WorldWideScience

Sample records for catheter insertion length

  1. Bedside prediction of right subclavian venous catheter insertion length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Ji Choi

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective: The present study aimed to evaluate whether right subclavian vein (SCV catheter insertion depth can be predicted reliably by the distances from the SCV insertion site to the ipsilateral clavicular notch directly (denoted as I-IC, via the top of the SCV arch, or via the clavicle (denoted as I-T-IC and I-C-IC, respectively. Method: In total, 70 SCV catheterizations were studied. The I-IC, I-T-IC, and I-C-IC distances in each case were measured after ultrasound-guided SCV catheter insertion. The actual length of the catheter between the insertion site and the ipsilateral clavicular notch, denoted as L, was calculated by using chest X-ray. Results: L differed from the I-T-IC, I-C-IC, and I-IC distances by 0.14±0.53, 2.19±1.17, and -0.45 ±0.68 cm, respectively. The mean I-T-IC distance was the most similar to the mean L (intraclass correlation coefficient = 0.89. The mean I-IC was significantly shorter than L, while the mean I-C-IC was significantly longer. Linear regression analysis provided the following formula: Predicted SCV catheter insertion length (cm = -0.037 + 0.036 × Height (cm + 0.903 × I-T-IC (cm (adjusted r2 =0.64. Conclusion: The I-T-IC distance may be a reliable bedside predictor of the optimal insertion length for a right SCV cannulation.

  2. Accuracy of five formulae to determine the insertion length of umbilical venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lean, Wei Ling; Dawson, Jennifer A; Davis, Peter G; Theda, Christiane; Thio, Marta

    2018-03-17

    Umbilical venous catheter (UVC) placement is a common neonatal procedure. It is important to position the UVC tip accurately at the first attempt to prevent complications and minimise handling. Catheters positioned too low need to be removed, but catheters positioned too high may be withdrawn in a sterile fashion to a safe position. We aimed to determine the precision and accuracy of five published formulae developed to guide UVC placement. This was a prospective observational study. Following UVC insertion, anteroposterior and lateral X-rays were performed to identify catheter tip position. Parameters required to apply the five formulae were recorded. Insertion lengths were then calculated and compared with the gold standard (UVC tip at the level of the diaphragm on the lateral X-ray). They were also used to classify predicted UVC tip position as either correct (UVC tip at or up to 1 cm above the diaphragm), too high or too low. Of 118 eligible infants, 70 had the UVC tip in a position where measurements could be used. Their median (IQR) gestational age and weight were 28.5 (26-36) weeks and 1035 (745-2788) g, respectively. The predicted success rate for each formula ranged from 44.9% to 55.7%. A formula based on birth weight had the highest rate of either correct or high position (95.8%). Inserting a UVC into a safe position on first attempt is difficult and low tip placement is common. Around half of UVCs need to be manipulated to achieve the desired position. © Article author(s) (or their employer(s) unless otherwise stated in the text of the article) 2018. All rights reserved. No commercial use is permitted unless otherwise expressly granted.

  3. Peripherally inserted central catheter - insertion

    Science.gov (United States)

    PICC - insertion ... A PICC is a long, thin tube (called a catheter) that goes into your body through a vein in ... into a large vein near your heart. The PICC helps carry nutrients and medicines into your body. ...

  4. Comparison of Wright's Formula and the Dunn Method for Measuring the Umbilical Arterial Catheter Insertion Length

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Se-ra Min

    2015-04-01

    Conclusion: The use of Wright's formula overall results in superior correct placement of the UAC tip. It may be a more accurate and practical method than the conventional practice for measuring the UAC insertion length in newborns.

  5. Percutaneously inserted central catheter - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    PICC - infants; PQC - infants; Pic line - infants; Per-Q cath - infants ... A percutaneously inserted central catheter (PICC) is a long, very thin, soft plastic tube that is put into a small blood vessel. This article addresses PICCs in ...

  6. A New Formula to Estimate the Length of Right Upper Extremity Vein from Elbow Crease to Carina Calculated by Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Insertion through Right Basilic Vein Puncture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Hyun Hwan; Jeon, Eui Yong; Lee, Hyun Jung; Lee, Hyun; Koh, Sung Hye; Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Kwan Seop; Yoon, Dae Young; Im, Hyoung June

    2012-01-01

    To measure the length of the upper extremity vein between the elbow crease and the carina (elbow crease to carina length, ECL), to facilitate the appropriate positioning of the tip of the peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC). A total of 124 patients (64 men and 60 women; mean age 65.2 ± 15.4 years; range, 21-90 years) inserted with PICC through the right basilic vein under fluoroscopy were included in this retrospective study. The ECL was determined as follows: ECL = (distance from elbow crease to puncture site) + (the catheter length of PICC) - (distance from carina to catheter tip on post-procedural chest radiograph). We analyzed the relationship between ECL and patient height. The mean ECL through right basilic vein was 42.07 ±4.03 cm (27.5 to 52.2 cm). ECL was found to be significantly correlated with patient height: ECL (cm) = 0.24 X patient height (cm) + 3.75. The formula developed in our study would be helpful for predicting the optimal catheter length during a blind bedside procedure of PICC via the right basilic vein.

  7. A New Formula to Estimate the Length of Right Upper Extremity Vein from Elbow Crease to Carina Calculated by Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Insertion through Right Basilic Vein Puncture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cho, Hyun Hwan; Jeon, Eui Yong; Lee, Hyun Jung; Lee, Hyun; Koh, Sung Hye; Choi, Sun Young; Lee, Kwan Seop [Dept. of Radiology, Hallym University Scared Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Dae Young [Dept. of Radiology, Kangdong Scared Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Im, Hyoung June [Dept. of Occupational Medicine, Hallym University Scared Heart Hospital, Hallym University College of Medicine, Anyang (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-03-15

    To measure the length of the upper extremity vein between the elbow crease and the carina (elbow crease to carina length, ECL), to facilitate the appropriate positioning of the tip of the peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC). A total of 124 patients (64 men and 60 women; mean age 65.2 {+-} 15.4 years; range, 21-90 years) inserted with PICC through the right basilic vein under fluoroscopy were included in this retrospective study. The ECL was determined as follows: ECL = (distance from elbow crease to puncture site) + (the catheter length of PICC) - (distance from carina to catheter tip on post-procedural chest radiograph). We analyzed the relationship between ECL and patient height. The mean ECL through right basilic vein was 42.07 {+-}4.03 cm (27.5 to 52.2 cm). ECL was found to be significantly correlated with patient height: ECL (cm) = 0.24 X patient height (cm) + 3.75. The formula developed in our study would be helpful for predicting the optimal catheter length during a blind bedside procedure of PICC via the right basilic vein.

  8. Peripherally inserted central catheter - dressing change

    Science.gov (United States)

    PICC - dressing change ... You have a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC). This is a tube that goes into a vein in your arm. It carries nutrients and medicines into your body. It may also ...

  9. [Intracavitary electrocardiogram during the insertion of peripherally inserted central catheters].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ortiz-Miluy, Gloria; Sánchez-Guerra, Carmen

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate the applicability, feasibility and accuracy of the IC-ECG with column of saline technique for verifying the final tip position of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) by specialist nurses. A total of 99 consecutive PICC were inserted. Patients with no superficial ECG P wave, atrial fibrillation, or a pacemaker were excluded. The IC-ECG technique was performed on 84 patients. A chest x-ray was performed after insertion in all cases, in order to compare images with IC-ECG. The technique showed an applicability of 84.4%, an feasibility of 88%, and an accuracy of 87.8%. The IC-ECG technique for verification of catheter PICC tip locations with column of saline is easy to apply, is cost-effective, is achievable by nurses, and does not involve any risk for patients. The technique involves a learning curve, and it must be performed by qualified health care professionals. The technique is performed during the insertion of the catheter, so verification of the tip is made in situ. It reduces future re-insertions due to wrong positioning of the tip. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  10. Nelaton catheter assisted versus standard nasogastric tube insertion: a randomized, clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghaemi, M; Mousavinasab, N; Jalili, S

    2014-01-09

    It is sometimes difficult to insert a nasogastric tube in an anaesthetized patient. We evaluated the benefit of reinforcing the distal portion of the nasogastric tube with a Nelaton catheter: 8 and 10 French Nelaton catheters were inserted into 16 and 18 French nasogastric tubes respectively through the first proximal holes of tubes up to their tips. The patients anaesthetized were randomly allocated into either the control or the Nelaton groups, and nasogastric tube was inserted as deeply as the catheter length, then the catheter was withdrawn and the tube was inserted farther to reach the stomach. Eighty patients (40 in each group) were included in this study. The success rate of nasogastric tube insertion was 90% in the Nelaton group and 57% in the control group (P = 0.001). The mean insertion time was 80 (SD 43) and 92 (SD 35) seconds in the Nelaton and the control groups respectively.

  11. Insertion site assessment of peripherally inserted central catheters: Inter-observer agreement between nurses and inpatients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webster, Joan; Northfield, Sarah; Larsen, Emily N; Marsh, Nicole; Rickard, Claire M; Chan, Raymond J

    2018-03-01

    Many patients are discharged from hospital with a peripherally inserted central catheter in place. Monitoring the peripherally inserted central catheter insertion site for clinical and research purposes is important for identifying complications, but the extent to which patients can reliably report the condition of their catheter insertion site is uncertain. The aim of this study was to assess the inter-observer agreement between nurses and patients when assessing a peripherally inserted central catheter site. The study was based on inpatients who were enrolled in a single-centre, randomised controlled trial comparing four different dressing and securement devices for peripherally inserted central catheter sites. A seven-item peripherally inserted central catheter site assessment tool, containing questions about the condition of the dressing and the insertion site, was developed. Assessment was conducted once by the research nurse and, within a few minutes, independently by the patient. Proportions of agreement and Cohen's kappa were calculated. In total, 73 patients agreed to participate. Overall, percentage agreement ranged from 83% to 100% (kappa = .65-.82). For important clinical signs (redness, swelling, ooze, pus and tracking), there were high levels of percentage agreement (99%-100%). The high level of agreement between nurse/patient pairs make the instrument useful for assessing peripherally inserted central catheter-associated signs of localised infection, allergic or irritant dermatitis or dressing dislodgement in a community setting.

  12. Ultrasonic Guided Insertion of Central Venous Catheter in Infants ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background/Purpose: ultrasound is licensed for application of regional blocks and insertion of vascular access. We aimed to compare ultrasonic guided (USG) and anatomical landmark technique (ALT) for insertion of central venous catheter (CVC) as regard success rate and rate of complications in infants and children.

  13. Electromagnetically tracked placement of a peripherally inserted central catheter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sacolick, Laura; Patel, Neilesh; Tang, Jonathan; Levy, Elliot; Cleary, Kevin R.

    2004-05-01

    This paper describes a computer program to utilize electromagnetic tracking guidance during insertion of peripherally inserted central catheters. Placement of a Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC) line is a relatively simple, routine procedure in which a catheter is inserted into the veins of the lower arm and threaded up the arm to the vena cava to sit just above the heart. However, the procedure requires x-ray verification of the catheter position and is usually done under continuous fluoroscopic guidance. The computer program is designed to replace fluoroscopic guidance in this procedure and make PICC line placement a bedside procedure. This would greatly reduce the time and resources dedicated to this procedure. The physician first goes through a quick registration procedure to register the patient space with the computer screen coordinates. Once registration is completed, the program provides a continuous, real-time display of the position of the catheter tip overlaid on an x-ray image of the patient on an adjacent computer screen. Both the position and orientation of the catheter tip is shown. The display is very similar to that shown when using fluoroscopy.

  14. Vascular access in neonatology: peripherally inserted central catheter and peripheral venous catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Lienemann

    2014-04-01

    The objective of this paper is to present aspects of peripherally inserted central catheter and peripheral venous catheter, highlighting important points in choosing the type of access. For the passage of peripherally inserted central catheter is previously performing specific course necessary, while the primary indication occurs when it is necessary to access the patient's stay for a long period of time. Whereas peripheral venipuncture is the most appropriate in cases of needing an IV line quickly and safely, for the administration of fluids, blood collection, blood transfusion and other.

  15. Imaging of the complications of peripherally inserted central venous catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amerasekera, S.S.H.; Jones, C.M.; Patel, R.; Cleasby, M.J.

    2009-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are widely used to provide central venous access, often in chronically ill patients with long-term intravenous access requirements. There are a number of significant complications related to both insertion and maintenance of PICC lines, including catheter malposition, migration, venous thrombosis, and line fracture. The incidence of these complications is likely to rise as the number of patients undergoing intravenous outpatient therapy increases, with a corresponding rise in radiologist input. This paper provides an overview of the relevant peripheral and central venous anatomy, including anatomical variations, and outlines the complications of PICC lines. Imaging examples demonstrate the range of radiological findings seen in these complications.

  16. Imaging of the complications of peripherally inserted central venous catheters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amerasekera, S.S.H. [Department of Radiology, Good Hope Hospital, Sutton Coldfield, Birmingham (United Kingdom)], E-mail: steve.amerasekera@nhs.net; Jones, C.M.; Patel, R.; Cleasby, M.J. [Department of Radiology, Good Hope Hospital, Sutton Coldfield, Birmingham (United Kingdom)

    2009-08-15

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are widely used to provide central venous access, often in chronically ill patients with long-term intravenous access requirements. There are a number of significant complications related to both insertion and maintenance of PICC lines, including catheter malposition, migration, venous thrombosis, and line fracture. The incidence of these complications is likely to rise as the number of patients undergoing intravenous outpatient therapy increases, with a corresponding rise in radiologist input. This paper provides an overview of the relevant peripheral and central venous anatomy, including anatomical variations, and outlines the complications of PICC lines. Imaging examples demonstrate the range of radiological findings seen in these complications.

  17. Placement peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC): the upper arm approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choo, In Wook; Choo, Sung Wook; Choi, Dong Il; Yoon, Jung Hwan; Hwang, Jae Woong; Lim, Jae Hoon; Andrews, James C.; Williams, David M.; Cho, Kyung J.

    1995-01-01

    To evaluate a recently developed technique to place a medium-duration (weeks to months) central venous access. Within three-year period, 635 patients were referred to interventional radiology suite for placement of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC). Contrast medium was injected into the peripheral intravenous line and a puncture was made into the opacified vein near the junction of the middle and upper thirds of the upper arm, either the brachial or basilic vein under fluoroscopic guidance. A 5.5-French peel-away sheath was inserted into the vein and a 5-French silicone catheter was introduced with its distal tip to the junction of the right atrium and superior vena cava. Catheter placement was successful in all patients unless there was a central venous obstruction. Catheters were maintained from 2 days to 5 months with a mean of 3 weeks. Complications included infection requiring removal of the PICC in 16 patients (2.5%), acute thrombosis of the subclavian vein in 3 (0.5%). Occluded catheters in 4 patients were easily cleared with urokinase in place. The PICC system is an excellent option for medium-duration central venous access. Patients were able to carry on normal activities with the catheters in place

  18. Placement peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC): the upper arm approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choo, In Wook; Choo, Sung Wook; Choi, Dong Il; Yoon, Jung Hwan; Hwang, Jae Woong; Lim, Jae Hoon [Samsung Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Andrews, James C. [Mayo Clinic, Lansing (United States); Williams, David M.; Cho, Kyung J. [University of Michigan Hospital, Lansing (United States)

    1995-10-15

    To evaluate a recently developed technique to place a medium-duration (weeks to months) central venous access. Within three-year period, 635 patients were referred to interventional radiology suite for placement of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC). Contrast medium was injected into the peripheral intravenous line and a puncture was made into the opacified vein near the junction of the middle and upper thirds of the upper arm, either the brachial or basilic vein under fluoroscopic guidance. A 5.5-French peel-away sheath was inserted into the vein and a 5-French silicone catheter was introduced with its distal tip to the junction of the right atrium and superior vena cava. Catheter placement was successful in all patients unless there was a central venous obstruction. Catheters were maintained from 2 days to 5 months with a mean of 3 weeks. Complications included infection requiring removal of the PICC in 16 patients (2.5%), acute thrombosis of the subclavian vein in 3 (0.5%). Occluded catheters in 4 patients were easily cleared with urokinase in place. The PICC system is an excellent option for medium-duration central venous access. Patients were able to carry on normal activities with the catheters in place.

  19. NURSING CARE IN PATIENTS NEONATES WITH PERIPHERALLY INSERTED CENTRAL CATHETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anacilda Oliveira Vieira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The PICC (peripherally inserted central catheter is a long flexible catheter which is inserted through a peripheral vein, progresses through a needle introducer until the final portion of the vena cava, acquiring characteristics of a central catheter. Objective: To point out the main theoretical and scientific ideas that demonstrate the reliability, competence and ability of nurses to perform the PICC. Methodology: Systematic review of articles, which were found by searching the database scientific journals and bibliographies area. Results: The success of integration depends on the patient assessment and choice of venous access where the catheter will be positioned, and its tip should be in the middle third of the superior vena cava, or the middle third of the inferior vena cava. In neonates, which are used more frequently, proper positioning of the catheter is through nursing care in making the dressing, and the first 24 hours it should be compressive. Ideally, the PICC remains in the vein for periods longer than seven days or until the end of treatment, thus decreasing invasive procedures. Conclusion: According to the Federal Board of Nursing (COFEN, it is lawful for the insertion of PICC nurses, provided it has undergone professional training.

  20. Supraventricular tachycardia following insertion of a central venous catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yavascan Onder

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Placement of central venous catheters (CVCs in patients is associated with several risks including endocardial injury and dysrhythmias. In addition, CVC extending into intracardiac chambers can provoke premature atrial and ventricular complexes, which have been reported to initiate supraventricular tachycardia (SVT. A 15-year-old boy with end-stage renal failure developed SVT after insertion of a CVC.

  1. Cardiac tamponade due to peripheral inserted central catheter in newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Fernanda Pellegrino da Silva Dornaus

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT This article reports the case of an adverse event of cardiac tamponade associated with central catheter peripheral insertion in a premature newborn. The approach was pericardial puncture, which reversed the cardiorespiratory arrest. The newborn showed good clinical progress and was discharged from hospital with no complications associated with the event.

  2. Complications of peripherally inserted central venous catheters in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: The objective of this study was to assess the complications of peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICC) in neonates admitted to neonatal surgical intensive care unit (NSICU). Patients and Methods: Retrospective analysis of 237 neonates admitted to NSICU from January 2010 to December 2011 ...

  3. NURSING CARE IN PATIENTS NEONATES WITH PERIPHERALLY INSERTED CENTRAL CATHETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anacilda Oliveira Vieira

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction:The PICC (peripherally inserted central catheter is a long flexible catheter which isinserted through a peripheral vein, progresses through a needle introducer until the final portion ofthe vena cava, acquiring characteristics of a central catheter.Objective:To point out the maintheoretical and scientific ideas that demonstrate the reliability, competence and ability of nurses toperform the PICC.Methodology:Systematic review of articles, which were found by searching thedatabase scientific journals and bibliographies area.Results:The success of integration depends onthe patient assessment and choice of venous access where the catheter will be positioned, and its tipshould be in the middle third of the superior vena cava, or the middle third of the inferior vena cava.In neonates, which are used more frequently, proper positioning of the catheter is through nursingcare in making the dressing, and the first24 hours it should be compressive. Ideally, the PICCremains in the vein for periods longer than seven days or until the end of treatment, thus decreasinginvasive procedures.Conclusion:According to the Federal Board of Nursing (COFEN, it is lawfulforthe insertion of PICC nurses, provided it has undergone professional training.

  4. Central venous catheter insertion problem solving using intravenous catheter: technical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alemohammad M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Insertion of central venous catheter is an accepted method for hemodynamic monitor-ring, drug and fluid administration, intravenous access, hemodialysis and applying cardiac pace-maker in hospitalized patients. This procedure can be associated with severe complications. The aim of this article is to provide a practical approach to prevent catheter malposition in states that the guide wire will not pass freely.During central venous insertion in internal jugular vein using modified seldinger technique, when after venous insertion, the passage of the guide wire shows difficulties and don’t pass freely, insertion of an intravenous cannula over the wire and re-insertion of the wire can help to prevent malposition of the wire and the catheter. Use of an intravenous cannula over the guide, in situations that the guide wire cannot pass freely among the needle inserted in internal jugular vein, and re-insertion of the guide can probably prevent or reduce the tissue or vascular trauma and the associated complica-tions. This simple maneuver can be helpful in difficult cases especially in cardiac surgery patients who receive high dose heparin and it is necessary to avoid traumatize-tion of carotid artery.

  5. Can femoral dialysis catheter insertion cause a life threatening complication?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nurkay Katrancıoğlu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Venous catheter (VC insertion may be necessary for the patients with renal failure facing vascular access problem. Femoral VCs are commonly used for their lower complication rates especially in emergency clinics. The incidence of bleeding associated with VC is reported 0.5-1.6%, however, life threatening hemorrhage and complications requiring surgical intervention are very rare. In this manuscript, we aimed to present a case with hemolytic uremic syndrome complicated with retroperitoneal hematoma after femoral VC insertion. J Clin Exp Invest 2014; 5 (3: 472-474

  6. COST ANALYSIS OF PERIPHERALLY INSERTED CENTRAL CATHETER IN PEDIATRIC PATIENTS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Zhaoxin; Connolly, Bairbre L; Ungar, Wendy J; Coyte, Peter C

    2018-01-01

    A peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) is a useful option in providing secure venous access, which enables patients to be discharged earlier with the provision of home care. The objective was to identify the costs associated with having a PICC from a societal perspective, and to identify factors that are associated with total PICC costs. Data were obtained from a retrospective cohort of 469 hospitalized pediatric patients with PICCs inserted. Both direct and indirect costs were estimated from a societal perspective. Insertion costs, complication costs, nurse and physician assessment costs, inpatient ward costs, catheter removal costs, home care costs, travel costs, and the cost associated with productivity losses incurred by parents were included in this study. Based on catheter dwell time, the median total cost associated with a PICC per patient per day (including inpatient hospital costs) was $3,133.5 ($2,210.7-$9,627.0) in 2017 Canadian dollars ($1.00USD = $1.25CAD in 2017). The adjusted mean cost per patient per day was $2,648.2 ($2,402.4-$2,920.4). Excluding inpatient ward costs, the median total and adjusted costs per patient per day were $198.8 ($91.8-$2,475.8) and $362.7($341.0-$386.0), respectively. Younger age, occurrence of complications, more catheter dwell days, wards with more intensive care, and the absence of home care were significant factors associated with higher total PICC costs. This study has demonstrated the costs associated with PICCs. This information may be helpful for healthcare providers to understand PICC related cost in children and resource implications.

  7. Efficacy and safety of peripherally inserted central venous catheters in acute cardiac care management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poletti, Fabrizio; Coccino, Claudio; Monolo, Davide; Crespi, Paolo; Ciccioli, Giorgio; Cordio, Giuseppe; Seveso, Giovanni; De Servi, Stefano

    2018-03-01

    Patients admitted to cardiac intensive care unit need administration of drugs intravenously often in concomitance of therapeutic techniques such as non-invasive ventilation, continuous renal replacement therapy and intra-aortic balloon counterpulsation. Therefore, the insertion of central venous catheters provides a reliable access for delivering medications, laboratory testing and hemodynamic monitoring, but it is associated with the risk of important complications. In our study, we tested the efficacy and safety of peripherally inserted central catheters to manage cardiac intensive care. All patients admitted to cardiac intensive care unit with indication for elective central venous access were checked by venous arm ultrasound for peripherally inserted central catheter's implantation. Peripherally inserted central catheters were inserted by ultrasound-guided puncture. After 7 days from the catheter's placement and at the removal, vascular ultrasound examination was performed searching signs of upper extremity deep venous thrombosis. In case of sepsis, blood cultures peripherally from the catheter and direct culture of the tip of the catheter were done to establish a catheter-related blood stream infection. In our cardiac intensive care unit, 137 peripherally inserted central catheters were placed: 80.3% of patients eligible for a peripherally inserted central catheter were implanted. The rate of symptomatic catheter-related peripheral venous thrombosis was 1.4%. Catheter-related blood stream infection was diagnosed in one patient (0.7%; 5.7 × 1000 peripherally inserted central catheter days). All peripherally inserted central catheters were inserted successfully without other major complications. In patients admitted to cardiac intensive care unit, peripherally inserted central catheters' insertion was feasible in a high percentage of patients and was associated with low infective complications and clinical thrombosis rate.

  8. Peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) complications during pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cape, Alison V; Mogensen, Kris M; Robinson, Malcolm K; Carusi, Daniela A

    2014-07-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are routinely used in women with hyperemesis gravidarum. However, little is known about the consequences of PICC insertion in these patients. Our aim was to analyze PICC-related complication rates among pregnant women. Pregnant women with PICC insertion between January 2000 and June 2006 were studied retrospectively. Infusate type, comorbid conditions, and PICC duration were characterized. Major complications, defined as need for surgical intervention, bacteremia requiring intravenous antibiotics, or thromboembolic events, were identified. Minor complications, including phlebitis, PICC malfunction, early PICC removal, infection requiring oral antibiotics, or hospitalization for PICC evaluation, were also studied. Eighty-four catheters in 66 women were eligible for study, totaling 2544 PICC days. Catheters remained in place for 1-177 days; median duration was 21.0 days. PICCs were used for intravenous fluid (IVF, 59.4%), parenteral nutrition (PN, 34.5%), and antibiotics (6%). The overall complication rate was 18.5 per 1000 PICC days (55.9% of PICCs); 22.6% were major, with bacteremia being most frequent (20.2%). A diagnosis of diabetes was the only factor that significantly predicted complications (hazard ratio, 2.71; 95% confidence interval, 1.13-6.13). PICC duration and type of infusate (PN vs IVF alone) were not associated with complications. PICC insertion in pregnant women is associated with a high complication rate, which appears to be independent of the type of infusate and occurs in the majority of women. PICCs should be used judiciously and only when clearly necessary during pregnancy. Further studies are needed to determine how to reduce PICC-related complications in this population. © 2013 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  9. [Peripherally inserted central catheter antibiotic therapy for cystic fibrosis patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Betegnie, A-L; Cracowski, C; Bedouch, P; Segond, C; Robein-Dobremez, M-J; Pin, I; Allenet, B

    2014-11-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are more and more used for intravenous antibiotic infusions in cystic fibrosis (CF) patients in the Grenoble area (France). The aim of this study was to assess the use of this technique in this indication. 1. Retrospective evaluation of 102 consecutive PICC insertions over 3years and the incidence of adverse events during the therapy. 2. Prospective evaluation of 12 patient's satisfaction and their nurses over a 3-month period. 3. Comparative analysis of single domiciliary treatment costs using PICC versus peripheral catheter (PC). 102 PICC insertions were attempted in 31 patients. Seven failures and 7 complications occurred during the treatment requiring removal of the PICC, i.e. an overall success rate of 86.2% (88/102). Pain during PICC introduction was 4.2/10 (visual analogical scale). Mean satisfaction levels during therapy were 9.3/10 for patients and 8.7/10 for nurses. Compared with PC, all the patients said that PICC was "more comfortable". Differential costs of treatment with PC and with PICC at home were estimated at 57.15€ and 590.16€ respectively. PICC is an alternative to CP for intravenous antibiotherapy in CF patients, providing better safety and comfort. PICC use should be promoted in this indication. Copyright © 2013 SPLF. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  10. Comparison of complication rates between umbilical and peripherally inserted central venous catheters in newborns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Arnts, I.J.J.; Bullens, L.M.; Groenewoud, H.; Liem, K.D.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the complication rates between umbilical central venous catheters and peripherally inserted central venous catheters in newborns and to investigate whether other variables might increase complication rates. DESIGN: A retrospective observational study. SETTING: A Level III

  11. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter dan Pemberian Terapi Intravena pada Neonatus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yani Setiasih

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Penelitian sebelumnya menemukan bahwa Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC efektif dalam pemberian terapi intravena. Belum banyak penelitian yang membandingkan pemberian terapi intravena antara akses intravena yang biasa dilakukan saat ini. Penelitian ini bertujuan membandingkan antara akses intravena perifer dengan Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC terhadap efektivitas pemberian terapi intravena pada neonatus. Jenis penelitian ini adalah deskriptif komparatif. Dengan teknik purposive sampling, 32 neonatus diikutsertakan sebagai subjek yang terbagi menjadi dua kelompok yaitu kelompok dengan akses intravena perifer dengan PICC. Pada kelompok dengan akses intravena perifer (n=16 dan pada kelompok dengan PICC (n=16. Efektivitas akses intravena dinilai dari kesesuaian terapi intravena yang didapat neonatus dengan kebutuhan yang seharusnya selama 24 jam dalam waktu lima hari menggunakan lembar observasi. Data dianalisis menggunakan uji fisher exact. Hasil penelitian menunjukkan bahwa pemberian terapi intravena menggunakan PICC lebih efektif dibandingkan pemberian terapi intravena menggunakan akses intravena perifer (ρ=0.00. Perawatan neonatus yang membutuhkan terapi intravena di rumah sakit lebih disarankan menggunakan PICC dibandingkan dengan akses intravena perifer.

  12. Peripherally inserted central catheters and upper extremity deep vein thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ong, B.; Gibbs, H.; Catchpole, I.; Hetherington, R.; Harper, J.

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of the study was to determine the incidence and risk factors for venous thrombosis in patients with a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC). A retrospective study of all upper extremity venous duplex scans was carried out in the Vascular Medicine department from year 2000 to 2002 inclusive. A chart review of positive scans was undertaken to identify possible thrombotic risk factors. Of 317 upper extremity venous duplex scans carried out, 115, or 32%, were positive for upper extremity deep vein thrombosis. Three main risk factors were identified - presence of a central line, malignancy and administration of chemotherapy. PICC were the most common central line present. Symptomatic thrombosis occurred in 7% of PICC inserted for chemotherapy compared with 1% of PICC inserted for other reasons. Ten per cent of the patients receiving chemotherapy through a PICC developed a thrombosis. The post-thrombotic syndrome was infrequent following upper extremity deep vein thrombosis. Patients receiving chemotherapy through a PICC are at increased risk of thrombosis. There may be a role for prophylactic low-dose anticoagulation in these high-risk patients

  13. An artifice in the insertion of the Hickman catheter in small children

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    catheter kit (Safe Guide Microneedle Seldinger kit,. Product ID – 1916–8GE; Nippon Covidien Co., Tokyo,. Japan) is inserted. This is necessary because the 0.018 inch guide wire cannot pass through all 24G peripheral intravenous catheters. The internal diameter, especially at the tip, varies even with catheters of the same ...

  14. A nurse led peripherally inserted central catheter line insertion service is effective with radiological support

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barber, Jonathan M.; Booth, Doris M.; King, Julia A.; Chakraverty, Sam

    2002-01-01

    AIM: Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are increasingly used as a route of chemotherapy administration. Our aims were to assess a collaborative approach to PICC placement, with radiological support for a nurse led line insertion service in a minority of cases, and to determine whether PICC provided a safe and reliable method of chemotherapy administration. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Prospective data on 100 consecutive patients undergoing PICC placement for chemotherapy were collected. Lines were inserted by ward based nurses or under ultrasound guidance by radiologists. End points were successful completion of treatment or patient death. RESULTS: One hundred and forty-four lines were placed for 118 courses of chemotherapy. 107 (74%) were placed by nurses and 37 (26%) by radiologists. Ninety-five percent of patients completed therapy with either one or two lines. Seventy percent of lines were removed on achieving the primary end points. In two additional patients PICC could not be placed radiologically. Twelve patients were unable to complete treatment with PICC alone, nine of these required an alternative administration route. The catheter related sepsis rate was 4.9%. CONCLUSION: The majority of PICC can be successfully placed by trained nurses, reserving image guidance only for more difficult cases. PICC have an acceptable complication profile, and decrease the need for tunnelled central lines. Barber, J.M. et al. (2002)

  15. A nurse led peripherally inserted central catheter line insertion service is effective with radiological support

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barber, Jonathan M.; Booth, Doris M.; King, Julia A.; Chakraverty, Sam

    2002-05-01

    AIM: Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are increasingly used as a route of chemotherapy administration. Our aims were to assess a collaborative approach to PICC placement, with radiological support for a nurse led line insertion service in a minority of cases, and to determine whether PICC provided a safe and reliable method of chemotherapy administration. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Prospective data on 100 consecutive patients undergoing PICC placement for chemotherapy were collected. Lines were inserted by ward based nurses or under ultrasound guidance by radiologists. End points were successful completion of treatment or patient death. RESULTS: One hundred and forty-four lines were placed for 118 courses of chemotherapy. 107 (74%) were placed by nurses and 37 (26%) by radiologists. Ninety-five percent of patients completed therapy with either one or two lines. Seventy percent of lines were removed on achieving the primary end points. In two additional patients PICC could not be placed radiologically. Twelve patients were unable to complete treatment with PICC alone, nine of these required an alternative administration route. The catheter related sepsis rate was 4.9%. CONCLUSION: The majority of PICC can be successfully placed by trained nurses, reserving image guidance only for more difficult cases. PICC have an acceptable complication profile, and decrease the need for tunnelled central lines. Barber, J.M. et al. (2002)

  16. Percutaneous insertion of peritoneal dialysis catheters using ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance: A single centre experience and review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    De Boo, Diederick W.; Mott, Nigel; Tregaskis, Peter; Quach, Trung; Menahem, Solomon; Walker, Rowan G.; Koukounaras, Jim

    2015-01-01

    Various methods of peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter insertion are available. The purpose of this study was to evaluate a percutaneous insertion technique using ultrasound (US) and fluoroscopy performed under conscious sedation and as day case procedure. Data of 87 percutaneous inserted dialysis catheters were prospectively collected, including patients' age, gender, body mass index, history of previous abdominal surgery and cause of end stage renal failure. Length of hospital stay, early complications and time to first use were also recorded. Institutional review board approval was obtained. A 100% technical success rate was observed. Early complications included bleeding (n = 3), catheter dysfunction (n = 6), exit site infection (n = 1) and exit site leakage (n = 1). All cases of catheter dysfunction and one case of bleeding required surgical revision. Median time of follow-up was 18 months (range 3–35), and median time from insertion to first use was days 14 (1–47). Of the 82 patients who started dialysis, 20 (23%) ceased PD at some stage during follow-up. Most frequently encountered reasons include deteriorating patient cognitive or functional status (n = 5), successful transplant kidney (n = 4) and pleuro-peritoneal fistula (n = 4). Sixty-two (71%) PD catheter insertions were performed as day case. The remaining insertions were performed on patients already admitted to the hospital. Percutaneous insertion of dialysis catheter using US and fluoroscopy is not only safe but can be performed as day case procedure in most patients, even with a medical history of abdominal surgery and/or obesity.

  17. Measurement of Vein Diameter for Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC) Insertion: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Rebecca; Cummings, Melita; Childs, Jessie; Fielder, Andrea; Mikocka-Walus, Antonina; Grech, Carol; Esterman, Adrian

    2015-01-01

    Choosing an appropriately sized vein reduces the risk of venous thromboembolism associated with peripherally inserted central catheters. This observational study described the diameters of the brachial, basilic, and cephalic veins and determined the effect of patient factors on vein size. Ultrasound was used to measure the veins of 176 participants. Vein diameter was similar in both arms regardless of hand dominance and side. Patient factors-including greater age, height, and weight, as well as male gender-were associated with increased vein diameter. The basilic vein tended to have the largest diameter statistically. However, this was the case in only 55% of patients.

  18. Efficacy of two antiseptic regimens on skin colonization of insertion sites for two different catheter types: a randomized, clinical trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lutz, Juergen Thomas; Diener, Isabel Victoria; Freiberg, Kerstin; Zillmann, Robert; Shah-Hosseini, Kija; Seifert, Harald; Berger-Schreck, Bettina; Wisplinghoff, Hilmar

    2016-12-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections affect patients in surgical and intensive care settings worldwide, causing complications, aggravation of existing symptoms and increased length of stay. The trial aimed at comparing two registered skin antiseptics with respect to their residual and therefore infection-preventing effects. In a parallel, monocentric, prospective, triple-blind, randomized trial the difference in bacterial recolonization of catheter skin sites in central venous (CVC) and epidural catheters (EC) was investigated by comparing two alcoholic-based skin disinfectants. Patients receiving planned surgeries or intensive care were eligible for the trial. Those in the trial group received skin disinfection with the additive octenidine dihydrochloride (OCT) (n = 51), those in the control group were treated with benzalkonium chloride as additive (BAC) (n = 59) prior to catheter insertion. Randomization was carried out by assigning patients to groups week-wise. Endpoints of the investigation were skin colonization of the catheter site counted in colony forming units per swab at three time points: (1) prior to catheter insertion, on untreated skin; (2) directly after catheter insertion, prior to sterile coverage; (3) 48 h after catheter insertion. The hypothesis was tested by a Wilcoxon test with a two-sided alpha = 5 %. From second to third swab, recolonization of the catheter-surrounding skin was significantly lower in the trial group for both sorts of catheters: delta 2-3 OCT group: 0.72 (95 % CI: 0.42; 1.02); delta 2-3 BAC group: 1.97 (95 % CI: 1.45; 2.50); p < 0.001. None of the patients enrolled developed a catheter-related blood stream infection (CRBSI) during follow-up. Previous studies have shown that skin colonization is strongly associated with the occurrence of CRBSI. This randomized controlled trial supports the observations made in previous trials that octenidine dihydrochloride in disinfectants is more effective than agents

  19. Peripherally-inserted Central Catheter (PICC Insertion in Neonates: Apnea and Radiocontrasts Complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eissa Bilehjani

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The importance of pain management throughout minimally-invasive procedures such as peripherally-inserted central catheter (PICC insertion is an inevitable fact. However, administration of varied analgesics, especially opioids, in specific age ranges such as neonate could be of immense concern. Most of these patients are on different medications, especially those hospitalized in the ICUs or with critical conditions. Neonates receiving continuous opioid infusions might also require an additional opioid bolus to control the associated pain (1. Importantly, it should be taken into consideration that administration of opioids or even a light sedation would increase the risk of delayed apnea in this group of patients (2. Factors contributing to this complication include ex-premature infants (gestational age<37 weeks, premature infants younger than 46 weeks’ postconceptual age and anemia (hematocrit< 30% (3, 4. Hence, it is recommended to use other supplementary analgesic techniques including local or topical anesthesia, especially in neonates having previously received continuous or bolus opioids. Furthermore, supplementary techniques assisting the confirmation of proper placement such as overpenetrating the radiograph, lateral X-rays and positioning the infant for a lateral oblique radiograph (right side elevated at a 10°–15° angle are frequently used by clinicians to avoid administration of radiocontrasts and their associated complications. In the latter technique, catheter visualization could be enhanced as the PICC will not be superimposed over the mediastinal structures (5, 6.

  20. [Ultrasound-guided peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) in cancer patients: success of the insertion, survival and complications].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moraza-Dulanto, Maria Inmaculada; Garate-Echenique, Lucía; Miranda-Serrano, Erika; Armenteros-Yeguas, Victoria; Tomás-López, María Aranzazu; Benítez-Delgado, Beatriz

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the results of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) inserted by nurses using an ultrasound-guided technique at bed-side. An observational and prospective study was conducted on all the PICC inserted at bed-side by an ultrasound-guided technique at the Araba University Hospital. The technique was introduced in June 2010, and the data collection period ended in November 2011. The main study variables were successful insertion, duration of PICC, incidences related to the catheter, devices reaching end of treatment and reasons for withdrawal. Patient sociodemographic data and PICC technical features were also registered. A total of 165 PICC were inserted, 73 are still in use, with 95.2% inserted in patients from oncology or haematology departments. Insertion was successful in the 89.7% (95% CI: 85.1%-94.3%) of the cases. The study included 16,234 catheter days, with a median dwell time of 92 days by PICC. The most frequent incidence was accidental removal in 0.986 per 1000 catheter days (95% CI=0.970-1.001). The thrombosis rate was 0.308 per 1,000 days (95% CI= 0.299-0.317), and the catheter-associated bloodstream infection rate was 0.062 per 1,000 catheter days (95% CI=0.058-0.065). Ultrasound-guided PICC insertion can be performed at bedside by trained nurses with a high probability of success. PICC, because of its low complication rate and long indwelling catheter survival, is a suitable central venous device for long-term treatment in oncology and haematology patients. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier España, S.L. All rights reserved.

  1. Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis after migration of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC): A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Sun, Wenyan; Shi, Xiaodong

    2017-12-01

    Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICC) are widely used in cancer patients and ultrasound-guided PICC insertion could improve success rate. The tip position of the catheter should be located at the border of lower one-third of the superior vena cava (SVC) and cavo-atrial junction. The migration is malposition at the late stage after PICCs were inserted, and catheter malposition was associated with thrombosis and other complications.After patient's informed consent, we report a case of a 66-year-old male with twice catheter migrations resulting in thrombosis after being diagnosed with cardiac cancer. The correct position of the catheter tip can ensure the normal use of PICC and reduce the complications. For the migrated catheter, it should be removed as soon as possible, and when thrombosis has been developed, standard anticoagulant therapy should be given. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Upper extremity deep vein thrombosis after migration of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Kai; Sun, Wenyan; Shi, Xiaodong

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Introduction: Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICC) are widely used in cancer patients and ultrasound-guided PICC insertion could improve success rate. The tip position of the catheter should be located at the border of lower one-third of the superior vena cava (SVC) and cavo-atrial junction. The migration is malposition at the late stage after PICCs were inserted, and catheter malposition was associated with thrombosis and other complications. After patient's informed consent, we report a case of a 66-year-old male with twice catheter migrations resulting in thrombosis after being diagnosed with cardiac cancer. Conclusion: The correct position of the catheter tip can ensure the normal use of PICC and reduce the complications. For the migrated catheter, it should be removed as soon as possible, and when thrombosis has been developed, standard anticoagulant therapy should be given. PMID:29390472

  3. Peripherally inserted central catheters in the treatment of children with cancer: Results of a multicenter study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rykov, Maxim Yu; Zaborovskij, Sergei V; Shvecov, Alexander N; Shukin, Vladimir V

    2018-03-01

    To review our experience with peripherally inserted central catheters in pediatric cancer patients. The analysis included 353 patients (3 months up to 17 years, mean age 11.2 years) with a variety of cancers diseases, which in 2011-2016, 354 peripherally inserted central catheters were placed. All settings are carried out using ultrasound guidance. In 138 (39%) patients, external anatomical landmarks were used and in 216 (61%) intraoperative fluoroscopy. Maximal duration of the line was 1.3 years, the lowest 1.5 months, and average 6.3 months. Among the technical difficulties during placement, most frequently have been the migration of the distal end of the catheter into the internal jugular vein against blood flow-32 (9%) patients. In one (0.3%) case, we were unable to catheterize the patient's vein. Among the most common complications of operation were marked peripherally inserted central catheter clot occlusion of the lumen-26 (7.3%) cases. Symptomatic catheter-related thrombosis was observed in 16 (4.5%) cases. Catheter-related blood stream infections were not reported. Removal of peripherally inserted central catheters related to the complications was performed in 30 (8.5%) patients who were later implanted venous ports. Peripherally inserted central catheters are recommend to use in the treatment of children with cancer. There should be trained nursing staff to minimize the risk of complications.

  4. Complications Associated with Insertion of Intrauterine Pressure Catheters: An Unusual Case of Uterine Hypertonicity and Uterine Perforation Resulting in Fetal Distress after Insertion of an Intrauterine Pressure Catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kara M. Rood

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Insertion of intrauterine pressure catheters is a routine procedure performed in labor and delivery departments, with few associated complications. There are several reports of maternal and neonatal morbidity associated with the use of intrauterine pressure catheters and their rare adverse outcomes. We report an unusual case of uterine hypertonicity resulting in fetal distress, immediately after the placement of an intrauterine pressure catheter. An emergent Cesarean section was performed for fetal distress and revealed a 5 cm vertical rent in the posterior lower uterine segment. The uterine perforation was repaired intraoperatively. Mother and infant did well and were discharged home on postoperative day four.

  5. Outcomes in a nurse-led peripherally inserted central catheter program: a retrospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDiarmid, Sheryl; Scrivens, Nicholas; Carrier, Marc; Sabri, Elham; Toye, Baldwin; Huebsch, Lothar; Fergusson, Dean

    2017-06-30

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) provide enormous benefit to patients. However, recent publications have highlighted relatively high PICC-associated complication rates. We report on patient and device outcomes from a nurse-led program. We performed a retrospective analysis of a prospective cohort of consecutive patients undergoing PICC insertion at The Ottawa Hospital between Jan. 1, 2013 and Dec. 31, 2014. Of the 8314 BioFlo PASV PICCs inserted, we randomly selected a sample of 700 and obtained a complete data set for 656. We measured the cumulative incidence of major complications (catheter-related bloodstream infections and deep vein thrombosis) and use of a thrombolytic to alleviate occlusions. The total number of catheter days was 58 486, and the median dwell time 45 days. We observed 4 cases of catheter-related bloodstream infection (0.6% [95% CI 0.17%-1.55%]) (0.07/1000 catheter days). Ten patients (1.5% [95% CI 0.83%-2.78%]) (0.17/1000 catheter days) had catheter-related deep venous thrombosis. At least 1 dose of thrombolytic was required in 75 catheters (11.4% [95% CI 8.61%-13.39]), 31 (7.1%) of the 436 single-lumen catheters and 113 (25.7%) of the 440 lumina of dual-lumen catheters ( p < 0.001). We attribute our low rates of major complications to a nurse-led expert insertion team, standardized care and maintenance protocols, high insertion volumes, novel catheter material and continuous quality-improvement initiatives that are implemented and evaluated regularly. We conclude that the considerable benefits PICCs provide to patients are attained with a low risk of major complications. Copyright 2017, Joule Inc. or its licensors.

  6. Twisting method for reducing friction during insertion of a sheath introducer and a sheathless guiding catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagawa, Yoshitoki; Furukawa, Tetsuaki

    2018-01-01

    A sheathless system that inserts a catheter directly into the artery can reduce puncture site-related complications through a 2-Fr reduction of the outer diameter. However, the gap between the dilator and the guiding catheter of the sheathless system is larger than the gap between the dilator and sheath of the introducer system, resulting in stronger insertion resistance. A twisting method with rapid alternating rotation of a device to the left and right during insertion can reduce the insertion resistance. This method can be effective with the sheathless system which has a larger gap. To examine the effect of size reduction on the sheathless system and the effect of insertion resistance reduction using the twisting method, we developed an insertion simulator and compared insertion resistance to a 5-Fr sheath introducer and a 5-Fr sheathless system, with and without the twisting method. The insertion simulator pushed a sheath introducer or a sheathless system toward a mock artery consisted with a 5-mm urethane and a 1-mm rubber sheet by an electrical motor with or without twisting motion generated by a crank shaft. Insertion resistance during the penetration was measured by a tension meter. The insertion resistance was less with the 5-Fr sheathless system than with the 5-Fr sheath introducer. The resistance reduced further with use of twisting for both the sheathed and sheathless catheters. In conclusion, the experiment suggests the benefits of twisting insertion of a sheathless guiding catheter for reduction of puncture site-related complications.

  7. Real-time ultrasound-guided placement of peripherally inserted central venous catheter without fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamuta, Soshi; Nishizawa, Toshihiro; Matsuhashi, Shiori; Shimizu, Arata; Uraoka, Toshio; Yamamoto, Masato

    2018-03-01

    Malposition of peripherally inserted central catheters placed at the bedside is a well-recognized phenomenon. We report the success rate of the placement of peripherally inserted central catheters with ultrasound guidance for tip positioning and describe the knacks and pitfalls. We retrospectively reviewed the medical case charts of 954 patients who received peripherally inserted central catheter procedure. Patient clinical data included success rate of puncture, detection rate of tip malposition with ultrasonography, adjustment rate after X-ray, and success rate of peripherally inserted central catheter placement. The success rate of puncture was 100% (954/954). Detection rate of tip malposition with ultrasonography was 82.1% (78/95). The success rate of ultrasound-guided tip navigation was 98.2% (937/954). The success rate of ultrasound-guided tip location was 98.0% (935/954). Adjustment rate after X-ray was 1.79% (17/952). The final success rate of peripherally inserted central catheter placement was 99.8% (952/954). Ultrasound guidance for puncturing and tip positioning is a promising option for the placement of peripherally inserted central catheters. Ultrasound guidance could dispense with radiation exposure and the transfer of patients to the X-ray department.

  8. Comparative study of peripherally inserted central venous catheter and traditional central catheter assisted with X-ray

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu Jianchun; Wang Xiurong; Jiang Zhuming

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To study the feasibility, complications, mid- and long-term advantages of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) compared with central venous access assisted with X-ray. Methods: From Jan 1997 to Dec 1998, the authors conducted a study in 60 patients with placed PICC lines and 60 patients with central lines. Study variables included tip placement and complication rates. Results: Tere were on significant differences between PICC and CVC in the successful placement 95.0% and 88.3%, t = 1.745, P 0.19; the mean duration 13(6-98) days and 14 (7-104) days, F = 0.049, P = 0.83; the total occlusion rate 6.7% (4/60) and 5.0%(3/60), t = 0.152, P = 0.70. In PICC patients, the occlusion rate was slightly higher in 3 Fr (20-gauge) catheter (3/20, 15.0%) than in 4 Fr(18-gauge) catheters (1/20, 5.0%), t = 1.111, P=0.29. Phlebitis occurred in 5.0% of patients (3/60) and one catheter fracture was happened on the catheter hub junction (1.7%). In 3 catheter tips dislocation cases, the catheter tips were moved to the optional position assisted with X-ray image. In CVC group, pneumothorax happened in 1 case (1.7%). In 4 catheter dislocation cases, the catheters were with drawn. No catheter-related sepsis and hemo-pneumothorax happened in both group patients. Conclusions: Both PICC and CVC can be acceptable in clinical use. PICC assisted with X-ray possesses the advantages of less trauma, accurate localization preventing some possible severe complications of central venous access such as pneumothorax. The new method provides a reliable, effective venous access for mid-and long-term usage in patients receiving a variety of solutions, primarily parenteral alimentation, chemotherapy or antibiotic infusion

  9. Peripherally inserted central catheter in extremely preterm infants: Characteristics and influencing factors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berg, J; Lööf Åström, J; Olofsson, J; Fridlund, M; Farooqi, A

    2017-01-01

    To evaluate the duration of catheter stay, incidence of non-elective removal and rates of complications associated with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) in relation to different catheter positions in extremely preterm infants (EPT, position, and 259 PICCs (56%) were removed electively after fulfilment of the treatment. Significantly more PICCs in the lower extremities compared to the upper extremities were in central positions (86% vs 61%, p position compared to a non-central position (p position compared to PICC lines inserted in the upper extremities.

  10. Laparoscopic versus open peritoneal dialysis catheter insertion, the LOCI-trial: a study protocol

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hagen Sander M

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peritoneal dialysis (PD is an effective treatment for end-stage renal disease. It allows patients more freedom to perform daily activities compared to haemodialysis. Key to successful PD is the presence of a well-functioning dialysis catheter. Several complications, such as in- and outflow obstruction, peritonitis, exit-site infections, leakage and migration, can lead to catheter removal and loss of peritoneal access. Currently, different surgical techniques are in practice for PD-catheter placement. The type of insertion technique used may greatly influence the occurrence of complications. In the literature, up to 35% catheter failure has been described when using the open technique and only 13% for the laparoscopic technique. However, a well-designed randomized controlled trial is lacking. Methods/Design The LOCI-trial is a multi-center randomized controlled, single-blind trial (pilot. The study compares the laparoscopic with the open technique for PD catheter insertion. The primary objective is to determine the optimum placement technique in order to minimize the incidence of catheter malfunction at 6 weeks postoperatively. Secondary objectives are to determine the best approach to optimize catheter function and to study the quality of life at 6 months postoperatively comparing the two operative techniques. Discussion This study will generate evidence on any benefits of laparoscopic versus open PD catheter insertion. Trial registration Dutch Trial Register NTR2878

  11. The development of a risk score for unplanned removal of peripherally inserted central catheter in newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Costa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to develop a risk score for unplanned removal of peripherally inserted central catheter in newborns.METHOD: prospective cohort study conducted in a neonatal intensive care unit with newborn babies who underwent 524 catheter insertions. The clinical characteristics of the newborn, catheter insertion and intravenous therapy were tested as risk factors for the unplanned removal of catheters using bivariate analysis. The risk score was developed using logistic regression. Accuracy was internally validated based on the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve.RESULTS: the risk score was made up of the following risk factors: transient metabolic disorders; previous insertion of catheter; use of a polyurethane double-lumen catheter; infusion of multiple intravenous solutions through a single-lumen catheter; and tip in a noncentral position. Newborns were classified into three categories of risk of unplanned removal: low (0 to 3 points, moderate (4 to 8 points, and high (≥ 9 points. Accuracy was 0.76.CONCLUSION: the adoption of evidence-based preventative strategies based on the classification and risk factors faced by the newborn is recommended to minimize the occurrence of unplanned removals.

  12. Difficult peripheral venous access: clinical evaluation of a catheter inserted with the Seldinger method under ultrasound guidance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Pascal; Cronier, Pierrick; Rousseau, Hélène; Vicaut, Eric; Choukroun, Gerald; Chergui, Karim; Chevrel, Guillaume; Maury, Eric

    2014-10-01

    A preliminary observational study was undertaken to evaluate the risk of failure of ultrasound-guided peripheral intravenous catheterization of a deep arm vein for a maximum of 7 days, after peripheral intravenous (PIV) cannulation failure. This prospective study included patients referred to the intensive care unit for placement of a central line, a polyurethane cannula commercialized for arterial catheterization was used for peripheral venous cannulation. Catheter length and diameter were chosen based on preliminary ultrasound measurements of vein diameter and skin-vein distance. Catheterization was successful for all 29 patients. Mean vein diameter was 0.42 ± 0.39 cm; mean vein depth was 0.94 ± 0.52 cm. Mean catheter duration was 6 (median 7) days. Two occluded catheters were removed prematurely. No thrombophlebitis, catheter infection, or extravasation was observed. Our results suggest that catheters inserted with the Seldinger method are adapted to prolonged peripheral deep-vein infusion. Ultrasound can play a role in catheter monitoring by identifying early thrombosis formation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Nonfatal cardiac perforation after central venous catheter insertion

    OpenAIRE

    Vedran Premuzic; Lea Katalinic; Marijan Pasalic; Hrvoje Jurin

    2018-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade caused by perforation of the cardiac wall is a rare complication related to central venous catheter (CVC) placement. A 71-year-old female with a previous history of moderate aortic stenosis and kidney transplantation was admitted to hospital due to global heart failure and worsening of allograft function. Intensified hemodialysis was commenced through a CVC placed in the right subclavian vein. Chest radiography revealed catheter tip in the right atrium and no signs of pneumo...

  14. Chest Radiograph Measurement Technique Facilitates Accurate Bedside Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Placement in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramamurthi, Aishu; Chick, Jeffrey Forris Beecham; Srinivasa, Rajiv N; Hage, Anthony N; Grove, Jason J; Gemmete, Joseph J; Johnson, Timothy D; Srinivasa, Ravi N

    2018-03-01

    To report the chest radiograph measurement technique for placing bedside peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs). Two hundred and thirty-two consecutive pediatric patients, mean age of 56.3 months (range: 0-203 months), underwent PICC placement from January 2015 to May 2017 (28 months) with a total of 232 PICCs placed. Measurements were taken from the cavoatrial junction to clavicle, clavicle to medial margin of mid-humeral head, and medial margin of mid-humeral head to mid-humerus. The difference between total radiographic measured length and actual PICC length was then calculated, and the percent difference (from actual cut length) was recorded. An equivalence test was performed using the two, one-sided test method. Mean ± standard deviation cavoatrial junction to clavicle length was 5.29 ± 2.20 cm (range: 2.1-12.6 cm). Mean clavicle to shoulder length was 8.20 ± 3.59 cm (range: 3.23-19.06 cm). Mean shoulder to mid-humerus length was 7.88 ± 3.87 cm (range: 2.01-16.8 cm). Mean total radiographic measured length was 21.37 ± 9.19 cm (range: 7.42-43.6 cm). Mean actual cut PICC length was 20.64 ± 8.72 cm (range: 8.5-44 cm). The mean difference between predicted, or total radiographic measured length, and actual cut PICC length was 0.73 ± 2.51 (range: - 5.42-8.60 cm). The mean percent difference was 4.07 ± 12.65% (range: - 23.84-47.80%). An equivalence test rejected the null hypothesis of the true percent difference greater/less than ± 6.67% with a p value of 0.002. The chest radiograph measurement technique is an accurate method to determine catheter length for PICC placement at bedside in the pediatric population.

  15. A novel technique of axillary vein puncture involving peripherally inserted central venous catheters for a small basilic vein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saijo, Fumito; Odaka, Yoshinobu; Mutoh, Mitsuhisa; Katayose, Yu; Tokumura, Hiromi

    2018-03-01

    Peripherally inserted central venous catheters are some of the most useful devices for vascular access used globally. Peripherally inserted central venous catheters have a low rate of fatal mechanical complications when compared to non-tunnel central venous catheters. However, as peripherally inserted central venous catheter access requires a smaller vein, there is a high risk of thrombosis. The axillary vein (confluence of the basilic and brachial veins) can serve as an access for cannulation. Moreover, as this vein is larger than the basilic or brachial vein, it might be a superior option for preventing thrombosis. The risk of catheter-related bloodstream infection should be considered when the puncture site is at the axillary fossa. The aim of this study was to present our new protocol involving peripherally inserted central venous catheters (non-tunneled/tunneled) and a tunneling technique and assess its feasibility and safety for improving cannulation and preventing thrombosis and infection. The study included 20 patients. The axillary vein in the upper arm was used for peripherally inserted central venous catheters in patients with a small-diameter basilic vein (venous catheter. The observed catheter duration was 645 days (median ± standard deviation, 26 ± 22.22 days). Catheterization was successful in all cases, however, two accidental dislodgements were identified. No fatal or serious complications were observed after catheterization. Our new protocol for axillary peripherally inserted central venous catheters/tunneled axillary peripherally inserted central venous catheters use for a small-diameter basilic vein is safe and feasible.

  16. Performance of Temporary Hemodialysis Catheter Insertion by Nephrology Fellows and Attending Nephrologists.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McQuillan, Rory F; Clark, Edward; Zahirieh, Alireza; Cohen, Elaine R; Paparello, James J; Wayne, Diane B; Barsuk, Jeffrey H

    2015-10-07

    Concerns have been raised about nephrology fellows' skills in inserting temporary hemodialysis catheters. Less is known about temporary hemodialysis catheter insertion skills of attending nephrologists supervising these procedures. The aim of this study was to compare baseline temporary hemodialysis catheter insertion skills of attending nephrologists with the skills of nephrology fellows before and after a simulation-based mastery learning (SBML) intervention. This pre- post-intervention study with a pretest-only comparison group was conducted at the University of Toronto in September of 2014. Participants were nephrology fellows and attending nephrologists from three university-affiliated academic hospitals who underwent baseline assessment of internal jugular temporary hemodialysis catheter insertion skills using a central venous catheter simulator. Fellows subsequently completed an SBML intervention, including deliberate practice with the central venous catheter simulator. Fellows were expected to meet or exceed a minimum passing score at post-test. Fellows who did not meet the minimum passing score completed additional deliberate practice. Attending nephrologist and fellow baseline performance on the temporary hemodialysis catheter skills assessment was compared. Fellows' pre- and post-test temporary hemodialysis catheter insertion performance was compared to assess the effectiveness of SBML. The skills assessment was scored using a previously published 28-item checklist. The minimum passing score was set at 79% of checklist items correct. In total, 19 attending nephrologists and 20 nephrology fellows participated in the study. Mean attending nephrologist checklist scores (46.1%; SD=29.5%) were similar to baseline scores of fellows (41.1% items correct; SD=21.4%; P=0.55). Only two of 19 attending nephrologists (11%) met the minimum passing score at baseline. After SBML, fellows' mean post-test score improved to 91.3% (SD=6.9%; Pnephrology fellows' skills, with

  17. Nonfatal cardiac perforation after central venous catheter insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Premuzic, Vedran; Katalinic, Lea; Pasalic, Marijan; Jurin, Hrvoje

    2018-01-01

    Cardiac tamponade caused by perforation of the cardiac wall is a rare complication related to central venous catheter (CVC) placement. A 71-year-old female with a previous history of moderate aortic stenosis and kidney transplantation was admitted to hospital due to global heart failure and worsening of allograft function. Intensified hemodialysis was commenced through a CVC placed in the right subclavian vein. Chest radiography revealed catheter tip in the right atrium and no signs of pneumothorax. Thorough diagnostics outruled immediate life-threatening conditions, such as myocardial infarction and pulmonary embolism. However, not previously seen, 2 cm thick pericardial effusion without repercussion on the blood flow was visualized during echocardiography, predominantly reclining the free surface of the right atrium, with fibrin scar tissue covering the epicardium - it was the spot of spontaneously recovered cardiac wall perforation. Follow-up echocardiogram performed before the discharge showed regression of the previously found pericardial effusion.

  18. Catheter-associated bloodstream infections and thrombotic risk in hematologic patients with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morano, Salvatore Giacomo; Latagliata, Roberto; Girmenia, Corrado; Massaro, Fulvio; Berneschi, Paola; Guerriero, Alfonso; Giampaoletti, Massimo; Sammarco, Arianna; Annechini, Giorgia; Fama, Angelo; Di Rocco, Alice; Chistolini, Antonio; Micozzi, Alessandra; Molica, Matteo; Barberi, Walter; Minotti, Clara; Brunetti, Gregorio Antonio; Breccia, Massimo; Cartoni, Claudio; Capria, Saveria; Rosa, Giovanni; Alimena, Giuliana; Foà, Robin

    2015-11-01

    The use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) as an alternative to other central venous access devices (CVAD) is becoming very frequent in cancer patients. To evaluate the impact of complications associated to these devices in patients with hematologic malignancies, we revised the catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) and the catheter-related thrombotic complications (CRTC) observed at our institute between January 2009 and December 2012. A total of 612 PICCs were inserted into 483 patients at diagnosis or in subsequent phases of their hematologic disease. PICCs were successfully inserted in all cases. The median duration of in situ PICC placement was 101 days (interquartile range, 48-184 days). A CRBSI occurred in 47 cases (7.7 %), with a rate of 0.59 per 1000 PICC days. A CRTC was recorded in 16 cases (2.6 %), with a rate of 0.20 per 1000 PICC days. No serious complication was associated to these events. Cox regression analyses of variables associated to CRBSIs and to CRTCs showed that only the type of disease (acute leukemia compared to other diseases) was significantly associated to a higher incidence of CRBSIs, while no feature was predictive for a higher risk of CRTCs. PICCs represent a useful and safe alternative to conventional CVAD for the management of patients with hematologic malignancies.

  19. An intervention to improve the catheter associated urinary tract infection rate in a medical intensive care unit: Direct observation of catheter insertion procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galiczewski, Janet M; Shurpin, Kathleen M

    2017-06-01

    Healthcare associated infections from indwelling urinary catheters lead to increased patient morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this study was to determine if direct observation of the urinary catheter insertion procedure, as compared to the standard process, decreased catheter utilization and urinary tract infection rates. This case control study was conducted in a medical intensive care unit. During phase I, a retrospective data review was conducted on utilsiation and urinary catheter infection rates when practitioners followed the institution's standard insertion algorithm. During phase II, an intervention of direct observation was added to the standard insertion procedure. The results demonstrated no change in utilization rates, however, CAUTI rates decreased from 2.24 to 0 per 1000 catheter days. The findings from this study may promote changes in clinical practice guidelines leading to a reduction in urinary catheter utilization and infection rates and improved patient outcomes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) via scalp veins in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Callejas, Allison; Osiovich, Horacio; Ting, Joseph Y

    2016-11-01

    The objective of this study is to describe the use and complications of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) via scalp veins in neonates. A retrospective review of neonates who had PICCs inserted, between January 2010 and June 2013, in the NICU at Children's and Women's Health Center of British Columbia. During the study period, 689 PICCs were inserted over a total of 46 728 NICU patient days. The PICC insertion sites were scalp veins (69), upper limb veins (471), and lower limb veins (149). The mean catheter durations were 17 d, 19 d, and 18 d for PICCs inserted through scalp, upper limb, and lower limb veins, respectively. The complication rates were 23%, 23%, and 15% for insertion via scalp, upper, and lower limb veins, respectively. Centrally placed PICCs at the time of insertion were more likely to remain in situ for longer than one week (p PICCs. Insertion of PICC via the scalp veins are feasible and not associated with higher complication rates compared with insertions via other sites.

  1. EXPLORING INDIVIDUAL AND ORGANIZATIONAL FACTORS INFLUENCING REGISTERED NURSES IN PREVENTING PERIPHERALLY INSERTED CENTRAL CATHETER RELATED COMPLICATION

    OpenAIRE

    Boka Dugassa Tolera; Feng Hui

    2017-01-01

    Peripherally InsertedCentral Catheter (PICC) isan essential vascular access device used in clinical practice in the delivery of fluids, medications, blood products, and nutrition. Despite the numerous benefits of PICC, various individual and organizational factors have made it difficult for registered nurses to practice in accordance with standardized nursing guideline developed for PICC insertion and removal. The purpose of this review was to explore factors influencing registered nurse in p...

  2. Insertion of central venous catheters for hemodialysis using angiographic techniques in patients with previous multiple catheterizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kotsikoris, Ioannis; Zygomalas, Apollon; Papas, Theofanis; Maras, Dimitris; Pavlidis, Polyvios; Andrikopoulou, Maria; Tsanis, Antonis; Alivizatos, Vasileios; Bessias, Nikolaos

    2012-01-01

    Introduction: Central venous catheter placement is an effective alternative vascular access for dialysis in patients with chronic renal failure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the insertion of central venous catheters for hemodialysis using angiographic techniques in patients with previous multiple catheterizations in terms of efficacy of the procedure and early complications. Materials and methods: Between 2008 and 2010, the vascular access team of our hospital placed 409 central venous catheters in patients with chronic renal failure. The procedure was performed using the Seldinger blind technique. In 18 (4.4%) cases it was impossible to advance the guidewire, and so the patients were transported to the angiography suite. Results: Using the angiographic technique, the guidewire was advanced in order to position the central venous catheter. The latter was inserted into the subclavian vein in 12 (66.6%) cases, into the internal jugular vein in 4 (22.2%) and into the femoral vein in 2 (11.1%) cases. There was only one complicated case with severe arrhythmia in 1 (5.5%) patient. Conclusion: Our results suggest that insertion of central venous catheters using angiographic techniques in hemodialysis patients with previous multiple catheterizations is a safe and effective procedure with few complications and high success rates

  3. Insertion of central venous catheters for hemodialysis using angiographic techniques in patients with previous multiple catheterizations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotsikoris, Ioannis, E-mail: gkotsikoris@gmail.com [Department of Vascular Surgery, “Erythros Stauros” General Hospital (Greece); Zygomalas, Apollon, E-mail: azygomalas@upatras.gr [Department of General Surgery, University Hospital of Patras (Greece); Papas, Theofanis, E-mail: pfanis@otenet.gr [Department of Vascular Surgery, “Erythros Stauros” General Hospital (Greece); Maras, Dimitris, E-mail: dimmaras@gmail.com [Department of Vascular Surgery, “Erythros Stauros” General Hospital (Greece); Pavlidis, Polyvios, E-mail: polpavlidis@yahoo.gr [Department of Vascular Surgery, “Erythros Stauros” General Hospital (Greece); Andrikopoulou, Maria, E-mail: madric@gmail.com [Department of Vascular Surgery, “Erythros Stauros” General Hospital (Greece); Tsanis, Antonis, E-mail: atsanis@gmail.com [Department of Interventional Radiology, “Erythros Stauros” General Hospital (Greece); Alivizatos, Vasileios, E-mail: valiviz@hol.gr [Department of General Surgery and Artificial Nutrition Unit, “Agios Andreas” General Hospital of Patras (Greece); Bessias, Nikolaos, E-mail: bessias@otenet.gr [Department of Vascular Surgery, “Erythros Stauros” General Hospital (Greece)

    2012-09-15

    Introduction: Central venous catheter placement is an effective alternative vascular access for dialysis in patients with chronic renal failure. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the insertion of central venous catheters for hemodialysis using angiographic techniques in patients with previous multiple catheterizations in terms of efficacy of the procedure and early complications. Materials and methods: Between 2008 and 2010, the vascular access team of our hospital placed 409 central venous catheters in patients with chronic renal failure. The procedure was performed using the Seldinger blind technique. In 18 (4.4%) cases it was impossible to advance the guidewire, and so the patients were transported to the angiography suite. Results: Using the angiographic technique, the guidewire was advanced in order to position the central venous catheter. The latter was inserted into the subclavian vein in 12 (66.6%) cases, into the internal jugular vein in 4 (22.2%) and into the femoral vein in 2 (11.1%) cases. There was only one complicated case with severe arrhythmia in 1 (5.5%) patient. Conclusion: Our results suggest that insertion of central venous catheters using angiographic techniques in hemodialysis patients with previous multiple catheterizations is a safe and effective procedure with few complications and high success rates.

  4. An unknown complication of peripherally inserted central venous catheter in a patient with ventricular assist device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikh M

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We report an unknown complication of peripherally inserted central venous catheter in a patient with Ventricular Assist Device. This rare complication led to the failure of the right ventricular assist device, which could be detrimental in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy.

  5. Surgical insertion of central venous catheters in low-birth-weight ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: Neonatal central vascular access (CVA) represents a daily practice in neonatal intensive care unit. Low birth weight (LBW) neonates pose a challenge to anesthetists who try the landmark technique to cannulate central veins. We reported our experience of open surgical cutdown (OSC) to insert catheters through right ...

  6. Central vein perforation during tunneled dialysis catheter insertion: principles of acute management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pua, Uei

    2014-10-01

    Central venous perforation during dialysis catheter insertion is a potentially fatal complication. Prompt recognition and judicious initial steps are important in optimizing the outcome. The purpose of this manuscript is to illustrate the imaging features and steps in initial management. © 2014 International Society for Hemodialysis.

  7. The incidence and risk factors of peripherally inserted central catheter-related infection among cancer patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gao Y

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Yufang Gao,1,* Yuxiu Liu,2,* Xiaoyan Ma,3 Lili Wei,4 Weifen Chen,2 Lei Song2 1President’s Office, 2Oncology Department, the Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao, 3Intensive Care Unit, Shanghai East Hospital, Shanghai, 4Nursing Department, the Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: As the use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs increased in chemotherapy, the identification of complications and risk factors became essential to prevent patient harm. But little is known about PICC-related infection and risk factors among patients with cancer. Our study was to identify the prevalence, patterns, and risk factors of catheter-related infections associated with PICCs.Methods: A 3-year prospective cohort study was conducted in a university-affiliated hospital. All patients with cancer who met inclusion criteria were enrolled. The patients were followed up until catheter removal. Tip cultures were routinely performed at the time of catheter removal. The general information was recorded at the time of PICC insertion, weekly care, and removal. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were applied for identification of risk factors.Results: In total, 912 cancer patients with 912 PICCs of 96,307 catheter days were enrolled. Ninety-four developed PICC-related infection; 46 were exit-site infection, 43 were catheter bacterial colonization, and five were PICC-related bloodstream infection. The median time from catheter insertion to infection was 98.26 days. Multivariate analysis showed StatLock fixing (odds ratio [OR] =0.555, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.326–0.945 and tip position located in the lower one-third of the superior vena cava (OR =0.340, 95% CI: 0.202–0.571 were associated with lower PICC infection rate. Catheter care delay (OR =2.612, 95% CI: 1.373–4.969 and indwelling mostly in summer (OR =4

  8. Placement of a peripherally inserted central catheter into the azygous vein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franklin, Iain, E-mail: iain.franklin@health.qld.gov.au; Gilmore, Christopher [The Prince Charles Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2015-06-15

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are used for a variety of infusion therapies. They are indicated in patients requiring long-term venous access. Incorrect positioning of the insertion of a PICC line is one of the known complications when inserting the device in clinical practice. Radiographers once performing imaging will commonly check if the tip of a PICC has entered the superior vena cava. This case study will report on a lesser known incorrect placement of a PICC line into the azygous vein and how this can be detected on radiographic imaging. This outcome for the patient can be detrimental as it has an increased risk of perforation, thrombus, and fistula formation.

  9. Placement of a peripherally inserted central catheter into the azygous vein

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Franklin, Iain; Gilmore, Christopher

    2015-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are used for a variety of infusion therapies. They are indicated in patients requiring long-term venous access. Incorrect positioning of the insertion of a PICC line is one of the known complications when inserting the device in clinical practice. Radiographers once performing imaging will commonly check if the tip of a PICC has entered the superior vena cava. This case study will report on a lesser known incorrect placement of a PICC line into the azygous vein and how this can be detected on radiographic imaging. This outcome for the patient can be detrimental as it has an increased risk of perforation, thrombus, and fistula formation

  10. Increased risk of symptomatic upper-extremity venous thrombosis with multiple peripherally inserted central catheter insertions in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnannt, Ralph; Waespe, Nicolas; Temple, Michael; Amirabadi, Afsaneh; Liu, Kuan; Brandão, Leonardo R; Connolly, Bairbre L

    2018-02-27

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are associated with superficial and deep venous thrombosis of the arm. The purpose of this study was to analyze the sequelae of repeated upper limb PICC insertions in children, in terms of the frequency of upper limb thrombosis in this patient group. The study population included all children who underwent their first successful arm PICC insertion between January 2010 and December 2015. We included subsequent ipsilateral arm PICCs in the analysis. Patients were followed until March 2016 or until any alternative central venous line insertion. For each PICC insertion, we collected demographic variables and line characteristics. We correlated all symptomatic deep and superficial thromboses of the arm with the PICC database. Applying inclusion and exclusion criteria, 2,180 PICCs remained for analysis. We identified first, second, third and fourth PICC insertions in the same arm in 1,955, 181, 38 and 6 patients, respectively. In total there were 57 upper body deep symptomatic thrombotic events. An increasing odds ratio was seen with higher numbers of PICC insertions, which was significant when comparing the first with the third and fourth PICC insertions in the same arm (odds ratio [OR] 6.00, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.25-16.04, P=0.0004). Double-lumen PICCs were associated with a significantly higher risk of thrombosis than single lumen (OR 2.77, 95% CI 1.72-4.47, P=0.0003). Repetitive PICC insertions in the same arm are associated with an increased risk of symptomatic thrombosis. Double-lumen PICCs are associated with a higher risk of thrombosis compared to single-lumen lines.

  11. Retrograde femoral vein catheter insertion. A new approach for challenging hemodialysis vascular access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gouda, Zaghloul

    2014-01-01

    Venous catheters provide access for hemodialysis (HD) when patients do not have functioning access device. Obstruction of jugular, femoral or even external iliac vessels further depletes options. Subclavian approach is prohibited. Catheterization of inferior vena cava requires specialized equipment and skills. The purpose is to assess a new lifesaving HD vascular access approach for patients with nonfunctioning access device in the ordinary sites. This entails insertion of a retrograde temporary HD catheter in the superficial femoral vein, directing the catheter distally, toward the foot. We included six end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients retrospectively who are on regular renal replacement therapy and need urgent HD with nonfunctioning access device in the ordinary sites. Successful insertion of six retrograde femoral vein catheters in the superficial femoral vein. The mean catheter days were 2.5±0.5 days with one patient having 26 catheter days. The mean blood pump speed was 230.0±44.7 mL/min. Urea reduction ratio and Kt/V at 3 hours HD session were 47% and 1.5, respectively, which increased with increasing session duration. The ultrafiltration volume was 2-3 L/session which increased up to 6 L/session in case of using slow low-efficiency dialysis. No major complications were observed during insertion or the postinsertion period except thigh pain in one patient and exit site infection in the case of long duration. This is a newly applied lifesaving HD vascular access approach for selected ESRD patients with no available HD vascular access at the ordinary sites with accepted HD adequacy. It needs more evaluation and more studies.

  12. Impact of catheter insertion using the radial approach on vasodilatation in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dawson, Ellen A; Rathore, Sudhir; Cable, N Timothy; Wright, D Jay; Morris, John L; Green, Daniel J

    2010-02-23

    The aim of this study was to determine the impact of catheter sheath insertion, a model of endothelium disruption in humans, on the conventional FMD (flow-mediated dilatation) response in vivo. Seventeen subjects undergoing transradial catheterization were recruited and assessed prior to, the day after, and 3-4 months postcatheterization. The catheter sheath's external diameter was 2.7 mm, and the average preprocedure internal radial artery diameter was 2.8 mm, indicating a high likelihood of endothelial denudation as a consequence of sheath placement. Radial artery flow-mediated and endothelium-derived NO (nitric oxide)-dependent function (FMD) was assessed within the region of sheath placement (sheath site) and also above the sheath (catheter site). GTN (glyceryl trinitrate) endothelium-independent NO-mediated function was also assessed distally. Measurements were made in both arms at all time points; the non-catheterized arm provided an internal control. Neither sheath (4.5+/-0.9%) nor catheter (4.4+/-0.9%) insertion abolished FMD, although both significantly decreased FMD from preintervention levels (9.0+/-0.8% sheath segment; 8.4+/-0.8% catheter segment; P<0.05). The impact of sheath and catheter placement on FMD was no longer evident after approximately 3 months recovery (8.0+/-1.5 and 8.1+/-1.7%, sheath and catheter, respectively). GTN responses also decreased from 14.8+/-1.7 to 7.9+/-1.0% (P<0.05) as a result of sheath placement, but values returned to baseline at approximately 3 months (13.0+/-1.8%). These results suggest that the presence of an intact, functional endothelial layer and consequent NO release may not be obligatory for some component of the FMD response. This raises the possibility of an endothelium-independent contribution to the flow-induced vasodilatation in humans.

  13. The incidence and risk factors of peripherally inserted central catheter-related infection among cancer patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yufang; Liu, Yuxiu; Ma, Xiaoyan; Wei, Lili; Chen, Weifen; Song, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Background As the use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) increased in chemotherapy, the identification of complications and risk factors became essential to prevent patient harm. But little is known about PICC-related infection and risk factors among patients with cancer. Our study was to identify the prevalence, patterns, and risk factors of catheter-related infections associated with PICCs. Methods A 3-year prospective cohort study was conducted in a university-affiliated hospital. All patients with cancer who met inclusion criteria were enrolled. The patients were followed up until catheter removal. Tip cultures were routinely performed at the time of catheter removal. The general information was recorded at the time of PICC insertion, weekly care, and removal. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were applied for identification of risk factors. Results In total, 912 cancer patients with 912 PICCs of 96,307 catheter days were enrolled. Ninety-four developed PICC-related infection; 46 were exit-site infection, 43 were catheter bacterial colonization, and five were PICC-related bloodstream infection. The median time from catheter insertion to infection was 98.26 days. Multivariate analysis showed StatLock fixing (odds ratio [OR] =0.555, 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.326–0.945) and tip position located in the lower one-third of the superior vena cava (OR =0.340, 95% CI: 0.202–0.571) were associated with lower PICC infection rate. Catheter care delay (OR =2.612, 95% CI: 1.373–4.969) and indwelling mostly in summer (OR =4.784, 95% CI: 2.681–8.538) were associated with higher infection incidence. Conclusion StatLock fixing and tip position located in the lower one-third of the superior vena cava were protective factors against PICC-related infection, while catheter care delay and indwelling mostly in summer were risk factors. Policy and measures targeting these factors may be necessary to reduce the risk of infection

  14. A national survey of neonatal peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) practices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharpe, Elizabeth; Pettit, Janet; Ellsbury, Dan L

    2013-02-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess and describe the practices involved in the insertion and maintenance of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) in neonates in level III neonatal intensive care units (NICUs) in the United States and to compare the findings with current recommendations and evidence. The study included responses from 187 nurses, nurse practitioners, and neonatologists who place PICCs in NICUs representing 43 states. A 90-question, multiple-choice survey of a variety of PICC practices was sent to NICU directors and nursing staff responsible for PICC insertion. The explorative survey was sent by electronic and standard mail services. A descriptive analysis of the responses was performed. Main outcome measures included the response rate to the survey and the summarized responses of multiple categories of PICC practices. Of the 460 level III NICUs contacted, 187 returned surveys meeting criteria for analysis, yielding a 42% response rate. Responses showed wide variation of PICC practices in multiple aspects of PICC insertion and maintenance. The greatest level of conformity was seen with the following practices: use of 2 nurses to perform a dressing change, trimming the PICC, using a kit or cart containing insertion supplies, use of maximal sterile barrier precautions during insertion, catheter tip residing in the superior vena cava for upper body insertions, and not heparin locking, infusing blood products, performing catheter repair, or inserting using Modified Seldinger Technique. Some identified practices, such as infusion tubing change and catheter entry techniques, were contrary to current evidence and demonstrated a lack of correct information, and some represented safety concerns for the neonates having PICCs. This extensive national survey of NICU PICC practices showed wide variation in multiple aspects of PICC insertion and maintenance. A gap between the evidence and current practice was evident in many facets of training

  15. Massive pleural effusion on the contralateral side of a venous peripherally inserted central catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sancak, Selim; Tuten, Abdulhamit; Yildirim, Tulin Gokmen; Karatekin, Guner

    2018-02-01

    A preterm newborn infant, delivered at 30 weeks of gestation and 965 g birth weight, developed respiratory distress with resistant hypoxia after a central catheter line was inserted via the right venae brachialis on postnatal day 21. Left-sided massive pleural effusion, collapsed left lung with air bronchograms, and bidirectional shunting through reopened ductus arteriosus were detected by targeted neonatal echocardiography. Hydrothorax was drained under sonographic guidance, producing a milky-white fluid biochemically compatible with parenteral nutrition. We report this case of hydrothorax secondary to a misplaced central catheter on the contralateral side of its peripheral insertion. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Clin Ultrasound 46:140-144, 2018. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Living with a peripherally inserted central catheter: the perspective of cancer outpatients-a qualitative study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parás-Bravo, Paula; Paz-Zulueta, María; Santibañez, Miguel; Fernández-de-Las-Peñas, Cesar; Herrero-Montes, Manuel; Caso-Álvarez, Vanesa; Palacios-Ceña, Domingo

    2018-02-01

    The aim of this study was to describe the experience of using a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) in cancer sufferers receiving outpatient treatment. A qualitative, phenomenological study was performed. Purposeful sampling methods were used. Data collection methods included semi-structured interviews and researcher field notes. Thematic analysis was used to analyze data. The study was conducted following the Consolidated Criteria for Reporting Qualitative Research guidelines. Eighteen patients (61% women, mean age 58 years) participated. They spent a mean duration of 155 days with the line in place. Two themes were identified with different subgroups. The theme "Living with a PICC line," including the subthemes "Benefits" and "Disadvantages," displays how the implantation is experienced by patients in a dichotomous manner. This highlighted both the beneficial and negative aspects of the implantation. The second theme was "Adapting to life with the catheter" and comprised three subthemes: "Advantages," "Lifestyle modifications," and "Overall assessment of the peripherally inserted central catheter," which shows how patients gradually accept the catheter by adapting their lifestyle. Over time, most patients considered having a PICC line to be a positive experience that they would recommend to other patients, as they found that it did not alter their quality of life. These results can be applied in Oncology Units for developing specific protocols for patients.

  17. Neonatal atrial flutter after insertion of an intracardiac umbilical venous catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos Moura de Almeida

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Objective: To describe a case of neonatal atrial flutter after the insertion of an intracardiac umbilical venous catheter, reporting the clinical presentation and reviewing the literature on this subject. Case description: A late-preterm newborn, born at 35 weeks of gestational age to a diabetic mother and large for gestational age, with respiratory distress and rule-out sepsis, required an umbilical venous access. After the insertion of the umbilical venous catheter, the patient presented with tachycardia. Chest radiography showed that the catheter was placed in the position that corresponds to the left atrium, and traction was applied. The patient persisted with tachycardia, and an electrocardiogram showed atrial flutter. As the patient was hemodynamically unstable, electric cardioversion was successfully applied. Comments: The association between atrial arrhythmias and misplaced umbilical catheters has been described in the literature, but in this case, it is noteworthy that the patient was an infant born to a diabetic mother, which consists in another risk factor for heart arrhythmias. Isolated atrial flutter is a rare tachyarrhythmia in the neonatal period and its identification is essential to establish early treatment and prevent systemic complications and even death.

  18. Evaluating ECG-aided tip localization of peripherally inserted central catheter in patients with cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Liu, Yan-Jin; Dong, Lei; Lou, Xiao-Ping; Miao, Jin-Hong; Li, Xiu-Xia; Li, Xiao-Jing; Li, Jing; Liu, Qian-Qian; Chang, Zhi-Wei

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate ECG-aided tip localization of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) in the patients with cancer. Methods: Between September and December 2014, 170 patients undergoing PICC were divided into observation group and control group (each group with 85 patients). In observation group, patients received ECG-aided tip localization of PICC. In control group, PICC was performed with conventional method. After PICC was performed, all patients took orthophoria chest radiogra...

  19. Azygos vein thrombosis secondary to a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sherif, Moayid M; Hall, Rebecca; Schauer, Cameron K M W

    2015-07-20

    This case illustrates a rare complication of a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC). PICCs are associated with a significantly increased risk of upper extremity deep vein thrombosis; however, there are currently no case reports of isolated thrombosis of the azygos vein secondary to a PICC. With the well-documented increase in the use of PICCs for venous access we remind clinicians to consider this rare complication.

  20. Risk Factors for Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter Complications in Children

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jumani, Ketan; Advani, Sonali; Reich, Nicholas G.; Gosey, Leslie; Milstone, Aaron M.

    2012-01-01

    Objective(s) To characterize the epidemiology and identify risk factors for complications necessitating removal of peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) in children. Design Cohort study Setting The Johns Hopkins Children’s Center, Baltimore, Maryland. Participants Hospitalized children who had a PICC inserted outside of the neonatal ICU between January 1, 2003 and December 1, 2009. Main Exposures Age, PICC dwell time, PICC insertion site, PICC tip location, pediatric ICU exposure, indication for PICC insertion Outcome Measures Complications necessitating PICC removal as recorded by the PICC Team. Results During the study period, 2574 PICCs were placed in 1807 children. Complications necessitating catheter removal occurred in 20.8% of PICCs during 46,021 catheter days (11.6 complications per 1,000 catheter days). These included accidental dislodgement (4.6%), infection (4.3%), occlusion (3.6%), local infiltration (3.0%), leakage (1.5%), breaks (1.4%), phlebitis (1.2%) and thrombosis (0.5%). From 2003 to 2009 complications decreased by 15% per year (IRR 0.85; 95%CI 0.81-0.89). In adjusted analysis, all non-central PICC tip locations - midline (IRR 4.59, 95% CI 3.69-5.69), mid-clavicular (IRR 2.15, 95% CI 1.54-2.98), and other (IRR 3.26 95% CI 1.72-6.15) - compared to central tip location were associated with an increased risk of complications. Pediatric ICU exposure and age less than one year old were independently associated with complications necessitating PICC removal. Conclusion(s) Non-central PICC tip locations, younger age, and pediatric ICU exposure were independent risk factors for complications necessitating PICC removal. Despite reductions in PICC complications, further efforts are needed to prevent PICC-associated complications in children. PMID:23549677

  1. Heparin for clearance of peripherally inserted central venous catheter in newborns: an in vitro study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaminut, Talita; Venturini, Danielle; da Silva, Valéria Costa Evangelista; Rossetto, Edilaine Giovanini; Zani, Adriana Valongo

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of two concentrations of heparin to clear the lumen of in vitro clotted neonatal peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs). Methods: This is an in vitro, experimental quantitative study of 76 neonatal 2.0-Fr PICCs coagulated in vitro. The catheters were divided into two groups of 38 PICCs each. In both groups an infusion of low molecular weight heparin was administered with a dose of 25IU/mL for Group 1 and 50IU/mL for Group 2. The negative pressure technique was applied to the catheters of both groups at 5, 15 and 30min and at 4h to test their permeability. Kaplan-Meier survival analysis was used to verify the outcome of the groups according to time intervals. Results: The comparison between both groups in the first 5min showed that more catheters from Group 2 were cleared compared to Group 1 (57.9 vs. 21.1%, respectively). Kaplan-Meier survival analysis showed that less time was needed to clear catheters treated with 50IU/mL of heparin (p<0.001). Conclusions: The use of low molecular weight heparin at a concentration of 50IU/mL was more effective in restoring the permeability of neonatal PICCs occluded in vitro by a clot, and the use of this concentration is within the safety margin indicated by scientific literature. PMID:26116325

  2. Additional Analgesia for Central Venous Catheter Insertion: A Placebo Controlled Randomized Trial of Dexmedetomidine and Fentanyl

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aloka Samantaray

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to show that a single preprocedural dose of either dexmedetomidine or fentanyl reduces procedural pain and discomfort and provides clinically acceptable sedation. In this prospective, double-blind study, sixty patients scheduled for elective surgery and requiring planned central venous catheter insertion were randomized to receive dexmedetomidine (1 μg/kg, fentanyl (1 μg/kg, or 0.9% normal saline intravenously over ten minutes followed by local anesthetic field infiltration before attempting central venous catheterization. The primary outcome measures are assessment and analysis of pain, discomfort, and sedation level before, during, and after the central venous catheter insertion at five time points. The median (IQR pain score is worst for normal saline group at local anaesthetic injection [6 (4–6.7] which was significantly attenuated by addition of fentanyl [3 (2–4] and dexmedetomidine [4 (3–5] in the immediate postprocedural period (P=0.001. However, the procedure related discomfort was significantly lower in dexmedetomidine group compared to fentanyl group in the first 10 min of procedure after local anaesthetic Injection (P=0.001. Fentanyl is more analgesically efficient for central venous catheter insertion along with local anaesthetic injection. However, dexmedetomidine has the potential to be superior to fentanyl and placebo in terms of providing comfort to the patients during the procedure.

  3. Assessing nursing students' knowledge and skills in performing venepuncture and inserting peripheral venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlin, C; Klang-Söderkvist, B; Johansson, E; Björkholm, M; Löfmark, A

    2017-03-01

    Venepuncture and the insertion of peripheral venous catheters are common tasks in health care, and training in these procedures is included in nursing programmes. Evidence of nursing students' knowledge and skills in these procedures is limited. The main aim of this study was to assess nursing students' knowledge and skills when performing venepuncture and inserting peripheral venous catheters. Potential associations between level of knowledge and skills, self-training, self-efficacy, and demographic characteristics were also investigated. The assessment was performed by lecturers at a university college in Sweden using the two previously tested instruments "Assess Venepuncture" and "Assess Peripheral Venous Catheter Insertion". Between 81% and 100% of steps were carried out correctly by the students. The step with the highest rating was "Uses gloves", and lowest rating was 'Informs the patients about the possibility of obtaining local anaesthesia'. Significant correlations between degree of self-training and correct performance were found in the group of students who registered their self-training. No associations between demographic characteristics and correct performances were found. Assessing that students have achieved adequate levels of knowledge and skills in these procedures at different levels of the nursing education is of importance to prevent complications and support patient safety. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Retrospective Analysis of Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter-related Vein
Thrombosis in Lung Cancer Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin CHEN

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been proven that peripherally inserted central catheter-related vein thrombosis is a unignorable complication which causes serious harm and economic burden to patients. We designed a study to analyze factors causing peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC-related vein thrombosis, and find some nursing interventions to reduce the incidence of PICC-related vein thrombosis, and prolong the service time of peripherally inserted central catheters. Methods We designed a retrospective analysis. The study participants were 1,538 lung cancer patients who underwent PICCs placement between January 2010 and September 2013. And tried to determine age, gender, indwelling vein, platelet count, prothrombin time, fibrinogen associated with PICC-related vein thrombosis. Results Of the 1,538 unique PICC placements, 38 patients developed PICC-related vein thrombosis, the incidence was 2.47%. The gender (OR=2.194, P=0.024, indwelling vein (OR=1.955, P=0.006, fibrinogen (OR=2.055, P=0.028 can significantly affect the occurrence of PICC-related vein thrombosis. Conclusion Patients’ gender, indwelling vein, fibrinogen can affect the occurrence of PICC-related vein thrombosis. Assessing the patients’ condition carefully, implementing individual nursing care can reduce the incidence of PICC-related vein thrombosis, and prolong the service time of PICCs.

  5. Peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC)-related thrombosis in critically ill patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zochios, Vasileios; Umar, Imraan; Simpson, Nicola; Jones, Nicola

    2014-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are being increasingly used in critical care setting. However, PICCs are associated with a number of complications, particularly upper extremity venous thrombosis (UEVT), leading to post-thrombotic syndrome, pulmonary embolism and increased risk of catheter-related infection. To review the literature surrounding PICCs and highlight the epidemiology, pathophysiology, diagnosis and management of PICC-related thrombosis in critically ill patients. We performed an electronic literature search of the databases PubMed, EMBASE and Google scholar using set search terms, from their commencement date to the end of January 2014. It has been shown that PICCs may double the risk of deep venous thrombosis compared with centrally inserted venous catheters, in critically ill patients. However, the incidence of PICC-related thrombosis in critically ill patients has not been quantified. Ultrasonography is the preferred diagnostic imaging modality. There are no randomized controlled trials (RCTs) on the best treatment of PICC-related thrombosis in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting and in most cohort studies, anticoagulation strategies with or without PICC removal have been used. Decision to insert a PICC should be taken after careful risk stratification. There is lack of high-quality evidence assessing prevention strategies and management of PICC-related thrombosis in the ICU. Well-designed RCTs are required to estimate the prevalence of UEVT in ICU patients with PICCs and evaluate the efficacy and magnitude of clinical benefit and cost-effectiveness of therapeutic strategies.

  6. A Deep-Learning System for Fully-Automated Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC) Tip Detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Hyunkwang; Mansouri, Mohammad; Tajmir, Shahein; Lev, Michael H; Do, Synho

    2017-10-05

    A peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) is a thin catheter that is inserted via arm veins and threaded near the heart, providing intravenous access. The final catheter tip position is always confirmed on a chest radiograph (CXR) immediately after insertion since malpositioned PICCs can cause potentially life-threatening complications. Although radiologists interpret PICC tip location with high accuracy, delays in interpretation can be significant. In this study, we proposed a fully-automated, deep-learning system with a cascading segmentation AI system containing two fully convolutional neural networks for detecting a PICC line and its tip location. A preprocessing module performed image quality and dimension normalization, and a post-processing module found the PICC tip accurately by pruning false positives. Our best model, trained on 400 training cases and selectively tuned on 50 validation cases, obtained absolute distances from ground truth with a mean of 3.10 mm, a standard deviation of 2.03 mm, and a root mean squares error (RMSE) of 3.71 mm on 150 held-out test cases. This system could help speed confirmation of PICC position and further be generalized to include other types of vascular access and therapeutic support devices.

  7. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Catheter Angiography Catheter angiography uses a ... few millimeters) in the skin where the catheter can be inserted into an artery. The catheter is ...

  8. Improving patient safety during insertion of peripheral venous catheters: an observational intervention study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kampf, Günter

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available [english] Background: Peripheral venous catheters are frequently used in hospitalized patients but increase the risk of nosocomial bloodstream infection. Evidence-based guidelines describe specific steps that are known to reduce infection risk. However, the degree of guideline implementation in clinical practice is not known. The aim of this study was to determine the use of specific steps for insertion of peripheral venous catheters in clinical practice and to implement a multimodal intervention aimed at improving both compliance and the optimum order of the steps.Methods: The study was conducted at University Hospital Hamburg. An optimum procedure for inserting a peripheral venous catheter was defined based on three evidence-based guidelines (WHO, CDC, RKI including five steps with 1A or 1B level of evidence: hand disinfection before patient contact, skin antisepsis of the puncture site, no palpation of treated puncture site, hand disinfection before aseptic procedure, and sterile dressing on the puncture site. A research nurse observed and recorded procedures for peripheral venous catheter insertion for healthcare workers in four different departments (endoscopy, central emergency admissions, pediatrics, and dermatology. A multimodal intervention with 5 elements was established (teaching session, dummy training, e-learning tool, tablet and poster, and direct feedback, followed by a second observation period. During the last observation week, participants evaluated the intervention.Results: In the control period, 207 insertions were observed, and 202 in the intervention period. Compliance improved significantly for four of five steps (e.g., from 11.6% to 57.9% for hand disinfection before patient contact; p<0.001, chi-square test. Compliance with skin antisepsis of the puncture site was high before and after intervention (99.5% before and 99.0% after. Performance of specific steps in the correct order also improved (e.g., from 7.7% to 68

  9. [The ISP (Safe Insertion of PICCs) protocol: a bundle of 8 recommendations to minimize the complications related to the peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICC)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emoli, Alessandro; Cappuccio, Serena; Marche, Bruno; Musarò, Andrea; Scoppettuolo, Giancarlo; Pittiruti, Mauro

    2014-01-01

    The ISP (Safe Insertion of PICCs) protocol: a bundle of 8 recommendations to minimize the complications related to the peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICC). The insertion of a peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC) is not without risks. The Italian Group for the Study of Long-Term Central Venous Access Devices (GAVeCeLT) has developed a protocol (SIP: Safe Implantation of PICCs) with the aim of minimizing the risks which may be associated with the placement of PICCs. The protocol is based on recommendations available in the literature and on the main clinical practice guidelines. The SIP protocol, a bundle of evidence-based recommendations, it is is easy to use, inexpensive, and cost-effective. If routinely used and carefully inplemented, it greatly reduces complications such as failure of venipuncture, accidental arterial puncture, damage of median nerve, infection and catheter related venous thrombosis.

  10. Inserting central venous catheter in emergency conditions in coagulopathic patients in comparison to noncoagulopathic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Nasr-Esfahani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The current study was designed to compare the complications and adverse effects of central venous catheter (CVC insertion under ultrasound guidance in patients with and without coagulopathy. Materials and Methods: In this clinical trial, 59 patients who needed CVC for various reasons were enrolled. Patients were divided into two groups of those with and without coagulopathy based on complete blood count, prothrombin time, partial thromboplastin time, and international normalized ratio test results, and then, CVC was inserted with ultrasound guidance in both groups. The CVC inserting site was examined for hematoma and hemorrhage in four stages at different times. Results: There was no significant difference in the terms of demographic features, catheter lumen size (P = 0.43, and number of attempting for CVC placement (odds ratio [OR] =2.35, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.36–15.3, P = 0.39 between two groups. Seven out of 59 patients suffered from complications (11.9% that the complications in coagulopathic patients were oozing (5.7% and superficial hematoma (8.6% while in noncoagulopathic patients were 4.2% for both complications (OR = 0.54, 95% CI = 0.09–3.07, P = 0.767. Conclusion: According to our results, it can be concluded that inserting CVC with ultrasound guidance under emergency conditions causes no serious and life-threatening complications in coagulopathic patients.

  11. ABO blood group related venous thrombosis risk in patients with peripherally inserted central catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koo, Chung Mo; Vissapragada, Ravi; Sharp, Rebecca; Nguyen, Phi; Ung, Thomas; Solanki, Chrismin; Esterman, Adrian

    2018-02-01

    To investigate the association between ABO blood group and upper limb venous thrombosis (VT) risk in patients with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC). Single centre retrospective cohort study. A cohort of patients who underwent PICC insertion from September 2010 to August 2014 were followed up for symptomatic VT presentations diagnosed by ultrasound. Blood group status was identified from hospital information systems. 2270 participants had 3020 PICCs inserted. There were 124 cases of symptomatic VT, an incident rate of 4% [95% confidence interval, CI (3-5%)]. Univariate analysis adjusting for the clustered sample showed that having chemotherapy, two or more previous PICCs, a larger catheter size, a diagnosis of cancer and having a blood group B were all associated with an increased risk of a VT. In the multivariate analysis, PICC diameter, cancer diagnosis and blood group B were all independently associated with increased risk of VT. Patients undergoing PICC insertion with a blood group B appear to have a higher risk of VT, independent of risks attached to the PICC procedure and cancer diagnosis. Without any existing guidelines for PICC-related VT, this investigation creates a platform for further research to be conducted in order to establish guidelines. Advances in knowledge: Previous studies investigating VT risk associated with blood group status related to large heterogeneous populations. In this article, we look at patients specifically with PICC, which reduces the heterogeneity in the cohort. In addition, due to the substantial number of patients enrolled, we had a chance to perform multivariate analyses with statistical significance.

  12. The effect of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) valve technology on catheter occlusion rates--the 'ELeCTRiC' study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnston, Andrew J; Streater, Carmel T; Noorani, Remy; Crofts, Joanne L; Del Mundo, Aldwin B; Parker, Richard A

    2012-01-01

    Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters (PICCs) are increasingly being used to provide short to medium-term central venous access. The current study was designed to test the hypothesis that PICC valve technology does not influence PICC occlusion rates. Intensive care unit (ICU) patients who required a PICC were randomized to one of three types of dual lumen PICC (open ended non-valved, Groshong valve, PASV valve). PICC occlusions were recorded and managed with a protocol that used urokinase. A total of 102 patients were recruited to the study. The overall risk of occlusion per catheter was 35% (95% CI 26% to 44%). The overall rate of occlusion was 76 occlusions per 1000 catheter days (95% CI 61 to 95). Presence or type of valve did not significantly influence this rate (open-ended non-valved PICC 38% of catheters, 79 occlusions per 1000 catheter days; Groshong 38% of catheters, 60 occlusions per 1000 catheter days; PASV 27% of catheters, 99 occlusions per 1000 catheter days). The dose of urokinase required to treat PICC occlusions did not significantly differ between PICC types. Valved PICCs do not appear to influence PICC occlusion rates.

  13. Peripherally inserted central catheters in infants and children - indications, techniques, complications and clinical recommendations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Westergaard, B; Classen, V; Walther-Larsen, S

    2013-01-01

    Venous access required both for blood sampling and for the delivery of medicines and nutrition is an integral element in the care of sick infants and children. Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) have been shown to be a valuable alternative to traditional central venous devices...... in adults and neonates. However, the evidence may not extrapolate directly to older paediatric patients. In this study, we therefore review the indications, methods of insertion and complications of PICC lines for children beyond the neonatal age to provide clinical recommendations based on a search...... of the current literature. Although the literature is heterogeneous with few randomised studies, PICCs emerge as a safe and valuable option for intermediate- to long-term central venous access in children both in and out of hospital. Insertion can often be performed in light or no sedation, with little risk...

  14. Mycobacterium abscessus causing native valve endocarditis due to peripherally inserted central catheter line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gajanan Rodge

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Infections due to rapidly-growing mycobacteria (RGM are increasing worldwide, especially in immunocompromised hosts. However, data on the clinical features of patients with RGM bacteremia are limited [1]. Data on the incidence of clinically significant non-tuberculous mycobacteria (NTM infections from India are scarce as these are frequently under-diagnosed due to either under recognition by clinicians because of the nonspecific nature of their clinical manifestations, and/or the inadequacy of laboratory services [2].We present a case of Mycobacterium abscessus native tricuspid valve endocarditis in a patient who had a peripherally inserted central catheter line (PICC.Clinicians need to be aware of RGM as a cause of prolonged fever in patients who have chronic indwelling intravenous catheters [3].

  15. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter-Related Infections in a Cohort of Hospitalized Adult Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bouzad, Caroline; Duron, Sandrine; Bousquet, Aurore; Arnaud, François-Xavier; Valbousquet, Laura; Weber-Donat, Gabrielle; Teriitehau, Christophe; Baccialone, Jacques; Potet, Julien

    2016-01-01

    PurposeTo determine the incidence and the risks factors of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC)-related infectious complications.Materials and MethodsMedical charts of every in-patient that underwent a PICC insertion in our hospital between January 2010 and October 2013 were reviewed. All PICC-related infections were recorded and categorized as catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI), exit-site infections, and septic thrombophlebitis.ResultsNine hundred and twenty-three PICCs were placed in 644 unique patients, mostly male (68.3 %) with a median age of 58 years. 31 (3.4 %) PICC-related infections occurred during the study period corresponding to an infection rate of 1.64 per 1000 catheter-days. We observed 27 (87.1 %) CR-BSI, corresponding to a rate of 1.43 per 1000 catheter-days, 3 (9.7 %) septic thrombophlebitis, and 1 (3.2 %) exit-site infection. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed a higher PICC-related infection rate with chemotherapy (odds ratio (OR) 7.2–confidence interval (CI) 95 % [1.77–29.5]), auto/allograft (OR 5.9–CI 95 % [1.2–29.2]), and anti-coagulant therapy (OR 2.2–95 % [1.4–12]).ConclusionChemotherapy, auto/allograft, and anti-coagulant therapy are associated with an increased risk of developing PICC-related infections.Clinical AdvanceChemotherapy, auto/allograft, and anti-coagulant therapy are important predictors of PICC-associated infections. A careful assessment of these risk factors may be important for future success in preventing PICC-related infections

  16. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter-Related Infections in a Cohort of Hospitalized Adult Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bouzad, Caroline, E-mail: caroline.bouzad@gmail.com [Percy Military Teaching Hospital, Radiology Department (France); Duron, Sandrine, E-mail: duronsandrine@yahoo.fr [GSBdD, Military Centre for Epidemiology and Public Health (CESPA) (France); Bousquet, Aurore, E-mail: aurorebousquet@yahoo.fr [Begin Military Teaching Hospital, Bacteriology Department (France); Arnaud, François-Xavier, E-mail: fxa0160@hotmail.com [Percy Military Teaching Hospital, Radiology Department (France); Valbousquet, Laura, E-mail: laura.valbousquet@gmail.com [Begin Military Teaching Hospital, Radiology Department (France); Weber-Donat, Gabrielle, E-mail: weberdonatgabrielle@yahoo.fr; Teriitehau, Christophe, E-mail: cteriitehau@me.com; Baccialone, Jacques, E-mail: jacques.baccialone@wanadoo.fr; Potet, Julien, E-mail: potet-julien@yahoo.fr [Percy Military Teaching Hospital, Radiology Department (France)

    2016-03-15

    PurposeTo determine the incidence and the risks factors of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC)-related infectious complications.Materials and MethodsMedical charts of every in-patient that underwent a PICC insertion in our hospital between January 2010 and October 2013 were reviewed. All PICC-related infections were recorded and categorized as catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI), exit-site infections, and septic thrombophlebitis.ResultsNine hundred and twenty-three PICCs were placed in 644 unique patients, mostly male (68.3 %) with a median age of 58 years. 31 (3.4 %) PICC-related infections occurred during the study period corresponding to an infection rate of 1.64 per 1000 catheter-days. We observed 27 (87.1 %) CR-BSI, corresponding to a rate of 1.43 per 1000 catheter-days, 3 (9.7 %) septic thrombophlebitis, and 1 (3.2 %) exit-site infection. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed a higher PICC-related infection rate with chemotherapy (odds ratio (OR) 7.2–confidence interval (CI) 95 % [1.77–29.5]), auto/allograft (OR 5.9–CI 95 % [1.2–29.2]), and anti-coagulant therapy (OR 2.2–95 % [1.4–12]).ConclusionChemotherapy, auto/allograft, and anti-coagulant therapy are associated with an increased risk of developing PICC-related infections.Clinical AdvanceChemotherapy, auto/allograft, and anti-coagulant therapy are important predictors of PICC-associated infections. A careful assessment of these risk factors may be important for future success in preventing PICC-related infections.

  17. Developing a preoperative predictive model for ureteral length for ureteral stent insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawahara, Takashi; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Ito, Hiroki; Kuroda, Shinnosuke; Terao, Hideyuki; Makiyama, Kazuhide; Uemura, Hiroji; Yao, Masahiro; Miyamoto, Hiroshi; Matsuzaki, Junichi

    2016-11-30

    Ureteral stenting has been a fundamental part of various urological procedures. Selecting a ureteral stent of optimal length is important for decreasing the incidence of stent migration and complications. The aim of the present study was to develop and internally validate a model for predicting the ureteral length for ureteral stent insertion. This study included a total of 127 patients whose ureters had previously been assessed by both intravenous urography (IVU) and CT scan. The actual ureteral length was determined by direct measurement using a 5-Fr ureteral catheter. Multiple linear regression analysis with backward selection was used to model the relationship between the factors analyzed and actual ureteral length. Bootstrapping was used to internally validate the predictive model. Patients all of whom had stone disease included 76 men (59.8%) and 51 women (40.2%), with the median and mean (± SD) ages of 60 and 58.7 (±14.2) years. In these patients, 53 (41.7%) right and 74 (58.3%) left ureters were analyzed. The median and mean (± SD) actual ureteral lengths were 24.0 and 23.3 (±2.0) cm, respectively. Using the bootstrap methods for internal validation, the correlation coefficient (R2) was 0.57 ± 0.07. We have developed a predictive model, for the first time, which predicts ureteral length using the following five preoperative characteristics: age, side, sex, IVU measurement, and CT calculation. This predictive model can be used to reliably predict ureteral length based on clinical and radiological factors and may thus be a useful tool to help determining the optimal length of ureteral stent.

  18. Use of Electronic Tablets for Patient Education on Flushing Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petroulias, Patricia L

    The purpose of this study was to examine the efficacy of using an electronic tablet to provide patient education for flushing peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) as a way to reduce the incidence of occlusion. Eleven patients, newly diagnosed with cancer, participated in a pilot study that used a video on PICC flushing and remote coaching using FaceTime (Apple, Cupertino, CA) to teach patients how to maintain their PICCs in their homes. At the end of the 6-week intervention, no adverse outcomes (occlusions or infections) were noted among the patients who participated in the study.

  19. Chlorhexidine 2% and choice of transparent dressing increase skin reactions at central venous catheter insertion sites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loewenthal, Mark; Dobson, Pauline; Boyle, Michael

    2016-12-01

    Infection at central venous catheter (CVC) sites remains a common problem, particularly with long-term use. This report discusses the influence of choice of transparent dressing type and chlorhexidine concentration on skin reactions at CVC insertion sites. A concentration of 2% chlorhexidine is associated with a higher rate of skin reactions than either 0.5% or 1% chlorhexidine. Higher chlorhexidine concentrations may not decrease the number of central line-associated bloodstream infections. Copyright © 2016 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Improving Patient Safety with a Mobile Application for Patients with Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheters (PICC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nüssli, Stephan; Schnyder, Florian; Zenhäusern, Raphael; Bosshart, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) are of growing interest because they allow intravenous therapies up to several months. The appropriate management of the PICCs is crucial to minimize complications and largely depends on the right information for everyone who cares for the patient. To reach this goal we develop the mobile application "PICC App" to provide the necessary information for all involved persons in the outpatient setting. We expect to be able to report about the PICC App and the results of the usability evaluation with pilot users.

  1. Delayed Migration and Perforation of the Jugular Vein by a Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joshua J. Oliver

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC migration and perforation of the left internal jugular vein in a home health setting in an 80-year-old female. A left sided PICC was placed for treatment of diverticulitis following hospital discharge. She complained of sudden onset left sided neck pain immediately after starting an infusion of vancomycin. In the emergency department the injury was identified by portable chest radiograph and computed tomography of her neck. Following removal of the line, she had an uneventful course. Emergency physicians should be aware of this possible PICC line complication.

  2. Plan to Reduce Improper Care of Peripherally-inserted Central Venous Catheters in Outpatient Chemotherapy Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Mei Chen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available This project aims at improving peripherally-inserted central venous catheter (PICC care in chemotherapy outpatients. From February to March 2011, 16.8% of PICCs were not cared for properly. The main problems encountered were dermatitis, catheter obstruction and catheter slippage. These problems were caused by lack of wound care guidelines for the PICC, the nursing staff's lack of knowledge and skills for PICC nursing care, and patients and their families’ lack of knowledge regarding PICC home care. Improvement plans included: 1. To establish norms for care of normal and abnormal PICC wounds and produce instructional videos; 2. To design correct flushing and butterfly fixation methods of the PICC. 3. To develop the transparent waterproof protective jacket and to produce a home nursing care manual and instructional video. After implementation of this project, the rate of improper PICC care decreased to 6.1% in September to November 2011, thus achieving the goals of this project. This PICC care project not only enhanced the professional knowledge and skills of nurses, but also the knowledge of patients regarding self-care.

  3. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Use in Skilled Nursing Facilities: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Vineet; Montoya, Ana; Joshi, Darius; Becker, Carol; Brant, Amy; McGuirk, Helen; Clark, Jordyn; Harrod, Molly; Kuhn, Latoya; Mody, Lona

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVES To describe patterns of use, care practices, and outcomes related to peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) use in skilled nursing facilities (SNFs). DESIGN Prospective cohort study. SETTING Two community SNFs. PARTICIPANTS Adult SNF residents with PICCs (N = 56). MEASUREMENTS Information on indication for PICC use, device characteristics (e.g., lumens, gauge), and participant data (comorbidities, medications) were obtained from medical records. Care practices (e.g., frequency of flushing, dressing care) and problems related to PICCs were recorded. Major (central line–associated bloodstream infection, venous thromboembolism, catheter dislodgement) and minor (migration, dressing disruption, lumen occlusion, exit site infection) complications and process measures (flushing of PICC, assessment of necessity) were recorded. Bivariate analyses with t-tests, chi-square tests, or Fischer exact tests were used for continuous and categorical data. RESULTS Participants were enrolled from two SNFs. The most common indication for PICC use was intravenous antibiotic delivery. The average PICC dwell time was 43 days, and most devices were single-lumen PICCs. Major and minor complications were common and occurred in 11 (20%) and 18 (32%) participants, respectively. Occlusion (23%, n = 13), accidental dislodgement (12%, n = 7), and dressing disruption (11%, n = 6) were the commonest complications observed. Documentation regarding catheter care practices occurred in 41% of cases. CONCLUSION Quality improvement efforts that seek to benchmark practice, identify gaps, and institute efforts to improve PICC care and practice in SNFs appear necessary. PMID:26312402

  4. Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Physical Properties of Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian Zhang

    Full Text Available Peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC has been widely used to treat cancer patients. It is unknown whether or not it can be applied safely during radiotherapy. The study aimed to investigate the direct effects of gamma radiation on physical properties of PICC. A total of 60 catheters were included in this study. Thirty PICCs were exposed to a radiation field, and another 30 PICCs received radiation in a 3-cm homogeneity water equivalent phantom and then were irradiated. Each group was divided into three subgroups: 10 PICCs were given conventional fractionation, 2 Gy per fraction, 5 fractions per week; 10 PICCs were continuously given hypofractionation, 10 Gy per fraction, for 6 weeks; and 10 PICCs were given mock radiation as controls. The physical properties of these catheters were analyzed after radiation. None of the PICCs leaked under 300-kPa airflow pressure lasting 15 seconds. Fracture force values and liquid velocity values of all PICCs were within the normal range. The liquid velocity values of the control groups were higher than the two groups that received radiation (P 0.05. There were no statistical differences among the conventional fractionation group, hypofractionation group, and control group when compared to the fracture force values in two parts (P > 0.05. The physical property of PICC is quite stable with a clinically relevant dose of gamma radiation. It is likely that PICC can be used safely in patients receiving radiotherapy, although further in vivo and clinical studies are required.

  5. The catheter to vein ratio and rates of symptomatic venous thromboembolism in patients with a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC): a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Rebecca; Cummings, Melita; Fielder, Andrea; Mikocka-Walus, Antonina; Grech, Carol; Esterman, Adrian

    2015-03-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are a common vascular access device used in clinical practice. Their use may be complicated by adverse events such as venous thromboembolism (VTE). The size of the vein used for PICC insertion and thus the catheter to vein ratio is thought to be a controllable factor in the reduction of VTE rates in patients who have a PICC. However, an optimal catheter to vein ratio for PICC insertion has not previously been investigated to inform clinical practice. To determine the effect of the catheter to vein ratio (proportion of the vein measured at the insertion point taken up by the catheter) on rates of symptomatic VTE in patients with a PICC and identify the optimal ratio cut-off point to reduce rates of this adverse event. Adult patients waiting for PICC insertion at a large metropolitan teaching hospital were recruited between May and December 2013. Vein diameter at the PICC insertion site was measured using ultrasound with in-built callipers. Participants were followed up at eight weeks to determine if they developed symptomatic VTE. Data were available for 136 patients (50% cancer; 44% infection; 6% other indication for PICC). Mean age was 57 years with 54% males. There were four cases of confirmed symptomatic VTE (two involving the deep veins, one peripheral vein and one pulmonary embolism). Receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis determined that a 45% catheter to vein ratio was the ideal cut off point to maximise sensitivity and specificity (AUC 0.761; 95% CI 0.681-0.830). When a ratio of 46% or above was compared to one that was less than or equal to 45% using a log binomial generalised linear model it was found that participants with a catheter to vein ratio >45% were 13 times more likely to suffer VTE (relative risk 13, p=0.022; CI 1.445-122.788). It was found that a 45% catheter to vein ratio was the optimal cut off with high sensitivity and specificity to reduce the risk of VTE. However, further research

  6. REcanalisation and Balloon-Oriented Puncture for Re-Insertion of Dialysis Catheter in Nonpatent Central Veins (REBORN)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Too, Chow Wei, E-mail: toochowwei@gmail.com [Singapore General Hospital (Singapore); Sayani, Raza [Aga Khan University Hospital (Pakistan); Lim, Elvin Yuan Ting; Leong, Sum; Gogna, Apoorva [Singapore General Hospital (Singapore); Teo, Terence K. [Mount Elizabeth Novena Hospital (Singapore)

    2016-08-15

    PurposeTo describe a technique involving REcanalisation and Balloon-Oriented puncture for Re-insertion of dialysis catheter in Nonpatent central veins (REBORN) and to report long-term results.Materials and MethodsThis is a retrospective study of ten subjects in whom dialysis catheters were inserted using the REBORN technique from March 2012 to October 2014 and followed up till April 2016. Data on the duration of catheter usage, complications and reasons for removal were obtained. Seven patients had partially occluded lower internal jugular veins (IJV) recanalised in an antegrade fashion via a more cranial puncture. The balloon was then inflated at usual puncture site with an 18G needle. The collapsed balloon was cannulated with a guide wire, and both balloon and guide wire were advanced together into the superior vena cava. This was followed by tunnelled catheter placement using standard techniques. Two patients had catheters placed in the subclavian vein using a similar antegrade technique, and one patient had catheter placed via the left IJV following retrograde recanalisation from a right femoral puncture.ResultsMean duration of catheter use was 278 days (range 32–503). Three catheters were removed due to matured arteriovenous accesses. Four patients had successful catheter change over the same subcutaneous track due to catheter malfunction. One catheter was removed after 7 months because of sepsis. No complications were reported.ConclusionThe REBORN technique allows for the preservation of central veins for future haemodialysis access, which can be challenging in patients requiring long-term dialysis.

  7. REcanalisation and Balloon-Oriented Puncture for Re-Insertion of Dialysis Catheter in Nonpatent Central Veins (REBORN)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Too, Chow Wei; Sayani, Raza; Lim, Elvin Yuan Ting; Leong, Sum; Gogna, Apoorva; Teo, Terence K.

    2016-01-01

    PurposeTo describe a technique involving REcanalisation and Balloon-Oriented puncture for Re-insertion of dialysis catheter in Nonpatent central veins (REBORN) and to report long-term results.Materials and MethodsThis is a retrospective study of ten subjects in whom dialysis catheters were inserted using the REBORN technique from March 2012 to October 2014 and followed up till April 2016. Data on the duration of catheter usage, complications and reasons for removal were obtained. Seven patients had partially occluded lower internal jugular veins (IJV) recanalised in an antegrade fashion via a more cranial puncture. The balloon was then inflated at usual puncture site with an 18G needle. The collapsed balloon was cannulated with a guide wire, and both balloon and guide wire were advanced together into the superior vena cava. This was followed by tunnelled catheter placement using standard techniques. Two patients had catheters placed in the subclavian vein using a similar antegrade technique, and one patient had catheter placed via the left IJV following retrograde recanalisation from a right femoral puncture.ResultsMean duration of catheter use was 278 days (range 32–503). Three catheters were removed due to matured arteriovenous accesses. Four patients had successful catheter change over the same subcutaneous track due to catheter malfunction. One catheter was removed after 7 months because of sepsis. No complications were reported.ConclusionThe REBORN technique allows for the preservation of central veins for future haemodialysis access, which can be challenging in patients requiring long-term dialysis.

  8. Risk Factors of Catheter-related Bloodstream Infection With Percutaneously Inserted Central Venous Catheters in Very Low Birth Weight Infants: A Center's Experience in Taiwan

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jen-Fu Hsu

    2010-12-01

    Conclusion: It is important to avoid inserting a PICC at the femoral site. Strict catheter care protocol should also be applied to reduce local site bacterial colonization and removal of PICCs as soon as they are no longer essential for patient care to reduce the incidence of infection.

  9. Cost-effectiveness analysis of ultrasound-guided Seldinger peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Jianghong; Liu, Liping; Xie, Jing; Hu, Lingli; Yang, Qiaolan; Wang, Honghong

    2016-01-01

    Ultrasound-guided cannulation of deep mid-arm veins by a modified Seldinger (US-Seldinger) technique has been demonstrated to yield better puncture success rates and lower postoperative complication rates than direct cannulation of superficial veins near the elbow with a short peripheral cannula and peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) insertion through the cannula (non-US conventional method). Economic factors have been evaluated across different operators (i.e. nurses, radiologists, and general practitioners) and different venous catheter types (i.e. PICCs vs. central venous catheters). However, to our knowledge, data describing the economic evaluation on the aforementioned modified Seldinger technique are lacking. Hence, the aim of this study was to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of US-Seldinger technique (experimental group) compared with that of the non-US conventional method based on direct vein visualization (control group). A cohort of 360 subjects were assigned randomly to the experimental and control groups. Cost-effectiveness ratio (CER) analyses indicated that the effectiveness index (EI) for the experimental group was 89.29% (final CER = 3732.75), whereas that for the control group was 59.18% (final CER = 2492.98). The US-Seldinger technique was found to be more cost-effective than the non-US conventional method. These findings support the use of the former in place of the traditional latter technique as a routine puncture technique and suggest that the update would improve intravenous therapy treatment for patients needing PICCs. This study should serve as a reference for national healthcare policy. Trial registration ChiCTR-TRC-14004993.

  10. A procedural check list for pleural decompression and intercostal catheter insertion for adult major trauma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, M; Fitzgerald, M; Martin, K; Santamaria, M; Arendse, S; O'Reilly, G; Smit, de V; Orda, U; Marasco, S

    2015-01-01

    Intercostal catheter (ICC) insertion is the standard pleural decompression and drainage technique for blunt and penetrating traumatic injury. Potentially high complication rates are associated with the procedure, with the literature quoting over 20% in some cases (1-4). Empyema in particular is a serious complication. Risk adverse industries such as the airline industry and military services regularly employ checklists to standardise performance and decrease human errors. The use of checklists in medical practice is exemplified by introduction of the WHO Surgical Safety checklist. The Alfred Hospital in Melbourne, Australia is an Adult Level 1 Trauma Centre. In August 2009 The Alfred Trauma Service introduced an evidence-based checklist system for the insertion of ICCs, combined with standardised formal training for resident medical staff, in an attempt to minimise the incidence of ICC related empyema. Between January 2003 and July 2009 the incidence of empyema was 1.44% (29 in 2009 insertions). This decreased to 0.57% between August 2009 and December 2011 (6 in 1060 insertions) when the measures described above were introduced [p=0.038 Fisher's exact test, 2-tailed]. Quality control checklists - such as the ICC checklist described - are a sensible and functional means to standardise practice, to decrease procedural error and to reduce complication rates during trauma resuscitation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Length of Catheter Use After Hysterectomy as a Risk Factor for Urinary Tract Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karp, Natalie E; Kobernik, Emily K; Kamdar, Neil S; Fore, Amanda M; Morgan, Daniel M

    2017-09-13

    The aims of this study were to determine the effect of length of postoperative catheterization on risk of urinary tract infection (UTI) and to identify risk factors for postoperative UTI. This was a retrospective case-control study. Demographic and perioperative data, including duration of indwelling catheter use and postoperative occurrence of UTI within 30 days of surgery, were analyzed for hysterectomies using the Michigan Surgical Quality Collaborative database. Catheter exposure was categorized as low-no catheter placed/catheter removed the day of surgery, intermediate-catheter removed postoperative day 1, high-catheter removal on postoperative day 2 or later, or highest-patient discharged home with catheter. A multivariable logistic regression model was developed to identify factors associated with UTI. An interaction term was included in the final model. Overall, UTI prevalence was 2.3% and increased with duration of catheter exposure (low: 1.3% vs intermediate: 2.1% vs high: 4.1% vs highest: 6.5%, P < 0.0001). High (odds ratio [OR] = 2.54 [1.51-4.27]) and highest (OR = 3.39 [1.86-6.17]) catheter exposure, operative time (OR = 1.15 [1.03-1.29]), and dependent functional status (OR = 4.62 [1.90-11.20]) were independently associated with UTI. Women who had a vaginal hysterectomy with sling/pelvic organ prolapse repair were more likely to have a UTI than those who had a vaginal hysterectomy alone (OR = 2.58 [1.10-6.07]) and more likely to have a UTI than women having an abdominal or laparoscopic hysterectomy with a sling/pelvic organ prolapse repair (OR = 2.13 [1.12-4.04]). Length of catheterization and operative time are modifiable risk factors for UTI after hysterectomy. An interaction between vaginal hysterectomy and concomitant pelvic reconstruction increases the odds of UTI.

  12. Incidence of thrombosis in children with tunneled central venous access devices versus peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanin, Maralee; Young, Guy

    2013-11-01

    The recent proliferation of deep vein thrombosis in children has been attributed to the increased use of central venous catheters, specifically tunneled lines and peripherally inserted central catheters. A formal comparison of the incidence rate for deep vein thrombosis between tunneled lines and peripherally inserted central catheters has not been undertaken. Children inclusion. Data were extracted from the hospital discharge database which includes data on all procedures and up to 20 diagnoses per admission. Diagnoses and procedures were identified by International Classification of Disease, Ninth Revision coding. Patients were excluded if they received more than one central line. Data collected included type of central line, deep vein thrombosis event, and underlying medical illnesses classified according to chronic complex conditions. Over the seven year study period there was an overall rate of 73 deep vein thromboses per 10,000 hospital discharges. Of the 6915 eligible subjects, 181 had a deep vein thrombosis for an overall incidence rate of 2.6%. There were 152 thrombi (2.6%) in subjects with peripherally inserted central catheters and 29 thrombi (3.1%) in subjects with tunneled lines [OR=.83 (0.55, 1.29), p=0.38]. Despite the relative ease and simplicity of use of peripherally inserted central catheters leading to a substantial rise in their use, this study demonstrates that such lines pose a substantial risk for venous thrombosis and no difference in incidence was detected between such lines and tunneled lines. © 2013.

  13. Laparoscopic versus open peritoneal dialysis catheter insertion for the management of pediatric acute kidney injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stack, Maria; Price, Neil; Ronaldson, Jane; Prestidge, Chanel; Wong, William; Kara, Tonya

    2016-02-01

    Acute pediatric dialysis is provided by a single center in New Zealand. Most acute dialysis in our center is performed in the under 5 age group. The advantage of using peritoneal dialysis (PD) in these children is the ability to perform continuous renal replacement therapy without always requiring an ICU setting, avoiding central venous access and promoting greater cardiovascular stability. The disadvantage of PD in the acute setting includes the requirement for immediate use and the potential for early leaks due to peritoneal disruption with resulting delayed use and restricted volumes. There is a growing trend toward minimally invasive surgery and the laparoscopic method allows this. Surgeons at this center have been using a laparoscopic technique since 2005. We performed a 10-year review of acute PD at the Starship Hospital from 2003 to 2013. Data on 102 children who met the criteria were collected. These 102 children had 113 acute PD catheters. The two groups were comparable in terms of age and reason for presentation. The median age of the laparoscopic group was 2 years (interquartile range [IQR] 6) and the open group was 3 years (IQR 3.2). The predominant diagnosis for both groups was hemolytic uremic syndrome (HUS) accounting for 71% of laparoscopic cases, and 72% of open cases. The incidence of infection was 0% versus 7% in the laparoscopic versus open approach. Ten percent of patients required further manipulation of the catheter after initial insertion in the laparoscopic group, compared with 11% in the open approach. Conversion to hemodialysis (HD) due to catheter-related complications was seen in 10% of laparoscopic cases and 9% of the open cases. Dialysate fluid leak was noted in 26% in the laparoscopic group compared with 11% in the open group (p = 0.08). Anesthesia time is longer in the laparoscopic group (p = 0.008). We found no significant differences in complication rates between laparoscopic and open surgical approaches regarding acute PD

  14. Radiographic inguinal curl may indicate paraspinal misplacement of percutaneously inserted central venous catheters: report of three cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chedid, Faris; Abbas, Adil; Morris, Lloyd

    2005-01-01

    Misplacement of percutaneously inserted central venous catheters (PCVCs) into the paraspinal venous plexus can result in devastating outcomes. Several cases have been reported in the literature together with an explanation of the mechanism. To describe three premature babies with their PCVCs inserted through the left saphenous vein that ended up in the lumbar spinal dural venous plexus. Plain radiographs obtained to check positions showed an unusual 360 curl of the PCVC in the left inguinal area. We believe that misplacement of the catheter into the paraspinal venous plexus could be diagnosed with great accuracy if such a curl is seen. (orig.)

  15. Radiographic inguinal curl may indicate paraspinal misplacement of percutaneously inserted central venous catheters: report of three cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chedid, Faris [Al Tawam Hospital, Department of Paediatrics, Al Ain, Abu Dhabi (United Arab Emirates); Abbas, Adil [Royal Children' s Hospital, Department of Clinical Haematology/Oncology, Brisbane (Australia); Morris, Lloyd [Women' s and Children' s Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Adelaide (Australia)

    2005-07-01

    Misplacement of percutaneously inserted central venous catheters (PCVCs) into the paraspinal venous plexus can result in devastating outcomes. Several cases have been reported in the literature together with an explanation of the mechanism. To describe three premature babies with their PCVCs inserted through the left saphenous vein that ended up in the lumbar spinal dural venous plexus. Plain radiographs obtained to check positions showed an unusual 360 curl of the PCVC in the left inguinal area. We believe that misplacement of the catheter into the paraspinal venous plexus could be diagnosed with great accuracy if such a curl is seen. (orig.)

  16. Barriers and Facilitators to Central Venous Catheter Insertion: A Qualitative Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Kenzie A; Cohen, Elaine R; Hertz, Joelle R; Wayne, Diane B; Mitra, Debi; Barsuk, Jeffrey H

    2018-03-14

    The aims of the study were to identify perceived barriers and facilitators to central venous catheter (CVC) insertion among healthcare providers and to understand the extent to which an existing Simulation-Based Mastery Learning (SBML) program may address barriers and leverage facilitators. Providers participating in a CVC insertion SBML train-the-trainer program, in addition to intensive care unit nurse managers, were purposively sampled from Veterans Administration Medical Centers located in geographically diverse areas. We conducted semistructured interviews to assess perceptions of barriers and facilitators to CVC insertion. Deidentified transcripts were analyzed using a grounded theory approach and the constant comparative method. We subsequently mapped identified barriers and facilitators to our SBML curriculum to determine whether or not the curriculum addresses these factors. We interviewed 28 providers at six Veterans Administration Medical Centers, identifying the following five overarching factors of perceived barriers to CVC insertion: (1) equipment, (2) personnel/staff, (3) setting or organizational context, (4) patient or provider, and (5) time-related barriers. Three overarching factors of facilitators emerged: (1) equipment, (2) personnel, and (3) setting or organizational context facilitators. The SBML curriculum seems to address most identified barriers, while leveraging many facilitators; building on the commonly identified facilitator of nursing staff contribution by expanding the curriculum to explicitly include nurse involvement could improve team efficiency and organizational culture of safety. Many identified facilitators (e.g., ability to use ultrasound, personnel confidence/competence) were also identified as barriers. Evidence-based SBML programs have the potential to amplify these facilitators while addressing the barriers by providing an opportunity to practice and master CVC insertion skills.

  17. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, a thin plastic tube, called a catheter , is inserted into an ... The catheter used in angiography is a long plastic tube about as thick as a strand of ...

  18. Variables decreasing tip movement of peripherally inserted central catheters in pediatric patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnannt, Ralph; Connolly, Bairbre L; Parra, Dimitri A; Amaral, Joao; Moineddin, Rahim; Thakor, Avnesh S

    2016-10-01

    The position of the tip of a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) is crucial; malposition can lead to malfunction of the line or life-threatening events (e.g., arrhythmias, perforation). To determine what factors other than arm position and accessed vein might influence the tip position of a PICC. Inclusion criteria were upper limb PICC placement, body weight central tip movement in rib units. We included 112 children who received a PICC (42 girls/70 boys, mean age 31±13 months, mean weight 6.5±4.9 kg). The overall range of central tip movement was -1 to +4 rib units (mean +0.8±0.7 rib units). Silicone PICCs moved significantly less than polyurethane PICCs (Pcentral tip movement of a PICC (P>0.05). Silicone PICCs and PICCs inserted into the cephalic vein move less than PICCs made of polyurethane and PICCs inserted into the brachial and basilic veins. These findings might assist operators in deciding which PICC to place in children in a given clinical context.

  19. High risk of deep vein thrombosis associated with peripherally inserted central catheters in lymphoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao-Feng; Wang, Yu; Liu, Pan-Pan; Bi, Xi-Wen; Sun, Peng; Lin, Tong-Yu; Jiang, Wen-Qi; Li, Zhi-Ming

    2016-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) are widely used in cancer patients. Although PICC is a convenient tool, its use is associated with an obvious increase in the incidence of venous thrombosis. The risk factors for deep vein thrombosis associated with the use of PICCs in cancer patients are largely unexplored. This study aimed to investigate the incidence of PICC-associated thrombosis in lymphoma compared with its incidences in other types of cancer. A total of 8028 adult cancer patients inserted with PICC between June 2007 and June 2015 were included in this study. A total of 249 of the 8028 included patients (3.1%) inserted with PICC developed upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (PICC-UEDVT). Patients with lymphoma were more likely to have PICC-UEDVT than those with other types of malignancies (7.1% vs. 2.80%; P PICC (OR: 3.849, 95% CI: 2.334–6.347). Patients with lymphoma may be more predisposed to developing PICC-UEDVT than those with other types of malignancies. Identifying the mechanism underlying the relationship between PICC-UEDVT and lymphoma requires further study. PMID:27078849

  20. Ultrasound-guided approach to the paravertebral space for catheter insertion in infants and children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boretsky, Karen; Visoiu, Mihaela; Bigeleisen, Paul

    2013-12-01

    Paravertebral perineural blocks are used to prevent pain in the thoracoabdominal dermatomes. Traditionally, a landmark-based technique is used in children, while ultrasound-guided (UG) techniques are being employed in adult patients. To describe an UG technique for placement of thoracic paravertebral nerve block (TPVNB) catheters in pediatric patients. Retrospective chart review of a series of 22 pediatric patients' ages 6 months to 17 years with weights from 6.25 kg to 135 kg using a transverse in-plane technique. Catheters were placed both bilateral and unilateral for a variety of thoracic and abdominal procedures. A linear ultrasound transducer was used in all cases with frequency of oscillation and transducer length chosen based on individual patient characteristics of age, weight, and BMI. The median pain scores at 12, 24, 36, and 48 h were 1.2 (interquartile range, 4.5), 0.84 (interquartile range 3.0), 1.6 (interquartile range 2.9), and 0.83 (interquartile range 1.74), respectively. The median dose of opioid expressed as morphine equivalents consumed during the first 24 h after surgery was 0.14 mg·kg(-1) (interquartile range, 0.78 mg·kg(-1) ) and from 24 to 48 h the median dose was 0.11 mg·kg(-1) (interquartile range 0.44 mg·kg(-1) ). No complications were noted, and catheters were left an average of 3 days with a range of 1-5 days with good pain relief. This technical description demonstrates the feasibility of placing PVNB catheters using a transverse in-line ultrasound-guided technique in a wide range of pediatric patients. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Inpatient Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheter Complications: Should Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Lines Be Placed in the Intensive Care Unit Setting?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martyak, Michael; Kabir, Ishraq; Britt, Rebecca

    2017-08-01

    Peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) are now commonly used for central access in the intensive care unit (ICU) setting; however, there is a paucity of data evaluating the complication rates associated with these lines. We performed a retrospective review of all PICCs placed in the inpatient setting at our institution during a 1-year period from January 2013 to December 2013. These were divided into two groups: those placed at the bedside in the ICU and those placed by interventional radiology in non-ICU patients. Data regarding infectious and thrombotic complications were collected and evaluated. During the study period, 1209 PICC line placements met inclusion criteria and were evaluated; 1038 were placed by interventional radiology in non-ICU patients, and 171 were placed at the bedside in ICU patients. The combined thrombotic and central line associated blood stream infection rate was 6.17 per cent in the non-ICU group and 10.53 per cent in the ICU group (P = 0.035). The thrombotic complication rate was 5.88 per cent in the non-ICU group and 7.60 per cent in the ICU group (P = 0.38), whereas the central line associated blood stream infection rate was 0.29 per cent in the non-ICU group and 2.92 per cent in the ICU group (P = 0.002). This study seems to suggest that PICC lines placed at the bedside in the ICU setting are associated with higher complication rates, in particular infectious complications, than those placed by interventional radiology in non-ICU patients. The routine placement of PICC lines in the ICU settings needs to be reevaluated given these findings.

  2. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters in Pediatric Patients: To Repair or Not Repair

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gnannt, Ralph, E-mail: ralph.gnannt@usz.ch; Patel, Premal; Temple, Michael; Al Brashdi, Yahya; Amaral, Joao; Parra, Dimitri; Rea, Vanessa [University of Toronto, Image Guided Therapy, Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children (Canada); Stephens, Derek [University of Toronto, Child Health Evaluative Sciences (Canada); Connolly, Bairbre [University of Toronto, Image Guided Therapy, Diagnostic Imaging, The Hospital for Sick Children (Canada)

    2017-06-15

    IntroductionPreservation of venous access in children is a major concern in pediatric interventional radiology. If a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) breaks, there are two options: repair the line with a repair kit or exchange the line over a wire in the interventional suite. The purpose of this study is to assess the outcome of PICC repairs in children and to compare these with the outcomes of PICC exchange.Materials and MethodsThis is a single-center, retrospective study of central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) following management of externally broken PICCs (2010–2014). The occurrence of CLABSI within 30 days after repair (Group A) or exchange (Group B) of a line was analyzed, as well as PICCs exchanged following an initial and failed repair.ResultsA total of 235 PICC breaks were included in the study, of which 161 were repaired, and 116 of whom were successful (68%, Group A). No repair was performed in 74 PICCs—55/74 of these were exchanged over a wire (74%, Group B), and 19/74 lines were removed. The 30 days post-repair CLABSI rate (Group A) was 2.0 infections per 1000 catheter days, and the calculated risk was 4.3%. In comparison the 30 days post-exchange CLABSI rate (Group B) was 4.0 per 1000 catheter days and the calculated risk 10.9%. This difference was significant when adjusted for antibiotic use (OR 3.87; 95% CI 1.07–14.0, p = 0.039).ConclusionThe results of this study support repairing a broken PICC instead of removing or replacing the line.

  3. Accuracy of Intravenous Electrocardiography Confirmation of Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter for Parenteral Nutrition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundi, Manpreet S; Edakkanambeth Varayil, Jithinraj; McMahon, Megan T; Okano, Akiko; Vallumsetla, Nishanth; Bonnes, Sara L; Andrews, James C; Hurt, Ryan T

    2016-04-01

    Parenteral nutrition (PN) is a life-saving therapy for patients with intestinal failure. Safe delivery of hyperosmotic solution requires a central venous catheter (CVC) with tip in the lower superior vena cava (SVC) or at the SVC-right atrium (RA) junction. To reduce cost and delay in use of CVC, new techniques such as intravascular electrocardiogram (ECG) are being used for tip confirmation in place of chest x-ray (CXR). The present study assessed for accuracy of ECG confirmation in home PN (HPN). Records for all patients consulted for HPN from December 17, 2014, to June 16, 2015, were reviewed for patient demographics, diagnosis leading to HPN initiation, and ECG and CXR confirmation. CXRs were subsequently reviewed by a radiologist to reassess location of the CVC tip and identify those that should be adjusted. Seventy-three patients were eligible, and after assessment for research authorization and postplacement CXR, 17 patients (30% male) with an age of 54 ± 14 years were reviewed. In all patients, postplacement intravascular ECG reading stated tip in the SVC. However, based on CXR, the location of the catheter tip was satisfactory (low SVC or SVC-RA junction) in 10 of 17 patients (59%). Due to the high osmolality of PN, CVC tip location is of paramount importance. After radiology review of CXR, we noted that 7 of 17 (41%) peripherally inserted central catheter lines were in an unsatisfactory position despite ECG confirmation. With current data available, intravenous ECG confirmation should not be used as the sole source of tip confirmation in patients receiving HPN. © 2016 American Society for Parenteral and Enteral Nutrition.

  4. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters in Pediatric Patients: To Repair or Not Repair

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gnannt, Ralph; Patel, Premal; Temple, Michael; Al Brashdi, Yahya; Amaral, Joao; Parra, Dimitri; Rea, Vanessa; Stephens, Derek; Connolly, Bairbre

    2017-01-01

    IntroductionPreservation of venous access in children is a major concern in pediatric interventional radiology. If a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) breaks, there are two options: repair the line with a repair kit or exchange the line over a wire in the interventional suite. The purpose of this study is to assess the outcome of PICC repairs in children and to compare these with the outcomes of PICC exchange.Materials and MethodsThis is a single-center, retrospective study of central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) following management of externally broken PICCs (2010–2014). The occurrence of CLABSI within 30 days after repair (Group A) or exchange (Group B) of a line was analyzed, as well as PICCs exchanged following an initial and failed repair.ResultsA total of 235 PICC breaks were included in the study, of which 161 were repaired, and 116 of whom were successful (68%, Group A). No repair was performed in 74 PICCs—55/74 of these were exchanged over a wire (74%, Group B), and 19/74 lines were removed. The 30 days post-repair CLABSI rate (Group A) was 2.0 infections per 1000 catheter days, and the calculated risk was 4.3%. In comparison the 30 days post-exchange CLABSI rate (Group B) was 4.0 per 1000 catheter days and the calculated risk 10.9%. This difference was significant when adjusted for antibiotic use (OR 3.87; 95% CI 1.07–14.0, p = 0.039).ConclusionThe results of this study support repairing a broken PICC instead of removing or replacing the line.

  5. Dwell times and risk of non-elective removal of 1-French peripherally inserted central catheters according to catheter tip position in very preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erhard, Daniela M; Nguyen, Sarah; Guy, Katelyn J; Casalaz, Dan M; König, Kai

    2017-03-01

    We investigated dwell times and risk of non-elective removal of 975 single-lumen 1-French peripherally inserted central catheters (1FR-PICC) according to tip position in a cohort of very preterm infants with a mean (SD) gestational age of 27 +6 (2 +1 ) weeks and a mean (SD) birth weight of 988 (294) g over an eight-year period. Infants with a 1FR-PICC inserted for continuous infusion of intravenous fluids within the first 30 days of life were eligible. Dwell times of PICC with elective versus non-elective removal, risk of non-elective removal of PICC according to tip position, and differences between upper versus lower limb catheter insertion were analysed. 33.8% PICC were removed non-electively. Median (IQR) dwell time was 193 (142-287) versus 154 (102-260) h for elective versus non-elective removal (p positioned in the axillary, cephalic, external iliac, and femoral veins had a higher risk of non-elective removal. What is Known: •Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) are widely used in neonatal intensive care. •Previous studies focused on 2-French PICC and newborns of all gestational ages. What is New: •Dwell times of 1-French PICC removed non-electively were similar to 2-French PICC. •1-French PICC tips positioned more peripherally had a higher risk of non-elective removal.

  6. [Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) in onco-hematology. PICC line in onco-hematology].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabsy, Y; Baudin, G; Vinti, H; Novellas, S; Mannone, L; Chevallier, P; Mounier, N

    2010-09-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) have the advantage of limiting the risk of accidents during installation and are easy to remove. Its use in oncology remains debated because of possible infectious complications. We analyzed 52 PICC in patients with hematological tumor from Nice Hospital. An installation failure was noted in 5.8% of cases. After a follow-up of 15 months, the complication rate was 26.9%, mainly mechanical complications: obstruction (13.5%) or accidental removal (9.6%). The organic complications such as infection or thrombophlebitis represented 3.8%. The median duration was 26 days [2-291]. The longest duration was associated with PICC for chemotherapy (median: 58 days). Frequent blood samples (above: 2 week) were associated with lower duration (median: 23 days). In conclusion, PICC represent a simple and effective alternative to intra-venous central devices in onco-hematology. However, physicians have to focus on short-course treatment.

  7. Adjusting the displaced tip of peripherally inserted central catheter under DSA guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mao Yanjun; Dong Huijuan; Zhang Lingjuan; Li Hongmei; Xu Lianqin

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To explore a new method to adjust the displaced tip of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) under DSA guidance. Methods: Under DSA guidance, the displaced tip of PICC was repositioned to the ideal junction area of superior vena cava with right atrium with proper manipulation. Results: Under DSA guidance, the displaced tip of PICC was successfully corrected in 13 cases. The mean operative time was 15.53 minutes, which was markedly shorter than that needed by blind adjusting beside the bed. Conclusion: The displacement of PICC tip is a common occurrence, which is hard to be avoided. Under DSA guidance, the adjusting manipulation of the displaced PICC tip is safe and time-saving with high successful rate. It is worth popularizing this technique in clinical practice. (authors)

  8. Counterbalancing clinical supervision and independent practice: case studies in learning thoracic epidural catheter insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, T

    2010-12-01

    Thoracic epidural catheter placement is an example of a demanding and high-risk clinical skill that junior anaesthetists need to learn by experience and under the supervision of consultants. This learning is known to present challenges that require further study. Ten consultant and 10 trainee anaesthetists in a teaching hospital were interviewed about teaching and learning this skill in the operating theatre, and a phenomenological analysis of their experience was performed. Trainee participation was limited by time pressure, lack of familiarity with consultants, and consultants' own need for clinical experience. There was a particular tension between safe and effective consultant practice and permitting trainees' independence. Three distinct stages of participation and assistance were identified from reports of ideal practice: early (part-task or basic procedure, consultant always present giving instruction and feedback), middle (independent practice with straightforward cases without further instruction), and late (skill extension and transfer). Learning assistance provided by consultants varied, but it was often not matched to the trainees' stages of learning. Negotiation of participation and assistance was recognized as being useful, but it did not happen routinely. There are many obstacles to trainees' participation in thoracic epidural catheter insertion, and learning assistance is not matched to need. A more explicit understanding of stages of learning is required to benefit the learning of this and other advanced clinical skills.

  9. Comparison of complications between pediatric peripherally inserted central catheter placement techniques

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dasgupta, Niloy; Lungren, Matthew P.; Patel, Manish N.; Racadio, John M.; Johnson, Neil D.

    2016-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) is among the most common procedures performed in children in the hospital setting. PICC insertion can be simplified with the use of a sheathed needle as an alternative to the modified Seldinger technique. To retrospectively evaluate PICC placement for the technique used and the incidence of complications at a large pediatric tertiary care center. We retrospectively reviewed all PICC placements at a single institution over a 4-year period. We reviewed patient records for demographic data, PICC placement technique, catheter size and number of lumens, and the incidence of complications (i.e. multiple attempted puncture sites, phlebitis and vessel thrombosis). We analyzed complication rates between two placement techniques using a chi-square test. We identified 8,816 successful PICC placements, 4,749 (53.9%) in males and 4,067 (46.1%) in females. The average age of the patients for which a line was placed was 5.6 years (range 1 day to 45 years). A direct sheathed needle puncture technique was used in 8,362 (94.9%) placements and a modified Seldinger technique was used in 454 (5.1%). Complications occurred in 312 (3.7%) of direct sheathed needle puncture placements versus 17 (3.7%) of modified Seldinger placements (P = 0.99). Multiple puncture sites were required in 175 (2.1%) attempted direct sheathed needle puncture placements compared with 8 (1.7%) attempted modified Seldinger placements (P = 0.63). Phlebitis occurred in 94 (1.1%) direct sheathed needle puncture lines versus 5 (1.1%) modified Seldinger placed lines (P = 0.96). Vessel thrombosis occurred in 43 (0.5%) direct sheathed needle puncture lines versus 4 (0.9%) modified Seldinger placed lines (P = 0.30). The direct peel-away sheathed needle vessel puncture technique and the modified Seldinger technique used to place PICC lines in children have similar complication rates. (orig.)

  10. Comparison of complications between pediatric peripherally inserted central catheter placement techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dasgupta, Niloy; Lungren, Matthew P. [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital Stanford, Department of Radiology, Palo Alto, CA (United States); Patel, Manish N.; Racadio, John M.; Johnson, Neil D. [Cincinnati Children' s Hospital Medical Center, Department of Radiology, Cincinnati, OH (United States)

    2016-09-15

    Peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) is among the most common procedures performed in children in the hospital setting. PICC insertion can be simplified with the use of a sheathed needle as an alternative to the modified Seldinger technique. To retrospectively evaluate PICC placement for the technique used and the incidence of complications at a large pediatric tertiary care center. We retrospectively reviewed all PICC placements at a single institution over a 4-year period. We reviewed patient records for demographic data, PICC placement technique, catheter size and number of lumens, and the incidence of complications (i.e. multiple attempted puncture sites, phlebitis and vessel thrombosis). We analyzed complication rates between two placement techniques using a chi-square test. We identified 8,816 successful PICC placements, 4,749 (53.9%) in males and 4,067 (46.1%) in females. The average age of the patients for which a line was placed was 5.6 years (range 1 day to 45 years). A direct sheathed needle puncture technique was used in 8,362 (94.9%) placements and a modified Seldinger technique was used in 454 (5.1%). Complications occurred in 312 (3.7%) of direct sheathed needle puncture placements versus 17 (3.7%) of modified Seldinger placements (P = 0.99). Multiple puncture sites were required in 175 (2.1%) attempted direct sheathed needle puncture placements compared with 8 (1.7%) attempted modified Seldinger placements (P = 0.63). Phlebitis occurred in 94 (1.1%) direct sheathed needle puncture lines versus 5 (1.1%) modified Seldinger placed lines (P = 0.96). Vessel thrombosis occurred in 43 (0.5%) direct sheathed needle puncture lines versus 4 (0.9%) modified Seldinger placed lines (P = 0.30). The direct peel-away sheathed needle vessel puncture technique and the modified Seldinger technique used to place PICC lines in children have similar complication rates. (orig.)

  11. Optimal Guiding Catheter Length for Endovascular Coiling of Intracranial Aneurysms in Anterior Circulation in Era of Flourishing Distal Access System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jia, Zhen Yu; Lee, Sang Hun; Kim, Young Eun; Choi, Joon Ho; Hwang, Sun Moon; Lee, Ga Young; Youn, Jin Ho; Lee, Deok Hee

    2017-09-01

    To determine the minimum required guiding catheter length for embolization of various intracranial aneurysms in anterior circulation and to analyze the effect of various patient factors on the required catheter length and potential interaction with its stability. From December 2016 to March 2017, 90 patients with 93 anterior circulation aneurysms were enrolled. Three types of guiding catheters (Envoy, Envoy DA, and Envoy DA XB; Codman Neurovascular, Raynham, MA, USA) were used. We measured the in-the-body length of the catheter and checked the catheter tip location in the carotid artery. We analyzed factors affecting the in-the-body length and stability of the guiding catheter system. The average (±standard deviation) in-the-body length of the catheter was 84.2±5.9 cm. The length was significantly longer in men (89.1±5.6 vs. 82.1±4.6 cm, Pguiding catheter was 84 cm on average for elective anterior-circulation aneurysm embolization. The length increased in men older than 65 years with a more tortuous arch. We could reach a higher position with distal access catheters with little difference in the stability once we reached the target location.

  12. Use of peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) in children receiving autologous or allogeneic stem-cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benvenuti, Stefano; Ceresoli, Rosanna; Boroni, Giovanni; Parolini, Filippo; Porta, Fulvio; Alberti, Daniele

    2018-03-01

    The aim of our study was to present our experience with the use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) in pediatric patients receiving autologous or allogenic blood stem-cell transplantation. The insertion of the device in older children does not require general anesthesia and does not require a surgical procedure. From January 2014 to January 2017, 13 PICCs were inserted as a central venous device in 11 pediatric patients submitted to 14 autologous or allogeneic stem-cell transplantation, at the Bone Marrow Transplant Unit of the Children's Hospital of Brescia. The mean age of patients at the time of the procedure was 11.3 years (range 3-18 years). PICCs remained in place for an overall period of 4104 days. All PICCs were positioned by the same specifically trained physician and utilized by nurses of our stem-cell transplant unit. No insertion-related complications were observed. Late complications were catheter ruptures and line occlusions (1.2 per 1000 PICC days). No rupture or occlusion required removal of the device. No catheter-related venous thrombosis, catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI), accidental removal or permanent lumen occlusion were observed. Indications for catheter removal were completion of therapy (8 patients) and death (2 patients). Three PICCs are currently being used for blood sampling in follow-up patients after transplantation. Our data suggest that PICCs are a safe and effective alternative to conventional central venous catheters even in pediatric patients with high risk of infectious and hemorrhagic complications such as patients receiving stem-cell transplantation.

  13. Computer Identification of Symptomatic Deep Venous Thrombosis Associated with Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, R. Scott; Linford, Lorraine H.; Sharp, Jamie H.; White, Gayle; Lloyd, James F.; Weaver, Lindell K.

    2007-01-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are considered a safe method to provide long-term antibiotic therapy, chemotherapy and nutrition support. Deep venous thrombosis (DVT) is a complication that requires early PICC removal, may extend hospitalization and can result in pulmonary embolism. PICC insertion teams strive to understand risk factors and develop methods to prevent DVTs. However, they can only manage what they can measure. At LDS Hospital, identification of PICC associated DVTs was dependent on verbal notification or manual surveillance of more than a thousand free-text vascular reports. Accurate DVT rates were not known which hindered prevention. We describe the development of a computer application (PICC-DVT monitor) to identify PICC associated DVTs each day. A one-year evaluation of the monitor by the PICC team and a review of 445 random vascular reports found a positive predictive value of 98%, sensitivity of 94%, specificity of 100% and a PICC team associated DVT rate of 2.8%. PMID:18693831

  14. Incidence and risk factors of superficial and deep vein thrombosis associated with peripherally inserted central catheters in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menéndez, J J; Verdú, C; Calderón, B; Gómez-Zamora, A; Schüffelmann, C; de la Cruz, J J; de la Oliva, P

    2016-11-01

    Essentials Pediatric studies on peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC)-related thrombosis are scarce. This study analyzes incidence and risk factors for PICC-related venous thrombosis in children. PICC-related thrombosis is a common, and nearly always, asymptomatic complication. Echo-guided insertion and a catheter to vein ratio thrombosis is associated with the use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs). Few pediatric studies have focused on this issue. Objectives To determine the incidence and risk factors for PICC-related superficial vein thrombosis (SVT) and deep vein thrombosis (DVT) in children. Patients/methods An observational follow-up cohort study was conducted at a single hospital between June 2012 and June 2015. All patients receiving a PICC were enrolled and followed up, with weekly Doppler ultrasound examination of the catheterized limb until PICC removal. Patient, procedural and follow-up data were analyzed. Results In the study period, 265 PICCs were inserted (median age of patients 6.5 years, interquartile range [IQR] 2.4-13 years; median weight 20 kg, IQR 11-38 kg; 54% males; 67.9% chronically ill), and patients were followed up for a total of 9743 days. The median indwelling time was 21 days (IQR 12-37 days). During follow-up, 88 (33.2% of insertions) PICC-related thromboses (incidence rate [IR] 9.03 per 1000 catheter-days) were diagnosed, 66 (24.9%) as isolated SVT, seven (2.6%) as isolated DVT, and 15 (5.7%) as SVT with associated DVT (IR 6.78, 0.71 and 1.54 per 1000 catheter-days, respectively). Only 9.9% of patients with SVT and 18.2% of those with DVT were symptomatic. The main risk factors for PICC-related SVT and DVT were a catheter/vein ratio of > 0.33 and thrombosis of the catheterized superficial vein, respectively. Conclusions PICC-related thrombosis is a common and nearly always asymptomatic complication in children, the SVT rate being approximately three times higher than the DVT rate. Optimal vein and catheter

  15. Electrocardiographic-guided tip positioning technique for peripherally inserted central catheters in a Dutch teaching hospital: Feasibility and cost-effectiveness analysis in a prospective cohort study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemen, Arthur; Daniels, Anne M; Samyn, Martine G; Janssen, Roel Jl; Elshof, Jan-Willem

    2018-03-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters are venous devices intended for short to medium periods of intravenous treatment. Positioning of the catheter tip at the cavoatrial junction is necessary for optimum performance of a peripherally inserted central catheter. In this study, safety, effectiveness and cost-effectiveness of electrocardiographic-guided peripherally inserted central catheter positioning in a Dutch teaching hospital were evaluated. All patients who received a peripherally inserted central catheter in 2016 using electrocardiographic guidance were compared to those where fluoroscopy guidance was used in a prospective non-randomized cohort study. Relevant data were extracted from electronic health records. Cost-effectiveness analysis was performed. A total of 162 patients received a peripherally inserted central catheter using fluoroscopy guidance and 103 patients using electrocardiographic guidance in 2016. No significant difference was found in malposition, infection or other complications between these groups. Due to personnel reduction and omission of fluoroscopy costs, cost reduction for each catheter insertion was €120 in the first year and, as a result of discounted acquisition costs, €190 in subsequent years. The positioning results and complication rate are comparable to the previously reported literature. The cost reduction may vary in different hospitals. Other benefits of the electrocardiographic-guided technique are omission of X-ray exposure and improved patient service. Implementation of electrocardiographic-guided tip positioning for peripherally inserted central catheter was safe and effective in this study and led to an improved high value and cost-conscious care.

  16. Insertion of an active fixation lead in the inferior interatrial septum via a 9.0 Fr guiding catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shumpei Mori, MD

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Placing an atrial lead in the inferior interatrial septum (IAS reportedly reduces the incidence of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF and slows the progression to chronic AF; however, in certain cases, inferior IAS pacing is technically difficult. When this procedure is unsuccessful, insertion of the lead in the right atrial appendage can be considered, but it is associated with a risk of cardiac perforation. Here, we describe a technique for lead insertion in the inferior IAS via a 9.0 Fr guiding catheter, which may serve as an alternative technique for inferior IAS pacing when the conventional stylet-guided insertion is not successful.

  17. Validation of Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter-Derived Fick Cardiac Outputs in Patients with Heart Failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tecson, Kristen M; Vasudevan, Anupama; Bindra, Amarinder; Joseph, Susan M; Felius, Joost; Hall, Shelley A; Kale, Parag

    2018-01-01

    The pulmonary artery catheter (PAC) remains the gold standard to calculate Fick cardiac outputs (FCOs) in patients with heart failure admitted to the intensive care unit (ICU). The peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) provides long-term intravenous access and is used outside the ICU; however, there is scant literature validating venous oxygen saturations (VOSs) from PICC lines. Heart failure patients in the ICU with an existing PAC requiring a PICC line to transition were enrolled. Three blood samples were taken per person (1 at PICC, 1 at central venous pressure [CVP], and 1 at distal PAC). We performed repeated measures analysis of variance, as well as reliability analysis on 31 subjects (77% male, 71% Caucasian, mean ± standard deviation age 60 ± 8 years, 80% on inotropes). The average VOSs were 62 ± 11%, 62 ± 12%, and 61 ± 9% for the PICC line, CVP, and distal port, respectively (p = 0.66); there was excellent reliability (0.79). The median FCOs were 5 [4, 6], 5 [4, 6], and 5 [4, 6] L/min at the PICC, CVP, and distal port, respectively (p = 0.91); there was fair-to-good reliability (0.67). In conclusion, VOS and FCO did not differ by location, on average. Reliable data may be obtained through the PICC line, after evaluation from the PAC. The PICC may provide longer-term hemodynamic assessment while improving patient comfort. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  18. Risk factors for venous thrombosis associated with peripherally inserted central venous catheters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Longfang; Zhao, Qianru; Yang, Xiangmei

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate the risk factors associated with an increased risk of symptomatic peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC)-related venous thrombosis. Retrospective analyses identified 2313 patients who received PICCs from 1 January 2012 to 31 December 2013. All 11 patients with symptomatic PICC-related venous thrombosis (thrombosis group) and 148 who did not have thromboses (non-thrombosis group) were selected randomly. The medical information of 159 patients (age, body mass index (BMI), diagnosis, smoking history, nutritional risk score, platelet count, leucocyte count as well as levels of D-dimer, fibrinogen, and degradation products of fibrin) were collected. Logistic regression analysis was undertaken to determine the risk factors for thrombosis. Of 2313 patients, 11 (0.47%) were found to have symptomatic PICC-related venous thrombosis by color Doppler ultrasound. Being bedridden for a long time (odds ratio [(OR]), 17.774; P=0.0017), D-dimer >5 mg/L (36.651; 0.0025) and suffering from one comorbidity (8.39; 0.0265) or more comorbidities (13.705; 0.0083) were the major risk factors for PICC-catheter related venous thrombosis by stepwise logistic regression analysis. Among 159 patients, the prevalence of PICC-associated venous thrombosis in those with ≥1 risk factor was 10.34% (12/116), in those with ≥2 risk factors was 20.41% (10/49), and in those with >3 risk factors was 26.67% (4/15). Being bedridden >72 h, having increased levels of D-dimer (>5 mg/L) and suffering from comorbidities were independent risk factors of PICC-related venous thrombosis. PMID:25664112

  19. The blind pushing technique for peripherally inserted central catheter placement through brachial vein puncture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae Myeong; Cho, Young Kwon; Kim, Han Myun; Song, Myung Gyu; Song, Soon-Young; Yeon, Jae Woo; Yoon, Dae Young; Lee, Sam Yeol

    2018-03-01

    The objective of this study was to conduct a prospective clinical trial evaluating the technical feasibility and short-term clinical outcome of the blind pushing technique for placement of pretrimmed peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) through brachial vein access. Patients requiring PICC placement at any of the three participating institutions were prospectively enrolled between January and December 2016. The review boards of all participating institutions approved this study, and informed consent was obtained from all patients. PICC placement was performed using the blind pushing technique and primary brachial vein access. The following data were collected from unified case report forms: access vein, obstacles during PICC advancement, procedure time, and postprocedural complications. During the 12-month study period, 1380 PICCs were placed in 1043 patients. Of these, 1092 PICCs placed in 837 patients were enrolled, with 834 PICCs (76%) and 258 PICCs (34%) placed through brachial vein and nonbrachial vein access, respectively. In both arms, obstacles were most commonly noted in the subclavian veins (n = 220) and axillary veins (n = 94). Successful puncture of the access vein was achieved at first try in 1028 PICCs (94%). The technical success rate was 99%, with 1055 PICCs (97%) placed within 120 seconds of procedure time and 1088 PICCs (99%) having the tip located at the ideal position. Follow-up Doppler ultrasound detected catheter-associated upper extremity deep venous thrombosis (UEDVT) for 18 PICCs in 16 patients and late symptomatic UEDVT for 16 PICCs in 16 patients (3.1%). Catheter-associated UEDVT was noted for 28 PICCs (82%) and 6 PICCs (18%) placed through brachial vein and nonbrachial vein access, respectively. The incidence of obstacles and the procedure time (<120 seconds) differed significantly between brachial vein and nonbrachial vein access (P = .001). There was no statistically significant difference between brachial vein and

  20. Development of instruments for assessment of knowledge and skills in performing venepuncture and inserting peripheral venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlin, Catharina; Löfmark, Anna; Klang-Söderkvist, Birgitta; Johansson, Eva

    2013-01-01

    Performing venepuncture is one of the most routinely performed invasive procedures in nursing care. The aim of this study was to develop instruments for the assessment of nursing students' knowledge and skills when performing venepuncture and inserting a peripheral venous catheter. 
 Two instruments were developed using the following steps. 1) Assessment items of importance for the procedures (venepuncture 48 items and peripheral venous catheter 51 items) were collected from focus groups including nurses, lecturers and patients. 2) The number of items was reduced using a method based on the Delphi method. Experts (n=51) reviewed the instruments in two rounds. The revised versions included 31 items for venepuncture and 33 items for peripheral venous catheter insertion. 3) Usability tests were conducted by nurses who tested the instruments to confirm that items were possible to assess. 4) Inter-rater reliability was assessed by twelve lecturers who in pairs, but independently of each other, used the instruments to assess 50 nursing students. Proportion of agreement and Cohen's kappa coefficient were calculated for each item to determine inter-rater reliability. Among the tested items for both instruments, the median proportion of agreement was 1 (range 0.66-1) and the median kappa was 0.52 (range 0.22-1). The instruments developed for assessing nursing students' knowledge and skills of venepuncture and peripheral venous catheter insertion showed satisfactory inter-rater reliability.

  1. An Evaluation of Complications in Ultrasound-Guided Central Venous Catheter Insertion in the Emergency Department

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Engin OZAKIN

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available SUMMARY: Objectives: In emergency departments, emergency physicians frequently have to perform central venous access. In cases where peripheral venous access is not possible, central venous access is required for dialysis, fulfillment of urgent fluid need, or central venous pressure measurement. This study was carried out to evaluate the emergence of complications in the process of and in the 15 days following the insertion of central venous catheter under ultrasound guidance in the emergency department. Methods: For this study, patients who presented to the emergency department over a period of eight months with an urgent need for central catheter were examined prospectively. Age, gender, and accompanying diseases of patients as well as the type, time, duration, and indication of the venous access were recorded. Furthermore, the amount of experience of the physician was taken into consideration. Results: In the emergency department, physicians performed ultrasound-guided central venous catheter insertion for 74 patients (40 men and 34 women. For access, internal jugular vein was used in 65 (87.8% patients, and femoral vein was used in 9 (12.2% patients. The reason for access was urgent dialysis need in 55 (74.3%, CVP measurement in 3 (4.1%, fluid support due to severe hypovolemia in 6 (8.1%, and difficulty of peripheral venous access in 10 (13.5% patients. None of the patients developed complications in the process of or after the insertion. Patients did not have infections related to the catheter in 15 days following the insertion. Conclusions: Central venous access is frequently required in emergency departments. The risk of complication is little if any in ultrasonographyguided access carried out under appropriate conditions. ÖZET: Amaç: Acil servislerde acil tıp hekimlerince santral damar yolu işlemi sık uygulanır. Periferik damar yolu açılamadığı hallerde, diyaliz, acil sıvı ihtiyacı veya santral venöz basınç

  2. Implementation of a children's hospital-wide central venous catheter insertion and maintenance bundle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    K. Helder MScN (Onno); R.F. Kornelisse (René); C. van der Starre (Cynthia); D. Tibboel (Dick); C.W.N. Looman (Caspar); R.M.H. Wijnen (René); M.J. Poley (Marten); E. Ista (Erwin)

    2013-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Central venous catheter-associated bloodstream infections in children are an increasingly recognized serious safety problem worldwide, but are often preventable. Central venous catheter bundles have proved effective to prevent such infections. Successful implementation

  3. Parallel insertion endoscopic technique for precise catheter placement in cystic craniopharyngiomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Ryosuke; Joki, Tatsuhiro; Nonaka, Yuichiro; Ikeuchi, Satoshi; Abe, Toshiaki

    2014-11-01

    Total removal of craniopharyngioma is the most acceptable therapeutic modality; however, there are cases in which radical excision is not possible. To reduce the cystic component volume, an Ommaya reservoir catheter can be placed endoscopically. However, there are certain complications and risks with this type of maneuver, such as misplacement of the catheter, which may result in leakage of cyst contents or installed fluids such as bleomycin. Thus, accurate placement of intracystic catheter is extremely important. The authors placed Ommaya reservoir catheters running over the outer surface of a transparent endoscopic sheath in three cases. This neuroendoscopic procedure permits easier manipulation of the catheter and precise placement of the catheter tip. This technique was useful for placement of Ommaya reservoir catheters. This new technique of catheter placement with neuroendoscopy is more accurate, safer, and less invasive. Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  4. Mitral and aortic valve endocarditis together with mitral cleft developing due to an incorrectly inserted permanent hemodialysis catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oktay Şenöz

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Infective endocarditis (IE usually affects the right-sided valves in hemodialysis (HD patients. Hemodialysis catheter-related left-sided endocarditis is a very rare condition and has a high mortality. A 58-year-old male patient who had been inserted a permanent HD catheter from the right subclavian vein 6 months ago was admitted with fever and dyspnea. Transesophageal echocardiography (TEE revealed that the HD catheter extended to the left atrium by passing from interatrial septum (IAS. A vegetation in the interatrial septum, aortic valve, which formed a perforation in the mitral valve and leading to severe valve insufficiency was observed. The patient was planned to undergo an operation however he died as a result of impaired hemodynamic stability. Catheter site should be confirmed through an imaging method performed during or after the procedure in order to prevent catheter malposition. A proper antibiotic treatment should be started as soon as a catheter-related endocarditis is detected, a surgical decision should be done in the shortest and the most proper time.

  5. An in vitro study comparing a peripherally inserted central catheter to a conventional central venous catheter: no difference in static and dynamic pressure transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregg Bethene L

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Early goal directed therapy improves survival in patients with septic shock. Central venous pressure (CVP monitoring is essential to guide adequate resuscitation. Use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC is increasing, but little data exists comparing a PICC to a conventional CVP catheter. We studied the accuracy of a novel PICC to transmit static and dynamic pressures in vitro. Methods We designed a device to generate controlled pressures via a column of water allowing simultaneous measurements from a PICC and a standard triple lumen catheter. Digital transducers were used to obtain all pressure readings. Measurements of static pressures over a physiologic range were recorded using 5Fr and 6Fr dual lumen PICCs. Additionally, random repetitive pressure pulses were applied to the column of water to simulate physiologic intravascular pressure variations. The resultant PICC and control waveforms were recorded simultaneously. Results Six-hundred thirty measurements were made using the 5 Fr and 6 Fr PICCs. The average bias determined by Bland-Altman plot was 0.043 mmHg for 5 Fr PICC and 0.023 mmHg for 6 Fr PICC with a difference range of 1.0 to -1.0. The correlation coefficient for both catheters was 1.0 (p-value Conclusion In vitro, no static or dynamic pressure differences were found between the PICC and a conventional CVP catheter. Clinical studies are required to assess whether the novel PICC has bedside equivalence to conventional catheters when measuring central venous pressures.

  6. Distal Superficial Femoral Vein Cannulation for Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Placement in Infants with Cardiac Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, Robert P; Law, Mark A; Borasino, Santiago; Surd, Jessica A; Alten, Jeffrey A

    2016-12-01

    To describe a novel real-time ultrasound (US)-guided distal superficial femoral vein (DSFV) cannulation technique for insertion of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) in critically ill infants with congenital heart disease. Descriptive retrospective cohort study SETTING: Pediatric cardiac intensive care unit in a pediatric tertiary hospital PATIENTS: First 28 critically ill infants that received DSFV PICCs via this new technique. Thirty-seven US-guided DSFV PICCs were attempted on 31 infants from September 2012 to November 2014; 34 PICCs were placed in 28 patients (success rate 92%). Twenty-six of 28 patients underwent cardiac surgery. Median (IQR) age at time of PICC placement 39 days (13, 151); weight 3.4 kg (3.2, 5.3). 25/34 PICCs were placed in patients with STAT 4 or 5 category. Median PICC duration 16 days (11, 29); maximum duration 123 days. Ten infants (36%) had DSFV PICCs placed as the primary central venous access in perioperative period. Ten of 28 patients underwent cardiac catheterization while DSFV PICC was in place, four of which were performed through ipsilateral common femoral vein. Two patients had femoral arterial lines placed in the ipsilateral femoral artery while DSFV PICC was in place. There were no reported inadvertent arterial punctures. The PICC-associated infection rate was 4.6 per 1000 line days. Four of 34 DSFV PICCs (11.8%) were associated with deep venous thrombosis. DSFV is a novel venous access site for PICC placement with high success rate and sufficient longevity and flexibility for critically ill infants with cardiac disease. More experience and larger studies are needed to confirm its potential advantages. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Bloodstream infection, venous thrombosis, and peripherally inserted central catheters: reappraising the evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Vineet; Anand, Sarah; Krein, Sarah L; Chenoweth, Carol; Saint, Sanjay

    2012-08-01

    The widespread use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) has transformed the care of medical and surgical patients. Whereas intravenous antibiotics, parenteral nutrition, and administration of chemotherapy once necessitated prolonged hospitalization, PICCs have eliminated the need for such practice. However, PICCs may not be as innocuous as once thought; a growing body of evidence suggests that these devices also have important risks. This review discusses the origin of PICCs and highlights reasons behind their rapid adoption in medical practice. We evaluate the evidence behind 2 important PICC-related complications--venous thrombosis and bloodstream infections--and describe how initial studies may have led to a false sense of security with respect to these outcomes. In this context, we introduce a conceptual model to understand the risk of PICC-related complications and guide the use of these devices. Through this model, we outline recommendations that clinicians may use to prevent PICC-related adverse events. We conclude by highlighting important knowledge gaps and identifying avenues for future research in this area. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Improving Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC) care on a Trauma and Orthopaedics ward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piorkowska, Marta; Al-Raweshidy, Zahra; Yeong, Keefai

    2013-01-01

    Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC) blockage rate was audited over a two month period on the Trauma & Orthopaedics ward at our District General Hospital. A 70% (five out of seven) PICC blockage rate was observed. High blockage rates lead to potential treatment complications, delays in delivery of treatment, increase in costs, and reduction in patient satisfaction. The factors contributing to the significant blockage rate include, long and contradictory PICC care guidelines, no information sheets in the patient notes, lack of training and awareness about care of, and flushing of, PICC lines, and lack of accountability for PICC flushing. Our project aimed to achieve a greater rate of PICC patency. We produced one succinct and comprehensive PICC care guideline, carried out staff training sessions, introduced a sticker reminding staff to flush the PICC line after use, and introduced a prescription of weekly heparin saline and PRN saline flushes (for monitoring and accountability). We used questionnaires to assess competency of hospital staff pre-teaching (doctors 6%, nurses 0%), and post-teaching (doctors 70%, nurses 38%). Blockage rate data post-intervention is pending. Education improved awareness of guidelines amongst staff and we anticipate that the proposed interventions will translate into reduced blockage rates, improving patient outcomes and reducing costs.

  9. Axillary Block as the Sole Anesthetic for Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Placement in an Infant with Goldenhar Syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ma. Carmen Bernardo-Ocampo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of peripheral nerve block as the sole anesthetic in infants is not very common. Studies have demonstrated that ultrasound guided (USG peripheral nerve block is associated with higher overall success rate when compared with nerve stimulation (Rubin et al., 2009, and Gelfand et al., 2011. Described below is a medically complex infant who had an USG axillary brachial plexus block for peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC placement.

  10. Use of a Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter as a Conduit for Central Venous Access Across Thrombosed Great Veins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guntur Ramkumar, Prasad; Chakraverty, Sam; Zealley, Ian

    2010-01-01

    This report describes a technique of inserting an implantable venous access port (portacath) through a thrombosed and occluded vein employing a pre-existing peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) as the route of access. The PICC was used as a conduit for venous access in a way that has not been described previously in the literature. This procedure was performed in a young patient with cystic fibrosis in an effort to prevent the use of his virgin contralateral veins, which might be used in the future.

  11. Comparison of hospital length of stay, costs, and readmissions of alteplase versus catheter replacement among patients with occluded central venous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ernst, Frank R; Chen, Er; Lipkin, Craig; Tayama, Darren; Amin, Alpesh N

    2014-08-01

    Central venous catheter (CVC) occlusion is common, affecting 30% of all CVCs. To compare length of stay (LOS), costs, and readmissions associated with the use of alteplase to clear catheter blockage to outcomes associated with catheter replacement. Retrospective observational study utilizing a large hospital database. Hospitalized patients treated for catheter occlusion from January 2006 to December 2011. Univariate analyses of patient characteristics and treatment patterns and multivariable regression analyses of postocclusion hospital costs, LOS, and 30- and 90-day readmissions were conducted. We included 34,579 patients treated for a CVC occlusion by replacement (N=1028) or by alteplase (2 mg) administration (N=33,551). Patients receiving alteplase were somewhat younger than those having catheter replacement (60 ± 19 vs 62 ± 20 years old, P=0.0002). After adjusting for patient and hospital factors via regression modeling, average daily postocclusion costs were $317 lower for alteplase recipients than for catheter replacement patients (95% confidence interval [CI]: 238.22-392.24; P0.05). Odds of readmission were not significantly different at 30 or 90 days. Among patients treated for an occluded CVC, alteplase-treated patients had lower daily and total postocclusion costs than patients receiving catheter replacement. Cost differences were mainly driven by lower operating room/surgery, radiology, and supplier costs. Published 2014. The Authors Journal of Hospital Medicine published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of Society of Hospital Medicine.

  12. Comparison of peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICC) versus subcutaneously implanted port-chamber catheters by complication and cost for patients receiving chemotherapy for non-haematological malignancies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, G S; Jain, K; Kumar, R; Strickland, A H; Pellegrini, L; Slavotinek, J; Eaton, M; McLeay, W; Price, T; Ly, M; Ullah, S; Koczwara, B; Kichenadasse, G; Karapetis, C S

    2014-01-01

    Indwelling central venous catheters (CVCs) have been increasingly used to enable delivery of intravenous chemotherapy. We aimed to compare the safety and cost of two commonly used CVCs, peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICCs) and ports, in the delivery of chemotherapy in patients with non-haematological malignancies. Seventy patients were randomly assigned to receive either a PICC or a port. The primary endpoint was occurrence of major complications, which required removal of the CVC and secondary endpoints included occurrence of any complications. Port devices were associated with fewer complications compared with PICC lines (hazard ratio of 0.25, CI, 0.09-0.86, P = 0.038). Major complication rate was lower in the port arm compared to the PICC arm (0.047 versus 0.193 major complications/100 catheter days, P = 0.034) with 6 versus 20 % of patients experiencing major complications, respectively. Thrombosis, the most common complication, was significantly higher in the PICC arm compared to the port arm (25 versus 0 %, P = 0.013). Quality of life and cost estimates did not differ significantly between the two arms. Port devices are associated with a lower risk of complications, with no difference in cost, compared to PICC lines in patients with non-haematological malignancies receiving intravenous chemotherapy.

  13. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... anxiety during the procedure. The area of the groin or arm where the catheter will be inserted ... it will make the rest of the procedure pain-free. You will not feel the catheter in ...

  14. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... incision in the skin. Once the catheter is guided to the area being examined, a contrast material ... inserted into an artery. The catheter is then guided through the arteries to the area to be ...

  15. [Assertiveness and peripheral intravenous catheters dwell time with ultrasonography-guided insertion in children and adolescents].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avelar, Ariane Ferreira Machado; Peterlini, Maria Angélica Sorgini; da Pedreira, Mavilde Luz Gonçalves

    2013-06-01

    Randomized controlled trial which aimed to verify whether the use of vascular ultrasound (VUS) increases assertiveness in the use of peripheral venous catheter in children, and the catheter dwell time, when compared to traditional puncture. Data were collected after approval of theethical merit. Children and adolescents undergoing VUS-guided peripheral intravenous (GVUS) or puncture guided by clinical assessment of the venous conditions(CG) were included in the study. Significance level was set at pAssertiveness was found in 73 (71.6%) GVUS catheters and in 84(71.8%) of the CG (p=0.970), and catheter dwell time presented a median of less than one day in both groups (p=0.121), showing nostatistically significant difference. VUS did not significantly influence the results of the dependent variables investigated. ClinicalTrials.govNCT00930254.

  16. The risk of bloodstream infection associated with peripherally inserted central catheters compared with central venous catheters in adults: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Vineet; O'Horo, John C; Rogers, Mary A M; Maki, Dennis G; Safdar, Nasia

    2013-09-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are associated with central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI). The magnitude of this risk relative to central venous catheters (CVCs) is unknown. To compare risk of CLABSI between PICCs and CVCs. MEDLINE, CinAHL, Scopus, EmBASE, and Cochrane CENTRAL were searched. Full-text studies comparing the risk of CLABSI between PICCs and CVCs were included. Studies involving adults 18 years of age or older who underwent insertion of a PICC or a CVC and reported CLABSI were included in our analysis. Studies were evaluated using the Downs and Black scale for risk of bias. Random effects meta-analyses were used to generate summary estimates of CLABSI risk in patients with PICCs versus CVCs. Of 1,185 studies identified, 23 studies involving 57,250 patients met eligibility criteria. Twenty of 23 eligible studies reported the total number of CLABSI episodes in patients with PICCs and CVCs. Pooled meta-analyses of these studies revealed that PICCs were associated with a lower risk of CLABSI than were CVCs (relative risk [RR], 0.62; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.40-0.94). Statistical heterogeneity prompted subgroup analysis, which demonstrated that CLABSI reduction was greatest in outpatients (RR [95% CI], 0.22 [0.18-0.27]) compared with hospitalized patients who received PICCs (RR [95% CI], 0.73 [0.54-0.98]). Thirteen of the included 23 studies reported CLABSI per catheter-day. Within these studies, PICC-related CLABSI occurred as frequently as CLABSI from CVCs (incidence rate ratio [95% CI], 0.91 [0.46-1.79]). Only 1 randomized trial met inclusion criteria. CLABSI definition and infection prevention strategies were variably reported. Few studies reported infections by catheter-days. Although PICCs are associated with a lower risk of CLABSI than CVCs in outpatients, hospitalized patients may be just as likely to experience CLABSI with PICCs as with CVCs. Consideration of risks and benefits before PICC use in inpatient

  17. Hemodialysis catheter insertion: is increased PO2 a sign of arterial cannulation? A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chirinos, Julio C; Neyra, Javier A; Patel, Jiten; Rodan, Aylin R

    2014-07-29

    Ultrasound-guided Central Venous Catheterization (CVC) for temporary vascular access, preferably using the right internal jugular vein, is widely accepted by nephrologists. However CVC is associated with numerous potential complications, including death. We describe the finding of a rare left-sided partial anomalous pulmonary vein connection during central venous catheterization for continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT). Ultrasound-guided cannulation of a large bore temporary dual-lumen Quinton-Mahurkar catheter into the left internal jugular vein was performed for CRRT initiation in a 66 year old African-American with sepsis-related oliguric acute kidney injury. The post-procedure chest X-ray suggested inadvertent left carotid artery cannulation. Blood gases obtained from the catheter showed high partial pressure of oxygen (PO2) of 140 mmHg and low partial pressure of carbon dioxide (PCO2) of 22 mmHg, suggestive of arterial cannulation. However, the pressure-transduced wave forms appeared venous and Computed Tomography Angiography located the catheter in the left internal jugular vein, but demonstrated that the tip of the catheter was lying over a left pulmonary vein which was abnormally draining into the left brachiocephalic (innominate) vein rather than into the left atrium. Although several mechanical complications of dialysis catheters have been described, ours is one of the few cases of malposition into an anomalous pulmonary vein, and highlights a sequential approach to properly identify the catheter location in this uncommon clinical scenario.

  18. [The use of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) in patients with hematological malignancies--a single center experience].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitrović, Zdravko; Komljenović, Igor; Jaksic, Ozren; Prka, Zeljko; Crnek, Sandra Sestan; Stojsavljević, Radmila Ajduković; Pirsic, Mario; Haris, Visnja; Kusec, Rajko; Dautovic, Diana; Pejsa, Vlatko

    2014-01-01

    AIM. In this study we presented our experience with peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC) in patients with hematological malignancies. In the period from 2009 to 2012, a total of 105 PICCs were inserted in 90 patients. Patients with Non-Hodgkin lymphoma treated with DA-EPOCH comprised almost 40% of the cohort. The total PICC in-dwell time was 14781 days with a median of 129 days (range 8-570 days). Malposition of the PICC occurred in 12 patients (11.4%) with a successful reposition or re-insertion. In 39 patients (37%) PICC was removed before the end of treatment due to suspected or proven infection (30 patients, 29%; 2.03 per 1000 PICC days), thrombosis associated with PICC in four patients (3.8%), occlusion of the PICC (two patients), misplaced catheter (two patients), and suspected thromboembolism in a single patient. PICC is a safe and convenient long-term venous access in patients with hematological malignancies.

  19. Use of real-time ultrasound for locating tip position in neonates undergoing peripherally inserted central catheter insertion: A pilot study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Telang, Nagsen; Sharma, Deepak; Pratap, Oleti Tejo; Kandraju, Hemasree; Murki, Srinivas

    2017-01-01

    Background & objectives: Securing long-term venous access is an essential part of sick newborn care. The malposition of central line tip leads to several complications. There is a need for an easily available bedside investigating tool to diagnose these malpositions. This study was done to compare the effectiveness of real-time ultrasound (RTUS) with X-ray in identifying the peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) line tip. Methods: This pilot observational study was conducted in a level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of a tertiary care hospital in India, from June 2012 to June 2013. A total of 33 PICC lines in 31 infants were included in the study. After insertion of PICC line, X-ray and RTUS were done to locate the tip of the PICC line. Results: In this study, PICC line tip could be identified by bedside RTUS in 94 per cent of line insertions. Standard X-ray identified the tip in all cases. RTUS has been shown to have good diagnostic utility in comparison with X-ray with sensitivity and specificity being 96.55 and 100 per cent, respectively. In our study, majority of malpositions were identified and manipulated by RTUS, thus second X-rays were avoided. Interpretation & conclusions: The result of this pilot study shows that RTUS may be a reliable and safe bedside tool for determining the tip of PICC lines. However, studies with large sample size need to be done to confirm these findings. PMID:28749401

  20. Utilization of a biomedical device (VeinViewer® ) to assist with peripheral intravenous catheter (PIV) insertion for pediatric nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNeely, Heidi L; Ream, Theresa L; Thrasher, Jodi M; Dziadkowiec, Oliwier; Callahan, Tiffany J

    2018-04-01

    Vascular access in pediatric patients can be challenging even with the currently available technological resources. This nurse-driven research study explored time, cost, and resources for intravenous access to determine if a biomedical device, VeinViewer ® Vision, would facilitate improvements in pediatric access. In addition, this study looked at nurse perceptions of skills and confidence around intravenous insertion and if the use of the VeinViewer ® impacted these perceptions. Literature examining pediatric intravenous access success rates compared with nurse perceived skills and confidence is lacking. Nonblinded randomized control trial of pediatric nurses working in an acute care hospital setting. A preliminary needs assessment solicited feedback from nurses regarding their practice, perceived skills, and confidence with placing peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVs). Due to the results of the preliminary needs assessment, a research study was designed and 40 nurses were recruited to participate. The nurses were randomized into either a VeinViewer ® or standard practice group. Nurse participants placed intravenous catheters on hospitalized pediatric patients using established procedures while tracking data for the study. Needs assessment showed a majority of nurses felt a biomedical device would be helpful in building their intravenous insertion skills and their confidence. The study results did not demonstrate any clinically significant differences between VeinViewer ® use and standard practice for intravenous catheter insertion in pediatric patients for success of placement, number of attempts, or overall cost. In addition, no difference was noted between nurses in either group on perceived skills or confidence with insertion of PIVs. The ongoing need for resources focused on building nurse skills and confidence for PIV insertion was highlighted and organizations should continue to direct efforts toward developing skills and competency for staff that

  1. Eliminating guidewire retention during ultrasound guided central venous catheter insertion via an educational program, a modified CVC set, and a drape with reminder stickers

    OpenAIRE

    Peh, Wee Ming; Loh, Wann Jia; phua, ghee chee; Loo, Chian Min

    2016-01-01

    Guidewire retention is a severe but preventable complication from central venous catheter (CVC) insertion. There were three cases of guidewire retention during CVC insertion in the medical intensive care unit (MICU) in Singapore General Hospital, in the period between December 2011 and February 2012. The primary objective of this quality improvement project was to eliminate future incidences of guidewire retention during CVC insertion in the MICU and medical intermediate care area (MICA) via ...

  2. Laparoscopy versus mini-laparotomy peritoneal catheter insertion of ventriculoperitoneal shunts: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Mingliang; Ouyang, Leping; Wang, Shengwen; Zheng, Meiguang; Liu, Anmin

    2016-09-01

    OBJECTIVE Ventriculoperitoneal (VP) shunt treatment is the main treatment method for hydrocephalus. The traditional operative approach for peritoneal catheter insertion is mini-laparotomy. In recent years, laparoscopy-assisted insertion has become increasingly popular. It seems likely that use of an endoscope could lower the incidence of shunt malfunction. However, there is no consensus about the benefits of laparoscopy-assisted peritoneal catheter insertion. METHODS A systematic search was performed using the PubMed, Embase, ScienceDirect, and Cochrane Library databases. A manual search for reference lists was conducted. The protocol was prepared according to the interventional systematic reviews of the Cochrane Handbook, and the article was written on the basis of the PRISMA (Preferred Reporting Items for Systematic Reviews and Meta-Analysis) guidelines. RESULTS Eleven observational trials and 2 randomized controlled trials were included. Seven operation-related outcome measures were analyzed, and 3 of these showed no difference between operative techniques. The results of the meta-analysis are as follows: in the laparoscopy group, the rate of distal shunt failure was lower (OR 0.41, 95% CI 0.25-0.67; p = 0.0003), the absolute effect is 7.11% for distal shunt failure, the number needed to treat is 14 (95% CI 8-23), operative time was shorter (mean difference [MD], -12.84; 95% CI -20.68 to -5.00; p = 0.001), and blood loss was less (MD -9.93, 95% CI -17.56 to -2.31; p = 0.01). In addition, a borderline statistically significant difference tending to laparoscopic technique was observed in terms of hospital stay (MD -1.77, 95% CI -3.67 to 0.13; p = 0.07). CONCLUSIONS To some extent, a laparoscopic insertion technique could yield a better prognosis, mainly because it is associated with a lower distal failure rate and shorter operative time, which would be clinically relevant.

  3. Complications with peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs used in hospitalized patients and outpatients: a prospective cohort study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Delphine Grau

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters (PICCs are widely used for hospitalized patients and among outpatients. Despite many advantages, PICC-related complications can occur such as infection, thrombosis or mechanical complications. We aimed to evaluate rates and nature of PICC-related complications from insertion to removal and analyze risk factors of complications at baseline and during healthcare. Methods We performed a prospective cohort study looking at PICC-related complication rates in the inpatient and outpatient settings of 163 patients over a 7-month period. Pertinent patient demographics as well as catheter-related factors were collected. The data were analyzed to identify catheter-related complications using univariate and multivariate analysis. Results One hundred ninety-two PICCs were monitored for a total of 5218 PICC-days (3337 PICC-days for inpatients, 1881 PICC-days for outpatients. The overall complication rate was 30.2% (11.1 per 1000 PICC-days with a mean time to onset of 16.1 days. Complications included occlusion (8.9%, accidental withdrawal (8.9%, infections (6.3% including 9 local infections (4.7% and 3 bloodstream infections (1.6%, venous thrombosis (1.6% and hematoma (1%. Complication rate was higher in the hospitalization setting (36.1%; 14.38 per 1000 PICC-days than in the outpatient setting (19.4%; 3.19 per 1000 PICC-days. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the occurrence of occlusion was significantly associated with an age > 65 years (OR = 4.19; 95% CI [1.1–15.81] and the presence of a pre-occlusive event the week before PICC removal (OR = 76.35; 95% CI [9.36–622.97]. Conclusions PICCs appear safe in the inpatient and outpatient settings with low rates of infectious or thrombotic complications. Occlusion and accidental withdrawal were the most common complications, with age > 65 and catheter pre-occlusive event associated with an increased likelihood of

  4. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... prick when the needle is inserted into your vein for the intravenous line (IV). Injecting a local anesthetic at the site where the catheter is inserted may sting briefly, but it will ...

  5. Laparoscopic versus open peritoneal dialysis catheter insertion, the LOCI-trial: A study protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.M. Hagen (Sander); A.M. van Alphen (Adriaan); J.N.M. IJzermans (Jan); F.J.M.F. Dor (Frank)

    2011-01-01

    textabstractBackground: Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is an effective treatment for end-stage renal disease. It allows patients more freedom to perform daily activities compared to haemodialysis. Key to successful PD is the presence of a well-functioning dialysis catheter. Several complications, such as

  6. Impact of Peritoneal Dialysis Catheter Insertion by a Nephrologist: Results of a Questionnaire Survey of Patients and Nurses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Washida, Naoki; Aikawa, Kayoko; Inoue, Shuji; Kasai, Takahiro; Shinozuka, Keisuke; Morimoto, Kohkichi; Hosoya, Kozi; Hayashi, Koichi; Itoh, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is an excellent dialysis mo- dality, but it is underutilized in the United States and Japan. In the present study, we evaluated the impact of interventional nephrology in PD on the impres- sions held by patients and nurses about selection of a renal replacement therapy and the complications associated with PD therapy. Over aperiod of 7 years, PD catheter insertion in 120 patients with end-stage renal disease (age: 63.0 ± 13.3 years) was performed by nephrologists at Keio University Hospital or Saitama Medical Center. A questionnaire survey evaluating the advantages and disadvantages of this interventional nephrology approach in PD was distributed to 72 PD patients and to 53 nurses in charge of those patients. After interventional nephrology in PD was adopted, the number of patients selecting PD therapy increased. The incidence of peritonitis was relatively low (1 episode in 101.1 patient-months). Responses to the questionnaire survey showed that neither patients nor nurses were concerned about catheter insertion by physicians, and no communication problems between the patients, nurses, and physicians were reported. Approximately 60% of the nurses specializing in PD therapy showed higher motivation with interventional nephrology, which might have a favorable effect on the selection of PD therapy, on the incidence of peritonitis, and on the tripartite communication between patients, nurses, and physicians.

  7. Risk of Venous Thromboembolism Following Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Exchange: An Analysis of 23,000 Hospitalized Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Vineet; Kaatz, Scott; Grant, Paul; Swaminathan, Lakshmi; Boldenow, Tanya; Conlon, Anna; Bernstein, Steven J; Flanders, Scott A

    2018-02-01

    Catheter exchange over a guidewire is frequently performed for malfunctioning peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs). Whether such exchanges are associated with venous thromboembolism is not known. We performed a retrospective cohort study to assess the association between PICC exchange and risk of thromboembolism. Adult hospitalized patients that received a PICC during clinical care at one of 51 hospitals participating in the Michigan Hospital Medicine Safety consortium were included. The primary outcome was hazard of symptomatic venous thromboembolism (radiographically confirmed upper-extremity deep vein thrombosis and pulmonary embolism) in those that underwent PICC exchange vs those that did not. Of 23,010 patients that underwent PICC insertion in the study, 589 patients (2.6%) experienced a PICC exchange. Almost half of all exchanges were performed for catheter dislodgement or occlusion. A total of 480 patients (2.1%) experienced PICC-associated deep vein thrombosis. The incidence of deep vein thrombosis was greater in those that underwent PICC exchange vs those that did not (3.6% vs 2.0%, P < .001). Median time to thrombosis was shorter among those that underwent exchange vs those that did not (5 vs 11 days, P = .02). Following adjustment, PICC exchange was independently associated with twofold greater risk of thrombosis (hazard ratio [HR] 1.98; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.37-2.85) vs no exchange. The effect size of PICC exchange on thrombosis was second in magnitude to device lumens (HR 2.06; 95% CI, 1.59-2.66 and HR 2.31; 95% CI, 1.6-3.33 for double- and triple-lumen devices, respectively). Guidewire exchange of PICCs may be associated with increased risk of thrombosis. As some exchanges may be preventable, consideration of risks and benefits of exchanges in clinical practice is needed. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  8. Placement of central venous port catheters and peripherally inserted central catheters in the routine clinical setting of a radiology department: analysis of costs and intervention duration learning curve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rotzinger, Roman; Gebauer, Bernhard; Schnapauff, Dirk; Streitparth, Florian; Wieners, Gero; Grieser, Christian; Freyhardt, Patrick; Hamm, Bernd; Maurer, Martin H

    2017-12-01

    Background Placement of central venous port catheters (CVPS) and peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) is an integral component of state-of-the-art patient care. In the era of increasing cost awareness, it is desirable to have more information to comprehensively assess both procedures. Purpose To perform a retrospective analysis of interventional radiologic implantation of CVPS and PICC lines in a large patient population including a cost analysis of both methods as well as an investigation the learning curve in terms of the interventions' durations. Material and Methods All CVPS and PICC line related interventions performed in an interventional radiology department during a three-year period from January 2011 to December 2013 were examined. Documented patient data included sex, venous access site, and indication for CVPS or PICC placement. A cost analysis including intervention times was performed based on the prorated costs of equipment use, staff costs, and expenditures for disposables. The decrease in intervention duration in the course of time conformed to the learning curve. Results In total, 2987 interventions were performed by 16 radiologists: 1777 CVPS and 791 PICC lines. An average implantation took 22.5 ± 0.6 min (CVPS) and 10.1 ± 0.9 min (PICC lines). For CVPS, this average time was achieved by seven radiologists newly learning the procedures after performing 20 CVPS implantations. Total costs per implantation were €242 (CVPS) and €201 (PICC lines). Conclusion Interventional radiologic implantations of CVPS and PICC lines are well-established procedures, easy to learn by residents, and can be implanted at low costs.

  9. Peripherally inserted central catheters in the neonatal period Cateteres centrais de inserção periférica no período neonatal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim Uygun

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC have been extensively used in neonates. However, insertion of these thinnest catheters is a very delicate procedure associated with a high failure rate. In our Neonatal Surgical Intensive Care Unit, we developed a very easy new PICC insertion and evaluated the neonates treated with PICCs which were inserted by using our technique as well as catheter features such as success rate, number of insertion attempts, reason for removal and complications. METHODS: Information was retrospectively collected on all 40 PICCs inserted at Kutahya Evliya Celebi Goverment Hospital and Dicle University Hospital during a 6-years period from September 2004 to September 2010. RESULTS: A total of 40 PICCs were inserted in 37 patients (26, 70% males, 11, 30% females by using new technique. The median age of patients was 8.3 days (range 1 to 66 days and the median weight of patients was 2365 g (range 600 to 5000 g. The vein most commonly accessed was long saphenous vein (85%. The length of PICCs in the body was 19.6 cm (range 5 cm to 30 cm. The tip was located in a central vein in all patients. Surgical abdomen was the most common cause for PICC insertion (38%. Duration of catheterization was 7.7±5.6 days (1-F 5.5 days, 2-F 8.6 days. Almost all of the PICCs were inserted successfully (40/42, success rate 95% and in the first venipucture (36/42, 86%. Completion of therapy and removed after death were achieved with 87% of PICCs. Three minor complications were noted. Minor bleeding in the insertion site which was stopped via compression occurred in two neonates. Major complication was not seen. No deaths were directly attributed to PICCs use. CONCLUSION: The new insertion technique of the neonatal peripherally inserted central catheters may be one of the easiest and safest techniques, in comparison to previous techniques reported in the literature.OBJETIVO: Cateteres centrais de inserção periférica (PICC têm sido

  10. [Management of a massive cervical hematoma after insertion of a central venous catheter under tirofiban].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfister, R; Michels, G

    2018-03-27

    An 81-year-old woman with infarct-related cardiogenic shock was admitted to the cardiac catheterization laboratory. Coronary angiography revealed an occlusion of the ramus interventricularis anterior. Due to incomplete flow after the percutaneous coronary intervention with implantation of three coronary stents and high thrombus burden, tirofiban was given as a bail out therapy. A central venous catheter (CVC) aimed at the internal jugular vein was incidentally inserted in the common carotid artery, resulting in acute dyspnea and a hemorrhagic shock due to a massive cervical hematoma. Although the CVC is a frequently used intervention in critical care, the procedure still carries some risks of iatrogenic injury. Knowledge about the emergency management of CVC-associated complications is therefore essential.

  11. Clinical evaluation of the use of an intracardiac electrocardiogram to guide the tip positioning of peripherally inserted central catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ruiyi; Chen, Chunfang; Jin, Jingfen; Sharma, Komal; Jiang, Nan; Shentu, Yingqin; Wang, Xingang

    2016-06-01

    The use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) provides important central venous accesses for clinical treatments, tests and monitoring. Compared with the traditional methods, intracardiac electrocardiogram (ECG)-guided method has the potential to guide more accurate tip positioning of PICCs. This study aimed to clinically evaluate the effectiveness of an intracardiac ECG to guide the tip positioning by monitoring characteristic P-wave changes. In this study, eligible patients enrolled September 2011 to May 2012 according to the inclusion and exclusion criteria received the catheterization monitored by intracardiac ECG. Then chest radiography was performed to check the catheter position. The results revealed that, with 117 eligible patients, all bar one patient who died (n = 116) completed the study, including 60 males and 56 females aged 51.2 ± 15.1 years. Most (n = 113, > 97%) had characteristic P-wave changes. The intracardiac ECG-guided positioning procedure achieved correct placement for 112 patients (96.56%), demonstrating 99.12% sensitivity and 100% specificity. In conclusion, the intracardiac ECG can be a promising technique to guide tip positioning of PICCs. However, since the sample size in this study is limited, more experience and further study during clinical practice are needed to demonstrate achievement of optimal catheterization outcomes. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  12. Peripherally inserted central catheter-related bloodstream infection due to Tsukamurella pulmonis: a case report and literature review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Jun; Sasahara, Teppei; Toshima, Masaki; Morisawa, Yuji

    2017-10-11

    Tsukamurella pulmonis is an aerobic gram-positive and rod-shaped organism that causes central catheter-related bloodstream infections in immunocompromised hosts. However, peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC)-related bloodstream infections due to this organism have not been reported. We describe a case of a 48-year-old man with acquired immunodeficiency syndrome and diffuse large B cell lymphoma who received five courses of chemotherapy including rituximab , cyclophosphamide , doxorubicin hydrochloride , vincristine , and prednisone via a PICC. Five days after the last chemotherapy course, he presented with a high fever and shaking chills. His absolute neutrophil count was 4200/μL. Cultures obtained from blood and PICC culture revealed T. pulmonis. The colony count of T. pulmonis grown from PICC culture was 10 3 colony-forming units. Therefore, he was diagnosed with T. pulmonis bacteremia resulting from PICC-related bloodstream infection. The patient's condition improved and he became afebrile within 48 h after intravenous administration of cefozopran hydrochloride, which is a fourth generation cephalosporin. PICCs can be associated with T. pulmonis bacteremia, and fourth generation cephalosporins may be effective treatment.

  13. Evaluation of a central venous catheter tip placement for superior vena cava-subclavian central venous catheterization using a premeasured length: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Hyun-Jung; Jeong, Young-Il; Jun, In-Gu; Moon, Young-Jin; Lee, Yu-Mi

    2018-01-01

    Subclavian central venous catheterization is a common procedure for which misplacement of the central venous catheter (CVC) is a frequent complication that can potentially be fatal. The carina is located in the mid-zone of the superior vena cava (SVC) and is considered a reliable landmark for CVC placement in chest radiographs. The C-length, defined as the distance from the edge of the right transverse process of the first thoracic spine to the carina, can be measured in posteroanterior chest radiographs using a picture archiving and communication system. To evaluate the placement of the tip of the CVC in subclavian central venous catheterizations using the C-length, we reviewed the medical records and chest radiographs of 122 adult patients in whom CVC catheterization was performed (from January 2012 to December 2014) via the right subclavian vein using the C-length. The tips of all subclavian CVCs were placed in the SVC using the C-length. No subclavian CVC entered the right atrium. Tip placement was not affected by demographic characteristics such as age, sex, height, weight, and body mass index. The evidence indicates that the C-length on chest radiographs can be used to determine the available insertion length and place the right subclavian CVC tip into the SVC. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Wolters Kluwer Health, Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Time and resources of peripherally inserted central catheter insertion procedures: a comparison between blind insertion/chest X-ray and a real time tip navigation and confirmation system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewski, Kenneth J; Ferko, Nicole; Hollmann, Sarah S; Eng, Simona C; Richard, Howard M; Rowe, Lynn; Sproule, Susan

    2017-01-01

    Background The Sherlock 3CG™ Tip Confirmation System (TCS) provides real-time peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) tip insertion information using passive magnetic navigation and patient cardiac electrical activity. It is an alternative tip confirmation method to fluoroscopy or chest X-ray for PICC tip insertion confirmation in adults. The purpose of this study was to evaluate time and cost of the Sherlock 3CG TCS and blind insertion with chest X-ray tip confirmation (BI/CXR) for PICC insertions. Methods A cross-sectional, observational Time and Motion study was conducted. Data were collected at four hospitals in the US. Two hospitals used Sherlock 3CG TCS and two hospitals used BI/CXR to place/confirm successful PICC tip location. Researchers observed PICC insertions, collecting data from the beginning (ie, PICC kit opening) to catheter tip confirmation (ie, released for intravenous [IV] therapy). An economic model was developed to project outcomes for a larger population. Results A total of 120 subjects were enrolled, with 60 subjects enrolled in each arm and 30 enrolled at each of the four US hospitals. The mean time from initiation of the PICC procedure to the time to release for IV therapy was 33.93 minutes in the Sherlock 3CG arm and 176.32 minutes in the BI/CXR arm (p PICC insertions using the Sherlock 3CG TCS, while 20% of subjects in the BI/CXR arm had a malposition. BI/CXR subjects had significantly more total malpositions (mean 0.23 vs. 0, p < 0.001). For a hypothetical population of 1,000 annual patients, adoption of Sherlock 3CG TCS was predicted to be cost saving compared with BI/CXR in all three analysis years. Conclusion The results from this study demonstrate that Sherlock 3CG TCS, when compared with BI/CXR, is a superior alternative with regard to time to release subject to therapy, malposition rates, and minimization of X-ray exposure. PMID:28223832

  15. Central venous pressure monitoring via peripherally or centrally inserted central catheters: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanfilippo, Filippo; Noto, Alberto; Martucci, Gennaro; Farbo, Marco; Burgio, Gaetano; Biasucci, Daniele G

    2017-07-14

    The central venous pressure (CVP) is the most commonly used static marker of preload for guiding fluid therapy in critically ill patients, though its usefulness remains controversial. Centrally inserted central catheters (CICCs) are the gold-standard devices for CVP monitoring but peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) may represent a valid alternative. We undertook a systematic review and meta-analysis with the aim to investigate whether the difference between PICC- and CICC-measured CVP is not significant. We searched for clinical studies published in PubMed and EMBASE databases from inception until December 21st 2016. We included studies providing data on paired and simultaneous CVP measurement from PICCs and CICCs. We conducted two analyses on the values of CVP, the first one according to the total number of CVP assessments, the second one considering the number of patients recruited. Four studies matched the inclusion criteria, but only three of them provided data for the meta-analyses. Both analyses showed non-significant differences between PICC-measured and CICC-measured CVP: 1489 paired simultaneous CVP assessments (MD 0.16, 95%CI -0.14, 0.45, p = 0.30) on a total of 57 patients (MD 0.22, 95%CI -1.46, 1.91, p = 0.80). Both analyses showed no heterogeneity (I2 = 0%). Available evidence supports that CVP monitoring with PICCs is accurate and reproduces similar values to those obtained from CICCs. The possibility to monitor CVP should not be used among clinical criteria for preferring a CICC over a PICC line.

  16. Is Routine Chest X-ray After Ultrasound-Guided Central Venous Catheter Insertion Choosing Wisely? A population-based retrospective study of 6875 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chui, Jason; Saeed, Rasha; Jakobowski, Luke; Wang, Wanyu; Eldeyasty, Basem; Zhu, Angel; Fochesato, LeeAnne; Lavi, Ronit; Bainbridge, Daniel

    2018-02-28

    A routine chest X-ray (CXR) is recommended as a screening test after central venous catheter (CVC) insertion. We sought to assess the value of a routine post-procedural CXR in the era of ultrasound-guided CVC insertion. We performed a population-based retrospective cohort study to review the records of all adult patients who had a CVC inserted in the operating room in a tertiary institution between July 1, 2008 and December 31, 2015. We determined the incidence of pneumothorax and catheter misplacement after ultrasound-guided CVC insertion. We performed a logistic regression analysis to examine the potential risk factors associated with these complications, and a cost analysis to evaluate the economic impact. Of 18274 patients who had a CVC inserted, 6875 patients were included. The overall incidence of pneumothorax and catheter misplacement was 0.33% [95%CI: 0.22- 0.5%] (23 patients) and 1.91% [95% CI: 1.61- 2.26] (131 patients), respectively. The site of catheterization was the major determinant of pneumothorax and catheter misplacement; left subclavian vein catheterization was the site at a higher risk for pneumothorax [OR: 6.69 (2.45 - 18.28); pcatheter misplacement. Expenditures on routine post-procedural CXR were $105,000-$183,000 per year at our institution. This study shows that pneumothorax and catheter misplacement after ultrasound-guided CVC insertion were rare and the costs of a post-procedural CXR was exceedingly high. We concluded that a routine post-procedural CXR is unnecessary and not choosing-wisely in our setting. Copyright © 2018. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  17. Comparison of conventional straight and swan-neck straight catheters inserted by percutaneous method for continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis: a single-center study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shivendra; Prakash, Jai; Singh, R G; Dole, P K; Pant, Pragya

    2015-10-01

    To evaluate the incidence of mechanical and infectious complications of conventional straight catheter (SC) versus swan-neck straight catheter (SNSC) implanted by percutaneous method. We retrospectively analyzed 45 catheter insertions being done by percutaneous method from January 1, 2011, to May 31, 2014. SC was inserted in 24 patients, and SNSC was inserted in 21 patients. Baseline characteristics for the two groups were similar with respect to age, sex and diabetic nephropathy as the cause for end-stage renal disease. Incidence of mechanical and infectious complications in SNSC group was found to be low as compared to the SC group and was statistically significant (1 in 11.6 patient months vs. 1 in 14.4 patient months, p = 0.02). Catheter migration was found to be the most common mechanical complication (20 %), and peritonitis was found to be the most common infectious complication in conventional SC group (27 episodes in 420 patient months vs. 11 episodes in 333 patient months, p = 0.03). The incidence of exit site and tunnel infection rates revealed no difference between the groups. SNSC insertion by percutaneous method is associated with low mechanical and infectious complications.

  18. Absorption and Tolerability of Aqueous Chlorhexidine Gluconate Used for Skin Antisepsis Prior to Catheter Insertion in Preterm Neonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapman, Alison K.; Aucott, Susan W.; Gilmore, Maureen M.; Advani, Sonali; Clarke, William; Milstone, Aaron M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective To assess chlorhexidine absorption and skin tolerability in premature infants following skin antisepsis with 2% aqueous chlorhexidine gluconate (CHG) prior to peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) placement. Study Design Neonates less than 32 weeks gestation had skin cleansed with CHG prior to PICC placement. CHG concentrations were measured on serial blood samples. Skin integrity was evaluated for 2 weeks after CHG exposure. Results Twenty infants were enrolled; median gestational age 28 2/7 weeks (range 24 3/7–31 4/7). Ten infants had detectable serum chlorhexidine concentrations (range 1.6–206 ng/ml). Seven of these infants had their highest serum concentration 2 to 3 days following exposure. No CHG-related skin irritation occurred in any infant. Conclusion CHG was detected in the blood of preterm infants receiving CHG skin antisepsis for PICC insertion. Highest serum concentrations occurred 2 to 3 days after exposure. Further investigation is needed to determine the clinical relevance of CHG absorption in preterm infants. PMID:23702618

  19. The patient experience of a Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC): a qualitative descriptive study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharp, Rebecca; Grech, Carol; Fielder, Andrea; Mikocka-Walus, Antonina; Cummings, Melita; Esterman, Adrian

    2014-07-19

    Abstract Aim: To investigate the patient experience of PICC insertion, the significance of arm choice and the impact of the device on activities of daily living. Background: Arm choice for PICC insertion is often determined by PICC nurses with little input from consumers. There are few studies that have investigated the patient experience of living with a PICC and none that have examined the impact of arm choice from the consumer's perspective. Method: Participants were recruited in a hospital whilst they waited for PICC insertion. A purposeful sampling approach was used to select participants based on diagnosis types. Semistructured telephone interviews were conducted November 2012-August 2013. Transcripts of the interviews were analysed using thematic analysis. Findings: Ten participants were interviewed. Four themes were identified: (i) apprehension/ adaptation/ acceptance, (ii) impact of treatment, (iii) asking questions (trusting doctors) and (iv) freedom. Although initially apprehensive, participants adapted to the PICC and came to accept that the device allowed convenient access for treatment. This allowed them the freedom to receive treatment at home. The use of the dominant or non-dominant arm for PICC insertion had marginal impact on activities of daily living for participants. Auxiliary factors such as the infusion pump had a significant impact for those who received outpatient treatment. For those participants who did not understand the procedure, many did not seek clarification and trusted medical and nursing staff to make decisions for them. Conclusion: Nurses should involve consumers in clinical decision-making and provide individualised information and support that facilitates adaptation for patients living with a PICC.

  20. Risk of venous thromboembolism associated with peripherally inserted central catheters: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Vineet; Anand, Sarah; Hickner, Andy; Buist, Michael; Rogers, Mary Am; Saint, Sanjay; Flanders, Scott A

    2013-07-27

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are associated with an increased risk of venous thromboembolism. However, the size of this risk relative to that associated with other central venous catheters (CVCs) is unknown. We did a systematic review and meta-analysis to compare the risk of venous thromboembolism associated with PICCs versus that associated with other CVCs. We searched several databases, including Medline, Embase, Biosis, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials, Conference Papers Index, and Scopus. Additional studies were identified through hand searches of bibliographies and internet searches, and we contacted study authors to obtain unpublished data. All human studies published in full text, abstract, or poster form were eligible for inclusion. All studies were of adult patients aged at least 18 years who underwent insertion of a PICC. Studies were assessed with the Newcastle-Ottawa risk of bias scale. In studies without a comparison group, the pooled frequency of venous thromboembolism was calculated for patients receiving PICCs. In studies comparing PICCs with other CVCs, summary odds ratios (ORs) were calculated with a random effects meta-analysis. Of the 533 citations identified, 64 studies (12 with a comparison group and 52 without) including 29 503 patients met the eligibility criteria. In the non-comparison studies, the weighted frequency of PICC-related deep vein thrombosis was highest in patients who were critically ill (13·91%, 95% CI 7·68-20·14) and those with cancer (6·67%, 4·69-8·64). Our meta-analysis of 11 studies comparing the risk of deep vein thrombosis related to PICCs with that related to CVCs showed that PICCs were associated with an increased risk of deep vein thrombosis (OR 2·55, 1·54-4·23, p<0·0001) but not pulmonary embolism (no events). With the baseline PICC-related deep vein thrombosis rate of 2·7% and pooled OR of 2·55, the number needed to harm relative to CVCs was 26 (95% CI 13-71). PICCs are

  1. Central Line–Associated Bloodstream Infection in Hospitalized Children with Peripherally Inserted Central Venous Catheters: Extending Risk Analyses Outside the Intensive Care Unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Advani, Sonali; Reich, Nicholas G.; Sengupta, Arnab; Gosey, Leslie

    2011-01-01

    Background. Increasingly, peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) are placed for prolonged intravenous access. Few data exist regarding risk factors for central line–associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) complicating PICCs in hospitalized children, especially children hospitalized outside the intensive care unit (ICU). Methods. We identified all children with a PICC inserted at The Johns Hopkins Hospital (Baltimore, MD) from 1 January 2003 through 31 December 2009 and used Poisson regression models to identify risk factors for PICC-associated CLABSIs. Results. A total of 2592 PICCs were placed in 1819 children. One hundred sixteen CLABSIs occurred over 44,972 catheter-days (incidence rate [IR], 2.58 cases per 1000 catheter-days; 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.07–3.00 cases per 1000 catheter-days). Independent predictors of CLABSI in the entire cohort included PICC dwell time of ≥21 days (IR ratio [IRR], 1.53; 95% CI, 1.05–2.26), parenteral nutrition as indication for insertion (IRR, 2.24; 95% CI, 1.31–3.84), prior PICC-associated CLABSI (IRR, 2.48; 95% CI, 1.18–5.25), underlying metabolic condition (IRR, 2.07; 95% CI, 1.14–3.74), and pediatric ICU exposure during hospitalization (IRR, 1.80; 95% CI, 1.18–2.75). Risk factors for CLABSI in children without PICU exposure included younger age, underlying malignancy and metabolic conditions, PICCs inserted in the lower extremity, and a prior PICC-associated CLABSI. Conclusions. Prolonged catheter dwell time, pediatric ICU exposure, and administration of parenteral nutrition as the indication for PICC insertion are important predictors of PICC-associated CLABSI in hospitalized children. A careful assessment of these risk factors may be important for future success in preventing CLABSIs in hospitalized children with PICCs. PMID:21454298

  2. The Effect of Model Fidelity on Learning Outcomes of a Simulation-Based Education Program for Central Venous Catheter Insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederich, Emily; Mahnken, Jonathan D; Rigler, Sally K; Williamson, Timothy L; Tarver, Stephen; Sharpe, Matthew R

    2015-12-01

    Simulation-based education for central venous catheter (CVC) insertion has been repeatedly documented to improve performance, but the impact of simulation model fidelity has not been described. The aim of this study was to examine the impact of the physical fidelity of the simulation model on learning outcomes for a simulation-based education program for CVC insertion. Forty consecutive residents rotating through the medical intensive care unit of an academic medical center completed a simulation-based education program for CVC insertion. The curriculum was designed in accordance with the principles of deliberate practice and mastery learning. Each resident underwent baseline skills testing and was then randomized to training on a commercially available CVC model with high physical fidelity (High-Fi group) or a simply constructed model with low physical fidelity (Low-Fi group) in a noninferiority trial. Upon completion of their medical intensive care unit rotation 4 weeks later, residents returned for repeat skills testing on the high-fidelity model using a 26-item checklist. The mean (SD) posttraining score on the 26-item checklist for the Low-Fi group was 23.8 (2.2) (91.5%) and was not inferior to the mean (SD) score for the High-Fi group of 22.5 (2.6) (86.5%) (P Simulation-based education using equipment with low physical fidelity can achieve learning outcomes comparable with those with high-fidelity equipment, as long as other aspects of fidelity are maintained and robust educational principles are applied during the design of the curriculum.

  3. Improving Nurses' Peripheral Intravenous Catheter Insertion Knowledge, Confidence, and Skills Using a Simulation-Based Blended Learning Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keleekai, Nowai L.; Schuster, Catherine A.; Murray, Connie L.; King, Mary Anne; Stahl, Brian R.; Labrozzi, Laura J.; Gallucci, Susan; LeClair, Matthew W.; Glover, Kevin R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Peripheral intravenous catheter (PIVC) insertion is one of the most common invasive procedures performed in a hospital, but most nurses receive little formal training in this area. Blended PIVC insertion training programs that incorporate deliberate simulated practice have the potential to improve clinical practice and patient care. Methods The study was a randomized, wait-list control group with crossover using nurses on three medical/surgical units. Baseline PIVC knowledge, confidence, and skills assessments were completed for both groups. The intervention group then received a 2-hour PIVC online course, followed by an 8-hour live training course using a synergistic mix of three simulation tools. Both groups were then reassessed. After crossover, the wait-list group received the same intervention and both groups were reassessed. Results At baseline, both groups were similar for knowledge, confidence, and skills. Compared with the wait-list group, the intervention group had significantly higher scores for knowledge, confidence, and skills upon completing the training program. After crossover, the wait-list group had similarly higher scores for knowledge, confidence, and skills than the intervention group. Between the immediate preintervention and postintervention periods, the intervention group improved scores for knowledge by 31%, skills by 24%, and decreased confidence by 0.5%, whereas the wait-list group improved scores for knowledge by 28%, confidence by 16%, and skills by 15%. Conclusions Results demonstrate significant improvements in nurses' knowledge, confidence, and skills with the use of a simulation-based blended learning program for PIVC insertion. Transferability of these findings from a simulated environment into clinical practice should be further explored. PMID:27504890

  4. Time and resources of peripherally inserted central catheter insertion procedures: a comparison between blind insertion/chest X-ray and a real time tip navigation and confirmation system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaszewski KJ

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Kenneth J Tomaszewski,1 Nicole Ferko,2 Sarah S Hollmann,2 Simona C Eng,3 Howard M Richard,4 Lynn Rowe,5 Susan Sproule6 1KJT Group, Inc., Honeoye Falls, NY, USA; 2Cornerstone Research Group, Inc., Burlington, ON, Canada; 3Department of Hospitalist/Inpatient Services, Peninsula Regional Medical Center, Salisbury, MD, USA; 4Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University of Maryland Medical Center, Baltimore, MD, USA; 5Department of Research, Florida Hospital, Maitland, FL, USA; 6Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Unity Hospital, Rochester, NY, USA Background: The Sherlock 3CG™ Tip Confirmation System (TCS provides real-time peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC tip insertion information using passive magnetic navigation and patient cardiac electrical activity. It is an alternative tip confirmation method to fluoroscopy or chest X-ray for PICC tip insertion confirmation in adults. The purpose of this study was to evaluate time and cost of the Sherlock 3CG TCS and blind insertion with chest X-ray tip confirmation (BI/CXR for PICC insertions.Methods: A cross-sectional, observational Time and Motion study was conducted. Data were collected at four hospitals in the US. Two hospitals used Sherlock 3CG TCS and two hospitals used BI/CXR to place/confirm successful PICC tip location. Researchers observed PICC insertions, collecting data from the beginning (ie, PICC kit opening to catheter tip confirmation (ie, released for intravenous [IV] therapy. An economic model was developed to project outcomes for a larger population.Results: A total of 120 subjects were enrolled, with 60 subjects enrolled in each arm and 30 enrolled at each of the four US hospitals. The mean time from initiation of the PICC procedure to the time to release for IV therapy was 33.93 minutes in the Sherlock 3CG arm and 176.32 minutes in the BI/CXR arm (p < 0.001. No malpositions were observed for PICC insertions using the Sherlock 3CG TCS, while 20% of subjects in the BI

  5. Complications of peripherally inserted central venous catheters in neonates: Lesson learned over 2 years in a tertiary care centre in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The objective of this study was to assess the complications of peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICC in neonates admitted to neonatal surgical intensive care unit (NSICU. Patients and Methods: Retrospective analysis of 237 neonates admitted to NSICU from January 2010 to December 2011 was done. Results: Mean age at presentation was 5.8 days and mean weight was 1.94 kg. Mean number of attempts was 1.14, mean duration of insertion 8.4 min and mean duration of patency of catheter 3.14 days. Most common site of catheter insertion was upper extremity (basilic followed by cephalic. Overall complications were seen in 47 (23% cases. Infectious complications were seen in 22 (10.7% and non-infectious in 25 (12.2% cases. Significant correlation existed between non-infective complications and insertion site (P = 0.03 and duration of PICC (P = 0.04. Conclusion: Precautions should be taken and position must be confirmed during and after PICC insertion to avoid undue complications.

  6. An In Vivo Rabbit Model for the Evaluation of Antimicrobial Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter to Reduce Microbial Migration and Colonization as Compared to an Uncoated PICC

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas D. Allan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Infection is the leading complication associated with intravascular devices, and these infections develop when a catheter becomes colonized by microorganisms. To combat this issue, medical device manufacturers seek to provide healthcare facilities with antimicrobial medical devices to prevent or reduce the colonization. In order to adequately evaluate these devices, an in vivo model is required to accurately assess the performance of the antimicrobial devices in a clinical setting. The model presented herein was designed to provide a simulation of the subcutaneous tunnel environment to evaluate the ability of an antimicrobial peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC, coated with chlorhexidine based technology, to reduce microbial migration and colonization compared to an uncoated PICC. Three samples of control, uncoated PICCs and three samples of coated PICCs were surgically tunneled into the backs of female New Zealand White rabbits. The insertion sites were then challenged with Staphylococcus aureus at the time of implantation. Animals were evaluated out to thirty days and sacrificed. Complete en bloc dissection and evaluation of the catheter and surrounding tissue demonstrated that the chlorhexidine coated catheter was able to significantly reduce microbial colonization and prevent microbial migration as compared to the standard, un-treated catheter.

  7. PERIPHERALLY INSERTED CENTRAL VENOUS CATHETER SAFETYIN BURN CARE: A SINGLE CENTRE RETROSPECTIVE COHORT REVIEW

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Ryan E.; Shahrokhi, Shahriar; Bolourani, Siavash; Jeschke, Marc G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective PICC line use for central venous access in thermally injured patients has increased in recent years despite a lack of evidence regarding safety in this patient population. A recent survey of invasive catheter practices among 44 burn centers in the United States found that 37% of burn units use PICC lines as part of their treatment protocol. The goal of this study was to compare PICC associated complication rates to existing literature in both the critical care and burn settings. Methods A single institution retrospective cohort review of patients who received a PICC line during admission to a regional burn unit between 2008–2013. Fifty-three patients were identified with a total of seventy-three PICC lines. The primary outcome measurement for this study was indication for PICC line discontinuation. Results The most common reason for PICC line discontinuation was that the line was no longer indicated (45.2%). Four cases of symptomatic upper extremity deep vein thrombosis (5.5%) and 3 cases of central line associated bloodstream infection (4.3%, 2.72 infections per 1000 line days) were identified. PICC lines were in situ an average of 15 days [range 1–49 days]. Conclusions We suggest that PICC line associated complication rates are similar to those published in the critical care literature. Though these rates are higher than those published in the burn literature, they are similar to CVC associated complication rates. While PICC lines can be a useful resource in the treatment of the thermally injured patient, they are associated with significant, and potentially fatal risks. PMID:25501778

  8. Peripherally inserted central catheter thrombosis incidence and risk factors in cancer patients: a double-center prospective investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Y

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Yuxiu Liu,1 Yufang Gao,3 Lili Wei,3 Weifen Chen,1 Xiaoyan Ma,4 Lei Song2 1Oncology Department, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Breast Oncology, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao, People’s Republic of China; 3Nursing Department, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao, People’s Republic of China; 4Intensive Care Unit, Shanghai East Hospital, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China Background: Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs are widely used in chemotherapy, but the reported PICC thrombosis incidence varies greatly, and risks of PICC thrombosis are not well defined. This study was to investigate the incidence and risk factors of PICC-related upper extremity vein thrombosis in cancer patients.Methods: This was a prospective study conducted in two tertiary referral hospitals from May 2010 to February 2013. Cancer patients who were subject to PICC placement were enrolled and checked by Doppler ultrasound weekly for at least 1 month. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were applied for identification of risk factors.Results: Three hundred and eleven cancer patients were enrolled in the study. One hundred and sixty (51.4% developed PICC thrombosis, of which 87 (54.4% cases were symptomatic. The mean time interval from PICC insertion to thrombosis onset was 11.04±5.538 days. The univariable logistic regression analysis showed that complications (odds ratio [OR] 1.686, P=0.032, less activity (OR 1.476, P=0.006, obesity (OR 3.148, P=0.000, and chemotherapy history (OR 3.405, P=0.030 were associated with PICC thrombosis. Multivariate analysis showed that less activity (OR 9.583, P=0.000 and obesity (OR 3.466, P=0.014 were significantly associated with PICC thrombosis.Conclusions: The incidence of PICC thrombosis is relatively high, and nearly half are asymptomatic. Less activity and obesity are risk factors of

  9. Skin antisepsis with 0.05% sodium hypochlorite before central venous catheter insertion in neonates: A 2-year single-center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciccia, Matilde; Chakrokh, Roksana; Molinazzi, Dario; Zanni, Angela; Farruggia, Patrizia; Sandri, Fabrizio

    2018-02-01

    The study reports a 2-year single-center experience of the practice of skin antisepsis using a 0.05% sodium hypochlorite solution before central venous catheter placement in neonates. Eligible subjects included any hospitalized neonate who needed a central line for at least 48 hours. Infants were excluded if they had a generalized or localized skin disorder. An ad hoc Excel (Microsoft Corp, Redmond, WA) file was used to record the data from each patient. The catheter sites were monitored daily for the presence of contact dermatitis. Central line-associated bloodstream infection was diagnosed according to Centers for Disease Control and Prevention definition. One hundred five infants underwent central venous catheter placement and were enrolled. A total of 198 central lines were inserted. The median gestational age was 31 weeks (range, 23-41 weeks) and median birth weight was 1,420 g (range, 500-5,170 g). There were no signs of 0.05% sodium hypochlorite-related skin toxicity in any infant. Of 198 catheters (1,652 catheter-days) prospectively studied, 9 were associated with bloodstream infections (5.4 per 1,000 catheter-days). During the observation period, no local adverse effects were observed suggesting that 0.05% sodium hypochlorite may be a safe choice in this context. Copyright © 2018 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Peripherally inserted central catheter thrombosis incidence and risk factors in cancer patients: a double-center prospective investigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuxiu; Gao, Yufang; Wei, Lili; Chen, Weifen; Ma, Xiaoyan; Song, Lei

    2015-01-01

    Background Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are widely used in chemotherapy, but the reported PICC thrombosis incidence varies greatly, and risks of PICC thrombosis are not well defined. This study was to investigate the incidence and risk factors of PICC-related upper extremity vein thrombosis in cancer patients. Methods This was a prospective study conducted in two tertiary referral hospitals from May 2010 to February 2013. Cancer patients who were subject to PICC placement were enrolled and checked by Doppler ultrasound weekly for at least 1 month. Univariable and multivariable logistic regression analyses were applied for identification of risk factors. Results Three hundred and eleven cancer patients were enrolled in the study. One hundred and sixty (51.4%) developed PICC thrombosis, of which 87 (54.4%) cases were symptomatic. The mean time interval from PICC insertion to thrombosis onset was 11.04±5.538 days. The univariable logistic regression analysis showed that complications (odds ratio [OR] 1.686, P=0.032), less activity (OR 1.476, P=0.006), obesity (OR 3.148, P=0.000), and chemotherapy history (OR 3.405, P=0.030) were associated with PICC thrombosis. Multivariate analysis showed that less activity (OR 9.583, P=0.000) and obesity (OR 3.466, P=0.014) were significantly associated with PICC thrombosis. Conclusions The incidence of PICC thrombosis is relatively high, and nearly half are asymptomatic. Less activity and obesity are risk factors of PICC-related thrombosis. PMID:25673995

  11. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... tube, called a catheter , is inserted into an artery through a small incision in the skin. Once ... in the chest and abdomen, or in other arteries. detect atherosclerotic (plaque) disease in the carotid artery ...

  12. Comparison of the Effectiveness of a Virtual Simulator With a Plastic Arm Model in Teaching Intravenous Catheter Insertion Skills.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Günay İsmailoğlu, Elif; Zaybak, Ayten

    2018-02-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the effectiveness of a virtual intravenous simulator with a plastic arm model in teaching intravenous catheter insertion skills to nursing students. We used a randomized controlled quasi-experimental trial design and recruited 65 students who were assigned to the experimental (n = 33) and control (n = 32) groups using the simple random sampling method. The experimental group received intravenous catheterization skills training on the virtual intravenous simulator, and the control group received the same training on a plastic model of a human arm. Data were collected using the personal information form, intravenous catheterization knowledge assessment form, Intravenous Catheterization Skill Test, Self-Confidence and Satisfaction Scale, and Fear Symptoms Scale. In the study, the mean scores in the control group were 20.44 for psychomotor skills, 15.62 for clinical psychomotor skills, 31.78 for self-confidence, and 21.77 for satisfaction. The mean scores in the experimental group were 45.18 for psychomotor skills, 16.28 for clinical psychomotor skills, 34.18 for self-confidence, and 43.89 for satisfaction. The results indicated that psychomotor skills and satisfaction scores were higher in the experimental group, while the clinical psychomotor skills and self-confidence scores were similar in both groups. More students in the control group reported experiencing symptoms such as cold and sweaty hands, significant restlessness, and tense muscles than those in the experimental group.

  13. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters (PICCs) and Potential Cost Savings and Shortened Bed Stays In an Acute Hospital Setting.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O’Brien, C

    2018-01-01

    Peripheral inserted central catheters (PICCs) have increasingly become the mainstay of patients requiring prolonged treatment with antibiotics, transfusions, oncologic IV therapy and total parental nutrition. They may also be used in delivering a number of other medications to patients. In recent years, bed occupancy rates have become hugely pressurized in many hospitals and any potential solutions to free up beds is welcome. Recent introductions of doctor or nurse led intravenous (IV) outpatient based treatment teams has been having a direct effect on early discharge of patients and in some cases avoiding admission completely. The ability to deliver outpatient intravenous treatment is facilitated by the placement of PICCs allowing safe and targeted treatment of patients over a prolonged period of time. We carried out a retrospective study of 2,404 patients referred for PICCs from 2009 to 2015 in a university teaching hospital. There was an exponential increase in the number of PICCs requested from 2011 to 2015 with a 64% increase from 2012 to 2013. The clear increase in demand for PICCs in our institution is directly linked to the advent of outpatient intravenous antibiotic services. In this paper, we assess the impact that the use of PICCs combined with intravenous outpatient treatment may have on cost and hospital bed demand. We advocate that a more widespread implementation of this service throughout Ireland may result in significant cost savings as well as decreasing the number of patients on hospital trollies.

  14. Impact of Postplacement Adjustment of Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters on the Risk of Bloodstream Infection and Venous Thrombus Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baxi, Sanjiv M.; Shuman, Emily K.; Scipione, Christy A.; Chen, Benrong; Sharma, Aditi; Rasanathan, Jennifer J. K.; Chenoweth, Carol E.

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) tip malposition is potentially associated with complications, and postplacement adjustment of PICCs is widely performed. We sought to characterize the association between central line–associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI) or venous thrombus (VT) and PICC adjustment. DESIGN Retrospective cohort study. SETTING University of Michigan Health System, a large referral hospital. PATIENTS Patients who had PICCs placed between February 2007 and August 2007. METHODS The primary outcomes were development of CLABSI within 14 days or VT within 60 days of postplacement PICC adjustment, identified by review of patient electronic medical records. RESULTS There were 57 CLABSIs (2.69/1,000 PICC-days) and 47 VTs (1.23/1,000 PICC-days); 609 individuals had 1, 134 had 2, and 33 had 3 or more adjustments. One adjustment was protective against CLABSI (P = .04), whereas 2 or 3 or more adjustments had no association with CLABSI (P = .58 and .47, respectively). One, 2, and 3 or more adjustments had no association with VT formation (P = .59, .85, and .78, respectively). Immunosuppression (P PICCs (P = .05), and 3 PICC lumens compared with 1 lumen (P = .02) were associated with CLABSI. Power-injectable PICCs were also associated with increased VT formation (P = .03). CONCLUSIONS Immunosuppression and 3 PICC lumens were associated with increased risk of CLABSI. Power-injectable PICCs were associated with increased risk of CLABSI and VT formation. Postplacement adjustment of PICCs was not associated with increased risk of CLABSI or VT. PMID:23838218

  15. An Accuracy Study of the Intracavitary Electrocardiogram (IC-ECG) Guided Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Tip Placement among Neonates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Lian-juan; Xua, Hong-zhen; Xu, Mei-fang; Hu, Yan; Lou, Xiao-Fang

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Objective To explore the clinical application of the intracavitary electrocardiogram (IC-ECG) guided Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC) tip placement among neonates. Background the ECGs of neonates are difficult to perform and their wave shapes are of doubtful accuracy due to various interfering factors Method 115 neonates were admitted to perform PICC guided by IC-ECG. Logistic regression was performed to analyze all possible influencing factors of the accuracy from the tip placement. The puncture site of the PICC, gestational age, height, weight, basal P/R amplitude and positioning P/R amplitude might be related to the accuracy of IC-ECG location. Result The accuracy in the lower extremity was higher than that in the upper extremity. Multivariate logistic regression analysis showed that the weight (Odds Ratio (OR)=1.93, 95%Confidence Interval(CI):1.06-3.50) and positioning P/R amplitude (OR=32.33, 95%CI: 2.02-517.41) are statistically significant risks to the accuracy PICC tip placement. Conclusions Possible methods to improve the accuracy might be Catheterizing through lower extremity, keeping the neonates calm, enhancing the electrocardiogram signal and strengthening technical training. Therefore it is practical to perfrom a tip placement by the dynamic change in the P waves from an electrocardiogram (ECG) guided PICC among neonates and as reliable as using X-rays. PMID:28730171

  16. Characterization of full-length sequenced cDNA inserts (FLIcs from Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lunner Sigbjørn

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sequencing of the Atlantic salmon genome is now being planned by an international research consortium. Full-length sequenced inserts from cDNAs (FLIcs are an important tool for correct annotation and clustering of the genomic sequence in any species. The large amount of highly similar duplicate sequences caused by the relatively recent genome duplication in the salmonid ancestor represents a particular challenge for the genome project. FLIcs will therefore be an extremely useful resource for the Atlantic salmon sequencing project. In addition to be helpful in order to distinguish between duplicate genome regions and in determining correct gene structures, FLIcs are an important resource for functional genomic studies and for investigation of regulatory elements controlling gene expression. In contrast to the large number of ESTs available, including the ESTs from 23 developmental and tissue specific cDNA libraries contributed by the Salmon Genome Project (SGP, the number of sequences where the full-length of the cDNA insert has been determined has been small. Results High quality full-length insert sequences from 560 pre-smolt white muscle tissue specific cDNAs were generated, accession numbers [GenBank: BT043497 - BT044056]. Five hundred and ten (91% of the transcripts were annotated using Gene Ontology (GO terms and 440 of the FLIcs are likely to contain a complete coding sequence (cCDS. The sequence information was used to identify putative paralogs, characterize salmon Kozak motifs, polyadenylation signal variation and to identify motifs likely to be involved in the regulation of particular genes. Finally, conserved 7-mers in the 3'UTRs were identified, of which some were identical to miRNA target sequences. Conclusion This paper describes the first Atlantic salmon FLIcs from a tissue and developmental stage specific cDNA library. We have demonstrated that many FLIcs contained a complete coding sequence (cCDS. This

  17. Renal access in PNL under sonographic guidance: Do we really need to insert an open end ureteral catheter in dilated renal systems? A prospective randomized study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eryildirim, Bilal; Tuncer, Murat; Camur, Emre; Ustun, Fatih; Tarhan, Fatih; Sarica, Kemal

    2017-10-03

    To evaluate the true necessity of open end ureteral catheter insertion in patients with moderate to severe pelvicalyceal system dilation treated with percutaneous nephrolithotomy (PNL) under sonographic guidance. 50 cases treated with PNL under sonographic guidance in prone position for solitary obstructing renal stones were evaluated. Patients were randomly divided into two groups; Group 1: Patients in whom a open end ureteral catheter was inserted prior to the procedure; Group 2: Patients receiving no catheter before PNL. In addition to the duration of the procedure as a whole and also all relevant stages as well, radiation exposure time, hospitalization period, mean nephrostomy tube duration, mean drop in Hb levels and all intra and postoperative complications have been evaluated. Mean size of the stones was 308.5 ± 133.2 mm2. Mean total duration of the PNL procedure in cases with open end ureteral catheter was significantly longer than the other cases (p < 0.001). Evaluation of the outcomes of the PNL procedures revealed no statistically significant difference between two groups regarding the stone-free rates (86% vs 84%). Additionally, there was no significant difference with respect to the duration of nephrostomy tube, hospitalization period and secondary procedures needed, complication rates as well as the post-operative Hb drop levels in both groups (p = 0.6830). Our results indicate that the placement of an open end ureteral catheter prior to a PNL procedure performed under sonographic access may not be indicated in selected cases presenting with solitary obstructing renal pelvic and/or calyceal stones.

  18. A Novel Two-Step Technique for Retrieving Fractured Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter Segments Migrating into the Heart or the Pulmonary Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juan Peng

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To report the experience of a percutaneous technique for retrieving fractured peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC segments migrating into the heart or the pulmonary artery. Method. From April 2013 to July 2015, we performed percutaneous retrieval of fractured PICC segments migrating into the heart or the pulmonary artery in five cancer patients who had undergone chemotherapy via PICC. The fractures were diagnosed with chest plain radiography. The patients included three cases of breast cancer, one case of rectal cancer, and one case of lower limb Ewing’s tumor. The fractures were retained in the vessels of the patients for 1 to 3 days. All the fractures were retrieved by using a novel two-step technique in the digital subtraction angiography (DSA suite. This two-step technique involves inserting a pigtail catheter to the heart or the pulmonary artery to grasp the fractured catheter fragment and bring it to the lower segment of the inferior vena cava, followed by grasping and removing the catheter fragment with a retrieval loop system of the vena cava filter retrieval set. Result. The fractured PICC segments were removed successfully in all five patients via unilateral (four patients or bilateral (one patient femoral vein access. No complications occurred during the interventional procedure. Conclusion. Percutaneous retrieval can be a safe, convenient, and minimally invasive method for the removal of fractured PICC segments. The technique reported in this paper will be applicable for the retrieval of fractured PICC segments and other catheter fragments migrating into the heart or the pulmonary artery.

  19. Prevention of neonatal late-onset sepsis associated with the removal of percutaneously inserted central venous catheters in preterm infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hemels, Marieke A. C.; van den Hoogen, Agnes; Verboon-Maciolek, Malgorzata A.; Fleer, Andre; Krediet, Tannette G.

    Objectives: Indwelling central venous catheters are the most important risk factors for the development of sepsis attributable to coagulase-negative staphylococci among preterm infants admitted to neonatal intensive care units. In addition, removal of a central venous catheter also may cause

  20. Cochlear implantation in Mondini's deformity: could the straight electrode array with length of 31 mm be fully inserted?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jia-Qiang; Sun, Jing-Wu; Hou, Xiao-Yan

    2017-07-01

    The straight electrode array with length of 31 mm can be fully inserted using round window insertion in cochlear implantation with Mondini's deformity. It is a safe and effective process, but also a challenging task of the full implantation in children with Mondini's deformity. The aim of this study is to discuss whether the straight electrode array with a length of 31 mm could be fully inserted in cochlear implantation with Mondini's deformity. A chart review of 30 patients undergoing cochlear implantation with Mondini's deformity using the electrode array with length of 31 mm was undertaken from January 2012 and December 2015 in Anhui Provincial Hospital. Full insertion of the straight electrode array with length of 31 mm were performed successfully in all patients with Mondini's deformity using round window insertion. Resistance was not encountered while introducing the electrodes. Ten of 30 patients had cerebrospinal fluid drainage during cochlear implantation. Cerebrospinal fluid drainage was controlled with small pieces of temporalis fascia packing round window in all patients. Intra-operative neural response telemetry was performed in all patients, and results were good. The result of X-ray showed proper placement of the cochlear implant electrode array. During surgery, no patients had experienced any immediate or delayed post-operative complications such as wound infection, intracranial complication, extrusion, or migration of the implant during an average follow-up period of 6-36 months.

  1. The vanishing veins: difficult venous access in a patient requiring translumbar, transhepatic, and transcollateral central catheter insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaacob, Yazmin; Zakaria, Rozman; Mohammad, Zahiah; Ralib, Ahmad Razali Md; Muda, Ahmad Sobri

    2011-10-01

    Central venous catheter placement is indicated in patients requiring long-term therapy. With repeated venous catheterisations, conventional venous access sites can be exhausted. This case illustrates the expanding role of radiology in managing difficult venous access. We present a case of translumbar, transhepatic, and transcollateral placement of central catheter in a woman with a difficult venous access problem who required lifelong parenteral nutrition secondary to short bowel syndrome. This case highlights the technical aspects of interventional radiology in vascular access management.

  2. Comparative Study of Complications in CV Catheter Insertion for Pediatric Patients: Real-time Ultrasound-guided Versus Venography-guided Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takano, Shuichi; Shimizu, Norio; Tokuyasu, Naruo; Sakamoto, Teruhisa; Honjo, Soichiro; Ashida, Keigo; Saito, Hiroaki; Fujiwara, Yoshiyuki

    2018-01-01

    Background Tunneled central venous catheters (CVC), called Broviac/Hickman catheter, are widely used in the long-term treatment of pediatric patients. Recently, the percutaneous approach for CVC insertion has become dominant as a less invasive intervention. In this study, we reviewed the mechanical and delayed complications according to different procedures of CVC insertion and assessed the risk factors for complications in CVC insertions for pediatric patients. Methods A total of 159 pediatric patients (85 males and 74 females) were included in this study. Primary reasons for indication of CVC settlement were hemato-oncologic disorders (66 cases, 42%), malignant solid tumors (30, 19%) and other benign diseases (63, 40%). CVC insertion was performed with surgical venous cut-down (CD) in 51 patients (32%), with real-time ultrasound-guided puncture (RTUS) in 57 (36%), and venography-guided puncture (VG) in 49 (31%). Results CD was dominantly selected and the frequency of venipuncture increased respective to the increased age of patients. RTUS was dominantly selected for one to four year old patients and VG was dominant in 5 to 15 year old patients. Some types of mechanical complication were observed in 4 of 159 (2.5%) and some delayed types were observed in 66 of 159 cases (42%). No mechanical complications occurred in cases with CD and RTUS; on the other hand, 3 (6%) of 49 insertions with VG were observed. However, we could not show any significant risk factors for the mechanical complications. In the meantime, delayed complications and premature removal were significantly observed in patients under 5 years old. Conclusion RTUS is superior to our conventional VG considering less frequent mechanical complications. High frequent delayed complication and premature removal should be considered, especially for patients under 5 years old. PMID:29434493

  3. An estimation of right- and left-sided central venous catheter insertion depth using measurement of surface landmarks along the course of central veins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Myung-Chun; Kim, Keon-Sik; Choi, Young-Kyoo; Kim, Dong-Soo; Kwon, Moo-Il; Sung, Joon-Kyung; Moon, Jee-Youn; Kang, Jong-Man

    2011-06-01

    In this study we sought to determine whether the topographical measurement along the course of the central veins can estimate the approximate insertion depths of central venous catheters (CVC). Two hundred central venous catheterizations were performed via the right and left internal jugular vein (IJV) or subclavian vein (SCV). The anterior approach, using the sternocleidomastoid muscle as a landmark, was used for IJV catheterization and the infraclavicular approach for SCV. Topographical measurement was performed by placing the catheter with its own curvature over the draped skin starting from the insertion point of the needle through the ipsilateral clavicular notch, and to the insertion point of the second right costal cartilage to the manubriosternal joint. The CVC was inserted and secured to a depth determined topographically. The distance between the CVC tip and the carina and the angle of the left-sided CVC tip to the vertical were measured on the postoperative chest radiograph. The mean (SD) tip position of 50 CVCs placed via the right IJV was 0.1 (1.1) cm above the carina; right SCV, 0.0 (0.9) cm; left IJV, 0.3 (1.0) cm above the carina, and left SCV, 0.2 (0.9) cm below the carina. CVC locations could be predicted with a margin of error between 2.2 cm below the carina and 2.3 cm above the carina in 95% of patients. There were steeper (≥ 40°) angles to the vertical in the left-sided CVCs whose tips were above the carina (17 out of 54) than below the carina (2 out of 46). The approximate insertion depth of a CVC can be estimated using measurement of surface landmarks along the pathway of central veins.

  4. Uterine Length in Adolescents with Developmental Disability: Are Ultrasound Examinations Necessary before Insertion of the Levonorgestrel Intrauterine System?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whyte, Helena; Pecchioli, Yael; Oyewumi, Lamide; Kives, Sari; Allen, Lisa M; Kirkham, Yolanda A

    2016-12-01

    (1) To determine if there are any differences in uterine length between adolescents with developmental disability (DD) compared with their normally developing (ND) peers that might necessitate ultrasonography before insertion of levonorgestrel intrauterine system (LNG-IUS) in patients with DD; and (2) to characterize the LNG-IUS insertion procedure in adolescents with disabilities. This was a retrospective cohort study of 223 female adolescents with or without DDs. Seventy-five adolescents had DD; 33 underwent intrauterine system insertion in the operating room and 42 did not. A comparative cohort of 148 ND adolescents who had pelvic ultrasound examinations for abnormal uterine bleeding were included. The study period was between January 2006 and July 2013 at the Hospital for Sick Children, Toronto, Canada. Cases were identified from surgical databases and medical records. Mean uterine length on pelvic ultrasound, demographic characteristics (age, age at menarche, time from menarche to ultrasound, weight), and descriptive statistics on intrauterine system insertion. There was a statistically significant difference (P = .03) in uterine length between adolescents with and without DD (6.7 vs 7.1 cm). However, this was not a clinically significant difference because insertion of the LNG-IUS in patients with DD was successful in patients with uteri more than 5 cm long. There was no difference (P = .97) in uterine length of adolescents with DD whether they had LNG-IUS insertion or not (6.7 cm). Adolescents with DD were younger than adolescents without DD at time of ultrasound examination (P = .01). However, among patients with DD, those who underwent intrauterine system insertion were older (P = .001). Incidence of uterine anomaly in patients with DD is low (2.7%) and was the same as in ND adolescents. Rates of complications and expulsions were low and there were no failures of LNG-IUS insertion in adolescents with DD. Routine pelvic ultrasound examinations

  5. Simulation-based medical education training improves short and long-term competency in, and knowledge of central venous catheter insertion: A before and after intervention study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cartier, Vanessa; Inan, Cigdem; Zingg, Walter; Delhumeau, Cecile; Walder, Bernard; Savoldelli, Georges L

    2016-08-01

    Multimodal educational interventions have been shown to improve short-term competency in, and knowledge of central venous catheter (CVC) insertion. To evaluate the effectiveness of simulation-based medical education training in improving short and long-term competency in, and knowledge of CVC insertion. Before and after intervention study. University Geneva Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland, between May 2008 and January 2012. Residents in anaesthesiology aware of the Seldinger technique for vascular puncture. Participants attended a half-day course on CVC insertion. Learning objectives included work organization, aseptic technique and prevention of CVC complications. CVC insertion competency was tested pretraining, posttraining and then more than 2 years after training (sustainability phase). The primary study outcome was competency as measured by a global rating scale of technical skills, a hand hygiene compliance score and a checklist compliance score. Secondary outcome was knowledge as measured by a standardised pretraining and posttraining multiple-choice questionnaire. Statistical analyses were performed using paired Student's t test or Wilcoxon signed-rank test. Thirty-seven residents were included; 18 were tested in the sustainability phase (on average 34 months after training). The average global rating of skills was 23.4 points (±SD 4.08) before training, 32.2 (±4.51) after training (P Simulation-based medical education training was effective in improving short and long-term competency in, and knowledge of CVC insertion.

  6. Modification of cervical length after cervical pessary insertion: correlation weeks of gestation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza, Manel; Goya, Maria; Gascón, Andrea; Pratcorona, Laia; Merced, Carme; Rodó, Carlota; Valle, Leonor; Romero, Azahar; Juan, Miquel; Rodríguez, Alberto; Muñoz, Begoña; Santacruz, Bele N; Carreras, Elena; Cabero, Luis

    2017-07-01

    To observe the modifications in cervical length (CL) in patients with and without cervical pessary (Arabin® ASQ 65/25/32) and correlate these modifications with gestational age at delivery. Prospective study of asymptomatic singleton pregnancies (PECEP-Trial) between weeks 20 + 0 and 23 + 6 with maternal short cervix (<25 mm) randomised into two groups: expectant management and cervical pessary. This study included 380 pregnant women: 190 with pessary and 190 without pessary. Mean CL in both groups at the time of randomisation showed no statistically-significant differences (pessary group: 19.0 mm and management group: 19.0 mm; p = 0.9). Mean CL measured after randomisation was 15.4 mm in patients of the expectant management group and 21.5 mm in the pessary group. These differences were statistically significant (p < 0.0001). When means at randomisation and at the second measurement were compared, CL had decreased by 3.6 mm in the expectant management group and increased by 2.6 mm in the pessary group; this difference was statistically significant (p < 0.0001). Coefficients of correlation showed that among patients of both groups with the same CL at 20 weeks of gestation, those with a pessary gave birth later. Insertion of an Arabin cervical pessary increased CL in asymptomatic patients with a short cervix, which correlated with shorter gestational age at delivery. The cervical pessary halted the progressive decrease in CL, which correlated with longer gestational age at delivery.

  7. Eliminating guidewire retention during ultrasound guided central venous catheter insertion via an educational program, a modified CVC set, and a drape with reminder stickers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peh, Wee Ming; Loh, Wann Jia; Phua, Ghee Chee; Loo, Chian Min

    2016-01-01

    Guidewire retention is a severe but preventable complication from central venous catheter (CVC) insertion. There were three cases of guidewire retention during CVC insertion in the medical intensive care unit (MICU) in Singapore General Hospital, in the period between December 2011 and February 2012. The primary objective of this quality improvement project was to eliminate future incidences of guidewire retention during CVC insertion in the MICU and medical intermediate care area (MICA) via a structured educational program and a cost effective modified CVC set. The secondary objective was to perform a cost analysis and comparison between the use of the conventional hospital CVC set and drape with our newly modified CVC dressing kit. Root cause analysis of the three cases identified major factors leading to guidewire retention. Interventions were planned and tested using PDSA cycles. Internal medicine trainees rotating through MICU and MICA during the period between February 2012 and June 2013 underwent a multi-modal structured CVC insertion training program with hands on simulation. They also used a newly modified CVC dressing kit and drape. The CVC dressing kit was modified (CVC PLUS) to include a sterile drape with reminder stickers stating "REMOVE the GUIDEWIRE," as well as a sterile ultrasound sleeve. The total number of CVC insertions performed and guidewire retentions were monitored. During the period of study there were 320 CVC insertions in the MICU and MICA. Since this quality improvement project was initiated, and up to the submission of this article, there have not been any further cases of guidewire retention in the MICU and MICA. The total cost reduction per use of CVC PLUS was S$29.26 (Singaporean Dollars). A multi-modal structured training program, integrated with a modified, pre-packed CVC set, and drapes with reminder stickers (all included in CVC PLUS) were cost effective, and improved patient safety by eliminating guidewire retention during CVC

  8. Advantages and disadvantages of peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICC) compared to other central venous lines: a systematic review of the literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Eva; Hammarskjöld, Fredrik; Lundberg, Dag; Arnlind, Marianne Heibert

    2013-06-01

    The use of central venous lines carries a significant risk for serious complications and high economic costs. Lately, the peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC) has gained in popularity due to presumed advantages over other central venous lines. The aim of this systematic literature review was to identify scientific evidence justifying the use of PICC. The literature review was performed according to the principles of Cochrane Collaboration. The electronic literature search included common databases up to March 2011. Only those studies rated as high or moderate quality were used for grading of evidence and conclusions. The search resulted in 827 abstracts, 48 articles were read in full text, and 11 met the inclusion criteria. None of the articles was classified as high quality and two had moderate quality. The results of these two studies indicate that PICC increases the risk for deep venous thrombosis (DVT), but decreases the risk for catheter occlusion. The quality of scientific evidence behind these conclusions, however, was limited. Due to the lack of studies with sufficiently high quality, questions such as early complications, patient satisfaction and costs could not be answered. We conclude that although PICCs are frequently used in oncology, scientific evidence supporting any advantage or disadvantage of PICC when comparing PICC with traditional central venous lines is limited, apart from a tendency towards increased risk for DVT and a decreased risk for catheter occlusion with PICC.

  9. Prospective evaluation of systematic use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC lines) for the home care after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cells transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornillon, J; Martignoles, J A; Tavernier-Tardy, E; Gire, M; Martinez, P; Tranchan, C; Vallard, A; Augeul-Meunier, K; Hacquard, B; Guyotat, D

    2017-09-01

    Long-term catheters are often necessary for outpatient care after an allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT), However, there is paucity of data on the use of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) in post-HSCT setting. We prospectively evaluated the systematic use of PICC in 37 consecutive patients returning home after HSCT. In 6 out of 37 patients, the PICC was exclusively used for weekly blood controls. In 31 patients, the PICC line was used at home for hydration (18), antibiotics (3), intravenous human Ig (7), transfusions (10), extracorporeal photopheresis (3), chemotherapy (2), artificial nutrition (1), and/or palliative care (1). PICC complications were reported in ten patients (27%), causing eight PICC removals. At the end of the study, 35 patients had their PICC removed. PICCs were used with a median duration of 67 days. Reasons for removal were that PICC was not considered to be useful any longer (16), suspicion of infection (inflammation without documentation) (5) or infection (2), patient's wish (4), death (4), accidental withdrawal (2), puncture site bleeding (1), and catheter change due to extracorporeal photopheresis (1). Three venous thromboses were reported (8%), requesting one PICC removal because of associated infection. In other cases, an antithrombotic treatment was initiated. Although the number of patients included in the study was small, our results suggest that PICC is a safe long-term venous access for home care after HSCT.

  10. Superior success rate of intracavitary electrocardiogram guidance for peripherally inserted central catheter placement in patients with cancer: A randomized open-label controlled multicenter study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Yuan

    Full Text Available Intracavitary electrocardiogram (IC ECG guidance emerges as a new technique for peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs placement and demonstrates many potential advantages in recent observational studies.To determine whether IC ECG-guided PICCs provide more accurate positioning of catheter tips compared to conventional anatomical landmarks in patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy.In this multicenter, open-label, randomized controlled study (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02409589, a total of 1,007 adult patients were assigned to receive either IC ECG guidance (n = 500 or anatomical landmark guidance (n = 507 for PICC positioning. The confirmative catheter tip positioning x-ray data were centrally interpreted by independent radiologists. All reported analyses in the overall population were performed on an intention-to-treat basis. Analyses of pre-specified subgroups and a selected large subpopulation were conducted to explore consistency and accuracy.In the IC ECG-guided group, the first-attempt success rate was 89.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 86.5% to 91.9%, which was significantly higher than 77.4% (95% CI, 73.7% to 81.0% in the anatomical landmark group (P < 0.0001. This trend of superiority of IC ECG guidance was consistently noted in almost all prespecified patient subgroups and two selected large subpopulations, even when using optimal target rates for measurement. In contrast, the superiority nearly disappeared when PICCs were used via the left instead of right arms (interaction P-value = 0.021. No catheter-related adverse events were reported during the PICC intra-procedures in either group.Our findings indicated that the IC ECG-guided method had a more favorable positioning accuracy versus traditional anatomical landmarks for PICC placement in adult patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy. Furthermore, there were no significant safety concerns reported for catheterization using the two techniques.

  11. Superior success rate of intracavitary electrocardiogram guidance for peripherally inserted central catheter placement in patients with cancer: A randomized open-label controlled multicenter study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Aifeng; Feng, Yuling; Wu, Xiancui; Yang, Yiqun; Chen, Ping; Qiu, Zhenzhu; Qi, Jing; Chen, Chuanying; Wei, Jia; Qin, Minyi; Kong, Weiwei; Chen, Xiangyu; Xu, Wei

    2017-01-01

    Background Intracavitary electrocardiogram (IC ECG) guidance emerges as a new technique for peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) placement and demonstrates many potential advantages in recent observational studies. Aims To determine whether IC ECG-guided PICCs provide more accurate positioning of catheter tips compared to conventional anatomical landmarks in patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy. Methods In this multicenter, open-label, randomized controlled study (ClinicalTrials.gov number, NCT02409589), a total of 1,007 adult patients were assigned to receive either IC ECG guidance (n = 500) or anatomical landmark guidance (n = 507) for PICC positioning. The confirmative catheter tip positioning x-ray data were centrally interpreted by independent radiologists. All reported analyses in the overall population were performed on an intention-to-treat basis. Analyses of pre-specified subgroups and a selected large subpopulation were conducted to explore consistency and accuracy. Results In the IC ECG-guided group, the first-attempt success rate was 89.2% (95% confidence interval [CI], 86.5% to 91.9%), which was significantly higher than 77.4% (95% CI, 73.7% to 81.0%) in the anatomical landmark group (P PICCs were used via the left instead of right arms (interaction P-value = 0.021). No catheter-related adverse events were reported during the PICC intra-procedures in either group. Conclusions Our findings indicated that the IC ECG-guided method had a more favorable positioning accuracy versus traditional anatomical landmarks for PICC placement in adult patients with cancer undergoing chemotherapy. Furthermore, there were no significant safety concerns reported for catheterization using the two techniques. PMID:28278167

  12. Use of a National Continuing Medical Education Meeting to Provide Simulation-Based Training in Temporary Hemodialysis Catheter Insertion Skills: A Pre-Test Post-Test Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Edward G Clark

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Simulation-based-mastery-learning (SBML is an effective method to train nephrology fellows to competently insert temporary, non-tunneled hemodialysis catheters (NTHCs. Previous studies of SBML for NTHC-insertion have been conducted at a local level. Objectives: Determine if SBML for NTHC-insertion can be effective when provided at a national continuing medical education (CME meeting. Describe the correlation of demographic factors, prior experience with NTHC-insertion and procedural self-confidence with simulated performance of the procedure. Design: Pre-test – post-test study. Setting: 2014 Canadian Society of Nephrology annual meeting. Participants: Nephrology fellows, internal medicine residents and medical students. Measurements: Participants were surveyed regarding demographics, prior NTHC-insertion experience, procedural self-confidence and attitudes regarding the training they received. NTHC-insertion skills were assessed using a 28-item checklist. Methods: Participants underwent a pre-test of their NTHC-insertion skills at the internal jugular site using a realistic patient simulator and ultrasound machine. Participants then had a training session that included a didactic presentation and 2 hours of deliberate practice using the simulator. On the following day, trainees completed a post-test of their NTHC-insertion skills. All participants were required to meet or exceed a minimum passing score (MPS previously set at 79%. Trainees who did not reach the MPS were required to perform more deliberate practice until the MPS was achieved. Results: Twenty-two individuals participated in SBML training. None met or exceeded the MPS at baseline with a median checklist score of 20 (IQR, 7.25 to 21. Seventeen of 22 participants (77% completed post-testing and improved their scores to a median of 27 (IQR, 26 to 28; p < 0.001. All met or exceeded the MPS on their first attempt. There were no significant correlations between demographics

  13. Use of a national continuing medical education meeting to provide simulation-based training in temporary hemodialysis catheter insertion skills: a pre-test post-test study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Edward G; Paparello, James J; Wayne, Diane B; Edwards, Cedric; Hoar, Stephanie; McQuillan, Rory; Schachter, Michael E; Barsuk, Jeffrey H

    2014-01-01

    Simulation-based-mastery-learning (SBML) is an effective method to train nephrology fellows to competently insert temporary, non-tunneled hemodialysis catheters (NTHCs). Previous studies of SBML for NTHC-insertion have been conducted at a local level. Determine if SBML for NTHC-insertion can be effective when provided at a national continuing medical education (CME) meeting. Describe the correlation of demographic factors, prior experience with NTHC-insertion and procedural self-confidence with simulated performance of the procedure. Pre-test - post-test study. 2014 Canadian Society of Nephrology annual meeting. Nephrology fellows, internal medicine residents and medical students. Participants were surveyed regarding demographics, prior NTHC-insertion experience, procedural self-confidence and attitudes regarding the training they received. NTHC-insertion skills were assessed using a 28-item checklist. Participants underwent a pre-test of their NTHC-insertion skills at the internal jugular site using a realistic patient simulator and ultrasound machine. Participants then had a training session that included a didactic presentation and 2 hours of deliberate practice using the simulator. On the following day, trainees completed a post-test of their NTHC-insertion skills. All participants were required to meet or exceed a minimum passing score (MPS) previously set at 79%. Trainees who did not reach the MPS were required to perform more deliberate practice until the MPS was achieved. Twenty-two individuals participated in SBML training. None met or exceeded the MPS at baseline with a median checklist score of 20 (IQR, 7.25 to 21). Seventeen of 22 participants (77%) completed post-testing and improved their scores to a median of 27 (IQR, 26 to 28; p < 0.001). All met or exceeded the MPS on their first attempt. There were no significant correlations between demographics, prior experience or procedural self-confidence with pre-test performance. Small sample-size and

  14. Using the Theory of Planned Behavior to explore hospital-based nurses' intention to use peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC): a survey study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertani, Laura; Carone, Maria; Caricati, Luca; Demaria, Serena; Fantuzzi, Silvia; Guarasci, Alessandro; Pirazzoli, Luca

    2016-11-22

    The peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) have become an alternative to the traditional CVC. PICCs are usually inserted by trained nurses who decided to attend and complete a special training on PICC insertion and management. The present work aimed to investigate the intention of using PICC in a sample of hospital-based nurses using the theory of planned behavior as theoretical framework. A cross-sectional design was used in which a questionnaire was delivered to 199 nurses. According to the theory of planned behavior, the attitude toward the use of PICC, subjective norms and perceived self-efficacy predicted the intention to use PICC. Contrary to the expectations, the effect of subjective norms on intention to use PICC was mediated by attitude and self-efficacy. Finally, age of participants was negatively related to the intention to use the PICC. The theory of planned behavior offers a useful framework to explain nurses' intention to use PICC. Shared norms favoring the use of PICC seem to increase both nurse's positive attitudes and self-efficacy whit respect to the use of these devices. Thus, it appears that to train professionals individually does not necessarily results in an increased use of PICC.

  15. PO-02 - Retrospective audit of the Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC) associated thrombosis in patients with haematological malignancies at Cork University Hospital.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McAuliffe, E; O'Shea, S; Khan, M I

    2016-04-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) have been increasingly used for administration of chemotherapy, antibiotics and blood products in patients with haematological malignancies. Although generally regarded safe, infections and thrombotic events have occurred with PICC use, necessitating study to guide future clinical prophylaxis and management. 1) Determine the incidence of PICC associated thrombosis in patients with haematological malignancies 2) To identify clinically significant risk factors contributing to these complications. This was a cohort study, conducted in Cork University Hospital, between January 2010 and June 2015. After ethical approval Picture Archiving and Communication System (PACS) in radiology was used. All adult patients with PICC inserted under haematology were identified. A total of 90 patients with haematological malignancies who had PICC line placement were included. Patients' charts were reviewed in the medical record department. Data was collected using proforma sheets. This included patients demographs, type of malignancy, size of the PICC line, and total days of insertion. Haematological laboratory parameters were also recorded. The main outcome measures were PICC associated thrombosis and/or infection Of 131 PICC placements in a total of 90 patients. Out of these total PICC episodes 28.2% developed complications (n=37) and lead to removal. Thrombosis was found in 14.5% (n=19), 13.7% developed infection (n=18) and remaining were without complications. Of those with thrombosis (n=19), 7 patients had a diagnosis of Multiple Myeloma and 6 had Acute Myeloid Leukaemia. Whereas those with PICC associated infection (n=18), 5 had Non-Hodgkin's lymphoma and 5 had Acute Lymphoid Leukaemia. Diagnosis was significantly associated with complication (p=0.019). The mean age of patients who has PICC associated thrombosis was 51.6 years (±8.1 years). PICC removal as a result of complications was associated with increasing PICC lumen size; 30

  16. Use of Flexible Cystoscopy to Insert a Foley Catheter over a Guide Wire in Spinal Cord Injury Patients: Special Precautions to be Observed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Vaidyanathan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available When urethral catheterisation is difficult or impossible in spinal cord injury patients, flexible cystoscopy and urethral catheterisation over a guide wire can be performed on the bedside, thus obviating the need for emergency suprapubic cystostomy. Spinal cord injury patients, who undergo flexible cystoscopy and urethral catheterisation over a guide wire, may develop potentially serious complications. (1 Persons with lesion above T-6 are susceptible to develop autonomic dysreflexia during cystoscopy and urethral catheterisation over a guide wire; nifedipine 5–10 milligrams may be administered sublingually just prior to the procedure to prevent autonomic dysreflexia. (2 Spinal cord injury patients are at increased risk for getting urine infections as compared to able-bodied individuals. Therefore, antibiotics should be given to patients who get haematuria or urethral bleeding following urethral catheterisation over a guide wire. (3 Some spinal cord injury patients may have a small capacity bladder; in these patients, the guide wire, which is introduced into the urinary bladder, may fold upon itself with the tip of guide wire entering the urethra. If this complication is not recognised and a catheter is inserted over the guide wire, the Foley catheter will then be misplaced in urethra despite using cystoscopy and guide wire.

  17. Association Between Prior Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters and Lack of Functioning Arteriovenous Fistulas: A Case-Control Study in Hemodialysis Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ters, Mireille El; Schears, Gregory J.; Taler, Sandra J.; Williams, Amy W.; Albright, Robert C.; Jenson, Bernice M.; Mahon, Amy L.; Stockland, Andrew H.; Misra, Sanjay; Nyberg, Scott L.; Rule, Andrew D.; Hogan, Marie C.

    2013-01-01

    Background Although an arteriovenous fistula (AVF) is the hemodialysis access of choice, its prevalence continues to be lower than recommended in the United States. We assessed the association between past peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) and lack of functioning AVFs. Study Design Case-control study. Participants & Setting Prevalent hemodialysis population in 7 Mayo Clinic outpatient hemodialysis units. Cases were without functioning AVFs and controls were with functioning AVFs on January 31, 2011. Predictors History of PICCs. Outcomes Lack of functioning AVFs. Results On January 31, 2011, a total of 425 patients were receiving maintenance hemodialysis, of whom 282 were included in this study. Of these, 120 (42.5%; cases) were dialyzing through a tunneled dialysis catheter or synthetic arteriovenous graft and 162 (57.5%; controls) had a functioning AVF. PICC use was evaluated in both groups and identified in 30% of hemodialysis patients, with 54% of these placed after dialysis therapy initiation. Cases were more likely to be women (52.5% vs 33.3% in the control group; P = 0.001), with smaller mean vein (4.9 vs 5.8 mm; P PICC was identified in 53 (44.2%) cases, but only 32 (19.7%) controls (P PICC use and lack of a functioning AVF (OR, 3.2; 95% CI, 1.9–5.5; P PICCs are commonly placed in patients with end-stage renal disease and are a strong independent risk factor for lack of functioning AVFs. PMID:22704142

  18. A prospective, randomized comparison of Foley catheter insertion versus intracervical prostaglandin E2 gel for preinduction cervical ripening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sciscione, A C; McCullough, H; Manley, J S; Shlossman, P A; Pollock, M; Colmorgen, G H

    1999-01-01

    The objective of this study was to compare intracervical prostaglandin E2 gel with insertion of a Foley bulb for efficacy in preinduction cervical ripening. Women who came to the hospital for induction of labor with a Bishop score intracervical prostaglandin E2 gel.

  19. A silver-alginate-coated dressing to reduce peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) infections in NICU patients: a pilot randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hill, M L; Baldwin, L; Slaughter, J C; Walsh, W F; Weitkamp, J-H

    2010-07-01

    Our aim was to evaluate the safety of a silver-alginate-containing dressing to reduce peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) infections in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) patients. Patients were randomized 3:1 to receive a patch containing silver, alginate and maltodextrin or standard of care. Patches were placed under the regular transparent retention dressing at the PICC exit site at insertion and were replaced with every dressing change at least every 2 weeks until PICC discontinuation. All study infants were monitored for adverse skin reactions. A total of 100 infants were followed up for 1922 person-days, including 75 subjects with 89 PICCs who received the patch. The median birth weight (1330 g) and median gestational age (30 weeks) was lower in the patch group when compared with the controls (P=0.001 and 0.005, respectively). Study patients received the patch with their PICC at a median age of 5 days; the patch stayed in place for a median of 13 days. We noted no adverse skin reactions and found no evidence that the patch alters the microbiology of PICC-associated infections. This pilot trial suggests that silver-alginate-coated dressings are skin safe and their inclusion in future trials aimed at reduction of PICC-associated bloodstream infections in the NICU should be considered.

  20. Improving Nurses' Peripheral Intravenous Catheter Insertion Knowledge, Confidence, and Skills Using a Simulation-Based Blended Learning Program: A Randomized Trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keleekai, Nowai L; Schuster, Catherine A; Murray, Connie L; King, Mary Anne; Stahl, Brian R; Labrozzi, Laura J; Gallucci, Susan; LeClair, Matthew W; Glover, Kevin R

    2016-12-01

    Peripheral intravenous catheter (PIVC) insertion is one of the most common invasive procedures performed in a hospital, but most nurses receive little formal training in this area. Blended PIVC insertion training programs that incorporate deliberate simulated practice have the potential to improve clinical practice and patient care. The study was a randomized, wait-list control group with crossover using nurses on three medical/surgical units. Baseline PIVC knowledge, confidence, and skills assessments were completed for both groups. The intervention group then received a 2-hour PIVC online course, followed by an 8-hour live training course using a synergistic mix of three simulation tools. Both groups were then reassessed. After crossover, the wait-list group received the same intervention and both groups were reassessed. At baseline, both groups were similar for knowledge, confidence, and skills. Compared with the wait-list group, the intervention group had significantly higher scores for knowledge, confidence, and skills upon completing the training program. After crossover, the wait-list group had similarly higher scores for knowledge, confidence, and skills than the intervention group. Between the immediate preintervention and postintervention periods, the intervention group improved scores for knowledge by 31%, skills by 24%, and decreased confidence by 0.5%, whereas the wait-list group improved scores for knowledge by 28%, confidence by 16%, and skills by 15%. Results demonstrate significant improvements in nurses' knowledge, confidence, and skills with the use of a simulation-based blended learning program for PIVC insertion. Transferability of these findings from a simulated environment into clinical practice should be further explored.

  1. Insert sequence length determines transfection efficiency and gene expression levels in bicistronic mammalian expression vectors

    OpenAIRE

    Payne, Andrew J; Gerdes, Bryan C; Kaja, Simon; Koulen, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Bicistronic expression vectors have been widely used for co-expression studies since the initial discovery of the internal ribosome entry site (IRES) about 25 years ago. IRES sequences allow the 5’ cap-independent initiation of translation of multiple genes on a single messenger RNA strand. Using a commercially available mammalian expression vector containing an IRES sequence with a 3’ green fluorescent protein fluorescent marker, we found that sequence length of the gene of interest expresse...

  2. Peripherally InSerted CEntral catheter dressing and securement in patients with cancer: the PISCES trial. Protocol for a 2x2 factorial, superiority randomised controlled trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickard, Claire M; Marsh, Nicole M; Webster, Joan; Gavin, Nicole C; Chan, Raymond J; McCarthy, Alexandra L; Mollee, Peter; Ullman, Amanda J; Kleidon, Tricia; Chopra, Vineet; Zhang, Li; McGrail, Matthew R; Larsen, Emily; Choudhury, Md Abu; Keogh, Samantha; Alexandrou, Evan; McMillan, David J; Mervin, Merehau Cindy; Paterson, David L; Cooke, Marie; Ray-Barruel, Gillian; Castillo, Maria Isabel; Hallahan, Andrew; Corley, Amanda; Geoffrey Playford, E

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Around 30% of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) fail from vascular, infectious or mechanical complications. Patients with cancer are at highest risk, and this increases morbidity, mortality and costs. Effective PICC dressing and securement may prevent PICC failure; however, no large randomised controlled trial (RCT) has compared alternative approaches. We designed this RCT to assess the clinical and cost-effectiveness of dressing and securements to prevent PICC failure. Methods and analysis Pragmatic, multicentre, 2×2 factorial, superiority RCT of (1) dressings (chlorhexidine gluconate disc (CHG) vs no disc) and (2) securements (integrated securement dressing (ISD) vs securement device (SED)). A qualitative evaluation using a knowledge translation framework is included. Recruitment of 1240 patients will occur over 3 years with allocation concealment until randomisation by a centralised service. For the dressing hypothesis, we hypothesise CHG discs will reduce catheter-associated bloodstream infection (CABSI) compared with no CHG disc. For the securement hypothesis, we hypothesise that ISD will reduce composite PICC failure (infection (CABSI/local infection), occlusion, dislodgement or thrombosis), compared with SED. Secondary outcomes: types of PICC failure; safety; costs; dressing/securement failure; dwell time; microbial colonisation; reversible PICC complications and consumer acceptability. Relative incidence rates of CABSI and PICC failure/100 devices and/1000 PICC days (with 95% CIs) will summarise treatment impact. Kaplan-Meier survival curves (and log rank Mantel-Haenszel test) will compare outcomes over time. Secondary end points will be compared between groups using parametric/non-parametric techniques; p values <0.05 will be considered to be statistically significant. Ethics and dissemination Ethical approval from Queensland Health (HREC/15/QRCH/241) and Griffith University (Ref. No. 2016/063). Results will be published

  3. A peripherally inserted central catheter line, inserted the day before surgery, decreases the time from induction to incision for spinal deformity surgery and safely provides central venous access during surgery: a pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stuedemann, Anne E; Schwend, Richard M; Thomas, Valorie K; Leamon, Julia M; Lightner, Tammy S

    2018-03-01

    Pediatric patients undergoing surgery for spinal deformity may benefit from central venous access to provide intraoperative monitoring and fluid resuscitation. For pediatric surgical patients requiring central access, we hypothesized that placing a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) line preoperatively should decrease time from induction of anesthesia to incision and result in improved patient safety and decreased operating room charges. This was a retrospective, nonrandomized, and case comparison study. Clinical records of all children with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis or neuromuscular scoliosis treated surgically by the senior author between December 2007 and April 2012 were reviewed. Control group patients had a central venous catheter (CVC) placed by the anesthesiologist after induction of anesthesia. The trial group had a PICC placed under local anesthesia the day before surgery by an experienced vascular access team. The time from induction of anesthesia to the time for the surgical incision was determined for each study group. The CVC line placement charges were determined by the operating room time charges at $214/min. Charges saved were the mean time difference multiplied by the operating room time charge, less the charge for PICC line insertion ($1282). There were 29 neuromuscular patients, the mean age was 13 years (SD: 4 years). The mean time from induction to incision for the PICC group was 91 min [95% confidence interval (CI): 67-115 min] and for the CVC group 113 min (95% CI: 99-127 min, P=0.083). For this mean time difference of 22 min, the estimated cost savings would be $3426 per patient. There were 59 patients with adolescent idiopathic scoliosis, the mean age was 14 years (SD: 2 years). The mean time from induction to incision for the PICC group was 78 min (95% CI: 74-82 min) and for the CVC group 106 min (95% CI: 96-116  min, P≤0.001). For this mean time difference of 28 min, the estimated cost savings would

  4. Insertion of Introns: A Strategy to Facilitate Assembly of Infectious Full Length Clones

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Ida Elisabeth; Lund, Ole Søgaard

    2008-01-01

    Some DNA fragments are difficult to clone in Escherichia coli by standard methods. It has been speculated that unintended transcription and translation result in expression of proteins that are toxic to the bacteria. This problem is frequently observed during assembly of infectious full-length vi......Some DNA fragments are difficult to clone in Escherichia coli by standard methods. It has been speculated that unintended transcription and translation result in expression of proteins that are toxic to the bacteria. This problem is frequently observed during assembly of infectious full...... the virus sequence in the plant nucleus. The resulting RNA, which enters the cytoplasm, is identical to the virus sequence and can initiate infection...

  5. The relationship between perceived role and appropriate use of peripherally inserted central catheters: A survey of vascular access nurses in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krein, Sarah L; Kuhn, Latoya; Ratz, David; Winter, Suzanne; Vaughn, Valerie M; Chopra, Vineet

    2017-06-01

    The presence and proliferation of vascular access nursing in hospital settings has been identified as a potential contributor to growing demand, and possible overuse, of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs). We examined vascular access nurses' perceived role related to use of PICCs and the association with appropriateness of PICC use in hospitals. A web-based survey was administered to members of two vascular access professional organizations. Of 2762 potentially eligible respondents who accessed the link, 1698 (61%) completed the survey. This sample was further restricted to vascular access nurses who worked in a U.S. hospital (n=1147). Respondents were categorized based on perceived role: 1) an operator who inserts PICCs; 2) a consultant whose views are not valued by the care team (unvalued consultant); 3) a consultant whose views are valued by the care team (valued consultant). Facility and respondent characteristics, reported practices, leadership support and relationships with other providers were compared across groups using chi-squared tests and analysis of variance. Multivariable logistic regression was used to assess the association between perceived role and reported percentage of PICCs placed for inappropriate reasons. Among the 1147 respondents, 210 (18%) viewed themselves as operators, 683 (59%) as valued consultants, 236 (21%) as unvalued consultants, and 18 (2%) could not be categorized. A significantly higher percentage (93%) of valued consultants reported that vascular access nurses placed the majority of PICCs at their facility, compared to operators (83%) or unvalued consultants (76%) (pconsultants were significantly more likely to report that consultants (OR 0.69, p=0.06). Vascular access nurses and their perceived role as part of the healthcare team are associated with PICC use in hospitals. Strong inter-professional collaboration and respect may help ensure more appropriate use of PICCs. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Catheter Angiography Catheter angiography uses a catheter, x-ray ... are the limitations of Catheter Angiography? What is Catheter Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test ...

  7. How effective is tetracaine 4% gel, before a peripherally inserted central catheter, in reducing procedural pain in infants: a randomized double-blind placebo controlled trial [ISRCTN75884221

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Blanchard Colline

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Procedural pain relief is sub-optimal in infants, especially small and vulnerable ones. Tetracaine gel 4% (Ametop®, Smith-Nephew provides pain relief in children and larger infants, but its efficacy in smaller infants and for peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC remains uncertain. The objective of this trial was to assess the safety and efficacy of tetracaine gel on the pain response of very low birth weight (VLBW infants during insertion of a PICC. Methods Medically stable infants greater than or equal to 24 weeks gestation, requiring a non-urgent PICC, were included. Following randomization and double blinding, 1.1 g of tetracaine or placebo was applied to the skin for 30 minutes. The PICC was inserted according to a standard protocol. Pain was assessed using the Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP. A 3-point change in the pain score was considered clinically significant, leading to a sample size of 54 infants, with 90% statistical power. Local skin reactions and immediate adverse cardiorespiratory events were noted. The primary outcome, PIPP score at 1 minute, was analysed using an independent Student's t-test. Results Fifty-four infants were included, 27 +/- 2 weeks gestation, 916 +/- 292 grams and 6.5 +/- 3.2 days of age. Baseline characteristics were similar between groups. The mean PIPP score in the first minute was 10.88 in the treatment group as compared to 11.74 in the placebo group (difference 0.86, 95% CI -1.86, 3.58. Median duration of crying in non-intubated infants was 181 seconds in the tetracaine group compared to 68 seconds in the placebo group (difference -78, 95% CI -539, 117. Local skin erythema was observed transiently in 4 infants (3 in the treatment and 1 in the placebo group. No serious harms were observed. Conclusion Tetracaine 4% when applied for 30 minutes was not beneficial in decreasing procedural pain associated with a PICC in very small infants.

  8. Role of duration of catheterization and length of hospital stay on the rate of catheter-related hospital-acquired urinary tract infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Al-Hazmi H

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Hamdan Al-HazmiDivision of Urology, Department of Surgery, College of Medicine and King Khalid University Hospital, King Saud University, Riyadh, Saudi ArabiaObjective: Our aim is to prove that duration of catheterization and length of hospital stay (LOS are associated with the rate of hospital-acquired urinary tract infections (UTI, while taking into account type of urinary catheter used, the most common organisms found, patient diagnosis on admission, associated comorbidities, age, sex, precautions that should be taken to avoid UTI, and comparison with other studies.Methods: The study was done in a university teaching hospital with a 920-bed capacity; this hospital is a tertiary care center in Riyadh, Saudi Arabia. The study was done on 250 selected patients during the year 2010 as a retrospective descriptive study. Patients were selected as purposive sample, all of them having been exposed to urinary catheterization; hospital-acquired UTI were found in 100 patients. Data were abstracted from the archived patients' files in the medical record department using the annual infection control logbook prepared by the infection control department. The data collected were demographic information about the patients, clinical condition (diagnosis and the LOS, and possible risk factors for infection such as duration of catheterization, exposure to invasive devices or surgical procedures, and medical condition.Results: There was a statistically significant association between the rate of UTI and duration of catheterization: seven patients had UTI out of 46 catheterized patients (15% at 3 days of catheterization, while 30 patients had UTI out of 44 catheterized patients (68% at 8 days of catheterization (median 8 days in infected patients versus 3 days in noninfected patients; P-value <0.05, which means that the longer the duration of catheterization, the higher the UTI rate. There was a statistically significant association between the rate of UTI and LOS

  9. Decompression of tension pneumothoraces in Asian trauma patients: greater success with lateral approach and longer catheter lengths based on computed tomography chest wall measurements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goh, S; Xu, W R; Teo, L T

    2017-10-03

    Our study aims to compare the anterior and lateral approaches for needle thoracostomy (NT) and determine the adequacy of catheter lengths used for NT in Asian trauma patients based on computed tomography chest wall measurements. A retrospective review of chest computed tomography scans of 583 Singaporean trauma patients during period of 2011-2015 was conducted. Four measurements of chest wall thickness (CWT) were taken at the second intercostal space, midclavicular line and fifth intercostal space, midaxillary line bilaterally. Measurements were from the superficial skin layer of the chest wall to the pleural space. Successful NT was defined radiologically as CWT ≤ 5 cm. There were 593 eligible subjects. Mean age was 49.1 years (49.1 ± 21.0). Majority were males (77.0%) and Chinese (70.2%). Mean CWT for the anterior approach was 4.04 cm (CI 3.19-4.68) on the left and 3.92 cm (CI 3.17-4.63) on the right. Mean CWT for the lateral approach was 3.52 cm (CI 2.52-4.36) on the left, and 3.62 cm (CI 3.65-4.48) on the right. Mean CWT was shorter in the lateral approach by 0.52 cm on the left and 0.30 cm on the right (p = 0.001). With a 5.0 cm catheter in the anterior approach, 925 out of 1186 sites (78.8%) will have adequate NT as compared to 98.2% with a 7.0 cm catheter. Similarly, in the lateral approach 1046 out of 1186 (88.2%) will have adequate NT as compared to 98.5% with a 7.0 cm catheter. Obese subjects had significantly higher mean CWT in both approaches (p = 0.001). There was moderate correlation between BMI and CWT in the anterior approach, r 2  = 0.529 as compared to the lateral approach, r 2  = 0.244. Needle decompression using the lateral approach or a longer catheter is more likely to succeed in Asian trauma patients. A high BMI is an independent predictor of failure of NT, especially for the anterior as compared to lateral approach.

  10. Dedicated radial ventriculography pigtail catheter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vidovich, Mladen I., E-mail: miv@uic.edu

    2013-05-15

    A new dedicated cardiac ventriculography catheter was specifically designed for radial and upper arm arterial access approach. Two catheter configurations have been developed to facilitate retrograde crossing of the aortic valve and to conform to various subclavian, ascending aortic and left ventricular anatomies. The “short” dedicated radial ventriculography catheter is suited for horizontal ascending aortas, obese body habitus, short stature and small ventricular cavities. The “long” dedicated radial ventriculography catheter is suited for vertical ascending aortas, thin body habitus, tall stature and larger ventricular cavities. This new design allows for improved performance, faster and simpler insertion in the left ventricle which can reduce procedure time, radiation exposure and propensity for radial artery spasm due to excessive catheter manipulation. Two different catheter configurations allow for optimal catheter selection in a broad range of patient anatomies. The catheter is exceptionally stable during contrast power injection and provides equivalent cavity opacification to traditional femoral ventriculography catheter designs.

  11. Peripherally inserted central catheter - flushing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Martin BC, Aebersold M, Gonzalez L, eds. Clinical Nursing Skills: Basic to Advanced Skills . 9th ed. New York, NY: Pearson; 2016:chap 29.6. Read More Bone marrow transplant Patient Instructions After chemotherapy - discharge Bleeding during cancer treatment Bone marrow transplant - ...

  12. FACTORS AND COMPLICATIONS AFFECTING CATHETER AND TECHNIQUE SURVIVAL WITH PERMANENT SINGLE-LUMEN DIALYSIS CATHETERS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    DEMEESTER, J; VANHOLDER, R; DEROOSE, J; RINGOIR, S

    1994-01-01

    This long-term study on the outcome of permanent silicone single-lumen dialysis catheters consisted of 43 surgically inserted catheters in 33 patients. All catheters were attached to a pressure-pressure single-cannula dialysis system. Technique and catheter survival were 80 and 59% at 1 year, and 63

  13. Catheter-related bloodstream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, Matthew R; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2009-04-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSIs) are a common, frequently preventable complication of central venous catheterization. CR-BSIs can be prevented by strict attention to insertion and maintenance of central venous catheters and removing unneeded catheters as soon as possible. Antiseptic- or antibiotic-impregnated catheters are also an effective tool to prevent infections. The diagnosis of CR-BSI is made largely based on culture results. CR-BSIs should always be treated with antibiotics, and except in rare circumstances the infected catheter needs to be removed.

  14. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... using: x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, a thin ... called superselective angiography. Unlike computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) angiography , use of a catheter makes ...

  15. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, a thin plastic ... superselective angiography. Unlike computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) angiography , use of a catheter makes it ...

  16. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... risks? What are the limitations of Catheter Angiography? What is Catheter Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive ... of ionizing radiation ( x-rays ). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Catheter ...

  17. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... use of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. Catheter ... use of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. An ...

  18. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. Catheter angiography ... of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. An example ...

  19. Urinary catheters

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... indwelling catheter, clean the area where the catheter exits your body and the catheter itself with soap ... DO, urologist with the Michigan Institute of Urology, West Bloomfield, MI. Review provided by VeriMed Healthcare Network. ...

  20. Intracorporeal knotting of a femoral nerve catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanem, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve catheters are effective and well-established tools to provide postoperative analgesia to patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. The performance of these techniques is usually considered safe. However, placement of nerve catheters may be associated with a considerable number of side effects and major complications have repeatedly been published. In this work, we report on a patient who underwent total knee replacement with spinal anesthesia and preoperative insertion of femoral and sciatic nerve catheters for postoperative analgesia. During insertion of the femoral catheter, significant resistance was encountered upon retracting the catheter. This occurred due to knotting of the catheter. The catheter had to be removed by operative intervention which has to be considered a major complication. The postoperative course was uneventful. The principles for removal of entrapped peripheral catheters are not well established, may differ from those for neuroaxial catheters, and range from cautious manipulation up to surgical intervention.

  1. Transversus abdominis plane (TAP) catheters inserted under direct vision in the donor site following free DIEP and MS-TRAM breast reconstruction: a prospective cohort study of 45 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Toni; Wong, Karen W; Cheng, Homan; Ojha, Marie; Srinivas, Coimbatore; McCluskey, Stuart A; Clarke, Hance; Jacks, Lindsay; Hofer, Stefan O P

    2013-03-01

    The transversus abdominis plane (TAP) block is a peripheral nerve block of T6-L1 intercostal nerves of the abdominal wall. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of intermittent TAP blockade for the first two postoperative days following free muscle sparing-transverse rectus abdominis muscle (MS-TRAM) or deep inferior epigastric perforator (DIEP) flap reconstruction of the breast. Therapeutic--Level II evidence. This prospective cohort consisted of 45 consecutive patients who underwent DIEP or MS-TRAM free-flap breast reconstruction. Intra-operatively, a multi-orifice epidural catheter was inserted under direct vision into the TAP. Ten millilitres of 0.25% bupivacaine was injected into each TAP catheter every 12 h until removal on day 3. The control group consisted of 80 consecutive patients who underwent free MS-TRAM or DIEP free-flap breast reconstructions by the same two surgeons without TAP block. Postoperatively, both groups had patient-controlled analgesia (PCA) and the primary outcome was intravenous (IV) PCA opioid consumption in the first 48 h. There were no complications associated with using TAP catheters. The 48-h PCA-delivered opioid requirement was significantly less (pTAP block group (17.10±17.23 mg IV morphine equivalent) compared to the control group (48.44±39.53 mg). Intermittent delivery of bupivacaine through the TAP block significantly reduced postoperative parenteral opioid requirements following free MS-TRAM or DIEP flap reconstruction of the breast. This is the first report of the TAP block being inserted under direct vision to provide postoperative analgesia at the abdominal flap donor site following microsurgical breast reconstruction. Copyright © 2012 British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Skin colonisation at the catheter exit site is strongly associated with catheter colonisation and catheter-related sepsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponnusamy, Vennila; Perperoglou, Aris; Venkatesh, Vidheya; Curley, Anna; Brown, Nicholas; Tremlett, Catherine; Clarke, Paul

    2014-12-01

    The commonest mode of catheter colonisation is via the extraluminal route with skin bacteria. Catheter-related sepsis causes significant mortality and morbidity in neonates. Our aim was to study the relationships between culture-positive catheter exit site skin swabs, percutaneous central venous catheter segments and blood to determine the magnitude of associations between exit site skin colonisation, catheter colonisation and catheter-related sepsis. In a prospective study, an exit site skin swab and three formerly in vivo catheter segments (proximal, middle and tip) were taken for culture at catheter removal. In those neonates who were clinically unwell at catheter removal, a peripheral blood culture was also collected. Univariate and multivariate analyses were used to study associations. Skin swabs were culture positive in 39 (21%) of 187 catheter removals. With a culture-positive skin swab, the risk of associated catheter colonisation was nearly eight times higher (OR: 7.84, 95% CI: 3.59-17.15) and the risk of definite catheter-related sepsis with the same organism was nearly 10 times higher (OR 9.86, 95% CI: 3.13-31.00). Culture-positive skin swabs from the catheter exit site were strongly associated with catheter colonisation and with definite catheter-related sepsis with the same organism. These data provide further evidence supporting catheter colonisation via the extraluminal route and highlight the importance of optimising skin disinfection before catheter insertion. ©2014 Foundation Acta Paediatrica. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Z Catheter Angiography Catheter angiography uses a catheter, x-ray imaging guidance and an injection of contrast material ... vessels in the body. Angiography is performed using: x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging ( ...

  4. A statistical approach designed for finding mathematically defined repeats in shotgun data and determining the length distribution of clone-inserts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhong, Lan; Zhang, Kunlin; Huang, Xiangang

    2003-01-01

    that repeats of different copy number have different probabilities of appearance in shotgun data, so based on this principle, we constructed a statistical model and inferred criteria for mathematically defined repeats (MDRs) at different shotgun coverages. According to these criteria, we developed software...... MDRmasker to identify and mask MDRs in shotgun data. With repeats masked prior to assembly, the speed of assembly was increased with lower error probability. In addition, clone-insert size affect the accuracy of repeat assembly and scaffold construction, we also designed length distribution of clone...

  5. The correlation between ATLS and junior doctors' anatomical knowledge of central venous catheter insertion at a major trauma centre in South Africa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, V Y; Odendaal, J J; Weale, R; Liu, M; Keene, C M; Sartorius, B; Clarke, D L

    2018-02-01

    To review the ability of junior doctors (JDs) in identifying the correct anatomical site for central venous catheterization (CVC) and whether prior Advanced Trauma Life Support (ATLS) training influences this. We performed a prospective, observational study using a structured survey and asked a group of JDs (postgraduate year 1 [PGY1] or year 2 [PGY2]) to indicate on a photograph the exact site for CVC insertion via the internal jugular (IJV) and the subclavian (SCV) approach. This study was conducted in a large metropolitan university hospital in South Africa. A total of 139 JDs were included. Forty-four per cent (61/139) were males and the mean age was 25 years. There were 90 PGY1s (65%) and 49 PGY2s (35%). Overall, 32% (45/139) were able to identify the correct insertion site for the IJV approach and 60% (84/139) for the SCV approach. Of the 90 PGY1s, 34% (31/90) correctly identified the insertion site for the IJV approach and 59% (53/90) for the SCV approach. Of the 49 PGY2s, 29% (14/49) correctly identified the insertion site for the IJV approach and 63% (31/49) for the SCV approach. No significant difference between PGY1 and 2 were identified. Those with ATLS provider training were significantly more likely to identify the correct site for the IJV approaches [OR=4.3, p=0.001]. This was marginally statistically significant (i.e. p>0.05 but <0.1) for the SCV approach. The majority of JDs do not have sufficient anatomical knowledge to identify the correct insertion site CVCs. Those who had undergone ATLS training were more likely to be able to identify the correct insertion site. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Retained Fractured Fragment of A Central Venous Catheter: A ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Complication following fracture of a central venous catheter can be catastrophic to both the patient and the attending doctor. Catheter fracture has been attributed to several factors namely prolong mechanical force acting on the catheter, and forceful removal or insertion of the catheter. CASE DETAILS: In ...

  7. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body for abnormalities such as aneurysms and disease such as atherosclerosis (plaque). The use of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. Catheter angiography ...

  8. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... Angiography is performed using: x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, ... a tumor; this is called superselective angiography. Unlike computed tomography (CT) or magnetic resonance (MR) angiography , use of ...

  9. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... it will make the rest of the procedure pain-free. You will not feel the catheter in ... nurse if you notice any bleeding, swelling or pain at the site where the catheter entered the ...

  10. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... should inform the nurse if you notice any bleeding, swelling or pain at the site where the ... Rarely, the catheter punctures the artery, causing internal bleeding. It also is possible that the catheter tip ...

  11. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or other procedures such as chemoembolization or selective internal radiation therapy. identify dissection or splitting in the ... days. Rarely, the catheter punctures the artery, causing internal bleeding. It also is possible that the catheter ...

  12. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. Catheter angiography produces very ... of a catheter makes it possible to combine diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. An example is finding ...

  13. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician Resources Professions Site Index A-Z Catheter Angiography Catheter angiography ...

  14. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... imaging technologies and, in most cases, a contrast material injection is needed to produce pictures of blood vessels in the body. Angiography is performed using: x-rays with catheters computed tomography (CT) magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) In catheter angiography, a thin ...

  15. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... injected through the catheter and reaches the blood vessels being studied, several sets of x-rays are taken. Then the catheter is removed and the incision site is closed by applying pressure on the area for approximately 10 to 20 ...

  16. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... is injected through the catheter and reaches the blood vessels being studied, several sets of x-rays are taken. Then the catheter is removed and the incision site is closed by applying pressure on the area for approximately 10 to 20 ...

  17. Urinary catheter - infants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bladder catheter - infants; Foley catheter - infants; Urinary catheter - neonatal ... A urinary catheter is a small, soft tube placed in the bladder. This article addresses urinary catheters in babies. WHY IS ...

  18. Accidental Breakage of Lumbar Epidural Catheter - Case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Breakage of epidural catheter is a rare occurrence with only isolated reports. Though insertion of epidural catheter is generally considered a safe procedure, breakage during removal leaving a segment in the patient's back can occur. There are many factors associated with breakage of an epidural catheter, such as the ...

  19. Robotic positioning of standard electrophysiology catheters: a novel approach to catheter robotics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knight, Bradley; Ayers, Gregory M; Cohen, Todd J

    2008-05-01

    Robotic systems have been developed to manipulate and position electrophysiology (EP) catheters remotely. One limitation of existing systems is their requirement for specialized catheters or sheaths. We evaluated a system (Catheter Robotics Remote Catheter Manipulation System [RCMS], Catheter Robotics, Inc., Budd Lake, New Jersey) that manipulates conventional EP catheters placed through standard introducer sheaths. The remote controller functions much like the EP catheter handle, and the system permits repeated catheter disengagement for manual manipulation without requiring removal of the catheter from the body. This study tested the hypothesis that the RCMS would be able to safely and effectively position catheters at various intracardiac sites and obtain thresholds and electrograms similar to those obtained with manual catheter manipulation. Two identical 7 Fr catheters (Blazer II; Boston Scientific Corp., Natick, Massachusetts) were inserted into the right femoral veins of 6 mongrel dogs through separate, standard 7 Fr sheaths. The first catheter was manually placed at a right ventricular endocardial site. The second catheter handle was placed in the mating holder of the RCMS and moved to approximately the same site as the first catheter using the Catheter Robotics RCMS. The pacing threshold was determined for each catheter. This sequence was performed at 2 right atrial and 2 right ventricular sites. The distance between the manually and robotically placed catheters tips was measured, and pacing thresholds and His-bundle recordings were compared. The heart was inspected at necropsy for signs of cardiac perforation or injury. Compared to manual positioning, remote catheter placement produced the same pacing threshold at 7/24 sites, a lower threshold at 11/24 sites, and a higher threshold at only 6/24 sites (p > 0.05). The average distance between catheter tips was 0.46 +/- 0.32 cm (median 0.32, range 0.13-1.16 cm). There was no difference between right atrial

  20. Persistent left superior vena cava with thrombus formed in the catheter lumen 4 h after dialysis catheter placed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawasaki, Tomoki; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Oba, Miki; Takada, Megumi; Tanaka, Haruna; Suda, Shin

    2018-02-17

    Persistent left superior vena cava (PLSVC) is one of the most common thoracic venous anomaly and rarely noticed, because it is asymptomatic. However, for nephrologists, it is frequent enough to be encountered while placing hemodialysis catheters through the jugular vein. We report the case of 66-year-old patient with PLSVC presenting intrinsic thrombosis formation 4 h after dialysis catheter placed. Dialysis catheter was placed in the left internal jugular vein without resistance and any complication. PLSVC was detected after dialysis catheter insertion. We decided to remove the catheter, because the patient has other veins in which the catheter can be placed. When it was removed 4 h after catheter placing, thrombus was recognized in the catheter lumen. Transesophageal echocardiography was performed and no thrombus formation was observed in the heart chamber. For patients with PLSVC, if there were other veins in which the catheter can be placed, catheter replacement should be considered.

  1. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... machine produces a small burst of radiation that passes through the body, recording an image on photographic ... By selecting the arteries through which the catheter passes, it is possible to assess vessels in several ...

  2. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... spaghetti. top of page How does the procedure work? Catheter angiography works much the same as a ... and x-rays. Manufacturers of intravenous contrast indicate mothers should not breastfeed their babies for 24-48 ...

  3. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... examine blood vessels in key areas of the body for abnormalities such as aneurysms and disease such ... to produce pictures of blood vessels in the body. Angiography is performed using: x-rays with catheters ...

  4. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... story about radiology? Share your patient story here Images × Image Gallery Interventional radiologist performing an angiography exam View ... ray, Interventional Radiology and Nuclear Medicine Radiation Safety Images related to Catheter Angiography Sponsored by Please note ...

  5. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... dose of ionizing radiation ( x-rays ). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Catheter ... live more than an hour away. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically ...

  6. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the body absorb the x-rays in varying degrees. Dense bone absorbs much of the radiation while ... by angioplasty and placement of a stent . The degree of detail displayed by catheter angiography may not ...

  7. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... rays ). top of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Catheter angiography is used to ... Society of Urogenital Radiology note that the available data suggest that it is safe to continue breastfeeding ...

  8. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... will make the rest of the procedure pain-free. You will not feel the catheter in your ... of North America, Inc. (RSNA). To help ensure current and accurate information, we do not permit copying ...

  9. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... spaghetti. top of page How does the procedure work? Catheter angiography works much the same as a ... material injection, you should immediately inform the technologist. Women should always inform their physician or x-ray ...

  10. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... such as aneurysms and disease such as atherosclerosis (plaque). The use of a catheter makes it possible ... and abdomen, or in other arteries. detect atherosclerotic (plaque) disease in the carotid artery of the neck, ...

  11. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... you are pregnant and discuss any recent illnesses, medical conditions, medications you're taking and allergies, especially ... is Catheter Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical ...

  12. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... diagnosis and treatment in a single procedure. An example is finding an area of severe arterial narrowing, ... contrast material, your radiologist may advise that you take special medication for 24 hours before catheter angiography ...

  13. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... disease). evaluate obstructions of vessels. top of page How should I prepare? You should inform your physician ... as a strand of spaghetti. top of page How does the procedure work? Catheter angiography works much ...

  14. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... of page What are some common uses of the procedure? Catheter angiography is used to examine blood ... an hour away. top of page What does the equipment look like? The equipment typically used for ...

  15. Central venous catheters: the role of radiology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, P.L.; Gibson, M.

    2006-01-01

    The insertion and management of long-term venous catheters have long been the province of anaesthetists, intensive care physicians and surgeons. Radiologists are taking an increasing role in the insertion of central venous catheters (CVCs) because of their familiarity with the imaging equipment and their ability to manipulate catheters and guide-wires. The radiological management of the complications of CVCs has also expanded as a result. This article reviews the role of radiology in central venous access, covering the detection and management of their complications

  16. Malposition of catheters during voiding cystourethrography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rathaus, V.; Konen, O.; Shapiro, M. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging Sapir Medical Center, Kfar-Saba and Sackler Medical School, Tel Aviv University (Israel); Grunebaum, M. [Veteran Pediatric Radiologist, Kfar Saba (Israel)

    2001-04-01

    The aim of this study was to report catheter malposition during voiding cystourethrography. Eight hundred forty-three voiding cystourethrography (265 males and 578 females, aged 1 week to 12 years, mean age 2 years) were performed during a period of 4 years. The conventional standard procedure was applied. In 3 cases with passed history of urinary tract infection the catheter entered directly into the ureter. In all these cases the uretero-vesical reflux was present on the same side where the catheter entered. It appears that insertion of a catheter into the ureter is possible only in the presence of an anomaly or pathology at the vesicoureteric junction. (orig.)

  17. Fibrin Sheath Angioplasty: A Technique to Prevent Superior Vena Cava Stenosis Secondary to Dialysis Catheters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hacker, Robert I.; Garcia, Lorena De Marco; Chawla, Ankur; Panetta, Thomas F.

    2012-01-01

    Fibrin sheaths are a heterogeneous matrix of cells and debris that form around catheters and are a known cause of central venous stenosis and catheter failure. A total of 50 cases of central venous catheter fibrin sheath angioplasty (FSA) after catheter removal or exchange are presented. A retrospective review of an outpatient office database identified 70 eligible patients over a 19-month period. After informed consent was obtained, the dialysis catheter exiting the skin was clamped, amputated, and a wire was inserted. The catheter was then removed and a 9-French sheath was inserted into the superior vena cava, a venogram was performed. If a fibrin sheath was present, angioplasty was performed using an 8 × 4 or 10 × 4 balloon along the entire length of the fibrin sheath. A completion venogram was performed to document obliteration of the sheath. During the study, 50 patients were diagnosed with a fibrin sheath, and 43 had no pre-existing central venous stenosis. After FSA, 39 of the 43 patient's (91%) central systems remained patent without the need for subsequent interventions; 3 patients (7%) developed subclavian stenoses requiring repeat angioplasty and stenting; 1 patent (2.3%) developed an occlusion requiring a reintervention. Seven patients with prior central stenosis required multiple angioplasties; five required stenting of their central lesions. Every patient had follow-up fistulograms to document long-term patency. We propose that FSA is a prudent and safe procedure that may help reduce the risk of central venous stenosis from fibrin sheaths due to central venous catheters. PMID:23997555

  18. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... or other procedures such as chemoembolization or selective internal radiation therapy. identify dissection or splitting in the aorta in the chest or abdomen or its major branches. show the extent and severity of ... the artery, causing internal bleeding. It also is possible that the catheter ...

  19. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available Toggle navigation Test/Treatment Patient Type Screening/Wellness Disease/Condition Safety En Español More Info Images/Videos About Us News Physician ... Catheter Angiography? Angiography is a minimally invasive medical test that helps physicians diagnose and treat medical conditions. ...

  20. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... the equipment look like? How does the procedure work? How is the procedure performed? What will I experience during and after the procedure? Who interprets the results and how do I get them? What are the benefits vs. risks? What are the limitations of Catheter Angiography? What ...

  1. Catheter Angiography

    Medline Plus

    Full Text Available ... spaghetti. top of page How does the procedure work? Catheter angiography works much the same as a regular x-ray ... any possibility that they are pregnant. See the Safety page for more information about pregnancy and x- ...

  2. Central venous catheter placement in coagulopathic patients: risk factors and incidence of bleeding complications

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Weerdt, Emma K.; Biemond, Bart J.; Baake, Bart; Vermin, Ben; Binnekade, Jan M.; van Lienden, Krijn P.; Vlaar, Alexander P. J.

    2017-01-01

    Central venous catheters are frequently inserted into patients with coagulation disorders. It is unclear whether preprocedural correction of hemostasis is beneficial. We determined the incidence of bleeding complications after central venous catheter placement in patients who had severe coagulopathy

  3. Patency of Femoral Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters and Factors Predictive of Patency Failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Burton, Kirsteen R.; Guo, Lancia L. Q.; Tan, Kong T.; Simons, Martin E.; Sniderman, Kenneth W.; Kachura, John R.; Beecroft, John R.; Rajan, Dheeraj K.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the patency rates of and factors associated with increased risk of patency failure in patients with femoral vein tunneled hemodialysis catheters. Methods: All femoral tunneled catheter insertions from 1996 to 2006 were reviewed, during which time 123 catheters were inserted. Of these, 66 were exchanges. Patients with femoral catheter failure versus those with femoral catheter patency were compared. Confounding factors, such as demographic and procedural factors, were incorporated and assessed using univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses. Results: Mean catheter primary patency failure time was 96.3 days (SE 17.9 days). Primary patency at 30, 60, 90, and 180 days was 53.8%, 45.4%, 32.1%, and 27.1% respectively. Crude rates of risk of catheter failure did not suggest a benefit for patients receiving catheters introduced from one side versus the other, but more cephalad location of catheter tip was associated with improved patency. Multivariate analysis showed that patients whose catheters were on the left side (p = 0.009), were of increasing age at the time of insertion (p = 0.002) and that those who had diabetes (p = 0.001) were at significantly greater risk of catheter failure. The catheter infection rate was 1.4/1000 catheter days. Conclusion: Patients who were of a more advanced age and had diabetes were at greater risk of femoral catheter failure, whereas those who received femoral catheters from the right side were less at risk of catheter failure.

  4. Utilização de cateter central de inserção periférica e ocorrência da infecção da corrente sanguínea em uma Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal | Use of peripherally inserted central catheters and occurrence of bloodstream infections in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Márcia Yumi Yonekura

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objetivo: Analisar a prevalência de infecção hospitalar primária da corrente sanguínea em uma Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal. Métodos: Estudo retrospectivo, com análise de prontuários de uma Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal, no período de janeiro a dezembro de 2010. Foi calculada a densidade de incidência de infecção de corrente sanguínea associada ao cateter por 1000 cateteres-dia. Resultados: Dos 192 recém-nascidos, 16 (8,3% apresentaram infecção da corrente sanguínea e todos estes utilizaram o cateter central de inserção periférica. A densidade de infecção confirmada por hemocultura foi de 5,9 e a baseada em critérios clínicos foi de 3,5 por 1000 pacientes com cateter vascular central-dia. A distribuição por faixa de peso foi de: 30,9 (750-999g; 11 (1000-1499g; 8,5 (1500-2499g e 6,8 (> 2500g por 1000 pacientes com cateter vascular dia. A média do tempo de uso do cateter foi de 11 dias. O sítio de inserção mais comum foi o acesso jugular (37,5% e a mortalidade associada à infecção da corrente sanguínea foi de 31%. Conclusões: A utilização do cateter central de inserção periférica é uma prática não isenta de riscos, considerando que este é um dispositivo invasivo e pode predispor à ocorrência de infecção. ------------------------------------------------------------------------------------------ Objective: To analyze the prevalence of hospital primary bloodstream infections in a neonatal intensive care unit (NICU. Methods: A retrospective study involving analyses of records of patients admitted to the NICU from January to December 2010 was conducted. The incidence density of catheter-associated bloodstream infections per 1000 catheter-days was calculated. Results: Among 192 newborns, 16 (8.3% who used peripherally inserted central catheters had bloodstream infections. The infection density confirmed by blood culture reached 5.9, while the density based on clinical criteria accounted for

  5. Causes and nursing countermeasures in pediatric PICC catheter complications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Mingli; Li, Na; Yi, Lan; Liu, Bin

    2016-01-01

    To analyze the complications and nursing countermeasures of PICC (Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter) catheters using children PICC catheter technique 40 cases, complications were observed, and analyze the original causes, in order to propose a solution. There were 10 cases of catheter blockage, 5 cases of catheter infection, 6 cases of phlebitis, 5 cases of puncture difficulties, 2 cases of poor feeding tube, 2 cases of bleeding puncture site with the continuous exploration and research of nursing intervention, the production of clinical complications from PICC has been used in children were greatly reduced.

  6. Indwelling catheter care

    Science.gov (United States)

    Foley catheter ... You will need to make sure your indwelling catheter is working properly. You will also need to ... not get an infection or skin irritation. Make catheter and skin care part of your daily routine. ...

  7. Standardizing umbilical catheter usage in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahid, Shaneela; Dutta, Sourabh; Symington, Amanda; Shivananda, Sandesh

    2014-06-01

    Absence of guidelines on umbilical arterial catheter (UAC) and umbilical venous catheter (UVC) use and inability to predict the hospital course may sway the frontline staff to overuse umbilical catheters in preterm infants. Our objective was to evaluate the feasibility of implementing guidelines standardizing the use of umbilical catheters and its impact on the incidence of sepsis and resource use. All inborn infants delivered at <33 weeks' gestation and admitted to the NICU were included in this quality improvement study. The primary outcome was proportion of infants receiving umbilical catheters. Secondary outcomes were central venous catheter (CVC) use and central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI). The proportion of infants receiving UACs and UVCs was significantly lower in postintervention (sustainment) phase than in the preintervention phase (93 [42.3%] vs 52 [23.6%], P = .0001) and (137 [62.6%] vs 93 [42.3%], P = .0001), respectively. There was no corresponding increase in the proportion of infants receiving peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) or surgical CVCs (SCVCs) during the sustainment phase. There was a significant reduction in the proportion of infants receiving CVCs (UVC, PICC, and SCVC) in the sustainment phase. The incidence of CLABSI was similar in the preintervention and sustainment phases. Implementation of guidelines standardizing the use of umbilical catheters in the NICU is feasible. Fewer infants were exposed to the risk of UVC or UAC, and fewer resources were used. Copyright © 2014 by the American Academy of Pediatrics.

  8. Successful Treatment of A Catheter-Induced Superior Vena Cava Syndrome through Catheter-Directed Thrombolysis: A Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Reza Ghanavati; Ali Amiri; Nafiseh Ansarinejad; Shokoufeh Hajsadeghi; Hasan Riahi Beni; Seyyed Hashem Sezavar

    2018-01-01

    Superior vena cava (SVC) syndrome is a medical condition resulting from the obstruction of the blood flow through the large central veins. Recently, central venous catheters have been reported as the increasingly common cause of this syndrome. We describe a 56-year-old woman with previous history of metastatic colon cancer, who had recently undergone central venous catheter insertion for her second chemotherapy course. Eight days following port insertion, she presented with signs and symptoms...

  9. Intravascular catheter-related bloodstream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Harshal; Bosch, Wendelyn; Thompson, Kristine M; Hellinger, Walter C

    2013-07-01

    Intravascular catheters required for the care of many hospitalized patients can give rise to bloodstream infection, a complication of care that has occurred most frequently in intensive care unit (ICU) settings. Elucidation of the pathogenesis of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) has guided development of effective diagnostic, management, and prevention strategies. When CRBSIs occur in the ICU, physicians must be prepared to recognize and treat them. Prevention of these infections requires careful attention to optimal catheter selection, insertion and maintenance, and to removal of catheters when they are no longer needed. This review provides a succinct summary of the epidemiology, pathogenesis, and microbiology of CRBSIs and a review of current guidance for the diagnosis, management, and prevention of these infections.

  10. Ultraminiature manometer-tipped cardiac catheter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coon, G. W.

    1967-01-01

    Miniature diaphragm-type capacitance transducer capable of being mounted on the end of a cardiac catheter has been developed for measurement of intravascular pressures. The transducer can be inserted in small ducts /arteries and veins/ without disturbing the flow characteristics. It is very useful for making measurements in babies.

  11. Evaluation of the safety of latrogenic lntestinal perforation during placement of percutaneous drainage catheter in rabbit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Choon Hyeong; Oh, Joo Hyung; Park, Ga Young; Shin, Hong Sub; Kim, In Sub; Yoon, Yup; Lee, Dong Ho; Ko, Young Tae; Choi, Woo Suk; Lim, Joo Won

    1996-01-01

    To evaluate the safety of transgression of the bowel during intraperitoneal percutaneous catheter placement in an animal model. Eight 8-F straight catheters were percutaneously inserted into the small and large bowel of eight rabbits. In four animals, the catheters were left in place until autopsy, whereas in the remaining four, the catheters were withdrawn five days after insertion. Autopsy was performed in all animals ten days after catheter placement, and gross and microscopic examination was carried out. Transgressing the bowel during intraperitoneal percutaneous catheter placement did not contribute to any clinically significant complications. At autopsy, there was no bowel leakage, peritonitis, or abscess, although peritoneal adhesions were found around the catheter tract. Although further study is warranted, our study with an animal model indicated that transgression of the intestine during percutaneous placement of an intraabdominal catheter did not produce significant complications

  12. Evaluation of the safety of latrogenic lntestinal perforation during placement of percutaneous drainage catheter in rabbit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Choon Hyeong; Oh, Joo Hyung; Park, Ga Young; Shin, Hong Sub; Kim, In Sub; Yoon, Yup; Lee, Dong Ho; Ko, Young Tae; Choi, Woo Suk; Lim, Joo Won [Kyunghee Univ. Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1996-10-01

    To evaluate the safety of transgression of the bowel during intraperitoneal percutaneous catheter placement in an animal model. Eight 8-F straight catheters were percutaneously inserted into the small and large bowel of eight rabbits. In four animals, the catheters were left in place until autopsy, whereas in the remaining four, the catheters were withdrawn five days after insertion. Autopsy was performed in all animals ten days after catheter placement, and gross and microscopic examination was carried out. Transgressing the bowel during intraperitoneal percutaneous catheter placement did not contribute to any clinically significant complications. At autopsy, there was no bowel leakage, peritonitis, or abscess, although peritoneal adhesions were found around the catheter tract. Although further study is warranted, our study with an animal model indicated that transgression of the intestine during percutaneous placement of an intraabdominal catheter did not produce significant complications.

  13. The Use of the Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (Picc in the Hospital Environment La utilización del catéter central de inserción periférica (CCIP en el ambiente hospitalario A utilização do cateter central de inserção periférica (CCIP no ambiente hospitalar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Graziella Gasparotto Baiocco

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available The study aimed to analyze the history of the use of the peripherally inserted central catheters in adult patients admitted to hospital from 2000 to 2007. The historical cohort approach was used with retrospective data collection from medical records of the Catheter Group of the Moinhos de Vento Hospital Association in Porto Alegre, RS, totaling 229 catheters inserted. The growth curve in the use of the PICC was from 1 catheter inserted in 2000 to 57 in 2007. The most prevalent pathology was oncology (17.9%, n=41. In relation to the indications of use, antibiotic use prevailed (54.1%, n=124. In the radiological confirmation the vena cava was prevalent (68.1%, n=156. The use of the PICC in the hospital environment is expanding and nursing has a fundamental role in its insertion, maintenance and removal.El estudio objetivó analizar el histórico de la utilización del catéter central de inserción periférica en pacientes adultos e internados en ambiente hospitalario de 2000 a 2007. Tuvo abordaje de cohorte histórico con recolección de datos retrospectivo en fichas del Grupo de Catéteres de la Asociación Hospitalaria Molinos de Viento en Porto Alegre, RS, totalizando 229 catéteres inseridos. La curva de crecimiento en la utilización del CCIP fue de 1 catéter inserido en 2000 a 57 inseridos en 2007. La prevalencia inherente a la patología fue oncológica (17,9%, n=41. En relación a las indicaciones de uso prevaleció la terapia con antibióticos (54,1%, n=124. En la confirmación radiológica la vena cava fue prevalente (68,1%, n=156. La utilización del CCIP en el ambiente hospitalario está en expansión y la enfermería tiene un papel fundamental en la inserción, manutención y remoción.O estudo objetivou analisar o histórico da utilização do cateter central de inserção periférica em pacientes adultos e internados, em ambiente hospitalar, de 2000 a 2007. Teve abordagem de coorte histórica, com coleta de dados retrospectiva em

  14. Chlorhexidine Gluconate Dressings Reduce Bacterial Colonization Rates in Epidural and Peripheral Regional Catheters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Kerwat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Bacterial colonization of catheter tips is common in regional anesthesia and is a suspected risk factor for infectious complications. This is the first study evaluating the effect of CHG-impregnated dressings on bacterial colonization of regional anesthesia catheters in a routine clinical setting. Methods. In this prospective study, regional anesthesia catheter infection rates were examined in two groups of patients with epidural and peripheral regional catheters. In the first group, regional anesthesia was dressed with a conventional draping. The second group of patients underwent catheter dressing using a CHG-impregnated draping. Removed catheters and the insertion sites were both screened for bacterial colonization. Results. A total of 337 catheters from 308 patients were analysed. There was no significant reduction of local infections in either epidural or peripheral regional anesthesia catheters in both CHG and conventional groups. In the conventional group, 21% of the catheter tips and 41% of the insertion sites showed positive culture results. In the CHG-group, however, only 3% of the catheter tips and 8% of the insertion sites were colonised. Conclusion. CHG dressings significantly reduce bacterial colonization of the tip and the insertion site of epidural and peripheral regional catheters. However, no reductions in rates of local infections were seen.

  15. Outcome of Radiologically Placed Tunneled Haemodialysis Catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sayani, R.; Anwar, M.; Haq, T.U.; Qamari, N.A.; Bilal, M.A.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To study the outcome of radiologically placed double lumen tunneled haemodialysis catheters for the management of renal failure. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Interventional Suite of Radiology Department at the Aga Khan University Hospital, Karachi, from April 2010 to June 2011. Methodology: All consecutive patients who were referred to the department of radiology by the nephrologists for double lumen tunneled haemodialysis catheter (Permacath) placement during the study period were included. Patients with septicemia, those for whom follow-up was not available, those coming for catheter exchange or who died due to a noncatheter related condition were excluded. A radio-opaque, soft silicone double lumen catheter was inserted through a subcutaneous tunnel created over the anterior chest wall. The catheter tip was placed in the right atrium via the internal jugular vein. Ultrasound guidance was used for initial venous puncture. The rest of the procedure was carried out under fluoroscopic guidance. Technical success, catheter related bacteremia rates, adequacy of dialysis, patency, and adverse events were analyzed. Results: Overall 88 tunneled haemodialysis catheters were placed in 87 patients. Patients were followed-up for duration of 1 - 307 days with mean follow-up period of 4 months. Immediate technical success was 100%. The procedural complication rate was 5.6% (5 catheters). Eight patients died during the study period, seven from causes unrelated to the procedure. One patient died due to septicemia secondary to catheter related infection. Of the remaining 69 patients, 50 (72.4%) predominantly had uneventful course during the study period. Twelve patients developed infection (17.3%); two were successfully treated conservatively while in 10 patients catheter had to be removed. Seven catheters (10.1%) failed due to mechanical problems. In 3 patients the internal jugular veins got partially thrombosed. One catheter was

  16. Central venous catheters and catheter locks in children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handrup, Mette Møller; Møller, Jens Kjølseth; Schrøder, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    To determine if the catheter lock taurolidine can reduce the number of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in pediatric cancer patients with tunneled central venous catheters (CVC).......To determine if the catheter lock taurolidine can reduce the number of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in pediatric cancer patients with tunneled central venous catheters (CVC)....

  17. Double guiding catheters for complex percutaneous coronary intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chou, Shing-Hsien; Lin, Chia-Pin; Lin, Yen-Chen; Kuo, Chi-Tai; Lin, Ming-Shyan; Chang, Chi-Jen

    2012-01-01

    A large-lumen guiding catheter is often used for complex percutaneous coronary intervention-particularly when a final kissing-balloon or 2-stent technique is required. However, catheter insertion is sometimes restricted by diseased vascular access sites or a tortuous vascular route.We report 2 cases in which a unique double guiding catheter technique was used to create a lumen of sufficient size for complex percutaneous coronary intervention. In each patient, two 6F guiding catheters were used concurrently to engage the ostium of 1 target vessel. In 1 patient, these catheters were used for the delivery of 2 balloons to complete kissing-balloon dilation after single-stent placement. In the other patient, the catheters were used to deliver 2 stents sequentially to their respective target lesions. The stents were then deployed simultaneously as kissing stents, followed by high-pressure kissing-balloon postdilation.

  18. Experimental insertions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sandweiss, J.; Kycia, T.F.

    1975-01-01

    A discussion is given of the eight identical experimental insertions for the planned ISABELLE storage rings. Four sets of quadrupole doublets are used to match the β functions in the insertions to the values in the cells, and the total free space available at the crossing point is 40 meters. An asymmetric beam energy operation is planned, which will be useful in a number of experiments

  19. Incidence of catheter-related complications in patients with central venous or hemodialysis catheters: a health care claims database analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Napalkov, Pavel; Felici, Diana M; Chu, Laura K; Jacobs, Joan R; Begelman, Susan M

    2013-10-16

    Central venous catheter (CVC) and hemodialysis (HD) catheter usage are associated with complications that occur during catheter insertion, dwell period, and removal. This study aims to identify and describe the incidence rates of catheter-related complications in a large patient population in a United States-based health care claims database after CVC or HD catheter placement. Patients in the i3 InVision DataMart® health care claims database with at least 1 CVC or HD catheter insertion claim were categorized into CVC or HD cohorts using diagnostic and procedural codes from the US Renal Data System, American College of Surgeons, and American Medical Association's Physician Performance Measures. Catheter-related complications were identified using published diagnostic and procedural codes. Incidence rates (IRs)/1000 catheter-days were calculated for complications including catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs), thrombosis, embolism, intracranial hemorrhage (ICH), major bleeding (MB), and mechanical catheter-related complications (MCRCs). Thirty percent of the CVC cohort and 54% of the HD cohort had catheter placements lasting <90 days. Catheter-related complications occurred most often during the first 90 days of catheter placement. IRs were highest for CRBSIs in both cohorts (4.0 [95% CI, 3.7-4.3] and 5.1 [95% CI, 4.7-5.6], respectively). Other IRs in CVC and HD cohorts, respectively, were thrombosis, 1.3 and 0.8; MCRCs, 0.6 and 0.7; embolism, 0.4 and 0.5; MB, 0.1 and 0.3; and ICH, 0.1 in both cohorts. Patients with cancer at baseline had significantly higher IRs for CRBSIs and thrombosis than non-cancer patients. CVC or HD catheter-related complications were most frequently seen in patients 16 years or younger. The risk of catheter-related complications is highest during the first 90 days of catheter placement in patients with CVCs and HD catheters and in younger patients (≤16 years of age) with HD catheters. Data provided in this study can be applied

  20. Effect of chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine-impregnated central venous catheters in an intensive care unit with a low blood stream infection rate after implementation of an educational program: a before-after trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuerer, Douglas J E; Zack, Jeanne E; Thomas, James; Borecki, Ingrid B; Sona, Carrie S; Schallom, Marilyn E; Venker, Melissa; Nemeth, Jennifer L; Ward, Myrna R; Verjan, Linda; Warren, David K; Fraser, Victoria J; Mazuski, John E; Boyle, Walter A; Buchman, Timothy G; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2007-08-01

    Current guidelines recommend using antiseptic- or antibiotic-impregnated central venous catheters (CVCs) if, following a comprehensive strategy to prevent catheter-related blood stream infection (CR-BSI), infection rates remain above institutional goals based on benchmark values. The purpose of this study was to determine if chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine-impregnated CVCs could decrease the CR-BSI rate in an intensive care unit (ICU) with a low baseline infection rate. Pre-intervention and post-intervention observational study in a 24-bed surgical/trauma/burn ICU from October, 2002 to August, 2005. All patients requiring CVC placement after March, 2004 had a chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine-impregnated catheter inserted (post-intervention period). Twenty-three CR-BSIs occurred in 6,960 catheter days (3.3 per 1,000 catheter days)during the 17-month control period. After introduction of chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine-impregnated catheters, 16 CR-BSIs occurred in 7,732 catheter days (2.1 per 1,000 catheter days; p = 0.16). The average length of time required for an infection to become established after catheterization was similar in the two groups (8.4 vs. 8.6 days; p = 0.85). Chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine-impregnated catheters did not result in a statistically significant change in the microbiological profile of CR-BSIs, nor did they increase the incidence of resistant organisms. Although chlorhexidine/silver sulfadiazine-impregnated catheters are useful in specific patient populations, they did not result in a statistically significant decrease in the CR-BSI rate in this study, beyond what was achieved with education alone.

  1. Using an indwelling catheter for the domiciliary management of malignant effusions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramkumar P

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Many patients with malignant pleural effusions and ascites require repeated hospital visits for paracentesis. Materials and Methods: Patients and caregivers were taught to drain malignant effusions at home, using an indwelling catheter inserted into the pleural/ peritoneal cavity. The catheter, (ARROW 14 wire gauge with three additional side holes made to prevent blockage was inserted using the Seldenger technique for central venous cannulation and secured with a stitch. A three way stopcock was used to regulate fluid drainage. The caregiver was taught to do biweekly dressings with antiseptic ointment. Results: The catheter has been used in 200 patients over a period of five years. Two patients developed infections in the pleural cavity, which were managed with antibiotics. Two patients needed catheter change because of blockage. Other patients retained the catheter till last follow up or death. The procedure can be carried out as a day case. This article describes practical guidelines for inserting and maintaining the catheter.

  2. Central Venous Catheter-Associated Deep Venous Thrombosis in Critically Ill Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faustino, Edward Vincent S

    2018-02-01

    The presence of a central venous catheter and admission to the intensive care unit are the most important risk factors for deep venous thrombosis (DVT) in children. At least 18% of critically ill children with a catheter develop radiologically confirmed catheter-associated thrombosis. Clinically apparent thrombosis occurs in 3% of critically ill children with a catheter and is associated with 8 additional days of mechanical ventilation. Even when the thrombus is initially asymptomatic, 8 to 18% of critically ill children with catheter-associated thrombosis develop postthrombotic syndrome. Thrombosis is uncommon within 24 hours after insertion of a nontunneled catheter in critically ill children, but nearly all thrombi have developed by 4 days after insertion. Hypercoagulability during or immediately after insertion of the catheter plays an essential role in the development of thrombosis. Pharmacologic prophylaxis, including local anticoagulation with heparin-bonded catheter, has not been shown to reduce the risk of catheter-related thrombosis in children. Systemic anticoagulation in critically ill children started soon after the insertion of the catheter, however, may be beneficial. A multicenter clinical trial that is testing this hypothesis is currently underway. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  3. Increased risk of cervical canal infections with intracervical Foley catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siddiqui, Salva; Zuberi, Nadeem Faiyaz; Zafar, Afia; Qureshi, Rahat Najam

    2003-03-01

    To evaluate the effect of intracervical Foley catheter insertion, for the induction of labor, on cervical canal infection. A prospective interventional study with paired analysis. The study was conducted in the department of Obstetrics and Gynecology at the Aga Khan University, Karachi, between June 1 and August 31, 2002. SUBJECTS AND METHODS In 45 women undergoing cervical ripening with intracervical Foley catheter for the induction of labour at term, cervical swabs were taken for culture and sensitivity before its insertion and again after its spontaneous expulsion or removal. Intracervical Foley catheter was retained for mean duration of 8.1 +/- 1.7 hours. There was a significant change in the pathogenic organisms (0 % v 16.3 %; p 0.016) from pre-Foley to post-Foley catheter cervical swab cultures. Growth of beta-hemolytic Streptococcus group-B, Candida albicans, Candida glabrata and Gardnerella vaginalis on cervical swab were considered pathogenic. One woman (2.2 %) developed fever following insertion of intracervical Foley catheter. No statistically significant effect of potential confounding factors was observed on change in growth of pathogenic organisms. Induction of labour at term with Foley catheter is associated with a significant increase in intracervical pathogenic organisms despite undertaking routine aseptic measures. We recommend evaluation of this technique for its potential infectious harm in larger studies. Meanwhile, extreme aseptic measures should be undertaken during its insertion to avoid maternal and possible neonatal infections.

  4. Catheter-related bloodstream infections in neonatal intensive care units

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jung Hyun Lee

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Central venous catheters (CVCs are regularly used in intensive care units, and catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI remains a leading cause of healthcare-associated infections, particularly in preterm infants. Increased survival rate of extremely-low-birth-weight infants can be partly attributed to routine practice of CVC placement. The most common types of CVCs used in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs include umbilical venous catheters, peripherally inserted central catheters, and tunneled catheters. CRBSI is defined as a laboratory-confirmed bloodstream infection (BSI with either a positive catheter tip culture or a positive blood culture drawn from the CVC. BSIs most frequently result from pathogens such as gram-positive cocci, coagulase-negative staphylococci , and sometimes gram-negative organisms. CRBSIs are usually associated with several risk factors, including prolonged catheter placement, femoral access, low birth weight, and young gestational age. Most NICUs have a strategy for catheter insertion and maintenance designed to decrease CRBSIs. Specific interventions slightly differ between NICUs, particularly with regard to the types of disinfectants used for hand hygiene and appropriate skin care for the infant. In conclusion, infection rates can be reduced by the application of strict protocols for the placement and maintenance of CVCs and the education of NICU physicians and nurses.

  5. Analog experiment of transarterial catheter hyperthermic infusion in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan Shufeng Li Zheng; Gu Weizhong; Ru Fuming

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the factors related to the heating effect by transarterial catheter hyperthermic infusion with the evaluation of the feasibility in controlling the tumor temperature. Methods: Infusing 55-68 degree C liquid at the speed of 10-40 ml/min through 6F, 5F or 3F catheter with different length respectively under the similar clinical condition. The liquid temperature at the terminal exit of the catheter was measured with a digital thermometer. The factors related to the liquid temperature at the exit of the catheter were analyzed by multiple regression analysis. Results: The infusion temperature , rate and the catheter length were the main related factors to the liquid temperature at the exit of the catheter as the condition similar in clinical use. When 60-65 degree C liquid was infused at the rate of 20-40 ml/min through 5F catheter with length of 80 cm, the mean and 95% confident interval of the liquid temperature at the catheter exit were (47.55±0.44) degree C and 44.61-48.49 degree C respectively. Conclusions: The liquid temperature at the exit of infusion catheter can be regulated and controlled through adjusting the liquid perfusion temperature and speed. (authors)

  6. A prototype catheter designed for ultraviolet C disinfection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Jimmy; Begovic, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    UVC light exposure, sampling and plate counting. Findings Two minutes of UVC exposure was sufficient to obtain 4 log10 disinfection for the full-length prototype catheter. This exposure corresponds to ∼40 mJ/cm2 at the catheter tip and indicates that even shorter exposure times can be achieved...

  7. Transradial Approach of Alcohol Septal Ablation Using a Sheathless Guiding Catheter: A Feasibility Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isawa, Tsuyoshi; Tada, Norio; Ootomo, Tatsushi; Sakurai, Mie; Takizawa, Kaname; Inoue, Naoto

    2015-11-01

    We aimed to investigate the feasibility and safety of alcohol septal ablation (ASA) via transradial approach using a sheathless guiding catheter. Although ASA is conventionally performed via the femoral artery, there is a potential risk of bleeding and other vascular complications. The transradial approach may be associated with a lower rate of such complications. A sheathless guiding catheter, with an advanced hydrophilic coating along its full length, could reduce radial artery occlusion and spasm. We enrolled 14 consecutive patients with hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy treated with ASA via the radial access at Sendai Kousei Hospital from December 2012 to May 2014. Left radial access was used for the sheathless guiding catheter, while right radial access was used for monitoring left ventricular pressure with a 4 Fr diagnostic catheter. A temporary pacemaker was inserted via the right jugular vein. Procedural success rate was 93% (13/14 patients). The left ventricular outflow tract pressure gradient at rest was reduced from a median of 128 mm Hg (interquartile range, 49-147 mm Hg) at baseline to a median of 16 mm Hg (interquartile range, 13-26 mm Hg) at 30-day follow-up (P=.01). The New York Heart Association functional class improved from a median of II (II-III) at baseline to a median of I (I-I) at 30-day follow-up (P=.01). There were no cases of access-site complication, including radial artery occlusion and spasm. The transradial approach using a sheathless guiding catheter was feasible and safe for ASA.

  8. Persistent left superior vena cava leads to catheter malposition during PICC Port placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Konstantinou, Evangelos A; Mariolis Sapsakos, Theodoros D; Katsoulas, Theodoros A; Velecheris, Dimitrios; Tsitsimelis, Dimitrios; Bonatsos, Gerasimos

    2016-03-09

    We present a case of peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) port placement where the catheter had been malpositioned to the persistent left superior vena cava. Despite the obvious elevation of the P-wave signaling proximity of the catheter tip to the sinus node, the catheter was not in the desired location within the superior vena cava or the right atrium, because of the presence of a persistent left superior vena cava. Computed tomography was used in order to locate the catheter. The catheter was located in the persistent left superior vena cava. Malpositioning of the catheter in the persistent left superior vena cava occurs in 0.3%-0.5% of patients. The catheter was subsequently removed.

  9. Stabilization of a percutaneously implanted port catheter system for hepatic artery chemotherapy infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shindoh, Noboru; Ozaki, Yutaka; Kyogoku, Shinsuke; Yamana, Daigo; Sumi, Yukiharu; Katayama, Hitoshi

    1999-01-01

    A port catheter system for hepatic artery infusion chemotherapy was implanted percutaneously via the left subclavian artery in 41 patients for treatment of unresectable liver metastases. The catheter tip was inserted into the gastroduodenal artery (GDA), the end hole was occluded with a guidewire fragment, and a side-hole for infusion was positioned at the bifurcation of the proper hepatic artery and the GDA. The GDA was embolized with steel coils around the infusion catheter tip via a transfemoral catheter. This procedure is designed to reduce the incidence of hepatic artery occlusion and infusion catheter dislocation.

  10. Facility target insert shielding assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mocko, Michal [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-10-06

    Main objective of this report is to assess the basic shielding requirements for the vertical target insert and retrieval port. We used the baseline design for the vertical target insert in our calculations. The insert sits in the 12”-diameter cylindrical shaft extending from the service alley in the top floor of the facility all the way down to the target location. The target retrieval mechanism is a long rod with the target assembly attached and running the entire length of the vertical shaft. The insert also houses the helium cooling supply and return lines each with 2” diameter. In the present study we focused on calculating the neutron and photon dose rate fields on top of the target insert/retrieval mechanism in the service alley. Additionally, we studied a few prototypical configurations of the shielding layers in the vertical insert as well as on the top.

  11. A Pilot Study of Catheter-Based Ultrasound Hyperthermia with HDR Brachytherapy for Treatment of Locally Advanced Cancer of the Prostate and Cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Diederich, Chris J.; Wootton, Jeff; Scott, Serena; Pouliot, Jean; Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant; Juang Titania; Chen Xin; Cunha, Adam; Hsu, I. C.

    2011-01-01

    Interstitial and endocavity ultrasound devices have been developed specifically for applying hyperthermia within temporary HDR brachytherapy implants during radiation therapy. Catheter-based ultrasound applicators are capable of 3D spatial control of heating in both angle and length of the devices, with enhanced radial penetration of heating compared to other hyperthermia technologies. A pilot study of the combination of catheter based ultrasound with HDR brachytherapy for locally advanced prostate and cervical cancer has been initiated, and preliminary results of the performance and heating distributions are reported herein. The treatment delivery platform consists of a 32 channel RF amplifier and a 48 channel thermocouple monitoring system. Controlling software can monitor and regulate frequency and power to each transducer section as required during the procedure. Interstitial applicators consist of multiple transducer sections of 2-4 cm lengthx180 deg and 3-4 cmx360 deg. heating patterns to be inserted in specific placed 13g implant catheters. The endocavity device, designed to be inserted within a 6 mm OD plastic tandem catheter within the cervix, consists of 2-3 transducers x dual 180 or 360 deg sectors. 3D temperature based treatment planning and optimization is dovetailed to the HDR optimization based planning to best configure and position the applicators within the catheters, and to determine optimal base power levels to each transducer section. To date we have treated eight cervix implants and four prostate implants. 100% of treatments achieved a goal of >60 min duration, with therapeutic temperatures achieved in all cases. Thermal dosimetry within the hyperthermia target volume (HTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) are reported. Catheter-based ultrasound hyperthermia with HDR appears feasible with therapeutic temperature coverage of the target volume within the prostate or cervix while sparing surrounding more sensitive regions.

  12. Inappropriate urinary catheter reinsertion in hospitalized older patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Fang-Wen; Tsai, Chuan-Hsiu; Lin, Huey-Shyan; Chen, Ching-Huey; Chang, Chia-Ming

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the incidence and rationale for inappropriate reinsertion of urinary catheters and elucidated whether reinsertion is an independent predictor of adverse outcomes. A longitudinal study was adopted. Patients aged ≥65 years with urinary catheters placed within 24 hours of hospitalization were enrolled. Data collection, including demographic variables and health conditions, was conducted within 48 hours after admission. Patients with catheters in place were followed-up every day. If the patient had catheter reinsertion, the reinsertion information was reviewed from medical records. Adverse outcomes were collected at discharge. A total of 321 patients were enrolled. Urinary catheters were reinserted in 66 patients (20.6%), with 95 reinsertions; 49.5% of catheter reinsertions were found to be inappropriate. "No evident reason for urinary catheter use" was the most common rationale for inappropriate reinsertion. Inappropriate reinsertion was found to be a significant predictor for prolonged length of hospital stay, development of catheter-associated urinary tract infections and catheter-related complications, and decline in activities of daily living. This study indicates a considerable percentage of inappropriate urinary catheter reinsertions in hospitalized older patients. Inappropriate reinsertion was significantly associated with worsening outcomes. Efforts to improve appropriateness of reinsertion and setting clinical policies for catheterization are necessary to reduce the high rate of inappropriate reinsertion. Copyright © 2017 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. New percutaneous and retrieval vena cava catheter filter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pieronne, A.; Cuingnet, P.; Dehont, G.; Boutaud, P.; Delenzenne, A.; Joffre, P.; Lemoinne, J.P.; Quesnel, F.; Fajadet, P.; Rousseau, H.

    1989-01-01

    This paper reports a new percutaneous and retrievable vena cava filter assessed. The authors used the Seldinger technique for percutaneous insertion of the 10-F catheter filter through the right internal jugular vein with fluoroscopic guidance. The authors used fibrinolytic agents (streptokinase) by direct infusion through the catheter filter. Venocavography and pulmonary angiography were performed at day 5 and day 10 before removal of the catheter filter at the patient's bed. This vena cava percutaneous filter was made for use by radiologists, interventional cardiologists, and staff of intensive care units. The compilation rate for this technique was low

  14. Pigtail Catheter: A Less Invasive Option for Pleural Drainage in Egyptian Patients with Recurrent Hepatic Hydrothorax

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed Sharaf-Eldin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background and Aims. Treatment of hepatic hydrothorax is a clinical challenge. Chest tube insertion for hepatic hydrothorax is associated with high complication rates. We assessed the use of pigtail catheter as a safe and practical method for treatment of recurrent hepatic hydrothorax as it had not been assessed before in a large series of patients. Methods. This study was conducted on 60 patients admitted to Tanta University Hospital, Egypt, suffering from recurrent hepatic hydrothorax. The site of pigtail catheter insertion was determined by ultrasound guidance under complete aseptic measures and proper local anesthesia. Insertion was done by pushing the trocar and catheter until reaching the pleural cavity and then the trocar was withdrawn gradually while inserting the catheter which was then connected to a collecting bag via a triple way valve. Results. The use of pigtail catheter was successful in pleural drainage in 48 (80% patients with hepatic hydrothorax. Complications were few and included pain at the site of insertion in 12 (20% patients, blockage of the catheter in only 2 (3.3% patients, and rapid reaccumulation of fluid in 12 (20% patients. Pleurodesis was performed on 38 patients with no recurrence of fluid within three months of observation. Conclusions. Pigtail catheter insertion is a practical method for treatment of recurrent hepatic hydrothorax with a low rate of complications. This trial is registered with ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT02119169.

  15. Dialysis catheter-related septicaemia--focus on Staphylococcus aureus septicaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J; Ladefoged, S D; Kolmos, H J

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dialysis catheters are a common cause of nosocomial septicaemia in haemodialysis units usually due to staphylococci, of which Staphylococcus aureus is the most pathogenic. In this study, the epidemiology and pathogenesis of dialysis catheter-related infections were studied, and methods...... to infection were measured. After catheter insertion, all patients were screened for nasal carriage of S. aureus, and a culture was taken from the skin overlying the catheter insertion site. Once a week, cultures were taken from the insertion site and from the hub, and aerobic and anaerobic blood cultures were...... drawn from the catheter. If clinical signs of septicaemia occurred, peripheral blood cultures were also performed, when it was possible. RESULTS: The incidence of septicaemia was 49% (21/43) in patients, and 56% of all cases were caused by S. aureus. The mortality was 14% (3/21) and the incidence...

  16. Nurses’ Knowledge about the Insertion Procedure for Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters in Newborns Conocimiento de los enfermeros sobre la técnica de inserción del catéter central de inserción periférica en recién nacidos Conhecimento dos enfermeiros sobre a técnica de inserção do cateter central de inserção periférica em recém-nascidos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Solange Antonia Lourenço

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available The right to practice the Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC technique, mainly in neonatal intensive care units, was achieved by nursing and consists of efforts that lead to a new challenge: the improvement of the practice of this procedure. This study determined and evaluated the theoretical and practical knowledge acquired by nurses in qualification courses concerning aspects of PICC line insertion in the case of newborns. This descriptive and quantitative study used a questionnaire with nine questions to collect data. The study population was composed of 40 nurses qualified to insert a PICC line in newborns. According to the conceptual knowledge scale established for this study, the results reveal that the nurses have inadequate knowledge concerning the studied aspects, indicating the need for nurses to constantly update and improve their knowledge about this practice so as to better the quality of care delivered to newborns.La utilización del catéter central de inserción periférica (PICC, principalmente en unidades de terapia intensiva neonatal, es una conquista de la enfermería constituida por una trayectoria de esfuerzos que condujeron a un nuevo desafío - el perfeccionamiento del ejercicio de esa práctica. Este artículo tuvo como objetivo verificar el conocimiento teórico y práctico adquirido por los enfermeros, en los cursos de calificación, sobre algunos aspectos de la técnica de inserción del PICC en recién nacidos. Se trata de un estudio descriptivo, de naturaleza cuantitativa, que utilizó como instrumento de investigación un cuestionario con nueve preguntas. La población se constituyó de 40 enfermeros calificados para inserción del PICC en neonatos. Los resultados mostraron que, según la atribución conceptual establecida para el estudio, los enfermeros presentaron un nivel de conocimiento malo sobre esos aspectos, denotando la necesidad de actualización y perfeccionamiento constante de los enfermeros

  17. Silicone Foley′s catheter: A useful splint in ear surgeries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karanth Siddharth

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of ear projection and post auricular sulcus in staged ear reconstruction in microtia is a trying problem. So also is the maintenance of the patency of the external auditory meatus following recanalization and meatoplasty. Numerous splints and dressing techniques have been described for the above situations. Some of the problems encountered include the availability of the materials, cost, expertise in fabrication and compliance. Aims: To devise a simple, reliable, inexpensive and readily available splint for the maintenance of post auricular sulcus and external auditory meatus opening. Settings and Design: A silicone catheter is made out of a soft and inert material that doesn′t cause tissue necrosis or any loss of skin graft. The basic design is that of a simple, self-retaining type of splint that doesn′t dislodge and can be prepared within minutes on the operating table. Materials and Methods: This splint has been used in four cases of microtia reconstruction and one case of congenital external auditory meatus stenosis between June 2006 and August 2007. A 14 or 16 Fr silicone Foley′s catheter was used. The proximal end of a catheter of required length was retained and the distal part was cut off. The catheter was looped into a circle around the base of the reconstructed ear and secured in position with a suture. A similar construct was used in cases of external auditory meatus reconstruction or recanalization. The funnel-shaped distal drainage end was sutured to the circular frame near the region of the tragus. This funnel was inserted into the external auditory canal. Results: The catheter was found to sit snugly in the newly created sulcus, thereby maintaining the sulcus and ear projection. It aided in maintaining the meatal opening of a satisfactory diameter in the case of external auditory canal recanalization. It was never found to slip or get dislodged in any of the cases. There was no skin graft loss or tissue necrosis

  18. Prevention of catheter-related blood stream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrnes, Matthew C; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2007-08-01

    Catheter-related blood stream infections are a morbid complication of central venous catheters. This review will highlight a comprehensive approach demonstrated to prevent catheter-related blood stream infections. Elements of prevention important to inserting a central venous catheter include proper hand hygiene, use of full barrier precautions, appropriate skin preparation with 2% chlorhexidine, and using the subclavian vein as the preferred anatomic site. Rigorous attention needs to be given to dressing care, and there should be daily assessment of the need for central venous catheters, with prompt removal as soon as is practicable. Healthcare workers should be educated routinely on methods to prevent catheter-related blood stream infections. If rates remain higher than benchmark levels despite proper bedside practice, antiseptic or antibiotic-impregnated catheters can also prevent infections effectively. A recent program utilizing these practices in 103 ICUs in Michigan resulted in a 66% decrease in infection rates. There is increasing recognition that a comprehensive strategy to prevent catheter-related blood stream infections can prevent most infections, if not all. This suggests that thousands of infections can potentially be averted if the simple practices outlined herein are followed.

  19. Diagnosis of intra vascular catheter-related infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicalini, S; Palmieri, F; Noto, P; Boumis, E; Petrosillo, N

    2002-01-01

    The use of central vascular catheters (CVC) is associated with a substantial number of complications, amongst which infections predominate. A diagnosis of CVC-related infection usually requires catheter removal for culture. Semiquantitative (roll-plate method) and quantitative methods (flush, vortex, centrifugation or sonication methods) are the most reliable diagnostic methodologies requiring catheter removal, because of their greater specificity. The roll-plate method is the simplest and most commonly used technique. This method only samples the external surface of the catheter, and is particularly indicated for recently inserted catheters in which extraluminal colonisation is the primary mechanism of infection. Luminal culture techniques, such as the quantitative methods, may be more relevant for catheters that have been in place for a long period of time. However, in up to 85% of removed CVC the culture is negative, and other diagnostic techniques that do not require catheter removal have been proposed, including paired quantitative blood cultures, endoluminal brushing, and differential time to positivity (DTP) of paired blood cultures. DTP, that compares the time to positivity for qualitative cultures of blood samples simultaneously drawn from the CVC and a peripheral vein, appears to be the most reliable in the routine clinical practice since many hospitals use automatic devices for qualitative blood culture positivity detection. More recently catheter-sparing direct diagnostic methods, which include Gram stain and acridin-orange leucocyte cytospin (AOLC) test, appeared to be especially useful because of the rapidity of results and the ability to distinguish different microorganisms, allowing early targeted antimicrobial therapy.

  20. Femoral venous catheters: a safe alternative for delivering parenteral alimentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, B; Kanter, G; Titus, D

    1994-04-01

    Femoral vein catheterization is an alternative method of obtaining central venous access. Placement of femoral venous catheters (FVCs) is possible in the majority of patients, suitable for most indications, and associated with a low complication rate during insertion. We wished to determine the incidence of infections or other complications resulting when parenteral nutrition was delivered through FVCs. Fifty-two patients were followed from a hospital-wide population including patients in the critical care units. Triple-lumen catheters were placed by using the sterile Seldinger technique, and sites were examined daily for inflammation. Bacteriologic surveillance was accomplished by submitting the catheter tip for semiquantitative cultures. If catheter line sepsis was suspected, blood samples for cultures were drawn through the catheter and peripherally. The rate of occurrence of colonized catheters was 9.6% (five of 52), and catheter sepsis was found in one case (1.9%). Other than inflammation at six (11.5%) of 52 catheter sites, noninfectious complications of FVCs were not found. On the basis of these findings, we consider FVC-delivered parenteral alimentation a safe and effective alternative to other forms of central venous access.

  1. Use of indwelling pleural catheters for the definitive treatment of malignant pleural effusion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Conrado Abrão

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Objective: To evaluate the safety and feasibility of the use of indwelling pleural catheters (IPCs in patients with malignant pleural effusion (MPE. Methods: We prospectively collected data from patients with MPE undergoing IPC placement between January of 2014 and July of 2015. All patients submitted to IPC placement had a life expectancy > 30 days, in accordance with the MPE treatment guidelines established by the British Thoracic Society. The data collected included gender, age, body mass index, primary cancer site, duration of IPC drainage, IPC-related complications, length of hospital stay, pleural effusion recurrence, and occurrence of spontaneous pleurodesis. Results: A total of 19 patients underwent IPC placement during the study period. Median overall survival after IPC insertion was 145 days. The median follow-up among the surviving patients was 125 days (range, 53-485 days, and the median time between catheter insertion and removal was 31 days (range, 2-126 days. There were IPC-related complications in 5 patients (26.2%, and spontaneous pleurodesis was achieved in 8 (42.0%. Among those 8 patients, the IPC was removed between days 30 and 126 in 4, and spontaneous pleurodesis occurred within the first 30 days in 4. Conclusions: The use of IPCs seems to be feasible and safe in patients with MPE.

  2. Complications, effects on dialysis dose, and survival of tunneled femoral dialysis catheters in acute renal failure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klouche, Kada; Amigues, Laurent; Deleuze, Sebastien; Beraud, Jean-Jacques; Canaud, Bernard

    2007-01-01

    Availability of a functional vascular access is a mandatory prerequisite for extracorporeal renal replacement therapy in patients with acute renal failure. The femoral site of insertion commonly is chosen because it is an easy and convenient access. However, an array of complications may substantially alter the quality of treatment, and it appears that catheter-related morbidity and dysfunction are more frequent with the femoral than internal jugular site. This study is designed to evaluate the potential benefits of using soft silicone tunneled catheters ((ST)Caths) at the femoral site. Thirty patients with acute renal failure treated by intermittent hemodialysis (IHD) and/or continuous venovenous hemodiafiltration (CVVHDF) were assigned to either twin (ST)Caths or twin polyurethane nontunneled femoral catheters. Time necessary for catheter insertion, catheter-related complications, and catheter lifespan were monitored. Catheter performance during IHD and the effect of catheter type on dialysis dose were evaluated. The time necessary for (ST)Cath insertion was significantly longer. The incidence of vein thrombosis and catheter-related infection was lower, and the ratio of venous return pressure to catheter blood flow was better with an (ST)Cath. Recirculation rates were similar for both types of catheters. Whether treated by using IHD or CVVHDF, patients with an (ST)Cath benefited from a greater delivered dialysis dose. Multivariate analysis confirmed that (ST)Cath use was a determinant factor to optimize dialysis dose delivery. (ST)Cath patency was significantly longer. In patients with acute renal failure, use of an (ST)Cath minimizes catheter-related morbidity and improves dialysis efficiency compared with conventional femoral catheters.

  3. Prophylactic antibiotics for preventing early central venous catheter Gram positive infections in oncology patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van de Wetering, M. D.; van Woensel, J. B. M.

    2003-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Long-term tunnelled central venous catheters (TCVC) are increasingly used in oncology patients. Despite guidelines on insertion, maintenance and use, infections remain an important complication. Most infections are caused by Gram-positive bacteria. Therefore antimicrobial prevention

  4. Single-centre experience with tunnelled central venous catheters in 150 cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koolen, D. A.; van Laarhoven, H. W. M.; Wobbes, Th; Punt, C. J. A.

    2002-01-01

    Tunnelled venous catheters improve venous access in cancer patients, but are associated with complications. We retrospectively analysed the outcome of Hickman catheter and Port-A-Cath (PAC) insertion in cancer patients from a department of medical oncology and compared these results with the

  5. Percutaneous Retrieval of a Pulmonary Artery Catheter Knot in Pacing Electrodes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Valenzuela-Garcia, Luis Felipe; Almendro-Delia, Manuel; Gonzalez-Valdayo, Miguel; Munoz-Campos, Juan; Dorado-Garcia, Jose C.; Gomez-Rosa, Francisco; Vazquez-Garcia, Rafael; Calderon-Leal, Jose M.

    2007-01-01

    To illustrate a successful approach to resolving a pulmonary artery catheter knot in the pacing leads of a cardiac resynchronization device. When planning invasive monitoring for patients having right chamber electrodes, fluoroscopic-guided catheter insertion and extraction is advisable. In the event of coiling or knotting, an interventional radiologist should be contacted as soon as possible to avoid serious complications

  6. Thrombosis caused by polyurethane double-lumen subclavian superior vena cava catheter and hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wanscher, Maria Rørbæk; Frifelt, J J; Smith-Sivertsen, C

    1988-01-01

    During an 18-month period, 82 consecutive patients (37 women and 45 men), with a mean age of 50 yr (range 15 to 74), underwent hemodialysis with 91 polyurethane double-lumen subclavian superior vena cava catheters inserted via the right subclavian vein. Upon catheter removal, venograms were...

  7. Effect of steel and teflon infusion catheters on subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow and infusion counter pressure in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højbjerre, Lise; Skov-Jensen, Camilla; Kaastrup, Peter

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Subcutaneous tissue is an important target for drug deposition or infusion. A local trauma may induce alterations in local microcirculation and diffusion barriers with consequences for drug bioavailability. We examined the influence of infusion catheters' wear time on local...... microcirculation and infusion counter pressure. METHODS: One steel catheter and one Teflon (Dupont, Wilmington, DE) catheter were inserted in subcutaneous, abdominal adipose tissue (SCAAT) in 10 healthy, lean men. The catheters were infused with isotonic saline at a rate of 10 microL/h for 48 h. Another steel...... catheter and a Teflon catheter were inserted contralateral to the previous catheters after 48 h. The infusion counter pressure was measured during a basal infusion rate followed by a bolus infusion. The measurements during a basal rate infusion were repeated after the bolus infusion. Adipose tissue blood...

  8. Cuidados com cateter central de inserção periférica no neonato: revisão integrativa da literatura Cuidados con catéter central de inserción periférica en el neonato: revisión integrativa de la literatura Peripherally inserted central catheter care in neonates: an integrative literature review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Derdried Athanasio Johann

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available O cateter central de inserção periférica é tecnologia comum empregada na terapia intravenosa de neonatos. Trata-se de revisão integrativa, cujo objetivo foi investigar e analisar as evidências disponíveis na literatura acerca da temática. As bases de dados pesquisadas foram Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe em Ciências da Saúde (LILACS e Biblioteca Nacional de Medicina dos Estados Unidos (PubMed. Resultados apontam lacunas no que tange à população neonatal; conhecimento insuficiente dos profissionais quanto indicações (n=1; e variados temas sobre uso de anticoagulantes (n=6, comparação com outros cateteres (n=4, diagnóstico por imagem (n=2, dor (n=2, infecção relacionada a cateter e sua prevenção (n=7, entre outros fatores. Conclui-se que há necessidade de atualização profissional, evidências científicas de fácil acesso e publicações nacionais.El catéter central de inserción periférica es una tecnología común empleada en terapia endovenosa de neonatos. Se trata de una revisión integrativa, cuyo objetivo fue investigar y analizar las evidencias disponibles en la literatura acerca de la temática. Se investigaron las bases de datos Literatura Latinoamericana y del Caribe en Ciencias de la Salud (LILACS y la Biblioteca Nacional de Medicina de los Estados Unidos (PubMed. Los resultados expresan omisiones en lo referente a la población neonatal; conocimiento insuficiente de los profesionales al respecto de las indicaciones (n=1, diagnóstico por imagen (n=2, dolor (n=2, infección relacionada al catéter y su prevención (n=7, entre otras. Se necesita de actualización profesional; evidencias científicas de fácil acceso y publicaciones nacionales.The peripherally inserted central catheter is a common technology employed in the intravenous therapy of neonates. This integrative review was performed with the objective to investigate and analyze the evidence available in the literature regarding this

  9. Needle catheter duodenostomy: a technique for duodenal alimentation of birds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goring, R L; Goldman, A; Kaufman, K J; Roberts, C; Quesenberry, K E; Kollias, G V

    1986-11-01

    A technique for duodenal alimentation (needle catheter duodenostomy) of birds was developed, using the domestic pigeon (Columba livia) as the experimental model. A needle catheter was inserted into the descending duodenum of 5 pigeons and was secured to the body wall and dorsum of each bird. A liquid diet was administered daily (in equal amounts of 0, 4, 8, 12, and 16 hours) for 14 days without adverse effects. On day 15, the catheters were removed, and the birds immediately resumed normal consumption of a pigeon ration and water diet. Although 4 of the 5 birds had minor weight loss, dietary alterations probably could be used on an individual basis to alleviate this problem. After oral alimentation was resumed, the 5 birds exceeded their initial body weight within 7 days. Four weeks after catheter removal, positive-contrast radiographic evaluations indicated that the duodenum of each pigeon appeared normal. Needle catheter duodenostomy was a viable method of alimentation in the domestic pigeon. This technique should be applicable for other avian species requiring bypass of the upper gastrointestinal tract proximal to the region of catheter insertion in the duodenum.

  10. Insertion rates and complications of central lines in the UK population: A pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Adrian Vk; Arora, Nitin; Olusanya, Olusegun; Sharif, Ben; Lundin, Robert M; Dhadda, A; Clarke, S; Siviter, R; Argent, M; Denton, Gavin; Dennis, Anna; Day, Angela; Szakmany, Tamas

    2018-02-01

    Central venous catheters are inserted ubiquitously in critical care and have roles in drug administration, fluid management and renal replacement therapy. They are also associated with numerous complications. The true number of central venous catheters inserted per year and the proportion of them associated with complications are unknown in the UK. We performed a prospective audit at five hospitals, as a feasibility pilot for a larger, nationwide audit. Using a novel secure online data collection platform, developed earlier and adapted for this project, all central venous catheters inserted for patients admitted to the Intensive Care Units were documented at five pilot sites across the UK. A total of 117 data collection forms were submitted. Users found the electronic data collection system easy to use. All data fields were ready for analysis immediately after data input. Out of the 117 central venous catheters, 17 were haemodialysis catheters and five pulmonary artery introducers. Experienced practitioners (at least three years' experience) inserted 85% of the central venous catheters. The site of insertion was the internal jugular vein for 80%, femoral for 12% and subclavian for 8% of central venous catheters. Most central venous catheters were inserted in ICU (49%) or theatres (42%). Ultrasound was used for 109 (93%) of central venous catheter insertions and its use was not associated with fewer complications. In 15 cases venopuncture was attempted more than once (all with ultrasound) and this was associated with significantly increased risk of complications. There were eight immediate complications (6.8%): five related to venopuncture and inability to pass a guidewire, two carotid artery punctures and one associated with significant arrhythmia. This study demonstrates the ease and feasibility of collecting detailed descriptive data on central line insertion and its immediate complications in the UK over two weeks. In our proposed nationwide audit, organisation

  11. Less leakage and dislodgement with a catheter-over-needle versus a catheter-through-needle approach for peripheral nerve block: an ex vivo study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsui, Ban C H; Tsui, Jenkin

    2012-07-01

    The objective of this study was to compare the catheter-through-needle (CTN) and catheter-over-needle (CON) catheterization techniques ex vivo by measuring leak pressure around the catheter and the catheter's resistance to pulling force. Using an ex vivo porcine limb model, we compared the conventional CTN design with the CON design with respect to the ability to resist leakage at the catheter insertion site under high injection pressure and the force required to withdraw the catheter from tissue. One CON assembly (MultiSet, Pajunk) and three CTN assemblies (Contiplex, B.Braun; StimuCath, Arrow; Stimulong Sono, Pajunk) were studied. Ten porcine hind limbs were used to test leakage and another ten were used to measure withdrawal force. Catheters were placed at angles of 15° and 30° at depths of 3 cm and 5 cm. Leakage was assessed visually at the insertion site, and pressure was measured at the moment leakage occurred. Withdrawal force was measured by pulling the catheter from the tissue. No evidence of leakage was detected at the CON catheter insertion site at the highest pressure applied (1,000 mmHg) (n = 40). The CON assembly withstood significantly higher injection pressure than the CTN catheters without causing leaks at the catheter insertion site [CON, mean (standard deviation) > 1,000 (0) mmHg; B.Braun, 596 (92) mmHg; Pajunk Stimulong, 615 (107) mmHg; and Arrow, 422 (104) mmHg; P < 0.001 CON vs CTN]. The force required to withdraw the catheter from the porcine limb was greater with CON catheters [3.8 (0.8) N] than with any of the CTN catheters [range, 0.4 (0.2) - 0.8 (0.2) N], depending on depth, angle, and manufacturer (P < 0.001 CON vs CTN). In the porcine leg model, CON catheterization provides greater resistance to leakage under high injection pressure and greater holding force in tissue than traditional CTN catheters.

  12. Systemic Air Embolism Associated with Pleural Pigtail Chest Tube Insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alkhankan, Emad; Nusair, Ahmad; Mazagri, Rida; Al-Ourani, Mohammed

    2016-01-01

    Pleural pigtail catheter placement is associated with many complications including pneumothorax, hemorrhage, and chest pain. Air embolism is a known but rare complication of pleural pigtail catheter insertion and has a high risk of occurrence with positive pressure ventilation. In this case report, we present a 50-year-old male with bilateral pneumonia who developed a pneumothorax while on mechanical ventilation with continuous positive airway pressure mode. During the placement of the pleural pigtail catheter to correct the pneumothorax, the patient developed a sudden left sided body weakness and became unresponsive. An air embolism was identified in the right main cerebral artery, which was fatal.

  13. Levantamento sobre a infecção na inserção do cateter de duplo lúmen Inventario sobre la infección en la inserción del cateter de doble lúmen Survey about infection at the site of a double-lumen catheter insertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita de Cássia Helú Mendonça Ribeiro

    2008-01-01

    ás encontrado el Staphylococcus aureus, el tiempo promedio de permanencia del catéter fue de 43 días en los dos períodos evaluados. CONCLUSIÓN: En este estudio se demostró que hubo mejora significativa en cuanto a los índices de infección en esa población.OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to identify the infection rate, etiologic agent, infectious complications and the double-lumen catheter permanence in one same period in alternating years. METHODS: This retrospective study was carried out in the Center of Hemodiálysis of the Hospital de Base de São José do Rio Preto-SP. All patients who presented infection in the double-lumen catheter insertion site within the period of the survey were included. RESULTS: It was reported that of the 80 patients undergoing hemodialysis treatment in the first period, from January to June 2002, 21% of the patients were using catheter. Three years later, 186 patients were in the same conditions, and of these, 10.7% was being treated with catheter therapy. The bloodstream infections were reduced by 9.4% in the last period. Bacteremia was the main prevailing infectiou complication. The Staphylococcus aureus was the most prevalent etiologic agent and the average double-lumen catheter permanence time was of 43 days in both periods of the study. CONCLUSION: This study revealed that there was a significant improvement as for the infection indexes in that population.

  14. Localização inicial da ponta de cateter central de inserção periférica (PICC em recém-nascidos Localización inicial de la punta del catéter central de inserción periférica (PICC en recién nacidos Initial placement of the peripherally inserted central catheter's tip in neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrícia Ponce de Camargo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Estudo transversal com coleta prospectiva de dados, que objetivouidentificar o posicionamento inicial da ponta do cateter central de inserção periférica (PICC e verificar a prevalência de sucesso de sua inserção em neonatos. Os dados foram coletados no berçário anexo à maternidade do Hospital das Clínicas da Faculdade de Medicina da Universidade de São Paulo, entre março e setembro de 2006. Dos 37 neonatos submetidos à inserção do cateter PICC, a taxa de sucesso no procedimento foi de 72,3% (27 neonatos; destes, quatro (14,8% estavam com as pontas dos cateteres alojadas nas veias axilar ou inominada; outros três (11,1%, alojadas em veia jugular. Estes cateteres foram removidos por desvio de trajeto. 13 (48,2% estavam com as pontas alojadas em átrio direito, cujos cateteres foram tracionados para reposicionamento da ponta para a veia cava superior.Estudio transversal con recolección prospectiva de datos. La finalidad fue identificar la posición inicial de la punta del catéter central de inserción periférica (PICC y verificar la prevalencia de éxitos durante su introducción en neonatos. Los datos fueron recolectados en un servicio de neonatología anexo a la maternidad del Hospital de las Clínicas de la Facultad de Medicina de la Universidad de São Paulo, entre marzo y setiembre del 2006. De los 37 neonatos sometidos a introducción del catéter PICC, la tasa de éxito fue de 72.3% (27 neonatos, de ellos, cuatro (14.8% estaban con las puntas de los catéteres alojadas en las venas axilar o no determinada, tres (11.1% localizadas en la vena yugular. Siendo estos últimos retirados por desviación en su trayecto. El 48.2% (13 se encontraba con las puntas en el atrio derecho, siendo estos catéteres nuevamente posicionados en la vena cava superior.This is a cross-sectional study aiming to identify the initial tip position of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC and to verify the prevalence of success in inserting

  15. Reducing unnecessary urinary catheter use and other strategies to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infection: an integrative review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meddings, Jennifer; Rogers, Mary A M; Krein, Sarah L; Fakih, Mohamad G; Olmsted, Russell N; Saint, Sanjay

    2014-04-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) are costly, common and often preventable by reducing unnecessary urinary catheter (UC) use. To summarise interventions to reduce UC use and CAUTIs, we updated a prior systematic review (through October 2012), and a meta-analysis regarding interventions prompting UC removal by reminders or stop orders. A narrative review summarises other CAUTI prevention strategies including aseptic insertion, catheter maintenance, antimicrobial UCs, and bladder bundle implementation. 30 studies were identified and summarised with interventions to prompt removal of UCs, with potential for inclusion in the meta-analyses. By meta-analysis (11 studies), the rate of CAUTI (episodes per 1000 catheter-days) was reduced by 53% (rate ratio 0.47; 95% CI 0.30 to 0.64, pSMD) in catheterisation duration (days) was -1.06 overall (p=0.065) including a statistically significant decrease in stop-order studies (SMD -0.37; pSMD, -1.54; p=0.071). No significant harm from catheter removal strategies is supported. Limited research is available regarding the impact of UC insertion and maintenance technique. A recent randomised controlled trial indicates antimicrobial catheters provide no significant benefit in preventing symptomatic CAUTIs. UC reminders and stop orders appear to reduce CAUTI rates and should be used to improve patient safety. Several evidence-based guidelines have evaluated CAUTI preventive strategies as well as emerging evidence regarding intervention bundles. Implementation strategies are important because reducing UC use involves changing well-established habits.

  16. A survey of the use of arterial catheters in anesthetized dogs and cats: 267 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trim, Cynthia M; Hofmeister, Erik H; Quandt, Jane E; Shepard, Molly K

    2017-01-01

    To describe the clinical practice of insertion of arterial catheters in anesthetized dogs and cats, to document complications of arterial catheterization, and to determine risk factors associated with the complications. Prospective clinical study and retrospective evaluation of medical records. University teaching hospital. Dogs (n = 251) and 13 cats anesthetized for clinical procedures with arterial catheters inserted for blood pressure monitoring. None. Details of the animal and catheter were collected at the time of anesthesia. On the following day, the catheter site was palpated and observed for abnormalities and the medical records of all animals were reviewed retrospectively for complications. Details of catheter placement were available for 216 catheters: 158 catheters in a dorsal pedal artery, 50 catheters in the median caudal (coccygeal) artery, 6 in the median artery, and 1 each in a cranial tibial and lingual artery. Blood pressure was obtained from 200 catheters, and 12 catheters failed before the end of anesthesia. Postoperative observational data obtained from 112 catheters described a palpable arterial pulse at 73 sites and no pulse at 21 sites. No risk factor for arterial occlusion was identified. No complications resulting from arterial catheterization were noted in the medical records. Arterial catheterization resulted in loss of a peripheral pulse postoperatively in 21/94 (22.3%) of animals examined, although no evidence of tissue ischemia was noted in the medical records of any of the patients in this study. These results suggest that insertion of a catheter in the dorsal pedal or coccygeal arteries was not associated with a high risk for complications. However, the course of arterial occlusion postoperatively warrants further investigation. © Veterinary Emergency and Critical Care Society 2016.

  17. Anchor balloons assisted deep intubation of 5F catheters for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-07-24

    Jul 24, 2015 ... However, cardiologists still encounter some difficult scenarios such as variant coronary artery origins, severely calcified and ... Medical University, 300, Guangzhou Road, Nanjing,. Jiangsu .... (l) The ST segment elevated while the 5F catheter was inserted into the proximal left anterior descending artery d.

  18. Prostate HDR brachytherapy catheter displacement between planning and treatment delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Whitaker, May; Hruby, George; Lovett, Aimee; Patanjali, Nitya

    2011-01-01

    Background and purpose: HDR brachytherapy is used as a conformal boost for treating prostate cancer. Given the large doses delivered, it is critical that the volume treated matches that planned. Our outpatient protocol comprises two 9 Gy fractions, two weeks apart. We prospectively assessed catheter displacement between CT planning and treatment delivery. Materials and methods: Three fiducial markers and the catheters were implanted under transrectal ultrasound guidance. Metal marker wires were inserted into 4 reference catheters before CT; marker positions relative to each other and to the marker wires were measured from the CT scout. Measurements were repeated immediately prior to treatment delivery using pelvic X-ray with marker wires in the same reference catheters. Measurements from CT scout and film were compared. For displacements of 5 mm or more, indexer positions were adjusted prior to treatment delivery. Results: Results are based on 48 implants, in 25 patients. Median time from planning CT to treatment delivery was 254 min (range 81–367 min). Median catheter displacement was 7.5 mm (range −2.9–23.9 mm), 67% of implants had displacement of 5 mm or greater. Displacements were predominantly caudal. Conclusions: Catheter displacement can occur in the 1–3 h between the planning CT scan and treatment. It is recommended that departments performing HDR prostate brachytherapy verify catheter positions immediately prior to treatment delivery.

  19. Retrograde epidural catheter relieves intractable sacral pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchir Gupta

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Pain caused by tumor infiltration of the sacral area remains a major clinical challenge. Patients with poor pain control despite comprehensive medical management may be treated with neuraxial techniques such as continuous epidural or spinal anesthetic. We report a case in which a patient with metastatic breast cancer experienced inadequate pain relief after multiple intravenous pain management regimens as well as intrathecal (IT drug delivery. The concentration of local anesthetics delivered via the IT catheter was limited due to the patient's baseline motor weakness which would be exacerbated with higher concentrations of local anesthetics. Thus, a decision was made to insert an epidural catheter via a retrograde technique to provide the patient with a “band of anesthesia” which would provide profound sensory blockade without concomitant motor weakness. Pain refractory to other modalities of pain control was successfully treated with the epidural technique.

  20. Usefulness of multifunctional gastrointestinal coil catheter for colorectal stent placement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Tae-Hyung; Shin, Ji Hoon; Kim, Jin Hyoung; Lim, Jin-Oh; Kim, Kyung Rae [Asan Medical Center, Radiology and Research Institute of Radiology, Seoul (Korea); Song, Ho-Young [Asan Medical Center - Radiology, Songpa-gu, Seoul (Korea); Park, In Kook [Dongguk University, Life Science, Seoul (Korea); Choi, Eugene K. [Weill Medical College of Cornell University, New York, NY (United States)

    2008-11-15

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the usefulness of a multifunctional gastrointestinal coil catheter for stent placement in 98 patients with colorectal strictures. The catheter was used in 98 consecutive patients for stent placement in the rectum (n = 24), recto-sigmoid (n = 13), sigmoid (n = 38), descending (n = 6), transverse (n = 11), splenic flexure (n = 3), hepatic flexure (n = 2), and ascending (n = 1) colon. The catheter was made of a stainless steel coil (1.3 mm in inner diameter), a 0.4-mm nitinol wire, a polyolefin tube, and a hemostasis valve. Usefulness of the catheter was evaluated depending on whether the catheter could pass a stricture over a guide wire and whether measurement of the stricture length was possible. The passage of the catheter over a guide wire beyond the stricture was technically successful and well tolerated in 93 (94.9%) of 98 patients. In the failed five patients, it was not possible to negotiate the guide wire due to presence of nearly complete small bowel obstruction. The average length of stricture was 6.15 cm (range, 3 cm to 20 cm) in patients with the colorectal stricture. There were no procedure-related complications. In conclusion, the multifunctional coil catheter seems to be useful in colorectal stent placement. (orig.)

  1. Factors Influencing Lesion Formation During Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olaf J. Eick

    2003-07-01

    Full Text Available In radiofrequency (RF ablation, the heating of cardiac tissue is mainly resistive. RF current heats cardiac tissue and in turn the catheter electrode is being heated. Consequently, the catheter tip temperature is always lower - or ideally equal - than the superficial tissue temperature. The lesion size is influenced by many parameters such as delivered RF power, electrode length, electrode orientation, blood flow and tissue contact. This review describes the influence of these different parameters on lesion formation and provides recommendations for different catheter types on selectable parameters such as target temperatures, power limits and RF durations

  2. "Extended subcutaneous route" technique: a quick subcutaneous tunnelling technique for PICC insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elli, Stefano; Abbruzzese, Chiara; Cannizzo, Luigi; Vimercati, Simona; Vanini, Stefania; Lucchini, Alberto

    2017-05-15

    To describe a quick tunnelling technique for peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) insertion called the "extended subcutaneous route" technique. The "extended subcutaneous route" technique is described step by step. In 18 consecutive PICCs, inserted with extended route technique in ASST Monza, no complications during insertion were registered. In 969 catheter days observed, we identified only one accidental dislodgement. No other mid-term complications were observed. Extended subcutaneous route technique allows the creation of a subcutaneous tunnel <5 cm, without skin incision and additional manipulation. Extended subcutaneous route technique may be feasible and useful, particularly for patients with high risk of bleeding or infection.

  3. Bladder Morphology Using 2 Different Catheter Designs

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-04-10

    Urologic Injuries; Urologic Diseases; Bladder Infection; Urinary Tract Infections; Mucosal Inflammation; Mucosal Infection; Bladder Injury; Catheter-Related Infections; Catheter Complications; Catheter; Infection (Indwelling Catheter); Pelvic Floor Disorders; Urinary Incontinence

  4. Dosimetric equivalence of nonstandard HDR brachytherapy catheter patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, J. A. M.; Hsu, I-C.; Pouliot, J. [University of California, San Francisco, California 94115 (United States)

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: To determine whether alternative high dose rate prostate brachytherapy catheter patterns can result in similar or improved dose distributions while providing better access and reducing trauma. Materials and Methods: Standard prostate cancer high dose rate brachytherapy uses a regular grid of parallel needle positions to guide the catheter insertion. This geometry does not easily allow the physician to avoid piercing the critical structures near the penile bulb nor does it provide position flexibility in the case of pubic arch interference. This study used CT datasets with 3 mm slice spacing from ten previously treated patients and digitized new catheters following three hypothetical catheter patterns: conical, bi-conical, and fireworks. The conical patterns were used to accommodate a robotic delivery using a single entry point. The bi-conical and fireworks patterns were specifically designed to avoid the critical structures near the penile bulb. For each catheter distribution, a plan was optimized with the inverse planning algorithm, IPSA, and compared with the plan used for treatment. Irrelevant of catheter geometry, a plan must fulfill the RTOG-0321 dose criteria for target dose coverage (V{sub 100}{sup Prostate}>90%) and organ-at-risk dose sparing (V{sub 75}{sup Bladder}<1 cc, V{sub 75}{sup Rectum}<1 cc, V{sub 125}{sup Urethra}<<1 cc). Results: The three nonstandard catheter patterns used 16 nonparallel, straight divergent catheters, with entry points in the perineum. Thirty plans from ten patients with prostate sizes ranging from 26 to 89 cc were optimized. All nonstandard patterns fulfilled the RTOG criteria when the clinical plan did. In some cases, the dose distribution was improved by better sparing the organs-at-risk. Conclusion: Alternative catheter patterns can provide the physician with additional ways to treat patients previously considered unsuited for brachytherapy treatment (pubic arch interference) and facilitate robotic guidance of

  5. Pneumorrhachis Resulting in Transient Paresis after PICC Line Insertion into the Ascending Lumbar Vein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payne, Russell; Sieg, Emily P; Choudhary, Arabinda; Iantosca, Mark

    2016-10-17

    Obtaining intravascular access in the neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) is not only critical but also technically challenging. Malposition of the catheter tip is a known and well-documented complication. Specifically, peripherally inserted central venous catheter (PICC) line insertion into the ascending lumbar vein can lead to neurological dysfunction and, in some cases, even death. We present the first reported case of pneumorrhachis (PR) following PICC line insertion into the ascending lumbar vein. Our patient presented with lower extremity weakness and imaging confirmed the presence of air within the spinal canal. After conservative treatment, the strength deficit resolved and subsequent imaging revealed resolution of the air within the spinal canal. Insertion of central venous catheters into the ascending lumbar vein is a well-documented complication that can lead to neurologic injury and even death. This should be considered in the evaluation of any neonate presenting with an abnormal neurological examination or unexplained change in exam after line insertion.

  6. [Effectiveness of intracervical catheter as a labor preinduction method].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patro-Małysza, Jolanta; Marciniak, Beata; Leszczyńska-Gorzelak, Bozena; Bartosiewicz, Jacek; Oleszczuk, Jan

    2010-01-01

    This study was undertaken to determine the efficacy and safety of the Foley catheter as a cervical priming agent. Data analysis concern 327 women undergoing cervical ripening with intracervical Foley catheter. The primary measured outcome was ripening of the cervix as measured with the Bishop score. The secondary outcomes were the timings starting from balloon removal (or from spontaneous expulsion) to delivery the preinduction-delivery interval, mode of delivery frequency of side effects and neonatal outcome. The most common indications for induction were post-term and non-reassuring fetal status. Intracervical Foley catheter was retained for mean duration of 15 hours 35 minutes. Bishop score rise after preinduction time was statistically significant (3.29 +/- 1.16 at the balloon insertion; 6.85 +/- 1.7 at the removal of the Foley catheter). Mean Bishop score change was 3.56 +/- 1.58. The average interval from balloon expulsion to delivery was 8 hours 27 minutes, the preinduction-delivery interval - 24 hours 3 minutes. Out of 327 women undergoing cervical ripening with the Foley catheter 236 (72.17%) had vaginal delivery 91 (27.38%)--cesarean delivery. The rate of vaginal delivery was significantly higher in the multiparous group (85.32%) when compared to nulliparous (65.6%). In 312 neonates (94.8%), the Apgar score at 3 min was more than 8. Intracervical Foley catheter is an effective and safe agent for cervical ripening.

  7. Can Peripheral Central Venous Lines be inserted safely and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    This study was performed to determine whether the placement of a more flexible peripherally inserted catheter, the Arrow PICC (Arrow PS-01651), would result in an improved and acceptable success rate. Method: Twenty-three patients in the casualty unit of the Mamelodi Hospital during 1997 and 1998, who required a ...

  8. Femoral Vein Catheter is an Important Risk Factor for Catheter-related Thrombosis in (Near-)term Neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubbink-Verheij, Gerdina H; Pelsma, Iris C M; van Ommen, Cornelia H; Smits-Wintjens, Vivianne E H J; Visser, Remco; Steggerda, Sylke J; Te Pas, Arjan B; Lopriore, Enrico

    2018-03-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) in neonates are associated with an increased risk of thrombosis. Most reports focus on umbilical venous catheters (UVCs) and peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs), whereas data available on femoral venous catheters (FVCs) are limited. We performed a retrospective cohort study in all neonates (gestational age ≥34 wk) with CVCs. The primary outcome was the occurrence of thrombosis in CVCs. The secondary outcomes were possible risk factors for thrombosis, the thrombotic incidence in FVCs, UVCs, and PICCs, and clinical aspects of thrombosis in these groups. A total of 552 neonates received a total of 656 catheters, including 407 (62%) UVCs, 185 (28%) PICCs, and 64 (10%) FVCs. Thrombosis was detected in 14 cases, yielding an overall incidence of 2.1% or 3.6 events per 1000 catheter days. FVC was significantly associated with the occurrence of thrombosis when compared with UVC (P=0.02; odds ratio, 3.8; 95% confidence interval, 1.2-12.0) and PICC (P=0.01; odds ratio, 8.2; 95% confidence interval, 1.6-41.7). The incidence of thrombosis was higher in FVCs than in UVCs and PICCS, that is, 7.8% (5/64), 1.7% (7/407), and 1.1% (2/185), respectively (Pcatheter days was 12.3 in FVCs, 3.2 in UVCs, and 1.5 in PICCs (P<0.05). We concluded that thrombosis occurs more frequently in FVCs than in other CVCs.

  9. 'Length'at Length

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Admin

    He was interested to know how `large' is the set of numbers x for which the series is convergent. Here large refers to its length. But his set is not in the class ♢. Here is another problem discussed by Borel. Consider .... have an infinite collection of pairs of new shoes and want to choose one shoe from each pair. We have an ...

  10. Does a novel method of PICC insertion improve safety?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caparas, Jona; Hu, Jian Ping; Hung, Hwei-San

    2014-05-01

    Placing a central venous access device via the internal jugular or subclavian vein entails significant risks to both patient and healthcare worker. The purpose of this randomized, prospective study was to determine whether the accelerated Seldinger technique (AST) offers significant safety advantages over the modified Seldinger technique (MST) for peripherally inserted central catheter insertion. Patients were randomly assigned to undergo introducer sheath insertion by means of either MST or AST. Primary outcome measures included time to completion of introducer sheath insertion, estimated blood loss, and success rate. Secondary outcome measures included vessel-to-air exposure events and unprotected sharps exposure. While both insertion methods proved equivalent for successful vessel cannulation, AST was significantly faster (P = 0.0048) and resulted in less blood loss (P = 0.0295) than MST. Additionally, AST resulted in significantly fewer vessel-to-air exposure events (P PICC peelable introducer sheath insertion.

  11. Effect of One versus Two Drain Insertion on Postoperative Seroma Formation after Modified Radical Mastectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    farzaneh ebrahimifard

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Modified radical mastectomy (MRM is still one of globally accepted surgical techniques for breast cancer and in some selected patient is the gold standard type of surgery. The most frequent complication of this procedure is seroma under skin flaps or in the axilla as reported as much as 30% in some studies. The use of closed suction drainage system to reduce the incidence of this complication has been routinely accepted by surgeons; however, length of catheter stay and the number of catheters inserted in the wound are still controversial. The present study compares the results of single versus double drain insertion in patients undergoing MRM for breast cancer.Materials and Methods: The study was conducted on 100 women with breast cancer who were candidate for MRM surgery during 2007-2010 referred to Modarres hospital, Tehran, Iran as a randomized group matched controlled trial.Results: There was no significant difference between the two groups in terms of age, BMI, and tumor weight (P=0.406 (Table 1. Similarly, the difference between the two groups was insignificant in tumor size (T and number of lymph nodes involved (P=0.145. There was no significant difference between the two groups in timing of axillary drain removal (P=0.064. No significant differences were observed between the two groups in mean aspirated fluid (P=0.071 and mean aspirated sera (P=0.484 after removal of drains.Conclusion: This study revealed one drain insertion in MRM surgery is as effective as two drain and probably less morbidity and cost.

  12. A 6-Fr Guiding Catheter (Slim Guide®) for Use with Multiple Microdevices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Y.; Ohmori, Y.; Watanabe, M.; Kaku, Y.; Morioka, M.; Hirano, T.; Yano, S.; Kawano, T.; Hamada, J-I.; Kuratsu, J-I.

    2013-01-01

    Summary A modified technique is required in patients with wide-necked aneurysms whose treatment by the single microcatheter technique is difficult. We developed a 6-Fr guiding catheter (Slim Guide®) that features a large lumen (0.072 inch) for performing the modified technique. To evaluate the usefulness of Slim Guide® we carried out experiments using three types of 6-Fr guiding catheter. In experiment 1, the shaft hardness and kink resistance were compared among three different guiding catheters (Slim Guide®, Launcher®, Envoy®). In experiment 2, we inserted a microballoon catheter and a microcatheter into the three different guiding catheters and recorded the maximal infusion pressure. In experiment 3, we inserted 13 different types of microdevices into the three different guiding catheters and evaluated the resistance of the microdevices. Although the shaft of the Slim Guide® was softer than that of the other two guiding catheters, its kink resistance was comparable. The maximal infusion pressure was significantly lower than with Launcher® or Envoy® catheters. Furthermore, with Slim Guide®, in 136 of 143 microdevice combinations examined (95.1%) there was no resistance; this was true for 125 (87.4%) and 116 (81.1%) combinations using the Launcher® - and the Envoy® guiding catheters, respectively. There was a significant difference between Slim Guide® and the other two guiding catheters with respect to their accommodation of double microsystems (pGuide® is slightly larger than of the other two guiding catheters, it significantly increased the combination of microdevices that could be used for the coil embolization of difficult aneurysms. PMID:23472717

  13. Temporary hemodialysis catheter placement by nephrology fellows: implications for nephrology training.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Edward G; Schachter, Michael E; Palumbo, Andrea; Knoll, Greg; Edwards, Cedric

    2013-09-01

    The insertion of temporary hemodialysis catheters is considered to be a core competency of nephrology fellowship training. Little is known about the adequacy of training for this procedure and the extent to which evidence-based techniques to reduce complications have been adopted. We conducted a web-based survey of Canadian nephrology trainees regarding the insertion of temporary hemodialysis catheters. Responses were received from 45 of 68 (66%) eligible trainees. The median number of temporary hemodialysis catheters inserted during the prior 6 months of training was 5 (IQR, 2-11), with 9 (20%) trainees reporting they had inserted none. More than one-third of respondents indicated that they were not adequately trained to competently insert temporary hemodialysis catheters at both the femoral and internal jugular sites. These findings are relevant to a discussion of the current adequacy of procedural skills training during nephrology fellowship. With respect to temporary hemodialysis catheter placement, there is an opportunity for increased use of simulation-based teaching by training programs. Certain infection control techniques and use of real-time ultrasound should be more widely adopted. Consideration should be given to the establishment of minimum procedural training requirements at the level of both individual training programs and nationwide certification authorities. Copyright © 2013 National Kidney Foundation, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. The length of the male urethra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tobias. S. Kohler

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Catheter-based medical devices are an important component of the urologic armamentarium. To our knowledge, there is no population-based data regarding normal male urethral length. We evaluated the length of the urethra in men with normal genitourinary anatomy undergoing either Foley catheter removal or standard cystoscopy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Male urethral length was obtained in 109 men. After study permission was obtained, the subject's penis was placed on a gentle stretch and the catheter was marked at the tip of the penis. The catheter was then removed and the distance from the mark to the beginning of the re-inflated balloon was measured. Alternatively, urethral length was measured at the time of cystoscopy, on removal of the cystoscope. Data on age, weight, and height was obtained in patients when possible. RESULTS: The mean urethral length was 22.3 cm with a standard deviation of 2.4 cm. Urethral length varied between 15 cm and 29 cm. No statistically significant correlation was found between urethral length and height, weight, body mass index (BMI, or age. CONCLUSIONS: Literature documenting the length of the normal male adult urethra is scarce. Our data adds to basic anatomic information of the male urethra and may be used to optimize genitourinary device design.

  15. Dimensionamento da dor durante a instalação do cateter central de inserção periférica em neonatos Medida de la intensidad del dolor durante la instalación del catéter central de inserción periférica en neonatos Measuring pain in neonates during placement of central line catheter via peripheral insertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Costa

    2010-01-01

    necesario adoptar medidas analgésicas, ya que los neonatos internados en la unidad de terapia intensiva neonatal son frecuentemente sometidos a procedimientos invasores y dolorosos.OBJECTIVE: To measure pain in neonates during placement of central line catheter via peripheral insertion by comparing pain at the moment of the introduction of the catheter and pain at the progression of the catheter. METHODS: This was a descriptive exploratory study with 28 neonates from a large teaching hospital in Sao Paulo city. Data were collected with the Premature Infant Pain Profile (PIPP 15 seconds prior the initial introduction of the catheter, during the initial introduction of the catheter (30 seconds, and during the progression of the catheter (30 seconds. RESULTS: The majority of neonates (59.1% had a score e" 7 on the PIPP, moderate to high pain intensity, during the initial introduction of the catheter. A greater number of neonates (45.5% who did not receive analgesic or sedative medication had score e" 7 on the PIPP, moderate to high pain intensity, during the progression of the catheter. CONCLUSION: There is a need for adoption of use of analgesic medication in the neonatal unit, since neonates often undergo invasive and painful procedures.

  16. Intravascular (catheter) MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cohen, A.M.; Hurst, G.C.; Katz, D.E.; Dverk, J.L.; Wiesen, E.J.; Czerski, L.W.; Malaya, R.; Bellon, E.M.

    1989-01-01

    Intravascular MR probes allow excellent spatial resolution and have the potential to detect arterial wall microstructure. Ultrasonic intravascular probes suggest that detailed morphologic information can assist clinical decision making. Catheter MR probes of 2--7 mm outside diameter (OD) were built of copper wire, Teflon, and parts from standard commercial catheters. The probes were connected to the surface coil receiver input of our Picker VISTA 2055HP 1.5-T imaging system. The extant (linear) body coil was used for transmit. Phantoms were constructed of coaxial glass MR tubes, filled with doped water. Watanabe rabbit aorta and human autopsy iliac artery specimens were examined within 4 hours of excision or stored by freezing. In vivo iliac arteries in dogs under general anesthesia were imaged, with percutaneous placement of the probe. Results are presented

  17. Complications of central venous catheter in patients transplanted with hematopoietic stem cells in a specialized service.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barretta, Lidiane Miotto; Beccaria, Lúcia Marinilza; Cesarino, Cláudia Bernardi; Pinto, Maria Helena

    2016-06-07

    to identify the model, average length of stay on site and complications of central venous catheter in patients undergoing transplant of hematopoietic stem cells and verify the corresponding relationship between the variables: age, gender, medical diagnosis, type of transplant, implanted catheter and insertion site. a retrospective and quantitative study with a sample of 188 patients transplanted records between 2007 and 2011. the majority of patients used Hickman catheter with an average length of stay on site of 47.6 days. The complication fever/bacteremia was significant in young males with non-Hodgkin's lymphoma undergoing autologous transplant, which remained with the device for a long period in the subclavian vein. nurses should plan with their team the minimum waiting time, recommended between the catheter insertion and start of the conditioning regimen, as well as not to extend the length of time that catheter should be on site and undertake their continuing education, focusing on the prevention of complications. identificar o modelo, tempo médio de permanência e complicações de cateter venoso central em pacientes submetidos ao transplante de células-tronco hematopoiéticas e verificar a relação de correspondência entre as variáveis: idade, sexo, diagnóstico médico, tipo de transplante, cateter implantado e local de inserção. retrospectivo, quantitativo, com amostra de prontuários de 188 pacientes transplantados, entre 2007 e 2011. a maioria dos pacientes utilizou o cateter de Hickman com permanência média de 47,6 dias. A complicação febre/bacteremia foi significante em jovens do sexo masculino, com linfoma não Hodgkin, submetidos ao transplante autólogo, que permaneceram com o dispositivo por longo período, em veia subclávia. os enfermeiros devem planejar com a equipe o aguardo do tempo mínimo preconizado entre o implante do cateter e início do regime de condicionamento, assim como não estender o período de permanência e realizar

  18. Insertion of Balloon Retained Gastrostomy Buttons: A 5-Year Retrospective Review of 260 Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Power, Sarah; Kavanagh, Liam N.; Shields, Mary C.; Given, Mark F.; Keeling, Aoife N.; McGrath, Frank P.; Lee, Michael J.

    2013-01-01

    Radiologically inserted gastrostomy (RIG) is an established way of maintaining enteral nutrition in patients who cannot maintain nutrition orally. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of primary placement of a wide bore button gastrostomy in a large, varied patient population through retrospective review. All patients who underwent gastrostomy placement from January 1, 2004 to January 1, 2009 were identified. 18-Fr gastrostomy buttons (MIC-Key G) were inserted in the majority. Follow-up ranged from 6 months to 4.5 years. A total of 260 patients (M:F 140:120, average age 59.2 years) underwent gastrostomy during the study period. Overall success rate for RIG placement was 99.6 %, with success rate of 95.3 % for primary button insertion. Indications included neurological disorders (70 %), esophageal/head and neck malignancy (21 %), and other indications (9 %). Major and minor complication rates were 1.2 and 12.8 %, respectively. Thirty-day mortality rate was 6.8 %. One third of patients underwent gastrostomy reinsertion during the study period, the main indication for which was inadvertent catheter removal. Patency rate was high at 99.5 %. The maximum number of procedures in any patient was 8 (n = 2), and the average tube dwell time was 125 days. Primary radiological insertion of a wide bore button gastrostomy is a safe technique, with high success rate, high patency rate, and low major complication rate. We believe that it is feasible to attempt button gastrostomy placement in all patients, once tract length is within limits of tube length. If difficulty is encountered, then a standard tube may simply be placed instead.

  19. Insertion of Balloon Retained Gastrostomy Buttons: A 5-Year Retrospective Review of 260 Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Power, Sarah, E-mail: sarahpower28@yahoo.co.uk; Kavanagh, Liam N.; Shields, Mary C.; Given, Mark F.; Keeling, Aoife N.; McGrath, Frank P.; Lee, Michael J., E-mail: mlee@rcsi.ie [Beaumont Hospital, Department of Radiology (Ireland)

    2013-04-15

    Radiologically inserted gastrostomy (RIG) is an established way of maintaining enteral nutrition in patients who cannot maintain nutrition orally. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the safety and efficacy of primary placement of a wide bore button gastrostomy in a large, varied patient population through retrospective review. All patients who underwent gastrostomy placement from January 1, 2004 to January 1, 2009 were identified. 18-Fr gastrostomy buttons (MIC-Key G) were inserted in the majority. Follow-up ranged from 6 months to 4.5 years. A total of 260 patients (M:F 140:120, average age 59.2 years) underwent gastrostomy during the study period. Overall success rate for RIG placement was 99.6 %, with success rate of 95.3 % for primary button insertion. Indications included neurological disorders (70 %), esophageal/head and neck malignancy (21 %), and other indications (9 %). Major and minor complication rates were 1.2 and 12.8 %, respectively. Thirty-day mortality rate was 6.8 %. One third of patients underwent gastrostomy reinsertion during the study period, the main indication for which was inadvertent catheter removal. Patency rate was high at 99.5 %. The maximum number of procedures in any patient was 8 (n = 2), and the average tube dwell time was 125 days. Primary radiological insertion of a wide bore button gastrostomy is a safe technique, with high success rate, high patency rate, and low major complication rate. We believe that it is feasible to attempt button gastrostomy placement in all patients, once tract length is within limits of tube length. If difficulty is encountered, then a standard tube may simply be placed instead.

  20. Bowel migration of dormant chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis catheter: A vexed problem not avoided by flushing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P Vincent

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Delayed bowel erosion by peritoneal dialysis catheter is rare with fewer than thirty cases having been reported in the literature. This complication is usually encountered when the catheter is kept dormant. Two cases have also been reported with catheters in active use. The risk factors for bowel erosion include immunosuppression, diverticulosis, and amyloidosis. An 80-year-old male with chronic kidney disease Stage 5 due to hypertensive nephrosclerosis underwent chronic ambulatory peritoneal dialysis catheter insertion. Due to improvement in the glomerular filtration rate and clinical parameters including extracellular fluid volume status, peritoneal dialysis was not initiated. Weekly catheter flushes were performed. After 5 months, he developed watery diarrhea after a regular flushing episode. Computed tomography scan revealed the catheter displaced into the sigmoid colon with the tip in the rectum. He was managed successfully with catheter removal alone and conservative treatment. He remains asymptomatic at 3-month follow-up. This case is presented to emphasize the fact that delayed bowel erosion can happen with dormant catheter even in the absence of risk factors. Periodic flushing has not prevented this complication in our patient. Perforations can be self-curing when diagnosed early and when patients present without features of peritonitis or sepsis. Such cases can be managed successfully with catheter removal alone.

  1. Role of ultrasound for central catheter tip localization in neonates: a review of the current evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Deepak; Farahbakhsh, Nazanin; Tabatabaii, Seyyed Ahmad

    2018-02-15

    Central catheters are known as "life lines" in intensive care units and are used frequently in neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) for multiple indications. The central catheters used in NICU includes umbilical venous catheter (UVC), umbilical arterial catheter (UAC) and peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) lines. The tip of these central lines needs to be in a correct position as malpositioned central line tips lead to many neonatal complications. Radiograph either abdomen or chest is the most widely used modality for locating the tip of the central catheter. There are many disadvantages of radiographic confirmation of tip position and recently ultrasound (USG)/echocardiography has been used for localization of catheter tip. USG provides real-time assessment of the tip position with other added advantages like no radiation exposure, need for minimal training for performing USG, minimal handling of the neonate, identification of migration of central lines and making repositioning of central lines under USG guidance. The present evidence supports the use of USG/Echo for localization of central catheter tip and USG has shown to have good sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value and negative predictive value when compared with a radiograph. In this review, we discuss about the role of USG/Echo in the identification of tip of central catheters in neonatal care.

  2. Frequency of colonization and isolated bacteria from the tip of epidural catheter implanted for postoperative analgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabille, Débora Miranda Diogo; Diogo Filho, Augusto; Mandim, Beatriz Lemos da Silva; de Araújo, Lúcio Borges; Mesquita, Priscila Miranda Diogo; Jorge, Miguel Tanús

    2015-01-01

    The increased use of epidural analgesia with catheter leads to the need to demonstrate the safety of this method and know the incidence of catheter colonization, inserted postoperatively for epidural analgesia, and the bacteria responsible for this colonization. From November 2011 to April 2012, patients electively operated and maintained under epidural catheter for postoperative analgesia were evaluated. The catheter tip was collected for semiquantitative and qualitative microbiological analysis. Of 68 cultured catheters, six tips (8.8%) had positive cultures. No patient had superficial or deep infection. The mean duration of catheter use was 43.45 h (18-118) (p=0.0894). The type of surgery (contaminated or uncontaminated), physical status of patients, and surgical time showed no relation with the colonization of catheters. Microorganisms isolated from the catheter tip were Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Sphingomonas paucimobilis. Postoperative epidural catheter analgesia, under these study conditions, was found to be low risk for bacterial colonization in patients at surgical wards. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Lattice insertions for POPAE

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cho, Y.; Crosbie, E.A.; Diebold, R.; Johnson, D.E.; Ohnuma, S.; Ruggiero, A.G.; Teng, L.C.

    1977-01-01

    Four types of insertions are described for the six 200-m straight sections of POPAE. All have dispersion matched to zero. (1) Injection-ejection insertion--This has proper high-β values and phase advances for horizontal injection and vertical ejection. (2) Phase-adjust insertion--The phase advance in this insertion is adjustable over a range of approximately 100 0 . (3) General-purpose insertion--The β* is adjustable from 2.5. to 200 m and the crossing angle is adjustable from 0 to 11 mrad. (4) High-luminosity insertion--This gives an even lower β + of meter

  4. Transvaginal closure of urethra and correction of uterovaginal prolapse in neurologically impaired patient with chronic indwelling catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kubal, U; Arunkalaivanan, A S; Baptiste, M

    2009-08-01

    We report the case of a 38-year-old neurologically impaired woman with continuous urinary incontinence as a result of a chronic indwelling catheter for neurogenic bladder. Long-term catheter resulted in dilatation of urethra and pressure necrosis of urethra, with subsequent incontinence despite the catheter. She also had a stage 3 uterovaginal prolapse. She underwent cystoscopy, closure of urethra and bladder neck by transvaginal route (Feneley procedure), insertion of a suprapubic catheter, sacrospinous fixation and posterior colporrhaphy with prolene mesh (Apogee). Vaginal hysterectomy was declined by the patient and her family. She remained dry at follow-up visit and is happy with the outcome.

  5. The mechanistic causes of peripheral intravenous catheter failure based on a parametric computational study

    OpenAIRE

    Piper, Russell; Carr, Peter J.; Kelsey, Lachlan J.; Bulmer, Andrew C.; Keogh, Samantha; Doyle, Barry J.

    2018-01-01

    Peripheral intravenous catheters (PIVCs) are the most commonly used invasive medical device, yet up to 50% fail. Many pathways to failure are mechanistic and related to fluid mechanics, thus can be investigated using computational fluid dynamics (CFD). Here we used CFD to investigate typical PIVC parameters (infusion rate, catheter size, insertion angle and tip position) and report the hemodynamic environment (wall shear stress (WSS), blood damage, particle residence time and venous stasis vo...

  6. Reducing unnecessary urinary catheter use and other strategies to prevent catheter-associated urinary tract infection: an integrative review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meddings, Jennifer; Rogers, Mary A M; Krein, Sarah L; Fakih, Mohamad G; Olmsted, Russell N; Saint, Sanjay

    2014-01-01

    Background Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTI) are costly, common and often preventable by reducing unnecessary urinary catheter (UC) use. Methods To summarise interventions to reduce UC use and CAUTIs, we updated a prior systematic review (through October 2012), and a meta-analysis regarding interventions prompting UC removal by reminders or stop orders. A narrative review summarises other CAUTI prevention strategies including aseptic insertion, catheter maintenance, antimicrobial UCs, and bladder bundle implementation. Results 30 studies were identified and summarised with interventions to prompt removal of UCs, with potential for inclusion in the meta-analyses. By meta-analysis (11 studies), the rate of CAUTI (episodes per 1000 catheter-days) was reduced by 53% (rate ratio 0.47; 95% CI 0.30 to 0.64, p<0.001) using a reminder or stop order, with five studies also including interventions to decrease initial UC placement. The pooled (nine studies) standardised mean difference (SMD) in catheterisation duration (days) was −1.06 overall (p=0.065) including a statistically significant decrease in stop-order studies (SMD −0.37; p<0.001) but not in reminder studies (SMD, −1.54; p=0.071). No significant harm from catheter removal strategies is supported. Limited research is available regarding the impact of UC insertion and maintenance technique. A recent randomised controlled trial indicates antimicrobial catheters provide no significant benefit in preventing symptomatic CAUTIs. Conclusions UC reminders and stop orders appear to reduce CAUTI rates and should be used to improve patient safety. Several evidence-based guidelines have evaluated CAUTI preventive strategies as well as emerging evidence regarding intervention bundles. Implementation strategies are important because reducing UC use involves changing well-established habits. PMID:24077850

  7. A randomized controlled trial of coiled versus straight swan-neck Tenckhoff catheters in peritoneal dialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, David W; Wong, Jennifer; Wiggins, Kathryn J; Kirwan, Robyn; Griffin, Anthony; Preston, John; Wall, Daryl; Campbell, Scott B; Isbel, Nicole M; Mudge, David W; Hawley, Carmel M; Nicol, David L

    2006-11-01

    Current clinical practice guidelines recommend that no particular type of peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter has been proved superior to another. However, a recent Cochrane review recommended the need for a large, well-designed, randomized, controlled trial of straight versus coiled PD catheters because of the paucity and suboptimal quality of previously performed trials. A randomized controlled trial was undertaken at 2 metropolitan teaching hospitals comparing the effects of straight versus coiled PD catheters on time to catheter malposition (primary outcome), catheter-associated infection, technique failure, and all-cause mortality. One hundred thirty-two PD patients were enrolled and randomly assigned to insertion of a coiled (n = 62) or straight catheter (n = 70). There was no significant difference in time to laparoscopic reposition between the 2 cohorts (log-rank score, 0.41; P = 0.52). However, median technique survival was significantly worse for coiled catheters (1.5 years; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.2 to 1.8) compared with straight catheters (2.1 years; 95% CI, 1.8 to 2.5; P < 0.05), primarily because of increased risk for inadequate dialytic clearance with the former. On univariate Cox proportional hazards model analysis, insertion of a coiled PD catheter was associated significantly with a greater risk for technique failure (unadjusted hazard ratio, 1.86; 95% CI, 1.03 to 3.36). No difference was observed between the 2 groups with respect to catheter-associated infections or overall patient survival. Coiled catheters do not influence the risk for drainage failure caused by catheter malposition compared with straight catheters, but are associated with significantly increased risk for PD technique failure, primarily because of inadequate dialytic clearance.

  8. The incidence of symptomatic upper limb venous thrombosis associated with midline catheter: Prospective observation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lisova, Katerina; Hromadkova, Jaroslava; Pavelková, Katerina; Zauška, Vladimir; Havlin, Jan; Charvat, Jiri

    2018-03-01

    The evaluation of the incidence of symptomatic upper limb venous thrombosis (ULVT) associated with midline catheters in patients admitted to the hospital. The frequency of symptomatic ULVT diagnosed in a group of patients with midline catheters confirmed by sonographic examination in hospitalised patients at Faculty Hospital over the period of 1 year. Four hundred thirty-nine midline catheters were inserted in 430 patients (250 women and 180 men) during year 2015. Nine patients had two midline catheters. The average age of the patient was 68 years (range: 19-96 years). The median time of midline catheter introduction into a vein was 10 days (range: 1-112 days). Symptomatic thrombosis was diagnosed in 20 patients (4.5%), 3.3/1000 catheter days. It was associated with gender (male) and midline insertion in the cephalic vein. The risk of upper limb symptomatic thrombosis associated with midline catheters during a stay in the hospital should be taken into consideration when indicating optimal venous access.

  9. Intra-vesical knot of bladder catheter in an extremely low birthweight neonate: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula M.Y. Tang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Premature and extremely low birth weight (ELBW neonates are at high risk of developing multiple co-morbidities and often require urinary catheterization for various medical indications. Intra-vesical knotting of bladder catheter is a known but uncommon complication of this procedure. We report a case of an ELBW baby boy with a knotted bladder catheter requiring surgical retrieval. After an elective operation for the closure of patent ductus arteriosus, a 4 French urinary catheter was inserted into an ELBW baby boy for urine output monitoring and left in-situ. Resistance was encountered in attempt to remove the urinary catheter. Abdominal X Ray confirmed intra-vesical knotting of the tube. Knot unravelling by interventional radiology was attempted but was unsuccessful. Open extra-peritoneal bladder exploration was performed for the retrieval of the tightly knotted catheter. A 6 French transurethral Foley catheter was inserted for bladder drainage. Upon removal of the Foley's catheter on day 5 post op, the baby was able to void spontaneously. With literature review, we postulated the potential risk factors resulting in this potentially avoidable iatrogenic unusual complication. Recommendations were suggested to avoid further incidences.

  10. [Combination of the ureteral dilation catheter and balloon catheter under the ureteroscope in the treatment of male urethral stricture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yi; Li, Gong-hui; Yan, Jia-jun; Shen, Cong; Tang, Gui-hang; Xu, Gang

    2016-01-01

    To investigate the clinical application of the ureteral dilation catheter combined with the balloon catheter under the ureteroscope in the treatment of urethral stricture in men. Under the ureteroscope, 45 male patients with urethral stricture received placement of a zebra guide wire through the strictured urethra into the bladder and then a ureteral dilation catheter along the guide wire, followed by dilation of the urethra from F8 initially to F14 and F16. Again, the ureteroscope was used to determine the length of the strictured urethra, its distance to the external urethral orifice, and whether it was normally located. An F24 balloon catheter and then a metal urethral calibrator was used for the dilation of the strictured urethra. After removal of the F18-F22 urethral catheter at 8 weeks, the urinary flow rate was measured immediately and again at 3 months. All the operations were successfully performed without serious complications. The maximum urinary flow rate was (13.3-29.9) ml/s (mean [17.7 ± 3.2] ml/s) at the removal of the catheter and (15.2-30.8) ml/s (mean [19.8 ± 3.9] ml/s) at 3 months after it. Smooth urination was found in all the patients during the 6-24 months follow-up. The application of the ureteral dilation catheter combined with, the balloon catheter under the ureteroscope is a good option for the treatment of male urethral stricture for its advantages of uncomplicatedness, safety, effectiveness, few complications, less pain, high success rate, and repeatable operation.

  11. Agile and Bright Intracardiac Catheters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M. Pekař (Martin)

    2017-01-01

    markdownabstractIntracardiac imaging catheters represent unique instruments to diagnose and treat a diseased heart. While there are imminent advances in medical innovation, many of the commercially available imaging catheters are outdated. Some of them have been designed more than 20 years and

  12. Cateter central de inserção periférica: descrição da utilização em UTI Neonatal e Pediátrica Catéter central de inserción periférica: descripción da utilización en UTI Neonatal y Pediátrica Peripherally inserted central catheter: description of its utilization in Neonatal and Pediatric ICU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Aparecida Baggio

    2010-03-01

    ,9%, ruptura (11,2%, retirada accidental (8,3%, flebitis (4,2%, cianosis (1,4% y migración (1,4%, con media de permanencia de 14,5 días. Para el mantenimiento del catéter es requerida la capacitación y educación permanente de los profesionales, estrategias que cualifican la asistencia.The purpose of this descriptive, retrospective, documental study is to describe the use of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC in a neonatal and pediatric intensive care unit regarding their insertion, maintenance, and removal. This study also characterized the population which received the catheter through descriptive and statistical analysis of 176 instruments filled out by nurses, in a two year period. The population attended consisted of 125 patients, mainly premature (43.2% and male (60%. The basilic and cephalic (43.2% veins were primarily used for the insertion of a 1.9Fr (85.8% catheter. The success rate was 98.9% in the punctures, but anticipated removal occurred due to obstruction (25%, infiltration (18%, suspected contamination (16,6%, traction (13,9%, rupture (11,2%, accidental removal (8,3%, phlebitis (4,2%, cyanosis (1,4%, and migration (1,4%, with an average period of permanence of 14.5 days. In order to maintain the catheter, professional education and preparation are required to qualify care.

  13. US-guided placement of temporary internal jugular vein catheters: immediate technical success and complications in normal and high-risk patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oguzkurt, Levent; Tercan, Fahri; Kara, Gulcan; Torun, Dilek; Kizilkilic, Osman; Yildirim, Tulin

    2005-01-01

    Objective: : To evaluate the technical success and immediate complication rates of temporary internal jugular vein (IJV) haemodialysis catheter placement in normal and high-risk patients. Methods and materials: Two-hundred and twenty temporary internal jugular vein catheters inserted under ultrasound guidance in 172 patients were prospectively analyzed. Of 172 patients, 93 (54%) were males and 79 (46%) were females (age range, 18-83; mean, 56.0 years). Of 220 catheters, 171 (78%) were placed in patients who had a risk factor for catheter placement like patients with disorder of haemostasis, poor compliance, and previous multiple catheter insertion in the same IJV. Forty-seven (21.3%) procedures were performed on bed-side. A catheter was inserted in the right IJV in 178 procedures (80.9%) and left IJV in 42 procedures. Of 172 patients, 112 (65%) had only one catheter placement and the rest had had more than one catheter placement (range, 1-5). Results: Technical success was achieved in all patients (100%). Average number of puncture was 1.24 (range, 1-3). One hundred and eighty-three insertions (83.1%) were single-wall punctures, whereas 37 punctures were double wall punctures. Nine (4%) minor complications were encountered. Inadvertent carotid artery puncture without a sequel in four procedures (1.8%), oozing of blood around the catheter in three procedures (1.4%), a small hematoma in one procedure (0.4%), and puncture through the pleura in one procedure (0.4%) without development of pneumothorax. Oozing of blood was seen only in patients with disorder of haemostasis. Conclusion: Ultrasound-guided placement of internal jugular vein catheters is very safe with very high success rate and few complications. It can safely be performed in high-risk patients, like patients with disorders of haemostasis and patients with previous multiple catheter insertion in the same vein

  14. The Incidence of Peripheral Catheter-Related Thrombosis in Surgical Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leung, Amy; Heal, Clare; Banks, Jennifer; Abraham, Breanna; Capati, Gian; Pretorius, Casper

    2016-01-01

    Background. Central venous catheters and peripherally inserted central catheters are well established risk factors for upper limb deep vein thrombosis. There is limited literature on the thrombosis rates in patients with peripheral catheters. A prospective observational study was conducted to determine the incidence of peripheral catheter-related thrombosis in surgical patients. Methods. Patients deemed high risk for venous thrombosis with a peripheral catheter were considered eligible for the study. An ultrasound was performed on enrolment into the study and at discharge from hospital. Participants were reviewed twice a day for clinical features of upper limb deep vein thrombosis during their admission and followed up at 30 days. Results. 54 patients were included in the study. The incidence of deep vein thrombosis and superficial venous thrombosis was 1.8% and 9.2%, respectively. All cases of venous thrombosis were asymptomatic. Risk factor analysis was limited by the low incidence of thrombosis. Conclusion. This study revealed a low incidence of deep vein thrombosis in surgical patients with peripheral catheters (1.8%). The study was underpowered; therefore the association between peripheral catheters and thrombosis is unable to be established. Future studies with larger sample sizes are required to determine the association between peripheral catheters and thrombosis. PMID:26904283

  15. Inactivation of Bacteria on Explanted Dialysis Catheter Lumens with Fiber Optically Delivered Ultraviolet Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Roger C; Prologo, J David

    2015-12-01

    To evaluate the germicidal effect of fiber optically delivered ultraviolet (UV) light on colonized explanted dialysis catheters. Explanted dialysis catheters were screened for intraluminal colonization by culturing 1 mL of a saline flush. Catheters growing >10 colony-forming units were treated with doses of fiber optically delivered UV light (range, 40-1,300 mJ/cm2). For each UV-treated catheter, an unexposed segment was first cut and set aside as a control sample. A sterile optical fiber was inserted into the catheter hub and advanced to the catheter tip. The fiber was slowly withdrawn at a constant rate while exposing the inner lumen to UV light. A second UV-exposed segment was then removed. The UV-exposed and control segments were split and sonicated to remove the adherent bacteria. The bacteria were counted and identified. There were 14 colonized catheters treated with UV light. The catheters were primarily colonized with coagulase-negative staphylococci (60%) and Staphylococcus aureus (33%). There was a significant reduction in viable bacteria between the UV-treated versus untreated segments of each infected catheter (P = .04). In the seven treated catheters with >100,000 colony-forming units per cm2 of luminal surface area, there was a >99.5% reduction of viable bacteria in all UV-exposed samples, with no residual viable bacteria in four of seven (57%) of the samples. This study demonstrates the technical feasibility and benchtop efficacy of using fiber optics to deliver UV light into the lumen of a colonized dialysis catheter and inactivating bacteria on the intraluminal surface. Copyright © 2015 SIR. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Percutaneous versus laparoscopic placement of peritoneal dialysis catheters: Simplicity and favorable outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla K Al-Hwiesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Implantation of peritoneal dialysis (PD catheters via the laparoscopic technique is expanding, but none of the studies concerning this technique have compared its outcome with the percutaneous insertion done by the nephrologist. We compared the technical survival and outcome of 52 PD catheters placed in 43 patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD in our center from March 2006 to October 2007. Of these, 27 PD catheters were inserted percutaneously by a nephrologist (group 1 and 25 were placed by a surgeon using the conventional laparoscopic technique (group 2. Very obese patients, those with previous abdominal surgery, and those who refused local anesthesia were excluded from the study. All catheters were evaluated for mechanical and infectious complications and the overall technique survival was analyzed. The incidence of complications in PD catheters did not largely differ between the two groups. Early catheter-related infection episodes (within two weeks of catheter placement occurred in three of 22 (13.6% patients in group 1, versus three of 21 (14.3% patients in group 2 (P >0.05. The incidence of exit site leak was higher in group 2 (19.0% compared to (4.5% group 1 (P 0.05. We conclude that in our study, the percutaneous bedside placements of PD catheters done by nephrologists were comparable with the laparoscopic insertions performed by surgeons where the high-risk patients were avoided, and the former provided a safer and more reliable access that allowed a rapid initiation of PD.

  17. Effect of an acrylic terpolymer barrier film beneath transparent catheter dressings on skin integrity, risk of dressing disruption, catheter colonisation and infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pivkina, A I; Gusarov, V G; Blot, S I; Zhivotneva, I V; Pasko, N V; Zamyatin, M N

    2018-03-23

    We assessed the effect of a skin-protective terpolymer barrier film around the catheter insertion site on frequency of dressing disruptions and skin integrity issues (hyperaemia, skin irritation, residues of adhesives and moisture under the dressing). Secondary outcomes included colonisation of the central venous catheter (CVC) and rates of central line-associated bloodstream infection. A monocentric, open-label, randomised controlled trial was performed comparing a control group receiving standard transparent catheter dressings without the skin-protecting barrier film and an intervention group receiving a transparent chlorhexidine-impregnated dressing with use of the skin-protective acrylic terpolymer barrier film (3M™ Cavilon™ No - Sting Barrier Film, 3 M Health Care, St. Paul, MN, USA). Sixty patients were enrolled and randomised in the study accounting for 60 central venous catheters and a total of 533 catheter days. Dressing disruptions occurred more frequently and at sooner time point in the control group. Skin integrity issues were significantly less observed in the intervention group. No differences in CVC colonisation or central line-associated bloodstream infection were observed. The application of a barrier film creating a skin-protective polymer layer beneath transparent catheter dressings is associated with less dressing disruptions and skin integrity issues without altering the risk of infectious complications if used in combination with a chlorhexidine-impregnated catheter dressing. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  18. US-guided placement of central vein catheters in patients with disorders of hemostasis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tercan, Fahri [Baskent University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey)], E-mail: ftercan@yahoo.com; Ozkan, Ugur; Oguzkurt, Levent [Baskent University, Faculty of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ankara (Turkey)

    2008-02-15

    Objective: To prospectively evaluate the technical success and immediate complication rates of temporary central catheter placement in a homogenous patient population with disorders of hemostasis. Materials and methods: One hundred and thirty three temporary central vein catheters inserted under ultrasound guidance in 119 patients with bleeding disorders were analyzed over a 4-year period. Patients were males (n = 51; 43%) and females (n = 68; 57%) with a mean age of 56.6 years (age range 18-95 years). A catheter was inserted in IJV in 129 (97%) procedures, subclavian vein in 2 (1.5%) procedures and femoral vein in 2 (1,5%) procedures. Thirty-three (24.8%) procedures were performed on bedside. Of 119 patients, 106 (89%) had only one catheter placement and the rest had had more than one catheter placement (range 1-3). Results: Technical success was achieved in all patients (100%). Average number of puncture was 1.01 (range 1-2). One hundred and nineteen insertions (89.5%) were single-wall punctures, whereas 14 insertions were double-wall punctures. Eight (6%) minor complications occurred including oozing of blood around the catheter in five (3.8%) procedures, small hematoma in two (1.5%) procedure and both in one patient. There was no inadvertent arterial puncture or major complications like hemothorax or pneumothorax in any patients. Conclusion: US-guided placement of central vein catheters in patients with disorder of hemostasis is safe with high technical success and low complication rates. US guidance for central venous catheterization should be the preferred method in this group of patients, if available in the hospital setting.

  19. Patients' experiences of the PICC insertion procedure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicholson, Jackie; Davies, Louise

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are a type of central venous access device used to deliver a variety of intravenous therapies, including chemotherapy. PICCs may be placed by interventional radiologists, anaesthetists or, as is increasingly common, by specialist nurses in the hospital setting. However, little is known about how patients feel regarding the PICC insertion procedure. The aim of this study was to interview patients who had undergone a recent PICC insertion in the chemotherapy day unit to identify their experiences. On analysis of the qualitative data obtained from the semi-structured interview, five themes emerged: the context of cancer; expectations; levels of pain and anxiety; coping strategies; and explanation. The findings of this study support some previously described elements of procedural experiences; however, new understanding has provided implications for practice in the areas of expectations, allaying anxiety levels, supporting individual coping strategies and providing explanation. The major limitation of the study was the homogenous sample of oncology patients with a clear link between the patient experience of the PICC insertion and the context of cancer. The main recommendation for further research would be to repeat this study with a broader patient population.

  20. Catheter Migration After Implantationan Intrathecal Baclofen Infusion Pump for Severe Spasticity: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tung-Chou Li

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of intrathecal baclofen infusion pump implantation complicated by migration of the catheter tip. A 55-year-old man required an intrathecal baclofen infusion for severe spasticity 4 years after a cervical spinal cord injury with incomplete tetraparesis. Twelve months after initial implantation of the device, the patient began to experience a recurrence of trunk tightness and spasticity. Subsequent X-ray and computed tomography evaluations of the catheter system revealed pooling of contrast medium outside of the intrathecal distribution in the lumbar subcutaneous region of the back and therefore migration of the pump catheter tip. At surgical revision, emphasis was placed on minimizing the length of catheter outside of the spine and securing the catheter in the supraspinous fascia with a right-angled anchor. The distance between the anchors and the entry point of the catheter into the supraspinous fascia was also reduced to prevent slipping when the patient bends forward. After surgery, the patient's spasticity improved and, 1 year later, he has experienced no further complications during follow-up, requiring an average baclofen dose of 150 mg/day. Here, we describe several surgical methods intended to secure the intrathecal catheter and prevent catheter migration. Other complications related to catheter failure are also highlighted.

  1. Semi-automated location identification of catheters in digital chest radiographs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keller, Brad M.; Reeves, Anthony P.; Cham, Matthew D.; Henschke, Claudia I.; Yankelevitz, David F.

    2007-03-01

    Localization of catheter tips is the most common task in intensive care unit imaging. In this work, catheters appearing in digital chest radiographs acquired by portable chest x-rays were tracked using a semi-automatic method. Due to the fact that catheters are synthetic objects, its profile does not vary drastically over its length. Therefore, we use forward looking registration with normalized cross-correlation in order to take advantage of a priori information of the catheter profile. The registration is accomplished with a two-dimensional template representative of the catheter to be tracked generated using two seed points given by the user. To validate catheter tracking with this method, we look at two metrics: accuracy and precision. The algorithms results are compared to a ground truth established by catheter midlines marked by expert radiologists. Using 12 objects of interest comprised of naso-gastric, endo-tracheal tubes, and chest tubes, and PICC and central venous catheters, we find that our algorithm can fully track 75% of the objects of interest, with a average tracking accuracy and precision of 85.0%, 93.6% respectively using the above metrics. Such a technique would be useful for physicians wishing to verify the positioning of catheter tips using chest radiographs.

  2. Analysis of damping characteristics of arterial catheter blood ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    working diagnosis, site of arterial cannula, date and time of insertion, hours since insertion, type of cannula (manufacturer, gauge, length). The CoD was measured using the 'fast flush' method described by .... THC-B & WHR: Design, data collection, analysis, manuscript preparation. JDT: Data collection and analysis.

  3. Emergency Department Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection Prevention: Multisite Qualitative Study of Perceived Risks and Implemented Strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carter, Eileen J; Pallin, Daniel J; Mandel, Leslie; Sinnette, Corine; Schuur, Jeremiah D

    2016-02-01

    Existing knowledge of emergency department (ED) catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) prevention is limited. We aimed to describe the motivations, perceived risks for CAUTI acquisition, and strategies used to address CAUTI risk among EDs that had existing CAUTI prevention programs. In this qualitative comparative case study, we enrolled early-adopting EDs, that is, those using criteria for urinary catheter placement and tracking the frequency of catheters placed in the ED. At 6 diverse facilities, we conducted 52 semistructured interviews and 9 focus groups with hospital and ED participants. All ED CAUTI programs originated from a hospitalwide focus on CAUTI prevention. Staff were motivated to address CAUTI because they believed program compliance improved patient care. ED CAUTI prevention was perceived to differ from CAUTI prevention in the inpatient setting. To identify areas of ED CAUTI prevention focus, programs examined ED workflow and identified 4 CAUTI risks: (1) inappropriate reasons for urinary catheter placement; (2) physicians' limited involvement in placement decisions; (3) patterns of urinary catheter overuse; and (4) poor insertion technique. Programs redesigned workflow to address risks by (1) requiring staff to specify the medical reason for catheter at the point of order entry and placement; (2) making physicians responsible for determining catheter use; (3) using catheter alternatives to address patterns of overuse; and (4) modifying urinary catheter insertion practices to ensure proper placement. Early-adopting EDs redesigned workflow to minimize catheter use and ensure proper insertion technique. Assessment of ED workflow is necessary to identify and modify local practices that may increase CAUTI risk.

  4. Colonization of peripheral intravascular catheters with biofilm ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Biofilms often colonize catheters and contribute to catheter-related septicemia. However, predictors of catheter colonization by biofilms remain poorly defined. The aim of this study was to evaluate clinical factors that may be associated with biofilm colonization of catheters. Materials and Methods: A total of 54 ...

  5. Value of modified Foley catheter method in the removal of blunt esophageal foreign bodies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Kyung In; Cha, Yoo Mi; Han, Heon; Yang, Dal Mo; Kim, Hyung Sik; Lee, Young Seok

    1993-01-01

    Removal of blunt esophageal foreign bodies using Foley catheter under a fluoroscopic guidance is a well recognized procedure. However, since this procedure is rather cumbersome and uncomfortable to the patient, the authors tried to find an easier and more convenient modified technique. For 10 patients with esophageal foreign body, we tried the method to the patient who is lying in the right lateral decubitus position and 3 assistants hold head, arms, trunk and legs of the patient without tilting the table and without using immobilizer. Foley catheter is inserted through nostril, nasal cavity and pharynx to esophagus. in order to identify the Foley catheter in esophagus, 0.025 inch short wire was inserted in the Foley catheter. The balloon of a Foley catheter was inflated by 10 cc of air, and the syringe was kept attached to the Foley catheter during the procedure. After passage of the foreign body through the upper esophageal sphinter, the balloon was deflated immediately and the foreign body was removed through the mouth. We successfully removed in removing all the blunt esophageal foreign body with ease. This modified method is also fast, safe and efficient

  6. Outcomes of dialysis catheters placed by the Y-TEC peritoneoscopic technique: a single-center surgical experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Azzi, Yorg; Zeldis, Etti; Nadkarni, Girish N; Schanzer, Harry; Uribarri, Jaime

    2016-02-01

    In the last few years, peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheter placement techniques and outcomes have become important because of the growing population of PD patients. Although there are a growing number of catheters placed by the minimally invasive Y-TEC peritoneoscopic technique, there are still limited data on outcomes for these catheters, especially those placed by a surgeon. We aimed to conduct a retrospective study of our experience with PD catheters placed by the Y-TEC peritoneoscopic technique in our institution. We reviewed patients with peritoneoscopic PD catheter insertion over the last decade and described their complications and outcomes. In a secondary analysis, we compared the outcomes and complications of these catheters with those with open placement placed by the same surgeon. We had complete data on 62 patients with peritoneoscopic catheter placement during the study period. The mean age was 55 years, 48.4% were females and the most common cause of end-stage renal disease was diabetes mellitus (33%). Surgical complications were seen in only 6/62 (9.6%) and peritonitis in 16/62 (26%) of peritoneoscopic catheters. Most catheters were used after 2 months of placement, while 12.3% were used within 2 months. When compared with 93 patients with open placement of catheters as a secondary analysis, peritoneoscopic catheters were found to have a higher 2-year survival. Our large series of peritoneoscopically placed catheters by a surgeon demonstrate low surgical complications and peritonitis rates as well as superior 2-year survival compared with open placement of catheters.

  7. A 6-fr guiding catheter (slim guide(®)) for use with multiple microdevices. An experimental study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kai, Y; Ohmori, Y; Watanabe, M; Kaku, Y; Morioka, M; Hirano, T; Yano, S; Kawano, T; Hamada, J-I; Kuratsu, J-I

    2013-03-01

    A modified technique is required in patients with wide-necked aneurysms whose treatment by the single microcatheter technique is difficult. We developed a 6-Fr guiding catheter (Slim Guide(®)) that features a large lumen (0.072 inch) for performing the modified technique. To evaluate the usefulness of Slim Guide(®) we carried out experiments using three types of 6-Fr guiding catheter. In experiment 1, the shaft hardness and kink resistance were compared among three different guiding catheters (Slim Guide(®), Launcher(®), Envoy(®)). In experiment 2, we inserted a microballoon catheter and a microcatheter into the three different guiding catheters and recorded the maximal infusion pressure. In experiment 3, we inserted 13 different types of microdevices into the three different guiding catheters and evaluated the resistance of the microdevices. Although the shaft of the Slim Guide(®) was softer than that of the other two guiding catheters, its kink resistance was comparable. The maximal infusion pressure was significantly lower than with Launcher(®) or Envoy(®) catheters. Furthermore, with Slim Guide(®), in 136 of 143 microdevice combinations examined (95.1%) there was no resistance; this was true for 125 (87.4%) and 116 (81.1%) combinations using the Launcher(®) - and the Envoy(®) guiding catheters, respectively. There was a significant difference between Slim Guide(®) and the other two guiding catheters with respect to their accommodation of double microsystems (pGuide(®) is slightly larger than of the other two guiding catheters, it significantly increased the combination of microdevices that could be used for the coil embolization of difficult aneurysms.

  8. Tie rod insertion test

    CERN Multimedia

    B. LEVESY

    2002-01-01

    The superconducting coil is inserted in the outer vaccum tank and supported by a set of tie rods. These tie rods are made of titanium alloy. This test reproduce the final insertion of the tie rods inside the outer vacuum tank.

  9. Rising charges and costs for pediatric catheter ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, Kristin M; Evans, Frank; Pearson, Gail D; Berul, Charles I; Kaltman, Jonathan R

    2013-02-01

    Catheter ablation has been shown to be effective for pediatric tachyarrhythmias, but the associated charges and costs have not been described in the recent era. Understanding such contemporary trends may identify ways to keep an effective therapy affordable while optimizing clinical outcomes. We used the 1997-2009 Kids' Inpatient Databases to examine trends in charges and costs for pediatric catheter ablation and identify determinants of temporal changes. There were 7,130 discharges for catheter ablation in the sample. Mean age at ablation was 12.1 ± 0.2 years. Patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) made up 10% of the sample. Complications occurred in 8% of discharges. Mean total charges rose 219% above inflation (from $23,798 ± 1,072 in 1997 to $75,831 ± 2,065 in 2009). From 2003 to 2009, costs rose 25% (from $20,459 ± 780 in 2003 to $25,628 ± 992 in 2009). Charges for ablation increased markedly relative to surgical procedures, but with a similar slope to other catheter-based interventions. Multivariable analysis revealed that year (P charges. The same factors also predicted increased costs. Charges and costs varied considerably by region, particularly for high-volume centers (P Charges and costs for pediatric catheter ablation increased relative to other procedures and significantly outstripped inflation. Further study of complications, length of stay, and regional differences may help control rising costs while maintaining quality of care. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. Rising Charges and Costs for Pediatric Catheter Ablation

    Science.gov (United States)

    BURNS, KRISTIN M.; EVANS, FRANK; PEARSON, GAIL D.; BERUL, CHARLES I.; KALTMAN, JONATHAN R.

    2018-01-01

    Introduction Catheter ablation has been shown to be effective for pediatric tachyarrhythmias, but the associated charges and costs have not been described in the recent era. Understanding such contemporary trends may identify ways to keep an effective therapy affordable while optimizing clinical outcomes. Methods We used the 1997-2009 Kids’ Inpatient Databases to examine trends in charges and costs for pediatric catheter ablation and identify determinants of temporal changes. Results There were 7,130 discharges for catheter ablation in the sample. Mean age at ablation was 12.1 ± 0.2 years. Patients with congenital heart disease (CHD) made up 10% of the sample. Complications occurred in 8% of discharges. Mean total charges rose 219% above inflation (from $23,798 ± 1,072 in 1997 to $75,831 ± 2,065 in 2009). From 2003 to 2009, costs rose 25% (from $20,459 ± 780 in 2003 to $25,628 ± 992 in 2009). Charges for ablation increased markedly relative to surgical procedures, but with a similar slope to other catheter-based interventions. Multivariable analysis revealed that year (P pediatric catheter ablation increased relative to other procedures and significantly outstripped inflation. Further study of complications, length of stay, and regional differences may help control rising costs while maintaining quality of care. PMID:23066833

  11. Nurse-led PICC insertion: is it cost effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Graham; Todd, Alistair

    Repeated attempts to cannulate small veins can cause considerable distress for patients and expend substantial staff time.For longer term venous access, a peripherally inserted central catheter(PICC) may be used instead of a peripheral cannula. Previous studies indicate that insertion of a PICC costs three times more than a cannula but the lifespan is substantially longer. This study aimed to compare insertion cost, patient satisfaction, and infection rates of PICCs for the two main staff groups (trained nurses and radiologists) inserting these devices in a district general hospital. The study took place over 4 months in 2012-13.A questionnaire was attached to all identified PICCs in stock at Raigmore Hospital to collect details of the date of insertion, patient involved, time taken, attendant staff grade and experience level,consumables used and insertion success. The lead author's personal observation of PICC insertion by different staff groups allowed estimation of staff time, costs and success rates. Patient experience and satisfaction was assessed before and after insertion using a patient questionnaire. PICC longevity, infection rates and failures were assessed by review of patient notes. The radiologist group had a statistically significant (pPICCs can be safely performed without x-ray screening in a ward-based environment. This is likely to be the most cost-effective solution for large volume services.

  12. Nurse-led PICC insertion: is it cost effective?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walker, Graham; Todd, Alistair

    2013-10-24

    Repeated attempts to cannulate small veins can cause considerable distress for patients and expend substantial staff time. For longer term venous access, a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) may be used instead of a peripheral cannula. Previous studies indicate that insertion of a PICC costs three times more than a cannula but the lifespan is substantially longer. This study aimed to compare insertion cost, patient satisfaction, and infection rates of PICCs for the two main staff groups (trained nurses and radiologists) inserting these devices in a district general hospital. The study took place over 4 months in 2012-13. A questionnaire was attached to all identified PICCs in stock at Raigmore Hospital to collect details of the date of insertion, patient involved, time taken, attendant staff grade and experience level, consumables used and insertion success. The lead author's personal observation of PICC insertion by different staff groups allowed estimation of staff time, costs and success rates. Patient experience and satisfaction was assessed before and after insertion using a patient questionnaire. PICC longevity, infection rates and failures were assessed by review of patient notes. The radiologist group had a statistically significant (pPICCs can be safely performed without x-ray screening in a ward-based environment. This is likely to be the most cost-effective solution for large volume services.

  13. Central venous catheter use in severe malaria: time to reconsider the World Health Organization guidelines?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanson, J.; Lam, S.W.K.; Mohanty, S.; Alam, S.; Hasan, M.M.U.; Lee, S.J.; Schultz, M.J.; Charunwatthana, P.; Cohen, S.; Kabir, A.; Mishra, S.; Day, N.P.J.; White, N.J.; Dondorp, A.M.

    2011-01-01

    ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: To optimize the fluid status of adult patients with severe malaria, World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines recommend the insertion of a central venous catheter (CVC) and a target central venous pressure (CVP) of 0-5 cmH2O. However there are few data from clinical trials to

  14. Central venous catheter use in severe malaria: time to reconsider the World Health Organization guidelines?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hanson, Josh; Lam, Sophia Wk; Mohanty, Sanjib; Alam, Shamshul; Hasan, Md Mahtab Uddin; Lee, Sue J.; Schultz, Marcus J.; Charunwatthana, Prakaykaew; Cohen, Sophie; Kabir, Ashraf; Mishra, Saroj; Day, Nicholas Pj; White, Nicholas J.; Dondorp, Arjen M.

    2011-01-01

    To optimize the fluid status of adult patients with severe malaria, World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines recommend the insertion of a central venous catheter (CVC) and a target central venous pressure (CVP) of 0-5 cmH2O. However there are few data from clinical trials to support this

  15. Intravesical knotting of feeding tube used as urinary catheter in an infant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mamatha Basavaraju

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Infant feeding tube is commonly used to temporarily drain the bladder in pediatric population. A case is described where the tube got knotted inside the bladder probably due to over insertion or bladder spasm caused by irritation of catheter.

  16. Central venous catheter placement by an interventional radiology unit: an australian experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, M. K. S.; Mossop, P. J.; Vrazas, J. I.

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to analyse the outcomes of central venous catheter (CVC) placement carried out by an interventional radiology unit. A review of our hospital records identified 331 consecutive patients who underwent insertion of a tunnelled or non-tunnelled CVC between January 2000 and December 2004. Key outcome measures included the technical success rate of CVC insertion and the percentage of immediate ( 30 days) complications. A total of 462 CVCs were placed under radiological guidance, with an overall success rate of 98.9%. Immediate complications included one pneumothorax, which was diagnosed 7 days after subclavian CVC insertion, and eight episodes of significant haematoma or bleeding within 24 h of CVC insertion. No cases were complicated by arterial puncture or air embolus. Catheter-related sepsis occurred in 2% of non-tunnelled CVC and 8.9% of tunnelled CVC. The overall incidence of catheter-related sepsis was 0.17 per 100 catheter days. As the demand for chemotherapy and haemodialysis grows with our ageing population, interventional radiology suites are well placed to provide a safe and reliable service for the placement of central venous access devices

  17. A randomized controlled trial comparing indwelling pleural catheters with talc pleurodesis (NVALT-14)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boshuizen, R. C.; van der Noort, V.; Burgers, J. A.; Herder, G. J. M.; Hashemi, S. M. S.; Hiltermann, T. J. N.; Kunst, P. W.; Stigt, J. A.; van den Heuvel, M. M.

    2017-01-01

    Background: Symptomatic malignant pleural effusion (MPE) occurs frequently in patients with metastatic cancer. The associated prognosis is poor and the success rate of talc pleurodesis (TP) is low. Indwelling pleural catheters (IPCs) are commonly inserted when TP has been unsuccessful. Methods: We

  18. A randomized controlled trial comparing indwelling pleural catheters with talc pleurodesis (NVALT-14).

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boshuizen, R.C.; Vander Noort, V.; Burgers, J.A.; Herder, G.J.M.; Hashemi, S.M.; Hiltermann, T.J.N.; Kunst, P.W.; Stigt, J.A.; Heuvel, M. van den

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Symptomatic malignant pleural effusion (MPE) occurs frequently in patients with metastatic cancer. The associated prognosis is poor and the success rate of talc pleurodesis (TP) is low. Indwelling pleural catheters (IPCs) are commonly inserted when TP has been unsuccessful. METHODS: We

  19. A randomized controlled trial comparing indwelling pleural catheters with talc pleurodesis (NVALT-14)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boshuizen, R. C.; vander Noort, V.; Burgers, J. A.; Herder, G. J. M.; Hashemi, S. M. S.; Hiltermann, T. J. N.; Kunst, P. W.; Stigt, J. A.; van den Heuvel, M. M.

    Background: Symptomatic malignant pleural effusion (MPE) occurs frequently in patients with metastatic cancer. The associated prognosis is poor and the success rate of talc pleurodesis (TP) is low. Indwelling pleural catheters (IPCs) are commonly inserted when TP has been unsuccessful. Methods: We

  20. Effect of insulin catheter wear-time on subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow and insulin absorption in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, Trine Schnedler; Kaastrup, Peter; Stallknecht, Bente

    2009-01-01

    .1 +/- 0.7 kg/m(2)) and connected to an insulin pump delivering a constant rate of isotonic saline for 4 days. Subjects participated in four study days (days 0, 1, 2, and 4) during which ATBF around the catheter tip was measured by (133)Xe clearance and absorption of an insulin aspart bolus (0.1 U......BACKGROUND: Insertion of an insulin catheter for continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion into the subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) causes a tissue trauma that may have consequences for insulin absorption. We evaluated the importance of insulin catheter wear-time on subcutaneous adipose tissue...... blood flow (ATBF) and absorption of the rapid-acting insulin analog insulin aspart over a period of 4 days. METHODS: Teflon insulin catheters (Medtronic, Minneapolis, MN) were inserted into the abdominal SAT of 10 healthy men without diabetes (mean +/- SEM age, 23.0 +/- 1.1 years; body mass index, 22...

  1. SURVIVAL OF CONTINUOUS AMBULATORY PERITONEAL DIALYSIS CATHETERS: AN EVALUATION OF SURGICAL AND NON-SURGICAL FACTORS (SINGLE CENTER STUDY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Keshvari

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Peritoneal dialysis is an established form of renal replacement therapy used in many patients with end-stage renal disease. The key to a successful chronic peritoneal dialysis is a permanent and safe access to the peritoneal cavity. This study was conducted in order to evaluate the catheter survival and its related factors in Imam Khomeini Hospital. A total of 80 catheters were inserted into 69 patients (52 men and 28 women with end-stage chronic renal failure during a period of 84 months. Retrospectively the correlation between catheter survival (overall and event free with demographic factors (sex and age, surgical factors (surgeons and surgical methods, nephrologic factors (the causes of peritoneal dialysis selection and the history of hemodialysis and peritonitis factors (the history and number of peritonitis has been evaluated. The mean age of the patients was 48.35 years (16 to 79 years. The overall survival of catheters or the probability of having a functioning catheter after one, two and three years was 53%, 41%, 22%, respectively. The event free survival of the catheter or the probability of having a functioning catheter without any problems after one year was 14%. It has been found out that among all factors in this study only history of hemodialysis had statistically significant effect on the overall survival of continuous ambulatory peritoneal dialysis catheter (P = 0.04. It seems that the overall survival of catheters is better when CAPD is started before any other attempts for hemodialysis.

  2. [Frequency of colonization and isolated bacteria from the tip of the epidural catheter implanted for postoperative analgesia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stabille, Débora Miranda Diogo; Filho, Augusto Diogo; Mandim, Beatriz Lemos da Silva; Araújo, Lúcio Borges de; Mesquita, Priscila Miranda Diogo; Jorge, Miguel Tanús

    2015-01-01

    The increased use of epidural analgesia with catheter leads to the need to demonstrate the safety of this method and know the incidence of catheter colonization, inserted postoperatively for epidural analgesia, and the bacteria responsible for this colonization. From November 2011 to April 2012, patients electively operated and maintained under epidural catheter for postoperative analgesia were evaluated. The catheter tip was collected for semiquantitative and qualitative microbiological analysis. Of 68 cultured catheters, six tips (8.8%) had positive cultures. No patient had superficial or deep infection. The mean duration of catheter use was 43.45hours (18-118) (p=0.0894). The type of surgery (contaminated or uncontaminated), physical status of patients, and surgical time showed no relation with the colonization of catheters. Microorganisms isolated from the catheter tip were Staphylococcus aureus, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Sphingomonas paucimobilis. Postoperative epidural catheter analgesia, under this study conditions, was found to be low risk for bacterial colonization in patients at surgical wards. Copyright © 2014 Sociedade Brasileira de Anestesiologia. Publicado por Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  3. Previous PICC placement may be associated with catheter-related infections in hemodialysis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Philip J; Sood, Shreya; Mojibian, Hamid; Tal, Michael G

    2011-02-01

    Catheter-related infections (CRIs) are a significant source of morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis patients. The identification of novel, modifiable risk factors for CRIs may lead to improved outcomes in this population. Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) have been hypothesized to compromise vascular access due to vascular damage and venous thrombosis, whereas venous thrombosis has been linked to the development of CRIs. Here we examine the association between PICC placement and CRIs. A retrospective review was performed of all chronic hemodialysis catheter placements and exchanges performed at a large university hospital from September 2003 to September 2008. History of PICC line use was determined by examining hospital radiologic records from December 1993 to September 2008. Catheter-related complications were assessed and correlated with PICC line history. One hundred eighty-five patients with 713 chronic tunneled hemodialysis catheter placements were identified. Thirty-eight of those patients (20.5%) had a history of PICC placement; these patients were more likely to have CRIs (odds ratio = 2.46, 95% confidence interval = 1.71-3.53, p PICC placement. There was no difference between the two groups in age or number of catheters placed. Previous PICC placement may be associated with catheter-related infections in hemodialysis patients.

  4. Previous PICC Placement May Be Associated With Catheter-Related Infections in Hemodialysis Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Butler, Philip J.; Sood, Shreya; Mojibian, Hamid; Tal, Michael G.

    2011-01-01

    Background: Catheter-related infections (CRIs) are a significant source of morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis patients. The identification of novel, modifiable risk factors for CRIs may lead to improved outcomes in this population. Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) have been hypothesized to compromise vascular access due to vascular damage and venous thrombosis, whereas venous thrombosis has been linked to the development of CRIs. Here we examine the association between PICC placement and CRIs. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of all chronic hemodialysis catheter placements and exchanges performed at a large university hospital from September 2003 to September 2008. History of PICC line use was determined by examining hospital radiologic records from December 1993 to September 2008. Catheter-related complications were assessed and correlated with PICC line history. Results: One hundred eighty-five patients with 713 chronic tunneled hemodialysis catheter placements were identified. Thirty-eight of those patients (20.5%) had a history of PICC placement; these patients were more likely to have CRIs (odds ratio = 2.46, 95% confidence interval = 1.71–3.53, p < .001) compared with patients without a history of PICC placement. There was no difference between the two groups in age or number of catheters placed. Conclusion: Previous PICC placement may be associated with catheter-related infections in hemodialysis patients.

  5. A National Implementation Project to Prevent Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection in Nursing Home Residents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Lona; Greene, M Todd; Meddings, Jennifer; Krein, Sarah L; McNamara, Sara E; Trautner, Barbara W; Ratz, David; Stone, Nimalie D; Min, Lillian; Schweon, Steven J; Rolle, Andrew J; Olmsted, Russell N; Burwen, Dale R; Battles, James; Edson, Barbara; Saint, Sanjay

    2017-08-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (UTI) in nursing home residents is a common cause of sepsis, hospital admission, and antimicrobial use leading to colonization with multidrug-resistant organisms. To develop, implement, and evaluate an intervention to reduce catheter-associated UTI. A large-scale prospective implementation project was conducted in community-based nursing homes participating in the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality Safety Program for Long-Term Care. Nursing homes across 48 states, Washington DC, and Puerto Rico participated. Implementation of the project was conducted between March 1, 2014, and August 31, 2016. The project was implemented over 12-month cohorts and included a technical bundle: catheter removal, aseptic insertion, using regular assessments, training for catheter care, and incontinence care planning, as well as a socioadaptive bundle emphasizing leadership, resident and family engagement, and effective communication. Urinary catheter use and catheter-associated UTI rates using National Healthcare Safety Network definitions were collected. Facility-level urine culture order rates were also obtained. Random-effects negative binomial regression models were used to examine changes in catheter-associated UTI, catheter utilization, and urine cultures and adjusted for covariates including ownership, bed size, provision of subacute care, 5-star rating, presence of an infection control committee, and an infection preventionist. In 4 cohorts over 30 months, 568 community-based nursing homes were recruited; 404 met inclusion criteria for analysis. The unadjusted catheter-associated UTI rates decreased from 6.78 to 2.63 infections per 1000 catheter-days. With use of the regression model and adjustment for facility characteristics, the rates decreased from 6.42 to 3.33 (incidence rate ratio [IRR], 0.46; 95% CI, 0.36-0.58; P < .001). Catheter utilization was 4.5% at baseline and 4.9% at the end of the project. Catheter

  6. Effect of using static ultrasound technique on peripherally inserted central catheters’ insertion success rate in neonates in a neonatal intensive care unit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdeyazdan, Zahra; Sheikhan-Sudani, Elaheh; Sadeghnia, Alireza; Talakoub, Sedigheh

    2014-01-01

    Background: Peripheral insertion of central catheters can be difficult in neonates. We compared the success rates of peripherally inserted central catheters by two methods of using static ultrasound and traditional technique (vein visualization and palpation) in neonates. Materials and Methods: In a prospective randomized, controlled trial, 52 neonates with birth weight lower than 1500 g in a level 3 neonatal intensive care unit were enrolled. Neonates were randomized to undergo peripherally inserted central catheter placement using a traditional technique (n = 27) versus static ultrasound-guided technique (n = 25). In the ultrasound group, vein localization was performed and the skin overlying the target vessel was marked. Insertion of catheter was then immediately performed. We recorded and compared success rates in the groups. Results: Success rate after the first attempt was 68% in ultrasound group and 60% in traditional group. These rates for the second attempt were 50% and 40%, respectively. The overall success rates after two attempts were 84% and 76% in ultrasound and traditional groups, retrospectively (P = 0.24). Conclusions: There was no significant difference between the two groups regarding PICC success rates, probably because in the present study, most of the subjects were premature neonates whose vasculature was visually detectable. PMID:25558263

  7. Catheter related bloodstream infection following PICC removal in preterm infants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brooker, R W; Keenan, W J

    2007-03-01

    Describe the incidence of catheter-related blood stream infection (CRBSI), following removal of peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICC) in preterm infants. A retrospective cohort study of infants PICC revealed 101 PICCs placed (2159 PICC days). Patients were hospitalized in a level III Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) between January 2002 and December 2003. Chi(2) analysis was performed. One infection was detected after the removal of a PICC (1 per 202 days). Ten infants had a CRBSI attributed to a PICC (1 per 216 PICC days). CRBSI during indwelling PICC was associated with increased risk for sepsis evaluation after PICC removal (PPICC removal was not different than the incidence of CRBSI while a PICC was in-dwelling. There was no evidence from this study to support antibacterial prophylaxis before PICC removal.

  8. 2016 Expert consensus document on prevention, diagnosis and treatment of short-term peripheral venous catheter-related infections in adults

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josep A. Capdevila

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The use of endovascular catheters is a routine practice in secondary and tertiary care level hospitals. The short-term use of peripheral catheters has been found to be associated with the risk of nosocomial bacteraemia, resulting in morbidity and mortality. Staphylococcus aureus is mostly associated with peripheral catheter insertion. This Consensus Document has been prepared by a panel of experts of the Spanish Society of Cardiovascular Infections, in cooperation with experts from the Spanish Society of Internal Medicine, Spanish Society of Chemotherapy, and the Spanish Society of Thoracic-Cardiovascular Surgery, and aims to define and establish guidelines for the management of short duration peripheral vascular catheters. The document addresses the indications for insertion, catheter maintenance, registering, diagnosis and treatment of infection, indications for removal, as well as placing an emphasis on continuous education as a drive toward quality. Implementation of these guidelines will allow uniformity in use, thus minimizing the risk of infections and their complications.

  9. Development of a New Coaxial Balloon Catheter System for Balloon-Occluded Retrograde Transvenous Obliteration (B-RTO)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanoue, Shuichi; Kiyosue, Hiro; Matsumoto, Shunro; Hori, Yuzo; Okahara, Mika; Kashiwagi, Junji; Mori, Hiromu

    2006-01-01

    Purpose. To develop a new coaxial balloon catheter system and evaluate its clinical feasibility for balloon-occluded retrograde transvenous obliteration (B-RTO). Methods. A coaxial balloon catheter system was constructed with 9 Fr guiding balloon catheter and 5 Fr balloon catheter. A 5 Fr catheter has a high flexibility and can be coaxially inserted into the guiding catheter in advance. The catheter balloons are made of natural rubber and can be inflated to 2 cm (guiding) and 1 cm (5 Fr) maximum diameter. Between July 2003 and April 2005, 8 consecutive patients (6 men, 2 women; age range 33-72 years, mean age 55.5 years) underwent B-RTO using the balloon catheter system. Five percent ethanolamine oleate iopamidol (EOI) was used as sclerosing agent. The procedures, including maneuverability of the catheter, amount of injected sclerosing agent, necessity for coil embolization of collateral draining veins, and initial clinical results, were evaluated retrospectively. The occlusion rate was assessed by postcontrast CT within 2 weeks after B-RTO. Results. The balloon catheter could be advanced into the proximal potion of the gastrorenal shunt beyond the collateral draining vein in all cases. The amount of injected EOI ranged from 3 to 34 ml. Coil embolization of the collateral draining vein was required in 2 cases. Complete obliteration of gastric varices on initial follow-up CT was obtained in 7 cases. The remaining case required re-treatment that resulted in complete obstruction of the varices after the second B-RTO. No procedure-related complications were observed. Conclusion. B-RTO using the new coaxial balloon catheter is feasible. Gastric varices can be treated more simply by using this catheter system

  10. Reasons of unsuccessful implantation of short-term hemodialysis catheters in jugular veins using real-time ultrasound.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins Marrocos, Mauro Sergio; S Gentil, Thais Marques; de C Lima, Fernanda; R Laranja, Sandra Maria

    2018-03-01

    Real-time ultrasound is indicated for hemodialysis catheters' insertion in internal jugular veins. We evaluated unsuccessful implantation of short-term hemodialysis catheters in internal jugular veins using real-time ultrasound between patients with and without previous short-term catheters. Observational open-label study of unsuccessful implantation of short-term hemodialysis catheters in internal jugular veins using real-time ultrasound from July 2013 to August 2014. A total of 185 procedures were compared in 122 individuals; 120 (64.86%) had previously used short-term catheters. There were 5 (8%) unsuccessful implantation among 62 catheterizations without previous short-term catheter and 41 (33.6%) among 122 with previous short-term catheter (p = 0.001 Pearson's chi-squared, odds ratio = 5.77, 95% confidence interval = 2.15-15.50, p = 0.001). Non-progressing guidewire occurred in 2 (3.2%) of 62 patients without previous short-term catheter and in 18 (14.8%) of 122 with previous short-term catheter (p = 0.018 Pearson's chi-squared, odds ratio = 5.19, 95% confidence interval = 1.16-23.15, p = 0.031). No difference was observed between size of the veins with or without non-progressing guidewire. All 11 cases of venous thrombosis occurred in patients who had previous short-term catheter removed due to infection. Previous use of short-term catheter is pivotal in the occurrence of unsuccessful implantation of short-term catheter in internal jugular veins using real-time ultrasound.

  11. Catheter Dwell Time and CLABSIs in Neonates With PICCs: A Multicenter Cohort Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reich, Nicholas G.; Advani, Sonali; Yuan, Guoshu; Bryant, Kristina; Coffin, Susan E.; Huskins, W. Charles; Livingston, Robyn; Saiman, Lisa; Smith, P. Brian; Song, Xiaoyan

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether the daily risk of central line–associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) increases over the dwell time of peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) in high-risk neonates. METHODS: Multicenter retrospective cohort including NICU patients with a PICC inserted between January 2005 and June 2010. We calculated incidence rates and used Poisson regression models to assess the risk of developing CLABSI as a function of PICC dwell time. RESULTS: A total of 4797 PICCs placed in 3967 neonates were included; 149 CLABSIs occurred over 89 946 catheter-days (incidence rate 1.66 per 1000 catheter-days). In unadjusted analysis, PICCs with a dwell time of 8 to 13 days, 14 to 22 days, and ≥23 days each had an increased risk of infection compared with PICCs in place for ≤7 days (P PICC insertion increased during the first 2 weeks after PICC insertion and remained elevated for the dwell time of the catheter. There was an increased risk of CLABSIs in neonates with concurrent PICCs (adjusted incidence rate ratio 2.04, 1.12–3.71). The incidence of Gram-negative CLABSIs was greater in PICCs with dwell times >50 days (incidence rate ratio 5.26, 2.40–10.66). CONCLUSIONS: The risk of CLABSIs increased during the 2 weeks after PICC insertion and then remained elevated until PICC removal. Clinicians should review PICC necessity daily, optimize catheter maintenance practices, and investigate novel CLABSI prevention strategies in PICCs with prolonged dwell times. PMID:24218474

  12. Comparison of intravaginal misoprostol and intracervical Foley catheter alone or in combination for termination of second trimester pregnancy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezk, Mohamed Abd-Allah; Sanad, Zakaria; Dawood, Ragab; Emarh, Mohamed; Masood, Alaa

    2015-01-01

    To examine the effectiveness, safety and acceptability of intravaginal misoprostol and intracervical Foley catheter alone or in combination for termination of second trimester pregnancy. This clinical study was conducted on 90 pregnant patients intended for termination of pregnancy between 13 and 24 gestational weeks for any indication. Enrolled women are equally allocated into three groups: • Group I (Misoprostol group): a standard regimen of moistened misoprostol (400 μg) 4 hourly inserted vaginally. • Group II (Catheter group): intracervical Foley catheter inserted, inflated and placed on traction. • Group III (Combined group): intracervical Foley catheter inserted with a standard regimen of moistened misoprostol (400 μg) 4 hourly intravaginally was used. Procedure efficacy (defined as complete abortion performed on site), safety and acceptability were assessed. The induction to abortion interval was 7.5±1.25 h in the combined group, compared to 11.76±1.63 h in the misoprostol group and 19.76±1.52 h in the catheter group (p valueintracervical Foley catheter and misoprostol for termination of second trimester pregnancy.

  13. Challenges and proposed improvements for reviewing symptoms and catheter use to identify National Healthcare Safety Network catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meddings, Jennifer; Reichert, Heidi; McMahon, Laurence F

    2014-10-01

    Retrospective medical record review is used to categorize urinary tract infections (UTIs) as symptomatic, catheter-associated, and/or healthcare-associated to generate National Healthcare Safety Network (NHSN) surveillance and claims data. We assessed how often patients with UTI diagnoses in claims data had a catheter in place, had documented symptoms, or met the NHSN criteria for catheter-associated UTI (CAUTI). Two physicians retrospectively reviewed medical records for 294 randomly selected patients hospitalized with UTI as a secondary diagnosis, discharged between October 2008 and September 2009 from the University of Michigan. We applied a modification of recent NHSN criteria to estimate how often UTIs in claims data may be an NHSN CAUTI. The 294 patients included 193 women (66%). The mean patient age was 63 years, and the median length of hospital stay was 7.5 days. Catheter use was noted for 216 of 294 postadmission records (74%), including 126 (43%) with a Foley catheter. NHSN symptoms were noted in 113 records (38%); 62 (21%) had symptoms other than fever. Of 136 hospitalizations meeting urine culture criteria, 17 (5.8%) met the criteria for a potential NHSN CAUTI. Retrospective medical record review to identify symptoms and catheter use is complicated and resource-intensive. Requiring standard documentation of symptoms and catheter status when ordering urine cultures could simplify and improve CAUTI surveillance and its fidelity as a hospital quality indicator. Copyright © 2014 Association for Professionals in Infection Control and Epidemiology, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Atuação do enfermeiro no cuidado com o cateter central de inserção periférica no recém-nascido Actuación del enfermero en el cuidado con el cateter central de inserción periferica en el recién nacido Action of the nurse with peripherally inserted central catheter in the infant newborn

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zaira Simas Rodrigues

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Os avanços tecnológicos em Neonatologia vêm beneficiando os recém-nascidos que necessitam de um acesso venoso seguro. Objetivou-se investigar a atuação do enfermeiro no cuidado com o Cateter Central de Inserção Periférica (PICC na Unidade de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal em Fortaleza, CE. A amostra foi composta por 17 enfermeiros e os dados foram coletados de julho a agosto/2004 através de questionário estruturado. Nos resultados verificou-se que 09 citaram a veia basílica como a mais indicada para a punção; 17 mencionaram a lavagem das mãos antes e após o manuseio e a lavagem do cateter antes e após as medicações como os cuidados mais importantes. Conclui-se que o manuseio deste dispositivo requer conhecimento e habilidade por parte dos profissionais.Los avances tecnológicos en la Neonatología han beneficiando los recién nacidos de alto riesgo, que necesitan de un acceso venoso seguro. Este trabajo tuvo por objetivo investigar la actuación del enfermero en el cuidado con el Cateter Central de Inserción Periférica (PICC en la Unidad de Terapia Intensiva Neonatal en Fortaleza, CE. Los datos fueron recolectados de julio a agosto de 2004 a través de un cuestionario. En los resultados se verificó que 09 citaron la vena basílica como de más indicada para la punción; 17 mencionaron de entre los cuidados, el lavado de las manos antes y después de lo manoseo y el lavado del cateter antes y después de las medicaciones como los más importantes. Se concluye que lo manoseo de este dispositivo requiere conocimiento y habilidad por parte de los profesionales.Technological advances in Neonatology have benefited the infant newborn who need a safe venous access. This study aimed at investigating the actions of the nurse regarding Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC in the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit in Fortaleza, CE. The sample was composed by 17 nurses; the data were collected from July to August 2004 through a structured

  15. Long-axis ultrasound imaging of the nerves and advancement of perineural catheters under direct vision: a preliminary report of four cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koscielniak-Nielsen, Z.J.; Rasmussen, H.; Hesselbjerg, L.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND OBJECTIVES: Ultrasound allows visualization of in plane needle insertion toward a nerve and the perineural spread of local anesthetic (LA) solution. However, advancement and final positioning of perineural catheters is difficult to visualize. We assessed the feasibility of long axis...... axis images of the target nerves, the high frequency linear transducer was rotated 90 degrees to obtain long axis views. An 18-gauge epidural Tuohy needle was inserted tangentially to the nerve and the correct tip position was confirmed visually by small volume injections of LA. A rigid epidural...... catheter was inserted under the transducer's long plane and advanced into the desired perineural position. LA was then injected through the catheter and the spread was confirmed both on long axis and short axis scans. RESULTS: The catheters were captured on the long axis scans in all 4 patients, both...

  16. Evaluation of mupirocin ointment in control of central venous catheter related infections: a randomized clinical trial

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rezaei J

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available "n Normal 0 false false false EN-US X-NONE AR-SA MicrosoftInternetExplorer4 st1":*{behavior:url(#ieooui } /* Style Definitions */ table.MsoNormalTable {mso-style-name:"Table Normal"; mso-tstyle-rowband-size:0; mso-tstyle-colband-size:0; mso-style-noshow:yes; mso-style-priority:99; mso-style-qformat:yes; mso-style-parent:""; mso-padding-alt:0in 5.4pt 0in 5.4pt; mso-para-margin:0in; mso-para-margin-bottom:.0001pt; mso-pagination:widow-orphan; font-size:11.0pt; font-family:"Calibri","sans-serif"; mso-ascii-font-family:Calibri; mso-ascii-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-fareast-font-family:"Times New Roman"; mso-fareast-theme-font:minor-fareast; mso-hansi-font-family:Calibri; mso-hansi-theme-font:minor-latin; mso-bidi-font-family:Arial; mso-bidi-theme-font:minor-bidi;} Background: Central venous catheter (CVC related infections are important complications of cathter application. This study assessed the usefulness of mupirocin in prevention and control of these infections."n"nMethods: In this randomized clinical trial, consecutive surgical patients requiring central venous catheter (for more than 2 days in Amir-Alam Hospital from 2006-2008 were enrolled. Patients were divided in two groups; in "case group" patients received topical mupirocin 2% every 48 hours at the time of insertion of catheter and dressing change and for "control group" mupirocin was not used. All of the patients received chlorhexidine and enoxoparin as complementary treatments. Two groups were comparable in regard of age, sex and risk factors."n"nResults: One hundred eighteen patients enrolled in the study (57 in case and 61 in control group completed the study. 84 catheters in case group and 88 catheters in control group were inserted. The catheters in 90% of patients were inserted in jugular vein. At the end of study 29(16.8% patients (16 in control versus 13 in case group had catheter colonization (p=NS. Catheter related bloodstream infection was observed in 16(9.3% patients (6 in

  17. Hemodialysis catheter implantation in the axillary vein by ultrasound guidance versus palpation or anatomical reference

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Restrepo Valencia CA

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Cesar A Restrepo Valencia,1 Carlos A Buitrago Villa,1 Jose A Chacon Cardona21Internal Medicine, Nephrology, 2Epidemiology, Caldas University, Manizales, ColombiaBackground: We compared the results of four different methods of hemodialysis catheter insertion in the medial segment of the axillary vein: ultrasound guidance, palpation, anatomical reference, and prior transient catheter.Methods: All patients that required acute or chronic hemodialysis and for whom it was determined impossible or not recommended either to place a catheter in the internal jugular vein (for instance, those patients with a tracheostomy, or to practice arteriovenous fistula or graft; it was then essential to obtain an alternative vascular access. When the procedure of axillary vein catheter insertion was performed in the Renal Care Facility (RCF, ultrasound guidance was used, but in the intensive care unit (ICU, this resource was unavailable, so the palpation or anatomical reference technique was used.Results: Two nephrologists with experience in the technique performed 83 procedures during a period lasting 15 years and 8 months (from January 1997–August 2012: 41 by ultrasound guidance; 19 by anatomical references; 15 by palpation of the contiguous axillary artery; and 8 through a temporary axillary catheter previously placed. The ultrasound-guided patients had fewer punctures than other groups, but the value was not statistically significant. Arterial punctures were infrequent in all techniques. Analyzing all the procedure-related complications, such as hematoma, pneumothorax, brachial-plexus injury, as well as the reasons for catheter removal, no differences were observed among the groups. The functioning time was longer in the ultrasound-guided and previous catheter groups. In 15 years and 8 months of surveillance, no clinical or image evidence for axillary vein stenosis was found.Conclusion: The ultrasound guide makes the procedure of inserting catheters in the

  18. Fundamental length and relativistic length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strel'tsov, V.N.

    1988-01-01

    It si noted that the introduction of fundamental length contradicts the conventional representations concerning the contraction of the longitudinal size of fast-moving objects. The use of the concept of relativistic length and the following ''elongation formula'' permits one to solve this problem

  19. Transcervical Foley's catheter versus Cook balloon for cervical ripening in stillbirth with a scarred uterus: a randomized controlled trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rab, Mohammed T Gadel; Mohammed, Abdel Baset F; Zahran, Khalid A; Hassan, Mo'men M; Eldeen, Abdel Razek M; Ebrahim, Emad M; Yehia, Mohammed

    2015-07-01

    To compare the efficacy and safety of the use of transcervical Foley's catheter versus Cook cervical ripening balloon in pregnant women with stillbirth, unfavorable cervix and scarred uterus. Randomized controlled study. El Minia University Hospital, El Minia, Egypt. Two-hundred pregnant women with stillbirth, unfavorable cervix and scarred uterus were recruited into this study. They were randomized into two groups. In group I (n = 100), cervical ripening was done using Foley's catheter. In group II (n = 100), cervical ripening was done using Cook cervical ripening balloon. Balloon insertion to delivery interval, successful ripening rate, cesarean delivery rate, maternal adverse events and maternal satisfaction. Time from balloon insertion to expulsion and from balloon insertion to delivery was significantly shorter in Foley's catheter group. However, the difference between the two groups regarding time from balloon insertion to active labor, time from balloon expulsion to delivery, cervical ripening, cesarean section, instrumental delivery, pain score, need for analgesia, hospital stay and maternal satisfaction was not statistically significant. Foley's catheter and Cook cervical ripening balloon are comparable regarding efficacy and safety profile when used to ripen the cervix in pregnant women with stillbirth, unfavorable cervix and scarred uterus. However, Foley's catheter has a shorter induction to delivery interval and is relatively cheaper device.

  20. A system to use electromagnetic tracking for the quality assurance of brachytherapy catheter digitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Damato, Antonio L.; Viswanathan, Akila N.; Don, Sarah M.; Hansen, Jorgen L.; Cormack, Robert A.

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate the use of a system using electromagnetic tracking (EMT), post-processing and an error-detection algorithm for detecting errors and resolving uncertainties in high-dose-rate brachytherapy catheter digitization for treatment planning. Methods: EMT was used to localize 15 catheters inserted into a phantom using a stepwise acquisition technique. Five distinct acquisition experiments were performed. Noise associated with the acquisition was calculated. The dwell location configuration was extracted from the EMT data. A CT scan of the phantom was performed, and five distinct catheter digitization sessions were performed. No a priori registration of the CT scan coordinate system with the EMT coordinate system was performed. CT-based digitization was automatically extracted from the brachytherapy plan DICOM files (CT), and rigid registration was performed between EMT and CT dwell positions. EMT registration error was characterized in terms of the mean and maximum distance between corresponding EMT and CT dwell positions per catheter. An algorithm for error detection and identification was presented. Three types of errors were systematically simulated: swap of two catheter numbers, partial swap of catheter number identification for parts of the catheters (mix), and catheter-tip shift. Error-detection sensitivity (number of simulated scenarios correctly identified as containing an error/number of simulated scenarios containing an error) and specificity (number of scenarios correctly identified as not containing errors/number of correct scenarios) were calculated. Catheter identification sensitivity (number of catheters correctly identified as erroneous across all scenarios/number of erroneous catheters across all scenarios) and specificity (number of catheters correctly identified as correct across all scenarios/number of correct catheters across all scenarios) were calculated. The mean detected and identified shift was calculated. Results: The

  1. Flame Length

    Data.gov (United States)

    Earth Data Analysis Center, University of New Mexico — Flame length was modeled using FlamMap, an interagency fire behavior mapping and analysis program that computes potential fire behavior characteristics. The tool...

  2. Accuracy of chest radiography for positioning of the umbilical venous catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana F.M. Guimarães

    Full Text Available Abstract Objectives: To evaluate the accuracy of the simultaneous analysis of three radiographic anatomical landmarks - diaphragm, cardiac silhouette, and vertebral bodies - in determining the position of the umbilical venous catheter distal end using echocardiography as a reference standard. Methods: This was a cross-sectional, observational study, with the prospective inclusion of data from all neonates born in a public reference hospital, between April 2012 and September 2013, submitted to umbilical venous catheter insertion as part of their medical care. The position of the catheter distal end, determined by the simultaneous analysis of three radiographic anatomical landmarks, was compared with the anatomical position obtained by echocardiography; sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy were calculated. Results: Of the 162 newborns assessed by echocardiography, only 44 (27.16% had the catheter in optimal position, in the thoracic portion of the inferior vena cava or at the junction of the inferior vena cava with the right atrium. The catheters were located in the left atrium and interatrial septum in 54 (33.33% newborns, in the right atrium in 26 (16.05%, intra-hepatic in 37 (22.84%, and intra-aortic in-one newborn (0.62%. The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the radiography to detect the catheter in the target area were 56%, 71%, and 67.28%, respectively. Conclusion: Anteroposterior radiography of the chest alone is not able to safely define the umbilical venous catheter position. Echocardiography allows direct visualization of the catheter tip in relation to vascular structures and, whenever possible, should be considered to identify the location of the umbilical venous catheter.

  3. Accuracy of chest radiography for positioning of the umbilical venous catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guimarães, Adriana F M; Souza, Aline A C G de; Bouzada, Maria Cândida F; Meira, Zilda M A

    To evaluate the accuracy of the simultaneous analysis of three radiographic anatomical landmarks - diaphragm, cardiac silhouette, and vertebral bodies - in determining the position of the umbilical venous catheter distal end using echocardiography as a reference standard. This was a cross-sectional, observational study, with the prospective inclusion of data from all neonates born in a public reference hospital, between April 2012 and September 2013, submitted to umbilical venous catheter insertion as part of their medical care. The position of the catheter distal end, determined by the simultaneous analysis of three radiographic anatomical landmarks, was compared with the anatomical position obtained by echocardiography; sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value, negative predictive value, and accuracy were calculated. Of the 162 newborns assessed by echocardiography, only 44 (27.16%) had the catheter in optimal position, in the thoracic portion of the inferior vena cava or at the junction of the inferior vena cava with the right atrium. The catheters were located in the left atrium and interatrial septum in 54 (33.33%) newborns, in the right atrium in 26 (16.05%), intra-hepatic in 37 (22.84%), and intra-aortic in-one newborn (0.62%). The sensitivity, specificity and accuracy of the radiography to detect the catheter in the target area were 56%, 71%, and 67.28%, respectively. Anteroposterior radiography of the chest alone is not able to safely define the umbilical venous catheter position. Echocardiography allows direct visualization of the catheter tip in relation to vascular structures and, whenever possible, should be considered to identify the location of the umbilical venous catheter. Copyright © 2016 Sociedade Brasileira de Pediatria. Published by Elsevier Editora Ltda. All rights reserved.

  4. Combined ultrasound and fluoroscopy guided port catheter implantation-High success and low complication rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gebauer, Bernhard; El-Sheik, Michael; Vogt, Michael; Wagner, Hans-Joachim

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate peri-procedural, early and late complications as well as patients' acceptance of combined ultrasound and fluoroscopy guided radiological port catheter implantation. Materials and methods: In a retrospective analysis, all consecutive radiological port catheter implantations (n = 299) between August 2002 and December 2004 were analyzed. All implantations were performed in an angio suite under analgosedation and antibiotic prophylaxis. Port insertion was guided by ultrasonographic puncture of the jugular (n = 298) or subclavian (n = 1) vein and fluoroscopic guidance of catheter placement. All data of the port implantation had been prospectively entered into a database for interventional radiological procedures. To assess long-term results, patients, relatives or primary physicians were interviewed by telephone; additional data were generated from the hospital information system. Patients and/or the relatives were asked about their satisfaction with the port implantion procedure and long-term results. Results: The technical success rate was 99% (298/299). There were no major complications according to the grading system of SIR. A total of 23 (0.33 per 1000 catheter days) complications (early (n = 4), late (n = 19)) were recorded in the follow-period of a total of 72,727 indwelling catheter days. Infectious complications accounted for 0.15, thrombotic for 0.07 and migration for 0.04 complications per 1000 catheter days. Most complications were successfully treated by interventional measures. Twelve port catheters had to be explanted due to complications, mainly because of infection (n = 9). Patients' and relatives' satisfaction with the port catheter system was very high, even if complications occurred. Conclusion: Combined ultrasound and fluoroscopy guided port catheter implantation is a very safe and reliable procedure with low peri-procedural, early and late complication rate. The intervention achieves very high acceptance by the patients and

  5. Malfunctioning and infected tunneled infusion catheters: over-the-wire catheter exchange versus catheter removal and replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guttmann, David M; Trerotola, Scott O; Clark, Timothy W; Dagli, Mandeep; Shlansky-Goldberg, Richard D; Itkin, Maxim; Soulen, Michael C; Mondschein, Jeffrey I; Stavropoulos, S William

    2011-05-01

    To compare the safety and effectiveness of over-the-wire catheter exchange (catheter-exchange) with catheter removal and replacement (removal-replacement) at a new site for infected or malfunctioning tunneled infusion catheters. Using a quality assurance database, 61 patients with tunneled infusion catheters placed during the period July 2001 to June 2009 were included in this study. Patients receiving hemodialysis catheters were excluded. Catheter-exchange was performed in 25 patients, and same-day removal-replacement was performed in 36 patients. Data collected included demographic information, indication for initial catheter placement and replacement, dwell time for the new catheter, and ultimate fate of the new device. Statistical comparisons between the two cohorts were analyzed using the Kaplan-Meier technique and Fisher exact test. Catheters exchanged over the wire remained functional without infection for a median of 102 days (range, 2-570 days), whereas catheters removed and replaced were functional for a median 238 days (range, 1-292 days, P = .12). After catheter replacement, there were 11 instances of subsequent infection in the catheter-exchange group and 7 instances in the removal-replacement cohort, accounting for infection rates of 4.4 and 2.3 per 1,000 catheter days (P = .049). Patients in the catheter-exchange group had 3.2 greater odds of infection compared with patients in the removal-replacement group. Five malfunction events occurred in each group, accounting for 2.0 and 1.7 malfunctions per 1,000 catheter days in the catheter-exchange and removal-replacement groups (P = .73). Catheter-exchange of tunneled infusion catheters results in a higher infection rate compared with removal-replacement at a new site. The rate of catheter malfunction is not significantly different between the two groups. Catheter-exchange is an alternative for patients with tunneled infusion catheters who have limited venous access, but this technique should not be

  6. Comparing Leaf and Root Insertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaco Geldenhuys

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available We consider two ways of inserting a key into a binary search tree: leaf insertion which is the standard method, and root insertion which involves additional rotations. Although the respective cost of constructing leaf and root insertion binary search trees trees, in terms of comparisons, are the same in the average case, we show that in the worst case the construction of a root insertion binary search tree needs approximately 50% of the number of comparisons required by leaf insertion.

  7. Poor value of surveillance cultures for prediction of septicaemia caused by coagulase-negative staphylococci in patients undergoing haemodialysis with central venous catheters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J; Kolmos, H J; Rosdahl, V T

    1998-01-01

    Surveillance cultures for the demonstration of coagulase-negative staphylococci in patients on catheter haemodialysis were performed in an attempt to predict dialysis catheter-related septicaemia. In all, 43 patients with 67 haemodialysis catheters were followed for a 1-y period. Once a week, swab...... specimens were obtained from the skin at the insertion site and the hub, and blood cultures were obtained from the catheter. Among coagulase-negative staphylococci, S. epidermidis was the most frequently (80%) isolated species, and two biotypes accounted for 55.7% of the 41 biotypes isolated. 11 septicaemia...... cases due to coagulase-negative staphylococci occurred, all caused by S. epidermidis, and the incidence of S. epidermidis septicaemia was 21% among patients and 16% among catheter periods. S. epidermidis septicaemia occurred in 17%, 31% and 33% of all catheter periods in which S. epidermidis...

  8. Translumbar aortography by catheter technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hagen, B.; Honemeyer, U.; Meier-Duis, H.

    1982-01-01

    400 examinations performed during the last three years by TLA (only catheter technique) were subjected to critical analysis and studied particularly in respect to the rate of complications. We observed 13 complications (3.25%) of moderate severity, including 3 large hematomas (documented by CT), 3 paravasations and 7 dissections, but no fatal complication. Two (0.5%) of these complications had clinical evidence. The advantages of the catheter technique of TLA are described. Injections through rigid metal cannula should be avoided because of the high incidence of complications (mainly the increased risk of dissection). Downstream injection resulted in excellent visualization of peripheral occluding vascular disease. Upstream injection should be preferred to demonstrate the major abdominal arteries as well as supraceliac collateral circulation in the case of high Leriche syndrome. The low or intermediate puncture of the aorta is preferable to facilitate caudad direction of the catheter and to diminish the risk of damaging other vessels or puncturing an organ. (orig.) [de

  9. Anatomical and procedural determinants of catheter-based renal denervation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ewen, Sebastian; Ukena, Christian; Lüscher, Thomas Felix; Bergmann, Martin; Blankestijn, Peter J; Blessing, Erwin; Cremers, Bodo; Dörr, Oliver; Hering, Dagmara; Kaiser, Lukas; Nef, Holger; Noory, Elias; Schlaich, Markus; Sharif, Faisal; Sudano, Isabella; Vogel, Britta; Voskuil, Michiel; Zeller, Thomas; Tzafriri, Abraham R; Edelman, Elazer R; Lauder, Lucas; Scheller, Bruno; Böhm, Michael; Mahfoud, Felix

    Catheter-based renal sympathetic denervation (RDN) can reduce blood pressure (BP) and sympathetic activity in certain patients with uncontrolled hypertension. Less is known about the impact of renal anatomy and procedural parameters on subsequent BP response. A total of 564 patients with resistant hypertension underwent bilateral RDN in 9 centers in Europe and Australia using a mono-electrode radiofrequency catheter (Symplicity Flex, Medtronic). Anatomical criteria such as prevalence of accessory renal arteries (ARA), presence of renal artery disease (RAD), length, and diameter were analyzed blinded to patient's characteristics. ARA was present in 171 patients (30%), and RAD was documented in 71 patients (13%). On average 11±2.7 complete 120-s ablations were performed, equally distributed on both sides. After 6months, BP was reduced by 19/8mmHg (p4mm (-29 vs. -26 vs. -17mmHg; p<0.001). Neither the length of the renal artery nor the number of RF ablations influenced BP reduction after 6months. The diameter of renal arteries correlated with SBP change after RDN at 6-month follow-up. Change of SBP was not related to the lengths of the renal artery, presence of ARA, RAD, or the number of RF ablations delivered by a mono-electrode catheter. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Hybrid interventions for catheter placement in pediatric intestinal rehabilitation patients with end-stage venous access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieverding, Ludger; Busch, Andreas; Gesche, Jens; Blumenstock, Gunnar; Sturm, Ekkehard; Tsiflikas, Ilias; Piersma, Femke; Hauser, Anja; Wiegand, Gesa; Hartleif, Steffen; Hofbeck, Michael; Fuchs, Jörg; Warmann, Steven W

    2018-03-01

    The purpose of this study is to analyze the combined approach of endovascular and open surgical procedures for insertion of permanent central venous catheters in children with intestinal failure and end-stage venous access. Data of 14 children (16 interventions) with intestinal failure and end-stage venous access, treated within the pediatric intestinal rehabilitation program at our institution between September 2011 and November 2016, were retrospectively reviewed. The patients underwent hybrid endovascular/open surgical approaches for insertion of central venous catheters. Access to central veins was established through endovascular intervention; catheter placement was achieved with combined interventional and surgical measures depending on the individual vascular conditions. Median age at intervention was 47months (interquartile range (IQR),29-74), median time for interventions was 66min (IQR,42-111). Catheter placement was successfully achieved in all patients. The median dose of irradiation during angiography was 0.2Gy*cm 2 (IQR, 0.2-0.6), no complications occurred during or after interventions. Hybrid endovascular/open surgical procedures can be successfully applied for restoring or maintaining permanent central venous catheters in children with intestinal failure and end-stage venous access. These approaches are a valuable contribution in intestinal rehabilitation programs contributing to a further decrease of the need for intestinal transplantation in affected patients. Treatment Study. Level IV. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Usefulness of a Biliary Manipulation Catheter in Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paek, Auh Whan; Won, Je Hwan; Lee, Jei Hee; Sun, Joo Sung; Kwak, Kyu Sung; Bae, Jae Ik

    2011-01-01

    To evaluate usefulness of a manipulation catheter in percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD). A biliary manipulation catheter was used for the aspiration of retained bile and lesion crossing during an initial PTBD in 91 consecutive patients over a 6 month period. This catheter allowed for a 0.035 inch guide wire made of 5F short steel braided polyurethane. The terminal 1 cm segment was tapered and 45 degree angulated. Two side holes were made in the terminal segment to facilitate the aspiration of bile. The safety of this procedure was evaluated based on whether the catheters caused complications during insertion and manipulation, and whether cholangitis was aggravated after the procedure. Effectiveness of the procedure was evaluated based on the ability to aspirate retained bile and to cross the lesion. Both the insertion of a 0.035 inch hydrophilic guide wire and aspiration of sufficient retained bile were successful with the catheter. Crossing the common bile duct (CBD) lesion had a 98.1% success rate during the initial PTBD. Crossing the hilar obstruction lesion was had a 94.7% success rate to the CBD and 92.1% to the contralateral lobe. Cholangitis improved in 97% of cases, and aggravated transiently in only 3% of cases after PTBD.

  12. Adult 'PICC' Device May be Used as a Tunnelled Central Venous Catheter in Children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawson, Brooke T; Zealley, Ian A

    2018-04-01

    Central venous access in children, in particular small children and infants, is challenging. We have developed a technique employing adult peripherally inserted central venous catheters (PICCs) as tunnelled central venous catheters (TCVCs) in children. The principal advantage of this novel technique is that the removal technique is less complex than that of conventional cuffed TCVCs. The catheter can be removed simply by being pulled out and does not require general anaesthesia. The purpose of this study is to determine the success, safety and utility of this technique and to identify the rate of late complications. We describe the 6-year experience in our unit. Electronic and paper medical records were reviewed for consecutive paediatric patients who had a PICC device inserted as a TCVC over a 6-year period (September 2009 through July 2015). The following data were recorded-patient demographics, setting for PICC as TCVC insertion, use of ultrasound and fluoroscopy, PICC device type, early or late complications and date of and reason for removal. Twenty-one PICCs were inserted as TCVCs in 19 children, all aged less than 10 years. Mean patient age at the time of placement was 3.7 years. Average patient weight was 15.7 kg. All insertions were successful with no significant immediate complications recorded. The most common indication for insertion in our patient sample was pseudo-obstruction secondary to gastrointestinal dysmotility disorder (24%), with cystic fibrosis infective exacerbation being the second most frequent diagnosis (14%). Suspected catheter-related infection led to early device removal in one case (4.8%). Inadvertent dislodgement occurred in one case (4.8%). Nineteen of the 21 devices (90.4%) lasted for the total intended duration of use. Using a PICC device as a TCVC in small children appears to be a safe technique, with an acceptable complication profile.

  13. Prevalência e motivos de remoção não eletiva do cateter central de inserção periférica em neonatos Prevalencia y motivos de retirada no electiva del catéter de inserción periférica en recién nacidos Prevalence and reasons for non-elective removal of peripherally inserted central catheter in neonates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Costa

    2012-09-01

    sectional study conducted with 67 newborns admitted at the Neonatal Intensive Care Unit of a private hospital in São Paulo, between July and December 2010, who underwent 84 Peripherally Inserted Central Catheter (PICC line placement procedures. The aim was to describe the prevalence and reasons of non-elective removal of the catheter. Data was collected from medical records and institutional forms related to PICC placement. The mean of corrected gestational age of the neonates was 32.8 weeks, weight 1,671.6g and postnatal age 9.4 days. The non-elective removal was observed in 33 (39.3% catheters, 13.1% due to occlusion, 9.5% rupture, 7.1% extremity edema, 6.0% suspectedinfection, 1.2% accidental dislodgement, 1.2% poor extremity perfusion and 1.2% due to extravasation. The prevalence and the reasons of non-elective removal indicated that strategies to prevent avoidable complications related to PICC are necessary.

  14. Nanopattern insert molding

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, S H; Youn, J R; Jeong, J H

    2010-01-01

    A new method was investigated to produce nanopatterns on polymeric surfaces with high resolution, good productivity, and low cost. It has certain advantages when compared with such conventional techniques as nanoimprint lithography (NIL), hot embossing, and injection molding. Polyvinyl alcohol (PVA) was utilized for preparation of the stamp with nanopatterns on its surface. The nanoimprinted PVA film was inserted into the cavity and the polymer melt was injected into the mold. Nanopatterns with pillars smaller than 100 nm were produced on the polymeric surface. The water soluble PVA film was used as the inserted template to overcome the difficulties of releasing the nanopatterned film from the substrate.

  15. Current updates in catheters, tubes and drains in the pediatric chest: A practical evaluation approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Concepcion, Nathan David P; Laya, Bernard F; Lee, Edward Y

    2017-10-01

    Chest radiographs are very helpful tool not only in the evaluation of respiratory and/or cardiac pathologies, but also to help clinicians in the assessment of various tubes and catheters inserted in pediatric patients. This review article focuses on the indications, contraindications, ideal locations of the tips of these tubes and catheters, as well as the consequences of malpositioning. Clinical outcomes of pediatric patients can be affected by the placement of these medical devices. The radiologist therefore has a critical role in detecting and relaying such malpositioned devices for prompt revisions or removal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. Intraventricular catheter placement by electromagnetic navigation safely applied in a paediatric major head injury patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aufdenblatten, Christoph Alexander; Altermatt, Stefan

    2008-09-01

    In the management of severe head injuries, the use of intraventricular catheters for intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring and the option of cerebrospinal fluid drainage is gold standard. In children and adolescents, the insertion of a cannula in a compressed ventricle in case of elevated intracranial pressure is difficult; therefore, a pressure sensor is placed more often intraparenchymal as an alternative option. In cases of persistent elevated ICP despite maximal brain pressure management, the use of an intraventricular monitoring device with the possibility of cerebrospinal fluid drainage is favourable. We present the method of intracranial catheter placement by means of an electromagnetic navigation technique.

  17. Elimination of Bloodstream Infections Associated with Candida albicans Biofilm in Intravascular Catheters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Freshta Akbari

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Intravascular catheters are among the most commonly inserted medical devices and they are known to cause a large number of catheter related bloodstream infections (BSIs. Biofilms are associated with many chronic infections due to the aggregation of microorganisms. One of these organisms is the fungus Candida albicans. It has shown to be one of the leading causes of catheter-related BSIs. The presence of biofilm on intravascular catheters provide increased tolerance against antimicrobial treatments, thus alternative treatment strategies are sought. Traditionally, many strategies, such as application of combined antimicrobials, addition of antifungals, and removal of catheters, have been practiced, but they were not successful in eradicating BSIs. Since these fungal infections can result in significant morbidity, mortality, and increased healthcare cost, other promising preventive strategies, including antimicrobial lock therapy, chelating agents, alcohol, and biofilm disruptors, have been applied. In this review, current success and failure of these new approaches, and a comparison with the previous strategies are discussed in order to understand which preventative treatment is the most effective in controlling the catheter-related BSIs.

  18. Placement of Hemodialysis Catheters with a Technical, Functional, and Anatomical Viewpoint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zeki Aydin

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims. Vascular access is of prime importance for hemodialysis patients. We aimed to study early complications of hemodialysis catheters placed in different central veins in patients with acute or chronic renal failure with or without ultrasound (US guidance. Material and Methods. Patients who were admitted to our unit between March 2008 and December 2010 with need for vascular access have been included. 908 patients were examined for their demographic parameters, primary renal disease, and indication for catheterization, type and location of the catheter, implantation technique, and acute complications. Results. The mean age of the patients was 60.6 ± 16.0 years. 643 (70.8 % of the catheters were temporary while 265 (29.2% were permanent. 684 catheters were inserted to internal jugular veins, 213 to femoral, and 11 to subclavian veins. Arterial puncture occurred in 88 (9.7% among which 13 had resultant subcutaneous hematoma. No patient had lung trauma and there had been no need for removal of the catheter or a surgical intervention for complications. US guidance in jugular vein and experience of operator decreased arterial puncture rate. Conclusion. US-guided replacement of catheter to internal jugular vein would decrease complication rate. Referral to invasive nephrologists may decrease use of subclavian vein. Experience improves complication rates even under US guidance.

  19. Bacillus Cereus catheter related bloodstream infection in a patient in a patient with acute lymphblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lütfiye Öksüz

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Bacillus cereus infection is rarely associated with actual infection and for this reason single positive blood culture is usually regarded as contamination . However it may cause a number of infections, such catheter-related blood stream infections. Significant catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI caused by Bacillus spp. are mainly due to B.cereus and have been predominantly reported in immunocompromised hosts1 . Catheter removal is generally advised for management of infection. In this report, catheter-related bacteremia caused by B.cereus in a patient with acute lymphoblastıc leukemia (ALL in Istanbul Medical Faculty was presented.A 44-year old man presented with fatigue, weight loss, epistaxis and high fever. A double-lumen Hickman–catheter (Bard 12.0 Fr, Round Dual Lumen was inserted by surgical cut-down to access the right subclavian vein which would be necessary for allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Three weeks later the patient presented with high fever and headache. Bacillus spp. was isolated from the cathether while blood culture obtained from the peripheral vein remained negative. The bacterial identification was confirmed as B.cereus using VITEK identification system It has been reported Bacillus cereus septicemia may be fatal in immunocompromised hosts despite broad-spectrum appropriate treatment10. Catheter removal is essential for prevention of recurrent bacteremia. Long-term cathater salvage should be reserved for appropriate patient group.

  20. Implementation of the updated 2015 Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention (KRINKO) recommendations "Prevention and control of catheter-associated urinary tract infections" in the hospitals in Frankfurt/Main, Germany.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heudorf, Ursel; Grünewald, Miriam; Otto, Ulla

    2016-01-01

    The Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention (KRINKO) updated the recommendations for the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections in 2015. This article will describe the implementation of these recommendations in Frankfurt's hospitals in autumn, 2015. In two non-ICU wards of each of Frankfurt's 17 hospitals, inspections were performed using a checklist based on the new KRINKO recommendations. In one large hospital, a total of 5 wards were inspected. The inspections covered the structure and process quality (operating instructions, training, indication, the placement and maintenance of catheters) and the demonstration of the preparation for insertion of a catheter using an empty bed and an imaginary patient, or insertion in a model. Operating instructions were available in all hospital wards; approximately half of the wards regularly performed training sessions. The indications were largely in line with the recommendations of the KRINKO. Alternatives to urinary tract catheters were available and were used more often than the urinary tract catheters themselves (15.9% vs. 13.5%). In accordance with the recommendations, catheters were placed without antibiotic prophylaxis or the instillation of antiseptic or antimicrobial substances or catheter flushing solutions. The demonstration of catheter placement was conscientiously performed. Need for improvement was seen in the daily documentation and the regular verification of continuing indication for a urinary catheter, as well as the omission of regular catheter change. Overall, the recommendations of the KRINKO on the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections were adequately implemented. However, it cannot be ruled out that in situations with time pressure and staff shortage, the handling of urinary tract catheters may be of lower quality than that observed during the inspections, when catheter insertion was done by two nurses. Against this background, a sufficient

  1. Implementation of the updated 2015 Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention (KRINKO recommendations “Prevention and control of catheter-associated urinary tract infections” in the hospitals in Frankfurt/Main, Germany

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heudorf, Ursel

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim: The Commission for Hospital Hygiene and Infection Prevention (KRINKO updated the recommendations for the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections in 2015. This article will describe the implementation of these recommendations in Frankfurt’s hospitals in autumn, 2015.Material and methods: In two non-ICU wards of each of Frankfurt’s , inspections were performed using a checklist based on the new KRINKO recommendations. In one large hospital, a total of were inspected. The inspections covered the structure and process quality (operating instructions, training, indication, the placement and maintenance of catheters and the demonstration of the preparation for insertion of a catheter using an empty bed and an imaginary patient, or insertion in a model.Results: Operating instructions were available in all hospital wards; approximately half of the wards regularly performed training sessions. The indications were largely in line with the recommendations of the KRINKO. Alternatives to urinary tract catheters were available and were used more often than the urinary tract catheters themselves (15.9% vs. 13.5%. In accordance with the recommendations, catheters were placed without antibiotic prophylaxis or the instillation of antiseptic or antimicrobial substances or catheter flushing solutions. The demonstration of catheter placement was conscientiously performed. Need for improvement was seen in the daily documentation and the regular verification of continuing indication for a urinary catheter, as well as the omission of regular catheter change.Conclusion: Overall, the recommendations of the KRINKO on the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections were adequately implemented. However, it cannot be ruled out that in situations with time pressure and staff shortage, the handling of urinary tract catheters may be of lower quality than that observed during the inspections, when catheter insertion was done by two

  2. Fundamental length

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pradhan, T.

    1975-01-01

    The concept of fundamental length was first put forward by Heisenberg from purely dimensional reasons. From a study of the observed masses of the elementary particles known at that time, it is sumrised that this length should be of the order of magnitude 1 approximately 10 -13 cm. It was Heisenberg's belief that introduction of such a fundamental length would eliminate the divergence difficulties from relativistic quantum field theory by cutting off the high energy regions of the 'proper fields'. Since the divergence difficulties arise primarily due to infinite number of degrees of freedom, one simple remedy would be the introduction of a principle that limits these degrees of freedom by removing the effectiveness of the waves with a frequency exceeding a certain limit without destroying the relativistic invariance of the theory. The principle can be stated as follows: It is in principle impossible to invent an experiment of any kind that will permit a distintion between the positions of two particles at rest, the distance between which is below a certain limit. A more elegant way of introducing fundamental length into quantum theory is through commutation relations between two position operators. In quantum field theory such as quantum electrodynamics, it can be introduced through the commutation relation between two interpolating photon fields (vector potentials). (K.B.)

  3. Transhepatic venous catheters for hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed El Gharib

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Based on our findings, transhepatic hemodialysis catheters have proven to achieve good long-term functionality. A high level of maintenance is required to preserve patency, although this approach provides remarkably durable access for patients who have otherwise exhausted access options.

  4. A Simple Radiological Technique for Demonstration of Incorrect Positioning of a Foley Catheter with Balloon Inflated in the Urethra of a Male Spinal Cord Injury Patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Subramanian Vaidyanathan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available In a male patient with cervical spinal cord injury, the urinary bladder may go into spasm when a urethral catheter is removed and a new Foley catheter is inserted. Before the balloon is inflated, the spastic bladder may push the Foley catheter out or the catheter may slip out of a small-capacity bladder. An inexperienced health professional may inflate the balloon of a Foley catheter in the urethra without realizing that the balloon segment of the catheter is lying in the urethra instead of the urinary bladder. When a Foley balloon is inflated in the urethra, a tetraplegic patient is likely to develop autonomic dysreflexia. This is a medical emergency and requires urgent treatment. Before the incorrectly placed Foley catheter is removed, it is important to document whether the balloon has been inflated in the urinary bladder or not. The clinician should first use the always available tools of observation and palpation at the bedside without delays of transportation. A misplaced balloon will often be evident by a long catheter sign, indicating excessive catheter remaining outside the patient. Radiological diagnosis is not frequently required and, when needed, should employ the technique most readily available, which might be a body and pelvic CT without intravenous contrast. An alternative radiological technique to demonstrate the position of the balloon of the Foley catheter is described. Three milliliters of nonionic X-ray contrast medium, Ioversol (OPTIRAY 300, is injected through the side channel of the Foley catheter, which is used for inflating the balloon. Then, with a catheter-tip syringe, 30 ml of sterile Ioversol is injected through the main lumen of the Foley catheter. Immediately thereafter, an X-ray of the pelvis (including perineum is taken. By this technique, both the urinary bladder and balloon of the Foley catheter are visualized by the X-ray contrast medium. When a Foley catheter has been inserted correctly, the balloon of the

  5. Intravascular Cooling Catheter-Related Venous Thromboembolism After Hypothermia: A Case Report and Review of the Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xuan; Moy, Brian T; Hiendlmayr, Brett J; Krainski, Felix; Duvall, W Lane; Fernandez, Antonio B

    2018-03-23

    Fifty-four year-old man with recent history of myocardial infarction and a percutaneous coronary intervention who suffered a ventricular fibrillation arrest at home. He was resuscitated in the field. His heart rhythm was in atrial fibrillation. The cardiac catheterization showed a patent stent from his previous myocardial infarction and no new occlusions. He subsequently underwent hypothermia protocol using the Alsius CoolGard 3000 Temperature Control System and Icy Catheter. Heparin drip was started for atrial fibrillation 36 hours after catheter insertion and became therapeutic 2 hours before the end of cooling maintenance phase. Heparin drip was stopped 4 hours into the rewarming phase because of spontaneous conversion to sinus rhythm. Subcutaneous heparin was resumed for deep venous thrombosis prophylaxis. He was extubated to room air after hypothermia protocol. The cooling catheter was removed 88 hours after insertion. Within 1 minute of catheter removal, his oxygen saturation dropped to 80%. Transthoracic echocardiogram showed a mobile thrombus in the right atrium prolapsing into the right ventricle. Computer tomography angiography of the chest confirmed a large saddle embolus. Ninety minutes later, patient went into cardiac arrest with pulseless electrical activity while he was being considered for surgical embolectomy, but he could not be resuscitated. The temporal relationship of the catheter removal and his acute clinical decompensation led to believe that this was an intravascular cooling catheter (ICC)-related event. Providers should be cognizant of the complications of central venous catheters such as thrombosis formation, as it could lead to fatal pulmonary embolism. Physicians should promote frequent assessment of the access site(s) during routine physical examinations and potentially use point of care vascular ultrasound in high-risk cases to rule out a catheter-associated thrombus before catheter removal.

  6. Inserting the CMS solenoid

    CERN Multimedia

    Maximilien Brice

    2005-01-01

    The huge superconducting solenoid for CMS is inserted into the cryostat barrel. CMS uses the world's largest thin solenoid, in terms of energy stored, and is 12 m long, with a diameter of 6 m and weighing 220 tonnes. When turned on the magnet will produce a field strength of 4 T using superconducting niobium-titanium material at 4.5 K.

  7. Learning curves for insertion

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Adele

    Introduction. Both the Unique™ LMA, and lately the Cobra™ PLA, is available in most of the larger state hospitals in South Africa. This study's objective is to evaluate and compare the learning curves for insertion of these two single-use airway devices. This is to ascertain which of these two devices is easier and safer to ...

  8. Insertion in Persian

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kambuziya, Aliyeh Kord-e Zafaranlu; Dehghan, Masoud

    2011-01-01

    This paper investigates epenthesis process in Persian to catch some results in relating to vowel and consonant insertion in Persian lexicon. This survey has a close relationship to the description of epenthetic consonants and the conditions in which these consonants are used. Since no word in Persian may begin with a vowel, so that hiatus can't be…

  9. The Composite Insertion Electrode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Atlung, Sven; Zachau-Christiansen, Birgit; West, Keld

    1984-01-01

    The specific energy obtainable by discharge of porous insertion electrodes is limited by electrolyte depletion in thepores. This can be overcome using a solid ion conductor as electrolyte. The term "composite" is used to distinguishthese electrodes from porous electrodes with liquid electrolyte...

  10. A COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS OF PERCUTANEOUS AND OPEN SURGICAL TECHNIQUESFOR PERITONEAL CATHETER PLACEMENT.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Medani, Samar

    2012-05-01

    BACKGROUND: Peritoneal dialysis (PD) is the preferred available option of renal replacement therapy for a significant number of end-stage kidney disease patients. A major limiting factor to the successful continuation of PD is the long-term viability of the PD catheter (PDC). Bedside percutaneous placement of the PDC is not commonly practiced despite published data encouraging use of this technique. Its advantages include faster recovery and avoidance of general anesthesia.♢ METHODS: We carried out a retrospective analysis of the outcomes of 313 PDC insertions at our center, comparing all percutaneous PDC insertions between July 1998 and April 2010 (group P, n = 151) with all surgical PDC insertions between January 2003 and April 2010 (group S, n = 162).♢ RESULTS: Compared with group P patients, significantly more group S patients had undergone previous abdominal surgery or PDC insertion (41.8% vs 9.3% and 33.3% vs 3.3% respectively, p = 0.00). More exit-site leaks occurred in group P than in group S (20.5% vs 6.8%, p = 0.002). The overall incidence of peritonitis was higher in group S than in group P (1 episode in 19 catheter-months vs 1 episode in 26 catheter-months, p = 0.017), but the groups showed no significant difference in the peritonitis rate within 1 month of catheter insertion (5% in group P vs 7.4% in group S, p =0.4) or in poor initial drainage or secondary drainage failure (9.9% vs 11.7%, p = 0.1, and 7.9% vs 12.3%, p = 0.38, for groups P and S respectively). Technical survival at 3 months was significantly better for group P than for group S (86.6% vs 77%, p = 0.037); at 12 months, it was 77.7% and 68.7% respectively (p = 0.126). No life-threatening complications attributable to the insertion of the PDC occurred in either group.♢ CONCLUSIONS: Our analysis demonstrates further encouraging outcomes of percutaneous PDC placement compared with open surgical placement. However, the members of the percutaneous insertion group were primarily a

  11. Button self-retaining drainage catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caridi, James G.; Hawkins, Irvin F.; Akins, E. William; Young, Ronald S.

    1997-01-01

    To help improve patient acceptance of long-term internal/external catheter access to the biliary tract in those with benign biliary obstruction, a simple design allows the catheter end to remain flush with the skin. It consists of a clothes button affixed to the drainage catheter with a wood screw after the catheter has been cut off at the skin exit. This button/screw device has been used successfully in 22 patients over the last 10 years; catheter exchanges were easily accomplished

  12. WE-G-17A-05: Real-Time Catheter Localization Using An Active MR Tracker for Interstitial Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, W; Damato, A; Viswanathan, A; Cormack, R [Dana Farber Cancer Institute / Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States); Penzkofer, T; Schmidt, E [Brigham and Women' s Hospital, Boston, MA (United States); Pan, L; Gilson, W [Siemens Corporation, Corporate Technology, Baltimore, MD (United States); Seethamraju, R [Siemens Healthcare, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-15

    Purpose: To develop a novel active MR-tracking system which can provide accurate and rapid localization of brachytherapy catheters, and assess its reliability and spatial accuracy in comparison to standard catheter digitization using MR images. Methods: An active MR tracker for brachytherapy was constructed by adding three printed-circuit micro-coils to the shaft of a commercial metallic stylet. A gel phantom with an embedded framework was built, into which fifteen 14-Gauge catheters were placed, following either with parallel or crossed paths. The tracker was inserted sequentially into each catheter, with MR-tracking running continuously. Tracking was also performed during the tracker's removal from each catheter. Catheter trajectories measured from the insertion and the removal procedures using the same micro-coil were compared, as well as trajectories obtained using different micro-coils. A 3D high-resolution MR image dataset of the phantom was acquired and imported into a treatment planning system (TPS) for catheter digitization. A comparison between MR-tracked positions and positions digitized from MR images by TPS was performed. Results: The MR tracking shows good consistency for varying catheter paths and for all micro-coils (mean difference ∼1.1 mm). The average distance between the MR-tracking trajectory and catheter digitization from the MR images was 1.1 mm. Ambiguity in catheter assignment from images due to crossed paths was resolved by active tracking. When tracking was interleaved with imaging, real-time images were continuously acquired at the instantaneous tip positions and displayed on an external workstation. Conclusion: The active MR tracker may be used to provide an independent measurement of catheter location in the MR environment, potentially eliminating the need for subsequent CT. It may also be used to control realtime imaging of catheter placement. This will enable MR-based brachytherapy planning of interstitial implants without

  13. Totally implantable catheter embolism: two related cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Chaves Ribeiro

    Full Text Available CONTEXT AND OBJECTIVE: Long-term totally implantable catheters (e.g. Port-a-Cath® are frequently used for long-term venous access in children with cancer. The use of this type of catheter is associated with complications such as infection, extrusion, extravasation and thrombosis. Embolism of catheter fragments is a rare complication, but has potential for morbidity. The aim here was to report on two cases in which embolism of fragments of a long-term totally implantable catheter occurred. DESIGN AND SETTING: Case series study at Hospital do Servidor Público Estadual, São Paulo. METHODS: Retrospective review of catheter embolism in oncological pediatric patients with long-term totally implantable catheters. RESULTS: The first patient was a 3-year-old girl diagnosed with stage IV Wilms' tumor. Treatment was started with the introduction of a totally implantable catheter through the subclavian vein. At the time of removal, it was realized that the catheter had fractured inside the heart. An endovascular procedure was necessary to remove the fragment. The second case was a boy diagnosed with stage II Wilms' tumor at the age of two years. At the time of removal, it was noticed that the catheter had disconnected from the reservoir and an endovascular procedure was also necessary to remove the embolized catheter. CONCLUSION: Embolism of fragments of totally implantable catheters is a rare complication that needs to be recognized even in asymptomatic patients.

  14. Empyema and Effusion: Outcome of Image-Guided Small-Bore Catheter Drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keeling, A. N.; Leong, S.; Logan, P. M.; Lee, M. J.

    2008-01-01

    Empyema and complicated pleural effusion represent common medical problems. Current treatment options are multiple. The purpose of this study was to access the outcome of image-guided, small-bore catheter drainage of empyema and effusion. We evaluated 93 small-bore catheters in 82 patients with pleural effusion (n = 30) or empyema (n = 52), over a 2-year period. Image guidance was with ultrasound (US; n = 56) and CT (n = 37). All patients were followed clinically, with catheter dwell times, catheter outcome, pleural fluid outcome, reinsertion rates, and need for urokinase or surgery recorded. Ninety-three small-bore chest drains (mean=10.2 Fr; range, 8.2-12.2 Fr) were inserted, with an average dwell time of 7.81 days for empyemas and 7.14 days for effusions (p > 0.05). Elective removal rates (73% empyema vs 86% effusions) and dislodgement rates (12% empyema vs 13% effusions) were similar for both groups. Eight percent of catheters became blocked and 17% necessitated reinsertion in empyemas, with no catheters blocked or requiring reinsertion in effusions (p < 0.05). Thirty-two patients (51%) required urokinase in the empyema group, versus 2 patients (6%) in the effusion group (p < 0.05). All treatment failures, requiring surgery, occurred in the empyema group (19%; n = 12; p < 0.05). In conclusion, noninfected pleural collections are adequately treated with small-bore catheters, however, empyemas have a failure rate of 19%. The threshold for using urokinase and larger-bore catheters should be low in empyema

  15. A new technique to insert nasogastric tube in an unconscious intubated patient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghatak, Tanmoy; Samanta, Sukhen; Baronia, Arvind Kumar

    2013-01-01

    Insertion of a nasogastric tube in an unconscious intubated patient may be difficult as they cannot follow the swallowing instructions, and therefore has a high first attempt failure rate. We describe here a new technique to insert nasogastric tube in an unconscious intubated patient by neck flexion and using angiography catheter as a stylet and manipulating the cricoid ring of trachea for easy passage of nasogastric tube. The technique is easy and helpful for nasogastric insertion in unconscious intubated patients. Additionally, it neither alters vital responses nor increases intracranial pressure like with laryngoscopy.

  16. Ablating the ventricular insertion of atrio-fascicular Mahaim fiber: what selection criteria should we use?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducceschi, Valentino; Vitale, Raffaele; Ottaviano, Luca; Sokola, Ewa Anna; Sangiuolo, Raffaele; Gregorio, Giovanni

    2009-09-01

    We reported a patient who underwent RF ablation of the distal insertion of an atrio-fascicular accessory pathway with decremental properties because of inability to map a suitable potential alongside the tricuspid annulus. Small, discrete potentials resembling those of purkinje fiber were found at right ventricular apex, all these potentials showed early activation during tachycardia preceding the QRS onset of various degrees. Pace mapping helped to localize the presumed main distal insertion of the atrio-fascicular AP in a region where a damage of the His-purkinje system may ensue. This case report describes catheter ablation of an atriofascicular accessory pathway by targeting its distal (ventricular) insertion site.

  17. Ablating the ventricular insertion of atrio-fascicular mahaim fiber: could be performed safely?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ducceschi, Valentino; Vitale, Raffaele; Sokola, Ewa Anna; Ottaviano, Luca; Sangiuolo, Raffaele; Gregorio, Giovanni

    2009-01-01

    We report a patient who underwent radiofrequency ablation of the distal insertion of an atrio-fascicular accessory pathway with decremental properties because of inability to map a suitable potential alongside the tricuspid annulus. Small, discrete potentials resembling those of Purkinje fiber were found at right ventricular apex. All these potentials showed early activation during tachycardia preceding the QRS onset of various degree. Pace mapping helped to localize the presumed main distal insertion of the atrio-fascicular accessory pathway in a region where damage of the His-purkinje system may ensue. This case report describes catheter ablation of an atriofascicular accessory pathway by targeting its distal (ventricular) insertion site.

  18. Symptomatic spinal cord deformity secondary to a redundant intramedullary shunt catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quencer, R.M.; Montalvo Morse, B.M.; Green, B.A.; Eismont, F.J.

    1985-01-01

    Right arm pain, motor and sensory loss in the right arm and right facial numbness recurred in a 27 year old quadraplegic shortly after a posttraumatic spinal cord cyst (PTSCC) was shunted via a catheter into the adjacent subarachnoid space. Although shunt malfunction was clinically suspected, metrizamide computed tomography (MCT) suggested that redundancy of the catheter had caused deformity of the spinal cord. This hypothesis was confirmed at surgery when intraoperative spinal sonography (IOSS) showed that the spinal cord deformity at C 1 -C 2 disappeared when the catheter was withdrawn. This case shows that new or recurrent spinal cord symptoms may be due to a mechanical deformity of the cord rather than shunt malfunction, that restricting the length of the shunt catheter which is used to decompress PTSCCs is important, and that IOSS is an indispensible tool for visualizing the changes in spinal cord morphology during shunting procedures. (orig.)

  19. Radiologic placement of hemodialysis central venous catheters: a practical guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schemmer, D.; Sadler, D.J.; Gray, R.R.; Saliken, J.C.; So, C.B. [Foothills Hospital, Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Calgary, Alberta (Canada)

    2001-04-01

    Typical indications for central venous catheters (CVCs) are hemodialysis (HD), apheresis, total parenteral nutrition, analgesia, chemotherapy, long-term antibiotic therapy and cases of difficult or absent peripheral venous access. One of the largest medical services requesting CVC insertion is nephrology for HD patients. Demographics dictate that the demand for CVCs will continue to grow over the next few decades, placing striking demands on interventional radiology departments. In our centre, interventional radiologists now place nearly all percutaneously inserted HD CVCs. Radiologists provide rapid access to CVC services with significantly fewer complications than CVCs placed by other clinicians. With the demand for CVC management increasing and available operating room time decreasing, many clinicians now refer CVC insertions to radiologists. As well, clinicians who ordinarily place their own lines often refer high-risk patients, such as those who are obese or uncooperative and those with burns or coagulopathy. Our experience, derived from over 7000 CVC insertions, manipulations and removals, has allowed us to continually progress and improve our techniques, many of which are summarized here. (author)

  20. Radiologic placement of hemodialysis central venous catheters: a practical guide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schemmer, D.; Sadler, D.J.; Gray, R.R.; Saliken, J.C.; So, C.B.

    2001-01-01

    Typical indications for central venous catheters (CVCs) are hemodialysis (HD), apheresis, total parenteral nutrition, analgesia, chemotherapy, long-term antibiotic therapy and cases of difficult or absent peripheral venous access. One of the largest medical services requesting CVC insertion is nephrology for HD patients. Demographics dictate that the demand for CVCs will continue to grow over the next few decades, placing striking demands on interventional radiology departments. In our centre, interventional radiologists now place nearly all percutaneously inserted HD CVCs. Radiologists provide rapid access to CVC services with significantly fewer complications than CVCs placed by other clinicians. With the demand for CVC management increasing and available operating room time decreasing, many clinicians now refer CVC insertions to radiologists. As well, clinicians who ordinarily place their own lines often refer high-risk patients, such as those who are obese or uncooperative and those with burns or coagulopathy. Our experience, derived from over 7000 CVC insertions, manipulations and removals, has allowed us to continually progress and improve our techniques, many of which are summarized here. (author)

  1. Vessel bifurcation localization based on intraoperative three-dimensional ultrasound and catheter path for image-guided catheter intervention of oral cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Kuan; Ohya, Takashi; Liao, Hongen; Kobayashi, Etsuko; Sakuma, Ichiro

    2013-03-01

    We present a method to localize intraoperative target vessel bifurcations under bones for ultrasound (US) image-guided catheter interventions. A catheter path is recorded to acquire skeletons for the target vessel bifurcations that cannot be imaged by intraoperative US. The catheter path is combined with the centerlines of the three-dimensional (3D) US image to construct a preliminary skeleton. Based on the preliminary skeleton, the orientations of target vessels are determined by registration with the preoperative image and the bifurcations were localized by computing the vessel length. An accurate intraoperative vessel skeleton is obtained for correcting the preoperative image to compensate for vessel deformation. A reality check of the proposed method was performed in a phantom experiment. Reasonable results were obtained. The in vivo experiment verified the clinical workflow of the proposed method in an in vivo environment. The accuracy of the centerline length of the vessel for localizing the target artery bifurcation was 2.4mm. These results suggest that the proposed method can allow the catheter tip to stop at the target artery bifurcations and enter into the target arteries. This method can be applied for virtual reality-enhanced image-guided catheter intervention of oral cancers. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. A Study of Use of “PORT” Catheter in Patients with Cancer: A Single-Center Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irappa Madabhavi

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Effective and reliable venous access is one of the cornerstones of modern medical therapy in oncology. Materials and methods: This is a prospective observational study, which collected data of patients who require “PORT” catheter insertion for any cancer, at a tertiary care oncology hospital in Ahmadabad, Gujarat, India, during a 2-year period. Aims and objectives: The main objective of this study was to study the various complications and outcomes related to “PORT” catheters. Results: “PORT” catheter was inserted in 100 patients and was most commonly used in solid malignancies (n = 86, 86%, followed by hematologic malignancies (n = 14, 14%. Among the solid malignancies, breast cancer (38, 38% was the most common underlying disease, whereas among the hematologic malignancies, acute lymphoblastic leukemia (6, 6% was the most common underlying disease for “PORT” catheter insertion. Chemotherapy was started on the first day of “PORT” catheter in 74% of patients in the “PORT” study group. The various complications developed in the “PORT” study group in the descending order are as follows: 4 patients (4% developed early infection (⩽30 days after “PORT” placement, 4 (4% late infection (⩾30 days after “PORT” placement, 4 (4% bloodstream infection, 2 (2% local skin infection at the “PORT” insertion site, 2 (2% dislodgment of the “PORT” catheter, 2 (2% fracture of the “PORT” catheter, and 1 recurrent pleural effusion. One patient (1% developed thrombosis as the complication of “PORT” catheter insertion. Conclusions: The most disturbing aspect of treatment for a patient with cancer is multiple painful venipunctures made for administration of cytotoxic agents, antibiotics, blood products, and nutritional supplements. The focus of this prospective observational research is to study the various underlying diseases for which “PORT” catheter is needed in different solid and hematologic

  3. Fuel insert shuffler

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naser, J.; Colley, R.; Gaiser, J.; Brookmire, T.; Engle, S.

    1987-01-01

    The potential for the use of expert systems in the nuclear power industry is widely recognized. The benefits of such systems include consistency of reasoning during off-normal situations when humans are under great stress, the reduction of time required to perform certain functions and the retention of human expertise in performing specialized functions. As the potential benefits are more and more demonstrated and realized, the development of expert systems becomes a necessary part of the nuclear power industry. The development of the fuel insert shuffle expert system is used as a case study. In fact, it shows that the potential benefits are realizable. Currently, the development of the insert shuffle plan requires three to four man-weeks of effort. Further modifications to this plan are sometimes required dur to either changes in the desired core load pattern or damaged fuel assemblies or inserts. These changes generally require two to four man-days of effort and could be stressful if they are critical path items on the outage schedule

  4. A Novel Nonantibiotic Nitroglycerin-Based Catheter Lock Solution for Prevention of Intraluminal Central Venous Catheter Infections in Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaftari, Anne-Marie; Hachem, Ray; Szvalb, Ariel; Taremi, Mahnaz; Granwehr, Bruno; Viola, George Michael; Sapna, Amin; Assaf, Andrew; Numan, Yazan; Shah, Pankil; Gasitashvili, Ketevan; Natividad, Elizabeth; Jiang, Ying; Slack, Rebecca; Reitzel, Ruth; Rosenblatt, Joel; Mouhayar, Elie; Raad, Issam

    2017-07-01

    For long-term central lines (CL), the lumen is the major source of central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSI). The current standard of care for maintaining catheter patency includes flushing the CL with saline or heparin. Neither agent has any antimicrobial activity. Furthermore, heparin may enhance staphylococcal biofilm formation. We evaluated the safety and efficacy of a novel nonantibiotic catheter lock solution for the prevention of CLABSI. Between November 2015 and February 2016, we enrolled 60 patients with hematologic malignancies who had peripherally inserted central catheters (PICC) to receive the study lock solution. The study lock consisted of 15 or 30 μg/ml of nitroglycerin in combination with 4% sodium citrate and 22% ethanol. Each lumen was locked for at least 2 h once daily prior to being flushed. After enrollment of 10 patients at the lower nitroglycerin dose without evidence of toxicity, the dose was escalated to the higher dose (30 μg/ml). There were no serious related adverse events or episodes of hypotension with lock administration. Two patients experienced mild transient adverse events (one headache and one rash) possibly related to the lock and that resolved without residual effect. The CLABSI rate was 0 on lock days versus 1.6/1,000 catheter days (CD) off lock prophylaxis, compared with a rate of 1.9/1,000 CD at the institution in the same patient population. In conclusion, the nitroglycerin-based lock prophylaxis is safe and well tolerated. It may prevent CLABSI when given daily to cancer patients. Large, prospective, randomized clinical trials are needed to validate these findings. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under identifier NCT02577718.). Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  5. Posterior cruciate ligament's tibial insertions: topographic anatomy and morphometric study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cesar Gali

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To provide anatomical and morphometric basis of the posterior cruciate ligament's tibial insertions in order to assist the creation of anatomical tibial tunnels, in the ligament surgical reconstruction. MATERIAL AND METHODS: The topographic anatomy and morphometry of the posterior cruciate ligament's anterolateral and posteromedial bundles' tibial insertions were analyzed in 24 anatomical knee pieces. The pieces were photographed by a digital camera and the images obtained were studied by the software ImageJ, where the bundles' insertion areas were measured in square millimeters, and the length of structures and the distances between significant points were measured in millimeters. RESULTS: In 54.2% of the knees the insertion' shape was concave; in most pieces (41.6% the form of insertion was oval. The average posterior cruciate ligament's tibial insertion total area was 88.33 ± 21.66 mm2; the average anterolateral bundle's tibial insertion area was 46.79 ± 14.10 mm2 and it was 41.54 ± 9.75 mm2 for the posteromedial bundle. CONCLUSIONS: The anterolateral bundle has a tibial insertion area larger than the posteromedial bundle; the insertion areas of those bundles in our study, were smaller than the ones found in the literature. The variations in the posterior cruciate ligament's tibial insertion area suggest that there should be an indication for anatomical reconstructions of this ligament using single or double tibial tunnels according to individual characteristics.

  6. Central venous infusion port inserted via high versus low jugular venous approaches: Retrospective comparison of outcome and complications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Hong Suk [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, 809 Madu 1-dong, Ilsan-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do 411-764 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Radiology, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: hpark@dreamwiz.com; Kim, Young Il; Lee, Sang Hyun; Kim, Jung Im; Seo, Hyobin; Lee, Sang Min; Lee, Youkyung; Lim, Min Kyung [Research Institute and Hospital, National Cancer Center, 809 Madu 1-dong, Ilsan-gu, Goyang-si, Gyeonggi-do 411-764 (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Suk [Division of Hematology-Oncology, Department of Medicine, Samsung Medical Center, Sungkyunkwan University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-12-15

    Purpose: To retrospectively compare immediate and long-term outcome of central venous infusion port inserted via right high versus low jugular vein approaches. Materials and methods: The study included 163 patients (125 women patients, 38 men patients; age range, 18-79 years; mean age, 53 years); 142 patients underwent port insertion with low jugular vein approach and 21 patients with high jugular vein approach. The causes of high jugular vein puncture were metastatic lymphadenopathy (n = 7), operation scar (n = 6), radiation scar (n = 5), failure of low jugular vein puncture (n = 2), and abnormal course of right subclavian artery (n = 1). Medical records and radiologic studies were reviewed retrospectively to determine and compare the outcome and the occurrence of complication related to port. Results: The procedure-related complications were all minor (n = 14, 8.6%) in both groups; hematoma (n = 4, 2.8% in low jugular puncture group and n = 1, 4.8% in high jugular puncture group, p = 0.6295), air embolism (n = 2, 1.4% in low jugular puncture group and n = 0 in high jugular puncture group, p = 0.5842) and minor bleeding (n = 5, 3.5% in low jugular vein puncture group and n = 2, 9.5% in high jugular vein puncture group, p = 0.2054). The average length of follow-up was 431 days for low jugular vein puncture group and 284 days for high jugular vein puncture group. The difference between two groups was significant (p = 0.0349). The reasons for catheter removal were patients' death (59 in low jugular puncture group and 14 in high jugular puncture group, p = 0.0465), suspected infection (11 in low jugular vein puncture group and 2 in high jugular vein puncture group, p = 0.8242), catheter occlusion (four in low jugular vein puncture group and one in high jugular vein puncture group, p = 0.6583). The catheter tip migrated upward an average of 1.86 cm (range, -0.5 to 5.0 cm) in low jugular vein puncture group and 1.56 cm (range, 0-3.6 cm) in high jugular vein

  7. Magnetic resonance imaging guided transatrial electrophysiological studies in swine using active catheter tracking - experience with 14 cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grothoff, Matthias; Gutberlet, Matthias [University of Leipzig - Heart Center, Department of Radiology, Leipzig (Germany); Hindricks, Gerhard; Sommer, Philipp; Hilbert, Sebastian [University of Leipzig - Heart Center, Department of Electrophysiology, Leipzig (Germany); Fleiter, Christian [Helios Klinikum Berlin-Buch, Department of Orthopaedic Surgery, Berlin (Germany); Schnackenburg, Bernhard [Philips Healthcare, Hamburg (Germany); Weiss, Steffen; Krueger, Sascha [Philips Innovative Technologies, Hamburg (Germany); Piorkowski, Christopher; Gaspar, Thomas [University of Dresden - Heart Center, Department of Electrophysiology, Dresden (Germany); Wedan, Steve; Lloyd, Thomas [Imricor Medical Systems, Burnsville, MN (United States)

    2017-05-15

    To evaluate the feasibility of performing comprehensive Cardiac Magnetic resonance (CMR) guided electrophysiological (EP) interventions in a porcine model encompassing left atrial access. After introduction of two femoral sheaths 14 swine (41 ± 3.6 kg) were transferred to a 1.5 T MR scanner. A three-dimensional whole-heart sequence was acquired followed by segmentation and the visualization of all heart chambers using an image-guidance platform. Two MR conditional catheters were inserted. The interventional protocol consisted of intubation of the coronary sinus, activation mapping, transseptal left atrial access (n = 4), generation of ablation lesions and eventually ablation of the atrioventricular (AV) node. For visualization of the catheter tip active tracking was used. Catheter positions were confirmed by passive real-time imaging. Total procedure time was 169 ± 51 minutes. The protocol could be completed in 12 swine. Two swine died from AV-ablation induced ventricular fibrillation. Catheters could be visualized and navigated under active tracking almost exclusively. The position of the catheter tips as visualized by active tracking could reliably be confirmed with passive catheter imaging. Comprehensive CMR-guided EP interventions including left atrial access are feasible in swine using active catheter tracking. (orig.)

  8. Implantation of peritoneal catheters by laparotomy: nephrologists obtained similar results to general surgeons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Restrepo CA

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cesar A Restrepo, Carlos Alberto Buitrago, Cielo Holguin Division of Nephrology, Department of Health Sciences, Caldas University, Caldas, ColombiaPurpose: To analyze the complications and costs of minilaparotomies performed by a nephrologist (group A compared with conventional laparotomies performed by a surgeon (group B for peritoneal catheter implantation.Setting: Two university hospitals (Santa Sofia and Caldas in Manizales, Caldas, Colombia.Methods: The study included stage 5 chronic kidney disease patients, with indication of renal replacement therapy, who were candidates for peritoneal dialysis and gave informed consent for a peritoneal catheter implant. Minilaparotomies were performed by a nephrologist in a minor surgery room under local anesthesia. Conventional laparotomies were performed by a surgeon in an operating room under general anesthesia.Results: Two nephrologists inserted 157 peritoneal catheters, and seven general surgeons inserted 185 peritoneal catheters. The groups had similar characteristics: the mean age was 55 years, 49.5% were men, and the primary diagnoses were diabetic nephropathy, hypertensive nephropathy, and unknown etiology. The implant was successful for 98.09% of group A and 99.46% of group B. There was no procedure-related mortality. The most frequent complications in the first 30 days postsurgery in group A versus group B, respectively, were: peritonitis (6.37% versus 3.78%, exit-site infection (3.82% versus 2.16%, tunnel infection (0% versus 0.54%, catheter entrapment by omentum (1.27% versus 3.24%, peritoneal effluent spillover (1.91% versus 2.16%, draining failure (4.46% versus 6.49%, hematoma (0% versus 1.08%, catheter migration with kinking (3.18% versus 2.70%, hemoperitoneum (1.27% versus 0%, and hollow viscera accidental puncture (1.91% versus 0.54%. There were no statistically significant differences in the number of complications between groups. In 2013, the cost of a surgeon-implanted peritoneal

  9. Comparison of three types of central venous catheters in patients with malignant tumor receiving chemotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang S

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Shirong Fang,1 Jinhong Yang,2 Lei Song,3 Yan Jiang,1 Yuxiu Liu4 1Department of Anesthesiology, 2Department of Oncology, Weifang People’s Hospital, Weifang, 3Intensive Care Unit, The Affiliated Hospital of Qingdao University, Qingdao, 4Nursing College, Weifang Medical University, Weifang, People’s Republic of China Background: Central venous catheters (CVCs have been an effective access for chemotherapy instead of peripherally intravenous catheters. There were limited studies on the choices and effects of different types of CVCs for chemotherapy. The aim of this study was to compare the complications, cost, and patients’ quality of life and satisfaction of three commonly used CVCs for chemotherapy, such as implanted venous port, peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs, and external non-tunneled central venous catheters (NTCs.Methods: A double-center prospective cohort study was carried out from March 2014 to December 2016. Catheterization situation, complications, catheter maintenance, cost, and patients’ quality of life and satisfaction were recorded, investigated, and analyzed. Forty-five ports, 60 PICCs and 40 NTCs were included. All the CVCs were followed up to catheter removal.Results: There was no statistical difference in catheterization success rates between port and PICC. NTC had less success rate by one puncture compared with port. Ports had fewer complications compared with PICCs and NTCs. The complication rates of ports, PICCs and NTCs were 2.2%, 40%, and 27.5%, respectively. If the chemotherapy process was <12 months, NTCs cost least, and the cost of port was much higher than PICC and NTC. When the duration time was longer than 12 months, the cost of port had no difference with the cost of PICC. Quality of life and patients’ satisfaction of port group were significantly higher than the other two groups. Conclusion: Although port catheterization costs more and needs professional medical staff and strict operational

  10. Safety related to the implantation of jugular catheters for haemodialysis and usefulness of PA chest X rays post procedure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Restrepo, Cesar A; Chacon, Jose Arnob; Mauricio Villota, Duvan

    2007-01-01

    The objective is to determine how safe the implantation of transient double lumen jugular catheters is for hemodialysis in patients with renal disease, and who require dialysis therapy and Posterior Anterior (PA) chest X-Ray post procedure. Design: observational descriptive study. Site: renal units at RTS Ltda. Sucursal Caldas (Hospital Santa Sofia y Hospital Infantil Rafael Henao Toro de la Cruz Roja). Patients: all patients with renal disease in whom it was necessary to do hemodyalitic therapy with implantation of a jugular catheter, with medical records of the events and complications that occurred during the procedure, with subsequent control AP chest X Ray and that showed reports made by the radiologist or physician who carried out the procedure, about the findings in the chest X Ray. Patients with renal disease, in whom jugular catheters had been inserted: Methods: variables such as age, gender, race, body mass index (BMI) etiology of the renal failure,time of evolution of the disease, indications for insertion, priority of catheter insertion, type of catheter inserted, amount of punctures, physician who carried out the procedure and patient's co-morbidities were analyzed. The events considered as complicated were analyzed as well as if there was any relationship with co-morbidities and the analyzed variables. Findings in the PA chest X-Ray were recorded and their relationship with the difficulties encountered during the procedure. A bi-variance analysis was done. The dependent and independent variables were classified in the nominal measurement scale. Results: 774 clinical histories were reviewed. 562 were excluded due to lack of variables and impossibility to read the notes. Men older than de 55 (45,7%). 212 (97.1%) patients with diagnosis of chronic renal disease (CRD) and in whom 238 procedures were carried out. seven patients (2,85%) had acute renal failure (ARF). The fi rst indication for central catheter insertion was in patients with chronic uremia

  11. Evaluation of a respiratory assist catheter that uses an impeller within a hollow fiber membrane bundle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mihelc, Kevin M; Frankowski, Brian J; Lieber, Samuel C; Moore, Nathan D; Hattler, Brack G; Federspiel, William J

    2009-01-01

    Respiratory assist using an intravenous catheter may be a potential treatment for patients suffering from acute or acute-on-chronic lung failure. The objective of this study was to evaluate a novel respiratory catheter that uses an impeller within the fiber bundle to enhance gas exchange efficiency, thus requiring a smaller fiber bundle and insertional size (25 Fr) and permitting simple percutaneous insertion. Bench testing of gas exchange in deionized water was used to evaluate eight impeller designs. The three best performing impeller designs were evaluated in acute studies in four calves (122 + or - 10 kg). Gas exchange increased significantly with increasing impeller rotation rate. The degree of enhancement varied with impeller geometry. The maximum gas exchange efficiency (exchange per unit surface area) for the catheter with the best performing impeller was 529 + or - 20 ml CO(2)/min/m(2) and 513 + or - 21 ml CO(2)/min/m(2) for bench and animal studies, respectively, at a rotation rate of 20,000 rpm. Absolute CO(2) exchange was 37 and 36 ml CO(2)/min, respectively. Active mixing by rotating impellers produced 70% higher gas exchange efficiency than pulsating balloon catheters. The sensitivity of gas exchange to impeller design suggests that further improvements can be made by computational fluid dynamics-based optimization of the impeller.

  12. Fuel assembly insertion system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Barkhurst, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    This patent describes a nuclear reactor facility having fuel bundles: a system for the insertion of a fuel bundle into a position where vertically arranged fuel bundles surround and are adjacent the system comprising, in combination, separate and individual centering devices secured to and disposed on top of each fuel bundle adjacent the position. Each such centering device has a generally box-like cap configuration on the upper end of each fuel bundle and includes: a top wall; first and second side walls, each secured along and upper edge to the top wall; a rear plate attached along opposite vertical edges to the first and second side walls; a front inclined wall joined along an upper edge to the top to the wall and attached along opposite vertical edges first and second side walls; pad means secured to the lower edge of the first and second side walls, the front inclined wall and the rear plate for mounting each centering device on top of an associated fuel bundle; pin means carried by at least two of the pad means engageable with an associated aperature for locating and laterally fixing each centering device on top of its respective fuel bundle. Each front inclined wall of each of the centering devices is orientated on top of its respective fuel bundle to slope upwardly and away from the position where upon downward insertion of a fuel bundle any contact between the lower end of the fuel bundle inserted with a front inclined wall of a centering device will laterally deflect the fuel bundle. Each centering device further includes a central socket means secured to the top wall, and an elongated handling pole pivotally attached to the socket

  13. Percutaneous central venous catheters versus peripheral cannulae for delivery of parenteral nutrition in neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ainsworth, S B; Clerihew, L; McGuire, W

    2007-07-18

    Parenteral nutrition for neonates may be delivered via a short peripheral cannula or a central venous catheter. The latter may either be inserted via the umbilicus or percutaneously. Because of the complications associated with umbilical venous catheter use, many neonatal units prefer to use percutaneously inserted catheters following the initial stabilisation period. The method of parenteral nutrition delivery may affect nutrient input and consequently growth and development. Although potentially more difficult to place, percutaneous central venous catheters may be more stable than peripheral cannulae, and need less frequent replacement. These delivery methods may also be associated with different risks of adverse events, including acquired systemic infection and extravasation injury. To determine the effect of infusion via a percutaneous central venous catheter versus a peripheral cannula on nutrient input, growth and development, and complications including systemic infection, or extravasation injuries in newborn infants who require parenteral nutrition. The standard search strategy of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group was used. This included searches of the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials (CENTRAL, The Cochrane Library, Issue 1, 2007), MEDLINE (1966 - February 2007), EMBASE (1980 - February 2007), conference proceedings, and previous reviews. Randomised controlled trials that compared the effect of delivering parenteral nutrition via a percutaneous central venous catheter versus a peripheral cannulae in neonates. Data were extracted the data using the standard methods of the Cochrane Neonatal Review Group, with separate evaluation of trial quality and data extraction by each author, and synthesis of data using relative risk, risk difference and mean difference. Four trials eligible for inclusion were found. These trials recruited a total of 368 infants and reported a number of different outcomes. One study showed that the use of a percutaneous

  14. Data Insertion in Bitcoin's Blockchain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew Sward

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides the first comprehensive survey of methods for inserting arbitrary data into Bitcoin’s blockchain. Historical methods of data insertion are described, along with lesser-known techniques that are optimized for efficiency. Insertion methods are compared on the basis of efficiency, cost, convenience of data reconstruction, permanence, and potentially negative impact on the Bitcoin ecosystem.

  15. Chlorhexidine-Impregnated Dressings and Prevention of Catheter-Associated Bloodstream Infections in a Pediatric Intensive Care Unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Düzkaya, Duygu Sönmez; Sahiner, Nejla Canbulat; Uysal, Gülzade; Yakut, Tülay; Çitak, Agop

    2016-12-01

    Bloodstream infections related to use of catheters are associated with increased morbidity and mortality rates, prolonged hospital lengths of stay, and increased medical costs. To compare the effectiveness of chlorhexidine-impregnated dressings with that of standard dressings in preventing catheter-related bloodstream infections. A total of 100 children were randomly divided into 2 groups of 50 each: a chlorhexidine group and a standard group. Patient care was provided in accordance with prevention bundles. Patients were followed up for development of catheter-related bloodstream infections. Catheter colonization occurred in 4 patients in the standard group (8%) and in 1 patient in the chlorhexidine group (2%). Catheter-related bloodstream infections occurred in 5 patients in the stand