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Sample records for catheterized rhesus macaque

  1. Rhesus Macaque Rhadinovirus-Associated Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Estep, Ryan D.; Wong, Scott W.

    2013-01-01

    Rhesus macaque rhadinovirus (RRV) is a gamma-2 herpesvirus that naturally infects rhesus macaque (RM) monkeys and is closely related to human herpesvirus-8 (HHV-8)/Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV). Infection of immunodeficient RM induces disease in infected RM that resembles KSHV-associated pathologies. Importantly, RRV possesses homologues of KSHV ORFs that are postulated to play a role in disease development. As such, RRV has emerged as a prominent in vivo model system for exa...

  2. Ambiguity aversion in rhesus macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BenjaminHayden

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available People generally prefer risky options, which have fully specified outcome probabilities, to ambiguous options, which have unspecified probabilities. This preference, formalized in economics, is strong enough that people will reliably prefer a risky option to an ambiguous option with a greater expected value. Explanations for ambiguity aversion often invoke uniquely human faculties like language, self-justification, or a desire to avoid public embarrassment. Challenging these ideas, here we demonstrate that a preference for unambiguous options is shared with rhesus macaques. We trained four monkeys to choose between pairs of options that both offered explicitly cued probabilities of large and small juice outcomes. We then introduced occasional trials where one of the options was obscured and examined their resulting preferences; we ran humans in a parallel experiment on a nearly identical task. We found that monkeys reliably preferred risky options to ambiguous ones, even when this bias was costly, closely matching the behavior of humans in the analogous task. Notably, ambiguity aversion varied parametrically with the extent of ambiguity. As expected, ambiguity aversion gradually declined as monkeys learned the underlying probability distribution of rewards. These data indicate that ambiguity aversion reflects fundamental cognitive biases shared with other animals rather than uniquely human factors guiding decisions.

  3. Camptomelia in a Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Hopper, Kelly; Morales, Pablo; Garcia, Anapatricia; Wagner, Joseph

    2010-01-01

    An 8.5-mo-old female rhesus macaque was examined for an apparent lump on the right arm, below the elbow. The macaque showed no signs of pain or discomfort. Examination revealed that the lump was actually a bend in the forearm. Radiography demonstrated that some of the long bones of the animal were bowed. Differential diagnoses included rickets, hyperparathyroidism, pseudohyperparathyroidism, and a growth dysplasia. No other similar abnormalities in animals from that cage or any other enclosur...

  4. Vicarious Reinforcement in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca Mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Steve W. C.; Amy A. Winecoff; Platt, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    What happens to others profoundly influences our own behavior. Such other-regarding outcomes can drive observational learning, as well as motivate cooperation, charity, empathy, and even spite. Vicarious reinforcement may serve as one of the critical mechanisms mediating the influence of other-regarding outcomes on behavior and decision-making in groups. Here we show that rhesus macaques spontaneously derive vicarious reinforcement from observing rewards given to another monkey, and that this...

  5. Vicarious Reinforcement In Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Steve W. C.; Amy A. Winecoff; Platt, Michael L.

    2011-01-01

    What happens to others profoundly influences our own behavior. Such other-regarding outcomes can drive observational learning, as well as motivate cooperation, charity, empathy, and even spite. Vicarious reinforcement may serve as one of the critical mechanisms mediating the influence of other-regarding outcomes on behavior and decision-making in groups. Here we show that rhesus macaques spontaneously derive vicarious reinforcement from observing rewards given to another monkey, and that t...

  6. Evolutionary and biomedical insights from the rhesus macaque genome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gibbs, Richard A; Rogers, Jeffrey; Katze, Michael G;

    2007-01-01

    The rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) is an abundant primate species that diverged from the ancestors of Homo sapiens about 25 million years ago. Because they are genetically and physiologically similar to humans, rhesus monkeys are the most widely used nonhuman primate in basic and applied biomedi...

  7. Vicarious reinforcement in rhesus macaques (macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Steve W C; Winecoff, Amy A; Platt, Michael L

    2011-01-01

    What happens to others profoundly influences our own behavior. Such other-regarding outcomes can drive observational learning, as well as motivate cooperation, charity, empathy, and even spite. Vicarious reinforcement may serve as one of the critical mechanisms mediating the influence of other-regarding outcomes on behavior and decision-making in groups. Here we show that rhesus macaques spontaneously derive vicarious reinforcement from observing rewards given to another monkey, and that this reinforcement can motivate them to subsequently deliver or withhold rewards from the other animal. We exploited Pavlovian and instrumental conditioning to associate rewards to self (M1) and/or rewards to another monkey (M2) with visual cues. M1s made more errors in the instrumental trials when cues predicted reward to M2 compared to when cues predicted reward to M1, but made even more errors when cues predicted reward to no one. In subsequent preference tests between pairs of conditioned cues, M1s preferred cues paired with reward to M2 over cues paired with reward to no one. By contrast, M1s preferred cues paired with reward to self over cues paired with reward to both monkeys simultaneously. Rates of attention to M2 strongly predicted the strength and valence of vicarious reinforcement. These patterns of behavior, which were absent in non-social control trials, are consistent with vicarious reinforcement based upon sensitivity to observed, or counterfactual, outcomes with respect to another individual. Vicarious reward may play a critical role in shaping cooperation and competition, as well as motivating observational learning and group coordination in rhesus macaques, much as it does in humans. We propose that vicarious reinforcement signals mediate these behaviors via homologous neural circuits involved in reinforcement learning and decision-making. PMID:21516263

  8. Vicarious Reinforcement In Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steve W. C. Chang

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available What happens to others profoundly influences our own behavior. Such other-regarding outcomes can drive observational learning, as well as motivate cooperation, charity, empathy, and even spite. Vicarious reinforcement may serve as one of the critical mechanisms mediating the influence of other-regarding outcomes on behavior and decision-making in groups. Here we show that rhesus macaques spontaneously derive vicarious reinforcement from observing rewards given to another monkey, and that this reinforcement can motivate them to subsequently deliver or withhold rewards from the other animal. We exploited Pavlovian and instrumental conditioning to associate rewards to self (M1 and/or rewards to another monkey (M2 with visual cues. M1s made more errors in the instrumental trials when cues predicted reward to M2 compared to when cues predicted reward to M1, but made even more errors when cues predicted reward to no one. In subsequent preference tests between pairs of conditioned cues, M1s preferred cues paired with reward to M2 over cues paired with reward to no one. By contrast, M1s preferred cues paired with reward to self over cues paired with reward to both monkeys simultaneously. Rates of attention to M2 strongly predicted the strength and valence of vicarious reinforcement. These patterns of behavior, which were absent in nonsocial control trials, are consistent with vicarious reinforcement based upon sensitivity to observed, or counterfactual, outcomes with respect to another individual. Vicarious reward may play a critical role in shaping cooperation and competition, as well as motivating observational learning and group coordination in rhesus macaques, much as it does in humans. We propose that vicarious reinforcement signals mediate these behaviors via homologous neural circuits involved in reinforcement learning and decision-making.

  9. Seed dispersal by rhesus macaques Macaca mulatta in Northern India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sengupta, Asmita; McConkey, Kim R; Radhakrishna, Sindhu

    2014-12-01

    Frugivorous primates are important seed dispersers and their absence from forest patches is predicted to be detrimental to tropical forest regeneration and recruitment. With the reduction of primate populations globally, ecologically resilient primate species, characterized by dietary flexibility and the ability to thrive in a variety of habitats, assume new importance as seed dispersers. The most widely distributed non-human primate, the rhesus macaque Macaca mulatta has been intensively studied but little is known about its role in maintaining ecosystem structure and functions. Due to their frugivorous diet, large group sizes, large home ranges and tolerance to disturbance, rhesus macaques may be effective seed dispersers. We studied seed dispersal by rhesus macaques at the Buxa Tiger Reserve, India, through a combination of behavioural observations and germination experiments. Rhesus macaques dispersed 84% of the 49 species they fed on either through spitting or defecation. Nearly 96% of the handled seeds were undamaged and 61% of the species for which germination tests were performed had enhanced germination. Almost 50% of the monitored seeds among those deposited in situ germinated and 22% established seedlings, suggesting that rhesus macaques are important seed dispersers in tropical forests. Due to their widespread distribution and large populations, rhesus macaques are perceived as common and are categorized as Least Concern on the IUCN Red List, effectively excluding them from any conservation plans. Based on the results of our study, we argue that rhesus macaques fulfill critical ecological functions in their habitat and that this parameter must be taken into consideration when they are reviewed for conservation priorities. PMID:24838181

  10. Examining the Species-Specificity of Rhesus Macaque Cytomegalovirus (RhCMV) in Cynomolgus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Marsh, Angie K.; Ambagala, Aruna P.; Perciani, Catia T.; Russell, Justen N. Hoffman; Chan, Jacqueline K.; Janes, Michelle; Antony, Joseph M.; Pilon, Richard; Sandstrom, Paul; Willer, David O.; MacDonald, Kelly S.

    2015-01-01

    Cytomegalovirus (CMV) is a highly species-specific virus that has co-evolved with its host over millions of years and thus restricting cross-species infection. To examine the extent to which host restriction may prevent cross-species research between closely related non-human primates, we evaluated experimental infection of cynomolgus macaques with a recombinant rhesus macaque-derived CMV (RhCMV-eGFP). Twelve cynomolgus macaques were randomly allocated to three groups: one experimental group ...

  11. Variation in CCL3L1 copy number in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taormina, Patrick L; Satkoski Trask, Jessica A; Smith, David G; Kanthaswamy, Sreetharan

    2012-06-01

    We used real-time quantitative PCR (qPCR) methodology to examine copy number variation (CNV) of the CCL3L1 gene among pure Indian-origin, pure Chinese-origin, and hybrid Indian-Chinese rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). CNV among purebred macaques fell within expected ranges, with Indian macaques having lower copy numbers than those of Chinese macaques. Compared with the purebred macaques, Indian-Chinese hybrid rhesus macaques showed much greater variance in copy number and an intermediate average copy number. Copy numbers of CCL3L1 in rhesus macaque trios (sire, dam, and offspring) were consistent with Mendelian inheritance. PMID:22776055

  12. Effect of sildenafil citrate on penile erection of rhesus macaques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xun-BinHuang; Cheng-LiangXiong; Cheng-GaoYu; Jie-LingZhou; Ji-YunShen

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To examine the effect of sildenafil citrate on penile erection of male rhesus macaque. Methods:Twenty Macaca mulatta were divided into the sildenafil treated and the control groups of l0 animals each. The penile size, the corpus cavernosal electromyogram (EMG) and the intra-corpus cavernosal pressure (ICP) were determined. Results: The diameter of penis and the ICP were significantly increased and the corpus cavernosal EMG significantly reduced in the sildenafil group. Conclusion: Sildenafil citrate increases the penile size and ICP and reduces the corpus cavernosal EMG in male rhesus macaque. (Asian J Androl 2004 Sep; 6: 233-235)

  13. Crossmodal Integration of Conspecific Vocalizations in Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Payne, Christa; Bachevalier, Jocelyne

    2013-01-01

    Crossmodal integration of audio/visual information is vital for recognition, interpretation and appropriate reaction to social signals. Here we examined how rhesus macaques process bimodal species-specific vocalizations by eye tracking, using an unconstrained preferential looking paradigm. Six adult rhesus monkeys (3M, 3F) were presented two side-by-side videos of unknown male conspecifics emitting different vocalizations, accompanied by the audio signal corresponding to one of the videos. Th...

  14. Molecular evidence for rhesus lymphocryptovirus infection of epithelial cells in immunosuppressed rhesus macaques.

    OpenAIRE

    Kutok, JL; Klumpp, S.; Simon, M.; MacKey, JJ; Nguyen, V.; Middeldorp, J.M.; Aster, JC; Wang, F.

    2004-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human oncogenic herpesvirus associated with epithelial cell and B-cell malignancies. EBV infection of B lymphocytes is essential for acute and persistent EBV infection in humans; however, the role of epithelial cell infection in the normal EBV life cycle remains controversial. The rhesus lymphocryptovirus (LCV) is an EBV-related herpesvirus that naturally infects rhesus macaques and can be used experimentally to model persistent B-cell infection and B-cell lympho...

  15. Molecular Evidence for Rhesus Lymphocryptovirus Infection of Epithelial Cells in Immunosuppressed Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Kutok, Jeffery L.; Klumpp, Sherry; Simon, Meredith; MacKey, John J.; Nguyen, Van Vuong; Middeldorp, Jaap M.; Aster, Jon C.; Wang, Fred

    2004-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a human oncogenic herpesvirus associated with epithelial cell and B-cell malignancies. EBV infection of B lymphocytes is essential for acute and persistent EBV infection in humans; however, the role of epithelial cell infection in the normal EBV life cycle remains controversial. The rhesus lymphocryptovirus (LCV) is an EBV-related herpesvirus that naturally infects rhesus macaques and can be used experimentally to model persistent B-cell infection and B-cell lympho...

  16. The Incidence of Spontaneous Neoplasia in Two Populations of Captive Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Simmons, Heather A.; Mattison, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) are genetically similar to humans and share many characteristics of aging and age-related diseases. They age at approximately three times the rate of humans and develop spontaneous cancers. In both humans and rhesus macaques, cancer incidence increases with age with the greatest incidence in those over 60 years of age and 20 years, respectively. The current survey reports on the incidence of spontaneous neoplasia in two colonies of captive rhesus macaques: the...

  17. Monkeying around with HIV vaccines: using rhesus macaques to define ‘gatekeepers’ for clinical trials

    OpenAIRE

    Shedlock, Devon J.; Silvestri, Guido; David B. Weiner

    2009-01-01

    Rhesus macaques are an important animal model for the study of human disease and the development of vaccines against HIV and AIDS. HIV vaccines have been benchmarked in rhesus macaque preclinical challenge studies using chimeric viruses made up of parts of HIV and simian immunodeficency viruses. However, the lack of efficacy in a recent clinical trial calls for a re-evaluation of the scientific assumptions regarding the predictive value of using data generated from rhesus macaques as a ‘gatek...

  18. Directed shift of vaginal microbiota induced by vaginal application of sucrose gel in rhesus macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kai-tao Hu

    2015-04-01

    Conclusions: Rhesus macaques can be used as animal models of bacterial vaginosis to develop drugs and test treatment efficacy. Furthermore, the topical application of sucrose gel induced the shifting of vaginal flora of rhesus macaques from a BV kind of flora to a lactobacilli-dominating flora.

  19. Demographic histories and patterns of linkage disequilibrium in Chinese and Indian rhesus macaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hernandez, Ryan D; Hubisz, Melissa J; Wheeler, David A; Smith, David G; Ferguson, Betsy; Rogers, Jeffrey; Nazareth, Lynne; Indap, Amit; Bourquin, Traci; McPherson, John; Muzny, Donna; Gibbs, Richard; Nielsen, Rasmus; Bustamante, Carlos D

    2007-01-01

    To understand the demographic history of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) and document the extent of linkage disequilibrium (LD) in the genome, we partially resequenced five Encyclopedia of DNA Elements regions in 9 Chinese and 38 captive-born Indian rhesus macaques. Population genetic analyses o...

  20. Increased Mucosal CD4+ T Cell Activation in Rhesus Macaques following Vaccination with an Adenoviral Vector

    OpenAIRE

    Bukh, Irene; Calcedo, Roberto; Roy, Soumitra; Carnathan, Diane G.; Grant, Rebecca; Qin, Qiuyue; Boyd, Surina; Ratcliffe, Sarah J.; Veeder, Christin L; Bellamy, Scarlett L.; Betts, Michael R.; James M Wilson

    2014-01-01

    The possibility that vaccination with adenovirus (AdV) vectors increased mucosal T cell activation remains a central hypothesis to explain the potential enhancement of HIV acquisition within the Step trial. Modeling this within rhesus macaques is complicated because human adenoviruses, including human adenovirus type 5 (HAdV-5), are not endogenous to macaques. Here, we tested whether vaccination with a rhesus macaque-derived adenoviral vector (simian adenovirus 7 [SAdV-7]) enhances mucosal T ...

  1. Evolutionary Interrogation of Human Biology in Well-Annotated Genomic Framework of Rhesus Macaque

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Shi-Jian; Liu, Chu-Jun; Yu, Peng; Zhong, Xiaoming; Chen, Jia-Yu; Yang, Xinzhuang; Peng, Jiguang; Yan, Shouyu; Wang, Chenqu; Zhu, Xiaotong; Xiong, Jingwei; Zhang, Yong E.; Tan, Bertrand Chin-Ming; Li, Chuan-Yun

    2014-01-01

    With genome sequence and composition highly analogous to human, rhesus macaque represents a unique reference for evolutionary studies of human biology. Here, we developed a comprehensive genomic framework of rhesus macaque, the RhesusBase2, for evolutionary interrogation of human genes and the associated regulations. A total of 1,667 next-generation sequencing (NGS) data sets were processed, integrated, and evaluated, generating 51.2 million new functional annotation records. With extensive N...

  2. Infectious Agent and Immune Response Characteristics of Chronic Enterocolitis in Captive Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Sestak, Karol; Merritt, Christopher K.; Borda, Juan; Saylor, Elizabeth; Schwamberger, Shelle R.; Cogswell, Frank; Didier, Elizabeth S; Didier, Peter J.; Plauche, Gail; Bohm, Rudolf P.; Aye, Pyone P.; Alexa, Pavel; Ward, Richard L.; Lackner, Andrew A

    2003-01-01

    Chronic enterocolitis is the leading cause of morbidity in colonies of captive rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). This study's aim was to identify the common enteric pathogens frequently associated with chronic enterocolitis in normal, immunocompetent rhesus monkeys and to elucidate the influence of this clinical syndrome on the host immune system. We analyzed the fecal specimens from 100 rhesus macaques with or without clinical symptoms of chronic diarrhea. Retrospective analysis revealed an ...

  3. The most common Chinese rhesus macaque MHC class I molecule shares peptide binding repertoire with the HLA-B7 supertype

    OpenAIRE

    Solomon, Christopher; Southwood, Scott; Hoof, Ilka; Rudersdorf, Richard; Peters, Bjoern; Sidney, John; Pinilla, Clemencia; Marcondes, Maria Cecilia Garibaldi; Ling, Binhua; Marx, Preston; Sette, Alessandro; Mothé, Bianca R.

    2010-01-01

    Of the two rhesus macaque subspecies used for AIDS studies, the Simian immunodeficiency virus-infected Indian rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) is the most established model of HIV infection, providing both insight into pathogenesis and a system for testing novel vaccines. Despite the Chinese rhesus macaque potentially being a more relevant model for AIDS outcomes than the Indian rhesus macaque, the Chinese-origin rhesus macaques have not been well-characterized for their major histocompatibili...

  4. A Characterization of Aerosolized Sudan Virus Infection in African Green Monkeys, Cynomolgus Macaques, and Rhesus Macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Donald K. Nichols

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Filoviruses are members of the genera Ebolavirus, Marburgvirus, and “Cuevavirus”. Because they cause human disease with high lethality and could potentially be used as a bioweapon, these viruses are classified as CDC Category A Bioterrorism Agents. Filoviruses are relatively stable in aerosols, retain virulence after lyophilization, and can be present on contaminated surfaces for extended periods of time. This study explores the characteristics of aerosolized Sudan virus (SUDV Boniface in non-human primates (NHP belonging to three different species. Groups of cynomolgus macaques (cyno, rhesus macaques (rhesus, and African green monkeys (AGM were challenged with target doses of 50 or 500 plaque-forming units (pfu of aerosolized SUDV. Exposure to either viral dose resulted in increased body temperatures in all three NHP species beginning on days 4–5 post-exposure. Other clinical findings for all three NHP species included leukocytosis, thrombocytopenia, anorexia, dehydration, and lymphadenopathy. Disease in all of the NHPs was severe beginning on day 6 post-exposure, and all animals except one surviving rhesus macaque were euthanized by day 14. Serum alanine transaminase (ALT and aspartate transaminase (AST concentrations were elevated during the course of disease in all three species; however, AGMs had significantly higher ALT and AST concentrations than cynos and rhesus. While all three species had detectable viral load by days 3-4 post exposure, Rhesus had lower average peak viral load than cynos or AGMs. Overall, the results indicate that the disease course after exposure to aerosolized SUDV is similar for all three species of NHP.

  5. Rhesus macaque MHC class I molecules show differential subcellular localizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Cornelia; Kruse, Philip H; Lübke, Torben; Walter, Lutz

    2010-03-01

    The MHC class I gene family of rhesus macaques is characterised by considerable gene duplications. While a HLA-C-orthologous gene is absent, the Mamu-A and in particular the Mamu-B genes have expanded, giving rise to plastic haplotypes with differential gene content. Although some of the rhesus macaque MHC class I genes are known to be associated with susceptibility/resistance to infectious diseases, the functional significance of duplicated Mamu-A and Mamu-B genes and the expression pattern of their encoded proteins are largely unknown. Here, we present data of the subcellular localization of AcGFP-tagged Mamu-A and Mamu-B molecules. We found strong cell surface and low intracellular expression for Mamu-A1, Mamu-A2 and Mamu-A3-encoded molecules as well as for Mamu-B*01704, Mamu-B*02101, Mamu-B*04801, Mamu-B*06002 and Mamu-B*13401. In contrast, weak cell surface and strong intracellular expression was seen for Mamu-A4*1403, Mamu-B*01202, Mamu-B*02804, Mamu-B*03002, Mamu-B*05704, Mamu-I*010201 and Mamu-I*0121. The different expression patterns were assigned to the antigen-binding alpha1 and alpha2 domains, suggesting failure of peptide binding is responsible for retaining 'intracellular' Mamu class I molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum. These findings indicate a diverse functional role of the duplicated rhesus macaque MHC class I genes. PMID:20151120

  6. Radiographic changes in rhesus macaques affected by scurvy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Spontaneous vitamin C deficiency, or scurvy, was recognized in juvenile rhesus monkeys maintained in a research center as a result of being fed a commercial diet for 2 to 3 months with low levels of vitamin C. Most severely affected animals (13) were radiographed repeatedly up to day 300 following detection of the disease. Early radiographic changes consisted of widened, lucent metaphyses with lateral flaring and radiopaque metaphyseal lines at the junction of the metaphyses and physes. Physeal slippage was noted commonly. Following institution of vitamin C therapy, calcification of subperiosteal hemorrhage occurred in the metaphyseal regions. Metaphyses and physes returned to normal radiographic appearance within 15 to 30 days. Initially, the subperiosteal hemorrhage progressed and a longer time was required for solution of the calcified hematomas. The macaques improved clinically and were released from the hospital when fractures were stable at 4-5 weeks after admission. Of the 13 macaques studied, all but one returned as normal members of the colony

  7. Comparison of discrete ratios by rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drucker, Caroline B; Rossa, Marley A; Brannon, Elizabeth M

    2016-01-01

    Perceiving and comparing ratios are crucial skills for humans. Little is known about whether other animals can compare ratios. We trained two rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) to choose arrays that contained the greater ratio of positive to negative stimuli, regardless of the absolute number of stimuli in each of the two choice arrays. Subjects learned this task, and their performance generalized to novel ratios. Moreover, performance was modulated by the ratio between ratios; subjects responded more quickly and accurately when the ratio between ratios was higher. Control conditions ruled out the possibility that subjects were relying on surface area, although the ratio between ratios of surface area did seem to influence their choices. Our results demonstrate that rhesus monkeys can compare discrete ratios, demonstrating not only proportional reasoning ability but also the ability to reason about relations between relations. PMID:26286201

  8. Disease Progression Patterns of SHIV-KB9 in Rhesus Macaques of Chinese Origin in Comparison with Indian Macaques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIANG LIU; GUI-BO YANG; HUI ZHAO; QIANG WEI; HUI XING; CHUAN QIN; YI-MING SHAO

    2008-01-01

    To develop a model of SHIV-KB9/Chinese origin rhesus (Ch Rh) macaques for vaccine research and to compare the pathogenesis of SHIV-KB9 in Ch Rh macaques with that reported in Indian rhesus (had Rh) macaques. Methods Seven mamu-A*01 negative Ch Rh macaques were inoculated intravenously with 1-10000 MID of SHIV-KB9. The monkeys were monitored for viral load, CD4, CD8, SHIV-specific antibody and virus genetic variation. The results were compared with those previously observed in Ind Rh macaques. Results As compared to that observed in Ind Rh macaques, SHIV-KB9 in Ch Rh macaques displayed three identical disease progression patterns. However, the primary pattern was not identical between the two subspecies. The level of plasma viremia differed in SHIV-KB9-infected Ch Rh macaques which exhibited different outcomes from those in Ind Rh macaques. Generally, the values of viral load and the maintenance of CD4 T cells were associated with humoral responses. Otherwise, the viral genetic distances (divergence, diversity) were larger in animals (M419, M425) with their CD4T cells profoundly depleted. Conclusion The model of SHIV-KB9/Ch Rh macaques displays a relatively slow progression to AIDS compared with Ind Rh macaques, which may more accurately reflect the potential ofcandidate vaccines in humans.

  9. Oxytocin blunts social vigilance in the rhesus macaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebitz, R. Becket; Watson, Karli K.; Platt, Michael L.

    2013-01-01

    Exogenous application of the neuromodulatory hormone oxytocin (OT) promotes prosocial behavior and can improve social function. It is unclear, however, whether OT promotes prosocial behavior per se, or whether it facilitates social interaction by reducing a state of vigilance toward potential social threats. To disambiguate these two possibilities, we exogenously delivered OT to male rhesus macaques, which have a characteristic pattern of species-typical social vigilance, and examined their performance in three social attention tasks. We first determined that, in the absence of competing task demands or goals, OT increased attention to faces and eyes, as in humans. By contrast, OT reduced species typical social vigilance for unfamiliar, dominant, and emotional faces in two additional tasks. OT eliminated the emergence of a typical state of vigilance when dominant face images were available during a social image choice task. Moreover, OT improved performance on a reward-guided saccade task, despite salient social distractors: OT reduced the interference of unfamiliar faces, particularly emotional ones, when these faces were task irrelevant. Together, these results demonstrate that OT suppresses vigilance toward potential social threats in the rhesus macaque. We hypothesize that a basic role for OT in regulating social vigilance may have facilitated the evolution of prosocial behaviors in humans. PMID:23798448

  10. Assisted reproductive technologies in rhesus macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wolf Don P

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The assisted reproductive technologies (ARTs have been used in the production of rhesus monkey offspring at the Oregon National Primate Research Center (ONPRC and that experience is summarized here. Additionally these technologies serve as a source of oocytes/embryos for monozygotic twinning, embryonic stem (ES cell derivation and cloning. High fertilization efficiencies were realized with conventional insemination or following the use of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI and approximately 50% of the resulting embryos grew in vitro to blastocysts. Both fresh and frozen sperm were employed in fertilization by ICSI and the resulting embryos could be low temperature stored for subsequent thawing and transfer when a synchronized recipient female was available or after shipment to another facility. Following the transfer of up to 3 embryos, an overall pregnancy rate of 30% was achieved with increasing rates dependent upon the number of embryos transferred. Singleton pregnancy outcomes following the transfer of ART produced embryos were similar to those observed in a control group of animals in the timed mated breeding colony at ONPRC. ICSI produced embryos were used in efforts to create monozygotic twins by blastomere separation or blastocyst splitting. While pregnancies were achieved following the transfer of demi-embryos, only one was a twin and it was lost to spontaneous abortion. ICSI produced embryos have also served as the source of blastocysts for the derivation of embryonic stem cells. These pluripotent cells hold potential for cell based therapies and we consider the monkey an important translational model in which to evaluate safety, efficacy and feasibility of regenerative medicine approaches based on the transplantation of stem cell-derived progeny. Finally, efforts to produce genetically-identical monkeys by nuclear transfer have been briefly summarized.

  11. Pharmacokinetics of Hydromorphone after Intravenous and Intramuscular Administration in Male Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Kelly, Kristi R.; Pypendop, Bruno H.; Christe, Kari L

    2014-01-01

    This study reports the pharmacokinetics of hydromorphone after intravenous and intramuscular administration to rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta ). Hydromorphone (0.075 mg/kg) was administered intravenously as a bolus or intramuscularly on separate occasions to healthy, socially housed, socially reared, adult, intact male rhesus macaques (n = 4). Blood samples were collected prior to and until 10 h after administration. Serum hydromorphone concentrations were analyzed with liquid chromatography...

  12. Characterization of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor genetics and comprehensive genotyping by pyrosequencing in rhesus macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Parham Peter; Johnson R Paul; Broman Karl W; Reeves R Keith; Guethlein Lisbeth A; Moreland Anna J; O'Connor David H; Bimber Benjamin N

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Human killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) play a critical role in governing the immune response to neoplastic and infectious disease. Rhesus macaques serve as important animal models for many human diseases in which KIRs are implicated; however, the study of KIR activity in this model is hindered by incomplete characterization of KIR genetics. Results Here we present a characterization of KIR genetics in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). We conducted a survey of KI...

  13. 4040 SNPs for genomic analysis in the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Trask, J Satkoski; Garnica, W T; Kanthaswamy, S; Malhi, RS; Smith, DG

    2011-01-01

    Although the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) is commonly used for biomedical research and becoming a preferred model for translational medicine, quantification of genome-wide variation has been slow to follow the publication of the genome in 2007. Here we report the properties of 4040 single nucleotide polymorphisms discovered and validated in Chinese and Indian rhesus macaques from captive breeding colonies in the United States. Frequency-matched measures of linkage disequilibrium were much ...

  14. Spatial Memory Performance Associated with Measures of Immune Function in Elderly Female Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Haley, Gwendolen E.; Urbanski, Henryk F.; Kohama, Steven G.; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Raber, Jacob

    2011-01-01

    We recently reported that in aged female rhesus macaques, spatial learning and memory correlates with circadian sleep-wake measures and hippocampal muscarinic type 1 (M1) receptor binding. To investigate if spatial memory also correlates with measures of immune function, we now assessed the magnitude of the adaptive immune response to vaccination in the same old female rhesus macaques. Cognitively characterized animals were classified as good spatial performers (GSP) or poor spatial performer...

  15. Haplotype diversity generated by ancient recombination-like events in the MHC of Indian rhesus macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Doxiadis, Gaby G. M.; de Groot, Nanine; Otting, Nel; de Vos-Rouweler, Annemiek J. M.; Bolijn, Maria J.; Heijmans, Corrine M. C.; Groot, Natasja G de; van der Wiel, Marit K. H.; Remarque, Edmond J; Vangenot, Christelle; Nunes, José M; Sanchez-Mazas, Alicia; Bontrop, Ronald E

    2013-01-01

    The Mamu-A, Mamu-B, and Mamu-DRB genes of the rhesus macaque show several levels of complexity such as allelic heterogeneity (polymorphism), copy number variation, differential segregation of genes/alleles present on a haplotype (diversity) and transcription level differences. A combination of techniques was implemented to screen a large panel of pedigreed Indian rhesus macaques (1,384 individuals representing the offspring of 137 founding animals) for haplotype diversity in an efficient and ...

  16. Chronic, Constant-Rate, Gastric Drug Infusion in Nontethered Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Strait, Karen R; Orkin, Jack L; Anderson, Daniel C.; Muly, E. Chris

    2010-01-01

    As part of a study of antipsychotic drug treatment in monkeys, we developed a technique to provide chronic, constant-rate, gastric drug infusion in nontethered rhesus macaques. This method allowed us to mimic the osmotic release oral delivery system currently used in humans for continuous enteral drug delivery. Rhesus macaques (n = 5) underwent gastric catheter placement by laparotomy. After the catheters were secured to the stomach, the remaining catheter length was exited through the latera...

  17. Elimination of Schistosoma mansoni Adult Worms by Rhesus Macaques: Basis for a Therapeutic Vaccine?

    OpenAIRE

    Wilson, R. Alan; Langermans, Jan A. M.; van Dam, Govert J.; Vervenne, Richard A.; Hall, Stephanie L.; Borges, William C.; Dillon, Gary P.; Thomas, Alan W.; Patricia S Coulson

    2008-01-01

    Background Among animal models of schistosomiasis, the rhesus macaque is unique in that an infection establishes but egg excretion rapidly diminishes, potentially due to loss of adult worms from the portal system via shunts or death by immune attack. Principal Findings To investigate this, six rhesus macaques were exposed to Schistosoma mansoni cercariae and the infection monitored until portal perfusion at 18 weeks. Despite a wide variation in worm numbers recovered, fecal egg output and cir...

  18. Spectral characteristics of the newborn rhesus macaque EEG reflect functional cortical activity

    OpenAIRE

    Ross E. Vanderwert; Ferrari, Pier F.; Paukner, Annika; Bower, Seth B.; Fox, Nathan A.; SUOMI, STEPHEN J

    2012-01-01

    Brain electrical activity is one means of assessing neural development in awake, reactive infants. The development of the electroencephalogram (EEG) in the first week of infant rhesus macaque life is poorly understood though recent work has demonstrated the utility of using this measure to assess neural responses to biologically meaningful stimuli. Here we report on the emergence of EEG rhythms in one-week-old infant rhesus macaques under both light and dark conditions. Our data show that the...

  19. SHIV-162P3 Infection of Rhesus Macaques Given Maraviroc Gel Vaginally Does Not Involve Resistant Viruses

    OpenAIRE

    Tsibris, Athe M. N.; Pal, Urboshi; Schure, Allison L.; Veazey, Ronald S.; Kunstman, Kevin J.; Henrich, Timothy J.; Klasse, P.J.; Wolinsky, Steven M.; KURITZKES, Daniel R.; Moore, John P.

    2011-01-01

    Maraviroc (MVC) gels are effective at protecting rhesus macaques from vaginal SHIV transmission, but breakthrough infections can occur. To determine the effects of a vaginal MVC gel on infecting SHIV populations in a macaque model, we analyzed plasma samples from three rhesus macaques that received a MVC vaginal gel (day 0) but became infected after high-dose SHIV-162P3 vaginal challenge. Two infected macaques that received a placebo gel served as controls. The infecting SHIV-162P3 stock had ...

  20. Genome sequencing and comparison of two nonhuman primate animal models, the cynomolgus and Chinese rhesus macaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yan, Guangmei; Zhang, Guojie; Fang, Xiaodong;

    2011-01-01

    The nonhuman primates most commonly used in medical research are from the genus Macaca. To better understand the genetic differences between these animal models, we present high-quality draft genome sequences from two macaque species, the cynomolgus/crab-eating macaque and the Chinese rhesus...... sequence similarity with human disease gene orthologs and drug targets. However, we identify several putatively dysfunctional genetic differences between the three macaque species, which may explain functional differences between them previously observed in clinical studies....

  1. Human-wildlife conflict: proximate predictors of aggression between humans and rhesus macaques in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beisner, Brianne A; Heagerty, Allison; Seil, Shannon K; Balasubramaniam, Krishna N; Atwill, Edward R; Gupta, Brij K; Tyagi, Praveen C; Chauhan, Netrapal P S; Bonal, B S; Sinha, P R; McCowan, Brenda

    2015-02-01

    Macaques live in close contact with humans across South and Southeast Asia, and direct interaction is frequent. Aggressive contact is a concern in many locations, particularly among populations of rhesus and longtail macaques that co-inhabit urbanized cities and towns with humans. We investigated the proximate factors influencing the occurrence of macaque aggression toward humans as well as human aggression toward macaques to determine the extent to which human behavior elicits macaque aggression and vice versa. We conducted a 3-month study of four free-ranging populations of rhesus macaques in Dehradun, India from October-December 2012, using event sampling to record all instances of human-macaque interaction (N = 3120). Our results show that while human aggression was predicted by the potential for economic losses or damage, macaque aggression was influenced by aggressive or intimidating behavior by humans as well as recent rates of conspecific aggression. Further, adult female macaques participated in aggression more frequently than expected, whereas adult and subadult males participated as frequently as expected. Our analyses demonstrate that neither human nor macaque aggression is unprovoked. Rather, both humans and macaques are responding to one another's behavior. Mitigation of human-primate conflict, and indeed other types of human-wildlife conflict in such coupled systems, will require a holistic investigation of the ways in which each participant is responding to, and consequently altering, the behavior of the other. PMID:25348896

  2. High-density rhesus macaque oligonucleotide microarray design using early-stage rhesus genome sequence information and human genome annotations

    OpenAIRE

    Magness Charles L; Thomas Matthew J; Proll Sean C; Paeper Bryan; Korth Marcus J; Wallace James C; Iadonato Shawn P; Nelson Charles; Katze Michael G

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Background Until recently, few genomic reagents specific for non-human primate research have been available. To address this need, we have constructed a macaque-specific high-density oligonucleotide microarray by using highly fragmented low-pass sequence contigs from the rhesus genome project together with the detailed sequence and exon structure of the human genome. Using this method, we designed oligonucleotide probes to over 17,000 distinct rhesus/human gene orthologs and increase...

  3. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of rhesus macaque CD8αα homodimer

    OpenAIRE

    Zong, Lili; CHEN, YONG; Yan, Jinghua; Zhang, Jianhua

    2010-01-01

    CD8α exodomain protein, a crucial immune-system factor in rhesus macaque (M. mulatta), one of the best animal models for vaccine design, was assembled and crystallized. The full structure data will contribute to future studies of immune responses in rhesus macaques.

  4. Turnover rates of B cells, T cells, and NK cells in simian immunodeficiency virus-infected and uninfected rhesus macaques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boer, R.J. de; Mohri, H.; Ho, D.D.; Perelson, A.S.

    2003-01-01

    We determined average cellular turnover rates by fitting mathematical models to 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine measurements in SIV-infected and uninfected rhesus macaques. The daily turnover rates of CD4(+) T cells, CD4(-) T cells, CD20(+) B cells, and CD16(+) NK cells in normal uninfected rhesus macaques

  5. Evidence that emotion mediates social attention in rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily J Bethell

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Recent work on non-human primates indicates that the allocation of social attention is mediated by characteristics of the attending animal, such as social status and genotype, as well as by the value of the target to which attention is directed. Studies of humans indicate that an individual's emotion state also plays a crucial role in mediating their social attention; for example, individuals look for longer towards aggressive faces when they are feeling more anxious, and this bias leads to increased negative arousal and distraction from other ongoing tasks. To our knowledge, no studies have tested for an effect of emotion state on allocation of social attention in any non-human species. METHODOLOGY: We presented captive adult male rhesus macaques with pairs of adult male conspecific face images - one with an aggressive expression, one with a neutral expression - and recorded gaze towards these images. Each animal was tested twice, once during a putatively stressful condition (i.e. following a veterinary health check, and once during a neutral (or potentially positive condition (i.e. a period of environmental enrichment. Initial analyses revealed that behavioural indicators of anxiety and stress were significantly higher after the health check than during enrichment, indicating that the former caused a negative shift in emotional state. PRINCIPLE FINDINGS: The macaques showed initial vigilance for aggressive faces across both conditions, but subsequent responses differed between conditions. Following the health check, initial vigilance was followed by rapid and sustained avoidance of aggressive faces. By contrast, during the period of enrichment, the macaques showed sustained attention towards the same aggressive faces. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence that shifts in emotion state mediate social attention towards and away from facial cues of emotion in a non-human animal. This work

  6. Pathophysiology of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome in rhesus macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safronetz, David; Prescott, Joseph; Feldmann, Friederike; Haddock, Elaine; Rosenke, Rebecca; Okumura, Atsushi; Brining, Douglas; Dahlstrom, Eric; Porcella, Stephen F.; Ebihara, Hideki; Scott, Dana P.; Hjelle, Brian; Feldmann, Heinz

    2014-01-01

    The pathophysiology of hantavirus pulmonary syndrome (HPS) remains unclear because of a lack of surrogate disease models with which to perform pathogenesis studies. Nonhuman primates (NHP) are considered the gold standard model for studying the underlying immune activation/suppression associated with immunopathogenic viruses such as hantaviruses; however, to date an NHP model for HPS has not been described. Here we show that rhesus macaques infected with Sin Nombre virus (SNV), the primary etiological agent of HPS in North America, propagated in deer mice develop HPS, which is characterized by thrombocytopenia, leukocytosis, and rapid onset of respiratory distress caused by severe interstitial pneumonia. Despite establishing a systemic infection, SNV differentially activated host responses exclusively in the pulmonary endothelium, potentially the mechanism leading to acute severe respiratory distress. This study presents a unique chronological characterization of SNV infection and provides mechanistic data into the pathophysiology of HPS in a closely related surrogate animal model. We anticipate this model will advance our understanding of HPS pathogenesis and will greatly facilitate research toward the development of effective therapeutics and vaccines against hantaviral diseases. PMID:24778254

  7. The effect of pentobarbital sodium and propofol anesthesia on multifocal electroretinograms in rhesus macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, Charlene B. Y.; Ver Hoeve, James N.; Nork, T. Michael

    2011-01-01

    We compared the suitability of pentobarbital sodium (PB) and propofol (PF) anesthetics for multifocal electroretinograms (mfERGs) in rhesus macaques. mfERGs were collected from 4 ocularly normal rhesus macaques. All animals were pre-anesthetized with intramuscular ketamine (10-15 mg/kg). Intravenous PB induction/maintenance levels were 15 mg/kg/2-10 mg/kg, and for PF, 2-5 mg/kg/6-24 mg/kg/h. There were 3 testing sessions with PB anesthesia and 5-7 testing sessions with PF anesthesia. All PB s...

  8. Interindividual Differences in Neonatal Imitation and the Development of Action Chains in Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrari, Pier Francesco; Paukner, Annika; Ruggiero, Angela; Darcey, Lisa; Unbehagen, Sarah; SUOMI, STEPHEN J

    2009-01-01

    The capacity to imitate facial gestures is highly variable in rhesus macaques and this variability may be related to differences in specific neurobehavioral patterns of development. This study evaluated the differential neonatal imitative response of 41 macaques in relation to the development of sensory, motor, and cognitive skills throughout the 1st month of life. The results show that infants who imitate facial gestures display more developed skills in goal-directed movements (reaching–gras...

  9. The Effects of Four Nursery Rearing Strategies on Infant Behavioral Development in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Rommeck, Ina; Gottlieb, Daniel H.; Strand, Sarah C.; McCowan, Brenda

    2009-01-01

    Nursery rearing is the single most important risk factor in the development of severe forms of abnormal behavior, such as self-biting, in rhesus macaques. This practice is common in research laboratories and typically involves continuous pair housing of infants without maternal contact. We examined the effects of variation in peer socialization on the behavioral development of rhesus infants by exposing 32 newborn infants to 4 different socialization routines: continuously paired; intermitten...

  10. Social rank and cortisol among female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-Dong QIN; Joshua Dominic Rizak; Xiao-Li FENG; Xun-Xun CHU; Shang-Chuan YANG; Chun-Lu LI; Long-Bao LV; Yuan-Ye MA; Xin-Tian HU

    2013-01-01

    In animal societies,some stressful events can lead to higher levels of physiological stress.Such stressors,like social rank,also predict an increased vulnerability to an array of diseases.However,the physiological relationship between social rank and stress varies between different species,as well as within groups of a single species.For example,dominant individuals are more socially stressed at times,while at other times it is the subordinate ones who experience this stress.Together,these variations make it difficult to assess disease vulnerability as connected to social interactions.In order to leam more about how physiological rank relationships vary between groups of a single species,cortisol measurements from hair samples were used to evaluate the effects of dominance rank on long-term stress levels in despotic and less stringent female rhesus macaque hierarchal groups.In despotic groups,cortisol levels were found not to be correlated with social rank,but a negative correlation was found between social rank and cortisol levels in less stringent hierarchies.Low ranking monkeys in less stringent groups secreted elevated levels of cortisol compared to higher ranking animals.These data suggest that variations in the strictness of the dominance hierarchy are determining factors in rank related stress physiology.The further consideration of nonhuman primate social system diversity and the linear degree of their hierarchies may allow for the development of valid rank-related stress models that will help increase our understanding and guide the development of new therapeutics for diseases related to human socioeconomic status.

  11. Pupil size and social vigilance in rhesus macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebitz, R. Becket; Pearson, John M.; Platt, Michael L.

    2014-01-01

    Complex natural environments favor the dynamic alignment of neural processing between goal-relevant stimuli and conflicting but biologically salient stimuli like social competitors or predators. The biological mechanisms that regulate dynamic changes in vigilance have not been fully elucidated. Arousal systems that ready the body to respond adaptively to threat may contribute to dynamic regulation of vigilance. Under conditions of constant luminance, pupil diameter provides a peripheral index of arousal state. Although pupil size varies with the processing of goal-relevant stimuli, it remains unclear whether pupil size also predicts attention to biologically salient objects and events like social competitors, whose presence interferes with current goals. Here we show that pupil size in rhesus macaques both reflects the biological salience of task-irrelevant social distractors and predicts vigilance for these stimuli. We measured pupil size in monkeys performing a visual orienting task in which distractors—monkey faces and phase-scrambled versions of the same images—could appear in a congruent, incongruent, or neutral position relative to a rewarded target. Baseline pupil size under constant illumination predicted distractor interference, consistent with the hypothesis that pupil-linked arousal mechanisms regulate task engagement and distractibility. Notably, pupil size also predicted enhanced vigilance for social distractors, suggesting that pupil-linked arousal may adjust the balance of processing resources between goal-relevant and biologically important stimuli. The magnitude of pupil constriction in response to distractors closely tracked distractor interference, saccade planning and the social relevance of distractors, endorsing the idea that the pupillary light response is modulated by attention. These findings indicate that pupil size indexes dynamic changes in attention evoked by both the social environment and arousal. PMID:24834026

  12. Percutaneous transhepatic portal catheterization guided by ultrasound technology for islet transplantation in rhesus monkey

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    FengGao; Shao-DongAi; ShengLiu; Wen-BinZeng; WeiWang

    2012-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Pig islet xenotransplantation has the potential to overcome the shortage of donated human islets for islet cell transplantation in type 1 diabetes. Testing in non-human primate models is necessary before clinical application in humans. Intraportal islet transplantation in monkeys is usually performed by surgical infusion during laparotomy or laparoscopy. In this paper, we describe a new method of percutaneous transhepatic portal catheterization (PTPC) as an alternative to current methods of islet transplantation in rhesus monkeys. METHODS: We performed ultrasound-guided PTPC in five adult rhesus monkeys weighing 7-8 kg, with portal vein catheterization confirmed by digital subtraction angiography. We monitored for complications in the thoracic and abdominal cavity. To evaluate the safety of ultrasound-guided PTPC, we recorded the changes in portal pressure throughout the microbead transplantation procedure. RESULTS:  Ultrasound-guided PTPC and infusion of 16 000 microbeads/kg body weight into the portal vein was successful in all five monkeys. Differences in the hepatobiliary anatomy of rhesus monkeys compared to humans led to a higher initial complication rate. The first monkey died of abdominal hemorrhage 10 hours post-transplantation. The second suffered from a mild pneumothorax but recovered fully after taking only conservative measures. After gaining experience with the first two monkeys, we decreased both the hepatic puncture time and the number of puncture attempts required, with the remaining three monkeys experiencing no complications. Portal pressures initially increased proportional to the number of transplanted microbeads but returned to pre-infusion levels at 30 minutes post-transplantation. The changes in portal pressures occurring during the procedure were not significantly different. CONCLUSIONS: Ultrasound-guided PTPC is an effective, convenient, and minimally invasive method suitable for use in non-human primate models of

  13. Retrograde ejaculation associated spontaneous sperm cystolithiasis in four Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Gumber, Sanjeev; Courtney, Cynthia L; Strait, Karen R; Sharma, Prachi; Freebersyser, Julie E; Crane, Maria M

    2013-01-01

    Retrograde ejaculation (RE) has been reported in humans and animals but RE with subsequent sperm calculi has rarely been reported. This report documents clinical and pathological findings of spontaneous sperm cystolithiasis in four rhesus macaques. While this condition has been associated with repeated electroejaculation, spontaneous sperm cystolithiasis is highly unusual. The animals presented with either stranguria, dysuria, hematuria, distended abdomen or lethargy. Ultras...

  14. Acute-phase responses in healthy and diseased rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krogh, Anne Kirstine Havnsøe; Lundsgaard, Jo F. H.; Bakker, Jaco;

    2014-01-01

    Five acute-phase reactants—serum amyloid A (SAA), C-reactive protein (CRP), haptoglobin, albumin, and iron—were measured using commercially available assays in 110 healthy rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), and reference intervals were established for future use in health monitoring of this specie...

  15. Protection of rhesus macaques from SIV infection by immunization with different experimental SIV vaccines.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. de Vries (Petra); J.L. Heeney (Jonathan); J. Boes (Jolande); M.E.M. Dings (Marlinda); E.G.J. Hulskotte (Ellen); R. Dubbes (Rob); W. Koornstra (Willem); P. ten Haaft (Peter); L. Akerblom; S. Eriksson (Sigrid); B. Morein (Bror); S. Norley (Steve); A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert)

    1994-01-01

    textabstractThe immunogenicity and efficacy of an inactivated whole SIVmac (32H) preparation adjuvanted with muramyl dipeptide (SIV-MDP) and a gp120-enriched SIVmac (32H) ISCOM preparation (SIV-ISCOM), were compared by immunizing four rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) four times with SIV-MDP and four

  16. Serotonin transporter genotype modulates social reward and punishment in rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karli K Watson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Serotonin signaling influences social behavior in both human and nonhuman primates. In humans, variation upstream of the promoter region of the serotonin transporter gene (5-HTTLPR has recently been shown to influence both behavioral measures of social anxiety and amygdala response to social threats. Here we show that length polymorphisms in 5-HTTLPR predict social reward and punishment in rhesus macaques, a species in which 5-HTTLPR variation is analogous to that of humans. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In contrast to monkeys with two copies of the long allele (L/L, monkeys with one copy of the short allele of this gene (S/L spent less time gazing at face than non-face images, less time looking in the eye region of faces, and had larger pupil diameters when gazing at photos of a high versus low status male macaques. Moreover, in a novel primed gambling task, presentation of photos of high status male macaques promoted risk-aversion in S/L monkeys but promoted risk-seeking in L/L monkeys. Finally, as measured by a "pay-per-view" task, S/L monkeys required juice payment to view photos of high status males, whereas L/L monkeys sacrificed fluid to see the same photos. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data indicate that genetic variation in serotonin function contributes to social reward and punishment in rhesus macaques, and thus shapes social behavior in humans and rhesus macaques alike.

  17. Pharmacokinetics of Cefovecin in Cynomolgus Macaques (Macaca fascicularis), Olive Baboons (Papio anubis), and Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatto)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raabe, Brigitte M.; Lovaglio, Jamie A.; Grover, GScott; Brown, Scott A.; Boucher, Joseph F.; Yuan, Yang; Civil, Jacqueline R.; Gillhouse, Kimberly A.; Stubbs, Makeida N.; Hoggatt, Amber F.; Halliday, Lisa C.; Fortman, Jeffrey D.

    2011-05-01

    Cefovecin sodium is a long-acting, third-generation, cephalosporin antibiotic approved for the treatment of skin infections in dogs and cats. The pharmacokinetic properties of cefovecin were evaluated in cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis), olive baboons (Papio anubis), and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatto) by using a single-dose (8 mg/kg SC) dosing regimen. Plasma cefovecin concentrations were determined by using ultra-performance liquid chromatography with tandem mass spectrometry, and a noncompartmental model was used to determine pharmacokinetic parameters. The half-life of cefovecin was 4.95 {+-} 1.47 h in cynomolgus macaques, 9.17 {+-} 1.84 h in olive baboons, and 8.40 {+-} 2.53 h in rhesus macaques. These values are considerably lower than the half-lives previously published for dogs (133 h) and cats (166 h). The extended half-life of cefovecin in dogs and cats is speculated to be due to active reabsorption of drug in the kidney tubules because plasma clearance is well below the normal glomerular filtration rate. In nonhuman primates, renal clearance rates approximated plasma clearance rates, suggesting that active renal reabsorption of cefovecin does not occur in these species. The pharmacokinetic properties of cefovecin in nonhuman primates are vastly different from the pharmacokinetic properties in dogs and cats, precluding its use as a long-acting antibiotic in nonhuman primates. This study highlights the importance of performing pharmacokinetic studies prior to extralabel drug usage.

  18. Comparative analysis of genotypic diversity in Entamoeba nuttalli isolates from Tibetan macaques and rhesus macaques in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guan, Yue; Feng, Meng; Cai, Junlong; Min, Xiangyang; Zhou, Xingyu; Xu, Qing; Tan, Ning; Cheng, Xunjia; Tachibana, Hiroshi

    2016-03-01

    We have recently demonstrated the potentially virulent species Entamoeba nuttalli as one of the highly prevalent parasites in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) in Mount Long-hu and Gui-yang in China. Tibetan macaque (Macaca thibetana) is a unique species living in China. To evaluate the prevalence of Entamoeba species in wild Tibetan macaques, we obtained 89 stool samples in Mount E-mei of Si-chuan Province in China. PCR analysis detected E. nuttalli, Entamoeba coli, and Entamoeba polecki ST2 in 17%, 42%, and 66% of the samples, respectively, whereas Entamoeba histolytica and Entamoeba dispar were undetected. This study is the first to report on the detection of E. nuttalli from Tibetan macaques. Six E. nuttalli isolates were obtained, 18S rRNA gene and six tRNA-linked short tandem repeat (STR) loci of the isolates were sequenced. The Mantel test results gave an r value of 0.97 of relationships between geographical distance and genetic diversity of Chinese E. nuttalli populations, indicating a significant isolation-by-distance effect in Chinese E. nuttalli according to the tRNA-STR loci sequences. Structural analysis of E. nuttalli isolates based on tRNA-linked STR loci demonstrated three Chinese E. nuttalli populations with their respective features, but the Gui-yang population was located in the middle. In the distance-based NJ tree, E. nuttalli isolates were divided into five different branches, and E-mei isolates were attributed to an independent branch to distinguish them from Gui-yang and Long-hu isolates. Genetic analysis in this study provided clues of the genetic differences between E. nuttalli isolates from Tibetan macaques and rhesus macaques in China. PMID:26723919

  19. Characterization of killer immunoglobulin-like receptor genetics and comprehensive genotyping by pyrosequencing in rhesus macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parham Peter

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human killer immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs play a critical role in governing the immune response to neoplastic and infectious disease. Rhesus macaques serve as important animal models for many human diseases in which KIRs are implicated; however, the study of KIR activity in this model is hindered by incomplete characterization of KIR genetics. Results Here we present a characterization of KIR genetics in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta. We conducted a survey of KIRs in this species, identifying 47 novel full-length KIR sequences. Using this expanded sequence library to build upon previous work, we present evidence supporting the existence of 22 Mamu-KIR genes, providing a framework within which to describe macaque KIRs. We also developed a novel pyrosequencing-based technique for KIR genotyping. This method provides both comprehensive KIR genotype and frequency estimates of transcript level, with implications for the study of KIRs in all species. Conclusions The results of this study significantly improve our understanding of macaque KIR genetic organization and diversity, with implications for the study of many human diseases that use macaques as a model. The ability to obtain comprehensive KIR genotypes is of basic importance for the study of KIRs, and can easily be adapted to other species. Together these findings both advance the field of macaque KIRs and facilitate future research into the role of KIRs in human disease.

  20. Use of Genome-wide Heterospecific Single-Nucleotide Polymorphisms to Estimate Linkage Disequilibrium in Rhesus and Cynomolgus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Ng, Jillian; Trask, Jessica Satkoski; Houghton, Paul; Smith, David G.; Kanthaswamy, Sree

    2015-01-01

    Rhesus and cynomolgus macaques are frequently used in biomedical research, and the availability of their reference genomes now provides for their use in genome-wide association studies. However, little is known about linkage disequilibrium (LD) in their genomes, which can affect the design and success of such studies. Here we studied LD by using 1781 conserved single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 183 rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), including 97 purebred Chinese and 86 purebred Indian a...

  1. Early social experience affects behavioral and physiological responsiveness to stressful conditions in infant rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Rommeck, Ina; Capitanio, John P.; Strand, Sarah C.; McCowan, Brenda

    2011-01-01

    Studies on early development have demonstrated the profound effects of early social experience on the behavioral development and physiology of young rhesus macaques. Given these relationships, we hypothesized that rhesus macaques exposed to different nursery-rearing conditions may develop unique biobehavioral profiles. If this is true, the assessment of temperament may allow us to pinpoint successful rearing environments, thus improving the overall health of non human primates that are raised...

  2. Intravaginal inoculation of rhesus macaques with cell-free simian immunodeficiency virus results in persistent or transient viremia.

    OpenAIRE

    Miller, C. J.; Marthas, M.; Torten, J; Alexander, N. J.; Moore, J P; Doncel, G. F.; Hendrickx, A G

    1994-01-01

    The simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-rhesus macaque model of heterosexual human immunodeficiency virus transmission consists of atraumatic application of cell-free SIVmac onto the intact vaginal mucosa of mature female rhesus macaques. This procedure results in systemic infection, and eventually infected animals develop the clinical signs and pathologic changes of simian AIDS. To achieve 100% transmission with the virus stocks used to date, multiple intravaginal inoculations are required. ...

  3. Immunophenotyping of lymphocyte, monocyte and dendritic cell subsets in normal rhesus macaques by 12-color flow cytometry: Clarification on DC heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Autissier, Patrick; Soulas, Caroline; Burdo, Tricia H.; Williams, Kenneth C.

    2010-01-01

    Monitoring changes in rhesus macaque immune cell populations during infectious disease is crucial. The aim of this work was to simultaneously analyze the phenotype of rhesus macaque lymphocyte, monocyte and dendritic cell (DC) subsets using a single 12-color flow cytometry panel. Blood from healthy non-infected rhesus macaques was labeled with a cocktail of 12 antibodies. Data were compared to three smaller lineage specific panels and absolute and relative percentages of cells were compared. ...

  4. The most common Chinese rhesus macaque MHC class I molecule shares peptide binding repertoire with the HLA-B7 supertype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solomon, Christopher; Southwood, Scott; Hoof, Ilka; Rudersdorf, Richard; Peters, Bjoern; Sidney, John; Pinilla, Clemencia; Marcondes, Maria Cecilia Garibaldi; Ling, Binhua; Marx, Preston; Sette, Alessandro; Mothé, Bianca R

    2010-07-01

    Of the two rhesus macaque subspecies used for AIDS studies, the Simian immunodeficiency virus-infected Indian rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) is the most established model of HIV infection, providing both insight into pathogenesis and a system for testing novel vaccines. Despite the Chinese rhesus macaque potentially being a more relevant model for AIDS outcomes than the Indian rhesus macaque, the Chinese-origin rhesus macaques have not been well-characterized for their major histocompatibility complex (MHC) composition and function, reducing their greater utilization. In this study, we characterized a total of 50 unique Chinese rhesus macaques from several varying origins for their entire MHC class I allele composition and identified a total of 58 unique complete MHC class I sequences. Only nine of the sequences had been associated with Indian rhesus macaques, and 28/58 (48.3%) of the sequences identified were novel. From all MHC alleles detected, we prioritized Mamu-A1*02201 for functional characterization based on its higher frequency of expression. Upon the development of MHC/peptide binding assays and definition of its associated motif, we revealed that this allele shares peptide binding characteristics with the HLA-B7 supertype, the most frequent supertype in human populations. These studies provide the first functional characterization of an MHC class I molecule in the context of Chinese rhesus macaques and the first instance of HLA-B7 analogy for rhesus macaques. PMID:20480161

  5. Cortisol responses to immobilization with Telazol or ketamine in baboons (Papio cynocephalus/anubis) and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Bentson, K L; Capitanio, J P; Mendoza, S P

    2003-01-01

    Little is known about the influence of Telazol on cortisol or of anesthetic agents on immunological measures, and reports of ketamine's effect on cortisol are inconsistent. We measured effects of Telazol, ketamine and blood sampling on cortisol in male rhesus macaques and male savannah baboons. We also obtained leukocyte counts in the macaques. In macaques, Telazol reduced cortisol in the morning but not in the afternoon; ketamine had no effect on cortisol in these animals. In baboons, cortis...

  6. High-density rhesus macaque oligonucleotide microarray design using early-stage rhesus genome sequence information and human genome annotations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magness Charles L

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Until recently, few genomic reagents specific for non-human primate research have been available. To address this need, we have constructed a macaque-specific high-density oligonucleotide microarray by using highly fragmented low-pass sequence contigs from the rhesus genome project together with the detailed sequence and exon structure of the human genome. Using this method, we designed oligonucleotide probes to over 17,000 distinct rhesus/human gene orthologs and increased by four-fold the number of available genes relative to our first-generation expressed sequence tag (EST-derived array. Results We constructed a database containing 248,000 exon sequences from 23,000 human RefSeq genes and compared each human exon with its best matching sequence in the January 2005 version of the rhesus genome project list of 486,000 DNA contigs. Best matching rhesus exon sequences for each of the 23,000 human genes were then concatenated in the proper order and orientation to produce a rhesus "virtual transcriptome." Microarray probes were designed, one per gene, to the region closest to the 3' untranslated region (UTR of each rhesus virtual transcript. Each probe was compared to a composite rhesus/human transcript database to test for cross-hybridization potential yielding a final probe set representing 18,296 rhesus/human gene orthologs, including transcript variants, and over 17,000 distinct genes. We hybridized mRNA from rhesus brain and spleen to both the EST- and genome-derived microarrays. Besides four-fold greater gene coverage, the genome-derived array also showed greater mean signal intensities for genes present on both arrays. Genome-derived probes showed 99.4% identity when compared to 4,767 rhesus GenBank sequence tag site (STS sequences indicating that early stage low-pass versions of complex genomes are of sufficient quality to yield valuable functional genomic information when combined with finished genome information from

  7. Catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewis, Mary Bell; Moseley, James L.

    This module is designed to teach the fundamentals of clean intermittent urinary catheterization for the disabled child, particularly in the school setting. The text includes information on proper hand washing techniques, the supplies needed, suggested settings, and the preparations required before and after the catheter is inserted into the…

  8. Serologic host response to Helicobacter pylori and Campylobacter jejuni in socially housed Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kienesberger Sabine

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Helicobacter pylori are successful colonizers of the human gastric mucosa. Colonization increases the risk of peptic ulcer disease and adenocarcinoma. However, potential benefits of H. pylori colonization include protection against early-onset asthma and against gastrointestinal infections. Campylobacter jejuni are a leading cause of bacterial diarrhea and complications include Guillain-Barré syndrome. Here, we describe the development of reliable serological assays to detect antibodies against those two bacteria in Rhesus macaques and investigated their distribution within a social group of monkeys. Methods Two cohorts of monkeys were analyzed. The first cohort consisted of 30 monkeys and was used to establish an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA for H. pylori antibodies detection. To evaluate colonization of those macaques, stomach biopsies were collected and analyzed for the presence of H. pylori by histology and culture. C. jejuni ELISAs were established using human serum with known C. jejuni antibody status. Next, plasma samples of the 89 macaques (Cohort 2 were assayed for antibodies and then statistically analyzed. Results An H. pylori IgG ELISA, which was 100% specific and 93% sensitive, was established. In contrast, the IgA ELISA was only 82% specific and 61% sensitive. The CagA IgG assay was 100% sensitive and 61% of the macaques were positive. In cohort 2, 62% macaques were H. pylori sero-positive and 52% were CagA positive. The prevalence of H. pylori IgG and CagA IgG increased with monkey age as described for humans. Of the 89 macaques 52% showed IgG against C. jejuni but in contrast to H. pylori, the sero-prevalence was not associated with increasing age. However, there was a drop in the IgG (but not in IgA mean values between infant and juvenile macaques, similar to trends described in humans. Conclusions Rhesus macaques have widespread exposure to H. pylori and C. jejuni, reflecting their social

  9. Protection of rhesus macaques against inhalational anthrax with a Bacillus anthracis capsule conjugate vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabot, Donald J; Ribot, Wilson J; Joyce, Joseph; Cook, James; Hepler, Robert; Nahas, Debbie; Chua, Jennifer; Friedlander, Arthur M

    2016-07-25

    The efficacy of currently licensed anthrax vaccines is largely attributable to a single Bacillus anthracis immunogen, protective antigen. To broaden protection against possible strains resistant to protective antigen-based vaccines, we previously developed a vaccine in which the anthrax polyglutamic acid capsule was covalently conjugated to the outer membrane protein complex of Neisseria meningitidis serotype B and demonstrated that two doses of 2.5μg of this vaccine conferred partial protection of rhesus macaques against inhalational anthrax . Here, we demonstrate complete protection of rhesus macaques against inhalational anthrax with a higher 50μg dose of the same capsule conjugate vaccine. These results indicate that B. anthracis capsule is a highly effective vaccine component that should be considered for incorporation in future generation anthrax vaccines. PMID:27329184

  10. Transepithelial Transport and Enzymatic Detoxification of Gluten in Gluten-Sensitive Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Bethune, Michael T.; Ribka, Erin; Khosla, Chaitan; Sestak, Karol

    2008-01-01

    Background and Aims In a previous report, we characterized a condition of gluten sensitivity in juvenile rhesus macaques that is similar in many respects to the human condition of gluten sensitivity, celiac disease. This animal model of gluten sensitivity may therefore be useful toward studying both the pathogenesis and the treatment of celiac disease. Here, we perform two pilot experiments to demonstrate the potential utility of this model for studying intestinal permeability toward an immun...

  11. Regional Metabolite T2 in the Healthy Rhesus Macaque Brain at 7T

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Songtao; Gonen, Oded; Fleysher, Lazar; Fleysher, Roman; Soher, Brian J.; Pilkenton, Sarah; Lentz, Margaret R.; Ratai, Eva-Maria; González, R. Gilberto

    2008-01-01

    Although the rhesus macaque brain is an excellent model system for the study of neurological diseases and their responses to treatment, its small size requires much higher spatial resolution, motivating use of ultra-high-field (B0) imagers. Their weaker radio-frequency fields, however, dictate longer pulses; hence longer TE localization sequences. Due to the shorter transverse relaxation time (T2) at higher B0s, these longer TEs subject metabolites to T2-weighting, that decrease their quantif...

  12. Accelerated immune senescence and reduced response to vaccination in ovariectomized female rhesus macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Engelmann, Flora; Barron, Alex; Urbanski, Henryk; Neuringer, Martha; Kohama, Steven G.; Park, Byung; Messaoudi, Ilhem

    2010-01-01

    Aging is associated with a general dysregulation in immune function, commonly referred to as “immune senescence”. Several studies have shown that female sex steroids can modulate the immune response. However, the impact of menopause-associated loss of estrogen and progestins on immune senescence remains poorly understood. To help answer this question, we examined the effect of ovariectomy on T-cell homeostasis and function in adult and aged female rhesus macaques. Our data show that in adult ...

  13. Use of an Aquarium as a Novel Enrichment Item for Singly Housed Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Meade, Theresa M; Hutchinson, Eric; Krall, Caroline; Watson, Julie

    2014-01-01

    Locomotor stereotypies are behaviors often seen in singly housed rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) and are considered to represent a maladaptive response to captive environments. Active and passive enrichment items are commonly used to mitigate these and other abnormal behaviors. Active enrichment items allow physical manipulation and may be temporarily successful in reducing stereotypies, but their beneficial effects usually are confined to relatively short periods of active use. Passive enri...

  14. Simian immunodeficiency virus infection of the gastrointestinal tract of rhesus macaques. Functional, pathological, and morphological changes.

    OpenAIRE

    Heise, C.; Vogel, P.; Miller, C. J.; Halsted, C H; Dandekar, S

    1993-01-01

    Gastrointestinal dysfunction and wasting are frequent complications of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. Nutrient malabsorption, decreased digestive enzymes and HIV transcripts have been documented in jejunal mucosa of HIV-infected patients; however, the pathogenesis of this enteropathy is not understood. Rhesus macaques infected with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) also exhibit diarrhea and weight loss; therefore, we investigated the use of this animal model to study HIV-asso...

  15. Auditory Rehabilitation in Rhesus Macaque Monkeys (Macaca mulatta) with Auditory Brainstem Implants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhen-Min Wang; Zhi-Jun Yang; Fu Zhao; Bo Wang; Xing-Chao Wang; Pei-Ran Qu; Pi-Nan Liu

    2015-01-01

    Background:The auditory brainstem implants (ABIs) have been used to treat deafness for patients with neurofibromatosis Type 2 and nontumor patients.The lack of an appropriate animal model has limited the study of improving hearing rehabilitation by the device.This study aimed to establish an animal model of ABI in adult rhesus macaque monkey (Macaca mulatta).Methods:Six adult rhesus macaque monkeys (M.mulatta) were included.Under general anesthesia,a multichannel ABI was implanted into the lateral recess of the fourth ventricle through the modified suboccipital-retrosigmoid (RS) approach.The electrical auditory brainstem response (EABR) waves were tested to ensure the optimal implant site.After the operation,the EABR and computed tomography (CT) were used to test and verify the effectiveness via electrophysiology and anatomy,respectively.The subjects underwent behavioral observation for 6 months,and the postoperative EABR was tested every two weeks from the 1st month after implant surgery.Result:The implant surgery lasted an average of 5.2 h,and no monkey died or sacrificed.The averaged latencies of peaks Ⅰ,Ⅱ and Ⅳ were 1.27,2.34 and 3.98 ms,respectively in the ABR.One-peak EABR wave was elicited in the operation,and one-or two-peak waves were elicited during the postoperative period.The EABR wave latencies appeared to be constant under different stimulus intensities;however,the amplitudes increased as the stimulus increased within a certain scope.Conclusions:It is feasible and safe to implant ABIs in rhesus macaque monkeys (M.mulatta) through a modified suboccipital RS approach,and EABR and CT are valid tools for animal model establishment.In addition,this model should be an appropriate animal model for the electrophysiological and behavioral study of rhesus macaque monkey with ABI.

  16. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus non-aureus Infection in an Irradiated Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Kolappaswamy, Krishnan; Shipley, Steven T; Tatarov, Ivan I; DeTolla, Louis J.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a case of methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus non-aureus infection in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta). The nonhuman primate described was part of a research project that involved whole-body gamma irradiation and subsequently developed acute generalized dermatitis with skin dryness, peeling, and erythema around the eyes. After initial evaluation, which included microbiologic culture and 6 d of medical treatment, the animal was euthanized due to concern regarding a possible outbr...

  17. Play Caging Benefits the Behavior of Singly Housed Laboratory Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Griffis, Caroline M; Martin, Allison L; Perlman, Jaine E; Bloomsmith, Mollie A

    2013-01-01

    This study addresses a recommendation in The Guide for the Care and Use of Laboratory Animals to provide singly housed nonhuman primates with intermittent access to large, enriched (play) caging. Research on the potential benefits of this type of caging is limited. The present study examines the effects of play caging on behavior, activity, and enrichment use. Singly housed, adult male, rhesus macaques (n = 10) underwent a baseline phase in their home cages, a 2-wk treatment phase with housin...

  18. An Outbreak of Tularemia in a Colony of Outdoor-Housed Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Ferrecchia, Christie E.; Colgin, Lois MA; Andrews, Kirk R; Lewis, Anne D

    2012-01-01

    Since an epizootic and detection of clinical cases of tularemia (Francisella tularensis) in 1996 at the Oregon National Primate Research Center, only 8 cases were identified in the succeeding 13 y. However, within a period of 7 mo, primarily during Winter 2010, 6 rhesus macaques were confirmed positive for Francisella tularensis type B by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention by culture and fluorescent antibody testing. All cases had similar gross pathologic findings, which included ...

  19. Personality Structure in Brown Capuchin Monkeys: Comparisons with Chimpanzees, Orangutans, and Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Morton, F. Blake; Phyllis C Lee; Buchanan-Smith, Hannah M.; Brosnan, Sarah F.; Thierry, Bernard; Paukner, Annika; Frans B M de Waal; Widness, Jane; Essler, Jennifer L.; Weiss, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Species comparisons of personality structure (i.e. how many personality dimensions and the characteristics of those dimensions) can facilitate questions about the adaptive function of personality in nonhuman primates. Here we investigate personality structure in the brown capuchin monkey (Sapajus apella), a New World primate species, and compare this structure to those of chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), orangutans (Pongo spp.), and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Brown capuchins evolved beha...

  20. Simian varicella virus infection of Chinese rhesus macaques produces ganglionic infection in the absence of rash

    OpenAIRE

    Ouwendijk, Werner J. D.; Mahalingam, Ravi; Traina-Dorge, Vicki; Amerongen, Geert van; Wellish, Mary; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.; Gilden, Don; Verjans, Georges M.G.M.

    2012-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) causes varicella (chickenpox), becomes latent in ganglia along the entire neuraxis, and may reactivate to cause herpes zoster (shingles). VZV may infect ganglia via retrograde axonal transport from infected skin or through hematogenous spread. Simian varicella virus (SVV) infection of rhesus macaques provides a useful model system to study the pathogenesis of human VZV infection. To dissect the virus and host immune factors during acute SVV infection, we analyzed ...

  1. Osmotic Stress Induces Oxidative Cell Damage to Rhesus Macaque Spermatozoa1

    OpenAIRE

    McCarthy, Megan J.; Baumber, Julie; Kass, Philip H.; Meyers, Stuart A.

    2009-01-01

    Cryopreservation introduces extreme temperature and osmolality changes that impart lethal and sublethal effects on spermatozoa survival. Additionally, evidence indicates that the osmotic stress induced by cryopreservation causes oxidative stress to spermatozoa as well. Our objective was to determine the effect of reactive oxygen species (ROS) on rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) sperm function and to determine whether osmotic stress elicits the production of ROS. In the first experiment, the xa...

  2. Altered gene expression in asymptomatic SHIV-infected rhesus macaques (Macacca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Phillips Aaron T; Chakraborty Nabarun; Hammamieh Rasha; Carroll Erica E; Miller Stacy-Ann M; Jett Marti

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Simian-Human immunodeficiency virus is a chimeric virus which, in rhesus macaques (Macacca mulatta) closely imitates immunodeficiency virus infection in human (HIV). A relatively new way to study pathogenesis of viral infection is to study alterations in host gene expression induced by the virus. SHIV infection with certain strains does not result in clinical signs. We hypothesized that alterations in gene expression relating to the immune system would be present in SHIV-infected ani...

  3. Comparative transcriptomics and metabolomics in a rhesus macaque drug administration study

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Kevin J.; Yin, Weiwei; Arafat, Dalia; Tang, Yan; Uppal, Karan; Tran, ViLinh; Cabrera-Mora, Monica; Lapp, Stacey; Moreno, Alberto; Meyer, Esmeralda; DeBarry, Jeremy D.; Pakala, Suman; Nayak, Vishal; Kissinger, Jessica C; Jones, Dean P.

    2014-01-01

    We describe a multi-omic approach to understanding the effects that the anti-malarial drug pyrimethamine has on immune physiology in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Whole blood and bone marrow (BM) RNA-Seq and plasma metabolome profiles (each with over 15,000 features) have been generated for five naïve individuals at up to seven timepoints before, during and after three rounds of drug administration. Linear modeling and Bayesian network analyses are both considered, alongside investigation...

  4. Detection of social group instability among captive rhesus macaques using joint network modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Beisner, Brianne A.; Jin, Jian; Fushing, Hsieh; McCowan, Brenda

    2015-01-01

    Social stability in group-living animals is an emergent property which arises from the interaction amongst multiple behavioral networks. However, pinpointing when a social group is at risk of collapse is difficult. We used a joint network modeling approach to examine the interdependencies between two behavioral networks, aggression and status signaling, from four stable and three unstable groups of rhesus macaques in order to identify characteristic patterns of network interdependence in stab...

  5. The Impact of Early Amygdala Damage on Juvenile Rhesus Macaque Social Behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Bliss-Moreau, Eliza; Moadab, Gilda; Bauman, Melissa D.; Amaral, David G.

    2013-01-01

    The present experiments continue a longitudinal study of rhesus macaque social behavior following bilateral neonatal ibotenic acid lesions of the amygdala or hippocampus, or sham operations. Juvenile animals (approximately 1.5- 2.5 years of age) were tested in four different social contexts—alone, while interacting with one familiar peer, while interacting with one unfamiliar peer, and in their permanent social groups. During infancy, the amygdala-lesioned animals displayed more interest in c...

  6. Characterization of Virus-Responsive Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cells in the Rhesus Macaque

    OpenAIRE

    Chung, Eugene; Amrute, Sheela B.; Abel, Kristina; Gupta, Gunjan; Wang, Yichuan; Miller, Christopher J.; Fitzgerald-Bocarsly, Patricia

    2005-01-01

    Plasmacytoid dendritic cells (PDC) are potent producers of alpha interferon (IFN-α) in response to enveloped viruses and provide a critical link between the innate and adaptive immune responses. Although the loss of peripheral blood PDC function and numbers has been linked to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) progression in humans, a suitable animal model is needed to study the effects of immunodeficiency virus infection on PDC function. The rhesus macaque SIV model closely mimics human HIV ...

  7. Autophagic Killing Effects against Mycobacterium tuberculosis by Alveolar Macrophages from Young and Aged Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Pacheco, Sophia A.; Powers, Katelyn M.; Engelmann, Flora; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Purdy, Georgiana E.

    2013-01-01

    Non-human primates, notably rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta, RM), provide a robust experimental model to investigate the immune response to and effective control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infections. Changes in the function of immune cells and immunosenescence may contribute to the increased susceptibility of the elderly to tuberculosis. The goal of this study was to examine the impact of age on M. tuberculosis host-pathogen interactions following infection of primary alveolar macrophages...

  8. Can Gender Differences Be Evaluated in a Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta) Model of Focal Cerebral Ischemia?

    OpenAIRE

    Murphy, Stephanie J.; Kirsch, Jeffrey R; Zhang, Wenri; Grafe, Marjorie R; West, G Alex; del Zoppo, Gregory J.; Traystman, Richard J.; Hurn, Patricia D.

    2008-01-01

    Gender differences, sex steroid effects, and sex-specific candidate therapeutics in ischemic stroke have been studied in rodents but not in nonhuman primates. In this feasibility study (n = 3 per group), we developed a model of transient focal cerebral ischemia in adult male and female rhesus macaques that consistently includes white matter injury. The animals also were used to determine whether gender-linked differences in histopathologic outcomes could be evaluated in this model in future, ...

  9. Renal pigmentation due to chronic bismuth administration in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, A L; Blaine, E T; Lewis, A D

    2015-05-01

    Renal pigmentation due to the administration of exogenous compounds is an uncommon finding in most species. This report describes renal pigmentation and intranuclear inclusions of the proximal convoluted tubules due to chronic bismuth administration in a rhesus macaque. An 11-year-old Indian-origin rhesus macaque with a medical history of chronic intermittent vomiting had been treated with bismuth subsalicylate, famotidine, and omeprazole singly or in combination over the course of 8 years. At necropsy, the renal cortices were diffusely dark green to black. Light and electron microscopy revealed intranuclear inclusions within the majority of renal proximal tubular epithelial cells. These inclusions appeared magenta to brown when stained with hematoxylin and eosin and were negative by the Ziehl-Neelsen acid-fast stain. Elemental analysis performed on frozen kidney measured bismuth levels to be markedly elevated at 110.6 ppm, approximately 500 to 1000 times acceptable limits. To our knowledge, this is the first report of renal bismuth deposition in a rhesus macaque resulting in renal pigmentation and intranuclear inclusions. PMID:24990482

  10. Laparoscopic diagnosis of gross reproductive abnormalities in free-ranging female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vijay Kumar

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available A study was conducted between July 2010 to June 2011 in the Monkey Sterilization Centre, Gopalpur, Himachal Pradesh, India to assess the prevalence of reproductive disorders by laparoscopic examination of the genitalia of female rhesus macaques. The animals were captured from different locations in the state using a cage trapping method. A total of 720 female rhesus macaques underwent laparoscopic examination of their reproductive tracts. A total of 63 cases were found to have reproductive abnormalities. Out of these 63 cases, the most common abnormalities reported were ovarian cyst 3.05% (n=22, ovarian tumor 1.66% (n=12, uterine tumor 1.25% (n=9, uterine edema 0.97% (n=7, uterine rupture 0.83% (n=6, ectopic pregnancy 0.69% (n=5, unicornis or acornis 0.28% (n=2. The highest number of cases of uterine abnormalities was recorded in the 12-16 year old age group (33.33%, followed by 8-12 year olds (25.39%, 16-20 year olds (22.22%, then 4-8 year olds (15.87% and 0-4 year olds (3.17%. Of the 63 animals that showed genital abnormalities, only 52 were found to be pregnant during the breeding season from November to March in the 5-20 year old age group, while 11 animals were not pregnant; a pregnancy rate of 82.53% (52 of 63 of the female rhesus macaques with reproductive abnormalities.

  11. Pharmacokinetics of tramadol following intravenous and oral administration in male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelly, K R; Pypendop, B H; Christe, K L

    2015-08-01

    Recently, tramadol and its active metabolite, O-desmethyltramadol (M1), have been studied as analgesic agents in various traditional veterinary species (e.g., dogs, cats, etc.). This study explores the pharmacokinetics of tramadol and M1 after intravenous (IV) and oral (PO) administration in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), a nontraditional veterinary species. Rhesus macaques are Old World monkeys that are commonly used in biomedical research. Effects of tramadol administration to monkeys are unknown, and research veterinarians may avoid inclusion of this drug into pain management programs due to this limited knowledge. Four healthy, socially housed, adult male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) were used in this study. Blood samples were collected prior to, and up to 10 h post-tramadol administration. Serum tramadol and M1 were analyzed using liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Noncompartmental pharmacokinetic analysis was performed. Tramadol clearance was 24.5 (23.4-32.7) mL/min/kg. Terminal half-life of tramadol was 111 (106-127) min IV and 133 (84.9-198) min PO. Bioavailability of tramadol was poor [3.47% (2.14-5.96%)]. Maximum serum concentration of M1 was 2.28 (1.88-2.73) ng/mL IV and 11.2 (9.37-14.9) ng/mL PO. Sedation and pruritus were observed after IV administration. PMID:25488714

  12. Light and Gravity Effects on Circadian Rhythms of Rhesus Macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuller, Charles

    1997-01-01

    Temporal integration of a biological organism's physiological, behavioral and biochemical systems depends upon its circadian timing system. The endogenous period of this timing system is typically synchronized to the 24- hour day by environmental cues. The daily alternation of light and dark has long been known as one of the most potent environmental synchronizers influencing the circadian timing system. Alterations in the lighting environment (length or intensity of light exposure) can also affect the homeostatic state of the organism. A series of experiments was performed using rhesus monkeys with the objective of defining the fundamental properties of the circadian rhythm of body temperature. Three major experiments were performed in addition to several preliminary studies. These experiments explored 1.) the response of the rhesus body temperature rhythm to varying day length and light intensity; 2.) the response of the body temperature rhythm to light exposure as a function of time of day; and 3.) the characteristics of the metabolic heat production rhythm which is responsible for the daily cycle in body temperature. Results of these three completed experiments will be reported here. In addition, preliminary experiments were also performed in social entrainment of rhesus circadian rhythms and the properties of rhesus body temperature rhythms in constant conditions, where no external time cues were provided. Four adult male rhesus monkeys served as subjects in all experiments. All experiments were performed at the California Regional Primate Research Center. Each animal was implanted with a biotelemetry unit that measured deep body temperature. All surgeries were performed by a board certified veterinary surgeon under sterile conditions. The biotelemetry implants also provided an index of activity level in each animal. For metabolic heat production measurements, oxygen consumption and carbon dioxide production were measured and the caloric equivalent of these

  13. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of rhesus macaque CD8αα homodimer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CD8α exodomain protein, a crucial immune-system factor in rhesus macaque (M. mulatta), one of the best animal models for vaccine design, was assembled and crystallized. The full structure data will contribute to future studies of immune responses in rhesus macaques. As a T-cell co-receptor, CD8 binds to MHC class I molecules and plays a pivotal role in the activation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes. To date, structures of CD8 have been solved for two different mammals: human and mouse. The infection of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) by simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) is the best animal model for studying HIV. In this study, the rhesus macaque CD8 (rCD8) αα homodimer was obtained and rCD8α exodomain protein crystals were successfully obtained for further structural analysis. Diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.4 Å. The crystal belonged to space group P212121, with unit-cell parameters a = 46.52, b = 56.28, c = 82.40 Å. These data will facilitate further studies on the structural differences between these CD8 structures and the cellular immune responses of rhesus macaque

  14. The most common Chinese rhesus macaque MHC class I molecule shares peptide binding repertoire with the HLA-B7 supertype

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solomon, C.; Southwood, S.; Hoof, Ilka;

    2010-01-01

    Of the two rhesus macaque subspecies used for AIDS studies, the Simian immunodeficiency virus-infected Indian rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) is the most established model of HIV infection, providing both insight into pathogenesis and a system for testing novel vaccines. Despite the Chinese rhesus...... macaque potentially being a more relevant model for AIDS outcomes than the Indian rhesus macaque, the Chinese-origin rhesus macaques have not been well-characterized for their major histocompatibility complex (MHC) composition and function, reducing their greater utilization. In this study, we...... sequences identified were novel. From all MHC alleles detected, we prioritized Mamu-A1*02201 for functional characterization based on its higher frequency of expression. Upon the development of MHC/peptide binding assays and definition of its associated motif, we revealed that this allele shares peptide...

  15. Parvalbumin increases in the medial and lateral geniculate nuclei of aged rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel T Gray

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Subcortical auditory structures in the macaque auditory system increase their densities of neurons expressing the calcium binding protein parvalbumin (PV with age. However, it is unknown whether these increases occur in the thalamic division of the auditory system, the medial geniculate nucleus (MGN. Furthermore, it is also unclear whether these age-related changes are specific to the macaque auditory system or are generalized to other sensory systems. To address these questions, the PV immunoreactivity of the medial and lateral geniculate nuclei (LGN from seven rhesus macaques ranging in age from 15 to 35 was assessed. Densities of PV expressing neurons in the three subdivisions of the MGN and the six layers of the LGN were calculated separately using unbiased stereological sampling techniques. We found that the ventral and magnocellular subdivisions of the MGN and all six layers of the LGN increased their expressions of PV with age, although increases in the MGN were greater in magnitude than in the LGN. Together, these results suggest that the MGN shows age-related increases in PV expression as is seen throughout the macaque ascending auditory system, and that the analogous region of the visual system shows smaller increases. We conclude that, while there are some similarities between sensory systems, the age-related neurochemical changes seen throughout the macaque auditory system cannot be fully generalized to other sensory systems.

  16. Amygdala lesions in rhesus macaques decrease attention to threat

    OpenAIRE

    Dal Monte, Olga; Costa, Vincent D; Noble, Pamela L.; Murray, Elisabeth A.; Averbeck, Bruno B.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from animal and human studies has suggested that the amygdala plays a role in detecting threat and in directing attention to the eyes. Nevertheless, there has been no systematic investigation of whether the amygdala specifically facilitates attention to the eyes or whether other features can also drive attention via amygdala processing. The goal of the present study was to examine the effects of amygdala lesions in rhesus monkeys on attentional capture by specific facial features, as...

  17. Intentional gestural communication and discrimination of human attentional states in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canteloup, Charlotte; Bovet, Dalila; Meunier, Hélène

    2015-07-01

    The present study tested intentionality of a learned begging gesture and attention-reading abilities in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Subjects were trained to produce a begging gesture towards a hidden food reward that could be delivered by a human experimenter. More specifically, we investigated which attentional cues--body, face and/or eyes orientation of a human partner--were taken into account by the macaques in order to communicate with her. Our results provide strong evidence of intentional communication: the monkeys adjusted their behaviour to that of the partner. The latter's attentional state influenced the monkeys' likelihood of performing begging gestures and showing gaze alternation between the partner and the hidden food. By contrast, we found no evidence of attention-getting behaviours, persistence or elaboration of new communicative behaviours. Our results also showed that rhesus macaques discriminated gross cues including the presence, body and face orientation of the human experimenter but not her eyes. However, the monkeys emitted more gaze alternation and monitored the human's attentional state more closely when she also displayed gaze alternation, suggesting an important role of joint attention in gestural communication. PMID:25749401

  18. The impact of Helicobacter pylori infection on the gastric microbiota of the rhesus macaque.

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    Miriam E Martin

    Full Text Available Helicobacter pylori colonization is highly prevalent among humans and causes significant gastric disease in a subset of those infected. When present, this bacterium dominates the gastric microbiota of humans and induces antimicrobial responses in the host. Since the microbial context of H. pylori colonization influences the disease outcome in a mouse model, we sought to assess the impact of H. pylori challenge upon the pre-existing gastric microbial community members in the rhesus macaque model. Deep sequencing of the bacterial 16S rRNA gene identified a community profile of 221 phylotypes that was distinct from that of the rhesus macaque distal gut and mouth, although there were taxa in common. High proportions of both H. pylori and H. suis were observed in the post-challenge libraries, but at a given time, only one Helicobacter species was dominant. However, the relative abundance of non-Helicobacter taxa was not significantly different before and after challenge with H. pylori. These results suggest that while different gastric species may show competitive exclusion in the gastric niche, the rhesus gastric microbial community is largely stable despite immune and physiological changes due to H. pylori infection.

  19. Evaluation of a Multivalent Vaccine against Lymphatic Filariasis in Rhesus macaque Model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dakshinamoorthy, Gajalakshmi; von Gegerfelt, Agneta; Andersen, Hanne; Lewis, Mark; Kalyanasundaram, Ramaswamy

    2014-01-01

    Lymphatic filariasis affects 120 million people worldwide and another 1.2 billion people are at risk of acquiring the infection. Chemotherapy with mass drug administration is substantially reducing the incidence of the infection. Nevertheless, an effective vaccine is needed to prevent the infection and eradicate the disease. Previously we reported that a multivalent fusion protein vaccine (rBmHAT) composed of small heat shock proteins 12.6 (HSP12.6), abundant larval transcript-2 (ALT-2) and large extracellular domain of tetraspanin (TSP LEL) could confer >95% protection against the challenge infection with Brugia malayi infective larvae (L3) in mouse and gerbil models. In this study we evaluated the immunogenicity and efficacy of rBmHAT fusion protein vaccine in a rhesus macaque model. Our results show that rBmHAT is highly immunogenic in rhesus macaques. All the vaccinated monkeys developed significant titers of antigen-specific IgG antibodies against each of the component antigens (16,000 for rBmHSP12.6), (24,000 for rBmALT-2) and (16,000 for rBmTSP-LEL). An in vitro antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC) assay performed using the sera samples from vaccinated monkeys showed that the anti-rBmHAT antibodies are functional with 35% killing of B. malayi L3s. Vaccinated monkeys also had antigen responding cells in the peripheral blood. Vaccine-induced protection was determined after challenging the monkeys with 500 B. malayi L3. Following challenge infection, 3 out of 5 vaccinated macaques failed to develop the infection. These three protected macaques had high titers of IgG1 antibodies and their PBMC secreted significantly high levels of IFN-γ in response to the vaccine antigens. The two vaccinated macaques that picked the infection had slightly low titers of antibodies and their PBMC secreted high levels of IL-10. Based on these findings we conclude that the rBmHAT vaccine is highly immunogenic and safe and can confer significant protection against

  20. Effects of Extended-Release Injectable Naltrexone on Self-Injurious Behavior in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Kempf, Doty J; Baker, Kate C.; Gilbert, Margaret H.; Blanchard, James L; Dean, Reginald L.; Deaver, Daniel R.; Bohm, Rudolf P.

    2012-01-01

    Self-injurious behavior (SIB) is a spontaneous behavior that threatens the health and wellbeing of multiple species. In humans, the opioid antagonist naltrexone hydrochloride has been used successfully to modulate the endogenous opioid system and reduce the occurrence of SIB. This study is the first to assess the efficacy of extended-release naltrexone in the pharmacologic treatment of SIB in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). In an acute pharmacokinetic study of 4 macaques, we determined the ...

  1. Rapid high resolution MHC class I genotyping of Chinese rhesus macaques by capillary reference strand mediated conformational analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Blasky, Alex J.; Karl, Julie A.; Wiseman, Roger W.; Read, Daniel S.; O’Connor, David H.

    2008-01-01

    Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) provide well-established models for studying human disease pathogenesis and vaccine development. When challenged with infectious agents macaques exhibit individual differences in susceptibility. An important determinant of these differences is the complement of major histocompatability complex (MHC) class I sequences expressed by each animal. Although previous studies have reported strong associations between MHC expression and disease outcome, a rapid, cost e...

  2. Efficient transmission and persistence of low-frequency SIVmac251 variants in CD8-depleted rhesus macaques with different neuropathology

    OpenAIRE

    Strickland, Samantha L.; Gray, Rebecca R; Lamers, Susanna L.; Burdo, Tricia H.; Huenink, Ellen; Nolan, David J.; Nowlin, Brian; Alvarez, Xavier; Midkiff, Cecily C.; Goodenow, Maureen M.; Williams, Kenneth; Salemi, Marco

    2012-01-01

    Infection of CD8-depleted rhesus macaques with the genetically heterogeneous simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)mac251 viral swarm provides a rapid-disease model for simian acquired immune deficiency syndrome and SIV-encephalitis (SIVE). The objective was to evaluate how the diversity of the swarm influences the initial seeding of the infection that may potentially affect disease progression. Plasma, lymphoid and non-lymphoid (brain and lung) tissues were collected from two infected macaques ...

  3. The Development of an Instrument to Measure Global Dimensions of Maternal Care in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    McCormack, K; Howell, B. R.; Guzman, D.; Villongco, C.; Pears, K.; Kim, H.; Gunnar, M.R.; Sanchez, M.M.

    2014-01-01

    One of the strongest predictors of healthy child development is the quality of maternal care. Although many measures of observation and self-report exist in humans to assess global aspects of maternal care, such qualitative measures are lacking in nonhuman primates. In this study we developed an instrument to measure global aspects of maternal care in rhesus monkeys, with the goal of complementing the individual behavioral data collected using a well-established rhesus macaque ethogram during...

  4. Post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder associated with immunosuppressive therapy for renal transplantation in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Page, Eugenia K.; Courtney, Cynthia L; Sharma, Prachi; Cheeseman, Jennifer; Jenkins, Joe B.; Strobert, Elizabeth; Knechtle, Stuart J.

    2013-01-01

    Human post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorder (PTLD) is an abnormal lymphoid proliferation that arises in 1–12% of transplant recipients as a consequence of prolonged immunosuppression and Epstein–Barr viral infection (EBV). Nonhuman primates, primarily rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), have been used extensively in research models of solid organ transplantation, as the nonhuman primate immune system closely resembles that of the human. Lymphocryptovirus of rhesus monkeys has been charac...

  5. Interleukin-8 and interleukin-10, brain volume and microstructure, and the influence of calorie restriction in old rhesus macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Willette, A.A.; Coe, C. L.; Birdsill, A. C.; Bendlin, B. B.; Colman, R.J.; Alexander, A.L.; Allison, D B; Weindruch, R.H.; Johnson, S.C.

    2013-01-01

    Higher systemic levels of the proinflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) were found to be associated with lower gray matter volume and tissue density in old rhesus macaques. This association between IL-6, and these brain indices were attenuated by long-term 30 % calorie restriction (CR). To extend these findings, the current analysis determined if a CR diet in 27 aged rhesus monkeys compared to 17 normally fed controls reduced circulating levels of another proinflammatory cytokine, interle...

  6. Erratum to: rhesus macaque MHC class I molecules show differential subcellular localizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosner, Cornelia; Kruse, Philip H; Lübke, Torben; Walter, Lutz

    2010-06-01

    The MHC class I gene family of rhesus macaques is characterised by considerable gene duplications. While a HLA-C-orthologous gene is absent, the Mamu-A and in particular the Mamu-B genes have expanded, giving rise to plastic haplotypes with differential gene content. Although some of the rhesus macaque MHC class I genes are known to be associated with susceptibility/resistance to infectious diseases, the functional significance of duplicated Mamu-A and Mamu-B genes and the expression pattern of their encoded proteins are largely unknown. Here, we present data of the subcellular localization of AcGFP-tagged Mamu-A and Mamu-B molecules. We found strong cell surface and low intracellular expression for Mamu-A1, Mamu-A2 and Mamu-A3-encoded molecules as well as for Mamu-B*01704, Mamu-B*02101, Mamu-B*04801, Mamu-B*06002 and Mamu-B*13401. In contrast, weak cell surface and strong intracellular expression was seen for Mamu-A4*1403, Mamu-B*01202, Mamu-B*02804, Mamu-B*03002, Mamu-B*05704, Mamu-I*010201 and Mamu-I*0121. The different expression patterns were assigned to the antigen-binding alpha1 and alpha2 domains, suggesting failure of peptide binding is responsible for retaining 'intracellular' Mamu class I molecules in the endoplasmic reticulum. These findings indicate a diverse functional role of the duplicated rhesus macaque MHC class I genes. PMID:20445972

  7. No-scalpel vasectomy by electrocauterization in free range rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Raj

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available The objective of the study was to standardize a new method of vasectomy in male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta. A total of 208 free range male rhesus macaques captured from different locations in Shivalik Hills in a population control programme of the rhesus macaques in India. General anaesthesia was achieved by using a combination of ketamine hydrochloride at 8 mg/kg body weight and xylazine hydrochloride at 2mg/kg body weight intramuscularly in squeeze cage. Surgical procedure of vasectomy was carried out by single-hole no-scalpel technique using a single pre-scrotal skin incision above the median raphae. Spermatic cord was grasped with ringed forceps and was pulled out through the single-hole incision. Vas deferens was separated from the artery-vein complexus and about 3-4 cm portion of vas deferens was resected. Cauterization of both ends of the vas deferens was achieved with electrocautery. The induction time for anaesthesia was 1.40±0.18 min while surgical time for vasectomy was found to be 5.09±0.22 min. Recovery from general anaesthesia was without side-effects after a mean duration of 36.07±1.22 min, whereas the duration of anaesthesia was observed to be 82.27±4.96 min. There were no major complications following the surgery and recovery of animals was smooth. Animals were kept in postoperative care for five days and released at the same capturing site.

  8. Left Ventricular Hypertrophy in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) at the California National Primate Research Center (1992-2014).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reader, J Rachel; Canfield, Don R; Lane, Jennifer F; Kanthaswamy, Sreetharan; Ardeshir, Amir; Allen, A Mark; Tarara, Ross P

    2016-01-01

    Necropsy records and associated clinical histories from the rhesus macaque colony at the California National Primate Research Center were reviewed to identify mortality related to cardiac abnormalities involving left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH). Over a 21-y period, 162 cases (female, 90; male, 72) of idiopathic LVH were identified. Macaques presented to necropsy with prominent concentric hypertrophy of the left ventricle associated with striking reduction of the ventricular lumen. Among all LVH cases, 74 macaques (female, 39; male, 35), mostly young adults, presented for spontaneous (sudden) death; more than 50% of these 74 cases were associated with a recent history of sedation or intraspecific aggression. The risk of sudden death in the 6- to 9-y-old age group was significantly higher in male macaques. Subtle histologic cardiac lesions included karyomegaly and increased cardiac myocyte diameter. Pedigree analyses based on rhesus macaque LVH probands suggested a strong genetic predisposition for the condition. In humans, hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is defined by the presence of unexplained left ventricular hypertrophy, associated with diverse clinical outcomes ranging from asymptomatic disease to sudden death. Although the overall risk of disease complications such as sudden death, end-stage heart failure, and stroke is low (1% to 2%) in patients with HCM, the absolute risk can vary dramatically. Prima facie comparison of HCM and LVH suggest that further study may allow the development of spontaneously occurring LVH in rhesus macaques as a useful model of HCM, to better understand the pathogenesis of this remarkably heterogeneous disease. PMID:27053572

  9. Sex Ratio, Conflict Dynamics, and Wounding in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Beisner, B.A.; Jackson, M E; Cameron, A; McCowan, B.

    2011-01-01

    Rhesus macaques, like many other primates, live in stable, multi-male multi-female groups in which adult females typically outnumber adult males. The number of males in multi-male/multi-female groups is most commonly discussed in terms of mate competition, where the sex ratio is a function of an adult male’s ability to monopolize a group of females. However, the relationship between sex ratio and group stability is unclear because the presence of many males may either reduce stability by incr...

  10. Effect of chronic morphine administration on circulating dendritic cells in SIV-infected rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornwell, William D; Wagner, Wendeline; Lewis, Mark G; Fan, Xiaoxuan; Rappaport, Jay; Rogers, Thomas J

    2016-06-15

    We studied the effect of chronic morphine administration on the circulating dendritic cell population dynamics associated with SIV infection using rhesus macaques. Animals were either first infected with SIV and then given chronic morphine, or visa versa. SIV infection increased the numbers of myeloid DCs (mDCs), but morphine treatment attenuated this mDC expansion. In contrast, morphine increased the numbers of plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs) in SIV-infected animals. Finally, chronic morphine administration (no SIV) transiently increased the numbers of circulating pDCs. These results show that chronic morphine induces a significant alteration in the available circulating levels of critical antigen-presenting cells. PMID:27235346

  11. Cell-Autonomous Heterogeneity of Nutrient Uptake in White Adipose Tissue of Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Varlamov, Oleg; Chu, Michael; Cornea, Anda; Sampath, Harini; Roberts, Charles T.

    2014-01-01

    Phenotypic diversity may play an adaptive role by providing graded biological responses to fluctuations in environmental stimuli. We used single-cell imaging of the metabolizable fluorescent fatty acid analog 4,4-difluoro-4-bora-3a,4a-diaza-s-indacene (BODIPY)-C12 and fluorescent 2-[N-(7-nitrobenz-2-oxa-1,3-diazol-4-yl) amino]-2-deoxy-D-glucose (2-NBDG) to explore cellular heterogeneity in nutrient uptake in white adipose tissue (WAT) explants of rhesus macaques. Surprisingly, WAT displayed a...

  12. Amblyomma maculatum Feeding Augments Rickettsia parkeri Infection in a Rhesus Macaque Model: A Pilot Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banajee, Kaikhushroo H; Embers, Monica E; Langohr, Ingeborg M; Doyle, Lara A; Hasenkampf, Nicole R; Macaluso, Kevin R

    2015-01-01

    Rickettsia parkeri is an emerging eschar-causing human pathogen in the spotted fever group of Rickettsia and is transmitted by the Gulf coast tick, Amblyomma maculatum. Tick saliva has been shown to alter both the cellular and humoral components of the innate and adaptive immune systems. However, the effect of this immunomodulation on Rickettsia transmission and pathology in an immunocompetent vertebrate host has not been fully examined. We hypothesize that, by modifying the host immune response, tick feeding enhances infection and pathology of pathogenic spotted fever group Rickettsia sp. In order to assess this interaction in vivo, a pilot study was conducted using five rhesus macaques that were divided into three groups. One group was intradermally inoculated with low passage R. parkeri (Portsmouth strain) alone (n = 2) and another group was inoculated during infestation by adult, R. parkeri-free A. maculatum (n = 2). The final macaque was infested with ticks alone (tick feeding control group). Blood, lymph node and skin biopsies were collected at several time points post-inoculation/infestation to assess pathology and quantify rickettsial DNA. As opposed to the tick-only animal, all Rickettsia-inoculated macaques developed inflammatory leukograms, elevated C-reactive protein concentrations, and elevated TH1 (interferon-γ, interleukin-15) and acute phase inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-6) post-inoculation, with greater neutrophilia and interleukin-6 concentrations in the tick plus R. parkeri group. While eschars formed at all R. parkeri inoculation sites, larger and slower healing eschars were observed in the tick feeding plus R. parkeri group. Furthermore, dissemination of R. parkeri to draining lymph nodes early in infection and increased persistence at the inoculation site were observed in the tick plus R. parkeri group. This study indicates that rhesus macaques can be used to model R. parkeri rickettsiosis, and suggests that immunomodulatory factors

  13. Altered gene expression in asymptomatic SHIV-infected rhesus macaques (Macacca mulatta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phillips Aaron T

    2006-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Simian-Human immunodeficiency virus is a chimeric virus which, in rhesus macaques (Macacca mulatta closely imitates immunodeficiency virus infection in human (HIV. A relatively new way to study pathogenesis of viral infection is to study alterations in host gene expression induced by the virus. SHIV infection with certain strains does not result in clinical signs. We hypothesized that alterations in gene expression relating to the immune system would be present in SHIV-infected animals despite the lack of clinical signs. Splenic tissue from four adult male Indian-origin Rhesus monkeys serologically positive for non-pathogenic SHIV 89.6 was processed by cDNA microarray analysis. Results were compared with the corresponding outcome using splenic tissues from four unexposed adult male Rhesus monkeys. Subsequent gene analysis confirmed statistically significant variations between control and infected samples. Interestingly, SHIV-infected monkeys exhibited altered expression in genes related to apoptosis, signal transduction, T and B lymphocyte activation and importantly, to immune regulation. Although infected animals appeared asymptomatic, our study demonstrated that SHIV-infected monkeys cannot reliably be used in studies of other infectious agents as their baseline gene expression differs from that of normal Rhesus monkeys. The gene expression differences in SHIV-infected animals relative to uninfected animals offer additional clues to the pathogenesis of altered immune function in response to secondary infection.

  14. Amygdala lesions in rhesus macaques decrease attention to threat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dal Monte, Olga; Costa, Vincent D; Noble, Pamela L; Murray, Elisabeth A; Averbeck, Bruno B

    2015-01-01

    Evidence from animal and human studies has suggested that the amygdala plays a role in detecting threat and in directing attention to the eyes. Nevertheless, there has been no systematic investigation of whether the amygdala specifically facilitates attention to the eyes or whether other features can also drive attention via amygdala processing. The goal of the present study was to examine the effects of amygdala lesions in rhesus monkeys on attentional capture by specific facial features, as well as gaze patterns and changes in pupil dilation during free viewing. Here we show reduced attentional capture by threat stimuli, specifically the mouth, and reduced exploration of the eyes in free viewing in monkeys with amygdala lesions. Our findings support a role for the amygdala in detecting threat signals and in directing attention to the eye region of faces when freely viewing different expressions. PMID:26658670

  15. Impact of irradiation and immunosuppressive agents on immune system homeostasis in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, C; Walker, J; Dewane, J; Engelmann, F; Laub, W; Pillai, S; Thomas, Charles R; Messaoudi, I

    2015-09-01

    In this study we examined the effects of non-myeloablative total body irradiation (TBI) in combination with immunosuppressive chemotherapy on immune homeostasis in rhesus macaques. Our results show that the administration of cyclosporin A or tacrolimus without radiotherapy did not result in lymphopenia. The addition of TBI to the regimen resulted in lymphopenia as well as alterations in the memory/naive ratio following reconstitution of lymphocyte populations. Dendritic cell (DC) numbers in whole blood were largely unaffected, while the monocyte population was altered by immunosuppressive treatment. Irradiation also resulted in increased levels of circulating cytokines and chemokines that correlated with T cell proliferative bursts and with the shift towards memory T cells. We also report that anti-thymocyte globulin (ATG) treatment and CD3 immunotoxin administration resulted in a selective and rapid depletion of naive CD4 and CD8 T cells and increased frequency of memory T cells. We also examined the impact of these treatments on reactivation of latent simian varicella virus (SVV) infection as a model of varicella zoster virus (VZV) infection of humans. None of the treatments resulted in overt SVV reactivation; however, select animals had transient increases in SVV-specific T cell responses following immunosuppression, suggestive of subclinical reactivation. Overall, we provide detailed observations into immune modulation by TBI and chemotherapeutic agents in rhesus macaques, an important research model of human disease. PMID:25902927

  16. Identification of a Novel Enterovirus Species in Rhesus Macaque in China.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ao, Yuan-Yun; Yu, Jie-Mei; Zhang, Cui-Yuan; Xin, Yun-Yun; Li, Li-Li; Duan, Zhao-Jun

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies of Enterovirus (EV) in nonhuman primates (NHPs), which could act as a source of future emerging human viral diseases, have boosted interest in the search for novel EVs. Here, a highly divergent strain of EV, tentatively named SEV-gx, was identified by viral metagenomic analysis from stool samples of rhesus macaques in China. In total, 27 of 280 (9.6%) faecal samples from rhesus macaques were positive for SEV-gx. Its complete genomic sequence is 7,367 nucleotide (nt). Genomic analyses showed that it has a standard genomic organisation for EVs, being more closely related to EV-J strains (approximately 54.0%, 43.0-44.1%, 52.3-55.2%, 61.1-62.7% and 64.0% amino acids identity in polyprotein, P1, P2 and P3 and combined 2C/3CD regions, respectively). It was also shown to have genome characteristics typical of EVs. Phylogenetic analysis of P1, 2C and 3CD aa indicated that SEV-gx can be classified as a distinct cluster in the EVs. All of this evidence demonstrates SEV-gx is a novel species (tentatively named EV-K) in the EV genus, which contributes to our understanding of the genetic diversity and evolution of EVs. Further studies are needed to investigate the potential pathogenicity of SEV-gx in NHPs and humans. PMID:27329349

  17. Acoustic and behavioral analyses of gecker distress vocalizations in young rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Erik R.; Owren, Michael J.

    2001-05-01

    Loud, pulsed gecker calls have long been known as one of the most common distress vocalizations produced by young rhesus macaques, but have not been systematically investigated. We therefore examined the rates, acoustics, and behavioral contexts associated with geckering, based on audio-recording and focal-animal observations conducted over 4 years at the California National Primate Research Center. The sample analyzed came from 14 young rhesus macaques, with 74 recorded gecker bouts and 556 total pulses. Callers ranged from 1 to 41 months, who in their first year showed most geckering in months 0-2 (26%) and 2-4 (35%). Females geckered longer and at higher rates than males, as well as showing acoustic differences likely to reflect greater vocal effort (e.g., more doubled and tripled pulses, greater noisiness, and higher first frequency peaks). Geckers were associated with 22 differentiable behavioral contexts, typically occurring when with the mother but without obvious antecedents (31.1%), and when the mother broke physical contact with the youngster (13.5%). The most frequent postcedent context of geckering was that most offspring gained the mother's attention and/or renewed proximity (49%). In combination, the outcomes suggest that geckers primarily function to draw listener attention, and are used by youngsters to elicit maternal response.

  18. Auditory brainstem responses in a Rhesus Macaque model of neuro-AIDS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raymond, L A; Wallace, D; Berman, N E; Marcario, J; Foresman, L; Joag, S V; Raghavan, R; Narayan, O; Cheney, P D

    1998-10-01

    Nine rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) were inoculated with a combination of two passaged strains of SIVmac (R71 and 17E), both of which are known to be neurovirulent. Auditory brainstem responses (ABRs) were recorded at regular intervals from these animals both before and after inoculation. Increases in ABR peak and interpeak latency were observed corresponding to progression of SIV disease. Post-inoculation increases in latency were observed for all five peaks of the ABR and for interpeak intervals I-V and III-V. The largest increases in latency were associated with end-stage disease. Within 14 weeks of inoculation, all but two animals developed end-stage simian AIDS and were euthanized. Histopathological examination revealed multifocal lesions in the cerebral gray and white matter as well as in the auditory structures of the brainstem. In most animals, ABR changes were accompanied by evidence of underlying neuropathology. However, cases of severe neuropathology with no ABR abnormalities and vice versa were also noted. Though in a much shorter time frame, SIVmac R71/17E produced both physiological and histopathological abnormalities similar to those associated with HIV disease in humans. These results further support the SIVmac R71/17E infected rhesus macaque as an animal model of HIV related neurological disease in humans. PMID:9839648

  19. A rhesus macaque model of Asian-lineage Zika virus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Dawn M; Aliota, Matthew T; Mohr, Emma L; Weiler, Andrea M; Lehrer-Brey, Gabrielle; Weisgrau, Kim L; Mohns, Mariel S; Breitbach, Meghan E; Rasheed, Mustafa N; Newman, Christina M; Gellerup, Dane D; Moncla, Louise H; Post, Jennifer; Schultz-Darken, Nancy; Schotzko, Michele L; Hayes, Jennifer M; Eudailey, Josh A; Moody, M Anthony; Permar, Sallie R; O'Connor, Shelby L; Rakasz, Eva G; Simmons, Heather A; Capuano, Saverio; Golos, Thaddeus G; Osorio, Jorge E; Friedrich, Thomas C; O'Connor, David H

    2016-01-01

    Infection with Asian-lineage Zika virus (ZIKV) has been associated with Guillain-Barré syndrome and fetal abnormalities, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Animal models of infection are thus urgently needed. Here we show that rhesus macaques are susceptible to infection by an Asian-lineage ZIKV closely related to strains currently circulating in the Americas. Following subcutaneous inoculation, ZIKV RNA is detected in plasma 1 day post infection (d.p.i.) in all animals (N=8, including 2 pregnant animals), and is also present in saliva, urine and cerebrospinal fluid. Non-pregnant and pregnant animals remain viremic for 21 days and for up to at least 57 days, respectively. Neutralizing antibodies are detected by 21 d.p.i. Rechallenge 10 weeks after the initial challenge results in no detectable virus replication, indicating protective immunity against homologous strains. Therefore, Asian-lineage ZIKV infection of rhesus macaques provides a relevant animal model for studying pathogenesis and evaluating potential interventions against human infection, including during pregnancy. PMID:27352279

  20. Retrograde ejaculation associated spontaneous sperm cystolithiasis in four rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gumber, Sanjeev; Courtney, Cynthia L; Strait, Karen R; Sharma, Prachi; Freebersyser, Julie E; Crane, Maria M

    2013-11-01

    Retrograde ejaculation (RE) has been reported in humans and animals but RE with subsequent sperm calculi has rarely been reported. This report documents clinical and pathological findings of spontaneous sperm cystolithiasis in four rhesus macaques. While this condition has been associated with repeated electroejaculation, spontaneous sperm cystolithiasis is highly unusual. The animals presented with either stranguria, dysuria, hematuria, distended abdomen or lethargy. Ultrasound examination revealed several hyperechoic masses within the lumen of the urinary bladder. The animals were euthanized due to poor prognosis or study end points. Postmortem examination revealed multiple angular, amorphous, soft to firm, pale yellow to greenish-brown and variably sized calculi in the lumen of the urinary bladder or prostatic/penile urethra. Histologically, the calculi were composed of numerous sperm embedded in abundant brightly eosinophilic matrix. Based on gross and histologic findings, RE associated sperm cystolithiasis was diagnosed, with ulcerative urethritis as the major primary apparent etiology. To the authors' knowledge, this is the first report of four spontaneous cases of sperm cystolithiasis in rhesus macaques. PMID:23735542

  1. A rhesus macaque model of Asian-lineage Zika virus infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudley, Dawn M.; Aliota, Matthew T.; Mohr, Emma L.; Weiler, Andrea M.; Lehrer-Brey, Gabrielle; Weisgrau, Kim L.; Mohns, Mariel S.; Breitbach, Meghan E.; Rasheed, Mustafa N.; Newman, Christina M.; Gellerup, Dane D.; Moncla, Louise H.; Post, Jennifer; Schultz-Darken, Nancy; Schotzko, Michele L.; Hayes, Jennifer M.; Eudailey, Josh A.; Moody, M. Anthony; Permar, Sallie R.; O'Connor, Shelby L.; Rakasz, Eva G.; Simmons, Heather A.; Capuano, Saverio; Golos, Thaddeus G.; Osorio, Jorge E.; Friedrich, Thomas C.; O'Connor, David H.

    2016-01-01

    Infection with Asian-lineage Zika virus (ZIKV) has been associated with Guillain–Barré syndrome and fetal abnormalities, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Animal models of infection are thus urgently needed. Here we show that rhesus macaques are susceptible to infection by an Asian-lineage ZIKV closely related to strains currently circulating in the Americas. Following subcutaneous inoculation, ZIKV RNA is detected in plasma 1 day post infection (d.p.i.) in all animals (N=8, including 2 pregnant animals), and is also present in saliva, urine and cerebrospinal fluid. Non-pregnant and pregnant animals remain viremic for 21 days and for up to at least 57 days, respectively. Neutralizing antibodies are detected by 21 d.p.i. Rechallenge 10 weeks after the initial challenge results in no detectable virus replication, indicating protective immunity against homologous strains. Therefore, Asian-lineage ZIKV infection of rhesus macaques provides a relevant animal model for studying pathogenesis and evaluating potential interventions against human infection, including during pregnancy. PMID:27352279

  2. Inactivated polio vaccination using a microneedle patch is immunogenic in the rhesus macaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edens, Chris; Dybdahl-Sissoko, Naomi C; Weldon, William C; Oberste, M Steven; Prausnitz, Mark R

    2015-09-01

    The phased replacement of oral polio vaccine (OPV) with inactivated polio vaccine (IPV) is expected to significantly complicate mass vaccination campaigns, which are an important component of the global polio eradication endgame strategy. To simplify mass vaccination with IPV, we developed microneedle patches that are easy to administer, have a small package size, generate no sharps waste and are inexpensive to manufacture. When administered to rhesus macaques, neutralizing antibody titers were equivalent among monkeys vaccinated using microneedle patches and conventional intramuscular injection for IPV types 1 and 2. Serologic response to IPV type 3 vaccination was weaker after microneedle patch vaccination compared to intramuscular injection; however, we suspect the administered type 3 dose was lower due to a flawed pre-production IPV type 3 analytical method. IPV vaccination using microneedle patches was well tolerated by the monkeys. We conclude that IPV vaccination using a microneedle patch is immunogenic in rhesus macaques and may offer a simpler method of IPV vaccination of people to facilitate polio eradication. PMID:25749246

  3. Socioendocrine and morphological correlates of paternity in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bercovitch, F B; Nürnberg, P

    1996-05-01

    When females mate with several males, problems arise in identifying sire and in determining factors contributing to differential male reproductive success. Three potential primary correlates of differential reproduction in males include fighting ability, sperm competition, and body condition. We collected a variety of socioendocrine and morphological measurements from sexually mature rhesus macaques to determine corollaries of paternity. We studied a troop of about 150 rhesus macaques living in a 0.3 ha corral and identified the sires of 70% of infants using multilocus DNA fingerprints. Eight of 21 males sired offspring, and dominant males were more successful than subordinate males. Neither canine size nor age influenced the probability of siring offspring. Male reproductive success was primarily an outcome of the number of females mated with, which was associated with an ensemble of traits including high dominance rank, large body size, relatively voluminous testicles and good body condition. Testes size was significantly larger in sires than in non-sires, but among sires the number of progeny produced was not correlated with testicle size. Sires began the mating season with more body fat than non-sires, but the energetic costs of mating resulted in a 50% reduction in abdominal skinfold thickness during the mating season. We conclude that social status exerts a major impact on paternity by affecting the number of females mated with, that male quality is a critical factor modulating paternity, and that male feeding strategies have a direct influence on variation in male reproductive success. PMID:8699435

  4. Vaccination of rhesus macaques with a vif-deleted simian immunodeficiency virus proviral DNA vaccine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Studies in non-human primates, with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and simian/human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) have demonstrated that live-attenuated viral vaccines are highly effective; however these vaccine viruses maintain a low level of pathogenicity. Lentivirus attenuation associated with deletion of the viral vif gene carries a significantly reduced risk for pathogenicity, while retaining the potential for virus replication of low magnitude in the host. This report describes a vif-deleted simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)mac239 provirus that was tested as an attenuated proviral DNA vaccine by inoculation of female rhesus macaques. SIV-specific interferon-γ enzyme-linked immunospot responses of low magnitude were observed after immunization with plasmid containing the vif-deleted SIV provirus. However, vaccinated animals displayed strong sustained virus-specific T cell proliferative responses and increasing antiviral antibody titers. These immune responses suggested either persistent vaccine plasmid expression or low level replication of vif-deleted SIV in the host. Immunized and unvaccinated macaques received a single high dose vaginal challenge with pathogenic SIVmac251. A transient suppression of challenge virus load and a greater median survival time was observed for vaccinated animals. However, virus loads for vaccinated and unvaccinated macaques were comparable by twenty weeks after challenge and overall survival curves for the two groups were not significantly different. Thus, a vif-deleted SIVmac239 proviral DNA vaccine is immunogenic and capable of inducing a transient suppression of pathogenic challenge virus, despite severe attenuation of the vaccine virus

  5. A decade of theory of mind research on Cayo Santiago: Insights into rhesus macaque social cognition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drayton, Lindsey A; Santos, Laurie R

    2016-01-01

    Over the past several decades, researchers have become increasingly interested in understanding how primates understand the behavior of others. One open question concerns whether nonhuman primates think about others' behavior in psychological terms, that is, whether they have a theory of mind. Over the last ten years, experiments conducted on the free-ranging rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) living on Cayo Santiago have provided important insights into this question. In this review, we highlight what we think are some of the most exciting results of this body of work. Specifically we describe experiments suggesting that rhesus monkeys may understand some psychological states, such as what others see, hear, and know, but that they fail to demonstrate an understanding of others' beliefs. Thus, while some aspects of theory of mind may be shared between humans and other primates, others capacities are likely to be uniquely human. We also discuss some of the broader debates surrounding comparative theory of mind research, as well as what we think may be productive lines for future research with the rhesus macaques of Cayo Santiago. PMID:25556543

  6. Immunoglobulin Concentrations and Antigen-Specific Antibody Levels in Cervicovaginal Lavages of Rhesus Macaques Are Influenced by the Stage of the Menstrual Cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Lü, F. Xusheng; Ma, Zhongmin; Rourke, Tracy; Srinivasan, Seema; McChesney, Michael; Christopher J. Miller

    1999-01-01

    The levels of antigen-specific antibodies (Abs) and immunoglobulins in the cervical mucus of women vary with the menstrual cycle; the highest levels occur during menses, and the lowest occur during the periovulatory period. The rhesus macaque is a widely used animal model of female genital tract immunity. We sought to determine whether rhesus macaques have a cyclical pattern of changing cervicovaginal Ab and immunoglobulin levels that is similar to that of the human female. ...

  7. TRIMe7-CypA, an alternative splicing isoform of TRIMCyp in rhesus macaque, negatively modulates TRIM5α activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Na, Lei [Harbin Veterinary Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin 150001 (China); Tang, Yan-Dong [Harbin Veterinary Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin 150001 (China); Biotechnology Institute of Southern Medical University, Guangzhou 510515 (China); Liu, Jian-Dong; Yu, Chang-Qing; Sun, Liu-Ke; Lin, Yue-Zhi; Wang, Xue-Feng [Harbin Veterinary Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin 150001 (China); Wang, Xiaojun, E-mail: xjw@hvri.ac.cn [Harbin Veterinary Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin 150001 (China); Zhou, Jian-Hua, E-mail: jianhua_uc@126.com [Harbin Veterinary Research Institute of the Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, Harbin 150001 (China); Harbin Pharmaceutical Group Biovaccine Company, Harbin 150069 (China)

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • TRIMe7-CypA expresses in rhesus and pig-tailed, but not long-tailed macaques. • TRIMe7-CypA does not show the restriction to a HIV-GFP report virus in vitro. • It acts as a negative modulator to TRIM5α likely by competitive inhibition. - Abstract: The existence of innate, host-specific restriction factors is a major obstacle to the development of nonhuman primate models for AIDS studies, and TRIM5α is one of the most important of these restriction factors. In recent years, a TRIM5 chimeric gene that was retrotransposed by a cyclophilin A (CypA) cDNA was identified in certain macaque species. The TRIM5α-CypA fusion protein, TRIMCyp, which was expressed in these monkeys, had lost its restriction ability toward HIV-1. We previously found that TRIMe7-CypA, an alternative splicing isoform of the TRIMCyp transcripts, was expressed in pig-tailed and rhesus macaques but absent in long-tailed macaques. In this study, the anti-HIV-1 activity of TRIMe7-CypA in the rhesus macaque (RhTRIMe7-CypA) was investigated. The over-expression of RhTRIMe7-CypA in CrFK, HeLa and HEK293T cells did not restrict the infection or replication of an HIV-1-GFP reporter virus in these cells. As a positive control, rhesus (rh)TRIM5α strongly inhibited the reporter virus. Intriguingly, the anti-HIV-1 activity of RhTRIM5α was significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner by the co-repression of RhTRIMe7-CypA. Our data indicate that although the RhTRIMe7-CypA isoform does not appear to restrict HIV-1, it may act as a negative modulator of TRIM family proteins, presumably by competitive inhibition.

  8. TRIMe7-CypA, an alternative splicing isoform of TRIMCyp in rhesus macaque, negatively modulates TRIM5α activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • TRIMe7-CypA expresses in rhesus and pig-tailed, but not long-tailed macaques. • TRIMe7-CypA does not show the restriction to a HIV-GFP report virus in vitro. • It acts as a negative modulator to TRIM5α likely by competitive inhibition. - Abstract: The existence of innate, host-specific restriction factors is a major obstacle to the development of nonhuman primate models for AIDS studies, and TRIM5α is one of the most important of these restriction factors. In recent years, a TRIM5 chimeric gene that was retrotransposed by a cyclophilin A (CypA) cDNA was identified in certain macaque species. The TRIM5α-CypA fusion protein, TRIMCyp, which was expressed in these monkeys, had lost its restriction ability toward HIV-1. We previously found that TRIMe7-CypA, an alternative splicing isoform of the TRIMCyp transcripts, was expressed in pig-tailed and rhesus macaques but absent in long-tailed macaques. In this study, the anti-HIV-1 activity of TRIMe7-CypA in the rhesus macaque (RhTRIMe7-CypA) was investigated. The over-expression of RhTRIMe7-CypA in CrFK, HeLa and HEK293T cells did not restrict the infection or replication of an HIV-1-GFP reporter virus in these cells. As a positive control, rhesus (rh)TRIM5α strongly inhibited the reporter virus. Intriguingly, the anti-HIV-1 activity of RhTRIM5α was significantly reduced in a dose-dependent manner by the co-repression of RhTRIMe7-CypA. Our data indicate that although the RhTRIMe7-CypA isoform does not appear to restrict HIV-1, it may act as a negative modulator of TRIM family proteins, presumably by competitive inhibition

  9. Phenotypic and Functional Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies with Specificity for Rhesus Macaque CD200, CD200R and Mincle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddappa N Byrareddy

    Full Text Available Lectin-like molecules and their receptors are cell surface molecules that have been shown to play a role in either facilitating infection or serving as transporters of HIV/SIV in vivo. The role of these lectin-like molecules in the pathogenesis of HIV/SIV infection continues to be defined. In efforts to gain further insight on the potential role of these lectin-like molecules, our laboratory generated monoclonal antibodies (mAb against the human analogs of rhesus macaque CD200, CD200R and Mincle, since the rhesus macaques are accepted as the most reliable animal model to study human HIV infection. The characterization of the cell lineages from the blood and various tissues of rhesus macaques that express these lectin-like molecules are described herein. Among the mononuclear cells, the cells of the myeloid lineage of rhesus macaques are the predominant cell lineages that express readily detectable levels of CD200, CD200R and Mincle that is similar to the expression of Siglec-1 and Siglec-3 reported by our laboratory earlier. Subset analysis revealed that a higher frequency of the CD14+/CD16- subset from normal rhesus macaques express CD200, CD200R and Mincle. Differences in the frequencies and density of expression of these molecules by the gated population of CD14+ cells from various tissues are noted with PBMC and bone marrow expressing the highest and the mononuclear cells isolated from the colon and ileum expressing the lowest levels. While a significant frequency of pDCs and mDCs express Siglec-1/Siglec-3, a much lower frequency expresses CD200, CD200R and Mincle in PBMCs from rhesus macaques. The mAb against CD200 and CD200R but not Mincle appear to inhibit the infection of macrophage tropic SIV/SHIV in vitro. We conclude that these mAbs may have potential to be used as adjunctive therapeutic agents to control/inhibit SIV/HIV infection.

  10. Phenotypic and Functional Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies with Specificity for Rhesus Macaque CD200, CD200R and Mincle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrareddy, Siddappa N; Little, Dawn; Mayne, Ann E; Villinger, Francois; Ansari, Aftab A

    2015-01-01

    Lectin-like molecules and their receptors are cell surface molecules that have been shown to play a role in either facilitating infection or serving as transporters of HIV/SIV in vivo. The role of these lectin-like molecules in the pathogenesis of HIV/SIV infection continues to be defined. In efforts to gain further insight on the potential role of these lectin-like molecules, our laboratory generated monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against the human analogs of rhesus macaque CD200, CD200R and Mincle, since the rhesus macaques are accepted as the most reliable animal model to study human HIV infection. The characterization of the cell lineages from the blood and various tissues of rhesus macaques that express these lectin-like molecules are described herein. Among the mononuclear cells, the cells of the myeloid lineage of rhesus macaques are the predominant cell lineages that express readily detectable levels of CD200, CD200R and Mincle that is similar to the expression of Siglec-1 and Siglec-3 reported by our laboratory earlier. Subset analysis revealed that a higher frequency of the CD14+/CD16- subset from normal rhesus macaques express CD200, CD200R and Mincle. Differences in the frequencies and density of expression of these molecules by the gated population of CD14+ cells from various tissues are noted with PBMC and bone marrow expressing the highest and the mononuclear cells isolated from the colon and ileum expressing the lowest levels. While a significant frequency of pDCs and mDCs express Siglec-1/Siglec-3, a much lower frequency expresses CD200, CD200R and Mincle in PBMCs from rhesus macaques. The mAb against CD200 and CD200R but not Mincle appear to inhibit the infection of macrophage tropic SIV/SHIV in vitro. We conclude that these mAbs may have potential to be used as adjunctive therapeutic agents to control/inhibit SIV/HIV infection. PMID:26468886

  11. SIV infection of rhesus macaques of Chinese origin: a suitable model for HIV infection in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yu; Bao, Rong; Haigwood, Nancy L; Persidsky, Yuri; Ho, Wen-zhe

    2013-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of Indian-origin rhesus macaques (RM) has been widely used as a well-established nonhuman primate (NHP) model for HIV/AIDS research. However, there have been a growing number of studies using Chinese RM to evaluate immunopathogenesis of SIV infection. In this paper, we have for the first time reviewed and discussed the major publications related to SIV or SHIV infection of Chinese RM in the past decades. We have compared the differences in the pathogenesis of SIV infection between Chinese RM and Indian RM with regard to viral infection, immunological response, and host genetic background. Given AIDS is a disease that affects humans of diverse origins, it is of importance to study animals with different geographical background. Therefore, to examine and compare results obtained from RM models of Indian and Chinese origins should lead to further validation and improvement of these animal models for HIV/AIDS research. PMID:23947613

  12. Network stability is a balancing act of personality, power, and conflict dynamics in rhesus macaque societies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brenda McCowan

    Full Text Available Stability in biological systems requires evolved mechanisms that promote robustness. Cohesive primate social groups represent one example of a stable biological system, which persist in spite of frequent conflict. Multiple sources of stability likely exist for any biological system and such robustness, or lack thereof, should be reflected and thus detectable in the group's network structure, and likely at multiple levels. Here we show how network structure and group stability are linked to the fundamental characteristics of the individual agents in groups and to the environmental and social contexts in which these individuals interact. Both internal factors (e.g., personality, sex and external factors (e.g., rank dynamics, sex ratio were considered from the level of the individual to that of the group to examine the effects of network structure on group stability in a nonhuman primate species. The results yielded three main findings. First, successful third-party intervention behavior is a mechanism of group stability in rhesus macaques in that successful interventions resulted in less wounding in social groups. Second, personality is the primary factor that determines which individuals perform the role of key intervener, via its effect on social power and dominance discrepancy. Finally, individuals with high social power are not only key interveners but also key players in grooming networks and receive reconciliations from a higher diversity of individuals. The results from this study provide sound evidence that individual and group characteristics such as personality and sex ratio influence network structures such as patterns of reconciliation, grooming and conflict intervention that are indicators of network robustness and consequent health and well-being in rhesus macaque societies. Utilizing this network approach has provided greater insight into how behavioral and social processes influence social stability in nonhuman primate groups.

  13. Crosstalk of dynamic functional modules in lung development of rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xuexin; Feng, Lin; Han, Zujing; Wu, Bo; Wang, Shuyuan; Xiao, Yun; Li, Feng; Zhang, Lianfeng; Cao, Bangrong; Di, Xuebing; Lu, Dan; Li, Xia; Jiang, Wei; Zhang, Kaitai; Cheng, Shujun

    2016-04-01

    Lung development follows a complex series of dynamic histogenic events that depend on the fluctuation of gene expression, and the disruption of gene regulation could lead to devastating consequences, such as diseases in adulthood. In order to investigate the mechanism of lung development, we performed RNA sequencing by Illumina HiSeq™ 2000 to measure mRNA expression in lung tissues of nine rhesus macaques spanning from foetuses at gestation of 45 days to postnatal at 7 days. This development period was divided into three developmental stages, including the early stage (45-100 gestational days), the middle stage (137-163 gestational days) and the late stage (after birth at 4-7 days). Firstly, we identified stage-specific genes, based on which we found that the principle biological processes of the early stage were mainly associated with internal growth signalling, while the middle and late stage-specific genes controlled the external stress signalling. Then, we constructed a stage-specific protein-protein interaction (PPI) subnetwork, extracted dynamic modules, and identified crosstalk between modules. Moreover, we found four active pathways that could mediate the crosstalk, including the Notch signalling pathway, cell cycle, NOD-like receptor signalling pathway, and Toll-like receptor signalling pathway. These pathways not only played crucial roles in lung development, but also were implicated in lung diseases. Finally, some important bridgers, such as PSEN2, HSP90AA1 and CASP8, were discovered to explain the potential mechanism of crosstalk. Therefore, our study presents the landscape of gene expression of lung development of rhesus macaques, and provides an extended insight into the lung development mechanism. PMID:26923754

  14. Early life exposure to allergen and ozone results in altered development in adolescent rhesus macaque lungs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Herring, M.J.; Putney, L.F.; St George, J.A. [California National Primate Research Center, Davis, CA (United States); Avdalovic, M.V. [Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Pulmonary and Critical Care, University of California, Davis, CA (United States); Schelegle, E.S.; Miller, L.A. [California National Primate Research Center, Davis, CA (United States); Hyde, D.M., E-mail: dmhyde@ucdavis.edu [California National Primate Research Center, Davis, CA (United States)

    2015-02-15

    In rhesus macaques, previous studies have shown that episodic exposure to allergen alone or combined with ozone inhalation during the first 6 months of life results in a condition with many of the hallmarks of asthma. This exposure regimen results in altered development of the distal airways and parenchyma (Avdalovic et al., 2012). We hypothesized that the observed alterations in the lung parenchyma would be permanent following a long-term recovery in filtered air (FA) housing. Forty-eight infant rhesus macaques (30 days old) sensitized to house dust mite (HDM) were treated with two week cycles of FA, house dust mite allergen (HDMA), ozone (O{sub 3}) or HDMA/ozone (HDMA + O{sub 3}) for five months. At the end of the five months, six animals from each group were necropsied. The other six animals in each group were allowed to recover in FA for 30 more months at which time they were necropsied. Design-based stereology was used to estimate volumes of lung components, number of alveoli, size of alveoli, distribution of alveolar volumes, interalveolar capillary density. After 30 months of recovery, monkeys exposed to HDMA, in either group, had significantly more alveoli than filtered air. These alveoli also had higher capillary densities as compared with FA controls. These results indicate that early life exposure to HDMA alone or HDMA + O{sub 3} alters the development process in the lung alveoli. - Highlights: • Abnormal lung development after postnatal exposure to ozone and allergen • This remodeling is shown as smaller, more numerous alveoli and narrower airways. • Allergen appears to have more of an effect than ozone during recovery. • These animals also have continued airway hyperresponsiveness (Moore et al. 2014)

  15. Early life exposure to allergen and ozone results in altered development in adolescent rhesus macaque lungs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In rhesus macaques, previous studies have shown that episodic exposure to allergen alone or combined with ozone inhalation during the first 6 months of life results in a condition with many of the hallmarks of asthma. This exposure regimen results in altered development of the distal airways and parenchyma (Avdalovic et al., 2012). We hypothesized that the observed alterations in the lung parenchyma would be permanent following a long-term recovery in filtered air (FA) housing. Forty-eight infant rhesus macaques (30 days old) sensitized to house dust mite (HDM) were treated with two week cycles of FA, house dust mite allergen (HDMA), ozone (O3) or HDMA/ozone (HDMA + O3) for five months. At the end of the five months, six animals from each group were necropsied. The other six animals in each group were allowed to recover in FA for 30 more months at which time they were necropsied. Design-based stereology was used to estimate volumes of lung components, number of alveoli, size of alveoli, distribution of alveolar volumes, interalveolar capillary density. After 30 months of recovery, monkeys exposed to HDMA, in either group, had significantly more alveoli than filtered air. These alveoli also had higher capillary densities as compared with FA controls. These results indicate that early life exposure to HDMA alone or HDMA + O3 alters the development process in the lung alveoli. - Highlights: • Abnormal lung development after postnatal exposure to ozone and allergen • This remodeling is shown as smaller, more numerous alveoli and narrower airways. • Allergen appears to have more of an effect than ozone during recovery. • These animals also have continued airway hyperresponsiveness (Moore et al. 2014)

  16. Inhaled oxytocin amplifies both vicarious reinforcement and self reinforcement in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Steve W. C.; Barter, Joseph W.; Ebitz, R. Becket; Watson, Karli K.; Platt, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    People attend not only to their own experiences, but also to the experiences of those around them. Such social awareness profoundly influences human behavior by enabling observational learning, as well as by motivating cooperation, charity, empathy, and spite. Oxytocin (OT), a neurosecretory hormone synthesized by hypothalamic neurons in the mammalian brain, can enhance affiliation or boost exclusion in different species in distinct contexts, belying any simple mechanistic neural model. Here we show that inhaled OT penetrates the CNS and subsequently enhances the sensitivity of rhesus macaques to rewards occurring to others as well as themselves. Roughly 2 h after inhaling OT, monkeys increased the frequency of prosocial choices associated with reward to another monkey when the alternative was to reward no one. OT also increased attention to the recipient monkey as well as the time it took to render such a decision. In contrast, within the first 2 h following inhalation, OT increased selfish choices associated with delivery of reward to self over a reward to the other monkey, without affecting attention or decision latency. Despite the differences in species typical social behavior, exogenous, inhaled OT causally promotes social donation behavior in rhesus monkeys, as it does in more egalitarian and monogamous ones, like prairie voles and humans, when there is no perceived cost to self. These findings potentially implicate shared neural mechanisms. PMID:22215593

  17. Administration of thimerosal-containing vaccines to infant rhesus macaques does not result in autism-like behavior or neuropathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gadad, Bharathi S; Li, Wenhao; Yazdani, Umar; Grady, Stephen; Johnson, Trevor; Hammond, Jacob; Gunn, Howard; Curtis, Britni; English, Chris; Yutuc, Vernon; Ferrier, Clayton; Sackett, Gene P; Marti, C Nathan; Young, Keith; Hewitson, Laura; German, Dwight C

    2015-10-01

    Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) is a complex neurodevelopmental disorder. Some anecdotal reports suggest that ASD is related to exposure to ethyl mercury, in the form of the vaccine preservative, thimerosal, and/or receiving the measles, mumps, rubella (MMR) vaccine. Using infant rhesus macaques receiving thimerosal-containing vaccines (TCVs) following the recommended pediatric vaccine schedules from the 1990s and 2008, we examined behavior, and neuropathology in three brain regions found to exhibit neuropathology in postmortem ASD brains. No neuronal cellular or protein changes in the cerebellum, hippocampus, or amygdala were observed in animals following the 1990s or 2008 vaccine schedules. Analysis of social behavior in juvenile animals indicated that there were no significant differences in negative behaviors between animals in the control and experimental groups. These data indicate that administration of TCVs and/or the MMR vaccine to rhesus macaques does not result in neuropathological abnormalities, or aberrant behaviors, like those observed in ASD. PMID:26417083

  18. Viral and immunological factors associated with breast milk transmission of SIV in rhesus macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fresh Lynn

    2004-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The viral and host factors involved in transmission of HIV through breastfeeding are largely unknown, and intervention strategies are urgently needed to protect at-risk populations. To evaluate the viral and immunological factors directly related to milk transmission of virus, we have evaluated the disease course of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV in lactating rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta as a model of natural breast milk transmission of HIV. Results Fourteen lactating macaques were infected intravenously with SIV/DeltaB670, a pathogenic isolate of SIV and were pair-housed with their suckling infants throughout the disease course. Transmission was observed in 10 mother-infant pairs over a one-year period. Two mothers transmitted virus during the period of initial viremia 14–21 days post inoculation (p.i. and were classified as early transmitters. Peak viral loads in milk and plasma of early transmitters were similar to other animals, however the early transmitters subsequently displayed a rapid progressor phenotype and failed to control virus expression as well as other animals at 56 days p.i. Eight mothers were classified as late transmitters, with infant infection detected at time points in the chronic stage of the maternal SIV disease course (81 to 360 days. Plasma viral loads, CD4+ T cell counts and SIV-specific antibody titers were similar in late transmitters and non-transmitters. Late breast milk transmission, however, was correlated with higher average milk viral loads and more persistent viral expression in milk 12 to 46 weeks p.i. as compared to non-transmitters. Four mothers failed to transmit virus, despite disease progression and continuous lactation. Conclusion These studies validate the SIV-infected rhesus macaque as a model for breast milk transmission of HIV. As observed in studies of HIV-infected women, transmission occurred at time points throughout the period of lactation. Transmission during the

  19. X-ray crystallographic characterization of rhesus macaque MHC Mamu-A*02 complexed with an immunodominant SIV-Gag nonapeptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    X-ray crystallographic characterization of rhesus macaque MHC Mamu-A*02 complexed with an immunodominant SIV-Gag nonapeptide. Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in the rhesus macaque is regarded as a classic animal model, playing a crucial role in HIV vaccine strategies and therapeutics by characterizing various cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses in macaque monkeys. However, the availability of well documented structural reports focusing on rhesus macaque major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules remains extremely limited. Here, a complex of the rhesus macaque MHC I molecule (Mamu-A*02) with human β2m and an immunodominant SIV-Gag nonapeptide, GESNLKSLY (GY9), has been crystallized. The crystal diffracts X-rays to 2.7 Å resolution and belongs to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 124.11, b = 110.45, c = 100.06 Å, and contains two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The availability of the structure, which is being solved by molecular replacement, will provide new insights into rhesus macaque MHC I (Mamu-A*02) presenting pathogenic SIV peptides

  20. X-ray crystallographic characterization of rhesus macaque MHC Mamu-A*02 complexed with an immunodominant SIV-Gag nonapeptide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Feng, Youjun [Laboratory of Molecular Immunology and Molecular Virology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Qi, Jianxun [Graduate School, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing (China); Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Zhang, Huimin; Wang, Jinzi [Laboratory of Molecular Immunology and Molecular Virology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Liu, Jinhua [College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China); Jiang, Fan [Institute of Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Gao, Feng, E-mail: gaofeng@im.ac.cn [Laboratory of Molecular Immunology and Molecular Virology, Institute of Microbiology, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); College of Veterinary Medicine, China Agricultural University, Beijing 100094 (China)

    2006-01-01

    X-ray crystallographic characterization of rhesus macaque MHC Mamu-A*02 complexed with an immunodominant SIV-Gag nonapeptide. Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) in the rhesus macaque is regarded as a classic animal model, playing a crucial role in HIV vaccine strategies and therapeutics by characterizing various cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) responses in macaque monkeys. However, the availability of well documented structural reports focusing on rhesus macaque major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) molecules remains extremely limited. Here, a complex of the rhesus macaque MHC I molecule (Mamu-A*02) with human β{sub 2}m and an immunodominant SIV-Gag nonapeptide, GESNLKSLY (GY9), has been crystallized. The crystal diffracts X-rays to 2.7 Å resolution and belongs to space group C2, with unit-cell parameters a = 124.11, b = 110.45, c = 100.06 Å, and contains two molecules in the asymmetric unit. The availability of the structure, which is being solved by molecular replacement, will provide new insights into rhesus macaque MHC I (Mamu-A*02) presenting pathogenic SIV peptides.

  1. Sex-specific heritability of spontaneous lipid levels in an extended pedigree of Indian-origin rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amanda Vinson

    Full Text Available The rhesus macaque is an important model for human atherosclerosis but genetic determinants of relevant phenotypes have not yet been investigated in this species. Because lipid levels are well-established and heritable risk factors for human atherosclerosis, our goal was to assess the heritability of lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels in a single, extended pedigree of 1,289 Indian-origin rhesus macaques. Additionally, because increasing evidence supports sex differences in the genetic architecture of lipid levels and lipid metabolism in humans and macaques, we also explored sex-specific heritability for all lipid measures investigated in this study. Using standard methods, we measured lipoprotein cholesterol and triglyceride levels from fasted plasma in a sample of 193 pedigreed rhesus macaques selected for membership in large, paternal half-sib cohorts, and maintained on a low-fat, low cholesterol chow diet. Employing a variance components approach, we found moderate heritability for total cholesterol (h²=0.257, P=0.032, LDL cholesterol (h²=0.252, P=0.030, and triglyceride levels (h²=0.197, P=0.034 in the full sample. However, stratification by sex (N=68 males, N=125 females revealed substantial sex-specific heritability for total cholesterol (0.644, P=0.004, females only, HDL cholesterol (0.843, P=0.0008, females only, VLDL cholesterol (0.482, P=0.018, males only, and triglyceride levels (0.705, P=0.001, males only that was obscured or absent when sexes were combined in the full sample. We conclude that genes contribute to spontaneous variation in circulating lipid levels in the Indian-origin rhesus macaque in a sex-specific manner, and that the rhesus macaque is likely to be a valuable model for sex-specific genetic effects on lipid risk factors for human atherosclerosis. These findings are a first-ever report of heritability for cholesterol levels in this species, and support the need for expanded analysis of these traits in

  2. The Lymphocytosis-Promoting Agent Pertussis Toxin Affects Virus Burden and Lymphocyte Distribution in the SIV-Infected Rhesus Macaque

    OpenAIRE

    Pauza, C. David; Hinds, Paul W.; Yin, Cheng; McKechnie, Timothy S.; Hinds, Sarah B; Salvato, Maria S.

    1997-01-01

    Pertussis toxin from the gram-negative bacterium Bordetella pertussis is an ADP-ribosylase that modifies Gi proteins in mammalian lymphocytes and inhibits their capacity to traffic from blood into lymphoid tissues. We used this compound to induce lymphocytosis in rhesus macaques and to study its effects on SIV infection. Pertussis toxin injected at 25 μg/kg induced a transient lymphocytosis that peaked 3–8 days after administration and caused a rapid, transient decrease in the frequency of in...

  3. Monkeypox Virus Infection of Rhesus Macaques Induces Massive Expansion of Natural Killer Cells but Suppresses Natural Killer Cell Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Song, Haifeng; Josleyn, Nicole; Janosko, Krisztina; Skinner, Jeff; Reeves, R. Keith; Cohen, Melanie; Jett, Catherine; Johnson, Reed; Blaney, Joseph E.; Bollinger, Laura; Jennings, Gerald; Jahrling, Peter B

    2013-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells play critical roles in innate immunity and in bridging innate and adaptive immune responses against viral infection. However, the response of NK cells to monkeypox virus (MPXV) infection is not well characterized. In this intravenous challenge study of MPXV infection in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), we analyzed blood and lymph node NK cell changes in absolute cell numbers, cell proliferation, chemokine receptor expression, and cellular functions. Our results show...

  4. Lipopolysaccharide Increases Immune Activation and Alters T Cell Homeostasis in SHIVB’WHU Chronically Infected Chinese Rhesus Macaque

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Gao-Hong; Wu, Run-Dong; Zheng, Hong-Yi; Zhang, Xiao-Liang; Zhang, Ming-Xu; Tian, Ren-Rong; Liu, Guang-Ming; Pang, Wei; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2015-01-01

    Immune activation plays a significant role in the disease progression of HIV. Microbial products, especially bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), contribute to immune activation. Increasing evidence indicates that T lymphocyte homeostasis disruptions are associated with immune activation. However, the mechanism by which LPS affects disruption of immune response is still not fully understood. Chronically SHIVB'WHU-infected Chinese rhesus macaques received 50 μg/kg body weight LPS in this study....

  5. Lipopolysaccharide Increases Immune Activation and Alters T Cell Homeostasis in SHIVB'WHU Chronically Infected Chinese Rhesus Macaque

    OpenAIRE

    Gao-Hong Zhang; Run-Dong Wu; Hong-Yi Zheng; Xiao-Liang Zhang; Ming-Xu Zhang; Ren-Rong Tian; Guang-Ming Liu; Wei Pang; Yong-Tang Zheng

    2015-01-01

    Immune activation plays a significant role in the disease progression of HIV. Microbial products, especially bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS), contribute to immune activation. Increasing evidence indicates that T lymphocyte homeostasis disruptions are associated with immune activation. However, the mechanism by which LPS affects disruption of immune response is still not fully understood. Chronically SHIVB’WHU-infected Chinese rhesus macaques received 50 μg/kg body weight LPS in this study....

  6. Locally infiltrative ameloblastic fibroma in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) with characterizations of its proliferating activity and biological behavior

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, David X.; Doyle, Lara A.; Bouljihad, Mostafa T.; Didier, Peter J.; Gilbert, Margaret H.; Wang, Xiaolei; Pahar, Bapi; Bohm, Rudolf P.; Veazey, Ronald S.; Lackner, Andrew A.

    2012-01-01

    An 8-year-old male rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) presented with unilateral enlargement of the left mandible. Radiographs revealed a marked expansion of the left mandible with a multilocular radiolucent mass with abundant osteolysis. The mass was grossly firm, fleshy, and gelatinous on the cut surface. Histologically, the mass was locally infiltrative and composed of neoplastic epithelial and mesenchymal components that stained positive for cytokeratin and vimentin, respectively. Occasional ...

  7. Critical Analysis of Treatment Trials of Rhesus Macaques Infected with Borrelia burgdorferi Reveals Important Flaws in Experimental Design

    OpenAIRE

    Wormser, Gary P.; Baker, Phillip J.; O'Connell, Susan; Pachner, Andrew R.; Schwartz, Ira; Shapiro, Eugene D.

    2012-01-01

    A critical analysis of two treatment trials of Chinese rhesus macaques infected with Borrelia burgdorferi indicates that insufficient attention was placed on documenting the blood levels, pharmacokinetics, and pharmacodynamic parameters of the antibiotics used in this host. Consequently, it is impossible to conclude that the findings have validity in judging the efficacy of doxycycline or ceftriaxone for the treatment of Borrelia burgdorferi in this animal model.

  8. Early Detection of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus in the Central Nervous System Following Oral Administration to Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Milush, Jeffrey M.; Chen, Hui-Ling; Atteberry, Ginger; Sodora, Donald L.

    2013-01-01

    The timing of HIV dissemination to the central nervous system (CNS) has the potential to have important implications regarding HIV disease progression and treatment. The earlier HIV enters the CNS the more difficult it might be to remove with antiretroviral therapy. Alternatively, HIV may only enter the CNS later in the course of disease as a result of disruption of the blood-brain-barrier. We utilized the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of rhesus macaques to evaluate the oral r...

  9. Detection of Neospora from tissues of experimentally infected rhesus macaques by PCR and specific DNA probe hybridization.

    OpenAIRE

    Ho, M. S.; Barr, B C; Tarantal, A F; Lai, L T; Hendrickx, A G; Marsh, A E; Sverlow, K W; Packham, A E; Conrad, P.A.

    1997-01-01

    Neospora is a newly recognized Toxoplasma-like cyst-forming coccidian parasite that causes abortion or congenital infections in naturally or experimentally infected animals. In this study, pregnant rhesus macaques were inoculated with culture-derived tachyzoites of a bovine Neospora isolate, and tissue samples from various major organs were collected from dams and fetuses for the detection of parasite DNA by using oligonucleotide primers COC-1 and COC-2 for PCR amplification of a conserved co...

  10. Vaccine-induced plasmablast responses in rhesus macaques: phenotypic characterization and a source for generating antigen-specific monoclonal antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Silveira, Eduardo L. V.; Kasturi, Sudhir P.; Kovalenkov, Yevgeniy; Ur Rasheed, Ata; Yeiser, Patryce; Jinnah, Zarpheen S.; Legere, Traci H.; Pulendran, Bali; Villinger, Francois; Wrammert, Jens

    2014-01-01

    Over 100 broadly neutralizing antibodies have been isolated from a minority of HIV infected patients, but the steps leading to the selection of plasmacells producing such antibodies remain incompletely understood, hampering the development of vaccines able to elicit them. Rhesus macaques have become a preferred animal model system used to study SIV/HIV, for the characterization and development of novel therapeutics and vaccines as well as to understand pathogenesis. However, most of our knowl...

  11. Reactive amyloidosis associated with ischial callosititis: a report with histology of ischial callosities in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, David X.; Gilbert, Margaret H; Wang, Xiaolei; Didier, Peter J.; Veazey, Ronald S.

    2012-01-01

    Ischial callosities have received little attention in veterinary medicine even though they are distinguishing anatomic organs. The organs are characterized by a pair of hairless pads of thickened epidermis, located bilaterally in the gluteal region, which overlay the tuberosities of the ischia of all Old World monkeys, gibbons, and siamangs. The current report describes a case of reactive amyloidosis associated with ischial callosititis in a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta). Amyloid A (AA) pro...

  12. Sequencing of rhesus macaque Y chromosome clarifies origins and evolution of the DAZ (Deleted in AZoospermia) genes

    OpenAIRE

    Hughes, Jennifer F.; Skaletsky, Helen; Page, David C.

    2012-01-01

    Studies of Y chromosome evolution often emphasize gene loss, but this loss has been counterbalanced by addition of new genes. The DAZ genes, which are critical to human spermatogenesis, were acquired by the Y chromosome in the ancestor of Old World monkeys and apes. We and our colleagues recently sequenced the rhesus macaque Y chromosome, and comparison of this sequence to human and chimpanzee enables us to reconstruct much of the evolutionary history of DAZ. We report that DAZ arrived on the...

  13. Mucosal transmissibility, disease induction and coreceptor switching of R5 SHIVSF162P3N molecular clones in rhesus macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Ren Wuze; Mumbauer Alexandra; Zhuang Ke; Harbison Carole; Knight Heather; Westmoreland Susan; Gettie Agegnehu; Blanchard James; Cheng-Mayer Cecilia

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Mucosally transmissible and pathogenic CCR5 (R5)-tropic simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) molecular clones are useful reagents to identity neutralization escape in HIV-1 vaccine experiments and to study the envelope evolutionary process and mechanistic basis for coreceptor switch during the course of natural infection. Results We observed progression to AIDS in rhesus macaques infected intrarectally with molecular clones of the pathogenic R5 SHIVSF162P3N isolate. ...

  14. Antibody Responses to a Spore Carbohydrate Antigen as a Marker of Nonfatal Inhalation Anthrax in Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Saile, Elke; Boons, Geert-Jan; Buskas, Therese; Carlson, Russell W.; Kannenberg, Elmar L; Barr, John R.; Boyer, Anne E.; Gallegos-Candela, Maribel; Quinn, Conrad P.

    2011-01-01

    The Bacillus anthracis exosporium protein BclA contains an O-linked antigenic tetrasaccharide whose terminal sugar is known as anthrose (J. M. Daubenspeck et al., J. Biol. Chem. 279:30945–30953, 2004). We hypothesized that serologic responses to anthrose may have diagnostic value in confirming exposure to aerosolized B. anthracis. We evaluated the serologic responses to a synthetic anthrose-containing trisaccharide (ATS) in a group of five rhesus macaques that survived inhalation anthrax foll...

  15. Similar protective immunity induced by an inactivated enterovirus 71 (EV71) vaccine in neonatal rhesus macaques and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ying; Wang, Lichun; Liao, Yun; Liu, Longding; Ma, Kaili; Yang, Erxia; Wang, Jingjing; Che, Yanchun; Jiang, Li; Pu, Jing; Guo, Lei; Feng, Min; Liang, Yan; Cui, Wei; Yang, Huai; Li, Qihan

    2015-11-17

    During the development of enterovirus 71 (EV71) inactivated vaccine for preventing human hand, foot and mouth diseases (HFMD) by EV71 infection, an effective animal model is presumed to be significant and necessary. Our previous study demonstrated that the vesicles in oral regions and limbs potentially associated with viremia, which are the typical manifestations of HFMD, and remarkable pathologic changes were identified in various tissues of neonatal rhesus macaque during EV71 infection. Although an immune response in terms of neutralizing antibody and T cell memory was observed in animals infected by the virus or stimulated by viral antigen, whether such a response could be considered as an indicator to justify the immune response in individuals vaccinated or infected in a pandemic needs to be investigated. Here, a comparative analysis of the neutralizing antibody response and IFN-γ-specific T cell response in vaccinated neonatal rhesus macaques and a human clinical trial with an EV71 inactivated vaccine was performed, and the results showed the identical tendency and increased level of neutralizing antibody and the IFN-γ-specific T cell response stimulated by the EV71 antigen peptide. Importantly, the clinical protective efficacy against virus infection by the elicited immune response in the immunized population compared with the placebo control and the up-modulated gene profile associated with immune activation were similar to those in infected macaques. Further safety verification of this vaccine in neonatal rhesus macaques and children confirmed the potential use of the macaque as a reliable model for the evaluation of an EV71 candidate vaccine. PMID:26419198

  16. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms reveal patterns of allele sharing across the species boundary between rhesus (Macaca mulatta) and cynomolgus (M. fascicularis) macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satkoski Trask, Jessica A; Garnica, Wendy T; Smith, David Glenn; Houghton, Paul; Lerche, Nicholas; Kanthaswamy, Sree

    2013-02-01

    Both phenotypic and genetic evidence for asymmetric hybridization between rhesus (Macaca mulatta) and cynomolgus (Macaca fascicularis) macaques has been observed in the region of Indochina where both species are sympatric. The large-scale sharing of major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II alleles between the two species in this region supports the hypothesis that genes, and especially genes involved in immune response, are being transferred across the species boundary. This differential introgression has important implications for the incorporation of cynomolgus macaques of unknown geographic origin in biomedical research protocols. Our study found that for 2,808 single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers, the minor allele frequencies (MAF) and observed heterozygosity calculated from a sample of Vietnamese cynomolgus macaques was significantly different from those calculated from samples of both Chinese rhesus and Indonesian cynomolgus macaques. SNP alleles from Chinese rhesus macaques were overrepresented in a sample of Vietnamese cynomolgus macaques relative to their Indonesian conspecifics and located in genes functionally related to the primary immune system. These results suggest that Indochinese cynomolgus macaques represent a genetically and immunologically distinct entity from Indonesian cynomolgus macaques. PMID:23165690

  17. Immune correlates of aging in outdoor-housed captive rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Didier Elizabeth S

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Questions remain about whether inflammation is a cause, consequence, or coincidence of aging. The purpose of this study was to define baseline immunological characteristics from blood to develop a model in rhesus macaques that could be used to address the relationship between inflammation and aging. Hematology, flow cytometry, clinical chemistry, and multiplex cytokine/chemokine analyses were performed on a group of 101 outdoor-housed captive rhesus macaques ranging from 2 to 24 years of age, approximately equivalent to 8 to 77 years of age in humans. Results These results extend earlier reports correlating changes in lymphocyte subpopulations and cytokines/chemokines with increasing age. There were significant declines in numbers of white blood cells (WBC overall, as well as lymphocytes, monocytes, and polymorphonuclear cells with increasing age. Among lymphocytes, there were no significant declines in NK cells and T cells, whereas B cell numbers exhibited significant declines with age. Within the T cell populations, there were significant declines in numbers of CD4+ naïve T cells and CD8+ naïve T cells. Conversely, numbers of CD4+CD8+ effector memory and CD8+effector memory T cells increased with age. New multiplex analyses revealed that concentrations of a panel of ten circulating cytokines/chemokines, IFNγ, IL1b, IL6, IL12, IL15, TNFα, MCP1, MIP1α, IL1ra, and IL4, each significantly correlated with age and also exhibited concordant pairwise correlations with every other factor within this group. To also control for outlier values, mean rank values of each of these cytokine concentrations in relation to age of each animal and these also correlated with age. Conclusions A panel of ten cytokines/chemokines were identified that correlated with aging and also with each other. This will permit selection of animals exhibiting relatively higher and lower inflammation status as a model to test mechanisms of inflammation

  18. Genetic studies on the Cayo Santiago rhesus macaques: A review of 40 years of research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widdig, Anja; Kessler, Matthew J; Bercovitch, Fred B; Berard, John D; Duggleby, Christine; Nürnberg, Peter; Rawlins, Richard G; Sauermann, Ulrike; Wang, Qian; Krawczak, Michael; Schmidtke, Jörg

    2016-01-01

    Genetic studies not only contribute substantially to our current understanding of the natural variation in behavior and health in many species, they also provide the basis of numerous in vivo models of human traits. Despite the many challenges posed by the high level of biological and social complexity, a long lifespan and difficult access in the field, genetic studies of primates are particularly rewarding because of the close evolutionary relatedness of these species to humans. The free-ranging rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) population on Cayo Santiago (CS), Puerto Rico, provides a unique resource in this respect because several of the abovementioned caveats are of either minor importance there, or lacking altogether, thereby allowing long-term genetic research in a primate population under constant surveillance since 1956. This review summarizes more than 40 years of genetic research carried out on CS, from early blood group typing and the genetic characterization of skeletal material via population-wide paternity testing with DNA fingerprints and short tandem repeats (STRs) to the analysis of the highly polymorphic DQB1 locus within the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The results of the paternity studies also facilitated subsequent studies of male dominance and other factors influencing male reproductive success, of male reproductive skew, paternal kin bias, and mechanisms of paternal kin recognition. More recently, the CS macaques have been the subjects of functional genetic and gene expression analyses and have played an important role in behavioral and quantitative genetic studies. In addition, the CS colony has been used as a natural model for human adult-onset macular degeneration, glaucoma, and circadian rhythm disorder. Our review finishes off with a discussion of potential future directions of research on CS, including the transition from STRs to single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) typing and whole genome sequencing. PMID:26031601

  19. Osmotic stress stimulates phosphorylation and cellular expression of heat shock proteins in rhesus macaque sperm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, Julie A; Meyers, Stuart A

    2011-01-01

    The cryosurvival of sperm requires cell signaling mechanisms to adapt to anisotonic conditions during the freezing and thawing process. Chaperone proteins heat shock protein 70 (HSP 70) and heat shock protein 90 (HSP 90; recently renamed HSPA and HSPC, respectively) facilitate some of these cell signaling events in somatic cells. Sperm were evaluated for their cellular expression and levels of phosphorylation of both HSP 70 and HSP 90 under anisotonic conditions as a potential model for cell signaling during the cryopreservation of macaque spermatozoa. In order to monitor the level of stress, the motility and viability parameters were evaluated at various time points. Cells were then either prepared for phosphoprotein enrichment or indirect immunocytochemistry. As controls, the phosphoserine, phosphothreonine, and phosphotyrosine levels were measured under capacitation and cryopreservation conditions and were compared with the phosphoprotein levels expressed under osmotic conditions. As expected, there was an increase in the level of tyrosine phosphorylation under capacitation and cryopreservation conditions. There was also a significant increase in the level of all phosphoproteins under hyperosmotic conditions. There was no change in the level of expression of HSP 70 or 90 under osmotic stress conditions as measured by Western blot. The enrichment of phosphoproteins followed by Western immunoblotting revealed an increase in the phosphorylation of HSP 70 but not HSP 90 under osmotic stress conditions. Indirect immunofluorescence localized HSP 70 to the postacrosomal region of sperm, and the level of membrane expression of HSP 70 was significantly affected by anisotonic conditions, as measured by flow cytometry. Taken together, these results suggest a differential role for HSP 70 and HSP 90 during osmotic stress conditions in rhesus macaque sperm. PMID:21088232

  20. Age-dependent changes in innate immune phenotype and function in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark Asquith

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Aged individuals are more susceptible to infections due to a general decline in immune function broadly referred to as immune senescence. While age-related changes in the adaptive immune system are well documented, aging of the innate immune system remains less well understood, particularly in nonhuman primates. A more robust understanding of age-related changes in innate immune function would provide mechanistic insight into the increased susceptibility of the elderly to infection. Rhesus macaques have proved a critical translational model for aging research, and present a unique opportunity to dissect age-dependent modulation of the innate immune system. We examined age-related changes in: (i innate immune cell frequencies; (ii expression of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs and innate signaling molecules; (iii cytokine responses of monocytes and dendritic cells (DC following stimulation with PRR agonists; and (iv plasma cytokine levels in this model. We found marked changes in both the phenotype and function of innate immune cells. This included an age-associated increased frequency of myeloid DC (mDC. Moreover, we found toll-like receptor (TLR agonists lipopolysaccharide (TLR4, fibroblast stimulating ligand-1 (TLR2/6, and ODN2006 (TLR7/9 induced reduced cytokine responses in aged mDC. Interestingly, with the exception of the monocyte-derived TNFα response to LPS, which increased with age, TNFα, IL-6, and IFNα responses declined with age. We also found that TLR4, TLR5, and innate negative regulator, sterile alpha and TIR motif containing protein (SARM, were all expressed at lower levels in young animals. By contrast, absent in melanoma 2 and retinoic acid-inducible gene I expression was lowest in aged animals. Together, these observations indicate that several parameters of innate immunity are significantly modulated by age and contribute to differential immune function in aged macaques.

  1. Age-dependent changes in innate immune phenotype and function in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asquith, Mark; Haberthur, Kristen; Brown, Monica; Engelmann, Flora; Murphy, Ashleigh; Al-Mahdi, Zainab; Messaoudi, Ilhem

    2012-01-01

    Aged individuals are more susceptible to infections due to a general decline in immune function broadly referred to as immune senescence. While age-related changes in the adaptive immune system are well documented, aging of the innate immune system remains less well understood, particularly in nonhuman primates. A more robust understanding of age-related changes in innate immune function would provide mechanistic insight into the increased susceptibility of the elderly to infection. Rhesus macaques have proved a critical translational model for aging research, and present a unique opportunity to dissect age-dependent modulation of the innate immune system. We examined age-related changes in: (i) innate immune cell frequencies; (ii) expression of pattern recognition receptors (PRRs) and innate signaling molecules; (iii) cytokine responses of monocytes and dendritic cells (DC) following stimulation with PRR agonists; and (iv) plasma cytokine levels in this model. We found marked changes in both the phenotype and function of innate immune cells. This included an age-associated increased frequency of myeloid DC (mDC). Moreover, we found toll-like receptor (TLR) agonists lipopolysaccharide (TLR4), fibroblast stimulating ligand-1 (TLR2/6), and ODN2006 (TLR7/9) induced reduced cytokine responses in aged mDC. Interestingly, with the exception of the monocyte-derived TNFα response to LPS, which increased with age, TNFα, IL-6, and IFNα responses declined with age. We also found that TLR4, TLR5, and innate negative regulator, sterile alpha and TIR motif containing protein (SARM), were all expressed at lower levels in young animals. By contrast, absent in melanoma 2 and retinoic acid-inducible gene I expression was lowest in aged animals. Together, these observations indicate that several parameters of innate immunity are significantly modulated by age and contribute to differential immune function in aged macaques. PMID:22953039

  2. Factors increasing snake detection and perceived threat in captive rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etting, Stephanie F; Isbell, Lynne A; Grote, Mark N

    2014-02-01

    The primary predators of primates are all ambush hunters, and yet felids, raptors, and snakes differ in aspects of their ecology that affect the evasive strategies of their primate prey. Felids and raptors can traverse long distances quickly, thus the urgency of threat they present increases as they come closer in proximity to primates. In contrast, snakes do not move rapidly over long distances, and so primates may be reasonably safe even at close distances provided snakes can be detected and monitored. We investigated the ability of captive rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) to detect snakes at distances ranging from 15 to 1.5 m. We also examined variation in intensity of perceived threat by applying a Hidden Markov Model to infer changes in underlying state from observable behaviors, that is, increased attention and mobbing. We found that the macaques often failed to detect snake models but that closer proximity improved snake detection, which is necessary before threat can be perceived. We also found that having only one individual in fairly close proximity (≤ 7.5 m) was sufficient to alert the rest of the group and so the chances of detection did not increase with increasing group size. Finally, we found that when the snakes were perceived, they did not elicit greater intensity of response with closer proximity. These results provide evidence that the threat from snakes is greatest when they are in proximity to primates but are unseen. When snakes are seen, however, distance appears not to affect primates' perceived risk, in contrast to their perceived risk from raptors and felids. PMID:24395649

  3. Personality dimensions in adult male rhesus macaques: prediction of behaviors across time and situation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capitanio, J P

    1999-01-01

    The idea that consistencies in behavior exist over time and across situations underlies human personality research. Although several studies have examined personality in nonhuman primates, there are very few data showing the predictive power of personality factors. The goal of the present study was to determine whether personality dimensions, identified in adult male rhesus monkeys living in half-acre cages, predicted behavior in situations different from the one from which the dimensions were originally derived and at time points of up to 4.5 years after the original assessments. Four personality dimensions (Sociability, Confidence, Excitability, and Equability) were identified using psychometric procedures and were correlated with behaviors recorded in several situations: the animals' natal groups, during tests of behavioral responsiveness while in individual cages, in small stable and unstable social groups, while viewing stimulus videotapes, and during stable social dyads. Results indicated substantial predictability. Sociability reflected a greater tendency to engage in affiliative interactions. Confidence correlated with more aggressive behaviors and with behaviors that suggest less attractiveness. Animals high in Excitability were somewhat inconsistent in their social behavior, perhaps reflecting hyper-responsiveness to novel circumstances and thwarted opportunities for escape. Equability appeared to be related to a less aggressive, more passive, style of interaction. Excitability and Equability appear to reflect more stylistic components of social behavior, whereas Sociability and Confidence may be more content-based dimensions. Sociability was strongly related to size of kin network in the animals' natal groups, suggesting an important role for ontogeny in this dimension. These data suggest that a limited number of personality dimensions exist in adult male rhesus macaques, and that these dimensions have predictive power that is both long-term and cross

  4. Association of TLR7 variants with AIDS-like disease and AIDS vaccine efficacy in rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roman A Siddiqui

    Full Text Available In HIV infection, TLR7-triggered IFN-α production exerts a direct antiviral effect through the inhibition of viral replication, but may also be involved in immune pathogenesis leading to AIDS. TLR7 could also be an important mediator of vaccine efficacy. In this study, we analyzed polymorphisms in the X-linked TLR7 gene in the rhesus macaque model of AIDS. Upon resequencing of the TLR7 gene in 36 rhesus macaques of Indian origin, 12 polymorphic sites were detected. Next, we identified three tightly linked single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP as being associated with survival time. Genotyping of 119 untreated, simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV-infected male rhesus macaques, including an 'MHC adjusted' subset, revealed that the three TLR7 SNPs are also significantly associated with set-point viral load. Surprisingly, this effect was not observed in 72 immunized SIV-infected male monkeys. We hypothesize (i that SNP c.13G>A in the leader peptide is causative for the observed genotype-phenotype association and that (ii the underlying mechanism is related to RNA secondary structure formation. Therefore, we investigated a fourth SNP (c.-17C>T, located 17 bp upstream of the ATG translation initiation codon, that is also potentially capable of influencing RNA structure. In c.13A carriers, neither set-point viral load nor survival time were related to the c.-17C>T genotype. In c.13G carriers, by contrast, the c.-17C allele was significantly associated with prolonged survival. Again, no such association was detected among immunized SIV-infected macaques. Our results highlight the dual role of TLR7 in immunodeficiency virus infection and vaccination and imply that it may be important to control human AIDS vaccine trials, not only for MHC genotype, but also for TLR7 genotype.

  5. Effects of extended-release injectable naltrexone on self-injurious behavior in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kempf, Doty J; Baker, Kate C; Gilbert, Margaret H; Blanchard, James L; Dean, Reginald L; Deaver, Daniel R; Bohm, Rudolf P

    2012-06-01

    Self-injurious behavior (SIB) is a spontaneous behavior that threatens the health and wellbeing of multiple species. In humans, the opioid antagonist naltrexone hydrochloride has been used successfully to modulate the endogenous opioid system and reduce the occurrence of SIB. This study is the first to assess the efficacy of extended-release naltrexone in the pharmacologic treatment of SIB in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). In an acute pharmacokinetic study of 4 macaques, we determined the mean naltrexone plasma concentration was maintained above the therapeutic level (2 ng/mL) after administration of a single dose (20 mg/kg) of 28-d extended-release naltrexone throughout the release period. For a subsequent treatment study, we selected 8 singly housed macaques known to engage in SIB. The study comprised a 4-wk baseline phase; an 8-wk treatment phase, during which each macaque received 2 doses of extended-release naltrexone 28 d apart; and a 4-wk posttreatment phase. Plasma samples were collected and analyzed weekly for naltrexone concentrations throughout the treatment and posttreatment phases. In addition, total of 6 h of video was analyzed per animal per phase of the study. Compared with baseline phases, both the frequency and the percentage of time spent displaying SIB decreased during the treatment phase, and the percentage of time remained decreased during the posttreatment phase. In contrast, extended-release naltrexone did not alter the expression of other abnormal, anxiety-related, or agonistic behaviors nor were levels of inactivity affected. The present study supports the use of naltrexone in the treatment of SIB in rhesus macaques. PMID:22776054

  6. Rhesus macaque brain morphometry: a methodological comparison of voxel-wise approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLaren, Donald G; Kosmatka, Kristopher J; Kastman, Erik K; Bendlin, Barbara B; Johnson, Sterling C

    2010-03-01

    Voxel-based morphometry studies have become increasingly common in human neuroimaging over the past several years; however, few studies have utilized this method to study morphometry changes in non-human primates. Here we describe the application of voxel-wise morphometry methods to the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) using the 112RM-SL template and priors (McLaren et al. (2009) [42]) and as an illustrative example we describe age-associated changes in grey matter morphometry. Specifically, we evaluated the unified segmentation routine implemented using Statistical Parametric Mapping (SPM) software and the FMRIB's Automated Segmentation Tool (FAST) in the FMRIB Software Library (FSL); the effect of varying the smoothing kernel; and the effect of the normalization routine. We found that when studying non-human primates, brain images need less smoothing than in human studies, 2-4mm FWHM. Using flow field deformations (DARTEL) improved inter-subject alignment leading to results that were more likely due to morphometry differences as opposed to registration differences. PMID:19883763

  7. Effects of Morphine on Behavioral Task Performance in SIV-Infected Rhesus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcario, Joanne K; Pendyala, Gurudutt; Riazi, Mariam; Fleming, Kandace; Marquis, Janet; Callen, Shannon; Lisco, Steven J; Fowler, Stephen C; Cheney, Paul D; Buch, Shilpa J

    2016-06-01

    The abuse of opiates such as morphine in synergy with HIV infection not only exacerbates neuropathogenesis but significantly impacts behavioral attributes in HIV infected subjects. Thus, the goal of the current study was to characterize behavioral perturbations in rhesus macaques subjected to chronic morphine and SIV infection. Specifically, we assessed three behavioral tasks: motor skill (MS), forelimb force (FFT) and progressive ratio (PR) tasks. After collecting baseline control data (44 weeks) and data during the morphine-only dependency period (26 weeks), a subset of animals were productively infected with neurovirulent strains of SIVmac (R71/E17) for an additional 33 weeks. A general pattern in the results is that behavioral decline occurred with high CSF viral loads but not necessarily with high plasma viral loads. Compared to saline controls, all treated animals showed significant decreases in performance on all three behavioral tasks during the morphine-only dependency period. During the post infection period, only the morphine plus SIV group showed a significant further decline and this only occurred for the MS task. Taken together, these data demonstrate a clear effect of morphine to produce behavioral deficits and also suggest that morphine can act synergistically with SIV/HIV to exacerbate behavioral deficits. PMID:27039332

  8. Training pair-housed Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) using a combination of negative and positive reinforcement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wergård, Eva-Marie; Temrin, Hans; Forkman, Björn; Spångberg, Mats; Fredlund, Hélène; Westlund, Karolina

    2015-04-01

    When training animals, time is sometimes a limiting factor hampering the use of positive reinforcement training (PRT) exclusively. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of a combination of negative and positive reinforcement training (NPRT). Twenty naïve female Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) were trained in 30 sessions with either PRT (n=8) or NPRT (n=12) to respond to a signal, move into a selected cage section and accept confinement. In the NPRT-group a signal preceded the presentation of one or several novel, and thus aversive, stimuli. When the correct behaviour was performed, the novel stimulus was removed and treats were given. As the animal learned to perform the correct behaviour, the use of novel stimuli was decreased and finally phased out completely. None of the PRT-trained animals finished the task. Ten out of 12 monkeys in the NPRT-group succeeded to perform the task within the 30 training sessions, a significant difference from the PRT-group (p=0.0007). A modified approach test showed no significant difference between the groups (p=0.67) in how they reacted to the trainer. The results from this study suggest that carefully conducted NPRT can be an alternative training method to consider, especially when under a time constraint. PMID:25555746

  9. Efficacy of 3 types of foraging enrichment for rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottlieb, Daniel H; Ghirardo, Stephanie; Minier, Darren E; Sharpe, Nicole; Tatum, Lindsay; McCowan, Brenda

    2011-11-01

    Primate facilities provide environmental enrichment to improve animal wellbeing, increase opportunities for expression of species-typical behaviors, and decrease the occurrence of stereotypic behaviors. The current study assessed the efficacy of 3 types of foraging enrichment: puzzle balls, supertubes, and shakers. We assigned 48 rhesus macaques to 3 experimental groups, each of which received (after a 3-wk baseline observation period) 1 of the 3 enrichment devices intermittently for 3 wk. Observations were collected during 10-min sessions by using 1-0 sampling with 15-s intervals (480 h total). Observations were collected at the same 10 specified time points each week during the baseline period and after enrichment. Data were analyzed by using generalized linear mixed-effects modeling under the assumption that the underlying response followed a Poisson distribution. Foraging behavior increased significantly in all 3 groups and remained increased in some groups when enrichment was removed after 43 h. The 3 enrichment devices had different effects on individual expression of stereotypy: supertubes decreased it, shakers increased it, and puzzle balls led to a decrease followed by an increase. We present potential reasons for the changes in stereotypy and postulate a likely balance between the beneficial and negative effects of enrichment in any given environment. PMID:22330782

  10. Natural History of Aerosol Exposure with Marburg Virus in Rhesus Macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewers, Evan C.; Pratt, William D.; Twenhafel, Nancy A.; Shamblin, Joshua; Donnelly, Ginger; Esham, Heather; Wlazlowski, Carly; Johnson, Joshua C.; Botto, Miriam; Hensley, Lisa E.; Goff, Arthur J.

    2016-01-01

    Marburg virus causes severe and often lethal viral disease in humans, and there are currently no Food and Drug Administration (FDA) approved medical countermeasures. The sporadic occurrence of Marburg outbreaks does not allow for evaluation of countermeasures in humans, so therapeutic and vaccine candidates can only be approved through the FDA animal rule—a mechanism requiring well-characterized animal models in which efficacy would be evaluated. Here, we describe a natural history study where rhesus macaques were surgically implanted with telemetry devices and central venous catheters prior to aerosol exposure with Marburg-Angola virus, enabling continuous physiologic monitoring and blood sampling without anesthesia. After a three to four day incubation period, all animals developed fever, viremia, and lymphopenia before developing tachycardia, tachypnea, elevated liver enzymes, decreased liver function, azotemia, elevated D-dimer levels and elevated pro-inflammatory cytokines suggesting a systemic inflammatory response with organ failure. The final, terminal period began with the onset of sustained hypotension, dehydration progressed with signs of major organ hypoperfusion (hyperlactatemia, acute kidney injury, hypothermia), and ended with euthanasia or death. The most significant pathologic findings were marked infection of the respiratory lymphoid tissue with destruction of the tracheobronchial and mediastinal lymph nodes, and severe diffuse infection in the liver, and splenitis. PMID:27043611

  11. Visual phenotype matching: cues to paternity are present in rhesus macaque faces.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anahita J N Kazem

    Full Text Available The ability to recognize kin and thus behaviourally discriminate between conspecifics based on genetic relatedness is of importance both in acquiring inclusive fitness benefits and to enable optimal inbreeding. In primates, mechanisms allowing recognition of paternal relatives are of particular interest, given that in these mating systems patrilineal information is unlikely to be available via social familiarity. Humans use visual phenotype matching based on facial features to identify their own and other's close relatives, and recent studies suggest similar abilities may be present in other species. However it is unclear to what extent familial resemblances remain detectable against the background levels of relatedness typically found within demes in the wild - a necessary condition if facial cues are to function in kin recognition under natural conditions. Here, we experimentally investigate whether parent-offspring relationships are discernible in rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta faces drawn from a large free-ranging population more representative of the latter scenario, and in which genetic relatedness has been well quantified from pedigrees determined via molecular markers. We used the human visual system as a means of integrating multiple types of facial cue simultaneously, and demonstrate that paternal, as well as maternal, resemblance to both sons and daughters can be detected even by human observers. Experts performed better than participants who lacked previous experience working with nonhuman primates. However the finding that even naïve individuals succeeded at the task underlines the strength of the phenotypic cues present in faces.

  12. Early Loss of Splenic Tfh Cells in SIV-Infected Rhesus Macaques.

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    Félicien Moukambi

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Follicular T helper cells (Tfh, a subset of CD4 T lymphocytes, provide crucial help to B cells in the production of antigen-specific antibodies. Although several studies have analyzed the dynamics of Tfh cells in peripheral blood and lymph nodes (LNs during Aids, none has yet addressed the impact of SIV infection on the dynamics of Tfh cells in the spleen, the primary organ of B cell activation. We show here a significant decrease in splenic Tfh cells in SIVmac251-infected rhesus macaques (RMs during the acute phase of infection, which persists thereafter. This profound loss is associated with lack of sustained expression of the Tfh-defining transcription factors, Bcl-6 and c-Maf but with higher expression of the repressors KLF2 and Foxo1. In this context of Tfh abortive differentiation and loss, we found decreased percentages of memory B cell subsets and lower titers of SIV-specific IgG. We further demonstrate a drastic remodeling of the lymphoid architecture of the spleen and LNs, which disrupts the crucial cell-cell interactions necessary to maintain memory B cells and Tfh cells. Finally, our data demonstrated the early infection of Tfh cells. Paradoxically, the frequencies of SIV DNA were higher in splenic Tfh cells of RMs progressing more slowly suggesting sanctuaries for SIV in the spleen. Our findings provide important information regarding the impact of HIV/SIV infection on Tfh cells, and provide new clues for future vaccine strategies.

  13. Testosterone increases circulating dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate levels in the male rhesus macaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HenrykUrbanski

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The adrenal steroid dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA and its sulfate (DHEAS are two of the most abundant hormones in the human circulation. Furthermore, they are released in a circadian pattern and show a marked age-associated decline. Adult levels of DHEA and DHEAS are significantly higher in males than in females, but the reason for this sexual dimorphism is unclear. In the present study, we administered supplementary androgens (DHEA, testosterone and 5α-dihydrotestosterone [DHT] to aged male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta. While this paradigm increased circulating DHEAS immediately after DHEA administration, an increase was also observed following either testosterone or DHT administration, resulting in hormonal profile resembling levels observed in young males in terms of both amplitude and circadian pattern. This stimulatory effect was limited to DHEAS, as an increase in circulating cortisol was not observed. Taken together, these data demonstrate an influence of the hypothalamo-pituitary-testicular axis on adrenal function in males, possibly by sensitizing the zona reticularis to the stimulating action of adrenocorticopic hormone. This represents a plausible mechanism to explain sex differences in circulating DHEA and DHEAS levels, and may have important implications in the development of hormone therapies designed for elderly men and women.

  14. Comparable Genital Tract Infection, Pathology, and Immunity in Rhesus Macaques Inoculated with Wild-Type or Plasmid-Deficient Chlamydia trachomatis Serovar D

    OpenAIRE

    Qu, Yanyan; Frazer, Lauren C.; O'Connell, Catherine M.; Tarantal, Alice F.; Andrews, Charles W.; O'Connor, Shelby L.; Russell, Ali N.; Sullivan, Jeanne E.; Poston, Taylor B.; Vallejo, Abbe N.; Darville, Toni

    2015-01-01

    Rhesus macaques were studied to directly address the potential for plasmid-deficient Chlamydia trachomatis to serve as a live attenuated vaccine in the genital tract. Five repeated cervical inoculations of rhesus macaques with wild-type serovar D strain D/UW-3/Cx or a plasmid-deficient derivative of this strain, CTD153, resulted in infections with similar kinetics and induced comparable levels of protective immunity. After all animals received five challenges with D/UW-3/Cx, levels of inflamm...

  15. Transduction of SIV-Specific TCR Genes into Rhesus Macaque CD8+ T Cells Conveys the Ability to Suppress SIV Replication

    OpenAIRE

    Barsov, Eugene V; Trivett, Matthew T.; Minang, Jacob T.; Sun, Haosi; Ohlen, Claes; Ott, David E.

    2011-01-01

    Background The SIV/rhesus macaque model for HIV/AIDS is a powerful system for examining the contribution of T cells in the control of AIDS viruses. To better our understanding of CD8+ T-cell control of SIV replication in CD4+ T cells, we asked whether TCRs isolated from rhesus macaque CD8+ T-cell clones that exhibited varying abilities to suppress SIV replication could convey their suppressive properties to CD8+ T cells obtained from an uninfected/unvaccinated animal. Principal Findings We tr...

  16. Simian hemorrhagic fever virus infection of rhesus macaques as a model of viral hemorrhagic fever: Clinical characterization and risk factors for severe disease

    OpenAIRE

    Johnson, Reed F.; Dodd, Lori; Yellayi, Srikanth; Gu, Wenjuan; Cann, Jennifer A.; Jett, Catherine; Bernbaum, John G.; Ragland, Dan R.; Claire, Marisa St.; Byrum, Russell; Paragas, Jason; Blaney, Joseph E.; Jahrling, Peter B

    2011-01-01

    Simian Hemorrhagic Fever Virus (SHFV) has caused sporadic outbreaks of hemorrhagic fevers in macaques at primate research facilities. SHFV is a BSL-2 pathogen that has not been linked to human disease; as such, investigation of SHFV pathogenesis in non-human primates (NHPs) could serve as a model for hemorrhagic fever viruses such as Ebola, Marburg, and Lassa viruses. Here we describe the pathogenesis of SHFV in rhesus macaques inoculated with doses ranging from 50 PFU to 500,000 PFU. Disease...

  17. The effects of an ActRIIb receptor Fc fusion protein ligand trap in juvenile simian immunodeficiency virus-infected rhesus macaques

    OpenAIRE

    O’Connell, Karyn E.; Guo, Wen; Serra, Carlo; Beck, Matthew; Wachtman, Lynn; Hoggatt, Amber; Xia, Dongling; Pearson, Chris; Knight, Heather; O’Connell, Micheal; Andrew D. Miller; Westmoreland, Susan V.; Bhasin, Shalender

    2014-01-01

    There are no approved therapies for muscle wasting in children infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which portends poor disease outcomes. To determine whether a soluble ActRIIb receptor Fc fusion protein (ActRIIB.Fc), a ligand trap for TGF-β/activin family members including myostatin, can prevent or restore loss of lean body mass and body weight in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected juvenile rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Fourteen pair-housed, juvenile male rhesus ma...

  18. Pathological findings and diagnostic implications of a rhesus macaque (Macacca mulatta) model of aerosol exposure to Burkholderia mallei (glanders).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yingst, Samuel L; Facemire, Paul; Chuvala, Lara; Norwood, David; Wolcott, Mark; Huzella, Louis

    2015-06-01

    Burkholderia mallei is a Gram-negative bacillus that causes a pneumonic disease known as glanders in equids and humans, and a lymphatic infection known as farcy, primarily in equids. With the potential to infect humans by the respiratory route, aerosol exposure can result in severe, occasionally fatal, pneumonia. Today, glanders infections in humans are rare, likely due to less frequent contact with infected equids than in the past. Acutely ill humans often have non-specific clinical signs and in order to diagnose cases, especially in scenarios of multiple cases in an unexpected setting, rapid diagnostics for B. mallei may be critical. The pathogenesis of acute glanders in the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) was studied as an initial effort to improve diagnostic methods. In the study described here, the diagnostic techniques of PCR, culture and histopathology were compared. The results indicated that PCR may provide rapid, non-invasive diagnosis of glanders in some cases. As expected, PCR results were positive in lung tissue in 11/12 acutely infected rhesus macaques, but more importantly in terms of diagnostic algorithm development, PCR results were frequently positive in non-invasive samples such as broncho-alveolar lavage or nasal swabs (7/12) and occasionally in blood (3/12). However, conventional bacterial culture failed to recover bacteria in many of these samples. The study showed that the clinical presentation of aerosol-exposed rhesus macaques is similar to descriptions of human glanders and that PCR has potential for rapid diagnosis of outbreaks, if not individual cases. PMID:25850696

  19. Truncated forms of human and simian immunodeficiency virus in infected individuals and rhesus macaques are unique or rare quasispecies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Truncated proviruses of variable sizes are present in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected persons and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected rhesus macaques. Here, we investigated whether the highly deleted HIV and SIV proviruses are present in infected organisms as multiple copies or whether each truncated provirus is unique. Using end-point dilution, multiple long-distance (LD) DNA PCR assays were run in parallel using DNA extracted from PBMC of seropositive, treatment-naive persons and from lymph nodes of a rhesus monkey inoculated with cloned, full-length SIVmac239 DNA. The PCR products were titrated and mapped. Most truncated proviruses were present in the DNA samples tested as single, nonintegrated molecules that differed from one another in size and/or nucleotide sequence. These results indicate that truncated primate lentiviral sequences found in infected tissues are unique or rare quasispecies that do not replicate significantly

  20. Phenotypic and Functional Characterization of Monoclonal Antibodies with Specificity for Rhesus Macaque CD200, CD200R and Mincle

    OpenAIRE

    Byrareddy, Siddappa N.; Little, Dawn; Mayne, Ann E.; Villinger, Francois; Aftab A. Ansari

    2015-01-01

    Lectin-like molecules and their receptors are cell surface molecules that have been shown to play a role in either facilitating infection or serving as transporters of HIV/SIV in vivo. The role of these lectin-like molecules in the pathogenesis of HIV/SIV infection continues to be defined. In efforts to gain further insight on the potential role of these lectin-like molecules, our laboratory generated monoclonal antibodies (mAb) against the human analogs of rhesus macaque CD200, CD200R and Mi...

  1. Expression Analysis of Taste Signal Transduction Molecules in the Fungiform and Circumvallate Papillae of the Rhesus Macaque, Macaca mulatta

    OpenAIRE

    Ishimaru, Yoshiro; Abe, Miki; Asakura, Tomiko; IMAI, HIROO; Abe, Keiko

    2012-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms of the mammalian gustatory system have been examined in many studies using rodents as model organisms. In this study, we examined the mRNA expression of molecules involved in taste signal transduction in the fungiform papillae (FuP) and circumvallate papillae (CvP) of the rhesus macaque, Macaca mulatta, using in situ hybridization. TAS1R1, TAS1R2, TAS2Rs, and PKD1L3 were exclusively expressed in different subsets of taste receptor cells (TRCs) in the FuP and CvP. This...

  2. Comparison of the effects of ketamine and fentanyl-midazolam-medetomidine for sedation of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Bertrand, Henri G. M. J.; Ellen, Yvette C.; O’Keefe, Stevie; Flecknell, Paul A.

    2016-01-01

    Background This study assessed the effects of sedation using a combination of fentanyl, midazolam and medetomidine in comparison to ketamine. Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta), (n = 16, 5 males and 3 females randomly allocated to each treatment group) received either ketamine (KET) (10 mg.kg−1) or fentanyl-midazolam-medetomidine (FMM) (10 μg/kg−1; 0.5 mg.kg−1; 20 μg.kg−1) both IM. Oxygen (100 %) was provided by mask and heart rate, blood pressure, respiratory rate, EtCO2 and depth of sedation ...

  3. Medicinal management of corneal opacity in free ranging rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta of Shivalik hills in Western Himalayas, Northern India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. Kumar

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Corneal opacification was diagnosed in 17 free ranging rhesus macaques during detailed ophthalmic examination as a part of clinical health examination, at the monkey rescue sterilization centre in Hamirpur Himachal Pradesh, India. The cornea was completely opaque permitting only a little vision with respect to the affected eye. Medical management with topical ciprofloxacin and prednisolone along with ketoprofen and vitamin A was instituted. The corneal lesions subsided completely within one week following treatment. The treatment protocol successfully eliminated the discomfort and intraocular lesions with no serious subsequent irritation due to the treatment in these animals.

  4. Cercopithecine Herpesvirus 9 (Simian Varicella Virus) Infection after Total-Body Irradiation in a Rhesus Macaque (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gulani, Jatinder; Koch, Amory; Chappell, Mark G; Christensen, Christine L; Facemire, Paul; Singh, Vijay K; Ossetrova, Natalia I; Srinivasan, Venkataraman; Holt, Rebecca K

    2016-01-01

    This case report describes a rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta; male; age, 5 y; weight, 6.7 kg) with anorexia, dehydration, lethargy, ataxia, and generalized skin rashes that occurred 30 d after total-body irradiation at 6.5 Gy ((60)Co γ-rays). Physical examination revealed pale mucus membranes, a capillary refill time of 4 s, heart rate of 180 bpm. and respirations at 50 breaths per minute. Diffuse multifocal maculopapulovesicular rashes were present on the body, including mucocutaneous junctions. The CBC analysis revealed a Hct of 48%, RBC count of 6.2 × 10(6)/μL, platelet count of 44 × 10(3)/μL, and WBC count of 25 × 10(3)/μL of WBC. The macaque was euthanized in light of a grave prognosis. Gross examination revealed white foci on the liver, multifocal generalized petechiation on serosal and mucosal surfaces of the gastrointestinal tract, hemorrhagic lymph nodes, and hemorrhagic fluid in the thoracic cavity. Microscopic examination revealed cutaneous vesicular lesions with intranuclear eosinophilic viral inclusions within the epithelial cells, consistent with herpesvirus. Immunohistochemistry was positive for herpesvirus. The serum sample was negative for antibodies against Macacine herpesvirus 1 and Cercopithecine herpesvirus 9 (simian varicella virus, SVV). Samples submitted for PCR-based identification of the etiologic agent confirmed the presence of SVV DNA. PCR analysis, immunohistochemistry, and histology confirmed that lesions were attributed to an active SVV infection in this macaque. This case illustrates the importance of screening for SVV in rhesus macaques, especially those used in studies that involve immunosuppressive procedures. PMID:27053570

  5. Chronic periadolescent alcohol consumption produces persistent cognitive deficits in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wright, M Jerry; Taffe, Michael A

    2014-11-01

    Although human alcoholics exhibit lasting cognitive deficits, it can be difficult to definitively rule out pre-alcohol performance differences. For example, individuals with a family history of alcoholism are at increased risk for alcoholism and are also behaviorally impaired. Animal models of controlled alcohol exposure permit balanced group assignment, thereby ruling out the effects of pre-existing differences. Periadolescent male rhesus macaques (N = 5) consumed alcohol during 200 drinking sessions (M-F) across a 10-month period (mean daily alcohol consumption: 1.38 g/kg/day). A control group (N = 5) consumed a fruit-flavored vehicle during the same period. Spatial working memory, visual discrimination learning and retention and response time behavioral domains were assessed with subtests of the Monkey CANTAB (CAmbridge Neuropsychological Test Automated Battery). Spatial working memory performance was impaired in the alcohol group after 120 drinking sessions (6 mo) in a manner that depended on retention interval. The chronic alcohol animals were also impaired in retaining a visual discrimination over 24 hrs when assessed 6-8 weeks after cessation of alcohol drinking. Finally, the presentation of distractors in the response time task impaired the response time and accuracy of the chronic alcohol group more than controls after 6 months of alcohol cessation. Chronic alcohol consumption over as little as 6 months produces cognitive deficits, with some domains still affected after acute (6-8 wks) and lasting (6 mo) discontinuation from drinking. Animals were matched on alcohol preference and behavioral performance prior to exposure, thus providing strong evidence for the causal role of chronic alcohol in these deficits. PMID:25018042

  6. Th1-skewed tissue responses to a mycolyl glycolipid in mycobacteria-infected rhesus macaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Glucose monomycolate (GMM) is a marker glycolipid for active tuberculosis. •Tissue responses to GMM involved up-regulation of Th1-attracting chemokines. •Th1-skewed local responses were mounted at the GMM-injected tissue. -- Abstract: Trehalose 6,6′-dimycolate (TDM) is a major glycolipid of the cell wall of mycobacteria with remarkable adjuvant functions. To avoid detection by the host innate immune system, invading mycobacteria down-regulate the expression of TDM by utilizing host-derived glucose as a competitive substrate for their mycolyltransferases; however, this enzymatic reaction results in the concomitant biosynthesis of glucose monomycolate (GMM) which is recognized by the acquired immune system. GMM-specific, CD1-restricted T cell responses have been detected in the peripheral blood of infected human subjects and monkeys as well as in secondary lymphoid organs of small animals, such as guinea pigs and human CD1-transgenic mice. Nevertheless, it remains to be determined how tissues respond at the site where GMM is produced. Here we found that rhesus macaques vaccinated with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette–Guerin mounted a chemokine response in GMM-challenged skin that was favorable for recruiting T helper (Th)1 T cells. Indeed, the expression of interferon-γ, but not Th2 or Th17 cytokines, was prominent in the GMM-injected tissue. The GMM-elicited tissue response was also associated with the expression of monocyte/macrophage-attracting CC chemokines, such as CCL2, CCL4 and CCL8. Furthermore, the skin response to GMM involved the up-regulated expression of granulysin and perforin. Given that GMM is produced primarily by pathogenic mycobacteria proliferating within the host, the Th1-skewed tissue response to GMM may function efficiently at the site of infection

  7. Demographic variability and density-dependent dynamics of a free-ranging rhesus macaque population

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Pacheco, Raisa; Rawlins, Richard G.; Kessler, Matthew J.; Williams, Lawrence E.; Ruiz-Maldonado, Tagrid M.; González-Martínez, Janis; Ruiz-Lambides, Angelina V.; Sabat, Alberto M.

    2014-01-01

    Density-dependence is hypothesized as the major mechanism of population regulation. However, the lack of long-term demographic data has hampered the use of density-dependent models in nonhuman primates. In this study, we make use of the long-term demographic data from Cayo Santiago’s rhesus macaques to parameterize and analyze both a density-independent and a density-dependent population matrix model, and compare their projections with the observed population changes. We also employ a retrospective analysis to determine how variance in vital rates, and covariance among them, contributed to the observed variation in long-term fitness across different levels of population density. The population exhibited negative density-dependence in fertility and the model incorporating this relationship accounted for 98% of the observed population dynamics. Variation in survival and fertility of sexually active individuals contributed the most to the variation in long-term fitness, while vital rates displaying high temporal variability exhibited lower sensitivities. Our findings are novel in describing density-dependent dynamics in a provisioned primate population, and in suggesting that selection is acting to lower the variance in the population growth rate by minimizing the variation in adult survival at high density. Because density-dependent mechanisms may become stronger in wild primate populations due to increasing habitat loss and food scarcity, our study demonstrates it is important to incorporate variation in population size, as well as demographic variability into population viability analyses for a better understanding of the mechanisms regulating the growth of primate populations. PMID:23847126

  8. Transcriptome Profiling Reveals Disruption of Innate Immunity in Chronic Heavy Ethanol Consuming Female Rhesus Macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sureshchandra, Suhas; Rais, Maham; Stull, Cara; Grant, Kathleen; Messaoudi, Ilhem

    2016-01-01

    It is well established that heavy ethanol consumption interferes with the immune system and inflammatory processes, resulting in increased risk for infectious and chronic diseases. However, these processes have yet to be systematically studied in a dose and sex-dependent manner. In this study, we investigated the impact of chronic heavy ethanol consumption on gene expression using RNA-seq in peripheral blood mononuclear cells isolated from female rhesus macaques with daily consumption of 4% ethanol available 22hr/day for 12 months resulting in average ethanol consumption of 4.3 g/kg/day (considered heavy drinking). Differential gene expression analysis was performed using edgeR and gene enrichment analysis using MetaCore™. We identified 1106 differentially expressed genes, meeting the criterion of ≥ two-fold change and p-value ≤ 0.05 in expression (445 up- and 661 down-regulated). Pathway analysis of the 879 genes with characterized identifiers showed that the most enriched gene ontology processes were “response to wounding”, “blood coagulation”, “immune system process”, and “regulation of signaling”. Changes in gene expression were seen despite the lack of differences in the frequency of any major immune cell subtype between ethanol and controls, suggesting that heavy ethanol consumption modulates gene expression at the cellular level rather than altering the distribution of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Collectively, these observations provide mechanisms to explain the higher incidence of infection, delay in wound healing, and increase in cardiovascular disease seen in subjects with Alcohol use disorder. PMID:27427759

  9. Elderly Female Rhesus Macaques Preserve Lung Alveoli With Estrogen/Progesterone Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herring, Matt J; Avdalovic, Mark V; Lasley, Bill; Putney, Lei F; Hyde, Dallas M

    2016-07-01

    The aging lung is associated with increased susceptibility to chronic inflammatory diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease where females have been reported to be more susceptible than males. The changes in reproductive hormones due to aging may directly or indirectly affect lung structure and function and little is known on the mechanism of these changes. Twenty female rhesus macaques were divided into four groups. Ovariectomy (OVX) was performed on eight animals with three receiving estrogen/progesterone therapy (HRT) and five animals given implants containing vehicle. The remaining 12 animals represented control groups of ages 10-14 years (n = 6) and ages 20-24 (n = 6). A design-based stereological method was employed to estimate the number of alveoli in the right middle lung lobe along with hormone analysis for possible correlation. A significant decrease was found in the number of alveoli in the vehicle OVX animals compared to intact younger adult females (P alveoli between OVX vehicle animals and those on HRT was also found (P alveoli between younger adult animals and animals on HRT. The loss of ovaries and hormones had a significant effect on alveolar lung morphology. This result mimics what is seen in the aging process and could contribute to gender differences reported in the elderly. Hormone replacement, as reported here, could possibly slow the loss of alveoli due to the aging process or aid in alveolar regeneration through direct or indirect mechanisms. Anat Rec, 299:973-978, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27084043

  10. Effect of IL-7 Therapy on Naive and Memory T Cell Homeostasis in Aged Rhesus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okoye, Afam A; Rohankhedkar, Mukta; Konfe, Audrie L; Abana, Chike O; Reyes, Matthew D; Clock, Joseph A; Duell, Derick M; Sylwester, Andrew W; Sammader, Partha; Legasse, Alfred W; Park, Byung S; Axthelm, Michael K; Nikolich-Žugich, Janko; Picker, Louis J

    2015-11-01

    Aging is associated with gradual deterioration of adaptive immune function, a hallmark of which is the profound loss of naive T cells (TN) associated with decline in thymic output and export of new cells into the peripheral T cell pool. Because the lymphotropic cytokine IL-7 plays crucial roles in both development of TN in the thymus and TN homeostasis in the periphery, we sought to determine the extent to which therapeutic administration of IL-7 could reverse TN deficiency in aging rhesus macaques (RM), either by enhancement of the demonstrably reduced thymopoiesis or by peripheral TN expansion. Our results indicate that treatment of both adult (8-15 y) and old (>20 y) RM with recombinant simian IL-7 (rsIL-7) results in only transient increases in peripheral CD4(+) and CD8(+) TN numbers with no long-term benefit, even with repeated therapy. This transient effect was due to peripheral TN expansion and not enhanced thymic function, and appeared to be limited by induction of IL-7 nonresponsiveness. However, rsIL-7 therapy had a more promising effect on the central memory T cell (TCM) population (both CD4(+) and CD8(+)) in adult and old RM, doubling the numbers of these cells in circulation and maintaining this larger population long term. IL-7 therapy did not reduce TCR diversity of the memory T cell compartment, suggesting that rsIL-7-induced expansion was symmetrical. Thus, although rsIL-7 failed to counter age-associated TN loss, the ability of this therapy to expand clonotypically diverse CD4(+) and CD8(+) TCM populations might potentially improve adaptive immune responsiveness in the elderly. PMID:26416281

  11. Th1-skewed tissue responses to a mycolyl glycolipid in mycobacteria-infected rhesus macaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morita, Daisuke; Miyamoto, Ayumi; Hattori, Yuki; Komori, Takaya [Laboratory of Cell Regulation, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, 53 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Nakamura, Takashi [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita 12 Nishi 6, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812 (Japan); Igarashi, Tatsuhiko, E-mail: tigarash@virus.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Primate Model, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, 53 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan); Harashima, Hideyoshi, E-mail: harasima@pharm.hokudai.ac.jp [Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Hokkaido University, Kita 12 Nishi 6, Kita-ku, Sapporo, Hokkaido 060-0812 (Japan); Sugita, Masahiko, E-mail: msugita@virus.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Laboratory of Cell Regulation, Institute for Virus Research, Kyoto University, 53 Kawahara-cho, Shogoin, Sakyo-ku, Kyoto 606-8507 (Japan)

    2013-11-08

    Highlights: •Glucose monomycolate (GMM) is a marker glycolipid for active tuberculosis. •Tissue responses to GMM involved up-regulation of Th1-attracting chemokines. •Th1-skewed local responses were mounted at the GMM-injected tissue. -- Abstract: Trehalose 6,6′-dimycolate (TDM) is a major glycolipid of the cell wall of mycobacteria with remarkable adjuvant functions. To avoid detection by the host innate immune system, invading mycobacteria down-regulate the expression of TDM by utilizing host-derived glucose as a competitive substrate for their mycolyltransferases; however, this enzymatic reaction results in the concomitant biosynthesis of glucose monomycolate (GMM) which is recognized by the acquired immune system. GMM-specific, CD1-restricted T cell responses have been detected in the peripheral blood of infected human subjects and monkeys as well as in secondary lymphoid organs of small animals, such as guinea pigs and human CD1-transgenic mice. Nevertheless, it remains to be determined how tissues respond at the site where GMM is produced. Here we found that rhesus macaques vaccinated with Mycobacterium bovis bacillus Calmette–Guerin mounted a chemokine response in GMM-challenged skin that was favorable for recruiting T helper (Th)1 T cells. Indeed, the expression of interferon-γ, but not Th2 or Th17 cytokines, was prominent in the GMM-injected tissue. The GMM-elicited tissue response was also associated with the expression of monocyte/macrophage-attracting CC chemokines, such as CCL2, CCL4 and CCL8. Furthermore, the skin response to GMM involved the up-regulated expression of granulysin and perforin. Given that GMM is produced primarily by pathogenic mycobacteria proliferating within the host, the Th1-skewed tissue response to GMM may function efficiently at the site of infection.

  12. Electrostatic potential of human immunodeficiency virus type 2 and rhesus macaque simian immunodeficiency virus capsid proteins

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna eBozek

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Human immunodeficiency virus type 2 (HIV-2 and simian immunodeficiency virus isolated from a macaque monkey (SIVmac are assumed to have originated from simian immunodeficiency virus isolated from sooty mangabey (SIVsm. Despite their close similarity in genome structure, HIV-2 and SIVmac show different sensitivities to TRIM5α, a host restriction factor against retroviruses. The replication of HIV-2 strains is potently restricted by rhesus (Rh monkey TRIM5α, while that of SIVmac strain 239 (SIVmac239 is not. Viral capsid protein is the determinant of this differential sensitivity to TRIM5α, as the HIV-2 mutant carrying SIVmac239 capsid protein evaded Rh TRIM5α-mediated restriction. However, the molecular determinants of this restriction mechanism are unknown. Electrostatic potential on the protein-binding site is one of the properties regulating protein-protein interactions. In this study, we investigated the electrostatic potential on the interaction surface of capsid protein of HIV-2 strain GH123 and SIVmac239. Although HIV-2 GH123 and SIVmac239 capsid proteins share more than 87% amino acid identity, we observed a large difference between the two molecules with the HIV-2 GH123 molecule having predominantly positive and SIVmac239 predominantly negative electrostatic potential on the surface of the loop between α-helices 4 and 5 (L4/5. As L4/5 is one of the major determinants of Rh TRIM5α sensitivity of these viruses, the present results suggest that the binding site of the Rh TRIM5α may show complementarity to the HIV-2 GH123 capsid surface charge distribution.

  13. Complex assembly, crystallization and preliminary X-ray crystallographic studies of rhesus macaque MHC Mamu-A*01 complexed with an immunodominant SIV-Gag nonapeptide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Crystallization of the first rhesus macaque MHC class I complex. Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in rhesus macaques has been used as the best model for the study of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in humans, especially in the cytotoxic T-lymphocyte (CTL) response. However, the structure of rhesus macaque (or any other monkey model) major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) presenting a specific peptide (the ligand for CTL) has not yet been elucidated. Here, using in vitro refolding, the preparation of the complex of the rhesus macaque MHC I allele (Mamu-A*01) with human β2m and an immunodominant peptide, CTPYDINQM (Gag-CM9), derived from SIV Gag protein is reported. The complex (45 kDa) was crystallized; the crystal belongs to space group I422, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 183.8, c = 155.2 Å. The crystal contains two molecules in the asymmetric unit and diffracts X-rays to 2.8 Å resolution. The structure is being solved by molecular replacement and this is the first attempt to determined the crystal structure of a peptide–nonhuman primate MHC complex

  14. The effects of an ActRIIb receptor Fc fusion protein ligand trap in juvenile simian immunodeficiency virus-infected rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Connell, Karyn E; Guo, Wen; Serra, Carlo; Beck, Matthew; Wachtman, Lynn; Hoggatt, Amber; Xia, Dongling; Pearson, Chris; Knight, Heather; O'Connell, Micheal; Miller, Andrew D; Westmoreland, Susan V; Bhasin, Shalender

    2015-04-01

    There are no approved therapies for muscle wasting in children infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), which portends poor disease outcomes. To determine whether a soluble ActRIIb receptor Fc fusion protein (ActRIIB.Fc), a ligand trap for TGF-β/activin family members including myostatin, can prevent or restore loss of lean body mass and body weight in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected juvenile rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Fourteen pair-housed, juvenile male rhesus macaques were inoculated with SIVmac239 and, 4 wk postinoculation (WPI) treated with intramuscular injections of 10 mg ⋅ kg(-1) ⋅ wk(-1) ActRIIB.Fc or saline placebo. Body weight, lean body mass, SIV titers, and somatometric measurements were assessed monthly for 16 wk. Age-matched SIV-infected rhesus macaques were injected with saline. Intervention groups did not differ at baseline. Gains in lean mass were significantly greater in the ActRIIB.Fc group than in the placebo group (P fat mass in juvenile SIV-infected rhesus macaques. PMID:25466897

  15. Simian varicella virus infection of rhesus macaques recapitulates essential features of varicella zoster virus infection in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilhem Messaoudi

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Simian varicella virus (SVV, the etiologic agent of naturally occurring varicella in primates, is genetically and antigenically closely related to human varicella zoster virus (VZV. Early attempts to develop a model of VZV pathogenesis and latency in nonhuman primates (NHP resulted in persistent infection. More recent models successfully produced latency; however, only a minority of monkeys became viremic and seroconverted. Thus, previous NHP models were not ideally suited to analyze the immune response to SVV during acute infection and the transition to latency. Here, we show for the first time that intrabronchial inoculation of rhesus macaques with SVV closely mimics naturally occurring varicella (chickenpox in humans. Infected monkeys developed varicella and viremia that resolved 21 days after infection. Months later, viral DNA was detected only in ganglia and not in non-ganglionic tissues. Like VZV latency in human ganglia, transcripts corresponding to SVV ORFs 21, 62, 63 and 66, but not ORF 40, were detected by RT-PCR. In addition, as described for VZV, SVV ORF 63 protein was detected in the cytoplasm of neurons in latently infected monkey ganglia by immunohistochemistry. We also present the first in depth analysis of the immune response to SVV. Infected animals produced a strong humoral and cell-mediated immune response to SVV, as assessed by immunohistology, serology and flow cytometry. Intrabronchial inoculation of rhesus macaques with SVV provides a novel model to analyze viral and immunological mechanisms of VZV latency and reactivation.

  16. Emergence and evolution of inter-specific segregating retrocopies in cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) and rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xu; Zhang, Qu; Su, Bing

    2016-01-01

    Retroposition is an RNA-mediated mechanism to generate gene duplication, and is believed to play an important role in genome evolution and phenotypic adaptation in various species including primates. Previous studies suggested an elevated rate of recent retroposition in the rhesus macaque genome. To better understand the impact of retroposition on macaque species which have undergone an adaptive radiation approximately 3–6 million years ago, we developed a bioinformatics pipeline to identify recently derived retrocopies in cynomolgus monkeys. As a result, we identified seven experimentally validated young retrocopies, all of which are polymorphic in cynomolgus monkeys. Unexpectedly, five of them are also present in rhesus monkeys and are still segregating. Molecular evolutionary analysis indicates that the observed inter-specific polymorphism is attribute to ancestral polymorphism. Further population genetics analysis provided strong evidence of balancing selection on at least one case (Crab-eating monkey retrocopy 6, or CER6) in both species. CER6 is in adjacent with an immunoglobulin related gene and may be involved in host-pathogen interaction, a well-known target of balancing selection. Altogether, our data support that retroposition is an important force to shape genome evolution and species adaptation. PMID:27600022

  17. Detection of Neospora from tissues of experimentally infected rhesus macaques by PCR and specific DNA probe hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, M S; Barr, B C; Tarantal, A F; Lai, L T; Hendrickx, A G; Marsh, A E; Sverlow, K W; Packham, A E; Conrad, P A

    1997-07-01

    Neospora is a newly recognized Toxoplasma-like cyst-forming coccidian parasite that causes abortion or congenital infections in naturally or experimentally infected animals. In this study, pregnant rhesus macaques were inoculated with culture-derived tachyzoites of a bovine Neospora isolate, and tissue samples from various major organs were collected from dams and fetuses for the detection of parasite DNA by using oligonucleotide primers COC-1 and COC-2 for PCR amplification of a conserved coccidial nuclear small-subunit rRNA gene sequence, and amplification products were confirmed by hybridization with a Neospora-specific DNA probe. PCR products were amplified from DNAs of different fetal monkey tissues, including brain, heart, lung, liver, spleen, skeletal muscle, skin, and placenta. In addition, Neospora DNA was amplified from the brain, heart, and lung tissues of infected rhesus macaque dams. The PCR and probe hybridization system may provide an effective method for the detection of Neospora infection in fetuses and dams from nonhuman primates and may be useful in determining the zoonotic potential of Neospora. PMID:9196184

  18. Vaccine Induction of Lymph Node-Resident Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Env-Specific T Follicular Helper Cells in Rhesus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Inchaustegui, Diego A; Demers, Andrew; Shaw, Julia M; Kang, Guobin; Ball, David; Tuero, Iskra; Musich, Thomas; Mohanram, Venkatramanan; Demberg, Thorsten; Karpova, Tatiana S; Li, Qingsheng; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2016-02-15

    Measurement of Ag-specific T follicular helper (TFH) cell activity in rhesus macaques has not previously been reported. Given that rhesus macaques are the animal model of choice for evaluating protective efficacy of HIV/SIV vaccine candidates and that TFH cells play a pivotal role in aiding B cell maturation, quantifying vaccine induction of HIV/SIV-specific TFH cells would greatly benefit vaccine development. In this study, we quantified SIV Env-specific IL-21-producing TFH cells for the first time, to our knowledge, in a nonhuman primate vaccine study. Macaques were primed twice mucosally with adenovirus 5 host range mutant recombinants encoding SIV Env, Rev, Gag, and Nef followed by two i.m. boosts with monomeric SIV gp120 or oligomeric SIV gp140 proteins. At 2 wk after the second protein boost, we obtained lymph node biopsy specimens and quantified the frequency of total and SIV Env-specific IL-21(+) TFH cells and total germinal center B cells, the size and number of germinal centers, and the frequency of SIV-specific Ab-secreting cells in B cell zones. Multiple correlation analyses established the importance of TFH for development of B cell responses in systemic and mucosally localized compartments, including blood, bone marrow, and rectum. Our results suggest that the SIV-specific TFH cells, initially induced by replicating adenovirus-recombinant priming, are long lived. The multiple correlations of SIV Env-specific TFH cells with systemic and mucosal SIV-specific B cell responses indicate that this cell population should be further investigated in HIV vaccine development as a novel correlate of immunity. PMID:26773147

  19. Mucosal transmissibility, disease induction and coreceptor switching of R5 SHIVSF162P3N molecular clones in rhesus macaques

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    Ren Wuze

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mucosally transmissible and pathogenic CCR5 (R5-tropic simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV molecular clones are useful reagents to identity neutralization escape in HIV-1 vaccine experiments and to study the envelope evolutionary process and mechanistic basis for coreceptor switch during the course of natural infection. Results We observed progression to AIDS in rhesus macaques infected intrarectally with molecular clones of the pathogenic R5 SHIVSF162P3N isolate. Expansion to CXCR4 usage was documented in one diseased macaque that mounted a neutralizing antibody response and in another that failed to do so, with the latter displaying a rapid progressor phenotype. V3 loop envelop glycoprotein gp120 sequence changes that are predictive of a CXCR4 (X4-using phenotype in HIV-1 subtype B primary isolates, specifically basic amino acid substations at positions 11 (S11R, 24 (G24R and 25 (D25K of the loop were detected in the two infected macaques. Functional assays showed that envelopes with V3 S11R or D25K mutation were dual-tropic, infecting CD4+ target cells that expressed either the CCR5 or CXCR4 coreceptor. And, consistent with findings of coreceptor switching in macaques infected with the pathogenic isolate, CXCR4-using variant was first detected in the lymph node of the chronically infected rhesus monkey several weeks prior to its presence in peripheral blood. Moreover, X4 emergence in this macaque coincided with persistent peripheral CD4+ T cell loss and a decline in neutralizing antibody titer that are suggestive of immune deterioration, with macrophages as the major virus-producing cells at the end-stage of disease. Conclusions The data showed that molecular clones derived from the R5 SHIVSF162P3N isolate are mucosally transmissible and induced disease in a manner similar to that observed in HIV-1 infected individuals, providing a relevant and useful animal infection model for in-depth analyses of host selection

  20. Copy number variation of CCL3-like genes affects rate of progression to simian-AIDS in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta.

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    Jeremiah D Degenhardt

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Variation in genes underlying host immunity can lead to marked differences in susceptibility to HIV infection among humans. Despite heavy reliance on non-human primates as models for HIV/AIDS, little is known about which host factors are shared and which are unique to a given primate lineage. Here, we investigate whether copy number variation (CNV at CCL3-like genes (CCL3L, a key genetic host factor for HIV/AIDS susceptibility and cell-mediated immune response in humans, is also a determinant of time until onset of simian-AIDS in rhesus macaques. Using a retrospective study of 57 rhesus macaques experimentally infected with SIVmac, we find that CCL3L CNV explains approximately 18% of the variance in time to simian-AIDS (p<0.001 with lower CCL3L copy number associating with more rapid disease course. We also find that CCL3L copy number varies significantly (p<10(-6 among rhesus subpopulations, with Indian-origin macaques having, on average, half as many CCL3L gene copies as Chinese-origin macaques. Lastly, we confirm that CCL3L shows variable copy number in humans and chimpanzees and report on CCL3L CNV within and among three additional primate species. On the basis of our findings we suggest that (1 the difference in population level copy number may explain previously reported observations of longer post-infection survivorship of Chinese-origin rhesus macaques, (2 stratification by CCL3L copy number in rhesus SIV vaccine trials will increase power and reduce noise due to non-vaccine-related differences in survival, and (3 CCL3L CNV is an ancestral component of the primate immune response and, therefore, copy number variation has not been driven by HIV or SIV per se.

  1. Correction of Refractive Errors in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) Involved in Visual Research

    OpenAIRE

    Mitchell, Jude F.; Boisvert, Chantal J; Reuter, Jon D.; Reynolds, John H.; Leblanc, Mathias

    2014-01-01

    Macaques are the most common animal model for studies in vision research, and due to their high value as research subjects, often continue to participate in studies well into old age. As is true in humans, visual acuity in macaques is susceptible to refractive errors. Here we report a case study in which an aged macaque demonstrated clear impairment in visual acuity according to performance on a demanding behavioral task. Refraction demonstrated bilateral myopia that significantly affected be...

  2. Effect of human feeding on the road mortality of Rhesus Macaques on National Highway - 7 routed along Pench Tiger Reserve, Madhya Pradesh, India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Pragatheesh

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available In Hindu mythology, Hanuman is worshipped as the monkey god and therefore there is a great reverence for macaques all across the country. Hindu devotees consider it their sacred duty to feed macaques along road, temples, parks and other public areas. Unfortunately, such food provisioning alters the habitat, food choice and behaviour of macaques. We studied the impact of feeding by humans on Rhesus Macaque Macaca mulatta feeding behaviour, distribution and also assessed the increased risk of accidents in the 11km road stretch of National Highway passing through Kanha-Pench corridor, from August 2009 to July 2010. Seasonal changes in macaque distribution and group sizes were assessed based on foot and vehicle transects. The numbers of road kills were monitored in early morning and late evening hours for different seasons. Five groups of macaques were occupying a minimum of 1.1 to a maximum of 1.7km stretch, together covering about 7.3km of road. Group size varied significantly in relation to the availability of food on the road. During the study, 54 macaques succumbed to road accidents. Maximum roadkill occurred during summer because of the greater inflow of tourists. Unless concerted efforts are made to increase awareness among people of the hazards of road-side feeding, incidences of macaque mortality are likely to increase.

  3. Induction of neutralizing antibodies in rhesus macaques using V3 mimotope peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hessell, Ann J; McBurney, Sean; Pandey, Shilpi; Sutton, William; Liu, Lily; Li, Liuzhe; Totrov, Maxim; Zolla-Pazner, Susan; Haigwood, Nancy L; Gorny, Miroslaw K

    2016-05-23

    RV144 vaccinees with low HIV-1 Envelope-specific IgA antibodies (Abs) also had Abs directed to the hypervariable region 3 (V3) that inversely correlated with infection risk. Thus, anti-V3 HIV-1 Abs may contribute to protection from HIV-1 infection. The V3 region contains two dominant clusters of epitopes; one is preferentially recognized by mAbs encoded by VH5-51 and VL lambda genes, while the second one is recognized by mAbs encoded by other VH genes. We designed a study in rhesus macaques to induce anti-V3 Abs specific to each of these two dominant clusters of V3 epitopes to test whether the usage of the VH5-51 gene results in different characteristics of antibodies. The two C4-V3 immunogens used for immunization were each comprised of a fusion of the C4 peptide containing the T cell epitope and a V3 mimotope peptide mimicking the V3 epitope. The C4-447 peptide was designed to target B cells with several VH1-VH4 genes, the C4-VH5-51 peptide was designed to specifically target B cells with the VH5-51 gene. Six animals in two groups were immunized five times with these two immunogens, and screening of 10 sequential plasma samples post immunization demonstrated that C4-447 induced higher titers of plasma anti-V3 Abs and significantly more potent neutralizing activities against tier 1 and some tier 2 pseudoviruses than C4-VH5-51. Levels of anti-V3 Abs in buccal secretions were significantly higher in sequential samples derived from C4-447- than from C4-VH5-51-immunized animals. The titers of anti-V3 Abs in plasma strongly correlated with their levels in mucosal secretions. The results show that high titers of vaccine-induced anti-V3 Abs in plasma determine the potency and breadth of neutralization, as well as the rate of transduction of Abs to mucosal tissues, where they can play a role in preventing HIV-1 infection. PMID:27102818

  4. Functional analysis of frequently expressed Chinese rhesus macaque MHC class I molecules Mamu-A1*02601 and Mamu-B*08301 reveals HLA-A2 and HLA-A3 supertypic specificities

    OpenAIRE

    Southwood, Scott; Solomon, Christopher; Hoof, Ilka; Rudersdorf, Richard; Sidney, John; Peters, Bjoern; Wahl, Angela; Hawkins, Oriana; Hildebrand, William; Mothé, Bianca R.; Sette, Alessandro

    2011-01-01

    The Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected Indian rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) is the most established model of HIV infection and AIDS-related research, despite the potential that macaques of Chinese origin is a more relevant model. Ongoing efforts to further characterize the Chinese rhesus macaques’ major histocompatibility complex (MHC) for composition and function should facilitate greater utilization of the species. Previous studies have demonstrated that Chinese-origin M. mulatt...

  5. Characterization of Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) That Induces SIV Encephalitis in Rhesus Macaques with High Frequency: Role of TRIM5 and Major Histocompatibility Complex Genotypes and Early Entry to the Brain

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuda, Kenta; Dang, Que; Brown, Charles R.; Keele, Brandon F.; Wu, Fan; Ourmanov, Ilnour; Goeken, Robert; Whitted, Sonya; Riddick, Nadeene E.; Buckler-White, Alicia; Hirsch, Vanessa M.

    2014-01-01

    Although nonhuman primate models of neuro-AIDS have made tremendous contributions to our understanding of disease progression in the central nervous system (CNS) of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1)-infected individuals, each model holds advantages and limitations. In this study, in vivo passage of SIVsmE543 was conducted to obtain a viral isolate that can induce neuropathology in rhesus macaques. After a series of four in vivo passages in rhesus macaques, we have successfully isola...

  6. Genetic diversity and differentiation of the rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) population in western Sichuan, China, based on the second exon of the major histocompatibility complex class II DQB (MhcMamu-DQB1) alleles

    OpenAIRE

    Yao, Yong-Fang; Dai, Qiu-Xia; Li, Jing; Ni, Qing-Yong; Zhang, Ming-Wang; Xu, Huai-Liang

    2014-01-01

    Abstracts Background Rhesus macaques living in western Sichuan, China, have been separated into several isolated populations due to habitat fragmentation. Previous studies based on the neutral or nearly neutral markers (mitochondrial DNA or microsatellites) showed high levels of genetic diversity and moderate genetic differentiation in the Sichuan rhesus macaques. Variation at the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) loci is widely accepted as being maintained by balancing selection, even w...

  7. Limited impact of passive non-neutralizing antibody immunization in acute SIV infection on viremia control in rhesus macaques.

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    Taku Nakane

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Antiviral antibodies, especially those with neutralizing activity against the incoming strain, are potentially important immunological effectors to control human immunodeficiency virus (HIV infection. While neutralizing activity appears to be central in sterile protection against HIV infection, the entity of inhibitory mechanisms via HIV and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV-specific antibodies remains elusive. The recent HIV vaccine trial RV144 and studies in nonhuman primate models have indicated controversial protective efficacy of HIV/SIV-specific non-neutralizing binding antibodies (non-NAbs. While reports on HIV-specific non-NAbs have demonstrated virus inhibitory activity in vitro, whether non-NAbs could also alter the pathogenic course of established SIV replication in vivo, likewise via neutralizing antibody (NAb administration, has been unclear. Here, we performed post-infection passive immunization of SIV-infected rhesus macaques with polyclonal SIV-specific, antibody-dependent cell-mediated viral inhibition (ADCVI-competent non-NAbs. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Ten lots of polyclonal immunoglobulin G (IgG were prepared from plasma of ten chronically SIVmac239-infected, NAb-negative rhesus macaques, respectively. Their binding capacity to whole SIVmac239 virions showed a propensity similar to ADCVI activity. A cocktail of three non-NAb lots showing high virion-binding capacity and ADCVI activity was administered to rhesus macaques at day 7 post-SIVmac239 challenge. This resulted in an infection course comparable with control animals, with no significant difference in set point plasma viral loads or immune parameters. CONCLUSIONS: Despite virus-specific suppressive activity of the non-NAbs having been observed in vitro, their passive immunization post-infection did not result in SIV control in vivo. Virion binding and ADCVI activity with lack of virus neutralizing activity were indicated to be insufficient for antibody

  8. Enhanced Th1/Th17 Functions of CD161+ CD8+ T Cells in Mucosal Tissues of Rhesus Macaques.

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    Namita Rout

    Full Text Available Expression of the C-type lectin-like receptor CD161 by human T cells is associated with type-17 responses, which play critical regulatory roles in immunity and inflammation at mucosal sites. However, the functions of CD161-expressing T cells in macaques, the pre-clinical model of several human diseases, remain unknown. This study examined the phenotypic and functional characteristics of CD161+ T cells in peripheral blood, mucosal tissues and lymph nodes of rhesus macaques. Majority of CD161-expressing T cells in peripheral blood and lung/intestinal mucosal tissues of rhesus macaques were found to be CD8+CD4- in phenotype. There was a significant enrichment of CD161+CD8+ T cells in the lungs and colonic mucosa (16.1%±6.6 and 16.8%±5.7 in comparison to peripheral blood (4.2%±1.2 and mesenteric lymph nodes (1.3%±0.8. Regardless of the tissue compartment, CD161+CD8+ T cells mainly comprised of γδ T cells and TCR Vα7.2+ MAIT cells (up to 80%, and displayed Th1 and Th17 cytokine responses to mitogen stimulation. Mucosal CD161+CD8+ T cells were characterized by very high expression of CD69, a recent activation marker that is preferentially expressed on tissue resident cells. Furthermore, lung and colonic mucosal CD161+CD8+ T cells showed enhanced IFN-γ, IL-17, and Perforin production in comparison to those in blood. Thus, macaque CD161+CD8+ T cells represent mucosal tissue-homing innate-like CD8+ T-cell populations with Th1/Th17 type cytokine and cytotoxic effector functions that can potentially enhance the recruitment of adaptive immune cells and control initial pathogen burden/dissemination in tissues. Analysis of their role in early immune responses to mucosal pathogens will be valuable in the design of vaccines and therapeutics.

  9. Detecting lineage-specific adaptive evolution of brain-expressed genes in human using rhesus macaque as outgroup

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yu, Xiao-Jing; Zheng, Hong-Kun; Wang, Jun;

    2006-01-01

    Comparative genetic analysis between human and chimpanzee may detect genetic divergences responsible for human-specific characteristics. Previous studies have identified a series of genes that potentially underwent Darwinian positive selection during human evolution. However, without a closely...... related species as outgroup, it is difficult to identify human-lineage-specific changes, which is critical in delineating the biological uniqueness of humans. In this study, we conducted phylogeny-based analyses of 2633 human brain-expressed genes using rhesus macaque as the outgroup. We identified 47...... candidate genes showing strong evidence of positive selection in the human lineage. Genes with maximal expression in the brain showed a higher evolutionary rate in human than in chimpanzee. We observed that many immune-defense-related genes were under strong positive selection, and this trend was more...

  10. In situ hybridization of hepatitis C virus RNA in liver cells of an experimentally infected rhesus macaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selma Majerowicz

    2004-10-01

    Full Text Available The liver tissue of a rhesus macaque inoculated with hepatitis C virus (HCV has been analyzed for the presence of HCV RNA using the technique of in situ hybridization, both at light and electron microscopy levels. The animal was inoculated by the intrasplenic route using a HCV infected autogenic hepatocyte transplant. The serum sample used to infect the hepatocyte cells was characterized by polymerase chain reaction technique and shown to be positive for HCV RNA, genotype 3 with 10(7 RNA copies/ml. In situ hybridization was performed using a complementary negative strand probe made with the specific primer. We were able to detect and localize viral RNA in altered membranes of the rough endoplasmic reticulum of infected liver cells, showing evidence of virus replication in vivo.

  11. The Hematopoietic Syndrome of the Acute Radiation Syndrome in Rhesus Macaques: A Systematic Review of the Lethal Dose Response Relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacVittie, Thomas J; Farese, Ann M; Jackson, William

    2015-11-01

    Well characterized animal models that mimic the human response to potentially lethal doses of radiation are required to assess the efficacy of medical countermeasures under the criteria of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration "animal rule." Development of a model requires the determination of the radiation dose response relationship and time course of mortality and morbidity across the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome. The nonhuman primate, rhesus macaque, is a relevant animal model that may be used to determine the efficacy of medical countermeasures to mitigate major signs of morbidity and mortality at selected lethal doses of total body irradiation. A systematic review of relevant studies that determined the dose response relationship for the hematopoietic acute radiation syndrome in the rhesus macaque relative to radiation quality, dose rate, and exposure uniformity has never been performed. The selection of data cohorts was made from the following sources: Ovid Medline (1957-present), PubMed (1954-present), AGRICOLA (1976-present), Web of Science (1954-present), and U.S. HHS REPORT (2002 to present). The following terms were used: Rhesus, total body-irradiation, total body x irradiation, TBI, irradiation, gamma radiation, hematopoiesis, LD50/60, Macaca mulatta, whole-body irradiation, nonhuman primate, NHP, monkey, primates, hematopoietic radiation syndrome, mortality, and nuclear radiation. The reference lists of all studies, published and unpublished, were reviewed for additional studies. The total number of hits across all search sites was 3,001. There were a number of referenced, unpublished, non-peer reviewed government reports that were unavailable for review. Fifteen studies, 11 primary (n = 863) and four secondary (n = 153) studies [n = 1,016 total nonhuman primates (NHP), rhesus Macaca mulatta] were evaluated to provide an informative and consistent review. The dose response relationships (DRRs) were determined for uniform or non-uniform total

  12. Immune targeting of PD-1hi expressing cells during and after antiretroviral therapy in SIV-infected rhesus macaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    High-level T cell expression of PD-1 during SIV infection is correlated with impaired proliferation and function. We evaluated the phenotype and distribution of T cells and Tregs during antiretroviral therapy plus PD-1 modulation (using a B7-DC-Ig fusion protein) and post-ART. Chronically SIV-infected rhesus macaques received: 11 weeks of ART (Group A); 11 weeks of ART plus B7-DC-Ig (Group B); 11 weeks of ART plus B7-DC-Ig, then 12 weeks of B7-DC-Ig alone (Group C). Continuous B7-DC-Ig treatment (Group C) decreased rebound viremia post-ART compared to pre-ART levels, associated with decreased PD-1hi expressing T cells and Tregs in PBMCs, and PD-1hi Tregs in lymph nodes. It transiently decreased expression of Ki67 and α4β7 in PBMC CD4+ and CD8+ Tregs for up to 8 weeks post-ART and maintained Ag-specific T-cell responses at low levels. Continued immune modulation targeting PD-1hi cells during and post-ART helps maintain lower viremia, keeps a favorable T cell/Treg repertoire and modulates antigen-specific responses. - Highlights: • B7-DC-Ig modulates PD-1hi cells in SIV-infected rhesus macaques during and post-ART. • Continued PD-1 modulation post-ART maintains PD-1hi cells at low levels. • Continued PD-1 modulation post-ART maintains a favorable T cell and Treg repertoire

  13. Effects of reproductive condition and dominance rank on cortisol responsiveness to stress in free-ranging female rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffman, Christy L; Ayala, James E; Mas-Rivera, Adaris; Maestripieri, Dario

    2010-06-01

    The hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis modulates individuals' physiological responses to social stress, which is an inevitable aspect of the daily lives of group-living animals. Previous nonhuman primate studies have reported that sex, age, rank, and reproductive condition influence cortisol levels under stressful conditions. In this study we investigated cortisol responses to stress among 70 multiparous, free-ranging female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) on the island of Cayo Santiago, PR. Plasma cortisol samples were collected in two consecutive years under similar conditions. Twenty-two females were sampled both years, and most of those females were lactating in only one of the years. Individual differences in cortisol levels were stable across years, even though reproductive condition changed for most individuals. No relationship was found between age or social rank and cortisol levels. Of the females that changed reproductive conditions, cortisol levels were higher when they were lactating than when they were cycling, and the amount of change in cortisol from cycling to lactating was greatest for low-ranking individuals. Heightened reactivity to stress during lactation may be the result of concerns about infant safety, and such concerns may be higher among low-ranking mothers than among higher ranking mothers. Psychosocial stress and hyperactivation of the HPA axis during lactation can suppress immune function and increase vulnerability to infectious diseases, thus explaining why adult females in the free-ranging rhesus macaque population on Cayo Santiago have a higher probability of mortality during the birth season than during the mating season. PMID:20039328

  14. Cloning and characterization of equine CD89 and identification of the CD89 gene in chimpanzees and rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, H Craig; Pleass, Richard J; Storset, Anne K; Brandtzaeg, Per; Woof, Jenny M

    2005-05-01

    Immunoglobulin A (IgA) is the major antibody class present in external secretions of mammals. At the vulnerable mucosal surfaces, IgA provides a crucial first-line defence by neutralizing pathogens. Primates also have a substantial level of IgA in serum and although not well understood, the biological role of this IgA depends, at least partly, on its ability to interact with specific receptors (FcalphaRs) on the surface of leucocytes. The human FcalphaR, CD89, was the first IgA Fc receptor to be identified and binding of IgA-coated particles to CD89 triggers numerous cellular effector functions, including phagocytosis, antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity, and release of inflammatory mediators, all of which may play an important role in both systemic and mucosal immunity. For many years humans were the only species known to express CD89, however, it has recently been cloned from cows and rats. Here, we describe the identification of the CD89 gene in three additional species: horses, chimpanzees, and Rhesus macaques. Equine CD89 was identified at the cDNA level, whereas the chimpanzee and Rhesus macaque genes were identified from the available draft genomic sequence. Interestingly, when compared with humans and other primates, horses, cows and rats have a relatively low concentration of serum IgA, so the role of CD89 in these species is of particular interest. The identification and characterization of CD89 in different species will contribute to a greater understanding of the biological role of IgA and CD89 in mucosal and systemic immunity throughout evolution. PMID:15819699

  15. Immune targeting of PD-1{sup hi} expressing cells during and after antiretroviral therapy in SIV-infected rhesus macaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vargas-Inchaustegui, Diego A.; Xiao, Peng; Hogg, Alison E.; Demberg, Thorsten; McKinnon, Katherine [Vaccine Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Venzon, David [Biostatistics and Data Management Section, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Brocca-Cofano, Egidio; DiPasquale, Janet [Vaccine Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Lee, Eun M.; Hudacik, Lauren; Pal, Ranajit [Advanced Bioscience Laboratories Inc., Rockville, MD 20850 (United States); Sui, Yongjun; Berzofsky, Jay A. [Vaccine Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States); Liu, Linda; Langermann, Solomon [Amplimmune Inc., Gaithersburg, MD 20878 (United States); Robert-Guroff, Marjorie, E-mail: guroffm@mail.nih.gov [Vaccine Branch, National Cancer Institute, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 20892 (United States)

    2013-12-15

    High-level T cell expression of PD-1 during SIV infection is correlated with impaired proliferation and function. We evaluated the phenotype and distribution of T cells and Tregs during antiretroviral therapy plus PD-1 modulation (using a B7-DC-Ig fusion protein) and post-ART. Chronically SIV-infected rhesus macaques received: 11 weeks of ART (Group A); 11 weeks of ART plus B7-DC-Ig (Group B); 11 weeks of ART plus B7-DC-Ig, then 12 weeks of B7-DC-Ig alone (Group C). Continuous B7-DC-Ig treatment (Group C) decreased rebound viremia post-ART compared to pre-ART levels, associated with decreased PD-1{sup hi} expressing T cells and Tregs in PBMCs, and PD-1{sup hi} Tregs in lymph nodes. It transiently decreased expression of Ki67 and α{sub 4}β{sub 7} in PBMC CD4{sup +} and CD8{sup +} Tregs for up to 8 weeks post-ART and maintained Ag-specific T-cell responses at low levels. Continued immune modulation targeting PD-1{sup hi} cells during and post-ART helps maintain lower viremia, keeps a favorable T cell/Treg repertoire and modulates antigen-specific responses. - Highlights: • B7-DC-Ig modulates PD-1{sup hi} cells in SIV-infected rhesus macaques during and post-ART. • Continued PD-1 modulation post-ART maintains PD-1{sup hi} cells at low levels. • Continued PD-1 modulation post-ART maintains a favorable T cell and Treg repertoire.

  16. Parvalbumin increases in the medial and lateral geniculate nuclei of aged rhesus macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Daniel T.; Engle, James R.; Recanzone, Gregg H.

    2013-01-01

    Subcortical auditory structures in the macaque auditory system increase their densities of neurons expressing the calcium binding protein parvalbumin (PV) with age. However, it is unknown whether these increases occur in the thalamic division of the auditory system, the medial geniculate nucleus (MGN). Furthermore, it is also unclear whether these age-related changes are specific to the macaque auditory system or are generalized to other sensory systems. To address these questions, the PV ...

  17. Low dose rectal inoculation of rhesus macaques by SIV smE660 or SIVmac251 recapitulates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hraber, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Giorgi, Elena E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Keele, Brandon [UNIV OF ALABAMA; Li, Hui [UNIV OF ALABAMA; Learn, Gerald [UNIV OF ALABAMA

    2008-01-01

    We recently developed a novel strategy to identify transmitted HIV-1 genomes in acutely infected humans using single-genome amplification and a model of random virus evolution. Here, we used this approach to determine the molecular features of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) transmission in 18 experimentally infected Indian rhesus macaques. Animals were inoculated intrarectally (i.r.) or intravenously (i.v.) with stocks of SIVmac251 or SIVsmE660 that exhibited sequence diversity typical of early-chronic HIV-1 infection. 987 full-length SIV env sequences (median of 48 per animal) were determined from plasma virion RNA 1--5 wk after infection. i.r. inoculation was followed by productive infection by one or a few viruses (median 1; range 1--5) that diversified randomly with near starlike phylogeny and a Poisson distribution of mutations. Consensus viral sequences from ramp-up and peak viremia were identical to viruses found in the inocula or differed from them by only one or a few nucleotides, providing direct evidence that early plasma viral sequences coalesce to transmitted/founder viruses. i.v. infection was >2,000-fold more efficient than i.r. infection, and viruses transmitted by either route represented the full genetic spectra of the inocula. These findings identify key similarities in mucosal transmission and early diversification between SIV and HIV-1, and thus validate the SIV-macaque mucosal infection model for HIV-1 vaccine and microbicide research.

  18. Accelerated structural decrements in the aging female rhesus macaque lung compared with males

    OpenAIRE

    Herring, Matt J.; Avdalovic, Mark V.; Quesenberry, Cheryl L.; Putney, Lei F.; Tyler, Nancy K.; Ventimiglia, Frank F.; St. George, Judith A.; Hyde, Dallas M.

    2012-01-01

    Aging is associated with morphometric changes in the lung that lead to decreased lung function. The nonhuman primate lung has been shown to have similar architectural, morphological, and developmental patterns to that of humans. We hypothesized that the lungs of rhesus monkeys age in a pattern similar to human lungs. Thirty-four rhesus monkeys from the California National Primate Research Center were euthanized, necropsied, and the whole lungs sampled. Stereological analysis was performed to ...

  19. Early involvement in friendships predicts later plasma concentrations of oxytocin and vasopressin in juvenile rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamara Aliza Rachel Weinstein

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The neuropeptides oxytocin (OT and vasopressin (AVP are involved in social bonding in attachment relationships, but their role in friendship is poorly understood. We investigated whether rhesus macaques’ (Macaca mulatta friendships at age one predicted plasma OT and AVP at two later time points. Subjects were 54 rhesus macaques at the California National Primate Research Center. Blood was drawn during a brief capture-and-release in the home cage, and plasma assayed for OT and AVP using an enzyme immunoassay. Separate linear mixed models for each sex tested the effects of dominance rank, age, sampling time point, housing condition, parturition status, two blood draw timing measures, and five friendship types: proximity friendships, play friendships, reciprocal friendships (a preference for a peer that also preferred the subject, multiplex friendships (friendships displayed in more than one behavioral domain, and total number of friendships. Females’ number of reciprocal and play friendships at age one significantly predicted later OT; additionally, these two friendship types interacted with rank, such that high-ranking females with the fewest friendships had the highest OT concentrations. Friendship did not predict later OT levels in males, however proximity, play, reciprocal, and total number of friendships predicted males’ plasma AVP. Play and total number of friendships also tended to predict AVP in females. Our results show that peripheral measures of neuroendocrine functioning in juvenile rhesus monkeys are influenced by early involvement in friendships. Friendships have an especially strong impact on an individual’s psychosocial development, and our data suggest OT and AVP as potential underlying mechanisms. Moreover, sex differences in the functioning of the OT and AVP systems, and their relation to friendship, may have important clinical implications for the use of OT as a therapeutic, as well as informing the social context in

  20. Blocking of α4β7 Gut-Homing Integrin during Acute Infection Leads to Decreased Plasma and Gastrointestinal Tissue Viral Loads in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Aftab A. Ansari; Reimann, Keith A.; Mayne, Ann E.; Takahashi, Yoshiaki; Stephenson, Susan T.; Wang, Rijian; Wang, Xinyue; Li, JiChu; Price, Andrew A.; Little, Dawn M.; Zaidi, Mohammad; Lyles, Robert; Villinger, Francois

    2010-01-01

    Intravenous administration of a novel recombinant rhesus mAb against the α4β7 gut-homing integrin (mAb) into rhesus macaques just prior to and during acute SIV infection resulted in significant decrease in plasma and gastrointestinal (GI) tissue viral load and a marked reduction in GI tissue proviral DNA load as compared with control SIV-infected rhesus macaques. This mAb administration was associated with increases in peripheral blood naive and central memory CD4+ T cells and maintenance of ...

  1. Gene expression of Lactobacillus plantarum and the commensal microbiota in the ileum of healthy and early SIV-infected rhesus macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golomb, Benjamin L.; Hirao, Lauren A.; Dandekar, Satya; Marco, Maria L.

    2016-01-01

    Chronic HIV infection results in impairment of gut-associated lymphoid tissue leading to systemic immune activation. We previously showed that in early SIV-infected rhesus macaques intestinal dysfunction is initiated with the induction of the IL-1β pathway in the small intestine and reversed by treatment with an exogenous Lactobacillus plantarum strain. Here, we provide evidence that the transcriptomes of L. plantarum and ileal microbiota are not altered shortly after SIV infection. L. plantarum adapts to the small intestine by expressing genes required for tolerating oxidative stress, modifying cell surface composition, and consumption of host glycans. The ileal microbiota of L. plantarum-containing healthy and SIV+ rhesus macaques also transcribed genes for host glycan metabolism as well as for cobalamin biosynthesis. Expression of these pathways by bacteria were proposed but not previously demonstrated in the mammalian small intestine. PMID:27102350

  2. Gene expression of Lactobacillus plantarum and the commensal microbiota in the ileum of healthy and early SIV-infected rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golomb, Benjamin L; Hirao, Lauren A; Dandekar, Satya; Marco, Maria L

    2016-01-01

    Chronic HIV infection results in impairment of gut-associated lymphoid tissue leading to systemic immune activation. We previously showed that in early SIV-infected rhesus macaques intestinal dysfunction is initiated with the induction of the IL-1β pathway in the small intestine and reversed by treatment with an exogenous Lactobacillus plantarum strain. Here, we provide evidence that the transcriptomes of L. plantarum and ileal microbiota are not altered shortly after SIV infection. L. plantarum adapts to the small intestine by expressing genes required for tolerating oxidative stress, modifying cell surface composition, and consumption of host glycans. The ileal microbiota of L. plantarum-containing healthy and SIV+ rhesus macaques also transcribed genes for host glycan metabolism as well as for cobalamin biosynthesis. Expression of these pathways by bacteria were proposed but not previously demonstrated in the mammalian small intestine. PMID:27102350

  3. Construction of Soluble Mamu-B*1703, a Class I Major Histocompatibility Complex of Chinese Rhesus Macaques, Monomer and Tetramer Loaded with a Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Peptide

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dongyun Ouyang; Xiaoying Wang; Xianhui He; Lihui Xu; Huanjing Shi; Qi Gao; He Guo

    2009-01-01

    Chinese-descent rhesus macaques have become more prevalent for HIV infection and vaccine investigation than Indian-origin macaques. Most of the currently available data and reagents such as major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I tetramers, however, were derived from Indian-origin macaques due to the dominant use of these animals in history. Although there are significant differences in the immunogenetic background between the two macaque populations, they share a few of common MHC class I alleles. We reported in this study the procedure for preparation of a soluble Mamu-B*1703 (a MHC class I molecule of Chinese macaques) monomer and tetramer loaded with a dominant simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) epitope IW9 (IRYPKTFGW) that was identified to be Mamu-B*1701-restricted in Indian macaques. The DNA fragment encoding the Mamu-B*1703 extracellular domain fused with a BirA substrate peptide (BSP) was amplified from a previously cloned cDNA and inserted into a prokaratic expression vector. In the presence of the antigenic peptide IW9 and light chain ?2-microglobulin, the expressed heavy chain was refolded into a soluble monomer. After biotinylation, four monomers were polymerized as a tetramer by phycoerythrin-conjugated streptavidin. The tetramer, having been confirmed to have the right conformation, was a potential tool for investigation of antigen-specific CD8+ T-lymphocytes in SIV vaccine models of Chinese macaques. And our results also suggested that some antigenic peptides reported in Indian-origin macaques could be directly recruited as ligands for construction of Chinese macaque MHC tetramers. Cellular & Molecular Immunology.

  4. Decreased Frequency of Cytomegalovirus (CMV)-Specific CD4+ T Lymphocytes in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Rhesus Macaques: Inverse Relationship with CMV Viremia

    OpenAIRE

    Kaur, Amitinder; Hale, Corrina L.; Noren, Bradley; Kassis, Nadine; Simon, Meredith A.; Johnson, R. Paul

    2002-01-01

    The frequency of cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific CD4+ T lymphocytes was determined in CMV-seropositive rhesus macaques with or without simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection by using the sensitive assays of intracellular cytokine staining and gamma interferon ELISPOT. Both techniques yielded 3- to 1,000-fold-higher frequencies of CMV-specific CD4+ T lymphocytes than traditional proliferative limiting dilution assays. The median frequency of CMV-specific CD4+ T lymphocytes in 23 CMV-sero...

  5. Peptide binding motifs associated with MHC molecules common in Chinese rhesus macaques are analogous to those of human HLA supertypes, and include HLA-B27-like alleles

    OpenAIRE

    Mothé, Bianca R.; Southwood, Scott; Sidney, John; English, A. Michelle; Wriston, Amanda; Hoof, Ilka; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F.; Sette, Alessandro

    2013-01-01

    Chinese rhesus macaques are of particular interest in SIV/HIV research as these animals have prolonged kinetics of disease progression to AIDS, compared to their Indian counterparts, suggesting that they may be a better model for HIV. Nevertheless, the specific mechanism(s) accounting for these kinetics remains unclear. The study of Major Histocompatibility Complex (MHC) molecules, including their MHC:peptide binding motifs, provides valuable information for measuring cellular immune response...

  6. Recombinant Yellow Fever Vaccine Virus 17D Expressing Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVmac239 Gag Induces SIV-Specific CD8+ T-Cell Responses in Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Bonaldo, Myrna C.; Martins, Mauricio A.; Rudersdorf, Richard; Mudd, Philip A.; Sacha, Jonah B.; Piaskowski, Shari M.; Costa Neves, Patrícia C.; Veloso de Santana, Marlon G.; Vojnov, Lara; Capuano, Saverio; Rakasz, Eva G.; Wilson, Nancy A.; Fulkerson, John; Sadoff, Jerald C.; Watkins, David I.

    2010-01-01

    Here we describe a novel vaccine vector for expressing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) antigens. We show that recombinant attenuated yellow fever vaccine virus 17D expressing simian immunodeficiency virus SIVmac239 Gag sequences can be used as a vector to generate SIV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses in the rhesus macaque. Priming with recombinant BCG expressing SIV antigens increased the frequency of these SIV-specific CD8+ T-cell responses after recombinant YF17D boosting. These recombinan...

  7. Risk factors for stereotypic behavior and self-biting in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta): animal’s history, current environment, and personality

    OpenAIRE

    Gottlieb, Daniel H.; Capitanio, John P.; McCowan, Brenda

    2013-01-01

    Captive rhesus macaques sometimes exhibit undesirable abnormal behaviors, such as motor stereotypic behavior (MSB) and self-abuse. Many risk factors for these behaviors have been identified but the list is far from comprehensive, and large individual differences in rate of behavior expression remain. The goal of the current study was to determine which experiences predict expression of MSB and self-biting, and if individual differences in personality can account for additional variation in MS...

  8. The serotonin transporter gene linked polymorphic region is associated with the behavioral response to repeated stress exposure in infant rhesus macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Spinelli, Simona; Schwandt, Melanie L.; Lindell, Stephen G.; Heilig, Markus; Stephen J. Suomi; Higley, J. Dee; Goldman, David; Barr, Christina S.

    2012-01-01

    The short allele of the serotonin transporter linked polymorphic region (5-HTTLPR) moderates the effects of stress on vulnerability to mood and anxiety disorders. The mechanism by which this occurs may relate to differential sensitivity to stressful life events. Here we explored whether 5-HTTLPR and sex affected behavioral responses to repeated maternal separation in infant rhesus macaques. Behaviors were collected during the acute (Day 1) and the chronic (Days 2–4) phases of the separation, ...

  9. Effect of CD8+ Lymphocyte Depletion on Virus Containment after Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVmac251 Challenge of Live Attenuated SIVmac239Δ3-Vaccinated Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Schmitz, Jörn E.; Johnson, R. Paul; McClure, Harold M.; Manson, Kelledy H.; Wyand, Michael S.; Kuroda, Marcelo J.; Lifton, Michelle A.; Khunkhun, Rajinder S.; McEvers, Kimberly J.; Gillis, Jacqueline; Piatak, Michael; Lifson, Jeffrey D.; Grosschupff, Gudrun; Racz, Paul; Tenner-Racz, Klara

    2005-01-01

    Although live attenuated vaccines can provide potent protection against simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and simian-human immunodeficiency virus challenges, the specific immune responses that confer this protection have not been determined. To test whether cellular immune responses mediated by CD8+ lymphocytes contribute to this vaccine-induced protection, we depleted rhesus macaques vaccinated with the live attenuated virus SIVmac239Δ3 of CD8+ lymphocytes and then challenged them with SIV...

  10. Influence of 17β-estradiol and progesterone on GABAergic gene expression in the arcuate nucleus, amygdala and hippocampus of the rhesus macaque

    OpenAIRE

    Noriega, Nigel C.; Eghlidi, Dominique H.; Garyfallou, Vasilios T.; Kohama, Steven G.; Kryger, Sharon G.; Urbanski, Henryk F.

    2009-01-01

    Gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the major inhibitory neurotransmitter in the brain, and the responsiveness of neurons to GABA can be modulated by sex steroids. To better understand how ovarian steroids influence GABAergic system in the primate brain, we evaluated the expression of genes encoding GABA receptor subunits, glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD) and a GABA transporter in the brains of female rhesus macaques. Ovariectomized adults were subjected to a hormone replacement paradigm invol...

  11. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms Reveal Patterns of Allele Sharing across the Species Boundary between Rhesus (Macaca mulatta) and Cynomolgus (M. fascicularis) Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Satkoski Trask, Jessica A.; Garnica, Wendy T.; Smith, David Glenn; Houghton, Paul; Lerche, Nicholas; Kanthaswamy, Sree

    2012-01-01

    Both phenotypic and genetic evidence for asymmetric hybridization between rhesus (Macaca mulatta) and cynomolgus (Macaca fascicularis) macaques has been observed in the region of Indochina where both species are sympatric. The large-scale sharing of MHC class II alleles between the two species in this region supports the hypothesis that genes, and especially genes involved in immune response, are being transferred across the species boundary. This differential introgression has important impl...

  12. An attenuated Lassa vaccine in SIV-infected rhesus macaques does not persist or cause arenavirus disease but does elicit Lassa virus-specific immunity

    OpenAIRE

    Zapata, Juan C.; Poonia, Bhawna; Bryant, Joseph; Davis, Harry; Ateh, Eugene; George, Lanea; Crasta, Oswald R.; Yan ZHANG; Slezak, Tom; Jaing, Crystal; Pauza, C D; Goicochea, Marco; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Lukashevich, Igor S.; Salvato, Maria S.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Background Lassa hemorrhagic fever (LHF) is a rodent-borne viral disease that can be fatal for human beings. In this study, an attenuated Lassa vaccine candidate, ML29, was tested in SIV-infected rhesus macaques for its ability to elicit immune responses without instigating signs pathognomonic for arenavirus disease. ML29 is a reassortant between Lassa and Mopeia viruses that causes a transient infection in non-human primates and confers sterilizing protection from lethal Lassa viral...

  13. Temporary disruption of the blood-brain barrier by use of ultrasound and microbubbles: safety and efficacy evaluation in rhesus macaques

    OpenAIRE

    McDannold, Nathan; Arvanitis, Costas D.; Vykhodtseva, Natalia; Livingstone, Margaret S

    2012-01-01

    The blood-brain barrier (BBB) prevents entry of most drugs into the brain and is a major hurdle to the use of drugs for brain tumors and other central nervous system disorders. Work in small animals has shown that ultrasound combined with an intravenously circulating microbubble agent can temporarily permeabilize the BBB. Here, we evaluated whether this targeted drug delivery method can be applied safely, reliably, and in a controlled manner on rhesus macaques using a focused ultrasound syste...

  14. An Adjuvanted, Tetravalent Dengue Virus Purified Inactivated Vaccine Candidate Induces Long-Lasting and Protective Antibody Responses Against Dengue Challenge in Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Fernandez, Stefan; Thomas, Stephen J.; De La Barrera, Rafael; Im-Erbsin, Rawiwan; Jarman, Richard G.; Baras, Benoît; Toussaint, Jean-François; Mossman, Sally; Bruce L. Innis; Schmidt, Alexander; Malice, Marie-Pierre; Festraets, Pascale; Warter, Lucile; Putnak, J. Robert; Eckels, Kenneth H.

    2015-01-01

    The immunogenicity and protective efficacy of a candidate tetravalent dengue virus purified inactivated vaccine (TDENV PIV) formulated with alum or an Adjuvant System (AS01, AS03 tested at three different dose levels, or AS04) was evaluated in a 0, 1-month vaccination schedule in rhesus macaques. One month after dose 2, all adjuvanted formulations elicited robust and persisting neutralizing antibody titers against all four dengue virus serotypes. Most of the formulations tested prevented vire...

  15. SIV infection of rhesus macaques results in dysfunctional T- and B-cell responses to neo and recall Leishmania major vaccination

    OpenAIRE

    Klatt, Nichole R.; Vinton, Carol L.; Lynch, Rebecca M.; Canary, Lauren A.; Ho, Jason; Darrah, Patricia A.; Estes, Jacob D.; Seder, Robert A.; Moir, Susan L.; Brenchley, Jason M.

    2011-01-01

    HIV infection is characterized by immune system dysregulation, including depletion of CD4+ T cells, immune activation, and abnormal B- and T-cell responses. However, the immunologic mechanisms underlying lymphocytic dysfunctionality and whether it is restricted to immune responses against neo antigens, recall antigens, or both is unclear. Here, we immunized SIV-infected and uninfected rhesus macaques to induce immune responses against neo and recall antigens using a Leishmania major polyprote...

  16. In vivo inactivation of Nef ITAM motif of chimeric simian/human immunodeficiency virus SHIVsbg-YE correlates with absence of increased virulence in chinese rhesus macaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SHIVsbg, expressing Vpu, Tat, Rev, and Env proteins of HIV-1 Lai, was shown to be infectious for rhesus macaques. In this study, we mutated SHIVsbg Nef amino acids 17-18 from RQ to YE, conferring to SHIVsbg-YE the ability to replicate in vitro in unstimulated macaque PBMC. Juvenile macaques inoculated intravenously or orally with SHIVsbg-YE developed persistent infection. All macaques lost weight during the first 17 weeks but recovered afterward. All animals developed a strong HIV-specific humoral immune response. Viruses isolated 2 years postinoculation lost the ability to replicate in unstimulated macaque PBMC. Point mutations or 33-bp-wide deletions in the nef ITAM motif were responsible for this phenotype and correlated with clinical improvement of the infected macaques. These data demonstrate that the ITAM domain is inactivated in animals developing an acute antiviral immune response and may be detrimental to viral replication, perhaps by interfering with other well-conserved functions of SIV Nef protein

  17. Chronic Δ(9)-Tetrahydrocannabinol Administration Reduces IgE(+)B Cells but Unlikely Enhances Pathogenic SIVmac251 Infection in Male Rhesus Macaques of Chinese Origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Qiang; Liu, Li; Cong, Zhe; Wu, Xiaoxian; Wang, Hui; Qin, Chuan; Molina, Patricia; Chen, Zhiwei

    2016-09-01

    Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ(9)-THC) is the major psychoactive component of the cannabis plant. Δ(9)-THC has been used in the active ingredient of Marinol as an appetite stimulant for AIDS patients. Its impact on progression of HIV-1 infection, however, remains debatable. Previous studies indicated that Δ(9)-THC administration enhanced HIV-1 infection in huPBL-SCID mice but seemingly decreased early mortality in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infected male Indian-derived rhesus macaques. Here, we determine the chronic effect of Δ(9)-THC administration using 0.32 mg/kg or placebo (PBO), i.m., twice daily for 428 days on SIVmac251 infected male Chinese-derived rhesus macaques. Sixteen animals were divided into four study groups: Δ(9)-THC(+)SIV(+), Δ(9)-THC(+)SIV(-), PBO/SIV(+) and PBO/SIV(-) (n = 4/group). One-month after daily Δ(9)-THC or PBO administrations, macaques in groups one and three were challenged intravenously with pathogenic SIVmac251/CNS, which was isolated from the brain of a Chinese macaque with end-staged neuroAIDS. No significant differences in peak and steady state plasma viral loads were seen between Δ(9)-THC(+)SIV(+) and PBO/SIV(+) macaques. Regardless of Δ(9)-THC, all infected macaques displayed significant drop of CD4/CD8 T cell ratio, loss of CD4(+) T cells and higher persistent levels of Ki67(+)CD8(+) T cells compared with uninfected animals. Moreover, long-term Δ(9)-THC treatment reduced significantly the frequency of circulating IgE(+)B cells. Only one Δ(9)-THC(+)SIV(+) macaque died of simian AIDS with paralyzed limbs compared with two deaths in the PBO/SIV(+) group during the study period. These findings indicate that chronic Δ(9)-THC administration resulted in reduction of IgE(+)B cells, yet it unlikely enhanced pathogenic SIVmac251/CNS infection in male Rhesus macaques of Chinese origin. PMID:27109234

  18. Simian virus 40 inhibits differentiation and maturation of rhesus macaque DC-SIGN+-dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changyong G

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dendritic cells (DC are the initiators and modulators of the immune responses. Some species of pathogenic microorganisms have developed immune evasion strategies by controlling antigen presentation function of DC. Simian virus 40 (SV40 is a DNA tumor virus of rhesus monkey origin. It can induce cell transformation and tumorigenesis in many vertebrate species, but often causes no visible effects and persists as a latent infection in rhesus monkeys under natural conditions. To investigate the interaction between SV40 and rhesus monkey DC, rhesus monkey peripheral blood monocyte-derived DC were induced using recombinant human Interleukin-4 (rhIL-4 and infective SV40, the phenotype and function of DC-specific intracellular adhesion molecule-3 grabbing nonintegrin (DC-SIGN+ DC were analyzed by flow cytometry (FCM and mixed lymphocyte reaction (MLR. Results showed that SV40 can down-regulate the expression of CD83 and CD86 on DC and impair DC-induced activation of T cell proliferation. These findings suggest that SV40 might also cause immune suppression by influencing differentiation and maturation of DC.

  19. Acquisition of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Rhesus Macaques Is Most Consistent with Oral-Oral Transmission

    OpenAIRE

    Solnick, Jay V.; Fong, Julie; Hansen, Lori M.; Chang, Kikuko; Canfield, Don R; Parsonnet, Julie

    2006-01-01

    Socially housed rhesus monkeys rapidly acquired Helicobacter pylori infection, although the organism was rarely cultivated from saliva, feces, or the environment. Since the concentrations of H. pylori in vomit were compatible with what is known about the infectious dose, our results are most consistent with an oral-oral means of transmission.

  20. An SNP marker at the STAT6 locus can identify the hybrids between rhesus (Macaca mulatta) and long-tailed macaques (M. fascicularis) in Thailand: a rapid and simple screening method and its application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jadejaroen, Janya; Kawamoto, Yoshi; Hamada, Yuzuru; Malaivijitnond, Suchinda

    2016-01-01

    A polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP) assay was developed to genetically discriminate rhesus (Macaca mulatta) macaques from long-tailed (M. fascicularis) macaques. The 745 bp PCR amplicon of the STAT6 locus that spans a potentially species-diagnostic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) marker was digested with ApaI and gel electrophoresed to give (1) two (234 and 511 bp), (2) one (745 bp) and (3) three (234, 511 and 745 bp) band patterns that correspond to the genotypes G/G (long-tailed macaque specific homozygote), A/A (rhesus macaque specific homozygote) and A/G (hybrid specific heterozygote), respectively. The diagnostic robustness and efficiency of this PCR-RFLP assay was tested on wild rhesus and long-tailed macaques inhabiting Thailand and a known hybrid population. The Indochinese and Sundaic long-tailed macaque samples (n = 18) all showed a homozygous G/G pattern, while the Indochinese rhesus macaques (n = 10) all showed a homozygous A/A pattern. The rhesus/long-tailed hybrid population at Khao Khieow Open Zoo, which resulted from an introduced group of rhesus macaques that hybridized with the indigenous long-tailed macaques about 20 years ago, revealed 47% (56/118 samples analyzed) with the heterogenous A/G genotype. In addition, the frequency of the rhesus-specific allele A significantly decreased in the hybrid population during 2006-2014, where a strong association between the STAT6 genotype and the morphology of the individuals was detected. In conclusion, a robust PCR-RFLP assay allows a simple, effective and inexpensive approach, in particular for field studies, to assess hybrid individuals between rhesus and long-tailed macaques. Although this assay cannot conclusively identify all the hybrids over two or more generations, it at least can allow the evaluation of the process of hybridization, and so it is applicable to the assessment of the status of natural or anthropogenic hybridization between the two

  1. Severity and Distribution of Wounds in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta) Correlate with Observed Self-Injurious Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Zachary T; Krall, Caroline; Rice, Kelly A; Adams, Robert J; Metcalf Pate, Kelly A; Hutchinson, Eric K

    2015-09-01

    Self-injurious behavior (SIB) occurs within laboratory-housed NHP at low frequency but can have a devastating effect on animal research and wellbeing. One barrier to the study and clinical management of these cases is the cost of equipment and personnel time to quantify the behavior according to the current standard of observation and to score remotely obtained video recordings. In studies of human SIB, in which direct observation is difficult or prohibited, researchers have demonstrated that quantifying the tissue damage resulting from SIB can be a useful proxy to represent the underlying behavior. We hypothesized that the nature of wounds resulting from SIB in NHP could be used in a similar manner to measure the abnormal behavior. Using a cohort of rhesus macaques with high-incidence SIB, we examined severity, distribution, and number of wounds and compared them with observed incidences of SIB during a 12-wk experiment. We found that the number, severity, and distribution of physical wounds were associated with the incidences of biting behavior observed during the 2 wk prior to measurement. We also found that an increased number of wounds was associated with increased severity. Animals with wounds of moderate severity were more likely to also have severe wounds than were macaques with wounds that were lower than moderate in severity. This work is the first representative study in NHP to find that behavioral SIB correlates with physical wounding and that increases in the frequency and number of the body regions affected correlates with the severity of wounding. PMID:26424249

  2. A new genetic vaccine platform based on an adeno-associated virus isolated from a rhesus macaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Jianping; Calcedo, Roberto; Vandenberghe, Luk H; Bell, Peter; Somanathan, Suryanarayan; Wilson, James M

    2009-12-01

    We created a hybrid adeno-associated virus (AAV) from two related rhesus macaque isolates, called AAVrh32.33, and evaluated it as a vaccine carrier for human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) and type A influenza virus antigens. The goal was to overcome the limitations of vaccines based on other AAVs, which generate dysfunctional T-cell responses and are inhibited by antibodies found in human sera. Injection of a Gag-expressing AAVrh32.33 vector into mice resulted in a high-quality CD8(+) T-cell response. The resulting Gag-specific T cells express multiple cytokines at high levels, including interleukin-2, with many having memory phenotypes; a subsequent boost with an adenovirus vector yielded a brisk expansion of Gag-specific T cells. A priming dose of AAVrh32.33 led to high levels of Gag antibodies, which exceed levels found after injection of adenovirus vectors. Importantly, passive transfer of pooled human immunoglobulin into mice does not interfere with the efficacy of AAVrh32.33 expressing nucleoproteins from influenza virus, as measured by protection to a lethal dose of influenza virus, which is consistent with the very low seroprevalence to this virus in humans. Studies of macaques with vectors expressing gp140 from HIV-1 (i.e., with AAVrh32.33 as the prime and simian adenovirus type 24 as the boost) demonstrated results similar to those for mice with high-level and high-quality CD8(+) T-cell responses to gp140 and high-titered neutralizing antibodies to homologous HIV-1. The biology of this novel AAV hybrid suggests that it should be a preferred genetic vaccine carrier, capable of generating robust T- and B-cell responses. PMID:19812149

  3. Age-Related Neurochemical Changes in the Rhesus Macaque Cochlear Nucleus

    OpenAIRE

    Gray, Daniel T.; Engle, James R.; Recanzone, Gregg H.

    2014-01-01

    Neurochemical changes in the expression of various proteins within the central auditory system have been associated with natural aging. These changes may compensate in part for the loss of auditory sensitivity arising from two phenomena of the aging auditory system: cochlear histopathologies and increased excitability of central auditory neurons. Recent studies in the macaque monkey have revealed age-related changes in the density of nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-diaphor...

  4. Fading perceptual resemblance: a path for rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) to conceptual matching?

    Science.gov (United States)

    David Smith, J; Flemming, Timothy M; Boomer, Joseph; Beran, Michael J; Church, Barbara A

    2013-12-01

    Cognitive, comparative, and developmental psychologists have long been intrigued by humans' and animals' capacity to respond to abstract relations like sameness and difference, because this capacity may underlie crucial aspects of cognition like analogical reasoning. Recently, this capacity has been explored in higher-order, relational matching-to-sample (RMTS) tasks in which humans and animals try to complete analogies of sameness and difference between disparate groups of items. The authors introduced a new paradigm to this area, by yoking the relational-matching cue to a perceptual-matching cue. Then, using established algorithms for shape distortion, the perceptual cue was weakened and eliminated. Humans' RMTS performance easily transcended the elimination of perceptual support. In contrast, RMTS performance by six macaques faltered as they were weaned from perceptual support. No macaque showed evidence of mature RMTS performance, even given more than 260,000 training trials during which we tried to coax a relational-matching performance from them. It is an important species difference that macaques show so hesitant a response to conceptual relations when humans respond to them so effortlessly. It raises theoretical questions about the emergence of this crucial capacity during humans' cognitive evolution and during humans' cognitive development. PMID:24076537

  5. Rapid cognitive flexibility of rhesus macaques performing psychophysical task-switching

    OpenAIRE

    Avdagic, Ema; Jensen, Greg; Altschul, Drew; Terrace, Herbert S.

    2013-01-01

    Three rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) performed a simultaneous chaining task in which stimuli had to be sorted according to their visual properties. Each stimulus could vary independently along two dimensions (luminosity and radius), and a cue indicating which dimension to sort by was random trial to trial. These rapid and unpredictable changes constitute a task-switching paradigm, in which subjects must encode task demands and shift to whichever task-set is presently activated. In contrast t...

  6. THE SIGNATURE OF MATERNAL REARING IN THE METHYLOME IN RHESUS MACAQUE PREFRONTAL CORTEX AND T CELLS

    OpenAIRE

    Provençal, Nadine; Suderman, Matthew J.; Guillemin, Claire; Massart, Renaud; Ruggiero, Angela; Wang, Dongsha; Bennett, Allyson J; Pierre, Peter J.; Friedman, David P.; Côté, Sylvana M; Hallett, Michael; Tremblay, Richard E.; Suomi, Stephen J.; Szyf, Moshe

    2012-01-01

    Early life adversity is associated with a broad scope of life-long health and behavioral disorders. Particularly critical is the role of the mother. A possible mechanism is that these effects are mediated by “epigenetic” mechanisms. Studies in rodents suggest a causal relationship between early life adversity and changes in DNA methylation in several “candidate genes” in the brain. This study examines whether randomized differential rearing (maternal versus surrogate-peer rearing) of rhesus m...

  7. Age-dependent changes in innate immune phenotype and function in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Asquith, Mark; Haberthur, Kristen; Brown, Monica; Engelmann, Flora; Murphy, Ashleigh; Al-Mahdi, Zainab; Messaoudi, Ilhem

    2012-01-01

    Aged individuals are more susceptible to infections due to a general decline in immune function broadly referred to as immune senescence. While age-related changes in the adaptive immune system are well documented, aging of the innate immune system remains less well understood, particularly in nonhuman primates. A more robust understanding of age-related changes in innate immune function would provide mechanistic insight into the increased susceptibility of the elderly to infection. Rhesus ma...

  8. Expression of insulin-like 3 (INSL3 and differential splicing of its receptor in the ovary of rhesus macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jensen Jeffrey T

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Although insulin-like 3 (INSL3 has been identified in the gonad of both sexes in many species, there are only limited reports on the distribution of INSL3 and its receptor, relaxin/insulin-like family peptide receptor 2 (RXFP2, in the primate ovary. Since the hormone-receptor pair is believed to play a role in female reproduction, investigating the transcription of INSL3/RXFP2 genes and the spatiotemporal expression of INSL3 in the nonhuman primate may shed light on the functional aspects of the system in humans. Methods Database mining, molecular and immunological methods were applied. Results One single INSL3 transcript and three novel splice variant transcripts of RXFP2 were identified in the ovary of rhesus macaques. While the full-length RXFP2 transcript is barely detectable in granulosa cells during the periovulatory period, INSL3 transcript and protein are highly abundant in theca cells surrounding antral follicles. Moreover, the INSL3 level in follicular fluid is 3-4 times higher than that in female serum which remains low throughout the menstrual cycle. Conclusions The presence of INSL3 and its receptor in the ovary implies a potential role of the ligand-receptor pair in female reproduction in nonhuman primates. However, the existence of multiple splice variants of RXFP2 indicates a very complex nature of the hormone-receptor system.

  9. Evaluation of the kappa-opioid receptor-selective tracer [11C]GR103545 in awake rhesus macaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The recent development in radiosynthesis of the 11C-carbamate function increases the potential of [11C]GR103545, which for the last decade has been regarded as promising for imaging the kappa-opioid receptor (κ-OR) with PET. In the present study, [11C]GR103545 was evaluated in awake rhesus macaques. Separate investigations were performed to clarify the OR subtype selectivity of this compound. Regional brain uptake kinetics of [11C]GR103545 was studied 0-120 min after injection. The binding affinity and opioid subtype selectivity of [11C]GR103545 was determined in cells transfected with cloned human opioid receptors. In vitro binding assays demonstrated a high affinity of GR103545 for κ-OR (Ki = 0.02 ±0.01 nM) with excellent selectivity over μ-OR (6 x 102-fold) and δ-OR (2 x 104-fold). PET imaging revealed a volume of distribution (VT) pattern consistent with the known distribution of κ-OR, with striatum = temporal cortex > cingulate cortex > frontal cortex > parietal cortex > thalamus > cerebellum. [11C]GR103545 is selective for κ-OR and holds promise for use to selectively depict and quantify this receptor in humans by means of PET. (orig.)

  10. Yersinia pestis biovar Microtus strain 201, an avirulent strain to humans, provides protection against bubonic plague in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingwen; Wang, Qiong; Tian, Guang; Qi, Zhizhen; Zhang, Xuecan; Wu, Xiaohong; Qiu, Yefeng; Bi, Yujing; Yang, Xiaoyan; Xin, Youquan; He, Jian; Zhou, Jiyuan; Zeng, Lin; Yang, Ruifu; Wang, Xiaoyi

    2014-01-01

    Yersinia pestis biovar Microtus is considered to be a virulent to larger mammals, including guinea pigs, rabbits and humans. It may be used as live attenuated plague vaccine candidates in terms of its low virulence. However, the Microtus strain's protection against plague has yet to be demonstrated in larger mammals. In this study, we evaluated the protective efficacy of the Microtus strain 201 as a live attenuated plague vaccine candidate. Our results show that this strain is highly attenuated by subcutaneous route, elicits an F1-specific antibody titer similar to the EV and provides a protective efficacy similar to the EV against bubonic plague in Chinese-origin rhesus macaques. The Microtus strain 201 could induce elevated secretion of both Th1-associated cytokines (IFN-γ, IL-2 and TNF-α) and Th2-associated cytokines (IL-4, IL-5, and IL-6), as well as chemokines MCP-1 and IL-8. However, the protected animals developed skin ulcer at challenge site with different severity in most of the immunized and some of the EV-immunized monkeys. Generally, the Microtus strain 201 represented a good plague vaccine candidate based on its ability to generate strong humoral and cell-mediated immune responses as well as its good protection against high dose of subcutaneous virulent Y. pestis challenge. PMID:24225642

  11. Sequencing of rhesus macaque Y chromosome clarifies origins and evolution of the DAZ (Deleted in AZoospermia) genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hughes, Jennifer F; Skaletsky, Helen; Page, David C

    2012-12-01

    Studies of Y chromosome evolution often emphasize gene loss, but this loss has been counterbalanced by addition of new genes. The DAZ genes, which are critical to human spermatogenesis, were acquired by the Y chromosome in the ancestor of Old World monkeys and apes. We and our colleagues recently sequenced the rhesus macaque Y chromosome, and comparison of this sequence to human and chimpanzee enables us to reconstruct much of the evolutionary history of DAZ. We report that DAZ arrived on the Y chromosome about 38 million years ago via the transposition of at least 1.1 megabases of autosomal DNA. This transposition also brought five additional genes to the Y chromosome, but all five genes were subsequently lost through mutation or deletion. As the only surviving gene, DAZ experienced extensive restructuring, including intragenic amplification and gene duplication, and has been the target of positive selection in the chimpanzee lineage. Editor's suggested further reading in BioEssays Should Y stay or should Y go: The evolution of non-recombining sex chromosomes Abstract. PMID:23055411

  12. Oligonucleotide fingerprinting of free-ranging and captive rhesus macaques from Cayo Santiago: paternity assignment and comparison of heterozygosity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nürnberg, P; Berard, J D; Bercovitch, F; Epplen, J T; Schmidtke, J; Krawczak, M

    1993-01-01

    Multilocus DNA fingerprinting with oligonucleotide probes (GTG)5, (GATA)4, and (CA)8 was applied in order to determine paternity in one birth cohort (15 infants) of social group (S) from the free-ranging colony of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) on Cayo Santiago. While sires could be identified in 11 cases, all males tested (N = 19) could be excluded from paternity for the remaining four infants. Data revealed marked discrepancies between actual paternity and paternity as inferred from the observation of copulation behavior. Thus, a dominant social rank does not appear to be strongly associated with reproductive success. Furthermore, alternative reproductive strategies were found to yield comparable net benefits in reproduction. A second group of animals (M) was translocated from Cayo Santiago to the Sabana Seca Field Station in 1984. They have continuously resided together in a large outdoor enclosure since then. Here paternity assessment was seriously impeded by a reduced number of discriminating bands, i.e. offspring bands which were unequivocally derived from the sires. This was initially held to be indicative of a smaller degree of heterozygosity in Group M, and was attributed to inbreeding due to a lack of male immigration or extra-group fertilizations. However, a comparison of the DNA fingerprint patterns obtained in Group S and Group M lends only partial support to this idea. PMID:8400713

  13. Social and nonsocial content differentially modulates visual attention and autonomic arousal in Rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher J Machado

    Full Text Available The sophisticated analysis of gestures and vocalizations, including assessment of their emotional valence, helps group-living primates efficiently navigate their social environment. Deficits in social information processing and emotion regulation are important components of many human psychiatric illnesses, such as autism, schizophrenia and social anxiety disorder. Analyzing the neurobiology of social information processing and emotion regulation requires a multidisciplinary approach that benefits from comparative studies of humans and animal models. However, many questions remain regarding the relationship between visual attention and arousal while processing social stimuli. Using noninvasive infrared eye-tracking methods, we measured the visual social attention and physiological arousal (pupil diameter of adult male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta as they watched social and nonsocial videos. We found that social videos, as compared to nonsocial videos, captured more visual attention, especially if the social signals depicted in the videos were directed towards the subject. Subject-directed social cues and nonsocial nature documentary footage, compared to videos showing conspecifics engaging in naturalistic social interactions, generated larger pupil diameters (indicating heightened sympathetic arousal. These findings indicate that rhesus monkeys will actively engage in watching videos of various kinds. Moreover, infrared eye tracking technology provides a mechanism for sensitively gauging the social interest of presented stimuli. Adult male rhesus monkeys' visual attention and physiological arousal do not always trend in the same direction, and are likely influenced by the content and novelty of a particular visual stimulus. This experiment creates a strong foundation for future experiments that will examine the neural network responsible for social information processing in nonhuman primates. Such studies may provide valuable information

  14. Brain penetration of telmisartan, a unique centrally acting angiotensin II type 1 receptor blocker, studied by PET in conscious rhesus macaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Telmisartan is a widely used, long-acting antihypertensive agent. Known to be a selective angiotensin II type 1 (AT1) receptor (AT1R) blocker (ARB), telmisartan acts as a partial agonist of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-gamma (PPAR-γ) and inhibits centrally mediated effects of angiotensin II in rats following peripheral administration, although the brain penetration of telmisartan remains unclear. We investigated the brain concentration and localization of telmisartan using 11 C-labeled telmisartan and positron emission tomography (PET) in conscious rhesus macaques. Methods: Three male rhesus macaques were bolus intravenously administered [11 C]telmisartan either alone or as a mixture with unlabeled telmisartan (1 mg/kg). Dynamic PET images were acquired for 95 min following administration. Blood samples were collected for the analysis of plasma concentration and metabolites, and brain and plasma concentrations were calculated from detected radioactivity using the specific activity of the administered drug preparation, in which whole blood radioactivity was used for the correction of intravascular blood radioactivity in brain. Results: Telmisartan penetrated into the brain little but enough to block AT1R and showed a consistently increasing brain/plasma ratio within the PET scanning period, suggesting slow clearance of the compound from the brain compared to the plasma clearance. Brain/plasma ratios at 30, 60, and 90 min were 0.06, 0.13, and 0.18, respectively. No marked localization according to the AT1R distribution was noted over the entire brain, even on tracer alone dosing. Conclusions: Telmisartan penetrated into the brain enough to block AT1R and showed a slow clearance from the brain in conscious rhesus macaques, supporting the long-acting and central responses of telmisartan as a unique property among ARBs.

  15. Rabies virus-based vaccines elicit neutralizing antibodies, poly-functional CD8+ T cell, and protect rhesus macaques from AIDS-like disease after SIVmac251 challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faul, Elizabeth J.; Aye, Pyone P.; Papaneri, Amy B.; Pahar, Bapi; McGettigan, James P.; Schiro, Faith; Chervoneva, Inna; Montefiori, David C.; Lackner, Andrew A.; Schnell, Matthias J.

    2010-01-01

    Highly attenuated rabies virus (RV) vaccine vectors were evaluated for their ability to protect against highly pathogenic SIVmac251 challenge. Mamu-A*01 negative rhesus macaques were immunized in groups of four with either: RV expressing SIVmac239-GagPol, a combination of RV expressing SIVmac239-Env and RV expressing SIVmac239-GagPol, or with empty RV vectors. Eight weeks later animals received a booster immunization with a heterologous RV expressing the same antigens. At twelve weeks post-boost, all animals were challenged intravenously with 100 TCID50 of pathogenic SIVmac251-CX. Immunized macaques in both vaccine groups had 1.3–1.6-log fold decrease in viral set point compared to control animals. The GagPol/Env immunized animals also had a significantly lower peak viral load. When compared to control animals following challenge, vaccinated macaques had a more rapid induction of SIVmac251 neutralizing antibodies and of CD8+ T cell responses to various SIV epitopes. Moreover, vaccinated macaques better-maintained peripheral memory CD4+ T cells and were able to mount a poly-functional CD8+ T cell response in the mucosa. These findings indicate promise for RV-based vectors and have important implications for the development of an efficacious HIV vaccine. PMID:19879223

  16. Live Attenuated Rev-Independent Nef¯SIV Enhances Acquisition of Heterologous SIVsmE660 in Acutely Vaccinated Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Byrareddy, Siddappa N.; Ayash-Rashkovsky, Mila; Kramer, Victor G; Lee, Sandra J.; Correll, Mick; Novembre, Francis J; Villinger, Francois; Johnson, Welkin E.; von Gegerfelt, Agneta; Felber, Barbara K.; Ruth M Ruprecht

    2013-01-01

    Background Rhesus macaques (RMs) inoculated with live-attenuated Rev-Independent Nef¯ simian immunodeficiency virus (Rev-Ind Nef¯SIV) as adults or neonates controlled viremia to undetectable levels and showed no signs of immunodeficiency over 6-8 years of follow-up. We tested the capacity of this live-attenuated virus to protect RMs against pathogenic, heterologous SIVsmE660 challenges. Methodology/Principal Findings Three groups of four RM were inoculated with Rev-Ind Nef¯SIV and compared. G...

  17. Live Attenuated Rev-Independent Nef¯SIV Enhances Acquisition of Heterologous SIVsmE660 in Acutely Vaccinated Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Byrareddy, Siddappa N.; Ayash-Rashkovsky, Mila; Kramer, Victor G; Lee, Sandra J.; Correll, Mick; Novembre, Francis J; Villinger, Francois; Johnson, Welkin E.; von Gegerfelt, Agneta; Felber, Barbara K.; Ruth M Ruprecht

    2013-01-01

    Background: Rhesus macaques (RMs) inoculated with live-attenuated Rev-Independent Nef¯ simian immunodeficiency virus (Rev-Ind Nef¯SIV) as adults or neonates controlled viremia to undetectable levels and showed no signs of immunodeficiency over 6-8 years of follow-up. We tested the capacity of this live-attenuated virus to protect RMs against pathogenic, heterologous SIVsmE660 challenges. Methodology/Principal Findings Three groups of four RM were inoculated with Rev-Ind Nef¯SIV and compared. ...

  18. Rabies virus-based vaccines elicit neutralizing antibodies, poly-functional CD8+ T cell, and protect rhesus macaques from AIDS-like disease after SIVmac251 challenge

    OpenAIRE

    Elizabeth J. Faul; Aye, Pyone P.; Papaneri, Amy B.; Pahar, Bapi; McGettigan, James P.; Schiro, Faith; Chervoneva, Inna; Montefiori, David C.; Lackner, Andrew A.; Schnell, Matthias J.

    2009-01-01

    Highly attenuated rabies virus (RV) vaccine vectors were evaluated for their ability to protect against highly pathogenic SIVmac251 challenge. Mamu-A*01 negative rhesus macaques were immunized in groups of four with either: RV expressing SIVmac239-GagPol, a combination of RV expressing SIVmac239-Env and RV expressing SIVmac239-GagPol, or with empty RV vectors. Eight weeks later animals received a booster immunization with a heterologous RV expressing the same antigens. At twelve weeks post-bo...

  19. OPRM1 gene variation influences hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis function in response to a variety of stressors in rhesus macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Schwandt, Melanie L.; Lindell, Stephen G.; Higley, James D.; Suomi, Stephen J.; Heilig, Markus; Barr, Christina S.

    2011-01-01

    The endogenous opioid system is involved in modulating a number of behavioral and physiological systems, including the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis. In humans, a functional variant in the OPRM1 gene (OPRM1 A118G) is associated with a number of outcomes, including attenuated HPA axis responses to stress. A nonsynonymous variant (OPRM1 C77G) in the rhesus macaque has been shown to have similar effects in vivo to the human variant. The current study investigated whether OPRM1 C77G i...

  20. Validation of a Body Condition Scoring System in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta): Assessment of Body Composition by using Dual-Energy X-ray Absorptiometry

    OpenAIRE

    Summers, Laura; Clingerman, Karen J; Yang, Xiaowei

    2012-01-01

    Body condition scoring (BCS) is a subjective semiquantitative method of assessing body fat and muscle by palpation of key anatomic features. A previously published BCS system for rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) uses a scale comprising both whole and half units, in which the midrange represents optimal body condition (3.0), lower values represent emaciated to lean conditions (1.0 to 2.0), and higher values (4.0 to 5.0) indicate excessive body fat. A valid BCS system is well described, relevan...

  1. Infection with Host-Range Mutant Adenovirus 5 Suppresses Innate Immunity and Induces Systemic CD4+ T Cell Activation in Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Qureshi, Huma; Genescà, Meritxell; Fritts, Linda; McChesney, Michael B.; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie; Christopher J. Miller

    2014-01-01

    Ad5 is a common cause of respiratory disease and an occasional cause of gastroenteritis and conjunctivitis, and seroconversion before adolescence is common in humans. To gain some insight into how Ad5 infection affects the immune system of rhesus macaques (RM) 18 RM were infected with a host-range mutant Ad5 (Ad5hr) by 3 mucosal inoculations. There was a delay of 2 to 6 weeks after the first inoculation before plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC) frequency and function increased in peripheral bl...

  2. Bioactive factors in milk across lactation: Maternal effects and influence on infant growth in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernstein, Robin M; Hinde, Katie

    2016-08-01

    Among mammals, numerous bioactive factors in milk vary across mothers and influence offspring outcomes. This emerging area of research has primarily investigated such dynamics within rodent biomedical models, domesticated dairy breeds, and among humans in clinical contexts. Less understood are signaling factors in the milk of non-human primates. Here, we report on multiple bioactive components in rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) milk and their associations with maternal and infant characteristics. Milk samples were collected from 59 macaques at multiple time points across lactation in conjunction with maternal and infant morphometrics and life-history animal records. Milk was assayed for adiponectin (APN), epidermal growth factor (EGF) and its receptor (EGF-R), and transforming growth factor beta 2 (TGF-β2 ). Regression models were constructed to assess the contributions of maternal factors on variation in milk bioactives, and on the relationship of this variation to infant body mass and growth. Maternal body mass, parity, social rank, and infant sex were all predictive of concentrations of milk bioactives. Primiparous mothers produced milk with higher adiponectin, but lower EGF, than multiparous mothers. Heavier mothers produced milk with lower EGF and EGF-R, but higher TGF-β2 . Mothers of daughters produced milk with higher TGF-β2 . Mid-ranking mothers produced milk with higher mean EGF and adiponectin concentrations than low-ranking mothers. Milk EGF and EGF-R were positively associated with infant body mass and growth rate. Importantly, these signaling bioactives (APN, EGF, EGF-R, and TGF-β2 ) were significantly correlated with nutritional values of milk. The effects of milk signals remained after controlling for the available energy in milk revealing the added physiological role of non-nutritive milk bioactives in the developing infant. Integrating analyses of energetic and other bioactive components of milk yields an important perspective for interpreting

  3. Pregnancy initiation in the rhesus macaque: Towards functional manipulation of the maternal-fetal interface

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    Golos Thaddeus G

    2004-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Nonhuman primates provide an important opportunity to define the mechanisms that contribute to the success of early pregnancy. We have focused for several years now on defining the expression of novel placental major histocompatibility complex (MHC class I molecules. In parallel, we have used reagents against human immune cell markers to characterize the leukocyte population in the decidua and have demonstrated dynamic changes in these cell populations during the first 5 weeks of gestation. The challenge is to identify the possible role(s of placental MHC class I in modifying/directing the maternal endometrial or systemic immune system in the post-implantation period. Foremost among the challenges is the difficulty in modifying placental function. In the instance of trophoblast surface proteins, passive immunization studies are feasible, although limitations include the empirical nature of this approach, as well as the inability to modify intracellular function. We have shown that using lentiviral vectors to effect preimplantation gene transfer for transgene expression in the placenta is not only feasible, but of good efficiency. In addition to transgene overexpression, robust approaches for knocking down/knocking out placental gene expression are essential. Recent developments in RNA interference approaches may allow "transient knockout" experiments. While the rhesus monkey has been our model of choice, currently there are limitations in the number of available female rhesus monkeys of reproductive age for research in early pregnancy. It is critical that the technologies for advanced study move forward in other species. The baboon has been used significantly in reproductive tract biology and early pregnancy research and important models have been developed for manipulation of the maternal-fetal interface. Additional characterization of other species, such as the cynomolgus and African green (vervet monkey is critical. Given the

  4. High immune activation and abnormal expression of cytokines contribute to death of SHIV89.6-infected Chinese rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Ren-Rong; Zhang, Ming-Xu; Zhang, Lin-Tao; Zhang, Xiao-Liang; Zheng, Hong-Yi; Zhu, Lin; Pang, Wei; Zhang, Gao-Hong; Zheng, Yong-Tang

    2015-08-01

    Chinese rhesus macaques (CRMs) are ideal experimental animals for studying the pathogenesis of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) and for vaccine research. SHIV89.6 has been reported to be an attenuated virus because, in most cases, SHIV89.6 infection only causes limited alteration of immune cells and tissues, and it has been used commonly for vaccine research. After two serial passages in vivo, SHIV (SHIV-89.6P) induces CD4 lymphopenia and an AIDS-like disease with wasting and opportunistic infections. However, the pathogenic ability of SHIV89.6 is not well understood. In this study, we found that 6 of 14 SHIV89.6-infected CRMs died within 127 weeks after infection. We found especially high immune activation, low IFN-α expression, and distinctive cytokine expression profiles in the infected and dead (ID) group of monkeys, while there was only few change in the CD4(+) T counts and distribution of T cell subsets in the ID group monkeys. Also, there was a similar dynamic of viral load between infected and surviving (IS) and ID group monkeys. Furthermore, we found various correlations among immune activation, IFN-α expression, and frequencies of cytokine-secreting cells. These results suggest that SHIV89.6 infections have pathogenic potential in CRMs and that high immune activation and abnormal expression of cytokines contribute to death of SHIV89.6-infected CRMs. This also implies that high immune activation may be relevant to dysfunction of immune cells. It is proposed that high immune activation and dysfunction of immune cells may be good predictors for disease progression and markers for therapy. PMID:26036562

  5. Chronic recording of hand prosthesis control signals via a regenerative peripheral nerve interface in a rhesus macaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irwin, Z. T.; Schroeder, K. E.; Vu, P. P.; Tat, D. M.; Bullard, A. J.; Woo, S. L.; Sando, I. C.; Urbanchek, M. G.; Cederna, P. S.; Chestek, C. A.

    2016-08-01

    Objective. Loss of even part of the upper limb is a devastating injury. In order to fully restore natural function when lacking sufficient residual musculature, it is necessary to record directly from peripheral nerves. However, current approaches must make trade-offs between signal quality and longevity which limit their clinical potential. To address this issue, we have developed the regenerative peripheral nerve interface (RPNI) and tested its use in non-human primates. Approach. The RPNI consists of a small, autologous partial muscle graft reinnervated by a transected peripheral nerve branch. After reinnervation, the graft acts as a bioamplifier for descending motor commands in the nerve, enabling long-term recording of high signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), functionally-specific electromyographic (EMG) signals. We implanted nine RPNIs on separate branches of the median and radial nerves in two rhesus macaques who were trained to perform cued finger movements. Main results. No adverse events were noted in either monkey, and we recorded normal EMG with high SNR (>8) from the RPNIs for up to 20 months post-implantation. Using RPNI signals recorded during the behavioral task, we were able to classify each monkey’s finger movements as flexion, extension, or rest with >96% accuracy. RPNI signals also enabled functional prosthetic control, allowing the monkeys to perform the same behavioral task equally well with either physical finger movements or RPNI-based movement classifications. Significance. The RPNI signal strength, stability, and longevity demonstrated here represents a promising method for controlling advanced prosthetic limbs and fully restoring natural movement.

  6. Matrilineal Behavioral and Physiological Changes following the Death of a Non-Alpha Matriarch in Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wooddell, Lauren J.; Kaburu, Stefano S. K.; Rosenberg, Kendra L.; Meyer, Jerrold S.; Suomi, Stephen J.; Dettmer, Amanda M.

    2016-01-01

    In many species, the loss of alpha matriarchs is associated with a number of negative outcomes such as troop fission, eviction, wounding, and reduced vitality. However, whether the dramatic consequences of their loss are due to their role as an old experienced figure or to their alpha status remains unclear. We tested the hypothesis that in a semi-free ranging colony of rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), the death of a non-alpha matriarch, who had a large set of kin, would lead to changes in behavior and physiological stress within her matriline. Following her death, her matriline increased in aggression, vigilance, and social grooming. Additionally, hierarchical stability, measured by levels of rank changes, decreased within her matriline, and levels of intense aggression by high-ranking animals were more frequent, as well as matrilineal wounding. Although ordinal rank was positively associated with higher chronic hair cortisol concentrations (HCCs) in the months before the matriarch’s death, following her death, only those who experienced large increases in rank within her matriline displayed higher HCCs. Changes in matrilineal stability, aggression, behavior, and HCCs within the other two matrilines in the troop were not evident, although caution is needed due to the small sample sizes. We conclude that the death of the non-alpha matriarch led to matrilineal instability, characterized by higher levels of aggression and subsequent vigilance, rank changes, physiological stress, and grooming. We suggest that non-alpha matriarchs with a large number of kin and social support can be integral to the stability of matrilines. PMID:27275743

  7. Social learning as a way to overcome choice-induced preferences? Insights from humans and rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ELISABETTAMONFARDINI

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Much theoretical attention is currently devoted to social learning. Yet, empirical studies formally comparing its effectiveness relative to individual learning are rare. Here, we focus on free choice, which is at the heart of individual reward-based learning, but absent in social learning. Choosing among two equally valued options is known to create a preference for the selected option in both humans and monkeys. We thus surmised that social learning should be more helpful when choice-induced preferences retard individual learning than when they optimize it. To test this prediction, the same task requiring to find which among two items concealed a reward was applied to rhesus macaques and humans. The initial trial was individual or social, rewarded or unrewarded. Learning was assessed on the second trial. Choice-induced preference strongly affected individual learning. Monkeys and humans performed much more poorly after an initial negative choice than after an initial positive choice. Comparison with social learning verified our prediction. For negative outcome, social learning surpassed or at least equaled individual learning in all subjects. For positive outcome, the predicted superiority of individual learning did occur in a majority of subjects (5/6 monkeys and 6/12 humans. A minority kept learning better socially though, perhaps due to a more dominant/aggressive attitude toward peers. Poor learning from errors due to over-valuation of personal choices is among the decision-making biases shared by humans and animals. The present study suggests that choice-immune social learning may help curbing this potentially harmful tendency. Learning from successes is an easier path. The present data suggest that whether one tends to walk it alone or with a peer's help might depend on the social dynamics within the actor/observer dyad.

  8. Late Effects of Total-Body Gamma Irradiation on Cardiac Structure and Function in Male Rhesus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeBo, Ryne J; Lees, Cynthia J; Dugan, Greg O; Caudell, David L; Michalson, Kris T; Hanbury, David B; Kavanagh, Kylie; Cline, J Mark; Register, Thomas C

    2016-07-01

    Heart disease is an increasingly recognized, serious late effect of radiation exposure, most notably among breast cancer and Hodgkin's disease survivors, as well as the Hiroshima and Nagasaki atomic bomb survivors. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the late effects of total-body irradiation (TBI) on cardiac morphology, function and selected circulating biomarkers in a well-established nonhuman primate model. For this study we used male rhesus macaques that were exposed to a single total-body dose of ionizing gamma radiation (6.5-8.4 Gy) 5.6-9.7 years earlier at ages ranging from ∼3-10 years old and a cohort of nonirradiated controls. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed annually for 3 years on 20 irradiated and 11 control animals. Myocardium was examined grossly and histologically, and myocardial fibrosis/collagen was assessed microscopically and by morphometric analysis of Masson's trichrome-stained sections. Serum/plasma from 27 irradiated and 13 control animals was evaluated for circulating biomarkers of cardiac damage [N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic protein (nt-proBNP) and troponin-I], inflammation (CRP, IL-6, MCP-1, sICAM) and microbial translocation [LPS-binding protein (LBP) and sCD14]. A higher prevalence of histological myocardial fibrosis was observed in the hearts obtained from the irradiated animals (9/14) relative to controls (0/3) (P = 0.04, χ(2)). Echocardiographically determined left ventricular end diastolic and systolic diameters were significantly smaller in irradiated animals (repeated measures ANOVA, P effects including a high incidence of myocardial fibrosis, reduced left ventricular diameter and elevated systemic inflammation. Additional prospective studies are required to define the time course and mechanisms underlying radiation-induced heart disease in this model. PMID:27333082

  9. Comparison of Indoor Air Quality between 2 Ventilation Strategies in a Facility Housing Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monts de Oca, Nicole A; Laughlin, Mitzi; Jenkins, John; Lockworth, Cynthia R; Bolton, Iris D; Brammer, David W

    2015-09-01

    Adequate indoor-air quality (IAQ)--defined by the temperature, relative humidity, and the levels of carbon dioxide, small particles, and total volatile organic compounds (TVOC)--is crucial in laboratory animal facilities. The ventilation standards for controlling these parameters are not well defined. This study assessed the effect of 2 ventilation strategies on IAQ in 2 rooms housing rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). We hypothesized that using a demand-controlled ventilation (DCV) system with a baseline ventilation rate of less than 3 fresh-air changes per hour (ACH) would maintain IAQ comparable to or better than the traditional constant flow rate (CFR) system at 12 fresh ACH. During a 60-d study period, each of the 2 rooms operated 30 d on DCV and 30 d on CFR ventilation. In both rooms, temperatures remained more consistently within the established setpoint during the DCV phase than during the CFR phase. Relative humidity did not differ significantly between rooms or strategies. CO₂ was lower during the CFR phase than DCV phase. Small-particle and TVOC levels were lower during CFR in the larger (3060 ft(3)) room but not the smaller (2340 ft(3)) room. During the DCV phase, the larger room was at the baseline airflow rate over 99% of the time and the smaller room over 96% of the time. The DCV strategy resulted in a baseline airflow rate of less than 3 ACH, which in turn provided acceptable IAQ over 96% of the time; higher ventilation rates were warranted only during sanitation periods. PMID:26424251

  10. Antibody responses to a spore carbohydrate antigen as a marker of nonfatal inhalation anthrax in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saile, Elke; Boons, Geert-Jan; Buskas, Therese; Carlson, Russell W; Kannenberg, Elmar L; Barr, John R; Boyer, Anne E; Gallegos-Candela, Maribel; Quinn, Conrad P

    2011-05-01

    The Bacillus anthracis exosporium protein BclA contains an O-linked antigenic tetrasaccharide whose terminal sugar is known as anthrose (J. M. Daubenspeck et al., J. Biol. Chem. 279:30945-30953, 2004). We hypothesized that serologic responses to anthrose may have diagnostic value in confirming exposure to aerosolized B. anthracis. We evaluated the serologic responses to a synthetic anthrose-containing trisaccharide (ATS) in a group of five rhesus macaques that survived inhalation anthrax following exposure to B. anthracis Ames spores. Two of five animals (RM2 and RM3) were treated with ciprofloxacin starting at 48 hours postexposure and two (RM4 and RM5) at 72 h postexposure; one animal (RM1) was untreated. Infection was confirmed by blood culture and detection of anthrax toxin lethal factor (LF) in plasma. Anti-ATS IgG responses were determined at 14, 21, 28, and 35 days postexposure, with preexposure serum as a control. All animals, irrespective of ciprofloxacin treatment, mounted a specific, measurable anti-ATS IgG response. The earliest detectable responses were on days 14 (RM1, RM2, and RM5), 21 (RM4), and 28 (RM3). Specificity of the anti-ATS responses was demonstrated by competitive-inhibition enzyme immunoassay (CIEIA), in which a 2-fold (wt/wt) excess of carbohydrate in a bovine serum albumin (BSA) conjugate of the oligosaccharide (ATS-BSA) effected >94% inhibition, whereas a structural analog lacking the 3-hydroxy-3-methyl-butyryl moiety at the C-4" of the anthrosyl residue had no inhibition activity. These data suggest that anti-ATS antibody responses may be used to identify aerosol exposure to B. anthracis spores. The anti-ATS antibody responses were detectable during administration of ciprofloxacin. PMID:21389148

  11. Transfer of a serial representation between two distinct tasks by rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Greg Jensen

    Full Text Available Do animals form task-specific representations, or do those representations take a general form that can be applied to qualitatively different tasks? Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta learned the ordering of stimulus lists using two different serial tasks, in order to test whether prior experience in each task could be transfered to the other, enhancing performance. The simultaneous chaining paradigm delivered rewards only after subjects responded in the correct order to all stimuli displayed on a touch sensitive video monitor. The transitive inference paradigm presented pairs of items and delivered rewards when subjects selected the item with the lower ordinal rank. After learning a list in one paradigm, subjects' knowledge of that list was tested using the other paradigm. Performance was enhanced from the very start of transfer training. Transitive inference performance was characterized by 'symbolic distance effects,' whereby the ordinal distance between stimuli in the implied list ordering was strongly predictive of the probability of a correct response. The patterns of error displayed by subjects in both tasks were best explained by a spatially coded representation of list items, regardless of which task was used to learn the list. Our analysis permits properties of this representation to be investigated without the confound of verbal reasoning.

  12. Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) exhibit the decoy effect in a perceptual discrimination task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parrish, Audrey E; Evans, Theodore A; Beran, Michael J

    2015-07-01

    The asymmetric dominance effect (or decoy effect) is a form of context-dependent choice bias in which the probability of choosing one of two options is impacted by the introduction of a third option, also known as the decoy. Decoy effects are documented widely within the human consumer choice literature, and even extend to preference testing within nonhuman animals. Here, we extended this line of research to a perceptual discrimination task with rhesus monkeys to determine whether decoy stimuli would impact size judgments of rectangular stimuli. In a computerized task, monkeys attempted to choose the larger of two rectangles that varied in size and orientation (horizontally or vertically oriented). In probe trials, a third stimulus (the decoy) was presented that was smaller than the other two rectangles but matched the orientation of one of them. On half of the probe trials, the presented decoy matched the orientation of the larger stimulus, and on the other half, the decoy matched the orientation of the smaller stimulus. Monkeys rarely selected the decoy stimulus. However, their performance (selection of the largest rectangle) increased relative to the baseline trials (with only two choices) when the decoy was congruent in its orientation with the largest rectangle, but decreased relative to baseline when the decoy was incongruent with the largest rectangle. Thus, a decoy stimulus impacted monkeys' perceptual choice behavior even when it was not a viable choice option itself. These results are explained with regard to comparative evaluation mechanisms. PMID:25832189

  13. Ecological genetics of Chinese rhesus macaque in response to mountain building: all things are not equal.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shan-Jin Wu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Pliocene uplifting of the Qinghai-Tibetan Plateau (QTP and Quaternary glaciation may have impacted the Asian biota more than any other events. Little is documented with respect to how the geological and climatological events influenced speciation as well as spatial and genetic structuring, especially in vertebrate endotherms. Macaca mulatta is the most widely distributed non-human primate. It may be the most suitable model to test hypotheses regarding the genetic consequences of orogenesis on an endotherm. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Using a large dataset of maternally inherited mitochondrial DNA gene sequences and nuclear microsatellite DNA data, we discovered two maternal super-haplogroups exist, one in western China and the other in eastern China. M. mulatta formed around 2.31 Ma (1.51-3.15, 95%, and divergence of the two major matrilines was estimated at 1.15 Ma (0.78-1.55, 95%. The western super-haplogroup exhibits significant geographic structure. In contrast, the eastern super-haplogroup has far greater haplotypic variability with little structure based on analyses of six variable microsatellite loci using Structure and Geneland. Analysis using Migrate detected greater gene flow from WEST to EAST than vice versa. We did not detect signals of bottlenecking in most populations. CONCLUSIONS: Analyses of the nuclear and mitochondrial datasets obtained large differences in genetic patterns for M. mulatta. The difference likely reflects inheritance mechanisms of the maternally inherited mtDNA genome versus nuclear biparentally inherited STRs and male-mediated gene flow. Dramatic environmental changes may be responsible for shaping the matrilineal history of macaques. The timing of events, the formation of M. mulatta, and the divergence of the super-haplogroups, corresponds to both the uplifting of the QTP and Quaternary climatic oscillations. Orogenesis likely drove divergence of western populations in China, and Pleistocene

  14. Managing the Cayo Santiago rhesus macaque population: The role of density.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernandez-Pacheco, Raisa; Delgado, Diana L; Rawlins, Richard G; Kessler, Matthew J; Ruiz-Lambides, Angelina V; Maldonado, Elizabeth; Sabat, Alberto M

    2016-01-01

    Cayo Santiago is the oldest continuously operating free-ranging rhesus monkey colony in the world. Population control of this colony has historically been carried out by periodic live capture and removal of animals. However, the effect of such a strategy on the size, growth rate, age structure, and sex ratio of the population has not been analyzed. This study reviews past removal data and uses a population projection model to simulate the effects of different removal schemes based on Cayo Santiago demographic data from 2000-2012. The model incorporates negative density-dependence in female fertility, as well as male and female survival rates, to determine the population-level effects of selective removal by age and sex. Modeling revealed that removal of sexually immature individuals has negligible effects on the population dynamics explaining why with an initial population of 1309 in 2000 and annual removals of immature monkeys a mean annual population growth rate of 12% and a final population size of ∼1,435 individuals by 2012 (∼0.009 animal/m(2) ) was observed. With no removals, the population is expected to exhibit dampened oscillations until reaching equilibrium at ∼1,690 individuals (∼0.0111 animal/m(2) ) in 2,100. In contrast, removal of adult females (≥4 yrs) would significantly reduce the population size, but would also promote an increase in population growth rate due to density feedback. A maximum annual production of 275 births is expected when 550 adult females are present in the population. Sensitivity analyses showed that removing females, in contrast to controlling their fertility through invasive treatments would contribute the most to changes in population growth rate. Given the density compensation on fertility, stabilizing the population would require removing ∼80% of the current population of adult females. This study highlights the importance of addressing the population-level density effects, as well as sensitivity analyses, to

  15. Context cue-dependent saccadic adaptation in rhesus macaques cannot be elicited using color.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cecala, Aaron L; Smalianchuk, Ivan; Khanna, Sanjeev B; Smith, Matthew A; Gandhi, Neeraj J

    2015-07-01

    When the head does not move, rapid movements of the eyes called saccades are used to redirect the line of sight. Saccades are defined by a series of metrical and kinematic (evolution of a movement as a function of time) relationships. For example, the amplitude of a saccade made from one visual target to another is roughly 90% of the distance between the initial fixation point (T0) and the peripheral target (T1). However, this stereotypical relationship between saccade amplitude and initial retinal error (T1-T0) may be altered, either increased or decreased, by surreptitiously displacing a visual target during an ongoing saccade. This form of motor learning (called saccadic adaptation) has been described in both humans and monkeys. Recent experiments in humans and monkeys have suggested that internal (proprioceptive) and external (target shape, color, and/or motion) cues may be used to produce context-dependent adaptation. We tested the hypothesis that an external contextual cue (target color) could be used to evoke differential gain (actual saccade/initial retinal error) states in rhesus monkeys. We did not observe differential gain states correlated with target color regardless of whether targets were displaced along the same vector as the primary saccade or perpendicular to it. Furthermore, this observation held true regardless of whether adaptation trials using various colors and intrasaccade target displacements were randomly intermixed or presented in short or long blocks of trials. These results are consistent with hypotheses that state that color cannot be used as a contextual cue and are interpreted in light of previous studies of saccadic adaptation in both humans and monkeys. PMID:25995353

  16. Altered immune responses in rhesus macaques co-infected with SIV and Plasmodium cynomolgi: an animal model for coincident AIDS and relapsing malaria.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey W Koehler

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Dual epidemics of the malaria parasite Plasmodium and HIV-1 in sub-Saharan Africa and Asia present a significant risk for co-infection in these overlapping endemic regions. Recent studies of HIV/Plasmodium falciparum co-infection have reported significant interactions of these pathogens, including more rapid CD4+ T cell loss, increased viral load, increased immunosuppression, and increased episodes of clinical malaria. Here, we describe a novel rhesus macaque model for co-infection that supports and expands upon findings in human co-infection studies and can be used to identify interactions between these two pathogens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Five rhesus macaques were infected with P. cynomolgi and, following three parasite relapses, with SIV. Compared to macaques infected with SIV alone, co-infected animals had, as a group, decreased survival time and more rapid declines in markers for SIV progression, including peripheral CD4+ T cells and CD4+/CD8+ T cell ratios. The naïve CD4+ T cell pool of the co-infected animals was depleted more rapidly than animals infected with SIV alone. The co-infected animals also failed to generate proliferative responses to parasitemia by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells as well as B cells while also having a less robust anti-parasite and altered anti-SIV antibody response. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These data suggest that infection with both SIV and Plasmodium enhances SIV-induced disease progression and impairs the anti-Plasmodium immune response. These data support findings in HIV/Plasmodium co-infection studies. This animal model can be used to further define impacts of lentivirus and Plasmodium co-infection and guide public health and therapeutic interventions.

  17. Myocarditis in CD8-depleted SIV-infected rhesus macaques after short-term dual therapy with nucleoside and nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitors.

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    Lakshmanan Annamalai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART has dramatically reduced the morbidity and mortality associated with HIV infection, a number of antiretroviral toxicities have been described, including myocardial toxicity resulting from the use of nucleotide and nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs. Current treatment guidelines recommend the use of HAART regimens containing two NRTIs for initial therapy of HIV-1 positive individuals; however, potential cardiotoxicity resulting from treatment with multiple NRTIs has not been addressed. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We examined myocardial tissue from twelve CD8 lymphocyte-depleted adult rhesus macaques, including eight animals infected with simian immunodeficiency virus, four of which received combined antiretroviral therapy (CART consisting of two NRTIs [(9-R-2-Phosphonomethoxypropyl Adenine (PMPA and (+/--beta-2',3'-dideoxy-5-fluoro-3'-thiacytidine (RCV] for 28 days. Multifocal infiltrates of mononuclear inflammatory cells were present in the myocardium of all macaques that received CART, but not untreated SIV-positive animals or SIV-negative controls. Macrophages were the predominant inflammatory cells within lesions, as shown by immunoreactivity for the macrophage markers Iba1 and CD68. Heart specimens from monkeys that received CART had significantly lower virus burdens than untreated animals (p<0.05, but significantly greater quantities of TNF-α mRNA than either SIV-positive untreated animals or uninfected controls (p<0.05. Interferon-γ (IFN-γ, IL-1β and CXCL11 mRNA were upregulated in heart tissue from SIV-positive monkeys, independent of antiretroviral treatment, but CXCL9 mRNA was only upregulated in heart tissue from macaques that received CART. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These results suggest that short-term treatment with multiple NRTIs may be associated with myocarditis, and demonstrate that the CD8-depleted SIV-positive rhesus monkey is a useful

  18. CD4+ and CD8+ T-cell responses to latent antigen EBNA-1 and lytic antigen BZLF-1 during persistent lymphocryptovirus infection of rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leskowitz, R M; Zhou, X Y; Villinger, F; Fogg, M H; Kaur, A; Lieberman, P M; Wang, F; Ertl, H C

    2013-08-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) infection leads to lifelong viral persistence through its latency in B cells. EBV-specific T cells control reactivations and prevent the development of EBV-associated malignancies in most healthy carriers, but infection can sometimes cause chronic disease and malignant transformation. Epstein-Barr nuclear antigen 1 (EBNA-1) is the only viral protein consistently expressed during all forms of latency and in all EBV-associated malignancies and is a promising target for a therapeutic vaccine. Here, we studied the EBNA-1-specific immune response using the EBV-homologous rhesus lymphocryptovirus (rhLCV) infection in rhesus macaques. We assessed the frequency, phenotype, and cytokine production profiles of rhLCV EBNA-1 (rhEBNA-1)-specific T cells in 15 rhesus macaques and compared them to the lytic antigen of rhLCV BZLF-1 (rhBZLF-1). We were able to detect rhEBNA-1-specific CD4(+) and/or CD8(+) T cells in 14 of the 15 animals screened. In comparison, all 15 animals had detectable rhBZLF-1 responses. Most peptide-specific CD4(+) T cells exhibited a resting phenotype of central memory (TCM), while peptide-specific CD8(+) T cells showed a more activated phenotype, belonging mainly to the effector cell subset. By comparing our results to the human EBV immune response, we demonstrate that the rhLCV model is a valid system for studying chronic EBV infection and for the preclinical development of therapeutic vaccines. PMID:23698300

  19. Arterial Catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... version AMERICAN THORACIC SOCIETY Patient Information Series Arterial Catheterization An arterial catheter is a thin, hollow tube ... PHYSICIANS: AND COPY Why Do I Need Arterial Catheterization? Common reasons an arterial catheterization is done include: ■ ...

  20. Peptide-binding motifs associated with MHC molecules common in Chinese rhesus macaques are analogous to those of human HLA supertypes and include HLA-B27-like alleles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mothé, Bianca R.; Southwood, Scott; Sidney, John;

    2013-01-01

    deciphering outcomes of infection and vaccine efficacy. In this study, we have provided detailed characterization of six prevalent Chinese rhesus macaque MHC class I alleles, yielding a combined phenotypic frequency of 29 %. The peptide-binding specificity of two of these alleles, Mamu-A2*01:02 and Mamu-B*010......:01, as well as the previously characterized allele Mamu-B*003:01 (and Indian rhesus Mamu-B*003:01), was found to be analogous to that of alleles in the HLA-B27 supertype family. Specific alleles in the HLA-B27 supertype family, including HLA-B*27:05, have been associated with long-term nonprogression to...... AIDS in humans. All six alleles characterized in the present study were found to have specificities analogous to HLA supertype alleles. These data contribute to the concept that Chinese rhesus macaque MHC immunogenetics is more similar to HLA than their Indian rhesus macaque counterparts and thereby...

  1. Memory B cells and CD8⁺ lymphocytes do not control seasonal influenza A virus replication after homologous re-challenge of rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy D Carroll

    Full Text Available This study sought to define the role of memory lymphocytes in the protection from homologous influenza A virus re-challenge in rhesus macaques. Depleting monoclonal antibodies (mAb were administered to the animals prior to their second experimental inoculation with a human seasonal influenza A virus strain. Treatment with either anti-CD8α or anti-CD20 mAbs prior to re-challenge had minimal effect on influenza A virus replication. Thus, in non-human primates with pre-existing anti-influenza A antibodies, memory B cells and CD8α⁺ T cells do not contribute to the control of virus replication after re-challenge with a homologous strain of influenza A virus.

  2. Structural basis of diverse peptide accommodation by the rhesus macaque MHC class I molecule Mamu-B*17: insights into immune protection from simian immunodeficiency virus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan; Gao, Feng; Liu, Jun; Qi, Jianxun; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A; Gao, George F

    2011-12-15

    The MHC class I molecule Mamu-B*17 has been associated with elite control of SIV infection in rhesus macaques, akin to the protective effects described for HLA-B*57 in HIV-infected individuals. In this study, we determined the crystal structures of Mamu-B*17 in complex with eight different peptides corresponding to immunodominant SIV(mac)239-derived CD8(+) T cell epitopes: HW8 (HLEVQGYW), GW10 (GSHLEVQGYW), MW9 (MHPAQTSQW), QW9 (QTSQWDDPW), FW9 (FQWMGYELW), MF8 (MRHVLEPF), IW9 (IRYPKTFGW), and IW11 (IRYPKTFGWLW). The structures reveal that not only P2, but also P1 and P3, can be used as N-terminal anchor residues by Mamu-B*17-restricted peptides. Moreover, the N-terminal anchor residues exhibit a broad chemical specificity, encompassing basic (H and R), bulky polar aliphatic (Q), and small (T) residues. In contrast, Mamu-B*17 exhibits a very narrow preference for aromatic residues (W and F) at the C terminus, similar to that displayed by HLA-B*57. Flexibility within the whole peptide-binding groove contributes to the accommodation of these diverse peptides, which adopt distinct conformations. Furthermore, the unusually large pocket D enables compensation from other peptide residues if P3 is occupied by an amino acid with a small side chain. In addition, residues located at likely TCR contact regions present highly flexible conformations, which may impact TCR repertoire profiles. These findings provide novel insights into the structural basis of diverse peptide accommodation by Mamu-B*17 and highlight unique atomic features that might contribute to the protective effect of this MHC I molecule in SIV-infected rhesus macaques. PMID:22084443

  3. Functional analysis of frequently expressed Chinese rhesus macaque MHC class I molecules Mamu-A1*02601 and Mamu-B*08301 reveals HLA-A2 and HLA-A3 supertypic specificities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Southwood, Scott; Solomon, Christopher; Hoof, Ilka;

    2011-01-01

    rhesus macaques’ major histocompatibility complex (MHC) for composition and function should facilitate greater utilization of the species. Previous studies have demonstrated that Chinese-origin M. mulatta (Mamu) class I alleles are more polymorphic than their Indian counterparts, perhaps inferring a...... populations. In this study, we have characterized two additional alleles expressed with high frequency in Chinese rhesus macaques, Mamu-A1*02601 and Mamu-B*08301. Upon the development of MHC–peptide-binding assays and definition of their associated motifs, we reveal that these Mamu alleles share peptide...

  4. Repertoire comparison of the B-cell receptor-encoding loci in humans and rhesus macaques by next-generation sequencing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vigdorovich, Vladimir; Oliver, Brian G; Carbonetti, Sara; Dambrauskas, Nicholas; Lange, Miles D; Yacoob, Christina; Leahy, Will; Callahan, Jonathan; Stamatatos, Leonidas; Sather, D Noah

    2016-01-01

    Rhesus macaques (RMs) are a widely used model system for the study of vaccines, infectious diseases and microbial pathogenesis. Their value as a model lies in their close evolutionary relationship to humans, which, in theory, allows them to serve as a close approximation of the human immune system. However, despite their prominence as a human surrogate model system, many aspects of the RM immune system remain ill characterized. In particular, B cell-mediated immunity in macaques has not been sufficiently characterized, and the B-cell receptor-encoding loci have not been thoroughly annotated. To address these gaps, we analyzed the circulating heavy- and light-chain repertoires in humans and RMs by next-generation sequencing. By comparing V gene segment usage, J-segment usage and CDR3 lengths between the two species, we identified several important similarities and differences. These differences were especially notable in the IgM+ B-cell repertoire. However, the class-switched, antigen-educated B-cell populations converged on a set of similar characteristics, implying similarities in how each species responds to antigen. Our study provides the first comprehensive overview of the circulating repertoires of the heavy- and light-chain sequences in RMs, and provides insight into how they may perform as a model system for B cell-mediated immunity in humans. PMID:27525066

  5. Multiple antibody targets on herpes B glycoproteins B and D identified by screening sera of infected rhesus macaques with peptide microarrays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sven-Kevin Hotop

    Full Text Available Herpes B virus (or Herpesvirus simiae or Macacine herpesvirus 1 is endemic in many populations of macaques, both in the wild and in captivity. The virus elicits only mild clinical symptoms (if any in monkeys, but can be transmitted by various routes, most commonly via bites, to humans where it causes viral encephalitis with a high mortality rate. Hence, herpes B constitutes a considerable occupational hazard for animal caretakers, veterinarians and laboratory personnel. Efforts are therefore being made to reduce the risk of zoonotic infection and to improve prognosis after accidental exposure. Among the measures envisaged are serological surveillance of monkey colonies and specific diagnosis of herpes B zoonosis against a background of antibodies recognizing the closely related human herpes simplex virus (HSV. 422 pentadecapeptides covering, in an overlapping fashion, the entire amino acid sequences of herpes B proteins gB and gD were synthesized and immobilized on glass slides. Antibodies present in monkey sera that bind to subsets of the peptide collection were detected by microserological techniques. With 42 different rhesus macaque sera, 114 individual responses to 18 different antibody target regions (ATRs were recorded, 17 of which had not been described earlier. This finding may pave the way for a peptide-based, herpes B specific serological diagnostic test.

  6. Prime-Boost Vaccination Using Chemokine-Fused gp120 DNA and HIV Envelope Peptides Activates Both Immediate and Long-Term Memory Cellular Responses in Rhesus Macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Qin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV vaccine candidates with improved immunogenicity and induction of mucosal T-cell immunity are needed. A prime-boost strategy using a novel HIV glycoprotein 120 DNA vaccine was employed to immunize rhesus macaques. The DNA vaccine encoded a chimeric gp120 protein in fusion with monocyte chemoattractant protein-3, which was hypothesized to improve the ability of antigen-presenting cells to capture viral antigen through chemokine receptor-mediated endocytosis. DNA vaccination induced virus-reactive T cells in peripheral blood, detectable by T cell proliferation, INFγ ELISPOT and sustained IL-6 production, without humoral responses. With a peptide-cocktail vaccine containing a set of conserved polypeptides of HIV-1 envelope protein, given by nasogastric administration, primed T-cell immunity was significantly boosted. Surprisingly, long-term and peptide-specific mucosal memory T-cell immunity was detected in both vaccinated macaques after one year. Therefore, data from this investigation offer proof-of-principle for potential effectiveness of the prime-boost strategy with a chemokine-fused gp120 DNA and warrant further testing in the nonhuman primate models for developing as a potential HIV vaccine candidate in humans.

  7. Transforming growth factor-β1 regulated phosphorylated AKT and interferon gamma expressions are associated with epithelial cell survival in rhesus macaque colon explants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahar, Bapi; Pan, Diganta; Lala, Wendy; Kenway-Lynch, Carys S; Das, Arpita

    2015-05-01

    Transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) is an important immunoregulatory cytokine that plays an obligate role in regulating T-cell functions. Here, we demonstrated the role of TGF-β1 in regulating the survival of intestinal epithelial cells (ECs) in rhesus colon explant cultures using either anti-TGF-β1 antibody or recombinant TGF-β1 proteins. Neutralization of endogenous TGF-β1 using anti-TGF-β1 antibodies induced apoptosis of both intestinal ECs and lamina propria (LP) cells. Additionally, endogenous TGF-β1 blocking significantly increased expression of IFNγ, TNFα, CD107a and Perforin in LP cells compared to media and isotype controls. A significant decrease in pAKT expression was detected in anti-TGF-β1 MAbs treated explants compared to isotype and rTGF-β1 protein treated explants. Our results demonstrated TGF-β1 regulated pAKT and IFNγ expressions were associated with epithelial cell survival in rhesus macaque colon explants and suggest a potential role of mucosal TGF-β1 in regulating intestinal homeostasis and EC integrity. PMID:25769244

  8. The Effects of Reduced Gluten Barley Diet on Humoral and Cell-Mediated Systemic Immune Responses of Gluten-Sensitive Rhesus Macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karol Sestak

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Celiac disease (CD affects approximately 1% of the general population while an estimated additional 6% suffers from a recently characterized, rapidly emerging, similar disease, referred to as non-celiac gluten sensitivity (NCGS. The only effective treatment of CD and NCGS requires removal of gluten sources from the diet. Since required adherence to a gluten-free diet (GFD is difficult to accomplish, efforts to develop alternative treatments have been intensifying in recent years. In this study, the non-human primate model of CD/NCGS, e.g., gluten-sensitive rhesus macaque, was utilized with the objective to evaluate the treatment potential of reduced gluten cereals using a reduced gluten (RG; 1% of normal gluten barley mutant as a model. Conventional and RG barleys were used for the formulation of experimental chows and fed to gluten-sensitive (GS and control macaques to determine if RG barley causes a remission of dietary gluten-induced clinical and immune responses in GS macaques. The impacts of the RG barley diet were compared with the impacts of the conventional barley-containing chow and the GFD. Although remission of the anti-gliadin antibody (AGA serum responses and an improvement of clinical diarrhea were noted after switching the conventional to the RG barley diet, production of inflammatory cytokines, e.g., interferon-gamma (IFN-γ, tumor necrosis factor (TNF and interleukin-8 (IL-8 by peripheral CD4+ T helper lymphocytes, persisted during the RG chow treatment and were partially abolished only upon re-administration of the GFD. It was concluded that the RG barley diet might be used for the partial improvement of gluten-induced disease but its therapeutic value still requires upgrading—by co-administration of additional treatments.

  9. Induction of Broad and Potent Anti-Human Immunodeficiency Virus Immune Responses in Rhesus Macaques by Priming with a DNA Vaccine and Boosting with Protein-Adsorbed Polylactide Coglycolide Microparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Otten, Gillis; Schaefer, Mary; Greer, Catherine; Calderon-Cacia, Maria; Coit, Doris; Kazzaz, Jina; Medina-Selby, Angelica; Selby, Mark; Singh, Manmohan; Ugozzoli, Mildred; zur Megede, Jan; Barnett, Susan W.; O'Hagan, Derek; Donnelly, John; Ulmer, Jeffrey

    2003-01-01

    Several vaccine technologies were evaluated for their abilities to induce anti-human immunodeficiency virus Gag immune responses in rhesus macaques. While no vaccine alone was able to induce broad and strong immune responses, these were achieved by priming with Gag DNA and boosting with Gag protein adsorbed to polylactide coglycolide microparticles. This regimen elicited strong antibodies, helper T cells, and cytotoxic T lymphocytes and thus holds promise as an effective vaccination scheme.

  10. Mucosal B Cells Are Associated with Delayed SIV Acquisition in Vaccinated Female but Not Male Rhesus Macaques Following SIVmac251 Rectal Challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iskra Tuero

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Many viral infections, including HIV, exhibit sex-based pathogenic differences. However, few studies have examined vaccine-related sex differences. We compared immunogenicity and protective efficacy of monomeric SIV gp120 with oligomeric SIV gp140 in a pre-clinical rhesus macaque study and explored a subsequent sex bias in vaccine outcome. Each immunization group (16 females, 8 males was primed twice mucosally with replication-competent Ad-recombinants encoding SIVsmH4env/rev, SIV239gag and SIV239nefΔ1-13 and boosted twice intramuscularly with SIVmac239 monomeric gp120 or oligomeric gp140 in MF59 adjuvant. Controls (7 females, 5 males received empty Ad and MF59. Up to 9 weekly intrarectal challenges with low-dose SIVmac251 were administered until macaques became infected. We assessed vaccine-induced binding, neutralizing, and non-neutralizing antibodies, Env-specific memory B cells and plasmablasts/plasma cells (PB/PC in bone marrow and rectal tissue, mucosal Env-specific antibodies, and Env-specific T-cells. Post-challenge, only one macaque (gp140-immunized remained uninfected. However, SIV acquisition was significantly delayed in vaccinated females but not males, correlated with Env-specific IgA in rectal secretions, rectal Env-specific memory B cells, and PC in rectal tissue. These results extend previous correlations of mucosal antibodies and memory B cells with protective efficacy. The gp140 regimen was more immunogenic, stimulating elevated gp140 and cyclic V2 binding antibodies, ADCC and ADCP activities, bone marrow Env-specific PB/PC, and rectal gp140-specific IgG. However, immunization with gp120, the form of envelope immunogen used in RV144, the only vaccine trial to show some efficacy, provided more significant acquisition delay. Further over 40 weeks of follow-up, no gp120 immunized macaques met euthanasia criteria in contrast to 7 gp140-immunized and 2 control animals. Although males had higher binding antibodies than females, ADCC

  11. Vaccination with Plasmodium knowlesi AMA1 formulated in the novel adjuvant co-vaccine HT™ protects against blood-stage challenge in rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzamil Mahdi Abdel Hamid

    Full Text Available Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (PfAMA1 is a leading blood stage vaccine candidate. Plasmodium knowlesi AMA1 (PkAMA1 was produced and purified using similar methodology as for clinical grade PfAMA1 yielding a pure, conformational intact protein. Combined with the adjuvant CoVaccine HT™, PkAMA1 was found to be highly immunogenic in rabbits and the efficacy of the PkAMA1 was subsequently tested in a rhesus macaque blood-stage challenge model. Six rhesus monkeys were vaccinated with PkAMA1 and a control group of 6 were vaccinated with PfAMA1. A total of 50 µg AMA1 was administered intramuscularly three times at 4 week intervals. One of six rhesus monkeys vaccinated with PkAMA1 was able to control parasitaemia, upon blood stage challenge with P. knowlesi H-strain. Four out of the remaining five showed a delay in parasite onset that correlated with functional antibody titres. In the PfAMA1 vaccinated control group, five out of six animals had to be treated with antimalarials 8 days after challenge; one animal did not become patent during the challenge period. Following a rest period, animals were boosted and challenged again. Four of the six rhesus monkeys vaccinated with PkAMA1 were able to control the parasitaemia, one had a delayed onset of parasitaemia and one animal was not protected, while all control animals required treatment. To confirm that the control of parasitaemia was AMA1-related, animals were allowed to recover, boosted and re-challenged with P. knowlesi Nuri strain. All control animals had to be treated with antimalarials by day 8, while five out of six PkAMA1 vaccinated animals were able to control parasitaemia. This study shows that: i Yeast-expressed PkAMA1 can protect against blood stage challenge; ii Functional antibody levels as measured by GIA correlated inversely with the day of onset and iii GIA IC(50 values correlated with estimated in vivo growth rates.

  12. Vaccination with Plasmodium knowlesi AMA1 formulated in the novel adjuvant co-vaccine HT™ protects against blood-stage challenge in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahdi Abdel Hamid, Muzamil; Remarque, Edmond J; van Duivenvoorde, Leonie M; van der Werff, Nicole; Walraven, Vanessa; Faber, Bart W; Kocken, Clemens H M; Thomas, Alan W

    2011-01-01

    Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (PfAMA1) is a leading blood stage vaccine candidate. Plasmodium knowlesi AMA1 (PkAMA1) was produced and purified using similar methodology as for clinical grade PfAMA1 yielding a pure, conformational intact protein. Combined with the adjuvant CoVaccine HT™, PkAMA1 was found to be highly immunogenic in rabbits and the efficacy of the PkAMA1 was subsequently tested in a rhesus macaque blood-stage challenge model. Six rhesus monkeys were vaccinated with PkAMA1 and a control group of 6 were vaccinated with PfAMA1. A total of 50 µg AMA1 was administered intramuscularly three times at 4 week intervals. One of six rhesus monkeys vaccinated with PkAMA1 was able to control parasitaemia, upon blood stage challenge with P. knowlesi H-strain. Four out of the remaining five showed a delay in parasite onset that correlated with functional antibody titres. In the PfAMA1 vaccinated control group, five out of six animals had to be treated with antimalarials 8 days after challenge; one animal did not become patent during the challenge period. Following a rest period, animals were boosted and challenged again. Four of the six rhesus monkeys vaccinated with PkAMA1 were able to control the parasitaemia, one had a delayed onset of parasitaemia and one animal was not protected, while all control animals required treatment. To confirm that the control of parasitaemia was AMA1-related, animals were allowed to recover, boosted and re-challenged with P. knowlesi Nuri strain. All control animals had to be treated with antimalarials by day 8, while five out of six PkAMA1 vaccinated animals were able to control parasitaemia. This study shows that: i) Yeast-expressed PkAMA1 can protect against blood stage challenge; ii) Functional antibody levels as measured by GIA correlated inversely with the day of onset and iii) GIA IC(50) values correlated with estimated in vivo growth rates. PMID:21655233

  13. Human Non-neutralizing HIV-1 Envelope Monoclonal Antibodies Limit the Number of Founder Viruses during SHIV Mucosal Infection in Rhesus Macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sampa Santra

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 mucosal transmission begins with virus or virus-infected cells moving through mucus across mucosal epithelium to infect CD4+ T cells. Although broadly neutralizing antibodies (bnAbs are the type of HIV-1 antibodies that are most likely protective, they are not induced with current vaccine candidates. In contrast, antibodies that do not neutralize primary HIV-1 strains in the TZM-bl infection assay are readily induced by current vaccine candidates and have also been implicated as secondary correlates of decreased HIV-1 risk in the RV144 vaccine efficacy trial. Here, we have studied the capacity of anti-Env monoclonal antibodies (mAbs against either the immunodominant region of gp41 (7B2 IgG1, the first constant region of gp120 (A32 IgG1, or the third variable loop (V3 of gp120 (CH22 IgG1 to modulate in vivo rectal mucosal transmission of a high-dose simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV-BaL in rhesus macaques. 7B2 IgG1 or A32 IgG1, each containing mutations to enhance Fc function, was administered passively to rhesus macaques but afforded no protection against productive clinical infection while the positive control antibody CH22 IgG1 prevented infection in 4 of 6 animals. Enumeration of transmitted/founder (T/F viruses revealed that passive infusion of each of the three antibodies significantly reduced the number of T/F genomes. Thus, some antibodies that bind HIV-1 Env but fail to neutralize virus in traditional neutralization assays may limit the number of T/F viruses involved in transmission without leading to enhancement of viral infection. For one of these mAbs, gp41 mAb 7B2, we provide the first co-crystal structure in complex with a common cyclical loop motif demonstrated to be critical for infection by other retroviruses.

  14. 桂林七星公园猕猴的食物组成及季节性变化%Diet and seasonal changes in Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulata) at Seven-star Park, Guilin

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周岐海; 唐华兴; 韦春强; 黄乘明

    2009-01-01

    @@ 觅食是动物最重、最常见的行为,动物通过觅食获取其生长发育、繁殖和运动所需要的营养与能量.%Data on diet were collected from one group of Rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatto,) between November 2005 and October 2006 at Seven-star Park, Cuilin, Guangxi Province, using the instantaneous scan sampling method. Our results indicated that 60 plant species were used as food by the macaques. The types of foods including 40 species of trees, 12 species of shrubs, 4 species of vines, and 4 species of herbs. They showed food preference, and 69. 4% of the diet came only from 10 species. Leaves constituted 41. 0% of the diet, comprising 16. 7% young leaves and 24. 3% mature leaves. Petiole and bark accounted for 27. 3% and 21. 8% respectively. Fruits, flowers and seeds contributed a small proportion of the diet, 6. 2% , 2. 2% , and 1.4%, respectively. The macaques' diet varied according to season. In spring, the macaques fed predominantly on young leaves, petiole and bark. In summer, they increased the consumption of mature leaves and bark. The consumption of young leaves and mature leaves peaked in autumn, and the consumption of petiole and bark decreased significantly. In winter, the macaques increased significantly the consumption of petiole and bark, and also consumed mature leaves in large quantity.

  15. Immunization of Newborn Rhesus Macaques with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) Vaccines Prolongs Survival after Oral Challenge with Virulent SIVmac251

    OpenAIRE

    Van Rompay, Koen K. A.; Greenier, Jennifer L.; Cole, Kelly Stefano; Earl, Patricia; Moss, Bernard; Steckbeck, Jonathan D.; Pahar, Bapi; Rourke, Tracy; Montelaro, Ronald C.; Canfield, Don R; Tarara, Ross P; Miller, Christopher; McChesney, Michael B.; Marthas, Marta L.

    2003-01-01

    There is an urgent need for active immunization strategies that, if administered shortly after birth, could protect infants in developing countries from acquiring human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection through breast-feeding. Better knowledge of the immunogenic properties of vaccine candidates in infants and of the effect of maternal antibodies on vaccine efficacy will aid in the development of such a neonatal HIV vaccine. Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of infant macaques...

  16. Unraveling the effect of genomic structural changes in the rhesus macaque - implications for the adaptive role of inversions

    OpenAIRE

    Ullastres, Ana; Farré, Marta; Capilla, Laia; Ruiz-Herrera, Aurora

    2014-01-01

    Background By reshuffling genomes, structural genomic reorganizations provide genetic variation on which natural selection can work. Understanding the mechanisms underlying this process has been a long-standing question in evolutionary biology. In this context, our purpose in this study is to characterize the genomic regions involved in structural rearrangements between human and macaque genomes and determine their influence on meiotic recombination as a way to explore the adaptive role of ge...

  17. Cashing out: The decisional flexibility of uncertainty responses in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) and humans (Homo sapiens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakrzewski, Alexandria C; Perdue, Bonnie M; Beran, Michael J; Church, Barbara A; Smith, J David

    2014-10-01

    Researchers are exploring whether animals share with humans something like a metacognitive capacity. Though some results point to human-animal continuities in this domain, they face the dominant criticism that animals' performances might be associative. A persistent problem is that animal-metacognition paradigms present static environments of risk and reward that may foster inflexible and conditioned responding. Those environments do not challenge animals to show the flexibility in their decision strategies that could indicate an antecedent capacity to metacognition. Accordingly, we tested macaques and humans on an uncertainty-monitoring paradigm in which risk changed dynamically. Participants classified stimuli of different difficulties while also choosing when to use a cashout response to collect the accumulated rewards that would be forfeit on a discrimination error. Macaques (Macaca mulatta) and humans flexibly adjusted their decision criteria to achieve appropriate protection against the cost of error that could differ depending on trial difficulty and the number of rewards at risk. In particular, monkeys widened their cashout-response region as their accumulated rewards increased, providing more protection against a more costly error. These findings demonstrate a new continuity between humans' and animals' uncertainty systems. They reveal a calibration by macaques of present risk to trial difficulty tolerated. They show that animals' uncertainty-monitoring and risk-management systems have substantial trial-by-trial flexibility. PMID:25546106

  18. Breast-fed and bottle-fed infant rhesus macaques develop distinct gut microbiotas and immune systems

    OpenAIRE

    Ardeshir, Amir; Narayan, Nicole R; Méndez-Lagares, Gema; Lu, Ding; Rauch, Marcus; Huang, Yong; Van Rompay, Koen K. A.; Lynch, Susan V.; Hartigan-O'Connor, Dennis J.

    2014-01-01

    Diet has a strong influence on the intestinal microbiota in both humans and animal models. It is well established that microbial colonization is required for normal development of the immune system and that specific microbial constituents prompt the differentiation or expansion of certain immune cell subsets. Nonetheless, it has been unclear how profoundly diet might shape the primate immune system or how durable the influence might be. We show that breast-fed and bottle-fed infant rhesus mac...

  19. Low dose rectal inoculation of rhesus macaques by SIV SME660 or SIV MAC251 recapitulates human mucosal infection by HIV-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koraber, Bette [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Perelson, Alan [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Hraber, Peter [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Giorgi, E [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Bhattacharya, T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2009-01-01

    Recently, we developed a novel approach to the identification of transmitted or early founder HIV -1 genomes in acutely infected humans based on single genome amplification and sequencing. Here we tested this approach in 18 acutely infected Indian rhesus macaques to determine the molecular features of SIV transmission. Animals were inoculated intrarectally (IR) or intravenously (IV) with stocks of SIVmac251 or SIVsmE660 that exhibited sequence diversity typical of early-chronic HIV -1 infection. 987 full-length SIV env sequences (median of 48 per animal) were determined from plasma virion RNA one to five weeks after infection. IR inoculation was followed by productive infection by one or few viruses (median 1; range 1-5) that diversified randomly with near star-like phylogeny and a Poisson distribution of mutations. Consensus viral sequences from ramp-up and peak viremia were identical to viruses found in the inocula or differed from them by only one or few nuc1eotides, providing direct evidence that early plasma viral sequences coalesce to transmitted/founder virus( es). IV infection was approximately 10,000-fold more efficient than IR infection, and viruses transmitted by either route represented the full genetic spectra of the inocula. These findings identify key similarities in mucosal transmission and early diversification between SIV and HIV -1.

  20. Depletion of CD8+ cells does not affect the lifespan of productively infected cells during pathogenic sivmac239 infection of rhesus macaques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shudo, Emi [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Ribeiro, Ruy M [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Perelson, Alan S [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    While CD8+ T cell responses are clearly important in anti-viral immunity during HIV/SIV infection, the mechanisms by which CD8+ T cells induce this effect remain poorly understood, as emphasized by the failure of the Merck adenovirus-based, cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL)-inducing AIDS vaccine in a large phase IIb clinical trial. In this study, we measured the in vivo effect of CD8+ lymphocytes on the lifespan of productively infected cells during chronic SIVmac239 infection of rhesus macaques by treating two groups of animals (i.e., CD8+ lymphocyte-depleted or controls) with antiretroviral therapy (PMPA and FTC). The lifespan of productively infected cells was calculated based on the slope of the decline of SIV plasma viremia using a well-accepted mathematical model. We found that, in both early (i.e., day 57 post-inoculation) and late (i.e., day 177 post-inoculation) chronic SIV infection, depletion of CD8+ lymphocytes did not result in an increased lifespan of productively infected cells in vivo. This result indicates that direct killing of cells producing virus is unlikely to be a major mechanism underlying the anti-viral effect of CD8+ T cells during SIV infection. These results have profound implications for the development of AIDS vaccines.

  1. Social correlates of the dominance rank and long-term cortisol levels in adolescent and adult male rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Xiaoli; Wu, Xujun; Morrill, Ryan J; Li, Zhifei; Li, Chunlu; Yang, Shangchuan; Li, Zhaoxia; Cui, Ding; Lv, Longbao; Hu, Zhengfei; Zhang, Bo; Yin, Yong; Guo, Liyun; Qin, Dongdong; Hu, Xintian

    2016-01-01

    A common pattern in dominance hierarchies is that some ranks result in higher levels of psychosocial stress than others. Such stress can lead to negative health outcomes, possibly through altered levels of stress hormones. The dominance rank-stress physiology relationship is known to vary between species; sometimes dominants show higher levels of glucocorticoid stress hormones, whereas in other cases subordinates show higher levels. It is less clear how this relationship varies between groups of different ages or cultures. In this study, we used long-term cortisol measurement methods to compare the effect of rank on cortisol levels in adult and adolescent male rhesus macaques. In the adult groups, subordinates had significantly higher cortisol levels. In the adolescents, no significant correlation between cortisol and status was found. Further analysis demonstrated that the adult hierarchy was stricter than that of the adolescents. Adult subordinates received extreme aggression more frequently than dominants, and this class of behavior was positively correlated with cortisol; by contrast, adolescents showed neither trend. Together, these findings provide evidence for a cortisol-rank relationship determined by social factors, namely, despotism of the group, and highlight the importance of group-specific social analysis when comparing or combining results obtained from different groups of animals. PMID:27145729

  2. Genetic imprint of vaccination on simian/human immunodeficiency virus type 1 transmitted viral genomes in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varela, Mariana; Verschoor, Ernst; Lai, Rachel P J; Hughes, Joseph; Mooj, Petra; McKinley, Trevelyan J; Fitzmaurice, Timothy J; Landskron, Lisa; Willett, Brian J; Frost, Simon D W; Bogers, Willy M; Heeney, Jonathan L

    2013-01-01

    Understanding the genetic, antigenic and structural changes that occur during HIV-1 infection in response to pre-existing immunity will facilitate current efforts to develop an HIV-1 vaccine. Much is known about HIV-1 variation at the population level but little with regard to specific changes occurring in the envelope glycoprotein within a host in response to immune pressure elicited by antibodies. The aim of this study was to track and map specific early genetic changes occurring in the viral envelope gene following vaccination using a highly controlled viral challenge setting in the SHIV macaque model. We generated 449 full-length env sequences from vaccinees, and 63 from the virus inoculum. Analysis revealed a different pattern in the distribution and frequency of mutations in the regions of the envelope gene targeted by the vaccine as well as different patterns of diversification between animals in the naïve control group and vaccinees. Given the high stringency of the model it is remarkable that we were able to identify genetic changes associated with the vaccination. This work provides insight into the characterization of breakthrough viral populations in less than fully efficacious vaccines and illustrates the value of HIV-1 Env SHIV challenge model in macaques to unravel the mechanisms driving HIV-1 envelope genetic diversity in the presence of vaccine induced-responses. PMID:23967111

  3. Co-evolution of the MHC class I and KIR gene families in rhesus macaques: ancestry and plasticity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Groot, Natasja G; Blokhuis, Jeroen H; Otting, Nel; Doxiadis, Gaby G M; Bontrop, Ronald E

    2015-09-01

    Researchers dealing with the human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I and killer immunoglobulin receptor (KIR) multi-gene families in humans are often wary of the complex and seemingly different situation that is encountered regarding these gene families in Old World monkeys. For the sake of comparison, the well-defined and thoroughly studied situation in humans has been taken as a reference. In macaques, both the major histocompatibility complex class I and KIR gene families are plastic entities that have experienced various rounds of expansion, contraction, and subsequent recombination processes. As a consequence, haplotypes in macaques display substantial diversity with regard to gene copy number variation. Additionally, for both multi-gene families, differential levels of polymorphism (allelic variation), and expression are observed as well. A comparative genetic approach has allowed us to answer questions related to ancestry, to shed light on unique adaptations of the species' immune system, and to provide insights into the genetic events and selective pressures that have shaped the range of these gene families. PMID:26284481

  4. Rabies virus-based vaccines elicit neutralizing antibodies, poly-functional CD8+ T cell, and protect rhesus macaques from AIDS-like disease after SIV(mac251) challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faul, Elizabeth J; Aye, Pyone P; Papaneri, Amy B; Pahar, Bapi; McGettigan, James P; Schiro, Faith; Chervoneva, Inna; Montefiori, David C; Lackner, Andrew A; Schnell, Matthias J

    2009-12-11

    Highly attenuated rabies virus (RV) vaccine vectors were evaluated for their ability to protect against highly pathogenic SIV(mac251) challenge. Mamu-A*01 negative rhesus macaques were immunized in groups of four with either: RV expressing SIV(mac239)-GagPol, a combination of RV expressing SIV(mac239)-Env and RV expressing SIV(mac239)-GagPol, or with empty RV vectors. Eight weeks later animals received a booster immunization with a heterologous RV expressing the same antigens. At 12 weeks post-boost, all animals were challenged intravenously with 100 TCID(50) of pathogenic SIV(mac251-CX). Immunized macaques in both vaccine groups had 1.3-1.6-log-fold decrease in viral set point compared to control animals. The GagPol/Env immunized animals also had a significantly lower peak viral load. When compared to control animals following challenge, vaccinated macaques had a more rapid induction of SIV(mac251) neutralizing antibodies and of CD8(+) T cell responses to various SIV epitopes. Moreover, vaccinated macaques better maintained peripheral memory CD4(+) T cells and were able to mount a poly-functional CD8(+) T cell response in the mucosa. These findings indicate promise for RV-based vectors and have important implications for the development of an efficacious HIV vaccine. PMID:19879223

  5. A DNA prime-oral Listeria boost vaccine in rhesus macaques induces a SIV-specific CD8 T cell mucosal response characterized by high levels of α4β7 integrin and an effector memory phenotype

    OpenAIRE

    Neeson, Paul; Boyer, Jean; Kumar, Sanjeev; Lewis, Mark G.; Veazey, Lennox MattiasRon; Weiner, David; Paterson, Yvonne

    2006-01-01

    In this study in Rhesus macaques, we tested whether IL-12 or IL-15 in a DNA prime-oral Listeria boost amplifies the SIV-Gag specific CD8 mucosal response. SIV-specific CD8 T cells were demonstrated in the peripheral blood (PB) in all test vaccine groups, but not the control group. SIV Gag-specific CD8 T cells in the PB expressed α4β7 integrin, the gut-homing receptor; a minor subset co-express αEβ7 integrin. SIV Gag-specific CD8 T cells were also detected in the gut tissue, intraepithelial (I...

  6. Naïve and memory B cells in the rhesus macaque can be differentiated by surface expression of CD27 and have differential responses to CD40 ligation

    OpenAIRE

    Kuhrt, David; Faith, Seth; Hattemer, Angela; Leone, Amanda; Sodora, Donald; Picker, Louis; Borghesi, Lisa; Cole, Kelly Stefano

    2010-01-01

    The rhesus macaque (RM) model has the potential to be an invaluable tool for studying B cell populations during pathogenic infections, however, to date, there has been no definitive delineation of naïve and memory B cell populations in the RM. This has precluded a rigorous analysis of the generation, persistence and resolution of a pathogen-specific memory B cell response. The present study utilized multiple analyses to demonstrate that CD27 expression on B cells is consistent with a memory p...

  7. PD-1HIGH Follicular CD4 T Helper Cell Subsets Residing in Lymph Node Germinal Centers Correlate with B Cell Maturation and IgG Production in Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Huanbin; Wang, Xiaolei; Lackner, Andrew A; Veazey, Ronald S.

    2014-01-01

    CD4+ T follicular helper (TFH) cells guide development and maturation of B cells and are crucial for effective antibody responses. Here we found rhesus macaque TFH cells, defined as CXCR5+CD4 T cells, contain two major populations: PD-1INT and PD-1HIGH cells. Of these, PD-1HIGHCD4+ T cells highly co-express ICOS but little CCR7, and reside in lymph node germinal centers (GCs), but not in blood. These cells secrete IL-21 and express transcriptional factor Bcl-6 at higher levels than CXCR5+PD-1...

  8. Trafficking, persistence, and activation state of adoptively transferred allogeneic and autologous SIV-specific CD8+ T-cell clones during acute and chronic SIV infection of rhesus macaques1

    OpenAIRE

    Bolton, Diane L.; Minang, Jacob T.; Trivett, Matt; Song, Kaimei; Tuscher, Jennifer J.; Li, Yuan; Piatak, Michael; O'Connor, David; Lifson, Jeffrey D; Roederer, Mario; Ohlen, Claes

    2009-01-01

    Despite multiple lines of evidence suggesting their involvement, the precise role of CD8+ T-cells in controlling HIV replication remains unclear. To determine whether CD8+ T cells can limit retroviral replication in the absence of other immune responses, we transferred 1-13 × 109 allogeneic in vitro expanded SIV-specific CD8+ T-cell clones matched for the relevant restricting MHC-I allele into rhesus macaques near the time of intravenous (i.v.) SIV challenge. Additionally, in vitro expanded a...

  9. Immunogenicity of seven new recombinant yellow fever viruses 17D expressing fragments of SIVmac239 Gag, Nef, and Vif in Indian rhesus macaques.

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    Mauricio A Martins

    Full Text Available An effective vaccine remains the best solution to stop the spread of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV. Cellular immune responses have been repeatedly associated with control of viral replication and thus may be an important element of the immune response that must be evoked by an efficacious vaccine. Recombinant viral vectors can induce potent T-cell responses. Although several viral vectors have been developed to deliver HIV genes, only a few have been advanced for clinical trials. The live-attenuated yellow fever vaccine virus 17D (YF17D has many properties that make it an attractive vector for AIDS vaccine regimens. YF17D is well tolerated in humans and vaccination induces robust T-cell responses that persist for years. Additionally, methods to manipulate the YF17D genome have been established, enabling the generation of recombinant (rYF17D vectors carrying genes from unrelated pathogens. Here, we report the generation of seven new rYF17D viruses expressing fragments of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac239 Gag, Nef, and Vif. Studies in Indian rhesus macaques demonstrated that these live-attenuated vectors replicated in vivo, but only elicited low levels of SIV-specific cellular responses. Boosting with recombinant Adenovirus type-5 (rAd5 vectors resulted in robust expansion of SIV-specific CD8(+ T-cell responses, particularly those targeting Vif. Priming with rYF17D also increased the frequency of CD4(+ cellular responses in rYF17D/rAd5-immunized macaques compared to animals that received rAd5 only. The effect of the rYF17D prime on the breadth of SIV-specific T-cell responses was limited and we also found evidence that some rYF17D vectors were more effective than others at priming SIV-specific T-cell responses. Together, our data suggest that YF17D - a clinically relevant vaccine vector - can be used to prime AIDS virus-specific T-cell responses in heterologous prime boost regimens. However, it will be important to optimize rYF17D

  10. Get it while it's hot: a peak-first bias in self-generated choice order in rhesus macaques.

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    Kanghoon Jung

    Full Text Available Animals typically must make a number of successive choices to achieve a goal: e.g., eating multiple food items before becoming satiated. However, it is unclear whether choosing the best first or saving the best for last represents the best choice strategy to maximize overall reward. Specifically, since outcomes can be evaluated prospectively (with future rewards discounted and more immediate rewards preferred or retrospectively (with prior rewards discounted and more recent rewards preferred, the conditions under which each are used remains unclear. On the one hand, humans and non-human animals clearly discount future reward, preferring immediate rewards to delayed ones, suggesting prospective evaluation; on the other hand, it has also been shown that a sequence that ends well, i.e., with the best event or item last, is often preferred, suggesting retrospective evaluation. Here we hypothesized that when individuals are allowed to build the sequence themselves they are more likely to evaluate each item individually and therefore build a sequence using prospective evaluation. We examined the relationship between self-generated choice order and preference in rhesus monkeys in two experiments in which the distinctiveness of options were relatively high and low, respectively. We observed a positive linear relationship between choice order and preference among highly distinct options, indicating that the rhesus monkeys chose their preferred food first: i.e., a peak-first order preference. Overall, choice order depended on the degree of relative preference among alternatives and a peak-first bias, providing evidence for prospective evaluation when choice order is self-generated.

  11. Get it while it's hot: a peak-first bias in self-generated choice order in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kanghoon; Kralik, Jerald D

    2013-01-01

    Animals typically must make a number of successive choices to achieve a goal: e.g., eating multiple food items before becoming satiated. However, it is unclear whether choosing the best first or saving the best for last represents the best choice strategy to maximize overall reward. Specifically, since outcomes can be evaluated prospectively (with future rewards discounted and more immediate rewards preferred) or retrospectively (with prior rewards discounted and more recent rewards preferred), the conditions under which each are used remains unclear. On the one hand, humans and non-human animals clearly discount future reward, preferring immediate rewards to delayed ones, suggesting prospective evaluation; on the other hand, it has also been shown that a sequence that ends well, i.e., with the best event or item last, is often preferred, suggesting retrospective evaluation. Here we hypothesized that when individuals are allowed to build the sequence themselves they are more likely to evaluate each item individually and therefore build a sequence using prospective evaluation. We examined the relationship between self-generated choice order and preference in rhesus monkeys in two experiments in which the distinctiveness of options were relatively high and low, respectively. We observed a positive linear relationship between choice order and preference among highly distinct options, indicating that the rhesus monkeys chose their preferred food first: i.e., a peak-first order preference. Overall, choice order depended on the degree of relative preference among alternatives and a peak-first bias, providing evidence for prospective evaluation when choice order is self-generated. PMID:24376758

  12. Live attenuated Rev-independent Nef¯SIV enhances acquisition of heterologous SIVsmE660 in acutely vaccinated rhesus macaques.

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    Siddappa N Byrareddy

    Full Text Available Rhesus macaques (RMs inoculated with live-attenuated Rev-Independent Nef¯ simian immunodeficiency virus (Rev-Ind Nef¯SIV as adults or neonates controlled viremia to undetectable levels and showed no signs of immunodeficiency over 6-8 years of follow-up. We tested the capacity of this live-attenuated virus to protect RMs against pathogenic, heterologous SIVsmE660 challenges.Three groups of four RM were inoculated with Rev-Ind Nef¯SIV and compared. Group 1 was inoculated 8 years prior and again 15 months before low dose intrarectal challenges with SIVsmE660. Group 2 animals were inoculated with Rev-Ind Nef¯SIV at 15 months and Group 3 at 2 weeks prior to the SIVsmE660 challenges, respectively. Group 4 served as unvaccinated controls. All RMs underwent repeated weekly low-dose intrarectal challenges with SIVsmE660. Surprisingly, all RMs with acute live-attenuated virus infection (Group 3 became superinfected with the challenge virus, in contrast to the two other vaccine groups (Groups 1 and 2 (P=0.006 for each and controls (Group 4 (P=0.022. Gene expression analysis showed significant upregulation of innate immune response-related chemokines and their receptors, most notably CCR5 in Group 3 animals during acute infection with Rev-Ind Nef¯SIV.We conclude that although Rev-Ind Nef¯SIV remained apathogenic, acute replication of the vaccine strain was not protective but associated with increased acquisition of heterologous mucosal SIVsmE660 challenges.

  13. Effect of plasma viremia on apoptosis and immunophenotype of dendritic cells subsets in acute SIVmac239 infection of Chinese rhesus macaques.

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    Hou-Jun Xia

    Full Text Available Non-human primates such as Chinese rhesus macaques (Ch Rhs provide good animal models for research on human infectious diseases. Similar to humans, there are two principal subsets of dendritic cells (DCs in the peripheral blood of Ch Rhs: myeloid DCs (mDCs and plasmacytoid DCs (pDCs. In this study, two-color fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS analyses were used to identify the main DC subsets, namely CD1c(+ mDCs and pDCs from Ch Rhs. Then, the apoptosis and immunophenotype changes of DCs subsets were first described during the acute phase of SIVmac239 infection. Both the DCs subsets showed decreased CD4 expression and enhanced CCR5 expression; in particular, those of pDCs significantly changed at most time points. Interestingly, the plasma viral loads were negatively correlated with CD4 expression, but were positively correlated with CCR5 expression of pDCs. During this period, both CD1c(+ mDCs and pDCs were activated by enhancing expressions of co-stimulatory molecules, accompanied with increase in CCR7. Either CD80 or CD86 expressed on CD1c(+ mDCs and pDCs was positively correlated with the plasma viral loads. Our analysis demonstrates that the pDCs were more prone to apoptosis after infection during the acute phase of SIVmac239 infection, which may be due to their high expressions of CD4 and CCR5. Both DCs subsets activated through elevating the expression of co-stimulatory molecules, which was beneficial in controlling the replication of SIV. However, a mere broad immune activation initiated by activated DCs may lead to tragic AIDS progression.

  14. Codelivery of Envelope Protein in Alum with MVA Vaccine Induces CXCR3-Biased CXCR5+ and CXCR5- CD4 T Cell Responses in Rhesus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer, Smita S; Gangadhara, Sailaja; Victor, Blandine; Gomez, Rosy; Basu, Rahul; Hong, Jung Joo; Labranche, Celia; Montefiori, David C; Villinger, Francois; Moss, Bernard; Amara, Rama Rao

    2015-08-01

    The goal of an HIV vaccine is to generate robust and durable protective Ab. Vital to this goal is the induction of CD4(+) T follicular helper (TFH) cells. However, very little is known about the TFH response to HIV vaccination and its relative contribution to magnitude and quality of vaccine-elicited Ab titers. In this study, we investigated these questions in the context of a DNA/modified vaccinia virus Ankara SIV vaccine with and without gp140 boost in aluminum hydroxide in rhesus macaques. In addition, we determined the frequency of vaccine-induced CD4(+) T cells coexpressing chemokine receptor, CXCR5 (facilitates migration to B cell follicles) in blood and whether these responses were representative of lymph node TFH responses. We show that booster modified vaccinia virus Ankara immunization induced a distinct and transient accumulation of proliferating CXCR5(+) and CXCR5(-) CD4 T cells in blood at day 7 postimmunization, and the frequency of the former but not the latter correlated with TFH and B cell responses in germinal centers of the lymph node. Interestingly, gp140 boost induced a skewing toward CXCR3 expression on germinal center TFH cells, which was strongly associated with longevity, avidity, and neutralization potential of vaccine-elicited Ab response. However, CXCR3(+) cells preferentially expressed the HIV coreceptor CCR5, and vaccine-induced CXCR3(+)CXCR5(+) cells showed a moderate positive association with peak viremia following SIV251 infection. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that vaccine regimens that elicit CXCR3-biased TFH cell responses favor Ab persistence and avidity but may predispose to higher acute viremia in the event of breakthrough infections. PMID:26116502

  15. Functional cure of SIVagm infection in rhesus macaques results in complete recovery of CD4+ T cells and is reverted by CD8+ cell depletion.

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    Ivona Pandrea

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the mechanism of infection control in elite controllers (EC may shed light on the correlates of control of disease progression in HIV infection. However, limitations have prevented a clear understanding of the mechanisms of elite controlled infection, as these studies can only be performed at randomly selected late time points in infection, after control is achieved, and the access to tissues is limited. We report that SIVagm infection is elite-controlled in rhesus macaques (RMs and therefore can be used as an animal model for EC HIV infection. A robust acute infection, with high levels of viral replication and dramatic mucosal CD4(+ T cell depletion, similar to pathogenic HIV-1/SIV infections of humans and RMs, was followed by complete and durable control of SIVagm replication, defined as: undetectable VLs in blood and tissues beginning 72 to 90 days postinoculation (pi and continuing at least 4 years; seroreversion; progressive recovery of mucosal CD4(+ T cells, with complete recovery by 4 years pi; normal levels of T cell immune activation, proliferation, and apoptosis; and no disease progression. This "functional cure" of SIVagm infection in RMs could be reverted after 4 years of control of infection by depleting CD8 cells, which resulted in transient rebounds of VLs, thus suggesting that control may be at least in part immune mediated. Viral control was independent of MHC, partial APOBEC restriction was not involved in SIVagm control in RMs and Trim5 genotypes did not impact viral replication. This new animal model of EC lentiviral infection, in which complete control can be predicted in all cases, permits research on the early events of infection in blood and tissues, before the defining characteristics of EC are evident and when host factors are actively driving the infection towards the EC status.

  16. Aerosol vaccination with AERAS-402 elicits robust cellular immune responses in the lungs of rhesus macaques but fails to protect against high-dose Mycobacterium tuberculosis challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darrah, Patricia A; Bolton, Diane L; Lackner, Andrew A; Kaushal, Deepak; Aye, Pyone Pyone; Mehra, Smriti; Blanchard, James L; Didier, Peter J; Roy, Chad J; Rao, Srinivas S; Hokey, David A; Scanga, Charles A; Sizemore, Donata R; Sadoff, Jerald C; Roederer, Mario; Seder, Robert A

    2014-08-15

    Development of a vaccine against pulmonary tuberculosis may require immunization strategies that induce a high frequency of Ag-specific CD4 and CD8 T cells in the lung. The nonhuman primate model is essential for testing such approaches because it has predictive value for how vaccines elicit responses in humans. In this study, we used an aerosol vaccination strategy to administer AERAS-402, a replication-defective recombinant adenovirus (rAd) type 35 expressing Mycobacterium tuberculosis Ags Ag85A, Ag85B, and TB10.4, in bacillus Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-primed or unprimed rhesus macaques. Immunization with BCG generated low purified protein derivative-specific CD4 T cell responses in blood and bronchoalveolar lavage. In contrast, aerosolized AERAS-402 alone or following BCG induced potent and stable Ag85A/b-specific CD4 and CD8 effector T cells in bronchoalveolar lavage that largely produced IFN-γ, as well as TNF and IL-2. Such responses induced by BCG, AERAS-402, or both failed to confer overall protection following challenge with 275 CFUs M. tuberculosis Erdman, although vaccine-induced responses associated with reduced pathology were observed in some animals. Anamnestic T cell responses to Ag85A/b were not detected in blood of immunized animals after challenge. Overall, our data suggest that a high M. tuberculosis challenge dose may be a critical factor in limiting vaccine efficacy in this model. However, the ability of aerosol rAd immunization to generate potent cellular immunity in the lung suggests that using different or more immunogens, alternative rAd serotypes with enhanced immunogenicity, and a physiological challenge dose may achieve protection against M. tuberculosis. PMID:25024382

  17. Decreased T Follicular Regulatory Cell/T Follicular Helper Cell (TFH) in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus-Infected Rhesus Macaques May Contribute to Accumulation of TFH in Chronic Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Ankita; Del Rio Estrada, Perla Mariana; Del Rio, Perla Maria Estrada; Tharp, Greg K; Trible, Ronald P; Amara, Rama R; Chahroudi, Ann; Reyes-Teran, Gustavo; Bosinger, Steven E; Silvestri, Guido

    2015-10-01

    T follicular helper cells (TFH) are critical for the development and maintenance of germinal center (GC) and humoral immune responses. During chronic HIV/SIV infection, TFH accumulate, possibly as a result of Ag persistence. The HIV/SIV-associated TFH expansion may also reflect lack of regulation by suppressive follicular regulatory CD4(+) T cells (TFR). TFR are natural regulatory T cells (TREG) that migrate into the follicle and, similar to TFH, upregulate CXCR5, Bcl-6, and PD1. In this study, we identified TFR as CD4(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+)CXCR5(+)PD1(hi)Bcl-6(+) within lymph nodes of rhesus macaques (RM) and confirmed their localization within the GC by immunohistochemistry. RNA sequencing showed that TFR exhibit a distinct transcriptional profile with shared features of both TFH and TREG, including intermediate expression of FOXP3, Bcl-6, PRDM1, IL-10, and IL-21. In healthy, SIV-uninfected RM, we observed a negative correlation between frequencies of TFR and both TFH and GC B cells, as well as levels of CD4(+) T cell proliferation. Post SIV infection, the TFR/TFH ratio was reduced with no change in the frequency of TREG or TFR within the total CD4(+) T cell pool. Finally, we examined whether higher levels of direct virus infection of TFR were responsible for their relative depletion post SIV infection. We found that TFH, TFR, and TREG sorted from SIV-infected RM harbor comparable levels of cell-associated viral DNA. Our data suggest that TFR may contribute to the regulation and proliferation of TFH and GC B cells in vivo and that a decreased TFR/TFH ratio in chronic SIV infection may lead to unchecked expansion of both TFH and GC B cells. PMID:26297764

  18. Rhesus macaque θ-defensin RTD-1 inhibits proinflammatory cytokine secretion and gene expression by inhibiting the activation of NF-κB and MAPK pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tongaonkar, Prasad; Trinh, Katie K; Schaal, Justin B; Tran, Dat; Gulko, Percio S; Ouellette, André J; Selsted, Michael E

    2015-12-01

    θ-Defensins are pleiotropic, macrocyclic peptides that are expressed uniquely in Old World monkeys. The peptides are potent, broad-spectrum microbicides that also modulate inflammatory responses in vitro and in animal models of viral infection and polymicrobial sepsis. θ-Defensins suppress proinflammatory cytokine secretion by leukocytes stimulated with diverse Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands. Studies were performed to delineate anti-inflammatory mechanisms of rhesus θ-defensin 1 (RTD-1), the most abundant θ-defensin isoform in macaque granulocytes. RTD-1 reduced the secretion of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-1β, and IL-8 in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated human blood monocytes and THP-1 macrophages, and this was accompanied by inhibition of nuclear factor κB (NF-κB) activation and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathways. Peptide inhibition of NF-κB activation occurred following stimulation of extracellular (TLRs 1/2 and 4) and intracellular (TLR9) receptors. Although RTD-1 did not inhibit MAPK in unstimulated cells, it induced phosphorylation of Akt in otherwise untreated monocytes and THP-1 cells. In the latter, this occurred within 10 min of RTD-1 treatment and produced a sustained elevation of phosphorylated Akt (pAkt) for at least 4 h. pAkt is a negative regulator of MAPK and NF-κB activation. RTD-1 inhibited IκBα degradation and p38 MAPK phosphorylation, and stimulated Akt phosphorylation in LPS-treated human primary monocytes and THP-1 macrophages. Specific inhibition of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) blocked RTD-1-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and reversed the suppression of NF-κB activation by the peptide. These studies indicate that the anti-inflammatory properties of θ-defensins are mediated by activation of the PI3K/Akt pathway and suppression of proinflammatory signals in immune-stimulated cells. PMID:26269197

  19. Control of SIV infection and subsequent induction of pandemic H1N1 immunity in rhesus macaques using an Ad5 [E1-, E2b-] vector platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabitzsch, Elizabeth S; Balint-Junior, Joseph P; Xu, Younong; Balcaitis, Stephanie; Sanders-Beer, Brigitte; Karl, Julie; Weinhold, Kent J; Paessler, Slobodan; Jones, Frank R

    2012-11-26

    Anti-vector immunity mitigates immune responses induced by recombinant adenovirus vector vaccines, limiting their prime-boost capabilities. We have developed a novel gene delivery and expression platform (Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]) that induces immune responses despite pre-existing and/or developed concomitant Ad5 immunity. In the present study, we evaluated if this new Ad5 platform could overcome the adverse condition of pre-existing Ad5 immunity to induce effective immune responses in prime-boost immunization regimens against two different infectious diseases in the same animal. Ad5 immune rhesus macaques (RM) were immunized multiple times with the Ad5 [E1-, E2b-] platform expressing antigens from simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV). Immunized RM developed cell-mediated immunity against SIV antigens Gag, Pol, Nef and Env as well as antibody against Env. Vaccinated and vector control RMs were challenged intra-rectally with homologous SIVmac239. During a 7-week follow-up, there was perturbation of SIV load in some immunized RM. At 7 weeks post-challenge, eight immunized animals (53%) did not have detectable SIV, compared to two RM controls (13%) (Pvaccinated with the same Ad5 [E1-, E2b-] platform expressing H1N1 influenza hemagglutinin (HA). Thirty days post Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-HA vaccination, significant levels of influenza neutralizing antibody were induced in all animals that increased after an Ad5 [E1-, E2b-]-HA homologous boost. These data demonstrate the versatility of this new vector platform to immunize against two separate disease targets in the same animal despite the presence of immunity against the delivery platform, permitting homologous repeat immunizations with an Ad5 gene delivery platform. PMID:23041546

  20. Safety and immunogenicity of multi-antigen AMA1-based vaccines formulated with CoVaccine HT™ and Montanide ISA 51 in rhesus macaques

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    Walraven Vanessa

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing the breadth of the functional antibody response through immunization with Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen 1 (PfAMA1 multi-allele vaccine formulations has been demonstrated in several rodent and rabbit studies. This study assesses the safety and immunogenicity of three PfAMA1 Diversity-Covering (DiCo vaccine candidates formulated as an equimolar mixture (DiCo mix in CoVaccine HT™ or Montanide ISA 51, as well as that of a PfAMA1-MSP119 fusion protein formulated in Montanide ISA 51. Methods Vaccine safety in rhesus macaques was monitored by animal behaviour observation and assessment of organ and systemic functions through clinical chemistry and haematology measurements. The immunogenicity of vaccine formulations was assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and in vitro parasite growth inhibition assays with three culture-adapted P. falciparum strains. Results These data show that both adjuvants were well tolerated with only transient changes in a few of the chemical and haematological parameters measured. DiCo mix formulated in CoVaccine HT™ proved immunologically and functionally superior to the same candidate formulated in Montanide ISA 51. Immunological data from the fusion protein candidate was however difficult to interpret as four out of six immunized animals were non-responsive for unknown reasons. Conclusions The study highlights the safety and immunological benefits of DiCo mix as a potential human vaccine against blood stage malaria, especially when formulated in CoVaccine HT™, and adds to the accumulating data on the specificity broadening effects of DiCo mix.

  1. Infection with host-range mutant adenovirus 5 suppresses innate immunity and induces systemic CD4+ T cell activation in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Huma; Genescà, Meritxell; Fritts, Linda; McChesney, Michael B; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie; Miller, Christopher J

    2014-01-01

    Ad5 is a common cause of respiratory disease and an occasional cause of gastroenteritis and conjunctivitis, and seroconversion before adolescence is common in humans. To gain some insight into how Ad5 infection affects the immune system of rhesus macaques (RM) 18 RM were infected with a host-range mutant Ad5 (Ad5hr) by 3 mucosal inoculations. There was a delay of 2 to 6 weeks after the first inoculation before plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC) frequency and function increased in peripheral blood. Primary Ad5hr infection suppressed IFN-γ mRNA expression, but the second Ad5hr exposure induced a rapid increase in IFN-gamma mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Primary Ad5hr infection suppressed CCL20, TNF and IL-1 mRNA expression in PBMC, and subsequent virus exposures further dampened expression of these pro-inflammatory cytokines. Primary, but not secondary, Ad5hr inoculation increased the frequency of CXCR3+ CD4+ T cells in blood, while secondary, but not primary, Ad5hr infection transiently increased the frequencies of Ki67+, HLADR+ and CD95+/CCR5+ CD4+ T cells in blood. Ad5hr infection induced polyfunctional CD4 and CD8+ T cells specific for the Ad5 hexon protein in all of the animals. Thus, infection with Ad5hr induced a complex pattern of innate and adaptive immunity in RM that included transient systemic CD4+ T cell activation and suppressed innate immunity on re-exposure to the virus. The complex effects of adenovirus infection on the immune system may help to explain the unexpected results of testing Ad5 vector expressing HIV antigens in Ad5 seropositive people. PMID:25203111

  2. R5-SHIV induces multiple defects in T cell function during early infection of rhesus macaques including accumulation of T reg cells in lymph nodes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Santosuosso

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: HIV-1 is a pathogen that T cell responses fail to control. HIV-1gp120 is the surface viral envelope glycoprotein that interacts with CD4 T cells and mediates entry. HIV-1gp120 has been implicated in immune dysregulatory functions that may limit anti-HIV antigen-specific T cell responses. We hypothesized that in the context of early SHIV infection, immune dysregulation of antigen-specific T-effector cell and regulatory functions would be detectable and that these would be associated or correlated with measurable concentrations of HIV-1gp120 in lymphoid tissues. METHODS: Rhesus macaques were intravaginally inoculated with a Clade C CCR5-tropic simian-human immunodeficiency virus, SHIV-1157ipd3N4. HIV-1gp120 levels, antigen-specificity, levels of apoptosis/anergy and frequency and function of Tregs were examined in lymph node and blood derived T cells at 5 and 12 weeks post inoculation. RESULTS/CONCLUSIONS: We observed reduced responses to Gag in CD4 and gp120 in CD8 lymph node-derived T cells compared to the peripheral blood at 5 weeks post-inoculation. Reduced antigen-specific responses were associated with higher levels of PD-1 on lymph node-derived CD4 T cells as compared to peripheral blood and uninfected lymph node-derived CD4 T cells. Lymph nodes contained increased numbers of Tregs as compared to peripheral blood, which positively correlated with gp120 levels; T regulatory cell depletion restored CD8 T cell responses to Gag but not to gp120. HIV gp120 was also able to induce T regulatory cell chemotaxis in a dose-dependent, CCR5-mediated manner. These studies contribute to our broader understanding of the ways in which HIV-1 dysregulates T cell function and localization during early infection.

  3. Long-term programming of antigen-specific immunity from gene expression signatures in the PBMC of rhesus macaques immunized with an SIV DNA vaccine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Belisle

    Full Text Available While HIV-1-specific cellular immunity is thought to be critical for the suppression of viral replication, the correlates of protection have not yet been determined. Rhesus macaques (RM are an important animal model for the study and development of vaccines against HIV/AIDS. Our laboratory has helped to develop and study DNA-based vaccines in which recent technological advances, including genetic optimization and in vivo electroporation (EP, have helped to dramatically boost their immunogenicity. In this study, RMs were immunized with a DNA vaccine including individual plasmids encoding SIV gag, env, and pol alone, or in combination with a molecular adjuvant, plasmid DNA expressing the chemokine ligand 5 (RANTES, followed by EP. Along with standard immunological assays, flow-based activation analysis without ex vivo restimulation and high-throughput gene expression analysis was performed. Strong cellular immunity was induced by vaccination which was supported by all assays including PBMC microarray analysis that identified the up-regulation of 563 gene sequences including those involved in interferon signaling. Furthermore, 699 gene sequences were differentially regulated in these groups at peak viremia following SIVmac251 challenge. We observed that the RANTES-adjuvanted animals were significantly better at suppressing viral replication during chronic infection and exhibited a distinct pattern of gene expression which included immune cell-trafficking and cell cycle genes. Furthermore, a greater percentage of vaccine-induced central memory CD8+ T-cells capable of an activated phenotype were detected in these animals as measured by activation analysis. Thus, co-immunization with the RANTES molecular adjuvant followed by EP led to the generation of cellular immunity that was transcriptionally distinct and had a greater protective efficacy than its DNA alone counterpart. Furthermore, activation analysis and high-throughput gene expression data may

  4. PCR detection and DNA sequence analysis of the regulatory region of lymphotropic papovavirus in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of an immunocompromised rhesus macaque

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lednicky, John A.; Halvorson, Steven J.; Butel, Janet S.

    2002-01-01

    A lymphotropic papovavirus (LPV) archetypal regulatory region was amplified from DNA from the blood of an immunocompromised rhesus monkey. We believe this is the first nonserological evidence of LPV infection in rhesus monkeys.

  5. Spatiotemporal interplay of severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus and respiratory mucosal cells drives viral dissemination in rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, L; Wei, Q; Nishiura, K; Peng, J; Wang, H; Midkiff, C; Alvarez, X; Qin, C; Lackner, A; Chen, Z

    2016-07-01

    Innate immune responses have a critical role in the control of early virus replication and dissemination. It remains unknown, however, how severe acute respiratory syndrome coronavirus (SARS-CoV) evades respiratory innate immunity to establish a systemic infection. Here we show in Chinese macaques that SARS-CoV traversed the mucosa through the respiratory tract within 2 days, resulting in extensive mucosal infiltration by T cells, MAC387(+), and CD163(+) monocytes/macrophages followed by limited viral replication in the lung but persistent viral shedding into the upper airway. Mucosal monocytes/macrophages sequestered virions in intracellular vesicles together with infected Langerhans cells and migrated into the tonsils and/or draining lymph nodes within 2 days. In lymphoid tissues, viral RNA and proteins were detected in infected monocytes upon differentiation into dendritic cells (DCs) within 3 days. Systemic viral dissemination was observed within 7 days. This study provides a comprehensive overview of the spatiotemporal interactions of SARS-CoV, monocytes/macrophages, and the DC network in mucosal tissues and highlights the fact that, while these innate cells contribute to viral clearance, they probably also serve as shelters and vehicles to provide a mechanism for the virus to escape host mucosal innate immunity and disseminate systemically. PMID:26647718

  6. 人工投食对黔灵公园"半野生"猕猴食物偏好的影响%Provision-induced food preference of a semi-free-ranging rhesus Macaque group at Qianling park of Guiyang,Guizhou

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓怀庆

    2016-01-01

    The instantaneous scanning sampling was used to study the feeding behavior of the semi-free-ranging rhesus macaques for two years in the Qianling park,The total observing time was 735h. The results revealed that the food preference of macaque's has obvious changed(P﹤0.01)under the influence of provision,food preference change not only affects the rhesus monkey population survival, and causing contradiction between the tourists and the rhesus macaques;Changing the way of feeding, can weaken the conflict between the tourists and the rhesus macaques.%采用瞬时扫描取样法对黔灵公园半野生猕猴的取食行为进行了为期2年的观察,总计观察时间约735h,结果表明:在人工投食的影响下,猴群的食物偏好发生了明显的改变(P﹤0.01),具有显著的选择性,喜食人工食物;黔灵山猕猴食物偏好的改变不仅影响猕猴种群的生存,而且导致人猴之间矛盾日益激化,改变投食方式,可以减弱人猴之间冲突.

  7. Urine culture - catheterized specimen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Culture - urine - catheterized specimen; Urine culture - catheterization; Catheterized urine specimen culture ... urinary tract infections may be found in the culture. This is called a contaminant. You may not ...

  8. Pharmacokinetic and Pharmacodynamic Evaluation following Vaginal Application of IQB3002, a Dual-Chamber Microbicide Gel Containing the Nonnucleoside Reverse Transcriptase Inhibitor IQP-0528 in Rhesus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Lara E; Mesquita, Pedro M M; Ham, Anthony; Singletary, Tyana; Deyounks, Frank; Martin, Amy; McNicholl, Janet; Buckheit, Karen W; Buckheit, Robert W; Smith, James M

    2016-03-01

    We evaluated the in vivo pharmacokinetics and used a complementary ex vivo coculture assay to determine the pharmacodynamics of IQB3002 gel containing 1% IQP-0528, a nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI), in rhesus macaques (RM). The gel (1.5 ml) was applied vaginally to 6 simian-human immunodeficiency (SHIV)-positive female RM. Blood, vaginal fluids, and rectal fluids were collected at 0, 1, 2, and 4 h. RM were euthanized at 4 h, and vaginal, cervical, rectal, and regional lymph node tissues were harvested. Anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) activity was evaluated ex vivo by coculturing fresh or frozen vaginal tissues with activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and measuring the p24 levels for 10 days after an HIV-1Ba-L challenge. The median levels of IQP-0528, determined using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectroscopy (LC-MS/MS) methods, were between 10(4) and 10(5) ng/g in vaginal and cervical tissue, between 10(3) and 10(4) ng/g in rectal tissues, and between 10(5) and 10(7) ng/ml in vaginal fluids over the 4-h period. The vaginal tissues protected the cocultured PBMCs from HIV-1 infection ex vivo, with a viral inhibition range of 81 to 100% in fresh and frozen tissues that were proximal, medial, and distal relative to the cervix. No viral inhibition was detected in untreated baseline tissues. Collectively, the median drug levels observed were 5 to 7 logs higher than the in vitro 50% effective concentration (EC50) range (0.21 ng/ml to 1.29 ng/ml), suggesting that 1.5 ml of the gel delivers IQP-0528 throughout the RM vaginal compartment at levels that are highly inhibitory to HIV-1. Importantly, antiviral activity was observed in both fresh and frozen vaginal tissues, broadening the scope of the ex vivo coculture model for future NNRTI efficacy studies. PMID:26666935

  9. Loss of Function of Intestinal IL-17 and IL-22 Producing Cells Contributes to Inflammation and Viral Persistence in SIV-Infected Rhesus Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Emily S; Micci, Luca; Fromentin, Rémi; Paganini, Sara; McGary, Colleen S; Easley, Kirk; Chomont, Nicolas; Paiardini, Mirko

    2016-02-01

    In HIV/SIV-infected humans and rhesus macaques (RMs), a severe depletion of intestinal CD4+ T-cells producing interleukin IL-17 and IL-22 associates with loss of mucosal integrity and chronic immune activation. However, little is known about the function of IL-17 and IL-22 producing cells during lentiviral infections. Here, we longitudinally determined the levels and functions of IL-17, IL-22 and IL-17/IL-22 producing CD4+ T-cells in blood, lymph node and colorectum of SIV-infected RMs, as well as how they recover during effective ART and are affected by ART interruption. Intestinal IL-17 and IL-22 producing CD4+ T-cells are polyfunctional in SIV-uninfected RMs, with the large majority of cells producing four or five cytokines. SIV infection induced a severe dysfunction of colorectal IL-17, IL-22 and IL-17/IL-22 producing CD4+ T-cells, the extent of which associated with the levels of immune activation (HLA-DR+CD38+), proliferation (Ki-67+) and CD4+ T-cell counts before and during ART. Additionally, Th17 cell function during ART negatively correlated with residual plasma viremia and levels of sCD163, a soluble marker of inflammation and disease progression. Furthermore, IL-17 and IL-22 producing cell frequency and function at various pre, on, and off-ART experimental points associated with and predicted total SIV-DNA content in the colorectum and blood. While ART restored Th22 cell function to levels similar to pre-infection, it did not fully restore Th17 cell function, and all cell types were rapidly and severely affected-both quantitatively and qualitatively-after ART interruption. In conclusion, intestinal IL-17 producing cell function is severely impaired by SIV infection, not fully normalized despite effective ART, and strongly associates with inflammation as well as SIV persistence off and on ART. As such, strategies able to preserve and/or regenerate the functions of these CD4+ T-cells central for mucosal immunity are critically needed in future HIV cure

  10. Activated CD4+CCR5+ T cells in the rectum predict increased SIV acquisition in SIVGag/Tat-vaccinated rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carnathan, Diane G; Wetzel, Katherine S; Yu, Joana; Lee, S Thera; Johnson, Brent A; Paiardini, Mirko; Yan, Jian; Morrow, Matthew P; Sardesai, Niranjan Y; Weiner, David B; Ertl, Hildegund C J; Silvestri, Guido

    2015-01-13

    An effective T-cell-based AIDS vaccine should induce strong HIV-specific CD8(+) T cells in mucosal tissues without increasing the availability of target cells for the virus. Here, we evaluated five immunization strategies that include Human adenovirus-5 (AdHu5), Chimpanzee adenovirus-6 (AdC6) or -7 (AdC7), Vaccinia virus (VV), and DNA given by electroporation (DNA/EP), all expressing Simian immunodeficiency virus group specific antigen/transactivator of transcription (SIV(mac239Gag/Tat)). Five groups of six rhesus macaques (RMs) each were vaccinated with DNA/EP-AdC6-AdC7, VV-AdC6-AdC7, DNA/-EP-VV-AdC6, DNA/EP-VV-AdC7, or AdHu5-AdHu5-AdHu5 and were challenged repeatedly with low-dose intrarectal SIVmac239. Upon challenge, there were no significant differences among study groups in terms of virus acquisition or viral load after infection. When taken together, the immunization regimens did not protect against SIV acquisition compared with controls but did result in an ∼ 1.6-log decline in set-point viremia. Although all immunized RMs had detectable SIV-specific CD8(+) T cells in blood and rectal mucosa, we found no correlation between the number or function of these SIV-specific CD8(+) T cells and protection against SIV acquisition. Interestingly, RMs experiencing breakthrough infection showed significantly higher prechallenge levels of CD4(+)C-C chemokine receptor type 5 (CCR5)(+)HLA-DR(+) T cells in the rectal biopsies (RB) than animals that remained uninfected. In addition, among the infected RMs, the percentage of CD4(+)CCR5(+)Ki-67(+) T cells in RBs prechallenge correlated with higher early viremia. Overall, these data suggest that the levels of activated CD4(+)CCR5(+) target T cells in the rectal mucosa may predict the risk of SIV acquisition in RMs vaccinated with vectors that express SIVGag/Tat. PMID:25550504

  11. Relationships between IL-17(+ subsets, Tregs and pDCs that distinguish among SIV infected elite controllers, low, medium and high viral load rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ladawan Khowawisetsut

    Full Text Available Comprehensive studies of the frequencies and absolute numbers of the various cell lineages that synthesize IL-17 in the blood and corresponding gastrointestinal (GI tissues, their correlation with CD4(+ Tregs, CD8(+ Tregs, total and IFN-α synthesizing plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC relative to plasma viral load in SIV infection has been lacking. The unique availability of SIV infected rhesus macaques (RM classified as Elite Controllers (EC, and those with Low, Intermediate and High Viral Loads (HVL provided a unique opportunity to address this issue. Results of these studies showed that EC demonstrated a remarkable ability to reverse changes that are induced acutely by SIV in the various cell lineages. Highlights of the differences between EC and HVL RM within Gastro-intestinal tissues (GIT was the maintenance and/or increases in the levels of IL-17 synthesizing CD4, CD8, and NK cells and pDCs associated with slight decreases in the levels of CD4(+ Tregs and IFN-α synthesizing pDCs in EC as compared with decreases in the levels of IL-17 synthesizing CD4, CD8 and NK cells associated with increases in pDCs and IFN-α synthesizing pDCs in HVL monkeys. A previously underappreciated role for CD8(+ Tregs was also noted with a moderate increase in ECs but further increases of CD8(+ Tregs with increasing VL in viremic monkeys. Positive correlations between plasma VL and decreases in the levels of Th17, Tc17, NK-17, CD4(+ Tregs and increases in the levels of CD8(+ Tregs, total and IFN-α synthesizing pDCs were also noted. This study also identified 2 additional IL-17(+ subsets in GIT as CD3(-/CD8(+/NKG2a(- and CD3(+/CD8(+/NKG2a(+ subsets. Studies also suggest a limited role for IFN-α synthesizing pDCs in chronic immune activation despite persistent up-regulation of ISGs. Finally, elevated persistent innate immune responses appear associated with poor prognosis. These findings provide an initial foundation for markers important to follow for vaccine

  12. Relationships between IL-17(+) subsets, Tregs and pDCs that distinguish among SIV infected elite controllers, low, medium and high viral load rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khowawisetsut, Ladawan; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Onlamoon, Nattawat; Mayne, Ann E; Little, Dawn M; Villinger, Francois; Ansari, Aftab A

    2013-01-01

    Comprehensive studies of the frequencies and absolute numbers of the various cell lineages that synthesize IL-17 in the blood and corresponding gastrointestinal (GI) tissues, their correlation with CD4(+) Tregs, CD8(+) Tregs, total and IFN-α synthesizing plasmacytoid dendritic cells (pDC) relative to plasma viral load in SIV infection has been lacking. The unique availability of SIV infected rhesus macaques (RM) classified as Elite Controllers (EC), and those with Low, Intermediate and High Viral Loads (HVL) provided a unique opportunity to address this issue. Results of these studies showed that EC demonstrated a remarkable ability to reverse changes that are induced acutely by SIV in the various cell lineages. Highlights of the differences between EC and HVL RM within Gastro-intestinal tissues (GIT) was the maintenance and/or increases in the levels of IL-17 synthesizing CD4, CD8, and NK cells and pDCs associated with slight decreases in the levels of CD4(+) Tregs and IFN-α synthesizing pDCs in EC as compared with decreases in the levels of IL-17 synthesizing CD4, CD8 and NK cells associated with increases in pDCs and IFN-α synthesizing pDCs in HVL monkeys. A previously underappreciated role for CD8(+) Tregs was also noted with a moderate increase in ECs but further increases of CD8(+) Tregs with increasing VL in viremic monkeys. Positive correlations between plasma VL and decreases in the levels of Th17, Tc17, NK-17, CD4(+) Tregs and increases in the levels of CD8(+) Tregs, total and IFN-α synthesizing pDCs were also noted. This study also identified 2 additional IL-17(+) subsets in GIT as CD3(-/)CD8(+)/NKG2a(-) and CD3(+)/CD8(+)/NKG2a(+) subsets. Studies also suggest a limited role for IFN-α synthesizing pDCs in chronic immune activation despite persistent up-regulation of ISGs. Finally, elevated persistent innate immune responses appear associated with poor prognosis. These findings provide an initial foundation for markers important to follow for vaccine

  13. Synthetic double-stranded RNAs are adjuvants for the induction of T helper 1 and humoral immune responses to human papillomavirus in rhesus macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christiane Stahl-Hennig

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Toll-like receptor (TLR ligands are being considered as adjuvants for the induction of antigen-specific immune responses, as in the design of vaccines. Polyriboinosinic-polyribocytoidylic acid (poly I:C, a synthetic double-stranded RNA (dsRNA, is recognized by TLR3 and other intracellular receptors. Poly ICLC is a poly I:C analogue, which has been stabilized against the serum nucleases that are present in the plasma of primates. Poly I:C(12U, another analogue, is less toxic but also less stable in vivo than poly I:C, and TLR3 is essential for its recognition. To study the effects of these compounds on the induction of protein-specific immune responses in an animal model relevant to humans, rhesus macaques were immunized subcutaneously (s.c. with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH or human papillomavirus (HPV16 capsomeres with or without dsRNA or a control adjuvant, the TLR9 ligand CpG-C. All dsRNA compounds served as adjuvants for KLH-specific cellular immune responses, with the highest proliferative responses being observed with 2 mg/animal poly ICLC (p = 0.002 or 6 mg/animal poly I:C(12U (p = 0.001 when compared with immunization with KLH alone. Notably, poly ICLC -- but not CpG-C given at the same dose -- also helped to induce HPV16-specific Th1 immune responses while both adjuvants supported the induction of strong anti-HPV16 L1 antibody responses as determined by ELISA and neutralization assay. In contrast, control animals injected with HPV16 capsomeres alone did not develop substantial HPV16-specific immune responses. Injection of dsRNA led to increased numbers of cells producing the T cell-activating chemokines CXCL9 and CXCL10 as detected by in situ hybridization in draining lymph nodes 18 hours after injections, and to increased serum levels of CXCL10 (p = 0.01. This was paralleled by the reduced production of the homeostatic T cell-attracting chemokine CCL21. Thus, synthetic dsRNAs induce an innate chemokine response and act as adjuvants

  14. Viral RNA levels and env variants in semen and tissues of mature male rhesus macaques infected with SIV by penile inoculation.

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    Francis Fieni

    Full Text Available HIV is shed in semen but the anatomic site of virus entry into the genital secretions is unknown. We determined viral RNA (vRNA levels and the envelope gene sequence in the SIVmac 251 viral populations in the genital tract and semen of 5 adult male rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta that were infected after experimental penile SIV infection. Paired blood and semen samples were collected from 1-9 weeks after infection and the monkeys were necropsied eleven weeks after infection. The axillary lymph nodes, testes, epididymis, prostate, and seminal vesicles were collected and vRNA levels and single-genome analysis of the SIVmac251 env variants was performed. At the time of semen collection, blood vRNA levels were between 3.09 and 7.85 log10 vRNA copies/ml plasma. SIV RNA was found in the axillary lymph nodes of all five monkeys and in 3 of 5 monkeys, all tissues examined were vRNA positive. In these 3 monkeys, vRNA levels (log10 SIVgag copies/ug of total tissue RNA in the axillary lymph node (6.48 ± 0.50 were significantly higher than in the genital tract tissues: testis (3.67 ± 2.16; p<0.05, epididymis (3.08 ± 1.19; p<0.0001, prostate (3.36 ± 1.30; p<0.01, and seminal vesicle (2.67 ± 1.50; p<0.0001. Comparison of the SIVmac251 env viral populations in blood plasma, systemic lymph node, and genital tract tissues was performed in two of the macaques. Visual inspection of the Neighbor-Joining phylograms revealed that in both animals, all the sequences were generally distributed evenly among all tissue compartments. Importantly, viral populations in the genital tissues were not distinct from those in the systemic tissues. Our findings demonstrate striking similarity in the viral populations in the blood and male genital tract tissues within 3 months of penile SIV transmission.

  15. KIR2DL4 copy number variation is associated with CD4+ T-cell depletion and function of cytokine-producing NK cell subsets in SIV-infected Mamu-A*01-negative rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellmann, Ina; Letvin, Norman L; Schmitz, Jörn E

    2013-05-01

    Here, we demonstrate that KIR2DL4 copy number variation (CNV) is associated with CD4(+) T-cell decline and functionality of cytokine-producing NK cells during primary simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection in Mamu-A*01(-) Indian-origin rhesus macaques, with higher KIR2DL4 copy numbers being associated with a better preservation of CD4(+) T cells and an increased gamma interferon (IFN-γ) production from stimulated cytokine-producing NK cell subsets during acute SIVmac251 infection. These findings underscore the crucial role of activating killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) in NK cell-mediated SIV responses during early SIV infection. PMID:23449795

  16. Whole-genome sequencing and analysis of the Malaysian cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) genome

    OpenAIRE

    Higashino, Atsunori; Sakate, Ryuichi; Kameoka, Yosuke; Takahashi, Ichiro; Hirata, Makoto; Tanuma, Reiko; Masui, Tohru; Yasutomi, Yasuhiro; Osada, Naoki

    2012-01-01

    Background The genetic background of the cynomolgus macaque (Macaca fascicularis) is made complex by the high genetic diversity, population structure, and gene introgression from the closely related rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta). Herein we report the whole-genome sequence of a Malaysian cynomolgus macaque male with more than 40-fold coverage, which was determined using a resequencing method based on the Indian rhesus macaque genome. Results We identified approximately 9.7 million single nuc...

  17. Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV envelope quasispecies transmission and evolution in infant rhesus macaques after oral challenge with uncloned SIVmac251: increased diversity is associated with neutralizing antibodies and improved survival in previously immunized animals

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Earl Patricia

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oral infection of infant macaques with simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV is a useful animal model to test interventions to reduce postnatal HIV transmission via breast-feeding. We previously demonstrated that immunization of infant rhesus macaques with either modified vaccinia virus Ankara (MVA expressing SIV Gag, Pol and Env, or live-attenuated SIVmac1A11 resulted in lower viremia and longer survival compared to unimmunized controls after oral challenge with virulent SIVmac251 (Van Rompay et al., J. Virology 77:179–190, 2003. Here we evaluate the impact of these vaccines on oral transmission and evolution of SIV envelope variants. Results Limiting dilution analysis of SIV RNA followed by heteroduplex mobility assays of the V1–V2 envelope (env region revealed two major env variants in the uncloned SIVmac251 inoculum. Plasma sampled from all infants 1 week after challenge contained heterogeneous SIV env populations including one or both of the most common env variants in the virus inoculum; no consistent differences in patterns of env variants were found between vaccinated and unvaccinated infants. However, SIV env variant populations diverged in most vaccinated monkeys 3 to 5 months after challenge, in association with the development of neutralizing antibodies. Conclusions These patterns of viral envelope diversity, immune responses and disease course in SIV-infected infant macaques are similar to observations in HIV-infected children, and underscore the relevance of this pediatric animal model. The results also support the concept that neonatal immunization with HIV vaccines might modulate disease progression in infants infected with HIV by breast-feeding.

  18. Selective induction of cell-mediated immunity and protection of rhesus macaques from chronic SHIVKU2 infection by prophylactic vaccination with a conserved HIV-1 envelope peptide-cocktail

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Infection of Indian-origin rhesus macaques by the simian human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) is considered to be a suitable preclinical model for directly testing efficacy of vaccine candidates based on the HIV-1 envelope. We used this model for prophylactic vaccination with a peptide-cocktail comprised of highly conserved HIV-1 envelope sequences immunogenic/antigenic in macaques and humans. Separate groups of macaques were immunized with the peptide-cocktail by intravenous and subcutaneous routes using autologous dendritic cells (DC) and Freund's adjuvant, respectively. The vaccine elicited antigen specific IFN-γ-producing cells and T-cell proliferation, but not HIV-neutralizing antibodies. The vaccinated animals also exhibited efficient cross-clade cytolytic activity against target cells expressing envelope proteins corresponding to HIV-1 strains representative of multiple clades that increased after intravenous challenge with pathogenic SHIVKU2. Virus-neutralizing antibodies were either undetectable or present only transiently at low levels in the control as well as vaccinated monkeys after infection. Significant control of plasma viremia leading to undetectable levels was achieved in majority of vaccinated monkeys compared to mock-vaccinated controls. Monkeys vaccinated with the peptide-cocktail using autologous DC, compared to Freund's adjuvant, and the mock-vaccinated animals, showed significantly higher IFN-γ production, higher levels of vaccine-specific IFN-γ producing CD4+ cells and significant control of plasma viremia. These results support DC-based vaccine delivery and the utility of the conserved HIV-1 envelope peptide-cocktail, capable of priming strong cell-mediated immunity, for potential inclusion in HIV vaccination strategies

  19. Brain aging in humans, chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes), and rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta): magnetic resonance imaging studies of macro- and microstructural changes

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Xu; Errangi, Bhargav; Li, Longchuan; Glasser, Matthew F.; Westlye, Lars T.; Fjell, Anders M.; Walhovd, Kristine B; Hu, Xiaoping; Herndon, James G; Preuss, Todd M.; Rilling, James K.

    2013-01-01

    Among primates, humans are uniquely vulnerable to many age-related neurodegenerative disorders. We used structural and diffusion magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to examine the brains of chimpanzees and rhesus monkeys across each species' adult lifespan, and compared these results with published findings in humans. As in humans, gray matter volume decreased with age in chimpanzees and rhesus monkeys. Also like humans, chimpanzees showed a trend for decreased white matter volume with age, but ...

  20. Alopecia in three macaque species housed in a laboratory environment

    OpenAIRE

    Kroeker, R.; Bellanca, R. U.; Lee, G. H.; Thom, J. P.; Worlein, J. M.

    2013-01-01

    Alopecia is a persistent problem in captive macaque populations and despite recent interest, no factors have been identified that can unequivocally explain the presence of alopecia in a majority of cases. Seasonal, demographic and environmental factors have been identified as affecting alopecia presentation in rhesus macaques, the most widely studied macaque species. However, few studies have investigated alopecia rates in other macaque species. We report alopecia scores over a period of 12 m...

  1. Longitudinal study to assess the safety and efficacy of a live-attenuated SHIV vaccine in long term immunized rhesus macaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Live-attenuated viruses derived from SIV and SHIV have provided the most consistent protection against challenge with pathogenic viruses, but concerns regarding their long-term safety and efficacy have hampered their clinical usefulness. We report a longitudinal study in which we evaluated the long-term safety and efficacy of ΔvpuSHIVPPC, a live virus vaccine derived from SHIVPPC. Macaques were administered two inoculations of ΔvpuSHIVPPC, three years apart, and followed for eight years. None of the five vaccinated macaques developed an AIDS-like disease from the vaccine. At eight years, macaques were challenged with pathogenic SIV and SHIV. None of the four macaques with detectable cellular-mediated immunity prior to challenge had detectable viral RNA in the plasma. This study demonstrates that multiple inoculations of a live vaccine virus can be used safely and can significantly extend the efficacy of the vaccine, as compared to a single inoculation, which is efficacious for approximately three years

  2. The Macaque Social Responsiveness Scale (mSRS: A Rapid Screening Tool for Assessing Variability in the Social Responsiveness of Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric J Feczko

    Full Text Available Understanding the biological mechanisms underlying human neuropsychiatric disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD, has been hindered by the lack of a robust, translational animal model. Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta display many of the same social behaviors that are affected in ASD, making them an excellent animal species in which to model social impairments. However, the social impairments associated with ASD may reflect extreme ends of a continuous distribution of traits. Thus, to validate the rhesus monkey as an animal model for studying social impairments that has strong translational relevance for ASD, researchers need an easily-implemented measurement tool that can quantify variation in social behavior dimensionally. The Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS is a 65-item survey that identifies both typical and atypical social behaviors in humans that covary with ASD symptom severity. A chimpanzee SRS has already been validated and the current study adapted this tool for use in the rhesus monkey (mSRS. Fifteen raters completed the mSRS for 105 rhesus monkeys living at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center. The mSRS scores showed a unimodal distribution with a positive skew that identified 6 statistical outliers. Inter-rater reliability was very strong, but only 17 of the 36 questions showed positive intra-item reliability. The results of an exploratory factor analysis identified 3 factors that explained over 60% of the variance, with 12 items significantly loading onto the primary factor. These items reflected behaviors associated with social avoidance, social anxiety or inflexibility and social confidence. These initial findings are encouraging and suggest that variability in the social responsiveness of rhesus monkeys can be quantified using the mSRS: a tool that has strong translational relevance for human disorders. With further modification, the mSRS may provide an promising new direction for research on the biological

  3. The Macaque Social Responsiveness Scale (mSRS): A Rapid Screening Tool for Assessing Variability in the Social Responsiveness of Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feczko, Eric J; Bliss-Moreau, Eliza; Walum, Hasse; Pruett, John R; Parr, Lisa A

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the biological mechanisms underlying human neuropsychiatric disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD), has been hindered by the lack of a robust, translational animal model. Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) display many of the same social behaviors that are affected in ASD, making them an excellent animal species in which to model social impairments. However, the social impairments associated with ASD may reflect extreme ends of a continuous distribution of traits. Thus, to validate the rhesus monkey as an animal model for studying social impairments that has strong translational relevance for ASD, researchers need an easily-implemented measurement tool that can quantify variation in social behavior dimensionally. The Social Responsiveness Scale (SRS) is a 65-item survey that identifies both typical and atypical social behaviors in humans that covary with ASD symptom severity. A chimpanzee SRS has already been validated and the current study adapted this tool for use in the rhesus monkey (mSRS). Fifteen raters completed the mSRS for 105 rhesus monkeys living at the Yerkes National Primate Research Center. The mSRS scores showed a unimodal distribution with a positive skew that identified 6 statistical outliers. Inter-rater reliability was very strong, but only 17 of the 36 questions showed positive intra-item reliability. The results of an exploratory factor analysis identified 3 factors that explained over 60% of the variance, with 12 items significantly loading onto the primary factor. These items reflected behaviors associated with social avoidance, social anxiety or inflexibility and social confidence. These initial findings are encouraging and suggest that variability in the social responsiveness of rhesus monkeys can be quantified using the mSRS: a tool that has strong translational relevance for human disorders. With further modification, the mSRS may provide an promising new direction for research on the biological mechanisms underlying

  4. Optimization and qualification of an 8-color intracellular cytokine staining assay for quantifying T cell responses in rhesus macaques for pre-clinical vaccine studies

    OpenAIRE

    Donaldson, Mitzi M.; Kao, Shing-Fen; Eslamizar, Leila; Gee, Connie; Koopman, Gerrit; Lifton, Michelle; Schmitz, Joern E.; Sylwester, Andrew W.; Wilson, Aaron; Hawkins, Natalie; Self, Steve G.; Roederer, Mario; Foulds, Kathryn E.

    2012-01-01

    Vaccination and SIV challenge of macaque species is the best animal model for evaluating candidate HIV vaccines in pre-clinical studies. As such, robust assays optimized for use in nonhuman primates are necessary for reliable ex vivo measurement of immune responses and identification of potential immune correlates of protection. We optimized and qualified an 8-color intracellular cytokine staining assay for the measurement of IFNγ, IL-2, and TNF from viable CD4 and CD8 T cells from cryopreser...

  5. The Macaque Social Responsiveness Scale (mSRS): A Rapid Screening Tool for Assessing Variability in the Social Responsiveness of Rhesus Monkeys (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Feczko, Eric J.; Eliza Bliss-Moreau; Hasse Walum; Pruett, John R.; Parr, Lisa A.

    2016-01-01

    Understanding the biological mechanisms underlying human neuropsychiatric disorders, such as autism spectrum disorder (ASD), has been hindered by the lack of a robust, translational animal model. Rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) display many of the same social behaviors that are affected in ASD, making them an excellent animal species in which to model social impairments. However, the social impairments associated with ASD may reflect extreme ends of a continuous distribution of traits. Thus, ...

  6. Bladder catheterization, male (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catheterization is accomplished by inserting a catheter (a hollow tube, often with and inflatable balloon tip) into ... catheter in place for a duration of time. Catheterization in males is slightly more difficult and uncomfortable ...

  7. Get It While It’s Hot: A Peak-First Bias in Self-Generated Choice Order in Rhesus Macaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kanghoon; Kralik, Jerald D.

    2013-01-01

    Animals typically must make a number of successive choices to achieve a goal: e.g., eating multiple food items before becoming satiated. However, it is unclear whether choosing the best first or saving the best for last represents the best choice strategy to maximize overall reward. Specifically, since outcomes can be evaluated prospectively (with future rewards discounted and more immediate rewards preferred) or retrospectively (with prior rewards discounted and more recent rewards preferred), the conditions under which each are used remains unclear. On the one hand, humans and non-human animals clearly discount future reward, preferring immediate rewards to delayed ones, suggesting prospective evaluation; on the other hand, it has also been shown that a sequence that ends well, i.e., with the best event or item last, is often preferred, suggesting retrospective evaluation. Here we hypothesized that when individuals are allowed to build the sequence themselves they are more likely to evaluate each item individually and therefore build a sequence using prospective evaluation. We examined the relationship between self-generated choice order and preference in rhesus monkeys in two experiments in which the distinctiveness of options were relatively high and low, respectively. We observed a positive linear relationship between choice order and preference among highly distinct options, indicating that the rhesus monkeys chose their preferred food first: i.e., a peak-first order preference. Overall, choice order depended on the degree of relative preference among alternatives and a peak-first bias, providing evidence for prospective evaluation when choice order is self-generated. PMID:24376758

  8. A genetically engineered live-attenuated simian-human immunodeficiency virus that co-expresses the RANTES gene improves the magnitude of cellular immunity in rhesus macaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Regulated-on-activation-normal-T-cell-expressed-and-secreted (RANTES), a CC-chemokine, enhances antigen-specific T helper (Th) type-1 responses against HIV-1. To evaluate the adjuvant effects of RANTES against HIV vaccine candidate in SHIV-macaque models, we genetically engineered a live-attenuated SHIV to express the RANTES gene (SHIV-RANTES) and characterized the virus's properties in vivo. After the vaccination, the plasma viral loads were same in the SHIV-RANTES-inoculated monkeys and the parental nef-deleted SHIV (SHIV-NI)-inoculated monkeys. SHIV-RANTES provided some immunity in monkeys by remarkably increasing the antigen-specific CD4+ Th cell-proliferative response and by inducing an antigen-specific IFN-γ ELISpot response. The magnitude of the immunity in SHIV-RANTES-immunized animals, however, failed to afford greater protection against a heterologous pathogenic SHIV (SHIV-C2/1) challenge compared to control SHIV-NI-immunized animals. SHIV-RANTES immunized monkeys, elicited robust cellular CD4+ Th responses and IFN-γ ELISpot responses after SHIV-C2/1 challenge. These findings suggest that the chemokine RANTES can augment vaccine-elicited, HIV-specific CD4+ T cell responses

  9. A rhesus macaque rhadinovirus related to Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus/human herpesvirus 8 encodes a functional homologue of interleukin-6.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaleeba, J A; Bergquam, E P; Wong, S W

    1999-07-01

    The rhesus rhadinovirus strain 17577 (RRV strain 17577) genome is essentially colinear with human herpesvirus 8 (HHV8)/Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV) and encodes several analogous open reading frames (ORFs), including the homologue of cellular interleukin-6 (IL-6). To determine if the RRV IL-6-like ORF (RvIL-6) is biologically functional, it was expressed either transiently in COS-1 cells or purified from bacteria as a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-RvIL-6 fusion and analyzed by IL-6 bioassays. Utilizing the IL-6-dependent B9 cell line, we found that both forms of RvIL-6 supported cell proliferation in a dose-dependent manner. Moreover, antibodies specific to the IL-6 receptor (IL-6R) or the gp130 subunit were capable of blocking the stimulatory effects of RvIL-6. Reciprocal titrations of GST-RvIL-6 against human recombinant IL-6 produced a more-than-additive stimulatory effect, suggesting that RvIL-6 does not inhibit but may instead potentiate normal cellular IL-6 signaling to B cells. These results demonstrate that RRV encodes an accessory protein with IL-6-like activity. PMID:10364379

  10. Variations in the Biological Functions of HIV-1 Clade C Envelope in a SHIV-Infected Rhesus Macaque during Disease Progression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    For Yue Tso

    Full Text Available A better understanding of how the biological functions of the HIV-1 envelope (Env changes during disease progression may aid the design of an efficacious anti-HIV-1 vaccine. Although studies from patient had provided some insights on this issue, the differences in the study cohorts and methodology had make it difficult to reach a consensus of the variations in the HIV-1 Env functions during disease progression. To this end, an animal model that can be infected under controlled environment and reflect the disease course of HIV-1 infection in human will be beneficial. Such an animal model was previously demonstrated by the infection of macaque with SHIV, expressing HIV-1 clade C Env V1-V5 region. By using this model, we examined the changes in biological functions of Env in the infected animal over the entire disease course. Our data showed an increase in the neutralization resistance phenotype over time and coincided with the decrease in the net charges of the V1-V5 region. Infection of PBMC with provirus expressing various Env clones, isolated from the infected animal over time, showed a surprisingly better replicative fitness for viruses expressing the Env from early time point. Biotinylation and ELISA data also indicated a decrease of cell-surface-associated Env and virion-associated gp120 content with disease progression. This decrease did not affect the CD4-binding capability of Env, but were positively correlated with the decrease of Env fusion ability. Interestingly, some of these changes in biological functions reverted to the pre-AIDS level during advance AIDS. These data suggested a dynamic relationship between the Env V1-V5 region with the host immune pressure. The observed changes of biological functions in this setting might reflect and predict those occurring during natural disease progression in human.

  11. Sequencing and analyses of the adenovirus polymerase gene in fecal samples of captively bred rhesus macaques%恒河猴肠道腺病毒聚合酶基因片段的序列分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢建溪; 曹红; 钱师宇; 王强; 李刚

    2011-01-01

    目的 研究非人灵长类动物猴腺病毒的分子多样性。方法 采集圈养的57只恒河猴粪便样本,以腺病毒聚合酶基因为目的基因,用PCR方法进行扩增,对PCR阳性产物进行克隆、测序,并进行系统进化分析。结果 57只恒河猴粪便样本有12份样本中存在腺病毒DNA,系统进化分析提示这些序列主要可分为两大组:类SAdV-6组(2个非重复序列)和类SAdV-7组(9个非重复序列)。此外,有三个克隆,其最相似序列分别为:SAdV-1,SAdV-3和HAdV-52。结论 我们的研究证实了腺病毒的确在非人灵长类粪便中普遍存在,揭示了本研究所涉及动物肠道内腺病毒的多样性以及系统进化情况。%Objective In an attempt to study the moleculr characterization and epidemiology of simian adenoviruses in nonhuman primate (NHP) populations. MethodsWe examined a colony of captively bred rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta ) in China for the presence of adenoviral DNA in stool samples. This was done by using the PCR method that targeted the adenovirus polymerase gene, and the PCR positive fragments were cloned for sequencing and phylogenetic analyses. ResultsAmong the 57animals analyzed, fecal samples from 12 animals were positive for the presence of adenoviral DNA. The results suggested that the viral DNA clones were primarily segregated into two large groups: SAdV-6 (2 nonredundant sequences) and SAdV-7 (9 non-redundant sequences). In addition, there were three clones with more similarity to SAdV-1, SAdV-3 and HAdV-52 respectively. ConclusionOur data confirmed the prevalence of adenoviral DNA in the feces of NHPs and revealed the heterogeneity and phylogenetics of the adenoviruses in the gastrointestinal tract of the study animals.

  12. Pathogenicity of Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus SHIV-89.6P and SIVmac Is Attenuated in Cynomolgus Macaques and Associated with Early T-Lymphocyte Responses

    OpenAIRE

    Reimann, Keith A.; Parker, Robert A.; Seaman, Michael S.; Beaudry, Kristin; Beddall, Margaret; Peterson, Lauren; Williams, Kenneth C.; Veazey, Ronald S.; Montefiori, David C.; Mascola, John R.; Nabel, Gary J.; Letvin, Norman L.

    2005-01-01

    Because most studies of AIDS pathogenesis in nonhuman primates have been performed in Indian-origin rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta), little is known about lentiviral pathogenicity and control of virus replication following infection of alternative macaque species. Here, we report the consequences of simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIV-89.6P and SIVmac251 infection in cynomolgus (Macaca fascicularis) and rhesus macaques of Chinese origin. Compared to the pathogenicity of the same viruses...

  13. Self catheterization - male

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000143.htm Self catheterization - male To use the sharing features on ... Read More Urinary incontinence Patient Instructions Kegel exercises - self-care Multiple sclerosis - discharge Stroke - discharge Urinary catheters - ...

  14. Self catheterization - female

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000144.htm Self catheterization - female To use the sharing features on ... incontinence - vaginal sling procedures Patient Instructions Kegel exercises - self-care Multiple sclerosis - discharge Stroke - discharge Urinary catheters - ...

  15. Left heart catheterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catheterization - left heart ... to help guide the catheters up into your heart and arteries. Dye will be injected into your ... in the blood vessels that lead to your heart. The catheter is then moved through the aortic ...

  16. Differential recombination dynamics within the MHC of macaque species

    OpenAIRE

    de Groot, Nanine; Doxiadis, Gaby G. M.; Otting, Nel; de Vos-Rouweler, Annemiek J. M.; Bontrop, Ronald E

    2014-01-01

    A panel of 15 carefully selected microsatellites (short tandem repeats, STRs) has allowed us to study segregation and haplotype stability in various macaque species. The STRs span the major histocompatibility complex (MHC) region and map in more detail from the centromeric part of the Mhc-A to the DR region. Two large panels of Indian rhesus and Indonesian/Indochinese cynomolgus macaques have been subjected to pedigree analysis, allowing the definition of 161 and 36 different haplotypes and t...

  17. Immediate zidovudine treatment protects simian immunodeficiency virus-infected newborn macaques against rapid onset of AIDS.

    OpenAIRE

    van Rompay, K K; Otsyula, M G; Marthas, M L; Miller, C. J.; McChesney, M.B.; Pedersen, N C

    1995-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) infection of newborn rhesus macaques is a practical animal model of pediatric AIDS. Intravenous inoculation of rhesus newborns with uncloned SIVmac resulted in a high virus load, no antiviral immune responses, severe immunodeficiency, and a high mortality rate within 3 months. In contrast, immediate oral zidovudine (AZT) treatment of SIV-inoculated rhesus newborns either prevented infection or resulted in reduced virus load, enhanced antiviral immune respon...

  18. Therapeutic envelope vaccination in combination with antiretroviral therapy temporarily rescues SIV-specific CD4⁺ T-cell-dependent natural killer cell effector responses in chronically infected rhesus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vargas-Inchaustegui, Diego A; Xiao, Peng; Demberg, Thorsten; Pal, Ranajit; Robert-Guroff, Marjorie

    2015-06-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are essential components of the immune system, and due to their rapid response potential, can have a great impact during early anti-viral immune responses. We have previously shown that interleukin-2-dependent NK and CD4(+) T-cell co-operative immune responses exist in long-term simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) -infected controlling macaques and can be rescued in SIV-infected non-controlling macaques by a short course of antiretroviral therapy (ART). Given that co-operative responses may play an important role in disease prevention and therapeutic treatment, in the present study we sought to determine if these responses can be enhanced in chronically SIV-infected macaques by vaccination with a single-dose of envelope protein given during ART. To this end, we treated 14 chronically SIV-infected macaques with ART for 11 weeks and gave 10 of these macaques a single intramuscular dose of SIV gp120 at week 9 of treatment. ART significantly decreased plasma and mucosal viral loads, increased the numbers of circulating CD4(+) T cells in all macaques, and increased T-cell-dependent envelope- and gag-specific interferon-γ and tumour necrosis factor-α production by circulatory CD56(+) NK cells. The therapeutic envelope immunization resulted in higher envelope-specific responses compared with those in macaques that received ART only. Functional T-cell responses restored by ART and therapeutic Env immunization were correlated with transiently reduced plasma viraemia levels following ART release. Collectively our results indicate that SIV-specific T-cell-dependent NK cell responses can be efficiently rescued by ART in chronically SIV-infected macaques and that therapeutic immunization may be beneficial in previously vaccinated individuals. PMID:25626488

  19. 高+Gx环境对猴咬肌肌细胞c-jun表达影响的研究%Effect of high +Gx on c-jun expression in masseter muscle cell of Rhesus macaque

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    施生根; 张建中; 汤楚华; 牛忠英; 张铭

    2008-01-01

    目的 观察高+Gx环境对猴咬肌组织病理学及c-jun表达的影响. 方法以9只雄性猕猴为对象,按受试猴暴露的+Gx环境及持续时间随机分4组,对照组为+1 Gx/300 s;实验组为3组,分别为+15 Gx/200 s、+18 Gx/165 s、+21 Gx/140 s.采用病理学和免疫组织化学方法,观察模拟高正加速度环境下猴咬肌肌细胞组织及c-jun表达的变化. 结果组织病理学观察:对照组猴咬肌肌细胞无明显变化;实验组肌细胞结构趋紊乱,偶见少量间质出血.免疫组织化学观察:对照组咬肌肌细胞c-jun呈阴性或弱阳性表达,主要位于肌细胞核,胞质着色不明显;实验组咬肌细胞核c-jun着色明显,呈强阳性表达,不同高+Gx暴露组之间无明显差别. 结论高于+15 Gx的模拟环境可引起猴咬肌肌细胞c-jun表达增强.%Objective To investigate the changes of c-jun expression in the monkey masseter muscles induced by stress reaction under +Gx loads. Methods Nine male Rhesus macaques were randomly divided in to four groups according to Gx loads and duration: control group was exposed to+1 Gx/300 s overloads, and experimental groups 1, 2 and 3 were exposed to +15 Gx/200 s,+18 Gx/165 s and + 21 Gx/140 s respectively. Masseter tissue was fixed with 10% buffered formaldehyde and embedded with paraffin, and histopathological changes were observed under microscope. The expression of c-jun was detected by immunohistochemical PicTureTM method on the masseters. Results Gross and histological analyses showed that no significant pathological changes were observed in the masseters in control group; there was structural disturbance of masseter with slight stromal hemorrhage in the different experimental groups. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that over-expression of c-jun was detected in the nuclei of the muscles in the experimental groups, and negative staining was also observed in the nuclei of muscles in controlanimals. There was no obvious difference in c

  20. Death in a catheterization laboratory.

    OpenAIRE

    Morton, B C; Higginson, L A; Beanlands, D. S.

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To assess current rates of death from diagnostic and therapeutic cardiac catheterization as well as changes in the rates, if any, from 1977 to 1991. DESIGN: A prospective descriptive study. SETTING: Catheterization laboratory, University of Ottawa Heart Institute. PATIENTS: Consecutive patients undergoing diagnostic and therapeutic procedures from 1977 to 1991. Those undergoing endomyocardial biopsy or electrophysiologic study were excluded. INTERVENTIONS: Cardiac catheterization w...

  1. Infections following epidural catheterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, MS; Andersen, SS; Andersen, Ove; Gahrn-Hansen, B; Siboni, K

    1995-01-01

    central nervous system infection of at least 0.7% at Odense University Hospital. This degree of infection is of the same magnitude as that reported for intravascular devices. We found that the patients with generalized symptoms of infection had been catheterized for a longer time, and were older than...

  2. Rhesus monkeys know when they remember

    OpenAIRE

    Hampton, Robert R.

    2001-01-01

    Humans are consciously aware of some memories and can make verbal reports about these memories. Other memories cannot be brought to consciousness, even though they influence behavior. This conspicuous difference in access to memories is central in taxonomies of human memory systems but has been difficult to document in animal studies, suggesting that some forms of memory may be unique to humans. Here I show that rhesus macaque monkeys can report the presence or absence...

  3. Decreased Dengue Replication and an Increased Anti-viral Humoral Response with the use of Combined Toll-Like Receptor 3 and 7/8 Agonists in Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    SARIOL, Carlos A.; Martínez, Melween I.; Rivera, Francheska; Rodríguez, Idia Vanessa; Pantoja, Petraleigh; Abel, Kristina; Arana, Teresa; Giavedoni, Luis; Hodara, Vida; White, Laura J.; Angleró, Yesseinia I.; Montaner, Luis J.; KRAISELBURD, EDMUNDO N.

    2011-01-01

    Background Pathogenic versus protective outcomes to Dengue virus (DENV) infection are associated with innate immune function. This study aimed to determine the role of increased TLR3- and TLR7/8-mediated innate signaling after Dengue infection of rhesus macaques in vivo to evaluate its impact on disease and anti-DENV immune responses. Methodology/Principal Findings TLR3 and TLR7/8 agonists (emulsified in Montanide) were administered subcutaneously to rhesus macaques at 48 hours and 7 days aft...

  4. Cloning of the Epstein-Barr Virus-Related Rhesus Lymphocryptovirus as a Bacterial Artificial Chromosome: a Loss-of-Function Mutation of the rhBARF1 Immune Evasion Gene ▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Ohashi, Makoto; Orlova, Nina; Quink, Carol; Wang, Fred

    2010-01-01

    Rhesus macaques are naturally infected with a gammaherpesvirus which is in the same lymphocryptovirus (LCV) genus as and closely related to Epstein-Barr virus (EBV). The rhesus macaque LCV (rhLCV) contains a repertoire of genes identical to that of EBV, and experimental rhLCV infection of naive rhesus macaques accurately models acute and persistent EBV infection of humans. We cloned the LCL8664 rhLCV strain as a bacterial artificial chromosome to create recombinant rhLCV for investigation in ...

  5. Infections following epidural catheterization

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holt, MS; Andersen, SS; Andersen, Ove; Gahrn-Hansen, B; Siboni, K

    1995-01-01

    central nervous system infection of at least 0.7% at Odense University Hospital. This degree of infection is of the same magnitude as that reported for intravascular devices. We found that the patients with generalized symptoms of infection had been catheterized for a longer time, and were older than......Seventy-eight patients with culture-positive epidural catheters, were studied. Fifty-nine had symptoms of exit site infection and 11 patients had clinical meningitis, two of whom also had an epidural abscess. This corresponds to a local infection incidence of at least 4.3% and an incidence of...... patients with only local symptoms of infection. The microorganisms isolated from the tips of the epidural catheters were coagulase-negative staphylococci (41%), Staphylococcus aureus (35%), Gram-negative bacilli (14%) and others (10%). The Gram-negative bacilli and S. aureus caused serious infections more...

  6. Differences in time of virus appearance in the blood and virus-specific immune responses in intravenous and intrarectal primary SIVmac251 infection of rhesus macaques; a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Washington Parks Robyn

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background HIV-I can be transmitted by intravenous inoculation of contaminated blood or blood product or sexually through mucosal surfaces. Here we performed a pilot study in the SIVmac251 macaque model to address whether the route of viral entry influences the kinetics of the appearance and the size of virus-specific immune in different tissue compartments. Methods For this purpose, of 2 genetically defined Mamu-A*01-positive macaques, 1 was exposed intravenously and the other intrarectally to the same SIVmac251 viral stock and virus-specific CD8+ T-cells were measured within the first 12 days of infection in the blood and at day 12 in several tissues following euthanasia. Results Virus-specific CD8+ T-cell responses to Gag, Env, and particularly Tat appeared earlier in the blood of the animal exposed by the mucosal route than in the animal exposed intravenously. The magnitude of these virus-specific responses was consistently higher in the systemic tissues and GALT of the macaque exposed by the intravenous route, suggesting a higher viral burden in the tissues as reflected by the faster appearance of virus in plasma. Differences in the ability of the virus-specific CD8+ T-cells to respond in vitro to specific peptide stimulation were also observed and the greatest proliferative ability was found in the GALT of the animal infected by the intrarectal route. Conclusions These data may suggest that the natural mucosal barrier may delay viral spreading. The consequences of this observation, if confirmed in studies with a larger number of animals, may have implications in vaccine development.

  7. The genomic sequence of lymphocryptovirus from cynomolgus macaque.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamperschroer, Cris; Gosink, Mark M; Kumpf, Steven W; O'Donnell, Lynn M; Tartaro, Karrie R

    2016-01-15

    Lymphocryptoviruses such as Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) cause persistent infections in human and non-human primates, and suppression of the immune system can increase the risk of lymphocryptovirus (LCV)-associated tumor development in both human and non-human primates. To enable LCV infection as a non-clinical model to study effects of therapeutics on EBV immunity, we determined the genomic DNA sequence of the LCV from cynomolgus macaque, a species commonly used for non-clinical testing. Comparison to rhesus macaque LCV and human EBV sequences indicates that LCV from the cynomolgus macaque has the same genomic arrangement and a high degree of similarity in most genes, especially with rhesus macaque LCV. Genes showing lower similarity were those encoding proteins involved in latency and/or tumor promotion or immune evasion. The genomic sequence of LCV from cynomolgus macaque should aid the development of non-clinical tools for identifying therapeutics that impact LCV immunity and carry potential lymphoma risk. PMID:26590795

  8. The Rhesus Rhadinovirus CD200 Homologue Affects Immune Responses and Viral Loads during In Vivo Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Estep, Ryan D.; Rawlings, Stephanie D.; Li, Helen; Manoharan, Minsha; Blaine, Elizabeth T.; O'Connor, Megan A.; Messaoudi, Ilhem; Axthelm, Michael K.; Wong, Scott W.

    2014-01-01

    Rhesus macaque rhadinovirus (RRV) is a gammaherpesvirus of rhesus macaque (RM) monkeys that is closely related to human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8)/Kaposi's Sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), and it is capable of inducing diseases in simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)-infected RM that are similar to those seen in humans coinfected with HIV and HHV-8. Both HHV-8 and RRV encode viral CD200 (vCD200) molecules that are homologues of cellular CD200, a membrane glycoprotein that regulates immune res...

  9. Rhesus Cytomegalovirus Encodes Seventeen MicroRNAs that are Differentially Expressed in vitro and in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Hancock, Meaghan H; Tirabassi, Rebecca S.; Nelson, Jay A.

    2012-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) miRNAs are important for regulation of viral infection and evasion of host immune responses. Unfortunately, the importance of HCMV miRNAs cannot be addressed in vivo due to the species specificity of CMVs. Rhesus CMV (RhCMV) infection of rhesus macaques provides an important model system for HCMV pathogenesis due to the genetic similarity between the viruses. In this report, seventeen RhCMV miRNAs were identified using Next Generation Sequencing. In fibroblasts, R...

  10. Genomic diversity and evolution of papillomaviruses in rhesus monkeys.

    OpenAIRE

    Chan, S. Y.; Bernard, H U; Ratterree, M.; Birkebak, T A; Faras, A J; Ostrow, R S

    1997-01-01

    We are studying the diversity of and relationships among papillomaviruses (PVs) to understand the modes and timescales of PV evolution and in the hope of finding animal PVs that may serve as model systems for disease caused by human PVs (HPVs). Toward this goal, we have examined 326 genital samples from rhesus monkeys and long-tailed macaques with a PCR protocol optimized for detecting genital HPV types. In 28 of the rhesus monkey samples, we found amplicons derived from 12 different and nove...

  11. Pulmonary embolism after cardiac catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We performed lung perfusion scintigrams before and after catheterization in consecutive 15 patients. Both right and left heart catheterization (9 patients), only right heart catheterization (5 patients), and only left heart catheterization (1 patient) were performed using percutaneous femoral approach with catheter introducer. After removal of all catheters, manual compression was carried out, and after completion of the hemostasis, 2 kg sand-bag was placed on the groin for 6 hours and each patient was then confined to complete bed rest for about 24 hours. Of 15 patients, 6 patients (40 %) demonstrated new pulmonary perfusion defects on the next day following catheterization, but these defects disappeared within a week. None of 6 patients with pulmonary embolism were symptomatic, and there were no changes in Chest X-ray films, spirogram and blood chemistry. Frontal plane QRS axis showed the right axis deviation in more than 30 degrees in 2 cases. And PaO2 showed significant decline by more than 10 mmHg in 3 cases. Duration of manual compression was significantly longer (p < 0.01) in patients who developed new perfusion defects than in patients who had no defects. New perfusion defects could develop without right heart catheterization in 1 case. These data suggested that the prolongation of compressing time of the puncture site and/or subsequent hematoma caused by technical failure may be an important factor in the development of pulmonary embolism. (author)

  12. 高+Gx环境对猴舌黏膜上皮热休克蛋白质70表达的影响%Effect of high + Gx load on heat-shock protein 70 expression of tongue mucous membrane epithelium in rhesus macaques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    汤楚华; 张建中; 牛忠英; 施生根; 张铭

    2007-01-01

    目的 研究模拟高+Gx环境中猴舌黏膜上皮热休克蛋白质70(HSP-70)的表达. 方法 以9只雄性猕猴为对象,随机分为4组,对照组+1 Gx/300 s;实验1、2、3组,分别为+15 Gx/200 s、+18 Gx/165 s、+21 Gx/140 s.采用免疫组织化学方法 ,研究模拟高+Gx环境作用下猴舌黏膜上皮细胞组织病理学改变及HSP-70基因的表达情况,探讨其表达水平的改变与高+Gx环境的关系. 结果 组织病理学观察:实验组和对照组猴舌黏膜上皮细胞无明显变化;免疫组织化学观察:对照组舌黏膜上皮细胞核HSP-70呈阴性表达或弱阳性表达.实验组舌黏膜上皮细胞核HSP-70着色明显,呈强阳性表达,不同高+Gx组之间无明显差别. 结论 本研究表明模拟高+Gx环境可引起猴舌黏膜上皮细胞HSP-70基因表达增强.%Objective To observe the expression of heat-shock protein 70 (HSP-70) in tongue mucous membrane epithelium in the stress reaction of rhesus macaque under+Gx loads. Methods Nine male rhesus macaques were randomly divided into 4 groups: control group was exposed to +1 Gx/300 s load, and experimental groups 1, 2 and 3 were exposed to + 15 Gx/200 s,+21 Gx/165 s and + 21 Gx/140 s respectively. Tongue tissue was fixed with 10% buffered formaldehyde and embedded with paraffin, and histopathological changes were observed under microscope. The expression of HSP-70 was detected by immunohistochemical PicTureTM method in the mucous membrane epithelium of tongue. Results Gross and histological analyses showed that no significant pathological changes were observed in the membrane of tongue mucous epithelium in different experimental groups of the animals. Immunohistochemical staining demonstrated that overexpression of HSP-70 was detected in the nuclei of the epithelium in the experimental groups, but no or slight positive staining was also observed in the nuclei of the epithelium in control animals. There was no significant difference in HSP-70 expression in

  13. Physiology and Endocrinology of the Ovarian Cycle in Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Weinbauer, Gerhard F.; Niehoff, Marc; Niehaus, Michael; Srivastav, Shiela; Fuchs, Antje; Van Esch, Eric; Cline, J. Mark

    2008-01-01

    Macaques provide excellent models for preclinical testing and safety assessment of female reproductive toxicants. Currently, cynomolgus monkeys are the predominant species for (reproductive) toxicity testing. Marmosets and rhesus monkeys are being used occasionally. The authors provide a brief review on physiology and endocrinology of the cynomolgus monkey ovarian cycle, practical guidance on assessment and monitoring of ovarian cyclicity, and new data on effects of social housing on ovarian ...

  14. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Interactions with Macaque Dendritic Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Teleshova, Natalia; Derby, Nina; Martinelli, Elena; Pugach, Pavel; Calenda, Giulia; Robbiani, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    This chapter summarizes advances in the following areas: (1) dendritic cell (DC)-mediated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) transmission, (2) role of DCs in innate and adaptive immunity against SIV, and (3) approaches to harness DC function to induce anti-SIV responses. The nonhuman primate (NHP) model of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in rhesus macaques and other Asian NHP species is highly relevant to advance the understanding of virus–host interactions critical for transmis...

  15. A ventral salience network in the macaque brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Touroutoglou, Alexandra; Bliss-Moreau, Eliza; Zhang, Jiahe; Mantini, Dante; Vanduffel, Wim; Dickerson, Bradford C; Barrett, Lisa Feldman

    2016-05-15

    Successful navigation of the environment requires attending and responding efficiently to objects and conspecifics with the potential to benefit or harm (i.e., that have value). In humans, this function is subserved by a distributed large-scale neural network called the "salience network". We have recently demonstrated that there are two anatomically and functionally dissociable salience networks anchored in the dorsal and ventral portions of the human anterior insula (Touroutoglou et al., 2012). In this paper, we test the hypothesis that these two subnetworks exist in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). We provide evidence that a homologous ventral salience network exists in macaques, but that the connectivity of the dorsal anterior insula in macaques is not sufficiently developed as a dorsal salience network. The evolutionary implications of these finding are considered. PMID:26899785

  16. Bleeding complications of femoral catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    CT has been used to evaluate hematomas resulting from femoral catheterization (percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, cardiac catheterization, angioplasty, valvuloplasty, and venous access) in 21 patients. Four distinct types of hematoma have been identified: retroperitoneal (N = 12); intraperitoneal (N = 3); groin/thigh (N = 9); and abdominal wall (N = 5). Seven patients had hematomas in two locations. CT contributed by estimating transfusion requirement, indicating the need for more intensive monitoring, and predicting the potential need for surgery. Type 1 and 2 bleeds were the most serious and had the most sequelae. Sequelae included transfusion in 17 patients (mean, 5 units/patient) and surgery in two patients

  17. MR-guided cardiac catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Exposing young children to X-rays is a source of concern, since the effect is cumulative and it is important to avoid adding to their lifetime dose. This becomes particularly significant in the case of congenital heart disease, as the patients often need life-long monitoring and successive interventions. Alternative imaging techniques are needed in order to eliminate or limit X-ray exposure. This article demonstrates the feasibility of MR-guided cardiac catheterization using passive device visualization. The procedures are performed in a Philips XMR suite, where all or a substantial part of the catheterization procedure is performed with MR guidance, resulting in significant dose savings. (orig.)

  18. macaque monkey

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L. Kimmel

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available From human perception to primate neurophysiology, monitoring eye position is critical to the study of vision, attention, oculomotor control, and behavior. Two principal techniques for the precise measurement of eye position—the long-standing sclera-embedded search coil and more recent optical tracking techniques—are in use in various laboratories, but no published study compares the performance of the two methods simultaneously in the same primates. Here we compare two popular systems—a sclera-embedded search coil from C-N-C Engineering and the EyeLink 1000 optical system from SR Research—by recording simultaneously from the same eye in the macaque monkey while the animal performed a simple oculomotor task. We found broad agreement between the two systems, particularly in positional accuracy during fixation, measurement of saccade amplitude, detection of fixational saccades, and sensitivity to subtle changes in eye position from trial to trial. Nonetheless, certain discrepancies persist, particularly elevated saccade peak velocities, post-saccadic ringing, influence of luminance change on reported position, and greater sample-to-sample variation in the optical system. Our study shows that optical performance now rivals that of the search coil, rendering optical systems appropriate for many if not most applications. This finding is consequential, especially for animal subjects, because the optical systems do not require invasive surgery for implantation and repair of search coils around the eye. Our data also allow laboratories using the optical system in human subjects to assess the strengths and limitations of the technique for their own applications.

  19. Cardiac catheterization and angiography. Third edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book discusses the papers on cardiac catheterization and angiography. The topics covered are: historical perspective and present practice of cardiac catheterization; angiography principles and utilization of radiologic and cineangiographic equipment; complications, incidence and prevention of side effects of cardiac catheterization; techniques; blood flow measurement of heart; pressure measurement; diagnostic techniques of angiography; special catheter techniques; coronary angiography, temporary and permanent pacemakers, potential role of lasers in the cardiac catheterization and evaluation of cardiac function

  20. Normative Values of Retinal Oxygen Saturation in Rhesus Monkeys: The Beijing Intracranial and Intraocular Pressure (iCOP) Study

    OpenAIRE

    Jing LI; Yang, Yiquan; Yang, Diya; Liu, Xiangxiang; Sun, Yunxiao; Wei, Shifei; Wang, Ningli

    2016-01-01

    Objective To study the normal values of the retinal oxygen saturation in Rhesus monkeys and to evaluated repeatability and reproducibility of retinal oxygen saturation measurements. Methods Eighteen adult Rhesus macaque monkeys were included in this experimental study. An Oxymap T1 retinal oximeter (Oxymap, Reykjavik, Iceland) was used to perform oximetry on all subjects. Global arterial (SaO2) and venous oxygen saturation (SvO2), arteriovenous difference in SO2 were measured. In the first ex...

  1. Sequential emergence and clinical implications of viral mutants with K70E and K65R mutation in reverse transcriptase during prolonged tenofovir monotherapy in rhesus macaques with chronic RT-SHIV infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedersen Niels C

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We reported previously on the emergence and clinical implications of simian immunodeficiency virus (SIVmac251 mutants with a K65R mutation in reverse transcriptase (RT, and the role of CD8+ cell-mediated immune responses in suppressing viremia during tenofovir therapy. Because of significant sequence differences between SIV and HIV-1 RT that affect drug susceptibilities and mutational patterns, it is unclear to what extent findings with SIV can be extrapolated to HIV-1 RT. Accordingly, to model HIV-1 RT responses, 12 macaques were inoculated with RT-SHIV, a chimeric SIV containing HIV-1 RT, and started on prolonged tenofovir therapy 5 months later. Results The early virologic response to tenofovir correlated with baseline viral RNA levels and expression of the MHC class I allele Mamu-A*01. For all animals, sensitive real-time PCR assays detected the transient emergence of K70E RT mutants within 4 weeks of therapy, which were then replaced by K65R mutants within 12 weeks of therapy. For most animals, the occurrence of these mutations preceded a partial rebound of plasma viremia to levels that remained on average 10-fold below baseline values. One animal eventually suppressed K65R viremia to undetectable levels for more than 4 years; sequential experiments using CD8+ cell depletion and tenofovir interruption demonstrated that both CD8+ cells and continued tenofovir therapy were required for sustained suppression of viremia. Conclusion This is the first evidence that tenofovir therapy can select directly for K70E viral mutants in vivo. The observations on the clinical implications of the K65R RT-SHIV mutants were consistent with those of SIVmac251, and suggest that for persons infected with K65R HIV-1 both immune-mediated and drug-dependent antiviral activities play a role in controlling viremia. These findings suggest also that even in the presence of K65R virus, continuation of tenofovir treatment as part of HAART may be

  2. The rhesus site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wagner, Franz F; Flegel, Willy A

    2014-10-01

    The Rhesus Site is a resource for information of the 'Rhesus' blood group. It is intended for specialists and non-specialists. The website details research in the field relevant for transfusion medicine, immunohematology, and molecular research. Link areas guide to important publications and to methodological resources for Rhesus. Many data originally presented at The Rhesus Site have been formally published later. The 'RhesusBase' section represents the largest database for RHD alleles; the 'RhesusSurveillance' section details the results of the largest prospective observational study on anti-D immunization events in D-positive patients. Visitors to the website are encouraged to explore the intricacies of the most complex blood group gene locus. PMID:25538538

  3. Percutaneous approach and transseptal catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In contrast, with the direct brachial technique, the percutaneous approach to left and right heart catheterizaiton involves achieving vascular access via needle puncture, obviating surgical isolation of the vessel during either the introduction or subsequent withdrawal of the cardiac catheter. With appropriate skill and knowledge of regional anatomy, the percutaneous technique can be adapted to catheter insertion from a variety of entry sites. Venous catheterization can be performed via the femoral, internal jugular, subclavian, or median antecubital vein, whereas arterial catheterization can be performed via the femoral, brachial, or axillary artery. At the termination of the procedure, the catheters and introducing sheaths are withdrawn, and bleeding from the puncture sites is controlled by the application of direct pressure

  4. Venous thrombosis after cardiac catheterization in infants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Factors influencing the rate of post-catheterization venous thrombosis were studied in 180 infants below one year of age. The initial cardiac catheterization was performed either with cutdown technique or percutaneously. At repeat catheterization on the ipsilateral side presence or absence of thrombosis was noted. The overall thrombosis frequency was higher than previously reported, 15.6%. The rate increased with decreasing weight. An increased rate of thrombosis was also found with indwelling femoral vein catheter left in place for more than 24 hours, and infection. In 6 cases, thrombosis involved only the catheterized side and would have been missed by recatheterization from the contralateral side. It was noteworthy that 9 of the thromboses spared the catheterized vessel and engaged only the vena cava. Among factors not influencing thrombosis rate were age, type of cardiac malformation, cyanosis, early operation, catheterization time or balloon septostomy. Percutaneous or cutdown technique did not influence thrombosis rate. (orig.)

  5. Diagnostic Cardiac Catheterization in the Pediatric Population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moustafa, Giannis A; Kolokythas, Argyrios; Charitakis, Konstantinos; Avgerinos, Dimitrios V

    2016-01-01

    Although the utility of diagnostic cardiac catheterization in the clinical setting has diminished over the last years, due to the emergence of noninvasive imaging modalities, such as echocardiography, magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography, catheterization for diagnostic reasons still constitutes a valuable tool in certain parts in the workup of pediatric heart disease. As a result, awareness of the main aspects of diagnostic catheterization is of great importance for the clinical cardiologist. In this article, the main variables measured and the main actions performed during diagnostic cardiac catheterization in children are discussed. PMID:26926292

  6. Diversity of TRIM5α and TRIMCyp sequences in cynomolgus macaques from different geographical origins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berry, Neil J; Marzetta, Flavia; Towers, Greg J; Rose, Nicola J

    2012-04-01

    The TRIM5α restriction factor can protect some species of monkeys, but not humans, from HIV infection. It has also emerged that some monkeys have a cyclophilin A domain retrotransposed into the TRIM5 locus resulting in the expression of a TRIMCyp protein with anti-retroviral activity. A high degree of sequence variation in the primate TRIM5 gene has been reported that varies between populations of rhesus macaques, a widely used non-human primate model of HIV/AIDS, and recently shown to correlate with susceptibility to simian immunodeficiency viruses in this species. Cynomolgus macaques are also used widely in HIV research. A non-indigenous population on Mauritius has highly restricted genetic diversity compared with macaques from Indonesia. The relative allelic diversity of TRIM5α and TRIMCyp within these two sub-populations may impact on the susceptibility of the macaques to simian immunodeficiency virus thereby influencing the outcome of studies using these monkeys. We sought to establish the genetic diversity of these alleles in cynomolgus macaques. We identified seven TRIM5α alleles in Indonesian macaques, three of which are novel, but only three in the Mauritian-origin macaques. Strikingly, 87% of Indonesian, but none of the Mauritian macaques, possessed a retrotransposed Cyp domain. A splice acceptor site single-nucleotide polymorphism that allows formation of a TRIMCyp protein was absent for the TRIM5α alleles found in the Mauritian macaques. The level of allelic diversity reported here is greater than previously proposed for cynomolgus macaque species. PMID:22124667

  7. Nursing ultrasound examination in catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Romei

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available Ultrasound (US examination of the bladder can precisely determine the bladder volume and is a useful tool in estimating the residual urine volume. Its application is consequently recommended as an alternative to catheterization for the determination of residual urine. Moreover it represents a simple, noninvasive method to predict the outcome of a voiding trial following acute urine retention based on intravesical prostatic protrusion and on the US pattern of the bladder content. In this article, the Authors review the implementation and results of a bladder US program developed for non-medical caregivers at one Emergency Department.

  8. Age-related alterations of plasma glutathione and oxidation of redox potentials in chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Paredes, Jamespaul; Jones, Dean P.; Wilson, Mark E.; Herndon, James G.

    2014-01-01

    Chimpanzee (Pan troglodytes) and rhesus macaque (Macaca mulatta) and humans (Homo sapiens) share physiological and genetic characteristics, but have remarkably different life spans, with chimpanzees living 50–60 % and the rhesus living 35–40 % of maximum human survival. Since oxidative processes are associated with aging and longevity, we might expect to see species differences in age-related oxidative processes. Blood and extracellular fluid contain two major thiol redox nodes, glutathione (...

  9. Construction of an Infectious Rhesus Rhadinovirus Bacterial Artificial Chromosome for the Analysis of Kaposi's Sarcoma-Associated Herpesvirus-Related Disease Development▿

    OpenAIRE

    Estep, Ryan D.; Powers, Michael F.; Yen, Bonnie K.; Li, He; Wong, Scott W.

    2007-01-01

    Rhesus rhadinovirus (RRV) is closely related to Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV)/human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) and causes KSHV-like diseases in immunocompromised rhesus macaques (RM) that resemble KSHV-associated diseases including multicentric Castleman's disease and non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. RRV retains a majority of open reading frames (ORFs) postulated to be involved in the pathogenesis of KSHV and is the closest available animal model to KSHV infection in humans. Here we descri...

  10. Venous catheterization with ultrasound navigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasatkin, A. A., E-mail: ant-kasatkin@yandex.ru; Nigmatullina, A. R. [Izhevsk State Medical Academy, Kommunarov street, 281, Izhevsk, Russia, 426034 (Russian Federation); Urakov, A. L., E-mail: ant-kasatkin@yandex.ru [Institute of Mechanics Ural Branch of Russian Academy of Sciences, T.Baramzinoy street 34, Izhevsk, Russia, 426067, Izhevsk (Russian Federation); Izhevsk State Medical Academy, Kommunarov street, 281, Izhevsk, Russia, 426034 (Russian Federation)

    2015-11-17

    By ultrasound scanning it was determined that respiratory movements made by chest of healthy and sick person are accompanied by respiratory chest rise of internal jugular veins. During the exhalation of an individual diameter of his veins increases and during the breath it decreases down to the complete disappearing if their lumen. Change of the diameter of internal jugular veins in different phases can influence significantly the results of vein puncture and cauterization in patients. The purpose of this research is development of the method increasing the efficiency and safety of cannulation of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound visualization. We suggested the method of catheterization of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound navigation during the execution of which the puncture of venous wall by puncture needle and the following conduction of J-guide is carried out at the moment of patient’s exhalation. This method decreases the risk of complications development during catheterization of internal jugular vein due to exclusion of perforating wound of vein and subjacent tissues and anatomical structures.

  11. Venous catheterization with ultrasound navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasatkin, A. A.; Urakov, A. L.; Nigmatullina, A. R.

    2015-11-01

    By ultrasound scanning it was determined that respiratory movements made by chest of healthy and sick person are accompanied by respiratory chest rise of internal jugular veins. During the exhalation of an individual diameter of his veins increases and during the breath it decreases down to the complete disappearing if their lumen. Change of the diameter of internal jugular veins in different phases can influence significantly the results of vein puncture and cauterization in patients. The purpose of this research is development of the method increasing the efficiency and safety of cannulation of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound visualization. We suggested the method of catheterization of internal jugular veins by the ultrasound navigation during the execution of which the puncture of venous wall by puncture needle and the following conduction of J-guide is carried out at the moment of patient's exhalation. This method decreases the risk of complications development during catheterization of internal jugular vein due to exclusion of perforating wound of vein and subjacent tissues and anatomical structures.

  12. Predominant Infection of CD150+ Lymphocytes and Dendritic Cells during Measles Virus Infection of Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    de Swart, Rik L.; Ludlow, Martin; de Witte, Lot; Yanagi, Yusuke; van Amerongen, Geert; McQuaid, Stephen; Yüksel, Selma; Geijtenbeek, Teunis B. H; Duprex, W. Paul; Osterhaus, Albert D. M. E.

    2007-01-01

    Measles virus (MV) is hypothesized to enter the host by infecting epithelial cells of the respiratory tract, followed by viremia mediated by infected monocytes. However, neither of these cell types express signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (CD150), which has been identified as the receptor for wild-type MV. We have infected rhesus and cynomolgus macaques with a recombinant MV strain expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP); thus bringing together the optimal animal model fo...

  13. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection of macaques: a model for Lassa fever

    OpenAIRE

    Zapata, Juan C.; Pauza, C. David; Djavani, Mahmoud M.; Rodas, Juan D.; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Bryant, Joseph; Ateh, Eugene; Garcia, Cybele; Lukashevich, Igor S.; Salvato, Maria S.

    2011-01-01

    Arenaviruses such as Lassa fever virus (LASV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) are benign in their natural reservoir hosts, and can occasionally cause severe viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in non-human primates and in human beings. LCMV is considerably more benign for human beings than Lassa virus, however certain strains, like the LCMV-WE strain, can cause severe disease when the virus is delivered as a high-dose inoculum. Here we describe a rhesus macaque model for Lassa fever t...

  14. Intergenic and Repeat Transcription in Human, Chimpanzee and Macaque Brains Measured by RNA-Seq

    OpenAIRE

    Augix Guohua Xu; Liu He; Zhongshan Li; Ying Xu; Mingfeng Li; Xing Fu; Zheng Yan; Yuan Yuan; Corinna Menzel; Na Li; Mehmet Somel; Hao Hu; Wei Chen; Svante Pääbo; Philipp Khaitovich

    2010-01-01

    Transcription is the first step connecting genetic information with an organism's phenotype. While expression of annotated genes in the human brain has been characterized extensively, our knowledge about the scope and the conservation of transcripts located outside of the known genes' boundaries is limited. Here, we use high-throughput transcriptome sequencing (RNA-Seq) to characterize the total non-ribosomal transcriptome of human, chimpanzee, and rhesus macaque brain. In all species, only 2...

  15. Recent refinements to cranial implants for rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Jessica M; Cohen, Yale E; Shirley, Harry; Tsunada, Joji; Bennur, Sharath; Christison-Lagay, Kate; Veeder, Christin L

    2016-04-20

    The advent of cranial implants revolutionized primate neurophysiological research because they allow researchers to stably record neural activity from monkeys during active behavior. Cranial implants have improved over the years since their introduction, but chronic implants still increase the risk for medical complications including bacterial contamination and resultant infection, chronic inflammation, bone and tissue loss and complications related to the use of dental acrylic. These complications can lead to implant failure and early termination of study protocols. In an effort to reduce complications, we describe several refinements that have helped us improve cranial implants and the wellbeing of implanted primates. PMID:27096188

  16. Invasive Ductular Carcinoma in 2 Rhesus Macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Beck, Amanda P; Brooks, Amos; Caroline J. Zeiss

    2014-01-01

    In the United States, breast cancer is the most common malignancy among women, with an estimated lifetime incidence of approximately 12% in American women. Invasive ductal carcinoma is the most common form of breast cancer in women, accounting for approximately 60% of all breast carcinomas. Prognostic markers are used to assess aggressiveness, invasiveness, and extent of spread of a neoplasm and thus may be correlated with patient survival. Immunohistochemistry is currently widely used for th...

  17. Cognitive influences on risk-seeking by rhesus macaques,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin Y. Hayden

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Humans and other animals are idiosyncratically sensitive to risk, either preferring or avoiding options having the same value but differing in uncertainty. Many explanations for risk sensitivity rely on the non-linear shape of a hypothesized utility curve. Because such models do not place any importance on uncertainty extit{per se}, utility curve-based accounts predict indifference between risky and riskless options that offer the same distribution of rewards. Here we show that monkeys strongly prefer uncertain gambles to alternating rewards with the same payoffs, demonstrating that uncertainty itself contributes to the appeal of risky options. Based on prior observations, we hypothesized that the appeal of the risky option is enhanced by the salience of the potential jackpot. To test this, we subtly manipulated payoffs in a second gambling task. We found that monkeys are more sensitive to small changes in the size of the large reward than to equivalent changes in the size of the small reward, indicating that they attend preferentially to the jackpots. Together, these results challenge utility curve-based accounts of risk sensitivity, and suggest that psychological factors, such as outcome salience and uncertainty itself, contribute to risky decision-making.

  18. Natural Acquisition of Helicobacter pylori Infection in Newborn Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Solnick, Jay V.; Chang, Kikuko; Canfield, Don R; Parsonnet, Julie

    2003-01-01

    Helicobacter pylori infection is usually acquired in childhood, but precise estimates of the age of acquisition are difficult to obtain in young children. Since serial endoscopic biopsies are not feasible in human infants, we examined acquisition of H. pylori infection that is known to occur in socially housed nonhuman primates. By 12 weeks of age, 8 of 20 newborns (40%) were culture positive for H. pylori, and prevalence reached 90% by 1 year of age. Newborns from infected dams were more com...

  19. Complexity and evolution of KIR genes in rhesus macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Blokhuis, J.H.

    2011-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are essential in shaping immune responses against pathogens, and play an important role during pregnancy. Killer cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIR) educate the NK cell and determine its activation state. Because of this broad medical relevance, it is important to understand how this gene system has evolved. KIR genes have undergone rapid evolution in primates, as evidenced by extensive copy number variation and allelic diversity. Since KIR diversification appea...

  20. Behavioral correlates of auditory streaming in rhesus macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Christison-Lagay, Kate L.; Cohen, Yale E.

    2013-01-01

    Perceptual representations of auditory stimuli (i.e., sounds) are derived from the auditory system’s ability to segregate and group the spectral, temporal, and spatial features of auditory stimuli—a process called “auditory scene analysis”. Psychophysical studies have identified several of the principles and mechanisms that underlie a listener’s ability to segregate and group acoustic stimuli. One important psychophysical task that has illuminated many of these principles and mechanisms is th...

  1. Transcriptional reprogramming in nonhuman primate (rhesus macaque tuberculosis granulomas.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smriti Mehra

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In response to Mtb infection, the host remodels the infection foci into a dense mass of cells known as the granuloma. The key objective of the granuloma is to contain the spread of Mtb into uninfected regions of the lung. However, it appears that Mtb has evolved mechanisms to resist killing in the granuloma. Profiling granuloma transcriptome will identify key immune signaling pathways active during TB infection. Such studies are not possible in human granulomas, due to various confounding factors. Nonhuman Primates (NHPs infected with Mtb accurately reflect human TB in clinical and pathological contexts. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We studied transcriptomics of granuloma lesions in the lungs of NHPs exhibiting active TB, during early and late stages of infection. Early TB lesions were characterized by a highly pro-inflammatory environment, expressing high levels of immune signaling pathways involving IFNgamma, TNFalpha, JAK, STAT and C-C/C-X-C chemokines. Late TB lesions, while morphologically similar to the early ones, exhibited an overwhelming silencing of the inflammatory response. Reprogramming of the granuloma transcriptome was highly significant. The expression of approximately two-thirds of all genes induced in early lesions was later repressed. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The transcriptional characteristics of TB granulomas undergo drastic changes during the course of infection. The overwhelming reprogramming of the initial pro-inflammatory surge in late lesions may be a host strategy to limit immunopathology. We propose that these host profiles can predict changes in bacterial replication and physiology, perhaps serving as markers for latency and reactivation.

  2. Executive-Attentional Uncertainty Responses by Rhesus Macaques ("Macaca mulatta")

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, J. David; Coutinho, Mariana V. C.; Church, Barbara A.; Beran, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    The uncertainty response has been influential in studies of human perception, and it is crucial in the growing research literature that explores animal metacognition. However, the uncertainty response's interpretation is still sharply debated. The authors sought to clarify this interpretation using the dissociative technique of cognitive loads…

  3. Gut-Resident Lactobacillus Abundance Associates with IDO1 Inhibition and Th17 Dynamics in SIV-Infected Macaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Vujkovic-Cvijin

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Gut microbes can profoundly modulate mucosal barrier-promoting Th17 cells in mammals. A salient feature of HIV/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV immunopathogenesis is the loss of Th17 cells, which has been linked to increased activity of the immunomodulatory enzyme, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO 1. The role of gut microbes in this system remains unknown, and the SIV-infected rhesus macaque provides a well-described model for HIV-associated Th17 loss and mucosal immune disruption. We observed a specific depletion of gut-resident Lactobacillus during acute and chronic SIV infection of rhesus macaques, which was also seen in early HIV-infected humans. This depletion in rhesus macaques correlated with increased IDO1 activity and Th17 loss. Macaques supplemented with a Lactobacillus-containing probiotic exhibited decreased IDO1 activity during chronic SIV infection. We propose that Lactobacillus species inhibit mammalian IDO1 and thus may help to preserve Th17 cells during pathogenic SIV infection, providing support for Lactobacillus species as modulators of mucosal immune homeostasis.

  4. Gut-Resident Lactobacillus Abundance Associates with IDO1 Inhibition and Th17 Dynamics in SIV-Infected Macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vujkovic-Cvijin, Ivan; Swainson, Louise A; Chu, Simon N; Ortiz, Alexandra M; Santee, Clark A; Petriello, Annalise; Dunham, Richard M; Fadrosh, Douglas W; Lin, Din L; Faruqi, Ali A; Huang, Yong; Apetrei, Cristian; Pandrea, Ivona; Hecht, Frederick M; Pilcher, Christopher D; Klatt, Nichole R; Brenchley, Jason M; Lynch, Susan V; McCune, Joseph M

    2015-11-24

    Gut microbes can profoundly modulate mucosal barrier-promoting Th17 cells in mammals. A salient feature of HIV/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) immunopathogenesis is the loss of Th17 cells, which has been linked to increased activity of the immunomodulatory enzyme, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO 1). The role of gut microbes in this system remains unknown, and the SIV-infected rhesus macaque provides a well-described model for HIV-associated Th17 loss and mucosal immune disruption. We observed a specific depletion of gut-resident Lactobacillus during acute and chronic SIV infection of rhesus macaques, which was also seen in early HIV-infected humans. This depletion in rhesus macaques correlated with increased IDO1 activity and Th17 loss. Macaques supplemented with a Lactobacillus-containing probiotic exhibited decreased IDO1 activity during chronic SIV infection. We propose that Lactobacillus species inhibit mammalian IDO1 and thus may help to preserve Th17 cells during pathogenic SIV infection, providing support for Lactobacillus species as modulators of mucosal immune homeostasis. PMID:26586432

  5. Guide wire migration during femoral vein catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khatami, Mohammad Reza; Abbasi, Rozita; Sadigh, Gelareh

    2010-10-01

    Central vein catheterization is a routine and relatively safe procedure in critically ill patients. Complications with this procedure depend to the site of catheterization and the skill of the operator. In addition to the common complications with femoral vein catheterization there are some rare usually preventable side effects related to guide wire and catheter. In our patient who underwent femoral catheterization for acute hemodialysis, we report migration of guide wire through the systemic circulation from the femoral vein to the jugular vein. This is a very rare complication that is a human error and is totally preventable by doing the procedure by a skilled doctor and considering the standards described for central vein catheter insertion. PMID:20852377

  6. Malposition and complications following venous catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malposition and complications following central venous catheterization largely depend on the site of venous approach. Malpositions are very common after subclavian vein catheterization, and even more common after left jugular vein catheterization. On the contrary, their incidence after right jugular puncture is very low. Among complications, pneumothorax is quate common after subclavian vein catheterization, and migration of the catheter towards the heart after right jugular puncture. Vascular damages may occur in any approach: their early detection on chest radiographs very much depends on a rigorous technique. Radiology plays an important role in the early detection of malposition and complications, which is greatly facilitated by a few ml of contrast medium injected through the catheter

  7. Aortic aneurysm secondary to umbilical artery catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A 14-month-girl presented with an asymptomatic posterior mediastinal mass. She had a history of prematurity, umbilical artery catheterization, and sepsis. The diagnosis of aortic aneurysm was made by dynamic computed tomography. The aneurysm was successfully resected. (orig.)

  8. Discovery of a secular trend in Cayo Santiago macaque reproduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Pacheco, Raisa; Rawlins, Richard G; Kessler, Matthew J; Delgado, Diana L; Ruiz-Lambides, Angelina V; Sabat, Alberto M

    2016-02-01

    Reproductive synchrony and the consequent clustering of births are hypothesized to be regulated by seasonal changes in rainfall and food availability. Such climate-related seasonality is, however, questionable in tropical populations occupying temporally invariant habitats year round. Using the long-term data of the Cayo Santiago rhesus macaques from 1973 to 2013, this study distinguishes synchrony (a greater than chance clustering of births) from seasonality (a cluster of births during a period of the year when abiotic conditions are favorable) and shows that females are highly synchronized (>72% of births in a 3-month period) but the effects of environmental zeitgebers on reproduction are overridden by biological factors. Specifically, biotic and abiotic factors including (i) loss of immature offspring; (ii) population density; (iii) age at delivery; (iv) rainfall; and (v) changes in colony management were modeled in relation to the annual onset of births and the median birth date. Females experiencing loss of immature offspring had an interbirth interval of advance across all calendar-based seasons by 2050. The secular trend in reproduction appears to be triggered by changes in the age at delivery of females, the absence of physiological constraints from maternal investment due to offspring loss, shorter interbirth interval, and a higher degree of coordination due to increasing population density. This study challenges the reproductive phenology previously described for rhesus macaques highlighting the importance of long-term studies in addressing the ultimate causes of reproductive synchrony. PMID:26540010

  9. Complications of cardiac catheterization: one centre's experience.

    OpenAIRE

    Morton, B C; Beanlands, D. S.

    1984-01-01

    Data on complication rates in a cardiac catheterization laboratory were prospectively gathered over a 6-year period. During this time 7960 catheterizations were performed. Death occurred in seven (0.1%) of the cases. The difference between the mortality rates for procedures performed with and without systemically administered heparin (0.04% and 0.2% respectively) was barely statistically significant (p less than 0.05). A significant complication occurred in 1.5% of the cases; however, most di...

  10. Transcutaneous transsplenic catheterization of the splenic vein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors have developed a method for transcutaneous transsplenic catheterizaton of the portal vein basin and used this method in clinical studies. This method permits a higher quality of spot splenoportography, selective catheterization and embolization of the gastric veins in bleedings from varicose veins of the esophagus in the patients in whom catheterization of the portal vien basin via the transcutaneous transhepatic approach is impossible because of liver tumors of occulusive stenotic deformation of the portal vein

  11. In Vitro Interleukin-1 and 2 Production and Interleukin 2 Receptor Expression in the Rhesus Monkey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmitt, Didier A.; Sonnenfeld, Gerald; Husson, David; Tkaczuk, Jean; Andre, Eric; Schaffar, Laurance

    1996-01-01

    Anti-human monoclonal antibodies were used to detect and quantify interleukins-1 and 2 and interleukin-2 receptor expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a rhesus monkey. Interleukin-1 production could be induced by phorbol esters (PMA) and was potentiated by phytohemagglutinin (PHA). Interleukin-2 secretion could also be induced by the combination of PHA and PMA, but only weakly with PHA alone. Interleukin-2 receptor expression was present in a subpopulation of unstimulated lymphocytes and could be enhanced by PHA or PMA. These data show once again that the rhesus monkey immune system is cross-reactive with the human one and that rhesus macaque could be a good model to study interleukin therapy.

  12. Radioimmunoassay for rhesus monkey gonadotropins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heterologous double-antibody radioimmunoassay methods are described for the measurement of circulating levels of rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta) FSH and LH; the latter assay is also applicable to rhesus chorionic gonadotropin (CG) estimations. The FSH assay utilizes purified rat FSH for trace, either of two anti-human FSH antisera and a semipurified rhesus pituitary standard. The LH assay utilizes purified ovine LH for trace, an anti-human CG antiserum and the same rhesus pituitary standard. The use of these systems obviates the necessity of purifying rhesus gonadotropins which are required for the development of homologous radioimmunoassay systems. (U.S.)

  13. Visualization of transepithelial passage of the immunogenic 33-residue peptide from alpha-2 gliadin in gluten-sensitive macaques.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaushiki Mazumdar

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Based on clinical, histopathological and serological similarities to human celiac disease (CD, we recently established the rhesus macaque model of gluten sensitivity. In this study, we further characterized this condition based on presence of anti-tissue transglutaminase 2 (TG2 antibodies, increased intestinal permeability and transepithelial transport of a proteolytically resistant, immunotoxic, 33-residue peptide from alpha(2-gliadin in the distal duodenum of gluten-sensitive macaques. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Six rhesus macaques were selected for study from a pool of 500, including two healthy controls and four gluten-sensitive animals with elevated anti-gliadin or anti-TG2 antibodies as well as history of non-infectious chronic diarrhea. Pediatric endoscope-guided pinch biopsies were collected from each animal's distal duodenum following administration of a gluten-containing diet (GD and again after remission by gluten-free diet (GFD. Control biopsies always showed normal villous architecture, whereas gluten-sensitive animals on GD exhibited histopathology ranging from mild lymphocytic infiltration to villous atrophy, typical of human CD. Immunofluorescent microscopic analysis of biopsies revealed IgG+ and IgA+ plasma-like cells producing antibodies that colocalized with TG2 in gluten-sensitive macaques only. Following instillation in vivo, the Cy-3-labeled 33-residue gluten peptide colocalized with the brush border protein villin in all animals. In a substantially enteropathic macaque with "leaky" duodenum, the peptide penetrated beneath the epithelium into the lamina propria. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The rhesus macaque model of gluten sensitivity not only resembles the histopathology of CD but it also may provide a model for studying intestinal permeability in states of epithelial integrity and disrepair.

  14. Splicing of Rhesus Rhadinovirus R15 and ORF74 Bicistronic Transcripts during Lytic Infection and Analysis of Effects on Production of vCD200 and vGPCR

    OpenAIRE

    Pratt, Carly L.; Estep, Ryan D.; Wong, Scott W.

    2005-01-01

    Rhesus macaque rhadinovirus (RRV) is the rhesus macaque homologue of human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8). Here we examine expression of RRV R15 and ORF74, homologues of K14 and ORF74 of HHV-8, respectively. As in HHV-8, transcripts encoding RRV R15 and ORF74 are bicistronic. However, unlike what has been suggested for HHV-8, RRV R15- and ORF74-encoding transcripts are expressed late during lytic infection and undergo unique splicing events that result in the production of transcripts capable of encod...

  15. Soluble human CD4 elicits an antibody response in rhesus monkeys that inhibits simian immunodeficiency virus replication

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhesus monkeys infected with the simian immunodeficiency virus of macaques (SIVmac) demonstrate significant virologic and clinical improvement as a result of treatment with human recombinant soluble CD4 (rsCD4). The authors show that human rsCD4 does not efficiently inhibit SIVmac replication in bone marrow macrophages of rhesus monkeys and does not significantly augment bone marrow hematopoietic colony formation in vitro. However, plasma of human rsCD4-treated rhesus monkeys does exhibit significant anti-SIVmac activity in vitro. Plasma of these animals efficiently blocks SIVmac replicaton in peripheral blood lymphocytes and bone marrow macrophages. It also increases granulocyte/macrophage colony formation in vitro by bone marrow cells of SIVmac-infected monkeys. This plasma and the IgG fraction of plasma from a rhesus monkey immunized with human rsCD4 in adjuvant demonstrate reactivity with a soluble form of the rhesus monkey CD4 molecule, exhibit binding to CD4+ but not CD8+ concanavalin A-activated rhesus monkey peripheral blood lymphocytes, and precipitate the CD4 molecule from surface-labeled activated rhesus monkey peripheral blood lymphocytes. Moreover, anti-viral activity is demonstrable in the IgG fraction of plasma from a human rsCD4-immunized monkey. These studies raise the possibility that a modified human CD4 molecule serving as an immunogen might elicit an antibody response that could potentially induce a beneficial therapeutic response in human immunodeficiency virus-infected individuals

  16. Rhesus Lymphocryptovirus Type 1-associated B-cell Nasal Lymphoma in SIV-infected Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Marr-Belvin, A. K.; Carville, A. K.; Fahey, M. A.; Boisvert, K.; Klumpp, S. A.; Ohashi, M.; Wang, F.; O’Neil, S. P.; Westmoreland, S. V.

    2008-01-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is a worldwide endemic gamma herpesvirus of the genus Lymphocryptovirus (LCV) that infects more than 90% of the world’s population. EBV has been associated with a variety of malignancies, but it has a demonstrated role in lymphomas, especially in immunosuppressed individuals. Lymphomas of the nasal cavity, paranasal sinuses, and nasopharynx are uncommon and constitute less than 5% of all extranodal lymphomas. Sinonasal non-Hodgkin’s lymphomas have been reported in pat...

  17. Fluoroscopically guided ureteral catheterization : preliminary experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the efficacy of fluoroscopically guided ureteral catheterization without cystoscopic assistance. We evaluated seven patients(male:female=2:5) who were candidates for percutaneous nephrostomy and noted the presence of ureteral strictures caused by metastasis from malignant tumors(n=5), tuberculosis(n=1) and previous ureterolithotomy(n=1). In six patients, retrograde catheterization of the ureter under cystoscopic guidance was failed. Ureter selection was performed with a guide wire and ureteral stent after bladder distension using contrast media which visualized the interureteric ridge. Retrograde catheterization of the ureter was successful in five patients and failed in two. Ureteral stent insertion was performed in three of the five patients, and removal of migrated ureteral stent and insertion of new ureteral stent was performed in two. The mean total procedure time was 35 minutes. Ureteral catheterization failed in two male patients, who underwent percutaneous nephrostomy. An old blood clot was seen in one patient during the procedure, but no complications ensued. Fluoroscopically guided ureteral catheterization without cystoscopic assistance is thought to be a useful procedure for the insertion of a ureteral stent in female patients

  18. Ultrasound-guided subclavian vein catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess the usefulness of the ultrasound-guided subclavian vein catheterization in difficult patients. We tried subclavian vein catheterization in 18 patients in which conventional blind technique failed(N=9): or was complicated by hemothorax or pneumothorax(N=3): or was prohibited by respirator care(N=4) and severe thoracic deformity(N=2). Initially, the patency of subclavian vein was evaluated with ultrasonography, and then, the puncture of the subclavian vein was performed under the guidance of ultrasonography. Under the fluoroscopy, the patency of the proximal subclavian vein and the superior vena cava was evaluated after contrast-media injection and a catheter was inserted into the subclavian vein and accurately positioned at the superior vena cava. Successful catheterization was performed in 17 patients. In the remaining one patient, we did not perform catheterization because of bilateral subclavian vein thrombosis detected during the procedure. There were no procedure-related complications. Ultrasound-guided subclavian vein catheterization is an easy and safe method even in difficult cases

  19. New radioimmunoassay for follicle-stimulating hormone in macaques: ovulatory menstrual cycles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay system for macaque follicle-stimulating hormone (mFSH) was developed utilizing an antiserum (H-31) prepared in a rabbit against purified ovine FSH as the immunogen. Sera from castrated female, adult male, and juvenile rhesus monkeys, as well as urinary extracts from castrated rhesus and bonnet monkeys, were used to demonstrate parallelism with a standard of partially purified monkey pituitary gonadotropins (LER-M-907-D). An extract of baboon pituitary tissue also showed parallelism with the reference standard. A highly purified pituitary extract (WP-X-105-28), containing approximately 75 percent macaque luteinizing hormone (mLH) and 1 percent mFSH, was used to demonstrate the specificity of this mFSH assay system. Sera and urinary extracts obtained from hypophysectomized monkeys did not show cross-reactivity in the assay. Macaque chorionic gonadotropin (mCG) did not produce an inhibition curve in the assay, as determined from serum samples and urinary extracts collected from pregnant monkeys at the time of peak mCG secretion. Serum concentrations of mFSH were suppressed in ovariectomized monkeys by the administration of ethinyl estradiol for 3 days, but returned to near pretreatment values by 96 h after the last estradiol administration. The determination of serum mFSH concentrations in daily blood samples obtained from 20 rhesus monkeys throughout ovulatory menstrual cycles revealed a pattern similar to that previously reported for the rhesus monkey and the woman. The peak value of serum mFSH during the menstrual cycle coincided with the midcycle surge of mLH in each case. The gonadotropin peaks were preceded by increasing serum concentrations of estradiol and followed by rises in the serum concentrations of progesterone

  20. Comparative Proteomics of Human and Macaque Milk Reveals Species-Specific Nutrition during Postnatal Development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beck, Kristen L; Weber, Darren; Phinney, Brett S; Smilowitz, Jennifer T; Hinde, Katie; Lönnerdal, Bo; Korf, Ian; Lemay, Danielle G

    2015-05-01

    Milk has been well established as the optimal nutrition source for infants, yet there is still much to be understood about its molecular composition. Therefore, our objective was to develop and compare comprehensive milk proteomes for human and rhesus macaques to highlight differences in neonatal nutrition. We developed a milk proteomics technique that overcomes previous technical barriers including pervasive post-translational modifications and limited sample volume. We identified 1606 and 518 proteins in human and macaque milk, respectively. During analysis of detected protein orthologs, we identified 88 differentially abundant proteins. Of these, 93% exhibited increased abundance in human milk relative to macaque and include lactoferrin, polymeric immunoglobulin receptor, alpha-1 antichymotrypsin, vitamin D-binding protein, and haptocorrin. Furthermore, proteins more abundant in human milk compared with macaque are associated with development of the gastrointestinal tract, the immune system, and the brain. Overall, our novel proteomics method reveals the first comprehensive macaque milk proteome and 524 newly identified human milk proteins. The differentially abundant proteins observed are consistent with the perspective that human infants, compared with nonhuman primates, are born at a slightly earlier stage of somatic development and require additional support through higher quantities of specific proteins to nurture human infant maturation. PMID:25757574

  1. Unusually high frequency MHC class I alleles in Mauritian origin cynomolgus macaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krebs, Kendall C; Jin, ZheYuan; Rudersdorf, Richard; Hughes, Austin L; O'Connor, David H

    2005-10-15

    Acute shortages of Indian origin Rhesus macaques significantly hinder HIV/AIDS research. Cellular immune responses are particularly difficult to study because only a subset of animals possess MHC class I (MHC I) alleles with defined peptide-binding specificities. To expand the pool of nonhuman primates suitable for studies of cellular immunity, we defined 66 MHC I alleles in Cynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) of Chinese, Vietnamese, and Mauritian origin. Most MHC I alleles were found only in animals from a single geographic origin, suggesting that Cynomolgus macaques from different origins are not interchangeable in studies of cellular immunity. Animals from Mauritius may be particularly valuable because >50% of these Cynomolgus macaques share the MHC class I allele combination Mafa-B*430101, Mafa-B*440101, and Mafa-B*460101. The increased MHC I allele sharing of Mauritian origin Cynomolgus macaques may dramatically reduce the overall number of animals needed to study cellular immune responses in nonhuman primates while simultaneously reducing the confounding effects of genetic heterogeneity in HIV/AIDS research. PMID:16210628

  2. Conformational adaptation of Asian macaque TRIMCyp directs lineage specific antiviral activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M J Ylinen

    Full Text Available TRIMCyps are anti-retroviral proteins that have arisen independently in New World and Old World primates. All TRIMCyps comprise a CypA domain fused to the tripartite domains of TRIM5alpha but they have distinct lentiviral specificities, conferring HIV-1 restriction in New World owl monkeys and HIV-2 restriction in Old World rhesus macaques. Here we provide evidence that Asian macaque TRIMCyps have acquired changes that switch restriction specificity between different lentiviral lineages, resulting in species-specific alleles that target different viruses. Structural, thermodynamic and viral restriction analysis suggests that a single mutation in the Cyp domain, R69H, occurred early in macaque TRIMCyp evolution, expanding restriction specificity to the lentiviral lineages found in African green monkeys, sooty mangabeys and chimpanzees. Subsequent mutations have enhanced restriction to particular viruses but at the cost of broad specificity. We reveal how specificity is altered by a scaffold mutation, E143K, that modifies surface electrostatics and propagates conformational changes into the active site. Our results suggest that lentiviruses may have been important pathogens in Asian macaques despite the fact that there are no reported lentiviral infections in current macaque populations.

  3. Cardiac catheterization in infants and children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiac catheterization in infants and children allows a unique opportunity to study physiologic effects of simple and complex lesions in a population with almost invariably normal coronary arteries. While morbidity from catherization is low and mortality is almost negligible in older infants and children, the risks are higher among infants under the age of 4 months, many of whom are seriously ill at the time of the study. In recent years there has been an increase in therapeutic procedures undertaken in the catheterization laboratory such as dilatation of stenotic valves and vessels. There has also been an increase in the use of such diagnostic techniques as electrophysiological studies and endomyocardial biopsies. Catheterization and these newer techniques, particularly in the young infant, should be undertaken only by physicians and technicians experienced in this field, using the best equipment available

  4. Iatrogenic intravascular pneumocephalus secondary to intravenous catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The presence of pneumocephalus without a history of intracranial or intrathecal procedures is a significant radiographic finding. Although pneumocephalus means a violation of the dural barrier or the presence of infection, intravascular pneumocephalus is different from intraparenchymal pneumocephalus and its benign nature must be known in the presence of intravenous catheterization. Herein, we present a case of iatrogenic intravascular pneumocephalus with CT findings. To our knowledge, there are only a few reported cases of iatrogenic intravascular pneumocephalus in the literature. Careful intravenous catheterization and diagnosis of the condition on imaging helps to prevent unnecessary treatment procedures. (orig.)

  5. Toward an evolutionary perspective on conceptual representation: Species-specific calls activate visual and affective processing systems in the macaque

    OpenAIRE

    Gil-da-Costa, Ricardo; Braun, Allen; Lopes, Marco; Hauser, Marc D; Carson, Richard E.; Herscovitch, Peter; Martin, Alex

    2004-01-01

    Non-human primates produce a diverse repertoire of species-specific calls and have rich conceptual systems. Some of their calls are designed to convey information about concepts such as predators, food, and social relationships, as well as the affective state of the caller. Little is known about the neural architecture of these calls, and much of what we do know is based on single-cell physiology from anesthetized subjects. By using positron emission tomography in awake rhesus macaques, we fo...

  6. Therapeutic Cardiac Catheterizations for Children with Congenital Heart Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Therapeutic Cardiac Catheterizations for Children with Congenital Heart Disease Introduction A therapeutic cardiac catheterization is a procedure performed to treat your child’s heart defect. A doctor will use special techniques and ...

  7. Noninvasive scalp recording of cortical auditory evoked potentials in the alert macaque monkey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itoh, Kosuke; Nejime, Masafumi; Konoike, Naho; Nakada, Tsutomu; Nakamura, Katsuki

    2015-09-01

    Scalp-recorded evoked potentials (EP) provide researchers and clinicians with irreplaceable means for recording stimulus-related neural activities in the human brain, due to its high temporal resolution, handiness, and, perhaps more importantly, non-invasiveness. This work recorded the scalp cortical auditory EP (CAEP) in unanesthetized monkeys by using methods that are essentially identical to those applied to humans. Young adult rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta, 5-7 years old) were seated in a monkey chair, and their head movements were partially restricted by polystyrene blocks and tension poles placed around their head. Individual electrodes were fixated on their scalp using collodion according to the 10-20 system. Pure tone stimuli were presented while electroencephalograms were recorded from up to nineteen channels, including an electrooculogram channel. In all monkeys (n = 3), the recorded CAEP comprised a series of positive and negative deflections, labeled here as macaque P1 (mP1), macaque N1 (mN1), macaque P2 (mP2), and macaque N2 (mN2), and these transient responses to sound onset were followed by a sustained potential that continued for the duration of the sound, labeled the macaque sustained potential (mSP). mP1, mN2 and mSP were the prominent responses, and they had maximal amplitudes over frontal/central midline electrode sites, consistent with generators in auditory cortices. The study represents the first noninvasive scalp recording of CAEP in alert rhesus monkeys, to our knowledge. PMID:26031378

  8. Current Trends in the Management of Difficult Urinary Catheterizations

    OpenAIRE

    Willette, Paul A.; Coffield, Scott

    2012-01-01

    Routine urinary catheter placement may cause trauma and poses a risk of infection. Male catheterization, in particular, can be difficult, especially in patients with enlarged prostate glands or other potentially obstructive conditions in the lower urinary tract. Solutions to problematic urinary catheterization are not well known and when difficult catheterization occurs, the risk of failed catheterization and concomitant complications increase. Repeated and unsuccessful attempts at urinary ca...

  9. Current Trends in the Management of Difficult Urinary Catheterizations

    OpenAIRE

    Willette, Paul A.; Coffield, Scott K

    2012-01-01

    Routine urinary catheter placement may cause trauma and poses a risk of infection. Male catheterization, in particular, can be difficult, especially in patients with enlarged prostate glands orother potentially obstructive conditions in the lower urinary tract. Solutions to problematic urinary catheterization are not well known and when difficult catheterization occurs, the risk of failedcatheterization and concomitant complications increase. Repeated and unsuccessful attempts aturinary cathe...

  10. 21 CFR 870.1310 - Vessel dilator for percutaneous catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Vessel dilator for percutaneous catheterization... Vessel dilator for percutaneous catheterization. (a) Identification. A vessel dilator for percutaneous catheterization is a device which is placed over the guide wire to enlarge the opening in the vessel, and which...

  11. Clean Intermittent Catheterization in the School Setting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katrancha, Elizabeth D.

    2008-01-01

    Spina bifida (SB) is a neural tube defect that causes many physical and mental disabilities. Bowel and bladder incontinence is the disability seen most often in these students that requires the school nurse's attention. Clean intermittent catheterization (CIC) provides the student with SB a vehicle to reach a satisfactory level of continence,…

  12. Protective effect and the therapeutic index of indralin in juvenile rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radioprotective effect of indralin in rhesus monkeys was examined over 60 d following gamma irradiation. Male and female rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) 2-3-years-old and weighing 2.1-3.5 kg were used. Animals were exposed to total-body gamma irradiation from 60Co at a dose of 6.8 Gy (lethal dose, 100% lethality over 30 days). Indralin (40-120 mg kg-1) was administered intramuscularly 5 min prior to radiation exposure. Indralin taken at a dose of 120 mg kg-1 protected five out of six monkeys (compared with the radiation control group, in which all 10 animals died). The average effective dose of indralin in the monkeys exposed to gamma irradiation for 30 min was equal to 77.3 (63.3-94.3) mg kg-1, and the maximum tolerated dose of indralin administered to monkeys was 800 mg kg-1. Indralin reduced radiation-induced injuries in macaques, thus resulting in a less severe course of acute radiation syndrome. Delayed and less pronounced manifestation of the haemorrhagic syndrome of the disease, and milder forms of both leukopenia and anaemia were also noted. The therapeutic index for indralin, expressed as the ratio of the maximum tolerated dose to the average effective dose, was equal to 10. Therefore, indralin has a significant radioprotective effect against radiation and has a high therapeutic index in rhesus monkeys. (author)

  13. High Frequency of Virus-Specific CD8+ T Cells in the Central Nervous System of Macaques Chronically Infected with Simian Immunodeficiency Virus SIVmac251

    OpenAIRE

    Moniuszko, Marcin; Brown, Charlie; Pal, Ranajit; Tryniszewska, Elzbieta; Tsai, Wen-Po; Hirsch, Vanessa M.; Franchini, Genoveffa

    2003-01-01

    Infection with human immunodeficiency virus or simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) induces virus-specific CD8+ T cells that traffic to lymphoid and nonlymphoid tissues. In this study, we used Gag-specific tetramer staining to investigate the frequency of CD8+ T cells in peripheral blood and the central nervous system of Mamu-A*01-positive SIV-infected rhesus macaques. Most of these infected macaques were vaccinated prior to SIVmac251 exposure. The frequency of Gag181-189 CM9 tetramer-positive...

  14. Radiation exposure during cardiac catheterization procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For some time there has been an increased interest in more information about radiation exposure during cardiac catheterization because of: relatively high doses to workers and patient; rapid increase of numbers of examinations; introduction of new procedure-types (e.g. Percutaneous Transluminal Coronary Angiography, PTCA) and introduction of new techniques (e.g. Digital Subtraction Angiography, DSA). This paper reports about a study on the exposure to medical personnel and patient in two major hospitals in the Netherlands. The Total number of cardiac catheterization procedures in both hospitals amounts to circa 3000 per year (approximately 10% of all cardiac procedures c.q. 20% of all PTCA procedures in the Netherlands). This study is related to 1300 cardiac examinations

  15. Cardiac catheterization and complications: initial experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Dubey

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Cardiac catheterization for diagnostic and therapeutic purposes has been routinely used since last one year in College of Medical Sciences and Teaching Hospital, Bharatpur, Nepal. Because all cardiac catheterizations involve the insertion of cardiac catheters into the circulatory system, it should not be surprising that a variety of complications can ensue. These complications range from minor problems with no long-term sequelae to major problem even death. A total of 357 consecutive diagnostic and therapeutic cardiac catheterization performed in College of Medical Sciences and Teaching Hospital, Bharatpur between April 2011 to April 2012 were evaluated for their complications. Among them 220 (61.6% were coronary angiogram, 65 (18.2 % percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty (PTCA and stenting, 7 ( 1.9 % permanent pacemaker insertion, 65 (18.2% were others including temporary pacemaker insertion, peripheral angiography and carotid angiography. There were 3 deaths (0.84%. Two deaths occurred following coronary angiogram and 1 death following PTCA stenting. Vascular complications occurred in 5 (1.4% patients with groin haematoma in all. Contrast allergy occurred in 9 (2.5 %, vasovagal reaction in 2 (0.56%, pyrogen reaction in 6 (1.6%, and contrast induced nephropathy occurred in 3 (0.84% patients. Cardiac catheterization procedure in CMS-TH, Bharatpur has acceptable low complications including death. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal,2012,Vol-8,No-2, 1-6 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v8i2.6830

  16. Entrapment of guidewire during central venous catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarun S.

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Central venous catheterization (CVC is common in the setting of ICU for various reasons like monitoring of CVP, fluid administration and vasopressor or drug infusions. Guidewires are routinely used in the Seldinger technique during central venous catheter placement CVC placement is not innocuous as numerous complications may occur, with varying frequency and severity. [Int J Res Med Sci 2016; 4(7.000: 3080-3081

  17. Complete guidewire retention after femoral vein catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cat, Bahar Gulcay; Guler, Sertac; Soyuduru, Murat; Guven, Ibrahim; Ramadan, Hayri

    2015-01-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are often used for various purposes in the emergency departments (ED). The main uses of CVCs in the EDs are emergent hemodialysis, in situations where peripheral vein catheterization cannot be achieved, and continuous invasive hemodynamic monitoring. The complications related to CVC insertion are usually mechanical and observed in the near term after the procedure. Retained CVC guidewire after catheterization is a rare complication in the published reports and usually related with intra- or postoperative settings and jugular or subclavian vein. The present study reported a young female patient who underwent left femoral vein catheterization 6 months earlier in an intensive care unit of another hospital and was diagnosed with complete guidewire retention in the ED. To the best of the authors' knowledge, this is the first case in published reports with a diagnosis of retained CVC guidewire with retrograde migration into the femoral vein. Surprisingly, the patient developed no thrombotic or embolic complication during this 6-month period. PMID:26657235

  18. Gonadotropin ratio affects the in vitro growth of rhesus ovarian preantral follicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yoon Young; Yun, Jun-Won; Kim, Jong Min; Park, Chung Gyu; Rosenwaks, Zev; Liu, Hung Ching; Kang, Byeong-Cheol; Ku, Seung-Yup

    2016-04-01

    In vitro follicle growth (IVFG) strategy is critical in the fertility preservation of cancer survivors; however, its optimal protocol needs to be developed using primate models since the availability of human samples is limited. Only a few previous studies have reported the successful IVFG of rhesus monkey ovaries using low-dose follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) (0.3 or 3 ng/mL) and long-term culture (up to 5 weeks) and it is still uncertain in regard to the optimal culture duration and effective dose of treated gonadotropins applicable to the IVFG of rhesus preantral follicles. Recently, we have reported that the FSH to luteinizing hormone (LH) ratio affects the in vitro growth of murine ovarian follicles. We aimed to investigate whether gonadotropin ratios affect the efficiency of rhesus follicular growth in vitro Ovaries were collected from six necropsied rhesus macaques (4-9 years) and preantral follicles were retrieved and cultured for 14 days using 200 mIU/mL FSH. The characteristics of follicular growth were compared between the FSH:LH=1:1 (n=24) and FSH:LH=2:1 (n=24) groups. High concentration gonadotropin treatment shortened the duration required for in vitro maturation of rhesus preantral follicles. The FSH:LH=2:1 group showed a faster follicular growth and enabled the acquisition of mature oocytes, although the expression of growth differentiation factor (GDF)-9 and anti-Müllerian hormone (AMH) did not differ significantly between the two groups. Taken together, high dose gonadotropin treatment can shorten the duration of IVFG and the gonadotropin ratio is important in the IVFG of rhesus monkey ovaries. PMID:26980777

  19. Rhesus TRIM5α Disrupts the HIV-1 Capsid at the Inter­Hexamer Interfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Gongpu; Ke, Danxia; Vu, Thomas; Ahn, Jinwoo; Shah, Vaibhav B.; Yang, Ruifeng; Aiken, Christopher; Charlton, Lisa M.; Gronenborn, Angela M.; Zhang, Peijun

    2011-01-01

    TRIM proteins play important roles in the innate immune defense against retroviral infection, including human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1). Rhesus macaque TRIM5α (TRIM5αrh) targets the HIV-1 capsid and blocks infection at an early post-entry stage, prior to reverse transcription. Studies have shown that binding of TRIM5α to the assembled capsid is essential for restriction and requires the coiled-coil and B30.2/SPRY domains, but the molecular mechanism of restriction is not fully und...

  20. Characterization of a Rhesus Monkey Calicivirus Representing a New Genus of Caliciviridae▿

    OpenAIRE

    Farkas, Tibor; Sestak, Karol; Wei, Chao; Jiang, Xi

    2008-01-01

    In this study, we report the characterization of a novel calicivirus (CV), the Tulane virus (TV), which was isolated from stool samples of captive juvenile rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) of the Tulane National Primate Research Center. The complete genome of TV contains 6,714 nucleotides plus a poly(A) tail and is organized into three open reading frames (ORFs) that encode the nonstructural (NS) polyprotein (ORF1); the capsid protein (ORF2), with an estimated molecular mass of 57.9 kDa; and ...

  1. Review of radiation safety in the cardiac catheterization laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    With the increasing use of coronary arteriography and interventional procedures, radiation exposure to patients and personnel working in cardiac catheterization laboratories has increased. Proper technique to minimize both patient and operator exposure is necessary. A practical approach to radiation safety in the cardiac catheterization laboratory is presented. This discussion should be useful to facilities with well-established radiation safety programs as well as facilities that require restructuring to cope with the radiation environment in a modern cardiac catheterization laboratory

  2. Improved Xenobiotic Metabolism and Reduced Susceptibility to Cancer in Gluten-Sensitive Macaques upon Introduction of a Gluten-Free Diet

    OpenAIRE

    Sestak, Karol; Conroy, Lauren; Aye, Pyone P.; Mehra, Smriti; Doxiadis, Gaby G.; Kaushal, Deepak

    2011-01-01

    Background A non-human primate (NHP) model of gluten sensitivity was employed to study the gene perturbations associated with dietary gluten changes in small intestinal tissues from gluten-sensitive rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta). Methodology Stages of remission and relapse were accomplished in gluten-sensitive animals by administration of gluten-free (GFD) and gluten-containing (GD) diets, as described previously. Pin-head-sized biopsies, obtained non-invasively by pediatric endoscope from...

  3. Developing Tools to Measure Quality in Congenital Catheterization and Interventions: The Congenital Cardiac Catheterization Project on Outcomes (C3PO)

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhry-Waterman, Nadia; Coombs, Sandra; Porras, Diego; Holzer, Ralf; Bergersen, Lisa

    2014-01-01

    The broad range of relatively rare procedures performed in pediatric cardiac catheterization laboratories has made the standardization of care and risk assessment in the field statistically quite problematic. However, with the growing number of patients who undergo cardiac catheterization, it has become imperative that the cardiology community overcomes these challenges to study patient outcomes. The Congenital Cardiac Catheterization Project on Outcomes was able to develop benchmarks, tools ...

  4. Antagonism of Corticotrophin-Releasing Factor Type 1 Receptors Attenuates Caloric Intake of Free Feeding Subordinate Female Rhesus Monkeys in a Rich Dietary Environment

    OpenAIRE

    Moore, C. J.; Johnson, Z P; Higgins, M.; Toufexis, D; Wilson, M E

    2014-01-01

    Social subordination in macaque females is a known chronic stressor and previous studies have shown that socially subordinate female rhesus monkeys consume fewer kilocalories than dominant animals when a typical laboratory chow diet is available. However, in a rich dietary environment that provides access to chow in combination with a more palatable diet (i.e. high in fat and refined sugar), subordinate animals consume significantly more daily kilocalories than dominant conspecifics. Substant...

  5. Adaptive evolution of simian immunodeficiency viruses isolated from two conventional progressor macaques with neuroaids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Foley, Brian T [Los Alamos National Laboratory; Korber, Bette T [Los Alamos National Laboratory

    2008-01-01

    Simian immunodeficiency virus infection of macaques may result in neuroAIDS, a feature more commonly observed in macaques with rapid progressive disease than in those with conventional disease. This is the first report of two conventional progressors (H631 and H636) with encephalitis in rhesus macaques inoculated with a derivative of SIVsmES43-3. Phylogenetic analyses of viruses isolated from the cerebral spinal fluid (CSF) and plasma from both animals demonstrated tissue compartmentalization. Additionally, virus from the central nervous system (CNS) was able to infect primary macaque monocyte-derived macrophages more efficiently than virus from plasma. Conversely, virus isolated from plasma was able to replicate better in peripheral blood mononuclear cells than virus from CNS. We speculate that these viruses were under different selective pressures in their separate compartments. Furthermore, these viruses appear to have undergone adaptive evolution to preferentially replicate in their respective cell targets. Analysis of the number of potential N-linked glycosylation sites (PNGS) in gp160 showed that there was a statistically significant loss of PNGS in viruses isolated from CNS in both macaques compared to SIVsmE543-3. Moreover, virus isolated from the brain in H631, had statistically significant loss of PNGS compared to virus isolated from CSF and plasma of the same animal. It is possible that the brain isolate may have adapted to decrease the number of PNGS given that humoral immune selection pressure is less likely to be encountered in the brain. These viruses provide a relevant model to study the adaptations required for SIV to induce encephalitis.

  6. Catheterization: A Review of Various Methods for Catheterization of Handicapped Students in the School System. A Technical Assistance Publication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Marilyn

    The manual is intended to provide technical assistance to South Carolina local education agencies (LEAs)in regard to provision of catheterization services to students with disabilities in the school system. The first section defines catheterization and briefly discusses the basic need for this specialized health care service. Recent relevant…

  7. Illegal trade in Barbary macaques

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Uhm, Daan

    2014-01-01

    While Morocco is well known as the main port between Africa and the EU for the illegal drugs trade and migration, the illegal trade in wildlife is flourishing as well. Next to the illegal large-scale trafficking of tortoises and birds, it is estimated that as few as 5,000 Barbary macaques remain in

  8. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection of macaques: a model for Lassa fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Juan C; Pauza, C David; Djavani, Mahmoud M; Rodas, Juan D; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Bryant, Joseph; Ateh, Eugene; Garcia, Cybele; Lukashevich, Igor S; Salvato, Maria S

    2011-11-01

    Arenaviruses such as Lassa fever virus (LASV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) are benign in their natural reservoir hosts, and can occasionally cause severe viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in non-human primates and in human beings. LCMV is considerably more benign for human beings than Lassa virus, however certain strains, like the LCMV-WE strain, can cause severe disease when the virus is delivered as a high-dose inoculum. Here we describe a rhesus macaque model for Lassa fever that employs a virulent strain of LCMV. Since LASV must be studied within Biosafety Level-4 (BSL-4) facilities, the LCMV-infected macaque model has the advantage that it can be used at BSL-3. LCMV-induced disease is rarely as severe as other VHF, but it is similar in cases where vascular leakage leads to lethal systemic failure. The LCMV-infected macaque has been valuable for describing the course of disease with differing viral strains, doses and routes of infection. By monitoring system-wide changes in physiology and gene expression in a controlled experimental setting, it is possible to identify events that are pathognomonic for developing VHF and potential treatment targets. PMID:21820469

  9. Lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) infection of macaques: a model for Lassa fever

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zapata, Juan C.; Pauza, C. David; Djavani, Mahmoud M.; Rodas, Juan D.; Moshkoff, Dmitry; Bryant, Joseph; Ateh, Eugene; Garcia, Cybele; Lukashevich, Igor S.; Salvato, Maria S.

    2011-01-01

    Arenaviruses such as Lassa fever virus (LASV) and lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus (LCMV) are benign in their natural reservoir hosts, and can occasionally cause severe viral hemorrhagic fever (VHF) in non-human primates and in human beings. LCMV is considerably more benign for human beings than Lassa virus, however certain strains, like the LCMV-WE strain, can cause severe disease when the virus is delivered as a high-dose inoculum. Here we describe a rhesus macaque model for Lassa fever that employs a virulent strain of LCMV. Since LASV must be studied within Biosafety Level-4 (BSL-4) facilities, the LCMV-infected macaque model has the advantage that it can be used at BSL-3. LCMV-induced disease is rarely as severe as other VHF, but it is similar in cases where vascular leakage leads to lethal systemic failure. The LCMV-infected macaque has been valuable for describing the course of disease with differing viral strains, doses and routes of infection. By monitoring system-wide changes in physiology and gene expression in a controlled experimental setting, it is possible to identify events that are pathognomonic for developing VHF and potential treatment targets. PMID:21820469

  10. Delayed viral replication and CD4+ T cell depletion in the rectosigmoid mucosa of macaques during primary rectal SIV infection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rectal infection of macaques by SIV is a model for rectal HIV transmission. We focus here on the digestive tract during days 7-14 of primary rectal infection by SIV in 15 rhesus macaques. Surprisingly, we did not detect productively infected cells in the rectosigmoid colon at early stages of viral dissemination. This strongly suggests that there is no massive viral amplification in the rectosigmoid colon prior to viral dissemination. As dissemination proceeds, productively infected T cells are observed in the rectosigmoid colon and small intestine, with rectosigmoid colon showing the heaviest viral load. Lymphoid follicles are infected prior to lamina propria at both sites. When viral dissemination is widespread, inflammatory infiltrates are visible in the rectosigmoid colon, but not in the small intestine. An important decrease in CD4+ T cells is then observed in the lamina propria of the rectosigmoid colon only

  11. Interventional ovarian tube catheterization in treating tubal ectopic pregnancy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the feasibility and curative effect of treating tubal pregnancy through the fallopian tube with interventional catheterization decrease the difficulty of the procedure and shorten the consuming time. Methods: Applying the method of interventional catheterization of fallopian tube and injecting 0.5 mg atropine at the cervix beforehand, then 70 mg MTX was administered into the fallopian tube. Results: 113 patients were successfully recovered with health except one without any adversary complication. Conclusions: The interventional fallopian tube catheterization for treating ectopic pregnancy is a simple, safe, minitraumatic, quick and effective method. (authors)

  12. Analysis of Gag-specific Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes in Simian Immunodeficiency Virus–infected Rhesus Monkeys by Cell Staining with a Tetrameric Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I–Peptide Complex

    OpenAIRE

    Kuroda, Marcelo J.; Schmitz, Jörn E.; Barouch, Dan H.; Craiu, Abie; Allen, Todd M.; Sette, Alessandro; Watkins, David I.; Forman, Meryl A.; Letvin, Norman L.

    1998-01-01

    A tetrameric recombinant major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I–peptide complex was used as a staining reagent in flow cytometric analyses to quantitate and define the phenotype of Gag-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in the peripheral blood of simian immunodeficiency virus macaque (SIVmac)-infected rhesus monkeys. The heavy chain of the rhesus monkey MHC class I molecule Mamu-A*01 and β2-microglobulin were refolded in the presence of an SIVmac Gag synthetic peptide (p11C, C–M)...

  13. Gut-Resident Lactobacillus Abundance Associates with IDO1 Inhibition and Th17 Dynamics in SIV-Infected Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Ivan Vujkovic-Cvijin; Louise A. Swainson; Simon N. Chu; Alexandra M. Ortiz; Clark A. Santee; Annalise Petriello; Richard M. Dunham; Douglas W. Fadrosh; Din L. Lin; Ali A. Faruqi; Yong Huang; Cristian Apetrei; Ivona Pandrea; Frederick M. Hecht; Christopher D. Pilcher

    2015-01-01

    Gut microbes can profoundly modulate mucosal barrier-promoting Th17 cells in mammals. A salient feature of HIV/simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) immunopathogenesis is the loss of Th17 cells, which has been linked to increased activity of the immunomodulatory enzyme, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1 (IDO 1). The role of gut microbes in this system remains unknown, and the SIV-infected rhesus macaque provides a well-described model for HIV-associated Th17 loss and mucosal immune disruption. We o...

  14. Natural Killer Cell Evasion Is Essential for Infection by Rhesus Cytomegalovirus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sturgill, Elizabeth R; Malouli, Daniel; Hansen, Scott G; Burwitz, Benjamin J; Seo, Seongkyung; Schneider, Christine L; Womack, Jennie L; Verweij, Marieke C; Ventura, Abigail B; Bhusari, Amruta; Jeffries, Krystal M; Legasse, Alfred W; Axthelm, Michael K; Hudson, Amy W; Sacha, Jonah B; Picker, Louis J; Früh, Klaus

    2016-08-01

    The natural killer cell receptor NKG2D activates NK cells by engaging one of several ligands (NKG2DLs) belonging to either the MIC or ULBP families. Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) UL16 and UL142 counteract this activation by retaining NKG2DLs and US18 and US20 act via lysomal degradation but the importance of NK cell evasion for infection is unknown. Since NKG2DLs are highly conserved in rhesus macaques, we characterized how NKG2DL interception by rhesus cytomegalovirus (RhCMV) impacts infection in vivo. Interestingly, RhCMV lacks homologs of UL16 and UL142 but instead employs Rh159, the homolog of UL148, to prevent NKG2DL surface expression. Rh159 resides in the endoplasmic reticulum and retains several NKG2DLs whereas UL148 does not interfere with NKG2DL expression. Deletion of Rh159 releases human and rhesus MIC proteins, but not ULBPs, from retention while increasing NK cell stimulation by infected cells. Importantly, RhCMV lacking Rh159 cannot infect CMV-naïve animals unless CD8+ cells, including NK cells, are depleted. However, infection can be rescued by replacing Rh159 with HCMV UL16 suggesting that Rh159 and UL16 perform similar functions in vivo. We therefore conclude that cytomegaloviral interference with NK cell activation is essential to establish but not to maintain chronic infection. PMID:27580123

  15. Metaphase yields from staphylococcal enterotoxin A stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes of unirradiated and irradiated aged rhesus monkeys

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, F. S.; Cox, A. B.; Salmon, Y. L.; Cantu, A. O.; Lucas, J. N.

    1994-01-01

    The mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) works well in both human and cynomolgus monkey (Macaca fascicularis) lymphocyte cultures to stimulate T cell proliferation. T cells from rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) are less responsive than human cells, producing few metaphases when thousands are required, e.g. in biological dosimetry studies. We show that staphylococcal enterotoxin A (SEA), one of the most potent mitogens known, at a concentration of 0.5 microgram/ml stimulated peripheral lymphocytes to grow with a mitotic index (MI) averaging 0.13 metaphases/cell in old, irradiated rhesus macaques. This was significantly greater (p animals. Whole blood was cultured for 96, 120 and 144 h for five irradiated individuals and for two controls. All cells cultured with SEA produced a high MI with a peak response at 120 h whereas the same cultures showed low MI for each PHA stimulated culture.

  16. Suprapubic compared with transurethral bladder catheterization for gynecologic surgery: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Healy, Eibhlín F

    2012-09-01

    Suprapubic catheterization is commonly used for postoperative bladder drainage after gynecologic procedures. However, recent studies have suggested an increased rate of complications compared with urethral catheterization. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials comparing suprapubic catheterization and urethral catheterization in gynecologic populations.

  17. Catheterization in congenital heart diseased patients with stage operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To explore the indications and clinical assessment for catheterization in congenital heart diseased patients with stage operation. Methods: Sixty five patients were selected from Apr. 1999 to Dec. 2002 undergoing second catheterization. 47 male, 18 females with age ranging from 5 months to 22 years old on average of 6.8 years. EKG, chest X-ray, ECHO, cardiovascular pressure and blood oxygen saturation were taken in all patients during the procedure. Results: According to the physiologic data recorded during the procedure of catheterization, 39 cases needed one more surgery, 9 cases for intervention, 4 cases would be placed with endovascular stent, 9 cases should be follow-up and 4 cases couldn't be operated again. Conclusions: Catheterization is not only offering the accurate physiologic data, but also revealing the details about anatomy with important information to the diagnosis and treatment for the congenital heart disease, especially for the stage-operation

  18. A novel cannulation technique for difficult urethral catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet Kaynar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To propose a novel cannulation technique for difficult urethral catheterization procedures. Technique: The sheath tip of an intravenous catheter is cut off, replaced to the needle tip and pushed through the distal drainage side hole to Foley catheter tip, and finally withdrawn for cannulation. In situations making urethral catheterization difficult, a guide wire is placed under direct vision. The modified Foley catheter is slid successfully over the guide wire from its distal end throughout the urethral passage into the bladder. Results: The modified Foley catheter was used successfully in our clinic in cases requiring difficult urethral catheterization. Conclusions: This easy and rapid modification of a Foley catheter may minimize the potential complications of blind catheter placement in standard catheterization.

  19. Polypoid cystitis in an adult without history of catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polypoid cystitis is a benign exophytic mucosal lesion of the bladder. Differentiating it from papillary transitional cell carcinoma is difficult due to their similar characteristics. Although indwelling catheter is the main well-known cause of polypoid cystitis, some case reports unrelated to catheterization have been described. However, the radiological findings of polypoid cystitis have rarely been reported. We hereby describe polypoid cystitis in a 20-year-old man without a history of catheterization along with the computed tomographic findings.

  20. Difficult male urethral catheterization: a review of different approaches

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Villanueva

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To review and compare the different methods for difficult male urethral catheterization described in selected literature. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A PubMed search was done with the terms "difficult", "failed", or "complications" and "urethral catheterization", "transurethral catheterization", "Foley catheter", "urethral catheter" or "filiforms and followers". All articles addressing the issue of difficult adult male urethral catheterization were included. RESULTS: Six main approaches were identified on the 14 articles included for review: 1 Passage of either a Glidewire, guide wire or filiform under direct vision; 2 Blind passage of a filiform, guide wire, Glidewire or hydrophilic catheter; 3 "The Peel-away® sheath placed on a cystoscope/resectoscope technique"; 4 "The rigid ureteroscope placed inside the 22F Foley technique"; 5 Suprapubic catheterization; and 6 "The instillation of 60 cc of saline through the catheter as it is advanced technique". CONCLUSION: There is a paucity of prospective data comparing the benefits, risks, success rates and complications of the different approaches for difficult Foley catheter placement. Our suggested approach starts with the initial attempt at urethral catheterization with an 18F coude and a 12F silicone catheter. If these fail, using a flexible cystoscope or the blind Glidewire technique are reasonable alternatives. If dilatation of a stricture is necessary, ureteric dilatators or a urethral balloon dilatator are recommended.

  1. Economic evaluation of increasing population rates of cardiac catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clement Fiona M

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Increasing population rates of cardiac catheterization can lead to the detection of more people with high risk coronary disease and opportunity for subsequent revascularization. However, such a strategy should only be undertaken if it is cost-effective. Methods Based on data from a cohort of patients undergoing cardiac catheterization, and efficacy data from clinical trials, we used a Markov model that considered 1 the yield of high-risk cases as the catheterization rate increases, 2 the long-term survival, quality of life and costs for patients with high risk disease, and 3 the impact of revascularization on survival, quality of life and costs. The cost per quality-adjusted life year was calculated overall, and by indication, age, and sex subgroups. Results Increasing the catheterization rate was associated with a cost per QALY of CAN$26,470. The cost per QALY was most attractive in females with Acute Coronary Syndromes (ACS ($20,320 per QALY gained, and for ACS patients over 75 years of age ($16,538 per QALY gained. However, there is significant model uncertainty associated with the efficacy of revascularization. Conclusion A strategy of increasing cardiac catheterization rates among eligible patients is associated with a cost per QALY similar to that of other funded interventions. However, there is significant model uncertainty. A decision to increase population rates of catheterization requires consideration of the accompanying opportunity costs, and careful thought towards the most appropriate strategy.

  2. Simian immunodeficiency virus interactions with macaque dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teleshova, Natalia; Derby, Nina; Martinelli, Elena; Pugach, Pavel; Calenda, Giulia; Robbiani, Melissa

    2013-01-01

    This chapter summarizes advances in the following areas: (1) dendritic cell (DC)-mediated simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) transmission, (2) role of DCs in innate and adaptive immunity against SIV, and (3) approaches to harness DC function to induce anti-SIV responses. The nonhuman primate (NHP) model of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection in rhesus macaques and other Asian NHP species is highly relevant to advance the understanding of virus-host interactions critical for transmission and disease pathogenesis. HIV infection is associated with changes in frequency, phenotype, and function of the two principal subsets of DCs, myeloid DCs and plasmacytoid DCs. DC biology during pathogenic SIV infection is strikingly similar to that observed in HIV-infected patients. The NHP models provide an opportunity to dissect the requirements for DC-driven SIV infection and to understand how SIV distorts the DC system to its advantage. Furthermore, the SIV model of mucosal transmission enables the study of the earliest events of infection at the portal of entry that cannot be studied in humans, and, importantly, the involvement of DCs. Nonpathogenic infection in African NHP hosts allows investigations into the role of DCs in disease control. Understanding how DCs are altered during SIV infection is critical to the design of therapeutic and preventative strategies against HIV. PMID:22975875

  3. Radiation exposure to the child during cardiac catheterization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Few data are available regarding radiation exposure to children during cardiac catheterization. Using lithium fluoride thermoluminescent dosimeters, radiation exposure was measured during precatheterization chest roentgenography, fluoroscopy (hemodynamic assessment phase of catheterization) and cineangiography in 30 infants and children, ages 3 days to 21 years. Dosimeters were placed over the eyes, thyroid, anterior chest, posterior chest, anterior abdomen, posterior abdomen and gonads. Average absorbed chest doses were 24.5 mR during chest roentgenography, 5810 mR during catheterization fluoroscopy and 1592 mR during cineangiography. During the complete catheterization, average doses were 26 mR to the eyes, 431 mR to the thyroid area, 150 mR to the abdomen and 11 mR to the gonads. Radiation exposure during pediatric cardiac catheterization is low to the eyes and gonads but high to the chest and thyroid area. To decrease radiation dosage we suggest (1) low pulse-rate fluoroscopy; (2) substitution of contrast echocardiography for cineangiography; (3) large-plate abdominal/gonadal shielding; (4) a selective shield for thyroid area; (5) a very small field during catheter manipulation. Minimum radiation consistent with accurate diagnosis is optimal; however, erroneous or incomplete diagnosis is more dangerous than radiation-related hazards

  4. Functional MRI of the vocalization-processing network in the macaque brain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael eOrtiz-Rios

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Using functional magnetic resonance imaging in awake behaving monkeys we investigated how species-specific vocalizations are represented in auditory and auditory-related regions of the macaque brain. We found clusters of active voxels along the ascending auditory pathway that responded to various types of complex sounds: inferior colliculus (IC, medial geniculate nucleus (MGN, auditory core, belt, and parabelt cortex, and other parts of the superior temporal gyrus (STG and sulcus (STS. Regions sensitive to monkey calls were most prevalent in the anterior STG, but some clusters were also found in frontal and parietal cortex on the basis of comparisons between responses to calls and environmental sounds. Surprisingly, we found that spectrotemporal control sounds derived from the monkey calls (scrambled calls also activated the parietal and frontal regions. Taken together, our results demonstrate that species-specific vocalizations in rhesus monkeys activate preferentially the auditory ventral stream, and in particular areas of the antero-lateral belt and parabelt.

  5. Auditory sequence processing reveals evolutionarily conserved regions of frontal cortex in macaques and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Benjamin; Kikuchi, Yukiko; Sun, Li; Hunter, David; Dick, Frederic; Smith, Kenny; Thiele, Alexander; Griffiths, Timothy D; Marslen-Wilson, William D; Petkov, Christopher I

    2015-01-01

    An evolutionary account of human language as a neurobiological system must distinguish between human-unique neurocognitive processes supporting language and evolutionarily conserved, domain-general processes that can be traced back to our primate ancestors. Neuroimaging studies across species may determine whether candidate neural processes are supported by homologous, functionally conserved brain areas or by different neurobiological substrates. Here we use functional magnetic resonance imaging in Rhesus macaques and humans to examine the brain regions involved in processing the ordering relationships between auditory nonsense words in rule-based sequences. We find that key regions in the human ventral frontal and opercular cortex have functional counterparts in the monkey brain. These regions are also known to be associated with initial stages of human syntactic processing. This study raises the possibility that certain ventral frontal neural systems, which play a significant role in language function in modern humans, originally evolved to support domain-general abilities involved in sequence processing. PMID:26573340

  6. A Forgotten Guidewire: Complication of Central Venous Catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Funda Gümüş

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Central venous catheterization is an invasive procedure commonly preferred for hemodynamic monitorization, total parenteral nutrition, cardiac pacemaker implantation, long-term use of vasoactive or irritating agents and hemodialysis. We present a 19-year-old woman with acute renal failure scheduled for hemodialysis catheterization. A catheter guidewire extending from the right internal jugular vein to the right external iliac vein was detected in the chest X-ray, taken two hours following catheterization after occurrence of arrhythmia and hypotension. Catheteter guidewire was extracted noninvasively without any complications. Most common reasons for this complication are stated to be attention deficits, lack of experience, overtired staff, and inadequate supervision of trainees. In this paper, we discussed this complication’s causes and preventive methods. (Journal of the Turkish Society Intensive Care 2011; 9:64-7

  7. Distribution of a macaque immunosuppressive type D retrovirus in neural, lymphoid, and salivary tissues

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lackner, A.A.; Rodriguez, M.H.; Bush, C.E.; Munn, R.J.; Kwang, Hweising; Moore, P.F.; Osborn, K.G.; Marx, P.A.; Gardner, M.B.; Lowenstine, L.J. (Univ. of California, Davis (USA))

    1988-06-01

    Simian acquired immune deficiency syndrome (SAIDS) in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) at the California Primate Research Center is caused by a type D retrovirus designated SAIDS retrovirus serotype 1 (SRV-1). This syndrome is characterized by profound immunosuppression and death associated with opportunistic infections. Neurologic signs and lesions have not been described as part of this syndrome. The distribution of SRV-1 in the salivary glands, lymph nodes, spleens, thymuses, and brains of eight virus-infected rhesus macaques was examined by immunohistochemistry. Electron microscopy, in situ RNA hybridization, and Southern blot hybridization were also performed on selected tissues to detect viral particles, RNA, and DNA, respectively. In seven of eight SRV-1-infected animals, the transmembrane envelope glycoprotein (gp20) of SRV-1 was present in three or more tissues, but never in the brain. In the remaining animal, no viral antigen was detected in any tissue. In this same group of animals, viral nucleic acid was detected in the lymph nodes of six of six animals by Southern blot hybridization, in the salivary glands of two of five animals by both Southern blot and in situ hybridizations, and, surprisingly, in the brains of three of three animals by Southern blot and of three of five animals by in situ hybridization, including the one animal in which viral gp20 was undetectable. None of these animals had neurologic signs or lesions. The detection of viral nucleic acid in the absence of viral antigen in the brain suggests latent SRV-1 infection of the central nervous system.

  8. Distribution of a macaque immunosuppressive type D retrovirus in neural, lymphoid, and salivary tissues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Simian acquired immune deficiency syndrome (SAIDS) in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta) at the California Primate Research Center is caused by a type D retrovirus designated SAIDS retrovirus serotype 1 (SRV-1). This syndrome is characterized by profound immunosuppression and death associated with opportunistic infections. Neurologic signs and lesions have not been described as part of this syndrome. The distribution of SRV-1 in the salivary glands, lymph nodes, spleens, thymuses, and brains of eight virus-infected rhesus macaques was examined by immunohistochemistry. Electron microscopy, in situ RNA hybridization, and Southern blot hybridization were also performed on selected tissues to detect viral particles, RNA, and DNA, respectively. In seven of eight SRV-1-infected animals, the transmembrane envelope glycoprotein (gp20) of SRV-1 was present in three or more tissues, but never in the brain. In the remaining animal, no viral antigen was detected in any tissue. In this same group of animals, viral nucleic acid was detected in the lymph nodes of six of six animals by Southern blot hybridization, in the salivary glands of two of five animals by both Southern blot and in situ hybridizations, and, surprisingly, in the brains of three of three animals by Southern blot and of three of five animals by in situ hybridization, including the one animal in which viral gp20 was undetectable. None of these animals had neurologic signs or lesions. The detection of viral nucleic acid in the absence of viral antigen in the brain suggests latent SRV-1 infection of the central nervous system

  9. Tonkean macaques communicate with their right hand.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meunier, Hélène; Fizet, Jonas; Vauclair, Jacques

    2013-08-01

    There are two conflicting hypotheses to explain the origins of language. Vocal origin theory states that language results from the gradual evolution of animals' vocal communication, but gestural origin theory considers that language evolved from gestures, with the initial left-hemispheric control of manual gestures gradually encompassing vocalizations. To contribute to this debate, we investigated functional hemispheric specialization related to hand biases when grasping or showing an object through manual gesture in Tonkean macaques. The results of this study, the first quantitative study on Tonkean macaques' handedness, showed a remarkable convergence of the Tonkean macaques' handedness patterns with those of baboons and human infants, with hand preferences for manual communicative gestures significantly favoring the use of the right hand. Our findings support the hypothesis that left hemispheric lateralization for language is derived from a gestural communication system that was present in the common ancestor of macaques, baboons and humans. PMID:23748098

  10. A macaque model for hantavirus infection.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. Groen (Jan); M.N. Gerding; J.P. Koeman; P.J.M. Roholl (Paul); G. van Amerongen (Geert); H.G.M. Jordans; A.D.M.E. Osterhaus (Albert); H.G.M. Niesters (Bert)

    1995-01-01

    textabstractCynomolgus macaques (Macaca fascicularis) were experimentally infected with Puumala virus (strain Hallnas), which causes nephropathia epidemica in humans in western Europe. During the first week after intratracheal inoculation, the monkeys exhibited signs of lethargy followed by mild pro

  11. Characterizing Human–Macaque Interactions in Singapore

    OpenAIRE

    Fuentes, Agustín; Kalchik, Stephanie; Gettler, Lee; Kwiatt, Anne; Konecki, Mckenna; Jones-Engel, Lisa

    2008-01-01

    Previous studies have noted substantial human–macaque interactions involving physical contact in Bali, Indonesia; Gibraltar; and Mt. Emei, China [Fuentes, American Journal of Primatology 68:880–896, 2006; Zhao, Tibetan macaques, visitors, and local people at Mt. Emei: problems and countermeasures. In: Paterson and Wallis, editor. Commensalism and conflict: the human–primate interface. Norman, OK: American Society of Primatologists. p 376–399, 2005]. The aim of this study was to conduct prelim...

  12. Isolation and Molecular Characterization of Entamoeba nuttalli Strains Showing Novel Isoenzyme Patterns from Wild Toque Macaques in Sri Lanka.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tachibana, Hiroshi; Yanagi, Tetsuo; Feng, Meng; Bandara, K B Anura T; Kobayashi, Seiki; Cheng, Xunjia; Hirayama, Kenji; Rajapakse, R P V Jayanthe

    2016-03-01

    We have proposed the revival of the name Entamoeba nuttalli for a virulent ameba strain, P19-061405, from a rhesus macaque and located it phylogenetically between E. histolytica and E. dispar. As E. nuttalli was originally described for an ameba found in a toque macaque in Sri Lanka, the prevalence and characteristics of Entamoeba species in wild toque macaques were examined. PCR analysis of 227 stool samples from six locations showed positive rates for E. nuttalli, E. dispar, and E. histolytica of 18.5%, 0.4%, and 0%, respectively. Fifteen E. nuttalli strains were cultured successfully from five locations. The 18S ribosomal RNA gene showed only three nucleotide differences in comparison with P19-061405 strain. In isoenzyme analysis, the pattern of hexokinase in Sri Lankan strains was different from that of P19-061405 strains and the difference was confirmed by analysis of the genes. Hepatic inoculation of one of the Sri Lankan E. nuttalli strains in hamsters resulted in amebic abscess formation and body weight loss. These results demonstrate that E. nuttalli is prevalent in wild toque macaques and that several characteristics of the strains are unique. We conclude that use of the name E. nuttalli is appropriate for the new Entamoeba species found in nonhuman primates. PMID:26333681

  13. Teaching Self-Catheterization Skills to a Child with Myelomeningocele in a Preschool Setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robertson, Jo; And Others

    1992-01-01

    Simulation training and a prompt hierarchy were found to facilitate acquisition of clean intermittent self-catheterization skills by a four-year-old male with myelomeningocele. The child was first taught to perform catheterization on a doll, then on himself. Skills were clustered into three tasks of diapering, cleansing, and catheterization.…

  14. Ultrasonographic diagnosis of aortic thrombosis after umbilical artery catheterization in neonate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present two cases of aortic thrombosis which developed after umbilical artery catheterization. Aortic thrombosis, one of the complications of umbilical artery catheterization can easily be diagnosed by ultrasonography, so ultrasonography would be needed as a screening study in neonate with umbilical artery catheterization.

  15. Large granular lymphocytes are universally increased in human, macaque, and feline lentiviral infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sprague, Wendy S; Apetrei, Cristian; Avery, Anne C; Peskind, Robert L; Vandewoude, Sue

    2015-10-15

    Large granular lymphocytes (LGLs) have only been anecdotally reported in HIV infection. We previously reported an LGL lymphocytosis in FIV-infected cats associated with a rise in FIV proviral loads and a marked neutropenia that persisted during chronic infection. Extensive immunophenotyping of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in cats chronically infected with FIV were identified LGLs as CD8lo(+)FAS(+); this cell population expanded commensurate with viral load. CD8lo(+)FAS(+) cells expressed similar levels of interferon-γ compared to CD8lo(+)FAS(+) cells from FIV-naive control animals, yet CD3ɛ expression, which was increased on total CD8(+) T cells in FIV-infected cats, was decreased on CD8lo(+)FAS(+) cells. Down-modulation of CD3 expression was reversed after culturing PBMC for 3 days in culture with ConA/IL-2. We identified CD8lo(+)FAS(+) LGLs to be polyclonal T cells lacking CD56 expression. Blood smears from HIV-infected individuals and SIVmac239-infected rhesus macaques revealed increased LGLs compared to HIV/SIV negative counterparts. In humans, there was no correlation with viral load or treatment and in macaques the LGLs arose in acute SIV infection with increases in viremia. This is the first report describing and partially characterizing LGL lymphocytosis in association with lentiviral infections in three different species. PMID:26292765

  16. Lipsmacking imitation skill in newborn macaques is predictive of social partner discrimination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth A Simpson

    Full Text Available Newborn rhesus macaques imitate facial gestures even after a delay, revealing the flexible nature of their early communicative exchanges. In the present study we examined whether newborn macaques are also sensitive to the identities of the social partners with whom they are interacting. We measured infant monkeys' (n = 90 lipsmacking and tongue protrusion gestures in a face-to-face interaction task with a human experimenter in the first week of life. After a one-minute delay, the same person who previously presented gestures or a different person returned and presented a still face to infants. We had two primary predictions: (1 infants would demonstrate higher rates of overall gesturing, and especially lipsmacking--an affiliative gesture--to a familiar person, compared to a novel person, and (2 infants' imitative skills would positively correlate with gestures to familiar, but not unfamiliar, social partners, as both abilities may reflect a strong general social interest. We found that overall infants did not produce more gestures or more lipsmacking when approached by a familiar person compared to a novel person; however, we did find individual differences in infants' social responsiveness: lipsmacking imitation was positively correlated with lipsmacking during the return period when the person was the same (p = .025, but not when the person was novel (p = .44. These findings are consistent with the notion that imitative skill is reflective of infants' more general interest in social interactions.

  17. Bilateral catheterization of inferior petrosal sinous: Utility in Cushing syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to present our experience on bilateral and simultaneous inferior petrous sinus catheterization, on those patients with ACTH -dependent Cushing's syndrome. We describe the procedure and our results. Material and Method: A retrospective study was held between January 2003 and September 2009, including nine patients (2 men, 7 women) presenting ACTH - dependent Cushing's syndrome. Simultaneous inferior petrosal sinus catheterization was performed in all of them, sampling basal ACTH and after CRH stimulation. ACTH levels gradient in different pituitary locations and peripheral blood levels was recorded. Diagnosis was suggested when inappropriate and maintained hypercortisolemia. High urinary free cortisol levels and no response to dexamethasone suppression were detected. Eight out of nine patients had a prior negative imaging test result. Results: Inferior petrosal sinus bilateral catheterization was successfully performed in all cases, with no evidence of further complications. The results showed definitive diagnosis in all cases. In four patients ACTH levels gradient was lateralized to the left, leading to a specific surgical approach. One patient presented pituitary ACTH - secreting adenoma. Two other patients showed ectopic ACTH production, one showed suprarenal adenoma secreting ACTH and other one showed response to pituitary stimulation without side lateralisation, presenting a histological diagnosis of pituitary hyperplasia. Conclusion: Petrosal sinus catheterization is shown to be an efficient procedure to manage Cushing's syndrome differential diagnosis and to obtain specific anatomical information.

  18. Accidental catheterization of epidural venous plexus: tomographic analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariano Paiva Souza

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Inadvertent venous catheterizations occur in approximately 9% of lumbar epidural anesthetic procedures with catheter placement and, if not promptly recognized, can result in fatal consequences. The objective of this report is to describe a case of accidental catheterization of epidural venous plexus and its recording by computed tomography with contrast injection through the catheter. CASE REPORT: A female patient in her sixties, physical status II (ASA, underwent conventional cholecystectomy under balanced general anesthesia and an epidural with catheter for postoperative analgesia. During surgery, there was clinical suspicion of accidental catheterization of epidural venous plexus because of blood backflow through the catheter, confirmed by the administration of a test dose through the catheter. After the surgery, a CT scan was obtained after contrast injection through the catheter. Contrast was observed all the way from the skin to the azygos vein, passing through anterior and posterior epidural venous plexuses and intervertebral vein. CONCLUSION: It is possible to identify the actual placement of the epidural catheter, as well as to register an accidental catheterization of the epidural venous plexus, using computed tomography with contrast injection through the epidural catheter.

  19. Cardiac Catheterization in Thoraco-Omphalocardiopagus Twins: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Minati Choudhury

    2008-01-01

    literature on the anaesthetic management of these cases is sparse. The following case report details the expert and vigilant anaesthetic management leading to successful diagnostic cardiac catheterization. The report emphasizes the importance of synchronous ventilation, teamwork and communication required in cases such as this. This case report also details the difficulties encountered and how to overcome them during the prolonged procedure.

  20. Managing Inadvertent Arterial Catheterization During Central Venous Access Procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Approximately 200,000 central venous catheterizations are carried out annually in the National Health Service in the United Kingdom. Inadvertent arterial puncture occurs in up to 3.7%. Significant morbidity and death has been reported. We report on our experience in the endovascular treatment of this iatrogenic complication. Methods: Retrospective analysis was carried out of 9 cases referred for endovascular treatment of inadvertent arterial puncture during central venous catheterization over a 5 year period. Results: It was not possible to obtain accurate figures on the numbers of central venous catheterizations carried out during the time period. Five patients were referred with carotid or subclavian pseudoaneurysms and hemothorax following inadvertent arterial catheter insertion and subsequent removal. These patients all underwent percutaneous balloon tamponade and/or stent-graft insertion. More recently 4 patients were referred with the catheter still in situ and were successfully treated with a percutaneous closure device. Conclusion: If inadvertent arterial catheterization during central venous access procedures is recognized and catheters removed, sequelae can be treated percutaneously. However, once the complication is recognized it is better to leave the catheter in situ and seal the artery percutaneously with a closure device

  1. Giant urethral stone in a patient using clean intermittant catheterization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdullah Gedik

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Urethral stone is a rare entity in clinical practice. Primary urethral stone happening directly in urethra is even rare, and it usually occurs as a result frequent urinary infection, urethral stricture and trauma.While the application of clear intermittant catheterization reliably protects bladder function, in long term use, it may cause various complications.In this case, we discussed giant urethral stone in a patient who has been acting clean intermittent catheterization regularly and without problem fort he last five years and who has had total loss of sensation in this lower extremity as a result of falling from height. Considering that the urethral calibration, in the patient acting clean intermittent catheterization is interesting, the giant urethra stone as much as examined such a case has not been presented in literature.In the patient acting clean intermittent catheterization and having loss of urethral sensation and with neurogenic bladder, we call attention to urethral pathologies the symptoms of which were seeing late

  2. Teaching Intermittent Self-Catheterization Skills to Mentally Retarded Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarnowski, Kenneth J.; Drabman, Ronald S.

    1987-01-01

    In an A-B design with replication, the efficacy of a behavioral training program for teaching two mildly retarded six-year-old children intermittent self-catheterization skills was demonstrated. Component skills were task-analyzed and trained via a graduated prompting procedure. (Author/DB)

  3. Biobehavioral consequences of prenatal exposure to a matrilineal overthrow and relocation in captive infant rhesus (Macaca mulatta) monkeys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrington, Joshua A; Del Rosso, Laura A; Capitanio, John P

    2016-09-01

    There is a general consensus that perinatal experiences help to shape infant behavior; however, relatively little is known about the effects of prenatal experience on postnatal phenotype in non-human primates. The current study sought to take advantage of a naturally occurring incident in a captive population of rhesus monkeys. Following a matrilineal overthrow in an outdoor field cage, pregnant female rhesus macaques were relocated from outdoor to indoor housing. Using data collected from the California National Primate Research Center's Biobehavioral Assessment Program, we assessed infants born to mothers that were in their first or second trimester of pregnancy during the overthrow and relocation, and compared their data with that of animals from two control groups born in the same year: indoor mother raised infants and field cage reared infants. Our results suggest that the experience of an overthrow and relocation during the first trimester elevated postnatal emotional responsiveness, while the same experience in the second trimester resulted in modified HPA axis regulation, elevated glucocorticoid output following maternal separation, and lower hematocrit levels compared to control groups. These data add to a growing body of literature that prenatal experiences represent a significant contribution to postnatal phenotypic variability. Findings such as ours have implications for studies in captive management and the management of captive rhesus monkey populations. Am. J. Primatol. 78:895-903, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27150125

  4. Oocyte loss in macaques from chronic tritiated water exposure before birth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because massive oocyte loss had been found in squirrel monkeys following low-level /sup 3/HOH exposure prenatally, two species of macaque, rhesus and bonnet monkeys (Macaca mulatta and M. radiata), were studied to test whether intense germ-cell radiosensitivity exists also in other primates before birth (hence perhaps in man). Adult females received 5 μCi/ml of /sup 3/HOH in drinking water from the time pregnancy was hormonally confirmed until shortly after parturition, giving measured body-water levels of 4 μCi/ml, delivering 0.9 rad/day. From the female offspring, ovaries were removed soon after birth and at 6 months; oocytes were enumerated in serial sections. In the newborns, germ-cell deficiencies (comparisons with controls) were about 20%, much less than seen in squirrel monkeys. By 6 months, however, losses were striking: 60% in rhesus and 95% in bonnet monkeys. Such losses, from less than 1 rad/day and seen varyingly in all three primate species examined, warn of possible high prenatal germ-cell vulnerability in the human female

  5. The utility of rhesus monkey (Macaca mulatta and other non-human primate models for preclinical testing of Leishmania candidate vaccines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Grimaldi Jr

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Leishmaniasis causes significant morbidity and mortality, constituting an important global health problem for which there are few effective drugs. Given the urgent need to identify a safe and effective Leishmania vaccine to help prevent the two million new cases of human leishmaniasis worldwide each year, all reasonable efforts to achieve this goal should be made. This includes the use of animal models that are as close to leishmanial infection in humans as is practical and feasible. Old world monkey species (macaques, baboons, mandrills etc. have the closest evolutionary relatedness to humans among the approachable animal models. The Asian rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta are quite susceptible to leishmanial infection, develop a human-like disease, exhibit antibodies to Leishmania and parasite-specific T-cell mediated immune responses both in vivo and in vitro, and can be protected effectively by vaccination. Results from macaque vaccine studies could also prove useful in guiding the design of human vaccine trials. This review summarizes our current knowledge on this topic and proposes potential approaches that may result in the more effective use of the macaque model to maximize its potential to help the development of an effective vaccine for human leishmaniasis.

  6. Simian Immunodeficiency Virus (SIV) gag DNA-Vaccinated Rhesus Monkeys Develop Secondary Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Responses and Control Viral Replication after Pathogenic SIV Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Egan, Michael A.; Charini, William A.; Kuroda, Marcelo J.; Schmitz, Jörn E.; Racz, Paul; Tenner-Racz, Klara; Manson, Kelledy; Wyand, Michael; Lifton, Michelle A.; Nickerson, Christie E.; Fu, Tongming; Shiver, John W.; Letvin, Norman L.

    2000-01-01

    The potential contribution of a plasmid DNA construct to vaccine-elicited protective immunity was explored in the simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV)/macaque model of AIDS. Making use of soluble major histocompatibility class I/peptide tetramers and peptide-specific killing assays to monitor CD8+ T-lymphocyte responses to a dominant SIV Gag epitope in genetically selected rhesus monkeys, a codon-optimized SIV gag DNA vaccine construct was shown to elicit a high-frequency SIV-specific cytotoxi...

  7. Epidurography with metrizamide in Rhesus monkeys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidurography with metrizamide was performed on 9 Rhesus monkeys; physiologic saline was substituted for metrizamide in 3 control monkeys. Metrizamide successfully outlined the epidural space without causing any adverse clinical effects or direct tissue injury. (Auth.)

  8. Intravitreal Injection of AAV2 Transduces Macaque Inner Retina

    OpenAIRE

    Yin, Lu; Greenberg, Kenneth; Hunter, Jennifer J.; Dalkara, Deniz; Kolstad, Kathleen D; Masella, Benjamin D.; Wolfe, Robert; Visel, Meike; Stone, Daniel; Libby, Richard T.; DiLoreto, David; Schaffer, David; Flannery, John; Williams, David R.; Merigan, William H.

    2011-01-01

    Intravitreally injected AAV2 transduced inner retinal cells in a restricted region at the macaque fovea. Because macaque and human eyes are similar, the results suggest a need to improve transduction methods in gene therapy for the human inner retina.

  9. ABO blood groups, rhesus factor and pemphigus

    OpenAIRE

    Valikhani Mahin; Kavand Sima; Toosi Siavash; Kavand Golnaz; Ghiasi Maryam

    2007-01-01

    Background: Pemphigus is an autoimmune blistering disease of the skin and mucous membranes with significant mortality and morbidity. Genetic factors are known to be involved in pemphigus. Several studies have reproducibly shown significant associations of ABO blood groups with various autoimmune human diseases. Aim: To study the relationship between ABO and Rhesus (D) blood groups and pemphigus in Iranian patients. Materials and Methods: Data on age, sex, ABO and Rhesus blood type and cl...

  10. Broad distribution of ataxin 1 silencing in rhesus cerebella for spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keiser, Megan S; Kordower, Jeffrey H; Gonzalez-Alegre, Pedro; Davidson, Beverly L

    2015-12-01

    Spinocerebellar ataxia type 1 is one of nine polyglutamine expansion diseases and is characterized by cerebellar ataxia and neuronal degeneration in the cerebellum and brainstem. Currently, there are no effective therapies for this disease. Previously, we have shown that RNA interference mediated silencing of ATXN1 mRNA provides therapeutic benefit in mouse models of the disease. Adeno-associated viral delivery of an engineered microRNA targeting ATXN1 to the cerebella of well-established mouse models improved motor phenotypes, neuropathy, and transcriptional changes. Here, we test the translatability of this approach in adult rhesus cerebella. Nine adult male and three adult female rhesus macaque were unilaterally injected with our therapeutic vector, a recombinant adeno-associated virus type 1 (rAAV1) expressing our RNAi trigger (miS1) and co-expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (rAAV1.miS1eGFP) into the deep cerebellar nuclei using magnetic resonance imaging guided techniques combined with a Stealth Navigation system (Medtronics Inc.). Transduction was evident in the deep cerebellar nuclei, cerebellar Purkinje cells, the brainstem and the ventral lateral thalamus. Reduction of endogenous ATXN1 messenger RNA levels were ≥30% in the deep cerebellar nuclei, the cerebellar cortex, inferior olive, and thalamus relative to the uninjected hemisphere. There were no clinical complications, and quantitative and qualitative analyses suggest that this therapeutic intervention strategy and subsequent reduction of ATXN1 is well tolerated. Collectively the data illustrate the biodistribution and tolerability of rAAV1.miS1eGFP administration to the adult rhesus cerebellum and are supportive of clinical application for spinocerebellar ataxia type 1. PMID:26490326

  11. ABO blood groups, rhesus factor and pemphigus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valikhani Mahin

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pemphigus is an autoimmune blistering disease of the skin and mucous membranes with significant mortality and morbidity. Genetic factors are known to be involved in pemphigus. Several studies have reproducibly shown significant associations of ABO blood groups with various autoimmune human diseases. Aim: To study the relationship between ABO and Rhesus (D blood groups and pemphigus in Iranian patients. Materials and Methods: Data on age, sex, ABO and Rhesus blood type and clinicopathological diagnosis of the patients with pemphigus were collected. A total of 573 patients with pemphigus were assessed for their association with ABO or Rhesus (D blood groups and compared with the normal population in the area. Results: The distribution of ABO and Rhesus blood groups in patients with pemphigus was similar to the normal local population in Iran. No relationship was found between ABO or Rhesus blood groups and the phenotype of pemphigus. Conclusion: It appears that there is no association between ABO or Rhesus (D blood groups and the frequency of pemphigus variants in comparison with normal population in Iran.

  12. Expansion of quasispecies diversity but no evidence for adaptive evolution of SHIV during rapid serial transfers among seronegative macaques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Four successive, rapid serial passages of the nonpathogenic, CCR5-tropic simian-human immunodeficiency virus SHIVSF162 in rhesus macaques resulted in an increase in acute plasma viremia with each passage and the emergence of a pathogenic isolate SHIVSF162P3 in one of the passage three transfer animals (macaque T353). To explore the mechanism(s) underlying increased virulence of SHIVSF162 upon in vivo passage, the evolution of the HIV-1 envelope gene was characterized in plasma and PBMC samples obtained from animals before (week 1) and after (week 3) the time of virus transfer. We found no evidence in support of adaptive evolution of the HIV gp120 during rapid serial passage; however, the animals which later received passage virus had more diverse quasispecies. SHIVSF162P3-like gp120 sequences were first detected in macaque T353 at week 6, after seroconversion. These sequence changes increased in frequency and number at later time points. The first sequence change conferred neutralization escape but not an increase in viral infectivity that could account for the apparent increase in replicative capacity of the later passage viruses. Collectively, our data argue against any host-specific adaptation of the HIV-1 envelope gp120 as the basis for the generation of more aggressive SHIV variants during rapid serial transfers in seronegative macaques, and support the model of quasispecies diversity as a predictor of pathogenesis. Envelope sequence changes accumulate principally in response to immune pressure exerted by the host, generating viral variants that can persist in the presence of a strong host immune response

  13. Novel Helicobacter species isolated from rhesus monkeys with chronic idiopathic colitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fox, J G; Handt, L; Xu, S; Shen, Z; Dewhirst, F E; Paster, B J; Dangler, C A; Lodge, K; Motzel, S; Klein, H

    2001-05-01

    Chronic, idiopathic diffuse colitis is a well recognised clinical and pathological entity in captive rhesus monkeys. Six rhesus monkeys were diagnosed with clinically debilitating, chronic diarrhoea. Histologically, colonic tissues were characterised as chronic, moderate to severe colitis and typhlitis, with diffuse mononuclear inflammation of lamina propria, reactive lymphoid hyperplasia and multifocal micro-abscesses. Colonic tissues were cultured for Salmonella spp. and Shigella spp.; all results were negative. Samples were negative for Clostridium difficile A and B toxins, and special stains of colonic tissue for acid-fast bacteria were also negative. The six diarrhoeic monkeys tested gave negative results for serum IgG antibodies to herpes B virus, STLV, SRV and SIV. Colonic tissue from the six diarrhoeic and two clinically normal monkeys with histologically confirmed colitis from the same colony were also subjected to micro-aerobic culture. Micro-aerobic cultures from all eight monkeys incubated at 37 degrees C and 42 degrees C revealed pinpoint or spreading colonies on antibiotic-containing media. Bacteria were identified as gram-negative, oxidase positive and urease negative. Of the nine strains characterised biochemically, two separate biotypes (corresponding to different species by 16S rRNA analysis) were identified. One biotype (type 1), from non-diarrhoeic monkeys and the second biotype (type 2) from diarrhoeic animals with subclinical chronic colonic inflammation, differed by catalase activity, ability to reduce nitrate to nitrite and sensitivity to cephalothin. Complete 16S rRNA analysis of five of the nine strains characterised biochemically indicated that the organisms isolated were two novel Helicobacter spp. By electron microscopy, these novel helicobacters had spiral morphology with bipolar sheathed flagella. This is the first report describing the isolation of novel Helicobacter spp. from inflamed colons of rhesus monkeys. Studies are needed to

  14. Inhaled oxytocin amplifies both vicarious reinforcement and self reinforcement in rhesus macaques (Macaca mulatta)

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Steve W. C.; Barter, Joseph W.; Ebitz, R. Becket; Watson, Karli K.; Platt, Michael L.

    2012-01-01

    People attend not only to their own experiences, but also to the experiences of those around them. Such social awareness profoundly influences human behavior by enabling observational learning, as well as by motivating cooperation, charity, empathy, and spite. Oxytocin (OT), a neurosecretory hormone synthesized by hypothalamic neurons in the mammalian brain, can enhance affiliation or boost exclusion in different species in distinct contexts, belying any simple mechanistic neural model. Here ...

  15. Genetic influences on behavioral inhibition and anxiety in juvenile rhesus macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Rogers, J.; Shelton, S. E.; Shelledy, W.; Garcia, R.; Kalin, N. H.

    2007-01-01

    In humans and other animals, behavioral responses to threatening stimuli are an important component of temperament. Among children, extreme behavioral inhibition elicited by novel situations or strangers predicts the subsequent development of anxiety disorders and depression. Genetic differences among children are known to affect risk of developing behavioral inhibition and anxiety, but a more detailed understanding of genetic influences on susceptibility is needed. Nonhuman primates provide ...

  16. Oral Immunization of Rhesus Macaques with Adenoviral HIV Vaccines Using Enteric-coated Capsules

    OpenAIRE

    Mercier, George T.; Pramod N. Nehete; Passeri, Marco F.; Nehete, Bharti N.; Weaver, Eric A.; Templeton, Nancy Smyth; Schluns, Kimberly; Buchl, Stephanie S.; Sastry, K. Jagannadha; Barry, Michael A.

    2007-01-01

    Targeted delivery of vaccine candidates to the gastrointestinal (GI) tract holds potential for mucosal immunization, particularly against mucosal pathogens like the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Among the different strategies for achieving targeted release in the GI tract, namely the small intestine, pH sensitive enteric coating polymers have been shown to protect solid oral dosage forms from the harsh digestive environment of the stomach and dissolve relatively rapidly in the small int...

  17. Metabolic and Endocrine Profiles in Response to Systemic Infusion of Fructose and Glucose in Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Adams, Sean H.; Stanhope, Kimber L.; Grant, Ryan W.; Cummings, Bethany P.; Havel, Peter J.

    2008-01-01

    Diurnal patterns of circulating leptin concentrations are attenuated after consumption of fructose-sweetened beverages compared with glucose-sweetened beverages, likely a result of limited postprandial glucose and insulin excursions after fructose. Differences in postprandial exposure of adipose tissue to peripheral circulating fructose and glucose or in adipocyte metabolism of the two sugars may also be involved. Thus, we compared plasma leptin concentrations after 6-h iv infusions of saline...

  18. Δ9tetrahydrocannabinol impairs visuo-spatial associative learning and spatial working memory in rhesus macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Taffe, Michael A.

    2012-01-01

    Cannabis remains the most commonly abused illicit drug and is rapidly expanding in quasi-licit use in some jurisdictions under medical marijuana laws. Effects of the psychoactive constituent Δ9tetrahydrocannabinol (Δ9THC) on cognitive function remain of pressing concern. Prior studies in monkeys have not shown consistent evidence of memory specific effects of Δ9THC on recognition tasks and it remains unclear to what extent Δ9THC causes sedative versus specific cognitive effects. In this study...

  19. Social and Nonsocial Content Differentially Modulates Visual Attention and Autonomic Arousal in Rhesus Macaques

    OpenAIRE

    Machado, Christopher J.; Eliza Bliss-Moreau; Platt, Michael L.; Amaral, David G.

    2011-01-01

    The sophisticated analysis of gestures and vocalizations, including assessment of their emotional valence, helps group-living primates efficiently navigate their social environment. Deficits in social information processing and emotion regulation are important components of many human psychiatric illnesses, such as autism, schizophrenia and social anxiety disorder. Analyzing the neurobiology of social information processing and emotion regulation requires a multidisciplinary approach that ben...

  20. Visual Phenotype Matching: Cues to Paternity Are Present in Rhesus Macaque Faces

    OpenAIRE

    Kazem, A.; Widdig, A.

    2013-01-01

    The ability to recognize kin and thus behaviourally discriminate between conspecifics based on genetic relatedness is of importance both in acquiring inclusive fitness benefits and to enable optimal inbreeding. In primates, mechanisms allowing recognition of paternal relatives are of particular interest, given that in these mating systems patrilineal information is unlikely to be available via social familiarity. Humans use visual phenotype matching based on facial features to identify their ...