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Sample records for catheter combining intracardiac

  1. Neonatal atrial flutter after insertion of an intracardiac umbilical venous catheter

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Almeida, Marcos Moura; Tavares, Wládia Gislaynne de Sousa; Furtado, Maria Mônica Alencar Araripe; Fontenele, Maria Marcia Farias Trajano

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Objective: To describe a case of neonatal atrial flutter after the insertion of an intracardiac umbilical venous catheter, reporting the clinical presentation and reviewing the literature on this subject. Case description: A late-preterm newborn, born at 35 weeks of gestational age to a diabetic mother and large for gestational age, with respiratory distress and rule-out sepsis, required an umbilical venous access. After the insertion of the umbilical venous catheter, the patient presented with tachycardia. Chest radiography showed that the catheter was placed in the position that corresponds to the left atrium, and traction was applied. The patient persisted with tachycardia, and an electrocardiogram showed atrial flutter. As the patient was hemodynamically unstable, electric cardioversion was successfully applied. Comments: The association between atrial arrhythmias and misplaced umbilical catheters has been described in the literature, but in this case, it is noteworthy that the patient was an infant born to a diabetic mother, which consists in another risk factor for heart arrhythmias. Isolated atrial flutter is a rare tachyarrhythmia in the neonatal period and its identification is essential to establish early treatment and prevent systemic complications and even death. PMID:26525686

  2. Robotic catheter cardiac ablation combining ultrasound guidance and force control

    OpenAIRE

    Kesner, Samuel Benjamin; Howe, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    Cardiac catheters allow physicians to access the inside of the heart and perform therapeutic interventions without stopping the heart or opening the chest. However, conventional manual and actuated cardiac catheters are currently unable to precisely track and manipulate the intracardiac tissue structures because of the fast tissue motion and potential for applying damaging forces. This paper addresses these challenges by proposing and implementing a robotic catheter system that uses 3D ultras...

  3. Annular sizing using real-time three-dimensional intracardiac echocardiography-guided trans-catheter aortic valve replacement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rendon, Alejandro; Hamid, Tahir; Kanaganayagam, Gajen; Karunaratne, Devinda; Mahadevan, Vaikom S

    2016-01-01

    Objective Transcatheter aortic valve replacement (TAVR) has been established as an alternative therapy for patients with severe aortic stenosis who are unfit for the surgical aortic valve replacements. Pre and periprocedural imaging for the TAVR procedure is the key to procedural success. Currently transesophageal echocardiography (TOE), including real-time three-dimensional (RT-3D) imaging TOE, has been used for peri-interventional monitoring and guidance for TAVR. We describe our initial experience with real-time three-dimensional intracardiac echocardiography (RT-3DICE), imaging technology for the use in the TAVR procedure. Methods We used RT-3DICE using an ACUSON SC2000 2.0v (Siemens Medical Solution), and a 10F AcuNav V catheter (Siemens-Acuson, Inc, Mountain View, California, USA) in addition to preoperative multislice CT (MSCT) in total of five patients undergoing TAVR procedure. Results Aortic annulus and sinus of valsalva diameters were measured using RT-3DICE. Aortic valve measurements obtained using RT-3DICE are comparable to those obtained using MSCT with no significant difference in our patients. Conclusions This small study of five patients shows the safe use of RT-3DICE in TAVR Procedure and may help the procedures performed under local anaesthesia without the need for TOE. PMID:27158522

  4. Removal of intracardiac fractured port-A catheter utilizing an existing forearm peripheral intravenous access site in the cath lab.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choksy, Pratik; Zaidi, Syed S; Kapoor, Deepak

    2014-02-01

    The intravenous port-A catheters are widely used for long-term central venous access in cancer patients. Spontaneous fracture and migration of implanted port catheters is a known complication and necessitates immediate removal. Percutaneous retrieval of intravascular foreign body has become a common practice and is commonly performed through central venous access, mostly using femoral, subclavian, or internal jugular veins. Although the percutaneous approach is relatively safe, it can lead to potential iatrogenic complications. We report the first case report of percutaneous removal of intravascular foreign body using forearm peripheral intravenous access. PMID:24486665

  5. Role of Intracardiac echocardiography in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

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    Antonio Dello Russo, MD PhD

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In the recent years, several new evidences support catheter-based ablation as a treatment modality of atrial fibrillation (AF. Based on a plenty of different applications, intracardiac echocardiography (ICE is now a well-established technology in complex electrophysiological procedures, in particular in AF ablation. ICE contributes to improve the efficacy and safety of such procedures defining the anatomical structures involved in ablation procedures and monitoring in real time possible complications. In particular ICE allows: a correct identification of the endocardial structures; a guidance of transseptal puncture; an assessment of accurate placement of the circular mapping catheter; an indirect evaluation of evolving lesions during radiofrequency (RF energy delivery via visualization of micro and macrobubbles tissue heating; assessment of catheter contact with cardiac tissues. Recently, also the feasibility of the integration of electroanatomical mapping (EAM and intracardiac echocardiography has been demonstrated, combining accurate real time anatomical information with electroanatomical data. As a matter of fact, different techniques and ablation strategies have been developed throughout the years. In the setting of balloon-based ablation systems, recently adopted by an increasing number of centers, ICE might have a role in the choice of appropriate balloon size and to confirm accurate occlusion of pulmonary veins. Furthermore, in the era of minimally fluoroscopic ablation, ICE has successfully provided a contribute in reducing fluoroscopy time. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current applications of ICE in catheter based ablation strategies of atrial fibrillation, focusing-on electronically phased-array ICE.

  6. Activity of glycopeptides in combination with amikacin or rifampin against Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms on plastic catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, A; Ramirez de Arellano, E; Perea, E J

    1994-06-01

    The in vitro activity of vancomycin and teicoplanin (fourfold the MBC), alone and in combination with amikacin (16 mg/l) or rifampin (1 mg/l), against Staphylococcus epidermidis (slime-producing and non slime-producing strains) biofilms on different plastic catheters was evaluated. The addition of amikacin or rifampin significantly increased the activity of glycopeptides against sessile bacteria. With the slime-producing strain, these combinations were able to sterilize the surface of Vialon and polyvinylchloride catheters. It is concluded that the in vitro activity of glycopeptides against Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms on plastic catheters can be increased by the addition of amikacin or rifampin. PMID:7957277

  7. Combined ultrasound and fluoroscopy guided port catheter implantation-High success and low complication rate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate peri-procedural, early and late complications as well as patients' acceptance of combined ultrasound and fluoroscopy guided radiological port catheter implantation. Materials and methods: In a retrospective analysis, all consecutive radiological port catheter implantations (n = 299) between August 2002 and December 2004 were analyzed. All implantations were performed in an angio suite under analgosedation and antibiotic prophylaxis. Port insertion was guided by ultrasonographic puncture of the jugular (n = 298) or subclavian (n = 1) vein and fluoroscopic guidance of catheter placement. All data of the port implantation had been prospectively entered into a database for interventional radiological procedures. To assess long-term results, patients, relatives or primary physicians were interviewed by telephone; additional data were generated from the hospital information system. Patients and/or the relatives were asked about their satisfaction with the port implantion procedure and long-term results. Results: The technical success rate was 99% (298/299). There were no major complications according to the grading system of SIR. A total of 23 (0.33 per 1000 catheter days) complications (early (n = 4), late (n = 19)) were recorded in the follow-period of a total of 72,727 indwelling catheter days. Infectious complications accounted for 0.15, thrombotic for 0.07 and migration for 0.04 complications per 1000 catheter days. Most complications were successfully treated by interventional measures. Twelve port catheters had to be explanted due to complications, mainly because of infection (n = 9). Patients' and relatives' satisfaction with the port catheter system was very high, even if complications occurred. Conclusion: Combined ultrasound and fluoroscopy guided port catheter implantation is a very safe and reliable procedure with low peri-procedural, early and late complication rate. The intervention achieves very high acceptance by the patients and

  8. Combined ultrasound and fluoroscopy guided port catheter implantation-High success and low complication rate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebauer, Bernhard [Department of Radiology, Charite, Universitaetsmedizin Berlin, Campus Virchow-Klinikum, Augustenburger Platz 1, 13353 Berlin (Germany)], E-mail: bernhard.gebauer@charite.de; El-Sheik, Michael [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, Philipps University Marburg, Baldingerstrasse, 35033 Marburg (Germany); Department of Radiology, Vivantes, Hospital Friedrichshain, Am Urban, Hellersdorf and prenzlauer Berg, Landsberger Allee 49, 10249 Berlin (Germany); Vogt, Michael [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, Philipps University Marburg, Baldingerstrasse, 35033 Marburg (Germany); Wagner, Hans-Joachim [Department of Diagnostic Radiology, University Hospital, Philipps University Marburg, Baldingerstrasse, 35033 Marburg (Germany); Department of Radiology, Vivantes, Hospital Friedrichshain, Am Urban, Hellersdorf and prenzlauer Berg, Landsberger Allee 49, 10249 Berlin (Germany)

    2009-03-15

    Purpose: To evaluate peri-procedural, early and late complications as well as patients' acceptance of combined ultrasound and fluoroscopy guided radiological port catheter implantation. Materials and methods: In a retrospective analysis, all consecutive radiological port catheter implantations (n = 299) between August 2002 and December 2004 were analyzed. All implantations were performed in an angio suite under analgosedation and antibiotic prophylaxis. Port insertion was guided by ultrasonographic puncture of the jugular (n = 298) or subclavian (n = 1) vein and fluoroscopic guidance of catheter placement. All data of the port implantation had been prospectively entered into a database for interventional radiological procedures. To assess long-term results, patients, relatives or primary physicians were interviewed by telephone; additional data were generated from the hospital information system. Patients and/or the relatives were asked about their satisfaction with the port implantion procedure and long-term results. Results: The technical success rate was 99% (298/299). There were no major complications according to the grading system of SIR. A total of 23 (0.33 per 1000 catheter days) complications (early (n = 4), late (n = 19)) were recorded in the follow-period of a total of 72,727 indwelling catheter days. Infectious complications accounted for 0.15, thrombotic for 0.07 and migration for 0.04 complications per 1000 catheter days. Most complications were successfully treated by interventional measures. Twelve port catheters had to be explanted due to complications, mainly because of infection (n = 9). Patients' and relatives' satisfaction with the port catheter system was very high, even if complications occurred. Conclusion: Combined ultrasound and fluoroscopy guided port catheter implantation is a very safe and reliable procedure with low peri-procedural, early and late complication rate. The intervention achieves very high acceptance by the

  9. Clinical application of low energy intracardiac cardioversion of atrial fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the efficacy and safety of low energy intracardiac cardioversion in persistent atria fibrillation. Methods: Low energy intracardiac cardioversion was performed by delivering R wave-synchronized biphasic shocks in 7 patients (4 men, 3 women) with persistent atrial fibrillation. Prior to the procedure, all patients underwent transesophageal echocardiographic examinations to rule out the presence of intracardiac thrombus and received subcutaneous injection of low molecular weight heparin for 3-5 days. Two custom-made 6 Fr catheters (Rhythm Technologies of Getz, USA) were used for de-fibrillation shock delivery. One catheter was positioned in the lower right atrium so that the majority of the catheter electrodes had firm contact with the right atrial free wall. The second catheter was placed randomly either in coronary sinus through right internal jugular vein or in the left pulmonary artery through femoral vein. In addition, a standard diagnostic 6-F quadrupolar catheter was placed at the right ventricular apex for ventricular synchronization and postshock ventricular pacing. Shocks were delivered by Implant Support Device (Model 4510, Teleceronics). After conversion, all patients were treated with intravenous amiodarone in the first 24 hours followed by oral administration. Results: In all 7 patients cardioversion of atrial fibrillation to sinus rhythm was successfully obtained. A mean of 2 ± 1 shocks per patient has been delivered with a total amount of 13 shocks. The average delivered energy was 7.8 ± 2.2 Joules. No complication occurred. At a mean follow-up of 18 ± 9 months, 4 of the 7 patients treated successfully showed sinus rhythm there after. Atrial fibrillation recurred in 3 patients at the second, fifth day and eighth month after cardioversion. Conclusions: Low energy intracardiac cardioversion is effective and safe, and can be easily performed in patients without general anesthesia. It offers a new option for restoring sinus

  10. The Role of Intracardiac Echocardiography in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elad Anter, MD

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency catheter ablation of pulmonary veins has emerged as an effective therapy for patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation. Advances in real-time intracardiac echocardiography with 2D and Doppler color flow imaging have led to it integration in atrial fibrillation ablation procedures. It allows imaging of the left atrium and pulmonary veins, including identification of anatomic variations. It has an important role in guiding transseptal catheterization, imaging the pulmonary vein ostia, assisting in accurate placement of mapping and ablation catheters, monitoring lesion morphology and flow changes in the ablated pulmonary veins, hence allowing titration of energy delivery. Importantly, it allows instant detection of procedural complications.

  11. The Role of Intracardiac Echocardiography in Atrial Fibrillation Ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elad Anter

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency catheter ablation of pulmonary veins has emerged as an effective therapy for patients with symptomatic atrial fibrillation. Advances in real-time intracardiac echocardiography with 2D and Doppler color flow imaging have led to its integration in atrial fibrillation ablation procedures. It allows imaging of the left atrium and pulmonary veins, including identification of anatomic variations. It has an important role in guiding transseptal catheterization, imaging the pulmonary vein ostia, assisting in accurate placement of mapping and ablation catheters, monitoring lesion morphology and flow changes in the ablated pulmonary veins, hence allowing titration of energy delivery. Importantly, it allows instant detection of procedural complications.

  12. Combined Therapeutic and Monitoring Ultrasonic Catheter for Cardiac Ablation Therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carias, Mathew; Hynynen, Kullervo

    2016-01-01

    This study evaluated the feasibility of a combined therapeutic and diagnostic ultrasonic catheter for cardiac ablation therapies. Ultrasound can be used to determine when diseased cardiac tissues have become fully coagulated through a method known as local harmonic motion imaging (LHMI). LHMI is an imaging modality for treatment monitoring that uses acoustic radiation force, displacement tracking and the different mechanical properties of viable and ablated tissues. In this study, we developed catheters that are capable of LHMI measurements. Experiments were conducted in phantoms, ex vivo cardiac samples and the in vivo beating hearts of healthy porcine subjects. In vivo experiments revealed that four of four epicardial sonications revealed a decrease in measured displacements from LHMI experiments and that when lower power was used, no lesions formed and there was no corresponding decrease in measured displacement amplitudes. In addition, two of three endocardial lesions were confirmed and corresponded to a decrease in the measured displacement amplitude. PMID:26431798

  13. Intracardiac ECHO Integration with Three Dimensional Mapping: Role in AF Ablation

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    Yaariv Khaykin,MD

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF is typically guided by 3D mapping. This involves point-by-point reconstruction of the 3D virtual anatomy and may be time consuming and require substantial fluoroscopy exposure. Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE affords real time imaging of the cardiac structures during mapping and ablation. Methods Between February and May 2007, 15 patients (100% men, 10 with paroxysmal AF presenting for AF ablation were offered mapping using a novel system integrating 3D mapping and ICE. A modified ICE probe with a location sensor tracked by the mapping system was positioned in the right atrium (RA. This allowed acquisition of ECG gated images of the left atrium (LA. Endocardial contours were traced on each image and were used to generate a registered 3D map. Results 3D maps took a mean of 51+/-25 minutes to create, PRIOR to entering the LA and without fluoroscopy. Pulmonary veins and the esophagus were rendered in 3D. A complete map was built from a mean of 46+/-19 contours. Upon instrumentation of the left atrium, the maps were easily distorted if points collected by the mapping catheter were combined with the original map, due to deformation of the left atrial geometry by the relatively stiff ablation catheter. Pulmonary vein antrum isolation was guided by a circular mapping catheter. Since this catheter could not be visualized on the CARTO map, fluoroscopy was used to track its position and the contact between the ablation catheter and the circular mapping catheter. No substantial reduction in fluoroscopy time was thus realized, as expected. At 10+/-1 months of followup, 73% of the patients were in sinus rhythm after the initial three month blanking period. No patient suffered any complications related to the procedure or in follow-up. Conclusions A mapping system combining ICE and 3D electroanatomical mapping can feasibly reconstruct a 3D shell of the LA and the pulmonary veins without the need to

  14. Intracardiac ECHO Integration With Three Dimensional Mapping: Role in AF Ablation

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    Atul Verma

    2008-07-01

    Full Text Available Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF is typically guided by 3D mapping. This involves point-by-point reconstruction of the 3D virtual anatomy and may be time consuming and require substantial fluoroscopy exposure. Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE affords real time imaging of the cardiac structures during mapping and ablation. Methods: Between February and May 2007, 15 patients (100% men, 10 with paroxysmal AF presenting for AF ablation were offered mapping using a novel system integrating 3D mapping and ICE. A modified ICE probe with location sensor tracked by the mapping system was positioned in the right atrium (RA. This allowed acquisition of ECG gated images of the left atrium (LA. Endocardial contours were traced on each image and were used to generate a registered 3D map. Results: 3D maps took a mean of 51+/-25 minutes to create, PRIOR to entering the LA and without fluoroscopy. Pulmonary veins and the esophagus were rendered in 3D. A complete map was built from a mean of 46+/-19 contours. While the maps were precise prior to instrumentation of the left atrium, they were easily distorted if points collected by the mapping catheter were combined with the original map due to deformation of the left atrial geometry by the relatively stiff ablation catheter. Pulmonary vein antrum isolation was guided by a circular mapping catheter. Since this catheter could not be visualized on the CARTO map, fluoroscopy was used to track its position and the contact between the ablation catheter and the circular mapping catheter. No substantial reduction in fluoroscopy time was thus realized as expected. At 10+/-1 months of followup, 73% of the patients were in sinus rhythm after the initial three month blanking period. No patient suffered any complications related to the procedure or in follow-up. Conclusions: A mapping system combining ICE and 3D electroanatomical mapping can feasibly reconstruct a 3D shell of the LA and the pulmonary veins

  15. Double decompression of presacral collection by heald anal stent and foley catheter combination

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    Dean A. Godfrey

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available The authors demonstrate the effective drainage of presacral sepsis following low anterior resection surgery using the novel approach of both the Heald anal stent and a Foley catheter combined. The Heald stent was placed trans-anally without the need for anaesthetic and an 18Fr Foley was placed through this. A presacral collection was drained through the stent, allowing the patient to be discharged after a week without the need to return to the operating theatre. The Heald stent may be used to successfully drain a presacral collection by double decompression of the rectum and the presacral space.

  16. Intracardiac Thrombosis during Adult Liver Transplantation

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    Marina Moguilevitch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracardiac thrombosis (ICT and pulmonary embolism (PE during adult liver transplantation are rare but potentially lethal complications. They are often overlooked because of significant diagnostic challenges. The combination of hemodynamic compromise and transesophageal echocardiography (TEE findings allows for correct diagnosis. A large variety of putative risk factors for ICT and PE have been suggested, but these events are considered to be multifactorial. There are different proposed treatment modalities for these devastating complications. Unfortunately, in spite of growing knowledge in this area, intraoperative and postoperative mortalities remain very high. The retrospective nature of the study of these events makes the case reports extremely valuable.

  17. Antimicrobial and antifouling efficacy of urinary catheters impregnated with a combination of macrolide and fluoroquinolone antibiotics against Pseudomonas aeruginosa.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saini, Hina; Chhibber, Sanjay; Harjai, Kusum

    2016-05-01

    The incidence of catheter associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs) is increasing worldwide. This study was designed to modify a biomaterial by impregnating a silicone urinary catheter with combination of a macrolide, azithromycin (AZM) and a fluoroquinolone, ciprofloxacin (CIP). Drug release profiles showed slow yet continuous release of antibiotics from catheters for one month. In vitro efficacy testing showed that group B catheters [3% (w v(-1)) CIP + 6% (w v(-1)) AZM] outperformed group A catheters [2% (w v(-1)) CIP + 5% (w v(-1)) AZM] by (1) showing larger zones of inhibition (>31 mm) compared to group A (<28 mm) for up to 30 days against Pseudomonas aeruginosa PAO1; (2) killing adhered bacteria in 24 h compared to 24-48 h in group A; (3) showing longer antimicrobial durability for four weeks; and (4) exhibiting a stable real-time shelf life of one year, suggesting that these catheters can be explored in clinical settings, especially in long-term CAUTI. PMID:26982572

  18. Entrapment of a Pacing Lead within a Chiari Network: Utility of Intracardiac Echo and a Laser Sheath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aung, Htin; Espinosa, Raul E; Powell, Brian D; McLeod, Christopher J

    2016-06-01

    Although rare, Chiari networks are elaborate embryological remnants that can pose distinct challenges for catheter and pacing lead manipulation within the right atrium. Device entrapment may require open thoracotomy for removal, with significant morbidity. We report an unusual case of pacing lead entanglement within this structure, followed by prompt intracardiac echocardiographic identification and laser sheath removal. PMID:26873294

  19. In situ treatment of liver using catheter based therapeutic ultrasound with combined imaging and GPS tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghoshal, Goutam; Heffter, Tamas; Williams, Emery; Bromfield, Corinne; Salgaonkar, Vasant; Rund, Laurie; Ehrhardt, John M.; Diederich, Chris J.; Burdette, E. Clif

    2013-02-01

    Extensive surgical procedure or liver transplant still remains the gold standard for treating slow-growing tumors in liver. But only few candidates are suitable for such procedure due to poor liver function, tumors in unresectable locations or presence of other liver diseases. In such situations, minimally invasive surgery may be the best therapeutic procedure. The use of RF, laser and ultrasound ablation techniques has gained considerable interest over the past several years to treat liver diseases. The success of such minimally invasive procedure depends on accurately targeting the desired region and guiding the entire procedure. The purpose of this study is to use ultrasound imaging and GPS tracking system to accurately place a steerable acoustic ablator and multiple temperature sensors in porcine liver in situ. Temperature sensors were place at eight different locations to estimate thermal distribution in the three-dimensional treated volume. Acoustic ablator of center frequency of 7 MHz was used for the experiments. During therapy a maximum temperature of 60-65 °C was observed at a distance 8-10 mm from the center of the ablation transducer. The dose distribution was analyzed and compared with the gross pathology of the treated region. Accurate placement of the acoustic applicator and temperature sensors were achieved using the combined image-guidance and the tracking system. By combining ultrasound imaging and GPS tracking system accurate placement of catheter based acoustic ablation applicator can be achieved in livers in situ.

  20. Percutaneous catheter drainage in combination with choledochoscope-guided debridement in treatment of peripancreatic infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    AIM:To introduce and evaluate the new method used in treatment of pancreatic and peripancreatic infections secondary to severe acute pancreatitis(SAP).METHODS:A total of 42 SAP patients initially underwent ultrasound-guided percutaneous puncture and catheterization.An 8-Fr drainage catheter was used to drain the infected peripancreatic necrotic foci for 3-5 d.The sinus tract of the drainage catheter was expanded gradually with a skin expander,and the 8-Fr drainage catheter was replaced with a 22-Fr drainage...

  1. Intracardiac therapy following emergency thoracotomy in the accident and emergency department: an experimental model.

    OpenAIRE

    Moulton, C; Pennycook, A; Crawford, R

    1992-01-01

    For a select group of patients with penetrating chest trauma, immediate thoracotomy in the accident and emergency department offers the only chance of survival. Foley catheters have been used to achieve haemostasis in cardiac wounds but are not widely used for intracardiac fluid and drug administration during resuscitation. In an anatomical model designed to assess this procedure an average flow rate of 275 ml min-1 was achieved. The equipment required is readily available and easily assembled.

  2. Endovascular treatment of a chronically occluded limb of endograft with combination TNK pharmacological and EKOS thrombolytic catheter system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arterial occlusion is a common and sometimes devastating medical condition related to peripheral vascular and cardiovascular disease. These patients are at severe risk of limb loss and death. Those patients with embolic phenomena are at significantly higher mortality risk than those with thrombosis. Catheter directed therapies have been used routinely for restoration of perfusion to a limb removing the thrombosis or embolic material. Limb thrombosis following endovascular graft placement is a known complication occurring within the first year of the endograft. In many institutions, endovascular treatment of aortic limb occlusions has become the initial management for acute occlusions. We describe the endovascular treatment of a chronic occluded limb utilizing a combination of pharmacological and mechanical thrombolysis using the new ultrasound enhanced EKOS catheter system. Endovascular specialists should be aware that chronically occluded endograft limbs can be successfully treated in the endovascular suite with the EKOS system without requiring more invasive surgical therapies.

  3. Percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy combined with catheter-directed thrombolysis in the treatment of symptomatic lower extremity deep venous thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the efficacy of percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy (PMT) combined with catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) in the treatment of massive symptomatic lower limb deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Materials and methods: One hundred and three clinically confirmed DVT patients were discharged from our institution. Sixteen patients with massive lower limb DVT were included in this retrospective study. After prophylactic placement of inferior vena cava filters (IVCFs), percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy (ATD, n = 10; Straub, n = 6) and catheter-directed thrombolysis were performed in all patients. Complementary therapy included percutaneous transluminal venous angioplasty (PTA, n = 3) and stent placement (n = 1). The doses of thrombolytic agents, length of hospital stay, peri-procedure complications and discharge status were reviewed. Oral anticoagulation was continued for at least 6 months during follow-up. Results: The average hospital stay was 7 days. The technical success rate (complete and partial lysis of clot) was 89%, the other 11% patients only achieved less than 50% clot lysis. The mean dose of urokinase was 3.3 million IU. There were no significant differences of clinical outcome between the ATD and Straub catheter group. The only major complication was an elderly male who experienced a fatal intracranial hemorrhage while still in the hospital (0.97%, 1/103). Minor complications consisted of three instances of subcutaneous bleeding. No transfusions were required. Vascular patency was achieved in 12 limbs during follow-up. No pulmonary emboli occurred. There is one recurrent DVT 4.5 months after the treatment. Conclusions: Percutaneous mechanical thrombectomy combined with catheter-directed thrombolysis is an effective and safe method for the treatment of symptomatic DVT. A randomized prospective study is warranted.

  4. Utilidade do Ultrassom intracardíaco no isolamento de veias pulmonares usando cateter-balão a laser Utilidad del ultrasonido intracardíaco en el aislamiento de venas pulmonares usando catéter-balón láser Utility of intracardiac ultrasound imaging to guide pulmonary vein ablation using laser balloon catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Leite

    2009-12-01

    . Se obtuvo el aislamiento completo en 38/59 (64%, y fue significantemente más común sin derrame: [30/38 (79% versus 8/23 (35%, pBACKGROUND: Pulmonary vein isolation (PVI with balloon catheter has been used as the endpoint for AF ablation. OBJECTIVE: To determine the usefulness of intracardiac ultrasound (ICUS to guide PVI using laser balloon catheter. METHODS: 59 PVs were ablated in 27 dogs. Doppler imaging was used to identify blood flow leaks between PV and balloon. After each energy delivery, the circular mapping catheter was repositioned to check if isolation had been achieved. The leak position was then correlated with the gap position at the pathological study. Multivariate logistic regression analysis was undertaken. RESULTS: 59 PV were ablated. Mean burn time was 279±177 sec, mean balloon diameter was 23±3 mm, and mean balloon length was 25±4 mm. Complete isolation was achieved in 38/59 (64% cases, and it was significantly more common when there was no leak: [30/38 (79% versus 8/23 (35%, p<0.001]. This occurred regardless of time of laser application (302±223 sec. vs. 266±148 sec., p=ns, laser power (3.5 W/cm, 4.5 W/cm, and 5.5 W/cm, balloon diameter (24± 3 mm vs. 22± 3 mm, p=ns and length (27±4 mm vs. 24±4mm, p=ns. The positive predictive value for predicting incomplete isolation was 65% and the negative predictive value was 83%. CONCLUSION: An identifiable leak between PV and the LBA device seen at the ICUS is predictive of lower PV isolation rates. ICUS may be useful for leak detection to avoid ineffective energy application during circumferential PV ablation. This could also be helpful when other types of energy are used.

  5. Comparative dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for brain tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Samia de Freitas Brandao; Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de Campos

    2013-01-01

    Objective Comparative analysis of dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for treatment of brain tumors. Materials and Methods Simulations of intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT were performed with the MCNP5 code, modeling the treatment of a brain tumor on a voxel computational phantom representing a human head. Absorbed dose rates were converted int...

  6. Robotic Catheters for Beating Heart Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kesner, Samuel Benjamin

    2011-01-01

    Compliant and flexible cardiac catheters provide direct access to the inside of the heart via the vascular system without requiring clinicians to stop the heart or open the chest. However, the fast motion of the intracardiac structures makes it difficult to modify and repair the cardiac tissue in a controlled and safe manner. In addition, rigid robotic tools for beating heart surgery require the chest to be opened and the heart exposed, making the procedures highly invasive. The novel robot...

  7. Combined Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation and Watchman® Left Atrial Appendage Occlusion Procedures: A Single Centre Experience

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    Daniel T. Walker B. App Sci

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Background Patients with atrial fibrillation (AF may be interested in undergoing concomitant interventions of left atrial catheter ablation and device occlusion of the left atrial appendage (LAA. We report on the feasibility and outcome of combined procedures in a single centre case series. Methods Twenty-six patients underwent either first time or redo pulmonary vein isolation (PVI procedures followed by successful implant of a Watchman? device. Results All procedures were uncomplicated with a mean case time of 233 ? 38 minutes. Maximal LAA orifice dimension was smaller in 3 of 26 patients post PVI (range 1mm than on the pre-procedural transoesophageal echocardiogram (TOE. A new peri-device leak of maximum 3mm was noted in 5 of 26 patients at 6 week follow-up TOE, but resolved in 4 by the 6 month follow-up. Conclusion Combined procedures for catheter ablation for AF and Watchman? LAA implant appear to be feasible and safe with satisfactory occlusion of the LAA maintained at follow-up.

  8. Comparative dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for brain tumors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brandao, Samia de Freitas, E-mail: samiabrandao@gmail.com [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Departamento de Engenharia Nuclear; Campos, Tarcisio Passos Ribeiro de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)

    2013-06-15

    Objective: comparative analysis of dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for treatment of brain tumors. Materials and methods: simulations of intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT were performed with the MCNP5 code, modeling the treatment of a brain tumor on a voxel computational phantom representing a human head. Absorbed dose rates were converted into biologically weighted dose rates. Results: intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 produced biologically weighted mean dose rates of 3.2E-11, 1.3E-10, 1.9E-11 and 6.9E-13 RBE.Gy.h{sup -1}.p{sup -1}.s, respectively, on the healthy tissue, on the balloon periphery and on the /{sub 1} and /{sub 2} tumor infiltration zones. On the other hand, Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT produced a biologically weighted mean dose rate of 5.2E-09, 2.3E-07, 8.7E-09 and 2.4E-09 RBE.Gy.h{sup -1}.p{sup -1}.s, respectively on the healthy tissue, on the target tumor and on the /{sub 1} and /{sub 2} infiltration zones. Conclusion: Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT delivered a selective irradiation to the target tumor and to infiltration zones, while intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 delivered negligible doses on the tumor infiltration zones. (author)

  9. Comparative dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for brain tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samia de Freitas Brandao

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Objective Comparative analysis of dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for treatment of brain tumors. Materials and Methods Simulations of intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT were performed with the MCNP5 code, modeling the treatment of a brain tumor on a voxel computational phantom representing a human head. Absorbed dose rates were converted into biologically weighted dose rates. Results Intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 produced biologically weighted mean dose rates of 3.2E-11, 1.3E-10, 1.9E-11 and 6.9E-13 RBE.Gy.h-1.p-1.s, respectively, on the healthy tissue, on the balloon periphery and on the I 1 and I 2 tumor infiltration zones. On the other hand, Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT produced a biologically weighted mean dose rate of 5.2E-09, 2.3E-07, 8.7E-09 and 2.4E-09 RBE.Gy.h-1.p-1.s, respectively on the healthy tissue, on the target tumor and on the I 1 and I 2 infiltration zones. Conclusion Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT delivered a selective irradiation to the target tumor and to infiltration zones, while intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 delivered negligible doses on the tumor infiltration zones.

  10. Comparative dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: comparative analysis of dosimetry in intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT for treatment of brain tumors. Materials and methods: simulations of intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 and in Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT were performed with the MCNP5 code, modeling the treatment of a brain tumor on a voxel computational phantom representing a human head. Absorbed dose rates were converted into biologically weighted dose rates. Results: intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 produced biologically weighted mean dose rates of 3.2E-11, 1.3E-10, 1.9E-11 and 6.9E-13 RBE.Gy.h-1.p-1.s, respectively, on the healthy tissue, on the balloon periphery and on the /1 and /2 tumor infiltration zones. On the other hand, Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT produced a biologically weighted mean dose rate of 5.2E-09, 2.3E-07, 8.7E-09 and 2.4E-09 RBE.Gy.h-1.p-1.s, respectively on the healthy tissue, on the target tumor and on the /1 and /2 infiltration zones. Conclusion: Cf-252 brachytherapy combined with BNCT delivered a selective irradiation to the target tumor and to infiltration zones, while intracavitary balloon catheter brachytherapy with I-125 delivered negligible doses on the tumor infiltration zones. (author)

  11. Clinical application of hysterosalpingography with a double-lumen catheter of a contrast media combination consisting iohexol and saline

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of hysteosalpingographic diagnosis in infertile women. Methods: After a catheter with a double-lumen saccule was inserted into the uterine cavity, saline or air of 2.5-3.5 ml was injected to fill the saccule. The filled saccule was inserted at the isthmus of uterus for blocking the internal orifice. The contrast medium was injected through the catheter into the uterine cavity and fallopian tubes to undertake hysterosalpingography and fallopian tube reopening. In case of fallopian tube obstruction, the injection pressure could be increased to obtain recanalization. All operations and selective imagings were carried out under TV supervision. Results: 2698 cases including 806 primary infertile women and 1868 secondary infertile women were examined by this method. Technical success rate was 99.5% with 2198 cases (81.9%) having normal uterus, 249 (9.3%) congenital abnormal uterus and 238 (8.9%) uterus diseases. The number of obstructed fallopian tube was 3028 with 117 serious hydropsy (3.8%). Ninety-eight cases had been examined with lipiodol hysterosalpingography in other hospitals with 35 cases still having lipiodol accumulated within the uterine cavities and fallopian tubes. No serious complications or death occurred except slight pain. Conclusions: Double-lumen cather with a contrast media combination of iohexol and saline for hysterosal pinography is safe, easy and effective, outcoming with excellent quality images. More information can be gained with this method than traditional lipiodol hyterosalpinography, and furthermore could have compression during radiogrophy and avoid the long term stasis of lipiodol. (authors)

  12. The Evolving Utility of Intracardiac Echocardiography in Cardiac Procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr. Christopher F. Liu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE has gained increasing use in electrophysiology due to the need to visualize key anatomic structures. Precise guidance for transseptal puncture and visualization of the pulmonary veins are common essential uses for ICE, but many operators adept at ICE imaging have developed additional and specific uses. With heavy use of ICE guidance, electrophysiologists demonstrated feasibility of left atrial ablation with minimal use of fluoroscopy. With the advent of 3D mapping-integrated ICE, rendering of contours for the left atrium, aortic cusps, and left ventricular structures such as the papillary muscles have become possible. Improved understanding of the anatomy of these areas can facilitate mapping and ablation of these structurally complex sites. Additional uses of scar-visualization and integration into voltage maps have been explored. Left atrial appendage imaging has been an area of interest in the ICE community, although technological improvements are likely needed to make this more reliably complete. A new real-time 3D ICE catheter has also been developed, and work is in progress to delineate potential uses for this new frontier. Increasingly routine use of ICE has led to improved real-time guidance of all percutaneous cardiac procedures.

  13. Early intracardiac thrombosis in preterm infants and thrombolysis with recombinant tissue type plasminogen activator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferrari, F; Vagnarelli, F; Gargano, G; Roversi, M; Biagioni, O; Ranzi, A; Cavazzuti, G

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVES—To determine the incidence of catheter related thrombosis and to test the efficacy of recombinant tissue type plasminogen activator (rt-PA) in preterm infants.
STUDY DESIGN—From January 1995 to December 1998, echocardiography was performed in the first few days of life in 76 very low birthweight (⩽ 1500 g) infants out of a total of 147 having an umbilical catheter placed. When intracardiac thrombosis was diagnosed, rt-PA infusion was performed.
RESULTS—Four infants (5%) developed an intracardiac thrombosis during the first few days of life. In three of them, rt-PA at a dose of 0.4-0.5 mg/kg in a 20-30 minute bolus led to dissolution of the clot. One patient received a three hour infusion after the bolus, at a dose of 0.1 mg/kg/h, with resolution of the thrombus. No systemic effects were observed after rt-PA infusion.
CONCLUSIONS—Early thrombosis may occur as a complication of umbilical catheterisation in preterm infants; early echocardiographic detection of this disorder allows complete, safe, and rapid lysis with rt-PA.

 PMID:11420328

  14. Assessment of intracardiac masses by transesophageal echocardiography.

    OpenAIRE

    DeVille, J B; Corley, D; Jin, B S; de Castro, C M; Hall, R J; Wilansky, S

    1995-01-01

    Transesophageal echocardiography and 2-dimensional transthoracic echocardiography have proved to be extremely valuable in the diagnosis of cardiac masses. In this report, we review the echocardiographic findings, clinical history, and histopathologic findings in 21 patients with intracardiac masses who underwent transthoracic echocardiography, transesophageal echocardiography, or both, at our institution. Of these patients, 14 had benign masses and 7 had malignant tumors. The potential role o...

  15. Intracardiac Thrombosis in Sickle Cell Disease

    OpenAIRE

    Marzieh Nikparvar; Mohammad Reza Evazi; Tasnim Eftekhari; Farzaneh Moosavi

    2016-01-01

    In patients with sickle cell disease, thrombotic microangiopathy is a rare complication. Also in sickle cell disease, intracardiac thrombus formation without structural heart diseases or atrial arrhythmias is a rare phenomenon. We herein describe a 22-year-old woman, who was a known case of sickle cell-βthalassemia, had a history of recent missed abortion, and was admitted with a vaso-occlusive crisis. The patient had manifestations of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, including laboratory e...

  16. Design, construction, and validation of a rotary multifunctional intravascular diagnostic catheter combining multispectral fluorescence lifetime imaging and intravascular ultrasound

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bec, Julien; Xie, Hongtao; Yankelevich, Diego R.; Zhou, Feifei; Sun, Yang; Ghata, Narugopal; Aldredge, Ralph; Marcu, Laura

    2012-10-01

    We report the development and validation of an intravascular rotary catheter for bimodal interrogation of arterial pathologies. This is based on a point-spectroscopy scanning time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy technique enabling reconstruction of fluorescence lifetime images (FLIm) and providing information on arterial intima composition and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) providing information on arterial wall morphology. The catheter design allows for independent rotation of the ultrasonic and optical channels within an 8 Fr outer diameter catheter sheath and integrates a low volume flushing channel for blood removal in the optical pathways. In the current configuration, the two channels consist of (a) a standard 3 Fr IVUS catheter with single element transducer (40 MHz) and (b) a side-viewing fiber optic (400 μm core). Experiments conducted in tissue phantoms showed the ability of the catheter to operate in an intraluminal setting and to generate coregistered FLIm and IVUS in one pull-back scan. Current results demonstrate the feasibility of the catheter for simultaneous bimodal interrogation of arterial lumen and for generation of robust fluorescence lifetime data under IVUS guidance. These results facilitate further development of a FLIm-IVUS technique for intravascular diagnosis of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases including vulnerable plaques.

  17. Design, construction, and validation of a multimodal intravascular diagnostic catheter combining IVUS and fluorescence lifetime spectroscopy detection channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bec, Julien; Xie, Hongtao; Yankelevich, Diego; Zhou, Feifei; Sun, Yang; Ghata, Narugopal; Aldredge, Ralph; Marcu, Laura

    2011-03-01

    We report the development and validation of an intravascular rotary catheter that enables bi-modal interrogation of arterial pathologies based on fast-frame time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy (TRFS) and intravascular ultrasound (IVUS). The catheter is based on a parallel design that allows for independent rotation of the ultrasonic and optical channels within an 8 Fr outer diameter catheter sheath and integrates a low volume flushing channel for blood removal in the optical pathways. In current configuration, the two channels consist of a) a standard 8 Fr IVUS catheter with single element transducer (15 MHz) and b) a side-viewing UV-grade silica/silica fiber optic (400 μm core). The catheter is terminated by a small (0.82 mm internal diameter) polyimide tube to keep the fiber stable within the sheath. To clear the field of view from blood, a saline solution can be flushed in a sheath channel, concentric with the fiber optic, through the tube and in a radial opening aligned with the fiber's optical beam. The flushing function was optimized with a computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model pursued in a parallel study. The ability of the catheter to operate in intraluminal setting in blood flow, the effect of probe-to-tissue distance on optical signal and ability to generate co-registered TRFS and IVUS data were demonstrated in blood vessel phantoms. Current results demonstrate the feasibility of the described catheter for parallel interrogation of vessel walls based on TRFS and IVUS and to generate robust TRFS data. These results facilitate further development of a bi-modal TRFS-IVUS technique for intravascular diagnosis of atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases including vulnerable plaques.

  18. Intracardiac Thrombosis in Sickle Cell Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikparvar, Marzieh; Evazi, Mohammad Reza; Eftekhari, Tasnim; Moosavi, Farzaneh

    2016-03-01

    In patients with sickle cell disease, thrombotic microangiopathy is a rare complication. Also in sickle cell disease, intracardiac thrombus formation without structural heart diseases or atrial arrhythmias is a rare phenomenon. We herein describe a 22-year-old woman, who was a known case of sickle cell-βthalassemia, had a history of recent missed abortion, and was admitted with a vaso-occlusive crisis. The patient had manifestations of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, including laboratory evidence of hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, respiratory distress, fever, jaundice, and abnormal liver function and coagulation tests, accompanied by clot formation on the Eustachian valve of the inferior vena cava in the right atrium and also a long and worm-like thrombus in the right ventricle. Therapeutic plasma exchange improved her clinical condition, and her intracardiac thrombus was completely resolved after 1 week. Echocardiography, as a simple and inexpensive imaging modality, had a significant role in the diagnosis and follow-up of this patient. PMID:26989287

  19. Intracardiac Thrombosis in Sickle Cell Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marzieh Nikparvar

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available In patients with sickle cell disease, thrombotic microangiopathy is a rare complication. Also in sickle cell disease, intracardiac thrombus formation without structural heart diseases or atrial arrhythmias is a rare phenomenon. We herein describe a 22-year-old woman, who was a known case of sickle cell-βthalassemia, had a history of recent missed abortion, and was admitted with a vaso-occlusive crisis. The patient had manifestations of microangiopathic hemolytic anemia, including laboratory evidence of hemolytic anemia, thrombocytopenia, respiratory distress, fever, jaundice, and abnormal liver function and coagulation tests, accompanied by clot formation on the Eustachian valve of the inferior vena cava in the right atrium and also a long and worm-like thrombus in the right ventricle. Therapeutic plasma exchange improved her clinical condition, and her intracardiac thrombus was completely resolved after 1 week. Echocardiography, as a simple and inexpensive imaging modality, had a significant role in the diagnosis and follow-up of this patient.

  20. A Novel Fenestration Technique for Abdominal Aortic Dissection Membranes Using a Combination of a Needle Re-entry Catheter and the “Cheese-wire” Technique

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study was designed to demonstrate the applicability of a combined needle-based re-entry catheter and “cheese-wire” technique for fenestration of abdominal aortic dissection membranes. Methods: Four male patients (mean age: 65 years) with acute complicated aortic type B dissections were treated at our institution by fenestrating the abdominal aortic dissection membrane using a hybrid technique. This technique combined an initial membrane puncture with a needle-based re-entry catheter using a transfemoral approach. A guidewire was passed through the re-entry catheter and across the membrane. Using a contralateral transfemoral access, this guidewire was then snared, creating a through-and-through wire access. The membrane was then fenestrated using the cheese-wire maneuver. Results: We successfully performed: (a) membrane puncture; (b) guidewire passage; (c) guidewire snaring; and (d) cheese-wire maneuver in all four cases. After this maneuver, decompression of the false lumen and acceptable arterial inflow into the true lumen was observed in all cases. The dependent visceral arteries were reperfused. In one case, portions of the fenestrated membrane occluded the common iliac artery, which was immediately and successfully stented. In another case, long-standing intestinal hypoperfusion before the fenestration resulted in reperfusion-related shock and intraoperative death of the patient. Conclusions: The described hybrid approach for fenestration of dissection membranes is technically feasible and may be established as a therapeutic method in cases with a complicated type B dissection.

  1. Disturbance of intracardiac hemodynamics in children with chronic rheumatic cardiac disease

    OpenAIRE

    Kondratiev V.A.; Porokhnya N.H.; Kunak Ye.V.

    2013-01-01

    By means of Doppler echocardiography there have been studied disturbances of intracardiac hemodynamics in 44 children aged 8-17 years with chronic rheumatic cardiac disease and developed mitral aortal and combined heart defects, as well as in chronic rheumatic cardiac disease  without developed valvar defect. Differential approach has been defined to administration of inhibitors of angiotensin-converting factor in rheumatic heart defects: developed insufficiency of mitral and/or aortal valves...

  2. Characterization of Left Atrial Tachyarrhythmias in Patients Following Atrial Fibrillation Ablation: Correlation of surface ECG with Intracardiac Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sanjay Dixit

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available With expected success rates in excess of 80% for achieving long term arrhythmia control, catheter based ablation has become a popular treatment strategy in the management of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF. However, the success of AF ablation has been tempered by the occurrence of post procedure left atrial tachycardias and / or flutters, which can be seen in up to 30% of the patients. These arrhythmias are perpetuated either due to abnormalities of impulse formation (abnormal automaticity / triggered activity, or abnormalities of impulse conduction (micro / macroreentry. Regardless of the underlying mechanism, these tachycardias manifest distinct “P” or flutter waves on the surface ECG, recognition of which may facilitate their characterization / localization. However, because of the frequent overlap in the morphology of P waves, intracardiac mapping is often the only way to distinguish them apart. This is accomplished using a combination of activation, entrainment and electroanatomic mapping techniques. Tachycardias resulting from abnormalities of impulse formation and / or microreentry are characteristically focal and usually confined in and around pulmonary vein (PV segments which have reconnected (septal aspect of right PVs and anterior aspect of left PVs. In contrast, macroreentrant tachycardias manifest a large circuit dimension involving zone(s of slow conduction. These are most commonly seen to occur around the mitral valve but can develop in any part of the left atrium where “gaps” across prior ablation lesion sets create altered conduction. Successful ablation of focal tachycardias is usually accomplished by isolating the reconnected PV segment(s. In case of macroreentrant arrhythmias however, a more extensive ablation approach is typically required in order to achieve conduction block across isthmus of the circuit. Using these strategies, the majority of left atrial tachycardias occurring post AF ablation can be

  3. Anti-biofilm properties of the antimicrobial peptide temporin 1Tb and its ability, in combination with EDTA, to eradicate Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms on silicone catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maisetta, Giuseppantonio; Grassi, Lucia; Di Luca, Mariagrazia; Bombardelli, Silvia; Medici, Chiara; Brancatisano, Franca Lisa; Esin, Semih; Batoni, Giovanna

    2016-08-01

    In search of new antimicrobials with anti-biofilm potential, in the present study activity of the frog-skin derived antimicrobial peptide temporin 1Tb (TB) against Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms was investigated. A striking ability of TB to kill both forming and mature S. epidermidis biofilms was observed, especially when the peptide was combined with cysteine or EDTA, respectively. Kinetics studies demonstrated that the combination TB/EDTA was active against mature biofilms already after 2-4-h exposure. A double 4-h exposure of biofilms to TB/EDTA further increased the therapeutic potential of the same combination. Of note, TB/EDTA was able to eradicate S. epidermidis biofilms formed in vitro on silicone catheters. At eradicating concentrations, TB/EDTA did not cause hemolysis of human erythrocytes. The results shed light on the anti-biofilm properties of TB and suggest a possible application of the peptide in the lock therapy of catheters infected with S. epidermidis. PMID:27351824

  4. Direct Digital Demultiplexing of Analog TDM Signals for Cable Reduction in Ultrasound Imaging Catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carpenter, Thomas M; Rashid, M Wasequr; Ghovanloo, Maysam; Cowell, David M J; Freear, Steven; Degertekin, F Levent

    2016-08-01

    In real-time catheter-based 3-D ultrasound imaging applications, gathering data from the transducer arrays is difficult, as there is a restriction on cable count due to the diameter of the catheter. Although area and power hungry multiplexing circuits integrated at the catheter tip are used in some applications, these are unsuitable for use in small sized catheters for applications, such as intracardiac imaging. Furthermore, the length requirement for catheters and limited power available to on-chip cable drivers leads to limited signal strength at the receiver end. In this paper, an alternative approach using analog time-division multiplexing (TDM) is presented, which addresses the cable restrictions of ultrasound catheters. A novel digital demultiplexing technique is also described, which allows for a reduction in the number of analog signal processing stages required. The TDM and digital demultiplexing schemes are demonstrated for an intracardiac imaging system that would operate in the 4- to 11-MHz range. A TDM integrated circuit (IC) with an 8:1 multiplexer is interfaced with a fast analog-to-digital converter (ADC) through a microcoaxial catheter cable bundle, and processed with a field-programmable gate array register-transfer level simulation. Input signals to the TDM IC are recovered with -40-dB crosstalk between the channels on the same microcoax, showing the feasibility of this system for ultrasound imaging applications. PMID:27116738

  5. Radiological Interventions for Correction of Central Venous Port Catheter Migrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the study is to evaluate radiological-interventional central venous port catheter corrections in migrated/malpositioned catheter tips. Thirty patients with migrated/malpositioned port catheter tips were included in this retrospective analysis. To visualize the catheter patency, a contrast-enhanced port catheter series was performed, followed by transfemoral port catheter correction with various 5F angiographic catheters (pigtail, Sos Omni), goose-neck snare, or combinations thereof. One patient showed spontaneous reposition of the catheter tip. In 27 of 29 patients (93%), radiological-interventional port catheter correction was successful. In two patients, port catheter malposition correction was not possible because of the inability to catch either the catheter tip or the catheter in its course, possibly due to fibrin sheath formation with attachment of the catheter to the vessel wall. No disconnection or port catheter dysfunction was observed after correction. In migrated catheter tips, radiological-interventional port catheter correction is a minimally invasive alternative to port extraction and reimplantation. In patients with a fibrin sheath and/or thrombosis, port catheter correction is often more challenging

  6. Radiological Interventions for Correction of Central Venous Port Catheter Migrations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose. The purpose of this study was to evaluate radiological-interventional central venous port catheter corrections in migrated/malpositioned catheter tips. Materials and Methods. Thirty patients with migrated/malpositioned port catheter tips were included in this retrospective analysis. To visualize the catheter patency a contrast-enhanced port catheter series was performed, followed by transfemoral port catheter correction with various 5-F angiographic catheters (pigtail; Sos Omni), gooseneck snares, or combinations thereof. Results. One patient showed spontaneous reposition of the catheter tip. In 27 of 29 patients (93%), radiological-interventional port catheter correction was successful. In two patients port catheter malposition correction was not possible, because of the inability to catch either the catheter tip or the catheter in its course, possibly due to fibrin sheath formation with attachment of the catheter to the vessel wall. No disconnection or port catheter dysfunction was observed after correction. Conclusions. We conclude that in migrated catheter tips radiological-interventional port catheter correction is a minimally invasive alternative to port extraction and reimplantation. In patients with a fibrin sheath and/or thrombosis port catheter correction is often more challenging

  7. Echocardiography-guided Radiofrequency Catheter Ablation of Atrioventricular Node and VVI Pacemaker Implantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Guo

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Objective: This study is to evaluate the feasibility and safety of intracardiac radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA of the atrioventricular node (AVN and pacemaker implantation using transthoracic echocardiography. Methods: Eleven patients – six males and five females (mean age 66 years – with persistent or permanent atrial fibrillation/atrial flutter received RFCA of AVN and VVI pacemaker implantation (paces and senses the ventricle and is inhibited if it senses ventricular activity. Under transthoracic echocardiography, the electrode catheters were positioned intracardiac, and target ablation was performed, with the permanent pacemaking catheter in the left subclavian vein and the ablation catheter in the right femoral vein. The multi-view imaging and dynamic observation applied during the stable AV dissociation were successful. Results: Atrioventricular node ablation and permanent pacemaker implantation in 11 patients were completed successfully without X-ray exposure. The operation success rate was 100%. All patients recovered well within the follow-up period. Conclusions: Radiofrequency catheter ablation of AVN and VVI pacemaker implantation under transthoracic echocardiography guidance is a safe, easy and feasible approach. This procedure could be an important supplemental measure to catheter ablation of arrhythmia under routine X-ray fluoroscopy.

  8. New approach to intracardiac hemodynamic measurements in small animals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eskesen, Kristian; Olsen, Niels T; Dimaano, Veronica L;

    2012-01-01

    Invasive measurements of intracardiac hemodynamics in animal models have allowed important advances in the understanding of cardiac disease. Currently they are performed either through a carotid arteriotomy or via a thoracotomy and apical insertion. Both of these techniques have disadvantages and...

  9. Effect of Pressure on Intracardiac Backscatter from Microbubbles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG; Youbin; LI; Chunlei; CHANG; Qing

    2001-01-01

    The backscatter from sonicated albumin microbubbles (Albunex) was analyzed using acoustic densitometry in an in vitro pulsatile heart model to evaluate the effects of pressure on the backscatter from Albunex, and the cardiac cyclic changes of intracardiac backscatter from sonicated albumin microbubbles in 16 healthy persons were analyzed. It was found that the Albunex microbubbles were compressed in systole and decompressed in diastole, causing corresponding changes of backscatter in cardiac cycle. Although the intensities of backscatter in diastole and systole were related to the concentration of microbubbles, the concentration of microbubbles had no effect on the difference of end-diastolic and end-systolic backscatter. The difference of the backscatter was highly correlated with end-systolic pressure (r = 0. 96, P = 0. 001). In human studies, we also observed same intracardiac cyclic changes of backscatter from sonicated albumin microbubbles. Our study indicates that it is possible to evaluate the intracardiac pressure non-invasively by analyzing the intracardiac backscatter from the microbubbles with acoustic densitometry.

  10. Mechanical thrombectomy for cerebral venous sinus thrombosis employing a novel combination of Angiojet and Penumbra ACE aspiration catheters: the Triaxial Angiojet technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bress, Aaron; Hurst, Robert; Pukenas, Bryan; Smith, Michelle; Kung, David

    2016-09-01

    Cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVST) can be life threatening. A previously healthy woman in her early forties on oral contraceptives presented with global CVST and rapid clinical deterioration. A novel 'Triaxial Angiojet technique' (KSAW Shuttle [Cook Inc., Bloomington, IN, USA], 5 MAX ACE [Penumbra Inc., Alameda, CA, USA], and Angiojet [Boston Scientific, Marlborough, MA, USA]) was employed to gain access into the superior sagittal sinus. The 5 MAX ACE reperfusion catheter was shortened prior to placing a 4 Fr Angiojet catheter through it. This resulted in markedly improved recanalization with good anterograde flow. The patient was extubated on postoperative day 2 and discharged neurologically intact on postoperative day 10. We report the first case of placing an Angiojet catheter through a larger Penumbra reperfusion catheter when access through a tortuous sigmoid and transverse sinus could not be obtained with a 6 Fr support catheter. PMID:27052259

  11. Percutaneous transvenous retrieval of intracardiac port-a-cath catheter fragment: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Said, S.A.M.; Fast, J.H.; Stassen, C. M.; Schepers-Bok, R.; Zijlstra, J.J.; Dankbaar, H.; van Driel, B.; Heijmans, H.J.

    2004-01-01

    A female patient, 36 years of age, with a metastasised left breast cancer received several courses of chemotherapy for aggressive local tumour growth and multiple metastatic activity. In the current patient, surgical ablation of the left breast was carried out. Also loco-regional radio-therapy was conducted. To facilitate the administration of chemotherapy courses and prevent thrombophlebitis a vascular access port (port-a-cath) was surgically inserted via the right subclavian vein. After a f...

  12. Activity of sparfloxacin on Staphylococcus epidermidis attached to plastic catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pascual, A; García, I; Ramirez de Arellano, E; Perea, E J

    1995-08-01

    The activity of sparfloxacin on Staphylococcus epidermidis biofilms on different plastic catheters was evaluated. Sparfloxacin showed high bactericidal activity against S. epidermidis biofilms on Vialon and polyvinylchloride catheters. The combination of sparfloxacin with amikacin or rifampicin significantly increased its activity against bacterial biofilms on polyurethane and Teflon catheters. PMID:8522473

  13. Central venous catheters and catheter locks in children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handrup, Mette Møller; Møller, Jens Kjølseth; Schrøder, Henrik

    2013-01-01

    To determine if the catheter lock taurolidine can reduce the number of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in pediatric cancer patients with tunneled central venous catheters (CVC).......To determine if the catheter lock taurolidine can reduce the number of catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI) in pediatric cancer patients with tunneled central venous catheters (CVC)....

  14. Ultrasound-guided perisaphenous tumescence infiltration improves the outcomes of long catheter foam sclerotherapy combined with phlebectomy of the varicose tributaries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Attilio Cavezzi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available A prospective comparative observational study was performed to assess the short--term efficacy and safety of the peri-saphenous infiltration of tumescence solution (PST in great saphenous vein (GSV long catheter foam sclerotherapy (LCFS combined with phlebectomy of the varicose tributaries. Since November 2006 through November 2010 fifty-one consecutive patients (16 males and 35 females, mean age 51.5 years who underwent LCFS of GSV + multiple phlebectomies were prospectively enrolled, without any pre-selection criteria, in three different groups (17 patients per group and reviewed as to their outcomes: i patients without additional PST; ii with PST under visual control; iii with ultrasound-guided PST. All procedures were performed in local anesthesia and an average of 7 mL [interquartile range (IQR 6.5-7.5] of 3% sodiumtetradecylsulfate CO2+O2-based sclerosant foam was injected in the diseased segment of GSV (median caliber 7 (IQR 6-8 by means of a 4F long catheter. Clinical and color-duplex ultrasound (CDU follow-up was performed at regular intervals, the last of which 14 months after the treatment. At 14 months follow-up no varicose veins were visible in 94%, 94% and 100% of the cases in group I, II and III respectively. The CDUbased outcomes were the following: 71%, 71% and 84% GSV occlusion rate in group I, II and III respectively; reflux was found in 5, 4 and 1 cases in group I, II and III respectively. Clinical and CDU morphologic and hemodynamic results were assembled and scored through an arbitrary system. The relative statistical analysis showed a significant (P<0.0001 improvement of the results for patients who received ultrasound guided PST over the other two groups. No relevant complications were recorded in all 51 cases. GSV treatment by means of LCFS + phlebectomy of varicose tributaries proved to be effective and safe in this prospective observational study. The addition of ultrasound guided PST resulted in a significant

  15. Trans-jugular catheter-directed thrombolysis combined with trans-dorsalis pedis vein thrombolysis for the treatment of deep venous thrombosis of the lower limbs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the feasibility and efficacy of trans-jugular catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) together with trans-dorsalis pedis vein thrombolysis for the treatment of deep venous thrombosis (DVT) of the lower limbs. Methods: Jugular vein puncture, indwelling catheter and placement of IVC filter were performed in 18 patients with DVT (study group) followed by continuous trans-jugular CDT together with trans-dorsalis pedis vein thrombolysis. During the corresponding period, 16 patients with DVT (control group) received trans-dorsalis pedis vein thrombolysis only. Results: The thrombolytic time and total dose of urokinase in study group and control group were (6.6 ± 2.3) days, (5.52 ± 2.24) x 106 units and (8.2 ± 1.4) days, (7.00 ± 1.66) x 106 units respectively. The thrombolytic time and total dose of urokinase in study group were significantly lower than that in control group (P < 0.05). After the treatment the thigh circumference and calf circumference in study group showed a reduction of (4.6 ± 2.1) cm and (4.0 ± 2.1) cm respectively, which were (3.2 ± 1.7) cm and (2.7 ± 1.5) cm respectively in control group, the difference between two groups was statistically significant (P < 0.05). The complete patent of the veins was 66.7% in study group and 31.3% in control group, the difference between two groups was significant (P < 0.05). In four cases of the study group, the filters were withdrawn through the original puncture site after the thrombus was completely dissolved. Conclusion: Trans-jugular CDT combined with trans-dorsalis pedis vein thrombolysis is an effective and safe therapeutic technique for the treatment of deep venous thrombosis of the lower extremities, moreover, the filter can be taken back via the original puncture site when the thrombus is completely dissolved. (authors)

  16. Suprapubic catheter care

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000145.htm Suprapubic catheter care To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. A suprapubic catheter (tube) drains urine from your bladder. It is ...

  17. Central venous catheter - flushing

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of your catheter and what company made it. Write this information down and keep it handy. To flush your catheter, you will need: Clean paper towels Saline syringes (clear), and maybe heparin syringes ( ...

  18. Robotic Motion Compensation for Beating Heart Intracardiac Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Howe, Robert D.; Yuen, Shelten G.; Kettler, Daniel T.; Notovny, Paul M.; Plowes, Richard D.

    2009-01-01

    3D ultrasound imaging has enabled minimally invasive, beating heart intracardiac procedures. However, rapid heart motion poses a serious challenge to the surgeon that is compounded by significant time delays and noise in 3D ultrasound. This paper investigates the concept of using a one-degree-of-freedom motion compensation system to synchronize with tissue motions that may be approximated by 1D motion models. We characterize the motion of the mitral valve annulus and show that it is well appr...

  19. Catheter-tip fixation of a percutaneously implanted port-catheter system to prevent dislocation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the incidence of catheter tip dislocation in patients with percutaneously implanted port-catheters for hepatic arterial chemotherapy with catheter tip fixation. Forty-seven patients (31 men and 16 women; mean age 66 years) with unresectable advanced liver cancers (primary liver cancer, n=19; metastatic liver cancer, n=28) underwent percutaneously implantable port-catheter system placement with the tip fixed at the gastroduodenal artery with coils and side hole opened at the common hepatic artery. In 39 patients, n-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA) mixed with Lipiodol was added for fixation. The position of the side hole after the indwelling port-catheter system was investigated, and the correction method in cases with catheter dislocation was determined. In 2 (25%) of the 8 patients without NBCA fixation, dislocation of the catheter was noted, in contrast to none (0%) of 37 patients with NBCA fixation. Two patients in whom NBCA was used could not undergo long-term intra-arterial chemotherapy because of hepatic arterial thrombotic occlusion which occurred after placement of the indwelling catheter, and were excluded from the evaluation. Fixation of the catheter tip with combined use of coils and NBCA-Lipiodol mixture to the gastroduodenal artery is important to prevent dislocation of the port-catheter system. (orig.)

  20. Levoatriocardinal vein with normal intracardiac anatomy and pulmonary venous return

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ender Odemis

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Levoatriocardinal vein (LACV is characterized by an abnormal connection between pulmonary and systemic venous return. This extremely rare cardiac malformation is usually associated with left-sided obstructive lesions including mitral atresia, hypoplastic left-heart syndrome, and abnormal pulmonary venous connection. Patients may have low systemic cardiac output and pulmonary venous obstruction symptoms. In this manuscript, we report a case with LACV and normal pulmonary venous return with absence of any intracardiac pathology. LACV was demonstrated with echocardiography, angiography, and computed tomography. Surgical correction was made successfully.

  1. Levoatriocardinal vein with normal intracardiac anatomy and pulmonary venous return

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Levoatriocardinal vein (LACV) is characterized by an abnormal connection between pulmonary and systemic venous return. This extremely rare cardiac malformation is usually associated with left-sided obstructive lesions including mitral atresia, hypoplastic left-heart syndrome, and abnormal pulmonary venous connection. Patients may have low systemic cardiac output and pulmonary venous obstruction symptoms. In this manuscript, we report a case with LACV and normal pulmonary venous return with absence of any intracardiac pathology. LACV was demonstrated with echocardiography, angiography, and computed tomography. Surgical correction was made successfully

  2. Intracardiac echocardiography to diagnose pannus formation after aortic valve replacement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Yoshiya; Ohara, Takahiro; Funada, Akira; Takahama, Hiroyuki; Amaki, Makoto; Hasegawa, Takuya; Sugano, Yasuo; Kanzaki, Hideaki; Anzai, Toshihisa

    2016-03-01

    A 66-year-old female, under regular follow-up for 20 years after aortic valve replacement (19-mm Carbomedics), presented dyspnea on effort and hypotension during hemodialysis. A transthoracic echocardiogram showed elevation of transvalvular velocity up to 4 m/s, but the structure around the aortic prosthesis was difficult to observe due to artifacts. Fluoroscopy revealed normal motion of the leaflets of the mechanical valve. Intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) revealed a pannus-like structure in the left ventricular outflow tract. Transesophageal echocardiogram also revealed this structure. ICE can visualize structural abnormalities around a prosthetic valve after cardiac surgery even in patients in whom conventional imaging modalities failed. PMID:26732266

  3. Implantation of Hickman catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickmann catheters are used mainly in patients with hematologic diseases, especially lymphatic and myelotic leukemias, and malignant lymphomas. They facilitate the administration of chemotherapeutics, hyperosmolar solutions and other substances with local toxicity as well as frequent taking of blood samples. Usually Hickmann catheters are placed by surgical cutdown on a jugular vein. In lieu of this surgical placement, we recommend the implantation of Hickman catheters by means of interventional radiology techniques. In a period of 13 months 78 Hickman catheters were placed in 67 patients. 37 catheters (=47%) stayed more than one month, 8 catheters (=10%) stayed 5 to 8 months in the central venous system. 26, respectively 6, of these catheters are until now in situ. Lethal or life threatening complications did not occur. There were no infections at the introduction site of the catheter. The main complications were: Pneumothorax without drainage: 3.2%, pneumothorax with drainage: 3.2%, slipping back of the tip of the catheter: 4.8%, thrombosis of the subclavian vein: 3.2%, fluid in the pleural cavity: 1.6%. In correspondance to the literature the complications of Hickman catheter placement by means of interventional radiology are less serious than by means of surgical cutdown. Further advantages are: General anesthesia can be avoided (less strain on severely ill patients, no problems to wean from assisted ventilation in patients with respiratory insufficiency), the smooth curve of the implanted catheter avoids sharp kinking and occlusion of the lumen, very small skin incisions are sufficient (lesser risk of hematomas in patients with thrombopenia), time and cost are reduced in comparison to surgical placement. (orig.)

  4. [Suprapubic catheter insertion].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neumann, Eva; Schwentner, Christian

    2016-01-01

    The suprapubic catheter enables a percutaneous drainage of urine. The insertion is made superior of the pubic bone through the abdominal wall into the bladder. It allows a permanent drainage of urine bypassing the urethra. The insertion of a suprapubic catheter requires knowledge and expertise. This paper summarizes the basic background and allows to follow the practical application step by step. PMID:26800072

  5. Classification and segmentation of intracardiac masses in cardiac tumor echocardiograms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strzelecki, Michal; Materka, Andrzej; Drozdz, Jaroslaw; Krzeminska-Pakula, Maria; Kasprzak, Jaroslaw D

    2006-03-01

    This paper describes an automatic method for classification and segmentation of different intracardiac masses in tumor echocardiograms. Identification of mass type is highly desirable, since to different treatment options for cardiac tumors (surgical resection) and thrombi (effective anticoagulant treatment) are possible. Correct diagnosis of the character of intracardiac mass in a living patient is a true challenge for a cardiologist; therefore, an objective image analysis method may be useful in heart diseases diagnosis. Image texture analysis is used to distinguish various types of masses. The presented methods assume that image texture encodes important histological features of masses and, therefore, texture numerical parameters enable the discrimination and segmentation of a mass. The recently developed technique based on the network of synchronized oscillators is proposed for the image segmentation. This technique is based on a 'temporary correlation' theory, which attempts to explain scene recognition as it would be performed by a human brain. This theory assumes that different groups of neural cells encode different properties of homogeneous image regions (e.g. shape, color, texture). Monitoring of temporal activity of cell groups leads to scene segmentation. A network of synchronized oscillators was successfully used for segmentation of Brodatz textures and medical textured images. The advantage of this network is its ability to detect texture boundaries. It can be also manufactured as a VLSI chip, for a very fast image segmentation. The accuracy of locating of analyzed tissues in the image should be assessed to evaluate a segmentation technique. The new evaluation method based on measurement of physical textured test objects was proposed. Firstly, a series of object images was obtained by the use of different devices (scanner, digital camera and TV camera). Secondly, the images were segmented using oscillator network and feedforward artificial neural

  6. Auditing urinary catheter care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dailly, Sue

    Urinary catheters are the main cause of hospital-acquired urinary tract infections among inpatients. Healthcare staff can reduce the risk of patients developing an infection by ensuring they give evidence-based care and by removing the catheter as soon as it is no longer necessary. An audit conducted in a Hampshire hospital demonstrated there was poor documented evidence that best practice was being carried out. Therefore a urinary catheter assessment and monitoring tool was designed to promote best practice and produce clear evidence that care had been provided. PMID:22375340

  7. Catheters, wires, tubes and drains on postoperative radiographs of pediatric cardiac patients: the whys and wherefores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Surgical treatment of congenital heart disease has advanced dramatically since the first intracardiac repairs in the mid-20th century. Previously inoperable lesions have become the focus of routine surgery and patients are managed successfully in intensive care units around the world. As a result, increasing numbers of postoperative images are processed by departments of radiology in children's hospitals. It is important that the radiologist accurately documents and describes the catheters, wires, tubes and drains that are present on the chest radiograph. This article reviews the reasons for the placement and positioning of perioperative equipment in children who have surgical repair of atrial septal defect, ventricular septal defect or transposition of the great arteries. Also included are a brief synopsis of each cardiac anomaly, the surgical procedure for its correction, and an in-depth discussion of the postoperative chest radiograph including illustrations of catheters, wires, tubes and drains. (orig.)

  8. Efficacy of ultraviolet C light at sublethal dose in combination with antistaphylococcal antibiotics to disinfect catheter biofilms of methicillin-susceptible and methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus and Staphylococcus epidermidis in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    El-Azizi M

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Mohamed El-Azizi,1 Nancy Khardori2 1Department of Microbiology, Immunology and Biotechnology, Faculty of Pharmacy and Biotechnology, German University in Cairo, New Cairo City, Egypt; 2Department of Internal Medicine, Division of Infectious Diseases, Eastern Virginia Medical School, Norfolk, VA, USA Background: Biofilm formation inside inserted medical devices leads to their failure and acts as a source of refractory infections. The ultraviolet C (UVC light is a potential therapy that can be used against the biofilm of bacterial pathogens. Objective: We evaluated the efficacy of sublethal dose of UVC light with anti-staphylococcal antibiotics against biofilms made from 30 isolates of methicillin-susceptible Staphylococcus aureus and methicillin-resistant S. aureus and S. epidermidis on vascular catheters. Materials and methods: A novel biofilm device was used to assess the combined approach. The biofilms on the catheters were irradiated with the UVC light at 254 nm and irradiance of 6.4 mW followed by treatment with vancomycin or quinupristin/dalfopristin at twice their minimum bactericidal concentrations or with linezolid at 64 µg/mL for 24 hours. The catheters were cut into segments and sonicated, and the number of the sessile cells was determined ­colorimetrically using XTT viable cells assay. The effect of UVC radiation followed by treatment with an ­antistaphylococcal antibiotic on the viability of the bacteria in the biofilm was visualized using LIVE/DEAD BacLight bacterial viability stain and confocal laser scanning microscopy. Results: Exposure of the bacterial biofilms to the UVC light or each of the antibiotics alone was ineffective in killing the bacteria. Treatment of the biofilms with the antibiotics following their exposure to UVC light significantly (P<0.001 reduced the number of viable cells within the biofilms but did not completely eradicate them. Conclusion: To our knowledge, this combinatorial approach has not been

  9. Electrophysiological evidence of P2X2 receptor expression in the neurons of intracardiac and paratracheal ganglia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Bei; NI Xin; HAN Hong; BURNSTOCK Geoffrey

    2006-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the expression of P2X receptors on rat intracardiac and paratracheal ganglion neurons. Methods: For preparation of intracardiac neurons, hearts were excised, the atria were separated and the medial region containing intracardiac ganglia was isolated and cut into pieces. For preparation of paratracheal neurons, the tracheas were removed and the superficial membranous layer containing paratracheal ganglia was rapidly isolated. Intracardiac and paratracheal ganglion neurons were dissociated after digestion by collagenase and trypsin. Whole-cell patch clamp recording was used to identify the pharmacological properties of P2X receptors in cultured neurons. Results:Neurons from these two ganglia responded to ATP with a rapidly activating, sustained inward current. Αβ-meATP failed to evoke any responses in paratracheal ganglion neurons while a few of intracardiac ganglion neurons responded to αβ-meATP with a tiny sustained inward current. ADP and UTP had no effect on intracardiac neurons. Lowering pH potentiated ATP responses in neurons from these two ganglia whereas increasing pH inhibited ATP responses. Co-application of Zn2+ potentiated ATP responses in intracardiac and paratracheal ganglion neurons. Conclusion: The receptor subtypes involved in intracardiac and paratracheal ganglia appear to be homomeric P2X2, while heteromeric P2X2/3 could not be completely excluded from intracardiac neurons.

  10. Intracardiac metastasis of squamous cell carcinoma of the penis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila Aparecida Coelho Siqueira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Penile cancer shows variable incidence in different countries with a higher prevalence in developing countries. Squamous cell carcinoma represents the most common histologic type. The seventh decade of life corresponds to the mean age at diagnosis, but it is not an unusual diagnosis among young adults. Most cases present as “in situ” neoplasia or loco regional disease; however, systemic disseminated disease occurs via lymphatic and/or hematogeneous routes. The lymph nodes, liver, and lungs are the most frequently involved sites whereas the heart constitutes an exceptional and atypical site for penile cancer metastases. We report a case of a 79-year-old patient who presented a metastatic squamous cell carcinoma of the penis with intracardiac dissemination. The patient had a past history of cardiomyopathy, which required an artificial cardiac pacemaker implantation. He had been treated 1 year before with a partial penectomy but was admitted for emasculation due to the cancer relapse. During the postoperative period, he experienced sudden respiratory distress and died. The autopsy findings showed metastatic disease into the cardiac right chambers, pulmonary tumoral thrombi, and pulmonary hilar involvement. The authors call attention to the possibility of the presence of pacing leads, cardiomyopathy and the altered low blood flow in the right chambers, as predisposing factors for the tumoral seeding in this case.

  11. Inverse Problem for Color Doppler Ultrasound-Assisted Intracardiac Blood Flow Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jaeseong

    2016-01-01

    For the assessment of the left ventricle (LV), echocardiography has been widely used to visualize and quantify geometrical variations of LV. However, echocardiographic image itself is not sufficient to describe a swirling pattern which is a characteristic blood flow pattern inside LV without any treatment on the image. We propose a mathematical framework based on an inverse problem for three-dimensional (3D) LV blood flow reconstruction. The reconstruction model combines the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations with one-direction velocity component of the synthetic flow data (or color Doppler data) from the forward simulation (or measurement). Moreover, time-varying LV boundaries are extracted from the intensity data to determine boundary conditions of the reconstruction model. Forward simulations of intracardiac blood flow are performed using a fluid-structure interaction model in order to obtain synthetic flow data. The proposed model significantly reduces the local and global errors of the reconstructed flow fields. We demonstrate the feasibility and potential usefulness of the proposed reconstruction model in predicting dynamic swirling patterns inside the LV over a cardiac cycle. PMID:27313657

  12. Burkitt Lymphoma Presenting as an Intracardiac Mass: Case Report and Review of Literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Onyee; Igwe, Michael; Breburda, Christian S; Amar, Surabhi

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Non-neoplastic causes such as infections and thrombi account for most intracardiac masses. Primary tumors such as myxomas and metastasis from breast cancer, lung cancer, or melanomas account for many of the remaining cases. Burkitt lymphoma manifesting as an intracardiac mass is a rare entity, with 21 cases reported in the English literature. CASE REPORT We report the case of a man infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) who presented with non-specific cardiac symptoms and was later found to have intracardiac mass caused by Burkitt lymphoma. His rapid decline with unexpected complications was reversed with prompt management. Subsequent to induction, the patient achieved a near complete response with considerable improvement in his condition. CONCLUSIONS Lymphoma should be considered in the differential diagnosis of intracardiac masses. Associated cardiac symptoms are frequently non-specific and can often be overlooked or underappreciated. Burkitt lymphoma has a short doubling time and an intracardiac lesion can become life-threatening in a matter of days. Early recognition and prompt treatment are crucial to achieving optimal outcomes. PMID:27484990

  13. Catheter-related bloodstream infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goede, Matthew R; Coopersmith, Craig M

    2009-04-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSIs) are a common, frequently preventable complication of central venous catheterization. CR-BSIs can be prevented by strict attention to insertion and maintenance of central venous catheters and removing unneeded catheters as soon as possible. Antiseptic- or antibiotic-impregnated catheters are also an effective tool to prevent infections. The diagnosis of CR-BSI is made largely based on culture results. CR-BSIs should always be treated with antibiotics, and except in rare circumstances the infected catheter needs to be removed. PMID:19281894

  14. Umbilical venous catheter malposition and errors in interpretation in newborns with Bochdalek hernia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Patricia T.; Taylor, George A. [Boston Children' s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-07-15

    Neonates with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) often require placement of lines and tubes for supportive therapy. The resulting altered anatomy can result in diagnostic errors when interpreting the location of support lines and tubes such as UVCs (umbilical venous catheters). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of CDH on UVC position and to evaluate the accuracy at which radiologists describe the position on chest radiographs. During a 5-year period, 406 chest radiographs performed within 7 days of birth in infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia were identified and reviewed for the following data: presence of UVC, location of catheter tip (cavoatrial junction, intracardiac, intrahepatic or umbilical vein), and location of CDH (right or left). The radiologic report of the UVC tip location for each case was then reviewed individually to determine the adequacy of interpretation. Inadequate reports were classified as incorrect (the wrong location of the catheter tip was reported), no mention (the location of the catheter tip was in a suboptimal location but not mentioned), and not specified (the precise location of the catheter tip was not clearly stated in the report when the tip was in a suboptimal location). A total of 60 infants were identified as having CDH (56 on the left, 4 on the right). The most common location for an incorrectly placed UVC was the contralateral chest, accounting for 26.7% (16/60) of the infants, followed by an abdominal intrahepatic location (16.7%) and the umbilical vein (8.3%). Thirty percent (120/406) of the chest radiograph reports were found to be inadequate regarding the interpretation of the location of the catheter tip. The majority of the inadequate reports (48/406, 11.8%) did not specify when the catheter tip was in a suboptimal location. In 37 reports (9.1%), the location of the catheter tip was reported incorrectly, and no mention of the catheter location was made in 35 reports (8.6%). The location of

  15. Umbilical venous catheter malposition and errors in interpretation in newborns with Bochdalek hernia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neonates with congenital diaphragmatic hernia (CDH) often require placement of lines and tubes for supportive therapy. The resulting altered anatomy can result in diagnostic errors when interpreting the location of support lines and tubes such as UVCs (umbilical venous catheters). The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of CDH on UVC position and to evaluate the accuracy at which radiologists describe the position on chest radiographs. During a 5-year period, 406 chest radiographs performed within 7 days of birth in infants with congenital diaphragmatic hernia were identified and reviewed for the following data: presence of UVC, location of catheter tip (cavoatrial junction, intracardiac, intrahepatic or umbilical vein), and location of CDH (right or left). The radiologic report of the UVC tip location for each case was then reviewed individually to determine the adequacy of interpretation. Inadequate reports were classified as incorrect (the wrong location of the catheter tip was reported), no mention (the location of the catheter tip was in a suboptimal location but not mentioned), and not specified (the precise location of the catheter tip was not clearly stated in the report when the tip was in a suboptimal location). A total of 60 infants were identified as having CDH (56 on the left, 4 on the right). The most common location for an incorrectly placed UVC was the contralateral chest, accounting for 26.7% (16/60) of the infants, followed by an abdominal intrahepatic location (16.7%) and the umbilical vein (8.3%). Thirty percent (120/406) of the chest radiograph reports were found to be inadequate regarding the interpretation of the location of the catheter tip. The majority of the inadequate reports (48/406, 11.8%) did not specify when the catheter tip was in a suboptimal location. In 37 reports (9.1%), the location of the catheter tip was reported incorrectly, and no mention of the catheter location was made in 35 reports (8.6%). The location of

  16. Radiologic placement of Hickman catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hickman catheter inserter has previously been predominantly accomplished surgically by means of venous cutdown or percutaneous placement in the operating room. The authors describe their method and results for 55 consecutive percutaneous placements of Hickman catheters in the interventional radiology suite. Complication rates were comparable to those for surgical techniques. Radiologic placement resulted in increased convenience, decreased time and cost of insertion, and super fluoroscopic control of catheter placement and any special manipulations. Modern angiographic materials provide safer access to the subclavian vein than traditional methods. The authors conclude that radiologic placement of Hickman catheters offers significant advantages over traditional surgical placement

  17. Urinary catheter capable of repeated on-demand removal of infectious biofilms via active deformation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levering, Vrad; Cao, Changyong; Shivapooja, Phanindhar; Levinson, Howard; Zhao, Xuanhe; López, Gabriel P

    2016-01-01

    Biofilm removal from biomaterials is of fundamental importance, and is especially relevant when considering the problematic and deleterious impact of biofilm infections on the inner surfaces of urinary catheters. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections are the most common cause of hospital-acquired infections and there are over 30 million Foley urinary catheters used annually in the USA. In this paper, we present the design and optimization of urinary catheter prototypes capable of on-demand removal of biofilms from the inner luminal surface of catheters. The urinary catheters utilize 4 intra-wall inflation lumens that are pressure-actuated to generate region-selective strains in the elastomeric urine lumen, and thereby remove overlying biofilms. A combination of finite-element modeling and prototype fabrication was used to optimize the catheter design to generate greater than 30% strain in the majority of the luminal surface when subjected to pressure. The catheter prototypes are able to remove greater than 80% of a mixed community biofilm of Proteus mirabilis and Escherichia coli on-demand, and furthermore are able to remove the biofilm repeatedly. Additionally, experiments with the prototypes demonstrate that biofilm debonding can be achieved upon application of both tensile and compressive strains in the inner surface of the catheter. The fouling-release catheter offers the potential for a non-biologic, non-antibiotic method to remove biofilms and thereby for impacting the thus far intractable problem of catheter-associated infections. PMID:26584348

  18. Rapid Endovascular Catheter Core Cooling combined with cold saline as an Adjunct to Percutaneous Coronary Intervention For the Treatment of Acute Myocardial Infarction (The CHILL-MI trial)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Erlinge, David; Götberg, Matthias; Lang, Irene;

    2014-01-01

    absolute reduction of IS/left ventricular volume of 6.2% (p = 0.15). CONCLUSIONS: Hypothermia induced by cold saline and endovascular cooling was feasible and safe, and it rapidly reduced core temperature with minor reperfusion delay. The primary end point of IS/MaR was not significantly reduced. Lower......OBJECTIVES: The aim of this study was to confirm the cardioprotective effects of hypothermia using a combination of cold saline and endovascular cooling. BACKGROUND: Hypothermia has been reported to reduce infarct size (IS) in patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarctions. METHODS: In a...... multicenter study, 120 patients with ST-segment elevation myocardial infarctions (<6 h) scheduled to undergo percutaneous coronary intervention were randomized to hypothermia induced by the rapid infusion of 600 to 2,000 ml cold saline and endovascular cooling or standard of care. Hypothermia was initiated...

  19. Localized rotors and focal impulse sources within the left atrium in human atrial fibrillation: A phase analysis of contact basket catheter electrograms

    OpenAIRE

    Sasaki, Naoko; Okumura, Yasuo; Watanabe, Ichiro; Madry, Andrew; HAMANO, Yuki; Nikaido, Mizuki; Kogawa, Rikitake; Nagashima, Koichi; Takahashi, Keiko; Iso, Kazuki; Ohkubo, Kimie; Nakai, Toshiko; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Background Consistent detection of rotor(s) and/or focal impulse(s) of atrial fibrillation can using a 64-pole basket catheter remain unclear. Methods and results Intracardiac left atrial electrograms were recorded, prior to ablation, in 20 patients with atrial fibrillation. Unipolar electrograms, filtered at 0.1–300 Hz, were recorded and exported for an offline phase analysis. From the cohort, 8 of the 20 patients had analyzable data. Localized rotors were identified in 3 of these patients, ...

  20. Electrophysiologic and anatomical characteristics of the right atrial posterior wall in patients with and without atrial flutter. Analysis by intracardiac echocardiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The posterior right atrial transverse conduction capability during typical atrial flutter (AFL) is well known, but its relationship to the anatomical characteristics remains controversial. Thirty-four AFL and 16 controls underwent intracardiac echocardiography after placement of a 20-polar catheter at the posterior block site during AFL or pacing. In 31 patients, the effective refractory period (ERP) at the block site was determined as the longest coupling interval that resulted in double potentials during extrastimuli from the mid-septal (SW) and free (FW) walls. The block site was located 3.0-29.0 mm posterior to the crista terminalis (CT) in each AFL and control patient. The CT area indexed to the body surface area was larger in AFL patients than in control patients (16.4±6.5 mm2/m2 vs 11.3±6.4 mm2/m2, p=0.01), and was positively correlated to age (r=0.34, p=0.02). The ERP was longer in the AFL patients than in controls (SW: median value 600 [270-725] ms vs 220 [200-253] ms; FW: 280 [230-675] ms vs 215 [188-260] ms, p<0.05 for each). A functional block line was located on the septal side of the CT in all patients. A limited conduction capability and age-related CT enlargement might have important implications for the pathogenesis in AFL. (author)

  1. Balloon catheter coronary angioplasty

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author has produced a reference and teaching book on balloon angioplasty. Because it borders in surgery and is performed on an awake patient without circulatory assistance, it is a complex and demanding procedure that requires thorough knowledge before it is attempted. The text is divided into seven sections. The first section describes coronary anatomy and pathophysiology, defines the objectives and mechanisms of the procedure and lists four possible physiologic results. The next section describes equipment in the catheterization laboratory, catheters, guidewires and required personnel. The following section is on the procedure itself and includes a discussion of examination, testing, technique and follow-up. The fourth section details possible complications that can occur during the procedure, such as coronary spasms, occlusion, thrombosis, perforations and ruptures, and also discusses cardiac surgery after failed angioplasty. The fifth section details complex or unusual cases that can occur. The sixth and seventh sections discuss radiation, alternative procedures and the future of angioplasty

  2. Intracardiac thrombus in Behçet's disease: Two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brahem Radhia

    2005-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Intracardiac thrombus in Behçet's disease is an extremely rare manifestation. We report two such cases. A 20-year-old man presented with dyspnoea, cough and haemoptysis. Right heart thrombus associated with pulmonary artery aneurysm and thromboembolism was identified by helical CT and transoesophageal echocardiography. The second case was a 29-year-old male admitted for fever and chest pain. A diagnosis of right atrial thrombosis associated with pulmonary embolism and hyperhomocysteinemia was made. Due to the absence of haemodynamic compromise, medical management consisting of immunosupressive and anticoagulation therapy was adopted which resulted in complete dissolution of the thrombus with dramatic clinical improvement in both cases of clinical status. Conclusion intracardiac thrombus is a rare complication of Behçet's disease. As shown in our patients, medical treatment should be considered as the first line.

  3. Prolonged Intraoperative Cardiac Resuscitation Complicated by Intracardiac Thrombus in a Patient Undergoing Orthotopic Liver Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sang; DeMaria, Samuel; Cohen, Edmond; Silvay, George; Zerillo, Jeron

    2016-09-01

    We report the case of successful resuscitation after prolonged cardiac arrest during orthotopic liver transplantation. After reperfusion, the patient developed ventricular tachycardia, complicated by intracardiac clot formation and massive hemorrhage. Transesophageal echocardiography demonstrated stunned and nonfunctioning right and left ventricles, with developing intracardiac clots. Treatment with heparin, massive transfusion and prolonged cardiopulmonary resuscitation ensued for 51 minutes. Serial arterial blood gases demonstrated adequate oxygenation and ventilation during cardiopulmonary resuscitation. Cardiothoracic surgery was consulted for potential use of extracorporeal membrane oxygenation, however, the myocardial function improved and the surgery was completed without further intervention. On postoperative day 6, the patient was extubated without neurologic or cardiac impairment. The patient continues to do well 2 years posttransplant, able to perform independent daily activities of living and his previous job. This case underscores the potential for positive outcomes with profoundly prolonged, effective advanced cardiovascular life support in patients who experience postreperfusion syndrome. PMID:27233818

  4. Delayed bowel perforation following suprapubic catheter insertion

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta Ajay; Ahmed Shwan J; Rimington Peter

    2004-01-01

    Abstract Background Complications of suprapubic catheter insertion are rare but can be significant. We describe an unusual complication of a delayed bowel perforation following suprapubic catheter insertion. Case presentation A gentleman presented with features of peritonitis and feculent discharge along a suprapubic catheter two months after insertion of the catheter. Conclusion Bowel perforation is the most feared complication of suprapubic catheter insertion especially in patients with low...

  5. Hydrodynamics of catheter biofilm formation

    CERN Document Server

    Sotolongo-Costa, Oscar; Rodriguez-Perez, Daniel; Martinez-Escobar, Sergio; Fernandez-Barbero, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    A hydrodynamic model is proposed to describe one of the most critical problems in intensive medical care units: the formation of biofilms inside central venous catheters. The incorporation of approximate solutions for the flow-limited diffusion equation leads to the conclusion that biofilms grow on the internal catheter wall due to the counter-stream diffusion of blood through a very thin layer close to the wall. This biological deposition is the first necessary step for the subsequent bacteria colonization.

  6. Observation on the curative effect of intestinal obstruction catheter complex combined with octreotide in the treatment of adhesive intestinal obstruction%肠梗阻导管联合奥曲肽治疗粘连性肠梗阻的疗效观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵叶芳; 马良

    2015-01-01

    目的:观察肠梗阻导管联合奥曲肽治疗粘连性肠梗阻的临床疗效。方法:收集78例确诊为粘连性肠梗阻的患者,用随机数字表将患者分为联合组、肠梗阻导管组和奥曲肽组,每组26例,3组均给予常规综合治疗,在此基础上联合组给予肠梗阻导管联合奥曲肽治疗,肠梗阻导管组给予肠梗阻导管治疗,奥曲肽组给予奥曲肽联合鼻胃管减压治疗,观察并比较3组的临床症状和疗效。结果:联合组腹痛缓解时间、恢复排气时间较肠梗阻导管组和奥曲肽组缩短,第1个24 h胃肠减压量较肠梗阻导管组减少,较奥曲肽组增加,差异有统计学意义(P<0.05或P<0.01)。联合组患者治疗总有效率(为100%)明显高于肠梗阻导管组(为84.6%)和奥曲肽组(为73.1%),3组比较差异有统计学意义(P<0.05或P<0.01)。结论:联合应用肠梗阻导管和奥曲肽能减少胃肠减压量,更快缓解粘连性肠梗阻患者的症状,增加患者治疗总有效率,临床疗效确切。%Objective: To observe the curative effect of intestinal obstruction catheter complex combined with octreotide in the treatment of adhesive intestinal obstruction.Methods: A total of 48 adhesive intestinal obstruction patients were collected and randomly divided into the combination group (16 patients), the intesti-nal obstruction catheter group (16 patients) and the octreotide group (16 patients). Three groups were all treated with the routine comprehensive therapy, while the combination group added intestinal obstruction catheter and octreotide, the intestinal obstruction catheter group added intestinal obstruction catheter and the octreotide group added octreotide and nasogastric tube. Clinical symptoms and curative effect of there groups were observed and compared.The experimental data were analyzed by statistical methods.Results: After therapy, the bloating pain relief time and recovery

  7. The application of thrombectomy with hydrolyser catheter in the treatment of lower extremity deep venous thrombosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical effectiveness of thrombectomy with hydrolyser catheter combined with catheter-directed thrombolysis in the treatment of chronic lower extremity deep venous thrombosis (LEDVT). Methods: 15 patients with thrombosis in left iliac veins (n = 2), left iliac and femoral veins (n = 8 ), left and right iliac and femoral veins (n = 5). Inferior vena cava filters (LVCF) were placed in all patients via the normal femoral veins. Antegrade puncture and catheterization was carried out through the femoral veins or popliteal veins in the thrombotic side. Thrombus aspiration with hydrolyser catheter combined with intravascular thrombolysis was accomplished. Results: The success rate of percutaneous catheterization was 100% (15/15). Total effective rate was 93% (14/15). No serious complications were observed. Conclusion: Thrombectomy with hydrolyser catheter combined with catheter-directed thrombolysis in the treatments of LEDVT is safe and effective

  8. New ferromagnetic catheters for MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Newly developed ferromagnetic catheters are more conspicuous than conventional radiographic catheters on MR images because they produce characteristic ferromagnetic signal patterns (FSPs). The authors systematically imaged ferromagnetic catheters (ferromagnetic concentration, 0.1--1.0 weight/weight%) in phantoms at 0.38 T and 1.5 T and compared their appearance with that of three radiographic catheters. The radiographic catheters always produced a signal void. The ferromagnetic catheters produced FSPs when perpendicular to the magnetic field, and the FSPs depended on the ferromagnetic concentration, strength of the main magnetic field, and the direction and strength of the frequency-encoding gradient. The ferromagnetic catheters produced no FSP when parallel to the magnetic field. Ferromagnetic catheters produce conspicuous FSPs on MR images, which depend on catheter position and the MR imaging parameters selected

  9. Intracorporeal knotting of a femoral nerve catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ghanem, Mohamed

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Peripheral nerve catheters are effective and well-established tools to provide postoperative analgesia to patients undergoing orthopedic surgery. The performance of these techniques is usually considered safe. However, placement of nerve catheters may be associated with a considerable number of side effects and major complications have repeatedly been published. In this work, we report on a patient who underwent total knee replacement with spinal anesthesia and preoperative insertion of femoral and sciatic nerve catheters for postoperative analgesia. During insertion of the femoral catheter, significant resistance was encountered upon retracting the catheter. This occurred due to knotting of the catheter. The catheter had to be removed by operative intervention which has to be considered a major complication. The postoperative course was uneventful. The principles for removal of entrapped peripheral catheters are not well established, may differ from those for neuroaxial catheters, and range from cautious manipulation up to surgical intervention.

  10. Irrigation with N,N-dichloro-2,2-dimethyltaurine (NVC-422) in a citrate buffer maintains urinary catheter patency in vitro and prevents encrustation by Proteus mirabilis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rani, Suriani Abdul; Celeri, Chris; Najafi, Ron; Bley, Keith; Debabov, Dmitri

    2016-06-01

    Long-term use of indwelling urinary catheters can lead to urinary tract infections and loss of catheter patency due to encrustation and blockage. Encrustation of urinary catheters is due to formation of crystalline biofilms by urease-producing microorganisms such as Proteus mirabilis. An in vitro catheter biofilm model (CBM) was used to evaluate current methods for maintaining urinary catheter patency. We compared antimicrobial-coated urinary Foley catheters, with both available catheter irrigation solutions and investigational solutions containing NVC-422 (N,N-dichloro-2,2-dimethyltaurine; a novel broad-spectrum antimicrobial). Inoculation of the CBM reactor with 10(8) colony-forming units of P. mirabilis resulted in crystalline biofilm formation in catheters by 48 h and blockage of catheters within 5 days. Silver hydrogel or nitrofurazone-coated catheters did not extend the duration of catheter patency. Catheters irrigated daily with commercially available solutions such as 0.25 % acetic acid and isotonic saline blocked at the same rate as untreated catheters. Daily irrigations of catheters with 0.2 % NVC-422 in 10 mM acetate-buffered saline pH 4 or Renacidin maintained catheter patency throughout 10-day studies, but P. mirabilis colonization of the CBM remained. In contrast, 0.2 % NVC-422 in citrate buffer (6.6 % citric acid at pH 3.8) resulted in an irrigation solution that not only maintained catheter patency for 10 days but also completely eradicated the P. mirabilis biofilm within one treatment day. These data suggest that an irrigation solution containing the rapidly bactericidal antimicrobial NVC-422 in combination with citric acid to permeabilize crystalline biofilm may significantly enhance catheter patency versus other approved irrigation solutions and antimicrobial-coated catheters. PMID:26282899

  11. Spinal canal extension of hyperalimentation catheter without neurologic sequela

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An attempt at placement of a left femoral vein hyperalimentation catheter resulted in entrance of the catheter into the spinal canal. Catheter location was documented by injections of nonionic contrast material into the catheter without neurologic sequellae. (orig.)

  12. Thermodilution measurement of right ventricular ejection fraction with a modified pulmonary artery catheter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vincent, J.L.; Thirion, M.; Brimioulle, S.; Lejeune, P.; Kahn, R.J.

    1986-01-01

    In 14 critically ill patients in stable cardiopulmonary status, right ventricular ejection fraction (RVEF) was measured by thermodilution technique and by radionuclear (gated first pass) technique. The pulmonary artery catheter was equipped with a fast-response thermistor and an intracardiac ECG monitor. In addition, the proximal lumen ended in a 3-hole port 21 cm from the tip of the catheter to facilitate mixing of the cold bolus above the tricuspid valve. The use of a new algorithm based on an exponential curve analysis of the thermodilution curve limited the variability of RVEF determinations to 7.6%. The correlation between RVEF measured by thermodilution and radionuclear techniques was significant (y = 12.7 +/- 0.49x, r = 0.67, p less than 0.01). However, the values obtained by thermodilution were usually lower, especially for high RVEF. Nevertheless, although some discrepancy was found, thermodilution techniques allow simple, accurate and repetitive bedside measurements of right ventricular volumes in the critically ill.

  13. Hemodialysis Catheter Heat Transfer for Biofilm Prevention and Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richardson, Ian P; Sturtevant, Rachael; Heung, Michael; Solomon, Michael J; Younger, John G; VanEpps, J Scott

    2016-01-01

    Central line-associated bloodstream infections (CLABSIs) are not easily treated, and many catheters (e.g., hemodialysis catheters) are not easily replaced. Biofilms (the source of infection) on catheter surfaces are notoriously difficult to eradicate. We have recently demonstrated that modest elevations of temperature lead to increased staphylococcal susceptibility to vancomycin and significantly soften the biofilm matrix. In this study, using a combination of microbiological, computational, and experimental studies, we demonstrate the efficacy, feasibility, and safety of using heat as an adjuvant treatment for infected hemodialysis catheters. Specifically, we show that treating with heat in the presence of antibiotics led to additive killing of Staphylococcus epidermidis with similar trends seen for Staphylococcus aureus and Klebsiella pneumoniae. The magnitude of temperature elevation required is relatively modest (45-50°C) and similar to that used as an adjuvant to traditional cancer therapy. Using a custom-designed benchtop model of a hemodialysis catheter, positioned with tip in the human vena cava as well as computational fluid dynamic simulations, we demonstrate that these temperature elevations are likely achievable in situ with minimal increased in overall blood temperature. PMID:26501916

  14. Review of catheter thrombectomy devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suarez, Jose A; Meyerrose, Gary E; Phisitkul, Sorot; Kennedy, Shalyn; Roongsritong, Chanwit; Tsikouris, James; Huang, Shoei K Stephen

    2004-01-01

    Acute massive pulmonary embolism (PE) is a frequently fatal event that causes significant compromise of hemodynamic stability. Unfortunately, mortality rates for PE have remained relatively constant despite advances in prophylactic and treatment measures. In addition to embolus size, symptom recognition for diagnosis and emergent treatment are two distinct factors that dictate survival. Treatment generally includes thrombolytic agents; however, not all patients are candidates for aggressive thrombolytic management. Development of catheter thrombectomy devices provides an alternative treatment modality for severe cases when thrombolytics are contraindicated. Catheter thrombectomy devices have undergone major advances over the last decade, but literature support of their success is limited. PMID:14988612

  15. FAQs about Catheter-Associated Bloodstream Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or groin. The catheter is often used to draw blood, or give fluids or medications. It may ... an antiseptic solution before using the catheter to draw blood or give medications. Healthcare providers also clean ...

  16. 21 CFR 876.5090 - Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    .... This generic type of device includes the suprapubic catheter and tube, Malecot catheter, catheter punch... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories... Suprapubic urological catheter and accessories. (a) Identification. A suprapubic urological catheter...

  17. Transhepatic venous catheters for hemodialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed El Gharib

    2014-06-01

    Conclusion: Based on our findings, transhepatic hemodialysis catheters have proven to achieve good long-term functionality. A high level of maintenance is required to preserve patency, although this approach provides remarkably durable access for patients who have otherwise exhausted access options.

  18. Detection of intra-cardiac and intra-arterial thrombi using labelled platelets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scintigraphy with 111 Indium labelled platelets is a powerful tool to detect platelet deposits in vessels. This quantitative and functional imaging method needs a labeling procedure which completely preserves the properties of the platelets and allows the concept of hematologically active clot. Three main groups of patients were examined. 1-91 hematologically active intra-cardiac thrombi were detected. The follow-up of 19 of them shows 5 deaths and 7 cerebral embolisms. 2-372 patients with lower limb ischemia, mainly in the case of blue toe syndrome were examined. 158 times a comparison with the surgical patterns was possible, there were 3 false positive and 9 false negative results. 3-In a group of 310 patients with transient cerebro-vascular accidents, 38 times the records were poorly significant. In 27 patients we were able to compare the morphological examinations (including platelet scintigraphy) to the anatomical findings. Sensitivity was only 64% and specificity 71%. As in the cases of intra-cardiac thrombi, the method allows the follow-up of pharmacological therapy. Platelets labelled with 111 Indium provide the means for sensitive and specific detection of hematologically active clots in cardiac and arterial pathology

  19. Muscarinic and nicotinic ACh receptor activation differentially mobilize Ca2+ in rat intracardiac ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beker, Friederike; Weber, Martin; Fink, Rainer H A; Adams, David J

    2003-09-01

    The origin of intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) transients stimulated by nicotinic (nAChR) and muscarinic (mAChR) receptor activation was investigated in fura-2-loaded neonatal rat intracardiac neurons. ACh evoked [Ca2+]i increases that were reduced to approximately 60% of control in the presence of either atropine (1 microM) or mecamylamine (3 microM) and to <20% in the presence of both antagonists. Removal of external Ca2+ reduced ACh-induced responses to 58% of control, which was unchanged in the presence of mecamylamine but reduced to 5% of control by atropine. The nAChR-induced [Ca2+]i response was reduced to 50% by 10 microM ryanodine, whereas the mAChR-induced response was unaffected by ryanodine, suggesting that Ca2+ release from ryanodine-sensitive Ca2+ stores may only contribute to the nAChR-induced [Ca2+]i responses. Perforated-patch whole cell recording at -60 mV shows that the rise in [Ca2+]i is concomitant with slow outward currents on mAChR activation and with rapid inward currents after nAChR activation. In conclusion, different signaling pathways mediate the rise in [Ca2+]i and membrane currents evoked by ACh binding to nicotinic and muscarinic receptors in rat intracardiac neurons. PMID:12761283

  20. Button self-retaining drainage catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To help improve patient acceptance of long-term internal/external catheter access to the biliary tract in those with benign biliary obstruction, a simple design allows the catheter end to remain flush with the skin. It consists of a clothes button affixed to the drainage catheter with a wood screw after the catheter has been cut off at the skin exit. This button/screw device has been used successfully in 22 patients over the last 10 years; catheter exchanges were easily accomplished

  1. Delayed bowel perforation following suprapubic catheter insertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehta Ajay

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Complications of suprapubic catheter insertion are rare but can be significant. We describe an unusual complication of a delayed bowel perforation following suprapubic catheter insertion. Case presentation A gentleman presented with features of peritonitis and feculent discharge along a suprapubic catheter two months after insertion of the catheter. Conclusion Bowel perforation is the most feared complication of suprapubic catheter insertion especially in patients with lower abdominal scar. The risk may be reduced with the use of ultrasound scan guidance.

  2. Longitudinal changes in intracardiac repolarization lability in patients with implantable cardioverter-defibrillator

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abhilash eGuduru

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background─While it is known that elevated baseline intracardiac repolarization lability is associated with the risk of fast ventricular tachycardia (FVT /ventricular fibrillation (VF, the effect of its longitudinal changes on the risk of FVT/VF is unknown. Methods and Results─Near-field (NF right ventricular (RV intracardiac electrograms (EGMs were recorded every 3-6 months at rest in 248 patients with structural heart disease (mean age 61.2±13.3; 185[75%] male; 162[65.3%] ischemic cardiomyopathy and implanted cardioverter-defibrillator (ICD or cardiac resynchronization therapy defibrillator (CRT-D [201 (81% primary prevention]. Intracardiac beat-to-beat QT variability index (QTVINF was measured on NF RV EGM. During the first study phase (median 18 months, participants made on average 2.4 visits. Then remote follow-up was continued for an additional median period of 3 years. Average QTVINF did not change during the first year after ICD implantation (-0.342±0.603 at baseline vs. -0.262±0.552 at 6 months vs. -0.334±0.603 at 12 months; however, it decreased thereafter (-0.510±0.603 at 18 months; P=0.042. Adjusted population-averaged GEE model showed that the odds of developing FVT/VF increased by 75% for each 1 unit increase in QTVINF. (OR 1.75 [95%CI 1.05-2.92]; P=0.031. However, individual patient–specific QTVINF trends (increasing, decreasing, flat varied from patient to patient. For a given patient, the odds of developing FVT/VF were not associated with increasing or decreasing QTVINF over time (OR 1.27; [95%CI 0.05–30.10]; P = 0.881.Conclusion─While on average the odds of FVT/VF increased with an increase in QTVINF, patient-specific longitudinal trends in QTVINF did not affect the odds of FVT/VF.

  3. Calcium phosphate in catheter encrustation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, A J; Harries, J E; Hukins, D W; Kennedy, A P; Sutton, T M

    1987-02-01

    Encrusted catheters from nine female patients were the source of samples of deposits which were examined by X-ray diffraction, atomic absorption spectroscopy, infra-red spectroscopy and extended X-ray absorption fine structure (EXAFS) spectroscopy. In eight samples the only crystalline phase which could be clearly distinguished by X-ray diffraction was ammonium magnesium orthophosphate hexahydrate, NH4MgPO4 X 6H2O, which occurs naturally as the mineral struvite. However, atomic absorption spectroscopy revealed an appreciable concentration of calcium in all samples. Calcium phosphates have previously been detected in catheter deposits. Infra-red and EXAFS spectra were consistent with the calcium phosphate being present as a poorly crystalline hydroxyapatite. Thus the deposits appear to consist of a mixture of crystalline struvite and a form of hydroxyapatite which is not fully crystalline. PMID:3030487

  4. Transhepatic venous catheters for hemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed El Gharib; Gamal Niazi; Waleed Hetta; Yahya Makkeyah

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To describe our experience with the technique of transhepatic venous access for hemodialysis and to evaluate its functionality and complications. Patients and methods: From March 2012 till October 2012, 23 patients with age ranging from 12 to 71 years old having end-stage renal disease (ESRD) were included in our study and were subjected to transhepatic venous catheter insertion. In 21 patients there were not any remaining patent peripheral venous accesses. In 2 patients there wer...

  5. Optimization of dialysis catheter function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallieni, Maurizio; Giordano, Antonino; Rossi, Umberto; Cariati, Maurizio

    2016-03-01

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are essential in the management of hemodialysis patients, but they also carry unintended negative consequences and in particular thrombosis and infection, adversely affecting patient morbidity and mortality. This review will focus on the etiology, prevention, and management of CVC-related dysfunction, which is mainly associated with inadequate blood flow. CVC dysfunction is a major cause of inadequate depuration. Thrombus, intraluminal and extrinsic, as well as fibrous connective tissue sheath (traditionally indicated as fibrin sheath) formation play a central role in establishing CVC dysfunction. Thrombolysis with urokinase or recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (rTPA) can be undertaken in the dialysis unit, restoring adequate blood flow in most patients, preserving the existing catheter, and avoiding an interventional procedure. If thrombolytics fail, mainly because of the presence of fibrous connective tissue sheath, catheter exchange with fibrin sheath disruption may be successful and preserve the venous access site. Prevention of CVC dysfunction is important for containing costly pharmacologic and interventional treatments, which also affect patients' quality of life. Prevention is based on the use of anticoagulant and/or thrombolytic CVC locks, which are only partially effective. Chronic oral anticoagulation with warfarin has also been proposed, but its use for this indication is controversial and its overall risk-benefit profile has not been clearly established. PMID:26951903

  6. Sinus thrombectomy for purulent cerebral venous sinus thrombosis utilizing a novel combination of the Trevo stent retriever and the Penumbra ACE aspiration catheter: the stent anchor with mobile aspiration technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mascitelli, Justin R; Pain, Margaret; Zarzour, Hekmat K; Baxter, Peter; Ghatan, Saadi; Mocco, J

    2016-06-01

    Intracranial complications of sinusitis are rare but life threatening. We present a case of a 17-year-old woman with sinusitis who deteriorated over the course of 12 days from subdural empyema and global purulent cerebral venous sinus thrombosis. The patient was managed with surgery and mechanical thrombectomy utilizing a novel 'stent anchor with mobile aspiration technique', in which a Trevo stent retriever (Stryker) was anchored in the superior sagittal sinus (SSS) while a 5 MAX ACE reperfusion catheter (Penumbra) was passed back and forth from the SSS to the sigmoid sinus with resultant dramatic improvement in venous outflow. The patient was extubated on postoperative day 3 and was discharged with minimal lower extremity weakness on postoperative day 11. This is the first report using the Trevo stent retriever for sinus thrombosis. It is important to keep these rare complications in mind when evaluating patients with oral and facial infections. PMID:26019186

  7. Flush Foley's catheter: The most easy way

    OpenAIRE

    Vijay P. Agrawal

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: Foley catheters are used for monitoring urine output in anesthetized patients, comatose patients, incontinent patients, acute urinary retention, paralysed patients, trauma patients, urethral surgeries, ureterectomy, kidney disease, before and after cesarean sections etc. When a Foley catheter becomes clogged, it can cause various complications. For which it is flushed or replaced.Objectives: To find a simple way to flush a Foleys catheter.Material & Methods: Patient was expl...

  8. Reuse of catheters for angiography. 2. Contribution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reuse of sterile medical devices designated for single use is a controversal practice, known to be performed in many countries. As far as catheters for angiography are concerned, various methods for cleaning and sterilisation are in use. However, interactions of detergents and ethylene oxide used in reprocessing with polyethylene materials of the catheters have not been investigated systematically. This paper presents a physico-chemical characterisation of common angiographic catheters. The interaction of polyethylene and ethylene oxide is examined. (orig.)

  9. [Catheter jejunostomy in elective abdominal surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodoky, A; Heberer, M; Iwatschenko, P; Harder, F

    1985-10-01

    Needle catheter jejunostomy is used to a varying extent today. Therefore, the need for nutritional support was evaluated following elective abdominal surgery and compared to experiences with postoperative enteral feeding. Oesophagectomy, total gastrectomy and the Whipple procedure were identified as good indications for catheter jejunostomy, whereas with other types of operation an individual decision is required. PMID:3935397

  10. Audit of catheter urine culture requests.

    OpenAIRE

    Manek, N; Napier Rees, E

    1992-01-01

    An audit to assess the appropriateness of catheter urine culture requests was carried out for a period of one month. The requests were followed up by members of the Infection Control Team at ward level. The laboratory report had no impact on the removal of the catheter in asymptomatic or symptomatic patients, although the reports did aid antibiotic prescribing in symptomatic patients.

  11. Audit of catheter urine culture requests.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manek, N; Napier Rees, E

    1992-01-01

    An audit to assess the appropriateness of catheter urine culture requests was carried out for a period of one month. The requests were followed up by members of the Infection Control Team at ward level. The laboratory report had no impact on the removal of the catheter in asymptomatic or symptomatic patients, although the reports did aid antibiotic prescribing in symptomatic patients. PMID:1740523

  12. Soft thrombus formation in radiofrequency catheter ablation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demolin, JM; Eick, OJ; Munch, K; Koullick, E; Nakagawa, H; Wittkampf, FHM

    2002-01-01

    During RF catheter ablation, local temperature elevation can result in coagulum formation on the ablation electrode, resulting in impedance rise. A recent study has also demonstrated the formation of a so-called soft thrombus during experimental ablations. This deposit poorly adhered to the catheter

  13. Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infections

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Top of page What is a urinary tract infection? A urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection that involves ... page What is a catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI)? A catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) occurs when germs (usually bacteria) ...

  14. Attitudes Towards Catheter Ablation for Atrial Fibrillation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vadmann, Henrik; Pedersen, Susanne S; Nielsen, Jens Cosedis;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation (AF) is an important but expensive procedure that is the subject of some debate. Physicians´ attitudes towards catheter ablation may influence promotion and patient acceptance. This is the first study to examine the attitudes of Danish...

  15. Functional pulmonary atresia in newborn with normal intracardiac anatomy: Successful treatment with inhaled nitric oxide and pulmonary vasodilators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gürkan Altun

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Functional pulmonary atresia is characterized by a structurally normal pulmonary valve that does not open during right ventricular ejection. It is usually associated with Ebstein′s anomaly, Uhl′s anomaly, neonatal Marfan syndrome and tricuspid valve dysplasia. However, functional pulmonary atresia is rarely reported in newborn with anatomically normal heart. We report a newborn with functional pulmonary atresia who had normal intracardiac anatomy, who responded to treatment with nitric oxide and other vasodilator therapy successfully.

  16. Intracardiac Eustachian Valve Cyst in an Adult Detected with Other Cardiac Anomalies: Usefulness of Multidetector CT in Diagnosis

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Hyung JI; Jung, Jung Im; Kim, Hwan Wook; Lee, Kyo Young

    2012-01-01

    We present an unusual case of an intracardiac Eustachian valve cyst observed concurrently with atresia of the coronary sinus ostium, a persistent left superior vena cava (LSVC) and a bicuspid aortic valve. There have been several echocardiographic reports of Eustachian valve cysts; however, there is no report of multidetector computed tomography (MDCT) findings related to a Eustachian valve cyst. Recently, we observed a Eustachian valve cyst diagnosed on MDCT showing a hypodense cyst at the c...

  17. Nonoperative replacement of a jejunostomy feeding catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stogdill, B J; Page, C P; Pestana, C

    1984-02-01

    Nonoperative replacement of lost or occluded jejunal feeding catheters proved successful in 8 of 11 patients. This technique is recommended as a nonoperative means of replacing a needle catheter jejunostomy when it is accidentally lost or becomes occluded. Adherence to sterile technique and gentle advancement of the guide wire to avoid injury to the bowel are important. Since the technique depends on an established tract between the skin and the bowel, catheter replacement should not be attempted when the feeding catheter is lost or becomes occluded in the immediate postoperative period. In addition, confirmation of catheter patency and intraluminal position with sterile water-soluble contrast medium is critical to the safe use of this technique. PMID:6421183

  18. Development of Bend Sensor for Catheter Tip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagano, Yoshitaka; Sano, Akihito; Fujimoto, Hideo

    Recently, a minimally invasive surgery which makes the best use of the catheter has been becoming more popular. In endovascular coil embolization for a cerebral aneurysm, the observation of the catheter's painting phenomenon is very important to execute the appropriate manipulation of the delivery wire and the catheter. In this study, the internal bend sensor which consists of at least two bending enhanced plastic optical fibers was developed in order to measure the curvature of the catheter tip. Consequently, the painting could be more sensitively detected in the neighborhood of the aneurysm. In this paper, the basic characteristics of the developed sensor system are described and its usefulness is confirmed from the comparison of the insertion force of delivery wire and the curvature of catheter tip in the experiment of coil embolization.

  19. Intracardiac impedance as a method for ventricular volume monitoring - Investigation by a finite-element model and clinical data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lippert, M.; Berdyshev, S.; Czygan, G.; Bocchiardo, M.; Hensel, B.

    2010-04-01

    A method for monitoring left ventricular (LV) volume changes of the human heart by intracardiac impedance measurement was developed. In order to model this method, we simulated the ventricular contraction using a finite-element model (FEM). The myocardium comprised three layers with anatomical fiber orientation. During excitation propagation contraction forces were applied, taking into account the myocardial elastic properties and the blood pressure time course. For a set of 21 contraction stages we calculated the intracardiac impedance Z between the right ventricular (RV) and LV leads for a set of common LV lead positions. The FEM results were compared to clinical data. Impedance and stroke volume were determined during overdrive pacing and end diastolic volume (EDV) at rest in 14 patients. All clinical EDV values were in the range of 147-394ml. Both the clinical data and the FEM in this volume range showed a linear correlation between admittance Y=1/Z and ventricular volume. For a quantitative comparison end diastolic impedance EDZ and the slope dY/dV were calculated. The model results across all LV lead positions were EDZ=0.16-1.2Ω, and dY/dV=3.3-21mS/ml, corresponding to clinical values of EDZ=0.14-1.46Ω and dY/dV=1-64mS/ml. In conclusion, the FEM resembled the clinical measurement data and serves as theoretical basis for ventricular volume monitoring via intracardiac impedance.

  20. Three-dimensional color Doppler reconstruction of intracardiac blood flow in patients with different heart valve diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Simone, R; Glombitza, G; Vahl, C F; Meinzer, H P; Hagl, S

    2000-12-15

    An improved perception of the magnitude and dynamics of intracardiac flow disturbances has been made possible by the advent of 3-dimensional (3-D) color Doppler, a new diagnostic procedure developed at our institution. This study describes the new insights derived from 3-D reconstruction of color Doppler flow patterns in patients with different heart valve diseases. The color Doppler flow data from 153 multiplanar transesophageal or transthoracic echocardiographic examinations has been obtained from 133 patients with heart valve disease; 73 patients had mitral regurgitation, 15 had mitral stenosis, 18 had aortic regurgitation, 26 had aortic stenosis, and 21 patients had tricuspid regurgitation. Four patients had pulmonary regurgitation associated with mitral valve disease. The 3-D reconstructions of color Doppler flow signals were accomplished by means of the "Heidelberg Raytracing model," developed at our institution. The 3-D color Doppler reconstructions were obtained in all patients. The 3-D images revealed for the first time the complex spatial distribution of the blood flow abnormalities in the heart chambers caused by different heart valve diseases. New patterns of intracardiac blood flow disturbances were observed and classified. Three-dimensional color Doppler provides a unique noninvasive method that can be easily applied for studying intracardiac blood flow disturbances in clinical practice. PMID:11113410

  1. Capacitive Micromachined Ultrasonic Transducer Arrays for Integrated Diagnostic/Therapeutic Catheters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Serena H.; Wygant, Ira O.; Yeh, David T.; Zhuang, Xuefeng; Bayram, Baris; Kupnik, Mario; Oralkan, Omer; Ergun, A. Sanli; Yaralioglu, Goksen G.; Khuri-Yakub, Butrus T.

    2006-05-01

    In recent years, medical procedures have become increasingly non-invasive. These include endoscopic procedures and intracardiac interventions (e.g., pulmonary vein isolation for treatment of atrial fibrillation and plaque ablation for treatment of arteriosclerosis). However, current tools suffer from poor visualization and difficult coordination of multiple therapeutic and imaging devices. Dual-mode (imaging and therapeutic) ultrasound arrays provide a solution to these challenges. A dual-mode transducer can provide focused, noncontact ultrasound suitable for therapy and can be used to provide high quality real-time images for navigation and monitoring of the procedure. In the last decade, capacitive micromachined ultrasonic transducers (CMUTs), have become an attractive option for ultrasonic imaging systems due to their fabrication flexibility, improved bandwidth, and integration with electronics. The CMUT's potential in therapeutic applications has also been demonstrated by surface output pressures as high as 1MPa peak to peak and continuous wave (CW) operation. This paper reviews existing interventional CMUT arrays, demonstrates the feasibility of CMUTs for high intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU), and presents a design for the next-generation CMUTs for integrated imaging and HIFU endoscopic catheters.

  2. Localized rotors and focal impulse sources within the left atrium in human atrial fibrillation: A phase analysis of contact basket catheter electrograms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Naoko; Okumura, Yasuo; Watanabe, Ichiro; Madry, Andrew; Hamano, Yuki; Nikaido, Mizuki; Kogawa, Rikitake; Nagashima, Koichi; Takahashi, Keiko; Iso, Kazuki; Ohkubo, Kimie; Nakai, Toshiko; Hirayama, Atsushi

    2016-01-01

    Background Consistent detection of rotor(s) and/or focal impulse(s) of atrial fibrillation can using a 64-pole basket catheter remain unclear. Methods and results Intracardiac left atrial electrograms were recorded, prior to ablation, in 20 patients with atrial fibrillation. Unipolar electrograms, filtered at 0.1–300 Hz, were recorded and exported for an offline phase analysis. From the cohort, 8 of the 20 patients had analyzable data. Localized rotors were identified in 3 of these patients, with focal impulses detected in 4 patients. Conclusion Localized rotors and focal impulses can be identified on phase maps of atrial fibrillation in a small number of patients. PMID:27092196

  3. Low-Grade Endometrial Stromal Sarcoma with Intravenous and Intracardiac Extension: A Multidisciplinary Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inafuku, Hitoshi; Nakamoto, Tomoko; Taira, Yusuke; Taira, Rie; Tsubakimoto, Maho; Totsuka, Yuichi; Kuniyoshi, Yukio; Tamaki, Tomoko; Aoyama, Hajime

    2016-01-01

    Background. A rare case of low-grade endometrial stromal sarcoma (LG-ESS) extending to inferior vena cava (IVC) and cardiac chambers. Case Report. A 40-year-old woman had IVC tumor, which was incidentally detected by abdominal ultrasonography during a routine medical checkup. CT scan revealed a tumor in IVC, right iliac and ovarian veins, which was derived from the uterus and extended into the right atrium and ventricle. The operation was performed, the heart and IVC were exposed, and cardiopulmonary bypass was initiated. A right atriotomy was performed, and the intracardiac mass was removed. Then the tumor in IVC and the right internal iliac vein were removed after longitudinal venotomies in the suprarenal and infrarenal vena cava, the right common iliac vein. Next the pelvis was explored. Tumors were found originating from the posterior wall of the uterus and continuing into both the right uterine and ovarian vein. The patient underwent total hysterectomy with bilateral salpingooophorectomy. Complete tumor resection was achieved. Histopathological analysis confirmed a diagnosis of LG-ESS. She showed no evidence of disease for 2 years and 3 months. Conclusions. Our case highlights the importance of a multidisciplinary approach in treating this rare cardiovascular pathological condition through preoperative assessment to final operation.

  4. Estimation of post mortem interval by tomographic images of intra-cardiac hypostasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zerbini, Talita; da Silva, Luiz Fernando Ferraz; Lobato Baptista, Pedro Artur; Ikari, Eduardo Seigo; Rodrigues de Araujo, Marina; de André, Carmen Diva Saldiva; da Motta Singer, Julio; da Rocha, Francisco Marcelo Monteiro; Junior, Edson Amaro; Pasqualucci, Carlos Augusto Gonçalves; Saldiva, Paulo Hilario Nascimento

    2016-02-01

    The determination of the post mortem interval (PMI) is important in many instances, especially in criminal investigations. So, we consider post mortem tomographic evaluation of intra-cardiac hypostasis as an additional method for such purpose. Tomographic images of the thoraces of the corpses of 23 patients who died in a hospital were obtained sequentially at one hour intervals to allow the analysis of changes in density due to hypostasis over time. The right and left atria, which appear in the mediastinal window, were selected for measurements of the average organ density. An exponential model was used to relate the difference between the attenuation coefficients of the anterior segment of the right atrium and the posterior segment of the left atrium to the PMI. In spite of the large variability of the data from this observational study, PMI estimates during the first 12 h after death can be estimated with a margin of error smaller than two hours. The results suggest that the difference between the attenuation coefficients stabilizes around 12 h post mortem and may be used as an additional method to estimate the PMI. PMID:26802976

  5. A Novel Ex Ovo Banding Technique to Alter Intracardiac Hemodynamics in an Embryonic Chicken System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Vinal; Junor, Lorain; Balhaj, Marwa; Eberth, John F; Potts, Jay D

    2016-01-01

    The new model presented here can be used to understand the influence of hemodynamics on specific cardiac developmental processes, at the cellular and molecular level. To alter intracardiac hemodynamics, fertilized chicken eggs are incubated in a humidified chamber to obtain embryos of the desired stage (HH17). Once this developmental stage is achieved, the embryo is maintained ex ovo and hemodynamics in the embryonic heart are altered by partially constricting the outflow tract (OFT) with a surgical suture at the junction of the OFT and ventricle (OVJ). Control embryos are also cultured ex ovo but are not subjected to the surgical intervention. Banded and control embryos are then incubated in a humidified incubator for the desired period of time, after which 2D ultrasound is employed to analyze the change in blood flow velocity at the OVJ as a result of OFT banding. Once embryos are maintained ex ovo, it is important to ensure adequate hydration in the incubation chamber so as to prevent drying and eventually embryo death. Using this new banded model, it is now possible to perform analyses of changes in the expression of key players involved in valve development and to understand the role of hemodynamics on cellular responses in vivo, which could not be achieved previously. PMID:27213265

  6. Radiofrequency catheter oblation in atrial flutter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the radiofrequency catheter ablation for type I atrial flutter through application of Holo catheter labelling with anatomic imaging localization to ablate the isthmus of IVCTA during complete double-way block. Methods: Eleven cases with type I atrial flutter undergone Holo catheter labelling technique and consecution with conduction time change of coronary venous sinus orifice with-right atrial lower lateral wall pace excitation, were performed with radiofrequency catheter ablation for the isthmus outcoming with complete double-way conduction block. Results: All together 11 cases with 4 of atrial flutter and 7 of sinus rhythm were undergone radiofrequency catheter ablation resulting with double-way conduction block of the isthmus accompanied by prolongation of right atrial conduction time 56.0 ± 2.3 ms and 53.0 ± 4.6 ms respectively. The right atrial excitation appeared to be in clockwise and counter-clockwise of single direction. No recurrence occurred during 3-34 months follow up with only one showing atrial fibrillation. Conclusions: The application of Holo catheter labelling technique with anatomic imaging localization to achieve the double-way conduction block by radiofrequency catheter ablation of TVC-TA isthmus, is a reliable method for treating atrial flutter

  7. [Catheter-associated urinary tract infections].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedl, B

    2015-09-01

    In patients with indwelling urethral catheters significant bacteriuria develops within 4 weeks of indwelling time in practically 100% of the cases. Catheter encrustation and obstruction can occur in approximately 40% of patients. Symptomatic ascending urinary tract infections, urethral complications and urolithiasis can occur in significant numbers in the long term. Regular educational and surveillance programs in nursing homes, hospitals and in home care are important to instruct personnel in hygiene procedures, to learn the indications for catheterization, to keep the indwelling time of catheters as short as possible, to detect any complications early and to initiate appropriate diagnostics and therapy by the urologist. PMID:26275988

  8. Catheter meaning for the adolescents in dialysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liliana Cristina Morales

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Goal: Terminal renal failure affects all the person’s life dimensions. The impact of this illness during adolescence is quite dramatic because the adolescent must live with the illness demands and the demands from this crucial developmental stage. Knowledge regarding the impact of the dialysis catheter on the adolescent’s life is spare. Methodology: A phenomenological study was carried out with 8 female and male adolescents that were in dialysis. Findings: The adolescents had to learn to live with the dialysis catheter in their body. The catheter became an obstacle to achieve their identity and deteriorated their physical appearance and peer relationships.

  9. 一对一培训联合 PICC 置管患儿责护准入制降低新生儿非正常拔管率%One to one training combined with PICC catheter in children with responsibility nurse 's access system reduce neonatal abnormal extubation rate

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张妮; 吕洁; 李双子

    2015-01-01

    control group was 14.41%, however, the rate of the observationgroup was 3.28%.There is significant difference between the two groups of non -planned decannulation rate (P<0.05).Conclusions One to one training combined with PICC catheter in children with responsibility nurse 's access system can reduce neonatal abnormal extubation rate .

  10. Antimicrobial-impregnated catheters for the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorente, Leonardo

    2016-05-01

    Central venous catheters are commonly used in critically ill patients. Such catheterization may entail mechanical and infectious complications. The interest in catheter-related infection lies in the morbidity, mortality and costs that it involved. Numerous contributions have been made in the prevention of catheter-related infection and the current review focuses on the possible current role of antimicrobial impregnated catheters to reduce catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSI). There is evidence that the use of chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine (CHSS), rifampicin-minocycline, or rifampicin-miconazol impregnated catheters reduce the incidence of CRBSI and costs. In addition, there are some clinical circumstances associated with higher risk of CRBSI, such as the venous catheter access and the presence of tracheostomy. Current guidelines for the prevention of CRBSI recommended the use of a CHSS or rifampicin-minocycline impregnated catheter in patients whose catheter is expected to remain in place > 5 d and if the CRBSI rate has not decreased after implementation of a comprehensive strategy to reduce it. PMID:27152256

  11. Stuck suction catheter in endotracheal tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monish S Raut

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Endotracheal tube (ETT suction is essential to clear secretions so that airway patency can be maintained. Stuck suction catheter in ETT is an uncommon event, and it can be dangerous in patients with difficult airway cases.

  12. Venous port catheter dislocation as an unusual cause of pneumonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Umut Serhat Sanrı

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of central venous port catheter is a very useful method for long-term therapy in patients with malignancy. Catheter insertion technique and maintenance of equipment is very important to the prevention of catheter-related complications. The most frequent complications are deep venous thrombosis, port infection, catheter obstruction. İn this article, pneumonia occurrence after chemotherapy infusion in a patient who has a completely extravasated central venous port catheter discussed.

  13. Advanced Imaging Catheter: Final Project Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Krulevitch, P; Colston, B; DaSilva, L; Hilken, D; Kluiwstra, J U; Lee, A P; London, R; Miles, R; Schumann, D; Seward, K; Wang, A

    2001-07-20

    Minimally invasive surgery (MIS) is an approach whereby procedures conventionally performed with large and potentially traumatic incisions are replaced by several tiny incisions through which specialized instruments are inserted. Early MIS, often called laparoscopic surgery, used video cameras and laparoscopes to visualize and control the medical devices, which were typically cutting or stapling tools. More recently, catheter-based procedures have become a fast growing sector of all surgeries. In these procedures, small incisions are made into one of the main arteries (e.g. femoral artery in the thigh), and a long thin hollow tube is inserted and positioned near the target area. The key advantage of this technique is that recovery time can be reduced from months to a matter of days. In the United States, over 700,000 catheter procedures are performed annually representing a market of over $350 million. Further growth in this area will require significant improvements in the current catheter technology. In order to effectively navigate a catheter through the tortuous vessels of the body, two capabilities must exist: imaging and positioning. In most cases, catheter procedures rely on radiography for visualization and manual manipulation for positioning of the device. Radiography provides two-dimensional, global images of the vasculature and cannot be used continuously due to radiation exposure to both the patient and physician. Intravascular ultrasound devices are available for continuous local imaging at the catheter tip, but these devices cannot be used simultaneously with therapeutic devices. Catheters are highly compliant devices, and manipulating the catheter is similar to pushing on a string. Often, a guide wire is used to help position the catheter, but this procedure has its own set of problems. Three characteristics are used to describe catheter maneuverability: (1) pushability -- the amount of linear displacement of the distal end (inside body) relative to

  14. An Unusual Complication of Suprapubic Catheter Insertion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishnan Ananthakrishnan

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available A patient who had a small bowel mesentery perforation following insertion of a suprapubic catheter (SPC is described. He had no bowel complaints immediately following the procedure, but presented 10 weeks later with insidious onset bowel obstruction due to the kink caused by the catheter. This complication occurred despite cystoscopy control and adequate bladder distension prior to the procedure. This isolated case illustrates the fact that regardless of the ease and frequency of SPC insertion, complications do occur.

  15. Wound catheter techniques for postoperative analgesia

    OpenAIRE

    VINTAR, NELI

    2009-01-01

    Wound catheter technique is a technique of postoperative analgesia in which the surgeon places a catheter to infuse local anesthetic into wounds at the end of the procedure. It can be used in abdominal colorectal surgery or after holecystectomies, was studied after caesarean delivery. It was effective after some orthopaedic procedures such as shoulder and knee surgery, at the donor site in the iliac crest. It can be used in plastic surgery after breast surgery. It is technically efficie...

  16. Pilot study evaluating catheter-directed contrast-enhanced ultrasound compared to catheter-directed computed tomography arteriography as adjuncts to digital subtraction angiography to guide transarterial chemoembolization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To investigate the feasibility and procedural value of catheter-directed contrast-enhanced ultrasound (CCEUS) compared with catheter-directed computed tomography arteriography (CCTA) in patients undergoing transarterial chemoembolization (TACE) guided by digital subtraction angiography (DSA). Materials and methods: From December 2010 to December 2011, a pilot study was conducted including nine patients (mean age 66.6 years; SD 8.3 years; seven men) undergoing TACE with drug-eluting beads for unresectable hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Both CCEUS and CCTA were performed in addition to DSA. Alterations of treatment plan based on CCEUS were recorded and compared with CCTA. Results: CCEUS provided additional information to DSA altering the treatment plan in four out of nine patients (44.4%). In these four patients, CCEUS helped to identify additional tumour feeders (n = 2) or led to a change in catheter position (n = 2). The information provided by CCEUS was similar to that provided by CCTA. Conclusion: CCEUS is a potentially valuable imaging tool in adjunction to DSA when performing TACE and may provide similar information to CCTA. - Highlights: • Transarterial chemotherapy is guided by digital subtraction angiography (DSA). • Additional catheter-directed CT-arteriography (CCTA) improves tumor targeting. • Catheter-directed contrast-enhanced US (CCEUS) does not cause radiation. • We compare CCEUS and CCTA to guide transarterial chemotherapy. • CCEUS provides similar information as CCTA in combination with DSA

  17. Haemolyzed samples: responsibility of short catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raisky, F; Gauthier, C; Marchal, A; Blum, D

    1994-01-01

    The haemolysis of blood samples is a source of error in the electrolytic and enzymatic determination in clinical biochemistry. This circumstance seems dependent on the material used for the venepuncture. In this study we compared three kinds of material in 350 patients who were sampled in the emergency department. This randomized study compared the haemolysis of blood samples collected with stainless steel needles and short catheters, either Teflon FEP (Cathlon Critikon) or polyurethane Vialon (Insyte Becton-Dickinson). Quantification of hemolysis was performed by assay of the optical density of plasma haemoglobin. Results were analysed, after verification of the randomization, by one-way analysis of variance by ranks. This study demonstrated a highly significant relation between occurrence of haemolysis and the sampling material, used according to its technical obligations. Haemolysis occurred frequently when short catheters were used in 42% and 55% of cases with the Teflon and Vialon catheters, respectively. Haemolysis was much less frequent with stainless steel needles (12%). This difference was even more marked for haemoglobin levels above 1.5 milligrams of plasma, where the incidence was 4.2%, 9% and 30%, respectively, for the stainless steel needles, the Teflon catheter and the Vialon catheter. This study induced our emergency department to take more blood samples with a needle, even if an infusion was to be given subsequently, or to take them using a Teflon catheter. PMID:7840428

  18. Strategies for the control of catheter encrustation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickler, D J; Evans, A; Morris, N; Hughes, G

    2002-06-01

    Two general strategies have been adopted to develop catheter materials that resist encrustaion by bacterial biofilms: (a) the incorporation of antimicrobial agents into the polymers and (b) the production of materials with surface properties which prevent the adherence of bacterial cells. Our experience to develop non-adherent surfaces which abstracts design from nature is reported. Compounds based on 2-methacryloloxyethylphosphorylcholine co-polymerised with long-chain alkyl methacrylates have been produced which have structural and surface properties similar to those of the outer membranes of erythrocytes. These PC-coatings have been applied onto catheter base materials where they produce polar surfaces that are extremely hydrophilic. In experiments using a laboratory model of the catheterised bladder we found that the PC-coatings did not reduce colonisation of latex or silicone catheters by crystalline Proteus mirabilis biofilm. There were no significant difference between the amounts of calcium and magnesium salts deposited on coated and non-coated catheters. In a further set of experiments the PC-coatings did not significantly increase the mean times for which catheters drained freely. In a parallel clinical study, the performance of PC-coated ureteral stents was investigated. Scanning electron microscopy and bacteriological analysis on 44 PC-coated stents that had been implanted in patients for 12-week periods and 28 control stents suggested that the PC-coated devices were less vulnerable to encrustation and colonisation by bacterial biofilm than normal stents. It was of interest that in contrast to encrusted catheters, urease producing species such as P. mirabilis were rarely isolated from the stents. The main organisms colonising the stents were enterococci and coagulase-negative staphylococci. These results suggest that the mechanisms of catheter and stent encrustation may be different and require different strategies for control. PMID:12135840

  19. Fatal liver injury complicated by percutaneous catheter drainage after distal pancreatosplenectomy in a patient with pancreatic cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Sung Hwan; Kang, Chang Moo; Chung, Yong Eun; Park, Jeong Youp; Lee, Woo Jung

    2014-01-01

    Postoperative pancreatic fistula (POPF) combined with postoperative fluid collection, bleeding and abscess formation is one of the most critical morbidities after distal pancreatectomy or pancreaticoduodenectomy. Percutaneous catheter drainage has been commonly used for managing for the postoperative management of abnormal fluid collection. Removal of the catheter is rarely associated with occurrence of life-threatening complication such as serious liver damage. Herein, we report a case of un...

  20. Stereotactic catheter placement for Ommaya reservoirs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kennedy, Benjamin C; Brown, Lauren T; Komotar, Ricardo J; McKhann, Guy M

    2016-05-01

    Ommaya reservoirs are an important surgical therapy for the chronic intrathecal administration of chemotherapy for patients with leptomeningeal carcinomatosis. Surgical accuracy is paramount in these patients with typically normal sized ventricles, and may be improved with stereotactic guidance. This paper aimed to review a large series of stereotactic Ommaya catheter placements, examining accuracy and complications. We conducted a retrospective review of 109 consecutive adult patients who underwent stereotactic Ommaya catheter placement for leptomeningeal carcinomatosis or central nervous system lymphoma at Columbia University Medical Center, USA, from 1998-2013. The rate of accurate placement in the ventricular system was 99%, with the only poor catheter position due to post-placement migration. The rate of peri-operative complications was 6.4%. Hemorrhagic complications occurred in patients with thrombocytopenia or therapeutic anti-coagulation pre-operatively or during the post-operative period. Use of stereotaxy for catheter placement of Ommaya reservoirs is safe and effective, and should be considered when placing a catheter into non-hydrocephalic ventricles. PMID:26778516

  1. Catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liedl, B

    2001-01-01

    In the past few years it has been clearly demonstrated that the concept of bacterial biofilm production permits an understanding and provides some explanation of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of catheter-associated urinary tract infections. This concept describes the colonization of catheter surfaces and the movement of bacteria against the urinary flow. It explains the antibacterial resistance of these matrix-enclosed sessile populations of bacteria. The catheter encrustation can be observed as mineralizing bacterial biofilm. The differentiation in swarming cells exposing a much higher activity of the enzyme urease is responsible for the predominant role of Proteus mirabilis in obstructing encrustations. The guidelines for the prevention of catheter-associated urinary tract infections were developed over the past decades by clinicians and are still valid. They can now be better understood taking into consideration these new theories. As overuse of urethral catheters and non-compliance of their recommended use are still apparent, educational and surveillance programmes are needed to help maintain good standards of care. PMID:11148750

  2. How to manage an arterial catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parry, Andrew; Higginson, Ray

    2016-03-16

    Rationale and key points This article provides nurses with information on the safe and effective use and management of arterial catheters, the gold standard for accurate blood pressure measurement and routine serial blood gas sampling in critical care. Arterial catheters are used when real-time blood pressure monitoring is required, such as when there is a risk of significant blood loss. ▶ Arterial catheters provide real-time blood pressure monitoring, enabling rapid identification of changes in blood pressure and guiding fluid resuscitation. ▶ Arterial catheters can be used to take blood samples without having to perform multiple arterial or venous punctures. Reflective activity Clinical skills articles can help update your practice and ensure it remains evidence based. Apply this article to your practice. Reflect on and write a short account of: 1. How this article will change your practice when managing a patient with an arterial catheter. 2. Any further learning needs you have identified. Subscribers can upload their reflective accounts at: rcni.com/portfolio . PMID:26982866

  3. Use of ultrasound to facilitate femoral nerve block with stimulating catheter

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Min; XU Ting; HAN Wen-yong; WANG Xue-dong; JIA Dong-lin; GUO Xiang-yang

    2011-01-01

    Background The adjunction of ultrasound to nerve stimulation has been proven to improve single-injection peripheral nerve block quality. However, few reports have been published determining whether ultrasound can facilitate continuous nerve blocks. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that the addition of ultrasound to nerve stimulation facilitates femoral nerve blocks with a stimulating catheter.Methods In this prospective randomized study, patients receiving continuous femoral nerve blocks for total knee replacement were randomly assigned to either the ultrasound guidance combined with stimulating catheter group (USNS group; n=60) or the stimulating catheter alone group (NS group; n=60). The primary end point was the procedure time (defined as the time from first needle contact with the skin until correct catheter placement). The numbers of needle passes and catheter insertions, onset and quality of femoral nerve blocks, postoperative pain score, and early knee function were also recorded.Results The procedure time was significantly less in the USNS group than in the NS group (9.0 (6.0-22.8) minutes vs.13.5 (6.0-35.9) minutes, P=0.024). The numbers of needle passes and catheter insertions were also significantly less in the USNS group. A greater complete block rate was achieved at 30 minutes in the USNS group (63.3% vs. 38.3%;P=0.010). The postoperative pain score, the number of patients who required bolus local anesthetic and intravenous patient-controlled analgesia, and knee flexion on the second postoperative day were not significantly different between the two groups of patients.Conclusions Ultrasound-assisted placement of a stimulating catheter for femoral nerve blocks decreases the time necessary to perform the block compared with just the nerve-stimulating technique. In addition, a more complete blockade is achieved using the ultrasound-assisted technique.

  4. Ceftiofur pharmacokinetics in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus after intracardiac and intramuscular administrations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalil, Waleed F; Shaheen, Hazem M; Abdou, Rania H

    2016-08-31

    Ceftiofur is a broad-spectrum third generation cephalosporin, which acts by inhibiting bacterial cell wall synthesis. It is active against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria such as Aeromonas hydrophila and β-lactamase-producing strains, which are common pathogens in freshwater fish. Ceftiofur pharmacokinetics in Nile tilapia Oreochromis niloticus were studied following single intracardiac (i.c.) or intramuscular (i.m.) administration of ceftiofur sodium (NAXCEL®) in a dose of 5 mg ceftiofur kg-1 body weight. After i.c. injection, ceftiofur plasma concentrations decreased biexponentially, suggesting a 2-compartmental open model. Distribution and elimination half-lives (t0.5(α) and t0.5(β)) were 0.61 ± 0.22 and 0.14 ± 0.03 h mean ±SD, respectively. Elimination constant (Kel) and total body clearances (Cltot) were 3.22 ± 0.48 h-1 and 1.64 ± 0.47 l h-1 kg-1, respectively. Volume of distribution (Vss) and areas under curves (AUC) were 0.12 ± 0.03 l kg-1 and 24.18 ± 8.81 µg ml-1 h, respectively. Following i.m. injection of ceftiofur, plasma concentrations were best described by a 1-compartment open model with a first order absorption; bioavailability was quite high (96.85 ± 23.74%). Plasma maximum concentration (Cmax) was 12.32 ± 6.53 µg ml-1; achieved at time of maximum concentration (Tmax) of 0.74 ± 0.04 h. Absorption and elimination half-lives (t0.5ab and t0.5β) were 0.49 ± 0.06 and 0.53 ± 0.03 h, respectively. In conclusion, i.m. injection of ceftiofur sodium produced extremely high bioavailability with high plasma concentrations that persisted up to 6 h post injection, which may make ceftiofur a useful alternative antibiotic for treatment of brood stock or important ornamental fishes. PMID:27596857

  5. Impact of short-term hemodialysis catheters on the central veins: a catheter venographic study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oguzkurt, Levent E-mail: loguzkurt@yahoo.com; Tercan, Fahri; Torun, Dilek; Yildirim, Tuelin; Zuemruetdal, Ayseguel; Kizilkilic, Osman

    2004-12-01

    Objective: To determine the incidence of pericatheter sleeve formation, thrombus formation, and stenosis of the central veins in hemodialysis patients with temporary catheters. Methods and material: In this prospective study, 57 patients (40 males, 17 females) with temporary dialysis catheters had catheter venography by pulling back the catheter just before removal. Patient's age range was 25-87 years (mean age, 51 years). The venographic studies were evaluated for pericatheter sleeve formation, thrombus formation, and stenosis of the brachiocephalic vein (BCV) and the superior vena cava (SVC). The IJV could only be evaluated if there was adequate filling during contrast administration. In a subgroup of patients who had had only right IJV or only right SCV catheters, impact of these catheters on the central veins was compared. Results: The catheter location was right internal jugular vein (IJV) in 26 cases, right subclavian vein (SCV) in 27 cases, left IJV in 1 case, and left SCV in 3 cases. Thirty-two patients (56%) had had only one temporary catheter and the rest had had more than one inserted. The mean dwell time for the catheters was 21 days (range 7-59 days). A pericatheter sleeve was detected on venography in 32 (56%) patients and thrombus formation was noted in 16 patients (28%). A total of 41 patients (72%) exhibited pericatheter sleeve and/or thrombus formation. While 19 of the 32 patients (59%) without previous catheterization had a sleeve around the catheter, only 13 (52%) of 25 patients who had had multiple catheters inserted had a sleeve (P>0.05). Of the eight patients (14%) with BCV stenosis, two had >50% stenosis. Only one patient (2%) had mild stenosis of the SVC. Three patients out of 15 (20%) who had diagnostic venography for the IJV had severe stenosis of the vein. Pericatheter sleeve formation was more frequent in women (P<0.05). However, there were no statistical differences with respect to pericatheter sleeve formation, luminal filling

  6. The importance of effective catheter securement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fisher, Jayne

    This article examines the importance of securing/fixing indwelling urinary catheters. The Oxford English dictionary interlinks the two words-'secure' and 'fix'-as having the same meaning. To secure the catheter should not be confused with 'support', whereby the weight of the urine drainage bag is supported with the use of velcro straps or a sleeve. The author introduces the need for the concept of this practice to be at the forefront of nurses' minds in all settings, and this is demonstrated through the use of case studies. Current guidance in this area is reviewed, as well as the problems that can arise when catheters are not secured properly and the available products for health professionals to use. PMID:20948482

  7. Everting (toposcopic) catheter for broad clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shook, D R; Doppman, J L; Cattau, E L; Goldstein, S R

    1986-05-01

    The advanced development of the clinical everting (toposcopic) catheter is described. A detailed discussion of the design and outline of the fabrication techniques are followed by a thorough performance evaluation and summary of the first two clinical applications. The everting element is a low-durometer thermoplastic polyurethane elastomer. Surface treatments include the bonding of a hydrophilic polymeric coating, optimized for lubricity, to the sliding internal surfaces of the catheter. Eversion pressures and infusion/aspiration flow rates have been measured under various conditions and the infusate-in-blood mixing potential investigated. A preliminary assessment is given of the clinical performance of the catheter in the vascular delivery of chemotherapy and standard endoscopic retrograde cholangiopancreatography. PMID:3724105

  8. Does antibiotic lock therapy prevent catheter-associated bacteremia in hemodialysis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Macarena Jiménez

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Central venous catheter-related blood stream infection is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in patients with renal disease treated with hemodialysis. Antibiotic lock solutions can be effective in preventing this complication in patients with hemodialysis. Searching in Epistemonikos database, which is maintained by screening more than twenty databases, we identified eight systematic reviews including seventeen randomized trials. We combined the evidence using meta-analysis and generated a summary of findings table following the GRADE approach. We concluded that antibiotic lock solutions probably decrease catheter-related blood stream infection in hemodialysis patients.

  9. Catheter directed thrombolysis for deep vein thrombosis during the first trimester of pregnancy: two case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Kum Rae; Park, Won Kyu; Kim, Jae Woon; Kwun, Woo Hyung; Suh, Bo Yang [College of Medicine, Yeungnam University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Park, Kyeong Seok [Yeungnam University, Medical Center, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-02-15

    Anticoagulation with heparin has been the standard management therapy of deep vein thrombosis during pregnancy. Pregnancy is generally considered as a contraindication for thrombolysis. However, anticoagulation therapy alone does not protect the limbs from post-thrombotic syndrome and venous valve insufficiency. Catheter-directed thrombolysis, combined with angioplasty and stenting, can remove the thrombus and restore patency of the veins, resulting in prevention of post-thrombotic syndrome and valve insufficiency. We report successful catheter-directed thrombolysis and stenting in two early gestation patients with a deep vein thrombosis of the left lower extremity.

  10. Catheter directed thrombolysis for deep vein thrombosis during the first trimester of pregnancy: two case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anticoagulation with heparin has been the standard management therapy of deep vein thrombosis during pregnancy. Pregnancy is generally considered as a contraindication for thrombolysis. However, anticoagulation therapy alone does not protect the limbs from post-thrombotic syndrome and venous valve insufficiency. Catheter-directed thrombolysis, combined with angioplasty and stenting, can remove the thrombus and restore patency of the veins, resulting in prevention of post-thrombotic syndrome and valve insufficiency. We report successful catheter-directed thrombolysis and stenting in two early gestation patients with a deep vein thrombosis of the left lower extremity

  11. [Phlebitogenicity of venous catheters of Vialon].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fassolt, A

    1985-12-01

    During three days 132 surgical patients with postoperative infusion treatment were checked on the frequency of venous reactions in the arms when catheters/cannulas of 4 different materials were used and the outcome compared. A significant result was obtained in connection with the I-cath catheter made of vialon (a polyurethanelike resin polymer) and the L-cath of polyurethane. Phlebitis was decreased to 27.3% resp. 24.2% - approximately half of its usual frequency - when I-cath of polyvinyl-chloride and FEP-teflon vasofix cannulas were applied (both 51.5%). The different predisposing factors of infusion phlebitis are under discussion. PMID:4093198

  12. Catheter ablation of inappropriate sinus tachycardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gianni, Carola; Di Biase, Luigi; Mohanty, Sanghamitra; Gökoğlan, Yalçın; Güneş, Mahmut F; Horton, Rodney; Hranitzky, Patrick M; Burkhardt, J David; Natale, Andrea

    2016-06-01

    Catheter ablation for inappropriate sinus tachycardia (IST) is recommended for patients symptomatic for palpitations and refractory to other treatments. The current approach consists in sinus node modification (SNM), achieved by ablation of the cranial part of the sinus node to eliminate faster sinus rates while trying to preserve chronotropic competence. This approach has a limited efficacy, with a very modest long-term clinical success. To overcome this, proper patient selection is crucial and an epicardial approach should always be considered. This brief review will discuss the current role and limitations of catheter ablation in the management of patients with IST. PMID:26310299

  13. Comparison of catheter tip migration using flexible and stimulating catheters inserted into the adductor canal in a cadaver model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Christopher A J; Kim, T Edward; Funck, Natasha; Howard, Steven K; Harrison, T Kyle; Ganaway, Toni; Keng, Heidi; Mariano, Edward R

    2015-06-01

    Use of adductor canal blocks and catheters for perioperative pain management following total knee arthroplasty is becoming increasingly common. However, the optimal equipment, timing of catheter insertion, and catheter dislodgement rate remain unknown. A previous study has suggested, but not proven, that non-tunneled stimulating catheters may be at increased risk for catheter migration and dislodgement after knee manipulation. We designed this follow-up study to directly compare tip migration of two catheter types after knee range of motion exercises. In a male unembalmed human cadaver, 30 catheter insertion trials were randomly assigned to one of two catheter types: flexible or stimulating. All catheters were inserted using an ultrasound-guided short-axis in-plane technique. Intraoperative knee manipulation similar to that performed during surgery was simulated by five sequential range of motion exercises. A blinded regional anesthesiologist performed caliper measurements on the ultrasound images before and after exercise. Changes in catheter tip to nerve distance (p = 0.547) and catheter length within the adductor canal (p = 0.498) were not different between groups. Therefore, catheter type may not affect the risk of catheter tip migration when placed prior to knee arthroplasty. PMID:25510467

  14. Prevention of catheter-related Pseudomonas aeruginosa infection by levofloxacin-impregnated catheters in vitro and in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Ping; Liu Wei; Kong Jinliang; Wu Hong; Chen Yiqiang

    2014-01-01

    Background Implanted medical catheter-related infections are increasing,hence a need for developing catheter polymers bonded to antimicrobials.We evaluated preventive effects of levofloxacin-impregnated catheters in catheterrelated Psuedomonas aeruginosa (strain PAO1) infection.Methods Drug release from levofloxacin-impregnated catheters was measured in vitro.Levofloxacin-impregnated catheters and polyvinyl chloride (PVC) catheters were immersed in 5 ml 50% Luria Bertani medium containing 108 CFU/ml Pseudomonas aeruginosa then incubated for 6,12,24 or 48 hours at 37℃ when bacteria adhering to the catheters and bacteria in the growth culture medium were determined.Impregnated and PVC catheters were singly implanted subcutaneously in mice,50 μl (107CFU) of PAO1 was injected into catheters.After the first and fifth days challenge,bacterial counts on implanted catheters and in surrounding tissues were determined microbiologically.Bacterial colonization and biofilm formation on implanted catheters were assessed by scanning electron microscopy.Results Drug release from levofloxacin-impregnated catheters was rapid.Levofloxacin-impregnated catheters had significantly fewer bacteria compared to PVC in vitro.After first and fifth day of challenge,no or significantly fewer bacteria adhered to impregnated catheters or in surrounding tissues compared to PVC.Scanning electron microscopical images after first day displayed from none to significantly fewer bacteria adhering to impregnated implanted catheters,compared to bacteria and microcolonies adhering to PVC catheters.After the fifth day,no bacteria were found on impregnated catheters,compared to clusters surrounding mucus-like substance and coral-shaped biofilms with polymorphonuclear leukocyte on PVC catheters.After the first day of challenge,secretion occurred in all implanted catheters with surrounding tissues mildly hyperaemic and swollen.After the fifth day,minute secretions inside impregnated catheters and no

  15. Catheter-Related Sepsis Due to Rhodotorula glutinis

    OpenAIRE

    Hsueh, Po-Ren; Teng, Lee-Jene; Ho, Shen-Wu; Luh, Kwen-Tay

    2003-01-01

    We describe a central venous catheter-related (Port-A-Cath; Smiths Industries Medical Systems [SIMS] Deltec, Inc., St. Paul, Minn.) infection caused by Rhodotorula glutinis in a 51-year-old man with nasopharyngeal carcinoma. He was treated with fluconazole for 8 weeks and had the catheter removed. Two isolates of R. glutinis recovered from blood specimens (one obtained via peripheral veins and one via the catheter) before administration of fluconazole and one recovered from the removed cathet...

  16. Force control of flexible catheter robots for beating heart surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kesner, Samuel Benjamin; Howe, Robert D.

    2011-01-01

    Recent developments in cardiac catheter technology promise to allow physicians to perform most cardiac interventions without stopping the heart or opening the chest. However, current cardiac devices, including newly developed catheter robots, are unable to accurately track and interact with the fast moving cardiac tissue without applying potentially damaging forces. This paper examines the challenges of implementing force control on a flexible robotic catheter. In particular, catheter frictio...

  17. 21 CFR 868.5120 - Anesthesia conduction catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Anesthesia conduction catheter. 868.5120 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5120 Anesthesia conduction catheter. (a) Identification. An anesthesia conduction catheter is a flexible tubular device used to...

  18. Damage of Central Catheters in Home Parenteral Nutrition Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Błasiak Renata

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available According to the ESPEN and ASPEN guidelines, in the case of a long-term (>3-month parenteral nutrition should be administered via a subcutaneous central venous catheter (CVC. There are three types of mechanical complications of tunnelled central catheter: catheter rupture, occlusion by TPN depositing and thrombofibrotic occlusion.

  19. Small Bowel Obstruction Due to Suprapubic Catheter Placement

    OpenAIRE

    Bonasso, Patrick C.; Brandon Lucke-Wold; Uzer Khan

    2016-01-01

    Suprapubic catheter placement has associated complications such as bowel injury, bladder injury, or bleeding. This case describes the management of an elderly patient who had suprapubic catheter placement complicated by small bowel obstruction. The catheter had continued production of urine. Further patient treatment required abdominal exploration and bowel resection.

  20. Small Bowel Obstruction Due to Suprapubic Catheter Placement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick C. Bonasso

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Suprapubic catheter placement has associated complications such as bowel injury, bladder injury, or bleeding. This case describes the management of an elderly patient who had suprapubic catheter placement complicated by small bowel obstruction. The catheter had continued production of urine. Further patient treatment required abdominal exploration and bowel resection.

  1. Small Bowel Obstruction Due to Suprapubic Catheter Placement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonasso, Patrick C; Lucke-Wold, Brandon; Khan, Uzer

    2016-07-01

    Suprapubic catheter placement has associated complications such as bowel injury, bladder injury, or bleeding. This case describes the management of an elderly patient who had suprapubic catheter placement complicated by small bowel obstruction. The catheter had continued production of urine. Further patient treatment required abdominal exploration and bowel resection. PMID:27335801

  2. 21 CFR 884.6110 - Assisted reproduction catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Assisted reproduction catheters. 884.6110 Section... (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES OBSTETRICAL AND GYNECOLOGICAL DEVICES Assisted Reproduction Devices § 884.6110 Assisted reproduction catheters. (a) Identification. Assisted reproduction catheters are devices used in...

  3. 21 CFR 868.5350 - Nasal oxygen catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Nasal oxygen catheter. 868.5350 Section 868.5350...) MEDICAL DEVICES ANESTHESIOLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 868.5350 Nasal oxygen catheter. (a) Identification. A nasal oxygen catheter is a device intended to be inserted through a patient's nostril...

  4. Not to Knot a Catheter. Case Report of the Knotting of a Suprapubic Catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. A. Farook

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available A 20-month-old boy, who underwent left nephrectomy, had a suprapubic catheter inserted that knotted within the bladder. This case report identifies possible causes for such occurrences and how best to manage them.

  5. Not to Knot a Catheter. Case Report of the Knotting of a Suprapubic Catheter

    OpenAIRE

    Farook, S. A.; Kariholu, U.; Kousidis, G.; Powlis, M.

    2007-01-01

    A 20-month-old boy, who underwent left nephrectomy, had a suprapubic catheter inserted that knotted within the bladder. This case report identifies possible causes for such occurrences and how best to manage them.

  6. A comparison of the priming properties of two central venous catheters and one pulmonary artery catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, P M

    1995-01-01

    The time taken to prime the individual lumina of two multilumen central venous catheters (Viggo-Spectramed 14G 20 cm Hydrocath and Vialon 14G 20 cm Deltacath) and one pulmonary artery catheter (Viggo-Spectramed 110 cm 7.5F Pentacath) at flows between 5 ml.h-1 and 99 ml.h-1 is reported. The catheters supplied by different manufacturers but of identical length and gauge have significantly different priming times (p < 0.001). A protocol which may be used to prime the individual lumina of the three catheters studied is described. By means of an in vitro test the accuracy of this protocol is validated. PMID:7702147

  7. Catheter Removal versus Retention in the Management of Catheter-Associated Enterococcal Bloodstream Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonas Marschall

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Enterococci are an important cause of central venous catheter (CVC-associated bloodstream infections (CA-BSI. It is unclear whether CVC removal is necessary to successfully manage enterococcal CA-BSI.

  8. The risks and benefits of suprapubic catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yates, Ann

    Suprapubic catheterisation can improve some patients' quality of life but the insertion procedure, as well as changing and managing the catheter, carry risks of infection and other negative patient outcomes. This article highlights the advantages and disadvantages, indications and contraindications, and the potential benefits, so health professionals can understand the relevant issues and assess and inform patients accordingly. PMID:27017651

  9. Complications after placement of peritoneal catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurđević-Mirković Tatjana

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Peritoneal dialysis is one of the modalities used for treatment of end-stage chronic kidney failure. Nowadays, this method is complementary to haemodialysis and renal transplantation. Owing to the rich vascularization of the peritoneum, it is used in the processes of osmosis and diffusion, enabling the removal of uremic material from the body. The procedure includes introduction of peritoneal fluid via the peritoneal catheter. Complications. The catheter is placed through the anterior abdominal wall with its tip positioned in the small pelvis. There are several techniques for catheter placement considered minimally invasive, which, however, may be associated with various complications. These complications can be divided into mechanical (catheter dysfunction, cuff protrusion, hernia, dialysate leaks, visceral perforation and infectious (early peritonitis, exit site or tunnel infection, surgical wounds. In most cases, such complications are rare and can be successfully managed using conservative therapy; however, in some situations severe complications can endanger the life of the patient. On-time recognition of complications, particularly in patients at risk, is of paramount importance for an effective treatment. The development of complications can increase the morbidity and the chance of treatment failure, and therefore transfer to haemodialysis. Conclusion. The preoperative evaluation and determination of the risk factors as well as the early recognition and adequate management of complications are essential in their prevention.

  10. Percutaneous Transhepatic Biliary Drainage Using a Ligated Catheter for Recurrent Catheter Obstruction: Antireflux Technique

    OpenAIRE

    Hamada, Tsuyoshi; Tsujino, Takeshi; Isayama, Hiroyuki; Hakuta, Ryunosuke; ITO Yukiko; Nakata, Ryo; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2013-01-01

    Percutaneous transhepatic biliary drainage (PTBD) is an established procedure for biliary obstruction. However, duodenobiliary or jejunobiliary reflux of the intestinal contents through a PTBD catheter sometimes causes recurrent catheter obstruction or cholangitis. A 64-year-old female patient with a history of choledochojejunostomy was referred to our department with acute cholangitis due to choledochojejunal anastomotic obstruction. Emergent PTBD was performed, but frequent obstructions of ...

  11. Modification of the HeRO Graft Allowing Earlier Cannulation and Reduction in Catheter Dependent Days in Patients with End Stage Renal Disease: A Single Center Retrospective Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deirdre Hart

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available After creation of an arteriovenous fistula or placement of an arteriovenous graft, several weeks are required for maturation prior to first cannulation. Patients need an alternative way to receive hemodialysis during this time, frequently a catheter. After multiple failed access attempts, patients can run out of options and become catheter dependent. At our institution, we place HeRO grafts in eligible patients who have otherwise been told they would be catheter dependent for life. By combining the HeRO graft system with a Flixene graft, patients are able to remove catheters sooner or avoid placement as they can undergo cannulation for hemodialysis the next day. Utilizing this novel technique, twenty-one patients over a two-year period with various forms of central venous stenosis, catheter dependence, or failing existing arteriovenous access have been successfully converted to stable long term noncatheter based upper extremity access.

  12. Which criteria demand additive stenting during catheter-directed thrombolysis?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bækgaard, N; Just, S; Foegh, P

    2014-01-01

    Many factors are necessary for obtaining satisfactory results after catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) for iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Selections of patients, composition of the thrombolytic fluid, anticoagulation per- and post-procedural, recognition and treatment of persistent...... obstructive lesions of the iliac veins are the most important contributors. Stenting has been known for 15 to 20 years. The first publication on CDT in 1991 was combined with ballooning the iliac vein, an additive procedure which has been abandoned as an isolated procedure. This chapter will discuss selection......, indication, such as an iliac compression syndrome, and outcome of iliac stenting in combination with CDT. The reported frequency of stenting used after CDT is very inconsistent, therefore this will be discussed in details. It is concluded that selection for stenting is of the greatest importance, when CDT is...

  13. Worsening Hypoxemia in the Face of Increasing PEEP: A Case of Large Pulmonary Embolism in the Setting of Intracardiac Shunt.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granati, Glen T; Teressa, Getu

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Patent foramen ovale (PFO) are common, normally resulting in a left-to-right shunt or no net shunting. Pulmonary embolism (PE) can cause sustained increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and right atrial pressure. Increasing positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) improves oxygenation at the expense of increasing intrathoracic pressures (ITP). Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) decreases shunt fraction, improves ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) matching, increases cardiac output, and decreases right atrial pressure by facilitating low airway pressure. CASE REPORT A 40-year-old man presented with dyspnea and hemoptysis. Oxygen saturation (SaO2) 80% on room air with A-a gradient of 633 mmHg. Post-intubation SaO2 dropped to 71% on assist control, FiO2 100%, and PEEP of 5 cmH20. Successive PEEP dropped SaO2 to 60-70% and blood pressure plummeted. APRV was initaiated with improvement in SaO2 to 95% and improvement in blood pressure. Hemiparesis developed and CT head showed infarction. CT pulmonary angiogram found a large pulmonary embolism. Transthoracic echocardiogram detected right-to left intracardiac shunt, with large PFO. CONCLUSIONS There should be suspicion for a PFO when severe hypoxemia paradoxically worsens in response to increasing airway pressures. Concomitant venous and arterial thromboemboli should prompt evaluation for intra-cardiac shunt. Patients with PFO and hypoxemia should be evaluated for causes of sustained right-to-left pressure gradient, such as PE. Management should aim to decrease PVR and optimize V/Q matching by treating the inciting incident (e.g., thrombolytics in PE) and by minimizing ITP. APRV can minimize PVR and maximize V/Q ratios and should be considered in treating patients similar to the one whose case is presented here. PMID:27377010

  14. Saline contrast echocardiography for the detection of patent foramen ovale in hypoxia: a validation study using intracardiac echocardiography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenster, Brett E; Curran-Everett, Douglas; Freeman, Andrew M; Weinberger, Howard D; Kern Buckner, J; Carroll, John D

    2014-04-01

    Although the "3 beat rule" is widely utiized to discriminate patent foramen ovale (PFO)-mediated right-to-left shunt (RTLS) from intrapulmonary RTLS using saline contrast transthoracic echocardiography (SCE), SCE diagnostic performance has yet to be validated using an invasive intracardiac standard. Percutaneous PFO occluder placement was recently shown to ameliorate hypoxia in patients with suspected PFO-mediated RTLS. We evaluated the ability of SCE to predict PFO presence and size using intracardiac echocardiography (ICE) as a gold standard in a hypoxic cohort. Sixty-three hypoxic patients with suspected PFO-mediated RTLS who underwent SCE at rest, with Valsalva maneuver, and with cough prior to ICE were evaluated retrospectively. PFO RTLS was defined by ICE findings including PFO anatomy, RTLS by saline contrast and color Doppler, and probe patency. SCE shunt severity and timing of left heart saline target appearance were compared to the presence of ICE-defined PFO RTLS. Forty-seven patients (75%) met criteria for PFO-mediated RTLS. A 4 beat cutoff for resting SCE provided optimal diagnostic performance for detection of PFO-mediated RTLS with a 71% sensitivity, 94% specificity, and 97% positive predictive value (PPV). Valsalva and cough maneuvers improved sensitivity compared to rest SCE (89% and 80%, respectively). Valsalva SCE shunt severity more accurately predicted PFO size than resting SCE. In contrast to the widely accepted "3 beat rule," resting SCE for the detection of PFO RTLS in a hypoxic population performs optimally using a 4-cycle cutoff with both excellent specificity and PPV. PMID:24138568

  15. Radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter in palliation of malignant ascites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate retrospectively the safety and effectiveness of radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter in palliation of malignant ascites. Between July 2005 and June 2009, 41 tunneled peritoneal catheters were placed under ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic guidance in 40 patients (mean age, 55 years; 22 women) who had symptomatic malignant ascites. No procedure related mortality was observed. Major complication occurred in one patient (2.5%) in the form of serious bacterial peritonitis that necessitated catheter removal. Minor complications such as minor bacterial peritonitis, catheter dislodgement, tunnel infection, and catheter blockage occurred in 11 patients (27.5%). The mean duration of survival after catheter placement was 11.8 weeks. All patients expired of their primary malignancies in the follow-up. Radiologically placed tunneled peritoneal catheter is safe and effective in palliation of symptomatic malignant ascites.

  16. Catheter-directed thrombolysis in the treatment of acute deep venous thrombosis: a meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, J J; Zhang, Z H; Shan, Z; Wang, W J; Li, X X; Wang, S M; Li, Y-X; Cheng, G-S

    2014-01-01

    We performed a meta-analysis for systematic evaluation of the status quo of catheter thrombolysis for the treatment of acute lower limb deep vein thrombosis in China. We searched the China Biomedical bibliographic database (CBM), China National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI), Weipu full-text electronic journals, Wanfang full-text database, and Medline (1990 through June 2011) for clinical randomized controlled trials of catheter-directed thrombolysis and superficial venous thrombolysis to compare their efficacies for the treatment of acute deep vein thrombosis. The results were analyzed by using the Cochrane-recommended RevMan 4.2 software package, and the odds ratio (OR) was used as the combined measure of efficacy. The search retrieved 8 randomized controlled trials, and meta-analysis using the total rate of effective treatment as the clinical observation index found that the combined OR for the catheter thrombolysis group versus the superficial venous thrombolysis group was significant (P < 0.01; OR = 11.78; 95% confidence interval = 6.99-19.87). In conclusion, the meta-analysis indicated that catheter thrombolysis was more effective than superficial venous thrombolysis for the treatment of acute deep vein thrombosis in the lower limb in Chinese individuals. However, the included trials were only of medium quality, so more rational and scientific clinical trials are needed to validate this conclusion. PMID:25078578

  17. Pulmonary Vein Isolation using a High Density Mesh Ablator Catheter: incorporation of three-dimensional navigation and mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiun Tuan

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Background We evaluated the use of a novel High Density Mesh Ablator (HDMA catheter in combination with three-dimensional navigation for the treatment of paroxysmal atrial fibrillation. Methods The HDMA catheter was used to carry out pulmonary vein isolation in a consecutive series of patients. Three-dimensional geometry of the left atrial-pulmonary vein (LA-PV junctions were first created with the HDMA catheter. Ostial, proximal and distal sites within the pulmonary veins were tagged with catheter shadows on the created geometry to allow for re-interrogation of these exact sites after ablation. Results The HDMA catheter was successfully used to create three dimensional geometry of the LA-PV junction in a total of 20 pulmonary veins which involved 5 patients. In all cases, ostial ablation alone was sufficient to achieve electrical isolation. No significant pulmonary vein stenosis was seen acutely after ablation. Conclusion We describe the successful use of the novel HDMA catheter to create three-dimensional geometry of the LA-PV junction to assist with pulmonary vein isolation. Keywords : Atrial Fibrillation, pulmonary vein isolation, ablation

  18. Antifouling coating with controllable and sustained silver release for long-term inhibition of infection and encrustation in urinary catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Rong; Neoh, Koon Gee; Kang, En-Tang; Tambyah, Paul Anantharajah; Chiong, Edmund

    2015-04-01

    Urinary tract infections constitute a large proportion of nosocomial infections, and the urinary catheter is the most important predisposing factor. Encrustation induced by urease-producing uropathogens like Proteus mirabilis causes further complications. In the present work, a strategy for controllable and sustained release of silver over several weeks has been developed for combating bacterial infection and encrustation in urinary devices. Silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) were first immobilized on polydopamine (PDA) pre-treated silicone catheter surface and this was followed by another PDA coating. The number of AgNP-PDA bilayers could be manipulated to control the amount of silver loaded and its subsequent release. Poly(sulfobetaine methacrylate-co-acrylamide) was then grafted to provide an antifouling outer layer, and to ensure free diffusion of Ag from the surface. The micron-scale combination of an antifouling coating with AgNP-PDA bilayers reduced colonization of the urinary catheter by uropathogens by approximately two orders of magnitude. With one and two AgNP-PDA bilayers, the coated catheter could resist encrustation for 12 and 45 days, respectively, compared with approximately 6 days with the Dover™ silver-coated catheter. Such anti-infective and anti-encrustation catheters can potentially have a large impact on reducing patient morbidity and healthcare expenditure. PMID:24922113

  19. Partition-type spinal cord catheter combined with bone marrow stromal stem cells in the repair of spinal cord transection injury in rats%分区式脊髓导管联合骨髓基质干细胞修复脊髓横断损伤模型大鼠

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵锡武; 刘鑫; 于大鹏; 荣辉; 于兴胜; 杨长生; 刘通; 赵廷宝

    2016-01-01

    背景:脊髓损伤致残率高,治疗上仅限于早期手术干预、药物治疗和后期功能锻炼等手段,运动功能稍有改善,但目前尚无有效治愈办法。目的:探讨分区式脊髓导管和骨髓基质干细胞联合对大鼠T8脊髓全横断损伤模型的修复效果。方法:根据数字表法将50只大鼠随机分为5组,每组10只,Ⅰ组为T8脊髓全横断切除5 mm,不做其他处理;Ⅱ组为造模后将分区式脊髓导管植入形成的缺损内;Ⅲ组为造模后将分区式脊髓导管植入形成的缺损内,同时植入骨髓基质干细胞;Ⅳ组为造模后将分区式脊髓导管植入形成的缺损内,同时植入聚乙醇酸纤维;Ⅴ组为造模后将分区式脊髓导管植入形成的缺损内,同时植入骨髓基质干细胞和聚乙醇酸纤维。结果与结论:①术后2周和12周Ⅲ组和Ⅴ组的BBB评分明显高于Ⅰ组、Ⅱ组和Ⅳ组,差异有显著性意义(P <0.05)。②术后12周Ⅴ组损伤平面以下运动诱发电位的潜伏期明显少于Ⅰ组、Ⅱ组、Ⅲ组和Ⅳ组,差异有显著性意义(P <0.05)。③免疫组化显示Ⅲ组和Ⅴ组在导管中间能找到染色阳性的再生神经纤维并生长有序,无明显缠绕成团的现象。④透射电镜显示桥接各组都有一定数量的有髓神经纤维。⑤结果表明分区式壳聚糖脊髓导管联合骨髓基质干细胞植入可以较好的连接脊髓损伤缺损,恢复一部分电生理特性,加快轴突再生,恢复运动功能,为脊髓损伤的治疗提供了一个新的方向。%BACKGROUND:There is a high morbidity after spinal cord injury, and the therapeutic strategy is limited to early surgical intervention, medication and post-treatment exercise that only can improve the motor function slightly. However, there is no effective cure method. OBJECTIVE:To study the effect of partition-type spinal cord catheter combined with bone marrow stromal stem cels on T8 spinal

  20. Distributed pressure sensors for a urethral catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Mahdi; Rajamani, Rajesh; Timm, Gerald; Sezen, A S

    2015-08-01

    A flexible strip that incorporates multiple pressure sensors and is capable of being fixed to a urethral catheter is developed. The urethral catheter thus instrumented will be useful for measurement of pressure in a human urethra during urodynamic testing in a clinic. This would help diagnose the causes of urinary incontinence in patients. Capacitive pressure sensors are fabricated on a flexible polyimide-copper substrate using surface micromachining processes and alignment/assembly of the top and bottom portions of the sensor strip. The developed sensor strip is experimentally evaluated in an in vitro test rig using a pressure chamber. The sensor strip is shown to have adequate sensitivity and repeatability. While the calibration factors for the sensors on the strip vary from one sensor to another, even the least sensitive sensor has a resolution better than 0.1 psi. PMID:26738054

  1. Pancreas tumor interstitial pressure catheter measurement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieskoski, Michael D.; Gunn, Jason; Marra, Kayla; Trembly, B. Stuart; Pogue, Brian W.

    2016-03-01

    This paper highlights the methodology in measuring interstitial pressure in pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumors. A Millar Mikrotip pressure catheter (SPR-671) was used in this study and a system was built to amplify and filter the output signal for data collection. The Millar pressure catheter was calibrated prior to each experiment in a water column at 37°C, range of 0 to 60 inH2O (112 mmHg), resulting in a calibration factor of 33 mV / 1 inH2O. The interstitial pressures measured in two orthotopically grown pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor were 57 mmHg and 48 mmHg, respectively. Verteporfin uptake into the pancreatic adenocarcinoma tumor was measured using a probe-based experimental dosimeter.

  2. Retrograde Epidural Catheter Relieves Intractable Sacral Pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Ruchir; Shodhan, Shivam; Hosny, Amr

    2016-01-01

    Pain caused by tumor infiltration of the sacral area remains a major clinical challenge. Patients with poor pain control despite comprehensive medical management may be treated with neuraxial techniques such as continuous epidural or spinal anesthetic. We report a case in which a patient with metastatic breast cancer experienced inadequate pain relief after multiple intravenous pain management regimens as well as intrathecal (IT) drug delivery. The concentration of local anesthetics delivered via the IT catheter was limited due to the patient's baseline motor weakness which would be exacerbated with higher concentrations of local anesthetics. Thus, a decision was made to insert an epidural catheter via a retrograde technique to provide the patient with a "band of anesthesia" which would provide profound sensory blockade without concomitant motor weakness. Pain refractory to other modalities of pain control was successfully treated with the epidural technique. PMID:27162431

  3. Electromagnetic tracking and steering for catheter navigation

    OpenAIRE

    O'Donoghue, Kilian

    2014-01-01

    This thesis explores the use of electromagnetics for both steering and tracking of medical instruments in minimally invasive surgeries. The end application is virtual navigation of the lung for biopsy of early stage cancer nodules. Navigation to the peripheral regions of the lung is difficult due to physical dimensions of the bronchi and current methods have low successes rates for accurate diagnosis. Firstly, the potential use of DC magnetic fields for the actuation of catheter devices with ...

  4. Transpleural central venous catheter discovered during thoracotomy

    OpenAIRE

    Ashima Malhotra; Prakash Sharma; Ashvini Kumar; Nikhil Malhotra

    2014-01-01

    We report an uncommon complication of subclavian central venous catheterization, discovered at thoracotomy. The central venous catheter (CVC) was placed by left infraclavicular route after induction of general anesthesia. CVC was secured after aspiration of blood and satisfactory central venous tracing. On thoracotomy, CVC was noticed to traverse the pleural cavity while the tracing was normal. CVC was thus removed consequent to which bleeding from each puncture site was noticed, that were se...

  5. Radiologic Placement of Tunneled Central Venous Catheters in Pediatric Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Ji; Song, Soon Young; Cho, On Koo; Koh, Byung Hee; Kim, Yong Soo; Jeong, Woo Kyoung; Lee, Yong Ho [Hanyang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    We evaluated the technical success and complication rates associated with the radiological placement of tunneled central venous catheters in pediatric patients. Between May 1, 2005 and March 31, 2008, a total of 46 tunneled central venous catheters were placed in 34 children (M:F = 22:12; mean age, 9.9 years [9 months to 16.8 years]). All procedures were performed under ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic guidance. Follow-up data were obtained through the retrospective review of the medical records. We used the Kaplan-Meier survival method for the evaluation of survival rate of the catheters. All procedures were technically successful. The observed periprocedural complications included hematoma formation in three patients. The mean catheter life was 189.3 days (total, 8710 days; range, 7-810). Catheters were removed due to death (n=9), the end of treatment (n=8), catheter sepsis (n=4), malfunction (n=8), and accidental removal (n=4). The rate of catheter sepsis and malfunction was 0.459 and 0.919 for every 1000 catheter days, respectively. The expected mean catheter life was 479.6 days as per the Kaplan- Meier analysis. The results suggest that the radiologic placement of a tunneled central venous catheter is an effective technique with a high technical success rate and low complication rate.

  6. Biological safety evaluation of the modified urinary catheter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kowalczuk, Dorota, E-mail: dorota.kowalczuk@umlub.pl [Department of Medicinal Chemistry, Medical University of Lublin, Jaczewskiego 4, 20-090 Lublin (Poland); Przekora, Agata; Ginalska, Grazyna [Department of Biochemistry and Biotechnology, Medical University of Lublin, Chodzki 1, 20-093 Lublin (Poland)

    2015-04-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro safety of the novel tosufloxacin (TOS)-treated catheters with the prolonged antimicrobial activity. The test samples of silicone latex catheter were prepared by the immobilization of TOS on chitosan (CHIT)-coated catheter by means of covalent bonds and non-covalent interactions. Each step of the modification process of catheter surface was observed using ATR–Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In vitro cytotoxicity of the modified and unmodified catheters was assessed by direct and indirect tests in accordance with ISO standards using green monkey kidney (GMK) cell line. The MTT, lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH), WST-8, Sulforhodamine B (SRB) test results and microscopic observation clearly indicated that unmodified silicone latex catheters decrease cell metabolic activity, act as a cytotoxic agent causing cell lysis and induce cell death through necrotic or apoptotic process. We suggest that chitosan coat with TOS immobilized limits leaching of harmful agents from silicone latex material, which significantly enhances survivability of GMK cells and therefore is quite a good protection against the cytotoxic effect of this material. - Highlights: • Characterization of the novel antimicrobial urinary catheters • Monitoring of the catheter modification by FTIR analysis • Confirmation of high cytotoxicity of latex-based catheter used in urological practice • Chitosan-coated and tosufloxacin-treated catheter is less toxic than the untreated one. • The proposed surface modification protects cells against latex-induced death.

  7. Biological safety evaluation of the modified urinary catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate in vitro safety of the novel tosufloxacin (TOS)-treated catheters with the prolonged antimicrobial activity. The test samples of silicone latex catheter were prepared by the immobilization of TOS on chitosan (CHIT)-coated catheter by means of covalent bonds and non-covalent interactions. Each step of the modification process of catheter surface was observed using ATR–Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. In vitro cytotoxicity of the modified and unmodified catheters was assessed by direct and indirect tests in accordance with ISO standards using green monkey kidney (GMK) cell line. The MTT, lactate dehydrogenase activity (LDH), WST-8, Sulforhodamine B (SRB) test results and microscopic observation clearly indicated that unmodified silicone latex catheters decrease cell metabolic activity, act as a cytotoxic agent causing cell lysis and induce cell death through necrotic or apoptotic process. We suggest that chitosan coat with TOS immobilized limits leaching of harmful agents from silicone latex material, which significantly enhances survivability of GMK cells and therefore is quite a good protection against the cytotoxic effect of this material. - Highlights: • Characterization of the novel antimicrobial urinary catheters • Monitoring of the catheter modification by FTIR analysis • Confirmation of high cytotoxicity of latex-based catheter used in urological practice • Chitosan-coated and tosufloxacin-treated catheter is less toxic than the untreated one. • The proposed surface modification protects cells against latex-induced death

  8. Interventional radiological imaging and treatment of port catheter dysfunctions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the impact of interventional radiological imaging and treatment of central venous port catheter complications. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective analysis 429 port catheter dysfunctions were evaluated in 393 port catheter systems for a total of 389 patients over a period of 10 years. The study included 193 (49.1 %) patients with radiologically implanted port catheter systems and 200 (50.9 %) referred patients with surgically implanted port systems. Port catheter dysfunctions were subdivided into early and late complications as well as into non-thrombotic and thrombotic events. After administration of contrast medium, the port system was visualized using digital subtraction angiography. Data were retrospectively collected from the in-house databases and then analyzed descriptively. Results: 429 contrast media injections via port catheters were performed in 393 port catheter systems. There were 359 (83.7 %) late complications and 70 (16.3 %) early complications. In 299 (69.7 %) cases thrombotic events occurred and 130 (30.3 %) non-thrombotic events were recorded. The most common reason for contrast media injection via port catheter system was port catheter-related thrombosis in 269 (62.7 %) cases. 70 (16.3 %) catheter migrations and 30 (7.0 %) fibrin sheath formations were detected. 18 (4.2 %) port needle malfunctions could be resolved through needle exchange. All 15 (3.5 %) catheter disconnections had to be revised in all cases. Also six port explantations were performed in 6 (1.4 %) catheter fractures. Conclusion: The possibilities of angiographic imaging and interventional radiological correction of port catheter dysfunctions must be exploited fully in order to avoid premature port explantation. (orig.)

  9. Retrieval of an intra-cardiac embolised very long wire via transhepatic access from a war victim child.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baspinar, Osman; Sahin, Derya A; Yildirim, Ali

    2016-04-01

    We present the case report of a war victim child with severe burn scars, orthopnoea, and dyspnoea due to diffuse pulmonary thromboembolism. During ICU stay, a central venous catheter's 45-mm wire embolised into the heart. The embolised wire was successfully removed via transhepatic access through the creation of an artificial simple snare. PMID:26358097

  10. Indications for needle catheter jejunostomy in elective abdominal surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heberer, M; Bodoky, A; Iwatschenko, P; Harder, F

    1987-06-01

    Needle catheter jejunostomy for postoperative nutritional support is now employed worldwide. However, there is a large discrepancy regarding indications for this technique which this study attempts to rectify. The need for nutritional support after elective abdominal procedures in 464 patients was analyzed and compared with the experience with needle catheter jejunostomy in 42 patients. The results show that needle catheter jejunostomy is indicated after extensive operations of the upper gastrointestinal tract, for example, esophagectomy, total gastrectomy, and the Whipple procedure. With minor upper gastrointestinal operations, or procedures of the lower gastrointestinal tract, needle catheter jejunostomy should be performed only in patients with poor nutritional status or in the presence of postoperative chemotherapy or radiotherapy. In an unclear situation, liberal insertion of the needle catheter jejunostomy and a postponed decision on enteral feeding is recommended, as there is no significant catheter-related morbidity. PMID:3109269

  11. Technique of Peritoneal Catheter Placement under Fluoroscopic Guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Peritoneal catheters are mainly used for peritoneal dialysis in patients with end-stage renal disease. Other uses of this catheter include intraperitoneal chemotherapy and gene therapy for ovarian cancer and draining of uncontrolled refractory ascites in patients with liver cirrhosis. Traditionally, surgeons place most of these peritoneal catheters either by laparoscopy or open laparotomy. We detail our percutaneous approach to placing peritoneal catheters using fluoroscopic guidance. We emphasize the use of additional ultrasound guidance, including gray scale and color Doppler ultrasound, to determine the safest puncture site and to guide the initial needle puncture in order to avoid bowel perforation and injury to epigastric artery. We present our experience in placing peritoneal catheters using this technique in 95 patients with various indications. Fluoroscopic guided percutaneous placement of peritoneal catheters is a safe, minimally invasive, and effective alternative to open surgical or laparoscopic placement.

  12. A Bone Metastasis Nude Mouse Model Created by Ultrasound Guided Intracardiac Injection of Breast Cancer Cells: the Micro-CT, MRI and Bioluminescence Imaging Analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to develop a nude mouse model of bone metastasis by performing intracardiac injection of breast cancer cells under ultrasonography guidance and we wanted to evaluate the development and the distribution of metastasis in vivo using micro-CT, MRI and bioluminescence imaging. Animal experiments were performed in 6-week-old female nude mice. The animals underwent left ventricular injection of 2x105 MDA-MB-231Bo-Luc cells. After injection of the tumor cells, serial bioluminescence imaging was performed for 7 weeks. The findings of micro-CT, MRI and the histology were correlated with the 'hot' lesions seen on the bioluminescence imaging. Metastasis was found in 62.3% of the animals. Two weeks after intracardiac injection, metastasis to the brain, spine and femur was detected with bioluminescence imaging with an increasing intensity by week 7. Micro-CT scan confirmed multiple osteolytic lesions at the femur, spine and skull. MRI and the histology were able to show metastasis in the brain and extraskeletal metastasis around the femur. The intracardiac injection of cancer cells under ultrasonography guidance is a safe and highly reproducible method to produce bone metastasis in nude mice. This bone metastasis nude mouse model will be useful to study the mechanism of bone metastasis and to validate new therapeutics

  13. A Bone Metastasis Nude Mouse Model Created by Ultrasound Guided Intracardiac Injection of Breast Cancer Cells: the Micro-CT, MRI and Bioluminescence Imaging Analysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Young Jin; Song, Eun Hye; Kim, Seol Hwa; Song, Ho Taek; Suh, Jin Suck [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Sang Hyun [Korean Minjok Leadership Academy, Heongsung (Korea, Republic of)

    2011-01-15

    The purpose of this study was to develop a nude mouse model of bone metastasis by performing intracardiac injection of breast cancer cells under ultrasonography guidance and we wanted to evaluate the development and the distribution of metastasis in vivo using micro-CT, MRI and bioluminescence imaging. Animal experiments were performed in 6-week-old female nude mice. The animals underwent left ventricular injection of 2x105 MDA-MB-231Bo-Luc cells. After injection of the tumor cells, serial bioluminescence imaging was performed for 7 weeks. The findings of micro-CT, MRI and the histology were correlated with the 'hot' lesions seen on the bioluminescence imaging. Metastasis was found in 62.3% of the animals. Two weeks after intracardiac injection, metastasis to the brain, spine and femur was detected with bioluminescence imaging with an increasing intensity by week 7. Micro-CT scan confirmed multiple osteolytic lesions at the femur, spine and skull. MRI and the histology were able to show metastasis in the brain and extraskeletal metastasis around the femur. The intracardiac injection of cancer cells under ultrasonography guidance is a safe and highly reproducible method to produce bone metastasis in nude mice. This bone metastasis nude mouse model will be useful to study the mechanism of bone metastasis and to validate new therapeutics

  14. Role of biofilm in catheter-associated urinary tract infection

    OpenAIRE

    Trautner, Barbara W.; Darouiche, Rabih O.

    2004-01-01

    The predominant form of life for the majority of microorganisms in any hydrated biologic system is a cooperative community termed a “biofilm.” A biofilm on an indwelling urinary catheter consists of adherent microorganisms, their extracellular products, and host components deposited on the catheter. The biofilm mode of life conveys a survival advantage to the microorganisms associated with it and, thus, biofilm on urinary catheters results in persistent infections that are resistant to antimi...

  15. Rat Indwelling Urinary Catheter Model of Candida albicans Biofilm Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Nett, Jeniel E.; Brooks, Erin G.; Cabezas-Olcoz, Jonathan; Sanchez, Hiram; Zarnowski, Robert; Marchillo, Karen; Andes, David R.

    2014-01-01

    Indwelling urinary catheters are commonly used in the management of hospitalized patients. Candida can adhere to the device surface and propagate as a biofilm. These Candida biofilm communities differ from free-floating Candida, exhibiting high tolerance to antifungal therapy. The significance of catheter-associated candiduria is often unclear, and treatment may be problematic considering the biofilm drug-resistant phenotype. Here we describe a rodent model for the study of urinary catheter-a...

  16. Intravenous anaesthetics inhibit nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-mediated currents and Ca2+ transients in rat intracardiac ganglion neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Martin; Motin, Leonid; Gaul, Simon; Beker, Friederike; Fink, Rainer H A; Adams, David J

    2005-01-01

    The effects of intravenous (i.v.) anaesthetics on nicotinic acetylcholine receptor (nAChR)-induced transients in intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) and membrane currents were investigated in neonatal rat intracardiac neurons. In fura-2-loaded neurons, nAChR activation evoked a transient increase in [Ca(2+)](I), which was inhibited reversibly and selectively by clinically relevant concentrations of thiopental. The half-maximal concentration for thiopental inhibition of nAChR-induced [Ca(2+)](i) transients was 28 microM, close to the estimated clinical EC(50) (clinically relevant (half-maximal) effective concentration) of thiopental. In fura-2-loaded neurons, voltage clamped at -60 mV to eliminate any contribution of voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, thiopental (25 microM) simultaneously inhibited nAChR-induced increases in [Ca(2+)](i) and peak current amplitudes. Thiopental inhibited nAChR-induced peak current amplitudes in dialysed whole-cell recordings by approximately 40% at -120, -80 and -40 mV holding potential, indicating that the inhibition is voltage independent. The barbiturate, pentobarbital and the dissociative anaesthetic, ketamine, used at clinical EC(50) were also shown to inhibit nAChR-induced increases in [Ca(2+)](i) by approximately 40%. Thiopental (25 muM) did not inhibit caffeine-, muscarine- or ATP-evoked increases in [Ca(2+)](i), indicating that inhibition of Ca(2+) release from internal stores via either ryanodine receptor or inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate receptor channels is unlikely. Depolarization-activated Ca(2+) channel currents were unaffected in the presence of thiopental (25 microM), pentobarbital (50 microM) and ketamine (10 microM). In conclusion, i.v. anaesthetics inhibit nAChR-induced currents and [Ca(2+)](i) transients in intracardiac neurons by binding to nAChRs and thereby may contribute to changes in heart rate and cardiac output under clinical conditions. PMID:15644873

  17. Encrusted and incarcerated urinary bladder catheter: what are the options?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher C.K. Ho

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Urinary bladder catheter encrustations are known complications of long-term urinary catheterisation, which is commonly seen in clinical practice. These encrustations can impede deflation of the balloon and therefore cause problems in the removal of the catheter. The options in managing an encrusted and incarcerated urinary bladder catheter include extracorporeal shock wave lithotripsy and lithoclast. We describe here another technique of dealing with a stuck and encrustated catheter, via direct crushing of the encrustations with a rigid cystoscope inserted through a suprapubic cystostomy tract.

  18. Real-time multipoint gastrointestinal 19-fluorine catheter tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Hahn, Tobias; Kozerke, Sebastian; Schwizer, Werner; Fried, Michael; Boesiger, Peter; Steingoetter, Andreas

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To develop MR based real-time gastrointestinal 19-Fluorine (19F) catheter tracking and visualization allowing for real-time detection and feedback of 3D catheter shape and movement as well as catheter-driven adjustments of 1H imaging geometry parameters. METHODS: Data were acquired on a 3T clinical system using 3D Golden Angle radial sampling. Two gastrointestinal catheters incorporating four fiducial 19F markers (65 or 50 µL marker volume) were tracked while being pulled through ...

  19. Analog experiment of transarterial catheter hyperthermic infusion in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the factors related to the heating effect by transarterial catheter hyperthermic infusion with the evaluation of the feasibility in controlling the tumor temperature. Methods: Infusing 55-68 degree C liquid at the speed of 10-40 ml/min through 6F, 5F or 3F catheter with different length respectively under the similar clinical condition. The liquid temperature at the terminal exit of the catheter was measured with a digital thermometer. The factors related to the liquid temperature at the exit of the catheter were analyzed by multiple regression analysis. Results: The infusion temperature , rate and the catheter length were the main related factors to the liquid temperature at the exit of the catheter as the condition similar in clinical use. When 60-65 degree C liquid was infused at the rate of 20-40 ml/min through 5F catheter with length of 80 cm, the mean and 95% confident interval of the liquid temperature at the catheter exit were (47.55±0.44) degree C and 44.61-48.49 degree C respectively. Conclusions: The liquid temperature at the exit of infusion catheter can be regulated and controlled through adjusting the liquid perfusion temperature and speed. (authors)

  20. Use of tunnelled catheters in haematological malignancy patients with neutropenia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sariosmanoglu, N; Uğurlu, B; Turgut, N H; Demirkan, F; Ozsan, H; Ergor, G; Gulay, Z; Hazan, E; Oto, O

    2008-01-01

    This prospective study analysed 83 patients (age 45 +/- 17 years) with haematological neoplasms, implanted with 93 tunnelled catheters, who were neutropenic or developed neutropenia during treatment. Catheters were implanted in the right (n = 82) or left (n = 11) jugular vein by the same surgical team using the same technique. They remained in place for 124 +/- 88 days: 29% were removed due to infection; 18% due to treatment termination and 2% due to mechanical problems. Seventeen patients died with catheters in place. At 30, 60, 90, 120 and 200 days mean catheter duration rates were 82%, 75%, 65%, 60% and 35%, respectively, and freedom from catheter removal due to infection was 92%, 88%, 80%, 77% and 67%, respectively. Patient diagnosis and history of previous catheter infection did not increase catheter infection risk, but patients undergoing stem cell transplantation had an increased infection risk. Tunnelled catheters can be used in high-risk patients with neutropenia. Systemic infections can be managed in most patients without catheter removal. PMID:18831907

  1. A prototype catheter designed for ultraviolet C disinfection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Jimmy; Begovic, Tanja

    2013-01-01

    possible to design a single-lumen catheter with a hub, tube connector and tube parts that can be UVC-disinfected throughout its entire lumen. Methods Two single-lumen catheters were designed: one control and one for UVC exposure. They were contaminated with Pseudomonas aeruginosa (104–105 cfu/mL) before...... UVC light exposure, sampling and plate counting. Findings Two minutes of UVC exposure was sufficient to obtain 4 log10 disinfection for the full-length prototype catheter. This exposure corresponds to ∼40 mJ/cm2 at the catheter tip and indicates that even shorter exposure times can be achieved...

  2. Remote control catheter navigation: options for guidance under MRI

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muller Leah

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Image-guided endovascular interventions have gained increasing popularity in clinical practice, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is emerging as an attractive alternative to X-ray fluoroscopy for guiding such interventions. Steering catheters by remote control under MRI guidance offers unique challenges and opportunities. Methods In this review, the benefits and limitations of MRI-guided remote control intervention are addressed, and the tools for guiding such interventions in the magnetic environment are summarized. Designs for remote control catheter guidance include a catheter tip electromagnetic microcoil design, a ferromagnetic sphere-tipped catheter design, smart material-actuated catheters, and hydraulically actuated catheters. Remote control catheter guidance systems were compared and contrasted with respect to visualization, safety, and performance. Performance is characterized by bending angles achievable by the catheter, time to achieve bending, degree of rotation achievable, and miniaturization capacity of the design. Necessary improvements for furthering catheter design, especially for use in the MRI environment, are addressed, as are hurdles that must be overcome in order to make MRI guided endovascular procedures more accessible for regular use in clinical practice. Conclusions MR-guided endovascular interventions under remote control steering are in their infancy due to issues regarding safety and reliability. Additional experimental studies are needed prior to their use in humans.

  3. Repositioning and Leaving In Situ the Central Venous Catheter During Percutaneous Treatment of Associated Superior Vena Cava Syndrome: A Report of Eight Cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To describe a combined procedure of repositioning and leaving in situ a central venous catheter followed by immediate percutaneous treatment of associated superior vena cava syndrome (SVCS). Methods: Eight patients are presented who have central venous catheter-associated SVCS (n = 6 Hickman catheters, n = 2 Port-a-cath) caused by central vein stenosis (n = 4) or concomitant thrombosis (n = 4). With the use of a vascular snare introduced via the transcubital or transjugular approach, the tip of the central venous catheter could be engaged, and repositioned after deployment of a stent in the innominate or superior vena cava. Results: In all patients it was technically feasible to reposition the central venous catheter and treat the SVCS at the same time. In one patient flipping of the Hickman catheter in its original position provoked dislocation of the released Palmaz stent, which could be positioned in the right common iliac vein. Conclusion: Repositioning of a central venous catheter just before and after stent deployment in SVCS is technically feasible and a better alternative than preprocedural removal of the vascular access

  4. Do Foley catheters adequately drain the bladder? Evidence from CT imaging studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The Foley catheter has been widely assumed to be an effective means of draining the bladder. However, recent studies have brought into question its efficacy. The objective of our study is to further assess the adequacy of Foley catheter for complete drainage of the bladder. Materials and Methods: Consecutive catheterized patients were identified from a retrospective review of contrast enhanced and non-contrast enhanced computed tomographic (CT) abdomen and pelvis studies completed from 7/1/2011-6/30/2012. Residual urine volume (RUV) was measured using 5mm axial CT sections as follows: The length (L) and width (W) of the bladder in the section with the greatest cross sectional area was combined with bladder height (H) as determined by multiplanar reformatted images in order to calculate RUV by applying the formula for the volume (V) of a sphere in a cube:V=(π/6)⁎L⁎W⁎H). Results: RUVs of 167 (mean age 67) consecutively catheterized men (n=72) and women (n=95) identified by CT abdomen and pelvis studies were calculated. The mean RUV was 13.2 mL (range: 0.0 mL-859.1 mL, standard deviation: 75.9 mL, margin of error at 95% confidence:11.6 mL). Four (2.4%) catheterized patients had RUVs of >50 mL, two of whom had an improperly placed catheter tip noted on their CT-reports. Conclusions: Previous studies have shown that up to 43% of catheterized patients had a RUV greater than 50 mL, suggesting inadequacy of bladder drainage via the Foley catheter. Our study indicated that the vast majority of patients with Foley catheters (97.6%), had adequately drained bladders with volumes of <50 mL. (author)

  5. Do Foley catheters adequately drain the bladder? Evidence from CT imaging studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Avulova, Svetlana; Li, Valery J.; Khusid, Johnathan A. [Department of Urology, SUNY Downstate College of Medicine, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Choi, Woo S. [Radiology, SUNY Downstate College of Medicine, Brooklyn, NY (United States); Weiss, Jeffrey P., E-mail: johnathan.khusid@downstate.edu [Department of Urology, Weill Cornell Medical College, New York, NY (United States)

    2015-05-15

    Introduction: The Foley catheter has been widely assumed to be an effective means of draining the bladder. However, recent studies have brought into question its efficacy. The objective of our study is to further assess the adequacy of Foley catheter for complete drainage of the bladder. Materials and Methods: Consecutive catheterized patients were identified from a retrospective review of contrast enhanced and non-contrast enhanced computed tomographic (CT) abdomen and pelvis studies completed from 7/1/2011-6/30/2012. Residual urine volume (RUV) was measured using 5mm axial CT sections as follows: The length (L) and width (W) of the bladder in the section with the greatest cross sectional area was combined with bladder height (H) as determined by multiplanar reformatted images in order to calculate RUV by applying the formula for the volume (V) of a sphere in a cube:V=(π/6)⁎L⁎W⁎H). Results: RUVs of 167 (mean age 67) consecutively catheterized men (n=72) and women (n=95) identified by CT abdomen and pelvis studies were calculated. The mean RUV was 13.2 mL (range: 0.0 mL-859.1 mL, standard deviation: 75.9 mL, margin of error at 95% confidence:11.6 mL). Four (2.4%) catheterized patients had RUVs of >50 mL, two of whom had an improperly placed catheter tip noted on their CT-reports. Conclusions: Previous studies have shown that up to 43% of catheterized patients had a RUV greater than 50 mL, suggesting inadequacy of bladder drainage via the Foley catheter. Our study indicated that the vast majority of patients with Foley catheters (97.6%), had adequately drained bladders with volumes of <50 mL. (author)

  6. Dosimetric equivalence of nonstandard HDR brachytherapy catheter patterns

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine whether alternative high dose rate prostate brachytherapy catheter patterns can result in similar or improved dose distributions while providing better access and reducing trauma. Materials and Methods: Standard prostate cancer high dose rate brachytherapy uses a regular grid of parallel needle positions to guide the catheter insertion. This geometry does not easily allow the physician to avoid piercing the critical structures near the penile bulb nor does it provide position flexibility in the case of pubic arch interference. This study used CT datasets with 3 mm slice spacing from ten previously treated patients and digitized new catheters following three hypothetical catheter patterns: conical, bi-conical, and fireworks. The conical patterns were used to accommodate a robotic delivery using a single entry point. The bi-conical and fireworks patterns were specifically designed to avoid the critical structures near the penile bulb. For each catheter distribution, a plan was optimized with the inverse planning algorithm, IPSA, and compared with the plan used for treatment. Irrelevant of catheter geometry, a plan must fulfill the RTOG-0321 dose criteria for target dose coverage (V100Prostate>90%) and organ-at-risk dose sparing (V75Bladder75Rectum125Urethra<<1 cc). Results: The three nonstandard catheter patterns used 16 nonparallel, straight divergent catheters, with entry points in the perineum. Thirty plans from ten patients with prostate sizes ranging from 26 to 89 cc were optimized. All nonstandard patterns fulfilled the RTOG criteria when the clinical plan did. In some cases, the dose distribution was improved by better sparing the organs-at-risk. Conclusion: Alternative catheter patterns can provide the physician with additional ways to treat patients previously considered unsuited for brachytherapy treatment (pubic arch interference) and facilitate robotic guidance of catheter insertion. In addition, alternative catheter patterns may

  7. Comparison of Standard Catheters Versus Radial Artery-Specific Catheter in Patients Who Underwent Coronary Angiography Through Transradial Access.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, On; Goel, Sunny; Acholonu, Michael; Kulbak, Guy; Verma, Shivani; Travlos, Efstratios; Casazza, Richard; Borgen, Elliot; Malik, Bilal; Friedman, Michael; Moskovits, Norbert; Frankel, Robert; Shani, Jacob; Ayzenberg, Sergey

    2016-08-01

    In this prospective, randomized controlled study, we aim to compare the performance outcomes of standard catheters with the radial artery-specific catheter. Over the past decade, transradial cardiac catheterization has gained widespread popularity because of its low complication rates compared with transfemoral access. Operators have the choice of using either standard catheters (used for both transfemoral and transradial approach, with need for separate catheter use for either right or left coronary artery engagement) or a dedicated radial artery catheter, which is specifically designed to engage both coronary arteries through radial artery access. A total of 110 consecutive patients who underwent coronary angiography at our institution from March 2015 to April 2015 were prospectively randomized to either radial artery-specific Tiger catheter (5Fr; Terumo Interventional Systems, Somerset, New Jersey) versus standard Judkins left and right catheters (5Fr R4, L4; Cordis Corporation, Miami, Florida). The end points of the study included fluoroscopy time, dose-area product, contrast volume used, and total procedure time for the coronary angiography. A total of 57 patients (52%) were randomized to radial artery-specific catheter and 53 (48%) to the standard catheter. Tiger catheter was associated with significantly lower fluoroscopy time (184 ± 91 vs 238 ± 131 seconds, p = 0.015), which was statistically significant. Other outcome measures such as dose-area product (2,882.4 ± 1,471.2 vs 3,524.6 ± 2,111.7 Gy·cm(2), p = 0.07), total contrast volume (48.1 ± 16.1 vs 53.4 ± 18.5 ml, p = 0.114), and total procedure time (337 ± 382 vs 434 ± 137 seconds, p = 0.085) were also lower in single-catheter group, but it did not reach statistical significance. A total of 8 patients (14%) were crossed over from radial-specific catheter arm to standard catheter arm because of substandard image quality and difficulty in coronary engagement. Six patients had to be

  8. Monitoring Atrial Fibrillation After Catheter Ablation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni B Forleo, MD PhD; MAssimo Moltrasio, MD; Michela Casella MD, PhD; Antonio Dello Russo MD, PhD; Getano Fassini, MD; Manfredi Tesauro, MD, PhD; Claudio Tondo, MD, PhD.

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Although catheter ablation is an effective treatment for recurrent atrial fibrillation (AF, there is no consensus on the definition of success or follow-up strategies. Symptoms are the major motivation for undergoing catheter ablation in patients with AF, however it is well known that reliance on perception of AF by patients after AF ablation results in an underestimation of recurrence of the arrhythmia. Because symptoms of AF occurrence may be misleading, a reliable assessment of rhythm outcome is essential for the definition of success in both clinical care and research trials. Continuous rhythm monitoring over long periods of time is superior to intermittent recording using external monitors to detect the presence of AF episodes and to quantify the AF burden. Today, new devices implanted subcutaneously using a minimally invasive technique have been developed for continuous AF monitoring. Implantable devices keep detailed information about arrhythmia recurrences and might allow identification of very brief episodes of AF, the significance of which is still uncertain. In particular, it is not known whether there is any critical value of daily AF burden that has a prognostic significance. This issue remains an area of active discussion, debate and investigation. Further investigation is required to determine if continuous AF monitoring with implantable devices is effective in reducing stroke risk and facilitating maintenance of sinus rhythm after AF ablation.

  9. Engineering Considerations Of Catheters For Intravascular Ultrasonic Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Roy W.; Johnson, Christopher C.

    1989-08-01

    The mechanical properties of commonly used fluid transfusion or pressure monitoring catheters are similar to the properties required of catheters which include sensing devices. Consequently, bending and torsional stiffness of commercial catheters and tubes were measured at both room and body temperature. Five of these usually placed with the aid of fluoroscopy had an average Young's modulus of 5714x101 dyne/cm at 21°C which decreased 29% at body temperature; a shear modulus of 70.5x101 dyne/cm 4 at 21°C which decreased 13% at body temperature, and plastic deformation of 8% when loaded for 1 minute at 37°. Four of these were composed of a composite material. Catheters which are balloon directed during insertion had moduli values approximately 1/3 of these or less. The drag forces produced on balloons used on such catheters were measured for fluid velocities ranging from 10-50 cm/sec. Using this information the average force applied to a balloon throughout a cardiac cycle was calculated; values of 1280 dynes for a .6 ml balloon and 2490 dynes for a 1 ml balloon were found. The maximum wall thicknesses to catheter radii for single lumen catheters were determined for various material moduli which would allow the catheter tip to be directed by a balloon during its passage into the right heart.

  10. Urethral catheter insertion forces: a comparison of experience and training

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin K. Canales

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study was undertaken to evaluate the insertion forces utilized during simulated placement of a urethral catheter by healthcare individuals with a variety of catheter experience. Materials and Methods: A 21F urethral catheter was mounted to a metal spring. Participants were asked to press the tubing spring against a force gauge and stop when they met a level of resistance that would typically make them terminate a catheter placement. Simulated catheter insertion was repeated fives times, and peak compression forces were recorded. Healthcare professionals were divided into six groups according to their title: urology staff, non-urology staff, urology resident/ fellow, non-urology resident/ fellow, medical student, and registered nurse. Results: A total of fifty-seven healthcare professionals participated in the study. Urology staff (n = 6 had the lowest average insertion force for any group at 6.8 ± 2.0 Newtons (N. Medical students (n = 10 had the least amount of experience (1 ± 0 years and the highest average insertion force range of 10.1 ± 3.7 N. Health care workers with greater than 25 years experience used significantly less force during catheter insertions (4.9 ± 1.8 N compared to all groups (p < 0.01. Conclusions: We propose the maximum force that should be utilized during urethral catheter insertion is 5 Newtons. This force deserves validation in a larger population and should be considered when designing urethral catheters or creating catheter simulators. Understanding urethral catheter insertion forces may also aid in establishing competency parameters for health care professionals in training.

  11. Efficacy of preventing hemodialysis catheter infections with citrate lock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silva, Jorge; Antunes, Jorge; Carvalho, Telmo; Ponce, Pedro

    2012-10-01

    Prevalent use of tunneled dialysis catheters can reach 30%. Infection remains the most serious catheter-related problem. Catheter locks are increasingly used for prevention, but are not yet recommended either by the Food and Drug Association or European Medicines Agency, on the basis of increasing bacterial resistance or lock toxicity. The aim was to test safety and effectiveness of citrate. A prospective, interventional study was conducted to assess the safety and efficacy of a 30% citrate lock in preventing catheter-related bacteremia (CRB). A total of 157 prevalent tunneled catheters were locked with citrate and prospectively followed during a 1-year period. The primary endpoint was first CRB diagnosed according to two of the diagnostic criteria for Catheter Infection of Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), namely definite and probable infection. The CDC criterion of possible but not proved infection was not considered. This citrate lock cohort (n = 157) had 10 episodes of CRB. We observed 0.49 CRB episodes/1000 patient-days and the mean infection-free catheter day was 130.6 ± 100.9. No clinically relevant adverse events were observed. No proved tunnel or exit site infection was observed and no patients died because of CRB. Catheter obstruction episodes were reported on 69 occasions out of 14 catheters. These results were compared with an historical cohort from a previous study of catheter locking with low-dose gentamicin and did not show significant difference in efficacy. Citrate lock is effective in preventing CRB. No toxicity was observed. The use of citrate lock may have advantages over antibiotic locks: no reported bacterial resistance, lower industrial cost, and less manipulation. PMID:22515732

  12. Value of Micronester coils in port-catheter implantation for continuous hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy with fixed catheter tip method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yamagami, Takuji; Kato, Takeharu; Hirota, Tatsuya; Yoshimatsu, Rika; Matsumoto, Tomohiro; Nishimura, Tsunehiko [Kyoto Prefectural University of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Graduate School of Medical Science, Kyoto (Japan); White, Robert I. [Yale University School of Medicine, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, New Haven, CT (United States)

    2008-01-15

    To retrospectively evaluate the use of Micronester coils in port-catheter implantation with the fixed catheter tip method in comparison with other previously used coils. The cohort of this study was 143 consecutive patients with unresectable advanced liver cancer for whom a port-catheter system was percutaneously implanted. In the most recent 32 patients, Micronester coils were used for catheter tip fixation. Details of embolic agents for fixation, persistent blood flow beyond the distal end of the indwelling catheter, and complications were compared between cases without and with Micronester coils. In all, percutaneous port-catheter placement was successful. Mean number of coils used for fixation was 4.2 without Micronester coils vs. 2.5 with Micronester coils. N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA)-Lipiodol was additionally used for catheter tip fixation in 85.6% of 111 procedures without Micronester coils and in 50% of 32 using Micronester coils. The gastroduodenal artery beyond the distal end was not detected at the final examination after any procedure. Catheter dislocation occurred in five and hepatic arterial obstruction or severe stenosis in eight. The number of coils used and necessity of NBCA-Lipiodol could be decreased with usage of Micronester coils without decreasing fixation ability compared to other coils. (orig.)

  13. Value of Micronester coils in port-catheter implantation for continuous hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy with fixed catheter tip method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To retrospectively evaluate the use of Micronester coils in port-catheter implantation with the fixed catheter tip method in comparison with other previously used coils. The cohort of this study was 143 consecutive patients with unresectable advanced liver cancer for whom a port-catheter system was percutaneously implanted. In the most recent 32 patients, Micronester coils were used for catheter tip fixation. Details of embolic agents for fixation, persistent blood flow beyond the distal end of the indwelling catheter, and complications were compared between cases without and with Micronester coils. In all, percutaneous port-catheter placement was successful. Mean number of coils used for fixation was 4.2 without Micronester coils vs. 2.5 with Micronester coils. N-butyl cyanoacrylate (NBCA)-Lipiodol was additionally used for catheter tip fixation in 85.6% of 111 procedures without Micronester coils and in 50% of 32 using Micronester coils. The gastroduodenal artery beyond the distal end was not detected at the final examination after any procedure. Catheter dislocation occurred in five and hepatic arterial obstruction or severe stenosis in eight. The number of coils used and necessity of NBCA-Lipiodol could be decreased with usage of Micronester coils without decreasing fixation ability compared to other coils. (orig.)

  14. Which criteria demand additive stenting during catheter-directed thrombolysis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bækgaard, N; Just, S; Foegh, P

    2014-05-19

    Many factors are necessary for obtaining satisfactory results after catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT) for iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis (DVT). Selections of patients, composition of the thrombolytic fluid, anticoagulation per- and post-procedural, recognition and treatment of persistent obstructive lesions of the iliac veins are the most important contributors. Stenting has been known for 15 to 20 years. The first publication on CDT in 1991 was combined with ballooning the iliac vein, an additive procedure which has been abandoned as an isolated procedure. This chapter will discuss selection, indication, such as an iliac compression syndrome, and outcome of iliac stenting in combination with CDT. The reported frequency of stenting used after CDT is very inconsistent, therefore this will be discussed in details. It is concluded that selection for stenting is of the greatest importance, when CDT is used for iliofemoral DVT, but strict criteria for stenting are not available in the existing literature. The potential value of intravascular ultrasound (IVUS) is also discussed. PMID:24843096

  15. Distributed parameter statics of magnetic catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tunay, Ilker

    2011-01-01

    We discuss how to use special Cosserat rod theory for deriving distributed-parameter static equilibrium equations of magnetic catheters. These medical devices are used for minimally-invasive diagnostic and therapeutic procedures and can be operated remotely or controlled by automated algorithms. The magnetic material can be lumped in rigid segments or distributed in flexible segments. The position vector of the cross-section centroid and quaternion representation of an orthonormal triad are selected as DOF. The strain energy for transversely isotropic, hyperelastic rods is augmented with the mechanical potential energy of the magnetic field and a penalty term to enforce the quaternion unity constraint. Numerical solution is found by 1D finite elements. Material properties of polymer tubes in extension, bending and twist are determined by mechanical and magnetic experiments. Software experiments with commercial FEM software indicate that the computational effort with the proposed method is at least one order of magnitude less than standard 3D FEM. PMID:22256282

  16. Central venous catheter insertion problem solving using intravenous catheter: technical communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alemohammad M

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Insertion of central venous catheter is an accepted method for hemodynamic monitor-ring, drug and fluid administration, intravenous access, hemodialysis and applying cardiac pace-maker in hospitalized patients. This procedure can be associated with severe complications. The aim of this article is to provide a practical approach to prevent catheter malposition in states that the guide wire will not pass freely.During central venous insertion in internal jugular vein using modified seldinger technique, when after venous insertion, the passage of the guide wire shows difficulties and don’t pass freely, insertion of an intravenous cannula over the wire and re-insertion of the wire can help to prevent malposition of the wire and the catheter. Use of an intravenous cannula over the guide, in situations that the guide wire cannot pass freely among the needle inserted in internal jugular vein, and re-insertion of the guide can probably prevent or reduce the tissue or vascular trauma and the associated complica-tions. This simple maneuver can be helpful in difficult cases especially in cardiac surgery patients who receive high dose heparin and it is necessary to avoid traumatize-tion of carotid artery.

  17. Modified multipurpose catheter enhances clinical utility for cardiac catheterizations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mannino, S C; Scavina, M; Palmer, S

    1994-10-01

    The Multipurpose technique for coronary arteriography employs a single catheter. The benefits are a reduction in the cost of the procedure and a shorter procedural time by experienced operators. To enhance the performance of these catheters, a modification was made in the materials and tip design, and these modifications were clinically evaluated in a small study. Compared to the control group of patients (n = 41), patients catheterized with the Multipurpose-SM (n = 43) were shown to have a shorter procedural time as measured by a reduced fluoroscopy time (7.08 min vs. 9.52 min, P = .007). This difference is statistically significant at a 95% confidence level and resulted in less radiation exposure to the operator and cath lab staff. The procedural time was significantly reduced by fewer catheter exchanges (19% study vs. 46% control; P = .006), which were needed to successfully complete the procedure. The new Multipurpose-SM catheter also demonstrated enhanced flexibility for cannulating coronary arteries with superior or anterior takeoffs. This study concludes that the utilization of a modified Multipurpose-SM catheter is safe and effective in cannulating both the left and right coronary arteries, bypass grafts, and performing left ventriculography. The primary benefits of using this modified catheter are reduced fluoroscopy time and the need for fewer catheter exchanges. PMID:7834732

  18. Percutaneous catheter drainage of intraabdominal abscesses and fluid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Tae; Kwon, Tae Hee; Yoo, Hyung Sik; Suh, Jung Ho [Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Young Ho [Cheil General Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1986-10-15

    Percutaneous catheter drainage has been reported to be an effective method in the management of selected patients with abscess and fluid collection. Its high success rate and relatively low complications make the procedure an alternative to surgery in the individual cases. During past two years percutaneous catheter drainage in 25 patients with intraabdominal abscesses and fluid collection was performed at the Department of Radiology, Yonsei University College of medicine. Here the technique and author's results were summarized. 1. The total 25 patients who had percutaneous catheter drainage are 10 liver abscesses, 3 subphrenic, one subhepatic, 4 renal and perirenal, 2 pelvic, one psoas, one anterior pararenal fluid from acute pancreatitis, one pancreas pseudocyst and 2 malignant tumor necrosis. 2. The modified Seldinger technique used for all cases of abscess and fluid drainage under guidance of ultrasound scan. The used catheters were 10F. Pigtail and 14F. Malecot (Cook c/o) catheters. 3. The abscesses and fluid of 17 patients among 25 were cured by the percutaneous catheter drainage and 4 patients were clinically improved. The catheter drainage was failed in 2 patients and 3 complication were developed. 4. The success rate of this procedure was 91.3%, failure rate was 8.7% and complication rate was 12%.

  19. The pathogenesis and epidemiology of catheter-related infection with pulmonary artery Swan-Ganz catheters: a prospective study utilizing molecular subtyping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mermel, L A; McCormick, R D; Springman, S R; Maki, D G

    1991-09-16

    To delineate the pathogenesis and epidemiology of catheter-related infection with Swan-Ganz pulmonary artery (PA) catheters, a prospective clinical study of hospitalized adult medical and surgical patients was done. Role of catheter material was assessed by randomizing insertions to heparin-bonded PA catheters made of polyvinylchloride or polyurethane. Sources of infection and pathogenesis were studied by culturing skin, the introducer, the PA catheter tip, all hubs, infusate from each lumen, and the extravascular portion of the PA catheter beneath the external protective plastic sleeve. Concordance between isolates from sources and infected catheters was determined by speciation, antibiogram, and for coagulase-negative staphylococci, plasmid profile analysis. Risk factors for infection were determined by stepwise logistic regression. Overall, 65 (22%) of 297 Swan-Ganz catheters showed local infection of the introducer (58 catheters) or the intravascular portion of the PA catheter (20 catheters); only two catheters (0.7%) caused bacteremia. Eighty percent of infected Swan-Ganz catheters (the introducer or PA catheter) showed concordance with organisms cultured from skin of the insertion site, 17% with a contaminated hub and 18% with organisms contaminating the extravascular portion of the PA catheter beneath the sleeve. Isolates from infected PA catheters were most likely to show concordance with concomitantly infected introducers (71%). Cutaneous colonization of the insertion site with greater than 10(2) cfu/10 cm2 (relative risk [RR] 5.5; p less than 0.001), insertion into an internal jugular vein (RR 4.3; p less than 0.01), catheterization greater than 3 days (RR 3.1; p less than 0.01), and insertion in the operating room using less stringent barrier precautions (RR 2.1; p = 0.03) were each associated with a significantly increased risk of catheter-related infection. The risk of bacteremic infection with Swan-Ganz catheters is now low, in the range of 1%, with

  20. Hickman catheter embolism in a child during stem cell transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The majority of stem cell recipients rely on indwelling central venous catheters situated in superior vena cava or right atrium. Semi-permanent tunneled silicone rubber Hickman catheters are widely used to provide durable central venous access for patients undergoing stem cell transplantation. A case of 5 years old child with diagnosis of severe aplastic anemia is reported. The patient received peripheral blood stem cells (PBSC) and had successful engraftment with complete hematological recovery. He had Hickman catheter embolism in the pulmonary circulation following unsuccessful attempt to remove the line. The catherter was successfully removed by midsternostomy operation. The child is normal with sustained remission on day +218 post stem cell transplant. (author)

  1. Management of catheter-associated upper extremity deep venous thrombosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crawford, Jeffrey D; Liem, Timothy K; Moneta, Gregory L

    2016-07-01

    Central venous catheters or peripherally inserted central catheters are major risk factors for upper extremity deep venous thrombosis (UEDVT). The body and quality of literature evaluating catheter-associated (CA) UEDVT have increased, yet strong evidence on screening, diagnosis, prevention, and optimal treatment is limited. We herein review the current evidence of CA UEDVT that can be applied clinically. Principally, we review the anatomy and definition of CA UEDVT, identification of risk factors, utility of duplex ultrasound as the preferred diagnostic modality, preventive strategies, and an algorithm for management of CA UEDVT. PMID:27318061

  2. Patency of Femoral Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters and Factors Predictive of Patency Failure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burton, Kirsteen R. [University Health Network, University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (Canada); Guo, Lancia L. Q. [University of Calgary, Department of Radiology (Canada); Tan, Kong T.; Simons, Martin E.; Sniderman, Kenneth W.; Kachura, John R.; Beecroft, John R.; Rajan, Dheeraj K., E-mail: dheeraj.rajan@uhn.on.ca [University Health Network, University of Toronto, Department of Medical Imaging, Division of Vascular and Interventional Radiology (Canada)

    2012-12-15

    Purpose: To determine the patency rates of and factors associated with increased risk of patency failure in patients with femoral vein tunneled hemodialysis catheters. Methods: All femoral tunneled catheter insertions from 1996 to 2006 were reviewed, during which time 123 catheters were inserted. Of these, 66 were exchanges. Patients with femoral catheter failure versus those with femoral catheter patency were compared. Confounding factors, such as demographic and procedural factors, were incorporated and assessed using univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses. Results: Mean catheter primary patency failure time was 96.3 days (SE 17.9 days). Primary patency at 30, 60, 90, and 180 days was 53.8%, 45.4%, 32.1%, and 27.1% respectively. Crude rates of risk of catheter failure did not suggest a benefit for patients receiving catheters introduced from one side versus the other, but more cephalad location of catheter tip was associated with improved patency. Multivariate analysis showed that patients whose catheters were on the left side (p = 0.009), were of increasing age at the time of insertion (p = 0.002) and that those who had diabetes (p = 0.001) were at significantly greater risk of catheter failure. The catheter infection rate was 1.4/1000 catheter days. Conclusion: Patients who were of a more advanced age and had diabetes were at greater risk of femoral catheter failure, whereas those who received femoral catheters from the right side were less at risk of catheter failure.

  3. Hematologic patients' clinical and psychosocial experiences with implanted long-term central venous catheter

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Møller, Tom; Adamsen, Lis

    2010-01-01

    A significant decrease in catheter-related infections was demonstrated in our earlier randomized controlled trial of central venous catheter (CVC) care in hematologic patients.......A significant decrease in catheter-related infections was demonstrated in our earlier randomized controlled trial of central venous catheter (CVC) care in hematologic patients....

  4. Patency of Femoral Tunneled Hemodialysis Catheters and Factors Predictive of Patency Failure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine the patency rates of and factors associated with increased risk of patency failure in patients with femoral vein tunneled hemodialysis catheters. Methods: All femoral tunneled catheter insertions from 1996 to 2006 were reviewed, during which time 123 catheters were inserted. Of these, 66 were exchanges. Patients with femoral catheter failure versus those with femoral catheter patency were compared. Confounding factors, such as demographic and procedural factors, were incorporated and assessed using univariate and multivariable Cox proportional hazards regression analyses. Results: Mean catheter primary patency failure time was 96.3 days (SE 17.9 days). Primary patency at 30, 60, 90, and 180 days was 53.8%, 45.4%, 32.1%, and 27.1% respectively. Crude rates of risk of catheter failure did not suggest a benefit for patients receiving catheters introduced from one side versus the other, but more cephalad location of catheter tip was associated with improved patency. Multivariate analysis showed that patients whose catheters were on the left side (p = 0.009), were of increasing age at the time of insertion (p = 0.002) and that those who had diabetes (p = 0.001) were at significantly greater risk of catheter failure. The catheter infection rate was 1.4/1000 catheter days. Conclusion: Patients who were of a more advanced age and had diabetes were at greater risk of femoral catheter failure, whereas those who received femoral catheters from the right side were less at risk of catheter failure.

  5. An Injectable and Drug-loaded Supramolecular Hydrogel for Local Catheter Injection into the Pig Heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pape, A C H; Bakker, Maarten H; Tseng, Cheyenne C S; Bastings, Maartje M C; Koudstaal, Stefan; Agostoni, Pierfrancesco; Chamuleau, Steven A J; Dankers, Patricia Y W

    2015-01-01

    Regeneration of lost myocardium is an important goal for future therapies because of the increasing occurrence of chronic ischemic heart failure and the limited access to donor hearts. An example of a treatment to recover the function of the heart consists of the local delivery of drugs and bioactives from a hydrogel. In this paper a method is introduced to formulate and inject a drug-loaded hydrogel non-invasively and side-specific into the pig heart using a long, flexible catheter. The use of 3-D electromechanical mapping and injection via a catheter allows side-specific treatment of the myocardium. To provide a hydrogel compatible with this catheter, a supramolecular hydrogel is used because of the convenient switching from a gel to a solution state using environmental triggers. At basic pH this ureido-pyrimidinone modified poly(ethylene glycol) acts as a Newtonian fluid which can be easily injected, but at physiological pH the solution rapidly switches into a gel. These mild switching conditions allow for the incorporation of bioactive drugs and bioactive species, such as growth factors and exosomes as we present here in both in vitro and in vivo experiments. The in vitro experiments give an on forehand indication of the gel stability and drug release, which allows for tuning of the gel and release properties before the subsequent application in vivo. This combination allows for the optimal tuning of the gel to the used bioactive compounds and species, and the injection system. PMID:26132631

  6. Navigation accuracy for an intracardiac procedure using ultrasound enhanced virtual reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiles, Andrew D.; Guiraudon, Gerard M.; Moore, John; Wedlake, Christopher; Linte, Cristian A.; Bainbridge, Daniel; Jones, Douglas L.; Peters, Terry M.

    2007-03-01

    Minimally invasive techniques for use inside the beating heart, such as mitral valve replacement and septal defect repair, are the focus of this work. Traditional techniques for these procedures require an open chest approach and a cardiopulmonary bypass machine. New techniques using port access and a combined surgical guidance tool that includes an overlaid two-dimensional ultrasound image in a virtual reality environment are being developed. To test this technique, a cardiac phantom was developed to simulate the anatomy. The phantom consists of an acrylic box filled with a 7% glycerol solution with ultrasound properties similar to human tissue. Plate inserts mounted in the box simulate the physical anatomy. An accuracy assessment was completed to evaluate the performance of the system. Using the cardiac phantom, a 2mm diameter glass toroid was attached to a vertical plate as the target location. An elastic material was placed between the target and plate to simulate the target lying on a soft tissue structure. The target was measured using an independent measurement system and was represented as a sphere in the virtual reality system. The goal was to test the ability of a user to probe the target using three guidance methods: (i) 2D ultrasound only, (ii) virtual reality only and (iii) ultrasound enhanced virtual reality. Three users attempted the task three times each for each method. An independent measurement system was used to validate the measurement. The ultrasound imaging alone was poor in locating the target (5.42 mm RMS) while the other methods proved to be significantly better (1.02 mm RMS and 1.47 mm RMS respectively). The ultrasound enhancement is expected to be more useful in a dynamic environment where the system registration may be disturbed.

  7. Urinary catheter related nosocomial infections in paediatric intensive care unit.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tullu M

    1998-04-01

    Full Text Available The present prospective study was carried out in the Paediatric Intensive Care Unit (PICU of a tertiary care teaching hospital in Mumbai. The objective was to determine the incidence, risk factors, mortality and organisms responsible for urinary catheter related infections (UCRI. Colonization and/or bacteriuria was labelled as urinary catheter related infection (UCRI. Forty-four patients with 51 urinary catheters were studied. Incidence of UCRI was 47.06%. Age, female sex and immunocompromised status did not increase the risk of UCRI. Duration of catheter in-situ and duration of stay in the PICU were associated with higher risk of UCRI. The mortality was not increased by UCRI. Commonest organism isolated in UCRI was E. coli, which had maximum susceptibility to nitrofurantoin and amikacin.

  8. Suprapubic catheter change resulting in terminal ileal perforation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Peng Chang

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Suprapubic cystostomy is commonly performed in patients with neurogenic bladder or bladder outlet obstruction. The most serious complication is bowel injury, which usually occurs during catheter insertion. Bowel perforation during suprapubic catheter exchange is rare. We herein report an extremely rare case of terminal ileal perforation resulting from a change of suprapubic catheter. After insertion of the suprapubic catheter, a feculent material was noted in the terminal ileum. A cystography revealed that the contrast medium passed directly into the terminal ileum and colon. A computed tomographic scan confirmed the presence of a balloon tip in the terminal ileum. Terminal ileum perforation was diagnosed. Emergent laparotomy and loop ileostomy were performed. The patient's recovery was uneventful.

  9. Collateral damage from Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wanwarang Wongcharoen, MD

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation (AF is the most common sustained arrhythmia, contributing to a significant morbidity and mortality. Catheter ablation of the pulmonary veins (PVs and left atrium (LA has been shown to be an effective strategy for the treatment of symptomatic AF. Regardless of technological advances and technique improvement, catheter ablation for AF remains a highly complex procedure and the risk of procedural complications is not negligible. The major complications have been reported to occur in up to 5.2% of procedures. A systematic investigation among 32,569 patients undergoing catheter ablation for AF has demonstrated that mortality is around 0.1%. Nevertheless, the true prevalence of complications is possibly underestimated in retrospective surveys because of recollection bias and other factors. This article will focus on the management of serious complications of catheter AF ablation including PV stenosis, atrioesophageal fistula, cardiac tamponade, stroke and thromboembolic complication

  10. FAQs about Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Tract Infection” What is “catheter-associated urinary tract infection”? A urinary tract infection (also called “UTI”) is an infection in the urinary system, which includes the bladder (which stores the ...

  11. Radiographic signs of non-venous placement of intended central venous catheters in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are commonly used in children, and inadvertent arterial or extravascular cannulation is rare but has potentially serious complications. To identify the radiographic signs of arterial placement of CVCs. We retrospectively reviewed seven cases of arterially malpositioned CVCs on chest radiograph. These cases were identified through departmental quality-assurance mechanisms and external consultation. Comparison of arterial cases was made with 127 age-matched chest radiographs with CVCs in normal, expected venous location. On each anteroposterior (AP) radiograph we measured the distance of the catheter tip from the right lateral border of the thoracic spine, and the angle of the vertical portion of the catheter relative to the midline. On each lateral radiograph we measured the angle of the vertical portion of each catheter relative to the anterior border of the thoracic spine. When bilateral subclavian catheters were present, the catheter tips were described as crossed, overlapping or uncrossed. On AP radiographs, arterially placed CVCs were more curved to the left, with catheter tip positions located farther to the left of midline than normal venous CVCs. When bilateral, properly placed venous catheters were present, all catheters crossed at the level of the superior vena cava (SVC). When one of the bilateral catheters was in arterial position, neither of the catheters crossed or the inter-catheter crossover distance was exaggerated. On lateral radiographs, there was a marked anterior angulation of the vertical portion of the catheter (mean angle 37 ± 15 standard deviation [SD] in arterial catheters versus 5.9 ± 8.3 SD in normally placed venous catheters). Useful radiographic signs suggestive of unintentional arterial misplacement of vascular catheters include leftward curvature of the vertical portion of the catheter, left-side catheter tip position, lack of catheter crossover on the frontal radiograph, as well as exaggerated

  12. Right atrial indwelling catheter for patients requiring long-term intravenous therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivey, M F; Adam, S M; Hickman, R O; Gibson, D L

    1978-12-01

    The use of a central venous catheter for long-term intravenous therapy is described. The catheter's history, physical description, and uses are discussed. Also reviewed are complications from use of the catheter, the pharmacist's role in patient teaching, and the procedure for administering medications through the catheter. A listing of drugs administered through the catheter, incompatibility data and patient teaching instructions are also included. PMID:717409

  13. Number and location of drainage catheter side holes: in vitro evaluation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To evaluate the influence of number and location of catheter shaft side holes regarding drainage efficiency in an in vitro model. Materials and methods: Three different drainage catheter models were constructed: open-ended model with no side holes (one catheter), unilateral side hole model (six catheters with one to six unilateral side holes), and bilateral side hole model (six catheters with one to six bilateral side holes). Catheters were inserted into a drainage output-measuring device with a constant-pressure reservoir of water. The volume of water evacuated by each of the catheters at 10-second intervals was measured. A total of five trials were performed for each catheter. Data were analysed using one-way analysis of variance. Results: The open-ended catheter had a mean drainage volume comparable to the unilateral model catheters with three, four, and five side holes. Unilateral model catheters had significant drainage volume increases up to three side holes; unilateral model catheters with more than three side holes had no significant improvement in drainage volume. All bilateral model catheters had significantly higher mean drainage volumes than their unilateral counterparts. There was no significant difference between the mean drainage volume with one, two, or three pairs of bilateral side holes. Further, there was no drainage improvement by adding additional bilateral side holes. Conclusion: The present in vitro study suggests that beyond a critical side hole number threshold, adding more distal side holes does not improve catheter drainage efficiency. These results may be used to enhance catheter design towards improving their drainage efficiency. -- Highlights: •We evaluated the drainage potential of three different drainage catheter models. •We found adding numerous distal sideholes does not improve catheter drainage. •Bilateral sidehole catheters performed better than unilateral sidehole catheters. •Our in vitro findings may be used to

  14. Radiographic signs of non-venous placement of intended central venous catheters in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taylor, Erin C. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Taylor, George A. [Boston Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2016-02-15

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) are commonly used in children, and inadvertent arterial or extravascular cannulation is rare but has potentially serious complications. To identify the radiographic signs of arterial placement of CVCs. We retrospectively reviewed seven cases of arterially malpositioned CVCs on chest radiograph. These cases were identified through departmental quality-assurance mechanisms and external consultation. Comparison of arterial cases was made with 127 age-matched chest radiographs with CVCs in normal, expected venous location. On each anteroposterior (AP) radiograph we measured the distance of the catheter tip from the right lateral border of the thoracic spine, and the angle of the vertical portion of the catheter relative to the midline. On each lateral radiograph we measured the angle of the vertical portion of each catheter relative to the anterior border of the thoracic spine. When bilateral subclavian catheters were present, the catheter tips were described as crossed, overlapping or uncrossed. On AP radiographs, arterially placed CVCs were more curved to the left, with catheter tip positions located farther to the left of midline than normal venous CVCs. When bilateral, properly placed venous catheters were present, all catheters crossed at the level of the superior vena cava (SVC). When one of the bilateral catheters was in arterial position, neither of the catheters crossed or the inter-catheter crossover distance was exaggerated. On lateral radiographs, there was a marked anterior angulation of the vertical portion of the catheter (mean angle 37 ± 15 standard deviation [SD] in arterial catheters versus 5.9 ± 8.3 SD in normally placed venous catheters). Useful radiographic signs suggestive of unintentional arterial misplacement of vascular catheters include leftward curvature of the vertical portion of the catheter, left-side catheter tip position, lack of catheter crossover on the frontal radiograph, as well as exaggerated

  15. Dosimetric equivalence of nonstandard HDR brachytherapy catheter patterns

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cunha, J. A. M.; Hsu, I-C.; Pouliot, J. [University of California, San Francisco, California 94115 (United States)

    2009-01-15

    Purpose: To determine whether alternative high dose rate prostate brachytherapy catheter patterns can result in similar or improved dose distributions while providing better access and reducing trauma. Materials and Methods: Standard prostate cancer high dose rate brachytherapy uses a regular grid of parallel needle positions to guide the catheter insertion. This geometry does not easily allow the physician to avoid piercing the critical structures near the penile bulb nor does it provide position flexibility in the case of pubic arch interference. This study used CT datasets with 3 mm slice spacing from ten previously treated patients and digitized new catheters following three hypothetical catheter patterns: conical, bi-conical, and fireworks. The conical patterns were used to accommodate a robotic delivery using a single entry point. The bi-conical and fireworks patterns were specifically designed to avoid the critical structures near the penile bulb. For each catheter distribution, a plan was optimized with the inverse planning algorithm, IPSA, and compared with the plan used for treatment. Irrelevant of catheter geometry, a plan must fulfill the RTOG-0321 dose criteria for target dose coverage (V{sub 100}{sup Prostate}>90%) and organ-at-risk dose sparing (V{sub 75}{sup Bladder}<1 cc, V{sub 75}{sup Rectum}<1 cc, V{sub 125}{sup Urethra}<<1 cc). Results: The three nonstandard catheter patterns used 16 nonparallel, straight divergent catheters, with entry points in the perineum. Thirty plans from ten patients with prostate sizes ranging from 26 to 89 cc were optimized. All nonstandard patterns fulfilled the RTOG criteria when the clinical plan did. In some cases, the dose distribution was improved by better sparing the organs-at-risk. Conclusion: Alternative catheter patterns can provide the physician with additional ways to treat patients previously considered unsuited for brachytherapy treatment (pubic arch interference) and facilitate robotic guidance of

  16. Use of cultivation-dependent and -independent techniques to assess contamination of central venous catheters: a pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Høiby Niels

    2008-10-01

    based on molecular methods improves the detection of microorganisms involved in central catheter-related infections. The importance of these microorganisms needs to be investigated further, also in relation to contamination risk from improper catheter handling, as only in vivo contaminants are of interest. This information can be used for development of fast and more reliable diagnostic tools, which can be used in combination with traditional methods.

  17. Penile gangrene following condom catheter urinary drainage : A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Sandhya Gupta; Vinod Tamaknand; Amit Dangi; Bhawan Nangarwal; Rajesh Godara; Pradeep Garg

    2016-01-01

    External urine collecting devices have been a boon to patients of urinary incontinence since their invention in late 90s. They have replaced the need for uncomfortable indwelling catheters in these patients. As safe as they may be, ghastly complications have occurred infrequently, mostly due to their inappropriate application. Such penile and urethral complications add to the morbidity of the patients significantly. They can be easily avoided by following few simple steps of catheter care, th...

  18. Periinterventional prophylactic antibiotics in radiological port catheter implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate whether catheter-related infections after radiologically placed port catheters can be reduced by single-shot periinterventional antibiosis. Materials and Method: Between January and September 2002, 164 consecutive patients with indication for central venous port catheter implantation were included in the present study. During implantation the interventional radiologist was responsible for deciding whether to administer a prophylactic single-shot antibiosis. The prophylactic antibiosis entailed intravenous administration of ampicillin and sulbactam (3 g Unacid, Pfizer) or 100 mg ciprofloxacine (Ciprobay, Bayer) in the case of an allergy history to penicillins. Catheter-related infection was defined as a local or systemic infection necessitating port catheter extraction. Results: Indication for port catheter implantation was a malignant disease requiring chemotherapy in 158 cases. The port catheter (Chemosite [Tyco Healthcare] [n = 123], low-profile [Arrow International] [n = 35], other port system [n = 6]) was implanted via sonographically guided puncture of the right jugular vein in 139 patients, via the left jugular vein in 24 cases and via the right subclavian vein in one patient. 75 patients received periinterventional prophylactic antibiosis (Unacid [n = 63] Ciprobay [n 12]) and 89 patients did not receive antibiosis. The prophylactic antibiosis caused a minor allergic reaction in one patient that improved with antihistamic and corticoid medication. A total of 7 ports, 6 without prophylactic antibiosis versus one with periinterventional prophylaxis, were extracted due to infectious complications. Conclusion: Single-shot periinterventional prophylactic antibiosis can reduce early and late infectious complications after radiological-interventional placement of central venous port catheters. (orig.)

  19. Catheter Migration of a Port-a-Cath System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A patient with axillary venous thrombosis caused by lymph node compression and the presence of a displaced catheter in the vascular lumen is presented. In this case, percutaneous interventional radiological procedures (balloon angioplasty and snare loop method) in conjunction with medical treatment were effective in limiting the post-thrombotic syndrome and restoring the proper positioning of the catheter, thereby saving the central venous access

  20. Pneumothorax as a complication of central venous catheter insertion

    OpenAIRE

    Tsotsolis, Nikolaos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Baka, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Karavergou, Anastasia; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Barbetakis, Nikos; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios

    2015-01-01

    The central venous catheter (CVC) is a catheter placed into a large vein in the neck [internal jugular vein (IJV)], chest (subclavian vein or axillary vein) or groin (femoral vein). There are several situations that require the insertion of a CVC mainly to administer medications or fluids, obtain blood tests (specifically the “central venous oxygen saturation”), and measure central venous pressure. CVC usually remain in place for a longer period of time than other venous access devices. There...

  1. Imaging and management of complications of central venous catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Central venous catheters (CVCs) provide valuable vascular access. Complications associated with the insertion and maintenance of CVCs includes pneumothorax, arterial puncture, arrhythmias, line fracture, malposition, migration, infection, thrombosis, and fibrin sheath formation. Image-guided CVC placement is now standard practice and reduces the risk of complications compared to the blind landmark insertion technique. This review demonstrates the imaging of a range of complications associated with CVCs and discusses their management with catheter salvage techniques

  2. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Vascular Catheter Infections Treatment.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Belkys Rodríguez Llerena

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Clinical Practice Guidelines for Vascular Catheter Infections Treatment. It has been defined as the presence of local or systemic signs without other obvious infection site, plus the microbiologic evidence involving the catheter. This document includes a review and update of concepts, main clinical aspects, and treatment and stresses the importance of prophylactic treatment. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  3. Clinical Practice Guidelines for Vascular Catheter Infections Treatment.

    OpenAIRE

    Belkys Rodríguez Llerena.; Marcos Diosdado Iraola Ferrer

    2009-01-01

    Clinical Practice Guidelines for Vascular Catheter Infections Treatment. It has been defined as the presence of local or systemic signs without other obvious infection site, plus the microbiologic evidence involving the catheter. This document includes a review and update of concepts, main clinical aspects, and treatment and stresses the importance of prophylactic treatment. It includes assessment guidelines focused on the most important aspects to be accomplished.

  4. Urinary catheter with polyurethane coating modified by ion implantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A low friction urinary catheter that could be used without a lubricant is proposed in this work. A polyurethane coating was synthesised on the surface of a metal guide wire catheter. Ion implantation was applied to surface modify the polyurethane coating. FTIR ATR, wetting angle, AFM and friction tests were used for analysis. Low friction was found to be provided by the formation of a hard carbonised layer on the polyurethane surface

  5. Detection of endotoxin on sterile catheters used for cardiac catheterization.

    OpenAIRE

    Kundsin, R B; Walter, C. W.

    1980-01-01

    Pyrogen reactions during cardiac catheterization are an alarming complication that frightens patients and baffles many physicans. This report describes a simple, reproducible, precise technique for the measurement of endotoxin-like activity on the inner and outer surfaces of catheters intended for intravascular insertion. This technique is useful in documenting the cause of patient reactions. Quality control procedures should be instituted following the manufacture of angiographic catheters s...

  6. Asystole during pulmonary artery catheter insertion under general anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swapna Chaudhuri

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In spite of ongoing debate for the past 40 years, pulmonary artery catheters remain in use for invasive hemodynamic monitoring and management of critically ill patients. We describe a case of a sudden onset of asystolic cardiac arrest during the placement of a pulmonary artery catheter, while under general anesthesia. A brief review of the literature highlighting arrhythmic complications associated with pulmonary artery catheterization is also presented.

  7. Worsening Hypoxemia in the Face of Increasing PEEP: A Case of Large Pulmonary Embolism in the Setting of Intracardiac Shunt

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granati, Glen T.; Teressa, Getu

    2016-01-01

    Patient: Male, 40 Final Diagnosis: Patent foramen ovale Symptoms: Dyspnea exertional • hemoptysis • shortness of breath Medication: — Clinical Procedure: Airway pressure release ventilation Specialty: Critical Care Medicine Objective: Rare co-existance of disease or pathology Background: Patent foramen ovale (PFO) are common, normally resulting in a left to right shunt or no net shunting. Pulmonary embolism (PE) can cause sustained increased pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and right atrial pressure. Increasing positive end-expiratory pressure (PEEP) improves oxygenation at the expense of increasing intrathoracic pressures (ITP). Airway pressure release ventilation (APRV) decreases shunt fraction, improves ventilation/perfusion (V/Q) matching, increases cardiac output, and decreases right atrial pressure by facilitating low airway pressure. Case Report: A 40-year-old man presented with dyspnea and hemoptysis. Oxygen saturation (SaO2) 80% on room air with A a gradient of 633 mmHg. Post-intubation SaO2 dropped to 71% on assist control, FiO2 100%, and PEEP of 5 cmH20. Successive PEEP dropped SaO2 to 60–70% and blood pressure plummeted. APRV was initaiated with improvement in SaO2 to 95% and improvement in blood pressure. Hemiparesis developed and CT head showed infarction. CT pulmonary angiogram found a large pulmonary embolism. Transthoracic echocardiogram detected right-to left intracardiac shunt, with large PFO. Conclusions: There should be suspicion for a PFO when severe hypoxemia paradoxically worsens in response to increasing airway pressures. Concomitant venous and arterial thromboemboli should prompt evaluation for intra cardiac shunt. Patients with PFO and hypoxemia should be evaluated for causes of sustained right-to left pressure gradient, such as PE. Management should aim to decrease PVR and optimize V/Q matching by treating the inciting incident (e.g., thrombolytics in PE) and by minimizing ITP. APRV can minimize PVR and maximize V/Q ratios and

  8. Continuous shoulder analgesia via an indwelling axillary brachial plexus catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reuben, S S; Steinberg, R B

    2000-09-01

    Continuous interscalene brachial plexus blockade can provide anesthesia and analgesia in the shoulder region. Difficulty accessing the interscalene space and premature displacement of interscalene catheters may preclude their use in certain situations. We present two case reports in which a catheter was advanced from the axilla along the brachial plexus sheath to the interscalene space to provide continuous cervicobrachial plexus analgesia. In the first case report, previous neck surgery made the anatomic landmarks for performing an interscalene block very difficult. An epidural catheter was advanced from the axillary brachial plexus sheath to the interscalene space under fluoroscopic guidance. This technique provided both intraoperative analgesia for shoulder surgery as well as 24-hour postoperative analgesia by an infusion of 0.125% bupivacaine. In the second case report, a catheter was inserted in a similar fashion from the axillary to the interscalene space to provide 14 days of continuous analgesia in the management of complex regional pain syndrome. We have found that this technique allows us to secure the catheter more easily than with the traditional interscalene approach and thus prevents premature dislodgment. This approach may be a suitable alternative when either an interscalene or an infraclavicular catheter may not be inserted. PMID:11090734

  9. Important aspects of the colonization of central venous catheter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andreoli-Pinto, T J; Graziano, K U

    1999-01-01

    This study comprises five different kind of venous central catheters, 103 in total, made of Polyurethane Tecoflex, Polyurethane Vialon, PTFE and PVC, and the influence of their raw material on the microbial colonization. Patients age and sex, besides their clinical conditions, were taken into account, and neither considered as a sample vicious, nor associated with colonization. When the tips of the catheters were asseptically inoculated in Tryptic Soy Broth and Tioglicolate, colonization was detected in 15.5% of the catheters. Coagulase negative Staphylococcus, some of which with biofilm, were the predominant organisms found, although some bacillus have also been detected: Enterobacter aerogenes, Hafnia alvei, Pseudomonas cepacia, Xanthomonas maltophilia and Aeromonas sobria. It was not possible to notice any association between the colonization of the catheters and their raw material, probably due to the influence of a previous contact and linking with blood components. This contact causes a thin coating on the surface of the cathether, which makes all the catheters similar in respect of the attachment of a bacterial cell. So, the colonization depends on the virulence of the organism, much more then on the nature of the catheter. PMID:10326311

  10. Contact force assessment in catheter ablation of atrial fibrillatio

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Josef Kautzner; Petr Peichl

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The efficacy of catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF remains limited. Increase of success would require more durable lesions without increased risk of steam pop and cardiac perforation. Recently, novel technologies have been developed to estimate real-time catheter-tissue contact force (CF. This paper reviews three available tools for assessment of CF and data on experimental or clinical experience. Experimental data with open-irrigated catheter showed that lesion size was greater with applications of lower power (like 30 W and greater CF (e.g. 30 to 40 g than vice versa. Impedance drop in the first 5 seconds was significantly correlated to catheter CF. Perforation was achieved more rapidly with the ablation catheter in a sheath despite the same CF because the sheath prevents catheter buckling. Clinical experience confirmed poor relationship between CF and either unipolar amplitude, bipolar amplitude, or impedance. Within the left atrium, the most common high CF site was found at the anterior/rightward LA roof, directly beneath the ascending aorta (confirmed by merging the CT image and map. Importantly, several studies showed that the use of CF leads to shorter procedure with less fluoroscopy time and less RF applications. CF assessment was also found to be associated with higher proportion of durable lesions. Finally, pilot studies showed that CF measurement could be associated with better clinical efficacy AF ablation.

  11. Bacterial biofilms in patients with indwelling urinary catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickler, David J

    2008-11-01

    Bacteria have a basic survival strategy: to colonize surfaces and grow as biofilm communities embedded in a gel-like polysaccharide matrix. The catheterized urinary tract provides ideal conditions for the development of enormous biofilm populations. Many bacterial species colonize indwelling catheters as biofilms, inducing complications in patients' care. The most troublesome complications are the crystalline biofilms that can occlude the catheter lumen and trigger episodes of pyelonephritis and septicemia. The crystalline biofilms result from infection by urease-producing bacteria, particularly Proteus mirabilis. Urease raises the urinary pH and drives the formation of calcium phosphate and magnesium phosphate crystals in the biofilm. All types of catheter are vulnerable to encrustation by these biofilms, and clinical prevention strategies are clearly needed, as bacteria growing in the biofilm mode are resistant to antibiotics. Evidence indicates that treatment of symptomatic, catheter-associated urinary tract infection is more effective if biofilm-laden catheters are changed before antibiotic treatment is initiated. Infection with P. mirabilis exposes the many faults of currently available catheters, and plenty of scope exists for improvement in both their design and production; manufacturers should take up the challenge to improve patient outcomes. PMID:18852707

  12. Peripherally Inserted Central Catheters Complicated by Vascular Erosion in Neonates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blackwood, Brian P; Farrow, Kathryn N; Kim, Stan; Hunter, Catherine J

    2016-08-01

    Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) are widely used in the pediatric population, and their use continues to grow in popularity. These catheters provide a reliable source of venous access to neonatal patients but can also be the cause of life-threatening complications. There are several well-documented complications such as infections, catheter thrombosis, vascular extravasations, and fractured catheters. However, the complication of vascular erosion into the pleural space using both small and silicone-based catheters is rarely described. After obtaining institutional review board approval, we identified 4 cases to review of PICCs complicated by vascular erosions in the past 2 years. Herein, we also review the current literature of PICC complications. Getting the catheter tip as close to the atrial-caval junction as possible and confirmation of this placement are of the utmost importance. The thick wall of the vena cava near the atrium seems to be less likely to perforate; in addition, this position provides increased volume and turbulence to help dilute the hyperosmolar fluid, which seems to also be a factor in this complication. A daily screening chest x-ray in patients with upper extremity PICCs and ongoing parenteral nutrition (PN) are not necessary at this time given the overall low rate of vascular erosion and concerns regarding excessive radiation exposure in pediatric populations. However, a low threshold for chest x-ray imaging in patients with even mild respiratory symptoms in the setting of upper extremity PN is recommended. PMID:25700180

  13. Fast integrated intravascular photoacoustic/ultrasound catheter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Changhoon; Cho, Seunghee; Kim, Taehoon; Park, Sungjo; Park, Hyoeun; Kim, Jinmoo; Lee, Seunghoon; Kang, Yeonsu; Jang, Kiyuk; Kim, Chulhong

    2016-03-01

    In cardiology, a vulnerable plaque is considered to be a key subject because it is strongly related to atherosclerosis and acute myocardial infarction. Because conventional intravascular imaging devices exhibit several limitations with regard to vulnerable plaque detection, the need for an effective lipid imaging modality has been continuously suggested. Photoacoustic (PA) imaging is a medical imaging technique with a high level of ultrasound (US) resolution and strong optical contrast. In this study, we successfully developed an integrated intravascular photoacoustic/ultrasound (IV-PAUS) imaging system with a catheter diameter of 1.2 mm for lipid-rich atherosclerosis imaging. An Nd:YAG pulsed laser with an excitation wavelength of 1064 nm was utilized. IV-PAUS offers 5-mm depth penetration and axial and lateral PA imaging resolutions of 94 μm and 203 μm, respectively, as determined by imaging a 6-μm carbon fiber. We initially obtained 3-dimensional (3D) co-registered PA/US images of metal stents. Subsequently, we successfully obtained 3D coregistered PA/US ex vivo images using an iliac artery from a rabbit atherosclerosis model. Accordingly, lipid-rich plaques were sufficiently differentiated from normal tissue in the ex vivo experiment. We validated these findings histologically to confirm the lipid content.

  14. Balloon catheter dilatation of benign urethral strictures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors report their experience of benign urethral stricture dilatation by balloon catheter in 11 male patients. Ten posterior and 2 anterior urethral strictures were treated; in 1 patients several narrowings coexisted at various levels. Etiology was inflammatory in 4 cases, iatrogen in 3, post-traumatic in 2, and equivocal in 2. The patients were studied both before and soon after dilatation by means of retrograde and voiding cystourethrogram and uroflowgraphy; the follow-up (2-14 months) was performed by urodynamic alone. In all cases, dilatation was followed by the restoration of urethral gauge, together with prompt functional improvement of urodynamic parameters. The latter result subsisted in time in 9 patients. In 2 cases recurrences were observed demonstrated at once by clinics and urodynamics. Both lesions were successfully re-treated. Neither early not late complication occurred. In spite of the limited material, the valuable results obtained, together with the absence of complications, the peculiar morphology of recurrences, and the chance of repeating it make the procedure advisable as a valid alternative to conventional techniques for these pathologies

  15. Bacterial Biofilms and Catheters: A Key to Understanding Bacterial Strategies in Catheter-Associated Urinary Tract Infection

    OpenAIRE

    Nickel, J. Curtis; Costerton, J. William

    1992-01-01

    Despite major technological improvements in catheter drainage systems, the indwelling Foley catheter remains the most common cause of nosocomial infection in medical practice. By approaching this common complicated urinary tract infection from the perspective of the biofilm strategy bacteria appear to use to overcome obstacles to produce bacteriuria, one appreciates a new understanding of these infections. An adherent biofilm of bacteria in their secretory products ascends the luminal and ext...

  16. Gamma radiation-sterilized, triple-lumen catheters coated with a low concentration of chlorhexidine were not efficacious at preventing catheter infections in intensive care unit patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Sherertz, R J; Heard, S O; Raad, I I; Gentry, L; Bowton, D; Scuderi, P; Hu, J.; Carruth, W; Satishchandra, B; J. Pepe; Mosenthal, A; Burke, T.; Dupuis, J.

    1996-01-01

    In a randomized, double-blind trial, gamma radiation-sterilized, chlorhexidine-coated triple-lumen catheters were compared with uncoated control catheters for their ability to prevent catheter infection in 254 intensive care unit patients. The chlorhexidine coating was not efficacious, and a rabbit model demonstrated that reduction of chlorhexidine activity by gamma radiation sterilization was the likely explanation for the failure.

  17. Potential In Vivo UVC Disinfection of Catheter Lumens: Estimation of the Doses Received by the Blood Flow Outside the Catheter Tip Hole

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Jimmy; Jørgensen, Thomas Martini; Helfmann, Jurgen;

    2011-01-01

    We have demonstrated that it is possible to launch UVC LED light into bacterial contaminated polymer tubes/catheters and disinfect the intraluminal space of these tubes. This can be achieved by UVC treatment of the catheters on a regular basis. Catheters are in the distal end equipped with an exi...

  18. A prospective randomized controlled trial of Wallace and Rocket embryo transfer catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Shawarby, Salem A; Ravhon, Amir; Skull, Jonathan; Ellenbogen, Adrian; Trew, Geoffrey; Lavery, Stuart

    2008-10-01

    The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of two embryo transfer catheters: Wallace and Rocket Embryon in an IVF programme of a tertiary referral university centre. A total of 308 patients undergoing embryo transfer were prospectively randomized to either a transfer with the Wallace catheter or a transfer with the Rocket catheter. The main outcome measure in this study was the clinical pregnancy rate, and secondary outcome measures included implantation rate, visibility of the catheter under ultrasound, number of retained embryos post transfer, and whether change of catheter was required. In addition, patient discomfort during the procedure was recorded. Pregnancy and implantation rates were similar when Wallace or Rocket catheters were used. However, for the Rocket catheter, the tip was more often clearly seen on ultrasound and it had a lower rate of retained embryos in the catheter after transfer (P < 0.05). Experience with different transfer catheters is recommended for difficult cases. PMID:18854110

  19. Cryo-balloon catheter position planning using AFiT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kleinoeder, Andreas; Brost, Alexander; Bourier, Felix; Koch, Martin; Kurzidim, Klaus; Hornegger, Joachim; Strobel, Norbert

    2012-02-01

    Atrial fibrillation (AFib) is the most common heart arrhythmia. In certain situations, it can result in life-threatening complications such as stroke and heart failure. For paroxsysmal AFib, pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) by catheter ablation is the recommended choice of treatment if drug therapy fails. During minimally invasive procedures, electrically active tissue around the pulmonary veins is destroyed by either applying heat or cryothermal energy to the tissue. The procedure is usually performed in electrophysiology labs under fluoroscopic guidance. Besides radio-frequency catheter ablation devices, so-called single-shot devices, e.g., the cryothermal balloon catheters, are receiving more and more interest in the electrophysiology (EP) community. Single-shot devices may be advantageous for certain cases, since they can simplify the creation of contiguous (gapless) lesion sets around the pulmonary vein which is needed to achieve PVI. In many cases, a 3-D (CT, MRI, or C-arm CT) image of a patient's left atrium is available. This data can then be used for planning purposes and for supporting catheter navigation during the procedure. Cryo-thermal balloon catheters are commercially available in two different sizes. We propose the Atrial Fibrillation Planning Tool (AFiT), which visualizes the segmented left atrium as well as multiple cryo-balloon catheters within a virtual reality, to find out how well cryo-balloons fit to the anatomy of a patient's left atrium. First evaluations have shown that AFiT helps physicians in two ways. First, they can better assess whether cryoballoon ablation or RF ablation is the treatment of choice at all. Second, they can select the proper-size cryo-balloon catheter with more confidence.

  20. Intracardiac tumor causing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher P. Jordan

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available The following report describes the case of newborn girl with an asymptomatic systolic murmur, which on imaging revealed a nearly obstructive mass in the left-ventricular outflow tract. The mass was resected and found to be consistent with a rhabdomyoma. Here, we describe the pathologic and clinical characteristics of this tumor.

  1. Reformed method of percutaneous port-catheter system implantation via femoral artery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To introduce the techniques of reformed method of percutaneous port-catheter system implantation via femoral artery with evaluation of its safety and advantages. Methods: 60 cases of mid and advance staged malignant tumors received percutaneous port-catheter system implantation via femoral artery by the reformed method. Results: Technical success was achieved in all cases and all procedures were completed within 30 minutes. Complications included one case of delayed healing, three catheter occlusion, two catheter dislodgement and one catheter induced infection. Conclusion: Reformed method of percutaneous port-catheter system implantation via femoral artery is not only feasible and safe, but also it can reduce the occurrence of complications. (authors)

  2. Transversus Abdominis Plane Catheter Bolus Analgesia after Major Abdominal Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nils Bjerregaard

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. Transversus abdominis plane (TAP blocks have been shown to reduce pain and opioid requirements after abdominal surgery. The aim of the present case series was to demonstrate the use of TAP catheter injections of bupivacaine after major abdominal surgery. Methods. Fifteen patients scheduled for open colonic resection surgery were included. After induction of anesthesia, bilateral TAP catheters were placed, and all patients received a bolus dose of 20 mL bupivacaine 2.5 mg/mL with epinephrine 5 μg/mL through each catheter. Additional bolus doses were injected bilaterally 12, 24, and 36 hrs after the first injections. Supplemental pain treatment consisted of paracetamol, ibuprofen, and gabapentin. Intravenous morphine was used as rescue analgesic. Postoperative pain was rated on a numeric rating scale (NRS, 0–10 at regular predefined intervals after surgery, and consumption of intravenous morphine was recorded. Results. The TAP catheters were placed without any technical difficulties. NRS scores were ≤3 at rest and ≤5 during cough at 4, 8, 12, 18, 24, and 36 hrs after surgery. Cumulative consumption of intravenous morphine was 28 (23–48 mg (median, IQR within the first 48 postoperative hours. Conclusion. TAP catheter bolus injections can be used to prolong analgesia after major abdominal surgery.

  3. NURSING CARE IN PATIENTS NEONATES WITH PERIPHERALLY INSERTED CENTRAL CATHETER

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anacilda Oliveira Vieira

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: The PICC (peripherally inserted central catheter is a long flexible catheter which is inserted through a peripheral vein, progresses through a needle introducer until the final portion of the vena cava, acquiring characteristics of a central catheter. Objective: To point out the main theoretical and scientific ideas that demonstrate the reliability, competence and ability of nurses to perform the PICC. Methodology: Systematic review of articles, which were found by searching the database scientific journals and bibliographies area. Results: The success of integration depends on the patient assessment and choice of venous access where the catheter will be positioned, and its tip should be in the middle third of the superior vena cava, or the middle third of the inferior vena cava. In neonates, which are used more frequently, proper positioning of the catheter is through nursing care in making the dressing, and the first 24 hours it should be compressive. Ideally, the PICC remains in the vein for periods longer than seven days or until the end of treatment, thus decreasing invasive procedures. Conclusion: According to the Federal Board of Nursing (COFEN, it is lawful for the insertion of PICC nurses, provided it has undergone professional training.

  4. Port- a- Cath Catheter placement by general surgery residents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. Schlottmann

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available In recent years an increasing incidence and prevalence of oncological diseases is observed, with a consequent increase in chemotherapies. In order to avoid repeated venipuncture of patients and toxicity in small veins during different cycles of treatment, devices that provide a permanent central venous access are used. The aim of this study was to evaluate the success and safety of port a cath devices inserted by surgery residents. A consecutive case series of patients in whom Port-a-CathTM catheter was placed by residents of surgery in the period from March 2009 to January 2014 were included. A total of 358 Port-a-CathTM catheters were inserted. Average age 58.7 years (16-88. Females 53.1%. Chemotherapy treatment for solid neoplasias (74.8% and for hematological diseases (25.2%. SThe different venous accesses were: Subclavian (67.6%, Cephalic (27.4%, external jugular (3.3%, internal jugular (1.7%. The morbidity rate was 5.3%, twelve patients with catheter-associated infection requiring the removal of it, 3 venous thrombosis with subsequent replacement of the catheter and 4 patients required pleural drainage. Port-a-CathTM catheter placement by residents is a safe and effective procedure for the administration of chemotherapy

  5. Effect of plastic catheter material on bacterial adherence and viability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez-Lopez, G; Pascual, A; Perea, E J

    1991-06-01

    The kinetics of adherence of single isolates of Staphylococcus aureus, S. epidermidis, Pseudomonas aeruginosa and Escherichia coli to catheters made of polyvinyl chloride (PVC), Teflon, siliconised latex, polyurethane and Vialon was evaluated by a radiometric assay. Radiolabelled bacteria (10(8) cfu/ml) were incubated in vials containing 1-cm lengths of catheter for up to 3 days. The peak of maximal adherence to each biomaterial was reached after 24 h for P. aeruginosa and after 72 h for the other strains. Bacterial adherence to PVC and siliconised latex was significantly higher (2-6 times; p less than 0.05) than to the other biomaterials for all the strains. The lowest values of adherence were observed with polyurethane and Vialon for the staphylococci but with Teflon for E. coli and P. aeruginosa. Bacterial viability and growth was evaluated in eluates obtained from incubation of segments of each catheter in buffer for 24 h. None of the eluates affected the viability of the staphylococci. However, all of them, significantly increased the growth of E. coli and P. aeruginosa with the exception of the eluate from siliconised latex, in which the inoculum count was reduced to an undetectable level for E. coli. We conclude that bacterial adherence to catheters may depend in part on the nature of the biomaterial and that certain substances eluted from the catheters may affect the viability and growth of different micro-organisms. PMID:1905357

  6. Catheter-based ultrasound hyperthermia with HDR brachytherapy for treatment of locally advanced cancer of the prostate and cervix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederich, Chris J.; Wootton, Jeff; Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant; Juang, Titania; Scott, Serena; Chen, Xin; Cunha, Adam; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I. C.

    2011-03-01

    A clinical treatment delivery platform has been developed and is being evaluated in a clinical pilot study for providing 3D controlled hyperthermia with catheter-based ultrasound applicators in conjunction with high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy. Catheter-based ultrasound applicators are capable of 3D spatial control of heating in both angle and length of the devices, with enhanced radial penetration of heating compared to other hyperthermia technologies. Interstitial and endocavity ultrasound devices have been developed specifically for applying hyperthermia within HDR brachytherapy implants during radiation therapy in the treatment of cervix and prostate. A pilot study of the combination of catheter based ultrasound with HDR brachytherapy for locally advanced prostate and cervical cancer has been initiated, and preliminary results of the performance and heating distributions are reported herein. The treatment delivery platform consists of a 32 channel RF amplifier and a 48 channel thermocouple monitoring system. Controlling software can monitor and regulate frequency and power to each transducer section as required during the procedure. Interstitial applicators consist of multiple transducer sections of 2-4 cm length × 180 deg and 3-4 cm × 360 deg. heating patterns to be inserted in specific placed 13g implant catheters. The endocavity device, designed to be inserted within a 6 mm OD plastic tandem catheter within the cervix, consists of 2-3 transducers × dual 180 or 360 deg sectors. 3D temperature based treatment planning and optimization is dovetailed to the HDR optimization based planning to best configure and position the applicators within the catheters, and to determine optimal base power levels to each transducer section. To date we have treated eight cervix implants and six prostate implants. 100 % of treatments achieved a goal of >60 min duration, with therapeutic temperatures achieved in all cases. Thermal dosimetry within the hyperthermia target

  7. Placement of a Hemodialysis Catheter using the Dilated Right External Jugular Vein as a Primary Route

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Mi Hyun [Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Byung Seok [Chungnam National University Hospital, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-08-15

    To evaluate the feasibility that a dilated right external jugular vein (EJV) could be a primary venous access site for large bore hemodialysis catheter placement. Between January 2008 and April 2009, a total of 173 hemodialysis catheters (14.5 F) were placed. Among them, we evaluated the clinical data of 42 patients who underwent placement through a dilated right EJV. We evaluated technical success, duration of catheterization in days, and the presence of complications. Technical success was achieved for 41 patients (98%). Catheter placement was unsuccessful in one patient due to narrowing of the EJV. The catheter dwell time ranged between 14 and 305 days (mean; 76 days, total catheter days: 3,111 days). A total of 26 hemodialysis catheters were removed due to complications (n=2) and termination of hemodialysis via the hemodialysis catheter (n=24). There was air embolization (n=1) and catheter kinking (n=3) during procedures and catheter related infections (n=2) during the follow-up period. The incidence of catheter related infection was 0.06 per 100 catheter days. No cases of catheter malfunction or symptomatic venous thrombosis were observed. We suggest that a dilated right EJV could be considered as a preferred primary route for hemodialysis catheter placement with easy access

  8. Compatibility of electrolytically produced sodium hypochlorite solutions on long- term implanted dialysis catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishkin, G J

    2007-01-01

    More than 20% of the world's population use a catheter for dialysis, despite guidelines limiting their use. Although the structure and design of the catheters differ by manufacturer, the material used in central venous catheters and peritoneal dialysis catheters are the same across manufacturers. Given the long-term use of these catheters in the dialysis population, the good compatibility of the antiseptics and disinfectants used on the catheters is imperative to prevent failure and cracking of the catheter material. Tensile strengths of commercially available catheters were measured after exposure to commonly used disinfectants. The tensile strength was then compared between the catheters by analyzing the displacement vs. force (N) curves produced during the evaluation. A total of 44 catheter lumens were evaluated. The electrolytically produced sodium hypochlorite solution, Alcavis 50/ExSept Plus, was the only solution shown to be compatible with all three catheter materials resulting in a deviation of less than 10% for each of the different catheter types. Electrolytically produced sodium hypochlorite solutions were the only solutions in this study that did not alter the physical properties of any of the catheters after long-term exposure. PMID:17099302

  9. Comparison of outcomes between surgically placed and percutaneously placed peritoneal dialysis catheters: A retrospective study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sivaramakrishnan, R; Gupta, S; Agarwal, S K; Bhowmik, D; Mahajan, S

    2016-01-01

    There is lack of adequate data on comparison of outcomes between percutaneously placed peritoneal dialysis (PD) catheters inserted by nephrologists and PD catheters placed by surgeons. The aim of this study is to retrospectively analyze the outcomes of PD catheters inserted by surgeons (by open surgical or laparoscopic technique) and compare them with those inserted by nephrologists among ESRD patients who underwent elective PD catheter insertions between January 2009 and December 2012. The primary outcome measure was the proportion of catheters removed because of primary nonfunction. The secondary outcome measures were catheter survival, patient survival, and incidence of complications of catheter insertion. A total of 143 PD catheter insertions (88 by surgeons and 55 by nephrologists) performed in 132 patients were considered for the analysis. The primary nonfunction rate of PD catheter insertions in both groups was comparable (18.2% and 7.3%, P = 0.08). Break-in period was shorter in Group N (p = <0.001). No differences were noted in patient or catheter survival. Percutaneously placed PD catheters performed by nephrologists have comparable outcomes with surgically placed PD catheters among selected cases and have the advantage of lower costs, avoidance of operation theater scheduling issues, smaller incision length, and shorter break-in period. Therefore, more nephrologists should acquire the expertise on percutaneous PD catheter placement as it leads to lesser waiting times and better utilization of PD. PMID:27512299

  10. The Hunter Pulmonary Angiography Catheter for a Brachiocephalic Vein Approach

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this work was to describe our experience in performing pulmonary angiography using the Hunter pulmonary catheter, manufactured by Cook, Inc., which is a modified 6F pigtail catheter with a 'C-shaped' curve, designed for a brachiocephalic vein approach. One hundred twenty-three patients underwent pulmonary angiograms using the Hunter catheter between August 1997 and January 2002. Operator comments were gathered in 86 (70%) of the cases. The operator was, if possible, the most junior resident on the service. Thirty-nine operators participated in the survey. Efficacy, safety, and ease of use of the catheter were determined by operators' comments and ECG observations during the procedure. Corroborating clinical data were gathered from medical records. In 68 (79%) of the procedures that were commented upon, the operator described insertion into the pulmonary artery (PA) as easy; only 2 (2%) indicated difficulty in accessing the PA. In 41 (63%) of the bilateral angiograms that were commented upon, the operator described accessing the left PA from the right PA as easy; only 6 (9%) rated it as difficult and all were with an older technique in which the catheter was withdrawn to the pulmonary bifurcation without a wire or with only the soft tip of the wire in the pigtail and then rotated to the left main pulmonary artery. Thirty-one of the 41 patients who demonstrated premature ventricular contractions (PVCs) had a previous history of heart disease. Nineteen of the 39 patients who did not have PVCs had a history of heart disease (p = 0.018). The maneuverability and shape of the Hunter catheter make pulmonary angiography an easy procedure, even for operators with minimal experience and limited technical proficiency. PVCs demonstrated a statistically significant correlation with a positive patient history for cardiac disease, rather than being a universal risk

  11. Ureteral Embolization to Prevent Thrombotic Obstruction of Nephrostomy Catheters in the Context of Refractory Hemorrhagic Radiation Cystitis with Severe Vesicoureteral Reflux.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarlagadda, Vidhush; Pettibon, Keith; Ertel, Nathan; Nix, Jeffrey

    2016-01-01

    We present a case of refractory hemorrhagic radiation cystitis in a patient who failed conservative management and was unable to undergo operative urinary diversion secondary to multiple comorbidities. His management was complicated by recurrent obstruction of his nephrostomy catheters due to marked ureteral thrombus formation from blood refluxing into the ureters from the urinary bladder. We were successful in treating his condition by occluding his distal ureters with a combination of embolization coils and glue to prevent the reflux of blood in order to allow his nephrostomy catheters to function properly. PMID:27019759

  12. Spontaneous migration of central venous catheter tip following extubation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balaji Prabaharan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Migration of the tip of central venous catheters is not an uncommon event and the mechanism for this is not clear. Increased intrathoracic pressure due to coughing, sneezing or weight lifting, changing the body position or physical movements such as abduction or adduction of the arms is thought to be the cause of such migration. We present here a case of a patient with a port catheter tip that migrated from the left subclavian to the superior vene cava following extubation.

  13. CT imaging of complications of catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complication rate following radiofrequency catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation is low (<5%). Complications include pericardial effusion, cardiac tamponade, pulmonary vein stenosis, oesophageal ulceration or perforation, atrio-oesophageal fistula formation, stroke/transient ischaemic attack, phrenic nerve injury, haematoma at the puncture site, and femoral arteriovenous fistula. Among available imaging tools, computed tomography (CT) can be very useful in diagnosing complications of the procedure, particularly in the subacute and delayed stages after ablation. This review illustrates CT imaging of several of the common and uncommon complications of radiofrequency catheter ablation

  14. Central venous catheters for chemotherapy of solid tumors--our results in the last 5 years.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zganjer, Mirko; Cizmić, Ante; Butković, Diana; Matolić, Martina; Karaman-Ilić, Maja; Stepan, Jasminka

    2008-09-01

    Central venous catheters provide an easy access for intravenous medications. Having a central line in place will relieve a child from the discomfort and danger of multiple regular intravenous lines for chemotherapy. The use of indwelling central venous catheters has become commonplace in the management of children undergoing oncological treatment. There are two types of central lines commonly used. There are Broviac catheters and Port-A-Cath (PAC) catheters. In the last 5 years we inserted 194 catheters in 175 children. We inserted 121 Broviac catheters and 73 PAC catheters. During the follow up of 39382 catheter days 44 complications were observed. In Broviac group the median follow up was 155 days and in PAC group was 230 days. We observed differences in the incidence between two devices. In Broviac group infections were more frequent and in PAC group other complications were more frequent than infections. PMID:18982750

  15. Effect of plastic catheters on the phagocytic activity of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-López, G; Pascual, A; Perea, E J

    1990-05-01

    The effect of five kinds of plastic catheters (polyvinyl chloride, Teflon, polyurethane, Vialon and siliconized latex) on the phagocytic and bactericidal function of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes was evaluated. In the presence of the polyvinyl chloride, Teflon and siliconized latex catheters, superoxide radical production by polymorphonuclear leukocytes was significantly inhibited. The effect of the siliconized latex catheter was presumably mediated by products eluted from the catheter into the medium, since the incubation of polymorphonuclear leukocytes in eluates obtained from the incubation of this catheter in buffer induced a similar inhibitory effect. This phenomenon was not observed with polyurethane or Vialon catheters. Neither the catheters evaluated nor their eluates affected the uptake of opsonized Staphylococcus aureus by human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. It is concluded that the polyvinyl chloride, Teflon and siliconized latex catheters used in this study could impair the respiratory burst of human polymorphonuclear leukocytes. PMID:2164932

  16. Radiologic interventional retrieval of retained central venous catheter fragment in prematurity: case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fracture of a central venous catheter is a rare but potentially serious complication. Moreover, removal of the broken catheter pieces is considerably challenging, especially for premature infants. We report 3 case studies of the percutaneous transcatheter retrieval of broken catheter parts in 3 premature infants. We confirmed the location of the catheter fragments via a DSA venogram with diluted contrast media. Using the minimum amount of contrast, and extreme caution, we made certain no contrast-induced nephrotoxicity of air embolism occurred during catheter manipulation. In addition, when the broken fragment was curled or attached to the cardiac wall, we used a hook-shaped catheter to facilitate the capturing of the catheter with a loopsnare. This report demonstrates the feasibility of removing a retained catheter fragment in a premature infant using a percutaneous transcatheter approach

  17. Evaluation of Fiber Bundle Rotation for Enhancing Gas Exchange in a Respiratory Assist Catheter

    OpenAIRE

    Eash, Heide J.; Mihelc, Kevin M.; Frankowski, Brain J.; Hattler, Brack G.; Federspiel, William J.

    2007-01-01

    Supplemental oxygenation and carbon dioxide removal through an intravenous respiratory assist catheter can be used as a means of treating patients with acute respiratory failure. We are beginning development efforts toward a new respiratory assist catheter with an insertional size

  18. Fluoroscopy guided percutaneous catheter drainage of pneumothorax in good mid-term patency with tube drainage

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Ga Young; Oh, Joo Hyung; Yoon, Yup; Sung, Dong Wook [Kyung Hee University Hospital, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1995-10-15

    To evaluate efficacy and the safety of percutaneous catheter drainage in patients with pneumothorax that is difficult to treat with closed thoracotomy. We retrospectively reviewed effectiveness of percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) in 10 patients with pneumothorax. The catheter was inserted under fluoroscopic guidance. Seven patients had spontaneous pneumothorax caused by tuberculosis (n =4), reptured bullae (n = 2), and histiocytosis-X (n = 1). Three patients had iatrogenic pneumothorax caused by trauma (n = 1) and surgery (n = 2). All procedures were performed by modified Seldinger's method by using 8F-20F catheter. All catheter were inserted successfully. In 9 of 10 patients, the procedure was curative without further therapy. Duration of catheter insertion ranged from 1 day to 26 days. In the remaining 1 patient in whom multiple pneumothorax occurred after operation, catheter insertion was performed twice. Percutaneous catheter drainage under fluoroscopic guidance is effective and safe procedure for treatment of pneumothorax in patients with failed closed thoracotomy.

  19. Fluoroscopy guided percutaneous catheter drainage of pneumothorax in good mid-term patency with tube drainage

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate efficacy and the safety of percutaneous catheter drainage in patients with pneumothorax that is difficult to treat with closed thoracotomy. We retrospectively reviewed effectiveness of percutaneous catheter drainage (PCD) in 10 patients with pneumothorax. The catheter was inserted under fluoroscopic guidance. Seven patients had spontaneous pneumothorax caused by tuberculosis (n =4), reptured bullae (n = 2), and histiocytosis-X (n = 1). Three patients had iatrogenic pneumothorax caused by trauma (n = 1) and surgery (n = 2). All procedures were performed by modified Seldinger's method by using 8F-20F catheter. All catheter were inserted successfully. In 9 of 10 patients, the procedure was curative without further therapy. Duration of catheter insertion ranged from 1 day to 26 days. In the remaining 1 patient in whom multiple pneumothorax occurred after operation, catheter insertion was performed twice. Percutaneous catheter drainage under fluoroscopic guidance is effective and safe procedure for treatment of pneumothorax in patients with failed closed thoracotomy

  20. Dialysis catheter-related septicaemia--focus on Staphylococcus aureus septicaemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J; Ladefoged, S D; Kolmos, H J

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Dialysis catheters are a common cause of nosocomial septicaemia in haemodialysis units usually due to staphylococci, of which Staphylococcus aureus is the most pathogenic. In this study, the epidemiology and pathogenesis of dialysis catheter-related infections were studied, and methods....../67) of all catheter periods--84% of these were due to coagulase-negative staphylococci. CONCLUSIONS: Dialysis catheter-related S. aureus septicaemia was highly unlikely if the patient had not been carrying S. aureus in the nose or at the insertion site during the time the catheter was in place. The best...... predictor of dialysis catheter-related S. aureus septicaemia was a positive S. aureus culture from the insertion site. Positive catheter blood cultures unrelated to any clinical signs of septicaemia occurred in one-third of all catheter periods, and 84% of these were due to coagulase-negative staphylococci....

  1. Clinical efficacy and safety of catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation in elderly patients

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    董静

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the clinical efficacy and safty of catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation in elderly patients.Methods From September 2008 to October 2011,a total of 420 consecutive patients undergoing cathete rablation

  2. Radiologic interventional retrieval of retained central venous catheter fragment in prematurity: case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jee Won; Jo, Jung Hyun; Park, Byeong Ho [College of Medicine, Dong-A University, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2007-12-15

    The fracture of a central venous catheter is a rare but potentially serious complication. Moreover, removal of the broken catheter pieces is considerably challenging, especially for premature infants. We report 3 case studies of the percutaneous transcatheter retrieval of broken catheter parts in 3 premature infants. We confirmed the location of the catheter fragments via a DSA venogram with diluted contrast media. Using the minimum amount of contrast, and extreme caution, we made certain no contrast-induced nephrotoxicity of air embolism occurred during catheter manipulation. In addition, when the broken fragment was curled or attached to the cardiac wall, we used a hook-shaped catheter to facilitate the capturing of the catheter with a loopsnare. This report demonstrates the feasibility of removing a retained catheter fragment in a premature infant using a percutaneous transcatheter approach.

  3. Disconnection of chamber and catheter as a complication of central venous catheter type port-a-cath.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kostic, S; Kovcin, V; Granić, M; Jevdic, D; Stanisavljevic, N

    2011-12-01

    The use of a central vein catheter (CVC) type port-a-cath (VPS), apart from the comfort it provides to the patient undergoing chemotherapy, also carries certain complications. In this study, our patient was subjected to chemotherapy after a radical breast cancer operation and was given a CVC type VPS. After further care, a rare complication was verified--disconnection of the chamber and catheter, which one was visually identified in the right heart chamber. As the patient was vitally endangered, she was immediately hospitalized and the catheter was removed by catheterization of the right femoral vein, with scopic imaging. Early diagnosis and localization of the problem prevented more severe complications and mortality. PMID:20607455

  4. Central Venous Catheters for Chemotherapy of Solid Tumors – Our Results in the Last 5 Years

    OpenAIRE

    Žganjer, Mirko; Čizmić, Ante; Butković, Diana; MATOLIĆ, MARTINA; Karaman-Ilić, Maja; Stepan, Jasminka

    2008-01-01

    Central venous catheters provide an easy access for intravenous medications. Having a central line in place will relieve a child from the discomfort and danger of multiple regular intravenous lines for chemotherapy. The use of indwelling central venous catheters has become commonplace in the management of children undergoing oncological treatment. There are two types of central lines commonly used. There are Broviac catheters and Port-A-Cath (PAC) catheters. In the last 5 years we...

  5. Colonization of bacteria on polyvinyl chloride and Teflon intravascular catheters in hospitalized patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Sheth, N. K.; Franson, T R; Rose, H. D.; Buckmire, F L; Cooper, J. A., Jr.; Sohnle, P G

    1983-01-01

    During an 8-month period all intravascular catheters were removed by sterile technique upon completion of use and submitted to the hospital microbiology laboratory. All catheters were routinely cultured by the semiquantitative culture technique, with greater than or equal to 15 colonies being defined as a positive result. Of the 687 Teflon catheters cultured, 6.9% were positive by culture, compared with 24.6% of 77 polyvinyl chloride catheters (P less than 0.001). Also, colonization of coagul...

  6. 21 CFR 878.4200 - Introduction/drainage catheter and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Introduction/drainage catheter and accessories. 878.4200 Section 878.4200 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN... Introduction/drainage catheter and accessories. (a) Identification. An introduction/drainage catheter is...

  7. Numerical simulation of the pulsating catheter pump : A left ventricular assist device

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verkerke, GJ; Mihaylov, D; Geertsema, AA; Lubbers, J; Rakhorst, G

    1999-01-01

    The pulsating catheter (PUCA) pump, a left ventricular assist device, consists of a hydraulically or pneumatically driven membrane pump, extracorporeally placed and mounted to a valved catheter. The catheter is introduced into an easily accessible artery and positioned with its distal tip in the lef

  8. Transcatheter Removal of Embolized Port Catheters from the Hearts of Two Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Osman Baspinar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Embolization of a port catheter is a dangerous and serious complication. In this paper, we present two cases of children, aged 4.5 months and 6 years, in whom port catheters had embolized to the right ventricle one month and 1.5 years priorly, respectively; the port catheters were retrieved via snaring.

  9. Use of an alteplase algorithm for the management of hemodialysis catheter dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelmoneim, Ahmed S; Miller, Lisa M; Armstrong, Sean; Sood, Manish M; Wazny, Lori; Chateau, Dan; Vercaigne, Lavern M

    2012-04-01

    Hemodialysis (HD) catheter dysfunction compromises HD adequacy and increases the cost of patient care. Repeated administration of alteplase in HD catheters typically produces only short-term benefits. The purpose of this study was to design, implement, and evaluate the efficacy of an experimental alteplase algorithm to manage HD catheter dysfunction. This was a two-part prospective nonrandomized study. Baseline data of alteplase use and catheter exchange were collected during part 1 of the study. Part 2 consisted of the alteplase algorithm implementation and repeat collection of catheter data. Rates of alteplase use and catheter exchange per 1000 catheter-days were the primary and secondary outcomes of the study. One hundred and seventy-two catheters in 131 patients were followed prospectively during the course of the study. The adjusted relative rate (RR) of alteplase use showed no significant difference between both parts of the study, adjusted RR: 1.10, 95% confidence interval (CI) (0.73-1.65). Similarly, catheter exchange rates were not significantly different over the duration of the study (1.12 vs. 1.03 per 1000 catheter-days). However, waiting time for catheter exchange increased from 20.36 ± 14 days in part 1 to 38.42 ± 28 days in part 2 (P < 0.05). The alteplase algorithm did not significantly reduce alteplase use. This may be partially explained by repeated use of alteplase in part 2, due to longer waiting times for catheter exchange procedures. PMID:22098698

  10. Biofilm formation in long-term central venous catheters in children with cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handrup, Mette Møller; Fuursted, Kurt; Funch, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    Taurolidine has demonstrated inhibition of biofilm formation in vitro. The aim of this study was to compare the effect of catheter locking with taurolidine vs heparin in biofilm formation in central venous catheters. Forty-eight children with cancer were randomized to catheter locking by heparin ...

  11. Bilateral external iliac artery catheter-induced vasospasm during angiography--a case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallagher, Chris; Shanklin, Chris; Roonsritong, Chanwit; Halldorsson, Ari; Tsikouris, James; Meyerrose, Gary

    2006-01-01

    The occurrence of catheter-induced vasospasm of small-caliber arteries during cardiac angiography is well documented. In contrast, little documentation of catheter-induced vasospasm in large-caliber arteries exists. This case presents reproducible catheter-induced vasospasm with bilateral asymptomatic occlusion of the femoral and iliac arteries. PMID:16444466

  12. Placing of tunneled central venous catheters prior to induction chemotherapy in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Handrup, Mette Møller; Møller, Jens Kjølseth; Frydenberg, Morten;

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Tunneled central venous catheters (CVCs) are inevitable in children with acute lymphoid leukemia (ALL). The aim of this study was to evaluate the risk of CVC-related complications in children with ALL in relation to timing of catheter placement and type of catheter. PROCEDURE: All...

  13. A new approach of extracting embolized venous catheters using a large-diameter steerable sheath under biplane fluoroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strohmer, Bernhard; Altenberger, Johann; Pichler, Maximilian

    2012-01-01

    To report the efficacy of a new percutaneous technique for extraction of embolized catheters, five female patients (62 ± 14 years) referred to our institution were analyzed. With the combination of a large-diameter steerable sheath with a sizeable snare system, three dislodged Port-A-Cath tubes and two ventriculoatrial shunts were retrieved successfully. Mean procedure time was 51 ± 23 min, biplane fluoroscopy time was 22 ± 21 min, and dose area product was 1188 ± 992 dGy cm(2). Percutaneous extraction of embolized venous catheters is highly effective with the help of this novel, self-assembled system. The presented technique provides major advantages with respect to three-dimensional steerability and should be considered for complex cases. PMID:22920353

  14. Transcervical Foley's catheter: a promising option for induction of labour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divya Pandey

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available We hereby report the results of a small randomized prospective study where we compared the efficiency and efficacy of transcervical extra-amniotic Foley catheter placement to intravaginal dinoprostone gel as a method of induction of labour. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2015; 4(3.000: 933-933

  15. Pneumothorax as a complication of central venous catheter insertion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsotsolis, Nikolaos; Tsirgogianni, Katerina; Kioumis, Ioannis; Pitsiou, Georgia; Baka, Sofia; Papaiwannou, Antonis; Karavergou, Anastasia; Rapti, Aggeliki; Trakada, Georgia; Katsikogiannis, Nikolaos; Tsakiridis, Kosmas; Karapantzos, Ilias; Karapantzou, Chrysanthi; Barbetakis, Nikos; Zissimopoulos, Athanasios; Kuhajda, Ivan; Andjelkovic, Dejan; Zarogoulidis, Konstantinos; Zarogoulidis, Paul

    2015-03-01

    The central venous catheter (CVC) is a catheter placed into a large vein in the neck [internal jugular vein (IJV)], chest (subclavian vein or axillary vein) or groin (femoral vein). There are several situations that require the insertion of a CVC mainly to administer medications or fluids, obtain blood tests (specifically the "central venous oxygen saturation"), and measure central venous pressure. CVC usually remain in place for a longer period of time than other venous access devices. There are situations according to the drug administration or length of stay of the catheter that specific systems are indicated such as; a Hickman line, a peripherally inserted central catheter (PICC) line or a Port-a-Cath may be considered because of their smaller infection risk. Sterile technique is highly important here, as a line may serve as a port of entry for pathogenic organisms, and the line itself may become infected with organisms such as Staphylococcus aureus and coagulase-negative Staphylococci. In the current review we will present the complication of pneumothorax after CVC insertion. PMID:25815301

  16. Abnormal location of umbilical venous catheter due to Scimitar syndrome

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scimitar syndrome is a rare congenital anomaly where the right pulmonary veins return to the inferior vena cava (IVC) just below the diaphragm. On chest X-ray (CXR), an IVC catheter will be in a bizarre location outside the heart if it inadvertently passes into the scimitar vein rather than into the right atrium

  17. Peritoneo-vulvar catheter extrusion after shunt operation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagulic, M; Djordjevic, M; Samardzic, M

    1996-04-01

    We report an unusual case of catheter extrusion through the external genitalia. between the labium majus and the labium minus, in a 6-month-old hydrocephalic baby. The event occurred 5 months after placement of a ventriculoperitoneal shunt. PMID:8739410

  18. Optimizing safety and efficacy of catheter ablation procedures

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Akca (Ferdi)

    2015-01-01

    markdownabstractAbstract In this thesis new developments in the field of invasive electrophysiology are studied and discussed. The aim of this work is to find strategies to optimize safety and efficacy of catheter ablation procedures. The most important developments that are studied in this thesis

  19. Polyvinyl chloride catheters with repressed migration of plasticizers

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sedláček, T.; Polášková, M.; Kašpárková, V.; Filip, Petr; Sáha, P.

    Larnaca : Polymer Processing Society, 2009, s. 243. [Polymer Processing Society Europe/Africa Regional Meeting. Larnaca (GR), 18.10.2009-21.10.2009] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z20600510 Keywords : Polyvinyl chloride * catheter * repressed migration of plasticizers Subject RIV: BK - Fluid Dynamics

  20. 21 CFR 876.5130 - Urological catheter and accessories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Urological catheter and accessories. 876.5130 Section 876.5130 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES GASTROENTEROLOGY-UROLOGY DEVICES Therapeutic Devices § 876.5130...

  1. Percutaneous placement of peritoneal port-catheter in oncologic patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper is to describe the technique of percutaneous ultrasound (US)-guided placement of a peritoneal port-catheter in an interventional radiological setting. Nineteen patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis were selected for intraperitoneal port-catheter placement in order to perform intracavitary receptor-immuno- or radio-immunotherapy with Ytrium-90. All the procedures were performed percutaneously under US and fluoro guidance; the insertion site for catheters was chosen according to abdominal conditions and US findings: all devices were implanted at the lower abdominal quadrants. All patients were followed up with CT and US according to the therapy protocol. The procedure was successfully completed in 15/19 patients, in 4 being contraindicated by peritoneal adhesions. No procedure-related complications and device occlusions during therapy were observed; one catheter displaced 7 months later the placement. In our experience, this procedure was feasible, reliable and easy to perform, allowing the correct administration of the planned intracavitary therapy. Peritoneal adhesions are the main limitation of peritoneal port placement. (orig.)

  2. Minimizing Hemodialysis Catheter Dysfunction: An Ounce of Prevention

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timmy Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The maintenance of tunneled catheter (TC patency is critical for the provision of adequate hemodialysis in patients who are TC-dependent. TC dysfunction results in the need for costly and inconvenient interventions, and reduced quality of life. Since the introduction of TCs in the late 1980s, heparin catheter lock has been the standard prophylactic regimen for the prevention of TC dysfunction. More recently, alternative catheter locking agents have emerged, and in some cases have shown to be superior to heparin lock with respect to improving TC patency and reducing TC-associated infections. These include citrate, tissue plasminogen activator, and a novel agent containing sodium citrate, methylene blue, methylparaben, and propylparaben. In addition, prophylaxis using oral anticoagulants/antiplatelet agents, including warfarin, aspirin, ticlodipine, as well as the use of modified heparin-coated catheters have also been studied for the prevention of TC dysfunction with variable results. The use of oral anticoagulants and/or antiplatelet agents as primary or secondary prevention of TC dysfunction must be weighed against their potential adverse effects, and should be individualized for each patient.

  3. Management of complicated perspired pleural, by means of angiographic catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the recent literature and to demonstrate that complicated exudate drainage through angiographic catheters is a safe and efficient technique that offers a very useful alternative as a first choice treatment and also as a secondary treatment in the cases where thoracotomy tubes have failed, we have designed this scheme, in 28 patients with pleural effusion by radiographic evidence with a 52.7 average age and that fulfilled the light criteria for complicated pleural effusions, we accomplished drainage of the pleural effusion, using angiographic catheters, under ultrasound guidance. In the drainages that were realized, there was an 85.72% rate of success. it is important to mention that of the remaining 14.28% that presented pleural fluid after the drainage, none required surgery. 71.42% of the patients were treated only with angiographic catheters, while the remaining 28.57% were treated with them, after a failed drainage with thoracotomy tubes. The necessary time for the drainage was between 3 and 14 days. There were no complications during the catheter placement procedure neither during the time required for drainage of the pleural effusion

  4. Should a Double-Lumen Catheter be withdrawn?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samad Shams Vahdati

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Haemodialysis needs a credible and recurrent access to the systemic circula-tion which can be accomplished by way of central vein catheterization. We report the case of bleeding after withdrawal of the double lumen catheter. Case Presentation: A 36-year-old woman who was a known case of end-stage renal disease referred to a dialysis center because of her arteriovenous fistula malfunction. A double-lumen catheter was inserted via the right internal jugular vein but failed to become functional so in the emergency department we decided to withdrawal catheter under cardiac monitoring and pulse oximetry but unfortunately A few minutes after the withdrawal of the double lumen Catheter the patient became agitated and confused. The resuscitation team after infusing IV fluid and blood decided to emergent thoracotomy. We control bleeding by direct pressure and repaired a rupture of the posterior aspect of the right internal jugular and right subclavian vein junction. Six hours later she became alert and one week after discharged, she was in well general condition.

  5. Staphylococcus-Infected Tunneled Dialysis Catheters: Is Over-the-Wire Exchange an Appropriate Management Option?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Over-the-wire exchange of tunneled dialysis catheters is the standard of care per K/DOQI guidelines for treating catheter-related bacteremia. However, Gram-positive bacteremia, specifically with staphylococcus species, may compromise over-the-wire exchange due to certain biological properties. This study addressed the effectiveness of over-the-wire exchange of staphylococcus-infected tunneled dialysis catheters compared with non-staphylococcus-infected tunneled dialysis catheters. Methods: Patients who received over-the-wire exchange of their tunneled dialysis catheter due to documented or suspected bacteremia were identified from a QA database. Study patients (n = 61) had positive cultures for Staphylococcus aureus, Staphylococcus epidermidis, or coagulase-negative staphylococcus not otherwise specified. Control patients (n = 35) received over-the-wire exchange of their tunneled dialysis catheter due to infection with any organism besides staphylococcus. Overall catheter survival and catheter survival among staphylococcal species were assessed. Results: There was no difference in tunneled dialysis catheter survival between study and control groups (P = 0.46). Median survival time was 96 days for study catheters and 51 days for controls; survival curves were closely superimposed. There also was no difference among the three staphylococcal groups in terms of catheter survival (P = 0.31). The median time until catheter removal was 143 days for SE, 67 days for CNS, and 88 days for SA-infected catheters. Conclusions: There is no significant difference in tunneled dialysis catheter survival between over-the-wire exchange of staphylococcus-infected tunneled dialysis catheters and those infected with other organisms.

  6. Modulation of crystalline Proteus mirabilis biofilm development on urinary catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickler, David J; Morgan, Sheridan D

    2006-05-01

    The crystalline biofilms formed by Proteus mirabilis can seriously complicate the care of patients undergoing long-term bladder catheterization. The generation of alkaline urine by the bacterial urease causes calcium and magnesium phosphates to precipitate from urine and accumulate in the catheter biofilm, blocking the flow of urine from the bladder. The pH at which these salts crystallize from a urine sample, the nucleation pH (pH(n)), can be elevated by diluting the urine and by increasing its citrate content. The aim of this study was to examine whether manipulation of pH(n) in these ways modulated the rate at which crystalline biofilm developed. Experiments in laboratory models of the catheterized bladder infected with P. mirabilis showed that when the bladder was supplied with a concentrated urine (pH(n) 6.7) at a low fluid output (720 ml per 24 h), catheters blocked at 19-31 h. Diluting this urine 1:4 increased the pH(n) to 7.5 and models supplied with this urine at 2880 ml per 24 h took 110-137 h to block. When models were supplied with urine containing citrate at 1.5 mg ml(-1) or above (pH(n) 8.3-9.1), the catheters drained freely for the full 7 day experimental period. Scanning electron microscopy revealed that the catheter biofilms that developed in urine with high pH(n) values were devoid of crystalline formations. These observations should encourage a clinical trial to examine the effect of increasing a patient's fluid intake with citrate-containing drinks on the encrustation and blockage of catheters. PMID:16585633

  7. A novel suture method to place and adjust peripheral nerve catheters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rothe, C.; Steen-Hansen, C.; Madsen, M. H.; Lundstrøm, Lars Hyldborg; Heimburger, R.; Jensen, K. E.; Lange, K. H. W.

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a peripheral nerve catheter, attached to a needle, which works like an adjustable suture. We used in-plane ultrasound guidance to place 45 catheters close to the femoral, saphenous, sciatic and distal tibial nerves in cadaver legs. We displaced catheters after their initial...... placement and then attempted to return them to their original positions. We used ultrasound to evaluate the initial and secondary catheter placements and the spread of injectate around the nerves. In 10 cases, we confirmed catheter position by magnetic resonance imaging. We judged 43/45 initial placements...

  8. Catheter selection for ablation of the cavotricuspid isthmus for treatment of typical atrial flutter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Da Costa, Antoine; Jamon, Yann; Romeyer-Bouchard, Cécile; Thévenin, Jérôme; Messier, Marc; Isaaz, Karl

    2006-11-01

    Radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFA) represents the first line therapy of the cavotricuspid isthmus-dependent atrial flutter (CTI-AFL) with a high efficacy and low secondary effects. RFA of CTI-dependent AFL can be performed by using various types of ablation catheters. Recent evaluations comparing externally cooled tip RFA (ecRFA) catheters and large-tip (8 mm) catheters have revealed that these catheters have a higher efficacy for CTI-AFL ablation compared to 4-mm catheters. The reliability of RFA catheters for AFL is variable and an optimal catheter selection may enhance the RFA effectiveness. The main goal of this article is to review the elements that improve the management of CTI RFA. Preliminary examinations of histopathologic and anatomical elements that may interfere with conventional CTI RFA are presented. Experimental studies concerning the electrobiology of large-tip and cooled-tip catheters are compared. The different catheter designs between cooled-tip and 8-mm-tip catheters are examined (size of the deflectable curve, rotation stability, and size of the distal nonsteerable catheter part) because of their critical role in CTI RFA results. A thorough review of clinical trials of each catheter is presented, and comparison of both catheters in this clinical setting is analyzed. In addition, the role of CTI morphology on AFL RF duration is underlined such as the value of right atrial angiography as an adjunct tool for CTI RFA catheter selection. Based on randomized studies, 8-mm-tip catheters seem to be more effective for ablation in case of straight angiographic isthmus morphology. On the other hand, ecRFA catheters appear to be more effective in cases of complex CTI anatomy or difficult CTI RFA. To reduce X-ray exposition and RFA application time, few studies report that CTI angiographic evaluation before RFA allows a catheter selection based on both CTI morphology and length. Moreover, preliminary data of randomized studies showed that an

  9. Stabilization of a Percutaneously Implanted Port Catheter System for Hepatic Artery Chemotherapy Infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A port catheter system for hepatic artery infusion chemotherapy was implanted percutaneously via the left subclavian artery in 41 patients for treatment of unresectable liver metastases. The catheter tip was inserted into the gastroduodenal artery (GDA), the end hole was occluded with a guidewire fragment, and a side-hole for infusion was positioned at the bifurcation of the proper hepatic artery and the GDA. The GDA was embolized with steel coils around the infusion catheter tip via a transfemoral catheter. This procedure is designed to reduce the incidence of hepatic artery occlusion and infusion catheter dislocation

  10. Stabilization of a percutaneously implanted port catheter system for hepatic artery chemotherapy infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A port catheter system for hepatic artery infusion chemotherapy was implanted percutaneously via the left subclavian artery in 41 patients for treatment of unresectable liver metastases. The catheter tip was inserted into the gastroduodenal artery (GDA), the end hole was occluded with a guidewire fragment, and a side-hole for infusion was positioned at the bifurcation of the proper hepatic artery and the GDA. The GDA was embolized with steel coils around the infusion catheter tip via a transfemoral catheter. This procedure is designed to reduce the incidence of hepatic artery occlusion and infusion catheter dislocation.

  11. Efficacy of dicloxacillin-coated polyurethane catheters in preventing subcutaneous Staphylococcus aureus infection in mice.

    OpenAIRE

    Sherertz, R J; Forman, D M; Solomon, D D

    1989-01-01

    In a mouse model, dicloxacillin-coated polyurethane catheters or control (uncoated) catheters were placed subcutaneously and then Staphylococcus aureus was inoculated at the time of insertion, 24 or 48 h later. The in vivo half-life of the antibiotic was 11 to 16 h. When 10(5) CFU of S. aureus were inoculated at the time of catheter insertion, dicloxacillin-coated catheters kept the number of S. aureus removed from catheters by sonication below 10(2) CFU at 12, 24, 48, and 96 h after inoculat...

  12. Controlled trial of a continuous irrigation suction catheter vs conventional intermittent suction catheter in clearing bronchial secretions from ventilated patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isea, J O; Poyant, D; O'Donnell, C; Faling, L J; Karlinsky, J; Celli, B R

    1993-04-01

    Continuous irrigation-suction catheter (Irri-cath) is a double-lumen device that allows for simultaneous saline solution infusion and aspiration. This system may theoretically be more effective than conventional dry intermittent suction due to its vortex principle. To test this hypothesis, we performed 200 suction maneuvers in 20 ventilated patients. Identically shaped catheters were used in a randomized sequence. For the same individual, we used equal instilled saline solution volume (40 ml), vacuum pressure (-180 cm H2O), and ventilatory parameters. Effectiveness of suction was determined by measuring the total aspirated volume, the dry lyophilized weight of secretion, the corrected dry weight (dry weight-weight of instilled salt), and protein concentration. No difference in heart rate, respiratory frequency, O2 saturation, systemic blood pressure, peak inspiratory pressure, or patient discomfort was found when the two modalities were compared; however, the total volume of secretions collected, the dry weight, the corrected dry weight, and the protein concentration were significantly higher with continuous irrigation suction catheter when compared with the conventional method (p < 0.05). The suction time was shorter with the Irri-cath (p < 0.05). We conclude that the Irri-Cath is more effective than conventional intermittent suction catheter in clearing bronchial secretions in patients on mechanical ventilation. PMID:8131470

  13. Chlorhexidine Gluconate Dressings Reduce Bacterial Colonization Rates in Epidural and Peripheral Regional Catheters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klaus Kerwat

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Bacterial colonization of catheter tips is common in regional anesthesia and is a suspected risk factor for infectious complications. This is the first study evaluating the effect of CHG-impregnated dressings on bacterial colonization of regional anesthesia catheters in a routine clinical setting. Methods. In this prospective study, regional anesthesia catheter infection rates were examined in two groups of patients with epidural and peripheral regional catheters. In the first group, regional anesthesia was dressed with a conventional draping. The second group of patients underwent catheter dressing using a CHG-impregnated draping. Removed catheters and the insertion sites were both screened for bacterial colonization. Results. A total of 337 catheters from 308 patients were analysed. There was no significant reduction of local infections in either epidural or peripheral regional anesthesia catheters in both CHG and conventional groups. In the conventional group, 21% of the catheter tips and 41% of the insertion sites showed positive culture results. In the CHG-group, however, only 3% of the catheter tips and 8% of the insertion sites were colonised. Conclusion. CHG dressings significantly reduce bacterial colonization of the tip and the insertion site of epidural and peripheral regional catheters. However, no reductions in rates of local infections were seen.

  14. Changing Behavior among Nurses to Track Indwelling Urinary Catheters in Hospitalized Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bona Yoon

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Catheter-associated urinary tract infections (CAUTIs are preventable complications of hospitalization. An interdisciplinary team developed a curriculum to increase awareness of the presence of indwelling urinary catheters (IUCs in hospitalized patients, addressed practical, primarily nurse-controlled inpatient risk-reduction interventions, and promoted the use of the IUC labels (“tags”. Five thirty-minute educational sessions were cycled over three daily nursing shifts on two inpatient medical floors over a 1-year period; participants were surveyed (n=152 to elicit feedback and provide real-time insight on the learning objectives. Nurse self-reported IUC tagging was early and sustained; after the IUC tag was introduced, there was a significant increase in tagging reported by the end of the block of educational sessions (from 46.2% to 84.6%, P=0.001. Early engagement combined with a targeted educational initiative led to increased knowledge, changes in behavior, and renewed CAUTI awareness in hospitalized patients with IUCs. The processes employed in this small-scale project can be applied to broader, hospitalwide initiatives and to large-scale initiatives for healthcare interventions. As first-line providers with responsibility for the placement and daily maintenance of IUCs, nurses are ideally positioned to implement efforts addressing CAUTIs in the hospital setting.

  15. The mechanism of lesion formation by focused ultrasound ablation catheter for treatment of atrial fibrillation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinelnikov, Y. D.; Fjield, T.; Sapozhnikov, O. A.

    2009-10-01

    The application of therapeutic ultrasound for the treatment of atrial fibrillation (AF) is investigated. The results of theoretical and experimental investigation of ultrasound ablation catheter are presented. The major components of the catheter are the high power cylindrical piezoelectric element and parabolic balloon reflector. Thermal elevation in the ostia of pulmonary veins is achieved by focusing the ultrasound beam in shape of a torus that transverses the myocardial tissue. High intensity ultrasound heating in the focal zone results in a lesion surrounding the pulmonary veins that creates an electrical conduction blocks and relief from AF symptoms. The success of the ablation procedure largely depends on the correct choice of reflector geometry and ultrasonic power. We present a theoretical model of the catheter’s acoustic field and bioheat transfer modeling of cardiac lesions. The application of an empirically derived relation between lesion formation and acoustic power is shown to correlate with the experimental data. Developed control methods combine the knowledge of theoretical acoustics and the thermal lesion formation simulations with experiment and thereby establish dosimetry that contributes to a safe and effective ultrasound ablation procedure.

  16. A Pilot Study of Catheter-Based Ultrasound Hyperthermia with HDR Brachytherapy for Treatment of Locally Advanced Cancer of the Prostate and Cervix

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diederich, Chris J.; Wootton, Jeff; Prakash, Punit; Salgaonkar, Vasant; Juang, Titania; Scott, Serena; Chen, Xin; Cunha, Adam; Pouliot, Jean; Hsu, I. C.

    2011-09-01

    Interstitial and endocavity ultrasound devices have been developed specifically for applying hyperthermia within temporary HDR brachytherapy implants during radiation therapy. Catheter-based ultrasound applicators are capable of 3D spatial control of heating in both angle and length of the devices, with enhanced radial penetration of heating compared to other hyperthermia technologies. A pilot study of the combination of catheter based ultrasound with HDR brachytherapy for locally advanced prostate and cervical cancer has been initiated, and preliminary results of the performance and heating distributions are reported herein. The treatment delivery platform consists of a 32 channel RF amplifier and a 48 channel thermocouple monitoring system. Controlling software can monitor and regulate frequency and power to each transducer section as required during the procedure. Interstitial applicators consist of multiple transducer sections of 2-4 cm length×180 deg and 3-4 cm×360 deg. heating patterns to be inserted in specific placed 13g implant catheters. The endocavity device, designed to be inserted within a 6 mm OD plastic tandem catheter within the cervix, consists of 2-3 transducers x dual 180 or 360 deg sectors. 3D temperature based treatment planning and optimization is dovetailed to the HDR optimization based planning to best configure and position the applicators within the catheters, and to determine optimal base power levels to each transducer section. To date we have treated eight cervix implants and four prostate implants. 100% of treatments achieved a goal of >60 min duration, with therapeutic temperatures achieved in all cases. Thermal dosimetry within the hyperthermia target volume (HTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) are reported. Catheter-based ultrasound hyperthermia with HDR appears feasible with therapeutic temperature coverage of the target volume within the prostate or cervix while sparing surrounding more sensitive regions.

  17. A Pilot Study of Catheter-Based Ultrasound Hyperthermia with HDR Brachytherapy for Treatment of Locally Advanced Cancer of the Prostate and Cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Interstitial and endocavity ultrasound devices have been developed specifically for applying hyperthermia within temporary HDR brachytherapy implants during radiation therapy. Catheter-based ultrasound applicators are capable of 3D spatial control of heating in both angle and length of the devices, with enhanced radial penetration of heating compared to other hyperthermia technologies. A pilot study of the combination of catheter based ultrasound with HDR brachytherapy for locally advanced prostate and cervical cancer has been initiated, and preliminary results of the performance and heating distributions are reported herein. The treatment delivery platform consists of a 32 channel RF amplifier and a 48 channel thermocouple monitoring system. Controlling software can monitor and regulate frequency and power to each transducer section as required during the procedure. Interstitial applicators consist of multiple transducer sections of 2-4 cm lengthx180 deg and 3-4 cmx360 deg. heating patterns to be inserted in specific placed 13g implant catheters. The endocavity device, designed to be inserted within a 6 mm OD plastic tandem catheter within the cervix, consists of 2-3 transducers x dual 180 or 360 deg sectors. 3D temperature based treatment planning and optimization is dovetailed to the HDR optimization based planning to best configure and position the applicators within the catheters, and to determine optimal base power levels to each transducer section. To date we have treated eight cervix implants and four prostate implants. 100% of treatments achieved a goal of >60 min duration, with therapeutic temperatures achieved in all cases. Thermal dosimetry within the hyperthermia target volume (HTV) and clinical target volume (CTV) are reported. Catheter-based ultrasound hyperthermia with HDR appears feasible with therapeutic temperature coverage of the target volume within the prostate or cervix while sparing surrounding more sensitive regions.

  18. Newly Designed Y-configured Single-Catheter Stenting for the Treatment of Hilar-Type Nonanastomotic Biliary Strictures After Orthotopic Liver Transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: This study was designed to introduce our novel technique of percutaneous single catheter placement into the hilar bile ducts strictures while fulfilling the purpose of bilateral biliary drainage and stenting. We investigated the efficacy and safety of the technique for the treatment of hilar nonanastomotic biliary strictures. Methods: Ten patients who were post-orthotopic liver transplantation between July 2000 and July 2010 were enrolled in this study. Percutaneous Y-configured single-catheter stenting for bilateral bile ducts combined with balloon dilation was designed as the main treatment approach. Technical success rate, clinical indicators, complications, and recurrent rate were analyzed. Results: Technical success rate was 100%. Nine of the ten patients had biochemical normalization, cholangiographic improvement, and clinical symptoms relief. None of them experienced recurrence in a median follow-up of 26 months after completion of therapy and removal of all catheters. Complications were minor and limited to two patients. The one treatment failure underwent a second liver transplantation but died of multiple system organ failure. Conclusions: Percutaneous transhepatic Y-configured single-catheter stenting into the hilar bile ducts is technically feasible. The preliminary trial of this technique combined with traditional PTCD or choledochoscopy for the treatment of hilar biliary strictures after orthotopic liver transplantation appeared to be effective and safe. Yet, further investigation is needed.

  19. Percutaneous Placement of Central Venous Catheters: Comparing the Anatomical Landmark Method with the Radiologically Guided Technique for Central Venous Catheterization Through the Internal Jugular Vein in Emergent Hemodialysis Patients

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koroglu, M.; Demir, M.; Koroglu, B.K.; Sezer, M.T.; Akhan, O.; Yildiz, H.; Yavuz, L.; Baykal, B.; Oyar, O. [Suleyman Demirel Univ., Isparta (Turkey). Depts. of Radiology, Internal Medicine and Anesthesiology

    2006-02-15

    Purpose: To compare the success and immediate complication rates of the anatomical landmark method (group 1) and the radiologically (combined real-time ultrasound and fluoroscopy) guided technique (group 2) in the placement of central venous catheters in emergent hemodialysis patients. Material and Methods: The study was performed prospectively in a randomized manner. The success and immediate complication rates of radiologically guided placement of central venous access catheters through the internal jugular vein (n = 40) were compared with those of the anatomical landmark method (n 40). The success of placement, the complications, the number of passes required, and whether a single or double-wall puncture occurred were also noted and compared. Results: The groups were comparable in age and sex. The indication for catheter placement was hemodialysis access in all patients. Catheter placement was successful in all patients in group 2 and unsuccessful in 1 (2.5%) patient in group 1. All catheters functioned adequately and immediately after the placement (0% initial failure rate) in group 2, but 3 catheters (7.5% initial failure rate) were non-functional just after placement in group 1. The total number of needle passes, double venous wall puncture, and complication rate were significantly lower in group 2. Conclusion: Percutaneous central venous catheterization via the internal jugular vein can be performed by interventional radiologists with better technical success rates and lower immediate complications. In conclusion, central venous catheterization for emergent dialysis should be performed under both real-time ultrasound and fluoroscopic guidance.

  20. Dual-phase CT angiography through the port-catheter system for hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy using multislice CT: assessment of system dysfunction and impact on predicting clinical problems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background Hepatic arterial infusion (HAI) chemotherapy is being explored for treatment of malignant liver tumors. Maintenance of HAI systems is important for effective treatment. Purpose To prospectively evaluate the efficacy of dual-phase CT angiography through the port-catheter system for HAI chemotherapy. Material and Methods This study enrolled 47 patients receiving HAI chemotherapy for malignant liver tumors who underwent dual-phase CT angiography through the port-catheter system using multislice CT. Using maximum intensity projection images reconstructed from vascular-phase CT imaging, hepatic arterial patency and catheter location were assessed. Using a combination of vascular- and perfusion-phase CT imaging, system dysfunction and clinical problems were evaluated. Results Dual-phase CT angiography was conducted 156 times. Stenosis and obstruction of the hepatic artery and catheter dislodgment were observed seven times in four patients and four times in three patients, respectively. Diagnostic accuracy using vascular-phase CT imaging was 100%. In addition, development of collateral blood supply to the liver and extrahepatic perfusion to the stomach were observed three times in three patients and twice in two patients, respectively. Overall, system dysfunction occurred 16 times in 12 patients, and system correction and treatment modification were required 11 times in 10 patients. In assessing system dysfunction and predicting clinical problems, the accuracy of dual-phase CT imaging was 100%. Conclusion Dual-phase CT angiography through the port-catheter system is helpful for assessing catheter system dysfunction and predicting clinical problems in HAI chemotherapy

  1. Use of open-ended Foley catheter to treat profuse urine leakage around suprapubic catheter in a female patient with spina bifida who had undergone closure of urethra and suprapubic cystostomy: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Vaidyanathan, Subramanian; Soni, Bakul M.; Peter L. Hughes; Singh, Gurpreet

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Leakage of urine around a catheter is not uncommon in spinal cord injury patients, who have indwelling urethral catheter. Aetiological factors for leakage of urine around a catheter are bladder spasms, partial blockage of catheter, constipation, and urine infection. Usually, leakage of urine subsides when the underlying cause is treated. Leakage of urine around a suprapubic catheter is very rare and occurs in patients, in whom the urethra is closed due to severe stricture or prev...

  2. Static and angioscintigraphic liver scans for controlling of catheter and pump functions during chemotherapy of liver malignoms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    104 static and angioscintigraphic liver scans (RNAs) and 64 DSAs were recorded within 23 months in 49 patients receiving non-systemic intra-arterial chemotherapy through an implanted arterial hepatic catheter. RNA showed catheter dislocation or defects, thrombosis and extravasation in 14 cases and extrahepatic perfusion (of the stomach) in another 6. DSA confirmed these findings throughout and offered additional information on the topographic location in 6 instances. The efficacy of cytostatic treatment was monitored in 30 patients (26 of them with liver secondaries of primary gastrointestinal tumors and 4 with primary liver cancer): 3 showed tumor regression, in 9 there was no change, and in 18 the disease was found to be progressive. A potential relationship between the treatment response and the perfusion of metastases is discussed. While RNA and DSA appear to be equally sensitive in detecting perfusion deficits, DSA is more specific than RNA in identifying the type and location of complications. But RNA is superior to DSA in estimating the size and flow conditions of secondaries and detecting tumor-related av shunts. Consequently, RNA is helpful for checking catheter and pump function and, in combination with static liver scans, in evaluating the success of selective chemotherapy. Radiology and nuclear medicine are complementary. In uncomplicated cases RNA alone may be sufficient. (Author)

  3. Needle localization using a moving stylet/catheter in ultrasound-guided regional anesthesia: a feasibility study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beigi, Parmida; Rohling, Robert

    2014-03-01

    Despite the wide range and long history of ultrasound guided needle insertions, an unresolved issue in many cases is clear needle visibility. A well-known ad hoc technique to detect the needle is to move the stylet and look for changes in the needle appearance. We present a new method to automatically locate a moving stylet/catheter within a stationary cannula using motion detection. We then use this information to detect the needle trajectory and the tip. The differences between the current frame and the previous frame are detected and localized, to minimize the influence of tissue global motions. A polynomial fit based on the detected needle axis determines the estimated stylet shaft trajectory, and the extent of the differences along the needle axis represents the tip. Over a few periodic movements of the stylet including its full insertion into the cannula to the tip, a combination of polynomial fits determines the needle trajectory and the last detected point represents the needle tip. Experiments are conducted in water bath and bovine muscle tissue for several stylet/catheter materials. Results show that a plastic stylet has the best needle shaft and tip localization accuracy in the water bath with RMSE = 0:16 mm and RMSE = 0:51 mm, respectively. In the bovine tissue, the needle tip was best localized with the plastic catheter with RMSE = 0:33 mm. The stylet tip localization was most accurate with the steel stylet, with RMSE = 2:81 mm and the shaft was best localized with the plastic catheter, with RMSE = 0:32 mm.

  4. Yttrium-90 Resin Microsphere Radioembolization Using an Antireflux Catheter: An Alternative to Traditional Coil Embolization for Nontarget Protection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Morshedi, Maud M., E-mail: maud.morshedi@my.rfums.org; Bauman, Michael, E-mail: mbauman@ucsd.edu; Rose, Steven C., E-mail: scrose@ucsd.edu; Kikolski, Steven G., E-mail: skikolski@gmail.com [University of California San Diego Health Sciences, Radiology Department, University of California San Diego Medical Center (United States)

    2015-04-15

    PurposeSerious complications can result from nontarget embolization during yttrium-90 (Y-90) transarterial radioembolization. Hepatoenteric artery coil embolization has been traditionally performed to prevent nontarget radioembolization. The U.S. Food and Drug Administration–approved Surefire Infusion System (SIS) catheter, designed to prevent reflux, is an alternative to coils. The hypothesis that quantifiable SIS procedural parameters are comparable to coil embolization was tested.MethodsFourteen patients aged 36–79 years with colorectal, neuroendocrine, hepatocellular, and other predominantly bilobar hepatic tumors who underwent resin microsphere Y-90 radioembolization using only the SIS catheter (n = 7) versus only detachable coils (n = 7) for nontarget protection were reviewed retrospectively. Procedure time, fluoroscopy time, contrast dose, radiation dose, and cost were evaluated.ResultsMultivariate analysis identified significant cohort differences in the procedural parameters evaluated (F(10, 3) = 10.39, p = 0.04). Between-group comparisons of the pretreatment planning procedure in the SIS catheter group compared to the coil embolization group demonstrated a significant reduction in procedure time (102.6 vs. 192.1 min, respectively, p = 0.0004), fluoroscopy time (14.3 vs. 49.7 min, respectively, p = 0.0016), and contrast material dose (mean dose of 174.3 vs. 265.0 mL, respectively, p = 0.0098). Procedural parameters were not significantly different between the two groups during subsequent dose delivery procedures. Overall cost of combined first-time radioembolization procedures was significantly less in the SIS group ($4252) compared to retrievable coil embolization ($11,123; p = 0.001).ConclusionThe SIS catheter results in a reduction in procedure time, fluoroscopy time, and contrast material dose and may be an attractive cost-effective alternative to detachable coil embolization for prevention of nontarget radioembolization.

  5. Efficacy of Linezolid and Fosfomycin in Catheter-Related Biofilm Infection Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dong Chai

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available As long-standing clinical problems, catheter-related infections and other chronic biofilm infections are more difficult to treat due to the high antibiotic resistance of biofilm. Therefore, new treatments are needed for more effective bacteria clearance. In this study, we evaluated the antibacterial activities of several common antibiotics alone and their combinations against biofilm-embedded methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA infections, both in vitro and in vivo. In brief, fosfomycin, levofloxacin, and rifampin alone or in combination with linezolid were tested in vitro against planktonic and biofilm-embedded MRSA infection in three MRSA stains. The synergistic effects between linezolid and the other three antibiotics were assessed by fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI and time-kill curves, where the combination of linezolid plus fosfomycin showed the best synergistic effect in all strains. For further evaluation in vivo, we applied the combination of linezolid and fosfomycin in a catheter-related biofilm rat model and found that viable bacteria counts in biofilm were significantly reduced after treatment (P<0.05. In summary, we have shown here that the combination of linezolid and fosfomycin treatment had improved therapeutic effects on biofilm-embedded MRSA infection both in vitro and in vivo, which provided important basis for new clinical therapy development.

  6. Irrigated Tip Catheters for Radiofrequency Ablation in Ventricular Tachycardia

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    Andreas Müssigbrodt

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency (RF ablation with irrigated tip catheters decreases the likelihood of thrombus and char formation and enables the creation of larger lesions. Due to the potential dramatic consequences, the prevention of thromboembolic events is of particular importance for left-sided procedures. Although acute success rates of ventricular tachycardia (VT ablation are satisfactory, recurrence rate is high. Apart from the progress of the underlying disease, reconduction and the lack of effective transmural lesions play a major role for VT recurrences. This paper reviews principles of lesion formation with radiofrequency and the effect of tip irrigation as well as recent advances in new technology. Potential areas of further development of catheter technology might be the improvement of mapping by better substrate definition and resolution, the introduction of bipolar and multipolar ablation techniques into clinical routine, and the use of alternative sources of energy.

  7. Technical developments: use of targeting guide wire in left subclavian puncture during percutaneous implantation of port-catheter systems using the catheter tip fixation method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our objective was to evaluate the feasibility and safety of a new method in approaching the access route percutaneously for the implantable port-catheter system for repeated hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy. Fifteen patients underwent port-catheter system placement via the left subclavian artery with the catheter tip fixed within the gastroduodenal artery with embolic materials and a catheter side hole opening to the common hepatic artery. Before port-catheter placement, the right gastric artery was embolized via the femoral catheter access. Then a 0.035-in. guide wire was inserted from the right femoral artery to the left subclavian artery. The guide wire was left in place during puncture by the needle as an access route for catheter placement. At the time of puncture, the tip of the puncture needle was aimed at the guide wire placed in the subclavian artery beforehand. In all 15 patients the procedure was successfully completed in a reasonable time (mean time 95.0 min, range 50-240 min). Complications occurred in two patients: a transient numbness of the arm in 1 patient and a mild hematoma detected in the subcutaneous pocket in another patient. This experience indicates the possibility of using a targeting guide wire in puncture of the subclavian artery as an access route for catheter placement. (orig.)

  8. Usefulness and safety of the GuideLiner catheter to enhance intubation and support of guide catheters: insights from the Twente GuideLiner registry

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Man, de F.H.; Birgelen, von C.; et al,

    2012-01-01

    Aims: Optimal ostial seating and adequate back-up of guide catheters are required for challenging percutaneous coronary interventions (PCI). The GuideLiner™ (GL) (Vascular Solutions Inc., Minneapolis, MN, USA) is a guide catheter extension system that provides active back-up support by deep coronary

  9. Symptomatic improvement after radiofrequency catheter ablation for typical atrial flutter

    OpenAIRE

    O'Callaghan, P.; Meara, M; Kongsgaard, E; Poloniecki, J.; Luddington, L; Foran, J; Camm, A; Rowland, E; Ward, D.

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To assess the changes in quality of life, arrhythmia symptoms, and hospital resource utilisation following catheter ablation of typical atrial flutter.
DESIGN—Patient questionnaire to compare the time interval following ablation with a similar time interval before ablation.
SETTING—Tertiary referral centre.
PATIENTS—63 consecutive patients were studied. Four patients subsequently underwent an ablate and pace procedure, two died of co-morbid illnesses, and two were lost to follow up....

  10. Determination of lesion size by ultrasound during radiofrequency catheter ablation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awad, S; Eick, O

    2003-01-01

    The catheter tip temperature that is used to control the radiofrequency generator output poorly correlates to lesion size. We, therefore, evaluated lesions created in vitro using a B-mode ultrasound imaging device as a potential means to assess lesion generation during RF applications non-invasively. Porcine ventricular tissue was immersed in saline solution at 37 degrees C. The catheter was fixed in a holder and positioned in a parallel orientation to the tissue with an array transducer (7.5 MHz) app. 3 cm above the tissue. Lesions were produced either in a temperature controlled mode with a 4-mm tip catheter with different target temperatures (50, 60, 70 and 80 degrees C, 80 W maximum output) or in a power controlled mode (25, 50 and 75 W, 20 ml/min irrigation flow) using an irrigated tip catheter. Different contact forces (0.5 N, 1.0 N) were tested, and RF was delivered for 60 s. A total of 138 lesions was produced. Out of these, 128 could be identified on the ultrasound image. The lesion depth and volume was on average 4.1 +/- 1.6 mm and 52 +/- 53 mm3 as determined by ultrasound and 3.9 +/- 1.7 mm and 52 +/- 55 mm3 as measured thereafter, respectively. A linear correlation between the lesion size determined by ultrasound and that measured thereafter was demonstrated with a correlation coefficient of r = 0.87 for lesion depth and r = 0.93 for lesion volume. We conclude that lesions can be assessed by B-mode ultrasound imaging. PMID:12910859

  11. Neurostimulation leads, intrathecal catheters and anchoring devices evolution

    OpenAIRE

    Laura Demartini; Gianluca Conversa; Luciana Armiento; Lucia Angelini; Cesare Bonezzi

    2015-01-01

    Many scientific studies highlight the usefulness of spinal cord stimulation and intrathecal therapy for the management of chronic pain syndromes resistant to pharmacological or less invasive interventional therapies. One of the possible complications of these techniques, reported in literature, is migration of the lead or catheter; thus the use of an anchoring system is considered mandatory. Every company that produces devices for neurostimulation or neuromodulation provides various anchoring...

  12. EVALUATION OF A NEW CATHETER FOR ESOPHAGEAL PH MONITORING

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    KUIT, JA; SCHEPEL, SJ; BIJLEVELD, CMA; KLEIBEUKER, JH

    1991-01-01

    A new catheter, provided with an Ion Sensitive Field Effect Transistor as a pH sensor and incorporating a reference electrode, was evaluated for esophageal pH recording. The pH-sensitivity was 54 mV/pH in vitro, with a linear response between pH 2 and pH 9. Clinical semi-ambulatory 24-hour esophagea

  13. Engineering out the risk for infection with urinary catheters.

    OpenAIRE

    Maki, D G; Tambyah, P.A.

    2001-01-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) is the most common nosocomial infection. Each year, more than 1 million patients in U.S. acute-care hospitals and extended-care facilities acquire such an infection; the risk with short-term catheterization is 5% per day. CAUTI is the second most common cause of nosocomial bloodstream infection, and studies suggest that patients with CAUTI have an increased institutional death rate, unrelated to the development of urosepsis. Novel urinary ca...

  14. Remote control catheter navigation: options for guidance under MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Muller Leah; Saeed Maythem; Wilson Mark W; Hetts Steven W

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background Image-guided endovascular interventions have gained increasing popularity in clinical practice, and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is emerging as an attractive alternative to X-ray fluoroscopy for guiding such interventions. Steering catheters by remote control under MRI guidance offers unique challenges and opportunities. Methods In this review, the benefits and limitations of MRI-guided remote control intervention are addressed, and the tools for guiding such intervent...

  15. Microbiological pattern of arterial catheters in the intensive care unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel Bharat

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intravascular catheter related infection (CRI is one of the most serious nosocomial infections. Diagnostic criteria include a positive culture from the catheter tip along with blood, yet in many patients with signs of infection, current culture techniques fail to identify pathogens on catheter segments. We hypothesised that a molecular examination of the bacterial community on short term arterial catheters (ACs would improve our understanding of the variety of organisms that are present in this niche environment and would help develop new methods for the diagnosis of CRI. Results The whole bacterial community presenting on all ACs was evaluated by molecular methods, i.e., a strategy of whole community DNA extraction, PCR amplification followed by cloning and 16S rDNA sequence analysis. Ten ACs were removed from patients suspected of CRI and 430 clones from 5 "colonised" and 5 "uncolonised" (semi-quantitative method AC libraries were selected for sequencing and subsequent analysis. A total of 79 operational taxonomic units (OTUs were identified at the level of 97% similarity belonging to six bacterial divisions. An average of 20 OTUs were present in each AC, irrespective of colonisation status. Conventional culture failed to reveal the majority of these bacteria. Conclusions There was no significant difference in the bacterial diversity between the 'uncolonised' and 'colonised' ACs. This suggests that vascular devices cultured conventionally and reported as non infective may at times potentially be a significant source of sepsis in critically ill patients. Alternative methods may be required for the accurate diagnosis of CRI in critically ill patients.

  16. Recycling of catheters used in angiography. Communication 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recycling and resterilisation of throwaway articles - in radiology especially of catheters used in angiography - has become widespread to save costs. Although extensive experimental work in this field is still lacking, criteria have been set up as guidelines to ensure safe recycling. These are subdivided into three parts: Cleaning - sterilisation - material testing. Experimental studies have been reported on sterilisation only proving the inadequacy of two ethylene oxide methods conventionally used in hospitals. (orig.)

  17. A catheter related sepsis case caused by Pantoea agglomerans

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadime Yılmaz

    2015-04-01

    microorganism was sensitive to piperacillin-tazobactam, so, patient's therapy was not changed. After treatment, when the general condition of the patient healed, he was discharged by ending antibiotics on the sixteenth day. This case report, is intended to call attention to the risk of the growth of catheter-associated sepsis and antibioterapi are lated to P. agglomerans which is rarely seen on immunocompromised patients.

  18. Neuropsychological Decline After Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Schwarz, N

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The article “Neuropsychological decline after cath- eter ablation of atrial fibrillation” by Schwarz et al. is the first publication that focused on cognitive side effects of elective circumferential pulmonary vein isolation (PVI.1 Adverse neuropsychological changes after left atrial catheter ablation, as report- ed in this paper, were found in verbal memory and the result, conjoined with ischemic brain lesions, might represent cerebral side-effects of the ablation procedure.

  19. Catheter Ablation without Fluoroscopy: Current Techniques and Future Direction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amee M. Bigelow, MD; Grace Smith, MD; John M. Clark, MD

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Catheter ablation is the treatment of choice for most forms of SVT. Traditionally, fluoroscopy has been the primary tool for visualizing catheter position. However, newer, 3-dimensional mapping technologies offer multiple options for minimizing fluoroscopy use. We review our 8 year experience of a zero-fluoroscopy approach using the Ensite system, and discuss our current techniques. Methods: From January 2006 to October 2013, we performed 524 catheter ablation procedures with a zero-fluoroscopy approach. The Ensite system was used exclusively. Early in the study, NavX mode was employed. In the later time period, Velocity mode was used. The Ensite system allowed easy access to all right sided arrhythmias. For left sided arrhythmias, TEE was added to aid with transseptal puncture. Results: Reviewing 524 consecutive procedures, mean age was 14 years (range 7 weeks to 65 years. Mean weight was 60.7 kg (range 3 to 174 kg. Mean procedure time was 142 minutes (range 42 – 402 minutes. There were no complications. Twenty -five patients required the use of fluoroscopy, mostly as part of simultaneous diagnostic or interventional cath procedures. There was only one instance in which fluoroscopy was used when not anticipated at the start of the procedure. With this data available, and seeing that fluoroscopy is rarely needed unexpectedly, we hypothesized that catheter ablation no longer requires a traditional cath lab. We present our early approach to ablation outside the catheterization lab. Conclusion: Three dimensional mapping systems can eliminate fluoroscopy use in virtually all routine ablation procedures. As technology improves, ablation procedures will shift beyond the traditional cath lab.

  20. Complications Encountered with a Transfemorally Placed Port-Catheter System for Hepatic Artery Chemotherapy Infusion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A port-catheter system was implanted via femoral artery access for hepatic artery chemotherapy infusion. Implantation was attempted in 90 patients and was successful in 88. Blood flow redistribution was performed using embolization coils. In the first ten patients a soft heparin-coated infusion catheter was used. For the following 78 patients we used a stiffer catheter coated with fluorine-acryl-styrene-urethane-silicone (FASUS) copolymer. The catheter was connected to a port implanted subcutaneously below the level of the inguinal ligament. Complications during the procedure and after placement were observed in 7 of 90 patients and 24 of 88 patients, respectively. These included catheter obstruction (11%), dislocation of the catheter tip (10%), drug toxicity (5.7%), and catheter infection (3.4%). In 6 of 10 patients with catheter obstruction, recanalization of the port system was achieved. In 7 of 9 patients with dislocation of the indwelling catheter tip, replacement of the port system was successful. Our complications appear to be comparable with those encountered with the subclavian/brachial approach when the new catheter coating is used. Notable is the avoidance of cerebral infarcts

  1. Effect of two different short peripheral catheter materials on phlebitis development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karadağ, A; Görgülü, S

    2000-01-01

    One of the most common causes of phlebitis in hospitalized patients is intravenous catheters. The material of the catheter is a determining factor in the development of phlebitis, as are factors such as age, gender, and medical diagnosis of the patient. The aim of this study, conducted in the coronary care unit of a 384-bed hospital in Ankara, Turkey, was to determine the effect of two different short peripheral catheters on phlebitis development caused by i.v. treatment. Overall, 255 patients constituted the study sample (130 with Teflon, 125 with Vialon catheters). Both groups were followed up for phlebitis development for 6 days. The total phlebitis rate was 36.8%, with almost half of the patients (49.2%) in the Teflon catheter group and 24.0% of patients in the Vialon catheter group. A significant statistical relationship was found between phlebitis rate and variables such as gender, catheter material, and indwelling time. The results of the study demonstrate that Vialon catheters are associated with less risk of catheter-induced phlebitis than are Teflon catheters. PMID:11272972

  2. Correction of malfunctioning peritoneal dialysis catheter with guidewire and stiffener under fluoroscopic guidance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the efficacy of correction of a malfunctioning peritoneal dialysis catheter with guidewire and stiffener under fluoroscopic guidance. Between November 1994 and March 1997, we performed 15 manipulations in 12 patients in whom a dual-cuff, straight Tenckhoff peritoneal dialysis catheter had been implanted due to chronic renal failure. The causes of catheter malfunctioning were inadequate drainage of the dialysate(n=14) and painful dialysis(n=1). Under fluoroscopic guidance, adhesiolysis and repositioning of the malfunctioning catheter were performed with an Amplatz Super Stiff guidewire and the stiffener from a biliary drainage catheter. The results of procedures were categorized as either immediate or durable success, this latter being defined as adequate catheter function for at least one month after the procedure. Immediate success was achieved in 14 of 15 procedures (93%), and durable success in 7 of 15(47%). The mean duration of catheter function was 157 (range, 30 to 578) days. After manipulation, abdominal pain developed in eight patients and peritonitis in two, but with conservative treatment, these symptoms improved. The correction of a malfunctioning peritoneal dialysis catheter with guidewire and stiffener under fluoroscopic guidance is an effective means of restoring catheter function and may be an effective alternative to surgical reimplantation of the catheter, or hemodialysis

  3. Selection of the vascular catheter: can it minimise the risk of infection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouza, E; Guembe, M; Muñoz, P

    2010-12-01

    Data regarding the prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infection (CRBSI) by making the correct decisions about when to place a central line, the appropriate selection of catheter composition and the size and number of lumens, a suitable choice of insertion site and the technique used are not well reported in recent medical literature. There is no clear evidence that the composition of the catheters presently on the market makes a significant difference to the risk of infection. Several prospective studies suggest that femoral vein location represents the highest risk of infection, followed by jugular vein and subclavian vein positioning, however, most articles do not correct for basic confounding variables. Several papers have reported that arterial catheters have a similar risk of infection as central venous catheters (CVCs). The slight increase in infection risk when using multi-lumen catheters is probably offset by their improved convenience. Current evidence does not support routine tunnelling of short-term catheters until its efficacy is evaluated at different placement sites, using specific catheters and situations and in relation to other preventive interventions. Cuffing is usually applied only to long-term tunnelled catheters. The available evidence suggests that chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine, minocycline-rifampicin CVCs and antifungal-coated catheters are useful in decreasing the incidence of CRBSI when other measures are not effective. PMID:21130605

  4. Development of A MEMS Based Manometric Catheter for Diagnosis of Functional Swallowing Disorders

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silicon pressure sensors based on micro-electro-mechanical-systems (MEMS) technologies are gaining popularity for applications in bio-medical devices. In this study, a silicon piezo-resistive pressure sensor die is used in a feasibility study of developing a manometric catheter for functional swallowing disorders diagnosis. The function of a manometric catheter is to measure the peak and intrabolus pressures along the esophageal segment during the swallowing action. Previous manometric catheters used the water perfusion technique to measure the pressure changes. This type of catheter is reusable, large in size and the pressure reading is recorded by an external transducer. Current manometric catheters use a solid state pressure sensor on the catheter itself to measure the pressure changes. This type of catheter reduces the discomfort to the patient but it is reusable and is very expensive. We carried out several studies and experiments on the MEMS-based pressure sensor die, and the results show the MEMS-based pressure sensors have a good stability and a good linearity output response, together with the advantage of low excitation biasing voltage and extremely small size. The MEMS-based sensor is the best device to use in the new generation of manometric catheters. The concept of the new MEMS-based manometric catheter consists of a pressure sensing sensor, supporting ring, the catheter tube and a data connector. Laboratory testing shows that the new calibrated catheter is capable of measuring pressure in the range from 0 to 100mmHg and maintaining stable condition on the zero baseline setting when no pressure is applied. In-vivo tests are carried out to compare the new MEMS based catheter with the current version of catheters used in the hospital

  5. Percutaneous interventional radiologic implantation of intravenous port-catheter systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Percutaneous interventional radiologic and surgical techniques of port-catheter implantation are described and compared with regard to the technical procedure and results. Materials and methods: In 53 patients with various malignancies interventional radiologic implantation of port-catheter systems into the subclavian vein was performed to provide long-term intravenous access for chemotherapy. The technical procedure, operation time, complication rates and long-term patency were compared with those of surgically implanted systems. Results: Implantation was successful in all cases. Mean operation time was 36 min (range 20-55 min). Mean function time was 189 days (range 7-518). Primary patency rate was 92.5% with a total complication rate of 15% (8/53). In three patients (5.7%) pneumothorax was observed but did not require further treatment. In two cases (3.8%) local infection occurred, and in one patient (1.8%) a non-complicated wound dehiscence. In 12/53 patients (22.6%) the system was withdrawn. Among these, withdrawal was due to complications in 4/53 (7.6%) cases. Conclusions: Interventional radiologic implantation of long-term intravenous port-catheter systems is comparable to surgical placement with regard to both complication rate and long-term patency. (orig.)

  6. Catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation in the elderly

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Louiza Lioni; Konstantinos P Letsas; Michael Efremidis; Konstantinos Vlachos; Georgios Giannopoulos; Vasileios Kareliotis; Spyridon Deftereos; Antonios Sideris

    2014-01-01

    Background Atrial fibrillation (AF) catheter ablation has emerged as a promising treatment strategy for AF, but has not been widely adopted in the elderly population. The present study aimed to determine the safety and efficacy of AF catheter ablation in the elderly popula-tion. Methods and Results The study population consisted of 316 patients with paroxysmal AF who underwent left atrial ablation. Ninety-five patients were≥65 years (48 males, mean age 68.9 ± 3.0 years old) and 221 patients were<65 years old (130 males, mean age 52.5 ± 10.4 years old). After a mean follow-up period of 34.0 ± 15.1 months, 55 (57.9%) patients in the elderly group were free from ar-rhythmia recurrence compared with 149 (67.4%) patients in the younger group (P=0.169). Procedural complications were uncommon in both study groups. In logistic regression analysis, left atrial diameter (P=0.003), hypertension (P=0.001), dyslipidemia (P=0.039), and coronary artery disease (P=0.018) were independent predictors of AF recurrence in the elderly population. Conclusions Catheter ablation of AF is safe and effective in older patients. Invasive strategies should be considered as an alternative choice in symptomatic elderly patients with AF.

  7. Bioelectromagnetic localization of a pacing catheter in the heart

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accuracy of localizing source currents within the human heart by non-invasive magneto- and electrocardiographic methods was investigated in 10 patients. A non-magnetic stimulation catheter inside the heart served as a reference current source. Biplane fluoroscopic imaging with lead ball markers was used to record the catheter position. Simultaneous multichannel magnetocardiographic (MCG) and body surface potential mapping (BSPM) recordings were performed during catheter pacing. Equivalent current dipole localizations were computed from MCG and BSPM data, employing standard and patient-specific boundary element torso models. Using individual models with the lungs included, the average MCG localization error was 7±3 mm, whereas the average BSPM localization error was 25±4 mm. In the simplified case of a single homogeneous standard torso model, an average error of 9±3 mm was obtained from MCG recordings. The MCG localization accuracies obtained in this study imply that the capability of multichannel MCG to locate dipolar sources is sufficient for clinical purposes, even without constructing individual torso models from x-ray or from magnetic resonance images. (author)

  8. Bioelectromagnetic localization of a pacing catheter in the heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pesola, K.; Nenonen, J.; Fenici, R.; Lötjönen, J.; Mäkijärvi, M.; Fenici, P.; Korhonen, P.; Lauerma, K.; Valkonen, M.; Toivonen, L.; Katila, T.

    1999-10-01

    The accuracy of localizing source currents within the human heart by non-invasive magneto- and electrocardiographic methods was investigated in 10 patients. A non-magnetic stimulation catheter inside the heart served as a reference current source. Biplane fluoroscopic imaging with lead ball markers was used to record the catheter position. Simultaneous multichannel magnetocardiographic (MCG) and body surface potential mapping (BSPM) recordings were performed during catheter pacing. Equivalent current dipole localizations were computed from MCG and BSPM data, employing standard and patient-specific boundary element torso models. Using individual models with the lungs included, the average MCG localization error was 7±3 mm, whereas the average BSPM localization error was 25±4 mm. In the simplified case of a single homogeneous standard torso model, an average error of 9±3 mm was obtained from MCG recordings. The MCG localization accuracies obtained in this study imply that the capability of multichannel MCG to locate dipolar sources is sufficient for clinical purposes, even without constructing individual torso models from x-ray or from magnetic resonance images.

  9. A Dynamical Training and Design Simulator for Active Catheters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Georges Dumont

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available This work addresses the design of an active multi-link micro-catheter actuated by Shape Memory Alloy (SMA micro actuators. This may be a response to one medical major demand on such devices, which will be useful for surgical explorations and interventions. In this paper, we focus on a training and design simulator dedicated to such catheters. This simulator is based on an original simulation platform (OpenMASK. The catheter is a robotic system, which is evaluated by a dynamical simulation addressing a navigation task in its environment. The design of the prototype and its mechanical model are presented. We develop an interaction model for contact. This model uses a real medical database for which distance cartography is proposed. Then we focus on an autonomous control model based on a multi-agent approach and including the behaviour description of the SMA actuators. Results of mechanical simulations including interaction with the ducts are presented. Furthermore, the interest of such a simulator is presented by applying virtual prototyping techniques for the design optimization. This optimization process is achieved by using genetic algorithms at different stages with respect to the specified task.

  10. The Malposition of Central Venous Catheters in Children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Contemporary medical care, especially in the field of pediatrics often requires central venous line (CVC – Central Venous Catheter) implantation for carrying out treatment. Some conditions are treated intravenously for several months, other require long-term venous access due to periodical administration of medications or daily nutritional supplementation. A total number of 309 CVCs were implanted at Children’s University Hospital in Cracow between January 2011 and December 2012 (24 months). Malposition of the CVC is not common. The target of our article was to present two rare cases of malposition of catheters and two displacements of catheter due to chest tumors, and to enhance the importance of differential diagnostic imaging when difficulties occur. CVC malposition was detected with different imaging modalities followed by appropriate medical procedures. In case of any difficulties with central lines, it is necessary to investigate the underlying cause. The central line team at hospital cooperating with other specialists is needed to detect complications and to prevent them

  11. Comment on "Comparison of dose rates calculated on Nucletron NPS v11 catheter tracking versus catheter describing"

    CERN Document Server

    Van der Laarse, R

    2003-01-01

    N D MacDougall has reported to Nucletron a dose error in the module MPS v11.33 of the Nucletron NPS brachytherapy program. This dose error occurred when an implant was reconstructed using the image tracking method. MPS v11 offers five methods for reconstruction from radiographs of the 3D localization in space of an iridium wire implant. The method using catheter-describing points is the most accurate one. It is based on digitizing the corresponding images of X-ray markers in the catheters on two radiographs, taken at different angles with an isocentric X-ray machine such as a treatment simulator. The method using tracking is the least accurate one. It tracks wire images on the radiographs to reconstruct a wire in space consisting of maximally 98 wire segments. This is the least accurate method because there is no correspondence between the image points of a wire on the radiographs.

  12. Low rate of asymptomatic cerebral embolism and improved procedural efficiency with the novel pulmonary vein ablation catheter GOLD: results of the PRECISION GOLD trial

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Greef, Yves; Dekker, Lukas; Boersma, Lucas; Murray, Stephen; Wieczorek, Marcus; Spitzer, Stefan G.; Davidson, Neil; Furniss, Steve; Hocini, Mélèze; Geller, J. Christoph; Csanádi, Zoltan

    2016-01-01

    Aims This prospective, multicentre study (PRECISION GOLD) evaluated the incidence of asymptomatic cerebral embolism (ACE) after pulmonary vein isolation (PVI) using a new gold multi-electrode radiofrequency (RF) ablation catheter, pulmonary vein ablation catheter (PVAC) GOLD. Also, procedural efficiency of PVAC GOLD was compared with ERACE. The ERACE study demonstrated that a low incidence of ACE can be achieved with a platinum multi-electrode RF catheter (PVAC) combined with procedural manoeuvres to reduce emboli. Methods and results A total of 51 patients with paroxysmal atrial fibrillation (AF) (age 57 ± 9 years, CHA2DS2-VASc score 1.4 ± 1.4) underwent AF ablation with PVAC GOLD. Continuous oral anticoagulation using vitamin K antagonists, submerged catheter introduction, and heparinization (ACT ≥ 350 s prior to ablation) were applied. Cerebral magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) scans were performed within 48 h before and 16–72 h post-ablation. Cognitive function assessed by the Mini-Mental State Exam at baseline and 30 days post-ablation. New post-procedural ACE occurred in only 1 of 48 patients (2.1%) and was not detectable on MRI after 30 days. The average number of RF applications per patient to achieve PVI was lower in PRECISION GOLD (20.3 ± 10.0) than in ERACE (28.8 ± 16.1; P = 0.001). Further, PVAC GOLD ablations resulted in significantly fewer low-power (energy modes, respectively). Mini-Mental State Exam was unchanged in all patients. Conclusion Atrial fibrillation ablation with PVAC GOLD in combination with established embolic lowering manoeuvres results in a low incidence of ACE. Pulmonary vein ablation catheter GOLD demonstrates improved biophysical efficiency compared with platinum PVAC. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01767558. PMID:26826134

  13. Efficacy of Linezolid and Fosfomycin in Catheter-Related Biofilm Infection Caused by Methicillin-Resistant Staphylococcus aureus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chai, Dong; Liu, Xu; Wang, Rui; Bai, Yan; Cai, Yun

    2016-01-01

    As long-standing clinical problems, catheter-related infections and other chronic biofilm infections are more difficult to treat due to the high antibiotic resistance of biofilm. Therefore, new treatments are needed for more effective bacteria clearance. In this study, we evaluated the antibacterial activities of several common antibiotics alone and their combinations against biofilm-embedded methicillin-resistant staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) infections, both in vitro and in vivo. In brief, fosfomycin, levofloxacin, and rifampin alone or in combination with linezolid were tested in vitro against planktonic and biofilm-embedded MRSA infection in three MRSA stains. The synergistic effects between linezolid and the other three antibiotics were assessed by fractional inhibitory concentration index (FICI) and time-kill curves, where the combination of linezolid plus fosfomycin showed the best synergistic effect in all strains. For further evaluation in vivo, we applied the combination of linezolid and fosfomycin in a catheter-related biofilm rat model and found that viable bacteria counts in biofilm were significantly reduced after treatment (P fosfomycin treatment had improved therapeutic effects on biofilm-embedded MRSA infection both in vitro and in vivo, which provided important basis for new clinical therapy development. PMID:27366751

  14. Impact of catheter antimicrobial coating on species-specific risk of catheter colonization: a meta-analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Novikov Aleksey

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Antimicrobial catheters have been utilized to reduce risk of catheter colonization and infection. We aimed to determine if there is a greater than expected risk of microorganism-specific colonization associated with the use of antimicrobial central venous catheters (CVCs. Methods We performed a meta-analysis of 21 randomized, controlled trials comparing the incidence of specific bacterial and fungal species colonizing antimicrobial CVCs and standard CVCs in hospitalized patients. Results The proportion of all colonized minocycline-rifampin CVCs found to harbor Candida species was greater than the proportion of all colonized standard CVCs found to have Candida. In comparison, the proportion of colonized chlorhexidine-silver sulfadiazine CVCs specifically colonized with Acinetobacter species or diphtheroids was less than the proportion of similarly colonized standard CVCs. No such differences were found with CVCs colonized with staphylococci. Conclusion Commercially-available antimicrobial CVCs in clinical use may become colonized with distinct microbial flora probably related to their antimicrobial spectrum of activity. Some of these antimicrobial CVCs may therefore have limited additional benefit or more obvious advantages compared to standard CVCs for specific microbial pathogens. The choice of an antimicrobial CVC may be influenced by a number of clinical factors, including a previous history of colonization or infection with Acinetobacter, diphtheroids, or Candida species.

  15. Management Of Fever And Suspected Infection In Pediatric Patients With Central Venous Catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brennan, Courtney; Wang, Vincent J

    2015-12-01

    The use of indwelling central venous catheters is essential for pediatric patients who require hemodialysis, parenteral nutrition, chemotherapy, or other medications. Fever is a common chief complaint in the emergency department, and fever in a patient with a central venous catheter may be related to a common cause of fever, or it may be due to a catheter-associated bloodstream infection. Catheter-associated bloodstream infections may also lead to additional complications such as sepsis, septic shock, or septic complications including suppurative thrombophlebitis, endocarditis, osteomyelitis, septic emboli, and abscesses. Early resuscitation as well as timely and appropriate antibiotic therapy have been shown to improve outcomes. This issue focuses on the approach to fever in pediatric patients with central venous catheters and the management and disposition of patients with possible catheter-associated bloodstream infections. PMID:26569627

  16. Percutaneous Placement of Peritoneal Port-Catheter in Patients with Malignant Ascites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report our experience with a radiologically placed peritoneal port-catheter in palliation of malignant ascites. Port-catheters were successfully placed under ultrasonographic and fluoroscopic guidance in seven patients (five women, two men) who had symptomatic malignant ascites. The long-term primary patency rate was 100%. The mean duration of catheter function was 148 days. Seven patients had a total of 1040 port-days. Two patients received intraperitoneal chemotherapy via the port-catheter. There were no procedure-related mortality and major complications. Minor complications such as ascitic fluid leakage from the peritoneal entry site, migration of the catheter tip to the right upper quadrant, and reversal of the port reservoir occurred in four patients. None of these complications affected the drainage and required port explantation. In patients with symptomatic malignant ascites, a peritoneal port-catheter can provide palliation and eliminate multiple hospital visits for repeated paracentesis with high patency and low complication rates

  17. Dosimetric equivalence of non-standard high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy catheter patterns

    CERN Document Server

    Cunha, J Adam M; Pouliot, Jean

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine whether alternative HDR prostate brachytherapy catheter patterns can result in improved dose distributions while providing better access and reducing trauma. Methods: Prostate HDR brachytherapy uses a grid of parallel needle positions to guide the catheter insertion. This geometry does not easily allow the physician to avoid piercing the critical structures near the penile bulb nor does it provide position flexibility in the case of pubic arch interference. On CT data from ten previously-treated patients new catheters were digitized following three catheter patterns: conical, bi-conical, and fireworks. The conical patterns were used to accommodate a robotic delivery using a single entry point. The bi-conical and fireworks patterns were specifically designed to avoid the critical structures near the penile bulb. For each catheter distribution, a plan was optimized with the inverse planning algorithm, IPSA, and compared with the plan used for treatment. Irrelevant of catheter geometry, a p...

  18. Catheter fracture and embolization from totally implanted venous access ports--case reports.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vadlamani, P; Dawn, B; Perry, M C

    1998-12-01

    Totally implanted venous access ports are excellent devices for delivering chemotherapeutic agents and prolonged intravenous infusions in patients with cancer. Catheter fracture and embolization are rare and potentially serious complications of these widely used devices. Retrieval of the embolized fragment is generally indicated but may not be possible. The authors report three cases of catheter embolization in their center over a period of 9 years. Catheter "pinch-off," fracture, embolization, and retrieval are discussed. PMID:9855376

  19. MR-Guided Percutaneous Angioplasty: Assessment of Tracking Safety, Catheter Handling and Functionality

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Magnetic resonance (MR)-guided percutaneous vascular interventions have evolved to a practical possibility with the advent of open-configuration MR systems and real-time tracking techniques. The purpose of this study was to assess an MR-tracking percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA) catheter with regard to its safety profile and functionality. Methods: Real-time, biplanar tracking of the PTA catheter was made possible by incorporating a small radiofrequency (RF) coil in the catheter tip and connecting it to a coaxial cable embedded in the catheter wall. To evaluate potentially hazardous thermal effects due to the incorporation of the coil, temperature measurements were performed within and around the coil under various scanning and tracking conditions at 1.5 Tesla (T). Catheter force transmission and balloon-burst pressure of the MR-tracking PTA catheter were compared with those of a standard PTA catheter. The dilatative capability of the angioplasty balloon was assessed in vitro as well as in vivo, in an isolated femoral artery segment in a swine. Results: The degree of heating at the RF coil was directly proportional to the power of the RF pulses. Heating was negligible with MR tracking, conventional spin-echo and low-flip gradient-echo sequences. Sequences with higher duty cycles, such as fast spin echo, produced harmful heating effects. Force transmission of the MR-tracking PTA catheter was slightly inferior to that of the standard PTA catheter, while balloon-burst pressures were similar to those of conventional catheters. The MR-tracking PTA catheter functioned well both in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion: The in vivo use of an MR-tracking PTA catheter is safe under most scanning conditions

  20. Preparation of Candida albicans Biofilms Using an in vivo Rat Central Venous Catheter Model

    OpenAIRE

    Taff, Heather T; Marchillo, Karen; Andes, David R.

    2013-01-01

    In vivo biofilms grown on medical devices are necessary to understand the interactions of the fungal biofilm and the host environment in which it is most commonly found. This protocol describes a way to grow Candida albicans biofilms on the interior lumen of central venous catheters surgically implanted into rats, which mimics quite well the clinical cases of biofilms found on human central venous catheters. These infected catheters can then be studied via a multitude of different experiments...

  1. Feasibility of virtual 3-Fr percutaneous coronary intervention using standard guiding catheters

    OpenAIRE

    Honda, Tsuyoshi; Fujimoto, Kazuteru; Miyao, Yuji

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Recent studies have reported the efficacy of sheathless percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) using hydrophilic-coated 5-Fr guiding catheters that are one to two Fr sizes smaller in diameter than the corresponding introducer sheath (virtual 3-Fr PCI). However, the limited number of shapes of hydrophilic-coated guiding catheters occasionally makes them difficult to engage and control. Aim To evaluate the efficacy and feasibility of virtual 3-Fr PCI using standard guiding cathet...

  2. A unique case of pulmonary artery catheter bleeding from the oximetry connection port

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Rajagopalan

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary artery catheter is an invasive monitor usually placed in high-risk cardiac surgical patients to optimize the cardiac functions. We present this case of blood oozing from the oximetry connection port of the pulmonary artery catheter that resulted in the inability to monitor continuous cardiac output requiring replacement of the catheter. The cause of this abnormal bleeding was later confirmed to be due to a manufacturing defect.

  3. Urinary Catheter Dependent Loops as a Potential Contributing Cause of Bacteriuria: An Observational Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuthier, Phil; Sublett, Karen; Riehl, Lance

    2016-01-01

    Urologic studies suggest that urinary catheter dependent loops (tubing low points) may be a contributing cause of bacteriuria and urinary tract infection among catheterized patients. The means by which this type of contaminant transmission occurs, however, remains poorly understood. An observational, cross-sectional study was conducted to provide a foundational look at catheter dependent loops and their possible role in catheter-acquired urinary tract infections, and as a building block for further research. PMID:27093758

  4. Simplified Surgical Placement of Tenckhoff Catheter under Local Anesthesia: The Dammam Central Hospital Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Youmbissi T

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available Many methods are used for the placement of Tenckhoff catheters. Eighteen consecutive Tenckhoff catheters were placed under local anesthesia through a mini laparotomy with a reduced operating team. There were only three total catheter failures. Complications were infrequent and operating time was less than one hour on average. This simple procedure should be a part of the training program of all junior surgeons and nephrologists.

  5. Intra-vesical knot of bladder catheter in an extremely low birthweight neonate: A case report

    OpenAIRE

    Paula M.Y. Tang; Kenneth L.Y. Chung; Yvonne C.L. Leung; Judy W.S. Hung; Clarence C.W. Liu; Nicholas S.Y. Chao; Michael W.Y. Leung; Kelvin K.W. Liu

    2015-01-01

    Premature and extremely low birth weight (ELBW) neonates are at high risk of developing multiple co-morbidities and often require urinary catheterization for various medical indications. Intra-vesical knotting of bladder catheter is a known but uncommon complication of this procedure. We report a case of an ELBW baby boy with a knotted bladder catheter requiring surgical retrieval. After an elective operation for the closure of patent ductus arteriosus, a 4 French urinary catheter was inserte...

  6. Catheter-associated Urinary Tract Infection and the Medicare Rule Changes

    OpenAIRE

    Saint, Sanjay; Meddings, Jennifer A.; Calfee, David; Kowalski, Christine P.; Krein, Sarah L.

    2009-01-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infection, a common and potentially preventable complication of hospitalization, is one of the hospital-acquired complications chosen by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) for which hospitals no longer receive additional payment. To help understand the potential consequences of the recent CMS rule changes we examine the preventability of catheter-associated infection, review the CMS rules changes regarding catheter-associated urinary tract i...

  7. Catheter-induced thrombosis in the atrium after central contrast medium injection for venous DSA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During bolus injection for central venous DSA, the high flow rates may cause a jet effect and a whipping movement with subsequent, partial bending up of the pigtail catheter. The paper reports two cases where penetration of catheter tip into the lateral atrial wall has led to intramural contrast extravasation and subsequent formation of a thrombus adherent to the wall. In order to prevent myocardial perforation, a modified placement of the catheter is suggested as a possible and simple method. (orig.)

  8. Ultrasound guided percutaneous drainage of pericardial fluid with an indwelling catheter

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ekberg, O.; Nilsson, P.E.; Aspelin, P.

    1986-10-01

    The technique of ultrasonographic guided percutaneous drainage of pericardial fluid, applied in three patients, is reported. The primary disease was synovial sarcoma, rheumatoid arthritis and prostatic carcinoma, respectively. Although three slightly different techniques and catheters were used all patients were sufficiently drained and the clinical symptoms promptly relieved. The catheters were left for drainage 3 months, 5 days and 14 days respectively. There were no major complications. One patient complained of transient palpitations. Percutaneous ultrasound-guided catheter drainage seems to be a safe method in patients with pericardial fluid where an indwelling catheter is considered.

  9. Titanium-Nickel Shape Memory Alloy Spring Actuator for Forward-Looking Active Catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Namazu

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The fabrication and characterization of forward-looking active catheter actuated by titanium-nickel (Ti-Ni shape memory alloy (SMA springs are described. The catheter has been designed for wide-range observation of an affected area inside a blood vessel when the blood vessel is occluded. The developed active catheter consists of eight Ti-Ni SMA spring actuators for actuation of catheter tip, an ultrasonic transducer for forward-looking, a guide wire, a polyurethane tube for coating, and spiral wirings for realization of various flexure motions of catheter tip using Ti-Ni SMA actuators. The size of the catheter is 3.5 mm in diameter and 60 mm in length of the sum of transducer and actuator sections. Ti-Ni SMA springs were fabricated from a Ti-50.9at.%Ni sheet by electrochemical etching with a mixed solution of ethanol and lithium chloride. The catheter was assembled by hand under a stereomicroscope. The tip of the produced catheter was able to move in parallel toward at least eight directions by controlling an applied current to Ti-Ni SMA springs. We have confirmed that the active catheter was able to observe an object settled in the front.

  10. Titanium-Nickel Shape Memory Alloy Spring Actuator for Forward-Looking Active Catheter

    OpenAIRE

    Shozo Inoue; Takahiro Miki; Takafumi Tsurui; Hiroyuki Nagasawa; Mamoru Komatsubara; Takahiro Namazu

    2011-01-01

    The fabrication and characterization of forward-looking active catheter actuated by titanium-nickel (Ti-Ni) shape memory alloy (SMA) springs are described. The catheter has been designed for wide-range observation of an affected area inside a blood vessel when the blood vessel is occluded. The developed active catheter consists of eight Ti-Ni SMA spring actuators for actuation of catheter tip, an ultrasonic transducer for forward-looking, a guide wire, a polyurethane tube for coating, and spi...

  11. Unusual cause for ventriculoperitoneal shunt failure: Carcinoma breast compressing distal catheter

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roka Yam

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Insertion of a ventriculoperitoneal (VP shunt is one of the most common surgical procedures in any neurosurgery unit worldwide. Distal catheter obstruction outside the peritoneum is a rare cause of shunt failure. We report the first case of distal obstruction in a 70-year old female by carcinoma breast engulfing the catheter and causing kinking. Intraoperatively, the catheter was intratumoral with no flow of cerebrospinal fluid distally. She underwent relocation of a new catheter to the opposite side of the abdomen and modified mastectomy with resolution of the hydrocephalus. The postoperative course has been uneventful.

  12. Evaluation of percutaneous radiologic placement of peritoneal dialysis catheters: technical aspects, results, and complications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the technical aspects, results and complications of the percutaneous radiologic placement of peritoneal dialysis catheters. Between December 1999 and April 2001, 26 peritoneal dialysis catheters were placed percutaneously in 26 consecutive patients by interventional radiologists. The patient group consisted of 16 men and ten women with a mean age of 55 (range, 30-77) years. The results and complications arising were reviewed, and the expected patency of the catheters was determined by means of Kaplan-Meier survival analysis. The technical success rate for catheter placement was 100% (26/26 patients). Severe local bleeding occurred in one patient due to by inferior epigastric artery puncture, and was treated by compression and electronic cautery. The duration of catheter implantation ranged from 1 to 510 days and the patency rate was 416±45 days. Catheter malfunction occurred in four patients. In two, this was restored by manipulation in the intervention room, and in one, through the use of urokinase. In three patients, peritonitis occurred. Catheters were removed from four patients due to malfunction (n=2), peritonitis (n=1), and death (n=1). Percutaneous radiologic placement of a peritoneal dialysis catheter is a relatively simple procedure that reduces the complication rate and improves catheter patency

  13. Early development of bacterial community diversity in emergently placed urinary catheters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Foxman Betsy

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Approximately 25% of hospitalized patients have a urinary catheter, and catheter associated urinary tract infection is the most common nosocomial infection in the US, causing >1 million cases/year. However, the natural history of the biofilms that rapidly form on urinary catheters and lead to infection is not well described. Findings We characterized the dynamics of catheter colonization among catheters collected from 3 women and 5 men in a trauma burn unit with different indwelling times using TRFLP and culture. All patients received antibiotic therapy. Results: Colony-forming units increased along the extraluminal catheter surface from the catheter balloon to the urethra, but no trend was apparent for the intraluminal surface. This suggests extraluminal bacteria come from periurethral communities while intraluminal bacteria are introduced via the catheter or already inhabit the urine/bladder. Richness of operational taxonomic units (OTUs increased over time on the intraluminal surface, but was constant extraluminally. Conclusions OTU community composition was explained best by time rather than axial location or surface. Our results suggest that catheter colonization can be very dynamic, and possibly have a predictable succession.

  14. Examining the effectiveness of 2 solutions used to flush capped pediatric peripheral intravenous catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Mary L; Crawley, Jamie; Rennie, Elizabeth A; Lewandowski, Linda A

    2011-01-01

    An evidence-based study examined the effectiveness of 2 solutions, heparin and normal saline, when used to flush capped pediatric peripheral intravenous (CPP IV) catheters. This experimental study assessed patency, redness, swelling, clotting, bruising, leakage, and patient pain after each intervention/flush. Study participants included 62 children (32 heparin and 30 normal saline) who had CPP IV catheters using 20-, 22-, or 24-gauge catheters. No statistically significant differences were found in IV catheter patency between children in the normal saline group and children in the heparin group. A postimplementation follow-up study with 30 patients who received normal saline only as a flush experienced no patency issues. PMID:21734522

  15. Virulence factors in Proteus bacteria from biofilm communities of catheter-associated urinary tract infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hola, Veronika; Peroutkova, Tereza; Ruzicka, Filip

    2012-07-01

    More than 40% of nosocomial infections are those of the urinary tract, most of these occurring in catheterized patients. Bacterial colonization of the urinary tract and catheters results not only in infection, but also various complications, such as blockage of catheters with crystalline deposits of bacterial origin, generation of gravels and pyelonephritis. The diversity of the biofilm microbial community increases with duration of catheter emplacement. One of the most important pathogens in this regard is Proteus mirabilis. The aims of this study were to identify and assess particular virulence factors present in catheter-associated urinary tract infection (CAUTI) isolates, their correlation and linkages: three types of motility (swarming, swimming and twitching), the ability to swarm over urinary catheters, biofilm production in two types of media, urease production and adherence of bacterial cells to various types of urinary tract catheters. We examined 102 CAUTI isolates and 50 isolates taken from stool samples of healthy people. Among the microorganisms isolated from urinary catheters, significant differences were found in biofilm-forming ability and the swarming motility. In comparison with the control group, the microorganisms isolated from urinary catheters showed a wider spectrum of virulence factors. The virulence factors (twitching motility, swimming motility, swarming over various types of catheters and biofilm formation) were also more intensively expressed. PMID:22533980

  16. Two years experience with tunneled dialysis catheters in patients requiring haemodialysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To look for survival rate and major reasons behind the failure of tunnelled dialysis catheters in patients on haemodialysis. Methods: The retrospective study was conducted at the Department of Interventional Radiology, Shifa International Hospital, Islamabad, and comprised records of 100 consecutive subjects from a list of patients in whom tunnelled cuffed catheters were placed from February 2009 to January 2011 and were followed up for two years. Data was collected on a proforma from the hospital database and medical records of patients. SPSS 19 was used for statistical analysis. Results: Of the total 122 catheters placed in 100 patients, 49(40.16%) were lost to follow-up. Of the remaining 73(59.83%) catheters, 38(52%) had achieved their desired function, while 35(48%) failed to achieve the target duration. Among the reasons of catheter failure, infection was the commonest at 13(37.14%) with infection rate of 0.24 per 1000 catheter days. According to Kaplan Meier analysis, catheter survival rates at 60, 90 and 180 days were 89%, 77% and 64% respectively. Mean effective duration of catheter was 129+-117 days. Conclusion: Tunnelled dialysis catheters can be safely used as vascular access till the maturation of fistula and may be an alternative to Arterio-Venous Fistula or graft for long-term vascular access if indicated. (author)

  17. MODERN APPROACHES TO ANTICOAGULANT THERAPY DURING CATHETER ABLATION TREATMENT OF NON-VALVULAR ATRIAL FIBRILLATION

    OpenAIRE

    E. A. Belikov; K. V. Davtyan; O. N. Tkacheva

    2015-01-01

    Prevention of thromboembolic complications in patients with atrial fibrillation during catheter pulmonary veins isolation is discussed. This subject review is presented with special consideration to new anticoagulants.

  18. Evaluation of non-target arterial patency after implantation of hepatic arterial catheter using a modified implantation technique with the fixed catheter tip method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aim: To retrospectively investigate persistent hepatofugal blood flow in the gastroduodenal artery after implantation of a port-catheter system for repeated hepatic arterial infusion chemotherapy using a modified fixed catheter tip method. Materials and methods: A port-catheter system was percutaneously implanted in 150 patients (90 men and 60 women; mean age 64.6 years) with unresectable liver cancer. The persistence of blood flow beyond the end hole of the indwelling catheter via the port obtained immediately and 1-10 days after port-catheter placement was investigated using arteriography. Results: In all cases, port-catheter placement was successfully performed. In 64 (42.7%) of the 150 participants, the gastroduodenal artery was detected on arteriography just after implantation. However, arteriography obtained 1-10 days (mean 4.3 days) after implantation revealed the gastroduodenal artery in only two of the 64 participants. In these two patients, persistent blood flow disappeared spontaneously 12 and 15 days after implantation, respectively. Conclusion: Closure of the lumen of the distal tip of the catheter beyond the side hole most often occurs spontaneously just after implantation. However, the findings of the present study indicate that closure will occur within 15 days at the latest. This suggests that delaying chemotherapy for about 2 weeks after implantation may be advisable

  19. Dialysis catheter-related superior vena cava syndrome with patent vena cava: Long term efficacy of unilateral viatorr stent-graft avoiding catheter manipulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Central venous catheters are the most frequent causes of benign central vein stenosis. We report the case of a 79-year-old woman on hemodialysis through a twin catheter in the right internal jugular vein, presenting with superior vena cava (SVC) syndrome with patent SVC. The clinically driven endovascular therapy was conducted to treat the venous syndrome with a unilateral left brachiocephalic stent-graft without manipulation of the well-functioning catheter. The follow-up was uneventful until death 94 months later.

  20. Dialysis catheter-related superior vena cava syndrome with patent vena cava: Long term efficacy of unilateral viatorr stent-graft avoiding catheter manipulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quaretti, Pietro; Galli, Franco; Maramarco, Lorenzo Paplo; Corti, Riccardo; Leati, Giovanni; Fiorina, Ilaria; Maestri, Marcello [IRCCS Policlinico San Matteo Foundation, Pavia (Italy)

    2014-06-15

    Central venous catheters are the most frequent causes of benign central vein stenosis. We report the case of a 79-year-old woman on hemodialysis through a twin catheter in the right internal jugular vein, presenting with superior vena cava (SVC) syndrome with patent SVC. The clinically driven endovascular therapy was conducted to treat the venous syndrome with a unilateral left brachiocephalic stent-graft without manipulation of the well-functioning catheter. The follow-up was uneventful until death 94 months later.

  1. MediGuide-impact on catheter ablation techniques and workflow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pillarisetti, Jayasree; Kanmanthareddy, Arun; Reddy, Yeruva Madhu; Lakkireddy, Dhanunjaya

    2014-09-01

    Since the introduction of percutaneous intervention in modern medical science, specifically cardiovascular medicine fluoroscopy has remained the gold standard for navigation inside the cardiac structures. As the complexity of the procedures continue to increase with advances in interventional electrophysiology, the procedural times and fluoroscopy times have proportionately increased and the risks of radiation exposure both to the patients as well as the operator continue to rise. 3D electroanatomic mapping systems have to some extent complemented fluoroscopic imaging in improving catheter navigation and forming a solid platform for exploring the electroanatomic details of the target substrate. The 3D mapping systems are still limited as they continue to be static representations of a dynamic heart without being completely integrated with fluoroscopy. The field needed a technological solution that could add a dynamic positioning system that can be successfully incorporated into fluoroscopic imaging as well as electroanatomic imaging modalities. MediGuide is one such innovative technology that exploits the geo-positioning system principles. It employs a transmitter mounted on the X-ray panel that emits an electromagnetic field within which sensor-equipped diagnostic and ablation catheters are tracked within prerecorded fluoroscopic images. MediGuide is also integrated with NavX mapping system and helps in developing better 3D images by field scaling-a process that reduces field distortions that occur from impedance mapping alone. In this review, we discuss about the principle of MediGuide technology, the catheter ablation techniques, and the workflow in the EP lab for different procedures. PMID:24928484

  2. P wave detection and delineation in the ECG based on the phase free stationary wavelet transform and using intracardiac atrial electrograms as reference.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenis, Gustavo; Pilia, Nicolas; Oesterlein, Tobias; Luik, Armin; Schmitt, Claus; Dössel, Olaf

    2016-02-01

    Robust and exact automatic P wave detection and delineation in the electrocardiogram (ECG) is still an interesting but challenging research topic. The early prognosis of cardiac afflictions such as atrial fibrillation and the response of a patient to a given treatment is believed to improve if the P wave is carefully analyzed during sinus rhythm. Manual annotation of the signals is a tedious and subjective task. Its correctness depends on the experience of the annotator, quality of the signal, and ECG lead. In this work, we present a wavelet-based algorithm to detect and delineate P waves in individual ECG leads. We evaluated a large group of commonly used wavelets and frequency bands (wavelet levels) and introduced a special phase free wavelet transformation. The local extrema of the transformed signals are directly related to the delineating points of the P wave. First, the algorithm was studied using synthetic signals. Then, the optimal parameter configuration was found using intracardiac electrograms and surface ECGs measured simultaneously. The reverse biorthogonal wavelet 3.3 was found to be optimal for this application. In the end, the method was validated using the QT database from PhysioNet. We showed that the algorithm works more accurately and more robustly than other methods presented in literature. The validation study delivered an average delineation error of the P wave onset of -0.32±12.41 ms when compared to manual annotations. In conclusion, the algorithm is suitable for handling varying P wave shapes and low signal-to-noise ratios. PMID:26136298

  3. Diffusing, side-firing, and radial delivery laser balloon catheters for creating subsurface thermal lesions in tissue

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chun-Hung; Fried, Nathaniel M.

    2016-02-01

    Infrared lasers have been used in combination with applied cooling methods to preserve superficial skin layers during cosmetic surgery. Similarly, combined laser irradiation and tissue cooling may also allow development of minimally invasive laser therapies beyond dermatology. This study compares diffusing, side-firing, and radial delivery laser balloon catheter designs for creation of subsurface lesions in tissue, ex vivo, using a near-IR laser and applied contact cooling. An Ytterbium fiber laser with 1075 nm wavelength delivered energy through custom built 18 Fr (6-mm-OD) balloon catheters incorporating either 10-mm-long diffusing fiber tip, 90 degree side-firing fiber, or radial delivery cone mirror, through a central lumen. A chilled solution was flowed through a separate lumen into 9-mm-diameter balloon to keep probe cooled at 7°C. Porcine liver tissue samples were used as preliminary tissue model for immediate observation of thermal lesion creation. The diffusing fiber produced subsurface thermal lesions measuring 49.3 +/- 10.0 mm2 and preserved 0.8 +/- 0.1 mm of surface tissue. The side-firing fiber produced subsurface thermal lesions of 2.4 +/- 0.9 mm2 diameter and preserved 0.5 +/- 0.1 mm of surface tissue. The radial delivery probe assembly failed to produce subsurface thermal lesions, presumably due to the small effective spot diameter at the tissue surface, which limited optical penetration depth. Optimal laser power and irradiation time measured 15 W and 100 s for diffusing fiber and 1.4 W and 20 s, for side-firing fiber, respectively. Diffusing and side-firing laser balloon catheter designs provided subsurface thermal lesions in tissue. However, the divergent laser beam in both designs limited the ability to preserve a thicker layer of tissue surface. Further optimization of laser and cooling parameters may be necessary to preserve thicker surface tissue layers.

  4. Neurostimulation leads, intrathecal catheters and anchoring devices evolution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Demartini

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Many scientific studies highlight the usefulness of spinal cord stimulation and intrathecal therapy for the management of chronic pain syndromes resistant to pharmacological or less invasive interventional therapies. One of the possible complications of these techniques, reported in literature, is migration of the lead or catheter; thus the use of an anchoring system is considered mandatory. Every company that produces devices for neurostimulation or neuromodulation provides various anchoring devices evolved over time. In the study, the authors discuss about the most common anchoring devices based on their clinical experience.

  5. Double Guide Catheter Technique for Sealing an Iatrogenic Coronary Perforation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez-Santamarta, Miguel; Estevez-Loureiro, Rodrigo; Cuellas, Carlos; Benito-Gonzalez, Tomas; Perez de Prado, Armando; Lopez-Benito, Maria; Fernandez-Vazquez, Felipe

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Coronary vessel perforation is one of the most feared complications of coronary angioplasty. The treatment of this complication relies mostly on the implantation of covered stents. However, due to their design, covered stents are difficult to advance in a tortuous or calcified vessel. Case Presentation: We present a case of a grade III coronary perforation in which the double guiding catheter technique helped us to deliver the graft stent. Conclusions: The double-guiding technique is useful in emergency situations to increase the safety and efficacy of sealing a coronary perforation. PMID:26949692

  6. Phrenic Nerve Injury After Catheter Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    2007-01-01

    Phrenic Nerve Injury (PNI) has been well studied by cardiac surgeons. More recently it has been recognized as a potential complication of catheter ablation with a prevalence of 0.11 to 0.48 % after atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation. This review will focus on PNI after AF ablation Anatomical studies have shown a close relationship between the right phrenic nerve and it's proximity to the superior vena cava (SVC), and the antero-inferior part of the right superior pulmonary vein (RSPV). In addi...

  7. SU-E-T-574: Fessiblity of Using the Calypso System for HDR Interstitial Catheter Reconstruction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, J S; Ma, C [Fox Chase Cancer Center, Philadelphia, PA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: It is always a challenge to reconstruct the interstitial catheter for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy on patient CT or MR images. This work aims to investigate the feasibility of using the Calypso system (Varian Medical, CA) for HDR catheter reconstruction utilizing its accuracy on tracking the electromagnetic transponder location. Methods: Experiment was done with a phantom that has a HDR interstitial catheter embedded inside. CT scan with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm was taken for this phantom with two Calypso beacon transponders in the catheter. The two transponders were connected with a wire. The Calypso system was used to record the beacon transponders’ location in real time when they were gently pulled out with the wire. The initial locations of the beacon transponders were used for registration with the CT image and the detected transponder locations were used for the catheter path reconstruction. The reconstructed catheter path was validated on the CT image. Results: The HDR interstitial catheter was successfully reconstructed based on the transponders’ coordinates recorded by the Calypso system in real time when the transponders were pulled in the catheter. After registration with the CT image, the shape and location of the reconstructed catheter are evaluated against the CT image and the result shows an accuracy of 2 mm anywhere in the Calypso detectable region which is within a 10 cm X 10 cm X 10 cm cubic box for the current system. Conclusion: It is feasible to use the Calypso system for HDR interstitial catheter reconstruction. The obstacle for its clinical usage is the size of the beacon transponder whose diameter is bigger than most of the interstitial catheters used in clinic. Developing smaller transponders and supporting software and hardware for this application is necessary before it can be adopted for clinical use.

  8. Complications of Transfemoral Removal of Percutaneous Transfemorally Implanted Port-Catheter Systems

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Our purpose is to evaluate the feasibility and safety of the withdrawal procedure of percutaneous transfemorally implanted port-catheter systems. Thirty-seven patients (17.7%) underwent the withdrawal procedure of this port-catheter system among 209 patients. The reasons for withdrawal were as follows: termination of intra-arterial chemotherapy (n = 7), obstruction of hepatic artery (n = 5), port infection (n = 4), catheter infection (n = 4), catheter obstruction (n = 4), lower-limb palsy and pain (n = 2), exposure of the port due to skin defect (n = 2), patient's desire (n = 2), side effect of chemotherapy (n = 1), no effectiveness of chemotherapy (n = 1), hematoma at the puncture site (n = 1), duodenum perforation by the catheter (n = 1), intermittent claudication due to severe stenosis of right common iliac artery (n = 1), dissection of common hepatic artery (n = 1), and broken catheter (n = 1). In thirty-four of the 37 cases, the port-catheter system was successfully withdrawn without any complications. Clinical success rate was 91.9%. Complications occurred in three cases (8.1%), which were a pseudoaneurysm, thromboembolism of the right common iliac artery, and continuous bleeding from the subcutaneous pocket where the port system was placed for 1 month. In 15 cases, correction of the catheter tip or exchange for dislocation of the tip had to be done without withdrawal. It is not rare to withdraw port-catheter systems in cases of infection or hematoma around the system. Although withdrawal of a percutaneous transfemorally implanted port-catheter system is a relatively safe procedure, the port-catheter system should not be removed unless absolutely indicated

  9. SU-E-T-574: Fessiblity of Using the Calypso System for HDR Interstitial Catheter Reconstruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: It is always a challenge to reconstruct the interstitial catheter for high dose rate (HDR) brachytherapy on patient CT or MR images. This work aims to investigate the feasibility of using the Calypso system (Varian Medical, CA) for HDR catheter reconstruction utilizing its accuracy on tracking the electromagnetic transponder location. Methods: Experiment was done with a phantom that has a HDR interstitial catheter embedded inside. CT scan with a slice thickness of 1.25 mm was taken for this phantom with two Calypso beacon transponders in the catheter. The two transponders were connected with a wire. The Calypso system was used to record the beacon transponders’ location in real time when they were gently pulled out with the wire. The initial locations of the beacon transponders were used for registration with the CT image and the detected transponder locations were used for the catheter path reconstruction. The reconstructed catheter path was validated on the CT image. Results: The HDR interstitial catheter was successfully reconstructed based on the transponders’ coordinates recorded by the Calypso system in real time when the transponders were pulled in the catheter. After registration with the CT image, the shape and location of the reconstructed catheter are evaluated against the CT image and the result shows an accuracy of 2 mm anywhere in the Calypso detectable region which is within a 10 cm X 10 cm X 10 cm cubic box for the current system. Conclusion: It is feasible to use the Calypso system for HDR interstitial catheter reconstruction. The obstacle for its clinical usage is the size of the beacon transponder whose diameter is bigger than most of the interstitial catheters used in clinic. Developing smaller transponders and supporting software and hardware for this application is necessary before it can be adopted for clinical use

  10. 3D ablation catheter localisation using individual C-arm x-ray projections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haase, C.; Schäfer, D.; Dössel, O.; Grass, M.

    2014-11-01

    Cardiac ablation procedures during electrophysiology interventions are performed under x-ray guidance with a C-arm imaging system. Some procedures require catheter navigation in complex anatomies like the left atrium. Navigation aids like 3D road maps and external tracking systems may be used to facilitate catheter navigation. As an alternative to external tracking a fully automatic method is presented here that enables the calculation of the 3D location of the ablation catheter from individual 2D x-ray projections. The method registers a high resolution, deformable 3D attenuation model of the catheter to a 2D x-ray projection. The 3D localization is based on the divergent beam projection of the catheter. On an individual projection, the catheter tip is detected in 2D by image filtering and a template matching method. The deformable 3D catheter model is adapted using the projection geometry provided by the C-arm system and 2D similarity measures for an accurate 2D/3D registration. Prior to the tracking and registration procedure, the deformable 3D attenuation model is automatically extracted from a separate 3D cone beam CT reconstruction of the device. The method can hence be applied to various cardiac ablation catheters. In a simulation study of a virtual ablation procedure with realistic background, noise, scatter and motion blur an average 3D registration accuracy of 3.8 mm is reached for the catheter tip. In this study four different types of ablation catheters were used. Experiments using measured C-arm fluoroscopy projections of a catheter in a RSD phantom deliver an average 3D accuracy of 4.5 mm.

  11. RADIOFREQUENCY CATHETER ABLATION OF PERMANENT ATRIAL FIBRILLATION UNDER GUIDANCE OF CARTO-MERGE TECHNIQUE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Objective To investigate the feasibility and effectiveness of radiofrequency catheter ablation (RFCA) to treat permanent atrial fibrillation (AF) under the guidance of Carto-Merge technique.Methods Fifteen male patients with permanent AF underwent RFCA under the guidance of Carto-Merge technique. The mean age was 54. 00 ± 10. 44 years, and duration of AF was 23.66 ± 14. 93 months. Cardiac magnetic resonance angiography (MRA) was performed to obtain pre-procedural three-dimensional (3D) images on the anatomy of left atrium (LA) and pulmonary veins (PVs) before RFCA procedure. Then the electroanatomical map was integrated with 3D images of MRA to form Carto-Merge map that guided step-by-step ablation strategy of permanent AF. Circumferential PV ablation was performed first until complete PVs electric isolation confirmed by Lasso catheter. If AF was not terminated, lesion lines on roof of LA, mitral isthmus, and tricuspid isthmus were produced.Results The episodes of AF were terminated during RFCA in 2 patients, by direct current cardioversion in the remaining 13 patients. Transient AF occurred in 2 patients after ablation on 1st day and 1st week respectively, AF terminated spontaneously not long after taking metoprolol. One patient developed persistent atrial flutter (AFL) in 2 months after procedure and AFL was eliminated by the second ablation. Persistent AF recurred on 1st day, 1st and 5th week respectively in 3 patients, and did not terminate after 3 months even though amiodarone was given The remaining 12 patients were all free of AF during 2-11 months of follow-up. The recent success rate for RFCA of permanent AF was 80%.Conclusions Carto-Merge technique can effectively guide RFCA of permanent AF. When combined with single Lasso mapping, it can simplify the mapping, lower expenses, and enhance the success rate of RFCA of permanent AF.

  12. Clinical effect of radiofrequency catheter ablation combined with ozone injection in the treatment of lumbar disc herniation of cervical spine%射频消融加臭氧注射微创技术治疗腰椎间盘突出症的临床效果观察

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨劲松; 刘衡; 佟言

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To observe the clinical effect of radiofrequency ablation combined with ozone injection in the treat-ment of cervical intervertebral disc herniation.Methods: selected in our hospital in 2013 from August in August were 60 cases of cervical lumbar disc herniation patients, through the double chromosphere randomly divided into observation group (n = 30) and control group (n = 30), the clinical therapeutic effect of two groups of patients were compared and analyzed.Results: after treatment, the VAS score of the observation group was lower than that of the control group, the effective rate was 90%, higher than that of the control group 70% (P<0.05).Conclusion: in the treatment of cervical inter-vertebral disc herniation, the minimally invasive technique of radiofrequency ablation combined with improve the quality of life of patients. It is worthy of clinical application.%目的:观察分析腰椎间盘突出症患者采用射频消融加臭氧注射微创技术治疗的临床效果。方法:选取我院2013年8月-2014年8月收治的60例腰椎间盘突出症患者,通过双色球随机分组法分为观察组(n=30)及对照组(n=30),对照组患者采用常规治疗,观察组患者采用射频消融加臭氧注射微创技术治疗,对两组患者临床治疗效果进行比较和分析。结果:治疗后观察组患者VAS评分较对照组更低,治疗有效率90.00%,高于对照组70.00%(P<0.05)。结论:在腰椎间盘突出症治疗中,射频消融加臭氧注射微创技术可明显缓解腰椎间盘突出症状,减轻患者身心疼痛,提高临床治疗效果,进而改善患者生活质量,值得临床推广应用。

  13. Ocelot catheter for the treatment of long SFA occlusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cawich, Ian; Marmagkiolis, Konstantinos; Cilingiroglu, Mehmet

    2014-01-01

    Long saphenous femoral artery (SFA) chronic total occlusions (CTOs) are considered the "Achilles heel" of the lower extremity percutaneous interventions. Antegrade, retrograde, or transcollateral approaches, intraluminal or subintimal techniques with re-entry and specialized CTO devices using microdissection, vibrational energy, and laser have all been tried for the management of such challenging lesions with various success rates. Ocelot is the first CTO crossing device using real-time OCT technology. Its crossing catheter utilizes spiral wedges to corkscrew the CTO cap, while real-time OCT offers direct visualization to facilitate intravascular true-lumen orientation. The recently presented results of the CONNECT-II study demonstrated crossing success of 97% and freedom from major adverse events of 98%. We present one of the most challenging SFA CTOs with ambiguous proximal cap in the ostium of the SFA, heavy calcification and involving almost the entire length of the SFA. The Ocelot catheter assisted to the successful true-lumen recanalization of that complex lesion. PMID:24030969

  14. Fast vision-based catheter 3D reconstruction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradi Dalvand, Mohsen; Nahavandi, Saeid; Howe, Robert D.

    2016-07-01

    Continuum robots offer better maneuverability and inherent compliance and are well-suited for surgical applications as catheters, where gentle interaction with the environment is desired. However, sensing their shape and tip position is a challenge as traditional sensors can not be employed in the way they are in rigid robotic manipulators. In this paper, a high speed vision-based shape sensing algorithm for real-time 3D reconstruction of continuum robots based on the views of two arbitrary positioned cameras is presented. The algorithm is based on the closed-form analytical solution of the reconstruction of quadratic curves in 3D space from two arbitrary perspective projections. High-speed image processing algorithms are developed for the segmentation and feature extraction from the images. The proposed algorithms are experimentally validated for accuracy by measuring the tip position, length and bending and orientation angles for known circular and elliptical catheter shaped tubes. Sensitivity analysis is also carried out to evaluate the robustness of the algorithm. Experimental results demonstrate good accuracy (maximum errors of  ±0.6 mm and  ±0.5 deg), performance (200 Hz), and robustness (maximum absolute error of 1.74 mm, 3.64 deg for the added noises) of the proposed high speed algorithms.

  15. The humanization of catheter room design: its clinical practice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    American scholar Engeer has proposed biological, psychological and sociological medicine pattern, which has been well accepted by the society, It has manifested the medical arena humanism return and has made the profound influence on the nursing development. The idea, 'the human is a whole', has gradually become the mainstream of the nurse service concept, meanwhile, the environment has more and more become a beneficial part for diagnosing and treating in hospitalization. The improvement and more user-friendly design of the diagnosing and treating environment has already become an important ring linked with the whole nursing work. At the beginning of the fitting up design for the Catheter Lab Room of Interventional Radiology in General Hospital of PLA, the authors receive the idea 'the environment experience and admiration of the patient', put more attention to the humanization in the diagnosing and treating environmental construction. The functional compartments are separated clearly. The color, the background music as well as the video are designed to be coordinated with each other in order to produce a relaxing system. Practice for the past three years indicates that the use of humanization environment design can markedly reduce the patient intense and the anxious level in perioperative period, it can also significantly promote the patient to be restored to health. This article will describe user-friendly diagnosing and treating environmental construction practice in the Catheter Lab Room of Interventional Radiology in General Hospital of PLA. (authors)

  16. Longitudinal cleavage of the penis, a rare catheter complication seen in paraplegic patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, T; Hansen, B J

    1989-01-01

    Two cases of total necrosis of the penile urethra and overlying ventral structures are described in paraplegic male patients treated with indwelling urethral catheters. The lesions were apparently caused by an inexpedient pull on the catheter causing ischaemic necrosis of the urethral wall....

  17. [Peripheral venous catheterization: influence of catheter composition on the occurrence of thrombophlebitis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacquot, C; Fauvage, B; Bru, J P; Croize, J; Calop, J

    1989-01-01

    Infusion thrombophlebitis is a common troublesome complication of intravenous therapy. This study compared peripheral intravenous Teflon and Vialon catheters. The incidence of phlebitis, bacterial adherence and mechanical resistance (distortion) were assessed on 170 catheters, 85 of each type. The Vialon catheter resulted in less phlebitis than the Teflon one (18 vs. 35; p less than 0.01). During the period 49 to 72 h after the insertion of the catheter, the risk of phlebitis in the Teflon group was twice that in the Vialon group. The study of bacterial adherence using a semi-quantitative culture method demonstrated that 9.0% of the catheters were infected with Staphylococcus epidermidis. There was no statistically significant difference between the two groups (5.7% Vialon group vs. 12.5% Teflon group). The Teflon catheters were much more distorted than vialon catheters: 1.7% vs. 55.7% in the macroscopic study; 1.75% vs. 8.2% in the microscopic study. As Vialon softens at body temperature, it would seem likely that it generates a lesser degree of endothelial injury, explaining the lower rate of phlebitis with Vialon catheters. PMID:2633660

  18. Bacterial colonization of intravenous catheter materials in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilsdorf, J R; Wilson, K; Beals, T F

    1989-07-01

    Four different intravenous catheter materials, brands Teflon, Silastic, Vialon, and Tecoflex, were evaluated in vitro for bacterial adherence after 2 and 24 hours' incubation in trypticase soy broth and after 2 hours' incubation in nutrient-free phosphate buffer (pH 7.2). The organisms used were Pseudomonas aeruginosa, Enterobacter aerogenes, Escherichia coli, and Staphylococcus epidermidis. The significant differences in in vitro adherence of the different bacterial species to the various catheters were then evaluated in vivo by intravenous injection of a single bolus of 1 X 10(5) organisms via tail vein of rats with previously placed catheters in their superior venae cavae. There was no association between the in vitro bacterial adherence and the tendency of the in vivo catheters to become colonized. Results of scanning electron microscopy of clean catheters and those removed from the rats showed obvious differences in surface characteristics and in clot adhesion between the catheters. These characteristics did not correlate with bacterial adherence in vitro or colonization in vivo. It is concluded that laboratory studies of bacterial adherence to, physical characteristics of, and thrombogenicity of intravenous catheters do not necessarily translate into resistance to clinical catheter sepsis. PMID:2500724

  19. Observations on the development of the crystalline bacterial biofilms that encrust and block Foley catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickler, D J; Morgan, S D

    2008-08-01

    The care of many patients undergoing long-term bladder catheterisation is complicated when the flow of urine through the catheter is blocked by encrustation. The problem results from infection by urease-producing bacteria, especially Proteus mirabilis, and the subsequent formation of crystalline biofilms on the catheter. The aim of this study was to discover how P. mirabilis initiates the development of these crystalline biofilms. The early stages in the formation of the biofilms were observed on a range of Foley catheters in a laboratory model of the catheterised bladder. Scanning electron micrographs revealed that when all-silicone, silicone-coated latex, hydrogel-coated latex, hydrogel/silver-coated latex and nitrofurazone silicone catheters were inserted into bladder models containing P. mirabilis and alkaline urine, their surfaces were rapidly coated with a microcrystalline foundation layer. X-ray microanalysis showed that this material was composed of calcium phosphate. Bacterial colonisation of the foundation layer followed and by 18h the catheters were encrusted by densely populated crystalline P. mirabilis biofilms. These observations have important implications for the development of encrustation-resistant catheters. In the case of silver catheters for example, bacterial cells can attach to the crystalline foundation layer and continue to grow, protected from contact with the underlying silver. If antimicrobials are to be incorporated into catheters to prevent encrustation, it is important that they diffuse into the urine and prevent the rise in pH that triggers crystal formation. PMID:18550219

  20. Thrombosis caused by polyurethane double-lumen subclavian superior vena cava catheter and hemodialysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wanscher, Maria Rørbæk; Frifelt, J J; Smith-Sivertsen, C;

    1988-01-01

    During an 18-month period, 82 consecutive patients (37 women and 45 men), with a mean age of 50 yr (range 15 to 74), underwent hemodialysis with 91 polyurethane double-lumen subclavian superior vena cava catheters inserted via the right subclavian vein. Upon catheter removal, venograms were...

  1. Infection risk with nitrofurazone-impregnated urinary catheters in trauma patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stensballe, Jakob; Tvede, Michael; Looms, Dagnia;

    2007-01-01

    Urinary tract infection is one of the most common nosocomial infections in hospitalized patients. It is predominantly associated with indwelling urinary catheters.......Urinary tract infection is one of the most common nosocomial infections in hospitalized patients. It is predominantly associated with indwelling urinary catheters....

  2. 3D/2D Registration of Mapping Catheter Images for Arrhythmia Interventional Assistance

    CERN Document Server

    Fallavollita, Pascal

    2009-01-01

    Radiofrequency (RF) catheter ablation has transformed treatment for tachyarrhythmias and has become first-line therapy for some tachycardias. The precise localization of the arrhythmogenic site and the positioning of the RF catheter over that site are problematic: they can impair the efficiency of the procedure and are time consuming (several hours). Electroanatomic mapping technologies are available that enable the display of the cardiac chambers and the relative position of ablation lesions. However, these are expensive and use custom-made catheters. The proposed methodology makes use of standard catheters and inexpensive technology in order to create a 3D volume of the heart chamber affected by the arrhythmia. Further, we propose a novel method that uses a priori 3D information of the mapping catheter in order to estimate the 3D locations of multiple electrodes across single view C-arm images. The monoplane algorithm is tested for feasibility on computer simulations and initial canine data.

  3. Nursing care for patients carrying indwelling catheter in target vessel for continuous chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To reduce the occurrence of undesirable catheter-related events in patients with indwelling catheter during the course of continuous chemotherapy. Methods: (1)To enhance the propaganda,education and guidance to patients. (2) To standardize the nursing care operations. (3) To establish the reasonable care rules and procedures. (4) The nurses should take the daily nursing care,observations and recording work seriously. Results: Through the analysis of a variety of problems occurred in patients with indwelling catheter during the course of continuous chemotherapy the nursing care experience was summed up. Conclusion: Proper and effective care can reduce the occurrence of undesirable catheter-related events in patients with indwelling catheter during the course of continuous chemotherapy. (authors)

  4. Pseudo-Rigid-Body Model and Kinematic Analysis of MRI-Actuated Catheters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greigarn, Tipakorn; Çavuşoğlu, M. Cenk

    2015-01-01

    This paper presents a kinematic study of a pseudorigid-body model (PRBM) of MRI-compatible, magnetically actuated, steerable catheters. It includes a derivation of a mathematical model of the PRBM of the catheter, singularity studies of the model, and a new manipulability measure. While the forward kinematics of the model presented here is applicable to PRBMs for other applications, actuation method is unique to the particular design. Hence, a careful study of singularities and manipulability of the model is required. The singularities are studied from the underlying equations of motion with intuitive interpretations. The proposed manipulability measure is a generalization of the inverse condition number manipulability measure of robotic manipulators. While the PRBM is an approximation of the flexible catheter, kinematic studies of the PRBM still provide some insight into feasibility and limitations of the catheter, which is beneficial to the design and motion planning of the catheter. PMID:26413380

  5. Internal jugular catheter malposition in a patient with end stage renal disease: a case report.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farzaneh Ebrahimifard

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available A 30-year-old female with end-stage renal disease was a candidate for dual lumen catheter placement. After catheter insertion, O2 saturation measurement of the aspirated blood from the catheter was similar to that of arterial blood. They referred the patient to our hospital after 48 hours. Diagnostic procedures revealed that the tip of the catheter had entered the pleural cavity. Catheter removal in the CPR room resulted in hemorrhagic shock. The patient was resuscitated and stabilized and sent to the operating room. A laceration found at the junction of right jugular and right subclavian veins and was surgically repaired. The patient was discharged after ten days without any complication.

  6. A system to use electromagnetic tracking for the quality assurance of brachytherapy catheter digitization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To investigate the use of a system using electromagnetic tracking (EMT), post-processing and an error-detection algorithm for detecting errors and resolving uncertainties in high-dose-rate brachytherapy catheter digitization for treatment planning. Methods: EMT was used to localize 15 catheters inserted into a phantom using a stepwise acquisition technique. Five distinct acquisition experiments were performed. Noise associated with the acquisition was calculated. The dwell location configuration was extracted from the EMT data. A CT scan of the phantom was performed, and five distinct catheter digitization sessions were performed. No a priori registration of the CT scan coordinate system with the EMT coordinate system was performed. CT-based digitization was automatically extracted from the brachytherapy plan DICOM files (CT), and rigid registration was performed between EMT and CT dwell positions. EMT registration error was characterized in terms of the mean and maximum distance between corresponding EMT and CT dwell positions per catheter. An algorithm for error detection and identification was presented. Three types of errors were systematically simulated: swap of two catheter numbers, partial swap of catheter number identification for parts of the catheters (mix), and catheter-tip shift. Error-detection sensitivity (number of simulated scenarios correctly identified as containing an error/number of simulated scenarios containing an error) and specificity (number of scenarios correctly identified as not containing errors/number of correct scenarios) were calculated. Catheter identification sensitivity (number of catheters correctly identified as erroneous across all scenarios/number of erroneous catheters across all scenarios) and specificity (number of catheters correctly identified as correct across all scenarios/number of correct catheters across all scenarios) were calculated. The mean detected and identified shift was calculated. Results: The

  7. Drawing on Accounts of Long-Term Urinary Catheter Use: Design for the "Seemingly Mundane".

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chapple, Alison; Prinjha, Suman; Feneley, Roger; Ziebland, Sue

    2016-01-01

    The design of the Foley catheter has not changed since 1937. Scientists interested in medical technology tend to focus on state-of-the-art designs for newsworthy specialties rather than the more mundane technologies of daily life. We interviewed 36 people living with a long-term urinary catheter in the United Kingdom, who described limitations of the current catheter design, including infections and complications and consequences for social life and relationships, and their perceptions of whose responsibility it was to improve the design. All took steps to hide the urine bag, but the need to use a catheter and urine bag had, for some, a very detrimental effect on social life and relationships. People living with long-term catheters are relatively isolated at home and dealing with many different underlying health problems, undermining opportunities to speak with a collective patient voice. Qualitative health researchers could act as a conduit to help stimulate new designs. PMID:25646001

  8. Even a "pigtail" distal end catheter can enter the epidural space after continuous paravertebral block.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuzier, Régis; Izard, Philippe; Aziza, Richard; Pouymayou, Jacques

    2016-06-01

    A woman with a medical history of breast cancer presented with chronic pain of the right hemithorax. To alleviate pain, a continuous paravertebral block was performed using a pigtail end catheter, introduced using ultrasound visualization (transversal technique at the inferior articular process of T6). Complete pain relief was observed. A few hours later, urinary retention was diagnosed and discharge from the ambulatory setting was canceled. On the following day, a new injection of local anesthetics through the catheter triggered paresthesia in the contralateral leg and a new urinary retention was diagnosed. A CT scan confirmed the epidural misplacement of the catheter. The latter was withdrawn, and the patient was released to home after the complete disappearance of her neurological symptoms. This case report highlights the risk of inadvertently misplacing the catheter into the epidural space during thoracic paravertebral block, even with a "pigtail" distal end type of catheter. PMID:26906035

  9. Balloon catheter dilatation in esophageal achalasia: long term follow-up

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of balloon catheter dilatation in the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Seven patients(three males and four females) with esopha-geal achalasia were treated with balloon catheter dilatation. Balloon catheters of variable sizes were used depending on patient's conditions. The patients were followed up over a period of 12-39 months. Balloon catheter dilatation in esophageal achalasia was successful in all patients without esophageal perforation. All patients were relieved from dysphagia. Recurrence was not found in 5 patients on long term follow-up study, but was seen in 2 patients after 18 and 21 months, respectively. Balloon catheter dilatation was a safe and effective method in the treatment of esophageal achalasia with low recurrence rate of 29% on follow-up study

  10. Balloon catheter dilatation in esophageal achalasia: long term follow-up

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Cheol Yong; Park, Hyun Mee; Kim, So Eun; Lee, Shin Hyung; Kim, Seung Hyeon; Lee, Chang Joon [National Medical Center, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-12-15

    To evaluate the clinical efficacy of balloon catheter dilatation in the treatment of esophageal achalasia. Seven patients(three males and four females) with esopha-geal achalasia were treated with balloon catheter dilatation. Balloon catheters of variable sizes were used depending on patient's conditions. The patients were followed up over a period of 12-39 months. Balloon catheter dilatation in esophageal achalasia was successful in all patients without esophageal perforation. All patients were relieved from dysphagia. Recurrence was not found in 5 patients on long term follow-up study, but was seen in 2 patients after 18 and 21 months, respectively. Balloon catheter dilatation was a safe and effective method in the treatment of esophageal achalasia with low recurrence rate of 29% on follow-up study.

  11. 3D/2D Registration of Mapping Catheter Images for Arrhythmia Interventional Assistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascal Fallavollita

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Radiofrequency (RF catheter ablation has transformed treatment for tachyarrhythmias and has become first-line therapy for some tachycardias. The precise localization of the arrhythmogenic site and the positioning of the RF catheter over that site are problematic: they can impair the efficiency of the procedure and are time consuming (several hours. Electroanatomic mapping technologies are available that enable the display of the cardiac chambers and the relative position of ablation lesions. However, these are expensive and use custom-made catheters. The proposed methodology makes use of standard catheters and inexpensive technology in order to create a 3D volume of the heart chamber affected by the arrhythmia. Further, we propose a novel method that uses a priori 3D information of the mapping catheter in order to estimate the 3D locations of multiple electrodes across single view C-arm images. The monoplane algorithm is tested for feasibility on computer simulations and initial canine data.

  12. [Obstructive pyelonephritis caused by ureteral orifice catheterization with a bladder catheter].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaud, P; Carpentier, X; Pedulla, F; Sandid, M; Pernin, F

    2014-12-01

    This article reports a rare case of acute pyelonephritis secondary to left ureteral obstruction by a bladder catheter. The patient was 93years old man hospitalized in the hospital emergency department with a 39°C fever and pyuria from an indwelling catheter. Blood test found hyperleukocytosis, inflammatory syndrome and acute renal failure. Diagnosis was confirmed by non-contrast abdominal CT scan showing distal part of the catheter inside left ureteral orifice with ureterohydronephrosis. Treatment consisted in replacing the catheter by a three-way catheter for irrigation and parenteral antibiotics therapy. Clinico-biological evolution was successful and a urinary tract CT scan could be realized at day 9. The left upper urinary tract function was recovered. With a short review of the literature we propose to describe the different procedures to manage those obstructions. PMID:25288585

  13. Catheter-directed thrombolysis for the treatment of acute lower limb ischemia: report of 30 cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To discuss the efficacy and safety of catheter-directed thrombolysis in treating acute lower limb ischemia. Methods: During the period from October 2009 to October 2012, 30 patients with acute lower limb ischemia were admitted to authors' hospital and received catheter-directed thrombolysis. The clinical data were retrospectively analyzed. Results: Direct effective response was obtained in 24 patients. Fogarty catheter embolectomy under DSA monitoring had to be carried out in 2 patients as they failed to respond catheter-directed thrombolysis. Two patients underwent amputation as a result of irreversible limb necrosis. One patient died from acute myocardial infarction. One patient died from multiple organs dysfunction caused by the absorption of toxins from the putrid limb. Conclusion: As a kind of minimally- invasive technique for acute lower limb ischemia, catheter-directed thrombolysis is safe and effective. (authors)

  14. Percutaneous Endoscopic Gastrostomy (PEG) catheter placementfor intragastric dosing studies in the Göttingen minipig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bollen, Peter; Saxtorph, Henrik; Lorentsen, Helle;

    2011-01-01

    Oral dosing is widely used to test compounds in minipigs. The procedure of oral dosing by gavage is stressful for the animals and may require up to 3-4 technicians to perform it. In humans, PEG catheters are commonly used to feed patients who are not able to ingest food, and where the placement of...... a nasal intragastric catheter is not possible. We suggested that oral dosing studies in minipigs would be easier to perform, and would cause less distress for the animals, when using PEG catheters, due to the absence of the need for restraint. For this reason, we investigated if PEG catheters could...... be placed and maintained in minipigs. Two male minipigs with a body weight of 6 kg were brought into general aneasthesia. Via a gastric endoscope, the ventricle was insufflated with CO2, and a PEG catheter was placed transabdominally. The animals were housed post-operatively for three weeks, after...

  15. A system to use electromagnetic tracking for the quality assurance of brachytherapy catheter digitization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Damato, Antonio L., E-mail: adamato@lroc.harvard.edu; Viswanathan, Akila N.; Don, Sarah M.; Hansen, Jorgen L.; Cormack, Robert A. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute/Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Purpose: To investigate the use of a system using electromagnetic tracking (EMT), post-processing and an error-detection algorithm for detecting errors and resolving uncertainties in high-dose-rate brachytherapy catheter digitization for treatment planning. Methods: EMT was used to localize 15 catheters inserted into a phantom using a stepwise acquisition technique. Five distinct acquisition experiments were performed. Noise associated with the acquisition was calculated. The dwell location configuration was extracted from the EMT data. A CT scan of the phantom was performed, and five distinct catheter digitization sessions were performed. No a priori registration of the CT scan coordinate system with the EMT coordinate system was performed. CT-based digitization was automatically extracted from the brachytherapy plan DICOM files (CT), and rigid registration was performed between EMT and CT dwell positions. EMT registration error was characterized in terms of the mean and maximum distance between corresponding EMT and CT dwell positions per catheter. An algorithm for error detection and identification was presented. Three types of errors were systematically simulated: swap of two catheter numbers, partial swap of catheter number identification for parts of the catheters (mix), and catheter-tip shift. Error-detection sensitivity (number of simulated scenarios correctly identified as containing an error/number of simulated scenarios containing an error) and specificity (number of scenarios correctly identified as not containing errors/number of correct scenarios) were calculated. Catheter identification sensitivity (number of catheters correctly identified as erroneous across all scenarios/number of erroneous catheters across all scenarios) and specificity (number of catheters correctly identified as correct across all scenarios/number of correct catheters across all scenarios) were calculated. The mean detected and identified shift was calculated. Results: The

  16. Pulmonary artery catheter insertion in a patient of dextrocardia with anomalous venous connections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripathi Mukesh

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available In a young adult patient having situs solitus with dextrocardia the attempted pulmonary artery catheter placement for emergency mitral valve replacement required an unduly long length (50cm of catheter insertion to get into right ventricle and then into pulmonary artery. Although catheter coiling was suspected initially, chest x-ray taken after successfully placement revealed an uncommon congenital anomalous venous connection i.e. right internal jugular opening into left sided superior vena cava then into inferior vena cava after running all along the left border of the heart. With the result, it required to pass 50cm of PA catheter to get into right ventricle in our patient. This emphasizes the need to look for abnormal venous connections during echocardiography and x-ray screening in congenital heart disease. Fluoroscopy is recommended when an unusual length of pulmonary artery catheter insertion is required to enter the pulmonary artery.

  17. The technical development of steerable catheter robot in performing interventional vascular surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Minimally invasive surgery is one of the primary means for the treatment of vascular diseases. The catheter is one of the main operating tools. As the vascular system is quite complicated and tiny, it is usually very difficult for the operator to accurately and bare-handily accomplish the whole intravascular procedure. Therefore, with the rapid development of minimally invasive surgeries the practical study related to the clinical employment of steerable catheter robot has attracted the researchers' attention. This paper aims to describe the emergence and development history of steerable catheter robot and also to introduce the main achievements as well as the up-to-date progress in the researches relevant to steerable catheter robot that the have been obtained by research workers all over the world so far. The prospects for the future development of steerable catheter robot are briefly discussed. (authors)

  18. Using a Distal Access Catheter in Acute Stroke Intervention with Penumbra, Merci and Gateway: A Technical Case Report

    OpenAIRE

    Kalia, J.S.; Zaidat, O O

    2009-01-01

    This technical report describes the successful use of the newly introduced Distal Access Catheter, initially designed to work with the Merci Retrieval System with the Penumbra aspiration system as the main aspiration catheter. Both devices, one a clot retriever and the other a thrombo-aspiration device, can be used and deployed via the same catheter saving time during acute stoke intervention. Moreover, the larger inner diameter of the distal access catheter may allow more effective clot aspi...

  19. Slow Release of Nitric Oxide from Charged Catheters and Its Effect on Biofilm Formation by Escherichia coli▿

    OpenAIRE

    Regev-Shoshani, Gilly; Ko, Mary; Miller, Chris; Av-Gay, Yossef

    2009-01-01

    Catheter-associated urinary tract infection is the most prevalent cause of nosocomial infections. Bacteria associated with biofilm formation play a key role in the morbidity and pathogenesis of these infections. Nitric oxide (NO) is a naturally produced free radical with proven bactericidal effect. In this study, Foley urinary catheters were impregnated with gaseous NO. The catheters demonstrated slow release of nitric oxide over a 14-day period. The charged catheters were rendered antiseptic...

  20. Chlorhexidine-based antiseptic solutions effectively reduce catheter-related bacteremia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onder, Ali Mirza; Chandar, Jayanthi; Billings, Anthony; Diaz, Rosa; Francoeur, Denise; Abitbol, Carolyn; Zilleruelo, Gaston

    2009-09-01

    The aim of this retrospective study was to investigate if the application of chlorhexidine-based solutions (ChloraPrep) to the exit site and the hub of long-term hemodialysis catheters could prevent catheter-related bacteremia (CRB) and prolong catheter survival when compared with povidone-iodine solutions. There were 20,784 catheter days observed. Povidone-iodine solutions (Betadine) were used in the first half of the study and ChloraPrep was used in the second half for all the patients. Both groups received chlorhexidine-impregnated dressings at the exit sites. The use of ChloraPrep significantly decreased the incidence of CRB (1.0 vs 2.2/1,000 catheter days, respectively, P = 0.0415), and hospitalization due to CRB (1.8 days vs 4.1 days/1,000 catheter days, respectively, P = 0.0416). The incidence of exit site infection was similar for the two groups. Both the period of overall catheter survival (207.6 days vs 161.1 days, P = 0.0535) and that of infection-free catheter survival (122.0 days vs 106.9 days, P = 0.1100) tended to be longer for the catheters cleansed with ChloraPrep, with no statistical significance. In conclusion, chlorhexidine-based solutions are more effective for the prevention of CRB than povidone-iodine solutions. This positive impact cannot be explained by decreased number of exit site infections. This study supports the notion that the catheter hub is the entry site for CRB. PMID:19296135

  1. Clinical complications of urinary catheters caused by crystalline biofilms: something needs to be done.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickler, D J

    2014-08-01

    This review is largely based on a previous paper published in the journal Spinal Cord. The care of many patients undergoing long-term bladder catheterization is complicated by encrustation and blockage of their Foley catheters. This problem stems from infection by urease-producing bacteria, particularly Proteus mirabilis. These organisms colonize the catheter forming an extensive biofilm; they also generate ammonia from urea, thus elevating the pH of urine. As the pH rises, crystals of calcium and magnesium phosphates precipitate in the urine and in the catheter biofilm. The continued development of this crystalline biofilm blocks the flow of urine through the catheter. Urine then either leaks along the outside of the catheter and the patient becomes incontinent or is retained causing painful distension of the bladder and reflux of urine to the kidneys. The process of crystal deposition can also initiate stone formation. Most patients suffering from recurrent catheter encrustation develop bladder stones. P. mirabilis establishes stable residence in these stones and is extremely difficult to eliminate from the catheterized urinary tract by antibiotic therapy. If blocked catheters are not identified and changed, serious symptomatic episodes of pyelonephritis, septicaemia and endotoxic shock can result. All types of Foley catheters including silver- or nitrofurazone-coated devices are vulnerable to this problem. In this review, the ways in which biofilm formation on Foley catheters is initiated by P. mirabilis will be described. The implications of understanding these mechanisms for the development of an encrustation-resistant catheter will be discussed. Finally, the way forward for the prevention and control of this problem will be considered. PMID:24635559

  2. Knowledge of Evidence-Based Urinary Catheter Care Practice Recommendations Among Healthcare Workers in Nursing Homes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mody, Lona; Saint, Sanjay; Galecki, Andrzej; Chen, Shu; Krein, Sarah L.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives This study assessed the knowledge of recommended urinary catheter care practices among nursing home (NH) healthcare workers (HCWs) in Southeast Michigan. Design A self-administered survey. Setting Seven nursing homes in Southeast Michigan. Participants Three hundred and fifty-six healthcare workers. Methods An anonymous, self-administered survey of HCWs (nurses & nurse aides) in seven NHs in 2006. The survey included questions about respondent characteristics and knowledge about indications, care, and personal hygiene pertaining to urinary catheters. The association of knowledge measures with occupation (nurses vs. aides) was assessed using generalized estimating equations. Results A total of 356 of 440 HCWs (81%) responded. Over 90% of HCWs were aware of measures such as cleaning around the catheter daily, glove use, and hand hygiene with catheter manipulation. They were less aware of research-proven recommendations of not disconnecting the catheter from its bag (59% nurses vs. 30% aides, P < .001), not routinely irrigating the catheter (48% nurses vs. 8% aides, P < .001), and hand hygiene even after casual contact (60% nurses vs. 69% aides, P = .07). HCWs were also unaware of recommendations regarding alcohol-based handrub (27% nurses & 32% aides with correct responses, P = .38). HCWs reported sources, both informal (such as nurse supervisors) and formal (in-services), of knowledge about catheter care. Conclusion Wide discrepancies remain between research-proven recommendations pertaining to urinary catheter care and HCWs' knowledge. Nurses and aides differ in their knowledge of recommendations against harmful practices, such as disconnecting the catheter from the bag and routinely irrigating catheters. Further research should focus on strategies to enhance dissemination of proven infection control practices in NHs. PMID:20662957

  3. Safety and Complications of Double-Lumen Tunnelled Cuffed Central Venous Dialysis Catheters

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamid, Rana S.; Kakaria, Anupam K.; Khan, Saif A.; Mohammed, Saja; Al-Sukaiti, Rashid; Al-Riyami, Dawood; Al-Mula Abed, Yasser W.

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: This study aimed to assess the technical success, safety and immediate and delayed complications of double-lumen tunnelled cuffed central venous catheters (TVCs) at the Sultan Qaboos University Hospital (SQUH), Muscat, Oman. Methods: This retrospective study took place between January 2012 and October 2013. The clinical records and radiological data of all patients who underwent ultrasound- and fluoroscopy-guided TVC placement at SQUH during the study period were reviewed. Demographic data and information regarding catheter placement, technical success and peri- and post-procedure complications (such as catheter-related infections or thrombosis) were collected. Results: A total of 204 TVCs were placed in 161 patients. Of these, 68 were female (42.2%) and 93 were male (57.8%). The mean age of the patients was 54.4 ± 17.3 years. The most common reason for catheter placement was the initiation of dialysis (63.4%). A total of 203 procedures were technically successful (99.5%). The right internal jugular vein was the most common site of catheter placement (74.9%). Mild haemorrhage which resolved spontaneously occurred in 11 cases (5.4%). No other complications were observed. Subsequent follow-up data was available for 132 catheters (65.0%); of these, thrombosis-related catheter malfunction was observed in 22 cases (16.7%) and catheter-related infection in 29 cases (22.0%). Conclusion: Radiological-guided placement of tunnelled haemodialysis catheters can be performed safely with excellent technical success. The success rate of catheter insertion at SQUH was favourable in comparison with other studies reported in the literature. PMID:26629377

  4. Fricke gel dosimetric catheters in high dose rate brachytherapy. In phantom dose distribution measurements of a 5 catheter implant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Due to the complexity and the many steps involved in a high dose rate brachytherapy process, radiation dose delivered to the patient during the treatment is susceptible to many inaccuracies and may not accurately match the planned dose. In vivo dosimetry is a reliable solution to compare planned and delivered dose distributions, representing therefore a valid tool to systematically perform a quality control of the radiotherapic process and eventually increment treatment accuracy. In this study, Fricke gel dosimetric catheters (FGDC) were investigated to perform dose distribution measurements of a brachytherapy implant. The brachytherapy implant was established in a water phantom with five flexible plastic needles and irradiation was performed with a high dose rate remote afterloading device provided with an Ir-192 radioactive source. Comparison between dose distributions measured with ten FGDC located in the proximity of the implant needles and calculated by the treatment planning system shows very good agreement for seven out of ten dosimeters, whereas the remaining three show a local underestimation of the dose. In phantom results indicate that Fricke gel dosimetric catheters might be valid candidates for performing in vivo dosimetry in high dose rate brachytherapy. However, further measurements are still required to validate this dosimetric method.

  5. Safety of a New Compact Male Intermittent Catheter: Randomized, Cross-Over, Single-Blind Study in Healthy Male Volunteers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bagi, Per; Hannibalsen, Jane; Permild, Rikke; Stilling, Sine; Looms, Dagnia K

    2011-01-01

    Introduction: A new compact male intermittent catheter was compared with a regular intermittent male catheter in terms of safety and acceptability. Methods: In this randomized, single-blind, cross-over study, healthy male volunteers were catheterized twice with a compact catheter and twice with a...

  6. Clinical-epidemiological characteristics and outcome of patients with catheter-related bloodstream infections in Europe (ESGNI-006 Study)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muñoz, P; Bouza, E; San Juan, R;

    2004-01-01

    (1.55 vs. 0.33/1,000 admissions). Most (67%) catheters were non-tunneled central venous catheters, were in the jugular vein (44%), had been implanted for > 7 days (70%), were made of polyurethane (61%) and were multi-lumen (67%). In 36% of cases, catheters were implanted by physicians other than...

  7. A Sensor To Detect the Early Stages in the Development of Crystalline Proteus mirabilis Biofilm on Indwelling Bladder Catheters

    OpenAIRE

    Stickler, D. J.; Jones, S.M.; Adusei, G. O.; Waters, M. G.

    2006-01-01

    A simple sensor has been developed to detect the early stages of urinary catheter encrustation and avoid the clinical crises induced by catheter blockage. In laboratory models of colonization by Proteus mirabilis, the sensor signaled encrustation at an average time of 43 h before catheters were blocked with crystalline biofilm.

  8. Clinical implication of parameteroptimized 3D-FISP MR angiography (MRA) in children with aortic coarctation: comparison with catheter angiography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To implement parameter-optimized 3D-FISP MR angiography (MRA) with interleaved double-slab excitation and to compare the result with catheter angiography in children with aortic coarctation. Materials and Methods: Eighteen children aged 2-15 years (mean 9.1 years) underwent MR imaging on a 1.5 T body scanner (Magnetom Vision, Siemens, Germany). All patients had undergone correlative catheter angiography. T1-weighted turbo spin echo (TSE) images (TR 600 ms, TE 17 ms, flip 160 , slice thickness 2-4 mm) were obtained in axial and parasagittal orientation, followed by an optimized 3D-FISP MR angiography in a sagittal plane (TR 12.5 ms, TE 5.5 ms, flip 22 , matrix 256 x 256, slice thickness 1.25 mm). All children were sedated but on spontaneous breathing. Image quality was graded by two experienced reviewers using a 4-point scoring system. Source images and reformatted maximum intensity projections (MIP) were analyzed for blood-tissue contrast as well as size and focal stenoses of the aortic arch. Results: Aortic coarctation was found in 13 of 18 patients, using the 3D-FISP MRA. A high correlation value (r=0.96) was found compared to catheter angiography. Image quality was high in 94% with well defined blood-tissue contrast in all cases. The sensitivity of flow and breathing motion was low. Examination time was about 15 minutes depending on volume of interest and heart rate. Diagnostic accuracy has shown improvement using a combined analysis of source and MIP images. The mentioned technique has provided an excellent display of thoracic vasculature. (orig.)

  9. Peripherally inserted central catheter placement using the Sonic Flashlight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amesur, Nikhil B; Wang, David C; Chang, Wilson; Weiser, David; Klatzky, Roberta; Shukla, Gaurav; Stetten, George D

    2009-10-01

    The Sonic Flashlight is an ultrasound (US) device that projects real-time US images into patients with use of a semireflective/transparent mirror. The present study evaluated the feasibility of use of the Sonic Flashlight for clinical peripherally inserted central catheter placements, originally with the mirror located inside a sterile cover (n = 15), then with the mirror outside (n = 11). Successful access was obtained in all cases. Results show that this new design improved visibility, as judged subjectively firsthand and in photographs. The study demonstrated the feasibility of the Sonic Flashlight and the new design to help assure sterility without degrading visibility, allowing further clinical trials involving physicians and nurses. PMID:19699661

  10. Catheter based renal sympathetic denervaton: treatment option for resistant hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BM Dhital

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Essential hypertension being a major public health problem with an atrocious toll. Furthermore resistant hypertension has increased morbidity and mortality in spite of using three or more antihypertensive medication, including one diuretic at their optimal doses to achieve the target blood pressure. Renal artery with its sympathetic afferent and efferent nerve signaling has substantial role in elevating and sustaining blood pressure. Blunting the overt sympathetic activity, catheter based renal sympathetic nerve denervation has become new treatment approach for the treatment of resistant hypertension. So in this review we address the current aspect and development of renal sympathetic denervation in the management of difficult to control hypertension. Journal of College of Medical Sciences-Nepal,2012,Vol-8,No-2, 58-63 DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.3126/jcmsn.v8i2.6841

  11. Efficacy of catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation beyond HATCH score

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Ri-bo; DONG Jian-zeng; LONG De-yong; YU Rong-hui; NING Man; JIANG Chen-xi; SANG Cai-hua; LIU Xiao-hui; MA Chang-sheng

    2012-01-01

    Background HATCH score is an established predictor of progression from paroxysmal to persistent atrial fibrillation (AF).The purpose of this study was to determine if HATCH score could predict recurrence after catheter ablation of AF.Methods The data of 488 consecutive paroxysmal AF patients who underwent an index circumferential pulmonary veins (PV) ablation were retrospectively analyzed.Of these patients,250 (51.2%) patients had HATCH score=0,185(37.9%) patients had HATCH score=1,and 53 (10.9%) patients had HATCH score >2 (28 patients had HATCH score=2,23 patients had HATCH score=3,and 2 patients had HATCH score=4).Results The patients with HATCH score >2 had significantly larger left atrium size,the largest left ventricular end systolic diameter,and the lowest ejection fraction.After a mean follow-up of (823±532) days,the recurrence rates were 36.4%,37.8% and 28.3% from the HATCH score=0,HATCH score=1 to HATCH score >2 categories (P=0.498).Univariate analysis revealed that left atrium size,body mass index,and failure of PV isolation were predictors of AF recurrence.After adjustment for body mass index,left atrial size and PV isolation,the HATCH score was not an independent predictor of recurrence (HR=0.92,95% confidence interval=0.76-1.12,P=0.406) in multivariate analysis.Conclusion HATCH score has no value in prediction of AF recurrence after catheter ablation.

  12. Previous PICC Placement May Be Associated With Catheter-Related Infections in Hemodialysis Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Catheter-related infections (CRIs) are a significant source of morbidity and mortality in hemodialysis patients. The identification of novel, modifiable risk factors for CRIs may lead to improved outcomes in this population. Peripherally inserted central catheters (PICCs) have been hypothesized to compromise vascular access due to vascular damage and venous thrombosis, whereas venous thrombosis has been linked to the development of CRIs. Here we examine the association between PICC placement and CRIs. Methods: A retrospective review was performed of all chronic hemodialysis catheter placements and exchanges performed at a large university hospital from September 2003 to September 2008. History of PICC line use was determined by examining hospital radiologic records from December 1993 to September 2008. Catheter-related complications were assessed and correlated with PICC line history. Results: One hundred eighty-five patients with 713 chronic tunneled hemodialysis catheter placements were identified. Thirty-eight of those patients (20.5%) had a history of PICC placement; these patients were more likely to have CRIs (odds ratio = 2.46, 95% confidence interval = 1.71–3.53, p < .001) compared with patients without a history of PICC placement. There was no difference between the two groups in age or number of catheters placed. Conclusion: Previous PICC placement may be associated with catheter-related infections in hemodialysis patients.

  13. Intra-vesical knot of bladder catheter in an extremely low birthweight neonate: A case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula M.Y. Tang

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Premature and extremely low birth weight (ELBW neonates are at high risk of developing multiple co-morbidities and often require urinary catheterization for various medical indications. Intra-vesical knotting of bladder catheter is a known but uncommon complication of this procedure. We report a case of an ELBW baby boy with a knotted bladder catheter requiring surgical retrieval. After an elective operation for the closure of patent ductus arteriosus, a 4 French urinary catheter was inserted into an ELBW baby boy for urine output monitoring and left in-situ. Resistance was encountered in attempt to remove the urinary catheter. Abdominal X Ray confirmed intra-vesical knotting of the tube. Knot unravelling by interventional radiology was attempted but was unsuccessful. Open extra-peritoneal bladder exploration was performed for the retrieval of the tightly knotted catheter. A 6 French transurethral Foley catheter was inserted for bladder drainage. Upon removal of the Foley's catheter on day 5 post op, the baby was able to void spontaneously. With literature review, we postulated the potential risk factors resulting in this potentially avoidable iatrogenic unusual complication. Recommendations were suggested to avoid further incidences.

  14. Development of an "early warning" sensor for encrustation of urinary catheters following Proteus infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malic, Sladjana; Waters, Mark G J; Basil, Leo; Stickler, David J; Williams, David W

    2012-01-01

    Biofilm formation in long-term urinary catheterized patients can lead to encrustation and blockage of urinary catheters with serious clinical complication. Catheter encrustation stems from infection with urease-producing bacteria, particularly Proteus mirabilis. Urease generates ammonia from urea, and the elevated pH of the urine results in crystallization of calcium and magnesium phosphates, which block the flow of urine. The aim of this research is to develop an "early warning" silicone sensor for catheter encrustation following bacterial infection of an in vitro bladder model system. The in vitro bladder model was infected with a range of urease positive and negative bacterial strains. Developed sensors enabled catheter blockage to be predicted ~17-24 h in advance of its occurrence. Signaling only occurred following infection with urease positive bacteria and only when catheter blockage followed. In summary, sensors were developed that could predict urinary catheter blockage in in vitro infection models. Translation of these sensors to a clinical environment will allow the timely and appropriate management of catheter blockage in long-term catheterized patients. PMID:21954120

  15. The development of a risk score for unplanned removal of peripherally inserted central catheter in newborns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Priscila Costa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: to develop a risk score for unplanned removal of peripherally inserted central catheter in newborns.METHOD: prospective cohort study conducted in a neonatal intensive care unit with newborn babies who underwent 524 catheter insertions. The clinical characteristics of the newborn, catheter insertion and intravenous therapy were tested as risk factors for the unplanned removal of catheters using bivariate analysis. The risk score was developed using logistic regression. Accuracy was internally validated based on the area under the Receiver Operating Characteristic curve.RESULTS: the risk score was made up of the following risk factors: transient metabolic disorders; previous insertion of catheter; use of a polyurethane double-lumen catheter; infusion of multiple intravenous solutions through a single-lumen catheter; and tip in a noncentral position. Newborns were classified into three categories of risk of unplanned removal: low (0 to 3 points, moderate (4 to 8 points, and high (≥ 9 points. Accuracy was 0.76.CONCLUSION: the adoption of evidence-based preventative strategies based on the classification and risk factors faced by the newborn is recommended to minimize the occurrence of unplanned removals.

  16. Mechanical Thrombectomy of Iliac Vein Thrombosis in a Pig Model Using the Rotarex and Aspirex Catheters

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Minko, P., E-mail: peterminko@yahoo.com; Bücker, A. [University Hospital Homburg/Saar, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany); Laschke, M.; Menger, M. [University Hospital Homburg/Saar, Institute of Clinical and Experimental Surgery (Germany); Bohle, R. [University Hospital Homburg/Saar, Department of Pathology (Germany); Katoh, M. [University Hospital Homburg/Saar, Department of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology (Germany)

    2013-06-08

    PurposeTo investigate the efficacy and safety of mechanical thrombectomy for iliac vein thrombosis using Rotarex and Aspirex catheters in a pig model.Materials and MethodsIliac vein thrombosis was induced in six pigs by means of an occlusion-balloon catheter and thrombin injection. The presence of thrombi was verified by digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and computed tomography (CT). Thrombectomy was performed using 6F and 8F Rotarex and 6F, 8F, and 10F Aspirex catheters (Straub Medical AG, Wangs, Switzerland). After intervention, DSA and CT were repeated to evaluate the efficacy of mechanical thrombectomy and to exclude local complications. In addition, pulmonary CT was performed to rule out pulmonary embolism. Finally, all pigs were killed, and iliac veins were dissected to perform macroscopic and histological examination.ResultsThrombus induction was successfully achieved in all animals as verified by DSA and CT. Subsequent thrombectomy lead to incomplete recanalization of the iliac veins with residual thrombi in all cases. However, the use of the 6F and 8F Rotarex catheters caused vessel perforation and retroperitoneal hemorrhage in all cases. Application of the Aspirex device caused one small transmural perforation in a vessel treated with a 10F Aspirex catheter, and this was only seen microscopically. Pulmonary embolism was detected in one animal treated with the Rotarex catheters, whereas no pulmonary emboli were seen in animals treated with the Aspirex catheters.ConclusionThe Aspirex catheter allowed subtotal and safe recanalization of iliac vein thrombosis. In contrast, the use of the Rotarex catheter caused macroscopically obvious vessel perforations in all cases.

  17. Mechanical Thrombectomy of Iliac Vein Thrombosis in a Pig Model Using the Rotarex and Aspirex Catheters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    PurposeTo investigate the efficacy and safety of mechanical thrombectomy for iliac vein thrombosis using Rotarex and Aspirex catheters in a pig model.Materials and MethodsIliac vein thrombosis was induced in six pigs by means of an occlusion-balloon catheter and thrombin injection. The presence of thrombi was verified by digital subtraction angiography (DSA) and computed tomography (CT). Thrombectomy was performed using 6F and 8F Rotarex and 6F, 8F, and 10F Aspirex catheters (Straub Medical AG, Wangs, Switzerland). After intervention, DSA and CT were repeated to evaluate the efficacy of mechanical thrombectomy and to exclude local complications. In addition, pulmonary CT was performed to rule out pulmonary embolism. Finally, all pigs were killed, and iliac veins were dissected to perform macroscopic and histological examination.ResultsThrombus induction was successfully achieved in all animals as verified by DSA and CT. Subsequent thrombectomy lead to incomplete recanalization of the iliac veins with residual thrombi in all cases. However, the use of the 6F and 8F Rotarex catheters caused vessel perforation and retroperitoneal hemorrhage in all cases. Application of the Aspirex device caused one small transmural perforation in a vessel treated with a 10F Aspirex catheter, and this was only seen microscopically. Pulmonary embolism was detected in one animal treated with the Rotarex catheters, whereas no pulmonary emboli were seen in animals treated with the Aspirex catheters.ConclusionThe Aspirex catheter allowed subtotal and safe recanalization of iliac vein thrombosis. In contrast, the use of the Rotarex catheter caused macroscopically obvious vessel perforations in all cases

  18. Malassezia furfur: a cause of occlusion of percutaneous central venous catheters in infants in the intensive care nursery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Azimi, P H; Levernier, K; Lefrak, L M; Petru, A M; Barrett, T; Schenck, H; Sandhu, A S; Duritz, G; Valesco, M

    1988-02-01

    Growth of Malassezia furfur in the intravascular catheter used for administration of lipid emulsion resulted in occlusion of deep intravascular Silastic catheters in 12 infants in 2 intensive care nurseries. At the time of occlusion visible growth was noted in the clear catheter which was connected to the Silastic intravascular line. Five infants showed clinical signs suggestive of sepsis. The yield of M. furfur from blood cultures and catheter tips was low even when oil enrichment was used. The highest yield of M. furfur was found in the connecting catheter (11 of 11). The source from and the route by which M. furfur entered the catheter remain unclear. The potential portals of entry include the proximal and distal ends of the connecting catheter as well as the colonized skin of the infants and caretakers. PMID:3125516

  19. Effect of steel and teflon infusion catheters on subcutaneous adipose tissue blood flow and infusion counter pressure in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Højbjerre, Lise; Skov-Jensen, Camilla; Kaastrup, Peter;

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Subcutaneous tissue is an important target for drug deposition or infusion. A local trauma may induce alterations in local microcirculation and diffusion barriers with consequences for drug bioavailability. We examined the influence of infusion catheters' wear time on local...... microcirculation and infusion counter pressure. METHODS: One steel catheter and one Teflon (Dupont, Wilmington, DE) catheter were inserted in subcutaneous, abdominal adipose tissue (SCAAT) in 10 healthy, lean men. The catheters were infused with isotonic saline at a rate of 10 microL/h for 48 h. Another steel...... catheter and a Teflon catheter were inserted contralateral to the previous catheters after 48 h. The infusion counter pressure was measured during a basal infusion rate followed by a bolus infusion. The measurements during a basal rate infusion were repeated after the bolus infusion. Adipose tissue blood...

  20. Use of the catheter in treatment of panophthalmitis and orbital purulent inflammation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nabil Al Hassan

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available In this study we have presented three cases with use of a catheter placed intraoperatively as a possiblemethod of medicaments application in the retrobulbar region. Two patients developed panophthalmitis,abscess and cellulitis of the orbit as a consequence of an injury afflicted during the war whereas thethird patient with glaukoma developed endogenic endophthalmitis. We eviscerated the bulb, implantedsmall soft tubes (catheters, then brought them out and fixed to the skin of the orbit region. Throughthe catheters we applied antibiotics and anesthetics directly into region of surgery and controlled them.

  1. An Update on the Energy Sources and Catheter Technology for the Ablation of Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pawan K. Arora

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available The ablation of atrial fibrillation (AF is an area of intense research in cardiac electrophysiology. In this review, we discuss the development of catheter-based interventions for AF ablation. We outline the pathophysiologic and anatomic bases for ablative lesion sets and the evolution of various catheter designs for the delivery of radiofrequency (RF, cryothermal, and other ablative energy sources. The strengths and weaknesses of various specialized RF catheters and alternative energy systems are delineated, with respect to efficacy and patient safety.

  2. Studies on the formation of crystalline bacterial biofilms on urethral catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickler, D; Morris, N; Moreno, M C; Sabbuba, N

    1998-09-01

    A model of the catheterised bladder was used to test the ability of urease-producing urinary tract pathogens to encrust urethral catheters. Encrustation was assessed by determining the amounts of calcium and magnesium deposited on the catheters and visualised by scanning electron microscopy. Urease-positive Morganella morganii, Klebsiella pneumoniae, and Pseudomonas aeruginosa failed to raise the urinary pH and form crystalline biofilms. In contrast, strains of Proteus mirabilis, Proteus vulgaris, and Providencia rettgeri generated alkaline urine (pH 8.3-8.6) and extensive catheter encrustation within 24 h. PMID:9832268

  3. SU-E-T-362: Automatic Catheter Reconstruction of Flap Applicators in HDR Surface Brachytherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Buzurovic, I; Devlin, P; Hansen, J; O' Farrell, D; Bhagwat, M; Friesen, S; Damato, A; Lewis, J; Cormack, R [Dana-Farber/Brigham and Women' s Cancer Center, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: Catheter reconstruction is crucial for the accurate delivery of radiation dose in HDR brachytherapy. The process becomes complicated and time-consuming for large superficial clinical targets with a complex topology. A novel method for the automatic catheter reconstruction of flap applicators is proposed in this study. Methods: We have developed a program package capable of image manipulation, using C++class libraries of The-Visualization-Toolkit(VTK) software system. The workflow for automatic catheter reconstruction is: a)an anchor point is placed in 3D or in the axial view of the first slice at the tip of the first, last and middle points for the curved surface; b)similar points are placed on the last slice of the image set; c)the surface detection algorithm automatically registers the points to the images and applies the surface reconstruction filter; d)then a structured grid surface is generated through the center of the treatment catheters placed at a distance of 5mm from the patient's skin. As a result, a mesh-style plane is generated with the reconstructed catheters placed 10mm apart. To demonstrate automatic catheter reconstruction, we used CT images of patients diagnosed with cutaneous T-cell-lymphoma and imaged with Freiburg-Flap-Applicators (Nucletron™-Elekta, Netherlands). The coordinates for each catheter were generated and compared to the control points selected during the manual reconstruction for 16catheters and 368control point Results: The variation of the catheter tip positions between the automatically and manually reconstructed catheters was 0.17mm(SD=0.23mm). The position difference between the manually selected catheter control points and the corresponding points obtained automatically was 0.17mm in the x-direction (SD=0.23mm), 0.13mm in the y-direction (SD=0.22mm), and 0.14mm in the z-direction (SD=0.24mm). Conclusion: This study shows the feasibility of the automatic catheter reconstruction of flap applicators with a high

  4. Intra-aortic balloon occlusion catheter for treating hemorrhagic shock after massive duodenal ulcer bleeding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shigesato, Shintaro; Shimizu, Tetsunosuke; Kittaka, Tadahiro; Akimoto, Hiroshi

    2015-03-01

    Clamping the descending aorta by emergency thoracotomy is a well-known effective procedure to stop bleeding from lesions under the diaphragm. We successfully treated a case of cardiopulmonary arrest resulting from a massive duodenal ulcer hemorrhage using an intraaortic balloon occlusion (IABO) catheter instead of the conventional technique. Our experience suggests that IABO catheters can be used to treat patients with hemorrhagic shock regardless of the presence of cardiopulmonary arrest. This can be a life-saving procedure, which prevents ischemic brain injury. This article describes the advantages of using IABO catheters and our experience with this case. PMID:25633531

  5. Umbilical venous catheter retrieval in a 970 gm neonate by a novel technique

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arima Nigam

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Umbilical venous catheterization is a necessity for the advanced care of very low birth weight neonates. Even with utmost care, few complications cannot be avoided. Fractured and retained catheter fragments are one of them. Endoluminal retrieval of such a catheter is an uncommon and challenging procedure for the interventionist. The only alternative is an open exploration of these patients. Various techniques have been described for retrieval of such foreign bodies. We describe a novel technique for percutaneous retrieval of an embolized umbilical venous catheter from a very low birth weight neonate.

  6. Combined surgical and catheter-based treatment of extensive thoracic aortic aneurysm and aortic valve stenosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    De Backer, Ole; Lönn, Lars; Søndergaard, Lars

    2015-01-01

    An extensive thoracic aortic aneurysm (TAA) is a potentially life-threatening condition and remains a technical challenge to surgeons. Over the past decade, repair of aortic arch aneurysms has been accomplished using both hybrid (open and endovascular) and totally endovascular techniques. Thoraci...

  7. Safety of pulmonary vein isolation and left atrial complex fractionated atrial electrograms ablation for atrial fibrillation with phased radiofrequency energy and multi-electrode catheters

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, A.A.W.; Balt, J.C.; Wijffels, M.C.; Wever, E.F.; Boersma, L.V.

    2012-01-01

    AIMS: Recently, a multi-electrode catheter system using phased radiofrequency (RF) energy was developed specifically for atrial fibrillation (AF) ablation: the pulmonary vein ablation catheter (PVAC), the multi-array septal catheter (MASC), and the multi-array ablation catheter (MAAC). Initial resul

  8. Nursing care of indwelling catheter thrombolysis for acute thrombosis in the arteriovenous fistula in hemodialysis patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To summarize the experience of the nursing care of indwelling catheter thrombolysis for acute thrombosis in the arteriovenous fistula in eight hemodialysis patients. Methods: After breaking thrombus through indwelling catheter, both bolus injection and micro-pump continuous infusion of urokinase was employed in eight hemodialysis patients with acute thrombosis in the arteriovenous fistula. The necessary nursing measures were carried out to assist the whole therapeutic procedure. Results: All the patients could well cooperate with the procedure of indwelling catheter thrombolysis and urokinase infusion. The reopening rate of the obstructed fistula was 100%. Conclusion: Indwelling catheter thrombolysis with urokinase infusion is a simple, effective and safe treatment for acute thrombosis in the arteriovenous fistula in hemodialysis patients. In order to obtain optimal results, necessary nursing measures must be carried out. (authors)

  9. Symptomatic spinal cord deformity secondary to a redundant intramedullary shunt catheter

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Right arm pain, motor and sensory loss in the right arm and right facial numbness recurred in a 27 year old quadraplegic shortly after a posttraumatic spinal cord cyst (PTSCC) was shunted via a catheter into the adjacent subarachnoid space. Although shunt malfunction was clinically suspected, metrizamide computed tomography (MCT) suggested that redundancy of the catheter had caused deformity of the spinal cord. This hypothesis was confirmed at surgery when intraoperative spinal sonography (IOSS) showed that the spinal cord deformity at C1-C2 disappeared when the catheter was withdrawn. This case shows that new or recurrent spinal cord symptoms may be due to a mechanical deformity of the cord rather than shunt malfunction, that restricting the length of the shunt catheter which is used to decompress PTSCCs is important, and that IOSS is an indispensible tool for visualizing the changes in spinal cord morphology during shunting procedures. (orig.)

  10. Isolation and identification of microbes from biofilm of Urinary catheters and antimicrobial Susceptibility evaluation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ABalasubramanian; KChairman; AJARanjit Singh; GAlagumuthu

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Bacterial species colonize indwelling catheters as biofilm induce complications in patients care. Methods: From the biofilm matrix seven species of microbes were isolated. The predominant bacteria seen in catheters were E.coli, (27 percent) P.mirabilis (20 percent) and S.epidermis (18 percent). Results: The biomass of microbes associated with the biofilm was estimated. The mean dry weight of biomass of bacteria associated with a catheter that was used for over a month time was in the range 2.5±0.04g - 3.1 ± 0.6g. Conclusion: But it was found to colonize the microtitre plate to attain a peak growth at 84h. P.mirabilis isolated from the biofilm was able to tolerate the antibiotics tetracycline, Penicillin, Kanamycin and Gentamycin at a dose level of 20μg/ml. The study indicated that the catheter has to be replaced if biofilm formation was noticed.

  11. [Prevention of catheter-related bloodstream infections in the operation room].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ema, Yoshiaki; Nishiwaki, Kimitoshi

    2010-05-01

    Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CRBSIs) are recognized as an important and serious problem, especially in an intensive care unit (ICU), since they have far higher infection rates compared to those for other type of intravascular devices. However, in the operation room, there seems to be little concern among anesthesiologists regarding this problem. It is important for anesthesiologists to understand that CRBSIs can be prevented or reduced by evidence-based interventions such as hand hygiene, education in hand washing and alcohol-based hand rubbing, sterile catheter care techniques, proper skin disinfection, maximal barrier precautions during catheter insertion, choice of subclavian vein placement, avoidance of femoral vein placement, and removal of an unnecessary catheter. This evidence is based mainly on findings in ICU patients, but introduction of these interventions into operation rooms may be very useful for reducing perioperative CRBSIs. PMID:20486568

  12. Blood flow measurements during hemodialysis vascular access interventions - Catheter-based thermodilution or Doppler ultrasound?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Heerwagen, Søren T; Hansen, Marc A; Schroeder, Torben V; Ladefoged, Søren D; Lönn, Lars

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To test the clinical performance of catheter-based thermodilution and Doppler ultrasound of the feeding brachial artery for blood flow measurements during hemodialysis vascular access interventions.Methods: Thirty patients with arteriovenous fistulas who underwent 46 interventions had...

  13. Rhodococcus bacteremia in cancer patients is mostly catheter related and associated with biofilm formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fadi Al Akhrass

    Full Text Available Rhodococcus is an emerging cause of opportunistic infection in immunocompromised patients, most commonly causing cavitary pneumonia. It has rarely been reported as a cause of isolated bacteremia. However, the relationship between bacteremia and central venous catheter is unknown. Between 2002 and 2010, the characteristics and outcomes of seventeen cancer patients with Rhodococcus bacteremia and indwelling central venous catheters were evaluated. Rhodococcus bacteremias were for the most part (94% central line-associated bloodstream infection (CLABSI. Most of the bacteremia isolates were Rhodococcus equi (82%. Rhodococcus isolates formed heavy microbial biofilm on the surface of polyurethane catheters, which was reduced completely or partially by antimicrobial lock solution. All CLABSI patients had successful response to catheter removal and antimicrobial therapy. Rhodococcus species should be added to the list of biofilm forming organisms in immunocompromised hosts and most of the Rhodococcus bacteremias in cancer patients are central line associated.

  14. Chlorhexidine impregnated central venous catheter inducing an anaphylatic shock in the intensive care unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khoo, A; Oziemski, P

    2011-10-01

    Chlorhexidine, a bisbiguanide, is widely used as an antiseptic agent in medical practice as it has the greatest residual antimicrobial activity. Central venous catheters coated extraluminally with chlorhexidine have been made to reduce extraluminal contamination. By using both the chlorhexidine-alchohol skin preparation and antimicrobial-coated catheters during vascular cannulation, it can reduce catheter related bloodstream significantly [1]. The reduction in infection rate is especially vital in critically ill patients who require long-term vascular access. Adverse reactions to chlorhexidine are rare and uncommon, and have been under-recognised as a cause of anaphylaxis. There are several reports of allergic reactions following exposure to chlorhexidine. We report of a case of anaphylaxis shock requiring cardiopulmonary resuscitation during the placement of a chlorhexidine impregnated central venous catheters. PMID:21036666

  15. Deflation of the ′obstinate′ Foley′s urinary catheter balloon : a new technique.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramakantan R

    1989-01-01

    Full Text Available We have successfully deflated "obstinate" Foley′s urinary catheter balloons in 15 cases in the last six months with the help of a simple bedside procedure using an angiographic guide-wire.

  16. Transradial Coronary Angiography--Insights to the One-Catheter Concept.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Christoph; Riehle, Julia; Frey, Norbert; Wiemer, Marcus

    2016-02-01

    Transradial coronary angiography (TRC) can be performed applying only one catheter fitting into the right and left coronary ostia (R/LCO). In this bicentric study (n = 2953), we analyzed the ostial performance of the Tiger_II_catheter widely used in TRC. Compared to Judkins catheters, the Tiger_II is frequently associated with ostial instability within the LCO but fits better into the RCO-irrespective of tube size. Judkins catheters generally need more peri-procedural contrast and radiation exposure. TRC may be started using a 5F_Tiger_II on the right side in order to be switched to 5F Judkins in case of propable LCO instability. PMID:26822190

  17. Preperitoneal Tunneling—A Novel Technique in Peritoneal Dialysis Catheter Insertion

    OpenAIRE

    Modaghegh, Mohammad-Hadi Saeed; Kazemzadeh, Gholamhossein; Rajabnejad, Yaser; Nazemian, Fatemeh

    2014-01-01

    ♦ Introduction: This study describes a new preperitoneal tunneling (PPT) method for inserting a peritoneal dialysis catheter (PDC), thereby lessening surgical complications and increasing the catheter’s survival.

  18. Body Mass Index, Quality of Life, and Catheter Ablation in Patients with Atrial Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethan R. Ellis, M.D

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Atrial fibrillation and obesity are interlinked epidemics and both impair quality of life. As the prevalence of both conditions in the US continues to rise, so will the number of obese patients with atrial fibrillation referred for catheter ablation. Catheter ablation has already been shown to significantly improve quality of life in patients with atrial fibrillation. Until recently, there has been little attention to the effects of catheter ablation on quality of life specifically in obese patients with atrial fibrillation. This paper will review what is known about the effects of atrial fibrillation and obesity on quality of life and how quality of life is affected by catheter ablation for atrial fibrillation in obese patients.

  19. Catheter-related candidemia caused by Candida lipolytica in a child with tubercular meningitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agarwal Santwana

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Candida lipolytica is weakly pathogenic yeast, which is rarely isolated from the blood. We recovered this species from repeated blood samples and in the central venous catheter in a debilitated pediatric patient of tubercular meningitis. Identity was established on the basis of colony morphology and sugar assimilation tests (ID 32C assimilation profile. The fungemia and associated fever subsided after the removal of catheter and amphotericin B therapy. The data suggest that though of low virulence and usually a contaminant, C. lipolytica is emerging yeast pathogen in cases of catheter-related candidemia. Pathogenicity is indicated by isolation from repeated samples as in our case. Intensive therapy is recommended in cases not resolving spontaneously or responding to removal of catheter alone.

  20. The effect of a 6 Fr catheter on flow rate in men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Richard

    2013-01-01

    Conclusion: A 6 Fr transurethral catheter significantly lowers the maximal flow rate by 4 mL/s. Its presence resulted in an upstaging on the ICS nomogram. However, further studies will be necessary to confirm this upstaging.

  1. The burden of prolonged indwelling catheter after acute urinary retention in Ikeja – Lagos, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uzodimma Charles C

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Acute urinary retention (AUR is a common urological problem. We have observed a growing list of patients on indwelling bladder catheter awaiting surgery after AUR. This study was aimed at identifying the health, financial and quality of life (QoL implications of prolonged use of indwelling catheter in these patients Methods We review the side-effects, QoL and cost of changing an indwelling catheter among patients who were on the waiting list for definitive surgery after AUR. All the 62 patients who presented to weekly catheter clinic for change of the indwelling catheter were recruited over a 3 – week period into the study. Results The mean age of the patients was 57.5 years and the mean catheter use time was 23 months. The aetiology of AUR was BPH in 40 (64% and urethral trauma in 16 (28.4% of the patients. The common side effects of prolonged catheterization included urethral/suprapubic pain, bleeding per urethram, loss of dignity, loss of job or being out of school, lack of sexual intercourse, pericatheter leakage of urine and recurrent urinary tract infection. The cost of change of the indwelling catheter to the patient each time ranged from 460.00 – 2500.00 Naira (averaged 789.67 Naira. The total annual cost for the change of indwelling catheter after AUR in our catheter clinic was estimated to be 7,350,000.00 Naira (58,800 US dollars with 1,890,000.00 Naira (15,120 US dollars being the cost borne by the patients per annum and the rest being government subsidy. Fifty-three (85.5% patients described that they were unhappy. There was a significant correlation between QoL and the presence of pain (p = 0.015 and bleeding (p = 0.042 associated with the presence of an indwelling catheter. Conclusion The need to have an indwelling catheter for a prolonged period after AUR is a painful experience and associated with several side-effects. This has a significant negative effect on the patients' QoL and constitutes a

  2. Three-dimensional tracking of cardiac catheters using an inverse geometry x-ray fluoroscopy system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Scanning beam digital x-ray (SBDX) is an inverse geometry fluoroscopic system with high dose efficiency and the ability to perform continuous real-time tomosynthesis at multiple planes. This study describes a tomosynthesis-based method for 3D tracking of high-contrast objects and present the first experimental investigation of cardiac catheter tracking using a prototype SBDX system. Methods: The 3D tracking algorithm utilizes the stack of regularly spaced tomosynthetic planes that are generated by SBDX after each frame period (15 frames/s). Gradient-filtered versions of the image planes are generated, the filtered images are segmented into object regions, and then a 3D coordinate is calculated for each object region. Two phantom studies of tracking performance were conducted. In the first study, an ablation catheter in a chest phantom was imaged as it was pulled along a 3D trajectory defined by a catheter sheath (10, 25, and 50 mm/s pullback speeds). SBDX tip tracking coordinates were compared to the 3D trajectory of the sheath as determined from a CT scan of the phantom after the registration of the SBDX and CT coordinate systems. In the second study, frame-to-frame tracking precision was measured for six different catheter configurations as a function of image noise level (662-7625 photons/mm2 mean detected x-ray fluence at isocenter). Results: During catheter pullbacks, the 3D distance between the tracked catheter tip and the sheath centerline was 1.0±0.8 mm (mean ±one standard deviation). The electrode to centerline distances were comparable to the diameter of the catheter tip (2.3 mm), the confining sheath (4 mm outside diameter), and the estimated SBDX-to-CT registration error (±0.7 mm). The tip position was localized for all 332 image frames analyzed and 83% of tracked positions were inside the 3D sheath volume derived from CT. The pullback speeds derived from the catheter trajectories were within 5% of the programed pullback speeds. The tracking

  3. Direct cooling of the catheter tip increases safety for CMR-guided electrophysiological procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reiter Theresa

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background One of the safety concerns when performing electrophysiological (EP procedures under magnetic resonance (MR guidance is the risk of passive tissue heating due to the EP catheter being exposed to the radiofrequency (RF field of the RF transmitting body coil. Ablation procedures that use catheters with irrigated tips are well established therapeutic options for the treatment of cardiac arrhythmias and when used in a modified mode might offer an additional system for suppressing passive catheter heating. Methods A two-step approach was chosen. Firstly, tests on passive catheter heating were performed in a 1.5 T Avanto system (Siemens Healthcare Sector, Erlangen, Germany using a ASTM Phantom in order to determine a possible maximum temperature rise. Secondly, a phantom was designed for simulation of the interface between blood and the vascular wall. The MR-RF induced temperature rise was simulated by catheter tip heating via a standard ablation generator. Power levels from 1 to 6 W were selected. Ablation duration was 120 s with no tip irrigation during the first 60 s and irrigation at rates from 2 ml/min to 35 ml/min for the remaining 60 s (Biotronik Qiona Pump, Berlin, Germany. The temperature was measured with fluoroscopic sensors (Luxtron, Santa Barbara, CA, USA at a distance of 0 mm, 2 mm, 4 mm, and 6 mm from the catheter tip. Results A maximum temperature rise of 22.4°C at the catheter tip was documented in the MR scanner. This temperature rise is equivalent to the heating effect of an ablator's power output of 6 W at a contact force of the weight of 90 g (0.883 N. The catheter tip irrigation was able to limit the temperature rise to less than 2°C for the majority of examined power levels, and for all examined power levels the residual temperature rise was less than 8°C. Conclusion Up to a maximum of 22.4°C, the temperature rise at the tissue surface can be entirely suppressed by using the catheter's own irrigation

  4. Radiofrequency catheter ablation of Type 1 atrial flutter using a large-tip electrode catheter and high-power radiofrequency energy generator.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feld, Gregory K

    2004-11-01

    Recent studies have demonstrated a high degree of efficacy of 8 mm electrode-tipped or saline-irrigated-tip catheters for ablation of atrial flutter (AFL). These catheters have a theoretical advantage as they produce a large ablation lesion. However, large-tip ablation catheters have a larger surface area and require a higher power radiofrequency (RF) generator with up to 100 W capacity to produce adequate ablation temperatures (50-60 degrees C). The potential advantages of a large-tip ablation catheter and high-power RF generator include the need for fewer energy applications, shorter procedure and fluoroscopy times, and greater efficacy. Therefore, the safety and efficacy of AFL ablation using 8 or 10 mm electrode catheters and a 100-W RF generator was studied using the Boston Scientific, Inc., EPT-1000 XP cardiac ablation system. There were 169 patients, aged 61 +/- 12 years involved. Acute end points were bidirectional isthmus block and no inducible AFL. Following ablation, patients were seen at 1, 3 and 6 months, with event monitoring performed weekly and for any symptoms. Three quality of life surveys were completed during follow-up. Acute success was achieved in 158 patients (93%), with 12 +/- 11 RF energy applications. The efficacy of 8 and 10 mm electrodes did not differ significantly. The number of RF energy applications (10 +/- 8 vs. 14 +/- 8) and ablation time (0.5 +/- 0.4 vs. 0.8 +/- 0.6 h) were less with 10 mm compared with 8 mm electrodes (p free of symptoms at 12 and 24 months, respectively. Ablation of AFL improved quality of life scores (p generator was safe, effective and improved quality of life. The number and duration of RF applications was lower with 10 mm compared with 8 mm electrode catheters. PMID:16293039

  5. Periinterventional prophylactic antibiotics in radiological port catheter implantation; Periinterventionelle prophylaktische Antibiotikagabe bei der radiologischen Portkatheterimplantation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gebauer, B.; Teichgraeber, U.; Werk, M. [Charite, Universitaetsmedizin Berlin (Germany). Klinik fuer Strahlenheilkunde; Wagner, H.J. [Vivantes Klinikum im Friedrichshain und am Urban (Germany). Inst. fuer Radiologie

    2007-08-15

    Purpose: To evaluate whether catheter-related infections after radiologically placed port catheters can be reduced by single-shot periinterventional antibiosis. Materials and Method: Between January and September 2002, 164 consecutive patients with indication for central venous port catheter implantation were included in the present study. During implantation the interventional radiologist was responsible for deciding whether to administer a prophylactic single-shot antibiosis. The prophylactic antibiosis entailed intravenous administration of ampicillin and sulbactam (3 g Unacid, Pfizer) or 100 mg ciprofloxacine (Ciprobay, Bayer) in the case of an allergy history to penicillins. Catheter-related infection was defined as a local or systemic infection necessitating port catheter extraction. Results: Indication for port catheter implantation was a malignant disease requiring chemotherapy in 158 cases. The port catheter (Chemosite [Tyco Healthcare] [n = 123], low-profile [Arrow International] [n = 35], other port system [n = 6]) was implanted via sonographically guided puncture of the right jugular vein in 139 patients, via the left jugular vein in 24 cases and via the right subclavian vein in one patient. 75 patients received periinterventional prophylactic antibiosis (Unacid [n = 63] Ciprobay [n = 12]) and 89 patients did not receive antibiosis. The prophylactic antibiosis caused a minor allergic reaction in one patient that improved with antihistamic and corticoid medication. A total of 7 ports, 6 without prophylactic antibiosis versus one with periinterventional prophylaxis, were extracted due to infectious complications. Conclusion: Single-shot periinterventional prophylactic antibiosis can reduce early and late infectious complications after radiological-interventional placement of central venous port catheters. (orig.)

  6. Single Center Retrospective Analysis of Conventional and Radial TIG Catheters for Transradial Diagnostic Coronary Angiography

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marc Vorpahl

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Current guidelines favor the radial approach for coronary angiography. Therefore, specialty radial diagnostic catheters were designed to engage both coronary arteries with a single device. However, it is unclear if single catheters are superior to conventional catheters. A retrospective analysis was performed of consecutive right radial coronary angiographies to determine catheter use, fluoroscopy time, radiation dosage, and consumption of contrast. Procedures were performed with a single TIG catheter or conventional catheters (CONV. Procedures with coronary artery bypass grafts or ventricular angiographies were excluded. 273 transradial procedures were performed successfully. 95 procedures were performed with CONV and 178 procedures with a TIG. Crossover to additional catheters was higher in TIG (15.2% compared to CONV (5.3%, p=0.02. Fluoroscopy time was comparable between CONV and TIG, without crossover (2.2±1.2 min versus 2.3±1.2 min; n.s., however, greater in the case of crossover for CONV (5.8±0.7 and TIG (7.6±3.0; p=0.0001. Radiation dosage was similar in CONV and the TIG, without crossover (1419±1075, cGy∗cm2 versus 1690±1138; n.s., however, greater for CONV (2374±620 and TIG (3733±2281, p=0.05 with crossover. Overall, the amount of contrast was greater in TIG (56±13 mL versus CONV (48±3 mL; p=0.0003. CONV femoral catheters may be the primary choice for radial approach.

  7. Assessment of right liver graft perfusion effectiveness between one and two-catheter infusion methods

    OpenAIRE

    Jung, Bo-Hyun; Hwang, Shin; Ha, Tae-Yong; Song, Gi-Won; Jung, Dong-Hwan; Kim, Ki-Hun; Ahn, Chul-Soo; Moon, Deok-Bog; Park, Gil-Chun; Kang, Sung-Hwa; Yoon, Young-In; Lee, Sung-Gyu

    2014-01-01

    Backgrounds/Aims Conventional graft perfusion method using one small-caliber catheter takes a relatively long time for right liver graft perfusion, thus some modification is needed. In this study, we intended to assess the effectiveness of right liver graft perfusion methods through comparison of different infusion catheters. Methods The study consisted of two parts including one bench experiment to obtain data of hydraulic infusion and one clinical trial of 40 cases on graft perfusion with o...

  8. Placement of an implantable port catheter in the biliary stent: an experimental study in dogs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To investigate the feasibility of port catheter placement following a biliary stent placement. We employed 14 mongrel dogs as test subject and after the puncture of their gaIl bladders using sonographic guidance, a 10-mm in diameter metallic stent was placed at the common duct. In 12 dogs, a 6.3 F port catheter was placed into the duodenum through the common duct and a port was secured at the subcutaneous space following stent placement. As a control group, an 8.5 F drain tube was placed into the gallbladder without port catheter placement in the remaining two dogs. Irrigation of the bile duct was performed every week by injection of saline into the port, and the port catheter was replaced three weeks later in two dogs. Information relating to the success of the procedure, complications and the five-week follow-up cholangiographic findings were obtained. Placement of a biliary stent and a port catheter was technically successful in 13 (93%) dogs, while stent migration (n=3), gallbladder rupture (n=1) and death (n=5) due to subcutaneous abscess and peritonitis also occurred. The follow-up was achieved in eight dogs (seven dogs with a port catheter placement and one dog with a drain tube placement). Irrigation of the bile duct and port catheter replacement were successfully achieved without any complications. Cholangiograms obtained five weeks after stent placement showed diffuse biliary dilation with granulation tissue formation. However, focal biliary stricture was seen in one dog with stent placement alone. Placement of a port catheter following biliary stent placement seems to be feasible. However, further investigation is necessary to reduce the current complications

  9. Minocycline-EDTA Lock Solution Prevents Catheter-Related Bacteremia in Hemodialysis

    OpenAIRE

    Campos, Rodrigo Peixoto; do Nascimento, Marcelo Mazza; Chula, Domingos Candiota; Riella, Miguel Carlos

    2011-01-01

    There is growing concern about the development of antibacterial resistance with the use of antibiotics in catheter lock solutions. The use of an antibiotic that is not usually used to treat other serious infections may be an alternative that may reduce the clinical impact should resistance develop. We conducted a randomized controlled trial to compare a solution of minocycline and EDTA with the conventional unfractionated heparin for the prevention of catheter-related bacteremia in hemodialys...

  10. A sheared Racz catheter in cervical epidural space for thirty months: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Jae Hyuk; Choi, Hoon; Kim, Jin Sung; Lee, Min Kyu; Park, Hue Jung

    2015-01-01

    Percutaneous epidural neuroplasty may lead to complications such as hematoma, infection, epidural abscess, meningitis, hypotension, respiratory depression, urinary and fecal dysfunction, sexual dysfunction and paresthesia. Other technical complications may include shearing or tearing, misplacement, blockage and migration of the catheter. We report a case of a 41-year-old female patient, who underwent surgical removal of a sheared catheter, which was retained for 30 months after cervical Racz ...

  11. Use of the catheter in treatment of panophthalmitis and orbital purulent inflammation

    OpenAIRE

    Nabil Al Hassan; Meliha Alender; Vesna Jurišić; Senija Rašić; Mirsad Ibišević; Emina Alimanović Halilović

    2008-01-01

    In this study we have presented three cases with use of a catheter placed intraoperatively as a possiblemethod of medicaments application in the retrobulbar region. Two patients developed panophthalmitis,abscess and cellulitis of the orbit as a consequence of an injury afflicted during the war whereas thethird patient with glaukoma developed endogenic endophthalmitis. We eviscerated the bulb, implantedsmall soft tubes (catheters), then brought them out and fixed to the skin of the orbit regio...

  12. Microbiological and Clinical Features of Four Cases of Catheter-Related Infection by Methylobacterium radiotolerans

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Li; Tarrand, Jeffrey J.; Han, Xiang Y.

    2015-01-01

    Four cases of central venous catheter-related Methylobacterium radiotolerans infection are presented here. The patients were all long-term catheter carriers with an underlying diagnosis of leukemia, and they mostly manifested fevers. The isolated bacterial strains all showed far better growth on buffered charcoal yeast extract agar during the initial isolation and/or subcultures than they did on sheep blood or chocolate agar. This microbiological feature may improve the culture recovery of th...

  13. Comparison of the Efficacy of Foley Catheter Balloon with Dinoprostone Gel for Cervical Ripening at Term

    OpenAIRE

    Smiti Nanda; Archit Dahiya; Kanika Malik; Krishna Dahiya

    2012-01-01

    Objective: The purpose of this study was to compare the efficacy of extra-amniotic Foley catheter with intra cervical Dinoprostone gel for preinduction cervical ripening. Study Design: A randomized, prospective study was conducted in the Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, PGIMS Rohtak on 100 pregnant women admitted for induction of labor. Fifty patients were randomized to receive Dinoprostone gel and 50 patients to receive intracervical, extra-amniotic Foley catheter. Results: The two g...

  14. Variables associated with peripherally inserted central catheter related infection in high risk newborn infants 1

    OpenAIRE

    Uesliz Vianna Rangel; Saint Clair dos Santos Gomes Junior; Ana Maria Aranha Magalhães Costa; Maria Elisabeth Lopes Moreira

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: to relate the variables from a surveillance form for intravenous devices in high risk newborn infants with peripherally inserted central catheter related infection. METHODOLOGY: approximately 15 variables were studied, being associated with peripherally inserted central catheter related infection, this being defined by blood culture results. The variables analyzed were obtained from the surveillance forms used with intravenous devices, attached to the medical records of newborn inf...

  15. A Comparative Study of Blood Culture Sampling from Umbilical Catheter Line versus Peripheral Site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdolkarim Hamedi

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Neonatal sepsis is an important cause of death and morbidity in newborns and is diagnosed by isolation of organism in blood culture. In several reports,reliablity of blood cultures were done from umbi lical catheters,have been demonstrated. The objective of the present study was to determine,wether an inde welling umbilical catheter, could be an alternative site for blood culture. In a prospective study over 6 months during 2006,141 paired blood cultures from 134 infant,were done simultaneously from peripheral site and umbilical catheter (mostly U. V. C,during the first four days of life. Majority of these infants were preterm and admitted to NICU for special care. these infants had indwelling umbilical line and had indication of sepsis workup. A total of 141 pairs of blood cultures were obtained from 134 infants. In 16 infants blood culture pairs were positive for one organism in both peripheral vein and umbilical site. 71. 6% of total cultures (n=11pairs were negative in boths site. A total of 22 pairs were positive in one site only,with 5 positive from peripheral vein only and the other 17 from umblical site. Two pairs were positve in boths site with two different organism. In over all 16 infant (11%of blood were considered to be contaminated. Contamination rate were 2. 4% and 9. 2% for peripheral and umbilical catheter site. Contamination rate increased after 48 hours of age in umbilical catheter. The result showed that after 2 days contamination rate for blood culture taken from catheter line increased and specifity decreased. We recommended that blood culture via umblical catheter in first 2 days in sick neonates with indwelling catheter can be a alternate site of blood culture sampelling.

  16. PROPHYLACTIC ADMINISTRATION OF DOXYCYCLINE REDUCES CENTRAL VENOUS CATHETER INFECTIONS IN PATIENTS UNDERGOING HEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANTATION

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed Kharfan-Dabaja; Mohamed Baydoun; Zaher Otrock; Samar Okaily; Rita Nehme; Racha Abu-Chahine; Ali Hamdan; Samar Noureddine; Souha Kanj; Zeina Kanafani; Ali Bazarbachi

    2013-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells are usually transfused through a central venous catheter (CVC), which also facilitates administration of medications and intravenous fluids. We had observed high rate of catheter-related blood-stream infection (CR-BSI) at our Bone Marrow Transplantation (BMT) unit despite prescribing fluoroquinolones for anti-bacterial prophylaxis. Accordingly, we implemented prophylactic use of a relatively inexpensive broad spectrum antibiotic, namely doxycycline to address this pro...

  17. Inadvertent subclavian artery cannulation with a central venous catheter; successful retrieval using a minimally invasive technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmond, C E; O'Donohoe, R; Breslin, D; Brophy, D P

    2014-10-01

    A 48-year-old lady was referred to our department as an emergency following an unsuccessful attempt at central venous catheter insertion, resulting in cannulation of the subclavian artery. She underwent angiography with removal of the catheter and closure of the arteriotomy using an Angio-Seal device. While the optimal management of this scenario has yet to be defined, the use of this minimally invasive technique warrants consideration. PMID:25507120

  18. A rare complication of endovenous laser ablation: intravascular laser catheter breakage

    OpenAIRE

    Bozoglan, Orhan; Mese, Bulent; Inci, Mehmet Fatih; Eroglu, Erdinc

    2013-01-01

    During endovenous laser ablation, which is performed as an alternative to surgery for the treatment of superficial venous insufficiency of lower extremity and associated varicose veins, it was realised that the distal end of the catheter protecting the fibre sheared off; the retained catheter fragment in the saphenous vein was removed by a mini incision. Herein, we aim to present a rare complication of endovenous laser ablation.

  19. A system for visualization and automatic placement of the endoclamp balloon catheter

    OpenAIRE

    Furtado, H.; Stüdeli, T.; Sette, M; Samset, E.; Gersak, B

    2010-01-01

    The European research network "Augmented Reality in Surgery" (ARIS*ER) developed a system that supports minimally invasive cardiac surgery based on augmented reality (AR) technology. The system supports the surgical team during aortic endoclamping where a balloon catheter has to be positioned and kept in place within the aorta. The presented system addresses the two biggest difficulties of the task: lack of visualization and difficulty in maneuvering the catheter. The system was developed usi...

  20. Tsukamurella catheter-related bloodstream infection in a pediatric patient with pulmonary hypertension

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen A. Wendorf

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Catheter-related bloodstream infections (CR-BSI are important complications in patients with long-term indwelling central venous catheters. In this report, we present the case of a 14-year-old male with pulmonary hypertension treated with continuous treprostinil infusion, who presented with a CR-BSI caused by a Tsukamurella species. This case highlights the potential for this unusual organism to cause infection in immunocompetent patients.

  1. Reversal of pulmonary vein remodeling after catheter ablation of atrial fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Jia-hui; Li, Hung-Kei; Couri, Daniel M; Araoz, Philip A; Lee, Ying-Hsiang; Ma, Chang-Sheng; Packer, Douglas L.; Cha, Yong-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulmonary veins (PV) and the atria undergo electrical and structural remodeling in atrial fibrillation (AF). This study aimed to determine PV and left atrial (LA) reverse remodeling after catheter ablation for AF assessed by chest computed tomography (CT). Methods PV electrophysiologic studies and catheter ablation were performed in 63 patients (68% male; mean ± SD age: 56 ± 10 years) with symptomatic AF (49% paroxysmal, 51% persistent). Chest CT was performed before and 3 months a...

  2. Pregnancy after catheter-directed thrombolysis for acute iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, M; Broholm, R; Bækgaard, N

    2013-01-01

    To assess the safety and efficacy of low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) in pregnancy and puerperium in women with previous acute iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis (DVT) treated with catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT).......To assess the safety and efficacy of low-molecular-weight heparin (LMWH) in pregnancy and puerperium in women with previous acute iliofemoral deep venous thrombosis (DVT) treated with catheter-directed thrombolysis (CDT)....

  3. Percutaneous versus laparoscopic placement of peritoneal dialysis catheters: Simplicity and favorable outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abdulla K Al-Hwiesh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Implantation of peritoneal dialysis (PD catheters via the laparoscopic technique is expanding, but none of the studies concerning this technique have compared its outcome with the percutaneous insertion done by the nephrologist. We compared the technical survival and outcome of 52 PD catheters placed in 43 patients with end-stage renal disease (ESRD in our center from March 2006 to October 2007. Of these, 27 PD catheters were inserted percutaneously by a nephrologist (group 1 and 25 were placed by a surgeon using the conventional laparoscopic technique (group 2. Very obese patients, those with previous abdominal surgery, and those who refused local anesthesia were excluded from the study. All catheters were evaluated for mechanical and infectious complications and the overall technique survival was analyzed. The incidence of complications in PD catheters did not largely differ between the two groups. Early catheter-related infection episodes (within two weeks of catheter placement occurred in three of 22 (13.6% patients in group 1, versus three of 21 (14.3% patients in group 2 (P >0.05. The incidence of exit site leak was higher in group 2 (19.0% compared to (4.5% group 1 (P 0.05. We conclude that in our study, the percutaneous bedside placements of PD catheters done by nephrologists were comparable with the laparoscopic insertions performed by surgeons where the high-risk patients were avoided, and the former provided a safer and more reliable access that allowed a rapid initiation of PD.

  4. Novel energy modalities for catheter ablation of cardiac arrhythmias : Pitfalls and possibilities of potent power sources

    OpenAIRE

    Neven, K.G.E.J.

    2014-01-01

    The acceptance of catheter ablation as treatment for cardiac arrhythmias is amongst others dependent on its success rate, a high initial success rate will increase physician and patient acceptance. One of the reasons why recurrence of arrhythmia after ablation is substantial is non-transmurality of ablation lesions. Transmurality is essential for conduction block and is depending on many factors, such as tissue ablation duration, thickness of the cardiac wall, ablation technique used, cathete...

  5. Isolated Calyx Mistaken for a Cyst: Inappropriately Performed Catheter-Directed Sclerotherapy and Safe Removal of the Catheter After Selective Embolization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwak, Jng Won, E-mail: jjungwonie@hanmail.net; Lee, Seung Hwa, E-mail: gareureung@daum.net; Chung, Hwan Hoon, E-mail: chungmic@korea.ac.kr; Je, Bo Kyung, E-mail: purity21@hanmail.net; Yeom, Suk kyu, E-mail: pagoda20@hanmail.net [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Ansan Hospital (Korea, Republic of); Sung, Deuk Jae, E-mail: urora@korea.ac.kr [Korea University College of Medicine, Department of Radiology, Anam Hospital (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-02-15

    We present a case of isolated calyx that was mistaken for a large cyst. A 47-year-old woman was referred for sclerotherapy of a large cystic lesion on her left kidney. Computed tomography (CT) and ultrasound showed that the cystic lesion was a large cyst. We noticed that the cystic lesion was not a typical simple cyst, even after two sessions of catheter-mediated sclerotherapy. Isolated calyx was presumed by medical history review and was confirmed by aspirated fluid analysis and far delayed-phase CT after intravenous contrast injection. We performed meticulous selective arterial embolization for an isolated calyx and inserted a catheter that could be removed without complication.

  6. Comparison of Step Tip Type and Split Tip Type Hemodialysis Catheter: HemoGlide Versus the HemoSplit

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Mi Hyun [Dankook University Hospital, Cheonan (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Byung Seok [Chungnam National University, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-08-15

    To evaluate the results and complications of the step tip type and split tip type tunneled hemodialysis catheters. Between March 2008 and December 2008, a total of 147 tunneled hemodialysis catheters of step tip (n=89) and split tip (n=58) type were placed in 126 patients to perform hemodialysis. We evaluated the number of catheterization days, as well as complications with respect to catheter tip types. A tunneled hemodialysis catheter was placed successfully in all cases. The duration of catheterization ranged from 7 to 180 days (mean 68, total catheter days: 10,504 days). A significantly higher complication rate was observed in the step tip type (n=23) as compared to the split tip type (n=4) (p=0.004), especially due to catheter dysfunction and catheter laceration. Five cases of catheter-related infection (3.4%, 0.48/1000 catheter days) were observed. Placement of the tunneled hemodialysis catheter of step tip type and spit tip type were performed safely. However, the split tip type is more useful because of the greater rate of complication in step tip type

  7. Comparison of two indwelling central venous access catheters in dogs undergoing fractionated radiotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Twenty dogs with neoplasms requiring multiple radiation treatments received either percutaneous vascular access catheters (PVACs; Cook, Bloomington, IN) or subcutaneous vascular access ports (SVAPs; Vascular-Access-Ports, Norfolk Medical Products, Inc., Skokie, IL); 10 dogs were entered in each group. All catheters were implanted and removed aseptically and the catheter tips were cultured during implant removal. Complications with PVACs included mild incisional swelling and redness and accidental severance or rupture of the catheter. Complications with SVAPs included incisional or port swelling, bruising or redness, hematoma formation, and pain. Ports in 4 of these dogs could not be used for 1 to 3 days after surgery because of swelling and pain. Surgical wound complications, when pooled for comparison, occurred significantly more frequently with the SVAPs (P = .023). Wound complications associated with both catheters were self-limiting and resolved within 7 days. Bacterial cultures were positive in two PVACs and four SVAP tips, however, none of these dogs had clinical signs of infection or sepsis. Although both types of indwelling catheters were functional in a clinical setting, PVACs were preferred to SVAPs for dogs undergoing radiation therapy because of decreased time for implantation and fewer overall complications

  8. Renal infarction and immune-mediated glomerulonephritis in sheep (Ovis aries) chronically implanted with indwelling catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Varada P; Poutahidis, Theofilos; Marini, Robert P; Holcombe, Hilda; Rogers, Arlin B; Fox, James G

    2006-07-01

    Microbial infections are common sequelae in humans and animals implanted with long-term intravascular catheters. Understanding the pathophysiology of infectious morbidity is critical to improving quality of care in catheterized subjects. Here, we describe findings in 6 clinically healthy, male sheep implanted with indwelling aortic or cardiac catheters for 6 to 10 mo. We isolated multiple bacterial species including Serratia spp., Enterobacter agglomerans, Eschericia coli, Klebsiella oxytoca, and K. pneumoniae in aerobic cultures from catheter tips. Although sheep were clinically asymptomatic, 1 or both kidneys from all animals contained wedge-shaped infarcts of varying size and number. Microscopic examination revealed (a) marked fibrosis with mild inflammatory cell infiltrate consistent with chronic foreign body reaction around catheters; (b) moderate to severe, diffuse, subacute to chronic membranoproliferative glomerulonephritis and mild, multifocal chronic interstitial nephritis; and (c) mesangial immune-complex deposition as demonstrated by direct immunofluorescence technique. The finding of bacterial colonization of catheters together with chronic glomerulonephritis and immune-complex deposits in kidneys in clinically asymptomatic sheep underscores the need for close microbiologic monitoring of catheter implants and assessment of kidney function in animals instrumented for long-term vascular access. PMID:16884173

  9. Surface evaluation of cardiac angiographic catheters after simulated use and reprocessing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reprocessing of single-use intravascular catheters is a common practice in public health services and hospitals. The determination of safe number of reprocessing cycles before the catheter integrity becomes compromised has been a priority issue. The present paper addresses the evaluating molecular and micro-structural integrity of reprocessed cardiac angiographic catheters. The Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy and Scanning Electron Microscopy were carried out to elucidate morphological changes. The tensile test was performed on catheters to examine changes in bulk characteristics. In this work, samples of catheters were reprocessed until nine times and sterilized by hydrogen peroxide plasma. It was observed that the number of hydrogen-bonded carbonyls groups increased in 0.05 u.a. (p < 0.001) after each reprocessing cycle. The spectra indicated degradation products included acids, esters, alcohols, and small amounts of other products containing a carbonyl functional group. The micrographs revealed that only after the fourth reprocessing cycle the effect increased in the surface roughness was more pronounced. On the other hand, after each reprocessing cycle and as consequence of extensive aging of polyamide/polyurethane blends of the catheters surface, it was observed that the micro-fissures, micro-scratches and micro-pores increased in quantity and length. The mechanical test proved that the Young modulus increased in average 3.26 MPa (p = 0.0003) at increasing number of reprocessing cycles, also suggestive of crosslinking in this material.

  10. Contrast media power injection using central venous port catheters - results of an in vitro study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: are implanted central venous port catheters suitable for contrast media pressure (power) injection in computed tomography? Material and methods: in an in vitro study 100 ml of contrast medium (Ultravist 370, Schering, Berlin, Deutschland) was injected through 20 different port catheter systems using a power injector (Stellant, Medrad, Inianola, USA) with a pressure limit of 325 PSI. The injection rate was increased from 2 ml/s to 10 ml/s in increments of 2 ml/s. The maximum injection pressure and maximum injection rate were assessed. Results: an injection rate of 2 ml/s was possible in all catheter systems. Injection rates of 4 ml/s in 18 systems, 6 ml/s in 13 systems and 8 ml/s in 6 systems were achieved. With a given pressure limit of 325 PSI an injection rate of 10 ml/s was not possible in any of the port catheter systems. There were no catheter ruptures, catheter disconnections or contrast extravasations noted. (orig.)

  11. Fibrous capsule formation of the peritoneal catheter tip in ventriculoperitoneal shunt: Two case reports

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoaki Kano

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: A fibrous capsule formation of a peritoneal catheter tip has not previously been researched as a complication of ventriculoperitoneal (VP shunts. Case Description: Two adult patients who had undergone a VP shunt for communicative hydrocephalus following subarachnoid hemorrhage caused by a ruptured aneurysm have been identified with malfunction of the VP shunt system by mild disturbance of consciousness and gait disturbance or loss of appetite. Hydrocephalus was diagnosed by computed tomography and the obstruction of the peritoneal catheter was revealed by shuntgraphy. Laparoscopy was performed and the peritoneal catheter tips were obstructed by fibrous white capsules that covered them. One was a thin membranous capsule like a stocking with two small endoluminal granulomas of the peritoneal catheter, and other one was a fibrous glossy white capsule like a sock. These fibrous capsules were excised by laparoscopy forceps without the conversion to a new peritoneal catheter. Following the procedure, the shunt functioned normally. The pathological diagnoses were peritoneum with foreign body reaction or hyalinization of membranous tissue surrounded by fibrous tissue. Conclusion: These fibrous capsules might be formed by the peritoneal reaction to cerebrospinal fluid as a foreign material. As such, a periodic medical check should be scheduled since a fibrous capsule of the peritoneal catheter tip might be formed again.

  12. Role of swarming in the formation of crystalline Proteus mirabilis biofilms on urinary catheters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Brian V; Mahenthiralingam, E; Sabbuba, N A; Stickler, D J

    2005-09-01

    The care of many patients undergoing long-term bladder catheterization is frequently complicated by infection with Proteus mirabilis. These organisms colonize the catheter, forming surface biofilm communities, and their urease activity generates alkaline conditions under which crystals of magnesium ammonium phosphate and calcium phosphate are formed and become trapped in the biofilm. As the biofilm develops it obstructs the flow of urine through the catheter, causing either incontinence due to leakage of urine around the catheter or retention of urine in the bladder. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of the surface-associated swarming motility of P. mirabilis in the initiation and development of these crystalline catheter biofilms. A set of stable transposon mutants with a range of swimming and swarming abilities were tested for their ability to colonize silicone surfaces in a parallel-plate flow cell. A laboratory model of the catheterized bladder was then used to examine their ability to form crystalline, catheter-blocking biofilms. The results showed that neither swarming nor swimming motility was required for the attachment of P. mirabilis to silicone. Mutants deficient in swarming and swimming were also capable of forming crystalline biofilms and blocking catheters more rapidly than the wild-type strain. PMID:16091430

  13. Why are Foley catheters so vulnerable to encrustation and blockage by crystalline bacterial biofilm?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stickler, David; Young, Robert; Jones, Gwennan; Sabbuba, Nora; Morris, Nicola

    2003-10-01

    Many patients undergoing long-term bladder catheterisation experience blockage and encrustation of their catheters. The problem stems from infection by urease producing bacteria, particularly Proteus mirabilis. Bacterial biofilms colonise the catheters, the activity of urease raises the pH and induces the deposition of calcium and magnesium phosphate crystals. In this study, a laboratory model of the catheterised bladder has been used to examine the early stages in the formation of the crystalline biofilms. The results show that initial cell adhesion is to the irregular surfaces surrounding the catheter eye-holes. Microcolonies form in depressions in these surfaces and spread to cover the entire surface of the rims around the eye-holes. Crystals then form around the bacterial populations and the biofilm starts to move down the lumenal surfaces of the catheters. The encrustation develops most extensively and generally blocks the catheter at or just below the eye-hole. There is a need to improve catheter design and manufacturing procedures for the eye-holes if the problems associated with the current devices are to be reduced. PMID:14574534

  14. Influence of catheter insertion on the hemodynamic environment in coronary arteries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Xiaopeng; Sun, Anqiang; Liu, Xiao; Pu, Fang; Deng, Xiaoyan; Kang, Hongyan; Fan, Yubo

    2016-09-01

    Intravascular stenting is one of the most commonly used treatments to restore the vascular lumen and flow conditions, while perioperative complications such as thrombosis and restenosis are still nagging for patients. As the catheter with crimped stent and folded balloon is directly advanced through coronary artery during surgery, it is destined to cause interference as well as obstructive effect on blood flow. We wonder how the hemodynamic environment would be disturbed and weather these disturbances cause susceptible factors for those complications. Therefore, a realistic three-dimensional model of left coronary artery was reconstructed and blood flow patterns were numerically simulated at seven different stages in the catheter insertion process. The results revealed that the wall shear stress (WSS) and velocity in left anterior descending (LAD) were both significantly increased after catheter inserted into LAD. Besides, the WSS on the catheter, especially at the ending of the catheter, was also at high level. Compared with the condition before catheter inserted, the endothelial cells of LAD was exposed to high-WSS condition and the risk of platelet aggregation in blood flow was increased. These influences may make coronary arteries more vulnerable for perioperative complications. PMID:27394085

  15. Electrophysiology Catheter Detection and Reconstruction From Two Views in Fluoroscopic Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Matthias; Brost, Alexander; Koch, Martin; Bourier, Felix; Maier, Andreas; Kurzidim, Klaus; Strobel, Norbert; Hornegger, Joachim

    2016-02-01

    Electrophysiology (EP) studies and catheter ablation have become important treatment options for several types of cardiac arrhythmias. We present a novel image-based approach for automatic detection and 3-D reconstruction of EP catheters where the physician marks the catheter to be reconstructed by a single click in each image. The result can be used to provide 3-D information for enhanced navigation throughout EP procedures. Our approach involves two X-ray projections acquired from different angles, and it is based on two steps: First, we detect the catheter in each view after manual initialization using a graph-search method. Then, the detection results are used to reconstruct a full 3-D model of the catheter based on automatically determined point pairs for triangulation. An evaluation on 176 different clinical fluoroscopic images yielded a detection rate of 83.4%. For measuring the error, we used the coupling distance which is a more accurate quality measure than the average point-wise distance to a reference. For successful outcomes, the 2-D detection error was 1.7 mm ±1.2 mm. Using successfully detected catheters for reconstruction, we obtained a reconstruction error of 1.8 mm ±1.1 mm on phantom data. On clinical data, our method yielded a reconstruction error of 2.2 mm ±2.2 mm. PMID:26441411

  16. Catheter placement via the occipital artery to achieve superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy for oral cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy via the superficial temporal artery (STA) has become useful for oral cancer. However, this method can not be performed if catheter placement via the STA is impossible. Therefore, we report a surgical method for catheter placement via the occipital artery (OA) to achieve retrograde superselective intra-arterial chemotherapy. Preoperatively, three-dimensional computed tomography angiography was performed to identify the course of the external carotid artery and the relationship between OA and the target artery. Ten patients with oral cancer underwent catheter placement via the OA with Doppler ultrasound and Harmonic Scalpel under local anesthesia. Catheter placement via the OA was superselectively successful in all the patients. The mean exposure time of OA and mean operating time were 17.5 min and 70.5 min, respectively. Catheter placement via the OA is useful when catheter placement via the STA is impossible. Three-dimensional vascular mapping and the use of Doppler ultrasound and Harmonic Scalpel can shorten the surgical time. (author)

  17. Risk factors for central venous catheter-related thrombosis in children: a retrospective analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Kai; Agarwal, Arnav; Tassone, Maria Cristina; Shahjahan, Nadia; Walton, Mark; Chan, Anthony; Mondal, Tapas

    2016-06-01

    Central venous catheter (CVC) placement is associated with increased risk of thrombosis in the paediatric population, particularly in relation to the type of catheter and the manner of its insertion. Here, we investigate risk factors associated with CVC-related thrombosis in children, with particular emphasis on positioning of the catheter tip. Patients aged 0-18 who underwent at least one CVC placement from 2008 to 2013 at a single centre with a subsequent follow-up echocardiogram were included for a total of 104 patients and 147 lines. Data on clinical and catheter-related risk factors were collected from patient charts. Statistical analysis using Pearson's χ tests, independent samples t-test, and odds ratios were used to assess potential risk factors for thrombosis. Neither insertion site (subclavian vein or otherwise), left- vs. right-sided insertion, nor catheter type were significant risk factors for thrombosis. There were no thrombotic events reported at the superior vena cava (SVC)-right atrium junction and no significant differences in thrombotic risk with initial tip placement in the SVC-right atrium junction vs. the SVC, right atrium, or inferior vena cava. Acute lymphoblastic leukaemia was a major clinical risk factor for thrombosis. Tip movement was common and may have been an important factor in the development of CVC-related thrombi. Prospective studies can yield insight into the role of follow-up imaging in the prevention of catheter-related thrombosis in children. PMID:26977751

  18. Biofilm Formation by Bacteria Isolated from Intravenous Catheters

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sina Hedayati

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Reports on the association of nosocomial bacterial infections with indwelling medical devices such as intravenous catheters (IVC has increased in recent years. The potential to form biofilm on these devices seems to be the main reason for establishment of such infections. The aim of this study was to measure the potential of biofilm formation by bacterialisolates from IVCs.Methods: Seventy-one IVCs were collected from hospitalized patients in ICU, NICU, hematology and oncology wards at Taleghani Hospital from Jan 2010 to Jan 2011. The bacterial isolates were identified using the standard biochemical tests and the potential to form biofilms was determined by the microtiter plate assay method (MTP and colony morphology using Congo red agar plates (CRA.Results: Overall, 54 (71% IVCs were colonized and 76 bacteria were isolated among which, 64 (84.2% were coagulase negative staphylococci (CoNS, 3 (3.9% S. aureus, 3 (3.9% Enterococcus spp., 2 (2.6% E. coli and 4 (5.3% were miscellaneous isolates not further identified. Among the CoNS, biofilm formation was observed in 68.7% and 82.8% of bacteriausing MTP and CRA methods, respectively. S. aureus and E. coli isolates also were biofilm producers but Enterococcus and other unknown isolates were biofilm negative.Conclusions: Our results confirm that the prevalent biofilm forming bacteria on IVCs were CoNS and that was the reason for high rates of nosocomial infections.

  19. Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension in Adults: Novel Drugs and Catheter Ablation Techniques Show Promise? Systematic Review on Pharmacotherapy and Interventional Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvatore Rosanio

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available This systematic review aims to provide an update on pharmacological and interventional strategies for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension in adults. Currently US Food and Drug Administration approved drugs including prostanoids, endothelin-receptor antagonists, phosphodiesterase type-5 inhibitors, and soluble guanylate-cyclase stimulators. These agents have transformed the prognosis for pulmonary arterial hypertension patients from symptomatic improvements in exercise tolerance ten years ago to delayed disease progression today. On the other hand, percutaneous balloon atrioseptostomy by using radiofrequency perforation, cutting balloon dilatation, or insertion of butterfly stents and pulmonary artery catheter-based denervation, both associated with very low rate of major complications and death, should be considered in combination with specific drugs at an earlier stage rather than late in the progression of pulmonary arterial hypertension and before the occurrence of overt right-sided heart failure.

  20. Real-time x-ray fluoroscopy-based catheter detection and tracking for cardiac electrophysiology interventions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: X-ray fluoroscopically guided cardiac electrophysiology (EP) procedures are commonly carried out to treat patients with arrhythmias. X-ray images have poor soft tissue contrast and, for this reason, overlay of a three-dimensional (3D) roadmap derived from preprocedural volumetric images can be used to add anatomical information. It is useful to know the position of the catheter electrodes relative to the cardiac anatomy, for example, to record ablation therapy locations during atrial fibrillation therapy. Also, the electrode positions of the coronary sinus (CS) catheter or lasso catheter can be used for road map motion correction.Methods: In this paper, the authors present a novel unified computational framework for image-based catheter detection and tracking without any user interaction. The proposed framework includes fast blob detection, shape-constrained searching and model-based detection. In addition, catheter tracking methods were designed based on the customized catheter models input from the detection method. Three real-time detection and tracking methods are derived from the computational framework to detect or track the three most common types of catheters in EP procedures: the ablation catheter, the CS catheter, and the lasso catheter. Since the proposed methods use the same blob detection method to extract key information from x-ray images, the ablation, CS, and lasso catheters can be detected and tracked simultaneously in real-time.Results: The catheter detection methods were tested on 105 different clinical fluoroscopy sequences taken from 31 clinical procedures. Two-dimensional (2D) detection errors of 0.50 ± 0.29, 0.92 ± 0.61, and 0.63 ± 0.45 mm as well as success rates of 99.4%, 97.2%, and 88.9% were achieved for the CS catheter, ablation catheter, and lasso catheter, respectively. With the tracking method, accuracies were increased to 0.45 ± 0.28, 0.64 ± 0.37, and 0.53 ± 0.38 mm and success rates increased to 100%, 99.2%, and 96