WorldWideScience

Sample records for cathode sputtering

  1. Reduction in plasma potential by applying negative DC cathode bias in RF magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isomura, Masao; Yamada, Toshinori; Osuga, Kosuke; Shindo, Haruo

    2016-11-01

    We applied a negative DC bias voltage to the cathode of an RF magnetron sputtering system and successfully reduced the plasma potential in both argon plasma and hydrogen-diluted argon plasma. The crystallinity of the deposited Ge films is improved by increasing the negative DC bias voltage. It is indicated that the reduction in plasma potential is effective for reducing the plasma damage on deposited materials, caused by the electric potential between the plasma and substrates. In addition, the deposition rate is increased by the increased electric potential between the plasma and the cathode owing to the negative DC bias voltage. The present method successfully gives us higher speed and lower damage sputtering deposition. The increased electric potential between the plasma and the cathode suppresses the evacuation of electrons from the plasma and also enhances the generation of secondary electrons on the cathode. These probably suppress the electron loss from the plasma and result in the reduction in plasma potential.

  2. Magnetron sputtered zinc oxide nanorods as thickness-insensitive cathode interlayer for perovskite planar-heterojunction solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Lusheng; Huang, Zhifeng; Cai, Longhua; Chen, Weizhong; Wang, Baozeng; Chen, Kaiwu; Bai, Hua; Tian, Qingyong; Fan, Bin

    2014-12-10

    Suitable electrode interfacial layers are essential to the high performance of perovskite planar heterojunction solar cells. In this letter, we report magnetron sputtered zinc oxide (ZnO) film as the cathode interlayer for methylammonium lead iodide (CH3NH3PbI3) perovskite solar cell. Scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis demonstrate that the sputtered ZnO films consist of c-axis aligned nanorods. The solar cells based on this ZnO cathode interlayer showed high short circuit current and power conversion efficiency. Besides, the performance of the device is insensitive to the thickness of ZnO cathode interlayer. Considering the high reliability and maturity of sputtering technique both in lab and industry, we believe that the sputtered ZnO films are promising cathode interlayers for perovskite solar cells, especially in large-scale production.

  3. Suppression of Cross Contamination in Multi-Layer Thin Film Prepared by Using Rotating Hexagonal Sputtering Cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Se Yeon; Choi, Bum Ho; Lee, Jong Ho

    2015-01-01

    In this study, single- and multi-layered thin films were prepared on a glass substrate using a newly developed rotating hexagonal sputtering cathode in a single chamber. The rotatinghexagonal sputtering cathode can install up to six different sputtering targets or six single targets in a cathode. Using the rotating hexagonal cathode, we prepared a single-layered AZO film and a multi-layer film to evaluate the performance of hexagonal gun. Cross-contamination, which is often observed in multi-layer thin film preparation, was suppressed to nearly zero by controlling process parameters and revising hardware. Energy-saving effects of five-layered glass were also verified by measuring the temperature.

  4. Structure and optical properties of CdS:O films by cathode sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nakajima, Masahiro; Asaba, Ryo; Suzuki, Akinori; Wakita, Kazuki [Department of Electrical, Electronics and Computer Engineering, Chiba Institute of Technology, 2-17-1, Tsudanuma, Narashino, Chiba 275-0016 (Japan); Shim, Yong-Gu [Department of Physics and Electronics, Osaka Prefecture University, 1-1 Gakuen-cho, Nakaku, Sakai, Osaka 599-8531 (Japan); Khalilova, Kh.; Mamedov, Nazim; Bayramov, Ayaz; Huseynov, Emil [Institute of Physics, Azerbaijan National Academy of Science, H. Javid ave. 33, Baku 1143 (Azerbaijan)

    2015-06-15

    We have studied the structure and optical properties of CdS:O films deposited on SLG (soda lime glass) substrates by cathode sputtering in the atmosphere of oxygen/argon gases. According to X-ray diffraction (XRD) and confocal Raman scattering data, the films annealed in vacuum at temperatures above 300 C exhibited crystalline structure of CdS. On the other hand, XRD, confocal Raman scattering, AFM (atomic force microscopy) and TEM (transmission electron microscopy) data indicated amorphous structure nano-crystallization in CdS:O films annealed in vacuum at 400 C. For the films, the emissions located at 3.35 eV were evident from photoluminescence measurements. The origin of this energy gap is discussed by taking into account redistribution of electronic density of states in the amorphous phase and quantum-size effect. (copyright 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  5. Synthesis and characterization of zirconium nitride coatings by cathodic arc sputtering technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sarwar, M.N.; Awan, M.S.; Akbar, S. [ISIT, Islamabad (Pakistan)

    2014-11-15

    Polycrystalline zirconium nitride films (560 nm) were deposited on stainless steel (SS-316) substrates using the multi-target cathodic arc sputtering technique. Deposition was carried out under N{sub 2} reactive atmosphere (4 x 10{sup -3} mbar) at two different temperatures, 150 and 200 C. X-ray diffraction studies show that reflections from planes changed from (111) to (200) for deposition temperatures of 150 C and 200 C, respectively. Films deposited at 150 C and 200 C bear a critical load of 6.4 N and 6.8 N respectively, showing better adherence at higher temperature. This may be the result of film-substrate diffusion at the interface.

  6. ZrN coatings deposited by high power impulse magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Purandare, Yashodhan, E-mail: Y.Purandare@shu.ac.uk; Ehiasarian, Arutiun; Hovsepian, Papken [Nanotechnology Centre for PVD Research, Materials and Engineering Research Institute, Sheffield Hallam University, Sheffield S1 1WB (United Kingdom); Santana, Antonio [Ionbond AG Olten, Industriestrasse 211, CH-4600 Olten (Switzerland)

    2014-05-15

    Zirconium nitride (ZrN) coatings were deposited on 1 μm finish high speed steel and 316L stainless steel test coupons. Cathodic Arc (CA) and High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HIPIMS) + Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering (UBM) techniques were utilized to deposit coatings. CA plasmas are known to be rich in metal and gas ions of the depositing species as well as macroparticles (droplets) emitted from the arc sports. Combining HIPIMS technique with UBM in the same deposition process facilitated increased ion bombardment on the depositing species during coating growth maintaining high deposition rate. Prior to coating deposition, substrates were pretreated with Zr{sup +} rich plasma, for both arc deposited and HIPIMS deposited coatings, which led to a very high scratch adhesion value (L{sub C2}) of 100 N. Characterization results revealed the overall thickness of the coatings in the range of 2.5 μm with hardness in the range of 30–40 GPa depending on the deposition technique. Cross-sectional transmission electron microscopy and tribological experiments such as dry sliding wear tests and corrosion studies have been utilized to study the effects of ion bombardment on the structure and properties of these coatings. In all the cases, HIPIMS assisted UBM deposited coating fared equal or better than the arc deposited coatings, the reasons being discussed in this paper. Thus H+U coatings provide a good alternative to arc deposited where smooth, dense coatings are required and macrodroplets cannot be tolerated.

  7. Growth of microscopic cones on titanium cathodes of sputter-ion pumps driven by sorption of large argon quantities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porcelli, Tommaso, E-mail: tommaso-porcelli@saes-group.com [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria, 16, 20133 Milano, Italy and SAES Getters S.p.A., viale Italia, 77, 20020 Lainate, Milan (Italy); Siviero, Fabrizio; Bongiorno, Gero A. [SAES Getters S.p.A., viale Italia, 77, 20020 Lainate, Milan (Italy); Michelato, Paolo [INFN-LASA, via fratelli Cervi, 201, 20090 Segrate, Milan (Italy); Pagani, Carlo [Dipartimento di Fisica, Università degli Studi di Milano, via Celoria, 16, 20133 Milano, Italy and INFN-LASA, via fratelli Cervi, 201, 20090 Segrate, Milan (Italy)

    2015-09-15

    Microscopic cones have been observed on titanium cathodes of sputter-ion pumps (SIPs) after pump operation. The cones were studied by means of scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersive x-ray analysis. Size and morphology of these cones are clearly correlated with the nature and the relative amount of each gas species pumped by each SIP during its working life. In particular, their growth was found to be fed by sputtering mechanisms, mostly during Ar pumping, and to be driven by the electromagnetic field applied to the Penning cells of each SIP. Experimental findings suggest that the formation and extent of such conic structures on cathode surfaces might play a leading role in the onset of phenomena typically related to the functioning of SIPs, e.g., the so-called argon instability.

  8. Effect of the thickness of sputtered gadolinia-doped ceria as a cathodic interlayer in solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Taehyun; Lee, Yoon Ho; Cho, Gu Young [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Gwanak-ro 1, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Ji, Sanghoon [Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, 864-1 Iui-dong, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Joonho [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Gwanak-ro 1, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Ikwhang [Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, 864-1 Iui-dong, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Suk Won, E-mail: swcha@snu.ac.kr [School of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Seoul National University, Gwanak-ro 1, Gwanak-gu, Seoul 151-744 (Korea, Republic of); Graduate School of Convergence Science and Technology, Seoul National University, 864-1 Iui-dong, Yeongtong-gu, Suwon 443-270 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-01

    Sputtered gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) film was introduced as the cathodic interlayer between an yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) pellet and a Pt cathode in solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The fuel cells with none, 50, 100 and 150 nm thick GDC interlayers were fabricated to investigate the effect of the thickness of the GDC interlayer. The performances of the SOFCs with the 100 and 150 nm thick GDC interlayers operated at 450 °C showed the highest performance. Through electrochemical impedance analysis, it was visualized that the GDC interlayer significantly reduced the faradaic resistance of the SOFC. The degradation of the performance from the increased ohmic resistance by adding the GDC interlayer was negligible. From the topographical images scanned by atomic force microscope, it was observed that the 50 nm thick GDC interlayer did not perfectly cover the surface of the YSZ pellet, resulting in incomplete performance enhancement by the sputtered GDC. - Highlights: • Gadolinia-doped ceria was used as a cathodic interlayer in solid oxide fuel cells. • Sputter was used to deposit gadolinia-doped ceria. • Gadolinia-doped ceria interlayer improved the electrochemical performance. • 100 nm or thicker gadolinia-doped ceria showed a full functionality as interlayer.

  9. Electrical Properties of (Pb, La)TiO3 Thin Films Fabricated by Multiple Cathode Sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maiwa, Hiroshi; Ichinose, Noboru; Okazaki, Kiyoshi

    1994-11-01

    (Pb, La)TiO3 (PLT, La/Ti=0.17) thin films were prepared by multiple cathode rf-magnetron sputtering. The electrical properties of these films were investigated. The PLT thin films deposited on Pt/MgO substrates exhibited higher crystallinity and better ferroelectric properties, compared to the films deposited on Pt/SiO2/Si substrates. The hysteresis loops of the PLT films on RuO2/Ru/SiO2/Si or RuO2/Ru/MgO were narrow compared to that of film deposited on platinum electrodes. The dielectric constant of PLT films deposited at 540° C decreased with decreasing film thickness. Existence of a Pb-deficient layer near the film/substrate interface was observed by X-ray photoemission spectroscopy (XPS) analysis. By lowering the substrate temperature to 515° C, Pb re-evaporation from the substrate decreased, and ferroelectric properties were improved. By controlling the Pb/Ti incident ratio, thin films with different Pb contents of the interface layer were formed. With an increase in the Pb content near the film/substrate interface, the fatigue resistance increased.

  10. Estimation of the Efficiency of Material Injection into the Reflex Discharge by Sputtering the Cathode Material

    CERN Document Server

    Kovtun, Yu V; Skibenko, A I; Yuferov, V B

    2012-01-01

    The processes of injection of a sputtered-and-ionized working material into the pulsed reflex discharge plasma have been considered at the initial stage of dense gas-metal plasma formation. A calculation model has been proposed to estimate the parameters of the sputtering mechanism for the required working material to be injected into the discharge. The data obtained are in good accordance with experimental results.

  11. Combining electrospinning and sputtering to improve rechargeable lithium battery cathodes: coating carbon fibre felt with nickel sulfide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Dong Kyu; Ryu, Ho Suk; Ahn, Chi Won; Jeon, Hwan-Jin

    2016-11-01

    Various nickel sulfide nanostructures have been developed for the fabrication of high surface area electrodes for rechargeable lithium batteries. In this study, we fabricated a nickel sulfide covered carbon fibre felt with high uniformity, high density, and large area for cathode materials for use in rechargeable lithium batteries, by using a combined electrospinning and sputtering deposition technique. In particular, the nickel sulfide/carbon fibre felt is a multi-functional material that can act as a conducting electrode itself without the use of binders and conductive materials owing to the high conductivity of the interlinked carbon fibre structures. A Li/nickel sulfide cell with current density of 100 mA g-1 exhibits good cycle performance and high first discharge capacity (970.46 mAh g-1) and good coulombic efficiency of 99% at 20 cycles. This electrode has good structural and electrochemical properties and has a potential to be commercialized when the properties are matured.

  12. The improvement of all-solid-state electrochromic devices fabricated with the reactive sputter and cathodic arc technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min-Chuan; Chen, Yung-Chih; Hsieh, Ming-Hao; Li, Yu-Chen; Wang, Jen-Yuan; Wu, Jin-Yu; Tsai, Wen-Fa; Jan, Der-Jun

    2016-11-01

    The all-solid-state electrochromic device (ECD) with the one substrate structure fabricated by the reactive dc magnetron sputtering (DCMS) and cathodic vacuum arc plasma (CVAP) technology has been developed for smart electrochromic (EC) glass application. The EC layer and ion conductor layer were deposited by reactive DCMS and CVAP technology, respectively. The ion conductor layer Ta2O5 deposited by the CVAP technology has provided the better porous material structure for ion transportation and showed 1.76 times ion conductivity than devices with all sputtering process. At the same time, the EC layer WO3 and NiO deposited by the reactive DCMS have also provided the high quality and uniform characteristic to overcome the surface roughness effect of the CVAP ion conductor layer in multilayer device structure. The all-solid-state ECD with the CVAP ion conductor layer has demonstrated a maximum transmittance variation (Δ T ) of 55% at 550nm and a faster-switching speed. Furthermore, the lower equipment cost and higher deposition rate could be achieved by the application of CVAP technology.

  13. The improvement of all-solid-state electrochromic devices fabricated with the reactive sputter and cathodic arc technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min-Chuan Wang

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available The all-solid-state electrochromic device (ECD with the one substrate structure fabricated by the reactive dc magnetron sputtering (DCMS and cathodic vacuum arc plasma (CVAP technology has been developed for smart electrochromic (EC glass application. The EC layer and ion conductor layer were deposited by reactive DCMS and CVAP technology, respectively. The ion conductor layer Ta2O5 deposited by the CVAP technology has provided the better porous material structure for ion transportation and showed 1.76 times ion conductivity than devices with all sputtering process. At the same time, the EC layer WO3 and NiO deposited by the reactive DCMS have also provided the high quality and uniform characteristic to overcome the surface roughness effect of the CVAP ion conductor layer in multilayer device structure. The all-solid-state ECD with the CVAP ion conductor layer has demonstrated a maximum transmittance variation (ΔT of 55% at 550nm and a faster-switching speed. Furthermore, the lower equipment cost and higher deposition rate could be achieved by the application of CVAP technology.

  14. Characterization of tantalum films on analytical surfaces: Insights into sputtering of nonconductors in a direct-current glow discharge using secondary cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wayne, David M.; Havrilla, George [Nuclear Materials Technology Division, Analytical Chemistry, NMT-1, MS G740, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] Schulze, Ronald K. [Nuclear Materials Technology Division, Materials Characterization, NMT-11, MS G730, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] Maggiore, Carl [Materials Science and Technology Division, Center for Materials Science, MST-10, MS K765, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)] Cooke, D. Wayne [Materials Science and Technology Division, MST-8, MS E546, Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, New Mexico 87545 (United States)

    1999-03-01

    We performed glow discharge mass spectrometry (GDMS) analyses on several nonconducting ceramic materials: a glass microscope slide, Nd-doped yttrium aluminum garnet (Nd:YAG), potassium titanyl phosphate (KTP), and several National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) Standard Reference Materials (e.g., Trace Elements in Glass SRM 610 and SRM 612). The sputtering of the nonconductor in the GD source results in the formation of a circular sputter crater whose surface profile varies with changing conditions in the GD cell. Following GD analysis, examination of the sample surfaces within, and adjacent to, the sputter crater by micro-X-ray fluorescence (MXRF) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) indicated that the sputter-deposited Ta film is nonuniform. In several samples, a sharp discontinuity is observable in both Ta concentration and average {ital Z}-number approximately 0.5 mm from the crater perimeter. This discontinuity probably corresponds to the physical contact between the Ta cathode and the nonconducting sample beneath. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) was then used to characterize Ta film thickness for each of the materials. The data presented here indicate that both crater shape and film thickness are dependent on GD sputtering parameters and on the nature of the material being sputtered. {copyright} {ital 1999} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  15. Friction properties of amorphous carbon ultrathin films deposited by filtered cathodic vacuum arc and radio-frequency sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matlak, J.; Komvopoulos, K., E-mail: kyriakos@me.berkeley.edu

    2015-03-31

    The friction properties of ultrathin films of amorphous carbon (a-C) deposited on Si(100) substrates by filtered cathodic vacuum arc and radio-frequency sputtering were investigated by surface force microscopy. Deposition parameters yielding a-C films with high sp{sup 3} content were used to deposit films of thickness between 5 and 35 nm. The coefficient of friction of both types of a-C films was measured with a 1-μm-radius conical diamond tip and normal loads in the range of 20–640 μN. The results show a strong dependence of the friction properties on the surface roughness, thickness, and structure of the a-C films, which are influenced by the intricacies of the deposition method. The dependence of the coefficient of friction on normal load and the dominance of adhesion and plowing friction mechanisms are interpreted in terms of the through-thickness variation of carbon atom hybridization of the a-C films. - Highlights: • Comparison of nanoscale friction properties of ultrathin amorphous carbon films. • Friction dependence on film roughness, thickness, and structure (hybridization). • Effect of through-thickness changes in carbon atom hybridization on film friction. • Explanation of film friction trends in terms of competing friction mechanisms.

  16. Characteristics of HT-LiCoO2 cathode films synthesized by Rf magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, P. Jeevan; Babu, K. Jayanth; Hussain, O. M.

    2012-06-01

    Polycrystalline HT-LiCoO2 films were successfully synthesized by rf magnetron sputtering. The films were characterized by the studying their phase, structure, and morphology using ex-situ measurements of X-ray diffractometry (XRD), Raman Spectroscopy, Atomic force micrometry (AFM). Electrochemical performance evaluation indicated that the as grown LiCoO2 films The anodic electrochemical performances of the films have been evaluated by cyclic voltammetry (CV) at a scan rate of 0.5 mV/s and by galvanostatic cycling, with lithium metal as the counter and the reference electrode, and cycled in the range of 3.0 - 4.2 V at a current density of 50 μA/cm2. The films show a discharge capacity at the 20th cycle of 58 μAh cm-2μm- Keywords: LiCoO which exhibited excellent capacity retention with a small capacity fade which exhibited excellent capacity retention with a small capacity fade.

  17. Magnetron sputtering source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makowiecki, Daniel M.; McKernan, Mark A.; Grabner, R. Fred; Ramsey, Philip B.

    1994-01-01

    A magnetron sputtering source for sputtering coating substrates includes a high thermal conductivity electrically insulating ceramic and magnetically attached sputter target which can eliminate vacuum sealing and direct fluid cooling of the cathode assembly. The magnetron sputtering source design results in greater compactness, improved operating characteristics, greater versatility, and low fabrication cost. The design easily retrofits most sputtering apparatuses and provides for safe, easy, and cost effective target replacement, installation, and removal.

  18. Porous NASICON-Type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 Thin Film Deposited by RF Sputtering as Cathode Material for Li-Ion Microbatteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiawati, Vinsensia Ade; Vacandio, Florence; Eyraud, Marielle; Knauth, Philippe; Djenizian, Thierry

    2016-12-01

    We report the electrochemical performance of porous NASICON-type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 thin films to be used as a cathode for Li-ion microbatteries. Crystalline porous NASICON-type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 layers were obtained by radio frequency sputtering with an annealing treatment. The thin films were characterized by XRD, SEM, and electrochemical techniques. The chronoamperometry experiments showed that a discharge capacity of 88 mAhg(-1) (23 μAhcm(-2)) is attained for the first cycle at C/10 to reach 65 mAhg(-1) (17 μAhcm(-2)) after 10 cycles with a good stability over 40 cycles.

  19. Porous NASICON-Type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 Thin Film Deposited by RF Sputtering as Cathode Material for Li-Ion Microbatteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiawati, Vinsensia Ade; Vacandio, Florence; Eyraud, Marielle; Knauth, Philippe; Djenizian, Thierry

    2016-08-01

    We report the electrochemical performance of porous NASICON-type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 thin films to be used as a cathode for Li-ion microbatteries. Crystalline porous NASICON-type Li3Fe2(PO4)3 layers were obtained by radio frequency sputtering with an annealing treatment. The thin films were characterized by XRD, SEM, and electrochemical techniques. The chronoamperometry experiments showed that a discharge capacity of 88 mAhg-1 (23 μAhcm-2) is attained for the first cycle at C/10 to reach 65 mAhg-1 (17 μAhcm-2) after 10 cycles with a good stability over 40 cycles.

  20. Dense and high-stability Ti2AlN MAX phase coatings prepared by the combined cathodic arc/sputter technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhenyu; Liu, Jingzhou; Wang, Li; Li, Xiaowei; Ke, Peiling; Wang, Aiying

    2017-02-01

    Ti2AlN belongs to a family of ternary nano-laminate alloys known as the MAX phases, which exhibit a unique combination of metallic and ceramic properties. In the present work, the dense and high-stability Ti2AlN coating has been successfully prepared through the combined cathodic arc/sputter deposition, followed by heat post-treatment. It was found that the as-deposited Ti-Al-N coating behaved a multilayer structure, where (Ti, N)-rich layer and Al-rich layer grew alternately, with a mixed phase constitution of TiN and TiAlx. After annealing at 800 °C under vacuum condition for 1.5 h, although the multilayer structure still was found, part of multilayer interfaces became indistinct and disappeared. In particular, the thickness of the Al-rich layer decreased in contrast to that of as-deposited coating due to the inner diffusion of the Al element. Moreover, the Ti2AlN MAX phase emerged as the major phase in the annealed coatings and its formation mechanism was also discussed in this study. The vacuum thermal analysis indicated that the formed Ti2AlN MAX phase exhibited a high-stability, which was mainly benefited from the large thickness and the dense structure. This advanced technique based on the combined cathodic arc/sputter method could be extended to deposit other MAX phase coatings with tailored high performance like good thermal stability, high corrosion and oxidation resistance etc. for the next protective coating materials.

  1. Effect of oxygen incorporation on the structure and elasticity of Ti-Al-O-N coatings synthesized by cathodic arc and high power pulsed magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hans, M., E-mail: hans@mch.rwth-aachen.de; Baben, M. to; Music, D.; Ebenhöch, J.; Schneider, J. M. [Materials Chemistry, RWTH Aachen University, Kopernikusstr. 10, D-52074 Aachen (Germany); Primetzhofer, D. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, Uppsala University, Lägerhyddsvägen 1, S-75120 Uppsala (Sweden); Kurapov, D.; Arndt, M.; Rudigier, H. [Oerlikon Balzers Coating AG, Iramali 18, LI-9496 Balzers, Principality of Liechtenstein (Liechtenstein)

    2014-09-07

    Ti-Al-O-N coatings were synthesized by cathodic arc and high power pulsed magnetron sputtering. The chemical composition of the coatings was determined by means of elastic recoil detection analysis and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy. The effect of oxygen incorporation on the stress-free lattice parameters and Young's moduli of Ti-Al-O-N coatings was investigated by X-ray diffraction and nanoindentation, respectively. As nitrogen is substituted by oxygen, implications for the charge balance may be expected. A reduction in equilibrium volume with increasing O concentration is identified by X-ray diffraction and density functional theory calculations of Ti-Al-O-N supercells reveal the concomitant formation of metal vacancies. Hence, the oxygen incorporation-induced formation of metal vacancies enables charge balancing. Furthermore, nanoindentation experiments reveal a decrease in elastic modulus with increasing O concentration. Based on ab initio data, two causes can be identified for this: First, the metal vacancy-induced reduction in elasticity; and second, the formation of, compared to the corresponding metal nitride bonds, relatively weak Ti-O and Al-O bonds.

  2. In-situ sputtering apparatus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erickson, Mark R.; Poole, Henry J.; Custer, III, Arthur W.; Hershcovitch, Ady

    2015-06-09

    A sputtering apparatus that includes at least a target presented as an inner surface of a confinement structure, the inner surface of the confinement structure is preferably an internal wall of a circular tube. A cathode is disposed adjacent the internal wall of the circular tube. The cathode preferably provides a hollow core, within which a magnetron is disposed. Preferably, an actuator is attached to the magnetron, wherein a position of the magnetron within the hollow core is altered upon activation of the actuator. Additionally, a carriage supporting the cathode and communicating with the target is preferably provided, and a cable bundle interacting with the cathode and linked to a cable bundle take up mechanism provided power and coolant to the cathode, magnetron, actuator and an anode of the sputtering apparatus.

  3. Effect of negative substrate bias on the microstructure and mechanical properties of Ti-Si-N films deposited by a hybrid filtered cathodic arc and ion beam sputtering technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang Yujuan, E-mail: cnzhangyujuan@yahoo.com.cn [Laboratory of Special Functional Materials, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China); Yang Yingze; Zhai Yuhao; Zhang Pingyu [Laboratory of Special Functional Materials, Henan University, Kaifeng 475004 (China)

    2012-07-01

    A hybrid cathodic arc and ion beam sputtering method was employed to synthesize Ti-Si-N films. The influence of negative substrate bias on the structure and mechanical properties was investigated by using XRD, XPS, HRTEM, nanoindentor and so on. With the increasing of negative bias there is a decrease in the TiN crystallite size from 36 nm to 10 nm. Negative substrate bias promoted the conformation of nc-TiN/a-Si{sub 3}N{sub 4} nanocomposite structure with complete phase separation and uniform crystallite size. Superhard TiSiN films with a maximum hardness of 46 GPa were successfully synthesized under 100 V negative bias. Severe oxidation occurred in films deposited under 200 V and 300 V negative substrate bias due to the decreasing of deposition rate, which led to the hardness of films reduced to the value of 26 GPa and 22 GPa respectively.

  4. Composition and growth behavior of the surface and electrolyte decomposition layer of/on a commercial lithium ion battery LixNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 cathode determined by sputter depth profile X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niehoff, Philip; Winter, Martin

    2013-12-23

    A detailed X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) study of the surface and electrolyte decomposition layer of a LixNi1/3Mn1/3Co1/3O2 (NMC) cathode from commercial NMC/graphite cells by intense sputter depth profiling (SDP) using a polyatomic ion gun is provided. Cathodes of a cell after electrochemical formation and a cell at a state of initial capacity (SOIC) of 80%, which was reached after 2500 full cycles at 30 °C, are investigated.

  5. Comparative study of structural and electro-optical properties of ZnO:Ga films grown by steered cathodic arc plasma evaporation and sputtering on plastic and their application on polymer-based organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liang, Chih-Hao, E-mail: dataman888@hotmail.com [R& D Division, Walsin Technology Corporation, Kaohsiung, Taiwan (China); Hsiao, Yu-Jen [National Nano Device Laboratories, National Applied Research Laboratories, Tainan, Taiwan (China); Hwang, Weng-Sing [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, Tainan, Taiwan (China)

    2016-08-01

    Ga-doped ZnO (GZO) films with various thicknesses (105–490 nm) were deposited on PET substrates at a low temperature of 90 °C by a steered cathodic arc plasma evaporation (steered CAPE), and a GZO film with a thickness of 400 nm was deposited at 90 °C by a magnetron sputtering (MS) for comparison. The comparative analysis of the microstructure, residual stress, surface morphology, electrical and optical properties, chemical states, and doping efficiency of the films produced by the steered CAPE and MS processes was performed, and the effect of thickness on the CAPE-grown GZO films was investigated in detail. The results showed that the GZO films grown by steered CAPE exhibited higher crystallinity and lower internal stress than those deposited by MS. The transmittance and electrical properties were also enhanced for the steered CAPE-grown films. The figure of merit (Φ = T{sup 10}/R{sub s}, where T is the transmittance and R{sub s} is the sheet resistance in Ω/□). was used to evaluate the performance of the electro-optical properties. The GZO films with a thickness of 400 nm deposited by CAPE had the highest Φ value, 1.94 × 10{sup −2} Ω{sup −1}, a corresponding average visible transmittance of 88.8% and resistivity of 6.29 × 10{sup −4} Ω·cm. In contrast, the Φ value of MS-deposited GZO film with a thickness of 400 nm is only 1.1 × 10{sup −3} Ω{sup −1}. This can be attributed to the increase in crystalline size, [0001] preferred orientation, decrease in stacking faults density and Ar contamination in steered CAPE-grown films, leading to increases in the Hall mobility and carrier density. In addition, the power conversion efficiency (PCE) of organic solar cells was significantly improved by using the CAPE-grown GZO electrode, and the PCE values were 1.2% and 1.7% for the devices with MS-grown and CAPE-grown GZO electrodes, respectively. - Highlights: • ZnO:Ga (GZO) films were grown on PET by steered cathodic arc plasma evaporation (CAPE

  6. Structural evolution of bias sputtered LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} thin film cathodes for lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Shih-Hsuan, E-mail: minimono42@gmail.com [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Feng Chia University, 100 Wenhwa Rd., Taichung 40724, Taiwan (China); Chiu, Kuo-Feng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Feng Chia University, 100 Wenhwa Rd., Taichung 40724, Taiwan (China); Leu, Hoang-Jyh [Department of Fiber and Composite Materials, Feng Chia University, 100 Wenhwa Rd., Taichung 40724, Taiwan (China)

    2014-12-01

    LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} (LNMO) thin films have been deposited on stainless steel substrates using radio frequency (f = 13.56 MHz) magnetron sputtering, followed by thermal annealing in ambient atmosphere. Various negative biases were applied on the substrates during deposition. The structural evolution of LNMO thin films under different negative biases has been investigated and characterized by X-ray diffraction. All of the deposited films exhibit a crystalline spinel structure with a space group of Fd-3m, which is a so-called disordered phase. The results also indicate that particle size decreases with increasing negative bias. The electrochemical properties of the LNMO thin films as cathode materials for lithium ion batteries were investigated. Two distinctive voltage plateaus at ∼ 4.7 V and at ∼ 4.0 V (vs. Li{sup +}/Li) can be observed in the discharge curves, corresponding to the reactions of the disordered phase. The capacity of LNMO thin film electrodes under suitable negative bias can be optimized. - Highlights: • LiNi{sub 0.5}Mn{sub 1.5}O{sub 4} thin films have been deposited on stainless steel substrates. • Various negative biases were applied on the substrates during deposition. • The particle sizes of LNMO thin films decrease with increasing negative bias.

  7. Industry-relevant magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc ultra-high vacuum deposition system for in situ x-ray diffraction studies of thin film growth using high energy synchrotron radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schroeder, J L; Thomson, W; Howard, B; Schell, N; Näslund, L-Å; Rogström, L; Johansson-Jõesaar, M P; Ghafoor, N; Odén, M; Nothnagel, E; Shepard, A; Greer, J; Birch, J

    2015-09-01

    We present an industry-relevant, large-scale, ultra-high vacuum (UHV) magnetron sputtering and cathodic arc deposition system purposefully designed for time-resolved in situ thin film deposition/annealing studies using high-energy (>50 keV), high photon flux (>10(12) ph/s) synchrotron radiation. The high photon flux, combined with a fast-acquisition-time (<1 s) two-dimensional (2D) detector, permits time-resolved in situ structural analysis of thin film formation processes. The high-energy synchrotron-radiation based x-rays result in small scattering angles (<11°), allowing large areas of reciprocal space to be imaged with a 2D detector. The system has been designed for use on the 1-tonne, ultra-high load, high-resolution hexapod at the P07 High Energy Materials Science beamline at PETRA III at the Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron in Hamburg, Germany. The deposition system includes standard features of a typical UHV deposition system plus a range of special features suited for synchrotron radiation studies and industry-relevant processes. We openly encourage the materials research community to contact us for collaborative opportunities using this unique and versatile scientific instrument.

  8. Sputtering TiO2 on LiCoO2 composite electrodes as a simple and effective coating to enhance high-voltage cathode performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Aijun; Lu, Yanting; Wang, Qingji; Xu, Jin; Wang, Weihang; Dai, Xinyi; Li, Jingze

    2017-04-01

    Surface coating is a key strategy in lithium-ion battery technologies to achieve a high and stable battery performance. Increasing the operation voltage is a direct way to increase the energy density of the battery. In this work, TiO2 is directly sputtered on as-fabricated LiCoO2 composite electrodes, enabling a controllable oxide coating on the topmost of the electrode. With an optimum coating, the discharge capacity is able to reach 160 mAh g-1 (86.5% retention) after 100 cycles within 3.0-4.5 V at 1 C, which is increased by 40% compared to that of the bare electrode. The high-voltage rate capability of LiCoO2 is also remarkably enhanced after TiO2-coating as reflected by the much larger capacity at 10 C (109 vs. 74 mAh g-1). The artificially introduced oxide coating is believed to make the LiCoO2 electrode more resistant to interfacial side reactions at high voltage and thus minimizes the irreversible loss of the active material upon long cycling. The TiO2 coating layer is also possible to partially react with the decomposition product of electrolyte (e.g. HF) and form a more stable and conductive interphase containing TiFx, which is responsible for the improvement of the rate capability.

  9. A novel sputtering technique: Inductively Coupled Impulse Sputtering (ICIS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loch, D. A. L.; Ehiasarian, A. P.

    2012-09-01

    Sputtering magnetic materials with magnetron based systems has the disadvantage of field quenching and variation of alloy composition with target erosion. The advantage of eliminating magnetic fields in the chamber is that this enables sputtered particles to move along the electric field more uniformly. Inductively coupled impulse sputtering (ICIS) is a form of high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) without a magnetic field where a high density plasma is produced by a high power radio frequency (RF) coil in order to sputter the target and ionise the metal vapour. In this emerging technology, the effects of power and pressure on the ionisation and deposition process are not known. The setup comprises of a 13.56 MHz pulsed RF coil pulsed with a duty cycle of 25 %. A pulsed DC voltage of 1900 V was applied to the cathode to attract Argon ions and initiate sputtering. Optical emission spectra (OES) for Cu and Ti neutrals and ions at constant pressure show a linear intensity increase for peak RF powers of 500 W - 3400 W and a steep drop of intensity for a power of 4500 W. Argon neutrals show a linear increase for powers of 500 W - 2300 W and a saturation of intensity between 2300 W - 4500 W. The influence of pressure on the process was studied at a constant peak RF power of 2300 W. With increasing pressure the ionisation degree increased. The microstructure of the coatings shows globular growth at 2.95×10-2 mbar and large-grain columnar growth at 1.2×10-1 mbar. Bottom coverage of unbiased vias with a width of 0.360 μm and aspect ratio of 2.5:1 increased from 15 % to 20 % for this pressure range. The current work has shown that the concept of combining a RF powered coil with a magnet-free high voltage pulsed DC powered cathode is feasible and produces very stable plasma. The experiments have shown a significant influence of power and pressure on the plasma and coating microstructure.

  10. Cathodic arcs

    OpenAIRE

    Anders, Andre

    2003-01-01

    Cathodic arc plasma deposition has become the technology of choice for hard, wear and corrosion resistant coatings for a variety of applications. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions, and emerging high-tech applications are briefly reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas stand out due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bia...

  11. Magnetron sputtering system stabilisation for high rate desposition of AlN films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fomin, A; Akhmatov, Vladislav; Selishchev, S

    1998-01-01

    The stabilisation of a planar magnetron sputtering system for reactive sputtering of AlN in a gaseous mixture of Ar and highly active NH3 was examined. The helical instability in the cathode plasma sheath was observed and methods for its damping were proposed. It was found that the deposition of c...

  12. Cathodic arcs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2003-10-29

    Cathodic arc plasma deposition has become the technology of choice for hard, wear and corrosion resistant coatings for a variety of applications. The history, basic physics of cathodic arc operation, the infamous macroparticle problem and common filter solutions, and emerging high-tech applications are briefly reviewed. Cathodic arc plasmas standout due to their high degree of ionization, with important consequences for film nucleation, growth, and efficient utilization of substrate bias. Industrial processes often use cathodic arc plasma in reactive mode. In contrast, the science of arcs has focused on the case of vacuum arcs. Future research directions include closing the knowledge gap for reactive mode, large area coating, linear sources and filters, metal plasma immersion process, with application in high-tech and biomedical fields.

  13. Analysis of cathode geometry to minimize cathode erosion in direct current microplasma jet

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Causa, Federica [Dipartimento di Scienze dell' Ambiente, della Sicurezza, del Territorio, degli Alimenti e della Salute, Universita degli studi di Messina, 98122 Messina (Italy); Ghezzi, Francesco; Caniello, Roberto; Grosso, Giovanni [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Via R. Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Dellasega, David [Istituto di Fisica del Plasma, Consiglio Nazionale delle Ricerche, EURATOM-ENEA-CNR Association, Via R. Cozzi 53, 20125 Milano (Italy); Dipartimento di Energia, Politecnico di Milano, Via Ponzio 34/3, 20133 Milano (Italy)

    2012-12-15

    Microplasma jets are now widely used for deposition, etching, and materials processing. The present study focuses on the investigation of the influence of cathode geometry on deposition quality, for microplasma jet deposition systems in low vacuum. The interest here is understanding the influence of hydrogen on sputtering and/or evaporation of the electrodes. Samples obtained with two cathode geometries with tapered and rectangular cross-sections have been investigated experimentally by scanning electron microscopy and energy dispersion X-ray spectroscopy. Samples obtained with a tapered-geometry cathode present heavy contamination, demonstrating cathode erosion, while samples obtained with a rectangular-cross-section cathode are free from contamination. These experimental characteristics were explained by modelling results showing a larger radial component of the electric field at the cathode inner wall of the tapered cathode. As a result, ion acceleration is larger, explaining the observed cathode erosion in this case. Results from the present investigation also show that the ratio of radial to axial field components is larger for the rectangular geometry case, thus, qualitatively explaining the presence of micro-hollow cathode discharge over a wide range of currents observed in this case. In the light of the above findings, the rectangular cathode geometry is considered to be more effective to achieve cleaner deposition.

  14. Solar system sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tombrello, T. A.

    1982-01-01

    The sites and materials involved in solar system sputtering of planetary surfaces are reviewed, together with existing models for the processes of sputtering. Attention is given to the interaction of the solar wind with planetary atmospheres in terms of the role played by the solar wind in affecting the He-4 budget in the Venus atmosphere, and the erosion and differentiation of the Mars atmosphere by solar wind sputtering. The study is extended to the production of isotopic fractionation and anomalies in interplanetary grains by irradiation, and to erosion effects on planetary satellites with frozen volatile surfaces, such as with Io, Europa, and Ganymede. Further measurements are recommended of the molecular form of the ejected material, the yields and energy spectra of the sputtered products, the iosotopic fractionation sputtering causes, and the possibility of electronic sputtering enhancement with materials such as silicates.

  15. Reactive sputter deposition

    CERN Document Server

    Mahieu, Stijn

    2008-01-01

    In this valuable work, all aspects of the reactive magnetron sputtering process, from the discharge up to the resulting thin film growth, are described in detail, allowing the reader to understand the complete process. Hence, this book gives necessary information for those who want to start with reactive magnetron sputtering, understand and investigate the technique, control their sputtering process and tune their existing process, obtaining the desired thin films.

  16. Denton Vacuum Discovery-550 Sputterer

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: CORAL Name: Sputter 2 Similar to the existing 4-Gun Denton Discovery 22 Sputter system, with the following enhancements: Specifications / Capabilities:...

  17. Sputtering of water ice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baragiola, R.A.; Vidal, R.A.; Svendsen, W.

    2003-01-01

    We present results of a range of experiments of sputtering of water ice together with a guide to the literature. We studied how sputtering depends on the projectile energy and fluence, ice growth temperature, irradiation temperature and external electric fields. We observed luminescence from...

  18. Fundamental sputtering studies: Nonresonant ionization of sputtered neutrals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnett, J.W.; Pellin, M.J.; Calaway, W.F.; Gruen, D.M. (Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)); Yates, J.T. Jr. (Pittsburgh Univ., PA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1989-01-04

    Because of the practical importance of sputtering, numerous theories and computer simulations are used for predicting many aspects of the sputtering process. Unfortunately, many of the calculated sputtering results are untested by experiment. Until recently, most sputtering experiments required either very high ion fluences or the detection of only minor constituents of the sputtered flux, i.e., ions. These techniques may miss the subtleties involved in the sputtering process. High-detection-efficiency mass spectrometry, coupled with the laser ionization of neutral atoms, allows the detection of the major sputtered species with very low incident ion fluences. The depth-of-origin of sputtered atoms is one example of an important but poorly understood aspect of the sputtering process. By following the sputtering yield of a substrate atom with various coverages of an adsorbed overlayer, the depth of origin of sputtered atoms has been determined. Our results indicate that two-thirds of the sputtered flux originates in the topmost atomic layer. The ion-dose dependence of sputtering yields has long been assumed to be quite minor for low- to-moderate primary ion fluences. We have observed a two-fold decrease in the sputtering yield of the Ru(0001) surface for very low primary ion fluences. Data analysis results in a cross section for damage of 2.7 {plus minus} 1.0 {times} 10{sup {minus}15}cm{sup 2}. 40 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  19. High power impulse magnetron sputtering and related discharges: scalable plasma sources for plasma-based ion implantation and deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2009-09-01

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) and related self-sputtering techniques are reviewed from a viewpoint of plasma-based ion implantation and deposition (PBII&D). HIPIMS combines the classical, scalable sputtering technology with pulsed power, which is an elegant way of ionizing the sputtered atoms. Related approaches, such as sustained self-sputtering, are also considered. The resulting intense flux of ions to the substrate consists of a mixture of metal and gas ions when using a process gas, or of metal ions only when using `gasless? or pure self-sputtering. In many respects, processing with HIPIMS plasmas is similar to processing with filtered cathodic arc plasmas, though the former is easier to scale to large areas. Both ion implantation and etching (high bias voltage, without deposition) and thin film deposition (low bias, or bias of low duty cycle) have been demonstrated.

  20. Cold cathodes based on carbonic nanostructured layered structures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belyanin A. F.

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The paper describes formation conditions for and the structure of diamond-like materials films used in the manufacture of layered cold cathodes of emission electronics devices. The authors study the structure and field emission properties of layered structures with polycluster diamond and diamond-like carbon films (DCF formed by various methods. It has been found that the best emission properties are characteristic of DCFs obtained by cathode sputtering. Emission from the surface of such films occurs on the boundaries of the globules.

  1. Characteristics of a toroidal planar hollow cathode and its use for the preparation of Bi nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez, A.; Luna, A. T.; Muhl, S.

    2013-12-01

    Using ideas from the sputter deposition by gas flow hollow cathode (GFHC) we have designed a new version in the form of a toroidal planar hollow cathode. Here the flow of gas is used to entrain the sputtered atoms and nanoparticles formed by agglomeration in the gas phase, through the cathode central exit aperture towards the substrate. We have studied the characteristics of the deposit as a function of the applied pulsed dc electrical power, the argon gas pressure and flow. By varying the different operating parameters, such as pressure (6.7-267 Pa), power (40-120 W) and gas flow (20-140 sccm), it was possible to control the size of the nanoparticles (10-150 nm) and the deposition rate (0.4-4.0 nm min-1). We demonstrate that the nanoparticles are of crystalline bismuth, even though the cathode is made of graphite with small added pieces of bismuth.

  2. Research and Development of a New Field Enhanced Low Temperature Thermionic Cathode that Enables Fluorescent Dimming and Loan Shedding without Auxiliary Cathode Heating

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng Jin

    2009-01-07

    This is the final report for project entitled 'Research and development of a new field enhanced low temperature thermionic cathode that enables fluorescent dimming and load shedding without auxiliary cathode heating', under Agreement Number: DE-FC26-04NT-42329. Under this project, a highly efficient CNT based thermionic cathode was demonstrated. This cathode is capable of emitting electron at a current density two order of magnitude stronger then a typical fluorescent cathode at same temperatures, or capable of emitting at same current density but at temperature about 300 C lower than that of a fluorescent cathode. Detailed fabrication techniques were developed including CVD growth of CNTs and sputter deposition of oxide thin films on CNTs. These are mature technologies that have been widely used in industry for large scale materials processing and device fabrications, thus, with further development work, the techniques developed in this project can be scaled-up in manufacturing environment. The prototype cathodes developed in this project were tested in lighting plasma discharge environment. In many cases, they not only lit and sustain the plasma, but also out perform the fluorescent cathodes in key parameters such like cathode fall voltages. More work will be needed to further evaluate more detailed and longer term performance of the prototype cathode in lighting plasma.

  3. Planar-Focusing Cathodes

    CERN Document Server

    Lewellen, J W

    2005-01-01

    Conventional pi-mode rf photoinjectors typically use magnetic solenoids for emittance compensation. This provides independent focusing strength, but can complicate rf power feed placement, introduce asymmetries (due to coil crossovers), and greatly increase the cost of the photoinjector. Cathode-region focusing can also provide for a form of emittance compensation. Typically this method strongly couples focusing strength to the field gradient on the cathode, however, and also requires altering the longitudinal position of the cathode to change the focusing. We propose a new method for achieving cathode-region variable-strength focusing for emittance compensation. The new method reduces the coupling to the gradient on the cathode, and does not require a change in the longitudinal position of the cathode. Expected performance for an S-band system is similar to conventional solenoid-based designs. This paper presents the results of rf cavity and beam dynamics simulations of the new design.

  4. Cathodic Protection Model Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — FUNCTION: Performs Navy design and engineering of ship and submarine impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP) systems for underwater hull corrosion control and...

  5. Very low pressure high power impulse triggered magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Andre; Andersson, Joakim

    2013-10-29

    A method and apparatus are described for very low pressure high powered magnetron sputtering of a coating onto a substrate. By the method of this invention, both substrate and coating target material are placed into an evacuable chamber, and the chamber pumped to vacuum. Thereafter a series of high impulse voltage pulses are applied to the target. Nearly simultaneously with each pulse, in one embodiment, a small cathodic arc source of the same material as the target is pulsed, triggering a plasma plume proximate to the surface of the target to thereby initiate the magnetron sputtering process. In another embodiment the plasma plume is generated using a pulsed laser aimed to strike an ablation target material positioned near the magnetron target surface.

  6. Application of Magnetron Sputtering in Fabricating MEMS Microbatteries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHEN Wan; YANG Zhi-min; XING Guang-jian; MAO Chang-hui; DU Jun

    2004-01-01

    With the development of MEMS and the electronic devices's miniaturization and integration, a new kind of power sources that can satisfy the need for high energy density is required. Microbatteries are being researched abroad for their advantages of extreme thinness and long-term power supply. The development of MEMS microbatteries are reviewed and suggestedmagnetron sputtering in fabricating a high-performance microbattery. The technics as annealing are analyzed. The microbattery with a LiNi1-x Cox O2 cathode exhibited stable cycle ability and a high specific discharge capacity, which was attributed to the alloying effect of the LiNiO2and LiCoO2.

  7. Beam optics optimization of a negative-ion sputter source

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    F Osswald; R Rebmeister

    2002-11-01

    A negative-ion sputter source has been studied in order to increase the beam intensity delivered by the Vivitron tandem injector. The aim was to characterize the influence on the beam intensity of some factors related to the configuration of the source such as the shape of the target holder, the target surface topography and the anode/cathode voltage. The paper reports the results carried out by experimentation on a test facility and on the injector itself as well as the investigations performed with computer simulations.

  8. Novel matching lens and spherical ionizer for a cesium sputter ion source

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    D C Weisser; N R Lobanov; P A Hausladen; L K Fifield; H J Wallace; S G Tims; E G Apushkinsky

    2002-12-01

    The beam optics of a multi-sample sputter ion source, based on the NEC MCSNICS, has been modified to accommodate cathode voltages higher than 5 kV and dispenses with the nominal extractor. The cathode voltage in Cs sputter sources plays the role of the classical extractor accomplishing the acceleration of beam particles from eV to keV energy, minimizing space charge effects and interactions between the beam and residual gas. The higher the cathode voltage, the smaller are these contributions to the emittance growth. The higher cathode voltage also raises the Child’s law limit on the Cs current resulting in substantially increased output. The incidental focusing role of the extractor is reallocated to a deceleration Einzel lens and the velocity change needed to match to the pre-acceleration tube goes to a new electrode at the tube entrance. All electrodes are large enough to ensure that the beam fills less than 30% of the aperture to minimize aberrations. The improvements are applicable to sputter sources generally.

  9. Sputtering in supported cluster arrays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiménez-Sáez, J.C., E-mail: jc.jimenez@upm.es [Dept. Física Aplicada a la Ingeniería Aeronáutica y Naval, ETSIAE, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM), 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pérez-Martín, A.M.C.; Jiménez-Rodríguez, J.J. [Dept. Física Aplicada III, Facultad de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2015-06-01

    Bombardment of periodical arrays formed by Co nanoislands deposited on a Cu(0 0 1) substrate with 1-keV argon ions is simulated by using molecular dynamics. Sputtering yield is analyzed distinguishing between particles sputtered across the supported cluster surface and across the flat substrate surface without nanoparticle above. The dependence of this magnitude on the height and the periodical spacing between nanoislands has been investigated. Results show that this dependence for the sputtering across the nanoislands and across the substrate is different. In the case of the total sputtering, the “substrate” effect prevails since the behavior of this magnitude is approximately analogous to the sputtering across the substrate. The more probable causes are analyzed in this article.

  10. Characteristics of Cu implantation into Si by PBII using UBMS cathode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    于伟东; 夏立芳; 孙跃

    2001-01-01

    The implantation of Cu into Si substrate was carried out by plasma-based ion implantation (PBII) using unbalanced magnetron sputtering (UBMS) cathode as the metal plasma source. The different pulse bias (Up) and the distance between the cathode and the samples (ds-t) were chosen to research the characteristics of this method. The results show that the implantation of metal ions can be realized by the metal plasma source of UBMS cathode. The physical process such as the metal ion pure implantation, the gas ion implantation, the recoil implantation of the metal atoms, the deposition of the metal particles and the re-sputtering of the metal film depend on the energy, dose and deposition rate of the ions (Cu+, Ar+). The metal plasma based ion implantation of Cu into Si substrate is favored by selecting higher Up (60  kV) and larger ds-t (200  mm).

  11. Role of cathode identity in liquid chromatography particle beam glow discharge mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krishna, M.V. Balarama [Department of Chemistry, Biosystems Research Complex, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-1905 (United States); Marcus, R.K. [Department of Chemistry, Biosystems Research Complex, Clemson University, Clemson, SC 29634-1905 (United States)], E-mail: marcusr@clemson.edu

    2008-06-15

    A detailed evaluation of the role of cathode identity on the analytical and spectral characteristics of various organic, organometallic and metal analytes using liquid chromatography-particle beam/glow discharge mass spectrometry (LC-PB/GDMS) has been carried out. A d.c. discharge, operating with argon as the support gas, was used throughout this work. In this study, Cu which has a relatively high sputtering rate, Ni which has moderate sputtering rate and Ta which has very low sputtering rate, are taken as cathode materials to study the ionization, fragmentation, and analytical characteristics of organic (caffeine, epigallocatechin gallate, peptide as representative compounds), organometallic (selenomethionine, triethyl lead chloride as representative compounds) and metal (Fe, La, Cs and Pb) species. A range of discharge gas pressures (26.6-106.4 Pa) and currents (0.2-1.5 mA) were investigated with the test cathodes to determine their influence on the spectral composition and overall analytical response for the various test species. Calibration plots were obtained for all of the species for each of the three cathodes to determine the respective limits of detection. Relative detection limits in the range of 0.02 to 15 ng mL{sup -1} (0.002-1.5 ng, absolute) for the test species were found to be in the order of Cu > Ni > Ta; which follows the order of the sputtering characteristics of the respective cathodes. These studies rendered information about the respective discharge parameters' role in choosing the most appropriate cathode identity in PB-GDMS for application in the areas of organic, organometallic and inorganic species analysis.

  12. Nanostructured sulfur cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Yuan

    2013-01-01

    Rechargeable Li/S batteries have attracted significant attention lately due to their high specific energy and low cost. They are promising candidates for applications, including portable electronics, electric vehicles and grid-level energy storage. However, poor cycle life and low power capability are major technical obstacles. Various nanostructured sulfur cathodes have been developed to address these issues, as they provide greater resistance to pulverization, faster reaction kinetics and better trapping of soluble polysulfides. In this review, recent developments on nanostructured sulfur cathodes and mechanisms behind their operation are presented and discussed. Moreover, progress on novel characterization of sulfur cathodes is also summarized, as it has deepened the understanding of sulfur cathodes and will guide further rational design of sulfur electrodes. © 2013 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  13. Sputtering. [as deposition technique in mechanical engineering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvins, T.

    1976-01-01

    This paper primarily reviews the potential of using the sputtering process as a deposition technique; however, the manufacturing and sputter etching aspects are also discussed. Since sputtering is not regulated by classical thermodynamics, new multicomponent materials can be developed in any possible chemical composition. The basic mechanism for dc and rf sputtering is described. Sputter-deposition is described in terms of the unique advantageous features it offers such as versatility, momentum transfer, stoichiometry, sputter-etching, target geometry (coating complex surfaces), precise controls, flexibility, ecology, and sputtering rates. Sputtered film characteristics, such as strong adherence and coherence and film morphology, are briefly evaluated in terms of varying the sputtering parameters. Also described are some of the specific industrial areas which are turning to sputter-deposition techniques.

  14. Absorption Measurement of Zn Atom Density during ICP-assisted Magnetron Sputter-deposition of Al-doped ZnO Thin Films

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the outlines of hollow cathode (HCD) lamp absorption system for the density measurement of sputtered metal atoms in the inductively coupled plasma (ICP) assisted sputter-deposition process of Al doped ZnO thin films. As a result, absorbance of about 6.5% was obtained, which corresponds to the Zn atom density of 1.5×1012 cm-3.

  15. Cathodic hydrodimerization of nitroolefins

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Weßling; Hans J. Schäfer

    2015-01-01

    Nitroalkenes are easily accessible in high variety by condensation of aldehydes with aliphatic nitroalkanes. They belong to the group of activated alkenes that can be hydrodimerized by cathodic reduction. There are many olefins with different electron withdrawing groups used for cathodic hydrodimerization, but not much is known about the behaviour of the nitro group. Synthetic applications of this group could profit from the easy access to nitroolefins in large variety, the C–C bond formation...

  16. Cathode materials review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Claus, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Mohanty, Debasish, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Li, Jianlin, E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov; Wood, David L., E-mail: danielc@ornl.gov [Oak Ridge National Laboratory, 1 Bethel Valley Road, MS6472 Oak Ridge, TN 37831-6472 (United States)

    2014-06-16

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO{sub 2} cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  17. Cathode materials review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Claus; Mohanty, Debasish; Li, Jianlin; Wood, David L.

    2014-06-01

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403-431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead-acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide-hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J. Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783-789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  18. Inkjet-Printed Porous Silver Thin Film as a Cathode for a Low-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chen-Chiang; Baek, Jong Dae; Su, Chun-Hao; Fan, Liangdong; Wei, Jun; Liao, Ying-Chih; Su, Pei-Chen

    2016-04-27

    In this work we report a porous silver thin film cathode that was fabricated by a simple inkjet printing process for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cell applications. The electrochemical performance of the inkjet-printed silver cathode was studied at 300-450 °C and was compared with that of silver cathodes that were fabricated by the typical sputtering method. Inkjet-printed silver cathodes showed lower electrochemical impedance due to their porous structure, which facilitated oxygen gaseous diffusion and oxygen surface adsorption-dissociation reactions. A typical sputtered nanoporous silver cathode became essentially dense after the operation and showed high impedance due to a lack of oxygen supply. The results of long-term fuel cell operation show that the cell with an inkjet-printed cathode had a more stable current output for more than 45 h at 400 °C. A porous silver cathode is required for high fuel cell performance, and the simple inkjet printing technique offers an alternative method of fabrication for such a desirable porous structure with the required thermal-morphological stability.

  19. Filtered cathodic arc source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falabella, Steven; Sanders, David M.

    1994-01-01

    A continuous, cathodic arc ion source coupled to a macro-particle filter capable of separation or elimination of macro-particles from the ion flux produced by cathodic arc discharge. The ion source employs an axial magnetic field on a cathode (target) having tapered sides to confine the arc, thereby providing high target material utilization. A bent magnetic field is used to guide the metal ions from the target to the part to be coated. The macro-particle filter consists of two straight solenoids, end to end, but placed at 45.degree. to one another, which prevents line-of-sight from the arc spot on the target to the parts to be coated, yet provides a path for ions and electrons to flow, and includes a series of baffles for trapping the macro-particles.

  20. Transport of Sputtered Particles in Capacitive Sputter Sources

    CERN Document Server

    Trieschmann, Jan

    2015-01-01

    The transport of sputtered aluminum inside a multi frequency capacitively coupled plasma chamber is simulated by means of a kinetic test multi-particle approach. A novel consistent set of scattering parameters obtained for a modified variable hard sphere collision model is presented for both argon and aluminum. An angular dependent Thompson energy distribution is fitted to results from Monte-Carlo simulations and used for the kinetic simulation of the transport of sputtered aluminum. For the proposed configuration the transport of sputtered particles is characterized under typical process conditions at a gas pressure of p = 0.5 Pa. It is found that - due to the peculiar geometric conditions - the transport can be understood in a one dimensional picture, governed by the interaction of the imposed and backscattered particle fluxes. It is shown that the precise geometric features play an important role only in proximity to the electrode edges, where the effect of backscattering from the outside chamber volume be...

  1. Highly Efficient Micro Cathode Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Busek Company, Inc. proposes to develop a micro thermionic cathode that requires extremely low power and provides long lifetime. The basis for the cathode is a...

  2. Advanced Cathode Electrolyzer (ACE) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The proposed innovation is a static, cathode-fed, 2000 psi, balanced-pressure Advanced Cathode Electrolyzer (ACE) based on PEM electrolysis technology. It...

  3. Miniaturized cathodic arc plasma source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Andre; MacGill, Robert A.

    2003-04-15

    A cathodic arc plasma source has an anode formed of a plurality of spaced baffles which extend beyond the active cathode surface of the cathode. With the open baffle structure of the anode, most macroparticles pass through the gaps between the baffles and reflect off the baffles out of the plasma stream that enters a filter. Thus the anode not only has an electrical function but serves as a prefilter. The cathode has a small diameter, e.g. a rod of about 1/4 inch (6.25 mm) diameter. Thus the plasma source output is well localized, even with cathode spot movement which is limited in area, so that it effectively couples into a miniaturized filter. With a small area cathode, the material eroded from the cathode needs to be replaced to maintain plasma production. Therefore, the source includes a cathode advancement or feed mechanism coupled to cathode rod. The cathode also requires a cooling mechanism. The movable cathode rod is housed in a cooled metal shield or tube which serves as both a current conductor, thus reducing ohmic heat produced in the cathode, and as the heat sink for heat generated at or near the cathode. Cooling of the cathode housing tube is done by contact with coolant at a place remote from the active cathode surface. The source is operated in pulsed mode at relatively high currents, about 1 kA. The high arc current can also be used to operate the magnetic filter. A cathodic arc plasma deposition system using this source can be used for the deposition of ultrathin amorphous hard carbon (a-C) films for the magnetic storage industry.

  4. Sputtering of a silicon surface: Preferential sputtering of surface impurities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nietiadi, Maureen L. [Physics Department and Research Center OPTIMAS, University Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schrödinger-Straße, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Rosandi, Yudi [Physics Department and Research Center OPTIMAS, University Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schrödinger-Straße, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Department of Physics, Universitas Padjadjaran, Jatinangor, Sumedang 45363 (Indonesia); Lorinčík, Jan [Faculty of Science, J. E. Purkinje University, České mládeže 8, 400 96 Ústí nad Labem (Czech Republic); Institute of Photonics and Electronics, Academy of Sciences of the Czech Republic, Chaberská 57, 182 51 Praha (Czech Republic); Urbassek, Herbert M., E-mail: urbassek@rhrk.uni-kl.de [Physics Department and Research Center OPTIMAS, University Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schrödinger-Straße, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2013-05-15

    We present molecular-dynamics simulations of the sputtering of an impurity atom off a Si 2×1 (100) surface by 2 keV Ar ions. The impurity is characterized by its mass and its binding energy to the Si substrate. We find that sputtering strongly decreases with the mass and even more strongly with the binding energy of the impurity atom to the matrix. The velocity of the impurity perpendicular to the surface is reduced with increasing impurity mass and binding energy. In terms of available ionization theories we can conclude that heavier impurities will have a smaller ionization probability.

  5. Cathode material for lithium batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang-Ho; Amine, Khalil

    2013-07-23

    A method of manufacture an article of a cathode (positive electrode) material for lithium batteries. The cathode material is a lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide material and is prepared by mixing in a solid state an intermediate molybdenum composite transition metal oxide and a lithium source. The mixture is thermally treated to obtain the lithium molybdenum composite transition metal oxide cathode material.

  6. Laser sputter neutral mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    King, B.V.; Clarke, M.; Hu, H.; Betz [Newcastle Univ., NSW (Australia). Dept. of Physics

    1993-12-31

    Laser sputter neutral mass spectrometry (LSNMS) is an emerging technique for highly sensitive surface analysis. In this technique a target is bombarded with a pulsed beam of keV ions. The sputtered particles are intercepted by a high intensity pulsed laser beam above the surface and ionised with almost 100% efficiency. The photions may then be mass analysed using a quadrupole or, more commonly, using time of flight (TOF) techniques. In this method photoions are extracted from the ionisation region, accelerated to a known energy E{sub o} and strike a channelplate detector a distance `d` away. The flight time `t` of the photoions is then related to their mass by `d` {radical}m / {radical} 2E{sub o} so measurement of `t` allows mass spectra to be obtained. It is found that LSNMS is an emerging technique of great sensitivity and flexibility, useful for both applied analysis and to investigate basic sputtering processes. 4 refs., 3 figs.

  7. Smart cathodic protection systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Polder, R.B.; Leggedoor, J.; Schuten, G.; Sajna, S.; Kranjc, A.

    2010-01-01

    Cathodic protection delivers corrosion protection in concrete structures exposed to aggressive environments, e.g. in de-icing salt and marine climates. Working lives of a large number of CP systems are at least more than 13 years and probably more than 25 years, provided a minimum level of maintenan

  8. SOFC Cathode Mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jacobsen, Torben; Zachau-Christiansen, Birgit; Bay, Lasse

    1996-01-01

    The transient response of SOFC oxygen cathodes shows a characteristic inductive hysteresis and correspondingly the impedance diagram combines one or two capacitive arcs with a low frequency inductive arc. These features are discussed on the basis of a three step reaction sequence taken from...

  9. Invited article: physical and chemical analyses of impregnated cathodes operated in a plasma environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Anita; Kulleck, James; Hill, Norm; Ohlinger, Wayne

    2008-11-01

    Destructive analyses of impregnated-cathode assemblies from an ion thruster life test were performed to characterize erosion and degradation after 30,472 h of operation. Post-test inspection of each cathode included examination of the emitter (insert), orifice plate, cathode tube, heater, anode assembly, insulator, and propellant isolator. The discharge-cathode assembly experienced significant erosion due to ion sputtering from the discharge plasma. The keeper electrode plate was removed and the heater and orifice plate were heavily eroded at the conclusion of the test. Had the test continued, these processes would likely have led to cathode failure. The discharge cathode insert experienced significant tungsten transport and temperature dependent barium oxide depletion within the matrix. Using barium depletion semiempirical relations developed by Palluel and Shroff, it is estimated that 25,000 h of operation remained in the discharge insert at the conclusion of the test. In contrast, the neutralizer insert exhibited significantly less tungsten transport and barium oxide depletion consistent with its lower current operation. The neutralizer was estimated to have 140,000 h of insert life remaining at the conclusion of the test. Neither insert had evidence of tungstate or oxide layer formation, previously known to have impeded cathode ignition and operation in similar long duration hollow-cathode tests. The neutralizer cathode was in excellent condition at the conclusion of the test with the exception of keeper tube erosion from direct plume-ion impingement, a previously underappreciated life-limiting mechanism. The most critical finding from the test was a power dependent deposition process within the neutralizer-cathode orifice. The process manifested at low-power operation and led to the production of energetic ions in the neutralizer plume, a potential life-limiting process for the neutralizer. Subsequent return of the engine and neutralizer operation to full

  10. Modeling target erosion during reactive sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Strijckmans, K., E-mail: Koen.Strijckmans@ugent.be; Depla, D.

    2015-03-15

    Highlights: • The erosion of a target is simulated with the RSD2013 software during reactive magnetron sputtering. • The influence of redeposition on the target state and on the hysteresis is explained. • The racetrack formation along the hysteresis and as function of the redeposition is quantified. • Comparison of the racetrack and the sputter profile shows clear differences. - Abstract: The influence of the reactive sputter conditions on the racetrack and the sputter profile for an Al/O{sub 2} DC reactive sputter system is studied by modeling. The role of redeposition, i.e. the deposition of sputtered material back on the target, is therefore taken into account. The used model RSD2013 is capable of simulating the effect of redeposition on the target condition in a spatial resolved way. Comparison between including and excluding redeposition in the RSD2013 model shows that the in-depth oxidation profile of the target differs. Modeling shows that it is important to distinguish between the formed racetrack, i.e. the erosion depth profile, and the sputter profile. The latter defines the distribution of the sputtered atoms in the vacuum chamber. As the target condition defines the sputter yield, it does determine the racetrack and the sputter profile of the planar circular target. Both the shape of the racetrack and the sputter profile change as function of the redeposition fraction as well as function of the oxygen flow change. Clear asymmetries and narrowing are observed for the racetrack shape. Similar effects are noticed for the sputter profile but to a different extent. Based on this study, the often heard misconception that the racetrack shape defines the distribution of the sputtered atoms during reactive sputtering is proven to be wrong.

  11. Microstructure and properties of sputtered thermal barrier coatings

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yang Gao; Lun Xie; Feng Pan; Mengcheng Chen

    2004-01-01

    A 3 kW radio frequency (RF) magnetron-sputtering unit was used to produce zirconia ceramic coatings on hollow turbine blades and vanes, which had been deposited a NiCrAlY bond coat layer by cathodic arc deposition. The NiCrAlY coating surface was shot-peened, and the residual stress in the bond coat layer and the effects of heat treatment on the residual stress are presented.After shot peening porosities and microgaps disappear in the NiCrAlY bond coat, the whole depth profile is residual compressive stress. Coarseness tests show that the roughness value (Rz) decreases from 16.4 to 3.3 μm. The microstructure and phase composition of the coatings were investigated using electron probe microanalysis (EPMA) and X-ray diffraction (XRD). The results show that the NiCrAlY bond coat is composed of γ' and Cr phases, and the Al2O3 scales are formed near the interface between the ZrO2 ceramic layer and the NiCrAlY bond coat. No degradation occurred to RF sputtered ceramic coatings after oxidating at 1150℃ for 100 h,heating at 1150℃ for 5 min and then air-cooling for 500 thermal cycles.

  12. The Fabrication of Flow Field Plates for Direct Methanol Fuel Cell Using Lithography and Radio Frequency Sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ho; Kao, Mu-Jung; Chen, Chih-Hao; Cho, Kun-Ching; Hsu, Chun-Yao; Chen, Zhi-Lun

    2015-08-01

    This study uses lithography to etch flow fields on a single side of a printed circuit board (PCB) and combines a flow field plate with a collector plate to make innovative anode flow field plates and cathode flow field plates for a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC). TiO2 thin film is also sputtered on the anode flow field plate using radio frequency (RF) sputtering. The experimental results show that the prepared DMFC has a better maximum power density of 11.928 mW/cm2. Furthermore, when a TiO2 thin film is sputtered on the flow field plate of the assembled DMFC, the maximum power density is 14.426 mW/cm2, which is actually 21% more than that for a DMFC with no TiO2 thin film coated on the flow field plate.

  13. A 10B-based neutron detector with stacked Multiwire Proportional Counters and macrostructured cathodes

    CERN Document Server

    Stefanescu, I; Birch, J; Defendi, I; Hall-Wilton, R; Hoglund, C; Hultman, L; Zee, M; Zeitelhack, K

    2013-01-01

    We present the results of the measurements of the detection efficiency for a 4.7 \\r{A} neutron beam incident upon a detector incorporating a stack of up to five MultiWire Proportional Counters (MWPC) with Boron-coated cathodes. The cathodes were made of Aluminum and had a surface exhibiting millimeter-deep V-shaped grooves of 45{\\deg}, upon which the thin Boron film was deposited by DC magnetron sputtering. The incident neutrons interacting with the converter layer deposited on the sidewalls of the grooves have a higher capture probability, owing to the larger effective absorption film thickness. This leads to a higher overall detection efficiency for the grooved cathode when compared to a cathode with a flat surface. Both the experimental results and the predictions of the GEANT4 model suggests that a 5-counter detector stack with coated grooved cathodes has the same efficiency as a 7-counter stack with flat cathodes. The reduction in the number of counters in the stack without altering the detection efficie...

  14. Collision-spike Sputtering of Au Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoval, Luis; Urbassek, Herbert M

    2015-12-01

    Ion irradiation of nanoparticles leads to enhanced sputter yields if the nanoparticle size is of the order of the ion penetration depth. While this feature is reasonably well understood for collision-cascade sputtering, we explore it in the regime of collision-spike sputtering using molecular-dynamics simulation. For the particular case of 200-keV Xe bombardment of Au particles, we show that collision spikes lead to abundant sputtering with an average yield of 397 ± 121 atoms compared to only 116 ± 48 atoms for a bulk Au target. Only around 31 % of the impact energy remains in the nanoparticles after impact; the remainder is transported away by the transmitted projectile and the ejecta. The sputter yield of supported nanoparticles is estimated to be around 80 % of that of free nanoparticles due to the suppression of forward sputtering.

  15. Ion sputtered deposit analysis by electron microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lundquist, T.R.; Kraus, B.; Swann, P.R. (GATAN, Inc., Warrendale, PA (USA))

    1983-12-15

    The collected deposit formed by sputtering a specimen provides a permanent record of the elemental surface composition. For analysis by X-rays or energy loss in a transmission electron microscope, all the sputtered particles (both ions and neutrals) are collected on a carbon or SiO thin film. Surface analysis can be obtained by exposing different areas of the specimen to the ion beam. Information available in the angular distributions of sputtered particles is retained on the thin film substrate. Depth profiling can be performed by the sequential exposure of different areas of the thin film substrate to the sputtered specimen particles. Examples from stainless steels and silicon compounds are given. The advantage of this ion sputtered deposit analysis (ISDA) technique, apart from its collection efficiency, is its ability to store permanently all the elemental information obtained from a particular experiment. This information can then be processed in a parallel or serial fashion at any time after the sputtering experiment.

  16. Epitaxial Growth of Rhenium with Sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-06

    match (a = 2.76 Å) to the oxygen sublattice (a = 2.77 Å) of α-Al2O3 (0001) [2]. Re also has a reasonably high superconducting critical temperature...to copyright. Keywords: Epitaxy, Rhenium, Sputtering 1. Introduction Epitaxial superconducting films of refractory metals are a promising new...than the RF sputtered films. These differences are most likely due to the fact that RF sputtering has more of an etching effect on the sample

  17. Particle visualization in high-power impulse magnetron sputtering. I. 2D density mapping

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Britun, Nikolay, E-mail: nikolay.britun@umons.ac.be; Palmucci, Maria; Konstantinidis, Stephanos [Chimie des Interactions Plasma-Surface (ChIPS), CIRMAP, Université de Mons, 23 Place du Parc, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Snyders, Rony [Chimie des Interactions Plasma-Surface (ChIPS), CIRMAP, Université de Mons, 23 Place du Parc, B-7000 Mons (Belgium); Materia Nova Research Center, Parc Initialis, B-7000 Mons (Belgium)

    2015-04-28

    Time-resolved characterization of an Ar-Ti high-power impulse magnetron sputtering discharge has been performed. This paper deals with two-dimensional density mapping in the discharge volume obtained by laser-induced fluorescence imaging. The time-resolved density evolution of Ti neutrals, singly ionized Ti atoms (Ti{sup +}), and Ar metastable atoms (Ar{sup met}) in the area above the sputtered cathode is mapped for the first time in this type of discharges. The energetic characteristics of the discharge species are additionally studied by Doppler-shift laser-induced fluorescence imaging. The questions related to the propagation of both the neutral and ionized discharge particles, as well as to their spatial density distributions, are discussed.

  18. Cathodic hydrodimerization of nitroolefins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Weßling

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Nitroalkenes are easily accessible in high variety by condensation of aldehydes with aliphatic nitroalkanes. They belong to the group of activated alkenes that can be hydrodimerized by cathodic reduction. There are many olefins with different electron withdrawing groups used for cathodic hydrodimerization, but not much is known about the behaviour of the nitro group. Synthetic applications of this group could profit from the easy access to nitroolefins in large variety, the C–C bond formation with the introduction of two nitro groups in a 1,4-distance and the conversions of the nitro group by reduction to oximes and amines, the conversion into aldehydes and ketones via the Nef reaction and base catalyzed condensations at the acidic CH bond. Eight 1-aryl-2-nitro-1-propenes have been electrolyzed in an undivided electrolysis cell to afford 2,5-dinitro-3,4-diaryl hexanes in high yield. The 4-methoxy-, 4-trifluoromethyl-, 2-chloro- and 2,6-difluorophenyl group and furthermore the 2-furyl and 2-pyrrolyl group have been applied. The reaction is chemoselective as only the double bond but not the nitro group undergoes reaction, is regioselective as a ß,ß-coupling with regard to the nitro group and forms preferentially two out of six possible diastereomers as major products.

  19. Cathodic hydrodimerization of nitroolefins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weßling, Michael; Schäfer, Hans J

    2015-01-01

    Nitroalkenes are easily accessible in high variety by condensation of aldehydes with aliphatic nitroalkanes. They belong to the group of activated alkenes that can be hydrodimerized by cathodic reduction. There are many olefins with different electron withdrawing groups used for cathodic hydrodimerization, but not much is known about the behaviour of the nitro group. Synthetic applications of this group could profit from the easy access to nitroolefins in large variety, the C-C bond formation with the introduction of two nitro groups in a 1,4-distance and the conversions of the nitro group by reduction to oximes and amines, the conversion into aldehydes and ketones via the Nef reaction and base catalyzed condensations at the acidic CH bond. Eight 1-aryl-2-nitro-1-propenes have been electrolyzed in an undivided electrolysis cell to afford 2,5-dinitro-3,4-diaryl hexanes in high yield. The 4-methoxy-, 4-trifluoromethyl-, 2-chloro- and 2,6-difluorophenyl group and furthermore the 2-furyl and 2-pyrrolyl group have been applied. The reaction is chemoselective as only the double bond but not the nitro group undergoes reaction, is regioselective as a ß,ß-coupling with regard to the nitro group and forms preferentially two out of six possible diastereomers as major products.

  20. New oxygen radical source using selective sputtering of oxygen atoms for high rate deposition of TiO{sub 2} films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, Yoji; Lei, Hao; Hoshi, Yoichi [Department of Electronics and Information Technology, Tokyo Polytechnic University, Kanagawa 243-0297 (Japan); State Key Laboratory for Corrosion and Protection, Surface Engineering of Materials Division, Institute of Metal Research, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shenyang 110016 (China); Department of Electronics and Information Technology, Tokyo Polytechnic University, Kanagawa 243-0297 (Japan)

    2012-11-15

    We have developed a new oxygen radical source based on the reactive sputtering phenomena of a titanium target for high rate deposition of TiO{sub 2} films. In this oxygen radical source, oxygen radicals are mainly produced by two mechanisms: selective sputter-emission of oxygen atoms from the target surface covered with a titanium oxide layer, and production of high-density oxygen plasma in the space near the magnetron-sputtering cathode. Compared with molecular oxygen ions, the amount of atomic oxygen radicals increased significantly with an increase in discharge current so that atomic oxygen radicals were mainly produced by this radical source. It should be noted that oxygen atoms were selectively sputtered from the target surface, and titanium atoms sputter-emitted from the target cathode were negligibly small. The amount of oxygen radicals supplied from this radical source increased linearly with increasing discharge current, and oxygen radicals of 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 15} atoms/s/cm{sup 2} were supplied to the substrate surface at a discharge current of 1.2 A. We conclude that our newly developed oxygen radical source can be a good tool to achieve high rate deposition and to control the structure of TiO{sub 2} films for many industrial design applications.

  1. Low yield sputtering of monocrystalline metals

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veen, A. van; Fluit, J.M.

    1980-01-01

    Sputtering of monocrystalline metals by light noble gas ions is studied experimentally and theoretically at low primary ion energy. Evidence is found for a multiple collision process in which surface atoms are sputtered by backscattered ions. The introduction of the maximum recoil energy EM in the s

  2. STUDY ON THE TANTALIZING ON THE SURFACE OF TITANIUM ALLOY BY NET-SHAPE CATHODE GLOW DISCHARGING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    F. Chen; H. Zhou; Y.F. Zhang; J.D. Pan

    2005-01-01

    A new net-shape cathode sputtering target which has a simple structure and a high sputtering was put forward. The multiple-structure made of alloying and coating layers of tantalum was achieved on the surface of TC4 (Ti6Al4V) using this method in double glow surface alloying process. The tantalized samples were investigated by SEM, XRD and electrochemical corrosion method .Results show the complicated tissue of pure tantalizing layer and diffusion layer was successfully formed on the surface of TC4 with the method of net-shape cathode glow discharge, which further improved the corrosion-resistance of TC4 and formed good corrosion-resistant alloys.

  3. Confined ion beam sputtering device and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, D.J.

    1986-03-25

    A hollow cylindrical target, lined internally with a sputter deposit material and open at both ends, surrounds a substrate on which sputtered deposition is to be obtained. An ion beam received through either one or both ends of the open cylindrical target is forced by a negative bias applied to the target to diverge so that ions impinge at acute angles at different points of the cylindrical target surface. The ion impingement results in a radially inward and downstream directed flux of sputter deposit particles that are received by the substrate. A positive bias applied to the substrate enhances divergence of the approaching ion beams to generate a higher sputtered deposition flux rate. Alternatively, a negative bias applied to the substrate induces the core portion of the ion beams to reach the substrate and provide ion polishing of the sputtered deposit thereon.

  4. Kinetic Behavior of LiFePO4/C Thin Film Cathode Material for Lithium-Ion Batteries

    OpenAIRE

    Kucinskis, G; Bajārs, G; Kleperis, J.; Smits, J.

    2010-01-01

    LiFePO4 was prepared in a solid state synthesis with various levels of carbon content. LiFePO4/C thin films were obtained via magnetron sputtering. The surface morphology and structure was examined. Electrochemical properties of LiFePO4/C were studied, by using cyclic voltammetry, chronopotentiometry and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Thin films acquired show a potential use as a cathode in lithium ion batteries, displaying charge capacity up to 34 mAh g-1.

  5. Hollow Cathode With Multiple Radial Orifices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brophy, John R.

    1992-01-01

    Improved hollow cathode serving as source of electrons has multiple radial orifices instead of single axial orifice. Distributes ion current more smoothly, over larger area. Prototype of high-current cathodes for ion engines in spacecraft. On Earth, cathodes used in large-diameter ion sources for industrial processing of materials. Radial orientation of orifices in new design causes current to be dispersed radially in vicinity of cathode. Advantageous where desireable to produce plasma more nearly uniform over wider region around cathode.

  6. Boron ion beam generation utilizing lanthanum hexaboride cathodes: Comparison of vacuum arc and planar magnetron glow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nikolaev, A. G.; Vizir, A. V.; Yushkov, G. Yu., E-mail: gyushkov@mail.ru; Frolova, V. P. [High Current Electronics Institute, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Oks, E. M. [High Current Electronics Institute, Siberian Branch of the Russian Academy of Science, Tomsk 634055 (Russian Federation); Tomsk State University of Control Systems and Radioelectronics, Tomsk 634050 (Russian Federation)

    2016-02-15

    Boron ion beams are widely used for semiconductor ion implantation and for surface modification for improving the operating parameters and increasing the lifetime of machine parts and tools. For the latter application, the purity requirements of boron ion beams are not as stringent as for semiconductor technology, and a composite cathode of lanthanum hexaboride may be suitable for the production of boron ions. We have explored the use of two different approaches to boron plasma production: vacuum arc and planar high power impulse magnetron in self-sputtering mode. For the arc discharge, the boron plasma is generated at cathode spots, whereas for the magnetron discharge, the main process is sputtering of cathode material. We present here the results of comparative test experiments for both kinds of discharge, aimed at determining the optimal discharge parameters for maximum yield of boron ions. For both discharges, the extracted ion beam current reaches hundreds of milliamps and the fraction of boron ions in the total extracted ion beam is as high as 80%.

  7. Liquid cathode primary batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schlaikjer, Carl R.

    1985-03-01

    Lithium/liquid cathode/carbon primary batteries offer from 3 to 6 times the volumetric energy density of zinc/alkaline manganese cells, improved stability during elevated temperature storage, satisfactory operation at temperatures from -40 to +150 °C, and efficient discharge at moderate rates. he lithium/sulfur dioxide cell is the most efficient system at temperatures below 0 °C. Although chemical reactions leading to electrolyte degradation and lithium corrosion are known, the rates of these reactions are slow. While the normal temperature cell reaction produces lithium dithionite, discharge at 60 °C leads to a reduction in capacity due to side reactions involving sulfur dioxide and discharge intermediates. Lithium/thionyl chloride and lithium/sulfuryl chloride cells have the highest practical gravimetric and volumetric energy densities when compared with aqueous and most other nonaqueous systems. For thionyl chloride, discharge proceeds through a series of intermediates to sulfur, sulfur dioxide and lithium chloride. Catalysis, leading to improved rate capability and capacity, has been achieved. The causes of rapid reactions leading to thermal runaway are thought to be chemical in nature. Lithium/sulfuryl chloride cells, which produce sulfur dioxide and lithium chloride on discharge, experience more extensive anode corrosion. An inorganic cosolvent and suitable salt are capable of alleviating this corrosion. Calcium/oxyhalide cells have been studied because of their promise of increased safety without substantial sacrifice of energy density relative to lithium cells. Anode corrosion, particularly during discharge, has delayed practical development.

  8. Microhollow cathode discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenbach, K. H.; Moselhy, M.; Shi, W.; Bentley, R.

    2003-07-01

    By reducing the dimensions of hollow cathodes into the hundred micrometer range, stable, direct current, high (atmospheric) pressure glow discharges in rare gases, rare gas-halide mixtures and in air could be generated. The electron energy distribution in these microdischarges is non-Maxwellian, with a pronounced high-energy tail. The high electron energy together with the high gas density, which favors three-body collisions, is the reason for an efficient excimer generation in these microplasmas. Excimer efficiencies from 1% to 9% have been measured for argon, xenon, argon fluoride, and xenon chloride direct current excimer emitters, with a radiant excimer emittance of up to 2 W/cm2 for xenon. Adding small amounts of oxygen to argon has allowed us to generate vacuum ultraviolet line radiation at 130.5 nm with an efficiency approaching 1%. Pulsing xenon discharges with nanosecond electrical pulses has led to an increase in intensity to 15 W/cm2 and to a simultaneous increase in efficiency to more than 20%. Operating the discharges in an abnormal glow mode has allowed us to generate microdischarge arrays without individual ballast. Applications of these plasma arrays are excimer lamps and plasma reactors.

  9. Liquid cathode primary batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schlaikjer, C.R.

    1985-01-15

    Lithium/liquid cathode/carbon primary batteries offer from 3 to 6 times the volumetric energy density of zinc/alkaline manganese cells, improved stability during elevated temperature storage, satisfactory operation at temperatures from -40 to +150/sup 0/C, and efficient discharge at moderate rates. The lithium/sulfur dioxide cell is the most efficient system at temperatures below 0/sup 0/C. Although chemical reactions leading to electrolyte degradation and lithium corrosion are known, the rates of these reactions are slow. While the normal temperature cell reaction produces lithium dithionite, discharge at 60/sup 0/C leads to a reduction in capacity due to side reactions involving sulfur dioxide and discharge intermediates. Lithium/thionyl chloride and lithium/sulfuryl chloride cells have the highest practical gravimetric and volumetric energy densities when compared with aqueous and most other nonaqueous systems. For thionyl chloride, discharge proceeds through a series of intermediates to sulfur, sulfur dioxide and lithium chloride. Catalysis, leading to improved rate capability and capacity, has been achieved. The causes of rapid reactions leading to thermal runaway are thought to be chemical in nature. Lithium/sulfuryl chloride cells, which produce sulfur dioxide and lithium chloride on discharge, experience more extensive anode corrosion. An inorganic cosolvent and suitable salt are capable of alleviating this corrosion. Calcium/oxyhalide cells have been studied because of their promise of increased safety without substantial sacrifice of energy density relative to lithium cells. Anode corrosion, particularly during discharge, has delayed practical development.

  10. Sputter-cleaning of an aluminum alloy using a thermionically assisted triode plasma system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hsieh, J.H., E-mail: jhhsieh@mail.mcut.edu.tw [Dept. of Materials Engineering, Ming Chi University of Technology, Taishan, Taipei 24301, Taiwan ROC (China); Center for Thin Film Technologies and Applications (CTFTA), Ming Chi University of Technology, Taishan, Taipei 24301, Taiwan, ROC (China); Li, C. [Dept. of Biomedical Engineering, National Yang Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan, ROC (China); Center for Thin Film Technologies and Applications (CTFTA), Ming Chi University of Technology, Taishan, Taipei 24301, Taiwan, ROC (China); Liu, S.J. [Dept. of Math. and Sci., National Taiwan Normal University, Linkou 244, Taiwan, ROC (China)

    2013-09-16

    Polished aluminum alloy (6061) samples were cleaned using Ar plasma in a diode or triode plasma system. By monitoring cathode current, the changes of surface state and removal (cleaning) rate were determined and compared based on various setup. A modified mathematical model, based on Berg's reactive sputtering model, is derived and proposed to simulate the cleaning process. The results show that it is possible to sputter-clean the substrate under a triode setup with low bias and high ion bombardment rate (i.e. −500 V, triode, 1.3 Pa). This triode cleaning process was comparable with high bias and high working pressure diode process (i.e. −2500 V, diode, 3.3 Pa). Cleaning with high energy particle bombardment can create rough surface in nano-scale, although with the similar efficiency. Also, according to the regressive fitting on the cathode current–time curve, it is found that the average secondary electron yield for the oxide compound is around 0.33 if the average secondary electron yield for aluminum metal is 0.1. - Highlights: • Plasma with various ion energies could be generated using a triode system. • A model was built to explain the plasma cleaning process. • The results are believed to be useful in cleaning precision metal parts. • Secondary electron yield could be estimated using the adopted approach. • By using a triode system, the surface roughness could be controlled as will.

  11. Sputtering of Surfaces of the Solid Hydrogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Thestrup Nielsen, Birgitte; Svendsen, Winnie Edith;

    1998-01-01

    Sputtering of the solid hydrogens by electrons and ions exhibits features that may be related to quantum properties of these solids, i.e. a drastic enhancement of the yield for electron–bombarded thick deuterium films and a thermal peak at low ejection energies in the energy distribution of the s......Sputtering of the solid hydrogens by electrons and ions exhibits features that may be related to quantum properties of these solids, i.e. a drastic enhancement of the yield for electron–bombarded thick deuterium films and a thermal peak at low ejection energies in the energy distribution...... of the sputtered particles....

  12. Nanoscale growth twins in sputtered metal films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Misra, Amit [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Anderoglu, Osman [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hoagland, Richard G [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Zhang, X [TEXAS A& M

    2008-01-01

    We review recent studies on the mechanical properties of sputtered Cu and 330 stainless steel films with {l_brace}1 1 1{r_brace} nanoscale growth twins preferentially oriented perpendicular to growth direction. The mechanisms of formation of growth twins during sputtering and the deformation mechanisms that enable usually high strengths in nanotwinned structures are highlighted. Growth twins in sputtered films possess good thermal stability at elevated temperature, providing an approach to extend the application of high strength nanostructured metals to higher temperatures.

  13. Deposition of Aluminium Oxide Films by Pulsed Reactive Sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xinhui MAO; Bingchu CAI; Maosong WU; Guoping CHEN

    2003-01-01

    Pulsed reactive sputtering is a novel process used to deposit some compound films, which are not deposited by traditional D.C. reactive sputtering easily. In this paper some experimental results about the deposition of Al oxide films by pulsed reactive sputtering are presented. The hysteresis phenomenon of the sputtering voltage and deposition rate with the change of oxygen flow during sputtering process are discussed.

  14. Plasma-Surface Interactions in Hollow Cathode Discharges for Electric Propulsion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capece, Angela Maria

    surface state cannot be obtained because of the cathode geometry and high particles fluxes, measurements of the emitter temperature using a two-color pyrometer were used to determine the oxygen surface coverage and characterize the rate processes that occur during poisoning. A model describing the material transport in the plasma discharge was developed and is used to predict the barium and oxygen fluxes to the emitter surface during cathode operation by solving the species continuity and momentum equations. The dominant ionization process for molecular oxygen in the plasma gas is resonant charge exchange with xenon ions. Barium is effectively recycled in the plasma; however, BaO and O2 are not. The model shows that the oxygen flux to the surface is not diffusion limited. Experimental results indicate that the oxygen poisoning rate is slow and that the oxygen poisoning coverage on the emitter surface is less than 3%. A time-dependent model of the reaction kinetics of oxygen and barium at the tungsten surface was developed using the experimental results. The experiments and kinetics model indicate that the dominant processes at the emitter surface are dissociative adsorption of O2, sputtering of the O2 precursor, and desorption of O. Ion sputtering of the weakly bound O2 precursor state limits the poisoning rate and yields low oxygen coverage. Removal of chemisorbed atomic oxygen is dominated by thermal processes. Based on the low oxygen coverage and long poisoning transients, plasma cathodes appear to be able to withstand higher oxygen concentrations than vacuum cathodes.

  15. Aluminum oxide films deposited in low pressure conditions by reactive pulsed dc magnetron sputtering

    CERN Document Server

    Seino, T

    2002-01-01

    The reactive pulsed dc sputtering technique is widely used for the deposition of oxide films. The operating pressure for sputtering is commonly above 0.13 Pa. In this study, however, aluminum oxide (alumina) films were deposited at operating pressures from 0.06 to 0.4 Pa using a sputtering system equipped with a scanning magnetron cathode and a pulsed dc power supply. The pulsed dc power was found to be useful not only to reduce arcing, but also to sustain the discharge at low pressure. The electrical breakdown field, intrinsic stress, O/Al ratio, refractive index, and surface roughness were investigated. Both a low intrinsic stress and an O/Al ratio around the stoichiometry were required to get the film having a high breakdown field. A low operating pressure of 0.1 Pa was found to provide the necessary stress and O/Al ratio targets. A 50-nm-thick alumina film having a maximum breakdown field of 7.4 MV/cm was obtained.

  16. Sputtering graphite coating to improve the elevated-temperature cycling ability of the LiMn2O4 electrode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jiexi; Zhang, Qiaobao; Li, Xinhai; Wang, Zhixing; Guo, Huajun; Xu, Daguo; Zhang, Kaili

    2014-08-14

    To improve the cycle performance of LiMn2O4 at elevated temperature, a graphite layer is introduced to directly cover the surface of a commercial LiMn2O4-based electrode via room-temperature DC magnetron sputtering. The as-modified cathodes display improved capacity retention as compared to the bare LiMn2O4 cathode (BLMO) at 55 °C. When sputtering graphite for 30 min, the sample shows the best cycling performance at 55 °C, maintaining 96.2% capacity retention after 200 cycles. Reasons with respect to the graphite layer for improving the elevated-temperature performance of LiMn2O4 are systematically investigated via the methods of cyclic voltammetry, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectrometry, scanning and transmission electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction and inductively coupled plasma-atomic emission spectrometry. The results demonstrate that the graphite coated LiMn2O4 cathode has much less increased electrode polarization and electrochemical impedance than BLMO during the elevated-temperature cycling process. Furthermore, the graphite layer is able to alleviate the severe dissolution of manganese ions into the electrolyte and mitigate the morphological and structural degradation of LiMn2O4 during cycling. A model for the electrochemical kinetics process is also suggested for explaining the roles of the graphite layer in suppressing the Mn dissolution.

  17. Sputtering of sodium on the planet Mercury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mcgrath, M. A.; Johnson, R. E.; Lanzerotti, L. J.

    1986-01-01

    It is shown here that ion sputtering cannot account for the observed neutral sodium vapor column density on Mercury, but that it is an important loss mechanism for Na. Photons are likely to be the dominant stimulus, both directly through photodesorption and indirectly through thermal desorption of absorbed Na. It is concluded that the atmosphere produced is characterized by the planet's surface temperature, with the ion-sputtered Na contributing to a lesser, but more extended, component of the atmosphere.

  18. The lunar exosphere: The sputtering contribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurz, P.; Rohner, U.; Whitby, J. A.; Kolb, C.; Lammer, H.; Dobnikar, P.; Martín-Fernández, J. A.

    2007-11-01

    We have extended our Monte Carlo model of exospheres [Wurz, P., Lammer, H., 2003. Icarus 164 (1), 1-13] by treating the ion-induced sputtering process from a known surface in a self-consistent way. The comparison of the calculated exospheric densities with experimental data, which are mostly upper limits, shows that all of our calculated densities are within the measurement limits. The total calculated exospheric density at the lunar surface of about 1×10 m as result of solar wind sputtering we find is much less than the experimental total exospheric density of about 10 m. We conclude that sputtering contributes only a small fraction of the total exosphere, at least close to the surface. Because of the considerably larger scale height of atoms released via sputtering into the exosphere, sputtered atoms start to dominate the exosphere at altitudes exceeding a few 1000 km, with the exception of some light and abundant species released thermally, e.g. H 2, He, CH 4, and OH. Furthermore, for more refractory species such as calcium, our model indicates that sputtering may well be the dominant mechanism responsible for the lunar atmospheric inventory, but observational data does not yet allow firm conclusions to be drawn.

  19. Nanostructured lanthanum manganate composite cathode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Wei Guo; Liu, Yi-Lin; Barfod, Rasmus

    2005-01-01

    Anode-supported cells were fabricated with optimized cathodes showing high power density of 1.2 W/cm(2) at 800 C under a cell voltage of 0.7 V and an active area of 4 x 4 cm. A microstructure study was performed on such cell using a field-emission gun scanning electron microscope, which revealed...... that the (La1-xSrx)(y)MnO3 +/-delta (LSM) composite cathodes consist of a network of homogenously distributed LSM, yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ), and pores. The individual grain size of LSM or YSZ is approximately 100 nm. The degree of contact between cathode and electrolyte is 39% on average. (c) 2005...

  20. Development of high power density cathode materials for Li-ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ketterer, B.; Vasilchina, H.; Seemann, K.; Ulrich, S.; Besser, H.; Pfleging, W.; Kaiser, T.; Adelhelm, C. [Forschungszentrum Karlsruhe (Germany). IMF I

    2008-10-15

    Cathode material for Li-ion batteries can be synthesised by r.f. magnetron sputtering of LiCoO{sub 2} targets in a pure Ar plasma. This technique is suitable for large-scale implementation in foil coating set-ups. By choosing the process parameters and by employing post heat treatment nanocrystalline, stoichiometrical LiCoO{sub 2} films can be fabricated which exhibit the desired high temperature phase. The determination of the elementary composition is possible by optical emission spectroscopy including plasma stimulation and carrier gas temperature extraction. The proof of crystal structure is carried out by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Heat treatment can be conventionally realised in a furnace or by laser impact. With regard to increasing the power density, the surface of the cathode material can be enhanced six-fold by laser-assisted surface patterning. (orig.)

  1. Reservoir Cathode for Electric Space Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a reservoir cathode to improve performance in both ion and Hall-effect thrusters. We propose to adapt our existing reservoir cathode technology to this...

  2. Reservoir Cathode for Electric Space Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose a hollow reservoir cathode to improve performance in ion and Hall thrusters. We will adapt our existing reservoir cathode technology to this purpose....

  3. High-current-density, high brightness cathodes for free electron laser applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Green, M.C. (Varian Associates, Palo Alto, CA (USA). Palo Alto Microwave Tube Div.)

    1987-06-01

    This report discusses the following topics: brightness and emittance of electron beams and cathodes; general requirements for cathodes in high brightness electron guns; candidate cathode types; plasma and field emission cathodes; true field emission cathodes; oxide cathodes; lanthanum hexaborides cathodes; laser driven thermionic cathodes; laser driven photocathodes; impregnated porous tungsten dispenser cathodes; and choice of best performing cathode types.

  4. Sputtered film thermistor IR detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baliga, Shankar B.; Rost, Martin R.; Doctor, Alan P.

    1994-07-01

    The thermistor infrared detector or bolometer is the detector of choice in many classical remote sensing applications such as horizon sensing, noncontact thermometry, and industrial applications. In recent years, the authors have developed a thin film process where the thermistor material is deposited from a target directly onto the substrate. This is an advance over the labor intensive ceramic technology, where sintered flakes of the thermistor are bonded to the substrate. The thin film technique permits a variety of device constructions and configurations. Detectors fabricated on heat-sunk ceramic substrates can withstand high operating temperatures and large incident optical power, in both pulsed and CW laser measurements. For dc or low frequency measurements, the films can be deposited onto a thermally isolated membrane with applications in motion sensing, gas detection, and temperature measurement. Utilizing advances in micromachining a 2D array of thermally isolated microbolometer sensors, integrated onto a silicon wafer containing readout circuitry may be achieved. This paper describes the construction of the sputtered film thermistor detectors, their operation, and applications.

  5. Mechanistic Enhancement of SOFC Cathode Durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wachsman, Eric [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States)

    2016-02-01

    Durability of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) under “real world” conditions is an issue for commercial deployment. In particular cathode exposure to moisture, CO2, Cr vapor (from interconnects and BOP), and particulates results in long-term performance degradation issues. Here, we have conducted a multi-faceted fundamental investigation of the effect of these contaminants on cathode performance degradation mechanisms in order to establish cathode composition/structures and operational conditions to enhance cathode durability.

  6. Modelling of the reactive sputtering process with non-uniform discharge current density and different temperature conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vašina, P; Hytková, T; Eliáš, M

    2009-05-01

    The majority of current models of the reactive magnetron sputtering assume a uniform shape of the discharge current density and the same temperature near the target and the substrate. However, in the real experimental set-up, the presence of the magnetic field causes high density plasma to form in front of the cathode in the shape of a toroid. Consequently, the discharge current density is laterally non-uniform. In addition to this, the heating of the background gas by sputtered particles, which is usually referred to as the gas rarefaction, plays an important role. This paper presents an extended model of the reactive magnetron sputtering that assumes the non-uniform discharge current density and which accommodates the gas rarefaction effect. It is devoted mainly to the study of the behaviour of the reactive sputtering rather that to the prediction of the coating properties. Outputs of this model are compared with those that assume uniform discharge current density and uniform temperature profile in the deposition chamber. Particular attention is paid to the modelling of the radial variation of the target composition near transitions from the metallic to the compound mode and vice versa. A study of the target utilization in the metallic and compound mode is performed for two different discharge current density profiles corresponding to typical two pole and multipole magnetics available on the market now. Different shapes of the discharge current density were tested. Finally, hysteresis curves are plotted for various temperature conditions in the reactor.

  7. The pumping of hydrogen and helium by sputter-ion pumps

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, K.M.; Pate, D.J.; Todd, R.J.

    1992-01-01

    The pumping of hydrogen in diode and triode sputter-ion pumps is discussed. The type of cathode material used in these pumps is shown to have a significant impact on the effectiveness with which hydrogen is pumped. Examples of this include data for pumps with aluminum and titanium-alloy cathodes. Diode pumps with aluminum cathodes are shown to be no more effective in the pumping of hydrogen than in the pumping of helium. The use of titanium or titanium alloy anodes is also shown to measurably impact on the speed of these pumps at.very low pressures. This stems from the fact that hydrogen is [times]10[sup 6] more soluble in titanium than in stainless steel. Hydrogen becomes resident in the anodes because of fast neutral burial. Lastly, quantitative data are given for the He speeds and capacities of both noble and conventional diode and triode pumps. The effectiveness of various pump regeneration procedures, subsequent to the pumping of He, is reported.These included bakeout and N[sub 2] glow discharge cleaning. The comparative desorption of He with the subsequent pumping of N[sub 2] is reported on. The N[sub 2] speed of these pumps was used as the benchmark for defining the size of the pumps vs. their respective He speeds.

  8. The pumping of hydrogen and helium by sputter-ion pumps. Revision 3/93

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Welch, K.M.; Pate, D.J.; Todd, R.J.

    1992-12-31

    The pumping of hydrogen in diode and triode sputter-ion pumps is discussed. The type of cathode material used in these pumps is shown to have a significant impact on the effectiveness with which hydrogen is pumped. Examples of this include data for pumps with aluminum and titanium-alloy cathodes. Diode pumps with aluminum cathodes are shown to be no more effective in the pumping of hydrogen than in the pumping of helium. The use of titanium or titanium alloy anodes is also shown to measurably impact on the speed of these pumps at.very low pressures. This stems from the fact that hydrogen is {times}10{sup 6} more soluble in titanium than in stainless steel. Hydrogen becomes resident in the anodes because of fast neutral burial. Lastly, quantitative data are given for the He speeds and capacities of both noble and conventional diode and triode pumps. The effectiveness of various pump regeneration procedures, subsequent to the pumping of He, is reported.These included bakeout and N{sub 2} glow discharge cleaning. The comparative desorption of He with the subsequent pumping of N{sub 2} is reported on. The N{sub 2} speed of these pumps was used as the benchmark for defining the size of the pumps vs. their respective He speeds.

  9. Influence of temperature on the microstructure of V2O5 film prepared by DC magnetron sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SU Qing; PAN Xiaojun; XIE Erqing; WANG Yinyue; QIU Jiawen; LIU Xueqin

    2006-01-01

    V2O5 films were prepared on silicon wafers by DC magnetron sputtering and post-annealing under various conditions. The influence of depositing and post-annealing temperatures on microstructure of V2O5 films was studied by XRD and Raman scattering measurements. The results reveal that sputtered V2O5 films show preferred growth orientation along (001) planes and the c -axis is perpendicular to the silicon substrate surface. It is interesting to find that both the V2O5 film deposited at temperature of 511 ℃ and the one annealed at 500℃ exhibit desirable layer-type structure of orthorhombic symmetry. Such layer-typed V2O5 films are promising candidates for cathodes of rechargeable lithiumor magnesium thin-film batteries.

  10. Computer simulation of sputtering of graphite target in magnetron sputtering device with two zones of erosion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bogdanov R.V.

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available A computer simulation program for discharge in a magnetron sputtering device with two erosion zones was developed. Basic laws of the graphite target sputtering process and transport of sputtered material to the substrate were taken into account in the Monte Carlo code. The results of computer simulation for radial distributions of density and energy flux of carbon atoms on the substrate (at different values of discharge current and pressure of the working gas confirmed the possibility of obtaining qualitative homogeneous films using this magnetron sputtering device. Also the discharge modes were determined for this magnetron sputtering device, in which it was possible to obtain such energy and density of carbon atoms fluxes, which were suitable for deposition of carbon films containing carbon nanotubes and other nanoparticles.

  11. Novel Cathodes Prepared by Impregnation Procedures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eduardo Paz

    2006-09-30

    (1) We showed that similar results were obtained when using various LSM precursors to produce LSM-YSZ cathodes. (2) We showed that enhanced performance could be achieved by adding LSCo to LSMYSZ cathodes. (3) We have preliminary results showing that there is a slow deactivation with LSFYSZ cathodes.

  12. Ion beam sputtering of Ag – Angular and energetic distributions of sputtered and scattered particles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feder, René, E-mail: rene.feder@iom-leipzig.de; Bundesmann, Carsten; Neumann, Horst; Rauschenbach, Bernd

    2013-12-01

    Ion beam sputter deposition (IBD) provides intrinsic features which influence the properties of the growing film, because ion properties and geometrical process conditions generate different energy and spatial distribution of the sputtered and scattered particles. A vacuum deposition chamber is set up to measure the energy and spatial distribution of secondary particles produced by ion beam sputtering of different target materials under variation of geometrical parameters (incidence angle of primary ions and emission angle of secondary particles) and of primary ion beam parameters (ion species and energies). A representative set of Ag thin films is deposited arranged on a substrate holder equatorial to the Ag target in steps of 10° and characterized concerning their film thickness by profilometry to determine the angular distribution of the sputtered particles. The film thickness distributions show a tilted, cosine-like shape and a shifting of the maximum position depending on the primary particle energy and incidence angle of the primary ions. The energy distributions of sputtered and scattered ions and of sputtered neutrals are measured with an energy-selective mass spectrometer. The average energy of the sputtered ions increases with increasing emission angle and also increases with increasing incidence angle of the primary ions. In contrast, the average energy of the sputtered ions is nearly unaffected by the primary particle energy and particle species. The energy distribution of the scattered Ar ions reveals high energetic maxima which shift with increasing emission angle to higher energies. These maxima are not observed for Xe bombardment. The total energies of sputtered and scattered ions show significant differences between the two bombarding species. The maximum of the energy distribution of sputtered Ag neutrals is used to conclude on the surface binding energy of Ag (2.72 eV). All experimental data are compared with Monte Carlo simulations done with

  13. Optical properties of diamond like carbon films containing copper, grown by high power pulsed magnetron sputtering and direct current magnetron sputtering: Structure and composition effects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meškinis, Š., E-mail: sarunas.meskinis@ktu.lt; Čiegis, A.; Vasiliauskas, A.; Šlapikas, K.; Tamulevičius, T.; Tamulevičienė, A.; Tamulevičius, S.

    2015-04-30

    In the present study chemical composition, structure and optical properties of hydrogenated diamond like carbon films containing copper (DLC:Cu films) deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering were studied. Different modes of deposition — direct current (DC) sputtering and high power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) as well as two configurations of the magnetron magnetic field (balanced and unbalanced) were applied. X-ray diffractometry, Raman scattering spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray spectroscopy and atomic force microscopy were used to study the structure and composition of the films. It was shown that by using HIPIMS mode contamination of the cathode during the deposition of DLC:Cu films can be suppressed. In all cases oxygen atomic concentration in the films was in 5–10 at.% range and it increased with the copper atomic concentration. The highest oxygen content was observed in the films deposited employing low ion/neutral ratio balanced DC magnetron sputtering process. According to the analysis of the parameters of Raman scattering spectra, sp{sup 3}/sp{sup 2} bond ratio decreased with the increase of Cu atomic concentration in the DLC films. Clear dependence of the extinction, absorbance and reflectance spectra on copper atomic concentration in the films was observed independently of the method of deposition. Surface plasmon resonance effect was observed only when Cu atomic concentration in DLC:Cu film was at least 15 at.%. The maximum of the surface plasmon resonance peak of the absorbance spectra of DLC:Cu films was in 600–700 nm range and redshifted with the increase of Cu amount. The ratio between the intensities of the plasmonic peak and hydrogenated amorphous carbon related peak at ~ 220 nm both in the extinction and absorbance spectra as well as peak to background ratio of DLC:Cu films increased linearly with Cu amount in the investigated 0–40 at.% range. Reflectance of the plasmonic DLC:Cu films was in 30–50% range that could be

  14. MoO3 Cathodes for High-Temperature Lithium Thin-Film Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    West, William; Whitacre, Jay

    2007-01-01

    MoO3 has shown promise as a cathode material that can extend the upper limit of operating temperature of rechargeable lithium thin-film electrochemical cells. Cells of this type are undergoing development for use as energy sources in cellular telephones, wireless medical sensors, and other, similarly sized portable electronic products. The LiCoO2 and LiMn2O4 cathodes heretofore used in these cells exhibit outstanding cycle lives (of the order of hundreds of thousands of cycles) at room temperature, but operation at higher temperatures reduces their cycle lives substantially: for example, at a temperature of 150 C, cells containing LiCoO2 cathodes lose half their capacities in 100 charge/discharge cycles. The superiority of MoO3 as a cathode material was demonstrated in experiments on lithium thin-film cells fabricated on glass slides. Each cell included a layer of Ti (for adhesion to the glass slide), a patterned layer of Pt that served as a cathode current collector, a cathode layer of MoO3, a solid electrolyte layer of Li3.3 PO3.8 N0.22 ("LiPON"), and an anode layer of Li. All the layers were deposited by magnetron sputtering except for the Li layer, which was deposited by thermal evaporation. These cells, along with similar ones containing LiCoO2 cathodes, were subjected to several tests, including measurements of specific capacity in charge/discharge cycling at a temperature of 150 C. The results of these measurements, plotted in the figure, showed that whereas specific capacity of the cells containing LiCoO2 cathodes faded to about half its initial value after only 100 cycles, the specific capacity of the cells containing the MoO3 cathodes faded only slightly during the first few hundred cycles and thereafter not only recovered to its initial value but continued to increase up to at least 5,500 cycles.

  15. Microhollow Cathode Discharge Excimer Lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenbach, K. H.

    1999-11-01

    character. Reducing the diameter of the cathode hole in a hollow cathode discharge geometry to values on the order of 100 μm has allowed us to extend the pressure range of stable, direct current hollow cathode gas discharges up to atmospheric pressure. The large concentration of high-energy electrons generated in the cathode fall, in combination with the high neutral gas density favors three-body processes such as excimer formation. Excimer emission in xenon discharges peaking at 172 nm, was observed with efficiencies between 6% and 9% at pressures of several hundred Torr. Typical forward voltages are 200 V at dc currents up to 8 mA. Pulsed operation allowed us to extend the current range to 80 mA with corresponding linear increase in optical power. Spatially resolved measurements showed that the source of the excimer radiation at atmospheric pressure and currents of less than 8 mA is confined to the cathode opening. The radiative emittance at 8 mA and atmospheric pressure is approximately 20 W/cm^2. With reduced pressure and increased current, respectively, the excimer source extends into the area outside the cathode hole. Besides in xenon, excimer emission in argon at a peak wavelength of 128 nm has been recorded. In addition to operating the discharge in rare gases, we have also explored its use as rare gas-halide excimer source. In a gas mixture containing 1% ArF we were able to generate stable dc discharges in flowing gas at pressures ranging from 100 Torr to atmospheric pressure. The spectra of the high-pressure ArF discharges are dominated by excimer radiation peaking at 193 nm. The excimer emission of a single ArF discharge at 700 Torr was measured as 150 mW at an efficiency of 3%. Parallel operation of these discharges by means of a resistive anode, which has recently been demonstrated for argon discharges, offers the possibility to use microhollow cathode discharge arrays as dc-excimer lamps, with estimated power densities exceeding 10 W/cm^2. abstract

  16. Sputtering of Lunar Regolith by Solar Wind Protons and Heavy Ions, and General Aspects of Potential Sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alnussirat, S. T.; Sabra, M. S.; Barghouty, A. F.; Rickman, Douglas L.; Meyer, F.

    2014-01-01

    New simulation results for the sputtering of lunar soil surface by solar-wind protons and heavy ions will be presented. Previous simulation results showed that the sputtering process has significant effects and plays an important role in changing the surface chemical composition, setting the erosion rate and the sputtering process timescale. In this new work and in light of recent data, we briefly present some theoretical models which have been developed to describe the sputtering process and compare their results with recent calculation to investigate and differentiate the roles and the contributions of potential (or electrodynamic) sputtering from the standard (or kinetic) sputtering.

  17. Solar Wind Sputtering of Lunar Surface Materials: Role and Some Possible Implications of Potential Sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouty, A. F.; Adams, J. H., Jr.; Meyer, F.; Reinhold, c.

    2010-01-01

    Solar-wind induced sputtering of the lunar surface includes, in principle, both kinetic and potential sputtering. The role of the latter mechanism, however, in many focused studies has not been properly ascertained due partly to lack of data but can also be attributed to the assertion that the contribution of solar-wind heavy ions to the total sputtering is quite low due to their low number density compared to solar-wind protons. Limited laboratory measurements show marked enhancements in the sputter yields of slow-moving, highly-charged ions impacting oxides. Lunar surface sputtering yields are important as they affect, e.g., estimates of the compositional changes in the lunar surface, its erosion rate, as well as its contribution to the exosphere as well as estimates of hydrogen and water contents. Since the typical range of solar-wind ions at 1 keV/amu is comparable to the thickness of the amorphous rim found on lunar soil grains, i.e. few 10s nm, lunar simulant samples JSC-1A AGGL are specifically enhanced to have such rims in addition to the other known characteristics of the actual lunar soil particles. However, most, if not all laboratory studies of potential sputtering were carried out in single crystal targets, quite different from the rim s amorphous structure. The effect of this structural difference on the extent of potential sputtering has not, to our knowledge, been investigated to date.

  18. Electrochemical Behaviour of Sputtering Deposited DLC Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUErjia; ZENGA; LIULX

    2003-01-01

    Diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were deposited via magnetron sputtering process. The energetic ion hombardment on the surface of growing film is one of the major parameters that control the atom mobility on the flirt1 surface and further the physical and chemical characteristics of the films. In this study, the energy of carbon ions was monitored by changing sputtering powerdensity, and its effect on the electrochemical performance of the films was investigated. For the deposition at a higher sputtering power density, a higher sp3 content in the DLC films was achieved with denser structure and increased film-substrate adhesion. The impedance at the interface of Si substrate/sulfufic acid solution was significantly enhanced, and at the same time higher film resistance, lower capacitance, higher breakdown potential and longer breakdown time were observed, which were related to the significant sp3 content of the DLC films.

  19. Collimated Magnetron Sputter Deposition for Mirror Coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vickery, A.; Cooper-Jensen, Carsten P.; Christensen, Finn Erland

    2008-01-01

    At the Danish National Space Center (DNSC), a planar magnetron sputtering chamber has been established as a research and production coating facility for curved X-ray mirrors for hard X-ray optics for astronomical X-ray telescopes. In the following, we present experimental evidence that a collimat......At the Danish National Space Center (DNSC), a planar magnetron sputtering chamber has been established as a research and production coating facility for curved X-ray mirrors for hard X-ray optics for astronomical X-ray telescopes. In the following, we present experimental evidence...... that a collimation of the sputtered particles is an efficient way to suppress the interfacial roughness of the produced multilayer. We present two different types of collimation optimized for the production of low roughness curved mirrors and flat mirrors, respectively....

  20. Sputtering and mixing of supported nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jiménez-Sáez, J.C., E-mail: jc.jimenez@upm.es [Dept. Física y Química Aplicadas a la Técnica Aeronaútica, ETSIAE, Universidad Politécnica de Madrid (UPM), 28040 Madrid (Spain); Pérez-Martín, A.M.C.; Jiménez-Rodríguez, J.J. [Dept. Física Aplicada III (Electricidad y Electrónica), Facultad de Ciencias Físicas, Universidad Complutense de Madrid (UCM), 28040 Madrid (Spain)

    2013-12-01

    Sputtering and mixing of Co nanoparticles supported in Cu(0 0 1) under 1-keV argon bombardment are studied using molecular-dynamics simulations. Particles of different initial size have been considered. The cluster height decreases exponentially with increasing fluence. In nanoparticles, sputtering yield is significantly enhanced compared to bulk. In fact, the value of this magnitude depends on the cluster height. A theoretical model for sputtering is introduced with acceptable results compared to those obtained by simulation. Discrepancies happen mainly for very small particles. Mixing rate at the interface is quantified; and besides, the influence of border effects for clusters of different initial size is assessed. Mixing rate and border length–surface area ratio for the initial interface show a proportionality relation. The phenomenon of ion-induced burrowing of metallic nanoparticles is analysed.

  1. Electrochemical Behaviour of Sputtering Deposited DLC Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Erjia; ZENG A,LIU L X

    2003-01-01

    Diamondlike carbon (DLC) films were deposited via magnetron sputtering process. The energetic ion bombardment on the surface of growing film is one of the major parameters that control the atom mobility on the film surface and further the physical and chemical characteristics of the films. In this study, the energy of carbon ions was monitored by changing sputtering power density, and its effect on the electrochemical performance of the films was investigated. For the deposition at a higher sputtering power density, a higher sp3 content in the DLC films was achieved with denser structure and increased film-substrate adhesion. The impedance at the interface of Si substrate/sulfuric acid solution was significantly enhanced, and at the same time higher film resistance, lower capacitance, higher breakdown potential and longer breakdown time were observed, which were related to the significant sp3 content of the DLC films.

  2. Characterization of Hydroxyapatite Film on Titanium Substrate by Sputtering Technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Radiofrequent magnetron sputtering technique was used to produce calcium phosphate coated on the titanium substrates, and the sputtered coating films were crystallized in an autoclave at 110 ℃ using a low temperature hydrothermal technique. The crystallization of as- sputtered coating film on the titanium substrates were amorphous calcium phosphate film. However, after the hydrothermal technique, calcium phosphate crystals grew and these were columnar crystal. The Ca/ P ratio of sputtered coating films in 1.6 to 2.0.

  3. Sputtering of dimers off a silicon surface

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nietiadi, Maureen L. [Physics Department, University Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Strasse, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Research Center OPTIMAS, University Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Strasse, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Rosandi, Yudi [Physics Department, University Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Strasse, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Research Center OPTIMAS, University Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Strasse, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Department of Physics, Universitas Padjadjaran, Jatinangor, Sumedang 45363 (Indonesia); Kopnarski, Michael [Physics Department, University Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Strasse, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Research Center OPTIMAS, University Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Strasse, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Institut fuer Oberflaechen- und Schichtanalytik IFOS GmbH, Trippstadter Strasse 120, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Urbassek, Herbert M., E-mail: urbassek@rhrk.uni-kl.de [Physics Department, University Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Strasse, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Research Center OPTIMAS, University Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Strasse, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2012-10-15

    We present experimental and molecular-dynamics simulation results of the sputtering of a Si surface by 2 keV Ar ions. Results on both the monomer and dimer distributions are presented. In simulation, these distributions follow a generalized Thompson law with power exponent n=2 and n=3, respectively. The experimental data, obtained via plasma post-ionization in an SNMS (secondary neutral mass spectrometry) apparatus, show good agreement with respect to the dimer fraction, and the relative energy distributions of dimers and monomers. The consequences for the dimer sputtering mechanism are discussed.

  4. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlan U. Anderson; Fatih Dogan; Vladimir Petrovsky

    2002-03-31

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. This period has continued to address the problem of making dense 1/2 to 5 {micro}m thick dense layers on porous substrates (the cathode LSM). Our current status is that we are making structures of 2-5 cm{sup 2} in area, which consist of either dense YSZ or CGO infiltrated into a 2-5 {micro}m thick 50% porous layer made of either nanoncrystalline CGO or YSZ powder. This composite structure coats a macroporous cathode or anode; which serves as the structural element of the bi-layer structure. These structures are being tested as SOFC elements. A number of structures have been evaluated both as symmetrical and as button cell configuration. Results of this testing indicates that the cathodes contribute the most to cell losses for temperatures below 750 C. In this investigation different cathode materials were studied using impedance spectroscopy of symmetric cells and IV characteristics of anode supported fuel cells. Cathode materials studied included La{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (LSCF), La{sub 0.7}Sr{sub 0.2}MnO{sub 3} (LSM), Pr{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (PSCF), Sm{sub 0.8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF), and Yb{sub .8}Sr{sub 0.2}Co{sub 0.2}Fe{sub 0.8}O{sub 3} (SSCF). A new technique for filtering the Fourier transform of impedance data was used to increase the sensitivity of impedance analysis. By creating a filter specifically for impedance spectroscopy the resolution was increased. The filter was tailored to look for specific circuit elements like R//C, Warburg, or constant phase elements. As many as four peaks can be resolved using the filtering technique on symmetric cells. It may be possible to relate the different peaks to material parameters, like the oxygen exchange coefficient. The cathode grouped in order from lowest to highest ASR is

  5. Characterization of multicapillary dielectric cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleizer, J. Z.; Hadas, Y.; Yarmolich, D.; Felsteiner, J.; Krasik, Ya. E.

    2007-04-01

    Parameters of the plasma and electron beam produced by a multicapillary cathode in a diode powered by a ˜200kV, ˜300ns pulse are presented. It was found that the source of electrons is the plasma ejected from the capillaries. Inside the capillaries this plasma obtains electron density and temperature of ˜8×1015cm-3 and ˜5eV, respectively. In the vicinity of the cathode, the density and temperature of the plasma electrons were found to be 2×1014cm-3 and 4.5eV, respectively, for electron current density of ˜40A/cm2. It was shown that the plasma expansion velocity is in the range of (1-2)×106cm/s for current density of >12A/cm2.

  6. Microhollow cathode discharge excimer lamps

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenbach, Karl H.; El-Habachi, Ahmed; Moselhy, Mohamed M.; Shi, Wenhui; Stark, Robert H.

    2000-05-01

    Microhollow cathode discharges are high-pressure, nonequilibrium gas discharges between a hollow cathode and a planar or hollow anode with electrode dimensions in the 100 μm range. The large concentration of high-energy electrons, in combination with the high-gas density favors excimer formation. Excimer emission was observed in xenon and argon, at wavelengths of 128 and 172 nm, respectively, and in argon fluoride and xenon chloride, at 193 and 308 nm. The radiant emittance of the excimer radiation was found to increase monotonically with pressure. However, due to the decrease in source size with pressure, the efficiency (ratio of excimer radiant power to input electrical power), has for xenon and argon fluoride a maximum at ˜400 Torr. The maximum efficiency is between 6% and 9% for xenon, and ˜2% for argon fluoride.

  7. RF Sputtering of Gold Contacts On Niobium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, D. W.

    1983-01-01

    Reliable gold contacts are deposited on niobium by combination of RF sputtering and photolithography. Process results in structures having gold only where desired for electrical contact. Contacts are stable under repeated cycling from room temperature to 4.2 K and show room-temperature contact resistance as much as 40 percent below indium contacts made by thermalcompression bonding.

  8. Research on Sputtering of Ferroelectric Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    1990-02-01

    and d1,5 coefficients as a function of composition in the PbNb 2 06-BaNb2O6 system. Fig. 4 Schematic representation of the sputter coating process. Fig...and photochromic 2 activities, and promises excellent optoelectronic properties. There have been numerous concepts for its application in elec- tronic

  9. IGM metal enrichment through dust sputtering

    CERN Document Server

    Bianchi, S; Bianchi, Simone; Ferrara, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    We study the motion of dust grains into the Intergalactic Medium (IGM) around redshift z=3, to test the hypothesis that grains can efficiently pollute the gas with metals through sputtering. We use the results available in the literature for radiation-driven dust ejection from galaxies as initial conditions, and follow the motion onward. Via this mechanism, grains are ejected into the IGM with velocities >100 km/s; as they move supersonically, grains can be efficiently eroded by non-thermal sputtering. However, Coulomb and collisional drag forces effectively reduce the charged grain velocity. Up-to-date sputtering yields for graphite and silicate (olivine) grains have been derived using the code TRIM, for which we provide analytic fits. After training our method on a homogeneous density case, we analyze the grain motion and sputtering in the IGM density field as derived from a LambdaCDM cosmological simulation at z = 3.27. We found that only large (a >~ 0.1-um) grains can travel up to considerable distances (...

  10. Lithium insertion in sputtered vanadium oxide film

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    West, K.; Zachau-Christiansen, B.; Skaarup, S.V.

    1992-01-01

    were oxygen deficient compared to V2O5. Films prepared in pure argon were reduced to V(4) or lower. The vanadium oxide films were tested in solid-state lithium cells. Films sputtered in oxygen showed electrochemical properties similar to crystalline V2O5. The main differences are a decreased capacity...

  11. Characterization of sputtered ZnO films under different sputter-etching time of substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Cui-ping; YANG Bao-he; QIAN Li-rong; XU Sheng; DAI Wei; LI Ming-ji; LI Xiao-wei; GAO Cheng-yao

    2011-01-01

    Polycrystalline ZnO films are prepared using radio frequency magnetron sputtering on glass substrates which are sputteretched for different time.Both the size of ZnO grains and the root-mean-square (RMS) roughness decrease,as the sputteretching time of the substrate increases.More Zn atoms are bound to O atoms in the films,and the defect concentration is decreased with increasing sputter-etching time of substrate.Meanwhile,the crystallinity and c-axis orientation are improved at longer sputter-etching time of the substrate.The Raman peaks at 99 cm-1,438 cm-1 and 589 cm-1 are identified as E2(low),E2(high) and E1(LO) modes,respectively,and the position of E1(LO) peak blue shifts at longer sputter-etching time.The transmittances of the films,which are deposited on the substrate and etched for 10 min and 20 min,are higher in the visible region than that of the films deposited under longer sputter-etching time of 30 min.The bandgap increases from 3.23 eV to 3.27 eV with the increase of the sputter-etching time of substrate.

  12. A pulsed cathodic arc spacecraft propulsion system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, P R C; Bilek, M M M; Tarrant, R N; McKenzie, D R [School of Physics, University of Sydney, NSW 2006 Australia (Australia)

    2009-11-15

    We investigate the use of a centre-triggered cathodic arc as a spacecraft propulsion system that uses an inert solid as a source of plasma. The cathodic vacuum arc produces almost fully ionized plasma with a high exhaust velocity (>10{sup 4} m s{sup -1}), giving a specific impulse competitive with other plasma or ion thrusters. A centre trigger design is employed that enables efficient use of cathode material and a high pulse-to-pulse repeatability. We compare three anode geometries, two pulse current profiles and two pulse durations for their effects on impulse generation, energy and cathode material usage efficiency. Impulse measurement is achieved through the use of a free-swinging pendulum target constructed from a polymer material. Measurements show that impulse is accurately controlled by varying cathode current. The cylindrical anode gave the highest energy efficiency. Cathode usage is optimized by choosing a sawtooth current profile. There is no requirement for an exhaust charge neutralization system.

  13. Fabrication of electrocatalytic Ta nanoparticles by reactive sputtering and ion soft landing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Grant E.; Moser, Trevor; Engelhard, Mark; Browning, Nigel D.; Laskin, Julia

    2016-11-07

    About 40 years ago, it was shown that tungsten carbide exhibits similar catalytic behavior to Pt for certain commercially relevant reactions, thereby suggesting the possibility of cheaper and earth-abundant substitutes for costly and rare precious metal catalysts. In this work, reactive magnetron sputtering of Ta in the presence of three model hydrocarbons (2-butanol, heptane, and m-xylene) combined with gas aggregation and ion soft landing was employed to prepare organic-inorganic hybrid nanoparticles (NPs) on surfaces for evaluation of catalytic activity and durability. The electro-catalytic behavior of the NPs supported on glassy carbon was evaluated in acidic aqueous solution by cyclic voltammetry. The Ta-heptane and Ta-xylene NPs were revealed to be active and robust toward promotion of the oxygen reduction reaction, an important process occurring at the cathode in fuel cells. In comparison, pure Ta and Ta-butanol NPs were essentially unreactive. Characterization techniques including atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) were applied to probe how different sputtering conditions such as the flow rates of gases, sputtering current, and aggregation length affect the properties of the NPs. AFM images reveal the focused size of the NPs as well as their preferential binding along the step edges of graphite surfaces. In comparison, TEM images of the same NPs on carbon grids show that they bind randomly to the surface with some agglomeration but little coalescence. The TEM images also reveal morphologies with crystalline cores surrounded by amorphous regions for NPs formed in the presence of 2-butanol and heptane. In contrast, NPs formed in the presence of m-xylene are amorphous throughout. XPS spectra indicate that while the percentage of Ta, C, and O in the NPs varies depending on the sputtering conditions and hydrocarbon employed, the electron binding energies of the elements are similar

  14. News on sputter theory: Molecular targets, nanoparticle desorption, rough surfaces

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urbassek, Herbert M., E-mail: urbassek@rhrk.uni-kl.d [Fachbereich Physik und Forschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Universitaet Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Strasse, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Anders, Christian [Fachbereich Physik und Forschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Universitaet Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Strasse, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Rosandi, Yudi [Fachbereich Physik und Forschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Universitaet Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Strasse, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Department of Physics, Universitas Padjadjaran, Jatinangor, Sumedang 45363 (Indonesia)

    2011-05-01

    Sputtering theory has existed as a mature and well-understood field of physics since the theory of collision-cascade sputtering has been developed in the late 1960s. In this presentation we outline several directions, in which the basic understanding of sputter phenomena has been challenged and new insight has been obtained recently. Sputtering of molecular solids: after ion impact on a molecular solid, not all of the impact energy is available for inducing sputtering. Part of the energy is converted into internal (rotational and vibrational) excitation of the target molecules, and part is used for molecule dissociation. Furthermore, exothermic or endothermic chemical reactions may further change the energy balance in the irradiated target. Nanoparticle desorption: usually, the flux of sputtered particles is dominated by monatomics; in the case of a pronounced spike contribution to sputtering, the contribution of clusters in the sputtered flux may become considerable. Here, we discuss the situation that nanoparticles were present on the surface, and outline mechanisms of how these may be desorbed (more or less intact) by ion or cluster impact. Rough surfaces: real surfaces are rough and contain surface defects (adatoms, surface steps, etc.). For grazing ion incidence, these influence the energy input into the surface dramatically. For such incidence angles sputtering vanishes for a flat terrace; however, ion impact close to a defect may lead to sputter yields comparable to those at normal incidence. In such cases sputtering also exhibits a pronounced azimuth and temperature dependence.

  15. Preventing Corrosion by Controlling Cathodic Reaction Kinetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-25

    Preventing corrosion by controlling cathodic reaction kinetics Progress Report for Period: 1 SEP 2015-31 MAR 2016 John Keith Department of...25 March 2016 Preventing corrosion by controlling cathodic reaction kinetics Annual Summary Report: FY16 PI: John Keith, 412-624-7016,jakeith...dominate the metal’s cathodic behavior. Within an alkaline environment, we expect the following reduction reactions to be catalyzed on the oxide

  16. A novel sputtered Pd mesh architecture as an advanced electrocatalyst for highly efficient hydrogen production

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Lucas-Consuegra, Antonio; de la Osa, Ana R.; Calcerrada, Ana B.; Linares, José J.; Horwat, David

    2016-07-01

    This study reports the preparation, characterization and testing of a sputtered Pd mesh-like anode as an advanced electrocatalyst for H2 production from alkaline ethanol solutions in an Alkaline Membrane Electrolyzer (AEM). Pd anodic catalyst is prepared by magnetron sputtering technique onto a microfiber carbon paper support. Scanning Electron Microscopy images reveal that the used preparation technique enables to cover the surface of the carbon microfibers exposed to the Pd target, leading to a continuous network that also maintains part of the original carbon paper macroporosity. Such novel anodic architecture (organic binder free) presents an excellent electro-chemical performance, with a maximum current density of 700 mA cm-2 at 1.3 V, and, concomitantly, a large H2 production rate with low energy requirement compared to water electrolysis. Potassium hydroxide emerges as the best electrolyte, whereas temperature exerts the expected promotional effect up to 90 °C. On the other hand, a 1 mol L-1 ethanol solution is enough to guarantee an efficient fuel supply without any mass transfer limitation. The proposed system also demonstrates to remain stable over 150 h of operation along five consecutives cycles, producing highly pure H2 (99.999%) at the cathode and potassium acetate as the main anodic product.

  17. Ion sources with arc-discharge plasma box driven by directly heated LaB(6) electron emitter or cold cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanov, Alexander A; Davydenko, Vladimir I; Deichuli, Petr P; Shulzhenko, Grigori I; Stupishin, Nikolay V

    2008-02-01

    In the Budker Institute, Novosibirsk, an ion source with arc-discharge plasma box has been developed in the recent years for application in thermonuclear devices for plasma diagnostics. Several modifications of the ion source were provided with extracted current ranging from 1 to 7 A and pulse duration of up to 4 s. Initially, the arc-discharge plasma box with cold cathode was used, with which pulse duration is limited to 2 s by the cathode overheating and sputtering in local arc spots. Recently, a directly heated LaB(6) electron emitter was employed instead, which has extended lifetime compared to the cold cathode. In the paper, characteristics of the beam produced with both arrangements of the plasma box are presented.

  18. Cathode materials: A personal perspective

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodenough, John B. [Texas Materials Institute, University of Texas at Austin, ETC 9.102, 1 University Station, Austin, TX 78712-1063 (United States)

    2007-12-06

    A thermodynamically stable rechargeable battery has a voltage limited by the window of the electrolyte. An aqueous electrolyte has a window of 1.2 eV, which prevents achieving the high energy density desired for many applications. A non-aqueous electrolyte with a window of 5 eV requires Li{sup +} rather than H{sup +} as the working ion. Early experiments with Li{sub x}TiS{sub 2} cathodes showed competitive capacity and rate capability, but problems with a lithium anode made the voltage of a safe cell based on a sulfide cathode too low to be competitive with a nickel/metal-hydride battery. Transition-metal oxides can give voltages of 4.5 V versus Li{sup +}/Li{sup 0}. However, the challenge with oxides has been to obtain a competitive capacity and rate capability while retaining a high voltage with low-cost, environmentally friendly cathode materials. Comparisons will be made between layered Li{sub 1-x}MO{sub 2}, spinels Li{sub 1-x}[M{sub 2}]O{sub 4}, and olivines Li{sub 1-x}MPO{sub 4} having 0 < x < 1. Although higher capacities can be obtained with layered Li{sub 1-x}MO{sub 2} compounds, which have enabled the wireless revolution, their metastability makes them unlikely to be used in power applications. The spinel and olivine framework structures have been shown to be capable of charge/discharge rates of over 10C with a suitable temperature range for plug-in hybrid vehicles. (author)

  19. Magnetron sputtered gadolinia-doped ceria diffusion barriers for metal-supported solid oxide fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sønderby, Steffen; Klemensø, Trine; Christensen, Bjarke H.;

    2014-01-01

    and substrate bias voltage. A GDC layer thickness of 0.6 μm is found to effectively block Sr diffusion when bias voltage and deposition temperature is tuned to promote dense coatings. The adatom mobility has a large influence on the film density. Low temperature and bias voltage result in underdense column......Gadolinia-doped ceria (GDC) thin films are deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering in an industrial-scale setup and implemented as barrier layers between the cathode and electrolyte in metal-based solid oxide fuel cells consisting of a metal support, an electrolyte of ZrO2 co-doped with Sc2O3...... and Y2O3 (ScYSZ) and a Sr-doped lanthanum cobalt oxide cathode. In order to optimize the deposition of GDC to obtain high electrochemical performance of the cells, the influence of film thickness and adatom mobility is studied. The adatom mobility is varied by tuning the deposition temperature...

  20. Characterization of magnetron co-sputtered W-doped C-based films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Moura e Silva, C.W. [REDEMAT/CETEC - Laboratorio de Engenharia e Modificacoes de Superficies, CETEC, Av. Jose Candido da Silveira, 2000, Horto, 31.170-000, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Branco, J.R.T. [REDEMAT/CETEC - Laboratorio de Engenharia e Modificacoes de Superficies, CETEC, Av. Jose Candido da Silveira, 2000, Horto, 31.170-000, Belo Horizonte, Minas Gerais (Brazil); Cavaleiro, A. [ICEMS - Grupo de Materiais e Engenharia de Superficies, Faculdade de Ciencias e Tecnologia da Universidade de Coimbra - Polo II - Pinhal de Marrocos, 3030-788 Coimbra (Portugal)]. E-mail: albano.cavaleiro@dem.uc.pt

    2006-11-23

    In this paper, W-doped C-based coatings were deposited on steel and silicon substrates by RF magnetron sputtering, using W and C targets, varying the cathode power applied to the W target and the substrate bias. The chemical composition was varied by placing the substrates in a row facing the C and W targets. W content in the films increased from 1 to 2 at.% over the C target to {approx} 73 at.% over the W target. The coatings with W content lower than {approx} 12 at.% and {approx} 23 at.%, for biased and unbiased conditions, respectively, showed X-ray amorphous structures, although carbide nanocrystals must exist as shown by the detection of the WC{sub 1-x} phase in films with higher W content. C-rich films were very dense and developed a columnar morphology with increasing W content. An improvement in the hardness (from 10 GPa, up to 25 GPa) of the films was achieved either when negative substrate bias was used in the deposition, or when the WC{sub 1-x} phase was detected by X-ray diffraction. The adhesion of the coatings is very low with spontaneous spallation of those deposited with negative substrate bias higher than 45 V. Varieties in cathode power (90 W or 120 W) applied to the W target showed no observable influence on the characteristics of the films.

  1. Preliminary Results of Field Emission Cathode Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sovey, James S.; Kovaleski, Scott D.

    2001-01-01

    Preliminary screening tests of field emission cathodes such as chemical vapor deposited (CVD) diamond, textured pyrolytic graphite, and textured copper were conducted at background pressures typical of electric thruster test facilities to assess cathode performance and stability. Very low power electric thrusters which provide tens to hundreds micronewtons of thrust may need field emission neutralizers that have a capability of tens to hundreds of microamperes. From current voltage characteristics, it was found that the CVD diamond and textured metals cathodes clearly satisfied the Fowler-Nordheim emission relation. The CVD diamond and a textured copper cathode had average current densities of 270 and 380 mA/sq cm, respectively, at the beginning-of-life. After a few hours of operation the cathode emission currents degraded by 40 to 75% at background pressures in the 10(exp -5) Pa to 10(exp -4) Pa range. The textured pyrolytic graphite had a modest current density at beginning-of-life of 84 mA/sq cm, but this cathode was the most stable of all. Extended testing of the most promising cathodes is warranted to determine if current degradation is a burn-in effect or whether it is a long-term degradation process. Preliminary experiments with ferroelectric emission cathodes, which are ceramics with spontaneous electric polarization, were conducted. Peak current densities of 30 to 120 mA/sq cm were obtained for pulse durations of about 500 ns in the 10(exp -4) Pa pressure range.

  2. The sputter cross section of a surface-vacancy island

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rosandi, Yudi, E-mail: rosandi@physik.uni-kl.de [Department of Physics, Universitas Padjadjaran, Jatinangor, Sumedang 45363 (Indonesia); Fachbereich Physik und Forschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Universitaet Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Strasse, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Urbassek, Herbert M., E-mail: urbassek@rhrk.uni-kl.de [Fachbereich Physik und Forschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Universitaet Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schroedinger-Strasse, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2011-07-15

    Using molecular-dynamics simulation we investigate the effect of surface-vacancy islands on ion-induced sputtering. As an exemplary case, the sputtering of a Pt(1 1 1) surface by 5 keV Ar{sup +} ions incident at 83{sup o} towards the surface normal is investigated. We find that only the ascending step of the island induces sputtering. Wide vacancy islands exhibit the direct-hit, indirect-hit and channeling zones previously identified for surface steps and adatom islands. A special role is played by the descending step edge. Even though it is not sputtered itself, it deflects ion trajectories and may direct them to the ascending step edge thus enhancing sputtering. We derive a simple criterion based on the shadow cone of the descending step to decide whether a vacancy island contributes to sputtering or not.

  3. GaAs Films Prepared by RF-Magnetron Sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    L.H. Ouyang; D.L. Rode; T. Zulkifli; B. Abraham-Shrauner; N. Lewis; M.R. Freeman

    2001-08-01

    The authors reported on the optical absorption, adhesion, and microstructure of RF-magnetron sputtered films of hydrogenated amorphous and microcrystalline GaAs films for the 1 to 25 {micro}m infrared wavelength rate. Sputtering parameters which were varied include sputtering power, temperature and pressure, and hydrogen sputtering-gas concentration. TEM results show a sharp transition from purely amorphous GaAs to a mixture of microcrystalline GaAs in an amorphous matrix at 34 {+-} 2 C. By optimizing the sputtering parameters, the optical absorption coefficient can be decreased below 100 cm{sup -1} for wavelengths greater than about 1.25 {micro}m. These results represent the lowest reported values of optical absorption for sputtered films of GaAs directly measured by spectrophotometry for the near-infrared wavelength region.

  4. SPUTTERING FROM A POROUS MATERIAL BY PENETRATING IONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez-Nieva, J. F. [Instituto Balseiro, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, 8400 Bariloche (Argentina); Bringa, E. M. [CONICET and Instituto de Ciencias Basicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, 5500 Mendoza (Argentina); Cassidy, T. A. [CalTech/JPL, Pasadena, CA 91109 (United States); Johnson, R. E.; Fama, M.; Baragiola, R. A. [Laboratory for Atomic and Surface Physics, University of Virginia, Charlottesville, VA 22903 (United States); Caro, A. [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM 94551 (United States); Loeffler, M. J. [NASA Goddard Space Flight Center, Astrochemistry Branch, Code 691, Greenbelt, MD 20771 (United States); Farkas, D. [Department of Materials Sciences, Virginia Tech, Blacksburg, VA 24061 (United States)

    2011-12-10

    Porous materials are ubiquitous in the universe and weathering of porous surfaces plays an important role in the evolution of planetary and interstellar materials. Sputtering of porous solids in particular can influence atmosphere formation, surface reflectivity, and the production of the ambient gas around materials in space. Several previous studies and models have shown a large reduction in the sputtering of a porous solid compared to the sputtering of the non-porous solid. Using molecular dynamics simulations we study the sputtering of a nanoporous solid with 55% of the solid density. We calculate the electronic sputtering induced by a fast, penetrating ion, using a thermal spike representation of the deposited energy. We find that sputtering for this porous solid is, surprisingly, the same as that for a full-density solid, even though the sticking coefficient is high.

  5. Sputtering from a Porous Material by Penetrating Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Nieva, J. F.; Bringa, E. M.; Cassidy, T. A.; Johnson, R. E.; Caro, A.; Fama, M.; Loeffler, M. J.; Baragiola, R. A.; Farkas, D.

    2011-12-01

    Porous materials are ubiquitous in the universe and weathering of porous surfaces plays an important role in the evolution of planetary and interstellar materials. Sputtering of porous solids in particular can influence atmosphere formation, surface reflectivity, and the production of the ambient gas around materials in space. Several previous studies and models have shown a large reduction in the sputtering of a porous solid compared to the sputtering of the non-porous solid. Using molecular dynamics simulations we study the sputtering of a nanoporous solid with 55% of the solid density. We calculate the electronic sputtering induced by a fast, penetrating ion, using a thermal spike representation of the deposited energy. We find that sputtering for this porous solid is, surprisingly, the same as that for a full-density solid, even though the sticking coefficient is high.

  6. Fluidized Bed Sputtering for Particle and Powder Metallization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-04-01

    Fluidized Bed Sputtering for Particle and Powder Metallization by Daniel M. Baechle, J. Derek Demaree, James K. Hirvonen, and Eric D...5069 ARL-TR-6435 April 2013 Fluidized Bed Sputtering for Particle and Powder Metallization Daniel M. Baechle, J. Derek Demaree, James K...YYYY) April 2013 2. REPORT TYPE Final 3. DATES COVERED (From - To) June 2008–June 2012 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Fluidized Bed Sputtering for

  7. Improvement in luminance efficiency of organic light emitting diodes by suppression of secondary electron bombardment of substrate during sputter deposition of top electrode films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamaguchi, Daichi; Kobayashi, Shin-ichi; Uchida, Takayuki; Sawada, Yutaka; Lei, Hao; Hoshi, Yoichi

    2016-10-01

    In this study, we investigated the degradation mechanisms of the luminance performance of organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) when their top electrode films were deposited by sputter deposition process. During the sputter deposition of the top electrode films, the suppression of the incidence of high-energy electrons on the substrate was attempted using various methods. As a result, we found that during electrode deposition, the incidence of the high-energy secondary electrons, which were emitted from the target surface, on the substrate was the main cause of the significant degradation of the luminance performance. It was also found that the application of a magnetic field by setting permanent magnets near the substrate holder and the insertion of a shield plate near the target cathode were effective in suppressing the incidence of secondary electrons on the substrate.

  8. Modeling and stability analysis of the nonlinear reactive sputtering process

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    György Katalin

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available The model of the reactive sputtering process has been determined from the dynamic equilibrium of the reactive gas inside the chamber and the dynamic equilibrium of the sputtered metal atoms which form the compound with the reactive gas atoms on the surface of the substrate. The analytically obtained dynamical model is a system of nonlinear differential equations which can result in a histeresis-type input/output nonlinearity. The reactive sputtering process has been simulated by integrating these differential equations. Linearization has been applied for classical analysis of the sputtering process and control system design.

  9. Sputtering materials for VLSI and thin film devices

    CERN Document Server

    Sarkar, Jaydeep

    2010-01-01

    An important resource for students, engineers and researchers working in the area of thin film deposition using physical vapor deposition (e.g. sputtering) for semiconductor, liquid crystal displays, high density recording media and photovoltaic device (e.g. thin film solar cell) manufacturing. This book also reviews microelectronics industry topics such as history of inventions and technology trends, recent developments in sputtering technologies, manufacturing steps that require sputtering of thin films, the properties of thin films and the role of sputtering target performance on overall p

  10. Lifetime dependence of nitrided carbon stripper foils on sputter angle during N{sup +} ion beam sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sugai, I., E-mail: isao.Sugai@kek.jp [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Accelerator Laboratory, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Oyaizu, M. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Takeda, Y. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Accelerator Laboratory, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Kawakami, H. [High Energy Accelerator Research Organization, Institute of Particle and Nuclear Studies, Oho 1-1, Tsukuba, Ibaraki 305-0801 (Japan); Kawasaki, K.; Hattori, T. [Department of Physics, Tokyo Institute of Technology, Ohokayama, Meguro, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Kadono, T. [Department of Physics, University of Tokyo, Hongo, 7-3-1, Bunkyo, Tokyo 113-0033 (Japan)

    2015-09-01

    We fabricated high-lifetime thin nitride carbon stripper (NCS) foils with high nitrogen contents using ion-beam sputtering with reactive nitrogen gas and investigated the dependence of their lifetimes on the sputter angle. The nitrogen in carbon foils plays a critical role in determining their lifetime. Therefore, in order to investigate the effects of the nitrogen level in NCS foils on foil lifetime, we measured the sputtering yield for different sputter angles at a sputtering voltage of 10 kV while using carbon-based targets. We also measured the nitrogen-to-carbon thickness ratios of the foils using Rutherford backscattering spectrometry. The foils made at a sputter angle of 15° using a glassy amorphous carbon target exhibited an average increase of 200-fold in lifetime when compared to commercially available foils.

  11. Hall-effect thruster--Cathode coupling: The effect of cathode position and magnetic field topology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerville, Jason D.

    2009-12-01

    Hall-effect thruster (HET) cathodes are responsible for the generation of the free electrons necessary to initiate and sustain the main plasma discharge and to neutralize the ion beam. The position of the cathode relative to the thruster strongly affects the efficiency of thrust generation. However, the mechanisms by which the position affects the efficiency are not well understood. This dissertation explores the effect of cathode position on HET efficiency. Magnetic field topology is shown to play an important role in the coupling between the cathode plasma and the main discharge plasma. The position of the cathode within the magnetic field affects the ion beam and the plasma properties of the near-field plume, which explains the changes in efficiency of the thruster. Several experiments were conducted which explored the changes of efficiency arising from changes in cathode coupling. In each experiment, the thrust, discharge current, and cathode coupling voltage were monitored while changes in the independent variables of cathode position, cathode mass flow and magnetic field topology were made. From the telemetry data, the efficiency of the HET thrust generation was calculated. Furthermore, several ion beam and plasma properties were measured including ion energy distribution, beam current density profile, near-field plasma potential, electron temperature, and electron density. The ion beam data show how the independent variables affected the quality of ion beam and therefore the efficiency of thrust generation. The measurements of near-field plasma properties partially explain how the changes in ion beam quality arise. The results of the experiments show that cathode position, mass flow, and field topology affect several aspects of the HET operation, especially beam divergence and voltage utilization efficiencies. Furthermore, the experiments show that magnetic field topology is important in the cathode coupling process. In particular, the magnetic field

  12. Cathode heating mechanisms in pseudospark plasma switches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sommerer, Timothy J.; Pak, Hoyoung; Kushner, Mark J.

    1992-10-01

    Pseudosparks, and the back-lighted thyratron (BLT) in particular, are finding increasing application as pulse power switches. An attractive feature of BLTs is that high current densities (≥ tens of kA cm-2) can be sustained from metal cathodes without auxiliary heating. The source of this current is believed to be electric-field-enhanced thermionic emission resulting from heating of the cathode by ion bombardment during commutation which ultimately melts the surface of the cathode. It is proposed that a photon-driven ionization mechanism in the interelectrode gap of the BLT is responsible for initiating the observed patterns of cathode surface melting and electron emission. A 21/2-dimensional computer model is presented that incorporates a photo-induced ionization mechanism to spread the plasma into the interelectrode gap. It predicts a melting of the cathode in a pattern similar to that which is experimentally observed, and predicts a rate of field-enhanced thermionic electron emission that is sufficient to explain the high BLT conduction current density. In the absence of these mechanisms, the model does not predict the observed large-area melting of the face of the cathode. The cathode heating rate during the BLT switching phase is maximum for operating parameters that are very close to the limit for which the switch will close (that is, the smallest possible pressure-electrode spacing product and smallest possible electrode holes).

  13. Tribological and structural properties of titanium nitride and titanium aluminum nitride coatings deposited with modulated pulsed power magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ward, Logan

    The demand for economical high-performance materials has brought attention to the development of advanced coatings. Recent advances in high power magnetron sputtering (HPPMS) have shown to improve tribological properties of coatings. These coatings offer increased wear and oxidation resistance, which may facilitate the use of more economical materials in harsh applications. This study demonstrates the use of novel forms of HPPMS, namely modulated pulsed-power magnetron sputtering (MPPMS) and deep oscillation magnetron sputtering (DOMS), for depositing TiN and Ti1-xAlxN tribological coatings on commonly used alloys, such as Ti-6Al-4V and Inconel 718. Both technologies have been shown to offer unique plasma characteristics in the physical vapor deposition (PVD) process. High power pulses lead to a high degree of ionization compared to traditional direct-current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) and pulsed magnetron sputtering (PMS). Such a high degree of ionization was previously only achievable by cathodic arc deposition (CAD); however, CAD can lead to increased macroparticles that are unfavorable in high friction and corrosive environments. MPPMS, DOMS, and other HPPMS techniques offer unique plasma characteristics and have been shown to produce coatings with refined grain structure, improved density, hardness, adhesion, and wear resistance. Using DOMS and MPPMS, TiN and Ti1-xAlxN coatings were deposited using PMS to compare microstructures and tribological performance. For Ti1-xAlxN, two sputtering target compositions, Ti 0.5Al0.5 and Ti0.3Al0.7, were used to evaluate the effects of MPPMS on the coating's composition and tribological properties. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to characterize microstructure and crystallographic texture. Several tribological properties were evaluated including: wear rate, coefficient of friction, adhesion, and nanohardness. Results show that substrate

  14. Batteries: Overview of Battery Cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doeff, Marca M

    2010-07-12

    The very high theoretical capacity of lithium (3829 mAh/g) provided a compelling rationale from the 1970's onward for development of rechargeable batteries employing the elemental metal as an anode. The realization that some transition metal compounds undergo reductive lithium intercalation reactions reversibly allowed use of these materials as cathodes in these devices, most notably, TiS{sub 2}. Another intercalation compound, LiCoO{sub 2}, was described shortly thereafter but, because it was produced in the discharged state, was not considered to be of interest by battery companies at the time. Due to difficulties with the rechargeability of lithium and related safety concerns, however, alternative anodes were sought. The graphite intercalation compound (GIC) LiC{sub 6} was considered an attractive candidate but the high reactivity with commonly used electrolytic solutions containing organic solvents was recognized as a significant impediment to its use. The development of electrolytes that allowed the formation of a solid electrolyte interface (SEI) on surfaces of the carbon particles was a breakthrough that enabled commercialization of Li-ion batteries. In 1990, Sony announced the first commercial batteries based on a dual Li ion intercalation system. These devices are assembled in the discharged state, so that it is convenient to employ a prelithiated cathode such as LiCoO{sub 2} with the commonly used graphite anode. After charging, the batteries are ready to power devices. The practical realization of high energy density Li-ion batteries revolutionized the portable electronics industry, as evidenced by the widespread market penetration of mobile phones, laptop computers, digital music players, and other lightweight devices since the early 1990s. In 2009, worldwide sales of Li-ion batteries for these applications alone were US$ 7 billion. Furthermore, their performance characteristics (Figure 1) make them attractive for traction applications such as

  15. Batteries: Overview of Battery Cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doeff, Marca M

    2010-07-12

    The very high theoretical capacity of lithium (3829 mAh/g) provided a compelling rationale from the 1970's onward for development of rechargeable batteries employing the elemental metal as an anode. The realization that some transition metal compounds undergo reductive lithium intercalation reactions reversibly allowed use of these materials as cathodes in these devices, most notably, TiS{sub 2}. Another intercalation compound, LiCoO{sub 2}, was described shortly thereafter but, because it was produced in the discharged state, was not considered to be of interest by battery companies at the time. Due to difficulties with the rechargeability of lithium and related safety concerns, however, alternative anodes were sought. The graphite intercalation compound (GIC) LiC{sub 6} was considered an attractive candidate but the high reactivity with commonly used electrolytic solutions containing organic solvents was recognized as a significant impediment to its use. The development of electrolytes that allowed the formation of a solid electrolyte interface (SEI) on surfaces of the carbon particles was a breakthrough that enabled commercialization of Li-ion batteries. In 1990, Sony announced the first commercial batteries based on a dual Li ion intercalation system. These devices are assembled in the discharged state, so that it is convenient to employ a prelithiated cathode such as LiCoO{sub 2} with the commonly used graphite anode. After charging, the batteries are ready to power devices. The practical realization of high energy density Li-ion batteries revolutionized the portable electronics industry, as evidenced by the widespread market penetration of mobile phones, laptop computers, digital music players, and other lightweight devices since the early 1990s. In 2009, worldwide sales of Li-ion batteries for these applications alone were US$ 7 billion. Furthermore, their performance characteristics (Figure 1) make them attractive for traction applications such as

  16. Plasma distribution of cathodic ARC deposition system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, S.; Raoux, S.; Krishnan, K.; MacGill, R.A.; Brown, I.G. [Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1996-08-01

    The plasma distribution using a cathodic arc plasma source with and without magnetic macroparticle filter has been determined by depositing on a transparent plastic substrate and measuring the film absorption. It was found that the width of the distribution depends on the arc current, and it also depends on the cathode material which leads to a spatial separation of the elements when an alloy cathode is used. By applying a magnetic multicusp field near the exit of the magnetic filter, it was possible to modify the plasma distribution and obtain a flat plasma profile with a constant and homogeneous elemental distribution.

  17. Electrochemical Impedance Studies of SOFC Cathodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hjelm, Johan; Søgaard, Martin; Wandel, Marie

    2007-01-01

    impedance of the cathode at intermediate operating temperatures. The perovskite is of the La-Sr-Co-Fe type. The EIS response of symmetrical cells with a thick (similar to 200 mu m) gadolinia doped ceria electrolyte was compared with the impedance contribution of the cathode of a full anode supported cell....... The full cells had a Ni-YSZ anode and anode support, a thin YSZ electrolyte, and a CGO barrier layer. The symmetric and full cell cathode responses were compared at open-circuit voltage. Humidified hydrogen was used as the fuel in the full cell measurements. Differential analysis of the impedance data...

  18. Advances in Thermionic Cathode of Tungsten and Molybdenum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    Several kinds of tungsten thermonic cathodes have been introduced. As a promising alternative for thoriated tungsten, rare earth doped molybdenum cathode has been studied. Compared with the traditional thoriated tungsten, La-Mo cathode has higher emission current density at lower temperature, but it has poor emission stability. In order to improve the emission stability, systematical study on the emission mechanism of La-Mo cathode has been carried out. The life of La-Mo cathode has been improved and has achieved 1400 h, which exceeds the minimum life for practical uses (1000 h). As another alternative for thoriated tungsten cathode, Y-Mo cathode has shown better performance. The thermionic emission capability of Y-Mo cathode is between that of La-Mo cathode and Th-W cathode.

  19. Coating metals on micropowders by magnetron sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Magnetron sputtering was used to coat various metals on micropowder surfaces. By using this method, the fine particles are better dispersed and can therefore be coated more homogeneously. The micro-powders used include cenospheres from fly ash of coal-burning electric power plants (diameter 40-200 μm and particle density 0.7±0.1 g/cm3), as well as carborundum particles of different sizes. Aluminum, silver, copper, cobalt and nickel were used as the coating metals. Tests showed that the coated metal film was compact adhering tightly on the base powders, and the coated powders possess adequate flow properties.

  20. High current density cathode for electrorefining in molten electrolyte

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shelly X.

    2010-06-29

    A high current density cathode for electrorefining in a molten electrolyte for the continuous production and collection of loose dendritic or powdery deposits. The high current density cathode eliminates the requirement for mechanical scraping and electrochemical stripping of the deposits from the cathode in an anode/cathode module. The high current density cathode comprises a perforated electrical insulated material coating such that the current density is up to 3 A/cm.sup.2.

  1. Magnetron-sputtered La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3 nanocomposite interlayer for solid oxide fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovyev, A. A.; Ionov, I. V.; Shipilova, A. V.; Kovalchuk, A. N.; Syrtanov, M. S.

    2017-03-01

    A thin layer of a La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3 (LSCF) is deposited between the electrolyte and the La0.6Sr0.4Co0.2Fe0.8O3/Ce0.9Gd0.1O2 (LSCF/CGO) cathode layer of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) by pulsed magnetron sputtering using an oxide target of LSCF. The films were completely dense and well adherent to the substrate. The effects of annealing in temperature range from 200 to 1000 °C on the crystalline structure of the LSCF films have been studied. The films of nominal thickness, 250-500 nm, are crystalline when annealed at temperatures above 600 °C. The crystalline structure, surface topology, and morphology of the films were determined using X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), and scanning electron microscopy (SEM), respectively. To study the electrochemical characteristics of the deposited-film, solid oxide fuel cells using 325-nm LSCF films as interlayer between the electrolyte and the cathode have been fabricated. The LSCF interlayer improves the overall performance of the SOFC by increasing the interfacial area between the electrolyte and cathode. The electrolyte-supported cells with the interlayer have 30% greater, overall power output compared to that achieved with the cells without interlayer. The LSCF interlayer could also act as a transition layer that improves adhesion and relieves both thermal stress and lattice strain between the cathode and the electrolyte. Our results demonstrate that pulsed magnetron sputtering provides a low-temperature synthesis route for realizing ultrathin nanocrystalline LSCF film layers for intermediate- or low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells.

  2. RF Electron Gun with Driven Plasma Cathode

    CERN Document Server

    Khodak, Igor

    2005-01-01

    It's known that RF guns with plasma cathodes based on solid-state dielectrics are able to generate an intense electron beam. In this paper we describe results of experimental investigation of the single cavity S-band RF gun with driven plasma cathode. The experimental sample of the cathode based on ferroelectric ceramics has been designed. Special design of the cathode permits to separate spatially processes of plasma development and electron acceleration. It has been obtained at RF gun output electron beam with particle energy ~500 keV, pulse current of 4 A and pulse duration of 80 ns. Results of experimental study of beam parameters are referred in. The gun is purposed to be applied as the intense electron beam source for electron linacs.

  3. Reservoir Scandate Cathode for Electric Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to combine two revolutionary cathode technologies into a single device for use in electric space propulsion. This will overcome problems that both...

  4. Sputtering of solid nitrogen by keV helium ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, O.; Schou, Jørgen; Sørensen, H.;

    1993-01-01

    Solid nitrogen has become a standard material among the frozen molecular gases for electronic sputtering. We have combined measurements of sputtering yields and energy spectra from nitrogen bombarded by 4-10 keV helium ions. The data show that the erosion is electronic rather than knockon...

  5. Sputtering of Ge(001): transition between dynamic scaling regimes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smilgies, D.-M.; Eng, P.J.; Landemark, E.;

    1997-01-01

    We have studied the dynamic behavior of the Ge(001) surface during sputtering in situ and in real time using synchrotron X-ray diffraction. We find two dynamic regimes as a function of surface temperature and sputter current which are separated by a sharp transition. The boundary between these two...

  6. Sputtering of Thick Deuterium Films by KeV Electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thestrup Nielsen, Birgitte; Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Schou, Jørgen;

    1994-01-01

    Sputtering of thick films of solid deuterium up to several μm by keV electrons is reported for the first time. The sputtering yield increases within a narrow range of thicknesses around 1.6 μm by about 2 orders of magnitude for 1.5 keV electrons. A similar behavior has not been observed for ion...

  7. Growth of brass nanofilms sputtered on organic substrate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Zhen-xing; WANG Ling-sen; HUANG Bai-yun

    2005-01-01

    The growth of brass nanofilms sputtered on acrylics substrate was studied through experimental investigation of the effect of sputtering voltage, target-to-substrate distance, chamber pressure and sputtering time on the content, growth rate and surface morphology of brass nanofilms. The results show that compared with original brass target, Cu content in brass nanofilms changes by no more than 6.23% (mass fraction). High sputtering voltage and short target-to-substrate distance help to improve brass nanofilm deposition rate. There exists an optimal chamber pressure where deposition rate of nanofilm reaches the maximum. The key factor affecting surface morphology is the kinetic energy of sputtering particles. Low sputtering voltage, large target-to-substrate distance and low chamber pressure are very important for the formation of the high-quality brass nanofilms. The brass films prepared under the conditions of sputtering voltage 1.6 kV, target-to-substrate distance 2.5 cm, chamber pressure 10 Pa and sputtering time 20 min, possess following characteristics: smooth and uniform surface, thickness of 41 nm and Cu content of 71.0% (mass fraction).

  8. Sputtering of the most volatile solids: The solid hydrogens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Stenum, B.; Ellegaard, O.

    1995-01-01

    Electronic sputtering of the three stable hydrogenic solids, H-2, HD and D-2 by keV hydrogen and deuterium ions has been studied at the low-temperature setup at Riso. The yield of the sputtered particles has been determined for hydrogenic films of thicknesses ranging from 0.1 X 10(18) up to 10 X ...

  9. Modeling High Pressure Micro Hollow Cathode Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-02

    cathode discharge excimer lamps , Phys. Plasmas 7, 286 (2000). [3] RH Stark and KH Schoenbach, Direct high pressure glow discharges, J. Appl. Phys...temperature profiles in argon glow discharges, J. Appl. Phys. 88, 2234 (2000) [8] M. Moselhy, W. Shi, R. Stark, A flat glow discharge excimer radiation...MHCD acts as a plasma cathode for a third electrode (anode). Some experimental results in this geometry are available for argon and for air from the

  10. Monte Carlo simulations of nanoscale focused neon ion beam sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timilsina, Rajendra; Rack, Philip D

    2013-12-13

    A Monte Carlo simulation is developed to model the physical sputtering of aluminum and tungsten emulating nanoscale focused helium and neon ion beam etching from the gas field ion microscope. Neon beams with different beam energies (0.5-30 keV) and a constant beam diameter (Gaussian with full-width-at-half-maximum of 1 nm) were simulated to elucidate the nanostructure evolution during the physical sputtering of nanoscale high aspect ratio features. The aspect ratio and sputter yield vary with the ion species and beam energy for a constant beam diameter and are related to the distribution of the nuclear energy loss. Neon ions have a larger sputter yield than the helium ions due to their larger mass and consequently larger nuclear energy loss relative to helium. Quantitative information such as the sputtering yields, the energy-dependent aspect ratios and resolution-limiting effects are discussed.

  11. Plasma debris sputter resistant x-ray mirror.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amano, Sho; Inoue, Tomoaki; Harada, Tetsuo

    2013-06-01

    A diamond-like carbon (DLC) mirror, used as a grazing incident mirror in a plasma x-ray source, exhibits a high resistance to plasma debris sputtering. Good mirror reflectivity at a wavelength of 13.5 nm was confirmed using synchrotron radiation at the NewSUBARU facility. The erosion rate due to plasma debris sputtered at the incident debris angle of 20° was measured using a laser-produced Xe plasma source developed by the authors. The results indicate that the DLC film has a 5- and 15-fold higher sputtering resistance compared to films made of the traditional mirror materials Ru and Au, respectively. Because the DLC mirror retains a high sputtering resistance to Sn ions, it may be effective in Sn plasma source applications. We conclude that a grazing incident x-ray mirror coated with DLC can be of use as a plasma debris sputtering resistant mirror.

  12. Dynamic Monte Carlo simulation for reactive sputtering of aluminium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Z.Y. E-mail: chen@uia.ua.ac.be; Bogaerts, A.; Depla, D.; Ignatova, V

    2003-08-01

    We have applied TRIDYN to simulate the transition from the metallic sputtering to the reactive sputtering mode during magnetron sputtering for an Al target when oxygen is added to argon plasma. Changes in the thickness and composition of multicomponent targets are investigated. The results basically confirm the reactive ion implantation mechanism together with chemical reaction in the subsurface. When oxygen mole fraction x<0.14, the target surface never becomes fully oxidized, even for very long sputtering times. When x>0.14 the target surface can be more or less fully oxidized. Furthermore, an abrupt change in the surface erosion rate at x=0.03 is observed. This corresponds to the avalanche phenomenon indicating the sputtering mode transition.

  13. Development of plasma cathode electron guns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oks, Efim M.; Schanin, Peter M.

    1999-05-01

    The status of experimental research and ongoing development of plasma cathode electron guns in recent years is reviewed, including some novel upgrades and applications to various technological fields. The attractiveness of this kind of e-gun is due to its capability of creating high current, broad or focused beams, both in pulsed and steady-state modes of operation. An important characteristic of the plasma cathode electron gun is the absence of a thermionic cathode, a feature which leads to long lifetime and reliable operation even in the presence of aggressive background gas media and at fore-vacuum gas pressure ranges such as achieved by mechanical pumps. Depending on the required beam parameters, different kinds of plasma discharge systems can be used in plasma cathode electron guns, such as vacuum arcs, constricted gaseous arcs, hollow cathode glows, and two kinds of discharges in crossed E×B fields: Penning and magnetron. At the present time, plasma cathode electron guns provide beams with transverse dimension from fractional millimeter up to about one meter, beam current from microamperes to kiloamperes, beam current density up to about 100 A/cm2, pulse duration from nanoseconds to dc, and electron energy from several keV to hundreds of keV. Applications include electron beam melting and welding, surface treatment, plasma chemistry, radiation technologies, laser pumping, microwave generation, and more.

  14. Sputtering effect of low-energy ions on biological target: The analysis of sputtering product of urea and capsaicin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Lili [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-Engineering, Institute of Technical Biology and Agriculture Engineering of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shushanhu Road 350, Hefei 230031 (China); Xu, Xue [Rice Research Institute, Anhui Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Nongke South Road 40, Hefei 230031 (China); Wu, Yuejin, E-mail: yjwu@ipp.ac.cn [Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bio-Engineering, Institute of Technical Biology and Agriculture Engineering of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Shushanhu Road 350, Hefei 230031 (China)

    2013-08-01

    Sputtering is a process whereby atoms are ejected from a solid target material due to bombardment of the target by energetic particles. Recent years, ion implantation was successfully applied to biological research based on the fragments sputtering and form open paths in cell structure caused by ion sputtering. In this study, we focused on urea and chilli pepper pericarp samples implanted with N{sup +} and Ar{sup +} ions. To investigate the sputtering effect, we designed a collecting unit containing a disk sample and a glass pipe. The urea content and capsaicin content recovered from glass pipes were adopted to represent the sputtering product. The result of urea showed that the sputtering effect is positively correlated with the ion energy and dose, also affected by the ion type. The result of capsaicin was different from that of urea at 20 keV and possibly due to biological complex composition and structure. Therefore the sputtering yield depended on both the parameters of incident ions and the state of target materials. The sputtering yield of urea was also simulated by computational method achieved through the TRIM program. The trajectories of primary and recoiled atoms were calculated on the basis of the binary collision approximation using Monte Carlo method. The experimental results were much higher than the calculated results. The possible explanation is that in the physical model the target were assumed as a disordered lattice and independent atoms, which is much less complicated than that of the biological models.

  15. Sputtering effect of low-energy ions on biological target: The analysis of sputtering product of urea and capsaicin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lili; Xu, Xue; Wu, Yuejin

    2013-08-01

    Sputtering is a process whereby atoms are ejected from a solid target material due to bombardment of the target by energetic particles. Recent years, ion implantation was successfully applied to biological research based on the fragments sputtering and form open paths in cell structure caused by ion sputtering. In this study, we focused on urea and chilli pepper pericarp samples implanted with N+ and Ar+ ions. To investigate the sputtering effect, we designed a collecting unit containing a disk sample and a glass pipe. The urea content and capsaicin content recovered from glass pipes were adopted to represent the sputtering product. The result of urea showed that the sputtering effect is positively correlated with the ion energy and dose, also affected by the ion type. The result of capsaicin was different from that of urea at 20 keV and possibly due to biological complex composition and structure. Therefore the sputtering yield depended on both the parameters of incident ions and the state of target materials. The sputtering yield of urea was also simulated by computational method achieved through the TRIM program. The trajectories of primary and recoiled atoms were calculated on the basis of the binary collision approximation using Monte Carlo method. The experimental results were much higher than the calculated results. The possible explanation is that in the physical model the target were assumed as a disordered lattice and independent atoms, which is much less complicated than that of the biological models.

  16. Filtered pulsed cathodic arc deposition of fullerene-like carbon and carbon nitride films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tucker, Mark D.; Czigány, Zsolt; Broitman, Esteban; Näslund, Lars-Åke; Hultman, Lars; Rosen, Johanna

    2014-04-01

    Carbon and carbon nitride films (CNx, 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.26) were deposited by filtered pulsed cathodic arc and were investigated using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A "fullerene-like" (FL) structure of ordered graphitic planes, similar to that of magnetron sputtered FL-CNx films, was observed in films deposited at 175 °C and above, with N2 pressures of 0 and 0.5 mTorr. Higher substrate temperatures and significant nitrogen incorporation are required to produce similar FL structure by sputtering, which may, at least in part, be explained by the high ion charge states and ion energies characteristic of arc deposition. A gradual transition from majority sp3-hybridized films to sp2 films was observed with increasing substrate temperature. High elastic recovery, an attractive characteristic mechanical property of FL-CNx films, is evident in arc-deposited films both with and without nitrogen content, and both with and without FL structure.

  17. Filtered pulsed cathodic arc deposition of fullerene-like carbon and carbon nitride films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tucker, Mark D., E-mail: martu@ifm.liu.se; Broitman, Esteban; Näslund, Lars-Åke; Hultman, Lars; Rosen, Johanna [Thin Film Physics Division, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-58183 Linköping (Sweden); Czigány, Zsolt [Institute for Technical Physics and Materials Science, RCNS, Hungarian Academy of Sciences, P.O. Box 49, H-1525 Budapest (Hungary)

    2014-04-14

    Carbon and carbon nitride films (CN{sub x}, 0 ≤ x ≤ 0.26) were deposited by filtered pulsed cathodic arc and were investigated using transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. A “fullerene-like” (FL) structure of ordered graphitic planes, similar to that of magnetron sputtered FL-CN{sub x} films, was observed in films deposited at 175 °C and above, with N{sub 2} pressures of 0 and 0.5 mTorr. Higher substrate temperatures and significant nitrogen incorporation are required to produce similar FL structure by sputtering, which may, at least in part, be explained by the high ion charge states and ion energies characteristic of arc deposition. A gradual transition from majority sp{sup 3}-hybridized films to sp{sup 2} films was observed with increasing substrate temperature. High elastic recovery, an attractive characteristic mechanical property of FL-CN{sub x} films, is evident in arc-deposited films both with and without nitrogen content, and both with and without FL structure.

  18. Laser modification and characterization of Li-Mn-O thin film cathodes for lithium-ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pröll, J.; Kohler, R.; Adelhelm, C.; Bruns, M.; Torge, M.; Heißler, S.; Przybylski, M.; Ziebert, C.; Pfleging, W.

    2011-03-01

    The development of future battery systems is mainly focused on powerful rechargeable lithium-ion batteries. To satisfy this demand, current studies are focused on cathodes based on nano-composite materials which lead to an increase in power density of the LIB primarily due to large electrochemically active surface areas. Electrode materials made of lithium manganese oxides (Li-Mn-O) are assumed to replace commonly used cathode materials like LiCoO2 due to less toxicity and lower costs. Thin films in the Li-Mn-O system were synthesized by non-reactive r.f. magnetron sputtering of a LiMn2O4 target on silicon and stainless steel substrates. In order to enhance power density and cycle stability of the cathode material, direct laser structuring methods were investigated using a laser system operating at a wavelength of 248 nm. Therefore, high aspect ratio micro-structures were formed on the thin films. Laser annealing processes were investigated in order to achieve an appropriate crystalline phase for unstructured and structured thin films as well as for an increase in energy density and control of grain size. Laser annealing was realized via a high power diode laser system. The effects of post-thermal treatment on the thin films were studied with Raman spectroscopy, X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscopy. The formation of electrochemically active and inactive phases was discussed. Surface chemistry was investigated via X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy. Interaction between UV-laser radiation and the thin film material was analyzed through ablation experiments. Finally, to investigate the electrochemical properties, the manufactured thin film cathodes were cycled against a lithium anode. The formation of a solid electrolyte interphase on the cathode side was discussed.

  19. Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watkins, Ronald; Goebel, Dan; Hofer, Richard

    2010-01-01

    A compact, high-current, hollow cathode utilizing a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) thermionic electron emitter has been developed for use with high-power Hall thrusters and ion thrusters. LaB6 cathodes are being investigated due to their long life, high current capabilities, and less stringent xenon purity and handling requirements compared to conventional barium oxide (BaO) dispenser cathodes. The new cathode features a much smaller diameter than previously developed versions that permit it to be mounted on axis of a Hall thruster ( internally mounted ), as opposed to the conventional side-mount position external to the outer magnetic circuit ("externally mounted"). The cathode has also been reconfigured to be capable of surviving vibrational loads during launch and is designed to solve the significant heater and materials compatibility problems associated with the use of this emitter material. This has been accomplished in a compact design with the capability of high-emission current (10 to 60 A). The compact, high-current design has a keeper diameter that allows the cathode to be mounted on the centerline of a 6- kW Hall thruster, inside the iron core of the inner electromagnetic coil. Although designed for electric propulsion thrusters in spacecraft station- keeping, orbit transfer, and interplanetary applications, the LaB6 cathodes are applicable to the plasma processing industry in applications such as optical coatings and semiconductor processing where reactive gases are used. Where current electrical propulsion thrusters with BaO emitters have limited life and need extremely clean propellant feed systems at a significant cost, these LaB6 cathodes can run on the crudest-grade xenon propellant available without impact. Moreover, in a laboratory environment, LaB6 cathodes reduce testing costs because they do not require extended conditioning periods under hard vacuum. Alternative rare earth emitters, such as cerium hexaboride (CeB6) can be used in this

  20. 2013 Estorm - Invited Paper - Cathode Materials Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daniel, Claus [ORNL; Mohanty, Debasish [ORNL; Li, Jianlin [ORNL; Wood III, David L [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The electrochemical potential of cathode materials defines the positive side of the terminal voltage of a battery. Traditionally, cathode materials are the energy-limiting or voltage-limiting electrode. One of the first electrochemical batteries, the voltaic pile invented by Alessandro Volta in 1800 (Phil. Trans. Roy. Soc. 90, 403 431) had a copper-zinc galvanic element with a terminal voltage of 0.76 V. Since then, the research community has increased capacity and voltage for primary (nonrechargeable) batteries and round-trip efficiency for secondary (rechargeable) batteries. Successful secondary batteries have been the lead acid with a lead oxide cathode and a terminal voltage of 2.1 V and later the NiCd with a nickel(III) oxide hydroxide cathode and a 1.2 V terminal voltage. The relatively low voltage of those aqueous systems and the low round-trip efficiency due to activation energies in the conversion reactions limited their use. In 1976, Wittingham (J. Electrochem. Soc., 123, 315) and Besenhard (J Power Sources 1(3), 267) finally enabled highly reversible redox reactions by intercalation of lithium ions instead of by chemical conversion. In 1980, Goodenough and Mizushima (Mater. Res. Bull. 15, 783 789) demonstrated a high-energy and high-power LiCoO2 cathode, allowing for an increase of terminal voltage far beyond 3 V. Over the past four decades, the international research community has further developed cathode materials of many varieties. Current state-of-the-art cathodes demonstrate voltages beyond any known electrolyte stability window, bringing electrolyte research once again to the forefront of battery research.

  1. Improved cathode materials for microbial electrosynthesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, T; Nie, HR; Bain, TS; Lu, HY; Cui, MM; Snoeyenbos-West, OL; Franks, AE; Nevin, KP; Russell, TP; Lovley, DR

    2013-01-01

    Microbial electrosynthesis is a promising strategy for the microbial conversion of carbon dioxide to transportation fuels and other organic commodities, but optimization of this process is required for commercialization. Cathodes which enhance electrode-microbe electron transfer might improve rates of product formation. To evaluate this possibility, biofilms of Sporomusa ovata, which are effective in acetate electrosynthesis, were grown on a range of cathode materials and acetate production was monitored over time. Modifications of carbon cloth that resulted in a positive-charge enhanced microbial electrosynthesis. Functionalization with chitosan or cyanuric chloride increased acetate production rates 6-7 fold and modification with 3-aminopropyltriethoxysilane gave rates 3-fold higher than untreated controls. A 3-fold increase in electrosynthesis over untreated carbon cloth cathodes was also achieved with polyaniline cathodes. However, not all strategies to provide positively charged surfaces were successful, as treatment of carbon cloth with melamine or ammonia gas did not stimulate acetate electrosynthesis. Treating carbon cloth with metal, in particular gold, palladium, or nickel nanoparticles, also promoted electrosynthesis, yielding electrosynthesis rates that were 6-,4.7- or 4.5-fold faster than the untreated control, respectively. Cathodes comprised of cotton or polyester fabric treated with carbon nanotubes yielded cathodes that supported acetate electrosynthesis rates that were similar to 3-fold higher than carbon cloth controls. Recovery of electrons consumed in acetate was similar to 80% for all materials. The results demonstrate that one approach to increase rates of carbon dioxide reduction in microbial electrosynthesis is to modify cathode surfaces to improve microbe-electrode interactions.

  2. Multiple cathodic reaction mechanisms in seawater cathodic biofilms operating in sediment microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babauta, Jerome T; Hsu, Lewis; Atci, Erhan; Kagan, Jeff; Chadwick, Bart; Beyenal, Haluk

    2014-10-01

    In this study, multiple reaction mechanisms in cathodes of sediment microbial fuel cells (SMFCs) were characterized by using cyclic voltammetry and microelectrode measurements of dissolved oxygen and pH. The cathodes were acclimated in SMFCs with sediment and seawater from San Diego Bay. Two limiting current regions were observed with onset potentials of approximately +400 mVAg/AgCl for limiting current I and -120 mVAg/AgCl for limiting current II. The appearance of two catalytic waves suggests that multiple cathodic reaction mechanisms influence cathodic performance. Microscale oxygen concentration measurements showed a zero surface concentration at the electrode surface for limiting current II but not for limiting current I, which allowed us to distinguish limiting current II as the conventional oxygen reduction reaction and limiting current I as a currently unidentified cathodic reaction mechanism. Microscale pH measurements further confirmed these results.

  3. Production of rare-earth atomic negative ion beams in a cesium-sputter-type negative ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Davis, V.T. [Test Support Division, Defense Threat Reduction Agency, West Desert Test Center, Dugway, UT 84022-5000 (United States)]. E-mail: vernon.davis@us.army.mil; Covington, A.M. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada, MS 220, Reno, NV 89557-0058 (United States); Duvvuri, S.S. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada, MS 220, Reno, NV 89557-0058 (United States); Kraus, R.G. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada, MS 220, Reno, NV 89557-0058 (United States); Emmons, E.D. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada, MS 220, Reno, NV 89557-0058 (United States); Kvale, T.J. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Toledo, Toledo, OH (United States); Thompson, J.S. [Department of Physics, University of Nevada, MS 220, Reno, NV 89557-0058 (United States)

    2007-08-15

    The desire to study negative ion structure and negative ion-photon interactions has spurred the development of ion sources for use in research and industry. The many different types of negative ion sources available today differ in their characteristics and abilities to produce anions of various species. Thus the importance of choosing the correct type of negative ion source for a particular research or industrial application is clear. In this study, the results of an investigation on the production of beams composed of negatively-charged rare-earth ions from a cylindrical-cathode-geometry, cesium-sputter-type negative ion source are presented. Beams of atomic anions have been observed for most of the first-row rare-earth elements, with typical currents ranging from hundreds of picoamps to several nanoamps.

  4. Transport Phenomena of Off-Axis Sputtering Deposition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, S.; Su, C. H.; Lehoczky, S. L.; Zhang, S.; Whitaker, Ann F. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Various high quality epitaxial films, especially oxides, have been synthesized using off-axis sputtering deposition. In this presentation, we report the experiment results of ZnO films grown by the off-axis sputtering deposition. Films were synthesized in temperatures ranged from room temperature to 600 C, and pressures from 5 mTorr to 150 mTorr. Film growth rate was measured by surface profilometer, ellipsometer, and wavelength dispersive spectrometry. Due to the collisions between the sputtered species and the residue gases, the kinetic energy of species was reduced and the transport of depositing species changed from a ballistic movement for low pressure to a diffuse drift for high pressure in which the transport species were almost thermalized. The measurements show an increase of growth rates along the gravity vector when the Knodson (Knudsen??) number of transport species is less than 0.05, which suggests that gravity affected the transport characterization in off-axis sputtering deposition. Because the product of pressure (p) and travel distance (d) of sputtered species, p exceeds several mTorr-cm during film deposition, the classical simulations for sputtering process in high vacuum system may not be applied. Based on these experimental measurements, a transport process of the off-axis sputtering deposition is proposed. Several methods including the Monte Carlo method and gravity-driven flow dynamics simulation will be discussed.

  5. Discharge Physics of High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Andre

    2010-10-13

    High power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) is pulsed sputtering where the peak power exceeds the time-averaged power by typically two orders of magnitude. The peak power density, averaged over the target area, can reach or exceed 107 W/m2, leading to plasma conditions that make ionization of the sputtered atoms very likely. A brief review of HIPIMS operation is given in a tutorial manner, illustrated by some original data related to the self-sputtering of niobium in argon and krypton. Emphasis is put on the current-voltage-time relationships near the threshold of self-sputtering runaway. The great variety of current pulse shapes delivers clues on the very strong gas rarefaction, self-sputtering runaway conditions, and the stopping of runaway due to the evolution of atom ionization and ion return probabilities as the gas plasma is replaced by metal plasma. The discussions are completed by considering instabilities and the special case of ?gasless? self-sputtering.

  6. Preparation of nanocomposite thoriated tungsten cathode by swaging technique

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王发展; 诸葛飞; 张晖; 丁秉钧

    2002-01-01

    By using the high energy ball milling method,the nanosized ThO2 powders were obtained.Through mixing powders,sintering and hot swaging processing,a nanocomposite thoriated tungsten cathode was fabricated.The relative density of the nanocomposite material is near 100%.The microstructure of nanocomposite cathode is quite different from that of conventional thoriated tungsten cathode.Most of thoria particles are less than 100 nm in diameter,and distribute on the boundaries of tungsten grains.The nanocomposite cathode shows a much lower arc starting field than that of conventional cathode,which will improve the performance of the cathode significantly.

  7. Intrinsic stress analysis of sputtered carbon film

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liqin Liu; Zhanshan Wang; Jingtao Zhu; Zhong Zhang; Moyan Tan; Qiushi Huang; Rui Chen; Jing Xu; Lingyan Chen

    2008-01-01

    Intrinsic stresses of carbon films deposited by direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering were investigated.The bombardments of energetic particles during the growth of films were considered to be the main reason for compressive intrinsic stresses.The values of intrinsic stresses were determined by measuring the radius of curvature of substrates before and after film deposition.By varying argon pressure and target-substrate distance,energies of neutral carbon atoms impinging on the growing films were optimized to control the intrinsic stresses level.The stress evolution in carbon films as a function of film thickness was investigated and a void-related stress relief mechanism was proposed to interpret this evolution.

  8. Structure adhesion and corrosion resistance study of tungsten bisulfide doped with titanium deposited by DC magnetron co-sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    De La Roche, J. [Laboratorio de Física del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 vía al aeropuerto, Campus La Nubia, Manizales (Colombia); González, J.M. [Laboratorio de Recubrimientos Duros y Aplicaciones Industriales – RDAI, Universidad del Valle, Calle 13 N° 100-00 Ciudadela Meléndez, Cali (Colombia); Restrepo-Parra, E., E-mail: erestrepop@unal.edu.co [Laboratorio de Física del Plasma, Universidad Nacional de Colombia Sede Manizales, Km. 9 vía al aeropuerto, Campus La Nubia, Manizales (Colombia); Sequeda, F. [Laboratorio de Recubrimientos Duros y Aplicaciones Industriales – RDAI, Universidad del Valle, Calle 13 N° 100-00 Ciudadela Meléndez, Cali (Colombia); Alleh, V.; Scharf, T.W. [The University of North Texas, Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Denton, TX 76203 (United States)

    2014-11-30

    Highlights: • Ti-doped WS{sub 2} films were grown via the magnetron co-sputtering technique. • At a high Ti percentage, the crystalline structure of WS{sub 2} coatings tends to be amorphous. • As the Ti percentage increases in WS{sub 2} coatings, nanocomposites tend to form. • Ti-doped WS{sub 2} films have elastic behavior compared with the plastic response of pure WS{sub 2} films. • A high Ti percentage increases the corrosion resistance of WS{sub 2} films. - Abstract: Titanium-doped tungsten bisulfide thin films (WS{sub 2}-Ti) were grown using a DC magnetron co-sputtering technique on AISI 304 stainless steel and silicon substrates. The films were produced by varying the Ti cathode power from 0 to 25 W. Using energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), the concentration of Ti in the WS{sub 2} was determined, and a maximum of 10% was obtained for the sample grown at 25 W. Moreover, the S/W ratio was calculated and determined to increase as a function of the Ti cathode power. According to transmission electron microscopy (TEM) results, at high titanium concentrations (greater than 6%), nanocomposite formation was observed, with nanocrystals of Ti embedded in an amorphous matrix of WS{sub 2}. Using the scratch test, the coatings’ adhesion was analyzed, and it was observed that as the Ti percentage was increased, the critical load (Lc) also increased. Furthermore, the failure type changed from plastic to elastic. Finally, the corrosion resistance was evaluated using the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique, and it was observed that at high Ti concentrations, the corrosion resistance was improved, as Ti facilitates coating densification and generates a protective layer.

  9. The influence of cathode excavation of cathodic arc evaporator on thickness uniformity and erosion products angle distribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. V. Duhopel'nikov

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cathodic arc evaporators are used for coating with functional films. Prolonged or buttend evaporators may be used for this purposes. In butt-end evaporator the cathode spots move continuously on the cathode work surface and evaporate cathode material. High depth excavation profile forms on the cathode work surface while the thick coating precipitation (tens or hundreds of microns. The cathode excavation profile is shaped like a “cup” with high walls for electrostatic discharge stabilization systems with axial magnetic fields. Cathode spots move on the bottom of the “cup”. It is very likely that high “cup” walls are formed as a result of lasting work time influence on the uniformity of precipitated films.In the present work the influence of excavation profile walls height on the uniformity of precipitated coating was carried out. The high profile walls are formed due to lasting work of DC vacuum arc evaporator. The cathode material used for tests was 3003 aluminum alloy. The extended substrate was placed parallel to the cathode work surface. Thickness distribution along the substrate length with the new cathode was obtained after 6 hours and after 12 hours of continuous operation.The thickness distribution of precipitated coating showed that the cathode excavation has an influence on the angular distribution of the matter escaping the cathode. It can be clearly seen from the normalized dependence coating thickness vs the distance from the substrate center. Also the angular distribution of the matter flow from the cathode depending on the cathode working time was obtained. It was shown that matter flow from the cathode differs from the LambertKnudsen law. The more the cathode excavation the more this difference.So, cathode excavation profile has an influence on the uniformity of precipitated coating and it is necessary to take in account the cathode excavation profile while coating the thick films.

  10. Parallel Operation of Microhollow Cathode Discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Robert H.; Shi, Wenhui; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    1998-10-01

    The dc current-voltage characteristics of microhollow cathode discharges has, in certain ranges of the discharge current, a positive slope [1]. In these current ranges it should be possible to operate multiple discharges in parallel without individual ballast, and be used as flat panel excimer lamps [2] or large area plasma cathodes. In order to verify this hypothesis we have studied the parallel operation of two microhollow cathode discharges of 100 micrometer hole diameter in argon at pressures from 100 Torr to 800 Torr. Stable dc operation of the two discharges, without individual ballast, was obtained if the voltage-current characteristics of the individual discharges had a positive slope greater than 10 V/mA over a voltage range of more than 5 to obtain parallel operation over the entire current range of the microhollow cathode discharges, which includes regions of negative differential conductivity, we have replaced the metal anode by a semi-insulating semiconductor, which serves as distributed resistive ballast. With this method, we were able to ignite and sustain an array of dc microhollow cathode discharges over a wide range of pressure and discharge current. [1] K.H.Schoenbach et al. Appl. Phys. Lett. 68, 13 (1996). [2] A.El-Habachi and K.H.Schoenbach, APL. 72, 1 (1998). This work was funded by the Department of Energy, Advanced Energy Division, and by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) in cooperation with the DDR&E Air Plasma Ramparts MURI Program.

  11. Porous, High Capacity Coatings for Solid Phase Microextraction by Sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diwan, Anubhav; Singh, Bhupinder; Roychowdhury, Tuhin; Yan, DanDan; Tedone, Laura; Nesterenko, Pavel N; Paull, Brett; Sevy, Eric T; Shellie, Robert A; Kaykhaii, Massoud; Linford, Matthew R

    2016-02-01

    We describe a new process for preparing porous solid phase microextraction (SPME) coatings by the sputtering of silicon onto silica fibers. The microstructure of these coatings is a function of the substrate geometry and mean free path of the silicon atoms, and the coating thickness is controlled by the sputtering time. Sputtered silicon structures on silica fibers were treated with piranha solution (a mixture of concd H2SO4 and 30% H2O2) to increase the concentration of silanol groups on their surfaces, and the nanostructures were silanized with octadecyldimethylmethoxysilane in the gas phase. The attachment of this hydrophobic ligand was confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and contact angle goniometry on model, planar silicon substrates. Sputtered silicon coatings adhered strongly to their surfaces, as they were able to pass the Scotch tape adhesion test. The extraction time and temperature for headspace extraction of mixtures of alkanes and alcohols on the sputtered fibers were optimized (5 min and 40 °C), and the extraction performances of SPME fibers with 1.0 or 2.0 μm of sputtered silicon were compared to those from a commercial 7 μm poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) fiber. For mixtures of alcohols, aldehydes, amines, and esters, the 2.0 μm sputtered silicon fiber yielded signals that were 3-9, 3-5, 2.5-4.5, and 1.5-2 times higher, respectively, than those of the commercial fiber. For the heavier alkanes (undecane-hexadecane), the 2.0 μm sputtered fiber yielded signals that were approximately 1.0-1.5 times higher than the commercial fiber. The sputtered fibers extracted low molecular weight analytes that were not detectable with the commercial fiber. The selectivity of the sputtered fibers appears to favor analytes that have both a hydrophobic component and hydrogen-bonding capabilities. No detectable carryover between runs was noted for the sputtered fibers. The repeatability (RSD%) for a fiber (n = 3) was less than 10% for all analytes tested

  12. Lattice dynamics during electronic sputtering of solid Ne

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutkiewicz, L.; Pedrys, R.; Schou, Jørgen

    1997-01-01

    Electronic sputtering of solid neon has been studied with molecular dynamics. The cavity formation around an excited atom and particle migration in the surface region, as well as the sputtering process have been studied. A single atomic exciton has been observed to produce a desorption of up...... to five excited or ground state atoms. The ejection from the surface is induced by excitons formed in five outermost monolayers of the solid. Energy and angular distributions of sputtered excited and ground state atoms have been calculated and are compared with experimental data....

  13. A hollow cathode ion source for production of primary ions for the BNL electron beam ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alessi, James, E-mail: alessi@bnl.gov; Beebe, Edward; Carlson, Charles; McCafferty, Daniel; Pikin, Alexander; Ritter, John [Collider-Accelerator Department, Brookhaven National Laboratory, Upton, New York 11973 (United States)

    2014-02-15

    A hollow cathode ion source, based on one developed at Saclay, has been modified significantly and used for several years to produce all primary 1+ ions injected into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) at Brookhaven. Currents of tens to hundreds of microamperes have been produced for 1+ ions of He, C, O, Ne, Si, Ar, Ti, Fe, Cu, Kr, Xe, Ta, Au, and U. The source is very simple, relying on a glow discharge using a noble gas, between anode and a solid cathode containing the desired species. Ions of both the working gas and ionized sputtered cathode material are extracted, and then the desired species is selected using an ExB filter before being transported into the EBIS trap for charge breeding. The source operates pulsed with long life and excellent stability for most species. Reliable ignition of the discharge at low gas pressure is facilitated by the use of capacitive coupling from a simple toy plasma globe. The source design, and operating experience for the various species, is presented.

  14. A hollow cathode ion source for production of primary ions for the BNL electron beam ion source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alessi, James; Beebe, Edward; Carlson, Charles; McCafferty, Daniel; Pikin, Alexander; Ritter, John

    2014-02-01

    A hollow cathode ion source, based on one developed at Saclay, has been modified significantly and used for several years to produce all primary 1+ ions injected into the Relativistic Heavy Ion Collider Electron Beam Ion Source (EBIS) at Brookhaven. Currents of tens to hundreds of microamperes have been produced for 1+ ions of He, C, O, Ne, Si, Ar, Ti, Fe, Cu, Kr, Xe, Ta, Au, and U. The source is very simple, relying on a glow discharge using a noble gas, between anode and a solid cathode containing the desired species. Ions of both the working gas and ionized sputtered cathode material are extracted, and then the desired species is selected using an ExB filter before being transported into the EBIS trap for charge breeding. The source operates pulsed with long life and excellent stability for most species. Reliable ignition of the discharge at low gas pressure is facilitated by the use of capacitive coupling from a simple toy plasma globe. The source design, and operating experience for the various species, is presented.

  15. Sputtered-deposited thin brass films in a modified glow discharge Grimm-type source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grais, K. I.; Eid, M. A.; Tawfik, N. L.; Abd-El-Aal, M. S.; Shaltout, A. A.

    2006-08-01

    Modification of the non-assisted gas flow-line across the target surface in a Grimm-type glow discharge source is described. The new flow line permits the gas to flow through a cylindrical annular space ending with a disc-space annular gap, facing the target surface. This configuration would cause directed jet assisted gas flow rays to impinge on infinite points across the cathode surface. Improvement has been achieved in the V-I characteristics where Δ V/Δ I increases from 1.8 to 3.5 V/mA. The sputtering as well as simultaneous deposition rates, have been increased by a factor of 16 and 17 respectively. These roll over with increasing sputtering time, their maximum values at a characteristic time, toc of 21 min. The toc value was constant for different operating parameters provided that the source geometry assembly is kept fixed. The presence of a glass substrate in the anode cavity has, apparently, no effect on the obtained data. Improvements have also been achieved in the crater profile, characterized by an approximately flat crater bottom with nearly vertical walls, and less re-deposited particles on the crater depth and edge. Fixing the distance Z of the substrate from target surface, along the cell axis, and varying the deposition time from 1 to 30 min, a sequence of changes in the deposited film were observed by X-ray diffraction and energy dispersion X-ray (EDX). These changes start with an amorphous structure, followed by the appearance of Cu and Zn crystallites and a probable deposition of Cu{5}Zn{8} clusters. The profile of the number of sputtered particles at different Z values is characterized by a number of peaks and troughs. This behavior has been explained by the occurrence of local cluster-dissociation and formation, by different collision processes. The improvements achieved by the application of the present jet assisted gas flow can be of value in the analytical application of this type of glow discharge.

  16. Sheet Plasma Produced by Hollow Cathode Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张龙; 张厚先; 杨宣宗; 冯春华; 乔宾; 王龙

    2003-01-01

    A sheet plasma is produced by a hollow cathode discharge under an axial magnetic field.The plasma is about 40cm in length,4 cm in width and 1cm in thickness.The electron density is about 108cm-3.The hollow cathode is made to be shallow with a large opening,which is different from the ordinary deep hollow cathode.A Langmuir probe is used to detect the plasma.The electron density and the spatial distribution of the plasma change when voltage,pressure and the magnetic field vary.A peak and a data fluctuation at about 200 G-300 G are observed in the variation of electron density(or thickness of the sheet plasma)with the magnetic field.Our work will be helpful in characterizing the sheet plasma and will make the production of dense sheet plasma more controllable.

  17. Filtered cathodic arc deposition apparatus and method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krauss, Alan R.

    1999-01-01

    A filtered cathodic arc deposition method and apparatus for the production of highly dense, wear resistant coatings which are free from macro particles. The filtered cathodic arc deposition apparatus includes a cross shaped vacuum chamber which houses a cathode target having an evaporable surface comprised of the coating material, means for generating a stream of plasma, means for generating a transverse magnetic field, and a macro particle deflector. The transverse magnetic field bends the generated stream of plasma in the direction of a substrate. Macro particles are effectively filtered from the stream of plasma by traveling, unaffected by the transverse magnetic field, along the initial path of the plasma stream to a macro particle deflector. The macro particle deflector has a preformed surface which deflects macro particles away from the substrate.

  18. Synchrotron Investigations of SOFC Cathode Degradation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Idzerda, Yves

    2013-09-30

    The atomic variations occurring in cathode/electrolyte interface regions of La{sub 1-x}Sr{sub x}Co{sub y}Fe{sub 1-y}O{sub 3-δ} (LSCF) cathodes and other SOFC related materials have been investigated and characterized using soft X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy (XAS) and diffuse soft X-ray Resonant Scattering (XRS). X-ray Absorption Spectroscopy in the soft X-ray region (soft XAS) is shown to be a sensitive technique to quantify the disruption that occurs and can be used to suggest a concrete mechanism for the degradation. For LSC, LSF, and LSCF films, a significant degradation mechanism is shown to be Sr out-diffusion. By using the XAS spectra of hexavalent Cr in SrCrO4 and trivalent Cr in Cr2O3, the driving factor for Sr segregation was identified to be the oxygen vacancy concentration at the anode and cathode side of of symmetric LSCF/GDC/LSCF heterostructures. This is direct evidence of vacancy induced cation diffusion and is shown to be a significant indicator of cathode/electrolyte interfacial degradation. X-ray absorption spectroscopy is used to identify the occupation of the A-sites and B-sites for LSC, LSF, and LSCF cathodes doped with other transition metals, including doping induced migration of Sr to the anti-site for Sr, a significant cathode degradation indicator. By using spatially resolved valence mapping of Co, a complete picture of the surface electrochemistry can be determined. This is especially important in identifying degradation phenomena where the degradation is spatially localized to the extremities of the electrochemistry and not the average. For samples that have electrochemical parameters that are measured to be spatially uniform, the Co valence modifications were correlated to the effects of current density, overpotential, and humidity.

  19. Klystron Amplifier Utilizing Scandate Cathode and Electrostatic Focusing Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to build an electrostatically focused klystron that exploits recent breakthroughs in scandate cathode technology. We have built cathodes with greater than...

  20. Nano-Particle Scandate Cathode for Space Communications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose an improved cathode based on our novel theory of the role of scandium oxide in enhancing emission in tungsten impregnate cathodes. Recent results have...

  1. Long Life Cold Cathodes for Hall effect Thrusters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An electron source incorporating long life, high current density cold cathodes inside a microchannel plate for use with ion thrusters is proposed. Cathode lifetime...

  2. Review on MIEC Cathode Materials for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnwal, Suman Kumar; Bharadwaj, S.; Kistaiah, P.

    2016-11-01

    The cathode is one of the most important components of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). The reduction of oxygen at the cathode (traditional cathodes like LSM, LSGM, etc.) is the slow step in the cell reaction at intermediate temperature (600-800∘C) which is one of the key obstacles to the development of SOFCs. The mixed ionic and electronic conducting cathode (MIEC) like LSCF, BSCF, etc., has recently been proposed as a promising cathode material for SOFC due to the improvement of the kinetic of the cathode reaction. The MIEC materials provide not only the electrons for the reduction of oxygen, but also the ionic conduction required to ensure the transport of the formed oxygen ions and thereby improves the overall electrochemical performance of SOFC system. The characteristics of MIEC cathode materials and its comparison with other traditional cathode materials is studied and presented in the paper.

  3. Investigation of kinetics model of dc reactive sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱圣龙; 王福会; 吴维叓

    1996-01-01

    A novel physical sputtering kinetics model for reactive sputtering is presented.Reactive gas gettering effects and interactions among the characteristic parameters have been taken into account in the model.The data derived from the model accorded fairly well with experimental results.The relationship between the values of initial oxide coverage on the target and the ready states was depicted in the model.This relationship gives reasons for the difference of the threshold of reactive gas fluxes (Q) from the metal sputtering region to the oxide sputtering region and in reverse direction.The discontinuities in oxide coverage on the target surface (θ) versus reactive gas fluxes (Q) are referred to as the effects of reactive gas partial pressure (p) upon the forming rates of oxide on the surfaces of target (V0).The diversity of the oxygen flux threshold results from the variance of the initial values of oxide coverage on target.

  4. Sputtering System for QWR Cavity in BRIF Project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    <正>1 Introduction Four superconducting QWR cavities will be used in HI-13 tandem accelerator upgrade project (BRIF). These niobium coated cavities will be produced by CIAE. Up to now, a niobium sputtering

  5. RF Sputtering for preparing substantially pure amorphous silicon monohydride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeffrey, Frank R.; Shanks, Howard R.

    1982-10-12

    A process for controlling the dihydride and monohydride bond densities in hydrogenated amorphous silicon produced by reactive rf sputtering of an amorphous silicon target. There is provided a chamber with an amorphous silicon target and a substrate therein with the substrate and the target positioned such that when rf power is applied to the target the substrate is in contact with the sputtering plasma produced thereby. Hydrogen and argon are fed to the chamber and the pressure is reduced in the chamber to a value sufficient to maintain a sputtering plasma therein, and then rf power is applied to the silicon target to provide a power density in the range of from about 7 watts per square inch to about 22 watts per square inch to sputter an amorphous silicon hydride onto the substrate, the dihydride bond density decreasing with an increase in the rf power density. Substantially pure monohydride films may be produced.

  6. Sputter-Resistant Materials for Electric Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This SBIR Phase 2 project shall develop sputter-resistant materials for use in electric propulsion test facilities and for plume shields on spacecraft using electric...

  7. Development of hydrophobicity of mica surfaces by ion beam sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Metya, Amaresh; Ghose, Debabrata, E-mail: debabrata.ghose@saha.ac.in; Ray, Nihar Ranjan

    2014-02-28

    The hydrophilic mica surface can be made hydrophobic by low energy Ar{sup +} ion sputtering. The ion sputtering leads to both topographical and physicochemical changes of the surface which are thought to be responsible for the water repelling behavior. The sessile drop method is used to evaluate the wetting properties of the sputtered mica surfaces. It has been shown that the sputter-pattern at the nano-length scale has little influence on the development of hydrophobicity. On the other hand, the wettability appears to be strongly connected with the chemistry of the bombarded surface. We have also studied the temporal evolution of contact angle as the water evaporates due to difference in vapor pressures between the droplet surface and the surroundings. The analysis offers a simple method to estimate the diffusion coefficient of water vapor.

  8. Development of hydrophobicity of mica surfaces by ion beam sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Metya, Amaresh; Ghose, Debabrata; Ray, Nihar Ranjan

    2014-02-01

    The hydrophilic mica surface can be made hydrophobic by low energy Ar+ ion sputtering. The ion sputtering leads to both topographical and physicochemical changes of the surface which are thought to be responsible for the water repelling behavior. The sessile drop method is used to evaluate the wetting properties of the sputtered mica surfaces. It has been shown that the sputter-pattern at the nano-length scale has little influence on the development of hydrophobicity. On the other hand, the wettability appears to be strongly connected with the chemistry of the bombarded surface. We have also studied the temporal evolution of contact angle as the water evaporates due to difference in vapor pressures between the droplet surface and the surroundings. The analysis offers a simple method to estimate the diffusion coefficient of water vapor.

  9. Hollow-Cathode Source Generates Plasma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deininger, W. D.; Aston, G.; Pless, L. C.

    1989-01-01

    Device generates argon, krypton, or xenon plasma via thermionic emission and electrical discharge within hollow cathode and ejects plasma into surrounding vacuum. Goes from cold start up to full operation in less than 5 s after initial application of power. Exposed to moist air between operations without significant degradation of starting and running characteristics. Plasma generated by electrical discharge in cathode barrel sustained and aided by thermionic emission from emitter tube. Emitter tube does not depend on rare-earth oxides, making it vulnerable to contamination by exposure to atmosphere. Device modified for use as source of plasma in laboratory experiments or industrial processes.

  10. DARHT 2 kA Cathode Development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Henestroza, E.; Houck, T.; Kwan, J.W.; Leitner, M.; Miram, G.; Prichard, B.; Roy, P.K.; Waldron, W.; Westenskow, G.; Yu, S.; Bieniosek, F.M.

    2009-03-09

    In the campaign to achieve 2 kA of electron beam current, we have made several changes to the DARHT-II injector during 2006-2007. These changes resulted in a significant increase in the beam current, achieving the 2 kA milestone. Until recently (before 2007), the maximum beam current that was produced from the 6.5-inch diameter (612M) cathode was about 1300 A when the cathode was operating at a maximum temperature of 1140 C. At this temperature level, the heat loss was dominated by radiation which is proportional to temperature to the fourth power. The maximum operating temperature was limited by the damage threshold of the potted filament and the capacity of the filament heater power supply, as well as the shortening of the cathode life time. There were also signs of overheating at other components in the cathode assembly. Thus it was clear that our approach to increase beam current could not be simply trying to run at a higher temperature and the preferred way was to operate with a cathode that has a lower work function. The dispenser cathode initially used was the type 612M made by SpectraMat. According to the manufacturer's bulletin, this cathode should be able to produce more than 10 A/cm{sup 2} of current density (corresponding to 2 kA of total beam current) at our operating conditions. Instead the measured emission (space charge limited) was 6 A/cm{sup 2}. The result was similar even after we had revised the activation and handling procedures to adhere more closely to the recommend steps (taking longer time and nonstop to do the out-gassing). Vacuum was a major concern in considering the cathode's performance. Although the vacuum gauges at the injector vessel indicated 10{sup -8} Torr, the actual vacuum condition near the cathode in the central region of the vessel, where there might be significant out-gassing from the heater region, was never determined. Poor vacuum at the surface of the cathode degraded the emission (by raising the work function

  11. A Novel Cathode Material for Cathodic Dehalogenation of 1,1-Dibromo Cyclopropane Derivatives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gütz, Christoph; Selt, Maximilian; Bänziger, Markus; Bucher, Christoph; Römelt, Christina; Hecken, Nadine; Gallou, Fabrice; Galvão, Tomás R; Waldvogel, Siegfried R

    2015-09-28

    Leaded bronze turned out to be an excellent cathode material for the dehalogenation reaction of cyclopropanes without affecting the strained molecular entity. With this particular alloy, beneficial properties of lead cathodes are conserved, whereas the corrosion of cathode is efficiently suppressed. The solvent in the electrolyte determines whether a complete debromination reaction is achieved or if the process can be selectively stopped at the monobromo cyclopropane intermediate. The electroorganic conversion tolerates a variety of functional groups and can be conducted at rather complex substrates like cyclosporine A. This approach allows the sustainable preparation of cyclopropane derivatives.

  12. Low-current hollow-cathode discharge in a trigger unit of a cold cathode thyratron

    OpenAIRE

    Landl, N. V.; Korolev, Yuriy Dmitrievich; Frants, O. B.; Geyman, V. G.; Bolotov, A. V.

    2015-01-01

    The paper deals with the investigations of the effect of cathode emissivity on the regimes of low-current hollow-cathode glow discharge. It is shown that an increase in the emissivity due to the so-called high-emissivity tablet allows the essential decrease in the discharge initiation voltage and the discharge burning voltage. The model of current sustaining for the hollow-cathode discharge, which takes into account the external emission current has been developed. On basis of the model, the ...

  13. Low-current hollow-cathode discharge in a trigger unit of a cold cathode thyratron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landl, N. V.; Korolev, Y. D.; Frants, O. B.; Geyman, V. G.; Bolotov, A. V.

    2015-11-01

    The paper deals with the investigations of the effect of cathode emissivity on the regimes of low-current hollow-cathode glow discharge. It is shown that an increase in the emissivity due to the so-called high-emissivity tablet allows the essential decrease in the discharge initiation voltage and the discharge burning voltage. The model of current sustaining for the hollow-cathode discharge, which takes into account the external emission current has been developed. On basis of the model, the current-voltage characteristics of the discharge have been interpreted.

  14. Uniform large-area thermionic cathode for SCALPEL

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katsap, Victor; Sewell, Peter B.; Waskiewicz, Warren K.; Zhu, Wei

    1999-11-01

    An electron beam lithography tool, which employs the SCALPEL technique, requires an extremely uniform beam to illuminate the scattering Mask, with the cathode operating in the temperature limited mode. It has been previously shown that LaB6 cathodes are not stable in this mode of operation. We have explored the possibility of implementing refined Tantalum-based emitters in the SCALPEL source cathode, and have developed large-area flat cathodes featuring suitably high emission uniformity under temperature limited operation.

  15. Transition from linear to nonlinear sputtering of solid xenon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutkiewicz, L.; Pedrys, R.; Schou, Jørgen;

    1995-01-01

    Self-sputtering of solid xenon has been studied with molecular dynamics simulations as a model system for the transition from dominantly linear to strongly nonlinear effects. The simulation covered the projectile energy range from 20 to 750 eV. Within a relatively narrow range from 30 to 250 eV, ......V, nonlinear features such as high collision densities in the sputtering volume, amorphization of the crystalline structure, and an enhanced emission of low-energy atoms occur gradually....

  16. Sputtering Yield Calculation of Some Candidate PFC Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENGBaiquan; YANJiancheng; HUANGJinhua

    2001-01-01

    In order to estimate the erosion rates of some plasma facing component materials, the sputtering yields of Mo, W and Li bombarded by charged particles H+, D+, T+ and He+ are calculated by application of sputtering theory based on bipartition model of ion transport. The comparisons with Monte-Carlo calculation results are made. These data might be useful to estimate the lifetime of plasma facing components and to analyze the impurity level in core plasma of fusion reactors.

  17. Sputtered iridium oxide films (SIROFs) for neural stimulation electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Cogan, Stuart F.; Ehrlich, Julia; Plante, Timothy D.; Smirnov, Anton; Shire, Douglas B.; Gingerich, Marcus; Rizzo, Joseph F

    2004-01-01

    Sputtered iridium oxide films (SIROFs) deposited by DC reactive sputtering from an iridium metal target have been characterized in vitro for their potential as neural recording and stimulation electrodes. SIROFs were deposited over gold metallization on flexible multielectrode arrays fabricated on thin (15 µm) polyimide substrates. SIROF thickness and electrode areas of 200–1300 nm and 1960–125600 µm2, respectively, were investigated. The charge-injection capacities of the SIROFs were evaluat...

  18. Sputter deposition and characterization of lithium cobalt oxide thin films and their applications in thin-film rechargeable lithium batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, B.; Bates, J.B.; Luck, C.F.; Sales, B.C.; Zuhr, R.A. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Robertson, J.D. [Kentucky Univ., Lexington, KY (United States). Dept. of Chemistry

    1996-01-01

    Li Co oxide thin films were deposited by rf magnetron sputtering of a LiCoO{sub 2} target in a 3:1 Ar/O{sub 2} mixture gas. From proton-induced gamma-ray emission analysis and Rutherford backscattering spectrometry, the average composition of these films was determined to be Li{sub 1.15}CoO{sub 2.16}. X-ray powder diffraction patterns of films annealed in air at 500-700 C were consistent with regular rhombohedral structure of crystalline LiCoO{sub 2}. Discharge curves of thin film lithium cells with amoprohous LiCoO{sub 2} showed no obvious structural transition between 4.2 and 1.5 V. Shape of discharge curves of cells with polycrystalline cathodes were consistent with a two-phase voltage plateau at {similar_to}3.9 V with a relatively large capacity and two additional smaller plateaus at higher voltages. Cells with the 700 C annealed cathodes showed a capacity loss of {similar_to} after 1000 cycles between 4.2 and 3.0 V.

  19. Optical Properties of Magnetron sputtered Nickel Thin Films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Twagirayezu, Fidele; Geerts, Wilhelmus J.; Cui, Yubo

    2015-03-01

    The study of optical properties of Nickel (Ni) is important, given the pivotal role it plays in the semiconductor and nano-electronics technology. Ni films were made by DC and RF magnetron sputtering in an ATC Orion sputtering system of AJA on various substrates. The optical properties were studied ex situ by variable angle spectroscopic (220-1000 nm) ellipsometry at room temperature. The data were modeled and analyzed using the Woollam CompleteEase Software fitting ellipsometric and transmission data. Films sputtered at low pressure have optical properties similar to that of Palik. Films sputtered at higher pressure however have a lower refraction index and extinction coefficient. It is expected from our results that the density of the sputtered films can be determined from the ellipsometric quantities. Our experiments also revealed that Ni is susceptible to a slow oxidation changing its optical properties over the course of several weeks. The optical properties of the native oxide differ from those of reactive sputtered NiO similar as found by. Furthermore the oxidation process of our samples is characterized by at least two different time constants.

  20. Sputtering by the Solar Wind: Effects of Variable Composition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killen, R. M.; Arrell, W. M.; Sarantos, M.; Delory, G. T.

    2011-01-01

    It has long been recognized that solar wind bombardment onto exposed surfaces in the solar system will produce an energetic component to the exospheres about those bodies. Laboratory experiments have shown that there is no increase in the sputtering yield caused by highly charged heavy ions for metallic and for semiconducting surfaces, but the sputter yield can be noticeably increased in the case of a good insulating surface. Recently measurements of the solar wind composition have become available. It is now known that the solar wind composition is highly dependent on the origin of the particular plasma. Using the measured composition of the slow wind, fast wind, solar energetic particle (SEP) population, and coronal mass ejection (CME), broken down into its various components, we have estimated the total sputter yield for each type of solar wind. Whereas many previous calculations of sputtering were limited to the effects of proton bombardment. we show that the heavy ion component. especially the He++ component. can greatly enhance the total sputter yield during times when the heavy ion population is enhanced. We will discuss sputtering of both neutrals and ions.

  1. Evaluation of residual stress in sputtered tantalum thin-film

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Al-masha’al, Asa’ad, E-mail: asaad.al@ed.ac.uk; Bunting, Andrew; Cheung, Rebecca

    2016-05-15

    Highlights: • Tantalum thin-films have been deposited by DC magnetron sputtering system. • Thin-film stress is observed to be strongly influenced by sputtering pressure. • Transition towards the compressive stress is ascribed to the annealing at 300 °C. • Expose thin-film to air ambient or ion bombardment lead to a noticeable change in the residual stress. - Abstract: The influence of deposition conditions on the residual stress of sputtered tantalum thin-film has been evaluated in the present study. Films have been deposited by DC magnetron sputtering and curvature measurement method has been employed to calculate the residual stress of the films. Transitions of tantalum film stress from compressive to tensile state have been observed as the sputtering pressure increases. Also, the effect of annealing process at temperature range of 90–300 °C in oxygen ambient on the residual stress of the films has been studied. The results demonstrate that the residual stress of the films that have been deposited at lower sputtering pressure has become more compressive when annealed at 300 °C. Furthermore, the impact of exposure to atmospheric ambient on the tantalum film stress has been investigated by monitoring the variation of the residual stress of both annealed and unannealed films over time. The as-deposited films have been exposed to pure Argon energy bombardment and as result, a high compressive stress has been developed in the films.

  2. Kinetic simulation of neutral particle transport in sputtering processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trieschmann, Jan; Gallian, Sara; Brinkmann, Ralf Peter; Mussenbrock, Thomas; Ries, Stefan; Bibinov, Nikita; Awakowicz, Peter

    2013-09-01

    For many physical vapor deposition applications using sputtering processes, knowledge about the detailed spatial and temporal evolution of the involved gas species is of great importance. Modeling of the involved gas dynamic and plasma processes is however challenging, because the operating pressure is typically below 1 Pa. In consequence, only kinetic descriptions are appropriate. In order to approach this problem, the dynamics of sputtered particle transport through a neutral gas background is simulated. For this study, a modified version of the three-dimensional Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) code dsmcFoam is utilized. The impact of a transient sputtering wind is investigated in a generic reactor geometry, which may be used for dc Magnetron Sputtering (dcMS), High Power Impulse Magnetron Sputtering (HiPIMS), as well as sputtering in capacitively coupled discharges. In the present work a rarefaction of the background gas is observed. Moreover in pulsed mode the temporal dynamics of the rarefaction and subsequent recovery of the background gas is investigated. This work is supported by the German Research Foundation in the frame of TRR 87.

  3. Optical properties of lamps with cold emission cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalenik, Jerzy; Czerwosz, ElŻbieta; Biernacki, Krzysztof; Rymarczyk, Joanna; Stepińska, Izabela

    2016-12-01

    A luminescent lamp was constructed and tested. Phosphor excited by electrons is the source of light. The source of electrons is field emission cathode. The cathode is covered with nickel-carbon layer containing carbon nanotubes that enhance electron emission from the cathode. Results of luminance measurements are presented. Luminance is high enough for lighting application.

  4. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlan U. Anderson

    2000-03-31

    . However, they have the potential of being useful as an interface on the anode side of the electrolyte. NexTech has focused much of its effort during the past few months on establishing tape casting methods for porous LSM substrates. This work, performed under a separate DOE-funded program, involved tape casting formulations comprising LSM powders with bi-modal particle size distributions and fugitive pore forming additives. Sintered LSM substrates with porosities in the 30 to 40 vol% range, and pore sizes of 10 {approx} 20 microns have been prepared. In addition, tape casting formulations involving composite mixtures of LSM and Sm-doped ceria (SDC) have been evaluated. The LSM/SDC cathode substrates are expected to provide better performance at low temperatures. Characterization of these materials is currently underway.

  5. LOW TEMPERATURE CATHODE SUPPORTED ELECTROLYTES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harlan U. Anderson; Wayne Huebner; Igor Kosacki

    2001-09-30

    This project has three main goals: Thin Films Studies, Preparation of Graded Porous Substrates and Basic Electrical Characterization and testing of Planar Single Cells. In this portion of study we have focused on producing YSZ films on porous LSM substrates. When using the polymer precursor there are a number of obstacles to overcome in order to form dense electrolyte layers on porous substrates (cathode or anode). Probably the most difficult problems are: (1) Extreme penetration of the polymer into the substrate must be prevented. (2) Shrinkage cracking must be avoided. (3) Film thickness in the 1 to 5{micro}m range must be achieved. We have demonstrated that cracking due to shrinkage involved during the elimination of solvents and organic matter and densification of the remaining oxide is not a problem as long as the resulting oxide film is < {approx} 0.15 {micro}m in thickness. We have also shown that we can make thicker films by making multiple depositions if the substrate is smooth (roughness {le} 0.1 {micro}m) and contains no surface pores > 0.2 {micro}m. The penetration of the polymer into the porous substrate can be minimized by increasing the viscosity of the polymer and reducing the largest pore at the surface of the substrate to {le} 0.2 {micro}m. We have shown that this can be done, but we have also shown that it is difficult to make dense films that are defect free with areas > 1 cm{sup 2}. This is because of the roughness of the substrate and the difficulty in making a substrate which does not have surface voids > 0.2 {micro}m. Thus the process works well for dense, smooth substrates for films < 1 {micro}m thick, but is difficult to apply to rough, porous surfaces and to make film thickness > 1 {micro}m. As a result of these problems, we have been addressing the issue of how to make dense films in the thickness range of 1 to 5 {micro}m on sintered porous substrates without introducing cracks and holes due to shrinkage and surface voids? These

  6. The double sheath on cathodes of discharges burning in cathode vapour

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Benilov, M S; Benilova, L G [Departamento de Fisica, Universidade da Madeira, Largo do MunicIpio, 9000 Funchal (Portugal)

    2010-09-01

    The model of a collisionless near-cathode space-charge sheath with ionization of atoms emitted by the cathode surface is considered. Numerical calculations showed that the mathematical problem is solvable and its solution is unique. In the framework of this model, the sheath represents a double layer with a potential maximum, with the ions which are produced before the maximum returning to the cathode surface and those produced after the maximum escaping into the plasma. Numerical results are given in a form to be readily applicable in analysis of discharges burning in cathode vapour, such as vacuum arcs. In particular, the results indicate that the ion backflow coefficient in such discharges exceeds 0.5, in agreement with values extracted from the experiment.

  7. Non-conventional photocathodes based on Cu thin films deposited on Y substrate by sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perrone, A.; D'Elia, M.; Gontad, F.; Di Giulio, M.; Maruccio, G.; Cola, A.; Stankova, N. E.; Kovacheva, D. G.; Broitman, E.

    2014-07-01

    Copper (Cu) thin films were deposited on yttrium (Y) substrate by sputtering. During the deposition, a small central area of the Y substrate was shielded to avoid the film deposition and was successively used to study its photoemissive properties. This configuration has two advantages: the cathode presents (i) the quantum efficiency and the work function of Y and (ii) high electrical compatibility when inserted into the conventional radio-frequency gun built with Cu bulk. The photocathode was investigated by scanning electron microscopy to determine surface morphology. X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy studies were performed to compare the structure and surface properties of the deposited film. The measured electrical resistivity value of the Cu film was similar to that of high purity Cu bulk. Film to substrate adhesion was also evaluated using the Daimler-Benz Rockwell-C adhesion test method. Finally, the photoelectron performance in terms of quantum efficiency was obtained in a high vacuum photodiode cell before and after laser cleaning procedures. A comparison with the results obtained with a twin sample prepared by pulsed laser deposition is presented and discussed.

  8. Non-conventional photocathodes based on Cu thin films deposited on Y substrate by sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrone, A. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, 73100 Lecce (Italy); National Institute of Nuclear Physics and University of Salento, 73100 Lecce (Italy); D’Elia, M. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Gontad, F., E-mail: francisco.gontad@le.infn.it [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, 73100 Lecce (Italy); National Institute of Nuclear Physics and University of Salento, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Di Giulio, M.; Maruccio, G. [Department of Mathematics and Physics “E. De Giorgi”, University of Salento, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Cola, A. [National Council Research, Institute for Microelectronics and Microsystems, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Stankova, N.E. [Institute of Electronics, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1784 Sofia (Bulgaria); Kovacheva, D.G. [Institute of General and Inorganic Chemistry, Bulgarian Academy of Sciences, 1113 Sofia (Bulgaria); Broitman, E. [Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    Copper (Cu) thin films were deposited on yttrium (Y) substrate by sputtering. During the deposition, a small central area of the Y substrate was shielded to avoid the film deposition and was successively used to study its photoemissive properties. This configuration has two advantages: the cathode presents (i) the quantum efficiency and the work function of Y and (ii) high electrical compatibility when inserted into the conventional radio-frequency gun built with Cu bulk. The photocathode was investigated by scanning electron microscopy to determine surface morphology. X-ray diffraction and atomic force microscopy studies were performed to compare the structure and surface properties of the deposited film. The measured electrical resistivity value of the Cu film was similar to that of high purity Cu bulk. Film to substrate adhesion was also evaluated using the Daimler–Benz Rockwell-C adhesion test method. Finally, the photoelectron performance in terms of quantum efficiency was obtained in a high vacuum photodiode cell before and after laser cleaning procedures. A comparison with the results obtained with a twin sample prepared by pulsed laser deposition is presented and discussed.

  9. Estimation of Sputtering Damages on a Magnetron H- Ion Source Induced by Cs+ and H+ Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Pereira, H; Alessi, J; Kalvas, t

    2013-01-01

    An H− ion source is being developed for CERN’s Linac4 accelerator. A beam current requirement of 80 mA and a reliability above 99% during 1 year with 3 month uninterrupted operation periods are mandatory. To design a low-maintenance long life-time source, it is important to investigate and understand the wear mechanisms. A cesiated plasma discharge ion source, such as the BNL magnetron source, is a good candidate for the Linac4 ion source. However, in the magnetron source operated at BNL, the removal of material from the molybdenum cathode and the stainless steel anode cover plate surfaces is visible after extended operation periods. The observed sputtering traces are shown to result from cesium vapors and hydrogen gas ionized in the extraction region and subsequently accelerated by the extraction field. This paper presents a quantitative estimate of the ionization of cesium and hydrogen by the electron and H− beams in the extraction region of BNL’s magnetron ion source. The respective contributions o...

  10. Low friction coefficient coatings Ni-Cr by magnetron sputtering, DC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morales-Hernandez, J.; Mandujano-Ruiz, A.; Torres-Gonzalez, J.; Espinosa-Beltran, F. J.; Herrera-Hernandez, H.

    2015-07-01

    Magnetron Sputter Deposition technique with DC was used for the deposition of Ni-Cr coatings on AISI 316 SS like substrate. The cathode with a nominal composition Ni-22 at% Cr was prepared by Mechanical Alloying (MA) technique, with a maximum milling time of 16 hours and, with a high energy SPEX 8000 mill. The coatings were made under Argon atmosphere at room temperature with a power of 100 W at different times of growth. Chemical composition, microstructure, topography, nano hardness and wear of the coatings were evaluated using the techniques of microanalysis by energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDAX), X-Ray Diffraction (XRD), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), Nano-indentation and pin-on-Disk, respectively. After milling, was not detected contamination in the mixtures. XRD analysis revealed that the microstructure of the Ni-Cr alloy was maintained in the coatings with respect to MA powders, with some degree of recrystallization. Nano hardness values were in the order of 8.8 GPa with a Youngs modulus of 195 GPa. The adhesion of the films was evaluated according to their resistance to fracture when these were indented at different loads using Vickers microhardness. The wear test results showed a decrease in the friction coefficient with respect to the increase of thickness films, getting a minimum value of 0.08 with a thickness of 1 μm and which correspond with the maximum growing time. (Author)

  11. Influence of sputtering pressure on the structural, optical and hydrophobic properties of sputtered deposited HfO{sub 2} coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dave, V. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India); Institute Instrumentation Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India); Dubey, P. [Institute Instrumentation Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India); Gupta, H.O. [Department of Electrical Engineering, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India); Chandra, R. [Institute Instrumentation Centre, Indian Institute of Technology Roorkee, Roorkee 247667 (India)

    2013-12-31

    The aim of this work is to develop hydrophobic coatings for outdoor insulators using sputtering technique. Hafnium oxide is characterized by high dielectric constant, large band gap (5.6 eV), high refractive index (2.1) and good mechanical, thermal and chemical properties. Hence HfO{sub 2} is suitable as a protective coating for outdoor insulators used in the transmission line and transformers. Hafnium oxide coatings were deposited on glass substrates by DC magnetron sputtering technique at a sputtering pressure of 5 mTorr, 10 mTorr, 15 mTorr, 20 mTorr and 25 mTorr. The deposited films were characterized by techniques like X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), water contact angle goniometry and UV–vis-NIR spectrophotometer. The average crystallite size calculated from XRD peaks shows that it increases with increase in sputtering pressure up to 15 mTorr and then it starts decreasing. The roughness calculated from AFM images shows the similar trend. The deposited films were found to be hydrophobic and transparent. The hydrophobicity of the films was correlated with the roughness calculated from AFM. The effect of sputtering pressure was also investigated on optical band gap and refractive index calculated from transmission and absorption data. The electrical resistivity was found to be high, thus ensuring insulating property of the deposited films. - Highlights: • Outdoor Insulators are suffering from environment pollution problem. • To mitigate problem, hydrophobic coating of HfO{sub 2} was synthesized by DC sputtering. • Effect of sputtering pressure was studied on structural, optical and hydrophobic properties of HfO{sub 2} • Optimum results were obtained at a sputtering pressure of 15 mTorr.

  12. High-pressure hollow cathode discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schoenbach, Karl H.; El-Habachi, Ahmed; Shi, Wenhui; Ciocca, Marco

    1997-11-01

    Reducing the diameter of the cathode hole in a plane anode - hollow cathode geometry to 0963-0252/6/4/003/img1m has allowed us to generate direct current discharges in argon at atmospheric pressure. Up to pressure times cathode hole diameter (pD) values of approximately 5 Torr cm, and at sub-mA currents, glow discharges (predischarges) are observed with a shape which is determined by the vacuum electric field. In the same pD range, but at higher currents of up to approximately 4 mA, the discharges are of the hollow cathode discharge type. At pD values exceeding 5 Torr cm the predischarges turn into surface discharges along the mica spacer between the electrodes. At currents > 4 mA filamentary, pulsed discharges are observed. Qualitative information on the electron energy distribution in the microdischarges has been obtained by studying the VUV emission from ionized argon atoms and the argon excimer radiation at 130 nm. The results of the spectral measurements indicate the presence of a relatively large concentration of electrons with energies > 15 eV over the entire pressure range. The fact that the current - voltage characteristic of the microdischarges has a positive slope over much of the current range where excimer radiation is emitted indicates the possibility of forming arrays of these discharges and using them in flat panel excimer lamps.

  13. ME1/1 Cathode Strip Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Erchov, Yu V; Kamenev, Alexey; Karjavin, Vladimir; Khabarov, Serguei; Moissenz, P V; Moissenz, K P; Movchan, Sergey; Perelygin, Victor; Vassiliev, S E; Zarubin, Anatoli; Tchekhovski, V A

    2008-01-01

    The 76 innermost ME1/1 cathode strip chambers (CSC) of the CMS Experiment were designed and produced in Dubna. The chambers have been installed in the detector and commissioning has been completed. This paper describes the design of the CSCs, their main mechanical parameters and read-out electronics, and the results of tests with cosmic-ray muons.

  14. Barium depletion in hollow cathode emitters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Polk, James E., E-mail: james.e.polk@jpl.nasa.gov; Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira [Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91109 (United States); Capece, Angela M. [Graduate Aerospace Laboratories, California Institute of Technology, Pasadena, California 91125 (United States)

    2016-01-14

    Dispenser hollow cathodes rely on a consumable supply of Ba released by BaO-CaO-Al{sub 2}O{sub 3} source material in the pores of a tungsten matrix to maintain a low work function surface. The examination of cathode emitters from long duration tests shows deposits of tungsten at the downstream end that appear to block the flow of Ba from the interior. In addition, a numerical model of Ba transport in the cathode plasma indicates that the Ba partial pressure in the insert may exceed the equilibrium vapor pressure of the dominant Ba-producing reaction, and it was postulated previously that this would suppress Ba loss in the upstream part of the emitter. New measurements of the Ba depletion depth from a cathode insert operated for 8200 h reveal that Ba loss is confined to a narrow region near the downstream end, confirming this hypothesis. The Ba transport model was modified to predict the depletion depth with time. A comparison of the calculated and measured depletion depths gives excellent qualitative agreement, and quantitative agreement was obtained assuming an insert temperature 70 °C lower than measured beginning-of-life values.

  15. Estimates of Sputter Yields of Solar-Wind Heavy Ions of Lunar Regolith Materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouty, Abdulmasser F.; Adams, James H., Jr.

    2008-01-01

    At energies of approximately 1 keV/amu, solar-wind protons and heavy ions interact with the lunar surface materials via a number of microscopic interactions that include sputtering. Solar-wind induced sputtering is a main mechanism by which the composition of the topmost layers of the lunar surface can change, dynamically and preferentially. This work concentrates on sputtering induced by solar-wind heavy ions. Sputtering associated with slow (speeds the electrons speed in its first Bohr orbit) and highly charged ions are known to include both kinetic and potential sputtering. Potential sputtering enjoys some unique characteristics that makes it of special interest to lunar science and exploration. Unlike the yield from kinetic sputtering where simulation and approximation schemes exist, the yield from potential sputtering is not as easy to estimate. This work will present a preliminary numerical scheme designed to estimate potential sputtering yields from reactions relevant to this aspect of solar-wind lunar-surface coupling.

  16. Improved Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goebel, Dan M.

    2011-01-01

    An improvement has been made to the design of the hollow cathode geometry that was created for the rare-earth electron emitter described in Compact Rare Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode (NPO-44923), NASA Tech Briefs, Vol. 34, No. 3 (March 2010), p. 52. The original interior assembly was made entirely of graphite in order to be compatible with the LaB6 material, which cannot be touched by metals during operation due to boron diffusion causing embrittlement issues in high-temperature refractory materials. Also, the graphite tube was difficult to machine and was subject to vibration-induced fracturing. This innovation replaces the graphite tube with one made out of refractory metal that is relatively easy to manufacture. The cathode support tube is made of molybdenum or molybdenum-rhenium. This material is easily gun-bored to near the tolerances required, and finish machined with steps at each end that capture the orifice plate and the mounting flange. This provides the manufacturability and robustness needed for flight applications, and eliminates the need for expensive e-beam welding used in prior cathodes. The LaB6 insert is protected from direct contact with the refractory metal tube by thin, graphite sleeves in a cup-arrangement around the ends of the insert. The sleeves, insert, and orifice plate are held in place by a ceramic spacer and tungsten spring inserted inside the tube. To heat the cathode, an insulating tube is slipped around the refractory metal hollow tube, which can be made of high-temperature materials like boron nitride or aluminum nitride. A screw-shaped slot, or series of slots, is machined in the outside of the ceramic tube to constrain a refractory metal wire wound inside the slot that is used as the heater. The screw slot can hold a single heater wire that is then connected to the front of the cathode tube by tack-welding to complete the electrical circuit, or it can be a double slot that takes a bifilar wound heater with both leads coming out

  17. Cathode depth sensing in CZT detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, JaeSub; Bellm, Eric C.; Grindlay, Jonathan E.; Narita, Tomohiko

    2004-02-01

    Measuring the depth of interaction in thick Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) detectors allows improved imaging and spectroscopy for hard X-ray imaging above 100 keV. The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) will employ relatively thick (5 - 10 mm) CZT detectors, which are required to perform the broad energy-band sky survey. Interaction depth information is needed to correct events to the detector "focal plane" for correct imaging and can be used to improve the energy resolution of the detector at high energies by allowing event-based corrections for incomplete charge collection. Background rejection is also improved by allowing low energy events from the rear and sides of the detector to be rejected. We present experimental results of intereaction depth sensing in a 5 mm thick pixellated Au-contact IMARAD CZT detector. The depth sensing was done by making simultaneous measurements of cathode and anode signals, where the interaction depth at a given energy is proportional to the ratio of cathode/anode signals. We demonstrate how a simple empirical formula describing the event distributions in the cathode/anode signal space can dramatically improve the energy resolution. We also estimate the energy and depth resolution of the detector as a function of the energy and the interaction depth. We also show a depth-sensing prototype system currently under development for EXIST in which cathode signals from 8, 16 or 32 crystals can be read-out by a small multi-channel ASIC board that is vertically edge-mounted on the cathode electrode along every second CZT crystal boundary. This allows CZT crystals to be tiled contiguously with minimum impact on throughput of incoming photons. The robust packaging is crucial in EXIST, which will employ very large area imaging CZT detector arrays.

  18. Influence of the sputtering pressure on the properties of transparent conducting zirconium-doped zinc oxide films prepared by RF magnetron sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘汉法; 张化福; 类成新; 袁长坤

    2009-01-01

    Transparent conducting zirconium-doped zinc oxide films with high transparency and relatively low re-sistivity have been successfully prepared on water-cooled glass substrate by radio frequency magnetron sputtering at room temperature. The Ar sputtering pressure was varied from 0.5 to 3 Pa. The crystallinity increases and the electri-cal resistivity decreases when the sputtering pressure increases from 0.5 to 2.5 Pa. The cystallinity decreases and the electrical resistivity increases when the sputtering pressure increases from 2.5 to 3 Pa. When the sputtering pressure The deposited films are polycrystalline with a hexagonal structure and a preferred orientation perpendicular to the substrate.

  19. Polymer coatings as separator layers for microbial fuel cell cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Watson, Valerie J.

    2011-03-01

    Membrane separators reduce oxygen flux from the cathode into the anolyte in microbial fuel cells (MFCs), but water accumulation and pH gradients between the separator and cathode reduces performance. Air cathodes were spray-coated (water-facing side) with anion exchange, cation exchange, and neutral polymer coatings of different thicknesses to incorporate the separator into the cathode. The anion exchange polymer coating resulted in greater power density (1167 ± 135 mW m-2) than a cation exchange coating (439 ± 2 mW m-2). This power output was similar to that produced by a Nafion-coated cathode (1114 ± 174 mW m-2), and slightly lower than the uncoated cathode (1384 ± 82 mW m-2). Thicker coatings reduced oxygen diffusion into the electrolyte and increased coulombic efficiency (CE = 56-64%) relative to an uncoated cathode (29 ± 8%), but decreased power production (255-574 mW m-2). Electrochemical characterization of the cathodes ex situ to the MFC showed that the cathodes with the lowest charge transfer resistance and the highest oxygen reduction activity produced the most power in MFC tests. The results on hydrophilic cathode separator layers revealed a trade off between power and CE. Cathodes coated with a thin coating of anion exchange polymer show promise for controlling oxygen transfer while minimally affecting power production. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Development of magnetron sputtering simulator with GPU parallel computing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sohn, Ilyoup; Kim, Jihun; Bae, Junkyeong; Lee, Jinpil

    2014-12-01

    Sputtering devices are widely used in the semiconductor and display panel manufacturing process. Currently, a number of surface treatment applications using magnetron sputtering techniques are being used to improve the efficiency of the sputtering process, through the installation of magnets outside the vacuum chamber. Within the internal space of the low pressure chamber, plasma generated from the combination of a rarefied gas and an electric field is influenced interactively. Since the quality of the sputtering and deposition rate on the substrate is strongly dependent on the multi-physical phenomena of the plasma regime, numerical simulations using PIC-MCC (Particle In Cell, Monte Carlo Collision) should be employed to develop an efficient sputtering device. In this paper, the development of a magnetron sputtering simulator based on the PIC-MCC method and the associated numerical techniques are discussed. To solve the electric field equations in the 2-D Cartesian domain, a Poisson equation solver based on the FDM (Finite Differencing Method) is developed and coupled with the Monte Carlo Collision method to simulate the motion of gas particles influenced by an electric field. The magnetic field created from the permanent magnet installed outside the vacuum chamber is also numerically calculated using Biot-Savart's Law. All numerical methods employed in the present PIC code are validated by comparison with analytical and well-known commercial engineering software results, with all of the results showing good agreement. Finally, the developed PIC-MCC code is parallelized to be suitable for general purpose computing on graphics processing unit (GPGPU) acceleration, so as to reduce the large computation time which is generally required for particle simulations. The efficiency and accuracy of the GPGPU parallelized magnetron sputtering simulator are examined by comparison with the calculated results and computation times from the original serial code. It is found that

  1. Virtual cathode microwave generator having annular anode slit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Thomas J. T.; Snell, Charles M.

    1988-01-01

    A microwave generator is provided for generating microwaves substantially from virtual cathode oscillation. Electrons are emitted from a cathode and accelerated to an anode which is spaced apart from the cathode. The anode has an annular slit therethrough effective to form the virtual cathode. The anode is at least one range thickness relative to electrons reflecting from the virtual cathode. A magnet is provided to produce an optimum magnetic field having the field strength effective to form an annular beam from the emitted electrons in substantial alignment with the annular anode slit. The magnetic field, however, does permit the reflected electrons to axially diverge from the annular beam. The reflected electrons are absorbed by the anode in returning to the real cathode, such that substantially no reflexing electrons occur. The resulting microwaves are produced with a single dominant mode and are substantially monochromatic relative to conventional virtual cathode microwave generators.

  2. Cathode R&D for Future Light Sources

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dowell, D.H.; /SLAC; Bazarov, I.; Dunham, B.; /Cornell U., CLASSE; Harkay, K.; /Argonne; Hernandez-Garcia; /Jefferson Lab; Legg, R.; /Wisconsin U., SRC; Padmore, H.; /LBL, Berkeley; Rao, T.; Smedley, J.; /Brookhaven; Wan, W.; /LBL, Berkeley

    2010-05-26

    This paper reviews the requirements and current status of cathodes for accelerator applications, and proposes a research and development plan for advancing cathode technology. Accelerator cathodes need to have long operational lifetimes and produce electron beams with a very low emittance. The two principal emission processes to be considered are thermionic and photoemission with the photocathodes being further subdivided into metal and semi-conductors. Field emission cathodes are not included in this analysis. The thermal emittance is derived and the formulas used to compare the various cathode materials. To date, there is no cathode which provides all the requirements needed for the proposed future light sources. Therefore a three part research plan is described to develop cathodes for these future light source applications.

  3. Design of ANSYS-based Cathode with Complex Groove

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    范植坚; 赵刚刚; 张丽娟

    2012-01-01

    The profile of cathode with complex groove needs to be modified time after time during design of electrochemical machining (ECM) cathode.A design scheme using finite element method (FEM) for cathode with complex profile is put forward to shorten the period of cathode design.Based on Laplace equation,the potential distribution on parameter-transformation model was calculated by using ANSYS,which is compared to the potential distribution calculated by substituting conductivity and current efficiency into Laplace equation.According to the difference between the results calculated and simulated by ANSYS,the cathode profile was modified by adjusting the cathode boundary.The experiments show that the dimensions and shape of workpiece machined by numerically simulated cathode conform well with the blueprint.

  4. Erosion behaviour of composite Al-Cr cathodes in cathodic arc plasmas in inert and reactive atmospheres

    CERN Document Server

    Franz, Robert; Hawranek, Gerhard; Polcik, Peter

    2015-01-01

    Al$_{x}$Cr$_{1-x}$ composite cathodes with Al contents of x = 0.75, 0.5 and 0.25 were exposed to cathodic arc plasmas in Ar, N$_2$ and O$_2$ atmospheres and their erosion behaviour was studied. Cross-sectional analysis of the elemental distribution of the near-surface zone in the cathodes by scanning electron microscopy revealed the formation of a modified layer for all cathodes and atmospheres. Due to intermixing of Al and Cr in the heat-affected zone, intermetallic Al-Cr phases formed as evidenced by X-ray diffraction analysis. Cathode poisoning effects in the reactive N$_2$ and O$_2$ atmospheres were non-uniform as a result of the applied magnetic field configuration. With the exception of oxide islands on Al-rich cathodes, reactive layers were absent in the circular erosion zone, while nitrides and oxides formed in the less eroded centre region of the cathodes.

  5. Sputtering of a metal nanofoam by Au ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anders, Christian [Physics Department and Research Center OPTIMAS, University Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schrödinger-Straße, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Bringa, Eduardo M. [CONICET, Mendoza 5500 (Argentina); Instituto de Ciencias Básicas, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza 5500 (Argentina); Urbassek, Herbert M., E-mail: urbassek@rhrk.uni-kl.de [Physics Department and Research Center OPTIMAS, University Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schrödinger-Straße, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2015-01-01

    Porous materials, such as nanofoams, may react differently to irradiation than compact targets. This is caused by the influence of the cavities on the evolution of collision cascades, but also by the differing heat conduction which affects the spike phase. Using molecular dynamics simulation we study the sputtering of a Au nanofoam by 10 keV Au projectiles, and compare to the sputtering of a compact Au target. These bombardment conditions lead to a strong contribution of spikes to the sputtering process. We find the foam to sputter considerably less than the compact target; the open structure of the foam prevents the build-up of strong collision spike regions at the surface, which are the major source of sputtering in the compact target. Also emission takes a longer time scale in the foam, as particles need to travel longer pathways to be emitted. On the other hand, the molten phase is more extended in the foam and also exists for a longer time; this is caused by the reduced heat conductivity in this material.

  6. Nitinol: Tubing versus sputtered film - microcleanliness and corrosion behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wohlschlögel, Markus; Lima de Miranda, Rodrigo; Schüßler, Andreas; Quandt, Eckhard

    2016-08-01

    Corrosion behavior and microcleanliness of medical-device grade Nitinol tubing (Nix Ti1- x , x = 0.51; outer diameter 7 mm, wall thickness 0.5 mm), drawn from various ingot qualities, are compared to the characteristics of sputtered Nitinol film material (Nix Ti1- x , x = 0.51; thickness 50 µm). Electropolished tubing half-shell samples are tested versus as-received sputtered film samples. Inclusion size distributions are assessed using quantitative metallography and corrosion behavior is investigated by potentiodynamic polarization testing in phosphate-buffered saline at body temperature. For the sputtered film samples, the surface chemistry is additionally analyzed employing Auger Electron Spectroscopy (AES) composition-depth profiling. Results show that the fraction of breakdowns in the potentiodynamic polarization test correlates with number and size of the inclusions in the material. For the sputtered Nitinol film material no inclusions were detectable by light microscopy on the one hand and no breakdowns were found in the potentiodynamic polarization test on the other hand. As for electropolished Nitinol, the sputtered Nitinol film material reveals Nickel depletion and an Oxygen-to-Titanium intensity ratio of ∼2:1 in the surface oxide layer, as measured by AES. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part B: Appl Biomater, 104B: 1176-1181, 2016.

  7. Projectile charge state dependent sputtering of solid surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Hayderer, G

    2000-01-01

    dependence on the ion kinetic energy. This new type of potential sputtering not only requires electronic excitation of the target material, but also the formation of a collision cascade within the target in order to initiate the sputtering process and has therefore been termed kinetically assisted potential sputtering. In order to study defects induced by potential sputtering on the atomic scale we performed measurements of multiply charged Ar ion irradiated HOPG (highly oriented pyrolitic graphite) samples with scanning tunneling microscopy (STM). The only surface defects found in the STM images are protrusions. The mean diameter of the defects increases with projectile charge state while the height of the protrusions stays roughly the same indicating a possible pre-equilibrium effect of the stopping of slow multiply charged projectiles in HOPG. Total sputter yields for impact of slow singly and multiply charged ions on metal- (Au), oxide- (Al2O3, MgO) and alkali-halide surfaces (LiF) have been measured as a...

  8. Reactive high power impulse magnetron sputtering: combining simulation and experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozak, Tomas; Vlcek, Jaroslav

    2016-09-01

    Reactive high-power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) has recently been used for preparation of various oxide films with high application potential, such as TiO2, ZrO2, Ta2O5, HfO2, VO2. Using our patented method of pulsed reactive gas flow control with an optimized reactive gas inlet, we achieved significantly higher deposition rates compared to typical continuous dc magnetron depositions. We have developed a time-dependent model of the reactive HiPIMS. The model includes a depth-resolved description of the sputtered target (featuring sputtering, implantation and knock-on implantation processes) and a parametric description of the discharge plasma (dissociation of reactive gas, ionization and return of sputtered atoms and gas rarefaction). The model uses a combination of experimental and simulation data as input. We have calculated the composition of the target and substrate for several deposition conditions. The simulations predict a reduced compound coverage of the target in HiPIMS compared to the continuous dc sputtering regime which explains the increased deposition rate. The simulations show that an increased dissociation of oxygen in a HiPIMS discharge is beneficial to achieve stoichiometric films on the substrate at high deposition rates.

  9. Measurements and Modelling of Sputtering Rates with Low Energy Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruzic, David N.; Smith, Preston C.; Turkot, Robert B., Jr.

    1996-10-01

    The angular-resolved sputtering yield of Be by D+, and Al by Ar+ was predicted and then measured. A 50 to 1000 eV ion beam from a Colutron was focused on to commercial grade and magnetron target grade samples. The S-65 C grade beryllium samples were supplied by Brush Wellman and the Al samples from TOSOH SMD. In our vacuum chamber the samples can be exposed to a dc D or Ar plasma to remove oxide, load the surface and more-nearly simulate steady state operating conditions in the plasma device. The angular distribution of the sputtered atoms was measured by collection on a single crystal graphite witness plate. The areal density of Be or Al (and BeO2 or Al2O3, after exposure to air) was then measured using a Scanning Auger Spectrometer. Total yield was also measured by deposition onto a quartz crystal oscillator simultaneously to deposition onto the witness plate. A three dimensional version of vectorized fractal TRIM (VFTRIM3D), a Monte-Carlo computer code which includes surface roughness characterized by fractal geometry, was used to predict the angular distribution of the sputtered particles and a global sputtering coefficient. Over a million trajectories were simulated for each incident angle to determine the azimuthal and polar angle distributions of the sputtered atoms. The experimental results match closely with the simulations for total yield, while the measured angular distributions depart somewhat from the predicted cosine curve.

  10. Cathodic Cage Plasma Nitriding: An Innovative Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Sousa,R.R.M.; de Araújo, F. O.; J. A. P. da Costa; Brandim,A.S.; R. A. de Brito; C. Alves

    2012-01-01

    Cylindrical samples of AISI 1020, AISI 316, and AISI 420 steels, with different heights, were simultaneously treated by a new technique of ionic nitriding, entitled cathodic cage plasma nitriding (CCPN), in order to evaluate the efficiency of this technique to produce nitrided layers with better properties compared with those obtained using conventional ionic nitriding technique. This method is able to eliminate the edge effect in the samples, promoting a better uniformity of temperature, and...

  11. FUZZY LOGIC CONTROLLED CATHODIC PROTECTION CIRCUIT DESIGN

    OpenAIRE

    AKÇAYOL, M. Ali

    2010-01-01

    In this study, output voltage of automatic transformer-rectifier (TR) unit of impressed current cathodic protection has been controlled by using fuzzy logic controller. To prevent corrosion, voltage between the protection metal and the auxiliary anode has to be controlled on a desired level. Because soil resistance in the environment changes with humidity and soil characteristics, TRs must control the output voltage between protection metal and auxiliary anode automatically. In this study, a ...

  12. The Hollow Cathode Phase of Pseudospark Operation

    Science.gov (United States)

    1993-06-01

    THE HOLLOW CATHODE PHASE OF PSEUDOSPARK OPERATION L. Pitchford and J. P. Boeuf University Paul Sabatier, France V. Puech University De Paris-Sud...ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND ADDRESS(ES) University Paul Sabatier, France 8. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION REPORT NUMBER 9. SPONSORING/MONITORING AGENCY NAME...Appl. Phys. 53, 1699 (1988). [9] A. Anders, S. Anders, and M. Gundersen, submitted to Phys. Rev. Lett. [10] J. P. Boeuf and L. Pitchford , IEEE

  13. Sputtering of W-Mo alloy under ion bombardment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    The distribution of plasma density in the vicinity of the W-Mo alloy source in the process of dou ble-glow discharge plasma surface alloying was diagnosed using the moveable Langmuir probe. The sputtering law, surface composition and morphological variation of the W-Mo alloy source was studied. The experimental results show that there exists obvious preferential sputtering on the surface of the W-Mo alloy source under the argon ion bombardment; the stable period is reached after a transitional period, and the preferential sputtering occurs in a definite range of composition(mole fraction): 70 % ~ 75 % Mo, 22 % ~ 25 % W; there appears segregation on the surface of the W-Mo alloy source.

  14. Anion formation in sputter ion sources by neutral resonant ionization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vogel, J. S., E-mail: johnsvogel@yahoo.com [University of California, 8300 Feliz Creek Dr., Ukiah, California 95482 (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Focused Cs{sup +} beams in sputter ion sources create mm-diameter pits supporting small plasmas that control anionization efficiencies. Sputtering produces overwhelmingly neutral products that the plasma can ionize as in a charge-change vapor. Electron capture between neutral atoms rises as the inverse square of the difference between the ionization potential of the Cs state and the electron affinity of the sputtered atom, allowing resonant ionization at very low energies. A plasma collision-radiation model followed electronic excitation up to Cs(7d). High modeled Cs(7d) in a 0.5 mm recess explains the 80 μA/mm{sup 2} C{sup −} current density compared to the 20 μA/mm{sup 2} from a 1 mm recess.

  15. Oxidation Behaviour of Sputtered Ni-3Cr-20Al Alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The oxidation behavior of sputtered Ni-3Cr-20Al coating at 900°C in air was investigated. A dense Al2O3 layer was formed on the sputtered Ni-3Cr-20Al coating after 200 h oxidation.However, owing to the segregation of Ni3Al during oxidation Focess at high temperature, the spinel NiAl2O4 was also formed in the Al2O3 layer. It was found that the formation of NiAl2O4had no detrimental effect on the oxidation resistance of the sputtered Ni-3Cr-20Al coating due to the excellent adhesion shown by the Al2O3 and NiAl2O4 complex oxide scale.

  16. Review of strategies for a comprehensive simulation in sputtering devices

    CERN Document Server

    Gentile, Antonio A

    2012-01-01

    The development of sputtering facilities, at the moment, is mainly pursued through experimental tests, or simply by expertise in the field, and relies much less on numerical simulation of the process environment. This leads to great efforts and empirically, roughly optimized solutions: in fact, the simulation of these devices, at the state of art, is quite good in predicting the behavior of single steps of the overall deposition process, but it seems still ahead a full integration among the tools simulating the various phenomena involved in a sputter. We summarize here the techniques and codes already available for problems of interest in sputtering facilities, and we try to outline the possible features of a comprehensive simulation framework. This framework should be able to integrate the single paradigms, dealing with aspects going from the plasma environment up to the distribution and properties of the deposited film, not only on the surface of the substrate, but also on the walls of the process chamber.

  17. CO2 gas sensitivity of sputtered zinc oxide thin films

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P Samarasekara; N U S Yapa; N T R N Kumara; M V K Perera

    2007-04-01

    For the first time, sputtered zinc oxide (ZnO) thin films have been used as a CO2 gas sensor. Zinc oxide thin films have been synthesized using reactive d.c. sputtering method for gas sensor applications, in the deposition temperature range from 130–153°C at a chamber pressure of 8.5 mbar for 18 h. Argon and oxygen gases were used as sputtering and reactive gases, respectively. ZnO phase could be crystallized using a pure metal target of zinc. The structure of the films determined by means of X-ray diffraction method indicates that the zinc oxide single phase can be fabricated in this substrate temperature range. The sensitivity of the film synthesized at substrate temperature of 130°C is 2.17 in the presence of CO2 gas at a measuring temperature of 100°C.

  18. Alloying of metal nanoparticles by ion-beam induced sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magudapathy, P.; Srivastava, S. K.; Gangopadhyay, P.; Amirthapandian, S.; Saravanan, K.; Das, A.; Panigrahi, B. K.

    2017-01-01

    Ion-beam sputtering technique has been utilized for controlled synthesis of metal alloy nanoparticles of compositions that can be tuned. Analysis of various experimental results reveals the formation of Ag-Cu alloy nanoparticles on a silica substrate. Surface-plasmon optical resonance positions and observed shifts of Ag Bragg angles in X-ray diffraction pattern particularly confirm formation of alloy nanoparticles on glass samples. Sputtering induced nano-alloying mechanism has been discussed and compared with thermal mixing of Ag and Cu thin films on glass substrates. Compositions and sizes of alloy nanoparticles formed during ion-beam induced sputtering are found to exceed far from the values of thermal mixing.

  19. Oxygen Recovery in Hf Oxide Films Fabricated by Sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    JIANG Ran; LI Zi-Feng

    2009-01-01

    The chemical structure of ultrathin Hf oxide films (< 10 nm) fabricated by a standard sputtering method is investigated using x-ray spectroscopy and Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy. According to the experiments,oxygen species are impacted to the HfO2/Si interface during the initial sputtering, and then released back to the upper Hf02 region driven by the oxygen concentration grads. A vacuum annealing can greatly enhance this recovery process. Additionally, significant SiO2 reduction in the interface is observed after the vacuum annealing for the thick HfO2 films in our experiment. It might be an effective method to confine the interracial layer thickness by sputtering thick HfO2 in no-oxygen ambient.

  20. A definitive criterion for cathodic protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alexander, Roger [Cathodic Protection Network International Ltd., Reading (United Kingdom)

    2009-07-01

    The corrosion reaction is defined using the Pourbaix Diagram and includes consideration of the pH, temperature, pressure, nobility of the metal and conductivity of the electrolyte. The passive zone can be established in a laboratory by creating a closed circuit condition in which the voltages can be measured. Natural corrosion cells occurring in simple conditions can be evaluated for the purpose of monitoring the performance of cathodic protection. Metal pipelines are complex networks of conductors submerged in electrolyte of infinitely variable qualities. The present method used to ascertain the effectiveness of cathodic protection has many inherent errors and results in costly and unpredictable corrosion failures. An electrode has been devised to define the exact electrical status of the corrosion reaction at its location. The design allows a closed circuit measurement of the corrosion current that can determine whether or not corrosion has been stopped by cathodic protection. This has allowed the development of software that can calculate the condition and corrosion status throughout a network of pipelines, using electrical circuit analysis common in the electronics industry. (author)

  1. IR emission from the target during plasma magnetron sputter deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cormier, P.-A. [GREMI, Université d' Orléans, 14 rue d' Issoudun, B.P. 6744, 45067 Orleans Cedex2 (France); Thomann, A.-L., E-mail: anne-lise.thomann@univ-orleans.fr [GREMI, Université d' Orléans, 14 rue d' Issoudun, B.P. 6744, 45067 Orleans Cedex2 (France); Dolique, V. [LMA, Université Claude Bernard Lyon I 7 Avenue Pierre de Coubertin, 69622 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Balhamri, A. [ChIPS, Université de Mons, 20 Place du Parc, 7000 Mons (Belgium); Université Hassan 1, École Supérieure de Technologie, 218 Berrechid (Morocco); Dussart, R.; Semmar, N.; Lecas, T.; Brault, P. [GREMI, Université d' Orléans, 14 rue d' Issoudun, B.P. 6744, 45067 Orleans Cedex2 (France); Snyders, R. [ChIPS, Université de Mons, 20 Place du Parc, 7000 Mons (Belgium); Materia Nova R and D Center, Avenue Corpernic 1, Mons (Belgium); Konstantinidis, S. [Materia Nova R and D Center, Avenue Corpernic 1, Mons (Belgium)

    2013-10-31

    In this article, energy flux measurements at the substrate location are reported. In particular, the energy flux related to IR radiation emanating from the titanium (10 cm in diam.) target surface is quantified during magnetron sputter deposition processes. In order to modulate the plasma–target surface interaction and the radiative energy flux thereof, the working conditions were varied systematically. The experiments were performed in balanced and unbalanced magnetic field configurations with direct current (DC), pulsed DC and high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharges. The power delivered to the plasma was varied too, typically from 100 to 800 W. Our data show that the IR contribution to the total energy flux at the substrate increases with the supplied sputter power and as the discharge is driven in a pulse regime. In the case of HiPIMS discharge generated with a balanced magnetic field, the energy flux associated to the IR radiation produced by the target becomes comparable to the energy flux originating from collisional processes (interaction of plasma particles such as ions, electron, sputtered atoms etc. with the substrate). From IR contribution, it was possible to estimate the rise of the target surface temperature during the sputtering process. Typical values found for a titanium target are in the range 210 °C to 870 °C. - Highlights: • During magnetron sputtering process the heated target emits IR radiation. • We follow in real time the energy transferred to the deposited film by IR radiation. • IR radiation can be the main energy contribution in balanced pulsed processes. • IR radiation might affect the deposition process and the final film properties.

  2. Cathode power distribution system and method of using the same for power distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williamson, Mark A; Wiedmeyer, Stanley G; Koehl, Eugene R; Bailey, James L; Willit, James L; Barnes, Laurel A; Blaskovitz, Robert J

    2014-11-11

    Embodiments include a cathode power distribution system and/or method of using the same for power distribution. The cathode power distribution system includes a plurality of cathode assemblies. Each cathode assembly of the plurality of cathode assemblies includes a plurality of cathode rods. The system also includes a plurality of bus bars configured to distribute current to each of the plurality of cathode assemblies. The plurality of bus bars include a first bus bar configured to distribute the current to first ends of the plurality of cathode assemblies and a second bus bar configured to distribute the current to second ends of the plurality of cathode assemblies.

  3. Discharge current modes of high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhongzhen Wu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Based on the production and disappearance of ions and electrons in the high power impulse magnetron sputtering plasma near the target, the expression of the discharge current is derived. Depending on the slope, six possible modes are deduced for the discharge current and the feasibility of each mode is discussed. The discharge parameters and target properties are simplified into the discharge voltage, sputtering yield, and ionization energy which mainly affect the discharge plasma. The relationship between these factors and the discharge current modes is also investigated.

  4. Hollow metal target magnetron sputter type radio frequency ion source

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamada, N., E-mail: mwada@mail.doshisha.ac.jp; Kasuya, T.; Wada, M. [Graduate School of Science and Engineering, Doshisha University, Kyoto 610–0321 (Japan); Tsubouchi, N. [Kansai Institute, Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Osaka 563–8577 (Japan)

    2014-02-15

    A 70 mm diameter 70 mm long compact ion source equipped with a hollow sputtering target has been designed and tested. The hollow sputtering target serves as the radio frequency (RF) plasma excitation electrode at 13.56 MHz. A stable beam of Cu{sup +} has been extracted when Ar was used as the discharge support gas. In the extracted beam, Cu{sup +} had occupied more than 85% of the total ion current. Further increase in Cu{sup +} ions in the beam is anticipated by increasing the RF power and Ar pressure.

  5. New Description Model of Sputtering on Material Surface

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓柏权; 严建成; 黄锦华; 彭利林

    2003-01-01

    In order to estimate the erosion rates of some plasma facing component materials, the sputtering yields of Mo, W and deuterium-saturated Li bombarded by fusion charged particles are calculated by application of new sputtering physics description methods based on the bipartition model of ion transport theory. The comparisons with Monte Carlo calculation and experimental results are made. These data might be useful to estimate the lifetime of plasma facing components and to analyse the impurity level in core plasma of fusion reactors.

  6. Mechanical and structural properties of sputtered Ni/Ti multilayers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Senthil Kumar, M.; Boeni, P.; Tixier, S.; Clemens, D.; Horisberger, M. [Paul Scherrer Inst. (PSI), Villigen (Switzerland)

    1997-09-01

    Ni/Ti bilayers have been prepared by dc-magnetron sputtering in order to study their mechanical and structural properties. A remarkable reduction of stress is observed when the Ni layers are sputtered reactively in argon with a high partial pressure of air. The high angle x-ray diffraction studies show a tendency towards amorphisation of the Ni layers with increasing air flow. The low angle measurements indicate a substantial reduction of interdiffusion resulting in smoother interfaces with increasing air content. (author) 2 figs., 2 refs.

  7. Raman imaging of biofilms using gold sputtered fiber optic probes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Christopher, Christina Grace Charlet; Manoharan, Hariharan; Subrahmanyam, Aryasomayajula; Sai, V. V. Raghavendra

    2016-12-01

    In this work we report characterization of bacterial biofilm using gold sputtered optical fiber probe as substrates for confocal Raman spectroscopy measurements. The chemical composition and the heterogeneity of biofilms in the extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) was evaluated. The spatial distribution of bacterial biofilm on the substrates during their growth phase was studied using Raman imaging. Further, the influence of substrate's surface on bacterial adhesion was investigated by studying growth of biofilms on surfaces with hydrophilic and hydrophobic coatings. This study validates the use of gold sputtered optical fiber probes as SERS substrates in confocal microscopic configuration to identify and characterize clinically relevant biofilms.

  8. Effect of cathode model on arc attachment for short high-intensity arc on a refractory cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Javidi Shirvan, Alireza; Choquet, Isabelle; Nilsson, Håkan

    2016-12-01

    Various models coupling the refractory cathode, the cathode sheath and the arc at atmospheric pressure exist. They assume a homogeneous cathode with a uniform physical state, and differ by the cathode layer and the plasma arc model. However even the most advanced of these models still fail in predicting the extent of the arc attachment when applied to short high-intensity arcs such as gas tungsten arcs. Cathodes operating in these conditions present a non-uniform physical state. A model taking into account the first level of this non-homogeneity is proposed based on physical criteria. Calculations are done for 5 mm argon arcs with a thoriated tungsten cathode. The results obtained show that radiative heating and cooling of the cathode surface are of the same order. They also show that cathode inhomogeneity has a significant effect on the arc attachment, the arc temperature and pressure. When changing the arc current (100 A, 200 A) the proposed model allows predicting trends observed experimentally that cannot be captured by the homogeneous cathode model unless restricting a priori the size of the arc attachment. The cathode physics is thus an important element to include to obtain a comprehensive and predictive arc model.

  9. Modelling cathode spots in glow discharges in the cathode boundary layer geometry

    CERN Document Server

    Almeida, P G C; Bieniek, M S

    2015-01-01

    Self-organized patterns of cathode spots in glow discharges are computed in the cathode boundary layer geometry, which is the one employed in most of the experiments reported in the literature. The model comprises conservation and transport equations of electrons and a single ion species, written in the drift-diffusion and local-field approximations, and Poisson's equation. Multiple solutions existing for the same value of the discharge current and describing modes with different configurations of cathode spots are computed by means of a stationary solver. The computed solutions are compared to their counterparts for plane-parallel electrodes, and experiments. All of the computed spot patterns have been observed in the experiment.

  10. Cathodic phosphate coating containing nano zinc particles on magnesium alloy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    A technology for preparation of a cathodic phosphate coating mainly containing nano metallic zinc particles and phosphate compounds on magnesium alloy was developed.The influence of cathodic current density on the microstructure of the cathodic phosphate coating Was investigated.The results show that the crystals of the coating are finer and the microstructures of the outer surface of the coatings are zigzag at the cathodic density of 0.2-0.5 A/dm2.The content of nano metallic zinc particles in the coating decreases with the increase of the thickness of the coatings and tends to be zero when the coating thickness is 4.14 μm.The cathodic phosphate coating was applied to be a transition coating for improving the adhesion between the paints and the magnesium alloys.The formation mechanism of the cathodic phosphate coating was investigated as well.

  11. Preliminary experimental study of a carbon fiber array cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, An-kun; Fan, Yu-wei

    2016-08-01

    The preliminary experimental results of a carbon fiber array cathode for the magnetically insulated transmission line oscillator (MILO) operations are reported. When the diode voltage and diode current were 480 kV and 44 kA, respectively, high-power microwaves with a peak power of about 3 GW and a pulse duration of about 60 ns were obtained in a MILO device with the carbon fiber array cathode. The preliminary experimental results show that the shot-to-shot reproducibility of the diode current and the microwave power is stable until 700 shots. No obvious damage or deterioration can be observed in the carbon fiber surface morphology after 700 shots. Moreover, the cathode performance has no observable deterioration after 700 shots. In conclusion, the maintain-free lifetime of the carbon fiber array cathode is more than 700 shots. In this way, this carbon fiber array cathode offers a potential replacement for the existing velvet cathode.

  12. Effect of cathodic protection on the state of steel reinforcement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cam, Phan Luong; Thuy, Thi Bich [Hanoi University of Technology, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2002-10-15

    Damage of reinforced concrete structures is mainly caused by chloride or carbonation induced corrosion of steel. Cathodic protection is a very effective measure for corrosion control of steel in concrete, especially in chloride contaminated concrete. In this paper, effect of cathodic protection on the state of steel reinforcement is presented. Cathodic polarization of reinforcements in concrete was done under different submerged conditions. Cyclic potentiodynamic tests were used to determine the effect of cathodic protection on the behavior of the steel. Pitting appeared on the non-protected steel, but was not observed on the cathodically protected steel. microscopic photographs show that a close film exists on the protected steel, while the non-protected steel's film is loose. Investigated results have proved the effect of cathodic protection in restoring or strengthening passive film on the steel reinforcement

  13. Rf Gun with High-Current Density Field Emission Cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jay L. Hirshfield

    2005-12-19

    High current-density field emission from an array of carbon nanotubes, with field-emission-transistor control, and with secondary electron channel multiplication in a ceramic facing structure, have been combined in a cold cathode for rf guns and diode guns. Electrodynamic and space-charge flow simulations were conducted to specify the cathode configuration and range of emission current density from the field emission cold cathode. Design of this cathode has been made for installation and testing in an existing S-band 2-1/2 cell rf gun. With emission control and modulation, and with current density in the range of 0.1-1 kA/cm2, this cathode could provide performance and long-life not enjoyed by other currently-available cathodes

  14. Assistant Anode in a Cathodic Arc Plasma Source

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张涛; Paul K. Chu; 张荟星; Ian G. Brown

    2001-01-01

    The performance and characteristics of a cathodic arc plasma source, consisting of a titanium cathode, an anode with and without a tungsten mesh, and a coil producing a focusing magnetic field between the anode and cathode,are investigated. The high transparency and large area of the mesh allow a high plasma flux to penetrate the anode from the cathodic arc. The mesh helps to decrease the arc resistance and the ignition voltage of the cathodic arc in the focusing magnetic field, and to increase the life of the source, which means that the source makes the cathodic arc easily and greatly stabilized during the operation when a focusing magnetic field exists in the source.

  15. Cathodic electrocatalyst layer for electrochemical generation of hydrogen peroxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rhodes, Christopher P. (Inventor); Tennakoon, Charles L. K. (Inventor); Singh, Waheguru Pal (Inventor); Anderson, Kelvin C. (Inventor)

    2011-01-01

    A cathodic gas diffusion electrode for the electrochemical production of aqueous hydrogen peroxide solutions. The cathodic gas diffusion electrode comprises an electrically conductive gas diffusion substrate and a cathodic electrocatalyst layer supported on the gas diffusion substrate. A novel cathodic electrocatalyst layer comprises a cathodic electrocatalyst, a substantially water-insoluble quaternary ammonium compound, a fluorocarbon polymer hydrophobic agent and binder, and a perfluoronated sulphonic acid polymer. An electrochemical cell using the novel cathodic electrocatalyst layer has been shown to produce an aqueous solution having between 8 and 14 weight percent hydrogen peroxide. Furthermore, such electrochemical cells have shown stable production of hydrogen peroxide solutions over 1000 hours of operation including numerous system shutdowns.

  16. Structured electron beams from nano-engineered cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lueangaramwong, A. [NICADD, DeKalb; Mihalcea, D. [NICADD, DeKalb; Andonian, G. [RadiaBeam Tech.; Piot, P. [Fermilab

    2017-03-07

    The ability to engineer cathodes at the nano-scale have open new possibilities such as enhancing quantum eciency via surface-plasmon excitation, forming ultra-low-emittance beams, or producing structured electron beams. In this paper we present numerical investigations of the beam dynamics associated to this class of cathode in the weak- and strong-field regimes.We finally discuss the possible applications of some of the achievable cathode patterns when coupled with other phase space manipulations.

  17. Impedance Modeling of Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mortensen, Jakob Egeberg; Søgaard, Martin; Jacobsen, Torben

    2010-01-01

    A 1-dimensional impedance model for a solid oxide fuel cell cathode is formulated and applied to a cathode consisting of 50/50 wt% strontium doped lanthanum cobaltite and gadolinia doped ceria. A total of 42 impedance spectra were recorded in the temperature range: 555-852°C and in the oxygen...... physical parameters such as the cathode thickness. ©2010 COPYRIGHT ECS - The Electrochemical Society...

  18. Structured electron beams from nano-engineered cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lueangaramwong, A.; Mihalcea, D.; Andonian, G.; Piot, P.

    2017-03-01

    The ability to engineer cathodes at the nano-scale have opened new possibilities such as enhancing quantum efficiency via surface-plasmon excitation, forming ultra-low-emittance beams, or producing structured electron beams. In this paper, we present numerical investigations of the beam dynamics associated with this class of cathode in the weak- and strong-field regimes. We finally discuss the possible applications of some of the achievable cathode patterns when coupled with other phase space manipulations.

  19. Influence of Oxygen in Sputtering and Annealing Processes on Properties of ZnO:Ag Films Deposited by rf Sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DUAN Li; GAO Wei

    2011-01-01

    ZnO:Ag films were prepared by rf sputtering on Si substrates.A detailed study on as-grown and annealed films was carried out using x-ray diffraction(XRD).The results indicate that the film crystalline quality and the Ag doping efficiency were both influenced by oxygen in the sputtering and annealing atmosphere.The optimum conditions are found. Ultraviolet and green emissions of annealed ZnO:Ag films were observed at room temperature.Photoluminescence results show that oxygen in annealing atmosphere reduces the deep-level defects in ZnO:Ag and increases the film quality .

  20. Development of spray coated cathodes for RITS-6.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simpson, Sean; Leckbee, Joshua J.; Miller, Stephen Samuel

    2013-09-01

    This report documents work conducted in FY13 to conduct a feasibility study on thermal spray coated cathodes to be used in the RITS-6 accelerator in an attempt to improve surface uniformity and repeatability. Currently, the cathodes are coated with colloidal silver by means of painting by hand. It is believed that improving the cathode coating process could simplify experimental setup and improve flash x-ray radiographic performance. This report documents the experimental setup and summarizes the results of our feasibility study. Lastly, it describes the path forward and potential challenges that must be overcome in order to improve the process for creating uniform and repeatable silver coatings for cathodes.

  1. Apparatuses for making cathodes for high-temperature, rechargeable batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Meinhardt, Kerry D.; Sprenkle, Vincent L.; Coffey, Gregory W.

    2016-09-13

    The approaches and apparatuses for fabricating cathodes can be adapted to improve control over cathode composition and to better accommodate batteries of any shape and their assembly. For example, a first solid having an alkali metal halide, a second solid having a transition metal, and a third solid having an alkali metal aluminum halide are combined into a mixture. The mixture can be heated in a vacuum to a temperature that is greater than or equal to the melting point of the third solid. When the third solid is substantially molten liquid, the mixture is compressed into a desired cathode shape and then cooled to solidify the mixture in the desired cathode shape.

  2. Recent developments in cathode materials for lithium ion batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fergus, Jeffrey W. [Auburn University, Materials Research and Education Center, 275 Wilmore Laboratories, Auburn, AL 36849 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    One of the challenges for improving the performance of lithium ion batteries to meet increasingly demanding requirements for energy storage is the development of suitable cathode materials. Cathode materials must be able to accept and release lithium ions repeatedly (for recharging) and quickly (for high current). Transition metal oxides based on the {alpha}-NaFeO{sub 2}, spinel and olivine structures have shown promise, but improvements are needed to reduce cost and extend effective lifetime. In this paper, recent developments in cathode materials for lithium ion batteries are reviewed. This includes comparison of the performance characteristics of the promising cathode materials and approaches for improving their performances. (author)

  3. Importance of OH(-) transport from cathodes in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Popat, Sudeep C; Ki, Dongwon; Rittmann, Bruce E; Torres, César I

    2012-06-01

    Cathodic limitation in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is considered an important hurdle towards practical application as a bioenergy technology. The oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) needs to occur in MFCs under significantly different conditions compared to chemical fuel cells, including a neutral pH. The common reason cited for cathodic limitation is the difficulty in providing protons to the catalyst sites. Here, we show that it is not the availability of protons, but the transport of OH(-) from the catalyst layer to the bulk liquid that largely governs cathodic potential losses. OH(-) is a product of an ORR mechanism that has not been considered dominant before. The accumulation of OH(-) at the catalyst sites results in an increase in the local cathode pH, resulting in Nernstian concentration losses. For Pt-based gas-diffusion cathodes, using polarization curves developed in unbuffered and buffered solutions, we quantified this loss to be >0.3 V at a current density of 10 Am(-2) . We show that this loss can be partially overcome by replacing the Nafion binder used in the cathode catalyst layer with an anion-conducting binder and by providing additional buffer to the cathode catalyst directly in the form of CO(2) , which results in enhanced OH(-) transport. Our results provide a comprehensive analysis of cathodic limitations in MFCs and should allow researchers to develop and select materials for the construction of MFC cathodes and identify operational conditions that will help minimize Nernstian concentration losses due to pH gradients.

  4. Cathodes for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells Operating at Low Temperatures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Alfred Junio

    This dissertation focuses on the development of nanostructured cathodes for solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) and their performance at low operating temperatures. Cathodes were mainly fabricated by the infiltration method, whereby electrocatalysts are introduced onto porous, ionic conducting backbones......degreeC. The most promising cathode was integrated onto an anode supported cell and it was found that the cell exhibits electrochemical stability with no measureable degradation during 1500 h operation at 700degreeC. LaCoO3 and Co3O4 infiltrated - CGO cathodes were also investigated and revealed...

  5. Argon Cluster Sputtering Source for ToF-SIMS Depth Profiling of Insulating Materials: High Sputter Rate and Accurate Interfacial Information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhaoying; Liu, Bingwen; Zhao, Evan W; Jin, Ke; Du, Yingge; Neeway, James J; Ryan, Joseph V; Hu, Dehong; Zhang, Kelvin H L; Hong, Mina; Le Guernic, Solenne; Thevuthasan, Suntharampilai; Wang, Fuyi; Zhu, Zihua

    2015-08-01

    The use of an argon cluster ion sputtering source has been demonstrated to perform superiorly relative to traditional oxygen and cesium ion sputtering sources for ToF-SIMS depth profiling of insulating materials. The superior performance has been attributed to effective alleviation of surface charging. A simulated nuclear waste glass (SON68) and layered hole-perovskite oxide thin films were selected as model systems because of their fundamental and practical significance. Our results show that high sputter rates and accurate interfacial information can be achieved simultaneously for argon cluster sputtering, whereas this is not the case for cesium and oxygen sputtering. Therefore, the implementation of an argon cluster sputtering source can significantly improve the analysis efficiency of insulating materials and, thus, can expand its applications to the study of glass corrosion, perovskite oxide thin film characterization, and many other systems of interest.

  6. Achieving high mobility ZnO : Al at very high growth rates by dc filtered cathodic arc deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendelsberg, R J; Lim, S H N; Wallig, J; Anders, A [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Plasma Applications Group, Berkeley, CA (United States); Zhu, Y K [Harbin Institute of Technology, Harbin (China); Milliron, D J, E-mail: aanders@lbl.gov [Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory, Molecular Foundry, Berkeley, CA (United States)

    2011-06-15

    Achieving a high growth rate is paramount for making large-area transparent conducting oxide coatings at a low cost. Unfortunately, the quality of thin films grown by most techniques degrades as the growth rate increases. Filtered dc cathodic arc is a lesser known technique which produces a stream of highly ionized plasma, in stark contrast to the neutral atoms produced by standard sputter sources. Ions bring a large amount of potential energy to the growing surface which is in the form of heat, not momentum. By minimizing the distance from cathode to substrate, the high ion flux gives a very high effective growth temperature near the film surface without causing damage from bombardment. The high surface temperature is a direct consequence of the high growth rate and allows for high-quality crystal growth. Using this technique, 500-1300 nm thick and highly transparent ZnO : Al films were grown on glass at rates exceeding 250 nm min{sup -1} while maintaining resistivity below 5 x 10{sup -4} {Omega} cm with electron mobility as high as 60 cm{sup 2} V{sup -1} s{sup -1}. (fast track communication)

  7. Sputtering of solid deuterium by He-ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schou, Jørgen; Stenum, B.; Pedrys, R.

    2001-01-01

    Sputtering of solid deuterium by bombardment of 3He+ and 4He+ ions was studied. Some features are similar to hydrogen ion bombardment of solid deuterium, but for the He-ions a significant contribution of elastic processes to the total yield can be identified. The thin-film enhancement is more...

  8. Sputtering of solid neon by keV hydrogen ions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ellegaard, Ole; Schou, Jørgen; Sørensen, H.

    1986-01-01

    Sputtering of solid Ne with the hydrogen ions H+1, H+2 and H+3 in the energy range 1–10 keV/atom has been studied by means of a quartz microbalance technique. No enhancement in the yield per atom for molecular ions was found. The results for hydrogen ions are compared with data for keV electrons....

  9. Sputtered thin films for high density tape recording

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nguyen, L.T.

    2004-01-01

    This thesis describes the investigation of sputtered thin film media for high density tape recording. As discussed in Chapter 1, to meet the tremendous demand of data storage, the density of recording tape has to be increased continuously. For further increasing the bit density the key factors are:

  10. Sputtering of Oxygen Ice by Low Energy Ions

    CERN Document Server

    Muntean, E A; Field, T A; Fitzsimmons, A; Hunniford, C A; McCullough, R W

    2015-01-01

    Naturally occurring ices lie on both interstellar dust grains and on celestial objects, such as those in the outer solar system. These ices are continu- ously subjected to irradiation by ions from the solar wind and/or cosmic rays, which modify their surfaces. As a result, new molecular species may form which can be sputtered off into space or planetary atmospheres. We determined the experimental values of sputtering yields for irradiation of oxygen ice at 10 K by singly (He+, C+, N+, O+ and Ar+) and doubly (C2+, N2+ and O2+) charged ions with 4 keV kinetic energy. In these laboratory experiments, oxygen ice was deposited and irradiated by ions in an ultra high vacuum chamber at low temperature to simulate the environment of space. The number of molecules removed by sputtering was observed by measurement of the ice thickness using laser interferometry. Preliminary mass spectra were taken of sputtered species and of molecules formed in the ice by temperature programmed desorption (TPD). We find that the experi...

  11. Production of carbon nanotubes by the magnetron DC sputtering method

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Antonenko, SV; Mal'tsev, SN

    2005-01-01

    Carbon films containing multiwall nanotubes were produced by the magnetron de sputtering method. A graphite disc with Y and Ni catalyst plates was used as a target. The structural and morphological properties of the films were investigated using a JEM 2000EXII transmission electron microscope. The f

  12. Plasma diagnostics during magnetron sputtering of aluminum doped zinc oxide

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stamate, Eugen; Crovetto, Andrea; Sanna, Simone

    2016-01-01

    Plasma parameters during magnetron sputtering of aluminum-doped zinc oxide are investigated with optical emission spectroscopy, electrostatic probes and mass spectrometry with the aim of understanding the role of negative ions of oxygen during the film growth and improving the uniformity...

  13. Oblique sputtered and evaporated magnetic thin films for tape recording

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bijker, Martin D.

    1998-01-01

    After having introduced some aspects of tape recording in chapter one, chapter two deals with the magnetron sputtering process itself. The kinetic energy of the electrons which are bound to the groove region by the combined action of the B and E field, was calculated. It was found that for a magneti

  14. Elementary surface processes during reactive magnetron sputtering of chromium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Monje, Sascha; Corbella, Carles, E-mail: carles.corbella@rub.de; Keudell, Achim von [Research Group Reactive Plasmas, Ruhr-University Bochum, Universitystr. 150, 44801 Bochum (Germany)

    2015-10-07

    The elementary surface processes occurring on chromium targets exposed to reactive plasmas have been mimicked in beam experiments by using quantified fluxes of Ar ions (400–800 eV) and oxygen atoms and molecules. For this, quartz crystal microbalances were previously coated with Cr thin films by means of high-power pulsed magnetron sputtering. The measured growth and etching rates were fitted by flux balance equations, which provided sputter yields of around 0.05 for the compound phase and a sticking coefficient of O{sub 2} of 0.38 on the bare Cr surface. Further fitted parameters were the oxygen implantation efficiency and the density of oxidation sites at the surface. The increase in site density with a factor 4 at early phases of reactive sputtering is identified as a relevant mechanism of Cr oxidation. This ion-enhanced oxygen uptake can be attributed to Cr surface roughening and knock-on implantation of oxygen atoms deeper into the target. This work, besides providing fundamental data to control oxidation state of Cr targets, shows that the extended Berg's model constitutes a robust set of rate equations suitable to describe reactive magnetron sputtering of metals.

  15. Sodium tungsten bronze thin films by rf sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderegg, J.W.

    1977-03-01

    Polycrystalline Na/sub x/WO/sub 3/ films were produced by rf sputtering. Films of low x-value resulted when co-sputtering WO/sub 3/ on a Na/sub 0.83/WO/sub 3/ target, and Na/sub 0/./sub 83/ on WO/sub 3/ target. Films of high x and of mixed phase were produced by sputtering a powder mixture of Na/sub 2/WO/sub 4/ and WO/sub 3/ on a tungsten target. Of the sputtering parameters studied, the substrate temperature is the most critical with temperatures above 500/sup 0/C producing films which were cubic in structure with only a small amount of Tetragonal I. The presence of oxygen up to 3 percent by volume had minimal effect on film quality or x-value. Auger, electron microprobe, SIMS, SEM, x-ray diffraction, and sheet resistivity techniques were used in characterizing these films. Resistivity of the films was a factor of 10 higher than the bulk crystalline data for Na/sub 0/./sub 83/WO/sub 3/.

  16. Particle dynamics during electronic sputtering of solid krypton

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dutkiewicz, L.; Pedrys, R.; Schou, Jørgen

    1995-01-01

    We have modeled electronic sputtering of solid krypton by excimer production with molecular dynamics. Both excimer evolution in the solid and deexcitation processes have been incorporated in the simulation. The excimer dynamics in the lattice has been analyzed: the excimers formed near the surface...

  17. Reorientation of magnetic anisotropy in obliquely sputtered metallic thin films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lisfi, A.; Lodder, J.C.; Wormeester, H.; Poelsema, B.

    2002-01-01

    Reorientation in the magnetic anisotropy as a function of film thickness has been observed in Co-Ni and Co thin films, obliquely sputtered on a polyethylene terephthalate substrate at a large incidence angle (70°). This effect is a consequence of the low magnetocrystalline anisotropy of the films (f

  18. RF Reactive Magnetron Sputter Deposition of Silicon Sub-Oxides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hattum, E.D. van

    2007-01-01

    RF reactive magnetron plasma sputter deposition of silicon sub oxide E.D. van Hattum Department of Physics and Astronomy, Faculty of Sciences, Utrecht University The work described in the thesis has been inspired and stimulated by the use of SiOx layers in the direct inductive printing technology, w

  19. Some New Views on the Principles of Magnetron Sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHAO Jia-xue; FANG Kai-ming; TONG Hong-hui

    2004-01-01

    In this paper, some common phenomena in magnetron sputtering are freshly analyzed and discussed on the basis of the motion of electrons in non-uniform orthogonal electric and magnetic fields. There exist magnetic confinements in three spatial dimensions on moving charged particles (including electrons) in this kind of non-uniform field. They are the longitudinal cycloidal motion, the horizontal simple harmonic-like motion (with varying amplitudes), and the vertical repelling action. The horizontal magnetic confinement in a mirror-like magnetic field keeps glow discharge lane completely parallel to the corridor of magnetic force lines, therefore only an effectively closed magnet array structure can form a relatively uniform and closed discharge lane. The main reasons for electrons' releasing from magnetic confinement are the vertical magnetic repelling force as well as a more and more weak confinement action in outer range etc. The dominant reasons for a comparatively low increase of substrate's temperature are that the density of bombarding electrons near the substrate is relatively low and their spatial distribution is relatively uniform (compared with that near the target surface). The erosion lane with an inverted Gauss's distribution shape on a magnetron sputtered target is due to that,with sputtering, the distribution width of the critical density of electrons shrinks continuously but the sputtering effect in the centerline of the corridor is always the most powerful.

  20. Plasma properties of RF magnetron sputtering system using Zn target

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nafarizal, N.; Andreas Albert, A. R.; Sharifah Amirah, A. S.; Salwa, O.; Riyaz Ahmad, M. A. [Microelectronic and Nanotechnology - Shamsuddin Research Centre (MiNT-SRC), Faculty of Electrical and Electronic Engineering, Universiti Tun Hussein Onn Malaysia 86400 Parit Raja, Batu Pahat, Johor (Malaysia)

    2012-06-29

    In the present work, we investigate the fundamental properties of magnetron sputtering plasma using Zn target and its deposited Zn thin film. The magnetron sputtering plasma was produced using radio frequency (RF) power supply and Argon (Ar) as ambient gas. A Langmuir probe was used to collect the current from the plasma and from the current intensity, we calculate the electron density and electron temperature. The properties of Zn sputtering plasma at various discharge conditions were studied. At the RF power ranging from 20 to 100 W and gas pressure 5 mTorr, we found that the electron temperature was almost unchanged between 2-2.5 eV. On the other hand, the electron temperature increased drastically from 6 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 9} to 1 Multiplication-Sign 10{sup 10}cm{sup -3} when the discharge gas pressure increased from 5 to 10 mTorr. The electron microscope images show that the grain size of Zn thin film increase when the discharge power is increased. This may be due to the enhancement of plasma density and sputtered Zn density.

  1. Angular distribution of sputtered atoms induced by low-energy heavy ion bombardment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Lai; ZHANG Zhu-Lin

    2004-01-01

    The sputtering yield angular distributions have been calculated based on the ion energy dependence of total sputtering yields for Ni and Motargets bombarded by low-energy Hg+ ion. The calculated curves show excellent agreement with the corresponding Wehner's experimental results of sputtering yield angular distribution. The fact clearly demonstrated the intrinsic relation between the ion energy dependence of total sputtering yields and the sputtering yield angular distribution. This intrinsic relation had been ignored in Yamamura's papers (1981,1982) due to some obvious mistakes.

  2. Intermediate-Temperature Solid-Oxide Fuel Cells with a Gadolinium-Doped Ceria Anodic Functional Layer Deposited via Radio-Frequency Sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanveer, Waqas Hassan; Ji, Sanghoon; Yu, Wonjong; Cho, Gu Young; Lee, Yoon Ho; Cha, Suk Won

    2015-11-01

    We investigated the effects of the insertion of a gadolinium-doped ceria (GDC) anodic functional layer (AFL) on the electrochemical performance of intermediate-temperature solid-oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Fully stabilized yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) was used as an oxygen-ion-conducting and support material. Nickel-Samaria-doped ceriathin film was used as an anode material, while screen-printed lanthanum strontium magnetite served as a cathode material. In order to enhance the interfacial reaction on the anode side, a GDC-AFL with a thickness of about 140 nm, deposited via radio-frequency sputtering, was inserted into the anode-electrolyte interface. SOFCs with and without a GDC-AFL were electrochemically characterized. In an intermediate temperature range of about 700 - 800 degrees C, the application of the GDC-AFL led to an increase in the peak power density of approximately 16%.

  3. Evaluation of microbial fuel cell operation using algae as an oxygen supplier: carbon paper cathode vs. carbon brush cathode.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakarla, Ramesh; Min, Booki

    2014-12-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) and its cathode performances were compared with use of carbon fiber brush and plain carbon paper cathode electrodes in algae aeration. The MFC having carbon fiber brush cathode exhibited a voltage of 0.21 ± 0.01 V (1,000 Ω) with a cathode potential of around -0.14 ± 0.01 V in algal aeration, whereas MFC with plain carbon paper cathode resulted in a voltage of 0.06 ± 0.005 V with a cathode potential of -0.39 ± 0.01 V. During polarizations, MFC equipped with carbon fiber brush cathode showed a maximum power density of 30 mW/m(2), whereas the MFC equipped with plain carbon paper showed a power density of 4.6 mW/m(2). In algae aeration, the internal resistance with carbon fiber brush cathode was 804 Ω and with plain carbon paper it was 1,210 Ω. The peak currents of MFC operation with carbon fiber brush and plain carbon paper cathodes were -31 mA and -850 µA, respectively.

  4. Excimer emission from cathode boundary layer discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moselhy, Mohamed; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2004-02-01

    The excimer emission from direct current glow discharges between a planar cathode and a ring-shaped anode of 0.75 and 1.5 mm diameter, respectively, separated by a gap of 250 μm, was studied in xenon and argon in a pressure range from 75 to 760 Torr. The thickness of the "cathode boundary layer" plasma, in the 100 μm range, and a discharge sustaining voltage of approximately 200 V, indicates that the discharge is restricted to the cathode fall and the negative glow. The radiant excimer emittance at 172 nm increases with pressure and reaches a value of 4 W/cm2 for atmospheric pressure operation in xenon. The maximum internal efficiency, however, decreases with pressure having highest values of 5% for 75 Torr operation. When the discharge current is reduced below a critical value, the discharge in xenon changes from an abnormal glow into a mode showing self-organization of the plasma. Also, the excimer spectrum changes from one with about equal contributions from the first and second continuum to one that is dominated by the second continuum emission. The xenon excimer emission intensity peaks at this discharge mode transition. In the case of argon, self-organization of the plasma was not seen, but the emission of the excimer radiation (128 nm) again shows a maximum at the transition from abnormal to normal glow. As was observed with xenon, the radiant emittance of argon increases with pressure, and the efficiency decreases. The maximum radiant emittance is 1.6 W/cm2 for argon at 600 Torr. The maximum internal efficiency is 2.5% at 200 Torr. The positive slope of the current-voltage characteristics at maximum excimer emission in both cases indicates the possibility of generating intense, large area, flat excimer lamps.

  5. Carbon Back Sputter Modeling for Hall Thruster Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilland, James H.; Williams, George J.; Burt, Jonathan M.; Yim, John Tamin

    2016-01-01

    Lifetime requirements for electric propulsion devices, including Hall Effect thrusters, are continually increasing, driven in part by NASA's inclusion of this technology in it's exploration architecture. NASA will demonstrate high-power electric propulsion system on the Solar Electric Propulsion Technology Demonstration Mission (SEP TDM). The Asteroid Redirect Robotic mission is one candidate SEP TDM, which is projected to require tens of thousands of thruster life. As thruster life is increased, for example through the use of improved magnetic field designs, the relative influence of facility effects increases. One such effect is the sputtering and redeposition, or back sputter, of facility materials by the high energy thruster plumes. In support of wear testing for the Hall Effect Rocket with Magnetic Shielding (HERMeS) project, the back sputter from a Hall effect thruster plume has been modeled for the NASA Glenn Research Center's Vacuum Facility 5. The predicted wear at a near-worst case condition of 600 V, 12.5 kW was found to be on the order of 1 micron/kh in a fully carbon-lined chamber. A more detailed numerical Monte Carlo code was also modified to estimate back sputter for a detailed facility and pumping configuration. This code demonstrated similar back sputter rate distributions, but is not yet accurately modeling the magnitudes. The modeling has been benchmarked to recent HERMeS wear testing, using multiple microbalance measurements. These recent measurements have yielded values on the order of 1.5 - 2 micron/kh at 600 V and 12.5 kW.

  6. Particle contamination formation and detection in magnetron sputtering processes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Selwyn, G.S. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Weiss, C.A. [Materials Research Corp., Congers, NY (United States). Sputtering Systems Div.; Sequeda, F.; Huang, C. [Seagate Peripherals Disk Div., Milpitas, CA (United States)

    1996-10-01

    Defects caused by particulate contamination are an important concern in the fabrication of thin film products. Often, magnetron sputtering processes are used for this purpose. Particle contamination can cause electrical shorting, pin holes, problems with photolithography, adhesion failure, as well as visual and cosmetic defects. Particle contamination generated during thin film processing can be detected using laser light scattering, a powerful diagnostic technique that provides real-time, {ital in-situ} imaging of particles > 0.3 {mu}m in diameter. Using this technique, the causes, sources and influences on particles in plasma and non-plasma and non-plasma processes may be independently evaluated and corrected. Several studies employing laser light scattering have demonstrated both homogeneous and heterogeneous causes of particle contamination. In this paper, we demonstrate that the mechanisms for particle generation, transport and trapping during magnetron sputter deposition are different from the mechanisms reported in previously studied plasma etch processes. During magnetron sputter deposition, one source of particle contamination is linked to portions of the sputtering target surface exposed to weaker plasma density. In this region, film redeposition is followed by filament or nodule growth and enhanced trapping which increases filament growth. Eventually the filaments effectively ``short circuit`` the sheath, causing high currents to flow through these features. This, in turn, causes heating failure of the filament fracturing and ejecting the filaments into the plasma and onto the substrate. Evidence of this effect has been observed in semiconductor (IC) fabrication and storage disk manufacturing. Discovery of this mechanism in both technologies suggests that this mechanism may be universal to many sputtering processes.

  7. Tailored Core Shell Cathode Powders for Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Swartz, Scott [NexTech Materials, Ltd.,Lewis Center, OH (United States)

    2015-03-23

    In this Phase I SBIR project, a “core-shell” composite cathode approach was evaluated for improving SOFC performance and reducing degradation of lanthanum strontium cobalt ferrite (LSCF) cathode materials, following previous successful demonstrations of infiltration approaches for achieving the same goals. The intent was to establish core-shell cathode powders that enabled high performance to be obtained with “drop-in” process capability for SOFC manufacturing (i.e., rather than adding an infiltration step to the SOFC manufacturing process). Milling, precipitation and hetero-coagulation methods were evaluated for making core-shell composite cathode powders comprised of coarse LSCF “core” particles and nanoscale “shell” particles of lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) or praseodymium strontium manganite (PSM). Precipitation and hetero-coagulation methods were successful for obtaining the targeted core-shell morphology, although perfect coverage of the LSCF core particles by the LSM and PSM particles was not obtained. Electrochemical characterization of core-shell cathode powders and conventional (baseline) cathode powders was performed via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) half-cell measurements and single-cell SOFC testing. Reliable EIS testing methods were established, which enabled comparative area-specific resistance measurements to be obtained. A single-cell SOFC testing approach also was established that enabled cathode resistance to be separated from overall cell resistance, and for cathode degradation to be separated from overall cell degradation. The results of these EIS and SOFC tests conclusively determined that the core-shell cathode powders resulted in significant lowering of performance, compared to the baseline cathodes. Based on the results of this project, it was concluded that the core-shell cathode approach did not warrant further investigation.

  8. Assessments of Hollow Cathode Wear in the Xenon Ion Propulsion System (XIPs(c)) by Numerical Analyses and Wear Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mikellides, Ioannis G.; Katz, Ira; Goebel, Dan M.; Polk, James E.

    2008-01-01

    The standard approach presently followed by NASA to qualify electric propulsion for the required mission throughput has been based largely on life tests, which can be costly and time consuming. Revised electric propulsion lifequalification approaches are being formulated that combine analytical and/or computational methods with (shorter-duration) wear tests. As a model case, a wear test is being performed at JPL to assess the lifetime of the discharge hollow cathode in the Xenon Ion Propulsion System (XIPS(c)), a 25-cm ion engine developed by L-3 Communications Electron Technologies, Inc. for commercial applications. Wear and plasma data accumulated throughout this life-assessment program are being used to validate the existing 2-D hollow cathode code OrCa2D. We find that the OrCa2D steady-state solution predicts very well the time-averaged plasma data and the keeper voltage after 5500 hrs of operation in high-power mode. When the wave motion that occurs naturally in these devices is accounted for, based on an estimate of the maximum wave amplitude, the molybdenum-keeper erosion profile observed in the XIPS(c) discharge cathode is also reproduced within a factor of two of the observation. When the same model is applied to predict the erosion of a tantalum keeper we find that erosion is reduced by more than two orders of magnitude compared to the molybdenum keeper due the significantly lower sputtering yield of tantalum. A tantalum keeper would therefore allow keeper lifetimes that greatly exceed the present requirements for deep-space robotic missions considered by NASA. Moreover, such large reduction of the erosion renders the largest uncertainties in the models, which are associated with the wave amplitude estimates and the electron transport model, negligible.

  9. Organic Cathode Materials for Rechargeable Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cao, Ruiguo; Qian, Jiangfeng; Zhang, Jiguang; Xu, Wu

    2015-06-28

    This chapter will primarily focus on the advances made in recent years and specify the development of organic electrode materials for their applications in rechargeable lithium batteries, sodium batteries and redox flow batteries. Four various organic cathode materials, including conjugated carbonyl compounds, conducting polymers, organosulfides and free radical polymers, are introduced in terms of their electrochemical performances in these three battery systems. Fundamental issues related to the synthesis-structure-activity correlations, involved work principles in energy storage systems, and capacity fading mechanisms are also discussed.

  10. Cathodic Vacuum Arc Plasma of Thallium

    OpenAIRE

    Yushkov, Georgy Yu.; Anders, Andre

    2006-01-01

    Thallium arc plasma was investigated in a vacuum arc ion source. As expected from previous consideration of cathode materials in the Periodic Table of the Elements, thallium plasma shows lead-like behavior. Its mean ion charge state exceeds 2.0 immediately after arc triggering, reaches the predicted 1.60 and 1.45 after about 100 microsec and 150 microsec, respectively. The most likely ion velocity is initially 8000 m/s and decays to 6500 m/s and 6200 m/s after 100 microsec and 150 micros...

  11. Three-dimensional particle simulation of back-sputtered carbon in electric propulsion test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hongru; Cai, Guobiao; Liu, Lihui; Shang, Shengfei; He, Bijiao

    2017-03-01

    The back-sputtering deposition on thruster surface caused by ion bombardment on chamber wall material affects the performance of thrusters during the ground based electric propulsion endurance tests. In order to decrease the back-sputtering deposition, most of vacuum chambers applied in electric propulsion experiments are equipped with anti-sputtering targets. In this paper, a three-dimensional model of plume experimental system (PES) including double layer anti-sputtering target is established. Simulation cases are made to simulate the plasma environment and sputtering effects when an ion thruster is working. The particle in cell (PIC) method and direct simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC) method is used to calculate the velocity and position of particles. Yamamura's model is used to simulate the sputtering process. The distribution of sputtered anti-sputtering target material is presented. The results show that the double layer anti-sputtering target can significantly reduce the deposition on thruster surface. The back-sputtering deposition rates on thruster exit surface for different cases are compared. The chevrons on the secondary target are rearranged to improve its performance. The position of secondary target has relation with the ion beam divergence angle, and the radius of the vacuum chamber. The back-sputtering deposition rate is lower when the secondary target covers the entire ion beam.

  12. Depth of origin of sputtered atoms: Experimental and theoretical study of Cu/Ru(0001)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burnett, J.W.; Biersack, J.P.; Gruen, D.M.; Joergensen, B.; Krauss, A.R.; Pellin, M.J.; Schweitzer, E.L.; Yates, J.T. Jr.; Young, C.E.

    1987-01-01

    The depth of origin of sputtered atoms is a subject of considerable interest. The surface sensitivity of analytical techniques such as Secondary Ion Mass Spectrometry (SIMS) and Surface Analysis by Resonance Ionization of Sputtered Atoms (SARISA), and the sputtering properties of strongly segregating alloy systems, are critically dependent on the sputtering depth of origin. A significant discrepancy exists between the predictions of the Sigmund theory and computer sputtering models; in general, the computer models predict a much shallower depth of origin. The existing experimental evidence suggests that most of the sputtered atoms originate in the topmost atomic layer, but until recently, the results have not been definitive. We have experimentally determined the depth of origin of atoms sputtered from surfaces consisting of Cu films of less than two monolayers on a Ru(0001) substrate. The Cu/Ru target was statically sputtered using 3.6 keV Ar/sup +/. The sputtered neutrals were non-resonantly laser ionized and detected using SARISA. The Cu/Ru sputtering yield ratio and the suppression of the Ru sputtering yield were determined for various Cu coverages. The results indicate that the majority of the sputtered atoms originate in the topmost atomic layer. The Cu/Ru system is also modeled using a modified Transport of Ions in Matter (TRIM) code. It was found that TRIM C does not correctly treat the first atomic layer, resulting in a serious underestimate of the number of sputtered atoms which originate in this layer. The corrected version adequately describes the results, predicting that for the experimental conditions roughly two-thirds of the sputtered atoms originate in the first atomic layer. These results are significantly greater than the Sigmund theory estimate of >40%. 26 refs., 3 figs., 1 tab.

  13. Experimental and ab initio investigations on textured Li–Mn–O spinel thin film cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fischer, J., E-mail: Julian.Fischer@kit.edu [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials (IAM), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany); Music, D. [RWTH Aachen University, Materials Chemistry, Kopernikusstrasse 10, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Bergfeldt, T.; Ziebert, C.; Ulrich, S.; Seifert, H.J. [Karlsruhe Institute of Technology (KIT), Institute for Applied Materials (IAM), Hermann-von-Helmholtz-Platz 1, 76344 Eggenstein-Leopoldshafen (Germany)

    2014-12-01

    This paper describes the tailored preparation of nearly identical lithium–manganese–oxide thin film cathodes with different global grain orientations. The thin films were synthesized by rf magnetron sputtering from a LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}-target in a pure argon plasma. Under appropriate processing conditions, thin films with a cubic spinel structure and a nearly similar density and surface topography but different grain orientation, i.e. (111)- and (440)-textured films, were achieved. The chemical composition was determined by inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectroscopy and carrier gas hot extraction. The constitution- and microstructure were evaluated by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. The surface morphology and roughness were investigated by scanning electron and atomic force microscopy. The differently textured films represent an ideal model system for studying potential effects of grain orientation on the lithium ion diffusion and electrochemical behavior in LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}-based thin films. They are nearly identical in their chemical composition, atomic bonding behavior, surface-roughness, morphology and thickness. Our initial ab initio molecular dynamics data indicate that Li ion transport is faster in (111)-textured structure than in (440)-textured one. - Highlights: • Thin film model system of differently textured cubic Li–Mn–O spinels. • Investigation of the Li–Mn–O thin film mass density by X-ray reflectivity. • Ab initio molecular dynamics simulation on Li ion diffusion in LiMn{sub 2}O{sub 4}.

  14. Raman Spectroscopy of DLC/a-Si Bilayer Film Prepared by Pulsed Filtered Cathodic Arc

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Srisang

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available DLC/a-Si bilayer film was deposited on germanium substrate. The a-Si layer, a seed layer, was firstly deposited on the substrate using DC magnetron sputtering and DLC layer was then deposited on the a-Si layer using pulsed filtered cathodic arc method. The bilayer films were deposited with different DLC/a-Si thickness ratios, including 2/2, 2/6, 4/4, 6/2, and 9/6. The effect of DLC/a-Si thickness ratios on the sp3 content of DLC was analyzed by Raman spectroscopy. The results show that a-Si layer has no effect on the structure of DLC film. Furthermore, the upper shift in G wavenumber and the decrease in ID/IG inform that sp3 content of the film is directly proportional to DLC thickness. The plot modified from the three-stage model informed that the structural characteristics of DLC/a-Si bilayer films are located close to the tetrahedral amorphous carbon. This information may be important for analyzing and developing bilayer protective films for future hard disk drive.

  15. Production of nanohole/nanodot patterns on Si(001) by ion beam sputtering with simultaneous metal incorporation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez-GarcIa, J A; Gago, R; Caillard, R; Martin-Gago, J A; Palomares, F J; Fernandez, M; Vazquez, L [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones CientIficas, E-28049 Madrid (Spain); Redondo-Cubero, A [Centro de Micro-Analisis de Materiales, Universidad Autonoma de Madrid, E-28049 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: lvb@icmm.csic.es

    2009-06-03

    We have established the conditions for which nanohole and nanodot patterns are produced on Si(001) surfaces by 1 keV Ar{sup +} ion beam sputtering (IBS) at normal incidence with an alternating cold cathode ion source (ACC-IS). Nanohole patterns are produced within a narrow IBS window for low ion fluxes (<100 {mu}A cm{sup -2}) and relatively low ion fluences (<10{sup 18} ions cm{sup -2}) whereas nanodot morphologies are produced above this window. The nanohole pattern is not stable after prolonged irradiation since it evolves to a nanodot morphology. Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS) measurements show that nanohole patterns are produced when the metal content on the irradiated surfaces is higher (within (2.5-3.5 x 10{sup 15}) atoms cm{sup -2}) than in the case of nanodots (<2.5 x 10{sup 15} atoms cm{sup -2}). The different metal content is related to the ACC-IS operation, since the set-up provides simultaneous incorporation of Fe and Mo on the target surface from the erosion of the cathodes and sample holder, respectively. The role of metal incorporation on pattern selectivity has been corroborated qualitatively by extending the results obtained with the ACC-IS to a standard Kaufman-type source. In order to gain further information on the metal effects, chemical analysis of the surface has been performed to complement the compositional RBS results, showing for the first time the relevant participation of metal silicides. Further outlook and a discussion regarding the role of metal incorporation are also given.

  16. Ion beam sputtering of Ti: Influence of process parameters on angular and energy distribution of sputtered and backscattered particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lautenschläger, T.; Feder, R.; Neumann, H.; Rice, C.; Schubert, M.; Bundesmann, C.

    2016-10-01

    In the present study, the influence of ion energy and geometrical parameters onto the angular and energy distribution of secondary particles for sputtering a Ti target with Ar ions is investigated. The angular distribution of the particle flux of the sputtered Ti atoms was determined by the collection method, i.e. by growing Ti films and measuring their thickness. The formal description of the particle flux can be realized by dividing it into an isotropic and an anisotropic part. The experimental data show that increasing the ion energy or decreasing the ion incidence angle lead to an increase of the isotropic part, which is in good agreement with basic sputtering theory. The energy distribution of the secondary ions was measured using an energy-selective mass spectrometer. The energy distribution of the sputtered target ions shows a maximum at an energy between 10 eV and 20 eV followed by a decay proportional to E-n, which is in principle in accordance with Thompson's theory, followed by a high energetic tail. When the sum of incidence angle and emission angle is increased, the high-energetic tail expands to higher energies and an additional peak due to direct sputtering events may occur. In the case of backscattered primary Ar ions, a maximum at an energy between 5 eV and 10 eV appears and, depending on the scattering geometry, an additional broad peak at a higher energy due to direct scattering events is observed. The center energy of the additional structure shifts systematically to higher energies with decreasing scattering angle or increasing ion energy. The experimental results are compared to calculations based on simple elastic two-particle-interaction theory and to simulations done with the Monte Carlo code SDTrimSP. Both confirm in principle the experimental findings.

  17. Development of cathode material for lithium-ion batteries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rustam Mukhtaruly Turganaly

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical characteristics of the cathode material coated with carbon layer has been developed. Various carbon coating methods. There  has been carried out a comparative electrochemical analysis of the coated and uncoated with carbon cathode material. 

  18. Microbial Fuel Cell Performance with a Pressurized Cathode Chamber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) power densities are often constrained by the oxygen reduction reaction rate on the cathode electrode. One important factor for this is the normally low solubility of oxygen in the aqueous cathode solution creating mass transport limitations, which hinder oxygen reduction a...

  19. Cathodic disbonding of organic coatings on submerged steel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knudsen, Ole oeystein

    1998-12-31

    In offshore oil production, submerged steel structures are commonly protected by an organic coating in combination with cathodic protection. The main advantage is that the coating decreases the current demand for cathodic protection. But the coating degrades with time. This thesis studies one of the most important mechanisms for coating degradation in seawater, cathodic disbonding. Seven commercial coatings and two model coatings with various pigmentations have been studied. Parameter studies, microscopy and studies of free films were used in the mechanism investigations. Exposure to simulated North Sea conditions was used in the performance studies. The effect of aluminium and glass barrier pigments on cathodic disbonding was investigated. The mechanism for the effect of the aluminium pigments on cathodic disbonding was also investigated. The transport of charge and oxygen to the steel/coating interface during cathodic disbonding was studied for two epoxy coatings. Cathodic disbonding, blistering and current demand for cathodic protection was measured for nine commercial coatings for submerged steel structures, using the ASTM-G8 standard test and a long term test under simulated North Sea conditions. The relevance of the ASTM-G8 test as a prequalification test was evaluated. 171 refs., 40 figs., 6 tabs.

  20. Miniature High Density Scandate Cathodes for Linear Beam Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-07-14

    Gartner1 and is useful with scandate cathodes that do not exhibit sharp transmissions from space-charge limited to temperature limited flow, see...Electron Detector ( BSE ) and an Energy- dispersive X-ray detector (EDX). In Image 5 the surface of the cathode is viewed using the BSE detector

  1. The Cathode Ramper: Application for the Duoplasmatron Ion Source

    CERN Document Server

    Sánchez-Conejo, J

    2003-01-01

    The purpose of the Cathode Ramper Application is to heat the Linac 2 duoplasmatron ion source cathode up to a desired temperature selected by the user. The application has been developed in Java, making use of the Java Development Kit 1.4 and the PS Java environment.

  2. Impressed current cathodic protection of deep water structures

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Venkatesan, R.

    Of all the various anti-corrosion systems usEd. by offshore structures and ship-building industry to reduce the ravages of sea-water corrosion, cathodic protection is one of the most important. Impressed current cathodic protection (ICCP...

  3. A Preliminary Study on Cathodic Prevention in Reinforced Mortar

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koleva, D.A.; Van Breugel, K.; Mol, J.M.C.; De Wit, J.H.W.

    2010-01-01

    This work presents the preliminary tests on the performance of cathodic prevention (CPre) in reinforced mortar, subjected to aggressive (10% NaCl environment). Cathodic prevention is an electrochemical technique for minimizing, actually "preventing" any eventual corrosion of the steel bars in reinfo

  4. The Effect of Substrate Topography on Coating Cathodic Delamination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weinell, Claus E.; Sørensen, Per A.; Kiil, Søren

    2011-01-01

    This article describes the effect of steel substrate topography on coating cathodic delamination. The study showed that the surface preparation can be used to control and minimize the rate of cathodic delamination. The coating should have maximum wetting properties so that substrates with high...

  5. Effects of Humidity on Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hardy, John S. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Stevenson, Jeffry W. [Pacific Northwest National Lab. (PNNL), Richland, WA (United States); Singh, Prabhakar [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Mahapatra, Manoj K. [Univ. of Connecticut, Storrs, CT (United States); Wachsman, E. D. [Univ. of Maryland, College Park, MD (United States); Liu, Meilin [Georgia Inst. of Technology, Atlanta, GA (United States); Gerdes, Kirk R. [National Energy Technology Lab. (NETL), Morgantown, WV (United States)

    2015-03-17

    This report summarizes results from experimental studies performed by a team of researchers assembled on behalf of the Solid-state Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Core Technology Program. Team participants employed a variety of techniques to evaluate and mitigate the effects of humidity in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) cathode air streams on cathode chemistry, microstructure, and electrochemical performance.

  6. Cathodic ARC surface cleaning prior to brazing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dave, V. R. (Vivek R.); Hollis, K. J. (Kendall J.); Castro, R. G. (Richard G.); Smith, F. M. (Frank M.); Javernick, D. A. (Daniel A.)

    2002-01-01

    Surface cleanliness is one the critical process variables in vacuum furnace brazing operations. For a large number of metallic components, cleaning is usually accomplished either by water-based alkali cleaning, but may also involve acid etching or solvent cleaning / rinsing. Nickel plating may also be necessary to ensure proper wetting. All of these cleaning or plating technologies have associated waste disposal issues, and this article explores an alternative cleaning process that generates minimal waste. Cathodic arc, or reserve polarity, is well known for welding of materials with tenacious oxide layers such as aluminum alloys. In this work the reverse polarity effect is used to clean austenitic stainless steel substrates prior to brazing with Ag-28%Cu. This cleaning process is compared to acid pickling and is shown to produce similar wetting behavior as measured by dynamic contact angle experiments. Additionally, dynamic contact angle measurements with water drops are conducted to show that cathodic arc cleaning can remove organic contaminants as well. The process does have its limitations however, and alloys with high titanium and aluminum content such as nickel-based superalloys may still require plating to ensure adequate wetting.

  7. Cathode depth sensing in CZT detectors

    CERN Document Server

    Hong, J; Grindlay, J E; Narita, T

    2003-01-01

    Measuring the depth of interaction in thick Cadmium-Zinc-Telluride (CZT) detectors allows improved imaging and spectroscopy for hard X-ray imaging above 100 keV. The Energetic X-ray Imaging Survey Telescope (EXIST) will employ relatively thick (5 - 10 mm) CZT detectors, which are required to perform the broad energy-band sky survey. Interaction depth information is needed to correct events to the detector "focal plane" for correct imaging and can be used to improve the energy resolution of the detector at high energies by allowing event-based corrections for incomplete charge collection. Background rejection is also improved by allowing low energy events from the rear and sides of the detector to be rejected. We present experimental results of interaction depth sensing in a 5 mm thick pixellated Au-contact IMARAD CZT detector. The depth sensing was done by making simultaneous measurements of cathode and anode signals, where the interaction depth at a given energy is proportional to the ratio of cathode/anode ...

  8. Scandia doped tungsten matrix for impregnated cathode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Jinshu; WANG Yanchun; LIU Wei; LI Hongyi; ZHOU Meiling

    2008-01-01

    As a matrix for Sc-type impregnated cathode,scandia doped tungsten with a uniform ldistribution of SC2O3 was obtained by powder metallurgy combined with the liquid-solid doping method.The microstructure and composition of the powder and the anti-ion bombardment behavior of scandium in the matrix were studied by means of SEM,EDS,XRD,and in-situ AES methods.Tungsten powder covered with scandium oxide,an ideal scandium oxide-doped tungsten powder for the preparation of Sc-type impregnated cathode,was obtained using the liquid-solid doping method.Compared with the matrix prepared with the mechanically mixed powder of tungsten and scandium oxide,SC2O3-W matrix prepared with this kind of powder had smaller grain size and uniform distribution of scandium.Sc on the surface of Sc2O3 doped tungsten mauix had good high temperature stability and good anti-ion bombardment capability.

  9. Oxide diffusion in innovative SOFC cathode materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Y; Thoréton, V; Pirovano, C; Capoen, E; Bogicevic, C; Nuns, N; Mamede, A-S; Dezanneau, G; Vannier, R N

    2014-01-01

    Oxide diffusion was studied in two innovative SOFC cathode materials, Ba(2)Co(9)O(14) and Ca(3)Co(4)O(9)+δ derivatives. Although oxygen diffusion was confirmed in the promising material Ba(2)Co(9)O(14), it was not possible to derive accurate transport parameters because of an oxidation process at the sample surface which has still to be clarified. In contrast, oxygen diffusion in the well-known Ca(3)Co(4)O(9)+δ thermoelectric material was improved when calcium was partly substituted with strontium, likely due to an increase of the volume of the rock salt layers in which the conduction process takes place. Although the diffusion coefficient remains low, interestingly, fast kinetics towards the oxygen molecule dissociation reaction were shown with surface exchange coefficients higher than those reported for the best cathode materials in the field. They increased with the strontium content; the Sr atoms potentially play a key role in the mechanism of oxygen molecule dissociation at the solid surface.

  10. Kinetic and Potential Sputtering of Lunar Regolith: The Contribution of the Heavy Highly Charged (Minority) Solar Wind Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, F. W.; Barghouty, A. F.

    2012-01-01

    Solar wind sputtering of the lunar surface helps determine the composition of the lunar exosphere and contributes to surface weathering. To date, only the effects of the two dominant solar wind constituents, H+ and He+, have been considered. The heavier, less abundant solar wind constituents have much larger sputtering yields because they have greater mass (kinetic sputtering) and they are highly charged (potential sputtering) Their contribution to total sputtering can therefore be orders of magnitude larger than their relative abundances would suggest

  11. Silver vanadium oxide cathode material and method of preparation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crespi, A.M.

    1993-06-22

    A method for making an electrochemical cell having the steps of admixing silver vanadium oxide with a conductive material and a binder and forming the admixture into a cathode, combining the cathode with a lithium metal anode; and combining an electrolyte with the anode and cathode, the method is described consisting of preparing the silver vanadium oxide by a chemical addition reaction consisting of admixing AgVO[sub 3] and V[sub 2]O[sub 5] in a 2:1 mole ratio heating the admixed AgVO[sub 3] and V[sub 3]O[sub 5] at a reaction temperature in the range of 300 C to 700 C for 5 to 24 hours. An electrochemical cell having a lithium metal anode, cathode and an electrolyte having a metal salt in a nonaqueous solvent comprising: the cathode including a crystalline silver vanadium oxide prepared by a chemical addition reaction.

  12. Barium depletion study on impregnated cathodes and lifetime prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roquais, J.M.; Poret, F.; Doze, R. le; Ricaud, J.L.; Monterrin, A.; Steinbrunn, A

    2003-06-15

    In the thermionic cathodes used in cathode ray-tubes (CRTs), barium is the key element for the electronic emission. In the case of the dispenser cathodes made of a porous tungsten pellet impregnated with Ba, Ca aluminates, the evaporation of Ba determines the cathode lifetime with respect to emission performance in the CRT. The Ba evaporation results in progressive depletion of the impregnating material inside the pellet. In the present work, the Ba depletion with time has been extensively characterized over a large range of cathode temperature. Calculations using the depletion data allowed modeling of the depletion as a function of key parameters. The link between measured depletion and emission in tubes has been established, from which an end-of-life criterion was deduced. Taking modeling into account, predicting accelerated life-tests were performed using high-density maximum emission current (MIK)

  13. High Performance Infiltrated Backbones for Cathode-Supported SOFC's

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gil, Vanesa; Kammer Hansen, Kent

    2014-01-01

    The concept of using highly ionic conducting backbones with subsequent infiltration of electronically conducting particles has widely been used to develop alternative anode-supported SOFC's. In this work, the idea was to develop infiltrated backbones as an alternative design based on cathode......-supported SOFC. The cathodes are obtained by infiltrating LSM into a sintered either thick (300 μm) yttria stabilized zirconia (YSZ) backbone or a thin YSZ backbone (10-15 μm) integrated onto a thick (300 μm) porous strontium substituted lanthanum manganite (LSM) and YSZ composite. Fabrication challenges...... printed symmetrical cells. Samples with LSM/YSZ composite and YSZ backbones made with graphite+PMMA as pore formers exhibited comparable Rp values to the screen printed LSM/YSZ cathode. This route was chosen as the best to fabricate the cathode supported cells. SEM micrograph of a cathode supported cell...

  14. Ionized magnetron sputtering of aluminum(,2)oxygen(,3)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Patrick Fernando

    2000-10-01

    This dissertation shows a detailed study of the conditions necessary for sputtering alumina using a novel variant of ionized magnetron sputtering (IMS) first demonstrated by Yamashita et. al. The study presented herein leverages concurrent research at our laboratory on high density plasmas, plasma characterization and charged particle beams research to demonstrate a new source capable of sputtering hydrated alumina films at high rates. High quality ceramics such as Al2O3 find uses in a variety of applications, and in particular, for mass storage applications. Consequently, there exists an ever-growing need to provide and improve the capability of growing thick insulating films. Ideally, the insulating film should be stoichiometric and able to be grown at rates high enough to be easily manufacturable. Alumina is a particularly attractive due to its high density, Na barrier properties, and stability and radiation resistance. However, high quality films are often difficult to achieve with conventional RF plasma due to extremely slow deposition rates and difficulties associated with system cooling. The preferred method is to reactively sputter Al from a solid target in an O2 ambient. Nevertheless, this process is inherently unstable and leads to arcing and uneven target wear when magnetrons are used. In this study, we build the sputtering source, evaluate, and maximize the deposition characteristics of alumina films sputtered from a solid target in an Ar/O2 ambient. Semi-crystalline (kappa + theta) alumina has been reported using a similar technique at temperatures as low 370 C. The difference in the system used herein is that RF power is used for both, the inductive and capacitive components. Additionally, we use a solid target made of sintered alumina throughout the experiment. A model is developed using regression analysis and compared to results obtained. Because plasma parameters can interact with each other, we explore ICP/CCP power interactions and gas influence

  15. Sputtering deposition and characterization of ultrathin amorphous carbon films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei

    1999-11-01

    This dissertation focuses on experimental investigations of ultrathin, ultrasmooth amorphous carbon (a-C) films deposited on Si(100) substrates by radio frequency (RF) sputtering and characterization of the nanomechanical and nanotribological properties and thermal stability of the films. Ultrathin a-C films of thickness 5--100 nm and typical root-mean-square roughness of 0.15--1 nm were deposited on ultrasmooth Si(100) substrates using pure argon as the sputtering gas. A low-pressure RF argon discharge model was used to analyze the plasma parameters in the film growth environment. These plasma parameters correlate the deposition conditions with the film growth processes. Atomic force microscopy (AFM) and surface force microscopy (SFM) were used to characterize the nanomechanical and nanotribological properties of the a-C films. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) was used to investigate the compositions and microstructures of the films. Sputter-etching measurements of the a-C films by energetic argon ion bombardment were used to study the surface binding energy of carbon atoms in a-C films deposited under different conditions. The dependence of film properties on deposition conditions was studied, and relations between nanomechanical and nanotribological properties were discussed in terms of a modified deformation index. The deformation and nanotribology mechanisms of the a-C films were compared with those of other films, such as TiC and Cr films (both 100 nm thick), and bulk Si(100). Reactive RF sputtering of nitrogenated amorphous carbon (a-CNx) films was investigated by introducing nitrogen into the a-C films during film growth by using an argon-nitrogen gas mixture as the sputtering gas. The alloying effect of nitrogen on the film growth and properties, such as hardness and surface energy, was studied and interpreted in terms of the changes in the plasma environment induced due to differences in the composition of the sputtering gas mixture. The thermal

  16. Air humidity and water pressure effects on the performance of air-cathode microbial fuel cell cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Ahn, Yongtae

    2014-02-01

    To better understand how air cathode performance is affected by air humidification, microbial fuel cells were operated under different humidity conditions or water pressure conditions. Maximum power density decreased from 1130 ± 30 mW m-2 with dry air to 980 ± 80 mW m -2 with water-saturated air. When the cathode was exposed to higher water pressures by placing the cathode in a horizontal position, with the cathode oriented so it was on the reactor bottom, power was reduced for both with dry (1030 ± 130 mW m-2) and water-saturated (390 ± 190 mW m-2) air. Decreased performance was partly due to water flooding of the catalyst, which would hinder oxygen diffusion to the catalyst. However, drying used cathodes did not improve performance in electrochemical tests. Soaking the cathode in a weak acid solution, but not deionized water, mostly restored performance (960 ± 60 mW m-2), suggesting that there was salt precipitation in the cathode that was enhanced by higher relative humidity or water pressure. These results showed that cathode performance could be adversely affected by both flooding and the subsequent salt precipitation, and therefore control of air humidity and water pressure may need to be considered for long-term MFC operation. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Air humidity and water pressure effects on the performance of air-cathode microbial fuel cell cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Yongtae; Zhang, Fang; Logan, Bruce E.

    2014-02-01

    To better understand how air cathode performance is affected by air humidification, microbial fuel cells were operated under different humidity conditions or water pressure conditions. Maximum power density decreased from 1130 ± 30 mW m-2 with dry air to 980 ± 80 mW m-2 with water-saturated air. When the cathode was exposed to higher water pressures by placing the cathode in a horizontal position, with the cathode oriented so it was on the reactor bottom, power was reduced for both with dry (1030 ± 130 mW m-2) and water-saturated (390 ± 190 mW m-2) air. Decreased performance was partly due to water flooding of the catalyst, which would hinder oxygen diffusion to the catalyst. However, drying used cathodes did not improve performance in electrochemical tests. Soaking the cathode in a weak acid solution, but not deionized water, mostly restored performance (960 ± 60 mW m-2), suggesting that there was salt precipitation in the cathode that was enhanced by higher relative humidity or water pressure. These results showed that cathode performance could be adversely affected by both flooding and the subsequent salt precipitation, and therefore control of air humidity and water pressure may need to be considered for long-term MFC operation.

  18. Reactive sputtering of δ-ZrH{sub 2} thin films by high power impulse magnetron sputtering and direct current magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Högberg, Hans, E-mail: hans.hogberg@liu.se; Tengdelius, Lina; Eriksson, Fredrik; Broitman, Esteban; Lu, Jun; Jensen, Jens; Hultman, Lars [Department of Physics, Chemistry, and Biology (IFM), Linköping University, SE-581 83 Linköping (Sweden); Samuelsson, Mattias [Impact Coatings AB, Westmansgatan 29, SE-582 16 Linköping (Sweden)

    2014-07-01

    Reactive sputtering by high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) and direct current magnetron sputtering (DCMS) of a Zr target in Ar/H{sub 2} plasmas was employed to deposit Zr-H films on Si(100) substrates, and with H content up to 61 at. % and O contents typically below 0.2 at. % as determined by elastic recoil detection analysis. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals a chemical shift of ∼0.7 eV to higher binding energies for the Zr-H films compared to pure Zr films, consistent with a charge transfer from Zr to H in a zirconium hydride. X-ray diffraction shows that the films are single-phase δ-ZrH{sub 2} (CaF{sub 2} type structure) at H content >∼55 at. % and pole figure measurements give a 111 preferred orientation for these films. Scanning electron microscopy cross-section images show a glasslike microstructure for the HiPIMS films, while the DCMS films are columnar. Nanoindentation yield hardness values of 5.5–7 GPa for the δ-ZrH{sub 2} films that is slightly harder than the ∼5 GPa determined for Zr films and with coefficients of friction in the range of 0.12–0.18 to compare with the range of 0.4–0.6 obtained for Zr films. Wear resistance testing show that phase-pure δ-ZrH{sub 2} films deposited by HiPIMS exhibit up to 50 times lower wear rate compared to those containing a secondary Zr phase. Four-point probe measurements give resistivity values in the range of ∼100–120 μΩ cm for the δ-ZrH{sub 2} films, which is slightly higher compared to Zr films with values in the range 70–80 μΩ cm.

  19. The effects of substrate and annealing on structural and electrochemical properties in LiCoO2 thin films prepared by DC magnetron sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noh, Jung Pil; Jung, Ki Taek; Cho, Gyu Bong; Lee, Sang Hun; Kim, Ki Won; Nam, Tae Hyun

    2012-07-01

    LiCoO2 thin films were fabricated by direct current magnetron sputtering method on STS304 and Ti substrates. The effects of substrate and annealing on their structural and electrochemical properties of LiCoO2 thin film cathode were studied. Crystal structures and surface morphologies of the deposited films were investigated by X-ray diffraction and field emission scanning electron microscopy. The as-deposited films on both substrates have amorphous structure. The (104) oriented perfect crystallization was obtained by annealing over 600 degrees C in STS304 substrate. The LiCoO2 thin film deposited on Ti substrate shows the (003) texture after annealing at 700 degrees C. The electrochemical properties were investigated by the cyclic voltammetry and charge-discharge measurement. The 600 degrees C-annealed LiCoO2 film deposited on STS304 substrate exhibits the inithial discharge capacity of 22 uAh/cm2 and the 96% capacity retention rate at 50th cycles. The electrochemical measurement on annealed films over 600 degrees C was impossible due to the formed TiO2 insulator layer using Ti substrate. As a result, it was found that the STS304 substrate seems to be more suitable material than the Ti substrate in fabricating LiCoO2 thin film cathode.

  20. Cationic fluorinated polymer binders for microbial fuel cell cathodes

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Guang

    2012-01-01

    Fluorinated quaternary ammonium-containing polymers were used as catalyst binders in microbial fuel cell (MFC) cathodes. The performance of the cathodes was examined and compared to NAFION ® and other sulfonated aromatic cathode catalyst binders using linear sweep voltammetry (LSV), impedance spectroscopy, and performance tests in single chamber air-cathode MFCs. The cathodes with quaternary ammonium functionalized fluorinated poly(arylene ether) (Q-FPAE) binders showed similar current density and charge transfer resistance (R ct) to cathodes with NAFION ® binders. Cathodes containing either of these fluorinated binders exhibited better electrochemical responses than cathodes with sulfonated or quaternary ammonium-functionalized RADEL ® poly(sulfone) (S-Radel or Q-Radel) binders. After 19 cycles (19 d), the power densities of all the MFCs declined compared to the initial cycles due to biofouling at the cathode. MFC cathodes with fluorinated polymer binders (1445 mW m -2, Q-FPAE-1.4-H; 1397 mW m -2, Q-FPAE-1.4-Cl; 1277 mW m -2, NAFION ®; and 1256 mW m -2, Q-FPAE-1.0-Cl) had better performance than those with non-fluorinated polymer binders (880 mW m -2, S-Radel; 670 mW m -2, Q-Radel). There was a 15% increase in the power density using the Q-FPAE binder with a 40% higher ion exchange capacity (Q-FPAE-1.4-H compared to Q-FPAE-1.0-Cl) after 19 cycles of operation, but there was no effect on the power production due to counter ions in the binder (Cl -vs. HCO 3 -). The highest-performance cathodes (NAFION ® and Q-FPAE binders) had the lowest charge transfer resistances (R ct) in fresh and in fouled cathodes despite the presence of thick biofilms on the surface of the electrodes. These results show that fluorinated binders may decrease the penetration of the biofilm and associated biopolymers into the cathode structure, which helps to combat MFC performance loss over time. © 2012 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  1. Molybdenum sputtering film characterization for high gradient accelerating structures

    CERN Document Server

    Bini, S; Marcelli, A; Sarti, S; Dolgashev, V A; Tantawi, S; Yeremian, A D; Higashi, Y; Grimaldi, M G; Romano, L; Ruffino, F; Parodi, R; Cibin, G; Marrelli, C; Migliorati, M; Caliendo, C

    2012-01-01

    Technological advancements are strongly required to fulfill the demands of new accelerator devices with the highest accelerating gradients and operation reliability for the future colliders. To this purpose an extensive R&D regarding molybdenum coatings on copper is in progress. In this contribution we describe chemical composition, deposition quality and resistivity properties of different molybdenum coatings obtained via sputtering. The deposited films are thick metallic disorder layers with different resistivity values above and below the molibdenum dioxide reference value. Chemical and electrical properties of these sputtered coatings have been characterized by Rutherford backscattering, XANES and photoemission spectroscopy. We will also present a three cells standing wave section coated by a molybdenum layer $\\sim$ 500 nm thick designed to improve the performance of X-Band accelerating systems.

  2. PREFERENTIAL SPUTTERING OF Cu76Ni15Sn9

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王震遐; 王传珊; 等

    1995-01-01

    Using collection film technique combined with Auger electron spectroscopy is analysis,the preferential sputtering of the ternary alloy Cu76Ni15Sn9 bombarded with 27keV Ar+ at normal incidence is studied.After bombardment,the target surface is examined with SEM,and the surface composition of different topographical feature areas is measured with electron probe micro-analyser(EPMA),The experiment results show that Cu atoms are preferentially ejected compared with Ni atoms,and Sn atoms come third within the ejection angle range from 0°to 60°.The results are discussed from the viewpoint of sputtering from a very rough surface.

  3. A COMPLEX—TYPE FOCUSSED MAGNTRON FOR SPUTTERING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郑思孝

    1994-01-01

    The design of a small complex-type focussed magnetron with a long target-life used for excited multi-atoms beam film deposition in hard coatings is described.The magnetron tunnel of the magentron source was constructed by a planar unbalanced magnetic annulus,which comes from the extended co-axial magnetron principle and inside cylindrical magnet tunnel.The use efficinecy of inside circular cone sputtering target area is high up to 62%.The inside-inversion cone sputtering target has a long life and results in a higher deposition rate 35nm/min for Ti at a 2.5Pa Ar pressure.A better focussing direction of ejecting atom beam has been achieved,and the are power input is 300W for Ti target.

  4. Nb Sputtered Quarter Wave Resonators for the HIE-ISOLDE

    CERN Document Server

    Venturini Delsolaro, W; Delaup, B; D'Elia, A; Jecklin, N M; Kadi, Y; Keppel, G; Lespinasse, D; Maesen, P; Mondino, I; Palmieri, V; Stark, S; Sublet, A R M; Therasse, M

    2013-01-01

    The HIE-ISOLDE superconducting linac will be based on quarter wave resonators (QWRs), made by niobium sputtering on copper. The operating frequency at 4.5 K is 101.28 MHz and the required performance for the high beta cavity is 6 MV/m accelerating field for 10 W maximum power dissipation. These challenging specifications were recently met at CERN at the end of a vigorous development program. The paper reports on the progress of the cavity RF performance with the evolution of the sputtering process; it equally illustrates the parallel R&D which is on-going at CERN and at INFN in the quest for even higher performances.

  5. Molybdenum sputtering film characterization for high gradient accelerating structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    S.Bini; B.Spataro; A.Marcelli; S.Sarti; V.A.Dolgashev; S.Tantawi; A.D.Yeremian

    2013-01-01

    Technological advancements are strongly required to fulfill the demands of new accelerator devices with the highest accelerating gradients and operation reliability for the future colliders.To this purpose an extensive R&D regarding molybdenum coatings on copper is in progress.In this contribution we describe chemical composition,deposition quality and resistivity properties of different molybdenum coatings obtained via sputtering.The deposited films are thick metallic disorder layers with different resistivity values above and below the molibdenum dioxide reference value.Chemical and electrical properties of these sputtered coatings have been characterized by Rutherford backscattering,XANES and photoemission spectroscopy.We will also consider multiple cells standing wave section coated by a molybdenum layer designed to improve the performance of X-Band accelerating systems.

  6. Physicochemical model for reactive sputtering of hot target

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shapovalov, Viktor I.; Karzin, Vitaliy V.; Bondarenko, Anastasia S.

    2017-02-01

    A physicochemical model for reactive magnetron sputtering of a metal target is described in this paper. The target temperature in the model is defined as a function of the ion current density. Synthesis of the coating occurs due to the surface chemical reaction. The law of mass action, the Langmuir isotherm and the Arrhenius equation for non-isothermal conditions were used for mathematical description of the reaction. The model takes into consideration thermal electron emission and evaporation of the target surface. The system of eight algebraic equations, describing the model, was solved for the tantalum target sputtered in the oxygen environment. It was established that the hysteresis effect disappears with the increase of the ion current density.

  7. Molecular dynamic simulations of the sputtering of multilayer organic systems

    CERN Document Server

    Postawa, Z; Piaskowy, J; Krantzman, K; Winograd, N; Garrison, B J

    2003-01-01

    Sputtering of organic overlayers has been modeled using molecular dynamics computer simulations. The investigated systems are composed of benzene molecules condensed into one, two and three layers on an Ag left brace 1 1 1 right brace surface. The formed organic overlayers were bombarded with 4 keV Ar projectiles at normal incidence. The development of the collision cascade in the organic overlayer was investigated. The sputtering yield, mass, internal and kinetic energy distributions of ejected particles have been analyzed as a function of the thickness of the organic layer. The results show that all emission characteristics are sensitive to the variation of layer thickness. Although most of the ejected intact benzene molecules originate from the topmost layer, the emission of particles located initially in second and third layers is significant. The analysis indicates that the metallic substrate plays a dominant role in the ejection of intact organic molecules.

  8. Deposition and tribological behaviour of sputtered carbon hard coatings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, S.; Camino, D.; Jones, A.H.S.; Teer, D.G. [Teer Coatings Ltd., Hartlebury (United Kingdom)

    2000-02-21

    The exceptional tribological properties of low deposition temperature sputtered carbon coatings (Graphit-iC coatings) have been recently reported. This paper describes the latest development of these coatings and particularly how, by an optimisation of the deposition parameters, it has been possible to obtain relative soft to very hard coatings with extremely low specific wear rates. The coatings have been deposited in a closed field unbalanced magnetron sputter ion plating (CFUBMSIP) installation. By applying the appropriate conditions of deposition, carbon coatings with hardness from 1500 to 4000 HV can be routinely deposited. Preliminary analytical results are presented in order to characterise such hard coatings: high-resolution transmission electron microscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction analysis are some of the different techniques used for this work. Finally, a number of the applications are reported with tribological test results. (orig.)

  9. Method and apparatus for improved high power impulse magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anders, Andre

    2013-11-05

    A high power impulse magnetron sputtering apparatus and method using a vacuum chamber with a magnetron target and a substrate positioned in the vacuum chamber. A field coil being positioned between the magnetron target and substrate, and a pulsed power supply and/or a coil bias power supply connected to the field coil. The pulsed power supply connected to the field coil, and the pulsed power supply outputting power pulse widths of greater that 100 .mu.s.

  10. In vitro flow measurements in ion sputtered hydrocephalus shunts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Y. I.; Back, L. H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper describes an experimental procedure for accurate measurements of the pressure-drop/flow rate relationship in hydrocephalus shunts. Using a fish-hook arrangement, small flow rates in a perforated ion-sputtered Teflon microtubule were measured in vitro in a pressured system and were correlated with pressure in the system. Results indicate that appropriate drainage rates could be obtained in the physiological range for hydrocephalus shunts.

  11. RF sputtering: A viable tool for MEMS fabrication

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Sudhir Chandra; Vivekanand Bhatt; Ravindra Singh

    2009-08-01

    Fabrication of Micro-Electro-Mechanical-Systems (MEMS) requires deposition of films such as SiO2, Si34, ZnO, polysilicon, phosphosilicate glass (PSG), Al, Cr-Au, Pt, etc. for use as structural, sacrificial, piezoelectric and conducting material. Deposition of these materials at low temperature is desirable for fabricating sensors/actuators on temperature-sensitive substrates and also for integrating MEMS structures on silicon in post-CMOS processing procedures. Plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (PECVD) and sputtering are amongst potential techniques for preparing films for MEMS fabrication at comparatively low temperatures. The sputtering technique has an added advantage that the process is carried out in an inert ambient (argon) and chemically sensitive substrate/sacrificial layers can be used in realization of MEMS. Furthermore, the same system can be used for depositing dielectric, piezoelectric and conducting materials as per requirement in the fabrication sequence. This enables rapid low-cost prototyping of MEMS with minimum fabrication facilities. In the present work, we report preparation, characterization and application of RF sputtered SiO2, Si34 and ZnO films for MEMS fabrication. The effect of RF power, sputtering pressure and target-to-substrate spacing was investigated on the structural and other properties of the films. The residual stress in the films was obtained using wafer curvature measurement technique. The deposition parameters are optimized to obtain low stress films of SiO2 and Si34. The self-heating of the substrate during deposition was advantageously exploited to obtain highly -axis oriented films of ZnO without any external heating. A variety of MEMS structures such as cantilever beams, micro-bridges, diaphragms, etc. are demonstrated using bulk, surface and surface-bulk micromachining techniques.

  12. Sputtering and codeposition of silicon carbide with deuterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Causey, Rion A.

    2003-03-01

    Due to its excellent thermal properties, silicon carbide is being considered as a possible plasma-facing material for fusion devices. If used as a plasma-facing material, the energetic hydrogen isotope ions and charge-exchanged neutrals escaping from the plasma will sputter the silicon carbide. To assess the tritium inventory problems that will be generated by the use of this material, it is necessary that we know the codeposition properties of the redeposited silicon carbide. To determine the codeposition properties, the deuterium plasma experiment at Sandia National Laboratories in Livermore, California has been used to directly compare the deuterium sputtering and codeposition of silicon carbide with that of graphite. A Penning discharge at a flux of 6×10 19 D/m 2 and an energy of ≈300 eV was used to sputter silicon and carbon from a pair of 0.05 m diameter silicon carbide disks. The removal rate of deuterium gas from the fixed volume of the system isolated from all other sources and sinks was used to measure the codeposition probability (probability that a hydrogen isotope atom will be removed through codeposition per ion striking the sample surface). A small catcher plate used to capture a fraction of the codeposited film was analyzed using Auger spectroscopy. This analysis showed the film to begin with a high carbon to silicon ratio due to preferential sputtering of the carbon. As the film became thicker, the ratio of the depositing material changed over to the (1:1) value that must eventually be attained.

  13. Development of New Sputter System by Magnetic Null Plasma

    OpenAIRE

    敦田, 悟; 楊, 鍾煥; 川尻, 晋平; 成, 烈[ブン; 本田, 親久; 大坪, 昌久

    2004-01-01

    Abstract ###A new type of plasma system based on the magnetic neutral loop discharge (NLD) concept ###has been developed for sputter application. This system is characterized by plasma production ###around the multi null magnetic field on the electrode surface, where a capacitive RF electric ###field is applied. From the experimental results and numerical analysis of electron behavior in ###this system, we found that electrons around the magnetic null region on the target surface ###moved in ...

  14. Performance evaluation of printed LiCoO{sub 2} cathodes with PVDF-HFP gel electrolyte for lithium ion microbatteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Moon-Soo [School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea); Samsung Electro-Mechanics Maetan-3-dong, YeongTong-gu, Suwon City, Gyeonggi Province 442-743 (Korea); Hyun, Sang-Hoon [School of Advanced Materials Science and Engineering, College of Engineering, Yonsei University, Seoul 120-749 (Korea); Nam, Sang-Cheol [Nuricell Inc., 4F, GS Caltex New Energy Development Center, 453-2, Seongnae-dong, Gangdong-gu, Seoul 134-030 (Korea); Cho, Sung Back [Advanced Technology Research Center, Agency for Defense Development, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea)

    2008-07-01

    In order to improve the discharge capacity in lithium ion microbatteries, a thick-film cathode was fabricated by a screen printing using LiCoO{sub 2} pastes. The printed cathode showed a different discharge curves when the cell was tested using various (liquid, gel and solid-state) electrolytes. When a cell test was performed with organic liquid electrolyte, the maximum discharge capacity was 200 {mu}Ah cm{sup -2}, which corresponded to approximately 133 mAh g{sup -1} when the loading weight of LiCoO{sub 2} was calculated. An all-solid-state microbattery could be assembled using sputtered LiPON electrolyte, an evaporated Li anode, and printed LiCoO{sub 2} cathode films without delamination or electrical problems. However, the highest discharge capacity showed a very small value (7 {mu}Ah cm{sup -2}). This problem could be improved using a poly(vinylidene fluoride-hexafluoro propylene) (PVDF-HFP) gel electrolyte, which enhanced the contact area and adhesion force between cathode and electrolyte. The discharge value of this cell was measured as approximately 164 {mu}Ah cm{sup -2} ({approx}110 mAh g{sup -1}). As the PVDF-HFP electrolyte had a relatively soft contact property with higher ionic conductance, the cell performance was improved. In addition, the cell can be fabricated in a leakage-free process, which can resolve many safety problems. According to these results, there is a significant possibility that a film prepared using the aforementioned paste with screen printing and PVDF-HFP gel electrolyte is feasible for a microbattery. (author)

  15. Tribological properties of sputtered tungsten and tungsten nitride thin films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wong; K.M.; ShenY.G.; Wong; P.L.

    2001-01-01

    The surface roughness, hardness and tribological properties of tungsten (W) and tung-sten nitride (WNx) thin films prepared by dc magnetron sputtering and reactive magnetron sputter-ing in Ar-N2 gas mixtures have been studied using atomic force microscopy (AFM), nanoindenta-tion measurements and ball-on-disc wear testing. A pronounced surface roughness was observedonly for films under compressive strains. The surface was flat under tension but rough under com-pression. Similar hardness with value about 20 GPa were observed in the W and WNx (x=0.3)films. This is thought to be due to the fact the grains are restricted to a very small size in the coat-ings. The higher coefficients of friction (0.4 for W and 0.9 for WN0.3) suggest that WN0.3 is not theoptimum phase. Finally, discussions are made with tribological test results.

  16. Sputter deposited Terfenol-D thin films for multiferroic applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. P. Mohanchandra

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study the sputter deposition and crystallization process to produce high quality Terfenol-D thin film (100 nm with surface roughness below 1.5 nm. The Terfenol-D thin film was produced using DC magnetron sputtering technique with various sputtering parameters and two different crystallization methods, i.e. substrate heating and post-annealing. Several characterization techniques including WDS, XRD, TEM, AFM, SQUID and MOKE were used to determine the physical and magnetic properties of the Terfenol-D films. TEM studies reveal that the film deposited on the heated substrate has large grains grown along the film thickness producing undesirable surface roughness while the film crystallized by post-annealing method shows uniformly distributed small grains producing a smooth surface. The Terfenol-D film was also deposited onto (011 cut PMN-PT single crystal substrate. With the application of an electric field the film exhibited a 1553 Oe change in coercivity with an estimated saturation magnetostriction of λs = 910 x 10−6.

  17. Sputter deposited Terfenol-D thin films for multiferroic applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohanchandra, K. P.; Prikhodko, S. V.; Wetzlar, K. P.; Sun, W. Y.; Nordeen, P.; Carman, G. P.

    2015-09-01

    In this paper, we study the sputter deposition and crystallization process to produce high quality Terfenol-D thin film (100 nm) with surface roughness below 1.5 nm. The Terfenol-D thin film was produced using DC magnetron sputtering technique with various sputtering parameters and two different crystallization methods, i.e. substrate heating and post-annealing. Several characterization techniques including WDS, XRD, TEM, AFM, SQUID and MOKE were used to determine the physical and magnetic properties of the Terfenol-D films. TEM studies reveal that the film deposited on the heated substrate has large grains grown along the film thickness producing undesirable surface roughness while the film crystallized by post-annealing method shows uniformly distributed small grains producing a smooth surface. The Terfenol-D film was also deposited onto (011) cut PMN-PT single crystal substrate. With the application of an electric field the film exhibited a 1553 Oe change in coercivity with an estimated saturation magnetostriction of λs = 910 x 10-6.

  18. Stress dependent oxidation of sputtered niobium and effects on superconductivity

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Henry, M.; Wolfley, Steve; Monson, Todd; Clark, Blythe G.; Shaner, Eric; Jarecki, Robert

    2014-02-01

    We report on the suppression of room temperature oxidation of DC sputtered niobium films and the effects upon the superconductive transition temperature, Tc. Niobium was sputter-deposited on silicon dioxide coated 150 mm wafers and permitted to oxidize at room temperature and pressure for up to two years. Resistivity and stress measurements indicate that tensile films greater than 400 MPa resist bulk oxidation with measurements using transmission electron microscope, electron dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, x-ray photoelectric spectroscopy, and secondary ion mass spectrometry confirming this result. Although a surface oxide, Nb2O5, consumed the top 6-10 nm, we measure less than 1 at. % oxygen and nitrogen in the bulk of the films after the oxidation period. Tc measurements using a SQUID magnetometer indicate that the tensile films maintained a Tc approaching the dirty superconductive limit of 8.4 K after two years of oxidation while maintaining room temperature sheet resistance. This work demonstrates that control over niobium film stress during deposition can prevent bulk oxidation by limiting the vertical grain boundaries ability to oxidize, prolonging the superconductive properties of sputtered niobium when exposed to atmosphere.

  19. Functional nanostructured titanium nitride films obtained by sputtering magnetron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, O. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz no3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)]. E-mail: olgas@icmm.csic.es; Hernandez-Velez, M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), or Juana Ines de la Cruz no3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Dept. Fisica Aplicada C-XII, Universidad Autonoma, Cantoblanco 28049 Madrid (Spain); Navas, D. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz no3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Auger, M.A. [Centro Nacional de Investigaciones Metalurgicas (CENIM-CSIC), Avda. Gregorio, del Amo 8, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Baldonedo, J.L. [Centro de Microscopia Electronica y Citometria de la Universidad Complutense de, Madrid (Spain); Sanz, R. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz no3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Pirota, K.R. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), or Juana Ines de la Cruz no3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain); Vazquez, M. [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Madrid (CSIC), Sor Juana Ines de la Cruz no3, Cantoblanco, 28049 Madrid (Spain)

    2006-01-20

    Development of new methods in the formation of hollow structures, in particular, nanotubes and nanocages are currently generating a great interest as a consequence of the growing relevance of these nanostructures on many technological fields, ranging from optoelectronics to biotechnology. In this work, we report the formation of titanium nitride (TiN) nanotubes and nanohills via reactive sputtering magnetron processes. Anodic Alumina Membranes (AAM) were used as template substrates to grow the TiN nanostructures. The AAM were obtained through electrochemical anodization processes by using oxalic acid solutions as electrolytes. The nanotubes were produced at temperatures below 100 deg. C, and using a pure titanium (99.995%) sputtering target and nitrogen as reactive gas. The obtained TiN thin films showed surface morphologies adjusted to pore diameter and interpore distance of the substrates, as well as ordered arrays of nanotubes or nanohills depending on the sputtering and template conditions. High Resolution Scanning Electron Microscopy (HRSEM) was used to elucidate both the surface order and morphology of the different grown nanostructures. The crystalline structure of the samples was examined using X-ray Diffraction (XRD) patterns and their qualitative chemical composition by using X-ray Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (XEDS) in a scanning electron microscopy.

  20. Arc generation from sputtering plasma-dielectric inclusion interactions

    CERN Document Server

    Wickersham, C E J; Fan, J S

    2002-01-01

    Arcing during sputter deposition and etching is a significant cause of particle defect generation during device fabrication. In this article we report on the effect of aluminum oxide inclusion size, shape, and orientation on the propensity for arcing during sputtering of aluminum targets. The size, shape, and orientation of a dielectric inclusion plays a major role in determining the propensity for arcing and macroparticle emission. In previous studies we found that there is a critical inclusion size required for arcing to occur. In this article we used high-speed videos, electric arc detection, and measurements of particle defect density on wafers to study the effect of Al sub 2 O sub 3 inclusion size, shape, and orientation on arc rate, intensity, and silicon wafer particle defect density. We found that the cross-sectional area of the inclusion exposed to the sputtering plasma is the critical parameter that determines the arc rate and rate of macroparticle emission. Analysis of the arc rate, particle defect...

  1. Sputtering as a Technique for Applying Tribological Coatings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramalingam, S.

    1984-01-01

    Friction and wear-induced mechanical failures may be controlled to extend the life of tribological components through the interposition of selected solid materials between contacting surfaces. Thin solid films of soft and hard materials are appropriate to lower friction and enhance the wear resistance of precision tribo-elements. Tribological characteristics of thin hard coats deposited on a variety of ferrous and non-ferrous substrates were tested. The thin hard coats used were titanium nitride films deposited by reactive magnetron sputtering of metallic titanium. High contact stress, low speed tests showed wear rate reductions of one or more magnitude, even with films a few micrometers in thickness. Low contact stress, high speed tests carried out under rather severe test conditions showed that thin films of TiN afforded significant friction reduction and wear protection. Thin hard coats were shown to improve the friction and wear performance of rolling contacts. Satisfactory film-to-substrate adhesion strengths can be obtained with reactive magnetron sputtering. X-ray diffraction and microhardness tests were employed to assess the effectiveness of the sputtering technique.

  2. Using cathode spacers to minimize reactor size in air cathode microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Yang, Qiao

    2012-04-01

    Scaling up microbial fuel cells (MFCs) will require more compact reactor designs. Spacers can be used to minimize the reactor size without adversely affecting performance. A single 1.5mm expanded plastic spacer (S1.5) produced a maximum power density (973±26mWm -2) that was similar to that of an MFC with the cathode exposed directly to air (no spacer). However, a very thin spacer (1.3mm) reduced power by 33%. Completely covering the air cathode with a solid plate did not eliminate power generation, indicating oxygen leakage into the reactor. The S1.5 spacer slightly increased columbic efficiencies (from 20% to 24%) as a result of reduced oxygen transfer into the system. Based on operating conditions (1000ς, CE=20%), it was estimated that 0.9Lh -1 of air would be needed for 1m 2 of cathode area suggesting active air flow may be needed for larger scale MFCs. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  3. Catadioptric aberration correction in cathode lens microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tromp, R.M. [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, PO Box 218, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Leiden Institute of Physics, Niels Bohrweg 2, 2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2015-04-15

    In this paper I briefly review the use of electrostatic electron mirrors to correct the aberrations of the cathode lens objective lens in low energy electron microscope (LEEM) and photo electron emission microscope (PEEM) instruments. These catadioptric systems, combining electrostatic lens elements with a reflecting mirror, offer a compact solution, allowing simultaneous and independent correction of both spherical and chromatic aberrations. A comparison with catadioptric systems in light optics informs our understanding of the working principles behind aberration correction with electron mirrors, and may point the way to further improvements in the latter. With additional developments in detector technology, 1 nm spatial resolution in LEEM appears to be within reach. - Highlights: • The use of electron mirrors for aberration correction in LEEM/PEEM is reviewed. • A comparison is made with similar systems in light optics. • Conditions for 1 nm spatial resolution are discussed.

  4. Cathodic Cage Plasma Nitriding: An Innovative Technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R. R. M. de Sousa

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cylindrical samples of AISI 1020, AISI 316, and AISI 420 steels, with different heights, were simultaneously treated by a new technique of ionic nitriding, entitled cathodic cage plasma nitriding (CCPN, in order to evaluate the efficiency of this technique to produce nitrided layers with better properties compared with those obtained using conventional ionic nitriding technique. This method is able to eliminate the edge effect in the samples, promoting a better uniformity of temperature, and consequently, a smaller variation of the thickness/height relation can be obtained. The compound layers were characterized by X-ray diffraction, optical microscopy, and microhardness test profile. The results were compared with the properties of samples obtained with the conventional nitriding, for the three steel types. It was verified that samples treated by CCPN process presented, at the same temperature, a better uniformity in the thickness and absence of the edge effect.

  5. Novel High Rate Lithium Intercalation Cathode Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    Application of amorphous V2O5/carbon/neodymium oxide (Nd2O3) composite is one of ways to surmount the lower electrical conductivity of V2O5. A new type of V2O5/carbon/Nd2O3 composite was prepared by mixing vanadium oxide hydrosol, acetone, carbon and Nd2O3 powder. High rate discharge/charge property of the composite electrode was tested electrochemically. This composite with Nd2O3 added shows the improvement of not only the discharge capacity but also cycle durability discharge capacity. The rate capability of the composite cathode also increases with the addition of Nd2O3.and cycle life are probably caused by the increase in porosity of open pores and short diffusion length of the active material on the lithium-ion insertion.

  6. Synchronization of the CMS Cathode Strip Chambers

    CERN Document Server

    Raknessa, G; Wang, D

    2007-01-01

    The synchronization of the trigger and data acquisition systems for the Cathode Strip Chambers (CSCs) in the Compact Muon Solenoid (CMS) detector at CERN is described. The CSC trigger system is designed to trigger CMS on muons with high efficiency (~99% per chamber) and is able to accurately identify its 25ns proton bunch crossing. To date, asynchronous cosmic ray data have been used to define the protocol and to refine timing algorithms, allowing synchronization to be realized within and between chambers to within ±10 ns. Final synchronization of the CSCs requires timing parameters to be accurate to 2 ns. This goal will be readily achieved from the cosmic ray baseline using data taken with the synchronous beam structure of the Large Hadron Collider.

  7. Ion cumulation by conical cathode electrolysis.

    CERN Document Server

    Grishin, V G

    2002-01-01

    Results of solid-state sodium stearate electrolysis with conical and cylindrical cathodes is presented here. Both electric measurement and conical samples destruction can be explained if a stress developing inside the conical sample is much bigger than in the cylindrical case and there is its unlimited amplification along cone slopes. OTHER KEYWORDS: ion, current, solid, symmetry, cumulation, polarization, depolarization, ionic conductor,superionic conductor, ice, crystal, strain, V-center, V-centre, doped crystal, interstitial impurity, intrinsic color center, high pressure technology, Bridgman, anvil, experiment, crowdion, dielectric, proton, layer, defect, lattice, dynamics, electromigration, mobility, muon catalysis, concentration, doping, dopant, conductivity, pycnonuclear reaction, permittivity, dielectric constant, point defects, interstitials, polarizability, imperfection, defect centers, glass, epitaxy, sodium hydroxide, metallic substrate, crystallization, point, tip, susceptibility, ferroelectric, ...

  8. Protection of p+-n-Si Photoanodes by Sputter-Deposited Ir/IrOxThin Films

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mei, Bastian Timo; Seger, Brian; Pedersen, Thomas;

    2014-01-01

    Sputter deposition of Ir/IrOx on p+-n-Si without interfacial corrosion protection layers yielded photoanodes capable of efficient water oxidation (OER) in acidic media (1 M H2SO4). Stability of at least 18 h was shown by chronoamperomety at 1.23 V versus RHE (reversible hydrogen electrode) under 38.......6 mW/cm2 simulated sunlight irradiation (λ > 635 nm, AM 1.5G) and measurements with quartz crystal microbalances. Films exceeding a thickness of 4 nm were shown to be highly active though metastable due to an amorphous character. By contrast, 2 nm IrOx films were stable, enabling OER at a current...... density of 1 mA/cm2 at 1.05 V vs. RHE. Further improvement by heat treatment resulted in a cathodic shift of 40 mV and enabled a current density of 10 mA/cm2 (requirements for a 10% efficient tandem device) at 1.12 V vs. RHS under irradiation. Thus, the simple IrOx/Ir/p+-n-Si structures not only provide...

  9. Evaluation of externally heated pulsed MPD thruster cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Roger M.; Domonkos, Matthew; Gallimore, Alec D.

    1993-01-01

    Recent interest in solar electric orbit transfer vehicles (SEOTV's) has prompted a reevaluation of pulsed magnetoplasmadynamic (MPD) thruster systems due to their ease of power scaling and reduced test facility requirements. In this work the use of externally heated cathodes was examined in order to extend the lifetime of these thrusters to the 1000 to 3000 hours required for SEOTV missions. A pulsed MPD thruster test facility was assembled, including a pulse-forming network (PFN), ignitor supply and propellant feed system. Results of cold cathode tests used to validate the facility, PFN, and propellant feed system design are presented, as well as a preliminary evaluation of externally heated impregnated tungsten cathodes. The cold cathode thruster was operated on both argon and nitrogen propellants at peak discharge power levels up to 300 kW. The results confirmed proper operation of the pulsed thruster test facility, and indicated that large amounts of gas were evolved from the BaO-CaO-Al2O3 cathodes during activation. Comparison of the expected space charge limited current with the measured vacuum current when using the heated cathode indicate that either that a large temperature difference existed between the heater and the cathode or that the surface work function was higher than expected.

  10. Cathodic degradation of antibiotics: characterization and pathway analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Deyong; Liang, Bin; Yun, Hui; Cheng, Haoyi; Ma, Jincai; Cui, Minhua; Wang, Aijie; Ren, Nanqi

    2015-04-01

    Antibiotics in wastewaters must be degraded to eliminate their antibacterial activity before discharging into the environment. A cathode can provide continuous electrons for the degradation of refractory pollutants, however the cathodic degradation feasibility, efficiency and pathway for different kinds of antibiotics is poorly understood. Here, we investigated the degradation of four antibiotics, namely nitrofurazone (NFZ), metronidazole (MNZ), chloramphenicol (CAP), and florfenicol (FLO) by a poised cathode in a dual chamber electrochemical reactor. The cyclic voltammetry preliminarily proved the feasibility of the cathodic degradation of these antibiotics. The cathodic reducibility of these antibiotics followed the order of NFZ > MNZ > CAP > FLO. A decreased phosphate buffered solution (PBS) concentration as low as 2 mM or utilization of NaCl buffer solution as catholyte had significant influence on antibiotics degradation rate and efficiency for CAP and FLO but not for NFZ and MNZ. PBS could be replaced by Na2CO3-NaHCO3 buffer solution as catholyte for the degradation of these antibiotics. Reductive dechlorination of CAP proceeded only after the reduction of the nitro group to aromatic amine. The composition of the degradation products depended on the cathode potential except for MNZ. The cathodic degradation process could eliminate the antibacterial activity of these antibiotics. The current study suggests that the electrochemical reduction could serve as a potential pretreatment or advanced treatment unit for the treatment of antibiotics containing wastewaters.

  11. Plasma characterization on carbon fiber cathode by spectroscopic diagnostics

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Lie; Li Li-Min; Xu Qi-Fu; Chang Lei; Wen Jian-Chun

    2009-01-01

    This paper mainly investigates plasma characterization on carbon fiber cathodes with and without cesium iodide (CsI) coating powered by a~300 ns,~200 kV accelerating pulse. It was found that the CsI layers can not only improve the diode voltage,but also maintain a stable perveance.This indicates a slowly changed diode gap or a low cathode plasma expansion velocity.By spectroscopic diagnostics,in the vicinity of the cathode surface the average plasma density and temperature were found to be~3×1014 cm-3 and~5 eV,respectively,for an electron current density of~40 A/cm2.Furthermore,there exists a multicomponent plasma expansion toward the anode.The plasma expansion velocity,corresponding to the carbon and hydrogen ions,is estimated to be~1.5 cm/μs.Most notably,Cs spectroscopic line was obtained only at the distance ≤0.5 mm from the cathode surface.Carbon and hydrogen ions are obtained up to the distance of 2.5 mm from the cathode surface.Cs ions almost remain at the vicinity of the cathode surface.These results show that the addition of Cal enables a slow cathode plasma expansion toward the anode,providing a positive prospect for developing long-pulse electron beam sources.

  12. High Performance Cathodes for Li-Air Batteries

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Yangchuan

    2013-08-22

    The overall objective of this project was to develop and fabricate a multifunctional cathode with high activities in acidic electrolytes for the oxygen reduction and evolution reactions for Li-air batteries. It should enable the development of Li-air batteries that operate on hybrid electrolytes, with acidic catholytes in particular. The use of hybrid electrolytes eliminates the problems of lithium reaction with water and of lithium oxide deposition in the cathode with sole organic electrolytes. The use of acid electrolytes can eliminate carbonate formation inside the cathode, making air breathing Li-air batteries viable. The tasks of the project were focused on developing hierarchical cathode structures and bifunctional catalysts. Development and testing of a prototype hybrid Li-air battery were also conducted. We succeeded in developing a hierarchical cathode structure and an effective bifunctional catalyst. We accomplished integrating the cathode with existing anode technologies and made a pouch prototype Li-air battery using sulfuric acid as catholyte. The battery cathodes contain a nanoscale multilayer structure made with carbon nanotubes and nanofibers. The structure was demonstrated to improve battery performance substantially. The bifunctional catalyst developed contains a conductive oxide support with ultra-low loading of platinum and iridium oxides. The work performed in this project has been documented in seven peer reviewed journal publications, five conference presentations, and filing of two U.S. patents. Technical details have been documented in the quarterly reports to DOE during the course of the project.

  13. Neutral hydrophilic cathode catalyst binders for microbial fuel cells

    KAUST Repository

    Saito, Tomonori

    2011-01-01

    Improving oxygen reduction in microbial fuel cell (MFC) cathodes requires a better understanding of the effects of the catalyst binder chemistry and properties on performance. A series of polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (PS-b-PEO) polymers with systematically varying hydrophilicity were designed to determine the effect of the hydrophilic character of the binder on cathode performance. Increasing the hydrophilicity of the PS-b-PEO binders enhanced the electrochemical response of the cathode and MFC power density by ∼15%, compared to the hydrophobic PS-OH binder. Increased cathode performance was likely a result of greater water uptake by the hydrophilic binder, which would increase the accessible surface area for oxygen reduction. Based on these results and due to the high cost of PS-b-PEO, the performance of an inexpensive hydrophilic neutral polymer, poly(bisphenol A-co-epichlorohydrin) (BAEH), was examined in MFCs and compared to a hydrophilic sulfonated binder (Nafion). MFCs with BAEH-based cathodes with two different Pt loadings initially (after 2 cycles) had lower MFC performance (1360 and 630 mW m-2 for 0.5 and 0.05 mg Pt cm-2) than Nafion cathodes (1980 and 1080 mW m -2 for 0.5 and 0.05 mg Pt cm-2). However, after long-term operation (22 cycles, 40 days), power production of each cell was similar (∼1200 and 700-800 mW m-2 for 0.5 and 0.05 mg Pt cm-2) likely due to cathode biofouling that could not be completely reversed through physical cleaning. While binder chemistry could improve initial electrochemical cathode performance, binder materials had less impact on overall long-term MFC performance. This observation suggests that long-term operation of MFCs will require better methods to avoid cathode biofouling. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.

  14. Molecular dynamics study on low-energy sputtering of carbon material by Xe ion bombardment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muramoto, T.; Hyakutake, T.

    2013-05-01

    The low-energy sputtering of carbon material under Xe ion bombardment is studied through the molecular dynamics (MD) simulation. For the normal incidence of Xe, the MD result of sputtering yield almost agrees with the experimental result by Williams et al. (AIAA-2004-3788). However, the experimental result shows a less incident angle dependence than the MD result because the experiment performed on a rough surface. It is found that the sputtered particles have memory of the projectile because the sputtered particles by the low-energy projectile undergo only a few collisions before the ejection. Low density of an amorphous carbon surface brings the decrease of the sputtering yield and the increase of high-energy sputtered atoms.

  15. Sputtering Preparation and Magneto-optical Properties of GdTbFeCo Thin Films

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG Zhixin; YU Weijun

    2012-01-01

    Amorphous GdTbFeCo magnetic thin films were successfully prepared on glass substrates by RF magnetron sputtering system from a mosaic target.The influences of sputtering parameters on the magnetooptical properties GdTbFeCo thin film were investigated by the variable control method.And the influence mechanism was analyzed in detail.After the sputtering parameters were optimized,it was found that when the distance between target and substrate was 72 mm,the thin film thickness was 120 nm,and the sputtering power,sputtering pressure and sputtering time was 75 W,0.5 Pa and 613 s,respectively,the coercivity with perpendicular anisotropy could be as high as 6735 Oe,and the squareness ratio of the hysteresis loop was almost equal to 1.

  16. Modeling Solar-Wind Heavy-Ions' Potential Sputtering of Lunar KREEP Surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barghouty, A. F.; Meyer, F. W.; Harris, R. P.; Adams, J. H., Jr.

    2012-01-01

    Recent laboratory data suggest that potential sputtering may be an important weathering mechanism that can affect the composition of both the lunar surface and its tenuous exosphere; its role and implications, however, remain unclear. Using a relatively simple kinetic model, we will demonstrate that solar-wind heavy ions induced sputtering of KREEP surfaces is critical in establishing the timescale of the overall solar-wind sputtering process of the lunar surface. We will also also show that potential sputtering leads to a more pronounced and significant differentiation between depleted and enriched surface elements. We briefly discuss the impacts of enhanced sputtering on the composition of the regolith and the exosphere, as well as of solar-wind sputtering as a source of hydrogen and water on the moon.

  17. Blacking FTO by strongly cathodic polarization with enhanced photocurrent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Yun; Lu, Xiaoqing; Huang, Wei; Li, Zelin

    2015-08-01

    Transparent fluorine-doped tin oxide (TFTO) coating on quartz glass is widely used as substrate in photoelectrochemistry for solar energy transformation, sensing and so on. We observed that the TFTO could become blackish by strongly cathodic polarization. Characterization of the black FTO (BFTO) by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that part of SnO2 on the TFTO was reduced into metal Sn nanoparticles during the cathodic polarization. The BFTO greatly increased solar absorption and enhanced photocurrent responses in comparison with TFTO. It might be necessary to take caution in photoelectrochemical measurements while the FTO is strongly cathodically polarized.

  18. The approach curve method for large anode-cathode distances

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mammana, Victor P.; Monteiro, Othon R.; Fonseca, Leo R.C.

    2003-09-20

    An important technique used to characterize field emission is the measurement of the emitted current against electric field (IxE). In this work we discuss a procedure for obtaining IxE data based on multiple approach curves. We show that the simulated features obtained for an idealized uniform surface matches available experimental data for small anode-cathode distances, while for large distances the simulation predicts a departure from the linear regime. We also discuss the shape of the approach curves for large anode-cathode distances for a cathode made of carbon nanotubes.

  19. The cathode test stand for the DARHT second-axis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fortgang, C.; Monroe, M.; Prono, D. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Hudson, C.; Macy, D.; Moy, K. [Bechtel Nevada, Santa Barbara, CA (United States)

    1998-12-31

    The injector for the DARHT second-axis injector will use an 8-in. thermionic dispenser cathode. Because the cathode is relatively large and requires a large amount of heat (5 kW) there are certain engineering issues that need to be addressed, before the DARHT injector reaches the final design stage. The Cathode Test Stand (CTS) will be used to address those concerns. The CTS is a new facility, presently under construction. The CTS will consist of a high-voltage pulse modulator, a high-vacuum diode test-chamber, and a short beam-transport section with diagnostics. This paper discusses the status of the project.

  20. Final Report: Wetted Cathodes for Low-Temperature Aluminum Smelting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, Craig W

    2002-09-30

    A low-temperature aluminum smelting process being developed differs from the Hall-Heroult process in several significant ways. The low-temperature process employs a more acidic electrolyte than cryolite, an alumina slurry, oxygen-generating metal anodes, and vertically suspended electrodes. Wetted and drained vertical cathodes are crucial to the new process. Such cathodes represent a significant portion of the capital costs projected for the new technology. Although studies exist of wetted cathode technology with Hall-Heoult cells, the differences make such a study desirable with the new process.

  1. Studies on Stability of a Novel Cathode Material for MCFC

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The stability of NiO and oxidized nickel-niobium surface alloy electrode under various molten carbonate fuel cell(MCFC) cathode conditions were investigated by determination of equilibrium solubility of nickel ions in the carbonate melt of the two electrode materials.It is found that under MCFC cathode conditions the stability of NiO electrode is improved significantly by the deposition of niobium.As far as stability is concerned,oxidized nickel-niobium alloy electrode can be considered as a candidate for cathode material of MCFC.

  2. Iron phosphate materials as cathodes for lithium batteries

    CERN Document Server

    Prosini, Pier Paolo

    2011-01-01

    ""Iron Phosphate Materials as Cathodes for Lithium Batteries"" describes the synthesis and the chemical-physical characteristics of iron phosphates, and presents methods of making LiFePO4 a suitable cathode material for lithium-ion batteries. The author studies carbon's ability to increase conductivity and to decrease material grain size, as well as investigating the electrochemical behaviour of the materials obtained. ""Iron Phosphate Materials as Cathodes for Lithium Batteries"" also proposes a model to explain lithium insertion/extraction in LiFePO4 and to predict voltage profiles at variou

  3. Cathodic corrosion protection of steel pipes; Kathodischer Korrosionsschutz von Rohrleitungsstaehlen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buechler, Markus [SGK Schweizerische Gesellschaft fuer Korrosionsschutz, Zuerich (Switzerland); Schoeneich, Hanns-Georg [Open Grid Europe, Essen (Germany)

    2011-07-01

    The cathodic corrosion protection has been proven excellently in the practical use for buried steel pipelines. This is evidenced statistically by a significantly less frequency of loss compared to non-cathodically protected pipelines. Based on thermodynamic considerations, the authors of the contribution under consideration describe the operation of the cathodic corrosion protection and regular adjustment of the electrochemical potential at the interface steel / soil in practical use. Subsequently, the corrosion scenarios are discussed that may occur when an incorrect setting of the potential results from an operation over several decades. This incorrect setting also can be caused by the failure of individual components of the corrosion protection.

  4. Effect of sputtering power on structural and optical properties of radio frequency-sputtered In2S3 thin films.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Dong Hyun; Cho, Shinho; Hui, Kwun Nam; Son, Young Guk

    2014-12-01

    In this study, we investigated the structural and optical properties of indium sulfide (In2S3) thin films as a substitute for the CdS buffer layer in Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells. The In2S3 films were deposited on glass substrates using radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering. The sputtering power was changed from 60 to 120 W in 20 W increments. The effects of sputtering power on the crystallinity, surface morphology, and optical properties of the films were characterized with X-ray diffraction (XRD), atomic force microscopy (AFM), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and UV-visible spectrophotometry. The XRD analyses indicated that the films were polycrystalline β-In2S3 structures with two preferred orientations along the (103) and (206) directions. The AFM images revealed that the films had nanosized grains and that the size increased from 7 nm for the samples prepared at 60 W to 13 nm for those prepared at 120 W. The optical band gap of the samples was found to vary between 2.88 and 2.43 eV.

  5. The Status Quo and Development Trend of High-purity Gold Sputtering Targets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Anheng; XIE Hongchao; ZHU Yong

    2012-01-01

    This article gives a brief introduction to manufacturers and markets of sputtering targets as well as the manufacturing technology thereof.Then,it analyzes the application of high-purity gold sputtering targets in the fields of integrated circuit,information storage,flat panel display,etc.Based on the above,the article analyzes the processing development trend for the high-purity gold sputtering targets in aspects of ultra-high purity,manufacturing technology,analysis and testing technologies.

  6. Lubrication with sputtered MoS2 films: Principles, operation, limitations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spalvins, T.

    1991-01-01

    The present practices, limitations, and understanding of thin sputtered MoS2 films are reviewed. Sputtered MoS2 films can exhibit remarkable tribological properties such as ultralow friction coefficients (0.01) and enhanced wear lives (millions of cycles) when used in vacuum or dry air. To achieve these favorable tribological characteristics, the sputtering conditions during deposition must be optimized for adequate film adherence and appropriate structure (morphology) and composition.

  7. Erosion behavior of composite Al-Cr cathodes in cathodic arc plasmas in inert and reactive atmospheres

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franz, Robert, E-mail: robert.franz@unileoben.ac.at; Mendez Martin, Francisca; Hawranek, Gerhard [Montanuniversität Leoben, Franz-Josef-Strasse 18, 8700 Leoben (Austria); Polcik, Peter [Plansee Composite Materials GmbH, Siebenbürgerstrasse 23, 86983 Lechbruck am See (Germany)

    2016-03-15

    Al{sub x}Cr{sub 1−x} composite cathodes with Al contents of x = 0.75, 0.5, and 0.25 were exposed to cathodic arc plasmas in Ar, N{sub 2}, and O{sub 2} atmospheres and their erosion behavior was studied. Cross-sectional analysis of the elemental distribution of the near-surface zone in the cathodes by scanning electron microscopy revealed the formation of a modified layer for all cathodes and atmospheres. Due to intermixing of Al and Cr in the heat-affected zone, intermetallic Al-Cr phases formed as evidenced by x-ray diffraction analysis. Cathode poisoning effects in the reactive N{sub 2} and O{sub 2} atmospheres were nonuniform as a result of the applied magnetic field configuration. With the exception of oxide islands on Al-rich cathodes, reactive layers were absent in the circular erosion zone, while nitrides and oxides formed in the less eroded center region of the cathodes.

  8. Characterization of plasma chemistry and ion energy in cathodic arc plasma from Ti-Si cathodes of different compositions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eriksson, A. O.; Zhirkov, I.; Dahlqvist, M.; Jensen, J.; Hultman, L.; Rosen, J. [Thin Film Physics Division, Department of Physics, Chemistry and Biology (IFM), Linkoeping University, SE-581 83 Linkoeping (Sweden)

    2013-04-28

    Arc plasma from Ti-Si compound cathodes with up to 25 at. % Si was characterized in a DC arc system with respect to chemistry and charge-state-resolved ion energy. The plasma ion composition showed a lower Si content, diverging up to 12 at. % compared to the cathode composition, yet concurrently deposited films were in accordance with the cathode stoichiometry. Significant contribution to film growth from neutrals is inferred besides ions, since the contribution from macroparticles, estimated by scanning electron microscopy, cannot alone account for the compositional difference between cathode, plasma, and film. The average ion charge states for Ti and Si were higher than reference data for elemental cathodes. This result is likely related to TiSi{sub x} phases of higher cohesive energies in the compound cathodes and higher effective electron temperature in plasma formation. The ion energy distributions extended up to {approx}200 and {approx}130 eV for Ti and Si, respectively, with corresponding average energies of {approx}60 and {approx}30 eV. These averages were, however, not dependent on Si content in the cathode, except for 25 at. % Si where the average energies were increased up to 72 eV for Ti and 47 eV for Si.

  9. Application of magnetron sputtering for producing bioactive ceramic coatings on implant materials

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    J Z Shi; C Z Chen; H J Yu; S J Zhang

    2008-11-01

    Radio frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering is a versatile deposition technique that can produce thin, uniform, dense calcium phosphate coatings. In this paper, principle and character of magnetron sputtering is introduced, and development of the hydroxyapatite and its composite coatings application is reviewed. In addition, influence of heat treatment on magnetron sputtered coatings is discussed. The heat treated coatings have been shown to exhibit bioactive behaviour both in vivo and in vitro. At last, the future application of the bioactive ceramic coating deposited by magnetron sputtering is mentioned.

  10. Kinetic and Potential Sputtering of Lunar Regolith: Contribution of Solar-Wind Heavy Ions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, F. W.; Harris, P. R.; Meyer, H. M., III; Hijiazi, H.; Barghouty, A. F.

    2013-01-01

    Sputtering of lunar regolith by protons as well as solar-wind heavy ions is considered. From preliminary measurements of H+, Ar+1, Ar+6 and Ar+9 ion sputtering of JSC-1A AGGL lunar regolith simulant at solar wind velocities, and TRIM simulations of kinetic sputtering yields, the relative contributions of kinetic and potential sputtering contributions are estimated. An 80-fold enhancement of oxygen sputtering by Ar+ over same-velocity H+, and an additional x2 increase for Ar+9 over same-velocity Ar+ was measured. This enhancement persisted to the maximum fluences investigated is approximately 1016/cm (exp2). Modeling studies including the enhanced oxygen ejection by potential sputtering due to the minority heavy ion multicharged ion solar wind component, and the kinetic sputtering contribution of all solar wind constituents, as determined from TRIM sputtering simulations, indicate an overall 35% reduction of near-surface oxygen abundance. XPS analyses of simulant samples exposed to singly and multicharged Ar ions show the characteristic signature of reduced (metallic) Fe, consistent with the preferential ejection of oxygen atoms that can occur in potential sputtering of some metal oxides.

  11. Characterization of SiC in DLC/a-Si films prepared by pulsed filtered cathodic arc using Raman spectroscopy and XPS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Srisang, C. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Western Digital (Thailand) Company Limited, Ayuthaya 13160 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, CHE, Ministry of Education, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Asanithi, P. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Siangchaew, K. [Western Digital (Thailand) Company Limited, Ayuthaya 13160 (Thailand); Pokaipisit, A. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, CHE, Ministry of Education, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand); Limsuwan, P., E-mail: opticslaser@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, King Mongkut' s University of Technology Thonburi, Bangkok 10140 (Thailand); Thailand Center of Excellence in Physics, CHE, Ministry of Education, Bangkok 10400 (Thailand)

    2012-05-15

    DLC/a-Si films were deposited on germanium substrates. a-Si film was initially deposited as a seed layer on the substrate using DC magnetron sputtering. DLC film was then deposited on the a-Si layer via a pulsed filtered cathodic arc (PFCA) system. In situ ellipsometry was used to monitor the thicknesses of the growth films, allowing a precise control over the a-Si and DLC thicknesses of 6 and 9 nm, respectively. It was found that carbon atoms implanting on a-Si layer act not only as a carbon source for DLC formation, but also as a source for SiC formation. The Raman peak positions at 796 cm{sup -1} and 972 cm{sup -1} corresponded to the LO and TO phonon modes of SiC, respectively, were observed. The results were also confirmed using TEM, XPS binding energy and XPS depth profile analysis.

  12. 集螺旋阴极笼型阴极网状阴极为一体的新型阴极(Z阴极)%A New Type of the Cathode Combining the Properties of Helix Cathode,Cage Cathode and Mesh Cathode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张新富

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes the derivation ,definition,properties and application of the Z cathode The conversion and replacement among Z cathode ,Helix cathode,cage cathode and mesh cathode are also discussed.%本文阐述了Z阴极的由来、定义、特性和运用,以及Z阴极与螺旋阴极、笼型阴极、网状阴极之间的转换和代替。

  13. Lipon coatings for high voltage and high temperature Li-ion battery cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dudney, Nancy J.; Liang, Chengdu; Nanda, Jagjit; Veith, Gabriel M.; Kim, Yoongu; Martha, Surendra Kumar

    2017-02-14

    A lithium ion battery includes an anode and a cathode. The cathode includes a lithium, manganese, nickel, and oxygen containing compound. An electrolyte is disposed between the anode and the cathode. A protective layer is deposited between the cathode and the electrolyte. The protective layer includes pure lithium phosphorus oxynitride and variations that include metal dopants such as Fe, Ti, Ni, V, Cr, Cu, and Co. A method for making a cathode and a method for operating a battery are also disclosed.

  14. Developing Polymer Cathode Material for the Chloride Ion Battery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Xiangyu; Zhao, Zhigang; Yang, Meng; Xia, Hui; Yu, Tingting; Shen, Xiaodong

    2017-01-25

    The chloride ion battery is an attractive rechargeable battery owing to its high theoretical energy density and sustainable components. An important challenge for research and development of chloride ion batteries lies in the innovation of the cathode materials. Here we report a nanostructured chloride ion-doped polymer, polypyrrole chloride, as a new type of potential cathode material for the chloride ion battery. The as-prepared polypyrrole chloride@carbon nanotubes (PPyCl@CNTs) cathode shows a high reversible capacity of 118 mAh g(-1) and superior cycling stability. Reversible electrochemical reactions of the PPyCl@CNTs cathode based on the redox reactions of nitrogen species and chloride ion transfer are demonstrated. Our work may guide and offer electrode design principles for accelerating the development of rechargeable batteries with anion transfer.

  15. Scandate Cathode for High Power Long Life Electric Propulsion Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Scandate cathodes are proposed as a way to boost performance and life for electric space propulsion systems. This company has recently demonstrated breakthrough...

  16. Space-charge limiting current in spherical cathode diodes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘国治; 邵浩

    2003-01-01

    The results of the investigation on the space-charge limiting current for a spherical-cathode diode in the nonrelativistic situation are presented in this paper. The results show that the current enhancement factor equals the square of E-field enhancement factor on the cathode surface. The generated space-charge limiting current is deduced.In the case of a pin-shaped-cathode diode, the space-charge limiting current is also obtained, indicating that the current is independent of the geometric parameters of the diode. Analyses of the shielding effects and the conditions for generation of the uniform space-charge limiting beam show that, for pin-arrayed cathodes, the distance between pins should be in the range from 1.2D to 1.5D, where D is the distance between the two electrodes.

  17. Photoconductive Cathode Interlayer for Highly Efficient Inverted Polymer Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nian, Li; Zhang, Wenqiang; Zhu, Na; Liu, Linlin; Xie, Zengqi; Wu, Hongbin; Würthner, Frank; Ma, Yuguang

    2015-06-10

    A highly photoconductive cathode interlayer was achieved by doping a 1 wt % light absorber, such as perylene bisimide, into a ZnO thin film, which absorbs a very small amount of light but shows highly increased conductivity of 4.50 × 10(-3) S/m under sunlight. Photovoltaic devices based on this kind of photoactive cathode interlayer exhibit significantly improved device performance, which is rather insensitive to the thickness of the cathode interlayer over a broad range. Moreover, a power conversion efficiency as high as 10.5% was obtained by incorporation of our photoconductive cathode interlayer with the PTB7-Th:PC71BM active layer, which is one of the best results for single-junction polymer solar cells.

  18. Temperature variation of a thermionic cathode during electron emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU YanWen; TIAN Hong; HAN Yong; XU ZhenYing; MENG MingFeng; ZHANG HongLai

    2008-01-01

    It is necessary to know the actual temperature of a thermionic cathode that works as the electron source in a microwave tube. It has been found that the temperature of the cathode drops markedly during the thermionic emission. For example, the temperature could fall by about 30℃ under a current density of 2.92 A/cm2. Using the molecular thermodynamics, the dependence of the cathode temperature on the emission current density has been obtained. It has been theoretically pointed out that several factors, such as heating model and temperature coefficient of resis- tance of heater, can influence the cathode temperature. These theoretical conclu- sions were supported by the experimental results.

  19. Model for solid oxide fuel cell cathodes prepared by infiltration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samson, Alfred Junio; Søgaard, Martin; Hendriksen, Peter Vang

    2017-01-01

    A 1-dimensional model of a cathode has been developed in order to understand and predict the performance of cathodes prepared by infiltration of La0.6Sr0.4Co1.05O3-δ (LSC) into porous backbones of Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 (CGO). The model accounts for the mixed ionic and electronic conductivity of LSC......, ionic conductivity of CGO, gas transport in the porous cathode, and the oxygen reduction reaction at the surface of percolated LSC. Geometrical variations are applied to reflect a changing microstructure of LSC under varying firing temperatures. Using microstructural parameters obtained from detailed...... parameter variations are presented and discussed with the aim of presenting specific guidelines for optimizing the microstructure of cathodes prepared by infiltration....

  20. The Properties of Normal Conducting Cathodes in FZD Superconducting Gun

    CERN Document Server

    Xiang, R; Buettig, H; Janssen, D; Justus, M; Lehnert, U; Michel, P; Murcek, P; Schamlott, A; Schneider, Ch; Schurig, R; Staufenbiel, F; Teichert, J

    2009-01-01

    The superconducting radio frequency photoinjector (SRF photoinjector) is one of the latest applications of SC technology in the accelerator field. Since superconducting cathodes with high QE are not available up to now, normal conducting cathode material is the main choice for the SRF photoinjectors. However, the compatibility between the cathode and the cavity is one of the challenges for this concept. The SRF gun with Cs2Te cathode has been successfully operated under the collaboration of BESSY, DESY, FZD, and MBI. In this paper, some experience gained in the gun commissioning will be concluded. The results of the properties of Cs2Te photocathode in the cavity will be presented, such as the Q.E., the life time, the dark current and the thermal emittance.

  1. Influence of substrate topography on cathodic delamination of anticorrosive coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Per Aggerholm; Kiil, Søren; Dam-Johansen, Kim

    2009-01-01

    The cathodic delamination of a commercial magnesium silicate and titanium dioxide pigmented epoxy coating on abrasive cleaned cold rolled steel has been investigated. The rate of delamination was found to depend on interfacial transport from the artificial defect to the delamination front...... and thereby the substrate topography, whereas the coating thickness had little influence. The presence of a significant potential gradient between the anode and the cathode and the dependency of the delamination rate on the tortuosity of the steel surface suggests that cathodic delamination is controlled...... by migration of cations from the defect to the delamination front. This means that abrasive blasting, to some extent, can be applied to control and minimize the observed rate of cathodic delamination. The lifetime of the species causing disbondment suggested that sodium hydroxide or potassium hydroxide...

  2. Macroparticle generation in DC arc discharge from a WC cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhirkov, Igor; Polcik, Peter; Kolozsvári, Szilard; Rosen, Johanna

    2017-03-01

    We have studied macroparticle generation from a tungsten carbide cathode used in a dc vacuum arc discharge. Despite a relatively high decomposition/melting point (˜3100 K), there is an intensive generation of visible particles with sizes in the range 20-35 μm. Visual observations during the discharge and scanning electron microscopy of the cathode surface and of collected macroparticles indicate a new mechanism for particle formation and acceleration. Based on the W-C phase diagram, there is an intensive sublimation of carbon from the melt resulting from the cathode spot. The sublimation supports the formation of a sphere, which is accelerated upon an explosion initiated by Joule heating at the critical contact area between the sphere and the cathode body. The explosive nature of the particle acceleration is confirmed by surface features resembling the remains of a splash on the droplet surface.

  3. Study of the Discharge Mode in Micro-Hollow Cathode

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HE Feng; HE Shoujie; ZHAO Xiaofei; GUO Bingang; OUYANG Jiting

    2012-01-01

    In this study, micro-hollow cathode discharge (MHCD) is investigated by a fluid model with drift-diffusion approximation. The MHC device is a cathode/dielectric/anode sandwich structure with one hole of a diameter D=200 um. The gas is a Ne/Xe mixture at a pressure p=50-500 Torr. The evolutions of the discharge show that there are two different discharge modes. At larger pD the discharge plasma and high density excited species expand along the cathode surface and, a ringed discharge mode is formed. At smaller pD, the discharge plasma and the excited species expand along the axis of the cathode aperture to form a columnar discharge.

  4. Installation of some Cathode Strip Chambers on March 2004

    CERN Multimedia

    Richard Breedon

    2004-01-01

    Installation on the Disk of some Cathode Strip Chambers, type ME3/1, produced in the US. The installation has been performed on March 2004 at the CMS experimental site SX5 (P5) in Cessy, neighbouring France.

  5. A High Performance Cathode Heater for Hall Thrusters Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — High current hollow cathodes are the baseline electron source for next generation high power Hall thrusters. Currently for electron sources providing current levels...

  6. Temperature variation of a thermionic cathode during electron emission

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    It is necessary to know the actual temperature of a thermionic cathode that works as the electron source in a microwave tube. It has been found that the temperature of the cathode drops markedly during the thermionic emission. For example, the temperature could fall by about 30oC under a current density of 2.92 A/cm2. Using the molecular thermodynamics, the dependence of the cathode temperature on the emission current density has been obtained. It has been theoretically pointed out that several factors, such as heating model and temperature coefficient of resis-tance of heater, can influence the cathode temperature. These theoretical conclu-sions were supported by the experimental results.

  7. Verification of high efficient broad beam cold cathode ion source

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel Reheem, A. M.; Ahmed, M. M.; Abdelhamid, M. M.; Ashour, A. H.

    2016-08-01

    An improved form of cold cathode ion source has been designed and constructed. It consists of stainless steel hollow cylinder anode and stainless steel cathode disc, which are separated by a Teflon flange. The electrical discharge and output characteristics have been measured at different pressures using argon, nitrogen, and oxygen gases. The ion exit aperture shape and optimum distance between ion collector plate and cathode disc are studied. The stable discharge current and maximum output ion beam current have been obtained using grid exit aperture. It was found that the optimum distance between ion collector plate and ion exit aperture is equal to 6.25 cm. The cold cathode ion source is used to deposit aluminum coating layer on AZ31 magnesium alloy using argon ion beam current which equals 600 μA. Scanning electron microscope and X-ray diffraction techniques used for characterizing samples before and after aluminum deposition.

  8. Dynamic Aspects of Solid Solution Cathodes for Electrochemical Power Sources

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atlung, Sven; West, Keld; Jacobsen, Torben

    1979-01-01

    , in particularfor vehicle propulsion, and electrochemical and constructional factors. It isargued that the energy obtainable at a given load is limited by saturation ofthe surface layers of cathode particles with cations, and that the time beforesaturation occurs is determined by diffusion of cations and electrons...... into thehost lattice. Expressions are developed for plane, cylindrical, and sphericalparticles, giving the relation between battery load and the amount of cathodematerial utilized before saturation. The particle shape and a single parameterQ is used to describe cathode performance. Q is the ratio between...... dischargetime at 100% utilization of the cathode at the given load, and the timeconstant for diffusion through the cathode particles. This description is extendedto cover short peak loads characteristic of vehicle propulsion. On thebasis of estimated parameters for the Li/TiS2 couple with LiClO4-propylene...

  9. Novel cathodes for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, M.; Xia, C. [Georgia Inst. of Tech., Atlanta, GA (United States). Center for Innovative Fuel Cell and Battery Technologies

    2002-04-04

    A solid-oxide fuel cell that operates at 500 C (instead of 600 C and higher), with lower material cost and better long-term stability, is presented. Its key piece is a cathode made of a silver/copper-doped bismuth vanadate (Ag-BI-CUVOX) composite, which reduces oxygen at lower temperatures and diminishes the resistance between the cathode and the electrolyte. (orig.)

  10. Cathodes for lithium-air battery cells with acid electrolytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xing, Yangchuan; Huang, Kan; Li, Yunfeng

    2016-07-19

    In various embodiments, the present disclosure provides a layered metal-air cathode for a metal-air battery. Generally, the layered metal-air cathode comprises an active catalyst layer, a transition layer bonded to the active catalyst layer, and a backing layer bonded to the transition layer such that the transition layer is disposed between the active catalyst layer and the backing layer.

  11. High-Current Cold Cathode Employing Diamond and Related Materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirshfield, Jay L. [Omega-P, Inc., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2014-10-22

    The essence of this project was for diamond films to be deposited on cold cathodes to improve their emission properties. Films with varying morphology, composition, and size of the crystals were deposited and the emission properties of the cathodes that utilize such films were studied. The prototype cathodes fabricated by the methods developed during Phase I were tested and evaluated in an actual high-power RF device during Phase II. These high-power tests used the novel active RF pulse compression system and the X-band magnicon test facility at US Naval Research Laboratory. In earlier tests, plasma switches were employed, while tests under this project utilized electron-beam switching. The intense electron beams required in the switches were supplied from cold cathodes embodying diamond films with varying morphology, including uncoated molybdenum cathodes in the preliminary tests. Tests with uncoated molybdenum cathodes produced compressed X-band RF pulses with a peak power of 91 MW, and a maximum power gain of 16.5:1. Tests were also carried out with switches employing diamond coated cathodes. The pulse compressor was based on use of switches employing electron beam triggering to effect mode conversion. In experimental tests, the compressor produced 165 MW in a ~ 20 ns pulse at ~18× power gain and ~ 140 MW at ~ 16× power gain in a 16 ns pulse with a ~ 7 ns flat-top. In these tests, molybdenum blade cathodes with thin diamond coatings demonstrated good reproducible emission uniformity with a 100 kV, 100 ns high voltage pulse. The new compressor does not have the limitations of earlier types of active pulse compressors and can operate at significantly higher electric fields without breakdown.

  12. Tolerant chalcogenide cathodes of membraneless micro fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gago, Aldo Saul; Gochi-Ponce, Yadira; Feng, Yong-Jun; Esquivel, Juan Pablo; Sabaté, Neus; Santander, Joaquin; Alonso-Vante, Nicolas

    2012-08-01

    The most critical issues to overcome in micro direct methanol fuel cells (μDMFCs) are the lack of tolerance of the platinum cathode and fuel crossover through the polymer membrane. Thus, two novel tolerant cathodes of a membraneless microlaminar-flow fuel cell (μLFFC), Pt(x)S(y) and CoSe(2), were developed. The multichannel structure of the system was microfabricated in SU-8 polymer. A commercial platinum cathode served for comparison. When using 5 M CH(3)OH as the fuel, maximum power densities of 6.5, 4, and 0.23 mW cm(-2) were achieved for the μLFFC with Pt, Pt(x)S(y), and CoSe(2) cathodes, respectively. The Pt(x)S(y) cathode outperformed Pt in the same fuel cell when using CH(3)OH at concentrations above 10 M. In a situation where fuel crossover is 100 %, that is, mixing the fuel with the reactant, the maximum power density of the micro fuel cell with Pt decreased by 80 %. However, for Pt(x)S(y) this decrease corresponded to 35 % and for CoSe(2) there was no change in performance. This result is the consequence of the high tolerance of the chalcogenide-based cathodes. When using 10 M HCOOH and a palladium-based anode, the μLFFC with a CoSe(2) cathode achieved a maxiumum power density of 1.04 mW cm(-2). This micro fuel cell does not contain either Nafion membrane or platinum. We report, for the first time, the evaluation of Pt(x)S(y)- and CoSe(2)-based cathodes in membraneless micro fuel cells. The results suggest the development of a novel system that is not size restricted and its operation is mainly based on the selectivity of its electrodes.

  13. An adjustable electron achromat for cathode lens microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tromp, R.M., E-mail: rtromp@us.ibm.com [IBM T.J. Watson Research Center, 1101 Kitchawan Road, Yorktown Heights, NY 10598 (United States); Leiden Institute of Physics, Kamerlingh Onnes Laboratory, Niels Bohrweg 2, 2333 CA Leiden (Netherlands)

    2015-12-15

    Chromatic aberration correction in light optics began with the invention of a two-color-corrected achromatic crown/flint lens doublet by Chester Moore Hall in 1730. Such color correction is necessary because any single glass shows dispersion (i.e. its index of refraction changes with wavelength), which can be counteracted by combining different glasses with different dispersions. In cathode lens microscopes (such as Photo Electron Emission Microscopy – PEEM) we encounter a similar situation, where the chromatic aberration coefficient of the cathode lens shows strong dispersion, i.e. depends (non-linearly) on the energy with which the electrons leave the sample. Here I show how a cathode lens in combination with an electron mirror can be configured as an adjustable electron achromat. The lens/mirror combination can be corrected at two electron energies by balancing the settings of the electron mirror against the settings of the cathode lens. The achromat can be adjusted to deliver optimum performance, depending on the requirements of a specific experiment. Going beyond the achromat, an apochromat would improve resolution and transmission by a very significant margin. I discuss the requirements and outlook for such a system, which for now remains a wish waiting for fulfilment. - Highlights: • The properties of cathode objective lens plus electron mirror are discussed. • In analogy with light-optical achromats, cathode lens plus mirror can be configured as an electron achromat. • Unlike light optics, the electron achromat can be adjusted to best fulfill experimental requirements.

  14. Reducing DRIFT Backgrounds with a Submicron Aluminized-Mylar Cathode

    CERN Document Server

    Battat, James B R; Dorofeev, Alexei; Ezeribe, Anthony C; Fox, Jennifer R; Gauvreau, Jean-Luc; Gold, Michael; Harmon, Lydia; Harton, John; Lafler, Randy; Lauer, Robert J; Lee, Eric R; Loomba, Dinesh; Lumnah, Alexander; Matthews, John; Miller, Eric H; Mouton, Frederic; Murphy, Alexander St J; Phan, Nguyen; Sadler, Stephen W; Scarff, Andrew; Schuckman, Fred; Snowden-Ifft, Daniel; Spooner, Neil J C; Walker, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Background events in the DRIFT-IId dark matter detector, mimicking potential WIMP signals, are predominantly caused by alpha decays on the central cathode in which the alpha particle is completely or partially absorbed by the cathode material. We installed a 0.9 micron thick aluminized-mylar cathode as a way to reduce the probability of producing these backgrounds. We study three generations of cathode (wire, thin-film, and radiologically clean thin-film) with a focus on the ratio of background events to alpha decays. Two independent methods of measuring the absolute alpha decay rate are used to ensure an accurate result, and agree to within $10\\%$. Using alpha range spectroscopy, we measure the radiologically cleanest cathode version to have a contamination of $3.3\\pm0.1$ ppt $^{234}$U and $73\\pm2$ ppb $^{238}$U. This cathode reduces the probability of producing an RPR from an alpha decay by a factor of $70\\pm20$ % while reducing the overall background rate by $96.5\\pm0.5\\%$ compared to the original stainles...

  15. Cathodic protection for the bottoms of above ground storage tanks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mohr, John P. [Tyco Adhesives, Norwood, MA (United States)

    2004-07-01

    Impressed Current Cathodic Protection has been used for many years to protect the external bottoms of above ground storage tanks. The use of a vertical deep ground bed often treated several bare steel tank bottoms by broadcasting current over a wide area. Environmental concerns and, in some countries, government regulations, have introduced the use of dielectric secondary containment liners. The dielectric liner does not allow the protective cathodic protection current to pass and causes corrosion to continue on the newly placed tank bottom. In existing tank bottoms where inadequate protection has been provided, leaks can develop. In one method of remediation, an old bottom is covered with sand and a double bottom is welded above the leaking bottom. The new bottom is welded very close to the old bottom, thus shielding the traditional cathodic protection from protecting the new bottom. These double bottoms often employ the use of dielectric liner as well. Both the liner and the double bottom often minimize the distance from the external tank bottom. The minimized space between the liner, or double bottom, and the bottom to be protected places a challenge in providing current distribution in cathodic protection systems. This study examines the practical concerns for application of impressed current cathodic protection and the types of anode materials used in these specific applications. One unique approach for an economical treatment using a conductive polymer cathodic protection method is presented. (author)

  16. High-current carbon-epoxy capillary cathode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gleizer, J. Z.; Queller, T.; Bliokh, Yu.; Yatom, S.; Vekselman, V.; Krasik, Ya. E.; Bernshtam, V.

    2012-07-01

    The results of experiments on the reproducible generation of an electron beam having a high current density of up to 300 A/cm2 and a satisfactorily uniform cross-sectional distribution of current density in a ˜200 kV, ˜450 ns vacuum diode with a carbon-epoxy capillary cathode are presented. It was found that the source of the electrons is the plasma formed as a result of flashover inside the capillaries. It is shown that the plasma formation occurs at an electric field ≤15 kV/cm and that the cathode sustains thousands of pulses without degradation in its emission properties. Time- and space-resolved visible light observation and spectroscopy analyses were used to determine the cathode plasma's density, temperature, and expansion velocity. It was found that the density of the cathode plasma decreases rapidly in relation to the distance from the cathode. In addition, it was found that the main reason for the short-circuiting of the accelerating gap is the formation and expansion of the anode plasma. Finally, it was shown that when an external guiding magnetic field is present, the injection of the electron beam into the drift space with a current amplitude exceeding its critical value changes the radial distribution of the current density of the electron beam because the inner electrons are reflected from the virtual cathode.

  17. Cathode erosion in high-current high-pressure arc

    CERN Document Server

    Nemchinsky, V A

    2003-01-01

    Cathode erosion rate was experimentally investigated for two types of arcs: one with tungsten cathode in nitrogen atmosphere and one with hafnium cathode in oxygen atmosphere. Conditions were typical for plasma arc cutting systems: gas pressure from 2 to 5 atm, arc current from 200 to 400 A, gas flow rate from 50 to 130 litre min sup - sup 1. It was found that the actual cathode evaporation rate G is much lower than G sub 0 , the evaporation rate that follows from the Hertz-Knudsen formula: G = nu G sub 0. The difference is because some of the evaporated particles return back to the cathode. For conditions of our experiments, the factor nu could be as low as 0.01. It was shown experimentally that nu depends strongly on the gas flow pattern close to the cathode. In particular, swirling the gas increases nu many times. To explain the influence of gas swirling, model calculations of gas flows were performed. These calculations revealed difference between swirling and non-swirling flows: swirling the gas enhances...

  18. A one-dimensional model illustrating virtual-cathode formation in a novel coaxial virtual-cathode oscillator

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Geoffrey R., E-mail: gturner@csir.co.za [Council for Scientific and Industrial Research, PO Box 395, Pretoria 0001 (South Africa)

    2014-09-15

    A one-dimensional electrostatic sheet model of a coaxial geometry Virtual Cathode Oscillator (VCO) is presented. The cathode is centrally located and connects to a peripherally located plate electrode to form a resonant cavity, and is thus considered to be a novel design. Charge is modelled as concentric sheets about the cathode whose absolute position and velocity are determined as a function of time by solving the relativistic equations of motion. The model predicts the formation of a virtual cathode between the grid and plate electrodes for the case of a space-charge limited current. Setting the electron reflexing frequency (as a function of the grid potential) comparable with the cavity resonant frequency is predicted to improve the efficiency of microwave emission.

  19. A one-dimensional model illustrating virtual-cathode formation in a novel coaxial virtual-cathode oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Geoffrey R.

    2014-09-01

    A one-dimensional electrostatic sheet model of a coaxial geometry Virtual Cathode Oscillator (VCO) is presented. The cathode is centrally located and connects to a peripherally located plate electrode to form a resonant cavity, and is thus considered to be a novel design. Charge is modelled as concentric sheets about the cathode whose absolute position and velocity are determined as a function of time by solving the relativistic equations of motion. The model predicts the formation of a virtual cathode between the grid and plate electrodes for the case of a space-charge limited current. Setting the electron reflexing frequency (as a function of the grid potential) comparable with the cavity resonant frequency is predicted to improve the efficiency of microwave emission.

  20. Magnetron-Sputtered YSZ and CGO Electrolytes for SOFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solovyev, A. A.; Shipilova, A. V.; Ionov, I. V.; Kovalchuk, A. N.; Rabotkin, S. V.; Oskirko, V. O.

    2016-08-01

    Reactive magnetron sputtering has been used for deposition of yttria-stabilized ZrO2 (YSZ) and gadolinium-doped CeO2 (CGO) layers on NiO-YSZ commercial anodes for solid oxide fuel cells. To increase the deposition rate and improve the quality of the sputtered thin oxide films, asymmetric bipolar pulse magnetron sputtering was applied. Three types of anode-supported cells, with single-layer YSZ or CGO and YSZ/CGO bilayer electrolyte, were prepared and investigated. Optimal thickness of oxide layers was determined experimentally. Based on the electrochemical characteristics of the cells, it is shown that, at lower operating temperatures of 650°C to 700°C, the cells with single-layer CGO electrolyte are most effective. The power density of these fuel cells exceeds that of the cell based on YSZ single-layer electrolyte at the same temperature. Power densities of 650 mW cm-2 and 500 mW cm-2 at 700°C were demonstrated by cells with single-layer YSZ and CGO electrolyte, respectively. Significantly enhanced maximum power density was achieved in a bilayer-electrolyte single cell, as compared with cells with a single electrolyte layer. Maximum power density of 1.25 W cm-2 at 800°C and 1 W cm-2 at 750°C under voltage of 0.7 V were achieved for the YSZ/CGO bilayer electrolyte cell with YSZ and CGO thickness of about 4 μm and 1.5 μm, respectively. This signifies that the YSZ thin film serves as a blocking layer to prevent electrical current leakage in the CGO layer, leading to the overall enhanced performance. This performance is comparable to the state of the art for cells based on YSZ/CGO bilayer electrolyte.

  1. Laser sputtering of highly oriented pyrolytic graphite at 248 nm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krajnovich, Douglas J.

    1995-01-01

    The interaction of excimer laser pulses with a highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) target has been studied. HOPG, a close approximation to single crystal graphite, was irradiated along a freshly cleaved basal plane in vacuum by pulses from a KrF excimer laser. The energy fluence was varied between 300-700 mJ/cm2, resulting in material removal rates of plasma effects are minimized. Time-of-flight distributions of the neutral carbon atoms and small carbon clusters were measured and inverted to obtain translational energy flux distributions and relative sputtering yields as a function of fluence. The translational energy distributions are remarkably close to Maxwell-Boltzmann distributions over most of the fluence range studied. However, the mean translational energies are far too high to reconcile with a simple thermal vaporization model. For example, the mean translational energy of C3, the most abundant species, increases from 1.1 eV at 305 mJ/cm2 to 31.7 eV at 715 mJ/cm2. Explanations are considered for this curious mix of thermal and non-thermal behavior. At the high end of our fluence range, the mean translational energies of C1, C2, C3 converge to a 1:2:3 ratio, indicating that the velocity distributions are almost identical. This particular result can be interpreted as a gas dynamic effect. Prolonged sputtering of the same target spot results in a falloff in the sputtering yield and the mean translational energies, but little change in the cluster size distribution. These effects are related to impurity induced topography formation on the target surface.

  2. Low friction coefficient coatings Ni-Cr by magnetron sputtering, DC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Morales-Hernández, Jorge

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Magnetron Sputter Deposition technique with DC was used for the deposition of Ni-Cr coatings on AISI 316 SS like substrate. The cathode with a nominal composition Ni-22 at% Cr was prepared by Mechanical Alloying (MA technique, with a maximum milling time of 16 hours and, with a high energy SPEX 8000 mill. The coatings were made under Argon atmosphere at room temperature with a power of 100 W at different times of growth. Chemical composition, microstructure, topography, nanohardness and wear of the coatings were evaluated using the techniques of microanalysis by energy dispersive X-ray analyzer (EDAX, X-Ray Diffraction (XRD, Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM, Nano-indentation and pin-on-Disk, respectively. After milling, was not detected contamination in the mixtures. XRD analysis revealed that the microstructure of the Ni-Cr alloy was maintained in the coatings with respect to MA powders, with some degree of recrystallization. Nanohardness values were in the order of 8.8 GPa with a Young’s modulus of 195 GPa. The adhesion of the films was evaluated according to their resistance to fracture when these were indented at different loads using Vickers microhardness. The wear test results showed a decrease in the friction coefficient with respect to the increase of thickness’ films, getting a minimum value of 0.08 with a thickness of 1 μm and which correspond with the maximum growing time.La técnica de Deposición por Chisporroteo Magnético (Magnetron Sputtering con el proceso DC, fue usado para la deposición de los recubrimientos de Ni-Cr sobre acero inoxidable AISI 316 como sustrato. El cátodo con una composición nominal Ni-22 at% Cr fue preparado por la técnica de Aleado Mecánico (AM, con un tiempo máximo de molienda de 16 horas y con un molino de alta energía tipo SPEX 8000. Las películas se realizaron bajo una atmósfera de argón a temperatura ambiente con una potencia de 100 W a diferentes tiempos de crecimiento. La composición qu

  3. Advances in primary lithium liquid cathode batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blomgren, George E.

    1989-05-01

    Recent work on cell development and various aspects of cell chemistry and cell development of lithium/thionyl chloride liquid cathode batteries is reviewed. As a result of safety studies, a number of cell sizes can now be considered satisfactory for many applications and the energy densities of these cells is higher than any other developed battery system. Primary batteries operate with low to moderate currents and the anode delay effect appears to be under reasonable control. Reserve cells are in the design stage and operate at high to very high power densities as well as very high energy densities. The nature of the anode film and the operation of the lithium anode has been studied with substantial success and understanding has grown accordingly. Also, studies of the structure of the electrolyte and the effects on the electrolyte of impurities and additives have led to improved understanding in this area as well. Work in progress on new electrolytes is reviewed. The state of the art of mathematical modeling is also discussed and it is expected that this work will continue to develop.

  4. Pulsed microhollow cathode discharge excimer sources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moselhy, Mohamed; Shi, Wenhui; Strak, Robert H.; Schoenbach, Karl H.

    2001-10-01

    Microhollow cathode discharges (MHCDs) are non-equilibrium, high-pressure gas discharges between perforated electrodes separated by a dielectric layer. Typical dimensions for the electrode foil thickness and hole diameter are 100 μm. Direct current experiments in xenon, argon, neon, helium, argon fluoride, and xenon chloride [1,2] have been performed. The excimer efficiency varies between 1 % and 9 %. Pulsed operation allowed us to increase the current from 8 mA (dc) to approximately 80 mA (pulsed with a pulse width of 700 μs), limited by the onset of instabilities. The total excimer power was found to increase linearly with current, however, the radiant emittance and efficiency stayed constant. Reducing the pulse duration into the nanosecond range allowed us to increase the current into the ampere range. The maximum measured excimer power was 2.75 W per microdischarge. The maximum radiant emittance was 15 W/cm^2 and the efficiency reached values of 20 %. This effect is assumed to be due to non-equilibrium electron heating in the high-pressure plasma [3]. This work was supported by the National Science Foundation under grant # CTS0078618. 1. Karl H. Schoenbach, Ahmed El-Habachi, Mohamed M. Moselhy, Wenhui Shi, and Robert H. Stark, Physics of Plasmas 7, 2186 (2000). 2. P. Kurunczi, J. Lopez, H. Shah, and K. Becker, Int. J. Mass Spectrom. 205, 277 (2001). 3. Robert H. Stark and Karl H. Schoenbach, J. Appl. Phys. 89, 3568 (2001).

  5. Pulsed photoelectric field emission from needle cathodes

    CERN Document Server

    Hernandez-Garcia, C

    2002-01-01

    Experiments have been carried out to measure the current emitted by tungsten needles with 1-mu m tip radius operated up to 50 kV. This corresponds to electric fields in the order of 10 sup 9 to 10 sup 1 sup 0 V/m. The needles were illuminated with 10-ns laser pulses at 532, 355 and 266 nm. The laser intensity was varied from 10 sup 1 sup 0 to 10 sup 1 sup 2 W/m sup 2 , limited by damage to the needle tip. The observed quantum efficiency depends on the wavelength and the electric field, approaching unity at the highest electric fields when illuminated at 266 nm. Peak currents up to 100 mA were observed in nanosecond pulses, corresponding to an estimated brightness of 10 sup 1 sup 6 A/m sup 2 sr. Since the current is controlled by the laser intensity, with only a weak voltage dependence, these cathodes can be used for infrared and ultraviolet tabletop free-electron lasers and other applications that demand short electron-beam pulses with high brightness.

  6. Nitrogen incorporation in sputter deposited molybdenum nitride thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stöber, Laura, E-mail: laura.stoeber@tuwien.ac.at; Patocka, Florian, E-mail: florian.patocka@tuwien.ac.at; Schneider, Michael, E-mail: michael.schneider@tuwien.ac.at; Schmid, Ulrich, E-mail: ulrich.e366.schmid@tuwien.ac.at [Institute of Sensor and Actuator Systems, TU Wien, Gußhausstraße 27-29, A-1040 Vienna (Austria); Konrath, Jens Peter, E-mail: jenspeter.konrath@infineon.com; Haberl, Verena, E-mail: verena.haberl@infineon.com [Infineon Technologies Austria AG, Siemensstraße 2, 9500 Villach (Austria)

    2016-03-15

    In this paper, the authors report on the high temperature performance of sputter deposited molybdenum (Mo) and molybdenum nitride (Mo{sub 2}N) thin films. Various argon and nitrogen gas compositions are applied for thin film synthetization, and the amount of nitrogen incorporation is determined by Auger measurements. Furthermore, effusion measurements identifying the binding conditions of the nitrogen in the thin film are performed up to 1000 °C. These results are in excellent agreement with film stress and scanning electron microscope analyses, both indicating stable film properties up to annealing temperatures of 500 °C.

  7. Pattern evolution during ion beam sputtering; reductionistic view

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J.-H.; Kim, J.-S.

    2016-09-01

    The development of the ripple pattern during the ion beam sputtering (IBS) is expounded via the evolution of its constituent ripples. For that purpose, we perform numerical simulation of the ripple evolution that is based on Bradley-Harper model and its non-linear extension. The ripples are found to evolve via various well-defined processes such as ripening, averaging, bifurcation and their combinations, depending on their neighboring ripples. Those information on the growth kinetics of each ripple allow the detailed description of the pattern development in real space that the instability argument and the diffraction study both made in k-space cannot provide.

  8. Nanofabrication by ion-beam sputtering fundamentals and applications

    CERN Document Server

    Som, Tapobrata

    2012-01-01

    Considerable attention has been paid to ion beam sputtering as an effective way to fabricate self-organized nano-patterns on various substrates. The significance of this method for patterning surfaces is that the technique is fast, simple, and less expensive. The possibility to create patterns on very large areas at once makes it even more attractive. This book reviews various fascinating results, understand the underlying physics of ion induced pattern formation, to highlight the potential applications of the patterned surfaces, and to explore the patterning behavior by different irradiation

  9. Deuterium Retention and Physical Sputtering of Low Activation Ferritic Steel

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    T. Hino; K. Yamaguchi; Y. Yamauchi; Y. Hirohata; K. Tsuzuki; Y.Kusama

    2005-01-01

    Low activation materials have to be developed toward fusion demonstration reactors. Ferritic steel, vanadium alloy and SiC/SiC composite are candidate materials of the first wall,vacuum vessel and blanket components, respectively. Although changes of mechanical-thermal properties owing to neutron irradiation have been investigated so far, there is little data for the plasma material interactions, such as fuel hydrogen retention and erosion. In the present study,deuterium retention and physical sputtering of low activation ferritic steel, F82H, were investigated by using deuterium ion irradiation apparatus.After a ferritic steel sample was irradiated by 1.7 kev D+ ions, the weight loss was measured to obtain the physical sputtering yield. The sputtering yield was 0.04, comparable to that of stainless steel. In order to obtain the retained amount of deuterium, technique of thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) was employed to the irradiated sample. The retained deuterium desorbed at temperature ranging from 450 K to 700 K, in the forms of DHO, D2, D2O and hydrocarbons. Hence, the deuterium retained can be reduced by baking with a relatively low temperature. The fluence dependence of retained amount of deuterium was measured by changing the ion fluence. In the ferritic steel without mechanical polish, the retained amount was large even when the fluence was low. In such a case, a large amount of deuterium was trapped in the surface oxide layer containing O and C. When the fluence was large, the thickness of surface oxide layer was reduced by the ion sputtering, and then the retained amount in the oxide layer decreased. In the case of a high fluence, the retained amount of deuterium became comparable to that of ferritic steel with mechanical polish or SS 316 L, and one order of magnitude smaller than that of graphite. When the ferritic steel is used, it is required to remove the surface oxide layer for reduction of fuel hydrogen retention.Ferritic steel sample was

  10. Characterization of high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hala, Matej

    Paper I: In the first paper, we present a new approach in the characterization of the high power pulsed magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) discharge evolution—time- and species-resolved plasma imaging—employing a set of band-pass optical interference filters suitable for the isolation of the emission originating from different species populating the plasma. We demonstrate that the introduction of such filters can be used to distinguish different phases of the discharge, and to visualize numerous plasma effects including background gas excitations during the discharge ignition, gas shock waves, and expansion of metal-rich plasmas. In particular, the application of this technique is shown on the diagnostics of the 200 µs long non-reactive HiPIMS discharges using a Cr target. Paper II: In order to gain further information about the dynamics of reactive HiPIMS discharges, both fast plasma imaging and time- and space-resolved optical emission spectroscopy (OES) are used for a systematic investigation of the 200 µs long HiPIMS pulses operated in Ar, N2 and N 2/Ar mixtures and at various pressures. It is observed that the dense metal plasma created next to the target propagates in the reactor at a speed ranging from 0.7 to 3.5 km s-1, depending on the working gas composition and the pressure. In fact, it increases with higher N 2 concentration and with lower pressure. The visible form of the propagating plasma wave changes from a hemispherical shape in Ar to a drop-like shape extending far from the target with increasing N2 concentration, owing to the significant emission from molecular N2. Interestingly, the evidence of the target self-sputtering is found for all investigated conditions, including pure N2 atmosphere. Paper III: Here, we report on the time- and species-resolved plasma imaging analysis of the dynamics of the 200 µs long HiPIMS discharges above a Cr target ignited in pure O2. It is shown that the discharge emission is dominated solely by neutral and

  11. Crystallization of amorphous Co-Nb-Zr sputtered films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battezzati, L.; Baricco, M.; Attina, P.

    1986-08-01

    Thermal analysis results obtained with some sputtered Co-Nb-Zr alloys are presented. Microstructural determinations at some stages of the crystallization process were made with transmission electron microscopy and the results given. Crystallization occurs over a wider temperature range than for binary Co/sub 90/Zr/sub 10/ ribbons. Binary Co-Nb films crystallize in the range 750-800K, some 10 degrees below ternary films. The presence of zirconium enhances the stability of the amorphous phase. An explanation of the results is given.

  12. Temporal variations of cathode performance in air-cathode single-chamber microbial fuel cells with different separators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Jinxing; Wang, Zhiwei; Suor, Denis; Liu, Shumeng; Li, Jiaqi; Wu, Zhichao

    2014-12-01

    An ideal separator is essential for efficient power production from air-cathode single-chamber microbial fuel cells (MFCs). In this study, we use different kinds of membranes as separators, including Nafion 117 proton exchange membrane, polyethersulfone and poly(vinylidene fluoride) microfiltration membranes. Temporal variations of cathode performance are monitored during the experiment. Results show that MFCs with microfiltration membranes present higher power output but deterioration is still observed after about 600-h operation. With the utilization of appropriate separators (e.g., polyethersulfone membrane), biofouling, cation fouling and chemical scale fouling of the cathodes are alleviated while reaction fouling seems inevitable. Moreover, it is found that Coulombic efficiency (CE) and energy efficiency (EE) are also related to the cathode performance. Despite relatively high oxygen diffusivity (1.49 × 10-5 cm2 s-1), CE and EE of the MFC with 0.1 μm pore-size polyethersulfone membrane can reach 92.8% and 13.7%, respectively, when its average power density registers 403.5 mW m-2. This phenomenon might be attributed to the finding that the overall substrate consumption rate due to oxygen reduction and respiration is almost constant in the air-cathode MFCs. Oxygen leakage into the electrolyte can be inhibited due to the efficient oxygen reduction reaction on the surface of the cathode.

  13. Intrinsic Photocatalytic Assessment of Reactively Sputtered TiO2 Films

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rafieian, Damon; Driessen, Rick T.; Ogieglo, Wojciech; Lammertink, Rob G.H.

    2015-01-01

    Thin TiO2 films were prepared by DC magnetron reactive sputtering at different oxygen partial pressures. Depending on the oxygen partial pressure during sputtering, a transition from metallic Ti to TiO2 was identified by spectroscopic ellipsometry. The crystalline nature of the film developed during

  14. Sputtering of thin and intermediately thick films of solid deuterium by keV electrons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svendsen, Winnie Edith; Thestrup Nielsen, Birgitte; Schou, Jørgen;

    1995-01-01

    Sputtering of films of solid deuterium by keV electrons was studied in a cryogenic set-up. The sputtering yield shows a minimum yield of about 4 D2/electron for 1.5 and 2 keV electrons at a thickness slightly larger than the average projected range of the electrons. We suggest that the yield around...

  15. Roles of secondary electrons and sputtered atoms in ion-beam-induced deposition

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, P.; Salemink, H.W.M.; Alkemade, P.F.A.

    2009-01-01

    The authors report the results of investigating two models for ion-beam-induced deposition (IBID). These models describe IBID in terms of the impact of secondary electrons and of sputtered atoms, respectively. The yields of deposition, sputtering, and secondary electron emission, as well as the ener

  16. Controlled formation of anatase and rutile TiO2 thin films by reactive magnetron sputtering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rafieian, Damon; Ogieglo, Wojciech; Savenije, Tom; Lammertink, Rob G.H.

    2015-01-01

    We discuss the formation of TiO2 thin films via DC reactive magnetron sputtering. The oxygen concentration during sputtering proved to be a crucial parameter with respect to the final film structure and properties. The initial deposition provided amorphous films that crystallise upon annealing to an

  17. Oxide cathode mechanisms: Electronic and structural features of oxide cathode surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, J.; Nunan, J.

    1985-01-01

    This report describes studies made upon systems selected for their ability to model various important features of oxide cathodes and the mechanisms which enable them to function as efficient thermionic emitters at moderate temperatures. An account is given of experiments which aimed to simulate conditions upon the surfaces of polycrystalline samples of alkaline earth oxides (e.g., SrO and BaO/SrO or MgO and BaO/MgO) at various stages of their preparation in similiar fashion to that used in the thermal activation of oxide cathodes. Accounts are given of experiments which examined the interaction between the gases O2, N2O, H2 or Ch4 and appropriately preactivated surface of pure and mixed alkaline earth oxide samples. Accounts are given of experiments involving the controlled deposition in UHV conditions of zero-valent Ba ad-atoms-in amounts ranging from submonolayer to multilayer coverage - upon layers of SrO or BaO previously prepared in UHV conditions by evaporation of the corresponding metal and its subsequent oxidation. UPS spectra have been undertaken in order to examine surfaces of samples prepared by evaporation of barium metal or strontium metal and to study effects upon the UPS spectra by exposures to the gases N20, O2 and CH4.

  18. Laser annealing of textured thin film cathode material for lithium ion batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohler, R.; Bruns, M.; Smyrek, P.; Ulrich, S.; Przybylski, M.; Pfleging, W.

    2010-02-01

    The material development for advanced lithium ion batteries plays an important role in future mobile applications and energy storage systems. It is assumed that electrode materials made of nano-composited materials will improve battery lifetime and will lead to an enhancement of lithium diffusion and thus improve battery capacity and cyclability. Lithium cobalt oxide (LiCoO2) is commonly used as a cathode material. Thin films of this electrode material were synthesized by non-reactive r.f. magnetron sputtering of LiCoO2 targets on silicon or stainless steel substrates. For the formation of the high temperature phase of LiCoO2 (HT-LiCoO2), which exhibits good electrochemical performance with a specific capacity of 140 mAh/g and high capacity retention, a subsequent annealing treatment is necessary. For this purpose laser annealing of thin film LiCoO2 was investigated in detail and compared to conventional furnace annealing. A high power diode laser system operating at a wavelength of 940 nm with an integrated pyrometer for temperature control was used. Different temperatures (between 200°C and 700°C) for the laser structured and unstructured thin films were applied. The effects of laser treatment on the LiCoO2 thin films studied with Raman spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction to determine their stoichiometry and crystallinity. The development of HT-LiCoO2 and also the formation of a Co3O4 phase were discussed. The electrochemical properties of the manufactured films were investigated via electrochemical cycling against a lithium anode.

  19. Electronic sputtering of solid O{sub 2} by keV Ne ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pedrys, Roman [Faculty of Physics, Astronomy and Applied Computer Science, Jagiellonian University, ul. Reymonta 4, 30-059 Krakow (Poland); Anders, Christian [Fachbereich Physik und Forschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Universität Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schrödinger-Straße, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany); Urbassek, Herbert M., E-mail: urbassek@rhrk.uni-kl.de [Fachbereich Physik und Forschungszentrum OPTIMAS, Universität Kaiserslautern, Erwin-Schrödinger-Straße, D-67663 Kaiserslautern (Germany)

    2015-07-01

    Sputtering of a solid oxygen target is studied both by experiment and by computer simulation. Experimental data of the translational energy distributions of sputtered O{sub 2} molecules are measured for 250 and 750 eV Ne impact; this process is also studied using molecular dynamics computer simulation. Translational energy distributions coincide well for high ejection energies; this proves that the collisional part of the sputtering process is well described by computer simulation. Deviations exist at the low-energy side, below around 0.3 eV; these are assigned to electronic excitations and exothermic chemical reactions that have not been included in the computer model. We show that the sputter contribution from electronic excitation is very similar to that found for 2–9 keV H{sub 2} and H{sub 3} impact and for electron impact at sub-keV energies. Our results thus allow us to separate collisional from electronic sputtering.

  20. Effect of sputtering pressure on some properties of chromium thin films obliquely deposited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besnard, A; Martin, N; Millot, C; Gavoille, J; Salut, R, E-mail: aurelien.besnard@ens2m.fr [Institut FEMTO-ST, UMR 6174 CNRS, Universite de Franche-Comte, ENSMM, UTBM, 32 avenue de l' observatoire, 25044 Besancon (France)

    2010-06-15

    Oriented columnar thin films provide a wide range of new properties linked to the large panel of available microstructures. The efficiency of the technique and thus the resulting structure, based on an incident flux of particles impinging on the substrate, depends on the distribution of the vapour source. The deposition pressure, which acts on the sputtered particles mean free path, is an important parameter, especially for sputtering processes. This study reports on the effect of different deposition pressures combined to a systematic change of the incidence angle of the sputtered particles, on the structural properties and electrical behaviours of obliquely sputtered chromium thin films. The results revealed higher performances and an enhanced control of the process at low sputtering pressure.

  1. Properties of Diamond-Like Carbon Films Synthesized by Dual-Target Unbalanced Magnetron Sputtering

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIU Cui; LI Guo-Qing; GOU Wei; MU Zong-Xin; ZHANG Cheng-Wu

    2004-01-01

    @@ Smooth, dense and uniform diamond-like carbon films (DLC films) for industrial applications have successfully been prepared by dual-target unbalanced magnetron sputtering and the DLC characteristics of the films are confirmed by Raman spectra. It is found that the sputtering current of target plays an important role in the DLC film deposition. Deposition rate of 3.5μm/h is obtained by using the sputtering current of 30 A. The friction coefficient of the films is 0.2-0.225 measured by using a pin-on-disc microtribometer. The structure of the films tends to have a growth of sp3 bonds content at high sputtering current. The compressive residual stress in the films increases with the increasing sputtering current of the target.

  2. Polyester fabric coated with Ag/ZnO composite film by magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Xiaohong; Xu, Wenzheng; Huang, Fenglin; Chen, Dongsheng; Wei, Qufu

    2016-12-01

    Ag/ZnO composite film was successfully deposited on polyester fabric by using direct current (DC) magnetron sputtering and radio frequency (RF) magnetron reaction sputtering techniques with pure silver (Ag) and zinc (Zn) targets. X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were used to examine the deposited film on the fabric. It was found that the zinc film coated on Ag film before RF reactive sputtering could protect the silver film from oxidation. Anti-ultraviolet property and antistatic property of the coated samples using different magnetron sputtering methods were also investigated. The experimental results showed that Ag film was oxidized into in Ag2O film in high vacuum oxygen environment. The deposition of Zn film on the surface of the fabric coated with Ag film before RF reactive sputtering, could successfully obtained Ag/ZnO composite film, and also generated structural color on the polyester fabric.

  3. Compression and strong rarefaction in high power impulse magnetron sputtering discharges

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Horwat, David; Anders, Andre

    2010-11-11

    Gas compression and strong rarefaction have been observed for high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HIPIMS) discharges using a copper target in argon. Time-resolved ion saturation currents of 35 probes were simultaneously recorded for HIPIMS discharges operating far above the self-sputtering runaway threshold. The argon background pressure was a parameter for the evaluation of the spatial and temporal development of the plasma density distribution. The data can be interpreted by a massive onset of the sputtering flux (sputter wind) that causes a transient densification of the gas, followed by rarefaction and the replacement of gas plasma by the metal plasma of sustained self-sputtering. The plasma density pulse follows closely the power pulse at low pressure. At high pressure, the relatively remote probes recorded a density peak only after the discharge pulse, indicative for slow, diffusive ion transport.

  4. Microstructure and properties of SiC-coated carbon fibers prepared by radio frequency magnetron sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Yong; Huang, Xiaozhong; Du, Zuojuan; Xiao, Jianrong; Zhou, Shan; Wei, Yongshan

    2016-04-01

    SiC-coated carbon fibers are prepared at room temperature with different radio-frequency magnetron sputtering powers. Results show that the coated carbon fibers have uniform, continuous, and flawless surfaces. The mean strengths of the coated carbon fibers with different sputtering powers are not influenced by other factors. Filament strength of SiC-coated carbon fibers increases by approximately 2% compared with that of uncoated carbon fibers at a sputtering power of coated fibers increase by 9.3% and 12% at sputtering powers of 250 and 300 W, respectively. However, the mean strength of the SiC-coated carbon fibers decreased by 8% at a sputtering power of 400 W.

  5. Mass Loss Due to Sputtering and Thermal Processes in Meteoroid Ablation

    CERN Document Server

    Rogers, L A; Hawkes, R L

    2005-01-01

    Conventional meteoroid theory assumes that the dominant mode of ablation is by evaporation following intense heating during atmospheric flight. In this paper we consider the question of whether sputtering may provide an alternative disintegration process of some importance.For meteoroids in the mass range from 10^-3 to 10^-13 kg and covering a meteor velocity range from 11 to 71 km/s, we numerically modeled both thermal ablation and sputtering ablation during atmospheric flight. We considered three meteoroid models believed to be representative of asteroidal (3300 kg m^-3 mass density), cometary (1000 kg m^-3) and porous cometary (300 kg m^-3) meteoroid structures. Atmospheric profiles which considered the molecular compositions at different heights were used in the sputtering calculations. We find that while in many cases (particularly at low velocities and for relatively large meteoroid masses) sputtering contributes only a small amount of mass loss during atmospheric flight, in some cases sputtering is ver...

  6. Preparation of iron cobaltite thin films by RF magnetron sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Trong, H. [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, Institut Carnot CIRIMAT, 118, Route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France); CNRS, Institut Carnot Cirimat, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Ho Chi Minh City University of Science, Vietnam National University Ho Chi Minh City, 227 Nguyen Van Cu Q 5, 750000 Ho Chi Minh City (Viet Nam); Bui, T.M.A. [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, Institut Carnot CIRIMAT, 118, Route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France); CNRS, Institut Carnot Cirimat, F-31062 Toulouse (France); University of Transport and Communications, Lang Thuong, Dong Da, Hanoi (Viet Nam); Presmanes, L., E-mail: presmane@chimie.ups-tlse.fr [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, Institut Carnot CIRIMAT, 118, Route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France); CNRS, Institut Carnot Cirimat, F-31062 Toulouse (France); Barnabé, A.; Pasquet, I.; Bonningue, C.; Tailhades, Ph. [Université de Toulouse, UPS, INPT, Institut Carnot CIRIMAT, 118, Route de Narbonne, F-31062 Toulouse cedex 9 (France); CNRS, Institut Carnot Cirimat, F-31062 Toulouse (France)

    2015-08-31

    Iron cobaltite thin films with spinel structure have been elaborated by radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering from a Co{sub 1.75}Fe{sub 1.25}O{sub 4} target. Influence of argon pressure on structure, microstructure and physical properties of films has been examined. Iron–cobalt oxide thin films essentially consist of one spinel phase when deposited at low pressure (0.5 and 1.0 Pa). At high pressure (2.0 Pa), the global stoichiometry of the film is changed which results in the precipitation of a mixed monoxide of cobalt and iron beside the spinel phase. This in-situ reduction due to an oxygen loss occurring mainly at high deposition pressure has been revealed by X-ray diffraction and Raman spectroscopy. Microstructural evolution of thin film with argon pressure has been shown by microscopic observations (AFM and SEM). The evolution of magnetic and electrical properties, versus argon pressure, has been also studied by SQUID and 4 point probe measurements. - Highlights: • Co{sub 1.75}Fe{sub 1.25}O{sub 4} phase is obtained at room temperature without any annealing. • This phase is a ferrimagnetic semiconductor with a coercive field of 32 kOe at 5 K. • Oxygen content of the thin film is related to the argon pressure during sputtering. • Monoxide phase grows into the film at high argon pressure. • Magnetic coupling effect reveals nanoscale impurities at low argon pressure.

  7. Reactive sputtering deposition of SiO2 thin films

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    IVAN RADOVIC

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available SiO2 layers were deposited in a UHV chamber by 1 keV Ar+ ion sputtering from a high purity silicon target, using different values of the oxygen partial pressure (5×10-6–2×10-4 mbar and of the ion beam current on the target (1.67–6.85 mA. The argon partial pressure during operation of the ion gun was 1×10-3 mbar. The substrate temperature was held at 550 °C and the films were deposited to a thickness of 12.5–150 nm, at a rate from 0.0018–0.035 nm s-1. Structural characterization of the deposited thin films was performed by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry (RBS analysis. Reactive sputtering was proved to be efficient for the deposition of silica at 550 °C, an oxygen partial pressure of 2×10-4 mbar (ion beam current on the target of 5 mA or, at a lower deposition rate, ion beam current of 1.67 mA and an oxygen partial pressure of 6×10-5 mbar. One aspect of these investigations was to study the consumption of oxygen from the gas cylinder, which was found to be lower for higher deposition rates.

  8. Electrochromic study on amorphous tungsten oxide films by sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Chuan, E-mail: cli10@yahoo.com [Department of Biomedical Engineering, National Yang Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli, Taoyuan 32001, Taiwan (China); Hsieh, J.H. [Department of Materials Engineering, Ming Chi University of Technology, Taishan, Taipei 24301, Taiwan (China); Hung, Ming-Tsung [Department of Mechanical Engineering, National Central University, Jhongli, Taoyuan 32001, Taiwan (China); Huang, B.Q. [Department of Biomedical Engineering, National Yang Ming University, Taipei 11221, Taiwan (China)

    2015-07-31

    Tungsten oxide films under different oxygen flow rates are deposited by DC sputtering. The voltage change at target and analyses for the deposited films by X-ray diffraction, scanning electronic microscope, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and ultraviolet–visible-near infrared spectroscopy consistently indicate that low oxygen flow rate (5 sccm) only creates metal-rich tungsten oxide films, while higher oxygen flow rate (10–20 sccm) assures the deposition of amorphous WO{sub 3} films. To explore the electrochromic function of deposited WO{sub 3} films, we use electrochemical tests to perform the insertion of lithium ions and electrons into films. The WO{sub 3} films switch between color and bleach states effectively by both potentiostat and cyclic voltammetry. Quantitative evaluation on electrochemical tests indicates that WO{sub 3} film with composition close to its stoichiometry is an optimal choice for electrochromic function. - Highlights: • Amorphous WO{sub 3} films are deposited by DC sputtering under different O{sub 2} flow rates. • Higher oxygen flow rate (> 10 sccm) assures the deposition of amorphous WO{sub 3} films. • Both potentiostat and cyclic voltammetry make WO{sub 3} films switch its color. • An optimal electrochromic WO{sub 3} is to make films close to its stoichiometry.

  9. In-situ sputtering of YBCO films for microwave applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballentine, P. H.; Kadin, A. M.; Mallory, D. S.

    1991-01-01

    RF magnetron sputtering from a single YBCO target onto a heated substrate (700 C) was used to obtain c-axis-oriented 1-2-3 films that are superconducting without a subsequent annealing or oxygenation step, with Tc(R = 0) as high as 88 K on MgO and LaAlO3 substrates. This process uses an 8-in-diameter target in the sputter-up configuration, with a central grounded shield to eliminate negative ion bombardment. It can reproducibly and uniformly cover substrates as large as 3-in across at rates exceeding 1 A/s. Maintaining film composition very close to stoichiometry is essential for obtaining films with good superconducting properties and surface morphology. Optimum films have critical currents of 1 MA/sq cm at 77 K. Measurements of microwave surface resistance based on a stripline resonator indicate low surface resistance for unpatterned YBCO ground planes, but excess loss and a strong power dependence in a patterned center strip.

  10. Protective infrared antireflection coating based on sputtered germanium carbide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibson, Des; Waddell, Ewan; Placido, Frank

    2011-09-01

    This paper describes optical, durablility and environmental performance of a germanium carbide based durable antireflection coating. The coating has been demonstrated on germanium and zinc selenide infra-red material however is applicable to other materials such as zinc sulphide. The material is deposited using a novel reactive closed field magnetron sputtering technique, offering significant advantages over conventional evaporation processes for germanium carbide such as plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition. The sputtering process is "cold", making it suitable for use on a wide range of substrates. Moreover, the drum format provide more efficient loading for high throughput production. The use of the closed field and unbalanced magnetrons creates a magnetic confinement that extends the electron mean free path leading to high ion current densities. The combination of high current densities with ion energies in the range ~30eV creates optimum thin film growth conditions. As a result the films are dense, spectrally stable, supersmooth and low stress. Films incorporate low hydrogen content resulting in minimal C-H absorption bands within critical infra-red passbands such as 3 to 5um and 8 to 12um. Tuning of germanium carbide (Ge(1-x)Cx) film refractive index from pure germanium (refractive index 4) to pure germanium carbide (refractive index 1.8) will be demonstrated. Use of film grading to achieve single and dual band anti-reflection performance will be shown. Environmental and durability levels are shown to be suitable for use in harsh external environments.

  11. Reactively sputtered titanium carbide thin films: Preparation and properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eizenberg, M.; Murarka, S. P.

    1983-06-01

    The low resistivity and refractory nature of titanium carbide makes it potentially useful as a diffusion barrier in thin film metallization schemes. In the present investigation, deposition and properties of thin titanium carbide films have been investigated. The films were deposited by reactive radio frequency sputtering in methane-argon mixtures on a variety of substrates. The effects of methane to argon ratio, total sputtering pressure, and power on the film deposition rate, composition and properties were determined. There were interactive effects of these parameters on the composition and properties of these films. Resistivity increased with carbon content; for Ti/C≥1 it was ˜200 μΩ cm. Stress that was compressive was maximum in the nearly stoichiometric TiC film. Grain size was small in all films, especially so in carbon rich films. All stoichiometric titanium carbide films were resistant to HF solutions. Films with TiC/≥1 dissolved easily in ethylene dinitrilo tetra acetric acid (EDTA) solution.

  12. Dielectric breakdown during Cs+ sputtering of polyvinyl chloride

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahoud, F.; Guillot, J.; Audinot, J. N.; Bertrand, P.; Delcorte, A.; Migeon, H. N.

    2014-02-01

    Thin films of insulating polymers are sometimes analyzed by secondary ion mass spectrometry (SIMS) or by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) without the use of an electron gun. In this work, both SIMS and XPS have been used to study the chemical and structural modifications due to the charge effect during Cs+ sputtering of a thin film of polyvinyl chloride (PVC). The kinetic energy distribution study shows that at a small primary fluence ˜1015 Cs+ ions/cm2, the dielectric breakdown voltage of the PVC film is reached, i.e. the minimum voltage that causes a portion of an insulator to become electrically conductive. XPS study indicates that the conducting phase created in the PVC film after energetic Cs+ bombardment consists of graphitized carbon and metallic cesium clusters. After the dielectric breakdown of the film, the positive charge, previously accumulated on the surface, is neutralized through the conductive regions, which are created in the insulating film. During Cs+ sputtering of a PVC film, the chemical structure of the analyzed surface is completely modified and some ionic bonds such as CsC and CsCl are also created.

  13. Progress in amorphous silicon solar cells produced by reactive sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustakas, T. D.

    The photovoltaic properties of reactively sputtered amorphous silicon are reviewed and it is shown that efficient PIN solar cells can be fabricated by the method of sputtering. The photovoltaic properties of the intrinsic films correlate with their structural and compositional inhomogeneities. Hydrogen incorporation and small levels of phosphorus and boron impurities also affect the photovoltaic properties through reduction of residual dangling bond related defects and modification of their occupation. The optical and transport properties of the doped P and N-films were found to depend sensitively on the amount of hydrogen and boron or phosphorus incorporation into the films as well as on their degree of crystallinity. Combination of the best intrinsic and doped films leads to PIN solar cell structures generating J(sc) of 13 mA/sq cm and V(oc) of between 0.85 to 0.95 volts. The efficiency of these devices, 5 to 6 percent, is limited by the low FF, typically about 50 percent. As a further test to the potential of this technology efficient tandem solar cell structures were fabricated, and device design concepts, such as the incorporation of optically reflective back contacts were tested.

  14. Impacting flux and associated sputtering effects at Mars

    Science.gov (United States)

    Modolo, R.; Chaufray, J.-Y.; Leblanc, F.; Chanteur, G.

    The sputtering of the atmosphere of Mars by incident solar wind ions and pick-up ions is studied using 3-D hybrid model coupled to a 3-D Monte Carlo model. The 3-D hybrid code describes the martian magnetosphere formed from the interaction of the solar wind with Mars by considering H+ and He2+ solar wind and O+, H+ and O2+ planetary ions. All the relevant processes of formation of the planetary ions from the neutral martian exosphere, by interaction with the solar wind and from the ionosphere are considered in particular with respect to solar activity. Such approach provides for the first time a complete 3-D spatial distribution, intensity, energy distribution and composition of the impacting flux into the martian atmosphere. We used these computed flux as input for a 3-D Monte Carlo model which describes the sputtering effect of the impacting particle on the martian atmosphere (Leblanc and Johnson, Plan. Space Sci., 2000). The incident flux produces a significant loss of atmosphere but also an enhanced neutral population in the martian corona. This approach allows to propose a whole image of the coronal 3-D structure. Such result will be later used as an input for the 3-D hybrid code. Results of this coupled approach will be discussed in the frame of the previous results on that subject. We will also discuss potential feedback mechanisms as suggested earlier by Johnson and Luhmann (J. Geophys. Res., 1998).

  15. Comparison of the structural properties and residual stress of AlN films deposited by dc magnetron sputtering and high power impulse magnetron sputtering at different working pressures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ait Aissa, K.; Achour, A., E-mail: a_aminph@yahoo.fr; Camus, J.; Le Brizoual, L.; Jouan, P.-Y.; Djouadi, M.-A.

    2014-01-01

    Aluminium nitride (AlN) films were deposited by dc magnetron sputtering (dcMS) and high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiPIMS) on (100) oriented silicon (Si) substrates, in Ar–N{sub 2} gas mixture, at different working pressures. The films were characterized using X-ray diffraction (XRD), profilometer and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). The effect of the sputtering pressure on the structure, the residual stress and the deposition rate of AlN films deposited by the two processes (dcMS and HiPIMS) was investigated. It was found that the deposition rate is always lower in HiPIMS compared to dcMS. The AlN films are textured along (002) direction in both cases of dcMS and HiPIMS as it is indicated by XRD measurements, with residual stresses which are more important in the case of films deposited by HiMIPS. These residual stresses decrease with the sputtering pressure increase, especially in the case of the films deposited by HiPIMS. TEM analyses have shown a local epitaxial growth of AlN on the Si substrate which would favour thermal evacuation improvement of AlN as thermal interface material. - Highlights: • Highly c-axis oriented AlN films were obtained. • dc magnetron sputtering and high power impulse magnetron sputtering (HiMIPS) were used. • Abrupt interface between AlN and silicon substrate was obtained by HiPIMS.

  16. Microstructure and Electrical Properties of Antimony Telluride Thin Films Deposited by RF Magnetron Sputtering on Flexible Substrate Using Different Sputtering Pressures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khumtong, T.; Sukwisute, P.; Sakulkalavek, A.; Sakdanuphab, R.

    2017-02-01

    The microstructural, electrical, and thermoelectric properties of antimony telluride (Sb2Te3) thin films have been investigated for thermoelectric applications. Sb2Te3 thin films were deposited on flexible substrate (polyimide) by radiofrequency (RF) magnetron sputtering from a Sb2Te3 target using different sputtering pressures in the range from 4 × 10-3 mbar to 1.2 × 10-2 mbar. The crystal structure, [Sb]:[Te] ratio, and electrical and thermoelectric properties of the films were analyzed by grazing-incidence x-ray diffraction (XRD) analysis, energy-dispersive x-ray spectroscopy (EDS), and Hall effect and Seebeck measurements, respectively. The XRD spectra of the films demonstrated polycrystalline structure with preferred orientation of (015), (110), and (1010). A high-intensity spectrum was found for the film deposited at lower sputtering pressure. EDS analysis of the films revealed the effects of the sputtering pressure on the [Sb]:[Te] atomic ratio, with nearly stoichiometric films being obtained at higher sputtering pressure. The stoichiometric Sb2Te3 films showed p-type characteristics with electrical conductivity, carrier concentration, and mobility of 35.7 S cm-1, 6.38 × 1019 cm-3, and 3.67 cm2 V-1 s-1, respectively. The maximum power factor of 1.07 × 10-4 W m-1 K-2 was achieved for the film deposited at sputtering pressure of 1.0 × 10-2 mbar.

  17. Exploring the benefits of depositing hard TiN thin films by non-reactive magnetron sputtering

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Martinez-Martinez, D.; Lopez-Cartes, C.; Fernandez, A.; Sanchez-Lopez, J. C.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to compare the mechanical and tribological properties of TiN coatings prepared in a conventional magnetron sputtering chamber according to two different routes: the usual reactive sputtering of a Ti target in an Ar/N-2 atmosphere vs. the comparatively more simple sputtering

  18. Chemical sputtering of graphite by low temperature nitrogen plasmas at various substrate temperatures and ion flux densities

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bystrov, K.; Morgan, T. W.; Tanyeli, I.; De Temmerman, G.; M. C. M. van de Sanden,

    2013-01-01

    We report measurements of chemical sputtering yields of graphite exposed to low temperature nitrogen plasmas. The influence of surface temperature and incoming ion energy on the sputtering yields has been investigated in two distinct ion flux density regimes. Sputtering yields grow consistently with

  19. Chromium poisoning of LSM/YSZ and LSCF/CGO composite cathodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzen, Janet Jonna; Høgh, Jens Valdemar Thorvald; Barfod, Rasmus;

    2009-01-01

    An electrochemical study of SOFC cathode degradation, due to poisoning by chromium oxide vapours, was performed applying 3-electrode set-ups. The cathode materials comprised LSM/YSZ and LSCF/CGO composites, whereas the electrolyte material was 8YSZ. The degradation of the cathode performance...... from 300 to 2,970 h. Both LSM/YSZ and LSCF/CGO cathodes were sensitive to chromium poisoning; LSCF/CGO cathodes to a lesser extent than LSM/YSZ. Humid air aggravated the degradation of the cathode performance. Post-mortem electron microscopic investigations revealed several Cr-containing compounds...

  20. Electron and ion kinetics in a micro hollow cathode discharge

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, G J; Iza, F; Lee, J K [Electronics and Electrical Engineering Department, Pohang University of Science and Technology, Pohang, 790-784 (Korea, Republic of)

    2006-10-21

    Electron and ion kinetics in a micro hollow cathode discharge are investigated by means of two-dimensional axisymmetric particle-in-cell Monte Carlo collision simulations. Argon discharges at 10 and 300 Torr are studied for various driving currents. Electron and ion energy probability functions (IEPF) are shown at various times and locations to study the spatio-temporal behaviour of the discharge. The electron energy probability function (EEPF) evolves from the Druyvesteyn type in the early stages of the discharge into a two (or three) temperature distribution when steady state is reached. In steady state, secondary electrons accelerated across the cathode fall populate the high energy tail of the EEPF while the low energy region is populated by trapped electrons. The IEPF evolves from a Maxwellian in the negative glow (bulk) to a two temperature distribution on the cathode surface. The overpopulation of low energy ions near the cathode surface is attributed to a larger collision cross section for low energy ions and ionization within the cathode fall.

  1. The design of cathode for organic photovoltaic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, De; Shi, Feng; Xia, Xuan; Li, Ye; Duanmu, Qingduo

    2016-11-01

    We have discussed the effect of the residual gas in the Al metal cathode deposition process and consequently influence the performance of organic photovoltaic devices (such as organic photoelectron detector or solar cell). We believe that the origin of degradation in Jsc and FF from the Al cathode device should be the formation of AlOx in the C60-Al interface, which contaminate the interface and plays a role like an energy barrier that block the charge collect process. To solve this problem the Ag and Alq3 layer had been inserted before the Al. Owing to the advantageous of Alq3 and Ag layer, the device which Al cathode prepared at a lower vacuum condition exhibits a comparable performance to that device which Al cathode deposited in regular situation. As an additional benefit, since the introducing of Alq3/Ag layer in the VOPc/C60 organic photovoltaic device performs a better near-infrared response, this phenomenon has been confirmed by means of both simulation and experimental data. So the design of our new cathode structure provides a degree of freedom to modulate the light absorption for organic photovoltaic devices in short-wave and long-wave.

  2. Blacking FTO by strongly cathodic polarization with enhanced photocurrent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, Yun; Lu, Xiaoqing; Huang, Wei, E-mail: hjhw9513@163.com; Li, Zelin, E-mail: lizelin@hunnu.edu.cn

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Transparent FTO became blackish under strongly cathodic polarization. • Part of SnO{sub 2} coating on the FTO can be reduced into Sn nanoparticles. • The black FTO increased solar absorption and enhanced photocurrent responses. • Take care in photoelectrochemistry test while FTO is strongly cathodically polarized. - Abstract: Transparent fluorine-doped tin oxide (TFTO) coating on quartz glass is widely used as substrate in photoelectrochemistry for solar energy transformation, sensing and so on. We observed that the TFTO could become blackish by strongly cathodic polarization. Characterization of the black FTO (BFTO) by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray diffraction, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy revealed that part of SnO{sub 2} on the TFTO was reduced into metal Sn nanoparticles during the cathodic polarization. The BFTO greatly increased solar absorption and enhanced photocurrent responses in comparison with TFTO. It might be necessary to take caution in photoelectrochemical measurements while the FTO is strongly cathodically polarized.

  3. High Performance Fe-Co Based SOFC Cathodes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kammer Hansen, Kent; Hansen, Karin Vels; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2010-01-01

    With the aim of reducing the temperature of the solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC), a new high-performance perovskite cathode has been developed. An area-specific resistance (ASR) as low as 0.12 Ωcm2 at 600 °C was measured by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) on symmetrical cells. The cathode...... is a composite between (Gd0.6Sr0.4)0.99Fe0.8Co0.2O3-δ (GSFC) and Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 (CGO10). Examination of the microstructure of the cathodes by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed a possibility of further optimisation of the microstructure in order to increase the performance of the cathodes. It also...... seems that an adjustment of the sintering temperature will make a lowering of the ASR value possible. The cathodes were compatible with ceria-based electrolytes but reacted to some extent with zirconia-based electrolytes depending on the sintering temperature....

  4. Trajectory control strategy of cathodes in blisk electrochemical machining

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhu Dong; Zhu Di; Xu Zhengyang; Zhou Laishui

    2013-01-01

    A turbine blisk,which combines blades and a disk together,is one of the most important components of an aero engine.In the process of blisk electrochemical machining (ECM),the sheet cathode,which is usually used as a tool electrode,has a complicated structure.In addition to that,the channel between the adjacent blades is narrow and twisted,so interference is apt to happen when the sheet cathode feeds into the channel.Therefore,it is important to choose suitable trajectory control strategy.In this paper,a new trajectory control strategy of the sheet cathode is presented and corresponding simulation analysis is conducted on the basis of an actual blisk model.The simulation results demonstrate that the sheet cathode can feed into the channel by a spatial line trajectory without interference.Moreover,the verification experiments are carried out according to the simulation.The experimental results show that the cathode can move into the channel without interference.It is verified that the new trajectory control strategy is correct and can be used in the blisk ECM process successfully.

  5. High-performance lanthanum-ferrite-based cathode for SOFC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, W.G.; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2005-01-01

    (La0.6Sr0.4)(1-x)Co0.2Fe0.8O3/Ce0.9Gd0.1O3 (LSCF/CGO) composite cathodes were investigated for SOFC application at intermediate temperature, i.e., 500-700 degreesC. The LSCF/CGO cathodes have been studied on three types of tape-casted electrolyte substrates including CGO electrolyte, Yttrium......C were obtained using LSCF/CGO cathode on CGO electrolyte. On the YSZ electrolyte with thin layer CGO coating, R-p of 0.6 Omega cm(2) at 600 degreesC and 0.12 Omega cm(2) at 700 degreesC were obtained. On the YSZ electrolyte directly, R-p of 1.0 Omega cm(2) at 600 degreesC and 0.13 Omega cm(2) at 700...... degreesC were achieved. These results are roughly six times better than our typical LSM cathodes. Slightly higher R-s was observed in the samples with LSCF/CGO cathode on the YSZ electrolyte with CGO coating due to extra contribution from the thin CGO layer and the CGO/YSZ interface. For the samples...

  6. The use of ultrasound to reduce cathodic incrustation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lima, J F; Vilar, E O

    2014-05-01

    Alternative technologies used to treat effluents from the petroleum industry have advanced in recent decades through the development of new physicochemical processes. Electrochemical processes such as electroflotation stand out among these advances. However, one problem remains unsolved-cathodic incrustation. This problem can increase the energy cost to maintain and operate the necessary equipment. The aim of this study is to minimize the incrustation in electrochemical cells used for the electroflotation of saline water produced by the oil industry via ultrasonic transducers operating at a frequency of 24 kHz. The optimal operating cycle of these transducers was found to occur during the electrochemical production of H2. The transducer efficiency in reducing cathodic incrustation was evaluated using the combined mass transfer coefficient (kd(g)‾). The reduction of cathodic incrustation was evaluated using the water hardness and incrustation indices from a synthetic solution with a composition similar to seawater. Finally we analyzed the morphology of the cathodic incrustation and identified its elements using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and EDS, respectively. One can conclude that the use of these devices can significantly reduce the cathodic incrustation. Enhanced performance can be achieved with improvements in the quality of the materials used, their geometry and the assembly design of the transducers.

  7. 50 Hz electron emission from PZT ferro-electric cathodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flechtner, D.; Golkowski, C.; Ivers, J.D.; Kerslick, G.S.; Nation, J.A.; Schachter, L. [Cornell Univ., Ithaca, NY (United States)

    1997-12-31

    Ferro-electric cathodes may offer a source of high current density electron beams for applications where the use of conventional field emitters is limited by repetition rate and lifetime. In a ferro-electric cathode, electrons are emitted when the spontaneous polarization is rapidly changed by a pulsed electric field applied across the ferroelectric. When no additional voltage is applied to a planar diode gap, emission current densities are on the order of 1 A/cm{sup 2}. When an additional field is applied to the gap, the authors have measured current densities up to 100 A/cm{sup 2}. In a new configuration that permits beam extraction into a drift tube, the cathode is pulsed 10--20kV negative and electron current densities of {approximately}20 A/cm{sup 2} at repetition rates up to {approximately}50 Hz (power supply limited) have been measured. The one inch diameter ferro-electric cathode is located in the fringing region of a 1.5 kG solenoid magnetic field {approximately}2.8 cm from the entrance of a grounded drift tube. A Faraday cup is located several centimeters inside the drift tube and measurements show that repeatable beam current can be extracted from the ferroelectric cathode in this geometry.

  8. Microscale Gradients of Oxygen, Hydrogen Peroxide, and pH in Freshwater Cathodic Biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babauta, Jerome T.; Nguyen, Hung Duc; Istanbullu, Ozlem

    2014-01-01

    Cathodic reactions in biofilms employed in sediment microbial fuel cells is generally studied in the bulk phase. However, the cathodic biofilms affected by these reactions exist in microscale conditions in the biofilm and near the electrode surface that differ from the bulk phase. Understanding these microscale conditions and relating them to cathodic biofilm performance is critical for better-performing cathodes. The goal of this research was to quantify the variation in oxygen, hydrogen peroxide, and the pH value near polarized surfaces in river water to simulate cathodic biofilms. We used laboratory river-water biofilms and pure culture biofilms of Leptothrix discophora SP-6 as two types of cathodic biofilms. Microelectrodes were used to quantify oxygen concentration, hydrogen peroxide concentration, and the pH value near the cathodes. We observed the correlation between cathodic current generation, oxygen consumption, and hydrogen peroxide accumulation. We found that the 2e− pathway for oxygen reduction is the dominant pathway as opposed to the previously accepted 4e− pathway quantified from bulk-phase data. Biofouling of initially non-polarized cathodes by oxygen scavengers reduced cathode performance. Continuously polarized cathodes could sustain a higher cathodic current longer despite contamination. The surface pH reached a value of 8.8 when a current of only −30 μA was passed through a polarized cathode, demonstrating that the pH value could also contribute to preventing biofouling. Over time, oxygen-producing cathodic biofilms (Leptothrix discophora SP-6) colonized on polarized cathodes, which decreased the overpotential for oxygen reduction and resulted in a large cathodic current attributed to manganese reduction. However, the cathodic current was not sustainable. PMID:23766295

  9. GAS FLOW CONTROL SYSTEM IN REACTIVE MAGNETRON SPUTTERING TECHNOLOGY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. M. Klimovich

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available  It is known that the discharge parameters and the chemical composition of the particles flux impinging onto the substrate during a reactive magnetron sputtering are unstable. As a result spontaneous transitions between the «metal» mode of the target surface and the «poisoned» mode of the target surface have been observed. This leads to nonrepeatability of the coating compositions from process to process. The aim of this work is to design a gas flow control system for reactive sputtering processes. The control system allows to maintain a steady nonequilibrium state of the magnetron discharge in transition mode where the chemical state of the target surface is unstable. The intensities of spectral lines of the discharge spectrum are proposed as control parameters. Photodiode detectors were used for registration of intensities of spectral lines. A gas flow control system regulates argon and reactive gas flow automatically, using feedback signals from photodiode detectors on the intensities of the spectral lines, vacuum gauge, ion current sensor, sensors of discharge current and voltage. As an example, the process of reactive magnetron Ti-Al-N deposition is considered. The following discharge parameters are controlled during sputtering a composite target based on Ti with Al cylindrical inserts: current, voltage, total pressure of a gas mixture, substrate temperature, bias voltage and current of the substrate. Nitrogen flow was controlled by the spectral line intensity of titanium TiI 506,5 nm. The value of the line intensity is connected with the value of reactivity. Elemental composition and structure of the Ti-Al-N coatings were studied using Rutherford backscattering spectroscopy, scanning electron microscopy and X-ray diffraction. It was found, that stoichiometric Ti-Al-N coatings have a globular structure, enhanced hardness and low friction coefficient in contrast to Ti-Al-N coatings with nonstoichiometric composition, which have a

  10. A Transient Model for Fuel Cell Cathode-Water Propagation Behavior inside a Cathode after a Step Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Der-Sheng Chan

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Most of the voltage losses of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFC are due to the sluggish kinetics of oxygen reduction on the cathode and the low oxygen diffusion rate inside the flooded cathode. To simulate the transient flooding in the cathode of a PEMFC, a transient model was developed. This model includes the material conservation of oxygen, vapor, water inside the gas diffusion layer (GDL and micro-porous layer (MPL, and the electrode kinetics in the cathode catalyst layer (CL. The variation of hydrophobicity of each layer generated a wicking effect that moves water from one layer to the other. Since the GDL, MPL, and CL are made of composite materials with different hydrophilic and hydrophobic properties, a linear function of saturation was used to calculate the wetting contact angle of these composite materials. The balance among capillary force, gas/liquid pressure, and velocity of water in each layer was considered. Therefore, the dynamic behavior of PEMFC, with saturation transportation taken into account, was obtained in this study. A step change of the cell voltage was used to illustrate the transient phenomena of output current, water movement, and diffusion of oxygen and water vapor across the entire cathode.

  11. Ultra short electron beam bunches from a laser plasma cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maekawa, Akira [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan)]. E-mail: maekawa@nuclear.jp; Tsujii, Ryosuke [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Kinoshita, Kennichi [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Atsushi, Yamazaki [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Kobayashi, Kazuyuki [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Uesaka, Mitsuru [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Shibata, Yukio [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Kondo, Yasuhiro [Nuclear Professional School, University of Tokyo, 2-22 Shirakata-Shirane, Tokai, Naka, Ibaraki 319-1188 (Japan); Ohkubo, Takeru [Takasaki Advanced Radiation Research Institute, Japan Atomic Energy Agency, 1233 Watanuki-machi, Takasaki, Gunma (Japan); Hosokai, Tomonao [Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo (Japan); Zhidkov, Alexei [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry, 2-6-1 Nagasaka, Yokosuka, Kanagawa (Japan); Takahashi, Toshiharu [Kyoto University Research Reactor Institute, Asahiro-nishi2, Kumatori, Sennan, Osaka (Japan)

    2007-08-15

    The fluctuation of the electron bunch duration due to energy spectrum instability in a laser plasma cathode has been examined. Previous experiments clearly proved that a laser plasma cathode can generate ultrashort electron bunches with a bunch duration of 130 fs (FWHM) and a geometrical emittance 0.07{pi} mm mrad. The effect of temporal elongation of electron bunches due to their energy spread is estimated and the results are in good agreement with previous experiments. It is also clarified that the instability of the energy spectrum not only leads to a fluctuation of the bunch shape but also to a time-of-flight jitter, affecting possible future applications of a laser plasma cathode.

  12. LSM-YSZ Cathodes with Reaction-Infiltrated Nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Chun; Sholklapper, Tal Z.; Jacobson, Craig P.; Visco, StevenJ.; De Jonghe, Lutgard C.

    2006-01-31

    To improve the LSM-YSZ cathode performance of intermediate temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs), Sm0.6Sr0.4CoO3-sigma (SSC) perovskite nanoparticles are incorporated into the cathodes by a reaction-infiltration process. The SSC particles are {approx}20 to 80nm in diameter, and intimately adhere to the pore walls of the preformed LSM-YSZ cathodes. The SSC particles dramatically enhance single-cell performance with a 97 percent H2+3 percent H2O fuel, between 600 C and 800 C. Consideration of a simplified TPB (triple phase boundary) reaction geometry indicates that the enhancement may be attributed to the high electrocatalytic activity of SSC for electrochemical reduction of oxygen in a region that can be located a small distance away from the strict triple phase boundaries. The implication of this work for developing high-performance electrodes is also discussed.

  13. The base metal of the oxide-coated cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Poret, F. [Thomson, S.B.U. Displays, Electron Optics Laboratory, Avenue du General de Gaulle, 21110 Genlis (France)]. E-mail: fabian.poret@thomson.net; Roquais, J.M. [Thomson, S.B.U. Displays, Electron Optics Laboratory, Avenue du General de Gaulle, 21110 Genlis (France)

    2005-09-15

    The oxide-coated cathode has been the most widely used electron emitter in vacuum electronic devices. From one manufacturing company to another the emissive oxide is either a double-Ba, Sr-or a triple-Ba, Sr, Ca-oxide, having always the same respective compositions. Conversely, the base metal composition is very often proprietary because of its importance in the cathode emission performances. The present paper aims at explaining the operation of the base metal through a review. After a brief introduction, the notion of activator is detailed along with their diffusivities and their associated interfacial compounds. Then, the different cathode life models are described prior to few comments on the composition choice of a base metal. Finally, the specificities of the RCA/Thomson 'bimetal' base metal are presented with a discussion on the optimized composition choice illustrated by a long-term life-test of five different melts.

  14. Wettable Ceramic-Based Drained Cathode Technology for Aluminum Electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J.N. Bruggeman; T.R. Alcorn; R. Jeltsch; T. Mroz

    2003-01-09

    The goal of the project was to develop the ceramic based materials, technology, and necessary engineering packages to retrofit existing aluminum reduction cells in order to reduce energy consumption required for making primary aluminum. The ceramic materials would be used in a drained cathode configuration which would provide a stable, molten aluminum wetted cathode surface, allowing the reduction of the anode-cathode distance, thereby reducing the energy consumption. This multi-tasked project was divided into three major tasks: (1) Manufacturing and laboratory scale testing/evaluation of the ceramic materials, (2) Pilot scale testing of qualified compositions from the first task, and (3) Designing, retrofitting, and testing the ceramic materials in industrial cells at Kaiser Mead plant in Spokane, Washington. Specific description of these major tasks can be found in Appendix A - Project Scope. Due to the power situation in the northwest, the Mead facility was closed, thus preventing the industrial cell testing.

  15. Kinetics of Zn cathodic deposition in alkaline zincate solution

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PENG Wen-jie; WANG Yun-yan

    2006-01-01

    Kinetic parameters of the electrode reactions were measured by investigating steady-state current-potential behaviors. The Tafel slopes of cathodic and anodic processes are -0.113 8 V and -0.041 18 V, the anodic and cathodic apparent transfer coefficients are 0.519 3 and 1.435 2, respectively, and the stoichiometric number of rate-determining step is 1. The theoretical kinetics equation of electrode reaction was deduced, from which the dynamic parameters can be calculated as follows: the cathodic and anodic Tafel slopes are -0.118 V and -0.039 4 V, respectively, consisting with the experimental values. Finally, the correctness of the mechanism was further demonstrated using apparent transfer coefficient according to the electrochemical dynamic equation of multi-electron reaction.

  16. Note: Improved heater design for high-temperature hollow cathodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDonald, M. S.; Gallimore, A. D.; Goebel, D. M.

    2017-02-01

    We present an improved heater design for thermionic cathodes using a rhenium filament encased in a boron nitride ceramic sleeve. This heater is relatively simple to fabricate, yet has been successfully used to reliably and repeatably light a lanthanum hexaboride (LaB6) hollow cathode based on a previously published design without noticeable filament degradation over hundreds of hours of operation. The high decomposition temperature of boron nitride (2800 C for inert environments) and melting point for rhenium (3180 C) make this heater especially attractive for use with LaB6, which may require operating temperatures upwards of 1700 C. While boron nitride decomposes in air above 1000 C, the heater was used only at vacuum with an inert gas discharge, and no degradation was observed. Limitations of current state of the art cathode heaters are also discussed and compared with the rhenium-boron nitride combination.

  17. Cathodic catalysts in bioelectrochemical systems for energy recovery from wastewater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xian-Wei; Li, Wen-Wei; Yu, Han-Qing

    2014-11-21

    Bioelectrochemical systems (BESs), in which microorganisms are utilized as a self-regenerable catalyst at the anode of an electrochemical cell to directly extract electrical energy from organic matter, have been widely recognized as a promising technology for energy-efficient wastewater treatment or even for net energy generation. However, currently BES performance is constrained by poor cathode reaction kinetics. Thus, there is a strong impetus to improve the cathodic catalysis performance through proper selection and design of catalysts. This review introduces the fundamentals and current development status of various cathodic catalysts (including electrocatalysts, photoelectrocatalysts and bioelectrocatalysts) in BES, identifies their limitations and influential factors, compares their catalytic performances in terms of catalytic efficiency, stability, selectivity, etc., and discusses the possible optimization strategies and future research directions. Special focus is given on the analysis of how the catalytic performance of different catalysts can be improved by fine tuning their physicochemical or physiological properties.

  18. The correlation between the radial distribution of high-energetic ions and the structural as well as electrical properties of magnetron sputtered ZnO:Al films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bikowski, André; Welzel, Thomas; Ellmer, Klaus [Helmholtz-Zentrum Berlin für Materialien und Energie GmbH, Institute for Solar Fuels, Hahn-Meitner-Platz 1, D-14109 Berlin (Germany)

    2013-12-14

    The origin of the pronounced radial distributions of structural and electrical properties of magnetron sputtered ZnO:Al films has been investigated. The film properties were correlated with the radially resolved ion-distribution functions. While the positive ions exhibit low energies and a radial distribution with a maximum intensity opposite the center of the target, the negative ions can have energies up to several hundred eV, depending on the target potential, with a radial distribution with two maxima opposite the erosion tracks. The most prominent positive ion is that of the working gas (Ar{sup +}), while the highest flux of the negative ions is measured for negative oxygen O{sup −}. The radial distribution of the flux of the high-energetic negative ions can clearly be related to the radial variations of the structural (c-axis lattice parameter, crystallite size) and electronic (resistivity) properties for sputtering from the planar target, which points to the decisive role of the high-energetic negative oxygen ions for the film quality. The relation between the negative ion bombardment and the structural as well as electronic properties can be explained by a qualitative model recently developed by us. The same target has also been investigated in the eroded state. In this case, the limited acceptance angle of the mass spectrometer leads to a misinterpretation of the radial distribution of the flux of the high-energetic negative ions. This effect can be explained by a simulation, based on the assumption that the high-energetic negative ions are mainly accelerated in the cathode (target) sheath perpendicular to the uneven substrate surface.

  19. The mechanism of growth of ZnO nanorods by reactive sputtering

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandi, R.; Major, S. S.

    2017-03-01

    DC reactive magnetron sputtering of zinc target in argon-oxygen sputtering atmosphere has been used to grow ZnO thin films/nanorods on Si in a wide substrate temperature range of 300-750 °C and under different sputtering conditions, namely, DC power, sputtering pressure and oxygen percentage in the sputtering atmosphere. Powder X-ray diffraction, Raman spectroscopy and a combination of top-down and cross-sectional scanning electron microscopy studies of ZnO films and nanorods grown under different conditions, have shown that substrate temperature critically controls their growth behavior and morphology, eventually resulting in the growth of vertically c-axis oriented, highly aligned and separated ZnO nanorods at substrate temperatures of 700-750 °C. The strongly substrate temperature dependent growth of nanorods is explained by considering that the growth above 600 °C, takes place in the 'desorption regime', in which, the surface diffusion length decreases exponentially with temperature. The diameter of nanorods increases with increase of DC power or decrease of sputtering pressure, which is attributed to the increase of surface diffusion length at higher deposition flux. The morphology of ZnO nanorods is not significantly affected by oxygen percentage in the sputtering atmosphere, since it does not influence the deposition flux.

  20. Full System Model of Magnetron Sputter Chamber - Proof-of-Principle Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walton, C; Gilmer, G; Zepeda-Ruiz, L; Wemhoff, A; Barbee, T

    2007-05-04

    The lack of detailed knowledge of internal process conditions remains a key challenge in magnetron sputtering, both for chamber design and for process development. Fundamental information such as the pressure and temperature distribution of the sputter gas, and the energies and arrival angles of the sputtered atoms and other energetic species is often missing, or is only estimated from general formulas. However, open-source or low-cost tools are available for modeling most steps of the sputter process, which can give more accurate and complete data than textbook estimates, using only desktop computations. To get a better understanding of magnetron sputtering, we have collected existing models for the 5 major process steps: the input and distribution of the neutral background gas using Direct Simulation Monte Carlo (DSMC), dynamics of the plasma using Particle In Cell-Monte Carlo Collision (PIC-MCC), impact of ions on the target using molecular dynamics (MD), transport of sputtered atoms to the substrate using DSMC, and growth of the film using hybrid Kinetic Monte Carlo (KMC) and MD methods. Models have been tested against experimental measurements. For example, gas rarefaction as observed by Rossnagel and others has been reproduced, and it is associated with a local pressure increase of {approx}50% which may strongly influence film properties such as stress. Results on energies and arrival angles of sputtered atoms and reflected gas neutrals are applied to the Kinetic Monte Carlo simulation of film growth. Model results and applications to growth of dense Cu and Be films are presented.

  1. Enhancement of the crystalline Ge film growth by inductively coupled plasma-assisted pulsed DC sputtering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eunkyeom; Han, Seung-Hee

    2014-11-01

    The effect of pulsed DC sputtering on the crystalline growth of Ge thin film was investigated. Ge thin films were deposited on the glass substrates using ICP-assisted pulsed DC sputtering. The Ge target was sputtered using asymmetric bipolar pulsed DC sputtering system with and without assistance of ICP source. The pulse frequency of 200 Hz and the pulse on time of 500 μsec (duty cycle = 10%) were kept during sputtering process. Crystal structures were studied from X-ray diffraction. The X-ray diffraction patterns clearly showed crystalline film structures. The Ge thin films with randomly oriented crystalline were obtained using pulsed DC sputtering without ICP, whereas they had well aligned (220) orientation crystalline using ICP source. Moreover, the combination of ICP assistance and pulsed DC sputtering enhanced the growth of crystalline Ge thin films without hydrogen and metal by in situ deposition. The structure and lattice of the films were studied from TEM images. The cross-sectional TEM images revealed the deposited Ge films with columnar structure.

  2. A new formula for sputtering yield as function of ion energies at normal incidence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grais, Kh. I.; Shaltout, A. A.; Ali, S. S.; Boutros, R. M.; El-behery, K. M.; El-Sayed, Z. A.

    2010-04-01

    The statistical ellipsoidal construction has been reconstructed into the statistical conicoidal construction, to describe the sputtering yield, at normal incidence, for various ion energies. The most important advantage of the new volume is the developing of a simple-single equation to describe the sputtering-energy relationship. Its parameters have been pictorially predicted from the conicoidal representation. A correction term [1-( E th/E i) 1/ Ω] was added to the present new equation to describe the threshold energy ( E th) of sputtering. The developed equation could be applied to all available ion/target combinations, over a broadened range of energy for low and heavy ion-masses. The new equation has been differentiated with respect to energy giving rise to a relation between the threshold energy and maximum energy, at which the maximum sputtering yield occurs. It was found that, the obtained theoretical sputtering data for low and heavy ions satisfactorily approaches the available experimental data and works well at the threshold regime. It should be mentioned that the conicoidal model is not only of interest for analytical glow discharge method but also for ion beam method for the sputtering process, where low and high sputtering values could occur.

  3. Changes in X-ray photoelectron spectra of yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal by ion sputtering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Watanabe, Eiko; Yoshinari, Masao [Tokyo Dental College, Oral Health Science Center, Tokyo, Chiyoda-ku (Japan)

    2016-04-15

    This paper reports changes in X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy spectra of yttria-tetragonal zirconia polycrystal (Y-TZP) brought about by Ar ion sputtering. The changes in the core-level spectra of Y-TZP suggest that preferential sputtering of oxygen occurred. A new peak was observed near 0 eV binding energy accompanied with changes in the core-level spectra by the sputtering. After 18 h in a high vacuum following the sputtering, the spectra changed by the sputtering were returned to their original shapes. In contrast, the color of Y-TZP was changed from white to pale brown by X-ray irradiation and was changed from pale brown to dark gray by ion sputtering. However, when the new peak near 0 eV decreased after 18 h, no color change was observed. Therefore, it is thought that the new peak was mainly derived from electrons trapped in various kinds of oxygen vacancies created by the sputtering in other than color centers. (orig.)

  4. Nano-Particle Scandate Cathode for Space Communications Phase 2 Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose an improved cathode based on our novel theory of the role of scandium oxide in enhancing emission in tungsten-impregnated cathodes. Recent results have...

  5. Study on the vibrational scraping of uranium product from a solid cathode of electrorefiner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Sung Bin; Kang, Young Ho; Hwang, Sung Chan; Lee, Han Soo; Paek, Seung Woo; Ahn, Do Hee [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-12-15

    A high-throughput electrorefiner has been developed for commercialization use by enhancing the uranium recovery from the reduced metal which is produced from the oxide reduction process. It is necessary to scrap and effectively collect uranium dendrites from the surface of the solid cathode for high yield. When a steel electrode is used as the cathode in the electrorefining process, uranium is deposited and regularly stuck to the steel cathode during electrorefining. The sticking coefficient of a steel cathode is very high. In order to decrease the sticking coefficient of the steel cathode effectively, vibration mode was applied to the electrode in this study. Uranium dendrites were scraped and fell apart from the steel cathode by a vibration force. The vibrational scraping of the steel cathode was compared to the self-scraping of the graphite cathode. Effects of the applied current density and the vibration stroke on the scraping of the uranium dendrites were also investigated.

  6. Compact High Current Rare-Earth Emitter Hollow Cathode for Hall Effect Thrusters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofer, Richard R. (Inventor); Goebel, Dan M. (Inventor); Watkins, Ronnie M. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    An apparatus and method for achieving an efficient central cathode in a Hall effect thruster is disclosed. A hollow insert disposed inside the end of a hollow conductive cathode comprises a rare-earth element and energized to emit electrons from an inner surface. The cathode employs an end opening having an area at least as large as the internal cross sectional area of the rare earth insert to enhance throughput from the cathode end. In addition, the cathode employs a high aspect ratio geometry based on the cathode length to width which mitigates heat transfer from the end. A gas flow through the cathode and insert may be impinged by the emitted electrons to yield a plasma. One or more optional auxiliary gas feeds may also be employed between the cathode and keeper wall and external to the keeper near the outlet.

  7. Power generation using an activated carbon and metal mesh cathode in a microbial fuel cell

    KAUST Repository

    Zhang, Fang

    2009-11-01

    An inexpensive activated carbon (AC) air cathode was developed as an alternative to a platinum-catalyzed electrode for oxygen reduction in a microbial fuel cell (MFC). AC was cold-pressed with a polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) binder to form the cathode around a Ni mesh current collector. This cathode construction avoided the need for carbon cloth or a metal catalyst, and produced a cathode with high activity for oxygen reduction at typical MFC current densities. Tests with the AC cathode produced a maximum power density of 1220 mW/m2 (normalized to cathode projected surface area; 36 W/m3 based on liquid volume) compared to 1060 mW/m2 obtained by Pt catalyzed carbon cloth cathode. The Coulombic efficiency ranged from 15% to 55%. These findings show that AC is a cost-effective material for achieving useful rates of oxygen reduction in air cathode MFCs. © 2009 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. SOFC LSM:YSZ cathode degradation induced by moisture: An impedance spectroscopy study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jimmi; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2011-01-01

    The cause of the degradation effect of moisture during operation of LSM cathode based SOFCs has been investigated by means of a detailed impedance characterization on LSM:YSZ composite cathode based SOFCs. Further the role of YSZ as cathode composite material was studied by measurements on SOFCs...... with a LSM:CGO composite cathode on a CGO interdiffusion barrier layer. It was found that both types of cathodes showed similar electrochemical characteristics towards the presence of moisture during operation. Upon addition and removal of moisture in the fed air the impedance study showed a change...... in the high frequency cathode arc, which is associated with the charge transport/transfer at the LSM/YSZ interface. On prolonged operation with the presence of moisture an ongoing increase in the high frequency cathode arc resulted in a permanent loss of cathode/electrolyte contact and thus increase...

  9. The Cathodic Corrosion of TiAl and Effect of Hydrogen

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    褚武杨; 高克玮; 乔利杰; 肖纪美

    1994-01-01

    TiAl can undergo severe corrosion, called cathodic corrosion, when cathodically charged with hydrogen in aqueous solutions or molten salt at 160℃. The mechanism of this phenomenon is experimentally discussed, and the results are analysed.

  10. Hydroxyapatite formation on biomedical Ti–Ta–Zr alloys by magnetron sputtering and electrochemical deposition

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Hyun-Ju [Department of Dental Materials, Research Center of Nano-Interface Activation for Biomaterials, and Research Center for Oral Disease Regulation of the Aged, School of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Yong-Hoon [Biomechanics and Tissue Engineering Laboratory, Division of Orthodontics, College of Dentistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States); Choe, Han-Cheol, E-mail: hcchoe@chosun.ac.kr [Department of Dental Materials, Research Center of Nano-Interface Activation for Biomaterials, and Research Center for Oral Disease Regulation of the Aged, School of Dentistry, Chosun University, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of); Brantley, William A. [Division of Prosthodontics and Restorative Science, College of Dentistry, The Ohio State University, Columbus, OH (United States)

    2014-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate hydroxyapatite formation on Ti-25Ta-xZr titanium alloys resulting from radio-frequency magnetron sputtering and electrochemical deposition. Electrochemical deposition of hydroxyapatite (HA) was first carried out using a cyclic voltammetry (CV) method at 80 °C in 5 mM Ca (NO{sub 3}){sub 2} + 3 mM NH{sub 4}H{sub 2}PO{sub 4}. Then a physical vapor deposition (PVD) coating was obtained by a radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering technique. The microstructures, phase transformations, and morphologies of the hydroxyapatite films deposited on the titanium alloys were analyzed by optical microscopy (OM), X-ray diffractometer (XRD), energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM). The morphologies of electrochemically deposited HA showed plate-like shapes on the titanium alloys, and the morphologies of the RF-sputtered HA coating had the appearance droplet particles on the plate-like precipitates that had formed by electrochemical deposition. For the RF-sputtered HA coatings, the Ca/P ratio was increased, compared to that for the electrochemically deposited HA surface. Moreover, the RF-sputtered HA coating, consisting of agglomerated droplet particles on the electrochemically deposited HA surface, had better wettability compared to the bulk titanium alloy surface. - Highlights: • Hydroxyapatite (HA) was deposited on Ti–Ta–Zr alloys by radio-frequency (RF) magnetron sputtering and a cyclic voltammetry. • The morphologies of the RF-sputtered HA coating on electrochemical deposits presented plate-like shapes with a droplet particle. • The Ca/P ratio for RF-sputtered HA coatings was greater than that for electrochemical deposited HA coatings. • The RF-sputtered and electrochemical HA coatings had superior wettability compared to the electrochemically deposited coatings.

  11. Tandem cathode for proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Siahrostami, Samira; Björketun, Mårten E.; Strasser, Peter

    2013-01-01

    The efficiency of proton exchange membrane fuel cells is limited mainly by the oxygen reduction reaction at the cathode. The large cathodic overpotential is caused by correlations between binding energies of reaction intermediates in the reduction of oxygen to water. This work introduces a novel...... reaction intermediate each, and they occur on different catalyst surfaces. As a result they can be optimized independently and the fundamental problem associated with the four-electron catalysis is avoided. A combination of density functional theory calculations and published experimental data is used...

  12. Web-Based Cathode Strip Chamber Data Display

    CERN Multimedia

    Firmansyah, M

    2013-01-01

    Cathode Strip Chamber (CSC) is a detector that uses gas and high electric field to detect particles. When a particle goes through CSC, it will ionize gas particles and generate electric signal in the anode and cathode of the detector. Analysis of the electric signal data can help physicists to reconstruct path of the particles and determine what happen inside the detector. Using data display, analysis of CSC data becomes easier. One can determine which data is interesting, unusual, or maybe only contain noise.\

  13. QE data for Pb/Nb deposited photo cathode samples

    CERN Document Server

    Sekutowicz, J

    2010-01-01

    This report outlines progress in the development of photo-cathodes for a hybrid lead/niobium (Pb/Nb) superconducting SRF electron injector. We have coated eight Nb samples with lead to study and determine deposition conditions leading to high quality emitting area. The results show that the oxide layer significantly influences the quantum efficiency (QE) of all measured cathodes. In addition, we learned that although the laser cleaning enhanced the QE substantially, the film morphology was strongly modified. That observation convinced us to make the coatings thicker and therefore more robust.

  14. Carbonization kinetics of La2O3-Mo cathode materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王金淑; 周美玲; 左铁镛; 张久兴; 聂祚仁; 胡延槽

    2001-01-01

    The carbonization kinetics of La2O3-Mo cathode materials was studied by thermal analysis method. Three-stage model of the carbonization was presented. The carbonization rate is initially controlled by chemical reaction, then by chemical reaction mixed with diffusion, finally by diffusion. The experimental data are processed according to this model and the correlation coefficients of the kinetic curves are satisfactory. The apparent activation energy of carbonization of La2O3-Mo cathode materials was obtained. At the same time, the empirical expressions of the rate constant against temperature in the temperature range of 1393~1493K were deduced.

  15. High Pressure Micro-Slot Hollow Cathode Discharge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xinbing; Zhou Lina; Yao Xilin

    2005-01-01

    A direct current glow discharge source structure operating at high pressure based on the micro-slot hollow cathode is presented in this article. A 100 μm width slot cathode was fabricated of copper, and a stable DC glow discharge with an area of 0.5 mm2 was produced in noble gases (He, Ne) and air over a wide pressure range (kPa ~ 10 kPa). The current-voltage characteristics and the near UV radiation emission of the discharge were studied.

  16. PVC DISULFIDE AS CATHODE MATERIALS FOR SECONDARY LITHIUM BATTERIES

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-xiang Xu; Lu Qi; Bi-tao Yu; Lei Wen

    2006-01-01

    PVC disulfide (2SPVC) was synthesized by solution crosslink and its molecular structure was confirmed by the particle size of d0.5 = 11.3 μm. With SEM (Scanning Electron Microscope) experiment the surface morphology and obvious S-S redox reaction in charge-discharge process. When 2SPVC was used as cathode material for secondary lithium mixture of o-xylene (oxy), diglyme (DG) and dimethoxymethane (DME) at 30℃, the first discharge capacity of 2SPVC is very promising cathode candidate for rechargeable lithium batteries.

  17. NEW CATHODE MATERIALS FOR INERT AND OXIDIZING ATMOSPHERE PLASMA APPLICATION

    OpenAIRE

    1990-01-01

    This study has been carried out to develop new cathode materials for two types of thermionic cathode. First is concerning to the tungsten electrodes for the plasma furnace and welding torches. The second one is the electrodes for air plasma cutting torch. Tungsten electrodes activated with a single and combined additives of rare earth metal oxides, such as La2O3, Y2O3 and CeO2, are produced and pared with pure and thoriated tungsten electrode conventionally used, from the point of view of ele...

  18. Structure of DC sputtered Si-C-N thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radnoczi, G.; Safran, G.; Czigany, Zs.; Berlind, T.; Hultman, L

    2003-09-01

    Si-C-N films of maximum 65 at.% of Si and maximum 40 at.% of N were prepared by reactive magnetron sputtering and their fine structure was investigated by high-resolution transmission electron microscopy. For compositions, where C-C and C-N bonds prevail, the films had anisotropic structure on the atomic scale, composed of curved graphitic layers, aligned parallel to the substrate normal. An isotropic structure was detected in the middle of the compositional triangle. On a larger scale, a columnar morphology, aligned in the direction of the deposition flux was formed in films containing more than 15 at.% of Si. Singular or simultaneous appearance of the above structures depended on film composition.

  19. Spatiotemporal synchronization of drift waves in a magnetron sputtering plasma

    CERN Document Server

    Martines, E; Cavazzana, R; Adámek, J; Antoni, V; Serianni, G; Spolaore, M; Vianello, N

    2014-01-01

    A feedforward scheme is applied for drift waves control in a magnetized magnetron sputtering plasma. A system of driven electrodes collecting electron current in a limited region of the explored plasma is used to interact with unstable drift waves. Drift waves actually appear as electrostatic modes characterized by discrete wavelengths of the order of few centimeters and frequencies of about 100 kHz. The effect of external quasi-periodic, both in time and space, travelling perturbations is studied. Particular emphasis is given to the role played by the phase relation between the natural and the imposed fluctuations. It is observed that it is possible by means of localized electrodes, collecting currents which are negligible with respect to those flowing in the plasma, to transfer energy to one single mode and to reduce that associated to the others. Due to the weakness of the external action, only partial control has been achieved.

  20. Anisotropies in magnetron sputtered carbon nitride thin films

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellgren, Niklas; Johansson, Mats P.; Broitman, Esteban; Hultman, Lars; Sundgren, Jan-Eric

    2001-04-01

    Carbon nitride CNx (0⩽x⩽0.35) thin films, deposited by reactive dc magnetron sputtering in Ar/N2 discharges have been studied with respect to microstructure using electron microscopy, and elastic modulus using nanoindentation and surface acoustic wave analyses. For growth temperature of 100 °C, the films were amorphous, and with an isotropic Young's modulus of ˜170-200 GPa essentially unaffected by the nitrogen fraction. The films grown at elevated temperatures (350-550 °C) show anisotropic mechanical properties due to a textured microstructure with standing basal planes, as observed from measuring the Young's modulus in different directions. The modulus measured in the plane of the film was ˜60-80 GPa, while in the vertical direction the modulus increased considerably from ˜25 to ˜200 GPa as the nitrogen content was increased above ˜15 at. %.