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Sample records for cathepsins

  1. Cathepsin D inhibitors

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    M. Gacko

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Inhibitors of cathepsin D belong to chemical compounds that estrify carboxyl groups of the Asp33 and Asp231residues of its catalytic site, penta-peptides containing statin, i.e. the amino acid similar in structure to the tetraedric indirectproduct, and polypeptides found in the spare organs of many plants and forming permanent noncovalent complexes withcathepsin. Cathepsin D activity is also inhibited by alpha2-macroglobulin and antibodies directed against this enzyme.Methods used to determine the activity and concentration of these inhibitors and their analytical, preparative and therapeuticapplications are discussed.

  2. Multiplex Cathepsin Zymography to Detect Amounts of Active Cathepsins K, L, S, and V.

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    Platt, Manu O

    2017-01-01

    Cysteine cathepsins are powerful proteases that can degrade other proteins, among which are the extracellular matrix proteins collagen and elastin. Multiplex cathepsin zymography is an assay that can quantify the amount of active cathepsins in a cell or tissue preparation. This method works for measuring the amounts of active cathepsins K, L, S, and V in a cell or tissue preparation without requiring the use of antibodies for specific identification which tremendously reduces cost. This chapter will demonstrate the utility and interpretation of this method with mammalian cells and tissue to quantify amounts of active cathepsins K, L, S, and V without complicating signals of the procathepsin. Multiplex cathepsin zymography has many advantages: (1) it separates cathepsins K, L, S, and V by electrophoretic migration distance, (2) allows visual confirmation of cathepsin identity, (3) does not detect procathepsins, and (4) can be quantified with densitometry.

  3. Role of cathepsin A and cathepsin C in the regulation of glycosidase activity

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    Anna Justyna Milewska

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Increased tissue activity of cathepsin A and cathepsin C can be observed in many pathological conditions. It is associated with an enhanced degradation of glycosaminoglycans, proteoglycans, and glycoproteins, and results in their decreased tissue content. Cathepsin C releases the glycosidases from complexes formed with cathepsin A, and reinstates their activity. In this review a current state of knowledge is presented concerning the regulation of selected glycosidases activity by cathepsin A (EC 3.4.16.1 and C (EC 3.4.14.1.

  4. Cathepsin B trafficking in thyroid carcinoma cells

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    Tedelind Sofia

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The cysteine peptidase cathepsin B is important in thyroid physiology by being involved in prohormone processing initiated in the follicle lumen and completed in endo-lysosomal compartments. However, cathepsin B has also been localized to the extrafollicular space in thyroid cancer tissue, and is therefore suggested to promote invasiveness and metastasis in thyroid carcinomas through e.g. extracellular matrix degradation. Methods Transport of cathepsin B in normal thyroid epithelial and carcinoma cells was investigated through immunolocalization of endogenous cathepsin B in combination with probing protease activity. Transport analyses of cathepsin B-eGFP and its active-site mutant counterpart cathepsin B-C29A-eGFP were used to test whether intrinsic sequences of a protease influence its trafficking. Results Our approach employing activity based probes, which distinguish between active and inactive cysteine proteases, demonstrated that both eGFP-tagged normal and active-site mutated cathepsin B chimeras reached the endo-lysosomal compartments of thyroid epithelial cells, thereby ruling out alterations of sorting signals by mutagenesis of the active-site cysteine. Analysis of chimeric protein trafficking further showed that GFP-tagged cathepsin B was transported to the expected compartments, i.e. endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus and endo-lysosomes of normal and thyroid carcinoma cell lines. However, the active-site mutated cathepsin B chimera was mostly retained in the endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi of KTC-1 and HTh7 cells. Hence the latter, as the least polarized of the three carcinoma cell lines analyzed, exhibited severe transport defects in that it retained chimeras in pre-endolysosomal compartments. Furthermore, secretion of endogenous cathepsin B and of other cysteine peptidases, which occurs at the apical pole of normal thyroid epithelial cells, was most prominent and occurred in a non-directed fashion in thyroid

  5. Differential cathepsin responses to inhibitor-induced feedback: E-64 and cystatin C elevate active cathepsin S and suppress active cathepsin L in breast cancer cells.

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    Wilder, Catera L; Walton, Charlene; Watson, Valencia; Stewart, Fermin A A; Johnson, Jade; Peyton, Shelly R; Payne, Christine K; Odero-Marah, Valerie; Platt, Manu O

    2016-10-01

    Cathepsins are powerful proteases, once referred to as the lysosomal cysteine proteases, that have been implicated in breast cancer invasion and metastasis, but pharmaceutical inhibitors have suffered failures in clinical trials due to adverse side effects. Scientific advancement from lysosomotropic to cell impermeable cathepsin inhibitors have improved efficacy in treating disease, but off-target effects have still been problematic, motivating a need to better understand cellular feedback and responses to treatment with cathepsin inhibitors. To address this need, we investigated effects of E-64 and cystatin C, two broad spectrum cathepsin inhibitors, on cathepsin levels intra- and extracellularly in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Cathepsins S and L had opposing responses to both E-64 and cystatin C inhibitor treatments with paradoxically elevated amounts of active cathepsin S, but decreased amounts of active cathepsin L, as determined by multiplex cathepsin zymography. This indicated cellular feedback to selectively sustain the amounts of active cathepsin S even in the presence of inhibitors with subnanomolar inhibitory constant values. These differences were identified in cellular locations of cathepsins L and S, trafficking for secretion, co-localization with endocytosed inhibitors, and longer protein turnover time for cathepsin S compared to cathepsin L. Together, this work demonstrates that previously underappreciated cellular compensation and compartmentalization mechanisms may sustain elevated amounts of some active cathepsins while diminishing others after inhibitor treatment. This can confound predictions based solely on inhibitor kinetics, and must be better understood to effectively deploy therapies and dosing strategies that target cathepsins to prevent cancer progression. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cathepsin B gene disruption induced Leishmania donovani proteome remodeling implies cathepsin B role in secretome regulation.

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    Teklu Kuru Gerbaba

    Full Text Available Leishmania cysteine proteases are potential vaccine candidates and drug targets. To study the role of cathepsin B cysteine protease, we have generated and characterized cathepsin B null mutant L. donovani parasites. L. donovani cathepsin B null mutants grow normally in culture, but they show significantly attenuated virulence inside macrophages. Quantitative proteome profiling of wild type and null mutant parasites indicates cathepsin B disruption induced remodeling of L. donovani proteome. We identified 83 modulated proteins, of which 65 are decreased and 18 are increased in the null mutant parasites, and 66% (55/83 of the modulated proteins are L. donovani secreted proteins. Proteins involved in oxidation-reduction (trypanothione reductase, peroxidoxins, tryparedoxin, cytochromes and translation (ribosomal proteins are among those decreased in the null mutant parasites, and most of these proteins belong to the same complex network of proteins. Our results imply virulence role of cathepsin B via regulation of Leishmania secreted proteins.

  7. Cathepsin L increases invasion and migration of B16 melanoma

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    Cox James L

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Most cancers express elevated protease levels which contribute to certain aspects of tumor behavior such as growth, metastatic spread, and angiogenesis. Elevation of the cathepsins of the cysteine protease family correlates with increased invasion of tumor cells. Cysteine proteases such as cathepsins B, H and L type participate in tumor cell invasion as extracellular proteases, yet are enzymes whose exact roles in metastasis are still being elucidated. Methods We have examined the role of cathepsin L in highly metastatic B16F10 murine melanoma cells through genetic antisense constructs of cathepsin L. The effects of cathepsin L antisense were examined for melanoma cell proliferation, invasion, migration and adhesion. Results Antisense expression of cathepsin L, while decreasing enzyme activity in cell lysates, did not influence cell proliferation. Cathepsin L contributed to melanoma cell invasion and also augmented melanoma cell migration. Further, we demonstrated the adhesion of cathepsin L down-regulated clones was unaltered to fibronectin, laminin, and collagen. Finally, the inhibition of melanoma cell migration via down-regulation of cathepsin L appears to be independent of cystatin C expression. Conclusion This study shows that cathepsin L facilitates high metastatic B16 melanoma cell invasion and migration. The mechanism of migration inhibition by decreased cathepsin L is independent of cystatin C levels. Since metastasis depends upon both the invasiveness and migration of tumor cells, cathepsin L may be a therapeutic target of strong clinical interest.

  8. Cathepsin B, cathepsin H, cathepsin X and cystatin C in sera of patients with early-stage and inflammatory breast cancer.

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    Decock, J; Obermajer, N; Vozelj, S; Hendrickx, W; Paridaens, R; Kos, J

    2008-01-01

    Numerous studies have linked cathepsins and their inhibitor cystatin C to tumor invasion and metastasis. We examined whether cathepsin B, cathepsin H, cathepsin X and cystatin C could be detected in sera from women with early stage or inflammatory breast cancer and whether they correlated with clinicopathological characteristics. Preoperative serum was obtained from 176 patients with early-stage breast cancer (tumor size cancer. Cathepsin and cystatin C levels were measured by ELISA. The patient and tumor characteristics under study were age at diagnosis, menopausal status, tumor size, tumor grade, and steroid hormone receptor status. Serum cathepsin B levels were significantly lower in patients with poorly differentiated tumors. High cystatin C levels were associated with tumor size, postmenopausal status and patient age. Interestingly, significantly lower levels of cathepsin X and H were found in patients with inflammatory breast cancer, a trend also observed for cathepsin B and cystatin C. In conclusion, our results show a limited association of cathepsins B, H, X and cystatin C with established prognostic parameters. These data are promising and encourage future analysis of the clinical outcome of our patients in order to examine the potential prognostic value of these biomarkers. Further, this study indicates a role for cathepsin X and H in inflammatory breast cancer.

  9. Extraction and Characterization of Cathepsin Inhibitor from Milkfish

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    Tati Nurhayati

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Proteolytic enzyme is distributed acros all organism including fish. Cysteine proteases are the largest group of proteolytic enzyme. Lysosomal cathepsin, one of cysteine protease enzyme, cause softening and degradation of myofibril protein and it’s activity is regulated by endogenous inhibitors. The purposes of this study were to optimize the extraction cathepsin inhibitors from the skin, muscles, and viscera of fish, to partially purify the cathepsin inhibitors of selected sources, and to study the characteristics of the cathepsin inhibitor. The cathepsin inhibitor could be extracted from muscle fish and partially purified using ammonium sulfate of 70%. The purified cathepsin inhibitor had optimum temperature at 40°C and the optimum at pH 8. Metal ions decreased the activity of the protease inhibitor, except 1 mM of metal ion Mn2+ and Na+. Keywords: Cathepsin, characterization, partial purification, protease inhibitor

  10. New method to discriminate between cathepsin B and cathepsin L in crude extracts from fish muscle based on a simple acidification procedure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godiksen, Helene; Nielsen, Henrik Hauch

    2007-01-01

    A new and simple method to distinguish between cathepsin B and cathepsin L in crude extracts of herring (Clupea harengus) muscle has been established. An acid treatment of crude extracts (exposed to pH 3 for 5 min) activated a latent form of cathepsin L and inactivated cathepsin B. Furthermore......, in neutral crude extract, the hydrolysis of benzyloxycarbonyl-L-phenylalanyl-L-arginyl-4-methylcoumarine (Z-Phe-Arg-MCA) (cathepsin B and cathepsin L substrates) was between 0% and 15% of the hydrolysis of benzyloxycarbonyl-L-arginyl-L-arginyl-7-amino-4-methylcoumarine (Z-Arg-Arg-MCA; cathepsin B substrate......). Cathepsin B activity is measured in neutral extract using the specific cathepsin B substrate Z-Arg-Arg-MCA and cathepsin L activity is measured in acid-treated extract with Z-Phe-Arg-MCA as substrate. The specific cathepsin B inhibitor, CA-074, did not inhibit the Z-Arg-Arg-MCA significantly without...

  11. xtraction and Characterization of Cathepsin Inhibitor from Milkfish

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    Tati Nurhayati

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Proteolytic enzyme is distributed acros all organism including fish. Cysteine proteases are the largest group of proteolytic enzyme. Lysosomal cathepsin, one of cysteine protease enzyme, cause softening and degradation of myofibril protein and it’s activity is regulated by endogenous inhibitors. The purposes of this study were to optimize the extraction cathepsin inhibitors from the skin, muscles, and viscera of fish, to partially purify the cathepsin inhibitors of selected sources, and to study the characteristics of the cathepsin inhibitor. The cathepsin inhibitor could be extracted from muscle fish and partially purified using ammonium sulfate of 70%. The purified cathepsin inhibitor had optimum temperature at 40°C and the optimum at pH 8. Metal ions decreased the activity of the protease inhibitor, except 1 mM of metal ion Mn2+ and Na+.

  12. Human lysosomal beta-galactosidase-cathepsin A complex: definition of the beta-galactosidase-binding interface on cathepsin A.

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    Pshezhetsky, A V; Elsliger, M A; Vinogradova, M V; Potier, M

    1995-02-28

    Human lysosomal beta-galactosidase is organized as a 680-kDa complex with cathepsin A (also named carboxypeptidase L and protective protein), which is necessary to protect beta-galactosidase from intralysosomal proteolysis. To understand the molecular mechanism of beta-galactosidase protection by cathepsin A, we defined the structural organization of their complex including the beta-galactosidase-binding interface on cathepsin A. Radiation inactivation analysis suggested the existence of a 168-kDa structural subunit of the complex containing both beta-galactosidase and cathepsin A. Chemical cross-linking of the complex confirmed the existence of this subunit and showed that it is composed of one cathepsin A dimer and one beta-galactosidase monomer. The modeling of the cathepsin A dimer tertiary structure based on atomic coordinates of a wheat carboxypeptidase suggested a putative beta-galactosidase-binding cavity formed by the association of two cathepsin A monomers. According to this model two exposed loops of cathepsin A bordering the cavity were chosen as part of a putative beta-galactosidase-binding interface. Synthetic peptides corresponding to these loops were found both to dissociate the complex and to inhibit its in vitro reconstitution from purified cathepsin A and beta-galactosidase. The defined location of the GAL monomer in the complex with 35% of its surface covered by the CathA dimer may explain the stabilizing effect of CathA on GAL in lysosome.

  13. Acyl hydrazides and triazoles as novel inhibitors of mammalian cathepsin B and cathepsin H.

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    Raghav, Neera; Singh, Mamta

    2014-04-22

    In the past decade, the work on the identification of small molecular weight compounds as inhibitors of cysteine proteases has been in focus. In this direction, we here present the facile microwave assisted synthesis of some acyl hydrazides and triazoles, followed by their evaluation as protease inhibitors and inhibitory studies on cathepsin B and cathepsin H, two significant lysosomal cysteine proteases. The compounds were characterized by (1)H NMR, (13)C NMR, Mass and IR spectral data. The compounds which were found inhibitory to endogenous proteolysis in liver homogenate at pH 5.0 were further studied for determination of inhibition type and Ki values on purified cathepsin B and cathepsin H. The maximum inhibitory effect was exerted by 3-(3'-nitrophenyl)-5-(3'-nitrophenyl)-4-amino-1,2,4-triazoles (2c), 3-(4'-chlorophenyl)-5-(4'-chloro phenyl)-4-amino-1,2,4-triazoles (2h), 3-(3'-aminophenyl)-5-(3'-aminophenyl)-4-amino-1,2,4-triazoles (2i) and 4-methoxybenzohydrazide (1b). Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Plasma levels of cathepsins L, K, and V and risks of abdominal aortic aneurysms

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    Lv, Bing-Jie; Lindholt, Jes S; Wang, Jing

    2013-01-01

    Cathepsin L (CatL), cathepsin K (CatK), and cathepsin V (CatV) are potent elastases implicated in human arterial wall remodeling. Whether plasma levels of these cathepsins are altered in patients with abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) remains unknown....

  15. Characterization of Dictyostelium discoideum cathepsin D.

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    Journet, A; Chapel, A; Jehan, S; Adessi, C; Freeze, H; Klein, G; Garin, J

    1999-11-01

    Previous studies using magnetic purification of Dictyostelium discoideum endocytic vesicles led us to the identification of some major vesicle proteins. Using the same purification procedure, we have now focused our interest on a 44 kDa soluble vesicle protein. Microsequencing of internal peptides and subsequent cloning of the corresponding cDNA identified this protein as the Dictyostelium homolog of mammalian cathepsins D. The only glycosylation detected on Dictyostelium cathepsin D (CatD) is common antigen 1, a cluster of mannose 6-sulfate residues on N-linked oligosaccharide chains. CatD intracellular trafficking has been studied, showing the presence of the protein throughout the entire endocytic pathway. During the differentiation process, the catD gene presents a developmental regulation, which is also observed at the protein level. catD gene disruption does not alter significantly the cell behaviour, either in the vegetative form or the differentiation stage. However, modifications in the SDS-PAGE profiles of proteins bearing common antigen 1 were detected, when comparing parental and catD(-) cells. These modifications point to a possible role of CatD in the maturation of a few Dictyostelium lysosomal proteins.

  16. Detection of femtomole quantities of mature cathepsin K with zymography.

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    Li, Weiwei A; Barry, Zachary T; Cohen, Joshua D; Wilder, Catera L; Deeds, Rebecca J; Keegan, Philip M; Platt, Manu O

    2010-06-01

    Cathepsin K, the most potent mammalian collagenase, has been implicated in osteoporosis, cancer metastasis, atherosclerosis, and arthritis. Although procathepsin K is stable and readily detected, the active mature cathepsin K eludes detection by in vitro methods due to its shorter half-life and inactivation at neutral pH. We describe, for the first time, reliable detection, visualization, and quantification of mature cathepsin K to femtomole resolution using gelatin zymography. The specificity of the method was validated with cathepsin K knockdown using small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection of human monocyte-derived macrophages, and enzymatic activity confirmed with benzyloxycarbonyl-glycine-proline-arginine-7-amino-4-methylcoumarin (Z-GPR-AMC) substrate hydrolysis was fit to a computational model of enzyme kinetics. Furthermore, cathepsin K zymography was used to show that murine osteoclasts secrete more cathepsin K than is stored intracellularly, and this was opposite to the behavior of the macrophages from which they were differentiated. In summary, this inexpensive, species-independent, antibody-free protocol describes a sensitive method with broad potential to elucidate previously undetectable cathepsin K activity. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Role of Cathepsin S in Periodontal Inflammation and Infection

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    S. Memmert

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cathepsin S is a cysteine protease and regulator of autophagy with possible involvement in periodontitis. The objective of this study was to investigate whether cathepsin S is involved in the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases. Human periodontal fibroblasts were cultured under inflammatory and infectious conditions elicited by interleukin-1β and Fusobacterium nucleatum, respectively. An array-based approach was used to analyze differential expression of autophagy-associated genes. Cathepsin S was upregulated most strongly and thus further studied in vitro at gene and protein levels. In vivo, gingival tissue biopsies from rats with ligature-induced periodontitis and from periodontitis patients were also analyzed at transcriptional and protein levels. Multiple gene expression changes due to interleukin-1β and F. nucleatum were observed in vitro. Both stimulants caused a significant cathepsin S upregulation. A significantly elevated cathepsin S expression in gingival biopsies from rats with experimental periodontitis was found in vivo, as compared to that from control. Gingival biopsies from periodontitis patients showed a significantly higher cathepsin S expression than those from healthy gingiva. Our findings provide original evidence that cathepsin S is increased in periodontal cells and tissues under inflammatory and infectious conditions, suggesting a critical role of this autophagy-associated molecule in the pathogenesis of periodontitis.

  18. Transcriptome Reveals Cathepsin K in Periodontal Ligament Differentiation.

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    Yamada, S; Ozaki, N; Tsushima, K; Yamaba, S; Fujihara, C; Awata, T; Sakashita, H; Kajikawa, T; Kitagaki, J; Yamashita, M; Yanagita, M; Murakami, S

    2016-08-01

    Periodontal ligaments (PDLs) play an important role in remodeling the alveolar bond and cementum. Characterization of the periodontal tissue transcriptome remains incomplete, and an improved understanding of PDL features could aid in developing new regenerative therapies. Here, we aimed to generate and analyze a large human PDL transcriptome. We obtained PDLs from orthodontic treatment patients, isolated the RNA, and used a vector-capping method to make a complementary DNA library from >20,000 clones. Our results revealed that 58% of the sequences were full length. Furthermore, our analysis showed that genes expressed at the highest frequencies included those for collagen type I, collagen type III, and proteases. We also found 5 genes whose expressions have not been previously reported in human PDL. To access which of the highly expressed genes might be important for PDL cell differentiation, we used real-time polymerase chain reaction to measure their expression in differentiating cells. Among the genes tested, the cysteine protease cathepsin K had the highest upregulation, so we measured its relative expression in several tissues, as well as in osteoclasts, which are known to express high levels of cathepsin K. Our results revealed that PDL cells express cathepsin K at similar levels as osteoclasts, which are both expressed at higher levels than those of the other tissues tested. We also measured cathepsin K protein expression and enzyme activity during cell differentiation and found that both increased during this process. Immunocytochemistry experiments revealed that cathepsin K localizes to the interior of lysosomes. Last, we examined the effect of inhibiting cathepsin K during cell differentiation and found that cathepsin K inhibition stimulated calcified nodule formation and increased the levels of collagen type I and osteocalcin gene expression. Based on these results, cathepsin K seems to regulate collagen fiber accumulation during human PDL cell

  19. Expression of Cathepsins B, D, and G in Isocitrate Dehydrogenase-Wildtype Glioblastoma

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    Sabrina P. Koh

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available AimTo investigate the expression of cathepsins B, D, and G, in relation to the cancer stem cell (CSC subpopulations, we have previously characterized within isocitrate dehydogenase (IDH-wildtype glioblastoma (IDHWGB.Methods3,3-Diaminobezidine (DAB immunohistochemical (IHC staining for cathepsins B, D, and G, was performed on 4μm-thick formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded IDHWGB samples obtained from six patients. Two representative DHWGB samples from the original cohort of patients were selected for immunofluorescent (IF IHC staining, to identify the localization of the cathepsins in relation to the CSC subpopulations. NanoString gene expression analysis and colorimetric in situ hybridization (CISH were conducted to investigate the transcriptional activation of genes encoding for cathepsins B, D, and G. Data obtained from cell counting of DAB IHC-stained slides and from NanoString analysis were subjected to statistical analyses to determine significance.ResultsCathepsin B and cathepsin D were detected in IDHWGB by DAB IHC staining. IF IHC staining demonstrated the expression of both cathepsin B and cathepsin D by the OCT4+ and SALL4+ CSC subpopulations. NanoString gene analysis and CISH confirmed the abundant transcript expression of these cathepsins. The transcriptional and translational expressions of cathepsin G were minimal and were confined to cells within the microvasculature.ConclusionThis study demonstrated the expression of cathepsin B and cathepsin D but not cathepsin G within the CSC subpopulations of IDHWGB at both the transcriptional and translational level. Cathepsin G was expressed at low levels and was not localized to the CSC population of IDHWGB. The novel finding of cathepsin B and cathepsin D in IDHWGB suggests the presence of bypass loops for the renin-angiotensin system, which may facilitate the production of angiotensin peptides. Elucidating the precise role of these cathepsins may lead to better understanding and more

  20. Complexity of cancer protease biology: Cathepsin K expression and function in cancer progression

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verbovšek, Urška; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.; Lah, Tamara T.

    2015-01-01

    Proteases, including lysosomal cathepsins, are functionally involved in many processes in cancer progression from its initiation to invasion and metastatic spread. Only recently, cathepsin K (CatK), the cysteine protease originally reported as a collagenolytic protease produced by osteoclasts,

  1. Silver and Gold Nanoparticles Alter Cathepsin Activity In vitro

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    Speshock, Janice L.; Braydich-Stolle, Laura K.; Szymanski, Eric R.; Hussain, Saber M.

    2011-12-01

    Nanomaterials are being incorporated into many biological applications for use as therapeutics, sensors, or labels. Silver nanomaterials are being utilized for biological implants and wound dressings as an antiviral material, whereas gold nanomaterials are being used as biological labels or sensors due to their surface properties and biocompatibility. Cytotoxicity data of these materials are becoming more prevalent; however, little research has been performed to understand how the introduction of these materials into cells affects cellular processes. Here, we demonstrate the impact that silver and gold nanoparticles have on cathepsin activity in vitro. Cathepsins are important cellular proteases that are imperative for proper immune system function. We have selected to examine gold and silver nanoparticles due to the increased use of these materials in biological applications. This manuscript depicts how both of these types of nanomaterials affect cathepsin activity, which could impact the host's immune system and its ability to respond to pathogens. Cathepsin B activity decreases in a dose-dependent manner with all nanoparticles tested. Alternatively, the impact of nanoparticles on cathepsin L activity depends greatly on the type and size of the material.

  2. Expression and Localization of Cathepsins B, D, and G in Dupuytren’s Disease

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    Kirin Tan, MB ChB

    2018-02-01

    Conclusions:. Cathepsins B, D, and G were expressed in the DD tissues, with cathepsins B and D localized to the primitive population in the endothelium of the microvessels, whereas cathepsin G was localized to phenotypic mast cells, suggesting the presence of bypass loops for the RAS.

  3. Effects of cysteine protease inhibitors on rabbit cathepsin D maturation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Samarel, A.M.; Ferguson, A.G.; Decker, R.S.; Lesch, M.

    1989-01-01

    To examine the effects of cysteine protease inhibitors on cathepsin D intracellular transport, proteolytic processing, and secretion, primary cultures of rabbit cardiac fibroblasts were grown to confluence and exposed to media containing leupeptin, E 64, or chloroquine. Cathepsin D maturation was then evaluated in pulse-chase biosynthetic labeling experiments. None of the three agents affected the charge modification of procathepsin D within the Golgi apparatus. However, all three agents interfered with the subsequent proteolytic processing of procathepsin D isoforms to active cathepsin D. Both leupeptin and E 64 caused the intracellular accumulation of large amounts of a Mr 51,000 processing intermediate. Trace amounts of this intermediate were also detected in chloroquine-treated cells. Combined activity assay and radioimmunoassay of cell lysates indicated that this partially processed form of cathepsin D possessed proteolytic activity. Whereas low medium concentrations of leupeptin (10-100 microM) but not E 64 appeared to stimulate procathepsin D secretion, neither agent appeared to have a major effect on the rate of proenzyme secretion at doses required to inhibit proteolytic maturation (1-10 mM). Furthermore, pretreatment of cells with 10 mM leupeptin appeared only to delay, but not prevent, the intracellular transport of cathepsin D to lysosomes. In contrast, chloroquine increased procathepsin D secretion in a dose-dependent manner, diverting the majority of newly synthesized procathepsin D from the intracellular protease(s) responsible for proteolytic processing. These results suggest that cysteine proteases participate in the proteolytic maturation of procathepsin D during the transport of newly synthesized enzyme to lysosomes, but cysteine protease-mediated proteolytic processing is not required for cathepsin D activation or lysosomal translocation

  4. An endogenous inhibitor of cysteine cathepsin B from brain tissues

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    O.L. Lyanna

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomes are the key degradative compartments of the cell in which the processes of protein degradation take place. Lysosomal cathepsins, which are enclosed in the lysosomes, help to maintain the homeostasis of the cell’s metabolism by participating in the degradation of heterophagic and autophagic material. When breaking down the integrity of lysosomal membranes the cathepsins are released into the cytosol and initiate the development of numerous pathological states. Breakdown in the control of protease activity leads to undesired and unregulated proteolysis. This is a cause of many diseases, such as Alzheimer’s disease, cancer, viral infections, cataracts etc. For this reason inhibitors of proteases have the potential to provide successful treatment for a wide range of diseases. Cathepsin B is one of the most abundant and ubiquitously expressed cysteine peptidases of the papain family. It is implicated in a number of pathological states including: inflammatory diseases of the airways, bone and joint disorders, acute pancreatitis, tumour metastasis, Alzheimer’s disease and ischemic neuronal death. The study of specific inhibitors for cathepsin B is considered important for chemotherapy and treatments of other diseases. This article represents part of a complex study of the lysosomal proteolytic-antiproteolytic system and its breakdown in the process of illness. In this article we present a scheme for extraction, purification and characterization of endogenous inhibitors of lysosomal cysteine cathepsin B. The cathepsin inhibitor was purified to homogeneity from the human neocortex. The purification was carried out in several successive stages: ammonium sulfate precipitation, followed by gel-filtration on Sephadex G-150, and ion exchange chromatography using DEAE-Sephadex A-75, followed by gel filtration on Sephadex G-100. Throughout the purification procedure, cathepsin inhibitory activity was controlled against the substrate p

  5. Cathepsin-D And Tnf-α in Bladder Cancer

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    T. Salman

    1996-01-01

    Full Text Available In a study of 34 normal healthy controls, 35 patients with urinary tract bilharziasis and 93 bladder cancer patients (62 of them are operable cases and 31 are non-operable ones, serum tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α and cytosolic Cathepsin-D were estimated. Though both potential markers were elevated in bladder cancer patients, neither Cathepsin-D nor TNF-α showed associations of prognostic value since there were no positive correlations with tumor stages, grades or association of tumors with bilharzia ova or lymph node involvement.

  6. Cathepsin G-dependent modulation of platelet thrombus formation in vivo by blood neutrophils.

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    Nauder Faraday

    Full Text Available Neutrophils are consistently associated with arterial thrombotic morbidity in human clinical studies but the causal basis for this association is unclear. We tested the hypothesis that neutrophils modulate platelet activation and thrombus formation in vivo in a cathepsin G-dependent manner. Neutrophils enhanced aggregation of human platelets in vitro in dose-dependent fashion and this effect was diminished by pharmacologic inhibition of cathepsin G activity and knockdown of cathepsin G expression. Tail bleeding time in the mouse was prolonged by a cathepsin G inhibitor and in cathepsin G knockout mice, and formation of neutrophil-platelet conjugates in blood that was shed from transected tails was reduced in the absence of cathepsin G. Bleeding time was highly correlated with blood neutrophil count in wildtype but not cathepsin G deficient mice. In the presence of elevated blood neutrophil counts, the anti-thrombotic effect of cathepsin G inhibition was greater than that of aspirin and additive to it when administered in combination. Both pharmacologic inhibition of cathepsin G and its congenital absence prolonged the time for platelet thrombus to form in ferric chloride-injured mouse mesenteric arterioles. In a vaso-occlusive model of ischemic stroke, inhibition of cathepsin G and its congenital absence improved cerebral blood flow, reduced histologic brain injury, and improved neurobehavioral outcome. These experiments demonstrate that neutrophil cathepsin G is a physiologic modulator of platelet thrombus formation in vivo and has potential as a target for novel anti-thrombotic therapies.

  7. Cleavage of desmin by cysteine proteases: Calpains and cathepsin B

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Baron, Caroline; Jacobsen, S.; Purslow, P.P.

    2004-01-01

    The intermediate filament protein, desmin, was purified from pork longissimus dorsi and incubated with either P-calpain, m-calpain or cathepsin B. Proteolysis of desmin was followed using SDS-PAGE and Western blotting. After incubation of desmin with the proteases, cleavage sites on the desmin...

  8. Complex modulation of peptidolytic activity of cathepsin D by sphingolipids

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Žebrakovská, Iva; Máša, Martin; Srp, Jaroslav; Horn, Martin; Vávrová, K.; Mareš, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 1811, č. 12 (2011), s. 1097-1104 ISSN 1388-1981 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400550705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : sphingolipid * phospholipid * inhibition * activation * cathepsin D * enzyme regulation Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 5.269, year: 2011

  9. Corrigendum to ''A novel nonsense mutation in the cathepsin C ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Corrigendum to ''A novel nonsense mutation in the cathepsin C gene in an Egyptian patient presenting with Papillon–Lefe`vre syndrome” [Egypt. J. Med. Hum. Genet. 16 (4) (2015) 387–392]. Hala Soliman, Heba Gamal Eldeen, Mostafa Ibrahim Mostafa ...

  10. Human cysteine cathepsins are not reliable markers of infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clément Naudin

    Full Text Available Cysteine cathepsins have emerged as new players in inflammatory lung disorders. Their activities are dramatically increased in the sputum of cystic fibrosis (CF patients, suggesting that they are involved in the pathophysiology of CF. We have characterized the cathepsins in CF expectorations and evaluated their use as markers of colonization by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The concentrations of active cathepsins B, H, K, L and S were the same in P. aeruginosa-positive (19 Ps+ and P. aeruginosa-negative (6 Ps- samples, unlike those of human neutrophil elastase. Also the cathepsin inhibitory potential and the cathepsins/cathepsin inhibitors imbalance remained unchanged and similar (∼2-fold in the Ps+ and Ps- groups (p<0.001, which correlated with the breakdown of their circulating cystatin-like inhibitors (kininogens. Procathepsins, which may be activated autocatalytically, are a potential proteolytic reservoir. Immunoblotting and active-site labeling identified the double-chain cathepsin B, the major cathepsin in CF sputum, as the main molecular form in both Ps+ and Ps- samples, despite the possible release of the ∼31 kDa single-chain form from procathepsin B by sputum elastase. Thus, the hydrolytic activity of cysteine cathepsins was not correlated with bacterial colonization, indicating that cathepsins, unlike human neutrophil elastase, are not suitable markers of P. aeruginosa infection.

  11. Human cysteine cathepsins are not reliable markers of infection by Pseudomonas aeruginosa in cystic fibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudin, Clément; Joulin-Giet, Alix; Couetdic, Gérard; Plésiat, Patrick; Szymanska, Aneta; Gorna, Emilia; Gauthier, Francis; Kasprzykowski, Franciszek; Lecaille, Fabien; Lalmanach, Gilles

    2011-01-01

    Cysteine cathepsins have emerged as new players in inflammatory lung disorders. Their activities are dramatically increased in the sputum of cystic fibrosis (CF) patients, suggesting that they are involved in the pathophysiology of CF. We have characterized the cathepsins in CF expectorations and evaluated their use as markers of colonization by Pseudomonas aeruginosa. The concentrations of active cathepsins B, H, K, L and S were the same in P. aeruginosa-positive (19 Ps+) and P. aeruginosa-negative (6 Ps-) samples, unlike those of human neutrophil elastase. Also the cathepsin inhibitory potential and the cathepsins/cathepsin inhibitors imbalance remained unchanged and similar (∼2-fold) in the Ps+ and Ps- groups (p<0.001), which correlated with the breakdown of their circulating cystatin-like inhibitors (kininogens). Procathepsins, which may be activated autocatalytically, are a potential proteolytic reservoir. Immunoblotting and active-site labeling identified the double-chain cathepsin B, the major cathepsin in CF sputum, as the main molecular form in both Ps+ and Ps- samples, despite the possible release of the ∼31 kDa single-chain form from procathepsin B by sputum elastase. Thus, the hydrolytic activity of cysteine cathepsins was not correlated with bacterial colonization, indicating that cathepsins, unlike human neutrophil elastase, are not suitable markers of P. aeruginosa infection.

  12. The occluding loop of cathepsin B prevents its effective inhibition by human kininogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naudin, C; Lecaille, F; Chowdhury, S; Krupa, J C; Purisima, E; Mort, J S; Lalmanach, G

    2010-07-30

    Kininogens, the major plasma cystatin-like inhibitors of cysteine cathepsins, are degraded at sites of inflammation, and cathepsin B has been identified as a prominent mediator of this process. Cathepsin B, in contrast to cathepsins L and S, is poorly inhibited by kininogens. This led us to delineate the molecular interactions between this protease and kininogens (high molecular weight kininogen and low molecular weight kininogen) and to elucidate the dual role of the occluding loop in this weak inhibition. Cathepsin B cleaves high molecular weight kininogen within the N-terminal region of the D2 and D3 cystatin-like domains and close to the consensus QVVAG inhibitory pentapeptide of the D3 domain. The His110Ala mutant, unlike His111Ala cathepsin B, fails to hydrolyze kininogens, but rather forms a tight-binding complex as observed by gel-filtration analysis. K(i) values (picomolar range) as well as association rate constants for the His110Ala cathepsin B variant compare to those reported for cathepsin L for both kininogens. Homology modeling of isolated inhibitory (D2 and D3) domains and molecular dynamics simulations of the D2 domain complexed with wild-type cathepsin B and its mutants indicate that additional weak interactions, due to the lack of the salt bridge (Asp22-His110) and the subsequent open position of the occluding loop, increase the inhibitory potential of kininogens on His110Ala cathepsin B. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Proteolysis of cystatin C by cathepsin D in the breast cancer microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurent-Matha, Valérie; Huesgen, Pitter F; Masson, Olivier; Derocq, Danielle; Prébois, Christine; Gary-Bobo, Magali; Lecaille, Fabien; Rebière, Bertrand; Meurice, Guillaume; Oréar, Cédric; Hollingsworth, Robert E; Abrahamson, Magnus; Lalmanach, Gilles; Overall, Christopher M; Liaudet-Coopman, Emmanuelle

    2012-12-01

    The aspartic protease cathepsin D, a poor prognostic indicator of breast cancer, is abundantly secreted as procathepsin D by human breast cancer cells and self-activates at low pH in vitro, giving rise to catalytically active cathepsin D. Due to a lower extracellular pH in tumor microenvironments compared to normal tissues, cathepsin D may cleave pathophysiological substrates contributing to cancer progression. Here, we show by yeast 2-hybrid and degradomics analyses that cystatin C, the most potent natural secreted inhibitor of cysteine cathepsins, both binds to and is a substrate of extracellular procathepsin D. The amount of cystatin C in the extracellular environment is reduced in the secretome of mouse embryonic fibroblasts stably transfected with human cathepsin D. Cathepsin D extensively cleaved cystatin C in vitro at low pH. Cathepsin D secreted by breast cancer cells also processed cystatin C at the pericellular pH of tumors and so enhancing extracellular proteolytic activity of cysteine cathepsins. Thus, tumor derived cathepsin D assists breast cancer progression by reducing cystatin C activity, which, in turn, enhances cysteine cathepsin proteolytic activity, revealing a new link between protease classes in the protease web.

  14. A mature and fusogenic form of the Nipah virus fusion protein requires proteolytic processing by cathepsin L

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pager, Cara Theresia; Craft, Willie Warren; Patch, Jared; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2006-01-01

    The Nipah virus fusion (F) protein is proteolytically processed to F 1 + F 2 subunits. We demonstrate here that cathepsin L is involved in this important maturation event. Cathepsin inhibitors ablated cleavage of Nipah F. Proteolytic processing of Nipah F and fusion activity was dramatically reduced in cathepsin L shRNA-expressing Vero cells. Additionally, Nipah virus F-mediated fusion was inhibited in cathepsin L-deficient cells, but coexpression of cathepsin L restored fusion activity. Both purified cathepsin L and B could cleave immunopurified Nipah F protein, but only cathepsin L produced products of the correct size. Our results suggest that endosomal cathepsins can cleave Nipah F, but that cathepsin L specifically converts Nipah F to a mature and fusogenic form

  15. Cathepsin E deficiency impairs autophagic proteolysis in macrophages.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takayuki Tsukuba

    Full Text Available Cathepsin E is an endosomal aspartic proteinase that is predominantly expressed in immune-related cells. Recently, we showed that macrophages derived from cathepsin E-deficient (CatE(-/- mice display accumulation of lysosomal membrane proteins and abnormal membrane trafficking. In this study, we demonstrated that CatE(-/- macrophages exhibit abnormalities in autophagy, a bulk degradation system for aggregated proteins and damaged organelles. CatE(-/- macrophages showed increased accumulation of autophagy marker proteins such as LC3 and p62, and polyubiquitinated proteins. Cathepsin E deficiency also altered autophagy-related signaling pathways such as those mediated by the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR, Akt, and extracellular signal-related kinase (ERK. Furthermore, immunofluorescence microscopy analyses showed that LC3-positive vesicles were merged with acidic compartments in wild-type macrophages, but not in CatE(-/- macrophages, indicating inhibition of fusion of autophagosome with lysosomes in CatE(-/- cells. Delayed degradation of LC3 protein was also observed under starvation-induced conditions. Since the autophagy system is involved in the degradation of damaged mitochondria, we examined the accumulation of damaged mitochondria in CatE(-/- macrophages. Several mitochondrial abnormalities such as decreased intracellular ATP levels, depolarized mitochondrial membrane potential, and decreased mitochondrial oxygen consumption were observed. Such mitochondrial dysfunction likely led to the accompanying oxidative stress. In fact, CatE(-/- macrophages showed increased reactive oxygen species (ROS production and up-regulation of oxidized peroxiredoxin-6, but decreased antioxidant glutathione. These results indicate that cathepsin E deficiency causes autophagy impairment concomitantly with increased aberrant mitochondria as well as increased oxidative stress.

  16. Structure of a Kunitz-type potato cathepsin D inhibitor

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Guo, J.; Erskine, P. T.; Coker, A. R.; Wood, S. P.; Cooper, J. B.; Mareš, Michael; Baudyš, Miroslav

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 192, č. 3 (2015), s. 554-560 ISSN 1047-8477 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA15-18929S; GA MŠk LO1302 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : potato cathepsin D inhibitor * Kunitz-type protease inhibitor * protein X-ray structure * reactive-site loop * docking Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.570, year: 2015

  17. The secreted cathepsin L-like proteinases of the trematode, Fasciola hepatica, contain 3-hydroxyproline residues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijffels, G L; Panaccio, M; Salvatore, L; Wilson, L; Walker, I D; Spithill, T W

    1994-01-01

    The cysteine proteinases synthesized by the adult stage of the trematode Fasciola hepatica were found to be a very heterogeneous group of proteins as demonstrated by one- and two-dimensional gel analyses. N-terminal amino acid sequencing indicated the presence of at least two distinct gene products among the secreted cysteine proteinases. Enzymic studies and peptide sequence analysis of the excreted/secreted cysteine proteinases suggested a close relationship to the plant thiol cathepsins and the mammalian cathepsin L subfamily. The cloning of a representative cDNA for a putative Fasciola cathepsin confirmed similarities to the cathepsin L subfamily but revealed low identity with the cathepsin-like proteinases of the related trematode, Schistosoma, nematode cathepsins and the mammalian cathepsin B subfamily. Furthermore, peptide and protein sequencing revealed the modification of certain highly conserved prolines to unusual 3-hydroxyproline derivatives. This is the first report of modified prolines in any proteinase. This finding, as well as the high activities of these cathepsins at neutral to alkaline pH values, raises a number of questions as to the physiological function of these thiol cathepsins and their interaction with host tissues. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 6 PMID:8192668

  18. The role of cathepsin B and cystatin C in the mechanisms of invasion by ovarian cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishikawa, Hiroshi; Ozaki, Yasuhiko; Nakanishi, Tamao; Blomgren, Klas; Tada, Toyohiro; Arakawa, Atsushi; Suzumori, Kaoru

    2004-03-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the contribution of cathepsin B and cystatin C to the mechanisms of invasion by ovarian cancer. Using surgical materials from patients with ovarian cancer, immunohistochemistry, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blotting analysis were performed using antibodies against cathepsin B or cystatin C. Serum levels of cathepsin B and cystatin C in patients with benign and malignant ovarian lesions were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). An invasion assay using an ovarian cancer cell line was performed by addition of cystatin C or specific inhibitors of cathepsin B. While immunohistochemical staining of cathepsin B and cystatin C was evident in cancer cells and associated stromal tissue, this was not the case in benign tumors. The malignancies were also found to be positive for cathepsin B and cystatin C by SDS-PAGE and Western blotting analysis. No significant difference in serum cathepsin B levels was observed between patients with benign and malignant disease. However, the concentration of cystatin C in cases with ovarian cancer was significantly higher in benign cases (Pcancer cells was dose-dependently suppressed by cystatin C and cathepsin B inhibitors. The results provided convincing evidence that cathepsin B and cystatin C may contribute to the mechanisms of invasion of ovarian cancer.

  19. Taking out the garbage: cathepsin D and calcineurin in neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aufschnaiter, Andreas; Kohler, Verena; Büttner, Sabrina

    2017-11-01

    Cellular homeostasis requires a tightly controlled balance between protein synthesis, folding and degradation. Especially long-lived, post-mitotic cells such as neurons depend on an efficient proteostasis system to maintain cellular health over decades. Thus, a functional decline of processes contributing to protein degradation such as autophagy and general lysosomal proteolytic capacity is connected to several age-associated neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's diseases. These so called proteinopathies are characterized by the accumulation and misfolding of distinct proteins, subsequently driving cellular demise. We recently linked efficient lysosomal protein breakdown via the protease cathepsin D to the Ca2 + /calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin. In a yeast model for Parkinson's disease, functional calcineurin was required for proper trafficking of cathepsin D to the lysosome and for recycling of its endosomal sorting receptor to allow further rounds of shuttling. Here, we discuss these findings in relation to present knowledge about the involvement of cathepsin D in proteinopathies in general and a possible connection between this protease, calcineurin signalling and endosomal sorting in particular. As dysregulation of Ca2 + homeostasis as well as lysosomal impairment is connected to a plethora of neurodegenerative disorders, this novel interplay might very well impact pathologies beyond Parkinson's disease.

  20. Taking out the garbage: cathepsin D and calcineurin in neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Aufschnaiter

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular homeostasis requires a tightly controlled balance between protein synthesis, folding and degradation. Especially long-lived, post-mitotic cells such as neurons depend on an efficient proteostasis system to maintain cellular health over decades. Thus, a functional decline of processes contributing to protein degradation such as autophagy and general lysosomal proteolytic capacity is connected to several age-associated neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson's, Alzheimer's and Huntington's diseases. These so called proteinopathies are characterized by the accumulation and misfolding of distinct proteins, subsequently driving cellular demise. We recently linked efficient lysosomal protein breakdown via the protease cathepsin D to the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin. In a yeast model for Parkinson's disease, functional calcineurin was required for proper trafficking of cathepsin D to the lysosome and for recycling of its endosomal sorting receptor to allow further rounds of shuttling. Here, we discuss these findings in relation to present knowledge about the involvement of cathepsin D in proteinopathies in general and a possible connection between this protease, calcineurin signalling and endosomal sorting in particular. As dysregulation of Ca2+ homeostasis as well as lysosomal impairment is connected to a plethora of neurodegenerative disorders, this novel interplay might very well impact pathologies beyond Parkinson's disease.

  1. Cathepsin L is involved in cathepsin D processing and regulation of apoptosis in A549 human lung epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Aline; Gerber, Annegret; Heimburg, Anke; Reisenauer, Anita; Peters, Christoph; Saftig, Paul; Reinheckel, Thomas; Welte, Tobias; Bühling, Frank

    2004-07-01

    Cathepsins are implicated in a multitude of physiological and pathophysiological processes. The aim of the present study was to investigate the function of cathepsin L (catL) in the proteolytic network of human lung epithelial cells and its role in the regulation of apoptosis. We found that catL-deficient A549 cells as well as lung tissue extracts of catL(-/-) mice express increased amounts of single-chain cathepsin D (catD). Degradation experiments indicate that catL specifically degrades the single-chain isoform of catD. Furthermore, we found that catL-deficient cells showed increased sensitivity to apoptosis. Finally, we demonstrate that the inhibition of catD activity by pepstatin A decreased the number of apoptotic cells in catL-deficient A549 cells after anti-Fas treatment. In conclusion, catL is involved in catD processing and the accumulation of catD isoforms in catL-deficient cells is associated with increased rates of spontaneous and anti-Fas-induced apoptosis.

  2. Stimulatory effect of interleukin-6 on both cathepsins B and L activities from human periodontal ligament cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yamaguchi, Masaru; Ueda, Yuji; Kasai, Kazutaka; Departments of Orthodontics, Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo; Departments of Orthodontics, Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo; Departments of Orthodontics, Nihon University School of Dentistry at Matsudo

    2001-01-01

    Cathepsin is typical and well-characterized lysosomal cystein protease and in pathological conditions is involved in tissue destruction. Recent studies have reported that the mRNA expression of cathepsin K, a family of cystein proteases such as cathepsin B (CAB) and cathepsin L (CAL), is detected in the osteoclasts on the pressure side of the alveolar bone during experimental tooth movement. Interleukin (IL)-6 is a multifunctional cytokine that induces osteoclastic bone resorption through an ...

  3. Cathepsin B inhibition interferes with metastatic potential of human melanoma: an in vitro and in vivo study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matarrese Paola

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cathepsins represent a group of proteases involved in determining the metastatic potential of cancer cells. Among these are cysteinyl- (e.g. cathepsin B and cathepsin L and aspartyl-proteases (e.g. cathepsin D, normally present inside the lysosomes as inactive proenzymes. Once released in the extracellular space, cathepsins contribute to metastatic potential by facilitating cell migration and invasiveness. Results In the present work we first evaluated, by in vitro procedures, the role of cathepsins B, L and D, in the remodeling, spreading and invasiveness of eight different cell lines: four primary and four metastatic melanoma cell lines. Among these, we considered two cell lines derived from a primary cutaneous melanoma and from a supraclavicular lymph node metastasis of the same patient. To this purpose, the effects of specific chemical inhibitors of these proteases, i.e. CA-074 and CA-074Me for cathepsin B, Cathepsin inhibitor II for cathepsin L, and Pepstatin A for cathepsin D, were evaluated. In addition, we also analyzed the effects of the biological inhibitors of these cathepsins, i.e. specific antibodies, on cell invasiveness. We found that i cathepsin B, but not cathepsins L and D, was highly expressed at the surface of metastatic but not of primary melanoma cell lines and that ii CA-074, or specific antibodies to cathepsin B, hindered metastatic cell spreading and dissemination, whereas neither chemical nor biological inhibitors of cathepsins D and L had significant effects. Accordingly, in vivo studies, i.e. in murine xenografts, demonstrated that CA-074 significantly reduced human melanoma growth and the number of artificial lung metastases. Conclusions These results suggest a reappraisal of the use of cathepsin B inhibitors (either chemical or biological as innovative strategy in the management of metastatic melanoma disease.

  4. The development and characterization of an ELISA specifically detecting the active form of cathepsin K

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, S; Karsdal, M A; Bay-Jensen, A C

    2013-01-01

    , such as osteoporosis or ankylosing spondylitis. METHODS: Presently there are no robust assays for the assessment of active cathepsin K in serum, and therefore an ELISA specifically detecting the N-terminal of the active form of cathepsin K was developed. RESULTS: The assay was technically robust, with a lowest limit...

  5. Fibrinogen and fibrin are novel substrates for Fasciola hepatica cathepsin L peptidases

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mebius, Mirjam M.; Op Heij, Jody M J; Tielens, Aloysius G.M.; de Groot, Philip G; Urbanus, Rolf T; van Hellemond, Jaap J.

    2018-01-01

    Cathepsin peptidases form a major component of the secreted proteins of the blood-feeding trematodes Fasciola hepatica and Schistosoma mansoni. These peptidases fulfill many functions, from facilitating infection to feeding and immune evasion. In this study, we examined the Fasciola cathepsin L

  6. Synthesis and biochemical evaluation of benzoylbenzophenone thiosemicarbazone analogues as potent and selective inhibitors of cathepsin L

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parker, Erica N; Song, Jiangli; Kishore Kumar, G D

    2015-01-01

    Upregulation of cathepsin L in a variety of tumors and its ability to promote cancer cell invasion and migration through degradation of the extracellular matrix suggest that cathepsin L is a promising biological target for the development of anti-metastatic agents. Based on encouraging results fr...

  7. Prognostic and predictive value of cathepsin X in serum from colorectal cancer patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vižin, Tjaša; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Wilhelmsen, Michael

    2014-01-01

    .4 SD, p > 0.05) and there was no association with age, gender, disease stage, tumour location or CEA. In univariate analysis no association between cathepsin X levels and overall survival was demonstrated for the entire set of patients, however, cathepsin X was associated with survival in a group...

  8. Cathepsins B, L and cystatin C in cyst fluid of ovarian tumors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolwijck, E.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Thomas, C.M.G.; Span, P.N.; Krasovec, M.; Kos, J.; Sweep, F.C.

    2010-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: In cancer, an extracellular and membrane bound localization of cathepsins contribute to the invasion of tumor cells at the basement membrane. METHODS: This is the first study that explored levels of cathepsins B (CatB), L (CatL) and their inhibitor cystatin C (CysC) in the cystic fluid

  9. Serum cathepsin H as a potential prognostic marker in patients with colorectal cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schweiger, A; Christensen, Ib Jarle; Nielsen, Hans Jørgen

    2005-01-01

    Cathepsin H is a lysosomal cysteine protease that may participate in tumor progression. In order to evaluate its potential as a prognostic marker, its protein levels were measured by ELISA in preoperative sera from 324 patients with colorectal cancer. The level of cathepsin H was significantly...... increased in patient sera, the median level was 8.4 ng/mL versus 2.1 ng/mL in 90 healthy blood donors (p CEA). In survival analysis...... a significant difference was found between the group of patients with low cathepsin H (first tertile) who had a poor prognosis and the remaining patients (p = 0.03). The risk of patients was further stratified when cathepsin H levels were combined with CEA. Patients with high CEA and low cathepsin H had...

  10. Serum cathepsin B to cystatin C ratio as a potential marker for the diagnosis of cholangiocarcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monsouvanh, Ammala; Proungvitaya, Tanakorn; Limpaiboon, Temduang; Wongkham, Chaisiri; Wongkham, Sopit; Luvira, Vor; Proungvitaya, Siriporn

    2014-01-01

    Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA) is a cancer of the bile duct epithelial cells. The highest incidence rate of CCA with a poor prognosis and poor response to chemotherapy is found in Southeast Asian countries, especially in northeastern Thailand and Lao PDR. Cathepsin B is a lysosomal cysteine protease which is regulated by cysteine proteinase inhibitors such as cystatin C. Elevation of cathepsin B levels in biological fluid has been observed in patients with inflammatory diseases and many cancers. We aimed to investigate the serum cathepsin B and cystatin C levels of CCA patients to evaluate the feasibility of using cathepsin B and cystatin C as markers for the diagnosis of CCA. Fifty-six sera from CCA patients, 17 with benign biliary diseases (BBD) and 13 from controls were collected and the cathepsin B and cystatin C levels were determined. In addition, cathepsin B expression was investigated immunohistochemically for 9 matched-pairs of cancerous and adjacent tissues of CCA patients. Serum cathepsin B, but not cystatin C, was significantly higher in CCA and BBD patient groups compared to that in the control group. Consistently, all cancerous tissues strongly expressed cathepsin B while adjacent tissues were negative in 7 out of 9 cases. In contrast, serum cystatin C levels were comparable between CCA and control groups, although serum cystatin C levels in the BBD group was higher than that in the control or CCA groups. When the serum cathepsin B to cystatin C ratio was calculated, that of the CCA group was significantly higher than that of the control group, and, although statistically not significant, the ratio of CCA group showed a trend to be higher than that of the BBD group. Thus, the cathepsin B to cystatin C ratio might be used as an alternative marker for aiding diagnosis of CCA.

  11. Monoclonal antibody against recombinant Fasciola gigantica cathepsin L1H could detect juvenile and adult cathepsin Ls of Fasciola gigantica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wongwairot, Sirima; Kueakhai, Pornanan; Changklungmoa, Narin; Jaikua, Wipaphorn; Sansri, Veerawat; Meemon, Krai; Songkoomkrong, Sineenart; Riengrojpitak, Suda; Sobhon, Prasert

    2015-01-01

    Cathepsin Ls (CatLs), the major cysteine protease secreted by Fasciola spp., are important for parasite digestion and tissue invasion. Fasciola gigantica cathepsin L1H (FgCatL1H) is the isotype expressed in the early stages for migration and invasion. In the present study, a monoclonal antibody (MoAb) against recombinant F. gigantica cathepsin L1H (rFgCatL1H) was produced by hybridoma technique using spleen cells from BALB/c mice immunized with recombinant proFgCatL1H (rproFgCatL1H). This MoAb is an immunoglobulin (Ig)G1 with κ light chain isotype. The MoAb reacted specifically with rproFgCatL1H, the native FgCatL1H at a molecular weight (MW) 38 to 48 kDa in the extract of whole body (WB) of metacercariae and newly excysted juvenile (NEJ) and cross-reacted with rFgCatL1 and native FgCatLs at MW 25 to 28 kDa in WB of 2- and 4-week-old juveniles, adult, and adult excretory-secretory (ES) fractions by immunoblotting and indirect ELISA. It did not cross-react with antigens in WB fractions from other parasites, including Gigantocotyle explanatum, Paramphistomum cervi, Gastrothylax crumenifer, Eurytrema pancreaticum, Setaria labiato-papillosa, and Fischoederius cobboldi. By immunolocalization, MoAb against rFgCatL1H reacted with the native protein in the gut of metacercariae and NEJ and also cross-reacted with CatL1 in 2- and 4-week-old juveniles and adult F. gigantica. Therefore, FgCatL1H and its MoAb may be used for immunodiagnosis of both early and late fasciolosis in ruminants and humans.

  12. Cathepsin Activity-Based Probes and Inhibitor for Preclinical Atherosclerosis Imaging and Macrophage Depletion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ihab Abd-Elrahman

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide, mainly due to an increasing prevalence of atherosclerosis characterized by inflammatory plaques. Plaques with high levels of macrophage infiltration are considered "vulnerable" while those that do not have significant inflammation are considered stable; cathepsin protease activity is highly elevated in macrophages of vulnerable plaques and contributes to plaque instability. Establishing novel tools for non-invasive molecular imaging of macrophages in plaques could aid in preclinical studies and evaluation of therapeutics. Furthermore, compounds that reduce the macrophage content within plaques should ultimately impact care for this disease.We have applied quenched fluorescent cathepsin activity-based probes (ABPs to a murine atherosclerosis model and evaluated their use for in vivo imaging using fluorescent molecular tomography (FMT, as well as ex vivo fluorescence imaging and fluorescent microscopy. Additionally, freshly dissected human carotid plaques were treated with our potent cathepsin inhibitor and macrophage apoptosis was evaluated by fluorescent microscopy.We demonstrate that our ABPs accurately detect murine atherosclerotic plaques non-invasively, identifying cathepsin activity within plaque macrophages. In addition, our cathepsin inhibitor selectively induced cell apoptosis of 55%±10% of the macrophage within excised human atherosclerotic plaques.Cathepsin ABPs present a rapid diagnostic tool for macrophage detection in atherosclerotic plaque. Our inhibitor confirms cathepsin-targeting as a promising approach to treat atherosclerotic plaque inflammation.

  13. Low-Cost Method to Monitor Patient Adherence to HIV Antiretroviral Therapy Using Multiplex Cathepsin Zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Manu O; Evans, Denise; Keegan, Philip M; McNamara, Lynne; Parker, Ivana K; Roberts, LaDeidra M; Caulk, Alexander W; Gleason, Rudolph L; Seifu, Daniel; Amogne, Wondwossen; Penny, Clement

    2016-01-01

    Monitoring patient adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) by patient survey is inherently error prone, justifying a need for objective, biological measures affordable in low-resource settings where HIV/AIDS epidemic is highest. In preliminary studies conducted in Ethiopia and South Africa, we observed loss of cysteine cathepsin activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells of HIV-positive patients on ART. We optimized a rapid protocol for multiplex cathepsin zymography to quantify cysteine cathepsins, and prospectively enrolled 350 HIV-positive, ART-naïve adults attending the Themba Lethu Clinic, Johannesburg, South Africa, to test if suppressed cathepsin activity could be a biomarker of ART adherence (103 patients were included in final analysis). Poor adherence was defined as detectable viral load (>400 copies/ml) or simplified medication adherence questionnaire, 4-6 months after ART initiation. 86 % of patients with undetectable viral loads after 6 months were cathepsin negative, and cathepsin-positive patients were twice as likely to have detectable viral loads (RR 2.32 95 % CI 1.26-4.29). Together, this demonstrates proof of concept that multiplex cathepsin zymography may be an inexpensive, objective method to monitor patient adherence to ART. Low cost of this electrophoresis-based assay makes it a prime candidate for implementation in resource-limited settings.

  14. Low cost method to monitor patient adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy using multiplex cathepsin zymography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platt, Manu O.; Evans, Denise; Keegan, Philip M.; McNamara, Lynne; Parker, Ivana K.; Roberts, LaDeidra M.; Caulk, Alexander W.; Gleason, Rudolph L.; Seifu, Daniel; Amogne, Wondwossen; Penny, Clement

    2015-01-01

    Monitoring patient adherence to HIV antiretroviral therapy (ART) by patient survey is inherently error-prone, justifying a need for objective, biological measures affordable in low resource settings where HIV/AIDS epidemic is highest. In preliminary studies conducted in Ethiopia and South Africa, we observed loss of cysteine cathepsin activity in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) of HIV-positive patients on ART. We optimized a rapid protocol for multiplex cathepsin zymography to quantify cysteine cathepsins, and prospectively enrolled 350 HIV-positive, ART naïve adults attending the Themba Lethu Clinic, Johannesburg, South Africa, to test if suppressed cathepsin activity could be a biomarker of ART adherence (103 patients were included in final analysis). Poor adherence was defined as detectable viral load (>400 copies/ml) or simplified medication adherence questionnaire (SMAQ), 4–6 months after ART initiation. 86% of patients with undetectable viral loads after 6 months were cathepsin negative, and cathepsin positive patients were twice as likely to have detectable viral loads (RR 2.32 95% CI 1.26–4.29). Together, this demonstrates proof of concept that multiplex cathepsin zymography may be an inexpensive, objective method to monitor patient adherence to ART. Low cost of this electrophoresis based assay makes it a prime candidate for implementation in resource limited settings. PMID:26589706

  15. Expression of cathepsin D in bladder carcinoma: correlation with pathological features and serum cystatin C levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokyol, Cidğem; Köken, Tülay; Demirbas, Murat; Dilek, Fatma Hüsniye; Yörükoglu, Kutsal; Mungan, Ugur; Kirkali, Ziya

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to evaluate the expression of cathepsin D in primary bladder cancer and to determine its relationship with conventional pathological features and serum cystatin C levels. The immunohistochemical cathepsin D expression and staining patterns of epithelial and stromal cells were investigated in 21 patients with primary bladder carcinoma. Serum cystatin C levels were determined by immunoturbidimetry and compared with matched controls. There were 7 papillary neoplasms of low malignant potential, 7 low-grade and 7 high-grade carcinomas. Six tumors were invasive. Statistical analysis showed a significant inverse relationship between cathepsin D expression of the tumor cells and tumor grade and stage (P = 0.018 and P = 0.046, respectively). Serum cystatin C levels of the controls and patients varied between 0.39 mg/L and 1.99 mg/L (P > 0.05). There was no significant relation between cathepsin D expression in tumor tissue and serum cystatin C levels. Loss of cathepsin D expression in bladder carcinomas may be associated with high-grade and invasive tumors. Thus, increased cathepsin D expression by tumor cells may be related to local tumor invasion at an early stage, but it seems that extracellular cystatin C is not affected by cathepsin D expression of tumor or stromal cells, and cystatin C concentrations are not directly correlated with the progression of primary bladder carcinomas.

  16. Cathepsin L of Triatoma brasiliensis (Reduviidae, Triatominae): sequence characterization, expression pattern and zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waniek, Peter J; Pacheco Costa, Juliana E; Jansen, Ana M; Costa, Jane; Araújo, Catarina A C

    2012-01-01

    Triatoma brasiliensis is considered one of the main vectors of Chagas disease commonly found in semi-arid areas of northeastern Brazil. These insects use proteases, such as carboxypeptidase B, aminopeptidases and different cathepsins for blood digestion. In the present study, two genes encoding cathepsin L from the midgut of T. brasiliensis were identified and characterized. Mature T. brasiliensis cathepsin L-like proteinases (TBCATL-1, TBCATL-2) showed a high level of identity to the cathepsin L-like proteinases of other insects, with highest similarity to Rhodnius prolixus. Both cathepsin L transcripts were highly abundant in the posterior midgut region, the main region of the blood digestion. Determination of the pH in the whole intestine of unfed T. brasiliensis revealed alkaline conditions in the anterior midgut region (stomach) and acidic conditions in the posterior midgut region (small intestine). Gelatine in-gel zymography showed the activity of at least four distinct proteinases in the small intestine and the cysteine proteinase inhibitors transepoxysuccinyl-l-leucylamido-(4-guanidino)butane (E-64) and cathepsin B inhibitor and N-(l-3-trans-propylcarbamoyl-oxirane-2-carbonyl)-l-isoleucyl-l-proline (CA-074) were employed to characterize enzymatic activity. E-64 fully inhibited cysteine proteinase activity, whereas in the samples treated with CA-074 residual proteinase activity was detectable. Thus, proteolytic activity could at least partially be ascribed to cathepsin L. Western blot analysis using specific anti cathepsin L antibodies confirmed the presence of cathepsin L in the lumen of the small intestine of the insects. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cathepsin D polymorphism in Italian sporadic and familial Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagnoli, Silvia; Nacmias, Benedetta; Tedde, Andrea; Guarnieri, Bianca Maria; Cellini, Elena; Ciantelli, Monica; Petruzzi, Concetta; Bartoli, Antonella; Ortenzi, Luigi; Serio, Antonio; Sorbi, Sandro

    2002-08-16

    A recent study has shown that a genetic variation in the Cathepsin D (catD) gene is a major risk factor for the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). CatD is an intracellular aspartyl protease involved in neurodegeneration. A C-->T (Ala-->Val) transition at position 224 has been associated with altered intracellular maturation. Recently, a significant overrepresentation of the T allele of the catD gene in AD patients compared with controls was reported. However, this finding has not yet been confirmed. We analyzed the distribution of catD and apolipoprotein E polymorphisms in Italian patients with sporadic and familial AD (FAD). Our studies revealed that the distribution of catD polymorphism did not differ in AD and FAD patients and controls. Thus, our data do not support a role for the catD gene as a genetic risk factor in the development of AD.

  18. Effects of RNAi-mediated cathepsin L gene silencing on bionomics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    . The transfection efficiency of each group was observed. The expression of cathepsin L in hepatoma carcinoma cells was detected by immunofluorescence, reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and western blot.

  19. The balance between extracellular cathepsins and cystatin C is of importance for ovarian cancer.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kolwijck, E.; Kos, J.; Obermajer, N.; Span, P.N.; Thomas, C.M.G.; Massuger, L.F.A.G.; Sweep, F.C.

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: A major step in cancer formation involves the degradation of the extracellular matrix, mediated by multiple degradative actions of (lysosomal) proteases. Extracellular release of lysosomal proteases (cathepsins) and their inhibitors has been associated with the development and

  20. Plasma cathepsin S and cystatin C levels and risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lv, Bing-Jie; Lindholt, Jes Sanddal; Cheng, Xiang

    2012-01-01

    Human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) lesions contain high levels of cathepsin S (CatS), but are deficient in its inhibitor, cystatin C. Whether plasma CatS and cystatin C levels are also altered in AAA patients remains unknown.......Human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA) lesions contain high levels of cathepsin S (CatS), but are deficient in its inhibitor, cystatin C. Whether plasma CatS and cystatin C levels are also altered in AAA patients remains unknown....

  1. Optimisation of the production of cathepsin L1 from a recombinant saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    O'Donovan, Eimear C

    2002-01-01

    Cathepsin L1 is a cysteine protease that has been previously isolated and functionally expressed in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. It has the potential to be employed as a vaccine for liver-fluke disease in cattle and other ruminants. Production of this recombinant enzyme, which is secreted into the media from recombinant yeast, was studied initially in shake flask cultures and subsequently in 5L and 15L fermenters. In early studies, low productivity and especially variations in Cathepsin L1 p...

  2. Imaging Primary Mouse Sarcomas After Radiation Therapy Using Cathepsin-Activatable Fluorescent Imaging Agents

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cuneo, Kyle C. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Mito, Jeffrey K.; Javid, Melodi P. [Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Ferrer, Jorge M. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Kim, Yongbaek [Department of Clinical Pathology, College of Veterinary Medicine, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, W. David [The David H. Koch Institute for Integrative Cancer Research, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Bawendi, Moungi G. [Department of Chemistry, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts (United States); Brigman, Brian E. [Department of Orthopedic Surgery, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Kirsch, David G., E-mail: david.kirsch@duke.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States); Department of Pharmacology and Cancer Biology, Duke University School of Medicine, Durham, North Carolina (United States)

    2013-05-01

    Purpose: Cathepsin-activated fluorescent probes can detect tumors in mice and in canine patients. We previously showed that these probes can detect microscopic residual sarcoma in the tumor bed of mice during gross total resection. Many patients with soft tissue sarcoma (STS) and other tumors undergo radiation therapy (RT) before surgery. This study assesses the effect of RT on the ability of cathepsin-activated probes to differentiate between normal and cancerous tissue. Methods and Materials: A genetically engineered mouse model of STS was used to generate primary hind limb sarcomas that were treated with hypofractionated RT. Mice were injected intravenously with cathepsin-activated fluorescent probes, and various tissues, including the tumor, were imaged using a hand-held imaging device. Resected tumor and normal muscle samples were harvested to assess cathepsin expression by Western blot. Uptake of activated probe was analyzed by flow cytometry and confocal microscopy. Parallel in vitro studies using mouse sarcoma cells were performed. Results: RT of primary STS in mice and mouse sarcoma cell lines caused no change in probe activation or cathepsin protease expression. Increasing radiation dose resulted in an upward trend in probe activation. Flow cytometry and immunofluorescence showed that a substantial proportion of probe-labeled cells were CD11b-positive tumor-associated immune cells. Conclusions: In this primary murine model of STS, RT did not affect the ability of cathepsin-activated probes to differentiate between tumor and normal muscle. Cathepsin-activated probes labeled tumor cells and tumor-associated macrophages. Our results suggest that it would be feasible to include patients who have received preoperative RT in clinical studies evaluating cathepsin-activated imaging probes.

  3. Cystatin C as a p53?inducible apoptotic mediator that regulates cathepsin L activity

    OpenAIRE

    Mori, Jinichi; Tanikawa, Chizu; Funauchi, Yuki; Lo, Paulisally Hau Yi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Matsuda, Koichi

    2016-01-01

    In response to various cellular stresses, p53 is activated and inhibits malignant transformation through the transcriptional regulation of its target genes. However, the full picture of the p53 downstream pathway still remains to be elucidated. Here we identified cystatin C, a major inhibitor of cathepsins, as a novel p53 target. In response to DNA damage, activated p53 induced cystatin C expression through p53 binding sequence in the first intron. We showed that cathepsin L activity was decr...

  4. Serum and saliva levels of cathepsin L in patients with acute coronary syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirzaii-Dizgah, Iraj; Riahi, Esmail

    2011-03-01

    Coronary artery disease (CAD) is the major cause of death nearly all over the world, and accurate and rapid diagnosis of CAD is of major medical and economic importance. The aim of this study was to evaluate the serum and saliva levels of cathepsin L in patients with acute coronary syndrome (ACS). In a cross-sectional study, 39 patients with ACS and 28 with controls were recruited to the study, and cathepsin L levels were measured in serum, resting saliva, and stimulated saliva obtained 12 and 24 h after the onset of ACS by ELISA method. Statistical analyses of Fisher's exact test, the Student's t-test or Kruskal-Wallis test were performed. Stimulated saliva cathepsin L levels in patients with ACS 12 hours but not 24 hours after admission showed significant decrease compared with that in control subjects. However, there were no significant differences in serum and unstimulated saliva cathepsin L levels between groups. Serum and saliva levels of cathepsin L remain unchanged in patients with ACS and hence may not be a promising factor in CAD risk assessment. It seems that serum and saliva cathepsin L may not be a good biomarker for CHD. CAD: Coronary artery disease, ACS: Acute coronary syndrome, CHD: Coronary heart disease, EU: Emergency unit, MI: Myocardial infarction. Cathepsin L, Acute coronary syndrome, Resting saliva, Stimulated saliva. How to cite this article: Mirzaii-Dizgah I, Riahi E. Serum and Saliva Levels of Cathepsin L in Patients with Acute Coronary Syndrome. J Contemp Dent Pract 2011;12(2):114-119.

  5. Uncovering the cathepsin system in heart failure patients submitted to Left Ventricular Assist Device (LVAD) implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    D'Amico, Andrea; Ragusa, Rosetta; Caruso, Raffaele; Prescimone, Tommaso; Nonini, Sandra; Cabiati, Manuela; Del Ry, Silvia; Trivella, Maria Giovanna; Giannessi, Daniela; Caselli, Chiara

    2014-12-12

    In end-stage heart failure (HF), the implantation of a left ventricular assist device (LVAD) is able to induce reverse remodeling. Cellular proteases, such as cathepsins, are involved in the progression of HF. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of cathepsin system in HF patients supported by LVAD, in order to determine their involvement in cardiac remodeling. The expression of cysteine (CatB, CatK, CatL, CatS) and serine cathepsin (CatG), and relative inhibitors (Cystatin B, C and SerpinA3, respectively) was determined in cardiac biopsies of 22 patients submitted to LVAD (pre-LVAD) and compared with: 1) control stable chronic HF patients on medical therapy at the moment of heart transplantation without prior LVAD (HT, n = 7); 2) patients supported by LVAD at the moment of transplantation (post-LVAD, n = 6). The expression of cathepsins and their inhibitors was significantly higher in pre-LVAD compared to the HT group and LVAD induced a further increase in the cathepsin system. Significant positive correlations were observed between cardiac expression of cathepsins and their inhibitors as well as inflammatory cytokines. In the pre-LVAD group, a relationship of cathepsins with dilatative etiology and length of hospitalization was found. A parallel activation of cathepsins and their inhibitors was observed after LVAD support. The possible clinical importance of these modifications is confirmed by their relation with patients' outcome. A better discovery of these pathways could add more insights into the cardiac remodeling during HF.

  6. Antibody targeting of Cathepsin S induces antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kwok Hang Fai

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteolytic enzymes have been implicated in driving tumor progression by means of their cancer cell microenvironment activity where they promote proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis, migration, and invasion. Therapeutic strategies have focused on attenuating their activity using small molecule inhibitors, but the association of proteases with the cell surface during cancer progression opens up the possibility of targeting these using antibody dependent cellular cytotoxicity (ADCC. Cathepsin S is a lysosomal cysteine protease that promotes the growth and invasion of tumour and endothelial cells during cancer progression. Our analysis of colorectal cancer patient biopsies shows that cathepsin S associates with the cell membrane indicating a potential for ADCC targeting. Results Here we report the cell surface characterization of cathepsin S and the development of a humanized antibody (Fsn0503h with immune effector function and a stable in vivo half-life of 274 hours. Cathepsin S is expressed on the surface of tumor cells representative of colorectal and pancreatic cancer (23%-79% positive expression. Furthermore the binding of Fsn0503h to surface associated cathepsin S results in natural killer (NK cell targeted tumor killing. In a colorectal cancer model Fsn0503h elicits a 22% cytotoxic effect. Conclusions This data highlights the potential to target cell surface associated enzymes, such as cathepsin S, as therapeutic targets using antibodies capable of elicitingADCC in tumor cells.

  7. Gelatin Zymography Using Leupeptin for the Detection of Various Cathepsin L Forms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashimoto, Yoko

    2017-01-01

    Zymography is a highly sensitive method to assess the activities as well as molecular weights of enzymes in crude biological fluids and tissue extracts. Cathepsin L is a lysosomal cysteine proteinase that is optimally active at slightly acidic pH and is highly unstable in alkaline solutions such as electrode buffer (pH 8.3). Large amounts of cathepsin L are secreted by various cancer cells, where it promotes invasion and metastasis. Leupeptin is a tight-binding inhibitor of cysteine proteinases, and its complex with cathepsin L is stable in alkaline solutions. Moreover, leupeptin can be easily removed from the complex because it is a reversibly binding inhibitor. In addition, leupeptin is too small to influence the electrode migration distance of the complex with cathepsin L on a sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel. Here, a novel gelatin zymography technique that employs leupeptin to detect pro-, intermediate, and mature cathepsin L forms on the basis of their gelatinolytic activities is described. Further, the differences in the glycosylation, phosphorylation, and processing statuses of lysosomal and secreted cathepsin L forms isolated from cultured HT 1080 cells are demonstrated using this method.

  8. Cathepsin G, a Neutrophil Protease, Induces Compact Cell-Cell Adhesion in MCF-7 Human Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoya Kudo

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cathepsin G is a serine protease secreted by activated neutrophils that play a role in the inflammatory response. Because neutrophils are known to be invading leukocytes in various tumors, their products may influence the characteristics of tumor cells such as the growth state, motility, and the adhesiveness between cells or the extracellular matrix. Here, we demonstrate that cathepsin G induces cell-cell adhesion of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells resulting from the contact inhibition of cell movement on fibronectin but not on type IV collagen. Cathepsin G subsequently induced cell condensation, a very compact cell colony, resulting due to the increased strength of E-cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesion. Cathepsin G action is protease activity-dependent and was inhibited by the presence of serine protease inhibitors. Cathepsin G promotes E-cadherin/catenin complex formation and Rap1 activation in MCF-7 cells, which reportedly regulates E-cadherin-based cell-cell junctions. Cathepsin G also promotes E-cadherin/protein kinase D1 (PKD1 complex formation, and Go6976, the selective PKD1 inhibitor, suppressed the cathepsin G-induced cell condensation. Our findings provide the first evidence that cathepsin G regulates E-cadherin function, suggesting that cathepsin G has a novel modulatory role against tumor cell-cell adhesion.

  9. Localization of nuclear cathepsin L and its association with disease progression and poor outcome in colorectal cancer.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Sullivan, Shane

    2012-02-01

    Previous in vitro studies have identified a nuclear isoform of Cathepsin L. The aim of this study was to examine if nuclear Cathepsin L exists in vivo and examine its association with clinical, pathological and patient outcome data. Cellular localization (nuclear and cytoplasmic) and expression levels v of Cathespin L in 186 colorectal cancer cases using immunohistochemistry. The molecular weight and activity of nuclear and cytoplasmic Cathepsin L in vivo and in vitro were assessed by Western blotting and ELISA, respectively. Epithelial nuclear staining percentage (p = 0.04) and intensity (p = 0.006) increased with advancing tumor stage, whereas stromal cytoplasmic staining decreased (p = 0.02). Using multivariate statistical analysis, survival was inversely associated with staining intensity in the epithelial cytoplasm (p = 0.01) and stromal nuclei (p = 0.007). In different colorectal cell lines and in vivo tumors, pro- and active Cathepsin L isoforms were present in both the cytoplasm and nuclear samples, with pro-Cathepsin L at 50 kDa and active Cathepsin L at 25 kDa. Purified nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions from cell lines and tumors showed active Cathepsin L activity. The identification of nuclear Cathepsin L may play an important prognostic role in colorectal disease progression and patient outcome. Moreover, these findings suggest that altering active nuclear Cathepsin L may significantly influence disease progression.

  10. Proteomic evaluation and validation of cathepsin D regulated proteins in macrophages exposed to Streptococcus pneumoniae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bewley, Martin A; Pham, Trong K; Marriott, Helen M; Noirel, Josselin; Chu, Hseuh-Ping; Ow, Saw Y; Ryazanov, Alexey G; Read, Robert C; Whyte, Moira K B; Chain, Benny; Wright, Phillip C; Dockrell, David H

    2011-06-01

    Macrophages are central effectors of innate immune responses to bacteria. We have investigated how activation of the abundant macrophage lysosomal protease, cathepsin D, regulates the macrophage proteome during killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae. Using the cathepsin D inhibitor pepstatin A, we demonstrate that cathepsin D differentially regulates multiple targets out of 679 proteins identified and quantified by eight-plex isobaric tag for relative and absolute quantitation. Our statistical analysis identified 18 differentially expressed proteins that passed all paired t-tests (α = 0.05). This dataset was enriched for proteins regulating the mitochondrial pathway of apoptosis or inhibiting competing death programs. Five proteins were selected for further analysis. Western blotting, followed by pharmacological inhibition or genetic manipulation of cathepsin D, verified cathepsin D-dependent regulation of these proteins, after exposure to S. pneumoniae. Superoxide dismutase-2 up-regulation was temporally related to increased reactive oxygen species generation. Gelsolin, a known regulator of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization, was down-regulated in association with cytochrome c release from mitochondria. Eukaryotic elongation factor (eEF2), a regulator of protein translation, was also down-regulated by cathepsin D. Using absence of the negative regulator of eEF2, eEF2 kinase, we confirm that eEF2 function is required to maintain expression of the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1, delaying macrophage apoptosis and confirm using a murine model that maintaining eEF2 function is associated with impaired macrophage apoptosis-associated killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae. These findings demonstrate that cathepsin D regulates multiple proteins controlling the mitochondrial pathway of macrophage apoptosis or competing death processes, facilitating intracellular bacterial killing.

  11. Cathepsin D, a Marker for the Metastatic Potential of Breast Cancer, May Regulate the Mitogenic Activity of Fibroblast Growth Factor 1

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Grieb, Teri

    1998-01-01

    .... Over the years, the data substantiating such a role for cathepsin D has been quite conflicting However, there is strong evidence that cathepsin D plays a role in the degradation of the extracellular matrix (ECM...

  12. Cathepsin L is an immune-related protein in Pacific abalone (Haliotis discus hannai)--Purification and characterization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Jian-Dong; Cai, Qiu-Feng; Yan, Long-Jie; Du, Cui-Hong; Liu, Guang-Ming; Su, Wen-Jin; Ke, Caihuan; Cao, Min-Jie

    2015-12-01

    Cathepsin L, an immune-related protein, was purified from the hepatopancreas of Pacific abalone (Haliotis discus hannai) by ammonium sulfate precipitation and column chromatographies of SP-Sepharose and Sephacryl S-200 HR. Purified cathepsin L appeared as two bands with molecular masses of 28.0 and 28.5 kDa (namely cathepsin La and Lb) on SDS-PAGE under reducing conditions, suggesting that it is a glycoprotein. Peptide mass fingerprinting (PMF) analysis revealed that peptide fragments of 95 amino acid residues was high similarity to cathepsin L of pearl oyster (Pinctada fucata). The optimal temperature and pH of cathepsin L were 35 °C and pH 5.5. Cathepsin L was particularly inhibited by cysteine proteinase inhibitors of E-64 and leupeptin, while it was activated by metalloproteinase inhibitors EDTA and EGTA. The full-length cathepsin L cDNA was further cloned from the hepatopancreas by rapid PCR amplification of cDNA ends (RACE). The open reading frame of the enzyme was 981 bp, encoding 327 amino acid residues, with a conserved catalytic triad (Cys134, His273 and Asn293), a potential N-glycosylation site and conserved ERFNIN, GNYD, and GCGG motifs, which are characteristics of cathepsin L. Western blot and proteinase activity analysis revealed that the expression and enzyme activity of cathepsin L were significantly up-regulated in hepatopancreas at 8 h following Vibrio parahaemolyticus infection, demonstrating that cathepsin L is involved in the innate immune system of abalone. Our present study for the first time reported the purification, characterization, molecular cloning, and tissue expression of cathepsin L in abalone. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Induction of protective immunity in cattle against infection with Fasciola hepatica by vaccination with cathepsin L proteinases and with hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dalton, J P; McGonigle, S; Rolph, T P; Andrews, S J

    1996-01-01

    Two cathepsin L proteinases, cathepsin L1 and cathepsin L2, secreted by liver flukes may be involved in tissue penetration, nutrition, and protection from immune attack. To ascertain the immunoprophylactic potential of these proteinases, and of another molecule, liver fluke hemoglobin (Hb), we performed vaccine trials in cattle. In the first vaccine trial various doses of cathepsin L1 were tested. The mean protection level obtained was 53.7%. In a second vaccine trial cathepsin L1 and Hb elicited 42.5 and 43.8% protection levels, respectively, while a combination of the two molecules induced a significantly higher level of protection (51.9%). Cathepsin L2 was not examined alone; however, vaccination of cattle with a combination of cathepsin L2 and Hb elicited the highest level of protection (72.4%). The animals that received cathepsin L1-Hb or cathepsin L2-Hb showed reduced liver damage as assessed by serum glutamic dehydrogenase and gamma-glutamyl transferase levels. Furthermore, a reduced viability was observed for fluke eggs recovered from all vaccine groups. This anti-embryonation effect of vaccination was particularly evident in the group that received cathepsin L2-Hb where >98% of the eggs recovered did not embryonate to miracidia. Although all vaccine preparations induced high antibody titers which were boosted following the challenge infection, there was no correlation between antibody titers and protection. The results of these trials demonstrate that cathepsin Ls and Hb could form the basis of a molecular vaccine that would not only reduce parasite burden but would also prevent transmission of liver fluke disease. PMID:8945548

  14. The propeptide of yeast cathepsin D inhibits programmed necrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmona-Gutiérrez, D; Bauer, M A; Ring, J; Knauer, H; Eisenberg, T; Büttner, S; Ruckenstuhl, C; Reisenbichler, A; Magnes, C; Rechberger, G N; Birner-Gruenberger, R; Jungwirth, H; Fröhlich, K-U; Sinner, F; Kroemer, G; Madeo, F

    2011-05-19

    The lysosomal endoprotease cathepsin D (CatD) is an essential player in general protein turnover and specific peptide processing. CatD-deficiency is associated with neurodegenerative diseases, whereas elevated CatD levels correlate with tumor malignancy and cancer cell survival. Here, we show that the CatD ortholog of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Pep4p) harbors a dual cytoprotective function, composed of an anti-apoptotic part, conferred by its proteolytic capacity, and an anti-necrotic part, which resides in the protein's proteolytically inactive propeptide. Thus, deletion of PEP4 resulted in both apoptotic and necrotic cell death during chronological aging. Conversely, prolonged overexpression of Pep4p extended chronological lifespan specifically through the protein's anti-necrotic function. This function, which triggered histone hypoacetylation, was dependent on polyamine biosynthesis and was exerted via enhanced intracellular levels of putrescine, spermidine and its precursor S-adenosyl-methionine. Altogether, these data discriminate two pro-survival functions of yeast CatD and provide first insight into the physiological regulation of programmed necrosis in yeast.

  15. Production and characterization of monoclonal antibodies against cathepsin B and cathepsin B-Like proteins of Naegleria fowleri.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seong, Gi-Sang; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Kang, Heekyoung; Seo, Ga-Eun; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2017-12-01

    Naegleria fowleri causes fatal primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) in humans and experimental animals. In previous studies, cathepsin B (nfcpb) and cathepsin B-like (nfcpb-L) genes of N. fowleri were cloned, and it was suggested that refolding rNfCPB and rNfCPB-L proteins could play important roles in host tissue invasion, immune response evasion and nutrient uptake. In this study, we produced anti-NfCPB and anti-NfCPB-L monoclonal antibodies (McAb) using a cell fusion technique, and observed their immunological characteristics. Seven hybridoma cells secreting rNfCPB McAbs and three hybridoma cells secreting rNfCPB-L McAbs were produced. Among these, 2C9 (monoclone for rNfCPB) and 1C8 (monoclone for rNfCPB-L) McAb showed high antibody titres and were finally selected for use. As determined by western blotting, 2C9 McAb bound to N. fowleri lysates, specifically the rNfCPB protein, which had bands of 28 kDa and 38.4 kDa. 1C8 McAb reacted with N. fowleri lysates, specifically the rNfCPB-L protein, which had bands of 24 kDa and 34 kDa. 2C9 and 1C8 monoclonal antibodies did not bind to lysates of other amoebae, such as N. gruberi, Acanthamoeba castellanii and A. polyphaga in western blot analyses. Immuno-cytochemistry analysis detected NfCPB and NfCPB-L proteins in the cytoplasm of N. fowleri trophozoites, particularly in the pseudopodia and food-cup. These results suggest that monoclonal antibodies produced against rNfCPB and rNfCPB-L proteins may be useful for further immunological study of PAM. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Amniotic fluid cathepsin-G in pregnancies complicated by the preterm prelabor rupture of membranes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musilova, Ivana; Andrys, Ctirad; Drahosova, Marcela; Soucek, Ondrej; Pliskova, Lenka; Stepan, Martin; Bestvina, Tomas; Maly, Jan; Jacobsson, Bo; Kacerovsky, Marian

    2017-09-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the amniotic fluid cathepsin-G concentrations in women with preterm prelabor rupture of membranes (PPROM) based on the presence of the microbial invasion of the amniotic cavity (MIAC) and/or intra-amniotic inflammation (IAI). A total of 154 women with singleton pregnancies complicated by PPROM were included in this study. Amniotic fluid samples were obtained by transabdominal amniocentesis. Amniotic fluid cathepsin-G concentrations were assessed by ELISA. MIAC was determined using a non-cultivation approach. IAI was defined as an amniotic fluid bedside interleukin-6 concentration ≥ 745 pg/mL. Women with MIAC had higher amniotic fluid cathepsin-G concentrations than women without MIAC (with MIAC: median 82.7 ng/mL, versus without MIAC: median 64.7 ng/mL; p = 0.0003). Women with IAI had higher amniotic fluid cathepsin-G concentrations than women without this complication (with IAI: median 103.0 ng/mL, versus without IAI: median 66.2 ng/mL; p G concentrations than women with colonization (MIAC without IAI) and women without both MIAC and IAI (p G concentrations in pregnancies complicated by PPROM. Amniotic fluid cathepsin-G appears to be a potential marker of IAI.

  17. Triterpene Acids from Frankincense and Semi-Synthetic Derivatives That Inhibit 5-Lipoxygenase and Cathepsin G

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Koeberle

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Age-related diseases, such as osteoarthritis, Alzheimer’s disease, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, are often associated with chronic unresolved inflammation. Neutrophils play central roles in this process by releasing tissue-degenerative proteases, such as cathepsin G, as well as pro-inflammatory leukotrienes produced by the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO pathway. Boswellic acids (BAs are pentacyclic triterpene acids contained in the gum resin of the anti-inflammatory remedy frankincense that target cathepsin G and 5-LO in neutrophils, and might thus represent suitable leads for intervention with age-associated diseases that have a chronic inflammatory component. Here, we investigated whether, in addition to BAs, other triterpene acids from frankincense interfere with 5-LO and cathepsin G. We provide a comprehensive analysis of 17 natural tetra- or pentacyclic triterpene acids for suppression of 5-LO product synthesis in human neutrophils. These triterpene acids were also investigated for their direct interference with 5-LO and cathepsin G in cell-free assays. Furthermore, our studies were expanded to 10 semi-synthetic BA derivatives. Our data reveal that besides BAs, several tetra- and pentacyclic triterpene acids are effective or even superior inhibitors of 5-LO product formation in human neutrophils, and in parallel, inhibit cathepsin G. Their beneficial target profile may qualify triterpene acids as anti-inflammatory natural products and pharmacological leads for intervention with diseases related to aging.

  18. Triterpene Acids from Frankincense and Semi-Synthetic Derivatives That Inhibit 5-Lipoxygenase and Cathepsin G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koeberle, Andreas; Henkel, Arne; Verhoff, Moritz; Tausch, Lars; König, Stefanie; Fischer, Dagmar; Kather, Nicole; Seitz, Stefanie; Paul, Michael; Jauch, Johann; Werz, Oliver

    2018-02-24

    Age-related diseases, such as osteoarthritis, Alzheimer's disease, diabetes, and cardiovascular disease, are often associated with chronic unresolved inflammation. Neutrophils play central roles in this process by releasing tissue-degenerative proteases, such as cathepsin G, as well as pro-inflammatory leukotrienes produced by the 5-lipoxygenase (5-LO) pathway. Boswellic acids (BAs) are pentacyclic triterpene acids contained in the gum resin of the anti-inflammatory remedy frankincense that target cathepsin G and 5-LO in neutrophils, and might thus represent suitable leads for intervention with age-associated diseases that have a chronic inflammatory component. Here, we investigated whether, in addition to BAs, other triterpene acids from frankincense interfere with 5-LO and cathepsin G. We provide a comprehensive analysis of 17 natural tetra- or pentacyclic triterpene acids for suppression of 5-LO product synthesis in human neutrophils. These triterpene acids were also investigated for their direct interference with 5-LO and cathepsin G in cell-free assays. Furthermore, our studies were expanded to 10 semi-synthetic BA derivatives. Our data reveal that besides BAs, several tetra- and pentacyclic triterpene acids are effective or even superior inhibitors of 5-LO product formation in human neutrophils, and in parallel, inhibit cathepsin G. Their beneficial target profile may qualify triterpene acids as anti-inflammatory natural products and pharmacological leads for intervention with diseases related to aging.

  19. Prevalence and clinical significance of cathepsin G antibodies in systemic sclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Favaro

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: To evaluate the prevalence and clinical significance of cathepsin G antibodies in patients affected with systemic sclerosis (SSc, scleroderma. Methods: 115 patients affected by SSc, 55 (47,8% with diffuse scleroderma (dSSc and 60 (52,2% with limited scleroderma (lSSc, were tested for cathepsin G antibodies by ELISA method. Moreover these sera were evaluated by indirect immunofluorescence (IIF on ethanol and formalin fixed human neutrophils. Results: By means of the ELISA method 16 (13,9% patients were found to be sera positive for anti-cathepsin G, 2 (12.5% of which showed a perinuclear fluorescence pattern (P-ANCA and 4 (25% an atypical ANCA staining, while 10 (62,5% were negative on IIF. The IIF on scleroderma sera revealed 5 (4,3% P-ANCA and 18 (15,7% atypical ANCA patterns. The anti-cathepsin G antibodies significantly prevailed in scleroderma sera (p=0.02 when their frequency was compared with that of healthy controls; while they were not significantly associated to any clinical or serological features of SSc patients. Conclusions: The anti-cathepsin G antibodies were significantly frequent in scleroderma sera; however, no clinical correlations were found. Thus, the significance of their presence in SSc still needs to be clarified.

  20. Bifunctional Probes of Cathepsin Protease Activity and pH Reveal Alterations in Endolysosomal pH during Bacterial Infection

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sanman, L.E.; Linden, W.A. van der; Verdoes, M.; Bogyo, M.

    2016-01-01

    Cysteine cathepsins are lysosomal proteases involved in regulation of both normal cellular processes and disease. Biochemical studies with peptide substrates indicate that cathepsins have optimal activity at acidic pH and highly attenuated activity at neutral pH. In contrast, there is mounting

  1. TAILS N-Terminomics and Proteomics Show Protein Degradation Dominates over Proteolytic Processing by Cathepsins in Pancreatic Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Prudova

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Deregulated cathepsin proteolysis occurs across numerous cancers, but in vivo substrates mediating tumorigenesis remain ill-defined. Applying 8-plex iTRAQ terminal amine isotopic labeling of substrates (TAILS, a systems-level N-terminome degradomics approach, we identified cathepsin B, H, L, S, and Z in vivo substrates and cleavage sites with the use of six different cathepsin knockout genotypes in the Rip1-Tag2 mouse model of pancreatic neuroendocrine tumorigenesis. Among 1,935 proteins and 1,114 N termini identified by TAILS, stable proteolytic products were identified in wild-type tumors compared with one or more different cathepsin knockouts (17%–44% of 139 cleavages. This suggests a lack of compensation at the substrate level by other cathepsins. The majority of neo-N termini (56%–83% for all cathepsins was consistent with protein degradation. We validated substrates, including the glycolytic enzyme pyruvate kinase M2 associated with the Warburg effect, the ER chaperone GRP78, and the oncoprotein prothymosin-alpha. Thus, the identification of cathepsin substrates in tumorigenesis improves the understanding of cathepsin functions in normal physiology and cancer.

  2. Changes in collagenous tissue microstructures and distributions of cathepsin L in body wall of autolytic sea cucumber (Stichopus japonicus).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yu-Xin; Zhou, Da-Yong; Ma, Dong-Dong; Liu, Yan-Fei; Li, Dong-Mei; Dong, Xiu-Ping; Tan, Ming-Qian; Du, Ming; Zhu, Bei-Wei

    2016-12-01

    The autolysis of sea cucumber (Stichopus japonicus) was induced by ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, and the changes of microstructures of collagenous tissues and distributions of cathepsin L were investigated using histological and histochemical techniques. Intact collagen fibers in fresh S. japonicus dermis were disaggregated into collagen fibrils after UV stimuli. Cathepsin L was identified inside the surface of vacuoles in the fresh S. japonicus dermis cells. After the UV stimuli, the membranes of vacuoles and cells were fused together, and cathepsin L was released from cells and diffused into tissues. The density of cathepsin L was positively correlated with the speed and degree of autolysis in different layers of body wall. Our results revealed that lysosomal cathepsin L was released from cells in response to UV stimuli, which contacts and degrades the extracellular substrates such as collagen fibers, and thus participates in the autolysis of S. japonicus. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cathepsin F cysteine protease of the human liver fluke, Opisthorchis viverrini.

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    Porntip Pinlaor

    Full Text Available The liver fluke Opisthorchis viverrini is classified as a class I carcinogen due to the association between cholangiocarcinoma and chronic O. viverrini infection. During its feeding activity within the bile duct, the parasite secretes several cathepsin F cysteine proteases that may induce or contribute to the pathologies associated with hepatobiliary abnormalities.Here, we describe the cDNA, gene organization, phylogenetic relationships, immunolocalization, and functional characterization of the cathepsin F cysteine protease gene, here termed Ov-cf-1, from O. viverrini. The full length mRNA of 1020 nucleotides (nt encoded a 326 amino acid zymogen consisting of a predicted signal peptide (18 amino acids, aa, prosegment (95 aa, and mature protease (213 aa. BLAST analysis using the Ov-CF-1 protein as the query revealed that the protease shared identity with cathepsin F-like cysteine proteases of other trematodes, including Clonorchis sinensis (81%, Paragonimus westermani (58%, Schistosoma mansoni and S. japonicum (52%, and with vertebrate cathepsin F (51%. Transcripts encoding the protease were detected in all developmental stages that parasitize the mammalian host. The Ov-cf-1 gene, of approximately 3 kb in length, included seven exons interrupted by six introns; the exons ranged from 69 to 267 bp in length, the introns from 43 to 1,060 bp. The six intron/exon boundaries of Ov-cf-1 were conserved with intron/exon boundaries in the human cathepsin F gene, although the gene structure of human cathepsin F is more complex. Unlike Ov-CF-1, human cathepsin F zymogen includes a cystatin domain in the prosegment region. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that the fluke, human, and other cathepsin Fs branched together in a clade discrete from the cathepsin L cysteine proteases. A recombinant Ov-CF-1 zymogen that displayed low-level activity was expressed in the yeast Pichia pastoris. Although the recombinant protease did not autocatalytically process and

  4. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) and cathepsin K contribute differently to osteoclastic activities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Delaissé, Jean-Marie; Andersen, Thomas L; Engsig, Michael T

    2003-01-01

    The best established proteolytic event of osteoclasts is bone matrix solubilization by the cysteine proteinase cathepsin K. Here, however, we draw the attention on osteoclastic activities depending on matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). We discuss the observations supporting that MMPs contribute...... significantly to bone matrix solubilization in specific areas of the skeleton and in some developmental and pathological situations. Our discussion takes into account (1) the characteristics of the bone remodeling persisting in the absence of cathepsin K, (2) the ultrastructure of the resorption zone...... in response to inactivation of MMPs and of cathepsin K in different bone types, (3) bone resorption levels in MMP knockout mice compared to wild-type mice, (4) the identification of MMPs in osteoclasts and surrounding cells, and (5) the effect of different bone pathologies on the serum concentrations...

  5. Pharmacodynamic Monitoring of RO5459072, a Small Molecule Inhibitor of Cathepsin S

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michel Theron

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII-restricted antigen priming of CD4+ T cells is both involved in adaptive immune responses and the pathogenesis of autoimmune diseases. Degradation of invariant chain Ii, a protein that prevents premature peptide loading, is a prerequisite for nascent MHCII–peptide complex formation. A key proteolytic step in this process is mediated by cathepsin S. Inhibition of this cysteine protease is known to result in the intracellular accumulation of Lip10 in B cells. Here, we describe the development and application of a neoepitope-based flow cytometry assay measuring accumulation of Lip10. This novel method enabled the investigation of cathepsin S-dependent MHCII maturation in professional antigen-presenting cell (APC subsets. Inhibition of cathepsin S by a specific inhibitor, RO5459072, in human PBMC ex vivo resulted in accumulation of Lip10 in B cells and myeloid dendritic cells, but not in plasmacytoid dendritic cells and only to a minor degree in monocytes. We qualified Lip10 as a pharmacodynamic biomarker by showing the cathepsin S inhibitor-dependent accumulation of Lip10 in vivo in cynomolgus monkeys treated with RO5459072. Finally, dosing of RO5459072 in a first-in-human clinical study (www.ClinicalTrials.gov, identifier NCT02295332 exhibited a dose-dependent increase in Lip10, confirming target engagement and demonstrating desired pharmacologic inhibition in vivo. The degree of cathepsin S antagonist-induced maximum Lip10 accumulation in APCs varied significantly between individuals both in vitro and in vivo. This finding has not been reported previously using alternative, less sensitive methods and demands further investigation as to the potential of this biomarker to predict response to treatment. These results will help guide subsequent clinical studies investigating the pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic relationship of cathepsin S inhibitor RO5459072 after multiple dosing.

  6. C2K77 ELISA detects cleavage of type II collagen by cathepsin K in equine articular cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noé, B; Poole, A R; Mort, J S; Richard, H; Beauchamp, G; Laverty, S

    2017-12-01

    Develop a species-specific ELISA for a neo-epitope generated by cathepsin K cleavage of equine type II collagen to: (1) measure cartilage type II collagen degradation by cathepsin K in vitro, (2) identify cytokines that upregulate cathepsin K expression and (3) compare cathepsin K with matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) collagenase activity in stimulated cartilage explants and freshly isolated normal and osteoarthritic (OA) articular cartilages. A new ELISA (C2K77) was developed and tested by measuring the activity of exogenous cathepsin K on equine articular cartilage explants. The ELISA was then employed to measure endogenous cathepsin K activity in cultured cartilage explants with or without stimulation by interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β), tumour necrosis-alpha (TNF-α), oncostatin M (OSM) and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Cathepsin K activity in cartilage explants (control and osteoarthritic-OA) and freshly harvested cartilage (control and OA) was compared to that of MMPs employing C2K77 and C1,2C immunoassays. The addition of Cathepsin K to normal cartilage caused a significant increase (P K77 epitope release. Whereas the content of C1,2C, that reflects MMP collagenase activity, was increased in media by the addition to cartilage explants of TNF-α and OSM (P K77 which also unchanged in OA cartilages compared to normal. The ELISA C2K77 measured the activity of cathepsin K in equine cartilage which was unchanged in OA cartilage. Cytokines that upregulate MMP collagenase activity had no effect on endogenous cathepsin K activity, suggesting a different activation mechanism that requires further study. Copyright © 2017 Osteoarthritis Research Society International. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Cathepsin Gene Family Reveals Transcriptome Patterns Related to the Infective Stages of the Salmon Louse Caligus rogercresseyi.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waleska Maldonado-Aguayo

    Full Text Available Cathepsins are proteases involved in the ability of parasites to overcome and/or modulate host defenses so as to complete their own lifecycle. However, the mechanisms underlying this ability of cathepsins are still poorly understood. One excellent model for identifying and exploring the molecular functions of cathepsins is the marine ectoparasitic copepod Caligus rogercresseyi that currently affects the Chilean salmon industry. Using high-throughput transcriptome sequencing, 56 cathepsin-like sequences were found distributed in five cysteine protease groups (B, F, L, Z, and S as well as in an aspartic protease group (D. Ontogenic transcriptome analysis evidenced that L cathepsins were the most abundant during the lifecycle, while cathepsins B and K were mostly expressed in the larval stages and adult females, thus suggesting participation in the molting processes and embryonic development, respectively. Interestingly, a variety of cathepsins from groups Z, L, D, B, K, and S were upregulated in the infective stage of copepodid, corroborating the complexity of the processes involved in the parasitic success of this copepod. Putative functional roles of cathepsins were conjectured based on the differential expressions found and on roles previously described in other phylogenetically related species. Moreover, 140 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNP were identified in transcripts annotated for cysteine and aspartic proteases located into untranslated regions, or the coding region. This study reports for the first time the presence of cathepsin-like genes and differential expressions throughout a copepod lifecycle. The identification of cathepsins together with functional validations represents a valuable strategy for pinpointing target molecules that could be used in the development of new delousing drugs or vaccines against C. rogercresseyi.

  8. Cathepsin B & L are not required for ebola virus replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Marzi

    Full Text Available Ebola virus (EBOV, family Filoviridae, emerged in 1976 on the African continent. Since then it caused several outbreaks of viral hemorrhagic fever in humans with case fatality rates up to 90% and remains a serious Public Health concern and biothreat pathogen. The most pathogenic and best-studied species is Zaire ebolavirus (ZEBOV. EBOV encodes one viral surface glycoprotein (GP, which is essential for replication, a determinant of pathogenicity and an important immunogen. GP mediates viral entry through interaction with cellular surface molecules, which results in the uptake of virus particles via macropinocytosis. Later in this pathway endosomal acidification activates the cysteine proteases Cathepsin B and L (CatB, CatL, which have been shown to cleave ZEBOV-GP leading to subsequent exposure of the putative receptor-binding and fusion domain and productive infection. We studied the effect of CatB and CatL on in vitro and in vivo replication of EBOV. Similar to previous findings, our results show an effect of CatB, but not CatL, on ZEBOV entry into cultured cells. Interestingly, cell entry by other EBOV species (Bundibugyo, Côte d'Ivoire, Reston and Sudan ebolavirus was independent of CatB or CatL as was EBOV replication in general. To investigate whether CatB and CatL have a role in vivo during infection, we utilized the mouse model for ZEBOV. Wild-type (control, catB(-/- and catL(-/- mice were equally susceptible to lethal challenge with mouse-adapted ZEBOV with no difference in virus replication and time to death. In conclusion, our results show that CatB and CatL activity is not required for EBOV replication. Furthermore, EBOV glycoprotein cleavage seems to be mediated by an array of proteases making targeted therapeutic approaches difficult.

  9. Cathepsin K expression is increased in oral lichen planus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siponen, Maria; Bitu, Carolina Cavalcante; Al-Samadi, Ahmed; Nieminen, Pentti; Salo, Tuula

    2016-11-01

    Oral lichen planus (OLP) is an idiopathic T-cell-mediated mucosal inflammatory disease. Cathepsin K (Cat K) is one of the lysosomal cysteine proteases. It is involved in many pathological conditions, including osteoporosis and cancer. The expression and role of Cat K in OLP are unknown. Twenty-five oral mucosal specimens diagnosed histopathologically as OLP and fourteen healthy controls (HC) were used to study the immunohistochemical (IHC) expression of Cat K. Colocalization of Cat K with CD1a, Melan-A, CD68, CD45, mast cell tryptase (MCT), and Toll-like receptors (TLRs) 4 and 9 were studied using double IHC and/or immunofluorescence (IF) staining. Expression of Cat K was also evaluated in OLP tissue samples before and after topical tacrolimus treatment. Cat K was expressed in a higher percentage of cells in the epithelial zone, and the staining intensity was stronger in the stroma in OLP compared to controls (P < 0.001). In OLP, Cat K was present mostly in melanocytes and macrophages and sporadically in basal keratinocytes, endothelial cells, and extracellularly. Cat K was found also in some fibroblasts in HC and OLP samples. Coexpression of Cat K and TLRs 4 and 9 was seen in some dendritic cells (presumably melanocytes) and macrophages. In OLP, tacrolimus treatment reduced the expression of Cat K in the epithelium but increased it in the stroma. These results suggest that Cat K is involved in the pathogenesis of OLP. Cat K possibly takes part in the modulation of matrix molecules and cellular receptors. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Effective DNA Inhibitors of Cathepsin G by In Vitro Selection

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    Manlio Palumbo

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Cathepsin G (CatG is a chymotrypsin-like protease released upon degranulation of neutrophils. In several inflammatory and ischaemic diseases the impaired balance between CatG and its physiological inhibitors leads to tissue destruction and platelet aggregation. Inhibitors of CatG are suitable for the treatment of inflammatory diseases and procoagulant conditions. DNA released upon the death of neutrophils at injury sites binds CatG. Moreover, short DNA fragments are more inhibitory than genomic DNA. Defibrotide, a single stranded polydeoxyribonucleotide with antithrombotic effect is also a potent CatG inhibitor. Given the above experimental evidences we employed a selection protocol to assess whether DNA inhibition of CatG may be ascribed to specific sequences present in defibrotide DNA. A Selex protocol was applied to identify the single-stranded DNA sequences exhibiting the highest affinity for CatG, the diversity of a combinatorial pool of oligodeoxyribonucleotides being a good representation of the complexity found in defibrotide. Biophysical and biochemical studies confirmed that the selected sequences bind tightly to the target enzyme and also efficiently inhibit its catalytic activity. Sequence analysis carried out to unveil a motif responsible for CatG recognition showed a recurrence of alternating TG repeats in the selected CatG binders, adopting an extended conformation that grants maximal interaction with the highly charged protein surface. This unprecedented finding is validated by our results showing high affinity and inhibition of CatG by specific DNA sequences of variable length designed to maximally reduce pairing/folding interactions.

  11. Proteolytic activity in Fasciola hepatica is reduced by the administration of cathepsin L mimotopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa-Mancera, A; Quiroz-Romero, H; Correa, D; Alonso, R A

    2011-03-01

    The objective of this study was to assess the proteolytic activity of Fasciola hepatica cathepsins in liver sections from mice vaccinated with phage clones of cathepsin L mimotopes, using the film in situ zymography technique. Female BALB/c mice were immunized three times with 2.5 x 10¹¹ phage particles without adjuvant. Animals vaccinated with phage clones produced high titres of anti-mimotope antibodies and a significant reduction in fluke burden was observed following challenge with metacercariae of F. hepatica. The proteolytic activity in hepatic tissue was reduced after the immunization with phage clones.

  12. Novel cathepsin B and cathepsin B-like cysteine protease of Naegleria fowleri excretory-secretory proteins and their biochemical properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jinyoung; Kim, Jong-Hyun; Sohn, Hae-Jin; Yang, Hee-Jong; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Chwae, Yong-Joon; Park, Sun; Kim, Kyongmin; Shin, Ho-Joon

    2014-08-01

    Naegleria fowleri causes a lethal primary amoebic meningoencephalitis (PAM) in humans and experimental animals, which leads to death within 7-14 days. Cysteine proteases of parasites play key roles in nutrient uptake, excystment/encystment, host tissue invasion, and immune evasion. In this study, we cloned N. fowleri cathepsin B (nfcpb) and cathepsin B-like (nfcpb-L) genes from our cDNA library of N. fowleri. The full-length sequences of genes were 1,038 and 939 bp (encoded 345 and 313 amino acids), and molecular weights were 38.4 and 34 kDa, respectively. Also, nfcpb and nfcpb-L showed a 56 and 46 % identity to Naegleria gruberi cathepsin B and cathepsin B-like enzyme, respectively. Recombinant NfCPB (rNfCPB) and NfCPB-L (rNfCPB-L) proteins were expressed by the pEX5-NT/TOPO vector that was transformed into Escherichia coli BL21, and they showed 38.4 and 34 kDa bands on sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) and Western blot analysis using their respective antibodies. Proteolytic activity of refolded rNfCPB and rNfCPB-L was maximum at a pH of 4.5, and the most effective substrate was Z-LR-MCA. rNfCPB and rNfCPB-L showed proteolytic activity for several proteins such as IgA, IgG, IgM, collagen, fibronectin, hemoglobin, and albumin. These results suggested that NfCPB and NfCPB-L cysteine protease are important components of the N. fowleri ESP, and they may play important roles in host tissue invasion and immune evasion as pathogens that cause N. fowleri PAM.

  13. Differential Role of Cathepsins S and B In Hepatic APC-Mediated NKT Cell Activation and Cytokine Secretion

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    Álvaro de Mingo Pulido

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer T (NKT cells exhibit a specific tissue distribution, displaying the liver the highest NKT/conventional T cell ratio. Upon antigen stimulation, NKT cells secrete Th1 cytokines, including interferon γ (IFNγ, and Th2 cytokines, including IL-4 that recruit and activate other innate immune cells to exacerbate inflammatory responses in the liver. Cysteine cathepsins control hepatic inflammation by regulating κB-dependent gene expression. However, the contribution of cysteine cathepsins other than Cathepsin S to NKT cell activation has remained largely unexplored. Here we report that cysteine cathepsins, cathepsin B (CTSB and cathepsin S (CTSS, regulate different aspects of NKT cell activation. Inhibition of CTSB or CTSS reduced hepatic NKT cell expansion in a mouse model after LPS challenge. By contrast, only CTSS inhibition reduced IFNγ and IL-4 secretion after in vivo α-GalCer administration. Accordingly, in vitro studies reveal that only CTSS was able to control α-GalCer-dependent loading in antigen-presenting cells (APCs, probably due to altered endolysosomal protein degradation. In summary, our study discloses the participation of cysteine cathepsins, CTSB and CTSS, in the activation of NKT cells in vivo and in vitro.

  14. Differential Role of Cathepsins S and B In Hepatic APC-Mediated NKT Cell Activation and Cytokine Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Mingo Pulido, Álvaro; de Gregorio, Estefanía; Chandra, Shilpi; Colell, Anna; Morales, Albert; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Marí, Montserrat

    2018-01-01

    Natural killer T (NKT) cells exhibit a specific tissue distribution, displaying the liver the highest NKT/conventional T cell ratio. Upon antigen stimulation, NKT cells secrete Th1 cytokines, including interferon γ (IFNγ), and Th2 cytokines, including IL-4 that recruit and activate other innate immune cells to exacerbate inflammatory responses in the liver. Cysteine cathepsins control hepatic inflammation by regulating κB-dependent gene expression. However, the contribution of cysteine cathepsins other than Cathepsin S to NKT cell activation has remained largely unexplored. Here we report that cysteine cathepsins, cathepsin B (CTSB) and cathepsin S (CTSS), regulate different aspects of NKT cell activation. Inhibition of CTSB or CTSS reduced hepatic NKT cell expansion in a mouse model after LPS challenge. By contrast, only CTSS inhibition reduced IFNγ and IL-4 secretion after in vivo α-GalCer administration. Accordingly, in vitro studies reveal that only CTSS was able to control α-GalCer-dependent loading in antigen-presenting cells (APCs), probably due to altered endolysosomal protein degradation. In summary, our study discloses the participation of cysteine cathepsins, CTSB and CTSS, in the activation of NKT cells in vivo and in vitro .

  15. Live imaging of cysteine-cathepsin activity reveals dynamics of focal inflammation, angiogenesis, and polyp growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elias Gounaris

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available It has been estimated that up to 30% of detectable polyps in patients regress spontaneously. One major challenge in the evaluation of effective therapy of cancer is the readout for tumor regression and favorable biological response to therapy. Inducible near infra-red (NIR fluorescent probes were utilized to visualize intestinal polyps of mice hemizygous for a novel truncation of the Adenomatous Polyposis coli (APC gene. Laser Scanning Confocal Microscopy in live mice allowed visualization of cathepsin activity in richly vascularized benign dysplastic lesions. Using biotinylated suicide inhibitors we quantified increased activities of the Cathepsin B & Z in the polyps. More than (3/4 of the probe signal was localized in CD11b(+Gr1(+ myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC and CD11b(+F4/80(+ macrophages infiltrating the lesions. Polyposis was attenuated through genetic ablation of cathepsin B, and suppressed by neutralization of TNFalpha in mice. In both cases, diminished probe signal was accounted for by loss of MDSC. Thus, in vivo NIR imaging of focal cathepsin activity reveals inflammatory reactions etiologically linked with cancer progression and is a suitable approach for monitoring response to therapy.

  16. Localization profile of Cathepsin L in the brain of African giant rat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Strong labeling in the hypothalamus was present in the anterior commissure and median eminencewhile in the cerebellum cathepsin L was observed in the deep white matter, granule cell layer, stellate, and basket cells of cerebellar cortex and in the Purkinje neurons. The distribution pattern and functional implications of ...

  17. RNA interference of Trypanosoma brucei cathepsin B and L affects disease progression in a mouse model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maha-Hamadien Abdulla

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available We investigated the roles played by the cysteine proteases cathepsin B and cathepsin L (brucipain in the pathogenesis of Trypansoma brucei brucei in both an in vivo mouse model and an in vitro model of the blood-brain barrier. Doxycycline induction of RNAi targeting cathepsin B led to parasite clearance from the bloodstream and prevent a lethal infection in the mice. In contrast, all mice infected with T. brucei containing the uninduced Trypanosoma brucei cathepsin B (TbCatB RNA construct died by day 13. Induction of RNAi against brucipain did not cure mice from infection; however, 50% of these mice survived 60 days longer than uninduced controls. The ability of T. b. brucei to cross an in vitro model of the human blood-brain barrier was also reduced by brucipain RNAi induction. Taken together, the data suggest that while TbCatB is the more likely target for the development of new chemotherapy, a possible role for brucipain is in facilitating parasite entry into the brain.

  18. Are Proteinase 3 and Cathepsin C Enzymes Related to Pathogenesis of Periodontitis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oya Türkoğlu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. Cathepsin C is the activator of the polymorphonuclear leukocyte-derived proteinase 3, which contributes to inflammatory processes. The aim of the present study was to investigate gingival crevicular fluid (GCF proteinase 3 and cathepsin C levels in periodontal diseases. Design. Eighteen patients with chronic periodontitis (CP, 20 patients with generalized aggressive periodontitis (G-AgP, 20 patients with gingivitis, and 18 healthy subjects were included in the study. Periodontal parameters including probing depth, clinical attachment level, papilla bleeding index, and plaque index were assessed in all study subjects. GCF proteinase 3 and cathepsin C levels were analyzed by ELISA. Results. GCF proteinase 3 total amount was significantly higher in diseased groups compared to control group, after adjusting age P0.05. Periodontal parameters of sampling sites were positively correlated with GCF proteinase 3 total amounts P0.05. Conclusions. Elevated levels of GCF proteinase 3 in CP, G-AgP, and gingivitis might suggest that proteinase 3 plays a role during inflammatory periodontal events in host response. However, cathepsin C in GCF does not seem to have an effect on the pathogenesis of periodontal diseases.

  19. Estrogen regulates the expression of cathepsin E-A-like gene via ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    徐春林

    by estrogen, and the regulative effect was predominantly mediated via ER-β in chicken liver. Keywords: Estrogen ... the RNA-seq technique to investigate the mechanism of hepatic lipid metabolism (Li et al. 2015). ... To clone the cathepsin E-A-like gene and investigate the effect of estrogen on expression of the gene, a total ...

  20. Involvement of cathepsin B in mitochondrial apoptosis by p-phenylenediamine under ambient UV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goyal, Shruti; Amar, Saroj Kumar [Photobiology Division, CSIR – Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box No. 80, M.G. Marg, Lucknow 226001, Uttar Pradesh (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, CSIR-IITR Campus, Lucknow (India); Dubey, Divya; Pal, Manish Kumar [Photobiology Division, CSIR – Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box No. 80, M.G. Marg, Lucknow 226001, Uttar Pradesh (India); Singh, Jyoti [Photobiology Division, CSIR – Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box No. 80, M.G. Marg, Lucknow 226001, Uttar Pradesh (India); Academy of Scientific and Innovative Research, CSIR-IITR Campus, Lucknow (India); Verma, Ankit; Kushwaha, Hari Narayan [Photobiology Division, CSIR – Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box No. 80, M.G. Marg, Lucknow 226001, Uttar Pradesh (India); Ray, Ratan Singh, E-mail: ratanray.2011@rediffmail.com [Photobiology Division, CSIR – Indian Institute of Toxicology Research, Post Box No. 80, M.G. Marg, Lucknow 226001, Uttar Pradesh (India)

    2015-12-30

    Highlights: • Photodegradation and formation of photoproduct. • Involvement of ROS in PPD phototoxicity. • Role of ROS in DNA damage, CPD and micronuclei formation. • PPD induced lysosomal destabilization and release of cathepsin B. • Cleavage of Bid and activation of mitochondrial apoptosis. - Abstract: Paraphenylenediamine (PPD), a derivative of paranitroaniline has been most commonly used as an ingredient of oxidative hair dye and permanent tattoos. We have studied the phototoxic potential of PPD under ambient ultraviolet radiation. PPD is photodegraded and form a novel photoproduct under UV A exposure. PPD shows a concentration dependent decrease in cell viability of human Keratinocyte cells (HaCaT) through MTT and NRU test. Significant intracellular ROS generation was measured by DCFDA assay. It caused an oxidative DNA damage via single stranded DNA breaks, micronuclei and CPD formation. Both lysosome and mitochondria is main target for PPD induced apoptosis which was proved through lysosomal destabilization and release of cathepsin B by immunofluorescence, real time PCR and western blot analysis. Cathepsin B process BID to active tBID which induces the release of cytochrome C from mitochondria. Mitochondrial depolarization was reported through transmission electron microscopy. The cathepsin inhibitor reduced the release of cytochrome C in PPD treated cells. Thus study suggests that PPD leads to apoptosis via the involvement of lysosome and mitochondria both under ambient UV radiation. Therefore, photosensitizing nature of hair dye ingredients should be tested before coming to market as a cosmetic product for the safety of human beings.

  1. Involvement of cathepsin B in mitochondrial apoptosis by p-phenylenediamine under ambient UV radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Goyal, Shruti; Amar, Saroj Kumar; Dubey, Divya; Pal, Manish Kumar; Singh, Jyoti; Verma, Ankit; Kushwaha, Hari Narayan; Ray, Ratan Singh

    2015-01-01

    Highlights: • Photodegradation and formation of photoproduct. • Involvement of ROS in PPD phototoxicity. • Role of ROS in DNA damage, CPD and micronuclei formation. • PPD induced lysosomal destabilization and release of cathepsin B. • Cleavage of Bid and activation of mitochondrial apoptosis. - Abstract: Paraphenylenediamine (PPD), a derivative of paranitroaniline has been most commonly used as an ingredient of oxidative hair dye and permanent tattoos. We have studied the phototoxic potential of PPD under ambient ultraviolet radiation. PPD is photodegraded and form a novel photoproduct under UV A exposure. PPD shows a concentration dependent decrease in cell viability of human Keratinocyte cells (HaCaT) through MTT and NRU test. Significant intracellular ROS generation was measured by DCFDA assay. It caused an oxidative DNA damage via single stranded DNA breaks, micronuclei and CPD formation. Both lysosome and mitochondria is main target for PPD induced apoptosis which was proved through lysosomal destabilization and release of cathepsin B by immunofluorescence, real time PCR and western blot analysis. Cathepsin B process BID to active tBID which induces the release of cytochrome C from mitochondria. Mitochondrial depolarization was reported through transmission electron microscopy. The cathepsin inhibitor reduced the release of cytochrome C in PPD treated cells. Thus study suggests that PPD leads to apoptosis via the involvement of lysosome and mitochondria both under ambient UV radiation. Therefore, photosensitizing nature of hair dye ingredients should be tested before coming to market as a cosmetic product for the safety of human beings.

  2. Fasciola gigantica cathepsin L proteinase-based synthetic peptide for immunodiagnosis and prevention of sheep fasciolosis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Ježek, Jan; El Ridi, R.; Salah, M.; Wagih, A.; Aziz, H. W.; Tallima, H.; El Shafie, M. H.; Khalek, T. A.; Ammou, F. F. A.; Strongylis, C.; Moussis, V.; Tsikaris, V.

    2008-01-01

    Roč. 90, č. 3 (2008), s. 349-357 ISSN 0006-3525 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : cathepsin L proteinase * peptides * sequential oligopeptide carriers * synthetic peptide vaccine * Fasciiola gigantica Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 2.823, year: 2008

  3. Fibrinogen and fibrin are novel substrates for Fasciola hepatica cathepsin L peptidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mebius, Mirjam M; Op Heij, Jody M J; Tielens, Aloysius G M; de Groot, Philip G; Urbanus, Rolf T; van Hellemond, Jaap J

    2018-02-04

    Cathepsin peptidases form a major component of the secreted proteins of the blood-feeding trematodes Fasciola hepatica and Schistosoma mansoni. These peptidases fulfill many functions, from facilitating infection to feeding and immune evasion. In this study, we examined the Fasciola cathepsin L peptidases FhCL1, FhCL2, and FhCL3 and the schistosomal cathepsin peptidases SmCB1 and SmCL3 for their anticoagulant properties. Although no direct anticoagulant effect of these peptidases was observed, we discovered that cathepsin peptidases from Fasciola, but not from Schistosoma, were able to degrade purified fibrinogen, with FhCL1 having the highest fibrinogenolytic activity. Additionally, FhCL1 and FhCL2 both efficiently degraded fibrin. The lack of a direct anticoagulant or fibrinolytic effect of these peptidases is explained by their inhibition by plasma components. However, within the parasite gut, high concentrations of these peptidases could induce an anticoagulant environment, facilitating blood-feeding for extended periods. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Molecular determinants of improved cathepsin B inhibition by new cystatins obtained by DNA shuffling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Garratt Richard C

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cystatins are inhibitors of cysteine proteases. The majority are only weak inhibitors of human cathepsin B, which has been associated with cancer, Alzheimer's disease and arthritis. Results Starting from the sequences of oryzacystatin-1 and canecystatin-1, a shuffling library was designed and a hybrid clone obtained, which presented higher inhibitory activity towards cathepsin B. This clone presented two unanticipated point mutations as well as an N-terminal deletion. Reversing each point mutation independently or both simultaneously abolishes the inhibitory activity towards cathepsin B. Homology modeling together with experimental studies of the reverse mutants revealed the likely molecular determinants of the improved inhibitory activity to be related to decreased protein stability. Conclusion A combination of experimental approaches including gene shuffling, enzyme assays and reverse mutation allied to molecular modeling has shed light upon the unexpected inhibitory properties of certain cystatin mutants against Cathepsin B. We conclude that mutations disrupting the hydrophobic core of phytocystatins increase the flexibility of the N-terminus, leading to an increase in inhibitory activity. Such mutations need not affect the inhibitory site directly but may be observed distant from it and manifest their effects via an uncoupling of its three components as a result of increased protein flexibility.

  5. A novel nonsense mutation in cathepsin C gene in an Egyptian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A novel nonsense mutation in cathepsin C gene in an Egyptian patient presenting with Papillon–Lefe`vre syndrome. ... Egyptian Journal of Medical Human Genetics ... Aim: The aim of this study is to detect the mutation in CTSC gene expected to be the cause of Papillon Lefe`vre syndrome (PLS) in an Egyptian patient ...

  6. Parasite Cathepsin D-Like Peptidases and Their Relevance as Therapeutic Targets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sojka, D.; Hartmann, D.; Bartošová-Sojková, P.; Dvořák, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 9 (2016), s. 708-723 ISSN 1471-4922 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-11043S; GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/11/1481 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : aspartic peptidases * cathepsin D * hemoglobinolysis * parasites * vectors Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 6.333, year: 2016

  7. Effects of RNAi-mediated cathepsin L gene silencing on bionomics ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    USER

    2010-08-02

    Aug 2, 2010 ... The changes of cell cycle and apoptosis were observed by flow cytometry. The changes of invasiveness of hepatoma carcinoma cells were detected by Boyden chamber. Compared with the blank group and fluorescence control group, mRNA and protein level of cathepsin L decreased significantly, and cell.

  8. Individual cathepsins degrade immune complexes internalized by antigen-presenting cells via Fcgamma receptors.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Driessen, C.A.G.G.; Lennon-Dumenil, A.M.; Ploegh, H.L.

    2001-01-01

    We have analyzed the intracellular degradation of an immune complex after its FcgammaR-mediated uptake in antigen-presenting cells (APC). Mice that lack the cathepsins (Cat) S, L, B and D allowed us to assess the direct contribution of these individual proteases to the processing events observed.

  9. Crystal structure of cathepsin A, a novel target for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreuder, Herman A., E-mail: herman.schreuder@sanofi.com; Liesum, Alexander, E-mail: alexander.liesum@sanofi.com; Kroll, Katja, E-mail: katja.kroll@sanofi.com; Böhnisch, Britta, E-mail: britta.boehnisch@sanofi.com; Buning, Christian, E-mail: christian.buning@sanofi.com; Ruf, Sven, E-mail: sven.ruf@sanofi.com; Sadowski, Thorsten, E-mail: thorsten.sadowski@sanofi.com

    2014-03-07

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • The structures of active cathepsin A and the inactive precursor are very similar. • The only major difference is the absence of a 40 residue activation domain. • The termini of the active catalytic core are held together by a disulfide bond. • Compound 1 reacts with the catalytic Ser150, building a tetrahedral intermediate. • Compound 2 is cleaved by the enzyme and a fragment remained bound. - Abstract: The lysosomal serine carboxypeptidase cathepsin A is involved in the breakdown of peptide hormones like endothelin and bradykinin. Recent pharmacological studies with cathepsin A inhibitors in rodents showed a remarkable reduction in cardiac hypertrophy and atrial fibrillation, making cathepsin A a promising target for the treatment of heart failure. Here we describe the crystal structures of activated cathepsin A without inhibitor and with two compounds that mimic the tetrahedral intermediate and the reaction product, respectively. The structure of activated cathepsin A turned out to be very similar to the structure of the inactive precursor. The only difference was the removal of a 40 residue activation domain, partially due to proteolytic removal of the activation peptide, and partially by an order–disorder transition of the peptides flanking the removed activation peptide. The termini of the catalytic core are held together by the Cys253–Cys303 disulfide bond, just before and after the activation domain. One of the compounds we soaked in our crystals reacted covalently with the catalytic Ser150 and formed a tetrahedral intermediate. The other compound got cleaved by the enzyme and a fragment, resembling one of the natural reaction products, was found in the active site. These studies establish cathepsin A as a classical serine proteinase with a well-defined oxyanion hole. The carboxylate group of the cleavage product is bound by a hydrogen-bonding network involving one aspartate and two glutamate side chains

  10. Synthetic cyclohexenyl chalcone natural products possess cytotoxic activities against prostate cancer cells and inhibit cysteine cathepsins in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deb Majumdar, Ishita; Devanabanda, Arvind; Fox, Benjamin; Schwartzman, Jacob; Cong, Huan; Porco, John A; Weber, Horst C

    2011-12-16

    A number of cyclohexenyl chalcone Diels-Alder natural products possess promising biological properties including strong cytotoxicity in various human cancer cells. Herein, we show that natural products in this class including panduratin A and nicolaioidesin C inhibit cysteine cathepsins as indicated by protease profiling assays and cell-free cathepsin L enzyme assays. Owing to the critical roles of cathepsins in the biology of human tumor progression, invasion, and metastasis, these findings should pave the way for development of novel antitumor agents for use in clinical settings. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Cathepsin D gene Expression in Stomach: Its Association with Age, Sex, and Menopausal status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reza Abedi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Background & Objectives :Gastric cancer is 2-4 folds higher in men than women. Sex hormones are one of the leading causes of sexual dimorphism in incidence of gastric cancer. The aim of this study is to compare Cathepsin D and Caspase-7 gene expressions in the gastric tissue of normal men and women. Materials & Methods :In this cross-sectional study, gastric antrum tissue samples were collected from 21 healthy females and 21 males in the three age groups including 35, 35-50, and over 50 years. Following RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis, the expressions of genes were compared between men and women via semi-quantitative Reverse Transcription-PCR method. The obtained data were analyzed, using the statistical T-Test and ANOVA. Results: Statical analyses confirmed that the expression of Cathepsin D gene was significantly higher in men under 35 than those in the range of 35-50 years (p=0.04. In addition, the expression of Cathepsin D gene was significantly 10 folds in pre-menopause than post-menopause women and men (post-menopause women and men as one group (p=0.008. Furthermore, the expression of Cathepsin D gene between men and women was significant at borderline (p=0.056. Conclusion: The findings of the present research indicate that the expression of Cathepsin D is higher in pre-menopause than post-menopause women and men, and is greater in men under 35 than those in the range of 35-50 years.

  12. Cathepsin L gene expression and promoter activation in rodent granulosa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sriraman, Venkataraman; Richards, JoAnne S

    2004-02-01

    The cysteine protease cathepsin L exhibits hormone-regulated expression during ovulation. In situ hybridization analyses of immature and pregnant mare serum gonadotropin-treated mouse and rat ovaries showed that cathepsin L expression in granulosa cells of small, growing follicles increased in periovulatory follicles after human chorionic gonadotropin stimulation. In the rat ovary, cathepsin L was also expressed in follicles with signs of atresia. To determine the molecular mechanisms that mediate the diverse regulation of this gene in granulosa cells, rat cathepsin L promoter-reporter constructs were analyzed by transient transfection assays in rat granulosa cells and EMSAs. A construct containing the transcriptional start site and -244 bp of upstream promoter sequence (-244/+33 bp) exhibited inducibility by forskolin, the phorbol ester phorbol myristate acetate, and an additive effect of both. Within this region, three functional specificity protein 1 (Sp1) sites, an overlapping early growth response protein-1 site, and a cAMP regulatory element-binding protein site were identified. Single or double mutants of the above-mentioned sites did not alter forskolin/phorbol myristate acetate inducibility of the promoter. Mutation of all three Sp1/specificity protein 3 (Sp3) sites, which also mutated the early growth response protein-1 site, reduced the promoter activation. Mutation of the cAMP regulatory element-binding protein site in the triple Sp1 mutant construct completely blocked the inducibility of the promoter. When these same constructs were transfected into MCF-7 human breast cancer cells or were cotransfected with an Sp1 expression vector in Drosophila SL2 cells, similar results were obtained. Collectively, the data document that three Sp1/specificity protein 3 binding GC-rich regions and a functional cAMP regulatory element constitute an important transcriptional regulatory complex for expression of the cathepsin L gene in rat granulosa cells.

  13. Multiplex zymography captures stage-specific activity profiles of cathepsins K, L, and S in human breast, lung, and cervical cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Binbin; Platt, Manu O

    2011-07-14

    Cathepsins K, L, and S are cysteine proteases upregulated in cancer and proteolyze extracellular matrix to facilitate metastasis, but difficulty distinguishing specific cathepsin activity in complex tissue extracts confounds scientific studies and employing them for use in clinical diagnoses. Here, we have developed multiplex cathepsin zymography to profile cathepsins K, L, and S activity in 10 μg human breast, lung, and cervical tumors by exploiting unique electrophoretic mobility and renaturation properties. Frozen breast, lung, and cervix cancer tissue lysates and normal organ tissue lysates from the same human patients were obtained (28 breast tissues, 23 lung tissues, and 23 cervix tissues), minced and homogenized prior to loading for cathepsin gelatin zymography to determine enzymatic activity. Cleared bands of cathepsin activity were identified and validated in tumor extracts and detected organ- and stage-specific differences in activity. Cathepsin K was unique compared to cathepsins L and S. It was significantly higher for all cancers even at the earliest stage tested (stage I for lung and cervix (n = 6, p zymography, yielded 100% sensitivity and specificity for 20 breast tissue samples tested (10 normal; 10 tumor) in part due to the consistent absence of cathepsin K in normal breast tissue across all patients. To summarize, this sensitive assay provides quantitative outputs of cathepsins K, L, and S activities from mere micrograms of tissue and has potential use as a supplement to histological methods of clinical diagnoses of biopsied human tissue.

  14. Manipulating substrate and pH in zymography protocols selectively distinguishes cathepsins K, L, S, and V activity in cells and tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilder, Catera L; Park, Keon-Young; Keegan, Philip M; Platt, Manu O

    2011-12-01

    Cathepsins K, L, S, and V are cysteine proteases that have been implicated in tissue-destructive diseases such as atherosclerosis, tumor metastasis, and osteoporosis. Among these four cathepsins are the most powerful human collagenases and elastases, and they share 60% sequence homology. Proper quantification of mature, active cathepsins has been confounded by inhibitor and reporter substrate cross-reactivity, but is necessary to develop properly dosed therapeutic applications. Here, we detail a method of multiplex cathepsin zymography to detect and distinguish the activity of mature cathepsins K, L, S, and V by exploiting differences in individual cathepsin substrate preferences, pH effects, and electrophoretic mobility under non-reducing conditions. Specific identification of cathepsins K, L, S, and V in one cell/tissue extract was obtained with cathepsin K (37 kDa), V (35 kDa), S (25 kDa), and L (20 kDa) under non-reducing conditions. Cathepsin K activity disappeared and V remained when incubated at pH 4 instead of 6. Application of this antibody free, species independent, and medium-throughput method was demonstrated with primary human monocyte-derived macrophages and osteoclasts, endothelial cells stimulated with inflammatory cytokines, and normal and cancer lung tissues, which identified elevated cathepsin V in lung cancer. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Salivary Tick Cystatin OmC2 Targets Lysosomal Cathepsins S and C in Human Dendritic Cells

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Zavasnik-Bergant, T.; Vidmar, R.; Sekirnik, A.; Fonovic, M.; Salát, Jiří; Grunclová, Lenka; Kopáček, Petr; Turk, B.

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 7, JUN 30 (2017), č. článku 288. ISSN 2235-2988 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-11043S Institutional support: RVO:60077344 Keywords : cystatin OmC2 * tick saliva * cathepsin S * cathepsin C * lysosomal proteases * dpp1 * dipeptidyl peptidase 1 * dendritic cells Subject RIV: EC - Immunology OBOR OECD: Immunology Impact factor: 4.300, year: 2016

  16. Clinical Significance of Detection of Cathepsin X and Cystatin C 
in the Sera of Patients with Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xuede ZHANG; Yanli HOU; Zequn NIU; Wei LI; Xia MENG; Na ZHANG; Shuanying YANG

    2013-01-01

    Background and objective Cathepsin X (Cat X) has been identified as a member of cathepsin family. Studies have shown that Cat X is involved in tumorigenesis and tumor development of various cancers. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between the clinicopathological prognosis and the levels of Cat X and cystatin C in the serum of patients with lung cancer. Methods Blood samples were collected from 84 patients with lung cancer and 36 healthy control subjects. Cat X and cys...

  17. Circulating cathepsin K and cystatin C in patients with cancer related bone disease: clinical and therapeutic implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tumminello, Francesca M; Flandina, Carla; Crescimanno, Marilena; Leto, Gaetano

    2008-02-01

    The clinical significance of serum cathepsin K and cystatin C was assessed in patients with breast cancer (BCa) or prostate cancer (PCa) with confined disease (M0) or bone metastasis (BM). Cathepsin K and cystatin C circulating levels were determined by ELISAs in 63 cancer patients, in 35 patients with nonmalignant diseases and in 42 healthy blood donors (control group). In BCa patients, cathepsin K serum levels were significantly lower than in sex matched control group (HS; p=0.0008) or in patients with primary osteoporosis (OP; p=0.0009). On the contrary, cystatin C levels were significantly higher in BCa patients than in HS (p=0.0001) or OP (p=0.017). In PCa patients, cathepsin K concentrations did not significantly differ from those measured in sex matched HS or in patients with benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). Conversely, cystatin C was more elevated in cancer patients than in controls (p=0.0001) or BPH patients (p=0.0078). Furthermore, in PCa patients, a positive correlation was observed between cystatin C and cathepsin K (r(S)=0.34; p=0.047). No further relationship was highlighted between these molecules and the clinicobiological parameters of BCa or PCa progression including the number of bone lesions. Moreover, ROC curve analysis showed a poor diagnostic performance of cathepsin K and cystatin C in the detection of BM patients. Interestingly, the administration of zoledronic acid (ZA), a bisphosphonate derivative endowed with a potent antiosteoclastic activity, induced in BM patients a marked increase of cathepsin K and cystatin C serum levels compared to baseline values. However, this phenomenon was statistically significant only in the PCa group. In conclusion Cystatin C and cathepsin K may be regarded as possible markers to monitor the therapeutic response to bisphosphonate treatments. Nevertheless, their clinical value as specific gauges of skeletal metastasis remains questionable.

  18. Role of receptor-mediated endocytosis, endosomal acidification and cathepsin D in cholera toxin cytotoxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Hage, Tatiana; Merlen, Clémence; Fabrega, Sylvie; Authier, François

    2007-05-01

    Using the in situ liver model system, we have recently shown that, after cholera toxin binding to hepatic cells, cholera toxin accumulates in a low-density endosomal compartment, and then undergoes endosomal proteolysis by the aspartic acid protease cathepsin-D [Merlen C, Fayol-Messaoudi D, Fabrega S, El Hage T, Servin A, Authier F (2005) FEBS J272, 4385-4397]. Here, we have used a subcellular fractionation approach to address the in vivo compartmentalization and cytotoxic action of cholera toxin in rat liver parenchyma. Following administration of a saturating dose of cholera toxin to rats, rapid endocytosis of both cholera toxin subunits was observed, coincident with massive internalization of both the 45 kDa and 47 kDa Gsalpha proteins. These events coincided with the endosomal recruitment of ADP-ribosylation factor proteins, especially ADP-ribosylation factor-6, with a time course identical to that of toxin and the A subunit of the stimulatory G protein (Gsalpha) translocation. After an initial lag phase of 30 min, these constituents were linked to NAD-dependent ADP-ribosylation of endogenous Gsalpha, with maximum accumulation observed at 30-60 min postinjection. Assessment of the subsequent postendosomal fate of internalized Gsalpha revealed sustained endolysosomal transfer of the two Gsalpha isoforms. Concomitantly, cholera toxin increased in vivo endosome acidification rates driven by the ATP-dependent H(+)-ATPase pump and in vitro vacuolar acidification in hepatoma HepG2 cells. The vacuolar H(+)-ATPase inhibitor bafilomycin and the cathepsin D inhibitor pepstatin A partially inhibited, both in vivo and in vitro, the cAMP response to cholera toxin. This cathepsin D-dependent action of cholera toxin under the control of endosomal acidity was confirmed using cellular systems in which modification of the expression levels of cathepsin D, either by transfection of the cathepsin D gene or small interfering RNA, was followed by parallel changes in the cytotoxic

  19. Cathepsin B- and L-like cysteine protease activities during the in vitro development of Hysterothylacium aduncum (Nematoda: Anisakidae), a worldwide fish parasite.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malagón, David; Díaz-López, Manuel; Benítez, Rocío; Adroher, Francisco Javier

    2010-03-01

    Proteinases play an important role as virulence factors both in the life-cycle of parasites and in the pathogen-host relationship. Hysterothylacium aduncum is a worldwide fish parasite nematode which has been associated with non-invasive anisakidosis and allergic responses to fish consumption in humans. Cysteine proteinases have been associated with allergy to plant pollens, detergents and dust mites. In this study the presence of two types of cysteine proteinases (cathepsin B and cathepsin L) during in vitro development of H. aduncum is investigated. Specific fluorescent substrates were used to determine cathepsin activities. The activity detected with substrate Z-FR-AMC was identified as cathepsin L (optimum pH=5.5; range 3.5-6.5). Cathepsin B activity was only identified with Z-RR-AMC (optimum pH=7.0-7.5; range 5.0-8.0). The start of cultivation led to increased activity of both cathepsins (1.8-fold for cathepsin B and 6.3-fold for cathepsin L). These activities varied according to the developmental stage. Cathepsin B activity decreased after M4, returning to its initial level. Cathepsin L activity also decreased after M4, but still maintained a high level (4-6 times the initial level) in adult stages. Having considered these activity variations and the optimum pH values, we suggest that cathepsin L has a role in digestive processes while cathepsin B could be involved in cuticle renewal, among other possible functions. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Human macrophage foam cells degrade atherosclerotic plaques through cathepsin K mediated processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barascuk, Natasha; Skjøt-Arkil, Helene; Register, Thomas C

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Proteolytic degradation of Type I Collagen by proteases may play an important role in remodeling of atherosclerotic plaques, contributing to increased risk of plaque rupture.The aim of the current study was to investigate whether human macrophage foam cells degrade the extracellular...... matrix (ECM) of atherosclerotic plaques by cathepsin K mediated processes. METHODS: We 1) cultured human macrophages on ECM and measured cathepsin K generated fragments of type I collagen (C-terminal fragments of Type I collagen (CTX-I) 2) investigated the presence of CTX-I in human coronary arteries......-I in areas of intimal hyperplasia and in shoulder regions of advanced plaques. Treatment of human monocytes with M-CSF or M-CSF+LDL generated macrophages and foam cells producing CTX-I when cultured on type I collagen enriched matrix. Circulating levels of CTX-I were not significantly different in women...

  1. Atick salivary protein targets cathepsin G and chymase and inhibits host inflammation and platelet aggregation

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Chmelař, Jindřich; Oliveira, C. J.; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Francischetti, I.M.B.; Kovářová, Zuzana; Pejler, G.; Kopáček, Petr; Ribeiro, J.M.C.; Mareš, Michael; Kopecký, Jan; Kotsyfakis, Michalis

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 117, č. 2 (2011), s. 736-744 ISSN 0006-4971 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600960811; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06009; GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/10/2183 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : parasite serpin * IRS-2 * tick * Ixodes ricinus * platelet aggregation * inflammation * cathepsin G * chymase Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 9.898, year: 2011

  2. Altered Ca2+ homeostasis induces Calpain-Cathepsin axis activation in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Llorens, Franc; Thüne, Katrin; Sikorska, Beata; Schmitz, Matthias; Tahir, Waqas; Fernández-Borges, Natalia; Cramm, Maria; Gotzmann, Nadine; Carmona, Margarita; Streichenberger, Nathalie; Michel, Uwe; Zafar, Saima; Schuetz, Anna-Lena; Rajput, Ashish; Andréoletti, Olivier; Bonn, Stefan; Fischer, Andre; Liberski, Pawel P; Torres, Juan Maria; Ferrer, Isidre; Zerr, Inga

    2017-04-27

    Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD) is the most prevalent form of human prion disease and it is characterized by the presence of neuronal loss, spongiform degeneration, chronic inflammation and the accumulation of misfolded and pathogenic prion protein (PrP Sc ). The molecular mechanisms underlying these alterations are largely unknown, but the presence of intracellular neuronal calcium (Ca 2+ ) overload, a general feature in models of prion diseases, is suggested to play a key role in prion pathogenesis.Here we describe the presence of massive regulation of Ca 2+ responsive genes in sCJD brain tissue, accompanied by two Ca 2+ -dependent processes: endoplasmic reticulum stress and the activation of the cysteine proteases Calpains 1/2. Pathogenic Calpain proteins activation in sCJD is linked to the cleavage of their cellular substrates, impaired autophagy and lysosomal damage, which is partially reversed by Calpain inhibition in a cellular prion model. Additionally, Calpain 1 treatment enhances seeding activity of PrP Sc in a prion conversion assay. Neuronal lysosomal impairment caused by Calpain over activation leads to the release of the lysosomal protease Cathepsin S that in sCJD mainly localises in axons, although massive Cathepsin S overexpression is detected in microglial cells. Alterations in Ca 2+ homeostasis and activation of Calpain-Cathepsin axis already occur at pre-clinical stages of the disease as detected in a humanized sCJD mouse model.Altogether our work indicates that unbalanced Calpain-Cathepsin activation is a relevant contributor to the pathogenesis of sCJD at multiple molecular levels and a potential target for therapeutic intervention.

  3. Molecular and immunological characterization of cathepsin L-like cysteine protease of Paragonimus pseudoheterotremus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoonuan, Tippayarat; Nuamtanong, Supaporn; Dekumyoy, Paron; Phuphisut, Orawan; Adisakwattana, Poom

    2016-12-01

    Cathepsin L is a cysteine protease belonging to the papain family. In parasitic trematodes, cathepsin L plays essential roles in parasite survival and host-parasite interactions. In this study, cathepsin L of the lung fluke Paragonimus pseudoheterotremus (PpsCatL) was identified and its molecular biological and immunological features characterized. A sequence analysis of PpsCatL showed that the gene encodes a 325-amino-acid protein that is most similar to P. westermani cathepsin L. The in silico three-dimensional structure suggests that PpsCatL is a pro-enzyme that becomes active when the propeptide is cleaved. A recombinant pro-PpsCatL lacking the signal peptide (rPpsCatL), with a molecular weight of 35 kDa, was expressed in E. coli and reacted with P. pseudoheterotremus-infected rat sera. The native protein was detected in crude worm antigens and excretory-secretory products and was localized in the cecum and in the lamellae along the intestinal tract of the adult parasite. Enzymatic activity of rPpsCatL showed that the protein could cleave the fluorogenic substrate Z-Phe-Arg-AMC after autocatalysis but was inhibited with E64. The immunodiagnostic potential of the recombinant protein was evaluated with an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and suggested that rPpsCatL can detect paragonimiasis with high sensitivity and specificity (100 and 95.6 %, respectively). This supports the further development of an rPpsCatL-ELISA as an immunodiagnostic tool.

  4. Correlation between serum cathepsin S and insulin resistance in type 2 diabetes

    OpenAIRE

    CHEN, RUO-PING; REN, AN; YE, SHAN-DONG

    2013-01-01

    Cathepsin S (CatS), a proteolytic enzyme, which belongs to the cysteine proteinase family, is associated with atherosclerosis, coronary heart disease, cancer and other diseases. The present study aimed to explore the correlation between serum CatS and insulin resistance (IR) in patients with type 2 diabetes. A total of 51 patients with type 2 diabetes (Group DM) were recruited for this study and 49 healthy individuals were selected as normal controls (Group NC). Blood pressure and body mass i...

  5. A novel nonsense mutation in cathepsin C gene in an Egyptian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hala Soliman

    2015-04-22

    Apr 22, 2015 ... [23] Hewitt C, McCormick D, Linden G, Turk D, Stern I, Wallace I, · et al. The Role of Cathepsin C in Papillon Lefevre Syndrome, · Prepubertal Periodontitis, and Aggressive Periodontitis. Hum · Mutat 2004;23:222–8, PMID: 14974080. [24] Hewitt C, WU C-L, Hattab FN, Amin W, Ghaffar KA, Toomes · C, et al.

  6. Overexpression of cathepsin f, matrix metalloproteinases 11 and 12 in cervical cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Vazquez-Ortiz, Guelaguetza; Pina-Sanchez, Patricia; Vazquez, Karla; Duenas, Alfonso; Taja, Lucia; Mendoza, Patricia; Garcia, José A; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2005-01-01

    Abstract Background Cervical carcinoma (CC) is one of the most common cancers among women worldwide and the first cause of death among the Mexican female population. CC progression shows a continuum of neoplastic transitions until invasion. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cathepsins play a central role on the enhancement of tumor-induced angiogenesis, cell migration, proliferation, apoptosis and connective tissue degradation. MMPs -2 and -9 expression has been widely studied in cervical ...

  7. GILT expression in B cells diminishes cathepsin S steady-state protein expression and activity

    OpenAIRE

    Phipps-Yonas, Hannah; Semik, Vikki; Hastings, Karen Taraszka

    2012-01-01

    MHC class II-restricted Ag processing requires protein degradation in the endocytic pathway for the activation of CD4+ T cells. Gamma-interferon-inducible lysosomal thiol reductase (GILT) facilitates Ag processing by reducing protein disulfide bonds in this compartment. Lysosomal cysteine protease cathepsin S (CatS) contains disulfide bonds and mediates essential steps in MHC class II-restricted processing, including proteolysis of large polypeptides and cleavage of the invariant chain. We so...

  8. Chemoproteomic profiling reveals that cathepsin D off-target activity drives ocular toxicity of ?-secretase inhibitors

    OpenAIRE

    Zuhl, Andrea M.; Nolan, Charles E.; Brodney, Michael A.; Niessen, Sherry; Atchison, Kevin; Houle, Christopher; Karanian, David A.; Ambroise, Claude; Brulet, Jeffrey W.; Beck, Elizabeth M.; Doran, Shawn D.; O'Neill, Brian T.; am Ende, Christopher W.; Chang, Cheng; Geoghegan, Kieran F.

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of ?-secretase BACE1 is considered one of the most promising approaches for treating Alzheimer's disease. Several structurally distinct BACE1 inhibitors have been withdrawn from development after inducing ocular toxicity in animal models, but the target mediating this toxicity has not been identified. Here we use a clickable photoaffinity probe to identify cathepsin D (CatD) as a principal off-target of BACE1 inhibitors in human cells. We find that several BACE1 inhibitors blocked ...

  9. Two Faces of Cathepsin D: Physiological Guardian Angel and Pathological Demon

    OpenAIRE

    Khalkhali-Ellis, Zhila; Hendrix, Mary J.C.

    2014-01-01

    Since its discovery as a lysosomal hydrolase, Cathepsin D (CatD) has been the subject of intensive scrutiny by numerous scientists. Those accumulated efforts have defined its biosynthetic pathway, structure, and companion proteins in the context of its perceived ?house keeping? function. However, in the past two decades CatD has emerged as a multifunctional enzyme, involved in myriad biological processes beyond its original ?housekeeping? role. CatD is responsible for selective and limited cl...

  10. Structural Basis for Inhibition of Cathepsin B Drug Target from the Human Blood Fluke, Schistosoma mansoni

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jílková, Adéla; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Lepšík, Martin; Horn, Martin; Váchová, Jana; Fanfrlík, Jindřich; Brynda, Jiří; McKerrow, J. H.; Caffrey, C. R.; Mareš, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 286, č. 41 (2011), s. 35770-35881 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/1585; GA ČR GAP208/11/0295; GA MŠk OC09007 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : cathepsin B * schistosoma * crystal structure Subject RIV: CC - Organic Chemistry Impact factor: 4.773, year: 2011

  11. Neutrophil Cathepsin G, but Not Elastase, Induces Aggregation of MCF-7 Mammary Carcinoma Cells by a Protease Activity-Dependent Cell-Oriented Mechanism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Yui

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available We previously found that a neutrophil serine protease, cathepsin G, weakens adherence to culture substrates and induces E-cadherin-dependent aggregation of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells through its protease activity. In this study, we examined whether aggregation is caused by degradation of adhesion molecules on the culture substrates or through an unidentified mechanism. We compared the effect of treatment with cathepsin G and other proteases, including neutrophil elastase against fibronectin- (FN- coated substrates. Cathepsin G and elastase potently degraded FN on the substrates and induced aggregation of MCF-7 cells that had been subsequently seeded onto the substrate. However, substrate-bound cathepsin G and elastase may have caused cell aggregation. After inhibiting the proteases on the culture substrates using the irreversible inhibitor phenylmethylsulfonyl fluoride (PMSF, we examined whether aggregation of MCF-7 cells was suppressed. PMSF attenuated cell aggregation on cathepsin G-treated substrates, but the effect was weak in cells pretreated with high concentrations of cathepsin G. In contrast, PMSF did not suppress cell aggregation on elastase-treated FN. Moreover, cathepsin G, but not elastase, induced aggregation on poly-L-lysine substrates which are not decomposed by these enzymes, and the action of cathepsin G was nearly completely attenuated by PMSF. These results suggest that cathepsin G induces MCF-7 aggregation through a cell-oriented mechanism.

  12. Inflammatory Monocytes Promote Perineural Invasion via CCL2-Mediated Recruitment and Cathepsin B Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakst, Richard L; Xiong, Huizhong; Chen, Chun-Hao; Deborde, Sylvie; Lyubchik, Anna; Zhou, Yi; He, Shizhi; McNamara, William; Lee, Sei-Young; Olson, Oakley C; Leiner, Ingrid M; Marcadis, Andrea R; Keith, James W; Al-Ahmadie, Hikmat A; Katabi, Nora; Gil, Ziv; Vakiani, Efsevia; Joyce, Johanna A; Pamer, Eric; Wong, Richard J

    2017-11-15

    Perineural invasion (PNI) is an ominous event strongly linked to poor clinical outcome. Cells residing within peripheral nerves collaborate with cancer cells to enable PNI, but the contributing conditions within the tumor microenvironment are not well understood. Here, we show that CCR2-expressing inflammatory monocytes (IM) are preferentially recruited to sites of PNI, where they differentiate into macrophages and potentiate nerve invasion through a cathepsin B-mediated process. A series of adoptive transfer experiments with genetically engineered donors and recipients demonstrated that IM recruitment to nerves was driven by CCL2 released from Schwann cells at the site of PNI, but not CCL7, an alternate ligand for CCR2. Interruption of either CCL2-CCR2 signaling or cathepsin B function significantly impaired PNI in vivo Correlative studies in human specimens demonstrated that cathepsin B-producing macrophages were enriched in invaded nerves, which was associated with increased local tumor recurrence. These findings deepen our understanding of PNI pathogenesis and illuminate how PNI is driven in part by corruption of a nerve repair program. Further, they support the exploration of inhibiting IM recruitment and function as a targeted therapy for PNI. Cancer Res; 77(22); 6400-14. ©2017 AACR . ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  13. Photodynamic quenched cathepsin activity based probes for cancer detection and macrophage targeted therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Nun, Yael; Merquiol, Emmanuelle; Brandis, Alexander; Turk, Boris; Scherz, Avigdor; Blum, Galia

    2015-01-01

    Elevated cathepsins levels and activities are found in several types of human cancer, making them valuable biomarkers for detection and targeting therapeutics. We designed small molecule quenched activity-based probes (qABPs) that fluoresce upon activity-dependent covalent modification, yielding cell killing by Photodynamic Therapy (PDT). These novel molecules are highly selective theranostic probes that enable both detection and treatment of cancer with minimal side effects. Our qABPs carry a photosensitizer (PS), which is activated by light, resulting in oxidative stress and subsequent cell ablation, and a quencher that when removed by active cathepsins allow the PS to fluoresce and demonstrate PD properties. Our most powerful and stable PS-qABP, YBN14, consists of a selective cathepsin recognition sequence, a QC-1 quencher and a new bacteriochlorin derivative as a PS. YBN14 allowed rapid and selective non-invasive in vivo imaging of subcutaneous tumors and induced specific tumor macrophage apoptosis by light treatment, resulting in a substantial tumor shrinkage in an aggressive breast cancer mouse model. These results demonstrate for the first time that the PS-qABPs technology offers a functional theranostic tool, which can be applied to numerous tumor types and other inflammation-associated diseases.

  14. Cathepsin D as a Promising Target for the Discovery of Novel Anticancer Agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dubey, Vijaya; Luqman, Suaib

    2017-01-01

    Cathepsin D (CATD), one of the aspartyl endoproteinase involved in different physiological processes and signaling pathways, is accountable for metabolic breakdown of intracellular proteins, the activation of growth factors, hormones, and precursors of enzyme, the processing of antigens, enzyme inhibitors and activators and the regulation of apoptosis. Implication as a Target: Studies have confirmed the role and significance of CATD in an assortment of pathological conditions like Atherosclerosis, Alzheimer, Cancer, Cardiovascular, Huntington and Parkinson diseases. Amalgamated and veiled as inactive proCATD, it undergoes diverse cleavages to attain a desired conformation in an acidic milieu to act as a functionally active protein. In search of new candidate target (s) for cancer, CATD has attracted a wide group of investigators across the globe and is being recognized as a well-defined marker in cancer especially for breast and hormone-dependent cancer. In this review, PubMed, Sci-finder and other search engines were used to gather information on Cathepsin D. The necessary and relevant information was thoroughly studied to make the article appropriate to highlight all the aspects related to Cathepsin D and its role in cancer. Findings & Conclusion: The present review illustrates structural, functional and regulatory aspects of CATD in cancer, its significant role in angiogenesis, metastasis, invasion, apoptosis, cell proliferation, and therapeutic potential besides the benefits of targeting CATD by the natural products in cancer chemoprevention. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  15. Acetate-induced apoptosis in colorectal carcinoma cells involves lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cathepsin D release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, C; Oliveira, C S F; Alves, S; Chaves, S R; Coutinho, O P; Côrte-Real, M; Preto, A

    2013-02-21

    Colorectal carcinoma (CRC) is one of the most common causes of cancer-related mortality. Short-chain fatty acids secreted by dietary propionibacteria from the intestine, such as acetate, induce apoptosis in CRC cells and may therefore be relevant in CRC prevention and therapy. We previously reported that acetic acid-induced apoptosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells involves partial vacuole permeabilization and release of Pep4p, the yeast cathepsin D (CatD), which has a protective role in this process. In cancer cells, lysosomes have emerged as key players in apoptosis through selective lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP) and release of cathepsins. However, the role of CatD in CRC survival is controversial and has not been assessed in response to acetate. We aimed to ascertain whether LMP and CatD are involved in acetate-induced apoptosis in CRC cells. We showed that acetate per se inhibits proliferation and induces apoptosis. More importantly, we uncovered that acetate triggers LMP and CatD release to the cytosol. Pepstatin A (a CatD inhibitor) but not E64d (a cathepsin B and L inhibitor) increased acetate-induced apoptosis of CRC cells, suggesting that CatD has a protective role in this process. Our data indicate that acetate induces LMP and subsequent release of CatD in CRC cells undergoing apoptosis, and suggest exploiting novel strategies using acetate as a prevention/therapeutic agent in CRC, through simultaneous treatment with CatD inhibitors.

  16. Application of a novel highly sensitive activity-based probe for detection of cathepsin G.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Fang; Schmon, Michael; Sienczyk, Marcin; Grzywa, Renata; Palesch, David; Boehm, Bernhard O; Sun, Zi Lin; Watts, Colin; Schirmbeck, Reinhold; Burster, Timo

    2012-02-15

    Cathepsins are crucial in antigen processing in the major histocompatibility complex class II (MHC II) pathway. Within the proteolytic machinery, three classes of proteases (i.e., cysteine, aspartic, and serine proteases) are present in the endocytic compartments. The combined action of these proteases generates antigenic peptides from antigens, which are loaded to MHC II molecules for CD4+ T cell presentation. Detection of active serine proteases in primary human antigen-presenting cells (APCs) is restricted because of the small numbers of cells isolated from the peripheral blood. For this purpose, we developed a novel highly sensitive α-aminoalkylphosphonate diphenyl ester (DAP) activity-based probe to detect the serine protease cathepsin G (CatG) in primary APCs and after Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) exposure. Although CatG activity was not altered after short-term exposure of EBV in primary myeloid dendritic cells 1 (mDC1s), the aspartic protease cathepsin D (CatD) was reduced, suggesting that EBV is responsible for mitigating the presentation of a model antigen tetanus toxoid C-fragment (TTCF) by reduction of CatD. In addition, CatG activity was reduced to background levels in B cells during cell culture; however, these findings were independent of EBV transformation. In conclusion, our activity-based probe can be used for both Western blot and 96-well-based high-throughput CatG detection when cell numbers are limited. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Cysteine and aspartic proteases cathepsins B and D determine the invasiveness of MCF10A neoT cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Premzl, J.; Kos, J.

    2003-01-01

    Background. Lysosomal cathepsins B and D have been reported to play a role in various processes leading to progression of malignant disease. In ras-transformed MCF10A neoT cells both enzymes show similar vesicular distribution in perinuclear and peripheral cytoplasmic regions. Results. The co-localization of cathepsins B and D in some vesicles as defined by confocal microscopy supports their co-ordinate activity in the proteolytic cascade. On the other hand, we showed that stefin A, an endogenous intracellular inhibitor of cysteine proteases, did not co-localize with cathepsin B and is presumably not involved in regulation of its enzymatic activity within the vesicles. Intracellular localization of both enzymes was confined to similar vesicles as the fluorescent degradation products of DQ-collagen IV either in individual cells or cell spheroids. The capability of these two enzymes to degrade collagen and other components of extracellular matrix is further supported by the results of Matrigel invasion assay. We showed that specific intracellular (CA-074 Me) and extracellular (CA-074) inhibitors of cathepsin B and pepstatin A, an inhibitor of cathepsin D, significantly reduced invasion of MCF10A neoT cells. Our results also show that in contrast to some other studies the activation peptide of pro-cathepsin D exhibited no mitogenic effect on MCF10A neoT, MCF-7 or HEK-293 cells. Conclusion. We conclude that lysosomal cysteine proteases cathepsins B and D predominantly participate in degradation of extracellular matrix and facilitate invasion of tumour cells. (author)

  18. Expression and Localization of Cathepsins B, D, and G in Two Cancer Stem Cell Subpopulations in Moderately Differentiated Oral Tongue Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Therese Featherston

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available AimWe have previously demonstrated the putative presence of two cancer stem cell (CSC subpopulations within moderately differentiated oral tongue squamous cell carcinoma (MDOTSCC, which express components of the renin–angiotensin system (RAS. In this study, we investigated the expression and localization of cathepsins B, D, and G in relation to these CSC subpopulations within MDOTSCC.Methods3,3-Diaminobenzidine (DAB and immunofluorescent (IF immunohistochemical (IHC staining was performed on MDOTSCC samples to determine the expression and localization of cathepsins B, D, and G in relation to the CSC subpopulations. NanoString mRNA analysis and colorimetric in situ hybridization (CISH were used to study their transcripts expression. Enzyme activity assays were performed to determine the activity of these cathepsins in MDOTSCC.ResultsIHC staining demonstrated expression of cathepsins B, D, and G in MDOTSCC. Cathepsins B and D were localized to CSCs within the tumor nests, while cathepsin B was localized to the CSCs within the peri-tumoral stroma, and cathepsin G was localized to the tryptase+ phenotypic mast cells within the peri-tumoral stroma. NanoString and CISH mRNA analyses confirmed transcription activation of cathepsins B, D, and G. Enzyme activity assays confirmed active cathepsins B and D, but not cathepsin G.ConclusionThe presence of cathepsins B and D on the CSCs and cathspsin G on the phenotypic mast cells suggest the presence of bypass loops for the RAS which may be a potential novel therapeutic target for MDOTSCC.

  19. Analysis of heparanase isoforms and cathepsin B in the plasma of patients with gastrointestinal carcinomas: analytical cross-sectional study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melo, Carina Mucciolo; Origassa, Clarice Silvia Taemi; Theodoro, Thérèse Rachell; Matos, Leandro Luongo; Miranda, Thaís Aguilar; Accardo, Camila Melo; Bouças, Rodrigo Ippolito; Suarez, Eloah Rabello; Pares, Madalena Maria Nunes Silva; Waisberg, Daniel Reis; Toloi, Giovanna Canato; Nader, Helena Bonciani; Waisberg, Jaques; Pinhal, Maria Aparecida Silva

    2015-02-01

    Heparanase-1 degrades heparan sulfate and has been correlated with tumor progression. Although the isoform heparanase-2 has no catalytic activity, it seems to be important for modulating heparanase-1 activity. Cathepsin B is a proteinase involved in tumor metastasis. The aim of this study was to analyze heparanase isoform expression and cathepsin B activity in plasma samples from patients with gastrointestinal carcinomas, compared with healthy individuals (control group). This was an analytical cross-sectional study. Peripheral blood samples were collected at a Brazilian public hospital, from 21 patients with histopathological diagnoses of gastrointestinal carcinomas and from 43 healthy individuals. The analyses were performed in two Brazilian medical schools. Heparanase isoforms were identified and quantified in plasma samples by means of Western blot. The enzymatic activities of heparanase-1 and cathepsin B were also measured. The results demonstrated that the expression of both heparanase isoforms was significantly greater in plasma samples from gastrointestinal carcinoma patients, compared with the control group. Logistic regression analysis showed that increased heparanase-1 and heparanase-2 expression was exclusively dependent on the tumor. There was a significant increase in heparanase-1 and cathepsin B activity in the patients' plasma. Overexpression of heparanase-1 and heparanase-2, along with increased heparanase-1 and cathepsin B activity in plasma, is associated with the diagnosis of gastrointestinal carcinoma. These findings provide support for using non-invasive assays (plasma samples) as an auxiliary method for diagnosing gastrointestinal tumors.

  20. In Vivo Molecular Imaging of Cathepsin and Matrix Metalloproteinase Activity Discriminates between Arthritic and Osteoarthritic Processes in Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eline A. Vermeij

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA and osteoarthritis (OA are serologically and clinically distinctive, but at the local level, both diseases have many molecular pathways in common. In vivo molecular imaging can unravel the local pathologic processes involved in both diseases. In this study, we investigated matrix metalloproteinase (MMP and cathepsin activity during cartilage destruction, in an RA and an OA mouse model, using biophotonic imaging of substrate-based probes. Mice with collagen-induced arthritis (CIA or destabilization of the medial meniscus (DMM were imaged using near-infrared fluorescent probes, activated by several cathepsins or MMPs. Fluorescence signal intensity was compared to synovial gene expression, histology, and cartilage staining of a neoepitope of aggrecan cleaved by MMPs with the amino acids DIPEN. Increased cathepsin and MMP activity was seen during CIA, whereas the DMM model only showed increased MMP activity. DIPEN expression was seen only during CIA. A possible explanation can be differences in gene expressions; MMP3 and -13, known to produce DIPEN neoepitopes, were upregulated in the CIA model, whereas MMP12, known to be involved in elastin degradation and chemokine inhibition, was upregulated in the DMM model. Thus, molecular imaging showed no cathepsin activity at the time of cartilage damage in the DMM model, whereas both cathepsins and MMPs are active in the CIA model during disease progression.

  1. Assessment of cathepsin mRNA expression and enzymatic activity during early embryonic development in the yellowtail kingfish Seriola lalandi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palomino, Jaime; Herrera, Giannina; Torres-Fuentes, Jorge; Dettleff, Phillip; Patel, Alok; Martínez, Víctor

    2017-05-01

    In pelagic species such as Seriola lalandi, survival of both the eggs and embryos depends on yolk processing during oocyte maturation and embryo development. The main enzymes involved in these processes are the cathepsins, which are essential for the hydration process, acquiring buoyancy and nutrition of the embryo before hatching. This study aimed to investigate the mRNA expression profiles of cathepsins B, D and L (catb, catd and catl) and the activity of these enzymes during early development in S. lalandi. We included previtellogenic oocytes (PO). All three enzymes were highly expressed in PO, but the expression was reduced throughout development. Between PO and recently spawned eggs (E1) the transcript to catb and catd decreased, unlike catl. Cathepsin B activity, showed stable levels between PO until blastula stage (E4). High activities levels of cathepsins D and L were observed in E1 in comparison with later developmental stages. Cathepsin L activity remained constant until E1, consistent with observations in other pelagic spawners, where its participation in a second protolithic cleavage of the yolk proteins, has been proposed for this enzyme. Their profiles of both mRNA expression and enzymatic activity indicate the importance of these enzymes during early development and suggest different roles in egg yolk processing for the hydration process and nutrition in early embryos in this species. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  2. Co-chaperone BAG2 Determines the Pro-oncogenic Role of Cathepsin B in Triple-Negative Breast Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyung-Min Yang

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Summary: Triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC is considered incurable with currently available treatments, highlighting the need for therapeutic targets and predictive biomarkers. Here, we report a unique role for Bcl-2-associated athanogene 2 (BAG2, which is significantly overexpressed in TNBC, in regulating the dual functions of cathepsin B as either a pro- or anti-oncogenic enzyme. Silencing BAG2 suppresses tumorigenesis and lung metastasis and induces apoptosis by increasing the intracellular mature form of cathepsin B, whereas BAG2 expression induces metastasis by blocking the auto-cleavage processing of pro-cathepsin B via interaction with the propeptide region. BAG2 regulates pro-cathepsin B/annexin II complex formation and facilitates the trafficking of pro-cathespin-B-containing TGN38-positive vesicles toward the cell periphery, leading to the secretion of pro-cathepsin B, which induces metastasis. Collectively, our results uncover BAG2 as a regulator of the oncogenic function of pro-cathepsin B and a potential diagnostic and therapeutic target that may reduce the burden of metastatic breast cancer. : The mechanisms controlling the pro- and anti-oncogenic roles of cathepsin B are unclear. Yang et al. find that BAG2 is a regulator of the dual functions of its client protein, CTSB, facilitating the progression of TNBC. Keywords: BAG2, cathepsin B, TNBC, tumorigenesis, metastasis, breast cancer, TGN38

  3. Cathepsin S inhibition suppresses systemic lupus erythematosus and lupus nephritis because cathepsin S is essential for MHC class II-mediated CD4 T cell and B cell priming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rupanagudi, Khader Valli; Kulkarni, Onkar P; Lichtnekert, Julia; Darisipudi, Murthy Narayana; Mulay, Shrikant R; Schott, Brigitte; Gruner, Sabine; Haap, Wolfgang; Hartmann, Guido; Anders, Hans-Joachim

    2015-02-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II-mediated priming of T and B lymphocytes is a central element of autoimmunity in systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and lupus nephritis. The cysteine protease cathepsin S degrades the invariant peptide chain during MHC II assembly with antigenic peptide in antigen-presenting cells; therefore, we hypothesised that cathepsin S inhibition would be therapeutic in SLE. We developed a highly specific small molecule, orally available, cathepsin S antagonist, RO5461111, with suitable pharmacodynamic and pharmacokinetic properties that efficiently suppressed antigen-specific T cell and B cell priming in vitro and in vivo. When given to MRL-Fas(lpr) mice with SLE and lupus nephritis, RO5461111 significantly reduced the activation of spleen dendritic cells and the subsequent expansion and activation of CD4 T cells and CD4/CD8 double-negative T cells. Cathepsin S inhibition impaired the spatial organisation of germinal centres, suppressed follicular B cell maturation to plasma cells and Ig class switch. This reversed hypergammaglobulinemia and significantly suppressed the plasma levels of numerous IgG (but not IgM) autoantibodies below baseline, including anti-dsDNA. This effect was associated with less glomerular IgG deposits, which protected kidneys from lupus nephritis. Together, cathepsin S promotes SLE by driving MHC class II-mediated T and B cell priming, germinal centre formation and B cell maturation towards plasma cells. These afferent immune pathways can be specifically reversed with the cathepsin S antagonist RO5461111, which prevents lupus nephritis progression even when given after disease onset. This novel therapeutic strategy could correct a common pathomechanism of SLE and other immune complex-related autoimmune diseases. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://group.bmj.com/group/rights-licensing/permissions.

  4. EKSTRAKSI DAN KARAKTERISASI PARSIAL EKSTRAK KASAR ENZIM KATEPSIN DARI IKAN PATIN [Extraction and Partial Characterization of Crude Enzymes Cathepsin from Catfish

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muhammad Zakiyul Fikri*

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Decomposition of protein by enzymatic process will lead to changes in odor, texture, and appearance of fish. The enzymes that play a role in the enzymatic process is primarily proteolytic enzymes. Cathepsin is one of the proteolytic enzymes found in animal tissue that hydrolyzes peptide bonds of proteins. This study aims to extract the cathepsin, characterize the crude extract derived from catfish. The stages of this research consist of the extraction and characterization of the cathepsin from catfish. Result of the extraction was crude extract of cathepsin with activity of 0.278 U/mL. The enzyme had optimum temperature of 50°C, pH 6 and substrate concentration of 2%. The activity of the cathepsin was inhibited by metal ions of Fe3+, Cu2+, Ca2+, but increased by metal ions of Mg2+.

  5. Expression characteristics and specific antibody reactivity of diverse cathepsin F members of Paragonimus westermani.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Chun-Seob; Na, Byoung-Kuk; Chung, Dong-Ll; Kim, Jeong-Geun; Kim, Jin-Taek; Kong, Yoon

    2015-02-01

    Paragonimiasis, caused by the lung fluke Paragonimus, is a major food-borne helminthic disease. Differential diagnosis of paragonimiasis from tuberculosis and other infectious granulomas in the lung is a prerequisite to proper management of patients. Cysteine proteases of Paragonimus westermani (PwCPs) invoke specific antibody responses against patient sera, while antibody capturing activity of different PwCPs has not been comparatively analyzed. In this study, we observed the expressional regulation of 11 species of different PwCPs (PwCP1-11). We expressed recombinant PwCPs and assessed diagnostic reliability employing sera from patients with P. westermani (n=138), other trematodiases (n=80), cestodiases (n=60) and pulmonary tuberculosis (n=20), and those of normal controls (n=20). PwCPs formed a monophyletic clade into cathepsin F and showed differential expression patterns along with developmental stages of worm. Bacterially expressed recombinant PwCPs (rPwCPs) exhibited variable sensitivity of 38.4-84.5% and specificity of 87.2-100% in diagnosing homologous infection. rPwCPs recognized specific antibodies of experimental cat sera as early as 3 or 6weeks after infection. Patient sera of fascioliasis, Schistosomiasis japonicum and clonorchiasis demonstrated weak cross-reactions. Our results demonstrate that diverse PwCPs of the cathepsin F family participate in inducing specific antibody responses. Most P. westermani cathepsin F, except for PwCP2 (AAF21461), which showed negligible antibody responses, might be applicable for paragonimiasis serodiagnosis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Cathepsin B-sensitive polymers for compartment-specific degradation and nucleic acid release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, David S H; Johnson, Russell N; Pun, Suzie H

    2012-02-10

    Degradable cationic polymers are desirable for in vivo nucleic acid delivery because they offer significantly decreased toxicity over non-degradable counterparts. Peptide linkers provide chemical stability and high specificity for particular endopeptidases but have not been extensively studied for nucleic acid delivery applications. In this work, enzymatically degradable peptide-HPMA copolymers were synthesized by RAFT polymerization of HPMA with methacrylamido-terminated peptide macromonomers, resulting in polymers with low polydispersity and near quantitative incorporation of peptides. Three peptide-HPMA copolymers were evaluated: (i) pHCathK(10), containing peptides composed of the linker phe-lys-phe-leu (FKFL), a substrate of the endosomal/lysosomal endopeptidase cathepsin B, connected to oligo-(L)-lysine for nucleic acid binding, (ii) pHCath(D)K(10), containing the FKFL linker with oligo-(D)-lysine, and (iii) pH(D)Cath(D)K(10), containing all (D) amino acids. Cathepsin B degraded copolymers pHCathK(10) and pHCath(D)K(10) within 1 h while no degradation of pH(D)Cath(D)K(10) was observed. Polyplexes formed with pHCathK(10) copolymers show DNA release by 4 h of treatment with cathepsin B; comparatively, polyplexes formed with pHCath(D)K(10) and pH(D)Cath(D)K(10) show no DNA release within 8 h. Transfection efficiency in HeLa and NIH/3T3 cells were comparable between the copolymers but pHCathK(10) was less toxic. This work demonstrates the successful application of peptide linkers for degradable cationic polymers and DNA release. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Inhibition of cathepsin B by E-64 induces oxidative stress and apoptosis in filarial parasite.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohit Wadhawan

    Full Text Available Current available antifilarial drug strategies only eliminate the larval stages of filarial parasites. Therefore, there is an urgent need of drugs which are macrofilaricidals. Identification of molecular targets crucial for survival of parasite is a prerequisite for drug designing. Cathepsin B, a cysteine protease family member is known to play crucial role in the normal growth, digestion of nutrients, exsheathment of the helminth parasites. Therefore, we targeted this enzyme in the filarial parasite using its specific inhibitor, E-64.We have exposed the parasites to E-64 and observed their motility and viability at various time intervals. It caused marked decrease in the motility and viability of the parasites ultimately leading to their death after 8 hours. It is well known that E-64 protects the cell from apoptosis, however, it causes apoptotic effect in carcinoma cell lines. To understand the mechanism of action of E-64 on parasite survival, we have measured levels of different apoptotic markers in the treated parasites. E-64 significantly reduced the level of ced-9 and activity of tyrosine phosphatases, cytochrome c oxidase. It also activated ced-3, homolog of mammalian caspase 3 suggesting initiation of an apoptotic like event in the filarial parasites. Different antioxidant enzymes were also evaluated to further explore the mechanism behind the death of the parasites. There was marked decrease in the level of GSH and activity of Glutathione reductase and glutathione-s-transferase leading to increased generation of reactive oxygen species. This led to the induced oxidation of fatty acids and protein which might alter the mitochondrial membrane permeability.This study suggests that inhibition of cathepsin B by E-64 generates oxidative stress followed by mitochondrial mediated apoptotic like event in filarial parasites leading to their death. Hence, suggesting filarial cathepsin B as a potential chemotherapeutic target for lymphatic

  8. Cathepsin activities and thermal properties of Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus meat during ambient storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tulakhun Nonthaput

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the postmortem changes at ambient aquatic temperature can be useful for estimating the time of death in environmental forensic studies when little information is available. Muscle degradation was investigated in Nile tilapia (Oreochromis niloticus in terms of the specific activities of cathepsins (B, H and L and the scavenging activities and thermal transition properties of myosin and actin, to assess postmortem changes with time (0, 1, 2, 4, 8, 12, 24 and 48 h after death. The study results are relevant to ambient temperatures in Thailand, (about 30 °C. The specific activities of the three cathepsin enzymes increased significantly with postmortem time (p < 0.05 and had a highly significant positive relationship (r = 0.987−0.997, p < 0.01, n = 32. Cathepsin H had the lowest specific activity and exhibited a different type of time profile. Its lowest specific activity was observed at 8 h, which indicated a significant role at this point in time after death. The radical scavenging activities substantially decreased with the time since death, especially within the first 1 h, while no changes occurred from 2 to 8 h, or from 12 to 24 h. The thermal properties of myosin and actin were observed up to a 24 h delay. The degradation of each protein fluctuated with the delay time; actin was more sensitive to postmortem delay than myosin. Overall, the findings from the current study might be used as primary data to estimate the time of death of an aquatic animal. A potential application is for environmental forensics in relation to fish kill events associated with pollution crimes or the mass death of exported fish under transportation insurance, as well as in animal cruelty investigations.

  9. An Aspartyl Cathepsin Targeted PET Agent: Application in an Alzheimer's Disease Mouse Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snir, Jonatan A; Suchy, Mojmir; Bindseil, Geron A; Kovacs, Michael; Chronik, Blaine A; Hudson, Robert H E; Pasternak, Stephen H; Bartha, Robert

    2018-01-01

    Early detection of Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology is a serious challenge for both diagnosis and clinical trials. The aspartyl protease, Cathepsin D (CatD), is overexpressed in AD and could be a biomarker of disease. We have previously designed a unique contrast agent (CA) for dual-optical and magnetic resonance imaging of the activity of the CatD class of enzymes. To compare the uptake and retention of a novel, more sensitive, and clinically-translatable 68Ga PET tracer targeting CatD activity in 5XFAD mice and non-Tg littermates. The targeted CA consisted of an HIV-1 Tat cell penetrating peptide (CPP) conjugated to a specialized cleavage sequence targeting aspartyl cathepsins and a DOTA conjugate chelating 68Ga. PET images were acquired using a Siemens Inveon preclinical microPET in female Tg AD mice and non-Tg age matched female littermates (n = 5-8) following intravenous CA administration at 2, 6, and 9 months of age. Additionally, 18F fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) PET imaging was performed at 10 months to measure glucose uptake. The Tg mice showed significantly higher relative uptake rate of the targeting CA in the forebrain relative to hindbrain at all ages compared to controls, consistent with histology. In contrast, no differences were seen in CA uptake in other organs. Additionally, the Tg mice did not show any differences in relative uptake of FDG at 10 months of age in the forebrain relative to the hindbrain compared to age matched non-Tg controls. Elevated aspartryl cathepsin activity was detected in vivo in the 5XFAD mouse model of AD using a novel targeted PET contrast agent.

  10. Analysis of Cathepsin and Furin Proteolytic Enzymes Involved in Viral Fusion Protein Activation in Cells of the Bat Reservoir Host

    Science.gov (United States)

    El Najjar, Farah; Lampe, Levi; Baker, Michelle L.; Wang, Lin-Fa; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2015-01-01

    Bats of different species play a major role in the emergence and transmission of highly pathogenic viruses including Ebola virus, SARS-like coronavirus and the henipaviruses. These viruses require proteolytic activation of surface envelope glycoproteins needed for entry, and cellular cathepsins have been shown to be involved in proteolysis of glycoproteins from these distinct virus families. Very little is currently known about the available proteases in bats. To determine whether the utilization of cathepsins by bat-borne viruses is related to the nature of proteases in their natural hosts, we examined proteolytic processing of several viral fusion proteins in cells derived from two fruit bat species, Pteropus alecto and Rousettus aegyptiacus. Our work shows that fruit bat cells have homologs of cathepsin and furin proteases capable of cleaving and activating both the cathepsin-dependent Hendra virus F and the furin-dependent parainfluenza virus 5 F proteins. Sequence analysis comparing Pteropus alecto furin and cathepsin L to proteases from other mammalian species showed a high degree of conservation; however significant amino acid variation occurs at the C-terminus of Pteropus alecto furin. Further analysis of furin-like proteases from fruit bats revealed that these proteases are catalytically active and resemble other mammalian furins in their response to a potent furin inhibitor. However, kinetic analysis suggests that differences may exist in the cellular localization of furin between different species. Collectively, these results indicate that the unusual role of cathepsin proteases in the life cycle of bat-borne viruses is not due to the lack of active furin-like proteases in these natural reservoir species; however, differences may exist between furin proteases present in fruit bats compared to furins in other mammalian species, and these differences may impact protease usage for viral glycoprotein processing. PMID:25706132

  11. Analysis of cathepsin and furin proteolytic enzymes involved in viral fusion protein activation in cells of the bat reservoir host.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Farah El Najjar

    Full Text Available Bats of different species play a major role in the emergence and transmission of highly pathogenic viruses including Ebola virus, SARS-like coronavirus and the henipaviruses. These viruses require proteolytic activation of surface envelope glycoproteins needed for entry, and cellular cathepsins have been shown to be involved in proteolysis of glycoproteins from these distinct virus families. Very little is currently known about the available proteases in bats. To determine whether the utilization of cathepsins by bat-borne viruses is related to the nature of proteases in their natural hosts, we examined proteolytic processing of several viral fusion proteins in cells derived from two fruit bat species, Pteropus alecto and Rousettus aegyptiacus. Our work shows that fruit bat cells have homologs of cathepsin and furin proteases capable of cleaving and activating both the cathepsin-dependent Hendra virus F and the furin-dependent parainfluenza virus 5 F proteins. Sequence analysis comparing Pteropus alecto furin and cathepsin L to proteases from other mammalian species showed a high degree of conservation; however significant amino acid variation occurs at the C-terminus of Pteropus alecto furin. Further analysis of furin-like proteases from fruit bats revealed that these proteases are catalytically active and resemble other mammalian furins in their response to a potent furin inhibitor. However, kinetic analysis suggests that differences may exist in the cellular localization of furin between different species. Collectively, these results indicate that the unusual role of cathepsin proteases in the life cycle of bat-borne viruses is not due to the lack of active furin-like proteases in these natural reservoir species; however, differences may exist between furin proteases present in fruit bats compared to furins in other mammalian species, and these differences may impact protease usage for viral glycoprotein processing.

  12. Protection against Fasciola gigantica infection in mice by vaccination with recombinant juvenile-specific cathepsin L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sansri, Veerawat; Meemon, Krai; Changklungmoa, Narin; Kueakhai, Pornanan; Chantree, Pathanin; Chaichanasak, Pannigan; Lorsuwannarat, Natcha; Itagaki, Tadashi; Sobhon, Prasert

    2015-03-24

    Fasciola gigantica cathepsin L1H (FgCatL1H) is one of the major cathepsin L released by juveniles of F. gigantica to aid in the invasion of host's tissues. Due to its high sequence similarity with other cathepsin L (CatL) isoforms of late stage F. gigantica, it was considered to be a good vaccine candidate that can block all CatL-mediated protease activities and affect juveniles as well as adult parasites. In this study, recombinant proFgCatL1H protein expressed in yeast, Pichia pastoris, system was mixed with Freund's adjuvants and used to subcutaneously immunize mice that were later challenged with metacercariae of F. gigantica. The percentage of worm protection in the rproFgCatL1H-vaccinated mice compared to the non-immunized and adjuvant control mice were approximately 62.7% and 66.1%, respectively. Anti-rproFgCatL1H antisera collected from vaccinated mice reacted specifically with rproFgCatL1H and other cathepsin L isoforms of F. gigantica, but the antibodies did not cross react with antigens from other trematode and nematode parasites, including Eurytrema pancreaticum, Opisthorchis viverrini, Fischoederius cobboldi, Cotylophoron cotylophorum, Gigantocotyle explanatum, Paramphistomum cervi, and Setaria labiato-papillosa. The levels of IgG1 and IgG2a in mouse sera increased significantly at two weeks after immunization and were highest during the sixth to eighth weeks after immunization. The IgG1 level was higher than IgG2a at all periods of immunization, implicating the dominance of the Th2 response. The levels of IgG1 and IgG2a in the immune sera were shown to be strongly correlated with the numbers of worm recovery, and the correlation coefficient was higher for IgG1. The levels of serum aspartate aminotransferase and alanine transaminase were significantly lower in the sera of rproFgCatL1H-vaccinated mice than in the infected control mice indicating a lower degree of liver damage. This study demonstrated a high potential of FgCatL1H vaccine, and its

  13. Overexpression of cathepsin f, matrix metalloproteinases 11 and 12 in cervical cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vazquez-Ortiz, Guelaguetza; Pina-Sanchez, Patricia; Vazquez, Karla; Duenas, Alfonso; Taja, Lucia; Mendoza, Patricia; Garcia, José A; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2005-01-01

    Background Cervical carcinoma (CC) is one of the most common cancers among women worldwide and the first cause of death among the Mexican female population. CC progression shows a continuum of neoplastic transitions until invasion. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and cathepsins play a central role on the enhancement of tumor-induced angiogenesis, cell migration, proliferation, apoptosis and connective tissue degradation. MMPs -2 and -9 expression has been widely studied in cervical cancer. Nevertheless, no other metalloproteinases or cathepsins have been yet related with the progression and/or invasion of this type of cancer. Methods Three HPV18 CC cell lines, two HPV16 CC cell lines and three HPV16 tumor CC tissues were compared with three morphologically normal, HPV negative, cervical specimens by cDNA arrays. Overexpression of selected genes was confirmed by end point semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR with densitometry. In situ hybridization and protein expression of selected genes was further studied by means of two tissue microarrays, one consisting of 10 HSIL and 15 CC and the other one of 15 normal cervical and 10 LSIL tissues. Results TIMP1, Integrins alpha 1 and 4, cadherin 2 and 11, Cathepsins F, B L2, MMP 9, 10 11 and 12 were upregulated and Cathepsin S, L, H and C, Cadherins 3 and 4, TIMP3, MMP 13, Elastase 2 and Integrin beta 8 were found to be downregulated by cDNA arrays. Endpoint RT-PCR with densitometry gave consistent results with the cDNA array findings for all three genes selected for study (CTSF, MMP11 and MMP12). In situ hybridization of all three genes confirmed overexpression in all the HSIL and CC. Two of the selected proteins were detected in LSIL, HSIL and CC by immunohistochemistry. Conclusion Novel undetected CC promoting genes have been identified. Increased transcription of these genes may result in overexpression of proteins, such as CTSF, MMP11 and MMP12 which could contribute to the pathogenesis of CC. PMID:15989693

  14. Overexpression of cathepsin f, matrix metalloproteinases 11 and 12 in cervical cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendoza Patricia

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cervical carcinoma (CC is one of the most common cancers among women worldwide and the first cause of death among the Mexican female population. CC progression shows a continuum of neoplastic transitions until invasion. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and cathepsins play a central role on the enhancement of tumor-induced angiogenesis, cell migration, proliferation, apoptosis and connective tissue degradation. MMPs -2 and -9 expression has been widely studied in cervical cancer. Nevertheless, no other metalloproteinases or cathepsins have been yet related with the progression and/or invasion of this type of cancer. Methods Three HPV18 CC cell lines, two HPV16 CC cell lines and three HPV16 tumor CC tissues were compared with three morphologically normal, HPV negative, cervical specimens by cDNA arrays. Overexpression of selected genes was confirmed by end point semiquantitative reverse transcription-PCR with densitometry. In situ hybridization and protein expression of selected genes was further studied by means of two tissue microarrays, one consisting of 10 HSIL and 15 CC and the other one of 15 normal cervical and 10 LSIL tissues. Results TIMP1, Integrins alpha 1 and 4, cadherin 2 and 11, Cathepsins F, B L2, MMP 9, 10 11 and 12 were upregulated and Cathepsin S, L, H and C, Cadherins 3 and 4, TIMP3, MMP 13, Elastase 2 and Integrin beta 8 were found to be downregulated by cDNA arrays. Endpoint RT-PCR with densitometry gave consistent results with the cDNA array findings for all three genes selected for study (CTSF, MMP11 and MMP12. In situ hybridization of all three genes confirmed overexpression in all the HSIL and CC. Two of the selected proteins were detected in LSIL, HSIL and CC by immunohistochemistry. Conclusion Novel undetected CC promoting genes have been identified. Increased transcription of these genes may result in overexpression of proteins, such as CTSF, MMP11 and MMP12 which could contribute to the pathogenesis

  15. IrCL1-The haemoglobinolytic cathepsin L of the hard tick, Ixodes ricinus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Franta, Zdeněk; Sojka, Daniel; Frantová, Helena; Dvořák, Jan; Horn, Martin; Srba, Jindřich; Talacko, Pavel; Mareš, Michael; Schneider, E.; Craik, C. S.; McKerrow, J. H.; Caffrey, C. R.; Kopáček, Petr

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 41, č. 12 (2011), 1253-1262 ISSN 0020-7519 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600960910; GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/10/2183; GA ČR GPP502/11/P682; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : tick gut * hemoglobin digestion * cathepsin L Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.393, year: 2011

  16. The synthesis of a tritium, carbon-14, and stable isotope-labeled cathepsin C inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Allen, Paul; Bragg, Ryan A; Caffrey, Moya; Ericsson, Cecilia; Hickey, Michael J; Kingston, Lee P; Elmore, Charles S

    2017-02-01

    As part of a medicinal chemistry program aimed at developing a highly potent and selective cathepsin C inhibitor, tritium, carbon-14, and stable isotope-labeled materials were required. The synthesis of tritium-labeled methanesulfonate 5 was achieved via catalytic tritiolysis of a chloro precursor, albeit at a low radiochemical purity of 67%. Tritium-labeled AZD5248 was prepared via a 3-stage synthesis, utilizing amide-directed hydrogen isotope exchange. Carbon-14 and stable isotope-labeled AZD5248 were successfully prepared through modifications of the medicinal chemistry synthetic route, enabling the use of available labeled intermediates. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Parasite Cathepsin D-Like Peptidases and Their Relevance as Therapeutic Targets

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sojka, Daniel; Hartmann, David; Bartošová-Sojková, Pavla; Dvořák, Jan

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 9 (2016), s. 708-723 ISSN 1471-4922 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA14-33693S; GA ČR GA13-11043S; GA ČR(CZ) GAP302/11/1481 EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 248642 - SCHISTOSOMA PROTEASE Institutional support: RVO:60077344 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : aspartic peptidases * cathepsin D * hemoglobinolysis * parasites * vectors Subject RIV: GJ - Animal Vermins ; Diseases, Veterinary Medicine Impact factor: 6.333, year: 2016

  18. Structure-based optimization of non-peptidic Cathepsin D inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grädler, Ulrich; Czodrowski, Paul; Tsaklakidis, Christos; Klein, Markus; Werkmann, Daniela; Lindemann, Sven; Maskos, Klaus; Leuthner, Birgitta

    2014-09-01

    We discovered a novel series of non-peptidic acylguanidine inhibitors of Cathepsin D as target for osteoarthritis. The initial HTS-hits were optimized by structure-based design using CatD X-ray structures resulting in single digit nanomolar potency in the biochemical CatD assay. However, the most potent analogues showed only micromolar activities in an ex vivo glycosaminoglycan (GAG) release assay in bovine cartilage together with low cellular permeability and suboptimal microsomal stability. This new scaffold can serve as a starting point for further optimization towards in vivo efficacy. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Loss of melanoregulin (MREG) enhances cathepsin-D secretion by the retinal pigment epithelium

    OpenAIRE

    Frost, Laura S.; Lopes, Vanda S.; Stefano, Frank P.; Bragin, Alvina; Williams, David S.; Mitchell, Claire H.; Boesze-Battaglia, Kathleen

    2013-01-01

    Cathepsin-D (Cat-D) is a major proteolytic enzyme in phagocytic cells. In the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE), it is responsible for the daily degradation of photoreceptor outer segments (POSs) to maintain retinal homeostasis. Melanoregulin (MREG)-mediated loss of phagocytic capacity has been linked to diminished intracellular Cat-D activity. Here, we demonstrate that loss of MREG enhances the secretion of intermediate Cat-D (48 kDa), resulting in a net enhancement of extracellular Cat-D act...

  20. Relationship between cathepsin B activity and compositional parameters in dry-cured hams of normal and defective texture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parolari, G; Virgili, R; Schivazappa, C

    1994-01-01

    Thirty-eight Italian dry-cured hams were analysed for cathepsin B activity, proximate composition and proteolysis index and results were related to lean tissue texture, as assessed by an expert panel, in order to search for relationships between excessive softness, a major problem in the raw ham industry, and chemical parameters. Softness was found to be related to protein breakdown which, in turn, was linked with higher residual cathepsin B activity and, to a lesser extent, to lower salt content. Results suggest that the use of raw ham of controlled enzyme activity would improve the texture quality of the end product. Copyright © 1994. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  1. The crystal structure of human dipeptidyl peptidase I (cathepsin C) in complex with the inhibitor Gly-Phe-CHN2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mølgaard, Anne; Arnau, Jose; Lauritzen, C.

    2007-01-01

    hDDPI (human dipeptidyl peptidase I) is a lysosomal cysteine protease involved in zymogen activation of granule-associated proteases, including granzymes A and B from cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and natural killer cells, cathepsin G and neutrophil elastase, and mast cell tryptase and chymase. In the ......hDDPI (human dipeptidyl peptidase I) is a lysosomal cysteine protease involved in zymogen activation of granule-associated proteases, including granzymes A and B from cytotoxic T-lymphocytes and natural killer cells, cathepsin G and neutrophil elastase, and mast cell tryptase and chymase...

  2. K-ras mutation promotes ionizing radiation-induced invasion and migration of lung cancer in part via the Cathepsin L/CUX1 pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Long; Zhao, Yifan; Xiong, Yajie; Wang, Wenjuan; Fei, Yao; Tan, Caihong; Liang, Zhongqin

    2018-01-15

    K-ras mutation is involved in cancer progression including invasion and migration, but the underlying mechanism is not yet clear. Cathepsin L is a lysosomal cysteine protease and has recently been associated with invasion and migration in human cancers when it is overexpressed. Our recent studies have shown that ionizing radiation (IR) enhanced expression of cathepsin L and increased invasion and migration of tumor cells, but the molecular mechanism is still unclear. In the present study, the effects of K-ras mutation and IR induced invasion and migration of lung cancer as well as the underlying mechanisms were investigated both in vitro and in vivo. Firstly, the levels of cathepsin L and epithelial mesenchymal transition (EMT) marker proteins remarkably changed in A549 (K-ras mutant) after irradiation compared with H1299 (K-ras wild), thereby promoting invasion and migration. Additionally, cathepsin L and its downstream transcription factor CUX1/p110 were increased after irradiation in A549 transfected with CUX1/p200, and the proteolytic processing of CUX1 by cathepsin L was remarkably increased after co-transfection of CUX1/p200 and cathepsin L-lentivirus in H1299. In addition, delivery of a mutant K-ras (V12) into HEK 293 cells stimulated EMT after irradiation due to the accumulation of cathepsin L. Moreover, mutated K-ras was associated with IR-induced cathepsin L and EMT in BALB/c nude mice. Finally, the level of cathepsin L expression was higher in samples carrying a K-ras mutation than in wild-type K-ras samples and the mesenchymal markers were upregulated in the samples of mutant K-ras, whereas the epithelial marker E-cadherin was downregulated in non-small cell lung cancers tissues. In conclusion, the findings demonstrated that mutated K-ras promotes cathepsin L expression and plays a pivotal role in EMT of human lung cancer. The regulatory effect of IR-induced cathepsin L on lung cancer invasion and migration was partially attributed to the Cathepsin L

  3. Polyamidoamine (PAMAM Dendrimers Modified with Cathepsin-B Cleavable Oligopeptides for Enhanced Gene Delivery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seulgi Lee

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Because of the complex mechanisms mediating cancer onset, prognosis, and metastatic behavior, different therapeutic approaches targeting these mechanisms have been investigated. Recent advancements in nanocarrier-based drug and gene delivery methods have encouraged scientific groups to investigate various novel therapeutic techniques. In this study, a poly(amidoamine (PAMAM polymer-based gene carrier containing the cathepsin B-enzyme sensitive sequence (glycine-phenylalanine-leucine-glycine, GFLG was evaluated to determine transfection efficiency. Following the GFLG sequence, the surface of PAMAM generation 4 (G4 was conjugated with histidine (H and arginine (R for improved endosomal escape and cellular uptake, respectively. The successful synthesis of G4-GLFG-H-R was confirmed by 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy. The polyplex composed of G4-GLFG-H-R and pDNA was simulated by the enzyme cathepsin B and induced endosomal escape of pDNA, which was confirmed by gel electrophoresis. Compared with the G4 control, enzyme-sensitive G4-GLFG-H-R showed higher transfection efficiency and lower cytotoxicity in HeLa cells. These results demonstrated that G4-GLFG-H-R may be a highly potent and efficient carrier for gene therapy applications.

  4. Extracellular cystatin SN and cathepsin B prevent cellular senescence by inhibiting abnormal glycogen accumulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Sang-Seok; Park, Soojong; Lee, Ki-Won; Madhi, Hamadi; Park, Sae Gwang; Lee, Hee Gu; Cho, Yong-Yeon; Yoo, Jiyun; Dong Kim, Kwang

    2017-04-06

    Cystatin SN (CST1), a known inhibitor of cathepsin B (CatB), has important roles in tumor development. Paradoxically, CatB is a member of the cysteine cathepsin family that acts in cellular processes, such as tumor development and invasion. However, the relationship between CST1 and CatB, and their roles in tumor development are poorly understood. In this study, we observed that the knockdown of CST1 induced the activity of senescence-associated β-galactosidase, a marker of cellular senescence, and expression of senescence-associated secretory phenotype genes, including interleukin-6 and chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 20, in MDA-MB-231 and SW480 cancer cells. Furthermore, CST1 knockdown decreased extracellular CatB activity, and direct CatB inhibition, using specific inhibitors or shCatB, induced cellular senescence. Reconstitution of CST1 restored CatB activity and inhibited cellular senescence in CST1 knockdown cells. CST1 knockdown or CatB inhibition increased glycogen synthase (GS) kinase 3β phosphorylation at serine 9, resulting in the activation of GS and the induction of glycogen accumulation associated with cellular senescence. Importantly, CST1 knockdown suppressed cancer cell proliferation, soft agar colony growth and tumor growth in a xenograft model. These results indicate that CST1-mediated extracellular CatB activity enhances tumor development by preventing cellular senescence. Our findings suggest that antagonists of CST1 or inhibitors of CatB are potential anticancer agents.

  5. Cathepsins and their inhibitors as tumor markers in head and neck cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Strojan, P.

    2004-01-01

    The invasion and metastasizing of tumor cells is closely connected with the disintegration of basement membranes and extracellular matrix. The carriers of these processes are different proteolytic enzymes, among them cysteine and aspartic cathepsins B, H, L and D as well, a group of ubiquitous lysosomal proteases, and endogenous inhibitors of the former, cystatins. The aim of the present review was to collect the current knowledge on the predictive and prognostic value of cathepsins and their inhibitors in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck. In this particular tumor type, the UICC/AJCC TNM-classification system and histopathological characteristics of the tumors were found inadequate to reliably predict either the response to therapy or patients' survival. Moreover, to date, no factor within the wide spectrum of biochemical and histological factors has yet been identified as reliably predicting the natural course of the disease or its response to therapy. To construct a prognostically meaningful tumor profile, new markers are intensively investigated. (author)

  6. Unnatural amino acids increase activity and specificity of synthetic substrates for human and malarial cathepsin C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poreba, Marcin; Mihelic, Marko; Krai, Priscilla; Rajkovic, Jelena; Krezel, Artur; Pawelczak, Malgorzata; Klemba, Michael; Turk, Dusan; Turk, Boris; Latajka, Rafal; Drag, Marcin

    2014-04-01

    Mammalian cathepsin C is primarily responsible for the removal of N-terminal dipeptides and activation of several serine proteases in inflammatory or immune cells, while its malarial parasite ortholog dipeptidyl aminopeptidase 1 plays a crucial role in catabolizing the hemoglobin of its host erythrocyte. In this report, we describe the systematic substrate specificity analysis of three cathepsin C orthologs from Homo sapiens (human), Bos taurus (bovine) and Plasmodium falciparum (malaria parasite). Here, we present a new approach with a tailored fluorogenic substrate library designed and synthesized to probe the S1 and S2 pocket preferences of these enzymes with both natural and a broad range of unnatural amino acids. Our approach identified very efficiently hydrolyzed substrates containing unnatural amino acids, which resulted in the design of significantly better substrates than those previously known. Additionally, in this study significant differences in terms of the structures of optimal substrates for human and malarial orthologs are important from the therapeutic point of view. These data can be also used for the design of specific inhibitors or activity-based probes.

  7. Cystatin SN neutralizes the inhibitory effect of cystatin C on cathepsin B activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, J-T; Lee, S-J; Kang, M A; Park, J E; Kim, B-Y; Yoon, D-Y; Yang, Y; Lee, C-H; Yeom, Y I; Choe, Y-K; Lee, H G

    2013-12-19

    Cystatin SN (CST1) is one of the several salivary cystatins that form tight equimolar complexes with cysteine proteases, such as the cathepsins. High expression of CST1 is correlated with advanced pTNM stage in gastric cancer. However, the functional role of CST1 in tumorigenesis has not been elucidated. In this study, we showed that CST1 was highly expressed in colon tumor tissues, compared with nontumor regions. Increased cell proliferation and invasiveness were observed in HCT116 cell lines stably transfected with CST1 cDNA (HCT116-CST1) but not in CST3-transfected cells. We also demonstrated that CST1-overexpressing cell lines exhibited increased tumor growth as well as metastasis in a xenograft nude mouse model. Interestingly, CST1 interacted with cystatin C (CST3), a potent cathepsin B (CTSB) inhibitor, with a higher affinity than the interaction between CST3 and CTSB in the extracellular space of HCT116 cells. CTSB-mediated cellular invasiveness and proteolytic activities were strongly inhibited by CST3, but in the presence of CST1 CTSB activities recovered significantly. Furthermore, domain mapping of CST1 showed that the disulfide-bonded conformation, or conserved folding, of CST1 is important for its secretion and for the neutralization of CST3 activity. These results suggest that CST1 upregulation might be involved in colorectal tumorigenesis and acts by neutralizing the inhibition of CTSB proteolytic activity by CST3.

  8. Cystatin C as a p53-inducible apoptotic mediator that regulates cathepsin L activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mori, Jinichi; Tanikawa, Chizu; Funauchi, Yuki; Lo, Paulisally Hau Yi; Nakamura, Yusuke; Matsuda, Koichi

    2016-03-01

    In response to various cellular stresses, p53 is activated and inhibits malignant transformation through the transcriptional regulation of its target genes. However, the full picture of the p53 downstream pathway still remains to be elucidated. Here we identified cystatin C, a major inhibitor of cathepsins, as a novel p53 target. In response to DNA damage, activated p53 induced cystatin C expression through p53 binding sequence in the first intron. We showed that cathepsin L activity was decreased in HCT116 p53(+/+) cells after adriamycin treatment, but not in HCT116 p53(-/-) cells. We also found that knockdown of cystatin C reduced adriamycin-induced caspase-3 activation. Cystatin C expression was significantly downregulated in breast cancer cells with p53 mutations, and decreased cystatin C expression was associated with poor prognosis of breast cancer. Our findings revealed an important role of the p53-cystatin C pathway in human carcinogenesis. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer Science published by John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd on behalf of Japanese Cancer Association.

  9. Human cathepsin L rescues the neurodegeneration and lethality incathepsin B/L double deficient mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sevenich, Lisa; Pennacchio, Len A.; Peters, Christoph; Reinheckel, Thomas

    2006-01-09

    Cathepsin B (CTSB) and cathepsin L (CTSL) are two widelyexpressed cysteine proteases thought to predominantly reside withinlysosomes. Functional analysis of CTSL in humans is complicated by theexistence of two CTSL-like homologues (CTSL and CTSL2), in contrast tomice which contain only one CTSL enzyme. Thus transgenic expression ofhuman CTSL in CTSL deficient mice provides an opportunity to study the invivo functions of this human protease without interference by its highlyrelated homologue. While mice with single gene deficiencies for murineCTSB or CTSL survive without apparent neuromuscular impairment, murineCTSB/CTSL double deficient mice display degeneration of cerebellarPurkinje cells and neurons of the cerebral cortex, resulting in severehypotrophy, motility defects, and lethality during their third to fourthweek of life. Here we show that expression of human CTSL through agenomic transgene results in widespread expression of human CTSL in themouse which is capable of rescuing the lethality found in CTSB/CTSLdouble-deficient animals. Human CTSL is expressed in the brain of thesecompound mutants predominantly in neurons of the cerebral cortex and inPurkinje cells of the cerebellum, where it appears to prevent neuronalcell death.

  10. Crystallographic, DFT and docking (cathepsin B) studies on an organotellurium(IV) compound

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Caracelli, Ignez; Maganhi, Stella H.; Zukerman-Schpector, Julio; Sousa Madureira, Lucas; Stefani, Helio A.; Guadagnin, Rafael C.; Tiekink, Edward R.T.

    2016-01-01

    Some biologically active organotellurium compounds exhibit inhibitory potency against cathepsin B. In this study, an alkyl derivative, viz. [CH 3 (CH 2 ) 2 C(I)=C(H)](nBu)TeI 2 , 1, has been structurally characterised by X-ray crystallography and shown to be coordinated within a C 2 I 2 donor set. When the stereochemically active lone pair of electrons is taken into account, a distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometry results with the iodide atoms in axial positions. Both intra- and inter-molecular Te..I interactions are also noted. If all interactions are considered, the coordination geometry is based on a Ψ-pentagonal bipyramidal geometry. An unusual feature of the structure is the curving of the functionalised C 5 chain. This feature has been explored by DFT methods and shown to arise as a result of close C-H..I interactions. A docking study (cathepsin B) was performed to understand the inhibition mechanism and to compare the new results with previous observations. Notably, 1 has the same pose exhibited by analogous biologically active compounds with aryl groups. Thus, the present study suggests that (alkyl) 2 TeX 2 compounds should also be evaluated for biological activity.

  11. Crystallographic, DFT and docking (cathepsin B) studies on an organotellurium(IV) compound

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caracelli, Ignez; Maganhi, Stella H. [Univ. Federal de Sao Carlos (Brazil). BioMat; Zukerman-Schpector, Julio; Sousa Madureira, Lucas [Univ. Federal de Sao Carlos (Brazil). Lab. de Cristalografia, Estereodinamica e Modelagem Molecular; Stefani, Helio A. [Sao Paulo Univ. (Brazil). Dept. de Farmacia; Guadagnin, Rafael C. [Univ. Federal de Sao Paulo, Diadema (Brazil). Inst. e Ciencias Mabientais, Quimicas e Farmaceuticas; Tiekink, Edward R.T. [Sunway Univ., Selangor Darul Ehsan (Malaysia). Centre for Crystalline Materials

    2016-08-01

    Some biologically active organotellurium compounds exhibit inhibitory potency against cathepsin B. In this study, an alkyl derivative, viz. [CH{sub 3}(CH{sub 2}){sub 2}C(I)=C(H)](nBu)TeI{sub 2}, 1, has been structurally characterised by X-ray crystallography and shown to be coordinated within a C{sub 2}I{sub 2} donor set. When the stereochemically active lone pair of electrons is taken into account, a distorted trigonal bipyramidal geometry results with the iodide atoms in axial positions. Both intra- and inter-molecular Te..I interactions are also noted. If all interactions are considered, the coordination geometry is based on a Ψ-pentagonal bipyramidal geometry. An unusual feature of the structure is the curving of the functionalised C{sub 5} chain. This feature has been explored by DFT methods and shown to arise as a result of close C-H..I interactions. A docking study (cathepsin B) was performed to understand the inhibition mechanism and to compare the new results with previous observations. Notably, 1 has the same pose exhibited by analogous biologically active compounds with aryl groups. Thus, the present study suggests that (alkyl){sub 2}TeX{sub 2} compounds should also be evaluated for biological activity.

  12. The lysosomal enzymes acid phosphatase and cathepsin D in rats intoxicated with Senna occidentalis seeds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calore, E E; Calore, N M; Weg, R; Cavaliere, M J; Ruckert da Rosa, A; De Souza Dias, S

    1999-04-01

    Chronic administration of Senna occidentalis seeds induces an experimental toxic myopathy characterized by skeletal muscle fibers atrophy, decrease in histochemical activity of cytochrome oxidase, and increase of the acid phosphatase activity in muscle fibres at the light microscopic level. The mechanisms that lead to the increase of this lysosomal enzyme activity are not known and could be related to other biochemical disturbs than the mitochondrial function impairment. The main aim of the present study is to localize the acid phosphatase activity using a cytochemical method at transmission electron microscopy level and to quantify cathepsin D in muscle of rats chronically intoxicated with Senna occidentalis seeds by immunoblotting. Acid phosphatase was observed in lysosomes and over profiles of some organelles apparently not involved by lysosomal membrane. In addition immunoblotting demonstrated a decrease in the content of the precursor and of the mature form of cathepsin D in samples of muscles and liver of intoxicated animals. We concluded that there is a selective increase in acid phosphatase activity in muscle--and maybe in other tissues--of animals intoxicated with Senna occidentalis, that can be related to the skeletal muscle atrophy and the intense decrease in weight gain of these animals. Further studies should be performed to establish the mechanisms of selectivity in increase of lysosomal enzymes in different situations and pathological states.

  13. Neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G protein and messenger RNA expression in bone marrow from a patient with Chediak-Higashi syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burnett, D; Ward, C J; Stockley, R A; Dalton, R G; Cant, A J; Hoare, S; Crocker, J

    1995-01-01

    Aims—To determine whether neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G are expressed, at transcriptional or translational levels, in the bone marrow from a patient with Chediak-Higashi syndrome. Methods—Blood neutrophils were isolated from three patients with Chediak-Higashi disease and bone marrow was collected from one. Cell lysates were analysed for neutrophil elastase and cathepsin G activity by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay and western immunoblotting. Northern blotting was used to detect messenger RNA (mRNA) for cathepsin G, elastase and β-actin in bone marrow extracts, and immunohistochemistry was used to localise the enzymes in marrow myeloid cells. Results—Elastase and cathepsin G were not detected in blood neutrophils from the patients with Chediak-Higashi disease, but were present in bone marrow cells, although immunohistochemistry showed they were not within cytoplasmic granules. The concentrations of elastase and cathepsin G in Chediak-Higashi bone marrow were about 25 and 15%, respectively, of those in normal marrow. Quantitative scanning of northern blots showed that elastase and cathepsin G mRNA, corrected for β-actin mRNA, were expressed equally in normal marrow. Conclusions—Transcription of elastase and cathepsin G mRNA in promyelocytes of patients with Chediak-Higashi disease is normal, but the protein products are deficient in these cells and absent in mature neutrophils. This suggests that the translated proteins are not packaged into azurophil granules but are degaded or secreted from the cells. Images PMID:16695972

  14. DNA structures decorated with cathepsin G/secretory leukocyte proteinase inhibitor stimulate IFNI production by plasmacytoid dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skrzeczynska-Moncznik, Joanna; Wlodarczyk, Agnieszka; Banas, Magdalena

    2013-01-01

    psoriasis. Here, we demonstrate that IFNI production in pDCs is stimulated by DNA structures containing the neutrophil serine protease cathepsin G (CatG) and the secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), which is a controlling inhibitor of serine proteases. We also demonstrate the presence...

  15. Identification of dipeptidyl nitriles as potent and selective inhibitors of cathepsin B through structure-based drug design.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greenspan, P D; Clark, K L; Tommasi, R A; Cowen, S D; McQuire, L W; Farley, D L; van Duzer, J H; Goldberg, R L; Zhou, H; Du, Z; Fitt, J J; Coppa, D E; Fang, Z; Macchia, W; Zhu, L; Capparelli, M P; Goldstein, R; Wigg, A M; Doughty, J R; Bohacek, R S; Knap, A K

    2001-12-20

    Cathepsin B is a member of the papain superfamily of cysteine proteases and has been implicated in the pathology of numerous diseases, including arthritis and cancer. As part of an effort to identify potent, reversible inhibitors of this protease, we examined a series of dipeptidyl nitriles, starting with the previously reported Cbz-Phe-NH-CH(2)CN (19, IC(50) = 62 microM). High-resolution X-ray crystallographic data and molecular modeling were used to optimize the P(1), P(2), and P(3) substituents of this template. Cathepsin B is unique in its class in that it contains a carboxylate recognition site in the S(2)' pocket of the active site. Inhibitor potency and selectivity were enhanced by tethering a carboxylate functionality from the carbon alpha to the nitrile to interact with this region of the enzyme. This resulted in the identification of compound 10, a 7 nM inhibitor of cathepsin B, with excellent selectivity over other cysteine cathepsins.

  16. Construction of a plasmid coding for green fluorescent protein tagged cathepsin L and data on expression in colorectal carcinoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tripti Tamhane

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The endo-lysosomal cysteine cathepsin L has recently been shown to have moonlighting activities in that its unexpected nuclear localization in colorectal carcinoma cells is involved in cell cycle progression (Tamhane et al., 2015 [1]. Here, we show data on the construction and sequence of a plasmid coding for human cathepsin L tagged with an enhanced green fluorescent protein (phCL-EGFP in which the fluorescent protein is covalently attached to the C-terminus of the protease. The plasmid was used for transfection of HCT116 colorectal carcinoma cells, while data from non-transfected and pEGFP-N1-transfected cells is also shown. Immunoblotting data of lysates from non-transfected controls and HCT116 cells transfected with pEGFP-N1 and phCL-EGFP, showed stable expression of cathepsin L-enhanced green fluorescent protein chimeras, while endogenous cathepsin L protein amounts exceed those of hCL-EGFP chimeras. An effect of phCL-EGFP expression on proliferation and metabolic states of HCT116 cells at 24 h post-transfection was observed.

  17. Single- and Double-Headed Chemical Probes for Detection of Active Cathepsin D in a Cancer Cell Proteome

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Nussbaumerová, Martina; Srp, Jaroslav; Máša, Martin; Hradilek, Martin; Šanda, Miloslav; Reiniš, Milan; Horn, Martin; Mareš, Michael

    2010-01-01

    Roč. 11, č. 11 (2010), s. 1538-1541 ISSN 1439-4227 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA400550705 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506; CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Keywords : cathepsin D * cancer * activity-based probes Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.945, year: 2010

  18. Molecular cloning and functional characterisation of a cathepsin L-like proteinases from the fish kinetoplastid parasite Trypanosoma carassii

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ruszczyk, A.; Forlenza, M.; Savelkoul, H.F.J.; Wiegertjes, G.F.

    2008-01-01

    Trypanosoma carassii is a fish kinetoplastid parasite that belongs to the family Trypanosomatida. In the present study we cloned a cathepsin L-like proteinase from T. carassii. The nucleotide sequence of 1371 bp translated into a preproprotein of 456 amino acids. The preproprotein contained the

  19. Synergistic apoptotic response between valproic acid and fludarabine in chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL) cells involves the lysosomal protease cathepsin B

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoon, J-Y; Szwajcer, D; Ishdorj, G; Benjaminson, P; Xiao, W; Kumar, R; Johnston, J B; Gibson, S B

    2013-01-01

    Fludarabine, a nucleoside analogue, is commonly used in combination with other agents for the treatment of chronic lymphocytic leukaemia (CLL). In previous studies, valproic acid (VPA), an inhibitor of histone deacetylases, combined with fludarabine to synergistically increase apoptotic cell death in CLL cells. In the present study, we found that the combination of fludarabine and VPA decreases the level of the anti-apoptotic proteins Mcl-1 and XIAP in primary CLL cells. Treatment with fludarabine alone, or in combination with VPA, led to the loss of lysosome integrity, and chemical inhibition of the lysosomal protease cathepsin B, using CA074-Me, was sufficient to reduce apoptosis. VPA treatment increased cathepsin B levels and activities in primary CLL cells, thereby priming CLL cells for lysosome-mediated cell death. Six previously treated patients with relapsed CLL were treated with VPA, followed by VPA/fludarabine combination. The combined therapy resulted in reduced lymphocyte count in five out of six and reduced lymph node sizes in four out of six patients. In vivo VPA treatment increased histone-3 acetylation and cathepsin B expression levels. Thus, the synergistic apoptotic response with VPA and fludarabine in CLL is mediated by cathepsin B activation leading to a decrease in the anti-apoptotic proteins

  20. Tumor Necrosis Factor-α Induced Apoptosis in U937 Cells Promotes Cathepsin D-Independent Stefin B Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidovec, Katja; Božič, Janja; Dolenc, Iztok; Turk, Boris; Turk, Vito; Stoka, Veronika

    2017-12-01

    Lysosomal cathepsins were previously found to be involved in tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα)-induced apoptosis. However, there are opposing views regarding their role as either initiators or amplifiers of the signaling cascade as well as the order of molecular events during this process. In this study, we investigated the role of cathepsin D (catD) in TNFα/cycloheximide-induced apoptosis in U937 human monocytic cells. TNFα-induced apoptosis proceeds through caspase-8 activation, processing of the pro-apoptotic molecule Bid, mitochondrial membrane permeabilization, and caspase-3 activation. The translocation of lysosomal catD into the cytosol was a late event, suggesting that lysosomal membrane permeabilization and the release of cathepsins are not required for the induction of apoptosis, but rather amplifies the process through the generation of reactive oxygen species. For the first time, we show that apoptosis is accompanied by degradation of the cysteine cathepsin inhibitor stefin B (StfB). CatD did not exhibit a crucial role in this step. However, this degradation was partially prevented through pre-incubation with the antioxidant N-acetyl cysteine, although it did not prevent apoptosis and its progression. These results suggest that the degradation of StfB, as a response to TNFα, could induce a cell death amplification effect as a result of progressive damage to lysosomes during TNFα treatment. J. Cell. Biochem. 118: 4813-4820, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Cathepsin B is involved in the heat shock induced cardiomyocytes apoptosis as well as the anti-apoptosis effect of HSP-70.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Shu-Fen; Hsu, Chuan-Chih; Cheng, Bor-Chih; Lin, Cheng-Hsien

    2014-11-01

    Cathepsin B is one of the major lysosomal cysteine proteases that plays an important role in apoptosis. Herein, we investigated whether Cathepsin B is involved in cardiomyocyte apoptosis caused by hyperthermic injury (HI) and heat shock protein (HSP)-70 protects these cells from HI-induced apoptosis mediated by Cathepsin. HI was produced in H9C2 cells by putting them in a circulating 43 °C water bath for 120 min, whereas preinduction of HSP-70 was produced in H9C2 cells by mild heat preconditioning (or putting them in 42 °C water bath for 30 min) 8 h before the start of HI. It was found that HI caused both cardiomyocyte apoptosis and increased Cathepsin B activity in H9C2 cells. E-64-c, in addition to reducing Cathepsin B activity, significantly attenuated HI-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis (evidenced by increased apoptotic cell numbers, increased tuncated Bid (t-Bid), increased cytochrome C, increased caspase-9/-3, and decreased Bcl-2/Bax) in H9C2 cells. In addition, preinduction of HSP-70 by mild heat preconditioning or inhibition of HSP-70 by Tripolide significantly attenuated or exacerbated respectively both the cardiomyocyte apoptosis and increased Cathepsin B activity in H9C2 cells. Furthermore, the beneficial effects of pre-induction of HSP-70 by mild heat production in reducing both cardiomyocyte apoptosis and increased Cathepsin B activity caused by HI can be significantly reduced by Triptolide preconditioning. These results indicate that Cathepsin B is involved in HI-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis in H9C2 cells and HSP-70 protects these cells from HI-induced cardiomyocyte apoptosis through Cathepsin B pathways.

  2. Cathepsin activities and membrane integrity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) oocytes after freezing to -196 degrees C using controlled slow cooling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, T; Rawson, D M; Tosti, L; Carnevali, O

    2008-04-01

    This study investigated enzymatic activity of cathepsins and the membrane integrity of zebrafish (Danio rerio) oocytes after freezing to -196 degrees C using controlled slow cooling. Stage III oocytes (>0.5mm), obtained through dissection of anaesthetised female fish and desegregation of ovarian cumulus, were exposed to 2M methanol or 2M DMSO (both prepared in Hank's medium) for 30min at 22 degrees C before being loaded into 0.5ml plastic straws and placed into a programmable cooler. After controlled slow freezing, samples were plunged into liquid nitrogen (LN) and held for at least 10min, and thawed by immersing straws into a 27 degrees C water bath for 10s. Thawed oocytes were washed twice in Hank's medium. Cathepsin activity and membrane integrity of oocytes were assessed both after cryoprotectant treatment at 22 degrees C and after freezing in LN. Cathepsin B and L colorimetric analyses were performed using substrates Z-Arg-ArgNNap and Z-Phe-Arg-4MbetaNA-HCl, respectively, and 2-naphthylamine and 4-methoxy-2-naphthylamine were used as standards. Cathepsin D activity was performed by analysing the level of hydrolytic action on haemoglobin. Oocytes membrane integrity was assessed using 0.2% Trypan blue staining for 5min. Analysis of cathepsin activities showed that whilst the activity of cathepsin B and D was not affected by 2M DMSO treatment, their activity was lowered when treated with 2M methanol. Following freezing to -196 degrees C, the activity of all cathepsins (B, D and L) was significantly decreased in both 2M DMSO and 2M methanol. Trypan blue staining showed that 63.0+/-11.3% and 72.7+/-5.2% oocytes membrane stayed intact after DMSO and methanol treatment for 30min at 22 degrees C, respectively, whilst 14.9+/-2.6% and 1.4+/-0.8% stayed intact after freezing in DMSO and methanol to -196 degrees C. The results indicate that cryoprotectant treatment and freezing modified the activities of lysosomal enzymes involved in oocyte maturation and yolk

  3. A Comparative Study of Cathepsin D Expression in Peripheral and Central Giant Cell Granuloma of the Jaws by Immunohistochemistry Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zargaran, Massoumeh; Moghimbeigi, Abbas; Afsharmoghadam, Noushin; Nasr Isfahani, Mohsen; Hashemi, Atefeh

    2016-06-01

    Peripheral and central giant cell granuloma are two common benign lesions of the oral cavity. In spite of histopathological similarities, they have different clinical behaviors. Cathepsin D is a lysosomal enzyme which has different functions on the basis of protein and applied peptide cleavage. This research aimed to evaluate and compare the expression level of Cathepsin D in these two lesions to find the reasons for the differences in clinical and biologic characteristics. The expression of Cathepsin D was investigated by using the immunohistochemistry method in 20 samples of peripheral giant cell granuloma and 20 samples of central giant cell granuloma. The percentage of stained giant cells (labeling index), the intensity of staining of giant cells, and staining-intensity-distribution in both groups were calculated and compared. The labeling indices of Cathepsin D in peripheral giant cell granuloma and central giant cell granuloma were 95.9±4.03 and 95.6±2.34, respectively. There was no significant difference in the percentages of stained giant cells between the two groups (p= 0.586). The intensity of staining of giant cells in central giant cell granuloma was stronger than that of peripheral giant cell granuloma (p> 0.001). Staining- intensity- distribution of giant cells in central giant cell granuloma was significantly greater than that of the peripheral type of lesion (p= 0.001). The higher expression level of Cathepsin D in central giant cell granuloma compared to peripheral type of lesion can explain more aggressive behavior of central giant cell granuloma.

  4. Excessive activity of cathepsin K is associated with cartilage defects in a zebrafish model of mucolipidosis II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaron C. Petrey

    2012-03-01

    The severe pediatric disorder mucolipidosis II (ML-II; also known as I-cell disease is caused by defects in mannose 6-phosphate (Man-6-P biosynthesis. Patients with ML-II exhibit multiple developmental defects, including skeletal, craniofacial and joint abnormalities. To date, the molecular mechanisms that underlie these clinical manifestations are poorly understood. Taking advantage of a zebrafish model of ML-II, we previously showed that the cartilage morphogenesis defects in this model are associated with altered chondrocyte differentiation and excessive deposition of type II collagen, indicating that aspects of development that rely on proper extracellular matrix homeostasis are sensitive to decreases in Man-6-P biosynthesis. To further investigate the molecular bases for the cartilage phenotypes, we analyzed the transcript abundance of several genes in chondrocyte-enriched cell populations isolated from wild-type and ML-II zebrafish embryos. Increased levels of cathepsin and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP transcripts were noted in ML-II cell populations. This increase in transcript abundance corresponded with elevated and sustained activity of several cathepsins (K, L and S and MMP-13 during early development. Unlike MMP-13, for which higher levels of protein were detected, the sustained activity of cathepsin K at later stages seemed to result from its abnormal processing and activation. Inhibition of cathepsin K activity by pharmacological or genetic means not only reduced the activity of this enzyme but led to a broad reduction in additional protease activity, significant correction of the cartilage morphogenesis phenotype and reduced type II collagen staining in ML-II embryos. Our findings suggest a central role for excessive cathepsin K activity in the developmental aspects of ML-II cartilage pathogenesis and highlight the utility of the zebrafish system to address the biochemical underpinnings of metabolic disease.

  5. Identification of Chalcones as Fasciola hepatica Cathepsin L Inhibitors Using a Comprehensive Experimental and Computational Approach.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Florencia Ferraro

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Increased reports of human infections have led fasciolosis, a widespread disease of cattle and sheep caused by the liver flukes Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica, to be considered an emerging zoonotic disease. Chemotherapy is the main control measure available, and triclabendazole is the preferred drug since is effective against both juvenile and mature parasites. However, resistance to triclabendazole has been reported in several countries urging the search of new chemical entities and target molecules to control fluke infections.We searched a library of forty flavonoid derivatives for inhibitors of key stage specific Fasciola hepatica cysteine proteases (FhCL3 and FhCL1. Chalcones substituted with phenyl and naphtyl groups emerged as good cathepsin L inhibitors, interacting more frequently with two putative binding sites within the active site cleft of the enzymes. One of the compounds, C34, tightly bounds to juvenile specific FhCL3 with an IC50 of 5.6 μM. We demonstrated that C34 is a slow-reversible inhibitor that interacts with the Cys-His catalytic dyad and key S2 and S3 pocket residues, determinants of the substrate specificity of this family of cysteine proteases. Interestingly, C34 induces a reduction in NEJ ability to migrate through the gut wall and a loss of motility phenotype that leads to NEJ death within a week in vitro, while it is not cytotoxic to bovine cells.Up to date there are no reports of in vitro screening for non-peptidic inhibitors of Fasciola hepatica cathepsins, while in general these are considered as the best strategy for in vivo inhibition. We have identified chalcones as novel inhibitors of the two main Cathepsins secreted by juvenile and adult liver flukes. Interestingly, one compound (C34 is highly active towards the juvenile enzyme reducing larval ability to penetrate the gut wall and decreasing NEJ´s viability in vitro. These findings open new avenues for the development of novel agents to control

  6. Characterization and differential expression of cathepsin L3 alleles from Fasciola hepatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zawistowska-Deniziak, A; Wasyl, K; Norbury, L J; Wesołowska, A; Bień, J; Grodzik, M; Wiśniewski, M; Bąska, P; Wędrychowicz, H

    2013-07-01

    Fasciola hepatica infections cause significant global problems in veterinary and human medicine, including causing huge losses in cattle and sheep production. F. hepatica host infection is a multistage process and flukes express papain-like cysteine proteases, termed cathepsins, which play pivotal roles in virulence through host entry, tissue migration and immune evasion. Expression of these proteases is developmentally regulated. Recent studies indicate that excystment of infective larvae is dependent on cysteine proteases and together FhCL3 and FhCB account for over 80% of total protease activity detectable in newly excysted juvenile (NEJ) fluke. This paper focuses on members of the cathepsin L gene family, specifically those belonging to the CL3 clade. The cDNA of two novel cathepsin L3 proteases--FhCL3-1 and FhCL3-2 were cloned. The mRNA transcript expression levels for these enzymes were significantly different at various time points in life development stages obtained in vitro, from dormant metacercariae to NEJ 24h after excystment. Maximum expression levels were observed in NEJ immediately after excystment. In all stages examined by Real Time PCR, FhCL3-2 was expressed at a higher level compared to FhCL3-1 which was expressed only at very low levels. Western blot and immunohistochemical analysis also indicated higher expression of the FhCL3-2 allele and its secretory nature. The ability of antibody responses from rats and sheep challenged with F. hepatica to recognize recombinant FhCL3-1 and FhCL3-2 was shown to differ. Differences were also confirmed through the use of anti-rFhCL3-1 and anti-rFhCL3-2 sera in Western blot analysis of juvenile excretory/secretory (ES) material separated by 2D electrophoresis. These results indicate analysis of relative expression of parasite virulence factors from different populations is required, as this will likely impact the effectiveness of vaccines based on these antigens. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights

  7. Identification of Chalcones as Fasciola hepatica Cathepsin L Inhibitors Using a Comprehensive Experimental and Computational Approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ferraro, Florencia; Merlino, Alicia; Dell Oca, Nicolás; Gil, Jorge; Tort, José F; Gonzalez, Mercedes; Cerecetto, Hugo; Cabrera, Mauricio; Corvo, Ileana

    2016-07-01

    Increased reports of human infections have led fasciolosis, a widespread disease of cattle and sheep caused by the liver flukes Fasciola hepatica and Fasciola gigantica, to be considered an emerging zoonotic disease. Chemotherapy is the main control measure available, and triclabendazole is the preferred drug since is effective against both juvenile and mature parasites. However, resistance to triclabendazole has been reported in several countries urging the search of new chemical entities and target molecules to control fluke infections. We searched a library of forty flavonoid derivatives for inhibitors of key stage specific Fasciola hepatica cysteine proteases (FhCL3 and FhCL1). Chalcones substituted with phenyl and naphtyl groups emerged as good cathepsin L inhibitors, interacting more frequently with two putative binding sites within the active site cleft of the enzymes. One of the compounds, C34, tightly bounds to juvenile specific FhCL3 with an IC50 of 5.6 μM. We demonstrated that C34 is a slow-reversible inhibitor that interacts with the Cys-His catalytic dyad and key S2 and S3 pocket residues, determinants of the substrate specificity of this family of cysteine proteases. Interestingly, C34 induces a reduction in NEJ ability to migrate through the gut wall and a loss of motility phenotype that leads to NEJ death within a week in vitro, while it is not cytotoxic to bovine cells. Up to date there are no reports of in vitro screening for non-peptidic inhibitors of Fasciola hepatica cathepsins, while in general these are considered as the best strategy for in vivo inhibition. We have identified chalcones as novel inhibitors of the two main Cathepsins secreted by juvenile and adult liver flukes. Interestingly, one compound (C34) is highly active towards the juvenile enzyme reducing larval ability to penetrate the gut wall and decreasing NEJ´s viability in vitro. These findings open new avenues for the development of novel agents to control fluke infection and

  8. [Wegener's granulomatosis with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies against anti-cathepsin G antigen].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña Pérez, E; Peña Casas, A M; del Campo Muñoz, T; Avila Casas, A; Luque Barona, R

    2013-12-01

    Wegener's granulomatosis belongs to the group of small vessel vasculitis associated with anti-neutrophil cytoplasmic antibodies characterized by granulomatous inflammation and necrotising vasculitis in various organs with particular involvement of the upper and lower respiratory tracts and kidneys. Wegener's granulomatosis is a rare disorder in childhood and early diagnosis of this disease is critical to the long-term prognosis of the disease. The presence of positive cytoplasmic antineutrophil cytoplasmic antibody staining or a high titre of proteinase 3 antibodies were added as new criteria of vasculitis in childhood. This article presents a case of Wegener's granulomatosis, with the presence of anti-neutrophil cytoplasm antibodies with cytoplasmic pattern with absence of anti-proteinase 3 antibodies and presence of high levels of anti-cathepsin G antibodies, rarely described in Wegener's granulomatosis. Copyright © 2012 Asociación Española de Pediatría. Published by Elsevier Espana. All rights reserved.

  9. Cysteine cathepsins: their role in tumor progression and recent trends in the development of imaging probes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Reik eLöser

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Papain-like cysteine proteases bear an enormous potential as drug discovery targets for both infectious and systemic human diseases. The considerable progress in this field over the last two decades has also raised interest in the visualization of these enzymes in their native context, especially with regard to tumor imaging.After a short introduction to structure and general functions of human cysteine cathepsins, we highlight their importance for drug discovery and development and provide a critical update on the current state of knowledge towards their involvement in tumor progression, with a special emphasis on their role in therapy response. In accordance with a radiopharmaceutical point of view, the main focus of this review article will be the discussion of recently developed fluorescence and radiotracer-based imaging agents together with related molecular probes.

  10. Tenascin C and cathepsin d expression in adipocytic tumors: an immunohistochemical investigation of 43 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sis, Banu; Tuna, Burcin; Yorukoglu, Kutsal; Kargi, Aydanur

    2004-01-01

    Cathepsin D (CatD) and tenascin C (Tn-C) have been implicated in invasion and metastasis of carcinomas. However, little is known about CatD and Tn-C distribution in mesenchymal tumors. Therefore, we aimed to investigate the expression of Tn-C and CatD in adipocytic tumors. Tn-C and CatD expressions in 27 lipomas, 5 atypical lipomatous tumor/well-differentiated liposarcomas (ALT/WDLS) and 11 liposarcomas (LS) were evaluated by immunohistochemistry and scored semiquantitatively. CatD expression was higher in ALT/WDLS than in lipomas (p0.05). These results indicate that Tn-C and CatD may be markers of locally aggressive or malignant behavior in adipocytic tumors.

  11. Cathepsin B as a potential cystatin M/E target in the mouse hair follicle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oortveld, Merel A. W.; van Vlijmen-Willems, Ivonne M. J. J.; Kersten, Ferry F. J.; Cheng, Tsing; Verdoes, Martijn; van Erp, Piet E. J.; Verbeek, Sjef; Reinheckel, Thomas; Hendriks, Wiljan J. A. J.; Schalkwijk, Joost; Zeeuwen, Patrick L. J. M.

    2017-01-01

    Deficiency of the cysteine protease inhibitor cystatin M/E (Cst6) in mice leads to disturbed epidermal cornification, impaired barrier function, and neonatal lethality. We report the rescue of the lethal skin phenotype of ichq (Cst6-deficient; Cst6−/−) mice by transgenic, epidermis-specific, reexpression of Cst6 under control of the human involucrin (INV) promoter. Rescued Tg(INV-Cst6)Cst6ichq/ichq mice survive the neonatal phase, but display severe eye pathology and alopecia after 4 mo. We observed keratitis and squamous metaplasia of the corneal epithelium, comparable to Cst6−/−Ctsl+/− mice, as we have reported in other studies. We found the INV promoter to be active in the hair follicle infundibulum; however, we did not observe Cst6 protein expression in the lower regions of the hair follicle in Tg(INV-Cst6)Cst6ichq/ichq mice. This result suggests that unrestricted activity of proteases is involved in disturbance of hair follicle biology, eventually leading to baldness. Using quenched activity-based probes, we identified mouse cathepsin B (CtsB), which is expressed in the lower regions of the hair follicle, as an additional target of mouse Cst6. These data suggest that Cst6 is necessary to control CtsB activity in hair follicle morphogenesis and highlight Cst6-controlled proteolytic pathways as targets for preventing hair loss.—Oortveld, M. A. W., van Vlijmen-Willems, I. M. J. J., Kersten, F. F. J., Cheng, T., Verdoes, M., van Erp, P. E. J., Verbeek, S., Reinheckel, T., Hendriks, W. J. A. J., Schalkwijk, J., Zeeuwen, P. L. J. M. Cathepsin B as a potential cystatin M/E target in the mouse hair follicle. PMID:28596234

  12. Cathepsin D immobilized capillary reactors for on-flow screening assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cornelio, Vivian Estevam; de Moraes, Marcela Cristina; Domingues, Vanessa de Cassia; Fernandes, João Batista; da Silva, Maria Fátima das Gracas Fernandes; Cass, Quezia Bezerra; Vieira, Paulo Cezar

    2018-03-20

    The treatment of diseases using enzymes as targets has called for the development of new and reliable methods for screening. The protease cathepsin D is one such target involved in several diseases such as tumors, degenerative processes, and vital processes of parasites causing schistosomiasis. Herein, we describe the preparation of a fused silica capillary, cathepsin D (CatD)-immobilized enzyme reactor (IMER) using in a multidimensional High Performance Liquid Chromatography-based method (2D-HPLC) and zonal affinity chromatography as an alternative in the search for new ligands. The activity and kinetic parameters of CatD-IMER were evaluated by monitoring the product MOCAc-Gly-Lys-Pro-Ile-Leu-Phe (P-MOCAc) (K M  = 81.9 ± 7.49 μmol/L) generated by cleavage of the fluorogenic substrate MOCAc-Gly-Lys-Pro-Ile-Leu-Phe-Phe-Arg-Leu-Lys(DNP)-d-Arg-NH2 (S-MOCAc). Stability studies have indicated that CatD-IMER retained 20% of activity after 5 months, a relevant result, because proteases are susceptible to autoproteolysis in solution assays with free enzyme. In the search for inhibitors, 12 crude natural product extracts were analyzed using CatD-IMER as the target, resulting in the isolation of different classes of natural products. In addition, 26 compounds obtained from different species of plants were also screened, demonstrating the efficiency and reproducibility of the herein reported assay even in the case of complex matrices such as plant crude extracts. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. A cardinal role for cathepsin d in co-ordinating the host-mediated apoptosis of macrophages and killing of pneumococci.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin A Bewley

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The bactericidal function of macrophages against pneumococci is enhanced by their apoptotic demise, which is controlled by the anti-apoptotic protein Mcl-1. Here, we show that lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP and cytosolic translocation of activated cathepsin D occur prior to activation of a mitochondrial pathway of macrophage apoptosis. Pharmacological inhibition or knockout of cathepsin D during pneumococcal infection blocked macrophage apoptosis. As a result of cathepsin D activation, Mcl-1 interacted with its ubiquitin ligase Mule and expression declined. Inhibition of cathepsin D had no effect on early bacterial killing but inhibited the late phase of apoptosis-associated killing of pneumococci in vitro. Mice bearing a cathepsin D(-/- hematopoietic system demonstrated reduced macrophage apoptosis in vivo, with decreased clearance of pneumococci and enhanced recruitment of neutrophils to control pulmonary infection. These findings establish an unexpected role for a cathepsin D-mediated lysosomal pathway of apoptosis in pulmonary host defense and underscore the importance of apoptosis-associated microbial killing to macrophage function.

  14. The silencing of cathepsin K used in gene therapy for periodontal disease reveals the role of cathepsin K in chronic infection and inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, W; Gao, B; Hao, L; Zhu, G; Jules, J; MacDougall, M J; Wang, J; Han, X; Zhou, X; Li, Y-P

    2016-10-01

    Periodontitis is a severe chronic inflammatory disease and one of the most prevalent non-communicable chronic diseases that affects the majority of the world's adult population. While great efforts have been devoted toward understanding the pathogenesis of periodontitis, there remains a pressing need for developing potent therapeutic strategies for targeting this dreadful disease. In this study, we utilized adeno-associated virus (AAV) expressing cathepsin K (Ctsk) small hairpin (sh)RNA (AAV-sh-Ctsk) to silence Ctsk in vivo and subsequently evaluated its impact in periodontitis as a potential therapeutic strategy for this disease. We used a known mouse model of periodontitis, in which wild-type BALB/cJ mice were infected with Porphyromonas gingivalis W50 in the maxillary and mandibular periodontium to induce the disease. AAV-sh-Ctsk was then administrated locally into the periodontal tissues in vivo, followed by analyses to assess progression of the disease. AAV-mediated Ctsk silencing drastically protected mice (> 80%) from P. gingivalis-induced bone resorption by osteoclasts. In addition, AAV-sh-Ctsk administration drastically reduced inflammation by impacting the expression of many inflammatory cytokines as well as T-cell and dendritic cell numbers in periodontal lesions. AAV-mediated Ctsk silencing can simultaneously target both the inflammation and bone resorption associated with periodontitis through its inhibitory effect on immune cells and osteoclast function. Thereby, AAV-sh-Ctsk administration can efficiently protect against periodontal tissue damage and alveolar bone loss, establishing this AAV-mediated local silencing of Ctsk as an important therapeutic strategy for effectively treating periodontal disease. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  15. A Cathepsin-L is required for invasive behavior during Air Sac Primordium development in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Qian; Brenneman, Breanna; Fields, Christopher; Srivastava, Ajay

    2015-10-07

    The Drosophila Air Sac Primordium (ASP) has emerged as an important structure where cellular, genetic and molecular events responsible for invasive behavior and branching morphogenesis can be studied. In this report we present data which demonstrate that a Cathepsin-L encoded by the gene CP1 in Drosophila is necessary for invasive behavior during ASP development. We find that CP1 is expressed in ASP and knockdown of CP1 results in suppression of migratory and invasive behavior observed during ASP development. We further show that CP1 possibly regulates invasive behavior by promoting degradation of Basement Membrane. Our data provide clues to the possible role of Cathepsin L in human lung development and tumor invasion, especially, given the similarities between human lung and Drosophila ASP development. Copyright © 2015 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Z-FL-COCHO, a cathepsin S inhibitor, enhances oxaliplatin-induced apoptosis through upregulation of Bim expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Seung Un; Woo, Seon Min; Min, Kyoung-Jin; Kwon, Taeg Kyu

    2018-04-15

    Inhibition of cathespsin S not only inhibits invasion and angiogenesis, but also induces apoptosis and autophagy in cancer cells. In present study, we revealed that pharmacological inhibitor [Z-FL-COCHO (ZFL)] of cathepsin S up-regulates pro-apoptotic protein Bim expression at the posttranslational levels. These effects were not associated with MAPKs and AMPK signal pathways. Interestingly, pretreatment with the chemical chaperones (TUDCA and PBA) and knockdown of protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) markedly inhibited ZFL-induced Bim upregulation. ZFL enhances oxaliplatin-mediated apoptosis through ER stress-induced Bim upregulation in cancer cells. Collectively, our results suggest that inhibition of cathepsin S-induced Bim upregulation contribute to anti-cancer drug-induced apoptotic cell death in renal carcinoma Caki cells. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Free-thiol cys331 is critical for native tetramer structure of cathepsin C (dipeptidyl peptidase I)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horn, Martin; Baudyš, M.; Voburka, Zdeněk; Kluh, Ivan; Vondrášek, Jiří; Mareš, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 269, - (2002), s. 71 ISSN 0014-2956. [Meeting of the Federation of European Biochemical Societies /28./. 20.10.2002-25.10.2002, Istanbul] R&D Projects: GA ČR GP203/01/D008; GA ČR GA522/00/1553; GA AV ČR IAA4055006 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : cathepsin C Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  18. Structural and Functional Relationships in the Virulence-associated Cathepsin L Proteases of the Parasitic Liver Fluke, Fasciola hepatica*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stack, Colin M.; Caffrey, Conor R.; Donnelly, Sheila M.; Seshaadri, Amritha; Lowther, Jonathan; Tort, Jose F.; Collins, Peter R.; Robinson, Mark W.; Xu, Weibo; McKerrow, James H.; Craik, Charles S.; Geiger, Sebastian R.; Marion, Rachel; Brinen, Linda S.; Dalton, John P.

    2008-01-01

    The helminth parasite Fasciola hepatica secretes cysteine proteases to facilitate tissue invasion, migration, and development within the mammalian host. The major proteases cathepsin L1 (FheCL1) and cathepsin L2 (FheCL2) were recombinantly produced and biochemically characterized. By using site-directed mutagenesis, we show that residues at position 67 and 205, which lie within the S2 pocket of the active site, are critical in determining the substrate and inhibitor specificity. FheCL1 exhibits a broader specificity and a higher substrate turnover rate compared with FheCL2. However, FheCL2 can efficiently cleave substrates with a Pro in the P2 position and degrade collagen within the triple helices at physiological pH, an activity that among cysteine proteases has only been reported for human cathepsin K. The 1.4-Å three-dimensional structure of the FheCL1 was determined by x-ray crystallography, and the three-dimensional structure of FheCL2 was constructed via homology-based modeling. Analysis and comparison of these structures and our biochemical data with those of human cathepsins L and K provided an interpretation of the substrate-recognition mechanisms of these major parasite proteases. Furthermore, our studies suggest that a configuration involving residue 67 and the “gatekeeper” residues 157 and 158 situated at the entrance of the active site pocket create a topology that endows FheCL2 with its unusual collagenolytic activity. The emergence of a specialized collagenolytic function in Fasciola likely contributes to the success of this tissue-invasive parasite. PMID:18160404

  19. Regulation of split anergy in natural killer cells by inhibition of cathepsins C and H and cystatin F

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magister, Špela; Tseng, Han-Ching; Bui, Vickie T.; Kos, Janko; Jewett, Anahid

    2015-01-01

    Freshly isolated human primary NK cells induce preferential lysis of Oral Squamous Carcinoma Stem Cells (OSCSCs) when compared to differentiated Oral Squamous Carcinoma Cells (OSCCs), while anti-CD16 antibody and monocytes induce functional split anergy in primary NK cells by decreasing the cytotoxic function of NK cells and increasing the release of IFN-γ. Since NK92 cells have relatively lower levels of cytotoxicity when compared to primary NK cells, and have the ability to increase secretion of regulatory cytokines IL-10 and IL-6, we used these cells as a model of NK cell anergy to identify and to study the upstream regulators of anergy. We demonstrate in this paper that the levels of truncated monomeric cystatin F, which is known to inhibit the functions of cathepsins C and H, is significantly elevated in NK92 cells and in anergized primary NK cells. Furthermore, cystatin F co-localizes with cathepsins C and H in the lysosomal/endosomal vesicles of NK cells. Accordingly, the mature forms of aminopeptidases cathepsins C and H, which regulate the activation of effector granzymes in NK cells, are significantly decreased, whereas the levels of pro-cathepsin C enzyme is increased in anergized NK cells after triggering of the CD16 receptor. In addition, the levels of granzyme B is significantly decreased in anti-CD16mAb and target cell anergized primary NK cells and NK92 cells. Our study provides the cellular and molecular mechanisms by which target cells may utilize to inhibit the cytotoxic function of NK cells. PMID:26247631

  20. Functional expression and characterization of cathepsin B and L from the gut of the tick Ixodes ricinus

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Franta, Zdeněk; Pěničková, Helena; Dvorak, J.; Schneider, E. I.; Horn, Martin; Mareš, Michael; Sojka, Daniel; McKerrow, J. H.; Caffrey, C. R.; Kopáček, Petr

    2009-01-01

    Roč. 276, S1 (2009), s. 309-309 ISSN 1742-464X. [34th FEBS Congress: Life's Molecular Interactions. 04.07.2009-09.07.2009, Prague] R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600960910; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06009 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518; CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : cathepsin B and L * Ixodes ricinus * functionl expresssion Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology

  1. Active subsite properties, subsite residues and targeting to lysosomes or midgut lumen of cathepsins L from the beetle Tenebrio molitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Damasceno, Ticiane F; Dias, Renata O; de Oliveira, Juliana R; Salinas, Roberto K; Juliano, Maria A; Ferreira, Clelia; Terra, Walter R

    2017-10-01

    Cathepsins L are the major digestive peptidases in the beetle Tenebrio molitor. Two digestive cathepsins L (TmCAL2 and TmCAL3) from it had their 3D structures solved. The aim of this paper was to study in details TmCAL3 specificity and properties and relate them to its 3D structure. Recombinant TmCAL3 was assayed with 64 oligopeptides with different amino acid replacements in positions P2, P1, P1' and P2'. Results showed that TmCAL3 S2 specificity differs from the human enzyme and that its specificities also explain why on autoactivation two propeptide residues remain in the enzyme. Data on free energy of binding and of activation showed that S1 and S2' are mainly involved in substrate binding, S1' acts in substrate binding and catalysis, whereas S2 is implied mainly in catalysis. Enzyme subsite residues were identified by docking with the same oligopeptide used for kinetics. The subsite hydrophobicities were calculated from the efficiency of hydrolysis of different amino acid replacements in the peptide and from docking data. The results were closer for S1 and S2' than for S1' and S2, indicating that the residue subsites that were more involved in transition state binding are different from those binding the substrate seen in docking. Besides TmCAL1-3, there are nine other cathepsins L, most of them more expressed at midgut. They are supposed to be directed to lysosomes by a Drosophila-like Lerp receptor and/or motifs in their prodomains. The mannose 6-phosphate lysosomal sorting machinery is absent from T. molitor transcriptome. Cathepsin L direction to midgut contents seems to depend on overexpression. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. The 3D structure and function of digestive cathepsin L-like proteinases of Tenebrio molitor larval midgut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beton, Daniela; Guzzo, Cristiane R; Ribeiro, Alberto F; Farah, Chuck S; Terra, Walter R

    2012-09-01

    Cathepsin L-like proteinases (CAL) are major digestive proteinases in the beetle Tenebrio molitor. Procathepsin Ls 2 (pCAL2) and 3 (pCAL3) were expressed as recombinant proteins in Escherichia coli, purified and activated under acidic conditions. Immunoblot analyses of different T. molitor larval tissues demonstrated that a polyclonal antibody to pCAL3 recognized pCAL3 and cathepsin L 3 (CAL3) only in the anterior two-thirds of midgut tissue and midgut luminal contents of T. molitor larvae. Furthermore, immunocytolocalization data indicated that pCAL3 occurs in secretory vesicles and microvilli in anterior midgut. Therefore CAL3, like cathepsin L 2 (CAL2), is a digestive enzyme secreted by T. molitor anterior midgut. CAL3 hydrolyses Z-FR-MCA and Z-RR-MCA (typical cathepsin substrates), whereas CAL2 hydrolyses only Z-FR-MCA. Active site mutants (pCAL2C25S and pCAL3C26S) were constructed by replacing the catalytic cysteine with serine to prevent autocatalytic processing. Recombinant pCAL2 and pCAL3 mutants (pCAL2C25S and pCAL3C26S) were prepared, crystallized and their 3D structures determined at 1.85 and 2.1 Å, respectively. While the overall structure of these enzymes is similar to other members of the papain superfamily, structural differences in the S2 subsite explain their substrate specificities. The data also supported models for CAL trafficking to lysosomes and to secretory vesicles to be discharged into midgut contents. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Plasma cathepsin D correlates with histological classifications of fatty liver disease in adults and responds to intervention

    OpenAIRE

    Walenbergh, Sofie M. A.; Houben, Tom; Rensen, Sander S.; Bieghs, Veerle; Hendrikx, Tim; van Gorp, Patrick J.; Oligschlaeger, Yvonne; Jeurissen, Mike L. J.; Gijbels, Marion J. J.; Buurman, Wim A.; Vreugdenhil, Anita C. E.; Greve, Jan Willem M.; Plat, Jogchum; Hofker, Marten H.; Kalhan, Satish

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is characterized by liver lipid accumulation and inflammation. The mechanisms that trigger hepatic inflammation are poorly understood and subsequently, no specific non-invasive markers exist. We previously demonstrated a reduction in the plasma lysosomal enzyme, cathepsin D (CatD), in children with NASH compared to children without NASH. Recent studies have raised the concept that non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in adults is distinct from childre...

  4. Cathepsin D protects renal tubular cells from damage induced by high glucose independent of its enzymatic activity

    OpenAIRE

    Du, Feng; Wang, Tian; Li, Si; Meng, Xin; Zhang, Hai-Yan; Li, De-Tian; Du, Zhen-Xian; Wang, Hua-Qin

    2017-01-01

    Although glomerular and vascular damage have been considered the main characteristics of diabetic kidney disease (DKD), accumulating data now indicate that tubular atrophy also plays a major role. Cathepsin D (CatD) is the major aspartate protease within lysosomes. The current study demonstrated that CatD expression was altered in the renal tubular epithelium in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). In contrast to its low and uniform distribution in the tubular epithelium in normal kidney tis...

  5. Giardia duodenalis cathepsin B proteases degrade intestinal epithelial interleukin-8 and attenuate interleukin-8-induced neutrophil chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotton, James A; Bhargava, Amol; Ferraz, Jose G; Yates, Robin M; Beck, Paul L; Buret, Andre G

    2014-07-01

    Giardia duodenalis (syn. G. intestinalis, G. lamblia) infections are a leading cause of waterborne diarrheal disease that can also result in the development of postinfectious functional gastrointestinal disorders via mechanisms that remain unclear. Parasite numbers exceed 10(6) trophozoites per centimeter of gut at the height of an infection. Yet the intestinal mucosa of G. duodenalis-infected individuals is devoid of signs of overt inflammation. G. duodenalis infections can also occur concurrently with infections with other proinflammatory gastrointestinal pathogens. Little is known of whether and how this parasite can attenuate host inflammatory responses induced by other proinflammatory stimuli, such as a gastrointestinal pathogen. Identifying hitherto-unrecognized parasitic immunomodulatory pathways, the present studies demonstrated that G. duodenalis trophozoites attenuate secretion of the potent neutrophil chemoattractant interleukin-8 (CXCL8); these effects were observed in human small intestinal mucosal tissues and from intestinal epithelial monolayers, activated through administration of proinflammatory interleukin-1β or Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium. This attenuation is caused by the secretion of G. duodenalis cathepsin B cysteine proteases that degrade CXCL8 posttranscriptionally. Furthermore, the degradation of CXCL8 via G. duodenalis cathepsin B cysteine proteases attenuates CXCL8-induced chemotaxis of human neutrophils. Taken together, these data demonstrate for the first time that G. duodenalis trophozoite cathepsins are capable of attenuating a component of their host's proinflammatory response induced by a separate proinflammatory stimulus. Copyright © 2014, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  6. Cathepsin B-dependent motor neuron death after nerve injury in the adult mouse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Li; Wu, Zhou; Baba, Masashi [Department of Aging Science and Pharmacology, Faculty of Dental Sciences, Kyushu University, Maidashi 3-1-1, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan); Peters, Christoph [Institute fuer Molekulare Medizin und Zellforshung, Albert-Ludwings-Universitaet Freiburg, D-79104 Freiburg (Germany); Uchiyama, Yasuo [Department of Cell Biology and Neuroscience, Juntendo University Graduate School of Medicine, Tokyo (Japan); Nakanishi, Hiroshi, E-mail: nakan@dent.kyushu-u.ac.jp [Department of Aging Science and Pharmacology, Faculty of Dental Sciences, Kyushu University, Maidashi 3-1-1, Fukuoka 812-8582 (Japan)

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} Cathepsin B (CB), a lysosomal cysteine protease, is expressed in neuron and glia. {yields} CB increased in hypogrossal nucleus neurons after nerve injury in adult mice. {yields} CB-deficiency significantly increased the mean survival ratio of injured neurons. {yields} Thus, CB plays a critical role in axotomy-induced neuronal death in adult mice. -- Abstract: There are significant differences in the rate of neuronal death after peripheral nerve injury between species. The rate of neuronal death of motor neurons after nerve injury in the adult rats is very low, whereas that in adult mice is relatively high. However, the understanding of the mechanism underlying axotomy-induced motor neuron death in adult mice is limited. Cathepsin B (CB), a typical cysteine lysosomal protease, has been implicated in three major morphologically distinct pathways of cell death; apoptosis, necrosis and autophagic cell death. The possible involvement of CB in the neuronal death of hypogrossal nucleus (HGN) neurons after nerve injury in adult mice was thus examined. Quantitative analyses showed the mean survival ratio of HGN neurons in CB-deficient (CB-/-) adult mice after nerve injury was significantly greater than that in the wild-type mice. At the same time, proliferation of microglia in the injured side of the HGN of CB-/- adult mice was markedly reduced compared with that in the wild-type mice. On the injured side of the HGN in the wild-type adult mice, both pro- and mature forms of CB markedly increased in accordance with the increase in the membrane-bound form of LC3 (LC3-II), a marker protein of autophagy. Furthermore, the increase in CB preceded an increase in the expression of Noxa, a major executor for axotomy-induced motor neuron death in the adult mouse. Conversely, expression of neither Noxa or LC3-II was observed in the HGN of adult CB-/- mice after nerve injury. These observations strongly suggest that CB plays a critical role in axotomy

  7. Diagnostic values of serum cathepsin B and D in patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tan, Gongjun; Liu, Qianxu; Tang, Xiaowei; Kang, Ting; Li, Yuejin; Lu, Jinping; Zhao, Xiaoming; Tang, Faqing

    2016-01-01

    The diagnostic and prognostic significance of increased cathepsin B (CTSB) and cathepsin D (CTSD) concentration in the serum of cancer patients were evaluated for some tumor types. High expression of CTSD and CTSB was detected in biopsy tissues from nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). However, whether CTSD and CTSB serve as diagnostic and prognostic markers of NPC remains unclear. Serum samples were collected from 40 healthy volunteers and 80 NPC patients enrolled in the study. CTSB and CTSD in the serum samples were detected using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Concomitantly, the relationship between CTSB and CTSD concentrations and clinicopathological prognosis was assessed. The sensitivity and specificity of the two components in the diagnosis of NPC were evaluated in 80 NPC patients. ELISA analysis showed that in the sera obtained from NPC patients, the CTSB concentration was 12.5 ± 3.5 mg/L (median, 12.4 mg/L), and the CTSD concentration was 15.7 ± 8.7 mg/L (median, 14.7 mg/L). CTSB and CTSD levels were significantly higher in the NPC patient population compared to the healthy control population (p = 0.001; p = 0.001, respectively). The presence of CTSB and CTSD in the serum of the patients with NPC correlated with the tumor node metastasis (TNM) scores (p = 0.001). Other parameters were not identified to be of significance. Receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis showed that a cut off CTSB concentration of 12.4 mg/L had 61.9 % sensitivity and 63.2 % specificity in the prediction of progression-free survival (Area under the curve (AUC) = 0.525; 95 % CI, 39.7–65.2; p = 0.704); whereas a cut off CTSD concentration of 14.7 mg/L had 66.7 % sensitivity, and 58.5 % specificity (AUC = 0.552; 95 % CI, 42.3–68.1; p = 0.42). Serum CTSB and CTSD concentrations were found to have a diagnostic value in NPC. However, the CTSB and CTSD serum levels had no prognostic role for the outcome in NPC patients

  8. Tegument Glycoproteins and Cathepsins of Newly Excysted Juvenile Fasciola hepatica Carry Mannosidic and Paucimannosidic N-glycans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia-Campos, Andres; Ravidà, Alessandra; Nguyen, D Linh; Cwiklinski, Krystyna; Dalton, John P; Hokke, Cornelis H; O'Neill, Sandra; Mulcahy, Grace

    2016-05-01

    Recently, the prevalence of Fasciola hepatica in some areas has increased considerably and the availability of a vaccine to protect livestock from infection would represent a major advance in tools available for controlling this disease. To date, most vaccine-target discovery research on this parasite has concentrated on proteomic and transcriptomic approaches whereas little work has been carried out on glycosylation. As the F. hepatica tegument (Teg) may contain glycans potentially relevant to vaccine development and the Newly Excysted Juvenile (NEJ) is the first lifecycle stage in contact with the definitive host, our work has focused on assessing the glycosylation of the NEJTeg and identifying the NEJTeg glycoprotein repertoire. After in vitro excystation, NEJ were fixed and NEJTeg was extracted. Matrix-assisted laser desorption ionisation-time of flight-mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS) analysis of released N-glycans revealed that oligomannose and core-fucosylated truncated N-glycans were the most dominant glycan types. By lectin binding studies these glycans were identified mainly on the NEJ surface, together with the oral and ventral suckers. NEJTeg glycoproteins were affinity purified after targeted biotinylation of the glycans and identified using liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). From the total set of proteins previously identified in NEJTeg, eighteen were also detected in the glycosylated fraction, including the F. hepatica Cathepsin B3 (FhCB3) and two of the Cathepsin L3 (FhCL3) proteins, among others. To confirm glycosylation of cathepsins, analysis at the glycopeptide level by LC-ESI-ion-trap-MS/MS with collision-induced dissociation (CID) and electron-transfer dissociation (ETD) was carried out. We established that cathepsin B1 (FhCB1) on position N80, and FhCL3 (BN1106_s10139B000014, scaffold10139) on position N153, carry unusual paucimannosidic Man2GlcNAc2 glycans. To our knowledge, this is the first description of F

  9. Silencing cathepsin S gene expression inhibits growth, invasion and angiogenesis of human hepatocellular carcinoma in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fan, Qi; Wang, Xuedi; Zhang, Hanguang; Li, Chuanwei; Fan, Junhua; Xu, Jing

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cat S is highly expressed in HCC cells with high metastatic potential. ► Knockdown of Cat S inhibits growth and invasion of HCC cells. ► Knockdown of Cat S inhibits HCC-associated angiogenesis. ► Cat S might be a potential target for HCC therapy. -- Abstract: Cathepsin S (Cat S) plays an important role in tumor invasion and metastasis by its ability to degrade extracellular matrix (ECM). Our previous study suggested there could be a potential association between Cat S and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) metastasis. The present study was designed to determine the role of Cat S in HCC cell growth, invasion and angiogenesis, using RNA interference technology. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) sequences for the Cat S gene were synthesized and transfected into human HCC cell line MHCC97-H. The Cat S gene targeted siRNA-mediated knockdown of Cat S expression, leading to potent suppression of MHCC97-H cell proliferation, invasion and angiogenesis. These data suggest that Cat S might be a potential target for HCC therapy.

  10. Cathepsin-Mediated Cleavage of Peptides from Peptide Amphiphiles Leads to Enhanced Intracellular Peptide Accumulation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acar, Handan [Institute; Department; Samaeekia, Ravand [Institute; Department; Schnorenberg, Mathew R. [Institute; Department; Medical; Sasmal, Dibyendu K. [Institute; Huang, Jun [Institute; Tirrell, Matthew V. [Institute; Institute; LaBelle, James L. [Department

    2017-08-24

    Peptides synthesized in the likeness of their native interaction domain(s) are natural choices to target protein protein interactions (PPIs) due to their fidelity of orthostatic contact points between binding partners. Despite therapeutic promise, intracellular delivery of biofunctional peptides at concentrations necessary for efficacy remains a formidable challenge. Peptide amphiphiles (PAs) provide a facile method of intracellular delivery and stabilization of bioactive peptides. PAs consisting of biofunctional peptide headgroups linked to hydrophobic alkyl lipid-like tails prevent peptide hydrolysis and proteolysis in circulation, and PA monomers are internalized via endocytosis. However, endocytotic sequestration and steric hindrance from the lipid tail are two major mechanisms that limit PA efficacy to target intracellular PPIs. To address these problems, we have constructed a PA platform consisting of cathepsin-B cleavable PAs in which a selective p53-based inhibitory peptide is cleaved from its lipid tail within endosomes, allowing for intracellular peptide accumulation and extracellular recycling of the lipid moiety. We monitor for cleavage and follow individual PA components in real time using a resonance energy transfer (FRET)-based tracking system. Using this platform, components in real time using a Forster we provide a better understanding and quantification of cellular internalization, trafficking, and endosomal cleavage of PAs and of the ultimate fates of each component.

  11. Decreased cathepsin K levels in human atherosclerotic plaques are associated with plaque instability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Huiying; Qin, Xiujiao; Wang, Shuai; Sun, Xiwei; Dong, Bin

    2017-10-01

    Investigating the determinants and dynamics of atherosclerotic plaque instability is a key area of current cardiovascular research. Extracellular matrix degradation from excessive proteolysis induced by enzymes such as cathepsin K (Cat K) is implicated in the pathogenesis of unstable plaques. The current study assessed the expression of Cat K in human unstable atherosclerotic plaques. Specimens of popliteal arteries with atherosclerotic plaques were classified as stable (K and cystatin C (Cys C) were assessed by immunohistochemical examination and levels of Cat K mRNA were detected by semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction. Morphological changes including a larger lipid core, endothelial proliferation with foam cells and destruction of internal elastic lamina were observed in unstable atherosclerotic plaques. In unstable plaques, the expression of Cat K protein and mRNA was upregulated, whereas Cys C protein expression was downregulated. The interplay between Cat K and Cys C may underlie the progression of plaques from stable to unstable and the current study indicated that Cat K and Cys C are potential targets for preventing and treating vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque ruptures.

  12. Cathepsin L Helps to Defend Mice from Infection with Influenza A.

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    Xiang Xu

    Full Text Available Host-derived proteases can augment or help to clear infections. This dichotomy is exemplified by cathepsin L (CTSL, which helps Hendra virus and SARS coronavirus to invade cells, but is essential for survival in mice with mycoplasma pneumonia. The present study tested the hypothesis that CTSL protects mice from serious consequences of infection by the orthomyxovirus influenza A, which is thought to be activated by host-supplied proteases other than CTSL. Ctsl-/- mice infected with influenza A/Puerto Rico/8/34(H1N1 had larger lung viral loads and higher mortality than infected Ctsl+/+ mice. Lung inflammation in surviving infected mice peaked 14 days after initial infection, accompanied marked focal distal airway bronchiolization and epithelial metaplasia followed by desquamation and fibrotic interstitial remodeling, and persisted for at least 6 weeks. Most deaths occurred during the second week of infection in both groups of mice. In contrast to mycoplasma pneumonia, infiltrating cells were predominantly mononuclear rather than polymorphonuclear. The histopathology of lung inflammation and remodeling in survivors was similar in Ctsl-/- and Ctsl+/+ mice, although Ctsl+/+ mice cleared immunoreactive virus sooner. Furthermore, Ctsl-/- mice had profound deficits in CD4+ lymphocytes before and after infection and weaker production of pathogen-specific IgG. Thus, CTSL appears to support innate as well as adaptive responses, which confer a survival advantage on mice infected with the orthomyxovirus influenza A.

  13. Alpha-synuclein induces lysosomal rupture and cathepsin dependent reactive oxygen species following endocytosis.

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    David Freeman

    Full Text Available α-synuclein dysregulation is a critical aspect of Parkinson's disease pathology. Recent studies have observed that α-synuclein aggregates are cytotoxic to cells in culture and that this toxicity can be spread between cells. However, the molecular mechanisms governing this cytotoxicity and spread are poorly characterized. Recent studies of viruses and bacteria, which achieve their cytoplasmic entry by rupturing intracellular vesicles, have utilized the redistribution of galectin proteins as a tool to measure vesicle rupture by these organisms. Using this approach, we demonstrate that α-synuclein aggregates can induce the rupture of lysosomes following their endocytosis in neuronal cell lines. This rupture can be induced by the addition of α-synuclein aggregates directly into cells as well as by cell-to-cell transfer of α-synuclein. We also observe that lysosomal rupture by α-synuclein induces a cathepsin B dependent increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS in target cells. Finally, we observe that α-synuclein aggregates can induce inflammasome activation in THP-1 cells. Lysosomal rupture is known to induce mitochondrial dysfunction and inflammation, both of which are well established aspects of Parkinson's disease, thus connecting these aspects of Parkinson's disease to the propagation of α-synuclein pathology in cells.

  14. Detection of oral squamous cell carcinoma metastasis with cathepsin D: An immunohistochemical approach

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    Seema Kapoor

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: The lysosomal protease cathepsin D (CD has been associated with tumor progression in malignant tumors including oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC. The purpose of this study was to find out any association between the CD and lymph node metastasis and to study the correlation of CD with various clinicopathological parameters to aid in assessment of its role as a prognostic indicator. Materials and Methods: Immunohistochemical staining was performed on 20 OSCC samples with polyclonal antibody against CD. Positive results indicative of the presence of CD were further analyzed to determine any correlation between the CD and other clinicopathological parameters. Pearson Chi-square analyses, Spearsman correlation coefficient, Mann-Whitney test, Kruskal Wallis test and student t test were used for statistical analysis (P < 0.05. Results: Patients with lymph node metastasis showed statistically significant increase in CD expression (P < 0.01. Increasing tumor size seemed to correlate with increased CD expression (P < 0.05. Conclusion: Based on its association with other clinicopathological variables, CD expression can be used for the assessment of patient survival in cases of OSCC.

  15. Exogenous cathepsin G upregulates cell surface MHC class I molecules on immune and glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giese, Madleen; Turiello, Nadine; Molenda, Nicole; Palesch, David; Meid, Annika; Schroeder, Roman; Basilico, Paola; Benarafa, Charaf; Halatsch, Marc-Eric; Zimecki, Michal; Westhoff, Mike-Andrew; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; Burster, Timo

    2016-11-15

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I molecules present antigenic peptides to cytotoxic T cells. During an adaptive immune response, MHC molecules are regulated by several mechanisms including lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and interferon gamma (IFN-g). However, it is unclear whether the serine protease cathepsin G (CatG), which is generally secreted by neutrophils at the site of inflammation, might regulate MHC I molecules. We identified CatG, and to a higher extend CatG and lactoferrin (LF), as an exogenous regulator of cell surface MHC I expression of immune cells and glioblastoma stem cells. In addition, levels of MHC I molecules are reduced on dendritic cells from CatG deficient mice compared to their wild type counterparts. Furthermore, cell surface CatG on immune cells, including T cells, B cells, and NK cells triggers MHC I on THP-1 monocytes suggesting a novel mechanism for CatG to facilitate intercellular communication between infiltrating cells and the respective target cell. Subsequently, our findings highlight the pivotal role of CatG as a checkpoint protease which might force target cells to display their intracellular MHC I:antigen repertoire.

  16. Cathepsin L is required for endothelial progenitor cell-induced neovascularization

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    Urbich, Carmen; Heeschen, Christopher; Aicher, Alexandra; Sasaki, Ken-ichiro; Bruhl, Thomas; Hofmann, Wolf K.; Peters, Christoph; Reinheckel, Thomas; Pennacchio, Len A.; Abolmaali, Nasreddin D.; Chavakis, Emmanouil; Zeiher, Andreas M.; Dimmeler, Stefanie

    2004-01-15

    Infusion of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), but not of mature endothelial cells (ECs), promotes neovascularization after ischemia. We performed a gene expression profiling of EPCs and ECs to identify genes, which might be important for the neovascularization capacity of EPCs. Intriguingly, the protease cathepsin L (CathL) was highly expressed in EPCs as opposed to ECs and is essential for matrix degradation and invasion by EPCs in vitro. CathL deficient mice showed impaired functional recovery after hind limb ischemia supporting the concept for an important role of CathL in postnatal neovascularization. Infused CathL deficient progenitor cells failed to home to sites of ischemia and to augment neovascularization. In contrast, over expression of CathL in mature ECs significantly enhanced their invasive activity and induced their neovascularization capacity in vivo. Taken together, CathL plays a crucial role for the integration of circulating EPCs into the ischemic tissue and is required for neovascularization mediated by EPCs.

  17. Cathepsin B Improves ß-Amyloidosis and Learning and Memory in Models of Alzheimer's Disease.

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    Embury, Christine M; Dyavarshetty, Bhagyalaxmi; Lu, Yaman; Wiederin, Jayme L; Ciborowski, Pawel; Gendelman, Howard E; Kiyota, Tomomi

    2017-06-01

    Amyloid-ß (Aß) precursor protein (APP) metabolism engages neuronal endolysosomal pathways for Aß processing and secretion. In Alzheimer's disease (AD), dysregulation of APP leads to excess Aß and neuronal dysfunction; suggesting that neuronal APP/Aß trafficking can be targeted for therapeutic gain. Cathepsin B (CatB) is a lysosomal cysteine protease that can lower Aß levels. However, whether CatB-modulation of Aß improves learning and memory function deficits in AD is not known. To this end, progenitor neurons were infected with recombinant adenovirus expressing CatB and recovered cell lysates subjected to proteomic analyses. The results demonstrated Lamp1 deregulation and linkages between CatB and the neuronal phagosome network. Hippocampal injections of adeno-associated virus expressing CatB reduced Aß levels, increased Lamp1 and improved learning and memory. The findings were associated with the emergence of c-fos + cells. The results support the idea that CatB can speed Aß metabolism through lysosomal pathways and as such reduce AD-associated memory deficits.

  18. Lysosomal Cathepsin A Plays Significant Role In The Processing Of Endogenous Bioactive Peptides

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    Zehra Timur

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Lysosomal serine carboxypeptidase Cathepsin A (CTSA is a multifunctional enzyme with distinct protective and catalytic function. CTSA that is present in the lysosomal multienzyme complex facilitates correct lysosomal routing, stability and activation of betagalactosidase and alpha-neuraminidase. In addition, CTSA plays a role in the inactivation of bioactive peptides including bradykinin, substances P, oxytocin, angiotensin I and endothelin-I by cleavage of one or two amino acid(s from the C-terminal ends. In this study, we aimed to elucidate the regulatory role of CTSA on bioactive peptides in a knock-in mouse model of CTSAS190A. We evaluated the levels of bradykinin, substances P, oxytocin, angiotensin I and endothelin-I in the kidney, liver, lung, brain and serum of the CTSAS190A mouse model at three- and six-months of age. Our results suggest that CTSA selectively contributes to the processing of bioactive peptides in different tissues of CTSAS190A mice compared to those of age-matched wild-type mice.

  19. Increasing Cystatin C and Cathepsin B in Serum of Colorectal Cancer Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; He, Ping; Zhong, Qi; Li, Ke; Chen, Dan; Lin, Qing; Liu, Weiwei

    2017-02-01

    The aim of this study was to measure levels of cathepsin B (CatB) and cystatin C (CysC) and determine the CatB/CysC ratio in serum samples from patients with colorectal cancer (CRC), benign diseases of the digestive system, and other malignancies. The serum specimens of 95 patients with CRC, 23 with benign diseases of the digestive system, 60 normal controls and 87 with other cancers were collected to measure the level of CysC and CatB. The CatB/CysC ratio was then calculated. There was a significant difference between the normal group and the CRC group (p < 0.01) in CysC serum levels. There were also differences in CatB levels and in the ratio of CatB/CysC between CRC patients and healthy controls or those with benign diseases of the digestive system (p < 0.01) and between those with carcinoma (highly-differentiated and poorly-differentiated) and those with adenoma (p < 0.01). The CysC, CatB, and CatB/ CysC levels were in the same range in other malignancies and CRC. These results suggest that CysC could exclude normal samples, while the level of CatB and the CatB/ CysC ratio could distinguish CRC from benign diseases of the digestive system and thus has important value in early diagnosis of CRC.

  20. Cathepsin C gene 5'-untranslated region mutation in papillon-lefèvre syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosem, Rok; Debeljak, Maruša; Repič Lampret, Barbka; Kansky, Aleksej; Battelino, Tadej; Trebušak Podkrajšek, Katarina

    2012-01-01

    Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome (PLS) is a rare autosomal recessive disorder characterized by palmoplantar keratoderma together with a severe form of generalized aggressive periodontitis and associated with mutations in cathepsin C gene (CTSC). To investigate the clinical and mutational characteristics of 6 PLS patients from 4 unrelated Slovenian families. CTSC mutational and functional analyses were performed. In all patients, a novel homozygous substitution, c.-55C>A, in the CTSC 5'-untranslated region (UTR) was detected on genomic DNA level and confirmed by mRNA analysis, resulting in the almost complete loss of CTSC mRNA expression and CTSC activity. In silico analysis revealed the potential of the mutation to disrupt putative transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) for AP-2 and Sp families of transcription factors. Identification of a novel CTSC 5'-UTR mutation together with a severe reduction of CTSC mRNA expression and virtually nonexistent CTSC activity was suggestive of a novel mechanism of TFBS dysfunction associated with PLS. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  1. Functional Cathepsin C mutations cause different Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noack, Barbara; Görgens, Heike; Schacher, Beate; Puklo, Magda; Eickholz, Peter; Hoffmann, Thomas; Schackert, Hans Konrad

    2008-04-01

    The autosomal-recessive Papillon-Lefèvre syndrome (PLS) is characterized by severe aggressive periodontitis, combined with palmoplantar hyperkeratosis, and is caused by mutations in the Cathepsin C (CTSC) gene. This study aimed to identify CTSC mutations in different PLS phenotypes, including atypical forms and isolated pre-pubertal aggressive periodontitis (PAP). Thirteen families with different phenotypes were analysed by direct sequencing of the entire coding region and the regulatory regions of CTSC. The function of novel mutations was tested with enzyme activity measurements. In 11 of 13 families, 12 different pathogenic CTSC mutations were found in 10 typical PLS patients, three atypical cases and one PAP patient. Out of four novel mutations, three result in protein truncation and are thus considered to be pathogenic. The homozygous c.854C>T nucleotide exchange (p.P285L) was associated with an almost complete loss of enzyme activity. The observed phenotypic heterogeneity could not be associated with specific genotypes. The phenotypic variability of the PLS associated with an identical genetic background may reflect the influence of additional genetic or environmental factors on disease characteristics. CTSC mutation analyses should be considered for differential diagnosis in all children suffering from severe aggressive periodontitis.

  2. DNA Vaccines Encoding Toxoplasma gondii Cathepsin C 1 Induce Protection against Toxoplasmosis in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Yali; Zhou, Aihua; Lu, Gang; Zhao, Guanghui; Sha, Wenchao; Wang, Lin; Guo, Jingjing; Zhou, Jian; Zhou, Huaiyu; Cong, Hua; He, Shenyi

    2017-10-01

    Toxoplasma gondii cathepsin C proteases (TgCPC1, 2, and 3) are important for the growth and survival of T. gondii. In the present study, B-cell and T-cell epitopes of TgCPC1 were predicted using DNAstar and the Immune Epitope Database. A TgCPC1 DNA vaccine was constructed, and its ability to induce protective immune responses against toxoplasmosis in BALB/c mice was evaluated in the presence or absence of the adjuvant α-GalCer. As results, TgCPC1 DNA vaccine with or without adjuvant α-GalCer showed higher levels of IgG and IgG2a in the serum, as well as IL-2 and IFN-γ in the spleen compared to controls (PBS, pEGFP-C1, and α-Galcer). Upon challenge infection with tachyzoites of T. gondii (RH), pCPC1/α-Galcer immunized mice showed the longest survival among all the groups. Mice vaccinated with DNA vaccine without adjuvant (pCPC1) showed better protective immunity compared to other controls (PBS, pEGFP-C1, and α-Galcer). These results indicate that a DNA vaccine encoding TgCPC1 is a potential vaccine candidate against toxoplasmosis.

  3. A genetic variation of cathepsin D is a major risk factor for Alzheimer's disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papassotiropoulos, A; Bagli, M; Kurz, A; Kornhuber, J; Förstl, H; Maier, W; Pauls, J; Lautenschlager, N; Heun, R

    2000-03-01

    Cathepsin D (catD) is an intracellular acid protease possibly involved in Alzheimer's disease (AD)-related neurodegeneration through cleavage of amyloid precursor protein into amyloidogenic components. We studied whether an exonic polymorphism of the catD gene (C --> T [Ala --> Val] transition at position 224), which possibly influences pro-catD secretion and intracellular maturation of the enzyme, was associated with the risk for the development of AD in 127 demented patients and 184 controls. The catD*T allele was significantly overrepresented in demented patients (11.8%) compared with nondemented controls (4.9%). Carriers of the catD*T allele had a 3.1-fold increased risk for developing AD than noncarriers. Carriers of the apolipoprotein E (ApoE) epsilon4 allele (ApoE*4) had a 3.9-fold increased risk than non-carriers. The adjusted odds ratio for subjects with the ApoE*4 and the catD*T allele was 19.0 compared with subjects with neither of these two alleles. Our data confirm the results of a recently performed pilot study in an independent sample and suggest that the catD genotype is strongly associated with the risk for AD.

  4. Cathepsin D inhibits oxidative stress-induced cell death via activation of autophagy in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hah, Young-Sool; Noh, Hae Sook; Ha, Ji Hye; Ahn, Jin Sook; Hahm, Jong Ryeal; Cho, Hee Young; Kim, Deok Ryong

    2012-10-28

    Cathepsin D (CatD), a lysosomal aspartic protease, plays an essential role in tumor progression and apoptosis. However, the function of CatD in cell death is not yet fully understood. In this study, we identified CatD as one of up-regulated proteins in human malignant glioblastoma M059J cells that lack the catalytic subunit of DNA-PK compared with its isogenic M059K cells with normal DNA-PK activity. M059J cells were relatively more resistant to genotoxic stress than M059K cells. Overexpression of wild-type CatD but not catalytically inactive mutant CatD (D295N) inhibited H(2)O(2)-induced cell death in HeLa cells. Furthermore, knockdown of CatD expression abolished anti-apoptotic effect by CatD in the presence of H(2)O(2). Interestingly, high expression of CatD in HeLa cells significantly activated autophagy: increase of acidic autophagic vacuoles, LC3-II formation, and GFP-LC3 puncta. These results suggest that CatD can function as an anti-apoptotic mediator by inducing autophagy under cellular stress. In conclusion, inhibition of autophagy could be a novel strategy for the adjuvant chemotherapy of CatD-expressing cancers. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. The Coordinated Action of Calcineurin and Cathepsin D Protects Against α-Synuclein Toxicity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aufschnaiter, Andreas; Habernig, Lukas; Kohler, Verena; Diessl, Jutta; Carmona-Gutierrez, Didac; Eisenberg, Tobias; Keller, Walter; Büttner, Sabrina

    2017-01-01

    The degeneration of dopaminergic neurons during Parkinson's disease (PD) is intimately linked to malfunction of α-synuclein (αSyn), the main component of the proteinaceous intracellular inclusions characteristic for this pathology. The cytotoxicity of αSyn has been attributed to disturbances in several biological processes conserved from yeast to humans, including Ca 2+ homeostasis, general lysosomal function and autophagy. However, the precise sequence of events that eventually results in cell death remains unclear. Here, we establish a connection between the major lysosomal protease cathepsin D (CatD) and the Ca 2+ /calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin. In a yeast model for PD, high levels of human αSyn triggered cytosolic acidification and reduced vacuolar hydrolytic capacity, finally leading to cell death. This could be counteracted by overexpression of yeast CatD (Pep4), which re-installed pH homeostasis and vacuolar proteolytic function, decreased αSyn oligomers and aggregates, and provided cytoprotection. Interestingly, these beneficial effects of Pep4 were independent of autophagy. Instead, they required functional calcineurin signaling, since deletion of calcineurin strongly reduced both the proteolytic activity of endogenous Pep4 and the cytoprotective capacity of overexpressed Pep4. Calcineurin contributed to proper endosomal targeting of Pep4 to the vacuole and the recycling of the Pep4 sorting receptor Pep1 from prevacuolar compartments back to the trans-Golgi network. Altogether, we demonstrate that stimulation of this novel calcineurin-Pep4 axis reduces αSyn cytotoxicity.

  6. Hydrolysis of androgen receptor by cathepsin D: its biological significance in human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mordente, J A; Choudhury, M S; Tazaki, H; Mallouh, C; Konno, S

    1998-09-01

    To elicit the biological role of a lysosomal protease, cathepsin D (CatD) in prostate cancer, by investigating its regulatory effect on the androgen receptor (AR) using human prostate cancer LNCaP cells and prostate tissue specimens. Cell extracts were prepared from LNCaP or prostate specimens by cell lysis and tissue homogenization. Proteolytic assays were performed by incubating these extracts in acidic buffer (pH 3-4) at 37 degrees C. The resulting effects on AR and CatD were then analysed using Western immunoblots. The Western blots showed that AR was virtually hydrolysed with acid treatment, because endogenous CatD was activated; this activation only occurred at pH 3.2-3.5, but no specific acid appeared to be required. Further analyses suggested that CatD activation could be attributed to acid-induced autoproteolysis of mature CatD. Similar assays were also performed on prostate tissues, including normal and malignant specimens. These studies revealed that CatD-mediated AR hydrolysis was observed only in cancer specimens, while no such hydrolysis occurred in normal specimens. Endogenous CatD can hydrolyse AR, thereby possibly modulating AR function/metabolism in LNCaP cells, and in cancer specimens. CatD activity also appears to differ significantly between normal and malignant tissue. Thus, CatD may play a pivotal role as a growth modulator in androgen-dependent prostate cancer.

  7. Biotinylated fluorescent peptide substrates for the sensitive and specific determination of cathepsin D activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baechle, D; Cansier, A; Fischer, R; Brandenburg, J; Burster, T; Driessen, C; Kalbacher, H

    2005-03-01

    Cathepsin D (CatD) is a member of the mammalian aspartic protease family and is involved in cellular protein degradation and in several pathological processes. A sensitive and specific assay for the determination of CatD activity in biological samples was developed. The peptide amide substrates Amca-EDKPILF downward arrowFRLGK(biotin)-CONH2 (I), Amca-EEKPIC(Acm)F downward arrowFRLGK(biotin)-CONH2 (II) and Amca-EEKPISF downward arrowFRLGK(biotin)-CONH2 (III) contain a CatD cleavage site (F downward arrowF) flanked by a N-terminal Amca-fluorophore (7-amino-4-methylcoumarin-3-acetic acid) and a C-terminal biotin moiety. Substrates II and III proved to be specific substrates containing only one cleavage site for CatD. After cleavage of the Phe-Phe bond by CatD all biotin conjugated peptides were removed with streptavidin-coated magnetic beads. The remaining fluorescent peptides in solution represent the amount of digested substrate. The versatility of this CatD digest and pull down assay was demonstrated by measuring the activity of CatD in different subcellular fractions of human EBV-transformed B cells and human monocytes. The described method based on the designed CatD substrates represents a valuable tool for routine assays. Copyright (c) 2004 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. The Coordinated Action of Calcineurin and Cathepsin D Protects Against α-Synuclein Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Aufschnaiter

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The degeneration of dopaminergic neurons during Parkinson’s disease (PD is intimately linked to malfunction of α-synuclein (αSyn, the main component of the proteinaceous intracellular inclusions characteristic for this pathology. The cytotoxicity of αSyn has been attributed to disturbances in several biological processes conserved from yeast to humans, including Ca2+ homeostasis, general lysosomal function and autophagy. However, the precise sequence of events that eventually results in cell death remains unclear. Here, we establish a connection between the major lysosomal protease cathepsin D (CatD and the Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent phosphatase calcineurin. In a yeast model for PD, high levels of human αSyn triggered cytosolic acidification and reduced vacuolar hydrolytic capacity, finally leading to cell death. This could be counteracted by overexpression of yeast CatD (Pep4, which re-installed pH homeostasis and vacuolar proteolytic function, decreased αSyn oligomers and aggregates, and provided cytoprotection. Interestingly, these beneficial effects of Pep4 were independent of autophagy. Instead, they required functional calcineurin signaling, since deletion of calcineurin strongly reduced both the proteolytic activity of endogenous Pep4 and the cytoprotective capacity of overexpressed Pep4. Calcineurin contributed to proper endosomal targeting of Pep4 to the vacuole and the recycling of the Pep4 sorting receptor Pep1 from prevacuolar compartments back to the trans-Golgi network. Altogether, we demonstrate that stimulation of this novel calcineurin-Pep4 axis reduces αSyn cytotoxicity.

  9. Excision of foreign gene product with cathepsin D in chicken hepatoma cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Masaharu; Kawashima, Tsuyoshi; Aosasa, Masayoshi; Horiuchi, Hiroyuki; Furusawa, Shuichi; Matsuda, Haruo

    2005-05-06

    To easily and rapidly recover exogenous gene products from chicken egg yolk, we constructed pVTG-catD (VTG, vitellogenin; catD, cathepsin D), a vector cassette carrying two catD-recognition signal peptides (catD-RSPs) in addition to the cloning site. An enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP)-encoding DNA fragment was ligated into the pVTG-catD. When the resultant construct pVTG-EGFP-catD containing histidine- and myc-tags was transfected into the chicken hepatoma cell line LMH, EGFP-expression at 24h post-cultivation was confirmed by fluorescence microscopy. Because a signal peptide (NTVLAEF) encoded in pVTG-EGFP-catD is recognized by catD, the VTG-EGFP fusion protein digested with catD was detectable by Western blotting. Digested exogenous gene product was recovered with nickel resin. These results indicate that catD-recognition sites bearing pVTG-catD and His-tags are functional in chicken LMH cells. Therefore, the system described here may be of use in making excision exogenous gene products in the chicken and in creating homozygous knock-in chickens.

  10. Lack of association of cathepsin D genetic polymorphism with Alzheimer's disease in Koreans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jhoo, Jin Hyeong; Park, Woong Yang; Kim, Ki Woong; Lee, Kwang Hyuk; Lee, Dong Young; Youn, Jong Chul; Choo, Il Han; Seo, Jeong Sun; Woo, Jong Inn

    2005-01-01

    Cathepsin D (CatD) is a good candidate susceptibility marker for Alzheimer's disease (AD), since it was found to be involved in the processing of the amyloid precursor protein and the formation of the hyperphosphorylated tau. And recently, a CatD genetic polymorphism was found to be associated with the risk of Alzheimer's disease (AD) in a German population. However, the CatD T-AD association has not been replicated in a series of the successive independent studies in other races. Therefore, we determined CatD genotypes to examine the possible association of the CatD polymorphism with AD in Koreans. We failed to find significant association between the CatD T allele and AD. In addition, the CatD T--AD association was not significant regardless of the age at onset or the occurrence of the apolipoprotein epsilon4 allele. However, we cannot exclude the possible contribution of the CatD in the development of AD, since the power of the present study was not high enough because of low allelic frequency of the CatD T in Koreans and small sample size. In conclusion, the association between the CatD genetic polymorphism and AD was not found in Koreans, although it waits for further replication in an extended sample.

  11. Expression of the Cydia pomonella granulovirus matrix metalloprotease enhances Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus virulence and can partially substitute for viral cathepsin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishimwe, Egide; Hodgson, Jeffrey J; Passarelli, A Lorena

    2015-07-01

    The Cydia pomonella granulovirus open reading frame 46 (CpGV-ORF46) contains predicted domains found in matrix metalloproteases (MMPs), a family of zinc-dependent endopeptidases that degrade extracellular matrix proteins. We showed that CpGV-MMP was active in vitro. Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus (AcMNPV) expressing CpGV-ORF46 replicated similarly to a control virus lacking CpGV-ORF46 in cultured cells. The effects of AcMNPV expressing CpGV-MMP on virus infection in cultured cells and Trichoplusia ni larvae in the presence or absence of other viral degradative enzymes, cathepsin and chitinase, were evaluated. In the absence of cathepsin and chitinase or cathepsin alone, larval time of death was significantly delayed. This delay was compensated by the expression of CpGV-MMP. CpGV-MMP was also able to promote larvae melanization in the absence of cathepsin and chitinase. In addition, CpGV-MMP partially substituted for cathepsin in larvae liquefaction when chitinase, which is usually retained in the endoplasmic reticulum, was engineered to be secreted. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Cathepsin B in antigen-presenting cells controls mediators of the Th1 immune response during Leishmania major infection.

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    Iris J Gonzalez-Leal

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Resistance and susceptibility to Leishmania major infection in the murine model is determined by the capacity of the host to mount either a protective Th1 response or a Th2 response associated with disease progression. Previous reports involving the use of cysteine cathepsin inhibitors indicated that cathepsins B (Ctsb and L (Ctsl play important roles in Th1/Th2 polarization during L. major infection in both susceptible and resistant mouse strains. Although it was hypothesized that these effects are a consequence of differential patterns of antigen processing, the mechanisms underlying these differences were not further investigated. Given the pivotal roles that dendritic cells and macrophages play during Leishmania infection, we generated bone-marrow derived dendritic cells (BMDC and macrophages (BMM from Ctsb-/- and Ctsl-/- mice, and studied the effects of Ctsb and Ctsl deficiency on the survival of L. major in infected cells. Furthermore, the signals used by dendritic cells to instruct Th cell polarization were addressed: the expression of MHC class II and co-stimulatory molecules, and cytokine production. We found that Ctsb-/- BMDC express higher levels of MHC class II molecules than wild-type (WT and Ctsl-/- BMDC, while there were no significant differences in the expression of co-stimulatory molecules between cathepsin-deficient and WT cells. Moreover, both BMDC and BMM from Ctsb-/- mice significantly up-regulated the levels of interleukin 12 (IL-12 expression, a key Th1-inducing cytokine. These findings indicate that Ctsb-/- BMDC display more pro-Th1 properties than their WT and Ctsl-/- counterparts, and therefore suggest that Ctsb down-regulates the Th1 response to L. major. Moreover, they propose a novel role for Ctsb as a regulator of cytokine expression.

  13. Drug-to-antibody determination for an antibody-drug-conjugate utilizing cathepsin B digestion coupled with reversed-phase high-pressure liquid chromatography analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamo, Michael; Sun, Guoyong; Qiu, Difei; Valente, Joseph; Lan, Wenkui; Song, Hangtian; Bolgar, Mark; Katiyar, Amit; Krishnamurthy, Girija

    2017-01-20

    Antibody drug conjugates or ADCs are currently being evaluated for their effectiveness as targeted chemotherapeutic agents across the pharmaceutical industry. Due to the complexity arising from the choice of antibody, drug and linker; analytical methods for release and stability testing are required to provide a detailed understanding of both the antibody and the drug during manufacturing and storage. The ADC analyzed in this work consists of a tubulysin drug analogue that is randomly conjugated to lysine residues in a human IgG1 antibody. The drug is attached to the lysine residue through a peptidic, hydrolytically stable, cathepsin B cleavable linker. The random lysine conjugation produces a heterogeneous mixture of conjugated species with a variable drug-to-antibody ratio (DAR), therefore, the average amount of drug attached to the antibody is a critical parameter that needs to be monitored. In this work we have developed a universal method for determining DAR in ADCs that employ a cathepsin B cleavable linker. The ADC is first cleaved at the hinge region and then mildly reduced prior to treatment with the cathepsin B enzyme to release the drug from the antibody fragments. This pre-treatment allows the cathepsin B enzyme unrestricted access to the cleavage sites and ensures optimal conditions for the cathepsin B to cleave all the drug from the ADC molecule. The cleaved drug is then separated from the protein components by reversed phase high performance liquid chromatography (RP-HPLC) and quantitated using UV absorbance. This method affords superior cleavage efficiency to other methods that only employ a cathepsin digestion step as confirmed by mass spectrometry analysis. This method was shown to be accurate and precise for the quantitation of the DAR for two different random lysine conjugated ADC molecules. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Cathepsin B-like and cell death in the unicellular human pathogen Leishmania.

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Fadili, A K; Zangger, H; Desponds, C; Gonzalez, I J; Zalila, H; Schaff, C; Ives, A; Masina, S; Mottram, J C; Fasel, N

    2010-09-02

    In several studies reporting cell death (CD) in lower eukaryotes and in the human protozoan parasite Leishmania, proteolytic activity was revealed using pan-caspase substrates or inhibitors such as carbobenzoxy-valyl-alanyl-aspartyl-[O-methyl]-fluoromethylketone (Z-VAD-FMK). However, most of the lower eukaryotes do not encode caspase(s) but MCA, which differs from caspase(s) in its substrate specificity and cannot be accountable for the recognition of Z-VAD-FMK. In the present study, we were interested in identifying which enzyme was capturing the Z-VAD substrate. We show that heat shock (HS) induces Leishmania CD and leads to the intracellular binding of Z-VAD-FMK. We excluded binding and inhibition of Z-VAD-FMK to Leishmania major metacaspase (LmjMCA), and identified cysteine proteinase C (LmjCPC), a cathepsin B-like (CPC) enzyme, as the Z-VAD-FMK binding enzyme. We confirmed the specific interaction of Z-VAD-FMK with CPC by showing that Z-VAD binding is absent in a Leishmania mexicana strain in which the cpc gene was deleted. We also show that parasites exposed to various stress conditions release CPC into a soluble fraction. Finally, we confirmed the role of CPC in Leishmania CD by showing that, when exposed to the oxidizing agent hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), cpc knockout parasites survived better than wild-type parasites (WT). In conclusion, this study identified CPC as the substrate of Z-VAD-FMK in Leishmania and as a potential additional executioner protease in the CD cascade of Leishmania and possibly in other lower eukaryotes.

  15. Fasciola gigantica: production and characterization of a monoclonal antibody against recombinant cathepsin B3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuracpreeda, Panat; Songkoomkrong, Sineenart; Sethadavit, Manussabhorn; Chotwiwatthanakun, Charoonroj; Tinikul, Yotsawan; Sobhon, Prasert

    2011-02-01

    A number of monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) against a recombinant cathepsin B3 (rCatB3) of Fasciola gigantica were produced in BALB/c mice. Reactivity and specificity of these MoAbs were assessed by indirect ELISA and immunoblotting techniques. Six stable clones, namely 1C4, 1E9, 2E5, 2F9, 5B4, 5D7 were obtained. All MoAbs reacted with rCatB3 at molecular weight (MW) 37 kDa as well as the glycosylated peptide at 55-75 kDa and with the native CatB3 at MW 37 kDa in WB extracts of metacercariae (Met) and newly excysted juveniles (NEJ). It was found to be IgG(1) and λ light chain isotypes. Immunolocalization of CatB3 in metacercariae, NEJ, 4-week-old juvenile and adult F. gigantica performed by immunoperoxidase technique by using these MoAbs as probes indicated that CatB3 was present in high concentration in the caecal epithelium and caecal lumen of the Met and NEJ, but not in the 4-week-old juvenile and adult fluke. The MoAbs show no cross-reactions with antigens of other parasites including Gigantocotyl explanatum, Eurytrema pancreaticum, Paramphistomum cervi, Schistosoma spindale, S. mansoni, Haemonchus placei and Setaria labiato-papillosa. Thus, it is possible that these MoAbs could be a good candidate for immunodiagnosis of fasciolosis. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Evaluation of matrix metalloproteinase and cysteine cathepsin activity in dentin hybrid layer by gelatin zymography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahalaxmi, Sekar; Madhubala, Manavalan Madhana; Jayaraman, Mahendran; Sathyakumar, Shanmugasundaram

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to comparatively assess the gelatinolytic activity of matrix metalloproteinases(MMPs) and Cysteine Cathepsins (CCs) in the adhesive interface using etch and rinse adhesive at different time intervals using zymographic technique. Twenty freshly extracted non-carious human third molars were used in this study. Occlusal surfaces were ground flat and 1mm thick horizontal dentin slabs were obtained from each tooth using a diamond disc. The dentin surface was polished with 600-grit silicon-carbide paper. Five out of 20 samples were directly pulverized. In the remaining fifteen samples, the dentin was etched and adhesive was applied and light cured according to the manufacturer's instructions. A 1mm thick flowable composite was build up and light cured. Bonded specimens were cut vertically into 3 to 4 dentin slabs by means of diamond disc to expose the adhesive/dentin interfaces. These were then ground down to 500 µm thick resin-dentin interface using a hard tissue microtome. These sections were then pulverised into powder. Following this, every five samples were subjected to zymographic analysis after 1 day, 7 days and 21 days. Zymograms showed clear, thicker bands on all three isoforms in the etched samples compared to control samples at 1st and 7th day intervals and became inactive at 21st day for all three isoforms. MMP 9 activity was relatively higher when compared to CCs and MMP 2. Etch and rinse adhesive activated MMPs and CCs within the hybrid layer that remained active till 7th day and no gelatinolytic activity was found on 21st day and MMPs are more active compared to CCs and MMP-2.

  17. Monitoring pancreatic carcinogenesis by the molecular imaging of cathepsin E in vivo using confocal laser endomicroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Li

    Full Text Available The monitoring of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC in high-risk populations is essential. Cathepsin E (CTSE is specifically and highly expressed in PDAC and pancreatic intraepithelial neoplasias (PanINs, and its expression gradually increases along with disease progression. In this study, we first established an in situ 7,12-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene (DMBA-induced rat model for PanINs and PDAC and then confirmed that tumorigenesis properties in this model were consistent with those of human PDAC in that CTSE expression gradually increased with tumor development using histology and immunohistochemistry. Then, using in vivo imaging of heterotopically implanted tumors generated from CTSE- overexpressing cells (PANC-1-CTSE in nude mice and in vitro imaging of PanINs and PDAC in DMBA-induced rats, the specificity of the synthesized CTSE-activatable probe was verified. Quantitative determination identified that the fluorescence signal ratio of pancreatic tumor to normal pancreas gradually increased in association with progressive pathological grades, with the exception of no significant difference between PanIN-II and PanIN-III grades. Finally, we monitored pancreatic carcinogenesis in vivo using confocal laser endomicroscopy (CLE in combination with the CTSE-activatable probe. A prospective double-blind control study was performed to evaluate the accuracy of this method in diagnosing PDAC and PanINs of all grades (>82.7%. This allowed us to establish effective diagnostic criteria for CLE in PDAC and PanINs to facilitate the monitoring of PDAC in high-risk populations.

  18. Seven-up facilitates insect counter-defense by suppressing cathepsin B expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Ji-Eun; Guarino, Linda A; Zhu-Salzman, Keyan

    2007-06-01

    When challenged by the dietary soybean cysteine protease inhibitor scN, the cowpea bruchid (Callosobruchus maculatus) adapts to the inhibitory effects by readjusting the transcriptome of its digestive system, including the specific activation of a cathepsin B-like cysteine protease CmCatB. To understand the transcriptional regulation of CmCatB, we cloned a portion of its promoter and demonstrated its activity in Drosophila cells using a chloramphenicol acetyltransferase reporter system. EMSAs detected differential DNA-binding activity between nuclear extracts of scN-adapted and -unadapted midguts. Two tandem chicken ovalbumin upstream promoter (COUP) elements were identified in the CmCatB promoter that specifically interacted with a protein factor unique to nuclear extracts of unadapted insect guts, where CmCatB expression was repressed. Seven-up (Svp) is a COUP-TF-related transcription factor that interacted with the COUP responsive element. Polyclonal anti-(mosquito Svp) serum abolished the specific DNA-binding activity in cowpea bruchid midgut extracts, suggesting that the protein factor is an Svp homolog. Subsequent cloning of a cowpea bruchid Svp (CmSvp) indicated that it shares a high degree of amino acid sequence similarity with COUP-TF/Svp orphan nuclear receptor family members from varied species. The protein was more abundant in scN-unadapted insect guts than scN-adapted guts, consistent with the observed DNA-binding activity. Furthermore, CmCatB expression was repressed when CmSvp was transiently expressed in Drosophila cells, most likely through COUP binding. These findings indicate that CmSvp may contribute to insect counter-defense, in part by inhibiting CmCatB expression under normal growth conditions, but releasing the inhibition when insects are challenged by dietary protease inhibitors.

  19. Essential role for cathepsin D in bleomycin-induced apoptosis of alveolar epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xiaopeng; Rayford, Heather; Shu, Ruijie; Zhuang, Jiaju; Uhal, Bruce D

    2004-07-01

    Our earlier studies showed that bleomycin-induced apoptosis of type II alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) requires the autocrine synthesis and proteolytic processing of angiotensinogen into ANG II and that inhibitors of ANG-converting enzyme (ACEis) block bleomycin-induced apoptosis (Li X, Zhang H, Soledad-Conrad V, Zhuang J, and Uhal BD. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 284: L501-L507, 2003). Given the documented role of cathepsin D (CatD) in apoptosis of other cell types, we hypothesized that CatD might be the AEC enzyme responsible for the conversion of angiotensinogen into ANG I, the substrate for ACE. Primary cultures of rat type II AECs challenged with bleomycin in vitro showed upregulation and secretion of CatD enzymatic activity and immunoreactive protein but no increases in CatD mRNA. The aspartyl protease inhibitor pepstatin A, which completely blocked CatD enzymatic activity, inhibited bleomycin-induced nuclear fragmentation by 76% and reduced bleomycin-induced caspase-3 activation by 47%. Antisense oligonucleotides against CatD mRNA reduced CatD-immunoreactive protein and inhibited bleomycin-induced nuclear fragmentation by 48%. A purified fragment of angiotensinogen (F1-14) containing the CatD and ACE cleavage sites, when applied to unchallenged AEC in vitro, yielded mature ANG II peptide and induced apoptosis. The apoptosis induced by F1-14 was inhibited 96% by pepstatin A and 77% by neutralizing antibodies specific for CatD (both P CatD in bleomycin-induced apoptosis of cultured AEC and suggest that the role(s) of CatD in AEC apoptosis include the conversion of newly synthesized angiotensinogen to ANG II.

  20. Cleavage of Histone 3 by Cathepsin D in the involuting mammary gland.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhila Khalkhali-Ellis

    Full Text Available The post-lactational regression of mammary gland is a complex multi-step process designed to conserve the biological function of the gland for next pregnancy. This developmental stage is a biological intrigue with great relevance to breast cancer research, and thus has been the subject of intensive scrutiny. Multipronged studies (microarray, proteomics profiling, animal knock-out models have provided a repertoire of genes critical to involution. However, the caveat of these approaches remains in their failure to reveal post-translational modification(s, an emerging and critical aspect of gene regulation in developmental processes and mammary gland remodeling. The massive surge in the lysosomal enzymes concurrent with the onset of involution has been known for decades, and considered essential for "clearance" purposes. However, functional significance of these enzymes in diverse biological processes distinct from their proteolytic activity is just emerging. Studies from our laboratory had indicated specific post-translational modifications of the aspartyl endopeptidase Cathepsin D (CatD at distinct stages mammary gland development. This study addresses the biological significance of these modifications in the involution process, and reveals that post-translational modifications drive CatD into the nucleus to cleave Histone 3. The cleavage of Histone 3 has been associated with cellular differentiation and could be critical instigator of involution process. From functional perspective, deregulated expression and increased secretion of CatD are associated with aggressive and metastatic phenotype of breast cancer. Thus unraveling CatD's physiological functions in mammary gland development will bridge the present gap in understanding its pro-tumorigenic/metastatic functions, and assist in the generation of tailored therapeutic approaches.

  1. Two Faces of Cathepsin D: Physiological Guardian Angel and Pathological Demon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalkhali-Ellis, Zhila; Hendrix, Mary J C

    2014-07-01

    Since its discovery as a lysosomal hydrolase, Cathepsin D (CatD) has been the subject of intensive scrutiny by numerous scientists. Those accumulated efforts have defined its biosynthetic pathway, structure, and companion proteins in the context of its perceived "house keeping" function. However, in the past two decades CatD has emerged as a multifunctional enzyme, involved in myriad biological processes beyond its original "housekeeping" role. CatD is responsible for selective and limited cleavage (quite distinct from non-specific protein degradation) of particular substrates vital to proper cellular function. These proteolytic events are critical in the control of biological processes, including cell cycle progression, differentiation and migration, morphogenesis and tissue remodeling, immunological processes, ovulation, fertilization, neuronal outgrowth, angiogenesis, and apoptosis. Consistent with the biological relevance of CatD, its deficiency, altered regulation or post-translational modification underlie important pathological conditions such as cancer, atherosclerosis, neurological and skin disorders. Specifically, deregulated synthesis, post-translational modifications and hyper-secretion of CatD, along with its mitogenic effects, are established hallmarks of cancer. More importantly, but less studied, is its significance in regulating the sensitivity to anticancer drugs. This review outlines CatD's post-translational modifications, cellular trafficking, secretion and protein binding partners in normal mammary gland, and restates the "site-specific" function of CatD which is most probably dictated by its post-translational modifications and binding partners. Noteworthy, CatD's association with one of its binding partners in the context of drug sensitivity is highlighted, with the optimism that it could contribute to the development of more effective chemotherapeutic agent(s) tailored for individual patients.

  2. Conformational dynamics of cathepsin D and binding to a small-molecule BACE1 inhibitor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ellis, Christopher R; Tsai, Cheng-Chieh; Lin, Fang-Yu; Shen, Jana

    2017-06-05

    BACE1 is a major therapeutic target for prevention and treatment of Alzheimer's disease. Developing inhibitors that can selectively target BACE1 in favor of other proteases, especially cathepsin D (CatD), has presented significant challenges. Here, we investigate the conformational dynamics and protonation states of BACE1 and CatD using continuous constant pH molecular dynamics with pH replica-exchange sampling protocol. Despite similar structure, BACE1 and CatD exhibit markedly different active site dynamics. BACE1 displays pH-dependent flap dynamics that controls substrate accessibility, while the CatD flap is relatively rigid and remains open in the pH range 2.5-6. Interestingly, although each protease hydrolyzes peptide bonds, the protonation states of the catalytic dyads are different within the active pH range. The acidic and basic components of the BACE1 catalytic dyad are clear, while either aspartic acid of the CatD catalytic dyad could play the role of acid or base. Finally, we investigate binding of the inhibitor LY2811376 developed by Eli Lilly to BACE1 and CatD. Surprisingly, in the enzyme active pH range, LY2811376 forms a stronger salt bridge with the catalytic dyad in CatD than in BACE1, which might explain the retinal toxicity of the inhibitor related to off-target inhibition of CatD. This work highlights the complexity and challenge in structure-based drug design where receptor-ligand binding induces protonation state change in both the protein and the inhibitor. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Cathepsin D deficiency induces oxidative damage in brain pericytes and impairs the blood-brain barrier.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okada, Ryo; Wu, Zhou; Zhu, Aiqin; Ni, Junjun; Zhang, Jingqi; Yoshimine, Yoshito; Peters, Christoph; Saftig, Paul; Nakanishi, Hiroshi

    2015-01-01

    Recent evidence suggests that peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) contribute to the pathogenesis of neuropathological changes in patients with neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis (NCL) and lysosomal storage diseases. In order to examine the possible increase in the permeability of the blood-brain-barrier (BBB) and resultant infiltration of PBMCs due to cathepsin D (CatD) deficiency, a process underlying the onset of congenital NCL, we examined structural changes in brain vessels in CatD-/- mice. Consequently, the mean diameter of the brain vessels in the cerebral cortex on postnatal day 24 (P24) was significantly larger in CatD-/- mice than in wild-type mice. Furthermore, the mean number of brain pericytes in CatD-/- mice began to decline significantly on P16 and almost disappeared on P24, and oxidative DNA damage was first detected in brain pericytes on P12. Examinations with electron microscopy revealed that brain pericytes were laden with dense granular bodies, cytoplasmic vacuoles and lipid droplets. The infiltration of PBMCs characterized by segmented nucleus laden with dense granular bodies was also noted in the cerebral cortex of CatD-/- mice. When primary cultured microglia prepared from enhanced green fluorescent protein (GFP)-expressing transgenic rats were injected into the common carotid artery, GFP-positive microglia were detected in the brain parenchyma of CatD-/-, but not wild-type, mice. Moreover, pepstatin A, a specific aspartic protease inhibitor, induced mitochondria-derived reactive oxygen species (ROS) production in the isolated brain pericytes, which decreased the cell viability. These observations suggest that increased lysosomal storage due to CatD deficiency causes oxidative damage in brain pericytes, subsequently resulting in an increased vessel diameter, enhanced permeability of the BBB and the infiltration of PBMCs. Therefore, protecting brain pericytes against lysosomal storage-induced oxidative stress may represent an alternative

  4. New insights into cathepsin D in mammary tissue development and remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margaryan, Naira V; Kirschmann, Dawn A; Lipavsky, Alina; Bailey, Caleb M; Hendrix, Mary J C; Khalkhali-Ellis, Zhila

    2010-09-01

    Cathepsin D (CatD) is a lysosomal aspartyl endopeptidase originally considered a "house keeping enzyme" involved in the clearance of unwanted proteins. However, recent studies have revealed CatD's involvement in apoptosis and autophagy, thus signifying an important function in the proper development and maintenance of multi-cellular organs. In the mammary gland, matrix degradation and the remodeling process are orchestrated by proteolytic enzymes, but the role of CatD at distinct developmental stages has remained mostly unexplored. Based on our previous studies we sought to address the role of this endopeptidase in mammary gland development and remodeling. By employing a mouse model, we report a previously unidentified participation of CatD in different stages of mammary gland development. Our findings reveal that CatD undergoes distinct protein processing at different stages of mammary gland development, and this customized processing results in differential enzymatic activity (constitutive and low pH activatable) best fitting particular stage(s) of development. In addition, at the onset of involution the N-glycan structure of this endopeptidase switches from a mixed high mannose and hybrid structure to an almost exclusively high mannose type, but reverts back to the original N-glycan composition by day 4 of involution. Our findings illuminate (at least in part) the "raison d'être" for CatD's numerous and highly regulated proteolytic processing steps from the pro-form to the mature enzyme. In the mammary gland, specific cleavage product(s) perform specialized function(s) befitting each stage of remodeling. It is noteworthy that deregulated synthesis, secretion and glycosylation of CatD are hallmarks of cancer progression. Thus, identifying the role of CatD in a dynamic normal tissue undergoing highly regulated cycles of remodeling could provide valuable information illuminating the deregulation of CatD associated with cancer development and metastasis.

  5. Plasma cathepsin D levels: a novel tool to predict pediatric hepatic inflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walenbergh, Sofie M A; Houben, Tom; Hendrikx, Tim; Jeurissen, Mike L J; van Gorp, Patrick J; Vreugdenhil, Anita C E; Adriaanse, Marlou P; Buurman, Wim A; Hofker, Marten H; Mosca, Antonella; Lindsey, Patrick J; Alisi, Anna; Liccardo, Daniela; Panera, Nadia; Koek, Ger H; Nobili, Valerio; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit

    2015-03-01

    Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is the most severe form of a hepatic condition known as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NASH is histologically characterized by hepatic fat accumulation, inflammation, and ballooning, and eventually coupled with fibrosis that, in turn, may progress to end-stage liver disease even in young individuals. Hence, there is a critical need for specific noninvasive markers to predict hepatic inflammation at an early age. We investigated whether plasma levels of cathepsin D (CatD), a lysosomal protease, correlated with the severity of liver inflammation in pediatric NAFLD. Liver biopsies from children (n=96) with NAFLD were histologically evaluated according to the criteria of Kleiner (NAFLD activity score) and the Brunt's criteria. At the time of liver biopsy, blood was taken and levels of CatD, alanine aminotransferase (ALT), and cytokeratin-18 (CK-18) were measured in plasma. Plasma CatD levels were significantly lower in subjects with liver inflammation compared with steatotic subjects. Furthermore, we found that CatD levels were gradually reduced and corresponded with increasing severity of liver inflammation, steatosis, hepatocellular ballooning, and NAFLD activity score. CatD levels correlated with pediatric NAFLD disease progression better than ALT and CK-18. In particular, CatD showed a high diagnostic accuracy (area under receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC-AUC): 0.94) for the differentiation between steatosis and hepatic inflammation, and reached almost the maximum accuracy (ROC-AUC: 0.998) upon the addition of CK-18. Plasma CatD holds a high diagnostic value to distinguish pediatric patients with hepatic inflammation from children with steatosis.

  6. Cleavage of Histone 3 by Cathepsin D in the involuting mammary gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalkhali-Ellis, Zhila; Goossens, William; Margaryan, Naira V; Hendrix, Mary J C

    2014-01-01

    The post-lactational regression of mammary gland is a complex multi-step process designed to conserve the biological function of the gland for next pregnancy. This developmental stage is a biological intrigue with great relevance to breast cancer research, and thus has been the subject of intensive scrutiny. Multipronged studies (microarray, proteomics profiling, animal knock-out models) have provided a repertoire of genes critical to involution. However, the caveat of these approaches remains in their failure to reveal post-translational modification(s), an emerging and critical aspect of gene regulation in developmental processes and mammary gland remodeling. The massive surge in the lysosomal enzymes concurrent with the onset of involution has been known for decades, and considered essential for "clearance" purposes. However, functional significance of these enzymes in diverse biological processes distinct from their proteolytic activity is just emerging. Studies from our laboratory had indicated specific post-translational modifications of the aspartyl endopeptidase Cathepsin D (CatD) at distinct stages mammary gland development. This study addresses the biological significance of these modifications in the involution process, and reveals that post-translational modifications drive CatD into the nucleus to cleave Histone 3. The cleavage of Histone 3 has been associated with cellular differentiation and could be critical instigator of involution process. From functional perspective, deregulated expression and increased secretion of CatD are associated with aggressive and metastatic phenotype of breast cancer. Thus unraveling CatD's physiological functions in mammary gland development will bridge the present gap in understanding its pro-tumorigenic/metastatic functions, and assist in the generation of tailored therapeutic approaches.

  7. Vaccination against Fasciola hepatica using cathepsin L3 and B3 proteases delivered alone or in combination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wesołowska, Agnieszka; Basałaj, Katarzyna; Norbury, Luke J; Sielicka, Alicja; Wędrychowicz, Halina; Zawistowska-Deniziak, Anna

    2018-01-30

    No licensed vaccine is currently available for prevention of Fasciola hepatica infections. However, considering the alarming increase in drug resistance, there is an urgent need for a safe and fully effective vaccine against fasciolosis. Here, we tested if cathepsins L (FhCL3-1, FhCL3-2) and B (FhCB3) secreted by juvenile liver flukes are viable vaccine targets when delivered alone or in combination in a rat model. Since control over the early immune response is crucial for parasite's establishment in its host, it was hypothesised that targeting fluke juvenile stages may prove beneficial. Moreover, it was assumed that selected antigens will act in a cumulative manner to interfere with liver fluke migration and thereby will reduce F. hepatica infection. Recombinant FhCL3-1 and FhCL3-2 delivered alone reduced liver fluke burdens by 47 % and 63 %, respectively. A trivalent vaccine containing rFhCL3-1/CL3-2/CB3 did not increase the protective vaccine efficacy compared to the rFhCL3-2 vaccinated group (53 %), although, reductions in liver fluke wet weight (statistically significant) and liver damage score were most pronounced. Further, the highest IgG1 and IgG2a levels were seen in rFhCL3-2 vaccinated rats, the group for which the highest reduction in worm burden was demonstrated. Moreover, IgG1 and IgG2a levels in vaccinated rats were significantly elevated compared to those reported for control groups up to 4 week post-infection. While the mechanism of protection remains unknown, it appears that it depends on vaccine-induced antibodies directed against cathepsins. The obtained results imply that F. hepatica juvenile-specific cathepsins are promising vaccine candidates that induce responses that successfully target early migratory liver fluke stages. Now, the challenge is to evaluate these juvenile-specific cathepsins for use in livestock. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Untersuchungen zur Aktivierung von Transglutaminasen durch das Zytokin Tumor Nekrose Faktor Alpha und Cathepsin D in Fibroblasten und Keratinozyten

    OpenAIRE

    Hellmich, Isabel

    2011-01-01

    Egberts et al. (2004) wiesen eine Aktivitätssteigerung der TG1 in Keratinozytenkulturen durch exogene Zugabe von Cathepsin D (CATD) nach. Daraufhin wurde die Regulation der Transglutaminase 1 (TG1) durch CATD mit Hilfe von CATD defizienten Mausfibroblasten überprüft. Es zeigte sich eine gestörte Prozessierung der TG1 in CATD-defizienten Fibroblasten. Daraus wurde geschlossen, dass die TG1 durch/über CATD vermittelte proteolytische Prozessierung aktiviert werden kann. Da von der Arbeitsgruppe ...

  9. Exploration of peptides that fit into the thermally vibrating active site of cathepsin K protease by alternating artificial intelligence and molecular simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Katsuhiko

    2017-08-01

    Eighteen tripeptides that fit into the thermally vibrating active site of cathepsin K were discovered by alternating artificial intelligence and molecular simulation. The 18 tripeptides fit the active site better than the cysteine protease inhibitor E64, and a better inhibitor of cathepsin K could be designed considering these tripeptides. Among the 18 tripeptides, Phe-Arg-Asp and Tyr-Arg-Asp fit the active site the best and their structural similarity should be considered in the design process. Interesting factors emerged from the structure of the decision tree, and its structural information will guide exploration of potential inhibitor molecules for proteases.

  10. Simultaneous human papilloma virus type 16 E7 and cdk inhibitor p21 expression induces apoptosis and cathepsin B activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaznelson, Dorte Wissing; Bruun, Silas; Monrad, Astrid; Gjerloev, Simon; Birk, Jesper; Roepke, Carsten; Norrild, Bodil

    2004-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) is the major risk factor for development of cervical cancer. The major oncoprotein E7 enhances cell growth control. However, E7 has in some reports been shown to induce apoptosis suggesting that there is a delicate balance between cell proliferation and induction of cell death. We have used the osteosarcoma cell line U2OS cells provided with E7 and the cdk2 inhibitor p21 (cip1/waf1) under inducible control, as a model system for the analysis of E7-mediated apoptosis. Our data shows that simultaneous expression of E7 and p21 proteins induces cell death, possibly because of conflicting growth control. Interestingly, E7/p21-induced cell death is associated with the activation of a newly identified mediator of apoptosis, namely cathepsin B. Activation of the cellular caspases is undetectable in cells undergoing E7/p21-induced apoptosis. To our knowledge, this is the first time a role for cathepsin B is reported in HPV-induced apoptotic signalling

  11. [Clinical significance of detection of cathepsin X and cystatin C in the sera of patients with lung cancer].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xuede; Hou, Yanli; Niu, Zequn; Li, Wei; Meng, Xia; Zhang, Na; Yang, Shuanying

    2013-08-20

    Cathepsin X (Cat X) has been identified as a member of cathepsin family. Studies have shown that Cat X is involved in tumorigenesis and tumor development of various cancers. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between the clinicopathological prognosis and the levels of Cat X and cystatin C in the serum of patients with lung cancer. Blood samples were collected from 84 patients with lung cancer and 36 healthy control subjects. Cat X and cystatin C were determined by quantitative ELISA. Cat X and cystatin C levels were significantly higher in the patients with lung cancer than that in the healthy control subjects (Pcancer (P=0.076). Cystatin C was positively correlated with TNM stage (P=0.01). Furthermore, cystatin C/Cat X was correlated with lymph node metastasis (P=0.058). The patients with high Cat X levels experienced significantly shorter overall survival rates compared with those with low Cat X. Univariate analysis indicated that Cat X and TNM stage were related to overall survival. Multivariate Cox analysis indicated that TNM stage may be used as an independent prognostic variable in patients with lung cancer. Cat X and cystatin C levels were significantly higher in patients with lung cancer. Cat X and cystatin C detection in the sera may contribute to the diagnosis of lung cancer and may be used to evaluate the prognosis of patients with NSCLC.

  12. Structural Dynamics Investigation of Human Family 1 & 2 Cystatin-Cathepsin L1 Interaction: A Comparison of Binding Modes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandy, Suman Kumar; Seal, Alpana

    2016-01-01

    Cystatin superfamily is a large group of evolutionarily related proteins involved in numerous physiological activities through their inhibitory activity towards cysteine proteases. Despite sharing the same cystatin fold, and inhibiting cysteine proteases through the same tripartite edge involving highly conserved N-terminal region, L1 and L2 loop; cystatins differ widely in their inhibitory affinity towards C1 family of cysteine proteases and molecular details of these interactions are still elusive. In this study, inhibitory interactions of human family 1 & 2 cystatins with cathepsin L1 are predicted and their stability and viability are verified through protein docking & comparative molecular dynamics. An overall stabilization effect is observed in all cystatins on complex formation. Complexes are mostly dominated by van der Waals interaction but the relative participation of the conserved regions varied extensively. While van der Waals contacts prevail in L1 and L2 loop, N-terminal segment chiefly acts as electrostatic interaction site. In fact the comparative dynamics study points towards the instrumental role of L1 loop in directing the total interaction profile of the complex either towards electrostatic or van der Waals contacts. The key amino acid residues surfaced via interaction energy, hydrogen bonding and solvent accessible surface area analysis for each cystatin-cathepsin L1 complex influence the mode of binding and thus control the diverse inhibitory affinity of cystatins towards cysteine proteases.

  13. Structural Dynamics Investigation of Human Family 1 & 2 Cystatin-Cathepsin L1 Interaction: A Comparison of Binding Modes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suman Kumar Nandy

    Full Text Available Cystatin superfamily is a large group of evolutionarily related proteins involved in numerous physiological activities through their inhibitory activity towards cysteine proteases. Despite sharing the same cystatin fold, and inhibiting cysteine proteases through the same tripartite edge involving highly conserved N-terminal region, L1 and L2 loop; cystatins differ widely in their inhibitory affinity towards C1 family of cysteine proteases and molecular details of these interactions are still elusive. In this study, inhibitory interactions of human family 1 & 2 cystatins with cathepsin L1 are predicted and their stability and viability are verified through protein docking & comparative molecular dynamics. An overall stabilization effect is observed in all cystatins on complex formation. Complexes are mostly dominated by van der Waals interaction but the relative participation of the conserved regions varied extensively. While van der Waals contacts prevail in L1 and L2 loop, N-terminal segment chiefly acts as electrostatic interaction site. In fact the comparative dynamics study points towards the instrumental role of L1 loop in directing the total interaction profile of the complex either towards electrostatic or van der Waals contacts. The key amino acid residues surfaced via interaction energy, hydrogen bonding and solvent accessible surface area analysis for each cystatin-cathepsin L1 complex influence the mode of binding and thus control the diverse inhibitory affinity of cystatins towards cysteine proteases.

  14. Regulation of Cathepsin G Reduces the Activation of Proinsulin-Reactive T Cells from Type 1 Diabetes Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Fang; Schäfer, Nadja; Palesch, David; Brücken, Ruth; Beck, Alexander; Sienczyk, Marcin; Kalbacher, Hubert; Sun, ZiLin; Boehm, Bernhard O.; Burster, Timo

    2011-01-01

    Autoantigenic peptides resulting from self-proteins such as proinsulin are important players in the development of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D). Self-proteins can be processed by cathepsins (Cats) within endocytic compartments and loaded to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II molecules for CD4+ T cell inspection. However, the processing and presentation of proinsulin by antigen-presenting cells (APC) in humans is only partially understood. Here we demonstrate that the processing of proinsulin by B cell or myeloid dendritic cell (mDC1)-derived lysosomal cathepsins resulted in several proinsulin-derived intermediates. These intermediates were similar to those obtained using purified CatG and, to a lesser extent, CatD, S, and V in vitro. Some of these intermediates polarized T cell activation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from T1D patients indicative for naturally processed T cell epitopes. Furthermore, CatG activity was found to be elevated in PBMC from T1D patients and abrogation of CatG activity resulted in functional inhibition of proinsulin-reactive T cells. Our data suggested the notion that CatG plays a critical role in proinsulin processing and is important in the activation process of diabetogenic T cells. PMID:21850236

  15. Regulation of cathepsin G reduces the activation of proinsulin-reactive T cells from type 1 diabetes patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fang Zou

    Full Text Available Autoantigenic peptides resulting from self-proteins such as proinsulin are important players in the development of type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1D. Self-proteins can be processed by cathepsins (Cats within endocytic compartments and loaded to major histocompatibility complex (MHC class II molecules for CD4(+ T cell inspection. However, the processing and presentation of proinsulin by antigen-presenting cells (APC in humans is only partially understood. Here we demonstrate that the processing of proinsulin by B cell or myeloid dendritic cell (mDC1-derived lysosomal cathepsins resulted in several proinsulin-derived intermediates. These intermediates were similar to those obtained using purified CatG and, to a lesser extent, CatD, S, and V in vitro. Some of these intermediates polarized T cell activation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from T1D patients indicative for naturally processed T cell epitopes. Furthermore, CatG activity was found to be elevated in PBMC from T1D patients and abrogation of CatG activity resulted in functional inhibition of proinsulin-reactive T cells. Our data suggested the notion that CatG plays a critical role in proinsulin processing and is important in the activation process of diabetogenic T cells.

  16. p53, cathepsin D, Bcl-2 are joint prognostic indicators of breast cancer metastatic spreading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerra, Emanuela; Cimadamore, Alessia; Simeone, Pasquale; Vacca, Giovanna; Lattanzio, Rossano; Botti, Gerardo; Gatta, Valentina; D'Aurora, Marco; Simionati, Barbara; Piantelli, Mauro; Alberti, Saverio

    2016-08-18

    Traditional prognostic indicators of breast cancer, i.e. lymph node diffusion, tumor size, grading and estrogen receptor expression, are inadequate predictors of metastatic relapse. Thus, additional prognostic parameters appear urgently needed. Individual oncogenic determinants have largely failed in this endeavour. Only a few individual tumor growth drivers, e.g. mutated p53, Her-2, E-cadherin, Trops, did reach some prognostic/predictive power in clinical settings. As multiple factors are required to drive solid tumor progression, clusters of such determinants were expected to become stronger indicators of tumor aggressiveness and malignant progression than individual parameters. To identify such prognostic clusters, we went on to coordinately analyse molecular and histopathological determinants of tumor progression of post-menopausal breast cancers in the framework of a multi-institutional case series/case-control study. A multi-institutional series of 217 breast cancer cases was analyzed. Twenty six cases (12 %) showed disease relapse during follow-up. Relapsed cases were matched with a set of control patients by tumor diameter, pathological stage, tumor histotype, age, hormone receptors and grading. Histopathological and molecular determinants of tumor development and aggressiveness were then analyzed in relapsed versus non-relapsed cases. Stepwise analyses and model structure fitness assessments were carried out to identify clusters of molecular alterations with differential impact on metastatic relapse. p53, Bcl-2 and cathepsin D were shown to be coordinately associated with unique levels of relative risk for disease relapse. As many Ras downstream targets, among them matrix metalloproteases, are synergistically upregulated by mutated p53, whole-exon sequence analyses were performed for TP53, Ki-RAS and Ha-RAS, and findings were correlated with clinical phenotypes. Notably, TP53 insertion/deletion mutations were only detected in relapsed cases

  17. Production and characterization of a monoclonal antibody against recombinant cathepsin L1 of Fasciola gigantica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anuracpreeda, Panat; Srirakam, Thippawan; Pandonlan, Sudarat; Changklungmoa, Narin; Chotwiwatthanakun, Charoonroj; Tinikul, Yotsawan; Poljaroen, Jaruwan; Meemon, Krai; Sobhon, Prasert

    2014-08-01

    Monoclonal antibodies (MoAbs) against a recombinant cathepsin L1 of Fasciola gigantica (rFgCatL1) were produced in vitro by fusion of BALB/c mice spleen cells immunized with rFgCatL1 and mouse myeloma cells. Reactivity and specificity of these MoAbs were evaluated by indirect ELISA and immunoblotting techniques. Seven MoAb clones were selected from the stable hybridoma clones, namely 1E10, 1F5, 3D11, 4B10, 4D3, 4E3 and 5E7. Clones 1E10, 1F5 and 3D11 were IgM, whereas clones 4B10, 4D3, 4E3 and 5E7 were IgG1. All MoAbs had kappa light chain isotypes. All MoAbs reacted with rCatL1 at molecular weight (MW) 30kDa and with the native CatL1 at MW 27kDa in whole body (WB) extracts of metacercariae (Met), newly excysted juveniles (NEJ), 1, 3, 5-week-old juveniles (Ju), adult WB and adult excretory-secretory (ES) fractions, but not with adult tegumental antigens (TA). All of these MoAbs showed no cross-reactions with antigens of other parasites commonly found in ruminants and human, including Paramphistomum cervi, Eurytrema pancreaticum, Gigantocotyle explanatum, Schistosoma spindale, Schistosoma mansoni, Moniezia benedeni, Avitellina centripunctata, Trichuris sp., Haemonchus placei and Setaria labiato-papillosa. Localization of CatL1 in each developmental stages of F. gigantica by immunoperoxidase technique, using these MoAbs as probes, indicated that CatL1 was present at high concentration in the caecal epithelium and caecal lumen of metacercariae, NEJ, 1, 3, 5-week-old juveniles and adult fluke. This finding indicated that CatL1 is a copiously expressed parasite protein that is released into the ES, thus CatL1 and its MoAb could be a good candidate for immunodiagnosis of fasciolosis in ruminant and human. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of cathepsin B from the sea cucumber Apostichopus japonicus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Huahui; Lv, Miao; Lv, Zhimeng; Li, Chenghua; Xu, Wei; Zhang, Weiwei; Zhao, Xuelin; Duan, Xuemei; Jin, Chunhua

    2017-01-01

    Cathepsin B (CTSB), a member of lysosomal cysteine protease, is involved in multiple levels of physiological and biological processes, and also plays crucial roles in host immune defense against pathogen infection in vertebrates. However, the function of CTSB within the innate immune system of invertebrates, particularly in marine echinoderms, has been poorly documented. In this study, the immune function of CTSB in Apostichopus japonicus (designated as AjCTSB), a commercially important and disease vulnerable aquaculture specie, was investigated by integrated molecular and protein approaches. A 2153 bp cDNA representing the full-length of AjCTSB was cloned via overlapping ESTs and RACE fragments. AjCTSB contained an open reading frame of 999 bp encoding a secreted protein of 332 amino acid residues with a predicted molecular mass of 36.8 kDa. The deduced amino acid of AjCTSB shared a typical activity center containing three conserved amino acid residues (Cys 108 , His 277 and Asn 297 ). Phylogenetic tree analysis also supported that AjCTSB was a new member of CTSB family with clustering firstly with invertebrate CTSBs. Quantitative real time PCR analysis revealed that AjCTSB was ubiquitously expressed in all examined tissues with the highest levels in intestine. The Vibrio splendidus challenged sea cucumber and LPS-exposed coelomocytes could both significantly boost the expression of AjCTSB. Moreover, the purified recombinant AjCTSB exhibited dose-dependent CTSB activities at the concentration ranged from 0 to 0.24 μg μL -1 . Further functional analysis indicated that coelomocytes apoptosis was significantly inhibited by 0.16-fold in vivo and the apoptosis execution Ajcaspase 3 was extremely reduced in Apostichopus japonicus coelomocytes treated with specific AjCTSB siRNA. Collectively, all these results suggested that AjCTSB was an important immune factor and might be served as apoptosis enhancers in pathogen challenged sea cucumber. Copyright © 2016

  19. Cathepsin D contributes to the accumulation of advanced glycation end products during photoaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xinya; Zheng, Yue; Huang, Yunfen; Chen, Jian; Gong, Zijian; Li, Yuying; Lu, Chun; Lai, Wei; Xu, Qingfang

    2018-02-19

    The deposition of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) is accelerated in photoaged skin, but the underlying mechanisms remain elusive. Intracellular degradation has been recently considered to play an important role in AGEs removal. Although lysosomal cathepsin D (CatD), B (CatB), L(CatL) and proteasomes are found to degrade internalized AGEs, it remains unknown which protease degrades internalized AGEs in human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs), and whether a decrease in intracellular degradation contributes to enhanced AGEs deposition in photoaged skin. This study aims to investigate the specific proteases that contribute to intracellular AGEs degradation in HDFs and regulate AGEs accumulation in photoaged skin. Repetitive UVA irradiation was used to induce primary HDF photoaging in vitro. Uptake and degradation of AGE-BSA were verified and compared between photoaged and non-photoaged fibroblasts with flow cytometry, ELISA and confocal microscopy. Proteasomal and lysosomal activity, expression of CatD, CatB and CatL were also investigated between photoaged and non-photoaged fibroblasts. Further, the effect of protease inhibitors and CatD overexpression via lentiviral transduction on AGE-BSA degradation was analyzed. Finally, the correlation between CatD expression and AGEs accumulation in sun-exposed and sun-protected skin of people from different age was studied with immunohistochemistry. Fibroblasts underwent photoaging in vitro after repetitive UVA irradiation. AGE-BSA was taken up by both photoaged and non-photoaged fibroblasts, but its degradation was significantly decreased in photoaged cells than that of non-photoaged cells. Although the activity of proteasome, CatB, Cat L and Cat D was significantly reduced in photoaged fibroblasts compared to that of non-photoaged cells, and the expression of CatB, CatL and CatD was profoundly attenuated in photoaged fibroblasts, inhibiting proteasome, CatB and CatL did not affect AGE-BSA degradation in HDFs. In contrast

  20. β-Endorphin biotransformation in brain: Formation of γ-endorphin by a synaptosomal plasma membrane associated endopeptidase distinct from cathepsin D

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Burbach, J.P.H.; Loeber, J.G.; Verhoef, J.; Kloet, E.R. de

    1980-01-01

    cSPM preparations of rat brain contain a peptidase activity which generates γ-endorphin from β-endorphin. Some properties of this enzyme were studied and compared with those of cathepsin D. Maximal accumulation of γ-endorphin upon digestion of β-endorphin with a cSPM preparation was found at neutral

  1. ErbB2-Driven Breast Cancer Cell Invasion Depends on a Complex Signaling Network Activating Myeloid Zinc Finger-1-Dependent Cathepsin B Expression

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rafn, Bo; Nielsen, Christian Thomas Friberg; Andersen, Sofie Hagel

    2012-01-01

    signaling network activates the transcription of cathepsin B gene (CTSB) via myeloid zinc finger-1 transcription factor that binds to an ErbB2-responsive enhancer element in the first intron of CTSB. This work provides a model system for ErbB2-induced breast cancer cell invasiveness, reveals a signaling...

  2. 4-tert-Octylphenol stimulates the expression of cathepsins in human breast cancer cells and xenografted breast tumors of a mouse model via an estrogen receptor-mediated signaling pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hye-Rim; Choi, Kyung-Chul

    2013-01-01

    Highlights: ► Cathepsins B and D were markedly enhanced by octylphenol (OP) in MCF-7 cells. ► OP may accelerate breast cancer cell growth and cathepsins via ER-mediated signaling. ► Breast cancer cells exposed with OP to mouse model were more aggressive. ► OP can promote metastasis through the amplification of cathepsins B and D via ER-mediated signaling pathway. -- Abstract: Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDCs) are defined as environmental compounds that modulate steroid hormone receptor-dependent responses an abnormal manner, resulting in adverse health problems for humans such as cancer growth and metastasis. Cathepsins are proteases that have been implicated in cancer progression. However, there have been few studies about the association between cathepsins and estrogenic chemicals during the cancer progression. In this study, we examined the effect(s) of 4-tert-octylphenol (OP), a potent EDC, on the expression of cathepsins B and D in human MCF-7 breast cancer cells and a xenograft mouse model. Treatment with OP significantly induced the proliferation MCF-7 cells in an MTT assay. In addition, the expression of cathepsins B and D was markedly enhanced in MCF-7 cells at both the transcriptional and the translational levels following treatment with E2 or OP up to 48 h. These results demonstrated the ability of OP to disrupt normal transcriptional regulation of cathepsins B and D in human breast cancer cells. However, the effects of OP on cell growth or overexpression of cathepsins by inhibiting ER-mediated signaling were abolished by an ER antagonist and siRNA specific for ERα. In conclusion, our findings suggest that OP at 10 −6 M, like E2, may accelerate breast cancer cell proliferation and the expression of cathepsins through an ER-mediated signaling pathway. In addition, the breast cancer cells exposed with OP to a xenograft mouse model were more aggressive according to our histological analysis and showed markedly increased expression of

  3. Amyloid β oligomers induce interleukin-1β production in primary microglia in a cathepsin B- and reactive oxygen species-dependent manner

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Taneo, Jun; Adachi, Takumi [Department of Animal Development and Physiology, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Yoshida, Aiko; Takayasu, Kunio [Responses to Environmental Signals and Stresses, Graduate School of Biostudies, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe, Sakyo, Kyoto, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Takahara, Kazuhiko, E-mail: ktakahar@zoo.zool.kyoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Animal Development and Physiology, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST), Tokyo 102-0081 (Japan); Inaba, Kayo [Department of Animal Development and Physiology, Kyoto University, Yoshida-Konoe, Sakyo, Kyoto 606-8501 (Japan); Japan Science and Technology Agency, Core Research for Evolutional Science and Technology (CREST), Tokyo 102-0081 (Japan)

    2015-03-13

    Amyloid β (Aβ) peptide, a causative agent of Alzheimer's disease, forms two types of aggregates: oligomers and fibrils. These aggregates induce inflammatory responses, such as interleukin-1β (IL-1β) production by microglia, which are macrophage-like cells located in the brain. In this study, we examined the effect of the two forms of Aβ aggregates on IL-1β production in mouse primary microglia. We prepared Aβ oligomer and fibril from Aβ (1–42) peptide in vitro. We analyzed the characteristics of these oligomers and fibrils by electrophoresis and atomic force microscopy. Interestingly, Aβ oligomers but not Aβ monomers or fibrils induced robust IL-1β production in the presence of lipopolysaccharide. Moreover, Aβ oligomers induced endo/phagolysosome rupture, which released cathepsin B into the cytoplasm. Aβ oligomer-induced IL-1β production was inhibited not only by the cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074-Me but also by the reactive oxygen species (ROS) inhibitor N-acetylcysteine. Random chemical crosslinking abolished the ability of the oligomers to induce IL-1β. Thus, multimerization and fibrillization causes Aβ oligomers to lose the ability to induce IL-1β. These results indicate that Aβ oligomers, but not fibrils, induce IL-1β production in primary microglia in a cathepsin B- and ROS-dependent manner. - Highlights: • We prepared amyloid β (Aβ) fibrils with minimum contamination of Aβ oligomers. • Primary microglia (MG) produced IL-1β in response to Aβ oligomers, but not fibrils. • Only Aβ oligomers induced leakage of cathepsin B from endo/phagolysosomes. • IL-1β production in response to Aβ oligomers depended on both cathepsin B and ROS. • Crosslinking reduced the ability of the Aβ oligomers to induce IL-1β from MG.

  4. Increased Plasma Cathepsin S at the Time of Percutaneous Transluminal Angioplasty is Associated with 6-Months’ Restenosis of the Femoropopliteal Artery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mijovski Mojca Bozic

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: We tested the hypothesis that increased levels of cathepsin S and decreased levels of cystatin C in plasma at the time of percutaneous transluminal angioplasty (PTA are associated with the occurrence of 6-months’ restenosis of the femoropopliteal artery (FPA. Methods: 20 patients with restenosis and 24 matched patients with patent FPA after a 6-months follow-up were in - cluded in this study. They all exhibited disabling claudication or critical limb ischemia and had undergone technically successful PTA. They were all receiving statins and ACE in hi - bitors (or angiotensin II receptor antagonist before the PTA and the therapy did not change throughout the observational period. Plasma concentrations of C-reactive protein were < 10 mg/L and of creatinine within the reference range at the time of the PTA. Plasma concentration and activity of cathepsin S, together with its potent inhibitor cystatin C, were measured the day before and the day after the PTA. Results: The increased plasma concentration and activity of cathepsin S at the time of PTA was associated with the occurrence of 6-months’ restenosis of FPA, independently of established risk factors (lesion complexity, infrapopliteal run-off vessels, type of PTA, age, gender, smoking, diabetes, lipids and of cystatin C. Plasma cystatin C concentration was not associated with restenosis and did not correlate with cathepsin S activity and concentration in the plasma. Conclusion: Increased level of plasma cathepsin S at the time of PTA is associated with 6-months’ restenosis of PTA, independently of established risk factors.

  5. The induction of neuronal death by up-regulated microglial cathepsin H in LPS-induced neuroinflammation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fan, Kai; Li, Daobo; Zhang, Yanli; Han, Chao; Liang, Junjie; Hou, Changyi; Xiao, Hongliang; Ikenaka, Kazuhiro; Ma, Jianmei

    2015-03-19

    Neuroinflammation is a hallmark that leads to selective neuronal loss and/or dysfunction in neurodegenerative disorders. Microglia-derived lysosomal cathepsins are increasingly recognized as important inflammatory mediators to trigger signaling pathways that aggravate neuroinflammation. However, cathepsin H (Cat H), a cysteine protease, has been far less studied in neuroinflammation, compared to cathepsins B, D, L, and S. The expression patterns and functional roles of Cat H in the brain in neuroinflammation remain unknown. C57BL/6J mice were intraperitoneally injected with either 0.9% saline or lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 5 mg/kg). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) and in situ hybridization (ISH) were used to analyze expression and localization of Cat H in the brain. Nitrite assay was used to examine microglial activation in vitro; ELISA was used to determine the release of Cat H and proinflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, IFN-γ). Cat H activity was analyzed by cellular Cat H assay kit. Flow cytometry and in situ cell death detection were used to investigate neuronal death. Data were evaluated for statistical significance with one-way ANOVA and t test. Cat H mRNA was only present in perivascular microglia and non-parenchymal sites under normal conditions. After LPS injection, Cat H mRNA expression in activated microglia in different brain regions was increased. Twenty-four hours after LPS injection, Cat H mRNA expression was maximal in SNr; 72 h later, it peaked in cerebral cortex and hippocampus then decreased and maintained at a low level. The expression of Cat H protein exhibited the similar alterations after LPS injection. In vitro, inflammatory stimulation (LPS, TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, and IFN-γ) increased the release and activity of Cat H in microglia. Conversely, addition of Cat H to microglia promoted the production and release of NO, IL-1β, and IFN-γ which could be prevented by neutralizing antibody. Further, addition of Cat H to Neuro2a cells induced

  6. Single nucleotide polymorphisms of cathepsin S and the risks of asthma attack induced by acaroid mites.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chaopin; Chen, Qi; Jiang, Yuxin; Liu, Zhiming

    2015-01-01

    To investigate association between the three single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs, rs146456111, rs143154304 and rs147260142) in cathepsin S (Cat S) and the risks of allergic asthma attack induced by the acaroid mites in the Chinese population. A case-control study was performed in 412 cases and 454 volunteers/controls to evaluate the effects of three SNPs in Cat S on the risks of asthma attack. The genotypes were determined using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and cleaved amplification polymorphism sequence-tagged sites (PCR-RFLP). The frequencies of genotypes and alleles in these SNPs in the asthmatic group were also analyzed between the two groups. The locus of rs146456111 in Cat S gene, the allele frequency of A and C in asthmatic group were significantly different from the control group (χ(2) = 184.425, P = 0.000), and the difference was significant regarding the distribution of the genotypes (AA, AC, and CC) between asthmatic subjects and normal controls (χ(2) = 177.915, P = 0.000). Logistic regression analysis revealed that the AC, CC, and AC + CC genotypes were significantly increased with the risk of asthma (AC vs. AA, OR = 4.013, 95% CI = 2.989-4.751, P = 0.000; CC vs. AA, OR = 3.167, 95% CI = 2.483-3.785, P = 0.000; AC + CC vs. AA, OR = 3.418, 95% CI = 2.381-4.214, P = 0.000, respectively), compared with AA genotype. Moreover, by comparison with allele A, allele C (OR = 2.187, 95% CI = 1.743-2.281, P asthma; For the locus of rs143154304, compared with the allele frequency G with A in control group, there was no difference (χ(2) = 1.434, P = 0.231) in that of asthmatic group, as well as the distributions of the genotypes (AA, AG, and GG) between asthmatic subjects and normal controls (χ(2) = 1.997, P = 0.369); Logistic regression analysis showed that the AG, GG, and AG + GG genotypes were no risk to asthma (AG vs. AA, OR = 0.991, 95% CI = 0.625-1.507, P = 0.968; GG vs. AA, OR = 0.812, 95% CI = 0.525-1.258, P = 0.352; AG + GG vs. AA, OR = 0.914, 95

  7. Pathological and parasitological protection in goats immunised with recombinant cathepsin L1 and challenged with Fasciola hepatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Ecija, Rafael A; Mendes, Ricardo E; Zafra, Rafael; Buffonni, Leandro; Martínez-Moreno, Alvaro; Pérez, José

    2010-09-01

    Fluke burdens, faecal egg output and hepatic damage were assessed in goats immunised with recombinant cathepsin L1 (rCL1) plus Quil A (n=7) or Quil A alone (control; n=7) and challenged with Fasciola hepatica. There were no significant differences in fluke burdens (56+/-26 vs. 92+/-53), average fluke length (20.9+/-3.0 vs. 21.0+/-3.4mm) or faecal egg output (525+/-533 vs. 758+/-677.8 eggs per gram at 17 weeks post-infection) between vaccinated and infected control groups, respectively, but high individual variability was evident. Morphometric and histopathological studies showed reduced hepatic damage in the vaccinated group compared to the infected control, but high individual variability was also recorded. Further vaccine trials in goats should be carried out using a larger number of animals to evaluate rCL1 as a vaccine for fasciolosis in goats. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Deficiency of Cathepsin K prevents inflammation and bone erosion in rheumatoid arthritis and periodontitis and reveals its shared osteoimmune role

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yun; Wang, Min; Jules, Joel; Zhou, Xuedong; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Using RA and periodontitis mouse models, we demonstrated that RA and periodontitis share many pathological features, such as deregulated cytokine production, increased immune-cell infiltration, increased expression of Toll-like receptors (TLRs), and enhanced osteoclast activity and bone erosion. We revealed that genetic deletion of Cathepsin K (Ctsk) caused a radical reduction in inflammation and bone erosion within RA joint capsules and periodontal lesions, a drastic decrease in immune-cell infiltration, and a significant reduction in osteoclasts, macrophages, dendritic and T-cells. Deficiency of Ctsk greatly decreased the expression of TLR-4, 5, and 9 and their downstream cytokines in periodontal gingival epithelial lesions and synovial RA lesions. Hence, Ctsk may be targeted to treat RA and periodontitis simultaneously due to its shared osteoimmune role. PMID:25896020

  9. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ-regulated cathepsin D is required for lipid antigen presentation by dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakken, Britt; Varga, Tamas; Szatmari, Istvan; Szeles, Lajos; Gyongyosi, Adrienn; Illarionov, Petr A; Dezso, Balazs; Gogolak, Peter; Rajnavolgyi, Eva; Nagy, Laszlo

    2011-07-01

    It is well established that dendritic cells (DCs) take up, process, and present lipid Ags in complex with CD1d molecules to invariant NKT cells. The lipid-activated transcription factor, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ), has previously been shown to regulate CD1d expression in human monocyte-derived DCs, providing a link between lipid metabolism and lipid Ag presentation. We report that PPARγ regulates the expression of a lysosomal protease, cathepsin D (CatD), in human monocyte-derived DCs. Inhibition of CatD specifically reduced the expansion of invariant NKT cells and furthermore resulted in decreased maturation of saposins, a group of lipid transfer proteins required for lysosomal lipid Ag processing and loading. These results reveal a novel mechanism of lipid Ag presentation and identify CatD as a key component of this machinery and firmly place PPARγ as the transcriptional regulator linking lipid metabolism and lipid Ag processing.

  10. Frequency of CFTR, SPINK1, and Cathepsin B Gene Mutation in North Indian Population: Connections between Genetics and Clinical Data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shweta Singh

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives. Genetic mutations and polymorphisms have been correlated with chronic pancreatitis (CP. This study aims to investigate the association of genetic variants of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR and serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK-1 genes and Cathepsin B gene polymorphisms with CP and to associate genetic backgrounds with clinical phenotypes. Methods. 150 CP patients and 150 normal controls were enrolled consecutively. We analyzed SPINK-1 N34S and IVS3+2T>C gene mutations by PCR-restriction-fragment length polymorphism (RFLP. The identification of DF508, G551D, G542X, R117H, and W1282X mutations was carried out by ARMS-PCR. S549N mutation, IVS8 polyTn polymorphism, and Cathepsin B Lec26Val were analysed by PCR-RFLP, nested PCR, and PCR-RFLP plus sequencing, respectively. Results. We found a significant association of SPINK1 (N34S gene polymorphism. IVS1−37T>C polymorphism shows linkage with 101A>G. 300 chromosomes belonging to the CFTR subgroup exhibited minor allele frequency of 0.04, 0.03, 0.03, 0.013, 0.006, and 0.02 for DF508, G452X, G551D, S549N, R117H, and IVS8 T5, respectively. Except for R117H and IVS8 T5 polymorphisms, all other mutations showed significant variation. Conclusion. Analysis of potential susceptibility variants is needed to support nature of the genes and environment in pancreatitis. This data may help establish genetic screening and prenatal setup for Indian population.

  11. Clinical Significance of Detection of Cathepsin X and Cystatin C 
in the Sera of Patients with Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuede ZHANG

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Cathepsin X (Cat X has been identified as a member of cathepsin family. Studies have shown that Cat X is involved in tumorigenesis and tumor development of various cancers. The aim of this study is to investigate the relationship between the clinicopathological prognosis and the levels of Cat X and cystatin C in the serum of patients with lung cancer. Methods Blood samples were collected from 84 patients with lung cancer and 36 healthy control subjects. Cat X and cystatin C were determined by quantitative ELISA. Results Cat X and cystatin C levels were significantly higher in the patients with lung cancer than that in the healthy control subjects (P<0.01. Cat X level was correlated with the pathological types of lung cancer (P=0.076. Cystatin C was positively correlated with TNM stage (P=0.01. Furthermore, cystatin C/Cat X was correlated with lymph node metastasis (P=0.058. The patients with high Cat X levels experienced significantly shorter overall survival rates compared with those with low Cat X. Univariate analysis indicated that Cat X and TNM stage were related to overall survival. Multivariate Cox analysis indicated that TNM stage may be used as an independent prognostic variable in patients with lung cancer. Conclusion Cat X and cystatin C levels were significantly higher in patients with lung cancer. Cat X and cystatin C detection in the sera may contribute to the diagnosis of lung cancer and may be used to evaluate the prognosis of patients with NSCLC.

  12. Cathepsin B Cysteine Proteinase is Essential for the Development and Pathogenesis of the Plant Parasitic Nematode Radopholus similis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Wang, Ke; Xie, Hui; Wang, Dong-Wei; Xu, Chun-Ling; Huang, Xin; Wu, Wen-Jia; Li, Dan-Lei

    2015-01-01

    Radopholus similis is an important plant parasitic nematode which severely harms many crops. Cathepsin B is present in a wide variety of organisms, and plays an important role in many parasites. Understanding cathepsin B of R. similis would allow us to find new targets and approaches for its control. In this study, we found that Rs-cb-1 mRNA was expressed in esophageal glands, intestines and gonads of females, testes of males, juveniles and eggs in R. similis. Rs-cb-1 expression was the highest in females, followed by juveniles and eggs, and was the lowest in males. The maximal enzyme activity of Rs-CB-1 was detected at pH 6.0 and 40 °C. Silencing of Rs-cb-1 using in vitro RNAi (Soaking with dsRNA in vitro) not only significantly inhibited the development and hatching of R. similis, but also greatly reduced its pathogenicity. Using in planta RNAi, we confirmed that Rs-cb-1 expression in nematodes were significantly suppressed and the resistance to R. similis was significantly improved in T2 generation transgenic tobacco plants expressing Rs-cb-1 dsRNA. The genetic effects of in planta RNAi-induced gene silencing could be maintained in the absence of dsRNA for at least two generations before being lost, which was not the case for the effects induced by in vitro RNAi. Overall, our results first indicate that Rs-cb-1 plays key roles in the development, hatching and pathogenesis of R. similis, and that in planta RNAi is an effective tool in studying gene function and genetic engineering of plant resistance to migratory plant parasitic nematodes. PMID:26221074

  13. Lipid core peptide targeting the cathepsin D hemoglobinase of Schistosoma mansoni as a component of a schistosomiasis vaccine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dougall, Annette M; Skwarczynski, Mariusz; Khoshnejad, Makan; Chandrudu, Saranya; Daly, Norelle L; Toth, Istvan; Loukas, Alex

    2014-01-01

    The self-adjuvanting lipid core peptide (LCP) system offers a safe alternative vaccine delivery strategy, eliminating the need for additional adjuvants such as CpG Alum. In this study, we adopted the LCP as a scaffold for an epitope located on the surface of the cathepsin D hemoglobinase (Sm-CatD) of the human blood fluke Schistosoma mansoni. Sm-CatD plays a pivotal role in digestion of the fluke's bloodmeal and has been shown to be efficacious as a subunit vaccine in a murine model of human schistosomiasis. Using molecular modeling we showed that S. mansoni cathepsin D possesses a predicted surface exposed α-helix (A₂₆₃K) that corresponds to an immunodominant helix and target of enzyme-neutralizing antibodies against Necator americanus APR-1 (Na-APR-1), the orthologous protease and vaccine antigen from blood-feeding hookworms. The A₂₆₃K epitope was engineered as two peptide variants, one of which was flanked at both termini with a coil maintaining sequence, thereby promoting the helical characteristics of the native A₂₆₃K epitope. Some of the peptides were fused to a self-adjuvanting lipid core scaffold to generate LCPs. Mice were vaccinated with unadjuvanted peptides, peptides formulated with Freund's adjuvants, or LCPs. Antibodies generated to LCPs recognized native Sm-CatD within a soluble adult schistosome extract, and almost completely abolished its enzymatic activity in vitro. Using immunohistochemistry we showed that anti-LCP antibodies bound to the native Sm-CatD protein in the esophagus and anterior regions of the gastrodermis of adult flukes. Vaccines offer an alternative control strategy in the fight against schistosomiasis, and further development of LCPs containing multiple epitopes from this and other vaccine antigens should become a research priority.

  14. Frequency of CFTR, SPINK1, and cathepsin B gene mutation in North Indian population: connections between genetics and clinical data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shweta; Choudhuri, Gourdas; Agarwal, Sarita

    2014-01-01

    Genetic mutations and polymorphisms have been correlated with chronic pancreatitis (CP). This study aims to investigate the association of genetic variants of cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR) and serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK-1) genes and Cathepsin B gene polymorphisms with CP and to associate genetic backgrounds with clinical phenotypes. 150 CP patients and 150 normal controls were enrolled consecutively. We analyzed SPINK-1 N34S and IVS3+2T>C gene mutations by PCR-restriction-fragment length polymorphism (RFLP). The identification of DF508, G551D, G542X, R117H, and W1282X mutations was carried out by ARMS-PCR. S549N mutation, IVS8 polyTn polymorphism, and Cathepsin B Lec26Val were analysed by PCR-RFLP, nested PCR, and PCR-RFLP plus sequencing, respectively. We found a significant association of SPINK1 (N34S) gene polymorphism. IVS1-37T>C polymorphism shows linkage with 101A>G. 300 chromosomes belonging to the CFTR subgroup exhibited minor allele frequency of 0.04, 0.03, 0.03, 0.013, 0.006, and 0.02 for DF508, G452X, G551D, S549N, R117H, and IVS8 T5, respectively. Except for R117H and IVS8 T5 polymorphisms, all other mutations showed significant variation. Analysis of potential susceptibility variants is needed to support nature of the genes and environment in pancreatitis. This data may help establish genetic screening and prenatal setup for Indian population.

  15. Systematic optimization of multiplex zymography protocol to detect active cathepsins K, L, S, and V in healthy and diseased tissue: compromise among limits of detection, reduced time, and resources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Jerald E; Platt, Manu O

    2013-07-01

    Cysteine cathepsins are a family of proteases identified in cancer, atherosclerosis, osteoporosis, arthritis, and a number of other diseases. As this number continues to rise, so does the need for low cost, broad use quantitative assays to detect their activity and can be translated to the clinic in the hospital or in low resource settings. Multiplex cathepsin zymography is one such assay that detects subnanomolar levels of active cathepsins K, L, S, and V in cell or tissue preparations observed as clear bands of proteolytic activity after gelatin substrate SDS-PAGE with conditions optimal for cathepsin renaturing and activity. Densitometric analysis of the zymogram provides quantitative information from this low cost assay. After systematic modifications to optimize cathepsin zymography, we describe reduced electrophoresis time from 2 h to 10 min, incubation assay time from overnight to 4 h, and reduced minimal tissue protein necessary while maintaining sensitive detection limits; an evaluation of the pros and cons of each modification is also included. We further describe image acquisition by Smartphone camera, export to Matlab, and densitometric analysis code to quantify and report cathepsin activity, adding portability and replacing large scale, darkbox imaging equipment that could be cost prohibitive in limited resource settings.

  16. Systematic optimization of multiplex zymography protocol to detect active cathepsins K, L, S, and V in healthy and diseased tissue: compromise between limits of detection, reduced time, and resources

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dumas, Jerald E.; Platt, Manu O.

    2013-01-01

    Cysteine cathepsins are a family of proteases identified in cancer, atherosclerosis, osteoporosis, arthritis and a number of other diseases. As this number continues to rise, so does the need for low cost, broad use quantitative assays to detect their activity and can be translated to the clinic in the hospital or in low resource settings. Multiplex cathepsin zymography is one such assay that detects subnanomolar levels of active cathepsins K, L, S, and V in cell or tissue preparations observed as cleared bands of proteolytic activity after gelatin substrate SDS-PAGE with conditions optimal for cathepsin renaturing and activity. Densitometric analysis of the zymogram provides quantitative information from this low cost assay. After systematic modifications to optimize cathepsin zymography, we describe reduced electrophoresis time from 2 hours to 10 minutes, incubation assay time from overnight to 4 hours, and reduced minimal tissue protein necessary while maintaining sensitive detection limits; an evaluation of the pros and cons of each modification is also included. We further describe image acquisition by smartphone camera, export to Matlab, and densitometric analysis code to quantify and report cathepsin activity, adding portability and replacing large scale, darkbox imaging equipment that could be cost prohibitive in limited resource settings. PMID:23532386

  17. Association of N-acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase with the multienzyme lysosomal complex of beta-galactosidase, cathepsin A, and neuraminidase. Possible implication for intralysosomal catabolism of keratan sulfate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pshezhetsky, A V; Potier, M

    1996-11-08

    N-Acetylgalactosamine-6-sulfate sulfatase (GALNS) catalyzes the first step of intralysosomal keratan sulfate (KS) catabolism. In Morquio type A syndrome GALNS deficiency causes the accumulation of KS in tissues and results in generalized skeletal dysplasia in affected patients. We show that in normal cells GALNS is in a 1.27-MDa complex with three other lysosomal hydrolases: beta-galactosidase, alpha-neuraminidase, and cathepsin A (protective protein). GALNS copurifies with the complex by different chromatography techniques: affinity chromatography on both cathepsin A-binding and beta-galactosidase-binding columns, gel filtration, and chromatofocusing. Anti-human cathepsin A rabbit antiserum coprecipitates GALNS together with cathepsin A, beta-galactosidase, and alpha-neuraminidase in both a purified preparation of the 1. 27-MDa complex and crude glycoprotein fraction from human placenta extract. Gel filtration analysis of fibroblast extracts of patients deficient in either beta-galactosidase (beta-galactosidosis) or cathepsin A (galactosialidosis), which accumulate KS, demonstrates that the 1.27-MDa complex is disrupted and that GALNS is present only in free homodimeric form. The GALNS activity and cross-reacting material are reduced in the fibroblasts of patients affected with galactosialidosis, indicating that the complex with cathepsin A may protect GALNS in the lysosome. We suggest that the 1.27-MDa complex of lysosomal hydrolases is essential for KS catabolism and that the disruption of this complex may be responsible for the KS accumulation in beta-galactosidosis and galactosialidosis patients.

  18. Enhanced Autophagy and Reduced Expression of Cathepsin D Are Related to Autophagic Cell Death in Epstein-Barr Virus-Associated Nasal Natural Killer/T-Cell Lymphomas: An Immunohistochemical Analysis of Beclin-1, LC3, Mitochondria (AE-1), and Cathepsin D in Nasopharyngeal Lymphomas

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hasui, Kazuhisa; Wang, Jia; Jia, Xinshan; Tanaka, Masashi; Nagai, Taku; Matsuyama, Takami; Eizuru, Yoshito

    2011-01-01

    This study investigated autophagy in 37 cases of nasopharyngeal lymphomas including 23 nasal natural killer (NK)/T-cell lymphomas (NKTCL), 3 cytotoxic T-cell lymphomas (cytotoxic-TML) and 9 B-cell lymphomas (BML) by means of antigen-retrieval immunohistochemistry of beclin-1, LC3, mitochondria (AE-1) and cathepsin D. Peculiar necrosis was noted in EBV + lymphomas comprising 21 NKTCL, 2 cytotoxic-TML and 1 BML. Lymphomas without peculiar necrosis showed high expression of beclin-1, macrogranular cytoplasmal stain of LC3 with sporadic nuclear stain, a hallmark of autophagic cell death (ACD), some aggregated mitochondria and high expression of cathepsin D, suggesting a state of growth with enhanced autophagy with sporadic ACD. EBV + NKTCL with the peculiar necrosis, showed significantly low level of macrogranular staining of LC3, aggregated mitochondria and low expression of cathepsin D in the cellular areas when degenerative lymphoma cells showed decreased beclin-1, significantly advanced LC3-labeled autophagy, residual aggregated mitochondria and significantly reduced expression of cathepsin D, suggesting advanced autophagy with regional ACD. Consequently it was suggested that enhanced autophagy and reduced expression of lysosomal enzymes induced regional ACD under EBV infection in NKTCL

  19. Hybrid 2D/3D-quantitative structure-activity relationship and modeling studies perspectives of pepstatin A analogs as cathepsin D inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arodola, Olayide A; Soliman, Mahmoud Es

    2018-01-01

    Cathepsin D, one of the attractive targets in the treatment of breast cancer, has been implicated in HIV neuropathogenesis with potential proteolytic effects on chemokines. Methodology/result: Diverse modeling tools were used to reveal the key structural features affecting the inhibitory activities of 78 pepstatin A analogs. Analyses were performed to investigate the stability, rationality and fluctuation of the analogs. Results showed a clear correlation between the experimental and predicted activities of the analogs as well as the variation in their activities relative to structural modifications. The insight gained from this study offers theoretical references for understanding the mechanism of action of cathepsin D and will aid in the design of more potent and clinically-relevant drugs. Graphical abstract [Formula: see text].

  20. Chemical constituents of the stem bark of Vochysia thyrsoidea Pohl. (Vochysiaceae) and evaluation of their cytotoxicity and inhibitory activity against cathepsins B and K

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sousa, Lorena Ramos Freitas de; Silva, Jame's A. da; Vieira, Paulo Cezar; Costa, Maisa Borges; Santos, Mirley Luciene dos; Menezes, Antonio Carlos Severo; Sbardelotto, Aline Borba; Pessoa, Claudia do O; Moraes, Manoel Odorico de

    2014-01-01

    A new flavonoid, catechin-3-O-(3 - O-trans-cinnamoyl)-α-rhamnopyranoside, along with known compounds, catechin-3-O-α-rhamnopyranoside, 3-oxo-urs-12-en-28-oic acid, 2,4,6-trimethoxybenzoic acid, 2-butyl-D-fructofuranoside and 1-butyl-D-fructofuranoside, has been isolated from the stem bark of V. thyrsoidea. These compounds were assayed for inhibition of protease activity (cathepsins B and K) and against cancer cell lines. Catechin-3-O-(3 - O-trans-cinnamoyl)-α-rhamnopyranoside showed moderate inhibitory activity (IC 50 = 62.02 µM) against cathepsin B while 2-butyl-D-fructofuranoside was the most potent against a strain of CNS (SF-295) and human leukemia (HL-60) with IC 50 = 36.80 μM and IC 50 = 25.37 μM, respectively (author)

  1. Activated cathepsin L is associated with the switch from autophagy to apoptotic death of SH-SY5Y cells exposed to 6-hydroxydopamine

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Lingyun, E-mail: lingyunlee@126.com [Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Experimental Center, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China); Gao, Luyan [Experimental Center, The Second Affiliated Hospital of Soochow University, Suzhou 215004 (China); Song, Yunzhen; Qin, Zheng-Hong [Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China); Liang, Zhongqin, E-mail: liangzhongqin@suda.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, College of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Soochow University, Suzhou 215123 (China)

    2016-02-12

    Autophagy and apoptosis are common responses to pathological damage in the process of Parkinson's disease (PD), and lysosome dysfunction may contribute to the etiology of PD's neurodegenerative process. In this study, we demonstrated that the neurotoxin 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA) increased autophagy in SH-SY5Y cells, as determined by detection of the lysosome marker lysosomal-associated membrane protein1, the autophagy protein light chain 3 (LC3)-II and the autophagy substrate P62 protein. Meanwhile, autophagy repression with 3-methyladenine accelerated the activation of caspase-3 and PARP and aggravated the cell apoptotic death induced by 6-OHDA. Furthermore, we found that 6-OHDA treatment resulted in a transient increase in the intracellular and nuclear expression of cathepsin L (CTSL). The CTSL inhibitor, Z-FY-CHO, could promote autophagy, decrease accumulation of P62, and block activation of caspase-3 and PARP. Taken together, these results suggest that activation of autophagy may primarily be a protective process in SH-SY5Y cell death induced by 6-OHDA, and the nuclear translocation of CTSL could enhance the cell apoptotic cascade via disturbing autophagy-apoptotic systems in SH-SY5Y cells. Our findings highlight the potential role of CTSL in the cross talk between autophagy and apoptosis, which might be considered a therapeutic strategy for treatment of pathologic conditions associated with neurodegeneration. - Highlights: • Inhibition of autophagy aggravated the cell apoptotic death in SH-SY5Y cells. • Activation of cathepsin L impaired the autophagy pathway. • Activation of cathepsin L enhanced the cell apoptotic cascade. • Cathepsin L involves in the cross talk between autophagy and apoptosis.

  2. Free-thiol Cys331 exposed during activation process is critical for native tetramer structure of cathepsin C (dipeptidyl peptidase I)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horn, Martin; Baudyš, M.; Voburka, Zdeněk; Kluh, Ivan; Vondrášek, Jiří; Mareš, Michael

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 11, - (2002), s. 933-943 ISSN 0961-8368 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA4055006; GA ČR GA522/00/1553; GA MŠk LN00A032; GA ČR GP203/01/D008 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : cathepsin C * cysteine protease Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.546, year: 2002

  3. Effect of mefenamic acid on the immunity and hemostatic system of cancer patients and on the activity of cathepsin D-like protease in colonic cancer tissue

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klyachkin, B.M.; Basargin, S.T.; Timofeev, I.V.; Khaliulin, Yu.G.; Dorofeev, S.A.; Alekseenko, L.D.; Gumenyuk, M.L.

    1992-01-01

    The study of the effect of sodium mefenaminate on radiation resistance of mice yielded positive results. Clinical investigations showed mefenamic acid to decrease the activity of cathepsin D-like protease in colonic cancer tissue. The acid field to affect the proteolytic activity of the normal mucosa. It revealed an immunomodulating activity and influenced the hemostatic system which usually manifested itself in amelioration of hypercoagulation

  4. Nidogen-1 Degraded by Cathepsin S can be Quantified in Serum and is Associated with Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicholas Willumsen

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Loss of basement membrane (BM integrity is typically associated with cancer. Nidogen-1 is an essential component of the BM. Nidogen-1 is a substrate for cathepsin-S (CatS which is released into the tumor microenvironment. Measuring nidogen-1 degraded by CatS may therefore have biomarker potential in cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate if CatS-degraded nidogen-1 was detectable in serum and a possible biomarker for cancer, a pathology associated with disruption of the BM. A competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (NIC was developed with a monoclonal mouse antibody specific for a CatS cleavage site on human nidogen-1. Dilution and spiking recovery, inter- and intravariation, as well as accuracy were evaluated. Serum levels were evaluated in patients with breast cancer, small cell lung cancer (SCLC, and non-SCLC (NSCLC and in healthy controls. The results indicated that the NIC assay was specific for nidogen-1 cleaved by CatS. Inter- and intraassay variations were 9% and 14%, respectively. NIC was elevated in NSCLC as compared to healthy controls (P < .001, breast cancer (P < .01, and SCLC (P < .5. The diagnostic power (area under the receiver operating characteristics of NIC for NSCLC as compared to all other samples combined was 0.83 (95% confidence interval: 0.71-0.95, P < .0001. In conclusion, nidogen-1 degraded by CatS can be quantified in serum by the NIC assay. The current data strongly suggest that cathepsin-S degradation of nidogen-1 is strongly associated with NSCLC, which needs validation in larger clinical cohorts.

  5. Mapping the Pro-Peptide of the Schistosoma mansoni Cathepsin B1 Drug Target: Modulation of Inhibition by Heparin and Design of Mimetic Inhibitors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horn, Martin; Jílková, Adéla; Vondrášek, Jiří; Marešová, Lucie; Caffrey, C. R.; Mareš, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Roč. 6, č. 6 (2011), s. 609-617 ISSN 1554-8929 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/1585; GA AV ČR KJB400550516; GA AV ČR IAA400550705 Grant - others: NATO (XE) NATO LST/CLG 980187 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : Schistosoma mansoni * cathepsin B * propeptide Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 6.446, year: 2011

  6. Reduced cathepsins B and D cause impaired autophagic degradation that can be almost completely restored by overexpression of these two proteases in Sap C-deficient fibroblasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatti, Massimo; Motta, Marialetizia; Di Bartolomeo, Sabrina; Scarpa, Susanna; Cianfanelli, Valentina; Cecconi, Francesco; Salvioli, Rosa

    2012-12-01

    Saposin (Sap) C deficiency, a rare variant form of Gaucher disease, is due to mutations in the Sap C coding region of the prosaposin (PSAP) gene. Sap C is required as an activator of the lysosomal enzyme glucosylceramidase (GCase), which catalyzes glucosylceramide (GC) degradation. Deficit of either GCase or Sap C leads to the accumulation of undegraded GC and other lipids in lysosomes of monocyte/macrophage lineage. Recently, we reported that Sap C mutations affecting a cysteine residue result in increased autophagy. Here, we characterized the basis for the autophagic dysfunction. We analyzed Sap C-deficient and GCase-deficient fibroblasts and observed that autophagic disturbance was only associated with lack of Sap C. By a combined fluorescence microscopy and biochemical studies, we demonstrated that the accumulation of autophagosomes in Sap C-deficient fibroblasts is not due to enhanced autophagosome formation but to delayed degradation of autolysosomes caused, in part, to decreased amount and reduced enzymatic activity of cathepsins B and D. On the contrary, in GCase-deficient fibroblasts, the protein level and enzymatic activity of cathepsin D were comparable with control fibroblasts, whereas those of cathepsin B were almost doubled. Moreover, the enhanced expression of both these lysosomal proteases in Sap C-deficient fibroblasts resulted in close to functional autophagic degradation. Our data provide a novel example of altered autophagy as secondary event resulting from insufficient lysosomal function.

  7. Molecular characterization of cathepsin B from Clonorchis sinensis excretory/secretory products and assessment of its potential for serodiagnosis of clonorchiasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Chenhui

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cathepsin cysteine proteases play multiple roles in the life cycle of parasites such as food uptake, immune invasion and pathogenesis, making them valuable targets for diagnostic assays, vaccines and drugs. The purpose of this study was to identify a cathepsin B of Clonorchis sinensis (CsCB and to investigate its diagnostic value for human helminthiases. Results The predicted amino acid sequence of the cathepsin B of C. sinensis shared 63%, 52%, 50% identity with that of Schistosoma japonicum, Homo sapiens and Fasciola hepatica, respectively. Sequence encoding proenzyme of CsCB was overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Reverse transcription PCR experiments revealed that CsCB transcribed in both adult worm and metacercaria of C. sinensis. CsCB was identified as a C. sinensis excretory/secretory product by immunoblot assay, which was consistent with immunohistochemical localization showing that CsCB was especially expressed in the intestine of C. sinensis adults. Both ELISA and western blotting analysis showed recombinant CsCB could react with human sera from clonorchiasis and other helminthiases. Conclusions Our findings revealed that secreted CsCB may play an important role in the biology of C. sinensis and could be a diagnostic candidate for helminthiases.

  8. Anthrax lethal toxin induced lysosomal membrane permeabilization and cytosolic cathepsin release is Nlrp1b/Nalp1b-dependent.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathleen M Averette

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available NOD-like receptors (NLRs are a group of cytoplasmic molecules that recognize microbial invasion or 'danger signals'. Activation of NLRs can induce rapid caspase-1 dependent cell death termed pyroptosis, or a caspase-1 independent cell death termed pyronecrosis. Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin (LT, is recognized by a subset of alleles of the NLR protein Nlrp1b, resulting in pyroptotic cell death of macrophages and dendritic cells. Here we show that LT induces lysosomal membrane permeabilization (LMP. The presentation of LMP requires expression of an LT-responsive allele of Nlrp1b, and is blocked by proteasome inhibitors and heat shock, both of which prevent LT-mediated pyroptosis. Further the lysosomal protease cathepsin B is released into the cell cytosol and cathepsin inhibitors block LT-mediated cell death. These data reveal a role for lysosomal membrane permeabilization in the cellular response to bacterial pathogens and demonstrate a shared requirement for cytosolic relocalization of cathepsins in pyroptosis and pyronecrosis.

  9. Azilsartan increases levels of IL-10, down-regulates MMP-2, MMP-9, RANKL/RANK, Cathepsin K and up-regulates OPG in an experimental periodontitis model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aurigena Antunes de Araújo

    Full Text Available AIMS: The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of azilsartan (AZT on bone loss, inflammation, and the expression of matrix metallo proteinases (MMPs, receptor activator of nuclear factor κB ligand (RANKL, receptor activator of nuclear factor κB (RANK, osteoprotegerin (OPG, cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2, and cathepsin K in periodontal tissue in a rat model of ligature-induced periodontitis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Male Wistar albino rats were randomly divided into 5 groups of 10 rats each: (1 nonligated, water; (2 ligated, water; (3 ligated, 1 mg/kg AZT; (4 ligated, 5 mg/kg AZT; and (5 ligated, 10 mg/kg AZT. All groups were treated with saline or AZT for 10 days. Periodontal tissues were analyzed by histopathology and immunohistochemical detection of MMP-2, MMP-9, COX-2, RANKL, RANK, OPG, and cathepsin K. Levels of IL-1β, IL-10, TNF-α, myeloperoxidase (MPO, and glutathione (GSH were determined by ELISA. RESULTS: Treatment with 5 mg/kg AZT resulted in reduced MPO (p<0.05 and IL-1β (p<0.05, increased levels of IL-10 (p<0.05, and reduced expression of MMP-2, MMP-9, COX-2, RANK, RANKL, cathepsin K, and increased expression of OPG. CONCLUSIONS: These findings reveal that AZT increases anti-inflammatory cytokines and GSH and decreases bone loss in ligature-induced periodontitis in rats.

  10. The protease degrading sperm histones post-fertilization in sea urchin eggs is a nuclear cathepsin L that is further required for embryo development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Violeta Morin

    Full Text Available Proteolysis of sperm histones in the sea urchin male pronucleus is the consequence of the activation at fertilization of a maternal cysteine protease. We previously showed that this protein is required for male chromatin remodelling and for cell-cycle progression in the newly formed embryos. This enzyme is present in the nucleus of unfertilized eggs and is rapidly recruited to the male pronucleus after insemination. Interestingly, this cysteine-protease remains co-localized with chromatin during S phase of the first cell cycle, migrates to the mitotic spindle in M-phase and is re-located to the nuclei of daughter cells after cytokinesis. Here we identified the protease encoding cDNA and found a high sequence identity to cathepsin proteases of various organisms. A phylogenetical analysis clearly demonstrates that this sperm histone protease (SpHp belongs to the cathepsin L sub-type. After an initial phase of ubiquitous expression throughout cleavage stages, SpHp gene transcripts become restricted to endomesodermic territories during the blastula stage. The transcripts are localized in the invaginating endoderm during gastrulation and a gut specific pattern continues through the prism and early pluteus stages. In addition, a concomitant expression of SpHp transcripts is detected in cells of the skeletogenic lineage and in accordance a pharmacological disruption of SpHp activity prevents growth of skeletal rods. These results further document the role of this nuclear cathepsin L during development.

  11. Expression of cathepsins S and D signals a distinctive biochemical trait in CD34+ hematopoietic stem cells of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martino, Sabata; Montesano, Simona; di Girolamo, Ilaria; Tiribuzi, Roberto; Di Gregorio, Maria; Orlacchio, Antonio; Datti, Alessandro; Calabresi, Paolo; Sarchielli, Paola; Orlacchio, Aldo

    2013-10-01

    The elucidation of mechanistic aspects of relapsing-remitting multiple sclerosis (RRMS) pathogenesis may offer valuable insights into diagnostic decisions and medical treatment. Two lysosomal proteases, cathepsins S and D (CatS and CatD), display an exclusive pattern of expression in CD34(+) hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) from peripheral blood of acute MS (A-MS) patients (n = 20). While both enzymes normally exist as precursor forms in the HSCs of healthy individuals (n = 30), the same cells from A-MS patients consistently exhibit mature enzymes. Further, mature cathepsins are expressed at lower rates in stable MS subjects (S-MS, n = 15) and revert to precursor proteins after interferon-β1a treatment (n = 5). Mature CatD and CatS were induced in HSCs of healthy donors that were either co-cultured with PBMCs of A-MS patients or exposed to their plasma, suggesting a functional involvement of soluble agents. Following HSC exposure to several cytokines known to be implicated in MS, and based on relative cytokine levels displayed in A-MS, S-MS and control individuals, we identified IL-16 as a specific cell signaling factor associated with cathepsin processing. These data point to an evident correlation between CatS and CatD expression and MS clinical stage, and define a biochemical trait in HSCs with functional, medical, and diagnostic relevance.

  12. Collagenolytic activities of the major secreted cathepsin L peptidases involved in the virulence of the helminth pathogen, Fasciola hepatica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark W Robinson

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The temporal expression and secretion of distinct members of a family of virulence-associated cathepsin L cysteine peptidases (FhCL correlates with the entry and migration of the helminth pathogen Fasciola hepatica in the host. Thus, infective larvae traversing the gut wall secrete cathepsin L3 (FhCL3, liver migrating juvenile parasites secrete both FhCL1 and FhCL2 while the mature bile duct parasites, which are obligate blood feeders, secrete predominantly FhCL1 but also FhCL2. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that FhCL1, FhCL2 and FhCL3 exhibit differences in their kinetic parameters towards a range of peptide substrates. Uniquely, FhCL2 and FhCL3 readily cleave substrates with Pro in the P2 position and peptide substrates mimicking the repeating Gly-Pro-Xaa motifs that occur within the primary sequence of collagen. FhCL1, FhCL2 and FhCL3 hydrolysed native type I and II collagen at neutral pH but while FhCL1 cleaved only non-collagenous (NC, non-Gly-X-Y domains FhCL2 and FhCL3 exhibited collagenase activity by cleaving at multiple sites within the α1 and α2 triple helix regions (Col domains. Molecular simulations created for FhCL1, FhCL2 and FhCL3 complexed to various seven-residue peptides supports the idea that Trp67 and Tyr67 in the S2 subsite of the active sites of FhCL3 and FhCL2, respectively, are critical to conferring the unique collagenase-like activity to these enzymes by accommodating either Gly or Pro residues at P2 in the substrate. The data also suggests that FhCL3 accommodates hydroxyproline (Hyp-Gly at P3-P2 better than FhCL2 explaining the observed greater ability of FhCL3 to digest type I and II collagens compared to FhCL2 and why these enzymes cleave at different positions within the Col domains. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These studies further our understanding of how this helminth parasite regulates peptidase expression to ensure infection, migration and establishment in host tissues.

  13. The importance of pH in regulating the function of the Fasciola hepatica cathepsin L1 cysteine protease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Lowther

    Full Text Available The helminth parasite Fasciola hepatica secretes cathepsin L cysteine proteases to invade its host, migrate through tissues and digest haemoglobin, its main source of amino acids. Here we investigated the importance of pH in regulating the activity and functions of the major cathepsin L protease FheCL1. The slightly acidic pH of the parasite gut facilitates the auto-catalytic activation of FheCL1 from its inactive proFheCL1 zymogen; this process was approximately 40-fold faster at pH 4.5 than at pH 7.0. Active mature FheCL1 is very stable at acidic and neutral conditions (the enzyme retained approximately 45% activity when incubated at 37 degrees C and pH 4.5 for 10 days and displayed a broad pH range for activity peptide substrates and the protein ovalbumin, peaking between pH 5.5 and pH 7.0. This pH profile likely reflects the need for FheCL1 to function both in the parasite gut and in the host tissues. FheCL1, however, could not cleave its natural substrate Hb in the pH range pH 5.5 and pH 7.0; digestion occurred only at pH

  14. The cathepsin B inhibitor z-FA-CMK induces cell death in leukemic T cells via oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liow, K Y; Chow, Sek C

    2018-01-01

    The cathepsin B inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-phenylalanine-alanine-chloromethyl ketone (z-FA-CMK) was recently found to induce apoptosis at low concentrations in Jurkat T cells, while at higher concentrations, the cells die of necrosis. In the present study, we showed that z-FA-CMK readily depletes intracellular glutathione (GSH) with a concomitant increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. The toxicity of z-FA-CMK in Jurkat T cells was completely abrogated by N-acetylcysteine (NAC), suggesting that the toxicity mediated by z-FA-CMK is due to oxidative stress. We found that L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) which depletes intracellular GSH through the inhibition of GSH biosynthesis in Jurkat T cells did not promote ROS increase or induce cell death. However, NAC was still able to block z-FA-CMK toxicity in Jurkat T cells in the presence of BSO, indicating that the protective effect of NAC does not involve GSH biosynthesis. This is further corroborated by the protective effect of the non-metabolically active D-cysteine on z-FA-CMK toxicity. Furthermore, in BSO-treated cells, z-FA-CMK-induced ROS increased which remains unchanged, suggesting that the depletion of GSH and increase in ROS generation mediated by z-FA-CMK may be two separate events. Collectively, our results demonstrated that z-FA-CMK toxicity is mediated by oxidative stress through the increase in ROS generation.

  15. GLUCOSE DEPRIVATION AFFECTS THE EXPRESSION OF LONP1 AND CATHEPSINS IN IRE1 KNOCKDOWN U87 GLIOMA CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O. H. Minchenko

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available To study the effect of glucose deprivation on the expression of genes encoding for LONP1/PRSS15 and cathepsins in U87 glioma cells in relation to inhibition of inositol requiring enzyme-1 (IRE1 was the aim of the research. It was shown that glucose deprivation up-regulated the expression of CTSA, CTSB, CTSD, CTSK, CTSL, CTSO, and LONP1 genes and did not change the expression of CTSC, CTSF, and CTSS genes in control glioma cells (transfected by empty vector. Inhibition of ІRE1 signaling enzyme function in U87 glioma cells modified effect of glucose deprivation on the expression of most studied genes: removed the effect of glucose deprivation on CTSA and CTSO genes, introduces on CTSC and CTSS genes, reduced – on CTSK gene, and enhanced – on CTSL gene. Therefore, glucose deprivation affect the expression level of most studied genes in relation to the functional activity of IRE1 enzyme, a central mediator of endoplasmic reticulum stress, which control cell proliferation and tumor growth.

  16. Inhibition of Ulmus davidiana Planch (Ulmaceae) on bone resorption mediated by processing of cathepsin K in cultured mouse osteoclasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kyung-Woon; Park, Jun-Sung; Kim, Kap-Sung; Jin, Un-Ho; Kim, June-Ki; Suh, Seok-Jong; Kim, Cheorl-Ho

    2008-04-01

    Ulmus davidiana Planch (Ulmaceae) (UD) has long been known to be antiinflammatory in traditional Korean medicine. This experiment investigated the effects of UD on bone resorption using bone cell culture. Different concentrations of crude extract of UD were added to mouse bone cell culture. The mitochondrial activity of the bone cells after exposure of UD was determined by colorimetric 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT). It was demonstrated that UD has potential effects on bone cell culture without cytotoxicity. The most effective concentration of UD in bone cells was 100 microg/mL. Cathepsin K (Cat K) is the major cysteine protease expressed in osteoclasts and is thought to play a key role in matrix degradation during bone resorption. When mouse long bone cells including osteoclasts and osteoblasts were treated with UD, UD prevented the osteoclast-mediated intracellular processing of Cat K, suggesting that UD may disrupt the intracellular transport of pro Cat K. Since secreted proenzymes have the potential to reenter the cell via the mannose-6-phosphate (M6P) receptor, to prevent this possibility, UD was tested in the absence or presence of M6P. Inhibition of Cat K processing by UD was observed in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the addition of M6P resulted in enhanced potency of UD. UD dose-dependently inhibited in vitro bone resorption with a potency similar to that observed for inhibition of Cat K processing. (c) 2008 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Camalexin-induced apoptosis in prostate cancer cells involves alterations of expression and activity of lysosomal protease cathepsin D.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Basil; Randle, Diandra; Mezencev, Roman; Thomas, LeeShawn; Hinton, Cimona; Odero-Marah, Valerie

    2014-04-02

    Camalexin, the phytoalexin produced in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, possesses antiproliferative and cancer chemopreventive effects. We have demonstrated that the cytostatic/cytotoxic effects of camalexin on several prostate cancer (PCa) cells are due to oxidative stress. Lysosomes are vulnerable organelles to Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS)-induced injuries, with the potential to initiate and or facilitate apoptosis subsequent to release of proteases such as cathepsin D (CD) into the cytosol. We therefore hypothesized that camalexin reduces cell viability in PCa cells via alterations in expression and activity of CD. Cell viability was evaluated by MTS cell proliferation assay in LNCaP and ARCaP Epithelial (E) cells, and their respective aggressive sublines C4-2 and ARCaP Mesenchymal (M) cells, whereby the more aggressive PCa cells (C4-2 and ARCaPM) displayed greater sensitivity to camalexin treatments than the lesser aggressive cells (LNCaP and ARCaPE). Immunocytochemical analysis revealed CD relocalization from the lysosome to the cytosol subsequent to camalexin treatments, which was associated with increased protein expression of mature CD; p53, a transcriptional activator of CD; BAX, a downstream effector of CD, and cleaved PARP, a hallmark for apoptosis. Therefore, camalexin reduces cell viability via CD and may present as a novel therapeutic agent for treatment of metastatic prostate cancer cells.

  18. Camalexin-Induced Apoptosis in Prostate Cancer Cells Involves Alterations of Expression and Activity of Lysosomal Protease Cathepsin D

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basil Smith

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Camalexin, the phytoalexin produced in the model plant Arabidopsis thaliana, possesses antiproliferative and cancer chemopreventive effects. We have demonstrated that the cytostatic/cytotoxic effects of camalexin on several prostate cancer (PCa cells are due to oxidative stress. Lysosomes are vulnerable organelles to Reactive Oxygen Species (ROS-induced injuries, with the potential to initiate and or facilitate apoptosis subsequent to release of proteases such as cathepsin D (CD into the cytosol. We therefore hypothesized that camalexin reduces cell viability in PCa cells via alterations in expression and activity of CD. Cell viability was evaluated by MTS cell proliferation assay in LNCaP and ARCaP Epithelial (E cells, and their respective aggressive sublines C4-2 and ARCaP Mesenchymal (M cells, whereby the more aggressive PCa cells (C4-2 and ARCaPM displayed greater sensitivity to camalexin treatments than the lesser aggressive cells (LNCaP and ARCaPE. Immunocytochemical analysis revealed CD relocalization from the lysosome to the cytosol subsequent to camalexin treatments, which was associated with increased protein expression of mature CD; p53, a transcriptional activator of CD; BAX, a downstream effector of CD, and cleaved PARP, a hallmark for apoptosis. Therefore, camalexin reduces cell viability via CD and may present as a novel therapeutic agent for treatment of metastatic prostate cancer cells.

  19. Neutrophil proteinase 3 and dipeptidyl peptidase I (cathepsin C) as pharmacological targets in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (Wegener granulomatosis).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Korkmaz, Brice; Lesner, Adam; Letast, Stephanie; Mahdi, Yassir K; Jourdan, Marie-Lise; Dallet-Choisy, Sandrine; Marchand-Adam, Sylvain; Kellenberger, Christine; Viaud-Massuard, Marie-Claude; Jenne, Dieter E; Gauthier, Francis

    2013-07-01

    Neutrophils are among the first cells implicated in acute inflammation. Leaving the blood circulation, they quickly migrate through the interstitial space of tissues and liberate oxidants and other antimicrobial proteins together with serine proteinases. Neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G, proteinase 3 (PR3), and neutrophil serine protease 4 are four hematopoietic serine proteases activated by dipeptidyl peptidase I during neutrophil maturation and are mainly stored in cytoplasmic azurophilic granules. They regulate inflammatory and immune responses after their release from activated neutrophils at inflammatory sites. Membrane-bound PR3 (mbPR3) at the neutrophil surface is the prime antigenic target of antineutrophil cytoplasmic autoantibodies (ANCA) in granulomatosis with polyangiitis (GPA), a vasculitis of small blood vessels and granulomatous inflammation of the upper and/or lower respiratory tracts. The interaction of ANCA with mbPR3 results in excessive activation of neutrophils to produce reactive oxygen species and liberation of granular proteinases to the pericellular environment. In this review, we focus on PR3 and dipeptidyl peptidase I as attractive pharmacological targets whose inhibition is expected to attenuate autoimmune activation of neutrophils in GPA.

  20. Relationship between bcl-2, bax, beclin-1, and cathepsin-D proteins during postovulatory follicular regression in fish ovary.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morais, Roberto D V S; Thomé, Ralph G; Santos, Hélio B; Bazzoli, Nilo; Rizzo, Elizete

    2016-04-01

    In fish ovaries, postovulatory follicles (POFs) are key biomarkers of breeding and provide an interesting model for studying the relationship between autophagy and apoptosis. In this study, we investigated the immunohistochemical expression of autophagic and apoptotic proteins to improve the knowledge on the mechanisms regulating ovarian remodeling after spawning. Females from three neotropical fish species kept in captivity were submitted to hormonal induction. After ova stripping, ovarian sections were sampled daily until 5 days postspawning (dps). Similar events of POF regression were detected by histology, terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labeling (TUNEL), and electron microscopy in the three species: follicular cells hypertrophy, progressive disintegration of the basement membrane, gradual closing of the follicular lumen, theca thickening, and formation of large autophagic vacuoles preceding apoptosis of the follicular cells. Autophagic and apoptotic proteins were assessed by immunohistochemistry. Morphometric analysis of the immunolabeling revealed a more intense reaction for bcl-2 and beclin-1 (BECN1) in POFs at 0 to 1 dps and for bax at 2 to 3 dps (P family, BECN1, and cathepsin-D can be involved in the regulation of ovarian remodeling in teleost fish. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Effects of cathepsin K on Emdogain-induced hard tissue formation by human periodontal ligament stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Fen; Zhou, Zhi-Fei; An, Ying; Yu, Yang; Wu, Rui-Xin; Yin, Yuan; Xue, Yang; Chen, Fa-Ming

    2017-10-01

    Recent studies have shown that patients with pycnodysostosis caused by cathepsin K (CTSK) genetic mutations exhibit significantly abnormal periodontal hard tissue structure. This finding suggests that CTSK may play a role in regulating the development of alveolar bone and cementum. However, the source of CTSK in the periodontal environment and the role of CTSK in periodontal regeneration, particularly hard tissue regeneration and development, remain unclear. After the isolation, cultivation, identification, and multi-lineage induction of human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs), the present study used light and scanning electron microscopy, reverse-transcription quantitative polymerase chain reaction, western blotting, micro-computed tomography, immunohistochemical assays and ectopic hard tissue formation experiments to examine CTSK expression in hPDLSCs. The results indicated that CTSK expression was significantly upregulated in hPDLSCs during Emdogain induction but underwent minimal change during osteogenic or adipogenic induction. The present study also showed that the downregulation of CTSK expression inhibited osteogenic/cementogenic differentiation and ectopic hard tissue formation of hPDLSCs. It is therefore concluded that hPDLSCs expressed CTSK and that CTSK levels were significantly upregulated during Emdogain induction. Furthermore, CTSK promoted not only the osteogenic/cementogenic differentiation of hPDLSCs but also their ability to form ectopic hard tissue. These new findings may enhance the understanding of periodontal hard tissue development and functional regeneration. However, the specific underlying mechanisms require further investigation. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  2. Specific cleavage of the lung surfactant protein A by human cathepsin S may impair its antibacterial properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lecaille, Fabien; Naudin, Clément; Sage, Juliette; Joulin-Giet, Alix; Courty, Agnès; Andrault, Pierre-Marie; Veldhuizen, Ruud A W; Possmayer, Fred; Lalmanach, Gilles

    2013-08-01

    Human cysteine cathepsins (Cats) are implicated in lung injuries and tissue remodeling and have recently emerged as important players in pulmonary inflammations. The proteolytic activities of Cat B, L, K, S and H are dramatically increased in the sputum of patients with cystic fibrosis (CF), suggesting a possible involvement in the CF pathophysiology. We found that pulmonary surfactant protein A (SP-A) that participates to innate host defense is extensively degraded in CF expectorations. Breakdown of SP-A was markedly decreased in CF sputum by E-64 and Mu-Leu-Hph-VSPh, a Cat S inhibitor. Cat S cleaved efficiently and specifically SP-A within critical residues of the solvent-exposed loop of its carbohydrate recognition (C-type lectin) domain that allows binding to pathogens. Cat S decreased aggregation properties of SP-A (self-aggregation, aggregation of phospholipid vesicles and rough LPS). Moreover cleavage of SP-A by Cat S reduced binding to yeast mannan and impaired agglutination of Escherichia coli and Pseudomonas aeruginosa, a foremost detrimental pathogen colonizing the lungs of CF patients. Besides human neutrophil serine proteases and bacterial proteases, we propose that Cat S may participate in the pathophysiology of CF by weakening the antibacterial activity of SP-A. More broadly, present results provide further indication that Cat S, along with Cats B and L, could display immuno-modulatory functions by inactivating key proteins involved in the innate immunity defense. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. Cathepsin S deficiency results in abnormal accumulation of autophagosomes in macrophages and enhances Ang II-induced cardiac inflammation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lili Pan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cathepsin S (Cat S is overexpressed in human atherosclerotic and aneurysmal tissues and may contributes to degradation of extracellular matrix, especially elastin, in inflammatory diseases. We aimed to define the role of Cat S in cardiac inflammation and fibrosis induced by angiotensin II (Ang II in mice. METHODS AND RESULTS: Cat S-knockout (Cat S(-/- and littermate wild-type (WT C57BL/6J mice were infused continuously with Ang II (750 ng/kg/min or saline for 7 days. Cat S(-/- mice showed severe cardiac fibrosis, including elevated expression of collagen I and α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA, as compared with WT mice. Moreover, macrophage infiltration and expression of inflammatory cytokines (tumor necrosis factor α, transforming growth factor β and interleukin 1β were significantly greater in Cat S(-/- than WT hearts. These Ang II-induced effects in Cat S(-/- mouse hearts was associated with abnormal accumulation of autophagosomes and reduced clearance of damaged mitochondria, which led to increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS and activation of nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB in macrophages. CONCLUSION: Cat S in lysosomes is essential for mitophagy processing in macrophages, deficiency in Cat S can increase damaged mitochondria and elevate ROS levels and NF-κB activity in hypertensive mice, so it regulates cardiac inflammation and fibrosis.

  4. Cathepsin B is up-regulated and mediates extracellular matrix degradation in trabecular meshwork cells following phagocytic challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine Porter

    Full Text Available Cells in the trabecular meshwork (TM, a tissue responsible for draining aqueous humor out of the eye, are known to be highly phagocytic. Phagocytic activity in TM cells is thought to play an important role in outflow pathway physiology. However, the molecular mechanisms triggered by phagocytosis in TM cells are unknown. Here we investigated the effects of chronic phagocytic stress on lysosomal function using different phagocytic ligands (E. coli, carboxylated beads, collagen I-coated beads, and pigment. Lysotracker red co-localization and electron micrographs showed the maturation of E. coli- and collagen I-coated beads-containing phagosomes into phagolysosomes. Maturation of phagosomes into phagolysosomes was not observed with carboxylated beads or pigment particles. In addition, phagocytosis of E. coli and collagen I-coated beads led to increased lysosomal mass, and the specific up-regulation and activity of cathepsin B (CTSB. Higher levels of membrane-bound and secreted CTSB were also detected. Moreover, in vivo zymography showed the intralysosomal degradation of ECM components associated with active CTSB, as well as an overall increased gelatinolytic activity in phagocytically challenged TM cells. This increased gelatinolytic activity with phagocytosis was partially blocked with an intracellular CTSB inhibitor. Altogether, these results suggest a potential role of phagocytosis in outflow pathway tissue homeostasis through the up-regulation and/or proteolytic activation of extracellular matrix remodeling genes.

  5. Cathepsin K gene mutations and 1q21 haplotypes in at patients with pycnodysostosis in an outbred population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haagerup, Annette; Hertz, Jens Michael; Christensen, M F

    2000-01-01

    : a one base transition in exon8, c926T > C, causing a single amino acid substitution leucine-->proline, L309P; A 3' splice site mutation in intron 2, c121-1G > A, causing deletion of all exon 3, 41V-81Mdel; and the exon 3 missense mutation c236G > A leading to residue G79E. In three of the families...... patients were homozygous for 926T > C. In the remaining two families patients were heterozygous for 926T > C and 121-1G > A in one case, and for 926T > C and 236G > A in the other case. Assays using genomic DNA were developed for all three mutations. We tested 150 healthy control persons and observed...... the mutation frequencies: 0 to 300 for 121-1G > A and 236G > A and 1 to 150 for 926T > C. One patient from each family was haplotyped with eight microsatellite markers surrounding the cathepsin K gene on chromosome 1q21. A very rare, P = 1.8 x 10(-6) to P = 0.0004, and highly preserved area around the presumed...

  6. Localization of cathepsin D in mouse reproductive tissues and its acquisition onto sperm surface during epididymal sperm maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asuvapongpatana, Somluk; Saewu, Arpornrad; Chotwiwatthanakun, Charoonroj; Vanichviriyakit, Rapeepun; Weerachatyanukul, Wattana

    2013-06-01

    Sperm maturation in the epididymis involves multiple complex events, that include the adsorption of epididymal secretory proteins, re-organization and removal of sperm surface ligands. In this study, we investigated the existence and distribution of cathepsin D (CAT-D) transcripts and proteins in mouse reproductive tissues and proposed a transfer mechanism of CAT-D to the sperm surface. CAT-D transcripts were highly expressed in cultured Sertoli cells, but not in germ cells. The transcriptional level was relatively higher in the caput epididymis (CP) than in the cauda epididymis (CD). At the translational level, CAT-D was detected in testicular somatic cells and in the principal and basal cells in the CP. The expression of CAT-D was fairly specific to the clear cells in the CD. All forms of CAT-D were detected in ultracentrifuged epididymosomes. In conjunction with the expression levels in epididymal epithelium and epididymosomes, CAT-D expression level on the sperm surface was relatively high in CP sperm, but gradually declined toward the CD. Overall, our results indicated that CAT-D was not inherent to sperm themselves, but rather of epididymal origin and was presumably transported to the sperm surface via epididymosomes. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  7. Chemoproteomic profiling reveals that cathepsin D off-target activity drives ocular toxicity of β-secretase inhibitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuhl, Andrea M; Nolan, Charles E; Brodney, Michael A; Niessen, Sherry; Atchison, Kevin; Houle, Christopher; Karanian, David A; Ambroise, Claude; Brulet, Jeffrey W; Beck, Elizabeth M; Doran, Shawn D; O'Neill, Brian T; Am Ende, Christopher W; Chang, Cheng; Geoghegan, Kieran F; West, Graham M; Judkins, Joshua C; Hou, Xinjun; Riddell, David R; Johnson, Douglas S

    2016-10-11

    Inhibition of β-secretase BACE1 is considered one of the most promising approaches for treating Alzheimer's disease. Several structurally distinct BACE1 inhibitors have been withdrawn from development after inducing ocular toxicity in animal models, but the target mediating this toxicity has not been identified. Here we use a clickable photoaffinity probe to identify cathepsin D (CatD) as a principal off-target of BACE1 inhibitors in human cells. We find that several BACE1 inhibitors blocked CatD activity in cells with much greater potency than that displayed in cell-free assays with purified protein. Through a series of exploratory toxicology studies, we show that quantifying CatD target engagement in cells with the probe is predictive of ocular toxicity in vivo. Taken together, our findings designate off-target inhibition of CatD as a principal driver of ocular toxicity for BACE1 inhibitors and more generally underscore the power of chemical proteomics for discerning mechanisms of drug action.

  8. Advanced glycation end products promote proliferation and suppress autophagy via reduction of Cathepsin D in rat vascular smooth muscle cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Mingfeng; Guo, Xiaofan; Chang, Ye; Li, Chao; Meng, Xin; Li, Si; Du, Zhen-Xian; Wang, Hua-Qin; Sun, Yingxian

    2015-05-01

    Autophagy is closely involved in vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) function, but little is known about the association between advanced glycation end products (AGEs) and autophagy and its role in AGEs-induced proliferation and migration of VSMCs. The current study investigated the effects of AGEs on the phenotypic modulation and autophagy of VSMCs, as well as the potential underlying mechanisms. Primary rat VSMCs were treated with bovine serum albumin or AGEs. Cell proliferation was detected by MTT assay, real-time cell analyzer and EdU incorporation. Cell cycle was analyzed by Hoechst staining and flow cytometry. The migration of VSMCs was detected by wound-healing assay and transwell migration assay. LC3 transition and p62 accumulation were detected using Western blotting. Acidic vacuoles were measured using AO and MDC staining. Cathepsin D (CatD) was transduced to VSMCs via lentiviral vectors. AGEs enhanced proliferation and migration of primary rat VSMC in a time-dependent manner. AGEs significantly increased LC3-II transition and p62 expression, as well as accumulation of acidic vacuole, which was not further increased by bafilomycin A1. AGEs decreased CatD expression in a time-dependent pattern, and overexpression of CatD prohibited autophagy attenuation mediated by AGEs. CatD overexpression suppressed AGEs-induced proliferation of VSMCs. Nevertheless, CatD exhibited no effects on AGEs-induced migration of VSMCs. AGEs promote proliferation of VSMCs and suppress autophagy, at least in part via CatD reduction.

  9. Serum cathepsin D and its density in men with prostate cancer as new predictors of disease progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Isao; Miyake, Hideaki; Yamanaka, Kazuki; Hara, Shoji; Kamidono, Sadao

    2002-01-01

    We examined whether serum levels of cathepsin D (CatD) and its density (CatD-D), which was determined by dividing the serum levels of CatD by the prostate volume, could be used as predictors of the progression and prognosis in patients with prostate cancer. Serum levels of CatD in 40 healthy controls, 70 patients with benign prostatic hypertrophy (BPH) and 80 patients with prostate cancer were measured by a sandwich enzyme immunoassay, and prostate volume was measured using transrectal ultrasonography. The mean levels of CatD and CatD-D in patients with prostate cancer were significantly higher than those in healthy controls and patients with BPH. Furthermore, the CatD and CatD-D levels in prostate cancer patients with metastasis were significantly elevated compared with those in patients without metastasis. Among patients who underwent radical prostatectomy, the levels of CatD and CatD-D in patients with pathologically organ-confined disease were significantly lower than in those with extraprostatic disease. However, the elevated levels of CatD and CatD-D were not significantly associated with the cause-specific survival in prostate cancer patients. These findings suggest that the elevation of CatD or CatD-D could be used as new predictors of disease progression, but not prognosis, in patients with prostate cancer.

  10. Plasma cathepsin D correlates with histological classifications of fatty liver disease in adults and responds to intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walenbergh, Sofie M A; Houben, Tom; Rensen, Sander S; Bieghs, Veerle; Hendrikx, Tim; van Gorp, Patrick J; Oligschlaeger, Yvonne; Jeurissen, Mike L J; Gijbels, Marion J J; Buurman, Wim A; Vreugdenhil, Anita C E; Greve, Jan Willem M; Plat, Jogchum; Hofker, Marten H; Kalhan, Satish; Pihlajamäki, Jussi; Lindsey, Patrick; Koek, Ger H; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit

    2016-12-06

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is characterized by liver lipid accumulation and inflammation. The mechanisms that trigger hepatic inflammation are poorly understood and subsequently, no specific non-invasive markers exist. We previously demonstrated a reduction in the plasma lysosomal enzyme, cathepsin D (CatD), in children with NASH compared to children without NASH. Recent studies have raised the concept that non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD) in adults is distinct from children due to a different histological pattern in the liver. Yet, the link between plasma CatD to adult NASH was not examined. In the current manuscript, we investigated whether plasma CatD in adults correlates with NASH development and regression. Biopsies were histologically evaluated for inflammation and NAFLD in three complementary cohorts of adults (total n = 248). CatD and alanine aminotransferase (ALT) were measured in plasma. Opposite to our previous observations with childhood NASH, we observed increased levels of plasma CatD in patients with NASH compared to adults without hepatic inflammation. Furthermore, after surgical intervention, we found a reduction of plasma CatD compared to baseline. Our observations highlight a distinct pathophysiology between NASH in children and adults. The observation that plasma CatD correlated with NASH development and regression is promising for NASH diagnosis.

  11. Cathepsin D protects renal tubular cells from damage induced by high glucose independent of its enzymatic activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Feng; Wang, Tian; Li, Si; Meng, Xin; Zhang, Hai-Yan; Li, De-Tian; Du, Zhen-Xian; Wang, Hua-Qin

    2017-01-01

    Although glomerular and vascular damage have been considered the main characteristics of diabetic kidney disease (DKD), accumulating data now indicate that tubular atrophy also plays a major role. Cathepsin D (CatD) is the major aspartate protease within lysosomes. The current study demonstrated that CatD expression was altered in the renal tubular epithelium in patients with diabetes mellitus (DM). In contrast to its low and uniform distribution in the tubular epithelium in normal kidney tissues, CatD demonstrated flecked and increased expression in tubules with relatively integral structures, and disappeared in disordered tubules in DM kidney tissues. In vitro studies demonstrated that CatD protected HK2 cells from the damage induced by high glucose and advanced glycation end-products (AGEs), independent of its enzymatic activity. In addition, the current study demonstrated that AGEs induced lysosome membrane permeabilization (LMP) and loss of mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP). Overexpression of CatD prevented LMP and maintained the MMP in HK2 cells exposed to AGEs. In addition, the catalytic activity of CatD was not required for its role in LMP prevention and MMP maintenance. These results indicate, for the first time that CatD may improve the viability of renal tubular cells in the presence of diabetic mediators independent of its enzymatic activity by preventing LMP and stabilizing the MMP.

  12. IFN-gamma regulation of vacuolar pH, cathepsin D processing and autophagy in mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalkhali-Ellis, Zhila; Abbott, Daniel E; Bailey, Caleb M; Goossens, William; Margaryan, Naira V; Gluck, Stephen L; Reuveni, Moshe; Hendrix, Mary J C

    2008-09-01

    In this study we examined the ability of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) to regulate mammary epithelial cell growth and gene expression, with particular emphasis on two genes: Maspin (a member of serine protease inhibitor superfamily), and the lysosomal aspartyl endopeptidase cathepsin D (CatD). The protein products of these genes are critically involved in regulation of multitude of biological functions in different stages of mammary tissue development and remodeling. In addition, the expression of Maspin is down-regulated in primary breast cancer and is lost in metastatic disease, while CatD is excessively produced and aberrantly secreted by breast cancer cells. We report that IFN-gamma receptors are expressed in mammary epithelial cells, and receptor engagement by IFN-gamma transduces the IFN-gamma signal via Stat-1 resulting in decreased vacuolar pH. This change in vacuolar pH alters CatD protein processing and secretion concurrent with increased Maspin secretion. In addition, IFN-gamma exerts a suppressive effect on cell growth and proliferation, and induces morphological changes in mammary epithelial cells. Our studies also reveal that breast cancer cells, which are devoid of Maspin, are refractory to IFN-gamma with respect to changes in vacuolar pH and CatD. However, Maspin transfection of breast cancer cells partially sensitizes the cells to IFN-gamma's effect, thus providing new therapeutic implications. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  13. Cathepsin G-mediated proteolytic degradation of MHC class I molecules to facilitate immune detection of human glioblastoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palesch, David; Wagner, Johanna; Meid, Annika; Molenda, Nicole; Sienczyk, Marcin; Burkhardt, Jutta; Münch, Jan; Prokop, Lea; Stevanovic, Stefan; Westhoff, Mike-Andrew; Halatsch, Marc-Eric; Wirtz, Christian Rainer; Zimecki, Michal; Burster, Timo

    2016-03-01

    To mount an adaptive immune response, MHC I molecules present antigenic peptides to CTLs. Transcriptional reduction of MHC I molecules is a strategy of immune evasion, which impairs the detection of infected or tumorous cells by CTLs. Natural killer (NK) cells, on the other hand, eliminate target cells specifically in the absence of MHC I. Consequently, infected or tumorous cells partly retain their MHC I at the cell surface to avoid NK recognition. However, it remains unclear which protease degrades MHC I molecules and how these cells maintain a limited set of MHC I at the cell surface. Here, we demonstrate that cathepsin G (CatG), a serine protease, found in the endocytic compartment of APCs and, to a lesser extent, CatD and CatS proteolytically degrade MHC I molecules. Inhibition of CatG boosted MHC I expression at the cell surface of primary human immune cells. In contrast, human glioblastoma cells do not harbor active CatG and might have lost the ability to proteolytically degrade MHC I during tumorigenesis to avoid NK-mediated killing. Overexpression of CatG in glioblastoma cells resulted in a rapid and efficient MHC I degradation. In conclusion, CatG is an essential protease for regulating MHC I molecules and thus modulation of CatG activity might present a new avenue for therapeutic intervention.

  14. Tumor marker utility and prognostic relevance of cathepsin B, cathepsin L, urokinase-type plasminogen activator, plasminogen activator inhibitor type-1, CEA and CA 19-9 in colorectal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Herszényi, László; Farinati, Fabio; Cardin, Romilda; István, Gábor; Molnár, László D; Hritz, István; De Paoli, Massimo; Plebani, Mario; Tulassay, Zsolt

    2008-01-01

    Cathepsin B and L (CATB, CATL), urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) and its inhibitor PAI-1 play an important role in colorectal cancer invasion. The tumor marker utility and prognostic relevance of these proteases have not been evaluated in the same experimental setting and compared with that of CEA and CA-19-9. Protease, CEA and CA 19-9 serum or plasma levels were determined in 56 patients with colorectal cancer, 25 patients with ulcerative colitis, 26 patients with colorectal adenomas and 35 tumor-free control patients. Protease, CEA, CA 19-9 levels have been determined by ELISA and electrochemiluminescence immunoassay, respectively; their sensitivity, specificity, diagnostic accuracy have been calculated and correlated with clinicopathological staging. The protease antigen levels were significantly higher in colorectal cancer compared with other groups. Sensitivity of PAI-1 (94%), CATB (82%), uPA (69%), CATL (41%) were higher than those of CEA or CA 19-9 (30% and 18%, respectively). PAI-1, CATB and uPA demonstrated a better accuracy than CEA or CA 19-9. A combination of PAI-1 with CATB or uPA exhibited the highest sensitivity value (98%). High CATB, PAI-1, CEA and CA 19-9 levels correlated with advanced Dukes stages. CATB (P = 0.0004), CATL (P = 0.02), PAI-1 (P = 0.01) and CA 19-9 (P = 0.004) had a significant prognostic impact. PAI-1 (P = 0.001), CATB (P = 0.04) and CA 19-9 (P = 0.02) proved as independent prognostic variables. At the time of clinical detection proteases are more sensitive indicators for colorectal cancer than the commonly used tumor markers. Determinations of CATB, CATL and PAI-1 have a major prognostic impact in patients with colorectal cancer

  15. Synthesis of Novel 5-(N-Boc-N-Benzyl-2-aminoethyl)-7-oxo-4,7-dihydropyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-carboxamides and Their Inhibition of Cathepsins B and K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lukić, Branislav; Grošelj, Uroš; Novinec, Marko; Svete, Jurij

    2017-12-01

    Eight novel 5-(N-Boc-N-benzyl-2-aminoethyl)-7-oxo-4,7-dihydropyrazolo[1,5-a]pyrimidin-3-carboxamides were prepared in three steps from methyl 3-amino-1H-pyrazole-4-carboxylate and methyl 5-(benzyl(tert-butoxycarbonyl)amino)-3-oxopentanoate. The synthetic procedure comprises cyclocondensation of the above starting compounds, hydrolysis of the ester, and bis(pentafluorophenyl) carbonate (BPC)-mediated amidation. Title carboxamides were tested for inhibition of cathepsins K and B. The N-butylcarboxamide 5a exhibited appreciable inhibition of cathepsin K (IC50 ~ 25 μM), while the strongest inhibition of cathepsin B was achieved with N-(2-picolyl)carboxamide 5c (IC50 ~ 45 μM).

  16. Characterization of a Recombinant Cathepsin B-Like Cysteine Peptidase from Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae: A Putative Target for Control of Citrus Huanglongbing.

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    Taíse Fernanda da Silva Ferrara

    Full Text Available Huanglonbing (HLB is one of the most destructive disease affecting citrus plants. The causal agent is associated with the phloem-limited bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas and the psyllid Diaphorina citri, vector of disease, that transmits the bacterium associated with HLB. The control of disease can be achieved by suppressing either the bacterium or the vector. Among the control strategies for HLB disease, one of the widely used consists in controlling the enzymes of the disease vector, Diaphorina citri. The insect Diaphorina citri belongs to the order Hemiptera, which frequently have cysteine peptidases in the gut. The importance of this class of enzymes led us to search for enzymes in the D. citri transcriptome for the establishment of alternatives strategies for HLB control. In this study, we reported the identification and characterization of a cathepsin B-like cysteine peptidase from D. citri (DCcathB. DCcathB was recombinantly expressed in Pichia pastoris, presenting a molecular mass of approximately 50 kDa. The enzyme hydrolyzed the fluorogenic substrate Z-F-R-AMC (Km = 23.5 μM and the selective substrate for cathepsin B, Z-R-R-AMC (Km = 6.13 μM. The recombinant enzyme was inhibited by the cysteine protease inhibitors E64 (IC50 = 0.014 μM and CaneCPI-4 (Ki = 0.05 nM and by the selective cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074 (IC50 = 0.095 nM. RT-qPCR analysis revealed that the expression of the DCcathB in nymph and adult was approximately 9-fold greater than in egg. Moreover, the expression of this enzyme in the gut was 175-fold and 3333-fold higher than in the remaining tissues and in the head, respectively, suggesting that DCcathB can be a target for HLB control.

  17. Cyclosporine A induced histological changes of Cathepsin L and CD2AP expression in renal glomeruli and tubules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimoto, Keisuke; Miyazawa, Tomoki; Enya, Takuji; Miyazaki, Kouhei; Okada, Mitsuru; Takemura, Tsukasa

    2017-02-01

    Cyclosporine A (CsA) is used globally as an immunosuppressant for the treatment of immune-mediated nephrotic syndrome (NS). However, its long-term use causes nephrotoxicity characterized by tubulointerstitial injury and glomerulosclerosis. The present study aimed to investigate the associations between histomorphological findings and immunohistological expression of Cathepsin L (CatL) and CD2-associated protein (CD2AP) in patients with NS mediated with CsA. A total of 18 patients with child-onset NS were divided into two groups after treatment with CsA for 2 years (group A; n = 10) and more than 4 years (group B; n = 8), respectively. Analyses of relationships between tubulointerstitial disorders and expression of CatL and CD2AP proteins were performed using immunohistochemistry of paired renal specimens. Glomeruli with arteriole hyalinization were significantly increased in both groups depending on dosage periods, although degrees of tubule and interstitial injury did not differ between groups. CD2AP expression was significantly greater in podocytes (P = 0.046) and was significantly less in proximal tubule cells (P = 0.014) in patients of group B compared with those of group A. Moreover, CD2AP expression was significantly increased in lateral tubule cells in both groups (group A, P = 0.02; group B, P = 0.001), and CatL expression in glomeruli and tubule cells did not change with the duration of CsA treatment in either patient group. CD2AP expression in renal tubules may histologically associate with tissue hypoxia and reflected recovery from CsA-mediated renal injury in patients, even with mild histological features of tubulointerstitial disorder.

  18. Early and late peritoneal and hepatic changes in goats immunized with recombinant cathepsin L1 and infected with Fasciola hepatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zafra, R; Pérez-Écija, R A; Buffoni, L; Moreno, P; Bautista, M J; Martínez-Moreno, A; Mulcahy, G; Dalton, J P; Pérez, J

    2013-05-01

    The aim of the present study was to study peritoneal and hepatic changes during early [7-9 days postinfection (dpi)] and late [15 weeks postinfection (wpi)] infection of goats immunized with recombinant F. hepatica pro cathepsin L1 (rCL1) in Quil A and challenged with Fasciola hepatica. Despite finding no significant reduction in fluke burdens between the control and immunized group, at 15 dpi the rCL1-vaccinated group showed significantly higher weight gain and reduced severity of hepatic lesions compared with the control group that received only Quil A. In the rCL1-vaccinated group, two of three goats sacrificed at 7-9 dpi had little hepatic damage and had a higher percentage of peritoneal eosinophils and elevated induced nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) expression in peritoneal cells than the goats from the control group. Moreover, while these two goats showed a heavy infiltration of eosinophils surrounding migrating flukes, the remaining animals examined at 7-9 dpi had no inflammatory infiltration surrounding migrating flukes. Two out of seven goats in the rCL1-vaccinated group had low fluke burdens and little hepatic damage at 15 wpi, suggesting an effective protective response in some of the vaccinated goats. This protective response did not correlate with peripheral eosinophilia or with serum titres of anti-rCL1 immunoglobulin (Ig) G. The results of the present work suggest that an eosinophil-mediated immune response plays a crucial role in the early effective host response against F. hepatica in goats. Adjuvants designed to increase cell-mediated immunity should be tested in future vaccine trials against F. hepatica. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. The cathepsin B inhibitor, z-FA-CMK is toxic and readily induced cell death in human T lymphocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liow, K.Y.; Chow, S.C., E-mail: chow.sek.chuen@monash.edu

    2013-11-01

    The cathepsin B inhibitor, benzyloxycarbonyl-phenylalanine-alanine-chloromethylketone (z-FA-CMK) was found to be toxic and readily induced cell death in the human T cell line, Jurkat, whereas two other analogs benzyloxycarbonyl-phenylalanine-alanine-fluoromethylketone (z-FA-FMK) and benzyloxycarbonyl-phenylalanine-alanine-diazomethylketone (z-FA-DMK) were not toxic. The toxicity of z-FA-CMK requires not only the CMK group, but also the presence of alanine in the P1 position and the benzyloxycarbonyl group at the N-terminal. Dose–response studies showed that lower concentrations of z-FA-CMK induced apoptosis in Jurkat T cells whereas higher concentrations induced necrosis. In z-FA-CMK-induced apoptosis, both initiator caspases (-8 and -9) and effector caspases (-3, -6 and -7) were processed to their respective subunits in Jurkat T cells. However, only the pro-form of the initiator caspases were reduced in z-FA-CMK-induced necrosis and no respective subunits were apparent. The caspase inihibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-valine-alanine-aspartic acid-(O-methyl)-fluoromehylketone (z-VAD-FMK) inhibits apoptosis and caspase processing in Jurkat T cells treated with low concentration of z-FA-CMK but has no effect on z-FA-CMK-induced necrosis and the loss of initiator caspases. This suggests that the loss of initiator caspases in Jurkat T cells during z-FA-CMK-induced necrosis is not a caspase-dependent process. Taken together, we have demonstrated that z-FA-CMK is toxic to Jurkat T cells and induces apoptosis at low concentrations, while at higher concentrations the cells die of necrosis. - Highlights: • z-FA-CMK is toxic and induce cell death in the human T cells. • z-FA-CMK toxicity requires the CMK group, alanine and the benzyloxycarbonyl group. • z-FA-CMK induced apoptosis at low concentration and necrosis at high concentration.

  20. Cathepsin K cleavage of SDF-1α inhibits its chemotactic activity towards glioblastoma stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hira, Vashendriya V V; Verbovšek, Urška; Breznik, Barbara; Srdič, Matic; Novinec, Marko; Kakar, Hala; Wormer, Jill; der Swaan, Britt Van; Lenarčič, Brigita; Juliano, Luiz; Mehta, Shwetal; Van Noorden, Cornelis J F; Lah, Tamara T

    2017-03-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most aggressive primary brain tumor with poor patient survival that is at least partly caused by malignant and therapy-resistant glioma stem-like cells (GSLCs) that are protected in GSLC niches. Previously, we have shown that the chemo-attractant stromal-derived factor-1α (SDF-1α), its C-X-C receptor type 4 (CXCR4) and the cysteine protease cathepsin K (CatK) are localized in GSLC niches in glioblastoma. Here, we investigated whether SDF-1α is a niche factor that through its interactions with CXCR4 and/or its second receptor CXCR7 on GSLCs facilitates their homing to niches. Furthermore, we aimed to prove that SDF-1α cleavage by CatK inactivates SDF-1α and inhibits the invasion of GSLCs. We performed mass spectrometric analysis of cleavage products of SDF-1α after proteolysis by CatK. We demonstrated that CatK cleaves SDF-1α at 3 sites in the N-terminus, which is the region of SDF-1α that binds to its receptors. Confocal imaging of human GBM tissue sections confirmed co-localization of SDF-1α and CatK in GSLC niches. In accordance, 2D and 3D invasion experiments using CXCR4/CXCR7-expressing GSLCs and GBM cells showed that SDF-1α had chemotactic activity whereas CatK cleavage products of SDF-1α did not. Besides, CXCR4 inhibitor plerixafor inhibited invasion of CXCR4/CXCR7-expressing GSLCs. In conclusion, CatK can cleave and inactivate SDF-1α. This implies that CatK activity facilitates migration of GSLCs out of niches. We propose that activation of CatK may be a promising strategy to prevent homing of GSLCs in niches and thus render these cells sensitive to chemotherapy and radiation. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. A cysteine protease (cathepsin Z) from disk abalone, Haliotis discus discus: Genomic characterization and transcriptional profiling during bacterial infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godahewa, G I; Perera, N C N; Lee, Sukkyoung; Kim, Myoung-Jin; Lee, Jehee

    2017-09-05

    Cathepsin Z (CTSZ) is lysosomal cysteine protease of the papain superfamily. It participates in the host immune defense via phagocytosis, signal transduction, cell-cell communication, proliferation, and migration of immune cells such as monocytes, macrophages, and dendritic cells. Hence, CTSZ is also acknowledged as an acute-phase protein in host immunity. In this study, we sought to identify the CTSZ homolog from disk abalone (AbCTSZ) and characterize it at the molecular, genomic, and transcriptional levels. AbCTSZ encodes a protein with 318 amino acids and a molecular mass of 36kDa. The structure of AbCTSZ reveals amino acid sequences that are characteristic of the signal sequence, pro-peptide, peptidase-C1 papain family cysteine protease domain, mini-loop, HIP motif, N-linked glycosylation sites, active sites, and conserved Cys residues. A pairwise comparison revealed that AbCTSZ shared the highest amino acid homology with its molluscan counterpart from Crassostrea gigas. A multiple alignment analysis revealed the conservation of functionally crucial elements of AbCTSZ, and a phylogenetic study further confirmed a proximal evolutionary relationship with its invertebrate counterparts. Further, an analysis of AbCTSZ genomic structure revealed seven exons separated by six introns, which differs from that of its vertebrate counterparts. Quantitative real time PCR (qPCR) detected the transcripts of AbCTSZ in early developmental stages and in eight different tissues. Higher levels of AbCTSZ transcripts were found in trochophore, gill, and hemocytes, highlighting its importance in the early development and immunity of disk abalone. In addition, we found that viable bacteria (Vibrio parahaemolyticus and Listeria monocytogenes) and bacterial lipopolysaccharides significantly modulated AbCTSZ transcription. Collectively, these lines of evidences suggest that AbCTSZ plays an indispensable role in the innate immunity of disk abalone. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier

  2. The cathepsin B inhibitor, z-FA-CMK is toxic and readily induced cell death in human T lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liow, K.Y.; Chow, S.C.

    2013-01-01

    The cathepsin B inhibitor, benzyloxycarbonyl-phenylalanine-alanine-chloromethylketone (z-FA-CMK) was found to be toxic and readily induced cell death in the human T cell line, Jurkat, whereas two other analogs benzyloxycarbonyl-phenylalanine-alanine-fluoromethylketone (z-FA-FMK) and benzyloxycarbonyl-phenylalanine-alanine-diazomethylketone (z-FA-DMK) were not toxic. The toxicity of z-FA-CMK requires not only the CMK group, but also the presence of alanine in the P1 position and the benzyloxycarbonyl group at the N-terminal. Dose–response studies showed that lower concentrations of z-FA-CMK induced apoptosis in Jurkat T cells whereas higher concentrations induced necrosis. In z-FA-CMK-induced apoptosis, both initiator caspases (-8 and -9) and effector caspases (-3, -6 and -7) were processed to their respective subunits in Jurkat T cells. However, only the pro-form of the initiator caspases were reduced in z-FA-CMK-induced necrosis and no respective subunits were apparent. The caspase inihibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-valine-alanine-aspartic acid-(O-methyl)-fluoromehylketone (z-VAD-FMK) inhibits apoptosis and caspase processing in Jurkat T cells treated with low concentration of z-FA-CMK but has no effect on z-FA-CMK-induced necrosis and the loss of initiator caspases. This suggests that the loss of initiator caspases in Jurkat T cells during z-FA-CMK-induced necrosis is not a caspase-dependent process. Taken together, we have demonstrated that z-FA-CMK is toxic to Jurkat T cells and induces apoptosis at low concentrations, while at higher concentrations the cells die of necrosis. - Highlights: • z-FA-CMK is toxic and induce cell death in the human T cells. • z-FA-CMK toxicity requires the CMK group, alanine and the benzyloxycarbonyl group. • z-FA-CMK induced apoptosis at low concentration and necrosis at high concentration

  3. Plasma cathepsin S and cystatin C levels and risk of abdominal aortic aneurysm: a randomized population-based study.

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    Bing-Jie Lv

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Human abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA lesions contain high levels of cathepsin S (CatS, but are deficient in its inhibitor, cystatin C. Whether plasma CatS and cystatin C levels are also altered in AAA patients remains unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: Plasma samples were collected from 476 male AAA patients and 200 age-matched male controls to determine CatS and cystatin C levels by ELISA. Student's t test demonstrated higher plasma levels of total, active, and pro-CatS in AAA patients than in controls (P<0.001. ROC curve analysis confirmed higher plasma total, active, and pro-CatS levels in AAA patients than in controls (P<0.001. Logistic regression suggested that plasma total (odds ratio [OR] = 1.332, active (OR = 1.21, and pro-CatS (OR = 1.25 levels were independent AAA risk factors that associated positively with AAA (P<0.001. Plasma cystatin C levels associated significantly, but negatively, with AAA (OR = 0.356, P<0.001. Univariate correlation demonstrated that plasma total and active CatS levels correlated positively with body-mass index, diastolic blood pressure, and aortic diameter, but negatively with the lowest ankle-brachial index (ABI. Plasma cystatin C levels also correlated negatively with the lowest ABI. Multivariate linear regression showed that plasma total, active, and pro-CatS levels correlated positively with aortic diameter and negatively with the lowest ABI, whereas plasma cystatin C levels correlated negatively with aortic diameter and the lowest ABI, after adjusting for common AAA risk factors. CONCLUSIONS: Correlation of plasma CatS and cystatin C with aortic diameter and the lowest ABI suggest these serological parameters as biomarkers for human peripheral arterial diseases and AAA.

  4. Expression and Purification of Active Recombinant Cathepsin C (Dipeptidyl Aminopeptidase I of Kuruma Prawn Marsupenaeus japonicus in Insect Cells

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    Gao-Feng Qiu

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cathepsin C (CTSC is a lysosomal cysteine protease belonging to the papain superfamily. Our previous study showed that CTSC precursor (zymogen is localized exclusively in cortical rods (CRs of mature oocyte in the kuruma prawn Marsupenaeus japonicus, suggesting that CTSC might have roles on regulating release and/or formation of a jelly layer. In this study, enzymically active CTSC of the kuruma prawn was prepared by recombinant expression in the High Five insect cell line. The recombinant enzyme with a polyhistidine tag at its C-terminus was considered to be initially secreted into the culture medium as an inactive form of zymogen, because Western blot with anti-CTSC antibody detected a 51 kDa protein corresponding to CTSC precursor. After purification by affinity chromatography on nickel-iminodiacetic acid resin, the enzyme displayed three forms of 51, 31, and 30 kDa polypeptides. All of the forms can be recognized by antiserum raised against C-terminal polyhistidine tag, indicating that the 31 and 30 kDa forms were generated from 51 kDa polypeptide by removal of a portion of the N-terminus of propeptide. Following activation at pH 5.5 and 37∘C for 40 hours under native conditions, the recombinant CTSC (rCTSC exhibited increased activity against the synthetic substrate Gly-Phe-β-naphthylamide and optimal pH at around 5. The purified rCTSC will be useful for further characterization of its exact physiological role on CRs release and/or formation of a jelly layer in kuruma prawn.

  5. Serum cathepsin K and cystatin C concentration in patients with advanced non-small-cell lung cancer during chemotherapy.

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    Elzbieta Chyczewska

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available A pathogenic implication of cathepsin K (Cath K and its inhibitor - cystatin C (Cyst C occur to be of growing importance in the mechanisms of tumor invasiveness in lung cancer. This study was conducted to investigate the prognostic role and the effects of chemotherapy on serum Cath K and Cyst C (ELISA in patients with advanced stage non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC. The study entered 40 patients (32 men and 15 healthy volunteers (control group. Peripheral blood samples were taken before and after four cycles of chemotherapy. The mean serum Cyst C levels were significantly higher in patients with advanced NSCLC than in controls (p=0.003. The levels of Cath K in serum of NSCLC are comparable to those in controls. No correlation was found between Cath K and Cyst C concentrations and the histological type and staging of lung cancer. Patients with T4-stage had a lower level of Cyst C, than those with T2 (p=0.033. No correlation was found between the concentrations of Cath K, Cyst C and the effect of chemotherapy. However, Cyst C level positively correlated with serum creatinine concentration (R=0.535; p=0.005 in patients who responded to chemotherapy and with patient's age (R=0.456; p=0.018 in whole group. When the cut-off values of serum Cath K and Cyst C (23.35 pmol/l, 1.29 mg/l, respectively were used, the prognoses of high and low groups were not different. Concluding, patients with lung cancer have a higher serum concentration of Cyst C compared to healthy people. In our opinion, determination of Cath K and Cyst C concentrations has no clinical significance in the prognosis of the survival time in lung cancer.

  6. Coronin 3 promotes gastric cancer metastasis via the up-regulation of MMP-9 and cathepsin K

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    Ren Gui

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coronins are a family of highly evolutionary conserved proteins reportedly involved in the regulation of actin cytoskeletal dynamics, although only coronin 3 has been shown to be related to cancer cell migration. In glioblastoma cells, the knockdown of coronin 3 inhibits cell proliferation and invasion. Coronin 3 is also associated with the aggression and metastasis of hepatocellular carcinoma. In this paper, we analyze the migration, invasion and metastasis abilities of gastric cancer cells after up- or down-regulation of coronin 3, and explore the mechanism of coronin 3 in the process of gastric cancer metastasis. Results The expression of coronin 3 was higher in the highly metastatic sub-cell line MKN28-M, which we established in our laboratory. We also demonstrated that the expression of coronin 3 was remarkably higher in lymph lode metastases than in primary gastric cancer tissues, and over-expression of coronin 3 was correlated with the increased clinical stage and lymph lode metastasis. Recombinant lentiviral vectors encoding shRNAs were designed to down-regulate coronin 3 expression in gastric cancer cell lines. Stable knockdown of coronin 3 by this lentiviral vector could efficiently inhibit the migration and invasion of MKN45 gastric cancer cells. In contrast, up-regulation of coronin 3 significantly enhanced migration and invasion of MKN28-NM cells. In addition, knockdown of coronin 3 significantly reduced liver metastasis in mice after tail vein injection of gastric cancer cells. The Human Tumor Metastasis PCR Array was used to screen the metastasis-associated genes identified by the down-regulation of coronin 3, and the results suggested that, following the knockdown of coronin 3, the tumor cell migration and invasion were inhibited by the reduced expression of MMP-9 and cathepsin K. Conclusion Coronin 3 is highly expressed in gastric cancer metastases and can promote the metastatic behaviors of gastric cancer

  7. Advanced Glycation End Products Inhibit the Proliferation of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells by Inhibiting Cathepsin D

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    Yuan Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available We aimed to investigate the effect of advanced glycation end products (AGEs on the proliferation and migration ability of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. Cell proliferation was detected by methyl thiazolyl tetrazolium (MTT assay, real-time cell analyzer and 5-Ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU staining. Cell migration was detected by wound-healing and transwell assay. AGEs significantly inhibited the proliferation and migration of HUVECs in a time-and dose-dependent way. Western blotting revealed that AGEs dramatically increased the expression of microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3 II/I and p62. Immunofluorescence of p62 and acridine orange staining revealed that AGEs significantly increased the expression of p62 and the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles, respectively. Chloroquine (CQ could further promote the expression of LC3 II/I and p62, increase the accumulation of autophagic vacuoles and promote cell injury induced by AGEs. In addition, AGEs reduced cathepsin D (CTSD expression in a time-dependent way. Overexpression of wild-type CTSD significantly decreased the ratio of LC 3 II/I as well as p62 accumulation induced by AGEs, but overexpression of catalytically inactive mutant CTSD had no such effects. Only overexpression of wild-type CTSD could restore the proliferation of HUVECs inhibited by AGEs. However, overexpression of both wild-type CTSD and catalytically inactive mutant CTSD could promote the migration of HUVECs inhibited by AGEs. Collectively, our study found that AGEs inhibited the proliferation and migration in HUVECs and promoted autophagic flux, which in turn played a protective role against AGEs-induced cell injury. CTSD, in need of its catalytic activity, may promote proliferation in AGEs-treated HUVECs independent of the autophagy-lysosome pathway. Meanwhile, CTSD could improve the migration of AGEs-treated HUVECs regardless of its enzymatic activity.

  8. Prolonged In Vivo Retention of a Cathepsin D Targeted Optical Contrast Agent in a Mouse Model of Alzheimer's Disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snir, Jonatan A; Suchy, Mojmir; Lawrence, Keith St; Hudson, Robert H E; Pasternak, Stephen H; Bartha, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Cathepsin D (CatD) is a lysosomal protease that is elevated early in Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have previously developed a Targeted contrast agent (CA) to detect CatD activity in vivo, consisting of a magnetic resonance imaging/fluorescent moiety linked to a cell penetrating peptide (CPP) by means of a CatD cleavage site and have demonstrated its uptake in the brain of an AD mouse model. The purpose of this study was to characterize the in vivo retention of a near infra-red fluorescent dye labeled version of this CA. Six adult C57Bl/6 wild-type mice and six adult 5XFAD transgenic AD mice were studied using a small animal imaging system at five and twelve months of age using our novel Targeted CA, or two different control CAs; a Non-Targeted (lacking the CatD cleavage site) and a Non-Penetrating (lacking the CPP). Following intravenous CA administration, the optical signal was recorded within the brain and uptake and washout curves were measured and fitted to a one-phase exponential decay curve. In all wild-type and 5XFAD mice, the washout of the Targeted CA that included a CPP domain was significantly slower than the washout of the Non-Penetrating and Non-Targeted CA. Furthermore, the washout of the CatD Targeted CA was significantly slower in the 5XFAD mice compared to the age matched wild-type controls (p CatD targeted CA in 5XFAD mice suggests this agent may be useful for AD detection.

  9. Control of active B and L cathepsins in tissues of colorectal cancer using cystatins isolated from chicken egg proteins: in vitro studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hap, Andrzej; Kielan, Wojciech; Grzebieniak, Zygmunt; Siewinski, Maciej; Rudnicki, Jerzy; Tarnawa, Robert; Rudno-Rudzinska, Julia; Agrawal, Anil Kumar

    2011-01-01

    The activity of cysteine peptidases (cathepsins B and L) was estimated in homogenates of tissues sampled during surgery from 60 patients operated due to colorectal tumors. The results were compared to those obtained using tissues in which histopathology disclosed no tumorous cells, obtained from 20 patients of the same group, treated as a control. Activity of the enzymes was inhibited using cysteine peptidase inhibitors isolated from chicken egg proteins. Application of the inhibitors was found to inhibit activity of the enzymes which play a key role in tumor development. It is suggested that in future the inhibitors may provide a component of new generation drugs in the so-called inhibitor therapy.

  10. Insights into the Interactions of Fasciola hepatica Cathepsin L3 with a Substrate and Potential Novel Inhibitors through In Silico Approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Alvarez, Lilian; Naranjo Feliciano, Dany; Hernández González, Jorge Enrique; de Oliveira Soares, Rosemberg; Barreto Gomes, Diego Enry; Pascutti, Pedro Geraldo

    2015-01-01

    Background Fasciola hepatica is the causative agent of fascioliasis, a disease affecting grazing animals, causing economic losses in global agriculture and currently being an important human zoonosis. Overuse of chemotherapeutics against fascioliasis has increased the populations of drug resistant parasites. F. hepatica cathepsin L3 is a protease that plays important roles during the life cycle of fluke. Due to its particular collagenolytic activity it is considered an attractive target against the infective phase of F. hepatica. Methodology/Principal Findings Starting with a three dimensional model of FhCL3 we performed a structure-based design of novel inhibitors through a computational study that combined virtual screening, molecular dynamics simulations, and binding free energy (ΔGbind) calculations. Virtual screening was carried out by docking inhibitors obtained from the MYBRIDGE-HitFinder database inside FhCL3 and human cathepsin L substrate-binding sites. On the basis of dock-scores, five compounds were predicted as selective inhibitors of FhCL3. Molecular dynamic simulations were performed and, subsequently, an end-point method was employed to predict ΔGbind values. Two compounds with the best ΔGbind values (-10.68 kcal/mol and -7.16 kcal/mol), comparable to that of the positive control (-10.55 kcal/mol), were identified. A similar approach was followed to structurally and energetically characterize the interface of FhCL3 in complex with a peptidic substrate. Finally, through pair-wise and per-residue free energy decomposition we identified residues that are critical for the substrate/ligand binding and for the enzyme specificity. Conclusions/Significance The present study is the first computer-aided drug design approach against F. hepatica cathepsins. Here we predict the principal determinants of binding of FhCL3 in complex with a natural substrate by detailed energetic characterization of protease interaction surface. We also propose novel compounds

  11. Insights into the Interactions of Fasciola hepatica Cathepsin L3 with a Substrate and Potential Novel Inhibitors through In Silico Approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández Alvarez, Lilian; Naranjo Feliciano, Dany; Hernández González, Jorge Enrique; Soares, R O; Soares, Rosemberg de Oliveira; Barreto Gomes, Diego Enry; Pascutti, Pedro Geraldo

    2015-05-01

    Fasciola hepatica is the causative agent of fascioliasis, a disease affecting grazing animals, causing economic losses in global agriculture and currently being an important human zoonosis. Overuse of chemotherapeutics against fascioliasis has increased the populations of drug resistant parasites. F. hepatica cathepsin L3 is a protease that plays important roles during the life cycle of fluke. Due to its particular collagenolytic activity it is considered an attractive target against the infective phase of F. hepatica. Starting with a three dimensional model of FhCL3 we performed a structure-based design of novel inhibitors through a computational study that combined virtual screening, molecular dynamics simulations, and binding free energy (ΔGbind) calculations. Virtual screening was carried out by docking inhibitors obtained from the MYBRIDGE-HitFinder database inside FhCL3 and human cathepsin L substrate-binding sites. On the basis of dock-scores, five compounds were predicted as selective inhibitors of FhCL3. Molecular dynamic simulations were performed and, subsequently, an end-point method was employed to predict ΔGbind values. Two compounds with the best ΔGbind values (-10.68 kcal/mol and -7.16 kcal/mol), comparable to that of the positive control (-10.55 kcal/mol), were identified. A similar approach was followed to structurally and energetically characterize the interface of FhCL3 in complex with a peptidic substrate. Finally, through pair-wise and per-residue free energy decomposition we identified residues that are critical for the substrate/ligand binding and for the enzyme specificity. The present study is the first computer-aided drug design approach against F. hepatica cathepsins. Here we predict the principal determinants of binding of FhCL3 in complex with a natural substrate by detailed energetic characterization of protease interaction surface. We also propose novel compounds as FhCL3 inhibitors. Overall, these results will foster the future

  12. Clinical Impact of Cystatin C/Cathepsin L and Follistatin/Activin A Systems in Breast Cancer Progression: A Preliminary Report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leto, Gaetano; Incorvaia, Lorena; Flandina, Carla; Ancona, Chiara; Fulfaro, Fabio; Crescimanno, Marilena; Sepporta, Maria Vittoria; Badalamenti, Giuseppe

    2016-10-20

    This study was directed to assess the clinical impact of the circulating cathepsin L, cystatin C, activin A, and follistatin in breast cancer patients. The serum concentrations of these molecules were determined by immunoenzymatic assays, and their association with some clinico-pathological parameters of breast cancer progression was evaluated. Our results identified cystatin C and activin A as predictive markers for the presence of breast cancer and bone metastasis, respectively. Therefore, these proteins may have a clinical role as circulating biomarkers in the diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of breast cancer patients.

  13. 177Lu-labeled HPMA copolymers utilizing cathepsin B and S cleavable linkers: Synthesis, characterization and preliminary in vivo investigation in a pancreatic cancer model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogbomo, Sunny M.; Shi, Wen; Wagh, Nilesh K.; Zhou, Zhengyuan; Brusnahan, Susan K.; Garrison, Jered C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction: A major barrier to the advancement of therapeutic nanomedicines has been the non-target toxicity caused by the accumulation of the drug delivery systems in organs associated with the reticuloendothelial system, particularly the liver and spleen. Herein, we report the development of peptide based metabolically active linkers (MALs) that are enzymatically cleaved by cysteine cathepsin B and S, two proteases highly expressed in the liver and spleen. The overall goal of this approach is to utilize the MALs to lower the non-target retention and toxicity of radiolabeled drug delivery systems, thus resulting in higher diagnostic and radiotherapeutic efficacy. Methods: In this study three MALs (MAL0, MAL1 and MAL2) were investigated. MAL1 and MAL2 are composed of known substrates of cathepsin B and S, respectively, while MAL0 is a non-cleavable control. Both MAL1 and MAL2 were shown to undergo enzymatic cleavage with the appropriate cathepsin protease. Subsequent to conjugation to the HPMA copolymer and radiolabeling with 177 Lu, the peptide–polymer conjugates were renamed 177 Lu-metabolically active copolymers ( 177 Lu-MACs) with the corresponding designations: 177 Lu-MAC0, 177 Lu-MAC1 and 177 Lu-MAC2. Results: In vivo evaluation of the 177 Lu-MACs was performed in an HPAC human pancreatic cancer xenograft mouse model. 177 Lu-MAC1 and 177 Lu-MAC2 demonstrated 3.1 and 2.1 fold lower liver retention, respectively, compared to control ( 177 Lu-MAC0) at 72 h post-injection. With regard to spleen retention, 177 Lu-MAC1 and 177 Lu-MAC2 each exhibited a nearly fourfold lower retention, relative to control, at the 72 h time point. However, the tumor accumulation of the 177 Lu-MAC0 was two to three times greater than 177 Lu-MAC1 and 177 Lu-MAC2 at the same time point. The MAL approach demonstrated the capability of substantially reducing the non-target retention of the 177 Lu-labeled HPMA copolymers. Conclusions: While further studies are needed to optimize the

  14. Isolation of novel peptides, cabin-1, -2, -3, and -4, that inhibit cathepsin B from a thermolysin digest of human plasma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakagomi, Kazuya; Fujimura, Akiyoshi; Maeda, Hiromi; Sadakane, Yutaka; Fujii, Noriko; Akizawa, Toshifumi; Tanimura, Takenori; Hatanaka, Yasumaru

    2002-05-01

    Four novel peptides that inhibit cathepsin B, designated as Cabin-1, -2, -3, and -4, were isolated from a thermolysin digest of human plasma. After gel filtration and cation-exchange chromatography, the peptide mixture was purified by reverse-phase HPLC to isolate Cabin-1, -2, -3, and 4, with the amino acid sequences LGPVTQE, VLQSSGLYS, VVSVLT, and LVYDAY, respectively. These peptides correspond to f(64-70) of human apolipoprotein A-I for Cabin-1, f(56-64) and f(185-190) of the human immunoglobulin G gamma chain for Cabin-2 and -3, and f(66-71) of human transferrin for Cabin-4. Synthetic Cabin-1, -2, -3, and -4 showed dose-dependent inhibition of cathepsin B. Their IC50 values were 450, 500, 20, and 5.0 micromol/l, respectively. Lineweaver-Burk plots suggested that Cabin-3 is a noncompetitive inhibitor, while Cabin-4 is a competitive inhibitor. Among the N- and C-terminal deletion peptides of Cabin-2 and -4, Cabin-2(1-8), VLQSSGLY, was found to have the most potent inhibitory activity, with an IC50 of 3.8 micromol/l.

  15. Sero-detection of Toxocara canis infection in human with T.canis recombinant arginine kinase, cathepsin L-1 and TES-26 antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varghese, Anju; Raina, Opinder K; Chandra, Dinesh; Mirdha, Bijay R; Kelawala, Naresh H; Solanki, Jayesh B; Kumar, Niranjan; Ravindran, Reghu; Arun, Anandanarayanan; Rialch, Ajayta; Lalrinkima, Hniang; Kelawala, Rohan N; Samanta, Subhamoy

    2017-12-20

    Three recombinant antigens viz. arginine kinase, cathepsin L-1 and TES-26 of Toxocara canis were expressed in Escherichia coli and evaluated for their potential in the detection of T. canis larval infection in human in immunoglobulin G-enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (IgG-ELISA). Results of the IgG-ELISA with the above recombinant antigens were confirmed with commercially available IgG detection kit for T. canis infection used as a standard test. All three recombinant antigens were 100% sensitive in the detection of positive cases (n = 6) of T. canis infection in human and were screened for their cross-reactivity in human patients with history of Toxoplasma gondii, Plasmodium vivax, Entamoeba histolytica, hydatid and hookworm infections. The recombinant TES-26 antigen showed higher specificity and cross-reacted with T. gondii infection sera only. However, arginine kinase and cathepsin L-1 recombinant antigens showed cross-reactions with sera of patients infected with T. gondii, P. vivax and E. histolytica but not with the patient sera infected with hydatid and hookworm. These results show that recombinant TES-26 is a potential diagnostic candidate antigen for human toxocarosis caused by migrating T. canis larvae.

  16. Association of increased levels of MCP-1 and cathepsin-D in young onset type 2 diabetes patients (T2DM-Y) with severity of diabetic retinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sruthi; Amutha, Anandakumar; Rajalakshmi, Ramachandran; Bhaskaran, Regin; Monickaraj, Finny; Rangasamy, Sampathkumar; Anjana, Ranjit Mohan; Abhijit, Shiny; Gokulakrishnan, Kuppan; Das, Arup; Mohan, Viswanathan; Balasubramanyam, Muthuswamy

    2017-05-01

    Young onset type 2 diabetes patients (T2DM-Y) have been shown to possess an increased risk of developing microvascular complications particularly diabetic retinopathy. However, the molecular mechanisms are not clearly understood. In this study, we investigated the serum levels of monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) and cathepsin-D in patients with T2DM-Y without and with diabetic retinopathy. In this case-control study, participants comprised individuals with normal glucose tolerance (NGT=40), patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM=35), non-proliferative diabetic retinopathy (NPDR=35) and proliferative diabetic retinopathy (PDR=35). Clinical characterization of the study subjects was done by standard procedures and MCP-1 and cathepsin-D were measured by ELISA. Compared to control individuals, patients with T2DM-Y, NPDR and PDR exhibited significantly (pdiabetic retinopathy. Correlation analysis revealed a positive association (ppredict the development of retinopathy in T2DM-Y patients. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Inhibitors of cysteine cathepsin and calpain do not prevent ultraviolet-B-induced apoptosis in human keratinocytes and HeLa cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bang, Bo; Baadsgaard, Ole; Skov, Lone

    2004-01-01

    been demonstrated to play a role in the execution of programmed cell death induced by other stimuli, e.g. TNF-alpha. The purpose of the present study was therefore to investigate whether inhibitors of cysteine cathepsins and calpains could prevent UVB-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells and keratinocytes....... This was done by investigating the effect of the irreversible cysteine protease inhibitor zFA-fmk, the cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074-Me and the calpain inhibitor ALLN on the viability of UVB-irradiated human keratinocytes and HeLa cells. At concentrations of 10 microM and above zVAD-fmk conferred partial dose......-dependent protection against UVB-induced apoptosis in HeLa cells and keratinocytes. Moreover, caspase-3 activity was completely blocked at zVAD-fmk concentrations of 1 microM in HeLa cells. This indicates that caspase-independent mechanisms could be involved in UVB-induced apoptosis. However, the protease inhibitors z...

  18. The Feasibility of Enzyme Targeted Activation for Amino Acid/Dipeptide Monoester Prodrugs of Floxuridine; Cathepsin D as a Potential Targeted Enzyme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gordon L. Amidon

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available The improvement of therapeutic efficacy for cancer agents has been a big challenge which includes the increase of tumor selectivity and the reduction of adverse effects at non-tumor sites. In order to achieve those goals, prodrug approaches have been extensively investigated. In this report, the potential activation enzymes for 5¢-amino acid/dipeptide monoester floxuridine prodrugs in pancreatic cancer cells were selected and the feasibility of enzyme specific activation of prodrugs was evaluated. All prodrugs exhibited the range of 3.0–105.7 min of half life in Capan-2 cell homogenate with the presence and the absence of selective enzyme inhibitors. 5¢-O-L-Phenylalanyl-L-tyrosyl-floxuridine exhibited longer half life only with the presence of pepstatin A. Human cathepsin B and D selectively hydrolized 5¢-O-L-phenylalanyl-L-tyrosylfloxuridine and 5¢-O-L-phenylalanyl-L-glycylfloxuridine compared to the other tested prodrugs. The wide range of growth inhibitory effect by floxuridine prodrugs in Capan-2 cells was observed due to the different affinities of prodrug promoieties to enyzmes. In conclusion, it is feasible to design prodrugs which are activated by specific enzymes. Cathepsin D might be a good candidate as a target enzyme for prodrug activation and 5¢-O-L-phenylalanyl-L-tyrosylfloxuridine may be the best candidate among the tested floxuridine prodrugs.

  19. The feasibility of enzyme targeted activation for amino acid/dipeptide monoester prodrugs of floxuridine; cathepsin D as a potential targeted enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsume, Yasuhiro; Amidon, Gordon L

    2012-03-26

    The improvement of therapeutic efficacy for cancer agents has been a big challenge which includes the increase of tumor selectivity and the reduction of adverse effects at non-tumor sites. In order to achieve those goals, prodrug approaches have been extensively investigated. In this report, the potential activation enzymes for 5'-amino acid/dipeptide monoester floxuridine prodrugs in pancreatic cancer cells were selected and the feasibility of enzyme specific activation of prodrugs was evaluated. All prodrugs exhibited the range of 3.0-105.7 min of half life in Capan-2 cell homogenate with the presence and the absence of selective enzyme inhibitors. 5'-O-L-Phenylalanyl-L-tyrosyl-floxuridine exhibited longer half life only with the presence of pepstatin A. Human cathepsin B and D selectively hydrolized 5'-O-L-phenylalanyl-L-tyrosylfloxuridine and 5'-O-L-phenylalanyl-L-glycylfloxuridine compared to the other tested prodrugs. The wide range of growth inhibitory effect by floxuridine prodrugs in Capan-2 cells was observed due to the different affinities of prodrug promoieties to enzymes. In conclusion, it is feasible to design prodrugs which are activated by specific enzymes. Cathepsin D might be a good candidate as a target enzyme for prodrug activation and 5'-O-L-phenylalanyl-L-tyrosylfloxuridine may be the best candidate among the tested floxuridine prodrugs.

  20. Improving serodiagnosis of human and canine leishmaniasis with recombinant Leishmania braziliensis cathepsin l-like protein and a synthetic peptide containing its linear B-cell epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menezes-Souza, Daniel; Mendes, Tiago Antônio de Oliveira; Gomes, Matheus de Souza; Bartholomeu, Daniella Castanheira; Fujiwara, Ricardo Toshio

    2015-01-01

    The early and correct diagnosis of human leishmaniasis is essential for disease treatment. Another important step in the control of visceral leishmaniasis is the identification of infected dogs, which are the main domestic reservoir of L. infantum. Recombinant proteins and synthetic peptides based on Leishmania genes have emerged as valuable targets for serodiagnosis due to their increased sensitivity, specificity and potential for standardization. Cathepsin L-like genes are surface antigens that are secreted by amastigotes and have little similarity to host proteins, factors that enable this protein as a good target for serodiagnosis of the leishmaniasis. We mapped a linear B-cell epitope within the Cathepsin L-like protein from L. braziliensis. A synthetic peptide containing the epitope and the recombinant protein was evaluated for serodiagnosis of human tegumentary and visceral leishmaniasis, as well as canine visceral leishmaniasis. The recombinant protein performed best for human tegumentary and canine visceral leishmaniasis, with 96.30% and 89.33% accuracy, respectively. The synthetic peptide was the best to discriminate human visceral leishmaniasis, with 97.14% specificity, 94.55% sensitivity and 96.00% accuracy. Comparison with T. cruzi-infected humans and dogs suggests that the identified epitope is specific to Leishmania parasites, which minimizes the likelihood of cross-reactions.

  1. A cathepsin F-like peptidase involved in barley grain protein mobilization, HvPap-1, is modulated by its own propeptide and by cystatins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambra, Ines; Martinez, Manuel; Dáder, Beatriz; González-Melendi, Pablo; Gandullo, Jacinto; Santamaría, M Estrella; Diaz, Isabel

    2012-07-01

    Among the C1A cysteine proteases, the plant cathepsin F-like group has been poorly studied. This paper describes the molecular and functional characterization of the HvPap-1 cathepsin F-like protein from barley. This peptidase is N-glycosylated and has to be processed to become active by its own propeptide being an important modulator of the peptidase activity. The expression pattern of its mRNA and protein suggest that it is involved in different proteolytic processes in the barley plant. HvPap-1 peptidase has been purified in Escherichia coli and the recombinant protein is able to degrade different substrates, including barley grain proteins (hordeins, albumins, and globulins) stored in the barley endosperm. It has been localized in protein bodies and vesicles of the embryo and it is induced in aleurones by gibberellin treatment. These three features support the implication of HvPap-1 in storage protein mobilization during grain germination. In addition, a complex regulation exerted by the barley cystatins, which are cysteine protease inhibitors, and by its own propeptide, is also described.

  2. Improving serodiagnosis of human and canine leishmaniasis with recombinant Leishmania braziliensis cathepsin l-like protein and a synthetic peptide containing its linear B-cell epitope.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Menezes-Souza

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The early and correct diagnosis of human leishmaniasis is essential for disease treatment. Another important step in the control of visceral leishmaniasis is the identification of infected dogs, which are the main domestic reservoir of L. infantum. Recombinant proteins and synthetic peptides based on Leishmania genes have emerged as valuable targets for serodiagnosis due to their increased sensitivity, specificity and potential for standardization. Cathepsin L-like genes are surface antigens that are secreted by amastigotes and have little similarity to host proteins, factors that enable this protein as a good target for serodiagnosis of the leishmaniasis.We mapped a linear B-cell epitope within the Cathepsin L-like protein from L. braziliensis. A synthetic peptide containing the epitope and the recombinant protein was evaluated for serodiagnosis of human tegumentary and visceral leishmaniasis, as well as canine visceral leishmaniasis.The recombinant protein performed best for human tegumentary and canine visceral leishmaniasis, with 96.30% and 89.33% accuracy, respectively. The synthetic peptide was the best to discriminate human visceral leishmaniasis, with 97.14% specificity, 94.55% sensitivity and 96.00% accuracy. Comparison with T. cruzi-infected humans and dogs suggests that the identified epitope is specific to Leishmania parasites, which minimizes the likelihood of cross-reactions.

  3. Assessment of cathepsin D and L-like proteinases of poultry red mite, Dermanyssus gallinae (De Geer), as potential vaccine antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartley, Kathryn; Huntley, John F; Wright, Harry W; Nath, Mintu; Nisbet, Alasdair J

    2012-05-01

    Vaccination is a feasible strategy for controlling the haematophagous poultry red mite Dermanyssus gallinae. A cDNA library enriched for genes upregulated after feeding was created to identify potential vaccine antigens. From this library, a gene (Dg-CatD-1) encoding a 383 amino acid protein (Dg-CatD-1) with homology to cathepsin D lysosomal aspartyl proteinases was identified as a potential vaccine candidate. A second gene (Dg-CatL-1) encoding a 341 amino acid protein (Dg-CatL-1) with homology to cathepsin L cysteine proteinases was also selected for further study. IgY obtained from naturally infested hens failed to detect Dg-CatD-1 suggesting that it is a concealed antigen. Conversely, Dg-CatL-1 was detected by IgY derived from natural-infestation, indicating that infested hens are exposed to Dg-CatL-1. Mortality rates 120 h after mites had been fed anti-Dg-CatD-1 were significantly higher than those fed control IgY (PFCatD-1 and anti-Dg-CatL-1 IgY had 4·42 and 2·13 times higher risks of dying compared with controls (PFCatD-1 and L-1 both have potential as vaccine antigens as part of a multi-component vaccine and have the potential to be improved as vaccine antigens using alternative expression systems.

  4. The C-terminal subunit of artificially truncated human cathepsin B mediates its nuclear targeting and contributes to cell viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dallner Claudia

    2005-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Splicing variants of human cathepsinB primary transcripts (CB(-2,3 result in an expression product product which lacks the signal peptide and parts of the propeptide. This naturally truncated Δ51CB is thus unable to follow the regular CB processing and sorting pathway. It is addressed to the mitochondria through an activated N-terminal mitochondrial targeting signal instead. Although Δ51CB is supposed to be devoid of the typical CB enzymatic activity, it might play a role in malignancies and trigger cell death/apoptosis independent from the function of the regular enzyme. Cytoplasmic presence of the mature CB might occur as a result of lysosomal damage. Results We investigated such "aberrant" proteins by artificial CB-GFP chimeras covering various sequence parts in respect to their enzymatic activity, their localization in different cell types, and the effects on the cell viability. Unlike the entire full length CB form, the artificial single chain form was not processed and did not reveal typical enzymatic CB activity during transient overexpression in large cell lung carcinoma cells. Δ51CB was found predominantly in mitochondria. In contrast, the shorter artificial CB constructs localized in the cytoplasm, inside the cell nucleus, and in the midbodies of dividing cells. Bleaching experiments revealed both mobile and immobile fractions of these constructs in the nucleus. Nuclear accumulation of artificially truncated CB variants led to disintegration of nuclei, followed by cell death. Conclusion We propose that cell death associated with CB is not necessarily triggered by its regular enzymatic activity but alternatively by a yet unknown activity profile of truncated CB. Cytoplasmic CB might be able to enter the cell nucleus. According to a mutational analysis, the part of CB that mediates its nuclear import is a signal patch within its heavy chain domain. The results suggest that besides the N-terminal signal peptide also

  5. Dissecting the active site of the collagenolytic cathepsin L3 protease of the invasive stage of Fasciola hepatica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ileana Corvo

    Full Text Available A family of secreted cathepsin L proteases with differential activities is essential for host colonization and survival in the parasitic flatworm Fasciola hepatica. While the blood feeding adult secretes predominantly FheCL1, an enzyme with a strong preference for Leu at the S2 pocket of the active site, the infective stage produces FheCL3, a unique enzyme with collagenolytic activity that favours Pro at P2.Using a novel unbiased multiplex substrate profiling and mass spectrometry methodology (MSP-MS, we compared the preferences of FheCL1 and FheCL3 along the complete active site cleft and confirm that while the S2 imposes the greatest influence on substrate selectivity, preferences can be indicated on other active site subsites. Notably, we discovered that the activity of FheCL1 and FheCL3 enzymes is very different, sharing only 50% of the cleavage sites, supporting the idea of functional specialization. We generated variants of FheCL1 and FheCL3 with S2 and S3 residues by mutagenesis and evaluated their substrate specificity using positional scanning synthetic combinatorial libraries (PS-SCL. Besides the rare P2 Pro preference, FheCL3 showed a distinctive specificity at the S3 pocket, accommodating preferentially the small Gly residue. Both P2 Pro and P3 Gly preferences were strongly reduced when Trp67 of FheCL3 was replaced by Leu, rendering the enzyme incapable of digesting collagen. In contrast, the inverse Leu67Trp substitution in FheCL1 only slightly reduced its Leu preference and improved Pro acceptance in P2, but greatly increased accommodation of Gly at S3.These data reveal the significance of S2 and S3 interactions in substrate binding emphasizing the role for residue 67 in modulating both sites, providing a plausible explanation for the FheCL3 collagenolytic activity essential to host invasion. The unique specificity of FheCL3 could be exploited in the design of specific inhibitors selectively directed to specific infective stage

  6. Canonical TSH Regulation of Cathepsin-Mediated Thyroglobulin Processing in the Thyroid Gland of Male Mice Requires Taar1 Expression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qatato, Maria; Szumska, Joanna; Skripnik, Vladislav; Rijntjes, Eddy; Köhrle, Josef; Brix, Klaudia

    2018-01-01

    Trace amine-associated receptor 1 (Taar1) has been suggested as putative receptor of thyronamines. These are aminergic messengers with potential metabolic and neurological effects countering their contingent precursors, the thyroid hormones (THs). Recently, we found Taar1 to be localized at the primary cilia of rodent thyroid epithelial cells in vitro and in situ. Thus, Taar1 is present in a location of thyroid follicles where it might be involved in regulation of cathepsin-mediated proteolytic processing of thyroglobulin, and consequently TH synthesis. In this study, taar1 knock-out male mice (taar1-/-) were used to determine whether Taar1 function would entail differential alterations in thyroid states of young and adult animals. Analyses of blood serum revealed unaltered T4 and T3 concentrations and unaltered T3-over-T4 ratios upon Taar1 deficiency accompanied, however, by elevated TSH concentrations. Interestingly, TSH receptors, typically localized at the basolateral plasma membrane domain of wild type controls, were located at vesicular membranes in thyrocytes of taar1-/- mice. In addition, determination of epithelial extensions in taar1-/- thyroids showed prismatic cells, which might indicate activation states higher than in the wild type. While gross degradation of thyroglobulin was comparable to controls, deregulated thyroglobulin turnover in taar1-/- mice was indicated by luminal accumulation of covalently cross-linked thyroglobulin storage forms. These findings were in line with decreased proteolytic activities of thyroglobulin-solubilizing and -processing proteases, due to upregulated cystatins acting as their endogenous inhibitors in situ. In conclusion, Taar1-deficient mice are hyperthyrotropinemic in the absence of respective signs of primary hypothyroidism such as changes in body weight or TH concentrations in blood serum. Thyrocytes of taar1-/- mice are characterized by non-canonical TSH receptor localization in intracellular compartments, which is

  7. Azanitrile Cathepsin K Inhibitors: Effects on Cell Toxicity, Osteoblast-Induced Mineralization and Osteoclast-Mediated Bone Resorption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhong-Yuan Ren

    Full Text Available The cysteine protease cathepsin K (CatK, abundantly expressed in osteoclasts, is responsible for the degradation of bone matrix proteins, including collagen type 1. Thus, CatK is an attractive target for new anti-resorptive osteoporosis therapies, but the wider effects of CatK inhibitors on bone cells also need to be evaluated to assess their effects on bone. Therefore, we selected, among a series of synthetized isothiosemicarbazides, two molecules which are highly selective CatK inhibitors (CKIs to test their effects on osteoblasts and osteoclasts.Cell viability upon treatment of CKIs were was assayed on human osteoblast-like Saos-2, mouse monocyte cell line RAW 264.7 and mature mouse osteoclasts differentiated from bone marrow. Osteoblast-induced mineralization in Saos-2 cells and in mouse primary osteoblasts from calvaria, with or without CKIs,; were was monitored by Alizarin Red staining and alkaline phosphatase activity, while osteoclast-induced bone resorption was performed on bovine slices.Treatments with two CKIs, CKI-8 and CKI-13 in human osteoblast-like Saos-2, murine RAW 264.7 macrophages stimulated with RANKL and mouse osteoclasts differentiated from bone marrow stimulated with RANKL and MCSF were found not to be toxic at doses of up to 100 nM. As probed by Alizarin Red staining, CKI-8 did not inhibit osteoblast-induced mineralization in mouse primary osteoblasts as well as in osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells. However, CKI-13 led to a reduction in mineralization of around 40% at 10-100 nM concentrations in osteoblast-like Saos-2 cells while it did not in primary cells. After a 48-hour incubation, both CKI-8 and CKI-13 decreased bone resorption on bovine bone slices. CKI-13 was more efficient than the commercial inhibitor E-64 in inhibiting bone resorption induced by osteoclasts on bovine bone slices. Both CKI-8 and CKI-13 created smaller bone resorption pits on bovine bone slices, suggesting that the mobility of osteoclasts was slowed

  8. Expression of Cathepsin S in BCG converts it into a pro-apoptotic and highly immunogenic strain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Alice; Singh, Vijender; Soualhine, Hafid; Hmama, Zakaria

    2017-04-11

    BCG vaccine, introduced almost 100years ago, is the only option to prevent TB disease. It effectively protects newborns from meningeal TB but fails to prevent adult pulmonary TB. TB kills 1.3million people annually in areas where BCG vaccination is widely practiced. Thus, more effective TB vaccines are urgently needed. Others and we have shown that BCG mimics features of virulent M. tuberculosis, in particular attenuation of essential macrophage functions such as phagosome maturation and antigen presentation. One of these studies revealed that defect in antigen presentation is largely due to down-regulation of the cysteine protease Cathepsin S (CatS), which prevents MHC II molecule maturation and proper antigen peptide loading. Recent studies also suggested a potential role for cysteine proteases in the regulation of apoptosis, a key cellular process used by the macrophage to (i) contain and process ingested bacteria and (ii) facilitate cross-talk antigen presentation between the macrophage and dendritic cells. To reverse the phenotype of vaccine-mediated macrophage attenuation, we engineered a novel BCG strain that expresses and secretes active CatS (rBCG-CatS) to examine its pro-apoptotic properties in vitro, and subsequently, immunogenicity in mice. Transcriptomic profiling of macrophages infected with rBCG-CatS, but not BCG, revealed upregulation of key pro-apoptotic genes and downregulation of anti-apoptotic genes, which were further confirmed by RT-qPCR analyses of expression of selected genes. Macrophages infected with rBCG-CatS undergo apoptosis as indicated by increased levels of annexin V staining and intracellular caspase-3 cleavage. Consistent with these findings, mice vaccinated with rBCG-CatS showed increased antigen-specific CD4 + T-cell responses, as well as enhanced cytokine production and proliferation in CD4 + upon ex vivo re-stimulation. Collectively, this study shows that a pro-apoptotic BCG strain alleviates adverse traits of the wild

  9. Cathepsin D protects colorectal cancer cells from acetate-induced apoptosis through autophagy-independent degradation of damaged mitochondria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira, C S F; Pereira, H; Alves, S; Castro, L; Baltazar, F; Chaves, S R; Preto, A; Côrte-Real, M

    2015-06-18

    Acetate is a short-chain fatty acid secreted by Propionibacteria from the human intestine, known to induce mitochondrial apoptotic death in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells. We previously established that acetate also induces lysosome membrane permeabilization in CRC cells, associated with release of the lysosomal protease cathepsin D (CatD), which has a well-established role in the mitochondrial apoptotic cascade. Unexpectedly, we showed that CatD has an antiapoptotic role in this process, as pepstatin A (a CatD inhibitor) increased acetate-induced apoptosis. These results mimicked our previous data in the yeast system showing that acetic acid activates a mitochondria-dependent apoptosis process associated with vacuolar membrane permeabilization and release of the vacuolar protease Pep4p, ortholog of mammalian CatD. Indeed, this protease was required for cell survival in a manner dependent on its catalytic activity and for efficient mitochondrial degradation independently of autophagy. In this study, we therefore assessed the role of CatD in acetate-induced mitochondrial alterations. We found that, similar to acetic acid in yeast, acetate-induced apoptosis is not associated with autophagy induction in CRC cells. Moreover, inhibition of CatD with small interfering RNA or pepstatin A enhanced apoptosis associated with higher mitochondrial dysfunction and increased mitochondrial mass. This effect seems to be specific, as inhibition of CatB and CatL with E-64d had no effect, nor were these proteases significantly released to the cytosol during acetate-induced apoptosis. Using yeast cells, we further show that the role of Pep4p in mitochondrial degradation depends on its protease activity and is complemented by CatD, indicating that this mechanism is conserved. In summary, the clues provided by the yeast model unveiled a novel CatD function in the degradation of damaged mitochondria when autophagy is impaired, which protects CRC cells from acetate-induced apoptosis. Cat

  10. Role of cathepsin D activation in major adverse cardiovascular events and new-onset heart failure after STEMI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamac, Aylin Hatice; Sevgili, Emrah; Kucukbuzcu, Sitki; Nasifov, Muharrem; Ismailoglu, Ziya; Kilic, Elif; Ercan, Cilem; Jafarov, Parviz; Uyarel, Hüseyin; Bacaksiz, Ahmet

    2015-09-01

    Increased serum levels of the activated aspartic lysosomal endopeptidase cathepsin D (CatD) have been found in patients with acute myocardial infarction (AMI). However, to date there have been no analyses of clinical follow-up data measuring the enzyme course and its role in the development of post-MI heart failure. This study aimed to evaluate the role of serum CatD activity in the development of heart failure in patients with ST-segment elevation acute myocardial infarction (STEMI). Eighty-eight consecutive patients (79.5 % men, mean age 57.4 ± 10.2 years) with STEMI were included in this study. Serum CatD activity was measured directly after primary percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI), before discharge, and at the 6-month follow-up. Patients were monitored for major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE), defined as hospitalization due to cardiovascular causes, recurrent nonfatal myocardial infarction, unplanned PCI, new-onset heart failure, and cardiovascular mortality. Serum CatD activity was significantly higher in patients with AMI after PCI and during follow-up (FU) than that in age-matched controls (16.2 ± 7.5 and 29.8 ± 8.9 vs. 8.5 ± 4.2 RFU; p CatD activity in these patients was inversely related to new-onset cardiac dysfunction compared with patients with preserved and improved LVEF after treatment (23.1 ± 3.2 vs. 28.8 ± 7.0 and 29.7 ± 5.0 RFU respectively, p CatD than those without any MACE (23.8 ± 4.6 vs 29.6 ± 6.9 RFU; p CatD activity as a marker of healthy endogenous phagocytosis and remodeling was impaired in patients with new-onset cardiac dysfunction, and lower levels of serum CatD were associated with MACE at the 6-month post-MI follow-up.

  11. Cathepsin D and H2O2 stimulate degradation of thioredoxin-1: implication for endothelial cell apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haendeler, Judith; Popp, Rüdiger; Goy, Christine; Tischler, Verena; Zeiher, Andreas M; Dimmeler, Stefanie

    2005-12-30

    Cathepsin D (CatD) is a lysosomal aspartic proteinase and plays an important role in the degradation of proteins and in apoptotic processes induced by oxidative stress, cytokines, and aging. All of these stimuli are potent inducers of endothelial cell apoptosis. Therefore, we investigated the role of CatD in endothelial cell apoptosis and determined the underlying mechanisms. Incubation with 100-500 microm H2O2 for 12 h induced apoptosis in endothelial cells. To determine a role for CatD, we co-incubated endothelial cells with the CatD inhibitor pepstatin A. Pepstatin A as well as genetic knock down of CatD abolished H2O2-induced apoptosis. In contrast, overexpression of CatD wild type but not a catalytically inactive mutant of CatD (CatDD295N) induced apoptosis under basal conditions. To gain insights into the underlying mechanisms, we investigated the effect of CatD on reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation. Indeed, knocking down CatD expression reduced H2O2-induced ROS formation and apoptosis. The major redox regulator in endothelial cells is thioredoxin-1 (Trx), which plays a crucial role in apoptosis inhibition. Thus, we hypothesized that CatD may alter Trx protein levels and thereby promote formation of ROS and apoptosis. Incubation with 100 microm H2O2 for 6 h decreased Trx protein levels, whereas Trx mRNA was not altered. H2O2-induced Trx degradation was inhibited by pepstatin A and genetic knock down of CatD but not by other protease inhibitors. Incubation of unstimulated cell lysates with recombinant CatD significantly reduced Trx protein levels in vitro, which was completely blocked by pepstatin A pre-incubation. Overexpression of CatD reduced Trx protein in cells. Moreover, H2O2 incubation led to a translocation of Trx to the lysosomes prior to the induction of apoptosis. Taken together, CatD induces apoptosis via degradation of Trx protein, which is an essential anti-apoptotic and reactive oxygen species scavenging protein in endothelial cells.

  12. The expression of E-cadherin and cathepsin-D in normal oral mucosa, oral epithelial dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma: A comparative analysis between immunohistochemistry and routine histopathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yogesh, Tl; Narayan, Tv; Shreedhar, Balasundari; Shashidara, R; Leekymohanty

    2011-09-01

    E-cadherin is known to be an invasion suppressor gene and cathepsin-D, a protease, which is an invasion promoter and plays a central role in solid tumors including oral cancer. To look for the expression pattern in normal buccal mucosa, dysplastic oral epithelium and oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) along with their correlation to individual atypical features, thereby providing an objective to the grading system in predicting the fate of affected epithelium. To elucidate the expression patterns of these markers, we examined immunohistochemically on formalin fixed, paraffin embedded sections 22 dysplastic epithelia, eight SCC and ten normal buccal mucosa. In dysplastic epithelium slight loss of expression of E-cadherin was noted as grade of dysplasia increased. Two cases of carcinoma clearance showed only basal and suprabasal staining. The staining varied in SCC with patchy to complete absence of expression. With cathepsin-D fine to moderate granular cytoplasmic staining was noted in most of the dysplastic epithelium. Similar staining was noted in SCC. The atypical features which strongly correlated to loss of expression of E-cadherin and intense cathepsin-D expression are basilar hyperplasia, loss of cohesion, mitosis, loss of polarity and drop shaped rete ridges. The result of the study shows that the above atypical features should be given more weightage in addition to traditional grading system, in predicting the fate of affected epithelium. Additional studies with larger sample size and using monoclonal antibody against cathepsin-D may further strengthen our findings.

  13. The highly antigenic 53/25 kDa Taenia solium protein fraction with cathepsin-L like activity is present in the oncosphere/cysticercus and induces non-protective IgG antibodies in pigs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimic, Mirko; Pajuelo, Mónica; Gilman, Robert H; Gutiérrez, Andrés H; Rueda, Luis D; Flores, Myra; Chile, Nancy; Verástegui, Manuela; Gonzalez, Armando; García, Héctor H; Sheen, Patricia

    2012-01-15

    Cathepsin L-like proteases are secreted by several parasites including Taenia solium. The mechanism used by T. solium oncospheres to degrade and penetrate the intestine and infect the host is incompletely understood. It is assumed that intestinal degradation is driven by the proteolytic activity of enzymes secreted by the oncosphere. Blocking the proteolytic activity by an antibody response would prevent the oncosphere penetration and further infection. Serine and cysteine proteases including chymotrypsin, trypsin, elastase, and cathepsin L, are secreted by T. solium and Taenia saginata oncospheres when cultured in vitro, being potential vaccine candidates. However, the purification of a sufficient quantity of proteases secreted by oncospheres to conduct a vaccine trial is costly and lengthy. A 53/25 kDa cathepsin L-like fraction partially purified from T. solium cyst fluid was described previously as an important antigen for immunodiagnostics. In this study we found that this antigen is present in the T. solium oncosphere and is also secreted by the cysticercus. This protein fraction was tested for its ability to protect pigs against an oral challenge with T. solium oncospheres in a vaccine trial. IgG antibodies against the 53/25 kDa cathepsin L-like protein fraction were elicited in the vaccinated animals but did not confer protection. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Sorafenib induces cathepsin B-mediated apoptosis of bladder cancer cells by regulating the Akt/PTEN pathway. The Akt inhibitor, perifosine, enhances the sorafenib-induced cytotoxicity against bladder cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amantini, Consuelo; Morelli, Maria Beatrice; Santoni, Matteo; Soriani, Alessandra; Cardinali, Claudio; Farfariello, Valerio; Eleuteri, Anna Maria; Bonfili, Laura; Mozzicafreddo, Matteo; Nabissi, Massimo; Cascinu, Stefano; Santoni, Giorgio

    2015-01-01

    Sorafenib, a tyrosine kinase inhibitor, has been demonstrated to exert anti-tumor effects. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying its effects on bladder cancer remain unknown. Here, we evaluated the mechanisms responsible for the sorafenib-induced anti-tumor effects on 5637 and T24 bladder cancer cells. We demonstrated that sorafenib reduces cell viability, stimulates lysosome permeabilization and induces apoptosis of bladder cancer cells. These effects are dependent by the activation of cathepsin B released from lysosomes. The sorafenib-increased cathepsin B activity induced the proteolysis of Bid into tBid that stimulates the intrinsic pathway of apoptosis characterized by mitochondrial membrane depolarization, oxygen radical generation and cytochrome c release. Moreover, we found that cathepsin B enzymatic activity, induced by sorafenib, is dependent on its dephosphorylation via PTEN activation and Akt inactivation. Pretreatment with orthovanadate rescued bladder cancer cells from apoptosis. In addition, the Akt inhibitor perifosine increased the sensitivity of bladder cancer cells to sorafenib-induced cytotoxicity. Overall, our results show that apoptotic cell death induced by sorafenib in bladder cancer cells is dependent on cathepsin B activity and involved PTEN and Akt signaling pathways. The Akt inhibitor perifosine increased the cytotoxic effects of sorafenib in bladder cancer cells.

  15. Ratio of cathepsin B to stefin A identifies heterogeneity within Gleason histologic scores for human prostate cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, A A; Quast, B J; Wilson, M J; Fernandes, E T; Reddy, P K; Ewing, S L; Sloane, B F; Gleason, D F

    2001-09-15

    Cathepsin B (CB), a lysosomal cysteine protease, is involved in degradation of extracellular matrix proteins and progression of tumor cells from one biological compartment to another in many solid organ cancers, including prostate cancer. Our objective was to identify patterns of distribution of CB and its endogenous cellular inhibitor stefin A in cryostat sections of frozen BPH and prostate cancer tissue samples and to define these patterns in relation to Gleason histologic scores, clinical stages, and serum total PSA levels. We localized CB and stefin A in the same sections using polyclonal and monoclonal antibody immunoglobulin G (IgGs) against CB and stefin A using immunofluorescence and confocal microscopic techniques. Only cryostat sections of frozen prostates were used in localizations of CB and stefin A. Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) showed similar localization patterns for CB and stefin A and a ratio of 1 was indicated by CB = stefin A. Confocal studies indicated that most CB and stefin A sites in BPH glandular cells overlapped as shown by the yellow fluorescence of their co-localization. We found considerable variability in individual localization of CB and stefin A within and between Gleason histologic scores for prostate cancers. This variability was also found in Gleason score 6 tumors that are otherwise considered similar histologically and morphologically. Negative control sections did not show localization of CB by FITC, stefin A by Cy3 or yellow fluorescence for co-localization. Our analysis of the ratio of CB to stefin A showed three patterns, namely CB = stefin A, CB > stefin A, and CB showed more sites of yellow fluorescence when the ratio was CB = stefin A than those found in CB > stefin A or CB showed prostate cancer cases with ratios of CB > stefin A (P show any specific relationship between the ratio of CB to stefin A and Gleason scores, clinical stages, and serum total prostate specific antigen (PSA) levels in prostate cancers

  16. Effect of electrohydraulic shockwave treatment on tenderness, muscle cathepsin and peptidase activities and microstructure of beef loin steaks from Holstein young bulls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolumar, Tomas; Bindrich, Utte; Toepfl, Stefan; Toldrá, Fidel; Heinz, Volker

    2014-12-01

    Hydrodynamic pressure processing (HDP) or shockwave treatment improved tenderness (18% reduction in Warner-Bratzler shear force (WBSF) of beef loin steaks. Endogenous muscle proteolyic activities (cathepsins and peptidases) and protein fragmentation of sarcoplasmic and myofibrillar proteins detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) were not influenced by HDP. However, microstructure changes were clearly detected using confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Specifically a disruption of the structure at the muscle fiber bundles and an increased endomysium space were observed. The present paper supports the evidence of physical disruption of the muscle fibers as a cause behind the tenderness improvement. The paper discusses the possible mechanisms responsible for the meat tenderisation induced by HDP treatment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Treatment with a human recombinant monoclonal IgG antibody against oxidized LDL in atherosclerosis-prone pigs reduces cathepsin S in coronary lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Christian Bo; Al-Mashhadi, Ahmed Ludvigsen; Von Wachenfeldt, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Background Immunization with oxidized LDL (oxLDL) reduces atherosclerosis in rodents. We tested the hypothesis that treatment with a human recombinant monoclonal antibody against oxLDL will reduce the burden or composition of atherosclerotic lesions in hypercholesterolemic minipigs. Methods...... and results Thirty-eight hypercholesterolemic minipigs with defective LDL receptors were injected with an oxLDL antibody or placebo weekly for 12 weeks. An 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (FDG PET) scan (n = 9) was performed before inclusion and after 3 months of treatment. Blood samples.......03) with no difference in CD68 or CD163 positivity. Conclusions In hypercholesterolemic minipigs, treatment with a human recombinant monoclonal antibody against oxLDL reduced cathepsin S in coronary lesions without any effect on the burden of atherosclerosis or aortic FDG-PET signal....

  18. Lysosomal cathepsin initiates apoptosis, which is regulated by photodamage to Bcl-2 at mitochondria in photodynamic therapy using a novel photosensitizer, ATX-s10 (Na).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ichinose, Shuji; Usuda, Jitsuo; Hirata, Takeshi; Inoue, Tatsuya; Ohtani, Keishi; Maehara, Sachio; Kubota, Mitsuhiro; Imai, Kentarou; Tsunoda, Yoshihiko; Kuroiwa, Yukari; Yamada, Kimito; Tsutsui, Hidemitsu; Furukawa, Kinya; Okunaka, Tetsuya; Oleinick, Nancy L; Kato, Harubumi

    2006-08-01

    ATX-s10 is a novel and second-generation photosensitizer for photodynamic therapy (PDT). In order to conduct clinical trials of ATX-s10-PDT and/or extend its clinical applications, it is very important to elucidate the mechanisms of the action of ATX-s10-PDT. We examined the apoptic response against ATX-s10-PDT using a Bcl-2 or Bcl-2 mutant overexpressing cells. Using fluorescent microscopy, ATX-s10 localized not only to mitochondria but also to lysosomes and possibly other intracellular organelles, but not to the plasma membrane or the nucleus. These results suggest that ATX-s10-PDT can damage mitochondria and lysosomes. By Western blot analysis, ATX-s10-PDT damaged Bcl-2, which localized preferentially at mitochondrial membranes, and caused Bcl-2 to cross-link immediately after laser irradiation. However, ATX-s10-PDT was not able to rapidly induce morphologically typical apoptosis (i.e. chromatin condensation and fragmentation) as PDT using mitochondria targeted photosensitizers, such as phthalocyanine 4 (Pc 4). Pharmacological inhibitions of lysosomal cytokine protease cathepsins, such as cathepsin B and D, protected MCF-7c3 cells (human breast cancer cells expressing stably transfected procaspase-3) from apoptosis caused by ATX-s10-PDT. Overexpression of wild-type Bcl-2 or Bcl-2Delta33-54 resulted in relative resistance of cells to ATX-s10-PDT, as assessed by the degree of morphological apoptosis or loss of clonogenicity. We conclude that lysosomal damage by ATX-s10-PDT can initiate apoptotic response and this apoptotic pathway can be regulated by photodamage to Bcl-2 via mitochondrial damage.

  19. A prognostic model for triple-negative breast cancer patients based on node status, cathepsin-D and Ki-67 index.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Huang

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: The aim of this study was to evaluate clinicopathologic factors that could possibly affect the outcome of patients with triple negative breast cancer and subsequently build a prognostic model to predict patients' outcome. METHODS: We retrospectively analyzed clinicopathologic characteristics and outcome of 504 patients diagnosed with triple-negative invasive ductal breast cancer. 185 patients enrolled between 2000 and 2002 were designated to the training set. The variables that had statistically significant correlation with prognosis were combined to build a model. The prognostic value of the model was further validated in the separate validation set containing 319 patients enrolled between 2003 and 2006. RESULTS: The median follow-up duration was 66 months. 174 patients experienced recurrence, and 111 patients died. Positivity for ≥4 lymph nodes, Cathepsin-D positivity, and Ki-67 index ≥20% were independent factors for DFS, while the lymph nodes status and Ki-67 index were the prognostic factors for OS. The prognostic model was established based on the sum of all three factors, where positivity for ≥4 lymph nodes, Cathepsin-D and Ki-67 index ≥20% would individually contribute 1 point to the risk score. The patients in the validation set were assigned to a low-risk group (0 and 1 point and a high-risk group (2 and 3 points. The external validation analysis also demonstrated that our prognostic model provided the independent high predictive accuracy of recurrence. CONCLUSION: This model has a considerable clinical value in predicting recurrence, and will help clinicians to design an appropriate level of adjuvant treatment and schedule adequate appointments of surveillance visits.

  20. Morning vs evening dosing of the cathepsin K inhibitor ONO-5334: effects on bone resorption in postmenopausal women in a randomized, phase 1 trial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eastell, R; Dijk, D-J; Small, M; Greenwood, A; Sharpe, J; Yamada, H; Yuba, M; Tanimoto, M; Deacon, S

    2016-01-01

    The cathepsin K inhibitor, ONO-5334, improves bone mineral density in postmenopausal women with osteoporosis. The effects of morning versus evening administration of ONO-5334 were investigated by measuring bone turnover marker levels in healthy postmenopausal women. Morning administration of ONO-5334 showed a more consistent suppressive effect on bone resorption than evening administration. Bone turnover is thought to be subject to circadian variation, and the efficacy of osteoporosis treatments may be optimized by regulating the time of dosing. This study assessed whether evening administration of the cathepsin K inhibitor, ONO-5334, had a differential effect on the bone turnover marker, C-terminal telopeptide of type I collagen (CTX-I), compared with morning administration. This was a single-center, single blind crossover study. Fourteen healthy postmenopausal women were assigned to receive ONO-5334 150 mg once daily for 5 days in each period; they were randomized to receive either evening doses in the first period and morning doses in the second or vice versa. Serum and urinary levels of CTX-I were measured throughout the study. Both regimens showed similar patterns of reduction in serum and urinary CTX-I; however, CTX-I suppression was more consistently >60% over 24 h following morning administration. Morning administration led to 6% greater suppression of 24-h serum CTX-I area under the effect curve (AUE; 69 vs 63%; P morning administration, with mean trough concentrations for the morning and evening regimens at 9.4 and 4.0 ng/mL, respectively. There were no safety findings of concern. Morning dosing of ONO-5334 is more efficacious at reducing markers of bone turnover in healthy postmenopausal women than evening dosing. ClinicalTrials.gov: NCT01384188 , registered on June 27, 2011 EudraCT: 2008-006284-37.

  1. Association between polymorphism in the human cathepsin L (CTSL 1) promoter with hypertension in the uygur, kazak and han population in china

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, S.; Wang, Z.; Zhou, C.; Wang, D.W.

    2015-01-01

    To systemically investigate the association between the polymorphism (rs3118869) in cathepsin Lenzyme gene with hypertension in three ethnic groups (Han, Kazak and Uygur) in China. Study Design: Case-control study. Place and Duration of Study: Department of Cardiology, The First Affiliated Hospital, Shihezi Medical College, Shihezi University and Department of Internal Medicine and Genetic Diagnosis Center, Tongji Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, from January 2013 to May 2014. Methodology: This case-control study included 1224 patients (422 Uygur, 425 Kazak and 377 Han individuals) with hypertension and 967 healthy unrelated individuals (339 Uygur, 337 Kazak and 291 Han individuals) as controls. The participants came from three ethnic groups (Han, Kazak and Uygur) which were recruited from Xinjiang Province of China. The polymorphism (rs3118869) of the human cathepsin Lgene was genotyped using the TaqMan 5' nuclease assay. Binary logistic regression was built to determine the association of polymorphism with hypertension. Results: The genotype distribution of polymorphism was not significantly different in three ethnic groups. The rs3118869 polymorphism was significantly associated with Essential Hypertension (EH) in co-dominant model (A/C vs. C/C) in total people (OR = 0.697, 95% CI = 0.520 -0.932, p = 0.015), the same result was obtained in recessive model (C/C + A/C vs. A/A) in total people (OR = 0.689, 95% CI = 0.522 -0.910, p = 0.009). Similar finding of rs3118869 in recessive model (C/C + A/C vs. A/A) was also observed after adjusting the variable to the covariates age (OR = 0.629, 95% CI = 0.464 0853, p = 0.003). Conclusion: The study results indicate the A-allele of rs3118869 is a protective factor in hypertension. (author)

  2. Loss of the nuclear pool of ubiquitin ligase CHIP/STUB1 in breast cancer unleashes the MZF1-cathepsin pro-oncogenic program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Haitao; Mohapatra, Bhopal; Bielecki, Timothy A; Mushtaq, Insha; Mirza, Sameer; Jennings, Tameka A; Clubb, Robert J; An, Wei; Ahmed, Dena; El Ansari, Rokaya; Storck, Matthew D; Mishra, Nitish K; Guda, Chittibabu; Sheinin, Yuri M; Meza, Jane L; Raja, Srikumar; Rakha, Emad A; Band, Vimla; Band, Hamid

    2018-03-06

    CHIP/STUB1 ubiquitin ligase is a negative co-chaperone for HSP90/HSC70, and its expression is reduced or lost in several cancers, including breast cancer. Using an extensive and well-annotated breast cancer tissue collection, we identified the loss of nuclear but not cytoplasmic CHIP to predict more aggressive tumorigenesis and shorter patient survival, with loss of CHIP in two-thirds of ErbB2+ and triple-negative breast cancers and in one-third of ER+ breast cancers. Reduced CHIP expression was seen in breast cancer patient-derived xenograft tumors and in ErbB2+ and triple-negative breast cancer cell lines. Ectopic CHIP expression in ErbB2+ lines suppressed in vitro oncogenic traits and in vivo xenograft tumor growth. An unbiased screen for CHIP-regulated nuclear transcription factors identified many candidates whose DNA-binding activity was up- or down-regulated by CHIP. We characterized Myeloid Zinc Finger 1 (MZF1) as a CHIP target given its recently identified role as a positive regulator of cathepsin B/L (CTSB/L)-mediated tumor cell invasion downstream of ErbB2. We show that CHIP negatively regulates CTSB/L expression in ErbB2+ and other breast cancer cell lines. CTSB inhibition abrogates invasion and matrix degradation in vitro and halts ErbB2+ breast cancer cell line xenograft growth. We conclude that loss of CHIP remodels the cellular transcriptome to unleash critical pro-oncogenic pathways, such as the matrix-degrading enzymes of the cathepsin family, whose components can provide new therapeutic opportunities in breast and other cancers with loss of CHIP expression. Copyright ©2018, American Association for Cancer Research.

  3. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Modulates miR-106b-5p to Control Cathepsin S Expression Resulting in Higher Pathogen Survival and Poor T-Cell Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Pires

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The success of tuberculosis (TB bacillus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb, relies on the ability to survive in host cells and escape to immune surveillance and activation. We recently demonstrated that Mtb manipulation of host lysosomal cathepsins in macrophages leads to decreased enzymatic activity and pathogen survival. In addition, while searching for microRNAs (miRNAs involved in posttranscriptional gene regulation during mycobacteria infection of human macrophages, we found that selected miRNAs such as miR-106b-5p were specifically upregulated by pathogenic mycobacteria. Here, we show that miR-106b-5p is actively manipulated by Mtb to ensure its survival in macrophages. Using an in silico prediction approach, we identified miR-106b-5p with a potential binding to the 3′-untranslated region of cathepsin S (CtsS mRNA. We demonstrated by luminescence-based methods that miR-106b-5p indeed targets CTSS mRNA resulting in protein translation silencing. Moreover, miR-106b-5p gain-of-function experiments lead to a decreased CtsS expression favoring Mtb intracellular survival. By contrast, miR-106b-5p loss-of-function in infected cells was concomitant with increased CtsS expression, with significant intracellular killing of Mtb and T-cell activation. Modulation of miR-106b-5p did not impact necrosis, apoptosis or autophagy arguing that miR-106b-5p directly targeted CtsS expression as a way for Mtb to avoid exposure to degradative enzymes in the endocytic pathway. Altogether, our data suggest that manipulation of miR-106b-5p as a potential target for host-directed therapy for Mtb infection.

  4. The expression of E-cadherin and cathepsin-D in normal oral mucosa, oral epithelial dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma: A comparative analysis between immunohistochemistry and routine histopathology

    OpenAIRE

    Yogesh, TL; Narayan, TV; Shreedhar, Balasundari; Shashidara, R; Leekymohanty,

    2011-01-01

    Background : E-cadherin is known to be an invasion suppressor gene and cathepsin-D, a protease, which is an invasion promoter and plays a central role in solid tumors including oral cancer. Aims: To look for the expression pattern in normal buccal mucosa, dysplastic oral epithelium and oral squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) along with their correlation to individual atypical features, thereby providing an objective to the grading system in predicting the fate of affected epithelium. Materials and...

  5. Trichomonas vaginalis cathepsin D-like aspartic proteinase (Tv-CatD) is positively regulated by glucose and degrades human hemoglobin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mancilla-Olea, Maria Inocente; Ortega-López, Jaime; Figueroa-Angulo, Elisa E; Avila-González, Leticia; Cárdenas-Guerra, Rosa Elena; Miranda-Ozuna, Jesús F T; González-Robles, Arturo; Hernández-García, Mar Saraí; Sánchez-Ayala, Lizbeth; Arroyo, Rossana

    2018-04-01

    Trichomonas vaginalis genome encodes ∼440 proteases, six of which are aspartic proteases (APs). However, only one belongs to a clan AA (EC 3.4.23.5), family A1 (pepsin A), cathepsin D-like protease. This AP is encoded by an 1113-bp gene (tv-catd), which translates into a 370-aa residues zymogen of 40.7-kDa and a theoretical pI of 4.6, generating a ∼35 kDa active enzyme after maturation (Tv-CatD). The goal of this study was to identify and analyze the effect of glucose on the expression of Tv-CatD at the transcript and protein levels, subcellular localization, and proteolytic activity. The qRT-PCR assays showed a ∼2-fold increase in tv-catd mRNA under high-glucose (HG) conditions compared to glucose-restriction (GR) conditions. We amplified, cloned, and expressed the tv-catd gene, and purified the recombinant precursor enzyme (Tv-CatDr) to generate a polyclonal antibody (anti-Tv-CatDr). Western blot (WB) and immunolocalization assays showed that glucose increases the amount of Tv-CatD in different subcellular localizations and in in vitro secretions. Additionally, Tv-CatD proteolytic activity was detected in protease-resistant extracts (PREs) using a synthetic fluorogenic peptide specific for cathepsin D/E APs at different pHs and in the presence of AP inhibitors. In a two-dimensional (2-DE) WB analysis of a PRE from parasites grown under GR and HG conditions, an anti-Tv-CatDr antibody detected a 35-kDa protein spot at pI 5.0 identified as the mature Tv-CatD form by mass spectrometry that showed proteolytic activity in 2-DE zymograms copolymerized with hemoglobin under both glucose conditions. Thus, Tv-CatD could be involved in trichomonal hemolysis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Serum Levels of a Cathepsin-K Generated Periostin Fragment Predict Incident Low-Trauma Fractures in Postmenopausal Women Independently of BMD and FRAX.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnet, Nicolas; Biver, Emmanuel; Chevalley, Thierry; Rizzoli, René; Garnero, Patrick; Ferrari, Serge L

    2017-11-01

    Periostin is a matricellular protein involved in bone formation and bone matrix organization, but it is also produced by other tissues. Its circulating levels have been weakly associated with bone microstructure and prevalent fractures, possibly because periostin measured by the current commercial assays does not specifically reflect bone metabolism. In this context, we developed a new ELISA for a periostin fragment resulting from cathepsin K digestion (K-Postn). We hypothesized that circulating K-Postn levels could be associated with bone fragility. A total of 695 women (age 65.0 ± 1.5 years), enrolled in the Geneva Retirees Cohort (GERICO), were prospectively evaluated over 4.7 ± 1.9 years for the occurrence of low-trauma fractures. At baseline, we measured serum periostin, K-Postn, and bone turnover markers (BTMs), distal radius and tibia microstructure by HR-pQCT, hip and lumbar spine aBMD by DXA, and estimated fracture probability using the Fracture Risk Assessment Tool (FRAX). Sixty-six women sustained a low-trauma clinical fracture during the follow-up. Total periostin was not associated with fractures (HR [95% CI] per SD: 1.19 [0.89 to 1.59], p = 0.24). In contrast, K-Postn was significantly higher in the fracture versus nonfracture group (57.5 ± 36.6 ng/mL versus 42.5 ± 23.4 ng/mL, p K-Postn remained significantly associated with fracture risk. The performance of the fracture prediction models was improved by adding K-Postn to aBMD or FRAX (Harrell C index for fracture: 0.70 for aBMD + K-Post versus 0.58 for aBMD alone, p = 0.001; 0.73 for FRAX + K-Postn versus 0.65 for FRAX alone, p = 0.005). Circulating K-Postn predicts incident fractures independently of BMD, BTMs, and FRAX in postmenopausal women. Hence measurement of a periostin fragment resulting from in vivo cathepsin K digestion may help to identify subjects at high risk of fracture. © 2017 American Society for Bone and Mineral Research. © 2017

  7. Clinical significance of serum cathepsin B and cystatin C levels and their ratio in the prognosis of patients with esophageal cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Y

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available Yan Yan,1,* Kun Zhou,2,* Liping Wang,1 Feng Wang,1 Xinfeng Chen,3 Qingxia Fan1 1Department of Oncology, 2Department of Thoracic Surgery, 3Department of Biotherapy Center, The First Affiliated Hospital of Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Objective: The main purpose of this study was to analyze the serum cathepsin B (CTSB and cystatin C (CysC levels in patients with esophageal carcinoma and their correlation with the clinical indices and prognosis. Methods: The serum levels of CTSB and CysC from 56 patients with esophageal carcinoma and 30 healthy donors were determined preoperatively by using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The correlation between CTSB and CysC was evaluated by Spearman correlation coefficient test. Kaplan–Meier survival curves were plotted, while the survival rates were compared using the log-rank test. Univariate and multivariate analyses of prognostic factors for survival were performed using the Cox proportional hazard regression model with a 95% confidence interval. Results: CTSB (38.35±4.3 ng/mL and CysC (703.96±23.6 ng/mL levels were significantly higher in the sera of the patients than in controls. A significant correlation was observed between CTSB and CysC (r=0.754, P<0.001. The levels of CTSB and CysC/CTSB in the patient serum significantly correlated with the T status. CysC/CTSB ratio was also found to be significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis. None of the parameters were observed to be related to CysC, including age, gender, pathologic type, tumor differentiation and tumor invasion depth. Kaplan–Meier analysis showed that patients with higher levels of CysC/CTSB and negative lymph node metastasis experienced significantly longer overall survival time, whereas patients with higher CSTB levels tended to live shorter, although the difference was not statistically significant (P=0.081. Conclusion: Serum CTSB and Cys

  8. Cathepsin W expressed exclusively in CD8+ T cells and NK cells, is secreted during target cell killing but is not essential for cytotoxicity in human CTLs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoeckle, Christina; Gouttefangeas, Cécile; Hammer, Michael; Weber, Ekkehard; Melms, Arthur; Tolosa, Eva

    2009-02-01

    Cathepsin W (CatW, lymphopain) is a putative cysteine protease with restricted expression to natural killer (NK) cells and CD8(+) T cells and so far unknown function and properties. Here, we characterize in detail, the regulation of human CatW during T-cell development in response to different stimuli and its functional involvement in cytotoxic lymphocyte effector function. Western blots and real time polymerase chain reaction of sorted, unstimulated, and stimulated cell subsets (thymocytes, T cells, NK cells) and their culture supernatants were used to study regulation and expression of CatW. Primary CD8(+) T cells and short-term T-cell lines were transfected with small interfering RNA to study the involvement of CatW in effector function such as target cell killing and interferon-gamma production. Levels of CatW expression correlate closely with cytotoxic capacity both during development and in response to factors influencing cytotoxicity. Furthermore, CatW is secreted during specific target cell killing. However, knockdown of CatW expression by small interfering RNA neither influences target cell killing nor interferon-gamma production. Despite being expressed in the effector subset of CD8(+) and NK cells and of being released during target cell killing, our functional inhibition studies exclude an essential role of CatW in the process of cytotoxicity.

  9. Distribution of Cathepsin K in Late Stage of Tooth Germ Development and Its Function in Degrading Enamel Matrix Proteins in Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Tao; Liu, Fen; Wang, Wei-Guang; Jiang, Xin; Wen, Xuan; Hu, Kai-Jin; Xue, Yang

    2017-01-01

    Cathepsin K (CTSK) is a member of cysteine proteinase family, and is predominantly expressed in osteoclastsfor degradationof bone matrix proteins. Given the similarity in physical properties of bone and dental mineralized tissues, including enamel, dentin and cementum, CTSK is likely to take part in mineralization process during odontogenesis. On the other hand, patients with pycnodysostosis caused by mutations of the CTSK gene displayedmultipledental abnormalities, such as hypoplasia of the enamel, obliterated pulp chambers, hypercementosis and periodontal disease. Thereforeitis necessary to study the metabolic role of CTSK in tooth matrix proteins. In this study, BALB/c mice at embryonic day 18 (E18), post-natal day 1 (P1), P5, P10 and P20 were used (5 mice at each time point)for systematic analyses of CTSK expression in the late stage of tooth germ development. We found that CTSK was abundantly expressed in the ameloblasts during secretory and maturation stages (P5 and P10) by immunohistochemistry stainings.During dentinogenesis, the staining was also intense in the mineralization stage (P5 and P10),but not detectable in the early stage of dentin formation (P1) and after tooth eruption (P20).Furthermore, through zymography and digestion test in vitro, CTSK was proved to be capable of hydrolyzing Emdogain and also cleaving Amelogenininto multiple products. Our resultsshed lights on revealing new functions of CTSK and pathogenesis of pycnodysostosis in oral tissues.

  10. Comparative assessment of ELISAs using recombinant saposin-like protein 2 and recombinant cathepsin L-1 from Fasciola hepatica for the serodiagnosis of human Fasciolosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Gottstein

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Two recombinant Fasciola hepatica antigens, saposin-like protein-2 (recSAP2 and cathepsin L-1 (recCL1, were assessed individually and in combination in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA for the specific serodiagnosis of human fasciolosis in areas of low endemicity as encountered in Central Europe. Antibody detection was conducted using ProteinA/ProteinG (PAG conjugated to alkaline phosphatase. Test characteristics as well as agreement with results from an ELISA using excretory-secretory products (FhES from adult stage liver flukes was assessed by receiver operator characteristic (ROC analysis, specificity, sensitivity, Youdens J and overall accuracy. Cross-reactivity was assessed using three different groups of serum samples from healthy individuals (n=20, patients with other parasitic infections (n=87 and patients with malignancies (n=121. The best combined diagnostic results for recombinant antigens were obtained using the recSAP2-ELISA (87% sensitivity, 99% specificity and 97% overall accuracy employing the threshold (cut-off to discriminate between positive and negative reactions that maximized Youdens J. The findings showed that recSAP2-ELISA can be used for the routine serodiagnosis of chronic fasciolosis in clinical laboratories; the use of the PAG-conjugate offers the opportunity to employ, for example, rabbit hyperimmune serum for the standardization of positive controls.

  11. Meta-Analysis of Large-Scale Toxicogenomic Data Finds Neuronal Regeneration Related Protein and Cathepsin D to Be Novel Biomarkers of Drug-Induced Toxicity.

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    Hyosil Kim

    Full Text Available Undesirable toxicity is one of the main reasons for withdrawing drugs from the market or eliminating them as candidates in clinical trials. Although numerous studies have attempted to identify biomarkers capable of predicting pharmacotoxicity, few have attempted to discover robust biomarkers that are coherent across various species and experimental settings. To identify such biomarkers, we conducted meta-analyses of massive gene expression profiles for 6,567 in vivo rat samples and 453 compounds. After applying rigorous feature reduction procedures, our analyses identified 18 genes to be related with toxicity upon comparisons of untreated versus treated and innocuous versus toxic specimens of kidney, liver and heart tissue. We then independently validated these genes in human cell lines. In doing so, we found several of these genes to be coherently regulated in both in vivo rat specimens and in human cell lines. Specifically, mRNA expression of neuronal regeneration-related protein was robustly down-regulated in both liver and kidney cells, while mRNA expression of cathepsin D was commonly up-regulated in liver cells after exposure to toxic concentrations of chemical compounds. Use of these novel toxicity biomarkers may enhance the efficiency of screening for safe lead compounds in early-phase drug development prior to animal testing.

  12. Cytosol cathepsin-D content and proliferative activity of human breast cancer. The Comitato Italiano per il Controllo di Qualita del Laboratorio in Oncologia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradiso, A; Mangia, A; Correale, M; Abbate, I; Ferri, G; Piffanelli, A; Catozzi, L; Amadori, D; Riccobon, A; De Lena, M

    1992-01-01

    Mitogenic properties have been demonstrated in vitro for the lysosomal acidic protease cathepsin-D (cath-D). We investigated possible relationships between cath-D cytosol cell content and tumor proliferative activity in a series of 129 operable breast cancer patients. For total cytosol cath-D evaluation, a solid phase two-site immunoradiometric assay was utilized on tumor cell cytosol obtained for hormone receptor assay (DCC method). The percentage of S-phase cells was analyzed by 3H-thymidine autoradiographic assay. Median 3H-thymidine Labeling Index (3H-Tdr-LI) of the series was 2.7%; median cath-D content resulted 57 pmol/mg of protein cytosol and was significantly higher in node-positive with respect to the node-negative subgroup (p < 0.03). When classified in low, intermediate or high tumor cath-D content and slow or fast proliferative activity (cut-off: median values of the series), no significant agreement was found between the two variables. Statistical analysis, however, showed that a significant inverse correlation existed in node positive tumors between cath-D and 3H-Tdr-LI values which was even more evident in N-positive high estrogen receptor-positive (ER+) cases (coefficient of correlation = 0.6828; p = 0.0001). Cytosol cath-D content cannot be generally proposed as a direct marker of proliferative activity for operable breast cancer.

  13. Antibody recognition of cathepsin L1-derived peptides in Fasciola hepatica-infected and/or vaccinated cattle and identification of protective linear B-cell epitopes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garza-Cuartero, Laura; Geurden, Thomas; Mahan, Suman M; Hardham, John M; Dalton, John P; Mulcahy, Grace

    2018-02-08

    Fasciola hepatica infection causes important economic losses in livestock and food industries around the world. In the Republic of Ireland F. hepatica infection has an 76% prevalence in cattle. Due to the increase of anti-helminthic resistance, a vaccine-based approach to control of Fasciolosis is urgently needed. A recombinant version of the cysteine protease cathepsin L1 (rmFhCL1) from F. hepatica has been a vaccine candidate for many years. We have found that vaccination of cattle with this immunodominant antigen has provided protection against infection in some experimental trials, but not in others. Differential epitope recognition between animals could be a source of variable levels of vaccine protection. Therefore, we have characterised for first time linear B-cell epitopes recognised within the FhCL1 protein using sera from F. hepatica-infected and/or vaccinated cattle from two independent trials. Results showed that all F. hepatica infected animals recognised the region 19-31 of FhCL1, which is situated in the N-terminal part of the pro-peptide. Vaccinated animals that showed fluke burden reduction elicited antibodies that bound to the regions 120-137, 145-155, 161-171 of FhCL1, which were not recognised by non-protected animals. This data, together with the high production of specific IgG2 in animals showing vaccine efficacy, suggest important targets for vaccine development. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Distribution of Cathepsin K in Late Stage of Tooth Germ Development and Its Function in Degrading Enamel Matrix Proteins in Mouse.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Jiang

    Full Text Available Cathepsin K (CTSK is a member of cysteine proteinase family, and is predominantly expressed in osteoclastsfor degradationof bone matrix proteins. Given the similarity in physical properties of bone and dental mineralized tissues, including enamel, dentin and cementum, CTSK is likely to take part in mineralization process during odontogenesis. On the other hand, patients with pycnodysostosis caused by mutations of the CTSK gene displayedmultipledental abnormalities, such as hypoplasia of the enamel, obliterated pulp chambers, hypercementosis and periodontal disease. Thereforeitis necessary to study the metabolic role of CTSK in tooth matrix proteins. In this study, BALB/c mice at embryonic day 18 (E18, post-natal day 1 (P1, P5, P10 and P20 were used (5 mice at each time pointfor systematic analyses of CTSK expression in the late stage of tooth germ development. We found that CTSK was abundantly expressed in the ameloblasts during secretory and maturation stages (P5 and P10 by immunohistochemistry stainings.During dentinogenesis, the staining was also intense in the mineralization stage (P5 and P10,but not detectable in the early stage of dentin formation (P1 and after tooth eruption (P20.Furthermore, through zymography and digestion test in vitro, CTSK was proved to be capable of hydrolyzing Emdogain and also cleaving Amelogenininto multiple products. Our resultsshed lights on revealing new functions of CTSK and pathogenesis of pycnodysostosis in oral tissues.

  15. Molecular characterization of cathepsin L cDNA and its expression during oogenesis and embryogenesis in the oriental river prawn Macrobrachium nipponense (Palaemonidae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, W; Chen, L; Zhang, F; Wu, P; Li, E; Qin, J

    2013-10-30

    We identified the cDNA sequence of cathepsin L (CatL) in Macrobrachium nipponense, designated as MnCatL, for the first time. The MnCatL cDNA, isolated from the ovary, was 1710 bp in length, containing a 31-bp 5'-untranslated region, a 650-bp 3'-untranslated region, and an open reading frame of 1029 bp, encoding a 342-amino acid polypeptide with a predicted molecular mass of 37.7 kDa. The polypeptide is composed of an 18-amino acid signal peptide, a 106-amino acid propeptide and a 218-amino acid mature peptide. MnCatL mRNA was detected in all tissues that we examined, including the thoracic ganglia, heart, muscle, intestine, hemocytes, ovary, testis, gills, and hepatopancreas. MnCatL expression reached a maximum value in both hepatopancreas and ovaries at the later stages of vitellogenesis, suggesting that MnCatL is involved in ovarian maturation of the oriental river prawn. During embryogenesis, MnCatL expression decreased as the embryo developed. The expression of MnCatL in the ovary and embryo suggest that MnCatL plays an important role in the uptake of vitellogenin and yolk protein, which are deposited in the oocyte for ovary maturation and embryo development, during oogenesis and embryogenesis of M. nipponense.

  16. Changes in Cathepsin D and Beclin-1 mRNA and protein expression by the excitotoxin quinolinic acid in human astrocytes and neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braidy, Nady; Brew, Bruce J; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C; Chung, Roger; Sachdev, Perminder; Guillemin, Gilles J

    2014-09-01

    Quinolinic acid (QUIN) is an excitotoxin that has been implicated in the pathogenesis of several neurodegenerative diseases including Alzheimer's disease (AD). While QUIN has been shown to induce neuronal and astrocytic apoptosis as well as excitotoxic cell death, other mechanisms such as autophagy remain unexplored. We investigated the role of Cathepsin D (CatD) and Beclin-1 (Bc1) in QUIN-treated primary human astrocytes and neurons. We demonstrated that the expression patterns of CatD, a lysosomal aspartic protease associated with autophagy, are increased at 24 h after QUIN treatment. However, unlike CatD, the expression patterns of Bc1, a tumour suppressor protein, are significantly reduced at 24 h after QUIN treatment in both brain cell types. Furthermore, we showed that the NMDA ion channel blockers, MK801, can attenuate QUIN-induced changes CatD and Bc1 expression in both astrocytes and neurons. Taken together, these results suggest that induction of deficits in CatD and Bc1 is a significant mechanism for QUIN toxicity in glial and neuronal cells. Maintenance of autophagy may play a crucial role in neuroprotection in the setting of AD.

  17. Cathepsin D inhibitors as potential therapeutics for breast cancer treatment: Molecular docking and bioevaluation against triple-negative and triple-positive breast cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anantaraju, Hasitha Shilpa; Battu, Madhu Babu; Viswanadha, Srikant; Sriram, Dharmarajan; Yogeeswari, Perumal

    2016-05-01

    The main aim of this study was to discover small molecule inhibitors against Cathepsin D (CatD) (EC.3.4.23.5), a clinically proven prognostic marker for breast cancer, and to explore the mechanisms by which CatD could be a useful therapeutic target for triple-positive and triple-negative breast cancers (TPBC & TNBC). The crystal structure of CatD at 2.5 Å resolution (PDB: 1LYB), which was complexed with Pepstatin A, was selected for computer-aided molecular modeling. The methods used in our study were pharmacophore modeling and molecular docking. Virtual screening was performed to identify small molecules from an in-house database and a large commercial chemical library. Cytotoxicity studies were performed on human normal cell line HEK293T and growth inhibition studies on breast adenocarcinoma cell lines, namely MCF-7, MDA-MB-231, SK-BR-3, and MDA-MB-468. Furthermore, RT-PCR analysis, in vitro enzyme assay, and cell cycle analysis ascertained the validity of the selected molecules. A set of 28 molecules was subjected to an in vitro fluorescence-based inhibitory activity assay, and among them six molecules exhibited >50 % inhibition at 25μM. These molecules also exhibited good growth inhibition against TPBC and TNBC cancer types. Among them, molecules 1 and 17 showed single-digit micromolar GI50 values against MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines.

  18. Comparative Assessment of ELISAs Using Recombinant Saposin-Like Protein 2 and recombinant Cathepsin L-1 from Fasciola hepatica for the Serodiagnosis of Human Fasciolosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gottstein, Bruno; Schneeberger, Marianne; Boubaker, Ghalia; Merkle, Bernadette; Huber, Cristina; Spiliotis, Markus; Müller, Norbert; Garate, Teresa; Doherr, Marcus G.

    2014-01-01

    Two recombinant Fasciola hepatica antigens, saposin-like protein-2 (recSAP2) and cathepsin L-1 (recCL1), were assessed individually and in combination in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA) for the specific serodiagnosis of human fasciolosis in areas of low endemicity as encountered in Central Europe. Antibody detection was conducted using ProteinA/ProteinG (PAG) conjugated to alkaline phosphatase. Test characteristics as well as agreement with results from an ELISA using excretory–secretory products (FhES) from adult stage liver flukes was assessed by receiver operator characteristic (ROC) analysis, specificity, sensitivity, Youdens J and overall accuracy. Cross-reactivity was assessed using three different groups of serum samples from healthy individuals (n = 20), patients with other parasitic infections (n = 87) and patients with malignancies (n = 121). The best combined diagnostic results for recombinant antigens were obtained using the recSAP2-ELISA (87% sensitivity, 99% specificity and 97% overall accuracy) employing the threshold (cut-off) to discriminate between positive and negative reactions that maximized Youdens J. The findings showed that recSAP2-ELISA can be used for the routine serodiagnosis of chronic fasciolosis in clinical laboratories; the use of the PAG-conjugate offers the opportunity to employ, for example, rabbit hyperimmune serum for the standardization of positive controls. PMID:24922050

  19. Characterization of the Entire Cystatin Gene Family in Barley and Their Target Cathepsin L-Like Cysteine-Proteases, Partners in the Hordein Mobilization during Seed Germination1[W

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez, Manuel; Cambra, Ines; Carrillo, Laura; Diaz-Mendoza, Mercedes; Diaz, Isabel

    2009-01-01

    Plant cystatins are inhibitors of cysteine-proteases of the papain C1A and legumain C13 families. Cystatin data from multiple plant species have suggested that these inhibitors act as defense proteins against pests and pathogens and as regulators of protein turnover. In this study, we characterize the entire cystatin gene family from barley (Hordeum vulgare), which contain 13 nonredundant genes, and identify and characterize their target enzymes, the barley cathepsin L-like proteases. Cystatins and proteases were expressed and purified from Escherichia coli cultures. Each cystatin was found to have different inhibitory capability against barley cysteine-proteases in in vitro inhibitory assays using specific substrates. Real-time reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction revealed that inhibitors and enzymes present a wide variation in their messenger RNA expression patterns. Their transcripts were mainly detected in developing and germinating seeds, and some of them were also expressed in leaves and roots. Subcellular localization of cystatins and cathepsin L-like proteases fused to green fluorescent protein demonstrated the presence of both protein families throughout the endoplasmic reticulum and the Golgi complex. Proteases and cystatins not only colocalized but also interacted in vivo in the plant cell, as revealed by bimolecular fluorescence complementation. The functional relationship between cystatins and cathepsin L-like proteases was inferred from their common implication as counterparts of mobilization of storage proteins upon barley seed germination. The opposite pattern of transcription expression in gibberellin-treated aleurones presented by inhibitors and enzymes allowed proteases to specifically degrade B, C, and D hordeins stored in the endosperm of barley seeds. PMID:19759340

  20. A major cathepsin B protease from the liver fluke Fasciola hepatica has atypical active site features and a potential role in the digestive tract of newly excysted juvenile parasites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beckham, Simone A.; Piedrafita, David; Phillips, Carolyn I.; Samarawickrema, Nirma; Law, Ruby H.P.; Smooker, Peter M.; Quinsey, Noelene S.; Irving, James A.; Greenwood, Deanne; Verhelst, Steven H. L.; Bogyo, Matthew; Turk, Boris; Coetzer, Theresa H.; Wijeyewickrema, Lakshmi C.; Spithill, Terry W.; Pike, Robert N.

    2012-01-01

    The newly excysted juvenile (NEJ) stage of the Fasciola hepatica lifecycle occurs just prior to invasion into the wall of the gut of the host, rendering it an important target for drug development. The cathepsin B enzymes from NEJ flukes have recently been demonstrated to be crucial to invasion and migration by the parasite. Here we characterize one of the cathepsin B enzymes (recombinant FhcatB1) from NEJ flukes. FhcatB1 has biochemical properties distinct from mammalian cathepsin B enzymes, with an atypical preference for Ile over Leu or Arg residues at the P2 substrate position and an inability to act as an exopeptidase. FhcatB1 was active across a broad pH range (optimal activity at pH 5.5–7.0) and resistant to inhibition by cystatin family inhibitors from sheep and humans, suggesting that this enzyme would be able to function in extracellular environments in its mammalian hosts. It appears, however, that the FhcatB1 protease functions largely as a digestive enzyme in the gut of the parasite, due to the localization of a specific, fluorescently labeled inhibitor with an Ile at the P2 position. Molecular modelling and dynamics were used to predict the basis for the unusual substrate specificity: a P2 Ile residue positions the substrate optimally for interaction with catalytic residues of the enzyme, and the enzyme lacks an occluding loop His residue crucial for exopeptidase activity. The unique features of the enzyme, particularly with regard to its specificity and likely importance to a vital stage of the parasite’s life cycle, make it an excellent target for therapeutic inhibitors or vaccination. PMID:19401154

  1. Protection and antibody isotype responses against Fasciola hepatica with specific antibody to pIII-displayed peptide mimotopes of cathepsin L1 in sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Villa-Mancera, Abel; Méndez-Mendoza, Maximino

    2012-10-01

    Fluke burdens, liver fluke size and biomass, fecal eggs counts, serum levels of hepatic enzymes and immune response were assessed in sheep immunized with peptide mimotopes of cathepsin L1 and challenged with Fasciola hepatica metacercariae. Twenty sheep were randomly allocated to four groups of five animals each; groups 1 and 2 were immunized at weeks 0 and 2 with mimotopes YVYRWVEAECVA and FSPAYLRDAALK, respectively; group 3 was immunized with wild-type M13KE phage and the control group received phosphate-buffered saline (PBS). All groups were challenged with 300 metacercariae at week 6 and slaughtered 16 weeks later. Groups 1 and 2 showed a reduction in fluke burden of 51.7% and 35.9%, respectively, when compared to the control group, but only the former was significant at the 5% level. Vaccinated animals showed a significant reduction in fluke length and width, wet weights and egg output. A significant diminution in the total biomass of parasites recovered was also observed in group 1. Levels of anti-phage total IgG increased rapidly within 2 weeks of the first immunization and were always significantly higher in groups 1 and 2 than in the infected control group. The fluke burden in group 1 was significantly correlated with IgG1 and total IgG. The vaccinated sheep with phage clones produced significantly high titres of IgG1 and IgG2 antibodies indicating a mixed Th1/Th2 response. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Towards Delineating Functions within the Fasciola Secreted Cathepsin L Protease Family by Integrating In Vivo Based Sub-Proteomics and Phylogenetics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morphew, Russell M.; Wright, Hazel A.; LaCourse, E. James; Porter, Joanne; Barrett, John; Woods, Debra J.; Brophy, Peter M.

    2011-01-01

    Background Fasciola hepatica, along with Fasciola gigantica, is the causative agent of fasciolosis, a foodborne zoonotic disease affecting grazing animals and humans worldwide. Pathology is directly related to the release of parasite proteins that facilitate establishment within the host. The dominant components of these excretory-secretory (ES) products are also the most promising vaccine candidates, the cathepsin L (Cat L) protease family. Methodology/Principal Findings The sub-proteome of Cat L proteases from adult F. hepatica ES products derived from in vitro culture and in vivo from ovine host bile were compared by 2-DE. The individual Cat L proteases were identified by tandem mass spectrometry with the support of an in-house translated liver fluke EST database. The study reveals plasticity within the CL1 clade of Cat L proteases; highlighted by the identification of a novel isoform and CL1 sub-clade, resulting in a new Cat L phylogenetic analysis including representatives from other adult Cat L phylogenetic clades. Additionally, for the first time, mass spectrometry was shown to be sufficiently sensitive to reveal single amino acid polymorphisms in a resolved 2-DE protein spot derived from pooled population samples. Conclusions/Significance We have investigated the sub-proteome at the population level of a vaccine target family using the Cat L proteases from F. hepatica as a case study. We have confirmed that F. hepatica exhibits more plasticity in the expression of the secreted CL1 clade of Cat L proteases at the protein level than previously realised. We recommend that superfamily based vaccine discovery programmes should screen parasite populations from different host populations and, if required, different host species via sub-proteomic assay in order to confirm the relative expression at the protein level prior to the vaccine development phase. PMID:21245911

  3. Towards delineating functions within the fasciola secreted cathepsin l protease family by integrating in vivo based sub-proteomics and phylogenetics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Russell M Morphew

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available fasciola hepatica, along with Fasciola gigantica, is the causative agent of fasciolosis, a foodborne zoonotic disease affecting grazing animals and humans worldwide. Pathology is directly related to the release of parasite proteins that facilitate establishment within the host. The dominant components of these excretory-secretory (ES products are also the most promising vaccine candidates, the cathepsin L (Cat L protease family.the sub-proteome of Cat L proteases from adult F. hepatica ES products derived from in vitro culture and in vivo from ovine host bile were compared by 2-DE. The individual Cat L proteases were identified by tandem mass spectrometry with the support of an in-house translated liver fluke EST database. The study reveals plasticity within the CL1 clade of Cat L proteases; highlighted by the identification of a novel isoform and CL1 sub-clade, resulting in a new Cat L phylogenetic analysis including representatives from other adult Cat L phylogenetic clades. Additionally, for the first time, mass spectrometry was shown to be sufficiently sensitive to reveal single amino acid polymorphisms in a resolved 2-DE protein spot derived from pooled population samples.we have investigated the sub-proteome at the population level of a vaccine target family using the Cat L proteases from F. hepatica as a case study. We have confirmed that F. hepatica exhibits more plasticity in the expression of the secreted CL1 clade of Cat L proteases at the protein level than previously realised. We recommend that superfamily based vaccine discovery programmes should screen parasite populations from different host populations and, if required, different host species via sub-proteomic assay in order to confirm the relative expression at the protein level prior to the vaccine development phase.

  4. Cathepsin D Specifically Cleaves the Chemokines Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-1α, Macrophage Inflammatory Protein-1β, and SLC That Are Expressed in Human Breast Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Marlene; Clark-Lewis, Ian; Buri, Caroline; Langen, Hanno; Lis, Maddalena; Mazzucchelli, Luca

    2003-01-01

    Cathepsin D (Cath-D) expression in human primary breast cancer has been associated with a poor prognosis. In search of a better understanding of the Cath-D substrates possibly involved in cancer invasiveness and metastasis, we investigated the potential interactions between this protease and chemokines. Here we report that purified Cath-D, as well as culture supernatants from the human breast carcinoma cell lines MCF-7 and T47D, selectively degrade macrophage inflammatory protein (MIP)-1α (CCL3), MIP-1β (CCL4), and SLC (CCL21). Proteolysis was totally blocked by the protease inhibitor pepstatin A, and specificity of Cath-D cleavage was demonstrated using a large chemokine panel. Whereas MIP-1α and MIP-1β degradation was rapid and complete, cleavage of SLC was slow and not complete. Mass spectrometry analysis showed that Cath-D cleaves the Leu58 to Trp59 bond of SLC producing two functionally inactive fragments. Analysis of Cath-D proteolysis of a series of monocyte chemoattractant protein-3/MIP-1β hybrids indicated that processing of MIP-1β might start by cleaving off amino acids located in the C-terminal domain. In situ hybridization studies revealed MIP-1α, MIP-1β, and Cath-D gene expression mainly in the stromal compartment of breast cancers whereas SLC transcripts were found in endothelial cells of capillaries and venules within the neoplastic tissues. Cath-D production in the breast carcinoma cell lines MCF-7 and T47D, as assessed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay of culture supernatants and cell lysates, was not affected by stimulation with chemokines such as interleukin-8 (CXCL8), SDF-1 (CXCL12), and SLC. These data suggest that inactivation of chemokines by Cath-D possibly influences regulatory mechanisms in the tumoral extracellular microenvironment that in turn may affect the generation of the antitumoral immune response, the migration of cancer cells, or both processes. PMID:12651610

  5. A dot-ELISA using a partially purified cathepsin-L-like protein fraction from Taenia solium cysticerci, for the diagnosis of human neurocysticercosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piña, R; Gutiérrez, A H; Gilman, R H; Rueda, D; Sifuentes, C; Flores, M; Sheen, P; Rodriguez, S; García, H H; Zimic, M

    2011-06-01

    Human neurocysticercosis (NCC), caused by the cestode Taenia solium, is responsible for a significant amount of neurological morbidity and epilepsy in developing countries. The disease remains highly endemic in many areas, despite several efforts and interventions to control it. A simple, cheap and fast diagnostic assay that is suitable for use in field conditions is highly desired. In immunodiagnostics based on western immunoblots or standard ELISA, a cathepsin-L-like protein purified from the cysticercus fluid has previously performed well as an antigen. In a recent study in Peru, the same 53/25-kDa antigen was therefore used in the development of a dot-ELISA that could be employed for mass screenings under field conditions. The assay was standardized and tested not only against sera from a large group of NCC cases but also against sera from patients with other common parasitic infections, so that sensitivity and specificity could be assessed. For NCC, the assay gave better sensitivity in the detection of individuals with extraparenchymal cysts (94·4%-100%) or multiple parenchymal cysts (74·6%-80·0%) than in the detection of individuals with single parenchymal cysts (29·4%-45·1%). The assay also showed a high specificity for NCC (99·0%-100%), with a very low level of cross-reactivity with other parasitic infections. The dot-ELISA developed in this study is a highly specific, simple, cheap and rapid test for NCC that could be used under field conditions, even in the low-resource settings that are common in developing countries.

  6. Elastogenesis in cultured dermal fibroblasts from patients with lysosomal beta-galactosidase, protective protein/cathepsin A and neuraminidase-1 deficiencies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tatano, Yutaka; Takeuchi, Naohiro; Kuwahara, Jun; Sakuraba, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Tsutomu; Takada, Goro; Itoh, Kohji

    2006-02-01

    The human GLB1 gene encodes a lysosomal beta-galactosidase (beta-Gal) and an elastin-binding protein (EBP). Defect of the EBP as a chaperon for tropoelastin and a component of receptor complex among neuraminidase-1 (NEU1) and protective protein/cathepsin A (PPCA) is suggested responsible for impaired elastogenesis in autosomal recessive beta-Gal, PPCA and NEU1 deficiencies. The purpose of this study is to determine effects of GLB1, PPCA and NEU1 gene mutations on elastogenesis in skin fibroblasts. Elastic fiber formation and the EBP mRNA expression were examined by immunofluorescence with an anti-tropoelastin antibody and RT-PCR selective for EBP in skin fibroblasts with these lysosomal enzyme deficiencies. Apparently normal elastogenesis and EBP mRNA expression were observed for fibroblasts from Morquio B disease cases with the GLB1 gene alleles (W273L/W273L, W273L/R482H and W273L/W509C substitutions, respectively), a galactosialidosis case with the PPCA allele (IVS7+3A/IVS7+3A) and a sialidosis case with the NEU1 allele (V217M/G243R) as well as normal subject. In this study, the W273L substitution in the EBP could impossibly cause the proposed defect of elastogenesis, and the typical PPCA splicing mutation and the V217M/G243R substitutions in the NEU1 might hardly have effects on elastic fiber formation in the dermal fibroblasts.

  7. Role of Interactions between Autographa californica Multiple Nucleopolyhedrovirus Procathepsin and Chitinase Chitin-Binding or Active-Site Domains in Viral Cathepsin Processing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgson, Jeffrey J.; Arif, Basil M.

    2013-01-01

    The binding of Autographa californica multiple nucleopolyhedrovirus chitinase (CHIA) to viral cathepsin protease progenitor (proV-CATH) governs cellular/endoplasmic reticulum (ER) coretention of CHIA and proV-CATH, thus coordinating simultaneous cellular release of both host tissue-degrading enzymes upon host cell death. CHIA is a proposed proV-CATH folding chaperone because insertional inactivation of chiA causes production of proV-CATH aggregates that are incompetent for proteolytic maturation into active V-CATH enzyme. We wanted to determine whether the N-terminal chitin-binding domain (CBD, 149 residues) and C-terminal CHIA active-site domain (ASD, 402 residues) of CHIA bind to proV-CATH independently of one another and whether either domain is dispensable for CHIA's putative proV-CATH folding chaperone activity. We demonstrate that N-terminally green fluorescent protein (GFP)-fused CHIA, ASD, and CBD each colocalize with proV-CATH-RFP in ER-like patterns and that both ASD and CBD independently associate with proV-CATH in vivo using bimolecular fluorescence complementation (BiFC) and in vitro using reciprocal nickel-histidine pulldown assays. Altogether, the data from colocalization, BiFC, and reciprocal copurification analyses suggest specific and independent interactions between proV-CATH and both domains of CHIA. These data also demonstrate that either CHIA domain is dispensable for normal proV-CATH processing. Furthermore, in contrast to prior evidence suggesting that a lack of chiA expression causes proV-CATH to become aggregated, insoluble, and unable to mature into V-CATH, a chiA deletion bacmid virus we engineered to express just v-cath produced soluble proV-CATH that was prematurely secreted from cells and proteolytically matured into active V-CATH enzyme. PMID:23302896

  8. Protective protein/cathepsin A down-regulates osteoclastogenesis by associating with and degrading NF-kappaB p50/p65.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuhara, Masaaki; Sato, Takuya; Hada, Naoto; Hakeda, Yoshiyuki

    2009-01-01

    Disruption of the cooperative function balance between osteoblasts and osteoclasts causes various bone disorders, some of which are attributed to abnormal osteoclast recruitment. Osteoclast differentiation is dependent on the receptor activator of nuclear factor (NF)-kappaB ligand (RANKL) as well as the macrophage colony-stimulating factor. The osteoclast formation induced by cytokines requires activation of NF-kappaB, AP-1 and nuclear factor of activated T cells c1. However, osteoclasts are not the only cell types that express these transcription factors, suggesting that some unknown molecules specific for osteoclasts may associate with the transcription factors. Here, we explored the possibility of molecules binding directly to NF-kappaB and cloned protective protein/cathepsin A (PPCA) by yeast two-hybrid screening using a cDNA library of osteoclast precursors. Forced expression of PPCA with p50/p65 in HEK293 cells decreased both the level of p50/p65 proteins and the transcriptional activity. Abundant PPCA was detected in the lysosomes of the transfected HEK293 cells, but a small amount of this enzyme was also present in the cytosolic fraction. In addition, over-expression of PPCA caused the disappearance of p50/p65 in both the lysosomal and cytosolic fractions. PPCA was expressed throughout osteoclastogenesis, and the expression was slightly up-regulated by RANKL signaling. Knockdown of PPCA in osteoclast precursors with PPCA siRNA stimulated binding of nuclear proteins to oligonucleotides containing an NF-kappaB binding motif and increased osteoclastogenesis. Our present results indicate a novel role for PPCA in osteoclastogenesis via down-regulation of NF-kappaB activity and suggest a new function for PPCA as an NF-kappaB-degrading enzyme in addition to its known multifunctional properties.

  9. Peri-implant crevicular fluid levels of cathepsin-K, RANKL, and OPG around standard, short, and mini dental implants after prosthodontic loading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alan, Raif; Marakoğlu, İsmail; Haliloğlu, Seyfullah

    2015-10-01

    Despite the high success rates of endosseous dental implants, their placement is restricted according to the height and volume of bone available. The use of short or mini dental implants could be one way to overcome this limitation. Thus, this study aimed to compare standard, short, and mini dental implants with regard to associated clinical parameters and peri-implant crevicular fluid (PICF) levels of cathepsin -K (CTSK), RANK ligand (RANKL), and osteoprotegerin (OPG), after prosthodontic loading. A total of 78 non-submerged implants (Euroteknika, Aesthetica(+2), Sallanches, France) were installed in 30 subjects (13 male, 17 female; range, 26-62 years) who visited the clinic of the Periodontology Department, Faculty of Dentistry, Selcuk University. Sampling and measurements were performed on the loading date (baseline) and 2, 14, and 90 days after loading. Assessment of the peri-implant status for the implant sites was performed using the pocket probing depth (PPD), modified plaque index, modified gingival index, modified sulcular bleeding index, and radiographic signs of bone loss. PICF samples collected from each implant were evaluated for CTSK, RANKL, and OPG levels using the ELISA method. Keratinized tissue and marginal bone loss (MBL) were also noted. Clinical parameters statistically significantly increased in each group but did not show statistical differences between groups without PPD. Although implant groups showed a higher MBL in the upper jaw, only the standard dental group demonstrated a statistically significant difference. At 90 days, the OPG: sRANKL ratio and total amounts of CTSK for each group did not differ from baseline. Within the limitations of this study, both short and mini dental implants were achieving the same outcomes as the standard dental implants in the early period after loading.

  10. Sensitivity to anti-Fas is independent of increased cathepsin D activity and adrenodoxin reductase expression occurring in NOS-3 overexpressing HepG2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Clara I; Ferrín, Gustavo; Aguilar-Melero, Patricia; González-Rubio, Sandra; Rodríguez-Perálvarez, Manuel; Sánchez-Aragó, María; Chicano-Gálvez, Eduardo; Cuezva, José M; Montero-Álvarez, José L; Muntané, Jordi; de la Mata, Manuel

    2015-05-01

    Stable overexpression of endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS-3) in HepG2 cells (4TO-NOS) leads to increased nitro-oxidative stress and upregulation of the cell death mediators p53 and Fas. Thus, NOS-3 overexpression has been suggested as a useful antiproliferative mechanism in hepatocarcinoma cells. We aimed to identify the underlying mechanism of cell death induced by NOS-3 overexpression at basal conditions and with anti-Fas treatment. The intracellular localization of NOS-3, the nitro-oxidative stress and the mitochondrial activity were analysed. In addition, the protein expression profile in 4TO-NOS was screened for differentially expressed proteins potentially involved in the induction of apoptosis. NOS-3 localization in the mitochondrial outer membrane was not associated with changes in the respiratory cellular capacity, but was related to the mitochondrial biogenesis increase and with a higher protein expression of mitochondrial complex IV. Nitro-oxidative stress and cell death in NOS-3 overexpressing cells occurred with the expression increase of pro-apoptotic genes and a higher expression/activity of the enzymes adrenodoxin reductase mitochondrial (AR) and cathepsin D (CatD). CatD overexpression in 4TO-NOS was related to the apoptosis induction independently of its catalytic activity. In addition, CatD activity inhibition by pepstatin A was not effective in blocking apoptosis induced by anti-Fas. In summary, NOS-3 overexpression resulted in an increased sensitivity to anti-Fas induced cell death, independently of AR expression and CatD activity. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. Cathepsin D is present in human eccrine sweat and involved in the postsecretory processing of the antimicrobial peptide DCD-1L.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baechle, Daniel; Flad, Thomas; Cansier, Alexander; Steffen, Heiko; Schittek, Birgit; Tolson, Jonathan; Herrmann, Timo; Dihazi, Hassan; Beck, Alexander; Mueller, Gerhard A; Mueller, Margret; Stevanovic, Stefan; Garbe, Claus; Mueller, Claudia A; Kalbacher, Hubert

    2006-03-03

    The protein pattern of healthy human eccrine sweat was investigated and 10 major proteins were detected from which apolipoprotein D, lipophilin B, and cathepsin D (CatD) were identified for the first time in human eccrine sweat. We focused our studies on the function of the aspartate protease CatD in sweat. In vitro digestion experiments using a specific fluorescent CatD substrate showed that CatD is enzymatically active in human sweat. To identify potential substrates of CatD in human eccrine sweat LL-37 and DCD-1L, two antimicrobial peptides present in sweat, were digested in vitro with purified CatD. LL-37 was not significantly digested by CatD, whereas DCD-1L was cleaved between Leu(44) and Asp(45) and between Leu(29) and Glu(30) almost completely. The DCD-1L-derived peptides generated in vitro by CatD were also found in vivo in human sweat as determined by surface-enhanced laser desorption/ionization (SELDI) mass spectrometry. Furthermore, besides the CatD-processed peptides we identified additionally DCD-1L-derived peptides that are generated upon cleavage with a 1,10-phenanthroline-sensitive carboxypeptidase and an endoprotease. Taken together, proteolytic processing generates 12 DCD-1L-derived peptides. To elucidate the functional significance of postsecretory processing the antimicrobial activity of three CatD-processed DCD-1L peptides was tested. Whereas two of these peptides showed no activity against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria, one DCD-1L-derived peptide showed an even higher activity against Escherichia coli than DCD-1L. Functional analysis indicated that proteolytic processing of DCD-1L by CatD in human sweat modulates the innate immune defense of human skin.

  12. 2-Chlorovinyl tellurium dihalides, (p-tol)Te[C(H)=C(Cl)Ph]X{sub 2} for X = Cl, Br and I: variable coordination environments, supramolecular structures and docking studies in cathepsin B

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caracelli, Ignez, E-mail: ignez@ufscar.b [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Fisica; Zukerman-Schpector, Julio; Maganhi, Stella H., E-mail: julio@power.ufscar.b [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica. Lab. de Cristalografia, Estereodinamica e Modelagem Molecular; Stefani, Helio A. [Universidade de Sao Paulo (USP), SP (Brazil). Faculdade de Ciencias Farmaceuticas. Dept. de Farmacia; Guadagnin, Rafael [Universidade Federal de Sao Paulo (Unifesp/EPM), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil). Dept. de Quimica; Tiekink, Edward R.T., E-mail: edward.tiekink@gmail.co [University of Malaya, Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia). Dept. of Chemistry

    2010-07-01

    Crystallography shows that the Te atom in each of (p-tol)Te[C(H)=C(Cl)Ph]X{sub 2}, for X = Cl (1), Br (2) and I (3), is within a distorted {Psi}-pentagonal bipyramidal geometry. An E configuration for the vinyl group in (1) precludes the formation of an intramolecular Te...Cl interaction so that an intramolecular Te{pi} interaction is found instead. The coordination environment features a linear Cl-Te-Cl arrangement with the pentagonal plane defined by the two C atoms of the organic substituents, an intermolecular TeCl contact, a Te{pi} interaction and a stereochemically active lone pair of electrons. In the X = Br (2) and I (3) structures, similar coordination geometries are found but the Te{pi} contact is replaced by an intramolecular TeCl contact owing to the adoption of a Z configuration about the vinyl bond. The differences in structure are readily explained in terms of electronic effects. Docking studies of cathepsin B with (1')-(3'), i.e. 1-3 less one Te-bound halide, show efficient binding through the agency of covalent Te-S{sub Cys29} bonds with stabilization afforded by a combination of N-H{pi}, C-H{pi} and Cl{sub vinyl} H interactions. These results comparable favorably with known inhibitors of cathepsin B suggesting the title compounds have potential biological activity. (author)

  13. Glycopeptide Antibiotics Potently Inhibit Cathepsin L in the Late Endosome/Lysosome and Block the Entry of Ebola Virus, Middle East Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (MERS-CoV), and Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome Coronavirus (SARS-CoV)*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Nan; Pan, Ting; Zhang, Junsong; Li, Qianwen; Zhang, Xue; Bai, Chuan; Huang, Feng; Peng, Tao; Zhang, Jianhua; Liu, Chao; Tao, Liang; Zhang, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Ebola virus infection can cause severe hemorrhagic fever with a high mortality in humans. The outbreaks of Ebola viruses in 2014 represented the most serious Ebola epidemics in history and greatly threatened public health worldwide. The development of additional effective anti-Ebola therapeutic agents is therefore quite urgent. In this study, via high throughput screening of Food and Drug Administration-approved drugs, we identified that teicoplanin, a glycopeptide antibiotic, potently prevents the entry of Ebola envelope pseudotyped viruses into the cytoplasm. Furthermore, teicoplanin also has an inhibitory effect on transcription- and replication-competent virus-like particles, with an IC50 as low as 330 nm. Comparative analysis further demonstrated that teicoplanin is able to block the entry of Middle East respiratory syndrome (MERS) and severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS) envelope pseudotyped viruses as well. Teicoplanin derivatives such as dalbavancin, oritavancin, and telavancin can also inhibit the entry of Ebola, MERS, and SARS viruses. Mechanistic studies showed that teicoplanin blocks Ebola virus entry by specifically inhibiting the activity of cathepsin L, opening a novel avenue for the development of additional glycopeptides as potential inhibitors of cathepsin L-dependent viruses. Notably, given that teicoplanin has routinely been used in the clinic with low toxicity, our work provides a promising prospect for the prophylaxis and treatment of Ebola, MERS, and SARS virus infection. PMID:26953343

  14. Cathepsin L upregulation-induced EMT phenotype is associated with the acquisition of cisplatin or paclitaxel resistance in A549 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Mei-Ling; Zhao, Yi-Fan; Tan, Cai-Hong; Xiong, Ya-Jie; Wang, Wen-Juan; Wu, Feng; Fei, Yao; Wang, Long; Liang, Zhong-Qin

    2016-12-01

    Cathepsin L (CTSL), a lysosomal acid cysteine protease, is known to play important roles in tumor metastasis and chemotherapy resistance. In this study we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the regulation of chemoresistance by CTSL in human lung cancer cells. Human lung cancer A549 cells, A549/PTX (paclitaxel-resistant) cells and A549/DDP (cisplatin-resistant) cells were tested. The resistance to cisplatin or paclitaxel was detected using MTT and the colony-formation assays. Actin remodeling was observed with FITC-Phalloidin fluorescent staining or immunofluorescence. A wound-healing assay or Transwell assay was used to assess the migration or invasion ability. The expression of CTSL and epithelial and mesenchymal markers was analyzed with Western blotting and immunofluorescence. The expression of EMT-associated transcription factors was measured with Western blotting or q-PCR. BALB/c nude mice were implanted subcutaneously with A549 cells overexpressing CTSL, and the mice were administered paclitaxel (10, 15 mg/kg, ip) every 3 d for 5 times. Cisplatin or paclitaxel treatment (10-80 ng/mL) induced CTSL expression in A549 cells. CTSL levels were much higher in A549/PTX and A549/DDP cells than in A549 cells. Silencing of CTSL reversed the chemoresistance in A549/DDP and A549/TAX cells, whereas overexpression of CTSL attenuated the sensitivity of A549 cells to cisplatin or paclitaxel. Furthermore, A549/DDP and A549/TAX cells underwent morphological and cytoskeletal changes with increased cell invasion and migration abilities, accompanied by decreased expression of epithelial markers (E-cadherin and cytokeratin-18) and increased expression of mesenchymal markers (N-cadherin and vimentin), as well as upregulation of EMT-associated transcription factors Snail, Slug, ZEB1 and ZEB2. Silencing of CTSL reversed EMT in A549/DDP and A549/TAX cells; In contrast, overexpression of CTSL induced EMT in A549 cells. In xenograft nude mouse model, the mice implanted

  15. Cathepsin S Is Involved in Th17 Differentiation Through the Upregulation of IL-6 by Activating PAR-2 after Systemic Exposure to Lipopolysaccharide from Porphyromonas gingivalis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masato Dekita

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Positive links have been found between periodontitis and numerous diseases in humans via persistent inflammation throughout the body. However, the main factors responsible for maintaining this pro-inflammatory condition are poorly understood. The spleen, the largest secondary immune organ, is a central hub regulating the immune response/inflammation due to the dendritic cell (DC response to CD4+ T cell subtype differentiation, and lysosomal proteinase cathepsin S (CatS is known to be involved in DC functions. In the present study, we found that CatS-induced IL-6 production by splenic DCs subsequently promotes Th17 differentiation, in response to systemic exposure to lipopolysaccharide derived from Porphyromonas gingivalis (PgLPS. The population of CD11c+ DCs was significantly increased in the splenic marginal zone (MZ locally of wild-type (DBA/2 mice with splenomegaly but not in that of CatS deficient (CatS-/- mice after systemic exposure to PgLPS for 7 consecutive days (5 mg/kg/day, intraperitoneal. Similarly, the population of Th17+CD4+ T cells was also significantly increased in the splenic MZ of wild-type mice but not in that of CatS-/- mice after PgLPS exposure. Furthermore, the increase in the Th17+ CD4+ T cell population paralleled increases in the levels of CatS and IL-6 in CD11c+ cells in the splenic MZ. In isolated primary splenic CD11c+ cells, the mRNA expression and the production of IL-6 was dramatically increased in wild-type mice but not in CatS-/- mice after direct stimulation with PgLPS (1 μg/ml, and this PgLPS-induced increase in the IL-6 expression was completely abolished by pre-treatment with Z-Phe-Leu-COCHO (Z-FL, the specific inhibitor of CatS. The PgLPS activated protease-activated receptor (PAR 2 in the isolated splenic CD11c+ cells was also significantly inhibited by CatS deficiently. In addition, the PgLPS-induced increase in the IL-6 production by splenic CD11c+ cells was completely abolished by pre-treatment with

  16. Influence and interactions of cathepsin D, HLA-DRB1 and APOE on cognitive abilities in an older non-demented population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Payton, A; van den Boogerd, E; Davidson, Y; Gibbons, L; Ollier, W; Rabbitt, P; Worthington, J; Horan, M; Pendleton, N

    2006-01-01

    Cathepsin D (CTSD), human leukocyte antigen DRB1 (HLA-DRB1) and apolipoprotein E (APOE) have all been associated with cognitive ability in both demented and non-demented individuals. CTSD is a pleiotrophic protein whose functions include the processing of proteins prior to presentation by HLA. Several studies have also reported that a functional exon 2 polymorphism in the CTSD gene interacts with APOEepsilon4 resulting in an increased risk of developing Alzheimer's disease (AD). We have previously reported that the CTSD exon 2 polymorphism regulates fluid intelligence. In this study, we extend this finding to other cognitive domains and investigate interactions with APOE and HLA-DRB1. Using a cohort of 766 non-demented volunteers, we found that the CTSD exon 2 T allele was associated with a decrease in several cognitive domains that comprise processing speed [random letters (RLs) test, P = 0.012; alphabet-coding task (ACT), P = 0.001], spatial recall (SR) (P = 0.016) and an additional test of fluid intelligence (P = 0.010). We also observed that the HLA-DR1 was associated with enhanced cumulative recall ability (P = 0.006), and conversely HLA-DR5 was associated with diminished delayed verbal recall and SR abilities (P = 0.014 and P = 0.003, respectively). When analysed independently, APOEepsilon4 did not influence any cognitive domains. In contrast, CTSD T/APOEepsilon4-positive volunteers scored lower on tests of fluid intelligence (P = 0.015), processing speed (ACT, P = 0.001; RL, P = 0.013) and immediate recall (P = 0.029). Scores were lower for all these tests than when CTSD and APOE were analysed independently. This supports previous findings in AD that have also reported an epistatic interaction. In addition, we found that CTSD T/HLA-DR2-positive volunteers had reduced processing speed (ACT, P = 0.040; RL, P = 0.014) and had significantly lower cumulative and SR abilities (P = 0.003 and P = 0.001, respectively). Biological interaction between these two

  17. Antiresorptive effect of a cathepsin K inhibitor ONO-5334 and its relationship to BMD increase in a phase II trial for postmenopausal osteoporosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Makoto; Hashimoto, Yoshitaka; Hasegawa, Chihiro; Deacon, Steve; Eastell, Richard

    2017-06-19

    ONO-5334 is a cathepsin K inhibitor that induced bone mineral density (BMD) gain in a phase II study in postmenopausal osteoporosis patients. Even though the antiresorptive effect could only be monitored in the morning during the study, simulation can allow the antiresorptive effect to be assessed over 24 h, with assessment of the relationship to BMD gain. Inhibition of the serum C-telopeptide of type I collagen (sCTX) level at doses of ONO-5334 of 100 mg once daily (QD), 300 mg QD, and 50 mg twice daily (BID) was simulated using plasma ONO-5334 pharmacokinetic (PK) data for repeated dose administration in a phase I study and corresponding sCTX inhibition from the PK-pharmacodynamic (PK/PD) relationship. sCTX was selected because it has a high signal-to-noise ratio compared to other telopeptides. A negative sigmoidal shape for the PK/PD relationship between plasma ONO-5334 and sCTX levels was obtained in our previous study. The simulated sCTX inhibition reached >99% of the maximal inhibitory effect (Emax) at 0.5 h in all treatment groups, and decreased to <80% Emax at 8 and 12 h at 50 mg BID and 100 mg QD, respectively. However, sCTX inhibition at 300 mg QD was maintained at ≥82% Emax over 24 h. The mean sCTX inhibition rates for 24 h at 100 mg QD, 300 mg QD and 50 mg BID were 63, 95 and 80% Emax, respectively. There was a positive linear relationship by treatment group between mean sCTX inhibition over 24 h and observed BMD gain in the phase II study. The dose response for BMD with ONO-5334 at 100 and 300 mg QD and higher BMD gain at 50 mg BID vs. 100 mg QD can be explained by sCTX inhibition over 24 h. The simulation gave the antiresorptive effect of ONO-5334 over 24 h and allowed prediction of BMD gain due to ONO-5334. The registration number in The European Union Clinical Trials Register is 2007-002417-39 . The date of registration was August 31, 2007.

  18. Degradation of proteoglycan 4/lubricin by cathepsin S: Potential mechanism for diminished ocular surface lubrication in Sjögren's syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regmi, Suresh C; Samsom, Michael L; Heynen, Miriam L; Jay, Gregory D; Sullivan, Benjamin D; Srinivasan, Sruthi; Caffery, Barbara; Jones, Lyndon; Schmidt, Tannin A

    2017-08-01

    Sjögren's syndrome (SS) is an autoimmune disease affecting the lacrimal and salivary glands with hallmark clinical symptoms of dry eye and dry mouth. Recently, markedly increased cathepsin S (CTSS) activity has been observed in the tears of SS patients. Proteoglycan 4 (PRG4), also known as lubricin, is an effective boundary lubricant that is naturally present on the ocular surface. While PRG4 is susceptible to proteolytic digestion, the potential effect of CTSS on PRG4 remains unknown. The objective of this study was to assess the ability of CTSS to enzymatically degrade purified PRG4, and PRG4 naturally present in human tears, and alter ocular surface boundary lubricating properties. To assess the potential time course and dose-dependency of PRG4 digestion by CTSS, full-length recombinant human PRG4 (rhPRG4) was incubated at 37 °C with or without CTSS in an enzymatic digestion buffer. Digestion of PRG4 by CTSS was also examined within normal human tear samples, both with and without supplementation by rhPRG4. Finally, digestion of endogenous PRG4 by CTSS, and the effect of a CTSS inhibitor, was examined in SS tears on Schirmer strips. Digestion products were separated on 3-8% SDS-PAGE and visualized by protein staining and western blotting. The boundary lubricating ability of rhPRG4 samples was assessed using an in vitro human eyelid-cornea friction test. Finally, SDS-PAGE protein stain bands resulting from rhPRG4 digestion were submitted for tandem mass spectrometry analysis to confirm their identity as PRG4 and identify non-tryptic cleavage sites. CTSS digested rhPRG4 in a time and dose dependent manner. CTSS digestion of rhPRG4 at 1% (where % is the mass ratio of CTSS to rhPRG4) resulted in a time dependent decrease in the full-length, ∼460 kDa, monomeric rhPRG4 band, and an appearance of lower MW fragments. After 20 h, no full-length rhPRG4 was observed. Furthermore, with an increased relative enzyme concentration of 3%, no protein bands were observed

  19. The protective role of yeast cathepsin D in acetic acid-induced apoptosis depends on ANT (Aac2p) but not on the voltage-dependent channel (Por1p).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Helena; Azevedo, Flávio; Rego, António; Sousa, Maria João; Chaves, Susana R; Côrte-Real, Manuela

    2013-01-16

    We have previously shown that the yeast Cathepsin D (CatD) Pep4p translocates from the vacuole to the cytosol during acetic acid-induced apoptosis and is required for efficient mitochondrial degradation, though its specific role in this process is still elusive. Here, we show that the protective role of Pep4p in acetic acid-induced apoptosis depends on its catalytic activity and is independent of the yeast voltage-dependent anion channel Por1p (which has no role on mitochondrial degradation) but dependent on AAC proteins, the yeast adenine nucleotide translocator. Our results demonstrate a differential interplay between yeast vacuolar CatD and mitochondrial proteins involved in apoptosis regulation. Copyright © 2012 Federation of European Biochemical Societies. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  20. Chemical constituents of the stem bark of Vochysia thyrsoidea Pohl. (Vochysiaceae) and evaluation of their cytotoxicity and inhibitory activity against cathepsins B and K; Constituintes quimicos das cascas do caule de Vochysia thyrsoidea Pohl. (Vochysiaceae) e avaliacao das atividades citotoxica e inibitoria frente as catepsinas B e K

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sousa, Lorena Ramos Freitas de; Silva, Jame' s A. da; Vieira, Paulo Cezar [Universidade Federal de Sao Carlos (UFSCar), SP (Brazil). Departamento de Quimica; Costa, Maisa Borges; Santos, Mirley Luciene dos; Menezes, Antonio Carlos Severo, E-mail: amenezes@ueg.br [Universidade Estadual de Goias (UEG), Anapolis, GO (Brazil). Unidade Universitaria de Ciencias Exatas e Tecnologicas; Sbardelotto, Aline Borba; Pessoa, Claudia do O; Moraes, Manoel Odorico de [Universidade Federal do Ceara (UFC), Fortaleza, CE (Brazil). Fac. de Medicina. Dept. de Fisiologia e Farmacologia

    2014-04-15

    A new flavonoid, catechin-3-O-(3{sup -}O-trans-cinnamoyl)-α-rhamnopyranoside, along with known compounds, catechin-3-O-α-rhamnopyranoside, 3-oxo-urs-12-en-28-oic acid, 2,4,6-trimethoxybenzoic acid, 2-butyl-D-fructofuranoside and 1-butyl-D-fructofuranoside, has been isolated from the stem bark of V. thyrsoidea. These compounds were assayed for inhibition of protease activity (cathepsins B and K) and against cancer cell lines. Catechin-3-O-(3{sup -}O-trans-cinnamoyl)-α-rhamnopyranoside showed moderate inhibitory activity (IC{sub 50} = 62.02 µM) against cathepsin B while 2-butyl-D-fructofuranoside was the most potent against a strain of CNS (SF-295) and human leukemia (HL-60) with IC{sub 50} = 36.80 μM and IC{sub 50} = 25.37 μM, respectively (author)

  1. A micRNA-200c/cathepsin L feedback loop determines paclitaxel resistance in human lung cancer A549 cells in vitro through regulating epithelial-mesenchymal transition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Yi-Fan; Han, Mei-Ling; Xiong, Ya-Jie; Wang, Long; Fei, Yao; Shen, Xiao; Zhu, Ying; Liang, Zhong-Qin

    2017-12-07

    Cathepsin L (CTSL), a cysteine protease, is closely related to tumor occurrence, development, and metastasis, and possibly regulates cancer cell resistance to chemotherapy. miRNAs, especially the miR-200 family, have been implicated in drug-resistant tumors. In this study we explored the relationship of CTSL, micRNA-200c and drug resistance, and the potential regulatory mechanisms in human lung cancer A549 cells and A549/TAX cells in vitro. A549/TAX cells were paclitaxel-resistant A549 cells overexpressing CTSL and characterized by epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). We showed that micRNA-200c and CTSL were reciprocally linked in a feedback loop in these cancer cells. Overexpression of micRNA-200c in A549/TAX cells decreased the expression of CTSL, and enhanced their sensitivity to paclitaxel and suppressed EMT, whereas knockdown of micRNA-200c in A549 cells significantly increased the expression of CTSL, and decreased their sensitivity to paclitaxel and induced EMT. Overexpression of CTSL in A549 cells significantly decreased the expression of micRNA-200c, and reduced their sensitivity to paclitaxel and induced EMT, but these effects were reversed by micRNA-200c, whereas knockdown of CTSL in A549/TAX cells attenuated paclitaxel resistance and remarkably inhibited EMT, but the inhibition of micRNA-200c could reverse these effects. Therefore, micRNA-200c may be involved in regulating paclitaxel resistance through CTSL-mediated EMT in A549 cells, and CTSL and micRNA-200c are reciprocally linked in a feedback loop.

  2. The Role of DmCatD, a Cathepsin D-Like Peptidase, and Acid Phosphatase in the Process of Follicular Atresia in Dipetalogaster maxima (Hemiptera: Reduviidae), a Vector of Chagas' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leyria, Jimena; Fruttero, Leonardo L.; Nazar, Magalí; Canavoso, Lilián E.

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we have investigated the involvement of DmCatD, a cathepsin D-like peptidase, and acid phosphatase in the process of follicular atresia of Dipetalogaster maxima, a hematophagous insect vector of Chagas’ disease. For the studies, fat bodies, ovaries and hemolymph were sampled from anautogenous females at representative days of the reproductive cycle: pre-vitellogenesis, vitellogenesis as well as early and late atresia. Real time PCR (qPCR) and western blot assays showed that DmCatD was expressed in fat bodies and ovaries at all reproductive stages, being the expression of its active form significantly higher at the atretic stages. In hemolymph samples, only the immunoreactive band compatible with pro-DmCatD was observed by western blot. Acid phosphatase activity in ovarian tissues significantly increased during follicular atresia in comparison to pre-vitellogenesis and vitellogenesis. A further enzyme characterization with inhibitors showed that the high levels of acid phosphatase activity in atretic ovaries corresponded mainly to a tyrosine phosphatase. Immunofluorescence assays demonstrated that DmCatD and tyrosine phosphatase were associated with yolk bodies in vitellogenic follicles, while in atretic stages they displayed a different cellular distribution. DmCatD and tyrosine phosphatase partially co-localized with vitellin. Moreover, their interaction was supported by FRET analysis. In vitro assays using homogenates of atretic ovaries as the enzyme source and enzyme inhibitors demonstrated that DmCatD, together with a tyrosine phosphatase, were necessary to promote the degradation of vitellin. Taken together, the results strongly suggested that both acid hydrolases play a central role in early vitellin proteolysis during the process of follicular atresia. PMID:26091289

  3. Ontogeny, immunocytochemical localization, and biochemical properties of the pregnancy-associated uterine elastase/cathepsin-G protease inhibitor, antileukoproteinase (ALP): monospecific antibodies to a synthetic peptide recognize native ALP.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simmen, R C; Michel, F J; Fliss, A E; Smith, L C; Fliss, M F

    1992-04-01

    Expression of the mRNA encoding the elastase/cathepsin-G protease inhibitor, antileukoproteinase (ALP), is highest in pig uterus during mid- and late pregnancy, suggesting a stage of pregnancy-dependent role for ALP in feto-maternal interactions. To elucidate a function for ALP in these events, immunogenic probes were developed to localize sites of ALP expression in the environment of the developing fetus. Monospecific antibodies raised against a 16-mer synthetic peptide corresponding to residues 21-36 (ALP 16P) of the deduced amino acid sequence of pig uterine ALP were generated by active immunization of sheep. ALP 16P conjugated to keyhole limpet hemocyanin elicited high titer antibodies that were specific to ALP. The antipeptide antibodies were used to characterize pig uterine ALP from allantoic fluids. Uterine ALP has an approximate mol wt of 14,000 and a pI of 8.2 and exhibits elastase inhibitor activity. Amino-terminal amino acid sequencing of uterine ALP indicated the sequence AENALKGGACPPRKIVQC, which has 44% identity with the corresponding region in human bronchial ALP. RIA for ALP, developed using ALP 16P as standard and iodinated tracer, demonstrated the presence of immunoreactive ALP in early, mid-, and late pregnant endometrium and myometrium, placenta, allantoic fluids, fetal cord blood, and fetal liver. ALP was undetectable in the maternal circulation. The ALP levels in endometrium, allantoic fluids, and fetal cord blood changed with the stage of pregnancy; however, ALP content in placenta, myometrium, and fetal liver, although different among tissues, remained invariant during gestation. By immunocytochemical analyses, ALP was localized in the glandular epithelium of the uterus, in placenta, and in fetal liver, consistent with the presence of immunoreactive ALP as measured by RIA. The localization of uterine ALP in placenta and its corresponding transport to fetal circulation provide strong evidence to support a physiological function for the

  4. Human herpesvirus 8 interleukin-6 contributes to primary effusion lymphoma cell viability via suppression of proapoptotic cathepsin D, a cointeraction partner of vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 variant 2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Daming; Gao, Yang; Nicholas, John

    2014-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) interleukin-6 (vIL-6) promotes cell proliferation and survival and is proangiogenic, implicating it as a contributor to virus-associated Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), and multicentric Castleman's disease. Although predominantly lytically expressed, vIL-6 is also produced at low, functional levels during latency in PEL cells. Unlike other IL-6 cytokines, vIL-6 is secreted very inefficiently and localizes in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). ER-localized vIL-6 supports PEL cell proliferation and survival, mediated in part through its interaction with the largely uncharacterized ER-resident protein vitamin K epoxide reductase complex subunit 1 variant 2 (VKORC1v2). Here, we report that the ER-transiting and functionally mitogenic secreted proenzyme (pCatD) form of cathepsin D (mature CatD), a proapoptotic lysosomal aspartate protease, is an interaction partner of VKORC1v2 and that vIL-6 promotes this interaction. Depletion of vIL-6 in PEL cells increased levels of the catalytically active, proteolytically cleaved form of CatD, corresponding with decreased PEL cell viability. Ectopic expression of CatD in PEL cells induced apoptosis, suggesting that CatD suppression by vIL-6 is biologically significant. In the context of high-density culture or reactivation of HHV-8 lytic replication in PEL cells, CatD depletion substantially reduced stress-induced apoptosis and increased virus production. In contrast, CatD overexpression, vIL-6 depletion, and peptide-mediated disruption of vIL-6-VKORC1v2 interaction inhibited replication and cell survival. Combined, our data identify pCatD as an interaction partner of VKORC1v2, demonstrate a role of vIL-6 in CatD suppression via VKORC1v2 in PEL cells, and identify a biologically significant mechanism of vIL-6 prosurvival and proreplication activities via VKORC1v2.

  5. Aumento de linfocitos T regulatorios en los ganglios linfoides de ratones mutantes para catepsina L Increase of regulatory T cells in the lymph node of cathepsin L mutant mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriela Camicia

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Las células T regulatorias CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ (Treg han sido implicadas en el rechazo al trasplante de órganos alogeneicos, en cáncer, infecciones y enfermedades autoinmunes. Así, su modulación posee un enorme potencial para el tratamiento de estas enfermedades. En este trabajo se evaluó la influencia de la catepsina L (CTSL sobre la homeostasis de las células Treg. Los ratones CTSLnkt/nkt -mutantes para CTSLpresentaron una reducción en el número de células Treg en el timo. Contrariamente, en los ganglios linfáticos el número de células Treg y su frecuencia dentro de la población CD4+ se incrementaron. La ausencia de actividad de CTSL en las células CD4+ de los ganglios linfoides -y no en su entorno- incrementó su tasa de proliferación. Las células Treg y las T CD4+ convencionales (CD4+CD25-Foxp3- de los ratones mutantes mostraron aumentos similares en su tasa de proliferación, sugiriendo que la proliferación contribuye al incremento en el número de células Treg, pero el aumento en su frecuencia no derivaría exclusivamente del incremento en su proliferación. Por otra parte, no se observó una disminución en los niveles de apoptosis de células Treg. Teniendo en cuenta que la producción diaria de timocitos CD4+ está disminuida en los ratones CTSLnkt/nkt, estos resultados sugieren que el incremento de células Treg en los ganglios linfoides de estos mutantes no derivaría de una mayor exportación tímica, y permiten hipotetizar que la ausencia de actividad de CTSL favorecería la adquisición del fenotipo CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ a partir de células CD4+CD25-Foxp3- en la periferia.Regulatory CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ T cells (Treg have been implicated in different pathologies including cancer, infections and autoimmune diseases and in the rejection of allogeneic organ transplantation. Thus, modulation of Treg activity has a great potential in the treatment of these pathologies. Herein, we evaluated the influence of cathepsin L (CTSL on Treg

  6. Activation processing of cathepsin H impairs recognition by its propeptide

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Horn, Martin; Marešová, Lucie; Rulíšek, Lubomír; Máša, Martin; Vasiljeva, O.; Turk, B.; Gan-Erdene, T.; Baudyš, Miroslav; Mareš, Michael

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 386, - (2005), s. 941-947 ISSN 1431-6730 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GP203/01/D008; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA4055303; GA MŠk(CZ) LC512 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z40550506 Keywords : aminopeptidase * cysteine peptidase * inhibition Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.577, year: 2005

  7. Cathepsin A-related arteriopathy with strokes and leukoencephalopathy (CARASAL)

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bugiani, Marianna; Kevelam, Sietske H.; Bakels, Hannah S.; Waisfisz, Quinten; Ceuterick-de Groote, Chantal; Niessen, Hans W. M.; Abbink, Truus E. M.; Lesnik Oberstein, Saskia A. M. J.; van der Knaap, Marjo S.

    2016-01-01

    To characterize the clinical and MRI features of 2 families with adult-onset dominant leukoencephalopathy and strokes and identify the underlying genetic cause. We applied MRI pattern recognition, whole-exome sequencing, and neuropathology. Based on brain imaging, 13 family members of 40 years or

  8. Role of Cathepsin C During Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-09-01

    2006 Robert Emmanuel and Mary Day Endowment Award 2005 John Richard Turner Fellowship in Microbiology 2005 Armauer-Hansen Memorial Scholarship...Student’s t test via Prism 4.0 software (GraphPad Software). ACKNOWLEDGMENTS. Wethank Erin Bowlby for compilingpatient data. This work was supported

  9. Role Of Cathepsin C During Breast Cancer Metastasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-01

    associated cancers, in particular Human Herpes Virus 8-associated Kaposi’s sarcoma, Epstein-Barr virus- associated Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma and HPV -associated...activation in a small number of patients with either lung, ovarian, breast, or renal cancer; either alone or in combination with DC-based vaccination ...2009;30:1073–81. [2] Clark CE, Hingorani SR, Mick R, Combs C, Tuveson DA, Vonderheide RH. Dynamics of the immune reaction to pancreatic cancer from

  10. Cathepsin-S degraded decorin are elevated in fibrotic lung disorders - development and biological validation of a new serum biomarker

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kehlet, Stephanie Nina; Bager, C. L.; Willumsen, N.

    2017-01-01

    disorders.Methods: A fragment of decorin cleaved in vitro using human articular cartilage was identified by mass-spectrometry (MS/MS). Monoclonal antibodies were raised against the neo-epitope of the cleaved decorin fragment and a competitive ELISA assay (DCN-CS) was developed. The assay was evaluated...... homeostasis contributing to extracellular matrix remodeling diseases. Here, we present the development and validation of a competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) quantifying a specific fragment of degraded decorin, which has potential as a novel non-invasive serum biomarker for fibrotic lung...

  11. Autophagy/Xenophagy as a survival strategy of cancer cells. The role of Cathepsins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Malorni, W.; Matarrese, P.; Ascione, B.; Ciarlo, L.; Zakeri, Z.

    2009-01-01

    Macroautophagy, often referred as to autophagy (self-cannibalism), designates the genetically determined process by which portions of the cytoplasm, organelles and long-lived proteins are engulfed in double-membraned vacuoles (autophagosomes) and sent for lysosomal degradation. Basal levels of autophagy contribute to the maintenance of intracellular homoeostasis by ensuring the turnover of supernumerary, aged and/or damaged components. Under conditions of starvation, the autophagic pathway operates to supply cells with metabolic substrates, and thus represents an important pro-survival mechanism. In cultured cells, the withdrawal of growth factors, known to represent an experimental condition triggering autophagy, can also enhance xeno-cannibalism (xenophagy; xeno is from ancient greek=foreign)

  12. Characterization of Gut-associated Cathepsin D Hemoglobinase from Tick Ixodes ricinus (IrCD1)

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Sojka, Daniel; Franta, Zdeněk; Frantová, Helena; Bartošová, Pavla; Horn, Martin; Váchová, Jana; O’Donoghue, A. J.; Eroy-Reveles, A. A.; Craik, C. S.; Knudsen, G. M.; Caffrey, C. R.; McKerrow, J. H.; Mareš, Michael; Kopáček, Petr

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 287, č. 25 (2012), s. 21152-21163 ISSN 0021-9258 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR IAA600960910; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06009; GA AV ČR KJB600960911; GA ČR GPP502/11/P682; GA AV ČR IAA400550705; GA ČR(CZ) GAP207/10/2183 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : RHIPICEPHALUS BOOPHILUS MICROPLUS * HARD TICK * ORNITHODOROS-MOUBATA * ASPARTIC PROTEINASE * RECOGNITION DOMAIN * MOLECULAR- CLONING * ACTIVE-SITE * EXPRESSION * INHIBITOR * PROTEASE Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 4.651, year: 2012

  13. Influence of cathepsin L on CD4+ regulatory T cell population: the role of stroma

    OpenAIRE

    Camicia, Gabriela Lorena

    2011-01-01

    Las células T regulatorias CD4+CD25+Foxp3+ (Treg) son esenciales para el mantenimiento de la tolerancia inmunológica hacia lo propio y la homeostasis del sistema inmune. Utilizando ratones CTSLnkt/nkt, portadores de una mutación en el gen que codifica para la proteasa catepsina L (CTSL), demostramos que la falta de actividad de esta enzima está asociada con una severa disminución en el número de células Treg en el timo, aunque no altera la frecuencia de los timocitos CD25+Foxp3+ en la poblaci...

  14. Estrogen regulates the expression of cathepsin E-A-like gene via ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    徐春林

    1College of Animal Science and Veterinary Medicine, Henan Agricultural University,. Zhengzhou ... combined with estrogen receptor antagonists including MPP, ICI 182,780 and tamoxifen. Our results showed that .... The ICI 182,780 and tamoxifen are antagonists of both ERα and ERβ, but may also act as the agonists of.

  15. [Gene cloning, selection of plasmids and application of Fasciola hepatica cathepsin L1 gene].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuk, Salih; Erensoy, Ahmet

    2008-01-01

    Gene cloning refers to the process by which a fragment of DNA is transferred from one organism to a vector. A vector is an agent that can carry a DNA fragment into a host cell. Commonly used vectors include plasmids, lambda phage, cosmid and yeast artificial chromosome (YAC). Plasmid vectors that have been extensively used in genetic engineering are derived from natural plasmids. These contain a genetic marker conferring a phenotype that can be selected for or against and a polylinker or multiple cloning site (MCS), which is a short region containing several commonly used restriction sites allowing the insertion of DNA fragments at this location easily. There are several plasmids and gene cloning kits available nowadays commercially. These kits contain an advanced positive selection system for the highest efficiency cloning of PCR products generated with any DNA polymerase. The kits offer cloning efficiencies of up to 100% positive clones, eliminating the need for tedious colony screening. We consider that researchers should choose the most suitable plasmids and cloning kits for gene cloning in view of factors such as time consumption, cost and individual laboratory options.

  16. Adsorption of Cathepsin B-sensitive peptide conjugated DOX on nanodiamonds

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Shanshan; Shao Jianqun [School of Chemical Biology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100069 (China); Gao Lifang [Center for Food and Drug Safety Evaluation of Capital Medical University, Beijing 100069 (China); Qi Yingzhe [School of Chemical Biology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100069 (China); Ye Ling, E-mail: lingye@ccmu.edu.cn [School of Chemical Biology and Pharmaceutical Sciences, Capital Medical University, Beijing 100069 (China)

    2011-08-01

    Drug delivery mediated by nanodiamonds (NDs) has shown great promise in controlled drug release field. In present study, dipeptide (Phe-Lys) conjugated antitumor drug doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) with self-immolative p-aminobenzylcarbonyl (PABC) spacer was non-covalently bound to carboxylated NDs via the electrostatic interactions. HIV-1 trans-activating transcriptor peptide (TAT) was additionally integrated to this ND-based delivery system in order to enhance the transmembrane efficiency. Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and zeta potentials were applied to characterize the DOX and TAT loaded ND delivery platform. The adsorption equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics for the adsorption of peptide conjugated DOX onto NDs were investigated. It was found that the adsorption fitted well with the Freundlich model and conformed to pseudo-second order kinetics. It also showed that the adsorption was a spontaneous and exothermic process. Therefore, our work offered a facile way to formulate a ND-based drug delivery platform with multifunctionality in a layer by layer adsorption fashion.

  17. Corrigendum to “A novel nonsense mutation in the cathepsin C ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Hala Soliman

    Heba Gamal Eldeen b. , Mostafa Ibrahim Mostafa b a Medical Molecular Genetics Department, Human Genetics & Genome Research Division, National Research Center,. Cairo 12311, Egypt b Oro-Dental Genetics Department, Oro-Dental Research Division, National Research Center, Cairo 12311, Egypt. The authors ...

  18. Localization profile of Cathepsin L in the brain of African giant rat ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the telencephalon, immunoreactivity was identified in cerebral cortex and subcortical structures, hippocampus, amygdala and basal ganglia. Within the diencephalon high density of positive signals was observed in mediodorsal and lateral posterior thalamic nuclei and medial habenular nucleus. In the mesencephalon ...

  19. Adsorption of Cathepsin B-sensitive peptide conjugated DOX on nanodiamonds

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang Shanshan; Shao Jianqun; Gao Lifang; Qi Yingzhe; Ye Ling

    2011-01-01

    Drug delivery mediated by nanodiamonds (NDs) has shown great promise in controlled drug release field. In present study, dipeptide (Phe-Lys) conjugated antitumor drug doxorubicin hydrochloride (DOX) with self-immolative p-aminobenzylcarbonyl (PABC) spacer was non-covalently bound to carboxylated NDs via the electrostatic interactions. HIV-1 trans-activating transcriptor peptide (TAT) was additionally integrated to this ND-based delivery system in order to enhance the transmembrane efficiency. Fourier transforms infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and zeta potentials were applied to characterize the DOX and TAT loaded ND delivery platform. The adsorption equilibrium, kinetics and thermodynamics for the adsorption of peptide conjugated DOX onto NDs were investigated. It was found that the adsorption fitted well with the Freundlich model and conformed to pseudo-second order kinetics. It also showed that the adsorption was a spontaneous and exothermic process. Therefore, our work offered a facile way to formulate a ND-based drug delivery platform with multifunctionality in a layer by layer adsorption fashion.

  20. Oestrogen regulates the expression of cathepsin E-A-like gene ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Hang Zheng

    2018-02-28

    Feb 28, 2018 ... participated in the sample collection, RNA isolation and contributed to the qPCR analyses. ... transferred to the ovarian follicles and takenup by the developing oocytes ..... The accession numbers of gene used to construct the phylogenetic tree in different species are shown in table 2. Table 3. The detail ...

  1. Plasma Cathepsin D Levels : A Novel Tool to Predict Pediatric Hepatic Infl ammation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walenbergh, Sofie M. A.; Houben, Tom; Hendrikx, Tim; Jeurissen, Mike L. J.; van Gorp, Patrick J.; Vreugdenhil, Anita C. E.; Adriaanse, Marlou P.; Buurman, Wim A.; Hofker, Marten H.; Mosca, Antonella; Lindsey, Patrick J.; Alisi, Anna; Liccardo, Daniela; Panera, Nadia; Koek, Ger H.; Nobili, Valerio; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit

    OBJECTIVES: Nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is the most severe form of a hepatic condition known as nonalcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). NASH is histologically characterized by hepatic fat accumulation, inflammation, and ballooning, and eventually coupled with fibrosis that, in turn, may

  2. Development of a chitinase and v-cathepsin negative bacmid for improved integrity of secreted recombinant proteins

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kaba, S.A.; Salcedo, A.M.; Wafula, P.O.; Vlak, J.M.; Oers, van M.M.

    2004-01-01

    The application of the baculovirus-in sect cell expression system for the production of integral membrane and secreted proteins is often more troublesome than for cytoplasmic proteins. One protein expressed at low levels in insect cells is the Theileria parva sporozoite surface protein p67.

  3. Contribution of cathepsins B, L and D to muscle protein profiles correlated with texture in rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Godiksen, Helene; Morzel, M.; Hyldig, Grethe

    2009-01-01

    Post-mortem softening of fish tissue often results in low yield and decreased product quality. In this study, proteolytic profiles of trout stored 5 days oil ice were obtained by SDS-PAGE. The link between protein hand intensities and firmness of trout fillets was examined through a correlation...

  4. The cystatin M/E-cathepsin L balance is essential for tissue homeostasis in epidermis, hair follicles, and cornea.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zeeuwen, P.L.J.M.; Vlijmen-Willems, I.M.J.J. van; Cheng, T.; Rodijk-Olthuis, D.; Hitomi, K.; Hara-Nishimura, I.; John, S.; Smyth, N.; Reinheckel, T.; Hendriks, W.J.A.J.; Schalkwijk, J.

    2010-01-01

    Cystatin M/E (CST6) is a nonredundant, epithelium-specific protease inhibitor with a presumed role in epidermal differentiation and tumor suppression. We have previously reported that cystatin M/E deficiency in Cst6(-/-) mice causes neonatal lethality because of excessive transepidermal water loss.

  5. Activation Route of the Schistosoma mansoni Cathepsin B1 Drug Target: Structural Map with a Glycosaminoglycan Switch

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jílková, Adéla; Horn, Martin; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Marešová, Lucie; Fajtová, Pavla; Brynda, Jiří; Vondrášek, Jiří; McKerrow, J. H.; Caffrey, C. R.; Mareš, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 12 (2014), s. 1786-1798 ISSN 0969-2126 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA203/09/1585; GA MŠk LH12023; GA MŠk LO1302 Institutional support: RVO:61388963 ; RVO:68378050 Keywords : human procathepsin B * slow binding inhibition * asparaginyl endopeptidase Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 5.618, year: 2014

  6. Heparin modulates the endopeptidase activity of Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease cathepsin L-Like rCPB2.8.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wagner A S Judice

    Full Text Available Cysteine protease B is considered crucial for the survival and infectivity of the Leishmania in its human host. Several microorganism pathogens bind to the heparin-like glycosaminoglycans chains of proteoglycans at host-cell surface to promote their attachment and internalization. Here, we have investigated the influence of heparin upon Leishmania mexicana cysteine protease rCPB2.8 activity.THE DATA ANALYSIS REVEALED THAT THE PRESENCE OF HEPARIN AFFECTS ALL STEPS OF THE ENZYME REACTION: (i it decreases 3.5-fold the k 1 and 4.0-fold the k -1, (ii it affects the acyl-enzyme accumulation with pronounced decrease in k 2 (2.7-fold, and also decrease in k 3 (3.5-fold. The large values of ΔG  =  12 kJ/mol for the association and dissociation steps indicate substantial structural strains linked to the formation/dissociation of the ES complex in the presence of heparin, which underscore a conformational change that prevents the diffusion of substrate in the rCPB2.8 active site. Binding to heparin also significantly decreases the α-helix content of the rCPB2.8 and perturbs the intrinsic fluorescence emission of the enzyme. The data strongly suggest that heparin is altering the ionization of catalytic (Cys(25-S(-/(His(163-Im(+ H ion pair of the rCPB2.8. Moreover, the interaction of heparin with the N-terminal pro-region of rCPB2.8 significantly decreased its inhibitory activity against the mature enzyme.Taken together, depending on their concentration, heparin-like glycosaminoglycans can either stimulate or antagonize the activity of cysteine protease B enzymes during parasite infection, suggesting that this glycoconjugate can anchor parasite cysteine protease at host cell surface.

  7. Simultaneous human papilloma virus type 16 E7 and cdk inhibitor p21 expression induces apoptosis and cathepsin B activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaznelson, Dorte Wissing; Bruun, Silas; Monrad, Astrid

    2004-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) is the major risk factor for development of cervical cancer. The major oncoprotein E7 enhances cell growth control. However, E7 has in some reports been shown to induce apoptosis suggesting that there is a delicate balance between cell proliferation and induc......Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) is the major risk factor for development of cervical cancer. The major oncoprotein E7 enhances cell growth control. However, E7 has in some reports been shown to induce apoptosis suggesting that there is a delicate balance between cell proliferation...

  8. Cathepsin D : design and characterisation of new in vitro and in vivo substrates applied to biological samples

    OpenAIRE

    Bächle, Daniel

    2005-01-01

    The specific and sensitive detection of protease activities within aqueous biological fluids such as blood, urine, sweat or cell lysates is important since proteases are widely used biomarkers for the discrimination between diseased and healthy samples. Recently, great efforts have been made to develop new proteomic approaches implying screening studies for the parallel determination of various parameters. Therefore specific and high-throughput compatible methods are required. The present wor...

  9. Plasma cathepsin D correlates with histological classifications of fatty liver disease in adults and responds to intervention

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Walenbergh, Sofie M. A.; Houben, Tom; Rensen, Sander S.; Bieghs, Veerle; Hendrikx, Tim; van Gorp, Patrick J.; Oligschlaeger, Yvonne; Jeurissen, Mike L. J.; Gijbels, Marion J. J.; Buurman, Wim A.; Vreugdenhil, Anita C. E.; Greve, Jan Willem M.; Plat, Jogchum; Hofker, Marten H.; Kalhan, Satish; Pihlajamaki, Jussi; Lindsey, Patrick; Koek, Ger H.; Shiri-Sverdlov, Ronit

    2016-01-01

    Non-alcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH) is characterized by liver lipid accumulation and inflammation. The mechanisms that trigger hepatic inflammation are poorly understood and subsequently, no specific non-invasive markers exist. We previously demonstrated a reduction in the plasma lysosomal enzyme,

  10. Characterization of a recombinant Cathepsin B-Like cysteine peptidase from Diaphorina citri Kuwayama (Hemiptera: Liviidae): A putative target control of citrus huanglongbing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huanglongbing (HLB) is one of the most destructive disease affecting citrus plants. The causal agent is associated with the phloem-limited bacterium Candidatus Liberibacter asiaticus (CLas) spread by the Asian citrus psyllid, Diaphorina citri (Hemiptera: Liviidae). Among the control strategies for H...

  11. Cathepsin B mediates caspase-independent cell death induced by microtubule stabilizing agents in non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Broker, L.E.; Huisman, C.; Span, SW; Rodriguez, J.A.; Kruyt, F.A.E.; Giaccone, G.

    2004-01-01

    We have previously reported that the microtubule stabilizing agents (MSAs) paclitaxel, epothilone B and discodermolide induce caspase-independent cell death in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells. Here we present two lines of evidence indicating a central role for the lysosomal protease

  12. Promising markers for the detection of premature senescence tumor cells induced by ionizing radiation: Cathepsin D and eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Byun, Hae-Ok; Han, Na-Kyung; Lee, Jae-Seon

    2008-01-01

    Recently, it has been proved that induction of senescence could be a promising way of tumor treatment. Senescence was originally described in normal human cells undergoing a finite number of divisions before permanent growth arrest. It has now become regarded more broadly as a general biological program of terminal growth arrest. A variety of stresses such as ionizing radiation (IR), oxidative stress, oncogenic transformation, DNA damaging agents triggers stress-induced premature senescence, i.e. rapid and permanent cell growth arrest. Therefore, premature senescence is bona fide barrier to tumorigenesis and hallmark of premalignant tumors. However, there is lack of obvious markers for senescent tumor cells. To identify useful premature senescence markers for tumor cells, we monitored the changes of protein expression profile in IR-induced premature senescence MCF7 human breast cancer cells. We identified biomarkers which evidently changed their expression levels in ionizing radiation-induced senescenct tumor cells

  13. Promising markers for the detection of premature senescence tumor cells induced by ionizing radiation: Cathepsin D and eukaryotic translation elongation factor 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Byun, Hae-Ok; Han, Na-Kyung; Lee, Jae-Seon [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-05-15

    Recently, it has been proved that induction of senescence could be a promising way of tumor treatment. Senescence was originally described in normal human cells undergoing a finite number of divisions before permanent growth arrest. It has now become regarded more broadly as a general biological program of terminal growth arrest. A variety of stresses such as ionizing radiation (IR), oxidative stress, oncogenic transformation, DNA damaging agents triggers stress-induced premature senescence, i.e. rapid and permanent cell growth arrest. Therefore, premature senescence is bona fide barrier to tumorigenesis and hallmark of premalignant tumors. However, there is lack of obvious markers for senescent tumor cells. To identify useful premature senescence markers for tumor cells, we monitored the changes of protein expression profile in IR-induced premature senescence MCF7 human breast cancer cells. We identified biomarkers which evidently changed their expression levels in ionizing radiation-induced senescenct tumor cells.

  14. Investigation of two novel biochemical markers of inflammation, matrix metalloproteinase and cathepsin generated fragments of C-reactive protein, in patients with ankylosing spondylitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Skjøt-Arkil, Helene; Schett, Georg; Zhang, Chen

    2012-01-01

    Ankylosing spondylitis (AS) is a chronic inflammation of the spine and the sacroiliac joints. Current markers of inflammation, such as C-reactive protein (CRP), are reflecting the production of an acute phase reactant rather than tissue specific inflammation, but the use of CRP as a diagnostic an...... additional information on systemic inflammation as compared to that of full-length CRP. We investigated whether these CRP degradation products would provide additional diagnostic value in AS patients compared to full-length CRP....

  15. c-Myb regulates matrix metalloproteinases 1/9, and cathepsin D: implications for matrix-dependent breast cancer cell invasion and metastasis

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Knopfová, L.; Beneš, P.; Pekarčíková, L.; Hermanová, M.; Masařík, M.; Pernicová, Zuzana; Souček, Karel; Šmarda, J.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 11, MAR 23 (2012), ID 15 ISSN 1476-4598 R&D Projects: GA MZd NS9600 Grant - others:GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA501630901 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : c-Myb * Metastasis * Breast cancer Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 5.134, year: 2012

  16. Structural Basis for Specificity of Propeptide-Enzyme Interaction in Barley C1A Cysteine Peptidases

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambra, Inés; Hernández, David; Diaz, Isabel; Martinez, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    C1A cysteine peptidases are synthesized as inactive proenzymes. Activation takes place by proteolysis cleaving off the inhibitory propeptide. The inhibitory capacity of propeptides from barley cathepsin L and B-like peptidases towards commercial and barley cathepsins has been characterized. Differences in selectivity have been found for propeptides from L-cathepsins against their cognate and non cognate enzymes. Besides, the propeptide from barley cathepsin B was not able to inhibit bovine cathepsin B. Modelling of their three-dimensional structures suggests that most propeptide inhibitory properties can be explained from the interaction between the propeptide and the mature cathepsin structures. Their potential use as biotechnological tools is discussed. PMID:22615948

  17. Structural basis for specificity of propeptide-enzyme interaction in barley C1A cysteine peptidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cambra, Inés; Hernández, David; Diaz, Isabel; Martinez, Manuel

    2012-01-01

    C1A cysteine peptidases are synthesized as inactive proenzymes. Activation takes place by proteolysis cleaving off the inhibitory propeptide. The inhibitory capacity of propeptides from barley cathepsin L and B-like peptidases towards commercial and barley cathepsins has been characterized. Differences in selectivity have been found for propeptides from L-cathepsins against their cognate and non cognate enzymes. Besides, the propeptide from barley cathepsin B was not able to inhibit bovine cathepsin B. Modelling of their three-dimensional structures suggests that most propeptide inhibitory properties can be explained from the interaction between the propeptide and the mature cathepsin structures. Their potential use as biotechnological tools is discussed.

  18. Functional Analysis of the Beclin-1 Tumor Suppressor Interaction with hVpa34 (Type III PI3’ -kinase) in Breast Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2005-06-01

    precleared with protein A Sepharose. Samples were then incubated for 2 h with a polyclonal antibody against cathepsin D ( Biodesign International, Saco...beads, immunoprecipitation was performed essentially as previously described [39], using a polyclonal antibody against cathepsin D ( Biodesign

  19. Homology modeling and SAR analysis of Schistosoma japonicum cathepsin D (SjCD) with statin inhibitors identify a unique active site steric barrier with potential for the design of specific inhibitors

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Caffrey, C. R.; Plachá, L.; Bařinka, Cyril; Hradilek, Martin; Dostál, Jiří; Sajid, M.; McKerrow, J. H.; Majer, P.; Konvalinka, Jan; Vondrášek, Jiří

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 386, č. 4 (2005), 339-349 ISSN 1431-6730 R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) LC512; GA ČR(CZ) GP203/02/P095; GA AV ČR(CZ) IAA400550510 Grant - others:SFSF(US) AI 53247; NATO(XE) CLG 974914 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : schistotoma * proteases of parasites * modelling Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 2.577, year: 2005

  20. Human Herpesvirus 8 Interleukin-6 Contributes to Primary Effusion Lymphoma Cell Viability via Suppression of Proapoptotic Cathepsin D, a Cointeraction Partner of Vitamin K Epoxide Reductase Complex Subunit 1 Variant 2

    OpenAIRE

    Chen, Daming; Gao, Yang; Nicholas, John

    2014-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8) interleukin-6 (vIL-6) promotes cell proliferation and survival and is proangiogenic, implicating it as a contributor to virus-associated Kaposi's sarcoma, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), and multicentric Castleman's disease. Although predominantly lytically expressed, vIL-6 is also produced at low, functional levels during latency in PEL cells. Unlike other IL-6 cytokines, vIL-6 is secreted very inefficiently and localizes in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER). ER-loc...

  1. Structural basis for specificity of propeptide-enzyme interaction in barley C1A cysteine peptidases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Inés Cambra

    Full Text Available C1A cysteine peptidases are synthesized as inactive proenzymes. Activation takes place by proteolysis cleaving off the inhibitory propeptide. The inhibitory capacity of propeptides from barley cathepsin L and B-like peptidases towards commercial and barley cathepsins has been characterized. Differences in selectivity have been found for propeptides from L-cathepsins against their cognate and non cognate enzymes. Besides, the propeptide from barley cathepsin B was not able to inhibit bovine cathepsin B. Modelling of their three-dimensional structures suggests that most propeptide inhibitory properties can be explained from the interaction between the propeptide and the mature cathepsin structures. Their potential use as biotechnological tools is discussed.

  2. Identification and characterization of the interactive proteins with cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-2α.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nga, Bui Thi To; Luziga, Claudius; Yamamoto, Misa; Kusakabe, Ken Takeshi; Yamamoto, Yoshimi

    2015-01-01

    Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-2α (CTLA-2α) is a potent inhibitor of cathepsin L-like cysteine proteases. Recombinant CTLA-2α is known to be a potent, competitive inhibitor of cathepsin L-like cysteine proteases. In this study, cathepsin L, cathepsin C, and tubulointerstitial nephritis antigen-related protein 1 (TINAGL1) were identified as novel interactive proteins of CTLA-2α by the yeast two-hybrid screening system. The direct interactions and co-localization of these proteins with CTLA-2α were confirmed using co-immunoprecipitation and immunofluorescence staining, respectively. The disulfide-bonded CTLA-2α/cathepsin L complex was isolated from mouse tissue. CTLA-2α was found to be specific and consistently expressed on the maternal side of the mouse placenta. Double immunofluorescence analysis showed that CTLA-2α was co-localized with cathepsin L, cathepsin C, and TINAGL1 in placenta. A simple cell-based fluorescence assay revealed that CTLA-2α exhibited inhibitory activity toward cathepsin C in live cells, which indicated that CTLA-2α is a novel endogenous inhibitor of cathepsin C.

  3. A single amino acid substitution affects substrate specificity in cysteine proteinases from Fasciola hepatica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smooker, P. M.; Whisstock, J. C.; Irving, J. A.; Siyaguna, S.; Spithill, T. W.; Pike, R. N.

    2000-01-01

    The trematode Fasciola hepatica secretes a number of cathepsin L-like proteases that are proposed to be involved in feeding, migration, and immune evasion by the parasite. To date, six full cDNA sequences encoding cathepsin L preproproteins have been identified. Previous studies have demonstrated that one of these cathepsins (L2) is unusual in that it is able to cleave substrates with a proline in the P2 position, translating into an unusual ability (for a cysteine proteinase) to clot fibrinogen. In this study, we report the sequence of a novel cathepsin (L5) and compare the substrate specificity of a recombinant enzyme with that of recombinant cathepsin L2. Despite sharing 80% sequence identity with cathepsin L2, cathepsin L5 does not exhibit substantial catalytic activity against substrates containing proline in the P2 position. Molecular modeling studies suggested that a single amino acid change (L69Y) in the mature proteinases may account for the difference in specificity at the S2 subsite. Recombinant cathepsin L5/L69Y was expressed in yeast and a substantial increase in the ability of this variant to accommodate substrates with a proline residue in the P2 position was observed. Thus, we have identified a single amino acid substitution that can substantially influence the architecture of the S2 subsite of F. hepatica cathepsin L proteases. PMID:11206078

  4. Cytotoxic T-Lymphocyte Antigen-2 alpha participates in axial ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cytotoxic T-lymphocyte antigen-2 alpha (CTLA-2α) has been discovered and expressed in mouse activated T-cells and mast cells. Structurally, it is homologous to the proregion of mouse cathepsin L, a lysosomal cystein proteinase. Expressed recombinant CTLA-2α is shown to exhibit selective inhibition to cathepsin L and ...

  5. EST Table: FS797973 [KAIKOcDNA[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FS797973 E_FL_ffbm_26A10_F_0 10/09/28 91 %/280 aa ref|NP_001036850.1| cathepsin B [...P004533 10/09/10 low homology 10/09/10 49 %/273 aa gi|91078958|ref|XP_974220.1| PREDICTED: similar to cathepsin b [Tribolium castaneum] FS792234 ffbm ...

  6. Disease: H00425 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available clerosis and short stature. Recent findings suggest a more expanded role for cathepsins in human biology... findings suggest a more expanded role for cathepsins in human biology. These roles include apoptosis, MHC c...pman HA, Riese RJ, Shi GP ... TITLE ... Emerging roles for cysteine proteases in human biology. ... JOURNAL ... An

  7. Cloning and sequence analysis of H. contortus HC58cDNA gene ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Phylogenetic analysis revealed close evolutionary proximity of the protein sequence to counterpart sequences in the cathepsin B like proteases, suggesting that HC58cDNA was a member of the papain family. Keywords:Haemonchus contortus, HC58cDNA, cathepsin B like protease, papain family. Kenya Veterinarian Vol.

  8. Functional analysis of C1 family cysteine peptidases in the larval gut of Тenebrio molitor and Tribolium castaneum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martynov, Alexander G; Elpidina, Elena N; Perkin, Lindsey; Oppert, Brenda

    2015-02-14

    Larvae of the tenebrionids Tenebrio molitor and Tribolium castaneum have highly compartmentalized guts, with primarily cysteine peptidases in the acidic anterior midgut that contribute to the early stages of protein digestion. High throughput sequencing was used to quantify and characterize transcripts encoding cysteine peptidases from the C1 papain family in the gut of tenebrionid larvae. For T. castaneum, 25 genes and one questionable pseudogene encoding cysteine peptidases were identified, including 11 cathepsin L or L-like, 11 cathepsin B or B-like, and one each F, K, and O. The majority of transcript expression was from two cathepsin L genes on chromosome 10 (LOC659441 and LOC659502). For cathepsin B, the major expression was from genes on chromosome 3 (LOC663145 and LOC663117). Some transcripts were expressed at lower levels or not at all in the larval gut, including cathepsins F, K, and O. For T. molitor, there were 29 predicted cysteine peptidase genes, including 14 cathepsin L or L-like, 13 cathepsin B or B-like, and one each cathepsin O and F. One cathepsin L and one cathepsin B were also highly expressed, orthologous to those in T. castaneum. Peptidases lacking conservation in active site residues were identified in both insects, and sequence analysis of orthologs indicated that changes in these residues occurred prior to evolutionary divergence. Sequences from both insects have a high degree of variability in the substrate binding regions, consistent with the ability of these enzymes to degrade a variety of cereal seed storage proteins and inhibitors. Predicted cathepsin B peptidases from both insects included some with a shortened occluding loop without active site residues in the middle, apparently lacking exopeptidase activity and unique to tenebrionid insects. Docking of specific substrates with models of T. molitor cysteine peptidases indicated that some insect cathepsins B and L bind substrates with affinities similar to human cathepsin L, while

  9. Disease: H00274 [KEGG MEDICUS

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available odontitis. Inherited metabolic disease CTSC; cathepsin C...oving dipeptides from the amino termini of its substrates. The disease is characterized by palmoplantar keratoderma and juvenile peri

  10. Expression of Oestrogen and progesterone receptors, Ki-67,p53 and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Expression of Oestrogen and progesterone receptors, Ki-67,p53 and bcl-2 proteins, cathepsin D, urokinase plasminogen activator and urokinase plasminogen activator-receptors in carcinomas of the female breast in an African population.

  11. Surface Density of the Hendra G Protein Modulates Hendra F Protein-Promoted Membrane Fusion: Role for Hendra G Protein Trafficking and Degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Whitman, Shannon D.; Dutch, Rebecca Ellis

    2007-01-01

    Hendra virus, like most paramyxoviruses, requires both a fusion (F) and attachment (G) protein for promotion of cell-cell fusion. Recent studies determined that Hendra F is proteolytically processed by the cellular protease cathepsin L after endocytosis. This unique cathepsin L processing results in a small percentage of Hendra F on the cell surface. To determine how the surface densities of the two Hendra glycoproteins affect fusion promotion, we performed experiments that varied the levels ...

  12. Local and Systemic Functional Responses of Mouse Macrophages to Intravaginal Infection with Type 2 Herpes Simplex Virus and Vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaitseva, L G; Bekhalo, V A; Kireeva, I V; Shaposhnikova, G M; Nagurskaya, E V; Barinskii, I F; Nesterenko, V G

    2017-05-01

    Activity of cathepsin D and phagocytosis of macrophages from vaginal lavage fluid, peritoneal exudation, and spleen were studied in mice of sensitive (DBA/2) and resistant (BALB/c) lines after intravaginal infection with type 2 herpes simplex virus and vaccination. Activity of cathepsin D and intensity of phagocytosis (irrespective of the macrophage source) and their ratio in BALB/c mice in early terms after infection were close to the control levels taken as a unit. In DBA/2 mice, these parameters and their balance were shifted and changes in cathepsin D activity depended on the time after challenge. Activities of cellular and extracellular cathepsin D increased sharply on day 1 postinfection under conditions of local virus interaction with the vaginal mucosa and activation of the pathological process. Later, after generalization of the infection, activity of cathepsin D decreased, while phagocytosis increased in all the studied macrophage populations. Vaccination corrected the cathepsin D/phagocytosis imbalance and created conditions for rapid elimination of the virus.

  13. Endogenous proteolytic enzymes--a study of their impact on cod (Gadus morhua) muscle proteins and textural properties in a fermented product.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Fang; Rustad, Turid; Xu, Yanshun; Jiang, Qixing; Xia, Wenshui

    2015-04-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate endogenous proteolytic activities in a cod product and their impact on muscle proteins and textural properties during fermentation and storage. The result of specific proteolytic activities showed that cathepsins, especially cathepsin B, had the highest activities during fermentation and storage. SDS-PAGE indicated more degradation of myofibrillar proteins by cathepsin L than other proteases and that the hydrolysis by cathepsins was pronounced in the last stage of fermentation. Texture analysis showed that cathepsins had a negative impact on gel strength and this impact increased in the last stage of fermentation. However the product still had a firm texture. During storage (4 °C) for one week, no significant changes were seen in the gel strength. In conclusion, cathepsins had more impact on muscle proteins and textural properties than other proteases during fermentation but had little impact on gel strength during storage at 4 °C. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  14. Proteolytic activities in fillets of selected underutilized Australian fish species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Z; Donkor, O; Street, W A; Vasiljevic, T

    2013-09-01

    The hydrolytic activity of major endogenous proteases, responsible for proteolysis of myofibrillar proteins during post-mortem storage, may be an indicator of the textural quality of fish which influences consumer purchasing behaviour and thus market value of the final product. Furthermore, it may also influence the type and bioactive properties of the peptides released during post-mortem proteolysis of myofibrillar proteins. This study compared the activities of cathepsins B, B+L, D, H and calpain-like enzymes in crude muscle extracted from 16 Australian underutilized fish species. Fish species had a significant effect on the activity of these enzymes with barracouta showing the highest cathepsins B, B+L, D and H activities. Activities of cathepsins B and B+L were higher than cathepsin H for all studied species. The more commercially important rock ling and tiger flathead demonstrated higher cathepsin B+L activity, whereas gemfish and eastern school whiting showed higher activity towards cathepsin B. Underutilized fish species showing higher endogenous protease activities may be suitable for fish sauce production, whereas those with lower protease activities for surimi processing. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Analysis of the Proteolytic Processing of ABCA3: Identification of Cleavage Site and Involved Proteases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Hofmann

    Full Text Available ABCA3 is a lipid transporter in the limiting membrane of lamellar bodies in alveolar type II cells. Mutations in the ABCA3 gene cause respiratory distress syndrome in new-borns and childhood interstitial lung disease. ABCA3 is N-terminally cleaved by an as yet unknown protease, a process believed to regulate ABCA3 activity.The exact site where ABCA3 is cleaved was localized using mass spectrometry (MS. Proteases involved in ABCA3 processing were identified using small molecule inhibitors and siRNA mediated gene knockdown. Results were verified by in vitro digestion of a synthetic peptide substrate mimicking ABCA3's cleavage region, followed by MS analysis.We found that cleavage of ABCA3 occurs after Lys174 which is located in the proteins' first luminal loop. Inhibition of cathepsin L and, to a lesser extent, cathepsin B resulted in attenuation of ABCA3 cleavage. Both enzymes showed activity against the ABCA3 peptide in vitro with cathepsin L being more active.We show here that, like some other proteins of the lysosomal membrane, ABCA3 is a substrate of cathepsin L. Therefore, cathepsin L may represent a potential target to therapeutically influence ABCA3 activity in ABCA3-associated lung disease.

  16. Inhibitory selectivity of canecystatin: a recombinant cysteine peptidase inhibitor from sugarcane

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oliva, Maria Luiza Vilela; Carmona, Adriana K.; Andrade, Sheila S.; Cotrin, Simone S.; Soares-Costa, Andrea; Henrique-Silva, Flavio

    2004-01-01

    The cDNA of a cystein peptidase inhibitor was isolated from sugarcane and expressed in Escherichia coli. The protein, named canecystatin, has previously been shown to exert antifungal activity on the filamentous fungus Trichoderma reesei. Herein, the inhibitory specificity of canecystatin was further characterized. It inhibits the cysteine peptidases from plant source papain (K i =3.3 nM) and baupain (K i =2.1x10 -8 M), but no inhibitory effect was observed on ficin or bromelain. Canecystatin also inhibits lysosomal cysteine peptidases such as human cathepsin B (K i =125 nM), cathepsin K (K i =0.76 nM), cathepsin L (K i =0.6 nM), and cathepsin V (K i =1.0 nM), but not the aspartyl peptidase cathepsin D. The activity of serine peptidases such as trypsin, chymotrypsin, pancreatic, and neutrophil elastases, and human plasma kallikrein is not affected by the inhibitor, nor is the activity of the metallopeptidases angiotensin converting enzyme and neutral endopeptidase. This is the first report of inhibitory activity of a sugarcane cystatin on cysteine peptidases

  17. Cystatin C Has a Dual Role in Post-Traumatic Brain Injury Recovery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Martinez-Vargas

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cathepsin B is one of the major lysosomal cysteine proteases involved in neuronal protein catabolism. This cathepsin is released after traumatic injury and increases neuronal death; however, release of cystatin C, a cathepsin inhibitor, appears to be a self-protective brain response. Here we describe the effect of cystatin C intracerebroventricular administration in rats prior to inducing a traumatic brain injury. We observed that cystatin C injection caused a dual response in post-traumatic brain injury recovery: higher doses (350 fmoles increased bleeding and mortality, whereas lower doses (3.5 to 35 fmoles decreased bleeding, neuronal damage and mortality. We also analyzed the expression of cathepsin B and cystatin C in the brains of control rats and of rats after a traumatic brain injury. Cathepsin B was detected in the brain stem, cerebellum, hippocampus and cerebral cortex of control rats. Cystatin C was localized to the choroid plexus, brain stem and cerebellum of control rats. Twenty-four hours after traumatic brain injury, we observed changes in both the expression and localization of both proteins in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus and brain stem. An early increase and intralysosomal expression of cystatin C after brain injury was associated with reduced neuronal damage.

  18. Giardia duodenalis Surface Cysteine Proteases Induce Cleavage of the Intestinal Epithelial Cytoskeletal Protein Villin via Myosin Light Chain Kinase.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amol Bhargava

    Full Text Available Giardia duodenalis infections are among the most common causes of waterborne diarrhoeal disease worldwide. At the height of infection, G. duodenalis trophozoites induce multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells that contribute to the development of diarrhoeal disease. To date, our understanding of pathophysiological processes in giardiasis remains incompletely understood. The present study reveals a previously unappreciated role for G. duodenalis cathepsin cysteine proteases in intestinal epithelial pathophysiological processes that occur during giardiasis. Experiments first established that Giardia trophozoites indeed produce cathepsin B and L in strain-dependent fashion. Co-incubation of G. duodenalis with human enterocytes enhanced cathepsin production by Assemblage A (NF and S2 isolates trophozoites, but not when epithelial cells were exposed to Assemblage B (GSM isolate trophozoites. Direct contact between G. duodenalis parasites and human intestinal epithelial monolayers resulted in the degradation and redistribution of the intestinal epithelial cytoskeletal protein villin; these effects were abolished when parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases were inhibited. Interestingly, inhibition of parasite proteases did not prevent degradation of the intestinal tight junction-associated protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1, suggesting that G. duodenalis induces multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells. Finally, this study demonstrates that G. duodenalis-mediated disruption of villin is, at least, in part dependent on activation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK. Taken together, this study indicates a novel role for parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases in the pathophysiology of G. duodenalis infections.

  19. Giardia duodenalis Surface Cysteine Proteases Induce Cleavage of the Intestinal Epithelial Cytoskeletal Protein Villin via Myosin Light Chain Kinase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhargava, Amol; Cotton, James A; Dixon, Brent R; Gedamu, Lashitew; Yates, Robin M; Buret, Andre G

    2015-01-01

    Giardia duodenalis infections are among the most common causes of waterborne diarrhoeal disease worldwide. At the height of infection, G. duodenalis trophozoites induce multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells that contribute to the development of diarrhoeal disease. To date, our understanding of pathophysiological processes in giardiasis remains incompletely understood. The present study reveals a previously unappreciated role for G. duodenalis cathepsin cysteine proteases in intestinal epithelial pathophysiological processes that occur during giardiasis. Experiments first established that Giardia trophozoites indeed produce cathepsin B and L in strain-dependent fashion. Co-incubation of G. duodenalis with human enterocytes enhanced cathepsin production by Assemblage A (NF and S2 isolates) trophozoites, but not when epithelial cells were exposed to Assemblage B (GSM isolate) trophozoites. Direct contact between G. duodenalis parasites and human intestinal epithelial monolayers resulted in the degradation and redistribution of the intestinal epithelial cytoskeletal protein villin; these effects were abolished when parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases were inhibited. Interestingly, inhibition of parasite proteases did not prevent degradation of the intestinal tight junction-associated protein zonula occludens 1 (ZO-1), suggesting that G. duodenalis induces multiple pathophysiological processes within intestinal epithelial cells. Finally, this study demonstrates that G. duodenalis-mediated disruption of villin is, at least, in part dependent on activation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). Taken together, this study indicates a novel role for parasite cathepsin cysteine proteases in the pathophysiology of G. duodenalis infections.

  20. Involvement of the endosomal-lysosomal system correlates with regional pathology in Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kovács, Gábor G; Gelpi, Ellen; Ströbel, Thomas

    2007-01-01

    . Combined with stereologic techniques, we examined components of the ELS in human sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease brains. We immunostained for the early endosomal marker Rab5 and lysosomal enzymes cathepsin D and B. We determined neuron-specific changes in their expression and correlated......-immunoreactive lysosomes. The intraneuronal distribution of cathepsin D and B diverges between Purkinje cells and frontal cortical neurons in sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease brains. We demonstrated focal intra- and perineuronal colocalization of cathepsin D and PrP. Our results indicate that effects in the ELS......The endosomal-lysosomal system (ELS) has been suggested to play a role in the pathogenesis of prion diseases. The purpose of this study was to examine how experimental observations can be translated to human neuropathology and whether alterations of the ELS relate to neuropathologic changes...

  1. Organelle-Specific Activity-Based Protein Profiling in Living Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wiedner, Susan D.; Anderson, Lindsey N.; Sadler, Natalie C.; Chrisler, William B.; Kodali, Vamsi K.; Smith, Richard D.; Wright, Aaron T.

    2014-02-06

    A multimodal acidic organelle targeting activity-based probe was developed for analysis of subcellular native enzymatic activity of cells by fluorescent microscopy and mass spectrometry. A cathepsin reactive warhead was conjugated to an acidotropic amine, and a clickable alkyne for appendage of AlexaFluor 488 or biotin reporter tags. This probe accumulated in punctate vesicles surrounded by LAMP1, a lysosome marker, as observed by Structured Illumination Microscopy (SIM) in J774 mouse macrophage cells. Biotin conjugation, affinity purification, and analysis of in vivo labeled J774 by mass spectrometry showed that the probe was very selective for Cathepsins B and Z, two lysosomal cysteine proteases. Analysis of starvation induced autophagy, which is an increase in cell component catabolism involving lysosomes, showed a large increase in tagged protein number and an increase in cathepsin activity. Organelle targeting activity-based probes and subsequent analysis of resident proteins by mass spectrometry is enabled by tuning the physicochemical properties of the probe.

  2. Interdependence of thyroglobulin processing and thyroid hormone export in the mouse thyroid gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weber, Jonas; McInnes, Joseph; Kizilirmak, Cise; Rehders, Maren; Qatato, Maria; Wirth, Eva K; Schweizer, Ulrich; Verrey, Francois; Heuer, Heike; Brix, Klaudia

    2017-08-01

    Thyroid hormone (TH) target cells need to adopt mechanisms to maintain sufficient levels of TH to ensure regular functions. This includes thyroid epithelial cells, which generate TH in addition to being TH-responsive. However, the cellular and molecular pathways underlying thyroid auto-regulation are insufficiently understood. In order to investigate whether thyroglobulin processing and TH export are sensed by thyrocytes, we inactivated thyroglobulin-processing cathepsins and TH-exporting monocarboxylate transporters (Mct) in the mouse. The states of thyroglobulin storage and its protease-mediated processing and degradation were related to the levels of TH transporter molecules by immunoblotting and immunofluorescence microscopy. Thyroid epithelial cells of cathepsin-deficient mice showed increased Mct8 protein levels at the basolateral plasma membrane domains when compared to wild type controls. While the protein amounts of the thyroglobulin-degrading cathepsin D remained largely unaffected by Mct8 or Mct10 single-deficiencies, a significant increase in the amounts of the thyroglobulin-processing cathepsins B and L was detectable in particular in Mct8/Mct10 double deficiency. In addition, it was observed that larger endo-lysosomes containing cathepsins B, D, and L were typical for Mct8- and/or Mct10-deficient mouse thyroid epithelial cells. These data support the notion of a crosstalk between TH transporters and thyroglobulin-processing proteases in thyroid epithelial cells. We conclude that a defect in exporting thyroxine from thyroid follicles feeds back positively on its cathepsin-mediated proteolytic liberation from the precursor thyroglobulin, thereby adding to the development of auto-thyrotoxic states in Mct8 and/or Mct10 deficiencies. The data suggest TH sensing molecules within thyrocytes that contribute to thyroid auto-regulation. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier GmbH.. All rights reserved.

  3. Identification of Plakortide E from the Caribbean Sponge Plakortis halichondroides as a Trypanocidal Protease Inhibitor using Bioactivity-Guided Fractionation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Swarna Oli

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report new protease inhibitory activity of plakortide E towards cathepsins and cathepsin-like parasitic proteases. We further report on its anti-parasitic activity against Trypanosoma brucei with an IC50 value of 5 μM and without cytotoxic effects against J774.1 macrophages at 100 μM concentration. Plakortide E was isolated from the sponge Plakortis halichondroides using enzyme assay-guided fractionation and identified by NMR spectroscopy and mass spectrometry. Furthermore, enzyme kinetic studies confirmed plakortide E as a non-competitive, slowly-binding, reversible inhibitor of rhodesain.

  4. Effect of altering local protein fluctuations using artificial intelligence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katsuhiko Nishiyama

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available The fluctuations in Arg111, a significantly fluctuating residue in cathepsin K, were locally regulated by modifying Arg111 to Gly111. The binding properties of 15 dipeptides in the modified protein were analyzed by molecular simulations, and modeled as decision trees using artificial intelligence. The decision tree of the modified protein significantly differed from that of unmodified cathepsin K, and the Arg-to-Gly modification exerted a remarkable effect on the peptide binding properties. By locally regulating the fluctuations of a protein, we may greatly alter the original functions of the protein, enabling novel applications in several fields.

  5. Two-Dimensional Zymography of Proteases from Steatotic Duck Liver.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkesman, Jeff; Padrón, María Fernanda; Kurz, Liliana; Rémignon, Hervé

    2017-01-01

    Protease activity present in liver cells with steatosis can be electrophoretically characterized. Zymographic techniques allow semi-quantitative results, successfully detecting cathepsin and metalloprotease activity using polyacrylamide gels copolymerized with gelatin and quantified by densitometry. By using specific inhibitors, the identity of the proteases can be confirmed. 2D zymography allows the determination of both M r. and pI of the metalloprotease and cathepsin activity present in the homogenates. The analysis of liver proteases activities in force fed ducks may elucidate the mechanisms behind steatosis development.

  6. The E3 ubiquitin ligase NEDD4 mediates cell migration signaling of EGFR in lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shao, Genbao; Wang, Ranran; Sun, Aiqin; Wei, Jing; Peng, Ke; Dai, Qian; Yang, Wannian; Lin, Qiong

    2018-02-19

    EGFR-dependent cell migration plays an important role in lung cancer progression. Our previous study observed that the HECT E3 ubiquitin ligase NEDD4 is significantly correlated with tumor metastasis and required for migration and invasion signaling of EGFR in gastric cancer cells. However, how NEDD4 promotes the EGFR-dependent lung cancer cell migration is unknown. This study is to elucidate the mechanism by which NEDD4 mediates the EGFR lung cancer migration signaling. Lentiviral vector-loaded NEDD4 shRNA was used to deplete endogenous NEDD4 in lung cancer cell lines. Effects of the NEDD4 knockdown on the EGFR-dependent or independent lung cancer cell migration were determined using the wound-healing and transwell assays. Association of NEDD4 with activated EGFR was assayed by co-immunoprecipitation. Co-expression of NEDD4 with EGFR or PTEN was determined by immunohistochemical (IHC) staining in 63 lung adenocarcinoma tissue samples. Effects of NEDD4 ectopic expression or knockdown on PTEN ubiquitination and down-regulation, AKT activation and lysosomal secretion were examined using the GST-Uba pulldown assay, immunoblotting, immunofluorescent staining and a human cathepsin B ELISA assay respectively. The specific cathepsin B inhibitor CA-074Me was used for assessing the role of cathepsin B in lung cancer cell migration. Knockdown of NEDD4 significantly reduced EGF-stimulated cell migration in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC) cells. Co-immunoprecipitation assay found that NEDD4 is associated with EGFR complex upon EGF stimulation, and IHC staining indicates that NEDD4 is co-expressed with EGFR in lung adenocarcinoma tumor tissues, suggesting that NEDD4 might mediate lung cancer cell migration by interaction with the EGFR signaling complex. Interestingly, NEDD4 promotes the EGF-induced cathepsin B secretion, possibly through lysosomal exocytosis, as overexpression of the ligase-dead mutant of NEDD4 impedes lysosomal secretion, and knockdown of NEDD4

  7. Generation of a lysosomal enzyme targeting signal in the secretory protein pepsinogen.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baranski, T J; Faust, P L; Kornfeld, S

    1990-10-19

    Lysosomal enzymes contain a common protein determinant that is recognized by UDP-GlcNAc:lysosomal enzyme N-acetylglucosamine-1-phosphotransferase, the initial enzyme in the formation of mannose 6-phosphate residues. To identify this protein determinant, we constructed chimeric molecules between two aspartyl proteases: cathepsin D, a lysosomal enzyme, and pepsinogen, a secretory protein. When expressed in Xenopus oocytes, the oligosaccharides of cathepsin D were efficiently phosphorylated, whereas the oligosaccharides of a glycosylated form of pepsinogen were not phosphorylated. The combined substitution of two noncontinuous sequences of cathepsin D (lysine 203 and amino acids 265-292) into the analogous positions of glycopepsinogen resulted in phosphorylation of the oligosaccharides of the expressed chimeric molecule. These two sequences are in direct apposition on the surface of the molecule, indicating that amino acids from different regions come together in three-dimensional space to form this recognition domain. Other regions of cathepsin D were identified that may be components of a more extensive recognition marker.

  8. Journal of Biosciences | Indian Academy of Sciences

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    The peptide fragments obtained by cathepsin digestion of purified buffalo prolactin (buPRL) monomer have been characterized using SDS-PAGE and FPLC with regard to size and pI. Their antiangiogenic activity was tested in chick embryo chorioallantoic membrane (CAM) assay and the human endothelial cells wound ...

  9. Catalyst-free aldol reaction of N-substituted rhodanines on aqueous ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    N S DEVI

    2018-02-07

    Feb 7, 2018 ... treatment of diabetic neuropathy.7 Additionally, they are known to inhibit numerous targets such as RNA polymerase,8 HIV-1 integrase,9 PMT1 mannosyl trans- ferase,10 JSP-1 phosphatases,11 hepatitis C virus NS5B polymerase12 and cathepsin D.13 Due to high potential of rhodanine derivatives in drug ...

  10. Mannose 6-Phosphate Receptor Is Reduced in -Synuclein Overexpressing Models of Parkinsons Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Matrone, Carmela; Dzamko, Nicolas; Madsen, Peder

    2016-01-01

    risk of neurodegeneration. Defects in cathepsin D (CD) processing and α-synuclein degradation causing its accumulation in lysosomes are particularly relevant for the development of Parkinson's disease (PD). However, the mechanism by which alterations in CD maturation and α-synuclein degradation leads...

  11. De intracellulaire peptidase kathepsine C

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Planta, Roelf Johannes

    1962-01-01

    Fruton and collaborators discovered an intracellular endopeptidase in beef spleen which appaeared homospecific with chymotrypsin when acting on dipeptide amides or esters. According to Fruton this enzyme (named cathepsin C) may have a function in protein breakdown in vivo. This author also suggested

  12. Papillon-Lefevre syndrome patient reveals species-dependent requirements for neutrophil defenses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sorensen, O. E.; Clemmensen, S. N.; Dahl, S. L.

    2014-01-01

    Papillon-Lefevre syndrome (PLS) results from mutations that inactivate cysteine protease cathepsin C (CTSC), which processes a variety of serine proteases considered essential for antimicrobial defense. Despite serine protease-deficient immune cell populations, PLS patients do not exhibit marked ...

  13. Multiple molecular forms of pyridinoline crosslinks generated by the ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We investigated in vitro the ability of cathepsin B, a lysosomal cysteine proteinases, to generate multiple molecular forms of pyridinoline crosslinks from insoluble bone type I collagen, and we studied the effects of various concentrations of divalent ions such as calcium (Ca2+) and magnesium (Mg2+) on this process.

  14. Digestive proteolysis in the Colorado potato beetle, Leptinotarsa decemlineata: Activity-based profiling and imaging of a multipeptidase network

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Srp, Jaroslav; Nussbaumerová, Martina; Horn, Martin; Mareš, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 78, Nov (2016), s. 1-11 ISSN 0965-1748 R&D Projects: GA MŠk LO1302; GA ČR GA15-18929S Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : Colorado potato beetle * peptidase * cathepsin * activity-based probe * digestive system * multienzyme network Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry Impact factor: 3.756, year: 2016

  15. Dietary factors impact on the association between CTSS variants and obesity related traits

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hooton, Henri; Ängquist, Lars Henrik; Holst, Claus

    2012-01-01

    Cathepsin S, a protein coded by the CTSS gene, is implicated in adipose tissue biology--this protein enhances adipose tissue development. Our hypothesis is that common variants in CTSS play a role in body weight regulation and in the development of obesity and that these effects are influenced by...... by dietary factors--increased by high protein, glycemic index and energy diets....

  16. Browse Title Index

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Vol 20 (2009), Multiple molecular forms of pyridinoline crosslinks generated by the action of cathepsin B on bone collagen: Influence of high calcium concentrations, Abstract PDF. B Meddah, S Kamel, AT Touil, JP Petit, JC Rogez, M Brazier. Vol 33 (2016), Nonlinear control of permanent magnet synchronous motor driving a ...

  17. Structural basis for vinyl sulfone inhibition of the SmCB1 drug target from the human blood fluke

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jílková, Adéla; Marešová, Lucie; Rubešová, Petra; Fajtová, Pavla; Horn, Martin; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Brynda, Jiří; McKerrow, J. H.; Caffrey, C. R.; Mareš, Michael

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 284, Suppl 1 (2017), s. 191 ISSN 1742-464X. [FEBS Congress /42./ From Molecules to Cells and Back. 10.09.2017-14.09.2017, Jerusalem] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : schistosomiasis * cathepsin B1 * inhibitor Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  18. wenbo tan

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Genetics. WENBO TAN. Articles written in Journal of Genetics. Volume 97 Issue 1 March 2018 pp 145-155 RESEARCH ARTICLE. Oestrogen regulates the expression of cathepsin E-A-like gene through ERβ in liver of chicken ( Gallus gallus ) · HANG ZHENG HONG LI WENBO TAN CHUNLIN XU ...

  19. Pycnodysostosis with Epilepsy in a Malawian patient: A case report ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Pycnodysostosis is a very rare genetic disease resulting from deletion the short arm of one of the group – G chromosomes leading to deficiency of Cathepsin –K, a cysteine protease needed for proper functioning of Osteoclasts to resorb and remodel bone. Unlike many skeletal dysplasias, it is lysosomal ...

  20. Genome engineering and parthenocloning in the silkworm, Bombyx ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2015-08-15

    Aug 15, 2015 ... Genetic engineering of the silkworm, Bombyx mori, opens door to the production of new kinds of silk and to the use of silkworms as ..... substrate suitable for the cocoon attachment, and eventually glues fibers to one another in ..... tion in silkworm silk glands requires cathepsin and chitinase of. Autographa ...

  1. Translational Research for Muscular Dystrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    digitorum longus GSM: grip strength measurement LV: left ventricle mRNA: messenger RNA TA: tibialis anterior TGF-β: transforming growth factor...kinase CNF: central nucleated fibers CTSB: cathepsin B DMD: Duchenne muscular dystrophy Dmd: dystrophin gene EBD: evan blue dye EDL: extensor

  2. Protective effect of squalene on certain lysosomal hydrolases and free amino acids in isoprenaline-induced myocardial infarction in rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farvin, Sabeena; Surendraraj, A.; Anandan, R.

    2010-01-01

    This study was aimed to evaluate the preventive role of squalene on free amino acids and lysosomal alterations in experimentally induced myocardial infarction in rats. The levels of lysosomal enzymes (beta-glucuronidase, beta-galactosidase, beta-glucosidase, acid phosphatase and cathepsin D) in p...

  3. Cloning and characterization of a basic Cysteine-like protease (Cathespsin L1) expressed in the gut of larval Diaprepes abbreviatus L. (Coleoptera: Curculionidae)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Diaprepes abbreviatus is an important pest that causes extensive damage to citrus in the USA. Analysis of an expressed sequence tag (EST) library from the digestive tract of larvae and adult D. abbreviatus identified cathepsins as major putative digestive enzymes. One class, sharing amino acid seque...

  4. Silicatein genes in spicule-forming and nonspicule-forming Pacific demosponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozhemyako, Valeri B; Veremeichik, Galina N; Shkryl, Yuri N; Kovalchuk, Svetlana N; Krasokhin, Vladimir B; Rasskazov, Valeri A; Zhuravlev, Yuri N; Bulgakov, Victor P; Kulchin, Yuri N

    2010-08-01

    Silicatein genes are known to be involved in siliceous spicule formation in marine sponges. Proteins encoded by these genes, silicateins, were recently proposed for nanobiotechnological applications. We studied silicatein genes of marine sponges Latrunculia oparinae collected in the west Pacific region, shelf of Kuril Islands. Five silicatein genes, LoSilA1, LoSilA1a, LoSilA2, and LoSilA3 (silicatein-alpha group), LoSilB (silicatein-beta group), and one cathepsin gene, LoCath, were isolated from the sponge L. oparinae for the first time. The deduced amino acid sequence of L. oparinae silicateins showed high-sequence identity with silicateins described previously. LoCath contains the catalytic triad of amino acid residues Cys-His-Asn characteristic for cathepsins as well as motifs typical for silicateins. A phylogenetic analysis places LoCath between sponge silicateins-beta and L-cathepsins suggesting that the LoCath gene represents an intermediate form between silicatein and cathepsin genes. Additionally, we identified, for the first time, silicatein genes (AcSilA and AcSilB) in nonspicule-forming marine sponge, Acsmall a, Cyrillicnthodendrilla sp. The results suggest that silicateins could participate also in the function(s) unrelated to spiculogenesis.

  5. Cdc42-dependent actin dynamics controls maturation and secretory activity of dendritic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schulz, Anna M; Stutte, Susanne; Hogl, Sebastian

    2015-01-01

    efficiently present peptide antigens (Ag's) for priming of Ag-specific CD4 T cells. Proteome analyses showed a significant reduction in lysosomal MHC class II-processing proteins, such as cathepsins, which are lost from DCs by enhanced secretion. As these effects on DCs can be mimicked by chemical actin...

  6. Characterisation of cysteine proteinases responsible for digestive proteolysis in guts of larval Western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera) by expression in the yeast Pichia pastoris

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bown, D.P.; Wilkinson, H.S.; Jongsma, M.A.; Gatehouse, J.A.

    2004-01-01

    Cysteine proteinases are the major class of enzymes responsible for digestive proteolysis in western corn rootworm (Diabrotica virgifera), a serious pest of maize. A larval gut extract hydrolysed typical cathepsin substrates, such as Z-phe-arg-AMC and Z-arg-arg-AMC, and hydrolysis was inhibited by

  7. High pressure treatment of brine enhanced pork affects endopeptidase activity, protein solubility, and peptide formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossi, Alberto Blak; Gkarane, Vasiliki; Otte, Jeanette Anita Held

    2012-01-01

    at 600 MPa following storage at 2 °C for up to 8 weeks. In this report a novel protocol for SDS gelatin zymography was established, and an increase of cathepsin B and L activity after HP treatment was shown followed by a decrease during storage. No calpain activity was detected following HP treatment. HP...

  8. Kathepsine C : Een allosterisch enzyme

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gorter, Jeannette

    1969-01-01

    In chapter I an introduction into allosteric systems is given. In chapter II is a detailed method is described for the applica of Gly-Phe--p. nitroanilide (GPNA) as a substrate for the activity assay of the lysosomal enzyme cathepsin C. It is an allosteric which is activated by Cl-, Br-, 1-, CNS-,

  9. Simukunin from the Salivary Glands of the Black Fly Simulium vittatum Inhibits Enzymes That Regulate Clotting and Inflammatory Responses

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Tsujimoto, H.; Kotsyfakis, Michalis; Francischetti, I.M.B.; Eum, J. H.; Strand, M. R.; Champagne, D. E.

    2012-01-01

    Roč. 7, č. 2 (2012), e29964 E-ISSN 1932-6203 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z60220518 Keywords : Simulium vittatum * Kunitz-family protein * elastase * cathepsin G * Factor Xa * coagulation * inflammation * serine proteases * BPTI-like inhibitor * Simukunin Subject RIV: EC - Immunology Impact factor: 3.730, year: 2012

  10. Chicken collagen type II reduces articular cartilage destruction in a model of osteoarthritis in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, D; Shen, W

    2007-06-01

    To evaluate the therapeutic effects of domestic chicken collagen type II (CCII) on rat osteoarthritis (OA) and analyze concomitant changes in the level of Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-13, MMP-9, Cathepsin K and their mRNA as well as the tissue inhibitor of matrix metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1 mRNA in articular cartilage of osteoarthritic rats. Osteoarthritis models were surgically induced. Morphology of articular cartilage was done by haematoxylin and eosin staining and Mankin score was calculated, immunohistochemistry of MMP-13, MMP-9 and Cathepsin K was done by ABC method while the mRNA level for MMP-13, MMP-9, cathepsin K as well as TIMP-1 was evaluated by RT-PCR method. Oral administration of CCII reduced the morphological changes of osteoarthritic cartilage (shown by Mankin score), decreased levels of MMP-13, MMP-9, cathepsin K as well as their mRNA in articular cartilage from osteoarthritic rats while it exhibited no effect on TIMP-1 mRNA. Oral CCII reduced articular cartilage degradation of osteoarthritic rats and may probably be a potent drug candidate for OA treatment.

  11. A plant-insect interaction in 3D

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Srp, Jaroslav; Pachl, Petr; Řezáčová, Pavlína; Vondrášek, Jiří; Nussbaumerová, Martina; Horn, Martin; Mareš, Michael

    2015-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 1 (2015), s. 55 ISSN 1211-5894. [Discussions in Structural Molecular Biology. Annual Meeting of the Czech Society for Structural Biology /13./. 19.03.2015-21.03.2015, Nové Hrady] Institutional support: RVO:61388963 Keywords : LdCD * potato cathepsin D inhibitor * crystal structure Subject RIV: CE - Biochemistry

  12. Anatomy Journal of Africa - Vol 5, No 2 (2016)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Localization profile of Cathepsin L in the brain of African giant rat (Cricestomys gambianus) · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Claudius Luziga, Bui ThiToNga, Isaac Kashoma, Abdul Katakweba, Yamamoto Yoshimi, 618-630 ...

  13. Anatomy Journal of Africa - Vol 5, No 1 (2016)

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Localization profile of Cathepsin L in the brain of African giant rat (Cricestomys gambianus) · EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT EMAIL FREE FULL TEXT · DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT DOWNLOAD FULL TEXT. Claudius Luziga, Bui Thi To Nga, Isaac Kashoma, Abdul Katakweba, Yamamoto Yoshimi, 618-630 ...

  14. Effect of Recombinant alpha1-Antitrypsin Fc-Fused (AAT-Fc)Protein on the Inhibition of Inflammatory Cytokine Production and Streptozotocin-Induced Diabetes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lee, S.; Lee, Y.; Hong, K.; Hong, J.; Bae, S.; Choi, J.; Jhun, H.; Kwak, A.; Kim, E.; Jo, S.; Dinarello, C.A.; Kim, S.

    2013-01-01

    alpha1-Antitrypsin (AAT) is a member of the serine proteinase inhibitor family that impedes the enzymatic activity of serine proteinases, including human neutrophil elastase, cathepsin G and neutrophil proteinase 3. Here, we expressed recombinant AAT by fusing the intact AAT gene to the constant

  15. AFRICAN GIANT RAT (Cricestomys gambianus

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-12-18

    Dec 18, 2015 ... of cathespin L in relation to spatial memory establishment, learning coordination and disease mechanisms is discussed. Keywords: Cathepsin L ... spatial memory in mouse (Dash et al., 2000), while the sharp modulation in the .... ventral area of secondary auditory cortex and primary somatosensory cortex ...

  16. Matrix metalloproteinase-12 (MMP-12) in osteoclasts

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hou, Peng; Troen, Tine; Ovejero, Maria C

    2004-01-01

    Osteoclasts require matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity and cathepsin K to resorb bone, but the critical MMP has not been identified. Osteoclasts express MMP-9 and MMP-14, which do not appear limiting for resorption, and the expression of additional MMPs is not clear. MMP-12, also called...

  17. Hypoxia enhances the antiglioma cytotoxicity of B10, a glycosylated derivative of betulinic acid.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Fischer

    Full Text Available B10 is a glycosylated derivative of betulinic acid with promising activity against glioma cells. Lysosomal cell death pathways appear to be essential for its cytotoxicity. We investigated the influence of hypoxia, nutrient deprivation and current standard therapies on B10 cytotoxicity. The human glioma cell lines LN-308 and LNT-229 were exposed to B10 alone or together with irradiation, temozolomide, nutrient deprivation or hypoxia. Cell growth and viability were evaluated by crystal violet staining, clonogenicity assays, propidium iodide uptake and LDH release assays. Cell death was examined using an inhibitor of lysosomal acidification (bafilomycin A1, a cathepsin inhibitor (CA074-Me and a short-hairpin RNA targeting cathepsin B. Hypoxia substantially enhanced B10-induced cell death. This effect was sensitive to bafilomycin A1 and thus dependent on hypoxia-induced lysosomal aci