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Sample records for catheterized rhesus macaque

  1. Disseminated Hemangiosarcoma in a Juvenile Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Amanda P; Gray, Stanton B; Chaffee, Beth K

    2016-01-01

    Hemangiosarcoma is a malignant tumor of vascular endothelial origin that is sporadically reported in rhesus macaques. This report describes the clinicopathologic features of a 1-y-old rhesus macaque with spontaneous disseminated hemangiosarcoma that originally presented as a focal cutaneous mass. Histopathologic examination of multiple tumor foci revealed regions in which the neoplastic cells formed diffuse sheets, as well as the well-defined vascular channels typically associated with hemangiosarcoma. Multiple endothelial cell immunomarkers were used to confirm the diagnosis in this rhesus macaque. The tumor exhibited staining properties consistent with those seen in domestic animals and humans. In addition, to our knowledge, this animal represents the youngest case of any form of spontaneous hemangiosarcoma reported in the rhesus macaque to date.

  2. Disseminated Hemangiosarcoma in a Juvenile Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, Amanda P; Gray, Stanton B; Chaffee, Beth K

    2016-01-01

    Hemangiosarcoma is a malignant tumor of vascular endothelial origin that is sporadically reported in rhesus macaques. This report describes the clinicopathologic features of a 1-y-old rhesus macaque with spontaneous disseminated hemangiosarcoma that originally presented as a focal cutaneous mass. Histopathologic examination of multiple tumor foci revealed regions in which the neoplastic cells formed diffuse sheets, as well as the well-defined vascular channels typically associated with hemang...

  3. Vicarious Reinforcement In Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve W. C. Chang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available What happens to others profoundly influences our own behavior. Such other-regarding outcomes can drive observational learning, as well as motivate cooperation, charity, empathy, and even spite. Vicarious reinforcement may serve as one of the critical mechanisms mediating the influence of other-regarding outcomes on behavior and decision-making in groups. Here we show that rhesus macaques spontaneously derive vicarious reinforcement from observing rewards given to another monkey, and that this reinforcement can motivate them to subsequently deliver or withhold rewards from the other animal. We exploited Pavlovian and instrumental conditioning to associate rewards to self (M1 and/or rewards to another monkey (M2 with visual cues. M1s made more errors in the instrumental trials when cues predicted reward to M2 compared to when cues predicted reward to M1, but made even more errors when cues predicted reward to no one. In subsequent preference tests between pairs of conditioned cues, M1s preferred cues paired with reward to M2 over cues paired with reward to no one. By contrast, M1s preferred cues paired with reward to self over cues paired with reward to both monkeys simultaneously. Rates of attention to M2 strongly predicted the strength and valence of vicarious reinforcement. These patterns of behavior, which were absent in nonsocial control trials, are consistent with vicarious reinforcement based upon sensitivity to observed, or counterfactual, outcomes with respect to another individual. Vicarious reward may play a critical role in shaping cooperation and competition, as well as motivating observational learning and group coordination in rhesus macaques, much as it does in humans. We propose that vicarious reinforcement signals mediate these behaviors via homologous neural circuits involved in reinforcement learning and decision-making.

  4. Vicarious reinforcement in rhesus macaques (macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Steve W C; Winecoff, Amy A; Platt, Michael L

    2011-01-01

    What happens to others profoundly influences our own behavior. Such other-regarding outcomes can drive observational learning, as well as motivate cooperation, charity, empathy, and even spite. Vicarious reinforcement may serve as one of the critical mechanisms mediating the influence of other-regarding outcomes on behavior and decision-making in groups. Here we show that rhesus macaques spontaneously derive vicarious reinforcement from observing rewards given to another monkey, and that this reinforcement can motivate them to subsequently deliver or withhold rewards from the other animal. We exploited Pavlovian and instrumental conditioning to associate rewards to self (M1) and/or rewards to another monkey (M2) with visual cues. M1s made more errors in the instrumental trials when cues predicted reward to M2 compared to when cues predicted reward to M1, but made even more errors when cues predicted reward to no one. In subsequent preference tests between pairs of conditioned cues, M1s preferred cues paired with reward to M2 over cues paired with reward to no one. By contrast, M1s preferred cues paired with reward to self over cues paired with reward to both monkeys simultaneously. Rates of attention to M2 strongly predicted the strength and valence of vicarious reinforcement. These patterns of behavior, which were absent in non-social control trials, are consistent with vicarious reinforcement based upon sensitivity to observed, or counterfactual, outcomes with respect to another individual. Vicarious reward may play a critical role in shaping cooperation and competition, as well as motivating observational learning and group coordination in rhesus macaques, much as it does in humans. We propose that vicarious reinforcement signals mediate these behaviors via homologous neural circuits involved in reinforcement learning and decision-making.

  5. Ventricular Parasystole in a Neonatal Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Collins, Dalis E; Dozier, Brandy L; Stanton, Jeffrey J; Colgin, Lois MA; MacAllister, Rhonda

    2016-01-01

    A 6-d-old Indian-origin female rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) presented with bradycardia shortly after sedation with ketamine. No other cardiac abnormalities were apparent. Approximately 2 wk after the initial presentation, the macaque was again bradycardic and exhibited a regularly irregular arrhythmia on a prestudy examination. ECG, echocardiography, blood pressure measurement, SpO2 assessment, and a CBC analysis were performed. The echocardiogram and bloodwork were normal, but the infant ...

  6. Evolutionary and biomedical insights from the rhesus macaque genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gibbs, Richard A; Rogers, Jeffrey; Katze, Michael G

    2007-01-01

    biomedical research. We determined the genome sequence of an Indian-origin Macaca mulatta female and compared the data with chimpanzees and humans to reveal the structure of ancestral primate genomes and to identify evidence for positive selection and lineage-specific expansions and contractions of gene......The rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) is an abundant primate species that diverged from the ancestors of Homo sapiens about 25 million years ago. Because they are genetically and physiologically similar to humans, rhesus monkeys are the most widely used nonhuman primate in basic and applied...... families. A comparison of sequences from individual animals was used to investigate their underlying genetic diversity. The complete description of the macaque genome blueprint enhances the utility of this animal model for biomedical research and improves our understanding of the basic biology...

  7. Evolutionary and biomedical insights from the rhesus macaque genome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gibbs, Richard A; Rogers, Jeffrey; Katze, Michael G; Bumgarner, Roger; Weinstock, George M; Mardis, Elaine R; Remington, Karin A; Strausberg, Robert L; Venter, J Craig; Wilson, Richard K; Batzer, Mark A; Bustamante, Carlos D; Eichler, Evan E; Hahn, Matthew W; Hardison, Ross C; Makova, Kateryna D; Miller, Webb; Milosavljevic, Aleksandar; Palermo, Robert E; Siepel, Adam; Sikela, James M; Attaway, Tony; Bell, Stephanie; Bernard, Kelly E; Buhay, Christian J; Chandrabose, Mimi N; Dao, Marvin; Davis, Clay; Delehaunty, Kimberly D; Ding, Yan; Dinh, Huyen H; Dugan-Rocha, Shannon; Fulton, Lucinda A; Gabisi, Ramatu Ayiesha; Garner, Toni T; Godfrey, Jennifer; Hawes, Alicia C; Hernandez, Judith; Hines, Sandra; Holder, Michael; Hume, Jennifer; Jhangiani, Shalini N; Joshi, Vandita; Khan, Ziad Mohid; Kirkness, Ewen F; Cree, Andrew; Fowler, R Gerald; Lee, Sandra; Lewis, Lora R; Li, Zhangwan; Liu, Yih-Shin; Moore, Stephanie M; Muzny, Donna; Nazareth, Lynne V; Ngo, Dinh Ngoc; Okwuonu, Geoffrey O; Pai, Grace; Parker, David; Paul, Heidie A; Pfannkoch, Cynthia; Pohl, Craig S; Rogers, Yu-Hui; Ruiz, San Juana; Sabo, Aniko; Santibanez, Jireh; Schneider, Brian W; Smith, Scott M; Sodergren, Erica; Svatek, Amanda F; Utterback, Teresa R; Vattathil, Selina; Warren, Wesley; White, Courtney Sherell; Chinwalla, Asif T; Feng, Yucheng; Halpern, Aaron L; Hillier, Ladeana W; Huang, Xiaoqiu; Minx, Pat; Nelson, Joanne O; Pepin, Kymberlie H; Qin, Xiang; Sutton, Granger G; Venter, Eli; Walenz, Brian P; Wallis, John W; Worley, Kim C; Yang, Shiaw-Pyng; Jones, Steven M; Marra, Marco A; Rocchi, Mariano; Schein, Jacqueline E; Baertsch, Robert; Clarke, Laura; Csürös, Miklós; Glasscock, Jarret; Harris, R Alan; Havlak, Paul; Jackson, Andrew R; Jiang, Huaiyang; Liu, Yue; Messina, David N; Shen, Yufeng; Song, Henry Xing-Zhi; Wylie, Todd; Zhang, Lan; Birney, Ewan; Han, Kyudong; Konkel, Miriam K; Lee, Jungnam; Smit, Arian F A; Ullmer, Brygg; Wang, Hui; Xing, Jinchuan; Burhans, Richard; Cheng, Ze; Karro, John E; Ma, Jian; Raney, Brian; She, Xinwei; Cox, Michael J; Demuth, Jeffery P; Dumas, Laura J; Han, Sang-Gook; Hopkins, Janet; Karimpour-Fard, Anis; Kim, Young H; Pollack, Jonathan R; Vinar, Tomas; Addo-Quaye, Charles; Degenhardt, Jeremiah; Denby, Alexandra; Hubisz, Melissa J; Indap, Amit; Kosiol, Carolin; Lahn, Bruce T; Lawson, Heather A; Marklein, Alison; Nielsen, Rasmus; Vallender, Eric J; Clark, Andrew G; Ferguson, Betsy; Hernandez, Ryan D; Hirani, Kashif; Kehrer-Sawatzki, Hildegard; Kolb, Jessica; Patil, Shobha; Pu, Ling-Ling; Ren, Yanru; Smith, David Glenn; Wheeler, David A; Schenck, Ian; Ball, Edward V; Chen, Rui; Cooper, David N; Giardine, Belinda; Hsu, Fan; Kent, W James; Lesk, Arthur; Nelson, David L; O'brien, William E; Prüfer, Kay; Stenson, Peter D; Wallace, James C; Ke, Hui; Liu, Xiao-Ming; Wang, Peng; Xiang, Andy Peng; Yang, Fan; Barber, Galt P; Haussler, David; Karolchik, Donna; Kern, Andy D; Kuhn, Robert M; Smith, Kayla E; Zwieg, Ann S

    2007-04-13

    The rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) is an abundant primate species that diverged from the ancestors of Homo sapiens about 25 million years ago. Because they are genetically and physiologically similar to humans, rhesus monkeys are the most widely used nonhuman primate in basic and applied biomedical research. We determined the genome sequence of an Indian-origin Macaca mulatta female and compared the data with chimpanzees and humans to reveal the structure of ancestral primate genomes and to identify evidence for positive selection and lineage-specific expansions and contractions of gene families. A comparison of sequences from individual animals was used to investigate their underlying genetic diversity. The complete description of the macaque genome blueprint enhances the utility of this animal model for biomedical research and improves our understanding of the basic biology of the species.

  8. Rhesus macaque IFITM3 gene polymorphisms and SIV infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Winkler

    Full Text Available Interferon-induced transmembrane proteins (IFITMs have been recognized as important antiviral effectors of the innate immune system, both in cell culture and in infected humans. In particular, polymorphisms of the human IFITM3 gene have been shown to affect disease severity and progression in influenza A virus (FLUAV and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection, respectively. Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta are commonly used to model human infections and the experimental inoculation of these animals with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV is one of the best models for HIV/AIDS in humans. However, information on the role of IFITM3 in SIV infection of rhesus macaques is currently lacking. We show that rhesus macaque (rh IFITM3 inhibits SIV and FLUAV entry in cell culture, although with moderately reduced efficiency as compared to its human counterpart. We further report the identification of 16 polymorphisms in the rhIFITM3 gene, three of which were exonic and synonymous while the remainder was located in non-coding regions. Employing previously characterized samples from two cohorts of SIV-infected rhesus macaques, we investigated the relationship between these rhIFITM3 polymorphisms and both AIDS-free survival time and virus load. In cohort 1, several intronic polymorphisms were significantly associated with virus load or survival. However, an association with both parameters was not observed and significance was lost in most cases when animals were stratified for the presence of MHC allele Mamu-A1*001. Moreover, no significant genotype-phenotype associations were detected in cohort 2. These results suggest that, although IFITM3 can inhibit SIV infection in cell culture, genetic variation in rhIFITM3 might have only a minor impact on the course of SIV infection in experimentally infected animals.

  9. Heterologous Protection against Asian Zika Virus Challenge in Rhesus Macaques.

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    Matthew T Aliota

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV; Flaviviridae, Flavivirus was declared a public health emergency of international concern by the World Health Organization (WHO in February 2016, because of the evidence linking infection with ZIKV to neurological complications, such as Guillain-Barre Syndrome in adults and congenital birth defects including microcephaly in the developing fetus. Because development of a ZIKV vaccine is a top research priority and because the genetic and antigenic variability of many RNA viruses limits the effectiveness of vaccines, assessing whether immunity elicited against one ZIKV strain is sufficient to confer broad protection against all ZIKV strains is critical. Recently, in vitro studies demonstrated that ZIKV likely circulates as a single serotype. Here, we demonstrate that immunity elicited by African lineage ZIKV protects rhesus macaques against subsequent infection with Asian lineage ZIKV.Using our recently developed rhesus macaque model of ZIKV infection, we report that the prototypical ZIKV strain MR766 productively infects macaques, and that immunity elicited by MR766 protects macaques against heterologous Asian ZIKV. Furthermore, using next generation deep sequencing, we found in vivo restoration of a putative N-linked glycosylation site upon replication in macaques that is absent in numerous MR766 strains that are widely being used by the research community. This reversion highlights the importance of carefully examining the sequence composition of all viral stocks as well as understanding how passage history may alter a virus from its original form.An effective ZIKV vaccine is needed to prevent infection-associated fetal abnormalities. Macaques whose immune responses were primed by infection with East African ZIKV were completely protected from detectable viremia when subsequently rechallenged with heterologous Asian ZIKV. Therefore, these data suggest that immunogen selection is unlikely to adversely affect the breadth of

  10. Directed shift of vaginal microbiota induced by vaginal application of sucrose gel in rhesus macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-tao Hu

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Rhesus macaques can be used as animal models of bacterial vaginosis to develop drugs and test treatment efficacy. Furthermore, the topical application of sucrose gel induced the shifting of vaginal flora of rhesus macaques from a BV kind of flora to a lactobacilli-dominating flora.

  11. A Characterization of Aerosolized Sudan Virus Infection in African Green Monkeys, Cynomolgus Macaques, and Rhesus Macaques

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    Donald K. Nichols

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Filoviruses are members of the genera Ebolavirus, Marburgvirus, and “Cuevavirus”. Because they cause human disease with high lethality and could potentially be used as a bioweapon, these viruses are classified as CDC Category A Bioterrorism Agents. Filoviruses are relatively stable in aerosols, retain virulence after lyophilization, and can be present on contaminated surfaces for extended periods of time. This study explores the characteristics of aerosolized Sudan virus (SUDV Boniface in non-human primates (NHP belonging to three different species. Groups of cynomolgus macaques (cyno, rhesus macaques (rhesus, and African green monkeys (AGM were challenged with target doses of 50 or 500 plaque-forming units (pfu of aerosolized SUDV. Exposure to either viral dose resulted in increased body temperatures in all three NHP species beginning on days 4–5 post-exposure. Other clinical findings for all three NHP species included leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, anorexia, dehydration, and lymphadenopathy. Disease in all of the NHPs was severe beginning on day 6 post-exposure, and all animals except one surviving rhesus macaque were euthanized by day 14. Serum alanine transaminase (ALT and aspartate transaminase (AST concentrations were elevated during the course of disease in all three species; however, AGMs had significantly higher ALT and AST concentrations than cynos and rhesus. While all three species had detectable viral load by days 3-4 post exposure, Rhesus had lower average peak viral load than cynos or AGMs. Overall, the results indicate that the disease course after exposure to aerosolized SUDV is similar for all three species of NHP.

  12. Ancestry, Plasmodium cynomolgi prevalence and rhesus macaque admixture in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) bred for export in Chinese breeding farms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xinjun; Meng, Yuhuan; Houghton, Paul; Liu, Mingyu; Kanthaswamy, Sreetharan; Oldt, Robert; Ng, Jillian; Trask, Jessica Satkoski; Huang, Ren; Singh, Balbir; Du, Hongli; Smith, David Glenn

    2017-04-01

    Most cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) used in the United States as animal models are imported from Chinese breeding farms without documented ancestry. Cynomolgus macaques with varying rhesus macaque ancestry proportions may exhibit differences, such as susceptibility to malaria, that affect their suitability as a research model. DNA of 400 cynomolgus macaques from 10 Chinese breeding farms was genotyped to characterize their regional origin and rhesus ancestry proportion. A nested PCR assay was used to detect Plasmodium cynomolgi infection in sampled individuals. All populations exhibited high levels of genetic heterogeneity and low levels of inbreeding and genetic subdivision. Almost all individuals exhibited an Indochinese origin and a rhesus ancestry proportion of 5%-48%. The incidence of P. cynomolgi infection in cynomolgus macaques is strongly associated with proportion of rhesus ancestry. The varying amount of rhesus ancestry in cynomolgus macaques underscores the importance of monitoring their genetic similarity in malaria research. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  13. Assisted reproductive technologies in rhesus macaques

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    Wolf Don P

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs have been used in the production of rhesus monkey offspring at the Oregon National Primate Research Center (ONPRC and that experience is summarized here. Additionally these technologies serve as a source of oocytes/embryos for monozygotic twinning, embryonic stem (ES cell derivation and cloning. High fertilization efficiencies were realized with conventional insemination or following the use of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI and approximately 50% of the resulting embryos grew in vitro to blastocysts. Both fresh and frozen sperm were employed in fertilization by ICSI and the resulting embryos could be low temperature stored for subsequent thawing and transfer when a synchronized recipient female was available or after shipment to another facility. Following the transfer of up to 3 embryos, an overall pregnancy rate of 30% was achieved with increasing rates dependent upon the number of embryos transferred. Singleton pregnancy outcomes following the transfer of ART produced embryos were similar to those observed in a control group of animals in the timed mated breeding colony at ONPRC. ICSI produced embryos were used in efforts to create monozygotic twins by blastomere separation or blastocyst splitting. While pregnancies were achieved following the transfer of demi-embryos, only one was a twin and it was lost to spontaneous abortion. ICSI produced embryos have also served as the source of blastocysts for the derivation of embryonic stem cells. These pluripotent cells hold potential for cell based therapies and we consider the monkey an important translational model in which to evaluate safety, efficacy and feasibility of regenerative medicine approaches based on the transplantation of stem cell-derived progeny. Finally, efforts to produce genetically-identical monkeys by nuclear transfer have been briefly summarized.

  14. Automated chair-training of rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponce, C R; Genecin, M P; Perez-Melara, G; Livingstone, M S

    2016-04-01

    Neuroscience research on non-human primates usually requires the animals to sit in a chair. To do this, typically monkeys are fitted with collars and trained to enter the chairs using either a pole, leash and jump cage. Animals may initially show resistance and risk injury. We have developed an automated chair-training method that minimizes restraints to ease the animals into their chairs. We developed a method to automatically train animals to enter a primate chair and stick out their heads for neckplate placement. To do this, we fitted the chairs with Arduino microcontrollers coupled to a water-reward system and touch- and proximity sensors. We found that the animals responded well to the chair, partially entering the chair within hours, sitting inside the chair within days and allowing us to manually introduce a door and neck plate, all within 14-21 sessions. Although each session could last many hours, automation meant that actual training person-hours could be as little as half an hour per day. The biggest advantage was that animals showed little resistance to entering the chair, compared to monkeys trained by leash pulling. This automated chair-training method can take longer than the standard collar-and-leash approach, but multiple macaques can be trained in parallel with fewer person-hours. It is also a promising method for animal-use refinement and in our case, it was the only effective training approach for an animal suffering from a behavioral pathology. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Genome sequencing and comparison of two nonhuman primate animal models, the cynomolgus and Chinese rhesus macaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Guangmei; Zhang, Guojie; Fang, Xiaodong

    2011-01-01

    The nonhuman primates most commonly used in medical research are from the genus Macaca. To better understand the genetic differences between these animal models, we present high-quality draft genome sequences from two macaque species, the cynomolgus/crab-eating macaque and the Chinese rhesus...

  16. Interindividual Differences in Neonatal Imitation and the Development of Action Chains in Rhesus Macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Pier Francesco; Paukner, Annika; Ruggiero, Angela; Darcey, Lisa; Unbehagen, Sarah; Suomi, Stephen J.

    2009-01-01

    The capacity to imitate facial gestures is highly variable in rhesus macaques and this variability may be related to differences in specific neurobehavioral patterns of development. This study evaluated the differential neonatal imitative response of 41 macaques in relation to the development of sensory, motor, and cognitive skills throughout the…

  17. Human and Rhesus MacaqueKIRHaplotypes Defined by Their Transcriptomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruijnesteijn, Jesse; van der Wiel, Marit K H; Swelsen, Wendy T N; Otting, Nel; de Vos-Rouweler, Annemiek J M; Elferink, Diënne; Doxiadis, Gaby G; Claas, Frans H J; Lardy, Neubury M; de Groot, Natasja G; Bontrop, Ronald E

    2018-03-01

    The killer-cell Ig-like receptors (KIRs) play a central role in the immune recognition in infection, pregnancy, and transplantation through their interactions with MHC class I molecules. KIR genes display abundant copy number variation as well as high levels of polymorphism. As a result, it is challenging to characterize this structurally dynamic region. KIR haplotypes have been analyzed in different species using conventional characterization methods, such as Sanger sequencing and Roche/454 pyrosequencing. However, these methods are time-consuming and often failed to define complete haplotypes, or do not reach allele-level resolution. In addition, most analyses were performed on genomic DNA, and thus were lacking substantial information about transcription and its corresponding modifications. In this paper, we present a single-molecule real-time sequencing approach, using Pacific Biosciences Sequel platform to characterize the KIR transcriptomes in human and rhesus macaque ( Macaca mulatta ) families. This high-resolution approach allowed the identification of novel Mamu-KIR alleles, the extension of reported allele sequences, and the determination of human and macaque KIR haplotypes. In addition, multiple recombinant KIR genes were discovered, all located on contracted haplotypes, which were likely the result of chromosomal rearrangements. The relatively high number of contracted haplotypes discovered might be indicative of selection on small KIR repertoires and/or novel fusion gene products. This next-generation method provides an improved high-resolution characterization of the KIR cluster in humans and macaques, which eventually may aid in a better understanding and interpretation of KIR allele-associated diseases, as well as the immune response in transplantation and reproduction. Copyright © 2018 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  18. Human-wildlife conflict: proximate predictors of aggression between humans and rhesus macaques in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisner, Brianne A; Heagerty, Allison; Seil, Shannon K; Balasubramaniam, Krishna N; Atwill, Edward R; Gupta, Brij K; Tyagi, Praveen C; Chauhan, Netrapal P S; Bonal, B S; Sinha, P R; McCowan, Brenda

    2015-02-01

    Macaques live in close contact with humans across South and Southeast Asia, and direct interaction is frequent. Aggressive contact is a concern in many locations, particularly among populations of rhesus and longtail macaques that co-inhabit urbanized cities and towns with humans. We investigated the proximate factors influencing the occurrence of macaque aggression toward humans as well as human aggression toward macaques to determine the extent to which human behavior elicits macaque aggression and vice versa. We conducted a 3-month study of four free-ranging populations of rhesus macaques in Dehradun, India from October-December 2012, using event sampling to record all instances of human-macaque interaction (N = 3120). Our results show that while human aggression was predicted by the potential for economic losses or damage, macaque aggression was influenced by aggressive or intimidating behavior by humans as well as recent rates of conspecific aggression. Further, adult female macaques participated in aggression more frequently than expected, whereas adult and subadult males participated as frequently as expected. Our analyses demonstrate that neither human nor macaque aggression is unprovoked. Rather, both humans and macaques are responding to one another's behavior. Mitigation of human-primate conflict, and indeed other types of human-wildlife conflict in such coupled systems, will require a holistic investigation of the ways in which each participant is responding to, and consequently altering, the behavior of the other. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Diversity and molecular phylogeny of mitochondrial DNA of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) in Bangladesh.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, M Kamrul; Feeroz, M Mostafa; Jones-Engel, Lisa; Engel, Gregory A; Kanthaswamy, Sree; Smith, David Glenn

    2014-11-01

    While studies of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) in the eastern (e.g., China) and western (e.g., India) parts of their geographic range have revealed major genetic differences that warrant the recognition of two different subspecies, little is known about genetic characteristics of rhesus macaques in the transitional zone extending from eastern India and Bangladesh through the northern part of Indo-China, the probable original homeland of the species. We analyzed genetic variation of 762 base pairs of mitochondrial DNA from 86 fecal swab samples and 19 blood samples from 25 local populations of rhesus macaque in Bangladesh collected from January 2010 to August 2012. These sequences were compared with those of rhesus macaques from India, China, and Myanmar. Forty-six haplotypes defined by 200 (26%) polymorphic nucleotide sites were detected. Estimates of gene diversity, expected heterozygosity, and nucleotide diversity for the total population were 0.9599 ± 0.0097, 0.0193 ± 0.0582, and 0.0196 ± 0.0098, respectively. A mismatch distribution of paired nucleotide differences yielded a statistically significantly negative value of Tajima's D, reflecting a population that rapidly expanded after the terminal Pleistocene. Most haplotypes throughout regions of Bangladesh, including an isolated region in the southwestern area (Sundarbans), clustered with haplotypes assigned to the minor haplogroup Ind-2 from India reflecting an east to west dispersal of rhesus macaques to India. Haplotypes from the southeast region of Bangladesh formed a cluster with those from Myanmar, and represent the oldest rhesus macaque haplotypes of Bangladesh. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that rhesus macaques first entered Bangladesh from the southeast, probably from Indo-China, then dispersed westward throughout eastern and central India. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Comprehensive identification of MHC class II alleles in a cohort of Chinese rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Huiling; Deng, Qing; Jin, Yabin; Liu, Beilei; Zhuo, Min; Ling, Fei

    2014-10-01

    Rhesus macaque is a very important animal model for various human diseases, especially for AIDS and vaccine research. The susceptibility and/or resistance to some of these diseases are related to the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). To gain insight into the MHC background and to facilitate the experimental use of Chinese rhesus macaques, Mamu-DPB1, Mamu-DQB1, and Mamu-DRB alleles were investigated in 30 Chinese rhesus macaques through gene cloning and sequencing. A total of 66 alleles were identified in this study, including 14 Mamu-DPB1, 20 Mamu-DQB1, and 30 Mamu-DRB alleles as well as 2 high-frequency Mamu-DPB1 alleles. Interestingly, one of the high-frequency Mamu-DPB1 alleles had been undocumented in earlier studies. Eleven of the other alleles, including four Mamu-DPB1, three Mamu-DQB1, and four Mamu-DRB alleles were also novel. Importantly, like MHC-DRB, more than two Mamu-DPB1 sequences per animal were detected in 13 monkeys, which suggested that they might represent gene duplication. Our data also indicated quite a few differences in the distribution of MHC class II alleles between the Chinese rhesus macaques and the previously reported Indian rhesus macaques. To our knowledge, our results revealed comprehensively the combination of MHC II alleles. This information will not only promote the understanding of Chinese rhesus macaque MHC polymorphism but will also facilitate the use of Chinese rhesus macaques in studies of human disease.

  1. Turnover rates of B cells, T cells, and NK cells in simian immunodeficiency virus-infected and uninfected rhesus macaques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, R.J. de; Mohri, H.; Ho, D.D.; Perelson, A.S.

    2003-01-01

    We determined average cellular turnover rates by fitting mathematical models to 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine measurements in SIV-infected and uninfected rhesus macaques. The daily turnover rates of CD4(+) T cells, CD4(-) T cells, CD20(+) B cells, and CD16(+) NK cells in normal uninfected rhesus macaques

  2. Evidence that emotion mediates social attention in rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily J Bethell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent work on non-human primates indicates that the allocation of social attention is mediated by characteristics of the attending animal, such as social status and genotype, as well as by the value of the target to which attention is directed. Studies of humans indicate that an individual's emotion state also plays a crucial role in mediating their social attention; for example, individuals look for longer towards aggressive faces when they are feeling more anxious, and this bias leads to increased negative arousal and distraction from other ongoing tasks. To our knowledge, no studies have tested for an effect of emotion state on allocation of social attention in any non-human species. METHODOLOGY: We presented captive adult male rhesus macaques with pairs of adult male conspecific face images - one with an aggressive expression, one with a neutral expression - and recorded gaze towards these images. Each animal was tested twice, once during a putatively stressful condition (i.e. following a veterinary health check, and once during a neutral (or potentially positive condition (i.e. a period of environmental enrichment. Initial analyses revealed that behavioural indicators of anxiety and stress were significantly higher after the health check than during enrichment, indicating that the former caused a negative shift in emotional state. PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: The macaques showed initial vigilance for aggressive faces across both conditions, but subsequent responses differed between conditions. Following the health check, initial vigilance was followed by rapid and sustained avoidance of aggressive faces. By contrast, during the period of enrichment, the macaques showed sustained attention towards the same aggressive faces. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence that shifts in emotion state mediate social attention towards and away from facial cues of emotion in a non-human animal. This work

  3. Pathophysiology of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in rhesus macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safronetz, David; Prescott, Joseph; Feldmann, Friederike; Haddock, Elaine; Rosenke, Rebecca; Okumura, Atsushi; Brining, Douglas; Dahlstrom, Eric; Porcella, Stephen F.; Ebihara, Hideki; Scott, Dana P.; Hjelle, Brian; Feldmann, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    The pathophysiology of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) remains unclear because of a lack of surrogate disease models with which to perform pathogenesis studies. Nonhuman primates (NHP) are considered the gold standard model for studying the underlying immune activation/suppression associated with immunopathogenic viruses such as hantaviruses; however, to date an NHP model for HPS has not been described. Here we show that rhesus macaques infected with Sin Nombre virus (SNV), the primary etiological agent of HPS in North America, propagated in deer mice develop HPS, which is characterized by thrombocytopenia, leukocytosis, and rapid onset of respiratory distress caused by severe interstitial pneumonia. Despite establishing a systemic infection, SNV differentially activated host responses exclusively in the pulmonary endothelium, potentially the mechanism leading to acute severe respiratory distress. This study presents a unique chronological characterization of SNV infection and provides mechanistic data into the pathophysiology of HPS in a closely related surrogate animal model. We anticipate this model will advance our understanding of HPS pathogenesis and will greatly facilitate research toward the development of effective therapeutics and vaccines against hantaviral diseases. PMID:24778254

  4. Estimation of Shear Wave Speed in the Rhesus Macaques Uterine Cervix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Bin; Drehfal, Lindsey C.; Rosado-Mendez, Ivan M.; Guerrero, Quinton W.; Palmeri, Mark L.; Simmons, Heather A.; Feltovich, Helen; Hall, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    Cervical softness is a critical parameter in pregnancy. Clinically, preterm birth is associated with premature cervical softening and post-dates birth is associated with delayed cervical softening. In practice, the assessment of softness is subjective, based on digital examination. Fortunately, objective, quantitative techniques to assess softness and other parameters associated with microstructural cervical change are emerging. One of these is shear wave speed (SWS) estimation. In principle, this allows objective characterization of stiffness because waves travel more slowly in softer tissue. We are studying SWS in humans and rhesus macaques, the latter in order to accelerate translation from bench to bedside. For the current study, we estimated SWS in ex vivo cervices of rhesus macaques, n=24 nulliparous (never given birth) and n=9 multiparous (delivered at least 1 baby). Misoprostol (a prostaglandin used to soften human cervices prior to gynecological procedures) was administered to 13 macaques prior to necropsy (nulliparous: 7, multiparous: 6). SWS measurements were made at predetermined locations from the distal to proximal end of the cervix on both the anterior and posterior cervix, with 5 repeat measures at each location. The intent was to explore macaque cervical microstructure, including biological and spatial variability, to elucidate the similarities and differences between the macaque and the human cervix in order to facilitate future in vivo studies. We found that SWS is dependent on location in the normal nonpregnant macaque cervix, as in the human cervix. Unlike the human cervix, we detected no difference between ripened and unripened rhesus macaque cervix samples, nor nulliparous versus multiparous samples, although we observed a trend toward stiffer tissue in nulliparous samples. We found rhesus macaque cervix to be much stiffer than human, which is important for technique refinement. These findings are useful for guiding study of cervical

  5. Acute-phase responses in healthy and diseased rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Anne Kirstine Havnsøe; Lundsgaard, Jo F. H.; Bakker, Jaco

    2014-01-01

    Five acute-phase reactants—serum amyloid A (SAA), C-reactive protein (CRP), haptoglobin, albumin, and iron—were measured using commercially available assays in 110 healthy rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), and reference intervals were established for future use in health monitoring of this species....... Reference intervals established were as follows: SAA, 29.5–87.7 mg/L; CRP, 0–17.5 mg/L; haptoglobin, 354.3–2,414.7 mg/L; albumin, 36.1–53.0 g/L; and iron, 13.3–40.2 lmol/L. Furthermore, changes in the acute-phase reactants were studied in two additional groups of animals: eight rhesus macaques suffering...... decreases in albumin and iron concentrations were observed. These results show that SAA, CRP, and haptoglobin are positive acute-phase proteins, whereas albumin and iron are negative acute-phase reactants in rhesus macaques....

  6. Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta are natural hosts of specific Staphylococcus aureus lineages.

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    Sanne van den Berg

    Full Text Available Currently, there is no animal model known that mimics natural nasal colonization by Staphylococcus aureus in humans. We investigated whether rhesus macaques are natural nasal carriers of S. aureus. Nasal swabs were taken from 731 macaques. S. aureus isolates were typed by pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE, spa repeat sequencing and multi-locus sequence typing (MLST, and compared with human strains. Furthermore, the isolates were characterized by several PCRs. Thirty-nine percent of 731 macaques were positive for S. aureus. In general, the macaque S. aureus isolates differed from human strains as they formed separate PFGE clusters, 50% of the isolates were untypeable by agr genotyping, 17 new spa types were identified, which all belonged to new sequence types (STs. Furthermore, 66% of macaque isolates were negative for all superantigen genes. To determine S. aureus nasal colonization, three nasal swabs from 48 duo-housed macaques were taken during a 5 month period. In addition, sera were analyzed for immunoglobulin G and A levels directed against 40 staphylococcal proteins using a bead-based flow cytometry technique. Nineteen percent of the animals were negative for S. aureus, and 17% were three times positive. S. aureus strains were easily exchanged between macaques. The antibody response was less pronounced in macaques compared to humans, and nasal carrier status was not associated with differences in serum anti-staphylococcal antibody levels. In conclusion, rhesus macaques are natural hosts of S. aureus, carrying host-specific lineages. Our data indicate that rhesus macaques are useful as an autologous model for studying S. aureus nasal colonization and infection prevention.

  7. Examining the species-specificity of rhesus macaque cytomegalovirus (RhCMV in cynomolgus macaques.

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    Angie K Marsh

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus (CMV is a highly species-specific virus that has co-evolved with its host over millions of years and thus restricting cross-species infection. To examine the extent to which host restriction may prevent cross-species research between closely related non-human primates, we evaluated experimental infection of cynomolgus macaques with a recombinant rhesus macaque-derived CMV (RhCMV-eGFP. Twelve cynomolgus macaques were randomly allocated to three groups: one experimental group (RhCMV-eGFP and two control groups (UV-inactivated RhCMV-eGFP or media alone. The animals were given two subcutaneous inoculations at week 0 and week 8, and a subset of animals received an intravenous inoculation at week 23. No overt clinical or haematological changes were observed and PBMCs isolated from RhCMV-eGFP inoculated animals had comparable eGFP- and IE-1-specific cellular responses to the control animals. Following inoculation with RhCMV-eGFP, we were unable to detect evidence of infection in any blood or tissue samples up to 4 years post-inoculation, using sensitive viral co-culture, qPCR, and Western blot assays. Co-culture of urine and saliva samples demonstrated the presence of endogenous cynomolgus CMV (CyCMV cytopathic effect, however no concomitant eGFP expression was observed. The absence of detectable RhCMV-eGFP suggests that the CyCMV-seropositive cynomolgus macaques were not productively infected with RhCMV-eGFP under these inoculation conditions. In a continued effort to develop CMV as a viral vector for an HIV/SIV vaccine, these studies demonstrate that CMV is highly restricted to its host species and can be highly affected by laboratory cell culture. Consideration of the differences between lab-adapted and primary viruses with respect to species range and cell tropism should be a priority in evaluating CMV as vaccine vector for HIV or other pathogens at the preclinical development stage.

  8. Pupil size and social vigilance in rhesus macaques

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    R Becket Ebitz

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Complex natural environments favor the dynamic alignment of neural processing between goal-relevant stimuli and conflicting but biologically salient stimuli like social competitors or predators. The biological mechanisms that regulate dynamic changes in vigilance have not been fully elucidated. Arousal systems that ready the body to respond adaptively to threat may contribute to dynamic regulation of vigilance. Under conditions of constant luminance, pupil diameter provides a peripheral index of arousal state. Although pupil size varies with the processing of goal-relevant stimuli, it remains unclear whether pupil size also predicts attention to biologically salient objects and events like social competitors, whose presence interferes with current goals. Here we show that pupil size in rhesus macaques both reflects the biological salience of task-irrelevant social distractors and predicts vigilance for these stimuli. We measured pupil size in monkeys performing a visual orienting task in which distractors—monkey faces and phase-scrambled versions of the same images—could appear in a congruent, incongruent, or neutral position relative to a rewarded target. Baseline pupil size under constant illumination predicted distractor interference, consistent with the hypothesis that pupil-linked arousal mechanisms regulate task engagement and distractibility. Notably, pupil size also predicted enhanced vigilance for social distractors, suggesting that pupil-linked arousal may adjust the balance of processing resources between goal-relevant and biologically important stimuli. The magnitude of pupil constriction in response to distractors closely tracked distractor interference, saccade planning and the social relevance of distractors, endorsing the idea that the pupillary light response is modulated by attention. These findings indicate that pupil size indexes dynamic changes in attention evoked by both the social environment and arousal.

  9. Acute-phase responses in healthy and diseased rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krogh, Anne K H; Lundsgaard, Jo F H; Bakker, Jaco; Langermans, Jan A M; Verreck, Frank A W; Kjelgaard-Hansen, Mads; Jacobsen, Stine; Bertelsen, Mads Frost

    2014-06-01

    Five acute-phase reactants-serum amyloid A (SAA), C-reactive protein (CRP), haptoglobin, albumin, and iron-were measured using commercially available assays in 110 healthy rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), and reference intervals were established for future use in health monitoring of this species. Reference intervals established were as follows: SAA, 29.5-87.7 mg/L; CRP, 0-17.5 mg/L; haptoglobin, 354.3-2,414.7 mg/ L; albumin, 36.1-53.0 g/L; and iron, 13.3-40.2 micromol/L. Furthermore, changes in the acute-phase reactants were studied in two additional groups of animals: eight rhesus macaques suffering from acute traumatic injuries and nine rhesus macaques experimentally infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis reflecting a chronic active inflammation. In animals with inflammation, SAA and haptoglobin concentrations were moderately increased, while CRP increased more than 200-fold. In addition, marked decreases in albumin and iron concentrations were observed. These results show that SAA, CRP, and haptoglobin are positive acute-phase proteins, whereas albumin and iron are negative acute-phase reactants in rhesus macaques.

  10. Protection of rhesus macaques from SIV infection by immunization with different experimental SIV vaccines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. de Vries (Petra); J.L. Heeney (Jonathan); J. Boes (Jolande); M.E.M. Dings (Marlinda); E.G.J. Hulskotte (Ellen); R. Dubbes (Rob); W. Koornstra (Willem); P. ten Haaft (Peter); L. Akerblom; S. Eriksson (Sigrid); B. Morein (Bror); S. Norley (Steve); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe immunogenicity and efficacy of an inactivated whole SIVmac (32H) preparation adjuvanted with muramyl dipeptide (SIV-MDP) and a gp120-enriched SIVmac (32H) ISCOM preparation (SIV-ISCOM), were compared by immunizing four rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) four times with SIV-MDP and four

  11. A diffusion-tensor-based white matter atlas for rhesus macaques.

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    Elizabeth Zakszewski

    Full Text Available Atlases of key white matter (WM structures in humans are widely available, and are very useful for region of interest (ROI-based analyses of WM properties. There are histology-based atlases of cortical areas in the rhesus macaque, but none currently of specific WM structures. Since ROI-based analysis of WM pathways is also useful in studies using rhesus diffusion tensor imaging (DTI data, we have here created an atlas based on a publicly available DTI-based template of young rhesus macaques. The atlas was constructed to mimic the structure of an existing human atlas that is widely used, making results translatable between species. Parcellations were carefully hand-drawn on a principle-direction color-coded fractional anisotropy image of the population template. The resulting atlas can be used as a reference to which registration of individual rhesus data can be performed for the purpose of white-matter parcellation. Alternatively, specific ROIs from the atlas may be warped into individual space to be used in ROI-based group analyses. This atlas will be made publicly available so that it may be used as a resource for DTI studies of rhesus macaques.

  12. Psychogenic Alopecia in Rhesus Macaques Presenting as Focally Extensive Alopecia of the Distal Limb

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramer, Joshua A; Mansfield, Keith G; Simmons, Joe H; Bernstein, Joseph A

    2011-01-01

    Focally extensive alopecia affecting the distal limbs is a common clinical finding in rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) colonies and is both a regulatory and colony-health concern. We performed diagnostic examinations including physical exams, bloodwork, skin scrapes, surface cytology, and surface bacterial–fungal cultures on 17 rhesus macaques with this presentation of alopecia. Skin biopsies from alopecic skin obtained from each macaque were compared with those of normal skin from the same animal. Immunohistochemistry and metachromatic staining for inflammatory cells were performed to compare alopecic and normal skin. In addition, we compared these biopsies with those previously obtained from macaques with generalized alopecia and dermal inflammatory infiltrates consistent with cutaneous hypersensitivity disorders and with those from animals with normal haircoats. Bacterial and fungal cultures, skin scrapes, surface cytology, and bloodwork were unremarkable. Affected skin showed only mild histologic alteration, with rare evidence of trichomalacia and follicular loss. Numbers of mast cells and CD3+ lymphocytes did not differ between alopecic and normally haired skin from the same animal. The number of mast cells in alopecic skin from animals in the current cohort was significantly lower than that in skin of animals previously diagnosed with a cutaneous hypersensitivity disorder. Numbers of both mast cells and CD3+ lymphocytes in alopecic skin from the current cohort were similar to those from biopsies of animals with normal haircoats. Together, the clinical findings and pathology are consistent with a psychogenic origin for this pattern of alopecia in rhesus macaques. PMID:21819697

  13. Serotonin transporter genotype modulates social reward and punishment in rhesus macaques.

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    Karli K Watson

    Full Text Available Serotonin signaling influences social behavior in both human and nonhuman primates. In humans, variation upstream of the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR has recently been shown to influence both behavioral measures of social anxiety and amygdala response to social threats. Here we show that length polymorphisms in 5-HTTLPR predict social reward and punishment in rhesus macaques, a species in which 5-HTTLPR variation is analogous to that of humans.In contrast to monkeys with two copies of the long allele (L/L, monkeys with one copy of the short allele of this gene (S/L spent less time gazing at face than non-face images, less time looking in the eye region of faces, and had larger pupil diameters when gazing at photos of a high versus low status male macaques. Moreover, in a novel primed gambling task, presentation of photos of high status male macaques promoted risk-aversion in S/L monkeys but promoted risk-seeking in L/L monkeys. Finally, as measured by a "pay-per-view" task, S/L monkeys required juice payment to view photos of high status males, whereas L/L monkeys sacrificed fluid to see the same photos.These data indicate that genetic variation in serotonin function contributes to social reward and punishment in rhesus macaques, and thus shapes social behavior in humans and rhesus macaques alike.

  14. Pharmacokinetics of Cefovecin in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis), Olive Baboons (Papio anubis), and Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatto)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raabe, Brigitte M.; Lovaglio, Jamie A.; Grover, GScott; Brown, Scott A.; Boucher, Joseph F.; Yuan, Yang; Civil, Jacqueline R.; Gillhouse, Kimberly A.; Stubbs, Makeida N.; Hoggatt, Amber F.; Halliday, Lisa C.; Fortman, Jeffrey D.

    2011-05-01

    Cefovecin sodium is a long-acting, third-generation, cephalosporin antibiotic approved for the treatment of skin infections in dogs and cats. The pharmacokinetic properties of cefovecin were evaluated in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis), olive baboons (Papio anubis), and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatto) by using a single-dose (8 mg/kg SC) dosing regimen. Plasma cefovecin concentrations were determined by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, and a noncompartmental model was used to determine pharmacokinetic parameters. The half-life of cefovecin was 4.95 {+-} 1.47 h in cynomolgus macaques, 9.17 {+-} 1.84 h in olive baboons, and 8.40 {+-} 2.53 h in rhesus macaques. These values are considerably lower than the half-lives previously published for dogs (133 h) and cats (166 h). The extended half-life of cefovecin in dogs and cats is speculated to be due to active reabsorption of drug in the kidney tubules because plasma clearance is well below the normal glomerular filtration rate. In nonhuman primates, renal clearance rates approximated plasma clearance rates, suggesting that active renal reabsorption of cefovecin does not occur in these species. The pharmacokinetic properties of cefovecin in nonhuman primates are vastly different from the pharmacokinetic properties in dogs and cats, precluding its use as a long-acting antibiotic in nonhuman primates. This study highlights the importance of performing pharmacokinetic studies prior to extralabel drug usage.

  15. Haplotype diversity generated by ancient recombination-like events in the MHC of Indian rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doxiadis, Gaby G M; de Groot, Nanine; Otting, Nel; de Vos-Rouweler, Annemiek J M; Bolijn, Maria J; Heijmans, Corrine M C; de Groot, Natasja G; van der Wiel, Marit K H; Remarque, Edmond J; Vangenot, Christelle; Nunes, José M; Sanchez-Mazas, Alicia; Bontrop, Ronald E

    2013-08-01

    The Mamu-A, Mamu-B, and Mamu-DRB genes of the rhesus macaque show several levels of complexity such as allelic heterogeneity (polymorphism), copy number variation, differential segregation of genes/alleles present on a haplotype (diversity) and transcription level differences. A combination of techniques was implemented to screen a large panel of pedigreed Indian rhesus macaques (1,384 individuals representing the offspring of 137 founding animals) for haplotype diversity in an efficient and inexpensive manner. This approach allowed the definition of 140 haplotypes that display a relatively low degree of region variation as reflected by the presence of only 17 A, 18 B and 22 DRB types, respectively, exhibiting a global linkage disequilibrium comparable to that in humans. This finding contrasts with the situation observed in rhesus macaques from other geographic origins and in cynomolgus monkeys from Indonesia. In these latter populations, nearly every haplotype appears to be characterised by a unique A, B and DRB region. In the Indian population, however, a reshuffling of existing segments generated "new" haplotypes. Since the recombination frequency within the core MHC of the Indian rhesus macaques is relatively low, the various haplotypes were most probably produced by recombination events that accumulated over a long evolutionary time span. This idea is in accord with the notion that Indian rhesus macaques experienced a severe reduction in population during the Pleistocene due to a bottleneck caused by geographic changes. Thus, recombination-like processes appear to be a way to expand a diminished genetic repertoire in an isolated and relatively small founder population.

  16. Comparative analysis of genotypic diversity in Entamoeba nuttalli isolates from Tibetan macaques and rhesus macaques in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yue; Feng, Meng; Cai, Junlong; Min, Xiangyang; Zhou, Xingyu; Xu, Qing; Tan, Ning; Cheng, Xunjia; Tachibana, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    We have recently demonstrated the potentially virulent species Entamoeba nuttalli as one of the highly prevalent parasites in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) in Mount Long-hu and Gui-yang in China. Tibetan macaque (Macaca thibetana) is a unique species living in China. To evaluate the prevalence of Entamoeba species in wild Tibetan macaques, we obtained 89 stool samples in Mount E-mei of Si-chuan Province in China. PCR analysis detected E. nuttalli, Entamoeba coli, and Entamoeba polecki ST2 in 17%, 42%, and 66% of the samples, respectively, whereas Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar were undetected. This study is the first to report on the detection of E. nuttalli from Tibetan macaques. Six E. nuttalli isolates were obtained, 18S rRNA gene and six tRNA-linked short tandem repeat (STR) loci of the isolates were sequenced. The Mantel test results gave an r value of 0.97 of relationships between geographical distance and genetic diversity of Chinese E. nuttalli populations, indicating a significant isolation-by-distance effect in Chinese E. nuttalli according to the tRNA-STR loci sequences. Structural analysis of E. nuttalli isolates based on tRNA-linked STR loci demonstrated three Chinese E. nuttalli populations with their respective features, but the Gui-yang population was located in the middle. In the distance-based NJ tree, E. nuttalli isolates were divided into five different branches, and E-mei isolates were attributed to an independent branch to distinguish them from Gui-yang and Long-hu isolates. Genetic analysis in this study provided clues of the genetic differences between E. nuttalli isolates from Tibetan macaques and rhesus macaques in China. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  17. Evolutionary interrogation of human biology in well-annotated genomic framework of rhesus macaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Shi-Jian; Liu, Chu-Jun; Yu, Peng; Zhong, Xiaoming; Chen, Jia-Yu; Yang, Xinzhuang; Peng, Jiguang; Yan, Shouyu; Wang, Chenqu; Zhu, Xiaotong; Xiong, Jingwei; Zhang, Yong E; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming; Li, Chuan-Yun

    2014-05-01

    With genome sequence and composition highly analogous to human, rhesus macaque represents a unique reference for evolutionary studies of human biology. Here, we developed a comprehensive genomic framework of rhesus macaque, the RhesusBase2, for evolutionary interrogation of human genes and the associated regulations. A total of 1,667 next-generation sequencing (NGS) data sets were processed, integrated, and evaluated, generating 51.2 million new functional annotation records. With extensive NGS annotations, RhesusBase2 refined the fine-scale structures in 30% of the macaque Ensembl transcripts, reporting an accurate, up-to-date set of macaque gene models. On the basis of these annotations and accurate macaque gene models, we further developed an NGS-oriented Molecular Evolution Gateway to access and visualize macaque annotations in reference to human orthologous genes and associated regulations (www.rhesusbase.org/molEvo). We highlighted the application of this well-annotated genomic framework in generating hypothetical link of human-biased regulations to human-specific traits, by using mechanistic characterization of the DIEXF gene as an example that provides novel clues to the understanding of digestive system reduction in human evolution. On a global scale, we also identified a catalog of 9,295 human-biased regulatory events, which may represent novel elements that have a substantial impact on shaping human transcriptome and possibly underpin recent human phenotypic evolution. Taken together, we provide an NGS data-driven, information-rich framework that will broadly benefit genomics research in general and serves as an important resource for in-depth evolutionary studies of human biology.

  18. Cochlear implantation feasibility in rhesus macaque monkey: anatomic and radiologic results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marx, Mathieu; Girard, Pascal; Escudé, Bernard; Barone, Pascal; Fraysse, Bernard; Deguine, Olivier

    2013-09-01

    Large animal models of implantable hearing devices are needed to assess innovative technologies before using them in humans. The rhesus macaque has cognitive abilities close to humans and has been used in the past but with noncommercial implants or no detailed radiologic descriptions of the surgical procedures. The aim of this study was to evaluate the feasibility of cochlear implantation in this animal model. We present detailed radiologic data (CT scan and Cone beam computed tomography) from 7 heads of rhesus macaque monkeys coming from autopsy materials. Several comparative measurements were performed with 10 human temporal bones to emphasize similarities and differences between the macaque and the human inner ear. The radiologic analyses helped planning the surgical approach for cochlear implant insertion in the macaque. We managed to perform one full (720 degrees) and 3 partial insertions (190-330 degrees) of cochlear implants in 4 rhesus macaque cochleae, documented by cone beam computed tomography reconstructions. We confirm that the procedure is facilitated in this animal because the cochlea dimensions are close to humans. However, marked differences in the orientation of the external auditory canal and the basal turn must be taken into account. We suggest that the removal of the inferior wall of tympanal bone provides the optimal axis for electrode array insertion. The rhesus macaque monkey is a valid and close-to-human animal model for cochlear implants insertion. Because this species is widely used in both behavioral and physiologic studies, we expect that functional implants can be coupled with electrophysiologic recordings to study the mechanisms of auditory compensation.

  19. Signaling context modulates social function of silent bared-teeth displays in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisner, Brianne A; McCowan, Brenda

    2014-02-01

    The signaling context has been found to change the meaning of the silent bared-teeth display (SBT) in pigtail macaques (Macaca nemestrina) such that the SBT in apparently peaceful contexts communicates subordination, a long-term pattern of behavior, whereas in conflict contexts it communicates immediate submission (PNAS, 104: 1581-1586). However, the context dependent nature of the SBT has not yet been explored in other species. We investigated SBT usage with respect to grooming, severe aggression, and signaler-receiver sex, rank difference, and body size in seven captive groups of rhesus macaques. Peaceful SBTs were given most often to male receivers by male and female signalers whereas conflict SBTs were given to both male and female receivers primarily by female signalers. Male signalers rarely gave SBTs (peaceful or conflict) to female receivers. Unlike pigtail macaques, peaceful SBTs in rhesus were often accompanied by withdrawal behavior (referred to as peaceful SBT-leave), which influenced grooming, but not aggression, at the dyadic level. Severe aggression was less frequent among dyads using peaceful SBTs (regardless of withdrawal behavior) than those using conflict SBTs. In contrast, grooming was more frequent among dyads using peaceful SBT-stay signals than those using peaceful SBT-leave signals or conflict SBTs. In total, our results indicate that peaceful SBTs are a functionally different signal from conflict SBTs in rhesus macaques. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Social management of laboratory rhesus macaques housed in large groups using a network approach: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCowan, Brenda; Beisner, Brianne; Hannibal, Darcy

    2017-12-07

    Biomedical facilities across the nation and worldwide aim to develop cost-effective methods for the reproductive management of macaque breeding groups, typically by housing macaques in large, multi-male multi-female social groups that provide monkey subjects for research as well as appropriate socialization for their psychological well-being. One of the most difficult problems in managing socially housed macaques is their propensity for deleterious aggression. From a management perspective, deleterious aggression (as opposed to less intense aggression that serves to regulate social relationships) is undoubtedly the most problematic behavior observed in group-housed macaques, which can readily escalate to the degree that it causes social instability, increases serious physical trauma leading to group dissolution, and reduces psychological well-being. Thus for both welfare and other management reasons, aggression among rhesus macaques at primate centers and facilities needs to be addressed with a more proactive approach.Management strategies need to be instituted that maximize social housing while also reducing problematic social aggression due to instability using efficacious methods for detection and prevention in the most cost effective manner. Herein we review a new proactive approach using social network analysis to assess and predict deleterious aggression in macaque groups. We discovered three major pathways leading to instability, such as unusually high rates and severity of trauma and social relocations.These pathways are linked either directly or indirectly to network structure in rhesus macaque societies. We define these pathways according to the key intrinsic and extrinsic variables (e.g., demographic, genetic or social factors) that influence network and behavioral measures of stability (see Fig. 1). They are: (1) presence of natal males, (2) matrilineal genetic fragmentation, and (3) the power structure and conflict policing behavior supported by this

  1. High-density rhesus macaque oligonucleotide microarray design using early-stage rhesus genome sequence information and human genome annotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magness Charles L

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Until recently, few genomic reagents specific for non-human primate research have been available. To address this need, we have constructed a macaque-specific high-density oligonucleotide microarray by using highly fragmented low-pass sequence contigs from the rhesus genome project together with the detailed sequence and exon structure of the human genome. Using this method, we designed oligonucleotide probes to over 17,000 distinct rhesus/human gene orthologs and increased by four-fold the number of available genes relative to our first-generation expressed sequence tag (EST-derived array. Results We constructed a database containing 248,000 exon sequences from 23,000 human RefSeq genes and compared each human exon with its best matching sequence in the January 2005 version of the rhesus genome project list of 486,000 DNA contigs. Best matching rhesus exon sequences for each of the 23,000 human genes were then concatenated in the proper order and orientation to produce a rhesus "virtual transcriptome." Microarray probes were designed, one per gene, to the region closest to the 3' untranslated region (UTR of each rhesus virtual transcript. Each probe was compared to a composite rhesus/human transcript database to test for cross-hybridization potential yielding a final probe set representing 18,296 rhesus/human gene orthologs, including transcript variants, and over 17,000 distinct genes. We hybridized mRNA from rhesus brain and spleen to both the EST- and genome-derived microarrays. Besides four-fold greater gene coverage, the genome-derived array also showed greater mean signal intensities for genes present on both arrays. Genome-derived probes showed 99.4% identity when compared to 4,767 rhesus GenBank sequence tag site (STS sequences indicating that early stage low-pass versions of complex genomes are of sufficient quality to yield valuable functional genomic information when combined with finished genome information from

  2. Pyrosequencing as a method for SNP identification in the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta

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    Kanthaswamy S

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta are the primate most used for biomedical research, but phenotypic differences between Indian-origin and Chinese rhesus macaques have encouraged genetic methods for identifying genetic differences between these two populations. The completion of the rhesus genome has led to the identification of many single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs in this species. These single nucleotide polymorphisms have many advantages over the short tandem repeat (STR loci currently used to assay genetic variation. However, the number of currently identified polymorphisms is too small for whole genome analysis or studies of quantitative trait loci. To that end, we tested a combination of methods to identify large numbers of high-confidence SNPs, and screen those with high minor allele frequencies (MAF. Results By testing our previously reported single nucleotide polymorphisms, we identified a subset of high-confidence, high-MAF polymorphisms. Resequencing revealed a large number of regionally specific SNPs not identified through a single pyrosequencing run. By resequencing a pooled sample of four individuals, we reliably identified loci with a MAF of at least 12.5%. Finally, we found that when applied to a larger, geographically variable sample of rhesus, a large proportion of our loci were variable in both populations, and very few loci were ancestry informative. Despite this fact, the SNP loci were more effective at discriminating Indian and Chinese rhesus than STR loci. Conclusion Pyrosequencing and pooled resequencing are viable methods for the identification of high-MAF SNP loci in rhesus macaques. These SNP loci are appropriate for screening both the inter- and intra-population genetic variation.

  3. Laboratory rhesus macaque social housing and social changes: Implications for research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannibal, Darcy L; Bliss-Moreau, Eliza; Vandeleest, Jessica; McCowan, Brenda; Capitanio, John

    2017-01-01

    Macaque species, specifically rhesus (Macaca mulatta), are the most common nonhuman primates (NHPs) used in biomedical research due to their suitability as a model of high priority diseases (e.g., HIV, obesity, cognitive aging), cost effective breeding and housing compared to most other NHPs, and close evolutionary relationship to humans. With this close evolutionary relationship, however, is a shared adaptation for a socially stimulating environment, without which both their welfare and suitability as a research model are compromised. While outdoor social group housing provides the best approximation of a social environment that matches the macaque behavioral biology in the wild, this is not always possible at all facilities, where animals may be housed indoors in small groups, in pairs, or alone. Further, animals may experience many housing changes in their lifetime depending on project needs, changes in social status, management needs, or health concerns. Here, we review the evidence for the physiological and health effects of social housing changes and the potential impacts on research outcomes for studies using macaques, particularly rhesus. We situate our review in the context of increasing regulatory pressure for research facilities to both house NHPs socially and mitigate trauma from social aggression. To meet these regulatory requirements and further refine the macaque model for research, significant advances must be made in our understanding and management of rhesus macaque social housing, particularly pair-housing since it is the most common social housing configuration for macaques while on research projects. Because most NHPs are adapted for sociality, a social context is likely important for improving repeatability, reproducibility, and external validity of primate biomedical research. Am. J. Primatol. 79:e22528, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. Brief communication: Hip joint mobility in free-ranging rhesus macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hammond, Ashley S.; Johnson, Victoria P.; Higham, James P.

    2016-01-01

    Objectives We aimed to test for differences in hip joint range of motion (ROM) between captive and free-ranging rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), particularly for hip joint abduction, which previous studies of captive macaques have found to be lower than predicted. Materials and Methods Hip ROM was assessed following standard joint measurement methodology in anesthetized adult free-ranging rhesus macaques (n=39) from Cayo Santiago, and compared to published ROM data from captive rhesus macaques (n=16) (Hammond 2014a, American Journal of Physical Anthropology). Significant differences between populations were detected using one-way analysis of variance (p<0.05). Results In a sample of pooled sexes and ages, free-ranging macaques are capable of increased hip abduction, flexion, and internal rotation compared to captive individuals. These differences in joint excursion resulted in free-ranging individuals having significantly increased ROM for hip adduction-abduction, rotation, flexion-extension, and the distance spanned by the knee during hip abduction. When looking at data for a smaller sample of age-matched males, fewer ROM differences are significant, but free-ranging males have significantly increased hip abduction, internal rotation, range of flexion-extension, and distance spanned by the knee during hip abduction compared to captive males of similar age. Discussion Our results suggest that a spatially restrictive environment results in decreased hip mobility in cage-confined animals and ultimately limits the potential limb postures in captive macaques. These results have implications for selection of animal samples in model validation studies, as well as laboratory animal husbandry practices. PMID:27731892

  5. Serologic host response to Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni in socially housed Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta

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    Kienesberger Sabine

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori are successful colonizers of the human gastric mucosa. Colonization increases the risk of peptic ulcer disease and adenocarcinoma. However, potential benefits of H. pylori colonization include protection against early-onset asthma and against gastrointestinal infections. Campylobacter jejuni are a leading cause of bacterial diarrhea and complications include Guillain-Barré syndrome. Here, we describe the development of reliable serological assays to detect antibodies against those two bacteria in Rhesus macaques and investigated their distribution within a social group of monkeys. Methods Two cohorts of monkeys were analyzed. The first cohort consisted of 30 monkeys and was used to establish an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for H. pylori antibodies detection. To evaluate colonization of those macaques, stomach biopsies were collected and analyzed for the presence of H. pylori by histology and culture. C. jejuni ELISAs were established using human serum with known C. jejuni antibody status. Next, plasma samples of the 89 macaques (Cohort 2 were assayed for antibodies and then statistically analyzed. Results An H. pylori IgG ELISA, which was 100% specific and 93% sensitive, was established. In contrast, the IgA ELISA was only 82% specific and 61% sensitive. The CagA IgG assay was 100% sensitive and 61% of the macaques were positive. In cohort 2, 62% macaques were H. pylori sero-positive and 52% were CagA positive. The prevalence of H. pylori IgG and CagA IgG increased with monkey age as described for humans. Of the 89 macaques 52% showed IgG against C. jejuni but in contrast to H. pylori, the sero-prevalence was not associated with increasing age. However, there was a drop in the IgG (but not in IgA mean values between infant and juvenile macaques, similar to trends described in humans. Conclusions Rhesus macaques have widespread exposure to H. pylori and C. jejuni, reflecting their social

  6. Zika Virus Tissue and Blood Compartmentalization in Acute Infection of Rhesus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coffey, Lark L; Pesavento, Patricia A; Keesler, Rebekah I; Singapuri, Anil; Watanabe, Jennifer; Watanabe, Rie; Yee, JoAnn; Bliss-Moreau, Eliza; Cruzen, Christina; Christe, Kari L; Reader, J Rachel; von Morgenland, Wilhelm; Gibbons, Anne M; Allen, A Mark; Linnen, Jeff; Gao, Kui; Delwart, Eric; Simmons, Graham; Stone, Mars; Lanteri, Marion; Bakkour, Sonia; Busch, Michael; Morrison, John; Van Rompay, Koen K A

    2017-01-01

    Animal models of Zika virus (ZIKV) are needed to better understand tropism and pathogenesis and to test candidate vaccines and therapies to curtail the pandemic. Humans and rhesus macaques possess similar fetal development and placental biology that is not shared between humans and rodents. We inoculated 2 non-pregnant rhesus macaques with a 2015 Brazilian ZIKV strain. Consistent with most human infections, the animals experienced no clinical disease but developed short-lived plasma viremias that cleared as neutralizing antibody developed. In 1 animal, viral RNA (vRNA) could be detected longer in whole blood than in plasma. Despite no major histopathologic changes, many adult tissues contained vRNA 14 days post-infection with highest levels in hemolymphatic tissues. These observations warrant further studies to investigate ZIKV persistence and its potential clinical implications for transmission via blood products or tissue and organ transplants.

  7. Zika Virus Tissue and Blood Compartmentalization in Acute Infection of Rhesus Macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lark L Coffey

    Full Text Available Animal models of Zika virus (ZIKV are needed to better understand tropism and pathogenesis and to test candidate vaccines and therapies to curtail the pandemic. Humans and rhesus macaques possess similar fetal development and placental biology that is not shared between humans and rodents. We inoculated 2 non-pregnant rhesus macaques with a 2015 Brazilian ZIKV strain. Consistent with most human infections, the animals experienced no clinical disease but developed short-lived plasma viremias that cleared as neutralizing antibody developed. In 1 animal, viral RNA (vRNA could be detected longer in whole blood than in plasma. Despite no major histopathologic changes, many adult tissues contained vRNA 14 days post-infection with highest levels in hemolymphatic tissues. These observations warrant further studies to investigate ZIKV persistence and its potential clinical implications for transmission via blood products or tissue and organ transplants.

  8. Brain xanthophyll content and exploratory gene expression analysis: subspecies differences in rhesus macaque

    OpenAIRE

    Mohn, Emily S.; Erdman, John W.; Neuringer, Martha; Kuchan, Matthew J.; Johnson, Elizabeth J.

    2017-01-01

    Background The dietary xanthophylls, lutein and zeaxanthin, accumulate in primate retina and brain, and emerging evidence indicates neural lutein content may be beneficial for cognition. Neural xanthophyll content in primates varies greatly among individuals, and genetic factors are likely to be significant contributors. Subspecies of rhesus macaques originating from different geographic locations are known to differ genetically, but the effect of origin on gene expression and carotenoid stat...

  9. Renal pigmentation due to chronic bismuth administration in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A L; Blaine, E T; Lewis, A D

    2015-05-01

    Renal pigmentation due to the administration of exogenous compounds is an uncommon finding in most species. This report describes renal pigmentation and intranuclear inclusions of the proximal convoluted tubules due to chronic bismuth administration in a rhesus macaque. An 11-year-old Indian-origin rhesus macaque with a medical history of chronic intermittent vomiting had been treated with bismuth subsalicylate, famotidine, and omeprazole singly or in combination over the course of 8 years. At necropsy, the renal cortices were diffusely dark green to black. Light and electron microscopy revealed intranuclear inclusions within the majority of renal proximal tubular epithelial cells. These inclusions appeared magenta to brown when stained with hematoxylin and eosin and were negative by the Ziehl-Neelsen acid-fast stain. Elemental analysis performed on frozen kidney measured bismuth levels to be markedly elevated at 110.6 ppm, approximately 500 to 1000 times acceptable limits. To our knowledge, this is the first report of renal bismuth deposition in a rhesus macaque resulting in renal pigmentation and intranuclear inclusions. © The Author(s) 2014.

  10. Personality Structure in Brown Capuchin Monkeys: Comparisons with Chimpanzees, Orangutans, and Rhesus Macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, F. Blake; Lee, Phyllis C.; Buchanan-Smith, Hannah M.; Brosnan, Sarah F.; Thierry, Bernard; Paukner, Annika; de Waal, Frans B. M.; Widness, Jane; Essler, Jennifer L.; Weiss, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Species comparisons of personality structure (i.e. how many personality dimensions and the characteristics of those dimensions) can facilitate questions about the adaptive function of personality in nonhuman primates. Here we investigate personality structure in the brown capuchin monkey (Sapajus apella), a New World primate species, and compare this structure to those of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), orangutans (Pongo spp.), and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Brown capuchins evolved behavioral and cognitive traits that are qualitatively similar to those of great apes, and individual differences in behavior and cognition are closely associated with differences in personality. Thus, we hypothesized that brown capuchin personality structure would overlap more with great apes than with rhesus macaques. We obtained personality ratings from seven sites on 127 brown capuchin monkeys. Principal-components analysis identified five personality dimensions (Assertiveness, Openness, Neuroticism, Sociability, and Attentiveness), which were reliable across raters and, in a subset of subjects, significantly correlated with relevant behaviors up to a year later. Comparisons between species revealed that brown capuchins and great apes overlapped in personality structure, particularly chimpanzees in the case of Neuroticism. However, in some respects (i.e. capuchin Sociability and Openness) the similarities between capuchins and great apes were not significantly greater than those between capuchins and rhesus macaques. We discuss the relevance of our results to brown capuchin behavior, and the evolution of personality structure in primates. PMID:23668695

  11. Mycobacterium kansasii Isolated from Tuberculinpositive Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) in the Absence of Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipley, Steven T; Johnson, David K; Roodgar, Morteza; Smith, David Glenn; Montgomery, Charles A; Lloyd, Steven M; Higgins, James A; Kriel, Edwin H; Klein, Hilton J; Porter, William P; Nazareno, Jerome B; Houghton, Paul W; Panda, Aruna; DeTolla, Louis J

    2017-08-01

    Mycobacterial infections are of primary health concern in NHP colonies in biomedical research. NHP are constantly monitored and screened for Mycobacterium spp. We report 6 Chinese-origin rhesus macaques infected with Mycobacterium kansasii that exhibited positive tuberculin skin tests in the absence of disease. Two of these macaques were being used for research purposes; the remaining 4 macaques were residing at the contract quarantine company. Histopathology and acid-fast staining of fixed tissues from all macaques showed that all were free of disease. Thoracic radiographs were negative for any signs of disease or infection. Samples from bronchial lavage and tissues including lung, spleen, hilar and mesenteric lymph nodes tested negative by PCR assay for Mycobacterium spp. One of the research macaques tested culture-positive for M. kansasii and a poorly characterized M. avium complex organism. One macaque from the contract quarantine facility tested culture positive for M. kansasii. Genomic testing and target gene RNA expression analysis of the 2 M. kansasii isolates were performed to evaluate possible kinship and affected genes that might contribute to susceptibility to mycobacterial infection. Genotyping of the 2 isolates revealed 2 genetically distinct strains (strains 1 and 4). The presence of positive tuberculin skin tests in the absence of disease raises serious concerns regarding diagnostic methods used for infected NHP.

  12. Pathologic and immunologic characteristics of coxsackievirus A16 infection in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jingjing; Zhang, Ying; Zhang, Xiaolong; Hu, Yajie; Dong, Chenghong; Liu, Longding; Yang, Erxia; Che, Yanchun; Pu, Jing; Wang, Xi; Song, Jie; Liao, Yun; Feng, Min; Liang, Yan; Zhao, Ting; Jiang, Li; He, Zhanlong; Lu, Shuaiyao; Wang, Lichun; Li, Yanyan; Fan, Shengtao; Guo, Lei; Li, Qihan

    2017-01-01

    Coxsackievirus A16 (CV-A16) causes human hand, foot and mouth disease, but its pathogenesis is unclear. In rhesus macaques, CV-A16 infection causes characteristic vesicles in the oral mucosa and limbs as well as viremia and positive viral loads in the tissues, suggesting that these animals reflect the pathologic process of the infection. An immunologic analysis indicated a defective immune response, which included undetectable neutralizing antibodies and IFN-γ-specific memory T-cells in macaques infected with CV-A16. Furthermore, existing neutralizing antibodies in macaques immunized with the inactivated vaccine were surprisingly unable to protect against a viral challenge despite the presence of a positive T-cell memory response against viral antigens. The virus was capable of infecting pre-conventional dendritic cells and replicating within them, which may correlate with the immunological characteristics observed in the animals. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Effects of Human Management Events on Conspecific Aggression in Captive Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta).

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    Theil, Jacob H; Beisner, Brianne A; Hill, Ashley E; McCowan, Brenda

    2017-03-01

    Conspecific aggression in outdoor-housed rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) at primate research facilities is a leading source of trauma and can potentially influence animal wellbeing and research quality. Although aggression between macaques is a normal part of daily social interactions, human presence might affect the frequency of various behaviors and instigate increases in conspecific aggression. We sought to determine how and which human management events affect conspecific aggression both immediately after an event and throughout the course of a day. From June 2008 through December 2009, we recorded agonistic encounters among macaques living in 7 social groups in large outdoor field cages. Behavioral data were then synchronized with specific management events (for example, feeding, enclosure cleaning, animal catching) that occurred within or near the enclosure. By using an Information Theoretical approach, 2 generalized linear mixed models were developed to estimate the effects of human management events on 1) aggression after individual management events and 2) daily levels of aggression. Univariate analysis revealed an increase in the rate of aggression after a management event occurred. The best predictor of aggression in a cage was the type of management event that occurred. Various factors including the number of daily management events, the total time of management events, the technicians involved, reproductive season, and their interactions also showed significant associations with daily aggression levels. Our findings demonstrate that human management events are associated with an increase in conspecific aggression between rhesus macaques and thus have implications regarding how humans manage primates in research facilities.

  14. The influence of age and sex on the cell counts of peripheral blood leukocyte subpopulations in Chinese rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Hou-Jun; Zhang, Gao-Hong; Wang, Rui-Rui; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2009-12-01

    Non-human primates such as Chinese rhesus macaques are the favorable models for preclinical study of potential therapeutic drugs, vaccines and mechanisms of human diseases. Little is known about the normal levels of leukocyte subpopulations of Chinese rhesus macaques. To obtain these data, 100 blood samples from Chinese rhesus macaques were collected. The normal range of major leukocyte subpopulations, such as T lymphocytes, B lymphocytes, monocytes, myeloid dendritic cells (mDCs) and plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDCs), were quantitatively analyzed by flow cytometry through BD trucount tubes. The influence of age and sex on the cell counts of leukocyte subpopulations was analyzed. The counts of CD3(+) T cells, CD3(+)CD4(+) T cells, CD3(+)CD8(+) T cells and B cells decreased with age, but those of monocytes, mDCs and pDCs had no significant correlation with age. Significant differences existed in the cell counts of most leukocyte subpopulations between the male and female groups except pDCs. And the values of the females were higher than those of the males. The study provided basic information about the leukocyte subpopulations of Chinese rhesus macaques, and it may be valuable for immunobiological study of Chinese rhesus macaques.

  15. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of rhesus macaque CD8αα homodimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zong, Lili; Chen, Yong; Yan, Jinghua; Zhang, Jianhua

    2010-01-01

    CD8α exodomain protein, a crucial immune-system factor in rhesus macaque (M. mulatta), one of the best animal models for vaccine design, was assembled and crystallized. The full structure data will contribute to future studies of immune responses in rhesus macaques. As a T-cell co-receptor, CD8 binds to MHC class I molecules and plays a pivotal role in the activation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. To date, structures of CD8 have been solved for two different mammals: human and mouse. The infection of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) by simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) is the best animal model for studying HIV. In this study, the rhesus macaque CD8 (rCD8) αα homodimer was obtained and rCD8α exodomain protein crystals were successfully obtained for further structural analysis. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.4 Å. The crystal belonged to space group P2 1 2 1 2 1 , with unit-cell parameters a = 46.52, b = 56.28, c = 82.40 Å. These data will facilitate further studies on the structural differences between these CD8 structures and the cellular immune responses of rhesus macaque

  16. Training rhesus macaques for venipuncture using positive reinforcement techniques: a comparison with chimpanzees.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coleman, Kristine; Pranger, Lindsay; Maier, Adriane; Lambeth, Susan P; Perlman, Jaine E; Thiele, Erica; Schapiro, Steven J

    2008-01-01

    As more emphasis is placed on enhancing the psychological well-being of nonhuman primates, many research facilities have started using positive reinforcement training (PRT) techniques to train primates to voluntarily participate in husbandry and research procedures. PRT increases the animal's control over its environment and desensitizes the animal to stressful stimuli. Blood draw is a common husbandry and research procedure that can be particularly stressful for nonhuman primate subjects. Although studies have demonstrated that chimpanzees can be trained for in-cage venipuncture using PRT only, fewer studies have demonstrated success using similar techniques to train macaques. It is often assumed that macaques cannot be trained in the same manner as apes. In this study, we compare PRT data from singly housed adult rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta; n = 8) with data from group-housed adult chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes; n = 4). All subjects were trained to place an arm in a 'blood sleeve' and remain stationary for venipuncture. Both facilities used similar PRT techniques. We were able to obtain repeated blood samples from 75% of the macaques and all of the chimpanzees. The training time did not differ significantly between the 2 species. These data demonstrate that macaques can be trained for venipuncture in a manner similar to that used for chimpanzees.

  17. Reduced TCOF1 mRNA level in a rhesus macaque with Treacher Collins-like syndrome: further evidence for haploinsufficiency of treacle as the cause of disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shows, Kathryn H; Ward, Christy; Summers, Laura; Li, Lin; Ziegler, Gregory R; Hendrickx, Andrew G; Shiang, Rita

    2006-02-01

    Mutations in the human gene TCOF1 cause a mandibulofacial dysostosis known as Treacher Collins syndrome (TCS). An infant rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) that displayed the TCS phenotype was identified at the California National Primate Research Center. The TCOF1 coding region was cloned from a normal rhesus macaque and sequenced. The rhesus macaque homolog of TCOF1 is 91.6% identical in cDNA sequence and 93.8% identical in translated protein sequence compared to human TCOF1. Sequencing of TCOF1 in the TCS-affected rhesus macaque showed no mutations within the coding region or splice sites; however, real-time quantitative PCR showed an 87% reduction of spleen TCOF1 mRNA level in the TCS affected macaque when compared with normal macaque spleen.

  18. An experimental examination of female responses to infant face coloration in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, Melissa S; Waitt, Corri; Maestripieri, Dario

    2006-11-01

    In many primates, infants possess distinctive coloration that changes as a function of age. This colour is thought to serve the purpose of eliciting caretaking behaviour from the mother as well as other conspecifics. The present study investigated the responses of adult female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) to pictures of infant faces in relation to infant age and facial coloration. Study animals were shown digitized images of neonates and 5-6-month-old infants displaying either unaltered facial colour, pink neonatal colour, or novel (green) facial colour. While infant and neonate faces of all colours elicited the attention of adult females, pink neonatal facial coloration did not appear to be especially attractive to subjects in contrast with the findings from an earlier study [Higley, J.D., Hopkins, W.D., Hirsch, R.M. Marra, L.M. Suomi S.J., 1987. Preferences of female rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) for infantile coloration. Dev. Psychobiol. 20, 7-18]. The results suggest that infant facial colour is not particularly important in mediating infant attractiveness to rhesus macaque females as previously suggested or that other infantile facial characteristics might be more important than colour in eliciting caretaking behaviours amongst females.

  19. Pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine following intravenous and intramuscular administration in male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, Kristi R.; Pypendop, Bruno H.; Christe, Kari L.

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the pharmacokinetics of buprenorphine in conscious rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) after intravenous (IV) and intramuscular (IM) administration. Four healthy, opioid-naïve, socially-housed, adult male macaques were used. Buprenorphine (0.03 mg/kg) was administered intravenously as a bolus or intramuscularly on separate occasions. Blood samples were collected prior to, and up to 24 h, post-administration. Serum buprenorphine concentrations were analyzed with liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was performed with commercially available software. Mean residence time in the IV study as compared to the IM study was 177 (159–189) minutes vs. 185 (174–214) minutes, respectively [median (range)]. In the IV study, concentration back extrapolated to time zero was found to be 33.0 (16.8–57.0) ng/mL [median (range)]. On the other hand, the maximum serum concentration found in the IM study was 11.8 (6.30–14.8) ng/mL [median (range)]. Rhesus macaques maintained concentrations greater than 0.10 ng/mL for over 24 h in the IV study and over 12 h in the IM study. Bioavailability was found to be 68.1 (59.3–71.2)% [median (range)]. No significant adverse effects were observed in the monkeys at the 0.03 mg/kg dose of buprenorphine during either study. PMID:24666428

  20. Comparison of noncontact infrared thermometry and 3 commercial subcutaneous temperature transponding microchips with rectal thermometry in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunell, Marla K

    2012-07-01

    This study compared a noncontact infrared laser thermometer and 3 different brands of subcutaneous temperature transponding microchips with rectal thermometry in 50 rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). The data were analyzed by using intraclass correlation coefficients and limits of agreement. In addition, the technical capabilities and practicality of the thermometers in the clinical setting were reviewed. None of the alternative techniques investigated was equivalent to rectal thermometry in rhesus macaques. Temperatures obtained by using microchips had higher correlation and agreed more closely with rectal temperatures than did those obtained by the noncontact infrared method. However, transponding microchips did not yield consistent results. Due to difficulty in positioning nonsedated macaques in their homecage, subcutaneous microchips were not practical in the clinical setting. Furthermore, pair-housed macaques may be able to break or remove microchips from their cagemates.

  1. Histopathological observation of immunized rhesus macaques with plague vaccines after subcutaneous infection of Yersinia pestis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guang Tian

    Full Text Available In our previous study, complete protection was observed in Chinese-origin rhesus macaques immunized with SV1 (20 µg F1 and 10 µg rV270 and SV2 (200 µg F1 and 100 µg rV270 subunit vaccines and with EV76 live attenuated vaccine against subcutaneous challenge with 6×10(6 CFU of Y. pestis. In the present study, we investigated whether the vaccines can effectively protect immunized animals from any pathologic changes using histological and immunohistochemical techniques. In addition, the glomerular basement membranes (GBMs of the immunized animals and control animals were checked by electron microscopy. The results show no signs of histopathological lesions in the lungs, livers, kidneys, lymph nodes, spleens and hearts of the immunized animals at Day 14 after the challenge, whereas pathological alterations were seen in the corresponding tissues of the control animals. Giemsa staining, ultrastructural examination, and immunohistochemical staining revealed bacteria in some of the organs of the control animals, whereas no bacterium was observed among the immunized animals. Ultrastructural observation revealed that no glomerular immune deposits on the GBM. These observations suggest that the vaccines can effectively protect animals from any pathologic changes and eliminate Y. pestis from the immunized animals. The control animals died from multi-organ lesions specifically caused by the Y. pestis infection. We also found that subcutaneous infection of animals with Y. pestis results in bubonic plague, followed by pneumonic and septicemic plagues. The histopathologic features of plague in rhesus macaques closely resemble those of rodent and human plagues. Thus, Chinese-origin rhesus macaques serve as useful models in studying Y. pestis pathogenesis, host response and the efficacy of new medical countermeasures against plague.

  2. Social relevance drives viewing behavior independent of low-level salience in rhesus macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James Andrew Solyst

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Quantifying attention to social stimuli during the viewing of complex social scenes with eye tracking has proven to be a sensitive method in the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorders years before average clinical diagnosis. Rhesus macaques provide an ideal model for understanding the mechanisms underlying social viewing behavior, but to date no comparable behavioral task has been developed for use in monkeys. Using a novel scene-viewing task, we monitored the gaze of three rhesus macaques while they freely viewed well-controlled composed social scenes and analyzed the time spent viewing objects and monkeys. In each of six behavioral sessions, monkeys viewed a set of 90 images (540 unique scenes with each image presented twice. In two-thirds of the repeated scenes, either a monkey or an object was replaced with a novel item (manipulated scenes. When viewing a repeated scene, monkeys made longer fixations and shorter saccades, shifting from a rapid orienting to global scene contents to a more local analysis of fewer items. In addition to this repetition effect, in manipulated scenes, monkeys demonstrated robust memory by spending more time viewing the replaced items. By analyzing attention to specific scene content, we found that monkeys strongly preferred to view conspecifics and that this was not related to their salience in terms of low-level image features. A model-free analysis of viewing statistics found that monkeys that were viewed earlier and longer had direct gaze and redder sex skin around their face and rump, two important visual social cues. These data provide a quantification of viewing strategy, memory and social preferences in rhesus macaques viewing complex social scenes, and they provide an important baseline with which to compare to the effects of therapeutics aimed at enhancing social cognition.

  3. The effect of pentobarbital sodium and propofol anesthesia on multifocal electroretinograms in rhesus macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Charlene B. Y.; Ver Hoeve, James N.; Nork, T. Michael

    2012-01-01

    We compared the suitability of pentobarbital sodium (PB) and propofol (PF) anesthetics for multifocal electroretinograms (mfERGs) in rhesus macaques. mfERGs were collected from 4 ocularly normal rhesus macaques. All animals were pre-anesthetized with intramuscular ketamine (10-15 mg/kg). Intravenous PB induction/maintenance levels were 15 mg/kg/2-10 mg/kg, and for PF, 2-5 mg/kg/6-24 mg/kg/h. There were 3 testing sessions with PB anesthesia and 5-7 testing sessions with PF anesthesia. All PB sessions were carried out before PF. First-order (K1) and second-order (first slice) kernels (K2.1) response density amplitude (RDA), implicit time (IT), and root mean square signal-to-noise ratios (RMS SNR) of the low-frequency (LFC) and high-frequency (HFC) components were evaluated. The use of PF or PB anesthesia resulted in robust, replicable mfERGs in rhesus macaques; however, RMS SNR of K1 LFC in ring and quadrant analyses was significantly larger for PF than for PB. Additionally, K1 RDA under PF was significantly larger than under PB for N1, P1 and P2 components (ring and quadrant), and for N2 (quadrant). PF IT was significantly prolonged (<1 ms) relative to PB IT for N1, P1 (ring) and N1 (quadrant) while PB IT was significantly prolonged (0.8-4.2 ms) relative to PF IT for N2 and P2 (ring and quadrant). K1 HFC and K2.1 LFC did not differ significantly between PB and PF in the ring or quadrant analyses. The response differences found with PB and PF anesthesia likely arise from variable relative effects of the anesthetics on retinal γ-aminobutyric acid (GABAA) receptors, and in part, on glycine and on glutamate receptors. Given the advantages of a stable anesthetic plane with continuous intravenous infusion and a smoother, more rapid recovery, PF is an appealing alternative for mfERG testing in rhesus macaques. PMID:22200766

  4. Amygdala lesions in rhesus macaques decrease attention to threat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Monte, Olga; Costa, Vincent D.; Noble, Pamela L.; Murray, Elisabeth A.; Averbeck, Bruno B.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from animal and human studies has suggested that the amygdala plays a role in detecting threat and in directing attention to the eyes. Nevertheless, there has been no systematic investigation of whether the amygdala specifically facilitates attention to the eyes or whether other features can also drive attention via amygdala processing. The goal of the present study was to examine the effects of amygdala lesions in rhesus monkeys on attentional capture by specific facial features, as well as gaze patterns and changes in pupil dilation during free viewing. Here we show reduced attentional capture by threat stimuli, specifically the mouth, and reduced exploration of the eyes in free viewing in monkeys with amygdala lesions. Our findings support a role for the amygdala in detecting threat signals and in directing attention to the eye region of faces when freely viewing different expressions. PMID:26658670

  5. Pediatric hepatic hemangiosarcoma in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejía, A.F.; Gierbolini, L.; Jacob, B.; Westmoreland, S.V.

    2009-01-01

    Background Pediatric hepatic angiosarcoma is a rare condition in children with poor prognosis. Microscopically this neoplasm has a particular ‘Kaposi-form’ arrangement. Hemangiosarcoma in non-human primates is a rare finding. Methods Gross and microscopic examination of a 3-year-old rhesus were performed. Immunohistochemistry was used to characterize the hepatic hemangiosarcoma. Results The gross necropsy revealed hemoabdomen and a 4 × 3 × 3 cm mass in the liver with multiple smaller masses throughout the hepatic parenchyma. Histopathology confirmed a poorly differentiated hemangiosarcoma. Other organs submitted were free of metastases. Conclusions Hemangiosarcoma in non-human primates has been rarely reported. Diagnosis was confirmed by expression of endothelial-specific markers CD31 and vWF by immunohistochemistry. Due to the young age of this monkey and the particular solid pattern throughout the mass this neoplasm resembles pediatric hepatic angiosarcoma in humans. PMID:18671765

  6. Delayed imitation of lipsmacking gestures by infant rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annika Paukner

    Full Text Available Human infants are capable of accurately matching facial gestures of an experimenter within a few hours after birth, a phenomenon called neonatal imitation. Recent studies have suggested that rather than being a simple reflexive-like behavior, infants exert active control over imitative responses and 'provoke' previously imitated gestures even after a delay of up to 24 h. Delayed imitation is regarded as the hallmark of a sophisticated capacity to control and flexibly engage in affective communication and has been described as an indicator of innate protoconversational readiness. However, we are not the only primates to exhibit neonatal imitation, and delayed imitation abilities may not be uniquely human. Here we report that 1-week-old infant rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta who show immediate imitation of a lipsmacking gesture also show delayed imitation of lipsmacking, facilitated by a tendency to refrain from lipsmacking toward a still face during baseline measurements. Individual differences in delayed imitation suggest that differentially matured cortical mechanisms may be involved, allowing some newborns macaques to actively participate in communicative exchanges from birth. Macaque infants are endowed with basic social competencies of intersubjective communication that indicate cognitive and emotional commonality between humans and macaques, which may have evolved to nurture an affective mother-infant relationship in primates.

  7. Pair housing for female longtailed and rhesus macaques in the laboratory: behavior in protected contact versus full contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Kate C; Crockett, Carolyn M; Lee, Grace H; Oettinger, Brooke C; Schoof, Valérie; Thom, Jinhee P

    2012-01-01

    Pair housing for caged macaques in the laboratory generally allows unrestricted tactile contact but, less commonly, may involve limited contact via grooming-contact bars or perforated panels. The purpose of using this protected contact housing, which prevents entry into pair-mates' cages, typically is to accommodate research and management requirements. The study used behavioral data collected on 12 pairs of female longtailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis) at the Washington National Primate Research Center and 7 pairs of female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) housed at the Tulane National Primate Research Center to assess the relative benefits of protected versus full protected contact. The study collected data in stable pairs housed first in protected contact followed by full contact. Species combined, the study found the presence of the panel was associated with lower levels of social grooming and higher levels of self-grooming, abnormal behavior, and tension-related behavior. Within species, only the protected- versus full-contact contrasts for abnormal and tension were statistically significant-and only for rhesus macaques. Results suggest that for female rhesus macaques, potential disadvantages or inconveniences of full contact should be balanced against the improved behavioral profile in comparison to protected contact. The use of protected contact among female longtailed macaques does not appear to require the same cost-benefit analysis. Copyright © Taylor & Francis Group, LLC

  8. Dynamic Interaction of Enterovirus 71 and Dendritic Cells in Infected Neonatal Rhesus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ting; Zhang, Zhixiao; Zhang, Ying; Feng, Min; Fan, Shengtao; Wang, Lichun; Liu, Longding; Wang, Xi; Wang, Qinglin; Zhang, Xiaolong; Wang, Jingjing; Liao, Yun; He, Zhanlong; Lu, Shuaiyao; Yang, Huai; Li, Qihan

    2017-01-01

    Enterovirus 71 (EV71) is one of the main pathogens responsible for hand, foot, and mouth disease (HFMD). Infection with EV71 can lead to severe clinical disease via extensive infections of either the respiratory or alimentary tracts in children. Based on the previous pathological study of EV71 infections in neonatal rhesus macaques, our work using this animal model and an EV71 chimera that expresses enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP-EV71) primarily explored where EV71 localizes and proliferates, and the subsequent initiation of the pathological process. The chimeric EGFP-EV71 we constructed was similar to the wild-type EV71 (WT-EV71) virus in its biological characteristics. Similar clinical manifestations and histo-pathologic features were equally displayed in neonatal rhesus macaques infected with either WT-EV71 or EGFP-EV71 via the respiratory route. Fluorescent signal tracing in tissues from the animals infected with EGFP-EV71 showed that EV71 proliferated primarily in the respiratory tract epithelium and the associated lymphoid tissues. Immunofluorescence and flow cytometry analyses revealed that EV71 was able to enter a pre-conventional dendritic cell (DC) population at the infection sites. The viremia identified in the macaques infected by WT-EV71 or EGFP-EV71 was present even in the artificial presence of a specific antibody against the virus. Our results suggest that EV71 primarily proliferates in the respiratory tract epithelium followed by subsequent entry into a pre-cDC population of DCs. These cells are then hijacked by the virus and they can potentially transmit the virus from local sites to other organs through the blood circulation during the infection process. Our results suggest that the EV71 infection process in this DC population does not interfere with the induction of an independent immune response against the EV71 infection in the neonatal macaques.

  9. The most common Chinese rhesus macaque MHC class I molecule shares peptide binding repertoire with the HLA-B7 supertype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Christopher; Southwood, Scott; Hoof, Ilka; Rudersdorf, Richard; Peters, Bjoern; Sidney, John; Pinilla, Clemencia; Marcondes, Maria Cecilia Garibaldi; Ling, Binhua; Marx, Preston; Sette, Alessandro

    2010-01-01

    Of the two rhesus macaque subspecies used for AIDS studies, the Simian immunodeficiency virus-infected Indian rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) is the most established model of HIV infection, providing both insight into pathogenesis and a system for testing novel vaccines. Despite the Chinese rhesus macaque potentially being a more relevant model for AIDS outcomes than the Indian rhesus macaque, the Chinese-origin rhesus macaques have not been well-characterized for their major histocompatibility complex (MHC) composition and function, reducing their greater utilization. In this study, we characterized a total of 50 unique Chinese rhesus macaques from several varying origins for their entire MHC class I allele composition and identified a total of 58 unique complete MHC class I sequences. Only nine of the sequences had been associated with Indian rhesus macaques, and 28/58 (48.3%) of the sequences identified were novel. From all MHC alleles detected, we prioritized Mamu-A1*02201 for functional characterization based on its higher frequency of expression. Upon the development of MHC/peptide binding assays and definition of its associated motif, we revealed that this allele shares peptide binding characteristics with the HLA-B7 supertype, the most frequent supertype in human populations. These studies provide the first functional characterization of an MHC class I molecule in the context of Chinese rhesus macaques and the first instance of HLA-B7 analogy for rhesus macaques. Electronic supplementary material The online version of this article (doi:10.1007/s00251-010-0450-3) contains supplementary material, which is available to authorized users. PMID:20480161

  10. Familial periodontal disease in the Cayo Santiago rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez, Octavio A; Orraca, Luis; Kensler, Terry B; Gonzalez-Martinez, Janis; Maldonado, Elizabeth; Ebersole, Jeffrey L

    2016-01-01

    Substantial ongoing research continues to explore the contribution of genetics and environment to the onset, extent and severity of periodontal disease(s). Existing evidence supports that periodontal disease appears to have an increased prevalence in family units with a member having aggressive periodontitis. We have been using the nonhuman primate as a model of periodontal disease for over 25 years with these species demonstrating naturally occurring periodontal disease that increases with age. This report details our findings from evaluation of periodontal disease in skulls from 97 animals (5-31 years of age) derived from the skeletons of the rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) on Cayo Santiago. Periodontal disease was evaluated by determining the distance from the base of the alveolar bone defect to the cemento-enamel junction on 1st/2nd premolars and 1st/2nd molars from all four quadrants. The results demonstrated an increasing extent and severity of periodontitis with aging across the population of animals beyond only compensatory eruption. Importantly, irrespective of age, extensive heterogeneity in disease expression was observed among the animals. Linking these variations to multi-generational matriarchal family units supported familial susceptibility of periodontitis. As the current generations of animals that are descendants from these matrilines are alive, studies can be conducted to explore an array of underlying factors that could account for susceptibility or resistance to periodontal disease. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Polymorphisms of cytochrome P450 2B6 (CYP2B6) in cynomolgus and rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Yasuhiro; Uehara, Shotaro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2018-02-22

    Cytochrome P450 2B6 (CYP2B6) is an important drug-metabolizing enzyme and is expressed in liver. Although human CYP2B6 variants account for variable enzyme properties among individuals and populations, CYP2B6 genetic variants have not been investigated in cynomolgus macaques, widely used in drug metabolism studies. CYP2B6 was resequenced in 120 cynomolgus macaques and 23 rhesus macaques by direct sequencing. Twenty-three non-synonymous variants were found, of which 12 and 3 were unique to cynomolgus macaques and rhesus macaques, respectively. By functional characterization using the 14 variant proteins, 8 variants (V114I, R253C, M435I, V459M, L465P, C475S, R487C, and R487H) showed different rate (>1.5-fold) of testosterone 16β-hydroxylation to wild type. However, the four variants (M435I, L465P, C475S, and R487H) were analyzed in liver microsomes, and the catalytic rates were not substantially different from wild type. Macaque CYP2B6 was polymorphic, and the genotype could partly account for variable enzyme activities of macaque CYP2B6. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Mapping putative hubs in human, chimpanzee and rhesus macaque connectomes via diffusion tractography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Longchuan; Hu, Xiaoping; Preuss, Todd M; Glasser, Matthew F; Damen, Frederick W; Qiu, Yuxuan; Rilling, James

    2013-10-15

    Mapping anatomical brain networks with graph-theoretic analysis of diffusion tractography has recently gained popularity, because of its presumed value in understanding brain function. However, this approach has seldom been used to compare brain connectomes across species, which may provide insights into brain evolution. Here, we employed a data-driven approach to compare interregional brain connections across three primate species: 1) the intensively studied rhesus macaque, 2) our closest living primate relative, the chimpanzee, and 3) humans. Specifically, we first used random parcellations and surface-based probabilistic diffusion tractography to derive the brain networks of the three species under various network densities and resolutions. We then compared the characteristics of the networks using graph-theoretic measures. In rhesus macaques, our tractography-defined hubs showed reasonable overlap with hubs previously identified using anterograde and retrograde tracer data. Across all three species, hubs were largely symmetric in the two hemispheres and were consistently identified in medial parietal, insular, retrosplenial cingulate and ventrolateral prefrontal cortices, suggesting a conserved structural architecture within these regions. However, species differences were observed in the inferior parietal cortex, polar and medial prefrontal cortices. The potential significance of these interspecies differences is discussed. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Impact of irradiation and immunosuppressive agents on immune system homeostasis in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, C; Walker, J; Dewane, J; Engelmann, F; Laub, W; Pillai, S; Thomas, Charles R; Messaoudi, I

    2015-09-01

    In this study we examined the effects of non-myeloablative total body irradiation (TBI) in combination with immunosuppressive chemotherapy on immune homeostasis in rhesus macaques. Our results show that the administration of cyclosporin A or tacrolimus without radiotherapy did not result in lymphopenia. The addition of TBI to the regimen resulted in lymphopenia as well as alterations in the memory/naive ratio following reconstitution of lymphocyte populations. Dendritic cell (DC) numbers in whole blood were largely unaffected, while the monocyte population was altered by immunosuppressive treatment. Irradiation also resulted in increased levels of circulating cytokines and chemokines that correlated with T cell proliferative bursts and with the shift towards memory T cells. We also report that anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) treatment and CD3 immunotoxin administration resulted in a selective and rapid depletion of naive CD4 and CD8 T cells and increased frequency of memory T cells. We also examined the impact of these treatments on reactivation of latent simian varicella virus (SVV) infection as a model of varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection of humans. None of the treatments resulted in overt SVV reactivation; however, select animals had transient increases in SVV-specific T cell responses following immunosuppression, suggestive of subclinical reactivation. Overall, we provide detailed observations into immune modulation by TBI and chemotherapeutic agents in rhesus macaques, an important research model of human disease. © 2015 British Society for Immunology.

  14. Inactivated polio vaccination using a microneedle patch is immunogenic in the rhesus macaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edens, Chris; Dybdahl-Sissoko, Naomi C; Weldon, William C; Oberste, M Steven; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2015-09-08

    The phased replacement of oral polio vaccine (OPV) with inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) is expected to significantly complicate mass vaccination campaigns, which are an important component of the global polio eradication endgame strategy. To simplify mass vaccination with IPV, we developed microneedle patches that are easy to administer, have a small package size, generate no sharps waste and are inexpensive to manufacture. When administered to rhesus macaques, neutralizing antibody titers were equivalent among monkeys vaccinated using microneedle patches and conventional intramuscular injection for IPV types 1 and 2. Serologic response to IPV type 3 vaccination was weaker after microneedle patch vaccination compared to intramuscular injection; however, we suspect the administered type 3 dose was lower due to a flawed pre-production IPV type 3 analytical method. IPV vaccination using microneedle patches was well tolerated by the monkeys. We conclude that IPV vaccination using a microneedle patch is immunogenic in rhesus macaques and may offer a simpler method of IPV vaccination of people to facilitate polio eradication. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Detecting instability in animal social networks: genetic fragmentation is associated with social instability in rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brianne A Beisner

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The persistence of biological systems requires evolved mechanisms which promote stability. Cohesive primate social groups are one example of stable biological systems, which persist in spite of regular conflict. We suggest that genetic relatedness and its associated kinship structure are a potential source of stability in primate social groups as kinship structure is an important organizing principle in many animal societies. We investigated the effect of average genetic relatedness per matrilineal family on the stability of matrilineal grooming and agonistic interactions in 48 matrilines from seven captive groups of rhesus macaques. Matrilines with low average genetic relatedness show increased family-level instability such as: more sub-grouping in their matrilineal groom network, more frequent fighting with kin, and higher rates of wounding. Family-level instability in multiple matrilines within a group is further associated with group-level instability such as increased wounding. Stability appears to arise from the presence of clear matrilineal structure in the rhesus macaque group hierarchy, which is derived from cohesion among kin in their affiliative and agonistic interactions with each other. We conclude that genetic relatedness and kinship structure are an important source of group stability in animal societies, particularly when dominance and/or affilative interactions are typically governed by kinship.

  16. Social power, conflict policing, and the role of subordination signals in rhesus macaque society.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisner, Brianne A; Hannibal, Darcy L; Finn, Kelly R; Fushing, Hsieh; McCowan, Brenda

    2016-05-01

    Policing is a conflict-limiting mechanism observed in many primate species. It is thought to require a skewed distribution of social power for some individuals to have sufficiently high social power to stop others' fights, yet social power has not been examined in most species with policing behavior. We examined networks of subordination signals as a source of social power that permits policing behavior in rhesus macaques. For each of seven captive groups of rhesus macaques, we (a) examined the structure of subordination signal networks and used GLMs to examine the relationship between (b) pairwise dominance certainty and subordination network pathways and (c) policing frequency and social power (group-level convergence in subordination signaling pathways). Networks of subordination signals had perfect linear transitivity, and pairs connected by both direct and indirect pathways of signals had more certain dominance relationships than pairs with no such network connection. Social power calculated using both direct and indirect network pathways showed a heavy-tailed distribution and positively predicted conflict policing. Our results empirically substantiate that subordination signaling is associated with greater dominance relationship certainty and further show that pairs who signal rarely (or not at all) may use information from others' signaling interactions to infer or reaffirm the relative certainty of their own relationships. We argue that the network of formal dominance relationships is central to societal stability because it is important for relationship stability and also supports the additional stabilizing mechanism of policing. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  17. Alcohol response and consumption in adolescent rhesus macaques: life history and genetic influences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwandt, Melanie L; Lindell, Stephen G; Chen, Scott; Higley, J Dee; Suomi, Stephen J; Heilig, Markus; Barr, Christina S

    2010-02-01

    The use of alcohol by adolescents is a growing problem and has become an important research topic in the etiology of the alcohol use disorders. A key component of this research has been the development of animal models of adolescent alcohol consumption and alcohol response. Because of their extended period of adolescence, rhesus macaques are especially well suited for modeling alcohol-related phenotypes that contribute to the adolescent propensity for alcohol consumption. In this review, we discuss studies from our laboratory that have investigated both the initial response to acute alcohol administration and the consumption of alcohol in voluntary self-administration paradigms in adolescent rhesus macaques. These studies confirm that adolescence is a time of dynamic change both behaviorally and physiologically, and that alcohol response and alcohol consumption are influenced by life history variables, such as age, sex, and adverse early experience in the form of peer-rearing. Furthermore, genetic variants that alter functioning of the serotonin, endogenous opioid, and corticotropin-releasing hormone systems are shown to influence both physiological and behavioral outcomes, in some cases interacting with early experience to indicate gene by environment interactions. These findings highlight several of the pathways involved in alcohol response and consumption, namely reward, behavioral dyscontrol, and vulnerability to stress, and demonstrate a role for these pathways during the early stages of alcohol exposure in adolescence. 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Platelet Aggregation in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) in Response to Short-Term Meloxicam Administration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, Keith E; Austin, Jamie; Escobar, Evelyn P; Carbone, Larry

    2013-01-01

    NSAID administration is often chosen as a method of minimizing pain and discomfort for nonhuman primates. Of concern when using NSAID is the potential for decreased platelet aggregation due to the inhibition of cyclooxygenases 1 and 2. In both dogs and humans, the use of NSAID that are selective for cyclooxygenase 2, like meloxicam, minimizes the inhibition of platelet aggregation in comparison to nonselective NSAID, like aspirin, that inhibit both isoforms of cyclooxygenase. In this study, we measured platelet aggregation in rhesus macaques (n = 6) by using the impedance method on a multiple-electrode aggregometer at baseline, at 1 and 4 d after initiating treatment with aspirin or meloxicam, and after a washout period. There was no statistical difference between aggregation at baseline and after 1 or 4 d of meloxicam treatment, but platelet aggregation decreased after both 1 and 4 d of aspirin therapy. Our data suggest that clinically significant postoperative hemorrhage is unlikely in rhesus macaques briefly treated with meloxicam. PMID:24041216

  19. The first observation of seasonal affective disorder symptoms in Rhesus macaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, Dongdong; Chu, Xunxun; Feng, Xiaoli; Li, Zhifei; Yang, Shangchuan; Lü, Longbao; Yang, Qing; Pan, Lei; Yin, Yong; Li, Jiali; Xu, Lin; Chen, Lin; Hu, Xintian

    2015-10-01

    Diurnal animals are a better model for seasonal affective disorder (SAD) than nocturnal ones. Previous work with diurnal rodents demonstrated that short photoperiod conditions brought about depression-like behavior. However, rodents are at a large phylogenetic distance from humans. In contrast, nonhuman primates are closely similar to humans, making them an excellent candidate for SAD model. This study made the first attempt to develop SAD in rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) and it was found that short photoperiod conditions could lead monkeys to display depressive-like huddling behavior, less spontaneous locomotion, as well as less reactive locomotion. In addition to these depression-related behavioral changes, the physiological abnormalities that occur in patients with SAD, such as weight loss, anhedonia and hypercortisolism, were also observed in those SAD monkeys. Moreover, antidepressant treatment could reverse all of the depression-related symptoms, including depressive-like huddling behavior, less spontaneous locomotion, less reactive locomotion, weight loss, anhedonia and hypercortisolism. For the first time, this study observed the SAD symptoms in rhesus macaque, which would provide an important platform for the understanding of the etiology of SAD as well as developing novel therapeutic interventions in the future. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. The influence of age on wild rhesus macaques' affiliative social interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Zhijie; Sosa, Sebastian; Wu, Chengfeng; Zhang, Peng

    2018-02-01

    The social relationships that individuals experience at different life stages have a non-negligible influence on their lives, and this is particularly true for group living animals. The long lifespan of many primates makes it likely that these animals have various tactics of social interaction to adapt to complex changes in environmental or physical conditions. The different strategies used in social interaction by individuals at different life stages, and whether the position (central or peripheral) or role (initiator or recipient) of an individual in the group social network changes with age, are intriguing questions that remain to be investigated. We used social network analysis to examine age-related differences in social interaction patterns, social roles, and social positions in three affiliative social networks (approach, allogrooming, and social play) in a group of wild rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Our results showed that social interaction patterns of rhesus macaques differ between age classes in the following ways: i) young individuals tend to allocate social time to a high number of groupmates, older individuals prefer to focus on fewer, specific partners; ii) as they grow older, individuals tend to be recipients in approach interactions and initiators in grooming interactions; and iii) regardless of the different social interaction strategies, individuals of all ages occupy a central position in the group. These results reveal a possible key role played by immature individuals in group social communication, a little-explored issue which deserves closer investigation in future research. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Plasmodium coatneyi in Rhesus Macaques Replicates the Multisystemic Dysfunction of Severe Malaria in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Mora, Monica; Garcia, AnaPatricia; Orkin, Jack; Strobert, Elizabeth; Barnwell, John W.; Galinski, Mary R.

    2013-01-01

    Severe malaria, a leading cause of mortality among children and nonimmune adults, is a multisystemic disorder characterized by complex clinical syndromes that are mechanistically poorly understood. The interplay of various parasite and host factors is critical in the pathophysiology of severe malaria. However, knowledge regarding the pathophysiological mechanisms and pathways leading to the multisystemic disorders of severe malaria in humans is limited. Here, we systematically investigate infections with Plasmodium coatneyi, a simian malaria parasite that closely mimics the biological characteristics of P. falciparum, and develop baseline data and protocols for studying erythrocyte turnover and severe malaria in greater depth. We show that rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) experimentally infected with P. coatneyi develop anemia, coagulopathy, and renal and metabolic dysfunction. The clinical course of acute infections required suppressive antimalaria chemotherapy, fluid support, and whole-blood transfusion, mimicking the standard of care for the management of severe malaria cases in humans. Subsequent infections in the same animals progressed with a mild illness in comparison, suggesting that immunity played a role in reducing the severity of the disease. Our results demonstrate that P. coatneyi infection in rhesus macaques can serve as a highly relevant model to investigate the physiological pathways and molecular mechanisms of malaria pathogenesis in naïve and immune individuals. Together with high-throughput postgenomic technologies, such investigations hold promise for the identification of new clinical interventions and adjunctive therapies. PMID:23509137

  2. Prevalence of Entamoeba nuttalli infection in wild rhesus macaques in Nepal and characterization of the parasite isolates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Hiroshi; Yanagi, Tetsuo; Lama, Chamala; Pandey, Kishor; Feng, Meng; Kobayashi, Seiki; Sherchand, Jeevan B

    2013-04-01

    We have recently resurrected the name Entamoeba nuttalli Castellani, 1908 for a potentially virulent ameba isolate, P19-061405, obtained from a rhesus macaque in Kathmandu, Nepal. The ameba was morphologically indistinguishable from Entamoeba histolytica/Entamoeba dispar/Entamoeba moshkovskii, but located phylogenetically between E. histolytica and E. dispar. To evaluate the prevalence of E. nuttalli infection in wild rhesus macaques, 112 fecal samples were collected in four locations of the Kathmandu Valley. PCR analysis of DNA extracted from the feces showed positive rates of E. nuttalli, E. dispar, E. histolytica and E. moshkovskii of 51%, 12%, 0% and 0%, respectively. A total of 14 E. nuttalli isolates were obtained from four locations, of which 6 were established as axenic cultures. The sequences of the serine-rich protein gene of E. nuttalli isolates differed among four locations although no differences were found in the composition of sequence motifs. Isoenzyme pattern was analyzed in 8 isolates obtained from three locations. In hexokinase, the mobility of the slower migrating band was located between E. histolytica and E. dispar regardless of the culture conditions. These results demonstrate that E. nuttalli is highly prevalent in wild rhesus macaques in Nepal. Rhesus macaques appear to be one of the natural hosts and heterogeneity of the serine-rich protein gene might be useful for geographical typing of isolates. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Effects of the macrolide drug tylosin on chronic diarrhea in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwood, Rebecca S; Tarara, Ross P; Christe, Kari L; Spinner, Abigail; Lerche, Nicholas W

    2008-02-01

    Diarrhea is the gastrointestinal disease most frequently encountered in captive rhesus macaques. The precise pathogenic mechanisms underlying chronic diarrhea in nonhuman primates are not well understood, but a persistent inflammatory component has been implicated strongly. This study evaluated the inflammatory changes in the colon of macaques with diarrhea and assessed the efficacy of a 10-d course of tylosin in a cohort of 21 animals with chronic diarrhea. Stool quality was evaluated daily, and fecal consistency was scored. Colonoscopies were performed; biopsy samples were characterized histologically and assayed for expression of TNFalpha mRNA. Blood samples collected pre-, mid-, and post-treatment were assayed for C-reactive protein (CRP). The results indicated that 63% of the animals receiving tylosin showed improvement in stool quality, compared with 10% in the sham-treated group. Histologically, 82% of animals in the tylosin-treated group had a reduction in the severity of colonic lesions post-treatment, compared with 40% of animals in the sham group. The amount of TNFalpha mRNA before treatment did not differ from that afterward in either tylosin- or sham-treated animals. CRP levels serially decreased in tylosin-treated monkeys; the average post-treatment CRP value for tylosin-treated animals was 11.96 +/- 3.86 microg/ml compared with 26.48 +/- 4.86 microg/ml for sham-treated controls. In conclusion, tylosin significantly improved the fecal consistency score, significantly decreased colonic inflammation, and significantly decreased serum CRP levels post-treatment in rhesus macaques with chronic diarrhea.

  4. A decade of theory of mind research on Cayo Santiago: Insights into rhesus macaque social cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drayton, Lindsey A; Santos, Laurie R

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several decades, researchers have become increasingly interested in understanding how primates understand the behavior of others. One open question concerns whether nonhuman primates think about others' behavior in psychological terms, that is, whether they have a theory of mind. Over the last ten years, experiments conducted on the free-ranging rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) living on Cayo Santiago have provided important insights into this question. In this review, we highlight what we think are some of the most exciting results of this body of work. Specifically we describe experiments suggesting that rhesus monkeys may understand some psychological states, such as what others see, hear, and know, but that they fail to demonstrate an understanding of others' beliefs. Thus, while some aspects of theory of mind may be shared between humans and other primates, others capacities are likely to be uniquely human. We also discuss some of the broader debates surrounding comparative theory of mind research, as well as what we think may be productive lines for future research with the rhesus macaques of Cayo Santiago. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Reciprocal face-to-face communication between rhesus macaque mothers and their newborn infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, Pier Francesco; Paukner, Annika; Ionica, Consuel; Suomi, Stephen J

    2009-11-03

    Human mothers interact emotionally with their newborns through exaggerated facial expressions, speech, mutual gaze, and body contact, a capacity that has long been considered uniquely human [1-4]. Current developmental psychological theories propose that this pattern of mother-infant exchange promotes the regulation of infant emotions [4-6] and serves as a precursor of more complex forms of social exchange including perspective taking and empathy. Here we report that in rhesus macaques, mother-infant pairs also communicate intersubjectively via complex forms of emotional exchanges including exaggerated lipsmacking, sustained mutual gaze, mouth-mouth contacts, and neonatal imitation. Infant macaques solicit their mother's affiliative responses and actively communicate to her. However, this form of communication disappears within the infant's first month of life. Our data challenge the view that the mother-infant communicative system functions in order to sustain proximity and that infants are simply passive recipients in such interaction. Thus, emotional communication between mother and infant is not uniquely human. Instead, we can trace back to macaques the evolutionary foundation of those behaviors that are crucial for the establishment of a functional capacity to socially exchange with others.

  6. Quantitative Proteomic Analysis of Hepatic Tissue of T2DM Rhesus Macaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tingfu Du

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM is a metabolic disorder that severely affects human health, but the pathogenesis of the disease remains unknown. The high-fat/high-sucrose diets combined with streptozotocin- (STZ- induced nonhuman primate animal model of diabetes are a valuable research source of T2DM. Here, we present a study of a STZ rhesus macaque model of T2DM that utilizes quantitative iTRAQ-based proteomic method. We compared the protein profiles in the liver of STZ-treated macaques as well as age-matched healthy controls. We identified 171 proteins differentially expressed in the STZ-treated groups, about 70 of which were documented as diabetes-related gene in previous studies. Pathway analyses indicated that the biological functions of differentially expressed proteins were related to glycolysis/gluconeogenesis, fatty acid metabolism, complements, and coagulation cascades. Expression change in tryptophan metabolism pathway was also found in this study which may be associations with diabetes. This study is the first to explore genome-wide protein expression in hepatic tissue of diabetes macaque model using HPLC-Q-TOF/MS technology. In addition to providing potential T2DM biomarkers, this quantitative proteomic study may also shed insights regarding the molecular pathogenesis of T2DM.

  7. Changes in Circulating B Cell Subsets Associated with Aging and Acute SIV Infection in Rhesus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, W L William; Gonzalez, Denise F; Kieu, Hung T; Castillo, Luis D; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Shen, Xiaoying; Tomaras, Georgia D; Shacklett, Barbara L; Barry, Peter A; Sparger, Ellen E

    2017-01-01

    Aging and certain viral infections can negatively impact humoral responses in humans. To further develop the nonhuman primate (NHP) model for investigating B cell dynamics in human aging and infectious disease, a flow cytometric panel was developed to characterize circulating rhesus B cell subsets. Significant differences between human and macaque B cells included the proportions of cells within IgD+ and switched memory populations and a prominent CD21-CD27+ unswitched memory population detected only in macaques. We then utilized the expanded panel to analyze B cell alterations associated with aging and acute simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in the NHP model. In the aging study, distinct patterns of B cell subset frequencies were observed for macaques aged one to five years compared to those between ages 5 and 30 years. In the SIV infection study, B cell frequencies and absolute number were dramatically reduced following acute infection, but recovered within four weeks of infection. Thereafter, the frequencies of activated memory B cells progressively increased; these were significantly correlated with the magnitude of SIV-specific IgG responses, and coincided with impaired maturation of anti-SIV antibody avidity, as previously reported for HIV-1 infection. These observations further validate the NHP model for investigation of mechanisms responsible for B cells alterations associated with immunosenescence and infectious disease.

  8. The Role of MHC-E in T Cell Immunity Is Conserved among Humans, Rhesus Macaques, and Cynomolgus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Helen L; Wiseman, Roger W; Hughes, Colette M; Webb, Gabriela M; Abdulhaqq, Shaheed A; Bimber, Benjamin N; Hammond, Katherine B; Reed, Jason S; Gao, Lina; Burwitz, Benjamin J; Greene, Justin M; Ferrer, Fidel; Legasse, Alfred W; Axthelm, Michael K; Park, Byung S; Brackenridge, Simon; Maness, Nicholas J; McMichael, Andrew J; Picker, Louis J; O'Connor, David H; Hansen, Scott G; Sacha, Jonah B

    2018-01-01

    MHC-E is a highly conserved nonclassical MHC class Ib molecule that predominantly binds and presents MHC class Ia leader sequence-derived peptides for NK cell regulation. However, MHC-E also binds pathogen-derived peptide Ags for presentation to CD8 + T cells. Given this role in adaptive immunity and its highly monomorphic nature in the human population, HLA-E is an attractive target for novel vaccine and immunotherapeutic modalities. Development of HLA-E-targeted therapies will require a physiologically relevant animal model that recapitulates HLA-E-restricted T cell biology. In this study, we investigated MHC-E immunobiology in two common nonhuman primate species, Indian-origin rhesus macaques (RM) and Mauritian-origin cynomolgus macaques (MCM). Compared to humans and MCM, RM expressed a greater number of MHC-E alleles at both the population and individual level. Despite this difference, human, RM, and MCM MHC-E molecules were expressed at similar levels across immune cell subsets, equivalently upregulated by viral pathogens, and bound and presented identical peptides to CD8 + T cells. Indeed, SIV-specific, Mamu-E-restricted CD8 + T cells from RM recognized antigenic peptides presented by all MHC-E molecules tested, including cross-species recognition of human and MCM SIV-infected CD4 + T cells. Thus, MHC-E is functionally conserved among humans, RM, and MCM, and both RM and MCM represent physiologically relevant animal models of HLA-E-restricted T cell immunobiology. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  9. The most common Chinese rhesus macaque MHC class I molecule shares peptide binding repertoire with the HLA-B7 supertype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, C.; Southwood, S.; Hoof, Ilka

    2010-01-01

    characterized a total of 50 unique Chinese rhesus macaques from several varying origins for their entire MHC class I allele composition and identified a total of 58 unique complete MHC class I sequences. Only nine of the sequences had been associated with Indian rhesus macaques, and 28/58 (48.......3%) of the sequences identified were novel. From all MHC alleles detected, we prioritized Mamu-A1*02201 for functional characterization based on its higher frequency of expression. Upon the development of MHC/peptide binding assays and definition of its associated motif, we revealed that this allele shares peptide...... binding characteristics with the HLA-B7 supertype, the most frequent supertype in human populations. These studies provide the first functional characterization of an MHC class I molecule in the context of Chinese rhesus macaques and the first instance of HLA-B7 analogy for rhesus macaques....

  10. Sex Determination According to the Lengths of Hand Bones in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca Mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Huaxiang; Zhao, Xiaojin; Hu, Fengxia; Hu, Haiyang

    2017-10-01

    Measurement of hand bone length has been used for sex determination in humans and nonhuman primates (McFadden and Bracht: Early Hum Dev 85 (2009) 117-124; El-Morsi and Al-Hawary: J Forensic Leg Med 20 (2013) 6-13). The aim of this study was to determine the sex of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) on the basis of the lengths of corresponding rows of metacarpals and phalanges in a macaque population by means of developing discriminant functions. Measurements on direct dry bones only included lengths for 19 bones of the left hand in 39 macaques (consisting of 13 adult males and 26 adult females). The results revealed that the mean values of males were significantly greater than those of females for all of the metacarpals and phalanges. The results were obtained in 84.4% of accuracy from distal phalanges, 93.8% from middle phalanges, and 96.9% from both metacarpals and proximal phalanges, respectively. There was a remarkable difference in the magnitude of sex dimorphism in lengths of each section of the hand bones between the population of macaques and humans. This difference may be attributable to the interaction between genetic factors and various environmental factors. As sex differences of hand bones are population-specific (Lazenby: Am J phys Anthropol 118 (2002) 378-384; Lu, Huo, Shi, Peng, Dang, Jiao, Zhu, Zhong, and Chen: Acta Aantomica Sinica 39 (2008) 267-271; Eshak, Ahmed, and Gawad: J Forensic Leg Med 18 (2011) 246-252), the discriminant equations for all of the metacarpals and phalanges are applicable to the population of Macaca mulatta from the Taihang Mountain. Anat Rec, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Anat Rec, 300:1741-1746, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Use of photogrammetry as a means to assess hybrids of rhesus (Macaca mulatta) and long-tailed (M. fascicularis) macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadejaroen, Janya; Hamada, Yuzuru; Kawamoto, Yoshi; Malaivijitnond, Suchinda

    2015-01-01

    Rhesus (Macaca mulatta) and long-tailed (M. fascicularis) macaques are the most commonly used non-human primate models for biomedical research, but it is difficult to identify these two species in the hybrid zone (15-20°N). In this work, we used morphological values obtained via photogrammetry to assess hybrids of rhesus and long-tailed macaques at Khao Khieow Open Zoo (KKZ; 13°21'N, 101°06'E), eastern Thailand. Long-tailed and rhesus macaques have species-specific tail lengths and contrasts of their yellowish pelages. The accuracy and precision of the relative tail length (%RTL) and the contrast of the yellow hue (Cb*) of the pelage, as obtained from photographs, were compared with the corresponding direct measurements (morphometrics). The photogrammetric and morphometric measurements of %RTL and Cb* were highly significantly correlated (r = 0.989 and 0.980, p photogrammetry can be utilized to identify macaque species or hybrids when species identification relies mainly on tail length and pelage color.

  12. TRIMe7-CypA, an alternative splicing isoform of TRIMCyp in rhesus macaque, negatively modulates TRIM5α activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Na, Lei; Tang, Yan-Dong; Liu, Jian-Dong; Yu, Chang-Qing; Sun, Liu-Ke; Lin, Yue-Zhi; Wang, Xue-Feng; Wang, Xiaojun; Zhou, Jian-Hua

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • TRIMe7-CypA expresses in rhesus and pig-tailed, but not long-tailed macaques. • TRIMe7-CypA does not show the restriction to a HIV-GFP report virus in vitro. • It acts as a negative modulator to TRIM5α likely by competitive inhibition. - Abstract: The existence of innate, host-specific restriction factors is a major obstacle to the development of nonhuman primate models for AIDS studies, and TRIM5α is one of the most important of these restriction factors. In recent years, a TRIM5 chimeric gene that was retrotransposed by a cyclophilin A (CypA) cDNA was identified in certain macaque species. The TRIM5α-CypA fusion protein, TRIMCyp, which was expressed in these monkeys, had lost its restriction ability toward HIV-1. We previously found that TRIMe7-CypA, an alternative splicing isoform of the TRIMCyp transcripts, was expressed in pig-tailed and rhesus macaques but absent in long-tailed macaques. In this study, the anti-HIV-1 activity of TRIMe7-CypA in the rhesus macaque (RhTRIMe7-CypA) was investigated. The over-expression of RhTRIMe7-CypA in CrFK, HeLa and HEK293T cells did not restrict the infection or replication of an HIV-1-GFP reporter virus in these cells. As a positive control, rhesus (rh)TRIM5α strongly inhibited the reporter virus. Intriguingly, the anti-HIV-1 activity of RhTRIM5α was significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner by the co-repression of RhTRIMe7-CypA. Our data indicate that although the RhTRIMe7-CypA isoform does not appear to restrict HIV-1, it may act as a negative modulator of TRIM family proteins, presumably by competitive inhibition

  13. TRIMe7-CypA, an alternative splicing isoform of TRIMCyp in rhesus macaque, negatively modulates TRIM5α activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Lei [Harbin Veterinary Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin 150001 (China); Tang, Yan-Dong [Harbin Veterinary Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin 150001 (China); Biotechnology Institute of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Liu, Jian-Dong; Yu, Chang-Qing; Sun, Liu-Ke; Lin, Yue-Zhi; Wang, Xue-Feng [Harbin Veterinary Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Xiaojun, E-mail: xjw@hvri.ac.cn [Harbin Veterinary Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhou, Jian-Hua, E-mail: jianhua_uc@126.com [Harbin Veterinary Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin 150001 (China); Harbin Pharmaceutical Group Biovaccine Company, Harbin 150069 (China)

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • TRIMe7-CypA expresses in rhesus and pig-tailed, but not long-tailed macaques. • TRIMe7-CypA does not show the restriction to a HIV-GFP report virus in vitro. • It acts as a negative modulator to TRIM5α likely by competitive inhibition. - Abstract: The existence of innate, host-specific restriction factors is a major obstacle to the development of nonhuman primate models for AIDS studies, and TRIM5α is one of the most important of these restriction factors. In recent years, a TRIM5 chimeric gene that was retrotransposed by a cyclophilin A (CypA) cDNA was identified in certain macaque species. The TRIM5α-CypA fusion protein, TRIMCyp, which was expressed in these monkeys, had lost its restriction ability toward HIV-1. We previously found that TRIMe7-CypA, an alternative splicing isoform of the TRIMCyp transcripts, was expressed in pig-tailed and rhesus macaques but absent in long-tailed macaques. In this study, the anti-HIV-1 activity of TRIMe7-CypA in the rhesus macaque (RhTRIMe7-CypA) was investigated. The over-expression of RhTRIMe7-CypA in CrFK, HeLa and HEK293T cells did not restrict the infection or replication of an HIV-1-GFP reporter virus in these cells. As a positive control, rhesus (rh)TRIM5α strongly inhibited the reporter virus. Intriguingly, the anti-HIV-1 activity of RhTRIM5α was significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner by the co-repression of RhTRIMe7-CypA. Our data indicate that although the RhTRIMe7-CypA isoform does not appear to restrict HIV-1, it may act as a negative modulator of TRIM family proteins, presumably by competitive inhibition.

  14. Oxytocin and social cognition in rhesus macaques: implications for understanding and treating human psychopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Steve W C; Platt, Michael L

    2014-09-11

    Converging evidence from humans and non-human animals indicates that the neurohypophysial hormone oxytocin (OT) evolved to serve a specialized function in social behavior in mammals. Although OT-based therapies are currently being evaluated as remedies for social deficits in neuropsychiatric disorders, precisely how OT regulates complex social processes remains largely unknown. Here we describe how a non-human primate model can be used to understand the mechanisms by which OT regulates social cognition and thereby inform its clinical application in humans. We focus primarily on recent advances in our understanding of OT-mediated social cognition in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), supplemented by discussion of recent work in humans, other primates, and rodents. Together, these studies endorse the hypothesis that OT promotes social exploration both by amplifying social motivation and by attenuating social vigilance. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Oxytocin and Social Behav. © 2013 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Phenotypic and Functional Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies with Specificity for Rhesus Macaque CD200, CD200R and Mincle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddappa N Byrareddy

    Full Text Available Lectin-like molecules and their receptors are cell surface molecules that have been shown to play a role in either facilitating infection or serving as transporters of HIV/SIV in vivo. The role of these lectin-like molecules in the pathogenesis of HIV/SIV infection continues to be defined. In efforts to gain further insight on the potential role of these lectin-like molecules, our laboratory generated monoclonal antibodies (mAb against the human analogs of rhesus macaque CD200, CD200R and Mincle, since the rhesus macaques are accepted as the most reliable animal model to study human HIV infection. The characterization of the cell lineages from the blood and various tissues of rhesus macaques that express these lectin-like molecules are described herein. Among the mononuclear cells, the cells of the myeloid lineage of rhesus macaques are the predominant cell lineages that express readily detectable levels of CD200, CD200R and Mincle that is similar to the expression of Siglec-1 and Siglec-3 reported by our laboratory earlier. Subset analysis revealed that a higher frequency of the CD14+/CD16- subset from normal rhesus macaques express CD200, CD200R and Mincle. Differences in the frequencies and density of expression of these molecules by the gated population of CD14+ cells from various tissues are noted with PBMC and bone marrow expressing the highest and the mononuclear cells isolated from the colon and ileum expressing the lowest levels. While a significant frequency of pDCs and mDCs express Siglec-1/Siglec-3, a much lower frequency expresses CD200, CD200R and Mincle in PBMCs from rhesus macaques. The mAb against CD200 and CD200R but not Mincle appear to inhibit the infection of macrophage tropic SIV/SHIV in vitro. We conclude that these mAbs may have potential to be used as adjunctive therapeutic agents to control/inhibit SIV/HIV infection.

  16. Sex Differences in the Development of Social Relationships in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amici, Federica; Langos, Doreen; Widdig, Anja

    2015-01-01

    Several studies have documented the importance of social bonding for the enhancement of individual fitness. However, little is known about how social relationships develop through ontogeny, and whether their development follows the same trajectory in males and females. Here we analyzed affiliative interactions (proximity, social grooming, play) combined with demographic and genetic data in semi-free-ranging rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) on Cayo Santiago over their first 4 yr of life (from birth to sexual maturation) to understand how these interactions change through development in both sexes. Generalized linear mixed models revealed that social behaviors mostly followed different developmental trajectories in males and females and were highly dependent on the social context. In particular, sex differences in social behavior varied through development depending on the partner’s sex and age. Females engaged in more social interactions than males, especially with other females, and were more involved in grooming around the time of maturation. In contrast, males interacted more with males and age peers, especially around maturation. Sex differences in social behavior varied through development, but also depended on rank, partner’s rank, and kin line, although not consistently. High-ranking individuals, especially older females, were generally preferred as social partners. Moreover, both male and female individuals interacted mostly with maternal kin, although males also preferred paternal kin over nonkin. Importantly, most developmental changes in sociality happened when individuals were ca. 2 yr old, suggesting that this might be a milestone in the development of sociality in rhesus macaques. The only notable exception to this pattern was play, which was more pronounced in males from the beginning of their lives. We propose that play might serve as a trigger of sex differences in social behavior, with sex differences emerging early in development and

  17. Network stability is a balancing act of personality, power, and conflict dynamics in rhesus macaque societies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda McCowan

    Full Text Available Stability in biological systems requires evolved mechanisms that promote robustness. Cohesive primate social groups represent one example of a stable biological system, which persist in spite of frequent conflict. Multiple sources of stability likely exist for any biological system and such robustness, or lack thereof, should be reflected and thus detectable in the group's network structure, and likely at multiple levels. Here we show how network structure and group stability are linked to the fundamental characteristics of the individual agents in groups and to the environmental and social contexts in which these individuals interact. Both internal factors (e.g., personality, sex and external factors (e.g., rank dynamics, sex ratio were considered from the level of the individual to that of the group to examine the effects of network structure on group stability in a nonhuman primate species. The results yielded three main findings. First, successful third-party intervention behavior is a mechanism of group stability in rhesus macaques in that successful interventions resulted in less wounding in social groups. Second, personality is the primary factor that determines which individuals perform the role of key intervener, via its effect on social power and dominance discrepancy. Finally, individuals with high social power are not only key interveners but also key players in grooming networks and receive reconciliations from a higher diversity of individuals. The results from this study provide sound evidence that individual and group characteristics such as personality and sex ratio influence network structures such as patterns of reconciliation, grooming and conflict intervention that are indicators of network robustness and consequent health and well-being in rhesus macaque societies. Utilizing this network approach has provided greater insight into how behavioral and social processes influence social stability in nonhuman primate groups.

  18. Network stability is a balancing act of personality, power, and conflict dynamics in rhesus macaque societies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCowan, Brenda; Beisner, Brianne A; Capitanio, John P; Jackson, Megan E; Cameron, Ashley N; Seil, Shannon; Atwill, Edward R; Fushing, Hsieh

    2011-01-01

    Stability in biological systems requires evolved mechanisms that promote robustness. Cohesive primate social groups represent one example of a stable biological system, which persist in spite of frequent conflict. Multiple sources of stability likely exist for any biological system and such robustness, or lack thereof, should be reflected and thus detectable in the group's network structure, and likely at multiple levels. Here we show how network structure and group stability are linked to the fundamental characteristics of the individual agents in groups and to the environmental and social contexts in which these individuals interact. Both internal factors (e.g., personality, sex) and external factors (e.g., rank dynamics, sex ratio) were considered from the level of the individual to that of the group to examine the effects of network structure on group stability in a nonhuman primate species. The results yielded three main findings. First, successful third-party intervention behavior is a mechanism of group stability in rhesus macaques in that successful interventions resulted in less wounding in social groups. Second, personality is the primary factor that determines which individuals perform the role of key intervener, via its effect on social power and dominance discrepancy. Finally, individuals with high social power are not only key interveners but also key players in grooming networks and receive reconciliations from a higher diversity of individuals. The results from this study provide sound evidence that individual and group characteristics such as personality and sex ratio influence network structures such as patterns of reconciliation, grooming and conflict intervention that are indicators of network robustness and consequent health and well-being in rhesus macaque societies. Utilizing this network approach has provided greater insight into how behavioral and social processes influence social stability in nonhuman primate groups.

  19. Bisphenol A exposure alters developmental gene expression in the fetal rhesus macaque uterus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn C Calhoun

    Full Text Available Bisphenol A (BPA exposure results in numerous developmental and functional abnormalities in reproductive organs in rodent models, but limited data are available regarding BPA effects in the primate uterus. To determine if maternal oral BPA exposure affects fetal uterine development in a non-human primate model, pregnant rhesus macaques carrying female fetuses were exposed orally to 400 µg/kg BPA or vehicle control daily from gestation day (GD 50-100 or GD100-165. Fetal uteri were collected at the completion of treatment (GD100 or GD165; tissue histology, cell proliferation, and expression of estrogen receptor alpha (ERα and progesterone receptor (PR were compared to that of controls. Gene expression analysis was conducted using rhesus macaque microarrays. There were no significant differences in histology or in the percentage of cells expressing the proliferation marker Ki-67, ERα, or PR in BPA-exposed uteri compared to controls at GD100 or GD165. Minimal differences in gene expression were observed between BPA-exposed and control GD100 uteri. However, at GD165, BPA-exposed uteri had significant differences in gene expression compared to controls. Several of the altered genes, including HOXA13, WNT4, and WNT5A, are critical for reproductive organ development and/or adult function. We conclude that second or third trimester BPA exposure does not significantly affect fetal uterus development based on morphological, proliferation, and steroid hormone receptor assessments. However, differences in expression of key developmental genes after third trimester exposure suggest that BPA could alter transcriptional signals influencing uterine function later in life.

  20. Early life exposure to allergen and ozone results in altered development in adolescent rhesus macaque lungs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herring, M.J.; Putney, L.F.; St George, J.A. [California National Primate Research Center, Davis, CA (United States); Avdalovic, M.V. [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Schelegle, E.S.; Miller, L.A. [California National Primate Research Center, Davis, CA (United States); Hyde, D.M., E-mail: dmhyde@ucdavis.edu [California National Primate Research Center, Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-02-15

    In rhesus macaques, previous studies have shown that episodic exposure to allergen alone or combined with ozone inhalation during the first 6 months of life results in a condition with many of the hallmarks of asthma. This exposure regimen results in altered development of the distal airways and parenchyma (Avdalovic et al., 2012). We hypothesized that the observed alterations in the lung parenchyma would be permanent following a long-term recovery in filtered air (FA) housing. Forty-eight infant rhesus macaques (30 days old) sensitized to house dust mite (HDM) were treated with two week cycles of FA, house dust mite allergen (HDMA), ozone (O{sub 3}) or HDMA/ozone (HDMA + O{sub 3}) for five months. At the end of the five months, six animals from each group were necropsied. The other six animals in each group were allowed to recover in FA for 30 more months at which time they were necropsied. Design-based stereology was used to estimate volumes of lung components, number of alveoli, size of alveoli, distribution of alveolar volumes, interalveolar capillary density. After 30 months of recovery, monkeys exposed to HDMA, in either group, had significantly more alveoli than filtered air. These alveoli also had higher capillary densities as compared with FA controls. These results indicate that early life exposure to HDMA alone or HDMA + O{sub 3} alters the development process in the lung alveoli. - Highlights: • Abnormal lung development after postnatal exposure to ozone and allergen • This remodeling is shown as smaller, more numerous alveoli and narrower airways. • Allergen appears to have more of an effect than ozone during recovery. • These animals also have continued airway hyperresponsiveness (Moore et al. 2014)

  1. Critical Role for Monocytes/Macrophages in Rapid Progression to AIDS in Pediatric Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Rhesus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Chie; Merino, Kristen M; Hasegawa, Atsuhiko; Wang, Xiaolei; Alvarez, Xavier A; Wakao, Hiroshi; Mori, Kazuyasu; Kim, Woong-Ki; Veazey, Ronald S; Didier, Elizabeth S; Kuroda, Marcelo J

    2017-09-01

    Infant humans and rhesus macaques infected with the human or simian immunodeficiency virus (HIV or SIV), respectively, express higher viral loads and progress more rapidly to AIDS than infected adults. Activated memory CD4 + T cells in intestinal tissues are major primary target cells for SIV/HIV infection, and massive depletion of these cells is considered a major cause of immunodeficiency. Monocytes and macrophages are important cells of innate immunity and also are targets of HIV/SIV infection. We reported previously that a high peripheral blood monocyte turnover rate was predictive for the onset of disease progression to AIDS in SIV-infected adult macaques. The purpose of this study was to determine if earlier or higher infection of monocytes/macrophages contributes to the more rapid progression to AIDS in infants. We observed that uninfected infant rhesus macaques exhibited higher physiologic baseline monocyte turnover than adults. Early after SIV infection, the monocyte turnover further increased, and it remained high during progression to AIDS. A high percentage of terminal deoxynucleotidyltransferase dUTP nick end label (TUNEL)-positive macrophages in the lymph nodes (LNs) and intestine corresponded with an increasing number of macrophages derived from circulating monocytes (bromodeoxyuridine positive [BrdU + ] CD163 + ), suggesting that the increased blood monocyte turnover was required to rapidly replenish destroyed tissue macrophages. Immunofluorescence analysis further demonstrated that macrophages were a significant portion of the virus-producing cells found in LNs, intestinal tissues, and lungs. The higher baseline monocyte turnover in infant macaques and subsequent macrophage damage by SIV infection may help explain the basis of more rapid disease progression to AIDS in infants. IMPORTANCE HIV infection progresses much more rapidly in pediatric cases than in adults; however, the mechanism for this difference is unclear. Using the rhesus macaque model

  2. Inhaled oxytocin amplifies both vicarious reinforcement and self reinforcement in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Steve W C; Barter, Joseph W; Ebitz, R Becket; Watson, Karli K; Platt, Michael L

    2012-01-17

    People attend not only to their own experiences, but also to the experiences of those around them. Such social awareness profoundly influences human behavior by enabling observational learning, as well as by motivating cooperation, charity, empathy, and spite. Oxytocin (OT), a neurosecretory hormone synthesized by hypothalamic neurons in the mammalian brain, can enhance affiliation or boost exclusion in different species in distinct contexts, belying any simple mechanistic neural model. Here we show that inhaled OT penetrates the CNS and subsequently enhances the sensitivity of rhesus macaques to rewards occurring to others as well as themselves. Roughly 2 h after inhaling OT, monkeys increased the frequency of prosocial choices associated with reward to another monkey when the alternative was to reward no one. OT also increased attention to the recipient monkey as well as the time it took to render such a decision. In contrast, within the first 2 h following inhalation, OT increased selfish choices associated with delivery of reward to self over a reward to the other monkey, without affecting attention or decision latency. Despite the differences in species typical social behavior, exogenous, inhaled OT causally promotes social donation behavior in rhesus monkeys, as it does in more egalitarian and monogamous ones, like prairie voles and humans, when there is no perceived cost to self. These findings potentially implicate shared neural mechanisms.

  3. Social modulation of cognition: Lessons from rhesus macaques relevant to education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monfardini, Elisabetta; Reynaud, Amélie J; Prado, Jérôme; Meunier, Martine

    2017-11-01

    Any animal, human or non-human, lives in a world where there are others like itself. Individuals' behaviors are thus inevitably influenced by others, and cognition is no exception. Long acknowledged in psychology, social modulations of cognition have been neglected in cognitive neuroscience. Yet, infusing this classic topic in psychology with brain science methodologies could yield valuable educational insights. In recent studies, we used a non-human primate model, the rhesus macaque, to identify social influences representing ancient biases rooted in evolution, and neuroimaging to shed light on underlying mechanisms. The behavioral and neural data garnered in humans and macaques are summarized, with a focus on two findings relevant to human education. First, peers' mistakes stand out as exceptional professors and seem to have devoted areas and neurons in the primates' brain. Second, peers' mere presence suffices to enhance performance in well-learned tasks, possibly by boosting activity in the brain network involved in the task at hand. These findings could be translated into concrete pedagogical interventions in the classroom. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. The use of preferred social stimuli as rewards for rhesus macaques in behavioural neuroscience.

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    Helen Gray

    Full Text Available Macaques are often motivated to perform in neuroscientific experiments by implementing fluid restriction protocols. Daily access to water is controlled and the monkeys are rewarded with droplets of fluid for performing correct trials in the laboratory. Although these protocols are widely used and highly effective, it is important from a 3Rs perspective to investigate refinements that may help to lessen the severity of the fluid restriction applied. We assessed the use of social stimuli (images of conspecifics as rewards for four rhesus macaques performing simple cognitive tasks. We found that individual preferences for images of male faces, female perinea and control stimuli could be identified in each monkey. However, using preferred images did not translate into effective motivators on a trial-by-trial basis: animals preferred fluid rewards, even when fluid restriction was relaxed. There was no difference in the monkeys' performance of a task when using greyscale versus colour images. Based on our findings, we cannot recommend the use of social stimuli, in this form, as a refinement to current fluid restriction protocols. We discuss the potential alternatives and possibilities for future research.

  5. Rhesus macaques form preferences for brand logos through sex and social status based advertising.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acikalin, M Yavuz; Watson, Karli K; Fitzsimons, Gavan J; Platt, Michael L

    2018-01-01

    Like humans, monkeys value information about sex and status, inviting the hypothesis that our susceptibility to these factors in advertising arises from shared, ancestral biological mechanisms that prioritize social information. To test this idea, we asked whether rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) show choice behavior that is similar to humans in response to sex and social status in advertising. Our results show that monkeys form preferences for brand logos repeatedly paired with images of macaque genitals and high status monkeys. Moreover, monkeys sustain preferences for these brand logos even though choosing them provided no tangible rewards, a finding that cannot be explained by a decision mechanism operating solely on material outcomes. Together, our results endorse the hypothesis that the power of sex and status in advertising emerges from the spontaneous engagement of shared, ancestral neural circuits that prioritize information useful for navigating the social environment. Finally, our results show that simple associative conditioning is sufficient to explain the formation of preferences for brand logos paired with sexual or status-based images.

  6. Zika virus pathogenesis in rhesus macaques is unaffected by pre-existing immunity to dengue virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantoja, Petraleigh; Pérez-Guzmán, Erick X; Rodríguez, Idia V; White, Laura J; González, Olga; Serrano, Crisanta; Giavedoni, Luis; Hodara, Vida; Cruz, Lorna; Arana, Teresa; Martínez, Melween I; Hassert, Mariah A; Brien, James D; Pinto, Amelia K; de Silva, Aravinda; Sariol, Carlos A

    2017-06-23

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is a re-emerging virus that has recently spread into dengue virus (DENV) endemic regions and cross-reactive antibodies (Abs) could potentially affect ZIKV pathogenesis. Using DENV-immune serum, it has been shown in vitro that antibody-dependent enhancement (ADE) of ZIKV infection can occur. Here we study the effects of pre-existing DENV immunity on ZIKV infection in vivo. We infect two cohorts of rhesus macaques with ZIKV; one cohort has been exposed to DENV 2.8 years earlier and a second control cohort is naïve to flaviviral infection. Our results, while confirming ADE in vitro, suggest that pre-existing DENV immunity does not result in more severe ZIKV disease. Rather our results show a reduction in the number of days of ZIKV viremia compared to naïve macaques and that the previous exposure to DENV may result in modulation of the immune response without resulting in enhancement of ZIKV pathogenesis.

  7. Impact of prior flavivirus immunity on Zika virus infection in rhesus macaques.

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    Michael K McCracken

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Studies have demonstrated cross-reactivity of anti-dengue virus (DENV antibodies in human sera against Zika virus (ZIKV, promoting increased ZIKV infection in vitro. However, the correlation between in vitro and in vivo findings is not well characterized. Thus, we evaluated the impact of heterotypic flavivirus immunity on ZIKV titers in biofluids of rhesus macaques. Animals previously infected (≥420 days with DENV2, DENV4, or yellow fever virus were compared to flavivirus-naïve animals following infection with a Brazilian ZIKV strain. Sera from DENV-immune macaques demonstrated cross-reactivity with ZIKV by antibody-binding and neutralization assays prior to ZIKV infection, and promoted increased ZIKV infection in cell culture assays. Despite these findings, no significant differences between flavivirus-naïve and immune animals were observed in viral titers, neutralizing antibody levels, or immune cell kinetics following ZIKV infection. These results indicate that prior infection with heterologous flaviviruses neither conferred protection nor increased observed ZIKV titers in this non-human primate ZIKV infection model.

  8. Combined Transcriptomics and Metabolomics in a Rhesus Macaque Drug Administration Study

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    Kevin J. Lee

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available We describe a multi-omic approach to understanding the effects that the anti-malarial drug pyrimethamine has on immune physiology in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta. Whole blood and bone marrow RNA-Seq and plasma metabolome profiles (each with over 15,000 features have been generated for five naïve individuals at up to seven time-points before, during and after three rounds of drug administration. Linear modelling and Bayesian network analyses are both considered, alongside investigations of the impact of statistical modeling strategies on biological inference. Individual macaques were found to be a major source of variance for both omic data types, and factoring individuals into subsequent modelling increases power to detect temporal effects. A major component of the whole blood transcriptome follows the bone marrow with a time-delay, while other components of variation are unique to each compartment. We demonstrate that pyrimethamine administration does impact both compartments throughout the experiment, but very limited perturbation of transcript or metabolite abundance following each round of drug exposure is observed. New insights into the mode of action of the drug are presented in the context of pyrimethamine’s predicted effect on suppression of cell division and metabolism in the immune system.

  9. Impact of prior flavivirus immunity on Zika virus infection in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCracken, Michael K; Gromowski, Gregory D; Friberg, Heather L; Lin, Xiaoxu; Abbink, Peter; De La Barrera, Rafael; Eckles, Kenneth H; Garver, Lindsey S; Boyd, Michael; Jetton, David; Barouch, Dan H; Wise, Matthew C; Lewis, Bridget S; Currier, Jeffrey R; Modjarrad, Kayvon; Milazzo, Mark; Liu, Michelle; Mullins, Anna B; Putnak, J Robert; Michael, Nelson L; Jarman, Richard G; Thomas, Stephen J

    2017-08-01

    Studies have demonstrated cross-reactivity of anti-dengue virus (DENV) antibodies in human sera against Zika virus (ZIKV), promoting increased ZIKV infection in vitro. However, the correlation between in vitro and in vivo findings is not well characterized. Thus, we evaluated the impact of heterotypic flavivirus immunity on ZIKV titers in biofluids of rhesus macaques. Animals previously infected (≥420 days) with DENV2, DENV4, or yellow fever virus were compared to flavivirus-naïve animals following infection with a Brazilian ZIKV strain. Sera from DENV-immune macaques demonstrated cross-reactivity with ZIKV by antibody-binding and neutralization assays prior to ZIKV infection, and promoted increased ZIKV infection in cell culture assays. Despite these findings, no significant differences between flavivirus-naïve and immune animals were observed in viral titers, neutralizing antibody levels, or immune cell kinetics following ZIKV infection. These results indicate that prior infection with heterologous flaviviruses neither conferred protection nor increased observed ZIKV titers in this non-human primate ZIKV infection model.

  10. The evolution of intergroup bias: perceptions and attitudes in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahajan, Neha; Martinez, Margaret A; Gutierrez, Natashya L; Diesendruck, Gil; Banaji, Mahzarin R; Santos, Laurie R

    2011-03-01

    Social psychologists have learned a great deal about the nature of intergroup conflict and the attitudinal and cognitive processes that enable it. Less is known about where these processes come from in the first place. In particular, do our strategies for dealing with other groups emerge in the absence of human-specific experiences? One profitable way to answer this question has involved administering tests that are conceptual equivalents of those used with adult humans in other species, thereby exploring the continuity or discontinuity of psychological processes. We examined intergroup preferences in a nonhuman species, the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta). We found the first evidence that a nonhuman species automatically distinguishes the faces of members of its own social group from those in other groups and displays greater vigilance toward outgroup members (Experiments 1-3). In addition, we observed that macaques spontaneously associate novel objects with specific social groups and display greater vigilance to objects associated with outgroup members (Experiments 4-5). Finally, we developed a looking time procedure-the Looking Time Implicit Association Test, which resembles the Implicit Association Test (Greenwald & Banaji, 1995)-and we discovered that macaques, like humans, automatically evaluate ingroup members positively and outgroup members negatively (Experiments 6-7). These field studies represent the first controlled experiments to examine the presence of intergroup attitudes in a nonhuman species. As such, these studies suggest that the architecture of the mind that enables the formation of these biases may be rooted in phylogenetically ancient mechanisms. (c) 2011 APA, all rights reserved

  11. Viral and immunological factors associated with breast milk transmission of SIV in rhesus macaques

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    Fresh Lynn

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The viral and host factors involved in transmission of HIV through breastfeeding are largely unknown, and intervention strategies are urgently needed to protect at-risk populations. To evaluate the viral and immunological factors directly related to milk transmission of virus, we have evaluated the disease course of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV in lactating rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta as a model of natural breast milk transmission of HIV. Results Fourteen lactating macaques were infected intravenously with SIV/DeltaB670, a pathogenic isolate of SIV and were pair-housed with their suckling infants throughout the disease course. Transmission was observed in 10 mother-infant pairs over a one-year period. Two mothers transmitted virus during the period of initial viremia 14–21 days post inoculation (p.i. and were classified as early transmitters. Peak viral loads in milk and plasma of early transmitters were similar to other animals, however the early transmitters subsequently displayed a rapid progressor phenotype and failed to control virus expression as well as other animals at 56 days p.i. Eight mothers were classified as late transmitters, with infant infection detected at time points in the chronic stage of the maternal SIV disease course (81 to 360 days. Plasma viral loads, CD4+ T cell counts and SIV-specific antibody titers were similar in late transmitters and non-transmitters. Late breast milk transmission, however, was correlated with higher average milk viral loads and more persistent viral expression in milk 12 to 46 weeks p.i. as compared to non-transmitters. Four mothers failed to transmit virus, despite disease progression and continuous lactation. Conclusion These studies validate the SIV-infected rhesus macaque as a model for breast milk transmission of HIV. As observed in studies of HIV-infected women, transmission occurred at time points throughout the period of lactation. Transmission during the

  12. Sex-specific heritability of spontaneous lipid levels in an extended pedigree of Indian-origin rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta.

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    Amanda Vinson

    Full Text Available The rhesus macaque is an important model for human atherosclerosis but genetic determinants of relevant phenotypes have not yet been investigated in this species. Because lipid levels are well-established and heritable risk factors for human atherosclerosis, our goal was to assess the heritability of lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels in a single, extended pedigree of 1,289 Indian-origin rhesus macaques. Additionally, because increasing evidence supports sex differences in the genetic architecture of lipid levels and lipid metabolism in humans and macaques, we also explored sex-specific heritability for all lipid measures investigated in this study. Using standard methods, we measured lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels from fasted plasma in a sample of 193 pedigreed rhesus macaques selected for membership in large, paternal half-sib cohorts, and maintained on a low-fat, low cholesterol chow diet. Employing a variance components approach, we found moderate heritability for total cholesterol (h²=0.257, P=0.032, LDL cholesterol (h²=0.252, P=0.030, and triglyceride levels (h²=0.197, P=0.034 in the full sample. However, stratification by sex (N=68 males, N=125 females revealed substantial sex-specific heritability for total cholesterol (0.644, P=0.004, females only, HDL cholesterol (0.843, P=0.0008, females only, VLDL cholesterol (0.482, P=0.018, males only, and triglyceride levels (0.705, P=0.001, males only that was obscured or absent when sexes were combined in the full sample. We conclude that genes contribute to spontaneous variation in circulating lipid levels in the Indian-origin rhesus macaque in a sex-specific manner, and that the rhesus macaque is likely to be a valuable model for sex-specific genetic effects on lipid risk factors for human atherosclerosis. These findings are a first-ever report of heritability for cholesterol levels in this species, and support the need for expanded analysis of these traits in

  13. The value of extended pedigrees for next-generation analysis of complex disease in the rhesus macaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vinson, Amanda; Prongay, Kamm; Ferguson, Betsy

    2013-01-01

    Complex diseases (e.g., cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes, among many others) pose the biggest threat to human health worldwide and are among the most challenging to investigate. Susceptibility to complex disease may be caused by multiple genetic variants (GVs) and their interaction, by environmental factors, and by interaction between GVs and environment, and large study cohorts with substantial analytical power are typically required to elucidate these individual contributions. Here, we discuss the advantages of both power and feasibility afforded by the use of extended pedigrees of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) for genetic studies of complex human disease based on next-generation sequence data. We present these advantages in the context of previous research conducted in rhesus macaques for several representative complex diseases. We also describe a single, multigeneration pedigree of Indian-origin rhesus macaques and a sample biobank we have developed for genetic analysis of complex disease, including power of this pedigree to detect causal GVs using either genetic linkage or association methods in a variance decomposition approach. Finally, we summarize findings of significant heritability for a number of quantitative traits that demonstrate that genetic contributions to risk factors for complex disease can be detected and measured in this pedigree. We conclude that the development and application of an extended pedigree to analysis of complex disease traits in the rhesus macaque have shown promising early success and that genome-wide genetic and higher order -omics studies in this pedigree are likely to yield useful insights into the architecture of complex human disease.

  14. Risk Factor Analysis May Provide Clues to Diarrhea Prevention in Outdoor-Housed Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

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    PRONGAY, KAMM; PARK, BYUNG; MURPHY, STEPHANIE J.

    2013-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of rhesus macaques at national primate research centers are housed outside. Annually, 15–39% of these animals experience diarrhea and require veterinary treatment for dehydration, electrolyte imbalance, or weight loss. An estimated 21–33% of these patients will die or be euthanized. Many studies have explored the various infectious etiologies of non-human primate diarrhea. However, there is little published information on diarrhea incidence rates and risk factors in outdo...

  15. X-ray crystallographic characterization of rhesus macaque MHC Mamu-A*02 complexed with an immunodominant SIV-Gag nonapeptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Feng, Youjun; Qi, Jianxun; Zhang, Huimin; Wang, Jinzi; Liu, Jinhua; Jiang, Fan; Gao, Feng

    2005-01-01

    X-ray crystallographic characterization of rhesus macaque MHC Mamu-A*02 complexed with an immunodominant SIV-Gag nonapeptide. Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in the rhesus macaque is regarded as a classic animal model, playing a crucial role in HIV vaccine strategies and therapeutics by characterizing various cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses in macaque monkeys. However, the availability of well documented structural reports focusing on rhesus macaque major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules remains extremely limited. Here, a complex of the rhesus macaque MHC I molecule (Mamu-A*02) with human β 2 m and an immunodominant SIV-Gag nonapeptide, GESNLKSLY (GY9), has been crystallized. The crystal diffracts X-rays to 2.7 Å resolution and belongs to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 124.11, b = 110.45, c = 100.06 Å, and contains two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The availability of the structure, which is being solved by molecular replacement, will provide new insights into rhesus macaque MHC I (Mamu-A*02) presenting pathogenic SIV peptides

  16. Safety study of the Bio-10-SAD Bern strain of the rabies virus on the rhesus macaque monkey species

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    Vladimír Vrzal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Based on a WHO recommendation, residual pathogenicity of the Bio-10-SAD Bern rabies virus strain (component of the Lysvulpen por. ad us. vet. vaccine was tested on rhesus macaque monkeys. Each of the ten monkeys, females, two years old, was administered orally 2 ml × 109 TCID50 of the Bio-10-SAD Bern rabies strain. The animals were monitored for 90 days. Subsequently, the animals were sacrificed and their brains were examined for presence of the vaccination rabies virus by the immunofluorescence and PCR methods. The occurrence of anti-rabies antibodies prior to and following administration of the vaccination rabies virus was also evaluated. No clinical signs of rabies were observed nor did any of the animals die of rabies following application of the virus. No rabies was detected in the study animals by post mortem examination. All of the 10 animals developed anti-rabies antibodies during the 90 days following administration of the rabies virus. It can be concluded, that Bio-10-SAD Bern virus administered at a dose equal to the tenfold maximum dose specified for field uses is safe to monkeys of the rhesus macaque species. This study is the first of its type performed in rhesus macaque monkey species.

  17. The Recombinant Maize Ribosome-Inactivating Protein Transiently Reduces Viral Load in SHIV89.6 Infected Chinese Rhesus Macaques

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    Rui-Rui Wang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ribosome inactivating proteins (RIPs inhibit protein synthesis by depurinating the large ribosomal RNA and some are found to possess anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV activity. Maize ribosome inactivating protein (RIP has an internal inactivation loop which is proteolytically removed for full catalytic activity. Here, we showed that the recombinant active maize RIP protected chimeric simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV 89.6-infected macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells from lysis ex vivo and transiently reduced plasma viral load in SHIV89.6-infected rhesus macaque model. No evidence of immune dysregulation and other obvious side-effects was found in the treated macaques. Our work demonstrates the potential development of maize RIP as an anti-HIV agent without impeding systemic immune functions.

  18. Pathophysiologic and transcriptomic analyses of viscerotropic yellow fever in a rhesus macaque model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Engelmann, Flora; Josset, Laurence; Girke, Thomas; Park, Byung; Barron, Alex; Dewane, Jesse; Hammarlund, Erika; Lewis, Anne; Axthelm, Michael K; Slifka, Mark K; Messaoudi, Ilhem

    2014-01-01

    Infection with yellow fever virus (YFV), an explosively replicating flavivirus, results in viral hemorrhagic disease characterized by cardiovascular shock and multi-organ failure. Unvaccinated populations experience 20 to 50% fatality. Few studies have examined the pathophysiological changes that occur in humans during YFV infection due to the sporadic nature and remote locations of outbreaks. Rhesus macaques are highly susceptible to YFV infection, providing a robust animal model to investigate host-pathogen interactions. In this study, we characterized disease progression as well as alterations in immune system homeostasis, cytokine production and gene expression in rhesus macaques infected with the virulent YFV strain DakH1279 (YFV-DakH1279). Following infection, YFV-DakH1279 replicated to high titers resulting in viscerotropic disease with ∼72% mortality. Data presented in this manuscript demonstrate for the first time that lethal YFV infection results in profound lymphopenia that precedes the hallmark changes in liver enzymes and that although tissue damage was noted in liver, kidneys, and lymphoid tissues, viral antigen was only detected in the liver. These observations suggest that additional tissue damage could be due to indirect effects of viral replication. Indeed, circulating levels of several cytokines peaked shortly before euthanasia. Our study also includes the first description of YFV-DakH1279-induced changes in gene expression within peripheral blood mononuclear cells 3 days post-infection prior to any clinical signs. These data show that infection with wild type YFV-DakH1279 or live-attenuated vaccine strain YFV-17D, resulted in 765 and 46 differentially expressed genes (DEGs), respectively. DEGs detected after YFV-17D infection were mostly associated with innate immunity, whereas YFV-DakH1279 infection resulted in dysregulation of genes associated with the development of immune response, ion metabolism, and apoptosis. Therefore, WT-YFV infection

  19. Model-observer similarity, error modeling and social learning in rhesus macaques.

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    Elisabetta Monfardini

    Full Text Available Monkeys readily learn to discriminate between rewarded and unrewarded items or actions by observing their conspecifics. However, they do not systematically learn from humans. Understanding what makes human-to-monkey transmission of knowledge work or fail could help identify mediators and moderators of social learning that operate regardless of language or culture, and transcend inter-species differences. Do monkeys fail to learn when human models show a behavior too dissimilar from the animals' own, or when they show a faultless performance devoid of error? To address this question, six rhesus macaques trained to find which object within a pair concealed a food reward were successively tested with three models: a familiar conspecific, a 'stimulus-enhancing' human actively drawing the animal's attention to one object of the pair without actually performing the task, and a 'monkey-like' human performing the task in the same way as the monkey model did. Reward was manipulated to ensure that all models showed equal proportions of errors and successes. The 'monkey-like' human model improved the animals' subsequent object discrimination learning as much as a conspecific did, whereas the 'stimulus-enhancing' human model tended on the contrary to retard learning. Modeling errors rather than successes optimized learning from the monkey and 'monkey-like' models, while exacerbating the adverse effect of the 'stimulus-enhancing' model. These findings identify error modeling as a moderator of social learning in monkeys that amplifies the models' influence, whether beneficial or detrimental. By contrast, model-observer similarity in behavior emerged as a mediator of social learning, that is, a prerequisite for a model to work in the first place. The latter finding suggests that, as preverbal infants, macaques need to perceive the model as 'like-me' and that, once this condition is fulfilled, any agent can become an effective model.

  20. Factors increasing snake detection and perceived threat in captive rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etting, Stephanie F; Isbell, Lynne A; Grote, Mark N

    2014-02-01

    The primary predators of primates are all ambush hunters, and yet felids, raptors, and snakes differ in aspects of their ecology that affect the evasive strategies of their primate prey. Felids and raptors can traverse long distances quickly, thus the urgency of threat they present increases as they come closer in proximity to primates. In contrast, snakes do not move rapidly over long distances, and so primates may be reasonably safe even at close distances provided snakes can be detected and monitored. We investigated the ability of captive rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) to detect snakes at distances ranging from 15 to 1.5 m. We also examined variation in intensity of perceived threat by applying a Hidden Markov Model to infer changes in underlying state from observable behaviors, that is, increased attention and mobbing. We found that the macaques often failed to detect snake models but that closer proximity improved snake detection, which is necessary before threat can be perceived. We also found that having only one individual in fairly close proximity (≤ 7.5 m) was sufficient to alert the rest of the group and so the chances of detection did not increase with increasing group size. Finally, we found that when the snakes were perceived, they did not elicit greater intensity of response with closer proximity. These results provide evidence that the threat from snakes is greatest when they are in proximity to primates but are unseen. When snakes are seen, however, distance appears not to affect primates' perceived risk, in contrast to their perceived risk from raptors and felids. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Age-related neurochemical changes in the rhesus macaque cochlear nucleus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Daniel T; Engle, James R; Recanzone, Gregg H

    2014-05-01

    Neurochemical changes in the expression of various proteins within the central auditory system have been associated with natural aging. These changes may compensate in part for the loss of auditory sensitivity arising from two phenomena of the aging auditory system: cochlear histopathologies and increased excitability of central auditory neurons. Recent studies in the macaque monkey have revealed age-related changes in the density of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-diaphorase (NADPHd) and parvalbumin (PV)-positive cells within the inferior colliculus and superior olivary complex. The cochlear nucleus (CN), which is the first central auditory nucleus, remains unstudied. Since the CN participates in the generation of the auditory brainstem response (ABR) and receives direct innervation from the cochlea, it serves as an ideal nucleus to compare the relationship between these neurochemical changes and the physiological and peripheral changes of the aging auditory system. We used stereological sampling to calculate the densities of NADPHd and PV reactive neurons within the three subdivisions of the CN in middle-aged and aged rhesus macaques. Regression analyses of these values with ABR properties and cochlear histopathologies revealed relationships between these cell types and the changing characteristics of the aging auditory system. Our results indicate that NADPHd expression does change with age in a specific subdivision of the CN, but PV does not. Conversely, PV expression correlated with ABR amplitudes and outer hair cell loss in the cochlea, but NADPHd did not. These results indicate that NADPHd and PV may take part in distinct compensatory efforts of the aging auditory system. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  2. Establishing the reliability of rhesus macaque social network assessment from video observations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feczko, Eric; Mitchell, Thomas A. J.; Walum, Hasse; Brooks, Jenna M.; Heitz, Thomas R.; Young, Larry J.; Parr, Lisa A.

    2015-01-01

    Understanding the properties of a social environment is important for understanding the dynamics of social relationships. Understanding such dynamics is relevant for multiple fields, ranging from animal behaviour to social and cognitive neuroscience. To quantify social environment properties, recent studies have incorporated social network analysis. Social network analysis quantifies both the global and local properties of a social environment, such as social network efficiency and the roles played by specific individuals, respectively. Despite the plethora of studies incorporating social network analysis, methods to determine the amount of data necessary to derive reliable social networks are still being developed. Determining the amount of data necessary for a reliable network is critical for measuring changes in the social environment, for example following an experimental manipulation, and therefore may be critical for using social network analysis to statistically assess social behaviour. In this paper, we extend methods for measuring error in acquired data and for determining the amount of data necessary to generate reliable social networks. We derived social networks from a group of 10 male rhesus macaques, Macaca mulatta, for three behaviours: spatial proximity, grooming and mounting. Behaviours were coded using a video observation technique, where video cameras recorded the compound where the 10 macaques resided. We collected, coded and used 10 h of video data to construct these networks. Using the methods described here, we found in our data that 1 h of spatial proximity observations produced reliable social networks. However, this may not be true for other studies due to differences in data acquisition. Our results have broad implications for measuring and predicting the amount of error in any social network, regardless of species. PMID:26392632

  3. Association of TLR7 variants with AIDS-like disease and AIDS vaccine efficacy in rhesus macaques.

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    Roman A Siddiqui

    Full Text Available In HIV infection, TLR7-triggered IFN-α production exerts a direct antiviral effect through the inhibition of viral replication, but may also be involved in immune pathogenesis leading to AIDS. TLR7 could also be an important mediator of vaccine efficacy. In this study, we analyzed polymorphisms in the X-linked TLR7 gene in the rhesus macaque model of AIDS. Upon resequencing of the TLR7 gene in 36 rhesus macaques of Indian origin, 12 polymorphic sites were detected. Next, we identified three tightly linked single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP as being associated with survival time. Genotyping of 119 untreated, simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV-infected male rhesus macaques, including an 'MHC adjusted' subset, revealed that the three TLR7 SNPs are also significantly associated with set-point viral load. Surprisingly, this effect was not observed in 72 immunized SIV-infected male monkeys. We hypothesize (i that SNP c.13G>A in the leader peptide is causative for the observed genotype-phenotype association and that (ii the underlying mechanism is related to RNA secondary structure formation. Therefore, we investigated a fourth SNP (c.-17C>T, located 17 bp upstream of the ATG translation initiation codon, that is also potentially capable of influencing RNA structure. In c.13A carriers, neither set-point viral load nor survival time were related to the c.-17C>T genotype. In c.13G carriers, by contrast, the c.-17C allele was significantly associated with prolonged survival. Again, no such association was detected among immunized SIV-infected macaques. Our results highlight the dual role of TLR7 in immunodeficiency virus infection and vaccination and imply that it may be important to control human AIDS vaccine trials, not only for MHC genotype, but also for TLR7 genotype.

  4. Isolation of a monoclonal antibody from a phage display library binding the rhesus macaque MHC class I allomorph Mamu-A1*001

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Nathan; Weinfurter, Jason T.; Harsla, Trevor R.; Wiseman, Roger W.; Belli, Aaron J.; Michaels, Anthony J.; Reimann, Keith A.; DeMars, Robert I.

    2017-01-01

    Monoclonal antibodies that bind to human leukocyte antigen (HLA) are useful tools for HLA-typing, tracking donor-recipient chimerisms after bone marrow transplants, and characterizing specific major histocompatibility complexes (MHC) on cell surfaces. Unfortunately, equivalent reagents are not available for rhesus macaques, which are commonly used animal as models in organ transplant and infectious disease research. To address this deficiency, we isolated an antibody that recognizes the common Indian rhesus macaque MHC class I molecule, Mamu-A1*001. We induced Mamu-A1*001-binding antibodies by alloimmunizing a female Mamu-A1*001-negative rhesus macaque with peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from a male Mamu-A1*001-positive donor. A Fab phage display library was constructed with PBMC from the alloimmunized macaque and panned to isolate an antibody that binds to Mamu-A1*001 but not to other common rhesus macaque MHC class I molecules. The isolated antibody distinguishes PBMC from Mamu-A1*001-positive and -negative macaques. Additionally, the Mamu-A1*001-specific antibody binds the cynomolgus macaque MHC class I ortholog Mafa-A1*001:01 but not variants Mafa-A1*001:02/03, indicating a high degree of binding specificity. The Mamu-A1*001-specific antibody will be useful for identifying Mamu-A1*001-positive rhesus macaques, for detecting Mamu-A1*001-positive cells in populations of Mamu-A1*001-negative cells, and for examining disease processes that alter expression of Mamu-A1*001 on cell surfaces. Moreover, the alloimmunization process we describe will be useful for isolating additional MHC allomorph-specific monoclonal antibodies or antibodies against other polymorphic host proteins which are difficult to isolate with traditional technologies. PMID:28719653

  5. Depressive-like behavioural profiles in captive-bred single- and socially-housed rhesus and cynomolgus macaques: a species comparison

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    Sandrine MJ Camus

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: To unravel the causes of major depressive disorder (MDD, the third leading cause of disease burden around the world, ethological animal models have recently been proposed. Our previous studies highlighted a depressive-like profile among single- and socially-housed farm-bred cynomolgus macaques. Although phylogenetically close, cynomolgus and rhesus macaques, the two most commonly used macaque species in biomedical research, differ on several levels such as patterns of aggression, reconciliation, temperament or dominance styles. The question of whether one captive macaque species was more vulnerable than another in the development of a pathological profile reminiscent of MDD symptoms was explored.Methods: Behavioural data (including body postures, orientations, gaze directions, inter-individual distances and locations in the cage were collected in farming conditions. Using an unbiased validated ethological scan-sampling method, followed by multiple correspondence and hierarchical clustering analyses, 40 single- and 35 socially-housed rhesus macaques were assessed. Independently, for each housing condition, inter-species comparisons were made with previously acquired data on farm-bred cynomolgus monkeys.Results: Consistent with our previous studies, we found depressive-like characteristics (e.g. inactivity, low level of investigation and maintenance, long time spent inactive while facing the wall among single- and socially-housed rhesus macaques. Species-specificities were reported in non-depressive time budgets and in the prevalence of the pathological profiles.Conclusions: Our results suggest that rhesus may be more vulnerable to developing a despair-like state than cynomolgus macaques, both in single- and in social-housing conditions. Therefore, rhesus macaques are more suitable for use as a spontaneous model of depressive disorders.

  6. Surrogate mobility and orientation affect the early neurobehavioral development of infant rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

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    Dettmer, Amanda M; Ruggiero, Angela M; Novak, Melinda A; Meyer, Jerrold S; Suomi, Stephen J

    2008-05-01

    A biological mother's movement appears necessary for optimal development in infant monkeys. However, nursery-reared monkeys are typically provided with inanimate surrogate mothers that move very little. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of a novel, highly mobile surrogate mother on motor development, exploration, and reactions to novelty. Six infant rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) were reared on mobile hanging surrogates (MS) and compared to six infants reared on standard stationary rocking surrogates (RS) and to 9-15 infants reared with their biological mothers (MR) for early developmental outcome. We predicted that MS infants would develop more similarly to MR infants than RS infants. In neonatal assessments conducted at Day 30, both MS and MR infants showed more highly developed motor activity than RS infants on measures of grasping (p = .009), coordination (p = .038), spontaneous crawl (p = .009), and balance (p = .003). At 2-3 months of age, both MS and MR infants displayed higher levels of exploration in the home cage than RS infants (p = .016). In a novel situation in which only MS and RS infants were tested, MS infants spent less time near their surrogates in the first five minutes of the test session than RS infants (p = .05), indicating a higher level of comfort. Collectively, these results suggest that when nursery-rearing of infant monkeys is necessary, a mobile hanging surrogate may encourage more normative development of gross motor skills and exploratory behavior and may serve as a useful alternative to stationary or rocking surrogates.

  7. An alert of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection of rhesus macaques in a wild zoo in China.

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    Gong, Wenping; Yang, Yourong; Luo, Yi; Li, Ning; Bai, Xuejuan; Liu, Yinping; Zhang, Junxian; Chen, Ming; Zhang, Chenglin; Wu, Xueqiong

    2017-10-30

    Mycobacterium tuberculosis, the pathogen that causes tuberculosis (TB), is becoming increasingly recognized as an important cause of fatal chronic illnesses in China. In this study, we report an infectious disease among 84 rhesus macaques at a Chinese zoo. Their clinical signs and symptoms were very similar with the manifestations of TB in humans. To determine the potential pathogens of this outbreak, many methods were used. First, tuberculin skin tests showed that none of the monkeys displayed significant skin reactions. Subsequently, the sera were tested for specific antibody IgG; 29 (34.5%) and 39 (46.4%) blood samples tested positive by TB-IgG and TB-DOT, respectively. Radiographic examination showed characteristic imageology changes in 14 (16.7%) monkeys. One individual determined as positive by the above three methods was euthanized, and histopathological analysis demonstrated typical granulomas and caseous necrosis in the lung, liver, spleen, and intestine. Furthermore, the pathogenic mycobacteria were isolated from lung lobe, cultured on acidic Lowenstein-Jensen culture medium, and identified as M. tuberculosis by real-time PCR and DNA sequencing. Nevertheless, the origin of the infection remained unknown. These findings emphasize the need to strengthen the management and training of staff, especially those working at animal shelters.

  8. The Influence of Kinship on Familiar Natal Migrant Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

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    Albers, Monika; Widdig, Anja

    2014-01-01

    In most primate species, females remain in the natal group with kin while males disperse away from kin around the time of puberty. Philopatric females bias their social behavior toward familiar maternal and paternal kin in several species, but little is known about kin bias in the dispersing sex. Male dispersal is likely to be costly because males encounter an increased risk of predation and death, which might be reduced by dispersing together with kin and/or familiar males (individuals that were born and grew up in same natal group) or into a group containing kin and/or familiar males. Here we studied the influence of kinship on familiar natal migrant rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) on Cayo Santiago, Puerto Rico, by combining demographic, behavioral, and genetic data. Our data suggest that kinship influences spatial proximity between recent natal immigrants and males familiar to them. Immigrants were significantly nearer to more closely related familiar males than to more distantly related individuals. Within a familiar subgroup, natal migrants were significantly closer to maternal kin, followed by paternal kin, then non-kin, and finally to males related via both the maternal and paternal line. Spatial proximity between natal immigrants and familiar males did not decrease over time in the new group, suggesting that there is no decline in associations between these individuals within the first months of immigration. Overall, our results might indicate that kinship is important for the dispersing sex, at least during natal dispersal when kin are still available. PMID:24850977

  9. Testosterone increases circulating dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels in the male rhesus macaque

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    Krystina eSorwell

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The adrenal steroid dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA and its sulfate (DHEAS are two of the most abundant hormones in the human circulation. Furthermore, they are released in a circadian pattern and show a marked age-associated decline. Adult levels of DHEA and DHEAS are significantly higher in males than in females, but the reason for this sexual dimorphism is unclear. In the present study, we administered supplementary androgens (DHEA, testosterone and 5α-dihydrotestosterone [DHT] to aged male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta. While this paradigm increased circulating DHEAS immediately after DHEA administration, an increase was also observed following either testosterone or DHT administration, resulting in hormonal profile resembling levels observed in young males in terms of both amplitude and circadian pattern. This stimulatory effect was limited to DHEAS, as an increase in circulating cortisol was not observed. Taken together, these data demonstrate an influence of the hypothalamo-pituitary-testicular axis on adrenal function in males, possibly by sensitizing the zona reticularis to the stimulating action of adrenocorticopic hormone. This represents a plausible mechanism to explain sex differences in circulating DHEA and DHEAS levels, and may have important implications in the development of hormone therapies designed for elderly men and women.

  10. THE SIGNATURE OF MATERNAL REARING IN THE METHYLOME IN RHESUS MACAQUE PREFRONTAL CORTEX AND T CELLS

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    Provençal, Nadine; Suderman, Matthew J.; Guillemin, Claire; Massart, Renaud; Ruggiero, Angela; Wang, Dongsha; Bennett, Allyson J.; Pierre, Peter J.; Friedman, David P.; Côté, Sylvana M.; Hallett, Michael; Tremblay, Richard E.; Suomi, Stephen J.; Szyf, Moshe

    2012-01-01

    Early life adversity is associated with a broad scope of life-long health and behavioral disorders. Particularly critical is the role of the mother. A possible mechanism is that these effects are mediated by “epigenetic” mechanisms. Studies in rodents suggest a causal relationship between early life adversity and changes in DNA methylation in several “candidate genes” in the brain. This study examines whether randomized differential rearing (maternal versus surrogate-peer rearing) of rhesus macaques is associated with differential methylation in early adulthood. The data presented here shows that differential rearing leads to differential DNA methylation in both prefrontal cortex and T cells. These differentially methylated promoters tend to cluster both by chromosomal region as well as by gene function. The broad impact of maternal rearing on DNA methylation in both the brain and T cells supports the hypothesis that the response to early-life adversity is system-wide and genome-wide and persists to adulthood. Our data also points to the feasibility of studying the impact of the social environment in peripheral T cells DNA methylation. PMID:23115197

  11. Lipopolysaccharide induces immune activation and SIV replication in rhesus macaques of Chinese origin.

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    Rong Bao

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chronic immune activation is a hallmark of progressive HIV infection and a key determinant of immunodeficiency in HIV-infected individuals. Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS in the circulation has been implicated as a key factor in HIV infection-related systemic immune activation. We thus investigate the impact of LPS on systemic immune activation in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV-infected rhesus macaques of Chinese origin. METHODS: The animals were inoculated intravenously with SIVmac239. The levels of plasma viral load and host inflammatory cytokines in PBMC were measured by real-time RT-PCR. CD4/CD8 ratio and systemic immune activation markers were examined by flow cytometric analysis of PBMCs. White blood cell and neutrophil counts and C Reactive Protein levels were determined using biochemistry analyzer. The plasma levels of LPS were determined by Tachypleus Amebocyte Lysate (TAL test. RESULTS: The animals inoculated with SIVmac239 became infected as evidenced by the increased plasma levels of SIV RNA and decreased CD4/CD8 ratio. LPS administration of SIV-infected animals induced a transient increase of plasma SIV RNA and immune activation, which was indicated by the elevated expression of the inflammatory cytokines and CD4+HLA-DR+ T cells in PBMCs. CONCLUSIONS: These data support the concept that LPS is a driving factor in systemic immune activation of HIV disease.

  12. Zika Virus infection of rhesus macaques leads to viral persistence in multiple tissues.

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    Alec J Hirsch

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Zika virus (ZIKV, an emerging flavivirus, has recently spread explosively through the Western hemisphere. In addition to symptoms including fever, rash, arthralgia, and conjunctivitis, ZIKV infection of pregnant women can cause microcephaly and other developmental abnormalities in the fetus. We report herein the results of ZIKV infection of adult rhesus macaques. Following subcutaneous infection, animals developed transient plasma viremia and viruria from 1-7 days post infection (dpi that was accompanied by the development of a rash, fever and conjunctivitis. Animals produced a robust adaptive immune response to ZIKV, although systemic cytokine response was minimal. At 7 dpi, virus was detected in peripheral nervous tissue, multiple lymphoid tissues, joints, and the uterus of the necropsied animals. Notably, viral RNA persisted in neuronal, lymphoid and joint/muscle tissues and the male and female reproductive tissues through 28 to 35 dpi. The tropism and persistence of ZIKV in the peripheral nerves and reproductive tract may provide a mechanism of subsequent neuropathogenesis and sexual transmission.

  13. Locomotor activity and the expression of orexin A and orexin B in aged female rhesus macaques.

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    Luna, Selva L; Brown, Donald I; Eghlidi, Dominique H; Kohama, Steven G; Urbanski, Henryk F

    2017-02-01

    Reduced activity has been linked to age-associated physiological changes but the underlying root cause is unclear. The goal of the present study was to compare the orexin neuronal system of old (23-29 years) female rhesus macaques with either active or sedentary 24-hour locomotor activity patterns. Using immunohistochemistry, we counted the number of orexin A and orexin B neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area of each animal. Overall, we observed no difference in the distribution pattern or number of either orexin A or orexin B immune-positive neurons between animals in the 2 groups. Thus, reduced activity in the elderly is unlikely to stem from a loss of orexin neuronal perikarya in the lateral hypothalamic area. This, however, does not rule out the possibility that the reduced activity stems from reduced orexin neuronal projections to arousal centers of the brain, such as the locus coeruleus, or from attenuated release of orexin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Early Loss of Splenic Tfh Cells in SIV-Infected Rhesus Macaques.

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    Félicien Moukambi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Follicular T helper cells (Tfh, a subset of CD4 T lymphocytes, provide crucial help to B cells in the production of antigen-specific antibodies. Although several studies have analyzed the dynamics of Tfh cells in peripheral blood and lymph nodes (LNs during Aids, none has yet addressed the impact of SIV infection on the dynamics of Tfh cells in the spleen, the primary organ of B cell activation. We show here a significant decrease in splenic Tfh cells in SIVmac251-infected rhesus macaques (RMs during the acute phase of infection, which persists thereafter. This profound loss is associated with lack of sustained expression of the Tfh-defining transcription factors, Bcl-6 and c-Maf but with higher expression of the repressors KLF2 and Foxo1. In this context of Tfh abortive differentiation and loss, we found decreased percentages of memory B cell subsets and lower titers of SIV-specific IgG. We further demonstrate a drastic remodeling of the lymphoid architecture of the spleen and LNs, which disrupts the crucial cell-cell interactions necessary to maintain memory B cells and Tfh cells. Finally, our data demonstrated the early infection of Tfh cells. Paradoxically, the frequencies of SIV DNA were higher in splenic Tfh cells of RMs progressing more slowly suggesting sanctuaries for SIV in the spleen. Our findings provide important information regarding the impact of HIV/SIV infection on Tfh cells, and provide new clues for future vaccine strategies.

  15. Perceptual category learning of photographic and painterly stimuli in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) and humans.

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    Altschul, Drew; Jensen, Greg; Terrace, Herbert

    2017-01-01

    Humans are highly adept at categorizing visual stimuli, but studies of human categorization are typically validated by verbal reports. This makes it difficult to perform comparative studies of categorization using non-human animals. Interpretation of comparative studies is further complicated by the possibility that animal performance may merely reflect reinforcement learning, whereby discrete features act as discriminative cues for categorization. To assess and compare how humans and monkeys classified visual stimuli, we trained 7 rhesus macaques and 41 human volunteers to respond, in a specific order, to four simultaneously presented stimuli at a time, each belonging to a different perceptual category. These exemplars were drawn at random from large banks of images, such that the stimuli presented changed on every trial. Subjects nevertheless identified and ordered these changing stimuli correctly. Three monkeys learned to order naturalistic photographs; four others, close-up sections of paintings with distinctive styles. Humans learned to order both types of stimuli. All subjects classified stimuli at levels substantially greater than that predicted by chance or by feature-driven learning alone, even when stimuli changed on every trial. However, humans more closely resembled monkeys when classifying the more abstract painting stimuli than the photographic stimuli. This points to a common classification strategy in both species, one that humans can rely on in the absence of linguistic labels for categories.

  16. Transcription Profiling Reveals Potential Mechanisms of Dysbiosis in the Oral Microbiome of Rhesus Macaques with Chronic Untreated SIV Infection

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    Ocon, Susan; Murphy, Christina; Dang, Angeline T.; Sankaran-Walters, Sumathi; Li, Chin-Shang; Tarara, Ross; Borujerdpur, Niku; Dandekar, Satya; Paster, Bruce J.; George, Michael D.

    2013-01-01

    A majority of individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have inadequate access to antiretroviral therapy and ultimately develop debilitating oral infections that often correlate with disease progression. Due to the impracticalities of conducting host-microbe systems-based studies in HIV infected patients, we have evaluated the potential of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infected rhesus macaques to serve as a non-human primate model for oral manifestations of HIV disease. We present the first description of the rhesus macaque oral microbiota and show that a mixture of human commensal bacteria and “macaque versions” of human commensals colonize the tongue dorsum and dental plaque. Our findings indicate that SIV infection results in chronic activation of antiviral and inflammatory responses in the tongue mucosa that may collectively lead to repression of epithelial development and impact the microbiome. In addition, we show that dysbiosis of the lingual microbiome in SIV infection is characterized by outgrowth of Gemella morbillorum that may result from impaired macrophage function. Finally, we provide evidence that the increased capacity of opportunistic pathogens (e.g. E. coli) to colonize the microbiome is associated with reduced production of antimicrobial peptides. PMID:24312248

  17. Tenofovir treatment augments anti-viral immunity against drug-resistant SIV challenge in chronically infected rhesus macaques

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    Marx Preston

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Emergence of drug-resistant strains of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 is a major obstacle to successful antiretroviral therapy (ART in HIV-infected patients. Whether antiviral immunity can augment ART by suppressing replication of drug-resistant HIV-1 in humans is not well understood, but can be explored in non-human primates infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV. Rhesus macaques infected with live, attenuated SIV develop robust SIV-specific immune responses but remain viremic, often at low levels, for periods of months to years, thus providing a model in which to evaluate the contribution of antiviral immunity to drug efficacy. To investigate the extent to which SIV-specific immune responses augment suppression of drug-resistant SIV, rhesus macaques infected with live, attenuated SIVmac239Δnef were treated with the reverse transcriptase (RT inhibitor tenofovir, and then challenged with pathogenic SIVmac055, which has a five-fold reduced sensitivity to tenofovir. Results Replication of SIVmac055 was detected in untreated macaques infected with SIVmac239Δnef, and in tenofovir-treated, naïve control macaques. The majority of macaques infected with SIVmac055 experienced high levels of plasma viremia, rapid CD4+ T cell loss and clinical disease progression. By comparison, macaques infected with SIVmac239Δnef and treated with tenofovir showed no evidence of replicating SIVmac055 in plasma using allele-specific real-time PCR assays with a limit of sensitivity of 50 SIV RNA copies/ml plasma. These animals remained clinically healthy with stable CD4+ T cell counts during three years of follow-up. Both the tenofovir-treated and untreated macaques infected with SIVmac239Δnef had antibody responses to SIV gp130 and p27 antigens and SIV-specific CD8+ T cell responses prior to SIVmac055 challenge, but only those animals receiving concurrent treatment with tenofovir resisted infection with SIVmac055. Conclusion

  18. Case-Control Comparison of Enteric Viromes in Captive Rhesus Macaques with Acute or Idiopathic Chronic Diarrhea.

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    Kapusinszky, Beatrix; Ardeshir, Amir; Mulvaney, Usha; Deng, Xutao; Delwart, Eric

    2017-09-15

    Diarrhea is the major cause of non-research-associated morbidity and mortality affecting the supply of rhesus macaques and, potentially, their responses to experimental treatments. Idiopathic chronic diarrhea (ICD) in rhesus macaques also resembles ulcerative colitis, one form of human inflammatory bowel disease. To test for viral etiologies, we characterized and compared the fecal viromes from 32 healthy animals, 31 animals with acute diarrhea, and 29 animals with ICD. The overall fractions of eukaryotic viral reads were 0.063% for the healthy group, 0.131% for the acute-diarrhea group, and 0.297% for the chronic-diarrhea group. Eukaryotic viruses belonging to 6 viral families, as well as numerous circular Rep-encoding single-stranded DNA (CRESS DNA) viral genomes, were identified. The most commonly detected sequences were from picornaviruses, making up 59 to 88% of all viral reads, followed by 9 to 17% for CRESS DNA virus sequences. The remaining 5 virus families, Adenoviridae , Astroviridae , Anelloviridae , Picobirnaviridae , and Parvoviridae , collectively made up 1 to 3% of the viral reads, except for parvoviruses, which made up 23% of the viral reads in the healthy group. Detected members of the families Picornaviridae and Parvoviridae were highly diverse, consisting of multiple genera, species, and genotypes. Coinfections with members of up to six viral families were detected. Complete and partial viral genomes were assembled and used to measure the number of matching short sequence reads in feces from the 92 animals in the two clinical and the healthy control groups. Several enterovirus genotypes and CRESS DNA genomes were associated with ICD relative to healthy animals. Conversely, higher read numbers from different parvoviruses were associated with healthy animals. Our study reveals a high level of enteric coinfections with diverse viruses in a captive rhesus macaque colony and identifies several viruses positively or negatively associated with ICD

  19. Risk Factor Analysis May Provide Clues to Diarrhea Prevention in Outdoor-Housed Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

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    PRONGAY, KAMM; PARK, BYUNG; MURPHY, STEPHANIE J.

    2014-01-01

    Seventy-five percent of rhesus macaques at national primate research centers are housed outside. Annually, 15–39% of these animals experience diarrhea and require veterinary treatment for dehydration, electrolyte imbalance, or weight loss. An estimated 21–33% of these patients will die or be euthanized. Many studies have explored the various infectious etiologies of non-human primate diarrhea. However, there is little published information on diarrhea incidence rates and risk factors in outdoor-housed rhesus macaques. Without this information, it is challenging to determine endemic and epidemic diarrhea levels, or to develop and evaluate mitigation strategies. Using electronic medical records, we conducted a retrospective cohort study to calculate diarrhea incidence rates for rhesus macaques (N = 3,181) housed in three different outdoor housing types (corrals, shelters, and temporary housing) at the Oregon National Primate Research Center between November 1, 2009 and October 31, 2010. With multiple logistic regression analysis, we determined the relative risk of housing type, sex, and age on development of diarrhea. Diarrhea incidence and mortality in our population was lower than many published ranges. Type of outdoor housing, age, and previous diarrhea episode were positively correlated with diarrhea risk. Younger animals in smaller shelters and temporary housing had a greater risk of acquiring diarrhea, with juvenile animals (0.7–3.9 years) having the highest mortality rate. Sex was not a risk factor, but adult females with diarrhea were more likely to develop life-threatening complications than adult males. We also constructed a predictive model for diarrhea-associated mortality using Classification and Regression Tree. Findings from this study will be used to develop and evaluate mitigation strategies in our outdoor-housed population and to provide a foundation for genetic susceptibility and immune function testing. PMID:23568382

  20. Th1-skewed tissue responses to a mycolyl glycolipid in mycobacteria-infected rhesus macaques

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    Morita, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Ayumi; Hattori, Yuki; Komori, Takaya [Laboratory of Cell Regulation, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, 53 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Nakamura, Takashi [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita 12 Nishi 6, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812 (Japan); Igarashi, Tatsuhiko, E-mail: tigarash@virus.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Primate Model, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, 53 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Harashima, Hideyoshi, E-mail: harasima@pharm.hokudai.ac.jp [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita 12 Nishi 6, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812 (Japan); Sugita, Masahiko, E-mail: msugita@virus.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Regulation, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, 53 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Glucose monomycolate (GMM) is a marker glycolipid for active tuberculosis. •Tissue responses to GMM involved up-regulation of Th1-attracting chemokines. •Th1-skewed local responses were mounted at the GMM-injected tissue. -- Abstract: Trehalose 6,6′-dimycolate (TDM) is a major glycolipid of the cell wall of mycobacteria with remarkable adjuvant functions. To avoid detection by the host innate immune system, invading mycobacteria down-regulate the expression of TDM by utilizing host-derived glucose as a competitive substrate for their mycolyltransferases; however, this enzymatic reaction results in the concomitant biosynthesis of glucose monomycolate (GMM) which is recognized by the acquired immune system. GMM-specific, CD1-restricted T cell responses have been detected in the peripheral blood of infected human subjects and monkeys as well as in secondary lymphoid organs of small animals, such as guinea pigs and human CD1-transgenic mice. Nevertheless, it remains to be determined how tissues respond at the site where GMM is produced. Here we found that rhesus macaques vaccinated with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette–Guerin mounted a chemokine response in GMM-challenged skin that was favorable for recruiting T helper (Th)1 T cells. Indeed, the expression of interferon-γ, but not Th2 or Th17 cytokines, was prominent in the GMM-injected tissue. The GMM-elicited tissue response was also associated with the expression of monocyte/macrophage-attracting CC chemokines, such as CCL2, CCL4 and CCL8. Furthermore, the skin response to GMM involved the up-regulated expression of granulysin and perforin. Given that GMM is produced primarily by pathogenic mycobacteria proliferating within the host, the Th1-skewed tissue response to GMM may function efficiently at the site of infection.

  1. Architectural assessment of rhesus macaque pelvic floor muscles: comparison for use as a human model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Amanda M; Cook, Mark S; Esparza, Mary C; Slayden, Ov D; Alperin, Marianna

    2017-10-01

    Animal models are essential to further our understanding of the independent and combined function of human pelvic floor muscles (PFMs), as direct studies in women are limited. To assure suitability of the rhesus macaque (RM), we compared RM and human PFM architecture, the strongest predictor of muscle function. We hypothesized that relative to other models, RM best resembles human PFM. Major architectural parameters of cadaveric human coccygeus, iliococcygeus, and pubovisceralis (pubococcygeus + puborectalis) and corresponding RM coccygeus, iliocaudalis, and pubovisceralis (pubovaginalis + pubocaudalis) were compared using 1- and 2-way analysis of variance (ANOVA) with post hoc testing. Architectural difference index (ADI), a combined measure of functionally relevant structural parameters predictive of length-tension, force-generation, and excursional muscle properties was used to compare PFMs across RM, rabbit, rat, and mouse. RM and human PFMs were similar with respect to architecture. However, the magnitude of similarity varied between individual muscles, with the architecture of the most distinct RM PFM, iliocaudalis, being well suited for quadrupedal locomotion. Except for the pubovaginalis, RM PFMs inserted onto caudal vertebrae, analogous to all tailed animals. Comparison of the PFM complex architecture across species revealed the lowest, thus closest to human, ADI for RM (1.9), followed by rat (2.0), mouse (2.6), and rabbit (4.7). Overall, RM provides the closest architectural representation of human PFM complex among species examined; however, differences between individual PFMs should be taken into consideration. As RM is closely followed by rat with respect to PFM similarity with humans, this less-sentient and substantially cheaper model is a good alternative for PFM studies.

  2. Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Disruption of Innate Immunity in Chronic Heavy Ethanol Consuming Female Rhesus Macaques.

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    Suhas Sureshchandra

    Full Text Available It is well established that heavy ethanol consumption interferes with the immune system and inflammatory processes, resulting in increased risk for infectious and chronic diseases. However, these processes have yet to be systematically studied in a dose and sex-dependent manner. In this study, we investigated the impact of chronic heavy ethanol consumption on gene expression using RNA-seq in peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from female rhesus macaques with daily consumption of 4% ethanol available 22hr/day for 12 months resulting in average ethanol consumption of 4.3 g/kg/day (considered heavy drinking. Differential gene expression analysis was performed using edgeR and gene enrichment analysis using MetaCore™. We identified 1106 differentially expressed genes, meeting the criterion of ≥ two-fold change and p-value ≤ 0.05 in expression (445 up- and 661 down-regulated. Pathway analysis of the 879 genes with characterized identifiers showed that the most enriched gene ontology processes were "response to wounding", "blood coagulation", "immune system process", and "regulation of signaling". Changes in gene expression were seen despite the lack of differences in the frequency of any major immune cell subtype between ethanol and controls, suggesting that heavy ethanol consumption modulates gene expression at the cellular level rather than altering the distribution of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Collectively, these observations provide mechanisms to explain the higher incidence of infection, delay in wound healing, and increase in cardiovascular disease seen in subjects with Alcohol use disorder.

  3. Th1-skewed tissue responses to a mycolyl glycolipid in mycobacteria-infected rhesus macaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morita, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Ayumi; Hattori, Yuki; Komori, Takaya; Nakamura, Takashi; Igarashi, Tatsuhiko; Harashima, Hideyoshi; Sugita, Masahiko

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: •Glucose monomycolate (GMM) is a marker glycolipid for active tuberculosis. •Tissue responses to GMM involved up-regulation of Th1-attracting chemokines. •Th1-skewed local responses were mounted at the GMM-injected tissue. -- Abstract: Trehalose 6,6′-dimycolate (TDM) is a major glycolipid of the cell wall of mycobacteria with remarkable adjuvant functions. To avoid detection by the host innate immune system, invading mycobacteria down-regulate the expression of TDM by utilizing host-derived glucose as a competitive substrate for their mycolyltransferases; however, this enzymatic reaction results in the concomitant biosynthesis of glucose monomycolate (GMM) which is recognized by the acquired immune system. GMM-specific, CD1-restricted T cell responses have been detected in the peripheral blood of infected human subjects and monkeys as well as in secondary lymphoid organs of small animals, such as guinea pigs and human CD1-transgenic mice. Nevertheless, it remains to be determined how tissues respond at the site where GMM is produced. Here we found that rhesus macaques vaccinated with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette–Guerin mounted a chemokine response in GMM-challenged skin that was favorable for recruiting T helper (Th)1 T cells. Indeed, the expression of interferon-γ, but not Th2 or Th17 cytokines, was prominent in the GMM-injected tissue. The GMM-elicited tissue response was also associated with the expression of monocyte/macrophage-attracting CC chemokines, such as CCL2, CCL4 and CCL8. Furthermore, the skin response to GMM involved the up-regulated expression of granulysin and perforin. Given that GMM is produced primarily by pathogenic mycobacteria proliferating within the host, the Th1-skewed tissue response to GMM may function efficiently at the site of infection

  4. Development of a Nonhuman Primate (Rhesus Macaque) Model of Uncontrolled Traumatic Liver Hemorrhage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheppard, Forest R; Macko, Antoni; Fryer, Darren M; Ozuna, Kassandra M; Brown, Alexander K; Crossland, Randy F; Tadaki, Douglas K

    2015-08-01

    Hemorrhage is the leading cause of potentially survivable trauma mortality, necessitating the development of improved therapeutic interventions. The objective of this study was to develop and characterize a reproducible clinically translatable nonhuman primate model of uncontrolled severe hemorrhage. Such a model is required to facilitate the development and meaningful evaluation of human-derived therapeutics. In Rhesus macaques, a laparoscopic left-lobe hepatectomy of 25% (n = 2), 50% (n = 4), or 60% (n = 6) was performed at T = 0 min, with no attempt at hemorrhage control until T = 120 min. A constant-rate infusion of normal saline was administered between T = 15 and 120 min to a total volume of 20 mL/kg. At T = 120 min, a laparotomy was performed to gain surgical hemostasis and quantify blood loss. Physiological parameters were recorded, and blood samples were collected at defined intervals until termination of the study at T = 480 min. Statistical analyses used Student t tests, with P < 0.05 considered statistically significant. Results are reported as mean ± SEM. The calculated percent blood loss for the 25% hepatectomy group was negligible (2.3% ± 0.2%), whereas the 50% and 60% hepatectomy groups exhibited 26.6% ± 7.1% and 24.9% ± 3.8% blood loss, respectively. At T = 5 min, blood pressure for the 25%, 50%, and 60% hepatectomy groups was reduced by 13.8%, 60.8%, and 63.2% from the respective baseline values (P < 0.05). In the 60% hepatectomy group, alterations in thromboelastometry parameters and systemic inflammatory markers were observed. The development of a translatable nonhuman primate model of uncontrolled hemorrhage is an ongoing process. This study demonstrates that 60% hepatectomy offers a significant reproducible injury applicable for the evaluation of human-derived therapeutics.

  5. The influence of acute and chronic alcohol consumption on response time distribution in adolescent rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, M Jerry; Vandewater, Sophia A; Taffe, Michael A

    2013-07-01

    Analysis of the distribution of reaction times (RTs) in behavioral tasks can illustrate differences attributable to changes in attention, even when no change in mean RT is observed. Detrimental attentional effects of both acute and chronic exposure to alcohol may therefore be revealed by fitting RT data to an ex-Gaussian probability density function which identifies the proportion of long-RT responses. Adolescent male rhesus macaques completed a 5-choice serial reaction time task (5CSRT) after acute alcohol consumption (up to 0.0, 1.0 and 1.5 g/kg). Monkeys were next divided into chronic alcohol (N = 5) and control groups (N = 5); the experimental group consumed 1.5-3.0 g/kg alcohol for 200 drinking sessions. Unintoxicated performance in the 5CSRT task was determined systematically across the study period and the effect of acute alcohol was redetermined after the 180th drinking session. The effect of extended abstinence from chronic alcohol was determined across 90 days. Acute alcohol exposure dose-dependently reduced the probability of longer RT responses without changing the mean or the standard deviation of the RT distribution. The RT distribution of control monkeys tightened across 10 months whereas that of the chronic alcohol group was unchanged. Discontinuation from chronic alcohol increased the probability of long RT responses with a difference from control animals observed after 30 days of discontinuation. Alcohol consumption selectively affected attention as reflected in the probability of long RT responses. Acute alcohol consumption focused attention, chronic alcohol consumption impaired the maturation of attention across the study period and alcohol discontinuation impaired attention. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Electrostatic potential of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 and rhesus macaque simian immunodeficiency virus capsid proteins

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    Katarzyna eBozek

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus isolated from a macaque monkey (SIVmac are assumed to have originated from simian immunodeficiency virus isolated from sooty mangabey (SIVsm. Despite their close similarity in genome structure, HIV-2 and SIVmac show different sensitivities to TRIM5α, a host restriction factor against retroviruses. The replication of HIV-2 strains is potently restricted by rhesus (Rh monkey TRIM5α, while that of SIVmac strain 239 (SIVmac239 is not. Viral capsid protein is the determinant of this differential sensitivity to TRIM5α, as the HIV-2 mutant carrying SIVmac239 capsid protein evaded Rh TRIM5α-mediated restriction. However, the molecular determinants of this restriction mechanism are unknown. Electrostatic potential on the protein-binding site is one of the properties regulating protein-protein interactions. In this study, we investigated the electrostatic potential on the interaction surface of capsid protein of HIV-2 strain GH123 and SIVmac239. Although HIV-2 GH123 and SIVmac239 capsid proteins share more than 87% amino acid identity, we observed a large difference between the two molecules with the HIV-2 GH123 molecule having predominantly positive and SIVmac239 predominantly negative electrostatic potential on the surface of the loop between α-helices 4 and 5 (L4/5. As L4/5 is one of the major determinants of Rh TRIM5α sensitivity of these viruses, the present results suggest that the binding site of the Rh TRIM5α may show complementarity to the HIV-2 GH123 capsid surface charge distribution.

  7. The delayed pulmonary syndrome following acute high-dose irradiation: a rhesus macaque model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garofalo, Michael; Bennett, Alexander; Farese, Ann M; Harper, Jamie; Ward, Amanda; Taylor-Howell, Cheryl; Cui, Wanchang; Gibbs, Allison; Lasio, Giovanni; Jackson, William; MacVittie, Thomas J

    2014-01-01

    Several radiation dose- and time-dependent tissue sequelae develop following acute high-dose radiation exposure. One of the recognized delayed effects of such exposures is lung injury, characterized by respiratory failure as a result of pneumonitis that may subsequently develop into lung fibrosis. Since this pulmonary subsyndrome may be associated with high morbidity and mortality, comprehensive treatment following high-dose irradiation will ideally include treatments that mitigate both the acute hematologic and gastrointestinal subsyndromes as well as the delayed pulmonary syndrome. Currently, there are no drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration to counteract the effects of acute radiation exposure. Moreover, there are no relevant large animal models of radiation-induced lung injury that permit efficacy testing of new generation medical countermeasures in combination with medical management protocols under the FDA animal rule criteria. Herein is described a nonhuman primate model of delayed lung injury resulting from whole thorax lung irradiation. Rhesus macaques were exposed to 6 MV photon radiation over a dose range of 9.0-12.0 Gy and medical management administered according to a standardized treatment protocol. The primary endpoint was all-cause mortality at 180 d. A comparative multiparameter analysis is provided, focusing on the lethal dose response relationship characterized by a lethal dose50/180 of 10.27 Gy [9.88, 10.66] and slope of 1.112 probits per linear dose. Latency, incidence, and severity of lung injury were evaluated through clinical and radiographic parameters including respiratory rate, saturation of peripheral oxygen, corticosteroid requirements, and serial computed tomography. Gross anatomical and histological analyses were performed to assess radiation-induced injury. The model defines the dose response relationship and time course of the delayed pulmonary sequelae and consequent morbidity and mortality. Therefore, it may provide

  8. Simian varicella virus infection of rhesus macaques recapitulates essential features of varicella zoster virus infection in humans.

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    Ilhem Messaoudi

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Simian varicella virus (SVV, the etiologic agent of naturally occurring varicella in primates, is genetically and antigenically closely related to human varicella zoster virus (VZV. Early attempts to develop a model of VZV pathogenesis and latency in nonhuman primates (NHP resulted in persistent infection. More recent models successfully produced latency; however, only a minority of monkeys became viremic and seroconverted. Thus, previous NHP models were not ideally suited to analyze the immune response to SVV during acute infection and the transition to latency. Here, we show for the first time that intrabronchial inoculation of rhesus macaques with SVV closely mimics naturally occurring varicella (chickenpox in humans. Infected monkeys developed varicella and viremia that resolved 21 days after infection. Months later, viral DNA was detected only in ganglia and not in non-ganglionic tissues. Like VZV latency in human ganglia, transcripts corresponding to SVV ORFs 21, 62, 63 and 66, but not ORF 40, were detected by RT-PCR. In addition, as described for VZV, SVV ORF 63 protein was detected in the cytoplasm of neurons in latently infected monkey ganglia by immunohistochemistry. We also present the first in depth analysis of the immune response to SVV. Infected animals produced a strong humoral and cell-mediated immune response to SVV, as assessed by immunohistology, serology and flow cytometry. Intrabronchial inoculation of rhesus macaques with SVV provides a novel model to analyze viral and immunological mechanisms of VZV latency and reactivation.

  9. Mapping Putative Hubs in Human, Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta) Connectomes via Diffusion Tractography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Longchuan; Hu, Xiaoping; Preuss, Todd M.; Glasser, Matthew F.; Damen, Frederick W.; Qiu, Yuxuan

    2013-01-01

    Mapping anatomical brain networks with graph-theoretic analysis of diffusion tractography has recently gained popularity, because of its presumed value in understanding brain function. However, this approach has seldom been used to compare brain connectomes across species, which may provide insights into brain evolution. Here, we employed a data-driven approach to compare interregional brain connections across three primate species: 1) the intensively studied rhesus macaque, 2) our closest living primate relative, the chimpanzee, and 3) humans. Specifically, we first used random parcellations and surface-based probabilistic diffusion tractography to derive the brain networks of the three species under various network densities and resolutions. We then compared the characteristics of the networks using graph-theoretic measures. In rhesus macaques, our tractography-defined hubs showed reasonable overlap with hubs previously identified using anterograde and retrograde tracer data. Across all three species, hubs were largely symmetric in the two hemispheres and were consistently identified in medial parietal, insular, retrosplenial cingulate and ventrolateral prefrontal cortices, suggesting a conserved structural architecture within these regions. However, species differences were observed in the inferior parietal cortex, polar and medial prefrontal cortices. The potential significance of these interspecies differences is discussed. PMID:23603286

  10. Immunoglobulin Concentrations and Antigen-Specific Antibody Levels in Cervicovaginal Lavages of Rhesus Macaques Are Influenced by the Stage of the Menstrual Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lü, F. Xusheng; Ma, Zhongmin; Rourke, Tracy; Srinivasan, Seema; McChesney, Michael; Miller, Christopher J.

    1999-01-01

    The levels of antigen-specific antibodies (Abs) and immunoglobulins in the cervical mucus of women vary with the menstrual cycle; the highest levels occur during menses, and the lowest occur during the periovulatory period. The rhesus macaque is a widely used animal model of female genital tract immunity. We sought to determine whether rhesus macaques have a cyclical pattern of changing cervicovaginal Ab and immunoglobulin levels that is similar to that of the human female. This study examined the relationship of the stages of the menstrual cycle to genital mucosal and systemic immunoglobulin concentrations and Ab levels in rhesus macaques. In all seven rhesus macaques studied, the immunoglobulins G and A and some antibodies in cervicovaginal lavages varied with the stages of the menstrual cycle, and in many cases this variation reached the level of statistical significance. In a pattern similar to that of women, the highest levels of Abs and immunoglobulins occurred during menses, and the lowest levels occurred around the time of ovulation. However, the Ab and immunoglobulin levels in serum and rectal lavages did not change with the menstrual cycle stage. The results of this study are consistent with the hypothesis that the ovarian hormones that drive the menstrual cycle influence genital tract immunity in female primates. PMID:10569744

  11. Complex assembly, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of rhesus macaque MHC Mamu-A*01 complexed with an immunodominant SIV-Gag nonapeptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chu, Fuliang; Lou, Zhiyong; Gao, Bin; Bell, John I.; Rao, Zihe; Gao, George F.

    2005-01-01

    Crystallization of the first rhesus macaque MHC class I complex. Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in rhesus macaques has been used as the best model for the study of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in humans, especially in the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response. However, the structure of rhesus macaque (or any other monkey model) major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) presenting a specific peptide (the ligand for CTL) has not yet been elucidated. Here, using in vitro refolding, the preparation of the complex of the rhesus macaque MHC I allele (Mamu-A*01) with human β 2 m and an immunodominant peptide, CTPYDINQM (Gag-CM9), derived from SIV Gag protein is reported. The complex (45 kDa) was crystallized; the crystal belongs to space group I422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 183.8, c = 155.2 Å. The crystal contains two molecules in the asymmetric unit and diffracts X-rays to 2.8 Å resolution. The structure is being solved by molecular replacement and this is the first attempt to determined the crystal structure of a peptide–nonhuman primate MHC complex

  12. SIV-infected Chinese-origin rhesus macaques express specific MHC class I alleles in either elite controllers or normal progressors

    OpenAIRE

    Wambua, Daniel; Henderson, Ryan; Solomon, Christopher; Hunter, Meredith; Marx, Preston; Sette, Alessandro; Mothé, Bianca R.

    2011-01-01

    We characterized twelve SIV-infected Chinese-origin rhesus macaques for their entire MHC class I allele composition. Several MHC class I alleles were present in animals with varying outcomes of infections, either elite control or normal progression to AIDS disease. These MHC class I alleles may prove interesting targets for additional characterization.

  13. SIV-infected Chinese-origin rhesus macaques express specific MHC class I alleles in either elite controllers or normal progressors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wambua, Daniel; Henderson, Ryan; Solomon, Christopher; Hunter, Meredith; Marx, Preston; Sette, Alessandro; Mothé, Bianca R.

    2011-01-01

    We characterized twelve SIV-infected Chinese-origin rhesus macaques for their entire MHC class I allele composition. Several MHC class I alleles were present in animals with varying outcomes of infections, either elite control or normal progression to AIDS disease. These MHC class I alleles may prove interesting targets for additional characterization. PMID:21781132

  14. Case Report: Severe and Complicated Cynomolgi Malaria in a Rhesus Macaque Resulted in Similar Histopathological Changes as Those Seen in Human Malaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    J Joyner, Chester; Consortium, The MaHPIC; Wood, Jennifer S; Moreno, Alberto; Garcia, Anapatricia; Galinski, Mary R

    2017-08-01

    Histopathological data collected from patients with severe malaria have been instrumental for studying malaria pathogenesis. Animal models of malaria are critical to complement such studies. Here, the histopathological changes observed in a rhesus macaque with severe and complicated Plasmodium cynomolgi malaria are reported. The animal presented with thrombocytopenia, severe anemia, and hyperparasitemia during the acute infection. The macaque was given subcurative antimalarial treatment, fluid support, and a blood transfusion to treat the clinical complications, but at the time of transfusion, kidney function was compromised. These interventions did not restore kidney function, and the animal was euthanized due to irreversible renal failure. Gross pathological and histological examinations revealed that the lungs, kidneys, liver, spleen, and bone marrow exhibited abnormalities similar to those described in patients with malaria. Overall, this case report illustrates the similarities in the pathophysiological complications that can occur in human malaria and cynomolgi malaria in rhesus macaques.

  15. Copy number variation of CCL3-like genes affects rate of progression to simian-AIDS in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeremiah D Degenhardt

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Variation in genes underlying host immunity can lead to marked differences in susceptibility to HIV infection among humans. Despite heavy reliance on non-human primates as models for HIV/AIDS, little is known about which host factors are shared and which are unique to a given primate lineage. Here, we investigate whether copy number variation (CNV at CCL3-like genes (CCL3L, a key genetic host factor for HIV/AIDS susceptibility and cell-mediated immune response in humans, is also a determinant of time until onset of simian-AIDS in rhesus macaques. Using a retrospective study of 57 rhesus macaques experimentally infected with SIVmac, we find that CCL3L CNV explains approximately 18% of the variance in time to simian-AIDS (p<0.001 with lower CCL3L copy number associating with more rapid disease course. We also find that CCL3L copy number varies significantly (p<10(-6 among rhesus subpopulations, with Indian-origin macaques having, on average, half as many CCL3L gene copies as Chinese-origin macaques. Lastly, we confirm that CCL3L shows variable copy number in humans and chimpanzees and report on CCL3L CNV within and among three additional primate species. On the basis of our findings we suggest that (1 the difference in population level copy number may explain previously reported observations of longer post-infection survivorship of Chinese-origin rhesus macaques, (2 stratification by CCL3L copy number in rhesus SIV vaccine trials will increase power and reduce noise due to non-vaccine-related differences in survival, and (3 CCL3L CNV is an ancestral component of the primate immune response and, therefore, copy number variation has not been driven by HIV or SIV per se.

  16. Effect of human feeding on the road mortality of Rhesus Macaques on National Highway - 7 routed along Pench Tiger Reserve, Madhya Pradesh, India

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    A. Pragatheesh

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In Hindu mythology, Hanuman is worshipped as the monkey god and therefore there is a great reverence for macaques all across the country. Hindu devotees consider it their sacred duty to feed macaques along road, temples, parks and other public areas. Unfortunately, such food provisioning alters the habitat, food choice and behaviour of macaques. We studied the impact of feeding by humans on Rhesus Macaque Macaca mulatta feeding behaviour, distribution and also assessed the increased risk of accidents in the 11km road stretch of National Highway passing through Kanha-Pench corridor, from August 2009 to July 2010. Seasonal changes in macaque distribution and group sizes were assessed based on foot and vehicle transects. The numbers of road kills were monitored in early morning and late evening hours for different seasons. Five groups of macaques were occupying a minimum of 1.1 to a maximum of 1.7km stretch, together covering about 7.3km of road. Group size varied significantly in relation to the availability of food on the road. During the study, 54 macaques succumbed to road accidents. Maximum roadkill occurred during summer because of the greater inflow of tourists. Unless concerted efforts are made to increase awareness among people of the hazards of road-side feeding, incidences of macaque mortality are likely to increase.

  17. Peptide-binding motifs associated with MHC molecules common in Chinese rhesus macaques are analogous to those of human HLA supertypes and include HLA-B27-like alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mothé, Bianca R.; Southwood, Scott; Sidney, John

    2013-01-01

    Chinese rhesus macaques are of particular interest in simian immunodeficiency virus/human immunodeficiency virus (SIV/HIV) research as these animals have prolonged kinetics of disease progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS), compared to their Indian counterparts, suggesting...

  18. Experimental Oral Herpes Simplex Virus-1 (HSV-1 Co-infection in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV-Infected Rhesus Macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meropi Aravantinou

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Herpes simplex virus 1 and 2 (HSV-1/2 similarly initiate infection in mucosal epithelia and establish lifelong neuronal latency. Anogenital HSV-2 infection augments the risk for sexual human immunodeficiency virus (HIV transmission and is associated with higher HIV viral loads. However, whether oral HSV-1 infection contributes to oral HIV susceptibility, viremia, or oral complications of HIV infection is unknown. Appropriate non-human primate (NHP models would facilitate this investigation, yet there are no published studies of HSV-1/SIV co-infection in NHPs. Thus, we performed a pilot study for an oral HSV-1 infection model in SIV-infected rhesus macaques to describe the feasibility of the modeling and resultant immunological changes. Three SIV-infected, clinically healthy macaques became HSV-1-infected by inoculation with 4 × 108 pfu HSV-1 McKrae on buccal, tongue, gingiva, and tonsils after gentle abrasion. HSV-1 DNA was shed in oral swabs for up to 21 days, and shedding recurred in association with intra-oral lesions after periods of no shedding during 56 days of follow up. HSV-1 DNA was detected in explant cultures of trigeminal ganglia collected at euthanasia on day 56. In the macaque with lowest baseline SIV viremia, SIV plasma RNA increased following HSV-1 infection. One macaque exhibited an acute pro-inflammatory response, and all three animals experienced T cell activation and mobilization in blood. However, T cell and antibody responses to HSV-1 were low and atypical. Through rigorous assessesments, this study finds that the virulent HSV-1 strain McKrae resulted in a low level HSV-1 infection that elicited modest immune responses and transiently modulated SIV infection.

  19. A modified vaccinia Ankara vaccine vector expressing a mosaic H5 hemagglutinin reduces viral shedding in rhesus macaques.

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    Nicholas W Florek

    Full Text Available The rapid antigenic evolution of influenza viruses requires frequent vaccine reformulations. Due to the economic burden of continuous vaccine reformulation and the threat of new pandemics, there is intense interest in developing vaccines capable of eliciting broadly cross-reactive immunity to influenza viruses. We recently constructed a "mosaic" hemagglutinin (HA based on subtype 5 HA (H5 and designed to stimulate cellular and humoral immunity to multiple influenza virus subtypes. Modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA expressing this H5 mosaic (MVA-H5M protected mice against multiple homosubtypic H5N1 strains and a heterosubtypic H1N1 virus. To assess its potential as a human vaccine we evaluated the ability of MVA-H5M to provide heterosubtypic immunity to influenza viruses in a non-human primate model. Rhesus macaques received an initial dose of either MVA-H5M or plasmid DNA encoding H5M, followed by a boost of MVA-H5M, and then were challenged, together with naïve controls, with the heterosubtypic virus A/California/04/2009 (H1N1pdm. Macaques receiving either vaccine regimen cleared H1N1pdm challenge faster than naïve controls. Vaccination with H5M elicited antibodies that bound H1N1pdm HA, but did not neutralize the H1N1pdm challenge virus. Plasma from vaccinated macaques activated NK cells in the presence of H1N1pdm HA, suggesting that vaccination elicited cross-reactive antibodies capable of mediating antibody-dependent cell-mediated cytotoxicity (ADCC. Although HA-specific T cell responses to the MVA-H5M vaccine were weak, responses after challenge were stronger in vaccinated macaques than in control animals. Together these data suggest that mosaic HA antigens may provide a means for inducing broadly cross-reactive immunity to influenza viruses.

  20. Enhanced Th1/Th17 Functions of CD161+ CD8+ T Cells in Mucosal Tissues of Rhesus Macaques.

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    Namita Rout

    Full Text Available Expression of the C-type lectin-like receptor CD161 by human T cells is associated with type-17 responses, which play critical regulatory roles in immunity and inflammation at mucosal sites. However, the functions of CD161-expressing T cells in macaques, the pre-clinical model of several human diseases, remain unknown. This study examined the phenotypic and functional characteristics of CD161+ T cells in peripheral blood, mucosal tissues and lymph nodes of rhesus macaques. Majority of CD161-expressing T cells in peripheral blood and lung/intestinal mucosal tissues of rhesus macaques were found to be CD8+CD4- in phenotype. There was a significant enrichment of CD161+CD8+ T cells in the lungs and colonic mucosa (16.1%±6.6 and 16.8%±5.7 in comparison to peripheral blood (4.2%±1.2 and mesenteric lymph nodes (1.3%±0.8. Regardless of the tissue compartment, CD161+CD8+ T cells mainly comprised of γδ T cells and TCR Vα7.2+ MAIT cells (up to 80%, and displayed Th1 and Th17 cytokine responses to mitogen stimulation. Mucosal CD161+CD8+ T cells were characterized by very high expression of CD69, a recent activation marker that is preferentially expressed on tissue resident cells. Furthermore, lung and colonic mucosal CD161+CD8+ T cells showed enhanced IFN-γ, IL-17, and Perforin production in comparison to those in blood. Thus, macaque CD161+CD8+ T cells represent mucosal tissue-homing innate-like CD8+ T-cell populations with Th1/Th17 type cytokine and cytotoxic effector functions that can potentially enhance the recruitment of adaptive immune cells and control initial pathogen burden/dissemination in tissues. Analysis of their role in early immune responses to mucosal pathogens will be valuable in the design of vaccines and therapeutics.

  1. Cytotoxic Capacity of SIV-Specific CD8+ T Cells against Primary Autologous Targets Correlates with Immune Control in SIV-Infected Rhesus Macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Daniel; Migueles, Stephen A.; Rood, Julia E.; Peterson, Bennett; Johnson, Sarah; Doria-Rose, Nicole; Schneider, Douglas; Rakasz, Eva; Trivett, Matthew T.; Trubey, Charles M.; Coalter, Vicky; Hallahan, Claire W.; Watkins, David; Franchini, Genoveffa; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Connors, Mark

    2013-01-01

    Although the study of non-human primates has resulted in important advances for understanding HIV-specific immunity, a clear correlate of immune control over simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replication has not been found to date. In this study, CD8+ T-cell cytotoxic capacity was examined to determine whether this function is a correlate of immune control in the rhesus macaque (RM) SIV infection model as has been suggested in chronic HIV infection. SIVmac251-infected human reverse transcriptase (hTERT)-transduced CD4+ T-cell clone targets were co-incubated with autologous macaque effector cells to measure infected CD4+ T-cell elimination (ICE). Twenty-three SIV-infected rhesus macaques with widely varying plasma viral RNA levels were evaluated in a blinded fashion. Nineteen of 23 subjects (83%) were correctly classified as long-term nonprogressor/elite controller (LTNP/EC), slow progressor, progressor or SIV-negative rhesus macaques based on measurements of ICE (weighted Kappa 0.75). LTNP/EC had higher median ICE than progressors (67.3% [22.0–91.7%] vs. 23.7% [0.0–58.0%], p = 0.002). In addition, significant correlations between ICE and viral load (r = −0.57, p = 0.01), and between granzyme B delivery and ICE (r = 0.89, pspecific CD8+ T cells and efficient delivery of active granzyme B to SIV-infected targets are associated with superior control of SIV infection in rhesus macaques, consistent with observations of HIV infection in humans. Therefore, such measurements appear to represent a correlate of control of viral replication in chronic SIV infection and their role as predictors of immunologic control in the vaccine setting should be evaluated. PMID:23468632

  2. Detecting lineage-specific adaptive evolution of brain-expressed genes in human using rhesus macaque as outgroup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Xiao-Jing; Zheng, Hong-Kun; Wang, Jun

    2006-01-01

    Comparative genetic analysis between human and chimpanzee may detect genetic divergences responsible for human-specific characteristics. Previous studies have identified a series of genes that potentially underwent Darwinian positive selection during human evolution. However, without a closely...... related species as outgroup, it is difficult to identify human-lineage-specific changes, which is critical in delineating the biological uniqueness of humans. In this study, we conducted phylogeny-based analyses of 2633 human brain-expressed genes using rhesus macaque as the outgroup. We identified 47...... candidate genes showing strong evidence of positive selection in the human lineage. Genes with maximal expression in the brain showed a higher evolutionary rate in human than in chimpanzee. We observed that many immune-defense-related genes were under strong positive selection, and this trend was more...

  3. The Hematopoietic Syndrome of the Acute Radiation Syndrome in Rhesus Macaques: A Systematic Review of the Lethal Dose Response Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacVittie, Thomas J; Farese, Ann M; Jackson, William

    2015-11-01

    Well characterized animal models that mimic the human response to potentially lethal doses of radiation are required to assess the efficacy of medical countermeasures under the criteria of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration "animal rule." Development of a model requires the determination of the radiation dose response relationship and time course of mortality and morbidity across the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome. The nonhuman primate, rhesus macaque, is a relevant animal model that may be used to determine the efficacy of medical countermeasures to mitigate major signs of morbidity and mortality at selected lethal doses of total body irradiation. A systematic review of relevant studies that determined the dose response relationship for the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome in the rhesus macaque relative to radiation quality, dose rate, and exposure uniformity has never been performed. The selection of data cohorts was made from the following sources: Ovid Medline (1957-present), PubMed (1954-present), AGRICOLA (1976-present), Web of Science (1954-present), and U.S. HHS REPORT (2002 to present). The following terms were used: Rhesus, total body-irradiation, total body x irradiation, TBI, irradiation, gamma radiation, hematopoiesis, LD50/60, Macaca mulatta, whole-body irradiation, nonhuman primate, NHP, monkey, primates, hematopoietic radiation syndrome, mortality, and nuclear radiation. The reference lists of all studies, published and unpublished, were reviewed for additional studies. The total number of hits across all search sites was 3,001. There were a number of referenced, unpublished, non-peer reviewed government reports that were unavailable for review. Fifteen studies, 11 primary (n = 863) and four secondary (n = 153) studies [n = 1,016 total nonhuman primates (NHP), rhesus Macaca mulatta] were evaluated to provide an informative and consistent review. The dose response relationships (DRRs) were determined for uniform or non-uniform total

  4. Live attenuated rubella vectors expressing SIV and HIV vaccine antigens replicate and elicit durable immune responses in rhesus macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    Background Live attenuated viruses are among our most potent and effective vaccines. For human immunodeficiency virus, however, a live attenuated strain could present substantial safety concerns. We have used the live attenuated rubella vaccine strain RA27/3 as a vector to express SIV and HIV vaccine antigens because its safety and immunogenicity have been demonstrated in millions of children. One dose protects for life against rubella infection. In previous studies, rubella vectors replicated to high titers in cell culture while stably expressing SIV and HIV antigens. Their viability in vivo, however, as well as immunogenicity and antibody persistence, were unknown. Results This paper reports the first successful trial of rubella vectors in rhesus macaques, in combination with DNA vaccines in a prime and boost strategy. The vectors grew robustly in vivo, and the protein inserts were highly immunogenic. Antibody titers elicited by the SIV Gag vector were greater than or equal to those elicited by natural SIV infection. The antibodies were long lasting, and they were boosted by a second dose of replication-competent rubella vectors given six months later, indicating the induction of memory B cells. Conclusions Rubella vectors can serve as a vaccine platform for safe delivery and expression of SIV and HIV antigens. By presenting these antigens in the context of an acute infection, at a high level and for a prolonged duration, these vectors can stimulate a strong and persistent immune response, including maturation of memory B cells. Rhesus macaques will provide an ideal animal model for demonstrating immunogenicity of novel vectors and protection against SIV or SHIV challenge. PMID:24041113

  5. Response of Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) to the Body of a Group Member That Died from a Fatal Attack

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buhl, Jacqueline S.; Aure, Bonn; Ruiz-Lambides, Angelina; Gonzalez-Martinez, Janis; Platt, Michael L.; Brent, Lauren J. N.

    2013-01-01

    Among animals that form social bonds, the death of a conspecific may be a significant social event, representing the loss of an ally and resulting in disruptions to the dominance hierarchy. Despite this potential biological importance, we have only limited knowledge of animals' reactions to the death of a group member. This is particularly true of responses to dead adults, as most reports describe the responses of mothers to dead infants. Here, we describe in detail and provide video evidence of the behavioral responses of a group of free-ranging rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) immediately after the death of a mid-ranking adult male as a result of a fatal attack. High-ranking male members of the group, suspected to have carried out the attack, dragged and bit the dead body, exhibiting a rate of aggression 20 times greater than baseline levels. Lower-ranking individuals approached and inspected the body by looking closely, smelling, and grooming the fur. There was inconclusive evidence that these rhesus macaques found the death of a conspecific stressful: Levels of grooming between group members after the fatal attack were significantly higher than baseline levels, and higher than levels of grooming after nonfatal attacks. However, when grooming levels were adjusted based on the assumption that individuals positioned close to the body, i.e., those visible to researchers, were more likely to be engaged in grooming than those positioned farther away, this difference from baseline was no longer significant. The rate of self-directed behaviors after the fatal attack was also not different from baseline. Many of the behaviors we observed directed toward the body (aggression, inspection) have been previously reported in chimpanzees and geladas, and are similar to reactions sometimes displayed by humans. As such, this report represents a potentially valuable contribution the nascent field of nonhuman primate thanatology. PMID:23459587

  6. Immune targeting of PD-1{sup hi} expressing cells during and after antiretroviral therapy in SIV-infected rhesus macaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas-Inchaustegui, Diego A.; Xiao, Peng; Hogg, Alison E.; Demberg, Thorsten; McKinnon, Katherine [Vaccine Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Venzon, David [Biostatistics and Data Management Section, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Brocca-Cofano, Egidio; DiPasquale, Janet [Vaccine Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Lee, Eun M.; Hudacik, Lauren; Pal, Ranajit [Advanced Bioscience Laboratories Inc., Rockville, MD 20850 (United States); Sui, Yongjun; Berzofsky, Jay A. [Vaccine Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Liu, Linda; Langermann, Solomon [Amplimmune Inc., Gaithersburg, MD 20878 (United States); Robert-Guroff, Marjorie, E-mail: guroffm@mail.nih.gov [Vaccine Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    High-level T cell expression of PD-1 during SIV infection is correlated with impaired proliferation and function. We evaluated the phenotype and distribution of T cells and Tregs during antiretroviral therapy plus PD-1 modulation (using a B7-DC-Ig fusion protein) and post-ART. Chronically SIV-infected rhesus macaques received: 11 weeks of ART (Group A); 11 weeks of ART plus B7-DC-Ig (Group B); 11 weeks of ART plus B7-DC-Ig, then 12 weeks of B7-DC-Ig alone (Group C). Continuous B7-DC-Ig treatment (Group C) decreased rebound viremia post-ART compared to pre-ART levels, associated with decreased PD-1{sup hi} expressing T cells and Tregs in PBMCs, and PD-1{sup hi} Tregs in lymph nodes. It transiently decreased expression of Ki67 and α{sub 4}β{sub 7} in PBMC CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} Tregs for up to 8 weeks post-ART and maintained Ag-specific T-cell responses at low levels. Continued immune modulation targeting PD-1{sup hi} cells during and post-ART helps maintain lower viremia, keeps a favorable T cell/Treg repertoire and modulates antigen-specific responses. - Highlights: • B7-DC-Ig modulates PD-1{sup hi} cells in SIV-infected rhesus macaques during and post-ART. • Continued PD-1 modulation post-ART maintains PD-1{sup hi} cells at low levels. • Continued PD-1 modulation post-ART maintains a favorable T cell and Treg repertoire.

  7. Functional analysis of frequently expressed Chinese rhesus macaque MHC class I molecules Mamu-A1*02601 and Mamu-B*08301 reveals HLA-A2 and HLA-A3 supertypic specificities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Southwood, Scott; Solomon, Christopher; Hoof, Ilka

    2011-01-01

    The Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected Indian rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) is the most established model of HIV infection and AIDS-related research, despite the potential that macaques of Chinese origin is a more relevant model. Ongoing efforts to further characterize the Chinese rhe...

  8. Social network community structure and the contact-mediated sharing of commensal E. coli among captive rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balasubramaniam, Krishna; Beisner, Brianne; Guan, Jiahui; Vandeleest, Jessica; Fushing, Hsieh; Atwill, Edward; McCowan, Brenda

    2018-01-01

    In group-living animals, heterogeneity in individuals' social connections may mediate the sharing of microbial infectious agents. In this regard, the genetic relatedness of individuals' commensal gut bacterium Escherichia coli may be ideal to assess the potential for pathogen transmission through animal social networks. Here we use microbial phylogenetics and population genetics approaches, as well as host social network reconstruction, to assess evidence for the contact-mediated sharing of E. coli among three groups of captively housed rhesus macaques ( Macaca mulatta ), at multiple organizational scales. For each group, behavioral data on grooming, huddling, and aggressive interactions collected for a six-week period were used to reconstruct social network communities via the Data Cloud Geometry (DCG) clustering algorithm. Further, an E. coli isolate was biochemically confirmed and genotypically fingerprinted from fecal swabs collected from each macaque. Population genetics approaches revealed that Group Membership, in comparison to intrinsic attributes like age, sex, and/or matriline membership of individuals, accounted for the highest proportion of variance in E. coli genotypic similarity. Social network approaches revealed that such sharing was evident at the community-level rather than the dyadic level. Specifically, although we found no links between dyadic E. coli similarity and social contact frequencies, similarity was significantly greater among macaques within the same social network communities compared to those across different communities. Moreover, tests for one of our study-groups confirmed that E. coli isolated from macaque rectal swabs were more genotypically similar to each other than they were to isolates from environmentally deposited feces. In summary, our results suggest that among frequently interacting, spatially constrained macaques with complex social relationships, microbial sharing via fecal-oral, social contact-mediated routes may

  9. Effect of Carotenoid Supplemented Formula on Carotenoid Bioaccumulation in Tissues of Infant Rhesus Macaques: A Pilot Study Focused on Lutein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Sookyoung; Neuringer, Martha; Johnson, Emily E; Kuchan, Matthew J; Pereira, Suzette L; Johnson, Elizabeth J; Erdman, John W

    2017-01-10

    Lutein is the predominant carotenoid in the developing primate brain and retina, and may have important functional roles. However, its bioaccumulation pattern during early development is not understood. In this pilot study, we investigated whether carotenoid supplementation of infant formula enhanced lutein tissue deposition in infant rhesus macaques. Monkeys were initially breastfed; from 1 to 3 months of age they were fed either a formula supplemented with lutein, zeaxanthin, β-carotene and lycopene, or a control formula with low levels of these carotenoids, for 4 months ( n = 2/group). All samples were analyzed by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC). Final serum lutein in the supplemented group was 5 times higher than in the unsupplemented group. All brain regions examined showed a selective increase in lutein deposition in the supplemented infants. Lutein differentially accumulated across brain regions, with highest amounts in occipital cortex in both groups. β-carotene accumulated, but zeaxanthin and lycopene were undetectable in any brain region. Supplemented infants had higher lutein concentrations in peripheral retina but not in macular retina. Among adipose sites, abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue exhibited the highest lutein level and was 3-fold higher in the supplemented infants. The supplemented formula enhanced carotenoid deposition in several other tissues. In rhesus infants, increased intake of carotenoids from formula enhanced their deposition in serum and numerous tissues and selectively increased lutein in multiple brain regions.

  10. IgG Fc variant cross-reactivity between human and rhesus macaque FcγRs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boesch, Austin W; Miles, Adam R; Chan, Ying N; Osei-Owusu, Nana Y; Ackerman, Margaret E

    2017-04-01

    Non-human primate (NHP) studies are often an essential component of antibody development efforts before human trials. Because the efficacy or toxicity of candidate antibodies may depend on their interactions with Fcγ receptors (FcγR) and their resulting ability to induce FcγR-mediated effector functions such as antibody-dependent cell-meditated cytotoxicity and phagocytosis (ADCP), the evaluation of human IgG variants with modulated affinity toward human FcγR is becoming more prevalent in both infectious disease and oncology studies in NHP. Reliable translation of these results necessitates analysis of the cross-reactivity of these human Fc variants with NHP FcγR. We report evaluation of the binding affinities of a panel of human IgG subclasses, Fc amino acid point mutants and Fc glycosylation variants against the common allotypes of human and rhesus macaque FcγR by applying a high-throughput array-based surface plasmon resonance platform. The resulting data indicate that amino acid variation present in rhesus FcγRs can result in disrupted, matched, or even increased affinity of IgG Fc variants compared with human FcγR orthologs. These observations emphasize the importance of evaluating species cross-reactivity and developing an understanding of the potential limitations or suitability of representative in vitro and in vivo models before human clinical studies when either efficacy or toxicity may be associated with FcγR engagement.

  11. Visual artificial grammar learning by rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta): exploring the role of grammar complexity and sequence length.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heimbauer, Lisa A; Conway, Christopher M; Christiansen, Morten H; Beran, Michael J; Owren, Michael J

    2018-03-01

    Humans and nonhuman primates can learn about the organization of stimuli in the environment using implicit sequential pattern learning capabilities. However, most previous artificial grammar learning studies with nonhuman primates have involved relatively simple grammars and short input sequences. The goal in the current experiments was to assess the learning capabilities of monkeys on an artificial grammar-learning task that was more complex than most others previously used with nonhumans. Three experiments were conducted using a joystick-based, symmetrical-response serial reaction time task in which two monkeys were exposed to grammar-generated sequences at sequence lengths of four in Experiment 1, six in Experiment 2, and eight in Experiment 3. Over time, the monkeys came to respond faster to the sequences generated from the artificial grammar compared to random versions. In a subsequent generalization phase, subjects generalized their knowledge to novel sequences, responding significantly faster to novel instances of sequences produced using the familiar grammar compared to those constructed using an unfamiliar grammar. These results reveal that rhesus monkeys can learn and generalize the statistical structure inherent in an artificial grammar that is as complex as some used with humans, for sequences up to eight items long. These findings are discussed in relation to whether or not rhesus macaques and other primate species possess implicit sequence learning abilities that are similar to those that humans draw upon to learn natural language grammar.

  12. Evaluation of a therapy for Idiopathic Chronic Enterocolitis in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta and linked microbial community correlates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua M. Taylor

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Idiopathic chronic enterocolitis (ICE is one of the most commonly encountered and difficult to manage diseases of captive rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta. The etiology is not well understood, but perturbations in gut microbial communities have been implicated. Here we evaluated the effects of a 14-day course of vancomycin, neomycin, and fluconazole on animals affected with ICE, comparing treated, untreated, and healthy animals. We performed microbiome analysis on duodenal and colonic mucosal samples and feces in order to probe bacterial and/or fungal taxa potentially associated with ICE. All treated animals showed a significant and long-lasting improvement in stool consistency over time when compared to untreated and healthy controls. Microbiome analysis revealed trends associating bacterial community composition with ICE, particularly lineages of the Lactobacillaceae family. Sequencing of DNA from macaque food biscuits revealed that fungal sequences recovered from stool were dominated by yeast-derived food additives; in contrast, bacteria in stool appeared to be authentic gut residents. In conclusion, while validation in larger cohorts is needed, the treatment described here was associated with significantly improved clinical signs; results suggested possible correlates of microbiome structure with disease, though no strong associations were detected between single microbes and ICE.

  13. CD8+ lymphocytes control viral replication in SIVmac239-infected rhesus macaques without decreasing the lifespan of productively infected cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nichole R Klatt

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available While CD8+ T cells are clearly important in controlling virus replication during HIV and SIV infections, the mechanisms underlying this antiviral effect remain poorly understood. In this study, we assessed the in vivo effect of CD8+ lymphocyte depletion on the lifespan of productively infected cells during chronic SIVmac239 infection of rhesus macaques. We treated two groups of animals that were either CD8+ lymphocyte-depleted or controls with antiretroviral therapy, and used mathematical modeling to assess the lifespan of infected cells either in the presence or absence of CD8+ lymphocytes. We found that, in both early (day 57 post-SIV and late (day 177 post-SIV chronic SIV infection, depletion of CD8+ lymphocytes did not result in a measurable increase in the lifespan of either short- or long-lived productively infected cells in vivo. This result indicates that the presence of CD8+ lymphocytes does not result in a noticeably shorter lifespan of productively SIV-infected cells, and thus that direct cell killing is unlikely to be the main mechanism underlying the antiviral effect of CD8+ T cells in SIV-infected macaques with high virus replication.

  14. Low dose rectal inoculation of rhesus macaques by SIV smE660 or SIVmac251 recapitulates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hraber, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Giorgi, Elena E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Keele, Brandon [UNIV OF ALABAMA; Li, Hui [UNIV OF ALABAMA; Learn, Gerald [UNIV OF ALABAMA

    2008-01-01

    We recently developed a novel strategy to identify transmitted HIV-1 genomes in acutely infected humans using single-genome amplification and a model of random virus evolution. Here, we used this approach to determine the molecular features of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) transmission in 18 experimentally infected Indian rhesus macaques. Animals were inoculated intrarectally (i.r.) or intravenously (i.v.) with stocks of SIVmac251 or SIVsmE660 that exhibited sequence diversity typical of early-chronic HIV-1 infection. 987 full-length SIV env sequences (median of 48 per animal) were determined from plasma virion RNA 1--5 wk after infection. i.r. inoculation was followed by productive infection by one or a few viruses (median 1; range 1--5) that diversified randomly with near starlike phylogeny and a Poisson distribution of mutations. Consensus viral sequences from ramp-up and peak viremia were identical to viruses found in the inocula or differed from them by only one or a few nucleotides, providing direct evidence that early plasma viral sequences coalesce to transmitted/founder viruses. i.v. infection was >2,000-fold more efficient than i.r. infection, and viruses transmitted by either route represented the full genetic spectra of the inocula. These findings identify key similarities in mucosal transmission and early diversification between SIV and HIV-1, and thus validate the SIV-macaque mucosal infection model for HIV-1 vaccine and microbicide research.

  15. Limited susceptibility of rhesus macaques to a cowpox virus isolated from a lethal outbreak among New World monkeys

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. Mätz-Rensing

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available This study was undertaken to investigate the susceptibility of rhesus monkeys to the calpox virus, an orthopoxvirus (OPXV of the Cowpox virus species (CPXV, which is uniformly lethal in common marmosets. Six rhesus monkeys were either intravenously (i.v. or intranasally (i.n. exposed to the virus. Monitoring of the macaques after viral exposure included physical examinations, the determination of viral load by real-time PCR and plaque assay, and the analysis of humoral responses. Two i.v. inoculated animals developed numerous classical pox lesions that started after inoculation at days 7 and 10. Both animals became viremic and seroconverted. They exhibited maximal numbers of lesions of approximately 50 and 140 by day 21. One animal completely recovered, while the other one suffered from a phlegmonous inflammation of a leg initially induced by a secondarily infected pox lesion and was euthanized for animal welfare reasons. In contrast to previous pathogenicity studies with the calpox virus in marmosets, none of the four animals inoculated intranasally with doses of the calpox virus exceeding those used in marmosets by orders of magnitude showed typical clinical symptoms. No viral DNA was detectable in the blood of those animals, but three animals seroconverted. In two of these three animals, infectious virus was sporadically isolated from saliva. This indicates that rhesus monkeys are less susceptible to calpox virus infection, which limits their use in further intervention studies with OPXV.

  16. Early involvement in friendships predicts later plasma concentrations of oxytocin and vasopressin in juvenile rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Aliza Rachel Weinstein

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The neuropeptides oxytocin (OT and vasopressin (AVP are involved in social bonding in attachment relationships, but their role in friendship is poorly understood. We investigated whether rhesus macaques’ (Macaca mulatta friendships at age one predicted plasma OT and AVP at two later time points. Subjects were 54 rhesus macaques at the California National Primate Research Center. Blood was drawn during a brief capture-and-release in the home cage, and plasma assayed for OT and AVP using an enzyme immunoassay. Separate linear mixed models for each sex tested the effects of dominance rank, age, sampling time point, housing condition, parturition status, two blood draw timing measures, and five friendship types: proximity friendships, play friendships, reciprocal friendships (a preference for a peer that also preferred the subject, multiplex friendships (friendships displayed in more than one behavioral domain, and total number of friendships. Females’ number of reciprocal and play friendships at age one significantly predicted later OT; additionally, these two friendship types interacted with rank, such that high-ranking females with the fewest friendships had the highest OT concentrations. Friendship did not predict later OT levels in males, however proximity, play, reciprocal, and total number of friendships predicted males’ plasma AVP. Play and total number of friendships also tended to predict AVP in females. Our results show that peripheral measures of neuroendocrine functioning in juvenile rhesus monkeys are influenced by early involvement in friendships. Friendships have an especially strong impact on an individual’s psychosocial development, and our data suggest OT and AVP as potential underlying mechanisms. Moreover, sex differences in the functioning of the OT and AVP systems, and their relation to friendship, may have important clinical implications for the use of OT as a therapeutic, as well as informing the social context in

  17. EFFECTS OF HISTONE DEACETYLASE INHIBITOR, SAHA, ON EFFECTOR AND FOXP3+ REGULATORY T CELLS IN RHESUS MACAQUES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Jennifer; Pahuja, Anil; Graham, Melanie; Hering, Bernhard; Hancock, Wayne W.; Pratima, Bansal-Pakala

    2008-01-01

    SAHA, a histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi), is clinically approved for treatment of cutaneous T-cell lymphoma. Although the exact underlying mechanisms are unknown, HDACi arrest the cell cycle in rapidly proliferating tumor cells and promote their apoptosis. HDACi were also recently shown to enhance the production and suppressive functions of Foxp3+ regulatory T (Treg) cells in rodents, leading us to begin to investigate the actions of HDACi on rhesus monkey T cells for the sake of potential preclinical applications. In this study, we show that SAHA inhibits polyclonal activation and proliferation of rhesus T cells and that the anti-proliferative effects are due to inhibition of T effector (Teff) cells and enhancement of Treg cells. Cryopreserved rhesus macaque splenocytes were CFSE labeled, stimulated with anti-CD3/anti-CD28 and cultured for 5 days in the presence of varying concentrations of SAHA. Samples were then co-stained to evaluate CD4 and CD8 expression. 10 and 5μM concentrations of SAHA were toxic to splenocytes. Proliferation was inhibited by 57% in CD4 cells and 47% in CD8 cells when unseparated splenocytes were cultured with 3 μM SAHA. Effector cells alone showed a decreased inhibition to proliferation when cultured with 3 μM and 1 μM SAHA when compared to Teff plus Treg cells. Our data suggest that SAHA can be used as part of an immunosuppressive protocol to enhance graft survival by limiting Teff cell proliferation as well as increasing Treg cells, thereby promoting tolerance. PMID:18374101

  18. Analysis of multiply spliced transcripts in lymphoid tissue reservoirs of rhesus macaques infected with RT-SHIV during HAART.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jesse D Deere

    Full Text Available Highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART can reduce levels of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 to undetectable levels in infected individuals, but the virus is not eradicated. The mechanisms of viral persistence during HAART are poorly defined, but some reservoirs have been identified, such as latently infected resting memory CD4⁺ T cells. During latency, in addition to blocks at the initiation and elongation steps of viral transcription, there is a block in the export of viral RNA (vRNA, leading to the accumulation of multiply-spliced transcripts in the nucleus. Two of the genes encoded by the multiply-spliced transcripts are Tat and Rev, which are essential early in the viral replication cycle and might indicate the state of infection in a given population of cells. Here, the levels of multiply-spliced transcripts were compared to the levels of gag-containing RNA in tissue samples from RT-SHIV-infected rhesus macaques treated with HAART. Splice site sequence variation was identified during development of a TaqMan PCR assay. Multiply-spliced transcripts were detected in gastrointestinal and lymphatic tissues, but not the thymus. Levels of multiply-spliced transcripts were lower than levels of gag RNA, and both correlated with plasma virus loads. The ratio of multiply-spliced to gag RNA was greatest in the gastrointestinal samples from macaques with plasma virus loads <50 vRNA copies per mL at necropsy. Levels of gag RNA and multiply-spliced mRNA in tissues from RT-SHIV-infected macaques correlate with plasma virus load.

  19. What cortisol can tell us about the costs of sociality and reproduction among free-ranging rhesus macaque females on Cayo Santiago.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maestripieri, Dario; Georgiev, Alexander V

    2016-01-01

    Research with the rhesus macaque population on Cayo Santiago can provide a unique perspective on the costs of sociality and reproduction in primates. Because the Cayo macaques live in unusually large groups and in a predator-free environment, in which their artificial food source lacks seasonal variation in abundance or quality, these monkeys constitute a semi-experimental study of the costs and benefits of group living. Here we review several long- and short-term studies that have focused on female life history and stress physiology. Long-term demographic data have shown that rhesus macaque females of middle- and low-ranking matrilines have lower adult survival probabilities than females of high-ranking matrilines. Costs of reproductive effort are also evident: adult females were more likely to die during the birth than during the mating season and they experienced higher cortisol levels when lactating. Lower-ranking females, in particular, experienced greater relative increase in cortisol production during lactation, in comparison to middle- and high-ranking females. Older high-ranking females had lower plasma cortisol levels than younger ones but cortisol levels were similarly high among young and old middle- and low-ranking females. Higher plasma cortisol levels and/or fecal glucocorticoid concentrations are associated with higher plasma concentrations of some proinflammatory cytokines. High cortisol, in turn, may be associated with chronic inflammation, and perhaps also with immunosuppression. In sum, the studies reviewed here provide multiple lines of evidence that sociality and reproductive effort impose measurable costs on female rhesus macaques. In line with socio-ecological theory, female dominance rank consistently emerges as an important modulator of variation in female life histories and physiology. The Cayo Santiago macaques are therefore a valuable model for elucidating the mechanisms by which within-group competition and reproduction impact health

  20. Direct Lymph Node Vaccination of Lentivector/Prostate-Specific Antigen is Safe and Generates Tissue-Specific Responses in Rhesus Macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bryan C. Au

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Anti-cancer immunotherapy is emerging from a nadir and demonstrating tangible benefits to patients. A variety of approaches are now employed. We are invoking antigen (Ag-specific responses through direct injections of recombinant lentivectors (LVs that encode sequences for tumor-associated antigens into multiple lymph nodes to optimize immune presentation/stimulation. Here we first demonstrate the effectiveness and antigen-specificity of this approach in mice challenged with prostate-specific antigen (PSA-expressing tumor cells. Next we tested the safety and efficacy of this approach in two cohorts of rhesus macaques as a prelude to a clinical trial application. Our vector encodes the cDNA for rhesus macaque PSA and a rhesus macaque cell surface marker to facilitate vector titering and tracking. We utilized two independent injection schemas demarcated by the timing of LV administration. In both cohorts we observed marked tissue-specific responses as measured by clinical evaluations and magnetic resonance imaging of the prostate gland. Tissue-specific responses were sustained for up to six months—the end-point of the study. Control animals immunized against an irrelevant Ag were unaffected. We did not observe vector spread in test or control animals or perturbations of systemic immune parameters. This approach thus offers an “off-the-shelf” anti-cancer vaccine that could be made at large scale and injected into patients—even on an out-patient basis.

  1. Milk composition of captive vervet monkey (Chlorocebus pygerythrus) and rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) with observations on gorilla (Gorilla gorilla gorilla) and white handed gibbon (Hylobates lar).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osthoff, G; Hugo, A; de Wit, M; Nguyen, T P M; Seier, J

    2009-04-01

    The nutrient content and fatty acid composition of vervet monkey milk has been determined and is compared with rhesus macaque, and two hominoid apes, the white handed gibbon and gorilla. With 15.7+/-4.1 g protein, 33.1+/-9.4 g fat, and 85.1+/-7.5 g lactose per kg milk, vervet monkey milk does not differ from that of rhesus macaque, and is within the range of other primates. Small amounts (>1 g kg(-1)) of oligosaccharides, glucose, galactose and fucose were noted. In comparison, gorilla milk has a low fat content of 13.8 g kg(-1), but contains high levels of oligosaccharides at 7.0 g kg(-1) milk. The hominoid partner, the white handed gibbon, contains no oligosaccharides and a milk fat content similar to other hominoid species. Differences between vervet monkey and rhesus macaque milks were observed in the electrophoretic pattern of the milk proteins, mainly amongst the kappa- and gamma-caseins, which also differ from that of the hominids. The fatty acid contents of these milks differ from studies where a natural diet of leafy material was available in that a low content of alpha-linolenic acid (18:3n-3) was noted. A phylogenetic effect is observed for the content of 8:0, 10:0 fatty acids between the Cercopithecidae and Hominoidea, and a further phylogenetic effect suggested between the Hylobatidae and Hominidae.

  2. Social segregation in male, but not female yearling rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassett, Janice M; Rupp, Heather A; Wallen, Kim

    2010-02-01

    Males and females of many species sex-segregate, ranging from complete separation of habitats to social segregation within the same space, sometimes varying across seasons and lifespan development. Mechanisms for such segregation are not well understood, though some have suggested that sex differences in preferred juvenile behaviors lead to greater behavioral compatibility within than between sexes. This within-sex behavioral compatibility may be the source of sex-segregation. As juvenile behavioral sex differences are well-documented in rhesus monkeys, we examined sex-segregation patterns of yearling rhesus monkeys engaged in three different types of behavior: rough play, parallel play, and grooming. We observed male and female rhesus yearlings from five stable long-term age-graded social groups of 67-183 animals. Behavioral observations were designed to collect equal numbers of rough play, grooming, and parallel play bouts. In addition, sex composition and proximity to adults was recorded for each bout. Across all behaviors, more all-male groups and fewer mixed sex-groups were observed than expected by chance. All-female groups occurred at the level expected by chance. Thus, males sex-segregated regardless of type of behavior, while females did not sex-segregate. Female groups were observed in proximity to adults more often than expected by chance. These results suggest that behavioral compatibility may produce sex-segregation in male yearling rhesus monkeys, possibly preparing males and females for different social roles and segregation as adults. 2009 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  3. Evidence for Motor Planning in Monkeys: Rhesus Macaques Select Efficient Grips when Transporting Spoons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Eliza L.; Berthier, Neil E.; Metevier, Christina M.; Novak, Melinda A.

    2011-01-01

    McCarty and colleagues (1999) developed the elevated spoon task to measure motor planning in human infants. In this task, a spoon containing food was placed on an elevated apparatus that supported both ends of the spoon. The handle was oriented to the left or right on different trials. We presented naive adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with…

  4. Simian virus 40 inhibits differentiation and maturation of rhesus macaque DC-SIGN+-dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changyong G

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dendritic cells (DC are the initiators and modulators of the immune responses. Some species of pathogenic microorganisms have developed immune evasion strategies by controlling antigen presentation function of DC. Simian virus 40 (SV40 is a DNA tumor virus of rhesus monkey origin. It can induce cell transformation and tumorigenesis in many vertebrate species, but often causes no visible effects and persists as a latent infection in rhesus monkeys under natural conditions. To investigate the interaction between SV40 and rhesus monkey DC, rhesus monkey peripheral blood monocyte-derived DC were induced using recombinant human Interleukin-4 (rhIL-4 and infective SV40, the phenotype and function of DC-specific intracellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN+ DC were analyzed by flow cytometry (FCM and mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR. Results showed that SV40 can down-regulate the expression of CD83 and CD86 on DC and impair DC-induced activation of T cell proliferation. These findings suggest that SV40 might also cause immune suppression by influencing differentiation and maturation of DC.

  5. Sensitivity to First-Order Relations of Facial Elements in Infant Rhesus Macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paukner, Annika; Bower, Seth; Simpson, Elizabeth A.; Suomi, Stephen J.

    2013-01-01

    Faces are visually attractive to both human and nonhuman primates. Human neonates are thought to have a broad template for faces at birth and prefer face-like to non-face-like stimuli. To better compare developmental trajectories of face processing phylogenetically, here, we investigated preferences for face-like stimuli in infant rhesus macaques…

  6. Variation in reproductive outcomes for captive male rhesus macaques (macaca mulatta) differing in CSF 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid concentrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerald, Melissa S; Higley, Sue; Lussier, I sabelle D; Westergaard, Greg C; Suomi, Stephen J; Higley, J Dee

    2002-01-01

    In rhesus macaque males, lower than average cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) concentrations of the principle metabolite of serotonin, 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), have been linked to impulsivity, involvement in escalated aggression, failure to elicit consort relationships, production of fewer sperm plugs, and a relatively early age of mortality. Given these potential fitness costs, we performed two studies aimed at elucidating the effects of CSF 5-HIAA on reproduction. Study 1 retrospectively evaluated over a four-year period, the relative reproductive outcome for pairs of adult male rhesus macaques (n = 15) who lived in social groups and who differed in concentrations of CSF 5-HIAA. Study 2 examined the relationship between CSF 5-HIAA and sperm motility and density (n = 12), as a potential mechanism for maintaining variability in CSF 5-HIAA. For Study 1, an average measure from two CSF 5-HIAA samples was calculated for the two males who were present during the time when conception most likely took place (offspring birth date -165 +/- 14 days). Within-pair comparisons of CSF 5-HIAA concentrations between the sire and the non-successful male were drawn for each of the 72 offspring in the study. We found that while sires were typically the male with relatively higher CSF 5-HIAA within the pair, there were no absolute differences in CSF 5-HIAA between males who sired at least one offspring (sires) and those who failed to reproduce (non-sires). Furthermore, while absolute age was not predictive of reproductive outcome, sires with relatively high CSF 5-HIAA also tended to be also relatively older than their competitors. By contrast, for the males with relatively low CSF 5-HIAA who reproduced, sires were relatively younger than the non-sires. These differences in reproductive outcome for males differing in CSF 5-HIAA could not be explained by variability in sperm quantity or quality as we did not find evidence of a relationship between CSF 5-HIAA and either sperm

  7. Fasting induced kisspeptin signaling suppression is regulated by glutamate mediated cues in adult male rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamas, Shazia; Khan, Saeed-Ul-Hassan; Khan, Muhammad Yousaf; Shabbir, Nadia; Zubair, Hira; Shafqat, Saira; Wahab, Fazal; Shahab, Muhammad

    2015-08-01

    Kisspeptin signaling is suppressed by short term fasting. It has been reported that hypothalamic Kiss1 and Kiss1r mRNA expression decreased after 48h of fasting in male rhesus monkey. But the mechanism involved in the reduction of kisspeptin signaling after 48h of fasting is unknown. Recent studies have suggested the role of afferent excitatory and inhibitory pathways in the regulation of kisspeptin neurons. Therefore, this study was designed to observe the changes in the glutamate and GABA signaling during fed and 48h fasting states by performing immunofluorescence to examine the interaction of kisspeptin neurons with NR1 subunit of NMDA receptors and by performing SYBR green qRT-PCR to measure and quantify the levels of Kiss1, Kiss1r, NR1 and GAD67 mRNA in the POA and MBH of adult male rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) during 48h of fasting (n=2) and fed ad libitum (n=2). Plasma testosterone (pfasting. Our results clearly showed that expression of hypothalamic Kiss1, Kiss1r and NR1 mRNA was significantly (pfasted for 48h as compared to those which were fed ad libitum. There was no clear difference in the GAD67 mRNA contents between the two groups. Number of kisspeptin neurons and the interactions of kisspeptin neurons with NR1 were significantly (pfasting. These observations suggest that decreased kisspeptin signaling during fasting may occur due to reduction in glutamatergic inputs to kisspeptin neurons. Our results also suggest that fasting induced suppression of kisspeptin signaling is not mediated through GABAergic neurons. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Effects of Vitrectomy and Lensectomy on Older Rhesus Macaques: Oxygen Distribution, Antioxidant Status, and Aqueous Humor Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siegfried, Carla J; Shui, Ying-Bo; Tian, Baohe; Nork, T Michael; Heatley, Gregg A; Kaufman, Paul L

    2017-08-01

    The purpose of this study is to evaluate effects of vitrectomy (PPV) and lens extraction with intraocular lens implantation (PE/IOL) on molecular oxygen (pO2) distribution, aqueous humor antioxidant-oxidant balance, aqueous humor dynamics, and histopathologic changes in the trabecular meshwork (TM) in the older macaque monkey. Six rhesus monkeys underwent PPV followed by PE/IOL. pO2, outflow facility, and intraocular pressure (IOP) were measured. Aqueous and vitreous humor specimens were analyzed for antioxidant status and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-OHdG), a marker of oxidative damage. TM specimens were obtained for immunohistochemical and quantitative PCR analysis. pO2 at baseline revealed steep gradients in the anterior chamber and low levels in the posterior chamber (PC) and around the lens. Following PPV and PE/IOL, pO2 significantly increased in the PC, around the IOL, and angle. IOP increased following both surgical interventions, with no change in outflow facility. Histopathologic analysis did not show changes in TM cell quantification, but there was an increase in 8-OHdG. Quantitative PCR did not reveal significant differences in glaucoma-related gene expression. Aqueous and vitreous humor analysis revealed decreased ascorbate and total reactive antioxidant potential and increased 8-OHdG in the aqueous humor only in the surgical eyes. Oxygen distribution in the older rhesus monkey is similar to humans at baseline and following surgical interventions. Our findings of histopathologic changes of TM oxidative damage and alterations in the oxidant-antioxidant balance suggest a potential correlation of increased oxygen exposure with oxidative stress/damage and the development of open angle glaucoma.

  9. Fading Perceptual Resemblance: A Path for Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) to Conceptual Matching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. David; Flemming, Timothy M.; Boomer, Joseph; Beran, Michael J.; Church, Barbara A.

    2013-01-01

    Cognitive, comparative, and developmental psychologists have long been intrigued by humans’ and animals’ capacity to respond to abstract relations like sameness and difference, because this capacity may underlie crucial aspects of cognition like analogical reasoning. Recently, this capacity has been explored in higher-order, relational matching-to-sample (RMTS) tasks in which humans and animals try to complete analogies of sameness and difference between disparate groups of items. The authors introduced a new paradigm to this area, by yoking the relational-matching cue to a perceptual-matching cue. Then, using established algorithms for shape distortion, the perceptual cue was weakened and eliminated. Humans’ RMTS performance easily transcended the elimination of perceptual support. In contrast, RMTS performance by six macaques faltered as they were weaned from perceptual support. No macaque showed evidence of mature RMTS performance, even given more than 260,000 training trials during which we tried to coax a relational-matching performance from them. It is an important species difference that macaques show so hesitant a response to conceptual relations when humans respond to them so effortlessly. It raises theoretical questions about the emergence of this crucial capacity during humans’ cognitive evolution and during humans’ cognitive development. PMID:24076537

  10. Evaluation of the kappa-opioid receptor-selective tracer [{sup 11}C]GR103545 in awake rhesus macaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schoultz, Bent W. [University of Oslo, Department of Chemistry, Oslo (Norway); Hjornevik, Trine; Willoch, Frode [University of Oslo, Centre for Molecular Biology and Neuroscience and Institute of Basic Medical Sciences, Oslo (Norway); Akershus University Hospital, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Loerenskog (Norway); Marton, Janos [ABX Advanced Biochemical Compounds GmbH, Radeberg (Germany); Noda, Akihiro; Murakami, Yoshihiro; Miyoshi, Sosuke; Nishimura, Shintaro [Medical and Pharmacological Research Center Foundation, Basic Research Department, Hakui City, Ishikawa (Japan); Aarstad, Erik [University College of London, Institute of Nuclear Medicine, London (United Kingdom); Drzezga, Alexander [Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany); Matsunari, Ichiro [Medical and Pharmacological Research Center Foundation, Clinical Research Department, Hakui City, Ishikawa (Japan); Henriksen, Gjermund [University of Oslo, Department of Chemistry, Oslo (Norway); Technische Universitaet Muenchen, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Klinikum rechts der Isar, Munich (Germany)

    2010-06-15

    The recent development in radiosynthesis of the {sup 11}C-carbamate function increases the potential of [{sup 11}C]GR103545, which for the last decade has been regarded as promising for imaging the kappa-opioid receptor ({kappa}-OR) with PET. In the present study, [{sup 11}C]GR103545 was evaluated in awake rhesus macaques. Separate investigations were performed to clarify the OR subtype selectivity of this compound. Regional brain uptake kinetics of [{sup 11}C]GR103545 was studied 0-120 min after injection. The binding affinity and opioid subtype selectivity of [{sup 11}C]GR103545 was determined in cells transfected with cloned human opioid receptors. In vitro binding assays demonstrated a high affinity of GR103545 for {kappa}-OR (K{sub i} = 0.02 {+-}0.01 nM) with excellent selectivity over {mu}-OR (6 x 10{sup 2}-fold) and {delta}-OR (2 x 10{sup 4}-fold). PET imaging revealed a volume of distribution (V{sub T}) pattern consistent with the known distribution of {kappa}-OR, with striatum = temporal cortex > cingulate cortex > frontal cortex > parietal cortex > thalamus > cerebellum. [{sup 11}C]GR103545 is selective for {kappa}-OR and holds promise for use to selectively depict and quantify this receptor in humans by means of PET. (orig.)

  11. Full genome sequence analysis of a novel adenovirus of rhesus macaque origin indicates a new simian adenovirus type and species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malouli, Daniel; Howell, Grant L; Legasse, Alfred W; Kahl, Christoph; Axthelm, Michael K; Hansen, Scott G; Früh, Klaus

    2014-09-01

    Multiple novel simian adenoviruses have been isolated over the past years and their potential to cross the species barrier and infect the human population is an ever present threat. Here we describe the isolation and full genome sequencing of a novel simian adenovirus (SAdV) isolated from the urine of two independent, never co-housed, late stage simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus macaques. The viral genome sequences revealed a novel type with a unique genome length, GC content, E3 region and DNA polymerase amino acid sequence that is sufficiently distinct from all currently known human- or simian adenovirus species to warrant classifying these isolates as a novel species of simian adenovirus. This new species, termed Simian mastadenovirus D (SAdV-D), displays the standard genome organization for the genus Mastadenovirus containing only one copy of the fiber gene which sets it apart from the old world monkey adenovirus species HAdV-G, SAdV-B and SAdV-C.

  12. Transitive inference in humans (Homo sapiens) and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) after massed training of the last two list items.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Greg; Alkan, Yelda; Muñoz, Fabian; Ferrera, Vincent P; Terrace, Herbert S

    2017-08-01

    Transitive inference (TI) is a classic learning paradigm for which the relative contributions of experienced rewards and representation-based inference have been debated vigorously, particularly regarding the notion that animals are capable of logic and reasoning. Rhesus macaque subjects and human participants performed a TI task in which, prior to learning a 7-item list (ABCDEFG), a block of trials presented exclusively the pair FG. Contrary to the expectation of associative models, the high prior rate of reward for F did not disrupt subsequent learning of the entire list. Monkeys (who each completed many sessions with novel stimuli) learned to anticipate that novel stimuli should be preferred over F. We interpret this as evidence of a task representation of TI that generalizes beyond learning about specific stimuli. Humans (who were task-naïve) showed a transitory bias to F when it was paired with novel stimuli, but very rapidly unlearned that bias. Performance with respect to the remaining stimuli was consistent with past reports of TI in both species. These results are difficult to reconcile with any account that assigns the strength of association between individual stimuli and rewards. Instead, they support sophisticated cognitive processes in both species, albeit with some species differences. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2017 APA, all rights reserved).

  13. Evaluation of the kappa-opioid receptor-selective tracer [11C]GR103545 in awake rhesus macaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schoultz, Bent W.; Hjornevik, Trine; Willoch, Frode; Marton, Janos; Noda, Akihiro; Murakami, Yoshihiro; Miyoshi, Sosuke; Nishimura, Shintaro; Aarstad, Erik; Drzezga, Alexander; Matsunari, Ichiro; Henriksen, Gjermund

    2010-01-01

    The recent development in radiosynthesis of the 11 C-carbamate function increases the potential of [ 11 C]GR103545, which for the last decade has been regarded as promising for imaging the kappa-opioid receptor (κ-OR) with PET. In the present study, [ 11 C]GR103545 was evaluated in awake rhesus macaques. Separate investigations were performed to clarify the OR subtype selectivity of this compound. Regional brain uptake kinetics of [ 11 C]GR103545 was studied 0-120 min after injection. The binding affinity and opioid subtype selectivity of [ 11 C]GR103545 was determined in cells transfected with cloned human opioid receptors. In vitro binding assays demonstrated a high affinity of GR103545 for κ-OR (K i = 0.02 ±0.01 nM) with excellent selectivity over μ-OR (6 x 10 2 -fold) and δ-OR (2 x 10 4 -fold). PET imaging revealed a volume of distribution (V T ) pattern consistent with the known distribution of κ-OR, with striatum = temporal cortex > cingulate cortex > frontal cortex > parietal cortex > thalamus > cerebellum. [ 11 C]GR103545 is selective for κ-OR and holds promise for use to selectively depict and quantify this receptor in humans by means of PET. (orig.)

  14. Real-time monitoring of disease progression in rhesus macaques infected with Borrelia turicatae by tick bite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, Job E; Vinet-Oliphant, Heather; Wilder, Hannah K; Brooks, Christopher P; Grasperge, Britton J; Morgan, Timothy W; Stuckey, Kerstan J; Embers, Monica E

    2014-11-15

    The hallmark of disease caused by tick- and louse-borne relapsing fever due to Borrelia infection is cyclic febrile episodes, which in humans results in severe malaise and may lead to death. To evaluate the pathogenesis of relapsing fever due to spirochetes in an animal model closely related to humans, disease caused by Borrelia turicatae after tick bite was compared in 2 rhesus macaques in which radiotelemetry devices that recorded body temperatures in 24-hour increments were implanted. The radiotelemetry devices enabled real-time acquisition of core body temperatures and changes in heart rates and electrocardiogram intervals for 28 consecutive days without the need to constantly manipulate the animals. Blood specimens were also collected from all animals for 14 days after tick bite, and spirochete densities were assessed by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. The complexity of disease caused by relapsing-fever spirochetes was demonstrated in the nonhuman primates monitored in real time. The animals experienced prolonged episodes of hyperthermia and hypothermia; disruptions in their diurnal patterns and repolarization of the heart were also observed. This is the first report of the characterizing disease progression with continuous monitoring in an animal model of relapsing fever due to Borrelia infection. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the Infectious Diseases Society of America. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  15. Representation of dynamic interaural phase difference in auditory cortex of awake rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, Brian H; Malone, Brian J; Semple, Malcolm N

    2009-04-01

    Neurons in auditory cortex of awake primates are selective for the spatial location of a sound source, yet the neural representation of the binaural cues that underlie this tuning remains undefined. We examined this representation in 283 single neurons across the low-frequency auditory core in alert macaques, trained to discriminate binaural cues for sound azimuth. In response to binaural beat stimuli, which mimic acoustic motion by modulating the relative phase of a tone at the two ears, these neurons robustly modulate their discharge rate in response to this directional cue. In accordance with prior studies, the preferred interaural phase difference (IPD) of these neurons typically corresponds to azimuthal locations contralateral to the recorded hemisphere. Whereas binaural beats evoke only transient discharges in anesthetized cortex, neurons in awake cortex respond throughout the IPD cycle. In this regard, responses are consistent with observations at earlier stations of the auditory pathway. Discharge rate is a band-pass function of the frequency of IPD modulation in most neurons (73%), but both discharge rate and temporal synchrony are independent of the direction of phase modulation. When subjected to a receiver operator characteristic analysis, the responses of individual neurons are insufficient to account for the perceptual acuity of these macaques in an IPD discrimination task, suggesting the need for neural pooling at the cortical level.

  16. Pathogenic infection of Rhesus macaques by an evolving SIV-HIV derived from CCR5-using envelope genes of acute HIV-1 infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmal, Mohammed; Lane, Sophie; Tian, Meijuan; Nickel, Gabrielle; Venner, Colin; Dirk, Brennan; Dikeakos, Jimmy; Luedemann, Corinne; Mach, Linh; Balachandran, Harikrishnan; Buzby, Adam; Rao, Srinivas; Letvin, Norman; Gao, Yong; Arts, Eric J

    2016-12-01

    For studies on vaccines and therapies for HIV disease, SIV-HIV chimeric viruses harboring the HIV-1 env gene (SHIVenv) remain the best virus in non-human primate models. However, there are still very few SHIVenv viruses that can cause AIDS in non-CD8-depleted animals. In the present study, a recently created CCR5-using SHIVenv_B3 virus with env gene derived from acute/early HIV-1 infections (AHI) successfully established pathogenic infection in macaques. Through a series of investigations on the evolution, mutational profile, and phenotype of the virus and the resultant humoral immune response in infected rhesus macaques, we found that the E32K mutation in the Env C1 domain was associated with macaque pathogenesis, and that the electrostatic interactions in Env may favor E32K at the gp120 N terminus and "lock" the binding to heptad repeat 1 of gp41 in the trimer and produce a SHIVenv with increased fitness and pathogenesis during macaque infections. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Identification of Rotavirus VP6-Specific CD4+ T Cell Epitopes in a G1P[8] Human Rotavirus-Infected Rhesus Macaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhao

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available A non-human primate model was used to evaluate its potential for identification of rotavirus viral protein 6 (VP6 CD4+ T cell epitopes. Four juvenile rhesus macaques were inoculated with a mixed inoculum (G1P[8] and G9P[8] of human rotaviruses. Infection accompanied by G1P[8] shedding was achieved in the two macaques that had no rotavirus immunoglobulin A (IgA in plasma. To measure the interferon gamma (IFN-γ and tumor necrosis factor (TNF anti-viral cytokines produced by peripheral CD4+ cells that recognize VP6 epitopes, whole blood cells from one infected macaque were stimulated in vitro with VP6 peptides. Stimulation with peptide pools derived from the simian rotavirus VP6 161–395 region revealed reactivity of CD4+ T cells with the VP6 281–331 domain. A VP6 301–315 region was identified as the epitope responsible for IFN-γ production while a broader VP6 293–327 domain was linked to TNF production. These results suggest that human rotavirus-infected macaques can be used for identification of additional epitopes and domains to address specific questions related to the development of pediatric vaccines.

  18. Occurrence of Giardia, Cryptosporidium, and Entamoeba in wild rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta living in urban and semi-rural North-West India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John J. Debenham

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Giardia duodenalis, Cryptosporidium spp., and Entamoeba spp. are intestinal protozoa capable of infecting a range of host species, and are important causes of human morbidity and mortality. Understanding their epidemiology is important, both for public health and for the health of the animals they infect. This study investigated the occurrence of these protozoans in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta in India, with the aim of providing preliminary information on the potential for transmission of these pathogens between macaques and humans. Faecal samples (n = 170 were collected from rhesus macaques from four districts of North-West India. Samples were analysed for Giardia/Cryptosporidium using a commercially available direct immunofluorescent antibody test after purification via immunomagnetic separation. Positive samples were characterised by sequencing of PCR products. Occurrence of Entamoeba was investigated first by using a genus-specific PCR, and positive samples further investigated via species-specific PCRs for Entamoeba coli, Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar and Entamoeba moshkovskii. Giardia cysts were found in 31% of macaque samples, with all isolates belonging to Assemblage B. Cryptosporidium oocysts were found in 1 sample, however this sample did not result in amplification by PCR. Entamoeba spp. were found in 79% of samples, 49% of which were positive for E. coli. Multiplex PCR for E. histolytica, E. dispar and E. moshkovskii, did not result in amplification in any of the samples. Thus in 51% of the samples positive at the genus specific PCR, the Entamoeba species was not identified. This study provides baseline information on the potential for transmission of these zoonotic parasites at the wildlife-human interface.

  19. Chronic recording of hand prosthesis control signals via a regenerative peripheral nerve interface in a rhesus macaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Z. T.; Schroeder, K. E.; Vu, P. P.; Tat, D. M.; Bullard, A. J.; Woo, S. L.; Sando, I. C.; Urbanchek, M. G.; Cederna, P. S.; Chestek, C. A.

    2016-08-01

    Objective. Loss of even part of the upper limb is a devastating injury. In order to fully restore natural function when lacking sufficient residual musculature, it is necessary to record directly from peripheral nerves. However, current approaches must make trade-offs between signal quality and longevity which limit their clinical potential. To address this issue, we have developed the regenerative peripheral nerve interface (RPNI) and tested its use in non-human primates. Approach. The RPNI consists of a small, autologous partial muscle graft reinnervated by a transected peripheral nerve branch. After reinnervation, the graft acts as a bioamplifier for descending motor commands in the nerve, enabling long-term recording of high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), functionally-specific electromyographic (EMG) signals. We implanted nine RPNIs on separate branches of the median and radial nerves in two rhesus macaques who were trained to perform cued finger movements. Main results. No adverse events were noted in either monkey, and we recorded normal EMG with high SNR (>8) from the RPNIs for up to 20 months post-implantation. Using RPNI signals recorded during the behavioral task, we were able to classify each monkey’s finger movements as flexion, extension, or rest with >96% accuracy. RPNI signals also enabled functional prosthetic control, allowing the monkeys to perform the same behavioral task equally well with either physical finger movements or RPNI-based movement classifications. Significance. The RPNI signal strength, stability, and longevity demonstrated here represents a promising method for controlling advanced prosthetic limbs and fully restoring natural movement.

  20. Local and systemic changes associated with long-term, percutaneous, static implantation with titanium alloys in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frydman, Galit F.; Marini, Robert P.; Bakthavatchalu, Vasudevan; Biddle, Kathleen; Muthupalani, Sureshkumar; Vanderburg, Charles R.; Lai, Barry; Bendapudi, Pavan K.; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Fox, James G.

    2017-04-01

    Metal alloys are frequently used as implant materials in veterinary medicine. Recent studies suggest that many types of metal alloys may induce both local and systemic inflammatory responses. In this study, 37 rhesus macaques with long-term skull-anchored percutaneous titanium alloy implants (0-14 years duration) were evaluated for changes in their hematology, coagulation and serum chemistry profiles. Negative controls (n=28) did not have implants. All of the implanted animals were on IACUC-approved protocols and were not implanted for the purpose of this study. Animals with implants had significantly higher plasma D-dimer and lower antithrombin III concentrations compared with nonimplanted animals (p-values < 0.05). Additionally, animals with implants had significantly higher globulin, and lower albumin and calcium concentrations compared with nonimplanted animals (p-values < 0.05). Many of these changes were positively correlated with duration of implantation as well as the number of implants. Chronic bacterial infection was observed on the skin around many of the implant sites, and within deeper tissues. Representative histopathology around the implant site of two implanted animals revealed chronic suppurative to pyogranulomatous inflammation extending from the skin to the dura mater. X-ray fluorescence microscopy of tissue biopsies from the implant site of the same two animals revealed significant increases in free metal ions within the tissue, including titanium and iron. Free metal ions persisted in the tissues up to 6 months postexplant. These results suggest that long-term skull-anchored percutaneous titanium alloy implants results in localized inflammation, chronic infection, and leaching of metal ions into local tissues.

  1. Tolerance to Chronic Delta-9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) in Rhesus Macaques Infected With Simian Immunodeficiency Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winsauer, Peter J.; Molina, Patricia E.; Amedee, Angela M.; Filipeanu, Catalin M.; McGoey, Robin R.; Troxclair, Dana A.; Walker, Edith M.; Birke, Leslie L.; Stouwe, Curtis Vande; Howard, Jessica M.; Leonard, Stuart T.; Moerschbaecher, Joseph M.; Lewis, Peter B.

    2011-01-01

    Although Δ9-THC has been approved to treat anorexia and weight loss associated with AIDS, it may also reduce well-being by disrupting complex behavioral processes or enhancing HIV replication. To investigate these possibilities, four groups of male rhesus macaques were trained to respond under an operant acquisition and performance procedure, and administered vehicle or Δ9-THC before and after inoculation with simian immunodeficiency virus(SIVmac251, 100 TCID50/ml, i.v.). Prior to chronic Δ9-THC and SIV inoculation, 0.032– 0.32 mg/kg of Δ9-THC produced dose-dependent rate-decreasing effects and small, sporadic error-increasing effects in the acquisition and performance components in each subject. Following 28 days of chronic Δ9-THC (0.32 mg/kg, i.m.) or vehicle twice daily, delta-9-THC-treated subjects developed tolerance to the rate-decreasing effects, and this tolerance was maintained during the initial 7–12 months irrespective of SIV infection (i.e., +THC/−SIV, +THC/+SIV). Full necropsy was performed on all SIV subjects an average of 329 days post-SIV inoculation, with postmortem histopathology suggestive of a reduced frequency of CNS pathology as well as opportunistic infections in delta-9-THC-treated subjects. Chronic Δ9-THC also significantly reduced CB-1 and CB-2 receptor levels in the hippocampus, attenuated the expression of a proinflammatory cytokine (MCP-1), and did not increase viral load in plasma, cerebrospinal fluid, or brain tissue compared to vehicle-treated subjects with SIV. Together, these data indicate that chronic Δ9-THC produces tolerance to its behaviorally disruptive effects on complex tasks while not adversely affecting viral load or other markers of disease progression during the early stages of infection. PMID:21463073

  2. CSF 5-HIAA, testosterone, and sociosexual behaviors in free-ranging male rhesus macaques in the mating season.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehlman, P T; Higley, J D; Fernald, B J; Sallee, F R; Suomi, S J; Linnoila, M

    1997-09-19

    This study examines sexual behavior, serotonin turnover in the central nervous system, and testosterone in free-ranging non-human primates. Study subjects were 33 young adult male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) living in naturalistic social groups on a 475-acre South Carolina barrier island. Blood and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) samples were obtained during random trappings, and the subjects were located for observation by radio telemetry. Quantitative behavioral samples totaling 203 observation hours were taken during two mating seasons (September through January) in 1994 and 1995. Control observations (65 h) on 13 subjects were also taken during the non-mating seasons in 1994 and 1995. The results indicate that CSF 5-hydroxyindoleacetic acid (5-HIAA), CSF testosterone, and plasma testosterone concentrations increase significantly during the mating season. During the mating season, there were significant increases in high intensity aggression, low intensity aggression, grooming behavior, and heterosexual mounting. In the mating season, CSF 5-HIAA was significantly correlated with several sociosexual behaviors: consorts per hour, heterosexual mounts per hour, and inseminations per hour. In contrast to previous findings from the non-mating season, CSF 5-HIAA was not correlated with any measures of aggression or sociality, although during consorting, CSF 5-HIAA was positively correlated with grooming. From these findings, we conclude that the lack of correlation between intense and severe aggression and CSF 5-HIAA in the mating season may reflect the use of high intensity aggression in 'normative' male-male competition over access to reproductively active females. We also conclude that CNS serotonin turnover is positively correlated with sexual competence, i.e. males with low CSF 5-HIAA concentrations are less sexually competent than males with higher concentrations.

  3. Collapse of Cytolytic Potential in SIV-Specific CD8+ T Cells Following Acute SIV Infection in Rhesus Macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily R Roberts

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Poor maintenance of cytotoxic factor expression among HIV-specific CD8+ T cells, in part caused by dysregulated expression of the transcription factor T-bet, is associated with HIV disease progression. However, the precise evolution and context in which CD8+ T cell cytotoxic functions become dysregulated in HIV infection remain unclear. Using the rhesus macaque (RM SIV infection model, we evaluated the kinetics of SIV-specific CD8+ T cell cytolytic factor expression in peripheral blood, lymph node, spleen, and gut mucosa from early acute infection through chronic infection. We identified rapid acquisition of perforin and granzyme B expression in SIV-specific CD8+ T cells in blood, secondary lymphoid tissues and gut mucosa that collapsed rapidly during the transition to chronic infection. The evolution of this expression profile was linked to low expression of T-bet and occurred independent of epitope specificity, viral escape patterns and tissue origin. Importantly, during acute infection SIV-specific CD8+ T cells that maintained T-bet expression retained the ability to express granzyme B after stimulation, but this relationship was lost in chronic infection. Together, these data demonstrate the loss of cytolytic machinery in SIV-specific CD8+ T cells in blood and at tissue sites of viral reservoir and active replication during the transition from acute to chronic infection. This phenomenon occurs despite persistent high levels of viremia suggesting that an inability to maintain properly regulated cytotoxic T cell responses in all tissue sites enables HIV/SIV to avoid immune clearance, establish persistent viral reservoirs in lymphoid tissues and gut mucosa, and lead ultimately to immunopathogenesis and death.

  4. Age at reproductive debut: Developmental predictors and consequences for lactation, infant mass, and subsequent reproduction in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittet, Florent; Johnson, Crystal; Hinde, Katie

    2017-11-01

    The age at which females initiate their reproductive career is a critical life-history parameter with potential consequences on their residual reproductive value and lifetime fitness. The age at reproductive debut may be intimately tied to the somatic capacity of the mother to rear her young, but relatively little is known about the influence of age of first birth on milk synthesis within a broader framework of reproductive scheduling, infant outcomes, and other life-history tradeoffs. Our study investigated the predictors of age at first reproduction among 108 captive rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) females, and associations with their milk synthesis at peak lactation, infant mass, and ability to subsequently conceive and reproduce. The majority of females reproduced in their fourth year (typical breeders); far fewer initiated their reproductive career one year earlier or one year later (respectively early and late breeders). Early breeders (3-year-old) benefited from highly favorable early life development (better juvenile growth, high dominance rank) to accelerate reproduction, but were impaired in milk synthesis due to lower somatic resources and their own continued growth. Comparatively, late breeders suffered from poor developmental conditions, only partially compensated by their delayed reproduction, and evinced compromised milk synthesis. Typical breeders not only produced higher available milk energy but also had best reproductive performance during the breeding and birth seasons following primiparity. Here, we refine and extend our understanding of how life-history tradeoffs manifest in the magnitude, sources, and consequences of variation in age of reproductive debut. These findings provide insight into primate reproductive flexibility in the context of constraints and opportunities. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Calorie restriction attenuates astrogliosis but not amyloid plaque load in aged rhesus macaques: a preliminary quantitative imaging study.

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    Sridharan, Aadhavi; Pehar, Mariana; Salamat, M Shahriar; Pugh, Thomas D; Bendlin, Barbara B; Willette, Auriel A; Anderson, Rozalyn M; Kemnitz, Joseph W; Colman, Ricki J; Weindruch, Richard H; Puglielli, Luigi; Johnson, Sterling C

    2013-05-01

    While moderate calorie restriction (CR) in the absence of malnutrition has been consistently shown to have a systemic, beneficial effect against aging in several animals models, its effect on the brain microstructure in a non-human primate model remains to be studied using post-mortem histopathologic techniques. In the present study, we investigated differences in expression levels of glial fibrillary acid protein (GFAP) and β-amyloid plaque load in the hippocampus and the adjacent cortical areas of 7 Control (ad libitum)-fed and 6 CR male rhesus macaques using immunostaining methods. CR monkeys expressed significantly lower levels (∼30% on average) of GFAP than Controls in the CA region of the hippocampus and entorhinal cortex, suggesting a protective effect of CR in limiting astrogliosis. These results recapitulate the neuroprotective effects of CR seen in shorter-lived animal models. There was a significant positive association between age and average amyloid plaque pathology in these animals, but there was no significant difference in amyloid plaque distribution between the two groups. Two of the seven Control animals (28.6%) and one of the six CR animal (16.7%) did not express any amyloid plaques, five of seven Controls (71.4%) and four of six CR animals (66.7%) expressed minimal to moderate amyloid pathology, and one of six CR animals (16.7%) expressed severe amyloid pathology. That CR affects levels of GFAP expression but not amyloid plaque load provides some insight into the means by which CR is beneficial at the microstructural level, potentially by offsetting the increased load of oxidatively damaged proteins, in this non-human primate model of aging. The present study is a preliminary post-mortem histological analysis of the effects of CR on brain health, and further studies using molecular and biochemical techniques are warranted to elucidate underlying mechanisms. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  6. Social learning as a way to overcome choice-induced preferences? Insights from humans and rhesus macaques.

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    ELISABETTA eMONFARDINI

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Much theoretical attention is currently devoted to social learning. Yet, empirical studies formally comparing its effectiveness relative to individual learning are rare. Here, we focus on free choice, which is at the heart of individual reward-based learning, but absent in social learning. Choosing among two equally valued options is known to create a preference for the selected option in both humans and monkeys. We thus surmised that social learning should be more helpful when choice-induced preferences retard individual learning than when they optimize it. To test this prediction, the same task requiring to find which among two items concealed a reward was applied to rhesus macaques and humans. The initial trial was individual or social, rewarded or unrewarded. Learning was assessed on the second trial. Choice-induced preference strongly affected individual learning. Monkeys and humans performed much more poorly after an initial negative choice than after an initial positive choice. Comparison with social learning verified our prediction. For negative outcome, social learning surpassed or at least equaled individual learning in all subjects. For positive outcome, the predicted superiority of individual learning did occur in a majority of subjects (5/6 monkeys and 6/12 humans. A minority kept learning better socially though, perhaps due to a more dominant/aggressive attitude toward peers. Poor learning from errors due to over-valuation of personal choices is among the decision-making biases shared by humans and animals. The present study suggests that choice-immune social learning may help curbing this potentially harmful tendency. Learning from successes is an easier path. The present data suggest that whether one tends to walk it alone or with a peer's help might depend on the social dynamics within the actor/observer dyad.

  7. No postcopulatory selection against MHC-homozygous offspring: Evidence from a pedigreed captive rhesus macaque colony.

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    Sterck, E H M; Bontrop, R E; de Groot, N; de Vos-Rouweler, A J M; Doxiadis, G G M

    2017-07-01

    The heterozygosity status of polymorphic elements of the immune system, such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), is known to increase the potential to cope with a wider variety of pathogens. Pre- and postcopulatory processes may regulate MHC heterozygosity. In a population where mating occurs among individuals that share identical MHC haplotypes, postcopulatory selection may disfavour homozygous offspring or ones with two MHC haplotypes identical to its mother. We tested these ideas by determining the incidence of MHC-heterozygous and MHC-homozygous individuals in a pedigreed, partially consanguineous captive rhesus monkey colony. Bayesian statistics showed that when parents share MHC haplotypes, the distribution of MHC-heterozygous and MHC-homozygous individuals significantly fitted the expected Mendelian distribution, both for the complete MHC haplotypes, and for MHC class I or II genes separately. Altogether, we found in this captive colony no evidence for postcopulatory selection against MHC-homozygous individuals. However, the distribution of paternally and maternally inherited MHC haplotypes tended to differ significantly from expected. Individuals with two MHC haplotypes identical to their mother were underrepresented and offspring with MHC haplotypes identical to their father tended to be overrepresented. This suggests that postcopulatory processes affect MHC haplotype combination in offspring, but do not prevent low MHC heterozygosity. © 2017 The Authors. Molecular Ecology Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. Left versus right nipple preference in free-ranging infant rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

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    Jaffe, Benjamin D; Evans, Theodore A; Howell, Sue; Westergaard, Gregory C; Snoy, Philip J; Higley, J Dee

    2006-04-01

    The examination of nonhuman primate (NHP) lateralized behaviors may provide insight into the evolution of hemispheric specialization. This study examined nipple preference in 64 infant macaques in order to consider the ontogeny of lateralized behavior. We used a focal animal sampling method to record nipple contact during 15, 30-min observation sessions collected across each infant's first year of life. Using a lateralized behavior index (LBI) we calculated individual and population preferences (LBI=(R-L)/(R+L); "R"=mean right nipple contact, "L"=mean left nipple contact). Strength of preference was calculated as the absolute value of this score. Infants exhibited no population preference for a particular nipple, but showed a significant strength of preference that developed after 48 hr. Interestingly, successive siblings preferred the nipple not used by the previous infant. These findings suggest that nipple preference is guided by external stimuli, and that nipple preference during infancy may not be a behavioral representation of hemispheric specialization. Copyright (c) 2006 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. CD4+ T Cells Modified by the Endoribonuclease MazF Are Safe and Can Persist in SHIV-infected Rhesus Macaques

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    Naoki Saito

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available MazF, an endoribonuclease encoded by Escherichia coli, specifically cleaves the ACA (adenine–cytosine–adenine sequence of single-stranded RNAs. Conditional expression of MazF under the control of the HIV-1 LTR promoter rendered CD4+ T cells resistant to HIV-1 replication without affecting cell growth. To investigate the safety, persistence and efficacy of MazF-modified CD4+ T cells in a nonhuman primate model in vivo, rhesus macaques were infected with a pathogenic simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV and transplanted with autologous MazF-modified CD4+ T cells. MazF-modified CD4+ T cells were clearly detected throughout the experimental period of more than 6 months. The CD4+ T cell count values increased in all four rhesus macaques. Moreover, the transplantation of the MazF-modified CD4+ T cells was not immunogenic, and did not elicit cellular or humoral immune responses. These data suggest that the autologous transplantation of MazF-modified CD4+ T cells in the presence of SHIV is effective, safe and not immunogenic, indicating that this is an attractive strategy for HIV-1 gene therapy.

  10. Correlation between genotypes of tRNA-linked short tandem repeats in Entamoeba nuttalli isolates and the geographical distribution of host rhesus macaques.

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    Feng, Meng; Komiyama, Tomoyoshi; Yanagi, Tetsuo; Cheng, Xunjia; Sherchand, Jeevan B; Tachibana, Hiroshi

    2014-01-01

    Several polymorphic markers, including serine-rich protein genes, have been used for the genotyping of isolates from the morphologically indistinguishable protozoan parasites Entamoeba histolytica, Entamoeba dispar, and Entamoeba nuttalli. Genotypes of tRNA-linked short tandem repeats (STRs) are highly polymorphic, but the correlation with geographical distribution is unknown. We have recently isolated 15 E. nuttalli strains from wild rhesus macaques in four locations in Kathmandu Valley, Nepal. The sequences of the serine-rich protein genes of the E. nuttalli strains differed among the four locations. In this study, we analyzed tRNA-linked STRs in six loci of the 15 strains. Two genotypes were found in loci N-K2, R-R, and S(TGA)-D, three in locus S-Q, and five in locus D-A. In locus A-L, one major genotype and ten minor genotypes were found, resulting in mixtures of two to six genotypes in eight strains. By combination of the main genotypes in the six loci, the 15 strains were divided into nine genotypes. The genotypes observed in E. nuttalli strains were quite different from those in E. histolytica and E. dispar. A phylogenetic tree constructed from tRNA-linked STRs in the six loci reflected the different places of isolation. These results suggest that sequence diversity of tRNA-linked STRs in E. nuttalli occurs with relatively high frequency and might be a marker of geographical distribution of host rhesus macaques, even in limited areas.

  11. The effects of 5-hydroxytryptophan on attention and central serotonin neurochemistry in the rhesus macaque.

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    Weinberg-Wolf, Hannah; Fagan, Nicholas A; Anderson, George M; Tringides, Marios; Dal Monte, Olga; Chang, Steve W C

    2018-01-30

    Psychiatric disorders, particularly depression and anxiety, are often associated with impaired serotonergic function. However, serotonergic interventions yield inconsistent effects on behavioral impairments. To better understand serotonin's role in these pathologies, we investigated the role of serotonin in a behavior frequently impaired in depression and anxiety, attention. In this study, we used a quantitative, repeated, within-subject, design to test how L-5-hydroxytryptophan (5-HTP), the immediate serotonin precursor, modulates central serotoninergic function and attention in macaques. We observed that intramuscular 5-HTP administration increased cisternal cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) 5-HTP and serotonin. In addition, individuals' baseline looking duration, during saline sessions, predicted the direction and magnitude in which 5-HTP modulated attention. We found that 5-HTP decreased looking duration in animals with high baseline attention, but increased looking duration in low baseline attention animals. Furthermore, individual differences in 5-HTP's effects were also reflected in how engaged individuals were in the task and how they allocated attention to salient facial features-the eyes and mouth-of stimulus animals. However, 5-HTP constricted pupil size in all animals, suggesting that the bi-directional effects of 5-HTP cannot be explained by serotonin-mediated changes in autonomic arousal. Critically, high and low baseline attention animals exhibited different baseline CSF concentrations of 5-HTP and serotonin, an index of extracellular functionally active serotonin. Thus, our results suggest that baseline central serotonergic functioning may underlie and predict variation in serotonin's effects on cognitive operation. Our findings may help inform serotonin's role in psychopathology and help clinicians predict how serotonergic interventions will influence pathologies.

  12. Ecological genetics of Chinese rhesus macaque in response to mountain building: all things are not equal.

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    Shan-Jin Wu

    Full Text Available Pliocene uplifting of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP and Quaternary glaciation may have impacted the Asian biota more than any other events. Little is documented with respect to how the geological and climatological events influenced speciation as well as spatial and genetic structuring, especially in vertebrate endotherms. Macaca mulatta is the most widely distributed non-human primate. It may be the most suitable model to test hypotheses regarding the genetic consequences of orogenesis on an endotherm.Using a large dataset of maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA gene sequences and nuclear microsatellite DNA data, we discovered two maternal super-haplogroups exist, one in western China and the other in eastern China. M. mulatta formed around 2.31 Ma (1.51-3.15, 95%, and divergence of the two major matrilines was estimated at 1.15 Ma (0.78-1.55, 95%. The western super-haplogroup exhibits significant geographic structure. In contrast, the eastern super-haplogroup has far greater haplotypic variability with little structure based on analyses of six variable microsatellite loci using Structure and Geneland. Analysis using Migrate detected greater gene flow from WEST to EAST than vice versa. We did not detect signals of bottlenecking in most populations.Analyses of the nuclear and mitochondrial datasets obtained large differences in genetic patterns for M. mulatta. The difference likely reflects inheritance mechanisms of the maternally inherited mtDNA genome versus nuclear biparentally inherited STRs and male-mediated gene flow. Dramatic environmental changes may be responsible for shaping the matrilineal history of macaques. The timing of events, the formation of M. mulatta, and the divergence of the super-haplogroups, corresponds to both the uplifting of the QTP and Quaternary climatic oscillations. Orogenesis likely drove divergence of western populations in China, and Pleistocene glaciations are likely responsible for genetic structuring in

  13. High expression levels of BLyS/BAFF by blood dendritic cells and granulocytes are associated with B-cell dysregulation in SIV-infected rhesus macaques.

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    Poudrier, Johanne; Soulas, Caroline; Chagnon-Choquet, Josiane; Burdo, Tricia; Autissier, Patrick; Oskar, Kathryn; Williams, Kenneth C; Roger, Michel

    2015-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) modulate B-cell survival and differentiation, mainly through production of growth factors such as B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS/BAFF). In recent longitudinal studies involving HIV-1-infected individuals with different rates of disease progression, we have shown that DCs were altered in number and phenotype in the context of HIV-1 disease progression and B-cell dysregulations were associated with increased BLyS/BAFF expression in plasma and by blood myeloid DCs (mDCs) in rapid and classic progressors but not in HIV-1-elite controllers (EC). Suggesting that the extent to which HIV-1 disease progression is controlled may be linked to BLyS/BAFF expression status and the capacity to orchestrate B-cell responses. Herein, longitudinal analyses of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus macaques also revealed increased expression of BLyS/BAFF by blood mDCs as soon as day 8 and throughout infection. Strikingly, granulocytes presented the highest BLyS/BAFF expression profile in the blood of SIV-infected macaques. BLyS/BAFF levels were also increased in plasma and correlated with viral loads. Consequently, these SIV-infected animals had plasma hyperglobulinemia and reduced blood B-cell numbers with altered population frequencies. These data underscore that BLyS/BAFF is associated with immune dysregulation in SIV-infected rhesus macaques and suggest that BLyS/BAFF is a key regulator of immune activation that is highly conserved among primates. These findings emphasize the potential importance of this SIV-infected primate model to test whether blocking excess BLyS/BAFF has an effect on the overall inflammatory burden and immune restoration.

  14. High expression levels of BLyS/BAFF by blood dendritic cells and granulocytes are associated with B-cell dysregulation in SIV-infected rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johanne Poudrier

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs modulate B-cell survival and differentiation, mainly through production of growth factors such as B lymphocyte stimulator (BLyS/BAFF. In recent longitudinal studies involving HIV-1-infected individuals with different rates of disease progression, we have shown that DCs were altered in number and phenotype in the context of HIV-1 disease progression and B-cell dysregulations were associated with increased BLyS/BAFF expression in plasma and by blood myeloid DCs (mDCs in rapid and classic progressors but not in HIV-1-elite controllers (EC. Suggesting that the extent to which HIV-1 disease progression is controlled may be linked to BLyS/BAFF expression status and the capacity to orchestrate B-cell responses. Herein, longitudinal analyses of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV-infected rhesus macaques also revealed increased expression of BLyS/BAFF by blood mDCs as soon as day 8 and throughout infection. Strikingly, granulocytes presented the highest BLyS/BAFF expression profile in the blood of SIV-infected macaques. BLyS/BAFF levels were also increased in plasma and correlated with viral loads. Consequently, these SIV-infected animals had plasma hyperglobulinemia and reduced blood B-cell numbers with altered population frequencies. These data underscore that BLyS/BAFF is associated with immune dysregulation in SIV-infected rhesus macaques and suggest that BLyS/BAFF is a key regulator of immune activation that is highly conserved among primates. These findings emphasize the potential importance of this SIV-infected primate model to test whether blocking excess BLyS/BAFF has an effect on the overall inflammatory burden and immune restoration.

  15. Myocarditis in CD8-depleted SIV-infected rhesus macaques after short-term dual therapy with nucleoside and nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

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    Lakshmanan Annamalai

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Although highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has dramatically reduced the morbidity and mortality associated with HIV infection, a number of antiretroviral toxicities have been described, including myocardial toxicity resulting from the use of nucleotide and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs. Current treatment guidelines recommend the use of HAART regimens containing two NRTIs for initial therapy of HIV-1 positive individuals; however, potential cardiotoxicity resulting from treatment with multiple NRTIs has not been addressed.We examined myocardial tissue from twelve CD8 lymphocyte-depleted adult rhesus macaques, including eight animals infected with simian immunodeficiency virus, four of which received combined antiretroviral therapy (CART consisting of two NRTIs [(9-R-2-Phosphonomethoxypropyl Adenine (PMPA and (+/--beta-2',3'-dideoxy-5-fluoro-3'-thiacytidine (RCV] for 28 days. Multifocal infiltrates of mononuclear inflammatory cells were present in the myocardium of all macaques that received CART, but not untreated SIV-positive animals or SIV-negative controls. Macrophages were the predominant inflammatory cells within lesions, as shown by immunoreactivity for the macrophage markers Iba1 and CD68. Heart specimens from monkeys that received CART had significantly lower virus burdens than untreated animals (p<0.05, but significantly greater quantities of TNF-α mRNA than either SIV-positive untreated animals or uninfected controls (p<0.05. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ, IL-1β and CXCL11 mRNA were upregulated in heart tissue from SIV-positive monkeys, independent of antiretroviral treatment, but CXCL9 mRNA was only upregulated in heart tissue from macaques that received CART.These results suggest that short-term treatment with multiple NRTIs may be associated with myocarditis, and demonstrate that the CD8-depleted SIV-positive rhesus monkey is a useful model for studying the cardiotoxic effects of combined antiretroviral

  16. Repressive effect of primary virus replication on superinfection correlated with gut-derived central memory CD4(+ T cells in SHIV-infected Chinese rhesus macaques.

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    Jing Xue

    Full Text Available A possible mechanism of susceptibility to superinfection with simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-1157ipd3N4 was explored in twelve SHIVSF162P3-infected Chinese rhesus macaques. Based on the kinetics of viral replication for the second infecting virus following SHIV-1157ipd3N4 inoculation, the monkeys were divided into two groups: those relatively resistant to superinfection (SIR and those relatively sensitive to superinfection (SIS. We found that superinfection-resistant macaques had high primary viremia, whereas superinfection-sensitive macaques had low primary viremia, suggesting that primary SHIVSF162P3 infection with a high viral-replication level would repress superinfection with a heterologous SHIV-1157ipd3N4. Although no correlation of protection against superinfection with virus-specific CD4(+ T cell or CD8(+ T cell immune responses from gut was observed prior to superinfection, superinfection susceptibility was strongly correlated with CD4(+ Tcm cells from gut both prior to the second infecting virus inoculation and on day 7 after superinfection, but not with CD4(+ Tem cells from gut or with CD4(+ Tcm cells from peripheral blood and lymph node. These results point to the important roles of gut-derived CD4(+ Tcm cells for the study of the mechanisms of protection against superinfection and the evaluation of the safety and efficacy of vaccines and therapies against acquired immune deficiency syndrome (AIDS.

  17. Central Nervous System Inflammation and Infection During Early, Non-Accelerated Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Infection in Rhesus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Denise C; Sunyakumthorn, Piyanate; Wegner, Matthew; Schuetz, Alexandra; Silsorn, Decha; Estes, Jacob D; Deleage, Claire; Tomusange, Khamis; Lakhashe, Samir K; Ruprecht, Ruth M; Lombardini, Eric; Im-Erbsin, Rawiwan; Kuncharin, Yanin; Phuang-Ngern, Yuwadee; Inthawong, Dutsadee; Chuenarom, Weerawan; Burke, Robin; Robb, Merlin L; Ndhlovu, Lishomwa C; Ananworanich, Jintanat; Valcour, Victor; O'Connell, Robert J; Spudich, Serena; Michael, Nelson L; Vasan, Sandhya

    2018-03-21

    describe a new model of central nervous system involvement in rhesus macaques infected with simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) expressing HIV envelope in earlier, less aggressive stages of disease. Here, we demonstrate that SHIV mimics the early clinical course in humans, and that early neurologic inflammation is characterized by predominantly T cell mediated inflammation, accompanied by SHIV infection in the brain and meninges. This model can be utilized to assess the effect of novel therapies targeted to HIV envelope on reducing brain inflammation before end stage disease. Copyright © 2018 Hsu et al.

  18. Extracellular matrix regenerative graft attenuates the negative impact of polypropylene prolapse mesh on vagina in rhesus macaque.

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    Liang, Rui; Knight, Katrina; Barone, William; Powers, Robert W; Nolfi, Alexis; Palcsey, Stacy; Abramowitch, Steven; Moalli, Pamela A

    2017-02-01

    The use of wide pore lightweight polypropylene mesh to improve anatomical outcomes in the surgical repair of prolapse has been hampered by mesh complications. One of the prototype prolapse meshes has been found to negatively impact the vagina by inducing a decrease in smooth muscle volume and contractility and the degradation of key structural proteins (collagen and elastin), resulting in vaginal degeneration. Recently, bioscaffolds derived from extracellular matrix have been used to mediate tissue regeneration and have been widely adopted in tissue engineering applications. Here we aimed to: (1) define whether augmentation of a polypropylene prolapse mesh with an extracellular matrix regenerative graft in a primate sacrocolpopexy model could mitigate the degenerative changes; and (2) determine the impact of the extracellular matrix graft on vagina when implanted alone. A polypropylene-extracellular matrix composite graft (n = 9) and a 6-layered extracellular matrix graft alone (n = 8) were implanted in 17 middle-aged parous rhesus macaques via sacrocolpopexy and compared to historical data obtained from sham (n = 12) and the polypropylene mesh (n = 12) implanted by the same method. Vaginal function was measured in passive (ball-burst test) and active (smooth muscle contractility) mechanical tests. Vaginal histomorphologic/biochemical assessments included hematoxylin-eosin and trichrome staining, immunofluorescent labeling of α-smooth muscle actin and apoptotic cells, measurement of total collagen, collagen subtypes (ratio III/I), mature elastin, and sulfated glycosaminoglycans. Statistical analyses included 1-way analysis of variance, Kruskal-Wallis, and appropriate post-hoc tests. The host inflammatory response in the composite mesh-implanted vagina was reduced compared to that following implantation with the polypropylene mesh alone. The increase in apoptotic cells observed with the polypropylene mesh was blunted in the composite (overall P matrix graft

  19. Comparative analysis of immune activation markers of CD8+ T cells in lymph nodes of different origins in SIV-infected Chinese rhesus macaques

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    Jinbiao Liu

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Altered T-cell homeostasis, such as expansion of CD8+ T cells to the secondary lymphatic compartments has been suggested as a mechanism of HIV/SIV-pathogenesis. However, the role of immune activation of CD8+ T cells in the CD4/CD8 turnover and viral replication in these tissues is not completely understood. In the present study, we compared the expression of immune activation markers (CD69 and HLA-DR on CD8+ T cells in the peripheral blood and lymph nodes (LNs of SIV-infected/uninfected Chinese rhesus macaques. SIV-infected macaques had significantly higher percentages of CD8+CD69+ and CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells in all these anatomical compartments than uninfected macaques except for CD8+HLA-DR+ T cells in peripheral blood. LNs that located close to the gastrointestinal (GI tract (colon, mesenteric and iliac LNs of SIV-infected macaques had profoundly lower numbers of CD4+ T cells, but no significantly difference in expression of activation marker (CD8+CD69+ and CD8+HLA-DR+ as compared with the peripheral lymphatic tissues (axillary and inguinal LNs. The CD4/CD8 ratios were negatively correlated with the activation of CD8 T cells in the overall LNs, with further associations with CD8+HLA-DR+ in GI LNs while CD8+CD69+ in peripheral LNs. These observations demonstrate that the increase of CD8+ T cell activation is a contributing factor for the decline of CD4/CD8 ratios in GI system.

  20. Aged Chinese-origin rhesus macaques infected with SIV develop marked viremia in absence of clinical disease, inflammation or cognitive impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bissel, Stephanie J; Gurnsey, Kate; Jedema, Hank P; Smith, Nicholas F; Wang, Guoji; Bradberry, Charles W; Wiley, Clayton A

    2018-02-01

    Damage to the central nervous system during HIV infection can lead to variable neurobehavioral dysfunction termed HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). There is no clear consensus regarding the neuropathological or cellular basis of HAND. We sought to study the potential contribution of aging to the pathogenesis of HAND. Aged (range = 14.7-24.8 year) rhesus macaques of Chinese origin (RM-Ch) (n = 23) were trained to perform cognitive tasks. Macaques were then divided into four groups to assess the impact of SIVmac251 infection (n = 12) and combined antiretroviral therapy (CART) (5 infected; 5 mock-infected) on the execution of these tasks. Aged SIV-infected RM-Ch demonstrated significant plasma viremia and modest CSF viral loads but showed few clinical signs, no elevations of systemic temperature, and no changes in activity levels, platelet counts or weight. Concentrations of biomarkers of acute and chronic inflammation such as soluble CD14, CXCL10, IL-6 and TNF-α are known to be elevated following SIV infection of young adult macaques of several species, but concentrations of these biomarkers did not shift after SIV infection in aged RM-Ch and remained similar to mock-infected macaques. Neither acute nor chronic SIV infection or CART had a significant impact on accuracy, speed or percent completion in a sensorimotor test. Viremia in the absence of a chronic elevated inflammatory response seen in some aged RM-Ch is reminiscent of SIV infection in natural disease resistant hosts. The absence of cognitive impairment during SIV infection in aged RM-Ch might be in part attributed to diminishment of some facets of the immunological response. Additional study encompassing species and age differences is necessary to substantiate this hypothesis.

  1. Chronic administration of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol induces intestinal anti-inflammatory microRNA expression during acute simian immunodeficiency virus infection of rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandra, Lawrance C; Kumar, Vinay; Torben, Workineh; Vande Stouwe, Curtis; Winsauer, Peter; Amedee, Angela; Molina, Patricia E; Mohan, Mahesh

    2015-01-15

    Recreational and medical use of cannabis among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected individuals has increased in recent years. In simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected macaques, chronic administration of Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) inhibited viral replication and intestinal inflammation and slowed disease progression. Persistent gastrointestinal disease/inflammation has been proposed to facilitate microbial translocation and systemic immune activation and promote disease progression. Cannabinoids including Δ9-THC attenuated intestinal inflammation in mouse colitis models and SIV-infected rhesus macaques. To determine if the anti-inflammatory effects of Δ9-THC involved differential microRNA (miRNA) modulation, we profiled miRNA expression at 14, 30, and 60 days postinfection (days p.i.) in the intestine of uninfected macaques receiving Δ9-THC (n=3) and SIV-infected macaques administered either vehicle (VEH/SIV; n=4) or THC (THC/SIV; n=4). Chronic Δ9-THC administration to uninfected macaques significantly and positively modulated intestinal miRNA expression by increasing the total number of differentially expressed miRNAs from 14 to 60 days p.i. At 60 days p.i., ∼28% of miRNAs showed decreased expression in the VEH/SIV group compared to none showing decrease in the THC/SIV group. Furthermore, compared to the VEH/SIV group, THC selectively upregulated the expression of miR-10a, miR-24, miR-99b, miR-145, miR-149, and miR-187, previously been shown to target proinflammatory molecules. NOX4, a potent reactive oxygen species generator, was confirmed as a direct miR-99b target. A significant increase in NOX4+ crypt epithelial cells was detected in VEH/SIV macaques compared to the THC/SIV group. We speculate that miR-99b-mediated NOX4 downregulation may protect the intestinal epithelium from oxidative stress-induced damage. These results support a role for differential miRNA induction in THC-mediated suppression of intestinal inflammation. Whether

  2. The Characteristics of Herpes Simplex Virus Type 1 Infection in Rhesus Macaques and the Associated Pathological Features.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Shengtao; Cai, Hongzhi; Xu, Xingli; Feng, Min; Wang, Lichun; Liao, Yun; Zhang, Ying; He, Zhanlong; Yang, Fengmei; Yu, Wenhai; Wang, Jingjing; Zhou, Jumin; Li, Qihan

    2017-01-30

    As one of the major pathogens for human herpetic diseases, herpes simplex virus type 1 (HSV1) causes herpes labialis, genital herpes and herpetic encephalitis. Our aim here was to investigate the infectious process of HSV1 in rhesus macaques and the pathological features induced during this infection. Clinical symptoms that manifested in the rhesus macaque during HSV1 infection included vesicular lesions and their pathological features. Viral distribution in the nervous tissues and associated pathologic changes indicated the typical systematic pathological processes associated with viral distribution of HSV1.Interestingly, vesicular lesions recurred in oral skin or in mucosa associated with virus shedding in macaques within four to five months post-infection,and viral latency-associated transcript (LAT) mRNA was found in the trigeminal ganglia (TG)on day 365 post-infection. Neutralization testing and enzyme-linked immunospot (ELISpot) detection of specific T cell responses confirmed the specific immunity induced by HSV1 infection. Thus, rhesus macaques could serve as an infectious model for HSV1 due to their typical clinical symptoms and the pathological recurrence associated with viral latency in nervous tissues.

  3. Memory B cells and CD8⁺ lymphocytes do not control seasonal influenza A virus replication after homologous re-challenge of rhesus macaques.

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    Timothy D Carroll

    Full Text Available This study sought to define the role of memory lymphocytes in the protection from homologous influenza A virus re-challenge in rhesus macaques. Depleting monoclonal antibodies (mAb were administered to the animals prior to their second experimental inoculation with a human seasonal influenza A virus strain. Treatment with either anti-CD8α or anti-CD20 mAbs prior to re-challenge had minimal effect on influenza A virus replication. Thus, in non-human primates with pre-existing anti-influenza A antibodies, memory B cells and CD8α⁺ T cells do not contribute to the control of virus replication after re-challenge with a homologous strain of influenza A virus.

  4. An adjuvanted, tetravalent dengue virus purified inactivated vaccine candidate induces long-lasting and protective antibody responses against dengue challenge in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandez, Stefan; Thomas, Stephen J; De La Barrera, Rafael; Im-Erbsin, Rawiwan; Jarman, Richard G; Baras, Benoît; Toussaint, Jean-François; Mossman, Sally; Innis, Bruce L; Schmidt, Alexander; Malice, Marie-Pierre; Festraets, Pascale; Warter, Lucile; Putnak, J Robert; Eckels, Kenneth H

    2015-04-01

    The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a candidate tetravalent dengue virus purified inactivated vaccine (TDENV PIV) formulated with alum or an Adjuvant System (AS01, AS03 tested at three different dose levels, or AS04) was evaluated in a 0, 1-month vaccination schedule in rhesus macaques. One month after dose 2, all adjuvanted formulations elicited robust and persisting neutralizing antibody titers against all four dengue virus serotypes. Most of the formulations tested prevented viremia after challenge, with the dengue serotype 1 and 2 virus strains administered at 40 and 32 weeks post-dose 2, respectively. This study shows that inactivated dengue vaccines, when formulated with alum or an Adjuvant System, are candidates for further development. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  5. Sporozoite neutralizing antibodies elicited in mice and rhesus macaques immunized with a Plasmodium falciparum repeat peptide conjugated to meningococcal outer membrane protein complex

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    Craig ePrzysiecki

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies that neutralize infectivity of malaria sporozoites target the central repeat region of the circumsporozoite (CS protein, which in Plasmodium falciparum is comprised primarily of 30-40 tandem NANP tetramer repeats. We evaluated immunogenicity of an alum-adsorbed (NANP6 peptide conjugated to an outer membrane protein complex (OMPC derived from Neisseria meningitidis, a carrier protein used in a licensed H. influenzae pediatric vaccine. Mice immunized with alum-adsorbed (NANP6-OMPC, with or without Iscomatrix© as co-adjuvant, developed high levels of anti-repeat peptide antibody that inhibited in vitro invasion of human hepatoma cells by transgenic P. berghei sporozoites that express P. falciparum CS repeats (PfPb. Inhibition of sporozoite invasion in vitro correlated with in vivo resistance to challenge by the bites of PfPb infected mosquitoes. Challenged mice had > 90% reduction of hepatic stage parasites as measured by real-time PCR, and either sterile immunity, i.e. no detectable blood stage parasites, or delayed prepatent periods which indicate neutralization of a majority, but not all, sporozoites. Rhesus macaques immunized with two doses of (NANP6-OMPC/MAA formulated with Iscomatrix© developed anti-repeat antibodies that persisted for ~2 years. A third dose of (NANP6-OMPC/MAA+ Iscomatrix© at that time elicited strong anamnestic antibody responses. Rhesus macaque immune sera obtained post second and third dose of vaccine displayed high levels of sporozoite neutralizing activity in vitro that correlated with presence of high anti-repeat antibody titers. These preclinical studies in mice of different MHC haplotypes and a non-human primate support use of CS peptide-OMPC conjugates as a highly immunogenic platform to evaluate CS protective epitopes. Potential pre-erythrocytic vaccines can be combined with sexual blood stage vaccines as a multi-antigen malaria vaccine to block invasion and transmission of Plasmodium parasites

  6. MVA.85A boosting of BCG and an attenuated, phoP deficient M. tuberculosis vaccine both show protective efficacy against tuberculosis in rhesus macaques.

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    Frank A W Verreck

    Full Text Available Continuous high global tuberculosis (TB mortality rates and variable vaccine efficacy of Mycobacterium bovis Bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG motivate the search for better vaccine regimes. Relevant models are required to downselect the most promising vaccines entering clinical efficacy testing and to identify correlates of protection.Here, we evaluated immunogenicity and protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis in rhesus monkeys with two novel strategies: BCG boosted by modified vaccinia virus Ankara expressing antigen 85A (MVA.85A, and attenuated M. tuberculosis with a disrupted phoP gene (SO2 as a single-dose vaccine. Both strategies were well tolerated, and immunogenic as evidenced by induction of specific IFNgamma responses. Antigen 85A-specific IFNgamma secretion was specifically increased by MVA.85A boosting. Importantly, both MVA.85A and SO2 treatment significantly reduced pathology and chest X-ray scores upon infectious challenge with M. tuberculosis Erdman strain. MVA.85A and SO2 treatment also showed reduced average lung bacterial counts (1.0 and 1.2 log respectively, compared with 0.4 log for BCG and significant protective effect by reduction in C-reactive protein levels, body weight loss, and decrease of erythrocyte-associated hematologic parameters (MCV, MCH, Hb, Ht as markers of inflammatory infection, all relative to non-vaccinated controls. Lymphocyte stimulation revealed Ag85A-induced IFNgamma levels post-infection as the strongest immunocorrelate for protection (spearman's rho: -0.60.Both the BCG/MVA.85A prime-boost regime and the novel live attenuated, phoP deficient TB vaccine candidate SO2 showed significant protective efficacy by various parameters in rhesus macaques. Considering the phylogenetic relationship between macaque and man and the similarity in manifestations of TB disease, these data support further development of these primary and combination TB vaccine candidates.

  7. Maintenance of intestinal Th17 cells and reduced microbial translocation in SIV-infected rhesus macaques treated with interleukin (IL-21.

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    Suresh Pallikkuth

    Full Text Available In pathogenic HIV and SIV infections of humans and rhesus macaques (RMs, preferential depletion of CD4⁺ Th17 cells correlates with mucosal immune dysfunction and disease progression. Interleukin (IL-21 promotes differentiation of Th17 cells, long-term maintenance of functional CD8⁺ T cells, and differentiation of memory B cells and antibody-secreting plasma cells. We hypothesized that administration of IL-21 will improve mucosal function in the context of pathogenic HIV/SIV infections. To test this hypothesis, we infected 12 RMs with SIV(mac239 and at day 14 post-infection treated six of them with rhesus rIL-21-IgFc. IL-21-treatment was safe and did not increase plasma viral load or systemic immune activation. Compared to untreated animals, IL-21-treated RMs showed (i higher expression of perforin and granzyme B in total and SIV-specific CD8⁺ T cells and (ii higher levels of intestinal Th17 cells. Remarkably, increased levels of Th17 cells were associated with reduced levels of intestinal T cell proliferation, microbial translocation and systemic activation/inflammation in the chronic infection. In conclusion, IL-21-treatment in SIV-infected RMs improved mucosal immune function through enhanced preservation of Th17 cells. Further preclinical studies of IL-21 may be warranted to test its potential use during chronic infection in conjunction with antiretroviral therapy.

  8. A Practical Approach for Designing Breeding Groups to Maximize Genetic Diversity in a Large Colony of Captive Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta).

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    Vinson, Amanda; Raboin, Michael J

    2015-11-01

    Limited guidance is available on practical approaches for maintaining genetic diversity in large NHP colonies that support biomedical research, despite the fact that reduced diversity in these colonies is likely to compromise the application of findings in NHP to human disease. In particular, constraints related to simultaneously housing, breeding, and providing ongoing veterinary care for thousands of animals with a highly complex social structure creates unique challenges for genetic management in these colonies. Because the composition of new breeding groups is a critical component of genetic management, here we outline a 3-stage protocol for forming new breeding groups of NHP that is aimed at maximizing genetic diversity in the face of frequent restrictions on age, sex, and numbers of animals per breeding group. As an example application of this protocol, we describe optimal combinations of rhesus macaques from an analysis of candidate animals available for breeding in July 2013, selected from among the approximately 4000 macaques maintained at the Oregon National Primate Research Center. In addition, a simulation study to explore the genetic diversity in breeding groups formed by using this protocol, indicated an approximate 10-fold higher genome uniqueness, 50% lower mean kinship, and an 84-fold lower mean inbreeding coefficient among potential offspring within groups, when compared with a suboptimal group design. We conclude that this protocol provides a practical and effective approach to breeding group design for colony managers who want to prevent the loss of genetic diversity in large, semiisolated NHP colonies.

  9. Multiple antibody targets on herpes B glycoproteins B and D identified by screening sera of infected rhesus macaques with peptide microarrays.

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    Sven-Kevin Hotop

    Full Text Available Herpes B virus (or Herpesvirus simiae or Macacine herpesvirus 1 is endemic in many populations of macaques, both in the wild and in captivity. The virus elicits only mild clinical symptoms (if any in monkeys, but can be transmitted by various routes, most commonly via bites, to humans where it causes viral encephalitis with a high mortality rate. Hence, herpes B constitutes a considerable occupational hazard for animal caretakers, veterinarians and laboratory personnel. Efforts are therefore being made to reduce the risk of zoonotic infection and to improve prognosis after accidental exposure. Among the measures envisaged are serological surveillance of monkey colonies and specific diagnosis of herpes B zoonosis against a background of antibodies recognizing the closely related human herpes simplex virus (HSV. 422 pentadecapeptides covering, in an overlapping fashion, the entire amino acid sequences of herpes B proteins gB and gD were synthesized and immobilized on glass slides. Antibodies present in monkey sera that bind to subsets of the peptide collection were detected by microserological techniques. With 42 different rhesus macaque sera, 114 individual responses to 18 different antibody target regions (ATRs were recorded, 17 of which had not been described earlier. This finding may pave the way for a peptide-based, herpes B specific serological diagnostic test.

  10. The Effects of Reduced Gluten Barley Diet on Humoral and Cell-Mediated Systemic Immune Responses of Gluten-Sensitive Rhesus Macaques

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    Karol Sestak

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD affects approximately 1% of the general population while an estimated additional 6% suffers from a recently characterized, rapidly emerging, similar disease, referred to as non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS. The only effective treatment of CD and NCGS requires removal of gluten sources from the diet. Since required adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD is difficult to accomplish, efforts to develop alternative treatments have been intensifying in recent years. In this study, the non-human primate model of CD/NCGS, e.g., gluten-sensitive rhesus macaque, was utilized with the objective to evaluate the treatment potential of reduced gluten cereals using a reduced gluten (RG; 1% of normal gluten barley mutant as a model. Conventional and RG barleys were used for the formulation of experimental chows and fed to gluten-sensitive (GS and control macaques to determine if RG barley causes a remission of dietary gluten-induced clinical and immune responses in GS macaques. The impacts of the RG barley diet were compared with the impacts of the conventional barley-containing chow and the GFD. Although remission of the anti-gliadin antibody (AGA serum responses and an improvement of clinical diarrhea were noted after switching the conventional to the RG barley diet, production of inflammatory cytokines, e.g., interferon-gamma (IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF and interleukin-8 (IL-8 by peripheral CD4+ T helper lymphocytes, persisted during the RG chow treatment and were partially abolished only upon re-administration of the GFD. It was concluded that the RG barley diet might be used for the partial improvement of gluten-induced disease but its therapeutic value still requires upgrading—by co-administration of additional treatments.

  11. DNA prime/protein boost vaccination elicits robust humoral response in rhesus macaques using oligomeric simian immunodeficiency virus envelope and Advax delta inulin adjuvant.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Veena; Ayala, Victor I; Rangaswamy, Sneha P; Kalisz, Irene; Whitney, Stephen; Galmin, Lindsey; Ashraf, Asma; LaBranche, Celia; Montefiori, David; Petrovsky, Nikolai; Kalyanaraman, Vaniambadi S; Pal, Ranajit

    2017-08-01

    The partial success of the RV144 trial underscores the importance of envelope-specific antibody responses for an effective HIV-1 vaccine. Oligomeric HIV-1 envelope proteins delivered with a potent adjuvant are expected to elicit strong antibody responses with broad neutralization specificity. To test this hypothesis, two SIV envelope proteins were formulated with delta inulin-based adjuvant (Advax) and used to immunize nonhuman primates. Oligomeric gp140-gp145 from SIVmac251 and SIVsmE660 was purified to homogeneity. Oligomers showed high-affinity interaction with CD4 and were highly immunogenic in rabbits, inducing Tier 2 SIV-neutralizing antibodies. The immunogenicity of an oligomeric Env DNA prime and protein boost together with Advax was evaluated in Chinese rhesus macaques. DNA administration elicited antibodies to both envelopes, and titres were markedly enhanced following homologous protein boosts via intranasal and intramuscular routes. Strong antibody responses were detected against the V1 and V2 domains of gp120. During peak immune responses, a low to moderate level of neutralizing activity was detected against Tier 1A/1B SIV isolates, with a moderate level noted against a Tier 2 isolate. Increased serum antibody affinity to SIVmac251 gp140 and generation of Env-specific memory B cells were observed in the immunized macaques. Animals were subjected to low-dose intravaginal challenge with SIVmac251 one week after the last protein boost. One out of three immunized animals was protected from infection. Although performed with a small number of macaques, this study demonstrates the utility of oligomeric envelopes formulated with Advax in eliciting broad antibody responses with the potential to provide protection against SIV transmission.

  12. The effects of reduced gluten barley diet on humoral and cell-mediated systemic immune responses of gluten-sensitive rhesus macaques.

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    Sestak, Karol; Thwin, Hazel; Dufour, Jason; Aye, Pyone P; Liu, David X; Moehs, Charles P

    2015-03-06

    Celiac disease (CD) affects approximately 1% of the general population while an estimated additional 6% suffers from a recently characterized, rapidly emerging, similar disease, referred to as non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS). The only effective treatment of CD and NCGS requires removal of gluten sources from the diet. Since required adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD) is difficult to accomplish, efforts to develop alternative treatments have been intensifying in recent years. In this study, the non-human primate model of CD/NCGS, e.g., gluten-sensitive rhesus macaque, was utilized with the objective to evaluate the treatment potential of reduced gluten cereals using a reduced gluten (RG; 1% of normal gluten) barley mutant as a model. Conventional and RG barleys were used for the formulation of experimental chows and fed to gluten-sensitive (GS) and control macaques to determine if RG barley causes a remission of dietary gluten-induced clinical and immune responses in GS macaques. The impacts of the RG barley diet were compared with the impacts of the conventional barley-containing chow and the GFD. Although remission of the anti-gliadin antibody (AGA) serum responses and an improvement of clinical diarrhea were noted after switching the conventional to the RG barley diet, production of inflammatory cytokines, e.g., interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) by peripheral CD4+ T helper lymphocytes, persisted during the RG chow treatment and were partially abolished only upon re-administration of the GFD. It was concluded that the RG barley diet might be used for the partial improvement of gluten-induced disease but its therapeutic value still requires upgrading-by co-administration of additional treatments.

  13. Mucosal B Cells Are Associated with Delayed SIV Acquisition in Vaccinated Female but Not Male Rhesus Macaques Following SIVmac251 Rectal Challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuero, Iskra; Mohanram, Venkatramanan; Musich, Thomas; Miller, Leia; Vargas-Inchaustegui, Diego A; Demberg, Thorsten; Venzon, David; Kalisz, Irene; Kalyanaraman, V S; Pal, Ranajit; Ferrari, Maria Grazia; LaBranche, Celia; Montefiori, David C; Rao, Mangala; Vaccari, Monica; Franchini, Genoveffa; Barnett, Susan W; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2015-08-01

    Many viral infections, including HIV, exhibit sex-based pathogenic differences. However, few studies have examined vaccine-related sex differences. We compared immunogenicity and protective efficacy of monomeric SIV gp120 with oligomeric SIV gp140 in a pre-clinical rhesus macaque study and explored a subsequent sex bias in vaccine outcome. Each immunization group (16 females, 8 males) was primed twice mucosally with replication-competent Ad-recombinants encoding SIVsmH4env/rev, SIV239gag and SIV239nefΔ1-13 and boosted twice intramuscularly with SIVmac239 monomeric gp120 or oligomeric gp140 in MF59 adjuvant. Controls (7 females, 5 males) received empty Ad and MF59. Up to 9 weekly intrarectal challenges with low-dose SIVmac251 were administered until macaques became infected. We assessed vaccine-induced binding, neutralizing, and non-neutralizing antibodies, Env-specific memory B cells and plasmablasts/plasma cells (PB/PC) in bone marrow and rectal tissue, mucosal Env-specific antibodies, and Env-specific T-cells. Post-challenge, only one macaque (gp140-immunized) remained uninfected. However, SIV acquisition was significantly delayed in vaccinated females but not males, correlated with Env-specific IgA in rectal secretions, rectal Env-specific memory B cells, and PC in rectal tissue. These results extend previous correlations of mucosal antibodies and memory B cells with protective efficacy. The gp140 regimen was more immunogenic, stimulating elevated gp140 and cyclic V2 binding antibodies, ADCC and ADCP activities, bone marrow Env-specific PB/PC, and rectal gp140-specific IgG. However, immunization with gp120, the form of envelope immunogen used in RV144, the only vaccine trial to show some efficacy, provided more significant acquisition delay. Further over 40 weeks of follow-up, no gp120 immunized macaques met euthanasia criteria in contrast to 7 gp140-immunized and 2 control animals. Although males had higher binding antibodies than females, ADCC and ADCP

  14. Mucosal B Cells Are Associated with Delayed SIV Acquisition in Vaccinated Female but Not Male Rhesus Macaques Following SIVmac251 Rectal Challenge.

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    Iskra Tuero

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Many viral infections, including HIV, exhibit sex-based pathogenic differences. However, few studies have examined vaccine-related sex differences. We compared immunogenicity and protective efficacy of monomeric SIV gp120 with oligomeric SIV gp140 in a pre-clinical rhesus macaque study and explored a subsequent sex bias in vaccine outcome. Each immunization group (16 females, 8 males was primed twice mucosally with replication-competent Ad-recombinants encoding SIVsmH4env/rev, SIV239gag and SIV239nefΔ1-13 and boosted twice intramuscularly with SIVmac239 monomeric gp120 or oligomeric gp140 in MF59 adjuvant. Controls (7 females, 5 males received empty Ad and MF59. Up to 9 weekly intrarectal challenges with low-dose SIVmac251 were administered until macaques became infected. We assessed vaccine-induced binding, neutralizing, and non-neutralizing antibodies, Env-specific memory B cells and plasmablasts/plasma cells (PB/PC in bone marrow and rectal tissue, mucosal Env-specific antibodies, and Env-specific T-cells. Post-challenge, only one macaque (gp140-immunized remained uninfected. However, SIV acquisition was significantly delayed in vaccinated females but not males, correlated with Env-specific IgA in rectal secretions, rectal Env-specific memory B cells, and PC in rectal tissue. These results extend previous correlations of mucosal antibodies and memory B cells with protective efficacy. The gp140 regimen was more immunogenic, stimulating elevated gp140 and cyclic V2 binding antibodies, ADCC and ADCP activities, bone marrow Env-specific PB/PC, and rectal gp140-specific IgG. However, immunization with gp120, the form of envelope immunogen used in RV144, the only vaccine trial to show some efficacy, provided more significant acquisition delay. Further over 40 weeks of follow-up, no gp120 immunized macaques met euthanasia criteria in contrast to 7 gp140-immunized and 2 control animals. Although males had higher binding antibodies than females, ADCC

  15. Intragastric administration of Lactobacillus plantarum and AT-2-inactivated SIV does not protect Indian rhesus macaques from intra-rectal SIV challenge nor reduce virus replication after transmission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnathan, Diane G; Mackel, Joseph J; Sweat, Shelby L; Enemuo, Chiamaka A; Gebru, Etse H; Dhadvai, Pallavi; Gangadhara, Sailaja; Hicks, Sakeenah; Vanderford, Thomas H; Amara, Rama R; Esparza, José; Lu, Wei; Andrieu, Jean-Marie; Silvestri, Guido

    2018-02-28

    A major obstacle to development of an effective AIDS vaccine is that along with intended beneficial responses, immunization regimen may activate CD4+ T cells that can facilitate acquisition of HIV by serving as target cells for the virus. Lu et al. reported that intra-gastric administration of chemically inactivated SIV mac239 (iSIV) and Lactobacillus plantarum (LP) (iSIV+LP) protected 15/16 Chinese-origin rhesus macaques (RMs) from high-dose intra-rectal SIV mac239 challenge at three months post-immunization. They attributed the observed protection to induction of immune tolerance, mediated by "MHC-Ib/E-restricted CD8+ regulatory T cells that suppressed SIV-harboring CD4+ T cell activation and ex vivo SIV replication in 15/16 animals without inducing SIV-specific antibodies or cytotoxic T". Andrieu et al subsequently reported protection from infection in 23/24 RM immunized intragastrically or intravaginally with iSIV and BCG, LP or Lactobacillus rhamnosus , which they ascribed to the same tolerogenic mechanism. Using vaccine materials obtained from our co-authors, we conducted an immunization and challenge experiment in 54 Indian RMs, and included control groups receiving iSIV only or LP only, as well as unvaccinated animals. Intra-rectal challenge with SIV mac239 resulted in rapid infection in all groups of vaccinated RMs as well as unvaccinated controls. iSIV+LP vaccinated animals that became SIV infected showed viral loads similar to those observed in animals receiving iSIV only, LP only, and unvaccinated controls. The protection from SIV transmission conferred by intra-gastric iSIV+LP administration reported previously for Chinese origin RMs was not observed when the same experiment was conducted in a larger cohort of Indian-origin animals. IMPORTANCE: Despite increased understanding in immune responses against HIV, a safe and effective AIDS vaccine is not yet available. One obstacle is that immunization may activate CD4+ T cells that could act as target cells

  16. Human Non-neutralizing HIV-1 Envelope Monoclonal Antibodies Limit the Number of Founder Viruses during SHIV Mucosal Infection in Rhesus Macaques.

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    Santra, Sampa; Tomaras, Georgia D; Warrier, Ranjit; Nicely, Nathan I; Liao, Hua-Xin; Pollara, Justin; Liu, Pinghuang; Alam, S Munir; Zhang, Ruijun; Cocklin, Sarah L; Shen, Xiaoying; Duffy, Ryan; Xia, Shi-Mao; Schutte, Robert J; Pemble Iv, Charles W; Dennison, S Moses; Li, Hui; Chao, Andrew; Vidnovic, Kora; Evans, Abbey; Klein, Katja; Kumar, Amit; Robinson, James; Landucci, Gary; Forthal, Donald N; Montefiori, David C; Kaewkungwal, Jaranit; Nitayaphan, Sorachai; Pitisuttithum, Punnee; Rerks-Ngarm, Supachai; Robb, Merlin L; Michael, Nelson L; Kim, Jerome H; Soderberg, Kelly A; Giorgi, Elena E; Blair, Lily; Korber, Bette T; Moog, Christiane; Shattock, Robin J; Letvin, Norman L; Schmitz, Joern E; Moody, M A; Gao, Feng; Ferrari, Guido; Shaw, George M; Haynes, Barton F

    2015-08-01

    HIV-1 mucosal transmission begins with virus or virus-infected cells moving through mucus across mucosal epithelium to infect CD4+ T cells. Although broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs) are the type of HIV-1 antibodies that are most likely protective, they are not induced with current vaccine candidates. In contrast, antibodies that do not neutralize primary HIV-1 strains in the TZM-bl infection assay are readily induced by current vaccine candidates and have also been implicated as secondary correlates of decreased HIV-1 risk in the RV144 vaccine efficacy trial. Here, we have studied the capacity of anti-Env monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against either the immunodominant region of gp41 (7B2 IgG1), the first constant region of gp120 (A32 IgG1), or the third variable loop (V3) of gp120 (CH22 IgG1) to modulate in vivo rectal mucosal transmission of a high-dose simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-BaL) in rhesus macaques. 7B2 IgG1 or A32 IgG1, each containing mutations to enhance Fc function, was administered passively to rhesus macaques but afforded no protection against productive clinical infection while the positive control antibody CH22 IgG1 prevented infection in 4 of 6 animals. Enumeration of transmitted/founder (T/F) viruses revealed that passive infusion of each of the three antibodies significantly reduced the number of T/F genomes. Thus, some antibodies that bind HIV-1 Env but fail to neutralize virus in traditional neutralization assays may limit the number of T/F viruses involved in transmission without leading to enhancement of viral infection. For one of these mAbs, gp41 mAb 7B2, we provide the first co-crystal structure in complex with a common cyclical loop motif demonstrated to be critical for infection by other retroviruses.

  17. Chronic combined hyperandrogenemia and western-style diet in young female rhesus macaques causes greater metabolic impairments compared to either treatment alone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    True, C A; Takahashi, D L; Burns, S E; Mishler, E C; Bond, K R; Wilcox, M C; Calhoun, A R; Bader, L A; Dean, T A; Ryan, N D; Slayden, O D; Cameron, J L; Stouffer, R L

    2017-09-01

    Does developmental exposure to the combination of hyperandrogenemia and western-style diet (WSD) worsen adult metabolic function compared to either treatment alone? Young female rhesus macaques treated for 3 years, beginning at menarche, with combined testosterone (T) and WSD have increased weight gain and insulin resistance compared to controls and animals treated with either T or WSD alone. Hyperandrogenemia is a well-established component of polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) and can be observed in peripubertal girls, indicating a potential pubertal onset of the disease. Obesity is often associated with hyperandrogenemia in peripubertal girls, and overweight girls appear to be at higher risk for the development of PCOS later in life. Juvenile (2.5- year old) female rhesus macaques were divided into four groups (n = 10/group): control animals receiving cholesterol implants and a control diet with 15% of calories derived from fat (C), animals receiving T implants (mean serum levels: 1.35 ± 0.01 ng/ml) and a control diet (T), animals receiving a cholesterol implant and a WSD with 36% of calories derived from fat (WSD) and animals receiving a T implant and a WSD (T + WSD). Animals were maintained on the treatments for 36 months and were 5.5 years old at study completion. Metabolic testing consisted of body measurements including weight, dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry scans, activity monitoring, and glucose tolerance testing at zero months and at least once every 12 months for the remainder of the study. Indirect calorimetry and serum hormone assays were performed following 36 months of treatment. Body weight and fat mass gain were significantly increased in T + WSD at 24 and 36 months of treatment compared to the other three groups. Log transformed fasting insulin and Homeostatic Model Assessment of Insulin Resistance (HOMA-IR) were significantly increased in T + WSD animals at 3 years of treatment compared to all other groups. T-treatment caused a greater rate of

  18. rBCG induces strong antigen-specific T cell responses in rhesus macaques in a prime-boost setting with an adenovirus 35 tuberculosis vaccine vector.

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    Isabelle Magalhaes

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: BCG vaccination, combined with adenoviral-delivered boosts, represents a reasonable strategy to augment, broaden and prolong immune protection against tuberculosis (TB. We tested BCG (SSI1331 (in 6 animals, delivered intradermally and a recombinant (rBCG AFRO-1 expressing perfringolysin (in 6 animals followed by two boosts (delivered intramuscullary with non-replicating adenovirus 35 (rAd35 expressing a fusion protein composed of Ag85A, Ag85B and TB10.4, for the capacity to induce antigen-specific cellular immune responses in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta. Control animals received diluent (3 animals. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Cellular immune responses were analyzed longitudinally (12 blood draws for each animal using intracellular cytokine staining (TNF-alpha, IL-2 and IFN-gamma, T cell proliferation was measured in CD4(+, CD8alpha/beta(+, and CD8alpha/alpha(+ T cell subsets and IFN-gamma production was tested in 7 day PBMC cultures (whole blood cell assay, WBA using Ag85A, Ag85B, TB10.4 recombinant proteins, PPD or BCG as stimuli. Animals primed with AFRO-1 showed i increased Ag85B-specific IFN-gamma production in the WBA assay (median >400 pg/ml for 6 animals one week after the first boost with adenoviral-delivered TB-antigens as compared to animals primed with BCG (<200 pg/ml, ii stronger T cell proliferation in the CD8alpha/alpha(+ T cell subset (proliferative index 17% as compared to BCG-primed animals (proliferative index 5% in CD8alpha/alpha(+ T cells. Polyfunctional T cells, defined by IFN-gamma, TNF-alpha and IL-2 production were detected in 2/6 animals primed with AFRO-1 directed against Ag85A/b and TB10.4; 4/6 animals primed with BCG showed a Ag85A/b responses, yet only a single animal exhibited Ag85A/b and TB10.4 reactivity. CONCLUSION: AFRO-1 induces qualitatively and quantitatively different cellular immune responses as compared with BCG in rhesus macaques. Increased IFN-gamma-responses and antigen-specific T cell

  19. Infection of rhesus macaques with a pool of simian immunodeficiency virus with the envelope genes from acute HIV-1 infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Kendall C; Tian, Meijuan; Asmal, Mohammed; Ling, Binhua; Nelson, Kenneth; Henry, Kenneth; Gibson, Richard; Li, Yuejin; Han, Weining; Shattock, Robin J; Veazey, Ronald S; Letvin, Norman; Arts, Eric J; Gao, Yong

    2016-11-25

    New simian-human immunodeficiency chimeric viruses with an HIV-1 env (SHIVenv) are critical for studies on HIV pathogenesis, vaccine development, and microbicide testing. Macaques are typically exposed to single CCR5-using SHIVenv which in most instances does not reflect the conditions during acute/early HIV infection (AHI) in humans. Instead of individual and serial testing new SHIV constructs, a pool of SHIVenv_B derived from 16 acute HIV-1 infections were constructed using a novel yeast-based SHIV cloning approach and then used to infect macaques. Even though none of the 16 SHIVenvs contained the recently reported mutations in env genes that could significantly enhance their binding affinity to RhCD4, one SHIVenv (i.e. SHIVenv_B3-PRB926) established infection in macaques exposed to this pool. AHI SHIVenv_B viruses as well as their HIVenv_B counterparts were analyzed for viral protein content, function, and fitness to identify possible difference between SHIVenv_B3-PRB926 and the other 15 SHIVenvs in the pool. All of the constructs produced SHIV or HIV chimeric with wild type levels of capsid (p27 and p24) content, reverse transcriptase (RT) activity, and expressed envelope glycoproteins that could bind to cell receptors CD4/CCR5 and mediate virus entry. HIV-1env_B chimeric viruses were propagated in susceptible cell lines but the 16 SHIVenv_B variants showed only limited replication in macaque peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and 174×CEM.CCR5 cell line. AHI chimeric viruses including HIVenv_B3 showed only minor variations in cell entry efficiency and kinetics as well as replicative fitness in human PBMCs. Reduced number of N-link glycosylation sites and slightly greater CCR5 affinity/avidity was the only distinguishing feature of env_B3 versus other AHI env's in the pool, a feature also observed in the HIV establishing new infections in humans. Despite the inability to propagate in primary cells and cell lines, a pool of 16 SHIVenv viruses could

  20. Delayed Treatment of Ebola Virus Infection with Plant-Derived Monoclonal Antibodies Provides Protection in Rhesus Macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-10-15

    for review August 7, 2012) Filovirus infections can cause a severe and often fatal disease in humans and nonhuman primates, including great apes. Here...bacterial, fungal , and parasitic diseases that cause disease in humans and animals (7, 8). However, the use of antibody therapy for EBOV has been fraught...study presents data demonstrating that the plant -produced MB-003RAMP is efficacious in preventing lethal disease in EBOV-infected macaques when

  1. Dietary Gluten-Induced Gut Dysbiosis Is Accompanied by Selective Upregulation of microRNAs with Intestinal Tight Junction and Bacteria-Binding Motifs in Rhesus Macaque Model of Celiac Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Mohan

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available The composition of the gut microbiome reflects the overall health status of the host. In this study, stool samples representing the gut microbiomes from 6 gluten-sensitive (GS captive juvenile rhesus macaques were compared with those from 6 healthy, age- and diet-matched peers. A total of 48 samples representing both groups were studied using V4 16S rRNA gene DNA analysis. Samples from GS macaques were further characterized based on type of diet administered: conventional monkey chow, i.e., wheat gluten-containing diet (GD, gluten-free diet (GFD, barley gluten-derived diet (BOMI and reduced gluten barley-derived diet (RGB. It was hypothesized that the GD diet would lower the gut microbial diversity in GS macaques. This is the first report illustrating the reduction of gut microbial alpha-diversity (p < 0.05 following the consumption of dietary gluten in GS macaques. Selected bacterial families (e.g., Streptococcaceae and Lactobacillaceae were enriched in GS macaques while Coriobacteriaceae was enriched in healthy animals. Within several weeks after the replacement of the GD by the GFD diet, the composition (beta-diversity of gut microbiome in GS macaques started to change (p = 0.011 towards that of a normal macaque. Significance for alpha-diversity however, was not reached by the day 70 when the feeding experiment ended. Several inflammation-associated microRNAs (miR-203, -204, -23a, -23b and -29b were upregulated (p < 0.05 in jejunum of 4 biopsied GS macaques fed GD with predicted binding sites on 16S ribosomal RNA of Lactobacillus reuteri (accession number: NR_025911, Prevotella stercorea (NR_041364 and Streptococcus luteciae (AJ297218 that were overrepresented in feces. Additionally, claudin-1, a validated tight junction protein target of miR-29b was significantly downregulated in jejunal epithelium of GS macaques. Taken together, we predict that with the introduction of effective treatments in future studies the diversity of gut microbiomes

  2. Transcriptomic profiling of the ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens in rhesus macaques following long-term cocaine self-administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vallender, Eric J; Goswami, Dharmendra B; Shinday, Nina M; Westmoreland, Susan V; Yao, Wei-Dong; Rowlett, James K

    2017-06-01

    The behavioral consequences associated with addiction are thought to arise from drug-induced neuroadaptation. The mesolimbic system plays an important initial role in this process, and while the dopaminergic system specifically has been strongly interrogated, a complete understanding of the broad transcriptomic effects associated with cocaine use remains elusive. Using next generation sequencing approaches, we performed a comprehensive evaluation of gene expression differences in the ventral tegmental area and nucleus accumbens of rhesus macaques that had self-administered cocaine for roughly 100days and saline-yoked controls. During self-administration, the monkeys increased daily consumption of cocaine until almost the maximum number of injections were taken within the first 15min of the one hour session for a total intake of 3mg/kg/day. We confirm the centrality of dopaminergic differences in the ventral tegmental area, but in the nucleus accumbens we see the strongest evidence for an inflammatory response and large scale chromatin remodeling. These findings suggest an expanded understanding of the pathology of cocaine addiction with the potential to lead to the development of alternative treatment strategies. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. CTLA-4+PD-1-Memory CD4+T Cells Critically Contribute to Viral Persistence in Antiretroviral Therapy-Suppressed, SIV-Infected Rhesus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McGary, Colleen S; Deleage, Claire; Harper, Justin; Micci, Luca; Ribeiro, Susan P; Paganini, Sara; Kuri-Cervantes, Leticia; Benne, Clarisse; Ryan, Emily S; Balderas, Robert; Jean, Sherrie; Easley, Kirk; Marconi, Vincent; Silvestri, Guido; Estes, Jacob D; Sekaly, Rafick-Pierre; Paiardini, Mirko

    2017-10-17

    Antiretroviral therapy (ART) suppresses viral replication in HIV-infected individuals but does not eliminate the reservoir of latently infected cells. Recent work identified PD-1 + follicular helper T (Tfh) cells as an important cellular compartment for viral persistence. Here, using ART-treated, SIV-infected rhesus macaques, we show that CTLA-4 + PD-1 - memory CD4 + T cells, which share phenotypic markers with regulatory T cells, were enriched in SIV DNA in blood, lymph nodes (LN), spleen, and gut, and contained replication-competent and infectious virus. In contrast to PD-1 + Tfh cells, SIV-enriched CTLA-4 + PD-1 - CD4 + T cells were found outside the B cell follicle of the LN, predicted the size of the persistent viral reservoir during ART, and significantly increased their contribution to the SIV reservoir with prolonged ART-mediated viral suppression. We have shown that CTLA-4 + PD-1 - memory CD4 + T cells are a previously unrecognized component of the SIV and HIV reservoir that should be therapeutically targeted for a functional HIV-1 cure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Multiple Low-Dose Challenges in a Rhesus Macaque AIDS Vaccine Trial Result in an Evolving Host Response That Affects Protective Outcome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selinger, Christian; Strbo, Natasa; Gonzalez, Louis; Aicher, Lauri; Weiss, Jeffrey M.; Law, G. Lynn; Palermo, Robert E.; Vaccari, Monica; Franchini, Genoveffa; Podack, Eckhard R.

    2014-01-01

    Using whole-blood transcriptional profiling, we investigated differences in the host response to vaccination and challenge in a rhesus macaque AIDS vaccine trial. Samples were collected from animals prior to and after vaccination with live, irradiated vaccine cells secreting the modified endoplasmic reticulum chaperone gp96-Ig loaded with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) peptides, either alone or in combination with a SIV-gp120 protein boost. Additional samples were collected following multiple low-dose rectal challenges with SIVmac251. Animals in the boosted group had a 73% reduced risk of infection. Surprisingly, few changes in gene expression were observed during the vaccination phase. Focusing on postchallenge comparisons, in particular for protected animals, we identified a host response signature of protection comprised of strong interferon signaling after the first challenge, which then largely abated after further challenges. We also identified a host response signature, comprised of early macrophage-mediated inflammatory responses, in animals with undetectable viral loads 5 days after the first challenge but with unusually high viral titers after subsequent challenges. Statistical analysis showed that prime-boost vaccination significantly lowered the probability of infection in a time-consistent manner throughout several challenges. Given that humoral responses in the prime-boost group were highly significant prechallenge correlates of protection, the strong innate signaling after the first challenge suggests that interferon signaling may enhance vaccine-induced antibody responses and is an important contributor to protection from infection during repeated low-dose exposure to SIV. PMID:25274805

  5. Low dose rectal inoculation of rhesus macaques by SIV SME660 or SIV MAC251 recapitulates human mucosal infection by HIV-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koraber, Bette [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Perelson, Alan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hraber, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Giorgi, E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bhattacharya, T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Recently, we developed a novel approach to the identification of transmitted or early founder HIV -1 genomes in acutely infected humans based on single genome amplification and sequencing. Here we tested this approach in 18 acutely infected Indian rhesus macaques to determine the molecular features of SIV transmission. Animals were inoculated intrarectally (IR) or intravenously (IV) with stocks of SIVmac251 or SIVsmE660 that exhibited sequence diversity typical of early-chronic HIV -1 infection. 987 full-length SIV env sequences (median of 48 per animal) were determined from plasma virion RNA one to five weeks after infection. IR inoculation was followed by productive infection by one or few viruses (median 1; range 1-5) that diversified randomly with near star-like phylogeny and a Poisson distribution of mutations. Consensus viral sequences from ramp-up and peak viremia were identical to viruses found in the inocula or differed from them by only one or few nuc1eotides, providing direct evidence that early plasma viral sequences coalesce to transmitted/founder virus( es). IV infection was approximately 10,000-fold more efficient than IR infection, and viruses transmitted by either route represented the full genetic spectra of the inocula. These findings identify key similarities in mucosal transmission and early diversification between SIV and HIV -1.

  6. Inactivated simian immunodeficiency virus vaccine failed to protect rhesus macaques from intravenous or genital mucosal infection but delayed disease in intravenously exposed animals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sutjipto, S.; Pedersen, N.C.; Miller, C.J.; Gardner, M.B.; Hanson, C.V.; Gettie, A.; Jennings, M.; Higgins, J.; Marx, P.A.

    1990-01-01

    Eight rhesus macaques were immunized four times over a period of 8 months with a psoralen-UV-light-inactivated whole simian immunodeficiency virus vaccine adjuvanted with threonyl muramyl dipeptide. Eight unvaccinated control animals received adjuvant alone. Only the vaccinated animals made antibodies before challenge exposure to the viral core and envelope as determined by Western blotting (immunoblotting) and virus-neutralizing antibodies. Ten days after the final immunization, one-half of the vaccinated and nonvaccinated monkeys were challenged exposed intravenously (i.v.) and one-half were challenge exposed via the genital mucosa with virulent simian immunodeficiency virus. All of the nonvaccinated control monkeys became persistently infected. In spite of preexisting neutralizing antibodies and an anamnestic antibody response, all of the immunized monkeys also became persistently infected. However, there was evidence that the clinical course in immunized i.v. infected animals was delayed. All four mock-vaccinated i.v. challenge-exposed animals died with disease from 3 to 9 months postchallenge. In contrast, only one of four vaccinated i.v. challenge-exposed monkeys had died by 11 months postchallenge

  7. Depletion of CD8+ cells does not affect the lifespan of productively infected cells during pathogenic sivmac239 infection of rhesus macaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shudo, Emi [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ribeiro, Ruy M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Perelson, Alan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    While CD8+ T cell responses are clearly important in anti-viral immunity during HIV/SIV infection, the mechanisms by which CD8+ T cells induce this effect remain poorly understood, as emphasized by the failure of the Merck adenovirus-based, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-inducing AIDS vaccine in a large phase IIb clinical trial. In this study, we measured the in vivo effect of CD8+ lymphocytes on the lifespan of productively infected cells during chronic SIVmac239 infection of rhesus macaques by treating two groups of animals (i.e., CD8+ lymphocyte-depleted or controls) with antiretroviral therapy (PMPA and FTC). The lifespan of productively infected cells was calculated based on the slope of the decline of SIV plasma viremia using a well-accepted mathematical model. We found that, in both early (i.e., day 57 post-inoculation) and late (i.e., day 177 post-inoculation) chronic SIV infection, depletion of CD8+ lymphocytes did not result in an increased lifespan of productively infected cells in vivo. This result indicates that direct killing of cells producing virus is unlikely to be a major mechanism underlying the anti-viral effect of CD8+ T cells during SIV infection. These results have profound implications for the development of AIDS vaccines.

  8. Strong interferon-gamma mediated cellular immunity to scrub typhus demonstrated using a novel whole cell antigen ELISpot assay in rhesus macaques and humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manutsanun Sumonwiriya

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Scrub typhus is a febrile infection caused by the obligate intracellular bacterium Orientia tsutsugamushi, which causes significant morbidity and mortality across the Asia-Pacific region. The control of this vector-borne disease is challenging due to humans being dead-end hosts, vertical maintenance of the pathogen in the vector itself, and a potentially large rodent reservoir of unclear significance, coupled with a lack of accurate diagnostic tests. Development of an effective vaccine is highly desirable. This however requires better characterization of the natural immune response of this neglected but important disease. Here we implement a novel IFN-γ ELISpot assay as a tool for studying O. tsutsugamushi induced cellular immune responses in an experimental scrub typhus rhesus macaque model and human populations. Whole cell antigen for O. tsutsugamushi (OT-WCA was prepared by heat inactivation of Karp-strain bacteria. Rhesus macaques were infected intradermally with O. tsutsugamushi. Freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from infected (n = 10 and uninfected animals (n = 5 were stimulated with OT-WCA, and IFN-γ secreting cells quantitated by ELISpot assay at five time points over 28 days. PBMC were then assayed from people in a scrub typhus-endemic region of Thailand (n = 105 and responses compared to those from a partially exposed population in a non-endemic region (n = 14, and to a naïve population in UK (n = 12. Mean results at Day 0 prior to O. tsutsugamushi infection were 12 (95% CI 0-25 and 15 (2-27 spot-forming cells (SFC/106 PBMC for infected and control macaques respectively. Strong O. tsutsugamushi-specific IFN-γ responses were seen post infection, with ELISpot responses 20-fold higher than baseline at Day 7 (mean 235, 95% CI 200-270 SFC/106 PBMC, 105-fold higher at Day 14 (mean 1261, 95% CI 1,097-1,425 SFC/106 PBMC, 125-fold higher at Day 21 (mean 1,498, 95% CI 1,496-1,500 SFC/106 PBMC and 118-fold higher at

  9. A novel trivalent HPV 16/18/58 vaccine with anti-HPV 16 and 18 neutralizing antibody responses comparable to those induced by the Gardasil quadrivalent vaccine in rhesus macaque model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Yin

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Persistent infection with human papillomavirus (HPV is a key factor in the development of precancerous lesions and invasive cervical cancer. Prophylactic vaccines to immunize against HPV are an effective approach to reducing HPV related disease burden. In this study, we investigated the immunogenicity and dosage effect of a trivalent HPV 16/18/58 vaccine (3vHPV produced in Escherichia coli (E.coli, with Gardasil quadrivalent vaccine (4vHPV, Merck & Co. as a positive control. Sera collected from rhesus macaques vaccinated with three dosage formulations of 3vHPV (termed low-, mid-, and high-dosage formulations, respectively, and the 4vHPV vaccine were analyzed by both Pseudovirus-Based Neutralization Assay (PBNA and Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay (ELISA. Strong immune responses against HPV 16/18/58 were successfully elicited, and dosage-dependence was observed, with likely occurrence of immune interference between different L1-VLP antigens. HPV 16/18 specific neutralizing antibody (nAb and total immunoglobulin G (IgG antibody responses in rhesus macaques receiving 3vHPV at the three dosages tested were generally non-inferior to those observed in rhesus macaques receiving 4vHPV throughout the study period. Particularly, HPV 18 nAb titers induced by the mid-dosage formulation that contained the same amounts of HPV 16/18 L1-VLPs as Gardasil 4vHPV were between 7.3 to 12.7-fold higher compared to the positive control arm from weeks 24–64. The durability of antibody responses specific to HPV 16/18 elicited by 3vHPV vaccines was also shown to be non-inferior to that associated with Gardasil 4vHPV. Keywords: Human papillomavirus, HPV 16/18/58, GMTs, Trivalent, Immunogenicity

  10. Evolution of nef variants in gut associated lymphoid tissue of rhesus macaques during primary simian immunodeficiency virus infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ndolo, Thomas; Syvanen, Michael; Ellison, Thomas; Dandekar, Satya

    2005-01-01

    We utilized the simian immunodeficiency virus model of AIDS to examine evolution of nef gene in gut-associated lymphoid tissue (GALT) during primary and early asymptomatic stages of infection. Macaques were infected with a cloned virus, SIVmac239/nef-stop harboring a premature stop codon in the nef gene. Restoration of the nef open reading frame occurred in GALT early at 3 days post-infection. Analysis of nef sequences by phylogenetic tools showed that evolution of nef was neutral thereafter, as evidenced by the ratio of synonymous to nonsynonymous substitutions, a star pattern in unrooted trees and distribution of amino acid replacements fitting a simple Poisson process. Two regions encoding for a nuclear localization signal and a CTL epitope were conserved. Thus, GALT was a site for strong positive selection of functional nef during initial stages of infection. However, evolution of the nef gene thereafter was neutral during early asymptomatic stage of infection

  11. Development of space perception in relation to the maturation of the motor system in infant rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sclafani, Valentina; Simpson, Elizabeth A; Suomi, Stephen J; Ferrari, Pier Francesco

    2015-04-01

    To act on the environment, organisms must perceive object locations in relation to their body. Several neuroscientific studies provide evidence of neural circuits that selectively represent space within reach (i.e., peripersonal) and space outside of reach (i.e., extrapersonal). However, the developmental emergence of these space representations remains largely unexplored. We investigated the development of space coding in infant macaques and found that they exhibit different motor strategies and hand configurations depending on the objects' size and location. Reaching-grasping improved from 2 to 4 weeks of age, suggesting a broadly defined perceptual body schema at birth, modified by the acquisition and refinement of motor skills through early sensorimotor experience, enabling the development of a mature capacity for coding space. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Get it while it's hot: a peak-first bias in self-generated choice order in rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanghoon Jung

    Full Text Available Animals typically must make a number of successive choices to achieve a goal: e.g., eating multiple food items before becoming satiated. However, it is unclear whether choosing the best first or saving the best for last represents the best choice strategy to maximize overall reward. Specifically, since outcomes can be evaluated prospectively (with future rewards discounted and more immediate rewards preferred or retrospectively (with prior rewards discounted and more recent rewards preferred, the conditions under which each are used remains unclear. On the one hand, humans and non-human animals clearly discount future reward, preferring immediate rewards to delayed ones, suggesting prospective evaluation; on the other hand, it has also been shown that a sequence that ends well, i.e., with the best event or item last, is often preferred, suggesting retrospective evaluation. Here we hypothesized that when individuals are allowed to build the sequence themselves they are more likely to evaluate each item individually and therefore build a sequence using prospective evaluation. We examined the relationship between self-generated choice order and preference in rhesus monkeys in two experiments in which the distinctiveness of options were relatively high and low, respectively. We observed a positive linear relationship between choice order and preference among highly distinct options, indicating that the rhesus monkeys chose their preferred food first: i.e., a peak-first order preference. Overall, choice order depended on the degree of relative preference among alternatives and a peak-first bias, providing evidence for prospective evaluation when choice order is self-generated.

  13. Safety and immunogenicity of multi-antigen AMA1-based vaccines formulated with CoVaccine HT™ and Montanide ISA 51 in rhesus macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Walraven Vanessa

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing the breadth of the functional antibody response through immunization with Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (PfAMA1 multi-allele vaccine formulations has been demonstrated in several rodent and rabbit studies. This study assesses the safety and immunogenicity of three PfAMA1 Diversity-Covering (DiCo vaccine candidates formulated as an equimolar mixture (DiCo mix in CoVaccine HT™ or Montanide ISA 51, as well as that of a PfAMA1-MSP119 fusion protein formulated in Montanide ISA 51. Methods Vaccine safety in rhesus macaques was monitored by animal behaviour observation and assessment of organ and systemic functions through clinical chemistry and haematology measurements. The immunogenicity of vaccine formulations was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and in vitro parasite growth inhibition assays with three culture-adapted P. falciparum strains. Results These data show that both adjuvants were well tolerated with only transient changes in a few of the chemical and haematological parameters measured. DiCo mix formulated in CoVaccine HT™ proved immunologically and functionally superior to the same candidate formulated in Montanide ISA 51. Immunological data from the fusion protein candidate was however difficult to interpret as four out of six immunized animals were non-responsive for unknown reasons. Conclusions The study highlights the safety and immunological benefits of DiCo mix as a potential human vaccine against blood stage malaria, especially when formulated in CoVaccine HT™, and adds to the accumulating data on the specificity broadening effects of DiCo mix.

  14. Heterogenic transplantation of bone marrow-derived rhesus macaque mesenchymal stem cells ameliorates liver fibrosis induced by carbon tetrachloride in mouse

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xufeng Fu

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Liver fibrosis is a disease that causes high morbidity and has become a major health problem. Liver fibrosis can lead to the end stage of liver diseases (livercirrhosisand hepatocellularcarcinoma. Currently, liver transplantation is the only effective treatment for end-stage liver disease. However, the shortage of organ donors, high cost of medical surgery, immunological rejection and transplantation complications severely hamper liver transplantation therapy. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs have been regarded as promising cells for clinical applications in stem cell therapy in the treatment of liver diseases due to their unique multipotent differentiation capacity, immunoregulation and paracrine effects. Although liver fibrosis improvements by MSC transplantation in preclinical experiments as well as clinical trials have been reported, the in vivo fate of MSCs after transportation and their therapeutic mechanisms remain unclear. In this present study, we isolated MSCs from the bone marrow of rhesus macaques. The cells exhibited typical MSC markers and could differentiate into chondrocytes, osteocytes, and adipocytes, which were not affected by labeling with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP. The harvested MSCs respond to interferon-γ stimulation and have the ability to inhibit lymphocyte proliferation in vitro. EGFP-labeled MSCs (1 × 106 cells were transplanted into mice with carbon tetrachloride-induced liver fibrosis via tail vein injection. The ability of the heterogenic MSC infusion to ameliorate liver fibrosis in mice was evaluated by a blood plasma chemistry index, pathological examination and liver fibrosis-associated gene expression. Additionally, a small number of MSCs that homed and engrafted in the mouse liver tissues were evaluated by immunofluorescence analysis. Our results showed that the transplantation of heterogenic MSCs derived from monkey bone marrow can be used to treat liver fibrosis in the mouse model and that the

  15. Compartmentalization of SIV Replication Within Secondary Lymphoid Tissues of Rhesus Macaques is Linked to Disease Stage and Inversely Related to Localization of Virus-Specific CTL1 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connick, Elizabeth; Folkvord, Joy M.; Lind, Katherine T.; Rakasz, Eva G.; Miles, Brodie; Wilson, Nancy A.; Santiago, Mario L.; Schmitt, Kimberly; Stephens, Edward B.; Kim, Hyeon O.; Wagstaff, Reece; Li, Shengbin; Abdelaal, Hadia M.; Kemp, Nathan; Watkins, David I.; MaWhinney, Samantha; Skinner, Pamela J.

    2014-01-01

    We previously demonstrated that HIV replication is concentrated in lymph node B cell follicles during chronic infection and that HIV-specific CTL fail to accumulate in large numbers at those sites. It is unknown whether these observations can be generalized to other secondary lymphoid tissues, or whether virus compartmentalization occurs in the absence of CTL. We evaluated these questions in SIVmac239-infected rhesus macaques by quantifying SIV RNA+ cells and SIV-specific CTL in situ in spleen, lymph nodes and intestinal tissues obtained at several stages of infection. During chronic asymptomatic infection prior to simian AIDS (SAIDS), SIV-producing cells were more concentrated in follicular compared to extrafollicular regions of secondary lymphoid tissues. At day 14 of infection, when CTL have minimal impact on virus replication, there was no compartmentalization of SIV-producing cells. Virus compartmentalization was diminished in animals with SAIDS, which often have low frequency CTL responses. SIV-specific CTL were consistently more concentrated within extrafollicular regions of lymph node and spleen in chronically infected animals regardless of epitope specificity. Frequencies of SIV-specific CTL within follicular and extrafollicular compartments predicted SIV RNA+ cells within these compartments in a mixed model. Few SIV-specific CTL expressed the follicular homing molecule CXCR5 in the absence of the extrafollicular retention molecule CCR7, possibly accounting for the paucity of follicular CTL. These findings bolster the hypothesis that B cell follicles are immune privileged sites and suggest that strategies to augment CTL in B cell follicles could lead to improved viral control and possibly a functional cure for HIV infection. PMID:25362178

  16. Variability of Bio-Clinical Parameters in Chinese-Origin Rhesus Macaques Infected with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus: A Nonhuman Primate AIDS Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Song; Lai, Chunhui; Wu, Xiaoxiang; Lu, Yaozheng; Han, Daishu; Guo, Weizhong; Fu, Linchun; Andrieu, Jean-Marie; Lu, Wei

    2011-01-01

    Background Although Chinese-origin Rhesus macaques (Ch RhMs) infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) have been used for many years to evaluate the efficacy of AIDS vaccines and therapeutics, the bio-clinical variability of such a nonhuman primate AIDS model was so far not established. Methodology/Principal Findings By randomizing 150 (78 male and 72 female) Ch RhMs with diverse MHC class I alleles into 3 groups (50 animals per group) challenged with intrarectal (ir) SIVmac239, intravenous (iv) SIVmac239, or iv SIVmac251, we evaluated variability in bio-clinical endpoints for 118 weeks. All SIV-challenged Ch RhMs became seropositive for SIV during 1–2 weeks. Plasma viral load (VL) peaked at weeks 1–2 and then declined to set-point levels as from week 5. The set-point VL was 30 fold higher in SIVmac239 (ir or iv)-infected than in SIVmac251 (iv)-infected animals. This difference in plasma VL increased overtime (>100 fold as from week 68). The rates of progression to AIDS or death were more rapid in SIVmac239 (ir or iv)-infected than in SIVmac251 (iv)-infected animals. No significant difference in bio-clinical endpoints was observed in animals challenged with ir or iv SIVmac239. The variability (standard deviation) in peak/set-point VL was nearly one-half lower in animals infected with SIVmac239 (ir or iv) than in those infected with SIVmac251 (iv), allowing that the same treatment-related difference can be detected with one-half fewer animals using SIVmac239 than using SIVmac251. Conclusion/Significance These results provide solid estimates of variability in bio-clinical endpoints needed when designing studies using the Ch RhM SIV model and contribute to the improving quality and standardization of preclinical studies. PMID:21850259

  17. Vaccine-induced immune responses against both Gag and Env improve control of simian immunodeficiency virus replication in rectally challenged rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mauricio A Martins

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available The ability to control lentivirus replication may be determined, in part, by the extent to which individual viral proteins are targeted by the immune system. Consequently, defining the antigens that elicit the most protective immune responses may facilitate the design of effective HIV-1 vaccines. Here we vaccinated four groups of rhesus macaques with a heterologous vector prime/boost/boost/boost (PBBB regimen expressing the following simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV genes: env, gag, vif, rev, tat, and nef (Group 1; env, vif, rev, tat, and nef (Group 2; gag, vif, rev, tat, and nef (Group 3; or vif, rev, tat, and nef (Group 4. Following repeated intrarectal challenges with a marginal dose of the neutralization-resistant SIVmac239 clone, vaccinees in Groups 1-3 became infected at similar rates compared to control animals. Unexpectedly, vaccinees in Group 4 became infected at a slower pace than the other animals, although this difference was not statistically significant. Group 1 exhibited the best post-acquisition virologic control of SIV infection, with significant reductions in both peak and chronic phase viremia. Indeed, 5/8 Group 1 vaccinees had viral loads of less than 2,000 vRNA copies/mL of plasma in the chronic phase. Vaccine regimens that did not contain gag (Group 2, env (Group 3, or both of these inserts (Group 4 were largely ineffective at decreasing viremia. Thus, vaccine-induced immune responses against both Gag and Env appeared to maximize control of immunodeficiency virus replication. Collectively, these findings are relevant for HIV-1 vaccine design as they provide additional insights into which of the lentiviral proteins might serve as the best vaccine immunogens.

  18. R5-SHIV induces multiple defects in T cell function during early infection of rhesus macaques including accumulation of T reg cells in lymph nodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Santosuosso

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 is a pathogen that T cell responses fail to control. HIV-1gp120 is the surface viral envelope glycoprotein that interacts with CD4 T cells and mediates entry. HIV-1gp120 has been implicated in immune dysregulatory functions that may limit anti-HIV antigen-specific T cell responses. We hypothesized that in the context of early SHIV infection, immune dysregulation of antigen-specific T-effector cell and regulatory functions would be detectable and that these would be associated or correlated with measurable concentrations of HIV-1gp120 in lymphoid tissues.Rhesus macaques were intravaginally inoculated with a Clade C CCR5-tropic simian-human immunodeficiency virus, SHIV-1157ipd3N4. HIV-1gp120 levels, antigen-specificity, levels of apoptosis/anergy and frequency and function of Tregs were examined in lymph node and blood derived T cells at 5 and 12 weeks post inoculation.We observed reduced responses to Gag in CD4 and gp120 in CD8 lymph node-derived T cells compared to the peripheral blood at 5 weeks post-inoculation. Reduced antigen-specific responses were associated with higher levels of PD-1 on lymph node-derived CD4 T cells as compared to peripheral blood and uninfected lymph node-derived CD4 T cells. Lymph nodes contained increased numbers of Tregs as compared to peripheral blood, which positively correlated with gp120 levels; T regulatory cell depletion restored CD8 T cell responses to Gag but not to gp120. HIV gp120 was also able to induce T regulatory cell chemotaxis in a dose-dependent, CCR5-mediated manner. These studies contribute to our broader understanding of the ways in which HIV-1 dysregulates T cell function and localization during early infection.

  19. Functional cure of SIVagm infection in rhesus macaques results in complete recovery of CD4+ T cells and is reverted by CD8+ cell depletion.

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    Ivona Pandrea

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanism of infection control in elite controllers (EC may shed light on the correlates of control of disease progression in HIV infection. However, limitations have prevented a clear understanding of the mechanisms of elite controlled infection, as these studies can only be performed at randomly selected late time points in infection, after control is achieved, and the access to tissues is limited. We report that SIVagm infection is elite-controlled in rhesus macaques (RMs and therefore can be used as an animal model for EC HIV infection. A robust acute infection, with high levels of viral replication and dramatic mucosal CD4(+ T cell depletion, similar to pathogenic HIV-1/SIV infections of humans and RMs, was followed by complete and durable control of SIVagm replication, defined as: undetectable VLs in blood and tissues beginning 72 to 90 days postinoculation (pi and continuing at least 4 years; seroreversion; progressive recovery of mucosal CD4(+ T cells, with complete recovery by 4 years pi; normal levels of T cell immune activation, proliferation, and apoptosis; and no disease progression. This "functional cure" of SIVagm infection in RMs could be reverted after 4 years of control of infection by depleting CD8 cells, which resulted in transient rebounds of VLs, thus suggesting that control may be at least in part immune mediated. Viral control was independent of MHC, partial APOBEC restriction was not involved in SIVagm control in RMs and Trim5 genotypes did not impact viral replication. This new animal model of EC lentiviral infection, in which complete control can be predicted in all cases, permits research on the early events of infection in blood and tissues, before the defining characteristics of EC are evident and when host factors are actively driving the infection towards the EC status.

  20. Progression to AIDS in SIV-Infected Rhesus Macaques is Associated with Distinct KIR and MHC class I Polymorphisms and NK Cell Dysfunction

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    Albrecht, Christina; Malzahn, Dörthe; Brameier, Markus; Hermes, Meike; Ansari, Aftab A.; Walter, Lutz

    2014-01-01

    Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) regulate the activity of natural killer (NK) cells and have been shown to be associated with susceptibility to a number of human infectious diseases. Here, we analyzed NK cell function and genetic associations in a cohort of 52 rhesus macaques experimentally infected with SIVmac and subsequently stratified into high viral load (HVL) and low viral load (LVL) plasma viral loads at set point. This stratification coincided with fast (HVL) and slow (LVL) disease progression indicated by the disease course and critical clinical parameters including CD4+ T cell counts. HVL animals revealed sustained proliferation of NK cells but distinct loss of peripheral blood NK cell numbers and lytic function. Genetic analyses revealed that KIR genes 3DL05, 3DS05, and 3DL10 as well as 3DSW08, 3DLW03, and 3DSW09 are correlated, most likely due to underlying haplotypes. SIV-infection outcome associated with presence of transcripts for two inhibitory KIR genes (KIR3DL02, KIR3DL10) and three activating KIR genes (KIR3DSW08, KIR3DS02, KIR3DS05). Presence of KIR3DL02 and KIR3DSW08 was associated with LVL outcome, whereas presence of KIR3DS02 was associated with HVL outcome. Furthermore, we identified epistasis between KIR and MHC class I alleles as the transcript presence of the correlated genes KIR3DL05, KIR3DS05, and KIR3DL10 increased HVL risk when Mamu-B*012 transcripts were also present or when Mamu-A1*001 transcripts were absent. These genetic associations were mirrored by changes in the numbers, the level of proliferation, and lytic capabilities of NK cells as well as overall survival time and gastro-intestinal tissue viral load. PMID:25506344

  1. Pre-existing neutralizing antibody mitigates B cell dysregulation and enhances the Env-specific antibody response in SHIV-infected rhesus macaques.

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    Juan Pablo Jaworski

    Full Text Available Our central hypothesis is that protection against HIV infection will be powerfully influenced by the magnitude and quality of the B cell response. Although sterilizing immunity, mediated by pre-formed abundant and potent antibodies is the ultimate goal for B cell-targeted HIV vaccine strategies, scenarios that fall short of this may still confer beneficial defenses against viremia and disease progression. We evaluated the impact of sub-sterilizing pre-existing neutralizing antibody on the B cell response to SHIV infection. Adult male rhesus macaques received passive transfer of a sub-sterilizing amount of polyclonal neutralizing immunoglobulin (Ig purified from previously infected animals (SHIVIG or control Ig prior to intra-rectal challenge with SHIVSF162P4 and extensive longitudinal sampling was performed. SHIVIG treated animals exhibited significantly reduced viral load and increased de novo Env-specific plasma antibody. Dysregulation of the B cell profile was grossly apparent soon after infection in untreated animals; exemplified by a ≈50% decrease in total B cells in the blood evident 2-3 weeks post-infection which was not apparent in SHIVIG treated animals. IgD+CD5+CD21+ B cells phenotypically similar to marginal zone-like B cells were highly sensitive to SHIV infection, becoming significantly decreased as early as 3 days post-infection in control animals, while being maintained in SHIVIG treated animals, and were highly correlated with the induction of Env-specific plasma antibody. These results suggest that B cell dysregulation during the early stages of infection likely contributes to suboptimal Env-specific B cell and antibody responses, and strategies that limit this dysregulation may enhance the host's ability to eliminate HIV.

  2. Effect of plasma viremia on apoptosis and immunophenotype of dendritic cells subsets in acute SIVmac239 infection of Chinese rhesus macaques.

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    Hou-Jun Xia

    Full Text Available Non-human primates such as Chinese rhesus macaques (Ch Rhs provide good animal models for research on human infectious diseases. Similar to humans, there are two principal subsets of dendritic cells (DCs in the peripheral blood of Ch Rhs: myeloid DCs (mDCs and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs. In this study, two-color fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS analyses were used to identify the main DC subsets, namely CD1c(+ mDCs and pDCs from Ch Rhs. Then, the apoptosis and immunophenotype changes of DCs subsets were first described during the acute phase of SIVmac239 infection. Both the DCs subsets showed decreased CD4 expression and enhanced CCR5 expression; in particular, those of pDCs significantly changed at most time points. Interestingly, the plasma viral loads were negatively correlated with CD4 expression, but were positively correlated with CCR5 expression of pDCs. During this period, both CD1c(+ mDCs and pDCs were activated by enhancing expressions of co-stimulatory molecules, accompanied with increase in CCR7. Either CD80 or CD86 expressed on CD1c(+ mDCs and pDCs was positively correlated with the plasma viral loads. Our analysis demonstrates that the pDCs were more prone to apoptosis after infection during the acute phase of SIVmac239 infection, which may be due to their high expressions of CD4 and CCR5. Both DCs subsets activated through elevating the expression of co-stimulatory molecules, which was beneficial in controlling the replication of SIV. However, a mere broad immune activation initiated by activated DCs may lead to tragic AIDS progression.

  3. Aerosol vaccination with AERAS-402 elicits robust cellular immune responses in the lungs of rhesus macaques but fails to protect against high-dose Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge.

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    Darrah, Patricia A; Bolton, Diane L; Lackner, Andrew A; Kaushal, Deepak; Aye, Pyone Pyone; Mehra, Smriti; Blanchard, James L; Didier, Peter J; Roy, Chad J; Rao, Srinivas S; Hokey, David A; Scanga, Charles A; Sizemore, Donata R; Sadoff, Jerald C; Roederer, Mario; Seder, Robert A

    2014-08-15

    Development of a vaccine against pulmonary tuberculosis may require immunization strategies that induce a high frequency of Ag-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells in the lung. The nonhuman primate model is essential for testing such approaches because it has predictive value for how vaccines elicit responses in humans. In this study, we used an aerosol vaccination strategy to administer AERAS-402, a replication-defective recombinant adenovirus (rAd) type 35 expressing Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ags Ag85A, Ag85B, and TB10.4, in bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-primed or unprimed rhesus macaques. Immunization with BCG generated low purified protein derivative-specific CD4 T cell responses in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage. In contrast, aerosolized AERAS-402 alone or following BCG induced potent and stable Ag85A/b-specific CD4 and CD8 effector T cells in bronchoalveolar lavage that largely produced IFN-γ, as well as TNF and IL-2. Such responses induced by BCG, AERAS-402, or both failed to confer overall protection following challenge with 275 CFUs M. tuberculosis Erdman, although vaccine-induced responses associated with reduced pathology were observed in some animals. Anamnestic T cell responses to Ag85A/b were not detected in blood of immunized animals after challenge. Overall, our data suggest that a high M. tuberculosis challenge dose may be a critical factor in limiting vaccine efficacy in this model. However, the ability of aerosol rAd immunization to generate potent cellular immunity in the lung suggests that using different or more immunogens, alternative rAd serotypes with enhanced immunogenicity, and a physiological challenge dose may achieve protection against M. tuberculosis.

  4. Infection with host-range mutant adenovirus 5 suppresses innate immunity and induces systemic CD4+ T cell activation in rhesus macaques.

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    Qureshi, Huma; Genescà, Meritxell; Fritts, Linda; McChesney, Michael B; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie; Miller, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Ad5 is a common cause of respiratory disease and an occasional cause of gastroenteritis and conjunctivitis, and seroconversion before adolescence is common in humans. To gain some insight into how Ad5 infection affects the immune system of rhesus macaques (RM) 18 RM were infected with a host-range mutant Ad5 (Ad5hr) by 3 mucosal inoculations. There was a delay of 2 to 6 weeks after the first inoculation before plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC) frequency and function increased in peripheral blood. Primary Ad5hr infection suppressed IFN-γ mRNA expression, but the second Ad5hr exposure induced a rapid increase in IFN-gamma mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Primary Ad5hr infection suppressed CCL20, TNF and IL-1 mRNA expression in PBMC, and subsequent virus exposures further dampened expression of these pro-inflammatory cytokines. Primary, but not secondary, Ad5hr inoculation increased the frequency of CXCR3+ CD4+ T cells in blood, while secondary, but not primary, Ad5hr infection transiently increased the frequencies of Ki67+, HLADR+ and CD95+/CCR5+ CD4+ T cells in blood. Ad5hr infection induced polyfunctional CD4 and CD8+ T cells specific for the Ad5 hexon protein in all of the animals. Thus, infection with Ad5hr induced a complex pattern of innate and adaptive immunity in RM that included transient systemic CD4+ T cell activation and suppressed innate immunity on re-exposure to the virus. The complex effects of adenovirus infection on the immune system may help to explain the unexpected results of testing Ad5 vector expressing HIV antigens in Ad5 seropositive people.

  5. Δ⁹Tetrahydrocannabinol impairs visuo-spatial associative learning and spatial working memory in rhesus macaques.

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    Taffe, Michael A

    2012-10-01

    Cannabis remains the most commonly abused illicit drug and is rapidly expanding in quasi-licit use in some jurisdictions under medical marijuana laws. Effects of the psychoactive constituent Δ⁹tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ⁹THC) on cognitive function remain of pressing concern. Prior studies in monkeys have not shown consistent evidence of memory-specific effects of Δ⁹THC on recognition tasks, and it remains unclear to what extent Δ⁹THC causes sedative versus specific cognitive effects. In this study, adult male rhesus monkeys were trained on tasks which assess spatial working memory, visuo-spatial associative memory and learning as well as motivation for food reward. Subjects were subsequently challenged with 0.1-0.3 mg/kg Δ⁹THC, i.m., in randomized order and evaluated on the behavioral measures. The performance of both vsPAL and SOSS tasks was impaired by Δ⁹THC in a dose and task-difficulty dependent manner. It is concluded that Δ⁹THC disrupts cognition in a way that is consistent with a direct effect on memory. There was evidence for interference with spatial working memory, visuo-spatial associative memory and incremental learning in the latter task. These results and the lack of specific effect of Δ⁹THC in prior visual recognition studies imply a sensitivity of spatial memory processing and/or working memory to endocannabinoid perturbation.

  6. Long-term effects of tetanus toxoid inoculation on the demography and life expectancy of the Cayo Santiago rhesus macaques.

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    Kessler, Matthew J; Hernández Pacheco, Raisa; Rawlins, Richard G; Ruiz-Lambrides, Angelina; Delgado, Diana L; Sabat, Alberto M

    2015-02-01

    Tetanus was a major cause of mortality in the free-ranging population of rhesus monkeys on Cayo Santiago prior to 1985 when the entire colony was given its first dose of tetanus toxoid. The immediate reduction in mortality that followed tetanus toxoid inoculation (TTI) has been documented, but the long-term demographic effects of eliminating tetanus infections have not. This study uses the Cayo Santiago demographic database to construct comparative life tables 12 years before, and 12 years after, TTI. Life tables and matrix projection models are used to test for differences in: (i) survival among all individuals as well as among social groups, (ii) long-term fitness of the population, (iii) age distribution, (iv) reproductive value, and (v) life expectancy. A retrospective life table response experiment (LTRE) was performed to determine which life cycle transition contributed most to observed changes in long-term fitness of the population post-TTI. Elimination of clinical tetanus infections through mass inoculation improved the health and well-being of the monkeys. It also profoundly affected the population by increasing survivorship and long-term fitness, decreasing the differences in survival rates among social groups, shifting the population's age distribution towards older individuals, and increasing reproductive value and life expectancy. These findings are significant because they demonstrate the long-term effects of eradicating a major cause of mortality at a single point in time on survival, reproduction, and overall demography of a naturalistic population of primates. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Sustained increases in cerebrospinal fluid quinolinic acid concentrations in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) naturally infected with simian retrovirus type-D.

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    Heyes, M P; Gravell, M; London, W T; Eckhaus, M; Vickers, J H; Yergey, J A; April, M; Blackmore, D; Markey, S P

    1990-10-29

    Sustained increases in CSF concentrations of the excitotoxin quinolinic acid (QUIN) occur in patients with AIDS and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of the AIDS dementia complex. Macaques in captivity may also develop immunodeficiency syndromes caused by retrovirus infection, including simian retrovirus type-D. In the present study, CSF QUIN concentrations were moderately increased in retrovirus type-D-positive/antibody-negative macaques (163.8 +/- 35.1 nmol/l; P less than 0.0001, n = 21) but not virus-negative/antibody-positive macaques (27.4 +/- 9.4 nmol/l, n = 8) compared to uninfected control macaques (23.0 +/- 1.6 nmol/l; n = 22). CSF QUIN concentrations in virus-positive/antibody-negative macaques tended to remain elevated over a 4-20 month period. Post-mortem studies of 9 virus-positive/antibody-negative macaques and 6 virus-negative/antibody-positive macaques revealed inflammatory responses in the brains of 6 of 9 virus-positive/antibody negative macaques, including lymphocytic infiltrates of the choroid plexus in 3 macaques, glial nodules in 3 macaques and perivascular infiltrates in 1 macaque. These lesions were not extensive and no evidence of brain atrophy was observed. No lesions were observed in the 6 antibody-positive/virus-negative macaques. Small increases in plasma L-kynurenine in virus-positive/antibody-negative macaques are consistent with activation of indoleamine-2,3-dioxygenase, the first enzyme in the kynurenine pathway. We conclude that sustained moderate increases in CSF QUIN occur in viremic simian retrovirus type-D macaques. The increases in CSF QUIN may reflect inflammatory responses within the brain or synthesis of QUIN precursors in systemic tissues, their entry into brain and subsequent conversion to QUIN. The neuropathologic significance of these increases in CSF QUIN remains to be determined.

  8. Lutein accumulates in subcellular membranes of brain regions in adult rhesus macaques: Relationship to DHA oxidation products.

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    Mohn, Emily S; Erdman, John W; Kuchan, Matthew J; Neuringer, Martha; Johnson, Elizabeth J

    2017-01-01

    Lutein, a carotenoid with anti-oxidant functions, preferentially accumulates in primate brain and is positively related to cognition in humans. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA), is also beneficial for cognition, but is susceptible to oxidation. The present study characterized the membrane distribution of lutein in brain regions important for different domains of cognitive function and determined whether membrane lutein was associated with brain PUFA oxidation. Adult rhesus monkeys were fed a stock diet (~2 mg/day lutein or ~0.5 μmol/kg body weight/day) (n = 9) or the stock diet plus a daily supplement of lutein (~4.5 mg/day or~1 μmol/kg body weight/day) and zeaxanthin (~0.5 mg/day or 0.1 μmol/kg body weight/day) for 6-12 months (n = 4). Nuclear, myelin, mitochondrial, and neuronal plasma membranes were isolated using a Ficoll density gradient from prefrontal cortex (PFC), cerebellum (CER), striatum (ST), and hippocampus (HC). Carotenoids, PUFAs, and PUFA oxidation products were measured using HPLC, GC, and LC-GC/MS, respectively. All-trans-lutein (ng/mg protein) was detected in all regions and membranes and was highly variable among monkeys. Lutein/zeaxanthin supplementation significantly increased total concentrations of lutein in serum, PFC and CER, as well as lutein in mitochondrial membranes and total DHA concentrations in PFC only (Plutein was inversely related to DHA oxidation products, but not those from arachidonic acid (P lutein accumulation and its relationship to DHA oxidation in primate brain. These findings support the hypothesis that lutein may be associated with antioxidant functions in the brain.

  9. Mephedrone (4-methylmethcathinone) and d-methamphetamine improve visuospatial associative memory, but not spatial working memory, in rhesus macaques.

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    Wright, M J; Vandewater, S A; Angrish, D; Dickerson, T J; Taffe, M A

    2012-11-01

    The novel cathinone derivative 4-methylmethcathinone (4-MMC; mephedrone) is increasingly popular with recreational users. Little scientific information is available but users report both entactogen-like and classic stimulant-like subjective properties. A recent study in humans reported psychomotor speed improvement after intranasal 4-MMC suggesting classic stimulant properties. Limitations of the user group (which was impaired on some tasks) prompt controlled laboratory investigation. Adult male rhesus monkeys were trained to perform tasks from the non-human primate Cambridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery, which assess spatial working memory, visuospatial associative memory, learning and motivation for food reward. Test of bimanual motor coordination and manual tracking were also included. The subjects were challenged with 0.178-0.56 mg·kg(-1) 4-MMC and 0.056-0.56 mg·kg(-1) d-methamphetamine (MA), i.m., in randomized order for behavioural evaluation. A pronounced improvement in visuospatial memory and learning was observed after the 0.32 mg·kg(-1) dose of each compound, this effect was confirmed with subsequent repetition of these conditions. Spatial working memory was not improved by either drug, and the progressive ratio, bimanual motor and rotating turntable tasks were all disrupted in a dose-dependent manner. These studies show that 4-MMC produces behavioural effects, including improvements in complex spatial memory and learning that are in large part similar to those of MA in non-human primates. Thus, the data suggest that the effects of 4-MMC in monkeys can be classified with classical psychomotor stimulants. © 2012 The Authors. British Journal of Pharmacology © 2012 The British Pharmacological Society.

  10. Lutein accumulates in subcellular membranes of brain regions in adult rhesus macaques: Relationship to DHA oxidation products.

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    Emily S Mohn

    Full Text Available Lutein, a carotenoid with anti-oxidant functions, preferentially accumulates in primate brain and is positively related to cognition in humans. Docosahexaenoic acid (DHA, an omega-3 polyunsaturated fatty acid (PUFA, is also beneficial for cognition, but is susceptible to oxidation. The present study characterized the membrane distribution of lutein in brain regions important for different domains of cognitive function and determined whether membrane lutein was associated with brain PUFA oxidation.Adult rhesus monkeys were fed a stock diet (~2 mg/day lutein or ~0.5 μmol/kg body weight/day (n = 9 or the stock diet plus a daily supplement of lutein (~4.5 mg/day or~1 μmol/kg body weight/day and zeaxanthin (~0.5 mg/day or 0.1 μmol/kg body weight/day for 6-12 months (n = 4. Nuclear, myelin, mitochondrial, and neuronal plasma membranes were isolated using a Ficoll density gradient from prefrontal cortex (PFC, cerebellum (CER, striatum (ST, and hippocampus (HC. Carotenoids, PUFAs, and PUFA oxidation products were measured using HPLC, GC, and LC-GC/MS, respectively.All-trans-lutein (ng/mg protein was detected in all regions and membranes and was highly variable among monkeys. Lutein/zeaxanthin supplementation significantly increased total concentrations of lutein in serum, PFC and CER, as well as lutein in mitochondrial membranes and total DHA concentrations in PFC only (P<0.05. In PFC and ST, mitochondrial lutein was inversely related to DHA oxidation products, but not those from arachidonic acid (P <0.05.This study provides novel data on subcellular lutein accumulation and its relationship to DHA oxidation in primate brain. These findings support the hypothesis that lutein may be associated with antioxidant functions in the brain.

  11. Viral RNA levels and env variants in semen and tissues of mature male rhesus macaques infected with SIV by penile inoculation.

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    Francis Fieni

    Full Text Available HIV is shed in semen but the anatomic site of virus entry into the genital secretions is unknown. We determined viral RNA (vRNA levels and the envelope gene sequence in the SIVmac 251 viral populations in the genital tract and semen of 5 adult male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta that were infected after experimental penile SIV infection. Paired blood and semen samples were collected from 1-9 weeks after infection and the monkeys were necropsied eleven weeks after infection. The axillary lymph nodes, testes, epididymis, prostate, and seminal vesicles were collected and vRNA levels and single-genome analysis of the SIVmac251 env variants was performed. At the time of semen collection, blood vRNA levels were between 3.09 and 7.85 log10 vRNA copies/ml plasma. SIV RNA was found in the axillary lymph nodes of all five monkeys and in 3 of 5 monkeys, all tissues examined were vRNA positive. In these 3 monkeys, vRNA levels (log10 SIVgag copies/ug of total tissue RNA in the axillary lymph node (6.48 ± 0.50 were significantly higher than in the genital tract tissues: testis (3.67 ± 2.16; p<0.05, epididymis (3.08 ± 1.19; p<0.0001, prostate (3.36 ± 1.30; p<0.01, and seminal vesicle (2.67 ± 1.50; p<0.0001. Comparison of the SIVmac251 env viral populations in blood plasma, systemic lymph node, and genital tract tissues was performed in two of the macaques. Visual inspection of the Neighbor-Joining phylograms revealed that in both animals, all the sequences were generally distributed evenly among all tissue compartments. Importantly, viral populations in the genital tissues were not distinct from those in the systemic tissues. Our findings demonstrate striking similarity in the viral populations in the blood and male genital tract tissues within 3 months of penile SIV transmission.

  12. Variability of bio-clinical parameters in Chinese-origin Rhesus macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus: a nonhuman primate AIDS model.

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    Song Chen

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although Chinese-origin Rhesus macaques (Ch RhMs infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV have been used for many years to evaluate the efficacy of AIDS vaccines and therapeutics, the bio-clinical variability of such a nonhuman primate AIDS model was so far not established. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: By randomizing 150 (78 male and 72 female Ch RhMs with diverse MHC class I alleles into 3 groups (50 animals per group challenged with intrarectal (i.r. SIVmac239, intravenous (i.v. SIVmac239, or i.v. SIVmac251, we evaluated variability in bio-clinical endpoints for 118 weeks. All SIV-challenged Ch RhMs became seropositive for SIV during 1-2 weeks. Plasma viral load (VL peaked at weeks 1-2 and then declined to set-point levels as from week 5. The set-point VL was 30 fold higher in SIVmac239 (i.r. or i.v.-infected than in SIVmac251 (i.v.-infected animals. This difference in plasma VL increased overtime (>100 fold as from week 68. The rates of progression to AIDS or death were more rapid in SIVmac239 (i.r. or i.v.-infected than in SIVmac251 (i.v.-infected animals. No significant difference in bio-clinical endpoints was observed in animals challenged with i.r. or i.v. SIVmac239. The variability (standard deviation in peak/set-point VL was nearly one-half lower in animals infected with SIVmac239 (i.r. or i.v. than in those infected with SIVmac251 (i.v., allowing that the same treatment-related difference can be detected with one-half fewer animals using SIVmac239 than using SIVmac251. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: These results provide solid estimates of variability in bio-clinical endpoints needed when designing studies using the Ch RhM SIV model and contribute to the improving quality and standardization of preclinical studies.

  13. Synthetic double-stranded RNAs are adjuvants for the induction of T helper 1 and humoral immune responses to human papillomavirus in rhesus macaques.

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    Christiane Stahl-Hennig

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor (TLR ligands are being considered as adjuvants for the induction of antigen-specific immune responses, as in the design of vaccines. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytoidylic acid (poly I:C, a synthetic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA, is recognized by TLR3 and other intracellular receptors. Poly ICLC is a poly I:C analogue, which has been stabilized against the serum nucleases that are present in the plasma of primates. Poly I:C(12U, another analogue, is less toxic but also less stable in vivo than poly I:C, and TLR3 is essential for its recognition. To study the effects of these compounds on the induction of protein-specific immune responses in an animal model relevant to humans, rhesus macaques were immunized subcutaneously (s.c. with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH or human papillomavirus (HPV16 capsomeres with or without dsRNA or a control adjuvant, the TLR9 ligand CpG-C. All dsRNA compounds served as adjuvants for KLH-specific cellular immune responses, with the highest proliferative responses being observed with 2 mg/animal poly ICLC (p = 0.002 or 6 mg/animal poly I:C(12U (p = 0.001 when compared with immunization with KLH alone. Notably, poly ICLC -- but not CpG-C given at the same dose -- also helped to induce HPV16-specific Th1 immune responses while both adjuvants supported the induction of strong anti-HPV16 L1 antibody responses as determined by ELISA and neutralization assay. In contrast, control animals injected with HPV16 capsomeres alone did not develop substantial HPV16-specific immune responses. Injection of dsRNA led to increased numbers of cells producing the T cell-activating chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 as detected by in situ hybridization in draining lymph nodes 18 hours after injections, and to increased serum levels of CXCL10 (p = 0.01. This was paralleled by the reduced production of the homeostatic T cell-attracting chemokine CCL21. Thus, synthetic dsRNAs induce an innate chemokine response and act as adjuvants

  14. Protection against SHIV-KB9 Infection by Combining rDNA and rFPV Vaccines Based on HIV Multiepitope and p24 Protein in Chinese Rhesus Macaques

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    Chang Li

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Developing an effective vaccine against HIV infection remains an urgent goal. We used a DNA prime/fowlpox virus boost regimen to immunize Chinese rhesus macaques. The animals were challenged intramuscularly with pathogenic molecularly cloned SHIV-KB9. Immunogenicity and protective efficacy of vaccines were investigated by measuring IFN-γ levels, monitoring HIV-specific binding antibodies, examining viral load, and analyzing CD4/CD8 ratio. Results show that, upon challenge, the vaccine group can induce a strong immune response in the body, represented by increased expression of IFN-γ, slow and steady elevated antibody production, reduced peak value of acute viral load, and increase in the average CD4/CD8 ratio. The current research suggests that rapid reaction speed, appropriate response strength, and long-lasting immune response time may be key protection factors for AIDS vaccine. The present study contributes significantly to AIDS vaccine and preclinical research.

  15. Necrotizing Scleritis, Conjunctivitis, and Other Pathologic Findings in the Left Eye and Brain of an Ebola Virus-Infected Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta) With Apparent Recovery and a Delayed Time of Death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alves, Derron A; Honko, Anna N; Kortepeter, Mark G; Sun, Mei; Johnson, Joshua C; Lugo-Roman, Luis A; Hensley, Lisa E

    2016-01-01

    A 3.5-year-old adult female rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) manifested swelling of the left upper eyelid and conjunctiva and a decline in clinical condition 18 days following intramuscular challenge with Ebola virus (EBOV; Kikwit-1995), after apparent clinical recovery. Histologic lesions with strong EBOV antigen staining were noted in the left eye (scleritis, conjunctivitis, and peri-optic neuritis), brain (choriomeningoencephalitis), stomach, proximal duodenum, and pancreas. Spleen, liver, and adrenal glands, common targets for acute infection, appeared histologically normal with no evidence of EBOV immunoreactivity. These findings may provide important insight for understanding sequelae seen in West African survivors of Ebola virus disease. Published by Oxford University Press for the Infectious Diseases Society of America 2015. This work is written by (a) US Government employee(s) and is in the public domain in the US.

  16. CXCR5-Dependent Entry of CD8 T Cells into Rhesus Macaque B-Cell Follicles Achieved through T-Cell Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ayala, Victor I; Deleage, Claire; Trivett, Matthew T; Jain, Sumiti; Coren, Lori V; Breed, Matthew W; Kramer, Joshua A; Thomas, James A; Estes, Jacob D; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Ott, David E

    2017-06-01

    Follicular helper CD4 T cells, T FH , residing in B-cell follicles within secondary lymphoid tissues, are readily infected by AIDS viruses and are a major source of persistent virus despite relative control of viral replication. This persistence is due at least in part to a relative exclusion of effective antiviral CD8 T cells from B-cell follicles. To determine whether CD8 T cells could be engineered to enter B-cell follicles, we genetically modified unselected CD8 T cells to express CXC chemokine receptor 5 (CXCR5), the chemokine receptor implicated in cellular entry into B-cell follicles. Engineered CD8 T cells expressing human CXCR5 (CD8 hCXCR5 ) exhibited ligand-specific signaling and chemotaxis in vitro Six infected rhesus macaques were infused with differentially fluorescent dye-labeled autologous CD8 hCXCR5 and untransduced CD8 T cells and necropsied 48 h later. Flow cytometry of both spleen and lymph node samples revealed higher frequencies of CD8 hCXCR5 than untransduced cells, consistent with preferential trafficking to B-cell follicle-containing tissues. Confocal fluorescence microscopy of thin-sectioned lymphoid tissues demonstrated strong preferential localization of CD8 hCXCR5 T cells within B-cell follicles with only rare cells in extrafollicular locations. CD8 hCXCR5 T cells were present throughout the follicles with some observed near infected T FH In contrast, untransduced CD8 T cells were found in the extrafollicular T-cell zone. Our ability to direct localization of unselected CD8 T cells into B-cell follicles using CXCR5 expression provides a strategy to place highly effective virus-specific CD8 T cells into these AIDS virus sanctuaries and potentially suppress residual viral replication. IMPORTANCE AIDS virus persistence in individuals under effective drug therapy or those who spontaneously control viremia remains an obstacle to definitive treatment. Infected follicular helper CD4 T cells, T FH , present inside B-cell follicles represent a

  17. Increased cellular immune responses and CD4+ T-cell proliferation correlate with reduced plasma viral load in SIV challenged recombinant simian varicella virus - simian immunodeficiency virus (rSVV-SIV vaccinated rhesus macaques

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    Pahar Bapi

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An effective AIDS vaccine remains one of the highest priorities in HIV-research. Our recent study showed that vaccination of rhesus macaques with recombinant simian varicella virus (rSVV vector – simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV envelope and gag genes, induced neutralizing antibodies and cellular immune responses to SIV and also significantly reduced plasma viral loads following intravenous pathogenic challenge with SIVMAC251/CX1. Findings The purpose of this study was to define cellular immunological correlates of protection in rSVV-SIV vaccinated and SIV challenged animals. Immunofluorescent staining and multifunctional assessment of SIV-specific T-cell responses were evaluated in both Experimental and Control vaccinated animal groups. Significant increases in the proliferating CD4+ T-cell population and polyfunctional T-cell responses were observed in all Experimental-vaccinated animals compared with the Control-vaccinated animals. Conclusions Increased CD4+ T-cell proliferation was significantly and inversely correlated with plasma viral load. Increased SIV-specific polyfunctional cytokine responses and increased proliferation of CD4+ T-cell may be crucial to control plasma viral loads in vaccinated and SIVMAC251/CX1 challenged macaques.

  18. Selective induction of cell-mediated immunity and protection of rhesus macaques from chronic SHIVKU2 infection by prophylactic vaccination with a conserved HIV-1 envelope peptide-cocktail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nehete, Pramod N.; Nehete, Bharti P.; Hill, Lori; Manuri, Pallavi R.; Baladandayuthapani, Veerabhadran; Feng Lei; Simmons, Johnny; Sastry, K. Jagannadha

    2008-01-01

    Infection of Indian-origin rhesus macaques by the simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) is considered to be a suitable preclinical model for directly testing efficacy of vaccine candidates based on the HIV-1 envelope. We used this model for prophylactic vaccination with a peptide-cocktail comprised of highly conserved HIV-1 envelope sequences immunogenic/antigenic in macaques and humans. Separate groups of macaques were immunized with the peptide-cocktail by intravenous and subcutaneous routes using autologous dendritic cells (DC) and Freund's adjuvant, respectively. The vaccine elicited antigen specific IFN-γ-producing cells and T-cell proliferation, but not HIV-neutralizing antibodies. The vaccinated animals also exhibited efficient cross-clade cytolytic activity against target cells expressing envelope proteins corresponding to HIV-1 strains representative of multiple clades that increased after intravenous challenge with pathogenic SHIV KU2 . Virus-neutralizing antibodies were either undetectable or present only transiently at low levels in the control as well as vaccinated monkeys after infection. Significant control of plasma viremia leading to undetectable levels was achieved in majority of vaccinated monkeys compared to mock-vaccinated controls. Monkeys vaccinated with the peptide-cocktail using autologous DC, compared to Freund's adjuvant, and the mock-vaccinated animals, showed significantly higher IFN-γ production, higher levels of vaccine-specific IFN-γ producing CD4 + cells and significant control of plasma viremia. These results support DC-based vaccine delivery and the utility of the conserved HIV-1 envelope peptide-cocktail, capable of priming strong cell-mediated immunity, for potential inclusion in HIV vaccination strategies

  19. Serial Cervicovaginal exposures with Replication-deficient SIVsm induce higher Dendritic Cell (pDC) and CD4+ T-Cell Infiltrates not associated with prevention but a More Severe SIVmac251 Infection of Rhesus Macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    ABDULHAQQ, Shaheed A.; MARTINEZ, Melween I.; KANG, Guobin; FOULKES, Andrea S.; RODRIGUEZ, Idia V.; NICHOLS, Stephanie M.; HUNTER, Meredith; SARIOL, Carlos A.; RUIZ, Lynnette A.; ROSS, Brian N.; YIN, Xiangfan; SPEICHER, David W.; HAASE, Ashley T.; MARX, Preston A.; LI, Qinsheng; KRAISELBURD, Edmundo N.; MONTANER, Luis J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Intravaginal exposure to SIV acutely recruits IFN-α producing plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) and CD4+ T-lymphocyte targets to the endocervix of nonhuman primates. We tested the impact of repeated cervicovaginal exposures to noninfectious, defective SIV particles over 72 hrs on a subsequent cervicovaginal challenge with replication-competent SIV. Methods 34 Female Indian Rhesus macaques were given a three-day, twice-daily vaginal exposures to either SIVsmB7, a replication-deficient derivative of SIVsmH3 produced by a CEMX174 cell clone (n=16), or to CEM supernatant controls (n=18). On the fourth day, animals were either euthanized to assess cervicovaginal immune cell infiltration or intravaginally challenged with SIVmac251. Challenged animals were tracked for plasma viral load and CD4 counts and euthanized at 42 days post infection. Results At the time of challenge, macaques exposed to SIVsmB7, had higher levels of cervical CD123 pDCs (p=0.032) and CD4+ T-Cells (p=0.036) than those exposed to CEM control. Vaginal tissues showed a significant increase in CD4+ T-Cell infiltrates (p=0.048), and a trend towards increased CD68+ cellular infiltrates. After challenge, 12 SIVsmB7-treated macaques showed 2.5-fold greater daily rate of CD4 decline (p=0.0408), and viral load rise (p=0.0036) as compared to 12 control animals. Conclusions Repeated non-productive exposure to viral particles within a short daily timeframe did not protect against infection in spite of pDC recruitment, resulting instead in an accelerated CD4+ T-Cell loss with an increased rate of viral replication PMID:24226059

  20. Contribution of nonneutralizing vaccine-elicited antibody activities to improved protective efficacy in rhesus macaques immunized with Tat/Env compared with multigenic vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Florese, Ruth H; Demberg, Thorsten; Xiao, Peng; Kuller, LaRene; Larsen, Kay; Summers, L Ebonita; Venzon, David; Cafaro, Aurelio; Ensoli, Barbara; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2009-03-15

    Previously, chronic-phase protection against SHIV(89.6P) challenge was significantly greater in macaques primed with replicating adenovirus type 5 host range mutant (Ad5hr) recombinants encoding HIVtat and env and boosted with Tat and Env protein compared with macaques primed with multigenic adenovirus recombinants (HIVtat, HIVenv, SIVgag, SIVnef) and boosted with Tat, Env, and Nef proteins. The greater protection was correlated with Tat- and Env-binding Abs. Because the macaques lacked SHIV(89.6P)-neutralizing activity prechallenge, we investigated whether Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) and Ab-dependent cell-mediated viral inhibition (ADCVI) might exert a protective effect. We clearly show that Tat can serve as an ADCC target, although the Tat-specific activity elicited did not correlate with better protection. However, Env-specific ADCC activity was consistently higher in the Tat/Env group, with sustained cell killing postchallenge exhibited at higher levels (p vaccine regimens.

  1. Longitudinal study to assess the safety and efficacy of a live-attenuated SHIV vaccine in long term immunized rhesus macaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yankee, Thomas M.; Sheffer, Darlene; Liu Zhengian; Dhillon, Sukhbir; Jia Fenglan; Chebloune, Yahia; Stephens, Edward B.; Narayan, Opendra

    2009-01-01

    Live-attenuated viruses derived from SIV and SHIV have provided the most consistent protection against challenge with pathogenic viruses, but concerns regarding their long-term safety and efficacy have hampered their clinical usefulness. We report a longitudinal study in which we evaluated the long-term safety and efficacy of ΔvpuSHIV PPC , a live virus vaccine derived from SHIV PPC . Macaques were administered two inoculations of ΔvpuSHIV PPC , three years apart, and followed for eight years. None of the five vaccinated macaques developed an AIDS-like disease from the vaccine. At eight years, macaques were challenged with pathogenic SIV and SHIV. None of the four macaques with detectable cellular-mediated immunity prior to challenge had detectable viral RNA in the plasma. This study demonstrates that multiple inoculations of a live vaccine virus can be used safely and can significantly extend the efficacy of the vaccine, as compared to a single inoculation, which is efficacious for approximately three years

  2. Effect of Complement Factor H on anti-FHbp Serum Bactericidal Antibody Responses of Infant Rhesus Macaques Boosted with a Licensed Meningococcal Serogroup B Vaccine

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntini, Serena; Beernink, Peter T.; Granoff, Dan M.

    2015-01-01

    FHbp is a major serogroup B meningococcal vaccine antigen. Binding of complement Factor H (FH) to FHbp is specific for human and some non-human primate FH. In previous studies, FH binding to FHbp vaccines impaired protective anti-FHbp antibody responses. In this study we investigated anti-FHbp antibody responses to a third dose of a licensed serogroup B vaccine (MenB-4C) in infant macaques vaccinated in a previous study with MenB-4C. Six macaques with high binding of FH to FHbp (FHhigh), and six with FHlow baseline phenotypes, were immunized three months after dose 2. After dose 2, macaques with the FHlow baseline phenotype had serum anti-FHbp antibodies that enhanced FH binding to FHbp (functionally converting them to a FHhigh phenotype). In this group, activation of the classical complement pathway (C4b deposition) by serum anti-FHbp antibody, and anti-FHbp serum bactericidal titers were lower after dose 3 than after dose 2 (pbactericidal titers were similar after doses 2 and 3. Two macaques developed serum anti-FH autoantibodies after dose 2, which were not detected after dose 3. In conclusion, in macaques with the FHlow baseline phenotype whose post-dose 2 serum anti-FHbp antibodies had converted them to FHhigh, the anti-FHbp antibody repertoire to dose 3 was skewed to less protective epitopes than after dose 2. Mutant FHbp vaccines that eliminate FH binding may avoid eliciting anti-FHbp antibodies that enhance FH binding, and confer greater protection with less risk of inducing anti-FH autoantibodies than FHbp vaccines that bind FH. PMID:26562320

  3. Effect of complement Factor H on anti-FHbp serum bactericidal antibody responses of infant rhesus macaques boosted with a licensed meningococcal serogroup B vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giuntini, Serena; Beernink, Peter T; Granoff, Dan M

    2015-12-16

    FHbp is a major serogroup B meningococcal vaccine antigen. Binding of complement Factor H (FH) to FHbp is specific for human and some non-human primate FH. In previous studies, FH binding to FHbp vaccines impaired protective anti-FHbp antibody responses. In this study we investigated anti-FHbp antibody responses to a third dose of a licensed serogroup B vaccine (MenB-4C) in infant macaques vaccinated in a previous study with MenB-4C. Six macaques with high binding of FH to FHbp (FH(high)), and six with FH(low) baseline phenotypes, were immunized three months after dose 2. After dose 2, macaques with the FH(low) baseline phenotype had serum anti-FHbp antibodies that enhanced FH binding to FHbp (functionally converting them to a FH(high) phenotype). In this group, activation of the classical complement pathway (C4b deposition) by serum anti-FHbp antibody, and anti-FHbp serum bactericidal titers were lower after dose 3 than after dose 2 (pb deposition and bactericidal titers were similar after doses 2 and 3. Two macaques developed serum anti-FH autoantibodies after dose 2, which were not detected after dose 3. In conclusion, in macaques with the FH(low) baseline phenotype whose post-dose 2 serum anti-FHbp antibodies had converted them to FH(high), the anti-FHbp antibody repertoire to dose 3 was skewed to less protective epitopes than after dose 2. Mutant FHbp vaccines that eliminate FH binding may avoid eliciting anti-FHbp antibodies that enhance FH binding, and confer greater protection with less risk of inducing anti-FH autoantibodies than FHbp vaccines that bind FH. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Urine culture - catheterized specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - urine - catheterized specimen; Urine culture - catheterization; Catheterized urine specimen culture ... Normal values depend on the test being performed. Normal results are reported as "no growth" and are a sign ...

  5. Comparison of neutralizing antibody responses elicited from highly diverse polyvalent heterotrimeric HIV-1 gp140 cocktail immunogens versus a monovalent counterpart in rhesus macaques.

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    Emma J Bowles

    Full Text Available Eliciting neutralizing antibodies capable of inactivating a broad spectrum of HIV-1 strains is a major goal of HIV-1 vaccine design. The challenge is that envelopes (Envs of circulating viruses are almost certainly different from any Env used in a vaccine. A novel immunogen composed of a highly diverse set of gp140 Envs including subtypes A, B, C, D and F was developed to stimulate a more cross-neutralizing antibody response. Env heterotrimers composed of up to 54 different gp140s were produced with the aim of focusing the response to the conserved regions of Env while reducing the dominance of any individual hypervariable region. Heterotrimeric gp140 Envs of inter- and intra-subtype combinations were shown to bind CD4 and a panel of neutralizing monoclonal antibodies with similar affinity to monovalent UG37 gp140. Macaques immunized with six groups of heterotrimer mixtures showed slightly more potent neutralizing antibody responses in TZM-BL tier 1 and A3R5 tier 2 pseudovirus assays than macaques immunized with monovalent Env gp140, and exhibited a marginally greater focus on the CD4-binding site. Carbopol enhanced neutralization when used as an adjuvant instead of RIBI in combination with UG37 gp140. These data indicate that cross-subtype heterotrimeric gp140 Envs may elicit some improvement of the neutralizing antibody response in macaques compared to monovalent gp140 Env.

  6. A novel adenovirus type 6 (Ad6)-based hepatitis C virus vector that overcomes preexisting anti-ad5 immunity and induces potent and broad cellular immune responses in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capone, Stefania; Meola, Annalisa; Ercole, Bruno Bruni; Vitelli, Alessandra; Pezzanera, Monica; Ruggeri, Lionello; Davies, Mary Ellen; Tafi, Rosalba; Santini, Claudia; Luzzago, Alessandra; Fu, Tong-Ming; Bett, Andrew; Colloca, Stefano; Cortese, Riccardo; Nicosia, Alfredo; Folgori, Antonella

    2006-02-01

    Success in resolving hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection has been correlated to vigorous, multispecific, and sustained CD8(+) T-cell response in humans and chimpanzees. The efficacy of inducing T-cell-mediated immunity by recombinant serotype 5 adenovirus vector has been proven in many animal models of infectious diseases, but its immunogenicity can be negatively influenced by preexisting immunity against the vector itself. To evaluate the less prevalent adenovirus serotype 6 (Ad6) as an alternative vector for and HCV vaccine development, we have generated serotype 5 and 6 adenoviral vectors directing expression of the nonstructural region of HCV (MRKAd5-NSmut and MRKAd6-NSmut). Immunogenicity studies in mice showed that the two vectors induced comparable T-cell responses but that only MRKAd6-NSmut was not suppressed in the presence of anti-Ad5 immunity. In contrast, preexisting anti-Ad5 immunity dramatically blunted the immunogenicity of the serotype 5-based HCV vector. Furthermore, MRKAd6-NSmut showed equivalent potency, breadth, and longevity of HCV-specific T-cell responses in rhesus macaques as the corresponding Ad5-based vector over a wide range of doses and was capable of boosting DNA-primed animals even if administered at low doses. These data support the use of the MRKAd6-NSmut for anti-HCV immunotherapy and, more generally, for the Ad6 serotype as a better genetic vaccine vehicle than Ad5.

  7. Immunogenicity of a reduced-dose whole killed rabies vaccine is significantly enhanced by ISCOMATRIX™ adjuvant, Merck amorphous aluminum hydroxylphosphate sulfate (MAA) or a synthetic TLR9 agonist in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiStefano, Daniel; Antonello, Joseph M; Bett, Andrew J; Medi, Muneeswara B; Casimiro, Danilo R; ter Meulen, Jan

    2013-10-01

    There is a need for novel rabies vaccines suitable for short course, pre- and post-exposure prophylactic regimens which require reduced doses of antigen to address the current worldwide supply issue. We evaluated in rhesus macaques the immunogenicity of a quarter-dose of a standard rabies vaccine formulated with Merck's amorphous aluminum hydroxylphosphate sulfate adjuvant, the saponin-based ISCOMATRIX™ adjuvant, or a synthetic TLR9 agonist. All adjuvants significantly increased the magnitude and durability of the humoral immune response as measured by rapid fluorescent focus inhibition test (RFFIT). Several three-dose vaccine regimens resulted in adequate neutralizing antibody of ≥ 0.5 IU/ml earlier than the critical day seven post the first dose. Rabies vaccine with ISCOMATRIX™ adjuvant given at days 0 and 3 resulted in neutralizing antibody titers which developed faster and were up to one log10 higher compared to WHO-recommended intramuscular and intradermal regimens and furthermore, passive administration of human rabies immunoglobulin did not interfere with immunogenicity of this reduced dose, short course vaccine regimen. Adjuvantation of whole-killed rabies vaccine for intramuscular injection may therefore be a viable alternative to intradermal application of non-adjuvanted vaccine for both pre- and post-exposure regimens. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. An update of the macaque testis proteome

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    Tao Zhou

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The genome sequence of rhesus macaque is a draft version with many errors and is lack of Y chromosome annotation. In the present dataset, we reanalyzed the previously published macaque testis proteome. We searched for refined protein sequences, potential Y chromosome proteins and transcripts predicted proteins in addition to the latest Ensembl protein sequences of macaque. A total of 74,433 peptides corresponding to 9247 protein groups were identified, and the data are supplied in this paper. The updated version of macaque testis proteome provided evidences for predicted genes or transcripts at the peptide level. It can be used for further in-depth proteogenomic annotation of macaque genome and is useful for studying the mechanisms of macaque spermatogenesis.

  9. Alopecia in three macaque species housed in a laboratory environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kroeker, R.; Bellanca, R. U.; Lee, G. H.; Thom, J. P.; Worlein, J. M.

    2014-01-01

    Alopecia is a persistent problem in captive macaque populations and despite recent interest, no factors have been identified that can unequivocally explain the presence of alopecia in a majority of cases. Seasonal, demographic and environmental factors have been identified as affecting alopecia presentation in rhesus macaques, the most widely studied macaque species. However, few studies have investigated alopecia rates in other macaque species. We report alopecia scores over a period of 12 months for three macaque species (Macaca nemestrina, M. mulatta, and M. fascicularis) housed at three indoor facilities within the Washington National Primate Research Center (WaNPRC) in Seattle. Clear species differences emerged with cynomolgus (M. fascicularis) showing the lowest alopecia rates and pigtails (M. nemestrina) the highest rates. Further analysis of pigtail and rhesus (M. mulatta) macaques revealed that sex effects were apparent for rhesus but not pigtails. Age and seasonal effects were evident for both species. In contrast to previous reports, we found that older animals (over 10 years of age) had improved alopecia scores in comparison to younger adults. This is the first report on alopecia rates in pigtail macaques and the first comparison of alopecia scores in pigtail, cynomolgus, and rhesus macaques housed under similar conditions. PMID:24243351

  10. Functional effector memory T cells contribute to protection from superinfection with heterologous simian immunodeficiency virus or simian-human immunodeficiency virus isolates in Chinese rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Ming; Zheng, Huiwen; Xie, Yingpeng; Li, Bingxiang; Long, Haiting; Guo, Ge; Guo, Lei; Wang, Jingjing; Ning, Ruotong; Li, Yue; Liu, Longding

    2017-05-01

    Many studies have revealed a protective effect of infection of an individual with an immunodeficiency virus against subsequent infection with a heterologous strain. However, the extent of protection against superinfection conferred by the first infection and the biological consequences of superinfection are not well understood. Here, we report that a rhesus monkey model of mucosal superinfection was established to investigate the protective immune response. Protection against superinfection was shown to correlate with the extent of the polyfunctionality of CD4 + effector memory T cells, whereas neutralizing antibody responses did not protect against superinfection in this model. Notably, immunodeficiency-virus-associated effector memory T-cell responses might significantly contribute to the suppression of virus superinfection. This provides a potential theoretical basis for the development of an HIV/AIDS vaccine.

  11. A putative SUMO interacting motif in the B30.2/SPRY domain of rhesus macaque TRIM5α important for NF-κB/AP-1 signaling and HIV-1 restriction

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    Marie-Édith Nepveu-Traversy

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available TRIM5α from the rhesus macaque (TRIM5αRh is a restriction factor that shows strong activity against HIV-1. TRIM5αRh binds specifically to HIV-1 capsid (CA through its B30.2/PRYSPRY domain shortly after entry of the virus into the cytoplasm. Recently, three putative SUMO interacting motifs (SIMs have been identified in the PRYSPRY domain of human and macaque TRIM5α. However, structural modeling of this domain suggested that two of them were buried in the hydrophobic core of the protein, implying that interaction with SUMO was implausible, while the third one was not relevant to restriction. In light of these results, we re-analyzed the TRIM5αRh PRYSPRY sequence and identified an additional putative SIM (435VIIC438 which we named SIM4. This motif is exposed at the surface of the PRYSPRY domain, allowing potential interactions with SUMO or SUMOylated proteins. Introducing a double mutation in SIM4 (V435K, I436K did not alter stability, unlike mutations in SIM1. SIM4-mutated TRIM5αRh failed to bind HIV-1CA and lost the ability to restrict this virus. Accordingly, SIM4 undergoes significant variation among primates and substituting this motif with naturally occurring SIM4 variants affected HIV-1 restriction by TRIM5αRh, suggesting a direct role in capsid recognition. Interestingly, SIM4-mutated TRIM5αRh also failed to activate NF-κB and AP-1-mediated transcription. Although there is no direct evidence that SIM4 is involved in direct interaction with SUMO or a SUMOylated protein, mutating this motif strongly reduced co-localization of TRIM5αRh with SUMO-1 and with PML, a SUMOylated nuclear protein. In conclusion, this new putative SIM is crucial for both direct interaction with incoming capsids and for NF-κB/AP-1 signaling. We speculate that the latter function is mediated by interactions of SIM4 with a SUMOylated protein involved in the NF-κB/AP-1 signaling pathways.

  12. Impact of cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte memory induction without virus-specific CD4+ T-Cell help on control of a simian immunodeficiency virus challenge in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Tetsuo; Takeda, Akiko; Yamamoto, Takuya; Yamamoto, Hiroyuki; Kawada, Miki; Matano, Tetsuro

    2009-09-01

    Despite many efforts to develop AIDS vaccines eliciting virus-specific T-cell responses, whether induction of these memory T cells by vaccination before human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) exposure can actually contribute to effective T-cell responses postinfection remains unclear. In particular, induction of HIV-specific memory CD4(+) T cells may increase the target cell pool for HIV infection because the virus preferentially infects HIV-specific CD4(+) T cells. However, virus-specific CD4(+) helper T-cell responses are thought to be important for functional CD8(+) cytotoxic-T-lymphocyte (CTL) induction in HIV infection, and it has remained unknown whether HIV-specific memory CD8(+) T cells induced by vaccination without HIV-specific CD4(+) T-cell help can exert effective responses after virus exposure. Here we show the impact of CD8(+) T-cell memory induction without virus-specific CD4(+) T-cell help on the control of a simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) challenge in rhesus macaques. We developed a prophylactic vaccine by using a Sendai virus (SeV) vector expressing a single SIV Gag(241-249) CTL epitope fused with enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). Vaccination resulted in induction of SeV-EGFP-specific CD4(+) T-cell and Gag(241-249)-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses. After a SIV challenge, the vaccinees showed dominant Gag(241-249)-specific CD8(+) T-cell responses with higher effector memory frequencies in the acute phase and exhibited significantly reduced viral loads. These results demonstrate that virus-specific memory CD8(+) T cells induced by vaccination without virus-specific CD4(+) T-cell help could indeed facilitate SIV control after virus exposure, indicating the benefit of prophylactic vaccination eliciting virus-specific CTL memory with non-virus-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses for HIV control.

  13. Depressive-like behavior, its sensitization, social buffering, and altered cytokine responses in rhesus macaques moved from outdoor social groups to indoor housing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hennessy, Michael B; Chun, Katie; Capitanio, John P

    2017-02-01

    Psychosocial stressors appear to promote the onset of depressive illness through activation and sensitization of inflammatory mechanisms. Here, adult male rhesus monkeys brought from large outdoor social groups to indoor housing for 8 days reliably exhibited a hunched, depressive-like posture. When rehoused indoors a second 8 days about 2 weeks later, monkeys housed alone, but not those with an affiliative partner, showed sensitization of the depressive-like hunched posture. Housing indoors also affected circulating pro-inflammatory cytokines: IL-1β showed increased responsiveness to immune challenge, and IL-1β and TNF-α showed reduced suppression by dexamethasone. Sensitivity of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 to immune challenge exhibited a relative increase from the first to the second round of indoor housing in animals housed in pairs, and a relative decrease in animals housed alone. Cytokine levels during indoor housing were positively correlated with duration of depressive-like behavior. Plasma cortisol levels increased but did not differentiate housing conditions or rounds. Results demonstrate a rapid induction and sensitization of depressive-like behavior to indoor individual housing, social buffering of sensitization, and associated inflammatory responses. This paradigm may provide a practical nonhuman primate model for examining inflammatory-mediated consequences of psychosocial stressors on depression and possible social buffering of these effects.

  14. A genetically engineered live-attenuated simian-human immunodeficiency virus that co-expresses the RANTES gene improves the magnitude of cellular immunity in rhesus macaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimizu, Yuya; Inaba, Katsuhisa; Kaneyasu, Kentaro; Ibuki, Kentaro; Himeno, Ai; Okoba, Masashi; Goto, Yoshitaka; Hayami, Masanori; Miura, Tomoyuki; Haga, Takeshi

    2007-01-01

    Regulated-on-activation-normal-T-cell-expressed-and-secreted (RANTES), a CC-chemokine, enhances antigen-specific T helper (Th) type-1 responses against HIV-1. To evaluate the adjuvant effects of RANTES against HIV vaccine candidate in SHIV-macaque models, we genetically engineered a live-attenuated SHIV to express the RANTES gene (SHIV-RANTES) and characterized the virus's properties in vivo. After the vaccination, the plasma viral loads were same in the SHIV-RANTES-inoculated monkeys and the parental nef-deleted SHIV (SHIV-NI)-inoculated monkeys. SHIV-RANTES provided some immunity in monkeys by remarkably increasing the antigen-specific CD4 + Th cell-proliferative response and by inducing an antigen-specific IFN-γ ELISpot response. The magnitude of the immunity in SHIV-RANTES-immunized animals, however, failed to afford greater protection against a heterologous pathogenic SHIV (SHIV-C2/1) challenge compared to control SHIV-NI-immunized animals. SHIV-RANTES immunized monkeys, elicited robust cellular CD4 + Th responses and IFN-γ ELISpot responses after SHIV-C2/1 challenge. These findings suggest that the chemokine RANTES can augment vaccine-elicited, HIV-specific CD4 + T cell responses

  15. Efficacy of an Adenovirus-based Anti-cocaine Vaccine to Reduce Cocaine Self-administration and Reacqusition using a Choice Procedure in Rhesus Macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Suzette M.; Foltin, Richard W.; Hicks, Martin J.; Rosenberg, Jonathan B.; De, Bishnu P.; Janda, Kim D.; Kaminsky, Stephen M.; Crystal, Ronald G.

    2016-01-01

    Immunopharmacotherapy offers an approach for treating cocaine abuse by specifically targeting the cocaine molecule and preventing its access to the CNS. dAd5GNE is a novel cocaine vaccine that attenuates the stimulant and the reinforcing effects of cocaine in rats. The goal of this study was to extend and validate dAd5GNE vaccine efficacy in non-human primates. Six experimentally naïve adult female rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) were trained to self-administer 0.1 mg/kg/injection intravenous (i.v.) cocaine or receive candy; then 4 monkeys were administered the vaccine and 2 monkeys were administered vehicle intramuscularly, with additional vaccine boosts throughout the study. The reinforcing effects of cocaine were measured during self-administration, extinction, and reacquisition (relapse) phases. Serum antibody titers in the vaccinated monkeys remained high throughout the study. There was no change in the preference for cocaine over candy over a 20-week period in 5 of the 6 monkeys; only one of the 4 (25%) vaccinated monkeys showed a decrease in cocaine choice. All 6 monkeys extinguished responding for cocaine during saline extinction testing; vaccinated monkeys tended to take longer to extinguish responding than control monkeys (17.5 vs. 7.0 sessions). Vaccination substantially retarded reacquisition of cocaine self-administration; control monkeys resumed cocaine self-administration within 6–41 sessions and 1 vaccinated monkey resumed cocaine self-administration in 19 sessions. The other 3 vaccinated monkeys required between 57–94 sessions to resume cocaine self-administration even in the context of employing several manipulations to encourage cocaine reacquisition. These data suggest that the dAdGNE vaccine may have therapeutic potential for humans who achieve cocaine abstinence as part of a relapse prevention strategy. PMID:27697554

  16. Variations in the Biological Functions of HIV-1 Clade C Envelope in a SHIV-Infected Rhesus Macaque during Disease Progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    For Yue Tso

    Full Text Available A better understanding of how the biological functions of the HIV-1 envelope (Env changes during disease progression may aid the design of an efficacious anti-HIV-1 vaccine. Although studies from patient had provided some insights on this issue, the differences in the study cohorts and methodology had make it difficult to reach a consensus of the variations in the HIV-1 Env functions during disease progression. To this end, an animal model that can be infected under controlled environment and reflect the disease course of HIV-1 infection in human will be beneficial. Such an animal model was previously demonstrated by the infection of macaque with SHIV, expressing HIV-1 clade C Env V1-V5 region. By using this model, we examined the changes in biological functions of Env in the infected animal over the entire disease course. Our data showed an increase in the neutralization resistance phenotype over time and coincided with the decrease in the net charges of the V1-V5 region. Infection of PBMC with provirus expressing various Env clones, isolated from the infected animal over time, showed a surprisingly better replicative fitness for viruses expressing the Env from early time point. Biotinylation and ELISA data also indicated a decrease of cell-surface-associated Env and virion-associated gp120 content with disease progression. This decrease did not affect the CD4-binding capability of Env, but were positively correlated with the decrease of Env fusion ability. Interestingly, some of these changes in biological functions reverted to the pre-AIDS level during advance AIDS. These data suggested a dynamic relationship between the Env V1-V5 region with the host immune pressure. The observed changes of biological functions in this setting might reflect and predict those occurring during natural disease progression in human.

  17. Perturbations de l'homéostasie lymphocytaire T chez le macaque rhésus chinois en phase aiguë d'infection par le SIVmac251

    OpenAIRE

    Ponte, Rosalie

    2014-01-01

    As a model to study type 1 human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) pathogenesis, rhesus macaques infected with the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) are under extensive investigation. Two subspecies of rhesus macaques have been defined, based on a different geographic origin. Indian rhesus macaques exhibit a rapid disease progression and acute infection is characterized by a massive CD4 T-cell loss in the intestinal mucosa. This was associated to the translocation of bacterial products through...

  18. Vaccination of rhesus macaques with the live-attenuated HSV-1 vaccine VC2 stimulates the proliferation of mucosal T cells and germinal center responses resulting in sustained production of highly neutralizing antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanfield, Brent A; Pahar, Bapi; Chouljenko, Vladimir N; Veazey, Ronald; Kousoulas, Konstantin G

    2017-01-23

    We have shown that the live-attenuated HSV-1 VC2 vaccine strain with mutations in glycoprotein K (gK) and the membrane protein UL20 is unable to establish latency in vaccinated animals and produces a robust immune response capable of completely protecting mice against lethal vaginal HSV-1 or HSV-2 infections. To better understand the immune response generated by vaccination with VC2, we tested its ability to elicit immune responses in rhesus macaques. Vaccinated animals showed no signs of disease and developed increasing HSV-1 and HSV-2 reactive IgG 1 after two booster vaccinations, while IgG subtypes IgG 2 and IgG 3 remained at low to undetectable levels. All vaccinated animals produced high levels of cross protective neutralizing antibodies. Flow cytometry analysis of cells isolated from draining lymph nodes showed that VC2 vaccination stimulated significant increases in plasmablast (CD27 high CD38 high ) and mature memory (CD21 - IgM - ) B cells. T cell analysis on cells isolated from draining lymph node biopsies demonstrated a statistically significant increase in proliferating (Ki67 + ) follicular T helper cells and regulatory CXCR5 + CD8 + cytotoxic T cells. Analysis of plasma isolated two weeks post vaccination showed significant increases in circulating CXCL13 indicating increased germinal center activity. Cells isolated from vaginal biopsy samples collected over the course of the study exhibited vaccination-dependent increases in proliferating (Ki67 + ) CD4 + and CD8 + T cell populations. These results suggest that intramuscular vaccination with the live-attenuated HSV-1 VC2 vaccine strain can stimulate robust IgG 1 antibody responses that persist for >250days post vaccination. In addition, vaccination lead to the maturation of B cells into plasmablast and mature memory B cells, the expansion of follicular T helper cells, and affects in the mucosal immune responses. These data suggest that the HSV VC2 vaccine induces potent immune responses that could help

  19. Cardiac Catheterization (For Kids)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... First Aid & Safety Doctors & Hospitals Videos Recipes for Kids Kids site Sitio para niños How the Body Works ... Educators Search English Español Cardiac Catheterization KidsHealth / For Kids / Cardiac Catheterization What's in this article? What Is ...

  20. Superiority in Rhesus Macaques of Targeting HIV-1 Env gp140 to CD40 versus LOX-1 in Combination with Replication-Competent NYVAC-KC for Induction of Env-Specific Antibody and T Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurawski, Gerard; Shen, Xiaoying; Zurawski, Sandra; Tomaras, Georgia D; Montefiori, David C; Roederer, Mario; Ferrari, Guido; Lacabaratz, Christine; Klucar, Peter; Wang, Zhiqing; Foulds, Kathryn E; Kao, Shing-Fen; Yu, Xuesong; Sato, Alicia; Yates, Nicole L; LaBranche, Celia; Stanfield-Oakley, Sherry; Kibler, Karen; Jacobs, Bertram; Salazar, Andres; Self, Steve; Fulp, William; Gottardo, Raphael; Galmin, Lindsey; Weiss, Deborah; Cristillo, Anthony; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Levy, Yves

    2017-05-01

    We compared the HIV-1-specific immune responses generated by targeting HIV-1 envelope protein (Env gp140) to either CD40 or LOX-1, two endocytic receptors on dendritic cells (DCs), in rhesus macaques primed with a poxvirus vector (NYVAC-KC) expressing Env gp140. The DC-targeting vaccines, humanized recombinant monoclonal antibodies fused to Env gp140, were administered as a boost with poly-ICLC adjuvant either alone or coadministered with the NYVAC-KC vector. All the DC-targeting vaccine administrations with poly-ICLC increased the low-level serum anti-Env IgG responses elicited by NYVAC-KC priming significantly more (up to a P value of 0.01) than in a group without poly-ICLC. The responses were robust and cross-reactive and contained antibodies specific to multiple epitopes within gp140, including the C1, C2, V1, V2, and V3, C4, C5, and gp41 immunodominant regions. The DC-targeting vaccines also elicited modest serum Env-specific IgA responses. All groups gave serum neutralization activity limited to tier 1 viruses and antibody-dependent cytotoxicity responses (ADCC) after DC-targeting boosts. Furthermore, CD4 + and CD8 + T cell responses specific to multiple Env epitopes were strongly boosted by the DC-targeting vaccines plus poly-ICLC. Together, these results indicate that prime-boost immunization via NYVAC-KC and either anti-CD40.Env gp140/poly-ICLC or anti-LOX-1.Env gp140/poly-ICLC induced balanced antibody and T cell responses against HIV-1 Env. Coadministration of NYVAC-KC with the DC-targeting vaccines increased T cell responses but had minimal effects on antibody responses except for suppressing serum IgA responses. Overall, targeting Env to CD40 gave more robust T cell and serum antibody responses with broader epitope representation and greater durability than with LOX-1. IMPORTANCE An effective vaccine to prevent HIV-1 infection does not yet exist. An approach to elicit strong protective antibody development is to direct virus protein antigens

  1. Self catheterization - male

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... FAQs Customer Support Health Topics Drugs & Supplements Videos & Tools Español You Are Here: Home → Medical Encyclopedia → Self catheterization - male URL of this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/ ...

  2. Left heart catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catheterization - left heart ... to help guide the catheters up into your heart and arteries. Dye (sometimes called "contrast") will be ... in the blood vessels that lead to your heart. The catheter is then moved through the aortic ...

  3. Rhesus monkeys know when they remember

    OpenAIRE

    Hampton, Robert R.

    2001-01-01

    Humans are consciously aware of some memories and can make verbal reports about these memories. Other memories cannot be brought to consciousness, even though they influence behavior. This conspicuous difference in access to memories is central in taxonomies of human memory systems but has been difficult to document in animal studies, suggesting that some forms of memory may be unique to humans. Here I show that rhesus macaque monkeys can report the presence or absence...

  4. Medicinal management of corneal opacity in free ranging rhesus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corneal opacification was diagnosed in 17 free ranging rhesus macaques during detailed ophthalmic examination as a part of clinical health examination, at the monkey rescue sterilization centre in Hamirpur Himachal Pradesh, India. The cornea was completely opaque permitting only a little vision with respect to the ...

  5. Pregnancy diagnosis by laparoscopy in free range rhesus ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The present study involved 50 adult female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatto) of age ranging between 4 to 15 years. Pregnancy diagnosis was done by using laparoscopic method. Anesthesia was achieved by using xylazine (2mg/kg) and ketamine (10mg/kg) intramuscularly. The gravid uterus was located close to the ...

  6. MaqFACS (Macaque Facial Action Coding System can be used to document facial movements in Barbary macaques (Macaca sylvanus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Églantine Julle-Danière

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Human and non-human primates exhibit facial movements or displays to communicate with one another. The evolution of form and function of those displays could be better understood through multispecies comparisons. Anatomically based coding systems (Facial Action Coding Systems: FACS are developed to enable such comparisons because they are standardized and systematic and aid identification of homologous expressions underpinned by similar muscle contractions. To date, FACS has been developed for humans, and subsequently modified for chimpanzees, rhesus macaques, orangutans, hylobatids, dogs, and cats. Here, we wanted to test whether the MaqFACS system developed in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta could be used to code facial movements in Barbary macaques (M. sylvanus, a species phylogenetically close to the rhesus macaques. The findings show that the facial movement capacity of Barbary macaques can be reliably coded using the MaqFACS. We found differences in use and form of some movements, most likely due to specializations in the communicative repertoire of each species, rather than morphological differences.

  7. Immunogenicity of viral vector, prime-boost SIV vaccine regimens in infant rhesus macaques: attenuated vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) and modified vaccinia Ankara (MVA) recombinant SIV vaccines compared to live-attenuated SIV.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Rompay, Koen K A; Abel, Kristina; Earl, Patricia; Kozlowski, Pamela A; Easlick, Juliet; Moore, Joseph; Buonocore-Buzzelli, Linda; Schmidt, Kimberli A; Wilson, Robert L; Simon, Ian; Moss, Bernard; Rose, Nina; Rose, John; Marthas, Marta L

    2010-02-10

    In a previously developed infant macaque model mimicking HIV infection by breast-feeding, we demonstrated that intramuscular immunization with recombinant poxvirus vaccines expressing simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) structural proteins provided partial protection against infection following oral inoculation with virulent SIV. In an attempt to further increase systemic but also local antiviral immune responses at the site of viral entry, we tested the immunogenicity of different orally administered, replicating vaccines. One group of newborn macaques received an oral prime immunization with a recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus expressing SIVmac239 gag, pol and env (VSV-SIVgpe), followed 2 weeks later by an intramuscular boost immunization with MVA-SIV. Another group received two immunizations with live-attenuated SIVmac1A11, administered each time both orally and intravenously. Control animals received mock immunizations or non-SIV VSV and MVA control vectors. Analysis of SIV-specific immune responses in blood and lymphoid tissues at 4 weeks of age demonstrated that both vaccine regimens induced systemic antibody responses and both systemic and local cell-mediated immune responses. The safety and immunogenicity of the VSV-SIVgpe+MVA-SIV immunization regimen described in this report provide the scientific incentive to explore the efficacy of this vaccine regimen against virulent SIV exposure in the infant macaque model. Copyright (c) 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Improved survival in rhesus macaques immunized with modified vaccinia virus Ankara recombinants expressing simian immunodeficiency virus envelope correlates with reduction in memory CD4+ T-cell loss and higher titers of neutralizing antibody.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ourmanov, Ilnour; Kuwata, Takeo; Goeken, Robert; Goldstein, Simoy; Iyengar, Ranjani; Buckler-White, Alicia; Lafont, Bernard; Hirsch, Vanessa M

    2009-06-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that immunization of macaques with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) Gag-Pol and Env recombinants of the attenuated poxvirus modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA) provided protection from high viremia and AIDS following challenge with a pathogenic strain of SIV. Although all animals became infected, plasma viremia was significantly reduced in animals that received the MVA-SIV recombinant vaccines compared with animals that received nonrecombinant MVA. Most importantly, the reduction in viremia resulted in a significant increase in median and cumulative survival. Continued analysis of these animals over the subsequent 9 years has shown that they maintain a survival advantage, although all but two of the macaques have progressed to AIDS. Importantly, improved survival correlated with preservation of memory CD4(+) T cells in the peripheral blood. The greatest survival advantage was observed in macaques immunized with regimens containing SIV Env, and the titer of neutralizing antibodies to the challenge virus prior to or shortly following challenge correlated with preservation of CD4(+) T cells. These data are consistent with a role for neutralizing antibodies in nonsterilizing protection from high viremia and associated memory CD4(+) T-cell loss.

  9. Serial Cognition and Personality in Macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Drew M. Altschul

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available We examined the associations between serial cognition and personality in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta. Nine macaques were tested on a simultaneous chaining task to assess their cognitive abilities. They were also rated for personality traits and scored according to a previously extracted six component structure derived from free-ranging rhesus macaques. Friendliness and Openness were positively associated with good performance on three measures of accuracy on the serial learning task: Progress, Error, and Rewarded (i.e., correctly completed Trials. Faster Reaction Times were associated with lower Friendliness and higher Confidence, as well as higher Openness when only correct responses were analyzed. We also used regularized exploratory factor analysis to extract two, three, four, five, and six factor structures, and found consistent associations between accuracy and single factors within each of these structures. Prior results on intelligence in other nonhuman primate species have focused on basic intelligence tests; this study demonstrates that more complex, abstract cognitive tasks can be used to assess intelligence and personality in nonhuman primates.

  10. Differences in time of virus appearance in the blood and virus-specific immune responses in intravenous and intrarectal primary SIVmac251 infection of rhesus macaques; a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Washington Parks Robyn

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-I can be transmitted by intravenous inoculation of contaminated blood or blood product or sexually through mucosal surfaces. Here we performed a pilot study in the SIVmac251 macaque model to address whether the route of viral entry influences the kinetics of the appearance and the size of virus-specific immune in different tissue compartments. Methods For this purpose, of 2 genetically defined Mamu-A*01-positive macaques, 1 was exposed intravenously and the other intrarectally to the same SIVmac251 viral stock and virus-specific CD8+ T-cells were measured within the first 12 days of infection in the blood and at day 12 in several tissues following euthanasia. Results Virus-specific CD8+ T-cell responses to Gag, Env, and particularly Tat appeared earlier in the blood of the animal exposed by the mucosal route than in the animal exposed intravenously. The magnitude of these virus-specific responses was consistently higher in the systemic tissues and GALT of the macaque exposed by the intravenous route, suggesting a higher viral burden in the tissues as reflected by the faster appearance of virus in plasma. Differences in the ability of the virus-specific CD8+ T-cells to respond in vitro to specific peptide stimulation were also observed and the greatest proliferative ability was found in the GALT of the animal infected by the intrarectal route. Conclusions These data may suggest that the natural mucosal barrier may delay viral spreading. The consequences of this observation, if confirmed in studies with a larger number of animals, may have implications in vaccine development.

  11. Different macaque models of cognitive aging exhibit task-dependent behavioral disparities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comrie, Alison E; Gray, Daniel T; Smith, Anne C; Barnes, Carol A

    2018-05-15

    Deficits in cognitive functions that rely on the integrity of the frontal and temporal lobes are characteristic of normative human aging. Due to similar aging phenotypes and homologous cortical organization between nonhuman primates and humans, several species of macaque monkeys are used as models to explore brain senescence. These macaque species are typically regarded as equivalent models of cognitive aging, yet no direct comparisons have been made to support this assumption. Here we used adult and aged rhesus and bonnet macaques (Macaca mulatta and Macaca radiata) to characterize the effect of age on acquisition and retention of information across delays in a battery of behavioral tasks that rely on prefrontal cortex and medial temporal lobe networks. The cognitive functions that were tested include visuospatial short-term memory, object recognition memory, and object-reward association memory. In general, bonnet macaques at all ages outperformed rhesus macaques on tasks thought to rely primarily on the prefrontal cortex, and were more resilient to age-related deficits in these behaviors. On the other hand, both species were comparably impaired by age on tasks thought to preferentially engage the medial temporal lobe. Together, these results suggest that rhesus and bonnet macaques are not equivalent models of cognitive aging and highlight the value of cross-species comparisons. These observations should enable improved design and interpretation of future experiments aimed at understanding changes in cognition across the lifespan. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Social facilitation of cognition in rhesus monkeys: audience vs. coaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amélie J. Reynaud

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Social psychology has long established that the mere presence of a conspecific, be it an active co-performer (coaction effect, or a passive spectator (audience effect changes behavior in humans. Yet, the process mediating this fundamental social influence has so far eluded us. Brain research and its nonhuman primate animal model, the rhesus macaque, could shed new light on this long debated issue. For this approach to be fruitful, however, we need to improve our patchy knowledge about social presence influence in rhesus macaques. Here, seven adults (two dyads and one triad performed a simple cognitive task consisting in touching images to obtain food treats, alone versus in presence of a co-performer or a spectator. As in humans, audience sufficed to enhance performance to the same magnitude as coaction. Effect sizes were however 4 times larger than those typically reported in humans in similar tasks. Both findings are an encouragement to pursue brain and behavior research in the rhesus macaque to help solve the riddle of social facilitation mechanisms.

  13. High Infection Rates for Adult Macaques after Intravaginal or Intrarectal Inoculation with Zika Virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haddow, Andrew D; Nalca, Aysegul; Rossi, Franco D; Miller, Lynn J; Wiley, Michael R; Perez-Sautu, Unai; Washington, Samuel C; Norris, Sarah L; Wollen-Roberts, Suzanne E; Shamblin, Joshua D; Kimmel, Adrienne E; Bloomfield, Holly A; Valdez, Stephanie M; Sprague, Thomas R; Principe, Lucia M; Bellanca, Stephanie A; Cinkovich, Stephanie S; Lugo-Roman, Luis; Cazares, Lisa H; Pratt, William D; Palacios, Gustavo F; Bavari, Sina; Pitt, M Louise; Nasar, Farooq

    2017-08-01

    Unprotected sexual intercourse between persons residing in or traveling from regions with Zika virus transmission is a risk factor for infection. To model risk for infection after sexual intercourse, we inoculated rhesus and cynomolgus macaques with Zika virus by intravaginal or intrarectal routes. In macaques inoculated intravaginally, we detected viremia and virus RNA in 50% of macaques, followed by seroconversion. In macaques inoculated intrarectally, we detected viremia, virus RNA, or both, in 100% of both species, followed by seroconversion. The magnitude and duration of infectious virus in the blood of macaques suggest humans infected with Zika virus through sexual transmission will likely generate viremias sufficient to infect competent mosquito vectors. Our results indicate that transmission of Zika virus by sexual intercourse might serve as a virus maintenance mechanism in the absence of mosquito-to-human transmission and could increase the probability of establishment and spread of Zika virus in regions where this virus is not present.

  14. High Infection Rates for Adult Macaques after Intravaginal or Intrarectal Inoculation with Zika Virus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalca, Aysegul; Rossi, Franco D.; Miller, Lynn J.; Wiley, Michael R.; Perez-Sautu, Unai; Washington, Samuel C.; Norris, Sarah L.; Wollen-Roberts, Suzanne E.; Shamblin, Joshua D.; Kimmel, Adrienne E.; Bloomfield, Holly A.; Valdez, Stephanie M.; Sprague, Thomas R.; Principe, Lucia M.; Bellanca, Stephanie A.; Cinkovich, Stephanie S.; Lugo-Roman, Luis; Cazares, Lisa H.; Pratt, William D.; Palacios, Gustavo F.; Bavari, Sina; Pitt, M. Louise; Nasar, Farooq

    2017-01-01

    Unprotected sexual intercourse between persons residing in or traveling from regions with Zika virus transmission is a risk factor for infection. To model risk for infection after sexual intercourse, we inoculated rhesus and cynomolgus macaques with Zika virus by intravaginal or intrarectal routes. In macaques inoculated intravaginally, we detected viremia and virus RNA in 50% of macaques, followed by seroconversion. In macaques inoculated intrarectally, we detected viremia, virus RNA, or both, in 100% of both species, followed by seroconversion. The magnitude and duration of infectious virus in the blood of macaques suggest humans infected with Zika virus through sexual transmission will likely generate viremias sufficient to infect competent mosquito vectors. Our results indicate that transmission of Zika virus by sexual intercourse might serve as a virus maintenance mechanism in the absence of mosquito-to-human transmission and could increase the probability of establishment and spread of Zika virus in regions where this virus is not present. PMID:28548637

  15. Free-ranging Cayo Santiago rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta): III. Dental eruption patterns and dental pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qian; Turnquist, Jean E; Kessler, Matthew J

    2016-01-01

    This article describes the dental eruption patterns, dentition, and dental wear, including tooth loss and breakage, of the free-ranging population of rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) on Cayo Santiago (CS), Puerto Rico, ranging from 24 hr to 25 years old. Of the 694 monkeys on the island in the year 1985, 688 (99.1%; 366 males, 322 females) were captured and the dentition of 685 subjects (98.7% of the total population; 366 males, 319 females) was examined. Animals ranged in age from less than 24 hr to 331 months (27.58 years), encompassing the entire life span of the CS macaques. Results demonstrated that the first deciduous teeth appeared as early as the third day of life and that the sequence of dental eruption was comparable to the pattern observed in laboratory rhesus. However, there were slight differences in the age of eruption of individual teeth. For example, the canines and third molars erupted about a year later in the CS macaques compared to some laboratory rhesus. Overall, CS rhesus had good oral health and dental condition although tooth wear, loss, and breakage were common in aged animals, especially in males. This report, combined with earlier studies on morphological characteristics and skeletal remains of the CS macaques, provides the basis for further studies on the biology, genetics, life history, and effects of the environment on rhesus monkeys. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Haplessly hoping: macaque major histocompatibility complex made easy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiseman, Roger W; Karl, Julie A; Bohn, Patrick S; Nimityongskul, Francesca A; Starrett, Gabriel J; O'Connor, David H

    2013-01-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene products control the repertoire of T cell responses that an individual may create against pathogens and foreign tissues. This text will review the current understanding of MHC genetics in nonhuman primates, with a focus on Mauritian-origin cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) and Indian-origin rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). These closely related macaque species provide important experimental models for studies of infectious disease pathogenesis, vaccine development, and transplantation research. Recent advances resulting from the application of several cost effective, high-throughput approaches, with deep sequencing technologies have revolutionized our ability to perform MHC genotyping of large macaque cohorts. Pyrosequencing of cDNA amplicons with a Roche/454 GS Junior instrument, provides excellent resolution of MHC class I allelic variants with semi-quantitative estimates of relative levels of transcript abundance. Introduction of the Illumina MiSeq platform significantly increased the sample throughput, since the sample loading workflow is considerably less labor intensive, and each instrument run yields approximately 100-fold more sequence data. Extension of these sequencing methods from cDNA to genomic DNA amplicons further streamlines the experimental workflow and opened opportunities for retrospective MHC genotyping of banked DNA samples. To facilitate the reporting of MHC genotypes, and comparisons between groups of macaques, this text also introduces an intuitive series of abbreviated rhesus MHC haplotype designations based on a major Mamu-A or Mamu-B transcript characteristic for ancestral allele combinations. The authors believe that the use of MHC-defined macaques promises to improve the reproducibility, and predictability of results from pre-clinical studies for translation to humans.

  17. Sequential emergence and clinical implications of viral mutants with K70E and K65R mutation in reverse transcriptase during prolonged tenofovir monotherapy in rhesus macaques with chronic RT-SHIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedersen Niels C

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We reported previously on the emergence and clinical implications of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac251 mutants with a K65R mutation in reverse transcriptase (RT, and the role of CD8+ cell-mediated immune responses in suppressing viremia during tenofovir therapy. Because of significant sequence differences between SIV and HIV-1 RT that affect drug susceptibilities and mutational patterns, it is unclear to what extent findings with SIV can be extrapolated to HIV-1 RT. Accordingly, to model HIV-1 RT responses, 12 macaques were inoculated with RT-SHIV, a chimeric SIV containing HIV-1 RT, and started on prolonged tenofovir therapy 5 months later. Results The early virologic response to tenofovir correlated with baseline viral RNA levels and expression of the MHC class I allele Mamu-A*01. For all animals, sensitive real-time PCR assays detected the transient emergence of K70E RT mutants within 4 weeks of therapy, which were then replaced by K65R mutants within 12 weeks of therapy. For most animals, the occurrence of these mutations preceded a partial rebound of plasma viremia to levels that remained on average 10-fold below baseline values. One animal eventually suppressed K65R viremia to undetectable levels for more than 4 years; sequential experiments using CD8+ cell depletion and tenofovir interruption demonstrated that both CD8+ cells and continued tenofovir therapy were required for sustained suppression of viremia. Conclusion This is the first evidence that tenofovir therapy can select directly for K70E viral mutants in vivo. The observations on the clinical implications of the K65R RT-SHIV mutants were consistent with those of SIVmac251, and suggest that for persons infected with K65R HIV-1 both immune-mediated and drug-dependent antiviral activities play a role in controlling viremia. These findings suggest also that even in the presence of K65R virus, continuation of tenofovir treatment as part of HAART may be

  18. [Ultrasound-guided peripheral catheterization].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salleras-Duran, Laia; Fuentes-Pumarola, Concepció

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral catheterization is a technique that can be difficult in some patients. Some studies have recently described the use of ultrasound to guide the venous catheterization. To describe the success rate, time required, complications of ultrasound-guided peripheral venous catheterization. and patients and professionals satisfaction The search was performed in databases (Medline-PubMed, Cochrane Library, CINAHL and Cuiden Plus) for studies published about ultrasound-guided peripheral venous catheterization performed on patients that provided results on the success of the technique, complications, time used, patient satisfaction and the type of professional who performed the technique. A total of 21 studies were included. Most of them get a higher success rate 80% in the catheterization ecoguide and time it is not higher than the traditional technique. The Technical complications analyzed were arterial puncture rates and lower nerve 10%. In all studies measuring and comparing patient satisfaction in the art ecoguide is greater. Various professional groups perform the technique. The use of ultrasound for peripheral pipes has a high success rate, complications are rare and the time used is similar to that of the traditional technique. The technique of inserting catheters through ultrasound may be learned by any professional group performing venipuncture. Finally, it gets underscores the high patient satisfaction with the use of this technique. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  19. Cloning, sequencing, and polymorphism analysis of novel classical MHC class I alleles in northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lian, Xiao-Dong; Zhang, Xi-He; Dai, Zheng-Xi; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2016-04-01

    The northern pig-tailed macaque (Macaca leonina) has been confirmed to be an independent species from the pig-tailed macaque group of Old World monkey. We have previously reported that the northern pig-tailed macaques were also susceptible to HIV-1. Here, to make this animal a potential HIV/AIDS model and to discover the mechanism of virus control, we attempted to assess the role of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I-restricted immune responses to HIV-1 infection, which was associated with viral replication and disease progression. As an initial step, we first cloned and characterized the classical MHC class I gene of northern pig-tailed macaques. In this study, we identified 39 MHC class I alleles including 17 MHC-A and 22 MHC-B alleles. Out of these identified alleles, 30 were novel and 9 were identical to alleles previously reported from other macaque species. The MHC-A and MHC-B loci were both duplicates as rhesus macaques and southern pig-tailed macaques. In addition, we also detected the patterns of positive selection in northern pig-tailed macaques and revealed the existence of balance selection with 20 positive selection sites in the peptide binding region. The analysis of B and F peptide binding pockets in northern and southern pig-tailed macaques and rhesus macaques suggested that they were likely to share a few common peptides to present. Thus, this study provides important MHC immunogenetics information and adds values to northern pig-tailed macaques as a promising HIV/AIDS model.

  20. Analysis of carboxylesterase 2 transcript variants in cynomolgus macaque liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Yasuhiro; Igawa, Yoshiyuki; Tanaka, Maori; Ohura, Kayoko; Hosokawa, Masakiyo; Imai, Teruko

    2018-04-27

    Carboxylesterase (CES) is important for the detoxification of a wide range of drugs and xenobiotics. In this study, the hepatic level of CES2 mRNA was examined in cynomolgus macaques used widely in preclinical studies for drug metabolism. Three CES2 mRNAs were present in cynomolgus macaque liver. The mRNA level was highest for cynomolgus CES2A (formerly CES2v3), much lower for cynomolgus CES2B (formerly CES2v1) and extremely low for cynomolgus CES2C (formerly CES2v2). Most various transcript variants produced from cynomolgus CES2B gene did not contain a complete coding region. Thus, CES2A is the major CES2 enzyme in cynomolgus liver. A new transcript variant of CES2A, CES2Av2, was identified. CES2Av2 contained exon 3 region different from wild-type (CES2Av1). In cynomolgus macaques expressing only CES2Av2 transcript, CES2A contained the sequence of CES2B in exon 3 and vicinity, probably due to gene conversion. On genotyping, this CES2Av2 allele was prevalent in Indochinese cynomolgus macaques, but not in Indonesian cynomolgus or rhesus macaques. CES2Av2 recombinant protein showed similar activity to CES2Av1 protein for several substrates. It is concluded that CES2A is the major cynomolgus hepatic CES2, and new transcript variant, CES2Av2, has similar functions to CES2Av1.

  1. Methemoglobin and sulfhemoglobin formation due to benzocaine and lidocaine in macaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martin, D.G.; Woodard, C.L.; Gold, M.B.; Watson, C.E.; Baskin, S.I.

    1993-05-13

    Benzocaine (BNZ) and lidocaine (LC) are commonly used topical (spray) anesthetics approved for use in humans. BNZ has structural similarities to methemoglobin (MHb) forming drugs that are current candidates for cyanide prophylaxis, while LC has been reported to increase MHb in man. We therefore, compared MHb and sulfhemoglobin (SHb) production in three groups of Macaques (Macaca mulata, Chinese rhesus and Indian rhesus, and Macaca nemistrina, Pig-tailed Macaques) after exposure to BNZ and LC. Formation of SHb, unlike MHb, is not thought to be reversible and is considered to be toxic. MHb and SHb levels were measured periodically on a CO-Oximeter. All rhesus (n=8) were dosed intratrachealy/intranasaly with 56 mg and 280 mg BNZ and with 40 mg of LC in a randomized cross-over design. Pig-tailed macaques (n=6) were dosed with BNZ intranasaly 56 mg and with 40 mg of LC. Since no differences in the peak MHb or time to peak (mean +/- SD) were observed among the three macaque subspecies, the data were pooled. LC did not cause MHb or SHb formation above baseline in any monkey.

  2. Preference for facial averageness: Evidence for a common mechanism in human and macaque infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damon, Fabrice; Méary, David; Quinn, Paul C; Lee, Kang; Simpson, Elizabeth A; Paukner, Annika; Suomi, Stephen J; Pascalis, Olivier

    2017-04-13

    Human adults and infants show a preference for average faces, which could stem from a general processing mechanism and may be shared among primates. However, little is known about preference for facial averageness in monkeys. We used a comparative developmental approach and eye-tracking methodology to assess visual attention in human and macaque infants to faces naturally varying in their distance from a prototypical face. In Experiment 1, we examined the preference for faces relatively close to or far from the prototype in 12-month-old human infants with human adult female faces. Infants preferred faces closer to the average than faces farther from it. In Experiment 2, we measured the looking time of 3-month-old rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) viewing macaque faces varying in their distance from the prototype. Like human infants, macaque infants looked longer to faces closer to the average. In Experiments 3 and 4, both species were presented with unfamiliar categories of faces (i.e., macaque infants tested with adult macaque faces; human infants and adults tested with infant macaque faces) and showed no prototype preferences, suggesting that the prototypicality effect is experience-dependent. Overall, the findings suggest a common processing mechanism across species, leading to averageness preferences in primates.

  3. Molecular characterization and polymorphisms of butyrylcholinesterase in cynomolgus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Yasuhiro; Uehara, Shotaro; Mahadhi, Hassan M D; Ohura, Kayoko; Hosokawa, Masakiyo; Imai, Teruko

    2018-06-01

    Butyrylcholinesterase (BChE), an enzyme essential for drug metabolism, has been investigated as antidotes against organophosphorus nerve agents, and the efficacy and safety have been studied in cynomolgus macaques. BChE polymorphisms partly account for variable BChE activities among individuals in humans, but have not been investigated in cynomolgus macaques. Molecular characterization was carried out by analyzing primary sequence, gene, tissue expression, and genetic variants. In cynomolgus and human BChE, phylogenetically closely related, amino acid residues important for enzyme function were conserved, and gene and genomic structure were similar. Cynomolgus BChE mRNA was most abundantly expressed in liver among the 10 tissue types analyzed. Re-sequencing found 26 non-synonymous genetic variants in 121 cynomolgus and 23 rhesus macaques, indicating that macaque BChE is polymorphic, although none of these variants corresponded to the null or defective alleles of human BChE. These results suggest molecular similarities of cynomolgus and human BChE. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Expression of cytochrome P450 regulators in cynomolgus macaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uno, Yasuhiro; Yamazaki, Hiroshi

    2017-09-11

    1. Cytochrome P450 (P450) regulators including nuclear receptors and transcription factors have not been fully investigated in cynomolgus macaques, an important species used in drug metabolism studies. In this study, we analyzed 17 P450 regulators by sequence and phylogenetic analysis, and tissue expression. 2. Gene and genome structures of 17 P450 regulators were similar to the human orthologs, and the deduced amino acid sequences showed high sequence identities (92-95%) and more closely clustered in a phylogenetic tree, with the human orthologs. 3. Many of the P450 regulator mRNAs were preferentially expressed in the liver, kidney, and/or jejunum. Among the P450 regulator mRNAs, PXR was most abundant in the liver and jejunum, and HNF4α in the kidney. In the liver, the expression of most P450 regulator mRNAs did not show significant differential expression (>2.5-fold) between cynomolgus macaques bred in Cambodia, China, and Indonesia, or rhesus macaques. 4. By correlation analysis, most of the P450 regulators were significantly (p < 0.05) correlated to other P450 regulators, and many of them were also significantly (p < 0.05) correlated with P450s. 5. These results suggest that 17 P450 regulators of cynomolgus macaques had similar molecular characteristics to the human orthologs.

  5. Executive-Attentional Uncertainty Responses by Rhesus Macaques ("Macaca mulatta")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. David; Coutinho, Mariana V. C.; Church, Barbara A.; Beran, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The uncertainty response has been influential in studies of human perception, and it is crucial in the growing research literature that explores animal metacognition. However, the uncertainty response's interpretation is still sharply debated. The authors sought to clarify this interpretation using the dissociative technique of cognitive loads…

  6. Complexity and evolution of KIR genes in rhesus macaques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Blokhuis, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are essential in shaping immune responses against pathogens, and play an important role during pregnancy. Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) educate the NK cell and determine its activation state. Because of this broad medical relevance, it is important to

  7. Laparoscopic paraovarian cyst removal in a female rhesus macaque

    OpenAIRE

    KUMAR, Vijay; RAJ, Anshu; RASTOGI, Sameer

    2014-01-01

    High purity, carbon monoxide-free hydrogen and filamentous carbon can be produced by thermo-catalytic cracking of methane. Carbon filaments continue to grow until the catalyst deactivates because of carbon encapsulation. Regeneration of catalyst is important to maintain a continuous process. Our work on optimization of the partial regeneration method showed that activity of the catalyst can be sustained for longer times by gasifying not all but some extent of the deposited carbon. I...

  8. Transcriptional reprogramming in nonhuman primate (rhesus macaque tuberculosis granulomas.

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    Smriti Mehra

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available In response to Mtb infection, the host remodels the infection foci into a dense mass of cells known as the granuloma. The key objective of the granuloma is to contain the spread of Mtb into uninfected regions of the lung. However, it appears that Mtb has evolved mechanisms to resist killing in the granuloma. Profiling granuloma transcriptome will identify key immune signaling pathways active during TB infection. Such studies are not possible in human granulomas, due to various confounding factors. Nonhuman Primates (NHPs infected with Mtb accurately reflect human TB in clinical and pathological contexts.We studied transcriptomics of granuloma lesions in the lungs of NHPs exhibiting active TB, during early and late stages of infection. Early TB lesions were characterized by a highly pro-inflammatory environment, expressing high levels of immune signaling pathways involving IFNgamma, TNFalpha, JAK, STAT and C-C/C-X-C chemokines. Late TB lesions, while morphologically similar to the early ones, exhibited an overwhelming silencing of the inflammatory response. Reprogramming of the granuloma transcriptome was highly significant. The expression of approximately two-thirds of all genes induced in early lesions was later repressed.The transcriptional characteristics of TB granulomas undergo drastic changes during the course of infection. The overwhelming reprogramming of the initial pro-inflammatory surge in late lesions may be a host strategy to limit immunopathology. We propose that these host profiles can predict changes in bacterial replication and physiology, perhaps serving as markers for latency and reactivation.

  9. Live interaction distinctively shapes social gaze dynamics in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Monte, Olga; Piva, Matthew; Morris, Jason A; Chang, Steve W C

    2016-10-01

    The dynamic interaction of gaze between individuals is a hallmark of social cognition. However, very few studies have examined social gaze dynamics after mutual eye contact during real-time interactions. We used a highly quantifiable paradigm to assess social gaze dynamics between pairs of monkeys and modeled these dynamics using an exponential decay function to investigate sustained attention after mutual eye contact. When monkeys were interacting with real partners compared with static images and movies of the same monkeys, we found a significant increase in the proportion of fixations to the eyes and a smaller dispersion of fixations around the eyes, indicating enhanced focal attention to the eye region. Notably, dominance and familiarity between the interacting pairs induced separable components of gaze dynamics that were unique to live interactions. Gaze dynamics of dominant monkeys after mutual eye contact were associated with a greater number of fixations to the eyes, whereas those of familiar pairs were associated with a faster rate of decrease in this eye-directed attention. Our findings endorse the notion that certain key aspects of social cognition are only captured during interactive social contexts and dependent on the elapsed time relative to socially meaningful events. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  10. Population-averaged macaque brain atlas with high-resolution ex vivo DTI integrated into in vivo space.

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    Feng, Lei; Jeon, Tina; Yu, Qiaowen; Ouyang, Minhui; Peng, Qinmu; Mishra, Virendra; Pletikos, Mihovil; Sestan, Nenad; Miller, Michael I; Mori, Susumu; Hsiao, Steven; Liu, Shuwei; Huang, Hao

    2017-12-01

    Animal models of the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta), the most widely used nonhuman primate, have been irreplaceable in neurobiological studies. However, a population-averaged macaque brain diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) atlas, including comprehensive gray and white matter labeling as well as bony and facial landmarks guiding invasive experimental procedures, is not available. The macaque white matter tract pathways and microstructures have been rarely recorded. Here, we established a population-averaged macaque brain atlas with high-resolution ex vivo DTI integrated into in vivo space incorporating bony and facial landmarks, and delineated microstructures and three-dimensional pathways of major white matter tracts in vivo MRI/DTI and ex vivo (postmortem) DTI of ten rhesus macaque brains were acquired. Single-subject macaque brain DTI template was obtained by transforming the postmortem high-resolution DTI data into in vivo space. Ex vivo DTI of ten macaque brains was then averaged in the in vivo single-subject template space to generate population-averaged macaque brain DTI atlas. The white matter tracts were traced with DTI-based tractography. One hundred and eighteen neural structures including all cortical gyri, white matter tracts and subcortical nuclei, were labeled manually on population-averaged DTI-derived maps. The in vivo microstructural metrics of fractional anisotropy, axial, radial and mean diffusivity of the traced white matter tracts were measured. Population-averaged digital atlas integrated into in vivo space can be used to label the experimental macaque brain automatically. Bony and facial landmarks will be available for guiding invasive procedures. The DTI metric measurements offer unique insights into heterogeneous microstructural profiles of different white matter tracts.

  11. Therapeutic Efficacy of the Small Molecule GS-5734 against Ebola virus in Rhesus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-03-02

    of Ebola virus infection with plant -derived 270 monoclonal antibodies provides protection in rhesus macaques. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 109, 271...flask for 3 to 4 days before seeding into 448 96-well assay plates. Immortalized human microvascular endothelial cells (HMVEC-TERT) 449 were...screening. Virology 332, 20-27 810 (2005). 811 27 Shao, R. & Guo, X. Human microvascular endothelial cells immortalized with human telomerase 812

  12. Radioimmunoassay for rhesus monkey gonadotropins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Faiman, C.; Stearns, E.L.; Winter, J.S.D.; Reyes, F.I.; Hobson, W.C.

    1975-01-01

    Heterologous double-antibody radioimmunoassay methods are described for the measurement of circulating levels of rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) FSH and LH; the latter assay is also applicable to rhesus chorionic gonadotropin (CG) estimations. The FSH assay utilizes purified rat FSH for trace, either of two anti-human FSH antisera and a semipurified rhesus pituitary standard. The LH assay utilizes purified ovine LH for trace, an anti-human CG antiserum and the same rhesus pituitary standard. The use of these systems obviates the necessity of purifying rhesus gonadotropins which are required for the development of homologous radioimmunoassay systems. (U.S.)

  13. The effect of suprapubic catheterization versus transurethral catheterization after abdominal surgery on urinary tract infection: A randomized controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baan, A. H.; Vermeulen, H.; van der Meulen, J.; Bossuyt, P.; Olszyna, D.; Gouma, D. J.

    2003-01-01

    Background/Aim: Transurethral catheterization is generally associated with a higher incidence of urinary tract infections than suprapubic catheterization; however, suprapubic catheterization is associated with other disadvantages such as higher costs and a more difficult technique, and at the moment

  14. Cervical carotid and circle of willis arterial anatomy of macaque monkeys: a comparative anatomy study.

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    Kumar, Nishant; Lee, John J; Perlmutter, Joel S; Derdeyn, Colin P

    2009-07-01

    Macaque monkeys are used in many research applications, including cerebrovascular investigations. However, detailed catalogs of the relevant vascular anatomy are scarce. We present our experience with macaque vessel patterns as determined by digital subtraction angiography of 34 different monkeys. We retrospectively analyzed digital subtraction angiograms obtained during experimental internal carotid artery (ICA) catheterization and subsequent injection of 1-methyl 4-phenyl 1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine. Results were catalogued according to vascular distribution and variants observed. Macaque monkeys have a bovine aortic arch. The carotid vessels generally bifurcate, but are occasionally observed to divide into three vessels. The external carotid gives rise primarily to two trunks: an occipital branch and a common vessel that subsequently gives off the lingual, facial, and superior thyroid arteries. The internal maxillary artery may be present as a terminal branch of the external carotid or as a branch of the occipital artery. The ICA is similar in course to that of the human. The anterior circle of Willis was intact in all monkeys in our study. Its primary difference from that of the human is the union of the bilateral anterior cerebral arteries as a single (azygous) median vessel. Macaque cervical carotid and circle of Willis arterial anatomy differs from humans in a couple of specific patterns. Knowledge of these differences and similarities between human and macaque anatomy is important in developing endovascular macaque models of human diseases, such as ischemic stroke.

  15. Phylogeny and History of the Lost SIV from Crab-Eating Macaques: SIVmfa.

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    Kevin R McCarthy

    Full Text Available In the 20th century, thirteen distinct human immunodeficiency viruses emerged following independent cross-species transmission events involving simian immunodeficiency viruses (SIV from African primates. In the late 1900s, pathogenic SIV strains also emerged in the United Sates among captive Asian macaque species following their unintentional infection with SIV from African sooty mangabeys (SIVsmm. Since their discovery in the 1980s, SIVs from rhesus macaques (SIVmac and pig-tailed macaques (SIVmne have become invaluable models for studying HIV pathogenesis, vaccine design and the emergence of viruses. SIV isolates from captive crab-eating macaques (SIVmfa were initially described but lost prior to any detailed molecular and genetic characterization. In order to infer the origins of the lost SIVmfa lineage, we located archived material and colony records, recovered its genomic sequence by PCR, and assessed its phylogenetic relationship to other SIV strains. We conclude that SIVmfa is the product of two cross-species transmission events. The first was the established transmission of SIVsmm to rhesus macaques, which occurred at the California National Primate Research Center in the late 1960s and the virus later emerged as SIVmac. In a second event, SIVmac was transmitted to crab-eating macaques, likely at the Laboratory for Experimental Medicine and Surgery in Primates in the early 1970s, and it was later spread to the New England Primate Research Center colony in 1973 and eventually isolated in 1986. Our analysis suggests that SIVmac had already emerged by the early 1970s and had begun to diverge into distinct lineages. Furthermore, our findings suggest that pathogenic SIV strains may have been more widely distributed than previously appreciated, raising the possibility that additional isolates may await discovery.

  16. Visualization of transepithelial passage of the immunogenic 33-residue peptide from alpha-2 gliadin in gluten-sensitive macaques.

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    Kaushiki Mazumdar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Based on clinical, histopathological and serological similarities to human celiac disease (CD, we recently established the rhesus macaque model of gluten sensitivity. In this study, we further characterized this condition based on presence of anti-tissue transglutaminase 2 (TG2 antibodies, increased intestinal permeability and transepithelial transport of a proteolytically resistant, immunotoxic, 33-residue peptide from alpha(2-gliadin in the distal duodenum of gluten-sensitive macaques. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Six rhesus macaques were selected for study from a pool of 500, including two healthy controls and four gluten-sensitive animals with elevated anti-gliadin or anti-TG2 antibodies as well as history of non-infectious chronic diarrhea. Pediatric endoscope-guided pinch biopsies were collected from each animal's distal duodenum following administration of a gluten-containing diet (GD and again after remission by gluten-free diet (GFD. Control biopsies always showed normal villous architecture, whereas gluten-sensitive animals on GD exhibited histopathology ranging from mild lymphocytic infiltration to villous atrophy, typical of human CD. Immunofluorescent microscopic analysis of biopsies revealed IgG+ and IgA+ plasma-like cells producing antibodies that colocalized with TG2 in gluten-sensitive macaques only. Following instillation in vivo, the Cy-3-labeled 33-residue gluten peptide colocalized with the brush border protein villin in all animals. In a substantially enteropathic macaque with "leaky" duodenum, the peptide penetrated beneath the epithelium into the lamina propria. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The rhesus macaque model of gluten sensitivity not only resembles the histopathology of CD but it also may provide a model for studying intestinal permeability in states of epithelial integrity and disrepair.

  17. Rhesus lymphocryptovirus latent membrane protein 2A activates β-catenin signaling and inhibits differentiation in epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Siler, Catherine A.; Raab-Traub, Nancy

    2008-01-01

    Rhesus lymphocryptovirus (LCV) is a γ-herpesvirus closely related to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The rhesus latent membrane protein 2A (LMP2A) is highly homologous to EBV LMP2A. EBV LMP2A activates the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and β-catenin signaling pathways in epithelial cells and affects differentiation. In the present study, the biochemical and biological properties of rhesus LMP2A in epithelial cells were investigated. The expression of rhesus LMP2A in epithelial cells induced Akt activation, GSK3β inactivation and accumulation of β-catenin in the cytoplasm and nucleus. The nuclear translocation, but not accumulation of β-catenin was dependent on Akt activation. Rhesus LMP2A also impaired epithelial cell differentiation; however, this process was not dependent upon Akt activation. A mutant rhesus LMP2A lacking six transmembrane domains functioned similarly to wild-type rhesus LMP2A indicating that the full number of transmembrane domains is not required for effects on β-catenin or cell differentiation. These results underscore the similarity of LCV to EBV and the suitability of the macaque as an animal model for studying EBV pathogenesis

  18. D316 is critical for the enzymatic activity and HIV-1 restriction potential of human and rhesus APOBEC3B

    OpenAIRE

    McDougle, Rebecca M.; Hultquist, Judd F.; Stabell, Alex C.; Sawyer, Sara L.; Harris, Reuben S.

    2013-01-01

    APOBEC3B is one of seven human APOBEC3 DNA cytosine deaminases that function to inhibit the replication and persistence of retroelements and retroviruses. Human APOBEC3B restricts the replication of HIV-1 in HEK293 cells, while our laboratory clone of rhesus macaque APOBEC3B did not. We mapped the restriction determinant to a single amino acid difference that alters enzymatic activity. Human APOBEC3B D316 is catalytically active and capable of restricting HIV-1 while rhesus APOBEC3B N316 is n...

  19. Auditory artificial grammar learning in macaque and marmoset monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Benjamin; Slater, Heather; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Milne, Alice E; Marslen-Wilson, William D; Smith, Kenny; Petkov, Christopher I

    2013-11-27

    Artificial grammars (AG) are designed to emulate aspects of the structure of language, and AG learning (AGL) paradigms can be used to study the extent of nonhuman animals' structure-learning capabilities. However, different AG structures have been used with nonhuman animals and are difficult to compare across studies and species. We developed a simple quantitative parameter space, which we used to summarize previous nonhuman animal AGL results. This was used to highlight an under-studied AG with a forward-branching structure, designed to model certain aspects of the nondeterministic nature of word transitions in natural language and animal song. We tested whether two monkey species could learn aspects of this auditory AG. After habituating the monkeys to the AG, analysis of video recordings showed that common marmosets (New World monkeys) differentiated between well formed, correct testing sequences and those violating the AG structure based primarily on simple learning strategies. By comparison, Rhesus macaques (Old World monkeys) showed evidence for deeper levels of AGL. A novel eye-tracking approach confirmed this result in the macaques and demonstrated evidence for more complex AGL. This study provides evidence for a previously unknown level of AGL complexity in Old World monkeys that seems less evident in New World monkeys, which are more distant evolutionary relatives to humans. The findings allow for the development of both marmosets and macaques as neurobiological model systems to study different aspects of AGL at the neuronal level.

  20. Malposition and complications following venous catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maffesanti, M.; Bortolotto, P.; Kette, F.

    1988-01-01

    Malposition and complications following central venous catheterization largely depend on the site of venous approach. Malpositions are very common after subclavian vein catheterization, and even more common after left jugular vein catheterization. On the contrary, their incidence after right jugular puncture is very low. Among complications, pneumothorax is quate common after subclavian vein catheterization, and migration of the catheter towards the heart after right jugular puncture. Vascular damages may occur in any approach: their early detection on chest radiographs very much depends on a rigorous technique. Radiology plays an important role in the early detection of malposition and complications, which is greatly facilitated by a few ml of contrast medium injected through the catheter

  1. Aortic aneurysm secondary to umbilical artery catheterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brill, P.W.; Winchester, P.; Griffith, A.Y.; Kazam, E.; Zirinsky, K.; Levin, A.R.

    1985-02-01

    A 14-month-girl presented with an asymptomatic posterior mediastinal mass. She had a history of prematurity, umbilical artery catheterization, and sepsis. The diagnosis of aortic aneurysm was made by dynamic computed tomography. The aneurysm was successfully resected.

  2. Prevention of rectal SHIV transmission in macaques by daily or intermittent prophylaxis with emtricitabine and tenofovir.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Gerardo García-Lerma

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available In the absence of an effective vaccine, HIV continues to spread globally, emphasizing the need for novel strategies to limit its transmission. Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP with antiretroviral drugs could prove to be an effective intervention strategy if highly efficacious and cost-effective PrEP modalities are identified. We evaluated daily and intermittent PrEP regimens of increasing antiviral activity in a macaque model that closely resembles human transmission.We used a repeat-exposure macaque model with 14 weekly rectal virus challenges. Three drug treatments were given once daily, each to a different group of six rhesus macaques. Group 1 was treated subcutaneously with a human-equivalent dose of emtricitabine (FTC, group 2 received orally the human-equivalent dosing of both FTC and tenofovir-disoproxil fumarate (TDF, and group 3 received subcutaneously a similar dosing of FTC and a higher dose of tenofovir. A fourth group of six rhesus macaques (group 4 received intermittently a PrEP regimen similar to group 3 only 2 h before and 24 h after each weekly virus challenge. Results were compared to 18 control macaques that did not receive any drug treatment. The risk of infection in macaques treated in groups 1 and 2 was 3.8- and 7.8-fold lower than in untreated macaques (p = 0.02 and p = 0.008, respectively. All six macaques in group 3 were protected. Breakthrough infections had blunted acute viremias; drug resistance was seen in two of six animals. All six animals in group 4 that received intermittent PrEP were protected.This model suggests that single drugs for daily PrEP can be protective but a combination of antiretroviral drugs may be required to increase the level of protection. Short but potent intermittent PrEP can provide protection comparable to that of daily PrEP in this SHIV/macaque model. These findings support PrEP trials for HIV prevention in humans and identify promising PrEP modalities.

  3. Bladder Management in Children: Intermittent Catheterization Education.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortuna, Suzanne Marie; Korcal, Layna; Thomas, Ginger

    2018-03-01

    Clean intermittent catheterization (IC) of the bladder is one example of advanced medical care required by students with special health care needs. The success of a child's intermittent catheterization program in a community setting such as a school is dependent on an educated team. This article discusses indications and problems that arise with IC bladder management in the pediatric population. The article also provides information about current best practice for IC management to assist school nurses in the optimization of bladder health.

  4. Conformational adaptation of Asian macaque TRIMCyp directs lineage specific antiviral activity.

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    Laura M J Ylinen

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available TRIMCyps are anti-retroviral proteins that have arisen independently in New World and Old World primates. All TRIMCyps comprise a CypA domain fused to the tripartite domains of TRIM5alpha but they have distinct lentiviral specificities, conferring HIV-1 restriction in New World owl monkeys and HIV-2 restriction in Old World rhesus macaques. Here we provide evidence that Asian macaque TRIMCyps have acquired changes that switch restriction specificity between different lentiviral lineages, resulting in species-specific alleles that target different viruses. Structural, thermodynamic and viral restriction analysis suggests that a single mutation in the Cyp domain, R69H, occurred early in macaque TRIMCyp evolution, expanding restriction specificity to the lentiviral lineages found in African green monkeys, sooty mangabeys and chimpanzees. Subsequent mutations have enhanced restriction to particular viruses but at the cost of broad specificity. We reveal how specificity is altered by a scaffold mutation, E143K, that modifies surface electrostatics and propagates conformational changes into the active site. Our results suggest that lentiviruses may have been important pathogens in Asian macaques despite the fact that there are no reported lentiviral infections in current macaque populations.

  5. Comparative Proteomics of Human and Macaque Milk Reveals Species-Specific Nutrition during Postnatal Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Kristen L; Weber, Darren; Phinney, Brett S; Smilowitz, Jennifer T; Hinde, Katie; Lönnerdal, Bo; Korf, Ian; Lemay, Danielle G

    2015-05-01

    Milk has been well established as the optimal nutrition source for infants, yet there is still much to be understood about its molecular composition. Therefore, our objective was to develop and compare comprehensive milk proteomes for human and rhesus macaques to highlight differences in neonatal nutrition. We developed a milk proteomics technique that overcomes previous technical barriers including pervasive post-translational modifications and limited sample volume. We identified 1606 and 518 proteins in human and macaque milk, respectively. During analysis of detected protein orthologs, we identified 88 differentially abundant proteins. Of these, 93% exhibited increased abundance in human milk relative to macaque and include lactoferrin, polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, alpha-1 antichymotrypsin, vitamin D-binding protein, and haptocorrin. Furthermore, proteins more abundant in human milk compared with macaque are associated with development of the gastrointestinal tract, the immune system, and the brain. Overall, our novel proteomics method reveals the first comprehensive macaque milk proteome and 524 newly identified human milk proteins. The differentially abundant proteins observed are consistent with the perspective that human infants, compared with nonhuman primates, are born at a slightly earlier stage of somatic development and require additional support through higher quantities of specific proteins to nurture human infant maturation.

  6. سکته قلبی در میمون Rhesus

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    م.ر. غلامی

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Myocardial necrosis can be result from a number of causes including nutritional deficiencies, chemical and plant toxins, ischemia and metabolic disorder. The outcome of myocardial necrosis varies depending on the extent of the damage (Donald 2001, Jubb 1993, Radostits 1994, Vanvaleet 1986. Myocardial infarction without demonstrable of atherosclerosis were reported in a rhesus macaque (Gonder 1982 and in a Kenya Baboon (Groover 1963.

  7. Noninvasive scalp recording of cortical auditory evoked potentials in the alert macaque monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Kosuke; Nejime, Masafumi; Konoike, Naho; Nakada, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Katsuki

    2015-09-01

    Scalp-recorded evoked potentials (EP) provide researchers and clinicians with irreplaceable means for recording stimulus-related neural activities in the human brain, due to its high temporal resolution, handiness, and, perhaps more importantly, non-invasiveness. This work recorded the scalp cortical auditory EP (CAEP) in unanesthetized monkeys by using methods that are essentially identical to those applied to humans. Young adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta, 5-7 years old) were seated in a monkey chair, and their head movements were partially restricted by polystyrene blocks and tension poles placed around their head. Individual electrodes were fixated on their scalp using collodion according to the 10-20 system. Pure tone stimuli were presented while electroencephalograms were recorded from up to nineteen channels, including an electrooculogram channel. In all monkeys (n = 3), the recorded CAEP comprised a series of positive and negative deflections, labeled here as macaque P1 (mP1), macaque N1 (mN1), macaque P2 (mP2), and macaque N2 (mN2), and these transient responses to sound onset were followed by a sustained potential that continued for the duration of the sound, labeled the macaque sustained potential (mSP). mP1, mN2 and mSP were the prominent responses, and they had maximal amplitudes over frontal/central midline electrode sites, consistent with generators in auditory cortices. The study represents the first noninvasive scalp recording of CAEP in alert rhesus monkeys, to our knowledge. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Pandemic Swine-Origin H1N1 Influenza Virus Replicates to Higher Levels and Induces More Fever and Acute Inflammatory Cytokines in Cynomolgus versus Rhesus Monkeys and Can Replicate in Common Marmosets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooij, Petra; Koopman, Gerrit; Mortier, Daniëlla; van Heteren, Melanie; Oostermeijer, Herman; Fagrouch, Zahra; de Laat, Rudy; Kobinger, Gary; Li, Yan; Remarque, Edmond J; Kondova, Ivanela; Verschoor, Ernst J; Bogers, Willy M J M

    2015-01-01

    The close immunological and physiological resemblance with humans makes non-human primates a valuable model for studying influenza virus pathogenesis and immunity and vaccine efficacy against infection. Although both cynomolgus and rhesus macaques are frequently used in influenza virus research, a direct comparison of susceptibility to infection and disease has not yet been performed. In the current study a head-to-head comparison was made between these species, by using a recently described swine-origin pandemic H1N1 strain, A/Mexico/InDRE4487/2009. In comparison to rhesus macaques, cynomolgus macaques developed significantly higher levels of virus replication in the upper airways and in the lungs, involving both peak level and duration of virus production, as well as higher increases in body temperature. In contrast, clinical symptoms, including respiratory distress, were more easily observed in rhesus macaques. Expression of sialyl-α-2,6-Gal saccharides, the main receptor for human influenza A viruses, was 50 to 73 times more abundant in trachea and bronchus of cynomolgus macaques relative to rhesus macaques. The study also shows that common marmosets, a New World non-human primate species, are susceptible to infection with pandemic H1N1. The study results favor the cynomolgus macaque as model for pandemic H1N1 influenza virus research because of the more uniform and high levels of virus replication, as well as temperature increases, which may be due to a more abundant expression of the main human influenza virus receptor in the trachea and bronchi.

  9. Pandemic Swine-Origin H1N1 Influenza Virus Replicates to Higher Levels and Induces More Fever and Acute Inflammatory Cytokines in Cynomolgus versus Rhesus Monkeys and Can Replicate in Common Marmosets.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Petra Mooij

    Full Text Available The close immunological and physiological resemblance with humans makes non-human primates a valuable model for studying influenza virus pathogenesis and immunity and vaccine efficacy against infection. Although both cynomolgus and rhesus macaques are frequently used in influenza virus research, a direct comparison of susceptibility to infection and disease has not yet been performed. In the current study a head-to-head comparison was made between these species, by using a recently described swine-origin pandemic H1N1 strain, A/Mexico/InDRE4487/2009. In comparison to rhesus macaques, cynomolgus macaques developed significantly higher levels of virus replication in the upper airways and in the lungs, involving both peak level and duration of virus production, as well as higher increases in body temperature. In contrast, clinical symptoms, including respiratory distress, were more easily observed in rhesus macaques. Expression of sialyl-α-2,6-Gal saccharides, the main receptor for human influenza A viruses, was 50 to 73 times more abundant in trachea and bronchus of cynomolgus macaques relative to rhesus macaques. The study also shows that common marmosets, a New World non-human primate species, are susceptible to infection with pandemic H1N1. The study results favor the cynomolgus macaque as model for pandemic H1N1 influenza virus research because of the more uniform and high levels of virus replication, as well as temperature increases, which may be due to a more abundant expression of the main human influenza virus receptor in the trachea and bronchi.

  10. Protective effect and the therapeutic index of indralin in juvenile rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vasin, Mikhail V.; Antipov, Vsevolod V.; Ushakov, Igor B.; Semenov, Leonid F.; Lapin, Boris A.; Suvorov, Nikolai N.; Ilyin, Leonid A.

    2014-01-01

    The radioprotective effect of indralin in rhesus monkeys was examined over 60 d following gamma irradiation. Male and female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) 2-3-years-old and weighing 2.1-3.5 kg were used. Animals were exposed to total-body gamma irradiation from 60 Co at a dose of 6.8 Gy (lethal dose, 100% lethality over 30 days). Indralin (40-120 mg kg -1 ) was administered intramuscularly 5 min prior to radiation exposure. Indralin taken at a dose of 120 mg kg -1 protected five out of six monkeys (compared with the radiation control group, in which all 10 animals died). The average effective dose of indralin in the monkeys exposed to gamma irradiation for 30 min was equal to 77.3 (63.3-94.3) mg kg -1 , and the maximum tolerated dose of indralin administered to monkeys was 800 mg kg -1 . Indralin reduced radiation-induced injuries in macaques, thus resulting in a less severe course of acute radiation syndrome. Delayed and less pronounced manifestation of the haemorrhagic syndrome of the disease, and milder forms of both leukopenia and anaemia were also noted. The therapeutic index for indralin, expressed as the ratio of the maximum tolerated dose to the average effective dose, was equal to 10. Therefore, indralin has a significant radioprotective effect against radiation and has a high therapeutic index in rhesus monkeys. (author)

  11. D316 is critical for the enzymatic activity and HIV-1 restriction potential of human and rhesus APOBEC3B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDougle, Rebecca M; Hultquist, Judd F; Stabell, Alex C; Sawyer, Sara L; Harris, Reuben S

    2013-06-20

    APOBEC3B is one of seven human APOBEC3 DNA cytosine deaminases that function to inhibit the replication and persistence of retroelements and retroviruses. Human APOBEC3B restricts the replication of HIV-1 in HEK293 cells, while our laboratory clone of rhesus macaque APOBEC3B did not. We mapped the restriction determinant to a single amino acid difference that alters enzymatic activity. Human APOBEC3B D316 is catalytically active and capable of restricting HIV-1 while rhesus APOBEC3B N316 is not; swapping these residues alters the activity and restriction phenotypes respectively. Genotyping of primate center rhesus macaques revealed uniform homozygosity for aspartate at position 316. Considering the C-to-T nature of the underlying mutation, we suspect that our rhesus APOBEC3B cDNA was inactivated by its own gene product during subcloning in Escherichia coli. This region has been previously characterized for its role in substrate specificity, but these data indicate it also has a fundamental role in deaminase activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Rhesus monkey platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Harbury, C.B.

    1986-03-01

    The purpose of this abstract is to describe the adenine nucleotide metabolism of Rhesus monkey platelets. Nucleotides are labelled with /sup 14/C-adenine and extracted with EDTA-ethanol (EE) and perchlorate (P). Total platelet ATP and ADP (TATP, TADP) is measured in the Holmsen Luciferase assay, and expressed in nanomoles/10/sup 8/ platelets. TR=TATP/TADP. Human platelets release 70% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.7. Rhesus platelets release 82% of their TADP, with a ratio of released ATP/ADP of 0.33. Thus, monkey platelets contain more ADP than human platelets. Thin layer chromatography of EE gives a metabolic ratio of 11 in human platelets and 10.5 in monkey platelets. Perchlorate extracts metabolic and actin bound ADP. The human and monkey platelets ratios were 5, indicating they contain the same proportion of actin. Thus, the extra ADP contained in monkey platelets is located in the secretory granules.

  13. Discovery of a secular trend in Cayo Santiago macaque reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Pacheco, Raisa; Rawlins, Richard G; Kessler, Matthew J; Delgado, Diana L; Ruiz-Lambides, Angelina V; Sabat, Alberto M

    2016-02-01

    Reproductive synchrony and the consequent clustering of births are hypothesized to be regulated by seasonal changes in rainfall and food availability. Such climate-related seasonality is, however, questionable in tropical populations occupying temporally invariant habitats year round. Using the long-term data of the Cayo Santiago rhesus macaques from 1973 to 2013, this study distinguishes synchrony (a greater than chance clustering of births) from seasonality (a cluster of births during a period of the year when abiotic conditions are favorable) and shows that females are highly synchronized (>72% of births in a 3-month period) but the effects of environmental zeitgebers on reproduction are overridden by biological factors. Specifically, biotic and abiotic factors including (i) loss of immature offspring; (ii) population density; (iii) age at delivery; (iv) rainfall; and (v) changes in colony management were modeled in relation to the annual onset of births and the median birth date. Females experiencing loss of immature offspring had an interbirth interval of trend in both the onset of births and the median date of birth is documented and the model predicts that the median birth date will advance across all calendar-based seasons by 2050. The secular trend in reproduction appears to be triggered by changes in the age at delivery of females, the absence of physiological constraints from maternal investment due to offspring loss, shorter interbirth interval, and a higher degree of coordination due to increasing population density. This study challenges the reproductive phenology previously described for rhesus macaques highlighting the importance of long-term studies in addressing the ultimate causes of reproductive synchrony. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Supraclavicular versus Infraclavicular Subclavian Vein Catheterization in Infants

    OpenAIRE

    Wen-Hsien Lu; Mei-Ling Yao; Kai-Sheng Hsieh; Pao-Chin Chiu; Ying-Yao Chen; Chu-Chuan Lin; Ta-Cheng Huang; Chu-Chin Chen

    2006-01-01

    Central venous catheterization is an important procedure for infant patients for a number of different purposes, including nutritional support, surgical operation, hemodynamic monitoring, and multiple lines for critical care medications. Subclavian vein catheterization (SVC) is one of the central vein catheterization techniques. SVC can be performed from 4 different locations: right supraclavicular (RSC), left supraclavicular (LSC), right infraclavicular (RIC), and left infraclavicular (LIC)....

  15. Relationships between affiliative social behavior and hair cortisol concentrations in semi-free ranging rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooddell, Lauren J; Hamel, Amanda F; Murphy, Ashley M; Byers, Kristen L; Kaburu, Stefano S K; Meyer, Jerrold S; Suomi, Stephen J; Dettmer, Amanda M

    2017-10-01

    Sociality is a fundamental aspect of human behavior and health. One benefit of affiliative social relationships is reduced short-term levels of glucocorticoids (GCs), which are indicative of physiological stress. Less is known, however, about chronic GC production in relation to affiliative social behavior. To address this issue, we studied a semi-free ranging troop of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) and collected hair samples to measure hair cortisol concentrations (HCCs), as a measure of chronic GC production, during routine biannual exams. We collected social behavior (both aggressive and affiliative) and hair samples for 32 adult female rhesus macaques over one year (Experiment 1). Our results indicated that adult females who initiated higher levels of social affiliation had significantly lower levels of HCCs. Neither the initiation nor the receipt of aggression were significantly related to HCCs in this study. In a second experiment we studied 28 mother-infant dyads for the first 90days postpartum to examine mother-infant facial interactions (i.e. mutual gazing). We analyzed HCCs during weaning approximately one year later, which is a major transitional period. We found that infants that engaged in higher levels of mutual gazing in the first 90days postpartum had significantly lower levels of HCCs during weaning. Finally, we studied 17 infant rhesus macaques (13 males) to examine whether social behavior (such as play) in the first five months of life correlated with infant HCCs over those months (Experiment 3). We found that infant males that engaged in more social play had significantly lower levels of HCCs. By relying on an animal model, our study shows that affiliative social traits are associated with lower long-term GC production. Future research should address the complex interactions between social behavior, chronic GC production, and mental and physical health. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Cloning of the Epstein-Barr virus-related rhesus lymphocryptovirus as a bacterial artificial chromosome: a loss-of-function mutation of the rhBARF1 immune evasion gene.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Makoto; Orlova, Nina; Quink, Carol; Wang, Fred

    2011-02-01

    Rhesus macaques are naturally infected with a gammaherpesvirus which is in the same lymphocryptovirus (LCV) genus as and closely related to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The rhesus macaque LCV (rhLCV) contains a repertoire of genes identical to that of EBV, and experimental rhLCV infection of naive rhesus macaques accurately models acute and persistent EBV infection of humans. We cloned the LCL8664 rhLCV strain as a bacterial artificial chromosome to create recombinant rhLCV for investigation in this animal model system. A recombinant rhLCV (clone 16 rhLCV) carrying a mutation in the putative immune evasion gene rhBARF1 was created along with a rescued wild-type (rWT) rhLCV in which the rhBARF1 open reading frame (ORF) was repaired. The rWT rhLCV molecular clone demonstrated viral replication and B-cell immortalization properties comparable to those of the naturally derived LCL8664 rhLCV. Qualitatively, clone 16 rhLCV carrying a mutated rhBARF1 was competent for viral replication and B-cell immortalization, but quantitative assays showed that clone 16 rhLCV immortalized B cells less efficiently than LCL8664 and rWT rhLCV. Functional studies showed that rhBARF1 could block CSF-1 cytokine signaling as well as EBV BARF1, whereas the truncated rhBARF1 from clone 16 rhLCV was a loss-of-function mutant. These recombinant rhLCV can be used in the rhesus macaque animal model system to better understand how a putative viral immune evasion gene contributes to the pathogenesis of acute and persistent EBV infection. The development of a genetic system for making recombinant rhLCV constitutes a major advance in the study of EBV pathogenesis in the rhesus macaque animal model.

  17. Sequence of the rhesus monkey T-cell receptor {beta} chain diversity and joining loci

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cheynier, R.; Henrichwark, S.; Wain-Hobson, S. [Institut Pasteur, Paris (France)

    1996-06-01

    Rhesus monkeys are frequently used as animal models for human diseases, most noticeably for simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection and simian AIDS. An analysis of HIV proviruses and HIV-specific cytotoxic T cells in splenic white pulps relied heavily on the analysis of rearranged TCRBV sequences. The spleens were derived from patients with drug-insensitive idiopathic thrombocytopenia purpura and frequently taken at an advanced stage of disease. In order to obtain some insight into the balance of forces between the virus and the immune system during earlier stages of infection, one must inevitably turn to the SIV/macaque AIDS model. As a prerequisite to undertaking similar virological and immunological studies the nucleotide sequence of the macaque TCRBJ loci had to be established. 9 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  18. Macaque cardiac physiology is sensitive to the valence of passively viewed sensory stimuli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliza Bliss-Moreau

    Full Text Available Autonomic nervous system activity is an important component of affective experience. We demonstrate in the rhesus monkey that both the sympathetic and parasympathetic branches of the autonomic nervous system respond differentially to the affective valence of passively viewed video stimuli. We recorded cardiac impedance and an electrocardiogram while adult macaques watched a series of 300 30-second videos that varied in their affective content. We found that sympathetic activity (as measured by cardiac pre-ejection period increased and parasympathetic activity (as measured by respiratory sinus arrhythmia decreased as video content changes from positive to negative. These findings parallel the relationship between autonomic nervous system responsivity and valence of stimuli in humans. Given the relationship between human cardiac physiology and affective processing, these findings suggest that macaque cardiac physiology may be an index of affect in nonverbal animals.

  19. Mixed-complexity artificial grammar learning in humans and macaque monkeys: evaluating learning strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Benjamin; Smith, Kenny; Petkov, Christopher I

    2015-03-01

    Artificial grammars (AG) can be used to generate rule-based sequences of stimuli. Some of these can be used to investigate sequence-processing computations in non-human animals that might be related to, but not unique to, human language. Previous AG learning studies in non-human animals have used different AGs to separately test for specific sequence-processing abilities. However, given that natural language and certain animal communication systems (in particular, song) have multiple levels of complexity, mixed-complexity AGs are needed to simultaneously evaluate sensitivity to the different features of the AG. Here, we tested humans and Rhesus macaques using a mixed-complexity auditory AG, containing both adjacent (local) and non-adjacent (longer-distance) relationships. Following exposure to exemplary sequences generated by the AG, humans and macaques were individually tested with sequences that were either consistent with the AG or violated specific adjacent or non-adjacent relationships. We observed a considerable level of cross-species correspondence in the sensitivity of both humans and macaques to the adjacent AG relationships and to the statistical properties of the sequences. We found no significant sensitivity to the non-adjacent AG relationships in the macaques. A subset of humans was sensitive to this non-adjacent relationship, revealing interesting between- and within-species differences in AG learning strategies. The results suggest that humans and macaques are largely comparably sensitive to the adjacent AG relationships and their statistical properties. However, in the presence of multiple cues to grammaticality, the non-adjacent relationships are less salient to the macaques and many of the humans. © 2015 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience published by Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  20. New radioimmunoassay for follicle-stimulating hormone in macaques: ovulatory menstrual cycles. [/sup 125/I tracer technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hodgen, G.D.; Wilks, J.W.; Vaitukaitis, J.L.; Chen, H.C.; Papkoff, H.; Ross, G.

    1976-07-01

    A sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay system for macaque follicle-stimulating hormone (mFSH) was developed utilizing an antiserum (H-31) prepared in a rabbit against purified ovine FSH as the immunogen. Sera from castrated female, adult male, and juvenile rhesus monkeys, as well as urinary extracts from castrated rhesus and bonnet monkeys, were used to demonstrate parallelism with a standard of partially purified monkey pituitary gonadotropins (LER-M-907-D). An extract of baboon pituitary tissue also showed parallelism with the reference standard. A highly purified pituitary extract (WP-X-105-28), containing approximately 75 percent macaque luteinizing hormone (mLH) and 1 percent mFSH, was used to demonstrate the specificity of this mFSH assay system. Sera and urinary extracts obtained from hypophysectomized monkeys did not show cross-reactivity in the assay. Macaque chorionic gonadotropin (mCG) did not produce an inhibition curve in the assay, as determined from serum samples and urinary extracts collected from pregnant monkeys at the time of peak mCG secretion. Serum concentrations of mFSH were suppressed in ovariectomized monkeys by the administration of ethinyl estradiol for 3 days, but returned to near pretreatment values by 96 h after the last estradiol administration. The determination of serum mFSH concentrations in daily blood samples obtained from 20 rhesus monkeys throughout ovulatory menstrual cycles revealed a pattern similar to that previously reported for the rhesus monkey and the woman. The peak value of serum mFSH during the menstrual cycle coincided with the midcycle surge of mLH in each case. The gonadotropin peaks were preceded by increasing serum concentrations of estradiol and followed by rises in the serum concentrations of progesterone.

  1. Guide Wire Entrapment during Central Venous Catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung Woo Kim

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available We experienced a case of venous vessel wall entrapment between the introducer needle and the guide wire during an attempt to perform right internal jugular vein (IJV catheterization. The guide wire was introduced with no resistance but could not be withdrawn. We performed ultrasonography and C-arm fluoroscopy to confirm the entrapment location. We assumed the introducer needle penetrated the posterior vessel wall during the puncture and that only the guide wire entered the vein; an attempt to retract the wire pinched the vein wall between the needle tip and the guide wire. Careful examination with various diagnostic tools to determine the exact cause of entrapment is crucial for reducing catastrophic complications and achieving better outcomes during catheterization procedures.

  2. Therapeutic Utilities of Pediatric Cardiac Catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Giannis A.; Kolokythas, Argyrios; Charitakis, Konstantinos; Avgerinos, Dimitrios 
V.

    2016-01-01

    In an era when less invasive techniques are favored, therapeutic cardiac catheterization constantly evolves and widens its spectrum of usage in the pediatric population. The advent of sophisticated devices and well-designed equipment has made the management of many congenital cardiac lesions more efficient and safer, while providing more comfort to the patient. Nowadays, a large variety of heart diseases are managed with transcatheter techniques, such as patent foramen ovale, atrial and ventricular septal defects, valve stenosis, patent ductus arteriosus, aortic coarctation, pulmonary artery and vein stenosis and arteriovenous malformations. Moreover, hybrid procedures and catheter ablation have opened new paths in the treatment of complex cardiac lesions and arrhythmias, respectively. In this article, the main therapeutic utilities of cardiac catheterization in children are discussed. PMID:26926291

  3. Improved Xenobiotic Metabolism and Reduced Susceptibility to Cancer in Gluten-Sensitive Macaques upon Introduction of a Gluten-Free Diet

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sestak, Karol; Conroy, Lauren; Aye, Pyone P.; Mehra, Smriti; Doxiadis, Gaby G.; Kaushal, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    Background A non-human primate (NHP) model of gluten sensitivity was employed to study the gene perturbations associated with dietary gluten changes in small intestinal tissues from gluten-sensitive rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Methodology Stages of remission and relapse were accomplished in gluten-sensitive animals by administration of gluten-free (GFD) and gluten-containing (GD) diets, as described previously. Pin-head-sized biopsies, obtained non-invasively by pediatric endoscope from duodenum while on GFD or GD, were used for preparation of total RNA and gene profiling, using the commercial Rhesus Macaque Microarray (Agilent Technologies),targeting expression of over 20,000 genes. Principal Findings When compared with normal healthy control, gluten-sensitive macaques showed differential gene expressions induced by GD. While observed gene perturbations were classified into one of 12 overlapping categories - cancer, metabolism, digestive tract function, immune response, cell growth, signal transduction, autoimmunity, detoxification of xenobiotics, apoptosis, actin-collagen deposition, neuronal and unknown function - this study focused on cancer-related gene networks such as cytochrome P450 family (detoxification function) and actin-collagen-matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) genes. Conclusions/Significance A loss of detoxification function paralleled with necessity to metabolize carcinogens was revealed in gluten-sensitive animals while on GD. An increase in cancer-promoting factors and a simultaneous decrease in cancer-preventing factors associated with altered expression of actin-collagen-MMP gene network were noted. In addition, gluten-sensitive macaques showed reduced number of differentially expressed genes including the cancer-associated ones upon withdrawal of dietary gluten. Taken together, these findings indicate potentially expanded utility of gluten-sensitive rhesus macaques in cancer research. PMID:21533263

  4. Improved xenobiotic metabolism and reduced susceptibility to cancer in gluten-sensitive macaques upon introduction of a gluten-free diet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sestak, Karol; Conroy, Lauren; Aye, Pyone P; Mehra, Smriti; Doxiadis, Gaby G; Kaushal, Deepak

    2011-04-12

    A non-human primate (NHP) model of gluten sensitivity was employed to study the gene perturbations associated with dietary gluten changes in small intestinal tissues from gluten-sensitive rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Stages of remission and relapse were accomplished in gluten-sensitive animals by administration of gluten-free (GFD) and gluten-containing (GD) diets, as described previously. Pin-head-sized biopsies, obtained non-invasively by pediatric endoscope from duodenum while on GFD or GD, were used for preparation of total RNA and gene profiling, using the commercial Rhesus Macaque Microarray (Agilent Technologies),targeting expression of over 20,000 genes. When compared with normal healthy control, gluten-sensitive macaques showed differential gene expressions induced by GD. While observed gene perturbations were classified into one of 12 overlapping categories--cancer, metabolism, digestive tract function, immune response, cell growth, signal transduction, autoimmunity, detoxification of xenobiotics, apoptosis, actin-collagen deposition, neuronal and unknown function--this study focused on cancer-related gene networks such as cytochrome P450 family (detoxification function) and actin-collagen-matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) genes. A loss of detoxification function paralleled with necessity to metabolize carcinogens was revealed in gluten-sensitive animals while on GD. An increase in cancer-promoting factors and a simultaneous decrease in cancer-preventing factors associated with altered expression of actin-collagen-MMP gene network were noted. In addition, gluten-sensitive macaques showed reduced number of differentially expressed genes including the cancer-associated ones upon withdrawal of dietary gluten. Taken together, these findings indicate potentially expanded utility of gluten-sensitive rhesus macaques in cancer research.

  5. Rhesus Negative Woman Transfused With Rhesus Positive Blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Clinicians sometimes are confronted with the challenge of transfusing haemorrhaging Rhesus (Rh) D negative patients with Rh D positive blood to save their lives. There are concerns about alloimmunization and future haemolytic disease of the newborn in women of the reproductive age. Another fear is transfusion reaction ...

  6. rhesus negative woman transfused with rhesus positive blood

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-03-01

    Mar 1, 2015 ... Keywords: Rhesus negative, alloimmunization, preg- nancy, blood transfusion, anti D immunoglobulin .... of immunogenicity4. Generally, individuals who are Rh D negative do not express the RHD gene.5 ... IgG and as little as 0.03ml of Rh D positive red blood cells (RBC) can elicit a secondary response.4.

  7. Adaptive evolution of simian immunodeficiency viruses isolated from two conventional progressor macaques with neuroaids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, Brian T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korber, Bette T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus infection of macaques may result in neuroAIDS, a feature more commonly observed in macaques with rapid progressive disease than in those with conventional disease. This is the first report of two conventional progressors (H631 and H636) with encephalitis in rhesus macaques inoculated with a derivative of SIVsmES43-3. Phylogenetic analyses of viruses isolated from the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) and plasma from both animals demonstrated tissue compartmentalization. Additionally, virus from the central nervous system (CNS) was able to infect primary macaque monocyte-derived macrophages more efficiently than virus from plasma. Conversely, virus isolated from plasma was able to replicate better in peripheral blood mononuclear cells than virus from CNS. We speculate that these viruses were under different selective pressures in their separate compartments. Furthermore, these viruses appear to have undergone adaptive evolution to preferentially replicate in their respective cell targets. Analysis of the number of potential N-linked glycosylation sites (PNGS) in gp160 showed that there was a statistically significant loss of PNGS in viruses isolated from CNS in both macaques compared to SIVsmE543-3. Moreover, virus isolated from the brain in H631, had statistically significant loss of PNGS compared to virus isolated from CSF and plasma of the same animal. It is possible that the brain isolate may have adapted to decrease the number of PNGS given that humoral immune selection pressure is less likely to be encountered in the brain. These viruses provide a relevant model to study the adaptations required for SIV to induce encephalitis.

  8. Diversification of both KIR and NKG2 natural killer cell receptor genes in macaques - implications for highly complex MHC-dependent regulation of natural killer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walter, Lutz; Petersen, Beatrix

    2017-02-01

    The killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) as well as their MHC class I ligands display enormous genetic diversity and polymorphism in macaque species. Signals resulting from interaction between KIR or CD94/NKG2 receptors and their cognate MHC class I proteins essentially regulate the activity of natural killer (NK) cells. Macaque and human KIR share many features, such as clonal expression patterns, gene copy number variations, specificity for particular MHC class I allotypes, or epistasis between KIR and MHC class I genes that influence susceptibility and resistance to immunodeficiency virus infection. In this review article we also annotated publicly available rhesus macaque BAC clone sequences and provide the first description of the CD94-NKG2 genomic region. Besides the presence of genes that are orthologous to human NKG2A and NKG2F, this region contains three NKG2C paralogues. Hence, the genome of rhesus macaques contains moderately expanded and diversified NKG2 genes in addition to highly diversified KIR genes. The presence of two diversified NK cell receptor families in one species has not been described before and is expected to require a complex MHC-dependent regulation of NK cells. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Illegal trade in Barbary macaques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Uhm, Daan

    2014-01-01

    While Morocco is well known as the main port between Africa and the EU for the illegal drugs trade and migration, the illegal trade in wildlife is flourishing as well. Next to the illegal large-scale trafficking of tortoises and birds, it is estimated that as few as 5,000 Barbary macaques remain in

  10. Can Urinary Catheterization Before Birth Reduce Postpartum Urinary Retention?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet B. Şentürk

    2016-04-01

    Results: The time to first micturition was determined to be shorter in the group where urinary catheterization was applied before birth, the PUR rate was lower and the amount of residual urine was less (p0.05. Conclusion: Urinary catheterization before birth reduces the rate of PUR.

  11. Urethral catheterization:The need for adequate undergraduate ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    E.V. Ezenwa

    2016-12-26

    Dec 26, 2016 ... urethral catheterization procedure and precautionary methods taken while carrying out the procedure. Also assessed was the ... Conclusion: Newly recruited interns have poor practical exposure to urethral catheterization. Efforts should .... ska B. Treatment of posterior and anterior urethral trauma. BJU Int.

  12. Variable BCG efficacy in rhesus populations: Pulmonary BCG provides protection where standard intra-dermal vaccination fails.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verreck, Frank A W; Tchilian, Elma Z; Vervenne, Richard A W; Sombroek, Claudia C; Kondova, Ivanela; Eissen, Okke A; Sommandas, Vinod; van der Werff, Nicole M; Verschoor, Ernst; Braskamp, Gerco; Bakker, Jaco; Langermans, Jan A M; Heidt, Peter J; Ottenhoff, Tom H M; van Kralingen, Klaas W; Thomas, Alan W; Beverley, Peter C L; Kocken, Clemens H M

    2017-05-01

    M.bovis BCG vaccination against tuberculosis (TB) notoriously displays variable protective efficacy in different human populations. In non-human primate studies using rhesus macaques, despite efforts to standardise the model, we have also observed variable efficacy of BCG upon subsequent experimental M. tuberculosis challenge. In the present head-to-head study, we establish that the protective efficacy of standard parenteral BCG immunisation varies among different rhesus cohorts. This provides different dynamic ranges for evaluation of investigational vaccines, opportunities for identifying possible correlates of protective immunity and for determining why parenteral BCG immunisation sometimes fails. We also show that pulmonary mucosal BCG vaccination confers reduced local pathology and improves haematological and immunological parameters post-infection in animals that are not responsive to induction of protection by standard intra-dermal BCG. These results have important implications for pulmonary TB vaccination strategies in the future. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  13. Development of a Zika Virus Infection Model in Cynomolgus Macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fusataka Koide

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available Limited availability of Indian rhesus macaques (IRM is a bottleneck to study Zika virus (ZIKV pathogenesis and evaluation of appropriate control measures in non-human primates. To address these issues, we report here the Mauritian cynomolgus macaque (MCM model for ZIKV infection. In brief, six MCMs (seronegative for dengue and ZIKV were subdivided into 3 cohorts with a male and female each and challenged with different doses of Asian PRVABC59 (Puerto Rico or FSS13025 (Cambodia or African (IBH30656 lineage ZIKV isolates. Clinical signs were monitored; and biological fluids (serum, saliva and urine and tissues (testes and brain were assessed for viral load by quantitative RT-PCR and neutralizing antibodies (Nab by 50% Plaque Reduction Neutralization Test (PRNT50 at various times post infection (p.i. PRVABC59 induced viremia detectable up to day 10, with peak viral load at 2 to 3 days p.i. An intermittent viremia spike was observed on day 30 with titers reaching 2.5 ×103 genomes/mL. Moderate viral load was observed in testes, urine and saliva. In contrast, FSS13025 induced viremia lasting only up to 6 days and detectable viral loads in testes but not in urine and saliva. Recurrent viremia was detected but at lower titers compare to PRVABC59. Challenge with either PRVABC59 or FSS13025 resulted in 100% seroconversion; with mean PRNT50 titers ranging from 597 to 5179. IBH30656 failed to establish infection in MCM suggesting that MCM are susceptible to infection with ZIKV isolates of the Asian lineage but not from Africa. Due to the similarity of biphasic viremia and Nab responses between MCM and IRM models, MCM could be a suitable alternative for evaluation of ZIKV vaccine and therapeutic candidates.

  14. Isolation and Molecular Characterization of Entamoeba nuttalli Strains Showing Novel Isoenzyme Patterns from Wild Toque Macaques in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Hiroshi; Yanagi, Tetsuo; Feng, Meng; Bandara, K B Anura T; Kobayashi, Seiki; Cheng, Xunjia; Hirayama, Kenji; Rajapakse, R P V Jayanthe

    2016-01-01

    We have proposed the revival of the name Entamoeba nuttalli for a virulent ameba strain, P19-061405, from a rhesus macaque and located it phylogenetically between E. histolytica and E. dispar. As E. nuttalli was originally described for an ameba found in a toque macaque in Sri Lanka, the prevalence and characteristics of Entamoeba species in wild toque macaques were examined. PCR analysis of 227 stool samples from six locations showed positive rates for E. nuttalli, E. dispar, and E. histolytica of 18.5%, 0.4%, and 0%, respectively. Fifteen E. nuttalli strains were cultured successfully from five locations. The 18S ribosomal RNA gene showed only three nucleotide differences in comparison with P19-061405 strain. In isoenzyme analysis, the pattern of hexokinase in Sri Lankan strains was different from that of P19-061405 strains and the difference was confirmed by analysis of the genes. Hepatic inoculation of one of the Sri Lankan E. nuttalli strains in hamsters resulted in amebic abscess formation and body weight loss. These results demonstrate that E. nuttalli is prevalent in wild toque macaques and that several characteristics of the strains are unique. We conclude that use of the name E. nuttalli is appropriate for the new Entamoeba species found in nonhuman primates. © 2015 The Author(s) Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology © 2015 International Society of Protistologists.

  15. Radiation-free CMR diagnostic heart catheterization in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratnayaka, Kanishka; Kanter, Joshua P; Faranesh, Anthony Z; Grant, Elena K; Olivieri, Laura J; Cross, Russell R; Cronin, Ileen F; Hamann, Karin S; Campbell-Washburn, Adrienne E; O'Brien, Kendall J; Rogers, Toby; Hansen, Michael S; Lederman, Robert J

    2017-09-06

    Children with heart disease may require repeated X-Ray cardiac catheterization procedures, are more radiosensitive, and more likely to survive to experience oncologic risks of medical radiation. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR) is radiation-free and offers information about structure, function, and perfusion but not hemodynamics. We intend to perform complete radiation-free diagnostic right heart catheterization entirely using CMR fluoroscopy guidance in an unselected cohort of pediatric patients; we report the feasibility and safety. We performed 50 CMR fluoroscopy guided comprehensive transfemoral right heart catheterizations in 39 pediatric (12.7 ± 4.7 years) subjects referred for clinically indicated cardiac catheterization. CMR guided catheterizations were assessed by completion (success/failure), procedure time, and safety events (catheterization, anesthesia). Pre and post CMR body temperature was recorded. Concurrent invasive hemodynamic and diagnostic CMR data were collected. During a twenty-two month period (3/2015 - 12/2016), enrolled subjects had the following clinical indications: post-heart transplant 33%, shunt 28%, pulmonary hypertension 18%, cardiomyopathy 15%, valvular heart disease 3%, and other 3%. Radiation-free CMR guided right heart catheterization attempts were all successful using passive catheters. In two subjects with septal defects, right and left heart catheterization were performed. There were no complications. One subject had six such procedures. Most subjects (51%) had undergone multiple (5.5 ± 5) previous X-Ray cardiac catheterizations. Retained thoracic surgical or transcatheter implants (36%) did not preclude successful CMR fluoroscopy heart catheterization. During the procedure, two subjects were receiving vasopressor infusions at baseline because of poor cardiac function, and in ten procedures, multiple hemodynamic conditions were tested. Comprehensive CMR fluoroscopy guided right heart catheterization was feasible and

  16. Δ9-Tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) Promotes Neuroimmune-Modulatory MicroRNA Profile in Striatum of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV)-Infected Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simon, Liz; Song, Keijing; Vande Stouwe, Curtis; Hollenbach, Andrew; Amedee, Angela; Mohan, Mahesh; Winsauer, Peter; Molina, Patricia

    2016-03-01

    Cannabinoid administration before and after simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-inoculation ameliorated disease progression and decreased inflammation in male rhesus macaques. Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9-THC) did not increase viral load in brain tissue or produce additive neuropsychological impairment in SIV-infected macaques. To determine if the neuroimmunomodulation of Δ9-THC involved differential microRNA (miR) expression, miR expression in the striatum of uninfected macaques receiving vehicle (VEH) or Δ9-THC (THC) and SIV-infected macaques administered either vehicle (VEH/SIV) or Δ9-THC (THC/SIV) was profiled using next generation deep sequencing. Among the 24 miRs that were differentially expressed among the four groups, 16 miRs were modulated by THC in the presence of SIV. These 16 miRs were classified into four categories and the biological processes enriched by the target genes determined. Our results indicate that Δ9-THC modulates miRs that regulate mRNAs of proteins involved in 1) neurotrophin signaling, 2) MAPK signaling, and 3) cell cycle and immune response thus promoting an overall neuroprotective environment in the striatum of SIV-infected macaques. This is also reflected by increased Brain Derived Neurotrophic Factor (BDNF) and decreased proinflammatory cytokine expression compared to the VEH/SIV group. Whether Δ9-THC-mediated modulation of epigenetic mechanisms provides neuroprotection in other regions of the brain and during chronic SIV-infection remains to be determined.

  17. Antibody-mediated immunotherapy of macaques chronically infected with SHIV suppresses viraemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shingai, Masashi; Nishimura, Yoshiaki; Klein, Florian; Mouquet, Hugo; Donau, Olivia K.; Plishka, Ronald; Buckler-White, Alicia; Seaman, Michael; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Dimitrov, Dimiter; Nussenzweig, Michel C.; Martin, Malcolm A.

    2013-11-01

    Neutralizing antibodies can confer immunity to primate lentiviruses by blocking infection in macaque models of AIDS. However, earlier studies of anti-human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) neutralizing antibodies administered to infected individuals or humanized mice reported poor control of virus replication and the rapid emergence of resistant variants. A new generation of anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibodies, possessing extraordinary potency and breadth of neutralizing activity, has recently been isolated from infected individuals. These neutralizing antibodies target different regions of the HIV-1 envelope glycoprotein including the CD4-binding site, glycans located in the V1/V2, V3 and V4 regions, and the membrane proximal external region of gp41 (refs 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14). Here we have examined two of the new antibodies, directed to the CD4-binding site and the V3 region (3BNC117 and 10-1074, respectively), for their ability to block infection and suppress viraemia in macaques infected with the R5 tropic simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV)-AD8, which emulates many of the pathogenic and immunogenic properties of HIV-1 during infections of rhesus macaques. Either antibody alone can potently block virus acquisition. When administered individually to recently infected macaques, the 10-1074 antibody caused a rapid decline in virus load to undetectable levels for 4-7days, followed by virus rebound during which neutralization-resistant variants became detectable. When administered together, a single treatment rapidly suppressed plasma viraemia for 3-5weeks in some long-term chronically SHIV-infected animals with low CD4+ T-cell levels. A second cycle of anti-HIV-1 monoclonal antibody therapy, administered to two previously treated animals, successfully controlled virus rebound. These results indicate that immunotherapy or a combination of immunotherapy plus conventional antiretroviral drugs might be useful as a treatment for chronically HIV-1-infected

  18. Interventional ovarian tube catheterization in treating tubal ectopic pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hu Yi; Xiong Linhui; Du Pianqin; Chen Jiabin

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To explore the feasibility and curative effect of treating tubal pregnancy through the fallopian tube with interventional catheterization decrease the difficulty of the procedure and shorten the consuming time. Methods: Applying the method of interventional catheterization of fallopian tube and injecting 0.5 mg atropine at the cervix beforehand, then 70 mg MTX was administered into the fallopian tube. Results: 113 patients were successfully recovered with health except one without any adversary complication. Conclusions: The interventional fallopian tube catheterization for treating ectopic pregnancy is a simple, safe, minitraumatic, quick and effective method. (authors)

  19. Suprapubic compared with transurethral bladder catheterization for gynecologic surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Healy, Eibhlín F

    2012-09-01

    Suprapubic catheterization is commonly used for postoperative bladder drainage after gynecologic procedures. However, recent studies have suggested an increased rate of complications compared with urethral catheterization. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing suprapubic catheterization and urethral catheterization in gynecologic populations.

  20. Comparison of Urinary Tract Infection Rates Associated with Transurethral Catheterization, Suprapubic Tube and Clean Intermittent Catheterization in the Postoperative Setting: A Network Meta-Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Christopher S; Kim, Sinae; Radadia, Kushan D; Zhao, Philip T; Elsamra, Sammy E; Olweny, Ephrem O; Weiss, Robert E

    2017-12-01

    We performed a network meta-analysis of available randomized, controlled trials to elucidate the risks of urinary tract infection associated with transurethral catheterization, suprapubic tubes and intermittent catheterization in the postoperative setting. PubMed®, EMBASE® and Google Scholar™ searches were performed for eligible randomized, controlled trials from January 1980 to July 2015 that included patients who underwent transurethral catheterization, suprapubic tube placement or intermittent catheterization at the time of surgery and catheterization lasting up to postoperative day 30. The primary outcome of comparison was the urinary tract infection rate via a network meta-analysis with random effects model using the netmeta package in R 3.2 (www.r-project.org/). Included in analysis were 14 randomized, controlled trials in a total of 1,391 patients. Intermittent catheterization and suprapubic tubes showed no evidence of decreased urinary tract infection rates compared to transurethral catheterization. Suprapubic tubes and intermittent catheterization had comparable urinary tract infection rates (OR 0.903, 95% CI 0.479-2.555). On subgroup analysis of 10 randomized, controlled trials with available mean catheterization duration data in a total of 928 patients intermittent catheterization and suprapubic tube were associated with significantly decreased risk of urinary tract infection compared to transurethral catheterization when catheterization duration was greater than 5 days (OR 0.173, 95% CI 0.073-0.412 and OR 0.142, 95% CI 0.073-0.276, respectively). Transurethral catheterization is not associated with an increased urinary tract infection risk compared to suprapubic tubes and intermittent catheterization if catheterization duration is 5 days or less. However, a suprapubic tube or intermittent catheterization is associated with a lower rate of urinary tract infection if longer term catheterization is expected in the postoperative period. Copyright

  1. A hand-held robotic device for peripheral intravenous catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhuoqi; Davies, Brian L; Caldwell, Darwin G; Barresi, Giacinto; Xu, Qinqi; Mattos, Leonardo S

    2017-12-01

    Intravenous catheterization is frequently required for numerous medical treatments. However, this process is characterized by a high failure rate, especially when performed on difficult patients such as newborns and infants. Very young patients have small veins, and that increases the chances of accidentally puncturing the catheterization needle directly through them. In this article, we present the design, development and experimental evaluation of a novel hand-held robotic device for improving the process of peripheral intravenous catheterization by facilitating the needle insertion procedure. To our knowledge, this design is the first hand-held robotic device for assisting in the catheterization insertion task. Compared to the other available technologies, it has several unique advantages such as being compact, low-cost and able to reliably detect venipuncture. The system is equipped with an electrical impedance sensor at the tip of the catheterization needle, which provides real-time measurements used to supervise and control the catheter insertion process. This allows the robotic system to precisely position the needle within the lumen of the target vein, leading to enhanced catheterization success rate. Experiments conducted to evaluate the device demonstrated that it is also effective to deskill the task. Naïve subjects achieved an average catheterization success rate of 88% on a 1.5 mm phantom vessel with the robotic device versus 12% with the traditional unassisted system. The results of this work prove the feasibility of a hand-held assistive robotic device for intravenous catheterization and show that such device has the potential to greatly improve the success rate of these difficult operations.

  2. Evaluation of engraftment and immunological tolerance after reduced intensity conditioning in a rhesus hematopoietic stem cell gene therapy model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchida, N; Weitzel, R P; Evans, M E; Green, R; Bonifacino, A C; Krouse, A E; Metzger, M E; Hsieh, M M; Donahue, R E; Tisdale, J F

    2014-02-01

    Reduced intensity conditioning (RIC) is desirable for hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) targeted gene therapy; however, RIC may be insufficient for efficient engraftment and inducing immunological tolerance to transgenes. We previously established long-term gene marking in our rhesus macaque autologous HSC transplantation model following 10 Gy total body irradiation (TBI). In this study, we evaluated RIC transplantation with 4 Gy TBI in two rhesus macaques that received equal parts of CD34(+) cells transduced with green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing lentiviral vector and empty vector not expressing transgenes. In both animals, equivalently low gene marking between GFP and empty vectors was observed 6 months post-transplantation, even with efficient transduction of CD34(+) cells in vitro. Autologous lymphocyte infusion with GFP marking resulted in an increase of gene marking in lymphocytes in a control animal with GFP tolerance, but not in the two RIC-transplanted animals. In vitro assays revealed strong cellular and humoral immune responses to GFP protein in the two RIC-transplanted animals, but this was not observed in controls. In summary, 4 Gy TBI is insufficient to permit engraftment of genetically modified HSCs and induce immunological tolerance to transgenes. Our findings should help in the design of conditioning regimens in gene therapy trials.

  3. Functional MRI of the vocalization-processing network in the macaque brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eOrtiz-Rios

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in awake behaving monkeys we investigated how species-specific vocalizations are represented in auditory and auditory-related regions of the macaque brain. We found clusters of active voxels along the ascending auditory pathway that responded to various types of complex sounds: inferior colliculus (IC, medial geniculate nucleus (MGN, auditory core, belt, and parabelt cortex, and other parts of the superior temporal gyrus (STG and sulcus (STS. Regions sensitive to monkey calls were most prevalent in the anterior STG, but some clusters were also found in frontal and parietal cortex on the basis of comparisons between responses to calls and environmental sounds. Surprisingly, we found that spectrotemporal control sounds derived from the monkey calls (scrambled calls also activated the parietal and frontal regions. Taken together, our results demonstrate that species-specific vocalizations in rhesus monkeys activate preferentially the auditory ventral stream, and in particular areas of the antero-lateral belt and parabelt.

  4. Indwelling Catheterization in Caesarean Section: Time To Retire It!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandey, Divya; Mehta, Sumita; Grover, Anshul; Goel, Neerja

    2015-09-01

    Routine placement of indwelling catheter preoperatively in Caesarean Section is being practiced without justified scientific evidence. To evaluate the effect of routine indwelling catheterization on the postoperative ambulation, morbidity and hospital stay in women undergoing Caesarean section. Case-Control study carried in a tertiary teaching hospital. This study was carried over 150 women undergoing primary Caesarean section without any medical complication or pre-existing Urinary Tract Infections (UTI). The subjects were randomly allocated to 2 groups i.e. Group 1(Non-Catheterized; NC) and Group 2 (Catheterized for 24 hours postoperatively; C). Parameters noted were; duration of surgery, time of ambulation, postoperative voiding discomfort {graded as - no, mild, moderate-severe, by Visual Analog Scoring (VAS)}, incidence of UTI, postoperative urinary retention, need of postoperative antibiotics and duration of hospital stay. Results were analysed using unpaired t-test. There was no significant difference in duration of surgery and postoperative urinary retention in both groups. However, it was seen that non-catheterized patients had significantly earlier ambulation, shorter hospital stay, took less time for first voiding, lesser voiding discomfort, less incidence of UTI and lesser use of postoperative antibiotics. The routine use of indwelling catheter in Caesarean section is unscientific and unnecessary. There should be selective rather than routine catheterization.

  5. ABO blood groups, rhesus factor and pemphigus

    OpenAIRE

    Valikhani Mahin; Kavand Sima; Toosi Siavash; Kavand Golnaz; Ghiasi Maryam

    2007-01-01

    Background: Pemphigus is an autoimmune blistering disease of the skin and mucous membranes with significant mortality and morbidity. Genetic factors are known to be involved in pemphigus. Several studies have reproducibly shown significant associations of ABO blood groups with various autoimmune human diseases. Aim: To study the relationship between ABO and Rhesus (D) blood groups and pemphigus in Iranian patients. Materials and Methods: Data on age, sex, ABO and Rhesus blood type and cl...

  6. Assessing significant (> 30%) alopecia as a possible biomarker for stress in captive rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Melinda A.; Menard, Mark T.; El-Mallah, Saif N.; Rosenberg, Kendra; Lutz, Corrine K.; Worlein, Julie; Coleman, Kris; Meyer, Jerrold S.

    2016-01-01

    Hair loss is common in macaque colonies. Very little is known about the relationship between psychological stress and hair loss. We initially examined alopecia and hair cortisol concentrations in 198 (89 male) rhesus macaques from three primate centers and demonstrated replicability of our previous finding that extensive alopecia (> 30% hair loss) is associated with increased chronic cortisol concentrations and significantly affected by facility. A subset of these monkeys (142 of which 67 were males) were sampled twice approximately 8 months apart allowing us to examine the hypotheses that gaining hair should be associated with decreases in cortisol concentrations and vice versa. Hair loss was digitally scored using ImageJ software for the first sample. Then visual assessment was used to examine the second sample, resulting in 3 categories of coat condition: 1) monkeys that remained fully haired, 2) monkeys that remained alopecic (with more than 30% hair loss), or 3) monkeys that showed more than a 15% increase in hair. The sample size for the group that lost hair was too small to be analyzed. Consistent with our hypothesis, monkeys that gained hair showed a significant reduction in hair cortisol concentrations but this effect only held for females. Coat condition changed little across sampling periods with only 25 (11 male) monkeys showing a greater than 15% gain of hair. Twenty (7 male) monkeys remained alopecic, whereas 97 (49 males) remained fully haired. Hair cortisol was highly correlated across samples for the monkeys that retained their status (remained alopecic or retained their hair). PMID:27008590

  7. Clinical and Pathological Findings Associated with Aerosol Exposure of Macaques to Ricin Toxin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seth H. Pincus

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Ricin is a potential bioweapon that could be used against civilian and military personnel. Aerosol exposure is the most likely route of contact to ricin toxin that will result in the most severe toxicity. Early recognition of ricin exposure is essential if specific antidotes are to be applied. Initial diagnosis will most likely be syndromic, i.e., fitting clinical and laboratory signs into a pattern which then will guide the choice of more specific diagnostic assays and therapeutic interventions. We have studied the pathology of ricin toxin in rhesus macaques exposed to lethal and sublethal ricin aerosols. Animals exposed to lethal ricin aerosols were followed clinically using telemetry, by clinical laboratory analyses and by post-mortem examination. Animals exposed to lethal aerosolized ricin developed fever associated with thermal instability, tachycardia, and dyspnea. In the peripheral blood a marked neutrophilia (without immature bands developed at 24 h. This was accompanied by an increase in monocytes, but depletion of lymphocytes. Red cell indices indicated hemoconcentration, as did serum chemistries, with modest increases in sodium and blood urea nitrogen (BUN. Serum albumin was strikingly decreased. These observations are consistent with the pathological observations of fluid shifts to the lungs, in the form of hemorrhages, inflammatory exudates, and tissue edema. In macaques exposed to sublethal aerosols of ricin, late pathologic consequences included chronic pulmonary fibrosis, likely mediated by M2 macrophages. Early administration of supportive therapy, specific antidotes after exposure or vaccines prior to exposure have the potential to favorably alter this outcome.

  8. A first report of non-invasive adenovirus detection in wild Assamese macaques in Thailand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sukmak, Manakorn; Wajjwalku, Worawidh; Ostner, Julia; Schülke, Oliver

    2017-04-01

    Several simian adenoviruses (AdVs) have been detected and isolated in various species of non-human primates with the goals of monitoring the health of wildlife and investigating their potential for zoonotic disease transmission. Here, we provide evidence of AdV infection in wild Assamese macaques (Macaca assamensis assamensis) at Phu Khieo Wildlife Sanctuary, Thailand, based on polymerase chain reaction of non-invasively collected fecal samples. Eight out of 110 fecal samples (7.3%), or five out of 87 monkeys (5.7%), showed evidence of AdV infection. All infected individuals were infants or juveniles. Phylogenetic analysis based on the sequence of hexon and polymerase genes revealed two different AdV genotypes. One genotype clustered in the human AdV-G group, while another showed 100% identity with previously reported AdVs of captive Chinese rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), which may be tentatively classified as a new species of AdV in non-human primates while awaiting further supporting evidence.

  9. Sexual partner preference in female Japanese macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasey, Paul L

    2002-02-01

    Whether animals ever exhibit a preference for same-sex sexual partners is a subject of debate. Japanese macaques represent excellent models for examining issues related to sexual preference in animals because females, in certain populations, routinely engage in both heterosexual and homosexual behavior over the course of their life spans. Multiple lines of evidence indicate that female homosexual behavior in Japanese macaques is a sexual behavior, not a sociosexual one. Additional evidence indicates that female Japanese macaques do not engage in homosexual behavior simply because acceptable male mates are unavailable or unmotivated to copulate. Patterns of sexual partner choice by female Japanese macaques that are the focus of intersexual competition indicate that females of this species choose same-sex sexual partners even when they are simultaneously presented with a motivated, opposite-sex alternative. Thus, in some populations of Japanese macaques, females prefer certain same-sex sexual partners relative to certain male mates, and vice versa. Taken together, this evidence suggests that female Japanese macaques are best characterized as bisexual in orientation, not preferentially homosexual or preferentially heterosexual.

  10. Multi-dose Romidepsin Reactivates Replication Competent SIV in Post-antiretroviral Rhesus Macaque Controllers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin B Policicchio

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Viruses that persist despite seemingly effective antiretroviral treatment (ART and can reinitiate infection if treatment is stopped preclude definitive treatment of HIV-1 infected individuals, requiring lifelong ART. Among strategies proposed for targeting these viral reservoirs, the premise of the "shock and kill" strategy is to induce expression of latent proviruses [for example with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis] resulting in elimination of the affected cells through viral cytolysis or immune clearance mechanisms. Yet, ex vivo studies reported that HDACis have variable efficacy for reactivating latent proviruses, and hinder immune functions. We developed a nonhuman primate model of post-treatment control of SIV through early and prolonged administration of ART and performed in vivo reactivation experiments in controller RMs, evaluating the ability of the HDACi romidepsin (RMD to reactivate SIV and the impact of RMD treatment on SIV-specific T cell responses. Ten RMs were IV-infected with a SIVsmmFTq transmitted-founder infectious molecular clone. Four RMs received conventional ART for >9 months, starting from 65 days post-infection. SIVsmmFTq plasma viremia was robustly controlled to <10 SIV RNA copies/mL with ART, without viral blips. At ART cessation, initial rebound viremia to ~106 copies/mL was followed by a decline to < 10 copies/mL, suggesting effective immune control. Three post-treatment controller RMs received three doses of RMD every 35-50 days, followed by in vivo experimental depletion of CD8+ cells using monoclonal antibody M-T807R1. RMD was well-tolerated and resulted in a rapid and massive surge in T cell activation, as well as significant virus rebounds (~104 copies/ml peaking at 5-12 days post-treatment. CD8+ cell depletion resulted in a more robust viral rebound (107 copies/ml that was controlled upon CD8+ T cell recovery. Our results show that RMD can reactivate SIV in vivo in the setting of post-ART viral control. Comparison of the patterns of virus rebound after RMD administration and CD8+ cell depletion suggested that RMD impact on T cells is only transient and does not irreversibly alter the ability of SIV-specific T cells to control the reactivated virus.

  11. No postcopulatory selection against MHC-homozygous offspring : Evidence from a pedigreed captive rhesus macaque colony

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sterck, E H M; Bontrop, R E; Groot, N.; de Vos-Rouweler, Annemiek J M; Doxiadis, Gaby G M

    The heterozygosity status of polymorphic elements of the immune system, such as the major histocompatibility complex (MHC), is known to increase the potential to cope with a wider variety of pathogens. Pre- and postcopulatory processes may regulate MHC heterozygosity. In a population where mating

  12. UTILIZING SPECTRAL TRANSCRANIAL DOPPLER TO CHARACTERIZE CEREBRAL HEMODYNAMICS IN A NON-HUMAN PRIMATE (RHESUS MACAQUE)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-16

    auto-regulatory mechanisms are activated to preserve cerebral perfusion21, and changes in cerebral blood flow due to hypotension can have permanent...institution. Food and water was restricted for 12 hours prior to surgery. NHPs were sedated with Telazol (3.0mg/kg), pre-medicated with an analgesic

  13. The development of object recognition memory in rhesus macaques with neonatal lesions of the perirhinal cortex

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyson Zeamer

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available To investigate the role of the perirhinal cortex on the development of recognition measured by the visual paired-comparison (VPC task, infant monkeys with neonatal perirhinal lesions and sham-operated controls were tested at 1.5, 6, 18, and 48 months of age on the VPC task with color stimuli and intermixed delays of 10 s, 30 s, 60 s, and 120 s. Monkeys with neonatal perirhinal lesions showed an increase in novelty preference between 1.5 and 6 months of age similar to controls, although at these two ages, performance remained significantly poorer than that of control animals. With age, performance in animals with neonatal perirhinal lesions deteriorated as compared to that of controls. In contrast to the lack of novelty preference in monkeys with perirhinal lesions acquired in adulthood, novelty preference in the neonatally operated animals remained above chance at all delays and all ages. The data suggest that, although incidental recognition memory processes can be supported by the perirhinal cortex in early infancy, other temporal cortical areas may support these processes in the absence of a functional perirhinal cortex early in development. The neural substrates mediating incidental recognition memory processes appear to be more widespread in early infancy than in adulthood.

  14. Impact of prior flavivirus immunity on Zika virus infection in rhesus macaques

    OpenAIRE

    McCracken, Michael K.; Gromowski, Gregory D.; Friberg, Heather L.; Lin, Xiaoxu; Abbink, Peter; De La Barrera, Rafael; Eckles, Kenneth H.; Garver, Lindsey S.; Boyd, Michael; Jetton, David; Barouch, Dan H.; Wise, Matthew C.; Lewis, Bridget S.; Currier, Jeffrey R.; Modjarrad, Kayvon

    2017-01-01

    Author summary Zika virus (ZIKV) is a mosquito-borne, emerging flavivirus. In addition to asymptomatic or mild febrile manifestations, ZIKV infection in humans is associated with comparatively rare congenital and neurological abnormalities. Previous in vitro studies have demonstrated cross-reactivity of antibodies derived from dengue virus infections with ZIKV, as well as antibody-mediated enhancement of infection in cell culture. Therefore, there is concern among vaccinologists and the publi...

  15. Detecting Instability in Animal Social Networks: Genetic Fragmentation Is Associated with Social Instability in Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Beisner, Brianne A.; Jackson, Megan E.; Cameron, Ashley N.; McCowan, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    The persistence of biological systems requires evolved mechanisms which promote stability. Cohesive primate social groups are one example of stable biological systems, which persist in spite of regular conflict. We suggest that genetic relatedness and its associated kinship structure are a potential source of stability in primate social groups as kinship structure is an important organizing principle in many animal societies. We investigated the effect of average genetic relatedness per matri...

  16. Δ9tetrahydrocannabinol impairs visuo-spatial associative learning and spatial working memory in rhesus macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Taffe, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Cannabis remains the most commonly abused illicit drug and is rapidly expanding in quasi-licit use in some jurisdictions under medical marijuana laws. Effects of the psychoactive constituent Δ9tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9THC) on cognitive function remain of pressing concern. Prior studies in monkeys have not shown consistent evidence of memory specific effects of Δ9THC on recognition tasks and it remains unclear to what extent Δ9THC causes sedative versus specific cognitive effects. In this study...

  17. Measuring infant attachment security in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta): adaptation of the attachment Q-set.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warfield, James J; Kondo-Ikemura, Kiyomi; Waters, Everett

    2011-02-01

    John Bowlby defined offspring-parent attachment as a relationship in which an infant or child uses one or a few preferred adults as a secure base from which to explore and as a haven of safety. He defined attachment security in terms of confidence in the adult's availability and responsiveness and the smooth organization of exploration and proximity seeking. Developmental psychologists have found this perspective productive in both observational and laboratory research. At the same time, they emphasize that such a construct cannot be operationalized in terms of one or a few behaviors. Instead, naturalistic observations of human infant attachment typically employ the Q-sort method to develop the Attachment q-set (AQS), 90 behaviorally descriptive items sorted in terms of how characteristic each item is of the infant's typical behavior. Meta-analyses of research using the AQS attest to its reliability and validity. This article reports an adaptation of the AQS to the task of assessing infant attachment security in nonhuman primates and illustrates its use. The availability of comparable measures of attachment security will contribute to an expanded understanding of patterns of attachment behavior in nonhuman primate societies and will facilitate interaction between comparative and developmental psychologists. © 2010 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  18. Targeting HIV-1 Env gp140 to LOX-1 Elicits Immune Responses in Rhesus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zurawski, Gerard; Zurawski, Sandra; Flamar, Anne-Laure; Richert, Laura; Wagner, Ralf; Tomaras, Georgia D; Montefiori, David C; Roederer, Mario; Ferrari, Guido; Lacabaratz, Christine; Bonnabau, Henri; Klucar, Peter; Wang, Zhiqing; Foulds, Kathryn E; Kao, Shing-Fen; Yates, Nicole L; LaBranche, Celia; Jacobs, Bertram L; Kibler, Karen; Asbach, Benedikt; Kliche, Alexander; Salazar, Andres; Reed, Steve; Self, Steve; Gottardo, Raphael; Galmin, Lindsey; Weiss, Deborah; Cristillo, Anthony; Thiebaut, Rodolphe; Pantaleo, Giuseppe; Levy, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Improved antigenicity against HIV-1 envelope (Env) protein is needed to elicit vaccine-induced protective immunity in humans. Here we describe the first tests in non-human primates (NHPs) of Env gp140 protein fused to a humanized anti-LOX-1 recombinant antibody for delivering Env directly to LOX-1-bearing antigen presenting cells, especially dendritic cells (DC). LOX-1, or 1ectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-1, is expressed on various antigen presenting cells and endothelial cells, and is involved in promoting humoral immune responses. The anti-LOX-1 Env gp140 fusion protein was tested for priming immune responses and boosting responses in animals primed with replication competent NYVAC-KC Env gp140 vaccinia virus. Anti-LOX-1 Env gp140 vaccination elicited robust cellular and humoral responses when used for either priming or boosting immunity. Co-administration with Poly ICLC, a TLR3 agonist, was superior to GLA, a TLR4 agonist. Both CD4+ and CD8+ Env-specific T cell responses were elicited by anti-LOX-1 Env gp140, but in particular the CD4+ T cells were multifunctional and directed to multiple epitopes. Serum IgG and IgA antibody responses induced by anti-LOX-1 Env gp140 against various gp140 domains were cross-reactive across HIV-1 clades; however, the sera neutralized only HIV-1 bearing sequences most similar to the clade C 96ZM651 Env gp140 carried by the anti-LOX-1 vehicle. These data, as well as the safety of this protein vaccine, justify further exploration of this DC-targeting vaccine approach for protective immunity against HIV-1.

  19. Targeting HIV-1 Env gp140 to LOX-1 Elicits Immune Responses in Rhesus Macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerard Zurawski

    Full Text Available Improved antigenicity against HIV-1 envelope (Env protein is needed to elicit vaccine-induced protective immunity in humans. Here we describe the first tests in non-human primates (NHPs of Env gp140 protein fused to a humanized anti-LOX-1 recombinant antibody for delivering Env directly to LOX-1-bearing antigen presenting cells, especially dendritic cells (DC. LOX-1, or 1ectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein (LDL receptor-1, is expressed on various antigen presenting cells and endothelial cells, and is involved in promoting humoral immune responses. The anti-LOX-1 Env gp140 fusion protein was tested for priming immune responses and boosting responses in animals primed with replication competent NYVAC-KC Env gp140 vaccinia virus. Anti-LOX-1 Env gp140 vaccination elicited robust cellular and humoral responses when used for either priming or boosting immunity. Co-administration with Poly ICLC, a TLR3 agonist, was superior to GLA, a TLR4 agonist. Both CD4+ and CD8+ Env-specific T cell responses were elicited by anti-LOX-1 Env gp140, but in particular the CD4+ T cells were multifunctional and directed to multiple epitopes. Serum IgG and IgA antibody responses induced by anti-LOX-1 Env gp140 against various gp140 domains were cross-reactive across HIV-1 clades; however, the sera neutralized only HIV-1 bearing sequences most similar to the clade C 96ZM651 Env gp140 carried by the anti-LOX-1 vehicle. These data, as well as the safety of this protein vaccine, justify further exploration of this DC-targeting vaccine approach for protective immunity against HIV-1.

  20. The metatranscriptome of the rhesus macaque: investigating potential causes of idiopathic chronic diarrhea

    Science.gov (United States)

    The study of the gut microbiome—the collection of microbes within the intestinal tract and the genes they express—is growing in popularity as associations are found between diet, gut microbiome activity, and host health and disease. However, current metagenomic and ribosomal profiling approaches are...

  1. Alcohol Consumption Modulates Host Defense in Rhesus Macaques by Altering Gene Expression in Circulating Leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barr, Tasha; Girke, Thomas; Sureshchandra, Suhas; Nguyen, Christina; Grant, Kathleen; Messaoudi, Ilhem

    2016-01-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that chronic alcohol use disorder leads to increased susceptibility to several viral and bacterial infections, whereas moderate alcohol consumption decreases the incidence of colds and improves immune responses to some pathogens. In line with these observations, we recently showed that heavy ethanol intake (average blood ethanol concentrations > 80 mg/dl) suppressed, whereas moderate alcohol consumption (blood ethanol concentrations consumption. To uncover the molecular basis for impaired immunity with heavy alcohol consumption and enhanced immune response with moderate alcohol consumption, we performed a transcriptome analysis using PBMCs isolated on day 7 post-modified vaccinia Ankara vaccination, the earliest time point at which we detected differences in T cell and Ab responses. Overall, chronic heavy alcohol consumption reduced the expression of immune genes involved in response to infection and wound healing and increased the expression of genes associated with the development of lung inflammatory disease and cancer. In contrast, chronic moderate alcohol consumption upregulated the expression of genes involved in immune response and reduced the expression of genes involved in cancer. To uncover mechanisms underlying the alterations in PBMC transcriptomes, we profiled the expression of microRNAs within the same samples. Chronic heavy ethanol consumption altered the levels of several microRNAs involved in cancer and immunity and known to regulate the expression of mRNAs differentially expressed in our data set. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  2. Oxytocin enhances attention to the eye region in rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Monte, Olga; Noble, Pamela L; Costa, Vincent D; Averbeck, Bruno B

    2014-01-01

    Human and non-human primates rely on the ability to perceive and interpret facial expressions to guide effective social interactions. The neuropeptide oxytocin (OT) has been shown to have a critical role in the perception of social cues, and in humans to increase the number of saccades to the eye region. To develop a useful primate model for the effects of OT on information processing, we investigated the influence of OT on gaze behavior during face processing in rhesus macaques. Forty-five minutes after a single intranasal dose of either 24IU OT or saline, monkeys completed a free-viewing task during which they viewed pictures of conspecifics displaying one of three facial expressions (neutral, open-mouth threat or bared-teeth) for 5 s. The monkey was free to explore the face on the screen while the pattern of eye movements was recorded. OT did not increase overall fixations to the face compared to saline. Rather, when monkeys freely viewed conspecific faces, OT increased fixations to the eye region relative to the mouth region. This effect of OT was particularly pronounced when face position on the screen was manipulated so that the eye region was not the first facial feature seen by the monkeys. Together these findings are consistent with prior evidence in humans that intranasal administration of OT specifically enhances visual attention to the eye region compared to other informative facial features, thus validating the use of non-human primates to mechanistically explore how OT modulates social information processing and behavior.

  3. Trends in the utilization of computed tomography and cardiac catheterization among children with congenital heart disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Justin Cheng-Ta Yang

    2015-11-01

    Conclusion: The use of noninvasive CT in children with selected heart conditions might reduce the use of diagnostic cardiac catheterization. This may release time and facilities within the catheterization laboratory to meet the increasing demand for cardiac interventions.

  4. Prevalence of Rhesus Negative Gene and Awareness of its ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of the Rhesus negative gene was 7.5%. Only 5% were aware of the implications of Rhesus status. The prevalence is comparable with previous reports, the use of anti-D immunoglobulin is advised when appropriate. Key Words: Rhesus negative, genotype anti-D immunoglobulin. Jnl of Medical Investigation ...

  5. Novel full-length major histocompatibility complex class I allele discovery and haplotype definition in pig-tailed macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Semler, Matthew R; Wiseman, Roger W; Karl, Julie A; Graham, Michael E; Gieger, Samantha M; O'Connor, David H

    2017-11-13

    Pig-tailed macaques (Macaca nemestrina, Mane) are important models for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) studies. Their infectability with minimally modified HIV makes them a uniquely valuable animal model to mimic human infection with HIV and progression to acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). However, variation in the pig-tailed macaque major histocompatibility complex (MHC) and the impact of individual transcripts on the pathogenesis of HIV and other infectious diseases is understudied compared to that of rhesus and cynomolgus macaques. In this study, we used Pacific Biosciences single-molecule real-time circular consensus sequencing to describe full-length MHC class I (MHC-I) transcripts for 194 pig-tailed macaques from three breeding centers. We then used the full-length sequences to infer Mane-A and Mane-B haplotypes containing groups of MHC-I transcripts that co-segregate due to physical linkage. In total, we characterized full-length open reading frames (ORFs) for 313 Mane-A, Mane-B, and Mane-I sequences that defined 86 Mane-A and 106 Mane-B MHC-I haplotypes. Pacific Biosciences technology allows us to resolve these Mane-A and Mane-B haplotypes to the level of synonymous allelic variants. The newly defined haplotypes and transcript sequences containing full-length ORFs provide an important resource for infectious disease researchers as certain MHC haplotypes have been shown to provide exceptional control of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) replication and prevention of AIDS-like disease in nonhuman primates. The increased allelic resolution provided by Pacific Biosciences sequencing also benefits transplant research by allowing researchers to more specifically match haplotypes between donors and recipients to the level of nonsynonymous allelic variation, thus reducing the risk of graft-versus-host disease.

  6. Protection of macaques with diverse MHC genotypes against a heterologous SIV by vaccination with a deglycosylated live-attenuated SIV.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chie Sugimoto

    Full Text Available HIV vaccine development has been hampered by issues such as undefined correlates of protection and extensive diversity of HIV. We addressed these issues using a previously established SIV-macaque model in which SIV mutants with deletions of multiple gp120 N-glycans function as potent live attenuated vaccines to induce near-sterile immunity against the parental pathogenic SIVmac239. In this study, we investigated the protective efficacy of these mutants against a highly pathogenic heterologous SIVsmE543-3 delivered intravenously to rhesus macaques with diverse MHC genotypes. All 11 vaccinated macaques contained the acute-phase infection with blood viral loads below the level of detection between 4 and 10 weeks postchallenge (pc, following a transient but marginal peak of viral replication at 2 weeks in only half of the challenged animals. In the chronic phase, seven vaccinees contained viral replication for over 80 weeks pc, while four did not. Neutralizing antibodies against challenge virus were not detected. Although overall levels of SIV specific T cell responses did not correlate with containment of acute and chronic viral replication, a critical role of cellular responses in the containment of viral replication was suggested. Emergence of viruses with altered fitness due to recombination between the vaccine and challenge viruses and increased gp120 glycosylation was linked to the failure to control SIV. These results demonstrate the induction of effective protective immune responses in a significant number of animals against heterologous virus by infection with deglycosylated attenuated SIV mutants in macaques with highly diverse MHC background. These findings suggest that broad HIV cross clade protection is possible, even in hosts with diverse genetic backgrounds. In summary, results of this study indicate that deglycosylated live-attenuated vaccines may provide a platform for the elucidation of correlates of protection needed for a

  7. Effect of Prolonged Catheterization of the bladder on Men with ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    %), lack of finance (15/30%) and presence of co-morbid conditions (10/20%). The common complications of indwelling catheterization included pain at the insertion of catheter (33/66%) and pericatheter leakage of urine (30/60%). The personal ...

  8. Pulse fluoroscopy radiation reduction in a pediatric cardiac catheterization laboratory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Covi, Stuart H; Whiteside, Wendy; Yu, Sunkyung; Zampi, Jeffrey D

    2015-01-01

    To determine if lower starting pulse fluoroscopy rates lead to lower overall radiation exposure without increasing complication rates or perceived procedure length or difficulty. The pediatric cardiac catheterization laboratory at University of Michigan Mott Children's Hospital. Pediatric patients with congenital heart disease. We performed a single-center quality improvement study where the baseline pulse fluoroscopy rate was varied between cases during pediatric cardiac catheterization procedures. Indirect and direct radiation exposure data were collected, and the perceived impact of the fluoroscopy rate and procedural complications was recorded. These outcomes were then compared among the different set pulse fluoroscopy rates. Comparing pulse fluoroscopy rates of 15, 7.5, and 5 frames per second from 61 cases, there was a significant reduction in radiation exposure between 15 and 7.5 frames per second. There was no difference in perceived case difficulty, procedural length, or procedural complications regardless of starting pulse fluoroscopy rate. For pediatric cardiac catheterizations, a starting pulse fluoroscopy rate of 7.5 frames per second exposes physicians and their patients to significantly less radiation with no impact on procedural difficulty or outcomes. This quality improvement study has resulted in a significant practice change in our pediatric cardiac catheterization laboratory, and 7.5 frames per second is now the default fluoroscopy rate. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Cerebral contrast retention after difficult cardiac catheterization: Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shahid M Khan

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: We report a diagnostic dilemma in a rare case of cerebral contrast retention after difficult cardiac catheterization in an elderly patient loaded with prasugrel. Summary: Our case report describes a 77-year-old female with history of hypertension, diabetes, and dyslipidemia who presented to emergency department complaining of chest pain. Patient was found to have an inferior wall ST elevation myocardial infarction. The patient was loaded with aspirin and prasugrel and taken for emergent cardiac catheterization. Cardiac catheterization revealed two-vessel coronary artery disease with unsuccessful attempt of percutaneous intervention. Immediately after procedure, patient developed an episode of seizure. Emergent computed tomography scan of the brain revealed hyperdensity in the right frontoparietal region consistent with intracerebral bleed. Repeat computed tomography (24 h later revealed substantial interval improvement of hyperdensity. Follow-up magnetic resonance imaging of the head was normal. Given the lack of magnetic resonance imaging changes, the rate of resolution on computed tomography without expected subacute changes, and the lack of neurologic findings, the initial hyperdensity seen on computed tomography of the brain was believed to be secondary to contrast leakage during cardiac catheterization as opposed to intracranial hemorrhage.

  10. Giant urethral stone in a patient using clean intermittant catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Gedik

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Urethral stone is a rare entity in clinical practice. Primary urethral stone happening directly in urethra is even rare, and it usually occurs as a result frequent urinary infection, urethral stricture and trauma.While the application of clear intermittant catheterization reliably protects bladder function, in long term use, it may cause various complications.In this case, we discussed giant urethral stone in a patient who has been acting clean intermittent catheterization regularly and without problem fort he last five years and who has had total loss of sensation in this lower extremity as a result of falling from height. Considering that the urethral calibration, in the patient acting clean intermittent catheterization is interesting, the giant urethra stone as much as examined such a case has not been presented in literature.In the patient acting clean intermittent catheterization and having loss of urethral sensation and with neurogenic bladder, we call attention to urethral pathologies the symptoms of which were seeing late

  11. Clean Intermittent Catheterization: Overview of Results in 194 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) is a life-saving procedure in children with spina bifida, but its effectiveness in Kenya has not been previously documented. Patients and Methods: The current study analyzed the application of CIC in a series of 194 patients with spina bifida who fulfilled set criteria for ...

  12. Managing Inadvertent Arterial Catheterization During Central Venous Access Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nicholson, Tony; Ettles, Duncan; Robinson, Graham

    2004-01-01

    Purpose: Approximately 200,000 central venous catheterizations are carried out annually in the National Health Service in the United Kingdom. Inadvertent arterial puncture occurs in up to 3.7%. Significant morbidity and death has been reported. We report on our experience in the endovascular treatment of this iatrogenic complication. Methods: Retrospective analysis was carried out of 9 cases referred for endovascular treatment of inadvertent arterial puncture during central venous catheterization over a 5 year period. Results: It was not possible to obtain accurate figures on the numbers of central venous catheterizations carried out during the time period. Five patients were referred with carotid or subclavian pseudoaneurysms and hemothorax following inadvertent arterial catheter insertion and subsequent removal. These patients all underwent percutaneous balloon tamponade and/or stent-graft insertion. More recently 4 patients were referred with the catheter still in situ and were successfully treated with a percutaneous closure device. Conclusion: If inadvertent arterial catheterization during central venous access procedures is recognized and catheters removed, sequelae can be treated percutaneously. However, once the complication is recognized it is better to leave the catheter in situ and seal the artery percutaneously with a closure device

  13. Indwelling versus Intermittent Urinary Catheterization following Total Joint Arthroplasty: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Zhang

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to compare the rates of urinary tract infection (UTI and postoperative urinary retention (POUR in patients undergoing lower limb arthroplasty after either indwelling urinary catheterization or intermittent urinary catheterization.We conducted a meta-analysis of relevant randomized controlled trials (RCT to compare the rates of UTI and POUR in patients undergoing total joint arthroplasty after either indwelling urinary catheterization or intermittent urinary catheterization. A comprehensive search was carried out to identify RCTs. Study-specific risk ratios (RR with 95% confidence intervals (CI were pooled. Additionally, a meta-regression analysis, as well as a sensitivity analysis, was performed to evaluate the heterogeneity.Nine RCTs with 1771 patients were included in this meta-analysis. The results showed that there was no significant difference in the rate of UTIs between indwelling catheterization and intermittent catheterization groups (P>0.05. Moreover, indwelling catheterization reduced the risk of POUR, versus intermittent catheterization, in total joint surgery (P<0.01.Based on the results of the meta-analysis, indwelling urinary catheterization, removed 24-48 h postoperatively, was superior to intermittent catheterization in preventing POUR. Furthermore, indwelling urinary catheterization with removal 24 to 48 hours postoperatively did not increase the risk of UTI. In patients with multiple risk factors for POUR undergoing total joint arthroplasty of lower limb, the preferred option should be indwelling urinary catheterization removed 24-48 h postoperatively.Level I.

  14. Spontaneous Metacognition in Rhesus Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosati, Alexandra G; Santos, Laurie R

    2016-09-01

    Metacognition is the ability to think about thinking. Although monitoring and controlling one's knowledge is a key feature of human cognition, its evolutionary origins are debated. In the current study, we examined whether rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta; N = 120) could make metacognitive inferences in a one-shot decision. Each monkey experienced one of four conditions, observing a human appearing to hide a food reward in an apparatus consisting of either one or two tubes. The monkeys tended to search the correct location when they observed this baiting event, but engaged in information seeking-by peering into a center location where they could check both potential hiding spots-if their view had been occluded and information seeking was possible. The monkeys only occasionally approached the center when information seeking was not possible. These results show that monkeys spontaneously use information about their own knowledge states to solve naturalistic foraging problems, and thus provide the first evidence that nonhumans exhibit information-seeking responses in situations with which they have no prior experience. © The Author(s) 2016.

  15. A species-specific amino acid difference in the macaque CD4 receptor restricts replication by global circulating HIV-1 variants representing viruses from recent infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humes, Daryl; Emery, Sandra; Laws, Elizabeth; Overbaugh, Julie

    2012-12-01

    HIV-1 replicates poorly in macaque cells, and this had hindered the advancement of relevant nonhuman primate model systems for HIV-1 infection and pathogenesis. Several host restriction factors have been identified that contribute to this species-specific restriction to HIV-1 replication, but these do not fully explain the poor replication of most strains of HIV-1 in macaque cells. Only select HIV-1 envelope variants, typically those derived from viruses that have been adapted in cell culture, result in infectious chimeric SIVs encoding HIV-1 envelope (SHIVs). Here we demonstrate that most circulating HIV-1 variants obtained directly from infected individuals soon after virus acquisition do not efficiently mediate entry using the macaque CD4 receptor. The infectivity of these viruses is ca. 20- to 50-fold lower with the rhesus and pig-tailed macaque versus the human CD4 receptor. In contrast, culture-derived HIV-1 envelope variants that facilitate efficient replication in macaques showed similar infectivity with macaque and human CD4 receptors (within ∼2-fold). The ability of an envelope to mediate entry using macaque CD4 correlated with its ability to mediate entry of cells expressing low levels of the human CD4 receptor and with soluble CD4 sensitivity. Species-specific differences in the functional capacity of the CD4 receptor to mediate entry mapped to a single amino acid difference at position 39 that is under strong positive selection, suggesting that the evolution of CD4 may have been influenced by its function as a viral receptor. These results also suggest that N39 in human CD4 may be a critical residue for interaction of transmitted HIV-1 variants. These studies provide important insights into virus-host cell interactions that have hindered the development of relevant nonhuman primate models for HIV-1 infection and provide possible markers, such as sCD4 sensitivity, to identify potential HIV-1 variants that could be exploited for development of better

  16. Use of a Recombinant Gamma-2 Herpesvirus Vaccine Vector against Dengue Virus in Rhesus Monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bischof, Georg F; Magnani, Diogo M; Ricciardi, Michael; Shin, Young C; Domingues, Aline; Bailey, Varian K; Gonzalez-Nieto, Lucas; Rakasz, Eva G; Watkins, David I; Desrosiers, Ronald C

    2017-08-15

    Research on vaccine approaches that can provide long-term protection against dengue virus infection is needed. Here we describe the construction, immunogenicity, and preliminary information on the protective capacity of recombinant, replication-competent rhesus monkey rhadinovirus (RRV), a persisting herpesvirus. One RRV construct expressed nonstructural protein 5 (NS5), while a second recombinant expressed a soluble variant of the E protein (E85) of dengue virus 2 (DENV2). Four rhesus macaques received a single vaccination with a mixture of both recombinant RRVs and were subsequently challenged 19 weeks later with 1 × 10 5 PFU of DENV2. During the vaccine phase, plasma of all vaccinated monkeys showed neutralizing activity against DENV2. Cellular immune responses against NS5 were also elicited, as evidenced by major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I) tetramer staining in the one vaccinated monkey that was Mamu-A*01 positive. Unlike two of two unvaccinated controls, two of the four vaccinated monkeys showed no detectable viral RNA sequences in plasma after challenge. One of these two monkeys also showed no anamnestic increases in antibody levels following challenge and thus appeared to be protected against the acquisition of DENV2 following high-dose challenge. Continued study will be needed to evaluate the performance of herpesviral and other persisting vectors for achieving long-term protection against dengue virus infection. IMPORTANCE Continuing studies of vaccine approaches against dengue virus (DENV) infection are warranted, particularly ones that may provide long-term immunity against all four serotypes. Here we investigated whether recombinant rhesus monkey rhadinovirus (RRV) could be used as a vaccine against DENV2 infection in rhesus monkeys. Upon vaccination, all animals generated antibodies capable of neutralizing DENV2. Two of four vaccinated monkeys showed no detectable viral RNA after subsequent high-dose DENV2 challenge at 19 weeks

  17. Value of cardiac catheterization and cineangiography in infantile lobar emphysema

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roguin, N.; Peleg, H.; Naveh, Y.; Riss, E.

    1980-01-01

    Lobar emphysema is an uncommon cause of respiratory distress in infancy. Congenital heart disease is seen in about 20% of the patients with infantile (congenital) lobar emphysema. We described six infants with lobar emphysema. In three of them a congenital heart disease was demonstrated by cardiac catheterization and cineangiography; two had a tetralogy of Fallot with right aortic arch and the third infant a ventricular septal defect. The pulmonary angiography showed stretching of the arteries with very poor filling of the peripheral arteries and a characteristic smaller pulmonary vein in the affected lobe. In all the six patients the pulmonary artery pressure was normal. All the patients underwent lobectomy with good results. We feel that a preoperative cardiac catheterization and cineangiography is of value in this very sick group of infants.

  18. A comparison of radial and femoral access for cardiac catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagener, John F; Rao, Sunil V

    2015-11-01

    Over the past several years, the transradial approach (TRA) for cardiac catheterization has become increasingly adopted in the United States. The increased utilization of the TRA is grounded on 2 decades of research, showing reduced bleeding and vascular complications to complement improved patient quality of life. However, the concern over cost, radiation exposure, and acknowledged "learning curve" has kept the transfemoral approach (TFA) the mainstay of most US catheterization laboratories. More recent larger multi-centered randomized studies have aimed to address outcomes and these concerns between the TR and TF approaches. This article will review the changing trends in TRA in the US, discuss clinical (bleeding and mortality) and non-clinical (quality of life and cost) outcomes from recent randomized studies, and finally discuss certain aspects when it comes to adopting TRA. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Continuous use of intermittent bladder catheterization - can social support contribute?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjoyre Anne Lindozo Lopes

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to investigate the factors affecting the adequate continuous use of intermittent catheterization and its relation with social support.METHOD: sectional, descriptive and correlational study involving 49 patients with neuropathic bladder caused by spinal cord injury.RESULTS: almost all (92% participants continued the intermittent catheterization, but 46.9% made some changes in the technique. The complications (28.6% of the sample were mainly infection and vesicolithiasis. There were high scores for social support in relation to people that were part of the patient's social support.CONCLUSION: All of them noticed great support from the family, but not from the society in general. The difficulties were related to the lack of equipment and inadequate infrastructure, leading to changes that increased urologic complications.

  20. Canine Distemper Outbreak in Rhesus Monkeys, China

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Wei; Zheng, Ying; Zhang, Shoufeng; Fan, Quanshui; Liu, Hua; Zhang, Fuqiang; Wang, Wei; Liao, Guoyang

    2011-01-01

    Since 2006, canine distemper outbreaks have occurred in rhesus monkeys at a breeding farm in Guangxi, People’s Republic of China. Approximately 10,000 animals were infected (25%–60% disease incidence); 5%–30% of infected animals died. The epidemic was controlled by vaccination. Amino acid sequence analysis of the virus indicated a unique strain. PMID:21801646

  1. Rhesus blood group systems and haemoglobin

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Medicine, University of Nigeria, Enugu Campus, Enugu State, Nigeria. Summary. Background: The distribution of ABO, Rhesus blood group and haemoglobin (Hb) genotypes was investigated among 320. confirmed human immunodeficiency virus I & 11 (HIV) / ac- quired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) with tuberculo-.

  2. [Current complications of heart catheterization. Analysis of 100 cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nunes, G L; Nicolela Júnior, E L; Sousa, G M; Maldonado, G; Cano, M M; Esteves, C A; Braga, S L; Yaktine, H M; Feres, F

    1991-02-01

    To analyse the impact of the new cardiac catheterization techniques on the complication profile of these procedures. One thousand consecutive patients who underwent cardiac catheterization from August through December, 1989 (739 diagnostic and 201 therapeutic procedures), who were followed up until hospital discharge. Complications were classified accordingly to their type and severity, and were related to the procedure employed and to the left ventricular ejection fraction. There were no complications in 77.7% of the population studied. In the remaining 236 patients the incidence of mild, moderate and severe complications were, respectively: 11.2%, 7.3% and 3.8%. Severe vascular complications occurred in 0.5%, cardiac perforation requiring emergency surgical repair in 0.1%, severe arrhythmias in 1.4%, acute myocardial infarction in 0.4%, acute pulmonary edema in 0.3% and fatal events in 0.5% patients. Despite the increasing application of interventional techniques and the greater number of acutely ill patients referred to cardiac catheterization, these procedures have proved to be safe with a low complication rate.

  3. Frozen-thawed rhesus sperm retain normal morphology and highly progressive motility but exhibit sharply reduced efficiency in penetrating cervical mucus and hyualuronic acid gel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollner, Theodore L.; Dong, Qiaoxiang; VandeVoort, Catherine A.

    2011-01-01

    The preservation of the genetic diversity of captive populations of rhesus monkeys is critical to the future of biomedical research. Cryopreservation of rhesus macaque sperm is relatively simple to perform, yields high post-thaw motility, and theoretically, provides via artificial insemination (AI) a way to easily transfer genetics among colonies of animals. In the interest of optimizing semen cryopreservation methods for use with vaginal AI, we evaluated the ability of frozen-thawed rhesus sperm to penetrate periovulatory cervical mucus (CM). Motile sperm concentration of pre–freeze (“fresh”) and post-thawed (“thawed”) samples from 5 different males were normalized for both computer assisted sperm motion analysis and CM penetration experiments. Sperm samples were deposited into slide chambers containing CM or gel composed of hyaluronic acid (HA) as a surrogate for CM and numbers of sperm were recorded as they entered a video field a preset distance from the sperm suspension-CM (or HA) interface. Fresh and thawed sperm were dried on glass slides, “Pap”-stained, and assessed for changes in head dimensions and head and flagellar shape. While retaining better than 80% of fresh sperm progressive motility, thawed sperm from the same ejaculate retained on average only 18.6% of the CM penetration ability. Experiments using HA gel yielded similar results only with reduced experimental error and thus improved detection of treatment differences. Neither the percentage of abnormal forms nor head dimensions differed between fresh and thawed sperm. While findings suggests that sperm-CM interaction is a prominent factor in previous failures of vaginal AI with cryopreserved macaque sperm, neither sperm motility nor morphology appears to account for changes in the ability of cryopreserved sperm to penetrate CM. Our data points to a previously unidentified manifestation of cryodamage which may have implications for assessment of sperm function beyond the cervix and

  4. Dynamics of envelope evolution in clade C SHIV-infected pig-tailed macaques during disease progression analyzed by ultra-deep pyrosequencing.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    For Yue Tso

    Full Text Available Understanding the evolution of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1 envelope during disease progression can provide tremendous insights for vaccine development, and simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV infection of non-human primate provides an ideal platform for such studies. A newly developed clade C SHIV, SHIV-1157ipd3N4, which was able to infect rhesus macaques, closely resembled primary HIV-1 in transmission and pathogenesis, was used to infect several pig-tailed macaques. One of the infected animals subsequently progressed to AIDS, whereas one remained a non-progressor. The viral envelope evolution in the infected animals during disease progression was analyzed by a bioinformatics approach using ultra-deep pyrosequencing. Our results showed substantial envelope variations emerging in the progressor animal after the onset of AIDS. These envelope variations impacted the length of the variable loops and charges of different envelope regions. Additionally, multiple mutations were located at the CD4 and CCR5 binding sites, potentially affecting receptor binding affinity, viral fitness and they might be selected at late stages of disease. More importantly, these envelope mutations are not random since they had repeatedly been observed in a rhesus macaque and a human infant infected by either SHIV or HIV-1, respectively, carrying the parental envelope of the infectious molecular clone SHIV-1157ipd3N4. Moreover, similar mutations were also observed from other studies on different clades of envelopes regardless of the host species. These recurring mutations in different envelopes suggest that there may be a common evolutionary pattern and selection pathway for the HIV-1 envelope during disease progression.

  5. The ORF59 DNA polymerase processivity factor homologs of Old World primate RV2 rhadinoviruses are highly conserved nuclear antigens expressed in differentiated epithelium in infected macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burnside Kellie L

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background ORF59 DNA polymerase processivity factor of the human rhadinovirus, Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV, is required for efficient copying of the genome during virus replication. KSHV ORF59 is antigenic in the infected host and is used as a marker for virus activation and replication. Results We cloned, sequenced and expressed the genes encoding related ORF59 proteins from the RV1 rhadinovirus homologs of KSHV from chimpanzee (PtrRV1 and three species of macaques (RFHVMm, RFHVMn and RFHVMf, and have compared them with ORF59 proteins obtained from members of the more distantly-related RV2 rhadinovirus lineage infecting the same non-human primate species (PtrRV2, RRV, MneRV2, and MfaRV2, respectively. We found that ORF59 homologs of the RV1 and RV2 Old World primate rhadinoviruses are highly conserved with distinct phylogenetic clustering of the two rhadinovirus lineages. RV1 and RV2 ORF59 C-terminal domains exhibit a strong lineage-specific conservation. Rabbit antiserum was developed against a C-terminal polypeptide that is highly conserved between the macaque RV2 ORF59 sequences. This anti-serum showed strong reactivity towards ORF59 encoded by the macaque RV2 rhadinoviruses, RRV (rhesus and MneRV2 (pig-tail, with no cross reaction to human or macaque RV1 ORF59 proteins. Using this antiserum and RT-qPCR, we determined that RRV ORF59 is expressed early after permissive infection of both rhesus primary fetal fibroblasts and African green monkey kidney epithelial cells (Vero in vitro. RRV- and MneRV2-infected foci showed strong nuclear expression of ORF59 that correlated with production of infectious progeny virus. Immunohistochemical studies of an MneRV2-infected macaque revealed strong nuclear expression of ORF59 in infected cells within the differentiating layer of epidermis corroborating previous observations that differentiated epithelial cells are permissive for replication of KSHV-like rhadinoviruses

  6. Prevalence of Du Phenotype amongst Rhesus Negative Females in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The prevalence of Du phenotype was investigated among rhesus negative women of childbearing age (15–45 years) in Port Harcourt, Nigeria over a period of 17 months. A total of 1,108 women were randomly sampled, out of which 1,003 (90.5%) were rhesus positive and 105 (9.5%) rhesus negative. Only one (0.95%) of ...

  7. Social subordination produces distinct stress-related phenotypes in female rhesus monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michopoulos, Vasiliki; Higgins, Melinda; Toufexis, Donna; Wilson, Mark E

    2012-07-01

    Social subordination in female macaques is imposed by harassment and the threat of aggression and produces reduced control over one's social and physical environment and a dysregulation of the limbic-hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis resembling that observed in people suffering from psychopathologies. These effects support the contention that this particular animal model is an ethologically relevant paradigm in which to investigate the etiology of stress-induced psychological illness related to women. Here, we sought to expand this model by performing a discriminate analysis (DA) on 33 variables within three domains; behavioral, metabolic/anthropomorphic, and neuroendocrine, collected from socially housed female rhesus monkeys in order to assess whether exposure to social subordination produces a distinct phenotype. A receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve was also calculated to determine each domain's classification accuracy. DA found significant markers within each domain that differentiated dominant and subordinate females. Subordinate females received more aggression, showed more submissive behavior, and received less of affiliation from others than did dominant females. Metabolic differences included increased leptin, and reduced adiponectin in dominant compared to subordinate females. Dominant females exhibited increased sensitivity to hormonal stimulation with higher serum LH in response to estradiol, cortisol in response to ACTH, and increased glucocorticoid negative feedback. Serum oxytocin, CSF DOPAC and serum PACAP were all significantly higher in dominant females. ROC curve analysis accurately predicted social status in all three domains. Results suggest that socially house rhesus monkeys represent a cogent animal model in which to study the physiology and behavioral consequences of chronic psychosocial stress in humans. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. CD4 depletion in SIV-infected macaques results in macrophage and microglia infection with rapid turnover of infected cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Micci

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available In rhesus macaques (RMs, experimental depletion of CD4+ T-cells prior to SIV infection results in higher viremia and emergence of CD4-independent SIV-envelopes. In this study we used the rhesus recombinant anti-CD4 antibody CD4R1 to deplete RM CD4+ T-cells prior to SIVmac251 infection and investigate the sources of the increased viral burden and the lifespan of productively infected cells. CD4-depleted animals showed (i set-point viral load two-logs higher than controls; (ii macrophages constituting 80% of all SIV vRNA+ cells in lymph node and mucosal tissues; (iii substantial expansion of pro-inflammatory monocytes; (iv aberrant activation and infection of microglial cells; and (v lifespan of productively infected cells significantly longer in comparison to controls, but markedly shorter than previously estimated for macrophages. The net effect of CD4+ T-cell depletion is an inability to control SIV replication and a shift in the tropism of infected cells to macrophages, microglia, and, potentially, other CD4-low cells which all appear to have a shortened in vivo lifespan. We believe these findings have important implications for HIV eradication studies.

  9. Assessing significant (>30%) alopecia as a possible biomarker for stress in captive rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Melinda A; Menard, Mark T; El-Mallah, Saif N; Rosenberg, Kendra; Lutz, Corrine K; Worlein, Julie; Coleman, Kris; Meyer, Jerrold S

    2017-01-01

    Hair loss is common in macaque colonies. Very little is known about the relationship between psychological stress and hair loss. We initially examined alopecia and hair cortisol concentrations in 198 (89 male) rhesus macaques from three primate centers and demonstrated replicability of our previous finding that extensive alopecia (>30% hair loss) is associated with increased chronic cortisol concentrations and significantly affected by facility. A subset of these monkeys (142 of which 67 were males) were sampled twice approximately 8 months apart allowing us to examine the hypotheses that gaining hair should be associated with decreases in cortisol concentrations and vice versa. Hair loss was digitally scored using ImageJ software for the first sample. Then visual assessment was used to examine the second sample, resulting in three categories of coat condition: (i) monkeys that remained fully haired; (ii) monkeys that remained alopecic (with more than 30% hair loss); or (iii) monkeys that showed more than a 15% increase in hair. The sample size for the group that lost hair was too small to be analyzed. Consistent with our hypothesis, monkeys that gained hair showed a significant reduction in hair cortisol concentrations but this effect only held for females. Coat condition changed little across sampling periods with only 25 (11 male) monkeys showing a greater than 15% gain of hair. Twenty (7 male) monkeys remained alopecic, whereas 97 (49 males) remained fully haired. Hair cortisol was highly correlated across samples for the monkeys that retained their status (remained alopecic or retained their hair). Am. J. Primatol. 79:e22547, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Molecular cloning and anti-HIV-1 activities of APOBEC3s from northern pig-tailed macaques (Macaca leonina).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiao-Liang; Song, Jia-Hao; Pang, Wei; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2016-07-18

    Northern pig-tailed macaques (NPMs, Macaca leonina) are susceptible to HIV-1 infection largely due to the loss of HIV-1-restricting factor TRIM5α. However, great impediments still exist in the persistent replication of HIV-1 in vivo, suggesting some viral restriction factors are reserved in this host. The APOBEC3 proteins have demonstrated a capacity to restrict HIV-1 replication, but their inhibitory effects in NPMs remain elusive. In this study, we cloned the NPM A3A-A3H genes, and determined by BLAST searching that their coding sequences (CDSs) showed 99% identity to the corresponding counterparts from rhesus and southern pig-tailed macaques. We further analyzed the anti-HIV-1 activities of the A3A-A3H genes, and found that A3G and A3F had the greatest anti-HIV-1 activity compared with that of other members. The results of this study indicate that A3G and A3F might play critical roles in limiting HIV-1 replication in NPMs in vivo. Furthermore, this research provides valuable information for the optimization of monkey models of HIV-1 infection.

  11. Suprapubic compared with transurethral bladder catheterization for gynecologic surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Healy, Eibhlín F; Walsh, Colin A; Cotter, Amanda M; Walsh, Stewart R

    2012-09-01

    Suprapubic catheterization is commonly used for postoperative bladder drainage after gynecologic procedures. However, recent studies have suggested an increased rate of complications compared with urethral catheterization. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing suprapubic catheterization and urethral catheterization in gynecologic populations. PubMed, EMBASE, CINAHL, Google Scholar, and trial registries were searched from 1966 to March 2012 for eligible randomized controlled trials comparing postoperative suprapubic catheterization and urethral catheterization in gynecologic patients. We used these search terms: "catheter," "supra(-)pubic catheter," "urinary catheter," "gyn(a)ecological," "catheterization techniques gyn(a)ecological surgery," "transurethral catheter," and "bladder drainage." No language restrictions were applied. METHODS AND STUDY SELECTION: The primary outcome was urinary tract infection. Secondary outcomes were the need for recatheterization, duration of catheterization, catheter-related complications, and duration of hospital stay. Pooled effect size estimates were calculated using the random effects model from DerSimonian and Laird. In total, 12 eligible randomized controlled trials were included in the analysis (N=1,300 patients). Suprapubic catheterization was associated with a significant reduction in postoperative urinary tract infections (20% compared with 31%, pooled odds ratio [OR] 0.31, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.185-0.512, Pgynecologic patients is clearly superior. The reduced rate of infective morbidity with suprapubic catheterization is offset by a higher rate of catheter-related complications and crucially does not translate into reduced hospital stay. As yet, there are insufficient data to determine which route is most appropriate for catheterization; therefore, cost and patient-specific factors should be paramount in the decision. Minimally invasive surgery may alter the

  12. Thyrocervical artery - jugular fistula following internal jugular venous catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P P Zachariah

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Arteriovenous fistula (AVF is an anomalous communication between an artery and a vein, caused by an iatrogenic or traumatic etiology. Surgically created upper limb AVF remains the preferred vascular access for patients on maintenance hemodialysis. Nonetheless central vein cannulation for hemodialysis is a common procedure done in patients who need hemodialysis. We incidentally detected a thyrocervical artery - jugular fistula in a patient on maintenance hemodialysis. He underwent a successful intra arterial coil embolization of the feeding vessel. Review of literature has shown that, a thyrocervical artery - internal jugular vein arteriovenous fistula following a central venous catheterization has not been reported so far.

  13. A bulbar artery pseudoaneurysm following traumatic urethral catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettez, Mathieu; Aubé, Melanie; Sherbiny, Mohamed El; Cabrera, Tatiana; Jednak, Roman

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic urethral catheterization may result in a number of serious complications. A rare occurrence is the development of a urethral pseudoaneurysm. We report the case of a 13-year-old male who required placement of a Foley catheter for an orthopedic surgical procedure. The Foley was misplaced in the bulbourethra, resulting in the development of a bulbar artery pseudoaneurysm. Profuse bleeding via the urethra was noted after removal of the catheter, and the patient experienced severe intermittent hematuria during the postoperative period. Cystoscopy revealed a pulsatile mass within the bulbourethra. Angiography confirmed a bulbar artery pseudoaneurysm, which was successfully embolized with resolution of bleeding. PMID:28163815

  14. Nonvalue of Neomycin Instillation after Intermittent Urinary Catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haldorson, Alice M.; Keys, Thomas F.; Maker, Myron D.; Opitz, Joachim L.

    1978-01-01

    This study evaluated weekly urine cultures of patients with neurogenic bladder disease who underwent intermittent urinary catheterization for bladder retraining. One group of 53 patients in 1974 received regular instillations of 0.1% neomycin after each catheterization. A similar group of 55 patients in 1975 did not receive neomycin and constituted a control group. Distribution of age, sex, diagnosis, and duration of bladder retraining was comparable in both groups. Quantitative bacterial colony counts of 104 to 105 or greater per ml of urine were considered significant. There was no difference in the incidence of bacteriuria between the neomycin-treated group and the control group (53 versus 49%, respectively), and most patients in each group had colony counts >105/ml. Escherichia coli was seen less frequently in neomycin-treated patients (43.4 versus 62.5%), but a greater percentage of infections due to Pseudomonas aeruginosa, group D streptococci, and yeasts was noted in the neomycin-treated group than in the control group (41.5 versus 22.5%). PMID:360984

  15. Stents in paediatric and adult congenital interventional cardiac catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hascoët, Sebastien; Baruteau, Alban; Jalal, Zakaria; Mauri, Lucia; Acar, Philippe; Elbaz, Meyer; Boudjemline, Younes; Fraisse, Alain

    2014-01-01

    A 'stent' is a tubular meshed endoprosthesis that has contributed to the development of interventional catheterization over the past 30 years. In congenital heart diseases, stents have offered new solutions to the treatment of congenital vessel stenosis or postsurgical lesions, to maintain or close shunt patency, and to allow transcatheter valve replacement. First, stents were made of bare metal. Then, stent frameworks evolved to achieve a better compromise between radial strength and flexibility. However, almost all stents used currently in children have not been approved for vascular lesions in children and are therefore used 'off-label'. Furthermore, the inability of stents to follow natural vessel growth still limits their use in low-weight children and infants. Recently, bioresorbable stents have been manufactured and may overcome this issue; they are made from materials that may dissolve or be absorbed in the body. In this review, we aim to describe the history of stent development, the technical characteristics of stents used currently, the clinical applications and results, and the latest technological developments and perspectives in paediatric and adult congenital cardiac catheterization. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Complex Regional Pain Syndrome after Transradial Cardiac Catheterization

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    Chih-Jou Lai

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS is a disease with unclear pathophysiology. The condition is characterized by pain, soft tissue change, vasomotor change, and even psychosocial disturbance. It may affect the upper more than the lower extremities, and the distal more than the proximal. The trigger factors include carpal tunnel release, Dupuytren's repair, tendon release procedures, knee surgery, crush injury, ankle arthrodesis, amputation, and hip arthroplasty. Rarely, it has been associated with stroke, mastectomy, pregnancy, and osteogenesis imperfecta. Herein, we present a rare case of a patient who was diagnosed with CRPS after transradial cardiac catheterization. CRPS was first diagnosed due to hand swelling, allodynia, paresthesia, and the limited range of motion of interphalangeal, metacarpophalangeal, and wrist joints, with the preceding factor of transradial cardiac catheterization, and was then confirmed by a three-phase bone scan. After intensive physical therapy with hydrotherapy, manual soft tissue release, and occupational therapy for the hand function, there was much improvement in range of motion and hand function. There was no allodynia or painful sensation in the follow-up. After training, the functional status of this patient was adequate for daily activity.

  17. Blood group and Rhesus antigens among Blood donors attending ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Blood group and Rhesus antigens among Blood donors attending the Central Blood Bank, Sudan. WM Shahata, HB Khalil, A-E Abass, I Adam, SM Hussien. Abstract. Background: It is well known that the Rhesus system remains the second most clinically important blood group system after the ABO. There is no published ...

  18. Rhesus negative pregnant women in a traditional birth home in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In a survey of 200 pregnant women (mean age 24 years) attending a traditional birth home (TBH) in Abeokuta, Nigeria, 19 (9.5%) were found to be rhesus negative, 8 (42.1%) of which were primigravidae while 11 (57.9%) were multigravidae. 87.5% of the Rhesus negative primigravidae delivered at the TBH without being ...

  19. The Effect of Heterogeneity on Numerical Ordering in Rhesus Monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantlon, Jessica F.; Brannon, Elizabeth M.

    2006-01-01

    We investigated how within-stimulus heterogeneity affects the ability of rhesus monkeys to order pairs of the numerosities 1 through 9. Two rhesus monkeys were tested in a touch screen task where the variability of elements within each visual array was systematically varied by allowing elements to vary in color, size, shape, or any combination of…

  20. Intergenic and repeat transcription in human, chimpanzee and macaque brains measured by RNA-Seq.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Augix Guohua Xu

    Full Text Available Transcription is the first step connecting genetic information with an organism's phenotype. While expression of annotated genes in the human brain has been characterized extensively, our knowledge about the scope and the conservation of transcripts located outside of the known genes' boundaries is limited. Here, we use high-throughput transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq to characterize the total non-ribosomal transcriptome of human, chimpanzee, and rhesus macaque brain. In all species, only 20-28% of non-ribosomal transcripts correspond to annotated exons and 20-23% to introns. By contrast, transcripts originating within intronic and intergenic repetitive sequences constitute 40-48% of the total brain transcriptome. Notably, some repeat families show elevated transcription. In non-repetitive intergenic regions, we identify and characterize 1,093 distinct regions highly expressed in the human brain. These regions are conserved at the RNA expression level across primates studied and at the DNA sequence level across mammals. A large proportion of these transcripts (20% represents 3'UTR extensions of known genes and may play roles in alternative microRNA-directed regulation. Finally, we show that while transcriptome divergence between species increases with evolutionary time, intergenic transcripts show more expression differences among species and exons show less. Our results show that many yet uncharacterized evolutionary conserved transcripts exist in the human brain. Some of these transcripts may play roles in transcriptional regulation and contribute to evolution of human-specific phenotypic traits.

  1. Using Machine Learning to Discover Latent Social Phenotypes in Free-Ranging Macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madlon-Kay, Seth; Brent, Lauren J. N.; Heller, Katherine A.; Platt, Michael L.

    2017-01-01

    Investigating the biological bases of social phenotypes is challenging because social behavior is both high-dimensional and richly structured, and biological factors are more likely to influence complex patterns of behavior rather than any single behavior in isolation. The space of all possible patterns of interactions among behaviors is too large to investigate using conventional statistical methods. In order to quantitatively define social phenotypes from natural behavior, we developed a machine learning model to identify and measure patterns of behavior in naturalistic observational data, as well as their relationships to biological, environmental, and demographic sources of variation. We applied this model to extensive observations of natural behavior in free-ranging rhesus macaques, and identified behavioral states that appeared to capture periods of social isolation, competition over food, conflicts among groups, and affiliative coexistence. Phenotypes, represented as the rate of being in each state for a particular animal, were strongly and broadly influenced by dominance rank, sex, and social group membership. We also identified two states for which variation in rates had a substantial genetic component. We discuss how this model can be extended to identify the contributions to social phenotypes of particular genetic pathways. PMID:28754001

  2. Environmental and social influences on neuroendocrine puberty and behavior in macaques and other nonhuman primates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephens, Shannon B. Z.; Wallen, Kim

    2013-01-01

    Puberty is the developmental period when the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis is activated, following a juvenile quiescent period, and reproductive capacity matures. Although pubertal events occur in a consistent sequence, there is considerable variation between individuals in the onset and timing of pubertal events, with puberty onset occurring earlier in girls than in boys. Evidence in humans demonstrates that social and environmental context influences the timing of puberty onset and may account for some of the observed variation. This review analyzes the nonhuman primate literature, focusing primarily on rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), to examine the social and environmental influences on puberty onset, how these factors influence puberty in males and females, and to review the relationship between puberty onset of adult neuroendocrine function and sexual behavior. Social and environmental factors influence the timing of puberty onset and pubertal events in nonhuman primates, as in humans, and the influences of these factors differ for males and females. In nonhuman primates, gonadal hormones are not required for sexual behavior, but modulate the frequency of occurrence of behavior, with social context influencing the relationship between gonadal hormones and sexual behavior. Thus, the onset of sexual behavior is independent of neuroendocrine changes at puberty; however, there are distinct behavioral changes that occur at puberty, which are modulated by social context. Puberty is possibly the developmental period when hormonal modulation of sexual behavior is organized, and thus, when social context interacts with hormonal state to strongly influence the expression of sexual behavior. PMID:23998667

  3. Characteristics of Spontaneous Square-Wave Jerks in the Healthy Macaque Monkey during Visual Fixation.

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    Francisco M Costela

    Full Text Available Saccadic intrusions (SIs, predominantly horizontal saccades that interrupt accurate fixation, include square-wave jerks (SWJs; the most common type of SI, which consist of an initial saccade away from the fixation target followed, after a short delay, by a return saccade that brings the eye back onto target. SWJs are present in most human subjects, but are prominent by their increased frequency and size in certain parkinsonian disorders and in recessive, hereditary spinocerebellar ataxias. SWJs have been also documented in monkeys with tectal and cerebellar etiologies, but no studies to date have investigated the occurrence of SWJs in healthy nonhuman primates. Here we set out to determine the characteristics of SWJs in healthy rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta during attempted fixation of a small visual target. Our results indicate that SWJs are common in healthy nonhuman primates. We moreover found primate SWJs to share many characteristics with human SWJs, including the relationship between the size of a saccade and its likelihood to be part of a SWJ. One main discrepancy between monkey and human SWJs was that monkey SWJs tended to be more vertical than horizontal, whereas human SWJs have a strong horizontal preference. Yet, our combined data indicate that primate and human SWJs play a similar role in fixation correction, suggesting that they share a comparable coupling mechanism at the oculomotor generation level. These findings constrain the potential brain areas and mechanisms underlying the generation of fixational saccades in human and nonhuman primates.

  4. Permanent catheterization of the carotid artery induces kidney infection and inflammation in the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fonseca, Uno Nicolas Kjærup; Nielsen, Sanne Gram; Hau, Jann

    2010-01-01

    Catheterization of the carotid artery and the jugular vein is one of the most commonly applied techniques used to gain intravascular access in pharmacology studies on rodents. We catheterized 10 rats by conventional clean techniques, 10 rats by aseptic techniques and 10 rats by conventional clean...

  5. Urinary catheterization diary – A useful tool in tracking causes of non ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In this paper we report on the introduction of a catheterization diary after an unusually high incidence of non-deflating catheters – three cases in 1 week, where all the involved catheters were not identifiable at the time of consultation. Material and methods: In August 2013, we started to keep urinary catheterization records in ...

  6. Brachial plexus compression due to subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm from internal jugular vein catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T N Mol

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Internal jugular vein (IJV catheterization has become the preferred approach for temporary vascular access for hemodialysis. However, complications such as internal carotid artery puncture, vessel erosion, thrombosis, and infection may occur. We report a case of brachial plexus palsy due to compression by right subclavian artery pseudoaneurysm as a result of IJV catheterization in a patient who was under maintenance hemodialysis.

  7. White-cheeked macaque (Macaca leucogenys): A new macaque species from Medog, southeastern Tibet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Cheng; Zhao, Chao; Fan, Peng-Fei

    2015-07-01

    We describe a newly discovered Macaca species from the Medog, in southeastern Tibet, China, Macaca leucogenys sp. nov or the "white-cheeked macaque". Based on 738 photos taken during direct observations and captured by camera traps this new species appears to be distinct from the Macaca sinica species group. Moreover, the species is distinguished from all potential sympatric macaque species (M. mulatta, M. thibetana, M. assamensis, and M. munzala) in exhibiting a suite of pelage characteristics including relatively uniform dorsal hair pattern, hairy ventral pelage, relative hairless short tail, prominent pale to white side- and chin-whiskers creating a white cheek and round facial appearance, dark facial skin on the muzzle, long and thick hairs on its neck, and a round rather than arrow-shaped male genitalia. This new macaque species was found to exploit a diverse set of habitat types from tropical forest at 1395 m, to primary and secondary evergreen broad-leaved forest at 2000 m, as well as mixed broadleaf-conifer forest at 2700 m. Its range may extend to neighboring counties in Tibet and the part of southeastern Tibet controlled by India. The white-cheeked macaque is threatened by illegal hunting and the construction of hydropower stations. Discovery of this new primate species further highlights the high value for biodiversity conservation of southeastern Tibet and calls for more intensive surveys, studies, and environmental protection in this area. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  8. Chronic impairment of leg muscle blood flow following cardiac catheterization in childhood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skovranek, J.; Samanek, M.

    1979-01-01

    In 99 patients with congenital heart defects or chronic respiratory disease without clinical symptoms of disturbances in peripheral circulation, resting and maximal blood flow in the anterior tibial muscle of both extremities were investigated 2.7 yrs (average) after cardiac catheterization. The method used involved 133 Xe clearance. Resting blood flow was normal and no difference could be demonstrated between the extremity originally used for catheterization and the contralateral control extremity. No disturbance in maximal blood flow could be proved in the extremity used for catheterization by the venous route only. Maximal blood flow was significantly lower in that extremity where the femoral artery had been catheterized or cannulated for pressure measurement and blood sampling. The disturbance in maximal flow was shown regardless of whether the arterial catheterization involved the Seldinger percutaneous technique, arteriotomy, or mere cannulation of the femoral artery. The values in the involved extremity did not differ significantly from the values in a healthy population

  9. A Rare Case of Massive Hemothorax due to Central Venous Catheterization Treated with Angiographic Stent Implantation

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