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Sample records for catheter model ats

  1. Iatrogenic Bowel Injury at Exchange of Supra-Pubic Catheter

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Foran, AT

    2018-04-01

    Suprapubic catheter insertion and exchange is a common urological procedure, but it is not without risks and complications. While bowel perforation is a recognised complication at suprapubic catheter insertion, it is not commonly reported at suprapubic catheter exchange. We report our experience of recognition, diagnosis and subsequent successful management of the most important complication related to suprapubic catheters.

  2. Large-deflection statics analysis of active cardiac catheters through co-rotational modelling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng Qi; Chen Qiu; Mehndiratta, Aadarsh; I-Ming Chen; Haoyong Yu

    2016-08-01

    This paper presents a co-rotational concept for large-deflection formulation of cardiac catheters. Using this approach, the catheter is first discretized with a number of equal length beam elements and nodes, and the rigid body motions of an individual beam element are separated from its deformations. Therefore, it is adequate for modelling arbitrarily large deflections of a catheter with linear elastic analysis at the local element level. A novel design of active cardiac catheter of 9 Fr in diameter at the beginning of the paper is proposed, which is based on the contra-rotating double helix patterns and is improved from the previous prototypes. The modelling section is followed by MATLAB simulations of various deflections when the catheter is exerted different types of loads. This proves the feasibility of the presented modelling approach. To the best knowledge of the authors, it is the first to utilize this methodology for large-deflection static analysis of the catheter, which will enable more accurate control of robot-assisted cardiac catheterization procedures. Future work would include further experimental validations.

  3. Theoretical modelling, experimental studies and clinical simulations of urethral cooling catheters for use during prostate thermal therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davidson, Sean R H; Sherar, Michael D

    2003-01-01

    Urethral cooling catheters are used to prevent thermal damage to the urethra during thermal therapy of the prostate. Quantification of a catheter's heat transfer characteristics is necessary for prediction of the catheter's influence on the temperature and thermal dose distribution in periurethral tissue. Two cooling catheters with different designs were examined: the Dornier Urowave catheter and a prototype device from BSD Medical Corp. A convection coefficient, h, was used to characterize the cooling ability of each catheter. The value of the convection coefficient (h = 330 W m -2 deg C -1 for the Dornier catheter, h = 160 W m -2 deg C -1 for the BSD device) was obtained by comparing temperatures measured in a tissue-equivalent phantom material to temperatures predicted by a finite element method simulation of the phantom experiments. The coefficient was found to be insensitive to the rate of coolant flow inside the catheter between 40 and 120 ml min -1 . The convection coefficient method for modelling urethral catheters was incorporated into simulations of microwave heating of the prostate. Results from these simulations indicate that the Dornier device is significantly more effective than the BSD catheter at cooling the tissue surrounding the urethra

  4. A pilot study to assess adductor canal catheter tip migration in a cadaver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Jody C; Harrison, T Kyle; Miller, Brett; Howard, Steven K; Conroy, Myles; Udani, Ankeet; Shum, Cynthia; Mariano, Edward R

    2015-04-01

    An adductor canal catheter may facilitate early ambulation after total knee arthroplasty, but there is concern over preoperative placement since intraoperative migration of catheters may occur from surgical manipulation and result in ineffective analgesia. We hypothesized that catheter type and subcutaneous tunneling may influence tip migration for preoperatively inserted adductor canal catheters. In a male unembalmed human cadaver, 20 catheter insertion trials were divided randomly into one of four groups: flexible epidural catheter either tunneled or not tunneled; or rigid stimulating catheter either tunneled or not tunneled. Intraoperative patient manipulation was simulated by five range-of-motion exercises of the knee. Distance and length measurements were performed by a blinded regional anesthesiologist. Changes in catheter tip to nerve distance (p = 0.225) and length of catheter within the adductor canal (p = 0.467) were not different between the four groups. Two of five non-tunneled stimulating catheters (40 %) were dislodged compared to 0/5 in all other groups (p = 0.187). A cadaver model may be useful for assessing migration of regional anesthesia catheters; catheter type and subcutaneous tunneling may not affect migration of adductor canal catheters based on this preliminary study. However, future studies involving a larger sample size, actual patients, and other catheter types are warranted.

  5. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it will make the rest of the procedure pain-free. You will not feel the catheter in ... nurse if you notice any bleeding, swelling or pain at the site where the catheter entered the ...

  6. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... should inform the nurse if you notice any bleeding, swelling or pain at the site where the ... Rarely, the catheter punctures the artery, causing internal bleeding. It also is possible that the catheter tip ...

  7. Convective Leakage Makes Heparin Locking of Central Venous Catheters Ineffective Within Seconds: Experimental Measurements in a Model Superior Vena Cava.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbour, Michael C; McGah, Patrick M; Ng, Chin H; Clark, Alicia M; Gow, Kenneth W; Aliseda, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs), placed in the superior vena cava (SVC) for hemodialysis or chemotherapy, are routinely filled while not in use with heparin, an anticoagulant, to maintain patency and prevent thrombus formation at the catheter tip. The heparin-locking procedure, however, places the patient at risk for systemic bleeding, as heparin is known to leak from the catheter into the blood stream. We provide evidence from detailed in vitro experiments that shows the driving mechanism behind heparin leakage to be convective-diffusive transport due to the pulsatile flow surrounding the catheter. This novel mechanism is supported by experimental planar laser-induced fluorescence (PLIF) and particle image velocimetry (PIV) measurements of flow velocity and heparin transport from a CVC placed inside a model SVC inside a pulsatile flow loop. The results predict an initial, fast (<10 s), convection-dominated phase that rapidly depletes the concentration of heparin in the near-tip region, the region of the catheter with side holes. This is followed by a slow, diffusion-limited phase inside the catheter lumen, where the concentration is still high, that is insufficient at replenishing the lost heparin concentration in the near-tip region. The results presented here, which are consistent with previous in vivo estimates of 24 hour leakage rates, predict that the concentration of heparin in the near-tip region is essentially zero for the majority of the interdialytic phase, rendering the heparin locking procedure ineffective.

  8. In Vitro Urethra Model to Characterize The Frictional Properties of Urinary Catheters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røn, Troels; Lee, Seunghwan

    2016-01-01

    conformal sliding contacts with the catheter and high relevance to clinical catherization. With the proposed urethra model assembled in texture analyzer, the lubricity of catheters lubricated in different modes was tested. In comparison with conventional pin-on-disk tribometry, the coefficients of friction......, frictional properties of tubular devices such as catheters, endoscopes, and angioplasty balloons are particularly challenging to characterize because of non-standard shape and contact configuration. In this study, we propose that fabrication of in vitro urethra model with castable elastomers can provide...... of sliding contacts with the urethra model with unlubricated and lubricated catheters were determined. Impact of the improved bio-relevance of friction testing methods on the evaluation of various catheter materials and surface modification methods is discussed in detail....

  9. Urinary catheters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catheter - urine; Foley catheter; Indwelling catheter; Suprapubic catheters ... stones Blood infections ( septicemia ) Blood in the urine (hematuria) Kidney damage (usually only with long-term, indwelling ...

  10. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Catheter Angiography Catheter angiography uses a catheter, x-ray ... are the limitations of Catheter Angiography? What is Catheter Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test ...

  11. Mechanical Thrombectomy of Iliac Vein Thrombosis in a Pig Model Using the Rotarex and Aspirex Catheters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minko, P., E-mail: peterminko@yahoo.com; Bücker, A. [University Hospital Homburg/Saar, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Laschke, M.; Menger, M. [University Hospital Homburg/Saar, Institute of Clinical and Experimental Surgery (Germany); Bohle, R. [University Hospital Homburg/Saar, Department of Pathology (Germany); Katoh, M. [University Hospital Homburg/Saar, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

    2013-06-08

    PurposeTo investigate the efficacy and safety of mechanical thrombectomy for iliac vein thrombosis using Rotarex and Aspirex catheters in a pig model.Materials and MethodsIliac vein thrombosis was induced in six pigs by means of an occlusion-balloon catheter and thrombin injection. The presence of thrombi was verified by digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and computed tomography (CT). Thrombectomy was performed using 6F and 8F Rotarex and 6F, 8F, and 10F Aspirex catheters (Straub Medical AG, Wangs, Switzerland). After intervention, DSA and CT were repeated to evaluate the efficacy of mechanical thrombectomy and to exclude local complications. In addition, pulmonary CT was performed to rule out pulmonary embolism. Finally, all pigs were killed, and iliac veins were dissected to perform macroscopic and histological examination.ResultsThrombus induction was successfully achieved in all animals as verified by DSA and CT. Subsequent thrombectomy lead to incomplete recanalization of the iliac veins with residual thrombi in all cases. However, the use of the 6F and 8F Rotarex catheters caused vessel perforation and retroperitoneal hemorrhage in all cases. Application of the Aspirex device caused one small transmural perforation in a vessel treated with a 10F Aspirex catheter, and this was only seen microscopically. Pulmonary embolism was detected in one animal treated with the Rotarex catheters, whereas no pulmonary emboli were seen in animals treated with the Aspirex catheters.ConclusionThe Aspirex catheter allowed subtotal and safe recanalization of iliac vein thrombosis. In contrast, the use of the Rotarex catheter caused macroscopically obvious vessel perforations in all cases.

  12. Intracardiac Echocardiography Guided Transeptal Catheter Injection of Microspheres for Assessment of Cerebral Microcirculation in Experimental Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Bellapart

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of microspheres for the determination of regional microvascular blood flow (RMBF has previously used different approaches. This study presents for the first time the intracardiac injection of microspheres using transeptal puncture under intracardiac echocardiography guidance. Five Merino sheep were instrumented and cardiovascularly supported according to local guidelines. Two catheter sheaths into the internal jugular vein facilitated the introduction of an intracardiac probe and transeptal catheter, respectively. Five million colour coded microspheres were injected into the left atrium via this catheter. After euthanasia the brain was used as proof of principle and the endpoint for determination of microcirculation at different time points. Homogeneous allocation of microspheres to different regions of the brain was found over time. Alternate slices from both hemispheres showed the following flow ranges: for slice 02; 0.57–1.02 mL/min/g, slice 04; 0.45–1.42 mL/min/g, slice 06; 0.35–1.87 mL/min/g, slice 08; 0.46–1.77 mL/min/g, slice 10; 0.34–1.28 mL/min/g. A mixed effect regression model demonstrated that the confidence interval did include zero suggesting that the apparent variability intra- and intersubject was not statistically significant, supporting the stability and reproducibility of the injection technique. This study demonstrates the feasibility of the transeptal injection of microspheres, showing a homogeneous distribution of blood flow through the brain unchanged over time and has established a new interventional model for the measurement of RMBF in ovine models.

  13. Erosion of the Silicone Peritoneal Dialysis Catheter with the Use of Gentamicin Cream at the Exit Site.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardezi, Ali I; Schlageter, Karen W; Foster, Dawn M; Astor, Brad C; Chan, Micah R; Waheed, Sana

    Infection remains the leading complication of peritoneal dialysis (PD). Topical mupirocin and gentamicin are frequently used to prevent infections. Mupirocin ointment has been reported to cause damage to both polyurethane and silicone PD catheters. Gentamicin cream has not been associated with physical damage to catheters.A 64-year-old woman on PD developed relapsing peritonitis with Staphylococcus epidermidis. Because of a drainage problem and white discoloration at the exit site, which is known as " frosting," she underwent catheter exchange. The catheter was found to be fractured within the area of frosting. Four more patients with frosting of the catheter were identified. On further questioning, it was recognized that they were applying excessive amounts of gentamicin cream directly on the catheter surface rather than at the exit site. All patients in the program were educated about the correct method of topical antibiotic application. After the change in practice, no further cases of catheter frosting were identified.Polyurethane catheters can undergo oxidation, mineralization, and environmental stress cracking, leading to physical damage such frosting, ballooning, and fracture. Polyethylene glycol, a component of the mupirocin ointment base, is thought to cause plasticization of polyurethane, reducing its tensile strength. Similar damage has been observed in silicone catheters. Previous reports have not found gentamicin cream to cause that type of damage. We observed that excessive amounts of cream applied directly to the catheter surface can damage it. Damage did not recur once patients had been educated about the proper method of application.

  14. The reentry catheter: a second chance for endoluminal reentry at difficult lower extremity subintimal arterial recanalizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etezadi, Vahid; Benenati, James F; Patel, Parag J; Patel, Rahul S; Powell, Alex; Katzen, Barry T

    2010-05-01

    From January 2005 to July 2008, a retrospective study was conducted at a single institution to investigate technical success of the use of a reentry device (Outback LTD reentry catheter) in aortoiliac and femoropopliteal artery recanalization in 34 patients (18 men; mean age +/- SD, 72 years +/- 11) in whom the conventional guide wires and catheters failed to reenter the true lumen. True lumen reentry was achieved in 87% (n = 23) and 91% (n = 11) of patients with femoropopliteal and aortoiliac occlusions, respectively. The overall technical success rate with the device was 88% (n = 34). The device success rate in Transatlantic Inter-Society Consensus II class D lesions was significantly lower than in lower lesion classes (71.4% vs 100%; P < .05). No procedure-related complications were encountered. In conclusion, the use of the reentry catheter enhances the likelihood of successful subintimal recanalization of chronic occlusions in femoropopliteal and aortoiliac arteries.

  15. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... rare, and radiology departments are well-equipped to deal with them. There is a small risk that ... standard x-ray contrast. Catheter angiography should be done very cautiously—if at all—in patients who ...

  16. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. Catheter angiography ... of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. An example ...

  17. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... few millimeters) in the skin where the catheter can be inserted into an artery. The catheter is ... need for surgery. If surgery remains necessary, it can be performed more accurately. Catheter angiography presents a ...

  18. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, a thin plastic tube, called a catheter , is inserted into an ... The catheter used in angiography is a long plastic tube about as thick as a strand of ...

  19. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... using: x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, a thin plastic ... called superselective angiography. Unlike computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) angiography , use of a catheter makes it ...

  20. Comparison of Foley catheter and prostaglandin E2 tablets for the induction of labor at term

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Daneva Markova

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the paper was to assess success rates and associated maternal and fetal risks, to determine the different methods of induction for labor at term, compare induction with Foley catheter and induction with naturally occurring prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 tablets in women with gestational age at term. Two hundred and twelve women at term were included into the study, one group with Foley catheter, the second group with PGE2 tablets, with a maximum of two doses. The primary outcome measures were the admission-to-delivery interval and the induction-to-delivery interval. Secondary outcomes included cesarean section rate, mode of delivery, and maternal and neonatal safety outcome. Results were calculated by applying the Fisher’s exact test, c2-test, t-test and calculating the P-value using an alpha level of 0.05 for Type I errors. The mean time from admission to delivery was 13.53h in the Foley catheter group and 12.30h in the PGE2 group (P=0.090. The induction-to-delivery interval was also comparable between the groups (10.75h vs 9.37h, while the cesarean section rate did not differ significantly between them (7.61% vs 15.30%. More women in the misoprostol group had an instrumental delivery (12.38% vs 2.94%. The only significant difference in neonatal outcome was a larger number of babies born with Apgar score < 7 at 1 min in the Foley group. Maternal outcomes were not significantly different, except for a higher number of digital examinations in the Foley group. Foley catheter is equally efficacious in labor induction and demonstrates a similar fetal and maternal safety profile to PGE2.

  1. Efficacy of Prophylactic Antibiotics at Peritoneal Catheter Insertion on Early Peritonitis: Data from the Catheter Section of the French Language Peritoneal Dialysis Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanot, Antoine; Lobbedez, Thierry; Bechade, Clémence; Verger, Christian; Fabre, Emmanuel; Dratwa, Max; Vernier, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    International guidelines recommend the use of a prophylactic antibiotic before the peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter can be inserted. The main objective of this study was to assess whether this practice is associated with a lower risk of early peritonitis and to estimate the magnitude of the centre effect. A retrospective, multi-centric study was conducted, in which data from the French Language Peritoneal Dialysis Registry was analysed. Patients were separated into 2 groups based on whether or not prophylactic antibiotics were used prior to catheter placement. Out of the 2,014 patients who had a PD catheter placed between February 1, 2012 and December 31, 2014, 1,105 were given a prophylactic antibiotic. In a classical logit model, the use of prophylactic antibiotics was found to protect the individual against the risk of early peritonitis (OR 0.67, 95% CI 0.49-0.92). However, this association lost significance in a mixed logistic regression model with centre as a random effect: OR 0.73 (95% CI 0.48-1.09). Covariates associated with the risk of developing early peritonitis were age over 65: OR 0.73 (95% CI 0.39-0.85), body mass index over 35 kg/m2: OR 1.99 (95% CI 1.13-3.47), transfer to PD due to graft failure: OR 2.24 (95% CI 1.22-4.11), assisted PD: OR 1.96 (95% CI 1.31-2.93), and the use of the Moncrief technique: OR 3.07 (95% CI 1.85-5.11). There is a beneficial effect of prophylactic antibiotic used prior to peritoneal catheter placement, on the occurence of early peritonitis. However, the beneficial effect could be masked by a centre effect. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z Catheter Angiography Catheter angiography uses a catheter, x-ray imaging guidance and an injection of contrast material ... vessels in the body. Angiography is performed using: x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging ( ...

  3. An ovine model of cerebral catheter venography for implantation of an endovascular neural interface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oxley, Thomas James; Opie, Nicholas Lachlan; Rind, Gil Simon; Liyanage, Kishan; John, Sam Emmanuel; Ronayne, Stephen; McDonald, Alan James; Dornom, Anthony; Lovell, Timothy John Haynes; Mitchell, Peter John; Bennett, Iwan; Bauquier, Sebastien; Warne, Leon Norris; Steward, Chris; Grayden, David Bruce; Desmond, Patricia; Davis, Stephen M; O'Brien, Terence John; May, Clive N

    2018-04-01

    OBJECTIVE Neural interface technology may enable the development of novel therapies to treat neurological conditions, including motor prostheses for spinal cord injury. Intracranial neural interfaces currently require a craniotomy to achieve implantation and may result in chronic tissue inflammation. Novel approaches are required that achieve less invasive implantation methods while maintaining high spatial resolution. An endovascular stent electrode array avoids direct brain trauma and is able to record electrocorticography in local cortical tissue from within the venous vasculature. The motor area in sheep runs in a parasagittal plane immediately adjacent to the superior sagittal sinus (SSS). The authors aimed to develop a sheep model of cerebral venography that would enable validation of an endovascular neural interface. METHODS Cerebral catheter venography was performed in 39 consecutive sheep. Contrast-enhanced MRI of the brain was performed on 13 animals. Multiple telescoping coaxial catheter systems were assessed to determine the largest wide-bore delivery catheter that could be delivered into the anterior SSS. Measurements of SSS diameter and distance from the motor area were taken. The location of the motor area was determined in relation to lateral and superior projections of digital subtraction venography images and confirmed on MRI. RESULTS The venous pathway from the common jugular vein (7.4 mm) to the anterior SSS (1.2 mm) was technically challenging to selectively catheterize. The SSS coursed immediately adjacent to the motor cortex (SSS. Attempted access with 5-Fr and 6-Fr delivery catheters was associated with longer procedure times and higher complication rates. A 4-Fr catheter (internal lumen diameter 1.1 mm) was successful in accessing the SSS in 100% of cases with no associated complications. Complications included procedure-related venous dissection in two major areas: the torcular herophili, and the anterior formation of the SSS. The

  4. In vitro analysis of balloon cuffing phenomenon: inherent biophysical properties of catheter material or mechanics of catheter balloon deflation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Eric; So, Karina

    2012-06-01

    To investigates the different methods of balloon deflation, types of urinary catheters and exposure to urine media in catheter balloon cuffing. Bardex®, Bard-Lubri-Sil®, Argyle®, Releen® and Biocath® were tested in sterile and E.Coli inoculated urine at 0, 14 and 28 days. Catheter deflation was performed with active deflation; passive deflation; passive auto-deflation; and excision of the balloon inflow channel. Balloon cuffing was assessed objectively by running the deflated balloon over a plate of agar and subjectively by 3 independent observers. Bardex®, Argyle® and Biocath® showed greater degree of catheter balloon cuffing (p deflation was the worst method (p 0.05). Linear regression model analysis confirmed time as the most significant factor. The duration of catheters exposure, different deflation methods and types of catheters tested contributed significantly to catheter balloon cuffing (p < 0.01).

  5. Serratia marcescens bacteraemia outbreak in haemodialysis patients with tunnelled catheters due to colonisation of antiseptic solution. Experience at 4 hospitals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merino, José L; Bouarich, Hanane; Pita, Mª José; Martínez, Patricia; Bueno, Blanca; Caldés, Silvia; Corchete, Elena; Jaldo, Mª Teresa; Espejo, Beatriz; Paraíso, Vicente

    %) colonised by S. marcescens. Given the routine application of this antiseptic in handling catheters at these units, this was considered the source of contagion and new cases were not observed after the removal of the batches. The presence of bacteraemia due to unconventional germs should alert us to a potential outbreak. The application of a solution contaminated by S. marcescens in haemodialysis catheters was the source of bacteraemia. The intravenous antibiotic treatment and the catheter lock solution allowed an excellent survival of patients and catheters. Copyright © 2016 Sociedad Española de Nefrología. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  6. Importance of catheter contact force during irrigated radiofrequency ablation: evaluation in a porcine ex vivo model using a force-sensing catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiagalingam, Aravinda; D'Avila, Andre; Foley, Lori; Guerrero, J Luis; Lambert, Hendrik; Leo, Giovanni; Ruskin, Jeremy N; Reddy, Vivek Y

    2010-07-01

    Ablation electrode-tissue contact has been shown to be an important determinant of lesion size and safety during nonirrigated ablation but little data are available during irrigated ablation. We aimed to determine the importance of contact force during irrigated-tip ablation. Freshly excised hearts from 11 male pigs were perfused and superfused using fresh, heparinized, oxygenated swine blood in an ex vivo model. One-minute ablations were placed using one of 3 different power control strategies (impedance control-15 Omega target impedance drop, and 20 W or 30 W fixed power) and 3 different contact forces (2 g, 20 g, and 60 g) to give a grid of 9 ablation groups. The force sensing catheter (Tacticath, Endosense SA) was irrigated at 17 mL/min for all of the ablations. Of a total 101 ablations, no thrombus formation was noted but popping was seen in 17 lesions. The lesion depth and incidence of pops was 5.0 +/- 1.3 mm /0%, 5.0 +/- 1.6 mm /10% and 6.7 +/- 2.5 mm /45% for the 15 Omega, 20 W, and 30 W groups (P force: 9.7 +/- 9.9 Omega, 22.3 +/- 11.0 Omega, and 41.7 +/- 22.1 Omega, respectively, for the 2 g, 20 g, and 60 g groups (Pearson's r = 0.65, P force has an important impact on both ablation lesion size and the incidence of pops.

  7. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... incision in the skin. Once the catheter is guided to the area being examined, a contrast material ... inserted into an artery. The catheter is then guided through the arteries to the area to be ...

  8. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... an artery through a small incision in the skin. Once the catheter is guided to the area ... small incision (usually a few millimeters) in the skin where the catheter can be inserted into an ...

  9. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... catheter , is inserted into an artery through a small incision in the skin. Once the catheter is ... the tube and images are captured using a small dose of ionizing radiation ( x-rays ). top of ...

  10. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, a thin plastic tube, called a catheter , is inserted into an artery ... examined, a contrast material is injected through the tube and images are captured using a small dose ...

  11. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or other procedures such as chemoembolization or selective internal radiation therapy. identify dissection or splitting in the ... days. Rarely, the catheter punctures the artery, causing internal bleeding. It also is possible that the catheter ...

  12. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is performed using: x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, ... tumor; this is called superselective angiography. Unlike computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) angiography , use of ...

  13. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is performed using: x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, a ... tumor; this is called superselective angiography. Unlike computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) angiography , use of a ...

  14. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Catheter angiography uses a catheter, x-ray imaging guidance and an injection of contrast material to examine ... removable dental appliances, eye glasses and any metal objects or clothing that might interfere with the x- ...

  15. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... most cases, the kidneys will regain their normal function within five to seven days. Rarely, the catheter ... limitations of Catheter Angiography? Patients with impaired kidney function, especially those who also have diabetes, are not ...

  16. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... lies. The catheter used in angiography is a long plastic tube about as thick as a strand of spaghetti. top of page How does the procedure work? Catheter angiography works much the same as a ...

  17. Basic study of charring detection at the laser catheter-tip using back scattering light measurement during therapeutic laser irradiation in blood.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Mei; Ito, Arisa; Kajihara, Takuro; Matsuo, Hiroki; Arai, Tsunenori

    2010-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate transient process of the charring at the laser catheter-tip in blood during therapeutic laser irradiation by the back scattering light measurement to detect precursor state of the charring. We took account of using photodynamic therapy for arrhythmia in blood through the laser catheter. We observed the influence of the red laser irradiation (λ=663 nm) upon the shape of red blood cells (RBCs). The RBCs aggregation, round formation, and hemolysis were took place sequentially before charring. With a model blood sandwiched between glass plates simulated as a catheter-tip boundary, we measured diffuse-reflected-light power and transmitted-light power simultaneously and continuously by a microscopic optics during the laser irradiation. We found that measured light power changes were originated with RBCs shape change induced by temperature rise due to the laser irradiation. A gentle peak following a slow descending was observed in the diffuse-reflected-light power history. This history might indicate the precursor state of the charring, in which the hemolysis might be considered to advance rapidly. We think that the measurement of diffuse-reflected-light power history might be able to detect precursor state of charring at the catheter-tip in blood.

  18. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... lessen your anxiety during the procedure. The area of the groin or arm where the catheter will be inserted is shaved, ... contrast material is injected through the catheter and reaches the blood vessels being studied, several sets of x-rays are taken. Then the catheter is ...

  19. Foley Catheter for Induction of Labor at Term: An Open-Label, Randomized Controlled Trial.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ning Gu

    Full Text Available This study aimed to determine the optimal Foley catheter balloon volume (30-mL vs. 80-mL and the maximum time for cervical ripening (12 hours vs. 24 hours to improve vaginal delivery rate within 24 hours of induction.We conducted an open-label, randomized controlled trial in a teaching hospital in China. Women with a term singleton pregnancy, cephalic presentation, intact membrane and an unfavorable cervix (Bishop score <6 were randomly allocated, in 1:1:1:1 ratio, to receive either one of the four treatments: (1 30-mL balloon for a maximum of 12 hours, (2 30-mL balloon for a maximum of 24 hours, (3 80-mL balloon for a maximum of 12 hours, and (4 80-mL balloon for a maximum of 24 hours. The primary outcome was vaginal delivery within 24 hours. Secondary outcomes included cesarean section rate and maternal/neonatal morbidity. Data were analyzed on a per-protocol basis.Five hundred and four women were recruited and randomized (126 women in each group; nine women did not receive the assigned intervention. More women achieved vaginal delivery within 24 hours in 12-hour Foley catheter groups than in the 24-hour Foley catheter groups (30-mL/12 hours: 54.5%, 30-mL/24 hours: 33.1%, 80-mL/12 hours: 46.4%, 80-mL/24 hours: 24.0%, p < 0.001. Cesarean section rates and the incidence of chorioaminonitis were comparable among four groups. After adjustment for confounding factors, both ripening time and balloon size did not affect the proportion of women delivered vaginally within 24 hours of induction.For women with an unfavorable cervix at term, induction of labor with a Foley catheter is safe and effective. Higher balloon volume (80-mL vs. 30-mL and longer ripening time (24 hours vs. 12 hours would not shorten induction to delivery interval or reduce cesarean section rate.Chinese Clinical trial registry (ChiCTR-TRC-13003044.

  20. Spinal canal extension of hyperalimentation catheter without neurologic sequela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glasier, M.; Arkansas Children's Hospital, Little Rock; Hassell, D.R.

    1989-01-01

    An attempt at placement of a left femoral vein hyperalimentation catheter resulted in entrance of the catheter into the spinal canal. Catheter location was documented by injections of nonionic contrast material into the catheter without neurologic sequellae. (orig.)

  1. Evaluation of the safety of latrogenic lntestinal perforation during placement of percutaneous drainage catheter in rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choon Hyeong; Oh, Joo Hyung; Park, Ga Young; Shin, Hong Sub; Kim, In Sub; Yoon, Yup; Lee, Dong Ho; Ko, Young Tae; Choi, Woo Suk; Lim, Joo Won

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the safety of transgression of the bowel during intraperitoneal percutaneous catheter placement in an animal model. Eight 8-F straight catheters were percutaneously inserted into the small and large bowel of eight rabbits. In four animals, the catheters were left in place until autopsy, whereas in the remaining four, the catheters were withdrawn five days after insertion. Autopsy was performed in all animals ten days after catheter placement, and gross and microscopic examination was carried out. Transgressing the bowel during intraperitoneal percutaneous catheter placement did not contribute to any clinically significant complications. At autopsy, there was no bowel leakage, peritonitis, or abscess, although peritoneal adhesions were found around the catheter tract. Although further study is warranted, our study with an animal model indicated that transgression of the intestine during percutaneous placement of an intraabdominal catheter did not produce significant complications

  2. Evaluation of the safety of latrogenic lntestinal perforation during placement of percutaneous drainage catheter in rabbit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choon Hyeong; Oh, Joo Hyung; Park, Ga Young; Shin, Hong Sub; Kim, In Sub; Yoon, Yup; Lee, Dong Ho; Ko, Young Tae; Choi, Woo Suk; Lim, Joo Won [Kyunghee Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-10-01

    To evaluate the safety of transgression of the bowel during intraperitoneal percutaneous catheter placement in an animal model. Eight 8-F straight catheters were percutaneously inserted into the small and large bowel of eight rabbits. In four animals, the catheters were left in place until autopsy, whereas in the remaining four, the catheters were withdrawn five days after insertion. Autopsy was performed in all animals ten days after catheter placement, and gross and microscopic examination was carried out. Transgressing the bowel during intraperitoneal percutaneous catheter placement did not contribute to any clinically significant complications. At autopsy, there was no bowel leakage, peritonitis, or abscess, although peritoneal adhesions were found around the catheter tract. Although further study is warranted, our study with an animal model indicated that transgression of the intestine during percutaneous placement of an intraabdominal catheter did not produce significant complications.

  3. Exploring relationships of catheter-associated urinary tract infection and blockage in people with long-term indwelling urinary catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilde, Mary H; McMahon, James M; Crean, Hugh F; Brasch, Judith

    2017-09-01

    To describe and explore relationships among catheter problems in long-term indwelling urinary catheter users, including excess healthcare use for treating catheter problems. Long-term urinary catheter users experience repeated problems with catheter-related urinary tract infection and blockage of the device, yet little has been reported of the patterns and relationships among relevant catheter variables. Secondary data analysis was conducted from a sample in a randomised clinical trial, using data from the entire sample of 202 persons over 12 months' participation. Descriptive statistics were used to characterise the sample over time. Zero-inflated negative binomial models were employed for logistic regressions to evaluate predictor variables of the presence/absence and frequencies of catheter-related urinary tract infection and blockage. Catheter-related urinary tract infection was marginally associated with catheter blockage. Problems reported at least once per person in the 12 months were as follows: catheter-related urinary tract infection 57%, blockage 34%, accidental dislodgment 28%, sediment 87%, leakage (bypassing) 67%, bladder spasms 59%, kinks/twists 42% and catheter pain 49%. Regression analysis demonstrated that bladder spasms were significantly related to catheter-related urinary tract infection and sediment amount, and catheter leakages were marginally significantly and positively related to catheter-related urinary tract infection. Frequencies of higher levels of sediment and catheter leakage were significantly associated with higher levels of blockage, and being female was associated with fewer blockages. Persons who need help with eating (more disabled) were also more likely to have blockages. Catheter-related urinary tract infection and blockage appear to be related and both are associated with additional healthcare expenditures. More research is needed to better understand how to prevent adverse catheter outcomes and patterns of problems in

  4. Number and location of drainage catheter side holes: in vitro evaluation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballard, D H; Alexander, J S; Weisman, J A; Orchard, M A; Williams, J T; D'Agostino, H B

    2015-09-01

    To evaluate the influence of number and location of catheter shaft side holes regarding drainage efficiency in an in vitro model. Three different drainage catheter models were constructed: open-ended model with no side holes (one catheter), unilateral side hole model (six catheters with one to six unilateral side holes), and bilateral side hole model (six catheters with one to six bilateral side holes). Catheters were inserted into a drainage output-measuring device with a constant-pressure reservoir of water. The volume of water evacuated by each of the catheters at 10-second intervals was measured. A total of five trials were performed for each catheter. Data were analysed using one-way analysis of variance. The open-ended catheter had a mean drainage volume comparable to the unilateral model catheters with three, four, and five side holes. Unilateral model catheters had significant drainage volume increases up to three side holes; unilateral model catheters with more than three side holes had no significant improvement in drainage volume. All bilateral model catheters had significantly higher mean drainage volumes than their unilateral counterparts. There was no significant difference between the mean drainage volume with one, two, or three pairs of bilateral side holes. Further, there was no drainage improvement by adding additional bilateral side holes. The present in vitro study suggests that beyond a critical side hole number threshold, adding more distal side holes does not improve catheter drainage efficiency. These results may be used to enhance catheter design towards improving their drainage efficiency. Copyright © 2015 The Royal College of Radiologists. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Catheter Angiography Catheter angiography ...

  6. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is injected through the catheter and reaches the blood vessels being studied, several sets of x-rays are taken. Then the catheter is removed and the incision site is closed by applying pressure on the area for approximately 10 to 20 ...

  7. Effects of a catheter-associated urinary tract infection prevention campaign on infection rate, catheter utilization, and health care workers' perspective at a community safety net hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray, Dorinne; Nussle, Richard; Cruz, Abner; Kane, Gail; Toomey, Michael; Bay, Curtis; Ostovar, Gholamabbas Amin

    2016-01-01

    Preventing catheter-associated urinary tract infections is in the forefront of health care quality. However, nurse and physician engagement is a common barrier in infection prevention efforts. After implementation of a multidisciplinary catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) prevention campaign, we studied the impact of our campaign and showed its association with reducing the CAUTI rate and catheter utilization and the positive effect on health care workers' engagement and perspectives. CAUTI prevention campaigns can lead to lower infection rates and change health care workers' perspective. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Urinary catheter - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladder catheter - infants; Foley catheter - infants; Urinary catheter - neonatal ... A urinary catheter is a small, soft tube placed in the bladder. This article addresses urinary catheters in babies. WHY IS ...

  9. Navigation of guidewires and catheters in the body during intervention procedures : A review of computer-based models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sharei Amarghan, H.; Alderliesten, Tanja; van den Dobbelsteen, J.J.; Dankelman, J.

    2018-01-01

    Guidewires and catheters are used during minimally invasive interventional procedures to traverse in vascular system and access the desired position. Computer models are increasingly being used to predict the behavior of these instruments. This information can be used to choose the right

  10. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the American College of Radiology (ACR) and the European Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available ... will regain their normal function within five to seven days. Rarely, the catheter punctures the artery, causing ...

  11. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. An example is finding an area of severe arterial narrowing, ... contrast material, your radiologist may advise that you take special medication for 24 hours before catheter angiography ...

  12. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. Catheter angiography produces very detailed, clear and ... possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. An example is finding an area of ...

  13. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... you are pregnant and discuss any recent illnesses, medical conditions, medications you're taking and allergies, especially ... is Catheter Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical ...

  14. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... spaghetti. top of page How does the procedure work? Catheter angiography works much the same as a ... angiogram may be performed in less than an hour; however, it may last several hours. top of ...

  15. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... a catheter, x-ray imaging guidance and an injection of contrast material to examine blood vessels in ... technologies and, in most cases, a contrast material injection is needed to produce pictures of blood vessels ...

  16. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... far outweighs the risk. If you have a history of allergy to x-ray contrast material, your ... Angiography (CTA) X-ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Catheter Angiography Sponsored ...

  17. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... spaghetti. top of page How does the procedure work? Catheter angiography works much the same as a ... and x-rays. Manufacturers of intravenous contrast indicate mothers should not breastfeed their babies for 24-48 ...

  18. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... atherosclerosis (plaque). The use of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a ... the aorta in the chest or abdomen or its major branches. show the extent and severity of ...

  19. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Interventional radiologist performing an angiography exam View ... ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Catheter Angiography Sponsored by Please note ...

  20. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... examine blood vessels in key areas of the body for abnormalities such as aneurysms and disease such ... to produce pictures of blood vessels in the body. Angiography is performed using: x-rays with catheters ...

  1. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... 20 minutes (or by using a special closure device). When the examination is complete, you may be ... contrast material, your radiologist may advise that you take special medication for 24 hours before catheter angiography ...

  2. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... rays ). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Catheter angiography is used to ... community, you can search the ACR-accredited facilities database . This website does not provide cost information. The ...

  3. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... spaghetti. top of page How does the procedure work? Catheter angiography works much the same as a ... possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. An example is finding an area of ...

  4. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Once the catheter is guided to the area being examined, a contrast material is injected through the ... You should inform your physician of any medications being taken and if there are any allergies, especially ...

  5. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Catheter Angiography ...

  6. Endovascular brain intervention and mapping in a dog experimental model using magnetically-guided micro-catheter technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Tomas; Leinveber, Pavel; Vlasin, Michal; Jurak, Pavel; Novak, Miroslav; Novak, Zdenek; Chrastina, Jan; Czechowicz, Krzysztof; Belehrad, Milos; Asirvatham, Samuel J

    2014-06-01

    Despite the substantial progress that has been achieved in interventional cardiology and cardiac electrophysiology, endovascular intervention for the diagnosis and treatment of central nervous system (CNS) disorders such as stroke, epilepsy and CNS malignancy is still limited, particularly due to highly tortuous nature of the cerebral arterial and venous system. Existing interventional devices and techniques enable only limited and complicated access especially into intra-cerebral vessels. The aim of this study was to develop a micro-catheter magnetically-guided technology specifically designed for endovascular intervention and mapping in deep CNS vascular structures. Mapping of electrical brain activity was performed via the venous system on an animal dog model with the support of the NIOBE II system. A novel micro-catheter specially designed for endovascular interventions in the CNS, with the support of the NIOBE II technology, was able to reach safely deep intra-cerebral venous structures and map the electrical activity there. Such structures are not currently accessible using standard catheters. This is the first study demonstrating successful use of a new micro-catheter in combination with NIOBE II technology for endovascular intervention in the brain.

  7. Infraclavicular versus axillary nerve catheters: A retrospective comparison of early catheter failure rate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Quast, Michaela B; Sviggum, Hans P; Hanson, Andrew C; Stoike, David E; Martin, David P; Niesen, Adam D

    2018-05-01

    Continuous brachial plexus catheters are often used to decrease pain following elbow surgery. This investigation aimed to assess the rate of early failure of infraclavicular (IC) and axillary (AX) nerve catheters following elbow surgery. Retrospective study. Postoperative recovery unit and inpatient hospital floor. 328 patients who received IC or AX nerve catheters and underwent elbow surgery were identified by retrospective query of our institution's database. Data collected included unplanned catheter dislodgement, catheter replacement rate, postoperative pain scores, and opioid administration on postoperative day 1. Catheter failure was defined as unplanned dislodging within 24 h of placement or requirement for catheter replacement and evaluated using a covariate adjusted model. 119 IC catheters and 209 AX catheters were evaluated. There were 8 (6.7%) failed IC catheters versus 13 (6.2%) failed AX catheters. After adjusting for age, BMI, and gender there was no difference in catheter failure rate between IC and AX nerve catheters (p = 0.449). These results suggest that IC and AX nerve catheters do not differ in the rate of early catheter failure, despite differences in anatomic location and catheter placement techniques. Both techniques provided effective postoperative analgesia with median pain scores < 3/10 for patients following elbow surgery. Reasons other than rate of early catheter failure should dictate which approach is performed. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. FACTORS AND COMPLICATIONS AFFECTING CATHETER AND TECHNIQUE SURVIVAL WITH PERMANENT SINGLE-LUMEN DIALYSIS CATHETERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEMEESTER, J; VANHOLDER, R; DEROOSE, J; RINGOIR, S

    1994-01-01

    This long-term study on the outcome of permanent silicone single-lumen dialysis catheters consisted of 43 surgically inserted catheters in 33 patients. All catheters were attached to a pressure-pressure single-cannula dialysis system. Technique and catheter survival were 80 and 59% at 1 year, and 63

  9. Analysis of risk factors and the establishment of a risk model for peripherally inserted central catheter thrombosis

    OpenAIRE

    Fang Hu; Ruo-Nan Hao; Jie Zhang; Zhi-Cheng Ma

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the main risk factors of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) related upper extremity deep venous thrombosis and establish the risk predictive model of PICC-related upper extremity deep venous thrombosis. Methods: Patients with PICC who were hospitalized between January 2014 and July 2015 were studied retrospectively; they were divided into a thrombosis group (n = 52), with patients who had a venous thrombosis complication after PICC, and a no-thrombosis ...

  10. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... key areas of the body for abnormalities such as aneurysms and disease such as atherosclerosis (plaque). The use of a catheter makes ... including the: brain neck heart chest abdomen (such as the kidneys and liver) pelvis legs and feet ...

  11. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Catheter Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  12. Feasibility of Endovascular Radiation Therapy Using Holmium-166 Filled Balloon Catheter in a Swine Hemodialysis Fistula Model: Preliminary Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Won, Jong Yun; Lee, Kwang Hun; Lee, Do Yun [Dept. of Radiology, Research Institute of Radiological Science, Yensei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Myoung Soo [Dept. of Radiology, Yensei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Byung Chul [Dept. of Radiology, Internal Medicine, EwhaWoman' s University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seung Jung [Dept. of Internal Medicine, EwhaWoman' s University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-08-15

    To describe how to make a swine hemodialysis fistula model and report our initial experience to test the feasibility of endovascular radiation therapy with Holmium-166 filled balloon catheters. The surgical formation of arterio-venous fistula (AVF) was performed by end-to-side anastomosis of the bilateral jugular vein and carotid artery of 6 pigs. After 4 weeks, angiograms were taken and endovascular radiation was delivered to the venous side of AVF with Holmium-166 filled balloon catheters. Pigs were sacrificed 4 weeks after the radiation and AVFs were harvested for histological examination. All animals survived without any morbidity during the experimental periods. The formation of fistula on the sides of necks was successful in 11 of the 12 pigs (92%). One AVF failed from the small jugular vein. On angiograms, 4 of the 11 AVFs showed total occlusion or significant stenosis and therefore, endovascular radiation could not be performed. Of 7 eligible AVFs, five underwent successful endovascular radiation and two AVFs did not undergo radiation for the control. Upon histologic analysis, one non-radiated AVF showed total occlusion and others showed intimal thickening from the neointimal hyperplasia. Formation of the swine carotid artery-jugular vein hemodialysis fistula model was successful. Endovascular radiation using a Holmium-166 filled balloon catheter was safe and feasible.

  13. Cardiac catheterization and percutaneus catheter in grown-up congenital heart diseases: single center experience at developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luh G.A.P. Dewi

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: Grown-up congenital heart disease (GUCH patients are unique and challenges especially at developing country. The numbers of diagnostic as well as interventional cardiac catheterization procedures in GUCH patients are growing. The aim of this study was to report the outcome of cardiac catheterization including intervention procedure in GUCH.Methods: The descriptive study was conducted at Sanglah Hospital, Denpasar, Bali, Indonesia. All patients (age of more than 12 years who underwent cardiac catheterization from 2011 until 2017 were included in this study. Patients, characteristic, types of catheter procedures, immediate complications, and outcomes were documented.Results: A total 54 subjects were included with median age of 23 years and 70% were female. The first symptom that brought patients to hospital is dyspnea 46% and palpitation 32%. Five subjects underwent a diagnostic catheter procedure and 49 (91% diagnostic and catheter based interventions. Transcatheter interventions procedures included atrial septal defect (ASD (success rate of 20 per 21, patent ductus arteriosus (PDA (success rate of 16 per16, ventricular septal defect (VSD (success rate of  9 per 9, pulmonal stenosis (PS (success rate of 1 per 2, and aortic stenosis (AS (success rate of 1 per 1. The complications encountered were transient dysrhythmias in 15 subjects, device embolization in 4 subjects, massive bleeding in 1 subject, and overall mortality in 2 subjects.Conclusion: The number of the catheterization interventions in GUCH was 91% and ASD device closure was the most common procedure. Transcatheter intervention has a high procedural success rates (96% and low procedural-related complications.

  14. Malfunctioning and infected tunneled infusion catheters: over-the-wire catheter exchange versus catheter removal and replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttmann, David M; Trerotola, Scott O; Clark, Timothy W; Dagli, Mandeep; Shlansky-Goldberg, Richard D; Itkin, Maxim; Soulen, Michael C; Mondschein, Jeffrey I; Stavropoulos, S William

    2011-05-01

    To compare the safety and effectiveness of over-the-wire catheter exchange (catheter-exchange) with catheter removal and replacement (removal-replacement) at a new site for infected or malfunctioning tunneled infusion catheters. Using a quality assurance database, 61 patients with tunneled infusion catheters placed during the period July 2001 to June 2009 were included in this study. Patients receiving hemodialysis catheters were excluded. Catheter-exchange was performed in 25 patients, and same-day removal-replacement was performed in 36 patients. Data collected included demographic information, indication for initial catheter placement and replacement, dwell time for the new catheter, and ultimate fate of the new device. Statistical comparisons between the two cohorts were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier technique and Fisher exact test. Catheters exchanged over the wire remained functional without infection for a median of 102 days (range, 2-570 days), whereas catheters removed and replaced were functional for a median 238 days (range, 1-292 days, P = .12). After catheter replacement, there were 11 instances of subsequent infection in the catheter-exchange group and 7 instances in the removal-replacement cohort, accounting for infection rates of 4.4 and 2.3 per 1,000 catheter days (P = .049). Patients in the catheter-exchange group had 3.2 greater odds of infection compared with patients in the removal-replacement group. Five malfunction events occurred in each group, accounting for 2.0 and 1.7 malfunctions per 1,000 catheter days in the catheter-exchange and removal-replacement groups (P = .73). Catheter-exchange of tunneled infusion catheters results in a higher infection rate compared with removal-replacement at a new site. The rate of catheter malfunction is not significantly different between the two groups. Catheter-exchange is an alternative for patients with tunneled infusion catheters who have limited venous access, but this technique should not be

  15. Epidural Catheter Breakage In-Situ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Geetanjali S Verma

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A 45yr old woman diagnosed with dysfunctional uterine bleeding and incisional hernia was planned for total abdominal hysterectomy with bilateral salpingo-oophorectomy and mesh repair under combined spinal and epidural anaesthesia. Using VYGON® epidural catheter with its recommended introducer, the catheter was inserted but it snapped off at 11cm mark while positioning the catheter. After radiological confirmation, the neurosurgeon removed the catheter under general anaesthesia, which was followed by the scheduled surgery.

  16. Indwelling catheter care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley catheter ... You will need to make sure your indwelling catheter is working properly. You will also need to ... not get an infection or skin irritation. Make catheter and skin care part of your daily routine. ...

  17. Modification of conservative treatment of heterotopic cervical pregnancy by Foley catheter balloon fixation with cerclage sutures at the level of the external cervical os: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vujisic Sanja

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Conservative treatment of a heterotopic cervical pregnancy was performed with a modification of the fixation of a Foley catheter at the level of the external cervical os, followed by the ligature of the descending cervical branches of the uterine arteries and systemic methotrexate application. Case presentation A 34-year-old Caucasian woman was diagnosed with double gestation after 6 weeks of in vitro fertilization treatment. A gynecological examination and color Doppler ultrasound scan revealed intra-uterine and cervical gestational sacs both containing live fetuses. A Foley catheter balloon was inserted into the cervical canal, inflated and fixed by a cerclage suture at the level of the external cervical os, followed by ligation of the descending cervical branches of the uterine arteries. Systemic methotrexate was applied. Three days after removal of the Foley catheter, an evacuation of the intra-uterine gestational sac was performed. Hemorrhage from the implantation site was controlled immediately and a pregnancy termination was successfully performed. The procedure was uneventful and our patient was discharged with a preserved uterus. Conclusions Conservative treatment of cervical pregnancy using a Foley catheter balloon is more efficacious if the Foley catheter balloon is attached in the correct position with a cerclage suture at the level of the external os, followed by ligation of the descending cervical branches of the uterine arteries, thereby exerting maximal pressure on the bleeding vessels.

  18. The establishment of implanted VX2 liver tumor model in rabbits and discussion on superselective left hepatic arterial catheterization with micro-catheter technique via femoral artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jiang Xiongying; Luo Rongguang; Huang Jinhua; Miao Bijian; Wang Yan

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To establish the implanted VX2 liver tumor model in rabbits and to discuss the feasibility and technical features of superselective left hepatic arterial catheterization by using micro-catheter through the femoral artery catheter sheath. Methods: Forty New Zealand white rabbits were inoculated with fragments of VX2 tumor into the medial left lobe of liver by using a 16G lumbar puncture needle through laparotomy route. Two weeks later, all the rabbits were proved to be successfully inoculated with liver neoplasm on CT scanning. Then, the catheter sheath was inserted into one of the femoral arteries, which was followed by celiac artery angiography and left hepatic artery catheterization with a micro-catheter under DSA guidance in order to evaluate the main branches of celiac artery and the imaging manifestations of VX2 liver tumor. After that, some scheduled interventional experiments were carried out. Results: Imaging examination and histopathologic study showed that the successful rate of implanted rabbit VX2 liver tumor was 100% (40/40). And the successful rate of the catheter sheath inserted to femoral artery was 97.5% (39/40). The successful rate of celiac artery, gastro-hepatic artery, common hepatic artery, proper hepatic artery and left hepatic artery catheterizations was 100% (39/39), 100% (39/39), 100% (39/39), 94.9% (37/39) and 71.2% (28/39) respectively. Conclusion: To implant tumor tissue mass through laparotomy is a stable and reliable method to establish rabbit VX2 liver tumor model. The insertion of micro-catheter through rabbit femoral catheter sheath approach is a convenient and simple technique to be carried out for the left hepatic artery catheterization and it can efficiently solve the technical difficulties when performing the interventional treatment of the rabbit VX2 hepatic tumor via left hepatic artery approach. (authors)

  19. Button self-retaining drainage catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caridi, James G.; Hawkins, Irvin F.; Akins, E. William; Young, Ronald S.

    1997-01-01

    To help improve patient acceptance of long-term internal/external catheter access to the biliary tract in those with benign biliary obstruction, a simple design allows the catheter end to remain flush with the skin. It consists of a clothes button affixed to the drainage catheter with a wood screw after the catheter has been cut off at the skin exit. This button/screw device has been used successfully in 22 patients over the last 10 years; catheter exchanges were easily accomplished

  20. A computational fluid dynamics simulation framework for ventricular catheter design optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weisenberg, Sofy H; TerMaath, Stephanie C; Barbier, Charlotte N; Hill, Judith C; Killeffer, James A

    2017-11-10

    OBJECTIVE Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) shunts are the primary treatment for patients suffering from hydrocephalus. While proven effective in symptom relief, these shunt systems are plagued by high failure rates and often require repeated revision surgeries to replace malfunctioning components. One of the leading causes of CSF shunt failure is obstruction of the ventricular catheter by aggregations of cells, proteins, blood clots, or fronds of choroid plexus that occlude the catheter's small inlet holes or even the full internal catheter lumen. Such obstructions can disrupt CSF diversion out of the ventricular system or impede it entirely. Previous studies have suggested that altering the catheter's fluid dynamics may help to reduce the likelihood of complete ventricular catheter failure caused by obstruction. However, systematic correlation between a ventricular catheter's design parameters and its performance, specifically its likelihood to become occluded, still remains unknown. Therefore, an automated, open-source computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation framework was developed for use in the medical community to determine optimized ventricular catheter designs and to rapidly explore parameter influence for a given flow objective. METHODS The computational framework was developed by coupling a 3D CFD solver and an iterative optimization algorithm and was implemented in a high-performance computing environment. The capabilities of the framework were demonstrated by computing an optimized ventricular catheter design that provides uniform flow rates through the catheter's inlet holes, a common design objective in the literature. The baseline computational model was validated using 3D nuclear imaging to provide flow velocities at the inlet holes and through the catheter. RESULTS The optimized catheter design achieved through use of the automated simulation framework improved significantly on previous attempts to reach a uniform inlet flow rate distribution using

  1. An in-vitro urinary catheterization model that approximates clinical conditions for evaluation of innovations to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, R Y R; Lim, K; Leong, S S J; Tambyah, P A; Ho, B

    2017-09-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) account for approximately 25% of nosocomial infections globally, and often result in increased morbidity and healthcare costs. An additional concern is the presence of microbial biofilms which are major reservoirs of bacteria, especially antibiotic-resistant bacteria, in catheters. Since introduction of the use of closed drainage systems, innovations to combat CAUTI have not led to significant improvements in clinical outcomes. The lack of a robust laboratory platform to test new CAUTI preventive strategies may impede development of novel technologies. To establish an in-vitro catheterization model (IVCM) for testing of technological innovations to prevent CAUTI. The IVCM consists of a continuous supply of urine medium flowing into a receptacle (bladder) where the urine is drained through a urinary catheter connected to an effluent collection vessel (drainage bag). Test organism(s) can be introduced conveniently into the bladder via a rubber septa port. Development of bacteriuria and microbial biofilm on the catheter can be determined subsequently. With an initial inoculum of Escherichia coli [∼5×10 5  colony-forming units (cfu)/mL] into the bladder, a 100% silicone catheter and a commercially available silver-hydrogel catheter showed heavy biofilm colonization (∼10 8  cfu/cm and ∼10 7  cfu/cm, respectively) with similar bacterial populations in the urine (bacteriuria) (∼10 8  cfu/mL and ∼10 7  cfu/mL, respectively) within three days. Interestingly, an antimicrobial peptide (CP11-6A)-coated catheter showed negligible biofilm colonization and no detectable bacteriuria. The IVCM is a useful preclinical approach to evaluate new strategies for the prevention of CAUTI. Copyright © 2017 The Healthcare Infection Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Flow Rate Through Pigtail Catheter Used for Left Heart Decompression in an Artificial Model of Extracorporeal Membrane Oxygenation Circuit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Won Ho; Hong, Tae Hee; Byun, Joung Hun; Kim, Jong Woo; Kim, Sung Hwan; Moon, Sung Ho; Park, Hyun Oh; Choi, Jun Young; Yang, Jun Ho; Jang, In Seok; Lee, Chung Eun; Yun, Jeong Hee

    In refractory cardiogenic shock, veno-arterial extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) can be initiated. Although left heart decompression can be accomplished by insertion of a left atrial (LA) or left ventricular (LV) cannula using a percutaneous pigtail catheter, the venting flow rate according to catheter size and ECMO flow rate is unknown. We developed an artificial ECMO circuit. One liter saline bag with its pressure set to 20 mm Hg was connected to ECMO to mimic LV failure. A pigtail catheter was inserted into the 1 L saline bag to simulate LV unloading. For each pigtail catheter size (5-8 Fr) and ECMO flow rate (2.0-4.0 L/min), the moving distance of an air bubble that was injected through a three-way stopcock was measured in the arterial pressure line between the pigtail catheter and ECMO inflow limb. The flow rate was then calculated. We obtained the following equation to estimate the pigtail catheter flow rate.Pigtail vent catheter flow rate (ml/min) = 8×ECMOflow rate(L /min)+9×pigtail catheter size(Fr)- 57This equation would aid in designing of a further study to determine optimal venting flow rate. To achieve optimal venting flow, our equation would enable selection of an adequate catheter size.

  3. Real-time monitoring of spinal cord blood flow with a novel sensor mounted on a cerebrospinal fluid drainage catheter in an animal model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayatsu, Yukihiro; Kawamoto, Shunsuke; Matsunaga, Tadao; Haga, Yoichi; Saiki, Yoshikatsu

    2014-10-01

    The aim of our study was to develop a novel monitoring system for spinal cord blood flow (SCBF) to test the efficacy of the SCBF sensor in an animal model. The sensor system consisted of 2 optical fibers, a pedestal for fiber fixation, and a mirror for the laser reflection and was incorporated into a cerebrospinal fluid drainage catheter. In vivo studies were performed in a swine model (n=10) to measure SCBF during spinal cord ischemia induced by clamping the descending thoracic aorta and supra-aortic neck vessels, when necessary. A temporary low cardiac output model was also created by inflow clamping of the inferior vena cava to analyze the quantitative changes in SCBF during this maneuver. The developed SCBF monitoring catheter placed intrathecally could detect SCBF in all the swine. The SCBF after aortic crossclamping at the fourth intercostal level exhibited diverse changes reproducibly among the swine, with a >25% reduction in SCBF in 5 pigs, an increase in 3, and no significant changes in 2. Consistent reductions were recorded during inferior vena cava occlusion. The mean SCBF decreased by 32% after inferior vena cava occlusion when the cardiac output had decreased by 27%. We have developed a novel SCBF sensor that could detect real-time changes in spinal cord perfusion in a swine model. The device holds promise to detect imminent ischemia or ensure acceptable blood perfusion in the spinal cord and could further enhance our understanding of spinal cord circulation. Copyright © 2014 The American Association for Thoracic Surgery. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Induction of labour with a Foley catheter or oral misoprostol at term : the PROBAAT-II study, a multicentre randomised controlled trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    ten Eikelder, Mieke L. G.; Neervoort, Femke; Rengerink, Katrien Oude; Jozwiak, Marta; de Leeuw, Jan-Willem; de Graaf, Irene; van Pampus, Maria G.; Franssen, Maureen; Oudijk, Martijn; van der Salm, Paulien; Woiski, Mallory; Pernet, Paula J. M.; Feitsma, A. Hanneke; van Vliet, Huib; Porath, Martina; Roumen, Frans; van Beek, Erik; Versendaal, Hans; Heres, Marion; Mol, Ben Willem J.; Bloemenkamp, Kitty W. M.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Induction of labour is a common obstetric procedure. At present, different methods are used for induction of labour in women with an unfavourable cervix. Recently, we showed that in term women with an unfavorable cervix the use of a Foley catheter in comparison with vaginal Prostaglandin

  5. Clinical study of the Erlanger silver catheter--data management and biometry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martus, P; Geis, C; Lugauer, S; Böswald, M; Guggenbichler, J P

    1999-01-01

    The clinical evaluation of venous catheters for catheter-induced infections must conform to a strict biometric methodology. The statistical planning of the study (target population, design, degree of blinding), data management (database design, definition of variables, coding), quality assurance (data inspection at several levels) and the biometric evaluation of the Erlanger silver catheter project are described. The three-step data flow included: 1) primary data from the hospital, 2) relational database, 3) files accessible for statistical evaluation. Two different statistical models were compared: analyzing the first catheter only of a patient in the analysis (independent data) and analyzing several catheters from the same patient (dependent data) by means of the generalized estimating equations (GEE) method. The main result of the study was based on the comparison of both statistical models.

  6. Cerebrospinal Fluid Leak at Percutaneous Exit of Ventricular Catheter as a Crucial Risk Factor for External Ventricular Drainage-Related Infection in Adult Neurosurgical Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jaechan; Choi, Yeon-Ju; Ohk, Boram; Chang, Hyun-Ha

    2018-01-01

    The placement of a ventricular catheter for temporary cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) diversion is associated with a considerable risk of CSF infection. The authors investigated the effect of a CSF leak on CSF-related infection and the predisposing factors for a CSF leak. Fifty-two patients who underwent external ventricular drainage (EVD) for acute hydrocephalus associated with a subarachnoid hemorrhage or intraventricular hemorrhage (IVH) were enrolled in this prospective study. A CSF leak-detection paper (small sterilized filter paper) was applied at the percutaneous catheter exit site to check for any bloody CSF leak. In addition, radiologic and clinical data were collected. Four of the 52 patients (7.7%) developed an EVD-related CSF infection from organisms including Staphylococcus epidermidis (n = 3) and Staphylococcus hominis (n = 1). A prolonged CSF leak >1 day was detected in 9 patients (17.3%) and revealed as a significant risk factor for CSF infection with a 44.4% positive predictive value. Moreover, an IVH >10 mL was found in 11 patients (21.2%) and revealed as a significant predisposing factor for a CSF leak at the percutaneous catheter exit. A prolonged CSF leak for >1 day at the percutaneous catheter exit site is a crucial risk factor for EVD-related CSF infection and an IVH >10 mL is a predisposing factor for a CSF leak. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Catheter indwell time and phlebitis development during peripheral intravenous catheter administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasalioglu, Kadriye Burcu; Kaya, Hatice

    2014-07-01

    Intravenous catheters have been indispensable tools of modern medicine. Although intravenous applications can be used for a multitude of purposes, these applications may cause complications, some of which have serious effects. Of these complications, the most commonly observed is phlebitis. This study was conducted to determine the effect of catheter indwell time on phlebitis development during peripheral intravenous catheter administration. This study determined the effect of catheter indwell time on phlebitis development during peripheral intravenous catheter administration. The study included a total of 103 individuals who were administered 439 catheters and satisfied the study enrollment criteria at one infectious diseases clinic in Istanbul/Turkey. Data were compiled from Patient Information Forms, Peripheral Intravenous Catheter and Therapy Information Forms, reported grades based on the Visual Infusion Phlebitis Assessment Scale, and Peripheral Intravenous Catheter Nurse Observation Forms. The data were analyzed using SPSS. Results : The mean patient age was 53.75±15.54 (standard deviation) years, and 59.2% of the study participants were men. Phlebitis was detected in 41.2% of peripheral intravenous catheters, and the rate decreased with increased catheter indwell time. Analyses showed that catheter indwell time, antibiotic usage, sex, and catheterization sites were significantly associated with development of phlebitis. The results of this study show that catheters can be used for longer periods of time when administered under optimal conditions and with appropriate surveillance.

  8. Chitin biological absorbable catheters bridging sural nerve grafts transplanted into sciatic nerve defects promote nerve regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Yong; Wang, Jian-Wei; Qin, Li-Hua; Zhang, Wei-Guang; Zhang, Pei-Xun; Jiang, Bao-Guo

    2018-06-01

    To investigate the efficacy of chitin biological absorbable catheters in a rat model of autologous nerve transplantation. A segment of sciatic nerve was removed to produce a sciatic nerve defect, and the sural nerve was cut from the ipsilateral leg and used as a graft to bridge the defect, with or without use of a chitin biological absorbable catheter surrounding the graft. The number and morphology of regenerating myelinated fibers, nerve conduction velocity, nerve function index, triceps surae muscle morphology, and sensory function were evaluated at 9 and 12 months after surgery. All of the above parameters were improved in rats in which the nerve graft was bridged with chitin biological absorbable catheters compared with rats without catheters. The results of this study indicate that use of chitin biological absorbable catheters to surround sural nerve grafts bridging sciatic nerve defects promotes recovery of structural, motor, and sensory function and improves muscle fiber morphology. © 2018 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  9. Catheter design optimization for practical intravascular photoacoustic imaging (IVPA) of vulnerable plaques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iskander-Rizk, Sophinese; Wu, Min; Springeling, Geert; Mastik, Frits; Beurskens, Robert H. S. H.; van der Steen, Antonius F. W.; van Soest, Gijs

    2018-02-01

    Intravascular photoacoustic/ultrasound imaging (IVPA/US) can image the structure and composition of atherosclerotic lesions identifying lipid-rich plaques ex vivo and in vivo. In the literature, multiple IVPA/US catheter designs were presented and validated both in ex-vivo models and preclinical in-vivo situations. Since the catheter is a critical component of the imaging system, we discuss here a catheter design oriented to imaging plaque in a realistic and translatable setting. We present a catheter optimized for light delivery, manageable flush parameters and robustness with reduced mechanical damage risks at the laser/catheter joint interface. We also show capability of imaging within sheath and in water medium.

  10. Severe neutropenia at time of port insertion is not a risk factor for catheter-associated infections in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, Beatriz L P; Connolly, Bairbre; Abla, Oussama; Tomlinson, George; Amaral, Joao G

    2010-09-15

    The objective of this study was to determine whether severe neutropenia on the day of port-a-catheter (PORT) insertion was a risk factor for catheter-associated infection (CAI) in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). This was a retrospective study of children with ALL who had a PORT insertion between January 2005 and August 2008. Early (≤ 30 days) and late (>30 days) postprocedure complications were reviewed. The length of follow-up ranged between 7 months and 42 months. In total, 192 PORTs were inserted in 179 children. There were 43 CAIs (22%), and the infection rate was 0.35 per 1000 catheter-days. The CAI rate (15%) in children who had severe neutropenia on the day of the procedure did not differ statistically from the CAI rate (24%) in children who did not have severe neutropenia (P = .137). Conversely, patients with severe neutropenia who had a CAI were more likely to have their PORT removed (P = .019). The most common organisms to cause catheter removal were coagulase-negative Staphylococcus and Staphylococcus aureus. Patients with high-risk ALL had a statistically significant higher incidence of late CAI than patients with standard-risk ALL (P = .012). Age (P = .272), positive blood culture preprocedure (P = 1.0), and dexamethasone use (P = .201) were not risk factors for CAI. Patients who had an early CAI did not have a greater chance of having a late CAI. The catheter infection-free survival rate at 1 year was 88.6%. The current results indicated that severe neutropenia on the day of PORT insertion does not increase the risk of CAI in children with ALL. © 2010 American Cancer Society.

  11. Atrial fibrillation ablation using a closed irrigation radiofrequency ablation catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Golden, Keith; Mounsey, John Paul; Chung, Eugene; Roomiani, Pahresah; Morse, Michael Andew; Patel, Ankit; Gehi, Anil

    2012-05-01

    Catheter ablation is an effective therapy for symptomatic, medically refractory atrial fibrillation (AF). Open-irrigated radiofrequency (RF) ablation catheters produce transmural lesions at the cost of increased fluid delivery. In vivo models suggest closed-irrigated RF catheters create equivalent lesions, but clinical outcomes are limited. A cohort of 195 sequential patients with symptomatic AF underwent stepwise AF ablation (AFA) using a closed-irrigation ablation catheter. Recurrence of AF was monitored and outcomes were evaluated using Kaplan-Meier survival analysis and Cox proportional hazards models. Mean age was 59.0 years, 74.9% were male, 56.4% of patients were paroxysmal and mean duration of AF was 5.4 years. Patients had multiple comorbidities including hypertension (76.4%), tobacco abuse (42.1%), diabetes (17.4%), and obesity (mean body mass index 30.8). The median follow-up was 55.8 weeks. Overall event-free survival was 73.6% with one ablation and 77.4% after reablation (reablation rate was 8.7%). Median time to recurrence was 26.9 weeks. AF was more likely to recur in patients being treated with antiarrhythmic therapy at the time of last follow-up (recurrence rate 30.3% with antiarrhythmic drugs, 13.2% without antiarrhythmic drugs; hazard ratio [HR] 2.2, 95% confidence interval [CI] 1.1-4.4, P = 0.024) and in those with a history of AF greater than 2 years duration (HR 2.7, 95% CI 1.1-6.9, P = 0.038). Our study represents the largest cohort of patients receiving AFA with closed-irrigation ablation catheters. We demonstrate comparable outcomes to those previously reported in studies of open-irrigation ablation catheters. Given the theoretical benefits of a closed-irrigation system, a large head-to-head comparison using this catheter is warranted. ©2012, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Reconstruction of Intima and Adventitia Models into a State Undeformed by a Catheter by Using CT, IVUS, and Biplane X-Ray Angiogram Images

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinwon Son

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The number of studies on blood flow analysis using fluid-structure interaction (FSI analysis is increasing. Though a 3D blood vessel model that includes intima and adventitia is required for FSI analysis, there are difficulties in generating it using only one type of medical imaging. In this paper, we propose a 3D modeling method for accurate FSI analysis. An intravascular ultrasound (IVUS image is used with biplane X-ray angiogram images to calculate the position and orientation of the blood vessel. However, these images show that the blood vessel is deformed by the catheter inserted into the blood vessel for IVUS imaging. To eliminate such deformation, a CT image was added and the two models were registered. First, a 3D model of the undeformed intima was generated using a CT image. In the second stage, a model of intima and adventitia deformed by the catheter was generated by combining the IVUS image and the X-ray angiogram images. A 3D model of intima and adventitia with the deformation caused by insertion of the catheter eliminated was generated by matching these 3D blood vessel models in different states. In addition, a 3D blood vessel model including bifurcation was generated using the proposed method.

  13. Common Atrial Fibrillation Risk Alleles at 4q25 Predict Recurrence after Catheter-based Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, M. Benjamin; Muhammad, Raafia; Parvez, Babar; White, Brenda W.; Streur, Megan; Song, Yanna; Stubblefield, Tanya; Kucera, Gayle; Blair, Marcia; Rytlewski, Jason; Parvathaneni, Sunthosh; Nagarakanti, Rangadham; Saavedra, Pablo; Ellis, Christopher; Whalen, S. Patrick; Roden, Dan M; Darbar, Dawood

    2012-01-01

    Background Common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at chromosome 4q25 (rs2200733, rs10033464) are associated with both lone and typical AF. Risk alleles at 4q25 have recently been shown to predict recurrence of AF after ablation in a population of predominately lone AF, but lone AF represents only 5–30% of AF cases. Objective To test the hypothesis that 4q25 AF risk alleles can predict response to AF ablation in the majority of AF cases. Methods Patients enrolled in the Vanderbilt AF Registry underwent 378 catheter-based AF ablations (median age 60 years, 71% male, 89% typical AF) between 2004 and 2011. The primary endpoint was time to recurrence of any non-sinus atrial tachyarrhythmia (atrial tachycardia, atrial flutter, or AF; [AT/AF]). Results Two-hundred AT/AF recurrences (53%) were observed. In multivariable analysis, the rs2200733 risk allele predicted a 24% shorter recurrence-free time (survival time ratio 0.76 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.6–0.95, P=0.016) compared with wild-type. The heterozygous haplotype demonstrated a 21% shorter recurrence-free time (survival time ratio = 0.79, 95% CI 0.62–0.99) and the homozygous risk allele carriers a 39% shorter recurrence-free time (survival time ratio = 0.61, 95% CI 0.37–1.0) (P=0.037). Conclusion Risk alleles at the 4q25 loci predict impaired clinical response to AF ablation in a population of predominately typical AF patients. Our findings suggest the rs2200733 polymorphism may hold promise as an as an objectively measured patient characteristic that can used as a clinical tool for selection of patients for AF ablation. PMID:23178686

  14. Renal denervation using catheter-based radiofrequency ablation with temperature control: renovascular safety profile and underlying mechanisms in a hypertensive canine model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Huijie; Yu, Hang; Zeng, Chunyu; Fang, Yuqiang; He, Duofen; Zhang, Xiaoqun; Wen, Chunlan; Yang, Chengming

    2015-01-01

    Renal denervation is a novel method for hypertension treatment. In this study, we aimed to investigate the safety and efficacy of radiofrequency ablation (RFA) at ablation temperatures of 45 °C or 50 °C and its possible mechanisms. A hypertensive canine model was established by abdominal aortic constriction in 20 healthy hybrid dogs. These dogs were then randomly assigned to the treatment and the control groups, with dogs in the treatment group further randomly assigned to receive RFA at ablation temperatures of 45 °C or 50 °C. In the treatment group, RFA was performed at 1 month after modeling; renal angiography was performed at 2 months after ablation. The arterial vessels of the dogs were examined histologically with hematoxylin and eosin staining. Changes in blood pressure in the foreleg and whole-body norepinephrine spillover rate were also assessed. No arterial stenosis, dissection, thrombosis or other abnormalities were detected in the treated vessels by renal angiography, yet histology results showed minimal to mild renal arterial injury. Renal denervation resulted in a marked decrease in the whole-body norepinephrine spillover rate (p 0.05). Renal denervation can be performed without acute major adverse events, using catheter-based RFA with temperature control. The procedure was feasible in reducing blood pressure by at least partially inhibiting sympathetic drive and systemic sympathetic outflow.

  15. Experimental study of a closed-chest pulmonary embolism-reperfusion injury canine model by means of Swan-Ganz catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bao Na; Zhai Renyou Jiang Tao; Wang Yajie; Zheng Juan; Wang Chen

    2007-01-01

    Objective: To establish a closed-chest pulmonary embolism-reperfusion animal model by Swan-Ganz catheter and to explore the mechanisms of pulmonary embolism (PE)-reperfusion injury (RI). Methods: Experiments were made on 14 mongrel dogs, ranging in weight from 15 to 18 kg, anesthetized with 3% pentobarbital sodium. The dogs were intubated with I. D. 7 endotracheal tubes. Under sterile conditions, a 7 F Swan-Ganz catheter via the external jugular vein was positioned in the unilateral pulmonary diaphragmatic lobe (DL) artery. Occlusion/reperfusion of the DL artery was controlled with 1.2 ml diluted contrast agent filled into/drawn from the balloon. After the 24 h PE, the balloon was deflated to result in 4 h reperfusion of the DL. Measurements of blood gases and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α)were made at normal condition, at 24 h PE and at 4 h reperfusion. Thin-section CT scans were performed at normal condition, 24 h PE, 30 rain, 1, 2, 3 and 4 h reperfusion, respectively. At the end of each experiment, tissue specimens of bilateral diaphragmatic lobes were obtained for both wet/dry (W/D) weight ratio and for pathological study. Results: Reperfusion pulmonary edema (RPE) was an acute, mixed, noncardiogenic edema that was observed in all 14 dogs who had been successfully established as PE/RI animal models. RPE demonstrated heterogeneous ground-glass opacifications that predominated in the areas distal to the recanalized vessels. It manifested pathologically as an edematous lung infihrated by inflammatory cells. The mean of PaO 2 and TNF-α of 4 h reperfusion was (81 ± 4) mm Hg( 1 mm Hg =0.133 kPa) and (16.0 ± 2.5)pg/ml, which were significantly different (P<0.05) from normal value [(96 ± 6)mm Hg and (13.9 ± 2.0) pg/ml]. The W/D of the injured lung (6.3 ± 1.2) was significantly greater (P<0.01) than that of the contralateral lung (4.5 ± 1.2), suggesting that the increase in the lung water was due to reperfusion injury. Conclusion: The closed-chest canine model

  16. Comparison of the Effectiveness of a Virtual Simulator With a Plastic Arm Model in Teaching Intravenous Catheter Insertion Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günay İsmailoğlu, Elif; Zaybak, Ayten

    2018-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of a virtual intravenous simulator with a plastic arm model in teaching intravenous catheter insertion skills to nursing students. We used a randomized controlled quasi-experimental trial design and recruited 65 students who were assigned to the experimental (n = 33) and control (n = 32) groups using the simple random sampling method. The experimental group received intravenous catheterization skills training on the virtual intravenous simulator, and the control group received the same training on a plastic model of a human arm. Data were collected using the personal information form, intravenous catheterization knowledge assessment form, Intravenous Catheterization Skill Test, Self-Confidence and Satisfaction Scale, and Fear Symptoms Scale. In the study, the mean scores in the control group were 20.44 for psychomotor skills, 15.62 for clinical psychomotor skills, 31.78 for self-confidence, and 21.77 for satisfaction. The mean scores in the experimental group were 45.18 for psychomotor skills, 16.28 for clinical psychomotor skills, 34.18 for self-confidence, and 43.89 for satisfaction. The results indicated that psychomotor skills and satisfaction scores were higher in the experimental group, while the clinical psychomotor skills and self-confidence scores were similar in both groups. More students in the control group reported experiencing symptoms such as cold and sweaty hands, significant restlessness, and tense muscles than those in the experimental group.

  17. The Effect of Model Fidelity on Learning Outcomes of a Simulation-Based Education Program for Central Venous Catheter Insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederich, Emily; Mahnken, Jonathan D; Rigler, Sally K; Williamson, Timothy L; Tarver, Stephen; Sharpe, Matthew R

    2015-12-01

    Simulation-based education for central venous catheter (CVC) insertion has been repeatedly documented to improve performance, but the impact of simulation model fidelity has not been described. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of the physical fidelity of the simulation model on learning outcomes for a simulation-based education program for CVC insertion. Forty consecutive residents rotating through the medical intensive care unit of an academic medical center completed a simulation-based education program for CVC insertion. The curriculum was designed in accordance with the principles of deliberate practice and mastery learning. Each resident underwent baseline skills testing and was then randomized to training on a commercially available CVC model with high physical fidelity (High-Fi group) or a simply constructed model with low physical fidelity (Low-Fi group) in a noninferiority trial. Upon completion of their medical intensive care unit rotation 4 weeks later, residents returned for repeat skills testing on the high-fidelity model using a 26-item checklist. The mean (SD) posttraining score on the 26-item checklist for the Low-Fi group was 23.8 (2.2) (91.5%) and was not inferior to the mean (SD) score for the High-Fi group of 22.5 (2.6) (86.5%) (P Simulation-based education using equipment with low physical fidelity can achieve learning outcomes comparable with those with high-fidelity equipment, as long as other aspects of fidelity are maintained and robust educational principles are applied during the design of the curriculum.

  18. A National Implementation Project to Prevent Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection in Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Lona; Greene, M Todd; Meddings, Jennifer; Krein, Sarah L; McNamara, Sara E; Trautner, Barbara W; Ratz, David; Stone, Nimalie D; Min, Lillian; Schweon, Steven J; Rolle, Andrew J; Olmsted, Russell N; Burwen, Dale R; Battles, James; Edson, Barbara; Saint, Sanjay

    2017-08-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (UTI) in nursing home residents is a common cause of sepsis, hospital admission, and antimicrobial use leading to colonization with multidrug-resistant organisms. To develop, implement, and evaluate an intervention to reduce catheter-associated UTI. A large-scale prospective implementation project was conducted in community-based nursing homes participating in the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Safety Program for Long-Term Care. Nursing homes across 48 states, Washington DC, and Puerto Rico participated. Implementation of the project was conducted between March 1, 2014, and August 31, 2016. The project was implemented over 12-month cohorts and included a technical bundle: catheter removal, aseptic insertion, using regular assessments, training for catheter care, and incontinence care planning, as well as a socioadaptive bundle emphasizing leadership, resident and family engagement, and effective communication. Urinary catheter use and catheter-associated UTI rates using National Healthcare Safety Network definitions were collected. Facility-level urine culture order rates were also obtained. Random-effects negative binomial regression models were used to examine changes in catheter-associated UTI, catheter utilization, and urine cultures and adjusted for covariates including ownership, bed size, provision of subacute care, 5-star rating, presence of an infection control committee, and an infection preventionist. In 4 cohorts over 30 months, 568 community-based nursing homes were recruited; 404 met inclusion criteria for analysis. The unadjusted catheter-associated UTI rates decreased from 6.78 to 2.63 infections per 1000 catheter-days. With use of the regression model and adjustment for facility characteristics, the rates decreased from 6.42 to 3.33 (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 0.46; 95% CI, 0.36-0.58; P project. Catheter utilization remained unchanged (4.50 at baseline, 4.45 at conclusion of project; IRR, 0

  19. Women's Experiences with and Preference for Induction of Labor with Oral Misoprostol or Foley Catheter at Term

    OpenAIRE

    Ten Eikelder, Mieke L G; van de Meent, Marieke M; Mast, Kelly; Rengerink, Katrien Oude; Jozwiak, Marta; de Graaf, Irene M; Scholtenhuis, Marloes A G Holswilder-Olde; Roumen, Frans J M E; Porath, Martina M; van Loon, Aren J; van den Akker, Eline S; Rijnders, Robbert J P; Feitsma, A Hanneke; Adriaanse, Albert H; Muller, Moira A

    2017-01-01

    Objective We assessed experience and preferences among term women undergoing induction of labor with oral misoprostol or Foley catheter.  Study Design In 18 of the 29 participating hospitals in the PROBAAT-II trial, women were asked to complete a questionnaire within 24 hours after delivery. We adapted a validated questionnaire about expectancy and experience of labor and asked women whether they would prefer the same method again in a future pregnancy. Results The questionnaire was completed...

  20. A central venous catheter coated with benzalkonium chloride for the prevention of catheter-related microbial colonization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moss, H A; Tebbs, S E; Faroqui, M H; Herbst, T; Isaac, J L; Brown, J; Elliott, T S

    2000-11-01

    In an attempt to overcome infections associated with central venous catheters, a new antiseptic central venous catheter coated with benzalkonium chloride on the internal and external surfaces has been developed and evaluated in a clinical trial. Patients (235) randomly received either a triple-lumen central venous catheter coated with benzalkonium chloride (117) or a polyurethane non-antiseptic catheter (118). The incidence of microbial colonization of both catheters and retained antiseptic activity of the benzalkonium chloride device following removal were determined. The benzalkonium chloride resulted in a significant reduction of the incidence of microbial colonization on both the internal and external catheter surfaces. The reduction in colonization was detected at both the intradermal (21 benzalkonium chloride catheters vs. 38 controls, P = 0.0016) and distal segments of the antiseptic-coated catheters. Following catheter removal retained activity was demonstrated in benzalkonium chloride catheters which had been in place for up to 12 days. No patients developed adverse reactions to the benzalkonium chloride catheters. The findings demonstrate that the benzalkonium chloride catheter significantly reduced the incidence of catheter-associated colonization.

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  11. Catheter-directed Intraportal Delivery of Endothelial Cell Therapy for Liver Regeneration: A Feasibility Study in a Large-Animal Model of Cirrhosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Kyungmouk Steve; Santagostino, Sara F; Li, David; Ramjit, Amit; Serrano, Kenneth; Ginsberg, Michael D; Ding, Bi-Sen; Rafii, Shahin; Madoff, David C

    2017-10-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the feasibility of imaging-guided catheter-directed delivery of endothelial cell therapy in a porcine model of cirrhosis for liver regeneration. Materials and Methods After approval from the institutional animal care and use committee, autologous liver endothelial cells were grown from core hepatic specimens from swine. Cirrhosis was induced in swine by means of transcatheter infusion of ethanol and iodized oil into the hepatic artery. Three weeks after induction of cirrhosis, the swine were randomly assigned to receive autologous cell therapy (endothelial cells, n = 4) or control treatment (phosphate-buffered saline, n = 4) by means of imaging-guided transhepatic intraportal catheterization. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting analysis was performed on biopsy samples 1 hour after therapy. Three weeks after intraportal delivery of endothelial cells, the swine were euthanized and the explanted liver underwent quantitative pathologic examination. Statistical analysis was performed with an unpaired t test by using unequal variance. Results Liver endothelial cells were successfully isolated, cultured, and expanded from eight 20-mm, 18-gauge hepatic core samples to 50 × 10 6 autologous cells per pig. Intraportal delivery of endothelial cell therapy or saline was technically successful in all eight swine, with no complications. Endothelial cells were present in the liver for a minimum of 1 hour after intraportal infusion. Swine treated with endothelial cell therapy showed mean levels of surrogate markers of hepatobiliary injury that were consistent with decreases in hepatic fibrosis and biliary ductal damage relative to the control animals, although statistical significance was not met in this pilot study: The mean percentage of positive pixels at Masson trichrome staining was 7.28% vs 5.57%, respectively (P = .20), the mean proliferation index with cytokeratin wide-spectrum was 2.55 vs 1.13 (P = .06), and the mean proliferation index with Ki67

  12. Intravascular catheter related infections in children admitted on the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    peripheral venous intravascular catheters uncoated with no antibiotic or antiseptic, was done. Social demographic characteristics, anthropometry, clinical examination including the catheter site were determined at enrollment. The children had their blood, catheter tip and hub samples taken off for culture and sensitivity as ...

  13. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... you will be admitted to the hospital overnight. Leave jewelry at home and wear loose, comfortable clothing. ... may also be asked to remove jewelry, removable dental appliances, eye glasses ... to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. An example is finding ...

  14. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by a physician with ... not responsible for the content contained on the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact ...

  15. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... X-rays are a form of radiation like light or radio waves. X-rays pass through most objects, including the body. Once it is carefully aimed at the part of the body being examined, an x-ray machine produces a small ...

  16. Catheter Angiography

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    Full Text Available ... understanding of the possible charges you will incur. Web page review process: This Web page is reviewed regularly by a physician with expertise ... not responsible for the content contained on the web pages found at these links. About Us | Contact Us | ...

  17. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... leg veins) or pulmonary arteriovenous malformations. look at congenital abnormalities in blood vessels, especially arteries in children (e.g., malformations in the heart or other blood vessels due to congenital heart disease). evaluate obstructions of vessels. top of ...

  18. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... body. Once it is carefully aimed at the part of the body being examined, an x-ray machine produces a small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording an image on photographic film or a special detector. Different parts of the body absorb the x-rays in ...

  19. Low-angled peripheral intravenous catheter tip placement decreases phlebitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanabe, Hidenori; Murayama, Ryoko; Yabunaka, Koichi; Oe, Makoto; Takahashi, Toshiaki; Komiyama, Chieko; Sanada, Hiromi

    2016-11-02

    Peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) are frequently removed due to phlebitis. We hypothesized that catheters made of polyurethane, which is more flexible than Teflon, would decrease phlebitis, and that flexibility could be estimated by measuring the catheter-tip angle. Ultrasonography in two groups of patients with different catheter types was then used to compare catheter-tip angles and phlebitis. Observational studies were carried out at a medical ward in a university hospital. Infusion therapy was administered to one group of patients in 2014 using Teflon catheters (control group, n = 200), and to another group of patients in 2015 using polyurethane catheters (investigational group, n = 207). The symptoms were assessed according to a scale developed by the Infusion Nurses Society. Long-axis ultrasonography images taken immediately before catheter removal were used to measure the angle between the central line of the catheter within 2 mm from the distal point and a tangent to the vessel wall. There were no significant differences between the two groups with respect to sex, age, and medical diagnosis. In the control and investigational groups, the rates of phlebitis were 37% (73/200) and 17% (36/207), respectively (pPhlebitis occurred more frequently when the catheter-tip was placed at angle >5.8°. The frequency of phlebitis was lower in the polyurethane, in which the catheter was placed at lower angle, almost parallel to the vessel. Our results will aid in developing new catheters and in improving PIVC-securement techniques.

  20. Central venous catheters: detection of catheter complications and therapeutical options

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebauer, B.; Beck, A.; Wagner, H.J.; Vivantes-Kliniken, Hellersdorf und Prenzlauer Berg

    2008-01-01

    For modern medicine central venous catheters play an important role for diagnostic and therapeutic options. Catheter implantation, complication detection and therapy of catheter complications are an increasing demand for the radiologist. The review article provides an overview of different catheter types, their indications, advantages and disadvantages. Catheter malpositions are usually detectable in conventional X-ray. Most malpositions are correctable using interventional-radiological techniques. In addition therapeutical options for thrombotic complications (venous thrombosis, catheter occlusion, fibrin sheath) are discussed. In case of an infectious catheter complication, usually a catheter extraction and re-implantation is necessary

  1. Paravertebral block catheter breakage by electrocautery during thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeki, Noboru; Sugimoto, Yuki; Mori, Yoko; Kato, Takahiro; Miyoshi, Hirotsugu; Nakamura, Ryuji; Koga, Tomomichi

    2017-06-01

    Advantages of thoracic paravertebral analgesia (TPA) include placement of the catheter closer to the surgical field; however, the catheter can become damaged during the operation. We experienced a case of intraoperative TPA catheter breakage that prompted us to perform an experiment to investigate possible causes. A 50-year-old male underwent a thoracoscopic lower lobectomy under general anesthesia with TPA via an intercostal approach. Following surgery, it was discovered that the catheter had become occluded, as well as cut and fused, so we reopened the incision and removed the residual catheter. From that experience, we performed an experiment to examine electrocautery-induced damage in normal (Portex™, Smith's Medical), radiopaque (Perifix SoftTip™, BBraun), and reinforced (Perifix FX™, BBraun) epidural catheters (n = 8 each). Chicken meat was penetrated by each catheter and then cut by electrocautery. In the normal group, breakage occurred in 8 and occlusion in 6 of the catheters, and in the radiopaque group breakage occurred in 8 and occlusion in 7. In contrast, breakage occurred in only 3 and occlusion in none in the reinforced group, with the 5 without breakage remaining connected only by the spring coil. Furthermore, in 7 of the reinforced catheters, electric arc-induced thermal damage was observed at the tip of the catheter. A TPA catheter for thoracic surgery should be inserted via the median approach, or it should be inserted after surgery to avoid catheter damage during surgery.

  2. Concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters for percutaneous retrieval of dislodged central venous port catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ming-Tsung Chuang

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to report our experience of percutaneous retrieval of dislodged port catheters with concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters. During a 5-year period at our institute (June 2005 to July 2010, a total of 23 dislodged port catheters were retrieved. The interval between port catheter implantation and dislodged catheter retrieval ranged from 43 days to 1,414 days (mean 586.7 days. The time of delayed retrieval ranged from 1 day to 45 days (mean 4.6 days. All dislodged catheters were retrieved with the concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters via femoral venous route. The prevalence of port catheter dislodgement at our institute was 3.4%. All dislodged port catheters were removed successfully with pigtail and loop snare catheters together. No procedure-related complications were encountered, except for transient arrhythmia in two patients, which required no medication. In conclusion, the concurrent use of pigtail and loop snare catheters is a feasible and easy way for percutaneous retrieval of a dislodged central venous port catheter.

  3. Black-box modeling to estimate tissue temperature during radiofrequency catheter cardiac ablation: feasibility study on an agar phantom model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blasco-Gimenez, Ramón; Lequerica, Juan L; Herrero, Maria; Hornero, Fernando; Berjano, Enrique J

    2010-01-01

    The aim of this work was to study linear deterministic models to predict tissue temperature during radiofrequency cardiac ablation (RFCA) by measuring magnitudes such as electrode temperature, power and impedance between active and dispersive electrodes. The concept involves autoregressive models with exogenous input (ARX), which is a particular case of the autoregressive moving average model with exogenous input (ARMAX). The values of the mode parameters were determined from a least-squares fit of experimental data. The data were obtained from radiofrequency ablations conducted on agar models with different contact pressure conditions between electrode and agar (0 and 20 g) and different flow rates around the electrode (1, 1.5 and 2 L min −1 ). Half of all the ablations were chosen randomly to be used for identification (i.e. determination of model parameters) and the other half were used for model validation. The results suggest that (1) a linear model can be developed to predict tissue temperature at a depth of 4.5 mm during RF cardiac ablation by using the variables applied power, impedance and electrode temperature; (2) the best model provides a reasonably accurate estimate of tissue temperature with a 60% probability of achieving average errors better than 5 °C; (3) substantial errors (larger than 15 °C) were found only in 6.6% of cases and were associated with abnormal experiments (e.g. those involving the displacement of the ablation electrode) and (4) the impact of measuring impedance on the overall estimate is negligible (around 1 °C)

  4. Evaluation of hypopharyngeal suction to eliminate aspiration: the Retro-Esophageal Suction (REScue) catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belafsky, Peter C; Mehdizadeh, O B; Ledgerwood, L; Kuhn, M

    2015-02-01

    Profound oropharyngeal dysphagia (OPD) is common and costly. Treatment options are limited. The purpose of this investigation was to evaluate the utility of hypopharyngeal suction at the upper esophageal sphincter (UES) to eliminate aspiration. Five different catheters were passed retrograde up the esophagus and positioned at the UES in a cadaver model of profound OPD. Suction was affixed to each catheter. 10 cc of barium was administered into the pyriform sinus, and videofluoroscopy was utilized to evaluate the presence of aspiration. 6 trials were administered per catheter and for a no catheter control. The outcome measures were the incidence of aspiration, the NIH Swallow Safety Scale (NIH-SSS), and UES opening. Control trials with no suction resulted in an aspiration rate of 100 % (6/6 trials). Negative pressure through 16, 18, 24, and 30 Fr catheter resulted in an aspiration rate of 0 % (0/24 trials; p  0.05). The mean NIH-SSS improved from 7.0 (±0.0) in the control to 0 (±0.0) with hypopharyngeal suction (18 Fr nasogastric catheter; p 12 Fr) at the level of the UES reduced aspiration by 100 % and significantly increased UES opening in a cadaveric model of profound oropharyngeal dysphagia.

  5. Radiofrequency catheter ablation: A study concerning electrode configuration, lesion size and potential complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anfinsen, Ole-Gunnar

    1999-01-01

    The study was performed to evaluate different methods of increasing the lesion size in radiofrequency catheter ablation, which is an important issue as the clinical indications for RF ablation are extended. The safety aspects of RF ablation are also studied, both with standard catheters and with experimental ones. The studies have been performed in vitro, in an animal model and in patients. The results are presented in 5 papers with titles of: 1) 'Radiofrequency catheter ablation of procine right atrium: Increased lesion size with bipolar two-catheter technique compared to unipolar application in vitro and in vivo. 2) Bipolar radiofrequency catheter ablation creates confluent lesions at a larger interelectrode spacing than does unipolar ablation from two electrodes in porcine heart. 3) Temperature-controlled radiofrequency catheter ablation with a 10 mm tip electrode creates larger lesions without charring in the porcine heart. 4) Radiofrequency catheter ablation in vitro: The difference between tissue and catheter tip temperature depends on location of the temperature sensor. 5) The activation of platelet function, coagulation and fibrinolysis during radiofrequency catheter ablation in heparin zed patients. The main conclusions are: 1) Large RF lesions may be created either by using larger electrodes and more power in the unipolar mode, or by changing the electrode configuration and thereby the geometry of the electrical field during RF current delivery. Both the 10 mm unipolar, the dielectrode and the bipolar mode showed feasible in porcine IVC-TV isthmus and right atrial free wall ablations, but the gain in lesion length was most pronounced in the bipolar mode. 2) Crater formation and intramural haemorrhages may complicate RF ablation using high current density in the right atrial free wall. In our study this was observed with 10 mm unipolar and bipolar two-catheter ablation. Phrenic nerve injury and lesions of the adjacent pulmonary tissue are risks related to

  6. Radiofrequency catheter ablation: A study concerning electrode configuration, lesion size and potential complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anfinsen, Ole-Gunnar

    1999-07-01

    The study was performed to evaluate different methods of increasing the lesion size in radiofrequency catheter ablation, which is an important issue as the clinical indications for RF ablation are extended. The safety aspects of RF ablation are also studied, both with standard catheters and with experimental ones. The studies have been performed in vitro, in an animal model and in patients. The results are presented in 5 papers with titles of: 1) 'Radiofrequency catheter ablation of procine right atrium: Increased lesion size with bipolar two-catheter technique compared to unipolar application in vitro and in vivo. 2) Bipolar radiofrequency catheter ablation creates confluent lesions at a larger interelectrode spacing than does unipolar ablation from two electrodes in porcine heart. 3) Temperature-controlled radiofrequency catheter ablation with a 10 mm tip electrode creates larger lesions without charring in the porcine heart. 4) Radiofrequency catheter ablation in vitro: The difference between tissue and catheter tip temperature depends on location of the temperature sensor. 5) The activation of platelet function, coagulation and fibrinolysis during radiofrequency catheter ablation in heparin zed patients. The main conclusions are: 1) Large RF lesions may be created either by using larger electrodes and more power in the unipolar mode, or by changing the electrode configuration and thereby the geometry of the electrical field during RF current delivery. Both the 10 mm unipolar, the dielectrode and the bipolar mode showed feasible in porcine IVC-TV isthmus and right atrial free wall ablations, but the gain in lesion length was most pronounced in the bipolar mode. 2) Crater formation and intramural haemorrhages may complicate RF ablation using high current density in the right atrial free wall. In our study this was observed with 10 mm unipolar and bipolar two-catheter ablation. Phrenic nerve injury and lesions of the adjacent pulmonary tissue are risks

  7. Obstruction of peritoneal dialysis catheter is associated with catheter type and independent of omentectomy: A comparative data analysis from a transplant surgical and a pediatric surgical department.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radtke, Josephine; Schild, Raphael; Reismann, Marc; Ridwelski, Robert-Richard; Kempf, Caroline; Nashan, Bjoern; Rothe, Karin; Koch, Martina

    2018-04-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter occlusion is a common complication with up to 36% of catheter obstructions described in the literature. We present a comparison of complications and outcome after implantation of PD catheters in a transplant surgical and a pediatric surgical department. We retrospectively analyzed 154 PD catheters, which were implanted during 2009-2015 by transplant surgeons (TS, University Medical Center Hamburg-Eppendorf, Germany, n=85 catheters) and pediatric surgeons (PS, Charité University Medicine Berlin, Germany, n=69 catheters) in 122 children (median (range) age 3.0 (0.01-17.1) years) for acute (n=65) or chronic (n=89) renal failure. All catheters were one-cuffed or double-cuffed curled catheters, except that straight catheters were implanted into smaller children (n=19) by TS in Hamburg. Patient characteristics and operation technique did not differ between the departments. Peritonitis was the most common complication (33 catheters, 21.4%). Leakage (n=18 catheters, 11.7%) occurred more often in children weighing <10kg (p<0.001). The incidence of obstruction and dysfunction was significantly higher in catheters used in PS than catheters used in TS (30.4% vs. 11.8%, p=0.004). Omentectomy did not reduce the incidence of catheter obstruction (p=1.0). Perforation at the catheter tips was larger and appeared to be rougher in catheters used in PS than the catheters in TS. The type of catheter and presumably the type of perforation at the catheter tip may influence the incidence of peritoneal dialysis catheter obstruction. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Patency of Femoral Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters and Factors Predictive of Patency Failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, Kirsteen R.; Guo, Lancia L. Q.; Tan, Kong T.; Simons, Martin E.; Sniderman, Kenneth W.; Kachura, John R.; Beecroft, John R.; Rajan, Dheeraj K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the patency rates of and factors associated with increased risk of patency failure in patients with femoral vein tunneled hemodialysis catheters. Methods: All femoral tunneled catheter insertions from 1996 to 2006 were reviewed, during which time 123 catheters were inserted. Of these, 66 were exchanges. Patients with femoral catheter failure versus those with femoral catheter patency were compared. Confounding factors, such as demographic and procedural factors, were incorporated and assessed using univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses. Results: Mean catheter primary patency failure time was 96.3 days (SE 17.9 days). Primary patency at 30, 60, 90, and 180 days was 53.8%, 45.4%, 32.1%, and 27.1% respectively. Crude rates of risk of catheter failure did not suggest a benefit for patients receiving catheters introduced from one side versus the other, but more cephalad location of catheter tip was associated with improved patency. Multivariate analysis showed that patients whose catheters were on the left side (p = 0.009), were of increasing age at the time of insertion (p = 0.002) and that those who had diabetes (p = 0.001) were at significantly greater risk of catheter failure. The catheter infection rate was 1.4/1000 catheter days. Conclusion: Patients who were of a more advanced age and had diabetes were at greater risk of femoral catheter failure, whereas those who received femoral catheters from the right side were less at risk of catheter failure.

  9. Cost-effectiveness of a central venous catheter care bundle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kate A Halton

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A bundled approach to central venous catheter care is currently being promoted as an effective way of preventing catheter-related bloodstream infection (CR-BSI. Consumables used in the bundled approach are relatively inexpensive which may lead to the conclusion that the bundle is cost-effective. However, this fails to consider the nontrivial costs of the monitoring and education activities required to implement the bundle, or that alternative strategies are available to prevent CR-BSI. We evaluated the cost-effectiveness of a bundle to prevent CR-BSI in Australian intensive care patients. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A Markov decision model was used to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the bundle relative to remaining with current practice (a non-bundled approach to catheter care and uncoated catheters, or use of antimicrobial catheters. We assumed the bundle reduced relative risk of CR-BSI to 0.34. Given uncertainty about the cost of the bundle, threshold analyses were used to determine the maximum cost at which the bundle remained cost-effective relative to the other approaches to infection control. Sensitivity analyses explored how this threshold alters under different assumptions about the economic value placed on bed-days and health benefits gained by preventing infection. If clinicians are prepared to use antimicrobial catheters, the bundle is cost-effective if national 18-month implementation costs are below $1.1 million. If antimicrobial catheters are not an option the bundle must cost less than $4.3 million. If decision makers are only interested in obtaining cash-savings for the unit, and place no economic value on either the bed-days or the health benefits gained through preventing infection, these cost thresholds are reduced by two-thirds. CONCLUSIONS: A catheter care bundle has the potential to be cost-effective in the Australian intensive care setting. Rather than anticipating cash-savings from this intervention, decision

  10. Towards modeling of cardiac micro-structure with catheter-based confocal microscopy: a novel approach for dye delivery and tissue characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lasher, Richard A; Hitchcock, Robert W; Sachse, Frank B

    2009-08-01

    This work presents a methodology for modeling of cardiac tissue micro-structure. The approach is based on catheter-based confocal imaging systems, which are emerging as tools for diagnosis in various clinical disciplines. A limitation of these systems is that a fluorescent marker must be available in sufficient concentration in the imaged region. We introduce a novel method for the local delivery of fluorescent markers to cardiac tissue based on a hydro-gel carrier brought into contact with the tissue surface. The method was tested with living rabbit cardiac tissue and applied to acquire three-dimensional image stacks with a standard inverted confocal microscope and two-dimensional images with a catheter-based confocal microscope. We processed these image stacks to obtain spatial models and quantitative data on tissue microstructure. Volumes of atrial and ventricular myocytes were 4901 +/- 1713 and 10 299 +/-3598 mum (3) (mean+/-sd), respectively. Atrial and ventricular myocyte volume fractions were 72.4 +/-4.7% and 79.7 +/- 2.9% (mean +/-sd), respectively. Atrial and ventricular myocyte density was 165 571 +/- 55 836 and 86 957 +/- 32 280 cells/mm (3) (mean+/-sd), respectively. These statistical data and spatial descriptions of tissue microstructure provide important input for modeling studies of cardiac tissue function. We propose that the described methodology can also be used to characterize diseased tissue and allows for personalized modeling of cardiac tissue.

  11. Use of monorail PTCA balloon catheter for local drug delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trehan, Vijay; Nair, Girish M; Gupta, Mohit D

    2007-01-01

    We report the use of monorail coronary balloon as an infusion catheter to give bailout abciximab selectively into the site of stent thrombosis as an adjunct to plain old balloon angioplasty (POBA) in a patient of subacute stent thrombosis of the left anterior descending coronary artery. The balloon component (polyamide material) of the monorail balloon catheter was shaved off the catheter so that abciximab injected through the balloon port of the catheter exited out the shaft of the balloon catheter at the site from where the balloon material was shaved off. We believe that selective infusion with abciximab along with POBA established antegrade flow and relieved the patient's ischemia. In the absence of essential hardware to give intracoronary drugs in an emergency situation, one may employ our technique of infusion through a monorail balloon catheter after shaving the balloon component from the catheter.

  12. The bowed catheter sign: a risk for pericardial tamponade

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Towbin, Richard

    2008-01-01

    The use of a central venous catheter (CVC) has become commonplace in the care of children with a wide variety of medical and surgical problems. Complications resulting from the insertion of these catheters are well recognized and can be life-threatening. When a temporary CVC or other catheter is inserted into the central venous system it is secured to the skin with a combination of sutures and sterile dressing. This fixes the catheter in place and does not allow it to retract, thereby putting pressure on the right atrial wall via the catheter tip if it is too long. The probability of wall penetration is increased if a catheter or device is tapered at the point of contact. The purpose of this case report is to present the bowed catheter sign and to review the anatomy of the cavotricuspid isthmus, a possible predisposing factor to cardiac perforation and tamponade. (orig.)

  13. The bowed catheter sign: a risk for pericardial tamponade

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Towbin, Richard [Phoenix Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2008-03-15

    The use of a central venous catheter (CVC) has become commonplace in the care of children with a wide variety of medical and surgical problems. Complications resulting from the insertion of these catheters are well recognized and can be life-threatening. When a temporary CVC or other catheter is inserted into the central venous system it is secured to the skin with a combination of sutures and sterile dressing. This fixes the catheter in place and does not allow it to retract, thereby putting pressure on the right atrial wall via the catheter tip if it is too long. The probability of wall penetration is increased if a catheter or device is tapered at the point of contact. The purpose of this case report is to present the bowed catheter sign and to review the anatomy of the cavotricuspid isthmus, a possible predisposing factor to cardiac perforation and tamponade. (orig.)

  14. Management of cancer-associated upper extremity deep vein thrombosis with and without venous catheters at a tertiary care center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALKindi, Said Y; Chai-Adisaksopha, Chatree; Cheah, Matthew; Linkins, Lori-Ann

    2018-04-03

    Data on management of upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (UEDVT) in patients with cancer is limited. The objective of this study was to determine risk factors for UEDVT and the rates of recurrence and bleeding in a real-world setting. Retrospective review of consecutive patients assessed for cancer-associated UEDVT. Outcome measures were recurrent venous thromboembolism (VTE), and major and clinically relevant non-major bleeding (CRNMB). Risk factors for recurrent VTE and bleeding were assessed. Mean duration of follow-up was 7.2 months. Two hundred cases were identified; 69% were associated with a central line. Non-line associated UEDVT occurred more frequently in the setting of breast cancer, lung cancer and documented local mass effect. The incidence of recurrent VTE was 18.5%, of which 14 (37.8%) were ipsilateral UEDVT. The risk of recurrence is higher with male gender (HR 2.0, 95% CI; 1.0-4.0). Major and CRNMB occurred in 1% and 11.5%, respectively. Concurrent use of an antiplatelet agent was associated with a higher risk of CRNMB compared to anticoagulant therapy alone (HR 3.9, 95% CI; 1.4-10.7). Presence of a venous catheter was the primary risk factor for UEDVT, however, extrinsic compression by local tumour may be just as important for some cancer types. Furthermore, the majority of recurrent events did not occur in the same upper limb suggesting that UEDVT may be predictive of increased thrombotic risk rather than just a local effect of catheters. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  15. Emergency coronary angioplasty with stenting using Cordis® diagnostic coronary catheters when there is difficulty in engaging guide catheters and bench evaluation of diagnostic and guide catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arokiaraj, Mark Christopher

    2018-02-01

    Difficulty in engaging with guide catheters is not uncommon in acute emergencies. We aimed to evaluate the use of Cordis ® INFINITI diagnostic catheters to perform angioplasty in patients in whom the coronaries cannot be engaged using standard guide catheters. In 34 cases of acute coronary syndrome, when difficulty in engagement with two standard guide catheters was encountered with reasonable manipulations, angioplasty was performed using diagnostic catheters. In total, 40 stents were placed by this technique. Pushability and trackability, distal tip flexion and three-point bending tests were performed to evaluate the performance of the guide and diagnostic catheters. Angioplasty was performed easily in a setting where it would have been very difficult to perform. Coronary dissection occurred in one patient, treated by a stent. The stent and dilatation balloons were easily passed through the diagnostic catheters. Pressure tracings were clearly preserved with certain stent delivery systems, and at angioplasty, although there was slightly reduced opacification of the respective artery, the coronary anatomy was sufficiently visualized to perform angioplasty. No periprocedural target lesion complications were seen in any cases. Pushability and trackability tests showed good force transmission along a tortuous path with diagnostic catheters, and balanced force-displacement curves from three-point bending tests and distal tip softness tests. Angioplasty with stenting can be performed safely through 6F Cordis ® infiniti diagnostic catheters when difficulty in engaging guide catheters is encountered. Copyright © 2018 Sociedade Portuguesa de Cardiologia. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  16. Suprapubic catheter care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... going back into your bladder. Try not to disconnect the catheter more than you need to. Keeping ... Copyright Privacy Accessibility Quality Guidelines Viewers & Players MedlinePlus Connect for EHRs For Developers U.S. National Library of ...

  17. Monorail Piccolino catheter: a new rapid exchange/ultralow profile coronary angioplasty system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mooney, M R; Douglas, J S; Mooney, J F; Madison, J D; Brandenburg, R O; Fernald, R; Van Tassel, R A

    1990-06-01

    The Monorail Piccolino coronary angioplasty balloon catheter (MBC) was evaluated on 118 patients at two centers. Technical success was achieved in 110 patients (93%). Time for catheter exchange and total fluoroscopy time were significantly lower for the Monorail catheter than with standard equipment (exchange time 97 vs. 170 seconds P less than .05 and fluoroscopy time 17 vs. 88 seconds P less than .001). The advantages of rapid exchange and the ability of utilize 2 Monorail balloon catheters through one 9F guiding catheter for simultaneous inflations allowed for maximal flexibility in treating patients with bifurcation lesions. The double wire approach utilizing one Monorail balloon catheter with a 7F guiding catheter was also technically successful. The Monorail Piccolino balloon catheter has unique features that allow for greater ease of operator use, rapid catheter exchange, and optimal angiographic visualization. It is felt that this catheter design provides distinct advantages over standard angioplasty equipment.

  18. [Peripheral intravenous catheter-related phlebitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Sar-van der Brugge, Simone; Posthuma, E F M Ward

    2011-01-01

    Phlebitis is a very common complication of the use of intravenous catheters. Two patients with an i.v. catheter complicated by thrombophlebitis are described. Patient A was immunocompromised due to chronic lymphatic leukaemia and developed septic thrombophlebitis with positive blood cultures for S. Aureus. Patient B was being treated with flucloxacillin because of an S. Aureus infection and developed chemical phlebitis. Septic phlebitis is rare, but potentially serious. Chemical or mechanical types of thrombophlebitis are usually less severe, but happen very frequently. Risk factors include: female sex, previous episode of phlebitis, insertion at (ventral) forearm, emergency placement and administration of antibiotics. Until recently, routine replacement of peripheral intravenous catheters after 72-96 h was recommended, but randomised controlled trials have not shown any benefit of this routine. A recent Cochrane Review recommends replacement of peripheral intravenous catheters when clinically indicated only.

  19. Dedicated radial ventriculography pigtail catheter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidovich, Mladen I., E-mail: miv@uic.edu

    2013-05-15

    A new dedicated cardiac ventriculography catheter was specifically designed for radial and upper arm arterial access approach. Two catheter configurations have been developed to facilitate retrograde crossing of the aortic valve and to conform to various subclavian, ascending aortic and left ventricular anatomies. The “short” dedicated radial ventriculography catheter is suited for horizontal ascending aortas, obese body habitus, short stature and small ventricular cavities. The “long” dedicated radial ventriculography catheter is suited for vertical ascending aortas, thin body habitus, tall stature and larger ventricular cavities. This new design allows for improved performance, faster and simpler insertion in the left ventricle which can reduce procedure time, radiation exposure and propensity for radial artery spasm due to excessive catheter manipulation. Two different catheter configurations allow for optimal catheter selection in a broad range of patient anatomies. The catheter is exceptionally stable during contrast power injection and provides equivalent cavity opacification to traditional femoral ventriculography catheter designs.

  20. Pressure-controlled drainage of cerebrospinal fluid: clinical experience with a new type of ventricular catheter (Ventcontrol MTC)and an integrated Piezo-resistive sensor at its tip: technical note.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piek, J; Raes, P

    1996-01-01

    We described a new ventricular catheter that is the combination of a "classic" ventricular catheter with a piezo-resistive transducer at its tip. The device allows parallel recordings of intraventricular fluid pressure via a chip and a fluid-filled external transducer, drainage of cerebrospinal fluid from the ventricle or injection of fluid into the ventricle with simultaneous monitoring of intracranial pressure, and recording of brain tissue pressure in cases of misplacement or dislocation of the ventricular catheter or in cases of progressively narrowing ventricles caused by brain edema. Clinical tests in various situations at different pressure ranges (total recording time, 1356 h in 13 patients) gave excellent correlations of both pressures. Application of the device is especially indicated in clinical situations in which pressure-controlled drainage is desirable, occlusion of ventricular bolts is likely, or pressure-volume tests are needed.

  1. Risk Factors for Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infections in a Pediatric Institution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Nora G; Marchalik, Daniel; Lipsky, Andrew; Rushton, H Gil; Pohl, Hans G; Song, Xiaoyan

    2016-04-01

    Catheter associated urinary tract infections are an essential measure for health care quality improvement that affects reimbursement through hospital acquired condition reduction programs in adult patients. With the mounting importance of preventing such infections we evaluated risk factors for acquiring catheter associated urinary tract infections in pediatric patients. All catheter associated urinary tract infections were identified at 1 pediatric institution from September 2010 to August 2014 from a prospective database maintained by the infection control office. To identify risk factors patients with a catheter associated urinary tract infection were individually matched to control patients with a urinary catheter but without infection by age, gender, date and the hospital location of the infection in 1:2 fashion. A total of 50 patients with catheter associated urinary tract infection were identified and matched to 100 control patients. Compared to controls the patients with infection were more likely to have a catheter in place for longer (2.9 days, OR 1.08, 95% CI 1.01, 1.15, p = 0.02). They were also more likely to be on contact precautions (OR 4.00, 95% CI 1.73, 9.26, p = 0.001), and have concurrent infections (OR 3.04, 95% CI 1.39, 6.28, p = 0.005) and a history of catheterization (OR 3.24, 95% CI 1.55, 6.77, p = 0.002). Using a conditional multivariate regression model the 3 most predictive variables were duration of catheter drainage, contact isolation status and history of catheterization. Longer duration of urinary catheter drainage, positive contact precautions status and a history of catheterization appear to be associated with a higher risk of catheter associated urinary tract infection in hospitalized pediatric patients. Physicians should attempt to decrease the duration of catheterization, especially in patients who meet these criteria, to minimize the risk of catheter associated urinary tract infection. Copyright © 2016 American Urological

  2. Radiographic signs of non-venous placement of intended central venous catheters in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Erin C. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Taylor, George A. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are commonly used in children, and inadvertent arterial or extravascular cannulation is rare but has potentially serious complications. To identify the radiographic signs of arterial placement of CVCs. We retrospectively reviewed seven cases of arterially malpositioned CVCs on chest radiograph. These cases were identified through departmental quality-assurance mechanisms and external consultation. Comparison of arterial cases was made with 127 age-matched chest radiographs with CVCs in normal, expected venous location. On each anteroposterior (AP) radiograph we measured the distance of the catheter tip from the right lateral border of the thoracic spine, and the angle of the vertical portion of the catheter relative to the midline. On each lateral radiograph we measured the angle of the vertical portion of each catheter relative to the anterior border of the thoracic spine. When bilateral subclavian catheters were present, the catheter tips were described as crossed, overlapping or uncrossed. On AP radiographs, arterially placed CVCs were more curved to the left, with catheter tip positions located farther to the left of midline than normal venous CVCs. When bilateral, properly placed venous catheters were present, all catheters crossed at the level of the superior vena cava (SVC). When one of the bilateral catheters was in arterial position, neither of the catheters crossed or the inter-catheter crossover distance was exaggerated. On lateral radiographs, there was a marked anterior angulation of the vertical portion of the catheter (mean angle 37 ± 15 standard deviation [SD] in arterial catheters versus 5.9 ± 8.3 SD in normally placed venous catheters). Useful radiographic signs suggestive of unintentional arterial misplacement of vascular catheters include leftward curvature of the vertical portion of the catheter, left-side catheter tip position, lack of catheter crossover on the frontal radiograph, as well as exaggerated

  3. Incidence of catheter-related complications in patients with central venous or hemodialysis catheters: a health care claims database analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napalkov, Pavel; Felici, Diana M; Chu, Laura K; Jacobs, Joan R; Begelman, Susan M

    2013-10-16

    Central venous catheter (CVC) and hemodialysis (HD) catheter usage are associated with complications that occur during catheter insertion, dwell period, and removal. This study aims to identify and describe the incidence rates of catheter-related complications in a large patient population in a United States-based health care claims database after CVC or HD catheter placement. Patients in the i3 InVision DataMart® health care claims database with at least 1 CVC or HD catheter insertion claim were categorized into CVC or HD cohorts using diagnostic and procedural codes from the US Renal Data System, American College of Surgeons, and American Medical Association's Physician Performance Measures. Catheter-related complications were identified using published diagnostic and procedural codes. Incidence rates (IRs)/1000 catheter-days were calculated for complications including catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs), thrombosis, embolism, intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), major bleeding (MB), and mechanical catheter-related complications (MCRCs). Thirty percent of the CVC cohort and 54% of the HD cohort had catheter placements lasting <90 days. Catheter-related complications occurred most often during the first 90 days of catheter placement. IRs were highest for CRBSIs in both cohorts (4.0 [95% CI, 3.7-4.3] and 5.1 [95% CI, 4.7-5.6], respectively). Other IRs in CVC and HD cohorts, respectively, were thrombosis, 1.3 and 0.8; MCRCs, 0.6 and 0.7; embolism, 0.4 and 0.5; MB, 0.1 and 0.3; and ICH, 0.1 in both cohorts. Patients with cancer at baseline had significantly higher IRs for CRBSIs and thrombosis than non-cancer patients. CVC or HD catheter-related complications were most frequently seen in patients 16 years or younger. The risk of catheter-related complications is highest during the first 90 days of catheter placement in patients with CVCs and HD catheters and in younger patients (≤16 years of age) with HD catheters. Data provided in this study can be applied

  4. Analog experiment of transarterial catheter hyperthermic infusion in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Shufeng Li Zheng; Gu Weizhong; Ru Fuming

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the factors related to the heating effect by transarterial catheter hyperthermic infusion with the evaluation of the feasibility in controlling the tumor temperature. Methods: Infusing 55-68 degree C liquid at the speed of 10-40 ml/min through 6F, 5F or 3F catheter with different length respectively under the similar clinical condition. The liquid temperature at the terminal exit of the catheter was measured with a digital thermometer. The factors related to the liquid temperature at the exit of the catheter were analyzed by multiple regression analysis. Results: The infusion temperature , rate and the catheter length were the main related factors to the liquid temperature at the exit of the catheter as the condition similar in clinical use. When 60-65 degree C liquid was infused at the rate of 20-40 ml/min through 5F catheter with length of 80 cm, the mean and 95% confident interval of the liquid temperature at the catheter exit were (47.55±0.44) degree C and 44.61-48.49 degree C respectively. Conclusions: The liquid temperature at the exit of infusion catheter can be regulated and controlled through adjusting the liquid perfusion temperature and speed. (authors)

  5. [The role of the uretral catheter in the development of catheter- related urinary tract infection].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vasilyev, A O; Govorov, A V; Shiryaev, A A; Pushkar, D Yu

    2017-12-01

    The most common source of nosocomial infection is the urinary tract, especially if they it is drained with a urethral catheter. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections account for at least 80% of all complicated urinary tract infections and are the most common type of hospital-acquired infection. Intestinal microflora plays the leading role in the pathogenesis of catheter-associated urinary tract infections, whereas the most important risk factor for their development is the long duration of urinary catheter drainage. In the case of short-term and intermittent catheterization, routine antibiotic prophylaxis is not required, but if a patient develops clinically significant infection, antibiotic therapy is required followed by definitive therapy based on culture. Urethral catheters coated with antimicrobial substances and anti-inflammatory agents can significantly reduce the adhesion and migration of bacteria, thereby reducing the incidence of urinary tract infections. Despite this, the incidence of catheter-associated infection remains high. We have reviewed recent literature related to catheter-associated urinary tract infections and the best means of preventing this condition.

  6. A Dynamical Training and Design Simulator for Active Catheters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Dumont

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This work addresses the design of an active multi-link micro-catheter actuated by Shape Memory Alloy (SMA micro actuators. This may be a response to one medical major demand on such devices, which will be useful for surgical explorations and interventions. In this paper, we focus on a training and design simulator dedicated to such catheters. This simulator is based on an original simulation platform (OpenMASK. The catheter is a robotic system, which is evaluated by a dynamical simulation addressing a navigation task in its environment. The design of the prototype and its mechanical model are presented. We develop an interaction model for contact. This model uses a real medical database for which distance cartography is proposed. Then we focus on an autonomous control model based on a multi-agent approach and including the behaviour description of the SMA actuators. Results of mechanical simulations including interaction with the ducts are presented. Furthermore, the interest of such a simulator is presented by applying virtual prototyping techniques for the design optimization. This optimization process is achieved by using genetic algorithms at different stages with respect to the specified task.

  7. A Dynamical Training and Design Simulator for Active Catheters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Dumont

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available This work addresses the design of an active multi-link micro-catheter actuated by Shape Memory Alloy (SMA micro actuators. This may be a response to one medical major demand on such devices, which will be useful for surgical explorations and interventions. In this paper, we focus on a training and design simulator dedicated to such catheters. This simulator is based on an original simulation platform (OpenMASK. The catheter is a robotic system, which is evaluated by a dynamical simulation addressing a navigation task in its environment. The design of the prototype and its mechanical model are presented. We develop an interaction model for contact. This model uses a real medical database for which distance cartography is proposed. Then we focus on an autonomous control model based on a multi-agent approach and including the behaviour description of the SMA actuators. Results of mechanical simulations including interaction with the ducts are presented. Furthermore, the interest of such a simulator is presented by applying virtual prototyping techniques for the design optimization. This optimization process is achieved by using genetic algorithms at different stages with respect to the specified task.

  8. Types of urethral catheter for reducing symptomatic urinary tract infections in hospitalised adults requiring short-term catheterisation: multicentre randomised controlled trial and economic evaluation of antimicrobial- and antiseptic-impregnated urethral catheters (the CATHETER trial).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pickard, R; Lam, T; Maclennan, G; Starr, K; Kilonzo, M; McPherson, G; Gillies, K; McDonald, A; Walton, K; Buckley, B; Glazener, C; Boachie, C; Burr, J; Norrie, J; Vale, L; Grant, A; N'dow, J

    2012-11-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) is a major preventable cause of harm for patients in hospital and incurs significant costs for health-care providers such as the UK NHS. Many preventative strategies and measures have been introduced to minimise CAUTI risk, including the use of antimicrobial catheters. However, there is considerable uncertainty regarding their usefulness in terms of reducing symptomatic CAUTI, and whether or not they are cost-effective. Do antimicrobial catheters reduce the rate of symptomatic urinary tract infection (UTI) during short-term hospital use and is their use cost-effective for the UK NHS? A pragmatic multicentre UK randomised controlled trial comparing three catheters as they would be used in the UK NHS: antimicrobial-impregnated (nitrofurazone) and antiseptic-coated (silver alloy) catheters with the standard polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE)-coated catheters. Economic evaluation used a decision model populated with data from the trial. Sensitivity analysis was used to explore uncertainty. Relevant clinical departments in 24 NHS hospitals throughout the UK. Adults requiring temporary urethral catheterisation for a period of between 1 and 14 days as part of their care, predominantly as a result of elective surgery. Eligible participants were randomised 1 : 1 : 1 to one of three types of urethral catheter in order to make the following pragmatic comparisons: nitrofurazone-impregnated silicone catheter compared with standard PTFE-coated latex catheter; and silver alloy-coated hydrogel latex catheter compared with standard PTFE-coated latex catheter. The primary outcome for clinical effectiveness was the incidence of UTI at any time up to 6 weeks post randomisation. This was defined as any symptom reported during catheterisation, up to 3 days or 1 or 2 weeks post catheter removal or 6 weeks post randomisation combined with a prescription of antibiotics, at any of these times, for presumed symptomatic UTI. The primary economic

  9. Catheter-associated UTI

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... UTI; Health care-associated UTI; Catheter-associated bacteriuria; Hospital acquired-UTI Images Bladder catheterization, female Bladder catheterization, male References Calfee DP. Prevention and control of health care-associated infections. In: Goldman L, Schafer AI, eds. Goldman's Cecil ...

  10. Catheter-related bloodstream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, Matthew R; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2009-04-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSIs) are a common, frequently preventable complication of central venous catheterization. CR-BSIs can be prevented by strict attention to insertion and maintenance of central venous catheters and removing unneeded catheters as soon as possible. Antiseptic- or antibiotic-impregnated catheters are also an effective tool to prevent infections. The diagnosis of CR-BSI is made largely based on culture results. CR-BSIs should always be treated with antibiotics, and except in rare circumstances the infected catheter needs to be removed.

  11. A cost-effectiveness analysis of long-term intermittent catheterisation with hydrophilic and uncoated catheters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clark, J F; Mealing, S J; Scott, D A

    2016-01-01

    includes the long-term sequelae of impaired renal function and urinary tract infection (UTI). SETTING: Analysis based on a UK perspective. METHODS: A probabilistic Markov decision model was constructed, to compare lifetime costs and quality-adjusted life years, taking renal and UTI health states...... into consideration, as well as other catheter-related events. UTI event rates for the primary data set were based on data from hospital settings to ensure controlled and accurate reporting. A sensitivity analysis was applied to evaluate best- and worst-case scenarios. RESULTS: The model predicts that a 36-year......-old SCI patient with chronic urinary retention will live an additional 1.4 years if using HC catheters compared with UC catheters, at an incremental cost of £2100. Moreover, the lifetime number of UTI events will be reduced by 16%. All best- and worst-case estimates were within the UK threshold of being...

  12. Quantification of Horseradish Peroxidase Delivery into the Arterial Wall In Vivo as a Model of Local Drug Treatment: Comparison Between a Porous and a Gel-Coated Balloon Catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dick, Armin; Kromen, Wolfgang; Juengling, Eberhard; Grosskortenhaus, Stephanie; Kammermeier, Helmut; Vorwerk, Dierk; Guenther, Rolf W.

    1999-01-01

    Purpose: To quantify horseradish peroxidase (HRP) delivery into the arterial wall, as a model of local drug delivery, and to compare two different percutaneous delivery balloons. Methods: Perforated and hydrophilic hydrogel-coated balloon catheters were used to deliver HRP in aqueous solution into the wall of porcine iliac arteries in vivo. HRP solutions of 1 mg/ml were used together with both perforated and hydrophilic hydrogel-coated balloon catheters and 40 mg/ml HRP solutions were used with the hydrogel-coated balloon only. The amount of HRP deposited in the arterial wall was then determined photospectrometrically. Results: Using the 1 mg/ml HRP solution, the hydrogel-coated balloon absorbed 0.047 mg HRP into the coating. Treatment with this balloon resulted in a mean vessel wall concentration of 7.4 μg HRP/g tissue ± 93% (standard deviation) (n 7). Treatment with the hydrogel-coated balloon that had absorbed 1.88 mg HRP into the coating (using the 40 mg/ml HRP solution) led to a mean vessel wall concentration of 69.5 μg HRP/g tissue ± 74% (n = 7). Treatment with the perforated balloon using 1 mg/ml aqueous HRP solution led to a mean vessel wall concentration of 174 μg/g ± 81% (n = 7). Differences between the hydrogel-coated and perforated balloons (1 mg/g solutions of HRP) and between hydrogel-coated balloons (0.047 mg vs 1.88 mg absorbed into the balloon coating) were significant (p < 0.05; two-sided Wilcoxon test). Conclusions: The use of a perforated balloon catheter allowed the delivery of a higher total amount of HRP compared with the hydrogel-coated balloon, but at the cost of a higher systemic HRP application. To deliver 174 μg HRP per gram of vessel wall with the perforated balloon, 6.5 ± 1.5 mg HRP were lost into the arterial blood (delivery efficiency range = 0.2%-0.3%). With 0.047 mg HRP loaded into the coating of the hydrogel balloon, 7.4 μg HRP could be applied to 1 g of vessel wall (delivery efficiency 1.7%), and with 1.88 mg HRP loaded

  13. Intravascular (catheter) MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, A.M.; Hurst, G.C.; Katz, D.E.; Dverk, J.L.; Wiesen, E.J.; Czerski, L.W.; Malaya, R.; Bellon, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    Intravascular MR probes allow excellent spatial resolution and have the potential to detect arterial wall microstructure. Ultrasonic intravascular probes suggest that detailed morphologic information can assist clinical decision making. Catheter MR probes of 2--7 mm outside diameter (OD) were built of copper wire, Teflon, and parts from standard commercial catheters. The probes were connected to the surface coil receiver input of our Picker VISTA 2055HP 1.5-T imaging system. The extant (linear) body coil was used for transmit. Phantoms were constructed of coaxial glass MR tubes, filled with doped water. Watanabe rabbit aorta and human autopsy iliac artery specimens were examined within 4 hours of excision or stored by freezing. In vivo iliac arteries in dogs under general anesthesia were imaged, with percutaneous placement of the probe. Results are presented

  14. Dosimetric equivalence of nonstandard HDR brachytherapy catheter patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cunha, J. A. M.; Hsu, I-C.; Pouliot, J.

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether alternative high dose rate prostate brachytherapy catheter patterns can result in similar or improved dose distributions while providing better access and reducing trauma. Materials and Methods: Standard prostate cancer high dose rate brachytherapy uses a regular grid of parallel needle positions to guide the catheter insertion. This geometry does not easily allow the physician to avoid piercing the critical structures near the penile bulb nor does it provide position flexibility in the case of pubic arch interference. This study used CT datasets with 3 mm slice spacing from ten previously treated patients and digitized new catheters following three hypothetical catheter patterns: conical, bi-conical, and fireworks. The conical patterns were used to accommodate a robotic delivery using a single entry point. The bi-conical and fireworks patterns were specifically designed to avoid the critical structures near the penile bulb. For each catheter distribution, a plan was optimized with the inverse planning algorithm, IPSA, and compared with the plan used for treatment. Irrelevant of catheter geometry, a plan must fulfill the RTOG-0321 dose criteria for target dose coverage (V 100 Prostate >90%) and organ-at-risk dose sparing (V 75 Bladder 75 Rectum 125 Urethra <<1 cc). Results: The three nonstandard catheter patterns used 16 nonparallel, straight divergent catheters, with entry points in the perineum. Thirty plans from ten patients with prostate sizes ranging from 26 to 89 cc were optimized. All nonstandard patterns fulfilled the RTOG criteria when the clinical plan did. In some cases, the dose distribution was improved by better sparing the organs-at-risk. Conclusion: Alternative catheter patterns can provide the physician with additional ways to treat patients previously considered unsuited for brachytherapy treatment (pubic arch interference) and facilitate robotic guidance of catheter insertion. In addition, alternative catheter

  15. Foley catheter for cervical priming in induction of labour at University Obstetrics Unit, Colombo, Sri Lanka: a clinical audit with a patient satisfaction survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patabendige, M; Jayawardane, A

    2017-04-12

    Intracervical insertion of a Foley catheter (FC) has shown to be a safe, effective and relatively feasible mechanical method of cervical priming in induction of labour (IOL). We evaluated indications, effectiveness, patient acceptability and outcomes of FC use in IOL adhering to the ward protocol in our unit. A clinical audit with a patient satisfaction survey conducted between July and September 2013 in University Obstetric Unit, Colombo, Sri Lanka. Patients selected for IOL for obstetric reasons were primed with Foley as per ward protocol. All had singleton pregnancies with cephalic presentation, intact membranes and period of gestation of 37 weeks or above. Women with a history of more than one caesarean section or uterine surgery, low-lying placenta and fetal growth restriction were excluded. Subjects who had a Modified Bishop Score (MBS) of less than 3, a 16Fr FC was inserted into cervical canal. Catheter was left undisturbed until spontaneous expulsion or no longer than 48 h. In women with MBS of less than 6 at 48 h after FC insertion, 3 mg prostaglandin E2 vaginal tablet was used subsequently. Artificial membrane rupture with or without oxytocin was used if MBS of 6 or more and in women not in labour 24 h after prostaglandins. Patient satisfaction for Foley insertion was assessed with regards to the degree of comfort using a validated visual analogue scale (0-10). There were a total of 910 deliveries during the study period. Fifty-six women were primed with FC. Thirty-two (57%) were nulliparous. During induction of labour, 53(95%) reported mild or no discomfort. MBS of 6 or more was achieved in 36/56 (64%) Foley insertions. Twenty needed further intervention with prostaglandins. FC only group had 5 caesarean sections and 31 vaginal deliveries and Foley/prostaglandin group had 7 caesarean sections and 13 vaginal deliveries. Of the 24 women who were induced due to completion of 41 weeks of gestation with otherwise uncomplicated pregnancies, 17 had MBS >6

  16. Healthcare resource consumption for intermittent urinary catheterisation: cost-effectiveness of hydrophilic catheters and budget impact analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rognoni, Carla; Tarricone, Rosanna

    2017-01-17

    This study presents a cost-effectiveness analysis comparing hydrophilic coated to uncoated catheters for patients performing urinary intermittent catheterisation. A national budget impact analysis is also included to evaluate the impact of intermittent catheterisation for management of bladder dysfunctions over a period of 5 years. A Markov model (lifetime horizon, 1 year cycle length) was developed to project health outcomes (life years and quality-adjusted life years) and economic consequences related to patients using hydrophilic coated or uncoated catheters. The model was populated with catheter-related clinical efficacy data retrieved from randomised controlled trials and quality-of-life data (utility weights) from the literature. Cost data (EUR, 2015) were estimated on the basis of healthcare resource consumption derived from an e-survey addressed to key opinion leaders in the field. Italian Healthcare Service perspective. Patients with spinal cord injury performing intermittent urinary catheterisation in the home setting. Incremental cost-effectiveness and cost-utility ratios (ICER and ICUR) of hydrophilic coated versus uncoated catheters and associated healthcare budget impact. The base-case ICER and ICUR associated with hydrophilic coated catheters were €20 761 and €24 405, respectively. This implies that hydrophilic coated catheters are likely to be cost-effective in comparison to uncoated ones, as proposed Italian threshold values range between €25 000 and €66 400. Considering a market share at year 5 of 89% hydrophilic catheters and 11% uncoated catheters, the additional cost for Italy is approximately €12 million in the next 5 years (current market share scenario for year 0: 80% hydrophilic catheters and 20% uncoated catheters). Considered over a lifetime, hydrophilic coated catheters are potentially a cost-effective choice in comparison to uncoated ones. These findings can assist policymakers in evaluating intermittent

  17. Pacemaker implantation after catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshmukh, Abhishek J; Yao, Xiaoxi; Schilz, Stephanie; Van Houten, Holly; Sangaralingham, Lindsey R; Asirvatham, Samuel J; Friedman, Paul A; Packer, Douglas L; Noseworthy, Peter A

    2016-01-01

    Sinus node dysfunction requiring pacemaker implantation is commonly associated with atrial fibrillation (AF), but may not be clinically apparent until restoration of sinus rhythm with ablation or cardioversion. We sought to determine frequency, time course, and predictors for pacemaker implantation after catheter ablation, and to compare the overall rates to a matched cardioversion cohort. We conducted a retrospective analysis using a large US commercial insurance database and identified 12,158 AF patients who underwent catheter ablation between January 1, 2005 and December 31, 2012. Over an average of 2.4 years of follow-up, 5.6 % of the patients underwent pacemaker implantation. Using the Cox proportional hazards models, we found that risk of risks of pacemaker implantation was associated with older age (50-64 and ≥65 versus pacemaker implantation between ablation patients and propensity score (PS)-matched cardioversion groups (3.5 versus. 4.1 % at 1 year and 8.8 versus 8.3 % at 5 years). Overall, pacemaker implantation occurs in about 1/28 patients within 1 year of catheter ablation. The overall implantation rate decreased between 2005 and 2012. Furthermore, the risk after ablation is similar to cardioversion, suggesting that patients require pacing due to a common underlying electrophysiologic substrate, rather than the ablation itself.

  18. [Incidence of phlebitis due to peripherally inserted venous catheters: impact of a catheter management protocol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrete-Morales, C; Vázquez-Pérez, M A; Sánchez-Berna, M; Gilabert-Cerro, I; Corzo-Delgado, J E; Pineda-Vergara, J A; Vergara-López, S; Gómez-Mateos, J

    2010-01-01

    To assess the impact on the incidence of PPIVC by implementing a catheter management protocol and to determine risk factors for PPIVC development in hospitalized patients. A total of 3978 episodes of venous catheterization were prospectively included from September 2002 to December 2007. A catheter management protocol was implemented during this period of time. The incidence and variables associated to the occurrence of PPIVC were determined. The incidence of PPIVC from 2002 to 2007 was 4.8%, 4.3%, 3.6%, 2.5%, 1.3% and 1.8% (phistory of phlebitis was the only factor independently associated to phlebitis due to peripherally inserted central venous catheters (AOR 3.24; CI at 95% CI= 1.05-9.98, p=0.04). A catheter management protocol decreases the incidence of PPIVC in hospitalized patients. The risk of PPIVC increases for peripherally inserted central venous catheters when the patients have a history of phlebitis and for peripheral venous catheters when amiodarone or cefotaxime are infused. Catheterization of peripheral veins performed during morning shifts is associated with a lower incidence of PPIVC when compared with night shift catheterizations.

  19. A prototype catheter designed for ultraviolet C disinfection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Jimmy; Begovic, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    UVC light exposure, sampling and plate counting. Findings Two minutes of UVC exposure was sufficient to obtain 4 log10 disinfection for the full-length prototype catheter. This exposure corresponds to ∼40 mJ/cm2 at the catheter tip and indicates that even shorter exposure times can be achieved...

  20. Predicting success of catheter drainage in infected necrotizing pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollemans, Robbert A.; Bollen, Thomas L.; Van Brunschot, Sandra; Bakker, Olaf J.; Ali, Usama Ahmed; Van Goor, Harry; Boermeester, Marja A.; Gooszen, Hein G.; Besselink, Marc G.; Van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: At least 30% of patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis are successfully treated with catheter drainage alone. It is currently not possible to predict which patients also need necrosectomy. We evaluated predictive factors for successful catheter drainage. Methods: This was a

  1. Predicting Success of Catheter Drainage in Infected Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollemans, Robbert A.; Bollen, Thomas L.; van Brunschot, Sandra; Bakker, Olaf J.; Ahmed Ali, Usama; van Goor, Harry; Boermeester, Marja A.; Gooszen, Hein G.; Besselink, Marc G.; van Santvoort, Hjalmar C.

    2016-01-01

    At least 30% of patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis are successfully treated with catheter drainage alone. It is currently not possible to predict which patients also need necrosectomy. We evaluated predictive factors for successful catheter drainage. This was a post hoc analysis of 130

  2. Predicting Success of Catheter Drainage in Infected Necrotizing Pancreatitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hollemans, R.A.; Bollen, T.L.; Brunschot, S. van; Bakker, O.J.; Ali, U. Ahmed; Goor, H. van; Boermeester, M.A.; Gooszen, H.G.; Besselink, M.G.; Santvoort, H.C. van

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: At least 30% of patients with infected necrotizing pancreatitis are successfully treated with catheter drainage alone. It is currently not possible to predict which patients also need necrosectomy. We evaluated predictive factors for successful catheter drainage. METHODS: This was a

  3. A system for visualization and automatic placement of the endoclamp balloon catheter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furtado, Hugo; Stüdeli, Thomas; Sette, Mauro; Samset, Eigil; Gersak, Borut

    2010-02-01

    The European research network "Augmented Reality in Surgery" (ARIS*ER) developed a system that supports minimally invasive cardiac surgery based on augmented reality (AR) technology. The system supports the surgical team during aortic endoclamping where a balloon catheter has to be positioned and kept in place within the aorta. The presented system addresses the two biggest difficulties of the task: lack of visualization and difficulty in maneuvering the catheter. The system was developed using a user centered design methodology with medical doctors, engineers and human factor specialists equally involved in all the development steps. The system was implemented using the AR framework "Studierstube" developed at TU Graz and can be used to visualize in real-time the position of the balloon catheter inside the aorta. The spatial position of the catheter is measured by a magnetic tracking system and superimposed on a 3D model of the patient's thorax. The alignment is made with a rigid registration algorithm. Together with a user defined target, the spatial position data drives an actuator which adjusts the position of the catheter in the initial placement and corrects migrations during the surgery. Two user studies with a silicon phantom show promising results regarding usefulness of the system: the users perform the placement tasks faster and more accurately than with the current restricted visual support. Animal studies also provided a first indication that the system brings additional value in the real clinical setting. This work represents a major step towards safer and simpler minimally invasive cardiac surgery.

  4. Real-time circumferential mapping catheter tracking for motion compensation in atrial fibrillation ablation procedures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brost, Alexander; Bourier, Felix; Wimmer, Andreas; Koch, Martin; Kiraly, Atilla; Liao, Rui; Kurzidim, Klaus; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2012-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib) has been identified as a major cause of stroke. Radiofrequency catheter ablation has become an increasingly important treatment option, especially when drug therapy fails. Navigation under X-ray can be enhanced by using augmented fluoroscopy. It renders overlay images from pre-operative 3-D data sets which are then fused with X-ray images to provide more details about the underlying soft-tissue anatomy. Unfortunately, these fluoroscopic overlay images are compromised by respiratory and cardiac motion. Various methods to deal with motion have been proposed. To meet clinical demands, they have to be fast. Methods providing a processing frame rate of 3 frames-per-second (fps) are considered suitable for interventional electrophysiology catheter procedures if an acquisition frame rate of 2 fps is used. Unfortunately, when working at a processing rate of 3 fps, the delay until the actual motion compensated image can be displayed is about 300 ms. More recent algorithms can achieve frame rates of up to 20 fps, which reduces the lag to 50 ms. By using a novel approach involving a 3-D catheter model, catheter segmentation and a distance transform, we can speed up motion compensation to 25 fps which results in a display delay of only 40 ms on a standard workstation for medical applications. Our method uses a constrained 2-D/3-D registration to perform catheter tracking, and it obtained a 2-D tracking error of 0.61 mm.

  5. The importance of effective catheter securement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jayne

    This article examines the importance of securing/fixing indwelling urinary catheters. The Oxford English dictionary interlinks the two words-'secure' and 'fix'-as having the same meaning. To secure the catheter should not be confused with 'support', whereby the weight of the urine drainage bag is supported with the use of velcro straps or a sleeve. The author introduces the need for the concept of this practice to be at the forefront of nurses' minds in all settings, and this is demonstrated through the use of case studies. Current guidance in this area is reviewed, as well as the problems that can arise when catheters are not secured properly and the available products for health professionals to use.

  6. Percutaneous Management of Postoperative Duodenal Stump Leakage with Foley Catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oh, Jung Suk; Lee, Hae Giu; Chun, Ho Jong; Choi, Byung Gil; Lee, Sang Hoon; Hahn, Seong Tai; Ohm, Joon Young

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to evaluate retrospectively the safety and efficacy of the percutaneous management of duodenal stump leakage with a Foley catheter after subtotal gastrectomy. Methods: Ten consecutive patients (M:F = 9:1, median age: 64 years) were included in this retrospective study. The duodenal stump leakages were diagnosed in all the patients within a median of 10 days (range, 6–20). At first, the patients underwent percutaneous drainage on the day of or the day after confirmation of the presence of duodenal stump leakage, and then the Foley catheters were replaced at a median of 9 days (range, 6–38) after the percutaneous drainage. Results: Foley catheters were placed successfully in the duodenal lumen of all the patients under a fluoroscopic guide. No complication was observed during and after the procedures in all the patients. All of the patients started a regular diet 1 day after the Foley catheter placement. The patients were discharged at a median of 7 days (range, 5–14) after the Foley catheter placement. The catheters were removed in an outpatient clinic 10–58 days (median, 28) after the Foley catheter placement. Conclusions: Fluoroscopy-guided percutaneous Foley catheter placement may be a safe and effective treatment option for postoperative duodenal stump leakage and may allow for shorter hospital stays, earlier oral intake, and more effective control of leakage sites

  7. Laser welding of balloon catheters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flanagan, Aidan J.

    2003-03-01

    The balloon catheter is one of the principal instruments of non-invasive vascular surgery. It is used most commonly for angioplasty (and in recent years for delivering stents) at a multitude of different sites in the body from small arteries in the heart to the bilary duct. It is composed of a polymer balloon that is attached to a polymer shaft at two points called the distal and proximal bonds. The diverse utility of balloon catheters means a large range of component sizes and materials are used during production; this leads to a complexity of bonding methods and technology. The proximal and distal bonds have been conventionally made using cyanoacrylate or UV curing glue, however with performance requirements of bond strength, flexibility, profile, and manufacturing costs these bonds are increasingly being made by welding using laser, RF, and Hot Jaw methods. This paper describes laser welding of distal and proximal balloon bonds and details beam delivery, bonding mechanisms, bond shaping, laser types, and wavelength choice.

  8. Radiologic placement of Hickman catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robertson, L.J.; Mauro, M.A.; Jaques, P.F.

    1988-01-01

    Hickman catheter inserter has previously been predominantly accomplished surgically by means of venous cutdown or percutaneous placement in the operating room. The authors describe their method and results for 55 consecutive percutaneous placements of Hickman catheters in the interventional radiology suite. Complication rates were comparable to those for surgical techniques. Radiologic placement resulted in increased convenience, decreased time and cost of insertion, and super fluoroscopic control of catheter placement and any special manipulations. Modern angiographic materials provide safer access to the subclavian vein than traditional methods. The authors conclude that radiologic placement of Hickman catheters offers significant advantages over traditional surgical placement

  9. Femoral venous catheters: a safe alternative for delivering parenteral alimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, B; Kanter, G; Titus, D

    1994-04-01

    Femoral vein catheterization is an alternative method of obtaining central venous access. Placement of femoral venous catheters (FVCs) is possible in the majority of patients, suitable for most indications, and associated with a low complication rate during insertion. We wished to determine the incidence of infections or other complications resulting when parenteral nutrition was delivered through FVCs. Fifty-two patients were followed from a hospital-wide population including patients in the critical care units. Triple-lumen catheters were placed by using the sterile Seldinger technique, and sites were examined daily for inflammation. Bacteriologic surveillance was accomplished by submitting the catheter tip for semiquantitative cultures. If catheter line sepsis was suspected, blood samples for cultures were drawn through the catheter and peripherally. The rate of occurrence of colonized catheters was 9.6% (five of 52), and catheter sepsis was found in one case (1.9%). Other than inflammation at six (11.5%) of 52 catheter sites, noninfectious complications of FVCs were not found. On the basis of these findings, we consider FVC-delivered parenteral alimentation a safe and effective alternative to other forms of central venous access.

  10. Positioning of nasobiliary tube using magnet-loaded catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Seitaro; Sato, Takamitsu; Kato, Shingo; Hosono, Kunihiro; Kobayashi, Noritoshi; Nakajima, Atsushi; Kubota, Kensuke

    2013-10-01

    In endoscopic nasobiliary drainage (ENBD), repositioning the catheter from the mouth to the nose is complicated. We devised a method using catheters with magnets and verified its utility and safety. We prospectively enrolled 20 patients undergoing ENBD at Yokohama City University Hospital. The procedures were successful in all 20 cases and no case required a change of operators to a senior doctor. The mean time for the procedure was 36.6 seconds. The emetic reflex was induced 0.5 times on average using the magnet method. The mean X-ray exposure time was 29.6 seconds. No complications occurred. The magnet-loaded catheter method for positioning the ENBD catheter before finally leading it through the nose took little time and was performed successfully and safely. Therefore, the magnet method could become the first choice among techniques for ENBD catheter placement. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  11. Catheter versus non-catheter angiography in isolated third nerve palsy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, A.G.

    2007-01-01

    To discuss the controversies surrounding the indications for catheter angiography versus non-catheter and less invasive angiography techniques (e.g. magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) and computerized tomography angiography (CTA)) in the evaluation of patients with a third nerve palsy. Clinical opinion-perspective and literature review. The patient with an isolated third nerve palsy might have a vasculopathic (and typically benign, self limited course) etiology or a life threatening intracranial posterior communicating artery aneurysm. Although it is clear that non-isolated third nerve palsies require imaging directed at the topographical localization of the clinical findings, the evaluation of the neurologically isolated third nerve palsy remains controversial. The completeness of the external (i.e. somatic) motor dysfunction and the presence or absence of internal (i.e. pupillary) dysfunction are generally used to guide the choice of initial neuroimaging. Advances in MRA and CTA technology have reduced but not eliminated our dependence upon catheter angiography in this setting. A properly performed and interpreted MRA or CTA probably will be able to detect greater than 95 % of aneurysms producing a third nerve palsy. The issues surrounding the use of catheter angiography in third nerve palsy are reviewed. If the clinician is highly confident in the capability, availability, and reliability of the neuroradiologist and of their institutional experience and quality of less invasive non-catheter MRA and CTA and if the risk of aneurysm is low or if the risk of angiography is high (e.g. elderly, renal failure, iodinated contrast allergy, risk of stroke) then MRI and MRA (or CTA) may be a reasonable alternative to catheter angiography. Patients with a moderate or uncertain risk of aneurysm and a lower risk for catheter angiography or if there is a low confidence in the quality or the interpretation of the institutional MRA (or CTA) may still require catheter

  12. Accelerator modeling at SPEAR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    LeBlanc, G.; Corbett, W.J.

    1997-01-01

    The response matrix, consisting of the closed orbit change at each beam position monitor (BPM) due to corrector magnet excitations, was measured and analyzed in order to calibrate a linear optics model of SPEAR. The model calibration was accomplished by varying model parameters to minimize the chi-square difference between the measured and the model response matrices. The singular value decomposition (SVD) matrix inversion method was used to solve the simultaneous equations. The calibrated model was then used to calculate corrections to the operational lattice. The results of the calibration and correction procedures are presented

  13. Value of Micronester coils in port-catheter implantation for continuous hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy with fixed catheter tip method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamagami, Takuji; Kato, Takeharu; Hirota, Tatsuya; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Nishimura, Tsunehiko; White, Robert I.

    2008-01-01

    To retrospectively evaluate the use of Micronester coils in port-catheter implantation with the fixed catheter tip method in comparison with other previously used coils. The cohort of this study was 143 consecutive patients with unresectable advanced liver cancer for whom a port-catheter system was percutaneously implanted. In the most recent 32 patients, Micronester coils were used for catheter tip fixation. Details of embolic agents for fixation, persistent blood flow beyond the distal end of the indwelling catheter, and complications were compared between cases without and with Micronester coils. In all, percutaneous port-catheter placement was successful. Mean number of coils used for fixation was 4.2 without Micronester coils vs. 2.5 with Micronester coils. N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA)-Lipiodol was additionally used for catheter tip fixation in 85.6% of 111 procedures without Micronester coils and in 50% of 32 using Micronester coils. The gastroduodenal artery beyond the distal end was not detected at the final examination after any procedure. Catheter dislocation occurred in five and hepatic arterial obstruction or severe stenosis in eight. The number of coils used and necessity of NBCA-Lipiodol could be decreased with usage of Micronester coils without decreasing fixation ability compared to other coils. (orig.)

  14. Spontaneous rotation of the monorail-type guide extension support catheter during advancement of a curved guiding catheter: the potential hazard of twisting with the coronary guidewire.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Sho; Takahashi, Akihiko; Yamada, Takeshi; Mizuguchi, Yukio; Taniguchi, Norimasa; Hata, Tetsuya; Nakajima, Shunsuke

    2017-11-20

    The extension support guiding catheter has been used to perform complex percutaneous coronary intervention to increase back-up support for the guiding catheter or to ensure deep intubation for device delivery. However, because of its monorail design, advancement of the stent into the distal extension tubing segment is sometimes problematic. Although this problem is considered due to simple collision of the stent, operators have observed tangling between a monorail extension catheter and coronary guidewire in some patients. To examine movement of the collar of the extension guide catheter during advancement of the guiding catheter, we set up an in vitro model in which the guiding catheter had two curves. Rotation of the extension guide catheter was examined by both fluoroscopic imaging and movement of the hub of the proximal end of the catheter. During advancement in the first curve, the collar moved toward the outer side of the curve of the guiding catheter as the operator pushed the shaft of the extension guiding catheter, which overrode the guidewire. After crossing the first curve, the collar moved again to the outer side of the second curve (the inner side of the first curve) of the mother catheter, and then, another clockwise rotation was observed in the proximal hub. Consequently, the collar and tubing portion of the extension guide catheter rotated 360° around the coronary guidewire, and the monorail extension catheter and guidewire became tangled. There is a potential risk of unintentional twisting with the guidewire during advancement into the curved guiding catheter because of its monorail design.

  15. Comparative evaluation of paired blood culture (aerobic/aerobic) and single blood culture, along with clinical importance in catheter versus peripheral line at a tertiary care hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarai, B; Das, P; Kumar, D; Budhiraja, S

    2012-01-01

    Paired blood culture (PBC) is uncommon practice in hospitals in India, leading to delayed and inadequate diagnosis. Also contamination remains a critical determinant in hampering the definitive diagnosis. To establish the need of PBC over single blood culture (SBC) along with the degree of contamination, this comparative retrospective study was initiated. We processed 2553 PBC and 4350 SBC in BacT/ALERT 3D (bioMerieux) between October 2010 and June 2011. The positive cultures were identified in VITEK 2 Compact (bioMerieux). True positivity and contaminants were also analyzed in 486 samples received from catheter and peripheral line. Out of 2553 PBC samples, positivity was seen in 350 (13.70%). In 4350 SBC samples, positivity was seen in 200 samples (4.59%). In PBC true pathogens were 267 (10.45%) and contaminants were 83 (3.25%), whereas in SBC 153 (3.51%) were true positives and contaminants were 47 (1.08%). Most of the blood cultures (99.27 %) grew within 72 h and 95.8% were isolated within 48 h. In 486 PBCs received from catheter/periphery (one each), catheter positivity was found in 85 (true positives were 48, false positives 37). In peripheral samples true positives were 50 and false positives were 8. Significantly higher positive rates were seen in PBCs compared with SBCs. Automated blood culture and identification methods significantly reduced the time required for processing of samples and also facilitated yield of diverse/rare organisms. Blood culture from catheter line had higher false positives than peripheral blood culture. Thus every positive result from a catheter must be correlated with clinical findings and requires further confirmation.

  16. Comparison of the Effectiveness of Three Methods of Recanalization in a Model of the Middle Cerebral Artery: Thrombus Aspiration via a 4F Catheter, Thrombus Aspiration via the GP Thromboaspiration Device, and Mechanical Thrombectomy Using the Solitaire Thrombectomy Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Tennuci

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. This paper compares different approaches to recanalization in a model of the middle cerebral artery (MCA. Methods. An occlusive thrombus (lamb's blood was introduced into the MCA of a model of the cerebral circulation perfused with Hartmann's solution (80 pulsations/min, mean pressure 90 mm Hg. Three methods of clot retrieval were tested: thrombus aspiration via a 4F catheter (n=26, thrombus aspiration via the GP thrombus aspiration device (GPTAD (n=30, and mechanical thrombectomy via the Solitaire Device (n=30. Results. Recanalization rate was similar for all 3 approaches (62%, 77%, and 85%. Time to recanalization was faster with aspiration devices (41 SD 42 s for 4F and 61 SD 21 s for GPTAD than with the Solitaire (197 SD 64 s P<.05 Kruksal-Wallis. Clot fragmentation was the same in the Solitaire (23% and the GPTAD (23%, but higher with the 4F (53%, P<.05. Conclusion. In this model, thrombus aspiration was faster than mechanical thrombectomy, and similarly effective at recanalization. These results should be confirmed in vivo.

  17. High dose urokinase for restoration of patency of occluded permanent central venous catheters in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shavit, L; Lifschitz, M; Plaksin, J; Grenader, T; Slotki, I

    2010-10-01

    Catheter thrombosis is common and results in inadequate dialysis treatment and, frequently, in catheter loss. Since dialysis treatment runs on a strict schedule, occluded catheters need to be restored in a timely and cost effective manner. We present a new shortened protocol of urokinase infusion that allows hemodialysis to be performed within 90 minutes. To chronic hemodialysis patients, who developed complete catheter occlusion, urokinase was infused simultaneously through both lumens of the catheter (125,000 units to each lumen) over 90 minutes. Technical success was defined as restoring blood pump speed to at least 250 ml/min. We determined the average time from catheter placement to first clot event (primary patency PP), recurrent clot event after urokinase treatment (secondary patency SP), catheter salvage rate and cause for removal. 37 catheters developed total thrombosis and urokinase was used to restore patency one or more times (total 47 treatments). Catheter salvage rate was 97 %. The average time of PP was 152 ± 56 days (7 - 784 days). Nine patients (30%) developed recurrent occlusion and the average time of SP was 64 ± 34 days (2 - 364 days). One catheter was removed because of dysfunction due to thrombosis. Other catheters were removed due to infection, fistula maturation or fell out spontaneously. Hemodialysis was performed immediately after treatment with blood speed of 250 ml/min in all patients. Our protocol is highly effective, short, and allows to restore patency of totally occluded central venous catheters with minimal disruption of the dialysis session.

  18. Novel Antiseptic Urinary Catheters for Prevention of Urinary Tract Infections: Correlation of In Vivo and In Vitro Test Results▿

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hachem, Ray; Reitzel, Ruth; Borne, Agatha; Jiang, Ying; Tinkey, Peggy; Uthamanthil, Rajesh; Chandra, Jyotsna; Ghannoum, Mahmoud; Raad, Issam

    2009-01-01

    Urinary catheters are widely used for hospitalized patients and are often associated with high rates of urinary tract infection. We evaluated in vitro the antiadherence activity of a novel antiseptic Gendine-coated urinary catheter against several multidrug-resistant bacteria. Gendine-coated urinary catheters were compared to silver hydrogel-coated Foley catheters and uncoated catheters. Bacterial biofilm formation was assessed by quantitative culture and scanning electron microscopy. These data were further correlated to an in vivo rabbit model. We challenged 31 rabbits daily for 4 days by inoculating the urethral meatus with 1.0 × 109 CFU streptomycin-resistant Escherichia coli per day. In vitro, Gendine-coated urinary catheters reduced the CFU of all organisms tested for biofilm adherence compared with uncoated and silver hydrogel-coated catheters (P < 0.004). Scanning electron microscopy analysis showed that a thick biofilm overlaid the control catheter and the silver hydrogel-coated catheters but not the Gendine-coated urinary catheter. Similar results were found with the rabbit model. Bacteriuria was present in 60% of rabbits with uncoated catheters and 71% of those with silver hydrogel-coated catheters (P < 0.01) but not in those with Gendine-coated urinary catheters. No rabbits with Gendine-coated urinary catheters had invasive bladder infections. Histopathologic assessment revealed no differences in toxicity or staining. Gendine-coated urinary catheters were more efficacious in preventing catheter-associated colonization and urinary tract infections than were silver hydrogel-coated Foley catheters and uncoated catheters. PMID:19805562

  19. Agile and Bright Intracardiac Catheters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Pekař (Martin)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractIntracardiac imaging catheters represent unique instruments to diagnose and treat a diseased heart. While there are imminent advances in medical innovation, many of the commercially available imaging catheters are outdated. Some of them have been designed more than 20 years and

  20. [Venous catheter-related infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrer, Carmen; Almirante, Benito

    2014-02-01

    Venous catheter-related infections are a problem of particular importance, due to their frequency, morbidity and mortality, and because they are potentially preventable clinical processes. At present, the majority of hospitalized patients and a considerable number of outpatients are carriers of these devices. There has been a remarkable growth of knowledge of the epidemiology of these infections, the most appropriate methodology for diagnosis, the therapeutic and, in particular, the preventive strategies. Multimodal strategies, including educational programs directed at staff and a bundle of simple measures for implementation, applied to high-risk patients have demonstrated great effectiveness for their prevention. In this review the epidemiology, the diagnosis, and the therapeutic and preventive aspects of these infections are updated. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  1. A pilot study of chest tube versus pigtail catheter drainage of acute hemothorax in swine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Russo, Rachel M; Zakaluzny, Scott A; Neff, Lucas P; Grayson, J Kevin; Hight, Rachel A; Galante, Joseph M; Shatz, David V

    2015-12-01

    Evacuation of traumatic hemothorax (HTx) is typically accomplished with large-bore (28-40 Fr) chest tubes, often resulting in patient discomfort. Management of HTx with smaller (14 Fr) pigtail catheters has not been widely adopted because of concerns about tube occlusion and blood evacuation rates. We compared pigtail catheters with chest tubes for the drainage of acute HTx in a swine model. Six Yorkshire cross-bred swine (44-54 kg) were anesthetized, instrumented, and mechanically ventilated. A 32 Fr chest tube was placed in one randomly assigned hemithorax; a 14 Fr pigtail catheter was placed in the other. Each was connected to a chest drainage system at -20 cm H2O suction and clamped. Over 15 minutes, 1,500 mL of arterial blood was withdrawn via femoral artery catheters. Seven hundred fifty milliliters of the withdrawn blood was instilled into each pleural space, and fluid resuscitation with colloid was initiated. The chest drains were then unclamped. Output from each drain was measured every minute for 5 minutes and then every 5 minutes for 40 minutes. The swine were euthanized, and thoracotomies were performed to quantify the volume of blood remaining in each pleural space and to examine the position of each tube. Blood drainage was more rapid from the chest tube during the first 3 minutes compared with the pigtail catheter (348 ± 109 mL/min vs. 176 ± 53 mL/min), but this difference was not statistically significant (p = 0.19). Thereafter, the rates of drainage between the two tubes were not substantially different. The chest tube drained a higher total percentage of the blood from the chest (87.3% vs. 70.3%), but this difference did not reach statistical significance (p = 0.21). We found no statistically significant difference in the volume of blood drained by a 14 Fr pigtail catheter compared with a 32 Fr chest tube.

  2. Feedforward Coordinate Control of a Robotic Cell Injection Catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Weyland; Law, Peter K

    2017-08-01

    Remote and robotically actuated catheters are the stepping-stones toward autonomous catheters, where complex intravascular procedures may be performed with minimal intervention from a physician. This article proposes a concept for the positional, feedforward control of a robotically actuated cell injection catheter used for the injection of myogenic or undifferentiated stem cells into the myocardial infarct boundary zones of the left ventricle. The prototype for the catheter system was built upon a needle-based catheter with a single degree of deflection, a 3-D printed handle combined with actuators, and the Arduino microcontroller platform. A bench setup was used to mimic a left ventricle catheter procedure starting from the femoral artery. Using Matlab and the open-source video modeling tool Tracker, the planar coordinates ( y, z) of the catheter position were analyzed, and a feedforward control system was developed based on empirical models. Using the Student's t test with a sample size of 26, it was determined that for both the y- and z-axes, the mean discrepancy between the calibrated and theoretical coordinate values had no significant difference compared to the hypothetical value of µ = 0. The root mean square error of the calibrated coordinates also showed an 88% improvement in the z-axis and 31% improvement in the y-axis compared to the unmodified trial run. This proof of concept investigation leads to the possibility of further developing a feedfoward control system in vivo using catheters with omnidirectional deflection. Feedforward positional control allows for more flexibility in the design of an automated catheter system where problems such as systemic time delay may be a hindrance in instances requiring an immediate reaction.

  3. Novel paclitaxel-coated angioplasty balloon catheter based on cetylpyridinium salicylate: Preparation, characterization and simulated use in an in vitro vessel model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Petersen, Svea; Kaule, Sebastian; Stein, Florian; Minrath, Ingo; Schmitz, Klaus-Peter; Kragl, Udo; Sternberg, Katrin

    2013-01-01

    Drug-coated balloons (DCB), which have emerged as therapeutic alternative to drug-eluting stents in percutaneous cardiovascular intervention, are well described with regard to clinical efficiency and safety within a number of clinical studies. In vitro studies elucidating the correlation of coating method and composition with DCB performance are however rare but considered important for the understanding of DCB requirements and the improvement of established DCB. In this context, we evaluated the applicability of a pipetting, dip-coating, and spray-coating process for the establishment of DCB based on paclitaxel (PTX) and the ionic liquid cetylpyridinium salicylate (Cetpyrsal) as novel innovative additive in three different compositions. Among tested methods and compositions, the pipetting process with 50 wt.% PTX resulted in most promising coatings as drug load was less controllable by the other processes and higher PTX contents led to considerable drug crystallization, as visualized by electron microscopy, accelerating PTX loss during short-term elution. Applying these conditions, homogeneous coatings could be applied on balloon catheter, whose simulated use in an in vitro vessel model revealed percental drug losses of 36 and 28% during transit and percental drug transfers of 12 and 40% under expansion for coatings applied in expanded and folded balloon condition, respectively. In comparison to literature values, these results support the high potential of Cetpyrsal as novel DCB matrix regarding low drug loss and efficient drug transfer. - Highlights: • We provide detailed in vitro data for definition of DCB coating requirements. • An in vitro vessel model for evaluating drug delivery from DCB is presented. • Innovative ionic liquid-based coatings for DCB are developed. • The coating shows low drug loss and efficient drug transfer

  4. Novel paclitaxel-coated angioplasty balloon catheter based on cetylpyridinium salicylate: Preparation, characterization and simulated use in an in vitro vessel model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petersen, Svea, E-mail: svea.petersen@uni-rostock.de [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University of Rostock, Friedrich-Barnewitz-Straße 4, 18119 Rostock (Germany); Kaule, Sebastian [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University of Rostock, Friedrich-Barnewitz-Straße 4, 18119 Rostock (Germany); Stein, Florian [Institute for Chemistry, Analytical and Technical Chemistry University of Rostock, Albert-Einstein-Straße 3a, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Minrath, Ingo; Schmitz, Klaus-Peter [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University of Rostock, Friedrich-Barnewitz-Straße 4, 18119 Rostock (Germany); Kragl, Udo [Institute for Chemistry, Analytical and Technical Chemistry University of Rostock, Albert-Einstein-Straße 3a, 18059 Rostock (Germany); Sternberg, Katrin [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, University of Rostock, Friedrich-Barnewitz-Straße 4, 18119 Rostock (Germany)

    2013-10-15

    Drug-coated balloons (DCB), which have emerged as therapeutic alternative to drug-eluting stents in percutaneous cardiovascular intervention, are well described with regard to clinical efficiency and safety within a number of clinical studies. In vitro studies elucidating the correlation of coating method and composition with DCB performance are however rare but considered important for the understanding of DCB requirements and the improvement of established DCB. In this context, we evaluated the applicability of a pipetting, dip-coating, and spray-coating process for the establishment of DCB based on paclitaxel (PTX) and the ionic liquid cetylpyridinium salicylate (Cetpyrsal) as novel innovative additive in three different compositions. Among tested methods and compositions, the pipetting process with 50 wt.% PTX resulted in most promising coatings as drug load was less controllable by the other processes and higher PTX contents led to considerable drug crystallization, as visualized by electron microscopy, accelerating PTX loss during short-term elution. Applying these conditions, homogeneous coatings could be applied on balloon catheter, whose simulated use in an in vitro vessel model revealed percental drug losses of 36 and 28% during transit and percental drug transfers of 12 and 40% under expansion for coatings applied in expanded and folded balloon condition, respectively. In comparison to literature values, these results support the high potential of Cetpyrsal as novel DCB matrix regarding low drug loss and efficient drug transfer. - Highlights: • We provide detailed in vitro data for definition of DCB coating requirements. • An in vitro vessel model for evaluating drug delivery from DCB is presented. • Innovative ionic liquid-based coatings for DCB are developed. • The coating shows low drug loss and efficient drug transfer.

  5. Stabilization of a percutaneously implanted port catheter system for hepatic artery chemotherapy infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindoh, Noboru; Ozaki, Yutaka; Kyogoku, Shinsuke; Yamana, Daigo; Sumi, Yukiharu; Katayama, Hitoshi

    1999-01-01

    A port catheter system for hepatic artery infusion chemotherapy was implanted percutaneously via the left subclavian artery in 41 patients for treatment of unresectable liver metastases. The catheter tip was inserted into the gastroduodenal artery (GDA), the end hole was occluded with a guidewire fragment, and a side-hole for infusion was positioned at the bifurcation of the proper hepatic artery and the GDA. The GDA was embolized with steel coils around the infusion catheter tip via a transfemoral catheter. This procedure is designed to reduce the incidence of hepatic artery occlusion and infusion catheter dislocation.

  6. Impact of a change in surveillance definition on performance assessment of a catheter-associated urinary tract infection prevention program at a tertiary care medical center.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sopirala, Madhuri M; Syed, Asma; Jandarov, Roman; Lewis, Margaret

    2018-03-16

    In January 2015, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)/National Health Safety Network (NHSN) changed the definition of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI). We evaluated the outcomes of a robust CAUTI prevention program when we performed surveillance using the old definition (before 2015) versus the new definition (after 2015). This is the first study to evaluate how the change in CDC/NHSN definitions affected the outcomes of a CAUTI reduction program. Baseline was from January 2012 to September 2014; the intervention period was from October 2014 to February 2016. Staff nurses were trained to be liaisons of infection prevention (Link Nurses) with clearly defined CAUTI prevention goals and with ongoing monthly activities. CAUTI incidence per 1000 catheter days was compared between the baseline and intervention periods, using the 2 definitions. With the new definition, CAUTIs decreased by 33%, from 2.69 to 1.81 cases per 1000 catheter days (incidence rate ratio [IRR] = 0.67; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.48-0.93; P definition, CAUTIs increased by 12%, from 3.38 to 3.80 cases per 1000 catheter days (IRR = 1.12; 95% CI: 0.88-1.43; P = .348). We aggressively targeted CAUTI prevention, but a reduction was observed only with the new definition. Our findings stress the importance of having a reasonably accurate surveillance definition to monitor infection prevention initiatives. Copyright © 2018 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. A prospective interventional study to examine the effect of a silver alloy and hydrogel-coated catheter on the incidence of catheter-associated urinary tract infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, P Hy; Wong, C Wy; Lai, C Kc; Siu, H K; Tsang, D Nc; Yeung, K Y; Ip, D Km; Tam, P Kh

    2017-06-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infection is a major hospital-acquired infection. This study aimed to analyse the effect of a silver alloy and hydrogel-coated catheter on the occurrence of catheter-associated urinary tract infection. This was a 1-year prospective study conducted at a single centre in Hong Kong. Adult patients with an indwelling urinary catheter for longer than 24 hours were recruited. The incidence of catheter-associated urinary tract infection in patients with a conventional latex Foley catheter without hydrogel was compared with that in patients with a silver alloy and hydrogel-coated catheter. The most recent definition of urinary tract infection was based on the latest surveillance definition of the National Healthcare Safety Network managed by Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. A total of 306 patients were recruited with a similar ratio between males and females. The mean (standard deviation) age was 81.1 (10.5) years. The total numbers of catheter-days were 4352 and 7474 in the silver-coated and conventional groups, respectively. The incidences of catheter-associated urinary tract infection per 1000 catheter-days were 6.4 and 9.4, respectively (P=0.095). There was a 31% reduction in the incidence of catheter-associated urinary tract infection per 1000 catheter-days in the silver-coated group. Escherichia coli was the most commonly involved pathogen (36.7%) of all cases. Subgroup analysis revealed that the protective effect of silver-coated catheter was more pronounced in long-term users as well as female patients with a respective 48% (P=0.027) and 42% (P=0.108) reduction in incidence of catheter-associated urinary tract infection. The mean catheterisation time per person was the longest in patients using a silver-coated catheter (17.0 days) compared with those using a conventional (10.8 days) or both types of catheter (13.6 days) [P=0.01]. Silver alloy and hydrogel-coated catheters appear to be effective in preventing catheter

  8. The effect of elastic modulus on ablation catheter contact area.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Jon J; Linte, Cristian A; Rettmann, Maryam E; Sun, Deyu; Packer, Douglas L; Robb, Richard A; Holmes, David R

    2015-02-21

    Cardiac ablation consists of navigating a catheter into the heart and delivering RF energy to electrically isolate tissue regions that generate or propagate arrhythmia. Besides the challenges of accurate and precise targeting of the arrhythmic sites within the beating heart, limited information is currently available to the cardiologist regarding intricate electrode-tissue contact, which directly impacts the quality of produced lesions. Recent advances in ablation catheter design provide intra-procedural estimates of tissue-catheter contact force, but the most direct indicator of lesion quality for any particular energy level and duration is the tissue-catheter contact area, and that is a function of not only force, but catheter pose and material elasticity as well. In this experiment, we have employed real-time ultrasound (US) imaging to determine the complete interaction between the ablation electrode and tissue to accurately estimate contact, which will help to better understand the effect of catheter pose and position relative to the tissue. By simultaneously recording tracked position, force reading and US image of the ablation catheter, the differing material properties of polyvinyl alcohol cryogel [1] phantoms are shown to produce varying amounts of tissue depression and contact area (implying varying lesion quality) for equivalent force readings. We have shown that the elastic modulus significantly affects the surface-contact area between the catheter and tissue at any level of contact force. Thus we provide evidence that a prescribed level of catheter force may not always provide sufficient contact area to produce an effective ablation lesion in the prescribed ablation time.

  9. Magnetic catheter manipulation in the interventional MR imaging environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mark W; Martin, Alastair B; Lillaney, Prasheel; Losey, Aaron D; Yee, Erin J; Bernhardt, Anthony; Malba, Vincent; Evans, Lee; Sincic, Ryan; Saeed, Maythem; Arenson, Ronald L; Hetts, Steven W

    2013-06-01

    To evaluate deflection capability of a prototype endovascular catheter, which is remotely magnetically steerable, for use in the interventional magnetic resonance (MR) imaging environment. Copper coils were mounted on the tips of commercially available 2.3-3.0-F microcatheters. The coils were fabricated in a novel manner by plasma vapor deposition of a copper layer followed by laser lithography of the layer into coils. Orthogonal helical (ie, solenoid) and saddle-shaped (ie, Helmholtz) coils were mounted on a single catheter tip. Microcatheters were tested in water bath phantoms in a 1.5-T clinical MR scanner, with variable simultaneous currents applied to the coils. Catheter tip deflection was imaged in the axial plane by using a "real-time" steady-state free precession MR imaging sequence. Degree of deflection and catheter tip orientation were measured for each current application. The catheter tip was clearly visible in the longitudinal and axial planes. Magnetic field artifacts were visible when the orthogonal coils at the catheter tip were energized. Variable amounts of current applied to a single coil demonstrated consistent catheter deflection in all water bath experiments. Changing current polarity reversed the observed direction of deflection, whereas current applied to two different coils resulted in deflection represented by the composite vector of individual coil activations. Microcatheter navigation through the vascular phantom was successful through control of applied current to one or more coils. Controlled catheter deflection is possible with laser lithographed multiaxis coil-tipped catheters in the MR imaging environment. Copyright © 2013 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Catheter placement for lysis of spontaneous intracerebral hematomas: does a catheter position in the core of the hematoma allow more effective and faster hematoma lysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malinova, Vesna; Schlegel, Anna; Rohde, Veit; Mielke, Dorothee

    2017-07-01

    For the fibrinolytic therapy of intracerebral hematomas (ICH) using recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rtPA), a catheter position in the core of the hematoma along the largest clot diameter was assumed to be optimal for an effective clot lysis. However, it never had been proven that core position indeed enhances clot lysis if compared with less optimal catheter positions. In this study, the impact of the catheter position on the effectiveness and on the time course of clot lysis was evaluated. We analyzed the catheter position using a relative error calculating the distance perpendicular to the catheter's center in relation to hematoma's diameter and evaluated the relative hematoma volume reduction (RVR). The correlation of the RVR with the catheter position was evaluated. Additionally, we tried to identify patterns of clot lysis with different catheter positions. The patient's outcome at discharge was evaluated using the Glasgow outcome score. A total of 105 patients were included in the study. The mean hematoma volume was 56 ml. The overall RVR was 62.7 %. In 69 patients, a catheter position in the core of the clot was achieved. We found no significant correlation between catheter position and hematoma RVR (linear regression, p = 0.14). Core catheter position leads to more symmetrical hematoma RVR. Faster clot lysis happens in the vicinity of the catheter openings. We found no significant difference in the patient's outcome dependent on the catheter position (linear regression, p = 0.90). The catheter position in the core of the hematoma along its largest diameter does not significantly influence the effectiveness of clot lysis after rtPA application.

  11. Fecal containment in bedridden patients: economic impact of 2 commercial bowel catheter systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowal-Vem, Areta; Poulakidas, Stathis; Barnett, Barbara; Conway, Deborah; Culver, Daniel; Ferrari, Michelle; Potenza, Bruce; Koenig, Michael; Mah, John; Majewski, Mary; Morris, Linda; Powers, Jan; Stokes, Elizabeth; Tan, Michael; Salstrom, Sara-Jane; Zaletel, Cindy; Ambutas, Shirley; Casey, Kathleen; Stein, Jayne; DeSane, Mary; Berry, Kathy; Konz, Elizabeth C; Riemer, Michael R; Cullum, Malford E

    2009-05-01

    Fecal contamination is a major challenge in patients in acute/critical care settings that is associated with increased cost of care and supplies and with development of pressure ulcers, incontinence dermatitis, skin and soft tissue infections, and urinary tract infections. To assess the economic impact of fecal containment in bedridden patients using 2 different indwelling bowel catheters and to compare infection rates between groups. A multicenter, observational study was done at 12 US sites (7 that use catheter A, 5 that use catheter B). Patients were followed from insertion of an indwelling bowel catheter system until the patient left the acute/critical care unit or until 29 days after enrollment, whichever came first. Demographic data, frequency of bedding/dressing changes, incidence of infection, and Braden scores (risk of pressure ulcers) were recorded. The study included 146 bedridden patients (76 with catheter A, 70 with catheter B) who had similar Braden scores at enrollment. The rate of bedding/dressing changes per day differed significantly between groups (1.20 for catheter A vs 1.71 for catheter B; P = .004). According to a formula that accounted for personnel resources and laundry cycle costs, catheter A cost $13.94 less per patient per day to use than did catheter B. Catheter A was less likely than was catheter B to be removed during the observational period (P = .03). Observed infection rates were low. Catheter A may be more cost-effective than catheter B because it requires fewer unscheduled linen changes per patient day.

  12. Retrograde prostatic urethroplasty with balloon catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaneda, F.; Reddy, P.; Hulbert, J.; Letourneau, J.G.; Hunter, D.W.; Castaneda-Zuniga, W.R.; Amplatz, K.

    1987-01-01

    The authors performed retrograde prostatic urethroplasty in 18 patients using a 25-mm urethroplasty balloon catheter. The procedure was performed on an outpatient basis under local anesthesia. Voiding cystourethrography, retrograde urethrography, rectal US, and MRE imaging were performed before and immediately after the procedure and at 2 weeks and 3, 6, 12, and 18 months. Long-term results at 18 months and possible clinical implications are discussed

  13. Comparison of utility of blood cultures from intravascular catheters and peripheral veins: a systematic review and decision analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falagas, Matthew E; Kazantzi, Maria S; Bliziotis, Ioannis A

    2008-01-01

    Blood cultures are sometimes obtained from intravascular catheters for convenience. However, there is controversy regarding this practice. The authors compared the diagnostic test characteristics of blood cultures obtained from intravascular catheters and peripheral veins. Relevant studies for inclusion in this review were identified through PubMed (January 1970-October 2005) and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Studies that reported clear definitions of true bacteraemia were included in the analysis. Two reviewers independently extracted the data. Six studies were included in the analysis, providing data for 2677 pairs of blood cultures obtained from an intravascular catheter and a peripheral venipuncture. A culture obtained from an intravascular catheter was found to be a diagnostic test for bacteraemia with better sensitivity (OR 1.85, 95 % CI 1.14-2.99, fixed effects model) and better negative predictive value (almost with statistical significance) (OR 1.55, 95 % CI 0.999-2.39, fixed effects model) but with less specificity (OR 0.33, 95 % CI 0.18-0.59, random effects model) and lower positive predictive value (OR 0.41, 95 % CI 0.23-0.76, random effects model) compared to a culture taken by peripheral venipuncture. In a group of 1000 patients, eight additional patients with true bacteraemia would be identified and 59 falsely diagnosed as having bacteraemia by a blood culture obtained from an intravascular catheter compared to results of the peripheral blood culture. Given the consequences of undertreating patients with bacteraemia, the authors believe that, based on the available evidence, at least one blood culture should be obtained from the intravascular catheter.

  14. An in-situ infection detection sensor coating for urinary catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milo, Scarlet; Thet, Naing Tun; Liu, Dan; Nzakizwanayo, Jonathan; Jones, Brian V; Jenkins, A Toby A

    2016-07-15

    We describe a novel infection-responsive coating for urinary catheters that provides a clear visual early warning of Proteus mirabilis infection and subsequent blockage. The crystalline biofilms of P. mirabilis can cause serious complications for patients undergoing long-term bladder catheterisation. Healthy urine is around pH 6, bacterial urease increases urine pH leading to the precipitation of calcium and magnesium deposits from the urine, resulting in dense crystalline biofilms on the catheter surface that blocks urine flow. The coating is a dual layered system in which the lower poly(vinyl alcohol) layer contains the self-quenching dye carboxyfluorescein. This is capped by an upper layer of the pH responsive polymer poly(methyl methacrylate-co-methacrylic acid) (Eudragit S100®). Elevation of urinary pH (>pH 7) dissolves the Eudragit layer, releasing the dye to provide a clear visual warning of impending blockage. Evaluation of prototype coatings using a clinically relevant in vitro bladder model system demonstrated that coatings provide up to 12h advanced warning of blockage, and are stable both in the absence of infection, and in the presence of species that do not cause catheter blockage. At the present time, there are no effective methods to control these infections or provide warning of impending catheter blockage. Copyright © 2016 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. SU-F-T-20: Novel Catheter Lumen Recognition Algorithm for Rapid Digitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dise, J; McDonald, D; Ashenafi, M; Peng, J; Mart, C; Koch, N; Vanek, K

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Manual catheter recognition remains a time-consuming aspect of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR) treatment planning. In this work, a novel catheter lumen recognition algorithm was created for accurate and rapid digitization. Methods: MatLab v8.5 was used to create the catheter recognition algorithm. Initially, the algorithm searches the patient CT dataset using an intensity based k-means filter designed to locate catheters. Once the catheters have been located, seed points are manually selected to initialize digitization of each catheter. From each seed point, the algorithm searches locally in order to automatically digitize the remaining catheter. This digitization is accomplished by finding pixels with similar image curvature and divergence parameters compared to the seed pixel. Newly digitized pixels are treated as new seed positions, and hessian image analysis is used to direct the algorithm toward neighboring catheter pixels, and to make the algorithm insensitive to adjacent catheters that are unresolvable on CT, air pockets, and high Z artifacts. The algorithm was tested using 11 HDR treatment plans, including the Syed template, tandem and ovoid applicator, and multi-catheter lung brachytherapy. Digitization error was calculated by comparing manually determined catheter positions to those determined by the algorithm. Results: he digitization error was 0.23 mm ± 0.14 mm axially and 0.62 mm ± 0.13 mm longitudinally at the tip. The time of digitization, following initial seed placement was less than 1 second per catheter. The maximum total time required to digitize all tested applicators was 4 minutes (Syed template with 15 needles). Conclusion: This algorithm successfully digitizes HDR catheters for a variety of applicators with or without CT markers. The minimal axial error demonstrates the accuracy of the algorithm, and its insensitivity to image artifacts and challenging catheter positioning. Future work to automatically place initial seed

  16. SU-F-T-20: Novel Catheter Lumen Recognition Algorithm for Rapid Digitization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dise, J; McDonald, D; Ashenafi, M; Peng, J; Mart, C; Koch, N; Vanek, K [Medical University of South Carolina, Charleston, SC (United States)

    2016-06-15

    Purpose: Manual catheter recognition remains a time-consuming aspect of high-dose-rate brachytherapy (HDR) treatment planning. In this work, a novel catheter lumen recognition algorithm was created for accurate and rapid digitization. Methods: MatLab v8.5 was used to create the catheter recognition algorithm. Initially, the algorithm searches the patient CT dataset using an intensity based k-means filter designed to locate catheters. Once the catheters have been located, seed points are manually selected to initialize digitization of each catheter. From each seed point, the algorithm searches locally in order to automatically digitize the remaining catheter. This digitization is accomplished by finding pixels with similar image curvature and divergence parameters compared to the seed pixel. Newly digitized pixels are treated as new seed positions, and hessian image analysis is used to direct the algorithm toward neighboring catheter pixels, and to make the algorithm insensitive to adjacent catheters that are unresolvable on CT, air pockets, and high Z artifacts. The algorithm was tested using 11 HDR treatment plans, including the Syed template, tandem and ovoid applicator, and multi-catheter lung brachytherapy. Digitization error was calculated by comparing manually determined catheter positions to those determined by the algorithm. Results: he digitization error was 0.23 mm ± 0.14 mm axially and 0.62 mm ± 0.13 mm longitudinally at the tip. The time of digitization, following initial seed placement was less than 1 second per catheter. The maximum total time required to digitize all tested applicators was 4 minutes (Syed template with 15 needles). Conclusion: This algorithm successfully digitizes HDR catheters for a variety of applicators with or without CT markers. The minimal axial error demonstrates the accuracy of the algorithm, and its insensitivity to image artifacts and challenging catheter positioning. Future work to automatically place initial seed

  17. Efficacy of Minocycline and EDTA Lock Solution in Preventing Catheter-Related Bacteremia, Septic Phlebitis, and Endocarditis in Rabbits

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raad, Issam; Hachem, Ray; Tcholakian, Robert K.; Sherertz, Robert

    2002-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of antibiotic catheter lock solution in preventing catheter-related infections, silicone catheters were tunneled and inserted into the jugular veins of 18 rabbits. The catheters were challenged with an intraluminal injection of 105 CFU of slime-producing Staphylococcus epidermidis in 0.1 ml of water. The catheters were maintained on heparin (100 IU/ml) flush for the first 3 days. On day 3, quantitative blood samples for culture were obtained from the catheters and ear veins, which documented catheter-related bacteremia, and the rabbits were randomized to have their catheters flushed as follows: five animals were continued on heparin (100 IU/ml), five animals received vancomycin (3 mg/ml) with heparin (100 IU/ml), and eight animals received 3 mg of minocycline per ml with 30 mg of EDTA per ml (M-EDTA). All animals were killed at day 7. Blood, catheters, jugular veins, and heart valves were cultured quantitatively. Animals maintained on heparin developed catheter-related colonization, bacteremia, septic phlebitis, and endocarditis. Vancomycin-heparin partially prevented catheter colonization, bacteremia, and phlebitis (P = 0.2). M-EDTA completely prevented catheter colonization, catheter-related bacteremia, and phlebitis in all of the animals (P phlebitis, and endocarditis in rabbits. PMID:11796338

  18. False coronary dissection with the new Monorail angioplasty balloon catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esplugas, E; Cequier, A R; Sabaté, X; Jara, F

    1990-01-01

    During percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty, the appearance of persistent staining in the vessel by contrast media suggests coronary dissection. We report seven patients in whom a false image of severe coronary dissection was observed during angioplasty performed with the new Monorail balloon catheter. This image emerges at the moment of balloon inflation, is distally located to the balloon, and disappears with balloon catheter deflation. No complications were associated with the appearance of this image.

  19. An efficient cardiac mapping strategy for radiofrequency catheter ablation with active learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Yingjing; Guo, Ziyan; Dong, Ziyang; Zhou, Xiao-Yun; Kwok, Ka-Wai; Ernst, Sabine; Lee, Su-Lin

    2017-07-01

    A major challenge in radiofrequency catheter ablation procedures is the voltage and activation mapping of the endocardium, given a limited mapping time. By learning from expert interventional electrophysiologists (operators), while also making use of an active-learning framework, guidance on performing cardiac voltage mapping can be provided to novice operators or even directly to catheter robots. A learning from demonstration (LfD) framework, based upon previous cardiac mapping procedures performed by an expert operator, in conjunction with Gaussian process (GP) model-based active learning, was developed to efficiently perform voltage mapping over right ventricles (RV). The GP model was used to output the next best mapping point, while getting updated towards the underlying voltage data pattern as more mapping points are taken. A regularized particle filter was used to keep track of the kernel hyperparameter used by GP. The travel cost of the catheter tip was incorporated to produce time-efficient mapping sequences. The proposed strategy was validated on a simulated 2D grid mapping task, with leave-one-out experiments on 25 retrospective datasets, in an RV phantom using the Stereotaxis Niobe ® remote magnetic navigation system, and on a tele-operated catheter robot. In comparison with an existing geometry-based method, regression error was reduced and was minimized at a faster rate over retrospective procedure data. A new method of catheter mapping guidance has been proposed based on LfD and active learning. The proposed method provides real-time guidance for the procedure, as well as a live evaluation of mapping sufficiency.

  20. Improved electromagnetic tracking for catheter path reconstruction with application in high-dose-rate brachytherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lugez, Elodie; Sadjadi, Hossein; Joshi, Chandra P; Akl, Selim G; Fichtinger, Gabor

    2017-04-01

    Electromagnetic (EM) catheter tracking has recently been introduced in order to enable prompt and uncomplicated reconstruction of catheter paths in various clinical interventions. However, EM tracking is prone to measurement errors which can compromise the outcome of the procedure. Minimizing catheter tracking errors is therefore paramount to improve the path reconstruction accuracy. An extended Kalman filter (EKF) was employed to combine the nonlinear kinematic model of an EM sensor inside the catheter, with both its position and orientation measurements. The formulation of the kinematic model was based on the nonholonomic motion constraints of the EM sensor inside the catheter. Experimental verification was carried out in a clinical HDR suite. Ten catheters were inserted with mean curvatures varying from 0 to [Formula: see text] in a phantom. A miniaturized Ascension (Burlington, Vermont, USA) trakSTAR EM sensor (model 55) was threaded within each catheter at various speeds ranging from 7.4 to [Formula: see text]. The nonholonomic EKF was applied on the tracking data in order to statistically improve the EM tracking accuracy. A sample reconstruction error was defined at each point as the Euclidean distance between the estimated EM measurement and its corresponding ground truth. A path reconstruction accuracy was defined as the root mean square of the sample reconstruction errors, while the path reconstruction precision was defined as the standard deviation of these sample reconstruction errors. The impacts of sensor velocity and path curvature on the nonholonomic EKF method were determined. Finally, the nonholonomic EKF catheter path reconstructions were compared with the reconstructions provided by the manufacturer's filters under default settings, namely the AC wide notch and the DC adaptive filter. With a path reconstruction accuracy of 1.9 mm, the nonholonomic EKF surpassed the performance of the manufacturer's filters (2.4 mm) by 21% and the raw EM

  1. Catheter fracture of intravenous ports and its management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ching-Yang; Fu, Jui-Ying; Feng, Po-Hao; Kao, Tsung-Chi; Yu, Sheng-Yueh; Li, Hao-Jui; Ko, Po-Jen; Hsieh, Hung-Chang

    2011-11-01

    Intravenous ports are widely used for oncology patients. However, catheter fractures may lead to the need for re-intervention. We aimed to identify the risk factors associated with catheter fractures. Between January 1 and December 31, 2006, we retrospectively reviewed the clinical data and plain chest films of 1,505 patients implanted with an intravenous port at Chang Gung Memorial Hospital. Different vascular sites were compared using the chi-square or Fisher's exact test for categorical variables, and the t test was used for continuous variables with normal distribution; P port type Arrow French (Fr.) 8.1 (P port and catheter removal is recommended. Female gender, intravenous port implantation via the subclavian route, and the Arrow Fr. 8.1 port were found to be risk factors. Patients with these risk factors should be monitored closely to avoid catheter fractures.

  2. Needle catheter duodenostomy: a technique for duodenal alimentation of birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goring, R L; Goldman, A; Kaufman, K J; Roberts, C; Quesenberry, K E; Kollias, G V

    1986-11-01

    A technique for duodenal alimentation (needle catheter duodenostomy) of birds was developed, using the domestic pigeon (Columba livia) as the experimental model. A needle catheter was inserted into the descending duodenum of 5 pigeons and was secured to the body wall and dorsum of each bird. A liquid diet was administered daily (in equal amounts of 0, 4, 8, 12, and 16 hours) for 14 days without adverse effects. On day 15, the catheters were removed, and the birds immediately resumed normal consumption of a pigeon ration and water diet. Although 4 of the 5 birds had minor weight loss, dietary alterations probably could be used on an individual basis to alleviate this problem. After oral alimentation was resumed, the 5 birds exceeded their initial body weight within 7 days. Four weeks after catheter removal, positive-contrast radiographic evaluations indicated that the duodenum of each pigeon appeared normal. Needle catheter duodenostomy was a viable method of alimentation in the domestic pigeon. This technique should be applicable for other avian species requiring bypass of the upper gastrointestinal tract proximal to the region of catheter insertion in the duodenum.

  3. Intracorporeal knotting of a femoral nerve catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanem, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve catheters are effective and well-established tools to provide postoperative analgesia to patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. The performance of these techniques is usually considered safe. However, placement of nerve catheters may be associated with a considerable number of side effects and major complications have repeatedly been published. In this work, we report on a patient who underwent total knee replacement with spinal anesthesia and preoperative insertion of femoral and sciatic nerve catheters for postoperative analgesia. During insertion of the femoral catheter, significant resistance was encountered upon retracting the catheter. This occurred due to knotting of the catheter. The catheter had to be removed by operative intervention which has to be considered a major complication. The postoperative course was uneventful. The principles for removal of entrapped peripheral catheters are not well established, may differ from those for neuroaxial catheters, and range from cautious manipulation up to surgical intervention.

  4. Percutaneous catheter drainage of tuberculous psoas abscesses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pombo, F.; Martin-Egana, R.; Cela, A.; Diaz, J.L.; Linares-Mondejar, P.; Freire, M.

    1993-01-01

    Six patients with 7 tuberculous psoas or ilio-psoas abscesses were treated by CT-guided catheter drainage and chemotherapy. The abscesses (5 unilateral and 1 bilateral) were completely drained using a posterior or lateral approach. The abscess volume was 70 to 700 ml (mean 300 ml) and the duration of drainage 5 to 11 days (mean 7 days). Immediate local symptomatic improvement was achieved in all patients, and there were no procedural complications. CT follow-up at 3 to 9 months showed normalization in 5 patients, 2 of whom are still in medical therapy. One patient, who did not take the medication regularly, had a recurrent abscess requiring new catheter drainage after which the fluid collection disappeared. Percutaneous drainage represents an efficient and attractive alternative to surgical drainage as a supplement to medical therapy in the management of patients with large tuberculous psoas abscesses. (orig.)

  5. Pancreas tumor interstitial pressure catheter measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieskoski, Michael D.; Gunn, Jason; Marra, Kayla; Trembly, B. Stuart; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    This paper highlights the methodology in measuring interstitial pressure in pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumors. A Millar Mikrotip pressure catheter (SPR-671) was used in this study and a system was built to amplify and filter the output signal for data collection. The Millar pressure catheter was calibrated prior to each experiment in a water column at 37°C, range of 0 to 60 inH2O (112 mmHg), resulting in a calibration factor of 33 mV / 1 inH2O. The interstitial pressures measured in two orthotopically grown pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor were 57 mmHg and 48 mmHg, respectively. Verteporfin uptake into the pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor was measured using a probe-based experimental dosimeter.

  6. Orthogonal electrode catheter array for mapping of endocardial focal site of ventricular activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, J.M.; Nyo, H.; Vera, Z.; Seibert, J.A.; Vogelsang, P.J. (Division of Cardiovascular Medicine, University of California, School of Medicine, Davis (USA))

    1991-04-01

    Precise location of the endocardial site of origin of ventricular tachycardia may facilitate surgical and catheter ablation of this arrhythmia. The endocardial catheter mapping technique can locate the site of ventricular tachycardia within 4-8 cm2 of the earliest site recorded by the catheter. This report describes an orthogonal electrode catheter array (OECA) for mapping and radiofrequency ablation (RFA) of endocardial focal site of origin of a plunge electrode paced model of ventricular activation in dogs. The OECA is an 8 F five pole catheter with four peripheral electrodes and one central electrode (total surface area 0.8 cm{sup 2}). In eight mongrel dogs, mapping was performed by arbitrarily dividing the left ventricle (LV) into four segments. Each segment was mapped with OECA to find the earliest segment. Bipolar and unipolar electrograms were obtained. The plunge electrode (not visible on fluoroscopy) site was identified by the earliest wave front arrival times of -30 msec or earlier at two or more electrodes (unipolar electrograms) with reference to the earliest recorded surface ECG (I, AVF, and V1). Validation of the proximity of the five electrodes of the OECA to the plunge electrode was performed by digital radiography and RFA. Pathological examination was performed to document the proximity of the OECA to the plunge electrode and also for the width, depth, and microscopic changes of the ablation. To find the segment with the earliest LV activation a total of 10 {plus minus} 3 (mean {plus minus} SD) positions were mapped. Mean arrival times at the two earlier electrodes were -39 {plus minus} 4 msec and -35 {plus minus} 3 msec. Digital radiography showed the plunge electrode to be within the area covered by all five electrodes in all eight dogs. The plunge electrode was within 1 cm2 area of the region of RFA in all eight dogs.

  7. Evaluation of the Achieve Mapping Catheter in cryoablation for atrial fibrillation: a prospective randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gang, Yi; Gonna, Hanney; Domenichini, Giulia; Sampson, Michael; Aryan, Niloufar; Norman, Mark; Behr, Elijah R; Zuberi, Zia; Dhillon, Paramdeep; Gallagher, Mark M

    2016-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to establish the role of Achieve Mapping Catheter in cryoablation for paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (PAF) in a randomized trial. A total of 102 patients undergoing their first ablation for PAF were randomized at 2:1 to an Achieve- or Lasso-guided procedure. Study patients were systematically followed up for 12 months with Holter monitoring. Primary study endpoint was acute procedure success. Secondary endpoint was clinical outcomes assessed by AF free at 6 and 12 months after the procedure. Of 102 participants, 99 % of acute procedure success was achieved. Significantly shorter procedure duration with the Achieve-guided group than with the Lasso-guided group (118 ± 18 vs. 129 ± 21 min, p < 0.05) was observed as was the duration of fluoroscopy (17 ± 5 vs. 20 ± 7 min, p < 0.05) by subgroup analysis focused on procedures performed by experienced operators. In the whole study patients, procedure and fluoroscopic durations were similar in the Achieve- (n = 68) and Lasso-guided groups (n = 34). Transient phrenic nerve weakening was equally prevalent with the Achieve and Lasso. No association was found between clinical outcomes and the mapping catheter used. The use of second-generation cryoballoon (n = 68) reduced procedure time significantly compared to the first-generation balloon (n = 34); more patients were free of AF in the former than the latter group during follow-up. The use of the Achieve Mapping Catheter can reduce procedure and fluoroscopic durations compared with Lasso catheters in cryoablation for PAF after operators gained sufficient experience. The type of mapping catheter used does not affect procedure efficiency and safety by models of cryoballoon.

  8. Virtual In-Silico Modeling Guided Catheter Ablation Predicts Effective Linear Ablation Lesion Set for Longstanding Persistent Atrial Fibrillation: Multicenter Prospective Randomized Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Jaemin; Hwang, Minki; Song, Jun-Seop; Lim, Byounghyun; Kim, Tae-Hoon; Joung, Boyoung; Kim, Sung-Hwan; Oh, Yong-Seog; Nam, Gi-Byung; On, Young Keun; Oh, Seil; Kim, Young-Hoon; Pak, Hui-Nam

    2017-01-01

    Objective: Radiofrequency catheter ablation for persistent atrial fibrillation (PeAF) still has a substantial recurrence rate. This study aims to investigate whether an AF ablation lesion set chosen using in-silico ablation (V-ABL) is clinically feasible and more effective than an empirically chosen ablation lesion set (Em-ABL) in patients with PeAF. Methods: We prospectively included 108 patients with antiarrhythmic drug-resistant PeAF (77.8% men, age 60.8 ± 9.9 years), and randomly assigned them to the V-ABL ( n = 53) and Em-ABL ( n = 55) groups. Five different in-silico ablation lesion sets [1 pulmonary vein isolation (PVI), 3 linear ablations, and 1 electrogram-guided ablation] were compared using heart-CT integrated AF modeling. We evaluated the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of V-ABL compared with that of Em-ABL. Results: The pre-procedural computing time for five different ablation strategies was 166 ± 11 min. In the Em-ABL group, the earliest terminating blinded in-silico lesion set matched with the Em-ABL lesion set in 21.8%. V-ABL was not inferior to Em-ABL in terms of procedure time ( p = 0.403), ablation time ( p = 0.510), and major complication rate ( p = 0.900). During 12.6 ± 3.8 months of follow-up, the clinical recurrence rate was 14.0% in the V-ABL group and 18.9% in the Em-ABL group ( p = 0.538). In Em-ABL group, clinical recurrence rate was significantly lower after PVI+posterior box+anterior linear ablation, which showed the most frequent termination during in-silico ablation (log-rank p = 0.027). Conclusions: V-ABL was feasible in clinical practice, not inferior to Em-ABL, and predicts the most effective ablation lesion set in patients who underwent PeAF ablation.

  9. Urinary incontinence and indwelling urinary catheters in acutely admitted elderly patients: relationship with mortality, institutionalization, and functional decline

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bootsma, A. M. Jikke; Buurman, Bianca M.; Geerlings, Suzanne E.; de Rooij, Sophia E.

    2013-01-01

    To study differences in functional status at admission in acutely hospitalized elderly patients with urinary incontinence, a catheter, or without a catheter or incontinence (controls) and to determine whether incontinence or a catheter are independent risk factors for death, institutionalization, or

  10. Effect of Foley catheters on seed positions and urethral dose in 125I and 103Pd prostate implants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brezovich, Ivan A.; Pareek, Prem N.; Duan, Jun; Fiveash, John

    2001-01-01

    Purpose: To estimate the perturbation of seed position and urethral dose, subsequent to withdrawal of urethral catheters. Methods and Materials: A mathematical model based on the volume incompressibility of tissues was used to compute seed positions and doses following removal of the Foley. The model assumed that the central axis of the urethra remains stationary, and that prostate tissue and seeds move radially toward the center of the urethra to fill the void left by the catheter. Seed motion has also been measured using transrectal ultrasound. Results: Based on the computations, seeds located originally close to the urethra travel relatively large distances toward the urethra upon Foley removal, whereas seeds located further away move substantially less. This seed motion leads to higher urethral doses than shown in a standard treatment plan. Dose enhancements increase with catheter size, decrease with increasing prostate volume, are more pronounced for 103 Pd than for 125 I, and range between 3.5% and 32.4%. Postimplant dosimetry is equally affected if images are taken with urethral catheters in place, showing lower urethral doses than actually delivered. Preliminary ultrasound based measurements of seed motion agree with the theory. Conclusion: During the implantation procedure, 12 fr or smaller urethral catheters are preferable to larger diameter catheters if urine drainage is sufficient. Treatment planners should avoid planning seeds at 5 mm or closer from the urethra. Special caution is indicated in prostates having about 20 cm 3 or smaller volumes, and when 103 Pd is used. Postimplant dosimetry is susceptible to the same errors

  11. Correction of malfunctioning peritoneal dialysis catheter with guidewire and stiffener under fluoroscopic guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Ryong; Baek, Kyong Hee; Jung, Gyoo Sik; Huh, Jin Do; Joh, Young Duk; Rim, Hark

    1997-01-01

    To determine the efficacy of correction of a malfunctioning peritoneal dialysis catheter with guidewire and stiffener under fluoroscopic guidance. Between November 1994 and March 1997, we performed 15 manipulations in 12 patients in whom a dual-cuff, straight Tenckhoff peritoneal dialysis catheter had been implanted due to chronic renal failure. The causes of catheter malfunctioning were inadequate drainage of the dialysate(n=14) and painful dialysis(n=1). Under fluoroscopic guidance, adhesiolysis and repositioning of the malfunctioning catheter were performed with an Amplatz Super Stiff guidewire and the stiffener from a biliary drainage catheter. The results of procedures were categorized as either immediate or durable success, this latter being defined as adequate catheter function for at least one month after the procedure. Immediate success was achieved in 14 of 15 procedures (93%), and durable success in 7 of 15(47%). The mean duration of catheter function was 157 (range, 30 to 578) days. After manipulation, abdominal pain developed in eight patients and peritonitis in two, but with conservative treatment, these symptoms improved. The correction of a malfunctioning peritoneal dialysis catheter with guidewire and stiffener under fluoroscopic guidance is an effective means of restoring catheter function and may be an effective alternative to surgical reimplantation of the catheter, or hemodialysis

  12. Correction of malfunctioning peritoneal dialysis catheter with guidewire and stiffener under fluoroscopic guidance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Ryong; Baek, Kyong Hee; Jung, Gyoo Sik; Huh, Jin Do; Joh, Young Duk; Rim, Hark [Kosin Medical College, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    1997-11-01

    To determine the efficacy of correction of a malfunctioning peritoneal dialysis catheter with guidewire and stiffener under fluoroscopic guidance. Between November 1994 and March 1997, we performed 15 manipulations in 12 patients in whom a dual-cuff, straight Tenckhoff peritoneal dialysis catheter had been implanted due to chronic renal failure. The causes of catheter malfunctioning were inadequate drainage of the dialysate(n=14) and painful dialysis(n=1). Under fluoroscopic guidance, adhesiolysis and repositioning of the malfunctioning catheter were performed with an Amplatz Super Stiff guidewire and the stiffener from a biliary drainage catheter. The results of procedures were categorized as either immediate or durable success, this latter being defined as adequate catheter function for at least one month after the procedure. Immediate success was achieved in 14 of 15 procedures (93%), and durable success in 7 of 15(47%). The mean duration of catheter function was 157 (range, 30 to 578) days. After manipulation, abdominal pain developed in eight patients and peritonitis in two, but with conservative treatment, these symptoms improved. The correction of a malfunctioning peritoneal dialysis catheter with guidewire and stiffener under fluoroscopic guidance is an effective means of restoring catheter function and may be an effective alternative to surgical reimplantation of the catheter, or hemodialysis.

  13. The dangers of long-term catheter drainage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowthian, P

    There are many dangers associated with long-term urinary bladder drainage by catheter. For various reasons, the choice of catheter is important, and its initial insertion can be particularly hazardous. All catheterizations should, however, be safer when there is some urine (or other fluid) in the bladder. The appropriate choice of drainage system attached to the catheter can delay bacterial invasion of the bladder. Great care is needed to prevent blockage of the system, particularly when bacteriuria is present. Recent evidence indicates that some bacteria encourage the development of encrustations, so that, in some circumstances, catheters may become blocked within 24 hours. This, together with other considerations, strongly suggests that indwelling catheters should be changed at intervals of not more than 5 days. The practical implications of this are considered, as are the benefits that may accrue. Accidental catheter traction is another danger, and some possible methods of avoiding this are discussed. Finally, the need for a new kind of drainage-bag support is highlighted.

  14. Conversion from temporary to tunneled catheters by nephrologists: report of a single-center experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Silva BC

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Bruno C Silva, Camila E Rodrigues, Regina CRM Abdulkader, Rosilene M Elias Nephrology Division, Hospital das Clínicas, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil Background: Nephrologists have increasingly participated in the conversion from temporary catheters (TC to tunneled-cuffed catheters (TCCs for hemodialysis. Objective: To prospectively analyze the outcomes associated with TCC placement by nephrologists with expertise in such procedure, in different time periods at the same center. The impact of vancomycin or cefazolin as prophylactic antibiotics on the infection outcomes was also tested. Patients and methods: Hemodialysis patients who presented to such procedure were divided into two cohorts: A (from 2004 to 2008 and B (from 2013 to 2015. Time from TC to TCC conversion, prophylactic antibiotics, and reasons for TCC removal were evaluated. Results: One hundred and thirty patients were included in cohort A and 228 in cohort B. Sex, age, and follow-up time were similar between cohorts. Median time from TC to TCC conversion was longer in cohort A than in cohort B (14 [3; 30] vs 4 [1; 8] days, respectively; P<0.0001. Infection leading to catheter removal occurred in 26.4% vs 18.9% of procedures in cohorts A and B, respectively, and infection rate was 0.93 vs 0.73 infections per 1,000 catheter-days, respectively (P=0.092. Infection within 30 days from the procedure occurred in 1.4% of overall cohort. No differences were observed when comparing vancomycin and cefazolin as prophylactic antibiotics on 90-day infection-free TCC survival in a Kaplan–Meier model (log-rank = 0.188. TCC removal for low blood flow occurred in 8.9% of procedures. Conclusion: Conversion of TC to TCC by nephrologists had overall infection, catheter patency, and complications similar to data reported in the literature. Vancomycin was not superior to cefazolin as a prophylactic antibiotic. Keywords: renal dialysis, tunneled catheters, interventional nephrology

  15. Adverse effects associated with ethanol catheter lock solutions: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mermel, Leonard A; Alang, Neha

    2014-10-01

    Antimicrobial lock therapy has been widely utilized internationally for the prevention and management of intravascular catheter-related bloodstream infections. One of the agents commonly utilized for lock therapy is ethanol. However, a systematic review of adverse events associated with ethanol locks has not been published. PubMed was searched to collect articles published from May 2003 through March 2014. The bibliographies of relevant articles were also reviewed. In vitro studies of the mechanical properties of catheters after ethanol immersion have revealed changes predominantly in polyurethane catheters and to a lesser extent in silicone and Carbothane catheters. An elution of polymers from polyurethane and Carbothane catheters has been observed at the ethanol concentrations used in ethanol lock therapy. Ethanol above a concentration of 28% leads to plasma protein precipitation. Ethanol locks were associated with catheter occlusion in 11 studies and independently increased the risk of thrombosis compared with heparin lock in a randomized trial. Six studies noted abnormalities in catheter integrity, including one case leading to catheter embolization. Of note, five of these studies involved silicone catheters. Ethanol lock use was associated with systemic side effects in 10 studies and possible side effects in one additional study. Four studies noted liver function test abnormalities, predominantly transaminase elevation, related to ethanol lock use. However, a prospective study did not find any difference in the risk of doubling the transaminase level above the normal range during use of ethanol locks compared with not using an ethanol lock. The use of ethanol locks has been associated with structural changes in catheters, as well as the elution of molecules from the catheter polymers. Clinical studies have revealed systemic toxicity, increased catheter occlusion and breaches in catheter integrity. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on

  16. Translumbar aortography by catheter technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, B.; Honemeyer, U.; Meier-Duis, H.

    1982-01-01

    400 examinations performed during the last three years by TLA (only catheter technique) were subjected to critical analysis and studied particularly in respect to the rate of complications. We observed 13 complications (3.25%) of moderate severity, including 3 large hematomas (documented by CT), 3 paravasations and 7 dissections, but no fatal complication. Two (0.5%) of these complications had clinical evidence. The advantages of the catheter technique of TLA are described. Injections through rigid metal cannula should be avoided because of the high incidence of complications (mainly the increased risk of dissection). Downstream injection resulted in excellent visualization of peripheral occluding vascular disease. Upstream injection should be preferred to demonstrate the major abdominal arteries as well as supraceliac collateral circulation in the case of high Leriche syndrome. The low or intermediate puncture of the aorta is preferable to facilitate caudad direction of the catheter and to diminish the risk of damaging other vessels or puncturing an organ. (orig.) [de

  17. Inhibition and Inactivation of Uropathogenic Escherichia coli Biofilms on Urinary Catheters by Sodium Selenite

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amoolya Narayanan

    2018-06-01

    Full Text Available Urinary tract infections (UTI are the most common hospital-acquired infections in humans and are caused primarily by uropathogenic Escherichia coli (UPEC. Indwelling urinary catheters become encrusted with UPEC biofilms that are resistant to common antibiotics, resulting in chronic infections. Therefore, it is important to control UPEC biofilms on catheters to reduce the risk for UTIs. This study investigated the efficacy of selenium for inhibiting and inactivating UPEC biofilms on urinary catheters. Urinary catheters were inoculated with UPEC and treated with 0 and 35 mM selenium at 37 °C for 5 days for the biofilm inhibition assay. In addition, catheters with preformed UPEC biofilms were treated with 0, 45, 60, and 85 mM selenium and incubated at 37 °C. Biofilm-associated UPEC counts on catheters were enumerated on days 0, 1, 3, and 5 of incubation. Additionally, the effect of selenium on exopolysacchride (EPS production and expression of UPEC biofilm-associated genes was evaluated. Selenium at 35 mM concentration was effective in preventing UPEC biofilm formation on catheters compared to controls (p < 0.05. Further, this inhibitory effect was associated with a reduction in EPS production and UPEC gene expression. Moreover, at higher concentrations, selenium was effective in inactivating preformed UPEC biofilms on catheters as early as day 3 of incubation. Results suggest that selenium could be potentially used in the control of UPEC biofilms on urinary catheters.

  18. Using an indwelling catheter for the domiciliary management of malignant effusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramkumar P

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many patients with malignant pleural effusions and ascites require repeated hospital visits for paracentesis. Materials and Methods: Patients and caregivers were taught to drain malignant effusions at home, using an indwelling catheter inserted into the pleural/ peritoneal cavity. The catheter, (ARROW 14 wire gauge with three additional side holes made to prevent blockage was inserted using the Seldenger technique for central venous cannulation and secured with a stitch. A three way stopcock was used to regulate fluid drainage. The caregiver was taught to do biweekly dressings with antiseptic ointment. Results: The catheter has been used in 200 patients over a period of five years. Two patients developed infections in the pleural cavity, which were managed with antibiotics. Two patients needed catheter change because of blockage. Other patients retained the catheter till last follow up or death. The procedure can be carried out as a day case. This article describes practical guidelines for inserting and maintaining the catheter.

  19. A survey of the use of arterial catheters in anesthetized dogs and cats: 267 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trim, Cynthia M; Hofmeister, Erik H; Quandt, Jane E; Shepard, Molly K

    2017-01-01

    To describe the clinical practice of insertion of arterial catheters in anesthetized dogs and cats, to document complications of arterial catheterization, and to determine risk factors associated with the complications. Prospective clinical study and retrospective evaluation of medical records. University teaching hospital. Dogs (n = 251) and 13 cats anesthetized for clinical procedures with arterial catheters inserted for blood pressure monitoring. None. Details of the animal and catheter were collected at the time of anesthesia. On the following day, the catheter site was palpated and observed for abnormalities and the medical records of all animals were reviewed retrospectively for complications. Details of catheter placement were available for 216 catheters: 158 catheters in a dorsal pedal artery, 50 catheters in the median caudal (coccygeal) artery, 6 in the median artery, and 1 each in a cranial tibial and lingual artery. Blood pressure was obtained from 200 catheters, and 12 catheters failed before the end of anesthesia. Postoperative observational data obtained from 112 catheters described a palpable arterial pulse at 73 sites and no pulse at 21 sites. No risk factor for arterial occlusion was identified. No complications resulting from arterial catheterization were noted in the medical records. Arterial catheterization resulted in loss of a peripheral pulse postoperatively in 21/94 (22.3%) of animals examined, although no evidence of tissue ischemia was noted in the medical records of any of the patients in this study. These results suggest that insertion of a catheter in the dorsal pedal or coccygeal arteries was not associated with a high risk for complications. However, the course of arterial occlusion postoperatively warrants further investigation. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2016.

  20. Longer Duration of Urinary Catheterization Increases Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection in PICU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuoka, Kahoru; Furuichi, Mihoko; Ito, Kenta; Morikawa, Yoshihiko; Watanabe, Ichiro; Shimizu, Naoki; Horikoshi, Yuho

    2018-06-13

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections account for 30% of healthcare-associated infections. To date, few studies have addressed pediatric catheter-associated urinary tract infection in PICUs. The aim of our study was to assess the risk of catheter-associated urinary tract infection in relation to the duration of catheterization in the PICU. Retrospective cohort study. PICU at a tertiary children's hospital. Our study was conducted between April 2012 and June 2015 at Tokyo Metropolitan Children's Medical Center in Japan. Children in the PICU with an urethral catheter were included. Catheter-associated urinary tract infection cases were defined according to the National Healthcare Safety Network criteria. The patients' demographic data and isolated organisms were reviewed. Duration of catheterization and the catheter-associated urinary tract infection occurrence rate were analyzed. None. Among 1,890 catheterizations, 23 catheter-associated urinary tract infection cases were identified. The overall occurrence rate was 2.35/1,000 catheter-days. Among the patients with catheter-associated urinary tract infection, 13 were boys. The median age was 11 months (interquartile range, 7-35 mo), and the median duration of catheterization was 7 days (interquartile range, 5-12 d). The isolated bacteria were Escherichia coli (26.5%), Enterococcus faecalis (17.6%), and Klebsiella pneumoniae (11.8%). Two species were isolated in each of 11 cases (47.8%). Each additional day of catheterization increased the risk of catheter-associated urinary tract infection (odds ratio, 1.06; 95% CI, 1.02-1.10, and odds ratio adjusted for contact precaution status and surgical procedures was 1.05; 95% CI, 1.01-1.09). Longer duration of catheterization increased the risk of catheter-associated urinary tract infection by 5% each day at the PICU. Prompt removal of the urethral catheter is strongly recommended whenever feasible.

  1. Two years experience with tunneled dialysis catheters in patients requiring haemodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raheem, A.; Rana, A. I.; Ramzan, M.; Shah, R. A.; Mehmood, S. N.; Naseem, S.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To look for survival rate and major reasons behind the failure of tunnelled dialysis catheters in patients on haemodialysis. Methods: The retrospective study was conducted at the Department of Interventional Radiology, Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, and comprised records of 100 consecutive subjects from a list of patients in whom tunnelled cuffed catheters were placed from February 2009 to January 2011 and were followed up for two years. Data was collected on a proforma from the hospital database and medical records of patients. SPSS 19 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the total 122 catheters placed in 100 patients, 49(40.16%) were lost to follow-up. Of the remaining 73(59.83%) catheters, 38(52%) had achieved their desired function, while 35(48%) failed to achieve the target duration. Among the reasons of catheter failure, infection was the commonest at 13(37.14%) with infection rate of 0.24 per 1000 catheter days. According to Kaplan Meier analysis, catheter survival rates at 60, 90 and 180 days were 89%, 77% and 64% respectively. Mean effective duration of catheter was 129+-117 days. Conclusion: Tunnelled dialysis catheters can be safely used as vascular access till the maturation of fistula and may be an alternative to Arterio-Venous Fistula or graft for long-term vascular access if indicated. (author)

  2. Transhepatic venous catheters for hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed El Gharib

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Based on our findings, transhepatic hemodialysis catheters have proven to achieve good long-term functionality. A high level of maintenance is required to preserve patency, although this approach provides remarkably durable access for patients who have otherwise exhausted access options.

  3. Hemodialysis Catheter Heat Transfer for Biofilm Prevention and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Ian P; Sturtevant, Rachael; Heung, Michael; Solomon, Michael J; Younger, John G; VanEpps, J Scott

    2016-01-01

    Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) are not easily treated, and many catheters (e.g., hemodialysis catheters) are not easily replaced. Biofilms (the source of infection) on catheter surfaces are notoriously difficult to eradicate. We have recently demonstrated that modest elevations of temperature lead to increased staphylococcal susceptibility to vancomycin and significantly soften the biofilm matrix. In this study, using a combination of microbiological, computational, and experimental studies, we demonstrate the efficacy, feasibility, and safety of using heat as an adjuvant treatment for infected hemodialysis catheters. Specifically, we show that treating with heat in the presence of antibiotics led to additive killing of Staphylococcus epidermidis with similar trends seen for Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The magnitude of temperature elevation required is relatively modest (45-50°C) and similar to that used as an adjuvant to traditional cancer therapy. Using a custom-designed benchtop model of a hemodialysis catheter, positioned with tip in the human vena cava as well as computational fluid dynamic simulations, we demonstrate that these temperature elevations are likely achievable in situ with minimal increased in overall blood temperature.

  4. Transversus Abdominis Plane Catheter Bolus Analgesia after Major Abdominal Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Bjerregaard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Transversus abdominis plane (TAP blocks have been shown to reduce pain and opioid requirements after abdominal surgery. The aim of the present case series was to demonstrate the use of TAP catheter injections of bupivacaine after major abdominal surgery. Methods. Fifteen patients scheduled for open colonic resection surgery were included. After induction of anesthesia, bilateral TAP catheters were placed, and all patients received a bolus dose of 20 mL bupivacaine 2.5 mg/mL with epinephrine 5 μg/mL through each catheter. Additional bolus doses were injected bilaterally 12, 24, and 36 hrs after the first injections. Supplemental pain treatment consisted of paracetamol, ibuprofen, and gabapentin. Intravenous morphine was used as rescue analgesic. Postoperative pain was rated on a numeric rating scale (NRS, 0–10 at regular predefined intervals after surgery, and consumption of intravenous morphine was recorded. Results. The TAP catheters were placed without any technical difficulties. NRS scores were ≤3 at rest and ≤5 during cough at 4, 8, 12, 18, 24, and 36 hrs after surgery. Cumulative consumption of intravenous morphine was 28 (23–48 mg (median, IQR within the first 48 postoperative hours. Conclusion. TAP catheter bolus injections can be used to prolong analgesia after major abdominal surgery.

  5. Frequency of colonization and isolated bacteria from the tip of epidural catheter implanted for postoperative analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabille, Débora Miranda Diogo; Diogo Filho, Augusto; Mandim, Beatriz Lemos da Silva; de Araújo, Lúcio Borges; Mesquita, Priscila Miranda Diogo; Jorge, Miguel Tanús

    2015-01-01

    The increased use of epidural analgesia with catheter leads to the need to demonstrate the safety of this method and know the incidence of catheter colonization, inserted postoperatively for epidural analgesia, and the bacteria responsible for this colonization. From November 2011 to April 2012, patients electively operated and maintained under epidural catheter for postoperative analgesia were evaluated. The catheter tip was collected for semiquantitative and qualitative microbiological analysis. Of 68 cultured catheters, six tips (8.8%) had positive cultures. No patient had superficial or deep infection. The mean duration of catheter use was 43.45 h (18-118) (p=0.0894). The type of surgery (contaminated or uncontaminated), physical status of patients, and surgical time showed no relation with the colonization of catheters. Microorganisms isolated from the catheter tip were Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Sphingomonas paucimobilis. Postoperative epidural catheter analgesia, under these study conditions, was found to be low risk for bacterial colonization in patients at surgical wards. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  6. Catheter Migration After Implantationan Intrathecal Baclofen Infusion Pump for Severe Spasticity: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung-Chou Li

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of intrathecal baclofen infusion pump implantation complicated by migration of the catheter tip. A 55-year-old man required an intrathecal baclofen infusion for severe spasticity 4 years after a cervical spinal cord injury with incomplete tetraparesis. Twelve months after initial implantation of the device, the patient began to experience a recurrence of trunk tightness and spasticity. Subsequent X-ray and computed tomography evaluations of the catheter system revealed pooling of contrast medium outside of the intrathecal distribution in the lumbar subcutaneous region of the back and therefore migration of the pump catheter tip. At surgical revision, emphasis was placed on minimizing the length of catheter outside of the spine and securing the catheter in the supraspinous fascia with a right-angled anchor. The distance between the anchors and the entry point of the catheter into the supraspinous fascia was also reduced to prevent slipping when the patient bends forward. After surgery, the patient's spasticity improved and, 1 year later, he has experienced no further complications during follow-up, requiring an average baclofen dose of 150 mg/day. Here, we describe several surgical methods intended to secure the intrathecal catheter and prevent catheter migration. Other complications related to catheter failure are also highlighted.

  7. Thoracic Nerve Root Entrapment by Intrathecal Catheter Coiling: Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Jing L; Loriaux, Daniel B; Tybout, Caroline; Kinon, Merritt D; Rahimpour, Shervin; Runyon, Scott L; Hopkins, Thomas J; Boortz-Marx, Richard L; Lad, Shivanand P

    2016-03-01

    Intrathecal catheter placement has long-term therapeutic benefits in the management of chronic, intractable pain. Despite the diverse clinical applicability and rising prevalence of implantable drug delivery systems in pain medicine, the spectrum of complications associated with intrathecal catheterization remains largely understudied and underreported in the literature. To report a case of thoracic nerve root entrapment resulting from intrathecal catheter migration. Case report. Inpatient hospital service. A 60-year-old man status post implanted intrathecal (IT) catheter for intractable low back pain secondary to failed back surgery syndrome returned to the operating room for removal of IT pump trial catheter after experiencing relapse of preoperative pain and pump occlusion. Initial attempt at ambulatory removal of the catheter was aborted after the patient reported acute onset of lower extremity radiculopathic pain during the extraction. Noncontrast computed tomography (CT) subsequently revealed that the catheter had ascended and coiled around the T10 nerve root. The patient was taken back to the operating room for removal of the catheter under fluoroscopic guidance, with possible laminectomy for direct visualization. Removal was ultimately achieved with slow continuous tension, with complete resolution of the patient's new radicular symptoms. This report describes a single case report. This case demonstrates that any existing loops in the intrathecal catheter during initial implantation should be immediately re-addressed, as they can precipitate nerve root entrapment and irritation. Reduction of the loop or extrication of the catheter should be attempted under continuous fluoroscopic guidance to prevent further neurosurgical morbidity.

  8. Evaluation of two different epidural catheters in clinical practice. narrowing down the incidence of paresthesia!

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouman, E A C; Gramke, H F; Wetzel, N; Vanderbroeck, T H T; Bruinsma, R; Theunissen, M; Kerkkamp, H E M; Marcus, M A E

    2007-01-01

    Although epidural anesthesia is considered safe, several complications may occur during puncture and insertion of a catheter. Incidences of paresthesia vary between 0.2 and 56%. A prospective, open, cohort-controlled pilot study was conducted in 188 patients, ASA I-III, age 19-87 years, scheduled for elective surgery and epidural anesthesia. We evaluated a 20 G polyamide (standard) catheter and a 20 G combined polyurethane-polyamide (new) catheter. Spontaneous reactions upon catheter-insertion, paresthesia on questioning, inadvertent dural or intravascular puncture, and reasons for early catheter removal were recorded. The incidence of paresthesia reported spontaneously was 21.3% with the standard catheter and 16.7% with the new catheter. Systematically asking for paresthesia almost doubled the paraesthesia rate. Intravascular cannulation occurred in 5%. No accidental dural punctures occurred. An overall incidence of 13.3% of technical problems led to early catheter removal. The new catheter was at least equivalent to the standard regarding epidural success rate and safety : rate of paresthesia, intravascular and dural cannulation.

  9. An epidural catheter removal after recent percutaneous coronary intervention and coronary artery stenting: Epidural catheter and antiaggregation therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joksić Nikola

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Anticoagulation and antiplatelet therapy in the presence of the epidural catheter is still controversial. It is well known that dual antiplatelet therapy is indicated for 12 months after the placement of drug-eluting stents (DES. Removal of an epidural catheter during that period is related to an increased risk of stent occlusion in case of discontinuation of platelet function inhibitors or, on the other hand, increased risk of epidural hematoma associated with neurological deficit if suppressed platelet function is still present. Case Report: Here we present a case of a 63-year-old man who was admitted to Institute for Cardiovascular Diseases Dedinje for elective aortic surgery. Before the induction, an epidural catheter was inserted at the Th10-Th11 epidural space. Uneventful surgery was performed under the combined epidural and general anesthesia. On the 2nd postoperative day, the patient sustained a ST depression myocardial infarction treated with percutaneous coronary intervention with DES placement, while epidural catheter was still in place. Dual antiplatelet therapy with 600mg of clopidogrel, 100 mg of acetilsalicylic acid (ASA and low molecular weight heparin (LMWH were started during the procedure. The next day, clopidogrel (75 mg and ASA (100 mg were continued as well as LMWH. The decision to remove the epidural catheter was made on the 9th postoperative day, after platelet aggregation assays were performed. Six hours after catheter removal the patient again received clopidogrel, ASA and LMWH. There were no signs of epidural hematoma. Conclusion: This case shows that point-of-care testing with platelet aggregation assays may be useful in increasing the margin of safety for epidural catheter removal during dual antiplatelet therapy.

  10. Effect of steel and teflon infusion catheters on subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow and infusion counter pressure in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højbjerre, Lise; Skov-Jensen, Camilla; Kaastrup, Peter

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Subcutaneous tissue is an important target for drug deposition or infusion. A local trauma may induce alterations in local microcirculation and diffusion barriers with consequences for drug bioavailability. We examined the influence of infusion catheters' wear time on local...... microcirculation and infusion counter pressure. METHODS: One steel catheter and one Teflon (Dupont, Wilmington, DE) catheter were inserted in subcutaneous, abdominal adipose tissue (SCAAT) in 10 healthy, lean men. The catheters were infused with isotonic saline at a rate of 10 microL/h for 48 h. Another steel...... catheter and a Teflon catheter were inserted contralateral to the previous catheters after 48 h. The infusion counter pressure was measured during a basal infusion rate followed by a bolus infusion. The measurements during a basal rate infusion were repeated after the bolus infusion. Adipose tissue blood...

  11. Observations on the development of the crystalline bacterial biofilms that encrust and block Foley catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickler, D J; Morgan, S D

    2008-08-01

    The care of many patients undergoing long-term bladder catheterisation is complicated when the flow of urine through the catheter is blocked by encrustation. The problem results from infection by urease-producing bacteria, especially Proteus mirabilis, and the subsequent formation of crystalline biofilms on the catheter. The aim of this study was to discover how P. mirabilis initiates the development of these crystalline biofilms. The early stages in the formation of the biofilms were observed on a range of Foley catheters in a laboratory model of the catheterised bladder. Scanning electron micrographs revealed that when all-silicone, silicone-coated latex, hydrogel-coated latex, hydrogel/silver-coated latex and nitrofurazone silicone catheters were inserted into bladder models containing P. mirabilis and alkaline urine, their surfaces were rapidly coated with a microcrystalline foundation layer. X-ray microanalysis showed that this material was composed of calcium phosphate. Bacterial colonisation of the foundation layer followed and by 18h the catheters were encrusted by densely populated crystalline P. mirabilis biofilms. These observations have important implications for the development of encrustation-resistant catheters. In the case of silver catheters for example, bacterial cells can attach to the crystalline foundation layer and continue to grow, protected from contact with the underlying silver. If antimicrobials are to be incorporated into catheters to prevent encrustation, it is important that they diffuse into the urine and prevent the rise in pH that triggers crystal formation.

  12. Tracing Fasting Glucose Fluxes with Unstressed Catheter Approach in Streptozotocin Induced Diabetic Rats

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    Shichun Du

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. Blood glucose concentrations of type 1 diabetic rats are vulnerable, especially to stress and trauma. The present study aimed to investigate the fasting endogenous glucose production and skeletal muscle glucose uptake of Streptozotocin induced type 1 diabetic rats using an unstressed vein and artery implantation of catheters at the tails of the rats as a platform. Research Design and Methods. Streptozotocin (65 mg·kg−1 was administered to induce type 1 diabetic state. The unstressed approach of catheters of vein and artery at the tails of the rats was established before the isotope tracer injection. Dynamic measurement of fasting endogenous glucose production was assessed by continuously infusing stable isotope [6, 6-2H2] glucose, while skeletal muscle glucose uptake by bolus injecting radioactively labeled [1-14C]-2-deoxy-glucose. Results. Streptozotocin induced type 1 diabetic rats displayed polydipsia, polyphagia, and polyuria along with overt hyperglycemia and hypoinsulinemia. They also had enhanced fasting endogenous glucose production and reduced glucose uptake in skeletal muscle compared to nondiabetic rats. Conclusions. The dual catheters implantation at the tails of the rats together with isotope tracers injection is a save time, unstressed, and feasible approach to explore the glucose metabolism in animal models in vivo.

  13. Radiological Tenckhoff catheter insertion for peritoneal dialysis: A cost-effective approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, James; Mott, Nigel; Mahmood, Usman; Clouston, John; Summers, Kara; Nicholas, Pauline; Gois, Pedro Henrique França; Ranganathan, Dwarakanathan

    2018-04-01

    Radiological insertion of Tenckhoff catheters can be an alternative option for peritoneal dialysis access creation, as compared to surgical catheter insertion. This study will review the outcomes and complications of radiological Tenckhoff catheter insertion in a metropolitan renal service and compare costs between surgical and radiological insertion. Data were collected prospectively for all patients who had a Tenckhoff catheter insertion for peritoneal dialysis (PD) under radiological guidance at our hospital from May 2014 to November 2016. The type of catheter used and complications, including peri-catheter leak, exit site infection and peritonitis were reviewed. Follow-up data were also collected at points 3, 6 and 12 months from catheter insertion. Costing data were obtained from Queensland Health Electronic Reporting System (QHERS) data, average staff salaries and consumable contract price lists. In the 30-month evaluation period, 70 catheters were inserted. Two patients had an unsuccessful procedure due to the presence of abdominal adhesions. Seven patients had an episode of peri-catheter leak, and four patients had an exit site infection following catheter insertion. Peritonitis was observed in nine patients during the study period. The majority of patients (90%) remained on peritoneal dialysis at 3-month follow-up. The average costs of surgical and radiological insertion were noted to be AUD$7788.34 and AUD$1597.35, respectively. Radiological Tenckhoff catheter insertion for peritoneal dialysis appears to be an attractive and cost-effective option given less waiting periods for the procedure, the relatively low cost of insertion and comparable rates of complications. © 2017 The Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Radiologists.

  14. Comparison of air-charged and water-filled urodynamic pressure measurement catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooper, M A; Fletter, P C; Zaszczurynski, P J; Damaser, M S

    2011-03-01

    Catheter systems are utilized to measure pressure for diagnosis of voiding dysfunction. In a clinical setting, patient movement and urodynamic pumps introduce hydrostatic and motion artifacts into measurements. Therefore, complete characterization of a catheter system includes its response to artifacts as well its frequency response. The objective of this study was to compare the response of two disposable clinical catheter systems: water-filled and air-charged, to controlled pressure signals to assess their similarities and differences in pressure transduction. We characterized frequency response using a transient step test, which exposed the catheters to a sudden change in pressure; and a sinusoidal frequency sweep test, which exposed the catheters to a sinusoidal pressure wave from 1 to 30 Hz. The response of the catheters to motion artifacts was tested using a vortex and the response to hydrostatic pressure changes was tested by moving the catheter tips to calibrated heights. Water-filled catheters acted as an underdamped system, resonating at 10.13 ± 1.03 Hz and attenuating signals at frequencies higher than 19 Hz. They demonstrated significant motion and hydrostatic artifacts. Air-charged catheters acted as an overdamped system and attenuated signals at frequencies higher than 3.02 ± 0.13 Hz. They demonstrated significantly less motion and hydrostatic artifacts than water-filled catheters. The transient step and frequency sweep tests gave comparable results. Air-charged and water-filled catheters respond to pressure changes in dramatically different ways. Knowledge of the characteristics of the pressure-measuring system is essential to finding the best match for a specific application. Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  15. Foley Catheter versus Vaginal Misoprostol for Labour Induction

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    Nasreen Noor

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. To compare the efficacy and safety of intravaginal misoprostol with transcervical Foley catheter for labour induction. Material and Methods. One hundred and four women with term gestation, with Bishop score < 4, and with various indications for labour induction were randomly divided into two groups. In Group I, 25 μg of misoprostol tablet was placed intravaginally, 4 hourly up to maximum 6 doses. In Group II, Foley catheter 16F was placed through the internal os of the cervix under aseptic condition and then inflated with 50 cc of sterile saline. Statistical analysis was done using SPSS software. Results. The induction to delivery interval was 14.03 ± 7.61 hours versus 18.40 ± 8.02 hours (p<0.01. The rate of vaginal delivery was 76.7% versus 56.8% in misoprostol and transcervical Foley catheter group, respectively. Uterine hyperstimulation was more common with misoprostol. Neonatal outcome was similar in both the groups. Conclusion. Intravaginal misoprostol is associated with a shorter induction to delivery interval as compared to Foley’s catheter and it increases the rate of vaginal delivery in cases of unripe cervix at term. Transcervical Foley catheter is associated with a lower incidence of uterine hyperstimulation during labour.

  16. Fantoni’s Tracheostomy using Catheter High Frequency Jet Ventilation

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    P. Török

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: It has been shown previously that conventional ventilation delivered through a long cuffed endotracheal tube is associated with a high flow-resistance and frequent perioperative complications. Aim: We attempted to supersede the conventional ventilation by high-frequency jet ventilation through a catheter (HFJV-C and assess safety of the procedure. Material and methods: Using a translaryngeal tracheostomy kit, we performed a translaryngeal (Fantoni tracheostomy (TLT. Subsequently, we introduced a special 2-way prototype ventilatory catheter into the trachea via the TLT under bronchoscopic control. Satisfactory HFJV-C ventilation through the catheter was achieved in 218 patients. Results: There were no significant adverse effects on vital signs observed in the cohort during the study. The pH, SpO2, PaO2, and PaCO2 did not change significantly following the HFJV-C. The intrinsic PEEPi measured in trachea did not exceed 4—5 cm H2O during its application, which was significantly less than during the classical ventilation via the endotracheal tube fluctuating between 12 and 17 cm H2O. No serious medical complications occurred. Conclusion: The HFJV during Fantoni’s tracheostomy using the catheter HFJV-C proved to be a safe and effective method of lung ventilation at the intensive care unit. Key words: Translaryngeal tracheostomy, HFJV via catheter.

  17. Peripheral intravenous catheter-related phlebitis and related risk factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nassaji-Zavareh, M; Ghorbani, R

    2007-08-01

    Peripheral intravenous catheter-related phlebitis is a common and significant problem in clinical practice. This study aims to investigate the incidence of phlebitis and to evaluate some important related factors. 300 patients admitted to medical and surgical wards of hospitals in Semnan, Iran from April 2003 to February 2004 were prospectively studied. Variables evaluated were age, gender, site and size of catheter, type of insertion and underlying conditions (diabetes mellitus, trauma, infectious disease and burns). Phlebitis was defined when at least four criteria were fulfilled (erythema, pain, tenderness, warmth, induration, palpable cord and swelling). Any patient who was discharged or their catheter removed before three days were excluded. Phlebitis occurred in 26 percent (95 percent confidence interval [CI] 21- 31 percent) of patients. There was no significant relationship between age, catheter bore size, trauma and phlebitis. Related risk factors were gender (odds-ratio [OR] 1.50, 95 percent CI 1.01-2.22), site (OR 3.25, 95 percent CI 2.26-4.67) and type of insertion (OR 2.04, 95 percent CI 1.36-3.05) of catheter, diabetes mellitus (OR 7.78, 95 percent CI 4.59-13.21), infectious disease (OR 6.21, 95 percent CI 4.27-9.03) and burns (OR 3.96, 95 percent CI 3.26-4.82). Phlebitis is still an important and ongoing problem in medical practice. In patients with diabetes mellitus and infectious diseases, more attention is needed.

  18. UK Renal Registry 15th annual report: Chapter 8 UK multisite peritoneal dialysis access catheter audit for first PD catheters 2011.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Briggs, Victoria; Pitcher, David; Braddon, Fiona; Fogarty, Damian; Wilkie, Martin

    2013-01-01

    The central paradigm of effective peritoneal dialysis (PD) is an appropriate standard of PD catheter function. The aim of the project was to develop an effective national PD access audit which would identify an 'appropriate standard' of PD catheter function. The UK Renal Registry collected centre specific information on various PD access outcome measures including catheter functionality and post-insertion complications. The first PD access audit covering England, Northern Ireland and Wales was conducted during April to June 2012 looking at incident dialysis patients in 2011. Forty three data collection spreadsheets were returned from a total of 65 centres describing 917 PD catheter placements. The median age of PD patients was 61 years and 61.5% were male. The proportion of patients initiated on PD in comparison to HD was lower in socially deprived areas. There was a relationship between the timing of nephrology referral and the likelihood of surgical assessment regarding PD catheter placement. Patients with diabetes did not have higher rates of PD catheter failure or of early peritonitis. A comparative PD catheter audit has the potential to provide valuable information on an important patient related outcome measure and lead to an improvement in patient experience. There was wide variation between centres of PD catheter use for late presenting patients. Overall patients were more likely to get a PD catheter if they had been known to the service for more than 1 year. The percutaneous insertion technique was associated with a higher early (less than 2 week) peritonitis rate and more catheter flow problems. Copyright © 2013 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. [Delayed (tension) pneumothorax after placement of a central venous catheter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, E C; van der Vliet, J A

    1999-09-11

    Laborious attempts at introducing a central venous catheter for parenteral nutrition in two women, aged 36 and 62 years, were followed by shortness of breath after 32 and 10 hours, respectively. This symptom was due to a (tension) pneumothorax not visible on earlier roentgenograms. Thoracic drainage led to recovery. In all patients with a central venous catheter an undetected delayed pneumothorax can be present. Urgent chest X-ray examination should be performed in all patients with acute respiratory symptoms. Patients undergoing elective intubation with positive pressure breathing should be examined carefully, since they are at risk of developing a late (tension) pneumothorax.

  20. Performance evaluation of a robot-assisted catheter operating system with haptic feedback.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yu; Guo, Shuxiang; Yin, Xuanchun; Zhang, Linshuai; Hirata, Hideyuki; Ishihara, Hidenori; Tamiya, Takashi

    2018-06-20

    In this paper, a novel robot-assisted catheter operating system (RCOS) has been proposed as a method to reduce physical stress and X-ray exposure time to physicians during endovascular procedures. The unique design of this system allows the physician to apply conventional bedside catheterization skills (advance, retreat and rotate) to an input catheter, which is placed at the master side to control another patient catheter placed at the slave side. For this purpose, a magnetorheological (MR) fluids-based master haptic interface has been developed to measure the axial and radial motions of an input catheter, as well as to provide the haptic feedback to the physician during the operation. In order to achieve a quick response of the haptic force in the master haptic interface, a hall sensor-based closed-loop control strategy is employed. In slave side, a catheter manipulator is presented to deliver the patient catheter, according to position commands received from the master haptic interface. The contact forces between the patient catheter and blood vessel system can be measured by designed force sensor unit of catheter manipulator. Four levels of haptic force are provided to make the operator aware of the resistance encountered by the patient catheter during the insertion procedure. The catheter manipulator was evaluated for precision positioning. The time lag from the sensed motion to replicated motion is tested. To verify the efficacy of the proposed haptic feedback method, the evaluation experiments in vitro are carried out. The results demonstrate that the proposed system has the ability to enable decreasing the contact forces between the catheter and vasculature.

  1. Coronary angioplasty with second generation Monorail catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pande, A K; Meier, B; Urban, P; Villavicencio, R; de la Serna, F; Moles, V

    1991-07-01

    The Monorail system (Schneider) consists of a balloon catheter in which the guidewire passes through the balloon itself, exits the catheter proximal to the balloon, and runs alongside its small shaft (3 French) through the length of the guiding catheter. It offers distinct advantages over conventional systems of coronary angioplasty. It facilitates contrast injections and permits rapid balloon exchanges. This system was used for coronary angioplasty in 273 unselected consecutive patients (age 59 +/- 10, mean 35 to 73 years). There were 216 patients (84%) undergoing single-vessel and 57 patients (16%) with multi-vessel coronary angioplasty. A total of 335 coronary stenoses were dilated, which included 35 total occlusions. The size of balloon used ranged from 2.0 to 4.25 mm (3.0 +/- 0.5 mm) and the severity of stenosis was 85 +/- 11%. Technical success was defined as a residual stenosis of less than 50% as determined angiographically. Clinical success was defined as technical success, and absence of a major inhospital complication defined as absence of myocardial infarction, lack of need for coronary arterial bypass surgery, and survival. The Monorail system was technically successful in 294/300 stenotic lesions (98%). It was clinically successful for 281 lesions (94%). Of the 35 total occlusions, technical success was obtained in 25 (71%). The residual stenosis of successful cases was 26 +/- 21%. The Monorail system was also successful in 5 patients with stenosis of more than 90% in whom conventional systems failed. The complications included acute occlusion causing acute myocardial infarction in 13 cases (5%), emergency coronary arterial bypass surgery in 1 patient (0.4%), and death in 4 patients (1.5%).(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  2. Epidemiology of peritonitis following maintenance peritoneal dialysis catheter placement during infancy: a report of the SCOPE collaborative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaritsky, Joshua Jacob; Hanevold, Coral; Quigley, Raymond; Richardson, Troy; Wong, Cynthia; Ehrlich, Jennifer; Lawlor, John; Rodean, Jonathan; Neu, Alicia; Warady, Bradley A

    2018-04-01

    Maintenance peritoneal dialysis (PD) is the dialysis modality of choice for infants and young children. However, there are limited outcome data for those who undergo PD catheter insertion and initiate maintenance PD within the first year of life. Using data from the Children's Hospital Association's Standardizing Care to Improve Outcomes in Pediatric End Stage Renal Disease (ESRD) Collaborative (SCOPE), we examined peritonitis rates and patient survival in 156 infants from 29 North American pediatric dialysis centers who had a chronic PD catheter placed prior to their first birthday. In-hospital and overall annualized rates of peritonitis were 1.73 and 0.76 episodes per patient-year, respectively. Polycystic kidney disease was the most frequent renal diagnosis and pulmonary hypoplasia the most common co-morbidity in infants with peritonitis. Multivariable regression models demonstrated that nephrectomy at or prior to PD catheter placement and G-tube insertion after catheter placement were associated with a nearly sixfold and nearly threefold increased risk of peritonitis, respectively. Infants with peritonitis had longer initial hospital stays and lower overall survival (86.3 vs. 95.6%, respectively; P high and several risk factors associated with the development of peritonitis were identified. Given that peritonitis was associated with a longer duration of initial hospitalization and increased mortality, increased attention to the potentially modifiable risk factors for infection is needed.

  3. Control of intravascular catheters using an array of active steering coils.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gudino, N; Heilman, J A; Derakhshan, J J; Sunshine, J L; Duerk, J L; Griswold, M A

    2011-07-01

    To extend the concept of deflecting the tip of a catheter with the magnetic force created in an MRI system through the use of an array of independently controllable steering coils located in the catheter tip, and to present methods for visualization of the catheter and/or surrounding areas while the catheter is deflected. An array of steering coils made of 42-gauge wire was built over a 2.5 Fr (0.83 mm) fiber braided microcatheter. Two of the coils were 70 turn axial coils separated by 1 cm, and the third was a 15-turn square side coil that was 2 x 4 mm2. Each coil was driven independently by a pulse width modulation (PWM) current source controlled by a microprocessor that received commands from a MATLAB routine that dynamically set current amplitude and direction for each coil. The catheter was immersed in a water phantom containing 1% Gd-DTPA that was placed at the isocenter of a 1.5 T MRI scanner. Deflections of the catheter tip were measured from image-based data obtained with a real-time radio frequency (RF) spoiled gradient echo sequence (GRE). The small local magnetic fields generated by the steering coils were exploited to generate a hyperintense signal at the catheter tip by using a modified GRE sequence that did not include slice-select rewinding gradients. Imaging and excitation modes were implemented by synchronizing the excitation of the steering coil array with the scanner by ensuring that no current was driven through the coils during the data acquisition window; this allowed visualization of the surrounding tissue while not affecting the desired catheter position. Deflections as large as 2.5 cm were measured when exciting the steering coils sequentially with a 100 mA maximum current per coil. When exciting a single axial coil, the deflection was half this value with 30% higher current. A hyperintense catheter tip useful for catheter tracking was obtained by imaging with the modified GRE sequence. Clear visualization of the areas surrounding the

  4. Taurolidine lock is superior to heparin lock in the prevention of catheter related bloodstream infections and occlusions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyn D Olthof

    Full Text Available Patients on home parenteral nutrition (HPN are at risk for catheter-related complications; mainly infections and occlusions. We have previously shown in HPN patients presenting with catheter sepsis that catheter locking with taurolidine dramatically reduced re-infections when compared with heparin. Our HPN population therefore switched from heparin to taurolidine in 2008. The aim of the present study was to compare long-term effects of this catheter lock strategy on the occurrence of catheter-related bloodstream infections and occlusions in HPN patients.Data of catheter-related complications were retrospectively collected from 212 patients who received HPN between January 2000 and November 2011, comprising 545 and 200 catheters during catheter lock therapy with heparin and taurolidine, respectively. We evaluated catheter-related bloodstream infection and occlusion incidence rates using Poisson-normal regression analysis. Incidence rate ratios were calculated by dividing incidence rates of heparin by those of taurolidine, adjusting for underlying disease, use of anticoagulants or immune suppressives, frequency of HPN/fluid administration, composition of infusion fluids, and duration of HPN/fluid use before catheter creation.Bloodstream infection incidence rates were 1.1/year for heparin and 0.2/year for taurolidine locked catheters. Occlusion incidence rates were 0.2/year for heparin and 0.1/year for taurolidine locked catheters. Adjusted incidence ratios of heparin compared to taurolidine were 5.9 (95% confidence interval, 3.9-8.7 for bloodstream infections and 1.9 (95% confidence interval, 1.1-3.1 for occlusions.Given that no other procedural changes than the catheter lock strategy were implemented during the observation period, these data strongly suggest that taurolidine decreases catheter-related bloodstream infections and occlusions in HPN patients compared with heparin.

  5. Efficacy of a one-catheter concept for transradial coronary angiography.

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    Christoph Langer

    Full Text Available Transradial coronary angiography (TRC can be performed with a one-catheter approach for the right and left coronary ostium (R/LCO. We investigated the performance of a special diagnostic catheter widely used for the one-catheter-approach, the Tiger (Tiger II, TerumoTM.In a dual center registry we analyzed 1412 TRC-procedures exclusively performed by experienced TRC-operators. We compared the performance of the Tiger with Judkins catheters by retrospectively judging ostial catheter stability during contrast injection, and by measuring contrast use, fluoroscopy time (FT and complication rate.Poor or failed ostial engagement was found in 40.5% in the Tiger group, compared to 46.6% with the use of Judkins catheters (p<0.183. Ostial instability of the Tiger was found more often during engagement of the LCO than the RCO (34.4% vs. 10.8%, p<0.001, whereas it was similar in the LCO and RCO for Judkins catheters (27.4% vs. 26.7%, p = 0.840. TRC-procedures performed with Tiger catheters were associated with less contrast volume (63.48 ± 29.83mL vs. 82.51 ± 56.58mL, p<0.004 and shorter FT than with Judkins catheters. (198.27 ± 194.8sec vs. 326.85 ± 329.70sec. Forearm hematomas occurred less often with the Tiger (1.2% vs. 6.6%, p< 0.02.The Tiger employed as a single catheter in TRC is an effective tool to achieve lower contrast volume and fluoroscopy time at a low complication rate. Unstable engagement affects predominantly the left coronary artery, but its overall frequency is similar for both, the Tiger and Judkins catheters.

  6. Tunneled dialysis catheter exchange with fibrin sheath disruption is not associated with increased rate of bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valliant, Amanda M; Chaudhry, Muhammad K; Yevzlin, Alexander S; Astor, Brad; Chan, Micah R

    2015-01-01

    Tunneled dialysis catheters are the most common form of vascular access among incident dialysis patients in the United States. Fibrin sheath formation is a frequent cause of late catheter dysfunction requiring an exchange procedure with balloon disruption of the fibrin sheath. It is unknown whether fibrin sheath disruption is associated with increased incidence of bacteremia or catheter failure. We reviewed all tunneled dialysis catheter exchange procedures at the University of Wisconsin between January 2008 and December 2011. The primary outcome was incidence of bacteremia, defined as positive blood cultures within 2 weeks of the procedure. Catheter failure, requiring intervention or replacement, was examined as a secondary outcome. Baseline characteristics examined included diabetic status, gender, race and age. A total of 163 procedures were reviewed; 67 (41.1%) had fibrin sheath disruption and 96 did not. Bacteremia occurred in 4.5% (3/67) of those with and 3.1% (3/97) of those without fibrin sheath disruption (p=0.65). Fibrin sheath disruption was not significantly associated with the risk of catheter failure (adjusted hazard ratio [aHR]=1.34; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.87-2.10; p=0.18). Diabetes was associated with greater risk of catheter failure (aHR=1.88; 95% CI: 1.19-2.95; p=0.006), whereas higher age was associated with a lower risk of catheter failure (aHR per 10 years=0.83; 95% CI: 0.72-0.96; p=0.01). This study demonstrates that there is no significant increase in bacteremia and subsequent catheter dysfunction rates after fibrin sheath disruption compared to simple over the wire exchange. These results are encouraging given the large numbers of patients utilizing tunneled catheters for initial hemodialysis access and the known rates of fibrin sheath formation leading to catheter failure.

  7. Local sustained-release delivery systems of the antibiofilm agent thiazolidinedione-8 for prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenderovich, Julia; Feldman, Mark; Kirmayer, David; Al-Quntar, Abed; Steinberg, Doron; Lavy, Eran; Friedman, Michael

    2015-05-15

    Thiazolidinedione-8 (TZD-8) is an anti-quorum-sensing molecule that has the potential to effectively prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infections, a major healthcare challenge. Sustained-release drug-delivery systems can enhance drugs' therapeutic potential, by maintaining their therapeutic level and reducing their side effects. Varnishes for sustained release of TZD-8 based on ethylcellulose or ammonio methacrylate copolymer type A (Eudragit(®) RL) were developed. The main factors affecting release rate were found to be film thickness and presence of a hydrophilic or swellable polymer in the matrix. The release mechanism of ethylcellulose-based systems matched the Higuchi model. Selected varnishes were retained on catheters for at least 8 days. Sustained-release delivery systems of TZD-8 were active against Candida albicans biofilms. The present study demonstrates promising results en route to developing applications for the prevention of catheter-associated infections. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. CT imaging of complications of catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shroff, G.S.; Guirguis, M.S.; Ferguson, E.C.; Oldham, S.A.A.; Kantharia, B.K.

    2014-01-01

    The complication rate following radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation is low (<5%). Complications include pericardial effusion, cardiac tamponade, pulmonary vein stenosis, oesophageal ulceration or perforation, atrio-oesophageal fistula formation, stroke/transient ischaemic attack, phrenic nerve injury, haematoma at the puncture site, and femoral arteriovenous fistula. Among available imaging tools, computed tomography (CT) can be very useful in diagnosing complications of the procedure, particularly in the subacute and delayed stages after ablation. This review illustrates CT imaging of several of the common and uncommon complications of radiofrequency catheter ablation

  9. Laparoscopic versus open peritoneal dialysis catheter insertion, the LOCI-trial: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen Sander M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peritoneal dialysis (PD is an effective treatment for end-stage renal disease. It allows patients more freedom to perform daily activities compared to haemodialysis. Key to successful PD is the presence of a well-functioning dialysis catheter. Several complications, such as in- and outflow obstruction, peritonitis, exit-site infections, leakage and migration, can lead to catheter removal and loss of peritoneal access. Currently, different surgical techniques are in practice for PD-catheter placement. The type of insertion technique used may greatly influence the occurrence of complications. In the literature, up to 35% catheter failure has been described when using the open technique and only 13% for the laparoscopic technique. However, a well-designed randomized controlled trial is lacking. Methods/Design The LOCI-trial is a multi-center randomized controlled, single-blind trial (pilot. The study compares the laparoscopic with the open technique for PD catheter insertion. The primary objective is to determine the optimum placement technique in order to minimize the incidence of catheter malfunction at 6 weeks postoperatively. Secondary objectives are to determine the best approach to optimize catheter function and to study the quality of life at 6 months postoperatively comparing the two operative techniques. Discussion This study will generate evidence on any benefits of laparoscopic versus open PD catheter insertion. Trial registration Dutch Trial Register NTR2878

  10. [Prevention of catheter-related infection: usefulness and cost-effectiveness of antiseptic catheters in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenz, Ana M; Vassallo, Juan C; Moreno, Guillermo E; Althabe, María; Gómez, Silvia; Magliola, Ricardo; Casimir, Lidia; Bologna, Rosa; Barretta, Jorge; Ruffa, Pablo

    2010-06-01

    To evaluate the cost-effectiveness of the antiseptic-impregnated catheter compared with conventional catheters in preventing catheter- related blood stream infections (CR-BSI). Cost-effectiveness analysis; clinical trial, experimental, randomized, controlled, prospective, open label. Patients and methods. A 172 patient cohort, under 1-year-old or less than 10 kg, postoperative cardiovascular children with central venous catheters (CVC) admitted to Cardiac Intensive Care Unit (UCI 35) at Hospital Nacional de Pediatría "Prof. Dr. Juan P. Garrahan", since September 2005 to December 2007. Demographic and CVC data were retrieved to compare: age, gender, weight, diagnosis, surgery, CVC days, costs and complications. Intervention. CVC Arrow, double-lumen, > 48 h of duration; intervention group: antiseptic-impregnated CVC vs. control group: CVC without antiseptics (conventional). The incidence of CR-IE (CR-Infected Events: colonization, local infection and/or CRBSI; combined end point) was 27% for antiseptic- impregnated CVC vs. 31% for conventional catheters (p= 0.6) with similar accumulated incidence of CR- BSI: 2.8 vs. 3.3 per 1000 dayscatheter. We found no differences between groups, except in weight: median 4.0 kg (r 2-17) vs. 4.7 kg (r 2-9) p= 0.0002 and age, median 2 months (r 1- 48) vs. 5 months (r 1- 24) p= 0.0019 in antiseptic-impregnated CVC group. These differences, though statistically significant were clinically non relevant. Median cost per patient during intensive care stay in the conventional CVC group was $3.417 (359-9.453) and in the antiseptic-impregnated-CVC group was $4.962 (239-24.532), p= 0.10. The use of antiseptic-impregnated CVC compared with conventional CVC did not decrease CR-BSI in this population. The cost per patients was higher in the antiseptic impregnated CVC group. These results do not support the routine use of this type of CVC in our population.

  11. Experience with the bonanno catheter in the management of OHSS from IVF-ET Cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okohue, J E; Oriji, V K; Ikimalo, J I

    2017-07-01

    To document our experience with the use of the Bonanno catheter as a closed abdominal drain for OHSS Methods: A retrospective study of all IVF embryo transfer (ET) treatment cycles carried out between May 2006 and April 2009 at a dedicated IVF centre. Case notes of patients with OHSS were retrieved and the outcome of the continuous closed abdominal drain with Bonanno catheter documented. Within the period under review, 234 patients had controlled ovarian stimulation with ultrasound guided egg retrieval. Two hundred and twenty eight (228) got to the stage of embryo transfer with 72 clinical pregnancies. The clinical pregnancy rate was 31.58%. Fourteen (6%) of those who were stimulated developed OHSS and had a closed abdominal drain of the ascitic fluid using the Bonanno catheter. The average number of days of the abdominal drainage was 7.5days and the average volume of ascitic fluid drained from a patient per day was 2454.9 + 748mls. Eight (8) patients who had OHSS achieved clinical pregnancy (six intrauterine, one ectopic and one heterotopic pregnancies), giving a clinical pregnancy rate of 57.14% in patients with OHSS. Four patients had blocked Bonanno catheters and three of them had the catheter changed while the fourth had the catheter successfully flushed. Four patients had the insertion site dressing changed due to soaking with ascitic fluid. There was no incidence of injury to intra abdominal organs or broken catheter. Bonanno Catheter is both effective and safe in draining ascitic fluid following OHSS.

  12. Cerebral microdialysis methodology--evaluation of 20 kDa and 100 kDa catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, P J; O'Connell, M T; Nortje, J; Smith, P; Al-Rawi, P G; Gupta, A K; Menon, D K; Pickard, J D

    2005-08-01

    Microdialysis monitoring of cerebral metabolism is now performed in several neuro-intensive care units. Conventional microdialysis utilizes CMA70 catheters with 20 kDa molecular weight cut-off membranes enabling the measurement of small molecules such as glucose, lactate, pyruvate and glutamate. The CMA71 100 kDa molecular weight cut-off microdialysis catheter has recently been introduced to allow detection of larger molecules such as cytokines. The objective of this study was to perform in vitro and in vivo testing of the CMA71 microdialysis catheter, comparing its performance with the CMA70. In vitro comparison studies of three of each catheter using reference analyte solutions, demonstrated equivalent recovery for glucose, lactate, pyruvate and glutamate (range 94-97% for CMA70 and 88-103% for CMA71). In vivo comparison involved intracranial placement of paired CMA70 and CMA71 catheters (through the same cranial access device) in six patients with severe traumatic brain injury. Both catheters were perfused with CNS Perfusion Fluid without dextran at 0.3 microl min-1 with hourly sampling and bedside analysis on a CMA600 microdialysis analyser. The two catheters yielded equivalent results for glucose, lactate, pyruvate, glutamate and lactate/pyruvate ratio. CMA71 microdialysis catheters can, therefore, be used for routine clinical monitoring of extracellular substances, as well as for their intended research role of larger molecular weight protein sampling.

  13. Model United Nations at CERN

    CERN Multimedia

    2012-01-01

    From 20 to 22 January, 300 young people from international secondary schools in Switzerland, France and Turkey will meet at CERN to debate scientific topics at a Model UN Conference.   Representing some 50 countries, they will form committees and a model General Assembly to discuss the meeting’s chosen topic: “UN – World Science Pole for Progress”.

  14. Real-time x-ray fluoroscopy-based catheter detection and tracking for cardiac electrophysiology interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ma Yingliang; Housden, R. James; Razavi, Reza; Rhode, Kawal S.; Gogin, Nicolas; Cathier, Pascal; Gijsbers, Geert; Cooklin, Michael; O'Neill, Mark; Gill, Jaswinder; Rinaldi, C. Aldo

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: X-ray fluoroscopically guided cardiac electrophysiology (EP) procedures are commonly carried out to treat patients with arrhythmias. X-ray images have poor soft tissue contrast and, for this reason, overlay of a three-dimensional (3D) roadmap derived from preprocedural volumetric images can be used to add anatomical information. It is useful to know the position of the catheter electrodes relative to the cardiac anatomy, for example, to record ablation therapy locations during atrial fibrillation therapy. Also, the electrode positions of the coronary sinus (CS) catheter or lasso catheter can be used for road map motion correction.Methods: In this paper, the authors present a novel unified computational framework for image-based catheter detection and tracking without any user interaction. The proposed framework includes fast blob detection, shape-constrained searching and model-based detection. In addition, catheter tracking methods were designed based on the customized catheter models input from the detection method. Three real-time detection and tracking methods are derived from the computational framework to detect or track the three most common types of catheters in EP procedures: the ablation catheter, the CS catheter, and the lasso catheter. Since the proposed methods use the same blob detection method to extract key information from x-ray images, the ablation, CS, and lasso catheters can be detected and tracked simultaneously in real-time.Results: The catheter detection methods were tested on 105 different clinical fluoroscopy sequences taken from 31 clinical procedures. Two-dimensional (2D) detection errors of 0.50 ± 0.29, 0.92 ± 0.61, and 0.63 ± 0.45 mm as well as success rates of 99.4%, 97.2%, and 88.9% were achieved for the CS catheter, ablation catheter, and lasso catheter, respectively. With the tracking method, accuracies were increased to 0.45 ± 0.28, 0.64 ± 0.37, and 0.53 ± 0.38 mm and success rates increased to 100%, 99.2%, and 96

  15. Real-time x-ray fluoroscopy-based catheter detection and tracking for cardiac electrophysiology interventions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ma Yingliang; Housden, R. James; Razavi, Reza; Rhode, Kawal S. [Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, King' s College London, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom); Gogin, Nicolas; Cathier, Pascal [Medisys Research Group, Philips Healthcare, Paris 92156 (France); Gijsbers, Geert [Interventional X-ray, Philips Healthcare, Best 5680 DA (Netherlands); Cooklin, Michael; O' Neill, Mark; Gill, Jaswinder; Rinaldi, C. Aldo [Department of Cardiology, Guys and St. Thomas' Hospitals NHS Foundation Trust, London SE1 7EH (United Kingdom)

    2013-07-15

    Purpose: X-ray fluoroscopically guided cardiac electrophysiology (EP) procedures are commonly carried out to treat patients with arrhythmias. X-ray images have poor soft tissue contrast and, for this reason, overlay of a three-dimensional (3D) roadmap derived from preprocedural volumetric images can be used to add anatomical information. It is useful to know the position of the catheter electrodes relative to the cardiac anatomy, for example, to record ablation therapy locations during atrial fibrillation therapy. Also, the electrode positions of the coronary sinus (CS) catheter or lasso catheter can be used for road map motion correction.Methods: In this paper, the authors present a novel unified computational framework for image-based catheter detection and tracking without any user interaction. The proposed framework includes fast blob detection, shape-constrained searching and model-based detection. In addition, catheter tracking methods were designed based on the customized catheter models input from the detection method. Three real-time detection and tracking methods are derived from the computational framework to detect or track the three most common types of catheters in EP procedures: the ablation catheter, the CS catheter, and the lasso catheter. Since the proposed methods use the same blob detection method to extract key information from x-ray images, the ablation, CS, and lasso catheters can be detected and tracked simultaneously in real-time.Results: The catheter detection methods were tested on 105 different clinical fluoroscopy sequences taken from 31 clinical procedures. Two-dimensional (2D) detection errors of 0.50 {+-} 0.29, 0.92 {+-} 0.61, and 0.63 {+-} 0.45 mm as well as success rates of 99.4%, 97.2%, and 88.9% were achieved for the CS catheter, ablation catheter, and lasso catheter, respectively. With the tracking method, accuracies were increased to 0.45 {+-} 0.28, 0.64 {+-} 0.37, and 0.53 {+-} 0.38 mm and success rates increased to 100%, 99

  16. More than just a urinary catheter — Haemorrhage control by using a Foley catheter in a penetrating aortic root injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adel Elmoghrabi

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of great vessel injuries in thoracic trauma is reported at 0.3–10%, predominantly due to a penetrating mechanism. Thoracic aortic injuries, more specifically those within proximity of the aortic root are challenging to manage and unceasing bleeding hampers adequate visualisation for performing repair. We report a case of a 31-year-old male that presented to the emergency department 1 h after sustaining a stab wound injury within proximity of the left upper sternal border. Vital signs were stable on presentation. Physical examination revealed a 1.5 cm laceration in the 3rd intercostal space. Chest X-ray revealed a small left pneumothorax, FAST scan was negative, and CT of the chest revealed left sided haemopneumothorax and haemopericardium. The patient was emergently transferred to the operating room where median thoracotomy was performed. A significant amount of bleeding was observed originating from a 1 cm laceration of the aortic root. Bleeding was controlled using a Foley catheter after unsuccessful attempts of digital compression, and the laceration was repaired using pledgeted sutures. Postoperative echocardiography and CT scan of the chest revealed normal cardiac functions with resolution of haemopericardium and haemopneumothorax, and the patient was discharged in a stable condition. High index of suspicion should be maintained for injury to the great vessels in patients with penetrating chest injuries, despite apparent haemodynamic stability. In this case, balloon tamponade using a Foley catheter served as a quick and simple technique that resulted in an almost bloodless field, facilitating adequate visualisation for definitive repair. Although the use of this technique has been previously described, this report serves as a reminder that a Foley catheter can be successfully used for balloon catheter tamponade in injuries to the aortic root. Keywords: Aortic root, Injury, Foley's catheter, Balloon catheter, Aorta

  17. Mesenchymal stromal cell secretomes are modulated by suspension time, delivery vehicle, passage through catheter, and exposure to adjuvants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsha, Kaushik; Mir, Osman; Satani, Nikunj; Yang, Bing; Guerrero, Waldo; Mei, Zhuyong; Cai, Chunyan; Chen, Peng R; Gee, Adrian; Hanley, Patrick J; Aronowski, Jaroslaw; Savitz, Sean I

    2017-01-01

    Extensive animal data indicate that mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) improve outcome in stroke models. Intra-arterial (IA) injection is a promising route of delivery for MSCs. Therapeutic effect of MSCs in stroke is likely based on the broad repertoire of secreted trophic and immunomodulatory cytokines produced by MSCs. We determined the differential effects of exposing MSCs to different types of clinically relevant vehicles, and/or different additives and passage through a catheter relevant to IA injections. MSCs derived from human bone marrow were tested in the following vehicles: 5% albumin (ALB), 6% Hextend (HEX) and 40% dextran (DEX). Each solution was tested (i) alone, (ii) with low-dose heparin, (iii) with 10% Omnipaque, or (iv) a combination of heparin and Omnipaque. Cells in vehicles were collected directly or passed through an IA catheter, and MSC viability and cytokine release profiles were assessed. Cell viability remained above 90% under all tested conditions with albumin being the highest at 97%. Viability was slightly reduced after catheter passage or exposure to heparin or Omnipaque. Catheter passage had little effect on MSC cytokine secretion. ALB led to increased release of angiogenic factors such as vascular endothelial growth factor compared with other vehicles, while HEX and DEX led to suppression of pro-inflammatory cytokines such as interleukin-6. However, when these three vehicles were subjected to catheter passage and/or exposure to additives, the cytokine release profile varied depending on the combination of conditions to which MSCs were exposed. Exposure of MSCs to certain types of vehicles or additives changes the profile of cytokine secretion. The activation phenotype of MSCs may therefore be affected by the vehicles used for these cells or the exposure to the adjuvants used in their administration. Copyright © 2017 International Society for Cellular Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. 21 CFR 870.1210 - Continuous flush catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Continuous flush catheter. 870.1210 Section 870.1210 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED... that permits continuous intravascular flushing at a slow infusion rate for the purpose of eliminating...

  19. Lung abscess; Percutaneous catheter therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ha, H.K. (Depts. of Radiology and Internal Medicine, Catholic Univ. Medical Coll., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Kang, M.W. (Depts. of Radiology and Internal Medicine, Catholic Univ. Medical Coll., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Park, J.M. (Depts. of Radiology and Internal Medicine, Catholic Univ. Medical Coll., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Yang, W.J. (Depts. of Radiology and Internal Medicine, Catholic Univ. Medical Coll., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Shinn, K.S. (Depts. of Radiology and Internal Medicine, Catholic Univ. Medical Coll., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)); Bahk, Y.W. (Depts. of Radiology and Internal Medicine, Catholic Univ. Medical Coll., Seoul (Korea, Republic of))

    1993-07-01

    Lung abscess was successfully treated with percutaneous drainage in 5 of 6 patients. Complete abscess resolution occurred in 4 patients, partial resolution in one, and no response in one. The duration of drainage ranged from 7 to 18 days (mean 15.5 days) in successful cases. The failure of drainage in one neurologicall impaired patient was attributed to persistent aspiration. In 2 patients, concurrent pleural empyema was also cured. CT provided the anatomic details necessary for choosing the puncture site and avoiding puncture of the lung parenchyma. Percutaneous catheter drainage is a safe and effective method for treating lung abscess. (orig.).

  20. Assessment of right liver graft perfusion effectiveness between one and two-catheter infusion methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Bo-Hyun; Hwang, Shin; Ha, Tae-Yong; Song, Gi-Won; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Kim, Ki-Hun; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Moon, Deok-Bog; Park, Gil-Chun; Kang, Sung-Hwa; Yoon, Young-In; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2014-05-01

    Conventional graft perfusion method using one small-caliber catheter takes a relatively long time for right liver graft perfusion, thus some modification is needed. In this study, we intended to assess the effectiveness of right liver graft perfusion methods through comparison of different infusion catheters. The study consisted of two parts including one bench experiment to obtain data of hydraulic infusion and one clinical trial of 40 cases on graft perfusion with one- versus two-catheter infusion methods. These two graft infusion methods were compared in terms of the perfusion time and washing-out efficiency. At bench experiment, the infusion flow rate and infusion pressure were 3.3 ml/sec and 1.9 cmH20 in one blood transfusion catheter group, and 11.7 ml/sec and 3.1 cmH20 in single transurethral resection of prostate irrigation catheter group, and 6.6 ml/sec and 2.0 cmH20 in two blood transfusion catheters group, respectively. In clinical trial with 40 right liver grafts, two-catheter group had a shorter graft portal perfusion time for the first 2 L of histidine-tryptophan-ketoglutarate (HTK) solution than the conventional one-catheter group (375±25 seconds vs. 662±34 seconds; p=0.001) and a lower rate of incomplete blood washing-out after the initial 2 L portal perfusion (40% vs. 85%; p=0.03). The two-catheter infusion method appears to be more effective than the conventional one-catheter infusion method for right liver graft perfusion at the back table. Large size of right liver grafts seems to be its good indication.

  1. Air charged and microtip catheters cannot be used interchangeably for urethral pressure measurement: a prospective, single-blind, randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zehnder, Pascal; Roth, Beat; Burkhard, Fiona C; Kessler, Thomas M

    2008-09-01

    We determined and compared urethral pressure measurements using air charged and microtip catheters in a prospective, single-blind, randomized trial. A consecutive series of 64 women referred for urodynamic investigation underwent sequential urethral pressure measurements using an air charged and a microtip catheter in randomized order. Patients were blinded to the type and sequence of catheter used. Agreement between the 2 catheter systems was assessed using the Bland and Altman 95% limits of agreement method. Intraclass correlation coefficients of air charged and microtip catheters for maximum urethral closure pressure at rest were 0.97 and 0.93, and for functional profile length they were 0.9 and 0.78, respectively. Pearson's correlation coefficients and Lin's concordance coefficients of air charged and microtip catheters were r = 0.82 and rho = 0.79 for maximum urethral closure pressure at rest, and r = 0.73 and rho = 0.7 for functional profile length, respectively. When applying the Bland and Altman method, air charged catheters gave higher readings than microtip catheters for maximum urethral closure pressure at rest (mean difference 7.5 cm H(2)O) and functional profile length (mean difference 1.8 mm). There were wide 95% limits of agreement for differences in maximum urethral closure pressure at rest (-24.1 to 39 cm H(2)O) and functional profile length (-7.7 to 11.3 mm). For urethral pressure measurement the air charged catheter is at least as reliable as the microtip catheter and it generally gives higher readings. However, air charged and microtip catheters cannot be used interchangeably for clinical purposes because of insufficient agreement. Hence, clinicians should be aware that air charged and microtip catheters may yield completely different results, and these differences should be acknowledged during clinical decision making.

  2. Ultrasound as a Screening Tool for Central Venous Catheter Positioning and Exclusion of Pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amir, Rabia; Knio, Ziyad O; Mahmood, Feroze; Oren-Grinberg, Achikam; Leibowitz, Akiva; Bose, Ruma; Shaefi, Shahzad; Mitchell, John D; Ahmed, Muneeb; Bardia, Amit; Talmor, Daniel; Matyal, Robina

    2017-07-01

    Although real-time ultrasound guidance during central venous catheter insertion has become a standard of care, postinsertion chest radiograph remains the gold standard to confirm central venous catheter tip position and rule out associated lung complications like pneumothorax. We hypothesize that a combination of transthoracic echocardiography and lung ultrasound is noninferior to chest radiograph when used to accurately assess central venous catheter positioning and screen for pneumothorax. All operating rooms and surgical and trauma ICUs at the institution. Single-center, prospective noninferiority study. Patients receiving ultrasound-guided subclavian or internal jugular central venous catheters. During ultrasound-guided central venous catheter placement, correct positioning of central venous catheter was accomplished by real-time visualization of the guide wire and positive right atrial swirl sign using the subcostal four-chamber view. After insertion, pneumothorax was ruled out by the presence of lung sliding and seashore sign on M-mode. Data analysis was done for 137 patients. Chest radiograph ruled out pneumothorax in 137 of 137 patients (100%). Lung ultrasound was performed in 123 of 137 patients and successfully screened for pneumothorax in 123 of 123 (100%). Chest radiograph approximated accurate catheter tip position in 136 of 137 patients (99.3%). Adequate subcostal four-chamber views could not be obtained in 13 patients. Accurate positioning of central venous catheter with ultrasound was then confirmed in 121 of 124 patients (97.6%) as described previously. Transthoracic echocardiography and lung ultrasound are noninferior to chest x-ray for screening of pneumothorax and accurate central venous catheter positioning. Thus, the point of care use of ultrasound can reduce central venous catheter insertion to use time, exposure to radiation, and improve patient safety.

  3. 21 CFR 880.5200 - Intravascular catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... Devices § 880.5200 Intravascular catheter. (a) Identification. An intravascular catheter is a device that consists of a slender tube and any necessary connecting fittings and that is inserted into the patient's vascular system for short term use (less than 30 days) to sample blood, monitor blood pressure, or...

  4. Urethral catheters: can we reduce use?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broek, P.J. van den; Wille, J.C.; Benthem, B.H.B. van; Perenboom, R.J.M.; Akker-van Marle, M.E. van den; Nielen, A.M.A.

    2011-01-01

    Indwelling urinary catheters are the main cause of healthcare-associated urinary tract infections. It can be expected that reduction of the use of urinary catheters will lead to decreased numbers of urinary tract infection. The efficacy of an intervention programme to improve adherence to

  5. The efficacy of noble metal alloy urinary catheters in reducing catheter-associated urinary tract infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alanood Ahmed Aljohi

    2016-01-01

    Results: A 90% relative risk reduction in the rate of CAUTI was observed with the noble metal alloy catheter compared to the standard catheter (10 vs. 1 cases, P = 0.006. When considering both catheter-associated asymptomatic bacteriuria and CAUTI, the relative risk reduction was 83% (12 vs. 2 cases, P = 0.005. In addition to CAUTI, the risk of acquiring secondary bacteremia was lower (100% for the patients using noble metal alloy catheters (3 cases in the standard group vs. 0 case in the noble metal alloy catheter group, P = 0.24. No adverse events related to any of the used catheters were recorded. Conclusion: Results from this study revealed that noble metal alloy catheters are safe to use and significantly reduce CAUTI rate in ICU patients after 3 days of use.

  6. A hospital-acquired outbreak of catheter-related nontuberculous mycobacterial infection in children on peritoneal dialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada, Takuji; Ushijima, Katsumi; Uemura, Osamu

    2014-01-01

    Catheter-related nontuberculous mycobacterial infection in children with chronic renal failure on peritoneal dialysis (PD) is rare. However, there have been five such infections in infants among PD patients at our center. Although the patients were treated with antibiotics to which the organisms showed in vitro sensitivity, they were clinically drug resistant. Hence, all PD catheters needed to be removed. Thereafter, following hemodialysis treatment for approximately 1 month, the PD catheters...

  7. Attitudes Towards Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vadmann, Henrik; Pedersen, Susanne S; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) is an important but expensive procedure that is the subject of some debate. Physicians´ attitudes towards catheter ablation may influence promotion and patient acceptance. This is the first study to examine the attitudes of Danish...... cardiologists towards catheter ablation for AF, using a nationwide survey. METHODS AND RESULTS: We developed a purpose-designed questionnaire to evaluate attitudes towards catheter ablation for AF that was sent to all Danish cardiologists (n = 401; response n = 272 (67.8%)). There was no association between...... attitudes towards ablation and the experience or age of the cardiologist with respect to patients with recurrent AF episodes with a duration of 7 days and/or need for cardioversion. The majority (69%) expected a recurrence of AF after catheter ablation in more than 30% of the cases...

  8. Catheter Associated Urinary Tract Infection Prevention bundle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. Zarkotou

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI are among the most common healthcare-associated infections, and potentially lead to significant morbidity and mortality. Multifaceted infection control strategies implemented as bundles can prevent nosocomial infections associated with invasive devices such as CAUTIs. The components of the CAUTI bundle proposed herein, include appropriate indications for catheterization and recommendations for the procedures of catheter insertion and catheter maintenance and care. Avoiding unnecessary urinary catheter use is the most effective measure for their prevention. To minimize the risk of CAUTI, urinary catheters should be placed only when a clinical valid indication is documented and they should be removed as soon as possible; alternatives to catheterization should also be considered. Aseptic insertion technique, maintenance of closed drainage system and strict adherence to hand hygiene are essential for preventing CAUTI. The successful implementation of the bundle requires education and training for all healthcare professionals and evaluation of surveillance data.

  9. Safety of a New Compact Male Intermittent Catheter: Randomized, Cross-Over, Single-Blind Study in Healthy Male Volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagi, Per; Hannibalsen, Jane; Permild, Rikke

    2011-01-01

    in hematuria (p = 0.54) or discomfort/stinging/pain at first micturition (p = 0.56). During insertion, handling was easier (p = 0.0001) and touching the coating was necessary less often (2.2 vs. 81.3% of catheterizations; p catheter; it was preferred by nurses for 20 of 23......Introduction: A new compact male intermittent catheter was compared with a regular intermittent male catheter in terms of safety and acceptability. Methods: In this randomized, single-blind, cross-over study, healthy male volunteers were catheterized twice with a compact catheter and twice...... with a regular catheter. Results: 28 participants were enrolled. Mean ± SD discomfort (visual analogue scale; primary objective) was 2.25 ± 1.5 and 2.52 ± 1.8 for the compact and regular catheters, respectively (difference -0.27; 95% confidence interval -0.73 to 0.19); there was no significant difference...

  10. Reinnervation following catheter-based radio-frequency renal denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Booth, Lindsea C; Nishi, Erika E; Yao, Song T; Ramchandra, Rohit; Lambert, Gavin W; Schlaich, Markus P; May, Clive N

    2015-04-20

    What is the topic of this review? Does catheter-based renal denervation effectively denervate the afferent and efferent renal nerves and does reinnervation occur? What advances does it highlight? Following catheter-based renal denervation, the afferent and efferent responses to electrical stimulation were abolished, renal sympathetic nerve activity was absent, and levels of renal noradrenaline and immunohistochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase and calcitonin gene-related peptide were significantly reduced. By 11 months after renal denervation, both the functional responses and anatomical markers of afferent and efferent renal nerves had returned to normal, indicating reinnervation. Renal denervation reduces blood pressure in animals with experimental hypertension and, recently, catheter-based renal denervation was shown to cause a prolonged decrease in blood pressure in patients with resistant hypertension. The randomized, sham-controlled Symplicity HTN-3 trial failed to meet its primary efficacy end-point, but there is evidence that renal denervation was incomplete in many patients. Currently, there is little information regarding the effectiveness of catheter-based renal denervation and the extent of reinnervation. We assessed the effectiveness of renal nerve denervation with the Symplicity Flex catheter and the functional and anatomical reinnervation at 5.5 and 11 months postdenervation. In anaesthetized, non-denervated sheep, there was a high level of renal sympathetic nerve activity, and electrical stimulation of the renal nerve increased blood pressure and reduced heart rate (afferent response) and caused renal vasoconstriction and reduced renal blood flow (efferent response). Immediately after renal denervation, renal sympathetic nerve activity and the responses to electrical stimulation were absent, indicating effective denervation. By 11 months after denervation, renal sympathetic nerve activity was present and the responses to electrical stimulation

  11. Transparent polyurethane film as an intravenous catheter dressing. A meta-analysis of the infection risks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, K K; Weber, D J; Samsa, G P; Rutala, W A

    1992-04-15

    To obtain a quantitative estimate of the impact on infectious complications of using transparent dressings with intravenous catheters. Meta-analysis of all studies published in the English literature, including abstracts, letters, and reports that examined the primary research question of infection risks associated with transparent compared with gauze dressings for use on central and peripheral venous catheters. Studies were identified by use of the MEDLINE database using the indexing terms occlusive dressings, transparent dressings, and infection and by review of referenced bibliographies. Seven of the 15 studies (47%) of central venous catheters and seven of 12 studies (58%) of peripheral catheters met our inclusion criteria for analysis. All studies used a prospective cohort design, utilized hospitalized patients, and reported at least one of our defined outcomes. Data for each study were abstracted independently by three investigators. At least three studies were used in the analysis of each outcome. Applying a Mantel-Haenszel chi 2 analysis, use of transparent dressings on central venous catheters was significantly associated with an elevated relative risk (RR) of catheter tip infection (RR = 1.78; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.38 to 2.30). Catheter-related sepsis (RR = 1.69; 95% CI, 0.97 to 2.95) and bacteremia (RR = 1.63; 95% CI, 0.76 to 3.47) were both associated with an elevated RR. Use of transparent dressings on peripheral catheters was associated with an elevated RR of catheter-tip infection (RR = 1.53; 95% CI, 1.18 to 1.99) but not phlebitis (RR = 1.02; 95% CI, 0.86 to 1.20), infiltration (RR = 1.12; 95% CI, 0.92 to 1.37), or skin colonization (RR = 0.99; 95% CI, 0.90 to 1.09). The results demonstrated a significantly increased risk of catheter-tip infection with the use of transparent compared with gauze dressings when used with either central or peripheral catheters. An increased risk of bacteremia and catheter sepsis associated with the use of

  12. Bi-layer sandwich film for antibacterial catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, Gerhard; Schamberger, Florian; Zare, Hamideh Heidari; Bröskamp, Sara Felicitas; Jocham, Dieter

    2017-01-01

    Background: Approximately one quarter of all nosocomial infections can be attributed to the urinary tract. The infections are supposed to be mainly caused by implantations of urethral catheters and stents. A new catheter design is introduced with the aim to lower the high number of nosocomial urethral infections. In order to avoid limitations to use, the design is first applied to conventional commercially available balloon catheters. Results: The main feature of the design is a sandwich layer on both sides of the catheter wall, which is composed of a fragmented base layer of silver capped by a thin film of poly( p -xylylene). This top layer is mainly designed to release a controlled amount of Ag + ions, which is bactericidal, but not toxic to humans. Simultaneously, the lifetime is prolonged to at least one year. The base layer is electrolessly deposited applying Tollens' reagens, the cap layer is deposited by using chemical vapor deposition. Conclusion: The three main problems of this process, electroless deposition of a fragmented silver film on the surface of an electrically insulating organic polymer, irreproducible evaporation during heating of the precursor, and exponential decrease of the layer thickness along the capillary, have been solved trough the application of a simple electrochemical reaction and two standard principles of physics: Papin's pot and the principle of Le Chatelier.

  13. Bi-layer sandwich film for antibacterial catheters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerhard Franz

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Background: Approximately one quarter of all nosocomial infections can be attributed to the urinary tract. The infections are supposed to be mainly caused by implantations of urethral catheters and stents. A new catheter design is introduced with the aim to lower the high number of nosocomial urethral infections. In order to avoid limitations to use, the design is first applied to conventional commercially available balloon catheters.Results: The main feature of the design is a sandwich layer on both sides of the catheter wall, which is composed of a fragmented base layer of silver capped by a thin film of poly(p-xylylene. This top layer is mainly designed to release a controlled amount of Ag+ ions, which is bactericidal, but not toxic to humans. Simultaneously, the lifetime is prolonged to at least one year. The base layer is electrolessly deposited applying Tollens’ reagens, the cap layer is deposited by using chemical vapor deposition.Conclusion: The three main problems of this process, electroless deposition of a fragmented silver film on the surface of an electrically insulating organic polymer, irreproducible evaporation during heating of the precursor, and exponential decrease of the layer thickness along the capillary, have been solved trough the application of a simple electrochemical reaction and two standard principles of physics: Papin’s pot and the principle of Le Chatelier.

  14. Percutaneous placement of peritoneal port-catheter in oncologic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Orsi, Franco; Vigna, Paolo Della; Bonomo, Guido; Penco, Silvia; Lovati, Elena; Bellomi, Massimo

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to describe the technique of percutaneous ultrasound (US)-guided placement of a peritoneal port-catheter in an interventional radiological setting. Nineteen patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis were selected for intraperitoneal port-catheter placement in order to perform intracavitary receptor-immuno- or radio-immunotherapy with Ytrium-90. All the procedures were performed percutaneously under US and fluoro guidance; the insertion site for catheters was chosen according to abdominal conditions and US findings: all devices were implanted at the lower abdominal quadrants. All patients were followed up with CT and US according to the therapy protocol. The procedure was successfully completed in 15/19 patients, in 4 being contraindicated by peritoneal adhesions. No procedure-related complications and device occlusions during therapy were observed; one catheter displaced 7 months later the placement. In our experience, this procedure was feasible, reliable and easy to perform, allowing the correct administration of the planned intracavitary therapy. Peritoneal adhesions are the main limitation of peritoneal port placement. (orig.)

  15. Catheter ablation as a treatment of atrioventricular block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuohy, Stephen; Saliba, Walid; Pai, Manjunath; Tchou, Patrick

    2018-01-01

    Symptomatic second-degree atrioventricular (AV) block is typically treated by implantation of a pacemaker. An otherwise healthy AV conduction system can nevertheless develop AV block due to interference from junctional extrasystoles. When present with a high burden, these can produce debilitating symptoms from AV block despite an underlying normal AV node and His-Purkinje system properties. The purpose of this study was to describe a catheter ablation approach for alleviating symptomatic AV block due to a ventricular nodal pathway interfering with AV conduction. Common clinical monitoring techniques such as Holter and event recorders were used. Standard electrophysiological study techniques using multipolar recording and ablation catheters were utilized during procedures. A 55-year-old woman presented with highly symptomatic, high-burden second-degree AV block due to concealed and manifest junctional premature beats. Electrophysiological characteristics indicated interference of AV conduction due to a concealed ventricular nodal pathway as the cause of the AV block. The patient's AV nodal and His-Purkinje system conduction characteristics were otherwise normal. Radiofrequency catheter ablation of the pathway was successful in restoring normal AV conduction and eliminating her clinical symptoms. Pathways inserting into the AV junction can interfere with AV conduction. When present at a high burden, this type of AV block can be highly symptomatic. Catheter ablation techniques can be used to alleviate this type of AV block and restore normal AV conduction. Copyright © 2017 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Performing Gram stain directly on catheter tips: assessment of the quality of the observation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guembe, M; Pérez-Granda, M J; Rivera, M L; Martín-Rabadán, P; Bouza, E

    2015-06-01

    A previous study performed in our institution showed that catheter tip (CT) staining by combining acridine orange and Gram stain (GS) before culture anticipated catheter colonization with exhaustive and careful observation by a highly trained technician. Our objective was to assess the validity values of GS without acridine orange on an external smear of CT for predicting catheter colonization and catheter-related bloodstream infection (C-RBSI). We compared different periods of observation and the results of two technicians with different levels of professional experience. Over a 5-month period, the roll-plate technique was preceded by direct GS of all CTs sent to the microbiology laboratory. The reading was taken at ×100 by two observers with different skill levels. Each observer performed a routine examination (3 min along three longitudinal lines) and an exhaustive examination (5 min along five longitudinal lines). The presence of at least one cell was considered positive. All slides were read before culture results were known. We included a total of 271 CTs from 209 patients. The prevalence of catheter colonization and C-RBSI was 16.2 % and 5.1 %, respectively. Routine and exhaustive examinations revealed only 29.5 % and 40.9 % of colonized catheters, respectively (p staining is performed exhaustively. However, the decision to implement this approach in daily routine will depend on the prevalence rate of catheter colonization at each institution.

  17. Comparison of heparinized saline and 0.9% sodium chloride for maintaining peripheral intravenous catheter patency in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Yu; Odunayo, Adesola; Mann, F A

    2013-01-01

    To determine whether heparinized saline would be more effective in maintaining the patency of peripheral IV catheters in dogs compared to 0.9% sodium chloride. Prospective blinded randomized study. University Veterinary Teaching Hospital. Thirty healthy purpose bred dogs, intended for use in the junior surgery laboratory, were utilized. The dogs were randomized into 1 of 3 groups, 2 treatment groups and a control group. An 18-Ga cephalic catheter was placed in the cephalic vein of each dog. Each dog in the treatment group had their catheter flushed with either 10 IU/mL heparinized saline or 0.9% sodium chloride every 6 hours for 42 hours. The dogs in the control group did not have their catheters flushed until the end of the study period. Immediately prior to flushing catheters, each catheter was evaluated for patency by aspiration of blood and the catheter site was evaluated for phlebitis. All dogs in the heparinized saline and 0.9% sodium chloride group had catheters that flushed easily at each evaluation point. More dogs in the saline group had catheters from which blood could not be aspirated, but there was no significant difference between these groups. All dogs in the control group had catheters that flushed easily at the end of the assigned 6 hour interval except in 1 dog. Phlebitis was not detected in any dog. Flushes of 0.9% sodium chloride were found to be as effective as 10 IU/mL heparinized saline flushes in maintaining patency of 18-Ga peripheral venous catheters in dogs for up to 42 hours. For peripheral catheters placed with the intention of performing serial blood draws, heparinized flushes may be warranted. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2013.

  18. Peripheral intravenous and central catheter algorithm: a proactive quality initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Kerry A; Kuehn, Susan C; Moore, James E

    2014-12-01

    Peripheral intravenous (PIV) infiltrations causing tissue damage is a global issue surrounded by situations that make vascular access decisions difficult. The purpose of this quality improvement project was to develop an algorithm and assess its effectiveness in reducing PIV infiltrations in neonates. The targeted subjects were all infants in our neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) with a PIV catheter. We completed a retrospective chart review of the electronic medical record to collect 4th quarter 2012 baseline data. Following adoption of the algorithm, we also performed a daily manual count of all PIV catheters in the 1st and 2nd quarters 2013. Daily PIV days were defined as follows: 1 patient with a PIV catheter equals 1 PIV day. An infant with 2 PIV catheters in place was counted as 2 PIV days. Our rate of infiltration or tissue damage was determined by counting the number of events and dividing by the number of PIV days. The rate of infiltration or tissue damage was reported as the number of events per 100 PIV days. The number of infiltrations and PIV catheters was collected from the electronic medical record and also verified manually by daily assessment after adoption of the algorithm. To reduce the rate of PIV infiltrations leading to grade 4 infiltration and tissue damage by at least 30% in the NICU population. Incidence of PIV infiltrations/100 catheter days. The baseline rate for total infiltrations increased slightly from 5.4 to 5.68/100 PIV days (P = .397) for the NICU. We attributed this increase to heightened awareness and better reporting. Grade 4 infiltrations decreased from 2.8 to 0.83/100 PIV catheter days (P = .00021) after the algorithm was implemented. Tissue damage also decreased from 0.68 to 0.3/100 PIV days (P = .11). Statistical analysis used the Fisher exact test and reported as statistically significant at P < .05. Our findings suggest that utilization of our standardized decision pathway was instrumental in providing guidance for

  19. Force Trends and Pulsatility for Catheter Contact Identification in Intracardiac Electrograms during Arrhythmia Ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivas-Lalaleo, David; Muñoz-Romero, Sergio; Huerta, Mónica; Erazo-Rodas, Mayra; Sánchez-Muñoz, Juan José; Rojo-Álvarez, José Luis; García-Alberola, Arcadi

    2018-05-02

    The intracardiac electrical activation maps are commonly used as a guide in the ablation of cardiac arrhythmias. The use of catheters with force sensors has been proposed in order to know if the electrode is in contact with the tissue during the registration of intracardiac electrograms (EGM). Although threshold criteria on force signals are often used to determine the catheter contact, this may be a limited criterion due to the complexity of the heart dynamics and cardiac vorticity. The present paper is devoted to determining the criteria and force signal profiles that guarantee the contact of the electrode with the tissue. In this study, we analyzed 1391 force signals and their associated EGM recorded during 2 and 8 s, respectively, in 17 patients (82 ± 60 points per patient). We aimed to establish a contact pattern by first visually examining and classifying the signals, according to their likely-contact joint profile and following the suggestions from experts in the doubtful cases. First, we used Principal Component Analysis to scrutinize the force signal dynamics by analyzing the main eigen-directions, first globally and then grouped according to the certainty of their tissue-catheter contact. Second, we used two different linear classifiers (Fisher discriminant and support vector machines) to identify the most relevant components of the previous signal models. We obtained three main types of eigenvectors, namely, pulsatile relevant, non-pulsatile relevant, and irrelevant components. The classifiers reached a moderate to sufficient discrimination capacity (areas under the curve between 0.84 and 0.95 depending on the contact certainty and on the classifier), which allowed us to analyze the relevant properties in the force signals. We conclude that the catheter-tissue contact profiles in force recordings are complex and do not depend only on the signal intensity being above a threshold at a single time instant, but also on time pulsatility and trends. These

  20. [Injection Pressure Evaluation of the New Venous Catheter with Side Holes for Contrast-enhanced CT/MRI].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Junya; Arai, Keisuke; Miyazawa, Hitomi; Kobayashi, Kyouko; Nakamura, Junpei; Suto, Takayuki; Tsushima, Yoshito

    2018-01-01

    The simulation study was conducted for the new venous catheter with side holes of contrast-enhanced computed tomography (CT) and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to evaluate the infusion pressure on four contrast media and several injection speeds. All infusion pressure of the new venous catheter with side holes were less than 15 kg/cm 2 as limitation of extension tube and also reduced the infusion pressure by 15% at the maximum compared to the catheter with single hole. The results suggest that the new venous catheter with side holes can reduce the infusion pressure by power injection of contrast-enhanced CT and MRI.

  1. Transvaginal closure of urethra and correction of uterovaginal prolapse in neurologically impaired patient with chronic indwelling catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubal, U; Arunkalaivanan, A S; Baptiste, M

    2009-08-01

    We report the case of a 38-year-old neurologically impaired woman with continuous urinary incontinence as a result of a chronic indwelling catheter for neurogenic bladder. Long-term catheter resulted in dilatation of urethra and pressure necrosis of urethra, with subsequent incontinence despite the catheter. She also had a stage 3 uterovaginal prolapse. She underwent cystoscopy, closure of urethra and bladder neck by transvaginal route (Feneley procedure), insertion of a suprapubic catheter, sacrospinous fixation and posterior colporrhaphy with prolene mesh (Apogee). Vaginal hysterectomy was declined by the patient and her family. She remained dry at follow-up visit and is happy with the outcome.

  2. CENTRAL VENOUS CATHETER AS A VASCULAR APPROACH TO HEMODIALYSTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Verica Djordjevic

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available The application of the central venous catheter (CVC as a temporary orpermanent vascular approach to hemodialysis has been practiced in our Center since1994. So far 30 (12,6% patients have been thus treated. The primary application hasbeen done in 25 patients, namely: the first making of the A V fistula has been done in16, the ABT in 6, while the vascular approach correction in 3 patients. The secondaryapplication has been done in 5 patients. The infection episode incidence concerningthe CVC application is 20 infections per 1.000 patients. This is the upper limitaccording to the data given in the literature (5, rang 3-20. The average duration of thecatheter is 21 + - 13 days (rang 1-47. Two-volume catheters have been used for ajugular approach though less often for a femoral one. The unsuccessful placing due tothe catheter thrombosis has occurred in 4 patients, the catheter drop-out and itsreplacing have been done in 2 patients, while no replacement has happened in onečaše. The treatment has been stopped in one patient. Tn four patients the cerebrovascularinsult has happened after placing the CVC. The mortality rate is 26,6%,that is, K patients, namely: 4 due to cerebrovascular insult, one due to lung emboly,one due to heart weakness and one due to the sepsis from the V fistula. One patientdied at home for unknown reason. A high infection episode incidence rate is related toinadequate patients' placing so that their location in the rooms for intensive care is away of reducing it. It is necessary to provide for general aseptic procedure at work aswell as for betterment of the accompanying procedures (hemoculture, antibiograms,sterilization in order to maintain a safe catheter function.

  3. Training of nurses on Foley catheter insertion in intensive care unit patients: limits and possibilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magno Conceição Merces

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Backgound and Objectives: Nursing has an important role in urinary tract infection prevention and control. Urinary catheters insertion represents the local topography with the highest rate of hospital infection. Foley catheter placement is performed solely by the nurse and requires aseptic techniques during its performance, thus preventing risks to the patients. The study aimed to evaluate the training of nurses on Foley catheter insertion and point out limits and possibilities of this practice in patients at the Intensive Care Unit (ICU of Hospital Geral do Interior da Bahia (HGIB. Methods: This was a qualitative, exploratory and descriptive study. Data collection was carried out through semi-structured interviews. After data analysis, two categories were evaluated, namely: the training of nurses on Foley catheter insertion in ICU patients and the limits and possibilities of Foley catheter insertion practice by nurses in ICU patients. Bardin analysis was used for data analysis. Results: The study shows that the nurse’s practice on Foley catheter insertion in ICU patients is based on the use of aseptic techniques for urinary tract infection prevention, theoretical and practical knowledge on Foley catheter insertion in ICU patients, knowledge on urinary tract infections and associations with catheter insertion, whereas the limits and possibilities of Foley catheter insertion practice by nurses are understood through measures to minimize the risk of hospital infection caused by long-term catheter use in the ICU. Nurses point out that the risks of hospital infection are inherent to long-term catheter use. This is an important fact, as the knowledge or its absence may constitute a limit or possibility for Foley catheter insertion practice by the nurse in ICU patients. Conclusion: Nurses must seek the systematization of knowledge, which warrants support for the team, as well as information, safety and prompt care, allowing the reduction of urinary

  4. In Vitro and In Vivo Effectiveness of an Innovative Silver-Copper Nanoparticle Coating of Catheters To Prevent Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ballo, Myriam K. S.; Pulgarin, César; Hopf, Nancy; Berthet, Aurélie; Kiwi, John; Moreillon, Philippe; Bizzini, Alain

    2016-01-01

    In this study, silver/copper (Ag/Cu)-coated catheters were investigated for their efficacy in preventing methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infection in vitro and in vivo. Ag and Cu were sputtered (67/33% atomic ratio) on polyurethane catheters by direct-current magnetron sputtering. In vitro, Ag/Cu-coated and uncoated catheters were immersed in phosphate-buffered saline (PBS) or rat plasma and exposed to MRSA ATCC 43300 at 104 to 108 CFU/ml. In vivo, Ag/Cu-coated and uncoated catheters were placed in the jugular vein of rats. Directly after, MRSA (107 CFU/ml) was inoculated in the tail vein. Catheters were removed 48 h later and cultured. In vitro, Ag/Cu-coated catheters preincubated in PBS and exposed to 104 to 107 CFU/ml prevented the adherence of MRSA (0 to 12% colonization) compared to uncoated catheters (50 to 100% colonization; P < 0.005) and Ag/Cu-coated catheters retained their activity (0 to 20% colonization) when preincubated in rat plasma, whereas colonization of uncoated catheters increased (83 to 100%; P < 0.005). Ag/Cu-coating protection diminished with 108 CFU/ml in both PBS and plasma (50 to 100% colonization). In vivo, Ag/Cu-coated catheters reduced the incidence of catheter infection compared to uncoated catheters (57% versus 79%, respectively; P = 0.16) and bacteremia (31% versus 68%, respectively; P < 0.05). Scanning electron microscopy of explanted catheters suggests that the suboptimal activity of Ag/Cu catheters in vivo was due to the formation of a dense fibrin sheath over their surface. Ag/Cu-coated catheters thus may be able to prevent MRSA infections. Their activity might be improved by limiting plasma protein adsorption on their surfaces. PMID:27353266

  5. Early catheter removal after radical retropubic prostatectomy: long-term followup.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koch, Michael O; Nayee, Anish H; Sloan, James; Gardner, Thomas; Wahle, Greg R; Bihrle, Richard; Foster, Richard S

    2003-06-01

    We examine the complication and continence rates with early catheter removal (day 3 or 4) after radical retropubic prostatectomy. A total of 365 patients with localized prostate cancer underwent radical retropubic prostatectomy at Indiana University Hospital with planned urethral catheter removal before discharge home. Low pressure cystograms were performed on postoperative day 3 or 4 to determine if catheter removal was possible. A subset of patients were analyzed using a validated prostate cancer specific questionnaire (University of California, Los Angeles Prostate Cancer Symptom Index) to determine quality of life outcomes. The catheter was removed on postoperative day 3 or 4 in 263 patients (72%). The reasons for leaving the catheter indwelling were significant leak on cystogram or excessive suprapubic drainage (21%), extensive bladder neck reconstruction (1%) and prolonged hospitalization because of an ileus or other complicating factor (6%). Thirteen patients (3.6%) were either unable to void after catheter removal or presented with retention (not associated with hematuria or clots) after hospital discharge, requiring reinsertion of the Foley catheter. A total of 41 patients (11%) had either an early or late complication (excluding incontinence). There were 3 complications (0.8%) that were considered major because they were potentially life threatening or required a return to the operating room. A pelvic abscess developed in 2 patients and a lymphocele in 1, which required percutaneous drainage. After at least 6 months (mean 20.9 months) 140 patients (89.2%) and 14 (8.9%) reported excellent and good continence, respectively. The patient questionnaire demonstrated bother scores to be minimal to no bother for 95% to 98% of patients at 6 and 12 months. This study confirms that it is safe to remove catheters in most patients 3 to 4 days after prostatectomy if a cystogram demonstrates no extravasation. Complication rates and continence rates with this approach

  6. Radiofrequency catheter oblation in atrial flutter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yan Ji; Wang Heping; Xu Jian; Liu Fuyuan; Fan Xizhen; An Chunsheng; Han Xiaoping; Ding Xiaomei; Wang Jiasheng; Gu Tongyuan

    2002-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate the radiofrequency catheter ablation for type I atrial flutter through application of Holo catheter labelling with anatomic imaging localization to ablate the isthmus of IVCTA during complete double-way block. Methods: Eleven cases with type I atrial flutter undergone Holo catheter labelling technique and consecution with conduction time change of coronary venous sinus orifice with-right atrial lower lateral wall pace excitation, were performed with radiofrequency catheter ablation for the isthmus outcoming with complete double-way conduction block. Results: All together 11 cases with 4 of atrial flutter and 7 of sinus rhythm were undergone radiofrequency catheter ablation resulting with double-way conduction block of the isthmus accompanied by prolongation of right atrial conduction time 56.0 ± 2.3 ms and 53.0 ± 4.6 ms respectively. The right atrial excitation appeared to be in clockwise and counter-clockwise of single direction. No recurrence occurred during 3-34 months follow up with only one showing atrial fibrillation. Conclusions: The application of Holo catheter labelling technique with anatomic imaging localization to achieve the double-way conduction block by radiofrequency catheter ablation of TVC-TA isthmus, is a reliable method for treating atrial flutter

  7. [Frequency of colonization and isolated bacteria from the tip of the epidural catheter implanted for postoperative analgesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabille, Débora Miranda Diogo; Filho, Augusto Diogo; Mandim, Beatriz Lemos da Silva; Araújo, Lúcio Borges de; Mesquita, Priscila Miranda Diogo; Jorge, Miguel Tanús

    2015-01-01

    The increased use of epidural analgesia with catheter leads to the need to demonstrate the safety of this method and know the incidence of catheter colonization, inserted postoperatively for epidural analgesia, and the bacteria responsible for this colonization. From November 2011 to April 2012, patients electively operated and maintained under epidural catheter for postoperative analgesia were evaluated. The catheter tip was collected for semiquantitative and qualitative microbiological analysis. Of 68 cultured catheters, six tips (8.8%) had positive cultures. No patient had superficial or deep infection. The mean duration of catheter use was 43.45hours (18-118) (p=0.0894). The type of surgery (contaminated or uncontaminated), physical status of patients, and surgical time showed no relation with the colonization of catheters. Microorganisms isolated from the catheter tip were Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Sphingomonas paucimobilis. Postoperative epidural catheter analgesia, under this study conditions, was found to be low risk for bacterial colonization in patients at surgical wards. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  8. Complications of Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheters: A Retrospective Cohort Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Parás-Bravo

    Full Text Available The use of venous catheters is a widespread practice, especially in oncological and oncohematological units. The objective of this study was to evaluate the complications associated with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs in a cohort of patients.In this retrospective cohort study, we included all patient carrying PICCs (n = 603 inserted at our institute between October 2010 and December 2013. The main variables collected were medical diagnosis, catheter care, location, duration of catheterization, reasons for catheter removal, complications, and nursing care. Complications were classified as infection, thrombosis, phlebitis, migration, edema, and/or ecchymosis.All patients were treated according to the same "nursing care" protocol. The incidence rate of complications was two cases per 1000 days of catheter duration. The most relevant complications were infection and thrombosis, both with an incidence of 0.17 cases per 1000 days of the total catheterization period. The total average duration of catheterization was 170 days [SD 6.06]. Additionally to "end of treatment" (48.42% and "exitus", (22.53% the most frequent cause of removal was migration (displacement towards the exterior of the catheter (5.80%.PICCs are safe devices that allow the administration of long-term treatment and preserve the integrity of the venous system of the patient. Proper care of the catheter is very important to improve the quality life of patients with oncologic and hematologic conditions. Therefore, correct training of professionals and patients as well as following the latest scientific recommendations are particularly relevant.

  9. Previous PICC Placement May Be Associated With Catheter-Related Infections in Hemodialysis Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, Philip J.; Sood, Shreya; Mojibian, Hamid; Tal, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Catheter-related infections (CRIs) are a significant source of morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis patients. The identification of novel, modifiable risk factors for CRIs may lead to improved outcomes in this population. Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) have been hypothesized to compromise vascular access due to vascular damage and venous thrombosis, whereas venous thrombosis has been linked to the development of CRIs. Here we examine the association between PICC placement and CRIs. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of all chronic hemodialysis catheter placements and exchanges performed at a large university hospital from September 2003 to September 2008. History of PICC line use was determined by examining hospital radiologic records from December 1993 to September 2008. Catheter-related complications were assessed and correlated with PICC line history. Results: One hundred eighty-five patients with 713 chronic tunneled hemodialysis catheter placements were identified. Thirty-eight of those patients (20.5%) had a history of PICC placement; these patients were more likely to have CRIs (odds ratio = 2.46, 95% confidence interval = 1.71–3.53, p < .001) compared with patients without a history of PICC placement. There was no difference between the two groups in age or number of catheters placed. Conclusion: Previous PICC placement may be associated with catheter-related infections in hemodialysis patients.

  10. A comparative analysis of radiological and surgical placement of central venous catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McBride, Kieran D.; Fisher, Ross; Warnock, Neil; Winfield, David A.; Reed, Malcolm W.; Gaines, Peter A.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the differences in practice and outcome of all radiologically and surgically placed central venous catheters retrospectively over a 2-year period simultaneously, at a single institution. Methods.A total of 253 Hickman catheters were inserted in 209 patients; 120 were placed radiologically in 102 patients and 133 were placed surgically in 107 patients. The indication was chemotherapy in 76% of radiological and in 47% of surgical cases; the remainder were for total parenteral nutrition and venous access. Results. There were 6 (4.5%) primary surgical failures and a further 17 (13%) surgical cases requiring multiple placement attempts. Pneumothorax occurred once (0.8%) surgically and four times (3.3%) radiologically. There were no radiological primary misplacements but there were five (3.7%) surgical ones. Catheter or central vein thrombosis occurred in four (3.3%) radiological and five (3.7%) surgical cases. The rate of infection per 1000 catheter-days was 1.9 in radiologically placed catheters and 4.0 in surgically placed ones (p<0.001). Average catheter life-span was similar for the two placement methods (100±23 days). Conclusion. Radiological placement is consistently more reliable than surgical placement. There are fewer placement complications and fewer catheter infections overall

  11. Intra-vesical knot of bladder catheter in an extremely low birthweight neonate: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula M.Y. Tang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Premature and extremely low birth weight (ELBW neonates are at high risk of developing multiple co-morbidities and often require urinary catheterization for various medical indications. Intra-vesical knotting of bladder catheter is a known but uncommon complication of this procedure. We report a case of an ELBW baby boy with a knotted bladder catheter requiring surgical retrieval. After an elective operation for the closure of patent ductus arteriosus, a 4 French urinary catheter was inserted into an ELBW baby boy for urine output monitoring and left in-situ. Resistance was encountered in attempt to remove the urinary catheter. Abdominal X Ray confirmed intra-vesical knotting of the tube. Knot unravelling by interventional radiology was attempted but was unsuccessful. Open extra-peritoneal bladder exploration was performed for the retrieval of the tightly knotted catheter. A 6 French transurethral Foley catheter was inserted for bladder drainage. Upon removal of the Foley's catheter on day 5 post op, the baby was able to void spontaneously. With literature review, we postulated the potential risk factors resulting in this potentially avoidable iatrogenic unusual complication. Recommendations were suggested to avoid further incidences.

  12. Pigtail Catheter: A Less Invasive Option for Pleural Drainage in Egyptian Patients with Recurrent Hepatic Hydrothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Sharaf-Eldin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. Treatment of hepatic hydrothorax is a clinical challenge. Chest tube insertion for hepatic hydrothorax is associated with high complication rates. We assessed the use of pigtail catheter as a safe and practical method for treatment of recurrent hepatic hydrothorax as it had not been assessed before in a large series of patients. Methods. This study was conducted on 60 patients admitted to Tanta University Hospital, Egypt, suffering from recurrent hepatic hydrothorax. The site of pigtail catheter insertion was determined by ultrasound guidance under complete aseptic measures and proper local anesthesia. Insertion was done by pushing the trocar and catheter until reaching the pleural cavity and then the trocar was withdrawn gradually while inserting the catheter which was then connected to a collecting bag via a triple way valve. Results. The use of pigtail catheter was successful in pleural drainage in 48 (80% patients with hepatic hydrothorax. Complications were few and included pain at the site of insertion in 12 (20% patients, blockage of the catheter in only 2 (3.3% patients, and rapid reaccumulation of fluid in 12 (20% patients. Pleurodesis was performed on 38 patients with no recurrence of fluid within three months of observation. Conclusions. Pigtail catheter insertion is a practical method for treatment of recurrent hepatic hydrothorax with a low rate of complications. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02119169.

  13. Convexity Adjustments for ATS Models

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Murgoci, Agatha; Gaspar, Raquel M.

    . As a result we classify convexity adjustments into forward adjustments and swaps adjustments. We, then, focus on affine term structure (ATS) models and, in this context, conjecture convexity adjustments should be related of affine functionals. In the case of forward adjustments, we show how to obtain exact...

  14. Central venous catheters: the role of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, P.L.; Gibson, M.

    2006-01-01

    The insertion and management of long-term venous catheters have long been the province of anaesthetists, intensive care physicians and surgeons. Radiologists are taking an increasing role in the insertion of central venous catheters (CVCs) because of their familiarity with the imaging equipment and their ability to manipulate catheters and guide-wires. The radiological management of the complications of CVCs has also expanded as a result. This article reviews the role of radiology in central venous access, covering the detection and management of their complications

  15. Miniaturization of catheter systems for angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hawkins, I.F. Jr.; Akins, E.W.

    1988-01-01

    The authors discuss the use of small catheters and needles in angiography and interventional procedures to improve the quality of the procedures and increase the success rate and safety. This philosophy was initially poorly received, both by operators and by industry; however, more recently microtechniques have become more acceptable primarily because of the changing economic climate requiring procedures with shorter or no hospitalization time. Since 1970, the authors have performed well over 10,000 angiographic procedures using 5 French catheters, or smaller. During the last 12 years, they have used almost exclusively 4 French catheters, primarily with standard filming techniques which have resulted in no thrombosed arteries, or significant hematoma formation

  16. Cryoballoon Catheter Ablation in Atrial Fibrillation

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    Cevher Ozcan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary vein isolation with catheter ablation is an effective treatment in patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation refractory or intolerant to antiarrhythmic medications. The cryoballoon catheter was recently approved for this procedure. In this paper, the basics of cryothermal energy ablation are reviewed including its ability of creating homogenous lesion formation, minimal destruction to surrounding vasculature, preserved tissue integrity, and lower risk of thrombus formation. Also summarized here are the publications describing the clinical experience with the cryoballoon catheter ablation in both paroxysmal and persistent atrial fibrillation, its safety and efficacy, and discussions on the technical aspect of the cryoballoon ablation procedure.

  17. Macroscopic barotrauma caused by stiff and soft-tipped airway exchange catheters: an in vitro case series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Axe, Robert; Middleditch, Alex; Kelly, Fiona E; Batchelor, Tim J; Cook, Tim M

    2015-02-01

    Many airway management guidelines include the use of airway exchange catheters (AECs). There are reports, however, of harm from their use, from both malpositioning and in particular from the administration of oxygen via an AEC leading to barotrauma. We used an in vitro pig lung model to investigate the safety of administering oxygen at 4 different flow rates from a high-pressure source via 2 different AECs: a standard catheter and a soft-tipped catheter. Experiments were performed with the catheters positioned either above the carina or below it at the first point of resistance to advancement (hold-up). The experiments were then repeated to produce a series of 32 cases. With an AEC positioned above the carina, we did not observe macroscopic lung damage after the administration of oxygen. The administration of oxygen through an AEC positioned below the carina resulted in macroscopic barotrauma regardless of the rate of oxygen delivery. Increasing speed of oxygen flow led to faster and more extensive damage. Use of an "injector" at 2.5 or 4 bar led to instantaneous macroscopic lung damage and advancement of the AEC through the lung tissue. Our observations were the same when both types of AECs were used. Our results are consistent with reports of harm during the use of AECs and demonstrate the risk of administering oxygen through these devices when they are positioned below the carina. An indicator, ideally made on an AEC at the time of manufacture and designed to lie at the same level as the teeth, may be useful in preventing the insertion of that AEC beyond the level of the carina and improve the safety of using such devices.

  18. Development of an X-Ray Catheter Final Report CRADA No. TC-1265-96

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Trebes, J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States); Schlossberg, M. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2017-11-01

    Toe goal of this CRADA project was to develop a catheter-based x-ray source to provide treatment of restenosis in arteries with a radiation source which can be precisely controlled and turned on and off at will.

  19. SU-E-T-362: Automatic Catheter Reconstruction of Flap Applicators in HDR Surface Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Buzurovic, I; Devlin, P; Hansen, J; O'Farrell, D; Bhagwat, M; Friesen, S; Damato, A; Lewis, J; Cormack, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: Catheter reconstruction is crucial for the accurate delivery of radiation dose in HDR brachytherapy. The process becomes complicated and time-consuming for large superficial clinical targets with a complex topology. A novel method for the automatic catheter reconstruction of flap applicators is proposed in this study. Methods: We have developed a program package capable of image manipulation, using C++class libraries of The-Visualization-Toolkit(VTK) software system. The workflow for automatic catheter reconstruction is: a)an anchor point is placed in 3D or in the axial view of the first slice at the tip of the first, last and middle points for the curved surface; b)similar points are placed on the last slice of the image set; c)the surface detection algorithm automatically registers the points to the images and applies the surface reconstruction filter; d)then a structured grid surface is generated through the center of the treatment catheters placed at a distance of 5mm from the patient's skin. As a result, a mesh-style plane is generated with the reconstructed catheters placed 10mm apart. To demonstrate automatic catheter reconstruction, we used CT images of patients diagnosed with cutaneous T-cell-lymphoma and imaged with Freiburg-Flap-Applicators (Nucletron™-Elekta, Netherlands). The coordinates for each catheter were generated and compared to the control points selected during the manual reconstruction for 16catheters and 368control point Results: The variation of the catheter tip positions between the automatically and manually reconstructed catheters was 0.17mm(SD=0.23mm). The position difference between the manually selected catheter control points and the corresponding points obtained automatically was 0.17mm in the x-direction (SD=0.23mm), 0.13mm in the y-direction (SD=0.22mm), and 0.14mm in the z-direction (SD=0.24mm). Conclusion: This study shows the feasibility of the automatic catheter reconstruction of flap applicators with a high

  20. Development of an Infection-Responsive Fluorescent Sensor for the Early Detection of Urinary Catheter Blockage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milo, Scarlet; Acosta, Florianne B; Hathaway, Hollie J; Wallace, Laura A; Thet, Naing T; Jenkins, A Toby A

    2018-03-23

    Formation of crystalline biofilms following infection by Proteus mirabilis can lead to encrustation and blockage of long-term indwelling catheters, with serious clinical consequences. We describe a simple sensor, placed within the catheter drainage bag, to alert of impending blockage via a urinary color change. The pH-responsive sensor is a dual-layered polymeric "lozenge", able to release the self-quenching dye 5(6)-carboxyfluorescein in response to the alkaline urine generated by the expression of bacterial urease. Sensor performance was evaluated within a laboratory model of the catheterized urinary tract, infected with both urease positive and negative bacterial strains under conditions of established infection, achieving an average "early warning" of catheter blockage of 14.5 h. Signaling only occurred following infection with urease positive bacteria. Translation of these sensors into a clinical environment would allow appropriate intervention before the occurrence of catheter blockage, a problem for which there is currently no effective control method.

  1. Catheter visualisation in MR tomography: first animal experimental experiences with field inhomogeneity catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, G.; Glowinski, A.; Neuerburg, J.; Buecker, A.; Vaals, J.J. van; Hurtak, W.; Guenther, R.W.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the feasibility of a new developed field inhomogeneity catheter for interventional MR imaging in vivo. Materials and methods: Three different prototypes of a field inhomogeneity catheter were investigated in 6 pigs. The catheters were introduced in Seldinger technique via the femoral vessels over a guide wire on an interventional MR system (Philips Gyroscan NT combined with a C-arm fluoroscopy unit [Philips BV 212[). Catheters were placed in veins and arteries. The catheter position was controlled by a fast gradient echo sequence (Turbo Field Echo [TEF[). Results: Catheters were introduced over a guide wire without complications in all cases. Using the field inhomogeneity concept, catheters were easily visualised in the inferior vena cava and the aorta by the fast gradient echo technique on MR in all cases. Although aortic branches were successfully cannulated, the catheters were not displayed by the TFE technique due to the complex and tortuous anatomy. All animals survived the experiments without complications. Conclusion: MR guided visualisation of a field inhomogeneity catheter is a simple concept which can be realised on each MR scanner and may allow intravascular MR guided interventions in future. (orig.) [de

  2. Does age at the time of elective cardiac surgery or catheter intervention in children influence the longitudinal development of psychological distress and styles of coping of parents?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Utens, Elisabeth M.; Versluis-den Bieman, Herma J.; Witsenburg, Maarten; Bogers, Ad J. J. C.; Hess, John; Verhulst, Frank C.

    2002-01-01

    To assess the influence of age at a cardiac procedure of children, who underwent elective cardiac surgery or interventional cardiac catheterisation for treatment of congenital cardiac defects between 3 months and 7 years of age, on the longitudinal development of psychological distress and styles of

  3. Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Duodenoscope Sampling Method Interim Duodenoscope Culture Method Multiplex Real-Time PCR Detection of KPC & NDM-1 genes Quinolones ... The most commonly used external catheter is a soft flexible sheath that fits over the penis (“condom” ...

  4. Scale-space for empty catheter segmentation in PCI fluoroscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacchuwar, Ketan; Cousty, Jean; Vaillant, Régis; Najman, Laurent

    2017-07-01

    In this article, we present a method for empty guiding catheter segmentation in fluoroscopic X-ray images. The guiding catheter, being a commonly visible landmark, its segmentation is an important and a difficult brick for Percutaneous Coronary Intervention (PCI) procedure modeling. In number of clinical situations, the catheter is empty and appears as a low contrasted structure with two parallel and partially disconnected edges. To segment it, we work on the level-set scale-space of image, the min tree, to extract curve blobs. We then propose a novel structural scale-space, a hierarchy built on these curve blobs. The deep connected component, i.e. the cluster of curve blobs on this hierarchy, that maximizes the likelihood to be an empty catheter is retained as final segmentation. We evaluate the performance of the algorithm on a database of 1250 fluoroscopic images from 6 patients. As a result, we obtain very good qualitative and quantitative segmentation performance, with mean precision and recall of 80.48 and 63.04% respectively. We develop a novel structural scale-space to segment a structured object, the empty catheter, in challenging situations where the information content is very sparse in the images. Fully-automatic empty catheter segmentation in X-ray fluoroscopic images is an important and preliminary step in PCI procedure modeling, as it aids in tagging the arrival and removal location of other interventional tools.

  5. Inadvertent positioning of suprapubic catheter in urethra: a serious complication during change of suprapubic cystostomy in a spina bifida patient - a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaidyanathan, Subramanian; Hughes, Peter L; Soni, Bakul M; Oo, Tun; Singh, Gurpreet

    2009-12-22

    Spinal cord injury patients are at risk for developing unusual complications such as autonomic dysreflexia while changing suprapubic cystostomy. We report a male patient with spina bifida in whom the Foley catheter was placed in the urethra during change of suprapubic cystostomy with serious consequences. A male patient, born in 1972 with spina bifida and paraplaegia, underwent suprapubic cystostomy in 2003 because of increasing problems with urethral catheter. The patient would come to spinal unit for change of suprapubic catheter every four to six weeks. Two days after a routine catheter change in November 2009, this patient woke up in the morning and noticed that the suprapubic catheter had come out. He went straight to Accident and Emergency. The suprapubic catheter was changed by a health professional and this patient was sent home. But the suprapubic catheter did not drain urine. This patient developed increasing degree of pain and swelling in suprapubic region. He did not pass any urine per urethra. He felt sick and came to spinal unit five hours later. About twenty ml of contrast was injected through suprapubic catheter and X-rays were taken. The suprapubic catheter was patent; the catheter was not blocked. The Foley catheter could be seen going around in a circular manner through the urinary bladder into the urethra. The contrast did not opacify urinary bladder; but proximal urethra was seen. The tip of Foley catheter was lying in proximal urethra. The balloon of Foley catheter had been inflated in urethra. When the balloon of Foley catheter was deflated, this patient developed massive bleeding per urethra. A sterile 22 French Foley catheter was inserted through suprapubic track. The catheter drained bloody urine. He was admitted to spinal unit and received intravenous fluids and meropenem. Haematuria subsided after 48 hours. The patient was discharged home a week later in a stable condition. This case shows that serious complications can occur during

  6. CO laser angioplasty system: efficacy of manipulatable laser angioscope catheter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arai, Tsunenori; Kikuchi, Makoto; Mizuno, Kyoichi; Sakurada, Masami; Miyamoto, Akira; Arakawa, Koh; Kurita, Akira; Nakamura, Haruo; Takeuchi, Kiyoshi; Utsumi, Atsushi; Akai, Yoshiro

    1992-08-01

    A percutaneous transluminal coronary angioplasty system using a unique combination of CO laser (5 micrometers ) and As-S infrared glass fiber under the guidance of a manipulatable laser angioscope catheter is described. The ablation and guidance functions of this system are evaluated. The angioplasty treatment procedure under angioscope guidance was studied by in vitro model experiment and in vivo animal experiment. The whole angioplasty system is newly developed. That is, a transportable compact medical CO laser device which can emit up to 10 W, a 5 F manipulatable laser angioscope catheter, a thin CO laser cable of which the diameter is 0.6 mm, an angioscope imaging system for laser ablation guidance, and a system controller were developed. Anesthetized adult mongrel dogs (n equals 5) with an artificial complete occlusion in the femoral artery and an artificial human vessel model including occluded or stenotic coronary artery were used. The manipulatability of the catheter was drastically improved (both rotation and bending), therefore, precise control of ablation to expand stenosis was obtained. A 90% artificial stenosis made of human yellow plaque in 4.0 mm diameter in the vessel was expanded to 70% stenosis by repetitive CO laser ablations of which total energy was 220 J. All procedures were performed and controlled under angioscope visualization.

  7. Symptomatic spinal cord deformity secondary to a redundant intramedullary shunt catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quencer, R.M.; Montalvo Morse, B.M.; Green, B.A.; Eismont, F.J.

    1985-01-01

    Right arm pain, motor and sensory loss in the right arm and right facial numbness recurred in a 27 year old quadraplegic shortly after a posttraumatic spinal cord cyst (PTSCC) was shunted via a catheter into the adjacent subarachnoid space. Although shunt malfunction was clinically suspected, metrizamide computed tomography (MCT) suggested that redundancy of the catheter had caused deformity of the spinal cord. This hypothesis was confirmed at surgery when intraoperative spinal sonography (IOSS) showed that the spinal cord deformity at C 1 -C 2 disappeared when the catheter was withdrawn. This case shows that new or recurrent spinal cord symptoms may be due to a mechanical deformity of the cord rather than shunt malfunction, that restricting the length of the shunt catheter which is used to decompress PTSCCs is important, and that IOSS is an indispensible tool for visualizing the changes in spinal cord morphology during shunting procedures. (orig.)

  8. Urinary Incontinence and Indwelling Urinary Catheters as Predictors of Death after New-Onset Stroke: A Report of the South London Stroke Register.

    Science.gov (United States)

    John, Gregor; Primmaz, Steve; Crichton, Siobhan; Wolfe, Charles

    2018-01-01

    To explore the relationship between indwelling urinary catheters (IUCs), urinary incontinence (UI), and death in the poststroke period and to determine when, after the neurological event, UI has the best ability to predict 1-year mortality. In a prospective observational study, 4477 patients were followed up for 1 year after a first-ever stroke. The impact of UI or urinary catheters on time to death was adjusted in a Cox model for age, sex, Glasgow Coma Scale, prestroke and poststroke Barthel Index, swallow test, motor deficit, diabetes, and year of inclusion. The predictive values of UI assessed at the maximal deficit or 7 days after a stroke were compared using receiver-operating curves. UI at the maximal neurological deficit and urinary catheters within the first week after the stroke were present in 43.9% and 31.2% patients, respectively. They were both associated with 1-year mortality in unadjusted and adjusted analysis (hazard ratio [HR], 1.78, 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.46-2.19, and HR, 1.84, 95% CI 1.54-2.19). Patients with UI and urinary catheters had twice the mortality rate of incontinent patients without urinary catheters (HR, 10.24; 95% CI, 8.72-12.03 versus HR, 4.70; 95% CI, 3.88-5.70; P year mortality than UI assessed at the maximal neurological deficit. IUCs in the poststroke period is associated with death, especially among incontinent patients. UI assessed at 1 week after the neurological event has the best predictive ability. Copyright © 2018 National Stroke Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Risk of infection due to medical interventions via central venous catheters or implantable venous access port systems at the middle port of a three-way cock: luer lock cap vs. luer access split septum system (Q-Syte).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pohl, Fabian; Hartmann, Werner; Holzmann, Thomas; Gensicke, Sandra; Kölbl, Oliver; Hautmann, Matthias G

    2014-01-25

    Many cancer patients receive a central venous catheter or port system prior to therapy to assure correct drug administration. Even appropriate hygienic intervention maintenance carries the risk of contaminating the middle port (C-port) of a three-way cock (TWC), a risk that increases with the number of medical interventions. Because of the complexity of the cleaning procedure with disconnection and reconnection of the standard luer lock cap (referred as "intervention"), we compared luer lock caps with a "closed access system" consisting of a luer access split septum system with regard to process optimization (work simplification, process time), efficiency (costs) and hygiene (patient safety). For determination of process optimization the workflow of an intervention according to the usual practice and risks was depicted in a process diagram. For determining the actual process costs, we analyzed use of material and time parameters per intervention and used the process parameters for programming the process into a simulation run (n = 1000) to determine the process costs as well as their differences (ACTUAL vs. NOMINAL) within the framework of a discrete event simulation.Additionally cultures were carried out at the TWC C-ports to evaluate possible contamination. With the closed access system, the mean working time of 5.5 minutes could be reduced to 2.97 minutes. The results for average process costs (labour and material costs per use) were 3.92 € for luer lock caps and 2.55 € for the closed access system. The hypothesis test (2-sample t-test, CI 0.95, p-valuerisks (related to material, surroundings, staff handling) could be reduced by 65.38%. In the present research, the closed access system with a divided split septum was superior to conventional luer lock caps. The advantage of the closed access system lies in the simplified handling for staff, which results in a reduced risk of patient infection due to improved clinical hygiene.

  10. Three-dimensional tracking of cardiac catheters using an inverse geometry x-ray fluoroscopy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Speidel, Michael A.; Tomkowiak, Michael T.; Raval, Amish N.; Van Lysel, Michael S.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: Scanning beam digital x-ray (SBDX) is an inverse geometry fluoroscopic system with high dose efficiency and the ability to perform continuous real-time tomosynthesis at multiple planes. This study describes a tomosynthesis-based method for 3D tracking of high-contrast objects and present the first experimental investigation of cardiac catheter tracking using a prototype SBDX system. Methods: The 3D tracking algorithm utilizes the stack of regularly spaced tomosynthetic planes that are generated by SBDX after each frame period (15 frames/s). Gradient-filtered versions of the image planes are generated, the filtered images are segmented into object regions, and then a 3D coordinate is calculated for each object region. Two phantom studies of tracking performance were conducted. In the first study, an ablation catheter in a chest phantom was imaged as it was pulled along a 3D trajectory defined by a catheter sheath (10, 25, and 50 mm/s pullback speeds). SBDX tip tracking coordinates were compared to the 3D trajectory of the sheath as determined from a CT scan of the phantom after the registration of the SBDX and CT coordinate systems. In the second study, frame-to-frame tracking precision was measured for six different catheter configurations as a function of image noise level (662-7625 photons/mm 2 mean detected x-ray fluence at isocenter). Results: During catheter pullbacks, the 3D distance between the tracked catheter tip and the sheath centerline was 1.0±0.8 mm (mean ±one standard deviation). The electrode to centerline distances were comparable to the diameter of the catheter tip (2.3 mm), the confining sheath (4 mm outside diameter), and the estimated SBDX-to-CT registration error (±0.7 mm). The tip position was localized for all 332 image frames analyzed and 83% of tracked positions were inside the 3D sheath volume derived from CT. The pullback speeds derived from the catheter trajectories were within 5% of the programed pullback speeds. The

  11. Biofilm Formation by Pseudomonas Species Onto Graphene Oxide-TiO2 Nanocomposite-Coated Catheters: In vitro Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb, Ananya; Vimala, R.

    The present study focuses on the development of an in vitro model system for biofilm growth by Pseudomonas aerouginosa onto small discs of foley catheter. Catheter disc used for the study was coated with graphene oxide-titanium oxide composite (GO-TiO2) and titanium oxide (TiO2) and characterized through XRD, UV-visible spectroscopy. Morphological analysis was done by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The biofilm formed on the catheter surface was quantified by crystal violet (CV) staining method and a colorimetric assay (MTT assay) which involves the reduction of tetrazolium salt. The catheter coated with GO-TiO2 showed reduced biofilm growth in comparison to the TiO2-coated and uncoated catheter, thus indicating that it could be successfully used in coating biomedical devices to prevent biofilm formation which is a major cause of nosocomial infection.

  12. Pulsatile flow in ventricular catheters for hydrocephalus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez, Á.; Galarza, M.; Thomale, U.; Schuhmann, M. U.; Valero, J.; Amigó, J. M.

    2017-05-01

    The obstruction of ventricular catheters (VCs) is a major problem in the standard treatment of hydrocephalus, the flow pattern of the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) being one important factor thereof. As a first approach to this problem, some of the authors studied previously the CSF flow through VCs under time-independent boundary conditions by means of computational fluid dynamics in three-dimensional models. This allowed us to derive a few basic principles which led to designs with improved flow patterns regarding the obstruction problem. However, the flow of the CSF has actually a pulsatile nature because of the heart beating and blood flow. To address this fact, here we extend our previous computational study to models with oscillatory boundary conditions. The new results will be compared with the results for constant flows and discussed. It turns out that the corrections due to the pulsatility of the CSF are quantitatively small, which reinforces our previous findings and conclusions. This article is part of the themed issue `Mathematical methods in medicine: neuroscience, cardiology and pathology'.

  13. Peritoneal catheter fixation combined with straight upward tunnel and low implant position to prevent catheter malfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qingyan; Jiang, Chunming; Zhu, Wei; Sun, Cheng; Xia, Yangyang; Tang, Tianfeng; Wan, Cheng; Shao, Qiuyuan; Liu, Jing; Jin, Bo; Zhang, Miao

    2018-03-01

    Catheter malfunction is the main reason for early peritoneal dialysis (PD) technique failure. This study aimed to evaluate the effect of a new surgery technique with catheter fixation to the lower abdominal wall combined with straight upward tunnel and low implant position in reducing catheter malfunction. Patients with end stage renal disease who received PD in our centre from January 2013 to December 2015 were involved in this study. They were randomly divided into three groups according to surgical technique: traditional open surgery group, modified open surgery group and modified open surgery with catheter fixation group. All patients were followed up for six months after surgery. Catheter- related complications were analyzed. A total of 152 patients were involved. Among them, 49 received traditional open surgery (TOS group), 49 received modified open surgery (MOS group), and 54 received modified open surgery with catheter fixation (MOS-F group). During follow-up, no patients (0%) in MOS-F group developed catheter malfunction which was significantly lower than that of the TOS group (0 vs 16.33%, P = 0.002). Although not statistically significant, the incidence of catheter malfunction was lower in MOS-F group than that in MOS group (0 vs 4.08%, P = 0.134). No significant difference was observed in the episodes of infection, bleeding, leakage, inflow or outflow pain, hernia and delayed wound healing among the three groups (all P > 0.05). Catheter fixation combined with straight upward tunnel and low implant position can effectively prevent catheter malfunction in PD catheter placement. © 2016 Asian Pacific Society of Nephrology.

  14. REcanalisation and Balloon-Oriented Puncture for Re-Insertion of Dialysis Catheter in Nonpatent Central Veins (REBORN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Too, Chow Wei; Sayani, Raza; Lim, Elvin Yuan Ting; Leong, Sum; Gogna, Apoorva; Teo, Terence K.

    2016-01-01

    PurposeTo describe a technique involving REcanalisation and Balloon-Oriented puncture for Re-insertion of dialysis catheter in Nonpatent central veins (REBORN) and to report long-term results.Materials and MethodsThis is a retrospective study of ten subjects in whom dialysis catheters were inserted using the REBORN technique from March 2012 to October 2014 and followed up till April 2016. Data on the duration of catheter usage, complications and reasons for removal were obtained. Seven patients had partially occluded lower internal jugular veins (IJV) recanalised in an antegrade fashion via a more cranial puncture. The balloon was then inflated at usual puncture site with an 18G needle. The collapsed balloon was cannulated with a guide wire, and both balloon and guide wire were advanced together into the superior vena cava. This was followed by tunnelled catheter placement using standard techniques. Two patients had catheters placed in the subclavian vein using a similar antegrade technique, and one patient had catheter placed via the left IJV following retrograde recanalisation from a right femoral puncture.ResultsMean duration of catheter use was 278 days (range 32–503). Three catheters were removed due to matured arteriovenous accesses. Four patients had successful catheter change over the same subcutaneous track due to catheter malfunction. One catheter was removed after 7 months because of sepsis. No complications were reported.ConclusionThe REBORN technique allows for the preservation of central veins for future haemodialysis access, which can be challenging in patients requiring long-term dialysis.

  15. REcanalisation and Balloon-Oriented Puncture for Re-Insertion of Dialysis Catheter in Nonpatent Central Veins (REBORN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Too, Chow Wei, E-mail: toochowwei@gmail.com [Singapore General Hospital (Singapore); Sayani, Raza [Aga Khan University Hospital (Pakistan); Lim, Elvin Yuan Ting; Leong, Sum; Gogna, Apoorva [Singapore General Hospital (Singapore); Teo, Terence K. [Mount Elizabeth Novena Hospital (Singapore)

    2016-08-15

    PurposeTo describe a technique involving REcanalisation and Balloon-Oriented puncture for Re-insertion of dialysis catheter in Nonpatent central veins (REBORN) and to report long-term results.Materials and MethodsThis is a retrospective study of ten subjects in whom dialysis catheters were inserted using the REBORN technique from March 2012 to October 2014 and followed up till April 2016. Data on the duration of catheter usage, complications and reasons for removal were obtained. Seven patients had partially occluded lower internal jugular veins (IJV) recanalised in an antegrade fashion via a more cranial puncture. The balloon was then inflated at usual puncture site with an 18G needle. The collapsed balloon was cannulated with a guide wire, and both balloon and guide wire were advanced together into the superior vena cava. This was followed by tunnelled catheter placement using standard techniques. Two patients had catheters placed in the subclavian vein using a similar antegrade technique, and one patient had catheter placed via the left IJV following retrograde recanalisation from a right femoral puncture.ResultsMean duration of catheter use was 278 days (range 32–503). Three catheters were removed due to matured arteriovenous accesses. Four patients had successful catheter change over the same subcutaneous track due to catheter malfunction. One catheter was removed after 7 months because of sepsis. No complications were reported.ConclusionThe REBORN technique allows for the preservation of central veins for future haemodialysis access, which can be challenging in patients requiring long-term dialysis.

  16. Use of wound soaker catheters for the administration of local anesthetic for post-operative analgesia: 56 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abelson, Amanda L; McCobb, Emily C; Shaw, Scott; Armitage-Chan, Elizabeth; Wetmore, Lois A; Karas, Alicia Z; Blaze, Cheryl

    2009-11-01

    To describe the administration of local anesthetic through wound soaker catheters for post-operative veterinary patients and to characterize complications. Retrospective study of hospital records. Records of patients in which a wound soaker catheter was placed post-operatively between November 1, 2004 and July 1, 2006 at a veterinary teaching hospital. Records in which a limb amputation was performed between January 1, 2002 and August 1, 2007 and in which a wound soaker catheter was not placed were reviewed for historic control. A total of 56 cases were identified in which a wound soaker catheter was placed post-operatively including 52 dogs, 2 cats, and 2 goats. Twenty canine cases were identified in which limb amputation was performed and no wound soaker catheter was placed. The majority of surgical procedures for which a wound soaker catheter was placed included thoracic limb amputation (46.4%) and pelvic limb amputation (35.7%). Wound soaker catheters remained in place for an average of 1.6 +/- 0.5 days. Feline and caprine patients received intermittent bupivacaine boluses every 6 hours. Canine patients received continuous lidocaine infusions. Complications included disconnection of the catheter from the infusion (7.7%), one seroma, and one suspected lidocaine neurotoxicity. Incisional infections were noted in 3/56 (5.3%) limb amputations with wound soaker catheters placed which was not higher than the incisional infection rate found in the historic control cases 3/20 (15%). Use of the wound soaker catheter was a viable means of providing local analgesia in post-operative veterinary patients. Studies are needed to evaluate efficacy of pain management, and to further investigate techniques for catheter placement and maintenance which may help to optimize the analgesia achieved using this technique.

  17. Catheter-based high-intensity ultrasound for epicardial ablation of the left ventricle: device design and in vivo feasiblity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgaonkar, Vasant A.; Nazer, Babak; Jones, Peter D.; Tanaka, Yasuaki; Martin, Alastair; Ng, Bennett; Duggirala, Srikant; Diederich, Chris J.; Gerstenfeld, Edward P.

    2015-03-01

    The development and in vivo testing of a high-intensity ultrasound thermal ablation catheter for epicardial ablation of the left ventricle (LV) is presented. Scar tissue can occur in the mid-myocardial and epicardial space in patients with nonischemic cardiomyopathy and lead to ventricular tachycardia. Current ablation technology uses radiofrequency energy, which is limited epicardially by the presence of coronary vessels, phrenic nerves, and fat. Ultrasound energy can be precisely directed to deliver targeted deep epicardial ablation while sparing intervening epicardial nerve and vessels. The proof-of-concept ultrasound applicators were designed for sub-xyphoid access to the pericardial space through a steerable 14-Fr sheath. The catheter consists of two rectangular planar transducers, for therapy (6.4 MHz) and imaging (5 MHz), mounted at the tip of a 3.5-mm flexible nylon catheter coupled and encapsulated within a custom-shaped balloon for cooling. Thermal lesions were created in the LV in a swine (n = 10) model in vivo. The ultrasound applicator was positioned fluoroscopically. Its orientation and contact with the LV were verified using A-mode imaging and a radio-opaque marker. Ablations employed 60-s exposures at 15 - 30 W (electrical power). Histology indicated thermal coagulation and ablative lesions penetrating 8 - 12 mm into the left ventricle on lateral and anterior walls and along the left anterior descending artery. The transducer design enabled successful sparing from the epicardial surface to 2 - 4 mm of intervening ventricle tissue and epicardial fat. The feasibility of targeted epicardial ablation with catheter-based ultrasound was demonstrated.

  18. A clever technique for placement of a urinary catheter over a wire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel E Abbott

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Placing urinary catheters over a wire is standard practice for urologists, however, use of this technique gives the freedom of performing wire-guided catheterization in more situations than a council-tip allows. This technique facilitates successful transurethral catheterization over wire in the setting of DUC for all catheter types and styles aiding in urologic management of patients at a cost benefit to the health care system.

  19. [Assertiveness and peripheral intravenous catheters dwell time with ultrasonography-guided insertion in children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avelar, Ariane Ferreira Machado; Peterlini, Maria Angélica Sorgini; da Pedreira, Mavilde Luz Gonçalves

    2013-06-01

    Randomized controlled trial which aimed to verify whether the use of vascular ultrasound (VUS) increases assertiveness in the use of peripheral venous catheter in children, and the catheter dwell time, when compared to traditional puncture. Data were collected after approval of theethical merit. Children and adolescents undergoing VUS-guided peripheral intravenous (GVUS) or puncture guided by clinical assessment of the venous conditions(CG) were included in the study. Significance level was set at pAssertiveness was found in 73 (71.6%) GVUS catheters and in 84(71.8%) of the CG (p=0.970), and catheter dwell time presented a median of less than one day in both groups (p=0.121), showing nostatistically significant difference. VUS did not significantly influence the results of the dependent variables investigated. ClinicalTrials.govNCT00930254.

  20. Ionizing radiation effect on central venous catheters (CVC) of polyurethane coatings with silver nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Heilman, Sonia; Silva, Leonardo G.A.; Hewer, Thiago L.R.; Souza, Michele L.

    2015-01-01

    The present work aimed to study the use of ionizing radiation for coating of silver nanoparticles on central polyurethane catheters, providing reduction of infections associated with contamination of catheters introduced into the bloodstream. Silver nanoparticles have physical, chemical and biological properties only when compared to metal on a macroscopic scale, and have been used in the medical field because of its remarkable antimicrobial activity. Titanium dioxide nanoparticles obtained by the sol gel method were used as the coating catheters for subsequent impregnation of silver nanoparticles with ionizing radiation at doses of 25 and 50 kGy. A Raman spectrometry was used to identify the polymorph of titanium oxide, rutile. In trials with (ICP OES) were evaluated amounts of titanium and silver coated catheters in titanium oxide and silver.(author)

  1. A Brief Recap of Tips and Surgical Manoeuvres to Enhance Optimal Outcome of Surgically Placed Peritoneal Dialysis Catheters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jodie H. Frost

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Peritoneal dialysis (PD is an effective option of renal replacement therapy for ESRF, offering advantages over haemodialysis. Peritoneal dialysis catheter (PDC placement is thought to be the key to successful PD and the economic advantages are lost if a patient switches to HD in the 1st year. This paper is a brief document elaborating a recap of published literature, looking at various surgical tips and manoeuvres to enhance optimal outcome of PDC placement. Methods. A search strategy assessing for access team, preoperative antibiotic prophylaxis, type of catheter, catheter exit site, intraoperative catheter trial, optimal time to commence PD, hernia repairs, number of cuffs, catheter-embedding procedures, rectus sheath tunnelling, laparoscopic fixing, omentopexy, omentectomy, the “Y”-Tec system, resection of epiploic appendages, adhesiolysis, a trained surgeon, and perioperative catheter care protocol was used looking at various databases. Findings. The complications of catheterrelated dysfunction can be reduced with advanced planning of access placement, immaculate surgery, and attention to catheter insertion techniques. Conclusion. The success of a peritoneal dialysis programme depends upon functional and durable long term access to the peritoneal cavity; this depends on placement techniques and competent surgeons and psychosocial support to the patient. The various technical tips and manoeuvres elaborated here should be considered options carried out to improve outcome and reduce catheter dysfunction.

  2. Dosimetric impact of interfraction catheter movement and organ motion on MRI/CT guided HDR interstitial brachytherapy for gynecologic cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rey, Felipe; Chang, Chang; Mesina, Carmen; Dixit, Nayha; Kevin Teo, Boon-Keng; Lin, Lilie L.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the dosimetric impact of catheter movement for MRI/CT image guided high dose rate (HDR) interstitial brachytherapy (ISBT) for gynecologic cancers. Materials and methods: Ten patients were treated with HDR ISBT. The CTV and organs at risk were contoured using a postimplant MRI and CT. 5 fractions were delivered twice daily on 3 consecutive days. The first fraction was delivered on day 1 (d1), fraction 2–3 on d2 and fraction 4–5 on d3. MRI/CT was acquired prior to the second and fourth fractions. Four scenarios were modeled. (1) The d1 plan was applied to the d2 and d3 CT, using the updated catheter positions. (2) Replanning was performed for d2 and d3. (3) We applied the dwell positions/times from the d2 replan over the d3 CT and compared with a d3 CT replan. (4) Based on daily MRI, target volumes were recontoured and replanned. Dosimetry was analyzed for each plan and compared to the d1 dose distribution. Results: (1) When using the d1 plan on the d2 and d3 CT with the updated catheter positions, the mean CTV D90 was reduced from 93.4% on d1 to 89.3% (p = 0.08) on d2 and to 87.7% (p = 0.005) on d3. (2) Replanning on d2 and d3 compensated for catheter movement, mean CTV D90 of 95.4% on d2 and 94.6% (p = 0.36) on d3. (3) When compared to the replan of d2 applied on the d3 CT vs the d3 replan, there was no significant difference in coverage, mean CTV D90 of 90.9% (p = 0.09). (4) Reoptimization based on daily MRI, significantly improved the CTV coverage for each day. The mean D2 cc for the rectum was significantly higher with model 1 vs model 3 59.1 ± 4.7 vs 60.9 ± 4.8 (p = 0.04) Gy EQD2. There were no significant differences in D2 cc of bladder and sigmoid between models. Conclusions: Interfraction dosimetric changes significantly decreased the CTV coverage of the third day. Rather than replanning on each day, replanning on the day 2 CT before the second or third fraction would give an optimal solution that would compensate for

  3. [Complications associated to central venous catheters in hematology patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    García-Gabás, Carmen; Castillo-Ayala, Ana; Hinojo-Marín, Begoña; Muriel-Abajo, M Ángeles; Gómez-Gutiérrez, Isabel; de Mena-Arenas, Ana M; Rodríguez-Gonzalo, Ana; Chao-Lozano, Cristina; García-Menéndez, Carmen; Madroñero-Agreda, M Antonia

    2015-01-01

    To discover the incidence of central venous catheters (tunnelled, subcutaneous and PICC) in patients with onco-hematological conditions, hospitalized in the Hematology or Transplantations of Hematopoietic Stem Cells Units, in two tertiary care hospitals. A cross-sectional, descriptive study form was developed in order to gather sociodemographic, clinical data as well as complications and follow-up of the care protocol. Each catheter was assigned a correlative identification number. Information was collected on 366 catheters: 185 in the University Hospital Ramón y Cajal (HURYC), 80 tunnelled, 40 subcutaneous venous access and 65 PICC, and 181 in the University Hospital Gregorio Marañón (HUGM), 101 tunnelled and 80 subcutaneous venous access. Major complications in the tunnellized were infections (13.7% in HURYC vs. 6.8% in HUGM - p<0.001) and occlusions (at least once in 3.8% vs. 21.8%). In subcutaneous venous access, infections were confirmed in 5% in HURYC vs. 1.2% in HUGM. There were occlusions at least once in 10% in HUGM and no other significant complications were detected. Regarding PICC, information was only collected in HURYC, where complications were phlebitis 10.8%, thrombosis 7.7%, confirmed or suspected infection 4.6%, occlusion at least once 7.7%. Differences between hospitals with regard to major complications, infection and occlusion may be related to different care protocol. We need to stress the high incidence of phlebitis and thrombosis in PICC catheters, compared with data of lower incidence of other papers. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  4. Development of a Novel Shock Wave Catheter Ablation System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, H.; Hasebe, Yuhi; Kondo, Masateru; Fukuda, Koji; Takayama, Kazuyoshi; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    Although radio-frequency catheter ablation (RFCA) is quite effective for the treatment tachyarrhythmias, it possesses two fundamental limitations, including limited efficacy for the treatment of ventricular tachyarrhythmias of epicardial origin and the risk of thromboembolism. Consequently, new method is required, which can eradicate arrhythmia source in deep part of cardiac muscle without heating. On the other hand, for a medical application of shock waves, extracorporeal shock wave lithotripter (ESWL) has been established [1]. It was demonstrated that the underwater shock focusing is one of most efficient method to generate a controlled high pressure in a small region [2]. In order to overcome limitations of existing methods, we aimed to develop a new catheter ablation system with underwater shock waves that can treat myocardium at arbitrary depth without causing heat.

  5. Clinical usefulness of catheter-drawn blood samples and catheter tip cultures for the diagnosis of catheter-related bloodstream infections in neonatology: A systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferreira, Janita; Camargos, Paulo Augusto Moreira; Clemente, Wanessa Trindade; Romanelli, Roberta Maia de Castro

    2018-01-01

    Neonatal sepsis is the most frequent health care-associated infection in neonatal units. This study aimed to analyze articles on the clinical usefulness of catheter-drawn blood samples and catheter tip cultures for the diagnosis of intravascular catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) in neonates. A systematic search was performed for studies published from 1987-2017, without language restriction. Observational studies carried out in neonates with CRBSI diagnosed using catheter-drawn blood samples or catheter tip cultures were included. A total of 412 articles were identified in the databases and 10 articles were included. The 7 studies that evaluated central venous catheter tip cultures and cultures of catheter fragments presented sensitivities ranging from 58.5%-100% and specificities ranging from 60%-95.7%. Three studies that evaluated catheter-drawn blood cultures, paired with peripheral blood cultures, reported sensitivity and specificity of 94% and 71% when evaluated for the differential time to positivity. When quantitative evaluation was performed, the sensitivity and specificity were 80% and 99.4%. Most of the studies analyzed cultures from the central venous catheter tip and catheter fragments for the diagnosis of CRBSI in neonatal populations. The results of this review suggest that the analysis of the catheter-drawn blood samples and catheter tip cultures, paired with peripheral blood cultures, are efficient methods for the diagnosis of CRBSI in neonates. Copyright © 2018 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Placement of an implantable port catheter in the biliary stent: an experimental study in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ko, Gi Young; Lee, Im Sick; Choi, Won Chan

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the feasibility of port catheter placement following a biliary stent placement. We employed 14 mongrel dogs as test subject and after the puncture of their gaIl bladders using sonographic guidance, a 10-mm in diameter metallic stent was placed at the common duct. In 12 dogs, a 6.3 F port catheter was placed into the duodenum through the common duct and a port was secured at the subcutaneous space following stent placement. As a control group, an 8.5 F drain tube was placed into the gallbladder without port catheter placement in the remaining two dogs. Irrigation of the bile duct was performed every week by injection of saline into the port, and the port catheter was replaced three weeks later in two dogs. Information relating to the success of the procedure, complications and the five-week follow-up cholangiographic findings were obtained. Placement of a biliary stent and a port catheter was technically successful in 13 (93%) dogs, while stent migration (n=3), gallbladder rupture (n=1) and death (n=5) due to subcutaneous abscess and peritonitis also occurred. The follow-up was achieved in eight dogs (seven dogs with a port catheter placement and one dog with a drain tube placement). Irrigation of the bile duct and port catheter replacement were successfully achieved without any complications. Cholangiograms obtained five weeks after stent placement showed diffuse biliary dilation with granulation tissue formation. However, focal biliary stricture was seen in one dog with stent placement alone. Placement of a port catheter following biliary stent placement seems to be feasible. However, further investigation is necessary to reduce the current complications

  7. Placement of an implantable port catheter in the biliary stent: an experimental study in dogs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Gi Young; Lee, Im Sick; Choi, Won Chan [Asan Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-04-01

    To investigate the feasibility of port catheter placement following a biliary stent placement. We employed 14 mongrel dogs as test subject and after the puncture of their gaIl bladders using sonographic guidance, a 10-mm in diameter metallic stent was placed at the common duct. In 12 dogs, a 6.3 F port catheter was placed into the duodenum through the common duct and a port was secured at the subcutaneous space following stent placement. As a control group, an 8.5 F drain tube was placed into the gallbladder without port catheter placement in the remaining two dogs. Irrigation of the bile duct was performed every week by injection of saline into the port, and the port catheter was replaced three weeks later in two dogs. Information relating to the success of the procedure, complications and the five-week follow-up cholangiographic findings were obtained. Placement of a biliary stent and a port catheter was technically successful in 13 (93%) dogs, while stent migration (n=3), gallbladder rupture (n=1) and death (n=5) due to subcutaneous abscess and peritonitis also occurred. The follow-up was achieved in eight dogs (seven dogs with a port catheter placement and one dog with a drain tube placement). Irrigation of the bile duct and port catheter replacement were successfully achieved without any complications. Cholangiograms obtained five weeks after stent placement showed diffuse biliary dilation with granulation tissue formation. However, focal biliary stricture was seen in one dog with stent placement alone. Placement of a port catheter following biliary stent placement seems to be feasible. However, further investigation is necessary to reduce the current complications.

  8. Infection and natural history of emergency department-placed central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeMaster, Christopher H; Schuur, Jeremiah D; Pandya, Darshan; Pallin, Daniel J; Silvia, Jennifer; Yokoe, Deborah; Agrawal, Ashish; Hou, Peter C

    2010-11-01

    Central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI, hereafter referred to in this paper as "bloodstream infection") is a leading cause of hospital-acquired infection. To our knowledge, there are no previously published studies designed to determine the rate of bloodstream infection among central venous catheters placed in the emergency department (ED). We design a retrospective chart review methodology to determine bloodstream infection and duration of catheterization for central venous catheters placed in the ED. Using hospital infection control, administrative, and ED billing databases, we identified patients with central venous catheters placed in the ED between January 1, 2007, and December 31, 2008, at one academic, urban ED with an annual census of 57,000. We performed a structured, explicit chart review to determine duration of catheterization and confirm bloodstream infection. We screened 4,251 charts and identified 656 patients with central venous catheters inserted in the ED, 3,622 catheter-days, and 7 bloodstream infections. The rate of bloodstream infection associated with central venous catheters placed in the ED was 1.93 per 1,000 catheter-days (95% confidence interval 0.50 to 3.36). The mean duration of catheterization was 5.5 days (median 4; range 1 to 29 days). Among infected central venous catheters, the mean duration of catheterization was 8.6 days (median 7; range 2 to 19 days). A total of 667 central venous catheters were placed in the internal jugular (392; 59%), subclavian (145; 22%), and femoral (130; 19%) veins. The sensitivity of using ED procedural billing code for identifying ED-placed central venous catheters among patients subsequently admitted to any ICU was 74.9% (95% confidence interval 71.4% to 78.3%). The rate of ED bloodstream infection at our institution is similar to current rates in ICUs. Central venous catheters placed in the ED remain in admitted patients for a substantial period. Copyright © 2010 American College of

  9. Catheter ablation of epicardial ventricular tachycardia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takumi Yamada, MD, PhD

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ventricular tachycardias (VTs can usually be treated by endocardial catheter ablation. However, some VTs can arise from the epicardial surface, and their substrate can be altered only by epicardial catheter ablation. There are two approaches to epicardial catheter ablation: transvenous and transthoracic. The transvenous approach through the coronary venous system (CVS has been commonly used because it is easily accessible. However, this approach may be limited by the distribution of the CVS and insufficient radiofrequency energy delivery. Transthoracic epicardial catheter ablation has been developed to overcome these limitations of the transvenous approach. It is a useful supplemental or even preferred strategy to eliminate epicardial VTs in the electrophysiology laboratory. This technique has been applied for scar-related VTs secondary to often non-ischemic cardiomyopathy and sometimes ischemic cardiomyopathy, and idiopathic VTs as the epicardial substrates of these VTs have become increasingly recognized. When endocardial ablation and epicardial ablation through the CVS are unsuccessful, transthoracic epicardial ablation should be the next option. Intrapericardial access is usually obtained through a subxiphoidal pericardial puncture. This approach might not be possible in patients with pericardial adhesions caused by prior cardiac surgery or pericarditis. In such cases, a hybrid procedure involving surgical access with a subxiphoid pericardial window and a limited anterior or lateral thoracotomy might be a feasible and safe method of performing an epicardial catheter ablation in the electrophysiology laboratory. Potential complications associated with this technique include bleeding and collateral damage to the coronary arteries and phrenic nerve. Although the risk of these complications is low, electrophysiologists who attempt epicardial catheter ablation should know the complications associated with this technique, how to minimize their

  10. Qureshi-5 Catheter for Complex Supra- and Abdominal-Aortic Catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qureshi, Adnan I; Xiao, WeiGang; Liu, HongLiang

    2015-10-01

    The use of previously described catheter technique was expanded to complex supra- and abdominal- aortic catheterizations. A new (Qureshi 5) catheter with curved shape at the distal end that has two lumens was used. One of lumens can accommodate a 0.035-inch guide wire and the second lumen can accommodate a 0.018-inch guide wire and terminates at the beginning of the distal curve of the first lumen. The manipulation and engagement of the curved distal end catheter was facilitated by rotation and movement of the J-shaped 0.018-inch guide wire extended coaxial and beyond the distal end of catheter. Subsequently, either contrast was injected or a 0.035-inch guide wire advanced into the target artery. The catheters were used in one patient to perform diagnostic cerebral and abdominal angiography through a 6F introducer sheath placed in the right common femoral artery. The catheterization was complex because of severe tortuosity of arch and descending aorta secondary to kyphosis. The left and right internal carotid arteries and left and right vertebral arteries, left renal artery, and superior mesenteric artery were catheterized in patient (fluoroscopy time 19:46 min). No complications were observed in the patient. The Qureshi-5 catheter was successful in complex supra- and abdominal-aortic catheterizations.

  11. Peripherally inserted central catheters. Guidewire versus nonguidewire use: a comparative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loughran, S C; Edwards, S; McClure, S

    1992-01-01

    To date, no research articles have been published that explore the practice of using guidewires for placement of peripherally inserted central catheters. The literature contains speculations regarding the pros and cons of guidewire use. However, no studies to date have compared patient outcomes when peripherally inserted central catheter lines are inserted with and without guidewires. To examine the use of guidewires for peripherally inserted central lines, a comparative study was conducted at two acute care facilities, one using guidewires for insertion and one inserting peripherally inserted central catheter lines without guidewires. 109 catheters were studied between January 1, 1990 and January 1, 1991. The primary focus of this study was to examine whether guidewire use places patients at higher risk for catheter-related complications, particularly phlebitis. No significant differences in phlebitis rates between the two study sites were found. Other catheter-related and noncatheter-related complications were similar between the two facilities. The results of this study do not support the belief that guidewire use increases complication rates.

  12. Pulmonary vein isolation using the Rhythmia mapping system: Verification of intracardiac signals using the Orion mini-basket catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anter, Elad; Tschabrunn, Cory M; Contreras-Valdes, Fernando M; Li, Jianqing; Josephson, Mark E

    2015-09-01

    During pulmonary vein isolation (PVI), a circular lasso catheter is positioned at the junction between the left atrium (LA) and the pulmonary vein (PV) to confirm PVI. The Rhythmia mapping system uses the Orion mini-basket catheter with 64 electrodes instead of the lasso catheter. However, its feasibility to determine PVI has not been studied. The purpose of this study was to compare signals between the mini-basket and lasso catheters at the LA-PV junction. In 12 patients undergoing PVI using Rhythmia, the mini-basket and lasso catheters were placed simultaneously at the LA-PV junction for baseline and post-PVI signal assessment. Pacing from both catheters was performed to examine the presence of exit block. At baseline, recordings of LA and PV potentials were concordant in all PVs. However, after PVI, concordance between the catheters was only 68%. Discordance in all cases resulted from loss of PV potentials on the lasso catheter with persistence of PV potentials on the mini-basket catheter. In 9 of 13 PVs (69%), these potentials represented true PV potentials that were exclusively recorded with the smaller and closely spaced mini-basket electrodes. In the other 4 PVs (31%), these potentials originated from neighboring structures and resulted in underestimation of PVI. The use of the mini-basket catheter alone is sufficient to determine PVI. While it improves recording of PV potentials after incomplete ablation, it is also associated with frequent recording of "PV-like" potentials originating from neighboring structures. In these cases, pacing maneuvers are helpful to determine PVI and avoid excessive ablation. Copyright © 2015 Heart Rhythm Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Direction of catheter insertion and the incidence of paresthesia during continuous epidural anesthesia in the elderly patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jong-Hak; Lee, Jun Seop

    2013-01-01

    Background Continuous epidural anesthesia is useful for endoscopic urologic surgery, as mostly performed in the elderly patients. In such a case, it is necessary to obtain successful sacral anesthesia, and the insertion of epidural catheter in the caudad direction may be needed. However, continuous epidural catherization has been related to paresthesias. This study aimed to evaluate the effects of the direction of the catheter insertion on the incidence of paresthesias in the elderly patients. Methods Two hundred elderly patients scheduled for endoscopic urologic surgery were enrolled. The epidural catheter was inserted at L2-3, L3-4, and L4-5 using the Tuohy needle. In Group I (n = 100), the Tuohy needle with the bevel directed the cephalad during the catheter insertion. In Group II (n = 100), it directed the caudad. During the catheter insertion, an anesthesiologist evaluated the presence of paresthesias and the ease or difficulty during the catheter insertion. Results In Group I (n = 97), 15.5% of the patients had paresthesias versus 18.4% in Group II (n = 98), and there was no significant difference between the two groups. In paresthesia depending on the insertion site and the ease or difficulty during the catheter insertion, there were no significant differences between the two groups. Conclusions Our results concluded that the direction of epidural catheter insertion did not significantly influence the incidence of paresthesias in the elderly patients. PMID:23741568

  14. A new Subcutaneously Anchored Device for Securing External Cerebrospinal Fluid Catheters: our Preliminary Experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frassanito, Paolo; Massimi, Luca; Tamburrini, Gianpiero; Pittiruti, Mauro; Doglietto, Francesco; Nucci, Carlotta Ginevra; Caldarelli, Massimo

    2016-09-01

    Accidental dislocation or removal is a well-known complication of external cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) drainage in daily clinical practice. At present, no data about the incidence of such complications are available in the scientific literature. SecurAcath (Interrad Medical, Plymouth, Minnesota, USA) is a subcutaneously anchored device recently adopted for securement of central venous catheters, known to be highly effective (and cost-effective) in reducing the risk of catheter dislodgement and/or accidental removal. We report our preliminary experience with the use of SecurAcath to secure CSF drainage, either ventricular or spinal, to the skin. SecurAcath was used in 29 consecutive patients (age range: 3 weeks-16 years, median age 6.3 years). In particular, the device was used for 25 ventricular catheters (a patient received 2 catheters in the same procedure for bilateral brain abscess) and 5 spinal drainages. Period in place ranged from 1-4 weeks (median 22 days). No complication related to the use of the device was observed, in particular there was no case of dislocation or accidental removal of the catheter. The removal procedure was extremely easy. The device has proven its utility also in 3 cases requiring an adjustment of the length of the catheter. In our experience, SecurAcath is a safe and effective device to secure CSF external catheters to the skin, with several relevant advantages: its placement and maintenance are easy; it may stay in place for the entire duration of the catheter; it allows a more complete antisepsis of the exit site, thus reducing local skin complications; it eliminates the risk of suture-related needlestick injuries. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. DSGE modeling at the fund

    CERN Document Server

    Botman, Dennis P J; Laxton, Douglas; Karam, Philippe D

    2007-01-01

    Researchers in policymaking institutions have expended significant effort to develop a new generation of macro models with more rigorous microfoundations. This paper provides a summary of the applications of two of these models. The Global Economy Model is a quarterly model that features a large assortment of nominal and real rigidities, which are necessary to create plausible short-run dynamics. However, because this model is based on a representative-agent paradigm, its Ricardian features make it unsuitable to study many fiscal policy issues. The Global Fiscal Model, which is an annual model

  16. Balloon catheter dilatation of benign urethral strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Perini, L.; Cavallo, A.; Perin, B.; Bighi, G.

    1988-01-01

    The authors report their experience of benign urethral stricture dilatation by balloon catheter in 11 male patients. Ten posterior and 2 anterior urethral strictures were treated; in 1 patients several narrowings coexisted at various levels. Etiology was inflammatory in 4 cases, iatrogen in 3, post-traumatic in 2, and equivocal in 2. The patients were studied both before and soon after dilatation by means of retrograde and voiding cystourethrogram and uroflowgraphy; the follow-up (2-14 months) was performed by urodynamic alone. In all cases, dilatation was followed by the restoration of urethral gauge, together with prompt functional improvement of urodynamic parameters. The latter result subsisted in time in 9 patients. In 2 cases recurrences were observed demonstrated at once by clinics and urodynamics. Both lesions were successfully re-treated. Neither early not late complication occurred. In spite of the limited material, the valuable results obtained, together with the absence of complications, the peculiar morphology of recurrences, and the chance of repeating it make the procedure advisable as a valid alternative to conventional techniques for these pathologies

  17. Percutaneous catheter drainage of intrapulmonary fluid collection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, E. D.; Kim, H. J.; Choi, P. Y.; Jung, S. H.

    1994-01-01

    With the success of percutaneous abdominal abscess drainage, attention is now being focused on the use of similar techniques in the thorax. We studied to evaluate the effect of percutaneous drainage in parenchymal fluid collections in the lungs. We performed percutaneous drainage of abscesses and other parenchymal fluid collections of the lungs in 15 patients. All of the procedures were performed under the fluoroscopic guidance with an 18-gauge Seldinger needle and coaxial technique with a 8-10F drainage catheter. Among 10 patients with lung abscess, 8 patients improved by percutaneous catheter drainage. In one patient, drainage was failed by the accidental withdrawal of the catheter before complete drainage. One patient died of sepsis 5 hours after the procedure. Among three patients with complicated bulla, successful drainage was done in two patients, but in the remaining patient, the procedure was failed. In one patient with intrapulmonary bronchogenic cyst, the drainage was not successful due to the thick internal contents. In one patient with traumatic hematoma, after the drainage of old blood clots, the signs of infection disappeared. Overally, of 14 patients excluding one who died, 11 patients improved with percutaneous catheter drainage and three patients did not. There were no major complications during and after the procedure. We conclude that percutaneous catheter drainage is effective and safe procedure for the treatment of parenchymal fluid collections of the lung in patients unresponsive to the medical treatment

  18. Percutaneous catheter drainage of intrapulmonary fluid collection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, E. D.; Kim, H. J.; Choi, P. Y.; Jung, S. H. [Gyeongsang National University Hospital, Chinju (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-01-15

    With the success of percutaneous abdominal abscess drainage, attention is now being focused on the use of similar techniques in the thorax. We studied to evaluate the effect of percutaneous drainage in parenchymal fluid collections in the lungs. We performed percutaneous drainage of abscesses and other parenchymal fluid collections of the lungs in 15 patients. All of the procedures were performed under the fluoroscopic guidance with an 18-gauge Seldinger needle and coaxial technique with a 8-10F drainage catheter. Among 10 patients with lung abscess, 8 patients improved by percutaneous catheter drainage. In one patient, drainage was failed by the accidental withdrawal of the catheter before complete drainage. One patient died of sepsis 5 hours after the procedure. Among three patients with complicated bulla, successful drainage was done in two patients, but in the remaining patient, the procedure was failed. In one patient with intrapulmonary bronchogenic cyst, the drainage was not successful due to the thick internal contents. In one patient with traumatic hematoma, after the drainage of old blood clots, the signs of infection disappeared. Overally, of 14 patients excluding one who died, 11 patients improved with percutaneous catheter drainage and three patients did not. There were no major complications during and after the procedure. We conclude that percutaneous catheter drainage is effective and safe procedure for the treatment of parenchymal fluid collections of the lung in patients unresponsive to the medical treatment.

  19. Treatment of lung abscess: effectiveness of percutaneous catheter drainage in 14 patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Su Hyun; Han, Young Min; Kim, Chong Soo; Chung, Gyung Ho; Ryu, Chun Su; Sohn, Myung Hee; Choi, Ki Chul [Chonbuk National University Medical School, Cheonju (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-01-15

    To evaluate the effectiveness of percutaneous catheter drainage in treatment of the lung abscess. We treated the lung abscesses in 14 patients (12 mean, 2 women), who did not respond to medical therapy, by percutaneous catheter drainage under fluoroscopic or ultrasound guidance. One abscess due to infacted bulla was managed by combination treatment with alcohol sclerosing therapy. Patients were followed by serial chest radiographs every three days and the amount of drained or aspirated pus evaluated. The treatment effect and recurrence were followed by chest PA and lateral chest at one week after removal of drainage catheter. Thirteen patients (93%) recovered clinically and radiologically within 3 days. In 10 patients, drainage catheter could be removed within 2 weeks, and three patients, the catheter was kept longer. Most complications were mild; vague to moderate chest pain (n = 14), mild hemoptysis (n = 2), and pneumothorax (n = 1). One man who suffered from far advanced pulmonary tuberculosis died of asphyxia caused by massive hemoptysis 16 days after percutaneous drainage. Percutaneous catheter drainage is a safe and effective method for treating lung abscess.

  20. A 10-Fr ultrasound catheter with integrated micromotor for 4-D intracardiac echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Warren; Griffin, Weston; Wildes, Douglas; Buckley, Donald; Topka, Terry; Chodakauskas, Thaddeus; Langer, Mark; Calisti, Serge; Bergstøl, Svein; Malacrida, Jean-Pierre; Lanteri, Frédéric; Maffre, Jennifer; McDaniel, Ben; Shivkumar, Kalyanam; Cummings, Jennifer; Callans, David; Silvestry, Frank; Packer, Douglas

    2011-07-01

    We developed prototype real-time 3-D intracardiac echocardiography catheters with integrated micromotors, allowing internal oscillation of a low-profile 64-element, 6.2-MHz phased-array transducer in the elevation direction. Components were designed to facilitate rotation of the array, including a low-torque flexible transducer interconnect and miniature fixtures for the transducer and micromotor. The catheter tip prototypes were integrated with two-way deflectable 10-Fr catheters and used in in vivo animal testing at multiple facilities. The 4-D ICE catheters were capable of imaging a 90° azimuth by up to 180° elevation field of view. Volume rates ranged from 1 vol/sec (180° elevation) to approximately 10 vol/sec (60° elevation). We successfully imaged electrophysiology catheters, atrial septal puncture procedures, and detailed cardiac anatomy. The elevation oscillation enabled 3-D visualization of devices and anatomy, providing new clinical information and perspective not possible with current 2-D imaging catheters.

  1. Risk Factors Related to Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter Nonselective Removal in Neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaohe Yu

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to investigate the incidence and risk factors associated with nonselective removal of peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC in neonates. In this prospective cohort study, neonates who underwent PICC placement at neonatal intensive care units (NICUs in China from October 2012 to November 2015 were included. The patient demographics, catheter characteristics, catheter duration, PICC insertion site, indication for PICC insertion, infuscate composition, PICC tip location, and catheter complications were recorded in a computerized database. Risk factors for nonselective removal were analyzed. A total of 497 PICCs were placed in 496 neonates. Nonselective removal occurred in 9.3% of PICCs during 10,540 catheter-days (4.6 nonselective removals per 1,000 catheter-days. These included occlusion (3%, infection (1.4%, leakage (2.0%, phlebitis (0.6%, displacement (1%, pleural effusion(0.6%, and breaks (0.6%. Noncentral tip position was independently associated with an increased risk of nonselective removal (odds ratio 2.621; 95% confidence interval, 1.258-5.461 after adjusting for gestational age, sex, birth weight, and PICC dwell time. No significant differences in the rate of complications occurred between silastic and polyurethane PICC or different insertion sites. Noncentral PICC tip position was the only independent risk factor for nonselective removal of PICC.

  2. Determination of lesion size by ultrasound during radiofrequency catheter ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, S; Eick, O

    2003-01-01

    The catheter tip temperature that is used to control the radiofrequency generator output poorly correlates to lesion size. We, therefore, evaluated lesions created in vitro using a B-mode ultrasound imaging device as a potential means to assess lesion generation during RF applications non-invasively. Porcine ventricular tissue was immersed in saline solution at 37 degrees C. The catheter was fixed in a holder and positioned in a parallel orientation to the tissue with an array transducer (7.5 MHz) app. 3 cm above the tissue. Lesions were produced either in a temperature controlled mode with a 4-mm tip catheter with different target temperatures (50, 60, 70 and 80 degrees C, 80 W maximum output) or in a power controlled mode (25, 50 and 75 W, 20 ml/min irrigation flow) using an irrigated tip catheter. Different contact forces (0.5 N, 1.0 N) were tested, and RF was delivered for 60 s. A total of 138 lesions was produced. Out of these, 128 could be identified on the ultrasound image. The lesion depth and volume was on average 4.1 +/- 1.6 mm and 52 +/- 53 mm3 as determined by ultrasound and 3.9 +/- 1.7 mm and 52 +/- 55 mm3 as measured thereafter, respectively. A linear correlation between the lesion size determined by ultrasound and that measured thereafter was demonstrated with a correlation coefficient of r = 0.87 for lesion depth and r = 0.93 for lesion volume. We conclude that lesions can be assessed by B-mode ultrasound imaging.

  3. CT guided transthoracic catheter drainage of intrapulmonary abscess.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yunus, Mahira

    2009-10-01

    To determine the efficacy of CT- guided transthoracic catheter drainage of intrapulmonary abscess considering success rate versus complications. This prospective study was carried out at radiology department of Al-Noor Specialist Hospital, Makkah, Saudi Arabia, from 1.1.2003 to 31.12.2005. Nineteen patients were selected for CT guided percutaneous drainage. Under CT guidance catheter placement was carried out using Seldinger technique. Nineteen patients with lung abscess were selected for the percutaneous CT guided drainage. Eight (42.105%) patients encountered no complications and lung abscess completely resolved with no residual cavity. Five (26.31%) patients developed pneumothorax, which was the most common complication of this study. These patients were kept under observation and followed-up by chest X-rays. Three (15.78%) had mild pneumothorax, which resolved and needed no further management, while two (10.52%) patients developed moderate pneumothorax and chest tube was inserted. Two (10.52%) patients developed mild haemoptysis which resolved within two hours, hence, no further management was required. Two (10.52%) patients had residual cavity and surgery was performed. Congenital cystic adenomatoid malformation (CCAM) was found in both cases. Two patients out of nineteen patients (10.52%) developed bronchopleural fistula and were operated. No mortality occurred during or after the procedure. CT allows optimal placement of catheter and hence enables safe and effective percutaneous evacuation of lung abscess. The morbidity and mortality of patients with percutaneous catheter drainage is lower than with surgical resection. Hence, CT guided drainage should be considered the first therapeutic choice in most patients of lung abscess who do not respond to medical therapy.

  4. Central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections in cancer patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butt, T.; Afzal, R.K.; Ahmad, R.N.; Hussain, I.; Anwar, M.

    2004-01-01

    Objective: To determine the frequency of central venous catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI) in cancer patients and the antimicrobial susceptibility pattern of the isolates. Subjects and Methods: Cancer patients requiring short or long-term central venous catheterization at the time of admission or thereafter were included. Catheter tips on removal were cultured quantitatively; specimens of blood and pus were cultured qualitatively. Isolates were identified and antimicrobial susceptibility testing was performed by standard techniques. Results: Eighty-nine patients were included in the study. The frequency of CR-BSI was 17%. Out of the 19 organisms isolated, 10 (53%) were Gram-positive cocci, 8 (42%) were Gram-negative rods and 1 (5%) was a fungus. Coagulase negative staphylococci (27%) were the predominant pathogens. Among the staphylococci, 46% of the isolates were methicillin-resistant. All Gram-positive isolates were susceptive to glycopeptides. Gram-negative rods were resistant to most of the commonly used antimicrobial groups. Conclusion: Central venous catheter is an important source of bloodstream infections in cancer patients. Most of the infections are caused by Gram-positive cocci. Rigorous infection control measures and continuous surveillance is required to curb the frequency of these infections. (author)

  5. Modeling subsurface contamination at Fernald

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, B.W.; Flinn, J.C.; Ruwe, P.R.

    1994-01-01

    The Department of Energy's Fernald site is located about 20 miles northwest of Cincinnati. Fernald produced refined uranium metal products from ores between 1953 and 1989. The pure uranium was sent to other DOE sites in South Carolina, Tennessee, Colorado,and Washington in support of the nation's strategic defense programs. Over the years of large-scale uranium production, contamination of the site's soil and groundwater occurred.The contamination is of particular concern because the Fernald site is located over the Great Miami Aquifer, a designated sole-source drinking water aquifer. Contamination of the aquifer with uranium was found beneath the site, and migration of the contamination had occurred well beyond the site's southern boundary. As a result, Fernald was placed on the National Priorities (CERCLA/Superfund) List in 1989. Uranium production at the site ended in 1989,and Fernald's mission has been changed to one of environmental restoration. This paper presents information about computerized modeling of subsurface contamination used for the environmental restoration project at Fernald

  6. Emergency Department Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection Prevention: Multisite Qualitative Study of Perceived Risks and Implemented Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Eileen J; Pallin, Daniel J; Mandel, Leslie; Sinnette, Corine; Schuur, Jeremiah D

    2016-02-01

    Existing knowledge of emergency department (ED) catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) prevention is limited. We aimed to describe the motivations, perceived risks for CAUTI acquisition, and strategies used to address CAUTI risk among EDs that had existing CAUTI prevention programs. In this qualitative comparative case study, we enrolled early-adopting EDs, that is, those using criteria for urinary catheter placement and tracking the frequency of catheters placed in the ED. At 6 diverse facilities, we conducted 52 semistructured interviews and 9 focus groups with hospital and ED participants. All ED CAUTI programs originated from a hospitalwide focus on CAUTI prevention. Staff were motivated to address CAUTI because they believed program compliance improved patient care. ED CAUTI prevention was perceived to differ from CAUTI prevention in the inpatient setting. To identify areas of ED CAUTI prevention focus, programs examined ED workflow and identified 4 CAUTI risks: (1) inappropriate reasons for urinary catheter placement; (2) physicians' limited involvement in placement decisions; (3) patterns of urinary catheter overuse; and (4) poor insertion technique. Programs redesigned workflow to address risks by (1) requiring staff to specify the medical reason for catheter at the point of order entry and placement; (2) making physicians responsible for determining catheter use; (3) using catheter alternatives to address patterns of overuse; and (4) modifying urinary catheter insertion practices to ensure proper placement. Early-adopting EDs redesigned workflow to minimize catheter use and ensure proper insertion technique. Assessment of ED workflow is necessary to identify and modify local practices that may increase CAUTI risk.

  7. Evaluation of electrical nerve stimulation for epidural catheter positioning in the dog.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Pereira, Fernando L; Sanders, Robert; Shih, Andre C; Sonea, Ioana M; Hauptman, Joseph G

    2013-09-01

    To evaluate the accuracy of epidural catheter placement at different levels of the spinal cord guided solely by electrical nerve stimulation and resultant segmental muscle contraction. Prospective, experiment. Six male and two female Beagles, age (1 ± 0.17 years) and weight (12.9 ± 1.1 kg). Animals were anesthetized with propofol and maintained with isoflurane. An insulated epidural needle was used to reach the lumbosacral epidural space. A Tsui epidural catheter was inserted and connected to a nerve stimulator (1.0 mA, 0.1 ms, 2 Hz) to assess positioning of the tip at specific spinal cord segments. The catheter was advanced to three different levels of the spinal cord: lumbar (L2-L5), thoracic (T5-T10) and cervical (C4-C6). Subcutaneous needles were previously placed at these spinal levels and the catheter was advanced to match the needle location, guided only by corresponding muscle contractions. Catheter position was verified by fluoroscopy. If catheter tip and needle were at the same vertebral body a score of zero was assigned. When catheter tip was cranial or caudal to the needle, positive or negative numbers, respectively, corresponding to the number of vertebrae between them, were assigned. The mean and standard deviation of the number of vertebrae between catheter tip and needle were calculated to assess accuracy. Results are given as mean ± SD. The catheter position in relation to the needle was within 0.3 ± 2.0 vertebral bodies. Positive predictive values (PPV) were 57%, 83% and 71% for lumbar, thoracic and cervical regions respectively. Overall PPV was 70%. No significant difference in PPV among regions was found. Placement of an epidural catheter at specific spinal levels using electrical nerve stimulation was feasible without radiographic assistance in dogs. Two vertebral bodies difference from the target site may be clinically acceptable when performing segmental epidural regional anesthesia. © 2013 Association of Veterinary

  8. Three-dimensional rotational angiography of the left atrium and the oesophagus: the short-term mobility of the oesophagus and the stability of the fused three-dimensional model of the left atrium and the oesophagus during catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starek, Zdenek; Lehar, Frantisek; Jez, Jiri; Scurek, Martin; Wolf, Jiri; Kulik, Tomas; Zbankova, Alena; Novak, Miroslav

    2017-08-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the mobility of the oesophagus and the stability of the three-dimensional (3D) model of the oesophagus using 3D rotational angiography (3DRA) of the left atrium (LA) and the oesophagus, fused with live fluoroscopy during catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation. From March 2015 to September 2015, 3DRA of the LA and the oesophagus was performed in 33 patients before catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation. Control contrast oesophagography was performed every 30 min. The positions of the oesophagograms and the 3D model of the LA and the oesophagus were repeatedly measured and compared with the spine. The average shift of the oesophagus ranged from 2.7 ± 2.2 to 5.0 ± 3.5 mm. The average real-time oesophageal shift ranged from 2.7 ± 2.2 to 3.8 ± 3.4 mm. No significant shift was detected until the 90th minute of the procedure. The average shift of the 3D model of the LA and the oesophagus ranged from 1.4 ± 1.8 to 3.3 ± 3.0 mm (right-left direction) and from 0.9 ± 1.2 to 2.2 ± 1.3 mm (craniocaudal direction). During the 2 h procedure, there were no significant shifts of the model. During catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation, there is no significant change in the position of the oesophagus until the 90th minute of the procedure and no significant shift in the 3D model of the LA and the oesophagus. The 3D model of the oesophagus reliably depicts the position of the oesophagus during the entire procedure. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2016. For permissions please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  9. Mechanism of prostatic urethroplasty with balloon catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Castaneda, F.; Maynar, M.; Hulbert, J.

    1988-01-01

    A series of 60 patients have undergone prostatic urethroplasty with balloon catheters at our institution. The follow-up of these patients has ranged from more than 3 years to not less than 6 months. The preliminary results have been excellent, with a success rate of 75% in patients with predominant lateral lobe hypertrophy. This success rate drops to 25% in patients with predominant middle lobe hypertrophy. In previous communications the authors have proposed that the mechanism of prostatic urethral relief of obstruction is due to stretching of the prostatic capsule, tissue compression, and possible subsequent atrophy, as suggested by findings of transrectal US, MR imaging, voiding and retrograde urethrography, and urinary flow studies. Recent clinical information that has led to further animal research has shown that in addition to the previously supposed mechanism of action, separation of the prostatic lobes occurs by splitting of the anterior and posterior commissures of the prostatic gland tissue. This separation of the prostatic lobes is therefore the goal of the procedure. As more experience is gained, the already high success rate can probably be improved

  10. Impact of short-term hemodialysis catheters on the central veins: a catheter venographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguzkurt, Levent E-mail: loguzkurt@yahoo.com; Tercan, Fahri; Torun, Dilek; Yildirim, Tuelin; Zuemruetdal, Ayseguel; Kizilkilic, Osman

    2004-12-01

    Objective: To determine the incidence of pericatheter sleeve formation, thrombus formation, and stenosis of the central veins in hemodialysis patients with temporary catheters. Methods and material: In this prospective study, 57 patients (40 males, 17 females) with temporary dialysis catheters had catheter venography by pulling back the catheter just before removal. Patient's age range was 25-87 years (mean age, 51 years). The venographic studies were evaluated for pericatheter sleeve formation, thrombus formation, and stenosis of the brachiocephalic vein (BCV) and the superior vena cava (SVC). The IJV could only be evaluated if there was adequate filling during contrast administration. In a subgroup of patients who had had only right IJV or only right SCV catheters, impact of these catheters on the central veins was compared. Results: The catheter location was right internal jugular vein (IJV) in 26 cases, right subclavian vein (SCV) in 27 cases, left IJV in 1 case, and left SCV in 3 cases. Thirty-two patients (56%) had had only one temporary catheter and the rest had had more than one inserted. The mean dwell time for the catheters was 21 days (range 7-59 days). A pericatheter sleeve was detected on venography in 32 (56%) patients and thrombus formation was noted in 16 patients (28%). A total of 41 patients (72%) exhibited pericatheter sleeve and/or thrombus formation. While 19 of the 32 patients (59%) without previous catheterization had a sleeve around the catheter, only 13 (52%) of 25 patients who had had multiple catheters inserted had a sleeve (P>0.05). Of the eight patients (14%) with BCV stenosis, two had >50% stenosis. Only one patient (2%) had mild stenosis of the SVC. Three patients out of 15 (20%) who had diagnostic venography for the IJV had severe stenosis of the vein. Pericatheter sleeve formation was more frequent in women (P<0.05). However, there were no statistical differences with respect to pericatheter sleeve formation, luminal filling

  11. Balloon-tipped flow-directed catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ganz, P.; Swan, H.J.C.; Ganz, W.

    1986-01-01

    Diagnostic catheterization of the right side of the heart with semirigid cardiac catheters requires fluoroscopic guidance and substantial skill. Abnormal positions of the heart chambers and of the great vessels associated with cardiac dilatation or with congenital malformation present difficulties even to experienced laboratory cardiologists. These problems have been largely overcome by the introduction of balloon tipped flow directed catheters, which allow for rapid and relatively safe catheterization of the pulmonary artery without fluoroscopy. It was through the application of these catheters in the intensive care unit that the many pitfalls in the clinical assessment of hemodynamic disturbances became apparent. Although S3 gallop sounds may be useful in the clinical recognition of chronic ventricular failure, their presence or absence has limited predictive value in estimating left ventricular filling pressure in myocardial infarction. Information derived from right heart catheterization is often pivotal in the evaluation of hemodynamic disorders, in directing treatment, and in monitoring the results of therapy in critically ill patients

  12. Vessel bifurcation localization based on intraoperative three-dimensional ultrasound and catheter path for image-guided catheter intervention of oral cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Kuan; Ohya, Takashi; Liao, Hongen; Kobayashi, Etsuko; Sakuma, Ichiro

    2013-03-01

    We present a method to localize intraoperative target vessel bifurcations under bones for ultrasound (US) image-guided catheter interventions. A catheter path is recorded to acquire skeletons for the target vessel bifurcations that cannot be imaged by intraoperative US. The catheter path is combined with the centerlines of the three-dimensional (3D) US image to construct a preliminary skeleton. Based on the preliminary skeleton, the orientations of target vessels are determined by registration with the preoperative image and the bifurcations were localized by computing the vessel length. An accurate intraoperative vessel skeleton is obtained for correcting the preoperative image to compensate for vessel deformation. A reality check of the proposed method was performed in a phantom experiment. Reasonable results were obtained. The in vivo experiment verified the clinical workflow of the proposed method in an in vivo environment. The accuracy of the centerline length of the vessel for localizing the target artery bifurcation was 2.4mm. These results suggest that the proposed method can allow the catheter tip to stop at the target artery bifurcations and enter into the target arteries. This method can be applied for virtual reality-enhanced image-guided catheter intervention of oral cancers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Microbiocidal effects of various taurolidine containing catheter lock solutions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Olthof, E.D.; Nijland, R van; Gulich, A.F.; Wanten, G.J.A.

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND & AIMS: We have recently shown that a catheter lock solution containing taurolidine dramatically decreases catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in patients on home parenteral nutrition (HPN) when compared to heparin. Since several taurolidine formulations are commercially

  14. Vascular access in neonatology: peripherally inserted central catheter and peripheral venous catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Lienemann

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to present aspects of peripherally inserted central catheter and peripheral venous catheter, highlighting important points in choosing the type of access. For the passage of peripherally inserted central catheter is previously performing specific course necessary, while the primary indication occurs when it is necessary to access the patient's stay for a long period of time. Whereas peripheral venipuncture is the most appropriate in cases of needing an IV line quickly and safely, for the administration of fluids, blood collection, blood transfusion and other.

  15. Catheter Occlusion in Home Infusion: The Influence of Needleless Connector Design on Central Catheter Occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Ann

    Thrombotic catheter occlusion is a common complication associated with central venous catheters (CVCs). A wide variety of needleless connectors that differ greatly in design and function are available for use with CVCs; however, there are a limited number of studies comparing the catheter occlusion rate associated with differently designed needleless connectors. This retrospective observational study compared occlusion rates associated with a split-septum neutral-displacement needleless connector versus those of a solid-surface neutral-reflux needleless connector in patients undergoing home infusion therapy. The neutral-reflux needleless connector was associated with a significant reduction in occlusion rate and thrombolytic use versus the neutral-displacement needleless connector.

  16. A Fast pH-Switchable and Self-Healing Supramolecular Hydrogel Carrier for Guided, Local Catheter Injection in the Infarcted Myocardium

    OpenAIRE

    Bastings, Maartje M. C.; Koudstaal, Stefan; Kieltyka, Roxanne E.; Nakano, Yoko; Pape, A. C. H.; Feyen, Dries A. M.; van Slochteren, Frebus J.; Doevendans, Pieter A.; Sluijter, Joost P. G.; Meijer, E. W.; Chamuleau, Steven A. J.; Dankers, Patricia Y. W.

    2014-01-01

    Minimally invasive intervention strategies after myocardial infarction use state-of-the-art catheter systems that are able to combine mapping of the infarcted area with precise, local injection of drugs. To this end, catheter delivery of drugs that are not immediately pumped out of the heart is still challenging, and requires a carrier matrix that in the solution state can be injected through a long catheter, and instantaneously gelates at the site of injection. To address this unmet need, a ...

  17. Cost-effectiveness of indwelling pleural catheter compared with talc in malignant pleural effusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olfert, Jordan A P; Penz, Erika D; Manns, Braden J; Mishra, Eleanor K; Davies, Helen E; Miller, Robert F; Luengo-Fernandez, Ramon; Gao, Song; Rahman, Najib M

    2017-05-01

    Malignant pleural effusion is associated with morbidity and mortality. A randomized controlled trial previously compared clinical outcomes and resource use with indwelling pleural catheter (IPC) and talc pleurodesis in this population. Using unpublished quality of life data, we estimate the cost-effectiveness of IPC compared with talc pleurodesis. Healthcare utilization and costs were captured during the trial. Utility weights produced by the EuroQol Group five-dimensional three-level questionnaire and survival were used to determine quality-adjusted life-years (QALYs) gained. The incremental cost-effectiveness ratio (ICER) was calculated over the 1-year trial period. Sensitivity analysis used patient survival data and modelled additional nursing time required per week for catheter drainage. Utility scores, cost and QALYs gained did not differ significantly between groups. The ICER for IPC compared with talc was favorable at $US10 870 per QALY gained. IPC was less costly with a probability exceeding 95% of being cost-effective when survival was pleural effusion in patients without history of prior pleurodesis, with consideration for patient survival, support and preferences. © 2016 The Authors. Respirology published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Asian Pacific Society of Respirology.

  18. Evaluation of mupirocin ointment in control of central venous catheter related infections: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezaei J

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1":*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Central venous catheter (CVC related infections are important complications of cathter application. This study assessed the usefulness of mupirocin in prevention and control of these infections."n"nMethods: In this randomized clinical trial, consecutive surgical patients requiring central venous catheter (for more than 2 days in Amir-Alam Hospital from 2006-2008 were enrolled. Patients were divided in two groups; in "case group" patients received topical mupirocin 2% every 48 hours at the time of insertion of catheter and dressing change and for "control group" mupirocin was not used. All of the patients received chlorhexidine and enoxoparin as complementary treatments. Two groups were comparable in regard of age, sex and risk factors."n"nResults: One hundred eighteen patients enrolled in the study (57 in case and 61 in control group completed the study. 84 catheters in case group and 88 catheters in control group were inserted. The catheters in 90% of patients were inserted in jugular vein. At the end of study 29(16.8% patients (16 in control versus 13 in case group had catheter colonization (p=NS. Catheter related bloodstream infection was observed in 16(9.3% patients (6 in

  19. Urinary catheterization diary – A useful tool in tracking causes of non-deflating Foley catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C.O. Okorie

    2015-06-01

    Conclusions: Most urinary catheters marketed in developing countries are unidentifiable after unpacking. A catheterization diary is a useful tool for solving catheter-related problems, and its application in health-care facilities should be encouraged. Companies marketing Foley catheters should print the catheter name on both the catheter packaging and on the catheter itself.

  20. A Simple Radiological Technique for Demonstration of Incorrect Positioning of a Foley Catheter with Balloon Inflated in the Urethra of a Male Spinal Cord Injury Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Vaidyanathan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In a male patient with cervical spinal cord injury, the urinary bladder may go into spasm when a urethral catheter is removed and a new Foley catheter is inserted. Before the balloon is inflated, the spastic bladder may push the Foley catheter out or the catheter may slip out of a small-capacity bladder. An inexperienced health professional may inflate the balloon of a Foley catheter in the urethra without realizing that the balloon segment of the catheter is lying in the urethra instead of the urinary bladder. When a Foley balloon is inflated in the urethra, a tetraplegic patient is likely to develop autonomic dysreflexia. This is a medical emergency and requires urgent treatment. Before the incorrectly placed Foley catheter is removed, it is important to document whether the balloon has been inflated in the urinary bladder or not. The clinician should first use the always available tools of observation and palpation at the bedside without delays of transportation. A misplaced balloon will often be evident by a long catheter sign, indicating excessive catheter remaining outside the patient. Radiological diagnosis is not frequently required and, when needed, should employ the technique most readily available, which might be a body and pelvic CT without intravenous contrast. An alternative radiological technique to demonstrate the position of the balloon of the Foley catheter is described. Three milliliters of nonionic X-ray contrast medium, Ioversol (OPTIRAY 300, is injected through the side channel of the Foley catheter, which is used for inflating the balloon. Then, with a catheter-tip syringe, 30 ml of sterile Ioversol is injected through the main lumen of the Foley catheter. Immediately thereafter, an X-ray of the pelvis (including perineum is taken. By this technique, both the urinary bladder and balloon of the Foley catheter are visualized by the X-ray contrast medium. When a Foley catheter has been inserted correctly, the balloon of the

  1. Magnetic resonance imaging guided transatrial electrophysiological studies in swine using active catheter tracking - experience with 14 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grothoff, Matthias; Gutberlet, Matthias [University of Leipzig - Heart Center, Department of Radiology, Leipzig (Germany); Hindricks, Gerhard; Sommer, Philipp; Hilbert, Sebastian [University of Leipzig - Heart Center, Department of Electrophysiology, Leipzig (Germany); Fleiter, Christian [Helios Klinikum Berlin-Buch, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Berlin (Germany); Schnackenburg, Bernhard [Philips Healthcare, Hamburg (Germany); Weiss, Steffen; Krueger, Sascha [Philips Innovative Technologies, Hamburg (Germany); Piorkowski, Christopher; Gaspar, Thomas [University of Dresden - Heart Center, Department of Electrophysiology, Dresden (Germany); Wedan, Steve; Lloyd, Thomas [Imricor Medical Systems, Burnsville, MN (United States)

    2017-05-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of performing comprehensive Cardiac Magnetic resonance (CMR) guided electrophysiological (EP) interventions in a porcine model encompassing left atrial access. After introduction of two femoral sheaths 14 swine (41 ± 3.6 kg) were transferred to a 1.5 T MR scanner. A three-dimensional whole-heart sequence was acquired followed by segmentation and the visualization of all heart chambers using an image-guidance platform. Two MR conditional catheters were inserted. The interventional protocol consisted of intubation of the coronary sinus, activation mapping, transseptal left atrial access (n = 4), generation of ablation lesions and eventually ablation of the atrioventricular (AV) node. For visualization of the catheter tip active tracking was used. Catheter positions were confirmed by passive real-time imaging. Total procedure time was 169 ± 51 minutes. The protocol could be completed in 12 swine. Two swine died from AV-ablation induced ventricular fibrillation. Catheters could be visualized and navigated under active tracking almost exclusively. The position of the catheter tips as visualized by active tracking could reliably be confirmed with passive catheter imaging. Comprehensive CMR-guided EP interventions including left atrial access are feasible in swine using active catheter tracking. (orig.)

  2. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to inject...

  3. 21 CFR 876.5030 - Continent ileostomy catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Continent ileostomy catheter. 876.5030 Section 876...) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5030 Continent ileostomy catheter. (a) Identification. A continent ileostomy catheter is a flexible tubular device used as a form...

  4. Management of Non- Deflating Foley Suprapubic Catheters - A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The procedure described uses a 10 ml syringe and needle passed through the lumen of the catheter to puncture the inner surface of the catheter balloon and thus deflate it. Because the catheter balloon does not burst in this procedure there is no risk of balloon fragmentation or subsequent stone formation. The technique is ...

  5. FAQs about Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... do so. o Avoid disconnecting the catheter and drain tube. This helps to pre - vent germs from getting into the catheter tube. o The catheter is secured to the leg to prevent pulling on the ... regularly. The drainage spout should not touch any - thing while emptying ...

  6. Umbilical venous catheter malposition and errors in interpretation in newborns with Bochdalek hernia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chang, Patricia T.; Taylor, George A.

    2015-01-01

    Neonates with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) often require placement of lines and tubes for supportive therapy. The resulting altered anatomy can result in diagnostic errors when interpreting the location of support lines and tubes such as UVCs (umbilical venous catheters). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of CDH on UVC position and to evaluate the accuracy at which radiologists describe the position on chest radiographs. During a 5-year period, 406 chest radiographs performed within 7 days of birth in infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia were identified and reviewed for the following data: presence of UVC, location of catheter tip (cavoatrial junction, intracardiac, intrahepatic or umbilical vein), and location of CDH (right or left). The radiologic report of the UVC tip location for each case was then reviewed individually to determine the adequacy of interpretation. Inadequate reports were classified as incorrect (the wrong location of the catheter tip was reported), no mention (the location of the catheter tip was in a suboptimal location but not mentioned), and not specified (the precise location of the catheter tip was not clearly stated in the report when the tip was in a suboptimal location). A total of 60 infants were identified as having CDH (56 on the left, 4 on the right). The most common location for an incorrectly placed UVC was the contralateral chest, accounting for 26.7% (16/60) of the infants, followed by an abdominal intrahepatic location (16.7%) and the umbilical vein (8.3%). Thirty percent (120/406) of the chest radiograph reports were found to be inadequate regarding the interpretation of the location of the catheter tip. The majority of the inadequate reports (48/406, 11.8%) did not specify when the catheter tip was in a suboptimal location. In 37 reports (9.1%), the location of the catheter tip was reported incorrectly, and no mention of the catheter location was made in 35 reports (8.6%). The location of

  7. Umbilical venous catheter malposition and errors in interpretation in newborns with Bochdalek hernia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Patricia T.; Taylor, George A. [Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Neonates with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) often require placement of lines and tubes for supportive therapy. The resulting altered anatomy can result in diagnostic errors when interpreting the location of support lines and tubes such as UVCs (umbilical venous catheters). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of CDH on UVC position and to evaluate the accuracy at which radiologists describe the position on chest radiographs. During a 5-year period, 406 chest radiographs performed within 7 days of birth in infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia were identified and reviewed for the following data: presence of UVC, location of catheter tip (cavoatrial junction, intracardiac, intrahepatic or umbilical vein), and location of CDH (right or left). The radiologic report of the UVC tip location for each case was then reviewed individually to determine the adequacy of interpretation. Inadequate reports were classified as incorrect (the wrong location of the catheter tip was reported), no mention (the location of the catheter tip was in a suboptimal location but not mentioned), and not specified (the precise location of the catheter tip was not clearly stated in the report when the tip was in a suboptimal location). A total of 60 infants were identified as having CDH (56 on the left, 4 on the right). The most common location for an incorrectly placed UVC was the contralateral chest, accounting for 26.7% (16/60) of the infants, followed by an abdominal intrahepatic location (16.7%) and the umbilical vein (8.3%). Thirty percent (120/406) of the chest radiograph reports were found to be inadequate regarding the interpretation of the location of the catheter tip. The majority of the inadequate reports (48/406, 11.8%) did not specify when the catheter tip was in a suboptimal location. In 37 reports (9.1%), the location of the catheter tip was reported incorrectly, and no mention of the catheter location was made in 35 reports (8.6%). The location of

  8. Catheter Removal versus Retention in the Management of Catheter-Associated Enterococcal Bloodstream Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Marschall

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enterococci are an important cause of central venous catheter (CVC-associated bloodstream infections (CA-BSI. It is unclear whether CVC removal is necessary to successfully manage enterococcal CA-BSI.

  9. Robustness of IPSA optimized high-dose-rate prostate brachytherapy treatment plans to catheter displacements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poder, Joel; Whitaker, May

    2016-06-01

    Inverse planning simulated annealing (IPSA) optimized brachytherapy treatment plans are characterized with large isolated dwell times at the first or last dwell position of each catheter. The potential of catheter shifts relative to the target and organs at risk in these plans may lead to a more significant change in delivered dose to the volumes of interest relative to plans with more uniform dwell times. This study aims to determine if the Nucletron Oncentra dwell time deviation constraint (DTDC) parameter can be optimized to improve the robustness of high-dose-rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy plans to catheter displacements. A set of 10 clinically acceptable prostate plans were re-optimized with a DTDC parameter of 0 and 0.4. For each plan, catheter displacements of 3, 7, and 14 mm were retrospectively applied and the change in dose volume histogram (DVH) indices and conformity indices analyzed. The robustness of clinically acceptable prostate plans to catheter displacements in the caudal direction was found to be dependent on the DTDC parameter. A DTDC value of 0 improves the robustness of planning target volume (PTV) coverage to catheter displacements, whereas a DTDC value of 0.4 improves the robustness of the plans to changes in hotspots. The results indicate that if used in conjunction with a pre-treatment catheter displacement correction protocol and a tolerance of 3 mm, a DTDC value of 0.4 may produce clinically superior plans. However, the effect of the DTDC parameter in plan robustness was not observed to be as strong as initially suspected.

  10. Postprocedural Aspiration Test to Predict Adequacy of Dialysis Following Tunneled Catheter Placement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, Jason C.; Sullivan, Kevin L.; Michael, Beckie

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the study was to determine if a timed aspiration technique with a 20-ml syringe can be used to predict adequacy of blood flow in tunneled dialysis catheters. Sixteen patients referred for de novo placement or manipulation of failing tunneled hemodialysis catheters had the time it takes to fill a 20-ml syringe with the plunger fully withdrawn measured to the nearest tenth of a second. These measurements were correlated with flow rates recorded in dialysis just prior to (if failed catheter) and in the following dialysis session with adequacy determined as at least 300 ml/min. Syringe-filling time (22 catheters in 16 patients) was plotted against adequacy of dialysis. The mean time to fill a 20-ml syringe was 2.2 sec, with a range of 1.0-4.7 sec. The mean time to fill syringes for catheters with adequate dialysis was 1.7 ± 0.5 sec, and for inadequate catheters, it was 2.8 ± 0.8 sec. These differences are statistically significant (p < 0.001). Using a filling time of greater than or equal to 2 sec as a threshold gives the highest sensitivity (100%) for predicting inadequate dialysis while maintaining high specificity (75%). To achieve a specificity of 100%, a 3-sec cutoff would be necessary, but would lead to a sensitivity of only 20%. A simple and objective aspiration technique can be performed at the time of tunneled dialysis catheter placement/manipulation to reasonably predict adequacy of subsequent dialysis

  11. Randomized clinical trial of pigtail catheter versus chest tube in injured patients with uncomplicated traumatic pneumothorax.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulvatunyou, N; Erickson, L; Vijayasekaran, A; Gries, L; Joseph, B; Friese, R F; O'Keeffe, T; Tang, A L; Wynne, J L; Rhee, P

    2014-01-01

    Small pigtail catheters appear to work as well as the traditional large-bore chest tubes in patients with traumatic pneumothorax, but it is not known whether the smaller pigtail catheters are associated with less tube-site pain. This study was conducted to compare tube-site pain following pigtail catheter or chest tube insertion in patients with uncomplicated traumatic pneumothorax. This prospective randomized trial compared 14-Fr pigtail catheters and 28-Fr chest tubes in patients with traumatic pneumothorax presenting to a level I trauma centre from July 2010 to February 2012. Patients who required emergency tube placement, those who refused and those who could not respond to pain assessment were excluded. Primary outcomes were tube-site pain, as assessed by a numerical rating scale, and total pain medication use. Secondary outcomes included the success rate of pneumothorax resolution and insertion-related complications. Forty patients were enrolled. Baseline characteristics of 20 patients in the pigtail catheter group were similar to those of 20 patients in the chest tube group. No patient had a flail chest or haemothorax. Pain scores related to chest wall trauma were similar in the two groups. Patients with a pigtail catheter had significantly lower mean(s.d.) tube-site pain scores than those with a chest tube, at baseline after tube insertion (3.2(0.6) versus 7.7(0.6); P pneumothorax, use of a 14-Fr pigtail catheter is associated with reduced pain at the site of insertion, with no other clinically important differences noted compared with chest tubes. NCT01537289 (http://clinicaltrials.gov). © 2013 BJS Society Ltd. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. A catheter friction tester using balance sensor: Combined evaluation of the effects of mechanical properties of tubing materials and surface coatings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Røn, Troels; Jacobsen, Kristina Pilgaard; Lee, Seunghwan

    2018-01-01

    of comparable diameter with catheters as urethra model, sliding contacts during the translation of catheters along the duct is generated. A most unique design and operation feature of this setup is that a digital balance was employed as the sensor to detect emerging forces from simulated catherization. Moreover...

  13. Successful management with glue injection of arterial rupture seen during embolization of an arteriovenous malformation using a flow-directed catheter: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hong, Jong Won; Baik, Seung Kug; Shin, Mi Jung; Choi, Han Yong; Kim, Bong Gi [Wallace Memorial Baptist Hospital, Pusan (Korea, Republic of)

    2000-12-01

    We present a case in which an arterial rupture occurring during embolization of an arteriovenous malformation of the left occipital lobe with a flow-directed micro-catheter, was successfully sealed with a small amount of glue. We navigated a 1.8-Fr Magic catheter through the posterior cerebral artery, and during superselective test injection, extravasation was observed at the parieto-occipital branch. The catheter was not removed and the perforation site was successfully sealed with a small amount of glue injected through the same catheter. Prompt recognition and closure of the perforation site is essential for good prognosis. (author)

  14. OCCASIONAL REVIEW 'Map and zap' - electrode catheter ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Where does this leave surgical treatment of WPW syndrome? Despite the high success rates reported, ·it is acknowledged that not all patients can be successfully treated by catheter ablation. The treatment of those with multiple accessory pathways and associated defects such as Ebstein's anomaly of the tricuspid valve is ...

  15. Thoracoscopic retrieval of a fractured thoracentesis catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrink, M H; McAllister, E W

    1994-08-01

    With the resurgence of laparoscopic surgical procedures, thorascopic procedures have followed close behind. Many procedures which in the past have required formal thoracotomy may now be performed via less invasive methods. Presented herein is a report and description of thoracoscopic retrieval of a fractured thoracentesis catheter.

  16. WE-G-17A-05: Real-Time Catheter Localization Using An Active MR Tracker for Interstitial Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W; Damato, A; Viswanathan, A; Cormack, R [Dana Farber Cancer Institute / Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Penzkofer, T; Schmidt, E [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Pan, L; Gilson, W [Siemens Corporation, Corporate Technology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Seethamraju, R [Siemens Healthcare, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a novel active MR-tracking system which can provide accurate and rapid localization of brachytherapy catheters, and assess its reliability and spatial accuracy in comparison to standard catheter digitization using MR images. Methods: An active MR tracker for brachytherapy was constructed by adding three printed-circuit micro-coils to the shaft of a commercial metallic stylet. A gel phantom with an embedded framework was built, into which fifteen 14-Gauge catheters were placed, following either with parallel or crossed paths. The tracker was inserted sequentially into each catheter, with MR-tracking running continuously. Tracking was also performed during the tracker's removal from each catheter. Catheter trajectories measured from the insertion and the removal procedures using the same micro-coil were compared, as well as trajectories obtained using different micro-coils. A 3D high-resolution MR image dataset of the phantom was acquired and imported into a treatment planning system (TPS) for catheter digitization. A comparison between MR-tracked positions and positions digitized from MR images by TPS was performed. Results: The MR tracking shows good consistency for varying catheter paths and for all micro-coils (mean difference ∼1.1 mm). The average distance between the MR-tracking trajectory and catheter digitization from the MR images was 1.1 mm. Ambiguity in catheter assignment from images due to crossed paths was resolved by active tracking. When tracking was interleaved with imaging, real-time images were continuously acquired at the instantaneous tip positions and displayed on an external workstation. Conclusion: The active MR tracker may be used to provide an independent measurement of catheter location in the MR environment, potentially eliminating the need for subsequent CT. It may also be used to control realtime imaging of catheter placement. This will enable MR-based brachytherapy planning of interstitial implants without

  17. WE-G-17A-05: Real-Time Catheter Localization Using An Active MR Tracker for Interstitial Brachytherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, W; Damato, A; Viswanathan, A; Cormack, R; Penzkofer, T; Schmidt, E; Pan, L; Gilson, W; Seethamraju, R

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To develop a novel active MR-tracking system which can provide accurate and rapid localization of brachytherapy catheters, and assess its reliability and spatial accuracy in comparison to standard catheter digitization using MR images. Methods: An active MR tracker for brachytherapy was constructed by adding three printed-circuit micro-coils to the shaft of a commercial metallic stylet. A gel phantom with an embedded framework was built, into which fifteen 14-Gauge catheters were placed, following either with parallel or crossed paths. The tracker was inserted sequentially into each catheter, with MR-tracking running continuously. Tracking was also performed during the tracker's removal from each catheter. Catheter trajectories measured from the insertion and the removal procedures using the same micro-coil were compared, as well as trajectories obtained using different micro-coils. A 3D high-resolution MR image dataset of the phantom was acquired and imported into a treatment planning system (TPS) for catheter digitization. A comparison between MR-tracked positions and positions digitized from MR images by TPS was performed. Results: The MR tracking shows good consistency for varying catheter paths and for all micro-coils (mean difference ∼1.1 mm). The average distance between the MR-tracking trajectory and catheter digitization from the MR images was 1.1 mm. Ambiguity in catheter assignment from images due to crossed paths was resolved by active tracking. When tracking was interleaved with imaging, real-time images were continuously acquired at the instantaneous tip positions and displayed on an external workstation. Conclusion: The active MR tracker may be used to provide an independent measurement of catheter location in the MR environment, potentially eliminating the need for subsequent CT. It may also be used to control realtime imaging of catheter placement. This will enable MR-based brachytherapy planning of interstitial implants without

  18. Urethral catheters: can we reduce use?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    van den Akker-van Marle M Elske

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Indwelling urinary catheters are the main cause of healthcare-associated urinary tract infections. It can be expected that reduction of the use of urinary catheters will lead to decreased numbers of urinary tract infection. Methods The efficacy of an intervention programme to improve adherence to recommendations to reduce the use of urethral catheters was studied in a before-after comparison in ten Dutch hospitals. The programme detected barriers and facilitators and each individual facility was supported with developing their own intervention strategy. Outcome was evaluated by the prevalence of catheters, alternatives such as diapers, numbers of urinary tract infections, the percentage of correct indications and the duration of catheterization. The costs of the implementation as well as the catheterization were evaluated. Results Of a population of 16,495 hospitalized patients 3335 patients of whom 2943 were evaluable for the study, had a urethral catheter. The prevalence of urethral catheters decreased insignificantly in neurology (OR 0.93; 95% CI 0.77 - 1.13 and internal medicine wards (OR 0.97; 95% CI 0.83 - 1.13, decreased significantly in surgical wards (OR 0.84; 95% CI 0.75 - 0.96, but increased significantly in intensive care (IC and coronary care (CC units (OR 1.48; 95% CI 1.01 - 2.17. The use of alternatives was limited and remained so after the intervention. Duration of catheterization decreased insignificantly in IC/CC units (ratio after/before 0.95; 95% CI 0.78 - 1.16 and neurology (ratio 0.97; 95% CI 0.80 - 1.18 and significantly in internal medicine (ratio 0.81; 95% CI 0.69 - 0.96 and surgery wards (ratio 0.80; 95% CI 0.71 - 0.90. The percentage of correct indications on the day of inclusion increased from 50 to 67% (p Conclusion Targeted implementation of recommendations from an existing guideline can lead to better adherence and cost savings. Especially, hospitals which use a lot of urethral catheters or

  19. Repositioning of malpositioned or flipped central venous catheters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thalhammer, A.; Jacobi, V.; Balzer, J.; Vogl, T.J. [Institute for Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Central Radiology Clinic, J.W. Goethe University, Frankfurt am Main (Germany)

    2002-03-01

    Primary misplaced or secondary flipped implanted catheters are located mostly in the right jugular vein. We demonstrate an effective method to replace fix implanted catheters such as Ports, Grochomg or Hickman catheters. Using a femoral venous approach, replacement into the superior vena cava can easily be done with a Sidewinder 1 catheter which is hooked over the misplaced central venous approach. In all our patients the method was successful. The repositioning technique described is simple, fast and has low costs. We can keep sterile conditions and do not need to solve the catheters' fixation. (orig.)

  20. Detection of electrophysiology catheters in noisy fluoroscopy images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franken, Erik; Rongen, Peter; van Almsick, Markus; ter Haar Romeny, Bart

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac catheter ablation is a minimally invasive medical procedure to treat patients with heart rhythm disorders. It is useful to know the positions of the catheters and electrodes during the intervention, e.g. for the automatization of cardiac mapping. Our goal is therefore to develop a robust image analysis method that can detect the catheters in X-ray fluoroscopy images. Our method uses steerable tensor voting in combination with a catheter-specific multi-step extraction algorithm. The evaluation on clinical fluoroscopy images shows that especially the extraction of the catheter tip is successful and that the use of tensor voting accounts for a large increase in performance.

  1. Infectious Complications of Radiologically Inserted Hickman Catheters in Patients with Hematologic Disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bakker, Jeannette; Overhagen, Hans van; Wielenga, Jenne; Marie, Siem de; Nouwen, Jan; Ridder, Marie A.J. de; Lameris, Johan S.

    1998-01-01

    Purpose: To assess the incidence of infections and its influence on the survival of radiologically inserted Hickman catheters (HCs) in patients with hematologic disorders and to determine factors associated with premature HC removal. Methods: Survival and complications of 175 HCs in 115 patients were studied retrospectively. To describe the data the Kaplan-Meier method and the log-rank test were used, using the date of HC removal due to HC-related infection as endpoint. A stratified Cox regression model was used to determine explanatory factors. Results: Seventy (40%) HCs were removed prematurely because of proven or probable HC-related infections. The incidence of infection leading to HC removal was 4.78 per 1000 catheter-days for proven HC infections. Univariate analysis revealed that acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphocytic leukemia, or treatment for these diseases, gender, each subsequent catheter in the same patient and insertion site increased the risk of premature removal of the catheter due to infection. Conclusion: Infection is a major problem in patients with HCs. Unfortunately, the factors associated with increased infection rates that were found in this study cannot be influenced. Further studies are necessary to determine the role of environmental conditions in a radiology suite in relation to the risk of developing a catheter-related infection

  2. WE-A-17A-03: Catheter Digitization in High-Dose-Rate Brachytherapy with the Assistance of An Electromagnetic (EM) Tracking System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damato, AL; Bhagwat, MS; Buzurovic, I; Devlin, PM; Friesen, S; Hansen, JL; Kapur, T; Lee, LJ; Mehrtash, A; Nguyen, PL; O' Farrell, D; Wang, W; Viswanathan, AN; Cormack, RA [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To investigate the use of a system using EM tracking, postprocessing and error-detection algorithms for measuring brachytherapy catheter locations and for detecting errors and resolving uncertainties in treatment-planning catheter digitization. Methods: An EM tracker was used to localize 13 catheters in a clinical surface applicator (A) and 15 catheters inserted into a phantom (B). Two pairs of catheters in (B) crossed paths at a distance <2 mm, producing an undistinguishable catheter artifact in that location. EM data was post-processed for noise reduction and reformatted to provide the dwell location configuration. CT-based digitization was automatically extracted from the brachytherapy plan DICOM files (CT). EM dwell digitization error was characterized in terms of the average and maximum distance between corresponding EM and CT dwells per catheter. The error detection rate (detected errors / all errors) was calculated for 3 types of errors: swap of two catheter numbers; incorrect catheter number identification superior to the closest position between two catheters (mix); and catheter-tip shift. Results: The averages ± 1 standard deviation of the average and maximum registration error per catheter were 1.9±0.7 mm and 3.0±1.1 mm for (A) and 1.6±0.6 mm and 2.7±0.8 mm for (B). The error detection rate was 100% (A and B) for swap errors, mix errors, and shift >4.5 mm (A) and >5.5 mm (B); errors were detected for shifts on average >2.0 mm (A) and >2.4 mm (B). Both mix errors associated with undistinguishable catheter artifacts were detected and at least one of the involved catheters was identified. Conclusion: We demonstrated the use of an EM tracking system for localization of brachytherapy catheters, detection of digitization errors and resolution of undistinguishable catheter artifacts. Automatic digitization may be possible with a registration between the imaging and the EM frame of reference. Research funded by the Kaye Family Award 2012.

  3. Comparison of the microbiological milieu of patients randomized to either hydrophilic or conventional PVC catheters for clean intermittent catheterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lucas, Elizabeth J; Baxter, Cheryl; Singh, Chandra; Mohamed, Ahmad Z; Li, Birong; Zhang, Jingwen; Jayanthi, Venkata R; Koff, Stephen A; VanderBrink, Brian; Justice, Sheryl S

    2016-06-01

    Control of bacteriuria is problematic in patients who perform clean intermittent catheterization for management of neurogenic bladder. This population is often burdened with multiple urinary tract infections (UTIs), placing them at increased risk of end-stage renal disease. Hydrophilic catheters are a potential way to improve smooth and clean insertion, reduce disruption of the urothelium, and reduce bacterial colonization. The goal of the study was to compare the type and virulence of microorganisms recovered from the urine of patients that use either a hydrophilic or conventional polyvinyl chloride (PVC) catheter. Fifty patients with an underlying diagnosis of myelomeningocele were recruited for a 12-month prospective, randomized, investigator-blinded study. Twenty-five patients were allocated to the hydrophilic catheter intervention, and 25 continued use of a PVC catheter. Cultures were performed on urine obtained by catheterization at enrollment, and 3, 6, and 12 months. Bacterial species were assigned a designation as either potentially pathogenic or non-pathogenic. Escherichia coli isolates were the most predominant and were serotyped to further stratify the pathogenicity of the strains. Lastly, patients were surveyed at enrollment, and at the two later time points evaluating their current catheter for satisfaction. A total of 232 different bacterial isolates were obtained from the 182 collected urine cultures. In addition, seven species were recovered from the two UTI reported during the study period. Bacterial growth was not detected in 29 of the samples (16%). Although not statistically significant, collectively there was a 40% decrease in the average number of potentially pathogenic species recovered from those patients using hydrophilic catheters (0.81 per urine sample) compared with PVC catheter use (1.24 per urine sample). Since E. coli species can be either pathogenic or non-pathogenic, we examined 14 of the most commonly implicated serotypes

  4. Radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter in palliation of malignant ascites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Akinci, Devrim; Erol, Bekir; Ciftci, Tuerkmen T.; Akhan, Okan

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the safety and effectiveness of radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter in palliation of malignant ascites. Between July 2005 and June 2009, 41 tunneled peritoneal catheters were placed under ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic guidance in 40 patients (mean age, 55 years; 22 women) who had symptomatic malignant ascites. No procedure related mortality was observed. Major complication occurred in one patient (2.5%) in the form of serious bacterial peritonitis that necessitated catheter removal. Minor complications such as minor bacterial peritonitis, catheter dislodgement, tunnel infection, and catheter blockage occurred in 11 patients (27.5%). The mean duration of survival after catheter placement was 11.8 weeks. All patients expired of their primary malignancies in the follow-up. Radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter is safe and effective in palliation of symptomatic malignant ascites.

  5. Radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter in palliation of malignant ascites

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Akinci, Devrim; Erol, Bekir; Ciftci, Tuerkmen T. [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 06100 Ankara (Turkey); Akhan, Okan, E-mail: akhano@tr.net [Hacettepe University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, 06100 Ankara (Turkey)

    2011-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the safety and effectiveness of radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter in palliation of malignant ascites. Between July 2005 and June 2009, 41 tunneled peritoneal catheters were placed under ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic guidance in 40 patients (mean age, 55 years; 22 women) who had symptomatic malignant ascites. No procedure related mortality was observed. Major complication occurred in one patient (2.5%) in the form of serious bacterial peritonitis that necessitated catheter removal. Minor complications such as minor bacterial peritonitis, catheter dislodgement, tunnel infection, and catheter blockage occurred in 11 patients (27.5%). The mean duration of survival after catheter placement was 11.8 weeks. All patients expired of their primary malignancies in the follow-up. Radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter is safe and effective in palliation of symptomatic malignant ascites.

  6. Usefulness of gram staining of blood collected from total parenteral nutrition catheter for rapid diagnosis of catheter-related sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moonens, F; el Alami, S; Van Gossum, A; Struelens, M J; Serruys, E

    1994-01-01

    The accuracy of Gram staining of blood drawn from catheters used to administer total parenteral nutrition was compared with paired quantitative blood cultures for the diagnosis of catheter-related sepsis. Gram staining was positive in 11 of 18 episodes of catheter-related sepsis documented by quantitative culture (sensitivity, 61%) but in none of the 5 episodes of fever unrelated to catheter infection. Thus, this procedure enabled the rapid presumptive diagnosis and guidance of antimicrobial therapy for total parenteral nutrition catheter sepsis, with a positive predictive value of 100% and a negative predictive value of 42%. PMID:7521359

  7. Use of the 4F Roesch Inferior Mesenteric Catheter in Embolization Procedures in the Pelvis: A Review of 300 Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kroencke, Thomas J.; Kluner, Claudia; Hamm, Bernd; Gauruder-Burmester, Annett

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the use of a 4F Roesch inferior mesenteric (RIM) catheter for pelvic embolization procedures. Between October 2000 and January 2006, 364 patients (357 female, 7 male; age: 23-67 years) underwent embolization of various pathologies [uterine fibroids (n = 324), pure adenomyosis of the uterus (n = 19), postpartum hemorrhage (n =1), traumatic or postoperative hemorrhage (n = 9), bleeding related to cervical cancer (n =7), AV malformation of the uterus (n = 2) and high-flow priapism (n = 2)] at a single institution. In all cases, bilateral catheterization was primarily attempted with the use of a 4F hook-shaped braided endhole catheter (Roesch-Inferior-Mesenteric, RIM-Catheter, Cordis, Miami, FL). Frequency of initial failure to catheterize the vascular territory of interest and carry out the embolization were recorded and the types of difficulty encountered were noted. Catherization of the main stem of the vessel territory of interest with the use of a unilateral femoral approach and the 4F RIM catherer was successful in 334/364 (91.8%) the embolization cases. Bilateral catheterization of the internal iliac arteries using a single common femoral artery access and the 4F RIM catheter was achieved in 322/364 (88.5%) patients. In 12/364 (3.3%) patients, a contralateral puncture was performed and the same 4F catheter was used. In 28/364 (7.7%) cases the 4F RIM catheter was exchanged for a catheter with a cobra-shaped or sidewinder configuration. The 4F RIM catheter is a simple and valuable alternative to catheters and techniques commonly employed for pelvic artery embolization

  8. Risk Factors of Catheter-related Bloodstream Infection With Percutaneously Inserted Central Venous Catheters in Very Low Birth Weight Infants: A Center's Experience in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Fu Hsu

    2010-12-01

    Conclusion: It is important to avoid inserting a PICC at the femoral site. Strict catheter care protocol should also be applied to reduce local site bacterial colonization and removal of PICCs as soon as they are no longer essential for patient care to reduce the incidence of infection.

  9. Does interscalene catheter placement with stimulating catheters improve postoperative pain or functional outcome after shoulder surgery? A prospective, randomized and double-blinded trial

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stevens, Markus F.; Werdehausen, Robert; Golla, Elisabeth; Braun, Sebastian; Hermanns, Henning; Ilg, Ansgar; Willers, Reinhardt; Lipfert, Peter

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: In this prospective, randomized, double-blind trial we investigated the use of stimulating catheters in patients during and after shoulder surgery; functional improvement being the primary outcome measurement. METHODS: After eliciting an adequate muscular twitch at

  10. Efficacy and safety of novel multi-lumen catheter for chronic total occlusions: from preclinical study to first-in-man experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsutake, Yoshiaki; Ebner, Adrian; Yeung, Alan C; Taber, Mark D; Davidson, Charles J; Ikeno, Fumiaki

    2015-02-15

    To report our initial animal and human experience with a new multi-lumen catheter called MultiCross™ (Roxwood Medical, Inc.) in a porcine coronary model and patients with a chronic total occlusion (CTO). Preclinical safety study was done in the coronary vasculature of a porcine model. In a clinical setting, patients with a CTO of a coronary artery (n = 5) were enrolled. After an initial unsuccessful attempt using a conventional guidewire, operators could use the MultiCross system. The primary efficacy endpoint was successful recanalization (technical success) and the primary safety endpoint was serious adverse events through 30 days post-procedure. The MultiCross catheter was used for all patients after failure of the initial attempt with a guidewire. Successful recanalization was achieved in all CTOs attempted (100%). No patients reported any adverse events at 30 days post-procedure. In this first-in-man experience, the MultiCross catheter has the potential to enhance crossing of CTOs. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. Development of Remote-Type Haptic Catheter Sensor System using Piezoelectric Transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haruta, Mineyuki; Murayama, Yoshinobu; Omata, Sadao

    This study describes the development of Remote-Type Haptic Catheter Sensor System which enables the mechanical property evaluation of a blood vessel. This system consists of a feedback circuit and a piezoelectric ultrasound transducer, and is operated based on a phase shift method so that the entire system oscillates at its inherent resonance frequency. Ultrasound reflected by the blood vessel makes a phase shift of the resonance system depending on the acoustic impedance of the reflector. The phase shift is then measured as a change in resonance frequency of the system; therefore, the detection resolution is highly improved. The correlation between the acoustic impedance and the resonance frequency change of the sensor system was demonstrated using silicone rubbers, metals and actual blood vessels from a pig. The performance of the sensor was also examined using vessel shaped phantom model. Finally, the discussion surveys a possibility of the novel sensor system in an application for intra vascular diagnosis.

  12. Distributed pressure sensors for a urethral catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Mahdi; Rajamani, Rajesh; Timm, Gerald; Sezen, A S

    2015-01-01

    A flexible strip that incorporates multiple pressure sensors and is capable of being fixed to a urethral catheter is developed. The urethral catheter thus instrumented will be useful for measurement of pressure in a human urethra during urodynamic testing in a clinic. This would help diagnose the causes of urinary incontinence in patients. Capacitive pressure sensors are fabricated on a flexible polyimide-copper substrate using surface micromachining processes and alignment/assembly of the top and bottom portions of the sensor strip. The developed sensor strip is experimentally evaluated in an in vitro test rig using a pressure chamber. The sensor strip is shown to have adequate sensitivity and repeatability. While the calibration factors for the sensors on the strip vary from one sensor to another, even the least sensitive sensor has a resolution better than 0.1 psi.

  13. Catheter based mid-infrared reflectance and reflectance generated absorption spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N

    2013-10-29

    A method of characterizing conditions in a tissue, by (a) providing a catheter that has a light source that emits light in selected wavenumbers within the range of mid-IR spectrum; (b) directing the light from the catheter to an area of tissue at a location inside a blood vessel of a subject; (c) collecting light reflected from the location and generating a reflectance spectra; and (d) comparing the reflectance spectra to a reference spectra of normal tissue, whereby a location having an increased number of absorbance peaks at said selected wavenumbers indicates a tissue inside the blood vessel containing a physiological marker for atherosclerosis.

  14. HDR monotherapy for prostate cancer: A simulation study to determine the effect of catheter displacement on target coverage and normal tissue irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kolkman-Deurloo, Inger-Karine K.; Roos, Martin A.; Aluwini, Shafak

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of this study was to systematically analyse the effect of catheter displacements both on target coverage and normal tissue irradiation in fractionated high dose rate (HDR) prostate brachytherapy, using a simulation study, and to define tolerances for catheter displacement ensuring that both target coverage and normal tissue doses remain clinically acceptable. Besides the effect of total implant displacement, also displacements of catheters belonging to selected template rows only were evaluated in terms of target coverage and normal tissue dose, in order to analyse the change in dose distribution as a function of catheter dwell weight and catheter location. Material and methods: Five representative implant geometries, with 17 catheters each, were selected. The clinical treatment plan was compared to treatment plans in which an entire implant displacement in caudal direction over 3, 5, 7 and 10 mm was simulated. Besides, treatment plans were simulated considering a displacement of either the central, most ventral or most dorsal catheter rows only, over 5 mm caudally. Results: Due to displacement of the entire implant the target coverage drops below the tolerance of 93% for all displacements studied. The effect of displacement of the entire implant on organs at risk strongly depended on the patient anatomy; e.g., for 80% of the implant geometries the V 80 of the rectum exceeded its tolerance for all displacements. The effect of displacement of catheters belonging to selected template rows depended strongly on the relative weight of each catheter row when considering the target coverage and on its location when considering the dose in the organs at risk. Conclusion: This study supports the need for a check of the catheter locations before each fraction and correction of deviations of the catheter position exceeding 3 mm.

  15. ENPEP model enhancements at ANL

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guziel, K.A.

    1997-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has been involved in energy and electricity planning analyses for almost 20 years. Their activities include the development of analytical tools and methodologies along with their application to a wide variety of national energy planning studies. The methodologies cover all aspects of energy planning. In response to a request by the US Department of Energy (USDOE) to integrate existing tools into a package that could be distributed to developing countries for their own use, the ENergy and Power Evaluation Program (ENPEP) was developed. The USDOE wanted an all purpose tool that would allow the user to do a complete energy analysis, from demand forecast through primary energy resources allocation to electricity generation system expansion plan and environmental analysis. Since its original development, the ENPEP modules have been improved and enhanced to incorporate advancements in computer hardware and software technology, as well as to correct bugs that were identified in the programs. In cooperation with other organizations (e.g. The World Bank - IBRD - and the International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA -), the ENPEP package has been used at national, regional and inter-regional training courses, as well as in the conduct of national energy/electricity planning studies. This paper reviews the development of the ENPEP package and the proposed enhancements to the package. (author). 1 fig., 2 tabs

  16. ENPEP model enhancements at ANL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guziel, K A [Decision and Information Sciences Div., Argonne National Lab., Argonne, IL (United States)

    1997-09-01

    Argonne National Laboratory (ANL) has been involved in energy and electricity planning analyses for almost 20 years. Their activities include the development of analytical tools and methodologies along with their application to a wide variety of national energy planning studies. The methodologies cover all aspects of energy planning. In response to a request by the US Department of Energy (USDOE) to integrate existing tools into a package that could be distributed to developing countries for their own use, the ENergy and Power Evaluation Program (ENPEP) was developed. The USDOE wanted an all purpose tool that would allow the user to do a complete energy analysis, from demand forecast through primary energy resources allocation to electricity generation system expansion plan and environmental analysis. Since its original development, the ENPEP modules have been improved and enhanced to incorporate advancements in computer hardware and software technology, as well as to correct bugs that were identified in the programs. In cooperation with other organizations (e.g. The World Bank - IBRD - and the International Atomic Energy Agency - IAEA -), the ENPEP package has been used at national, regional and inter-regional training courses, as well as in the conduct of national energy/electricity planning studies. This paper reviews the development of the ENPEP package and the proposed enhancements to the package. (author). 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  17. Incidence of phlebitis associated with the use of peripheral IV catheter and following catheter removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Janete de Souza Urbanetto

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: to investigate the incidence of phlebitis and its association with risk factors when using peripheral IV catheters (PIC and following their removal - (post-infusion phlebitis in hospitalized adults. Method: a cohort study of 171 patients using PIC, totaling 361 punctures. Sociodemographic variables and variables associated with the catheter were collected. Descriptive and analytical statistical analyses were performed. Results: average patient age was 56.96 and 51.5% of the sample population was male. The incidence of phlebitis was 1.25% while using PIC, and 1.38% post-infusion. The incidence of phlebitis while using PIC was associated with the length of time the catheter remained in place, whereas post-infusion phlebitis was associated with puncture in the forearm. Ceftriaxone, Clarithromycin and Oxacillin are associated with post-infusion phlebitis. Conclusions: this study made it possible to investigate the association between risk factors and phlebitis during catheter use and following its removal. The frequency of post-infusion phlebitis was larger than the incidence of phlebitis with the catheter in place, with Phlebitis Grade III and II being the most frequently found in each of these situations, respectively. Aspects related to post-infusion phlebitis can be explained, given the limited number of studies addressing this theme from this perspective.

  18. CATHETER DURATION AND THE RISK OF SEPSIS IN PREMATURE BABIES WITH UMBILICAL VEIN CATHETERS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hartojo Hartojo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Umbilical catheters are frequently required in the management of severely ill premature babies. The risk of complications may increase with duration of UVC use. Objective: To determine whether the risk of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLA-BSIs and sepsis remained constant over the duration of umbilical vein catheters (UVCs in high-risk premature neonates. Methods:retrospective analysis. The data were collected from the medical record of high risk premature neonates who had a UVC placed in neonatal care unit of Husada Utama Hospital between April 1st 2008 to April 30th 2011 with purposive sampling. Catheter duration was observed before and after 14 days on placement. Blood and UVC culture was performed to establish the risk of CLA-BSIs and sepsis. Chi-square and logistic regression analysis were performed in the laboratorium data. Result: A total 44 high risk premature babies with UVCs were enrolled (sepsis group: n = 23 and non sepsis group: n = 21. Baseline demographics were similar between the groups. 15 babies in sepsis group have UVCs duration > 14 days, and 8 babies have UVCs 14 days show blood culture performance in 11 babies with positive evidence, UVCs culture performance is negative in 18 babies (p = 0.456. Burkholderia cepacia and Klebsiella pneumonia mostly appeared in blood culture performance. 25% of UVC culture performance shows Pseudomonas aeroginosa. Conclusions: The catheter duration have no significant difference in risk of sepsis in premature babies with Umbilical Vein Catheters.

  19. Radiologic Placement of Tunneled Central Venous Catheters in Pediatric Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Ji; Song, Soon Young; Cho, On Koo; Koh, Byung Hee; Kim, Yong Soo; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Lee, Yong Ho

    2010-01-01

    We evaluated the technical success and complication rates associated with the radiological placement of tunneled central venous catheters in pediatric patients. Between May 1, 2005 and March 31, 2008, a total of 46 tunneled central venous catheters were placed in 34 children (M:F = 22:12; mean age, 9.9 years [9 months to 16.8 years]). All procedures were performed under ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic guidance. Follow-up data were obtained through the retrospective review of the medical records. We used the Kaplan-Meier survival method for the evaluation of survival rate of the catheters. All procedures were technically successful. The observed periprocedural complications included hematoma formation in three patients. The mean catheter life was 189.3 days (total, 8710 days; range, 7-810). Catheters were removed due to death (n=9), the end of treatment (n=8), catheter sepsis (n=4), malfunction (n=8), and accidental removal (n=4). The rate of catheter sepsis and malfunction was 0.459 and 0.919 for every 1000 catheter days, respectively. The expected mean catheter life was 479.6 days as per the Kaplan- Meier analysis. The results suggest that the radiologic placement of a tunneled central venous catheter is an effective technique with a high technical success rate and low complication rate

  20. Biological safety evaluation of the modified urinary catheter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalczuk, Dorota, E-mail: dorota.kowalczuk@umlub.pl [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Medical University of Lublin, Jaczewskiego 4, 20-090 Lublin (Poland); Przekora, Agata; Ginalska, Grazyna [Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Medical University of Lublin, Chodzki 1, 20-093 Lublin (Poland)

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro safety of the novel tosufloxacin (TOS)-treated catheters with the prolonged antimicrobial activity. The test samples of silicone latex catheter were prepared by the immobilization of TOS on chitosan (CHIT)-coated catheter by means of covalent bonds and non-covalent interactions. Each step of the modification process of catheter surface was observed using ATR–Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In vitro cytotoxicity of the modified and unmodified catheters was assessed by direct and indirect tests in accordance with ISO standards using green monkey kidney (GMK) cell line. The MTT, lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH), WST-8, Sulforhodamine B (SRB) test results and microscopic observation clearly indicated that unmodified silicone latex catheters decrease cell metabolic activity, act as a cytotoxic agent causing cell lysis and induce cell death through necrotic or apoptotic process. We suggest that chitosan coat with TOS immobilized limits leaching of harmful agents from silicone latex material, which significantly enhances survivability of GMK cells and therefore is quite a good protection against the cytotoxic effect of this material. - Highlights: • Characterization of the novel antimicrobial urinary catheters • Monitoring of the catheter modification by FTIR analysis • Confirmation of high cytotoxicity of latex-based catheter used in urological practice • Chitosan-coated and tosufloxacin-treated catheter is less toxic than the untreated one. • The proposed surface modification protects cells against latex-induced death.

  1. Radiologic Placement of Tunneled Central Venous Catheters in Pediatric Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Ji; Song, Soon Young; Cho, On Koo; Koh, Byung Hee; Kim, Yong Soo; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Lee, Yong Ho [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    We evaluated the technical success and complication rates associated with the radiological placement of tunneled central venous catheters in pediatric patients. Between May 1, 2005 and March 31, 2008, a total of 46 tunneled central venous catheters were placed in 34 children (M:F = 22:12; mean age, 9.9 years [9 months to 16.8 years]). All procedures were performed under ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic guidance. Follow-up data were obtained through the retrospective review of the medical records. We used the Kaplan-Meier survival method for the evaluation of survival rate of the catheters. All procedures were technically successful. The observed periprocedural complications included hematoma formation in three patients. The mean catheter life was 189.3 days (total, 8710 days; range, 7-810). Catheters were removed due to death (n=9), the end of treatment (n=8), catheter sepsis (n=4), malfunction (n=8), and accidental removal (n=4). The rate of catheter sepsis and malfunction was 0.459 and 0.919 for every 1000 catheter days, respectively. The expected mean catheter life was 479.6 days as per the Kaplan- Meier analysis. The results suggest that the radiologic placement of a tunneled central venous catheter is an effective technique with a high technical success rate and low complication rate.

  2. Potential Misclassification of Urinary Tract-Related Bacteremia Upon Applying the 2015 Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection Surveillance Definition From the National Healthcare Safety Network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greene, M Todd; Ratz, David; Meddings, Jennifer; Fakih, Mohamad G; Saint, Sanjay

    2016-04-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recently updated the surveillance definition of catheter-associated urinary tract infection to include only urine culture bacteria of at least 1 × 10(5) colony-forming units/mL. Our findings suggest that the new surveillance definition may fail to capture clinically meaningful catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

  3. Anticoagulants for the prevention and treatment of catheter-related thrombosis in adults and children on parenteral nutrition: a systematic review and critical appraisal

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Barco, Stefano; Atema, Jasper J.; Coppens, Michiel; Serlie, Mireille J.; Middeldorp, Saskia

    2017-01-01

    Patients on parenteral nutrition require a central venous access and are at risk of catheter-related thrombosis, pulmonary embolism, and vena cava syndrome. Parenteral nutrition guidelines suggest anticoagulation for the primary prevention of catheter-related thrombosis during long-term parenteral

  4. Hemodialysis Access Usage Patterns in the Incident Dialysis Year and Associated Catheter-Related Complications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Hui; Ix, Joachim H.; Wang, Weiling; Brunelli, Steven M.; Lazarus, Michael; Hakim, Raymond; Lacson, Eduardo

    2012-01-01

    Background Hemodialysis(HD) access is considered a critical and actionable determinant of morbidity, with a growing literature suggesting that initial HD access type is an important marker of long term outcomes. Accordingly, we examined HD access during the incident dialysis period, focusing on infection risk and successful fistula creation over the first dialysis year. Study Design Longitudinal cohort Setting & Participants All United States adults admitted to Fresenius Medical Care North America facilities within 15 days of first maintenance dialysis session between January 1 and December 31, 2007. Predictor Vascular access type at HD initiation Outcomes Vascular access type at 90 days and at the end of the first year on HD, bloodstream infection within the first year by access type, and catheter complication rate. Results Amongst the 25,003 incident dialysis patients studied, 19,622(78.5%) initiated dialysis with a catheter, 4,151(16.6%) with a fistula, and 1,230(4.9%) with a graft. At 90 days, 14,105(69.7%) had a catheter, 4432(21.9%) patients had a fistula, and 1705(8.4%) had a graft. Functioning fistulas and grafts at dialysis initiation had first year failure rates of 10% and 15%, respectively. Grafts were seldom replaced by fistulas (3%), while 7,064 (47.6%) of all patients who initiated with a catheter alone still had only a catheter at 1 year. Overall, 3,327 (13.3%) patients had at least one positive blood culture during follow-up, with the risk being similar between fistula and graft groups, but approximately 3-fold higher in patients with a catheter (p<0.001 for either comparison). Nearly one in three catheters (32.5%) will require TPA use by median time of 41 days, with 59% requiring more than one TPA administration. Limitations Potential underestimation of bacteremia because follow-up blood culture results did not include samples sent to local laboratories. Conclusions Among a large and representative population of incident US dialysis patients

  5. Tensile strength decreases and perfusion pressure of 3-holed polyamide epidural catheters increases in long-term epidural infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Pascal; Meyer, Urs; Schüpfer, Guido; Rukwied, Roman; Konrad, Christoph; Gerber, Helmut

    2011-01-01

    Epidural analgesia is an established method for pain management. The failure rate is 8% to 12% due to technical difficulties (catheter dislocation and/or disconnection; partial or total catheter occlusion) and management. The mechanical properties of the catheters, like tensile strength and flow rate, may also be affected by the analgesic solution and/or the tissue environment. We investigated the tensile strength and perfusion pressure of new (n=20), perioperatively (n=30), and postoperatively (n=73) used epidural catheters (20-gauge, polyamide, closed tip, 3 side holes; Perifix [B. Braun]). To prevent dislocation, epidural catheters were taped (n=5) or fixed by suture (n=68) to the skin. After removal, mechanical properties were assessed by a tensile-testing machine (INSTRON 4500), and perfusion pressure was measured at flow rates of 10, 20, and 40 mL/h. All catheters demonstrated a 2-step force transmission. Initially, a minimal increase of length could be observed at 15 N followed by an elongation of several cm at additional forces (7 N). Breakage occurred in the control group at 23.5±1.5 N compared with 22.4±1.6 N in perioperative and 22.4±1.7 N in postoperative catheters (Ptensile strength, whereas perfusion pressure at clinically used flow rates (10 mL/h) increased significantly from 19±1.3 to 44±72 mm Hg during long-term (≥7 days) epidural analgesia (Ptensile strength or perfusion pressure. Epidural catheter use significantly increases the perfusion pressure and decreases the tensile strength. Copyright © 2011 by American Society of Regional Anesthesia and Pain Medicine

  6. Current status of endovascular catheter robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lumsden, Alan B; Bismuth, Jean

    2018-06-01

    In this review, we will detail the evolution of endovascular therapy as the basis for the development of catheter-based robotics. In parallel, we will outline the evolution of robotics in the surgical space and how the convergence of technology and the entrepreneurs who push this evolution have led to the development of endovascular robots. The current state-of-the-art and future directions and potential are summarized for the reader. Information in this review has been drawn primarily from our personal clinical and preclinical experience in use of catheter robotics, coupled with some ground-breaking work reported from a few other major centers who have embraced the technology's capabilities and opportunities. Several case studies demonstrating the unique capabilities of a precisely controlled catheter are presented. Most of the preclinical work was performed in the advanced imaging and navigation laboratory. In this unique facility, the interface of advanced imaging techniques and robotic guidance is being explored. Although this procedure employs a very high-tech approach to navigation inside the endovascular space, we have conveyed the kind of opportunities that this technology affords to integrate 3D imaging and 3D control. Further, we present the opportunity of semi-autonomous motion of these devices to a target. For the interventionist, enhanced precision can be achieved in a nearly radiation-free environment.

  7. In vitro catheter and sorbent-based method for clearance of radiocontrast material during cerebral interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Angheloiu, George O.; Hänscheid, Heribert; Reiners, Christoph; Anderson, William D.; Kellum, John A.

    2013-01-01

    Background: Contrast-induced acute kidney injury is a severe condition resulting from the use of radiology contrast in patients with predisposing factors. Hypothesis: We hypothesized that a novel system including a device containing polymer resin sorbent beads and a custom-made suctioning catheter could efficiently remove contrast from an in vitro novel model of circulatory system (MOCS) mimicking the cerebral circulation. Methods: A custom-made catheter was built and optimized for cerebral venous approach. The efficiency of a system made of a polymer resin sorbent beads column (CST 401, Cytosorbents) and this particular catheter was tested in the MOCS running a solution composed of 0.9% saline and radio-contrast. During two series of 18 cycles of first-pass experiments we assessed the catheter's suctioning efficiency and the system's ability to clear radio-contrast injected into the MOCS's cerebral arterial segment. We also assessed the functioning and reliability of the MOCS. Results: Mean suctioning efficiency of the catheter was 84% ± 24%. The polymer sorbent column contrast removal rate was initially 96% and gradually decreased with subsequent cycles in a linear fashion during an experiment lasting approximately 90 minutes. The MOCS had a reliability of 0.9946×min −1 where 1 × min −1 was the optimum value. Conclusion: A system including a polymer resin sorbent beads column and a custom-made suctioning catheter had an excellent initial efficiency in quickly removing contrast from an artificial MOCS mimicking the cerebral circulation. MOCS is an inexpensive and relatively reliable custom-made system that can be used for training or testing purposes

  8. In vitro catheter and sorbent-based method for clearance of radiocontrast material during cerebral interventions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Angheloiu, George O., E-mail: goangheloiu@drmc.org [Heart and Vascular Institute, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Department of Cardiology, Dubois Regional Medical Center, Dubois, PA (United States); Hänscheid, Heribert; Reiners, Christoph [Department of Nuclear Medicine, University of Würzburg, Würzburg (Germany); Anderson, William D. [Cardiology Department, Exempla Healthcare, Denver, CO (United States); Kellum, John A. [CRISMA Center, Department of Critical Care Medicine, University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Background: Contrast-induced acute kidney injury is a severe condition resulting from the use of radiology contrast in patients with predisposing factors. Hypothesis: We hypothesized that a novel system including a device containing polymer resin sorbent beads and a custom-made suctioning catheter could efficiently remove contrast from an in vitro novel model of circulatory system (MOCS) mimicking the cerebral circulation. Methods: A custom-made catheter was built and optimized for cerebral venous approach. The efficiency of a system made of a polymer resin sorbent beads column (CST 401, Cytosorbents) and this particular catheter was tested in the MOCS running a solution composed of 0.9% saline and radio-contrast. During two series of 18 cycles of first-pass experiments we assessed the catheter's suctioning efficiency and the system's ability to clear radio-contrast injected into the MOCS's cerebral arterial segment. We also assessed the functioning and reliability of the MOCS. Results: Mean suctioning efficiency of the catheter was 84% ± 24%. The polymer sorbent column contrast removal rate was initially 96% and gradually decreased with subsequent cycles in a linear fashion during an experiment lasting approximately 90 minutes. The MOCS had a reliability of 0.9946×min{sup −1} where 1 × min{sup −1} was the optimum value. Conclusion: A system including a polymer resin sorbent beads column and a custom-made suctioning catheter had an excellent initial efficiency in quickly removing contrast from an artificial MOCS mimicking the cerebral circulation. MOCS is an inexpensive and relatively reliable custom-made system that can be used for training or testing purposes.

  9. Influence of the hole geometry on the flow distribution in ventricular catheters for hydrocephalus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giménez, Ángel; Galarza, Marcelo; Pellicer, Olga; Valero, José; Amigó, José M

    2016-07-15

    Hydrocephalus is a medical condition consisting of an abnormal accumulation of cerebrospinal fluid within the brain. A catheter is inserted in one of the brain ventricles and then connected to an external valve to drain the excess of cerebrospinal fluid. The main drawback of this technique is that, over time, the ventricular catheter ends up getting blocked by the cells and macromolecules present in the cerebrospinal fluid. A crucial factor influencing this obstruction is a non-uniform flow pattern through the catheter, since it facilitates adhesion of suspended particles to the walls. In this paper we focus on the effects that tilted holes as well as conical holes have on the flow distribution and shear stress. We have carried out 3D computational simulations to study the effect of the hole geometry on the cerebrospinal fluid flow through ventricular catheters. All the simulations were done with the OpenFOAM® toolbox. In particular, three different groups of models were investigated by varying (i) the tilt angles of the holes, (ii) the inner and outer diameters of the holes, and (iii) the distances between the so-called hole segments. The replacement of cylindrical holes by conical holes was found to have a strong influence on the flow distribution and to lower slightly the shear stress. Tilted holes did not involve flow distribution changes when the hole segments are sufficiently separated, but the mean shear stress was certainly reduced. The authors present new results about the behavior of the fluid flow through ventricular catheters. These results complete earlier work on this topic by adding the influence of the hole geometry. The overall objective pursued by this research is to provide guidelines to improve existing commercially available ventricular catheters.

  10. Impact of catheter reconstruction error on dose distribution in high dose rate intracavitary brachytherapy and evaluation of OAR doses

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thaper, Deepak; Shukla, Arvind; Rathore, Narendra; Oinam, Arun S.

    2016-01-01

    In high dose rate brachytherapy (HDR-B), current catheter reconstruction protocols are relatively slow and error prone. The purpose of this study is to evaluate the impact of catheter reconstruction error on dose distribution in CT based intracavitary brachytherapy planning and evaluation of its effect on organ at risk (OAR) like bladder, rectum and sigmoid and target volume High risk clinical target volume (HR-CTV)

  11. Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation in Patients with Hardware in the Heart - Septal Closure Devices, Mechanical Valves and More.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartoletti, Stefano; Santangeli, Pasquale; DI Biase, Luigi; Natale, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    Patients with mechanical "hardware" in the heart, such as those with mechanical cardiac valves or atrial septal closure devices, represent a population at high risk of developing AF. Catheter ablation of AF in these subjects might represent a challenge, due to the perceived higher risk of complications associated with the presence of intracardiac mechanical devices. Accordingly, such patients were excluded or poorly represented in major trials proving the benefit of catheter ablation for the rhythm-control of AF. However, recent evidence supports the concept that catheter ablation procedures might be equally effective in these patients, without a significant increase in the risk of procedural complications. This review will summarize the current state-of-the-art on catheter ablation of AF in patients with mechanical "hardware" in the heart.

  12. Reducing catheter-associated urinary tract infections: a quality-improvement initiative.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Katherine Finn; Colebaugh, Ann M; Eithun, Benjamin L; Klieger, Sarah B; Meredith, Dennis J; Plachter, Natalie; Sammons, Julia Shaklee; Thompson, Allison; Coffin, Susan E

    2014-09-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) are among the most common health care-associated infections in the United States, yet little is known about the prevention and epidemiology of pediatric CAUTIs. An observational study was conducted to assess the impact of a CAUTI quality improvement prevention bundle that included institution-wide standardization of and training on urinary catheter insertion and maintenance practices, daily review of catheter necessity, and rapid review of all CAUTIs. Poisson regression was used to determine the impact of the bundle on CAUTI rates. A retrospective cohort study was performed to describe the epidemiology of incident pediatric CAUTIs at a tertiary care children's hospital over a 3-year period (June 2009 to June 2012). Implementation of the CAUTI prevention bundle was associated with a 50% reduction in the mean monthly CAUTI rate (95% confidence interval: -1.28 to -0.12; P = .02) from 5.41 to 2.49 per 1000 catheter-days. The median monthly catheter utilization ratio remained unchanged; ∼90% of patients had an indication for urinary catheterization. Forty-four patients experienced 57 CAUTIs over the study period. Most patients with CAUTIs were female (75%), received care in the pediatric or cardiac ICUs (70%), and had at least 1 complex chronic condition (98%). Nearly 90% of patients who developed a CAUTI had a recognized indication for initial catheter placement. CAUTI is a common pediatric health care-associated infection. Implementation of a prevention bundle can significantly reduce CAUTI rates in children. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  13. Micromotor endoscope catheter for in vivo, ultrahigh-resolution optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herz, P. R.; Chen, Y.; Aguirre, A. D.; Schneider, K.; Hsiung, P.; Fujimoto, J. G.; Madden, K.; Schmitt, J.; Goodnow, J.; Petersen, C.

    2004-10-01

    A distally actuated, rotational-scanning micromotor endoscope catheter probe is demonstrated for ultrahigh-resolution in vivo endoscopic optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging. The probe permits focus adjustment for visualization of tissue morphology at varying depths with improved transverse resolution compared with standard OCT imaging probes. The distal actuation avoids nonuniform scanning motion artifacts that are present with other probe designs and can permit a wider range of imaging speeds. Ultrahigh-resolution endoscopic imaging is demonstrated in a rabbit with micromotor endoscope catheter probe promises to improve OCT imaging performance in future endoscopic imaging applications.

  14. Reducing catheter-related thrombosis using a risk reduction tool centered on catheter to vessel ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Timothy R; Mahoney, Keegan J

    2017-11-01

    In vascular access practices, the internal vessel size is considered important, and a catheter to vessel ratio (CVR) is recommended to assist clinicians in selecting the most appropriate-sized device for the vessel. In 2016, new practice recommendations stated that the CVR can increase from 33 to 45% of the vessels diameter. There has been evidence on larger diameter catheters and increased thrombosis risk in recent literature, while insufficient information established on what relationship to vessel size is appropriate for any intra-vascular device. Earlier references to clinical standards and guidelines did not clearly address vessel size in relation to the area consumed or external catheter diameter. The aim of this manuscript is to present catheter-related thrombosis evidence and develop a standardized process of ultrasound-guided vessel assessment, integrating CVR, Virchow's triad phenomenon and vessel health and preservation strategies, empowering an evidence-based approach to device placement. Through review, calculation and assessment on the areas of the 33 and 45% rule, a preliminary clinical tool was developed to assist clinicians make cognizant decisions when placing intravascular devices relating to target vessel size, focusing on potential reduction in catheter-related thrombosis. Increasing the understanding and utilization of CVRs will lead to a safer, more consistent approach to device placement, with potential thrombosis reduction strategies. The future of evidence-based data relies on the clinician to capture accurate vessel measurements and device-related outcomes. This will lead to a more dependable data pool, driving the relationship of catheter-related thrombosis and vascular assessment.

  15. [Peripherally inserted central catheter antibiotic therapy for cystic fibrosis patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betegnie, A-L; Cracowski, C; Bedouch, P; Segond, C; Robein-Dobremez, M-J; Pin, I; Allenet, B

    2014-11-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are more and more used for intravenous antibiotic infusions in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients in the Grenoble area (France). The aim of this study was to assess the use of this technique in this indication. 1. Retrospective evaluation of 102 consecutive PICC insertions over 3years and the incidence of adverse events during the therapy. 2. Prospective evaluation of 12 patient's satisfaction and their nurses over a 3-month period. 3. Comparative analysis of single domiciliary treatment costs using PICC versus peripheral catheter (PC). 102 PICC insertions were attempted in 31 patients. Seven failures and 7 complications occurred during the treatment requiring removal of the PICC, i.e. an overall success rate of 86.2% (88/102). Pain during PICC introduction was 4.2/10 (visual analogical scale). Mean satisfaction levels during therapy were 9.3/10 for patients and 8.7/10 for nurses. Compared with PC, all the patients said that PICC was "more comfortable". Differential costs of treatment with PC and with PICC at home were estimated at 57.15€ and 590.16€ respectively. PICC is an alternative to CP for intravenous antibiotherapy in CF patients, providing better safety and comfort. PICC use should be promoted in this indication. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  16. Technique of Peritoneal Catheter Placement under Fluoroscopic Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Abdel-Aal, A.K.; Gaddikeri, S.; Saddekni, S.

    2011-01-01

    Peritoneal catheters are mainly used for peritoneal dialysis in patients with end-stage renal disease. Other uses of this catheter include intraperitoneal chemotherapy and gene therapy for ovarian cancer and draining of uncontrolled refractory ascites in patients with liver cirrhosis. Traditionally, surgeons place most of these peritoneal catheters either by laparoscopy or open laparotomy. We detail our percutaneous approach to placing peritoneal catheters using fluoroscopic guidance. We emphasize the use of additional ultrasound guidance, including gray scale and color Doppler ultrasound, to determine the safest puncture site and to guide the initial needle puncture in order to avoid bowel perforation and injury to epigastric artery. We present our experience in placing peritoneal catheters using this technique in 95 patients with various indications. Fluoroscopic guided percutaneous placement of peritoneal catheters is a safe, minimally invasive, and effective alternative to open surgical or laparoscopic placement.

  17. The N-Terminus of Human Lactoferrin Displays Anti-biofilm Activity on Candida parapsilosis in Lumen Catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fais, Roberta; Di Luca, Mariagrazia; Rizzato, Cosmeri; Morici, Paola; Bottai, Daria; Tavanti, Arianna; Lupetti, Antonella

    2017-01-01

    Candida parapsilosis is a major cause of hospital-acquired infection, often related to parenteral nutrition administered via catheters and hand colonization of health care workers, and its peculiar biofilm formation ability on plastic surfaces. The mortality rate of 30% points to the pressing need for new antifungal drugs. The present study aimed at analyzing the inhibitory activity of the N-terminal lactoferrin-derived peptide, further referred to as hLF 1-11, against biofilms produced by clinical isolates of C. parapsilosis characterized for their biofilm forming ability and fluconazole susceptibility. hLF 1-11 anti-biofilm activity was assessed in terms of reduction of biofilm biomass, metabolic activity, and observation of sessile cell morphology on polystyrene microtiter plates and using an in vitro model of catheter-associated C. parapsilosis biofilm production. Moreover, fluctuation in transcription levels of genes related to cell adhesion, hyphal development and extracellular matrix production upon peptide exposure were evaluated by quantitative real time RT-PCR. The results revealed that hLF 1-11 exhibits an inhibitory effect on biofilm formation by all the C. parapsilosis isolates tested, in a dose-dependent manner, regardless of their fluconazole susceptibility. In addition, hLF 1-11 induced a statistically significant dose-dependent reduction of preformed-biofilm cellular density and metabolic activity at high peptide concentrations only. Interestingly, when assessed in a catheter lumen, hLF 1-11 was able to induce a 2-log reduction of sessile cell viability at both the peptide concentrations used in RPMI diluted in NaPB. A more pronounced anti-biofilm effect was observed (3.5-log reduction) when a 10% glucose solution was used as experimental condition on both early and preformed C. parapsilosis biofilm. Quantitative real time RT-PCR experiments confirmed that hLF 1-11 down-regulates key biofilm related genes. The overall findings suggest hLF 1-11 as a

  18. A new device for the prevention of pulmonary embolism in critically ill patients: Results of the European Angel Catheter Registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taccone, Fabio S; Bunker, Nicholas; Waldmann, Carl; De Backer, Daniel; Brohi, Karim; Jones, Robert G; Vincent, Jean-Louis

    2015-09-01

    Pulmonary embolism (PE) is a potentially life-threatening complication of critical illness. In trauma and neurosurgical patients with contraindications to anticoagulation, inferior vena cava (IVC) filters have been used to prevent PE, but their associated long-term complication rates and difficulties associated with filter removal have limited their use. The Angel catheter is a temporary device, which combined an IVC filter with a triple-lumen central venous catheter (IVC filter-catheter) and is intended for bedside placement and removal when no longer indicated. This study presents data from a European Registry of 60 critically ill patients in whom the IVC filter-catheter was used to prevent PE. The patients were all at high risk of PE development or recurrence and had contraindications to anticoagulation. The primary end points of this study were to evaluate the safety (in particular, the presence of infectious or thrombotic events) and effectiveness (the numbers of PEs and averted PEs) of the IVC filter-catheter. The main diagnosis before catheter insertion was major trauma in 33 patients (55%), intracerebral hemorrhage or stroke in 9 (15%), a venous thromboembolic event in 9 (15%), and active bleeding in 6 (10%). The IVC filter-catheter was placed as prophylaxis in 51 patients (85%) and as treatment in the 9 patients (15%) with venous thromboembolic event. The devices were inserted at the bedside without fluoroscopic guidance in 54 patients (90%) and within a median of 4 days after hospital admission. They were left in place for a mean of 6 days (4-8 days). One patient developed a PE, without hemodynamic compromise; two PEs were averted. No serious adverse events were reported. Early bedside placement of an IVC filter-catheter is possible, and our results suggest that this is a safe, effective alternative to short-term PE prophylaxis for high-risk patients with contraindications to anticoagulation. Therapeutic study, level V.

  19. Implementation of the updated 2015 Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention (KRINKO recommendations “Prevention and control of catheter-associated urinary tract infections” in the hospitals in Frankfurt/Main, Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heudorf, Ursel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention (KRINKO updated the recommendations for the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections in 2015. This article will describe the implementation of these recommendations in Frankfurt’s hospitals in autumn, 2015.Material and methods: In two non-ICU wards of each of Frankfurt’s , inspections were performed using a checklist based on the new KRINKO recommendations. In one large hospital, a total of were inspected. The inspections covered the structure and process quality (operating instructions, training, indication, the placement and maintenance of catheters and the demonstration of the preparation for insertion of a catheter using an empty bed and an imaginary patient, or insertion in a model.Results: Operating instructions were available in all hospital wards; approximately half of the wards regularly performed training sessions. The indications were largely in line with the recommendations of the KRINKO. Alternatives to urinary tract catheters were available and were used more often than the urinary tract catheters themselves (15.9% vs. 13.5%. In accordance with the recommendations, catheters were placed without antibiotic prophylaxis or the instillation of antiseptic or antimicrobial substances or catheter flushing solutions. The demonstration of catheter placement was conscientiously performed. Need for improvement was seen in the daily documentation and the regular verification of continuing indication for a urinary catheter, as well as the omission of regular catheter change.Conclusion: Overall, the recommendations of the KRINKO on the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections were adequately implemented. However, it cannot be ruled out that in situations with time pressure and staff shortage, the handling of urinary tract catheters may be of lower quality than that observed during the inspections, when catheter insertion was done by two

  20. Implementation of the updated 2015 Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention (KRINKO) recommendations "Prevention and control of catheter-associated urinary tract infections" in the hospitals in Frankfurt/Main, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heudorf, Ursel; Grünewald, Miriam; Otto, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    The Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention (KRINKO) updated the recommendations for the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections in 2015. This article will describe the implementation of these recommendations in Frankfurt's hospitals in autumn, 2015. In two non-ICU wards of each of Frankfurt's 17 hospitals, inspections were performed using a checklist based on the new KRINKO recommendations. In one large hospital, a total of 5 wards were inspected. The inspections covered the structure and process quality (operating instructions, training, indication, the placement and maintenance of catheters) and the demonstration of the preparation for insertion of a catheter using an empty bed and an imaginary patient, or insertion in a model. Operating instructions were available in all hospital wards; approximately half of the wards regularly performed training sessions. The indications were largely in line with the recommendations of the KRINKO. Alternatives to urinary tract catheters were available and were used more often than the urinary tract catheters themselves (15.9% vs. 13.5%). In accordance with the recommendations, catheters were placed without antibiotic prophylaxis or the instillation of antiseptic or antimicrobial substances or catheter flushing solutions. The demonstration of catheter placement was conscientiously performed. Need for improvement was seen in the daily documentation and the regular verification of continuing indication for a urinary catheter, as well as the omission of regular catheter change. Overall, the recommendations of the KRINKO on the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections were adequately implemented. However, it cannot be ruled out that in situations with time pressure and staff shortage, the handling of urinary tract catheters may be of lower quality than that observed during the inspections, when catheter insertion was done by two nurses. Against this background, a sufficient

  1. Embolization of brain arteriovenous malformations using tracker catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Sun Yong; Son, Mi Young; Jang, Jae Chun; Hwang, Mi Soo; Park, Bok Hwan

    1990-01-01

    With the recent advance in micro catheters, steerable guide wires, balloons, embolic materials and digital subtraction angiography (DSA), as well as technical refinements in endovascular surgery, there has been a revolution in therapeutic strategies for cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). We have performed super selective angiography and embolization with Tracker micro catheter about 12 cases of brain AVMs for therapeutic and preoperative aims. This micro catheter and guide wire provided high selectivity of feeding artery, greater maneuverability and useful for deliver various embolus materials

  2. Successful Use of Modified Suprapubic Catheter to Rescue Prostatorectal Fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi-Chun Chiu

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Prostatorectal fistula is a complication following radiotherapy. It remains a clinical challenge to treat because most patients experience a poor quality of life. This case report discusses a modified suprapubic catheter for use in a patient with a prostatorectal fistula that developed after radiotherapy for localized prostate cancer. It is an inexpensive, easily available, and more patient-tolerable catheter that improves quality of life. Herein, we describe the development of this catheter.

  3. Dimerized plasmin fragment D as a potential biomarker to predict successful catheter-directed thrombolysis therapy in acute deep vein thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Chien-Ming; Wu, I-Hui; Chan, Chih-Yang; Chen, Yih-Sharng; Yang, Wei-Shiung; Wang, Shoei-Shen

    2015-10-01

    The value of dimerized plasmin fragment D in the clinical monitoring during the catheter-directed thrombolysis in patients with acute deep vein thrombosis is not known. Dimerized plasmin fragment D levels in 24 patients with acute deep vein thrombosis undergoing catheter-directed thrombolysis were prospectively evaluated. The plasma dimerized plasmin fragment D level was measured serially before and at every 12 h during catheter-directed thrombolysis for 24 h. Technical success was defined as restoration of patency and flow with less than 50% residual thrombus by surveillance rotational venography. Technical success was achieved in 79.2% (19 of 24) of the treated limbs after catheter-directed thrombolysis. In univariate analysis, there was significant elevation of the dimerized plasmin fragment D at 12th h after starting the catheter-directed thrombolysis (P fragment D to predict successful catheter-directed thrombolysis was determined as 18.4 µg/ml at the 12th h after starting the catheter-directed thrombolysis with sensitivity 0.8 and specificity 0.8 (P = 0.03). It was further validated in multivariate logistic regression analysis (odds ratio: 14.38; 95% CI: 1.22-169.20; P = 0.03). Catheter-directed thrombolysis is safe and effective for restoration of blood flow in patients with acute deep vein thrombosis. Dimerized plasmin fragment D value greater than 18.4 µg/ml at the 12th h after starting catheter-directed thrombolysis had a high predictive rate of greater than 50% lysis at the end of catheter-directed thrombolysis. © The Author(s) 2014.

  4. Efficacy of silver/hydrophilic poly(p-xylylene) on preventing bacterial growth and biofilm formation in urinary catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari Zare, Hamideh; Juhart, Viktorija; Vass, Attila; Franz, Gerhard; Jocham, Dieter

    2017-01-18

    Catheter associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI), caused by several strains of bacteria, are a common complication for catheterized patients. This may eventually lead to a blockage of the catheter due to the formation of a crystalline or amorphous biofilm. Inhibiting bacteria should result in a longer application time free of complaints. This issue has been investigated using an innovative type of silver-coated catheter with a semipermeable cap layer to prevent CAUTI. In this work, two different types of silver catheters were investigated, both of which were capped with poly(p-xylylene) (PPX-N) and exhibited different surface properties that completely changed their wetting conduct with water. The contact angle of conventionally deposited PPX-N is approximately 80°. After O 2 plasma treatment, the contact angle drops to approximately 30°. These two systems, Ag/PPX-N and Ag/PPX-N-O 2 , were tested in synthetic urine at a body temperature of 37 °C. First, the optical density and the inhibition zones of both bacteria strains (Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus cohnii) were examined to confirm the antibacterial effect of these silver-coated catheters. Afterward, the efficacy of silver catheters with different treatments of biofilm formed by E. coli and S. cohnii were tested with crystal violet staining assays. To estimate the life cycles of silver/PPX-catheters, the eluted amount of silver was assessed at several time intervals by anodic stripping voltammetry. The silver catheter with hydrophilic PPX-N coating limited bacterial growth in synthetic urine and prevented biofilm formation. The authors attribute the enhanced bacteriostatic effect to increased silver ion release detected under these conditions. With this extensive preparatory analytic work, the authors studied the ability of the two different cap layers (without silver), PPX-N and oxygen plasma treated PPX-N, to control the growth of a crystalline biofilm by measuring the concentrations of the Ca 2

  5. Efficacy of two antiseptic regimens on skin colonization of insertion sites for two different catheter types: a randomized, clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Juergen Thomas; Diener, Isabel Victoria; Freiberg, Kerstin; Zillmann, Robert; Shah-Hosseini, Kija; Seifert, Harald; Berger-Schreck, Bettina; Wisplinghoff, Hilmar

    2016-12-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections affect patients in surgical and intensive care settings worldwide, causing complications, aggravation of existing symptoms and increased length of stay. The trial aimed at comparing two registered skin antiseptics with respect to their residual and therefore infection-preventing effects. In a parallel, monocentric, prospective, triple-blind, randomized trial the difference in bacterial recolonization of catheter skin sites in central venous (CVC) and epidural catheters (EC) was investigated by comparing two alcoholic-based skin disinfectants. Patients receiving planned surgeries or intensive care were eligible for the trial. Those in the trial group received skin disinfection with the additive octenidine dihydrochloride (OCT) (n = 51), those in the control group were treated with benzalkonium chloride as additive (BAC) (n = 59) prior to catheter insertion. Randomization was carried out by assigning patients to groups week-wise. Endpoints of the investigation were skin colonization of the catheter site counted in colony forming units per swab at three time points: (1) prior to catheter insertion, on untreated skin; (2) directly after catheter insertion, prior to sterile coverage; (3) 48 h after catheter insertion. The hypothesis was tested by a Wilcoxon test with a two-sided alpha = 5 %. From second to third swab, recolonization of the catheter-surrounding skin was significantly lower in the trial group for both sorts of catheters: delta 2-3 OCT group: 0.72 (95 % CI: 0.42; 1.02); delta 2-3 BAC group: 1.97 (95 % CI: 1.45; 2.50); p < 0.001. None of the patients enrolled developed a catheter-related blood stream infection (CRBSI) during follow-up. Previous studies have shown that skin colonization is strongly associated with the occurrence of CRBSI. This randomized controlled trial supports the observations made in previous trials that octenidine dihydrochloride in disinfectants is more effective than agents

  6. Analytical methods used at model facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wing, N.S.

    1984-01-01

    A description of analytical methods used at the model LEU Fuel Fabrication Facility is presented. The methods include gravimetric uranium analysis, isotopic analysis, fluorimetric analysis, and emission spectroscopy

  7. Ultrasound-guided pigtail catheters for drainage of various pleural diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yi-Heng; Lin, Yu-Chao; Liang, Shinn-Jye; Tu, Chih-Yen; Chen, Chia-Hung; Chen, Hung-Jen; Chen, Wei; Shih, Chuen-Ming; Hsu, Wu-Huei

    2010-10-01

    Little is known about the efficacy and safety of ultrasound-guided pigtail catheters for the management of various pleural diseases in the emergency department, ward, and intensive care unit. We conducted a retrospective study in a university hospital during a 1-year interval. A total of 276 patients (178 men and 98 women) underwent 332 pigtail catheters (the drain size ranged from 10F to 16F) under ultrasound guidance. The mean ± SEM patient age was 59 ± 18 years, and mean duration of drainage was 6.1 ± 2 days. A total of 64 drains (19.2%) were inserted for pneumothoraces; 98 drains (29.5%), for malignant effusions; 119 drains (35.8%), for parapneumonic effusions/empyemas; and 38 drains (11.4%), for massive transudate pleural effusions. The overall success rate was 72.9%. The success rate was highest when the drain was used to treat massive transudate effusions (81.6%) and malignant pleural effusions (75.5%), followed by parapneumonic effusions/empyemas (72.2%), hemothoraces (66.6%), and pneumothoraces (64.0%). Only 10 (3.0%) drains had complications due to the procedure, including infection (n = 4, 1.2%), dislodgment (n = 4, 1.2%), wound bleeding at the pigtail catheter puncture area complicated with hemothoraces (n = 1, 0.3%), and lung puncture (n = 1, 0.3%). There was no significant difference in success rate when different catheter sizes were used to treat pleural diseases. Ultrasound-guided pigtail catheters provide a safe and effective method of draining various pleural diseases. We strongly suggest that ultrasound-guided pigtail catheters be considered as the initial draining method for a variety of pleural diseases. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. An Endovascular Approach to the Entrapped Central Venous Catheter After Cardiac Surgery

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Desai, Shamit S., E-mail: shamit.desai@northwestern.edu [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Department of Radiology (United States); Konanur, Meghana [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine (United States); Foltz, Gretchen [Mallinckrodt Institute of Radiology at Washington University, Interventional Radiology (United States); Malaisrie, S. Chris [Northwestern Memorial Hospital, Department of Cardiothoracic Surgery (United States); Resnick, Scott, E-mail: sresnick@northwestern.edu [Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Interventional Radiology, Northwestern Memorial Hospital (United States)

    2016-03-15

    PurposeEntrapment of central venous catheters (CVC) at the superior vena cava (SVC) cardiopulmonary bypass cannulation site by closing purse-string sutures is a rare complication of cardiac surgery. Historically, resternotomy has been required for suture release. An endovascular catheter release approach was developed.Materials and MethodsFour cases of CVC tethering against the SVC wall and associated resistance to removal, suggestive of entrapment, were encountered. In each case, catheter removal was achieved using a reverse catheter fluoroscopically guided over the suture fixation point between catheter and SVC wall, followed by the placement of a guidewire through the catheter. The guidewire was snared and externalized to create a through-and-through access with the apex of the loop around the suture. A snare placed from the femoral venous access provided concurrent downward traction on the distal CVC during suture release maneuvers.ResultsIn the initial attempt, gentle traction freed the CVC, which fractured and was removed in two sections. In the subsequent three cases, traction alone did not release the CVC. Therefore, a cutting balloon was introduced over the guidewire and inflated. Gentle back-and-forth motion of the cutting balloon atherotomes successfully incised the suture in all three attempts. No significant postprocedural complications were encountered. During all cases, a cardiovascular surgeon was present in the interventional suite and prepared for emergent resternotomy, if necessary.ConclusionAn endovascular algorithm to the “entrapped CVC” is proposed, which likely reduces risks posed by resternotomy to cardiac surgery patients in the post-operative period.

  9. Timing of urinary catheter removal after uncomplicated total abdominal hysterectomy: a prospective randomized trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Magdy R; Sayed Ahmed, Waleed A; Atwa, Khaled A; Metwally, Lobna

    2014-05-01

    To assess whether immediate (0h), intermediate (after 6h) or delayed (after 24h) removal of an indwelling urinary catheter after uncomplicated abdominal hysterectomy can affect the rate of re-catheterization due to urinary retention, rate of urinary tract infection, ambulation time and length of hospital stay. Prospective randomized controlled trial conducted at Suez Canal University Hospital, Egypt. Two hundred and twenty-one women underwent total abdominal hysterectomy for benign gynecological diseases and were randomly allocated into three groups. Women in group A (73 patients) had their urinary catheter removed immediately after surgery. Group B (81 patients) had the catheter removed 6h post-operatively while in group C (67 patients) the catheter was removed after 24h. The main outcome measures were the frequency of urinary retention, urinary tract infections, ambulation time and length of hospital stay. There was a significantly higher number of urinary retention episodes requiring re-catheterization in the immediate removal group compared to the intermediate and delayed removal groups (16.4% versus 2.5% and 0% respectively). Delayed urinary catheter removal was associated with a higher incidence of urinary tract infections (15%), delayed ambulation time (10.3h) and longer hospital stay (5.6 days) compared to the early (1.4%, 4.1h and 3.2 days respectively) and intermediate (3.7%, 6.8h and 3.4 days respectively) removal groups. Removal of the urinary catheter 6h postoperatively appears to be more advantageous than early or late removal in cases of uncomplicated total abdominal hysterectomy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. An Endovascular Approach to the Entrapped Central Venous Catheter After Cardiac Surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Desai, Shamit S.; Konanur, Meghana; Foltz, Gretchen; Malaisrie, S. Chris; Resnick, Scott

    2016-01-01

    PurposeEntrapment of central venous catheters (CVC) at the superior vena cava (SVC) cardiopulmonary bypass cannulation site by closing purse-string sutures is a rare complication of cardiac surgery. Historically, resternotomy has been required for suture release. An endovascular catheter release approach was developed.Materials and MethodsFour cases of CVC tethering against the SVC wall and associated resistance to removal, suggestive of entrapment, were encountered. In each case, catheter removal was achieved using a reverse catheter fluoroscopically guided over the suture fixation point between catheter and SVC wall, followed by the placement of a guidewire through the catheter. The guidewire was snared and externalized to create a through-and-through access with the apex of the loop around the suture. A snare placed from the femoral venous access provided concurrent downward traction on the distal CVC during suture release maneuvers.ResultsIn the initial attempt, gentle traction freed the CVC, which fractured and was removed in two sections. In the subsequent three cases, traction alone did not release the CVC. Therefore, a cutting balloon was introduced over the guidewire and inflated. Gentle back-and-forth motion of the cutting balloon atherotomes successfully incised the suture in all three attempts. No significant postprocedural complications were encountered. During all cases, a cardiovascular surgeon was present in the interventional suite and prepared for emergent resternotomy, if necessary.ConclusionAn endovascular algorithm to the “entrapped CVC” is proposed, which likely reduces risks posed by resternotomy to cardiac surgery patients in the post-operative period

  11. Large-volume paracentesis with indwelling peritoneal catheter and albumin infusion: a community hospital study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel K. Martin

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: The management of ascites can be problematic. This is especially true in patients with diuretic refractory ascites who develop a tense abdomen. This often results in hypotension and decreased venous return with resulting renal failure. In this paper, we further examine the risks and benefits of utilizing an indwelling peritoneal catheter to remove large-volume ascites over a 72-h period while maintaining intravascular volume and preventing renal failure. Methods: We retrospectively reviewed charts and identified 36 consecutive patients undergoing continuous large-volume paracentesis with an indwelling peritoneal catheter. At the time of drain placement, no patients had signs or laboratory parameters suggestive of spontaneous bacterial peritonitis. The patients underwent ascitic fluid removal through an indwelling peritoneal catheter and were supported with scheduled albumin throughout the duration. The catheter was used to remove up to 3 L every 8 h for a maximum of 72 h. Regular laboratory and ascitic fluid testing was performed. All patients had a clinical follow-up within 3 months after the drain placement. Results: An average of 16.5 L was removed over the 72-h time frame of indwelling peritoneal catheter maintenance. The albumin infusion utilized correlated to 12 mg/L removed. The average creatinine trend improved in a statistically significant manner from 1.37 on the day of admission to 1.21 on the day of drain removal. No patients developed renal failure during the hospital course. There were no documented episodes of neutrocytic ascites or bacterial peritonitis throughout the study review. Conclusion: Large-volume peritoneal drainage with an indwelling peritoneal catheter is safe and effective for patients with tense ascites. Concomitant albumin infusion allows for maintenance of renal function, and no increase in infectious complications was noted.

  12. Using optical coherence tomography to detect bacterial biofilms on foley catheters (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidari, Andrew E.; Oh, Kyungjin; Chen, Zhongping

    2017-02-01

    Urinary tract infections(UTI) pose a serious problem for hospital patients accounting for 33% of all hospital acquired(nosocomial) infections with indwelling foley catheters. The presence of an indwelling foley catheter provides a scaffolding for circulating planktonic bacteria to adhere to and to form microbial biofilm communities that would typically be hindered by the body's innate immune system response. It is these biofilm communities that form on the inner lumen of foley catheters that provide a reservoir of pathogenic bacteria that could dislodge or disperse from the biofilm and infect urethra or bladder mucosal tissue in the urinary tract. Current diagnostic techniques of urine microbiological cultures are lacking in differentiating asymptomatic bacteriuria and symptomatic catheter-associated urinary tract infection(CAUTI) since almost all patients with chronic indwelling catheters are almost universally bacteriuruic. There is an unmet need of a diagnostic tool to assess the difference between the pathogenesis of asymptomatic bacteriuria and CAUTI, specifically at the site of the native biofilm formation. Optical Coherence Tomography(OCT) is an emerging high resolution, minimally invasive tomographic imaging technique that has shown promise in imaging biofilm structures previously in an endoscopic setting of the airway in-vivo and in microfluidic chambers. OCT can be adapted to image various sized biological surfaces and orifices such as airway branches and blood vessels by using a variety of minature endoscopic probes. In this work OCT will be used to image biofilm structure in-vitro on the inner lumen of extravasated critical care patient's foley catheters. Scanning electron microscopy will be conducted post OCT to confirm the presence of bacterial biofilm in OCT images.

  13. Endovascular MR-guided Renal Embolization by Using a Magnetically Assisted Remote-controlled Catheter System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lillaney, Prasheel V; Yang, Jeffrey K; Losey, Aaron D; Martin, Alastair J; Cooke, Daniel L; Thorne, Bradford R H; Barry, David C; Chu, Andrew; Stillson, Carol; Do, Loi; Arenson, Ronald L; Saeed, Maythem; Wilson, Mark W; Hetts, Steven W

    2016-10-01

    Purpose To assess the feasibility of a magnetically assisted remote-controlled (MARC) catheter system under magnetic resonance (MR) imaging guidance for performing a simple endovascular procedure (ie, renal artery embolization) in vivo and to compare with x-ray guidance to determine the value of MR imaging guidance and the specific areas where the MARC system can be improved. Materials and Methods In concordance with the Institutional Animal Care and Use Committee protocol, in vivo renal artery navigation and embolization were tested in three farm pigs (mean weight 43 kg ± 2 [standard deviation]) under real-time MR imaging at 1.5 T. The MARC catheter device was constructed by using an intramural copper-braided catheter connected to a laser-lithographed saddle coil at the distal tip. Interventionalists controlled an in-room cart that delivered electrical current to deflect the catheter in the MR imager. Contralateral kidneys were similarly embolized under x-ray guidance by using standard clinical catheters and guidewires. Changes in renal artery flow and perfusion were measured before and after embolization by using velocity-encoded and perfusion MR imaging. Catheter navigation times, renal parenchymal perfusion, and renal artery flow rates were measured for MR-guided and x-ray-guided embolization procedures and are presented as means ± standard deviation in this pilot study. Results Embolization was successful in all six kidneys under both x-ray and MR imaging guidance. Mean catheterization time with MR guidance was 93 seconds ± 56, compared with 60 seconds ± 22 for x-ray guidance. Mean changes in perfusion rates were 4.9 au/sec ± 0.8 versus 4.6 au/sec ± 0.6, and mean changes in renal flow rate were 2.1 mL/min/g ± 0.2 versus 1.9 mL/min/g ± 0.2 with MR imaging and x-ray guidance, respectively. Conclusion The MARC catheter system is feasible for renal artery catheterization and embolization under real-time MR imaging in vivo, and quantitative physiologic

  14. Transbronchial Catheter Drainage via Fiberoptic Bronchoscope in Intractable Lung Abscess

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Man Pyo; Kim, Woo Sung; Han, Sung Koo; Shim, Young Soo; Kim, Keun Youl; Han, Yong Chol

    1989-01-01

    The use of the fiberoptic bronchoscope as a drainage procedure for lung abscess has become more and more widespread. We have recently adopted the technique of inserting a simple polyethylene catheter through the flexible fiberoptic bronchoscope into the abscess cavity of 11 patients with lung absess. All cases had not responded to aggressive postural drainage and adequate antibiotic therapy for at least a week. The results were as follows: Among 11 patients, the therapeutic response was dramatic in 6 patients.In the successful group, the abscess sizes were greater than 8cm in diameter and the air-fluid levels were higher than two-thirds of the cavity.Additional diagnoses, other than bacterial lung abscess, could be made in 2 cases when otherwise the diagnosis would have remained in doubt. The authors suggest that catheter drainage via fiberoptic bronchoscpope is an effective treatment modality in the large lung abscess with a high air-fluid level which is intractable to other medical approaches, and it is also a safe procedure. PMID:2487405

  15. The humanization of catheter room design: its clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lin Hanying; Shi Fengxia; Guo Huiying

    2011-01-01

    American scholar Engeer has proposed biological, psychological and sociological medicine pattern, which has been well accepted by the society, It has manifested the medical arena humanism return and has made the profound influence on the nursing development. The idea, 'the human is a whole', has gradually become the mainstream of the nurse service concept, meanwhile, the environment has more and more become a beneficial part for diagnosing and treating in hospitalization. The improvement and more user-friendly design of the diagnosing and treating environment has already become an important ring linked with the whole nursing work. At the beginning of the fitting up design for the Catheter Lab Room of Interventional Radiology in General Hospital of PLA, the authors receive the idea 'the environment experience and admiration of the patient', put more attention to the humanization in the diagnosing and treating environmental construction. The functional compartments are separated clearly. The color, the background music as well as the video are designed to be coordinated with each other in order to produce a relaxing system. Practice for the past three years indicates that the use of humanization environment design can markedly reduce the patient intense and the anxious level in perioperative period, it can also significantly promote the patient to be restored to health. This article will describe user-friendly diagnosing and treating environmental construction practice in the Catheter Lab Room of Interventional Radiology in General Hospital of PLA. (authors)

  16. Impact of quality management monitoring and intervention on central venous catheter dysfunction in the outpatient chemotherapy infusion setting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bansal, Anu; Binkert, Christoph A; Robinson, Malcolm K; Shulman, Lawrence N; Pellerin, Linda; Davison, Brian

    2008-08-01

    To assess the utility of maintaining and analyzing a quality-management database while investigating a subjectively perceived increase in the incidence of tunneled catheter and port dysfunction in a cohort of oncology outpatients. All 152 patients undergoing lytic therapy (2-4 mg alteplase) of a malfunctioning indwelling central venous catheter (CVC) from January through June 2004 at a single cancer center in the United States were included in a quality-management database. Patients were categorized by time to device failure and the initial method of catheter placement (surgery vs interventional radiology). Data were analyzed after 3 months, and areas of possible improvement were identified and acted upon. Three months of follow-up data were then collected and similarly analyzed. In a 6-month period, 152 patients treated for catheter malfunction received a total of 276 doses of lytic therapy. A 3-month interim analysis revealed a disproportionately high rate (34%) of early catheter malfunction (ECM; <30 days from placement). Postplacement radiographs demonstrated suboptimal catheter positioning in 67% of these patients, all of whom had surgical catheter placement. There was a 50% absolute decrease in the number of patients presenting with catheter malfunction in the period from April through June (P < .001). Evaluation of postplacement radiographs in these patients demonstrated a 50% decrease in the incidence of suboptimal positioning (P < .05). Suboptimal positioning was likely responsible for some, but not all, cases of ECM. Maintenance of a quality-management database is a relatively simple intervention that can have a clear and important impact on the quality and cost of patient care.

  17. Model of MSD Risk Assessment at Workplace

    OpenAIRE

    K. Sekulová; M. Šimon

    2015-01-01

    This article focuses on upper-extremity musculoskeletal disorders risk assessment model at workplace. In this model are used risk factors that are responsible for musculoskeletal system damage. Based on statistic calculations the model is able to define what risk of MSD threatens workers who are under risk factors. The model is also able to say how MSD risk would decrease if these risk factors are eliminated.

  18. Bronchial lumen is the safer route for an airway exchange catheter in double-lumen tube replacement: preventable complication in airway management for thoracic surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Hsiang-Ling; Tai, Ying-Hsuan; Wei, Ling-Fang; Cheng, Hung-Wei; Ho, Chiu-Ming

    2017-10-01

    There is no current consensus on which lumen an airway exchange catheter (AEC) should be passed through in double-lumen endotracheal tube (DLT) to exchange for a single-lumen endotracheal tube (SLT) after thoracic surgery. We report an unusual case to provide possible solution on this issue. A 71-year-old man with lung adenocarcinoma had an event of a broken exchange catheter used during a DLT replacement with a SLT, after a video-assisted thoracic surgery. The exchange catheter was impinged at the distal tracheal lumen and snapped during manipulation. All three segments of the catheter were retrieved without further airway compromises. Placement of airway tube exchanger into the tracheal lumen of double-lumen tube is a potential contributing factor of the unusual complication. We suggest an exchange catheter be inserted into the bronchial lumen in optimal depth with the adjunct of video laryngoscope, as the safe method for double-lumen tube exchange.

  19. Does Guidewire Exchange Influence Infection Rate Related to Catheters Used for Vascular Access in Children on Chronic Hemodialysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rus, Rina R; Battelino, Nina; Ponikvar, Rafael; Premru, Vladimir; Novljan, Gregor

    2017-02-01

    A central venous catheter (CVC) can either be inserted "de novo" or placed by guidewire exchange (GWE). From September 1998 to September 2015, 32 children (19 boys, 13 girls) were hemodialyzed in our unit by using a CVC. The mean age at CVC insertion was 12.6 ± 0.5 years. A total of 121 uncuffed catheters were placed, either "de novo" or by GWE in 64 (52.9%) and 57 (47.1%) cases, respectively. The most frequent cause for line revision was catheter dysfunction in 40/121 (33.1%) patients. The overall incidence of bacteremia was 1.5/1000 catheter-days. The incidence in newly inserted and GWE catheters was 1.4 and 1.7/1000 catheter-days, respectively. The difference did not reach statistical significance (P = 0.939). The infection rate correlated with patient age, and was higher in younger children (P = 0.006). GWE is an effective option of line revision, and did not influence the infection rate in our study. © 2016 International Society for Apheresis, Japanese Society for Apheresis, and Japanese Society for Dialysis Therapy.

  20. A Cognitive Neuroscience Perspective on Skill Acquisition in Catheter-based Interventions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Paul, Katja; Cnossen, Fokeltje; Lanzer, Peter

    2018-01-01

    Catheter-based cardiovascular interventions (CBCVI) provide a fascinating context to study skill acquisition. In CBCVI, multiple cognitive skills are crucial; technical, perceptual, and decision-making skills are all used at the same time and often depend on each other. In order to be able to

  1. Presence of air in the hepatic portal system in association with umbilical venous catheter malposition

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Regina Alvares

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The authors report a case of umbilical venous catheter malposition with air in the portal venous system in a preterm neonate. Initially, the hypothesis of necrotizing enterocolitis was considered, but the newborn progressed with no finding of disease and the air disappeared at follow-up radiography. The differential diagnosis of such a finding can avoid unnecessary clinical treatments.

  2. Selection of peripheral intravenous catheters with 24-gauge side-holes versus those with 22-gauge end-hole for MDCT: A prospective randomized study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tamura, Akio, E-mail: a.akahane@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, 19-1 Uchimaru, Morioka 020-8505 (Japan); Kato, Kenichi, E-mail: kkato@iwate-med.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, 19-1 Uchimaru, Morioka 020-8505 (Japan); Kamata, Masayoshi, E-mail: kamataaoi@yahoo.co.jp [Iwate Medical University Hospital, 19-1 Uchimaru, Morioka 020-8505 (Japan); Suzuki, Tomohiro, E-mail: suzukitomohiro123@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, 19-1 Uchimaru, Morioka 020-8505 (Japan); Suzuki, Michiko, E-mail: mamimichiko@me.com [Department of Radiology, Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, 19-1 Uchimaru, Morioka 020-8505 (Japan); Nakayama, Manabu, E-mail: gakuymgt@yahoo.co.jp [Department of Radiology, Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, 19-1 Uchimaru, Morioka 020-8505 (Japan); Tomabechi, Makiko, E-mail: mtomabechi@mac.com [Department of Radiology, Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, 19-1 Uchimaru, Morioka 020-8505 (Japan); Nakasato, Tatsuhiko, E-mail: nakasato77@gmail.com [Department of Radiology, Southern Tohoku Research Institute for Neuroscience, 7-115 Yatsuyamada, Koriyama 963-8563 (Japan); Ehara, Shigeru, E-mail: ehara@iwate-med.ac.jp [Department of Radiology, Iwate Medical University School of Medicine, 19-1 Uchimaru, Morioka 020-8505 (Japan)

    2017-02-15

    Highlights: • We compared 24-gauge side-hole and conventional 22-gauge end-hole catheters in MDCT. • The 24-gauge side-hole catheter is noninferior to the 22-gauge end-hole catheter. • The 24-gauge side-hole catheter is safe and facilitates optimal enhancement quality. • The 24-gauge side-hole catheter is suitable for patients with narrow or fragile veins. - Abstract: Purpose: To compare the 24-gauge side-holes catheter and conventional 22-gauge end-hole catheter in terms of safety, injection pressure, and contrast enhancement on multi-detector computed tomography (MDCT). Materials & methods: In a randomized single-center study, 180 patients were randomized to either the 24-gauge side-holes catheter or the 22-gauge end-hole catheter groups. The primary endpoint was safety during intravenous administration of contrast material for MDCT, using a non-inferiority analysis (lower limit 95% CI greater than −10% non-inferiority margin for the group difference). The secondary endpoints were injection pressure and contrast enhancement. Results: A total of 174 patients were analyzed for safety during intravenous contrast material administration for MDCT. The overall extravasation rate was 1.1% (2/174 patients); 1 (1.2%) minor episode occurred in the 24-gauge side-holes catheter group and 1 (1.1%) in the 22-gauge end-hole catheter group (difference: 0.1%, 95% CI: −3.17% to 3.28%, non-inferiority P = 1). The mean maximum pressure was higher with the 24-gauge side-holes catheter than with the 22-gauge end-hole catheter (8.16 ± 0.95 kg/cm{sup 2} vs. 4.79 ± 0.63 kg/cm{sup 2}, P < 0.001). The mean contrast enhancement of the abdominal aorta, celiac artery, superior mesenteric artery, and pancreatic parenchyma in the two groups were not significantly different. Conclusion: In conclusion, our study showed that the 24-gauge side-holes catheter is safe and suitable for delivering iodine with a concentration of 300 mg/mL at a flow-rate of 3 mL/s, and it may contribute to

  3. Where does the pulmonary artery catheter float: Transesophageal echocardiography evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deepak K Tempe

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Pulmonary artery (PA catheter provides a variety of cardiac and hemodynamic parameters. In majority of the patients, the catheter tends to float in the right pulmonary artery (RPA than the left pulmonary artery (LPA. We evaluated the location of PA catheter with the help of transesophageal echocardiography (TEE to know the incidence of its localization. Three views were utilized for this purpose; midesophageal ascending aorta (AA short-axis view, modified mid esophageal aortic valve long-axis view, and modified bicaval view. Methods: We enrolled 135 patients undergoing elective cardiac surgery where both the PA catheter and TEE were to be used; for this prospective observational study. PA catheter was visualized by TEE in the above mentioned views and the degree of clarity of visualization by three views was also noted. Position of the PA catheter was further confirmed by a postoperative chest radiograph. Results: One patient was excluded from the data analysis. PA catheter was visualized in RPA in 129 patients (96% and in LPA in 4 patients (3%. In 1 patient, the catheter was visualized in main PA in the chest radiograph. The midesophageal AA short-axis, modified aortic valve long-axis, and modified bicaval view provided good visualization in 51.45%, 57.4%, and 62.3% patients respectively. Taken together, PA catheter visualization was good in 128 (95.5% patients. Conclusion: We conclude that the PA catheter has a high probability of entering the RPA as compared to LPA (96% vs. 3% and TEE provides good visualization of the catheter in RPA.

  4. Totally implantable venous catheters for chemotherapy: experience in 500 patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nelson Wolosker

    Full Text Available CONTEXT: Totally implantable devices are increasingly being utilized for chemotherapy treatment of oncological patients, although few studies have been done in our environment to analyze the results obtained from the implantation and utilization of such catheters. OBJECTIVE: To study the results obtained from the implantation of totally implantable catheters in patients submitted to chemotherapy. TYPE OF STUDY: Prospective. SETTING: Hospital do Câncer A.C. Camargo, São Paulo, Brazil. METHODS: 519 totally implantable catheters were placed in 500 patients submitted to chemotherapy, with preference for the use of the right external jugular vein. Evaluations were made of the early and late-stage complications and patient evolution until removal of the device, death or the end of the treatment. RESULTS: The prospective analysis showed an average duration of 353 days for the catheters. There were 427 (82.2% catheters with no complications. Among the early complications observed, there were 15 pathway hematomas, 8 cases of thrombophlebitis of the distal stump of the external jugular vein and one case of pocket infection. Among the late-stage complications observed, there were 43 infectious complications (0.23/1000 days of catheter use, 11 obstructions (0.06/1000 days of catheter use and 14 cases of deep vein thrombosis (0.07/1000 days of catheter use. Removal of 101 catheters was performed: 35 due to complications and 66 upon terminating the treatment. A total of 240 patients died while the catheter was functioning and 178 patients are still making use of the catheter. CONCLUSION: The low rate of complications obtained in this study confirms the safety and convenience of the use of totally implantable accesses in patients undergoing prolonged chemotherapy regimes.

  5. Use of asymmetric bidirectional catheters with different curvature radius for catheter ablation of cardiac arrhythmias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantziari, Lilian; Suman-Horduna, Irina; Gujic, Marko; Jones, David G; Wong, Tom; Markides, Vias; Foran, John P; Ernst, Sabine

    2013-06-01

    The impact of recently introduced asymmetric bidirectional ablation catheters on procedural parameters and acute success rates of ablation procedures is unknown. We retrospectively analyzed data regarding ablations using a novel bidirectional catheter in a tertiary cardiac center and compared these in 1:5 ratio with a control group of procedures matched for age, gender, operator, and ablation type. A total of 50 cases and 250 controls of median age 60 (50-68) years were studied. Structural heart disease was equally prevalent in both groups (39%) while history of previous ablations was more common in the study arm (54% vs 30%, P = 0.001). Most of the ablation cases were for atrial fibrillation (46%), followed by atrial tachycardia (28%), supraventricular tachycardia (12%), and ventricular tachycardia (14%). Median procedure duration was 128 (52-147) minutes with the bidirectional, versus 143 (105-200) minutes with the conventional catheter (P = 0.232), and median fluoroscopy time was 17 (10-34) minutes versus 23 (12-39) minutes, respectively (P = 0.988). There was a trend toward a lower procedure duration for the atrial tachycardia ablations, 89 (52-147) minutes versus 130 (100-210) minutes, P = 0.064. The procedure was successfully completed in 96% of the bidirectional versus 84% of the control cases (P = 0.151). A negative correlation was observed between the relative fluoroscopy duration and the case number (r = -0.312, P = 0.028), reflecting the learning curve for the bidirectional catheter. The introduction of the bidirectional catheter resulted in no prolongation of procedure parameters and similar success rates, while there was a trend toward a lower procedure duration for atrial tachycardia ablations. ©2013, The Authors. Journal compilation ©2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Modelling Cooperative Work at a Medical Department

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Lars Rune; Hildebrandt, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    Based on ethnographic fieldwork, and the modelling of work processes at a medical department, this paper considers some of the opportunities and challenges involved in working with models in a complex work setting. The paper introduces a flexible modelling tool to CSCW, called the DCR Portal......, and considers how it may be used to model complex work settings collaboratively. Further, the paper discusses how models created with the DCR portal may potentially play a key role in making a cooperative work ensemble appreciate, discuss and coordinate key interdependencies inherent to their cooperative work...

  7. Phlebitis and infiltration: vascular trauma associated with the peripheral venous catheter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braga, Luciene Muniz; Parreira, Pedro Miguel; Oliveira, Anabela de Sousa Salgueiro; Mónico, Lisete dos Santos Mendes; Arreguy-Sena, Cristina; Henriques, Maria Adriana

    2018-01-01

    ABSTRACT Objective: to determine the incidence rate and risk factors for the nursing-sensitive indicators phlebitis and infiltration in patients with peripheral venous catheters (PVCs). Method: cohort study with 110 patients. Scales were used to assess and document phlebitis and infiltration. Socio-demographic variables, clinical variables related to the PVC, medication and hospitalization variables were collected. Descriptive and inferential analysis and multivariate logistic models were used. Results: the incidence rate of phlebitis and infiltration was respectively 43.2 and 59.7 per 1000 catheter-days. Most PVCs with these vascular traumas were removed in the first 24 hours. Risk factors for phlebitis were: length of hospital stay (p=0.042) and number of catheters inserted (p<0.001); risk factors for infiltration were: piperacillin/tazobactan (p=0.024) and the number of catheters inserted (p<0.001). Conclusion: the investigation documented the incidence of nursing-sensitive indicators (phlebitis and infiltration) and revealed new risk factors related to infiltration. It also allowed a reflection on the nursing care necessary to prevent these vascular traumas and on the indications and contraindications of the PVC, supporting the implementation of the PICC as an alternative to PVC. PMID:29791668

  8. A catheter friction tester using balance sensor: Combined evaluation of the effects of mechanical properties of tubing materials and surface coatings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Røn, Troels; Jacobsen, Kristina Pilgaard; Lee, Seunghwan

    2018-04-24

    In this study, we introduce a new experimental approach to characterize the forces emerging from simulated catherization. This setup allows for a linear translation of urinary catheters in vertical direction as controlled by an actuator. By employing silicone-based elastomer with a duct of comparable diameter with catheters as urethra model, sliding contacts during the translation of catheters along the duct is generated. A most unique design and operation feature of this setup is that a digital balance was employed as the sensor to detect emerging forces from simulated catherization. Moreover, the possibility to give a variation in environment (ambient air vs. water), clearance, elasticity, and curvature of silicone-based urethra model allows for the detection of forces arising from diverse simulated catherization conditions. Two types of commercially available catheters varying in tubing materials and surface coatings were tested together with their respective uncoated catheter tubing. The first set of testing on the catheter samples showed that this setup can probe the combined effect from flexural strain of bulk tubing materials and slipperiness of surface coatings, both of which are expected to affect the comfort and smooth gliding in clinical catherization. We argue that this new experimental setup can provide unique and valuable information in preclinical friction testing of urinary catheters. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Percutaneous catheter drainage of lung abscess

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Young Shin; Chun, Kyung Ah; Choi, Hyo Sun; Ha, Hyun Kown; Shinn, Kyung Sub [Catholic University Medical college, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-09-15

    From March 1987 to July 1989, six patients (five adults and one child) with lung abscess (size, 5-13 cm in diameter) were treated with percutaneous aspiration and drainage. In each case, the puncture was made where the wall of the abscess was in contact with the pleural surface. An 8 to 10 Fr cartheter was inserted for drainage. Five of 6 had a dynamatic clinical response within 24 hours of the drainage. Percutaneous drainage was successful with complete abscess resolution in four and partial resolution in one patient. No response was seen in the rest one. The duration of drainage ranged from 7 to 18 days(average, 15.5 days) in successful cases. One case of the failure in drainage was due tio persistent aspiration of the neurologically impaired patient. In one patient, the abscess resolved after drainage but recurred after inadvertent removal of the catheter 7 days after insertion. In two patients, concurrent pleural empyema was resolved completely by the drainage. Computed tomography provide anatomic details necessary for choosing the puncture site and avoiding a puncture of the lung parenchyma. Percutaneous catheter drainage is safe and effective method for treating patient with lung abscess.

  10. Percutaneous catheter drainage of lung abscess

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Young Shin; Chun, Kyung Ah; Choi, Hyo Sun; Ha, Hyun Kown; Shinn, Kyung Sub

    1993-01-01

    From March 1987 to July 1989, six patients (five adults and one child) with lung abscess (size, 5-13 cm in diameter) were treated with percutaneous aspiration and drainage. In each case, the puncture was made where the wall of the abscess was in contact with the pleural surface. An 8 to 10 Fr cartheter was inserted for drainage. Five of 6 had a dynamatic clinical response within 24 hours of the drainage. Percutaneous drainage was successful with complete abscess resolution in four and partial resolution in one patient. No response was seen in the rest one. The duration of drainage ranged from 7 to 18 days(average, 15.5 days) in successful cases. One case of the failure in drainage was due tio persistent aspiration of the neurologically impaired patient. In one patient, the abscess resolved after drainage but recurred after inadvertent removal of the catheter 7 days after insertion. In two patients, concurrent pleural empyema was resolved completely by the drainage. Computed tomography provide anatomic details necessary for choosing the puncture site and avoiding a puncture of the lung parenchyma. Percutaneous catheter drainage is safe and effective method for treating patient with lung abscess

  11. Prolonged use of indwelling urinary catheter following acute urinary ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    J.O. Bello

    prolonged use of urinary catheters following acute urinary retention secondary to benign prostate enlarge- ment (BPE) and urethral ... indwelling urinary catheter for >3 months following acute urinary retention due to BPE or USD. The study .... the major health-care financing strategy in Nigeria and accounts for more than ...

  12. Management of retained encrusted urethral catheter with extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sameh Anwar Kunzman

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of non-deflating heavily encrusted Foley catheter successfully removed by extracorporeal shockwave lithotripsy (ESWL. To our knowledge this is the first case of using ESWL to remove encrusted foley catheter retained in the bladder.

  13. The left atrial catheter: its uses and complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leitman, B S; Naidich, D P; McGuinness, G; McCauley, D I

    1992-11-01

    The authors describe the radiographic appearance of the left atrial catheter, a widely used postsurgical intracardiac device. Recognition of the characteristic appearance of this catheter should be of value in detection of potential complications, including line fracture with resultant retention and/or embolization, infection, prosthetic valve dysfunction, and even cardiac tamponade.

  14. Prevention of catheter-related blood stream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Matthew C; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2007-08-01

    Catheter-related blood stream infections are a morbid complication of central venous catheters. This review will highlight a comprehensive approach demonstrated to prevent catheter-related blood stream infections. Elements of prevention important to inserting a central venous catheter include proper hand hygiene, use of full barrier precautions, appropriate skin preparation with 2% chlorhexidine, and using the subclavian vein as the preferred anatomic site. Rigorous attention needs to be given to dressing care, and there should be daily assessment of the need for central venous catheters, with prompt removal as soon as is practicable. Healthcare workers should be educated routinely on methods to prevent catheter-related blood stream infections. If rates remain higher than benchmark levels despite proper bedside practice, antiseptic or antibiotic-impregnated catheters can also prevent infections effectively. A recent program utilizing these practices in 103 ICUs in Michigan resulted in a 66% decrease in infection rates. There is increasing recognition that a comprehensive strategy to prevent catheter-related blood stream infections can prevent most infections, if not all. This suggests that thousands of infections can potentially be averted if the simple practices outlined herein are followed.

  15. Encrusted and incarcerated urinary bladder catheter: what are the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Urinary bladder catheter encrustations are known complications of long-term urinary catheterisation, which is commonly seen in clinical practice. These encrustations can impede deflation of the balloon and therefore cause problems in the removal of the catheter. The options in managing an encrusted and incarcerated ...

  16. Detection of electrophysiology catheters in noisy fluoroscopy images

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Franken, E.M.; Rongen, P.M.J.; Almsick, van M.A.; Haar Romenij, ter B.M.

    2006-01-01

    Cardiac catheter ablation is a minimally invasive medical procedure to treat patients with heart rhythm disorders. It is useful to know the positions of the catheters and electrodes during the intervention, e.g. for the automatization of cardiac mapping. Our goal is therefore to develop a robust

  17. Risk factors for peritoneal dialysis catheter failure in children ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background Peritoneal dialysis catheter (PDC) failure still remains a common clinical problem in pediatric patients despite advancements in catheter placement and dialysis techniques. Our aim was to determine the risk factors that may lead to PDC failure, especially those factors that could be potentially modified to ...

  18. Unusual migration of ventriculo peritoneal distal catheter into vagina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sghavamedin Tavallaee

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available VP shunt is one of the most popular methods for ICP reduction and treatment of hydrocephalus. Various complications of this method are not uncommon such as shunt malfunction, infection and unusual migration of distal catheter. I present a case of migration of the peritoneal catheter out of the vagina.

  19. Percutaneous transfemoral repositioning of malpositioned central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartnell, G G; Roizental, M

    1995-04-01

    Central venous catheters inserted by blind surgical placement may not advance into a satisfactory position and may require repositioning. Malpositioning via surgical insertion is common in patients in whom central venous catheters have previously been placed, as these patients are more likely to have central venous thrombosis and distortion of central venous anatomy. This is less of a problem when catheter placement is guided by imaging; however, even when insertion is satisfactory, central venous catheters may become displaced spontaneously after insertion (Fig. 1). Repositioning can be effected by direct manipulation using guidewires or tip-deflecting wires [1, 2], by manipulation via a transfemoral venous approach [3-5], and by injection of contrast material or saline [6]. Limitations of the direct approach include (1) the number and type of maneuvers that can be performed to effect repositioning when anatomy is distorted, (2) difficulty in accessing the catheter, and (3) the risk of introducing infection. Moreover, these patients are often immunosuppressed, and there is a risk of introducing infection by exposing and directly manipulating the venous catheter. Vigorous injection of contrast material or saline may be unsuccessful for the same reasons: It seldom exerts sufficient force to reposition large-caliber central venous catheters and may cause vessel damage or rupture if injection is made into a small or thrombosed vessel. We illustrate several alternative methods for catheter repositioning via a transfemoral venous approach.

  20. Intravascular catheter-related infection – current concepts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2006-08-28

    Aug 28, 2006 ... prevented. ... blood from both the catheter and a peripheral site, may ... Given the important role of cutaneous microflora in the ... valvular heart disease (especially prosthetic valves) and ... be explained by high arterial flow around the catheter, ... vena cava or right atrium via the cephalic and basilar veins of ...

  1. Encrusted and incarcerated urinary bladder catheter: what are the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-11-25

    Nov 25, 2010 ... cases of extraluminal encrusted urethral catheters. Extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy (ESWL) has been utilised in the treatment of the bladder stones. Borrowing this principle, Kunzman et al. (12) has even used ESWL to fragment the stone-like encrustation over the retained Foley catheter balloon.

  2. Preprocedural ultrasound examination versus manual palpation for thoracic epidural catheter insertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmed M Hasanin

    2017-01-01

    Conclusion: Preprocedural ultrasound imaging increased the incidence of first pass success in thoracic epidural catheter insertion and reduced the catheter insertion time compared to manual palpation method.

  3. Standard model Higgs physics at colliders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rosca, A.

    2007-01-01

    In this report we briefly review the experimental status and prospects to verify the Higgs mechanism of spontaneous symmetry breaking. The focus is on the most relevant aspects of the phenomenology of the Standard Model Higgs boson at current (Tevatron) and future (Large Hadron Collider, LHC and International Linear Collider, ILC) particle colliders. We review the Standard Model searches: searches at the Tevatron, the program planned at the LHC and prospects at the ILC. Emphasis is put on what follows after a candidate discovery at the LHC: the various measurements which are necessary to precisely determine what the properties of this Higgs candidate are. (author)

  4. Successful retrieval of an entrapped Rotablator burr using 5 Fr guiding catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimura, Masayoshi; Shiraishi, Jun; Kohno, Yoshio

    2011-10-01

    Although burr entrapment is a rare complication of the Rotablator, it is extremely difficult to retrieve a fixedly entrapped burr without surgical procedure. An 84-year-old male with effort angina had heavily calcified coronary trees as well as severe stenosis in the mid LCx, and moderate stenosis in the proximal LCx, and in the LMT. We planned to perform rotational atherectomy in the LCx lesions. Using 7 Fr Q-curve guiding catheter and Rotawire floppy, we began to ablate using 1.5-mm burr at 200,000 rpm. Because the burr could not pass the proximal stenosis, we exchanged the wire for Rotawire extrasupport and the burr for 1.25-mm burr, and restarted the ablation at 220,000 rpm. Although the burr could manage to pass the proximal stenosis, it had become trapped in the mid LCx lesion. Simple pull on the Rotablator, rotation of the burr, and crossing the Conquest (Confianza) wire could not retrieve it. Thus, we cut off the drive shaft and sheath of the Rotablator, inserted 5 Fr 120-cm straight guiding catheter (Heartrail ST01; Terumo) through the remaining Rotablator system, pushed the catheter tip to the lesion around the burr as well as simultaneously pulled the Rotablator, and finally could retrieve it. Then we implanted stents in the LCx and in the LMT without difficulty. The 5 Fr straight guiding catheter might be useful for retrieving an entrapped burr (1.25-mm burr). Copyright © 2011 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  5. SEP modeling based on global heliospheric models at the CCMC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mays, M. L.; Luhmann, J. G.; Odstrcil, D.; Bain, H. M.; Schwadron, N.; Gorby, M.; Li, Y.; Lee, K.; Zeitlin, C.; Jian, L. K.; Lee, C. O.; Mewaldt, R. A.; Galvin, A. B.

    2017-12-01

    Heliospheric models provide contextual information of conditions in the heliosphere, including the background solar wind conditions and shock structures, and are used as input to SEP models, providing an essential tool for understanding SEP properties. The global 3D MHD WSA-ENLIL+Cone model provides a time-dependent background heliospheric description, into which a spherical shaped hydrodynamic CME can be inserted. ENLIL simulates solar wind parameters and additionally one can extract the magnetic topologies of observer-connected magnetic field lines and all plasma and shock properties along those field lines. An accurate representation of the background solar wind is necessary for simulating transients. ENLIL simulations also drive SEP models such as the Solar Energetic Particle Model (SEPMOD) (Luhmann et al. 2007, 2010) and the Energetic Particle Radiation Environment Module (EPREM) (Schwadron et al. 2010). The Community Coordinated Modeling Center (CCMC) is in the process of making these SEP models available to the community and offering a system to run SEP models driven by a variety of heliospheric models available at CCMC. SEPMOD injects protons onto a sequence of observer field lines at intensities dependent on the connected shock source strength which are then integrated at the observer to approximate the proton flux. EPREM couples with MHD models such as ENLIL and computes energetic particle distributions based on the focused transport equation along a Lagrangian grid of nodes that propagate out with the solar wind. The coupled SEP models allow us to derive the longitudinal distribution of SEP profiles of different types of events throughout the heliosphere. The coupled ENLIL and SEP models allow us to derive the longitudinal distribution of SEP profiles of different types of events throughout the heliosphere. In this presentation we demonstrate several case studies of SEP event modeling at different observers based on WSA-ENLIL+Cone simulations.

  6. Innovating urinary catheter design: An introduction to the engineering challenge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Cathy

    2018-05-01

    Every day, people around the world rely on intermittent and indwelling urinary catheters to manage bladder dysfunction, but the potential or actual harm caused by these devices is well-recognised. Current catheter designs can cause urinary tract infection and septicaemia, bladder and urethral trauma and indwelling devices frequently become blocked. Furthermore, the devices can severely disrupt users' lives, limiting their daily activities and can be costly to manage for healthcare providers. Despite this, little significant design innovation has taken place in the last 80 years. In this article current catheter designs and their limitations are reviewed, common catheter-associated problems are outlined and areas of design ripe for improvement proposed. The potential to relieve the individual and economic burden of catheter use is high.

  7. An experimental study about efficacy of the drain catheters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ahn, Bum Gyu; Nho, Joon Young; Woo, Hyo Cheol; Hwang, Woo Cheol; Park, Choong Ki; Yoon, Jong Sup [Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1993-09-15

    Although percutaneous abscess drainage has become and accepted alternative from of therapy for selected patients with abscess, it is well known that there are several factors in the failure of adequate drainage such as pre- and post-procedural management, technique itself, various features of abscess, and selection and application of catheters. Among these factors, we made an experiment about drainage efficacy of commonly used various catheters with different viscosities of water-glycerin solution under the two different pressure gradients. The experimental values of flow rate were very lower than the calculated values. An efficacy of experimental value was 4-14%. Because the inner diameter of fittings and stopcocks was usually smaller than the inner diameter of catheters, these factors also affected the drain efficacy. Finally, we thought that it will be very helpful to the treatment of patient as well as to study about the catheter drainage, if the drain efficacy of individual catheters has been notified.

  8. Dose requirements for UVC disinfection of catheter biofilms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Jimmy; Ladefoged, Søren D.; Tvede, Michael

    2009-01-01

    Bacterial biofilms on permanent catheters are the major sources of infection. Exposure to ultraviolet-C (UVC) light has been proposed as a method for disinfecting the inner surface of catheters. Specification of a UVC-based device for in vivo disinfection is based on the knowledge of the required...... doses to kill catheter biofilm. Given these doses and the power of available UVC light sources, calculation of the necessary treatment times is then possible. To determine the required doses, contaminated urinary catheters were used as test samples and UVC treated in vitro. Patient catheters (n = 67......) were collected and cut into segments of equal size and treated with various UVC doses. After treatment, the biofilm was removed by scraping and quantified by counting colony forming units. Percentage killing rates were determined by calculating ratios between UVC-treated samples and controls (no UVC...

  9. The dialysis catheter and infectious peritonitis in intermittent peritoneal dialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kolmos, Hans Jørn; Hemmeløff Andersen, Karl Erik; Hansen, Lise

    1984-01-01

    118 episodes of infectious peritonitis registered among 156 patients treated with intermittent peritoneal dialysis over a 5-yr period were analysed with special reference to potential routes of infection associated with the dialysis catheter. Peritonitis was randomly distributed among the patients......, and the change of keeping free of peritonitis declined exponentially with time. The main factor determining the individual number of episodes was the total space of time, in which a patient had been wearing a dialysis catheter, whereas the number of catheter disconnections played no significant role. A relative...... preponderance of cases due to Enterobacteriaceae was noted within the first week after catheter implantation. In contrast with this, peritonitis with skin microorganisms was not associated with the implantation of catheters....

  10. GRA model development at Bruce Power

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Parmar, R.; Ngo, K.; Cruchley, I.

    2011-01-01

    In 2007, Bruce Power undertook a project, in partnership with AMEC NSS Limited, to develop a Generation Risk Assessment (GRA) model for its Bruce B Nuclear Generating Station. The model is intended to be used as a decision-making tool in support of plant operations. Bruce Power has recognized the strategic importance of GRA in the plant decision-making process and is currently implementing a pilot GRA application. The objective of this paper is to present the scope of the GRA model development project, methodology employed, and the results and path forward for the model implementation at Bruce Power. The required work was split into three phases. Phase 1 involved development of GRA models for the twelve systems most important to electricity production. Ten systems were added to the model during each of the next two phases. The GRA model development process consists of developing system Failure Modes and Effects Analyses (FMEA) to identify the components critical to the plant reliability and determine their impact on electricity production. The FMEAs were then used to develop the logic for system fault tree (FT) GRA models. The models were solved and post-processed to provide model outputs to the plant staff in a user-friendly format. The outputs consisted of the ranking of components based on their production impact expressed in terms of lost megawatt hours (LMWH). Another key model output was the estimation of the predicted Forced Loss Rate (FLR). (author)

  11. Effective model for deconfinement at high temperature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Skokov, Vladimir

    2013-01-01

    In this talk I consider the deconfining phase transition at nonzero temperature in a SU(N) gauge theory, using a matrix model. I present some results including the position of the deconfining critical endpoint, where the first order transition for deconfinement is washed out by the presence of massive, dynamical quarks, and properites of the phase transition in the limit of large N. I show that the model is soluble at infinite N, and exhibits a Gross-Witten-Wadia transition

  12. Strongly coupled models at the LHC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vries, Maikel de

    2014-10-01

    In this thesis strongly coupled models where the Higgs boson is composite are discussed. These models provide an explanation for the origin of electroweak symmetry breaking including a solution for the hierarchy problem. Strongly coupled models provide an alternative to the weakly coupled supersymmetric extensions of the Standard Model and lead to different and interesting phenomenology at the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). This thesis discusses two particular strongly coupled models, a composite Higgs model with partial compositeness and the Littlest Higgs model with T-parity - a composite model with collective symmetry breaking. The phenomenology relevant for the LHC is covered and the applicability of effective operators for these types of strongly coupled models is explored. First, a composite Higgs model with partial compositeness is discussed. In this model right-handed light quarks could be significantly composite, yet compatible with experimental searches at the LHC and precision tests on Standard Model couplings. In these scenarios, which are motivated by flavour physics, large cross sections for the production of new resonances coupling to light quarks are expected. Experimental signatures of right-handed compositeness at the LHC are studied, and constraints on the parameter space of these models are derived using recent results by ATLAS and CMS. Furthermore, dedicated searches for multi-jet signals at the LHC are proposed which could significantly improve the sensitivity to signatures of right-handed compositeness. The Littlest Higgs model with T-parity, providing an attractive solution to the fine-tuning problem, is discussed next. This solution is only natural if its intrinsic symmetry breaking scale f is relatively close to the electroweak scale. The constraints from the latest results of the 8 TeV run at the LHC are examined. The model's parameter space is being excluded based on a combination of electroweak precision observables, Higgs precision

  13. Effective flow performances and dialysis doses delivered with permanent catheters: a 24-month comparative study of permanent catheters versus arterio-venous vascular accesses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Canaud, Bernard; Leray-Moragues, Hélène; Kerkeni, Nadia; Bosc, Jean-Yves; Martin, Katja

    2002-07-01

    loss of dialysis efficacy using catheters was estimated at 6%. However, in all cases Kt/Vdp values remained above the recommended values (Kt/Vdp > or = 1.2). Protein nutritional state, as well as conventional clinical and biochemical markers of dialysis adequacy, remained in the optimal range. Permanent venous catheters provide adequate haemodialysis on a long-term basis. Flow performances and dialysis doses are slightly reduced (5-6%) when compared with AVA. Regular assessment of dialysis performance is strongly recommended to assure dialysis adequacy. Lengthening dialysis time may represent a simple and efficient tool to compensate for reduced flow performances with catheter use.

  14. Antibiotic prescribing practices for catheter urine culture results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Jonathan; Thompson, G William; Austin, Thomas W; Hussain, Zafar; John, Michael; Bombassaro, Anne Marie; Connelly, Sarah E; Elsayed, Sameer

    2013-01-01

    The literature suggests that positive results of catheter urine cultures frequently lead to unnecessary antimicrobial prescribing, which therefore represents an important target for stewardship. To assess the appropriateness of antibiotic prescribing in response to the results of urine cultures from patients with indwelling urinary catheters. This retrospective study was conducted at a tertiary care centre and involved adults with indwelling urinary catheters from whom urine specimens were obtained for culture. Patients with positive or negative culture results were identified from microbiology laboratory reports. The medical records of consecutive patients were screened to select a sample of 80 inpatients (40 per group). Abstracted patient histories were independently evaluated by an expert panel of 3 infectious diseases consultants blinded to the decisions of prescribers and of fellow panelists. The primary end point was concordance of each patient's treatment decision (with respect to the indication) between the expert panel (based on majority agreement, i.e., at least 2 of the 3 expert panelists) and the prescriber. The secondary end points were unnecessary days of therapy and selected outcomes over a predefined period after urine was obtained for culture. A total of 591 charts were screened to generate the targeted number of patients. Baseline demographic characteristics were comparable for the 2 groups, except antibiotic exposure before urine collection was significantly more frequent for the group with negative culture results. The treatment decision was concordant in 40% (16/40) of the patients with a positive culture result and 85% (34/40) of those with a negative culture result (p < 0.001). The most common reason for discordance was administration of antibiotics when not indicated (23 of 24 patients with a positive result and 5 of 6 patients with a negative result), which accounted for 165 and 32 unnecessary days of therapy per 1000 inpatient

  15. Phrenic Nerve Injury After Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacques Clementy

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Phrenic Nerve Injury (PNI has been well studied by cardiac surgeons. More recently it has been recognized as a potential complication of catheter ablation with a prevalence of 0.11 to 0.48 % after atrial fibrillation (AF ablation. This review will focus on PNI after AF ablation. Anatomical studies have shown a close relationship between the right phrenic nerve and it's proximity to the superior vena cava (SVC, and the antero-inferior part of the right superior pulmonary vein (RSPV. In addition, the proximity of the left phrenic nerve to the left atrial appendage has been well established. Independent of the type of ablation catheter (4mm, 8 mm, irrigated tip, balloon or energy source used (radiofrequency (RF, ultrasound, cryothermia, and laser; the risk of PNI exists during ablation at the critical areas listed above. Although up to thirty-one percent of patients with PNI after AF ablation remain asymptomatic, dyspnea remain the cardinal symptom and is present in all symptomatic patients. Despite the theoretical risk for significant adverse effect on functional status and quality of life, short-term outcomes from published studies appear favorable with 81% of patients with PNI having a complete recovery after 7 ± 7 months.Conclusion: Existing studies have described PNI as an uncommon but avoidable complication in patients undergoing pulmonary vein isolation for AF. Prior to ablation at the SVC, antero-inferior RSPV ostium or the left atrial appendage, pacing should be performed before energy delivery. If phrenic nerve capture is documented, energy delivery should be avoided at this site. Electrophysiologist's vigilance as well as pacing prior to ablation at high risk sites in close proximity to the phrenic nerve are the currently available tools to avoid the complication of PNI.

  16. Removal of non-deflatable retained foley catheter in the bladder by percutaneous puncture of catheter balloon

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoo, Jae Duk; Kim, Jae Kyu; Park, Jin Gyun; Chung, Hyon De

    1988-01-01

    Nondeflatable Foley catheter in the bladder is an uncommon event. We recently experienced a patient in whom the urologist were unable to remove a Foley catheter with cystoscope due to public bone fractures. The procedure, which was successfully carried out, consists of puncturing the ballon under fluoroscope.

  17. Over-the-catheter precut to gain access to the biliary duct during ERCP rendezvous.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manes, Gianpiero; Baratti, Cinzia; Ardizzone, Sandro; Ferla, Fabio; Spiropoulos, Jean; Corsi, Fabio; Foschi, Diego; Trabucchi, Emilio; Bianchi Porro, Gabriele

    2008-10-01

    Endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography (ERCP) rendezvous during laparoscopic cholecystectomy is an efficient and safe method to treat cholecystocholedocholithiasis. Advancing a guidewire through the cystic duct into the duodenum and withdrawing it in the accessory channel of duodenoscope may be, however, laborious. Moreover, rendezvous performed in the typical manner needs the use of several costly accessories. We herein describe a simpler and cheaper method to gain access to the biliary duct at rendezvous. Twenty-four consecutive patients undergoing ERCP rendezvous during laparoscopic cholecystectomy were considered. A catheter was introduced in the cystic duct and advanced into the duodenum. Access to the bile duct was than achieved by means of a precut sphincterotomy performed over the catheter emerging from the papilla. Cannulation was successful in all but two patients, in whom ERCP was performed in the conventional manner. The only complication was a case of mild post-sphincterotomy bleeding. In comparison with the typical rendezvous technique our procedure allowed savings of about 250, since its performance only requires a catheter and a knife sphincterotome. Over-the-catheter precut during ERCP rendezvous is a feasible and safe method which avoids the need for the manipulation of several accessories and guidewires, and thus results in money and time savings.

  18. Evaluation of a respiratory assist catheter that uses an impeller within a hollow fiber membrane bundle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihelc, Kevin M; Frankowski, Brian J; Lieber, Samuel C; Moore, Nathan D; Hattler, Brack G; Federspiel, William J

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory assist using an intravenous catheter may be a potential treatment for patients suffering from acute or acute-on-chronic lung failure. The objective of this study was to evaluate a novel respiratory catheter that uses an impeller within the fiber bundle to enhance gas exchange efficiency, thus requiring a smaller fiber bundle and insertional size (25 Fr) and permitting simple percutaneous insertion. Bench testing of gas exchange in deionized water was used to evaluate eight impeller designs. The three best performing impeller designs were evaluated in acute studies