission are described

  16. Rep-rate explosive whisker emission cathode investigations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litz, Marc S.; Golden, Jeffry

    1994-05-01

    An experiment is underway to study the performance of several materials as field-emission cathodes for low voltage (EQ 100 kV), repetitive (coatings, niobium wire nanocomposite, and poly-crystalline tungsten. Surface emission is monitored by an array of Faraday cups. The `turn-on' time, uniformity of emission, and gap closure time are measured as a function of the spatially averaged, macroscopic electric field at the cathode. The carbon fiber cathode produces the largest current density and has the lowest threshold voltage for emission.

  17. Iron phosphate materials as cathodes for lithium batteries

    CERN Document Server

    Prosini, Pier Paolo

    2011-01-01

    ""Iron Phosphate Materials as Cathodes for Lithium Batteries"" describes the synthesis and the chemical-physical characteristics of iron phosphates, and presents methods of making LiFePO4 a suitable cathode material for lithium-ion batteries. The author studies carbon's ability to increase conductivity and to decrease material grain size, as well as investigating the electrochemical behaviour of the materials obtained. ""Iron Phosphate Materials as Cathodes for Lithium Batteries"" also proposes a model to explain lithium insertion/extraction in LiFePO4 and to predict voltage profiles at variou

  18. The approach curve method for large anode-cathode distances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mammana, Victor P.; Monteiro, Othon R.; Fonseca, Leo R.C.

    2003-09-20

    An important technique used to characterize field emission is the measurement of the emitted current against electric field (IxE). In this work we discuss a procedure for obtaining IxE data based on multiple approach curves. We show that the simulated features obtained for an idealized uniform surface matches available experimental data for small anode-cathode distances, while for large distances the simulation predicts a departure from the linear regime. We also discuss the shape of the approach curves for large anode-cathode distances for a cathode made of carbon nanotubes.

  19. Preliminary experiments with a carbon fiber tuft cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fessenden, T. J.

    1984-01-01

    Initial tests of a carbon brush or tuft cathode intended for use by the Beam Research Program are reported. It was found that electric fields of approximately 100 kV/cm were required to produce current densities above 20 A/sq cm. The beam extracted from the cathode consisted of many beamlets, one for each tuft. The beamlets were found to be quite uniform in peak current density and the cathode operation was microscopically repeatable. The turn on time was estimated to be 200 ns.

  20. Preliminary experiments with a carbon fiber tuft cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fessenden, T.J.

    1984-01-11

    This work reports initial tests of a carbon brush or tuft cathode intended for use by the Beam Research Program. It was found that electric fields of approximately 100 kV/cm were required to produce current densities above 20 A/sq cm. The beam extracted from the cathode consisted of many beamlets - one for each tuft. The beamlets were found to be quite uniform in peak current density and the cathode operation was microscopically repeatable. The turn-on time was estimated to be 200 ns.

  1. Development of a novel macrostructured cathode for large-area neutron detectors based on the {sup 10}B-containing solid converter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stefanescu, I., E-mail: irina.stefanescu@frm2.tum.de [Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Abdullahi, Y. [Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Birch, J. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Thin Film Physics Division, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Defendi, I. [Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Hall-Wilton, R. [European Spallation Source ESS AB, P.O. Box 176, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Höglund, C. [European Spallation Source ESS AB, P.O. Box 176, SE-221 00 Lund (Sweden); Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Thin Film Physics Division, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Hultman, L. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Thin Film Physics Division, Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Seiler, D. [Physics Department E12, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany); Zeitelhack, K. [Forschungs-Neutronenquelle Heinz Maier-Leibnitz, Technische Universität München, D-85748 Garching (Germany)

    2013-11-01

    We present a novel design for a macrostructured cathode that can be coated with a thin layer of the {sup 10}B solid converter and mounted to replace the Boron-lined flat parallel plates of a proportional counter used for slow neutron detection. The proposed design consists of a 3D regular pattern exhibiting millimeter deep grooves with an opening angle of α=45°, which could be created in the substrate material by milling or forming. When a commonly used coating method like magnetron sputtering is employed to deposit the Boron-layer, due to the line-of-sight distribution of the ions, the thickness of the coating on the side of the grooves will be reduced by a factor ∼sinα/2 with respect to the thickness of the layer deposited on a flat surface normal to the ion flux. The effective neutron absorption film thickness is in this case similar for the sidewalls of the grooves and a surface at normal incidence, yielding comparable absorption efficiencies. However, the escape efficiency for the reaction products is higher for the sidewalls, owing to the thinner coating. This leads to a higher overall detection efficiency for the grooved cathode when compared to a flat cathode with the same surface area and coated with a Boron layer with roughly the same thickness. In this paper we present and discuss the GEANT4 simulations performed to optimize the geometry of the cathode, the manufacturing and coating by magnetron sputtering, as well as the proof-of-principle measurements carried out in order to assess the performance of the proposed design. -- Highlights: • The GEANT4 package was used to simulate the efficiency of {sup 10}B-coated plates. • The surface of the plates was either flat or with millimeter-deep grooves. • The efficiency of the plates was measured with a beam of slow neutrons. • The grooved plates were found to have a higher efficiency. • Their use in a MWPC allows for a reduced number of electronics channels.

  2. Erosion behavior of composite Al-Cr cathodes in cathodic arc plasmas in inert and reactive atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franz, Robert, E-mail: robert.franz@unileoben.ac.at; Mendez Martin, Francisca; Hawranek, Gerhard [Montanuniversität Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Polcik, Peter [Plansee Composite Materials GmbH, Siebenbürgerstrasse 23, 86983 Lechbruck am See (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Al{sub x}Cr{sub 1−x} composite cathodes with Al contents of x = 0.75, 0.5, and 0.25 were exposed to cathodic arc plasmas in Ar, N{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} atmospheres and their erosion behavior was studied. Cross-sectional analysis of the elemental distribution of the near-surface zone in the cathodes by scanning electron microscopy revealed the formation of a modified layer for all cathodes and atmospheres. Due to intermixing of Al and Cr in the heat-affected zone, intermetallic Al-Cr phases formed as evidenced by x-ray diffraction analysis. Cathode poisoning effects in the reactive N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} atmospheres were nonuniform as a result of the applied magnetic field configuration. With the exception of oxide islands on Al-rich cathodes, reactive layers were absent in the circular erosion zone, while nitrides and oxides formed in the less eroded center region of the cathodes.

  3. CrN/AlN nanolaminate coatings deposited via high power pulsed and middle frequency pulsed magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanolaminate coatings based on transition metal nitrides such as CrN, AlN and TiN deposited via physical vapor deposition (PVD) have shown great advantage as protective coatings on tools and components subject to high loads in tribological applications. By varying the individual layer materials and their thicknesses it is possible to optimize the coating properties, e.g. hardness, Young's modulus and thermal stability. One way for further improvement of coating properties is the use of advanced PVD technologies. High power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HPPMS) is an advancement of pulsed magnetron sputtering (MS). The use of HPPMS allows a better control of the energetic bombardment of the substrate due to the higher ionization degree of metallic species. It provides an opportunity to influence chemical and mechanical properties by varying the process parameters. The present work deals with the development of CrN/AlN nanolaminate coatings in an industrial scale unit by using two different PVD technologies. Therefore, HPPMS and mfMS (middle frequency magnetron sputtering) technologies were used. The bilayer period Λ, i.e. the thickness of a CrN/AlN double layer, was varied between 6.2 nm and 47.8 nm by varying the rotational speed of the substrate holders. In a second step the highest rotational speed was chosen and further HPPMS CrN/AlN coatings were deposited applying different HPPMS pulse lengths (40, 80, 200 μs) at the same mean cathode power and frequency. Thickness, morphology, roughness and phase composition of the coatings were analyzed by means of scanning electron microscopy (SEM), confocal laser microscopy, and X-ray diffraction (XRD), respectively. The chemical composition was determined using glow discharge optical emission spectroscopy (GDOES). Detailed characterization of the nanolaminate was conducted by transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The hardness and the Young's modulus were analyzed by nanoindentation measurements. The residual

  4. The Status Quo and Development Trend of High-purity Gold Sputtering Targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Anheng; XIE Hongchao; ZHU Yong

    2012-01-01

    This article gives a brief introduction to manufacturers and markets of sputtering targets as well as the manufacturing technology thereof.Then,it analyzes the application of high-purity gold sputtering targets in the fields of integrated circuit,information storage,flat panel display,etc.Based on the above,the article analyzes the processing development trend for the high-purity gold sputtering targets in aspects of ultra-high purity,manufacturing technology,analysis and testing technologies.

  5. Lubrication with sputtered MoS2 films: Principles, operation, limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvins, T.

    1991-01-01

    The present practices, limitations, and understanding of thin sputtered MoS2 films are reviewed. Sputtered MoS2 films can exhibit remarkable tribological properties such as ultralow friction coefficients (0.01) and enhanced wear lives (millions of cycles) when used in vacuum or dry air. To achieve these favorable tribological characteristics, the sputtering conditions during deposition must be optimized for adequate film adherence and appropriate structure (morphology) and composition.

  6. Effect of sputtering power on structural and optical properties of radio frequency-sputtered In2S3 thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Dong Hyun; Cho, Shinho; Hui, Kwun Nam; Son, Young Guk

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the structural and optical properties of indium sulfide (In2S3) thin films as a substitute for the CdS buffer layer in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells. The In2S3 films were deposited on glass substrates using radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering. The sputtering power was changed from 60 to 120 W in 20 W increments. The effects of sputtering power on the crystallinity, surface morphology, and optical properties of the films were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and UV-visible spectrophotometry. The XRD analyses indicated that the films were polycrystalline β-In2S3 structures with two preferred orientations along the (103) and (206) directions. The AFM images revealed that the films had nanosized grains and that the size increased from 7 nm for the samples prepared at 60 W to 13 nm for those prepared at 120 W. The optical band gap of the samples was found to vary between 2.88 and 2.43 eV.

  7. A series of tufted carbon fiber cathodes designed for different high power microwave sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Lie; Li, Limin; Zhang, Jun; Zhang, Xiaoping; Wen, Jianchun; Liu, Yonggui

    2008-06-01

    We report the fabrication technique of tufted carbon fiber cathodes for different microwave sources. Three carbon fiber cathodes were constructed, including a planar cathode, an annular cathode, and a cylindrical cathode for radial emission. Experimental investigations on these cathodes were performed in a reflex triode virtual cathode oscillator (vircator), a backward wave oscillator (BWO), and a magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO), respectively. The pulse duration of microwave emission from the reflex triode vircator was lengthened by using the planar carbon fiber cathode. In the BWO with the annular carbon fiber cathode, the uniform electron beam with a kA /cm2 current density was observed. In addition, carbon fiber has great promise as field emitter for MILOs. These results show that the carbon fiber cathodes can be utilized for electron emission in high power diodes with different structures.

  8. Electronic sputtering of solid nitrogen and oxygen by keV electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Ole; Schou, Jørgen; Sørensen, H.;

    1986-01-01

    Sputtering of solid N2 and O2 has been performed with electrons in the keV regime by means of a quartz microbalance technique. Good agreement is found between the sputtering yields obtained with this and the emissivity-change method. O2 sputters more efficiently than N2, although these solids...... are very similar in their physical properties. The yields are almost proportional to the electronic stopping power of the primary electrons. Different models for electronic sputtering of solid condensed gases are discussed and compared with the results. For low excitation densities predictions...

  9. Application of magnetron sputtering for producing bioactive ceramic coatings on implant materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Z Shi; C Z Chen; H J Yu; S J Zhang

    2008-11-01

    Radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering is a versatile deposition technique that can produce thin, uniform, dense calcium phosphate coatings. In this paper, principle and character of magnetron sputtering is introduced, and development of the hydroxyapatite and its composite coatings application is reviewed. In addition, influence of heat treatment on magnetron sputtered coatings is discussed. The heat treated coatings have been shown to exhibit bioactive behaviour both in vivo and in vitro. At last, the future application of the bioactive ceramic coating deposited by magnetron sputtering is mentioned.

  10. Characterization of SiC in DLC/a-Si films prepared by pulsed filtered cathodic arc using Raman spectroscopy and XPS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DLC/a-Si films were deposited on germanium substrates. a-Si film was initially deposited as a seed layer on the substrate using DC magnetron sputtering. DLC film was then deposited on the a-Si layer via a pulsed filtered cathodic arc (PFCA) system. In situ ellipsometry was used to monitor the thicknesses of the growth films, allowing a precise control over the a-Si and DLC thicknesses of 6 and 9 nm, respectively. It was found that carbon atoms implanting on a-Si layer act not only as a carbon source for DLC formation, but also as a source for SiC formation. The Raman peak positions at 796 cm-1 and 972 cm-1 corresponded to the LO and TO phonon modes of SiC, respectively, were observed. The results were also confirmed using TEM, XPS binding energy and XPS depth profile analysis.

  11. Extended area cathode for transverse discharge gas lasers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Laser cathodes of extended emission area are disclosed having a plurality of substantially aligned electrically conductive plates spaced from one another and disposed in respective planes perpendicular to the longitudinal axis of the laser housing. Adjacent plates are spaced by a spacing s selected to achieve the ''hollow'' cathode effect and satisfying the relation s = k/p where p is the laser gas pressure and k is a constant determined by the laser gas and lying in the range of from about 5 to about 20 torr-cm. In one embodiment the cathode plates are supported by and attached to a pair of longitudinally extending electrically conductive rods. In another embodiment the cathode consists of a laminated array of alternatively disposed aligned taller and shorter electrically conductive plates. (U.S.)

  12. Intermetallics as cathode materials in the electrolytic hydrogen production

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stojic, D.L.; Maksic, A.D.; Kaninski, M.P.M. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro). Lab. of Physical Chemistry; Cekic, B.D. [Vinca Inst. of Nuclear Sciences, Belgrade (Serbia and Montenegro). Lab. of Physics; Miljanic, S.S. [Belgrade Univ. (Serbia and Montenegro). Faculty of Physical Chemistry

    2005-01-01

    The intermetallics of transition metals have been investigated as cathode materials for the production of hydrogen by electrolysis from water-KOH solutions, in an attempt to increase the electrolytic process efficiency. We found that the best effect among all investigated cathodes (Hf{sub 2}Fe, Zr-Pt, Nb-Pd(I), Pd-Ta, Nb-Pd(II), Ti-Pt) exhibits the Hf{sub 2}Fe phase. These materials were compared with conventional cathodes (Fe and Ni), often used in the alkaline electrolysis. A significant upgrade of the electrolytic efficiency using intermetallics, either in pure KOH electrolyte or in combination with ionic activators added in situ, was achieved. The effects of these cathode materials on the process efficiency were discussed in the context of transition metal features that issue from their electronic configuration. (Author)

  13. The Properties of Normal Conducting Cathodes in FZD Superconducting Gun

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang, R; Buettig, H; Janssen, D; Justus, M; Lehnert, U; Michel, P; Murcek, P; Schamlott, A; Schneider, Ch; Schurig, R; Staufenbiel, F; Teichert, J

    2009-01-01

    The superconducting radio frequency photoinjector (SRF photoinjector) is one of the latest applications of SC technology in the accelerator field. Since superconducting cathodes with high QE are not available up to now, normal conducting cathode material is the main choice for the SRF photoinjectors. However, the compatibility between the cathode and the cavity is one of the challenges for this concept. The SRF gun with Cs2Te cathode has been successfully operated under the collaboration of BESSY, DESY, FZD, and MBI. In this paper, some experience gained in the gun commissioning will be concluded. The results of the properties of Cs2Te photocathode in the cavity will be presented, such as the Q.E., the life time, the dark current and the thermal emittance.

  14. Space-charge limiting current in spherical cathode diodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘国治; 邵浩

    2003-01-01

    The results of the investigation on the space-charge limiting current for a spherical-cathode diode in the nonrelativistic situation are presented in this paper. The results show that the current enhancement factor equals the square of E-field enhancement factor on the cathode surface. The generated space-charge limiting current is deduced.In the case of a pin-shaped-cathode diode, the space-charge limiting current is also obtained, indicating that the current is independent of the geometric parameters of the diode. Analyses of the shielding effects and the conditions for generation of the uniform space-charge limiting beam show that, for pin-arrayed cathodes, the distance between pins should be in the range from 1.2D to 1.5D, where D is the distance between the two electrodes.

  15. Scandate Cathode for High Power Long Life Electric Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Scandate cathodes are proposed as a way to boost performance and life for electric space propulsion systems. This company has recently demonstrated breakthrough...

  16. Verification of high efficient broad beam cold cathode ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Reheem, A M; Ahmed, M M; Abdelhamid, M M; Ashour, A H

    2016-08-01

    An improved form of cold cathode ion source has been designed and constructed. It consists of stainless steel hollow cylinder anode and stainless steel cathode disc, which are separated by a Teflon flange. The electrical discharge and output characteristics have been measured at different pressures using argon, nitrogen, and oxygen gases. The ion exit aperture shape and optimum distance between ion collector plate and cathode disc are studied. The stable discharge current and maximum output ion beam current have been obtained using grid exit aperture. It was found that the optimum distance between ion collector plate and ion exit aperture is equal to 6.25 cm. The cold cathode ion source is used to deposit aluminum coating layer on AZ31 magnesium alloy using argon ion beam current which equals 600 μA. Scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction techniques used for characterizing samples before and after aluminum deposition. PMID:27587108

  17. High current density nanofilament cathodes for microwave amplifiers

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnell, J-P.; Minoux, E.; Gangloff, L.; Vincent, P.; Legagneux, P.; Dieumegard, D.; David, J.-F.; Peauger, F.; Hudanski, L.; Teo, K.B.K.; Lacerda, R.; Chhowalla, M.; Hasko, D.G.; Ahmed, H.; Amaratunga, G.A.J.; Milne, W.I.; Vila, L.; Dauginet-De Pra, L.; Demoustier-Champagne, S.; Ferain, E.; Legras, R.; Piraux, L.; Gröening, O.; Raedt, H. De; Michielsen, K.

    2004-01-01

    We study high current density nanofilament cathodes for microwave amplifiers. Two different types of aligned nanofilament array have been studied: first, metallic nanowires grown by electrodeposition into nanoporous templates at very low temperature (T

  18. 12Cao-7Al2o3 Electride Hollow Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rand, Lauren P. (Inventor); Williams, John D. (Inventor); Martinez, Rafael A. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The use of the electride form of 12CaO-7Al.sub.2O.sub.3, or C12A7, as a low work function electron emitter in a hollow cathode discharge apparatus is described. No heater is required to initiate operation of the present cathode, as is necessary for traditional hollow cathode devices. Because C12A7 has a fully oxidized lattice structure, exposure to oxygen does not degrade the electride. The electride was surrounded by a graphite liner since it was found that the C12A7 electride converts to it's eutectic (CA+C3A) form when heated (through natural hollow cathode operation) in a metal tube.

  19. High Performance Fe-Co Based SOFC Cathodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammer Hansen, Kent; Hansen, Karin Vels; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2010-01-01

    With the aim of reducing the temperature of the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), a new high-performance perovskite cathode has been developed. An area-specific resistance (ASR) as low as 0.12 Ωcm2 at 600 °C was measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) on symmetrical cells. The cathode...... is a composite between (Gd0.6Sr0.4)0.99Fe0.8Co0.2O3-δ (GSFC) and Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 (CGO10). Examination of the microstructure of the cathodes by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed a possibility of further optimisation of the microstructure in order to increase the performance of the cathodes. It also...

  20. Development of a cathode strip chamber for minimum ionizing particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cathode strip chamber (CSC) capable of measuring position information for minimum ionizing particles (MIPS) has been developed. The chamber operates in the proportional or limited proportional region, where the avalanche on the anode wire is localised to a small region around the anode wire. The position of the avalanche can be obtained by the pulse heights induced on the cathode strips which run perpendicular to direction of the anode wire. The pulse height induced on the cathode strips is proportional directly to the strip width and inversely to the distance between the strip centre to the avalanche location. Thus by measuring the pulse heights on at least three cathode strips for every event, one can reconstruct the centroid that would give the location of the avalanche on the anode

  1. A High Performance Cathode Heater for Hall Thrusters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High current hollow cathodes are the baseline electron source for next generation high power Hall thrusters. Currently for electron sources providing current levels...

  2. Temperature variation of a thermionic cathode during electron emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    It is necessary to know the actual temperature of a thermionic cathode that works as the electron source in a microwave tube. It has been found that the temperature of the cathode drops markedly during the thermionic emission. For example, the temperature could fall by about 30oC under a current density of 2.92 A/cm2. Using the molecular thermodynamics, the dependence of the cathode temperature on the emission current density has been obtained. It has been theoretically pointed out that several factors, such as heating model and temperature coefficient of resis-tance of heater, can influence the cathode temperature. These theoretical conclu-sions were supported by the experimental results.

  3. Développement de cathodes performantes pour batteries lithium/air

    OpenAIRE

    Berenger, Sophie

    2014-01-01

    In this thesis, high-performance cathodes for lithium/air batteries have been investigated. The main limitations for lithium/air batteries are oxygen diffusion into the cathode and in the electrolyte and the progressive clogging of cathode pores by lithium oxide. The development of the air cathode is strongly dependant on the organic electrolyte used, thus the nature of the electrolyte has been here considered. Electrode porosity and the kind of catalyst employed influence the cathode perform...

  4. Electrokinetic Treatment of Cr-, Cu-, and Zn-Contaminated Sediment: Cathode Modification

    OpenAIRE

    Rajić, Ljiljana; Dalmacija, Božo; Perović, Svetlana Ugarčina; Krčmar, Dejan; Rončević, Srđan; Tomašević, Dragana

    2013-01-01

    Enhanced electrokinetic (EK) removal of Cr, Cu, and Zn from sediment by using original and modified integrated ion exchange (IIX™) cathodes was investigated. IIX cathode design and EK device process modifications were made to improve performance: separation of IIX cathode components (IIXS), combination of modified IIX cathode with pulsed electric field (IIXSP), and separation of IIX cathode components with addition of an anion exchange resin compartment (IIXA). After using the IIXSP, overall ...

  5. Tolerant chalcogenide cathodes of membraneless micro fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gago, Aldo Saul; Gochi-Ponce, Yadira; Feng, Yong-Jun; Esquivel, Juan Pablo; Sabaté, Neus; Santander, Joaquin; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas

    2012-08-01

    The most critical issues to overcome in micro direct methanol fuel cells (μDMFCs) are the lack of tolerance of the platinum cathode and fuel crossover through the polymer membrane. Thus, two novel tolerant cathodes of a membraneless microlaminar-flow fuel cell (μLFFC), Pt(x)S(y) and CoSe(2), were developed. The multichannel structure of the system was microfabricated in SU-8 polymer. A commercial platinum cathode served for comparison. When using 5 M CH(3)OH as the fuel, maximum power densities of 6.5, 4, and 0.23 mW cm(-2) were achieved for the μLFFC with Pt, Pt(x)S(y), and CoSe(2) cathodes, respectively. The Pt(x)S(y) cathode outperformed Pt in the same fuel cell when using CH(3)OH at concentrations above 10 M. In a situation where fuel crossover is 100 %, that is, mixing the fuel with the reactant, the maximum power density of the micro fuel cell with Pt decreased by 80 %. However, for Pt(x)S(y) this decrease corresponded to 35 % and for CoSe(2) there was no change in performance. This result is the consequence of the high tolerance of the chalcogenide-based cathodes. When using 10 M HCOOH and a palladium-based anode, the μLFFC with a CoSe(2) cathode achieved a maxiumum power density of 1.04 mW cm(-2). This micro fuel cell does not contain either Nafion membrane or platinum. We report, for the first time, the evaluation of Pt(x)S(y)- and CoSe(2)-based cathodes in membraneless micro fuel cells. The results suggest the development of a novel system that is not size restricted and its operation is mainly based on the selectivity of its electrodes.

  6. Cathodes for lithium-air battery cells with acid electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Yangchuan; Huang, Kan; Li, Yunfeng

    2016-07-19

    In various embodiments, the present disclosure provides a layered metal-air cathode for a metal-air battery. Generally, the layered metal-air cathode comprises an active catalyst layer, a transition layer bonded to the active catalyst layer, and a backing layer bonded to the transition layer such that the transition layer is disposed between the active catalyst layer and the backing layer.

  7. High-Current Cold Cathode Employing Diamond and Related Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirshfield, Jay L. [Omega-P, Inc., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2014-10-22

    The essence of this project was for diamond films to be deposited on cold cathodes to improve their emission properties. Films with varying morphology, composition, and size of the crystals were deposited and the emission properties of the cathodes that utilize such films were studied. The prototype cathodes fabricated by the methods developed during Phase I were tested and evaluated in an actual high-power RF device during Phase II. These high-power tests used the novel active RF pulse compression system and the X-band magnicon test facility at US Naval Research Laboratory. In earlier tests, plasma switches were employed, while tests under this project utilized electron-beam switching. The intense electron beams required in the switches were supplied from cold cathodes embodying diamond films with varying morphology, including uncoated molybdenum cathodes in the preliminary tests. Tests with uncoated molybdenum cathodes produced compressed X-band RF pulses with a peak power of 91 MW, and a maximum power gain of 16.5:1. Tests were also carried out with switches employing diamond coated cathodes. The pulse compressor was based on use of switches employing electron beam triggering to effect mode conversion. In experimental tests, the compressor produced 165 MW in a ~ 20 ns pulse at ~18× power gain and ~ 140 MW at ~ 16× power gain in a 16 ns pulse with a ~ 7 ns flat-top. In these tests, molybdenum blade cathodes with thin diamond coatings demonstrated good reproducible emission uniformity with a 100 kV, 100 ns high voltage pulse. The new compressor does not have the limitations of earlier types of active pulse compressors and can operate at significantly higher electric fields without breakdown.

  8. High Performance Infiltrated Backbones for Cathode-Supported SOFC's

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil, Vanesa; Kammer Hansen, Kent

    2014-01-01

    -supported SOFC. The cathodes are obtained by infiltrating LSM into a sintered either thick (300 μm) yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) backbone or a thin YSZ backbone (10-15 μm) integrated onto a thick (300 μm) porous strontium substituted lanthanum manganite (LSM) and YSZ composite. Fabrication challenges...... with infiltrated LSM nanoparticles is shown in Fig. 1. Figure 1. Cross section of LSM infiltrated cathode supported cell. [Formula]...

  9. Reducing DRIFT Backgrounds with a Submicron Aluminized-Mylar Cathode

    CERN Document Server

    Battat, James B R; Dorofeev, Alexei; Ezeribe, Anthony C; Fox, Jennifer R; Gauvreau, Jean-Luc; Gold, Michael; Harmon, Lydia; Harton, John; Lafler, Randy; Lauer, Robert J; Lee, Eric R; Loomba, Dinesh; Lumnah, Alexander; Matthews, John; Miller, Eric H; Mouton, Frederic; Murphy, Alexander St J; Phan, Nguyen; Sadler, Stephen W; Scarff, Andrew; Schuckman, Fred; Snowden-Ifft, Daniel; Spooner, Neil J C; Walker, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Background events in the DRIFT-IId dark matter detector, mimicking potential WIMP signals, are predominantly caused by alpha decays on the central cathode in which the alpha particle is completely or partially absorbed by the cathode material. We installed a 0.9 micron thick aluminized-mylar cathode as a way to reduce the probability of producing these backgrounds. We study three generations of cathode (wire, thin-film, and radiologically clean thin-film) with a focus on the ratio of background events to alpha decays. Two independent methods of measuring the absolute alpha decay rate are used to ensure an accurate result, and agree to within $10\\%$. Using alpha range spectroscopy, we measure the radiologically cleanest cathode version to have a contamination of $3.3\\pm0.1$ ppt $^{234}$U and $73\\pm2$ ppb $^{238}$U. This cathode reduces the probability of producing an RPR from an alpha decay by a factor of $70\\pm20$ % while reducing the overall background rate by $96.5\\pm0.5\\%$ compared to the original stainles...

  10. High-current carbon-epoxy capillary cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleizer, J. Z.; Queller, T.; Bliokh, Yu.; Yatom, S.; Vekselman, V.; Krasik, Ya. E.; Bernshtam, V.

    2012-07-01

    The results of experiments on the reproducible generation of an electron beam having a high current density of up to 300 A/cm2 and a satisfactorily uniform cross-sectional distribution of current density in a ˜200 kV, ˜450 ns vacuum diode with a carbon-epoxy capillary cathode are presented. It was found that the source of the electrons is the plasma formed as a result of flashover inside the capillaries. It is shown that the plasma formation occurs at an electric field ≤15 kV/cm and that the cathode sustains thousands of pulses without degradation in its emission properties. Time- and space-resolved visible light observation and spectroscopy analyses were used to determine the cathode plasma's density, temperature, and expansion velocity. It was found that the density of the cathode plasma decreases rapidly in relation to the distance from the cathode. In addition, it was found that the main reason for the short-circuiting of the accelerating gap is the formation and expansion of the anode plasma. Finally, it was shown that when an external guiding magnetic field is present, the injection of the electron beam into the drift space with a current amplitude exceeding its critical value changes the radial distribution of the current density of the electron beam because the inner electrons are reflected from the virtual cathode.

  11. Cathodic protection for the bottoms of above ground storage tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohr, John P. [Tyco Adhesives, Norwood, MA (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Impressed Current Cathodic Protection has been used for many years to protect the external bottoms of above ground storage tanks. The use of a vertical deep ground bed often treated several bare steel tank bottoms by broadcasting current over a wide area. Environmental concerns and, in some countries, government regulations, have introduced the use of dielectric secondary containment liners. The dielectric liner does not allow the protective cathodic protection current to pass and causes corrosion to continue on the newly placed tank bottom. In existing tank bottoms where inadequate protection has been provided, leaks can develop. In one method of remediation, an old bottom is covered with sand and a double bottom is welded above the leaking bottom. The new bottom is welded very close to the old bottom, thus shielding the traditional cathodic protection from protecting the new bottom. These double bottoms often employ the use of dielectric liner as well. Both the liner and the double bottom often minimize the distance from the external tank bottom. The minimized space between the liner, or double bottom, and the bottom to be protected places a challenge in providing current distribution in cathodic protection systems. This study examines the practical concerns for application of impressed current cathodic protection and the types of anode materials used in these specific applications. One unique approach for an economical treatment using a conductive polymer cathodic protection method is presented. (author)

  12. Cathode erosion in high-current high-pressure arc

    CERN Document Server

    Nemchinsky, V A

    2003-01-01

    Cathode erosion rate was experimentally investigated for two types of arcs: one with tungsten cathode in nitrogen atmosphere and one with hafnium cathode in oxygen atmosphere. Conditions were typical for plasma arc cutting systems: gas pressure from 2 to 5 atm, arc current from 200 to 400 A, gas flow rate from 50 to 130 litre min sup - sup 1. It was found that the actual cathode evaporation rate G is much lower than G sub 0 , the evaporation rate that follows from the Hertz-Knudsen formula: G = nu G sub 0. The difference is because some of the evaporated particles return back to the cathode. For conditions of our experiments, the factor nu could be as low as 0.01. It was shown experimentally that nu depends strongly on the gas flow pattern close to the cathode. In particular, swirling the gas increases nu many times. To explain the influence of gas swirling, model calculations of gas flows were performed. These calculations revealed difference between swirling and non-swirling flows: swirling the gas enhances...

  13. Cathodic Protection of the Yaquina Bay Bridge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bullard, Sophie J.; Cramer, Stephen D.; Covino, Bernard S., Jr.; Holcomb, Gordon R.; Russell, James H.; Laylor, H.M.; Cryer, C.B.

    2001-02-01

    The Yaquina Bay Bridge in Newport, Oregon, was designed by Conde B. McCullough and built in 1936. The 3,223-foot (982 m) structure is a combination of concrete arch approach spans and a steel through arch over the shipping channel. Cathodic protection is used to prevent corrosion damage to the concrete arches. The Oregon Department of Transportation (Oregon DOT) installed a carbon anode coating (DAC-85) on two of the north approach spans in 1985. This anode was operated at a current density of 6.6 mA/m2(0.6 mA/ft2). No failure of the conductive anode was observed in 1990, five years after application, or in 2000, 15 years after application. Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes 20 mils (0.5 mm) thick were applied to half the south approach spans beginning in 1990. Thermal-sprayed zinc anodes 15 mils (0.4 mm) thick were applied to the remaining spans in 1996. These anodes were operated at a current density of 2.2 mA/m2(0.2 mA/ft2). In 1999, four zones on the approach spans were included in a two-year field trial of humectants to improve zinc anode performance. The humectants LiNO3 and LiBr were applied to two zones; the two adjacent zones were left untreated as controls. The humectants substantially reduced circuit resistance compared to the controls.

  14. Pulsed microhollow cathode discharge excimer sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moselhy, Mohamed; Shi, Wenhui; Strak, Robert H.; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2001-10-01

    Microhollow cathode discharges (MHCDs) are non-equilibrium, high-pressure gas discharges between perforated electrodes separated by a dielectric layer. Typical dimensions for the electrode foil thickness and hole diameter are 100 μm. Direct current experiments in xenon, argon, neon, helium, argon fluoride, and xenon chloride [1,2] have been performed. The excimer efficiency varies between 1 % and 9 %. Pulsed operation allowed us to increase the current from 8 mA (dc) to approximately 80 mA (pulsed with a pulse width of 700 μs), limited by the onset of instabilities. The total excimer power was found to increase linearly with current, however, the radiant emittance and efficiency stayed constant. Reducing the pulse duration into the nanosecond range allowed us to increase the current into the ampere range. The maximum measured excimer power was 2.75 W per microdischarge. The maximum radiant emittance was 15 W/cm^2 and the efficiency reached values of 20 %. This effect is assumed to be due to non-equilibrium electron heating in the high-pressure plasma [3]. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under grant # CTS0078618. 1. Karl H. Schoenbach, Ahmed El-Habachi, Mohamed M. Moselhy, Wenhui Shi, and Robert H. Stark, Physics of Plasmas 7, 2186 (2000). 2. P. Kurunczi, J. Lopez, H. Shah, and K. Becker, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 205, 277 (2001). 3. Robert H. Stark and Karl H. Schoenbach, J. Appl. Phys. 89, 3568 (2001).

  15. Swift chemical sputtering and potential development for fusion reactor materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bjoerkas, C.; Juslin, N.; Nordlund, K.; Keinonen, J. (Univ. of Helsinki, Dept. of Physics (Finland)); Traeskelin, P. (Univ. of California at Davis, Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Materials Science, CA (United States)); Salonen, E. (Helsinki Univ. of Technology, Lab. of Physics (Finland)); Krasheninnikov, A.V.

    2008-10-15

    One of the objectives of the International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor (ITER) is to demonstrate prolonged fusion power production in deuterium-tritium plasma. The selection of plasma facing materials (PFMs) is a key issue for this objective, and multiple factors have to be taken into account. These include the lifetime of the materials (shortened by e.g. erosion and thermal fatigue), safety requirements (tritium retention and activation) and engineering aspects. Due to the ITER tokamak plasma design, the thermal load and particle flux are divided between different areas in the reactor. Consequently, the material requirements vary with location and the current choice for first wall material is beryllium and the divertor region is to be composed of carbon-fibre-composites (CFC) (strike point tiles) and tungsten (baffle and dome). When energetic atoms or ions escape from the hot plasma in a fusion reactor and hit a wall material, they can cause the material to erode. The erosion is well understood if the ion energy is high enough that the erosion is caused by physical sputtering, i.e. when the ion collides with a sample atom and directly kicks it out of the sample. Alternatively ions with thermal energies can also cause erosion if a chemical etching reaction can take place. In the particular case of hydrogen escaping from a fusion reactor plasma and hitting a carbon-based wall material, high carbon erosion has been observed for hydrogen ion energies which are so low (10-30 eV) that physical sputtering is impossible. On the other hand, no chemical etching reaction has been able to explain the erosion either. Using classical and quantum mechanical atomistic simulations of the ion-sample collision dynamics, we have shown that the observed erosion can be explained by a chemical sputtering mechanism, where the incoming ion attacks a chemical bond between two carbon atoms, and causes the bond to break. This mechanism requires an ion energy of only about 3 eV, and

  16. Laser sputtering of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite at 248 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajnovich, Douglas J.

    1995-01-01

    The interaction of excimer laser pulses with a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) target has been studied. HOPG, a close approximation to single crystal graphite, was irradiated along a freshly cleaved basal plane in vacuum by pulses from a KrF excimer laser. The energy fluence was varied between 300-700 mJ/cm2, resulting in material removal rates of plasma effects are minimized. Time-of-flight distributions of the neutral carbon atoms and small carbon clusters were measured and inverted to obtain translational energy flux distributions and relative sputtering yields as a function of fluence. The translational energy distributions are remarkably close to Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions over most of the fluence range studied. However, the mean translational energies are far too high to reconcile with a simple thermal vaporization model. For example, the mean translational energy of C3, the most abundant species, increases from 1.1 eV at 305 mJ/cm2 to 31.7 eV at 715 mJ/cm2. Explanations are considered for this curious mix of thermal and non-thermal behavior. At the high end of our fluence range, the mean translational energies of C1, C2, C3 converge to a 1:2:3 ratio, indicating that the velocity distributions are almost identical. This particular result can be interpreted as a gas dynamic effect. Prolonged sputtering of the same target spot results in a falloff in the sputtering yield and the mean translational energies, but little change in the cluster size distribution. These effects are related to impurity induced topography formation on the target surface.

  17. Low friction coefficient coatings Ni-Cr by magnetron sputtering, DC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales-Hernández, Jorge

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnetron Sputter Deposition technique with DC was used for the deposition of Ni-Cr coatings on AISI 316 SS like substrate. The cathode with a nominal composition Ni-22 at% Cr was prepared by Mechanical Alloying (MA technique, with a maximum milling time of 16 hours and, with a high energy SPEX 8000 mill. The coatings were made under Argon atmosphere at room temperature with a power of 100 W at different times of growth. Chemical composition, microstructure, topography, nanohardness and wear of the coatings were evaluated using the techniques of microanalysis by energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDAX, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM, Nano-indentation and pin-on-Disk, respectively. After milling, was not detected contamination in the mixtures. XRD analysis revealed that the microstructure of the Ni-Cr alloy was maintained in the coatings with respect to MA powders, with some degree of recrystallization. Nanohardness values were in the order of 8.8 GPa with a Young’s modulus of 195 GPa. The adhesion of the films was evaluated according to their resistance to fracture when these were indented at different loads using Vickers microhardness. The wear test results showed a decrease in the friction coefficient with respect to the increase of thickness’ films, getting a minimum value of 0.08 with a thickness of 1 μm and which correspond with the maximum growing time.La técnica de Deposición por Chisporroteo Magnético (Magnetron Sputtering con el proceso DC, fue usado para la deposición de los recubrimientos de Ni-Cr sobre acero inoxidable AISI 316 como sustrato. El cátodo con una composición nominal Ni-22 at% Cr fue preparado por la técnica de Aleado Mecánico (AM, con un tiempo máximo de molienda de 16 horas y con un molino de alta energía tipo SPEX 8000. Las películas se realizaron bajo una atmósfera de argón a temperatura ambiente con una potencia de 100 W a diferentes tiempos de crecimiento. La composición qu

  18. Lowering of the cathode fall voltage by laser exposure of the cathode in a high-pressure mercury discharge

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of an additional electrode heating by laser light exposure of one electrode has been studied in a high-pressure mercury discharge. The exposed electrode operates as cathode or anode during the corresponding half-cycles of a square-wave current which has been used for driving the discharge. The additional heating influences the discharge voltage and the electrode tip temperatures in different ways during the cathode and anode phases. Only during the cathode phase is there a noticeable decrease in the discharge voltage connected with a moderate increase in the cathode tip temperature. The maximum absorbed laser power of 6.2 W causes a voltage decrease of about 3.5 V for a discharge current of 1.8 A. The exposure during the anode phase is characterized by a strong increase in the electrode tip temperature and a nearly unchanged discharge voltage. Theoretically determined parameters of the cathode boundary layer are given. For a constant discharge current the power balance at the cathode surface suggests a nearly linear dependence of the discharge voltage lowering on the laser input power, which has been verified experimentally

  19. Nanofabrication by ion-beam sputtering fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Som, Tapobrata

    2012-01-01

    Considerable attention has been paid to ion beam sputtering as an effective way to fabricate self-organized nano-patterns on various substrates. The significance of this method for patterning surfaces is that the technique is fast, simple, and less expensive. The possibility to create patterns on very large areas at once makes it even more attractive. This book reviews various fascinating results, understand the underlying physics of ion induced pattern formation, to highlight the potential applications of the patterned surfaces, and to explore the patterning behavior by different irradiation

  20. Growth of large area graphene from sputtered films

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Genhua; Heath, Mark; Horsell, David; Wears, M. Lesley

    2012-01-01

    Techniques for mass-production of large area graphene using an industrial scale thin film deposition tool could be the key to the practical realization of a wide range of technological applications of this material. Here, we demonstrate the growth of large area polycrystalline graphene from sputtered films (a carbon-containing layer and a metallic layer) using in-situ or ex-situ rapid thermal processing in the temperature range from 650 to 1000 oC. It was found that graphene always grows on t...

  1. Plasma sputtering system for deposition of thin film combinatorial libraries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, James S.; Zhang, Guanghai; McGinn, Paul J.

    2005-06-01

    The design of a plasma sputtering system for the deposition of combinatorial libraries is described. A rotating carousel is used to position shadow masks between the targets and the substrate. Multilayer films are built up by depositing sequentially through various masks. Postdeposition annealing is used to promote interdiffusion of the layered structures. Either discrete or compositional gradient libraries can be deposited in this system. Samples appropriate for characterization with a scanning electrochemical microscope or a multichannel microelectrode array system can be produced. The properties of some deposited Pt-Ru films for fuel cell applications are described.

  2. Nitrogen incorporation in sputter deposited molybdenum nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stöber, Laura, E-mail: laura.stoeber@tuwien.ac.at; Patocka, Florian, E-mail: florian.patocka@tuwien.ac.at; Schneider, Michael, E-mail: michael.schneider@tuwien.ac.at; Schmid, Ulrich, E-mail: ulrich.e366.schmid@tuwien.ac.at [Institute of Sensor and Actuator Systems, TU Wien, Gußhausstraße 27-29, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Konrath, Jens Peter, E-mail: jenspeter.konrath@infineon.com; Haberl, Verena, E-mail: verena.haberl@infineon.com [Infineon Technologies Austria AG, Siemensstraße 2, 9500 Villach (Austria)

    2016-03-15

    In this paper, the authors report on the high temperature performance of sputter deposited molybdenum (Mo) and molybdenum nitride (Mo{sub 2}N) thin films. Various argon and nitrogen gas compositions are applied for thin film synthetization, and the amount of nitrogen incorporation is determined by Auger measurements. Furthermore, effusion measurements identifying the binding conditions of the nitrogen in the thin film are performed up to 1000 °C. These results are in excellent agreement with film stress and scanning electron microscope analyses, both indicating stable film properties up to annealing temperatures of 500 °C.

  3. Deuterium Retention and Physical Sputtering of Low Activation Ferritic Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T. Hino; K. Yamaguchi; Y. Yamauchi; Y. Hirohata; K. Tsuzuki; Y.Kusama

    2005-01-01

    Low activation materials have to be developed toward fusion demonstration reactors. Ferritic steel, vanadium alloy and SiC/SiC composite are candidate materials of the first wall,vacuum vessel and blanket components, respectively. Although changes of mechanical-thermal properties owing to neutron irradiation have been investigated so far, there is little data for the plasma material interactions, such as fuel hydrogen retention and erosion. In the present study,deuterium retention and physical sputtering of low activation ferritic steel, F82H, were investigated by using deuterium ion irradiation apparatus.After a ferritic steel sample was irradiated by 1.7 kev D+ ions, the weight loss was measured to obtain the physical sputtering yield. The sputtering yield was 0.04, comparable to that of stainless steel. In order to obtain the retained amount of deuterium, technique of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was employed to the irradiated sample. The retained deuterium desorbed at temperature ranging from 450 K to 700 K, in the forms of DHO, D2, D2O and hydrocarbons. Hence, the deuterium retained can be reduced by baking with a relatively low temperature. The fluence dependence of retained amount of deuterium was measured by changing the ion fluence. In the ferritic steel without mechanical polish, the retained amount was large even when the fluence was low. In such a case, a large amount of deuterium was trapped in the surface oxide layer containing O and C. When the fluence was large, the thickness of surface oxide layer was reduced by the ion sputtering, and then the retained amount in the oxide layer decreased. In the case of a high fluence, the retained amount of deuterium became comparable to that of ferritic steel with mechanical polish or SS 316 L, and one order of magnitude smaller than that of graphite. When the ferritic steel is used, it is required to remove the surface oxide layer for reduction of fuel hydrogen retention.Ferritic steel sample was

  4. Characterization of high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hala, Matej

    Paper I: In the first paper, we present a new approach in the characterization of the high power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge evolution—time- and species-resolved plasma imaging—employing a set of band-pass optical interference filters suitable for the isolation of the emission originating from different species populating the plasma. We demonstrate that the introduction of such filters can be used to distinguish different phases of the discharge, and to visualize numerous plasma effects including background gas excitations during the discharge ignition, gas shock waves, and expansion of metal-rich plasmas. In particular, the application of this technique is shown on the diagnostics of the 200 µs long non-reactive HiPIMS discharges using a Cr target. Paper II: In order to gain further information about the dynamics of reactive HiPIMS discharges, both fast plasma imaging and time- and space-resolved optical emission spectroscopy (OES) are used for a systematic investigation of the 200 µs long HiPIMS pulses operated in Ar, N2 and N 2/Ar mixtures and at various pressures. It is observed that the dense metal plasma created next to the target propagates in the reactor at a speed ranging from 0.7 to 3.5 km s-1, depending on the working gas composition and the pressure. In fact, it increases with higher N 2 concentration and with lower pressure. The visible form of the propagating plasma wave changes from a hemispherical shape in Ar to a drop-like shape extending far from the target with increasing N2 concentration, owing to the significant emission from molecular N2. Interestingly, the evidence of the target self-sputtering is found for all investigated conditions, including pure N2 atmosphere. Paper III: Here, we report on the time- and species-resolved plasma imaging analysis of the dynamics of the 200 µs long HiPIMS discharges above a Cr target ignited in pure O2. It is shown that the discharge emission is dominated solely by neutral and

  5. Pattern evolution during ion beam sputtering; reductionistic view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.-H.; Kim, J.-S.

    2016-09-01

    The development of the ripple pattern during the ion beam sputtering (IBS) is expounded via the evolution of its constituent ripples. For that purpose, we perform numerical simulation of the ripple evolution that is based on Bradley-Harper model and its non-linear extension. The ripples are found to evolve via various well-defined processes such as ripening, averaging, bifurcation and their combinations, depending on their neighboring ripples. Those information on the growth kinetics of each ripple allow the detailed description of the pattern development in real space that the instability argument and the diffraction study both made in k-space cannot provide.

  6. Effect of sputtering pressure and post-annealing on hydrophilicity of TiO2 thin films deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A series of TiO2 thin films was deposited onto glass substrates without intentional heating or biasing by magnetron sputtering of a titanium target using Ar/O2 reactive mixtures over a broad range of total sputtering pressures from 0.12 Pa to 2.24 Pa. Each of the film types was deposited by the threshold poisoned mode at a specific given oxygen flow rate monitored in-situ by optical emission spectroscopy. Both the sputtering pressure and thermal annealing are the key factors for the TiO2 films to yield fast-response superhydrophilicity with a water contact angle of 5o. The mechanism of superhydrophilicity for the TiO2 films deposited by high-pressure sputtering will be discussed based on empirical studies of X-ray diffractometry, high-resolution scanning microscopy and atomic force spectroscopy.

  7. Statistical simulation of periodical structure formation on surfaces of plane targets undergoing ion-beam sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Numerical analysis of periodical structure formation on surfaces of plane targets undergoing ion-beam sputtering has been carried out. The base of the mathematical model of target ion-sputtering is the nonlinear evolutionary equation, in which the erosion velocity dependence on ion-flux is simulated by means of Monte Carlo method

  8. Deposition Rates of High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering: Physics and Economics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2009-11-22

    Deposition by high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) is considered by some as the new paradigm of advanced sputtering technology, yet this is met with skepticism by others for the reported lower deposition rates, if compared to rates of more conventional sputtering of equal average power. In this contribution, the underlying physical reasons for the rate changes are discussed, including (i) ion return to the target and self-sputtering, (ii) the less-than-linear increase of the sputtering yield with increasing ion energy, (iii) yield changes due to the shift of species responsible for sputtering, (iv) changes to due to greater film density, limited sticking, and self-sputtering on the substrate, (v) noticeable power losses in the switch module, (vi) changes of the magnetic balance and particle confinement of the magnetron due to self-fields at high current, and (vii) superposition of sputtering and sublimation/evaporation for selected materials. The situation is even more complicated for reactive systems where the target surface chemistry is a function of the reactive gas partial pressure and discharge conditions. While most of these factors imply a reduction of the normalized deposition rate, increased rates have been reported for certain conditions using hot targets and less poisoned targets. Finally, some points of economics and HIPIMS benefits considered.

  9. Sputtering of thin and intermediately thick films of solid deuterium by keV electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Thestrup Nielsen, Birgitte; Schou, Jørgen;

    1995-01-01

    Sputtering of films of solid deuterium by keV electrons was studied in a cryogenic set-up. The sputtering yield shows a minimum yield of about 4 D2/electron for 1.5 and 2 keV electrons at a thickness slightly larger than the average projected range of the electrons. We suggest that the yield around...

  10. Deposition rates of high power impulse magnetron sputtering: Physics and economics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Deposition by high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) is considered by some as the new paradigm of advanced sputtering technology, yet this is met with skepticism by others for the reported lower deposition rates, if compared to rates of more conventional sputtering of equal average power. In this contribution, the underlying physical reasons for the rate changes are discussed, including (i) ion return to the target and self-sputtering, (ii) the less-than-linear increase in the sputtering yield with increasing ion energy, (iii) yield changes due to the shift of species responsible for sputtering, (iv) changes due to greater film density, limited sticking, and self-sputtering on the substrate, (v) noticeable power losses in the switch module, (vi) changes in the magnetic balance and particle confinement of the magnetron due to self-fields at high current, and (vii) superposition of sputtering and sublimation/evaporation for selected materials. The situation is even more complicated for reactive systems where the target surface chemistry is a function of the reactive gas partial pressure and discharge conditions. While most of these factors imply a reduction in the normalized deposition rate, increased rates have been reported for certain conditions using hot targets and less poisoned targets. Finally, some points of economics and HIPIMS benefits are considered.

  11. Influence of Bias on the Properties of Carbon Nitride Films Prepared by Vacuum Cathodic Arc Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhimin ZHOU; Lifang XIA; Mingren SUN

    2004-01-01

    Carbon nitride films have been synthesized in a wide range of biases from 0 to -900 V by vacuum cathodic arc method. The N content was about 12.0~22.0 at. Pct. Upon increasing the biases from 0 to -100 V, the N content increased from 15.0 to 22.0 at. Pct which could be attributed to the knot-on effect. While the further increasing biases led to the gradual falling of the N content to 12.0 at. Pct at -900 V due to the enhancement of the sputtering effect. Below -200 V, with the increasing biases the sp2C fraction in the films decreased, as a result of which the I(D)/I(G) fell in the Raman spectra and the sp peaks also showed the decreasing tendency relative to the s peaks in the VBXPS (valence band X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy). While above -200 V, the sp2C fraction increased and the films became graphitinized gradually, accompanying which theI(D)/I(G) rose from -200 V to -300 V and the Raman spectra even showed the graphite characteristic above -300 V and the sp peaks rose again relative to the s peak. The carbon nitride films mainly consist of three types of bonding: CC, sp2CN and sp3CN bonds. In the first stage the sp3CN relative ratio rises and falls in the second stage, which corresponded well with the variation of the sp2C in the films. The subplantation mechanism resulting from the effect of ion energy played an important role in decidingthe variation of the microstructure of the carbon nitride films.

  12. Ion exchange membrane cathodes for scalable microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Yi; Cheng, Shaoan; Logan, Bruce E

    2008-09-15

    One of the main challenges for using microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is developing materials and architectures that are economical and generate high power densities. The performance of two cathodes constructed from two low-cost anion (AEM) and cation (CEM) exchange membranes was compared to that achieved using an ultrafiltration (UF) cathode, when the membranes were made electrically conductive using graphite paint and a nonprecious metal catalyst (CoTMPP). The best performance in single-chamber MFCs using graphite fiber brush anodes was achieved using an AEM cathode with the conductive coating facing the solution, at a catalyst loading of 0.5 mg/cm2 CoTMPP. The maximum power densitywas 449 mW/ m2 (normalized to the projected cathode surface area) or 13.1 W/m3 (total reactor volume), with a Coulombic efficiency up to 70% in a 50 mM phosphate buffer solution (PBS) using acetate. Decreasing the CoTMPP loading by 40-80% reduced power by 28-56%, with only 16% of the power (72 mW/m2) generated using an AEM cathode lacking a catalyst. Using a current collector (a stainless steel mesh) pressed against the inside surface of the AEM cathode and 200 mM PBS, the maximum power produced was further increased to 728 mW/m2 (21.2 W/m3). The use of AEM cathodes and brush anodes provides comparable performance to similar systems that use materials costing nearly an order of magnitude more (carbon paper electrodes) and thus represent more useful materials for reducing the costs of MFCs for wastewater treatment applications. PMID:18853817

  13. Compression and strong rarefaction in high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horwat, David; Anders, Andre

    2010-11-11

    Gas compression and strong rarefaction have been observed for high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) discharges using a copper target in argon. Time-resolved ion saturation currents of 35 probes were simultaneously recorded for HIPIMS discharges operating far above the self-sputtering runaway threshold. The argon background pressure was a parameter for the evaluation of the spatial and temporal development of the plasma density distribution. The data can be interpreted by a massive onset of the sputtering flux (sputter wind) that causes a transient densification of the gas, followed by rarefaction and the replacement of gas plasma by the metal plasma of sustained self-sputtering. The plasma density pulse follows closely the power pulse at low pressure. At high pressure, the relatively remote probes recorded a density peak only after the discharge pulse, indicative for slow, diffusive ion transport.

  14. High-temperature oxidation resistance of sputtered micro-grain superalloy K38G

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The oxidation of sputtered and cast superalloy K38G specimens was studied. The sputtered alloy was microcrystalline, with an average grain size 2O3, TiO2, Al2O3,and a spinel. The oxide scale formed on the sputtered alloy was Al2O3. This scale is thin, compact, and adherent. This result implied that microcrystallization reduced the critical aluminum content necessary to form alumina on the surface of this superalloy. No oxide spallation, as typically observed for cast of aluminized alloys, occurred on the sputtered superalloy. The reduction of the critical aluminum content for the formation of alumina and the improvement of the spallation resistance may be attributed to the microcrystalline structure formed during sputtering. The numerous grain boundaries favor outward aluminum grain-boundary diffusion, provide increased nucleation sites, and reduced stresses in the oxide scales

  15. Properties of Diamond-Like Carbon Films Synthesized by Dual-Target Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Cui; LI Guo-Qing; GOU Wei; MU Zong-Xin; ZHANG Cheng-Wu

    2004-01-01

    @@ Smooth, dense and uniform diamond-like carbon films (DLC films) for industrial applications have successfully been prepared by dual-target unbalanced magnetron sputtering and the DLC characteristics of the films are confirmed by Raman spectra. It is found that the sputtering current of target plays an important role in the DLC film deposition. Deposition rate of 3.5μm/h is obtained by using the sputtering current of 30 A. The friction coefficient of the films is 0.2-0.225 measured by using a pin-on-disc microtribometer. The structure of the films tends to have a growth of sp3 bonds content at high sputtering current. The compressive residual stress in the films increases with the increasing sputtering current of the target.

  16. Mass Loss Due to Sputtering and Thermal Processes in Meteoroid Ablation

    CERN Document Server

    Rogers, L A; Hawkes, R L

    2005-01-01

    Conventional meteoroid theory assumes that the dominant mode of ablation is by evaporation following intense heating during atmospheric flight. In this paper we consider the question of whether sputtering may provide an alternative disintegration process of some importance.For meteoroids in the mass range from 10^-3 to 10^-13 kg and covering a meteor velocity range from 11 to 71 km/s, we numerically modeled both thermal ablation and sputtering ablation during atmospheric flight. We considered three meteoroid models believed to be representative of asteroidal (3300 kg m^-3 mass density), cometary (1000 kg m^-3) and porous cometary (300 kg m^-3) meteoroid structures. Atmospheric profiles which considered the molecular compositions at different heights were used in the sputtering calculations. We find that while in many cases (particularly at low velocities and for relatively large meteoroid masses) sputtering contributes only a small amount of mass loss during atmospheric flight, in some cases sputtering is ver...

  17. Chemical sputtering of graphite by low temperature nitrogen plasmas at various substrate temperatures and ion flux densities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bystrov, K.; Morgan, T. W.; Tanyeli, I.; De Temmerman, G.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,

    2013-01-01

    We report measurements of chemical sputtering yields of graphite exposed to low temperature nitrogen plasmas. The influence of surface temperature and incoming ion energy on the sputtering yields has been investigated in two distinct ion flux density regimes. Sputtering yields grow consistently with

  18. Exploring the benefits of depositing hard TiN thin films by non-reactive magnetron sputtering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez-Martinez, D.; Lopez-Cartes, C.; Fernandez, A.; Sanchez-Lopez, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to compare the mechanical and tribological properties of TiN coatings prepared in a conventional magnetron sputtering chamber according to two different routes: the usual reactive sputtering of a Ti target in an Ar/N-2 atmosphere vs. the comparatively more simple sputtering

  19. RF-magnetron sputtered kesterite Cu2ZnSnS4 thin film using single quaternary sputtering target prepared by sintering process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoo, Dongjun; Choi, Moonsuk; Heo, Seung Chan; Kim, Dohyung; Chung, Chulwon; Choi, Changhwan

    2013-11-01

    Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin film applicable to an absorber material in compound thin film solar cells was deposited by a single quaternary sputtering target containing four components--Cu, Zn, Sn, and S-and its material properties were investigated. A single quaternary sputtering target was fabricated by sequential powder mixing/ball milling, pressure moulding, and a sintering process. An as-fabricated pellet or sputter target sintered at 500 degrees C-700 degrees C showed relevant peaks associated with CZTS phases. However, acceptable density as a sputter target (> 90% of ideal density) was attained up to a sintering temperature of only 500 degrees C due to thermal expansion. Unlike other metallic precursor approaches, there was no volume expansion after sulfurization. The sulfurized CZTS film contained CZTS phases including some secondary phases such as SnS or SnS2 depending on the film thickness. This result was attributed to the different sputtering yields of the constituents in the sputter target. Optical E(g) decreased with increasing deposition time. The E(g) attained was 1.488 eV, well-matched to the reported CZTS data. The carrier concentration, resistivity, and mobility of the CZTS film were 1.29 x 10(17) cm(-3), 1.2 x 10(-1) omega x cm and 5.44 cm(-3) N x sec, respectively, showing suitability for absorber layer applications. PMID:24245324

  20. Magnetron sputtered WS2; optical and structural analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koçak, Y.; Akaltun, Y.; Gür, Emre

    2016-04-01

    Remarkable properties of graphene have renewed interest in inorganic, Transition Metal Dichalgogenits (TMDC) due to unique electronic and optical properties. TMDCs such as MoS2, MoSe2, WS2 and WSe2 have sizable bandgaps that change from indirect to direct in single layers, allowing applications such as solar cells, transistors, photodetectors and electroluminescent devices in which the graphene is not actively used. So, fabrication and analysis of these films are important for new generation devices. In this work, polycrystalline WS2 films were grown by radio frequency magnetron sputtering (RFMS) on different substrates like n-Si(100), n-Si(111), p-Si(100), glass and fused silica. Structural, morphological, optical and electrical properties were investigated as a function of film thickness and RF power. From XRD analysis, signals from planes of (002), (100), (101), (110), (008) belong to the hegzagonal WS2 were obtained. Raman spectra of the WS2 show that there are two dominant peaks at ~351 cm-1 (in-plane phonon mode) and ~417 cm-1 (out-of-plane phonon mode). XPS analysis of the films has shown that binding energy and the intensity of tungsten 4f shells shifts by depending on the depth of the films which might be due to the wellknown preferential sputtering.

  1. Electrochromic study on amorphous tungsten oxide films by sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chuan, E-mail: cli10@yahoo.com [Department of Biomedical Engineering, National Yang Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli, Taoyuan 32001, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, J.H. [Department of Materials Engineering, Ming Chi University of Technology, Taishan, Taipei 24301, Taiwan (China); Hung, Ming-Tsung [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli, Taoyuan 32001, Taiwan (China); Huang, B.Q. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, National Yang Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China)

    2015-07-31

    Tungsten oxide films under different oxygen flow rates are deposited by DC sputtering. The voltage change at target and analyses for the deposited films by X-ray diffraction, scanning electronic microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ultraviolet–visible-near infrared spectroscopy consistently indicate that low oxygen flow rate (5 sccm) only creates metal-rich tungsten oxide films, while higher oxygen flow rate (10–20 sccm) assures the deposition of amorphous WO{sub 3} films. To explore the electrochromic function of deposited WO{sub 3} films, we use electrochemical tests to perform the insertion of lithium ions and electrons into films. The WO{sub 3} films switch between color and bleach states effectively by both potentiostat and cyclic voltammetry. Quantitative evaluation on electrochemical tests indicates that WO{sub 3} film with composition close to its stoichiometry is an optimal choice for electrochromic function. - Highlights: • Amorphous WO{sub 3} films are deposited by DC sputtering under different O{sub 2} flow rates. • Higher oxygen flow rate (> 10 sccm) assures the deposition of amorphous WO{sub 3} films. • Both potentiostat and cyclic voltammetry make WO{sub 3} films switch its color. • An optimal electrochromic WO{sub 3} is to make films close to its stoichiometry.

  2. Thermoelectric properties of DC-sputtered filled skutterudite thin film

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Yb filled CoSb3 skutterudite thermoelectric thin films were prepared by DC magnetron sputtering. The electrical conductivity, Seebeck coefficient, thermal conductivity, and figure of merit ZT of the samples are characterized in a temperature range of 300 K to 700 K. X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, and energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy are obtained to assess the phase composition and crystallinity of thin film samples at different heat treatment temperatures. Carrier concentrations and Hall mobilities are obtained from Hall Effect measurements, which provide further insight into the electrical conductivity and Seebeck coefficient mechanisms. The thermal conductivity of thin film filled skutterudite was found to be much less compared with bulk Yb filled CoSb3 skutterudite. In this work, the 1020 K heat treatment was adopted for thin film post process due to the high degree of crystallinity as well as avoiding reverse heating effect. Thin film samples of different thicknesses were prepared with the same sputtering deposition rate and maximum ZT of 0.48 was achieved at 700 K for the 130 nm thick sample. This value was between half and one third of the bulk figure of merit which was due to the lower Hall mobility

  3. Transients in the composition of material sputtered from alloy targets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Andersen, H.H.; Stenum, B.; Soerensen, T.; Whitlow, H.J. (Aarhus Univ. (Denmark). Inst. of Physics)

    1984-03-01

    Material sputtered with 20-320 keV Ar/sup +/ ions from the binary alloy CuPt, Ni/sub 5/Pt and NiPt has been collected sequentially on thin carbon foils. The composition of the collected material was analyzed by Rutherford backscattering to reveal transients in the composition of the sputtered flux. In the beginning Cu and Ni were preferentially ejected. These results, together with earlier data for AgAu and Cu/sub 3/Au, where Ag and Cu were preferentially ejected, show the lighter element to be preferentially emitted during the transient, but particularly the results for Cu/sub 3/Au and Ni/sub 5/Pd suggest that a native oxide layer may play a substantial role, although only for the case of Cu/sub 3/Au did such an oxide have a sufficient thickness to be revealed by Rutherford backscattering. Measurements have further been carried out for pure copper bombarded with 45 keV Bi/sup +/ ions. Here, the bismuth re-emission reaches a steady-state a factor of 10 faster than the copper yield, a fact which again may be related to oxygen-driven surface segregation. 39 refs.

  4. Preparation of iron cobaltite thin films by RF magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Trong, H. [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, Institut Carnot CIRIMAT, 118, Route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France); CNRS, Institut Carnot Cirimat, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Ho Chi Minh City University of Science, Vietnam National University Ho Chi Minh City, 227 Nguyen Van Cu Q 5, 750000 Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Bui, T.M.A. [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, Institut Carnot CIRIMAT, 118, Route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France); CNRS, Institut Carnot Cirimat, F-31062 Toulouse (France); University of Transport and Communications, Lang Thuong, Dong Da, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Presmanes, L., E-mail: presmane@chimie.ups-tlse.fr [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, Institut Carnot CIRIMAT, 118, Route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France); CNRS, Institut Carnot Cirimat, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Barnabé, A.; Pasquet, I.; Bonningue, C.; Tailhades, Ph. [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, Institut Carnot CIRIMAT, 118, Route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France); CNRS, Institut Carnot Cirimat, F-31062 Toulouse (France)

    2015-08-31

    Iron cobaltite thin films with spinel structure have been elaborated by radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering from a Co{sub 1.75}Fe{sub 1.25}O{sub 4} target. Influence of argon pressure on structure, microstructure and physical properties of films has been examined. Iron–cobalt oxide thin films essentially consist of one spinel phase when deposited at low pressure (0.5 and 1.0 Pa). At high pressure (2.0 Pa), the global stoichiometry of the film is changed which results in the precipitation of a mixed monoxide of cobalt and iron beside the spinel phase. This in-situ reduction due to an oxygen loss occurring mainly at high deposition pressure has been revealed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Microstructural evolution of thin film with argon pressure has been shown by microscopic observations (AFM and SEM). The evolution of magnetic and electrical properties, versus argon pressure, has been also studied by SQUID and 4 point probe measurements. - Highlights: • Co{sub 1.75}Fe{sub 1.25}O{sub 4} phase is obtained at room temperature without any annealing. • This phase is a ferrimagnetic semiconductor with a coercive field of 32 kOe at 5 K. • Oxygen content of the thin film is related to the argon pressure during sputtering. • Monoxide phase grows into the film at high argon pressure. • Magnetic coupling effect reveals nanoscale impurities at low argon pressure.

  5. Electrochromic study on amorphous tungsten oxide films by sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tungsten oxide films under different oxygen flow rates are deposited by DC sputtering. The voltage change at target and analyses for the deposited films by X-ray diffraction, scanning electronic microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ultraviolet–visible-near infrared spectroscopy consistently indicate that low oxygen flow rate (5 sccm) only creates metal-rich tungsten oxide films, while higher oxygen flow rate (10–20 sccm) assures the deposition of amorphous WO3 films. To explore the electrochromic function of deposited WO3 films, we use electrochemical tests to perform the insertion of lithium ions and electrons into films. The WO3 films switch between color and bleach states effectively by both potentiostat and cyclic voltammetry. Quantitative evaluation on electrochemical tests indicates that WO3 film with composition close to its stoichiometry is an optimal choice for electrochromic function. - Highlights: • Amorphous WO3 films are deposited by DC sputtering under different O2 flow rates. • Higher oxygen flow rate (> 10 sccm) assures the deposition of amorphous WO3 films. • Both potentiostat and cyclic voltammetry make WO3 films switch its color. • An optimal electrochromic WO3 is to make films close to its stoichiometry

  6. Reactive sputtering deposition of SiO2 thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IVAN RADOVIC

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available SiO2 layers were deposited in a UHV chamber by 1 keV Ar+ ion sputtering from a high purity silicon target, using different values of the oxygen partial pressure (5×10-6–2×10-4 mbar and of the ion beam current on the target (1.67–6.85 mA. The argon partial pressure during operation of the ion gun was 1×10-3 mbar. The substrate temperature was held at 550 °C and the films were deposited to a thickness of 12.5–150 nm, at a rate from 0.0018–0.035 nm s-1. Structural characterization of the deposited thin films was performed by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS analysis. Reactive sputtering was proved to be efficient for the deposition of silica at 550 °C, an oxygen partial pressure of 2×10-4 mbar (ion beam current on the target of 5 mA or, at a lower deposition rate, ion beam current of 1.67 mA and an oxygen partial pressure of 6×10-5 mbar. One aspect of these investigations was to study the consumption of oxygen from the gas cylinder, which was found to be lower for higher deposition rates.

  7. Protective infrared antireflection coating based on sputtered germanium carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Des; Waddell, Ewan; Placido, Frank

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes optical, durablility and environmental performance of a germanium carbide based durable antireflection coating. The coating has been demonstrated on germanium and zinc selenide infra-red material however is applicable to other materials such as zinc sulphide. The material is deposited using a novel reactive closed field magnetron sputtering technique, offering significant advantages over conventional evaporation processes for germanium carbide such as plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition. The sputtering process is "cold", making it suitable for use on a wide range of substrates. Moreover, the drum format provide more efficient loading for high throughput production. The use of the closed field and unbalanced magnetrons creates a magnetic confinement that extends the electron mean free path leading to high ion current densities. The combination of high current densities with ion energies in the range ~30eV creates optimum thin film growth conditions. As a result the films are dense, spectrally stable, supersmooth and low stress. Films incorporate low hydrogen content resulting in minimal C-H absorption bands within critical infra-red passbands such as 3 to 5um and 8 to 12um. Tuning of germanium carbide (Ge(1-x)Cx) film refractive index from pure germanium (refractive index 4) to pure germanium carbide (refractive index 1.8) will be demonstrated. Use of film grading to achieve single and dual band anti-reflection performance will be shown. Environmental and durability levels are shown to be suitable for use in harsh external environments.

  8. Impedance- and IR-spectroscopy on sputtered borate glasses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ion-conducting oxide glasses are considered as components of thin film batteries. In our study, glass films of the compositions xLi2O.(1-x)B2O3 with x=0.15, 0.20, 0.25, 0.30, and 0.35 are prepared by ion beam sputtering in a thickness range between 100 and 1000 nm. TEM cross section investigations show a homogeneous, amorphous structure of the films, while the correspondence of their chemical composition with the glass targets is proved by EELS analysis. The specific dc-conductivity of the glass films is determined by temperature-dependent impedance spectroscopy and found to be up to three orders of magnitude higher compared to the conductivity of the corresponding bulk glasses prepared from the melt. This conductivity increase is explained by a modification of the network structure of the thin glass films. The concentration of the Non-Bridging Oxygen atoms of the network is assumed to be increased by the sputter process. This increase is expected to be the main reason for the observed conductivity enhancement. IR-spectroscopy is used to determine the content of the Non-Bridging Oxygen atoms of the network, to correlate structural and electrical properties of the thin film glasses

  9. Progress in amorphous silicon solar cells produced by reactive sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustakas, T. D.

    The photovoltaic properties of reactively sputtered amorphous silicon are reviewed and it is shown that efficient PIN solar cells can be fabricated by the method of sputtering. The photovoltaic properties of the intrinsic films correlate with their structural and compositional inhomogeneities. Hydrogen incorporation and small levels of phosphorus and boron impurities also affect the photovoltaic properties through reduction of residual dangling bond related defects and modification of their occupation. The optical and transport properties of the doped P and N-films were found to depend sensitively on the amount of hydrogen and boron or phosphorus incorporation into the films as well as on their degree of crystallinity. Combination of the best intrinsic and doped films leads to PIN solar cell structures generating J(sc) of 13 mA/sq cm and V(oc) of between 0.85 to 0.95 volts. The efficiency of these devices, 5 to 6 percent, is limited by the low FF, typically about 50 percent. As a further test to the potential of this technology efficient tandem solar cell structures were fabricated, and device design concepts, such as the incorporation of optically reflective back contacts were tested.

  10. Dielectric breakdown during Cs+ sputtering of polyvinyl chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahoud, F.; Guillot, J.; Audinot, J. N.; Bertrand, P.; Delcorte, A.; Migeon, H. N.

    2014-02-01

    Thin films of insulating polymers are sometimes analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) or by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) without the use of an electron gun. In this work, both SIMS and XPS have been used to study the chemical and structural modifications due to the charge effect during Cs+ sputtering of a thin film of polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The kinetic energy distribution study shows that at a small primary fluence ˜1015 Cs+ ions/cm2, the dielectric breakdown voltage of the PVC film is reached, i.e. the minimum voltage that causes a portion of an insulator to become electrically conductive. XPS study indicates that the conducting phase created in the PVC film after energetic Cs+ bombardment consists of graphitized carbon and metallic cesium clusters. After the dielectric breakdown of the film, the positive charge, previously accumulated on the surface, is neutralized through the conductive regions, which are created in the insulating film. During Cs+ sputtering of a PVC film, the chemical structure of the analyzed surface is completely modified and some ionic bonds such as CsC and CsCl are also created.

  11. Impacting flux and associated sputtering effects at Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modolo, R.; Chaufray, J.-Y.; Leblanc, F.; Chanteur, G.

    The sputtering of the atmosphere of Mars by incident solar wind ions and pick-up ions is studied using 3-D hybrid model coupled to a 3-D Monte Carlo model. The 3-D hybrid code describes the martian magnetosphere formed from the interaction of the solar wind with Mars by considering H+ and He2+ solar wind and O+, H+ and O2+ planetary ions. All the relevant processes of formation of the planetary ions from the neutral martian exosphere, by interaction with the solar wind and from the ionosphere are considered in particular with respect to solar activity. Such approach provides for the first time a complete 3-D spatial distribution, intensity, energy distribution and composition of the impacting flux into the martian atmosphere. We used these computed flux as input for a 3-D Monte Carlo model which describes the sputtering effect of the impacting particle on the martian atmosphere (Leblanc and Johnson, Plan. Space Sci., 2000). The incident flux produces a significant loss of atmosphere but also an enhanced neutral population in the martian corona. This approach allows to propose a whole image of the coronal 3-D structure. Such result will be later used as an input for the 3-D hybrid code. Results of this coupled approach will be discussed in the frame of the previous results on that subject. We will also discuss potential feedback mechanisms as suggested earlier by Johnson and Luhmann (J. Geophys. Res., 1998).

  12. Bonding Low-density Nanoporous Metal Foams Using Sputtered Solder

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bono, M; Cervantes, O; Akaba, C; Hamza, A; Foreman, R; Teslich, N

    2007-08-21

    A method has been developed for bonding low-density nanoporous metal foam components to a substrate using solder that is sputtered onto the surfaces. Metal foams have unusual properties that make them excellent choices for many applications, and as technologies for processing these materials are evolving, their use in industry is increasing dramatically. Metal foams are lightweight and have advantageous dynamic properties, which make them excellent choices for many structural applications. They also provide good acoustic damping, low thermal conductivity, and excellent energy absorption characteristics. Therefore, these materials are commonly used in the automotive, aerospace, construction, and biomedical industries. The synthesis of nanoporous metal foams with a cell size of less then 1 {micro}m is an emerging technology that is expected to lead to widespread application of metal foams in microdevices, such as sensors and actuators. One of the challenges to manufacturing components from metal foams is that they can be difficult to attach to other structures without degrading their properties. For example, traditional liquid adhesives cannot be used because they are absorbed into foams. The problem of bonding or joining can be particularly difficult for small-scale devices made from nanoporous foam, due to the requirement for a thin bond layer. The current study addresses this problem and develops a method of soldering a nanoporous metal foam to a substrate with a bond thickness of less than 2 {micro}m. There are many applications that require micro-scale metal foams precisely bonded to substrates. This study was motivated by a physics experiment that used a laser to drive a shock wave through an aluminum foil and into a copper foam, in order to determine the speed of the shock in the copper foam. To avoid disturbing the shock, the interface between the copper foam and the aluminum substrate had to be as thin as possible. There are many other applications that

  13. Measurement of cathode surface temperature using the method of CCD imaging in arc discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    A two-wavelength pyrometry device using ordinary array CCD (charge coupled device) to collect the radiation data in the horizontal and vertical directions has been developed for measuring the cathode surface temperature during the arc discharge. Analyses of experimental results show that the device can make the measurement of the cathode surface temperature feasible. The cathode surface temperatures measured are lower than the melting point of tungsten (3653 K), and the arc current, cathode diameter, and the cathode length are the main influencing factors of the cathode surface temperature.

  14. Durability and performance optimization of cathode materials for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colon-Mercado, Hector Rafael

    The primary objective of this dissertation is to develop an accelerated durability test (ADT) for the evaluation of cathode materials for fuel cells. The work has been divided in two main categories, namely high temperature fuel cells with emphasis on the Molten Carbonate Fuel Cell (MCFC) cathode current collector corrosion problems and low temperature fuel cells in particular Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell (PEMFC) cathode catalyst corrosion. The high operating temperature of MCFC has given it benefits over other fuel cells. These include higher efficiencies (>50%), faster electrode kinetics, etc. At 650°C, the theoretical open circuit voltage is established, providing low electrode overpotentials without requiring any noble metal catalysts and permitting high electrochemical efficiency. The waste heat is generated at sufficiently high temperatures to make it useful as a co-product. However, in order to commercialize the MCFC, a lifetime of 40,000 hours of operation must be achieved. The major limiting factor in the MCFC is the corrosion of cathode materials, which include cathode electrode and cathode current collector. In the first part of this dissertation the corrosion characteristics of bare, heat-treated and cobalt coated titanium alloys were studied using an ADT and compared with that of state of the art current collector material, SS 316. PEMFCs are the best choice for a wide range of portable, stationary and automotive applications because of their high power density and relatively low-temperature operation. However, a major impediment in the commercialization of the fuel cell technology is the cost involved due to the large amount of platinum electrocatalyst used in the cathode catalyst. In an effort to increase the power and decrease the cathode cost in polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEMFC) systems, Pt-alloy catalysts were developed to increase its activity and stability. Extensive research has been conducted in the area of new alloy development and

  15. Electron and ion kinetics in a micro hollow cathode discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, G J; Iza, F; Lee, J K [Electronics and Electrical Engineering Department, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-10-21

    Electron and ion kinetics in a micro hollow cathode discharge are investigated by means of two-dimensional axisymmetric particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision simulations. Argon discharges at 10 and 300 Torr are studied for various driving currents. Electron and ion energy probability functions (IEPF) are shown at various times and locations to study the spatio-temporal behaviour of the discharge. The electron energy probability function (EEPF) evolves from the Druyvesteyn type in the early stages of the discharge into a two (or three) temperature distribution when steady state is reached. In steady state, secondary electrons accelerated across the cathode fall populate the high energy tail of the EEPF while the low energy region is populated by trapped electrons. The IEPF evolves from a Maxwellian in the negative glow (bulk) to a two temperature distribution on the cathode surface. The overpopulation of low energy ions near the cathode surface is attributed to a larger collision cross section for low energy ions and ionization within the cathode fall.

  16. Trajectory control strategy of cathodes in blisk electrochemical machining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Dong; Zhu Di; Xu Zhengyang; Zhou Laishui

    2013-01-01

    A turbine blisk,which combines blades and a disk together,is one of the most important components of an aero engine.In the process of blisk electrochemical machining (ECM),the sheet cathode,which is usually used as a tool electrode,has a complicated structure.In addition to that,the channel between the adjacent blades is narrow and twisted,so interference is apt to happen when the sheet cathode feeds into the channel.Therefore,it is important to choose suitable trajectory control strategy.In this paper,a new trajectory control strategy of the sheet cathode is presented and corresponding simulation analysis is conducted on the basis of an actual blisk model.The simulation results demonstrate that the sheet cathode can feed into the channel by a spatial line trajectory without interference.Moreover,the verification experiments are carried out according to the simulation.The experimental results show that the cathode can move into the channel without interference.It is verified that the new trajectory control strategy is correct and can be used in the blisk ECM process successfully.

  17. Blacking FTO by strongly cathodic polarization with enhanced photocurrent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yun; Lu, Xiaoqing; Huang, Wei, E-mail: hjhw9513@163.com; Li, Zelin, E-mail: lizelin@hunnu.edu.cn

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Transparent FTO became blackish under strongly cathodic polarization. • Part of SnO{sub 2} coating on the FTO can be reduced into Sn nanoparticles. • The black FTO increased solar absorption and enhanced photocurrent responses. • Take care in photoelectrochemistry test while FTO is strongly cathodically polarized. - Abstract: Transparent fluorine-doped tin oxide (TFTO) coating on quartz glass is widely used as substrate in photoelectrochemistry for solar energy transformation, sensing and so on. We observed that the TFTO could become blackish by strongly cathodic polarization. Characterization of the black FTO (BFTO) by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that part of SnO{sub 2} on the TFTO was reduced into metal Sn nanoparticles during the cathodic polarization. The BFTO greatly increased solar absorption and enhanced photocurrent responses in comparison with TFTO. It might be necessary to take caution in photoelectrochemical measurements while the FTO is strongly cathodically polarized.

  18. AlN films deposited by dc magnetron sputtering and high power impulse magnetron sputtering for SAW applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, aluminium nitride (AlN) films were deposited on silicon substrates buffered by an epitaxial AlN thin film for surface acoustic wave (SAW) applications. The films were deposited by dc magnetron sputtering (dcMS) and high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) deposition techniques. The structural properties of AlN films were investigated using x-ray diffraction (XRD), Raman spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy. In both cases of films deposited by dcMS and HiPIMS, the XRD results showed that the obtained films are oriented, with full width at half maximum rocking curves of around 1°. Raman spectroscopy revealed higher residual stress relaxation in the AlN epilayers grown by HiPIMS compared to AlN grown by dcMS, highlighted by a blue shift in the E2(high) Raman mode. The SAW measurements indicated an insertion loss of AlN-SAW devices of about 53 and 35 dB for the AlN films deposited by dcMS and HiPIMS respectively. The relation between the structural properties of AlN and the characteristics of AlN-SAW devices were correlated and discussed. (paper)

  19. Thermionically electron emitting matrix cathodes for magnetohydrodynamic generators: Analytical model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Current and voltage drop calculations have been made for matrix cathodes having a number of sharp pins projecting out from its surface in open-cycle magnetohydrodynamic plasmas. It is assumed that from the cathode surface to the cathode sheath edge, the current flows in current tubes formed around the projected pins. The effect of high electric field on the work function of the tip has been taken into account and calculations are made for a variable number of tips and tip area. Work functions of the tip and the slant surface are taken to be different. The current and voltage characteristics have been obtained by solving the current continuity and Poisson's equations in spherical coordinate geometry. It is observed that the current increases with an increase in the number of pins per unit area and tip area. The theoretical results have been compared with the experimental observations

  20. Wettable Ceramic-Based Drained Cathode Technology for Aluminum Electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.N. Bruggeman; T.R. Alcorn; R. Jeltsch; T. Mroz

    2003-01-09

    The goal of the project was to develop the ceramic based materials, technology, and necessary engineering packages to retrofit existing aluminum reduction cells in order to reduce energy consumption required for making primary aluminum. The ceramic materials would be used in a drained cathode configuration which would provide a stable, molten aluminum wetted cathode surface, allowing the reduction of the anode-cathode distance, thereby reducing the energy consumption. This multi-tasked project was divided into three major tasks: (1) Manufacturing and laboratory scale testing/evaluation of the ceramic materials, (2) Pilot scale testing of qualified compositions from the first task, and (3) Designing, retrofitting, and testing the ceramic materials in industrial cells at Kaiser Mead plant in Spokane, Washington. Specific description of these major tasks can be found in Appendix A - Project Scope. Due to the power situation in the northwest, the Mead facility was closed, thus preventing the industrial cell testing.

  1. Ultra short electron beam bunches from a laser plasma cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, Akira [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan)]. E-mail: maekawa@nuclear.jp; Tsujii, Ryosuke [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Kinoshita, Kennichi [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Atsushi, Yamazaki [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Kobayashi, Kazuyuki [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Uesaka, Mitsuru [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Shibata, Yukio [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Kondo, Yasuhiro [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Ohkubo, Takeru [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan); Hosokai, Tomonao [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Zhidkov, Alexei [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, 2-6-1 Nagasaka, Yokosuka, Kanagawa (Japan); Takahashi, Toshiharu [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Asahiro-nishi2, Kumatori, Sennan, Osaka (Japan)

    2007-08-15

    The fluctuation of the electron bunch duration due to energy spectrum instability in a laser plasma cathode has been examined. Previous experiments clearly proved that a laser plasma cathode can generate ultrashort electron bunches with a bunch duration of 130 fs (FWHM) and a geometrical emittance 0.07{pi} mm mrad. The effect of temporal elongation of electron bunches due to their energy spread is estimated and the results are in good agreement with previous experiments. It is also clarified that the instability of the energy spectrum not only leads to a fluctuation of the bunch shape but also to a time-of-flight jitter, affecting possible future applications of a laser plasma cathode.

  2. Cyclic erosion of a cathode in high-pressure arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nemchinsky, Valerian [ESAB Welding and Cutting Products and Francis Marion University, Florence, SC 29501 (United States)

    2003-07-07

    Erosion that occurred during arc shut down was investigated. The arc current was 200 A; the cathode was made of hafnium. Different gases were used: oxygen, nitrogen, and noble gases (argon, helium, and hydrogen-argon mixture). The gas pressure was 3 atm. It was shown that erosion in noble gases is higher compared to gases that create chemical compounds with hafnium (oxygen and nitrogen). The following model of arc-off erosion is suggested. An amount of plasma gas is diluted in the molten tip of the cathode. When the arc is terminated, the gas pressure in the cathode vicinity drops down. The diluted gas then leaves the molten puddle and carries some liquid material with it.

  3. Microwave generator experiment at LLNL. [Virtual cathode oscillator (VIRCATOR)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hofer, W.W.; Burkhart S.C.; Scarpetti, R.D.

    1983-02-14

    A high power microwave oscillator known as a Virtual Cathode Oscillator (VIRCATOR) is described here. It is basically a space charge limited field emission cathode injecting electrons through a thin foil into a 4.3 cm radius circular waveguide. The total injected current forms a potential which exceeds the electron energy at which point a virtual cathode forms, and the electrons are reflected back across the foil. This occurs cyclically, coupling energy into TM/sub on/ waveguide modes. The frequency and power of the oscillations are very dependent on geometry and driving voltage. The VIRCATOR is presented here in two parts. First, the VIRCATOR theory and experiment setup is discussed, then numerical analysis of various VIRCATOR geometries is shown.

  4. Impedance Modeling of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jakob Egeberg; Søgaard, Martin; Jacobsen, Torben

    2010-01-01

    A 1-dimensional impedance model for a solid oxide fuel cell cathode is formulated and applied to a cathode consisting of 50/50 wt% strontium doped lanthanum cobaltite and gadolinia doped ceria. A total of 42 impedance spectra were recorded in the temperature range: 555-852°C and in the oxygen...... partial pressure range 0.028-1.00 atm. The recorded impedance spectra were successfully analyzed using the developed impedance model in the investigated temperature and oxygen partial pressure range. It is also demonstrated that the model can be used to predict how impedance spectra evolve with different...... physical parameters such as the cathode thickness. ©2010 COPYRIGHT ECS - The Electrochemical Society...

  5. A Transient Model for Fuel Cell Cathode-Water Propagation Behavior inside a Cathode after a Step Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Der-Sheng Chan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Most of the voltage losses of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC are due to the sluggish kinetics of oxygen reduction on the cathode and the low oxygen diffusion rate inside the flooded cathode. To simulate the transient flooding in the cathode of a PEMFC, a transient model was developed. This model includes the material conservation of oxygen, vapor, water inside the gas diffusion layer (GDL and micro-porous layer (MPL, and the electrode kinetics in the cathode catalyst layer (CL. The variation of hydrophobicity of each layer generated a wicking effect that moves water from one layer to the other. Since the GDL, MPL, and CL are made of composite materials with different hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties, a linear function of saturation was used to calculate the wetting contact angle of these composite materials. The balance among capillary force, gas/liquid pressure, and velocity of water in each layer was considered. Therefore, the dynamic behavior of PEMFC, with saturation transportation taken into account, was obtained in this study. A step change of the cell voltage was used to illustrate the transient phenomena of output current, water movement, and diffusion of oxygen and water vapor across the entire cathode.

  6. Comparisons of physical and chemical sputtering in high density divertor plasmas with the Monte Carlo Impurity (MCI) transport model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The MCI transport model was used to compare chemical and physical sputtering for a DIII-D divertor plasma near detachment. With physical sputtering alone the integrated carbon influx was 8.4 x 1019 neutral/s while physical plus chemical sputtering produced an integrated carbon influx of 1.7 x 1021 neutrals/s. The average carbon concentration in the computational volume increased from 0.012% with only physical sputtering to 0.182% with both chemical and physical sputtering. This increase in the carbon inventory produced more radiated power which is in better agreement with experimental measurements

  7. 电泳沉积制备平行栅碳纳米管场发射阴极的研究%Study on field emission cathode based on planar-gate triode with carbon nanotubes by electrophoretic deposition

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张永爱; 林金阳; 吴朝兴; 郑泳; 林志贤; 郭太良

    2011-01-01

    Field emission arrays (FEAs) were fabricated by magnetron sputtering,photolithography,wet etching technique and electrophoretic deposition. The CNTs cathodes were characterized by the optical microscopy,field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) and Raman spectra. And then,its field emission characteristics based on planar-gate triode with CNTs emitters were also investigated. The optical microscopy and field emission scanning electron microscopy (FESEM) image indicates that the cathode electrodes and gate electrodes were interdigitated and paralleled on the same plane and CNTs emitters were selectively defined on the cathode in this triode structure. Its field emission performance shows that the turn-on voltage of planar-gate triod field e-mission cathode with CNTs emitters was about 155 V and the emission current came to 286μA. The field emission properties were completely modulated by gate voltage. In addition,field emission properties of EPD CNTs and scrren printed CNTs cathode were compared. The results indicate that the EPD CNTs cathode has lower turn-on voltage and higer luminescence uniformity than that of the screen printed CNTs cathode.%利用磁控溅射、光刻、湿法刻蚀和电泳技术在玻璃基片上成功制备平行栅场发射阴极阵列,用光学显微镜、场发射扫描电镜和拉曼光谱观察了碳纳米管的形貌和结构,并测试所制备的平行栅碳纳米管阴极的场发射性能.光学显微镜和场发射电子显微镜测试表明,平行栅结构阴极和栅极交替地分布,同一个平面内,CNTs有选择性地沉积在平行栅结构中的阴极表面.场发射测试表明,平行栅CNTs场发射阴极的开启电压为 155V,发射电流高达268μA,场发射特性完全由栅压控制;此外,其场发射特性与丝网印刷工艺制备的阴极有相似甚至更佳的性能,开启电压更低,发光均匀性更好,具有更好的发射特性.

  8. Low-temperature crystallization of TiO2 films by sputter deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taga, Yasunori; Yamada, Naoomi

    2010-04-01

    Crystalline TiO2 film was formed on PET(polyethlene terephthalate) film by radio frequency sputter deposition method using a sintered TiO2 target by adding H2O gas to Ar gas for sputtering. X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the crystal structure of the film of 100 nm thick was confirmed to be anatase crystallites of TiO2. In order to elucidate the mechanism of low temperature crystallization thus observed, direct measurement of surface temperature of growing films during sputter deposition was carried out by two methods of an infrared thermometer from the outside of vacuum chamber and a thermocouple attached to the growing film surface. Upon the beginning of sputter deposition in Ar gas, film temperature increased rapidly and became constant at 120°C after 30 min. Addition of H2O gas to Ar gas for sputtering resulted in further increase in film temperature and reached to 230 °C depending on the deposition conditions. Furthermore, photocatalytic performance of decomposition of methylene blue was examined to be enhanced remarkably as a result of crystallization of the film. It was concluded that low temperature crystallization of TiO2 film by sputter deposition was explained in terms of local heating of thin shallow surface region of growing film by kinetic energy deposition of sputtered particles.

  9. Surface tension enhancement of TRIM sputtering yields for liquid metal targets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A critical part of all models of physical sputtering is the magnitude of the attractive interaction of a surface atom with the bulk, the surface binding energy, which is often equated to the heat of sublimation, independent of temperature and regardless of the state of aggregation of the target. Sputtering occurs when target particles which are accelerated by atomic collisions caused by an incident energetic projectile, reach the surface with enough energy to overcome the surface binding energy. This surface binding energy influences sputtering in two ways: (1) it acts as a barrier which must be overcome by the escaping atoms and so affects the sputtering yield, and (2) its directional properties influence the directions taken by the ejected target atoms. Lower surface binding energies increase the sputtering yield, while higher surface binding energies reduce the sputtering yield. The thermodynamics of liquid surfaces is used to determine the temperature dependence of surface tension and thus the binding energy of atoms in the liquid surface. Liquid lithium and gallium have surface tensions that follow the same universal function of T/Tc observed for most simple atomic liquids. The decrease of surface binding energy with increasing target temperature is calculated, and the TRIM code is then used to determine the resulting increase in sputtering yield with temperature as functions of the incident angle for these targets under bombardment by low energy deuteron projectiles

  10. Optical properties of Ti-doped ZnO films synthesized via magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen Haixia, E-mail: chxia8154@163.com [School of Science, Xi' an Shiyou University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710065 (China); Ding Jijun [Electronic Materials Research Laboratory, Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education, Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710049 (China); Shi Feng [Department of Renewable Energy Engineering, Oregon Institute of Technology, Klamath Falls, OR 97601 (United States); Li Yingfeng [Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Texas A and M University, College Station, TX 77843 (United States); Guo Wenge [School of Science, Xi' an Shiyou University, Xi' an, Shaanxi 710065 (China)

    2012-09-05

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Via magnetron sputtering technique, Ti-doped ZnO films were prepared. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Optical properties in Ti-doped ZnO films were systematically investigated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer A metallic conduction behavior was observed at higher sputtering power. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The shift mechanism of blue emission is discussed in detail. - Abstract: Undoped and Ti-doped ZnO films were deposited using magnetron sputtering at various sputtering power. The crystal structures, surface morphology and optical properties in ZnO films were systematically investigated via X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), Jasco V-570 UV/VIS/NIR and ultraviolet visible (UV-Vis) spectrophotometer. The results indicated that Ti-doped ZnO polycrystalline films with a hexagonal wurzite structure formed. Ti-doped ZnO films show more uniform and denser columnar structures with the increase of sputtering power, and a metallic conduction behavior was observed when sputtering powers is increased to 150 and 200 W. One main blue emission peak located at 445 nm was observed. However, blue emission centered at 445 nm continually blue shifted to 438 nm as sputtering power further increased. The shift mechanism of blue emission at different deposited conditions is discussed in detail.

  11. Changes in X-ray photoelectron spectra of yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal by ion sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Eiko; Yoshinari, Masao [Tokyo Dental College, Oral Health Science Center, Tokyo, Chiyoda-ku (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    This paper reports changes in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra of yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) brought about by Ar ion sputtering. The changes in the core-level spectra of Y-TZP suggest that preferential sputtering of oxygen occurred. A new peak was observed near 0 eV binding energy accompanied with changes in the core-level spectra by the sputtering. After 18 h in a high vacuum following the sputtering, the spectra changed by the sputtering were returned to their original shapes. In contrast, the color of Y-TZP was changed from white to pale brown by X-ray irradiation and was changed from pale brown to dark gray by ion sputtering. However, when the new peak near 0 eV decreased after 18 h, no color change was observed. Therefore, it is thought that the new peak was mainly derived from electrons trapped in various kinds of oxygen vacancies created by the sputtering in other than color centers. (orig.)

  12. Microstructure and strain relaxation in thin nanocrystalline platinum films produced via different sputtering techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruber, Wolfgang; Baehtz, Carsten; Horisberger, Michael; Ratschinski, Ingmar; Schmidt, Harald

    2016-04-01

    In this study we investigated the correlation between microstructure and residual strain relaxation in nanocrystalline Pt films with a thickness of about 20 nm produced by different deposition techniques: magnetron sputtering and ion beam sputtering. X-ray diffractometry was carried out using synchrotron radiation. The out-of-plane interplanar distance was measured during isothermal in situ annealing at temperatures between 130 °C und 210 °C. The thermoelastic expansion coefficient is equal for both types of nanocrystalline Pt films and slightly lower than for coarse grained Pt. The relaxation of residual out-of-plain strain depends on temperature and is significantly stronger in the case of the magnetron sputtered films than for the ion beam sputtered films. Different relaxation of compressive stress is ascribed to the different microstructures which evolve during deposition via the corresponding deposition technique. Thickness fringes around the (1 1 1) Bragg peak deposited via magnetron sputtering reveal that these films are essentially composed of columnar (1 1 1) oriented grains which cover the whole film thickness. In contrast, no thickness fringes are observed around the (1 1 1) Bragg peak of films prepared by ion beam sputtering indicating a significantly different microstructure. This is confirmed by Electron Backscatter Diffraction which reveals a (1 1 1) texture for both types of films. The (1 1 1) texture, however, is significantly stronger in the case of the magnetron sputtered films. Grain growth at low homologous temperatures is considered to be an important contribution to relaxation of residual stress.

  13. Enhancement of the crystalline Ge film growth by inductively coupled plasma-assisted pulsed DC sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunkyeom; Han, Seung-Hee

    2014-11-01

    The effect of pulsed DC sputtering on the crystalline growth of Ge thin film was investigated. Ge thin films were deposited on the glass substrates using ICP-assisted pulsed DC sputtering. The Ge target was sputtered using asymmetric bipolar pulsed DC sputtering system with and without assistance of ICP source. The pulse frequency of 200 Hz and the pulse on time of 500 μsec (duty cycle = 10%) were kept during sputtering process. Crystal structures were studied from X-ray diffraction. The X-ray diffraction patterns clearly showed crystalline film structures. The Ge thin films with randomly oriented crystalline were obtained using pulsed DC sputtering without ICP, whereas they had well aligned (220) orientation crystalline using ICP source. Moreover, the combination of ICP assistance and pulsed DC sputtering enhanced the growth of crystalline Ge thin films without hydrogen and metal by in situ deposition. The structure and lattice of the films were studied from TEM images. The cross-sectional TEM images revealed the deposited Ge films with columnar structure.

  14. The mechanism of controlling liquid crystal surface pretilt angle on plasma beam sputtered films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Ru-Pin; Huang, Meng-Chiou; Wu, Wei-Ta; Lai, Cheng-Wei; Wu, Hsin-Ying

    2012-02-01

    In liquid crystal (LC) devices, the surface alignment is essential. The polyimide (PI) film is commonly used to make LC molecules parallel to the surface. A rubbing process is usually applied to choose a particular direction on the surface. A pretilt angle is also induced, which is useful but usually very small. In previous works, we have found out that the sputtered ion-oxide films can give a homeotropic alignment to LC, i,e, the LC molecules are perpendicular to the surface. In this work, we combine these two effects by sputtering the ion-oxide particles onto the PI coated glasses. By adjusting the sputtering conditions, the LC alignment are controlled. A wide range of pretilt angles have been achieved, while the rubbing process is no longer required. A thorough study by varying the sputtering conditions, such as voltage, current, and time duration, and observing the pretilt angles is carried out. The sputtered surfaces are examined with scanning electron microscope to see the coverage. By considering the charge distribution and electric field within the sputter, a quantitative model is then developed, which explains how the sputtering conditions affect the pretilt angles almost perfectly.

  15. Contribution to the study of sputtering and damage of uranium dioxide by fast heavy ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swift heavy ion-solid interaction leads in volume to track creation and on the surface to the ejection of particles into the vacuum. To learn more about initial mechanisms of track formation, we are focused on the sputtering of uranium dioxide by fast heavy ions. This present study is exclusively devoted to the influence of the electronic stopping power on the emission of neutral particles and especially on their angular distribution. These measurements are completed by those of the ions emitted from UO2 targets bombarded with swift heavy ions. The whole experimental results give access to: i) the nature of the sputtered particles; ii) the charge state of the emitted particles; iii) the direction of ejection of the sputtered particles ; iv) the sputtering yields deduced from the angular distributions. These results are compared to the prediction of the sputtering models proposed in the literature and it seems that the supersonic gas flow model is well suited to describe our results. Finally, the sputtering yields are compared with a set of earlier experimental data on uranium dioxide damage obtained by T. Wiss and we observe that only a small fraction of UO2 monolayers are sputtered. (author)

  16. PVC DISULFIDE AS CATHODE MATERIALS FOR SECONDARY LITHIUM BATTERIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-xiang Xu; Lu Qi; Bi-tao Yu; Lei Wen

    2006-01-01

    PVC disulfide (2SPVC) was synthesized by solution crosslink and its molecular structure was confirmed by the particle size of d0.5 = 11.3 μm. With SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope) experiment the surface morphology and obvious S-S redox reaction in charge-discharge process. When 2SPVC was used as cathode material for secondary lithium mixture of o-xylene (oxy), diglyme (DG) and dimethoxymethane (DME) at 30℃, the first discharge capacity of 2SPVC is very promising cathode candidate for rechargeable lithium batteries.

  17. An RF excited plasma cathode electron beam gun design

    OpenAIRE

    Del Pozo, S.; Ribton, C; Smith, DR

    2014-01-01

    A plasma cathode electron beam (EB) gun is presented in this work. A radio frequency (RF) excited plasma at 84 MHz was used as the electron source to produce a beam power of up to 3.2 kW at -60 kV accelerating voltage. The pressure in the plasma chamber is approximately 1 mbar. The electrons are extracted from the plasma chamber to the vacuum chamber (at 10-5 mbar) through a diaphragm with a 0.5 mm diameter nozzle. Advantages over thermionic cathode guns were demonstrated empirically. Mainten...

  18. Improved Cathode Structure for a Direct Methanol Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valdez, Thomas; Narayanan, Sekharipuram

    2005-01-01

    An improved cathode structure on a membrane/electrode assembly has been developed for a direct methanol fuel cell, in a continuing effort to realize practical power systems containing such fuel cells. This cathode structure is intended particularly to afford better cell performance at a low airflow rate. A membrane/electrode assembly of the type for which the improved cathode structure was developed (see Figure 1) is fabricated in a process that includes brush painting and spray coating of catalyst layers onto a polymer-electrolyte membrane and onto gas-diffusion backings that also act as current collectors. The aforementioned layers are then dried and hot-pressed together. When completed, the membrane/electrode assembly contains (1) an anode containing a fine metal black of Pt/Ru alloy, (2) a membrane made of Nafion 117 or equivalent (a perfluorosulfonic acid-based hydrophilic, proton-conducting ion-exchange polymer), (3) a cathode structure (in the present case, the improved cathode structure described below), and (4) the electrically conductive gas-diffusion backing layers, which are made of Toray 060(TradeMark)(or equivalent) carbon paper containing between 5 and 6 weight percent of poly(tetrafluoroethylene). The need for an improved cathode structure arises for the following reasons: In the design and operation of a fuel-cell power system, the airflow rate is a critical parameter that determines the overall efficiency, cell voltage, and power density. It is desirable to operate at a low airflow rate in order to obtain thermal and water balance and to minimize the size and mass of the system. The performances of membrane/electrode assemblies of prior design are limited at low airflow rates. Methanol crossover increases the required airflow rate. Hence, one way to reduce the required airflow rate is to reduce the effect of methanol crossover. Improvement of the cathode structure - in particular, addition of hydrophobic particles to the cathode - has been

  19. NEW CATHODE MATERIALS FOR INERT AND OXIDIZING ATMOSPHERE PLASMA APPLICATION

    OpenAIRE

    Sadek, A; Kusumoto, K.; Ushio, M; Matsuda, F.

    1990-01-01

    This study has been carried out to develop new cathode materials for two types of thermionic cathode. First is concerning to the tungsten electrodes for the plasma furnace and welding torches. The second one is the electrodes for air plasma cutting torch. Tungsten electrodes activated with a single and combined additives of rare earth metal oxides, such as La2O3, Y2O3 and CeO2, are produced and pared with pure and thoriated tungsten electrode conventionally used, from the point of view of ele...

  20. High Pressure Micro-Slot Hollow Cathode Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xinbing; Zhou Lina; Yao Xilin

    2005-01-01

    A direct current glow discharge source structure operating at high pressure based on the micro-slot hollow cathode is presented in this article. A 100 μm width slot cathode was fabricated of copper, and a stable DC glow discharge with an area of 0.5 mm2 was produced in noble gases (He, Ne) and air over a wide pressure range (kPa ~ 10 kPa). The current-voltage characteristics and the near UV radiation emission of the discharge were studied.

  1. Web-Based Cathode Strip Chamber Data Display

    CERN Multimedia

    Firmansyah, M

    2013-01-01

    Cathode Strip Chamber (CSC) is a detector that uses gas and high electric field to detect particles. When a particle goes through CSC, it will ionize gas particles and generate electric signal in the anode and cathode of the detector. Analysis of the electric signal data can help physicists to reconstruct path of the particles and determine what happen inside the detector. Using data display, analysis of CSC data becomes easier. One can determine which data is interesting, unusual, or maybe only contain noise.\

  2. Dynamic Aspects of Solid Solution Cathodes for Electrochemical Power Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atlung, Sven; West, Keld; Jacobsen, Torben

    1979-01-01

    , in particularfor vehicle propulsion, and electrochemical and constructional factors. It isargued that the energy obtainable at a given load is limited by saturation ofthe surface layers of cathode particles with cations, and that the time beforesaturation occurs is determined by diffusion of cations and electrons......–10 cm2 sec–1. On the basis of an approximaterelation between cathode thickness and electrode spacing the specificenergy for the Li/TiS2 system with organic electrolyte is estimated to be 120–150W-hr/kg in agreement with published values. ©1979 The Electrochemical Society, Inc....

  3. Modulation transfer spectroscopy of ytterbium atoms in hollow cathode lamp

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present the experimental study of modulation transfer spectroscopy of ytterbium atoms in a hollow cathode lamp. The dependences of its linewidth, slope and magnitude on the various experimental parameters are measured and fitted by the well-known theoretical expressions. The experimental results are in good agreement with the theoretical prediction. We have observed the Dicke narrowing effect by increasing the current of the hollow cathode lamp. It is also found that there are the optimal current and laser power to generate the better modulation transfer spectroscopy signal, which can be employed for locking the laser frequency to the atomic transition. (authors)

  4. Virtual cathode oscillator with E-beam modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A new type virtual cathode oscillator (VCO) with preliminary e-beam modulation was studied by numerical simulation and experimentally tested. It was shown that the variation of the beam modulation signal leaded to the change of character of vircator. In the vircator scheme, the microwave generated by virtual cathode oscillation was partially fed back to the beam acceleration region to modulate the injected e-beam and so as to improve the performance of the vircator. Changing the length of feedback waveguide resulted in a 8dB variation of the radiated microwave power

  5. QE data for Pb/Nb deposited photo cathode samples

    CERN Document Server

    Sekutowicz, J

    2010-01-01

    This report outlines progress in the development of photo-cathodes for a hybrid lead/niobium (Pb/Nb) superconducting SRF electron injector. We have coated eight Nb samples with lead to study and determine deposition conditions leading to high quality emitting area. The results show that the oxide layer significantly influences the quantum efficiency (QE) of all measured cathodes. In addition, we learned that although the laser cleaning enhanced the QE substantially, the film morphology was strongly modified. That observation convinced us to make the coatings thicker and therefore more robust.

  6. Power generation using an activated carbon and metal mesh cathode in a microbial fuel cell

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Fang

    2009-11-01

    An inexpensive activated carbon (AC) air cathode was developed as an alternative to a platinum-catalyzed electrode for oxygen reduction in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). AC was cold-pressed with a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) binder to form the cathode around a Ni mesh current collector. This cathode construction avoided the need for carbon cloth or a metal catalyst, and produced a cathode with high activity for oxygen reduction at typical MFC current densities. Tests with the AC cathode produced a maximum power density of 1220 mW/m2 (normalized to cathode projected surface area; 36 W/m3 based on liquid volume) compared to 1060 mW/m2 obtained by Pt catalyzed carbon cloth cathode. The Coulombic efficiency ranged from 15% to 55%. These findings show that AC is a cost-effective material for achieving useful rates of oxygen reduction in air cathode MFCs. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Compact High Current Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode for Hall Effect Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Richard R. (Inventor); Goebel, Dan M. (Inventor); Watkins, Ronnie M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An apparatus and method for achieving an efficient central cathode in a Hall effect thruster is disclosed. A hollow insert disposed inside the end of a hollow conductive cathode comprises a rare-earth element and energized to emit electrons from an inner surface. The cathode employs an end opening having an area at least as large as the internal cross sectional area of the rare earth insert to enhance throughput from the cathode end. In addition, the cathode employs a high aspect ratio geometry based on the cathode length to width which mitigates heat transfer from the end. A gas flow through the cathode and insert may be impinged by the emitted electrons to yield a plasma. One or more optional auxiliary gas feeds may also be employed between the cathode and keeper wall and external to the keeper near the outlet.

  8. Methods and apparatus for using gas and liquid phase cathodic depolarizers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Oliver J. (Inventor); Hitchens, G. Duncan (Inventor)

    1998-01-01

    The invention provides methods for using gas and liquid phase cathodic depolarizers in an electrochemical cell having a cation exchange membrane in intimate contact with the anode and cathode. The electrochemical conversion of cathodic depolarizers at the cathode lowers the cell potential necessary to achieve a desired electrochemical conversion, such as ozone evolution, at the anode. When gaseous cathodic depolarizers, such as oxygen, are used, a gas diffusion cathode having the cation exchange membrane bonded thereto is preferred. When liquid phase cathodic depolarizers are used, the cathode may be a flow-by electrode, flow-through electrode, packed-bed electrode or a fluidized-bed electrode in intimate contact with the cation exchange membrane.

  9. Study on the vibrational scraping of uranium product from a solid cathode of electrorefiner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sung Bin; Kang, Young Ho; Hwang, Sung Chan; Lee, Han Soo; Paek, Seung Woo; Ahn, Do Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    A high-throughput electrorefiner has been developed for commercialization use by enhancing the uranium recovery from the reduced metal which is produced from the oxide reduction process. It is necessary to scrap and effectively collect uranium dendrites from the surface of the solid cathode for high yield. When a steel electrode is used as the cathode in the electrorefining process, uranium is deposited and regularly stuck to the steel cathode during electrorefining. The sticking coefficient of a steel cathode is very high. In order to decrease the sticking coefficient of the steel cathode effectively, vibration mode was applied to the electrode in this study. Uranium dendrites were scraped and fell apart from the steel cathode by a vibration force. The vibrational scraping of the steel cathode was compared to the self-scraping of the graphite cathode. Effects of the applied current density and the vibration stroke on the scraping of the uranium dendrites were also investigated.

  10. Nano-Particle Scandate Cathode for Space Communications Phase 2 Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose an improved cathode based on our novel theory of the role of scandium oxide in enhancing emission in tungsten-impregnated cathodes. Recent results have...

  11. Hydroxyapatite formation on biomedical Ti–Ta–Zr alloys by magnetron sputtering and electrochemical deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun-Ju [Department of Dental Materials, Research Center of Nano-Interface Activation for Biomaterials, and Research Center for Oral Disease Regulation of the Aged, School of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Yong-Hoon [Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Laboratory, Division of Orthodontics, College of Dentistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Choe, Han-Cheol, E-mail: hcchoe@chosun.ac.kr [Department of Dental Materials, Research Center of Nano-Interface Activation for Biomaterials, and Research Center for Oral Disease Regulation of the Aged, School of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Brantley, William A. [Division of Prosthodontics and Restorative Science, College of Dentistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate hydroxyapatite formation on Ti-25Ta-xZr titanium alloys resulting from radio-frequency magnetron sputtering and electrochemical deposition. Electrochemical deposition of hydroxyapatite (HA) was first carried out using a cyclic voltammetry (CV) method at 80 °C in 5 mM Ca (NO{sub 3}){sub 2} + 3 mM NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}. Then a physical vapor deposition (PVD) coating was obtained by a radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering technique. The microstructures, phase transformations, and morphologies of the hydroxyapatite films deposited on the titanium alloys were analyzed by optical microscopy (OM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The morphologies of electrochemically deposited HA showed plate-like shapes on the titanium alloys, and the morphologies of the RF-sputtered HA coating had the appearance droplet particles on the plate-like precipitates that had formed by electrochemical deposition. For the RF-sputtered HA coatings, the Ca/P ratio was increased, compared to that for the electrochemically deposited HA surface. Moreover, the RF-sputtered HA coating, consisting of agglomerated droplet particles on the electrochemically deposited HA surface, had better wettability compared to the bulk titanium alloy surface. - Highlights: • Hydroxyapatite (HA) was deposited on Ti–Ta–Zr alloys by radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering and a cyclic voltammetry. • The morphologies of the RF-sputtered HA coating on electrochemical deposits presented plate-like shapes with a droplet particle. • The Ca/P ratio for RF-sputtered HA coatings was greater than that for electrochemical deposited HA coatings. • The RF-sputtered and electrochemical HA coatings had superior wettability compared to the electrochemically deposited coatings.

  12. View factor modeling of sputter-deposition on micron-scale-architectured surfaces exposed to plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huerta, C. E.; Matlock, T. S.; Wirz, R. E.

    2016-03-01

    The sputter-deposition on surfaces exposed to plasma plays an important role in the erosion behavior and overall performance of a wide range of plasma devices. Plasma models in the low density, low energy plasma regime typically neglect micron-scale surface feature effects on the net sputter yield and erosion rate. The model discussed in this paper captures such surface architecture effects via a computationally efficient view factor model. The model compares well with experimental measurements of argon ion sputter yield from a nickel surface with a triangle wave geometry with peak heights in the hundreds of microns range. Further analysis with the model shows that increasing the surface pitch angle beyond about 45° can lead to significant decreases in the normalized net sputter yield for all simulated ion incident energies (i.e., 75, 100, 200, and 400 eV) for both smooth and roughened surfaces. At higher incident energies, smooth triangular surfaces exhibit a nonmonotonic trend in the normalized net sputter yield with surface pitch angle with a maximum yield above unity over a range of intermediate angles. The resulting increased erosion rate occurs because increased sputter yield due to the local ion incidence angle outweighs increased deposition due to the sputterant angular distribution. The model also compares well with experimentally observed radial expansion of protuberances (measuring tens of microns) in a nano-rod field exposed to an argon beam. The model captures the coalescence of sputterants at the protuberance sites and accurately illustrates the structure's expansion due to deposition from surrounding sputtering surfaces; these capabilities will be used for future studies into more complex surface architectures.

  13. Structure of DC sputtered Si-C-N thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radnoczi, G.; Safran, G.; Czigany, Zs.; Berlind, T.; Hultman, L

    2003-09-01

    Si-C-N films of maximum 65 at.% of Si and maximum 40 at.% of N were prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering and their fine structure was investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. For compositions, where C-C and C-N bonds prevail, the films had anisotropic structure on the atomic scale, composed of curved graphitic layers, aligned parallel to the substrate normal. An isotropic structure was detected in the middle of the compositional triangle. On a larger scale, a columnar morphology, aligned in the direction of the deposition flux was formed in films containing more than 15 at.% of Si. Singular or simultaneous appearance of the above structures depended on film composition.

  14. Effect of Oxygen Chemistry in Sputtering of Polymers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanski, Michal; Garrison, Barbara J; Postawa, Zbigniew

    2016-04-21

    Molecular dynamics computer simulations are used to model kiloelectronvolt cluster bombardment of pure hydrocarbon [polyethylene (PE) and polystyrene (PS)] and oxygen-containing [paraformaldehyde (PFA) and polylactic acid (PLA)] polymers by 20 keV C60 projectiles at a 45° impact angle to investigate the chemical effect of oxygen in the substrate material on the sputtering process. The simulations demonstrate that the presence of oxygen enhances the formation of small molecules such as carbon monoxide, carbon dioxide, water, and various molecules containing C═O double bonds. The explanation for the enhanced small molecule formation is the stability of carbon and oxygen multiple bonds relative to multiple bonds with only carbon atoms. This chemistry is reflected in the fraction of the ejected material that has a mass not higher than 104 amu. For PFA and PLA, the fraction is approximately 90% of the total mass, whereas for PE and PS, it is less than half.

  15. Method and apparatus for sputtering with a plasma lens

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2016-09-27

    A plasma lens for enhancing the quality and rate of sputter deposition onto a substrate is described herein. The plasma lens serves to focus positively charged ions onto the substrate while deflecting negatively charged ions, while at the same time due to the line of sight positioning of the lens, allowing for free passage of neutrals from the target to the substrate. The lens itself is formed of a wound coil of multiple turns, inside of which are deposed spaced lens electrodes which are electrically paired to impress an E field overtop the B field generated by the coil, the potential applied to the electrodes increasing from end to end towards the center of the lens, where the applied voltage is set to a high potential at the center electrodes as to produce a potential minimum on the axis of the lens.

  16. Microstructure of microwave dielectricthin films by RF magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The article describes the microstructure and morphological properties of microwave dielectric ceramic thin films. These thin films were successfully prepared on SiO2 (1 1 0) single-crystal substrates by radio frequency magnetron-sputtering system. The microstructure and morphology of the thin films were characterized by X-ray diffraction, scanning electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. The results show that the main phase is Ba0.5Sr0.5Nb2O6,which has a tetragonal perovskite structure, a long strip pattern, and uniform crystal-grain size of about 2-3 μm in length when annealed under 1150 deg. C for 30 min in an O2 atmosphere. These thin films are of excellent crystallization quality, with a polycrystalline and dense structure.

  17. GaN nanowires sputtered with Ag shell layers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyoun Woo, E-mail: hwkim@inha.ac.k [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Inha University, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of); Kebede, Mesfin Abayneh; Kim, Hyo Sung; Lee, Chongmu [Division of Materials Science and Engineering, Inha University, Incheon 402-751 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-05-29

    We have demonstrated the fabrication of GaN-core/Ag shell nanowires and investigated their annealing effects. Scanning electron microscopy has revealed that the thermal annealing facilitated the surface-roughening of the heteronanowires. TEM investigations indicated that the thermal annealing has changed the shell morphology from continuous Ag layer to the discrete Au nanoparticles or islands. X-ray diffraction suggested that the thermal annealing has enhanced the crystallinity of Ag shell. Photoluminescence measurements revealed that the Ag-sputtering has induced an UV peak, in addition to the GaN-associated emission peaks. Thermal annealing has further changing the overall shape of the PL spectrum and we have discussed the possible emission mechanisms.

  18. Production of nickel oxide thin films by magnetron sputtering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Discrepancies between short-circuit diffusion data derived from nickel oxide bicrystals and specimens produced by the oxidation of nickel has led to a requirement for thin film nickel oxide specimens of controlled microstructure and impurity level that can be produced independently of the oxidation process. RF magnetron sputtering of nickel oxide has been used to produce thin films intended for this application. The as-deposited films contain excess oxygen compared to stoichiometric nickel oxide and exhibit strong preferred orientation. Annealing in argon leads to oxygen deficient films. The reduction in porosity which accompanies the annealing leads to the formation of through-thickness cracks in the films. Subsequent oxygen tracer studies demonstrate that the cracks give rise to excessive oxygen transport through the films compared to that expected for thermally oxidised scales. The microstructural anomalies produced by the annealing process mean that the required microstructures were not achieved and these films are not useful analogues of thermal nickel oxide scales. (author)

  19. Bismuth coatings deposited by the pulsed dc sputtering technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ortiz, M. F.; Olaya, J. J.; Alfonso, J. E., E-mail: jealfonsoo@unal.edu.co [Universidad Nacional de Colombia, Departamento de Fisica, Grupo de Ciencia de Materiales y Superficies, Carrera 45 No. 26-85, Edif. Uriel Gutierrez, Bogota D. C. (Colombia)

    2013-08-01

    In this work we present the results obtained from the deposition of nano-structured bismuth coatings through Dc pulsed unbalanced magnetron sputtering. The coatings were grown on two substrates: silicon and AISI steel 316 L. The microstructure of the Bi coatings grown on silicon and the corrosion resistance of the Bi coatings grown on AISI steel were evaluated. The microstructure was evaluated by X-ray diffraction and the corrosion resistance was characterized by means of polarization potentiodynamic and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Finally the morphology of the coatings was evaluated through scanning electronic microscopy. The X-ray diffraction analysis indicates that the coatings are polycrystalline; the corrosion resistance tests indicate that the films with better corrosion resistance were deposited at 40 khz. Scanning electron microscopy micrographs show that the coatings are grown as granular form. (Author)

  20. Nylon-sputtered nanoparticles: fabrication and basic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polonskyi, O.; Kylián, O.; Solař, P.; Artemenko, A.; Kousal, J.; Slavínská, D.; Choukourov, A.; Biederman, H.

    2012-12-01

    Nylon-sputtered nanoparticles were prepared using a simple gas aggregation cluster source based on a planar magnetron (Haberland type) and equipped with a nylon target. Plasma polymer particles originated in an aggregation chamber and travelled to a main (deposition) chamber with a gas flow through an orifice. The deposited nanoparticles were observed to have a cauliflower-like structure. The nanoparticles were found to be nitrogen-rich with N/C ratio close to 0.5. An increase in rf power from 60 to 100 W resulted in a decrease in mean particle size from 210 to 168 nm whereas an increase in their residence time in the cluster source from 0.7 to 4.6 s resulted in an increase in the size from 73 to 231 nm.