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Sample records for catecholaminergic neurons isolated

  1. Molecular basis for catecholaminergic neuron diversity

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    Grimm, Jan; Mueller, Anne; Hefti, Franz; Rosenthal, Arnon

    2004-01-01

    Catecholaminergic neurons control diverse cognitive, motor, and endocrine functions and are associated with multiple psychiatric and neurodegenerative disorders. We present global gene-expression profiles that define the four major classes of dopaminergic (DA) and noradrenergic neurons in the brain. Hypothalamic DA neurons and noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus display distinct group-specific signatures of transporters, channels, transcription, plasticity, axon-guidance, and surviva...

  2. Neuromelanin, neurotransmitter status and brainstem location determine the differential vulnerability of catecholaminergic neurons to mitochondrial DNA deletions

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    Elstner Matthias

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Deletions of the mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA accumulate to high levels in dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc in normal aging and in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD. Human nigral neurons characteristically contain the pigment neuromelanin (NM, which is believed to alter the cellular redox-status. The impact of neuronal pigmentation, neurotransmitter status and brainstem location on the susceptibility to mtDNA damage remains unclear. We quantified mtDNA deletions (ΔmtDNA in single pigmented and non-pigmented catecholaminergic, as well as non-catecholaminergic neurons of the human SNc, the ventral tegmental area (VTA and the locus coeruleus (LC, using laser capture microdissection and single-cell real-time PCR. Results In healthy aged individuals, ΔmtDNA levels were highest in pigmented catecholaminergic neurons (25.2 ± 14.9%, followed by non-pigmented catecholamergic (18.0 ± 11.2% and non-catecholaminergic neurons (12.3 ± 12.3%; p Conclusions Catecholaminergic brainstem neurons are differentially susceptible to mtDNA damage. Pigmented dopaminergic neurons of the SNc show the highest ΔmtDNA levels, possibly explaining the exceptional vulnerability of the nigro-striatal system in PD and aging. Although loss of pigmented noradrenergic LC neurons also is an early feature of PD pathology, mtDNA levels are not elevated in this nucleus in healthy controls. Thus, ΔmtDNA are neither an inevitable consequence of catecholamine metabolism nor a universal explanation for the regional vulnerability seen in PD.

  3. Involvement of catecholaminergic neurons in motor innervation of striated muscle in the mouse esophagus.

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    van der Keylen, Piet; Garreis, Fabian; Steigleder, Ruth; Sommer, Daniel; Neuhuber, Winfried L; Wörl, Jürgen

    2016-05-01

    Enteric co-innervation is a peculiar innervation pattern of striated esophageal musculature. Both anatomical and functional data on enteric co-innervation related to various transmitters have been collected in different species, although its function remains enigmatic. However, it is unclear whether catecholaminergic components are involved in such a co-innervation. Thus, we examined to identify catecholaminergic neuronal elements and clarify their relationship to other innervation components in the esophagus, using immunohistochemistry with antibodies against tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), vesicular acetylcholine transporter (VAChT), choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) and protein gene product 9.5 (PGP 9.5), α-bungarotoxin (α-BT) and PCR with primers for amplification of cDNA encoding TH and dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH). TH-positive nerve fibers were abundant throughout the myenteric plexus and localized on about 14% of α-BT-labelled motor endplates differing from VAChT-positive vagal nerve terminals. TH-positive perikarya represented a subpopulation of only about 2.8% of all PGP 9.5-positive myenteric neurons. Analysis of mRNA showed both TH and DBH transcripts in the mouse esophagus. As ChAT-positive neurons in the compact formation of the nucleus ambiguus were negative for TH, the TH-positive nerve varicosities on motor endplates are presumably of enteric origin, although a sympathetic origin cannot be excluded. In the medulla oblongata, the cholinergic ambiguus neurons were densely supplied with TH-positive varicosities. Thus, catecholamines may modulate vagal motor innervation of esophageal-striated muscles not only at the peripheral level via enteric co-innervation but also at the central level via projections to the nucleus ambiguus. As Parkinson's disease, with a loss of central dopaminergic neurons, also affects the enteric nervous system and dysphagia is prevalent in patients with this disease, investigation of intrinsic catecholamines in the esophagus may

  4. An optogenetic mouse model of rett syndrome targeting on catecholaminergic neurons.

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    Zhang, Shuang; Johnson, Christopher M; Cui, Ningren; Xing, Hao; Zhong, Weiwei; Wu, Yang; Jiang, Chun

    2016-10-01

    Rett syndrome (RTT) is a neurodevelopmental disorder affecting multiple functions, including the norepinephrine (NE) system. In the CNS, NE is produced mostly by neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC), where defects in intrinsic neuronal properties, NE biosynthetic enzymes, neuronal CO2 sensitivity, and synaptic currents have been reported in mouse models of RTT. LC neurons in methyl-CpG-binding protein 2 gene (Mecp2) null mice show a high rate of spontaneous firing, although whether such hyperexcitability might increase or decrease the NE release from synapses is unknown. To activate the NEergic axonal terminals selectively, we generated an optogenetic mouse model of RTT in which NEergic neuronal excitability can be manipulated with light. Using commercially available mouse breeders, we produced a new strain of double-transgenic mice with Mecp2 knockout and channelrhodopsin (ChR) knockin in catecholaminergic neurons. Several RTT-like phenotypes were found in the tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)-ChR-Mecp2(-/Y) mice, including hypoactivity, low body weight, hindlimb clasping, and breathing disorders. In brain slices, optostimulation produced depolarization and an increase in the firing rate of LC neurons from TH-ChR control mice. In TH-ChR control mice, optostimulation of presynaptic NEergic neurons augmented the firing rate of hypoglossal neurons (HNs), which was blocked by the α-adrenoceptor antagonist phentolamine. Such optostimulation of NEergic terminals had almost no effect on HNs from two or three TH-ChR-Mecp2(-/Y) mice, indicating that excessive excitation of presynaptic neurons does not benefit NEergic modulation in mice with Mecp2 disruption. These results also demonstrate the feasibility of generating double-transgenic mice for studies of RTT with commercially available mice, which are inexpensive, labor/time efficient, and promising for cell-specific stimulation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:27317352

  5. Distribution of catecholaminergic presympathetic-premotor neurons in the rat lower brainstem.

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    Nam, H; Kerman, I A

    2016-06-01

    We previously characterized the organization of presympathetic-premotor neurons (PSPMNs), which send descending poly-synaptic projections with collaterals to skeletal muscle and the adrenal gland. Such neurons may play a role in shaping integrated adaptive responses, and many of them were found within well-characterized regions of noradrenergic cell populations suggesting that some of the PSPMNs are catecholaminergic. To address this issue, we used retrograde trans-synaptic tract-tracing with attenuated pseudorabies virus (PRV) recombinants combined with multi-label immunofluorescence to identify PSPMNs expressing tyrosine hydroxylase (TH). Our findings indicate that TH-immunoreactive (ir) PSPMNs are present throughout the brainstem within multiple cell populations, including the A1, C1, C2, C3, A5 and A7 cell groups along with the locus coeruleus (LC) and the nucleus subcoeruleus (SubC). The largest numbers of TH-ir PSPMNs were located within the LC and SubC. Within SubC and the A7 cell group, about 70% of TH-ir neurons were PSPMNs, which was a significantly greater fraction of neurons than in the other brain regions we examined. These findings indicate that TH-ir neurons near the pontomesencephalic junction that are distributed across the LC, SubC, and the A7 may play a prominent role in somatomotor-sympathetic integration, and that the major functional role of the A7 and SubC noradrenergic cell groups maybe in the coordination of concomitant activation of somatomotor and sympathetic outflows. These neurons may participate in mediating homeostatic adaptations that require simultaneous activation of sympathetic and somatomotor nerves in the periphery. PMID:26946268

  6. Distribution and morphology of catecholaminergic and serotonergic neurons in the brain of the highveld gerbil, Tatera brantsii.

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    Moon, Don-Joon; Maseko, Busisiwe C; Ihunwo, Amadi O; Fuxe, Kjell; Manger, Paul R

    2007-11-01

    The distribution, morphology and nuclear subdivisions of the putative catecholaminergic and serotonergic systems within the brain of the highveld gerbil were identified following immunohistochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase and serotonin. The aim of the present study was to investigate possible differences in the complement of nuclear subdivisions of these systems when comparing those of the highveld gerbil with those of the laboratory rat. The highveld gerbil was chosen as it is relatively closely related to the laboratory rat, but the Gerbillinae and Murinae lineages diverged over 20 million years ago. Moreover, even though brain sizes are similar, the life history and phenotypes between these two species are substantially different. The gerbils used in the present study were caught from the wild, which is again another contrast to the laboratory rat. While these differences may lead to the prediction of significant differences in the nuclear complement of these systems, we found that all nuclei identified in both systems in the laboratory rat in several earlier studies had direct homologs in the brain of the highveld gerbil. Moreover, there were no additional nuclei in the brain of the highveld gerbil that are not found in the laboratory rat. The only discernable difference between the two species was a greater density and number of catecholaminergic neurons in the olfactory bulb of the highveld gerbil. Thus, the evolution of nuclear parcellation in these systems appears to demonstrate a form of phylogenetic constraint related to the order Rodentia. PMID:17606363

  7. Comprehensive catecholaminergic projectome analysis reveals single-neuron integration of zebrafish ascending and descending dopaminergic systems

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    Tay, Tuan Leng; Ronneberger, Olaf; Ryu, Soojin; Nitschke, Roland; Driever, Wolfgang

    2011-01-01

    Essential components of animal behaviour are modulated by dopaminergic (DA) and noradrenergic circuitry. In this study, we reveal at cellular resolution the complete set of projections ('projectome') of every single type of DA and noradrenergio neurons in the central nervous system of zebrafish larvae. The most extensive DA projections are established by posterior tubercular otp-dependent neurons, with individual somata integrating the ascending DA system, the descending diencephalospinal, as...

  8. Exposure to advertisement calls of reproductive competitors activates vocal-acoustic and catecholaminergic neurons in the plainfin midshipman fish, Porichthys notatus.

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    Petersen, Christopher L; Timothy, Miky; Kim, D Spencer; Bhandiwad, Ashwin A; Mohr, Robert A; Sisneros, Joseph A; Forlano, Paul M

    2013-01-01

    While the neural circuitry and physiology of the auditory system is well studied among vertebrates, far less is known about how the auditory system interacts with other neural substrates to mediate behavioral responses to social acoustic signals. One species that has been the subject of intensive neuroethological investigation with regard to the production and perception of social acoustic signals is the plainfin midshipman fish, Porichthys notatus, in part because acoustic communication is essential to their reproductive behavior. Nesting male midshipman vocally court females by producing a long duration advertisement call. Females localize males by their advertisement call, spawn and deposit all their eggs in their mate's nest. As multiple courting males establish nests in close proximity to one another, the perception of another male's call may modulate individual calling behavior in competition for females. We tested the hypothesis that nesting males exposed to advertisement calls of other males would show elevated neural activity in auditory and vocal-acoustic brain centers as well as differential activation of catecholaminergic neurons compared to males exposed only to ambient noise. Experimental brains were then double labeled by immunofluorescence (-ir) for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), an enzyme necessary for catecholamine synthesis, and cFos, an immediate-early gene product used as a marker for neural activation. Males exposed to other advertisement calls showed a significantly greater percentage of TH-ir cells colocalized with cFos-ir in the noradrenergic locus coeruleus and the dopaminergic periventricular posterior tuberculum, as well as increased numbers of cFos-ir neurons in several levels of the auditory and vocal-acoustic pathway. Increased activation of catecholaminergic neurons may serve to coordinate appropriate behavioral responses to male competitors. Additionally, these results implicate a role for specific catecholaminergic neuronal groups in

  9. Exposure to advertisement calls of reproductive competitors activates vocal-acoustic and catecholaminergic neurons in the plainfin midshipman fish, Porichthys notatus.

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    Christopher L Petersen

    Full Text Available While the neural circuitry and physiology of the auditory system is well studied among vertebrates, far less is known about how the auditory system interacts with other neural substrates to mediate behavioral responses to social acoustic signals. One species that has been the subject of intensive neuroethological investigation with regard to the production and perception of social acoustic signals is the plainfin midshipman fish, Porichthys notatus, in part because acoustic communication is essential to their reproductive behavior. Nesting male midshipman vocally court females by producing a long duration advertisement call. Females localize males by their advertisement call, spawn and deposit all their eggs in their mate's nest. As multiple courting males establish nests in close proximity to one another, the perception of another male's call may modulate individual calling behavior in competition for females. We tested the hypothesis that nesting males exposed to advertisement calls of other males would show elevated neural activity in auditory and vocal-acoustic brain centers as well as differential activation of catecholaminergic neurons compared to males exposed only to ambient noise. Experimental brains were then double labeled by immunofluorescence (-ir for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, an enzyme necessary for catecholamine synthesis, and cFos, an immediate-early gene product used as a marker for neural activation. Males exposed to other advertisement calls showed a significantly greater percentage of TH-ir cells colocalized with cFos-ir in the noradrenergic locus coeruleus and the dopaminergic periventricular posterior tuberculum, as well as increased numbers of cFos-ir neurons in several levels of the auditory and vocal-acoustic pathway. Increased activation of catecholaminergic neurons may serve to coordinate appropriate behavioral responses to male competitors. Additionally, these results implicate a role for specific catecholaminergic

  10. Hypoxia and electrical stimulation of the carotid sinus nerve induce Fos-like immunoreactivity within catecholaminergic and serotoninergic neurons of the rat brainstem.

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    Erickson, J T; Millhorn, D E

    1994-10-01

    A complete understanding of the neural mechanisms responsible for the chemoreceptor and baroreceptor reflexes requires precise knowledge of the locations and chemical phenotypes of higher-order neurons within these reflex pathways. In the present study, the protein product (Fos) of the c-fos protooncogene was used as a metabolic marker to trace central neural pathways following activation of carotid sinus nerve afferent fibers. In addition, immunohistochemical double-labeling techniques were used to define the chemical phenotypes of activated neurons. Both electrical stimulation of the carotid sinus nerve and physiological stimulation of the carotid bodies by hypoxia induced Fos-like immunoreactivity in catecholaminergic neurons containing tyrosine hydroxylase or phenylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase in the ventrolateral medulla oblongata and, to a lesser degree, in the dorsal vagal complex. Tyrosine hydroxylase/Fos colocalization was also observed in the locus coeruleus and the A5 noradrenergic cell group in pons. Many serotoninergic neurons in nucleus raphe pallidus, nucleus raphe magnus, and along the ventral medullary surface contained Fos-like immunoreactivity. In pons and midbrain, Fos-like immunoreactivity was observed in the lateral parabrachial and Kölliker-Fuse nuclei, the inferior colliculus, the cuneiform nucleus, and in the vicinity of the Edinger-Westphal nucleus, but no catecholaminergic or serotoninergic colocalization was observed in these regions. Although Fos-labeled cells were observed within and lateral to the dorsal raphe nucleus, few were catecholaminergic or serotoninergic. This study further defines a potential central neuroanatomical substrate for the chemoreceptor and/or baroreceptor reflexes. PMID:7814687

  11. PYY(3-36) Induces Fos in the Arcuate Nucleus and in both Catecholaminergic and Non-catecholaminergic Neurons in the Nucleus Tractus Solitarius of Rats

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    Blevins, J.E.; Chelikani, P. K.; Haver, A. C.; Reidelberger, R. D.

    2007-01-01

    Peptide YY (3-36) [PYY(3-36)] inhibits feeding in rodents, nonhuman primates and humans, yet the neural circuits underlying this action remain to be determined. Here we assessed whether PYY(3-36) inhibits feeding by activating neurons in forebrain and hindbrain sites containing Y2 receptors and linked to control of food intake, or in hindbrain sites immediately downstream of vagal afferent neurons. Rats received an anorexigenic dose of PYY(3-36), and the number of neurons expressing Fos, an i...

  12. Presence of a dynorphin-like peptide in a restricted subpopulation of catecholaminergic neurons in rat nucleus tractus solitarii.

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    Ceccatelli, S; Seroogy, K B; Millhorn, D E; Terenius, L

    1992-09-01

    Immunofluorescence colocalization techniques were used to examine the extent of coexistence of the endogenous opioid peptide dynorphin with catecholamines and the related opioid peptide enkephalin within neurons of the rat medulla oblongata. Immunoreactivities for dynorphin and the catecholamine-synthesizing enzyme tyrosine hydroxylase were found to coexist within a limited subpopulation of A2 catecholamine cells, localized to the medial nucleus of the nucleus tractus solitarii. Colocalization of the two opioid peptides was found mainly within perikarya situated in the medial and ventrolateral nuclei of the nucleus tractus solitarii. Triple-labeling studies revealed only rare cases of catecholamine/dynorphin/enkephalin coexistence. These data demonstrate that dynorphin is present within a restricted subpopulation of catecholamine neurons in the dorsal medulla oblongata. In addition, the content of either of the opioids enkephalin or dynorphin appears to distinguish subsets of medullary catecholamine neurons. PMID:1356595

  13. Columnar Distribution of Catecholaminergic Neurons in the Ventrolateral Periaqueductal Gray (vlPAG) and Their Relationship to Efferent Pathways

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    Suckow, Shelby K.; Deichsel, Emily L.; Ingram, Susan L; Morgan, Michael M; Aicher, Sue A.

    2012-01-01

    The periaqueductal gray (PAG) is a critical brain region involved in opioid analgesia and provides efferents to descending pathways that modulate nociception. In addition, the PAG contains ascending pathways to regions involved in the regulation of reward, including the substantia nigra (SN) and the ventral tegmental area (VTA). SN and VTA contain dopaminergic neurons that are critical for the maintenance of positive reinforcement. Interestingly, the PAG is also reported to contain a populati...

  14. New perspectives on catecholaminergic regulation of executive circuits: evidence for independent modulation of prefrontal functions by midbrain dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurons

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    Chandler, Daniel J.; WATERHOUSE, BARRY D.; Gao, Wen-Jun

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive functions associated with prefrontal cortex (PFC), such as working memory and attention, are strongly influenced by catecholamine [dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE)] release. Midbrain dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area and noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus are major sources of DA and NE to the PFC. It is traditionally believed that DA and NE neurons are homogeneous with highly divergent axons innervating multiple terminal fields and once released, DA a...

  15. New Perspectives on Catecholaminergic Regulation of Executive Circuits: Evidence for Independent Modulation of Prefrontal Functions by Midbrain Dopaminergic and Noradrenergic Neurons

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    Wen-Jun Gao

    2014-01-01

    Cognitive functions associated with prefrontal cortex, such as working memory and attention, are strongly influenced by catecholamine (dopamine, DA and norepinephrine, NE) release. Midbrain dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA) and noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC) are major sources of DA and NE to the prefrontal cortex. It is traditionally believed that DA and NE neurons are homogeneous with highly divergent axons innervating multiple terminal fields and on...

  16. Deficient vesicular storage: A common theme in catecholaminergic neurodegeneration.

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    Goldstein, David S; Holmes, Courtney; Sullivan, Patti; Mash, Deborah C; Sidransky, Ellen; Stefani, Alessandro; Kopin, Irwin J; Sharabi, Yehonatan

    2015-09-01

    Several neurodegenerative diseases involve loss of catecholamine neurons--Parkinson's disease (PD) is a prototypical example. Catecholamine neurons are rare in the nervous system, and why they are lost has been mysterious. Accumulating evidence supports the concept of "autotoxicity"--inherent cytotoxicity caused by catecholamine metabolites. Since vesicular sequestration limits the buildup of toxic products of enzymatic and spontaneous oxidation of catecholamines, a vesicular storage defect could play a pathogenic role in the death of catecholaminergic neurons in a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. In putamen, deficient vesicular storage is revealed in vivo by accelerated loss of (18)F-DOPA-derived radioactivity and post-mortem by decreased tissue dopamine (DA):DOPA ratios; in myocardium in vivo by accelerated loss of (18)F-dopamine-derived radioactivity and post-mortem by increased 3,4-dihydroxyphenylglycol:norepinephrine (DHPG:NE) ratios; and in sympathetic noradrenergic nerves overall in vivo by increased plasma F-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (F-DOPAC):DHPG ratios. We retrospectively analyzed data from 20 conditions with decreased or intact catecholaminergic innervation, involving different etiologies, pathogenetic mechanisms, and lesion locations. All conditions involving parkinsonism had accelerated loss of putamen (18)F-DOPA-derived radioactivity; in those with post-mortem data there were also decreased putamen DA:DOPA ratios. All conditions involving cardiac sympathetic denervation had accelerated loss of myocardial (18)F-dopamine-derived radioactivity; in those with post-mortem data there were increased myocardial DHPG:NE ratios. All conditions involving localized loss of catecholaminergic innervation had evidence of decreased vesicular storage specifically in the denervated regions. Thus, across neurodegenerative diseases, loss of catecholaminergic neurons seems to be associated with decreased vesicular storage in the residual neurons. PMID:26255205

  17. New Perspectives on Catecholaminergic Regulation of Executive Circuits: Evidence for Independent Modulation of Prefrontal Functions by Midbrain Dopaminergic and Noradrenergic Neurons

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    Wen-Jun Gao

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Cognitive functions associated with prefrontal cortex, such as working memory and attention, are strongly influenced by catecholamine (dopamine, DA and norepinephrine, NE release. Midbrain dopaminergic neurons in the ventral tegmental area (VTA and noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC are major sources of DA and NE to the prefrontal cortex. It is traditionally believed that DA and NE neurons are homogeneous with highly divergent axons innervating multiple terminal fields and once released, DA and NE individually or complementarily modulate the prefrontal functions and other brain regions. However, recent studies indicate that both DA and NE neurons in the mammalian brain are heterogeneous with a great degree of diversity, including their developmental lineages, molecular phenotypes, projection targets, afferent inputs, synaptic connectivity, physiological properties, and behavioral functions. These diverse characteristics could potentially endow DA and NE neurons with distinct roles in executive function, and alterations in their responses to genetic and epigenetic risk factors during development may contribute to distinct phenotypic and functional changes in disease states. In this review of recent literature, we discuss how these advances in DA and NE neurons change our thinking of catecholamine influences in cognitive functions in the brain, especially functions related to prefrontal cortex. We review how the projection-target specific populations of neurons in these two systems execute their functions in both normal and abnormal conditions. Additionally, we explore what open questions remain and suggest where future research needs to move in order to provide perspective insight into the cause of neuropsychiatric disorders related to DA and NE systems.

  18. Dorsal Raphe Dopamine Neurons Represent the Experience of Social Isolation.

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    Matthews, Gillian A; Nieh, Edward H; Vander Weele, Caitlin M; Halbert, Sarah A; Pradhan, Roma V; Yosafat, Ariella S; Glober, Gordon F; Izadmehr, Ehsan M; Thomas, Rain E; Lacy, Gabrielle D; Wildes, Craig P; Ungless, Mark A; Tye, Kay M

    2016-02-11

    The motivation to seek social contact may arise from either positive or negative emotional states, as social interaction can be rewarding and social isolation can be aversive. While ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons may mediate social reward, a cellular substrate for the negative affective state of loneliness has remained elusive. Here, we identify a functional role for DA neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), in which we observe synaptic changes following acute social isolation. DRN DA neurons show increased activity upon social contact following isolation, revealed by in vivo calcium imaging. Optogenetic activation of DRN DA neurons increases social preference but causes place avoidance. Furthermore, these neurons are necessary for promoting rebound sociability following an acute period of isolation. Finally, the degree to which these neurons modulate behavior is predicted by social rank, together supporting a role for DRN dopamine neurons in mediating a loneliness-like state. PAPERCLIP. PMID:26871628

  19. The distribution and morphological characteristics of catecholaminergic cells in the brain of monotremes as revealed by tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry.

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    Manger, P R; Fahringer, H M; Pettigrew, J D; Siegel, J M

    2002-01-01

    The present study describes the distribution and cellular morphology of catecholaminergic neurons in the CNS of two species of monotreme, the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) and the short-beaked echidna (Tachyglossus aculeatus). Tyrosine hydroxylase immunohistochemistry was used to visualize these neurons. The standard A1-A17, C1-C3 nomenclature was used for expediency, but the neuroanatomical names of the various nuclei have also been given. Monotremes exhibit catecholaminergic neurons in the diencephalon (A11, A12, A13, A14, A15), midbrain (A8, A9, A10), rostral rhombencephalon (A5, A6, A7), and medulla (A1, A2, C1, C2). The subdivisions of these neurons are in general agreement with those of other mammals, and indeed other amniotes. Apart from minor differences, those being a lack of A4, A3, and C3 groups, the catecholaminergic system of monotremes is very similar to that of other mammals. Catecholaminergic neurons outside these nuclei, such as those reported for other mammals, were not numerous with occasional cells observed in the striatum. It seems unlikely that differences in the sleep phenomenology of monotremes, as compared to other mammals, can be explained by these differences. The similarity of this system across mammalian and amniote species underlines the evolutionary conservatism of the catecholaminergic system. PMID:12476055

  20. Dorsal Raphe Dopamine Neurons Represent the Experience of Social Isolation

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    Matthews, Gillian A.; Nieh, Edward H.; Vander Weele, Caitlin M.; Halbert, Sarah A.; Pradhan, Roma V.; Yosafat, Ariella S.; Glober, Gordon F.; Izadmehr, Ehsan M.; Thomas, Rain E.; Lacy, Gabrielle D.; Wildes, Craig P.; Ungless, Mark A.; Tye, Kay M.

    2015-01-01

    Summary The motivation to seek social contact may arise from either positive or negative emotional states, as social interaction can be rewarding and social isolation can be aversive. While ventral tegmental area (VTA) dopamine (DA) neurons may mediate social reward, a cellular substrate for the negative affective state of loneliness has remained elusive. Here, we identify a functional role for DA neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN), in which we observe synaptic changes following acute ...

  1. Catecholaminergic neurotransmission in heart and brain, development of tracers for positron emission tomography

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    Langer, Claus Oliver

    2000-01-01

    The catecholamines norepinephrine and its biosynthetic precursor dopamine are two principal neurotransmitters in the human central nervous system (CNS). Moreover, norepinephrine is a major transmitter substance in the peripheral, autonomic nervous system. Positron emission tomography (PET) is a non-invasive imaging technique that uses positron-labeled molecules to image and measure the function of biological processes in vivo. Neuronal catecholaminergic pathways, both in CNS...

  2. Genetic dissection of dopaminergic and noradrenergic contributions to catecholaminergic tracts in early larval zebrafish

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    Kastenhuber, Edda; Kratochwil, Claudius F; Ryu, Soojin; Schweitzer, Jörn; Driever, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    The catecholamines dopamine and noradrenaline provide some of the major neuromodulatory systems with far-ranging projections in the brain and spinal cord of vertebrates. However, development of these complex systems is only partially understood. Zebrafish provide an excellent model for genetic analysis of neuronal specification and axonal projections in vertebrates. Here, we analyze the ontogeny of the catecholaminergic projections in zebrafish embryos and larvae up to the fifth day of develo...

  3. Modafinil as a catecholaminergic agent: empirical evidence and unanswered questions

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    Jonathan P Wisor

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Modafinil, in its two clinical formulations (Provigil® and Nuvigil®, is a widely prescribed wake-promoting therapeutic agent. It binds competitively to the cell membrane dopamine transporter and is dependent on catecholaminergic (dopaminergic and adrenergic signaling for its wake-promoting effects. The clinical spectrum of effects for modafinil is distinct from the effects seen with other catecholaminergic agents. Relative to other commonly used agents that act through catecholaminergic mechanisms, modafinil has a relatively low abuse potential, produces wakefulness with an attenuated compensatory sleep recovery thereafter, and does not ameliorate cataplexy in narcolepsy. These clinically relevant phenomenological differences between modafinil and agents such as amphetamines and cocaine do not eliminate catecholaminergic effects as a possible mediator of its wake-promoting action; they merely reflect its unique pharmacological profile. Modafinil is an exceptionally weak, but apparently very selective, dopamine transporter inhibitor. The pharmacodynamic response to modafinil, as measured by dopamine levels in brain microdialysate, is protracted relative to other agents that act via catecholaminergic mechanisms. The conformational constraints on the interaction of modafinil with the dopamine transporter—and probably, as a consequence, its effects on trace amine receptor signaling in the catecholaminergic cell—are unique among catecholaminergic agents. These unique pharmacological properties of modafinil should be considered both in seeking to thoroughly understand its putatively elusive mechanism of action and in the design of novel therapeutic agents.

  4. Clinical Challenges in Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia.

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    Imberti, Jacopo F; Underwood, Katherine; Mazzanti, Andrea; Priori, Silvia G

    2016-08-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is an inheritable cardiac disorder associated with exercise- and stress-induced sudden death in young individuals. Although important steps forward have been made in the comprehension and treatment of this disease, several aspects remain unclear. Firstly, from an epidemiological standpoint the actual prevalence of CPVT is still unknown and possibly underestimated. In addition, the diagnostic process remains very challenging and can be supported by genetic analysis in only about half of the cases. Finally, up to one third of CPVT patients continue to present complex arrhythmias despite beta blocker treatment; the role of newer therapeutic options, such as flecainide and left cardiac sympathetic denervation, needs to be further elucidated. All these points constitute challenges for the cardiologist in the management of CPVT patients and fuel research into new diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches. PMID:26948768

  5. Nuclear organization of cholinergic, catecholaminergic, serotonergic and orexinergic systems in the brain of the Tasmanian devil (Sarcophilus harrisii).

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    Patzke, Nina; Bertelsen, Mads F; Fuxe, Kjell; Manger, Paul R

    2014-11-01

    This study investigated the nuclear organization of four immunohistochemically identifiable neural systems (cholinergic, catecholaminergic, serotonergic and orexinergic) within the brains of three male Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii), which had a mean brain mass of 11.6g. We found that the nuclei generally observed for these systems in other mammalian brains were present in the brain of the Tasmanian devil. Despite this, specific differences in the nuclear organization of the cholinergic, catecholaminergic and serotonergic systems appear to carry a phylogenetic signal. In the cholinergic system, only the dorsal hypothalamic cholinergic nucleus could be observed, while an extra dorsal subdivision of the laterodorsal tegmental nucleus and cholinergic neurons within the gelatinous layer of the caudal spinal trigeminal nucleus were observed. Within the catecholaminergic system the A4 nucleus of the locus coeruleus complex was absent, as was the caudal ventrolateral serotonergic group of the serotonergic system. The organization of the orexinergic system was similar to that seen in many mammals previously studied. Overall, while showing strong similarities to the organization of these systems in other mammals, the specific differences observed in the Tasmanian devil reveal either order specific, or class specific, features of these systems. Further studies will reveal the extent of change in the nuclear organization of these systems in marsupials and how these potential changes may affect functionality. PMID:25150966

  6. Anopheles gambiae mosquito isolated neurons : a new biological model for optimizing insecticide/repellent efficacy

    OpenAIRE

    Lavialle-Defaix, C.; Apaire-Marchais, V; Legros, C.; Pennetier, Cédric; Mohamed, A; P. Licznar; Corbel, Vincent; Lapied, B

    2011-01-01

    To understand better the mode of action of insecticides and repellents used in vector-borne diseases control, we developed a new biological model based on mosquito neurons isolated from adults Anopheles gambiae heads. This cellular model is well adapted to multidisciplinary approaches: electrophysiology, pharmacology, molecular biology and biochemical assays. Using RT-PCR, we demonstrated that isolated neurons express the nicotinic acetylcholine receptor subunit alpha 1 (Ag alpha 1 nAchR), tw...

  7. LASER BIOLOGY: Peculiarities of studying an isolated neuron by the method of laser interference microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yusipovich, Alexander I.; Novikov, Sergey M.; Kazakova, Tatiana A.; Erokhova, Liudmila A.; Brazhe, Nadezda A.; Lazarev, Grigory L.; Maksimov, Georgy V.

    2006-09-01

    Actual aspects of using a new method of laser interference microscopy (LIM) for studying nerve cells are discussed. The peculiarities of the LIM display of neurons are demonstrated by the example of isolated neurons of a pond snail Lymnaea stagnalis. A comparative analysis of the images of the cell and subcellular structures of a neuron obtained by the methods of interference microscopy, optical transmission microscopy, and confocal microscopy is performed. Various aspects of the application of LIM for studying the lateral dimensions and internal structure of the cytoplasm and organelles of a neuron in cytology and cell physiology are discussed.

  8. [Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia is a rare inherited heart disease.

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Anders Gaarsdal; Tfelt-Hansen, 1jacob; Olesen, Morten S;

    2010-01-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia is a rare inherited heart disease, which can lead to life-threatening ventricular arrhythmias in patients with a structurally normal heart. The age of onset is usually between two and 12 years and the initial symptom is frequently syncope or...

  9. Sudden Death and Myocardial Lesions after Damage to Catecholamine Neurons of the Nucleus Tractus Solitarii in Rat

    OpenAIRE

    Talman, William T.; Dragon, Deidre Nitschke; Jones, Susan Y.; Moore, Steven A.; Lin, Li-Hsien

    2012-01-01

    Lesions that remove neurons expressing neurokinin-1 (NK1) receptors from the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS) without removing catecholaminergic neurons lead to loss of baroreflexes, labile arterial pressure, myocardial lesions and sudden death. Because destruction of NTS catecholaminergic neurons expressing tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) may also cause lability of arterial pressure and loss of baroreflexes, we sought to test the hypothesis that cardiac lesions associated with lability are not depe...

  10. Isolation of specific neurons from C. elegans larvae for gene expression profiling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W Clay Spencer

    Full Text Available The simple and well-described structure of the C. elegans nervous system offers an unprecedented opportunity to identify the genetic programs that define the connectivity and function of individual neurons and their circuits. A correspondingly precise gene expression map of C. elegans neurons would facilitate the application of genetic methods toward this goal. Here we describe a powerful new approach, SeqCeL (RNA-Seq of C. elegans cells for producing gene expression profiles of specific larval C. elegans neurons.We have exploited available GFP reporter lines for FACS isolation of specific larval C. elegans neurons for RNA-Seq analysis. Our analysis showed that diverse classes of neurons are accessible to this approach. To demonstrate the applicability of this strategy to rare neuron types, we generated RNA-Seq profiles of the NSM serotonergic neurons that occur as a single bilateral pair of cells in the C. elegans pharynx. These data detected >1,000 NSM enriched transcripts, including the majority of previously known NSM-expressed genes.This work offers a simple and robust protocol for expression profiling studies of post-embryonic C. elegans neurons and thus provides an important new method for identifying candidate genes for key roles in neuron-specific development and function.

  11. Postexertional Supraventricular Tachycardia in Children with Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott D. N. Else

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT is a severe arrhythmia associated with sudden death in the young. It is caused by defective calcium handling in ventricular myocytes. The association of supraventricular tachycardia (SVT with CPVT is described in the literature, occurring in the lead-up to ventricular tachycardia during exercise testing. We describe three cases of SVT that were initiated in the recovery period of exercise testing in children with CPVT.

  12. Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia: An exciting new era

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shashank P Behere

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT is a highly malignant inheritable cardiac channelopathy. The past decade and a half has provided exciting new discoveries elucidating the genetic etiology and pathophysiology of CPVT. This review of the current literature on CPVT aims to summarize the state of the art in our understanding of the genetic etiology and the molecular pathogenesis of CPVT, and how these relate to our current approach to diagnosis and management. We will also shed light on groundbreaking new work that will continue to refine the management of CPVT in the future. As our knowledge of CPVT continues to grow, further studies will yield a better understanding of the efficacy and pitfalls of established diagnostic approaches and therapies as well as help shape newer diagnostic and treatment strategies. Two separate searches were run on the National Center for Biotechnology Information's (NCBI website. The first used the medical subject headings (MeSH database using the term “catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia” that was run on the PubMed database using the age filter (birth to 18 years, and it yielded 58 results. The second search using the MeSH database with the search term “catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia,” applying no filters yielded 178 results. The abstracts of all these articles were studied and the articles were categorized and organized. Articles of relevance were read in full. As and where applicable, relevant references and citations from the primary articles were further explored and read in full.

  13. A Method to Target and Isolate Airway-innervating Sensory Neurons in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaelberer, Melanie Maya; Jordt, Sven-Eric

    2016-01-01

    Somatosensory nerves transduce thermal, mechanical, chemical, and noxious stimuli caused by both endogenous and environmental agents. The cell bodies of these afferent neurons are located within the sensory ganglia. Sensory ganglia innervate a specific organ or portion of the body. For instance, the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) are located in the vertebral column and extend processes throughout the body and limbs. The trigeminal ganglia are located in the skull and innervate the face, and upper airways. Vagal afferents of the nodose ganglia extend throughout the gut, heart, and lungs. The nodose neurons control a diverse array of functions such as: respiratory rate, airway irritation, and cough reflexes. Thus, to understand and manipulate their function, it is critical to identify and isolate airway specific neuronal sub-populations. In the mouse, the airways are exposed to a fluorescent tracer dye, Fast Blue, for retrograde tracing of airway-specific nodose neurons. The nodose ganglia are dissociated and fluorescence activated cell (FAC) sorting is used to collect dye positive cells. Next, high quality ribonucleic acid (RNA) is extracted from dye positive cells for next generation sequencing. Using this method airway specific neuronal gene expression is determined. PMID:27168016

  14. The effects of neuroleptic and tricyclic compounds on BKCa channel activity in rat isolated cortical neurones

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, K.; McKenna, F; Rowe, I C M; Ashford, M.L.J.

    1997-01-01

    The actions of several neuroleptic and tricyclic compounds were examined on the large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ (BKCa) channel present in neurones isolated from the rat motor cortex.Classical neuroleptic compounds including chlorpromazine and haloperidol applied to the intracellular surface of inside-out patches produced a concentration-dependent reduction in BKCa channel activity. Similar effects were observed when these compounds were applied to the extracellular surface of outside-out ...

  15. Deadly proposal: a case of catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiner, Jason D; Bullard-Berent, Jeffrey H; Inbar, Shmuel

    2011-11-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is a rare adrenergically mediated arrhythmogenic disorder classically induced by exercise or emotional stress and found in structurally normal hearts. It is an important cause of cardiac syncope and sudden death in childhood. Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia is a genetic cardiac channelopathy with known mutations involving genes affecting intracellular calcium regulation. We present a case of a 14-year-old boy who had cardiopulmonary arrest after an emotionally induced episode of CPVT while attempting to invite a girl to the school dance. Review of his presenting cardiac rhythm, induction of concerning ventricular arrhythmias during an exercise stress test, and genetic testing confirmed the diagnosis of CPVT. He recovered fully and was treated with β-blocker therapy and placement of an implantable cardioverter-defibrillator. In this report, we discuss this rare but important entity, including its molecular foundation, clinical presentation, basics of diagnosis, therapeutic options, and implications of genetic testing for family members. We also compare CPVT to other notable cardiomyopathic and channelopathic causes of sudden death in youth including hypertrophic cardiomyopathy, arrhythmogenic right ventricular dysplasia, long QT syndrome, short QT syndrome, and Brugada syndrome. PMID:22068070

  16. Expression of the paralogous tyrosine hydroxylase encoding genes th1 and th2 reveals the full complement of dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurons in zebrafish larval and juvenile brain

    OpenAIRE

    Filippi, Alida; Mahler, Julia; Schweitzer, Jörn; Driever, Wolfgang

    2009-01-01

    The development of dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurons has received much attention based on their modulatory effect on many behavioral circuits and their involvement in neurodegenerative diseases. The zebrafish (Danio rerio) has emerged as a new model organism with which to study development and function of catecholaminergic systems. Tyrosine hydroxylase is the entry enzyme into catecholamine biosynthesis and is frequently used as a marker for catecholaminergic neurons. A genome duplicatio...

  17. Effects of lithium chloride on outward potassium currents in acutely isolated hippocampal CA1 pyramidal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chaofeng; DU Huizhi; YANG Pin

    2006-01-01

    Although lithium possesses neuroprotective functions, the molecular mechanism underlying its actions has not been fully elucidated. In the present paper, the effects of lithium chloride on voltage-dependent potassium currents in the CA1 pyramidal neurons acutely isolated from rat hippocampus were studied using the whole-cell patch-clamp technique. Depolarizing test pulses activated two components of outward potassium currents: a rapidly activating and inactivating component, IA and a delayed component, IK. Results showed that lithium chloride increased the amplitude of IA in a concentration-dependent manner. Half enhancement concentration (EC50) was 22.80±5.45 μmol·L-1. Lithium chloride of 25 μmol·L-1 shifted the steady-state activation curve and inactivation curve of IA to more negative potentials, but mainly affected the activation kinetics. The amplitude and the activation processes of IK were not affected by lithium chloride. The effects of lithium chloride on potassium channel appear to possess neuroprotective properties by Ca2+-lowing effects modulate neuronal excitability by activating IA in rat hippocampal neurons.

  18. Catecholaminergic Fiber Innervation of the Vocal Motor System Is Intrasexually Dimorphic in a Teleost with Alternative Reproductive Tactics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghahramani, Zachary N; Timothy, Miky; Kaur, Gurpreet; Gorbonosov, Michelle; Chernenko, Alena; Forlano, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    Catecholamines, which include the neurotransmitters dopamine and noradrenaline, are known modulators of sensorimotor function, reproduction, and sexually motivated behaviors across vertebrates, including vocal-acoustic communication. Recently, we demonstrated robust catecholaminergic (CA) innervation throughout the vocal motor system in the plainfin midshipman fish Porichthys notatus, a seasonal breeding marine teleost that produces vocal signals for social communication. There are 2 distinct male reproductive morphs in this species: type I males establish nests and court females with a long-duration advertisement call, while type II males sneak spawn to steal fertilizations from type I males. Like females, type II males can only produce brief, agonistic, grunt type vocalizations. Here, we tested the hypothesis that intrasexual differences in the number of CA neurons and their fiber innervation patterns throughout the vocal motor pathway may provide neural substrates underlying divergence in reproductive behavior between morphs. We employed immunofluorescence (-ir) histochemistry to measure tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; a rate-limiting enzyme in catecholamine synthesis) neuron numbers in several forebrain and hindbrain nuclei as well as TH-ir fiber innervation throughout the vocal pathway in type I and type II males collected from nests during the summer reproductive season. After controlling for differences in body size, only one group of CA neurons displayed an unequivocal difference between male morphs: the extraventricular vagal-associated TH-ir neurons, located just lateral to the dimorphic vocal motor nucleus (VMN), were significantly greater in number in type II males. In addition, type II males exhibited greater TH-ir fiber density within the VMN and greater numbers of TH-ir varicosities with putative contacts on vocal motor neurons. This strong inverse relationship between the predominant vocal morphotype and the CA innervation of vocal motor neurons suggests

  19. c-fos Expression in mesopontine noradrenergic and cholinergic neurons of the cat during carbachol-induced active sleep: a double-labeling study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamuy, J; Sampogna, S; Morales, F R; Chase, M H

    1998-01-01

    The interaction of cholinergic and catecholaminergic mechanisms in the mesopontine region has been hypothesized as being critical for the generation and maintenance of active (REM) sleep. To further examine this hypothesis, we sought to determine the pattern of neuronal activation (via c-fos expression) of catecholaminergic and cholinergic neurons in this region during active sleep induced by the pontine microapplication of carbachol (designated as active sleep-carbachol). Accordingly, we used two sets of double-labeling techniques; the first to identify tyrosine hydroxylase-containing neurons (putative catecholaminergic cells) which also express the c-fos protein product Fos, and the second to reveal choline acetyltransferase-containing neurons (putative cholinergic cells) which also express Fos. Compared to control cats, active sleep-carbachol cats exhibited a significantly greater number of Fos-expressing neurons in the dorsolateral region of the pons, which encompasses the locus coeruleus, the lateral pontine reticular formation, the peribrachial nuclei and the latero-dorsal and pedunculo-pontine tegmental nuclei. However, both control and active sleep-carbachol cats exhibited a similar number of catecholaminergic and cholinergic neurons in those regions that expressed Fos (i.e., double-labeled cells). A large number of c-fos-expressing neurons in the active sleep-carbachol cats whose neurotransmitter phenotype was not identified suggests that non-catecholaminergic, non-cholinergic neuronal populations in mesopontine regions are involved in the generation and maintenance of active sleep. The lack of increased c-fos expression in catecholaminergic neurons during active sleep-carbachol confirms and extends previous data that indicate that these cells are silent during active sleep-carbachol and naturally-occurring active sleep. The finding that cholinergic neurons of the dorsolateral pons were not activated either during wakefulness or active sleep

  20. FolR1: a novel cell surface marker for isolating midbrain dopamine neural progenitors and nascent dopamine neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gennet, Nicole; Tamburini, Claudia; Nan, Xinsheng; Li, Meng

    2016-01-01

    Cell type-specific surface markers offer a powerful tool for purifying defined cell types for restorative therapies and drug screenings. Midbrain dopaminergic neurons (mesDA) are the nerve cells preferentially lost in the brains of Parkinson's disease patients. Clinical trials of transplantation of fetal neural precursors suggest that cell therapy may offer a cure for this devastating neurological disease. Many lines of preclinical studies demonstrate that neural progenitors committed to dopaminergic fate survive and integrate better than postmitotic DA neurons. We show that the folate-receptor 1 (FolR1), a GPI-anchored cell surface molecule, specifically marks mesDA neural progenitors and immature mesDA neurons. FolR1 expression superimposes with Lmx1a, a bona-fide mesDA lineage marker, during the active phase of mesDA neurogenesis from E9.5 to E14.5 during mouse development, as well as in ESC-derived mesDA lineage. FolR1(+) neural progenitors can be isolated by FACS or magnetic sorting (MAC) which give rise to dopamine neurons expressing TH and Pitx3, whilst FolR1 negative cells generate non-dopaminergic neurons and glia cells. This study identifies FolR1 as a new cell surface marker selectively expressed in mesDA progenitors in vivo and in vitro and that can be used to enrich in vitro differentiated TH neurons. PMID:27580818

  1. A case of catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia caused by two calsequestrin 2 mutations

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    De La Fuente, Sam; Van Langen, Irene M.; Postma, Alex V.; Bikker, Henni; Meijer, Albert

    2008-01-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is an uncommon heritable disease presenting with syncope or sudden cardiac death. Two genes involved in calcium homeostasis, the ryanodine receptor gene and the calsequestrin 2 (CASQ2) gene, have been implicated in this disease. We describ

  2. Catecholaminergic activation in acute myocardial infarction: time course and relation to left ventricular performance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Claus Leth; Nielsen, Jens Rokkedal; Petersen, Bodil Laub;

    2003-01-01

    AIM: The study was designed to assess (1) the time course of catecholaminergic activation in acute myocardial infarction (AMI) as estimated by adrenaline (ADR) and noradrenaline (NOR) concentrations, and (2) to relate activation of these hormones to predict the outcome of cardiac performance...

  3. New exome data question the pathogenicity of genetic variants previously associated with catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jabbari, Javad; Jabbari, Reza; Nielsen, Morten Wagner;

    2013-01-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is a lethal, rare hereditary disease with an estimated prevalence of 1:10 000. The genetic variants that cause CPVT are usually highly penetrant. To date, about 189 variants in 5 genes (RYR2, CASQ2, CALM1, TRND, and KCNJ2) have been...

  4. Effects of benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine compounds on the GABA-induced response in frog isolated sensory neurones.

    OpenAIRE

    Yakushiji, T; Fukuda, T.; Oyama, Y.; Akaike, N.

    1989-01-01

    1. The effects of benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine compounds on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced chloride current (ICl) were studied in frog isolated sensory neurones by use of a concentration-jump (termed 'concentration-clamp') technique, under single-electrode voltage-clamp conditions. The drugs used were classified into four categories as follows: full benzodiazepine receptor agonists (diazepam, clonazepam, nitrazepam, midazolam, clotiazepam and etizolam), partial agonists ...

  5. Segmentation of isolated MR images: development and comparison of neuronal networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Segmentation defines the capacity to differentiate among types of tissues. In MR. it is frequently applied to volumetric determinations. Digital images can be segmented in a number of ways; neuronal networks (NN) can be employed for this purpose. Our objective was to develop algorithms for automatic segmentation using NN and apply them to central nervous system MR images. The segmentation obtained with NN was compared with that resulting from other procedures (region-growing and K means). Each NN consisted of two layers: one based on unsupervised training, which was utilized for image segmentation in sets of K, and a second layer associating each set obtained by the preceding layer with the real set corresponding to the previously segmented objective image. This NN was trained with previously segmented images with supervised regions-growing algorithms and automatic K means. Thus, 4 different segmentation were obtained: region-growing, K means, NN with region-growing and NN with K means. The tissue volumes corresponding to cerebrospinal fluid, gray matter and white matter obtained with the 4 techniques were compared and the most representative segmented image was selected qualitatively by averaging the visual perception of 3 radiologists. The segmentation that best corresponded to the visual perception of the radiologists was that consisting of trained NN with region-growing. In comparison, the other 3 algorithms presented low percentage differences (mean, 3.44%). The mean percentage error for the 3 tissues from these algorithms was lower for region-growing segmentation (2.34%) than for trained NN with K means (3.31%) and for automatic K-means segmentation (4.66%). Thus, NN are reliable in the automation of isolated MR image segmentation. (Author) 12 refs

  6. Postpacing abnormal repolarization in catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia associated with a mutation in the cardiac ryanodine receptor gene

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    E. Nof; B. Belhassen; M. Arad; Z.A. Bhuiyan; C. Antzelevitch; R. Rosso; R. Fogelman; D. Luria; D. El-Ani; M.M.A.M. Mannens; S. Viskin; M. Eldar; A.A.M. Wilde; M. Glikson

    2011-01-01

    Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is an arrhythmogenic disease for which electrophysiological studies (EPS) have shown to be of limited value. This study presents a CPVT family in which marked postpacing repolarization abnormalities during EPS were the only consistent phen

  7. Effect of helium-neon laser on fast excitatory postsynaptic potential of neurons in the isolated rat superior cervical ganglia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hua Mo(莫华); Ping He(何萍); Ning Mo(莫宁)

    2004-01-01

    The aim of this study is to further measure the effect of 632.8-nm helium-neon laser on fast excitatory postsynaptic potential(f-EPSP)of postganglionic neurons in isolated rat superior cervical ganglia by means of intracellular recording techniques.The neurons with f-EPSP were irradiated by different power densities(1 - 5 mW/cm2)laser.Irradiated by the 2-mW/cm2 laser,the amplitude of the f-EPSP could augment(P < 0.05,paired t test)and even cause action potential at the end of the first 1 - 2 minutes,the f-EPSP could descend and last for 3 - 8 minutes.But the amplitude of the f-EPSP of neurons irradiated by the 5-mW/cm2 laser could depress for the irradiating periods.The results show that:1)the variation of the amplitude of f-EPSP caused by laser is power density-dependent and time-dependent; 2)there exist the second-order phases in the interaction of the helium-neon laser with neurons.These findings may provide certain evidence in explanation of the mechanisms of clinical helium-neon laser therapy.

  8. Isolation of Specific Neurons from C. elegans Larvae for Gene Expression Profiling

    OpenAIRE

    W Clay Spencer; Rebecca McWhirter; Tyne Miller; Pnina Strasbourger; Owen Thompson; Hillier, LaDeana W.; Waterston, Robert H.; Miller, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Background The simple and well-described structure of the C. elegans nervous system offers an unprecedented opportunity to identify the genetic programs that define the connectivity and function of individual neurons and their circuits. A correspondingly precise gene expression map of C. elegans neurons would facilitate the application of genetic methods toward this goal. Here we describe a powerful new approach, SeqCeL (RNA-Seq of C. elegans cells) for producing gene expression profiles of s...

  9. Isolation and Culture of Pig Spermatogonial Stem Cells and Their in Vitro Differentiation into Neuron-Like Cells and Adipocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaoyan; Chen, Tingfeng; Zhang, Yani; Li, Bichun; Xu, Qi; Song, Chengyi

    2015-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) renew themselves throughout the life of an organism and also differentiate into sperm in the adult. They are multipopent and therefore, can be induced to differentiate into many cells types in vitro. SSCs from pigs, considered an ideal animal model, are used in studies of male infertility, regenerative medicine, and preparation of transgenic animals. Here, we report on a culture system for porcine SSCs and the differentiation of these cells into neuron-like cells and adipocytes. SSCs and Sertoli cells were isolated from neonatal piglet testis by differential adhesion and SSCs were cultured on a feeder layer of Sertoli cells. Third-generation SSCs were induced to differentiate into neuron-like cells by addition of retinoic acid, β-mercaptoethanol, and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX) to the induction media and into adipocytes by the addition of hexadecadrol, insulin, and IBMX to the induction media. The differentiated cells were characterized by biochemical staining, qRT-PCR, and immunocytochemistry. The cells were positive for SSC markers, including alkaline phosphatase and SSC-specific genes, consistent with the cells being undifferentiated. The isolated SSCs survived on the Sertoli cells for 15 generations. Karyotyping confirmed that the chromosomal number of the SSCs were normal for pig (2n = 38, n = 19). Pig SSCs were successfully induced into neuron-like cells eight days after induction and into adipocytes 22 days after induction as determined by biochemical and immunocytochemical staining. qPCR results also support this conclusion. The nervous tissue markers genes, Nestin and β-tubulin, were expressed in the neuron-like cells and the adipocyte marker genes, PPARγ and C/EBPα, were expressed in the adipocytes. PMID:26556335

  10. Isolation and Culture of Pig Spermatogonial Stem Cells and Their in Vitro Differentiation into Neuron-Like Cells and Adipocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoyan Wang

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs renew themselves throughout the life of an organism and also differentiate into sperm in the adult. They are multipopent and therefore, can be induced to differentiate into many cells types in vitro. SSCs from pigs, considered an ideal animal model, are used in studies of male infertility, regenerative medicine, and preparation of transgenic animals. Here, we report on a culture system for porcine SSCs and the differentiation of these cells into neuron-like cells and adipocytes. SSCs and Sertoli cells were isolated from neonatal piglet testis by differential adhesion and SSCs were cultured on a feeder layer of Sertoli cells. Third-generation SSCs were induced to differentiate into neuron-like cells by addition of retinoic acid, β-mercaptoethanol, and 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX to the induction media and into adipocytes by the addition of hexadecadrol, insulin, and IBMX to the induction media. The differentiated cells were characterized by biochemical staining, qRT-PCR, and immunocytochemistry. The cells were positive for SSC markers, including alkaline phosphatase and SSC-specific genes, consistent with the cells being undifferentiated. The isolated SSCs survived on the Sertoli cells for 15 generations. Karyotyping confirmed that the chromosomal number of the SSCs were normal for pig (2n = 38, n = 19. Pig SSCs were successfully induced into neuron-like cells eight days after induction and into adipocytes 22 days after induction as determined by biochemical and immunocytochemical staining. qPCR results also support this conclusion. The nervous tissue markers genes, Nestin and β-tubulin, were expressed in the neuron-like cells and the adipocyte marker genes, PPARγ and C/EBPα, were expressed in the adipocytes.

  11. Leptin receptor immunoreactivity is present in ascending serotonergic and catecholaminergic neurons of the rat

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hay-Schmidt, Anders; Helboe, Lone; Larsen, Philip J.

    2001-01-01

    Obesity, tyrosine hydroxylase, arcuate nucleus, paracentricular nucleus, raphe nuclei, leptin, serotonin, catecholamines......Obesity, tyrosine hydroxylase, arcuate nucleus, paracentricular nucleus, raphe nuclei, leptin, serotonin, catecholamines...

  12. Genetic Isolation of Hypothalamic Neurons that Regulate Context-Specific Male Social Behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soden, Marta E; Miller, Samara M; Burgeno, Lauren M; Phillips, Paul E M; Hnasko, Thomas S; Zweifel, Larry S

    2016-07-12

    Nearly all animals engage in a complex assortment of social behaviors that are essential for the survival of the species. In mammals, these behaviors are regulated by sub-nuclei within the hypothalamus, but the specific cell types within these nuclei responsible for coordinating behavior in distinct contexts are only beginning to be resolved. Here, we identify a population of neurons in the ventral premammillary nucleus of the hypothalamus (PMV) that are strongly activated in male intruder mice in response to a larger resident male but that are not responsive to females. Using a combination of molecular and genetic approaches, we demonstrate that these PMV neurons regulate intruder-specific male social behavior and social novelty recognition in a manner dependent on synaptic release of the excitatory neurotransmitter glutamate. These data provide direct evidence for a unique population of neurons that regulate social behaviors in specific contexts. PMID:27346361

  13. Effects of SO2 derivatives on sodium currents in acutely isolated rat hippocampal lead-exposed neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    In this study, the effects of acute SO2 derivatives and chronic lead exposure together on sodium cur-rents (INa) were investigated in acutely isolated rat hippocampal neurons by using the whole-cell patch clamp techniques. We found that chronic lead exposure hardly reduced the amplitudes of INa. In the normal condition, sodium current started to appear at around ?70 mV, and reached the peak current at around ?40 mV. After chronic lead exposure, the data changed to ?70 and ?30 mV. After adding SO2 derivatives, the data changed to ?80 and ?40 mV, respectively. SO2 derivatives caused a significant in-crease of INa in hippocampal chronic-lead exposed neurons. Chronic lead exposure induced a right shift of the activation curve and a left shift of the inactivation curve of sodium channels. SO2 derivatives caused negative shifts of the activation and inactivation curves of INa in hippocampal chronic-lead ex-posed neurons. Lead exposure put off the time reaching the peak of INa activation. SO2 derivatives in-creased the time constants of inactivation after lead exposure. The interaction of lead and SO2 deriva-tives with voltage-dependent sodium channels may lead to changes in electrical activity and contribute to worsening the neurotoxicological damage.

  14. Gene Expression Analysis of Neurons and Astrocytes Isolated by Laser Capture Microdissection from Frozen Human Brain Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagliafierro, Lidia; Bonawitz, Kirsten; Glenn, Omolara C; Chiba-Falek, Ornit

    2016-01-01

    Different cell types and multiple cellular connections characterize the human brain. Gene expression analysis using a specific population of cells is more accurate than conducting analysis of the whole tissue homogenate, particularly in the context of neurodegenerative diseases, where a specific subset of cells is affected by the different pathology. Due to the difficulty of obtaining homogenous cell populations, gene expression in specific cell-types (neurons, astrocytes, etc.) has been understudied. To leverage the use of archive resources of frozen human brains in studies of neurodegenerative diseases, we developed and calibrated a method to quantify cell-type specific-neuronal, astrocytes-expression profiles of genes implicated in neurodegenerative diseases, including Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases. Archive human frozen brain tissues were used to prepare slides for rapid immunostaining using cell-specific antibodies. The immunoreactive-cells were isolated by Laser Capture Microdissection (LCM). The enrichment for a particular cell-type of interest was validated in post-analysis stage by the expression of cell-specific markers. We optimized the technique to preserve the RNA integrity, so that the RNA was suitable for downstream expression analyses. Following RNA extraction, the expression levels were determined digitally using nCounter Single Cell Gene Expression assay (NanoString Technologies®). The results demonstrated that using our optimized technique we successfully isolated single neurons and astrocytes from human frozen brain tissues and obtained RNA of a good quality that was suitable for mRNA expression analysis. We present here new advancements compared to previous reported methods, which improve the method's feasibility and its applicability for a variety of downstream molecular analyses. Our new developed method can be implemented in genetic and functional genomic research of neurodegenerative diseases and has the potential to significantly

  15. Opioid tolerance in periaqueductal gray neurons isolated from mice chronically treated with morphine

    OpenAIRE

    Bagley, Elena E.; Chieng, Billy C H; Christie, MacDonald J.; Connor, Mark

    2005-01-01

    The midbrain periaqueductal gray (PAG) is a major site of opioid analgesic action, and a significant site of cellular adaptations to chronic morphine treatment (CMT). We examined μ-opioid receptor (MOP) regulation of voltage-gated calcium channel currents (ICa) and G-protein-activated K channel currents (GIRK) in PAG neurons from CMT mice.Mice were injected s.c. with 300 mg kg−1 of morphine base in a slow release emulsion three times over 5 days, or with emulsion alone (vehicles). This protoc...

  16. Pentobarbitone modulation of NMDA receptors in neurones isolated from the rat olfactory brain.

    OpenAIRE

    Charlesworth, P; Jacobson, I; Richards, C. D.

    1995-01-01

    1. The action of pentobarbitone on the N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptors of neurones freshly dissociated from the olfactory bulb and olfactory tubercle has been studied using patch-clamp techniques. 2. Pentobarbitone produced a concentration-dependent depression of the currents evoked by NMDA with an IC50 value of c. 250 microM. 3. Analysis of the NMDA-evoked noise produced power spectra that could be fitted by the sum of two Lorentzians with corner frequencies of 17 and 82 Hz. Pentobarbi...

  17. Radioautographic identification of central monoaminergic neurons after local micro-instillation of tritiated serotonin and norepinephrine in the cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Monoaminergic neurons in nuclei raphe dorsalis and locus coeruleus of the cat may be visualized by radioautography after local micro-instillation of tritiated serotonin and noradrenaline. The concomitant administration of the appropriate tracer with the other biogenic amine in non radioactive form permits a specific identification of serotoninergic and catecholaminergic nerve cell bodies. A small contingent of presumptive serotoninergic neurons is thus demonstrated in the region of the locus coeruleus

  18. TRIAL TO CULTIVATE AND ISOLATE NEURONAL LIKE CELLS FROM 7 DAYS OLD MICE BRAIN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    CALIN TATU

    Full Text Available role to replace lost cells due to physiological turnover, injury, or disease and tosupport cell genesis contributing to the cell number homeostasis. Long time it wasthought that adult mammalian central nervous system doesn't possess any or fewregenerative capacity. Nowadays it was demonstrated that also in the brain thereare stem cells which have the capacity to differentiate into astocytes,oligodendrocytes and neurons.In few degenerative diseases the stem cells lose the regenerative capacity withconsequences in diminishing and loss of functional capacity. Stem cell therapyrepresents a novel and promising therapeutic approach to treatment of a variety ofdegenerative disease as multiple sclerosis. For this it is necessary that a efficientstem cell source can be found and secondary to be proven that these transplantablecells have differential potential into neural tissue.In order to be able to possess a stem cell source capable to build an implant it isnecessary to know the cultivation technology and also the instruments to prove theircapacity to differentiate into specific cells of the nervous system. These were themotives that enabled us to to try to harvest, cultivate and differentiate stem cellsfrom the murine central nervous system.

  19. Effects of cannabinoid receptor agonists on neuronally-evoked contractions of urinary bladder tissues isolated from rat, mouse, pig, dog, monkey and human

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, R S; Luong, L A; Welsh, N. J.; Eglen, R. M.; Martin, G R; MacLennan, S J

    2000-01-01

    This study investigated the cannabinoid receptor, known to inhibit neuronally-evoked contractions of the mouse isolated urinary bladder, in bladder sections isolated from mouse, rat, dog, pig non-human primate or human.The CB1-like pharmacology of the cannabinoid receptor in mouse isolated bladder observed previously was confirmed in this study by the rank order of agonist potencies: CP 55940⩾WIN 55212-2>HU 210>JWH 015>anandamide, the high affinity of the CB1 selective antagonist, SR 141716A ...

  20. Effects of benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine compounds on the GABA-induced response in frog isolated sensory neurones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yakushiji, T; Fukuda, T; Oyama, Y; Akaike, N

    1989-11-01

    1. The effects of benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine compounds on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced chloride current (ICl) were studied in frog isolated sensory neurones by use of a concentration-jump (termed 'concentration-clamp') technique, under single-electrode voltage-clamp conditions. The drugs used were classified into four categories as follows: full benzodiazepine receptor agonists (diazepam, clonazepam, nitrazepam, midazolam, clotiazepam and etizolam), partial agonists (CL 218,872, Ro 16-6028, Ro 17-1812 and Ro 23-0364), inverse agonists (Ro 15-3505, FG 7142 and beta-CCE) and a benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, Ro 15-1788 (flumazenil). 2. All full agonists at concentrations of 3 x 10(-6) M or less increased dose-dependently the peak amplitude of ICl elicited by 3 x 10(-6) M GABA to twice to three times larger than the control. However, no further augmentation of the GABA response was observed at concentrations of 1 x 10(-5) M or higher. Partial agonists also showed a dose-dependent augmentation of the GABA response at concentrations ranging from 3 x 10(-8) M to 3 x 10(-5) M, but their efficacies of augmentation of the GABA response were only about half or less of those of full agonists. Of the inverse agonists, beta-CCE had a unique dose-dependent effect on the GABA response. Beta-CCE reduced dose-dependently the GABA response at concentrations of less than 3 x 10(-6) M, but augmented it at concentrations of 3 x 10(-5) M and 6 x 10(-5) M. The inverse agonists reduced dose-dependently the GABA response. The benzodiazepine antagonist, flumazenil, slightly augmented the GABA response at concentrations between 3 x 10 7M and 3 x 10 5 M. 3. These results show clear differences in the effects on the GABA response between these four categories of compounds known to affect the benzodiazepine recognition site of the GABA/ benzodiazepine receptor-chloride channel complex. Our experimental system of frog isolated sensory neurones and a 'concentration

  1. Isolation of Multipotent Nestin-Expressing Stem Cells Derived from the Epidermis of Elderly Humans and TAT-VHL Peptide-Mediated Neuronal Differentiation of These Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiro Maegawa

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available A specialized population of cells residing in the hair follicle is quiescent but shows pluripotency for differentiating into epithelial-mesenchymal lineage cells. Therefore, such cells are hoped to be useful as implantable donor cells for regenerative therapy. Recently, it was reported that intracellular delivery of TAT-VHL peptide induces neuronal differentiation of skin-derived precursors. In the present study, we successfully isolated multipotent stem cells derived from the epidermis of elderly humans, characterized these cells as being capable of sphere formation and strong expression of nestin, fibronectin, and CD34 but not of keratin 15, and identified the niche of these cells as being the outer root sheath of the hair follicles. In addition, we showed that TAT-VHL peptide induced their neuronal differentiation in vitro, and confirmed by fluorescence immunohistochemistry the neuronal differentiation of such peptide-treated cells implanted into rodent brains. These multipotent nestin-expressing stem cells derived from human epidermis are easily accessible and should be useful as donor cells for neuronal regenerative cell therapy.

  2. Modeling Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia using Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-derived Cardiomyocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Atara Novak

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT is an inherited arrhythmogenic cardiac disorder characterized by life-threatening arrhythmias induced by physical or emotional stress, in the absence structural heart abnormalities. The arrhythmias may cause syncope or degenerate into cardiac arrest and sudden death which usually occurs during childhood. Recent studies have shown that CPVT is caused by mutations in the cardiac ryanodine receptor type 2 (RyR2 or calsequestrin 2 (CASQ2 genes. Both proteins are key contributors to the intracellular Ca2+ handling process and play a pivotal role in Ca2+ release from the sarcoplasmic reticulum to the cytosol during systole. Although the molecular pathogenesis of CPVT is not entirely clear, it was suggested that the CPVT mutations promote excessive sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ leak, which initiates delayed afterdepolarizations (DADs and triggered arrhythmias in cardiac myocytes. The recent breakthrough discovery of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC generated from somatic cells (e.g. fibroblasts, keratinocytes now enables researches to investigate mutated cardiomyocytes generated from the patient’s iPSC. To this end, in the present article we review recent studies on CPVT iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes, thus demonstrating in the mutated cells catecholamine-induced DADs and triggered arrhythmias.

  3. Divergent Projections of Catecholaminergic Neurons in the Nucleus of the Solitary Tract to Limbic Forebrain and Medullary Autonomic Brain Regions

    OpenAIRE

    Reyes, Beverly A. S.; Van Bockstaele, Elisabeth J.

    2006-01-01

    The nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS) is a critical structure involved in coordinating autonomic and visceral activities. Previous independent studies have demonstrated efferent projections from the NTS to the nucleus paragigantocellularis (PGi) and the central nucleus of the amygdala (CNA) in rat brain. To further characterize the neural circuitry originating from the NTS with postsynaptic targets in the amygdala and medullary autonomic targets, distinct green or red fluorescent latex micr...

  4. Alternans in genetically modified Langendorff-perfused murine hearts modeling catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ian N Sabir

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between alternans and arrhythmogenicity was studied in genetically modified murine hearts modeling catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT during Langendorff perfusion, before and after treatment with catecholamines and a β-adrenergic antagonist. Heterozygous (RyR2p/s and homozygous (RyR2s/s RyR2-P2328S hearts, and wild-type (WT controls, were studied before and after treatment with epinephrine (100 nM and 1 µM and propranolol (100 nM. Monophasic action potential recordings demonstrated significantly greater incidences of arrhythmia in RyR2s/p and RyR2s/s hearts as compared to WTs. Arrhythmogenicity in RyR2s/s hearts was associated with alternans, particularly at short baseline cycle lengths. Both phenomena were significantly accentuated by treatment with epinephrine and significantly diminished by treatment with propranolol, in full agreement with clinical expectations. These changes took place, however, despite an absence of changes in action potential durations, ventricular effective refractory periods or restitution curve characteristics. Furthermore pooled data from all hearts in which arrhythmia occurred demonstrated significantly greater alternans magnitudes, but similar restitution curve slopes, to hearts that did not demonstrate arrhythmia. These findings thus further validate the RyR2-P2328S murine heart as a model for human CPVT, confirming an alternans phenotype in common with murine genetic models of the Brugada syndrome and the congenital long-QT syndrome type 3. In contrast to these latter similarities, however, this report demonstrates the dissociation of alternans from changes in the properties of restitution curves for the first time in a murine model of a human arrhythmic syndrome.

  5. Characterization and evaluation of neuronal trans-differentiation with electrophysiological properties of mesenchymal stem cells isolated from porcine endometrium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subbarao, Raghavendra Baregundi; Ullah, Imran; Kim, Eun-Jin; Jang, Si-Jung; Lee, Won-Jae; Jeon, Ryoung Hoon; Kang, Dawon; Lee, Sung-Lim; Park, Bong-Wook; Rho, Gyu-Jin

    2015-01-01

    Endometrial stromal cells (EMSCs) obtained from porcine uterus (n = 6) were positive for mesenchymal stem cell markers (CD29, CD44 and CD90), and negative for epithelial marker CD9 and hematopoietic markers CD34, CD45 analyzed by flow cytometry. Further the cells were positive for expression of mesenchymal markers, CD105, CD140b, and CD144 by PCR. Pluripotent markers OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG were positively expressed in EMSCs analyzed by Western blotting and PCR. Further, differentiation into adipocytes and osteocytes was confirmed by cytochemical staining and lineage specific gene expression by quantitative realtime-PCR. Adipocyte (FABP, LPL, AP2) and osteocyte specific genes (ON, BG, RUNX2) in differentiated EMSCs showed significant (p < 0.05) increase in expression compared to undifferentiated control cells. Neurogenic transdifferentiation of EMSCs exhibited distinctive dendritic morphology with axon projections and neuronal specific genes, NFM, NGF, MBP, NES, B3T and MAP2 and proteins, B3T, NFM, NGF, and TRKA were positively expressed in neuronal differentiated cells. Functional analysis of neuronal differentiated EMSCs displayed voltage-dependence and kinetics for transient outward K+ currents (Ito), at holding potential of -80 mV, Na+ currents and during current clamp, neuronal differentiated EMSCs was more negative than that of control EMSCs. Porcine EMSCs is a suitable model for studying molecular mechanism of transdifferentiation, assessment of electrophysiological properties and their efficiency during in vivo transplantation. PMID:26006231

  6. Characterization and Evaluation of Neuronal Trans-Differentiation with Electrophysiological Properties of Mesenchymal Stem Cells Isolated from Porcine Endometrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghavendra Baregundi Subbarao

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Endometrial stromal cells (EMSCs obtained from porcine uterus (n = 6 were positive for mesenchymal stem cell markers (CD29, CD44 and CD90, and negative for epithelial marker CD9 and hematopoietic markers CD34, CD45 analyzed by flow cytometry. Further the cells were positive for expression of mesenchymal markers, CD105, CD140b, and CD144 by PCR. Pluripotent markers OCT4, SOX2, and NANOG were positively expressed in EMSCs analyzed by Western blotting and PCR. Further, differentiation into adipocytes and osteocytes was confirmed by cytochemical staining and lineage specific gene expression by quantitative realtime-PCR. Adipocyte (FABP, LPL, AP2 and osteocyte specific genes (ON, BG, RUNX2 in differentiated EMSCs showed significant (p < 0.05 increase in expression compared to undifferentiated control cells. Neurogenic transdifferentiation of EMSCs exhibited distinctive dendritic morphology with axon projections and neuronal specific genes, NFM, NGF, MBP, NES, B3T and MAP2 and proteins, B3T, NFM, NGF, and TRKA were positively expressed in neuronal differentiated cells. Functional analysis of neuronal differentiated EMSCs displayed voltage-dependence and kinetics for transient outward K+ currents (Ito, at holding potential of −80 mV, Na+ currents and during current clamp, neuronal differentiated EMSCs was more negative than that of control EMSCs. Porcine EMSCs is a suitable model for studying molecular mechanism of transdifferentiation, assessment of electrophysiological properties and their efficiency during in vivo transplantation.

  7. Assessing social isolation in motor neurone disease: A Rasch analysis of the MND Social Withdrawal Scale ☆

    OpenAIRE

    Gibbons, Chris J.; Thornton, Everard W; Ealing, John; Shaw, Pamela J; Talbot, Kevin; Tennant, Alan; Young, Carolyn A.; ,

    2013-01-01

    Objective Social withdrawal is described as the condition in which an individual experiences a desire to make social contact, but is unable to satisfy that desire. It is an important issue for patients with motor neurone disease who are likely to experience severe physical impairment. This study aims to reassess the psychometric and scaling properties of the MND Social Withdrawal Scale (MND-SWS) domains and examine the feasibility of a summary scale, by applying scale data to the Rasch model....

  8. Isolation and Culture of Pig Spermatogonial Stem Cells and Their in Vitro Differentiation into Neuron-Like Cells and Adipocytes

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoyan Wang; Tingfeng Chen; Yani Zhang; Bichun Li; Qi Xu; Chengyi Song

    2015-01-01

    Spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) renew themselves throughout the life of an organism and also differentiate into sperm in the adult. They are multipopent and therefore, can be induced to differentiate into many cells types in vitro. SSCs from pigs, considered an ideal animal model, are used in studies of male infertility, regenerative medicine, and preparation of transgenic animals. Here, we report on a culture system for porcine SSCs and the differentiation of these cells into neuron-like c...

  9. Dantrolene rescues arrhythmogenic RYR2 defect in a patient-specific stem cell model of catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Christian B; Moretti, Alessandra; Mederos y Schnitzler, Michael; Iop, Laura; Storch, Ursula; Bellin, Milena; Dorn, Tatjana; Ruppenthal, Sandra; Pfeiffer, Sarah; Goedel, Alexander; Dirschinger, Ralf J; Seyfarth, Melchior; Lam, Jason T; Sinnecker, Daniel; Gudermann, Thomas; Lipp, Peter; Laugwitz, Karl-Ludwig

    2012-01-01

    Coordinated release of calcium (Ca2+) from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) through cardiac ryanodine receptor (RYR2) channels is essential for cardiomyocyte function. In catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT), an inherited disease characterized by stress-induced ventricular arrhythmias in young patients with structurally normal hearts, autosomal dominant mutations in RYR2 or recessive mutations in calsequestrin lead to aberrant diastolic Ca2+ release from the SR causing arrhythmogenic delayed after depolarizations (DADs). Here, we report the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from a CPVT patient carrying a novel RYR2 S406L mutation. In patient iPSC-derived cardiomyocytes, catecholaminergic stress led to elevated diastolic Ca2+ concentrations, a reduced SR Ca2+ content and an increased susceptibility to DADs and arrhythmia as compared to control myocytes. This was due to increased frequency and duration of elementary Ca2+ release events (Ca2+ sparks). Dantrolene, a drug effective on malignant hyperthermia, restored normal Ca2+ spark properties and rescued the arrhythmogenic phenotype. This suggests defective inter-domain interactions within the RYR2 channel as the pathomechanism of the S406L mutation. Our work provides a new in vitro model to study the pathogenesis of human cardiac arrhythmias and develop novel therapies for CPVT. PMID:22174035

  10. Isolation Rearing Reduces Neuronal Excitability in Dentate Gyrus Granule Cells of Adolescent C57BL/6J Mice: Role of GABAergic Tonic Currents and Neurosteroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Talani, Giuseppe; Biggio, Francesca; Licheri, Valentina; Locci, Valentina; Biggio, Giovanni; Sanna, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Early-life exposure to stress, by impacting on a brain still under development, is considered a critical factor for the increased vulnerability to psychiatric disorders and abuse of psychotropic substances during adulthood. As previously reported, rearing C57BL/6J weanling mice in social isolation (SI) from their peers for several weeks, a model of prolonged stress, is associated with a decreased plasma and brain levels of neuroactive steroids such as 3α,5α-THP, with a parallel up-regulation of extrasynaptic GABAA receptors (GABAAR) in dentate gyrus (DG) granule cells compared to group-housed (GH) mice. In the present study, together with the SI-induced decrease in plasma concentration of both progesterone and 3α,5α-THP, and an increase in THIP-stimulated GABAergic tonic currents, patch-clamp analysis of DG granule cells revealed a significant decrease in membrane input resistance and action potential (AP) firing rate, in SI compared to GH mice, suggesting that SI exerts an inhibitory action on neuronal excitability of these neurons. Voltage-clamp recordings of glutamatergic spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs) revealed a SI-associated decrease in frequency as well as a shift from paired-pulse (PP) depression to PP facilitation (PPF) of evoked EPSCs, indicative of a reduced probability of glutamate release. Daily administration of progesterone during isolation reverted the changes in plasma 3α,5α-THP as well as in GABAergic tonic currents and neuronal excitability caused by SI, but it had only a limited effect on the changes in the probability of presynaptic glutamate release. Overall, the results obtained in this work, together with those previously published, indicate that exposure of mice to SI during adolescence reduces neuronal excitability of DG granule cells, an effect that may be linked to the increased GABAergic tonic currents as a consequence of the sustained decrease in plasma and hippocampal levels of neurosteroids. All these

  11. Enhanced sensitivity to ethanol-induced inhibition of LTP in CA1 pyramidal neurons of socially isolated C57BL/6J mice: role of neurosteroids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe eTalani

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Ethanol (EtOH–induced impairment of long-term potentiation (LTP in the rat hippocampus is prevented by the 5α-reductase inhibitor finasteride, suggesting that this effect of EtOH is dependent on the increased local release of neurosteroids such as 3α,5α-THP that promote GABA–mediated transmission. Given that social isolation (SI in rodents is associated with altered plasma and brain levels of such neurosteroids as well as with an enhanced neurosteroidogenic action of EtOH, we examined whether the inhibitory effect of EtOH on LTP at CA3-CA1 hippocampal excitatory synapses is altered in C57BL/6J mice subjected to SI for 6 weeks in comparison with group-housed (GH animals. Extracellular recording of fEPSPs as well as patch-clamp analysis were performed in hippocampal slices prepared from both SI and GH mice. Consistent with previous observations, recording of fEPSPs revealed that the extent of LTP induced in the CA1 region of SI mice was significantly reduced compared with that in GH animals. EtOH (40 mM inhibited LTP in slices from SI mice but not in those from GH mice, and this effect of EtOH was abolished by co-application of 1 µM finasteride. Current-clamp analysis of CA1 pyramidal neurons revealed a decrease in action potential frequency and an increase in the intensity of injected current required to evoke the first action potential in SI mice compared with GH mice, indicative of a decrease in neuronal excitability associated with SI. Together, our data suggest that SI results in reduced levels of neuronal excitability and synaptic plasticity in the hippocampus. Furthermore, the increased sensitivity to the neurosteroidogenic effect of EtOH associated with SI likely accounts for the greater inhibitory effect of EtOH on LTP in SI mice. The increase in EtOH sensitivity induced by SI may be important for the changes in the effects of EtOH on anxiety and on learning and memory associated with the prolonged stress attributable to social

  12. Vestibular Neuronitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Prevent Painful Swimmer's Ear Additional Content Medical News Vestibular Neuronitis By Lawrence R. Lustig, MD NOTE: This ... Drugs Herpes Zoster Oticus Meniere Disease Purulent Labyrinthitis Vestibular Neuronitis Vestibular neuronitis is a disorder characterized by ...

  13. Effects of serum immunoglobulins from patients with complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) on depolarisation-induced calcium transients in isolated dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reilly, Joanne M; Dharmalingam, Backialakshmi; Marsh, Stephen J; Thompson, Victoria; Goebel, Andreas; Brown, David A

    2016-03-01

    Complex regional pain syndrome (CRPS) is thought to have an auto-immune component. One such target recently proposed from the effects of auto-immune IgGs on Ca(2+) transients in cardiac myocytes and cell lines is the α1-adrenoceptor. We have tested whether such IgGs exerted comparable effects on nociceptive sensory neurons isolated from rat dorsal root ganglia. Depolarisation-induced [Ca(2+)]i transients were generated by applying 30mM KCl for 2min and monitored by Fura-2 fluorescence imaging. No IgGs tested (including 3 from CRPS patients) had any significant effect on these [Ca(2+)]i transients. However, IgG from one CRPS patient consistently and significantly reduced the K(+)-induced response of cells that had been pre-incubated for 24h with a mixture of inflammatory mediators (1μM histamine, 5-hydroxytryptamine, bradykinin and PGE2). Since this pre-incubation also appeared to induce a comparable inhibitory response to the α1-agonist phenylephrine, this is compatible with the α1-adrenoceptor as a target for CRPS auto-immunity. A mechanism whereby this might enhance pain is suggested. PMID:26708558

  14. Evidence for the occurrence of an enkephalin-like peptide in adrenaline and noradrenaline neurons of the rat medulla oblongata.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceccatelli, S; Millhorn, D E; Hökfelt, T; Goldstein, M

    1989-01-01

    The indirect immunofluorescence technique was used to analyze the catecholaminergic neurons in the medulla oblongata of the rat for the presence of enkephalin (ENK)- and neuropeptide Y (NPY)-like immunoreactivity (LI). In colchicine pretreated animals, using a double staining technique with mouse and rabbit antibodies against ENK and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) or phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT), it was demonstrated that both TH- and ENK-LI occurred in the same neurons, particularly in many neurons of the A1 noradrenaline cell group. In the transition zone to the C1 adrenaline cell group, a proportion of PNMT-positive cells also contained ENK-LI. In the rostral and mid portion of the C1 group only few TH/PNMT-positive cells were found to be ENK-positive. In the noradrenergic A2 region, a moderate number of cell bodies also contained TH- plus ENK-LI, whereas only a few of the adrenaline cells of the C2 and C3 groups showed ENK-LI. In addition, with an elution restaining technique it was possible to demonstrate that several of the cells containing TH- and ENK-LI were also positive for NPY-LI. The present findings demonstrate that a subpopulation of the catecholaminergic neurons in the medulla oblongata of the rat is ENK-positive, thereby indicating a possible co-release of the two compounds in their projection areas, for example the paraventricular nucleus and the spinal cord. PMID:2565245

  15. vglut2 and gad expression reveal distinct patterns of dual GABAergic versus glutamatergic cotransmitter phenotypes of dopaminergic and noradrenergic neurons in the zebrafish brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippi, Alida; Mueller, Thomas; Driever, Wolfgang

    2014-06-15

    Throughout the vertebrate lineage, dopaminergic neurons form important neuromodulatory systems that influence motor behavior, mood, cognition, and physiology. Studies in mammals have established that dopaminergic neurons often use γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) or glutamatergic cotransmission during development and physiological function. Here, we analyze vglut2, gad1b and gad2 expression in combination with tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactivity in 4-day-old larval and 30-day-old juvenile zebrafish brains to determine which dopaminergic and noradrenergic groups may use GABA or glutamate as a second transmitter. Our results show that most dopaminergic neurons also express GABAergic markers, including the dopaminergic groups of the olfactory bulb (homologous to mammalian A16) and the subpallium, the hypothalamic groups (A12, A14), the prethalamic zona incerta group (A13), the preoptic groups (A15), and the pretectal group. Thus, the majority of catecholaminergic neurons are gad1b/2-positive and coexpress GABA. A very few gad1/2-negative dopaminergic groups, however, express vglut2 instead and use glutamate as a second transmitter. These glutamatergic dual transmitter phenotypes are the Orthopedia transcription factor-dependent, A11-type dopaminergic neurons of the posterior tuberculum. All together, our results demonstrate that all catecholaminergic groups in zebrafish are either GABAergic or glutamatergic. Thus, cotransmission of dopamine and noradrenaline with either GABA or glutamate appears to be a regular feature of zebrafish catecholaminergic systems. We compare our results with those that have been described for mammalian systems, discuss the phenomenon of transmitter dualism in the context of developmental specification of GABAergic and glutamatergic regions in the brain, and put this phenomenon in an evolutionary perspective. PMID:24374659

  16. Cuneiform neurons activated during cholinergically induced active sleep in the cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pose, I; Sampogna, S; Chase, M H; Morales, F R

    2000-05-01

    In the present study, we report that the cuneiform (Cun) nucleus, a brainstem structure that before now has not been implicated in sleep processes, exhibits a large number of neurons that express c-fos during carbachol-induced active sleep (AS-carbachol). Compared with control (awake) cats, during AS-carbachol, there was a 671% increase in the number of neurons that expressed c-fos in this structure. Within the Cun nucleus, three immunocytochemically distinct populations of neurons were observed. One group consisted of GABAergic neurons, which predominantly did not express c-fos during AS-carbachol. Two other different populations expressed c-fos during this state. One of the Fos-positive (Fos(+)) populations consisted of a distinct group of nitric oxide synthase (NOS)-NADPH-diaphorase (NADPH-d)-containing neurons; the neurotransmitter of the other Fos(+) population remains unknown. The Cun nucleus did not contain cholinergic, catecholaminergic, serotonergic, or glycinergic neurons. On the basis of neuronal activation during AS-carbachol, as indicated by c-fos expression, we suggest that the Cun nucleus is involved, in an as yet unknown manner, in the physiological expression of active sleep. The finding of a population of NOS-NADPH-d containing neurons, which were activated during AS-carbachol, suggests that nitrergic modulation of their target cell groups is likely to play a role in active sleep-related physiological processes. PMID:10777795

  17. Energy efficiency of information transmission by electrically coupled neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Torrealdea, Francisco J.; Sarasola, Cecilia; d'Anjou, Alicia; Moujahid, Abdelmalik; de Mendizábal, N. Vélez

    2012-01-01

    The generation of spikes by neurons is energetically a costly process. This paper studies the consumption of energy and the information entropy in the signalling activity of a model neuron both when it is supposed isolated and when it is coupled to another neuron by an electrical synapse. The neuron has been modelled by a four dimensional Hindmarsh-Rose type kinetic model for which an energy function has been deduced. For the isolated neuron values of energy consumption and information entrop...

  18. Immune challenge and satiety-related activation of both distinct and overlapping neuronal populations in the brainstem indicate parallel pathways for viscerosensory signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaykema, Ronald P A; Daniels, Teresa E; Shapiro, Nathan J; Thacker, Gregory C; Park, Su-Mi; Goehler, Lisa E

    2009-10-19

    Caudal brainstem viscerosensory nuclei convey information about the body's internal state to forebrain regions implicated in feeding behavior and responses to immune challenge, and may modulate ingestive behavior following immune activation. Illness-induced appetite loss might be attributed to accentuated "satiety" pathways, activation of a distinct "danger channel" separate from satiety pathways, or both. To evaluate neural substrates that could mediate the effects of illness on ingestive behavior, we analyzed the pattern and phenotypes of medullary neurons responsive to consumption of a preferred food, sweetened milk, and to intraperitoneal lipopolysaccharide challenge that reduced sweetened milk intake. Brainstem sections were stained for c-Fos, dopamine beta-hydroxylase, phenylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase, and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) immunoreactivity. Sweetened milk intake activated many neurons throughout the nucleus of the solitary tract (NTS), including A2 noradrenergic neurons in the caudal half of the NTS. LPS challenge activated a similar population of neurons in the NTS, in addition to rostral C2 adrenergic and mid-level A2 noradrenergic neurons in the NTS, many C1 and A1 neurons in the ventrolateral medulla, and in GLP-1 neurons in the dorsal medullary reticular nucleus. Increased numbers of activated GLP-1 neurons in the NTS were only associated with sweetened milk ingestion. Evidence for parallel processing was reflected in the parabrachial nucleus, where sweetened milk intake resulted in activation of the inner external lateral, ventrolateral and central medial portions, whereas LPS challenge induced c-Fos expression in the outer external lateral portions. Thus, signals generated in response to potentially dangerous physiological conditions seem to be propagated via specific populations of catecholaminergic neurons in the NTS and VLM, and likely include a pathway through the external lateral PBN. The data indicate that immune challenge

  19. Is activation of the Na+K+ pump necessary for NGF-mediated neuronal survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability of nerve growth factor to cause rapid activation of the Na+K+ pump of its responsive cells was examined by measuring the uptake of 86Rb+. A significant increase in 86Rb+ uptake in E8 chick dorsal root ganglion sensory neurons after NGF treatment was seen only if the cells had been damaged during the preparation procedure. Such damaged cells could not survive in culture in the presence of NGF, and undamaged cells that did survive in response to NGF exhibited no increased 86Rb+ uptake rate. Furthermore, cultured calf adrenal medullary cells did not show an increase in 86Rb+ uptake after treatment with NGF, although these cells respond to NGF with an increased synthesis of catecholaminergic enzymes. These results are incompatible with the hypothesis that the mechanism of action of NGF that promotes neuronal survival and enzyme induction results from an initial stimulation of the Na+K+ pump

  20. Catecholaminergic Gene Variants: Contribution in ADHD and Associated Comorbid Attributes in the Eastern Indian Probands

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paramita Ghosh

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Contribution of genes in attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD has been explored in various populations, and several genes were speculated to contribute small but additive effects. We have assessed variants in four genes, DDC (rs3837091 and rs3735273, DRD2 (rs1800496, rs1801028, and rs1799732, DRD4 (rs4646984 and rs4646983, and COMT (rs165599 and rs740603 in Indian ADHD subjects with comorbid attributes. Cases were recruited following the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual for Mental Disorders-IV-TR after obtaining informed written consent. DNA isolated from peripheral blood leukocytes of ADHD probands (N=170, their parents (N=310, and ethnically matched controls (n=180 was used for genotyping followed by population- and family-based analyses by the UNPHASED program. DRD4 sites showed significant difference in allelic frequencies by case-control analysis, while DDC and COMT exhibited bias in familial transmission (P<0.05. rs3837091 “AGAG,” rs3735273 “A,” rs1799732 “C,” rs740603 “G,” rs165599 “G” and single repeat alleles of rs4646984/rs4646983 showed positive correlation with co-morbid characteristics (P<0.05. Multi dimensionality reduction analysis of case-control data revealed significant interactive effects of all four genes (P<0.001, while family-based data showed interaction between DDC and DRD2 (P=0.04. This first study on these gene variants in Indo-Caucasoid ADHD probands and associated co-morbid conditions indicates altered dopaminergic neurotransmission in ADHD.

  1. An Optimized Culture Method of Rat Dorsal Root Ganglion Neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIUYin; CHENJing-Hong; GONGZe-Hui

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To establish a primary culture technique of acutely isolated dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons, and provide a simple & useful in vitro model for study of analgesia. Methods: Acutely isolated dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons were planted and cultured; the configuration and growth characters of DRG neurons were observed through inverted microscope.

  2. Genetically-directed, cell type-specific sparse labeling for the analysis of neuronal morphology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Rotolo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In mammals, genetically-directed cell labeling technologies have not yet been applied to the morphologic analysis of neurons with very large and complex arbors, an application that requires extremely sparse labeling and that is only rendered practical by limiting the labeled population to one or a few predetermined neuronal subtypes. METHODS AND FINDINGS: In the present study we have addressed this application by using CreER technology to non-invasively label very small numbers of neurons so that their morphologies can be fully visualized. Four lines of IRES-CreER knock-in mice were constructed to permit labeling selectively in cholinergic or catecholaminergic neurons [choline acetyltransferase (ChAT-IRES-CreER or tyrosine hydroxylase (TH-IRES-CreER], predominantly in projection neurons [neurofilament light chain (NFL-IRES-CreER], or broadly in neurons and some glia [vesicle-associated membrane protein2 (VAMP2-IRES-CreER]. When crossed to the Z/AP reporter and exposed to 4-hydroxytamoxifen in the early postnatal period, the number of neurons expressing the human placental alkaline phosphatase reporter can be reproducibly lowered to fewer than 50 per brain. Sparse Cre-mediated recombination in ChAT-IRES-CreER;Z/AP mice shows the full axonal and dendritic arbors of individual forebrain cholinergic neurons, the first time that the complete morphologies of these very large neurons have been revealed in any species. CONCLUSIONS: Sparse genetically-directed, cell type-specific neuronal labeling with IRES-creER lines should prove useful for studying a wide variety of questions in neuronal development and disease.

  3. Blocking and isolation of a calcium channel from neurons in mammals and cephalopods utilizing a toxin fraction (FTX) from funnel-web spider poison.

    OpenAIRE

    Llinás, R; Sugimori, M.; Lin, J. W.; Cherksey, B

    1989-01-01

    A Ca2+-channel blocker derived from funnel-web spider toxin (FTX) has made it possible to define and study the ionic channels responsible for the Ca2+ conductance in mammalian Purkinje cell neurons and the preterminal in squid giant synapse. In cerebellar slices, FTX blocked Ca2+-dependent spikes in Purkinje cells, reduced the spike afterpotential hyperpolarization, and increased the Na+-dependent plateau potential. In the squid giant synapse, FTX blocked synaptic transmission without affecti...

  4. Neuroprotective effects of a novel single compound 1-methoxyoctadecan-1-ol isolated from Uncaria sinensis in primary cortical neurons and a photothrombotic ischemia model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Yeon Jang

    Full Text Available We identified a novel neuroprotective compound, 1-methoxyoctadecan-1-ol, from Uncaria sinensis (Oliv. Havil and investigated its effects and mechanisms in primary cortical neurons and in a photothrombotic ischemic model. In primary rat cortical neurons against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity, pretreatment with 1-methoxyoctadecan-1-ol resulted in significantly reduced neuronal death in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, treatment with 1-methoxyoctadecan-1-ol resulted in decreased neuronal apoptotic death, as assessed by nuclear morphological approaches. To clarify the neuroprotective mechanism of 1-methoxyoctadecan-1-ol, we explored the downstream signaling pathways of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR with calpain activation. Treatment with glutamate leads to early activation of NMDAR, which in turn leads to calpain-mediated cleavage of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP and subsequent activation of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK. However, pretreatment with 1-methoxyoctadecan-1-ol resulted in significantly attenuated activation of GluN2B-NMDAR and a decrease in calpain-mediated STEP cleavage, leading to subsequent attenuation of p38 MAPK activation. We confirmed the critical role of p38 MAPK in neuroprotective effects of 1-methoxyoctadecan-1-ol using specific inhibitor SB203580. In the photothrombotic ischemic injury in mice, treatment with 1-methoxyoctadecan-1-ol resulted in significantly reduced infarct volume, edema size, and improved neurological function. 1-methoxyoctadecan-1-ol effectively prevents cerebral ischemic damage through down-regulation of calpain-mediated STEP cleavage and activation of p38 MAPK. These results suggest that 1-methoxyoctadecan-1-ol showed neuroprotective effects through down-regulation of calpain-mediated STEP cleavage with activation of GluN2B-NMDAR, and subsequent alleviation of p38 MAPK activation. In addition, 1-methoxyoctadecan-1-ol might be a useful therapeutic agent for

  5. Neuroprotective effects of a novel single compound 1-methoxyoctadecan-1-ol isolated from Uncaria sinensis in primary cortical neurons and a photothrombotic ischemia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Ji Yeon; Choi, Young Whan; Kim, Ha Neui; Kim, Yu Ri; Hong, Jin Woo; Bae, Dong Won; Park, Se Jin; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Choi, Byung Tae

    2014-01-01

    We identified a novel neuroprotective compound, 1-methoxyoctadecan-1-ol, from Uncaria sinensis (Oliv.) Havil and investigated its effects and mechanisms in primary cortical neurons and in a photothrombotic ischemic model. In primary rat cortical neurons against glutamate-induced neurotoxicity, pretreatment with 1-methoxyoctadecan-1-ol resulted in significantly reduced neuronal death in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, treatment with 1-methoxyoctadecan-1-ol resulted in decreased neuronal apoptotic death, as assessed by nuclear morphological approaches. To clarify the neuroprotective mechanism of 1-methoxyoctadecan-1-ol, we explored the downstream signaling pathways of N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) with calpain activation. Treatment with glutamate leads to early activation of NMDAR, which in turn leads to calpain-mediated cleavage of striatal-enriched protein tyrosine phosphatase (STEP) and subsequent activation of p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK). However, pretreatment with 1-methoxyoctadecan-1-ol resulted in significantly attenuated activation of GluN2B-NMDAR and a decrease in calpain-mediated STEP cleavage, leading to subsequent attenuation of p38 MAPK activation. We confirmed the critical role of p38 MAPK in neuroprotective effects of 1-methoxyoctadecan-1-ol using specific inhibitor SB203580. In the photothrombotic ischemic injury in mice, treatment with 1-methoxyoctadecan-1-ol resulted in significantly reduced infarct volume, edema size, and improved neurological function. 1-methoxyoctadecan-1-ol effectively prevents cerebral ischemic damage through down-regulation of calpain-mediated STEP cleavage and activation of p38 MAPK. These results suggest that 1-methoxyoctadecan-1-ol showed neuroprotective effects through down-regulation of calpain-mediated STEP cleavage with activation of GluN2B-NMDAR, and subsequent alleviation of p38 MAPK activation. In addition, 1-methoxyoctadecan-1-ol might be a useful therapeutic agent for brain disorder

  6. Characterization of high affinity dopamine uptake into the dopamine neurons of the hypothalamus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study the authors have examined the uptake of tritiated dopamine into the nerve terminals of hypothalamic DA neurons, which were isolated pharmacologically from NE neurons using desmethylimipramine (DMI), an inhibitor of catecholamine uptake into NE neurons. (Auth.)

  7. Exposure to Advertisement Calls of Reproductive Competitors Activates Vocal-Acoustic and Catecholaminergic Neurons in the Plainfin Midshipman Fish, Porichthys notatus

    OpenAIRE

    Christopher L Petersen; Miky Timothy; D Spencer Kim; Ashwin A Bhandiwad; Robert A Mohr; Sisneros, Joseph A.; Forlano, Paul M.

    2013-01-01

    While the neural circuitry and physiology of the auditory system is well studied among vertebrates, far less is known about how the auditory system interacts with other neural substrates to mediate behavioral responses to social acoustic signals. One species that has been the subject of intensive neuroethological investigation with regard to the production and perception of social acoustic signals is the plainfin midshipman fish, Porichthys notatus, in part because acoustic communication is e...

  8. Neurones and neuropeptides in coelenterates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grimmelikhuijzen, C J; Ebbesen, Ditte Graff; McFarlane, I D

    1989-01-01

    The first nervous system probably evolved in coelenterates. Many neurons in coelenterates have morphological characteristics of both sensory and motor neurones, and appear to be multifunctional. Using immunocytochemistry with antisera to the sequence Arg-Phe-NH2 (RFamide), RFamide-like peptides......) was isolated, which also belongs to the less than Glu...Arg-X-NH2 family. Using specific antisera it was shown that all four peptides were located in neurones. Application of low doses of Antho-RFamide, or Antho-RWamide I or II induced contractions of endodermal muscles of sea anemones. This indicates...

  9. Neuronal avalanches and coherence potentials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plenz, D.

    2012-05-01

    The mammalian cortex consists of a vast network of weakly interacting excitable cells called neurons. Neurons must synchronize their activities in order to trigger activity in neighboring neurons. Moreover, interactions must be carefully regulated to remain weak (but not too weak) such that cascades of active neuronal groups avoid explosive growth yet allow for activity propagation over long-distances. Such a balance is robustly realized for neuronal avalanches, which are defined as cortical activity cascades that follow precise power laws. In experiments, scale-invariant neuronal avalanche dynamics have been observed during spontaneous cortical activity in isolated preparations in vitro as well as in the ongoing cortical activity of awake animals and in humans. Theory, models, and experiments suggest that neuronal avalanches are the signature of brain function near criticality at which the cortex optimally responds to inputs and maximizes its information capacity. Importantly, avalanche dynamics allow for the emergence of a subset of avalanches, the coherence potentials. They emerge when the synchronization of a local neuronal group exceeds a local threshold, at which the system spawns replicas of the local group activity at distant network sites. The functional importance of coherence potentials will be discussed in the context of propagating structures, such as gliders in balanced cellular automata. Gliders constitute local population dynamics that replicate in space after a finite number of generations and are thought to provide cellular automata with universal computation. Avalanches and coherence potentials are proposed to constitute a modern framework of cortical synchronization dynamics that underlies brain function.

  10. INTERACTION OF VESICULAR MONOAMINE TRANSPORTER 2 (VMAT2 AND NEUROMELANIN PIGMENT AMONG THE MIDBRAIN DOPAMINERGIC NEURONS, IN MAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    P. Pasbakhsh

    2004-05-01

    Full Text Available Neuromelanin (NM pigment accumulates with age in catecholaminergic neurons in man, and the ventral substantia nigra dopaminergic neurons that are the most vulnerable to degeneration in Parkinson's disease (PD contain the greatest amount of this pigment. In vitro data indicate that NM pigment is formed from the excess cytosolic catecholamine that is not accumulated into synaptic vesicles via the vesicular monoamine transporter2 (VMAT2. Using semi-quantitative immunohistochemical methods in human postmortem brain, we sought to examine the relationship between the contents of VMAT2 and NM pigment. The immunostaining intensity (ISI was measured for VMAT2 in two regions of the midbrain dopaminergic cell complex. The ISI of the cells was related to the density of NM pigment within the cells. We also measured the ISI for tyrosine hydroxylase (TH and examined the noradrenergic neurons in the locus coeruleus (LC. In brains 22-65 years of age: 1 ventral substantia nigra neurons had the lowest VMAT2 ISI of all neurons in the midbrain cell complex, whereas over 2-fold higher levels are found in most ventral tegmental area neurons; 2 there was an inverse relationship between VMAT2 ISI and neuromelanin pigment in the midbrain dompaminergic neurons; 3 neurons with the highest VMAT2 ISI resided in the LC; 4 neurons with high VMAT2 ISI also had high TH ISI; and 5 in the newborn brain, which has not yet accumulated neuromelanin pigment in the aminergic neurons, the regional distribution of VMAT2 and TH-ISI was similar to that found in the adult brain. These data support the hypothesis that among the midbrain dopaminergic neurons, the ventral substantia nigra dopamine neurons accumulate the highest levels of NM pigment because they have the lowest levels of VMAT2, which thereby renders them especially vulnerable to degeneration in PD.

  11. Differential regulation of the zebrafish orthopedia1 gene during fate determination of diencephalic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarallo Raffaella

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The homeodomain transcription factor Orthopedia (Otp is essential in restricting the fate of multiple classes of secreting neurons in the neuroendocrine hypothalamus of vertebrates. However, there is little information on the intercellular factors that regulate Otp expression during development. Results Here, we identified two otp orthologues in zebrafish (otp1 and otp2 and explored otp1 in the context of the morphogenetic pathways that specify neuroectodermal regions. During forebrain development, otp1 is expressed in anterior groups of diencephalic cells, positioned in the preoptic area (PO (anterior alar plate and the posterior tuberculum (PT (posterior basal plate. The latter structure is characterized by Tyrosine Hydroxylase (TH-positive cells, suggesting a role for otp1 in the lineage restriction of catecholaminergic (CA neurons. Disruptions of Hedgehog (HH and Fibroblast Growth Factor (FGF pathways point to the ability of SHH protein to trigger otp1 expression in PO presumptive neuroblasts, with the attenuating effect of Dzip1 and FGF8. In addition, our data disclose otp1 as a determinant of CA neurons in the PT, where otp1 activity is strictly dependent on Nodal signaling and it is not responsive to SHH and FGF. Conclusion In this study, we pinpoint the evolutionary importance of otp1 transcription factor in cell states of the diencephalon anlage and early neuronal progenitors. Furthermore, our data indicate that morphogenetic mechanisms differentially regulate otp1 expression in alar and basal plates.

  12. Isolation Rearing Reduces Neuronal Excitability in Dentate Gyrus Granule Cells of Adolescent C57BL/6J Mice: Role of GABAergic Tonic Currents and Neurosteroids

    OpenAIRE

    Talani, Giuseppe; Biggio, Francesca; Licheri, Valentina; Locci, Valentina; Biggio, Giovanni; Sanna, Enrico

    2016-01-01

    Early-life exposure to stress, by impacting on a brain still under development, is considered a critical factor for the increased vulnerability to psychiatric disorders and abuse of psychotropic substances during adulthood. As previously reported, rearing C57BL/6J weanling mice in social isolation (SI) from their peers for several weeks, a model of prolonged stress, is associated with a decreased plasma and brain levels of neuroactive steroids such as 3α,5α-THP, with a parallel up-regulation ...

  13. Isolation rearing reduces neuronal excitability in dentate gyrus granule cells of adolescent C57BL/6J mice: role of GABAergic tonic currents and neurosteroids

    OpenAIRE

    Giuseppe Talani; Francesca Biggio; Valentina Licheri; Valentina Locci; Giovanni Biggio; Enrico Sanna

    2016-01-01

    Early-life exposure to stress, by impacting on a brain still under development, is considered a critical factor for the increased vulnerability to psychiatric disorders and abuse of psychotropic substances during adulthood. As previously reported, rearing C57BL/6J weanling mice in isolation (SI) from their peers for several weeks, a model of prolonged stress, is associated with a decreased plasma and brain levels of neuroactive steroids such as 3α,5α-THP, with a parallel up-regulation of extr...

  14. Nursing of Patients with Catecholaminergic Polymorphic Ventricular Tachycardia%儿茶酚胺敏感性室性心动过速患者的护理

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    蒋欣

    2012-01-01

    目的 探讨儿茶酚胺敏感性室性心动过速(catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia,CPVT)患者的护理特点.方法 回顾性分析2005年6月至2011年6月宁波市医疗中心李惠利医院心内科收治的5例CPVT患者的临床资料,并总结其护理经验.结果 β受体阻滞剂对大多数CPVT患者效果良好,但对长期足量应用β受体阻滞剂仍不能满意控制心律失常发生的患者,需要采用植入式心律转复除颤器(implantable cardioverter defibrillator,ICD)治疗.结论 CPVT患者护理各有特点,药物治疗为主的CPVT患者应重视解释疏导和心理护理,而安装植入式心律转复除颤器(implantable cardioverter defibrillator,ICD)患者的应重视术后护理工作.%Objective To summarizes the nursing Features in patients with catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT). Methods The clinical data of five CPVT patients in our hospital during June 2005 and June 2011 were analyzed retrospectivley. The nursing features were summarized according ly. Results The β-blockers are effective in the most patients but the long-term adequate doses of beta blockers are still not satisfied with the control of arrhythmia in patients. Implantable cardioverter defibril- lator (ICD) is the only option for the high risk patients. Conclusion Both treatments have different nurs ing features:one focuses on the interpretation of treatment guidelines and psychological care,and the other emphasizes the post-operative care.

  15. Post-natal heart adaptation in a knock-in mouse model of calsequestrin 2-linked recessive catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valle, Giorgia; Boncompagni, Simona; Sacchetto, Roberta; Protasi, Feliciano; Volpe, Pompeo

    2014-02-15

    Cardiac calsequestrin (CASQ2) contributes to intracellular Ca(2+) homeostasis by virtue of its low-affinity/high-capacity Ca(2+) binding properties, maintains sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) architecture and regulates excitation-contraction coupling, especially or exclusively upon β-adrenergic stimulation. Catecholaminergic polymorphic ventricular tachycardia (CPVT) is an inherited arrhythmogenic disease associated with cardiac arrest in children or young adults. Recessive CPVT variants are due to mutations in the CASQ2 gene. Molecular and ultra-structural properties were studied in hearts of CASQ2(R33Q/R33Q) and of CASQ2(-/-) mice from post-natal day 2 to week 8. The drastic reduction of CASQ2-R33Q is an early developmental event and is accompanied by down-regulation of triadin and junctin, and morphological changes of jSR and of SR-transverse-tubule junctions. Although endoplasmic reticulum stress is activated, no signs of either apoptosis or autophagy are detected. The other model of recessive CPVT, the CASQ2(-/-) mouse, does not display the same adaptive pattern. Expression of CASQ2-R33Q influences molecular and ultra-structural heart development; post-natal, adaptive changes appear capable of ensuring until adulthood a new pathophysiological equilibrium. PMID:24370574

  16. Electrophysiological effects of trace amines on mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ada eLedonne

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Trace amines (TAs are a class of endogenous compounds strictly related to classic monoamine neurotransmitters with regard to their structure, metabolism and tissue distribution. Although the presence of TAs in mammalian brain has been recognized for decades, until recently they were considered to be by-products of amino acid metabolism or as ‘false’ neurotransmitters. The discovery in 2001 of a new family of G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs, namely trace amines receptors, has re-ignited interest in TAs. In particular, two members of the family, trace amine receptor 1 (TA1 and trace amine receptor 2 (TA2, were shown to be highly sensitive to these endogenous compounds. Experimental evidence suggests that TAs modulate the activity of catecholaminergic neurons and that TA dysregulation may contribute to neuropsychiatric disorders, including schizophrenia, attention deficit hyperactivity disorder, depression and Parkinson’s disease, all of which are characterised by altered monoaminergic networks. Here we review recent data concerning the electrophysiological effects of TAs on the activity of mesencephalic dopaminergic neurons. In the context of recent data obtained with TA1 receptor knockout mice, we also discuss the mechanisms by which the activation of these receptors modulates the activity of these neurons. Three important new aspects of TAs action have recently emerged: (a inhibition of firing due to increased release of dopamine; (b reduction of D2 and GABAB receptor-mediated inhibitory responses (excitatory effects due to dysinhibition; and (c a direct TA1 receptor-mediated activation of GIRK channels which produce cell membrane hyperpolarization. While the first two effects have been well documented in our laboratory, the direct activation of GIRK channels by TA1 receptors has been reported by others, but has not been seen in our laboratory (Geracitano et al., 2004. Further research is needed to address this point, and to further

  17. Self-organized criticality in single-neuron excitability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Asaf; Marom, Shimon

    2013-12-01

    We present experimental and theoretical arguments, at the single-neuron level, suggesting that neuronal response fluctuations reflect a process that positions the neuron near a transition point that separates excitable and unexcitable phases. This view is supported by the dynamical properties of the system as observed in experiments on isolated cultured cortical neurons, as well as by a theoretical mapping between the constructs of self-organized criticality and membrane excitability biophysics. PMID:24483496

  18. Self-organized criticality in single-neuron excitability

    OpenAIRE

    Gal A.; Marom S.

    2013-01-01

    We present experimental and theoretical arguments, at the single neuron level, suggesting that neuronal response fluctuations reflect a process that positions the neuron near a transition point that separates excitable and unexcitable phases. This view is supported by the dynamical properties of the system as observed in experiments on isolated cultured cortical neurons, as well as by a theoretical mapping between the constructs of self organized criticality and membrane excitability biophysics.

  19. SURVIVAL AND NEURITE FORMATION OF MESENCEPHALIC TRIGEMINAL NEURONS OF THE RAT IN-VITRO

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    COPRAY, JCVM; LIEM, RSB

    1993-01-01

    In order to study the development and functional properties of single, isolated, rat mesencephalic trigeminal neurones, a cell-culture procedure was developed for these specific primary sensory neurones. Mesencephalic trigeminal neurones were isolated from the brainstem of 16-day-old rat embryos. Va

  20. Degenerative alterations in noradrenergic neurons of the locus coeruleus in Alzheimer’s disease****

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lihua Liu; Saiping Luo; Leping Zeng; Weihong Wang; Liming Yuan; Xiaohong Jian

    2013-01-01

    Mice carrying mutant amyloid-β precursor protein and presenilin-1 genes (APP/PS1 double trans-genic mice) have frequently been used in studies of Alzheimer’s disease; however, such studies have focused mainly on hippocampal and cortical changes. The severity of Alzheimer’s disease is known to correlate with the amount of amyloid-βprotein deposition and the number of dead neurons in the locus coeruleus. In the present study, we assigned APP/PS1 double transgenic mice to two groups according to age: young mice (5–6 months old) and aged mice (16–17 months old). Age-matched wild-type mice were used as controls. Immunohistochemistry for tyrosine hydroxylase (a marker of catecholaminergic neurons in the locus coeruleus) revealed that APP/PS1 mice had 23%fewer cel s in the locus coeruleus compared with aged wild-type mice. APP/PS1 mice also had increased numbers of cel bodies of neurons positive for tyrosine hydroxylase, but fewer tyrosine hydroxylase-positive fibers, which were also short, thick and broken. Quantitative analysis using unbiased stereology showed a significant age-related increase in the mean volume of tyrosine hy-droxylase-positive neurons in aged APP/PS1 mice compared with young APP/PS1 mice. Moreover, the mean volume of tyrosine hydroxylase-positive neurons was positively correlated with the total volume of the locus coeruleus. These findings indicate that noradrenergic neurons and fibers in the locus coeruleus are predisposed to degenerative alterations in APP/PS1 double transgenic mice.

  1. Neuronal Migration Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Neuronal Migration Disorders Information Page Table of Contents (click to ... being done? Clinical Trials Organizations What are Neuronal Migration Disorders? Neuronal migration disorders (NMDs) are a group ...

  2. Motor Neuron Diseases

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Awards Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS Motor Neuron Diseases Fact Sheet See a list of all ... can I get more information? What are motor neuron diseases? The motor neuron diseases (MNDs) are a ...

  3. Effects of pre-experience of social exclusion on hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis and catecholaminergic responsiveness to public speaking stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Weik

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Being socially excluded is associated with a variety of psychological changes and with an increased risk of disease. Today, the immediate physiological consequences of being socially excluded are not well understood. In two recent studies employing a standardized exclusion paradigm (Cyberball we found social exclusion in this virtual game did not alter cortisol secretion directly. However, exclusion pre-experience suppresses the normal cortisol response to public speaking stress in women. The present study aims to replicate our previous finding and further elucidate it by analyzing for the first time whether this alteration of cortisol-responsiveness is associated to ACTH and whether the catecholaminergic system is affected as well. METHODS: Women were randomly assigned to Cyberball-induced exclusion (SE, n = 22 or inclusion (SI, n = 21, respectively. Immediately afterwards they were subjected to public speaking stress. Salivary cortisol, plasma ACTH, catecholamines and estradiol were assessed as were psychological distress and mood. RESULTS: Cyberball exclusion led to a highly significant immediate increase in negative affect in excluded women. After public speaking negative affect in included women increased as well and groups no longer differed. We replicate our previous finding of cortisol non-responsiveness to public speaking stress after exclusion pre-experience and find this effect to be significantly correlated with ACTH alterations. No such effects are observed for catecholamines. CONCLUSIONS: We replicated our previous study result of a suppressed cortisol stress response after a short exclusion experience via Cyberball, thereby underlining the profound effects of social exclusion on a subsequent cortisol stress response. This further demonstrates that these alterations are associated with ACTH. Lack of effects on catecholamines is discussed in view of the tend-and-befriend hypothesis but also from a methodological

  4. Noradrenergic system in cultured aggregates of fetal rat brain cells: morphology of the aggregates and pharmacological indices of noradrenergic neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Majocha, R.E.; Pearse, R.N.; Baldessarini, R.J.; Delong, G.R.; Walton, K.G. (Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA (USA))

    1981-12-28

    Spherical aggregates formed rapidly in culture by re-aggregation of trypsin-dissociated brain cells from the 17-day-old fetal rat. Over about 10 days an initially random distribution of cells evolved into a 3-layered arrangement; cells with characteristics of neurons were found largely in the intermediate layer. The survival of neuronal and glial cell types was evaluated histologically and verified by electron microscopy, which revealed synaptic and myelin structures that rapidly increased in number after 18 days in culture. Levels of norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA) reached peaks of 9.5 and 4.4 ng/mg protein, respectively, at culture day 21. Uptake of (/sup 3/H)NE paralleled these amine levels and was blocked by desipramine or pretreatment with either reserpine or 6-OH-DA. Autoradiographs of aggregates labeled with (/sup 3/H)NE showed a high density of silver grains over cells, apparently neurons, with branching processes traced for 120 ..mu..m. Previously accumulated (/sup 3/H)NE was released under depolarizing conditions (high (K/sup +/) or vertridine) only in the presence of Ca/sup 2 +/. Release was induced to a lesser extent by kainic > glutamic acid. Thus, such aggregates appear to contain catecholaminergic neurons capable of synthesis, uptake and release of NE. The time course of development of these functions supports suggestions that aggregate preparations might be useful in studying neurochemical or morphological aspects of brain development and function in vitro.

  5. Hypothalamic leptin-neurotensin-hypocretin neuronal networks in zebrafish.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levitas-Djerbi, Talia; Yelin-Bekerman, Laura; Lerer-Goldshtein, Tali; Appelbaum, Lior

    2015-04-01

    Neurotensin (NTS) is a 13 amino acid neuropeptide that is expressed in the hypothalamus. In mammals, NTS-producing neurons that express leptin receptor (LepRb) regulate the function of hypocretin/orexin (HCRT) and dopamine neurons. Thus, the hypothalamic leptin-NTS-HCRT neuronal network orchestrates key homeostatic output, including sleep, feeding, and reward. However, the intricate mechanisms of the circuitry and the unique role of NTS-expressing neurons remain unclear. We studied the NTS neuronal networks in zebrafish and cloned the genes encoding the NTS neuropeptide and receptor (NTSR). Similar to mammals, the ligand is expressed primarily in the hypothalamus, while the receptor is expressed widely throughout the brain in zebrafish. A portion of hypothalamic nts-expressing neurons are inhibitory and some coexpress leptin receptor (lepR1). As in mammals, NTS and HCRT neurons are localized adjacently in the hypothalamus. To track the development and axonal projection of NTS neurons, the NTS promoter was isolated. Transgenesis and double labeling of NTS and HCRT neurons showed that NTS axons project toward HCRT neurons, some of which express ntsr. Moreover, another target of NTS neurons is ntsr-expressing dopaminergeric neurons. These findings suggest structural circuitry between leptin, NTS, and hypocretinergic or dopaminergic neurons and establish the zebrafish as a model to study the role of these neuronal circuits in the regulation of feeding, sleep, and reward. PMID:25421126

  6. Axon guidance and neuronal migration research in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    Proper migration of neuronal somas and axonal growth cones to designated locations in the developing brain is essential for the assembly of functional neuronal circuits.Rapid progress in research of axon guidance and neuronal migration has been made in the last twenty years.Chinese researchers began their exploration in this field ten years ago and have made significant contributions in clarifying the signal transduction of axon guidance and neuronal migration.Several unique experimental approaches,including the migration assay of single isolated neurons in response to locally delivered guidance cues,have been developed by Chinese neuroscientists to investigate the molecular machinery underlying these guidance events.

  7. Worms With a Single Functional Sensory Cilium Generate Proper Neuron-Specific Behavioral Output

    OpenAIRE

    Senti, Gabriele; Ezcurra, Marina; Löbner, Jana; Schafer, William R.; Swoboda, Peter

    2009-01-01

    Studying the development and mechanisms of sensory perception is challenging in organisms with complex neuronal networks. The worm Caenorhabditis elegans possesses a simple neuronal network of 302 neurons that includes 60 ciliated sensory neurons (CSNs) for detecting external sensory input. C. elegans is thus an excellent model in which to study sensory neuron development, function, and behavior. We have generated a genetic rescue system that allows in vivo analyses of isolated CSNs at both c...

  8. The Intracellular Signaling Molecule Darpp-32 Is a Marker for Principal Neurons in the Cerebellum and Cerebellum-Like Circuits of Zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robra, Lena; Thirumalai, Vatsala

    2016-01-01

    The dopamine and cAMP regulated phosphoprotein of apparent molecular weight 32 kDa (Darpp-32) is an inhibitory subunit of protein phosphatase-1 (PP-1). Darpp-32 activity is regulated by multiple ligand-activated G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs). This protein is coded for by the protein phosphatase-1 regulatory subunit 1b (ppp1r1b) gene. Here, we provide experimental evidence for the presence of multiple isoforms of ppp1r1b in zebrafish. We show that these isoforms are differentially expressed during development with the full-length isoform being maternally deposited. Next, with a custom polyclonal antibody generated against the full-length protein, we show that in the adult, Darpp-32 is strongly expressed in principal neurons of the cerebellum and cerebellum-like circuits. These include Purkinje neurons in the cerebellum, Type-I neurons in the optic tectum, and crest cells in the medial octavolateralis nucleus (MON). We confirmed the identity of these neurons through their colocalization with Parvalbumin 7 immunoreactivity. Darpp-32 is seen in the somata and dendrites of these neurons with faint staining in the axons. In all of these regions, Darpp-32-immunoreactive cells were in close proximity to tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) immunoreactive puncta indicating the presence of direct catecholaminergic input to these neurons. Darpp-32 immunoreactivity was seen in Purkinje neurons as early as 3 days post-fertilization (dpf) when Purkinje neurons are first specified. In sum, we show that Darpp-32, a signaling integrator, is a specific marker of principal neurons in the cerebellum and cerebellum-like circuits in zebrafish. PMID:27540357

  9. Context-aware modeling of neuronal morphologies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Benjamin eTorben-Nielsen

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal morphologies are pivotal for brain functioning: physical overlap between dendrites and axons constrain the circuit topology, and the precise shape and composition of dendrites determine the integration of inputs to produce an output signal. At the same time, morphologies are highly diverse and variant. The variance, presumably, originates from neurons developing in a densely packed brain substrate where they interact (e.g., repulsion or attraction with other actors in this substrate. However, when studying neurons their context is never part of the analysis and they are treated as if they existed in isolation.Here we argue that to fully understand neuronal morphology and its variance it is important to consider neurons in relation to each other and to other actors in the surrounding brain substrate, i.e., their context. We propose a context-aware computational framework, NeuroMaC, in which large numbers of neurons can be grown simultaneously according to growth rules expressed in terms of interactions between the developing neuron and the surrounding brain substrate.As a proof of principle, we demonstrate that by using NeuroMaC we can generate accurate virtual morphologies of distinct classes both in isolation and as part of neuronal forests. Accuracy is validated against population statistics of experimentally reconstructed morphologies. We show that context-aware generation of neurons can explain characteristics of variation. Indeed, plausible variation is an inherent property of the morphologies generated by context-aware rules. We speculate about the applicability of this framework to investigate morphologies and circuits, to classify healthy and pathological morphologies, and to generate large quantities of morphologies for large-scale modeling.

  10. Cross-talk between sympathetic neurons and adipocytes in coculture

    OpenAIRE

    Turtzo, L. Christine; Marx, Ruth; Lane, M. Daniel

    2001-01-01

    White adipose tissue plays an integral role in energy metabolism and is governed by endocrine, autocrine, and neural signals. Neural control of adipose metabolism is mediated by sympathetic neurons that innervate the tissue. To investigate the effects of this innervation, an ex vivo system was developed in which 3T3-L1 adipocytes are cocultured with sympathetic neurons isolated from the superior cervical ganglia of newborn rats. In coculture, both adipocytes and neurons exhibit appropriate mo...

  11. Neurons controlling Aplysia feeding inhibit themselves by continuous NO production.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nimrod Miller

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Neural activity can be affected by nitric oxide (NO produced by spiking neurons. Can neural activity also be affected by NO produced in neurons in the absence of spiking? METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Applying an NO scavenger to quiescent Aplysia buccal ganglia initiated fictive feeding, indicating that NO production at rest inhibits feeding. The inhibition is in part via effects on neurons B31/B32, neurons initiating food consumption. Applying NO scavengers or nitric oxide synthase (NOS blockers to B31/B32 neurons cultured in isolation caused inactive neurons to depolarize and fire, indicating that B31/B32 produce NO tonically without action potentials, and tonic NO production contributes to the B31/B32 resting potentials. Guanylyl cyclase blockers also caused depolarization and firing, indicating that the cGMP second messenger cascade, presumably activated by the tonic presence of NO, contributes to the B31/B32 resting potential. Blocking NO while voltage-clamping revealed an inward leak current, indicating that NO prevents this current from depolarizing the neuron. Blocking nitrergic transmission had no effect on a number of other cultured, isolated neurons. However, treatment with NO blockers did excite cerebral ganglion neuron C-PR, a command-like neuron initiating food-finding behavior, both in situ, and when the neuron was cultured in isolation, indicating that this neuron also inhibits itself by producing NO at rest. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Self-inhibitory, tonic NO production is a novel mechanism for the modulation of neural activity. Localization of this mechanism to critical neurons in different ganglia controlling different aspects of a behavior provides a mechanism by which a humeral signal affecting background NO production, such as the NO precursor L-arginine, could control multiple aspects of the behavior.

  12. Topology of Central Pattern Generators Selection by Chaotic Neurons

    CERN Document Server

    Huerta, R; Rabinovich, M I; Abarbanel, Henry D I; Abarbanel, Henry D I

    1999-01-01

    Central Pattern Generators (CPGs) in invertebrates are comprised of networks of neurons in which every neuron has reciprocal connections to other members of the CPG. This is a ``closed'' network topology. An ``open'' topology, where one or more neurons receives input but does not send output to other member neurons, is not found in these CPGs. In this paper we investigate a possible reason for this topological structure using the ability to perform a biological functional task as a measure of the efficacy of the network. When the CPG is composed of model neurons which exhibit regular membrane voltage oscillations, open topologies are essentially as able to maximize this functionality as closed topologies. When we replace these models by neurons which exhibit chaotic membrane voltage oscillations, the functional criterion selects closed topologies when the demands of the task are increased, and these are the topologies observed in known CPG networks. As isolated neurons from invertebrate CPGs are known in some...

  13. Juvenil neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostergaard, J R; Hertz, Jens Michael

    1998-01-01

    Neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinosis is a group of neurodegenerative diseases which are characterized by an abnormal accumulation of lipopigment in neuronal and extraneuronal cells. The diseases can be differentiated into several subgroups according to age of onset, the clinical picture...

  14. Refractory Neuron Circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Sarpeshkar, Rahul; Watts, Lloyd; Mead, Carver

    1992-01-01

    Neural networks typically use an abstraction of the behaviour of a biological neuron, in which the continuously varying mean firing rate of the neuron is presumed to carry information about the neuron's time-varying state of excitation. However, the detailed timing of action potentials is known to be important in many biological systems. To build electronic models of such systems, one must have well-characterized neuron circuits that capture the essential behaviour of real neur...

  15. NEURON and Python

    OpenAIRE

    Michael Hines; Davison, Andrew P.; Eilif Muller

    2009-01-01

    The NEURON simulation program now allows Python to be used, alone or in combination with NEURON's traditional Hoc interpreter. Adding Python to NEURON has the immediate benefit of making available a very extensive suite of analysis tools written for engineering and science. It also catalyzes NEURON software development by offering users a modern programming tool that is recognized for its flexibility and power to create and maintain complex programs. At the same time, nothing is lost because ...

  16. Motor Neurons that Multitask

    OpenAIRE

    Goulding, Martyn

    2012-01-01

    Animals use a form of sensory feedback termed proprioception to monitor their body position and modify the motor programs that control movement. In this issue of Neuron, Wen et al. (2012) provide evidence that a subset of motor neurons function as proprioceptors in C. elegans, where B-type motor neurons sense body curvature to control the bending movements that drive forward locomotion.

  17. NeuronMetrics: Software for Semi-Automated Processing of Cultured-Neuron Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Narro, Martha L.; Yang, Fan; Kraft, Robert; Wenk, Carola; Efrat, Alon; Restifo, Linda L.

    2007-01-01

    Using primary cell culture to screen for changes in neuronal morphology requires specialized analysis software. We developed NeuronMetrics™ for semi-automated, quantitative analysis of two-dimensional (2D) images of fluorescently labeled cultured neurons. It skeletonizes the neuron image using two complementary image-processing techniques, capturing fine terminal neurites with high fidelity. An algorithm was devised to span wide gaps in the skeleton. NeuronMetrics uses a novel strategy based on geometric features called faces to extract a branch-number estimate from complex arbors with numerous neurite-to-neurite contacts, without creating a precise, contact-free representation of the neurite arbor. It estimates total neurite length, branch number, primary neurite number, territory (the area of the convex polygon bounding the skeleton and cell body), and Polarity Index (a measure of neuronal polarity). These parameters provide fundamental information about the size and shape of neurite arbors, which are critical factors for neuronal function. NeuronMetrics streamlines optional manual tasks such as removing noise, isolating the largest primary neurite, and correcting length for self-fasciculating neurites. Numeric data are output in a single text file, readily imported into other applications for further analysis. Written as modules for ImageJ, NeuronMetrics provides practical analysis tools that are easy to use and support batch processing. Depending on the need for manual intervention, processing time for a batch of ~60 2D images is 1.0–2.5 hours, from a folder of images to a table of numeric data. NeuronMetrics’ output accelerates the quantitative detection of mutations and chemical compounds that alter neurite morphology in vitro, and will contribute to the use of cultured neurons for drug discovery. PMID:17270152

  18. Somatostatin 2a receptors are not expressed on functionally identified respiratory neurons in the ventral respiratory column of the rat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Le, Sheng; Turner, Anita J; Parker, Lindsay M; Burke, Peter G; Kumar, Natasha N; Goodchild, Ann K; McMullan, Simon

    2016-05-01

    Microinjection of somatostatin (SST) causes site-specific effects on respiratory phase transition, frequency, and amplitude when microinjected into the ventrolateral medulla (VLM) of the anesthetized rat, suggesting selective expression of SST receptors on different functional classes of respiratory neurons. Of the six subtypes of SST receptor, somatostatin 2a (sst2a ) is the most prevalent in the VLM, and other investigators have suggested that glutamatergic neurons in the preBötzinger Complex (preBötC) that coexpress neurokinin-1 receptor (NK1R), SST, and sst2a are critical for the generation of respiratory rhythm. However, quantitative data describing the distribution of sst2a in respiratory compartments other than preBötC, or on functionally identified respiratory neurons, is absent. Here we examine the medullary expression of sst2a with particular reference to glycinergic/expiratory neurons in the Bötzinger Complex (BötC) and NK1R-immunoreactive/inspiratory neurons in the preBötC. We found robust sst2a expression at all rostrocaudal levels of the VLM, including a large proportion of catecholaminergic neurons, but no colocalization of sst2a and glycine transporter 2 mRNA in the BötC. In the preBötC 54% of sst2a -immunoreactive neurons were also positive for NK1R. sst2a was not observed in any of 52 dye-labeled respiratory interneurons, including seven BötC expiratory-decrementing and 11 preBötC preinspiratory neurons. We conclude that sst2a is not expressed on BötC respiratory neurons and that phasic respiratory activity is a poor predictor of sst2a expression in the preBötC. Therefore, sst2a is unlikely to underlie responses to BötC SST injection, and is sparse or absent on respiratory neurons identified by classical functional criteria. J. Comp. Neurol. 524:1384-1398, 2016. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. PMID:26470751

  19. Process entanglement as a neuronal anchorage mechanism to rough surfaces

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The organization of neurons and glia cells on substrates composed of pristine carbon nanotube islands was investigated using high resolution scanning electron microscopy, immunostaining and confocal microscopy. Neurons were found bound and preferentially anchored to the rough surfaces; moreover, the morphology of the neuronal processes on the small, isolated islands of high density carbon nanotubes was found to be conspicuously curled and entangled. We further demonstrate that the roughness of the surface must match the diameter of the neuronal processes in order to allow them to bind. The results presented here suggest that entanglement, a mechanical effect, may constitute an additional mechanism by which neurons (and possibly other cell types) anchor themselves to rough surfaces. Understanding the nature of the interface between neurons and carbon nanotubes is essential to effectively harness carbon nanotube technology in neurological applications such as neuro-prosthetic and retinal electrodes.

  20. Process entanglement as a neuronal anchorage mechanism to rough surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sorkin, Raya; Greenbaum, Alon; David-Pur, Moshe; Anava, Sarit; Ayali, Amir; Ben-Jacob, Eshel; Hanein, Yael

    2009-01-01

    The organization of neurons and glia cells on substrates composed of pristine carbon nanotube islands was investigated using high resolution scanning electron microscopy, immunostaining and confocal microscopy. Neurons were found bound and preferentially anchored to the rough surfaces; moreover, the morphology of the neuronal processes on the small, isolated islands of high density carbon nanotubes was found to be conspicuously curled and entangled. We further demonstrate that the roughness of the surface must match the diameter of the neuronal processes in order to allow them to bind. The results presented here suggest that entanglement, a mechanical effect, may constitute an additional mechanism by which neurons (and possibly other cell types) anchor themselves to rough surfaces. Understanding the nature of the interface between neurons and carbon nanotubes is essential to effectively harness carbon nanotube technology in neurological applications such as neuro-prosthetic and retinal electrodes.

  1. Mechanical Dissociation of Retinal Neurons with Vibration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motomura, Tamami; Hayashida, Yuki; Murayama, Nobuki

    The neuromorphic device, which implements the functions of biological neural circuits by means of VLSI technology, has been collecting much attention in the engineering fields in the last decade. Concurrently, progress in neuroscience research has revealed the nonlinear computation in single neuron levels, suggesting that individual neurons are not merely the circuit elements but computational units. Thus, elucidating the properties of neuronal signal processing is thought to be an essential step for developing the next generation of neuromorphic devices. In the present study, we developed a method for dissociating single neurons from specific sublayers of mammalian retinas with using no proteolytic enzymes but rather combining tissue incubation in a low-Ca2+ medium and the vibro-dissociation technique developed for the slices of brains and spinal cords previously. Our method took shorter time of the procedure, and required less elaborated skill, than the conventional enzymatic method did; nevertheless it yielded enough number of the cells available for acute electrophysiological experiments. The isolated retinal neurons were useful for measuring the nonlinear membrane conductances as well as the spike firing properties under the perforated-patch whole-cell configuration. These neurons also enabled us to examine the effects of proteolytic enzymes on the membrane excitability in those cells.

  2. Study of a New Neuron

    OpenAIRE

    Adler, S. L.; Bhanot, G. V.; Weckel, J. D.

    1994-01-01

    We study a modular neuron alternative to the McCulloch-Pitts neuron that arises naturally in analog devices in which the neuron inputs are represented as coherent oscillatory wave signals. Although the modular neuron can compute $XOR$ at the one neuron level, it is still characterized by the same Vapnik-Chervonenkis dimension as the standard neuron. We give the formulas needed for constructing networks using the new neuron and training them using back-propagation. A numerical study of the mod...

  3. Mesmerising mirror neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyes, Cecilia

    2010-06-01

    Mirror neurons have been hailed as the key to understanding social cognition. I argue that three currents of thought-relating to evolution, atomism and telepathy-have magnified the perceived importance of mirror neurons. When they are understood to be a product of associative learning, rather than an adaptation for social cognition, mirror neurons are no longer mesmerising, but they continue to raise important questions about both the psychology of science and the neural bases of social cognition. PMID:20167276

  4. Kalman Filter Neuron Training

    OpenAIRE

    Murase, Haruhiko; KOYAMA, Shuhei; HONAMI, Nobuo; Kuwabara, Takao

    1991-01-01

    An attempt of implementing Kalman filter algorithm in the procedure for training the neural network was made and evaluated. The Kalman filter neuron training program (KNT) was coded. The performance of Kalman filter in KNT was compared to commonly used neuron training algorithm. The study revealed that KNT requires much less calculation time to accomplish neuron training than commonly used other algorithms do. KNT also gave much smaller final error than any other algorithms tested in this study.

  5. Functional coupling with cardiac muscle promotes maturation of hPSC-derived sympathetic neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Yohan; Cho, Gun-Sik; Li, Zhe; Hong, Ingie; Zhu, Renjun; Kim, Min-Jeong; Kim, Yong Jun; Tampakakis, Emmanouil; Tung, Leslie; Huganir, Richard; Dong, Xinzhong; Kwon, Chulan; Lee, Gabsang

    2016-01-01

    Summary Neurons derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are powerful tools for studying human neural development and diseases. Robust functional coupling of hPSC-derived neurons with target tissues in vitro is essential for modeling intercellular physiology in a dish and to further translational studies, but has proven difficult to achieve. Here, we derive sympathetic neurons from hPSCs and show they can form physical and functional connections with cardiac muscle cells. Using multiple hPSC reporter lines, we recapitulated human autonomic neuron development in vitro and successfully isolated PHOX2B:eGFP+ neurons that exhibit sympathetic marker expression and electrophysiological properties, and norepinephrine secretion. Upon pharmacologic and optogenetic manipulation, PHOX:eGFP+ neurons controlled beating rates of cardiomyocytes, and the physical interactions between these cells increased neuronal maturation. This study provides a foundation for human sympathetic neuron specification and for hPSC-based neuronal control of organs in a dish. PMID:27320040

  6. Energy efficiency of information transmission by electrically coupled neurons

    CERN Document Server

    Torrealdea, Francisco J; d'Anjou, Alicia; Moujahid, Abdelmalik; de Mendizábal, N Vélez; 10.1016/j.biosystems.2009.04.004

    2012-01-01

    The generation of spikes by neurons is energetically a costly process. This paper studies the consumption of energy and the information entropy in the signalling activity of a model neuron both when it is supposed isolated and when it is coupled to another neuron by an electrical synapse. The neuron has been modelled by a four dimensional Hindmarsh-Rose type kinetic model for which an energy function has been deduced. For the isolated neuron values of energy consumption and information entropy at different signalling regimes have been computed. For two neurons coupled by a gap junction we have analyzed the roles of the membrane and synapse in the contribution of the energy that is required for their organized signalling. Computational results are provided for cases of identical and nonidentical neurons coupled by unidirectional and bidirectional gap junctions. One relevant result is that there are values of the coupling strength at which the organized signalling of two neurons induced by the gap junction take...

  7. Kappe neurons, a novel population of olfactory sensory neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Ahuja, Gaurav; Nia, Shahrzad Bozorg; Zapilko, Veronika; Shiriagin, Vladimir; Kowatschew, Daniel; Oka, Yuichiro; Korsching, Sigrun I.

    2014-01-01

    Perception of olfactory stimuli is mediated by distinct populations of olfactory sensory neurons, each with a characteristic set of morphological as well as functional parameters. Beyond two large populations of ciliated and microvillous neurons, a third population, crypt neurons, has been identified in teleost and cartilaginous fishes. We report here a novel, fourth olfactory sensory neuron population in zebrafish, which we named kappe neurons for their characteristic shape. Kappe neurons ar...

  8. Neuronal uptake and intracellular superoxide scavenging of a fullerene (C60)-poly(2-oxazoline)s nanoformulation

    KAUST Repository

    Tong, Jing

    2011-05-01

    Fullerene, the third allotrope of carbon, has been referred to as a "radical sponge" because of its powerful radical scavenging activities. However, the hydrophobicity and toxicity associated with fullerene limits its application as a therapeutic antioxidant. In the present study, we sought to overcome these limitations by generating water-soluble nanoformulations of fullerene (C(60)). Fullerene (C(60)) was formulated with poly(N-vinyl pyrrolidine) (PVP) or poly(2-alkyl-2-oxazoline)s (POx) homopolymer and random copolymer to form nano-complexes. These C(60)-polymer complexes were characterized by UV-vis spectroscopy, infrared spectroscopy (IR), dynamic light scattering (DLS), atomic force microscopy (AFM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). Cellular uptake and intracellular distribution of the selected formulations in catecholaminergic (CATH.a) neurons were examined by UV-vis spectroscopy, immunofluorescence and immunogold labeling. Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy was used to determine the ability of these C(60)-polymer complexes to scavenge superoxide. Their cytotoxicity was evaluated in three different cell lines. C(60)-POx and C(60)-PVP complexes exhibited similar physicochemical properties and antioxidant activities. C(60)-poly(2-ethyl-2-oxazoline) (PEtOx) complex, but not C(60)-PVP complex, were efficiently taken up by CATH.a neurons and attenuated the increase in intra-neuronal superoxide induced by angiotensin II (Ang II) stimulation. These results show that C(60)-POx complexes are non-toxic, neuronal cell permeable, superoxide scavenging antioxidants that might be promising candidates for the treatment of brain-related diseases associated with increased levels of superoxide.

  9. Neuronal Response Clamp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Avner Wallach

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Responses of individual neurons to ongoing input are highly variable, reflecting complex threshold dynamics. Experimental access to this threshold dynamics is required in order to fully characterize neuronal input-output relationships. The challenge is practically intractable using present day experimental paradigms due to the cumulative, nonlinear interactions involved. Here we introduce the Neuronal Response Clamp, a closed-loop technique enabling control over the instantaneous response probability of the neuron. The potential of the technique is demonstrated by showing direct access to threshold dynamics of cortical neuron in-vitro using extracellular recording and stimulation, over timescales ranging from seconds to many hours. Moreover, the method allowed us to expose the sensitivity of threshold dynamics to spontaneous input from the network in which the neuron is embedded. The Response Clamp technique follows the rationale of the voltage-clamp and dynamic-clamp approaches, extending it to the neuron's spiking behavior. The general framework offered here is applicable in the study of other neural systems, beyond the single neuron level.

  10. NEURON and Python

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Hines

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available The NEURON simulation program now allows Python to be used, alone or in combination with NEURON's traditional Hoc interpreter. Adding Python to NEURON has the immediate benefit of making available a very extensive suite of analysis tools written for engineering and science. It also catalyzes NEURON software development by offering users a modern programming tool that is recognized for its flexibility and power to create and maintain complex programs. At the same time, nothing is lost because all existing models written in Hoc, including GUI tools, continue to work without change and are also available within the Python context. An example of the benefits of Python availability is the use of the XML module in implementing NEURON's Import3D and CellBuild tools to read MorphML and NeuroML model specifications.

  11. The Limited Utility of Multiunit Data in Differentiating Neuronal Population Activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corey J Keller

    Full Text Available To date, single neuron recordings remain the gold standard for monitoring the activity of neuronal populations. Since obtaining single neuron recordings is not always possible, high frequency or 'multiunit activity' (MUA is often used as a surrogate. Although MUA recordings allow one to monitor the activity of a large number of neurons, they do not allow identification of specific neuronal subtypes, the knowledge of which is often critical for understanding electrophysiological processes. Here, we explored whether prior knowledge of the single unit waveform of specific neuron types is sufficient to permit the use of MUA to monitor and distinguish differential activity of individual neuron types. We used an experimental and modeling approach to determine if components of the MUA can monitor medium spiny neurons (MSNs and fast-spiking interneurons (FSIs in the mouse dorsal striatum. We demonstrate that when well-isolated spikes are recorded, the MUA at frequencies greater than 100Hz is correlated with single unit spiking, highly dependent on the waveform of each neuron type, and accurately reflects the timing and spectral signature of each neuron. However, in the absence of well-isolated spikes (the norm in most MUA recordings, the MUA did not typically contain sufficient information to permit accurate prediction of the respective population activity of MSNs and FSIs. Thus, even under ideal conditions for the MUA to reliably predict the moment-to-moment activity of specific local neuronal ensembles, knowledge of the spike waveform of the underlying neuronal populations is necessary, but not sufficient.

  12. How microglia kill neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Guy C; Vilalta, Anna

    2015-12-01

    Microglia are resident brain macrophages that become inflammatory activated in most brain pathologies. Microglia normally protect neurons, but may accidentally kill neurons when attempting to limit infections or damage, and this may be more common with degenerative disease as there was no significant selection pressure on the aged brain in the past. A number of mechanisms by which activated microglia kill neurons have been identified, including: (i) stimulation of the phagocyte NADPH oxidase (PHOX) to produce superoxide and derivative oxidants, (ii) expression of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) producing NO and derivative oxidants, (iii) release of glutamate and glutaminase, (iv) release of TNFα, (v) release of cathepsin B, (vi) phagocytosis of stressed neurons, and (vii) decreased release of nutritive BDNF and IGF-1. PHOX stimulation contributes to microglial activation, but is not directly neurotoxic unless NO is present. NO is normally neuroprotective, but can react with superoxide to produce neurotoxic peroxynitrite, or in the presence of hypoxia inhibit mitochondrial respiration. Glutamate can be released by glia or neurons, but is neurotoxic only if the neurons are depolarised, for example as a result of mitochondrial inhibition. TNFα is normally neuroprotective, but can become toxic if caspase-8 or NF-κB activation are inhibited. If the above mechanisms do not kill neurons, they may still stress the neurons sufficiently to make them susceptible to phagocytosis by activated microglia. We review here whether microglial killing of neurons is an artefact, makes evolutionary sense or contributes in common neuropathologies and by what mechanisms. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled SI: Neuroprotection. PMID:26341532

  13. Characteristics of sodium currents in rat geniculate ganglion neurons

    OpenAIRE

    NAKAMURA, SHIRO; Bradley, Robert M.

    2011-01-01

    Geniculate ganglion (GG) cell bodies of chorda tympani (CT), greater superficial petrosal (GSP), and posterior auricular (PA) nerves transmit orofacial sensory information to the rostral nucleus of the solitary tract. We have used whole cell recording to investigate the characteristics of the Na+ channels in isolated Fluorogold-labeled GG neurons that innervate different peripheral receptive fields. GG neurons expressed two classes of Na+ channels, TTX sensitive (TTX-S) and TTX resistant (TTX...

  14. Single neuron computation

    CERN Document Server

    McKenna, Thomas M; Zornetzer, Steven F

    1992-01-01

    This book contains twenty-two original contributions that provide a comprehensive overview of computational approaches to understanding a single neuron structure. The focus on cellular-level processes is twofold. From a computational neuroscience perspective, a thorough understanding of the information processing performed by single neurons leads to an understanding of circuit- and systems-level activity. From the standpoint of artificial neural networks (ANNs), a single real neuron is as complex an operational unit as an entire ANN, and formalizing the complex computations performed by real n

  15. Straintronic spin-neuron

    OpenAIRE

    Biswas, Ayan K.; Atulasimha, Jayasimha; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo

    2015-01-01

    In artificial neural networks, neurons are usually implemented with highly dissipative CMOS-based operational amplifiers. A more energy-efficient implementation is a 'spin-neuron' realized with a magneto-tunneling junction (MTJ) that is switched with a spin-polarized current (representing weighted sum of input currents) that either delivers a spin transfer torque or induces domain wall motion in the soft layer of the MTJ. Here, we propose and analyze a different type of spin-neuron in which t...

  16. Electrophysiology and neuropharmacology of noradrenergic projections to rat PVN magnocellular neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saphier, D

    1993-05-01

    Responses of electrophysiologically identified tuberohypophysial paraventricular nucleus (PVN) neurons were examined following electrical stimulation of the A1, A2, A6, and C2 catecholaminergic cell groups and of the ventral noradrenergic ascending bundle (VNAB). A1, A2, and A6 stimulation evoked primarily excitatory responses from the cells recorded, but C2 stimulation yielded a greater proportion of inhibitory responses. VNAB stimulation at low frequencies (0.5/5 Hz) excited the majority of cells tested, but high-frequency (50 Hz) trains of stimulation reversed the direction of response to inhibition for approximately half of the cells excited by single-shock stimulation. Only 5-Hz stimulation had any affect on blood pressure, causing a slight increase. Treatment with alpha-methylparatyrosine, to inhibit (nor) epinephrine synthesis, reduced the proportion of excitatory responses and prevented the response reversals following 50-Hz VNAB stimulation. Treatment with 6-hydroxydopamine also reduced the proportion of cells excited by VNAB stimulation. Iontophoresis of either norepinephrine or the alpha 1-adrenoceptor agonist l-phenylephrine increased the activity of most cells tested whilst the alpha 1-antagonist ergotamine reduced the activity of most cells tested and prevented excitation elicited by VNAB stimulation. The alpha 2-agonist clonidine excited all cells tested. The beta-antagonist propranolol increased the activity of the majority of cells and prevented inhibitory responses following 50-Hz VNAB stimulation. The results confirm a role for brain stem projections in regulating PVN neuronal activity and demonstrate for the first time that the VNAB provides excitatory input to the PVN, primarily regulated by alpha 1-adrenoceptors. The effects of propranolol on spontaneous activity, and on the inhibitory responses following high-frequency VNAB stimulation, indicate the presence of an inhibitory counterbalancing beta-adrenoceptor mechanism. PMID:8388662

  17. An electrophysiological investigation of the effects of cholecystokinin entric neurons.

    OpenAIRE

    Schutte, I.W.M.

    1998-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) is a peptide, which is present in the gastrointestinat tract in endocrine cells and in the enteric nervous system (ENS). A possible function in the control of motility of the small intestine has been attributed to neuronal CCK. The aim of this thesis was  to obtain a fundamental insight into the action and effects of CCK on enteric neurons. Therefore, intracelluiar recordings were made of myenteric neurons in an isolated preparation of the guinea-pig ileum. Two types of ...

  18. Recent Developments in NEURON

    OpenAIRE

    Hines, Michael L.; Carnevale, Nicholas T.

    2005-01-01

    We describe four recent additions to NEURON's suite of graphical tools that make it easier for users to create and manage models: an enhancement to the Channel Builder that facilitates the specification and efficient simulation of stochastic channel models

  19. Neuromorphic silicon neuron circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    GiacomoIndiveri

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Hardware implementations of spiking neurons can be extremely useful for a large variety of applications, ranging from high-speed modeling of large-scale neural systems to real-time behaving systems, to bidirectional brain-machine interfaces. The specific circuit solutions used to implement silicon neurons depend on the application requirements. In this paper we describe the most common building blocks and techniques used to implement these circuits, and present an overview of a wide range of neuromorphic silicon neurons, which implement different computational models, ranging from biophysically realistic and conductance based Hodgkin-Huxley models to bi-dimensional generalized adaptive Integrate and Fire models. We compare the different design methodologies used for each silicon neuron design described, and demonstrate their features with experimental results, measured from a wide range of fabricated VLSI chips.

  20. Noise and Neuronal Heterogeneity

    OpenAIRE

    Barber, Michael J.; Ristig, Manfred L.

    2010-01-01

    We consider signal transaction in a simple neuronal model featuring intrinsic noise. The presence of noise limits the precision of neural responses and impacts the quality of neural signal transduction. We assess the signal transduction quality in relation to the level of noise, and show it to be maximized by a non-zero level of noise, analogous to the stochastic resonance effect. The quality enhancement occurs for a finite range of stimuli to a single neuron; we show how to construct network...

  1. Josephson junction simulation of neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Crotty, Patrick; Schult, Daniel; Segall, Ken

    2010-01-01

    With the goal of understanding the intricate behavior and dynamics of collections of neurons, we present superconducting circuits containing Josephson junctions that model biologically realistic neurons. These "Josephson junction neurons" reproduce many characteristic behaviors of biological neurons such as action potentials, refractory periods, and firing thresholds. They can be coupled together in ways that mimic electrical and chemical synapses. Using existing fabrication technologies, lar...

  2. Expression of polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecules on adult stem cells after neuronal differentiation of inner ear spiral ganglion neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kyoung Ho [Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, College of Medicine, Catholic University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yeo, Sang Won, E-mail: swyeo@catholic.ac.kr [Department of Otolaryngology Head and Neck Surgery, College of Medicine, Catholic University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Troy, Frederic A., E-mail: fatroy@ucdavis.edu [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Medicine, University of California, School of Medicine, Davis, CA 95616 (United States); Xiamen University, School of Medicine, Xiamen City (China)

    2014-10-17

    Highlights: • PolySia expressed on neurons primarily during early stages of neuronal development. • PolySia–NCAM is expressed on neural stem cells from adult guinea pig spiral ganglion. • PolySia is a biomarker that modulates neuronal differentiation in inner ear stem cells. - Abstract: During brain development, polysialylated (polySia) neural cell adhesion molecules (polySia–NCAMs) modulate cell–cell adhesive interactions involved in synaptogenesis, neural plasticity, myelination, and neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation and differentiation. Our findings show that polySia–NCAM is expressed on NSC isolated from adult guinea pig spiral ganglion (GPSG), and in neurons and Schwann cells after differentiation of the NSC with epidermal, glia, fibroblast growth factors (GFs) and neurotrophins. These differentiated cells were immunoreactive with mAb’s to polySia, NCAM, β-III tubulin, nestin, S-100 and stained with BrdU. NSC could regenerate and be differentiated into neurons and Schwann cells. We conclude: (1) polySia is expressed on NSC isolated from adult GPSG and on neurons and Schwann cells differentiated from these NSC; (2) polySia is expressed on neurons primarily during the early stage of neuronal development and is expressed on Schwann cells at points of cell–cell contact; (3) polySia is a functional biomarker that modulates neuronal differentiation in inner ear stem cells. These new findings suggest that replacement of defective cells in the inner ear of hearing impaired patients using adult spiral ganglion neurons may offer potential hope to improve the quality of life for patients with auditory dysfunction and impaired hearing disorders.

  3. Expression of polysialylated neural cell adhesion molecules on adult stem cells after neuronal differentiation of inner ear spiral ganglion neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • PolySia expressed on neurons primarily during early stages of neuronal development. • PolySia–NCAM is expressed on neural stem cells from adult guinea pig spiral ganglion. • PolySia is a biomarker that modulates neuronal differentiation in inner ear stem cells. - Abstract: During brain development, polysialylated (polySia) neural cell adhesion molecules (polySia–NCAMs) modulate cell–cell adhesive interactions involved in synaptogenesis, neural plasticity, myelination, and neural stem cell (NSC) proliferation and differentiation. Our findings show that polySia–NCAM is expressed on NSC isolated from adult guinea pig spiral ganglion (GPSG), and in neurons and Schwann cells after differentiation of the NSC with epidermal, glia, fibroblast growth factors (GFs) and neurotrophins. These differentiated cells were immunoreactive with mAb’s to polySia, NCAM, β-III tubulin, nestin, S-100 and stained with BrdU. NSC could regenerate and be differentiated into neurons and Schwann cells. We conclude: (1) polySia is expressed on NSC isolated from adult GPSG and on neurons and Schwann cells differentiated from these NSC; (2) polySia is expressed on neurons primarily during the early stage of neuronal development and is expressed on Schwann cells at points of cell–cell contact; (3) polySia is a functional biomarker that modulates neuronal differentiation in inner ear stem cells. These new findings suggest that replacement of defective cells in the inner ear of hearing impaired patients using adult spiral ganglion neurons may offer potential hope to improve the quality of life for patients with auditory dysfunction and impaired hearing disorders

  4. Rhynchophylline Protects Cultured Rat Neurons against Methamphetamine Cytotoxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dan Dan Xu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Rhynchophylline (Rhy is an active component isolated from species of the genus Uncaria which has been used for the treatment of ailments to the central nervous system in traditional Chinese medicine. Besides acting as a calcium channel blocker, Rhy was also reported to be able to protect against glutamate-induced neuronal death. We thus hypothesize that Rhy may have neuroprotective activity against methamphetamine (MA. The primary neurons were cultured directly from the cerebral cortex of neonatal rats, acting as in vitro model in the present study. The neurotoxicity of MA and the protective effect of Rhy were evaluated by MTT assay. The effects of MA, Rhy or their combination on intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i were determined in individual neocortical neurons by the Fluo-3/AM tracing method. The MTT assay demonstrated that MA has a dose-dependent neurotoxicity in neuronal cultures. The addition of Rhy prior to the exposure to MA prevented neuronal death. Time course studies with the Fluo-3/AM probe showed that Rhy significantly decreased neuronal [Ca2+]i which was elevated by the exposure to MA. Our results suggested that Rhy can protect the neuronal cultures against MA exposure and promptly attenuate intracellular calcium overload triggered by MA challenge. This is the first report demonstrating an inhibitory effect of Rhy against MA impairment in cultured neurons in vitro.

  5. Neurons of human nucleus accumbens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sazdanović Maja

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Nucleus accumbens is a part of the ventral striatum also known as a drug active brain region, especially related with drug addiction. The aim of the study was to investigate the Golgi morphology of the nucleus accumbens neurons. Methods. The study was performed on the frontal and sagittal sections of 15 human brains by the Golgi Kopsch method. We classified neurons in the human nucleus accumbens according to their morphology and size into four types: type I - fusiform neurons; type II - fusiform neurons with lateral dendrite, arising from a part of the cell body; type III - pyramidal-like neuron; type IV - multipolar neuron. The medium spiny neurons, which are mostly noted regarding to the drug addictive conditions of the brain, correspond to the type IV - multipolar neurons. Results. Two regions of human nucleus accumbens could be clearly recognized on Nissl and Golgi preparations each containing different predominant neuronal types. Central part of nucleus accumbens, core region, has a low density of impregnated neurons with predominant type III, pyramidal-like neurons, with spines on secondary branches and rare type IV, multipolar neurons. Contrary to the core, peripheral region, shell of nucleus, has a high density of impregnated neurons predominantly contained of type I and type IV - multipolar neurons, which all are rich in spines on secondary and tertiary dendritic branches. Conclusion. Our results indicate great morphological variability of human nucleus accumbens neurons. This requires further investigations and clarifying clinical significance of this important brain region.

  6. Synapse-to-neuron ratio is inversely related to neuronal density in mature neuronal cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Cullen, D. Kacy; Gilroy, Meghan; Irons, Hillary R.; LaPlaca, Michelle C.

    2010-01-01

    Synapse formation is a fundamental process in neurons that occurs throughout development, maturity, and aging. Although these stages contain disparate and fluctuating numbers of mature neurons, tactics employed by neuronal networks to modulate synapse number as a function of neuronal density are not well understood. The goal of this study was to utilize an in vitro model to assess the influence of cell density and neuronal maturity on synapse number and distribution. Specifically, cerebral co...

  7. Information in a Network of Neuronal Cells: Effect of Cell Density and Short-Term Depression

    OpenAIRE

    Onesto, Valentina; Cosentino, Carlo; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Cesarelli, Mario; Amato, Francesco; Gentile, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Neurons are specialized, electrically excitable cells which use electrical to chemical signals to transmit and elaborate information. Understanding how the cooperation of a great many of neurons in a grid may modify and perhaps improve the information quality, in contrast to few neurons in isolation, is critical for the rational design of cell-materials interfaces for applications in regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, and personalized lab-on-a-chips. In the present paper, we couple an...

  8. Spine morphology of neurons in the Avian forebrain is affected by rearing conditions

    OpenAIRE

    Rollenhagen, Astrid; Bischof, Hans-Joachim

    1994-01-01

    An area of the caudal forebrain of male zebra finches, the Archi-Neostriatum caudale (ANC), which is active during arousal (Bischof and Herrmann, 1986, 1988), shows rearing-dependent changes in neuron morphology (Rollenhagen and Bischof, 1991). We demonstrate here that rearing conditions also affect the shape of spines of one of the four ANC neuron types. This neuron type was examined in birds reared under five different conditions - in isolation (1), caged (2), in the aviary (3), and with so...

  9. Protoplasmic Astrocytes Enhance the Ability of Neural Stem Cells to Differentiate into Neurons In Vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan Liu; Li Wang; Zaiyun Long; Lin Zeng; Yamin Wu

    2012-01-01

    Protoplasmic astrocytes have been reported to exhibit neuroprotective effects on neurons, but there has been no direct evidence for a functional relationship between protoplasmic astrocytes and neural stem cells (NSCs). In this study, we examined neuronal differentiation of NSCs induced by protoplasmic astrocytes in a co-culture model. Protoplasmic astrocytes were isolated from new-born and NSCs from the E13-15 cortex of rats respectively. The differentiated cells labeled with neuron-specific...

  10. Stochastic neuron models

    CERN Document Server

    Greenwood, Priscilla E

    2016-01-01

    This book describes a large number of open problems in the theory of stochastic neural systems, with the aim of enticing probabilists to work on them. This includes problems arising from stochastic models of individual neurons as well as those arising from stochastic models of the activities of small and large networks of interconnected neurons. The necessary neuroscience background to these problems is outlined within the text, so readers can grasp the context in which they arise. This book will be useful for graduate students and instructors providing material and references for applying probability to stochastic neuron modeling. Methods and results are presented, but the emphasis is on questions where additional stochastic analysis may contribute neuroscience insight. An extensive bibliography is included. Dr. Priscilla E. Greenwood is a Professor Emerita in the Department of Mathematics at the University of British Columbia. Dr. Lawrence M. Ward is a Professor in the Department of Psychology and the Brain...

  11. Enteric bacterial metabolites propionic and butyric acid modulate gene expression, including CREB-dependent catecholaminergic neurotransmission, in PC12 cells--possible relevance to autism spectrum disorders.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bistra B Nankova

    Full Text Available Alterations in gut microbiome composition have an emerging role in health and disease including brain function and behavior. Short chain fatty acids (SCFA like propionic (PPA, and butyric acid (BA, which are present in diet and are fermentation products of many gastrointestinal bacteria, are showing increasing importance in host health, but also may be environmental contributors in neurodevelopmental disorders including autism spectrum disorders (ASD. Further to this we have shown SCFA administration to rodents over a variety of routes (intracerebroventricular, subcutaneous, intraperitoneal or developmental time periods can elicit behavioral, electrophysiological, neuropathological and biochemical effects consistent with findings in ASD patients. SCFA are capable of altering host gene expression, partly due to their histone deacetylase inhibitor activity. We have previously shown BA can regulate tyrosine hydroxylase (TH mRNA levels in a PC12 cell model. Since monoamine concentration is known to be elevated in the brain and blood of ASD patients and in many ASD animal models, we hypothesized that SCFA may directly influence brain monoaminergic pathways. When PC12 cells were transiently transfected with plasmids having a luciferase reporter gene under the control of the TH promoter, PPA was found to induce reporter gene activity over a wide concentration range. CREB transcription factor(s was necessary for the transcriptional activation of TH gene by PPA. At lower concentrations PPA also caused accumulation of TH mRNA and protein, indicative of increased cell capacity to produce catecholamines. PPA and BA induced broad alterations in gene expression including neurotransmitter systems, neuronal cell adhesion molecules, inflammation, oxidative stress, lipid metabolism and mitochondrial function, all of which have been implicated in ASD. In conclusion, our data are consistent with a molecular mechanism through which gut related environmental signals

  12. A high-throughput method for generating uniform microislands for autaptic neuronal cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Sgro, Allyson E.; Nowak, Amy L.; Austin, Naola S.; Custer, Kenneth L.; Allen, Peter B.; Chiu, Daniel T.; Bajjalieh, Sandra M.

    2011-01-01

    Generating microislands of culture substrate on coverslips by spray application of poly-D lysine is a commonly used method for culturing isolated neurons that form self (autaptic) synapses. This preparation has multiple advantages for studying synaptic transmission in isolation; however, generating microislands by spraying produces islands of non-uniform size and thus cultures vary widely in the number of islands containing single neurons. To address these problems, we developed a high-throug...

  13. New findings on neuron development

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    @@ A mature neuron receives inputs from multiple dendrites and sends its output to other neurons via a single axon.This polarized morphology requires proper axonal/dendritic differentiation during development.

  14. Chaotic neuron clock

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → A chaotic model of spontaneous neuron firing. → Mapping the irregular spiking time-series into telegraph signals. → Fundamental frequency of the Rossler attractor provides periodic component. → Spiking time-series from spontaneous activity of hippocampal neurons. → Comparison shows good agreement between the model and the experiment. - Abstract: A chaotic model of spontaneous (without external stimulus) neuron firing has been analyzed by mapping the irregular spiking time-series into telegraph signals. In this model the fundamental frequency of chaotic Roessler attractor provides (with a period doubling) the strong periodic component of the generated irregular signal. The exponentially decaying broad-band part of the spectrum of the Roessler attractor has been transformed by the threshold firing mechanism into a scaling tale. These results are compared with irregular spiking time-series obtained in vitro from a spontaneous activity of hippocampal (CA3) singular neurons (rat's brain slice culture). The comparison shows good agreement between the model and experimentally obtained spectra.

  15. Neuronal nets in robotics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper gives a generic idea of the solutions that the neuronal nets contribute to the robotics. The advantages and the inconveniences are exposed that have regarding the conventional techniques. It also describe the more excellent applications as the pursuit of trajectories, the positioning based on images, the force control or of the mobile robots management, among others

  16. Lower motor neuron facial palsy in cerebral venous sinus thrombosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Girish Baburao Kulkarni

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available With advances in the neuro-imaging modalities, diverse manifestations of the cerebral venous sinus thrombosis (CVT are being recognized. There are very few reports of isolated cranial nerve palsies in CVT. In this case report, we describe a patient of lower motor neuron facial palsy with CVT who was successfully treated with anticoagulation, highlighting the atypical manifestation of the disease.

  17. Cultures of Cerebellar Granule Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    sprotocols

    2014-01-01

    Authors: Parizad M. Bilimoria and Azad Bonni1 Corresponding author ([]()) ### INTRODUCTION Primary cultures of granule neurons from the post-natal rat cerebellum provide an excellent model system for molecular and cell biological studies of neuronal development and function. The cerebellar cortex, with its highly organized structure and few neuronal subtypes, offers a well-characterized neural circuitry. Many fundamental insight...

  18. Rhythm dynamics of complex neuronal networks with mixed bursting neurons

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The spatiotemporal order and rhythm dynamics of a complex neuronal network with mixed bursting neurons are studied in this paper. A quantitative characteristic, the width factor, is introduced to describe the rhythm dynamics of an individual neuron, and the average width factor is used to characterize the rhythm dynamics of a neuronal network. An r parameter is introduced to denote the ratio of the short bursting neurons in the network. Then we investigate the effect of the ratio on the rhythm dynamics of the neuronal network. The critical value of r is derived, and the neurons in the network always remain short bursting when the r ratio is larger than the critical value. (general)

  19. Rhythm dynamics of complex neuronal networks with mixed bursting neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lü Yong-Bing; Shi Xia; Zheng Yan-Hong

    2013-01-01

    The spatiotemporal order and rhythm dynamics of a complex neuronal network with mixed bursting neurons are studied in this paper.A quantitative characteristic,the width factor,is introduced to describe the rhythm dynamics of an individual neuron,and the average width factor is used to characterize the rhythm dynamics of a neuronal network.An r parameter is introduced to denote the ratio of the short bursting neurons in the network.Then we investigate the effect of the ratio on the rhythm dynamics of the neuronal network.The critical value of r is derived,and the neurons in the network always remain short bursting when the r ratio is larger than the critical value.

  20. Electrophysiological evidence of P2X2 receptor expression in the neurons of intracardiac and paratracheal ganglia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MA Bei; NI Xin; HAN Hong; BURNSTOCK Geoffrey

    2006-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the expression of P2X receptors on rat intracardiac and paratracheal ganglion neurons. Methods: For preparation of intracardiac neurons, hearts were excised, the atria were separated and the medial region containing intracardiac ganglia was isolated and cut into pieces. For preparation of paratracheal neurons, the tracheas were removed and the superficial membranous layer containing paratracheal ganglia was rapidly isolated. Intracardiac and paratracheal ganglion neurons were dissociated after digestion by collagenase and trypsin. Whole-cell patch clamp recording was used to identify the pharmacological properties of P2X receptors in cultured neurons. Results:Neurons from these two ganglia responded to ATP with a rapidly activating, sustained inward current. Αβ-meATP failed to evoke any responses in paratracheal ganglion neurons while a few of intracardiac ganglion neurons responded to αβ-meATP with a tiny sustained inward current. ADP and UTP had no effect on intracardiac neurons. Lowering pH potentiated ATP responses in neurons from these two ganglia whereas increasing pH inhibited ATP responses. Co-application of Zn2+ potentiated ATP responses in intracardiac and paratracheal ganglion neurons. Conclusion: The receptor subtypes involved in intracardiac and paratracheal ganglia appear to be homomeric P2X2, while heteromeric P2X2/3 could not be completely excluded from intracardiac neurons.

  1. Phosphoinositide signaling in somatosensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohacs, Tibor

    2016-05-01

    Somatosensory neurons of the dorsal root ganglia (DRG) and trigeminal ganglia (TG) are responsible for detecting thermal and tactile stimuli. They are also the primary neurons mediating pain and itch. A large number of cell surface receptors in these neurons couple to phospholipase C (PLC) enzymes leading to the hydrolysis of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate [PI(4,5)P2] and the generation of downstream signaling molecules. These neurons also express many different ion channels, several of which are regulated by phosphoinositides. This review will summarize the knowledge on phosphoinositide signaling in DRG neurons, with special focus on effects on sensory and other ion channels. PMID:26724974

  2. Motor neurone disease

    OpenAIRE

    Talbot, K.

    2002-01-01

    Motor neurone disease (MND), or amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS), is a neurodegenerative disorder of unknown aetiology. Progressive motor weakness and bulbar dysfunction lead to premature death, usually from respiratory failure. Confirming the diagnosis may initially be difficult until the full clinical features are manifest. For all forms of the disease there is a significant differential diagnosis to consider, including treatable conditions, and therefore specialist neurological opinion ...

  3. The neuron classification problem

    OpenAIRE

    Bota, Mihail; Swanson, Larry W.

    2007-01-01

    A systematic account of neuron cell types is a basic prerequisite for determining the vertebrate nervous system global wiring diagram. With comprehensive lineage and phylogenetic information unavailable, a general ontology based on structure-function taxonomy is proposed and implemented in a knowledge management system, and a prototype analysis of select regions (including retina, cerebellum, and hypothalamus) presented. The supporting Brain Architecture Knowledge Management System (BAMS) Neu...

  4. Why our brains cherish humanity: Mirror neurons and colamus humanitatem

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John R. Skoyles

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Commonsense says we are isolated. After all, our bodies are physically separate. But Seneca’s colamus humanitatem, and John Donne’s observation that “no man is an island” suggests we are neither entirely isolated nor separate. A recent discovery in neuroscience—that of mirror neurons—argues that the brain and the mind is neither built nor functions remote from what happens in other individuals. What are mirror neurons? They are brain cells that process both what happens to or is done by an individual, and, as it were, its perceived “refl ection,” when that same thing happens or is done by another individual. Thus, mirror neurons are both activated when an individual does a particular action, and when that individual perceives that same action done by another. The discovery of mirror neurons suggests we need to radically revise our notions of human nature since they offer a means by which we may not be so separated as we think. Humans unlike other apes are adapted to mirror interact nonverbally when together. Notably, our faces have been evolved to display agile and nimble movements. While this is usually explained as enabling nonverbal communication, a better description would be nonverbal commune based upon mirror neurons. I argue we cherish humanity, colamus humanitatem, because mirror neurons and our adapted mirror interpersonal interface blur the physical boundaries that separate us.

  5. Consistent estimation of complete neuronal connectivity in large neuronal populations using sparse "shotgun" neuronal activity sampling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishchenko, Yuriy

    2016-10-01

    We investigate the properties of recently proposed "shotgun" sampling approach for the common inputs problem in the functional estimation of neuronal connectivity. We study the asymptotic correctness, the speed of convergence, and the data size requirements of such an approach. We show that the shotgun approach can be expected to allow the inference of complete connectivity matrix in large neuronal populations under some rather general conditions. However, we find that the posterior error of the shotgun connectivity estimator grows quickly with the size of unobserved neuronal populations, the square of average connectivity strength, and the square of observation sparseness. This implies that the shotgun connectivity estimation will require significantly larger amounts of neuronal activity data whenever the number of neurons in observed neuronal populations remains small. We present a numerical approach for solving the shotgun estimation problem in general settings and use it to demonstrate the shotgun connectivity inference in the examples of simulated synfire and weakly coupled cortical neuronal networks. PMID:27515518

  6. Metabolic reprogramming during neuronal differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agostini, M; Romeo, F; Inoue, S; Niklison-Chirou, M V; Elia, A J; Dinsdale, D; Morone, N; Knight, R A; Mak, T W; Melino, G

    2016-09-01

    Newly generated neurons pass through a series of well-defined developmental stages, which allow them to integrate into existing neuronal circuits. After exit from the cell cycle, postmitotic neurons undergo neuronal migration, axonal elongation, axon pruning, dendrite morphogenesis and synaptic maturation and plasticity. Lack of a global metabolic analysis during early cortical neuronal development led us to explore the role of cellular metabolism and mitochondrial biology during ex vivo differentiation of primary cortical neurons. Unexpectedly, we observed a huge increase in mitochondrial biogenesis. Changes in mitochondrial mass, morphology and function were correlated with the upregulation of the master regulators of mitochondrial biogenesis, TFAM and PGC-1α. Concomitant with mitochondrial biogenesis, we observed an increase in glucose metabolism during neuronal differentiation, which was linked to an increase in glucose uptake and enhanced GLUT3 mRNA expression and platelet isoform of phosphofructokinase 1 (PFKp) protein expression. In addition, glutamate-glutamine metabolism was also increased during the differentiation of cortical neurons. We identified PI3K-Akt-mTOR signalling as a critical regulator role of energy metabolism in neurons. Selective pharmacological inhibition of these metabolic pathways indicate existence of metabolic checkpoint that need to be satisfied in order to allow neuronal differentiation. PMID:27058317

  7. Co-culture of astrocytes with neurons from injured brain A time-dependent dichotomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaojing Xu; Min Wang; Jing Liu; Jingya Lv; Yanan Hu; Huanxiang Zhang

    2011-01-01

    As supportive cells for neuronal growth and development, much effort has been devoted to the role of astrocytes in the normal state. However, the effect of the astrocytes after injury remains elusive. In the present study, neurons isolated from the subventricular zone of injured neonatal rat brains were co-cultured with astrocytes. After 6 days, these astrocytes showed a mature neuron-like appearance and the number of survivingneurons, primary dendrites and total branches was significantly higher than those at 3 days. The neurons began to shrink at 9 days after co-culture with shorter and thinner processes and the number of primary dendrites and total branches was significantly reduced. These experimental findings indicate that astrocytes in the injured brain promote the development of neurons in the early stages of co-culture while these cells reversely inhibit neuronal growth and development at the later states.

  8. The origin of cortical neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Parnavelas J.G.

    2002-01-01

    Neurons of the mammalian cerebral cortex comprise two broad classes: pyramidal neurons, which project to distant targets, and the inhibitory nonpyramidal cells, the cortical interneurons. Pyramidal neurons are generated in the germinal ventricular zone, which lines the lateral ventricles, and migrate along the processes of radial glial cells to their positions in the developing cortex in an `inside-out' sequence. The GABA-containing nonpyramidal cells originate for the most part in the gangli...

  9. Leptin counteracts the hypoxia-induced inhibition of spontaneously firing hippocampal neurons: a microelectrode array study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavello, Daniela; Rojo-Ruiz, Jonathan; Marcantoni, Andrea; Franchino, Claudio; Carbone, Emilio; Carabelli, Valentina

    2012-01-01

    Besides regulating energy balance and reducing body-weight, the adipokine leptin has been recently shown to be neuroprotective and antiapoptotic by promoting neuronal survival after excitotoxic and oxidative insults. Here, we investigated the firing properties of mouse hippocampal neurons and the effects of leptin pretreatment on hypoxic damage (2 hours, 3% O(2)). Experiments were carried out by means of the microelectrode array (MEA) technology, monitoring hippocampal neurons activity from 11 to 18 days in vitro (DIV). Under normoxic conditions, hippocampal neurons were spontaneously firing, either with prevailing isolated and randomly distributed spikes (11 DIV), or with patterns characterized by synchronized bursts (18 DIV). Exposure to hypoxia severely impaired the spontaneous activity of hippocampal neurons, reducing their firing frequency by 54% and 69%, at 11 and 18 DIV respectively, and synchronized their firing activity. Pretreatment with 50 nM leptin reduced the firing frequency of normoxic neurons and contrasted the hypoxia-induced depressive action, either by limiting the firing frequency reduction (at both ages) or by increasing it to 126% (in younger neurons). In order to find out whether leptin exerts its effect by activating large conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channels (BK), as shown on rat hippocampal neurons, we applied the BK channel blocker paxilline (1 µM). Our data show that paxilline reversed the effects of leptin, both on normoxic and hypoxic neurons, suggesting that the adipokine counteracts hypoxia through BK channels activation in mouse hippocampal neurons. PMID:22848520

  10. Dynamic expression of tyrosine hydroxylase mRNA and protein in neurons of the striatum and amygdala of mice, and experimental evidence of their multiple embryonic origin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bupesh, Munisamy; Vicario, Alba; Abellán, Antonio; Desfilis, Ester; Medina, Loreta

    2014-05-01

    Emotional and motivational dysfunctions observed in Parkinson's disease, schizophrenia, and drug addiction are associated to an alteration of the mesocortical and mesolimbic dopaminergic pathways, which include axons projecting to the prefrontal cortex, the ventral striatum, and the amygdala. Subpopulations of catecholaminergic neurons have been described in the cortex and striatum of several mammals, but the presence of such cells in the adult amygdala is unclear in murine rodents, and in other rodents appears to show variations depending on the species. Moreover, the embryonic origin of telencephalic tyrosine hydroxylase (TH) cells is unknown, which is essential for trying to understand aspects of their evolution, distribution and function. Herein we investigated the expression of TH mRNA and protein in cells of the striatum and amygdala of developing and adult mice, and analyzed the embryonic origin of such cells using in vitro migration assays. Our results showed the presence of TH mRNA and protein expressing cells in the striatum (including nucleus accumbens), central and medial extended amygdala during development, which are persistent in adulthood although they are less numerous, generally show weak mRNA expression, and some appear to lack the protein. Fate mapping analysis showed that these cells include at least two subpopulations with different embryonic origin in either the commissural preoptic area of the subpallium or the supraopto-paraventricular domain of the alar hypothalamus. These data are important for future studies trying to understand the role of catecholamines in modulation of emotion, motivation, and reward. PMID:23479178

  11. Microglial control of neuronal activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine eBéchade

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Fine-tuning of neuronal activity was thought to be a neuron-autonomous mechanism until the discovery that astrocytes are active players of synaptic transmission. The involvement of astrocytes has changed our understanding of the roles of non-neuronal cells and shed new light on the regulation of neuronal activity. Microglial cells are the macrophages of the brain and they have been mostly investigated as immune cells. However recent data discussed in this review support the notion that, similarly to astrocytes, microglia are involved in the regulation of neuronal activity. For instance, in most, if not all, brain pathologies a strong temporal correlation has long been known to exist between the pathological activation of microglia and dysfunction of neuronal activity. Recent studies have convincingly shown that alteration of microglial function is responsible for pathological neuronal activity. This causal relationship has also been demonstrated in mice bearing loss-of-function mutations in genes specifically expressed by microglia. In addition to these long-term regulations of neuronal activity, recent data show that microglia can also rapidly regulate neuronal activity, thereby acting as partners of neurotransmission.

  12. The biophysics of neuronal growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franze, Kristian; Guck, Jochen

    2010-09-01

    For a long time, neuroscience has focused on biochemical, molecular biological and electrophysiological aspects of neuronal physiology and pathology. However, there is a growing body of evidence indicating the importance of physical stimuli for neuronal growth and development. In this review we briefly summarize the historical background of neurobiophysics and give an overview over the current understanding of neuronal growth from a physics perspective. We show how biophysics has so far contributed to a better understanding of neuronal growth and discuss current inconsistencies. Finally, we speculate how biophysics may contribute to the successful treatment of lesions to the central nervous system, which have been considered incurable until very recently.

  13. The straintronic spin-neuron.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Ayan K; Atulasimha, Jayasimha; Bandyopadhyay, Supriyo

    2015-07-17

    In artificial neural networks, neurons are usually implemented with highly dissipative CMOS-based operational amplifiers. A more energy-efficient implementation is a 'spin-neuron' realized with a magneto-tunneling junction (MTJ) that is switched with a spin-polarized current (representing weighted sum of input currents) that either delivers a spin transfer torque or induces domain wall motion in the soft layer of the MTJ to mimic neuron firing. Here, we propose and analyze a different type of spin-neuron in which the soft layer of the MTJ is switched with mechanical strain generated by a voltage (representing weighted sum of input voltages) and term it straintronic spin-neuron. It dissipates orders of magnitude less energy in threshold operations than the traditional current-driven spin neuron at 0 K temperature and may even be faster. We have also studied the room-temperature firing behaviors of both types of spin neurons and find that thermal noise degrades the performance of both types, but the current-driven type is degraded much more than the straintronic type if both are optimized for maximum energy-efficiency. On the other hand, if both are designed to have the same level of thermal degradation, then the current-driven version will dissipate orders of magnitude more energy than the straintronic version. Thus, the straintronic spin-neuron is superior to current-driven spin neurons. PMID:26112081

  14. STDP in recurrent neuronal networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthieu Gilson

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Recent results about spike-timing-dependent plasticity (STDP in recurrently connected neurons are reviewed, with a focus on the relationship between the weight dynamics and the emergence of network structure. In particular, the evolution of synaptic weights in the two cases of incoming connections for a single neuron and recurrent connections are compared and contrasted. A theoretical framework is used that is based upon Poisson neurons with a temporally inhomogeneous firing rate and the asymptotic distribution of weights generated by the learning dynamics. Different network configurations examined in recent studies are discussed and an overview of the current understanding of STDP in recurrently connected neuronal networks is presented.

  15. Differentiation of the immortalized adult neuronal progenitor cell line HC2S2 into neurons by regulatable suppression of the v-myc oncogene.

    OpenAIRE

    Hoshimaru, M; Ray, J.; Sah, D W; Gage, F.H.

    1996-01-01

    A regulatable retroviral vector in which the v-myc oncogene is driven by a tetracycline-controlled transactivator and a human cytomegalovirus minimal promoter fused to a tet operator sequence was used for conditional immortalization of adult rat neuronal progenitor cells. A single clone, HC2S2, was isolated and characterized. Two days after the addition of tetracycline, the HC2S2 cells stopped proliferating, began to extend neurites, and expressed the neuronal markers tau, NeuN, neurofilament...

  16. Cutaneous overexpression of NT-3 increases sensory and sympathetic neuron number and enhances touch dome and hair follicle innervation

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    Target-derived influences of nerve growth factor on neuronal survival and differentiation are well documented, though effects of other neurotrophins are less clear. To examine the influence of NT-3 neurotrophin overexpression in a target tissue of sensory and sympathetic neurons, transgenic mice were isolated that overexpress NT- 3 in the epidermis. Overexpression of NT-3 led to a 42% increase in the number of dorsal root ganglia sensory neurons, a 70% increase in the number of trigeminal sen...

  17. Evidence that OGG1 glycosylase protects neurons against oxidative DNA damage and cell death under ischemic conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Dong; Croteau, Deborah L; Souza-Pinto, Nadja; Pitta, Michael; Tian, Jingyan; Wu, Christopher; Jiang, Haiyang; Mustafa, Khadija; Keijzers, Guido; Bohr, Vilhelm; Mattson, Mark P

    2011-01-01

    . Cortical neurons isolated from OGG1(-/-) mice were more vulnerable to oxidative insults than were OGG1(+/+) neurons, and OGG1(-/-) mice developed larger cortical infarcts and behavioral deficits after permanent middle cerebral artery occlusion compared with OGG1(+/+) mice. Accumulations of oxidative DNA...

  18. In vitro and in vivo responses of saccular and caudal nucleus neurons in the grassfrog (Rana temporaria)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen-Dalsgaard, J; Walkowiak, W

    1999-01-01

    We present results from in vitro and in vivo studies of response properties of neurons in the saccular and caudal nuclei in the frog. In the in vitro studies the saccular nerve of the isolated brain was stimulated with electrical pulses. In the in vivo experiments, the neurons were stimulated...

  19. Nerve growth factor, sphingomyelins, and sensitization in sensory neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Grant D. Nicol

    2008-01-01

    @@ Because nerve growth factor (NGF) is elevated during inflammation, plays a causal role in the initiation of hyperalgesia, and is known to activate the sphingomyelin signalling pathway, we examined whether NGF and its putative second messenger, ceramide, could modulate the excitability of capsaicin-sensitive adult sensory neurons.Using the whole-cell patch-clamp recording technique,exposure of isolated sensory neurons to either 100 ng/mL NGF or 1 mmol/L N-acetyl sphingosine (C2-ceramide) produced a 3-4 fold increase in the number of action po-tentials (APs) evoked by a ramp of depolarizing current in a time-dependent manner. Intracellular perfusion with bac- terial sphingomyelinase (SMase) also increased the num- ber of APs suggesting that the release of native ceramide enhanced neuronal excitability.

  20. Synchronization by elastic neuronal latencies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardi, Roni; Timor, Reut; Marom, Shimon; Abeles, Moshe; Kanter, Ido

    2013-01-01

    Psychological and physiological considerations entail that formation and functionality of neuronal cell assemblies depend upon synchronized repeated activation such as zero-lag synchronization. Several mechanisms for the emergence of this phenomenon have been suggested, including the global network quantity, the greatest common divisor of neuronal circuit delay loops. However, they require strict biological prerequisites such as precisely matched delays and connectivity, and synchronization is represented as a stationary mode of activity instead of a transient phenomenon. Here we show that the unavoidable increase in neuronal response latency to ongoing stimulation serves as a nonuniform gradual stretching of neuronal circuit delay loops. This apparent nuisance is revealed to be an essential mechanism in various types of neuronal time controllers, where synchronization emerges as a transient phenomenon and without predefined precisely matched synaptic delays. These findings are described in an experimental procedure where conditioned stimulations were enforced on a circuit of neurons embedded within a large-scale network of cortical cells in vitro, and are corroborated and extended by simulations of circuits composed of Hodgkin-Huxley neurons with time-dependent latencies. These findings announce a cortical time scale for time controllers based on tens of microseconds stretching of neuronal circuit delay loops per spike. They call for a reexamination of the role of the temporal periodic mode in brain functionality using advanced in vitro and in vivo experiments.

  1. The Neuronal Ceroid-Lipofuscinoses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bennett, Michael J.; Rakheja, Dinesh

    2013-01-01

    The neuronal ceroid-lipofuscinoses (NCL's, Batten disease) represent a group of severe neurodegenerative diseases, which mostly present in childhood. The phenotypes are similar and include visual loss, seizures, loss of motor and cognitive function, and early death. At autopsy, there is massive neuronal loss with characteristic storage in…

  2. Odorant responses of Xenopus laevis tadpole olfactory neurons: a comparison between preparations.

    OpenAIRE

    Manzini, Ivan; Peters, Florian; Schild, Detlev

    2002-01-01

    We used a slice preparation of the olfactory epithelium of Xenopus laevis tadpoles to record odorant responses of olfactory receptor neurons (ORNs) and compared these to odorant responses recorded in isolated ORNs. The maximum recording time in the slice was considerably longer than in isolated ORNs, which is essential when many odorants are to be tested. No odorant-induced responses could be obtained from isolated ORNs recorded in the on-cell mode, while recordings in the slice (on-cell and ...

  3. Ethanol and neuronal metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandel, P; Ledig, M; M'Paria, J R

    1980-01-01

    The effect of ethanol on membrane enzymes (Na+, K+ and Mg2+ ATPases, 5'-nucleotidase, adenylate cyclase) alcohol dehydrogenase, aldehyde dehydrogenase and superoxide dismutase were studied in nerve cells (established cell lines, primary cultures of chick and rat brain) cultured in the presence of 100 mM ethanol, and in total rat brain, following various ethanol treatments of the rats (20% ethanol as the sole liquid source, intraperitoneal injection). The results show a difference between neuronal and glial cells. Most of the observed changes in enzymatic activities returned rapidly to control values when ethanol was withdrawn from the culture medium or from the diet. Alcohol dehydrogenase was more stimulated by ethanol than aldehyde dehydrogenase; therefore acetaldehyde may be accumulated. The inhibition of superoxide dismutase activity may allow an accumulation of cytotoxic O2- radicals in nervous tissue and may explain the polymorphism of lesions brought about by alcohol intoxication. PMID:6264495

  4. Orexin neurons receive glycinergic innervations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Hondo

    Full Text Available Glycine, a nonessential amino-acid that acts as an inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, is currently used as a dietary supplement to improve the quality of sleep, but its mechanism of action is poorly understood. We confirmed the effects of glycine on sleep/wakefulness behavior in mice when administered peripherally. Glycine administration increased non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep time and decreased the amount and mean episode duration of wakefulness when administered in the dark period. Since peripheral administration of glycine induced fragmentation of sleep/wakefulness states, which is a characteristic of orexin deficiency, we examined the effects of glycine on orexin neurons. The number of Fos-positive orexin neurons markedly decreased after intraperitoneal administration of glycine to mice. To examine whether glycine acts directly on orexin neurons, we examined the effects of glycine on orexin neurons by patch-clamp electrophysiology. Glycine directly induced hyperpolarization and cessation of firing of orexin neurons. These responses were inhibited by a specific glycine receptor antagonist, strychnine. Triple-labeling immunofluorescent analysis showed close apposition of glycine transporter 2 (GlyT2-immunoreactive glycinergic fibers onto orexin-immunoreactive neurons. Immunoelectron microscopic analysis revealed that GlyT2-immunoreactive terminals made symmetrical synaptic contacts with somata and dendrites of orexin neurons. Double-labeling immunoelectron microscopy demonstrated that glycine receptor alpha subunits were localized in the postsynaptic membrane of symmetrical inhibitory synapses on orexin neurons. Considering the importance of glycinergic regulation during REM sleep, our observations suggest that glycine injection might affect the activity of orexin neurons, and that glycinergic inhibition of orexin neurons might play a role in physiological sleep regulation.

  5. Disinhibition Bursting of Dopaminergic Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Collin J Lobb

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Substantia nigra pars compacta (SNpc dopaminergic neurons receive strong tonic inputs from GABAergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars reticulata (SNpr and globus pallidus (GP, and glutamatergic neurons in the subthalamic nucleus. The presence of these tonic inputs raises the possibility that phasic disinhibition may trigger phasic bursts in dopaminergic neurons. We first applied constant NMDA and GABAA conductances onto a two-compartment single cell model of the dopaminergic neuron (Kuznetsov et al., 2006. The model exhibited disinhibition bursting upon stepwise removal of inhibition. A further bifurcation analysis suggests that disinhibition may be more robust than excitation alone in that for most levels of NMDA conductance, the cell remains capable of bursting even after a complete removal of inhibition, whereas too much excitatory input will drive the cell into depolarization block. To investigate the network dynamics of disinhibition, we used a modified version of an integrate-and-fire based model of the basal ganglia (Humphries et al., 2006. Synaptic activity generated in the network was delivered to the two-compartment single cell dopaminergic neuron. Phasic activation of the D1-expressing medium spiny neurons in the striatum (D1STR produced disinhibition bursts in dopaminergic neurons through the direct pathway (D1STR to SNpr to SNpc. Anatomical studies have shown that D1STR neurons have collaterals that terminate in GP. Adding these collaterals to the model, we found that striatal activation increased the intra-burst firing frequency of the disinhibition burst as the weight of this connection was increased. Our studies suggest that striatal activation is a robust means by which disinhibition bursts can be generated by SNpc dopaminergic neurons, and that recruitment of the indirect pathway via collaterals may enhance disinhibition bursting.

  6. Parallel Algorithms for Neuronal Spike Sorting

    OpenAIRE

    Bergheim, Thomas Stian; Skogvold, Arve Aleksander Nymo

    2011-01-01

    Neurons communicate through electrophysiological signals, which may be recorded using electrodes inserted into living tissue.When a neuron emits a signal, it is referred to as a spike, and an electrode can detect these from multiple neurons.Neuronal spike sorting is the process of classifying the spike activity based on which neuron each spike signal is emitted from.Advances in technology have introduced better recording equipment, which allows the recording of many neurons at the same time.H...

  7. Postmitotic specification of Drosophila insulinergic neurons from pioneer neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Miguel-Aliaga

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Insulin and related peptides play important and conserved functions in growth and metabolism. Although Drosophila has proved useful for the genetic analysis of insulin functions, little is known about the transcription factors and cell lineages involved in insulin production. Within the embryonic central nervous system, the MP2 neuroblast divides once to generate a dMP2 neuron that initially functions as a pioneer, guiding the axons of other later-born embryonic neurons. Later during development, dMP2 neurons in anterior segments undergo apoptosis but their posterior counterparts persist. We show here that surviving posterior dMP2 neurons no longer function in axonal scaffolding but differentiate into neuroendocrine cells that express insulin-like peptide 7 (Ilp7 and innervate the hindgut. We find that the postmitotic transition from pioneer to insulin-producing neuron is a multistep process requiring retrograde bone morphogenetic protein (BMP signalling and four transcription factors: Abdominal-B, Hb9, Fork Head, and Dimmed. These five inputs contribute in a partially overlapping manner to combinatorial codes for dMP2 apoptosis, survival, and insulinergic differentiation. Ectopic reconstitution of this code is sufficient to activate Ilp7 expression in other postmitotic neurons. These studies reveal striking similarities between the transcription factors regulating insulin expression in insect neurons and mammalian pancreatic beta-cells.

  8. Establishment of a mechanical injury model of rat hippocampal neurons in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Xiao-feng; CAO Fei; PAN De-sheng; LIU Wei-guo; HU Wei-wei; ZHENG Xiu-jue; ZHAO Xue-qun; L(U) Shi-ting

    2006-01-01

    Objective:To establish a simple, reproducible, and practical mechanical injury model of hippocampal neurons of Sprague-Dawley rats in vitro.Methods: Hippocampal neurons isolated from1-2-day old rats were cultured in vitro. Mild, moderate and severe mechanical injuries were delivered to the neurons by syringe needle tearing, respectively. The control neurons were treated identically with the exception of trauma. Cell damage was assessed by measuring the Propidium Iodide(PI) uptaking at different time points (0.5, 1, 6, 12 and24 hours) after injury. The concentration of neuron specific enolase was also measured at some time points.Results: Pathological examination showed that degeneration, degradation and necrosis occurred in the injured cultured neurons. Compared with the control group, the ratio of PI-positive cells in the injured groups increased significantly after 30 minutes of injury (P <0.05). More severe the damage was, more PI-positive neurons were detected. Compared with the control group,the concentration of neuron specific enolase in the injured culture increased significantly after 1 hour of injury (P <0.05).Conclusions: The established model of hippocampal neuron injury in vitro can be repeated easily and can simulate the damage mechanism of traumatic brain injury,which can be used in the future research of traumatic brain injury.

  9. Serotonergic neuron regulation informed by in vivo single-cell transcriptomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spaethling, Jennifer M; Piel, David; Dueck, Hannah; Buckley, Peter T; Morris, Jacqueline F; Fisher, Stephen A; Lee, Jaehee; Sul, Jai-Yoon; Kim, Junhyong; Bartfai, Tamas; Beck, Sheryl G; Eberwine, James H

    2014-02-01

    Despite the recognized importance of the dorsal raphe (DR) serotonergic (5-HT) nuclei in the pathophysiology of depression and anxiety, the molecular components/putative drug targets expressed by these neurons are poorly characterized. Utilizing the promoter of an ETS domain transcription factor that is a stable marker of 5-HT neurons (Pet-1) to drive 5-HT neuronal expression of YFP, we identified 5-HT neurons in live acute slices. We isolated RNA from single 5-HT neurons in the ventromedial and lateral wings of the DR and performed single-cell RNA-Seq analysis identifying >500 G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) including receptors for classical transmitters, lipid signals, and peptides as well as dozens of orphan-GPCRs. Using these data to inform our selection of receptors to assess, we found that oxytocin and lysophosphatidic acid 1 receptors are translated and active in costimulating, with the α1-adrenergic receptor, the firing of DR 5-HT neurons, while the effects of histamine are inhibitory and exerted at H3 histamine receptors. The inhibitory histamine response provides evidence for tonic in vivo histamine inhibition of 5-HT neurons. This study illustrates that unbiased single-cell transcriptomics coupled with functional analyses provides novel insights into how neurons and neuronal systems are regulated. PMID:24192459

  10. Mutations Affecting the Chemosensory Neurons of Caenorhabditis Elegans

    OpenAIRE

    Starich, T. A.; Herman, R. K.; Kari, C. K.; Yeh, W. H.; Schackwitz, W. S.; Schuyler, M. W.; Collet, J.; Thomas, J. H.; Riddle, D L

    1995-01-01

    We have identified and characterized 95 mutations that reduce or abolish dye filling of amphid and phasmid neurons and that have little effect on viability, fertility or movement. Twenty-seven mutations occurred spontaneously in strains with a high frequency of transposon insertion. Sixty-eight were isolated after treatment with EMS. All of the mutations result in defects in one or more chemosensory responses, such as chemotaxis to ammonium chloride or formation of dauer larvae under conditio...

  11. Isolated dextrogastria

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cha, Kyung Soo; Kim, Soo Ryun; Lee, Yong Chul; Park, Soo Soung [Chung Ang University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Sim, Young Soo [Seoul National University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    1982-06-15

    Isolated situs inversus of the stomach with otherwise normal position of the thoracic and abdominal viscera is an extremely rare anomaly occurring in two district forms. Majority of cases are associated with eventration of the diphragm and are reported as being confused with spontaneous pneumothorax or pyopneumothorax at base of the right lung. The right sided stomach may produce interesting and confusing changes in liver scan. We have experienced 2 cases of the isolated dextrogastria.

  12. Isolated dextrogastria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Isolated situs inversus of the stomach with otherwise normal position of the thoracic and abdominal viscera is an extremely rare anomaly occurring in two district forms. Majority of cases are associated with eventration of the diphragm and are reported as being confused with spontaneous pneumothorax or pyopneumothorax at base of the right lung. The right sided stomach may produce interesting and confusing changes in liver scan. We have experienced 2 cases of the isolated dextrogastria

  13. Murine Mueller cells are progenitor cells for neuronal cells and fibrous tissue cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mammalian Mueller cells have been reported to possess retinal progenitor cell properties and generate new neurons after injury. This study investigates murine Mueller cells under in vitro conditions for their capability of dedifferentiation into retinal progenitor cells. Mueller cells were isolated from mouse retina, and proliferating cells were expanded in serum-containing medium. For dedifferentiation, the cultured cells were transferred to serum-replacement medium (SRM) at different points in time after their isolation. Interestingly, early cell passages produced fibrous tissue in which extracellular matrix proteins and connective tissue markers were differentially expressed. In contrast, aged Mueller cell cultures formed neurospheres in SRM that are characteristic for neuronal progenitor cells. These neurospheres differentiated into neuron-like cells after cultivation on laminin/ornithine cell culture substrate. Here, we report for the first time that murine Mueller cells can be progenitors for both, fibrous tissue cells and neuronal cells, depending on the age of the cell culture

  14. Pathogenesis of motor neuron disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xuefei Wang

    2006-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To summarize and analyze the factors and theories related to the attack of motor neuron disease, and comprehensively investigate the pathogenesis of motor neuron disease.DATA SOURCES: A search of Pubmed database was undertaken to identify articles about motor neuron disease published in English from January 1994 to June 2006 by using the keywords of "neurodegenerative diseases". Other literatures were collected by retrieving specific journals and articles.STUDY SELECTION: The data were checked primarily, articles related to the pathogenesis of motor neuron disease were involved, and those obviously irrelated to the articles were excluded.DATA EXTRACTION: Totally 54 articles were collected, 30 of them were involved, and the other 24 were excluded.DATA SYNTHESIS: The pathogenesis of motor neuron disease has multiple factors, and the present related theories included free radical oxidation, excitotoxicity, genetic and immune factors, lack of neurotrophic factor,injury of neurofilament, etc. The studies mainly come from transgenic animal models, cell culture in vitro and patients with familial motor neuron disease, but there are still many restrictions and disadvantages.CONCLUSION: It is necessary to try to find whether there is internal association among different mechanisms,comprehensively investigate the pathogenesis of motor neuron diseases, in order to provide reliable evidence for the clinical treatment.

  15. Cellular actions of somatostatin on rat periaqueductal grey neurons in vitro

    OpenAIRE

    Connor, Mark; Bagley, Elena E.; Mitchell, Vanessa A; Ingram, Susan L; Christie, MacDonald J.; Humphrey, Patrick P A; Vaughan, Christopher W

    2004-01-01

    Functional studies indicate that the midbrain periaqueductal grey (PAG) is involved in the analgesic actions of somatostatin; however, the cellular actions of somatostatin in this brain region are unknown. In the present study, whole-cell patch clamp recordings were made from rat PAG neurons in vitro. In 93% of acutely isolated neurons, somatostatin inhibited Ca2+-channel currents. This effect was mimicked by the sst-2 selective agonist BIM-23027, but not by the sst-1 and sst-5 selective agon...

  16. Neuronal subtypes and diversity revealed by single-nucleus RNA sequencing of the human brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lake, Blue B; Ai, Rizi; Kaeser, Gwendolyn E; Salathia, Neeraj S; Yung, Yun C; Liu, Rui; Wildberg, Andre; Gao, Derek; Fung, Ho-Lim; Chen, Song; Vijayaraghavan, Raakhee; Wong, Julian; Chen, Allison; Sheng, Xiaoyan; Kaper, Fiona; Shen, Richard; Ronaghi, Mostafa; Fan, Jian-Bing; Wang, Wei; Chun, Jerold; Zhang, Kun

    2016-06-24

    The human brain has enormously complex cellular diversity and connectivities fundamental to our neural functions, yet difficulties in interrogating individual neurons has impeded understanding of the underlying transcriptional landscape. We developed a scalable approach to sequence and quantify RNA molecules in isolated neuronal nuclei from a postmortem brain, generating 3227 sets of single-neuron data from six distinct regions of the cerebral cortex. Using an iterative clustering and classification approach, we identified 16 neuronal subtypes that were further annotated on the basis of known markers and cortical cytoarchitecture. These data demonstrate a robust and scalable method for identifying and categorizing single nuclear transcriptomes, revealing shared genes sufficient to distinguish previously unknown and orthologous neuronal subtypes as well as regional identity and transcriptomic heterogeneity within the human brain. PMID:27339989

  17. A Neuron Model for FPGA Spiking Neuronal Network Implementation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BONTEANU, G.

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available We propose a neuron model, able to reproduce the basic elements of the neuronal dynamics, optimized for digital implementation of Spiking Neural Networks. Its architecture is structured in two major blocks, a datapath and a control unit. The datapath consists of a membrane potential circuit, which emulates the neuronal dynamics at the soma level, and a synaptic circuit used to update the synaptic weight according to the spike timing dependent plasticity (STDP mechanism. The proposed model is implemented into a Cyclone II-Altera FPGA device. Our results indicate the neuron model can be used to build up 1K Spiking Neural Networks on reconfigurable logic suport, to explore various network topologies.

  18. Immune clearance of attenuated rabies virus results in neuronal survival with altered gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emily A Gomme

    Full Text Available Rabies virus (RABV is a highly neurotropic pathogen that typically leads to mortality of infected animals and humans. The precise etiology of rabies neuropathogenesis is unknown, though it is hypothesized to be due either to neuronal death or dysfunction. Analysis of human brains post-mortem reveals surprisingly little tissue damage and neuropathology considering the dramatic clinical symptomology, supporting the neuronal dysfunction model. However, whether or not neurons survive infection and clearance and, provided they do, whether they are functionally restored to their pre-infection phenotype has not been determined in vivo for RABV, or any neurotropic virus. This is due, in part, to the absence of a permanent "mark" on once-infected cells that allow their identification long after viral clearance. Our approach to study the survival and integrity of RABV-infected neurons was to infect Cre reporter mice with recombinant RABV expressing Cre-recombinase (RABV-Cre to switch neurons constitutively expressing tdTomato (red to expression of a Cre-inducible EGFP (green, permanently marking neurons that had been infected in vivo. We used fluorescence microscopy and quantitative real-time PCR to measure the survival of neurons after viral clearance; we found that the vast majority of RABV-infected neurons survive both infection and immunological clearance. We were able to isolate these previously infected neurons by flow cytometry and assay their gene expression profiles compared to uninfected cells. We observed transcriptional changes in these "cured" neurons, predictive of decreased neurite growth and dysregulated microtubule dynamics. This suggests that viral clearance, though allowing for survival of neurons, may not restore them to their pre-infection functionality. Our data provide a proof-of-principle foundation to re-evaluate the etiology of human central nervous system diseases of unknown etiology: viruses may trigger permanent neuronal

  19. Neurofibromatosis: The role of guanosine triphosphatase activating proteins in sensory neuron function

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cynthia M. Hingtgen

    2008-01-01

    Neurofibromatosis type 1 (NF1) is a common autosomal dominant disease characterized by formation of multiple benign and malignant tumors. People with this disorder also experience chronic pain, which can be disabling. Neurofibromin, the protein product of the Nfl gene, is a gnanosine triphosphatase activating protein (GAP) for p21Ras (Ras). Loss of Nfl results in an increase in activity of the Ras transduction cascade. Because of the growing evidence suggesting involvement of downstream components of the Ras transduction cascade in the sensitization of nociceptive sensory neurons, we examined the stimulus-evoked release of the neuropeptides, substance P (SP) and calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), from primary sensory neurons of mice with a mutation of the Nfl gene (NfI+1-). Measuring the levels of SP and CGRP by radioimmunoassay, we demonstrated that capsaicin-stimulated release of neuropep-tides is 3-5 folds higher in spinal cord slices from Nfl+1-mice than that from wildtype mouse tissue. In addition, the potassium- and capsaicin-stimulated release of CGRP from the culture of sensory neurons isolated from Nfl+1- mice was more than double that from the culture of wildtype neurons. Using patch-clamp electrophysiological techniques, we also examined the excitability of capsaicin-sensitive sensory neurons. It was found that the number of action potentials generated by the neurons from Nfl+1- mice, responsing to a ramp of depolarizing current, was more than three times of that generated by wildtype neurons. Consistent with that observation, neurons from Nfl+1- mice had lower firing thresholds, lower rheobase currents and shorter firing latencies compared with wildtype neurons. These data clearly demonstrate that GAPs, such as neurofihromin, can alter the excitability of nociceptive sensory neurons. The augmented response of sensory neurons with altered Ras signaling may explain the abnormal pain sensations experienced by people with NFI and suggests an important

  20. Neuronal responses to physiological stress

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kagias, Konstantinos; Nehammer, Camilla; Pocock, Roger David John

    2012-01-01

    damage during aging that results in decline and eventual death. Studies have shown that the nervous system plays a pivotal role in responding to stress. Neurons not only receive and process information from the environment but also actively respond to various stresses to promote survival. These responses...... include changes in the expression of molecules such as transcription factors and microRNAs that regulate stress resistance and adaptation. Moreover, both intrinsic and extrinsic stresses have a tremendous impact on neuronal development and maintenance with implications in many diseases. Here, we review...... the responses of neurons to various physiological stressors at the molecular and cellular level....

  1. Simulating synchronization in neuronal networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fink, Christian G.

    2016-06-01

    We discuss several techniques used in simulating neuronal networks by exploring how a network's connectivity structure affects its propensity for synchronous spiking. Network connectivity is generated using the Watts-Strogatz small-world algorithm, and two key measures of network structure are described. These measures quantify structural characteristics that influence collective neuronal spiking, which is simulated using the leaky integrate-and-fire model. Simulations show that adding a small number of random connections to an otherwise lattice-like connectivity structure leads to a dramatic increase in neuronal synchronization.

  2. Detection of explosives by olfactory sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcelli, Angela; Lobasso, Simona; Lopalco, Patrizia; Dibattista, Michele; Araneda, Ricardo; Peterlin, Zita; Firestein, Stuart

    2010-03-15

    The response of olfactory sensory neurons to TNT and RDX as well as to some volatile organic compounds present in the vapors of antipersonnel landmines has been studied both in the pig and in the rat. GC/MS analyses of different plastic components of six different kinds of landmines were performed in order to identify the components of the "perfume" of mines. Studies on rat olfactory mucosa were carried out with electro-olfactogram and calcium imaging techniques, while changes in the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) levels following exposure to odorants and explosives were used as a criterion to evaluate the interaction of TNT and RDX with olfactory receptors in a preparation of isolated pig olfactory cilia. These studies indicate that chemical compounds associated with explosives and explosive devices can activate mammalian olfactory receptors. PMID:19913995

  3. Neuronal Coding of pacemaker neurons - A random dynamical systems approach

    OpenAIRE

    de Jaeger, T

    2009-01-01

    The behaviour of neurons under the influence of periodic external input has been modelled very successfully by circle maps. The aim of this note is to extend certain aspects of this analysis to a much more general class of forcing processes. We apply results on the fibred rotation number of randomly forced circle maps to show the uniqueness of the asymptotic firing frequency of ergodically forced pacemaker neurons. The details of the analysis are carried out for the forced leaky integrate-and...

  4. Neuronal Transcriptome of Aplysia: Neuronal Compartments and Circuitry

    OpenAIRE

    Moroz, Leonid L.; Edwards, John R.; Puthanveettil, Sathyanarayanan V.; Kohn, Andrea B.; Ha, Thomas; Heyland, Andreas; Knudsen, Bjarne; Sahni, Anuj; Yu, Fahong; Liu, Li; Jezzini, Sami; LOVELL, PETER; Iannucculli, William; Chen, Minchen; Nguyen, Tuan

    2006-01-01

    Molecular analyses of Aplysia, a well-established model organism for cellular and systems neural science, have been seriously handicapped by a lack of adequate genomic information. By sequencing cDNA libraries from the central nervous system (CNS), we have identified over 175,000 expressed sequence tags (ESTs), of which 19,814 are unique neuronal gene products and represent 50%–70% of the total Aplysia neuronal transcriptome. We have characterized the transcriptome at three levels: (1) the ce...

  5. From Neurons to Brain: Adaptive Self-Wiring of Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Segev, Ronen; Ben-Jacob, Eshel

    1998-01-01

    During embryonic morpho-genesis, a collection of individual neurons turns into a functioning network with unique capabilities. Only recently has this most staggering example of emergent process in the natural world, began to be studied. Here we propose a navigational strategy for neurites growth cones, based on sophisticated chemical signaling. We further propose that the embryonic environment (the neurons and the glia cells) acts as an excitable media in which concentric and spiral chemical ...

  6. Neuronal boost to evolutionary dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Vladar, Harold P.; Szathmáry, Eörs

    2015-01-01

    Standard evolutionary dynamics is limited by the constraints of the genetic system. A central message of evolutionary neurodynamics is that evolutionary dynamics in the brain can happen in a neuronal niche in real time, despite the fact that neurons do not reproduce. We show that Hebbian learning and structural synaptic plasticity broaden the capacity for informational replication and guided variability provided a neuronally plausible mechanism of replication is in place. The synergy between learning and selection is more efficient than the equivalent search by mutation selection. We also consider asymmetric landscapes and show that the learning weights become correlated with the fitness gradient. That is, the neuronal complexes learn the local properties of the fitness landscape, resulting in the generation of variability directed towards the direction of fitness increase, as if mutations in a genetic pool were drawn such that they would increase reproductive success. Evolution might thus be more efficient within evolved brains than among organisms out in the wild. PMID:26640653

  7. Towards Automatic Classification of Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Armañanzas, Rubén; Ascoli, Giorgio A.

    2015-01-01

    The classification of neurons into types has been much debated since the inception of modern neuroscience. Recent experimental advances are accelerating the pace of data collection. The resulting information growth of morphological, physiological, and molecular properties encourages efforts to automate neuronal classification by powerful machine learning techniques. We review state-of-the-art analysis approaches and availability of suitable data and resources, highlighting prominent challenge...

  8. Neuronal Classification of Atria Fibrillation

    OpenAIRE

    Mohamed BEN MESSAOUD

    2008-01-01

    Motivation. In medical field, particularly the cardiology, the diagnosis systems constitute the essential domain of research. In some applications, the traditional methods of classification present some limitations. The neuronal technique is considered as one of the promising algorithms to resolve such problem.Method. In this paper, two approaches of the Artificial Neuronal Network (ANN) technique are investigated to classify the heart beats which are Multi Layer Perception (MLP) and Radial B...

  9. Computing with Spiking Neuron Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Paugam-Moisy, H.; Bohte, Sander; Rozenberg, G.; Baeck, Thomas; Kok, Joost

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Spiking Neuron Networks (SNNs) are often referred to as the 3rd gener- ation of neural networks. Highly inspired from natural computing in the brain and recent advances in neurosciences, they derive their strength and interest from an ac- curate modeling of synaptic interactions between neurons, taking into account the time of spike firing. SNNs overcome the computational power of neural networks made of threshold or sigmoidal units. Based on dynamic event-driven processing, they ope...

  10. A more substantive neuron doctrine

    OpenAIRE

    Lau, JYF

    1999-01-01

    First, it is not clear from Gold and Stoljar's definition of biological neuroscience whether it includes computational and representational concepts. If so, then their evaluation of Kandel's theory is problematic. If not, then a more direct refutation of the radical neuron doctrine is available. Second, objections to the psychological sciences might derive not just from the conflation of the radical and the trivial neuron doctrines. There might also be the implicit belief that, for many menta...

  11. Chimera states in bursting neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Bera, Bidesh K.; Ghosh, Dibakar; Lakshmanan, M.

    2015-01-01

    We study the existence of chimera states in pulse-coupled networks of bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with nonlocal, global and local (nearest neighbor) couplings. Through a linear stability analysis, we discuss the behavior of stability function in the incoherent (i.e. disorder), coherent, chimera and multi-chimera states. Surprisingly, we find that chimera and multi-chimera states occur even using local nearest neighbor interaction in a network of identical bursting neurons alone. This is i...

  12. Novel model of neuronal bioenergetics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Lasse Kristoffer; Obel, Linea Lykke Frimodt; Walls, Anne B;

    2012-01-01

    We have previously investigated the relative roles of extracellular glucose and lactate as fuels for glutamatergic neurons during synaptic activity. The conclusion from these studies was that cultured glutamatergic neurons utilize glucose rather than lactate during NMDA (N-methyl-d-aspartate)-ind......We have previously investigated the relative roles of extracellular glucose and lactate as fuels for glutamatergic neurons during synaptic activity. The conclusion from these studies was that cultured glutamatergic neurons utilize glucose rather than lactate during NMDA (N...... an ionomycin-induced increase in intracellular Ca2+ (i.e. independent of synaptic activity) on neuronal energy metabolism employing 13C-labelled glucose and lactate and subsequent mass spectrometric analysis of labelling in glutamate, alanine and lactate. The results demonstrate that glucose...... utilization is positively correlated with intracellular Ca2+ whereas lactate utilization is not. This result lends further support for a significant role of glucose in neuronal bioenergetics and that Ca2+ signalling may control the switch between glucose and lactate utilization during synaptic activity. Based...

  13. Cooperative effects of neuronal ensembles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rose, G; Siebler, M

    1995-01-01

    Electrophysiological properties of neurons as the basic cellular elements of the central nervous system and their synaptic connections are well characterized down to a molecular level. However, the behavior of complex noisy networks formed by these constituents usually cannot simply be derived from the knowledge of its microscopic parameters. As a consequence, cooperative phenomena based on the interaction of neurons were postulated. This is a report on a study of global network spike activity as a function of synaptic interaction. We performed experiments in dissociated cultured hippocampal neurons and, for comparison, simulations of a mathematical model closely related to electrophysiology. Numeric analyses revealed that at a critical level of synaptic connectivity the firing behavior undergoes a phase transition. This cooperative effect depends crucially on the interaction of numerous cells and cannot be attributed to the spike threshold of individual neurons. In the experiment a drastic increase in the firing level was observed upon increase of synaptic efficacy by lowering of the extracellular magnesium concentration, which is compatible with our theoretical predictions. This "on-off" phenomenon demonstrates that even in small neuronal ensembles collective behavior can emerge which is not explained by the characteristics of single neurons. PMID:8542966

  14. Automated identification of neurons and their locations

    CERN Document Server

    Inglis, Andrew; Roe, Dan L; Stanley, H E; Rosene, Douglas L; Urbanc, Brigita

    2007-01-01

    Individual locations of many neuronal cell bodies (>10^4) are needed to enable statistically significant measurements of spatial organization within the brain such as nearest-neighbor and microcolumnarity measurements. In this paper, we introduce an Automated Neuron Recognition Algorithm (ANRA) which obtains the (x,y) location of individual neurons within digitized images of Nissl-stained, 30 micron thick, frozen sections of the cerebral cortex of the Rhesus monkey. Identification of neurons within such Nissl-stained sections is inherently difficult due to the variability in neuron staining, the overlap of neurons, the presence of partial or damaged neurons at tissue surfaces, and the presence of non-neuron objects, such as glial cells, blood vessels, and random artifacts. To overcome these challenges and identify neurons, ANRA applies a combination of image segmentation and machine learning. The steps involve active contour segmentation to find outlines of potential neuron cell bodies followed by artificial ...

  15. Communication among neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marner, Lisbeth

    2012-04-01

    The communication among neurons is the prerequisite for the working brain. To understand the cellular, neurochemical, and structural basis of this communication, and the impacts of aging and disease on brain function, quantitative measures are necessary. This thesis evaluates several quantitative neurobiological methods with respect to possible bias and methodological issues. Stereological methods are suited for the unbiased estimation of number, length, and volumes of components of the nervous system. Stereological estimates of the total length of myelinated nerve fibers were made in white matter of post mortem brains, and the impact of aging and diseases as Schizophrenia and Alzheimer's disease were evaluated. Although stereological methods are in principle unbiased, shrinkage artifacts are difficult to account for. Positron emission tomography (PET) recordings, in conjunction with kinetic modeling, permit the quantitation of radioligand binding in brain. The novel serotonin 5-HT4 antagonist [11C]SB207145 was used as an example of the validation process for quantitative PET receptor imaging. Methods based on reference tissue as well as methods based on an arterial plasma input function were evaluated with respect to precision and accuracy. It was shown that [11C]SB207145 binding had high sensitivity to occupancy by unlabeled ligand, necessitating high specific activity in the radiosynthesis to avoid bias. The established serotonin 5-HT2A ligand [18F]altanersin was evaluated in a two-year follow-up study in elderly subjects. Application of partial volume correction of the PET data diminished the reliability of the measures, but allowed for the correct distinction between changes due to brain atrophy and receptor availability. Furthermore, a PET study of patients with Alzheimer's disease with the serotonin transporter ligand [11C]DASB showed relatively preserved serotonergic projections, despite a marked decrease in 5-HT2A receptor binding. Possible confounders are

  16. Isoler nu

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, N.E.; Ankerstjerne, P.; Jørgensen, B.;

    Omfattende vejledning, der angiver, hvordan energiforbruget i eksisterende huse kan nedbringes ved isolering, tætning og forbedring af varmeanlægget, og hvor meget det koster. Anvisningen indeholder detaljerede eksempler på efterisolering af ydervægge, tage, gulve og vinduer. Henvender sig til ej...

  17. Culture of Mouse Olfactory Sensory Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Gong, Qizhi

    2012-01-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons, located in the nasal epithelium, detect and transmit odorant information to the central nervous system. This requires that these neurons form specific neuronal connections within the olfactory bulb and express receptors and signaling molecules specific for these functions. This protocol describes a primary olfactory sensory neuron culture technique that allows in vitro investigation of olfactory sensory neuron differentiation, axon outgrowth, odorant receptor expres...

  18. Cognition and behavior in motor neuron disease

    OpenAIRE

    Raaphorst, J.

    2015-01-01

    Motor neuron disease (MND) is a devastating neurodegenerative disorder characterized by progressive motor neuron loss, leading to weakness of the muscles of arms and legs, bulbar and respiratory muscles. Depending on the involvement of the lower and the upper motor neuron, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS; both lower and upper motor neuron affected) and progressive muscular atrophy (PMA; only lower motor neuron affected) are recognized. There is no cure, despite numerous pharmaceutical tria...

  19. Parvalbumin+ Neurons and Npas1+ Neurons Are Distinct Neuron Classes in the Mouse External Globus Pallidus

    OpenAIRE

    Hernández, Vivian M.; Hegeman, Daniel J.; Cui, Qiaoling; Kelver, Daniel A.; Fiske, Michael P.; Glajch, Kelly E.; Pitt, Jason E.; Huang, Tina Y.; Justice, Nicholas J.; Chan, C. Savio

    2015-01-01

    Compelling evidence suggests that pathological activity of the external globus pallidus (GPe), a nucleus in the basal ganglia, contributes to the motor symptoms of a variety of movement disorders such as Parkinson's disease. Recent studies have challenged the idea that the GPe comprises a single, homogenous population of neurons that serves as a simple relay in the indirect pathway. However, we still lack a full understanding of the diversity of the neurons that make up the GPe. Specifically,...

  20. Viscoelastic properties of individual glial cells and neurons in the CNS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Yun-Bi; Franze, Kristian; Seifert, Gerald; Steinhäuser, Christian; Kirchhoff, Frank; Wolburg, Hartwig; Guck, Jochen; Janmey, Paul; Wei, Er-Qing; Käs, Josef; Reichenbach, Andreas

    2006-11-21

    One hundred fifty years ago glial cells were discovered as a second, non-neuronal, cell type in the central nervous system. To ascribe a function to these new, enigmatic cells, it was suggested that they either glue the neurons together (the Greek word "gammalambdaiotaalpha" means "glue") or provide a robust scaffold for them ("support cells"). Although both speculations are still widely accepted, they would actually require quite different mechanical cell properties, and neither one has ever been confirmed experimentally. We investigated the biomechanics of CNS tissue and acutely isolated individual neurons and glial cells from mammalian brain (hippocampus) and retina. Scanning force microscopy, bulk rheology, and optically induced deformation were used to determine their viscoelastic characteristics. We found that (i) in all CNS cells the elastic behavior dominates over the viscous behavior, (ii) in distinct cell compartments, such as soma and cell processes, the mechanical properties differ, most likely because of the unequal local distribution of cell organelles, (iii) in comparison to most other eukaryotic cells, both neurons and glial cells are very soft ("rubber elastic"), and (iv) intriguingly, glial cells are even softer than their neighboring neurons. Our results indicate that glial cells can neither serve as structural support cells (as they are too soft) nor as glue (because restoring forces are dominant) for neurons. Nevertheless, from a structural perspective they might act as soft, compliant embedding for neurons, protecting them in case of mechanical trauma, and also as a soft substrate required for neurite growth and facilitating neuronal plasticity. PMID:17093050

  1. Isoflurane-induced neuronal apoptosis in developing hippocampal neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongliang Liu; Tijun Dai; Weitao Guo

    2013-01-01

    We hypothesized that the P2X7 receptor may be the target of isoflurane, so we investigated the roles of the P2X7 receptor and inositol triphosphate receptor in calcium overload and neuronal apoptosis induced by isoflurane in cultured embryonic rat hippocampal neurons. Results showed that isoflurane induced widespread neuronal apoptosis and significantly increased cytoplasmic Ca2+. Blockade of P2X7 receptors or removal of extracellular Ca2+ combined with blockade of inositol triphosphate receptors completely inhibited apoptosis or increase in cytoplasmic Ca2+. Removal of extracellular Ca2+ or blockade of inositol triphosphate receptor alone could partly inhibit these effects of isoflurane. Isoflurane could directly activate P2X7-gated channels and induce inward currents, but did not affect the expression of P2X7 receptor protein in neurons. These findings indicate that the mechanism by which isoflurane induced neuronal apoptosis in rat developing brain was mediated by intracellular calcium overload, which was caused by P2X7 receptor mediated calcium influx and inositol triphosphate receptor mediated calcium release.

  2. Learning of time series through neuron-to-neuron instruction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model neuron with delayline feedback connections can learn a time series generated by another model neuron. It has been known that some student neurons that have completed such learning under the instruction of a teacher's quasi-periodic sequence mimic the teacher's time series over a long interval, even after instruction has ceased. We found that in addition to such faithful students, there are unfaithful students whose time series eventually diverge exponentially from that of the teacher. In order to understand the circumstances that allow for such a variety of students, the orbit dimension was estimated numerically. The quasi-periodic orbits in question were found to be confined in spaces with dimensions significantly smaller than that of the full phase space

  3. Comparative pharmacology of cholecystokinin induced activation of cultured vagal afferent neurons from rats and mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dallas C Kinch

    Full Text Available Cholecystokinin (CCK facilitates the process of satiation via activation of vagal afferent neurons innervating the upper gastrointestinal tract. Recent findings indicate CCK acts on these neurons via a ruthenium red (RuR sensitive pathway that involves members of the vanilloid (V subfamily of transient receptor potential (TRP channels. To further test this mechanism, the mouse provides an ideal model in which genetic tools could be applied. However, whether CCK acts by similar mechanism(s in mice has not been determined. In the present study we explored the actions of CCK on nodose neurons isolated from Sprague Dawley (SD rat and two strains of mice; C57BL/6 and BalbC using fluorescence-based calcium imaging. With minor exceptions nodose neurons isolated from all species/strains behaved similarly. They all respond to brief depolarization with a large calcium transient. A significant subset of neurons responded to capsaicin (CAP, a TRPV1 agonist, although neurons from C57BL/6 were 10-fold more sensitive to CAP than SD rats or BalbC mice, and a significantly smaller fraction of neurons from BalbC mice responded to CAP. CCK-8 dose-dependently activated a subpopulation of neurons with similar dose dependency, percent responders, and overlap between CCK and CAP responsiveness. In all species/strains CCK-8 induced activation was significantly attenuated (but not completely blocked by pretreatment with the TRPV channel blocker RuR. Surprisingly, the CCK analogue JMV-180, which is reported to have pure antagonistic properties in rat but mixed agonist/antagonist properties in mice, behaved as a pure antagonist to CCK in both rat and mouse neurons. The pure antagonistic action of JMV-180 in this in vitro preparation suggests that prior reported differential effects of JMV-180 on satiation in rats versus mouse must be mediated by a site other than vagal afferent activation.

  4. Ephaptic coupling in cortical neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Costas Anastassiou

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The electrochemical processes that underlie neural function manifest themselves in ceaseless spatial and temporal fluctuations in the extracellular electric field. The local field potential (LFP, used to study neural interactions during various brain states, is regarded as an epiphenomenon of coordinated neural activity. Yet the extracellular field activity feeds back onto the electrical potential across the neuronal membrane via ephaptic coupling (Jefferys et al, Physiol Rev, 1995. The extent to which such ephaptic coupling alters the functioning of individual neurons and neural assemblies under physiological conditions has remained largely speculative despite recent advances (Ozen et al, JNeurosci, 2010; Fröhlich & McCormick, Neuron, 2010, Anastassiou et al, JNeurosci, 2010. To address this question we use a 12-pipette setup that allows independent positioning of each pipette under visual control with μm accuracy, with the flexibility of using an arbitrary number of these as patching, extracellularly stimulating or extracellular recording pipettes only a few μm away from the cell body of patched neurons (Anastassiou et al, Nat Neurosci, 2011. We stimulated in rat somatosensory cortical slices a variety of layer 5 neural types and recorded inside and outside their cell bodies while pharmacologically silencing synaptic transmission. Pyramidal cells couple to the extracellular field distinctly different from interneurons. Ephaptic coupling strength depends both on the field strength (as measured at the neuron soma as well as the spike-history of neurons. In particular, we find that ephaptic coupling strength depends both on the field strength (as measured at the cell body as well as the spike-history of neurons. How do such effects manifest themselves in vivo? We address this question through detailed large-scale simulations from thousands of biophysically realistic and interconnected neurons (Reimann, Anastassiou et al, Neuron, 2013 emulating

  5. Neuronal factors determining high intelligence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicke, Ursula; Roth, Gerhard

    2016-01-01

    Many attempts have been made to correlate degrees of both animal and human intelligence with brain properties. With respect to mammals, a much-discussed trait concerns absolute and relative brain size, either uncorrected or corrected for body size. However, the correlation of both with degrees of intelligence yields large inconsistencies, because although they are regarded as the most intelligent mammals, monkeys and apes, including humans, have neither the absolutely nor the relatively largest brains. The best fit between brain traits and degrees of intelligence among mammals is reached by a combination of the number of cortical neurons, neuron packing density, interneuronal distance and axonal conduction velocity--factors that determine general information processing capacity (IPC), as reflected by general intelligence. The highest IPC is found in humans, followed by the great apes, Old World and New World monkeys. The IPC of cetaceans and elephants is much lower because of a thin cortex, low neuron packing density and low axonal conduction velocity. By contrast, corvid and psittacid birds have very small and densely packed pallial neurons and relatively many neurons, which, despite very small brain volumes, might explain their high intelligence. The evolution of a syntactical and grammatical language in humans most probably has served as an additional intelligence amplifier, which may have happened in songbirds and psittacids in a convergent manner. PMID:26598734

  6. Stochastic phase-change neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuma, Tomas; Pantazi, Angeliki; Le Gallo, Manuel; Sebastian, Abu; Eleftheriou, Evangelos

    2016-08-01

    Artificial neuromorphic systems based on populations of spiking neurons are an indispensable tool in understanding the human brain and in constructing neuromimetic computational systems. To reach areal and power efficiencies comparable to those seen in biological systems, electroionics-based and phase-change-based memristive devices have been explored as nanoscale counterparts of synapses. However, progress on scalable realizations of neurons has so far been limited. Here, we show that chalcogenide-based phase-change materials can be used to create an artificial neuron in which the membrane potential is represented by the phase configuration of the nanoscale phase-change device. By exploiting the physics of reversible amorphous-to-crystal phase transitions, we show that the temporal integration of postsynaptic potentials can be achieved on a nanosecond timescale. Moreover, we show that this is inherently stochastic because of the melt-quench-induced reconfiguration of the atomic structure occurring when the neuron is reset. We demonstrate the use of these phase-change neurons, and their populations, in the detection of temporal correlations in parallel data streams and in sub-Nyquist representation of high-bandwidth signals.

  7. Peripheral Sensory Neurons Expressing Melanopsin Respond to Light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matynia, Anna; Nguyen, Eileen; Sun, Xiaoping; Blixt, Frank W.; Parikh, Sachin; Kessler, Jason; Pérez de Sevilla Müller, Luis; Habib, Samer; Kim, Paul; Wang, Zhe Z.; Rodriguez, Allen; Charles, Andrew; Nusinowitz, Steven; Edvinsson, Lars; Barnes, Steven; Brecha, Nicholas C.; Gorin, Michael B.

    2016-01-01

    The ability of light to cause pain is paradoxical. The retina detects light but is devoid of nociceptors while the trigeminal sensory ganglia (TG) contain nociceptors but not photoreceptors. Melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) are thought to mediate light-induced pain but recent evidence raises the possibility of an alternative light responsive pathway independent of the retina and optic nerve. Here, we show that melanopsin is expressed in both human and mouse TG neurons. In mice, they represent 3% of small TG neurons that are preferentially localized in the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve and are likely nociceptive C fibers and high-threshold mechanoreceptor Aδ fibers based on a strong size-function association. These isolated neurons respond to blue light stimuli with a delayed onset and sustained firing, similar to the melanopsin-dependent intrinsic photosensitivity observed in ipRGCs. Mice with severe bilateral optic nerve crush exhibit no light-induced responses including behavioral light aversion until treated with nitroglycerin, an inducer of migraine in people and migraine-like symptoms in mice. With nitroglycerin, these same mice with optic nerve crush exhibit significant light aversion. Furthermore, this retained light aversion remains dependent on melanopsin-expressing neurons. Our results demonstrate a novel light-responsive neural function independent of the optic nerve that may originate in the peripheral nervous system to provide the first direct mechanism for an alternative light detection pathway that influences motivated behavior.

  8. Peripheral Sensory Neurons Expressing Melanopsin Respond to Light.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matynia, Anna; Nguyen, Eileen; Sun, Xiaoping; Blixt, Frank W; Parikh, Sachin; Kessler, Jason; Pérez de Sevilla Müller, Luis; Habib, Samer; Kim, Paul; Wang, Zhe Z; Rodriguez, Allen; Charles, Andrew; Nusinowitz, Steven; Edvinsson, Lars; Barnes, Steven; Brecha, Nicholas C; Gorin, Michael B

    2016-01-01

    The ability of light to cause pain is paradoxical. The retina detects light but is devoid of nociceptors while the trigeminal sensory ganglia (TG) contain nociceptors but not photoreceptors. Melanopsin-expressing intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGCs) are thought to mediate light-induced pain but recent evidence raises the possibility of an alternative light responsive pathway independent of the retina and optic nerve. Here, we show that melanopsin is expressed in both human and mouse TG neurons. In mice, they represent 3% of small TG neurons that are preferentially localized in the ophthalmic branch of the trigeminal nerve and are likely nociceptive C fibers and high-threshold mechanoreceptor Aδ fibers based on a strong size-function association. These isolated neurons respond to blue light stimuli with a delayed onset and sustained firing, similar to the melanopsin-dependent intrinsic photosensitivity observed in ipRGCs. Mice with severe bilateral optic nerve crush exhibit no light-induced responses including behavioral light aversion until treated with nitroglycerin, an inducer of migraine in people and migraine-like symptoms in mice. With nitroglycerin, these same mice with optic nerve crush exhibit significant light aversion. Furthermore, this retained light aversion remains dependent on melanopsin-expressing neurons. Our results demonstrate a novel light-responsive neural function independent of the optic nerve that may originate in the peripheral nervous system to provide the first direct mechanism for an alternative light detection pathway that influences motivated behavior. PMID:27559310

  9. Magnetosensitive neurons mediate geomagnetic orientation in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vidal-Gadea, Andrés; Ward, Kristi; Beron, Celia; Ghorashian, Navid; Gokce, Sertan; Russell, Joshua; Truong, Nicholas; Parikh, Adhishri; Gadea, Otilia; Ben-Yakar, Adela; Pierce-Shimomura, Jonathan

    2015-01-01

    Many organisms spanning from bacteria to mammals orient to the earth's magnetic field. For a few animals, central neurons responsive to earth-strength magnetic fields have been identified; however, magnetosensory neurons have yet to be identified in any animal. We show that the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans orients to the earth's magnetic field during vertical burrowing migrations. Well-fed worms migrated up, while starved worms migrated down. Populations isolated from around the world, migrated at angles to the magnetic vector that would optimize vertical translation in their native soil, with northern- and southern-hemisphere worms displaying opposite migratory preferences. Magnetic orientation and vertical migrations required the TAX-4 cyclic nucleotide-gated ion channel in the AFD sensory neuron pair. Calcium imaging showed that these neurons respond to magnetic fields even without synaptic input. C. elegans may have adapted magnetic orientation to simplify their vertical burrowing migration by reducing the orientation task from three dimensions to one. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.07493.001 PMID:26083711

  10. Eksistentiel Isolation

    OpenAIRE

    Matikainen, Oliver Albert; Andersen, Kian Alexander; Thorup, Johannes Hoff; Slotsager, Christian Knud; Jensen, Mette Ingersholm; Bachmann, Zenia Gruhl; Razga, Pauline Marie

    2015-01-01

    This study examines whether or not isolation can lead to personal growth. In order to answer this question we distinguish between loneliness and aloneness. We explain the theory of existential psychotherapist Irvin D. Yalom and on the basis of this examination, we analyze a conducted interview through the theory. Based on the theory, interview and analysis, we discuss the validity of Yalom’s theory. Considering the examination, the analysis and the distinction between the two types of isolati...

  11. Chimera states in bursting neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bera, Bidesh K.; Ghosh, Dibakar; Lakshmanan, M.

    2016-01-01

    We study the existence of chimera states in pulse-coupled networks of bursting Hindmarsh-Rose neurons with nonlocal, global, and local (nearest neighbor) couplings. Through a linear stability analysis, we discuss the behavior of the stability function in the incoherent (i.e., disorder), coherent, chimera, and multichimera states. Surprisingly, we find that chimera and multichimera states occur even using local nearest neighbor interaction in a network of identical bursting neurons alone. This is in contrast with the existence of chimera states in populations of nonlocally or globally coupled oscillators. A chemical synaptic coupling function is used which plays a key role in the emergence of chimera states in bursting neurons. The existence of chimera, multichimera, coherent, and disordered states is confirmed by means of the recently introduced statistical measures and mean phase velocity.

  12. The neuronal code for number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieder, Andreas

    2016-06-01

    Humans and non-human primates share an elemental quantification system that resides in a dedicated neural network in the parietal and frontal lobes. In this cortical network, 'number neurons' encode the number of elements in a set, its cardinality or numerosity, irrespective of stimulus appearance across sensory motor systems, and from both spatial and temporal presentation arrays. After numbers have been extracted from sensory input, they need to be processed to support goal-directed behaviour. Studying number neurons provides insights into how information is maintained in working memory and transformed in tasks that require rule-based decisions. Beyond an understanding of how cardinal numbers are encoded, number processing provides a window into the neuronal mechanisms of high-level brain functions. PMID:27150407

  13. Turning skin into dopamine neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Malin Parmar; Johan Jakobsson

    2011-01-01

    The possibility to generate neurons from fibroblasts became a reality with the development of iPS technology a few years ago.By reprogramming somatic cells using transcription factor (TF) overexpression,it is possible to generate pluripotent stem cells that then can be differentiated into any somatic cell type including various subtypes of neurons.This raises the possibility of using donor-matched or even patientspecific cells for cell therapy of neurological disorders such as Parkinson's disease (PD),Huntington's disease and stroke.Supporting this idea,dopamine neurons,which are the cells dying in PD,derived from human iPS cells have been demonstrated to survive transplantation and reverse motor symptoms in animal models of PD [1].

  14. Intracellular localization of the HCS2 gene products in identified snail neurons in vivo and in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanova, J L; Leonova, O G; Popenko, V I; Ierusalimsky, V N; Korshunova, T A; Boguslavsky, D V; Malyshev, A Y; Balaban, P M; Belyavsky, A V

    2006-03-01

    1. The HCS2 (Helix command specific 2) gene expressed in giant command neurons for withdrawal behavior of the terrestrial snail Helix lucorum encodes a unique hybrid precursor protein that contains a Ca-binding (EF-hand motif) protein and four small peptides (CNP1-CNP4) with similar Tyr-Pro-Arg-X aminoacid sequence at the C terminus. Previous studies suggest that under conditions of increased intracellular Ca(2+) concentration the HCS2 peptide precursor may be cleaved, and small physiologically active peptides transported to the release sites. In the present paper, intracellular localization of putative peptide products of the HCS2-encoded precursor was studied immunocytochemically by means of light and electron microscopy. 2. Polyclonal antibodies against the CNP3 neuropeptide and a Ca-binding domain of the precursor protein were used for gold labeling of ultrathin sections of identified isolated neurons maintained in culture for several days, and in same identified neurons freshly isolated from the central nervous system. 3. In freshly isolated neurons, the gold particles were mainly localized over the cytoplasmic secretory granules, with the density of labeling for the CNP3 neuropeptide being two-fold higher than for the calcium-binding domain. In cultured neurons, both antibodies mostly labeled clusters of secretory granules in growth cones and neurites of the neuron. The density of labeling for cultured neurons was the same for both antibodies, and was two-fold higher than for the freshly isolated from the central nervous system neurons. 4. The immunogold particles were practically absent in the bodies of cultured neurons. 5. The data obtained conform to the suggestion that the HCS2 gene products are transported from the cell body to the regions of growth or release sites. PMID:16763780

  15. Neuronal involvement in cisplatin neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup-Hansen, A; Helweg-Larsen, Susanne Elisabeth; Schmalbruch, H;

    2007-01-01

    Although it is well known that cisplatin causes a sensory neuropathy, the primary site of involvement is not established. The clinical symptoms localized in a stocking-glove distribution may be explained by a length dependent neuronopathy or by a distal axonopathy. To study whether the whole neuron...... processes of large dorsal root ganglion cells. Motor conduction studies, autonomic function and warm and cold temperature sensation remained unchanged at all doses of cisplatin treatment. The results of these studies are consistent with degeneration of large sensory neurons whereas there was no evidence of...

  16. Genetic and pharmacological evidence for low-abundance TRPV3 expression in primary vagal afferent neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Shaw-Wen; Lindberg, Jonathan E M; Peters, James H

    2016-05-01

    Primary vagal afferent neurons express a multitude of thermosensitive ion channels. Within this family of ion channels, the heat-sensitive capsaicin receptor (TRPV1) greatly influences vagal afferent signaling by determining the threshold for action-potential initiation at the peripheral endings, while controlling temperature-sensitive forms of glutamate release at central vagal terminals. Genetic deletion of TRPV1 does not completely eliminate these temperature-dependent effects, suggesting involvement of additional thermosensitive ion channels. The warm-sensitive, calcium-permeable, ion channel TRPV3 is commonly expressed with TRPV1; however, the extent to which TRPV3 is found in vagal afferent neurons is unknown. Here, we begin to characterize the genetic and functional expression of TRPV3 in vagal afferent neurons using molecular biology (RT-PCR and RT-quantitative PCR) in whole nodose and isolated neurons and fluorescent calcium imaging on primary cultures of nodose ganglia neurons. We confirmed low-level TRPV3 expression in vagal afferent neurons and observed direct activation with putative TRPV3 agonists eugenol, ethyl vanillin (EVA), and farnesyl pyrophosphate (FPP). Agonist activation stimulated neurons also containing TRPV1 and was blocked by ruthenium red. FPP sensitivity overlapped with EVA and eugenol but represented the smallest percentage of vagal afferent neurons, and it was the only agonist that did not stimulate neurons from TRPV3(-/-1) mice, suggesting FPP has the highest selectivity. Further, FPP was predictive of enhanced responses to capsaicin, EVA, and eugenol in rats. From our results, we conclude TRPV3 is expressed in a discrete subpopulation of vagal afferent neurons and may contribute to vagal afferent signaling either directly or in combination with TRPV1. PMID:26843581

  17. Bursting neurons and ultrasound avoidance in crickets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gary eMarsat

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Decision making in invertebrates often relies on simple neural circuits composed of only a few identified neurons. The relative simplicity of these circuits makes it possible to identify the key computation and neural properties underlying decisions. In this review, we summarize recent research on the neural basis of ultrasound avoidance in crickets, a response that allows escape from echolocating bats. The key neural property shaping behavioral output is high-frequency bursting of an identified interneuron, AN2, which carries information about ultrasound stimuli from receptor neurons to the brain. AN2's spike train consists of clusters of spikes –bursts– that may be interspersed with isolated, non-burst spikes. AN2 firing is necessary and sufficient to trigger avoidance steering but only high-rate firing, such as occurs in bursts, evokes this response. AN2 bursts are therefore at the core of the computation involved in deciding whether or not to steer away from ultrasound. Bursts in AN2 are triggered by synaptic input from nearly synchronous bursts in ultrasound receptors. Thus the population response at the very first stage of sensory processing –the auditory receptor- already differentiates the features of the stimulus that will trigger a behavioral response from those that will not. Adaptation, both intrinsic to AN2 and within ultrasound receptors, scales the burst-generating features according to the stimulus statistics, thus filtering out background noise and ensuring that bursts occur selectively in response to salient peaks in ultrasound intensity. Furthermore AN2’s sensitivity to ultrasound varies adaptively with predation pressure, through both developmental and evolutionary mechanisms. We discuss how this key relationship between bursting and the triggering of avoidance behavior is also observed in other invertebrate systems such as the avoidance of looming visual stimuli in locusts or heat avoidance in beetles.

  18. Neurons excitability changes in rat medial vestibular nucleus following vestibular neurectomy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    金麟毅

    2008-01-01

    Intrinsic excitabilities of acutely isolated medial vestibular nucleus (MVN) neurons of rats with normal labyrinth and with undergoingvestibular compensation from 30 min to 24 h after unilateral vestibular deafferentation (UVD) were compared. In control rats, proportions of type A andB cells were 30 and 70%, respectively, however, the proportion of type A cells increased following UVD. Bursting discharge and irregular firingpatterns were recorded from 2 to 12 h post UVD. The spontaneous discharge rate of neurons in the ipsilesional MVN increased significantly at 2 hpost-UVD and remained high until 12 h post-UVD in both type A and type B cells. Mter-hyperpolarization (AHP) of the MVN neurons decreasedsignificantly from 2 h post-UVD in both types of cells. These results suggest that the early stage of vestibular compensation after peripheralneurectomy is associated with an increase in intrinsic excitability due to reduction of AHP in MVN neurons.

  19. Performance of a Single Quantum Neuron

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIFei; ZHAOShengmei; ZHENGBaoyu

    2005-01-01

    Quantum neural network (QNN) is a promising area in the field of quantum computing and quantum information processing. A novel model for quantum neuron is described, a quantum learning algorithm is proposed and its convergence property is investigated. It has been shown, Quantum neuron (QN) has the same convergence property as Conventional neuron (CN) but can attain faster training than Conventional neuron. The computational power of the quantum neuron is also explored.Numerical and graphical results show that this single quantum neuron can implement the Walsh-Hadamard transformation, perform the XOR function unrealizable with a classical neuron and can eliminate the necessity of building a network of neurons to obtain nonlinear mapping.

  20. Unbalanced Neuronal Circuits in Addiction

    OpenAIRE

    Volkow, Nora D; Wang, Gen-Jack; Tomasi, Dardo; Baler, Ruben D.

    2013-01-01

    Through sequential waves of drug-induced neurochemical stimulation, addiction co-opts the brain's neuronal circuits that mediate reward, motivation, , to behavioral inflexibility and a severe disruption of self-control and compulsive drug intake. Brain imaging technologies have allowed neuroscientists to map out the neural landscape of addiction in the human brain and to understand how drugs modify it.

  1. Cellular pathways of energy metabolism in the brain: is glucose used by neurons or astrocytes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nehlig, Astrid; Coles, Jonathan A

    2007-09-01

    Most techniques presently available to measure cerebral activity in humans and animals, i.e. positron emission tomography (PET), autoradiography, and functional magnetic resonance imaging, do not record the activity of neurons directly. Furthermore, they do not allow the investigator to discriminate which cell type is using glucose, the predominant fuel provided to the brain by the blood. Here, we review the experimental approaches aimed at determining the percentage of glucose that is taken up by neurons and by astrocytes. This review is integrated in an overview of the current concepts on compartmentation and substrate trafficking between astrocytes and neurons. In the brain in vivo, about half of the glucose leaving the capillaries crosses the extracellular space and directly enters neurons. The other half is taken up by astrocytes. Calculations suggest that neurons consume more energy than do astrocytes, implying that astrocytes transfer an intermediate substrate to neurons. Experimental approaches in vitro on the honeybee drone retina and on the isolated vagus nerve also point to a continuous transfer of intermediate metabolites from glial cells to neurons in these tissues. Solid direct evidence of such transfer in the mammalian brain in vivo is still lacking. PET using [(18)F]fluorodeoxyglucose reflects in part glucose uptake by astrocytes but does not indicate to which step the glucose taken up is metabolized within this cell type. Finally, the sequence of metabolic changes occurring during a transient increase of electrical activity in specific regions of the brain remains to be clarified. PMID:17659529

  2. One-photon and two-photon stimulation of neurons in a microfluidic culture system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Jae Myung; Lee, Jeonghyeon; Kim, Hyeongeun; Jeon, Noo Li; Jung, Woonggyu

    2016-04-26

    In this study, we demonstrate a novel platform for optical stimulation of neural circuits combined with a microfluidic culture method and microelectrode array measurements. Neuron-on-a-chip was designed and fabricated to isolate axons without a soma or dendrite. Thus, it is readily able to manipulate the neuronal alignment and to investigate the neuronal activity at the locations we want to observe. We adapted the optical stimulation technique to the arranged neurons to generate the neuronal signals in a non-invasive fashion. A blue light-emitting diode and a femtosecond laser with 780 nm center wavelength were used for neuronal activation and the corresponding neuronal signals were measured by MEAs at the same time. We found that one-photon light via caged glutamate provoked periodic spiking. In contrast, the femtosecond pulse irradiation generated repetitive firing at constant rates. Response times of one-photon and two-photon stimulation were around 200 ms and 50 ms, respectively. We also quantified neural responses, by varying optical parameters such as exposure time and irradiation power. PMID:27053163

  3. Responses of medullary reticular formation neurons to input from the male genitalia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubscher, C H; Johnson, R D

    1996-10-01

    1. The medullary reticular formation (MRF) is known to be involved in the modulation of certain reproductive behaviors. Ejaculation in the male, disrupted after spinal transection, may depend on a spinal-bulbo-spinal connection. To determine whether single neurons in the MRF receive sensory input from the male genitalia, the present study was undertaken using electrophysiological techniques. 2. The MRF of 14 urethan-anesthetized mature male rats was searched for single neurons responsive to bilateral electrical stimulation of the dorsal nerve of the penis (DNP). In addition, each DNP-responsive neuron was tested for responsiveness to bilateral electrical stimulation of the pelvic nerve (PN) and to mechanical stimulation (gentle touch, pressure, pinch) of the external genitalia, anus, urethra, and skin over most regions of the body. 3. A total of 165 single neurons responsive to bilateral electrical stimulation of the DNP were isolated and characterized throughout the MRF. All neurons responded to both ipsilateral and contralateral DNP stimulation. The majority of responses were excitatory, and most neurons had no background activity. Some neurons required wind-up with bilateral electrical stimulation of the DNP to respond. 4. About half of the neurons were located in the nucleus reticularis gigantocellularis (Gi); the remainder were located in surrounding (dorsal, ventral, lateral) regions of the MRF. Variations in response properties were found among neurons located in different MRF regions. 5. Eighty-eight DNP-responsive neurons were additionally responsive to bilateral electrical stimulation of the PN. None of the responses to bilateral PN were stronger than those for bilateral DNP and many (48%) were weaker. 6. Of the 165 DNP-responsive neurons, all were responsive to pressure/pinching of the penis; 16% responded to gentle stroking of the glans. Most of these neurons were additionally responsive (bilaterally) to pinching more than one (often all) of the

  4. Adaptation to visual stimulation modifies the burst firing property of V1 neurons%Adaptation to visual stimulation modifies the burst firing property of V1neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rui-Long LIU; Ke WANG; Jian-Jun MENG; Tian-Miao HUA; Zhen LIANG; Min-Min XI

    2013-01-01

    The mean firing rate of visual cortical neurons is reduced after prolonged visual stimulation,but the underlying process by which this occurs as well as the biological significance of this phenomenon remains unknown.Computational neuroscience studies indicate that high-frequency bursts in stimulus-driven responses can be transmitted across synapses more reliably than isolated spikes,and thus may carry accurate stimulus-related information.Our research examined whether or not adaptation affects the burst firing property of visual cortical neurons by examining changes in the burst firing changes of V1 neurons during adaptation to the preferred visual stimulus.The results show that adaptation to prolonged visual stimulation significantly decreased burst frequency (bursts/s) and burst length (spikes/burst),but increased burst duration and the interspike interval within bursts.These results suggest that the adaptation of V1 neurons to visual stimulation may result in a decrease of feedforward response gain but an increase of functional activities from lateral and/or feedback connections,which could lead to a reduction in the effectiveness of adapted neurons in transmitting information to its driven neurons.

  5. Automated identification of neurons and their locations

    OpenAIRE

    Inglis, A.; Cruz, L; Roe, D L; H. E. Stanley; Rosene, D.L.; Urbanc, B.

    2008-01-01

    Individual locations of many neuronal cell bodies (>10^4) are needed to enable statistically significant measurements of spatial organization within the brain such as nearest-neighbor and microcolumnarity measurements. In this paper, we introduce an Automated Neuron Recognition Algorithm (ANRA) which obtains the (x,y) location of individual neurons within digitized images of Nissl-stained, 30 micron thick, frozen sections of the cerebral cortex of the Rhesus monkey. Identification of neurons ...

  6. Motors and Adaptors : Transport Regulation within Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    van Spronsen, C.S.A.M.

    2012-01-01

    Human thoughts and behavior are the outcome of communication between neurons in our brains. There is an entire world inside each of these neurons where transactions are established and meeting points are set. By using molecular motors to transport proteins and organelles along cytoskeletal tracks, neurons create the internal order of the bustling community of macromolecules. Given the challenging geometry of the neuron, the mechanisms that deliver fuel and materials to sustain the distant syn...

  7. Glutamate Mediated Astrocytic Filtering of Neuronal Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Wallach, Gilad; Lallouette, Jules; Herzog, Nitzan; De Pittà, Maurizio; Ben Jacob, Eshel; Berry, Hugues; Hanein, Yael

    2014-01-01

    Neuron-astrocyte communication is an important regulatory mechanism in various brain functions but its complexity and role are yet to be fully understood. In particular, the temporal pattern of astrocyte response to neuronal firing has not been fully characterized. Here, we used neuron-astrocyte cultures on multi-electrode arrays coupled to Ca2+ imaging and explored the range of neuronal stimulation frequencies while keeping constant the amount of stimulation. Our results reveal that astrocyt...

  8. Spatially selective photoconductive stimulation of live neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, Jacob; Singh, Dipika; Hollett, Geoffrey; Dravid, Shashank M; Sailor, Michael J.; Arikkath, Jyothi

    2014-01-01

    Synaptic activity is intimately linked to neuronal structure and function. Stimulation of live cultured primary neurons, coupled with fluorescent indicator imaging, is a powerful technique to assess the impact of synaptic activity on neuronal protein trafficking and function. Current technology for neuronal stimulation in culture include chemical techniques or microelectrode or optogenetic based techniques. While technically powerful, chemical stimulation has limited spatial resolution and mi...

  9. Artificial Neurons with Arbitrarily Complex Internal Structures

    OpenAIRE

    Kohring, G. A.

    2001-01-01

    Artificial neurons with arbitrarily complex internal structure are introduced. The neurons can be described in terms of a set of internal variables, a set activation functions which describe the time evolution of these variables and a set of characteristic functions which control how the neurons interact with one another. The information capacity of attractor networks composed of these generalized neurons is shown to reach the maximum allowed bound. A simple example taken from the domain of p...

  10. Characterization of cutaneous and articular sensory neurons

    OpenAIRE

    da Silva Serra, I.; Husson, Z.; Bartlett, J.D.; Smith, E.S.J.

    2016-01-01

    Background A wide range of stimuli can activate sensory neurons and neurons innervating specific tissues often have distinct properties. Here, we used retrograde tracing to identify sensory neurons innervating the hind paw skin (cutaneous) and ankle/knee joints (articular), and combined immunohistochemistry and electrophysiology analysis to determine the neurochemical phenotype of cutaneous and articular neurons, as well as their electrical and chemical excitability. Results Immunohistoche...

  11. Convergent cortical innervation of striatal projection neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Kress, Geraldine J.; Yamawaki, Naoki; Wokosin, David L.; Wickersham, Ian R.; Gordon M. G Shepherd; Surmeier, D. James

    2013-01-01

    Anatomical studies have led to the assertion that intratelencephalic (IT) and pyramidal tract (PT) cortical neurons innervate different striatal projection neurons. To test this hypothesis, the responses of mouse striatal neurons to optogenetic activation of IT and PT axons were measured. Contrary to expectation, direct and indirect pathway striatal spiny projection neurons (SPNs) responded to both IT and PT activation, arguing that these cortical networks innervate both striatal projection n...

  12. A Method for Neuronal Source Identification

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Chang Won; Szymanska, Agnieszka A.; Wu, Shun Chi; Swindlehurst, A. Lee; Nenadic, Zoran

    2013-01-01

    Multi-sensor microelectrodes for extracellular action potential recording have significantly improved the quality of in vivo recorded neuronal signals. These microelectrodes have also been instrumental in the localization of neuronal signal sources. However, existing neuron localization methods have been mostly utilized in vivo, where the true neuron location remains unknown. Therefore, these methods could not be experimentally validated. This article presents experimental validation of a met...

  13. Signal Propagation in Drosophila Central Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Gouwens, Nathan W.; Wilson, Rachel I.

    2009-01-01

    Drosophila is an important model organism for investigating neural development, neural morphology, neurophysiology, and neural correlates of behaviors. However, almost nothing is known about how electrical signals propagate in Drosophila neurons. Here we address these issues in antennal lobe projection neurons (PNs), one of the most well-studied classes of Drosophila neurons. We use morphological and electrophysiological data to deduce the passive membrane properties of these neurons and to b...

  14. Information processing at single neuron level

    OpenAIRE

    Vidybida, A. K.

    2007-01-01

    Based on numerical simulation of Hodgkin and Huxley type neuron stimulated from many synaptic inputs, an abstract concept of signal processing in individual neuron is proposed. In the concept proposed, neuron performs binding of synaptic inputs into a single output event, based on the degree of temporal coherence between the inputs. Inhibition serves as controlling factor of this type of binding.

  15. NEURONAL PHOSPHOPROTEINS: PHYSIOLOGICAL AND CLINICAL IMPLICATIONS

    Science.gov (United States)

    The presence of a great variety of neuron-specific phosproteins in nervous tissue supports the view that protein phosphorylation plays many roles in neuronal function. The physiological significance of several of these phosphoproteins has already been established. Some neuronal p...

  16. Studies Gain Insight into Neuronal Polarity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    @@ A typical matured nerve cell (or neuron) has one axon and multiple dendrites. It receives information at the dendrites and sending signals to other neurons via the axon. Although scientists have discovered that this axon-dendrite polarity is a cardinal feature of neuronal morphology essential for information flow, they are still in the dark about the cause of this polarization.

  17. Oscillating from Neurosecretion to Multitasking Dopamine Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David R. Grattan

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In this issue of Cell Reports, Stagkourakis et al. (2016 report that oscillating hypothalamic TIDA neurons, previously thought to be simple neurosecretory neurons controlling pituitary prolactin secretion, control dopamine output via autoregulatory mechanisms and thus could potentially regulate other physiologically important hypothalamic neuronal circuits.

  18. Oscillating from Neurosecretion to Multitasking Dopamine Neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grattan, David R; Akopian, Armen N

    2016-04-26

    In this issue of Cell Reports, Stagkourakis et al. (2016) report that oscillating hypothalamic TIDA neurons, previously thought to be simple neurosecretory neurons controlling pituitary prolactin secretion, control dopamine output via autoregulatory mechanisms and thus could potentially regulate other physiologically important hypothalamic neuronal circuits. PMID:27119847

  19. Oscillating from Neurosecretion to Multitasking Dopamine Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grattan, David R.; Akopian, Armen N.

    2016-01-01

    In this issue of Cell Reports, Stagkourakis et al. (2016) report that oscillating hypothalamic TIDA neurons, previously thought to be simple neurosecretory neurons controlling pituitary prolactin secretion, control dopamine output via autoregulatory mechanisms and thus could potentially regulate other physiologically important hypothalamic neuronal circuits. PMID:27119847

  20. Responses of single neurons and neuronal ensembles in frog first- and second-order olfactory neurons

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Rospars, J. P.; Šanda, Pavel; Lánský, Petr; Duchamp-Viret, P.

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 1536, NOV 6 (2013), s. 144-158. ISSN 0006-8993 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GBP304/12/G069; GA ČR(CZ) GAP103/11/0282 Institutional support: RVO:67985823 Keywords : olfaction * spiking activity * neuronal model Subject RIV: JD - Computer Applications, Robotics Impact factor: 2.828, year: 2013

  1. Serotonin released from amacrine neurons is scavenged and degraded in bipolar neurons in the retina

    OpenAIRE

    Ghai, Kanika; Zelinka, Christopher; Fischer, Andy J.

    2009-01-01

    The neurotransmitter serotonin is synthesized in the retina by one type of amacrine neuron but accumulates in bipolar neurons in many vertebrates. The mechanisms, functions and purpose underlying of serotonin in bipolar cells remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that exogenous serotonin transiently accumulates in a distinct type of bipolar neuron. KCl-mediated depolarization causes the depletion of serotonin from amacrine neurons and, subsequently, serotonin is taken-up by bipolar neurons. Th...

  2. NeuronMetrics: Software for Semi-Automated Processing of Cultured-Neuron Images

    OpenAIRE

    Narro, Martha L.; Yang, Fan; Kraft, Robert; Wenk, Carola; Efrat, Alon; Restifo, Linda L.

    2007-01-01

    Using primary cell culture to screen for changes in neuronal morphology requires specialized analysis software. We developed NeuronMetrics™ for semi-automated, quantitative analysis of two-dimensional (2D) images of fluorescently labeled cultured neurons. It skeletonizes the neuron image using two complementary image-processing techniques, capturing fine terminal neurites with high fidelity. An algorithm was devised to span wide gaps in the skeleton. NeuronMetrics uses a novel strategy based ...

  3. Neural Networks for Template Matching: Application to Real-Time Classification of the Action Potentials of Real Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Yiu-fai; Banik, Jashojiban; Bower, James M.

    1988-01-01

    Much experimental study of real neural networks relies on the proper classification of extracellulary sampled neural signals (i .e. action potentials) recorded from the brains of experimental animals. In most neurophysiology laboratories this classification task is simplified by limiting investigations to single, electrically well-isolated neurons recorded one at a time. However, for those interested in sampling the activities of many single neurons simultaneously, waveform cla...

  4. Molecular reconstruction of mGluR5a-mediated endocannabinoid signaling cascade in single rat sympathetic neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Won, Yu-Jin; Puhl, Henry L.; Ikeda, Stephen R.

    2009-01-01

    Endocannabinoids (eCB) such as 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG) are lipid metabolites that are synthesized in a postsynaptic neurons and act upon CB1 cannabinoid receptors (CB1R) in presynaptic nerve terminals. This retrograde transmission underlies several forms of short and long term synaptic plasticity within the central nervous system. Here, we constructed a model system based on isolated rat sympathetic neurons in which an eCB signaling cascade could be studied in a reduced, spatially compac...

  5. Gene expression analysis of neuronal precursors from adult mouse brain and differential screen for neural stem cell markers

    OpenAIRE

    Pennartz, Sandra

    2004-01-01

    In the adult mouse brain, neuronal precursor cells continuously emanate from neural stem cells (NSC) in the subventricular zone (SVZ) and migrate into the olfactory bulb (OB) where they differentiate to serve as replenishment for GABAergic interneurons. During the migration process, PSA-NCAM (Polysialic acid-Neural cell adhesion molecule) specifically marks the neuronal precursors (PSA+ cells). This phenomenon was exploited in the framework of this doctoral thesis to isolate a homogeneous cel...

  6. Isolation and Cannulation of Cerebral Parenchymal Arterioles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, Paulo W; Dabertrand, Fabrice; Earley, Scott

    2016-01-01

    Intracerebral parenchymal arterioles (PAs), which include parenchymal arterioles, penetrating arterioles and pre-capillary arterioles, are high resistance blood vessels branching out from pial arteries and arterioles and diving into the brain parenchyma. Individual PA perfuse a discrete cylindrical territory of the parenchyma and the neurons contained within. These arterioles are a central player in the regulation of cerebral blood flow both globally (cerebrovascular autoregulation) and locally (functional hyperemia). PAs are part of the neurovascular unit, a structure that matches regional blood flow to metabolic activity within the brain and also includes neurons, interneurons, and astrocytes. Perfusion through PAs is directly linked to the activity of neurons in that particular territory and increases in neuronal metabolism lead to an augmentation in local perfusion caused by dilation of the feed PA. Regulation of PAs differs from that of better-characterized pial arteries. Pressure-induced vasoconstriction is greater in PAs and vasodilatory mechanisms vary. In addition, PAs do not receive extrinsic innervation from perivascular nerves - innervation is intrinsic and indirect in nature through contact with astrocytic endfeet. Thus, data regarding contractile regulation accumulated by studies using pial arteries does not directly translate to understanding PA function. Further, it remains undetermined how pathological states, such as hypertension and diabetes, affect PA structure and reactivity. This knowledge gap is in part a consequence of the technical difficulties pertaining to PA isolation and cannulation. In this manuscript we present a protocol for isolation and cannulation of rodent PAs. Further, we show examples of experiments that can be performed with these arterioles, including agonist-induced constriction and myogenic reactivity. Although the focus of this manuscript is on PA cannulation and pressure myography, isolated PAs can also be used for

  7. Neuronal gap junctions play a role in the secondary neuronal death following controlled cortical impact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belousov, Andrei B; Wang, Yongfu; Song, Ji-Hoon; Denisova, Janna V; Berman, Nancy E; Fontes, Joseph D

    2012-08-22

    In the mammalian CNS, excessive release of glutamate and overactivation of glutamate receptors are responsible for the secondary (delayed) neuronal death following neuronal injury, including ischemia, traumatic brain injury (TBI) and epilepsy. Recent studies in mice showed a critical role for neuronal gap junctions in NMDA receptor-mediated excitotoxicity and ischemia-mediated neuronal death. Here, using controlled cortical impact (CCI) in adult mice, as a model of TBI, and Fluoro-Jade B staining for analysis of neuronal death, we set to determine whether neuronal gap junctions play a role in the CCI-mediated secondary neuronal death. We report that 24h post-CCI, substantial neuronal death is detected in a number of brain regions outside the injury core, including the striatum. The striatal neuronal death is reduced both in wild-type mice by systemic administration of mefloquine (a relatively selective blocker of neuronal gap junctions) and in knockout mice lacking connexin 36 (neuronal gap junction protein). It is also reduced by inactivation of group II metabotropic glutamate receptors (with LY341495) which, as reported previously, control the rapid increase in neuronal gap junction coupling following different types of neuronal injury. The results suggest that neuronal gap junctions play a critical role in the CCI-induced secondary neuronal death. PMID:22781494

  8. The mast cell degranulator compound 48/80 directly activates neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Schemann

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Compound 48/80 is widely used in animal and tissue models as a "selective" mast cell activator. With this study we demonstrate that compound 48/80 also directly activates enteric neurons and visceral afferents. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We used in vivo recordings from extrinsic intestinal afferents together with Ca(++ imaging from primary cultures of DRG and nodose neurons. Enteric neuronal activation was examined by Ca(++ and voltage sensitive dye imaging in isolated gut preparations and primary cultures of enteric neurons. Intraluminal application of compound 48/80 evoked marked afferent firing which desensitized on subsequent administration. In egg albumen-sensitized animals, intraluminal antigen evoked a similar pattern of afferent activation which also desensitized on subsequent exposure to antigen. In cross-desensitization experiments prior administration of compound 48/80 failed to influence the mast cell mediated response. Application of 1 and 10 µg/ml compound 48/80 evoked spike discharge and Ca(++ transients in enteric neurons. The same nerve activating effect was observed in primary cultures of DRG and nodose ganglion cells. Enteric neuron cultures were devoid of mast cells confirmed by negative staining for c-kit or toluidine blue. In addition, in cultured enteric neurons the excitatory action of compound 48/80 was preserved in the presence of histamine H(1 and H(2 antagonists. The mast cell stabilizer cromolyn attenuated compound 48/80 and nicotine evoked Ca(++ transients in mast cell-free enteric neuron cultures. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The results showed direct excitatory action of compound 48/80 on enteric neurons and visceral afferents. Therefore, functional changes measured in tissue or animal models may involve a mast cell independent effect of compound 48/80 and cromolyn.

  9. Differentiation of fetal pancreatic stem cells into neuron-like and islet-like cells in vitro ★

    OpenAIRE

    Hua, Xiufeng; Wang, Yanwei; Lian, Peiwen; Zhang, Shouxin; Li, Jianyuan; Wang, Haiyan; Chen, Shulin; Gao, Wei

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic stem cells were isolated and cultured from aborted human fetal pancreases of gestational age 14–20 weeks. They were seeded at a density of 1 × 104 in serum-free media for differentiation into neuron-like cells, expressing β-tubulin III and glial fibrillary acidic protein. These neuron-like cells displayed a synapse-like morphology and appeared to form a neuronal network. Pancreatic stem cells were also seeded at a density of 1 × 105 for differentiation into islet-like cells, expres...

  10. Ubiquitous L1 Mosaicism in Hippocampal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Upton, Kyle R.; Gerhardt, Daniel J.; Jesuadian, J. Samuel; Richardson, Sandra R.; Sánchez-Luque, Francisco J.; Bodea, Gabriela O.; Ewing, Adam D.; Salvador-Palomeque, Carmen; van der Knaap, Marjo S.; Brennan, Paul M.; Vanderver, Adeline; Faulkner, Geoffrey J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Somatic LINE-1 (L1) retrotransposition during neurogenesis is a potential source of genotypic variation among neurons. As a neurogenic niche, the hippocampus supports pronounced L1 activity. However, the basal parameters and biological impact of L1-driven mosaicism remain unclear. Here, we performed single-cell retrotransposon capture sequencing (RC-seq) on individual human hippocampal neurons and glia, as well as cortical neurons. An estimated 13.7 somatic L1 insertions occurred per hippocampal neuron and carried the sequence hallmarks of target-primed reverse transcription. Notably, hippocampal neuron L1 insertions were specifically enriched in transcribed neuronal stem cell enhancers and hippocampus genes, increasing their probability of functional relevance. In addition, bias against intronic L1 insertions sense oriented relative to their host gene was observed, perhaps indicating moderate selection against this configuration in vivo. These experiments demonstrate pervasive L1 mosaicism at genomic loci expressed in hippocampal neurons. PMID:25860606

  11. Molecular profiling of neurons based on connectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekstrand, Mats I; Nectow, Alexander R; Knight, Zachary A; Latcha, Kaamashri N; Pomeranz, Lisa E; Friedman, Jeffrey M

    2014-05-22

    The complexity and cellular heterogeneity of neural circuitry presents a major challenge to understanding the role of discrete neural populations in controlling behavior. While neuroanatomical methods enable high-resolution mapping of neural circuitry, these approaches do not allow systematic molecular profiling of neurons based on their connectivity. Here, we report the development of an approach for molecularly profiling projective neurons. We show that ribosomes can be tagged with a camelid nanobody raised against GFP and that this system can be engineered to selectively capture translating mRNAs from neurons retrogradely labeled with GFP. Using this system, we profiled neurons projecting to the nucleus accumbens. We then used an AAV to selectively profile midbrain dopamine neurons projecting to the nucleus accumbens. By comparing the captured mRNAs from each experiment, we identified a number of markers specific to VTA dopaminergic projection neurons. The current method provides a means for profiling neurons based on their projections. PMID:24855954

  12. Neuronal avalanches and brain plasticity

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Arcangelis, L.; Herrmann, H. J.; Perrone-Capano, C.

    2007-12-01

    Networks of living neurons exhibit an avalanche mode of activity, experimentally found in organotypic cultures. Moreover, experimental studies of morphology indicate that neurons develop a network of small-world-like connections, with the possibility of a very high connectivity degree. Here we discuss a recent model based on self-organized criticality, which consists of an electrical network with threshold firing and activity-dependent synapse strengths. The model is implemented on regular and small world lattices and on a scale-free network, the Apollonian network. The system exhibits an avalanche activity with a power law distribution of sizes and durations. The analysis of the power spectra of the electrical signal reproduces very robustly the power law behaviour with the exponent 0.8, experimentally measured in electroencephalogram (EEG) spectra. The exponents are found to be quite stable with respect to initial configurations and strength of plastic remodelling, indicating that universality holds for a wide class of neural network models.

  13. When Neurons Fail - Technical Report

    OpenAIRE

    El Mhamdi, El Mahdi; Guerraoui, Rachid

    2016-01-01

    Neural networks have been traditionally considered robust in the sense that their precision degrades gracefully with failure of neurons and can be compensated by additional learning phases. Nevertheless, in a critical application such as flight control, for which neural networks are now appealing solutions, we require a high level of precision and cannot afford any additional learning at run-time. In this paper, we view a multilayer (often called "deep") neural network as a distributed system...

  14. Selective serotonergic excitation of callosal projection neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel eAvesar

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Serotonin (5-HT acting as a neurotransmitter in the cerebral cortex is critical for cognitive function, yet how 5-HT regulates information processing in cortical circuits is not well understood. We tested the serotonergic responsiveness of layer 5 pyramidal neurons (L5PNs of the mouse medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC, and found 3 distinct response types: long-lasting 5-HT1A (1A receptor-dependent inhibitory responses (84% of L5PNs, 5-HT2A (2A receptor-dependent excitatory responses (9%, and biphasic responses in which 2A-dependent excitation followed brief inhibition (5%. Relative to 5-HT-inhibited neurons, those excited by 5-HT had physiological properties characteristic of callosal/commissural (COM neurons that project to the contralateral cortex. We tested whether serotonergic responses in cortical pyramidal neurons are correlated with their axonal projection pattern using retrograde fluorescent labeling of COM and corticopontine-projecting (CPn neurons. 5-HT generated excitatory or biphasic responses in all 5-HT-responsive layer 5 COM neurons. Conversely, CPn neurons were universally inhibited by 5-HT. Serotonergic excitation of COM neurons was blocked by the 2A antagonist MDL 11939, while serotonergic inhibition of CPn neurons was blocked by the 1A antagonist WAY 100635, confirming a role for these two receptor subtypes in regulating pyramidal neuron activity. Selective serotonergic excitation of COM neurons was not layer-specific, as COM neurons in layer 2/3 were also selectively excited by 5-HT relative to their non-labeled pyramidal neuron neighbors. Because neocortical 2A receptors are implicated in the etiology and pathophysiology of schizophrenia, we propose that COM neurons may represent a novel cellular target for intervention in psychiatric disease.

  15. Neuronal responses to physiological stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konstantinos eKagias

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Physiological stress can be defined as any external or internal condition that challenges the homeostasis of a cell or an organism. Physiological stress can be divided into three different aspects: environmental stress, intrinsic developmental stress and aging. Throughout life all living organisms are challenged by changes in the environment. Fluctuations in oxygen levels, temperature and redox state for example, trigger molecular events that enable an organism to adapt, survive and reproduce. In addition to external stressors, organisms experience stress associated with morphogenesis and changes in inner chemistry during normal development. For example, conditions such as intrinsic hypoxia and oxidative stress, which result from an increase in tissue mass, have to be confronted by developing embryos in order to complete their development. Finally, organisms face the challenge of stochastic accumulation of molecular damage during aging that results in decline and eventual death. Studies have shown that the nervous system plays a pivotal role in responding to stress. Neurons not only receive and process information from the environment but also actively respond to various stresses to promote survival. These responses include changes in the expression of molecules such as transcription factors and microRNAs that regulate stress resistance and adaptation. Moreover, both intrinsic and extrinsic stresses have a tremendous impact on neuronal development and maintenance with implications in many diseases. Here, we review the responses of neurons to various physiological stressors at the molecular and cellular level.

  16. Neuronal responses to physiological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kagias, Konstantinos; Nehammer, Camilla; Pocock, Roger

    2012-01-01

    Physiological stress can be defined as any external or internal condition that challenges the homeostasis of a cell or an organism. It can be divided into three different aspects: environmental stress, intrinsic developmental stress, and aging. Throughout life all living organisms are challenged by changes in the environment. Fluctuations in oxygen levels, temperature, and redox state for example, trigger molecular events that enable an organism to adapt, survive, and reproduce. In addition to external stressors, organisms experience stress associated with morphogenesis and changes in inner chemistry during normal development. For example, conditions such as intrinsic hypoxia and oxidative stress, due to an increase in tissue mass, have to be confronted by developing embryos in order to complete their development. Finally, organisms face the challenge of stochastic accumulation of molecular damage during aging that results in decline and eventual death. Studies have shown that the nervous system plays a pivotal role in responding to stress. Neurons not only receive and process information from the environment but also actively respond to various stresses to promote survival. These responses include changes in the expression of molecules such as transcription factors and microRNAs that regulate stress resistance and adaptation. Moreover, both intrinsic and extrinsic stresses have a tremendous impact on neuronal development and maintenance with implications in many diseases. Here, we review the responses of neurons to various physiological stressors at the molecular and cellular level. PMID:23112806

  17. Dynamics of Time Delay-Induced Multiple Synchronous Behaviors in Inhibitory Coupled Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gu, Huaguang; Zhao, Zhiguo

    2015-01-01

    The inhibitory synapse can induce synchronous behaviors different from the anti-phase synchronous behaviors, which have been reported in recent studies. In the present paper, synchronous behaviors are investigated in the motif model composed of reciprocal inhibitory coupled neurons with endogenous bursting and time delay. When coupling strength is weak, synchronous behavior appears at a single interval of time delay within a bursting period. When coupling strength is strong, multiple synchronous behaviors appear at different intervals of time delay within a bursting period. The different bursting patterns of synchronous behaviors, and time delays and coupling strengths that can induce the synchronous bursting patterns can be well interpreted by the dynamics of the endogenous bursting pattern of isolated neuron, which is acquired by the fast-slow dissection method, combined with the inhibitory coupling current. For an isolated neuron, when a negative impulsive current with suitable strength is applied at different phases of the bursting, multiple different bursting patterns can be induced. For a neuron in the motif, the inhibitory coupling current, of which the application time and strength is modulated by time delay and coupling strength, can cause single or multiple synchronous firing patterns like the negative impulsive current when time delay and coupling strength is suitable. The difference compared to the previously reported multiple synchronous behaviors that appear at time delays wider than a period of the endogenous firing is discussed. The results present novel examples of synchronous behaviors in the neuronal network with inhibitory synapses and provide a reasonable explanation. PMID:26394224

  18. Neuronal oscillations in sleep: insights from functional neuroimaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang-Vu, Thien Thanh

    2012-09-01

    Recent functional neuroimaging studies have investigated brain activity patterns during sleep in humans, beyond the conventionally defined sleep stages. These works have characterized the neural activations related to the major brain oscillations of sleep, that is, spindles and slow waves during non-rapid-eye-movement sleep and ponto-geniculo-occipital waves during rapid-eye-movement sleep. These phasic events have been found associated with increases of brain activity in specific neural networks, which identify structures involved in the generation of sleep oscillations. Most importantly, these results confirm that, even during the deepest stages of sleep, neuronal network activities are sustained and organized by spontaneous brain oscillations of sleep. The understanding of the neural mechanisms underlying sleep oscillations is fundamental since increasing evidence suggests a pivotal role for these rhythms in the functional properties of sleep. In particular, interactions between the sleeping brain and the surrounding environment are closely modulated by neuronal oscillations of sleep. Functional neuroimaging studies have demonstrated that spindles distort the transmission of auditory information to the cortex, therefore isolating the brain from external disturbances during sleep. In contrast, slow waves evoked by acoustic stimulation--and also termed K-complexes--are associated with larger auditory cortex activation, thus reflecting an enhanced processing of external information during sleep. Future brain imaging studies of sleep should further explore the contribution of neuronal oscillations to the off-line consolidation of memory during sleep. PMID:22274804

  19. Complexity in neuronal noise depends on network interconnectivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serletis, Demitre; Zalay, Osbert C; Valiante, Taufik A; Bardakjian, Berj L; Carlen, Peter L

    2011-06-01

    "Noise," or noise-like activity (NLA), defines background electrical membrane potential fluctuations at the cellular level of the nervous system, comprising an important aspect of brain dynamics. Using whole-cell voltage recordings from fast-spiking stratum oriens interneurons and stratum pyramidale neurons located in the CA3 region of the intact mouse hippocampus, we applied complexity measures from dynamical systems theory (i.e., 1/f(γ) noise and correlation dimension) and found evidence for complexity in neuronal NLA, ranging from high- to low-complexity dynamics. Importantly, these high- and low-complexity signal features were largely dependent on gap junction and chemical synaptic transmission. Progressive neuronal isolation from the surrounding local network via gap junction blockade (abolishing gap junction-dependent spikelets) and then chemical synaptic blockade (abolishing excitatory and inhibitory post-synaptic potentials), or the reverse order of these treatments, resulted in emergence of high-complexity NLA dynamics. Restoring local network interconnectivity via blockade washout resulted in resolution to low-complexity behavior. These results suggest that the observed increase in background NLA complexity is the result of reduced network interconnectivity, thereby highlighting the potential importance of the NLA signal to the study of network state transitions arising in normal and abnormal brain dynamics (such as in epilepsy, for example). PMID:21347547

  20. Neuronal Hemoglobin Expression and Its Relevance to Multiple Sclerosis Neuropathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Nolan; Alkhayer, Kholoud; Clements, Robert; Singhal, Naveen; Gregory, Roger; Azzam, Sausan; Li, Shuo; Freeman, Ernest; McDonough, Jennifer

    2016-05-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is characterized by demyelination and progressive neurological disability. Previous studies have reported defects to mitochondria in MS including decreased expression of nuclear encoded electron transport chain subunit genes and inhibition of respiratory complexes. We previously reported increased levels of the hemoglobin β subunit (Hbb) in mitochondrial fractions isolated from postmortem MS cortex compared to controls. In the present study, we performed immunohistochemistry to determine the distribution of Hbb in postmortem MS cortex and identified proteins which interact with Hbb by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). We found that Hbb was enriched in pyramidal neurons in internal layers of the cortex and interacts with subunits of ATP synthase, histones, and a histone lysine demethylase. We also found that Hbb is present in the nucleus and that expression of Hbb in SH-SY5Y neuroblastoma cells increased trimethylation of histone H3 on lysine 4 (H3K4me3), a histone mark that regulates cellular metabolism. These data suggest that Hbb may be a part of a mechanism linking neuronal energetics with epigenetic changes to histones in the nucleus and may provide neuroprotection in MS by supporting neuronal metabolism. PMID:26809286

  1. Toxic effects of lead on neuronal development and function

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of lead on the development of the nervous system are of immediate concern to human health. While it is clear that lead can affect neuronal development at levels of exposure within the range found in the environment, the particular mechanism of the disruption is not readily ascertained. The goal of the authors research is to develop a model system in which the effects of lead on central nervous system development can be demonstrated. To study neuronal development in a system that minimizes such difficulties, the authors have grafted discrete brain regions derived from rat fetuses into the anterior chamber of the eye of adult hosts. The brain pieces continue organotypic development in the eye, but are isolated from possible secondary changes due to alterations in the development of the endocrine and other somatic systems because the adult host has these systems already fully developed. Using this system, they have discovered that lead induces a hypernoradrenergic innervation of central nervous system tissue. The increased innervation is observed not only structurally, but also functionally. Since norepinephrine is an inhibitory neurotransmitter, this ingrowth may explain the profound slowing of discharge of cerebellar neurons recorded in grafts of lead-treated animals. Studies in other tissues suggest that increased axonal ingrowth may be a general problem of lead intoxication that encompasses many brain areas, as well as peripheral sympathetic systems

  2. NBLAST: Rapid, Sensitive Comparison of Neuronal Structure and Construction of Neuron Family Databases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Marta; Manton, James D; Ostrovsky, Aaron D; Prohaska, Steffen; Jefferis, Gregory S X E

    2016-07-20

    Neural circuit mapping is generating datasets of tens of thousands of labeled neurons. New computational tools are needed to search and organize these data. We present NBLAST, a sensitive and rapid algorithm, for measuring pairwise neuronal similarity. NBLAST considers both position and local geometry, decomposing neurons into short segments; matched segments are scored using a probabilistic scoring matrix defined by statistics of matches and non-matches. We validated NBLAST on a published dataset of 16,129 single Drosophila neurons. NBLAST can distinguish neuronal types down to the finest level (single identified neurons) without a priori information. Cluster analysis of extensively studied neuronal classes identified new types and unreported topographical features. Fully automated clustering organized the validation dataset into 1,052 clusters, many of which map onto previously described neuronal types. NBLAST supports additional query types, including searching neurons against transgene expression patterns. Finally, we show that NBLAST is effective with data from other invertebrates and zebrafish. VIDEO ABSTRACT. PMID:27373836

  3. Glutamate neurons are intermixed with midbrain dopamine neurons in nonhuman primates and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, David H.; Wang, Hui-Ling; Liu, Bing; Barker, David J.; Mód, László; Szocsics, Péter; Silva, Afonso C.; Maglóczky, Zsófia; Morales, Marisela

    2016-01-01

    The rodent ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC) contain dopamine neurons intermixed with glutamate neurons (expressing vesicular glutamate transporter 2; VGluT2), which play roles in reward and aversion. However, identifying the neuronal compositions of the VTA and SNC in higher mammals has remained challenging. Here, we revealed VGluT2 neurons within the VTA and SNC of nonhuman primates and humans by simultaneous detection of VGluT2 mRNA and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; for identification of dopamine neurons). We found that several VTA subdivisions share similar cellular compositions in nonhuman primates and humans; their rostral linear nuclei have a high prevalence of VGluT2 neurons lacking TH; their paranigral and parabrachial pigmented nuclei have mostly TH neurons, and their parabrachial pigmented nuclei have dual VGluT2-TH neurons. Within nonhuman primates and humans SNC, the vast majority of neurons are TH neurons but VGluT2 neurons were detected in the pars lateralis subdivision. The demonstration that midbrain dopamine neurons are intermixed with glutamate or glutamate-dopamine neurons from rodents to humans offers new opportunities for translational studies towards analyzing the roles that each of these neurons play in human behavior and in midbrain-associated illnesses such as addiction, depression, schizophrenia, and Parkinson’s disease. PMID:27477243

  4. Glutamate neurons are intermixed with midbrain dopamine neurons in nonhuman primates and humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Root, David H; Wang, Hui-Ling; Liu, Bing; Barker, David J; Mód, László; Szocsics, Péter; Silva, Afonso C; Maglóczky, Zsófia; Morales, Marisela

    2016-01-01

    The rodent ventral tegmental area (VTA) and substantia nigra pars compacta (SNC) contain dopamine neurons intermixed with glutamate neurons (expressing vesicular glutamate transporter 2; VGluT2), which play roles in reward and aversion. However, identifying the neuronal compositions of the VTA and SNC in higher mammals has remained challenging. Here, we revealed VGluT2 neurons within the VTA and SNC of nonhuman primates and humans by simultaneous detection of VGluT2 mRNA and tyrosine hydroxylase (TH; for identification of dopamine neurons). We found that several VTA subdivisions share similar cellular compositions in nonhuman primates and humans; their rostral linear nuclei have a high prevalence of VGluT2 neurons lacking TH; their paranigral and parabrachial pigmented nuclei have mostly TH neurons, and their parabrachial pigmented nuclei have dual VGluT2-TH neurons. Within nonhuman primates and humans SNC, the vast majority of neurons are TH neurons but VGluT2 neurons were detected in the pars lateralis subdivision. The demonstration that midbrain dopamine neurons are intermixed with glutamate or glutamate-dopamine neurons from rodents to humans offers new opportunities for translational studies towards analyzing the roles that each of these neurons play in human behavior and in midbrain-associated illnesses such as addiction, depression, schizophrenia, and Parkinson's disease. PMID:27477243

  5. Multiple isolated cutaneous plexiform schwannomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enas A. S. Attia

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Plexiform schwannoma is a rare neurogenic tumor, arising from skin and subcutaneous tissue. The presence of multiple schwannomas suggests a possible association with neurofibromatosis type 2 (NF2. A 50-year old male patient presented with multiple papulo-nodular cutaneous lesions on both arms and forearms. Histopathological examination revealed a dermal multinodular pattern of well-circumscribed masses of closely packed cells, with peripheral myxoid tissue, well-encapsulated in a thin collagenous capsule. S-100 immunohistochemical staining was diffusely and strongly positive. Neuron-specific enolase was positive, confirming a neural tissue tumor. An audiogram and Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI of cerebro-pontine angle showed no detected abnormality, excluding acoustic neuroma. Thus, we present a case of multiple bilateral isolated cutaneous plexiform schwannomas, not associated with NF2. Multiple plexiform schwannomas is a very rare entity, distinct from neurofibromatosis (NF, and being confined to the dermis is even more rarely reported.

  6. tPA promotes cortical neuron survival via mTOR-dependent mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grummisch, Julia A; Jadavji, Nafisa M; Smith, Patrice D

    2016-07-01

    Tissue plasminogen activator (tPA) is a thrombolytic agent commonly used in the treatment of ischemic stroke. While the thrombolytic effects of tPA have been well established, the impact of this blood-brain barrier (BBB) crossing drug on neurons is not known. Given the widespread use of tPA in the clinical setting and the strict therapeutic window established for effective use of the drug, we examined the molecular mechanisms mediating the impact of tPA on postnatal cortical neurons isolated from the mouse brain. Dissociated postnatal primary cortical neurons were treated with tPA and the effects on neuron survival were evaluated. Pharmacological inhibitors of several signaling pathways previously implicated in neuroprotection (mTOR, JAK/STAT, MAPK and PKA-dependent mechanisms) were used to pinpoint the mechanistic effectors of tPA on neuron survival in vitro. We report here that tPA treatment results in a time-dependent neuroprotective effect on postnatal cortical neurons that relies predominantly on Janus kinase (JAK) and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signaling mechanisms. Taken together, these data suggest that tPA promotes neuroprotection in a temporally-regulated manner and that both JAK and mTOR signaling effectors are critical mediators of this neuroprotective effect. The results suggest the possibility of targeting these defined mechanisms to potentially expand the therapeutic window for tPA. PMID:26995507

  7. Influenza Virus Induces Inflammatory Response in Mouse Primary Cortical Neurons with Limited Viral Replication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Zhiwu; Gu, Liming; Chen, Yanxia

    2016-01-01

    Unlike stereotypical neurotropic viruses, influenza A viruses have been detected in the brain tissues of human and animal models. To investigate the interaction between neurons and influenza A viruses, mouse cortical neurons were isolated, infected with human H1N1 influenza virus, and then examined for the production of various inflammatory molecules involved in immune response. We found that replication of the influenza virus in neurons was limited, although early viral transcription was not affected. Virus-induced neuron viability decreased at 6 h postinfection (p.i.) but increased at 24 h p.i. depending upon the viral strain. Virus-induced apoptosis and cytopathy in primary cortical neurons were not apparent at 24 h p.i. The mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and type I interferons were upregulated at 6 h and 24 h p.i. These results indicate that the influenza virus induces inflammatory response in mouse primary cortical neurons with limited viral replication. The cytokines released in viral infection-induced neuroinflammation might play critical roles in influenza encephalopathy, rather than in viral replication-induced cytopathy. PMID:27525278

  8. Rapid and efficient generation of neurons from human pluripotent stem cells in a multititre plate format.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Miao; Schöler, Hans R; Greber, Boris

    2013-01-01

    Existing protocols for the generation of neurons from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) are often tedious in that they are multistep procedures involving the isolation and expansion of neural precursor cells, prior to terminal differentiation. In comparison to these time-consuming approaches, we have recently found that combined inhibition of three signaling pathways, TGFβ/SMAD2, BMP/SMAD1, and FGF/ERK, promotes rapid induction of neuroectoderm from hPSCs, followed by immediate differentiation into functional neurons. Here, we have adapted our procedure to a novel multititre plate format, to further enhance its reproducibility and to make it compatible with mid-throughput applications. It comprises four days of neuroectoderm formation in floating spheres (embryoid bodies), followed by a further four days of differentiation into neurons under adherent conditions. Most cells obtained with this protocol appear to be bipolar sensory neurons. Moreover, the procedure is highly efficient, does not require particular expert skills, and is based on a simple chemically defined medium with cost-efficient small molecules. Due to these features, the procedure may serve as a useful platform for further functional investigation as well as for cell-based screening approaches requiring human sensory neurons or neurons of any type. PMID:23486189

  9. Preliminary evidence for human globus pallidus pars interna neurons signaling reward and sensory stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Howell, Nicholas A; Prescott, Ian A; Lozano, Andres M; Hodaie, Mojgan; Voon, Valerie; Hutchison, William D

    2016-07-22

    The globus pallidus pars interna (GPi) is a component of the basal ganglia, a network of subcortical nuclei that process motor, associative, and limbic information. While non-human primate studies have suggested a role for the GPi in non-motor functions, there have been no single-unit studies of non-motor electrophysiological behavior of human GPi neurons. We therefore sought to extend these findings by collecting single-unit recordings from awake patients during functional stereotactic neurosurgery targeting the GPi for deep brain stimulation. To assess cellular responses to non-motor information, patients performed a reward task where virtual money could be won, lost, or neither, depending on their performance while cellular activity was monitored. Changes in the firing rates of isolated GPi neurons after the presentation of reward-related stimuli were compared between different reward contingencies (win, loss, null). We observed neurons that modulated their firing rate significantly to the presentation of reward-related stimuli. We furthermore found neurons that responded to visual-stimuli more broadly. This is the first single-unit evidence of human GPi neurons carrying non-motor information. These results are broadly consistent with previous findings in the animal literature and suggest non-motor information may be represented in the single-unit activity of human GPi neurons. PMID:27109924

  10. Influenza Virus Induces Inflammatory Response in Mouse Primary Cortical Neurons with Limited Viral Replication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gefei Wang

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Unlike stereotypical neurotropic viruses, influenza A viruses have been detected in the brain tissues of human and animal models. To investigate the interaction between neurons and influenza A viruses, mouse cortical neurons were isolated, infected with human H1N1 influenza virus, and then examined for the production of various inflammatory molecules involved in immune response. We found that replication of the influenza virus in neurons was limited, although early viral transcription was not affected. Virus-induced neuron viability decreased at 6 h postinfection (p.i. but increased at 24 h p.i. depending upon the viral strain. Virus-induced apoptosis and cytopathy in primary cortical neurons were not apparent at 24 h p.i. The mRNA levels of inflammatory cytokines, chemokines, and type I interferons were upregulated at 6 h and 24 h p.i. These results indicate that the influenza virus induces inflammatory response in mouse primary cortical neurons with limited viral replication. The cytokines released in viral infection-induced neuroinflammation might play critical roles in influenza encephalopathy, rather than in viral replication-induced cytopathy.

  11. Cells from the adult corneal stroma can be reprogrammed to a neuron-like cell using exogenous growth factors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cells thought to be stem cells isolated from the cornea of the eye have been shown to exhibit neurogenic potential. We set out to uncover the identity and location of these cells within the cornea and to elucidate their neuronal protein and gene expression profile during the process of switching to a neuron-like cell. Here we report that every cell of the adult human and rat corneal stroma is capable of differentiating into a neuron-like cell when treated with neurogenic differentiation specifying growth factors. Furthermore, the expression of genes regulating neurogenesis and mature neuronal structure and function was increased. The switch from a corneal stromal cell to a neuron-like cell was also shown to occur in vivo in intact corneas of living rats. Our results clearly indicate that lineage specifying growth factors can affect changes in the protein and gene expression profiles of adult cells, suggesting that possibly many adult cell populations can be made to switch into another type of mature cell by simply modifying the growth factor environment. - Highlights: • Adult corneal stromal cells can differentiated into neuron-like cells. • Neuronal specification of the adult stromal cell population is stochastic. • Neuronal specification in an adult cell population can be brought about by growth factors

  12. Cells from the adult corneal stroma can be reprogrammed to a neuron-like cell using exogenous growth factors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greene, Carol Ann, E-mail: carol.greene@auckland.ac.nz; Chang, Chuan-Yuan; Fraser, Cameron J.; Nelidova, Dasha E.; Chen, Jing A.; Lim, Angela; Brebner, Alex; McGhee, Jennifer; Sherwin, Trevor; Green, Colin R.

    2014-03-10

    Cells thought to be stem cells isolated from the cornea of the eye have been shown to exhibit neurogenic potential. We set out to uncover the identity and location of these cells within the cornea and to elucidate their neuronal protein and gene expression profile during the process of switching to a neuron-like cell. Here we report that every cell of the adult human and rat corneal stroma is capable of differentiating into a neuron-like cell when treated with neurogenic differentiation specifying growth factors. Furthermore, the expression of genes regulating neurogenesis and mature neuronal structure and function was increased. The switch from a corneal stromal cell to a neuron-like cell was also shown to occur in vivo in intact corneas of living rats. Our results clearly indicate that lineage specifying growth factors can affect changes in the protein and gene expression profiles of adult cells, suggesting that possibly many adult cell populations can be made to switch into another type of mature cell by simply modifying the growth factor environment. - Highlights: • Adult corneal stromal cells can differentiated into neuron-like cells. • Neuronal specification of the adult stromal cell population is stochastic. • Neuronal specification in an adult cell population can be brought about by growth factors.

  13. Directing astroglia from the cerebral cortex into subtype specific functional neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Heinrich

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Astroglia from the postnatal cerebral cortex can be reprogrammed in vitro to generate neurons following forced expression of neurogenic transcription factors, thus opening new avenues towards a potential use of endogenous astroglia for brain repair. However, in previous attempts astroglia-derived neurons failed to establish functional synapses, a severe limitation towards functional neurogenesis. It remained therefore also unknown whether neurons derived from reprogrammed astroglia could be directed towards distinct neuronal subtype identities by selective expression of distinct neurogenic fate determinants. Here we show that strong and persistent expression of neurogenic fate determinants driven by silencing-resistant retroviral vectors instructs astroglia from the postnatal cortex in vitro to mature into fully functional, synapse-forming neurons. Importantly, the neurotransmitter fate choice of astroglia-derived neurons can be controlled by selective expression of distinct neurogenic transcription factors: forced expression of the dorsal telencephalic fate determinant neurogenin-2 (Neurog2 directs cortical astroglia to generate synapse-forming glutamatergic neurons; in contrast, the ventral telencephalic fate determinant Dlx2 induces a GABAergic identity, although the overall efficiency of Dlx2-mediated neuronal reprogramming is much lower compared to Neurog2, suggesting that cortical astroglia possess a higher competence to respond to the dorsal telencephalic fate determinant. Interestingly, however, reprogramming of astroglia towards the generation of GABAergic neurons was greatly facilitated when the astroglial cells were first expanded as neurosphere cells prior to transduction with Dlx2. Importantly, this approach of expansion under neurosphere conditions and subsequent reprogramming with distinct neurogenic transcription factors can also be extended to reactive astroglia isolated from the adult injured cerebral cortex, allowing for the

  14. Isolation of dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons from the central nervous system of the cockroach Periplaneta americana and patch-clamp recording of their voltage-gated sodium current%美洲大蠊中枢DUM神经元的分离和电压门控Na+电流的记录

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    许鹏; 孙芹; 陈超; 程洁; 高蓉; 姜志宽; 肖杭

    2009-01-01

    [目的]建立美洲大蠊Periplaneta americana中枢神经系统背侧不成对中间神经元(dorsal unpaired median neurons,DUM neurons)的分离方法和DUM神经元电生理实验模型.[方法]IA型胶原酶法消化美洲大蠊末端腹神经节,机械吹打得到DUM神经元细胞,运用膜片钳技术记录DUM神经元细胞电压门控Na+电流.[结果]分离得到的DUM神经元细胞状态良好,具有DUN神经元典型的梨状形态和表面特征.以膜片钳全细胞方式记录到的Na+电流符合钠通道电流特征.[结论]IA型胶原酶消化得到美洲大蠊DUM神经元细胞的方法可靠,能稳定地记录到Na+电流.本文描述的方法为昆虫神经细胞的电生理机制研究提供一个可用的实验模型.

  15. A chimeric path to neuronal synchronization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Essaki Arumugam, Easwara Moorthy; Spano, Mark L. [School of Biological and Health Systems Engineering, Arizona State University, Tempe, Arizona 85287-9709 (United States)

    2015-01-15

    Synchronization of neuronal activity is associated with neurological disorders such as epilepsy. This process of neuronal synchronization is not fully understood. To further our understanding, we have experimentally studied the progression of this synchronization from normal neuronal firing to full synchronization. We implemented nine FitzHugh-Nagumo neurons (a simplified Hodgkin-Huxley model) via discrete electronics. For different coupling parameters (synaptic strengths), the neurons in the ring were either unsynchronized or completely synchronized when locally coupled in a ring. When a single long-range connection (nonlocal coupling) was introduced, an intermediate state known as a chimera appeared. The results indicate that (1) epilepsy is likely not only a dynamical disease but also a topological disease, strongly tied to the connectivity of the underlying network of neurons, and (2) the synchronization process in epilepsy may not be an “all or none” phenomenon, but can pass through an intermediate stage (chimera)

  16. Characterization of NCAM diversity in cultured neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gegelashvili, George; Andersson, A M; Schousboe, Arne;

    1993-01-01

    A single transcript of the NCAM gene undergoes differential processing resulting in a multiplicity of mRNAs and their translation products. In this study, the diversity of NCAM in rat primary neuronal cultures was investigated utilizing immuno- and Northern blot analyses. NCAM polypeptides of 190 k......Da (NCAM-A) and 135 kDa (NCAM-B) were shown to be associated with the neuronal phenotype. These data were confirmed by Northern blotting, which in both neocortical neurons and cerebellar granule neurons revealed mRNA classes of 7.4 kb and 6.7 kb encoding for NCAM-A and -B, respectively. However......, oligonucleotide probes, specific for selected exons or exon combinations, revealed special features of cerebellar granule neurons as compared to neocortical neurons: expression of 4.3 kb NCAM mRNA, a relatively low amount of VASE-containing variants, and an apparent lack of mRNA species containing exons alpha and...

  17. Neuronal synaptobrevin promotes longevity in Drosophila photoreceptors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mejia, Jonathan; Haberman, Adam

    2012-11-01

    Neurons have unique challenges relative to other cell types. Unlike most other cells, neurons must remain healthy and functional throughout the lifespan of an animal. Premature neuronal loss underlies many age-related neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer and Parkinson Diseases. Despite previous research aimed at understanding the mechanisms of age-related neurodegenerative diseases, little is known about the mechanisms that allow neurons to remain functional for the lifetime of a healthy animal. Understanding these cellular and biochemical processes is essential to promote healthful aging and reduce the severity of neurodegenerative disease. Here we discuss our recent identification of neuron-specific proteins that regulate endosome fusion events and the role of endosomes in maintaining healthy neurons. PMID:23740166

  18. Npas4: Linking Neuronal Activity to Memory.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaochen; Lin, Yingxi

    2016-04-01

    Immediate-early genes (IEGs) are rapidly activated after sensory and behavioral experience and are believed to be crucial for converting experience into long-term memory. Neuronal PAS domain protein 4 (Npas4), a recently discovered IEG, has several characteristics that make it likely to be a particularly important molecular link between neuronal activity and memory: it is among the most rapidly induced IEGs, is expressed only in neurons, and is selectively induced by neuronal activity. By orchestrating distinct activity-dependent gene programs in different neuronal populations, Npas4 affects synaptic connections in excitatory and inhibitory neurons, neural circuit plasticity, and memory formation. It may also be involved in circuit homeostasis through negative feedback and psychiatric disorders. We summarize these findings and discuss their implications. PMID:26987258

  19. Neuronal Networks on Nanocellulose Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonsson, Malin; Brackmann, Christian; Puchades, Maja; Brattås, Karoline; Ewing, Andrew; Gatenholm, Paul; Enejder, Annika

    2015-11-01

    Proliferation, integration, and neurite extension of PC12 cells, a widely used culture model for cholinergic neurons, were studied in nanocellulose scaffolds biosynthesized by Gluconacetobacter xylinus to allow a three-dimensional (3D) extension of neurites better mimicking neuronal networks in tissue. The interaction with control scaffolds was compared with cationized nanocellulose (trimethyl ammonium betahydroxy propyl [TMAHP] cellulose) to investigate the impact of surface charges on the cell interaction mechanisms. Furthermore, coatings with extracellular matrix proteins (collagen, fibronectin, and laminin) were investigated to determine the importance of integrin-mediated cell attachment. Cell proliferation was evaluated by a cellular proliferation assay, while cell integration and neurite propagation were studied by simultaneous label-free Coherent anti-Stokes Raman Scattering and second harmonic generation microscopy, providing 3D images of PC12 cells and arrangement of nanocellulose fibrils, respectively. Cell attachment and proliferation were enhanced by TMAHP modification, but not by protein coating. Protein coating instead promoted active interaction between the cells and the scaffold, hence lateral cell migration and integration. Irrespective of surface modification, deepest cell integration measured was one to two cell layers, whereas neurites have a capacity to integrate deeper than the cell bodies in the scaffold due to their fine dimensions and amoeba-like migration pattern. Neurites with lengths of >50 μm were observed, successfully connecting individual cells and cell clusters. In conclusion, TMAHP-modified nanocellulose scaffolds promote initial cellular scaffold adhesion, which combined with additional cell-scaffold treatments enables further formation of 3D neuronal networks. PMID:26398224

  20. Tracing lineages to uncover neuronal identity

    OpenAIRE

    Perlmann Thomas; Panman Lia

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Many previous studies have focused on understanding how midbrain dopamine neurons, which are implicated in many neurological conditions, are generated during embryogenesis. One of the remaining questions concerns how different dopamine neuron subtypes are specified. A recent paper in Neural Development has revealed features of a spatial and temporal lineage map that, together with other studies, begins to elucidate the developmental origin of distinct neuronal subtypes within the dev...

  1. Neuronal degeneration in spinal multiple sclerosis

    OpenAIRE

    Bernhardt, Lydia

    2010-01-01

    To elucidate neuronal degeneration in spinal multiple sclerosis the spinal cord of 27 post mortem patients of the years 1997 to 2000 was investigated in comparison to 29 controls matched for sex, age and year of death. In addition to immunohistochemical examinations and demonstration of pathological cell changes, we also quantified the neurons of the cervical and thoracic spinal cord. In comparison to controls, MS-patients show a significant loss of 43% of the cervical neurons and a signif...

  2. Neuronal organization of olfactory bulb circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Shin eNagayama; Ryota eHomma; Fumiaki eImamura

    2014-01-01

    Olfactory sensory neurons extend their axons solely to the olfactory bulb, which is dedicated to odor information processing. The olfactory bulb is divided into multiple layers, with different types of neurons found in each of the layers. Therefore, neurons in the olfactory bulb have conventionally been categorized based on the layers in which their cell bodies are found; namely, juxtaglomerular cells in the glomerular layer, tufted cells in the external plexiform layer, mitral cells in the...

  3. Towards functional classification of neuronal types

    OpenAIRE

    Sharpee, Tatyana O.

    2014-01-01

    How many types of neurons are there in the brain? This basic neuroscience question remains unsettled despite many decades of research. Classification schemes have been proposed based on anatomical, electrophysiological or molecular properties. However, different schemes do not always agree with each other. This raises the question of whether one can classify neurons based on their function directly. For example, among sensory neurons, can a classification scheme be devised that is based on th...

  4. High-Degree Neurons Feed Cortical Computations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timme, Nicholas M.; Ito, Shinya; Shimono, Masanori; Yeh, Fang-Chin; Litke, Alan M.; Beggs, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Recent work has shown that functional connectivity among cortical neurons is highly varied, with a small percentage of neurons having many more connections than others. Also, recent theoretical developments now make it possible to quantify how neurons modify information from the connections they receive. Therefore, it is now possible to investigate how information modification, or computation, depends on the number of connections a neuron receives (in-degree) or sends out (out-degree). To do this, we recorded the simultaneous spiking activity of hundreds of neurons in cortico-hippocampal slice cultures using a high-density 512-electrode array. This preparation and recording method combination produced large numbers of neurons recorded at temporal and spatial resolutions that are not currently available in any in vivo recording system. We utilized transfer entropy (a well-established method for detecting linear and nonlinear interactions in time series) and the partial information decomposition (a powerful, recently developed tool for dissecting multivariate information processing into distinct parts) to quantify computation between neurons where information flows converged. We found that computations did not occur equally in all neurons throughout the networks. Surprisingly, neurons that computed large amounts of information tended to receive connections from high out-degree neurons. However, the in-degree of a neuron was not related to the amount of information it computed. To gain insight into these findings, we developed a simple feedforward network model. We found that a degree-modified Hebbian wiring rule best reproduced the pattern of computation and degree correlation results seen in the real data. Interestingly, this rule also maximized signal propagation in the presence of network-wide correlations, suggesting a mechanism by which cortex could deal with common random background input. These are the first results to show that the extent to which a neuron

  5. High-Degree Neurons Feed Cortical Computations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timme, Nicholas M; Ito, Shinya; Myroshnychenko, Maxym; Nigam, Sunny; Shimono, Masanori; Yeh, Fang-Chin; Hottowy, Pawel; Litke, Alan M; Beggs, John M

    2016-05-01

    Recent work has shown that functional connectivity among cortical neurons is highly varied, with a small percentage of neurons having many more connections than others. Also, recent theoretical developments now make it possible to quantify how neurons modify information from the connections they receive. Therefore, it is now possible to investigate how information modification, or computation, depends on the number of connections a neuron receives (in-degree) or sends out (out-degree). To do this, we recorded the simultaneous spiking activity of hundreds of neurons in cortico-hippocampal slice cultures using a high-density 512-electrode array. This preparation and recording method combination produced large numbers of neurons recorded at temporal and spatial resolutions that are not currently available in any in vivo recording system. We utilized transfer entropy (a well-established method for detecting linear and nonlinear interactions in time series) and the partial information decomposition (a powerful, recently developed tool for dissecting multivariate information processing into distinct parts) to quantify computation between neurons where information flows converged. We found that computations did not occur equally in all neurons throughout the networks. Surprisingly, neurons that computed large amounts of information tended to receive connections from high out-degree neurons. However, the in-degree of a neuron was not related to the amount of information it computed. To gain insight into these findings, we developed a simple feedforward network model. We found that a degree-modified Hebbian wiring rule best reproduced the pattern of computation and degree correlation results seen in the real data. Interestingly, this rule also maximized signal propagation in the presence of network-wide correlations, suggesting a mechanism by which cortex could deal with common random background input. These are the first results to show that the extent to which a neuron

  6. Cortical Plasticity Induced by Inhibitory Neuron Transplantation

    OpenAIRE

    Southwell, Derek G.; Froemke, Robert C.; Alvarez-Buylla, Arturo; Stryker, Michael P.; Gandhi, Sunil P.

    2010-01-01

    Critical periods are times of pronounced brain plasticity. During a critical period in the postnatal development of the visual cortex, the occlusion of one eye triggers a rapid reorganization of neuronal responses, a process known as ocular dominance plasticity. We have shown that the transplantation of inhibitory neurons induces ocular dominance plasticity after the critical period. Transplanted inhibitory neurons receive excitatory synapses, make inhibitory synapses onto host cortical neuro...

  7. Effective stimuli for constructing reliable neuron models.

    OpenAIRE

    Shaul Druckmann; Berger, Thomas K.; Felix Schürmann; Sean Hill; Henry Markram; Idan Segev

    2011-01-01

    Author Summary Neurons perform complicated non-linear transformations on their input before producing their output - a train of action potentials. This input-output transformation is shaped by the specific composition of ion channels, out of the many possible types, that are embedded in the neuron's membrane. Experimentally, characterizing this transformation relies on injecting different stimuli to the neuron while recording its output; but which of the many possible stimuli should one apply...

  8. Reflections on mirror neurons and speech perception

    OpenAIRE

    Lotto, Andrew J.; Hickok, Gregory S.; Holt, Lori L.

    2009-01-01

    The discovery of mirror neurons, a class of neurons that respond when a monkey performs an action and also when the monkey observes others producing the same action, has promoted a renaissance for the Motor Theory (MT) of speech perception. This is because mirror neurons seem to accomplish the same kind of one to one mapping between perception and action that MT theorizes to be the basis of human speech communication. However, this seeming correspondence is superficial, and there are theoreti...

  9. Prospective separation and transcriptome analyses of cortical projection neurons and interneurons based on lineage tracing by Tbr2 (Eomes)-GFP/Dcx-mRFP reporters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jiancheng; Wu, Xiwei; Zhang, Heying; Qiu, Runxiang; Yoshikawa, Kazuaki; Lu, Qiang

    2016-06-01

    In the cerebral cortex, projection neurons and interneurons work coordinately to establish neural networks for normal cortical functions. While the specific mechanisms that control productions of projection neurons and interneurons are beginning to be revealed, a global characterization of the molecular differences between these two neuron types is crucial for a more comprehensive understanding of their developmental specifications and functions. In this study, using lineage tracing power of combining Tbr2(Eomes)-GFP and Dcx-mRFP reporter mice, we prospectively separated intermediate progenitor cell (IPC)-derived neurons (IPNs) from non-IPC-derived neurons (non-IPNs) of the embryonic cerebral cortex. Molecular characterizations revealed that IPNs and non-IPNs were enriched with projection neurons and interneurons, respectively. Expression profiling documented cell-specific genes including differentially expressed transcriptional regulators that might be involved in cellular specifications, for instance, our data found that SOX1 and SOX2, which were known for important functions in neural stem/progenitor cells, continued to be expressed by interneurons but not by projection neurons. Transcriptome analyses of cortical neurons isolated at different stages of neurogenesis revealed distinct temporal patterns of expression of genes involved in early-born or late-born neuron specification. These data present a resource useful for further investigation of the molecular regulations and functions of projection neurons and interneurons. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Develop Neurobiol 76: 587-599, 2016. PMID:26248544

  10. Performance limitations of relay neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Agarwal

    Full Text Available Relay cells are prevalent throughout sensory systems and receive two types of inputs: driving and modulating. The driving input contains receptive field properties that must be transmitted while the modulating input alters the specifics of transmission. For example, the visual thalamus contains relay neurons that receive driving inputs from the retina that encode a visual image, and modulating inputs from reticular activating system and layer 6 of visual cortex that control what aspects of the image will be relayed back to visual cortex for perception. What gets relayed depends on several factors such as attentional demands and a subject's goals. In this paper, we analyze a biophysical based model of a relay cell and use systems theoretic tools to construct analytic bounds on how well the cell transmits a driving input as a function of the neuron's electrophysiological properties, the modulating input, and the driving signal parameters. We assume that the modulating input belongs to a class of sinusoidal signals and that the driving input is an irregular train of pulses with inter-pulse intervals obeying an exponential distribution. Our analysis applies to any [Formula: see text] order model as long as the neuron does not spike without a driving input pulse and exhibits a refractory period. Our bounds on relay reliability contain performance obtained through simulation of a second and third order model, and suggest, for instance, that if the frequency of the modulating input increases or the DC offset decreases, then relay increases. Our analysis also shows, for the first time, how the biophysical properties of the neuron (e.g. ion channel dynamics define the oscillatory patterns needed in the modulating input for appropriately timed relay of sensory information. In our discussion, we describe how our bounds predict experimentally observed neural activity in the basal ganglia in (i health, (ii in Parkinson's disease (PD, and (iii in PD during

  11. Conductance-based neuron models and the slow dynamics of excitability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Soudry

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available In recent experiments, synaptically isolated neurons from rat cortical culture, were stimulated with periodic extra-cellular fixed-amplitude current pulses for extended durations of days. The neuron's response depended on its own history, as well as on the history of the input, and was classified into several modes. Interestingly, in one of the modes the neuron behaved intermittently, exhibiting irregular firing patterns changing in a complex and variable manner over the entire range of experimental timescales, from seconds to days. With the aim of developing a minimal biophysical explanation for these results, we propose a general scheme, that, given a few assumptions (mainly, a timescale separation in kinetics closely describes the response of deterministic conductance-based neuron models under pulse stimulation, using a discrete time piecewise linear mapping, which is amenable to detailed mathematical analysis. Using this method we reproduce the basic modes exhibited by the neuron experimentally, as well as the mean response in each mode. Specifically, we derive precise closed-form input-output expressions for the transient timescale and firing rates, which are expressed in terms of experimentally measurable variables, and conform with the experimental results. However, the mathematical analysis shows that the resulting firing patterns in these deterministic models are always regular and repeatable (i.e., no chaos, in contrast to the irregular and variable behavior displayed by the neuron in certain regimes. This fact, and the sensitive near-threshold dynamics of the model, indicate that intrinsic ion channel noise has a significant impact on the neuronal response, and may help reproduce the experimentally observed variability, as we also demonstrate numerically. In a companion paper, we extend our analysis to stochastic conductance-based models, and show how these can be used to reproduce the details of the observed irregular and variable

  12. Alterations in neuronal calcium levels are associated with cognitive deficits after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deshpande, Laxmikant S; Sun, David A; Sombati, Sompong; Baranova, Anya; Wilson, Margaret S; Attkisson, Elisa; Hamm, Robert J; DeLorenzo, Robert J

    2008-08-15

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) survivors often suffer from a post-traumatic syndrome with deficits in learning and memory. Calcium (Ca(2+)) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of TBI-induced neuronal death. However, the role of long-term changes in neuronal Ca(2+) function in surviving neurons and the potential impact on TBI-induced cognitive impairments are less understood. Here we evaluated neuronal death and basal free intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](i)) in acutely isolated rat CA3 hippocampal neurons using the Ca(2+) indicator, Fura-2, at seven and thirty days after moderate central fluid percussion injury. In moderate TBI, cognitive deficits as evaluated by the Morris Water Maze (MWM), occur after injury but resolve after several weeks. Using MWM paradigm we compared alterations in [Ca(2+)](i) and cognitive deficits. Moderate TBI did not cause significant hippocampal neuronal death. However, basal [Ca(2+)](i) was significantly elevated when measured seven days post-TBI. At the same time, these animals exhibited significant cognitive impairment (F(2,25)=3.43, p<0.05). When measured 30 days post-TBI, both basal [Ca(2+)](i) and cognitive functions had returned to normal. Pretreatment with MK-801 blocked this elevation in [Ca(2+)](i) and also prevented MWM deficits. These studies provide evidence for a link between elevated [Ca(2+)](i) and altered cognition. Since no significant neuronal death was observed, the alterations in Ca(2+) homeostasis in the traumatized, but surviving neurons may play a role in the pathophysiology of cognitive deficits that manifest in the acute setting after TBI and represent a novel target for therapeutic intervention following TBI. PMID:18583041

  13. Brain state-dependent neuronal computation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascale eQuilichini

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal firing pattern, which includes both the frequency and the timing of action potentials, is a key component of information processing in the brain. Although the relationship between neuronal output (the firing pattern and function (during a task/behavior is not fully understood, there is now considerable evidence that a given neuron can show very different firing patterns according to brain state. Thus, such neurons assembled into neuronal networks generate different rhythms (e.g. theta, gamma, sharp wave ripples, which sign specific brain states (e.g. learning, sleep. This implies that a given neuronal network, defined by its hard-wired physical connectivity, can support different brain state-dependent activities through the modulation of its functional connectivity. Here, we review data demonstrating that not only the firing pattern, but also the functional connections between neurons, can change dynamically. We then explore the possible mechanisms of such versatility, focusing on the intrinsic properties of neurons and the properties of the synapses they establish, and how they can be modified by neuromodulators, i.e. the different ways that neurons can use to switch from one mode of communication to the other.

  14. Shaping Neuronal Network Activity by Presynaptic Mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayal Lavi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal microcircuits generate oscillatory activity, which has been linked to basic functions such as sleep, learning and sensorimotor gating. Although synaptic release processes are well known for their ability to shape the interaction between neurons in microcircuits, most computational models do not simulate the synaptic transmission process directly and hence cannot explain how changes in synaptic parameters alter neuronal network activity. In this paper, we present a novel neuronal network model that incorporates presynaptic release mechanisms, such as vesicle pool dynamics and calcium-dependent release probability, to model the spontaneous activity of neuronal networks. The model, which is based on modified leaky integrate-and-fire neurons, generates spontaneous network activity patterns, which are similar to experimental data and robust under changes in the model's primary gain parameters such as excitatory postsynaptic potential and connectivity ratio. Furthermore, it reliably recreates experimental findings and provides mechanistic explanations for data obtained from microelectrode array recordings, such as network burst termination and the effects of pharmacological and genetic manipulations. The model demonstrates how elevated asynchronous release, but not spontaneous release, synchronizes neuronal network activity and reveals that asynchronous release enhances utilization of the recycling vesicle pool to induce the network effect. The model further predicts a positive correlation between vesicle priming at the single-neuron level and burst frequency at the network level; this prediction is supported by experimental findings. Thus, the model is utilized to reveal how synaptic release processes at the neuronal level govern activity patterns and synchronization at the network level.

  15. Effective stimuli for constructing reliable neuron models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaul Druckmann

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available The rich dynamical nature of neurons poses major conceptual and technical challenges for unraveling their nonlinear membrane properties. Traditionally, various current waveforms have been injected at the soma to probe neuron dynamics, but the rationale for selecting specific stimuli has never been rigorously justified. The present experimental and theoretical study proposes a novel framework, inspired by learning theory, for objectively selecting the stimuli that best unravel the neuron's dynamics. The efficacy of stimuli is assessed in terms of their ability to constrain the parameter space of biophysically detailed conductance-based models that faithfully replicate the neuron's dynamics as attested by their ability to generalize well to the neuron's response to novel experimental stimuli. We used this framework to evaluate a variety of stimuli in different types of cortical neurons, ages and animals. Despite their simplicity, a set of stimuli consisting of step and ramp current pulses outperforms synaptic-like noisy stimuli in revealing the dynamics of these neurons. The general framework that we propose paves a new way for defining, evaluating and standardizing effective electrical probing of neurons and will thus lay the foundation for a much deeper understanding of the electrical nature of these highly sophisticated and non-linear devices and of the neuronal networks that they compose.

  16. Spiking Neurons for Analysis of Patterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huntsberger, Terrance

    2008-01-01

    Artificial neural networks comprising spiking neurons of a novel type have been conceived as improved pattern-analysis and pattern-recognition computational systems. These neurons are represented by a mathematical model denoted the state-variable model (SVM), which among other things, exploits a computational parallelism inherent in spiking-neuron geometry. Networks of SVM neurons offer advantages of speed and computational efficiency, relative to traditional artificial neural networks. The SVM also overcomes some of the limitations of prior spiking-neuron models. There are numerous potential pattern-recognition, tracking, and data-reduction (data preprocessing) applications for these SVM neural networks on Earth and in exploration of remote planets. Spiking neurons imitate biological neurons more closely than do the neurons of traditional artificial neural networks. A spiking neuron includes a central cell body (soma) surrounded by a tree-like interconnection network (dendrites). Spiking neurons are so named because they generate trains of output pulses (spikes) in response to inputs received from sensors or from other neurons. They gain their speed advantage over traditional neural networks by using the timing of individual spikes for computation, whereas traditional artificial neurons use averages of activity levels over time. Moreover, spiking neurons use the delays inherent in dendritic processing in order to efficiently encode the information content of incoming signals. Because traditional artificial neurons fail to capture this encoding, they have less processing capability, and so it is necessary to use more gates when implementing traditional artificial neurons in electronic circuitry. Such higher-order functions as dynamic tasking are effected by use of pools (collections) of spiking neurons interconnected by spike-transmitting fibers. The SVM includes adaptive thresholds and submodels of transport of ions (in imitation of such transport in biological

  17. Hypoglycemic neuronal death is triggered by glucose reperfusion and activation of neuronal NADPH oxidase

    OpenAIRE

    Suh, Sang Won; Gum, Elizabeth T.; Hamby, Aaron M.; Chan, Pak H.; Swanson, Raymond A

    2007-01-01

    Hypoglycemic coma and brain injury are potential complications of insulin therapy. Certain neurons in the hippocampus and cerebral cortex are uniquely vulnerable to hypoglycemic cell death, and oxidative stress is a key event in this cell death process. Here we show that hypoglycemia-induced oxidative stress and neuronal death are attributable primarily to the activation of neuronal NADPH oxidase during glucose reperfusion. Superoxide production and neuronal death were blocked by the NADPH ox...

  18. Leptin Action on GABAergic Neurons Prevents Obesity and Reduces Inhibitory Tone to POMC Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Vong, Linh; Ye, Chianping; Yang, Zongfang; Choi, Brian; Chua, Streamson; Lowell, Bradford B.

    2011-01-01

    Leptin acts in the brain to prevent obesity. The underlying neurocircuitry responsible for this is poorly understood, in part due to incomplete knowledge regarding first order, leptin-responsive neurons. To address this, we and others have been removing leptin receptors from candidate first order neurons. While functionally relevant neurons have been identified, the observed effects have been small suggesting that most first order neurons remain unidentified. Here we take an alternative appro...

  19. Not Just for Bimodal Neurons Anymore: The Contribution of Unimodal Neurons to Cortical Multisensory Processing

    OpenAIRE

    Allman, Brian L.; Keniston, Leslie P.; Meredith, M. Alex

    2009-01-01

    Traditionally, neuronal studies of multisensory processing proceeded by first identifying neurons that were overtly multisensory (e.g., bimodal, trimodal) and then testing them. In contrast, the present study examined, without precondition, neurons in an extrastriate visual area of the cat for their responses to separate (visual, auditory) and combined-modality (visual and auditory) stimulation. As expected, traditional bimodal forms of multisensory neurons were identified. In addition, howev...

  20. Neuronal Classification of Atria Fibrillation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed BEN MESSAOUD

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Motivation. In medical field, particularly the cardiology, the diagnosis systems constitute the essential domain of research. In some applications, the traditional methods of classification present some limitations. The neuronal technique is considered as one of the promising algorithms to resolve such problem.Method. In this paper, two approaches of the Artificial Neuronal Network (ANN technique are investigated to classify the heart beats which are Multi Layer Perception (MLP and Radial Basis Function (RBF. A calculation algorithm of the RBF centers is proposed. For the Atria Fibrillation anomalies, an artificial neural network was used as a pattern classifier to distinguish three classes of the cardiac arrhythmias. The different classes consist of the normal beats (N, the Arrhythmia (AFA and Tachycardia (TFA Atria Fibrillation cases. The global and the partition classifier are performed. The arrhythmias of MIT-BIH database are analyzed. The ANN inputs are the temporal and morphological parameters deduced from the electrocardiograph.Results. The simulation results illustrate the performances of the studied versions of the neural network and give the fault detection rate of the tested data, a rate of classification reaching the 3.7%.Conclusion. This system can constitute a mesh in a chain of automated diagnosis and can be a tool for assistance for the classification of the cardiac anomalies in the services of urgencies before the arrival of a qualified personal person.

  1. Neuron Mid-Infrared Absorption Study for Direct Optical Excitation of Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Guo, Dingkai; Chen, Xing; Vadala, Shilpa; Leach, Jennie; Choa, Fow-Sen

    2011-01-01

    Neuron optical excitations are important for brain-circuitry explorations and sensory-neuron-stimulation applications. To optimize the stimulation, we identify neuron mid-IR absorption peaks in this study and discuss their meanings and delivery methods of mid-IR photons.

  2. Nitric oxide damages neuronal mitochondria and induces apoptosis in neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    The cytotoxic effect of nitric oxide on primarily cultured rat cerebellar granule cells was studied,and the mechanisms were discussed.The results showed that nitric oxide donor S-nitroso-N-acetyl-penicillamine (SNAP; 500 μmol/L) could induce apoptosis in immature cultures of cerebellar granule cells.Flow cytometry and HPLC analyses revealed that after treatment with SNAP,the mitochondrial transmembrane potential and the cellular ATP content decreased significantly.Nitric oxide scavenger hemoglobin could effectively prevent the neuronal mitochondria from dysfunction and attenuate apoptosis.The results suggested that nitric oxide activated the apoptotic program by inhibiting the activity of mitochondrial respiratory chain and thus decreasing the cellular ATP content.

  3. Protection of neuronal cells against reactive oxygen species by carnosine and related compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boldyrev, Alexander; Bulygina, Elena; Leinsoo, Toomas; Petrushanko, Irina; Tsubone, Shiori; Abe, Hiroki

    2004-01-01

    Carnosine and related compounds were compared in terms of their abilities to decrease the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) in suspensions of isolated neurons activated by N-methyl-D-aspartic acid (NMDA) using both stationary fluorescence measurements and flow cytometry. Carnosine was found to suppress the fluorescent signal induced by ROS production and decreased the proportion of highly fluorescent neurons, while histidine showed opposite effects. N-Acetylated derivatives of both carnosine and histidine demonstrated weak (statistically indistinguishable) suppressive effects on the ROS signal. N-Methylated derivatives of carnosine suppressed intracellular ROS generation to the same extent as carnosine. This rank of effectiveness is distinct from that previously obtained for the anti-radical ability of CRCs (anserine>carnosine>ophidine). These differences suggest that the similar ability of carnosine and its N-methylated derivatives to protect neuronal cells against the excitotoxic effect of NMDA is not solely related to the antioxidant properties of these compounds. PMID:14698913

  4. Alternativ isolering i Tyskland

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Ernst Jan de Place

    2001-01-01

    Resume af rapport om brugen af alternativ isolering i Tyskland, som er udarbejdet af Teknologisk Insititut under Energistyrelsens udviklingsprogram "Miljø- og arbejdsmiljøvenlig isolering"......Resume af rapport om brugen af alternativ isolering i Tyskland, som er udarbejdet af Teknologisk Insititut under Energistyrelsens udviklingsprogram "Miljø- og arbejdsmiljøvenlig isolering"...

  5. Neuron-glia cell adhesion molecule interacts with neurons and astroglia via different binding mechanisms

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    The neuron-glia cell adhesion molecule (Ng-CAM) is present in the central nervous system on postmitotic neurons and in the periphery on neurons and Schwann cells. It has been implicated in binding between neurons and between neurons and glia. To understand the molecular mechanisms of Ng-CAM binding, we analyzed the aggregation of chick Ng- CAM either immobilized on 0.5-micron beads (Covaspheres) or reconstituted into liposomes. The results were correlated with the binding of these particles t...

  6. Review Paper: Polyphenolic Antioxidants and Neuronal Regeneration

    OpenAIRE

    Amin Ataie; Mohammad Shadifar; Ramin Ataee

    2016-01-01

    Many studies indicate that oxidative stress is involved in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. Oxidative stress can induce neuronal damages, modulate intracellular signaling and ultimately leads to neuronal death by apoptosis or necrosis. To review antioxidants preventive effects on oxidative stress and neurodegenerative diseases we accumulated data from international medical journals and academic informations' sites. According to many studies, antioxidants could...

  7. Adaptive Neurons For Artificial Neural Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawel, Raoul

    1990-01-01

    Training time decreases dramatically. In improved mathematical model of neural-network processor, temperature of neurons (in addition to connection strengths, also called weights, of synapses) varied during supervised-learning phase of operation according to mathematical formalism and not heuristic rule. Evidence that biological neural networks also process information at neuronal level.

  8. Locally active Hindmarsh-Rose neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arena, Paolo [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Elettronica e dei Sistemi, Universita degli Studi di Catania, viale A. Doria 6, 95100 Catania (Italy); Fortuna, Luigi [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Elettronica e dei Sistemi, Universita degli Studi di Catania, viale A. Doria 6, 95100 Catania (Italy)] e-mail: lfortuna@diees.unict.it; Frasca, Mattia [Dipartimento di Ingegneria Elettrica, Elettronica e dei Sistemi, Universita degli Studi di Catania, viale A. Doria 6, 95100 Catania (Italy)] e-mail: mfrasca@diees.unict.it; Rosa, Manuela La [SST Group, Corporate R and D, STMicroelectronics, Stradale Primosole 50, 95121 Catania (Italy)] e-mail: manuela.la-rosa@st.com

    2006-01-01

    In this paper the locally active and the edge of chaos regions of the Hindmarsh-Rose (HR) model for neuron dynamics are studied. From these regions parameters are chosen to set emergent phenomena both in 2D and 3D grids of HR neurons.

  9. Polarity and intracellular compartmentalization of Drosophila neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Henner Astra L

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proper neuronal function depends on forming three primary subcellular compartments: axons, dendrites, and soma. Each compartment has a specialized function (the axon to send information, dendrites to receive information, and the soma is where most cellular components are produced. In mammalian neurons, each primary compartment has distinctive molecular and morphological features, as well as smaller domains, such as the axon initial segment, that have more specialized functions. How neuronal subcellular compartments are established and maintained is not well understood. Genetic studies in Drosophila have provided insight into other areas of neurobiology, but it is not known whether flies are a good system in which to study neuronal polarity as a comprehensive analysis of Drosophila neuronal subcellular organization has not been performed. Results Here we use new and previously characterized markers to examine Drosophila neuronal compartments. We find that: axons and dendrites can accumulate different microtubule-binding proteins; protein synthesis machinery is concentrated in the cell body; pre- and post-synaptic sites localize to distinct regions of the neuron; and specializations similar to the initial segment are present. In addition, we track EB1-GFP dynamics and determine microtubules in axons and dendrites have opposite polarity. Conclusion We conclude that Drosophila will be a powerful system to study the establishment and maintenance of neuronal compartments.

  10. Neuronal Development: SAD Kinases Make Happy Axons

    OpenAIRE

    Xing, Lei; Newbern, Jason M.; Snider, William D

    2013-01-01

    The polarity proteins LKB1 and SAD-A/B are key regulators of axon specification in the developing cerebral cortex. Recent studies now show that this mechanism cannot be generalized to other classes of neurons: instead, SAD-A/B functions downstream of neurotrophin signaling in sensory neurons to mediate a later stage of axon development — arborization in the target field.

  11. Dissociated neurons and glial cells derived from rat inferior colliculi after digestion with papain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaiser, Odett; Aliuos, Pooyan; Wissel, Kirsten; Lenarz, Thomas; Werner, Darja; Reuter, Günter; Kral, Andrej; Warnecke, Athanasia

    2013-01-01

    The formation of gliosis around implant electrodes for deep brain stimulation impairs electrode-tissue interaction. Unspecific growth of glial tissue around the electrodes can be hindered by altering physicochemical material properties. However, in vitro screening of neural tissue-material interaction requires an adequate cell culture system. No adequate model for cells dissociated from the inferior colliculus (IC) has been described and was thus the aim of this study. Therefore, IC were isolated from neonatal rats (P3_5) and a dissociated cell culture was established. In screening experiments using four dissociation methods (Neural Tissue Dissociation Kit [NTDK] T, NTDK P; NTDK PN, and a validated protocol for the dissociation of spiral ganglion neurons [SGN]), the optimal media, and seeding densities were identified. Thereafter, a dissociation protocol containing only the proteolytic enzymes of interest (trypsin or papain) was tested. For analysis, cells were fixed and immunolabeled using glial- and neuron-specific antibodies. Adhesion and survival of dissociated neurons and glial cells isolated from the IC were demonstrated in all experimental settings. Hence, preservation of type-specific cytoarchitecture with sufficient neuronal networks only occurred in cultures dissociated with NTDK P, NTDK PN, and fresh prepared papain solution. However, cultures obtained after dissociation with papain, seeded at a density of 2×10(4) cells/well and cultivated with Neuro Medium for 6 days reliably revealed the highest neuronal yield with excellent cytoarchitecture of neurons and glial cells. The herein described dissociated culture can be utilized as in vitro model to screen interactions between cells of the IC and surface modifications of the electrode. PMID:24349001

  12. Timing control by redundant inhibitory neuronal circuits

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tristan, I., E-mail: itristan@ucsd.edu; Rulkov, N. F.; Huerta, R.; Rabinovich, M. [BioCircuits Institute, University of California, San Diego, La Jolla, California 92093-0402 (United States)

    2014-03-15

    Rhythms and timing control of sequential activity in the brain is fundamental to cognition and behavior. Although experimental and theoretical studies support the understanding that neuronal circuits are intrinsically capable of generating different time intervals, the dynamical origin of the phenomenon of functionally dependent timing control is still unclear. Here, we consider a new mechanism that is related to the multi-neuronal cooperative dynamics in inhibitory brain motifs consisting of a few clusters. It is shown that redundancy and diversity of neurons within each cluster enhances the sensitivity of the timing control with the level of neuronal excitation of the whole network. The generality of the mechanism is shown to work on two different neuronal models: a conductance-based model and a map-based model.

  13. Vestibular efferent neurons project to the flocculus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinder, M. E.; Purcell, I. M.; Kaufman, G. D.; Perachio, A. A.

    2001-01-01

    A bilateral projection from the vestibular efferent neurons, located dorsal to the genu of the facial nerve, to the cerebellar flocculus and ventral paraflocculus was demonstrated. Efferent neurons were double-labeled by the unilateral injections of separate retrograde tracers into the labyrinth and into the floccular and ventral parafloccular lobules. Efferent neurons were found with double retrograde tracer labeling both ipsilateral and contralateral to the sites of injection. No double labeling was found when using a fluorescent tracer with non-fluorescent tracers such as horseradish peroxidase (HRP) or biotinylated dextran amine (BDA), but large percentages of efferent neurons were found to be double labeled when using two fluorescent substances including: fluorogold, microruby dextran amine, or rhodamine labeled latex beads. These data suggest a potential role for vestibular efferent neurons in modulating the dynamics of the vestibulo-ocular reflex (VOR) during normal and adaptive conditions.

  14. An overview of the neuron ring model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taber, Rod

    1991-01-01

    The Neuron Ring model employs an avalanche structure with two important distinctions at the neuron level. Each neuron has two memory latches; one traps maximum neuronal activation during pattern presentation, and the other records the time of latch content change. The latches filter short term memory. In the process, they preserve length 1 snapshots of activation theory history. The model finds utility in pattern classification. Its synaptic weights are first conditioned with sample spectra. The model then receives a test or unknown signal. The objective is to identify the sample closest to the test signal. Class decision follows complete presentation of the test data. The decision maker relies exclusively on the latch contents. Presented here is an overview of the Neuron Ring at the seminar level.

  15. Attractor dynamics in local neuronal networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jean-Philippe eThivierge

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Patterns of synaptic connectivity in various regions of the brain are characterized by the presence of synaptic motifs, defined as unidirectional and bidirectional synaptic contacts that follow a particular configuration and link together small groups of neurons. Recent computational work proposes that a relay network (two populations communicating via a third, relay population of neurons can generate precise patterns of neural synchronization. Here, we employ two distinct models of neuronal dynamics and show that simulated neural circuits designed in this way are caught in a global attractor of activity that prevents neurons from modulating their response on the basis of incoming stimuli. To circumvent the emergence of a fixed global attractor, we propose a mechanism of selective gain inhibition that promotes flexible responses to external stimuli. We suggest that local neuronal circuits may employ this mechanism to generate precise patterns of neural synchronization whose transient nature delimits the occurrence of a brief stimulus.

  16. Central auditory neurons have composite receptive fields.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, Andrei S; Gentner, Timothy Q

    2016-02-01

    High-level neurons processing complex, behaviorally relevant signals are sensitive to conjunctions of features. Characterizing the receptive fields of such neurons is difficult with standard statistical tools, however, and the principles governing their organization remain poorly understood. Here, we demonstrate multiple distinct receptive-field features in individual high-level auditory neurons in a songbird, European starling, in response to natural vocal signals (songs). We then show that receptive fields with similar characteristics can be reproduced by an unsupervised neural network trained to represent starling songs with a single learning rule that enforces sparseness and divisive normalization. We conclude that central auditory neurons have composite receptive fields that can arise through a combination of sparseness and normalization in neural circuits. Our results, along with descriptions of random, discontinuous receptive fields in the central olfactory neurons in mammals and insects, suggest general principles of neural computation across sensory systems and animal classes. PMID:26787894

  17. Differentiation of fetal pancreatic stem cells into neuron-like and islet-like cells in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiufeng Hua; Yanwei Wang; Peiwen Lian; Shouxin Zhang; Jianyuan Li; Haiyan Wang; Shulin Chen; Wei Gao

    2012-01-01

    Pancreatic stem cells were isolated and cultured from aborted human fetal pancreases of gestational age 14-20 weeks.They were seeded at a density of 1 × 104 in serum-free media for differentiation into neuron-like cells, expressing β-tubulin III and glial fibrillary acidic protein.These neuron-like cells displayed a synapse-like morphology and appeared to form a neuronal network.Pancreatic stem cells were also seeded at a density of 1 × 105 for differentiation into islet-like cells, expressing insulin and glucagon, with an islet-like morphology.These cells had glucose-stimulated secretion of human insulin and C-peptide.Results suggest that pancreatic stem cells can be differentiated into neuron-like and islet-like cells.

  18. Effect of immobilization stress on gene expression of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes in heart auricles of socially isolated rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Gavrilovic

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic stress is associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases. The sympathoneural system plays an important role in the regulation of cardiac function both in health and disease. In the present study, the changes in gene expression of the catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT and protein levels in the right and left heart auricles of naive control and long-term (12 weeks socially isolated rats were investigated by Taqman RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. The response of these animals to additional immobilization stress (2 h was also examined. Long-term social isolation produced a decrease in TH mRNA level in left auricles (about 70% compared to the corresponding control. Expression of the DBH gene was markedly decreased both in the right (about 62% and left (about 81% auricles compared to the corresponding control, group-maintained rats, whereas PNMT mRNA levels remained unchanged. Exposure of group-housed rats to acute immobilization for 2 h led to a significant increase of mRNA levels of TH (about 267%, DBH (about 37% and PNMT (about 60% only in the right auricles. Additional 2-h immobilization of individually housed rats did not affect gene expression of these enzymes in either the right or left auricle. Protein levels of TH, DBH and PNMT in left and right heart auricles were unchanged either in both individually housed and immobilized rats. The unchanged mRNA levels of the enzymes examined after short-term immobilization suggest that the catecholaminergic system of the heart auricles of animals previously exposed to chronic psychosocial stress was adapted to maintain appropriate cardiovascular homeostasis.

  19. Quo vadis motor neuron disease?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balendra, Rubika; Patani, Rickie

    2016-03-26

    Motor neuron disease (MND), also known as amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, is a relentlessly progressive neurodegenerative condition that is invariably fatal, usually within 3 to 5 years of diagnosis. The aetio-pathogenesis of MND remains unresolved and no effective treatments exist. The only Food and Drug Administration approved disease modifying therapy is riluzole, a glutamate antagonist, which prolongs survival by up to 3 mo. Current management is largely symptomatic/supportive. There is therefore a desperate and unmet clinical need for discovery of disease mechanisms to guide novel therapeutic strategy. In this review, we start by introducing the organizational anatomy of the motor system, before providing a clinical overview of its dysfunction specifically in MND. We then summarize insights gained from pathological, genetic and animal models and conclude by speculating on optimal strategies to drive the step change in discovery, which is so desperately needed in this arena. PMID:27019797

  20. Properties of BK-type Ca++-dependent K+ channel currents in medial prefrontal cortex (PFC pyramidal neurons in rats of different ages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bartłomiej Paweł Szulczyk

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available The medial prefrontal cortex (PFC is involved in cognitive functions, which undergo profound changes during adolescence. This alteration of the PFC function derives from neuron activity, which, in turn, may depend on age-dependent properties and the expression of neuronal ion channels. BK-type channels are involved in controlling both the Ca++ ion concentration in the cell interior and cell excitability. The purpose of this study was to test the properties of BK currents in the medial PFC pyramidal neurons of young (18–22-day-old, adolescent (38–42-day-old and adult (58–62-day-old rats. Whole-cell currents evoked by depolarizing voltage steps were recorded from dispersed medial PFC pyramidal neurons. A selective BK channel blocker – paxilline (10 µM – irreversibly decreased the non-inactivating K+ current in neurons that were isolated from the young and adult rats. This current was not significantly affected by paxilline in the neurons obtained from adolescent rats. The properties of single-channel K+ currents were recorded from the soma of dispersed medial PFC pyramidal neurons in the cell-attached configuration. Of the K+ channel currents that were recorded, ~90% were BK and leak channel currents. The BK-type channel currents were dependent on the Ca++ concentration and the voltage and were inhibited by paxilline. The biophysical properties of the BK channel currents did not differ among the pyramidal neurons isolated from young, adolescent and adult rats. Among all of the recorded K+ channel currents, 38.9%, 12.7% and 21.1% were BK-type channel currents in the neurons isolated from the young, adolescent and adult rats, respectively. Furthermore, application of paxilline effectively prolonged the half-width of the action potential in pyramidal neurons in slices isolated from young and adult rats but not in neurons isolated from adolescent rats. We conclude that the availability of BK channel currents decreases in medial PFC

  1. Investigation of mitochondrial dysfunction by sequential microplate-based respiration measurements from intact and permeabilized neurons.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascaline Clerc

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial dysfunction is a component of many neurodegenerative conditions. Measurement of oxygen consumption from intact neurons enables evaluation of mitochondrial bioenergetics under conditions that are more physiologically realistic compared to isolated mitochondria. However, mechanistic analysis of mitochondrial function in cells is complicated by changing energy demands and lack of substrate control. Here we describe a technique for sequentially measuring respiration from intact and saponin-permeabilized cortical neurons on single microplates. This technique allows control of substrates to individual electron transport chain complexes following permeabilization, as well as side-by-side comparisons to intact cells. To illustrate the utility of the technique, we demonstrate that inhibition of respiration by the drug KB-R7943 in intact neurons is relieved by delivery of the complex II substrate succinate, but not by complex I substrates, via acute saponin permeabilization. In contrast, methyl succinate, a putative cell permeable complex II substrate, failed to rescue respiration in intact neurons and was a poor complex II substrate in permeabilized cells. Sequential measurements of intact and permeabilized cell respiration should be particularly useful for evaluating indirect mitochondrial toxicity due to drugs or cellular signaling events which cannot be readily studied using isolated mitochondria.

  2. Evidence for homologous peptidergic neurons in the buccal ganglia of diverse nudibranch mollusks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, W H; Willows, A O

    1992-03-01

    The buccal ganglia of seven nudibranches (Aeolidia papillosa, Armina californica, Dirona albolineata, D. picta, Hermissenda crassicornis, Melibe leonina, and Tritonia diomedea) were examined to explore possible homologies between large cells that reacted with antibodies directed against small cardioactive peptide B (SCPB). The buccal ganglion of each species possessed a pair of large, dorsal-lateral, whitish neurons that contained an SCPB-like peptide. We refer to these neurons as the SLB (SCPB-immunoreactive Large Buccal) cells. In all species examined, the SLB cells project out the gastroesophageal nerves and appear to innervate the esophagus. In each species, an apparent rhythmic feeding motor program (FMP) was observed by intracellular recording from both SLB neurons and other neurons in isolated preparations of the buccal ganglia. SLB cells often fire at a high frequency, and usually burst in a specific phase relation to the FMP activity. Stimulation of SLB cells enhances expression of the feeding motor program, either by potentiating existing activity or eliciting the FMP in quiescent preparations. Finally, perfusion of isolated buccal ganglia with SCPB excites the SLB cells and activates FMPs. Thus, both the immunohistochemical and electrophysiological data suggest that the SLB cells within three suborders of the opisthobranchia (Dendronotacea, Arminacea, and Aeolidacea) are homologous. A comparison of our data with previously published studies indicates that SLB cell homologs may exist in other gastropods as well. PMID:1527526

  3. Cloned myogenic cells can transdifferentiate in vivo into neuron-like cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachel Sarig

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The question of whether intact somatic cells committed to a specific differentiation fate, can be reprogrammed in vivo by exposing them to a different host microenvironment is a matter of controversy. Many reports on transdifferentiation could be explained by fusion with host cells or reflect intrinsic heterogeneity of the donor cell population. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have tested the capacity of cloned populations of mouse and human muscle progenitor cells, committed to the myogenic pathway, to transdifferentiate to neurons, following their inoculation into the developing brain of newborn mice. Both cell types migrated into various brain regions, and a fraction of them gained a neuronal morphology and expressed neuronal or glial markers. Likewise, inoculated cloned human myogenic cells expressed a human specific neurofilament protein. Brain injected donor cells that expressed a YFP transgene controlled by a neuronal specific promoter, were isolated by FACS. The isolated cells had a wild-type diploid DNA content. CONCLUSIONS: These and other results indicate a genuine transdifferentiation phenomenon induced by the host brain microenvironment and not by fusion with host cells. The results may potentially be relevant to the prospect of autologous cell therapy approach for CNS diseases.

  4. Effect of cholecystokinin on experimental neuronal aging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Jiang Sun; Qin-Chi Lu; Yan Cai

    2005-01-01

    AIM: To observe the effect of cholecystokinin (CCK) on lipofusin value, neuronal dendrite and spine ultrastructure, and total cellular protein during the process of experimental neuronal aging.METHODS: Experimental neuronal aging study model was established by NBA2cellular serum-free culture method. By using single irtracellular lipofusin value from microspectrophotometry,morphology of neuronal dendrites and spines from the scanner electron microscopy, and total cellular protein as the indexes of experimental neuronal aging, we observed the effect of CCK8 on the process of experimental neuronal aging.RESULTS: Under the condition of serum-free culture,intracellular fluorescence value (%) increased with the extension of culture time (1 d 8.51±3.43; 5 d 10.12±3.03;10 d 20.54±10.3; 15 d 36.88±10.49; bP<0.01). When CCK was added to serum-free culture medium, intracellular lipofusin value (%) decreased remarkably after consecutive CCK reaction for 10 and 15 d (control 36.88±10.49; 5 d 32.03±10.01; 10 d 14.37±5.55; 15 d 17.31±4.80; bP<0.01).As the time of serum-free culturing was prolonged, the number of neuronal dendrite and spine cells decreased.The later increased in number when CCK8 was added. CCK8 could improve the total cellular protein in the process of experimental neuronal aging.CONCLUSION: CCK8 may prolong the process of experimental neuronal aging by maintaining the structure and the number of neuronal dendrite and spine cells and changing the total cellular protein.

  5. Three-dimensional nanofibrillar surfaces covalently modified with tenascin-C-derived peptides enhance neuronal growth in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmed, Ijaz; Liu, Hsing-Yin; Mamiya, Ping C; Ponery, Abdul S; Babu, Ashwin N; Weik, Thom; Schindler, Melvin; Meiners, Sally

    2006-03-15

    Current methods to promote growth of cultured neurons use two-dimensional (2D) glass or polystyrene surfaces coated with a charged molecule (e.g. poly-L-lysine (PLL)) or an isolated extracellular matrix (ECM) protein (e.g. laminin-1). However, these 2D surfaces represent a poor topological approximation of the three-dimensional (3D) architecture of the assembled ECM that regulates neuronal growth in vivo. Here we report on the development of a new 3D synthetic nanofibrillar surface for the culture of neurons. This nanofibrillar surface is composed of polyamide nanofibers whose organization mimics the porosity and geometry of the ECM. Neuronal adhesion and neurite outgrowth from cerebellar granule, cerebral cortical, hippocampal, motor, and dorsal root ganglion neurons were similar on nanofibers and PLL-coated glass coverslips; however, neurite generation was increased. Moreover, covalent modification of the nanofibers with neuroactive peptides derived from human tenascin-C significantly enhanced the ability of the nanofibers to facilitate neuronal attachment, neurite generation, and neurite extension in vitro. Hence the 3D nanofibrillar surface provides a physically and chemically stabile cell culture surface for neurons and, potentially, an exciting new opportunity for the development of peptide-modified matrices for use in strategies designed to encourage axonal regrowth following central nervous system injury. PMID:16345089

  6. Distinct functional and temporal requirements for zebrafish Hdac1 during neural crest-derived craniofacial and peripheral neuron development.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Myron S Ignatius

    Full Text Available The regulation of gene expression is accomplished by both genetic and epigenetic means and is required for the precise control of the development of the neural crest. In hdac1(b382 mutants, craniofacial cartilage development is defective in two distinct ways. First, fewer hoxb3a, dlx2 and dlx3-expressing posterior branchial arch precursors are specified and many of those that are consequently undergo apoptosis. Second, in contrast, normal numbers of progenitors are present in the anterior mandibular and hyoid arches, but chondrocyte precursors fail to terminally differentiate. In the peripheral nervous system, there is a disruption of enteric, DRG and sympathetic neuron differentiation in hdac1(b382 mutants compared to wildtype embryos. Specifically, enteric and DRG-precursors differentiate into neurons in the anterior gut and trunk respectively, while enteric and DRG neurons are rarely present in the posterior gut and tail. Sympathetic neuron precursors are specified in hdac1(b382 mutants and they undergo generic neuronal differentiation but fail to undergo noradrenergic differentiation. Using the HDAC inhibitor TSA, we isolated enzyme activity and temporal requirements for HDAC function that reproduce hdac1(b382 defects in craniofacial and sympathetic neuron development. Our study reveals distinct functional and temporal requirements for zebrafish hdac1 during neural crest-derived craniofacial and peripheral neuron development.

  7. Calcium activity of upper thoracic dorsal root ganglion neurons in zucker diabetic Fatty rats

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ghorbani, Marie Louise; Nyborg, Niels C B; Fjalland, Bjarne;

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to examine the calcium activity of C8-T5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from Zucker diabetic fatty rats. In total, 8 diabetic ZDF fatty animals and 8 age-matched control ZDF lean rats were employed in the study. C8-T5 dorsal root ganglia were isolated bilatera......The aim of the present study was to examine the calcium activity of C8-T5 dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons from Zucker diabetic fatty rats. In total, 8 diabetic ZDF fatty animals and 8 age-matched control ZDF lean rats were employed in the study. C8-T5 dorsal root ganglia were isolated...

  8. Information Transmission in a Neuron-Astrocyte Coupled Model

    OpenAIRE

    Tang, Jun; Luo, Jin-Ming; Ma, Jun

    2013-01-01

    A coupled model containing two neurons and one astrocyte is constructed by integrating Hodgkin-Huxley neuronal model and Li-Rinzel calcium model. Based on this hybrid model, information transmission between neurons is studied numerically. Our results show that when the successive spikes are produced in neuron 1 (N1), the bursting-like spikes (BLSs) occur in two neurons simultaneously during the spikes being transferred to neuron 2 (N2). The existence of the astrocyte and a higher expression l...

  9. Generation of sensory neurons is stimulated by leukemia inhibitory factor.

    OpenAIRE

    M. Murphy; Reid, K.; Hilton, D J; Bartlett, P F

    1991-01-01

    The processes that regulate the development of peripheral neurons from their precursors in the embryonic neural crest are essentially unknown. In this report, we show that leukemia inhibitory factor stimulates the generation of neurons in cultures of mouse neural crest. These neurons have the morphology of sensory neurons and contain neuropeptides found in mammalian sensory neurons. Consistent with these neurons being of the sensory lineage is the finding that they arise from nondividing prec...

  10. A proposal for the morphological classification and nomenclature of neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong Jiang; Qiang Liu; Quan Liu; Shenquan Liu

    2011-01-01

    The morphological and functional characteristics of neurons are quite varied and complex. There is a need for a comprehensive approach for distinguishing and classifying neurons. Similar to the biological species classification system, this study proposes a morphological classification system for neurons based on principal component analysis. Based on four principal components of neuronal morphology derived from principal component analysis, a nomenclature system for neurons was obtained. This system can accurately distinguish between the same type of neuron from different species.

  11. Isolation of a diterpenoid substance with potent neuroprotective activity from fetal calf serum

    OpenAIRE

    Kume, Toshiaki; Asai, Naoki; Nishikawa, Hiroyuki; Mano, Nariyasu; Terauchi, Taro; Taguchi, Ryota; Shirakawa, Hisashi; Osakada, Fumitaka; Mori, Hiroki; Asakawa, Naoki; Yonaga, Masahiro; Nishizawa, Yukio; Sugimoto, Hachiro; Shimohama, Shun; Katsuki, Hiroshi

    2002-01-01

    Excess activation of glutamate receptors and production of free radicals including nitric oxide may result in severe and irreversible damage to the mammalian central nervous system (CNS), but endogenous defense systems that protect neurons from these insults are poorly understood. Here, we purified and isolated a neuroprotective substance, which has been named “serofendic acid,” from a lipophilic fraction of FCS based on the ability to protect rat primary cortical neurons against nitric oxide...

  12. Isolation of Enteric Ganglia from the Myenteric Plexus of Adult Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Jaeger, Christine B.

    1994-01-01

    Enteric neurons and glia cells were isolated from adult Sprague Dawley rats. A procedure is described using a combination of microdissection and mechanical dissociation after enzyme treatment which yields large numbers of cell clusters suitable for tissue culture and grafting into the injured spinal cord. Differentiated enteric ganglia remained viable for at least 5 days in vitro Cultured neurons expressed histochemical reactivity for acetylcholinesterase and nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide...

  13. Enhanced excitability of small dorsal root ganglion neurons in rats with bone cancer pain

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Qin

    2012-04-01

    cancer rats. In addiotion, immunofluorescent staining and single-cell reverse-transcriptase PCR revealed that in isolated small DRG neurons, most neurons were IB4-positive, or expressed TRPV1 or CGRP, indicating that most recorded small DRG neurons were nociceptive neurons. Finally, using in vivo behavioral test, we found that blockade of DRG neurons activity by TTX inhibited the tumor-evoked mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia in bone cancer rats, implicating that the enhanced excitability of primary sensory neurons underlied the development of bone cancer pain. Conclusions Our present results suggest that implantation of tumor cells into the tibial canal in rats induces an enhanced excitability of small-sized DRG neurons that is probably as results of alterations in intrinsic electrogenic properties of these neurons. Therefore, alterations in intrinsic membrane properties associated with the hyperexcitability of primary sensory neurons likely contribute to the peripheral sensitization and tumor-induced hyperalgesia under cancer condition.

  14. Death of Neurons following Injury Requires Conductive Neuronal Gap Junction Channels but Not a Specific Connexin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fontes, Joseph D; Ramsey, Jon; Polk, Jeremy M; Koop, Andre; Denisova, Janna V; Belousov, Andrei B

    2015-01-01

    Pharmacological blockade or genetic knockout of neuronal connexin 36 (Cx36)-containing gap junctions reduces neuronal death caused by ischemia, traumatic brain injury and NMDA receptor (NMDAR)-mediated excitotoxicity. However, whether Cx36 gap junctions contribute to neuronal death via channel-dependent or channel-independent mechanism remains an open question. To address this, we manipulated connexin protein expression via lentiviral transduction of mouse neuronal cortical cultures and analyzed neuronal death twenty-four hours following administration of NMDA (a model of NMDAR excitotoxicity) or oxygen-glucose deprivation (a model of ischemic injury). In cultures prepared from wild-type mice, over-expression and knockdown of Cx36-containing gap junctions augmented and prevented, respectively, neuronal death from NMDAR-mediated excitotoxicity and ischemia. In cultures obtained form from Cx36 knockout mice, re-expression of functional gap junction channels, containing either neuronal Cx36 or non-neuronal Cx43 or Cx31, resulted in increased neuronal death following insult. In contrast, the expression of communication-deficient gap junctions (containing mutated connexins) did not have this effect. Finally, the absence of ethidium bromide uptake in non-transduced wild-type neurons two hours following NMDAR excitotoxicity or ischemia suggested the absence of active endogenous hemichannels in those neurons. Taken together, these results suggest a role for neuronal gap junctions in cell death via a connexin type-independent mechanism that likely relies on channel activities of gap junctional complexes among neurons. A possible contribution of gap junction channel-permeable death signals in neuronal death is discussed. PMID:26017008

  15. Clinico-investigative profile of infantile and late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinoses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahesh Kamate

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis is a group of progressive neurodegenerative disorders characterized by accumulation of ceroid lipopigment in lysosomes in neurons and other cell types. This study is a retrospective review of charts of patients with a diagnosis of infantile and late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis seen between January 2009 and December 2011. Of the 16 patients, 5 had infantile type and 11 had late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis. Diagnosis was confirmed by appropriate enzyme assay. Clinical presentation was quite varied. Common presenting features included refractory seizures, developmental delay/regression, and abnormal movements. Visual failure was not common in the present case series, and novel neuroimaging finding in the form of isolated dentate nucleus hyperintensities were noted. During follow-up, all patients had a progressive downhill course and one patient died. Prenatal diagnosis could be offered to one family. This study suggests that infantile and late-infantile neuronal ceroid lipofuscinosis is not uncommon in this region of the country and the phenotype may be different.

  16. AlGaN/GaN-based HEMTs for electrical stimulation of neuronal cell cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Unipolar source-drain voltage pulses of GaN/AlGaN-high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) were used for stimulation of cultured neuronal networks obtained from embryonic rat cerebral cortex. The HEMT sensor was grown by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy on a 2 inch sapphire substrate consisting of 10 single HEMTs concentrically arranged around the wafer centre. Electrolytic reactions between the HEMT sensor surface and the culture medium were not detected using cyclic voltammetry. During voltage pulses and resulting neuronal excitation, capacitances were recharged giving indications of the contributions of the AlGaN and AlOx isolation layers between the two-dimensional electron gas channel and the neuron culture. The resulting threshold current for stimulation of neuron activity strongly depended on the culture and HEMT position on the sensor surface under consideration which was caused by different impedances of each neuron culture and position within the culture. The differences of culture impedances could be explained by variations of composition, thickness and conductivity of the culture areas.

  17. Double labelling immunohistochemical characterization of autonomic sympathetic neurons innervating the sow retractor clitoridis muscle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L Ragionieri

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Retrograde neuronal tracing and immunohistochemical methods were used to define the neurochemical content of sympathetic neurons projecting to the sow retractor clitoridis muscle (RCM. Differently from the other smooth muscles of genital organs, the RCM is an isolated muscle that is tonically contracted in the rest phase and relaxed in the active phase. This peculiarity makes it an interesting experimental model. The fluorescent tracer fast blue was injected into the RCM of three 50 kg subjects. After a one-week survival period, the ipsilateral paravertebral ganglion S1, that in a preliminary study showed the greatest number of cells projecting to the muscle, was collected from each animal. The co-existence of tyrosine hydroxylase with choline acetyltransferase, neuronal nitric oxide synthase, calcitonin gene-related peptide, leuenkephalin, neuropeptide Y, substance P and vasoactive intestinal polypeptide was studied under a fluorescent microscope on cryostat sections. Tyrosine hydroxylase was present in about 58% of the neurons projecting to the muscle and was found to be co-localized with each of the other tested substances.Within fast blue-labelled cells negative to the adrenergic marker, small populations of neurons singularly containing each of the other enzymatic markers or peptides were also observed. The present study documents the complexity of the neurochemical interactions that regulate the activity of the smooth myocytes of the RCM and their vascular components.

  18. Automated computation of arbor densities: a step toward identifying neuronal cell types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Uygar eSümbül

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The shape and position of a neuron convey information regarding its molecular and functional identity. The identification of cell types from structure, a classic method, relies on the time-consuming step of arbor tracing. However, as genetic tools and imaging methods make data-driven approaches to neuronal circuit analysis feasible, the need for automated processing increases. Here, we first establish that mouse retinal ganglion cell types can be as precise about distributing their arbor volumes across the inner plexiform layer as they are about distributing the skeletons of the arbors. Then, we describe an automated approach to computing the spatial distribution of the dendritic arbors, or arbor density, with respect to a global depth coordinate based on this observation. Our method involves three-dimensional reconstruction of neuronal arbors by a supervised machine learning algorithm, post-processing of the enhanced stacks to remove somata and isolate the neuron of interest, and registration of neurons to each other using automatically detected arbors of the starburst amacrine interneurons as fiducial markers. In principle, this method could be generalizable to other structures of the CNS, provided that they allow sparse labeling of the cells and contain a reliable axis of spatial reference.

  19. Lymphocytes with cytotoxic activity induce rapid microtubule axonal destabilization independently and before signs of neuronal death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arundhati Jana

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available MS (multiple sclerosis is the most prevalent autoimmune disease of the CNS (central nervous system historically characterized as an inflammatory and demyelinating disease. More recently, extensive neuronal pathology has lead to its classification as a neurodegenerative disease as well. While the immune system initiates the autoimmune response it remains unclear how it orchestrates neuronal damage. In our previous studies, using in vitro cultured embryonic neurons, we demonstrated that MBP (myelin basic protein-specific encephalitogenic CD4 T-cells induce early neuronal damage. In an extension of those studies, here we show that polarized CD4 Th1 and Th17 cells as wells as CD8 T-cells and NK (natural killer cells induce microtubule destabilization within neurites in a contact-independent manner. Owing to the cytotoxic potential of these immune cells, we isolated the luminal components of lytic granules and determined that they were sufficient to drive microtubule destabilization. Since lytic granules contain cytolytic proteins, we determined that the induction of microtubule destabilization occurred prior to signs of apoptosis. Furthermore, we determined that microtubule destabilization was largely restricted to axons, sparing dendrites. This study demonstrated that lymphocytes with cytolytic activity have the capacity to directly drive MAD (microtubule axonal destabilization in a bystander manner that is independent of neuronal death.

  20. Information in a Network of Neuronal Cells: Effect of Cell Density and Short-Term Depression

    KAUST Repository

    Onesto, Valentina

    2016-05-10

    Neurons are specialized, electrically excitable cells which use electrical to chemical signals to transmit and elaborate information. Understanding how the cooperation of a great many of neurons in a grid may modify and perhaps improve the information quality, in contrast to few neurons in isolation, is critical for the rational design of cell-materials interfaces for applications in regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, and personalized lab-on-a-chips. In the present paper, we couple an integrate-and-fire model with information theory variables to analyse the extent of information in a network of nerve cells. We provide an estimate of the information in the network in bits as a function of cell density and short-term depression time. In the model, neurons are connected through a Delaunay triangulation of not-intersecting edges; in doing so, the number of connecting synapses per neuron is approximately constant to reproduce the early time of network development in planar neural cell cultures. In simulations where the number of nodes is varied, we observe an optimal value of cell density for which information in the grid is maximized. In simulations in which the posttransmission latency time is varied, we observe that information increases as the latency time decreases and, for specific configurations of the grid, it is largely enhanced in a resonance effect.

  1. Information in a Network of Neuronal Cells: Effect of Cell Density and Short-Term Depression

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onesto, Valentina; Cosentino, Carlo; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Cesarelli, Mario; Amato, Francesco; Gentile, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Neurons are specialized, electrically excitable cells which use electrical to chemical signals to transmit and elaborate information. Understanding how the cooperation of a great many of neurons in a grid may modify and perhaps improve the information quality, in contrast to few neurons in isolation, is critical for the rational design of cell-materials interfaces for applications in regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, and personalized lab-on-a-chips. In the present paper, we couple an integrate-and-fire model with information theory variables to analyse the extent of information in a network of nerve cells. We provide an estimate of the information in the network in bits as a function of cell density and short-term depression time. In the model, neurons are connected through a Delaunay triangulation of not-intersecting edges; in doing so, the number of connecting synapses per neuron is approximately constant to reproduce the early time of network development in planar neural cell cultures. In simulations where the number of nodes is varied, we observe an optimal value of cell density for which information in the grid is maximized. In simulations in which the posttransmission latency time is varied, we observe that information increases as the latency time decreases and, for specific configurations of the grid, it is largely enhanced in a resonance effect.

  2. Information in a Network of Neuronal Cells: Effect of Cell Density and Short-Term Depression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Onesto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Neurons are specialized, electrically excitable cells which use electrical to chemical signals to transmit and elaborate information. Understanding how the cooperation of a great many of neurons in a grid may modify and perhaps improve the information quality, in contrast to few neurons in isolation, is critical for the rational design of cell-materials interfaces for applications in regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, and personalized lab-on-a-chips. In the present paper, we couple an integrate-and-fire model with information theory variables to analyse the extent of information in a network of nerve cells. We provide an estimate of the information in the network in bits as a function of cell density and short-term depression time. In the model, neurons are connected through a Delaunay triangulation of not-intersecting edges; in doing so, the number of connecting synapses per neuron is approximately constant to reproduce the early time of network development in planar neural cell cultures. In simulations where the number of nodes is varied, we observe an optimal value of cell density for which information in the grid is maximized. In simulations in which the posttransmission latency time is varied, we observe that information increases as the latency time decreases and, for specific configurations of the grid, it is largely enhanced in a resonance effect.

  3. Information in a Network of Neuronal Cells: Effect of Cell Density and Short-Term Depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onesto, Valentina; Cosentino, Carlo; Di Fabrizio, Enzo; Cesarelli, Mario; Amato, Francesco; Gentile, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Neurons are specialized, electrically excitable cells which use electrical to chemical signals to transmit and elaborate information. Understanding how the cooperation of a great many of neurons in a grid may modify and perhaps improve the information quality, in contrast to few neurons in isolation, is critical for the rational design of cell-materials interfaces for applications in regenerative medicine, tissue engineering, and personalized lab-on-a-chips. In the present paper, we couple an integrate-and-fire model with information theory variables to analyse the extent of information in a network of nerve cells. We provide an estimate of the information in the network in bits as a function of cell density and short-term depression time. In the model, neurons are connected through a Delaunay triangulation of not-intersecting edges; in doing so, the number of connecting synapses per neuron is approximately constant to reproduce the early time of network development in planar neural cell cultures. In simulations where the number of nodes is varied, we observe an optimal value of cell density for which information in the grid is maximized. In simulations in which the posttransmission latency time is varied, we observe that information increases as the latency time decreases and, for specific configurations of the grid, it is largely enhanced in a resonance effect. PMID:27403421

  4. AlGaN/GaN-based HEMTs for electrical stimulation of neuronal cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Witte, H; Warnke, C; Krost, A [Institute of Experimental Physics, Otto-von-Guericke-University-Magdeburg, Magdeburg (Germany); Voigt, T; De Lima, A [Institute for Physiology, Otto-von-Guericke-University-Magdeburg, Magdeburg (Germany); Ivanov, I; Vidakovic-Koch, T R; Sundmacher, K, E-mail: hartmut.witte@physik.uni-magdeburg.de [Process Systems Engineering, Otto-von-Guericke-University-Magdeburg, Magdeburg (Germany)

    2011-09-07

    Unipolar source-drain voltage pulses of GaN/AlGaN-high electron mobility transistors (HEMTs) were used for stimulation of cultured neuronal networks obtained from embryonic rat cerebral cortex. The HEMT sensor was grown by metal organic vapour phase epitaxy on a 2 inch sapphire substrate consisting of 10 single HEMTs concentrically arranged around the wafer centre. Electrolytic reactions between the HEMT sensor surface and the culture medium were not detected using cyclic voltammetry. During voltage pulses and resulting neuronal excitation, capacitances were recharged giving indications of the contributions of the AlGaN and AlO{sub x} isolation layers between the two-dimensional electron gas channel and the neuron culture. The resulting threshold current for stimulation of neuron activity strongly depended on the culture and HEMT position on the sensor surface under consideration which was caused by different impedances of each neuron culture and position within the culture. The differences of culture impedances could be explained by variations of composition, thickness and conductivity of the culture areas.

  5. Acute stress increases interstitial fluid amyloid-β via corticotropin-releasing factor and neuronal activity

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Jae-Eun; Cirrito, John R.; Dong, Hongxin; John G. Csernansky; Holtzman, David M.

    2007-01-01

    Aggregation of the amyloid-β (Aβ) peptide in the extracellular space of the brain is critical in the pathogenesis of Alzheimer's disease. Aβ is produced by neurons and released into the brain interstitial fluid (ISF), a process regulated by synaptic activity. To determine whether behavioral stressors can regulate ISF Aβ levels, we assessed the effects of chronic and acute stress paradigms in amyloid precursor protein transgenic mice. Isolation stress over 3 months increased Aβ levels by 84%. ...

  6. SNAP-29-mediated Modulation of Synaptic Transmission in Cultured Hippocampal Neurons*

    OpenAIRE

    Pan, Ping-Yue; Cai, Qian; Lin, Lin; Lu, Pei-Hua; Duan, Shumin; Sheng, Zu-Hang

    2005-01-01

    Identifying the molecules that regulate both the recycling of synaptic vesicles and the SNARE components required for fusion is critical for elucidating the molecular mechanisms underlying synaptic plasticity. SNAP-29 was initially isolated as a syntaxin-binding and ubiquitously expressed protein. Previous studies have suggested that SNAP-29 inhibits SNARE complex disassembly, thereby reducing synaptic transmission in cultured superior cervical ganglion neurons in an activity-dependent manner...

  7. Attachment to an endogenous laminin-like protein initiates sprouting by leech neurons

    OpenAIRE

    1988-01-01

    Leech neurons in culture sprout rapidly when attached to extracts from connective tissue surrounding the nervous system. Laminin-like molecules that promote sprouting have now been isolated from this extracellular matrix. Two mAbs have been prepared that react on immunoblots with a approximately equal to 220- and a approximately equal to 340-kD polypeptide, respectively. These antibodies have been used to purify molecules with cross-shaped structures in the electron microscope. The molecules,...

  8. Firing dynamics of an autaptic neuron

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Heng-Tong; Chen, Yong

    2015-12-01

    Autapses are synapses that connect a neuron to itself in the nervous system. Previously, both experimental and theoretical studies have demonstrated that autaptic connections in the nervous system have a significant physiological function. Autapses in nature provide self-delayed feedback, thus introducing an additional timescale to neuronal activities and causing many dynamic behaviors in neurons. Recently, theoretical studies have revealed that an autapse provides a control option for adjusting the response of a neuron: e.g., an autaptic connection can cause the electrical activities of the Hindmarsh-Rose neuron to switch between quiescent, periodic, and chaotic firing patterns; an autapse can enhance or suppress the mode-locking status of a neuron injected with sinusoidal current; and the firing frequency and interspike interval distributions of the response spike train can also be modified by the autapse. In this paper, we review recent studies that showed how an autapse affects the response of a single neuron. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant Nos. 11275084 and 11447027) and the Fundamental Research Funds for the Central Universities, China (Grant No. GK201503025).

  9. Parabrachial CGRP Neurons Control Meal Termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Carlos A; Bowen, Anna J; Schwartz, Michael W; Palmiter, Richard D

    2016-05-10

    The lateral parabrachial nucleus is a conduit for visceral signals that cause anorexia. We previously identified a subset of neurons located in the external lateral parabrachial nucleus (PBel) that express calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) and inhibit feeding when activated by illness mimetics. We report here that in otherwise normal mice, functional inactivation of CGRP neurons markedly increases meal size, with meal frequency being reduced in a compensatory manner, and renders mice insensitive to the anorexic effects of meal-related satiety peptides. Furthermore, CGRP neurons are directly innervated by orexigenic hypothalamic AgRP neurons, and photostimulation of AgRP fibers supplying the PBel delays satiation by inhibiting CGRP neurons, thereby contributing to AgRP-driven hyperphagia. By establishing a role for CGRP neurons in the control of meal termination and as a downstream mediator of feeding elicited by AgRP neurons, these findings identify a node in which hunger and satiety circuits interact to control feeding behavior. PMID:27166945

  10. Carboxylation and anaplerosis in neurons and glia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassel, B

    2000-01-01

    Anaplerosis, or de novo formation of intermediates of the tricarboxylic acid (TCA) cycle, compensates for losses of TCA cycle intermediates, especially alpha-ketoglutarate, from brain cells. Loss of alpha-ketoglutarate occurs through release of glutamate and GABA from neurons and through export of glutamine from glia, because these amino acids are alpha-ketoglutarate derivatives. Anaplerosis in the brain may involve four different carboxylating enzymes: malic enzyme, phosphoenopyruvate carboxykinase (PEPCK), propionyl-CoA carboxylase, and pyruvate carboxylase. Anaplerotic carboxylation was for many years thought to occur only in glia through pyruvate carboxylase; therefore, loss of transmitter glutamate and GABA from neurons was thought to be compensated by uptake of glutamine from glia. Recently, however, anaplerotic pyruvate carboxylation was demonstrated in glutamatergic neurons, meaning that these neurons to some extent can maintain transmitter synthesis independently of glutamine. Malic enzyme, which may carboxylate pyruvate, was recently detected in neurons. The available data suggest that neuronal and glial pyruvate carboxylation could operate at as much as 30% and 40-60% of the TCA cycle rate, respectively. Cerebral carboxylation reactions are probably balanced by decarboxylation reactions,, because cerebral CO2 formation equals O2 consumption. The finding of pyruvate carboxylation in neurons entails a major revision of the concept of the glutamine cycle. PMID:11414279

  11. Glucose Sensing Neurons in the Ventromedial Hypothalamus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa H. Routh

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Neurons whose activity is regulated by glucose are found in a number of brain regions. Glucose-excited (GE neurons increase while glucose-inhibited (GI neurons decrease their action potential frequency as interstitial brain glucose levels increase. We hypothesize that these neurons evolved to sense and respond to severe energy deficit (e.g., fasting that threatens the brains glucose supply. During modern times, they are also important for the restoration of blood glucose levels following insulin-induced hypoglycemia. Our data suggest that impaired glucose sensing by hypothalamic glucose sensing neurons may contribute to the syndrome known as hypoglycemia-associated autonomic failure in which the mechanisms which restore euglycemia following hypoglycemia become impaired. On the other hand, increased responses of glucose sensing neurons to glucose deficit may play a role in the development of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus and obesity. This review will discuss the mechanisms by which glucose sensing neurons sense changes in interstitial glucose and explore the roles of these specialized glucose sensors in glucose and energy homeostasis.

  12. Neurons controlling jumping in froghopper insects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bräunig, Peter; Burrows, Malcolm

    2008-03-01

    The neurons innervating muscles that deliver the enormous power enabling froghopper insects to excel at jumping were revealed by backfilling the nerves from those muscles. The huge trochanteral depressor muscle (M133) of a hind leg consists of four parts. The two largest parts (M133b,c) occupy most of the metathorax and are innervated by the same two motor neurons that have small, laterally placed somata in the metathoracic ganglion and axons in nerve N3C(2). They are also supplied by three dorsal unpaired median (DUM) neurons with the largest diameter somata in the central nervous system. A small metathoracic part of the muscle (M133d) is supplied by two motor neurons with lateral somata and by common inhibitory motor neuron CI(1), all with axons in nerve N3C(3) The motor neuron with the larger soma has a thick primary neurite that projects across the midline of the ganglion so that its branches overlap those of its symmetrical counterpart,innervating the same muscle of the other hind leg. The fourth coxal part of the muscle (M133a) is innervated by two motor neurons (one with a ventral and the other with a dorsal and lateral soma), by CI(1), and by a DUM neuron with a small soma. All have axons in nerve N5A. The two trochanteral levator muscles of a hind leg are contained within the coxa and are separately innervated by nerves N3B and N4, respectively. The properties of the different motor neurons are discussed in the context of the neural patterns that generate jumping. PMID:18095320

  13. The microtubular cytoskeleton of olfactory neurons derived from patients with schizophrenia or with bipolar disorder: Implications for biomarker characterization, neuronal physiology and pharmacological screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benítez-King, G; Valdés-Tovar, M; Trueta, C; Galván-Arrieta, T; Argueta, J; Alarcón, S; Lora-Castellanos, A; Solís-Chagoyán, H

    2016-06-01

    Schizophrenia (SZ) and Bipolar Disorder (BD) are highly inheritable chronic mental disorders with a worldwide prevalence of around 1%. Despite that many efforts had been made to characterize biomarkers in order to allow for biological testing for their diagnoses, these disorders are currently detected and classified only by clinical appraisal based on the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders. Olfactory neuroepithelium-derived neuronal precursors have been recently proposed as a model for biomarker characterization. Because of their peripheral localization, they are amenable to collection and suitable for being cultured and propagated in vitro. Olfactory neuroepithelial cells can be obtained by a non-invasive brush-exfoliation technique from neuropsychiatric patients and healthy subjects. Neuronal precursors isolated from these samples undergo in vitro the cytoskeletal reorganization inherent to the neurodevelopment process which has been described as one important feature in the etiology of both diseases. In this paper, we will review the current knowledge on microtubular organization in olfactory neurons of patients with SZ and with BD that may constitute specific cytoskeletal endophenotypes and their relation with alterations in L-type voltage-activated Ca(2+) currents. Finally, the potential usefulness of neuronal precursors for pharmacological screening will be discussed. PMID:26837043

  14. Tracing lineages to uncover neuronal identity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Perlmann Thomas

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Many previous studies have focused on understanding how midbrain dopamine neurons, which are implicated in many neurological conditions, are generated during embryogenesis. One of the remaining questions concerns how different dopamine neuron subtypes are specified. A recent paper in Neural Development has revealed features of a spatial and temporal lineage map that, together with other studies, begins to elucidate the developmental origin of distinct neuronal subtypes within the developing midbrain. See research article http://www.neuraldevelopment.com/content/6/1/29

  15. Neuron-glia interactions in glutamatergic neurotransmission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schousboe, A; Sickmann, H M; Bak, Lasse Kristoffer;

    2011-01-01

    theses processes also has not been fully elucidated. Cultured astrocytes and neurons were utilized to monitor these processes related to glutamatergic neurotransmission. Inhibitors of glycolysis and TCA cycle in combination with pathway-selective substrates were used to study glutamate uptake and release...... in providing energy for glutamate uptake both in astrocytes and in neurons. The neuronal vesicular glutamate release was less dependent on glycolytic ATP. Dependence of glutamate uptake on glycolytic ATP may be at least partially explained by a close association in the membrane of GAPDH and PGK and...

  16. Associative memory - An optimum binary neuron representation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Awwal, A. A.; Karim, M. A.; Liu, H. K.

    1989-01-01

    Convergence mechanism of vectors in the Hopfield's neural network is studied in terms of both weights (i.e., inner products) and Hamming distance. It is shown that Hamming distance should not always be used in determining the convergence of vectors. Instead, weights (which in turn depend on the neuron representation) are found to play a more dominant role in the convergence mechanism. Consequently, a new binary neuron representation for associative memory is proposed. With the new neuron representation, the associative memory responds unambiguously to the partial input in retrieving the stored information.

  17. Towards the automatic classification of neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armañanzas, Rubén; Ascoli, Giorgio A

    2015-05-01

    The classification of neurons into types has been much debated since the inception of modern neuroscience. Recent experimental advances are accelerating the pace of data collection. The resulting growth of information about morphological, physiological, and molecular properties encourages efforts to automate neuronal classification by powerful machine learning techniques. We review state-of-the-art analysis approaches and the availability of suitable data and resources, highlighting prominent challenges and opportunities. The effective solution of the neuronal classification problem will require continuous development of computational methods, high-throughput data production, and systematic metadata organization to enable cross-laboratory integration. PMID:25765323

  18. Stochastic resonance in mammalian neuronal networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gluckman, Bruce J.; So, Paul; Netoff, Theoden I.; Spano, Mark L.; Schiff, Steven J.

    1998-09-01

    We present stochastic resonance observed in the dynamics of neuronal networks from mammalian brain. Both sinusoidal signals and random noise were superimposed into an applied electric field. As the amplitude of the noise component was increased, an optimization (increase then decrease) in the signal-to-noise ratio of the network response to the sinusoidal signal was observed. The relationship between the measures used to characterize the dynamics is discussed. Finally, a computational model of these neuronal networks that includes the neuronal interactions with the electric field is presented to illustrate the physics behind the essential features of the experiment. (c) 1998 American Institute of Physics. PMID:12779762

  19. Statistical Mechanics Characterization of Neuronal Mosaics

    CERN Document Server

    Costa, Luciano da Fontoura; de Lima, Silene Maria Araujo

    2005-01-01

    The spatial distribution of neuronal cells is an important requirement for achieving proper neuronal function in several parts of the nervous system of most animals. For instance, specific distribution of photoreceptors and related neuronal cells, particularly the ganglion cells, in mammal's retina is required in order to properly sample the projected scene. This work presents how two concepts from the areas of statistical mechanics and complex systems, namely the \\emph{lacunarity} and the \\emph{multiscale entropy} (i.e. the entropy calculated over progressively diffused representations of the cell mosaic), have allowed effective characterization of the spatial distribution of retinal cells.

  20. Stochastic resonance in mammalian neuronal networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present stochastic resonance observed in the dynamics of neuronal networks from mammalian brain. Both sinusoidal signals and random noise were superimposed into an applied electric field. As the amplitude of the noise component was increased, an optimization (increase then decrease) in the signal-to-noise ratio of the network response to the sinusoidal signal was observed. The relationship between the measures used to characterize the dynamics is discussed. Finally, a computational model of these neuronal networks that includes the neuronal interactions with the electric field is presented to illustrate the physics behind the essential features of the experiment. copyright 1998 American Institute of Physics

  1. Neuronal Alignment On Asymmetric Textured Surfaces

    CERN Document Server

    Beighley, Ross; Sekeroglu, Koray; Atherton, Timothy; Demirel, Melik C; Staii, Cristian

    2013-01-01

    Axonal growth and the formation of synaptic connections are key steps in the development of the nervous system. Here we present experimental and theoretical results on axonal growth and interconnectivity in order to elucidate some of the basic rules that neuronal cells use for functional connections with one another. We demonstrate that a unidirectional nanotextured surface can bias axonal growth. We perform a systematic investigation of neuronal processes on asymmetric surfaces and quantify the role that biomechanical surface cues play in neuronal growth. These results represent an important step towards engineering directed axonal growth for neuro-regeneration studies.

  2. Somatostatin-expressing neurons in cortical networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urban-Ciecko, Joanna; Barth, Alison L

    2016-07-01

    Somatostatin-expressing GABAergic neurons constitute a major class of inhibitory neurons in the mammalian cortex and are characterized by dense wiring into the local network and high basal firing activity that persists in the absence of synaptic input. This firing provides both GABA type A receptor (GABAAR)- and GABABR-mediated inhibition that operates at fast and slow timescales. The activity of somatostatin-expressing neurons is regulated by brain state, during learning and in rewarded behaviour. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of how this class of cells can control network activity, with specific reference to how this is constrained by their anatomical and electrophysiological properties. PMID:27225074

  3. Estradiol rapidly modulates odor responses in mouse vomeronasal sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cherian, S; Wai Lam, Y; McDaniels, I; Struziak, M; Delay, R J

    2014-06-01

    In rodents, many social behaviors are driven by the sense of smell. The vomeronasal organ (VNO), part of the accessory olfactory system mediates many of these chemically driven behaviors. The VNO is heavily vascularized, and is readily accessible to circulating peptide or steroid hormones. Potentially, this allows circulating hormones to alter behavior through modulating the output of the primary sensory neurons in the VNO, the vomeronasal sensory neurons (VSNs). Based on this, we hypothesized that steroid hormones, in particular 17β-estradiol, would modulate activity of VSNs. In this paper, we show that the estrogen receptors, GPR30 and ERα, were present in VSNs and that estradiol may be synthesized locally in the VNO. Our results also showed that 17β-estradiol decreased responses of isolated VSNs to dilute urine, a potent natural stimulus, with respect to current amplitudes and depolarization. Further, 17β-estradiol increased the latency of the first action potential (AP) and the AP amplitude. Additionally, calcium responses to sulfated steroids (present in the low molecular weight fraction of urine) that act as ligands for apical vomeronasal receptors were decreased by 17β-estradiol. In conclusion, we show that estradiol modulates odorant responses mediated by VSNs and hence paves the way for future studies to better understand the mechanisms by which odorant mediated behavior is altered by endocrine status of the animal. PMID:24680884

  4. Spin switches for compact implementation of neuron and synapse

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Quang Diep, Vinh, E-mail: vdiep@purdue.edu; Sutton, Brian; Datta, Supriyo [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States); Behin-Aein, Behtash [GLOBALFOUNDRIES, Inc., Sunnyvale, California 94085 (United States)

    2014-06-02

    Nanomagnets driven by spin currents provide a natural implementation for a neuron and a synapse: currents allow convenient summation of multiple inputs, while the magnet provides the threshold function. The objective of this paper is to explore the possibility of a hardware neural network implementation using a spin switch (SS) as its basic building block. SS is a recently proposed device based on established technology with a transistor-like gain and input-output isolation. This allows neural networks to be constructed with purely passive interconnections without intervening clocks or amplifiers. The weights for the neural network are conveniently adjusted through analog voltages that can be stored in a non-volatile manner in an underlying CMOS layer using a floating gate low dropout voltage regulator. The operation of a multi-layer SS neural network designed for character recognition is demonstrated using a standard simulation model based on coupled Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equations, one for each magnet in the network.

  5. Spin switches for compact implementation of neuron and synapse

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanomagnets driven by spin currents provide a natural implementation for a neuron and a synapse: currents allow convenient summation of multiple inputs, while the magnet provides the threshold function. The objective of this paper is to explore the possibility of a hardware neural network implementation using a spin switch (SS) as its basic building block. SS is a recently proposed device based on established technology with a transistor-like gain and input-output isolation. This allows neural networks to be constructed with purely passive interconnections without intervening clocks or amplifiers. The weights for the neural network are conveniently adjusted through analog voltages that can be stored in a non-volatile manner in an underlying CMOS layer using a floating gate low dropout voltage regulator. The operation of a multi-layer SS neural network designed for character recognition is demonstrated using a standard simulation model based on coupled Landau-Lifshitz-Gilbert equations, one for each magnet in the network

  6. Mutations affecting the chemosensory neurons of Caenorhabditis elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starich, T A; Herman, R K; Kari, C K; Yeh, W H; Schackwitz, W S; Schuyler, M W; Collet, J; Thomas, J H; Riddle, D L

    1995-01-01

    We have identified and characterized 95 mutations that reduce or abolish dye filling of amphid and phasmid neurons and that have little effect on viability, fertility or movement. Twenty-seven mutations occurred spontaneously in strains with a high frequency of transposon insertion. Sixty-eight were isolated after treatment with EMS. All of the mutations result in defects in one or more chemosensory responses, such as chemotaxis to ammonium chloride or formation of dauer larvae under conditions of starvation and overcrowding. Seventy-five of the mutations are alleles of 12 previously defined genes, mutations which were previously shown to lead to defects in amphid ultrastructure. We have assigned 20 mutations to 13 new genes, called dyf-1 through dyf-13. We expect that the genes represented by dye-filing defective mutants are important for the differentiation of amphid and phasmid chemosensilla. PMID:7705621

  7. Phosphorylation of a neuronal-specific beta-tubulin isotype

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adult rats were intracraneally injected with [32P] phosphate and brain microtubules isolated. The electrophoretically purified, in vivo phospholabeled, beta-tubulin was digested with the V8-protease and the labeled peptide purified by reversed-phase liquid chromatography. Its amino acid sequence corresponds to the COOH-terminal sequence of a minor neuronal beta 3-tubulin isoform from chicken and human. The phosphorylation site was at serine 444. A synthetic peptide with sequence EMYEDDEEESESQGPK, corresponding to that of the COOH terminus of beta 3-tubulin, was efficiently phosphorylated in vitro by casein kinase II at the same serine 444. The functional meaning of tubulin phosphorylation is still unclear. However, the modification of the protein takes place after microtubule assembly, and phosphorylated tubulin is mainly present in the assembled microtubule protein fraction

  8. Understand Quarantine and Isolation

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Social Media What CDC is Doing Blog: Public Health Matters What's New Preparation & Planning Emergency Preparedness and Response Understand Quarantine and Isolation Recommend on Facebook Tweet Share Compartir Isolation and quarantine help protect the public by ...

  9. Leptin transiently antagonizes ghrelin and long-lastingly orexin in regulation of Ca2+ signaling in neuropeptide Y neurons of the arcuate nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daisuke Kohno; Shigetomo Suyama; Toshihiko Yada

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To explore the mechanism for interactions of leptin with ghrelin and orexin in the arcuate nucleus (ARC) activating neuropeptide Y (NPY) neurons during physiological regulation of feeding. METHODS: Single neurons from ARC of adult rats with matured feeding function were isolated. [Ca2+]I was measured to monitore their activities. The time course of leptin effects on ghrelin-induced versus orexin-induced [Ca2+]I increases in NPY neurons was studied. RESULTS: Administration of ghrelin or orexin-A at 10-10 mol/L increased cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+I) in NPY neurons isolated from the ARC of adult rats. Upon administration of leptin at 10-14-1012 mol/L, ghrelin-induced [Ca2+]I increases were initially (<10 min) inhibited but later restored, exhibiting a transient pattern of inhibition. In contrast, orexin-induced [Ca2+]I increases were inhibited by leptin in a long-lasting manner. Furthermore, a prior administration of leptin inhibited orexin action but not ghrelin action to increase [Ca2+]I. CONCLUSION: Leptin counteracted ghrelin effects transiently and orexin effects long-lastingly in NPY neurons. The transient property with which leptin counteracts ghrelin action in NPY neurons may allow the fasting-associated increase in ghrelin levels to activate NPY neurons in the presence of physiological leptin and to stimulate feeding.

  10. diferenciación neuronal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel Moreno González

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available El L-glutamato (Glu es el principal neurotransmisor excitador del Sistema Nervioso Central (SNC y ejerce su función por medio de receptores (GluRs que se clasifican en dos grandes superfamilias. La primera la forman canales iónicos activados por ligando o receptores de glutamato ionotrópicos (iGluRs permeables a Ca2+, Na+ y K+. Estos se han clasificado en tres familias con base en datos farmacológicos y electrofisiológicos: los receptores para el α-amino-3-hidroxi-5-metil-4-isoxazol propionato (AMPA; los receptores para kainato (KA; y los receptores para N-metil-Daspartato (NMDA. A la segunda superfamilia pertenecen los GluRs acoplados a segundos mensajeros (inositol 3-fosfato, diacilglicerol y AMP cíclico, también llamados receptores metabotrópicos (mGluRs. La importancia del estudio de los GluRs en el SNC se centra en el papel que estos cumplen en diversas enfermedades neurodegenerativas, como la corea de Huntington, la enfermedad de Parkinson, la enfermedad de Alzheimer, la esclerosis lateral amiotrófica, los accidentes vasculares cerebrales, la epilepsia, la demencia por VIH, la enfermedad de Creutzfeld-Jacob y la hipoglicemia, así como en enfermedades psiquiátricas como la esquizofrenia, la depresión, los trastornos de ansiedad y la enfermedad por estrés postraumático. Además, el Glu, al actuar mediante diversos receptores, desempeña un papel fundamental en los procesos que involucran la diferenciación neuronal y el desarrollo del SNC. Se sabe que existe una expresión diferencial de la gran variedad de subunidades de iGluRs y mGluRs durante la diferenciación y el desarrollo del SNC, la cual depende tanto de su localización en el SNC como de la etapa del desarrollo neuronal. Durante la neurogénesis, se encuentran niveles altos de Glu en las áreas de desarrollo del SNC que, por activación de diferentes receptores, dan lugar a una señalización por segundos mensajeros, una variación en las concentraciones de calcio

  11. Neuronal Differentiation of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells Using Exosomes Derived from Differentiating Neuronal Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Takeda, Yuji S.; Qiaobing Xu

    2015-01-01

    Exosomes deliver functional proteins and genetic materials to neighboring cells, and have potential applications for tissue regeneration. One possible mechanism of exosome-promoted tissue regeneration is through the delivery of microRNA (miRNA). In this study, we hypothesized that exosomes derived from neuronal progenitor cells contain miRNAs that promote neuronal differentiation. We treated mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) daily with exosomes derived from PC12 cells, a neuronal cell line, for 1...

  12. Frizzled-5 Receptor Is Involved in Neuronal Polarity and Morphogenesis of Hippocampal Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slater, Paula G.; Ramirez, Valerie T.; Gonzalez-Billault, Christian; Varela-Nallar, Lorena; Inestrosa, Nibaldo C.

    2013-01-01

    The Wnt signaling pathway plays important roles during different stages of neuronal development, including neuronal polarization and dendritic and axonal outgrowth. However, little is known about the identity of the Frizzled receptors mediating these processes. In the present study, we investigated the role of Frizzled-5 (Fzd5) on neuronal development in cultured Sprague-Dawley rat hippocampal neurons. We found that Fzd5 is expressed early in cultured neurons on actin-rich structures localized at minor neurites and axonal growth cones. At 4 DIV, Fzd5 polarizes towards the axon, where its expression is detected mainly at the peripheral zone of axonal growth cones, with no obvious staining at dendrites; suggesting a role of Fzd5 in neuronal polarization. Overexpression of Fzd5 during the acquisition of neuronal polarity induces mislocalization of the receptor and a loss of polarized axonal markers. Fzd5 knock-down leads to loss of axonal proteins, suggesting an impaired neuronal polarity. In contrast, overexpression of Fzd5 in neurons that are already polarized did not alter polarity, but decreased the total length of axons and increased total dendrite length and arborization. Fzd5 activated JNK in HEK293 cells and the effects triggered by Fzd5 overexpression in neurons were partially prevented by inhibition of JNK, suggesting that a non-canonical Wnt signaling mechanism might be involved. Our results suggest that, Fzd5 has a role in the establishment of neuronal polarity, and in the morphogenesis of neuronal processes, in part through the activation of the non-canonical Wnt mechanism involving JNK. PMID:24205342

  13. GABAergic Neurons in the Preoptic Area Send Direct Inhibitory Projections to Orexin Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Yuki eSaito; Natsuko eTsujino; Emi eHasegawa; Kaoru eAkashi; Manabu eAbe; Michihiro eMieda; Kenji eSakimura; Takeshi eSakurai

    2013-01-01

    Populations of neurons in the hypothalamic preoptic area (POA) fire rapidly during sleep, exhibiting sleep/waking state-dependent firing patterns that are the reciprocal of those observed in the arousal system. The majority of these preoptic “sleep-active” neurons contain the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. On the other hand, a population of neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) contains orexins, which play an important role in the maintenance of wakefulness, and exhibit an excitat...

  14. GABAergic neurons in the preoptic area send direct inhibitory projections to orexin neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, Yuki C.; Tsujino, Natsuko; Hasegawa, Emi; Akashi, Kaori; Abe, Manabu; Mieda, Michihiro; Sakimura, Kenji; Sakurai, Takeshi

    2013-01-01

    Populations of neurons in the hypothalamic preoptic area (POA) fire rapidly during sleep, exhibiting sleep/waking state-dependent firing patterns that are the reciprocal of those observed in the arousal system. The majority of these preoptic "sleep-active" neurons contain the inhibitory neurotransmitter GABA. On the other hand, a population of neurons in the lateral hypothalamic area (LHA) contains orexins, which play an important role in the maintenance of wakefulness, and exhibit an excitat...

  15. Mrgprd-expressing polymodal nociceptive neurons innervate most known classes of substantia gelatinosa neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Hong; Zylka, Mark J.

    2009-01-01

    The Mas-related G protein-coupled receptor D (Mrgprd) marks a distinct subset of sensory neurons that transmit polymodal nociceptive information from the skin epidermis to the substantia gelatinosa (SG, lamina II) of the spinal cord. Moreover, Mrgprd-expressing (Mrgprd+) neurons are required for the full expression of mechanical but not thermal nociception. While such anatomical and functional specificity suggests Mrgprd+ neurons might synapse with specific postsynaptic targets in the SG, pre...

  16. BDNF signaling and survival of striatal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baoji Xu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The striatum, a major component of the basal ganglia, performs multiple functions including control of movement, reward, and addiction. Dysfunction and death of striatal neurons are the main causes for the motor disorders associated with Huntington’s disease (HD. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF, a member of the neurotrophin family, is among factors that promote survival and proper function of this neuronal population. Here, we review recent studies showing that BDNF determines the size of the striatum by supporting survival of the immature striatal neurons at their origin, promotes maturation of striatal neurons, and facilitates establishment of striatal connections during brain development. We also examine the role of BDNF in maintaining proper function of the striatum during adulthood, summarize the mechanisms that lead to a deficiency in BDNF signaling and subsequently striatal degeneration in HD, and highlight a potential role of BDNF as a therapeutic target for HD treatment.

  17. Review Paper: Polyphenolic Antioxidants and Neuronal Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amin Ataie

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Many studies indicate that oxidative stress is involved in the pathophysiology of neurodegenerative diseases. Oxidative stress can induce neuronal damages, modulate intracellular signaling and ultimately leads to neuronal death by apoptosis or necrosis. To review antioxidants preventive effects on oxidative stress and neurodegenerative diseases we accumulated data from international medical journals and academic informations' sites. According to many studies, antioxidants could reduce toxic neuronal damages and many studies confirmed the efficacy of polyphenol antioxidants in fruits and vegetables to reduce neuronal death and to diminish oxidative stress. This systematic review showed the antioxidant activities of phytochemicals which play as natural neuroprotectives with low adverse effects against some neurodegenerative diseases as Parkinson or Alzheimer diseases.

  18. Neuronal damage by secretory phospholipase A2

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez de Turco, Elena B; Diemer, Nils H; Bazan, Nicolas G;

    2003-01-01

    signal transduction has previously been suggested (J Biol Chem 271:32722; 1996). Here we show, using neuronal cell cultures, an up-regulation of cPLA(2) expression and an inhibition by the selective cPLA(2) inhibitor AACOCF3 after exposure to neurotoxic concentrations of sPLA(2)-OS2. Pretreatment of...... neuronal cultures with recombinant PAF acetylhydrolase (rPAF-AH) or the presynaptic PAF receptor antagonist, BN52021, partially blocked neuronal cell death induced by sPLA(2)-OS2. Furthermore, selective COX-2 inhibitors ameliorated sPLA(2)-OS2-induced neurotoxicity. We conclude that sPLA(2)-OS2 activates a...... neuronal signaling cascade that includes activation of cPLA(2), arachidonic acid release, PAF production, and induction of COX-2....

  19. Optimizing sound features for cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    deCharms, R C; Blake, D T; Merzenich, M M

    1998-05-29

    The brain's cerebral cortex decomposes visual images into information about oriented edges, direction and velocity information, and color. How does the cortex decompose perceived sounds? A reverse correlation technique demonstrates that neurons in the primary auditory cortex of the awake primate have complex patterns of sound-feature selectivity that indicate sensitivity to stimulus edges in frequency or in time, stimulus transitions in frequency or intensity, and feature conjunctions. This allows the creation of classes of stimuli matched to the processing characteristics of auditory cortical neurons. Stimuli designed for a particular neuron's preferred feature pattern can drive that neuron with higher sustained firing rates than have typically been recorded with simple stimuli. These data suggest that the cortex decomposes an auditory scene into component parts using a feature-processing system reminiscent of that used for the cortical decomposition of visual images. PMID:9603734

  20. Physiology and pharmacology of striatal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kreitzer, Anatol C

    2009-01-01

    The basal ganglia occupy the core of the forebrain and consist of evolutionarily conserved motor nuclei that form recurrent circuits critical for motivation and motor planning. The striatum is the main input nucleus of the basal ganglia and a key neural substrate for procedural learning and memory. The vast majority of striatal neurons are spiny GABAergic projection neurons, which exhibit slow but temporally precise spiking in vivo. Contributing to this precision are several different types of interneurons that constitute only a small fraction of total neuron number but play a critical role in regulating striatal output. This review examines the cellular physiology and modulation of striatal neurons that give rise to their unique properties and function. PMID:19400717

  1. Fitting Neuron Models to Spike Trains

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rossant, Cyrille; Goodman, Dan F. M.; Fontaine, Bertrand; Platkiewicz, Jonathan; Magnusson, Anna K.; Brette, Romain

    2011-01-01

    Computational modeling is increasingly used to understand the function of neural circuits in systems neuroscience. These studies require models of individual neurons with realistic input–output properties. Recently, it was found that spiking models can accurately predict the precisely timed spike trains produced by cortical neurons in response to somatically injected currents, if properly fitted. This requires fitting techniques that are efficient and flexible enough to easily test different candidate models. We present a generic solution, based on the Brian simulator (a neural network simulator in Python), which allows the user to define and fit arbitrary neuron models to electrophysiological recordings. It relies on vectorization and parallel computing techniques to achieve efficiency. We demonstrate its use on neural recordings in the barrel cortex and in the auditory brainstem, and confirm that simple adaptive spiking models can accurately predict the response of cortical neurons. Finally, we show how a complex multicompartmental model can be reduced to a simple effective spiking model. PMID:21415925

  2. How Might New Neurons Buffer Against Stress?

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... 99 items) How Might New Neurons Buffer Against Stress? Clues Emerging from Studies in New Porter Neuroscience ... role in the action of antidepressants , resilience to stress , the benefits of exercise and enriched environments , and ...

  3. The Neuronal Network Orchestration behind Motor Behaviors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Peter Christian

    inducing different scratch behaviors. We find that neuronal populations in the spinal cord have highly skewed distributions of firing rates. The majority of the neurons was spiking at low firing rates, while a minority had an activity level that was much higher. The distribution is lognormal-like and...... robust across trials, and it remains skewed in different behaviors. Our findings support that the neuronal activity, which is involved in motor behavior, is governed by synaptic fluctuations and as a result thereof is irregular. Similar lognormal- like distributions of firing rates have also been......In biological networks, millions of neurons organize themselves from microscopic noisy individuals to robust macroscopic entities. These entities are capable of producing higher functions like sensory processing, decision-making, and elaborate behavioral responses. Every aspect of these behaviors...

  4. Control and Synchronization of Neuron Ensembles

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Jr-Shin; Ruths, Justin

    2011-01-01

    Synchronization of oscillations is a phenomenon prevalent in natural, social, and engineering systems. Controlling synchronization of oscillating systems is motivated by a wide range of applications from neurological treatment of Parkinson's disease to the design of neurocomputers. In this article, we study the control of an ensemble of uncoupled neuron oscillators described by phase models. We examine controllability of such a neuron ensemble for various phase models and, furthermore, study the related optimal control problems. In particular, by employing Pontryagin's maximum principle, we analytically derive optimal controls for spiking single- and two-neuron systems, and analyze the applicability of the latter to an ensemble system. Finally, we present a robust computational method for optimal control of spiking neurons based on pseudospectral approximations. The methodology developed here is universal to the control of general nonlinear phase oscillators.

  5. The Age of Human Cerebral Cortex Neurons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhardwaj, R D; Curtis, M A; Spalding, K L; Buchholz, B A; Fink, D; Bjork-Eriksson, T; Nordborg, C; Gage, F H; Druid, H; Eriksson, P S; Frisen, J

    2006-04-06

    The traditional static view of the adult mammalian brain has been challenged by the realization of continuous generation of neurons from stem cells. Based mainly on studies in experimental animals, adult neurogenesis may contribute to recovery after brain insults and decreased neurogenesis has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurological and psychiatric diseases in man. The extent of neurogenesis in the adult human brain has, however, been difficult to establish. We have taken advantage of the integration of {sup 14}C, generated by nuclear bomb tests during the Cold War, in DNA to establish the age of neurons in the major areas of the human cerebral cortex. Together with the analysis of the cortex from patients who received BrdU, which integrates in the DNA of dividing cells, our results demonstrate that whereas non-neuronal cells turn over, neurons in the human cerebral cortex are not generated postnatally at detectable levels, but are as old as the individual.

  6. A neuron-astrocyte transistor-like model for neuromorphic dressed neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valenza, G; Pioggia, G; Armato, A; Ferro, M; Scilingo, E P; De Rossi, D

    2011-09-01

    Experimental evidences on the role of the synaptic glia as an active partner together with the bold synapse in neuronal signaling and dynamics of neural tissue strongly suggest to investigate on a more realistic neuron-glia model for better understanding human brain processing. Among the glial cells, the astrocytes play a crucial role in the tripartite synapsis, i.e. the dressed neuron. A well-known two-way astrocyte-neuron interaction can be found in the literature, completely revising the purely supportive role for the glia. The aim of this study is to provide a computationally efficient model for neuron-glia interaction. The neuron-glia interactions were simulated by implementing the Li-Rinzel model for an astrocyte and the Izhikevich model for a neuron. Assuming the dressed neuron dynamics similar to the nonlinear input-output characteristics of a bipolar junction transistor, we derived our computationally efficient model. This model may represent the fundamental computational unit for the development of real-time artificial neuron-glia networks opening new perspectives in pattern recognition systems and in brain neurophysiology. PMID:21441011

  7. Neuronal dysfunction with aging and its amelioration

    OpenAIRE

    Ando, Susumu

    2012-01-01

    The author focused on the functional decline of synapses in the brain with aging to understand the underlying mechanisms and to ameliorate the deficits. The first attempt was to unravel the neuronal functions of gangliosides so that gangliosides could be used for enhancing synaptic activity. The second attempt was to elicit the neuronal plasticity in aged animals through enriched environmental stimulation and nutritional intervention. Environmental stimuli were revealed neurochemically and mo...

  8. Progranulin regulates neuronal outgrowth independent of Sortilin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gass Jennifer

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Progranulin (PGRN, a widely secreted growth factor, is involved in multiple biological functions, and mutations located within the PGRN gene (GRN are a major cause of frontotemporal lobar degeneration with TDP-43-positive inclusions (FLTD-TDP. In light of recent reports suggesting PGRN functions as a protective neurotrophic factor and that sortilin (SORT1 is a neuronal receptor for PGRN, we used a Sort1-deficient (Sort1−/− murine primary hippocampal neuron model to investigate whether PGRN’s neurotrophic effects are dependent on SORT1. We sought to elucidate this relationship to determine what role SORT1, as a regulator of PGRN levels, plays in modulating PGRN’s neurotrophic effects. Results As the first group to evaluate the effect of PGRN loss in Grn knockout primary neuronal cultures, we show neurite outgrowth and branching are significantly decreased in Grn−/− neurons compared to wild-type (WT neurons. More importantly, we also demonstrate that PGRN overexpression can rescue this phenotype. However, the recovery in outgrowth is not observed following treatment with recombinant PGRN harboring missense mutations p.C139R, p.P248L or p.R432C, indicating that these mutations adversely affect the neurotrophic properties of PGRN. In addition, we also present evidence that cleavage of full-length PGRN into granulin peptides is required for increased neuronal outgrowth, suggesting that the neurotrophic functions of PGRN are contained within certain granulins. To further characterize the mechanism by which PGRN impacts neuronal morphology, we assessed the involvement of SORT1. We demonstrate that PGRN induced-outgrowth occurs in the absence of SORT1 in Sort1−/− cultures. Conclusion We demonstrate that loss of PGRN impairs proper neurite outgrowth and branching, and that exogenous PGRN alleviates this impairment. Furthermore, we determined that exogenous PGRN induces outgrowth independent of SORT1, suggesting another

  9. Targeting neuronal populations of the striatum

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre F Durieux

    2011-07-01

    In view of the still debated respective functions of projection D2R-striatopallidal and D1R-striatonigral neurons and striatal interneurons, both in motor control and learning but also in more cognitive processes such as motivation, the present review sum up the development of new models and techniques (BAC transgenesis, optogenetic, viral transgenesis allowing the selective targeting of these striatal neuronal populations in adult animal brain to understand their specific roles.

  10. Synchronized Firing in Coupled Inhomogeneous Excitable Neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHENG Zhi-Gang; WANG Fu-Zhong

    2002-01-01

    We study the firing synchronization behavior of the inhomogeneous excitable media. Phase synchronizationof neuron firings is observed with increasing the coupling, while the phases of neurons are different (out-of-phase synchronization). We found the synchronization of bursts can be greatly enhanced by applying an external forcing (in-phasesynchronization). The external forcing can be either a periodic or just homogeneous thermal noise. The mechanismresponsible for this enhancement is discussed.PACS numbers: 05.45.-a, 87.10.+e

  11. Neuronal alignment on asymmetric textured surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Beighley, Ross; Spedden, Elise; Sekeroglu, Koray; Atherton, Timothy; Demirel, Melik C.; Staii, Cristian

    2012-01-01

    Axonal growth and the formation of synaptic connections are key steps in the development of the nervous system. Here, we present experimental and theoretical results on axonal growth and interconnectivity in order to elucidate some of the basic rules that neuronal cells use for functional connections with one another. We demonstrate that a unidirectional nanotextured surface can bias axonal growth. We perform a systematic investigation of neuronal processes on asymmetric surfaces and quantify...

  12. Action observation: Inferring intentions without mirror neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frith, Christopher; Kilner, James M

    2008-01-01

    A recent study has shown, using fMRI, that the mirror neuron system does not mediate action understanding when the observed action is novel or when it is hard to understand.......A recent study has shown, using fMRI, that the mirror neuron system does not mediate action understanding when the observed action is novel or when it is hard to understand....

  13. Neural network with dynamically adaptable neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tawel, Raoul (Inventor)

    1994-01-01

    This invention is an adaptive neuron for use in neural network processors. The adaptive neuron participates in the supervised learning phase of operation on a co-equal basis with the synapse matrix elements by adaptively changing its gain in a similar manner to the change of weights in the synapse IO elements. In this manner, training time is decreased by as much as three orders of magnitude.

  14. Neuronal organization of olfactory bulb circuits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shin eNagayama

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Olfactory sensory neurons extend their axons solely to the olfactory bulb, which is dedicated to odor information processing. The olfactory bulb is divided into multiple layers, with different types of neurons found in each of the layers. Therefore, neurons in the olfactory bulb have conventionally been categorized based on the layers in which their cell bodies are found; namely, juxtaglomerular cells in the glomerular layer, tufted cells in the external plexiform layer, mitral cells in the mitral cell layer, and granule cells in the granule cell layer. More recently, numerous studies have revealed the heterogeneous nature of each of these cell types, allowing them to be further divided into subclasses based on differences in morphological, molecular, and electrophysiological properties. In addition, technical developments and advances have resulted in an increasing number of studies regarding cell types other than the conventionally categorized ones described above, including short-axon cells and adult-generated interneurons. Thus, the expanding diversity of cells in the olfactory bulb is now being acknowledged. However, our current understanding of olfactory bulb neuronal circuits is mostly based on the conventional and simplest classification of cell types. Few studies have taken neuronal diversity into account for understanding the function of the neuronal circuits in this region of the brain. This oversight may contribute to the roadblocks in developing more precise and accurate models of olfactory neuronal networks. The purpose of this review is therefore to discuss the expanse of existing work on neuronal diversity in the olfactory bulb up to this point, so as to provide an overall picture of the olfactory bulb circuit.

  15. Beyond the frontiers of neuronal types

    OpenAIRE

    Demian eBattaglia; Anastassios eKaragiannis; Thierry eGallopin; Gutch, Harold W; Bruno eCauli

    2013-01-01

    Cortical neurons and, particularly, inhibitory interneurons display a large diversity of morphological, synaptic, electrophysiological, and molecular properties, as well as diverse embryonic origins. Various authors have proposed alternative classification schemes that rely on the concomitant observation of several multimodal features. However, a broad variability is generally observed even among cells that are grouped into a same class. Furthermore, the attribution of specific neurons to a s...

  16. SnapShot: Neuronal Regulation of Aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weir, Heather J; Mair, William B

    2016-07-28

    Aging is characterized by loss of homeostasis across multiple tissues. The nervous system governs whole-body homeostasis by communicating external and internal signals to peripheral tissues. Here, we highlight neuronal mechanisms and downstream outputs that regulate aging and longevity. Targeting these neuronal pathways may be a novel strategy to promote healthy aging. To view this SnapShot, open or download the PDF. PMID:27471972

  17. Waveform sample method of excitable sensory neuron

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Sheng-Jun; Xu, Xin-Jian; Wang, Ying-Hai

    2006-01-01

    We present a new interpretation for encoding information of the period of input signals into spike-trains in individual sensory neuronal systems. The spike-train could be described as the waveform sample of the input signal which locks sample points to wave crests with randomness. Based on simulations of the Hodgkin-Huxley (HH) neuron responding to periodic inputs, we demonstrate that the random sampling is a proper encoding method in medium frequency region since power spectra of the reconst...

  18. Inside the brain of a neuron

    OpenAIRE

    Sidiropoulou, Kyriaki; Pissadaki, Eleftheria Kyriaki; Poirazi, Panayiota

    2006-01-01

    For many decades, neurons were considered to be the elementary computational units of the brain and were assumed to summate incoming signals and elicit action potentials only in response to suprathreshold stimuli. Although modelling studies predicted that single neurons constitute a much more powerful computational entity, able to perform an array of nonlinear calculations, this possibility was not explored experimentally until the discovery of active mechanisms in the dendrites of most neuro...

  19. Studies on metals in motor neuron disease

    OpenAIRE

    Roos, Per M.

    2013-01-01

    A slow but steady increase in neurodegenerative disorders has been noted in recent decades. Degenerations in the nervous system are found in Alzheimer´s disease, Parkinson´s disease and motor neuron diseases. Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) is the most common of the motor neuron diseases. It is often considered a model disorder of neurodegeneration. Early symptoms of ALS are limb weakness or weakness in muscles of speech and swallowing. Muscle atrophy follow and a slowly progressing paral...

  20. Double-Wavelet Neuron Based on Analytical Activation Functions

    OpenAIRE

    Bodyanskiy, Yevgeniy; Lamonova, Nataliya; Vynokurova, Olena

    2007-01-01

    In this paper a new double-wavelet neuron architecture obtained by modification of standard wavelet neuron, and its learning algorithm are proposed. The offered architecture allows to improve the approximation properties of wavelet neuron. Double-wavelet neuron and its learning algorithm are examined for forecasting non-stationary chaotic time series.

  1. Frequency-domain analysis of intrinsic neuronal properties using high-resistant electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Rössert

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Intrinsic cellular properties of neurons in culture or slices are usually studied by the whole cell clamp method using low-resistant patch pipettes. These electrodes allow detailed analyses with standard electrophysiological methods such as current- or voltage-clamp. However, in these preparations large parts of the network and dendritic structures may be removed, thus preventing an adequate study of synaptic signal processing. Therefore, intact in vivo preparations or isolated in vitro whole brains have been used in which intracellular recordings are usually made with sharp, high-resistant electrodes to optimize the impalement of neurons. The general non-linear resistance properties of these electrodes, however, severely limit accurate quantitative studies of membrane dynamics especially needed for precise modelling. Therefore, we have developed a frequency-domain analysis of membrane properties that uses a Piece-wise Non-linear Electrode Compensation (PNEC method. The technique was tested in second-order vestibular neurons and abducens motoneurons of isolated frog whole brain preparations using sharp potassium chloride- or potassium acetate-filled electrodes. All recordings were performed without online electrode compensation. The properties of each electrode were determined separately after the neuronal recordings and were used in the frequency-domain analysis of the combined measurement of electrode and cell. This allowed detailed analysis of membrane properties in the frequency-domain with high-resistant electrodes and provided quantitative data that can be further used to model channel kinetics. Thus, sharp electrodes can be used for the characterization of intrinsic properties and synaptic inputs of neurons in intact brains.

  2. Farnesol-Detecting Olfactory Neurons in Drosophila

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ronderos, David S.; Lin, Chun-Chieh; Potter, Christopher J.

    2014-01-01

    We set out to deorphanize a subset of putative Drosophila odorant receptors expressed in trichoid sensilla using a transgenic in vivo misexpression approach. We identified farnesol as a potent and specific activator for the orphan odorant receptor Or83c. Farnesol is an intermediate in juvenile hormone biosynthesis, but is also produced by ripe citrus fruit peels. Here, we show that farnesol stimulates robust activation of Or83c-expressing olfactory neurons, even at high dilutions. The CD36 homolog Snmp1 is required for normal farnesol response kinetics. The neurons expressing Or83c are found in a subset of poorly characterized intermediate sensilla. We show that these neurons mediate attraction behavior to low concentrations of farnesol and that Or83c receptor mutants are defective for this behavior. Or83c neurons innervate the DC3 glomerulus in the antennal lobe and projection neurons relaying information from this glomerulus to higher brain centers target a region of the lateral horn previously implicated in pheromone perception. Our findings identify a sensitive, narrowly tuned receptor that mediates attraction behavior to farnesol and demonstrates an effective approach to deorphanizing odorant receptors expressed in neurons located in intermediate and trichoid sensilla that may not function in the classical “empty basiconic neuron” system. PMID:24623773

  3. A fly's view of neuronal remodeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaniv, Shiri P; Schuldiner, Oren

    2016-09-01

    Developmental neuronal remodeling is a crucial step in sculpting the final and mature brain connectivity in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Remodeling includes degenerative events, such as neurite pruning, that may be followed by regeneration to form novel connections during normal development. Drosophila provides an excellent model to study both steps of remodeling since its nervous system undergoes massive and stereotypic remodeling during metamorphosis. Although pruning has been widely studied, our knowledge of the molecular and cellular mechanisms is far from complete. Our understanding of the processes underlying regrowth is even more fragmentary. In this review, we discuss recent progress by focusing on three groups of neurons that undergo stereotypic pruning and regrowth during metamorphosis, the mushroom body γ neurons, the dendritic arborization neurons and the crustacean cardioactive peptide peptidergic neurons. By comparing and contrasting the mechanisms involved in remodeling of these three neuronal types, we highlight the common themes and differences as well as raise key questions for future investigation in the field. WIREs Dev Biol 2016, 5:618-635. doi: 10.1002/wdev.241 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website. PMID:27351747

  4. Cultured neuronal networks as environmental biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Shaughnessy, Thomas J; Gray, Samuel A; Pancrazio, Joseph J

    2004-01-01

    Contamination of water by toxins, either intentionally or unintentionally, is a growing concern for both military and civilian agencies and thus there is a need for systems capable of monitoring a wide range of natural and industrial toxicants. The EILATox-Oregon Workshop held in September 2002 provided an opportunity to test the capabilities of a prototype neuronal network-based biosensor with unknown contaminants in water samples. The biosensor is a portable device capable of recording the action potential activity from a network of mammalian neurons grown on glass microelectrode arrays. Changes in the action potential fi ring rate across the network are monitored to determine exposure to toxicants. A series of three neuronal networks derived from mice was used to test seven unknown samples. Two of these unknowns later were revealed to be blanks, to which the neuronal networks did not respond. Of the five remaining unknowns, a significant change in network activity was detected for four of the compounds at concentrations below a lethal level for humans: mercuric chloride, sodium arsenite, phosdrin and chlordimeform. These compounds--two heavy metals, an organophosphate and an insecticide--demonstrate the breadth of detection possible with neuronal networks. The results generated at the workshop show the promise of the neuronal network biosensor as an environmental detector but there is still considerable effort needed to produce a device suitable for routine environmental threat monitoring. PMID:15478174

  5. Protective effects of Humanin on hypoxia-induced neuronal death

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yunqi Zhu; Yanli Li; Jingyi Liu; Xiaorong Yang; Ce Zhang

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Humanin is a 24-amino acid peptide isolated from the brain of an Alzheimer's disease patient. Several studies have indicated that Humanin can protect cells against cytotoxicity induced by various insults.OBJECTIVE: To investigate the protective role of Humanin on hypoxia-induced neuronal death, and to determine the most appropriate therapeutic concentration of Humanin.DESIGN, TIME AND SETTING: Neuropathophysiological, randomized, controlled experiment, conducted at the Department of Physiology and Neurobiology, Shanxi Medical University, between March 2007 and October 2007.MATERIALS: Newborn Wistar rats, 5,5',6,6' tetrachloro-1,1',3,3'-tetraethyl- benzimidazolylcarbocyanine iodide (JC-1, USA), calcein-acetoxymethylester (calcein-AM, USA), and Humanin (Shanghai, China) were used in this study. METHODS: Primary cortical neurons were cultured with dulbecco's modified eagle's medium containing 15% fetal bovine serum. Cultures were divided into three groups: control, hypoxia, and hypoxia + Humanin. Various concentrations of Humanin (1, 10, and 20 μmol/L) were added to the cultures 16 hours prior to hypoxia induction. For hypoxic conditions, cells were maintained at 37 ℃ within an incubator chamber filled with 95% N2 and 5% CO2 for 24 hours. Cells in the control group were cultured in normal oxygen. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Cell viability was determined through the use of the vital dye calcein-AM, and the number of live cells was determined. Mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) was assessed using the fluorescent probe JC-1. Mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening was determined with calcein-AM in the presence of cobalt chloride.RESULTS: (1) Cell viability: Hypoxia for 24 hours induced death in a large number of neurons. Pretreatment with 10 μmol/L and 20 μmol/L Humanin, 16 hours prior to hypoxia, protected cells against hypoxia. However, 1 μmol/L Humanin provided little protection. (2) ΔΨm: ΔΨm was reduced after 24-hour hypoxia

  6. Sustained Exposure to the Widely Used Herbicide Atrazine: Altered Function and Loss of Neurons in Brain Monoamine Systems

    OpenAIRE

    Rodriguez, Veronica M.; Thiruchelvam, Mona; Cory-Slechta, Deborah A.

    2005-01-01

    The widespread use of atrazine (ATR) and its persistence in the environment have resulted in documented human exposure. Alterations in hypothalamic catecholamines have been suggested as the mechanistic basis of the toxicity of ATR to hormonal systems in females and the reproductive tract in males. Because multiple catecholamine systems are present in the brain, however, ATR could have far broader effects than are currently understood. Catecholaminergic systems such as the two major long-lengt...

  7. An introduction to neuronal cholecystokinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beinfeld, M C

    2001-08-01

    This issue of Peptides was inspired by a gathering of CCK researchers at the first Neuronal Cholecsytokinin Gordon Conference. The papers in this issue reflect the diversity of CCK research and demonstrate how the field has matured. Reviews describe the regulation of CCK gene expression and CCK release, the nature of the hormone binding site of the CCK A receptor, interaction of CCK, dopamine and GABA, the role of CCK in thermoregulation, sexual behavior and satiety in rodents and humans. The research articles document features of cardiovascular regulation, reduced cocaine sensitization and decreased satiety in rats that lack the CCK A receptor. Pro CCK processing in neuroblastoma cells and the elevation of CCK levels in CSF in a model of chronic pain are detailed in other articles. Three articles using different behavioral paradigms in rat and sheep examine CCK in learning and memory. Two articles that examine CCK in different behaviors that have a dopaminergic component are included. Other articles describe the interaction between a 5HT(3) antagonist and CCK-induced satiety and c-fos activation and document secretion of oxytocin and vasopressin in female patients and controls in response to CCK 4 administration. There is good reason to believe that the future is bright for research on CCK. With the organization of national and international meetings, CCK researchers have a forum for communication. Opportunities for cooperation and collaboration have never been better. The easy integration of academic basic and clinical science with industrial science bodes very well for the advancement of our understanding of the multiple roles that CCK plays in the brain and for the future development of CCK-based therapies. PMID:11457511

  8. Computational models of neuron-astrocyte interaction in epilepsy

    OpenAIRE

    Vladislav Volman; Maxim Bazhenov; Sejnowski, Terrence J.

    2012-01-01

    Astrocytes actively shape the dynamics of neurons and neuronal ensembles by affecting several aspects critical to neuronal function, such as regulating synaptic plasticity, modulating neuronal excitability, and maintaining extracellular ion balance. These pathways for astrocyte-neuron interaction can also enhance the information-processing capabilities of brains, but in other circumstances may lead the brain on the road to pathological ruin. In this article, we review the existing computation...

  9. Regeneration of New Neurons is Preserved in Aged Vomeronasal Epithelia

    OpenAIRE

    Brann, Jessica H.; Firestein, Stuart

    2010-01-01

    During normal and diseased aging, it is thought the capacity for tissue regeneration and repair in neuronal tissues diminishes. In the peripheral olfactory system, stem cell reservoirs permit regeneration of olfactory and vomeronasal sensory neurons, a unique capacity among neurons. Following injury a large number of new neurons can be regenerated in a young animal. However, it is unknown whether this capacity for renewal exists in aged proliferative populations. Here we report that neuronal ...

  10. Synchronization of Coupled Neurons Controlled by a Pacemaker

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We investigate synchronization of Hindmarsh—Rose neurons with gap junctions under the control of a pacemaker. In a ring Hindmarsh—Rose neuronal network, the coupled neurons with the pacemaker can occur in synchronization more easily than those without the pacemaker. Furthermore, the pacemaker can induce phase synchronization or nearly-complete synchronization of nonidentical neurons. This synchronization can occur more easily when time delay is considered. Theses results can be helpful to understand the activities of the real neuronal system. (general)

  11. Silicon neuron: digital hardware implementation of the quartic model

    OpenAIRE

    Grassia, Filippo; Levi, Timothée; Kohno, Takashi; Saïghi, Sylvain

    2014-01-01

    International audience This paper presents an FPGA implementation of the quartic neuron model. This approach uses digital computation to emulate individual neuron behavior. We implemented the neuron model using fixed point arithmetic operation. The neuron model's computations are performed in arithmetic pipelines. It was designed in VHDL language and simulated prior to mapping in the FPGA. We show that the proposed FPGA implementation of the quartic neuron model can emulate the electrophys...

  12. Lineage origins of GABAergic versus glutamatergic neurons in the neocortex

    OpenAIRE

    Marín, Oscar; Müller, Ulrich

    2014-01-01

    Neocortical circuits are assembled from subtypes of glutamatergic excitatory and GABAergic inhibitory neurons with divergent anatomical and molecular signatures and unique physiological properties. Excitatory neurons derive from progenitors in the pallium, whereas inhibitory neurons originate from progenitors in the subpallium. Both classes of neurons subsequently migrate along well-defined routes to their final target area, where they integrate into common neuronal circuits. Recent findings ...

  13. Abelson tyrosine kinase links PDGFbeta receptor activation to cytoskeletal regulation of NMDA receptors in CA1 hippocampal neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beazely Michael A

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We have previously demonstrated that PDGF receptor activation indirectly inhibits N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA currents by modifying the cytoskeleton. PDGF receptor ligand is also neuroprotective in hippocampal slices and cultured neurons. PDGF receptors are tyrosine kinases that control a variety of signal transduction pathways including those mediated by PLCγ. In fibroblasts Src and another non-receptor tyrosine kinase, Abelson kinase (Abl, control PDGF receptor regulation of cytoskeletal dynamics. The mechanism whereby PDGF receptor regulates cytoskeletal dynamics in central neurons remains poorly understood. Results Intracellular applications of active Abl, but not heat-inactivated Abl, decreased NMDA-evoked currents in isolated hippocampal neurons. This mimics the effects of PDGF receptor activation in these neurons. The Abl kinase inhibitor, STI571, blocked the inhibition of NMDA currents by Abl. We demonstrate that PDGF receptors can activate Abl kinase in hippocampal neurons via mechanisms similar to those observed previously in fibroblasts. Furthermore, PDGFβ receptor activation alters the subcellular localization of Abl. Abl kinase is linked to actin cytoskeletal dynamics in many systems. We show that the inhibition of NMDA receptor currents by Abl kinase is blocked by the inclusion of the Rho kinase inhibitor, Y-27632, and that activation of Abl correlates with an increase in ROCK tyrosine phosphorylation. Conclusion This study demonstrates that PDGFβ receptors act via an interaction with Abl kinase and Rho kinase to regulated cytoskeletal regulation of NMDA receptor channels in CA1 pyramidal neurons.

  14. Activity-dependent structural plasticity after aversive experiences in amygdala and auditory cortex pyramidal neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gruene, Tina; Flick, Katelyn; Rendall, Sam; Cho, Jin Hyung; Gray, Jesse; Shansky, Rebecca

    2016-07-22

    The brain is highly plastic and undergoes changes in response to many experiences. Learning especially can induce structural remodeling of dendritic spines, which is thought to relate to memory formation. Classical Pavlovian fear conditioning (FC) traditionally pairs an auditory cue with an aversive footshock, and has been widely used to study neural processes underlying associative learning and memory. Past research has found dendritic spine changes after FC in several structures. But, due to heterogeneity of cells within brain structures and limitations of traditional neuroanatomical techniques, it is unclear if all cells included in analyses were actually active during learning processes, even if known circuits are isolated. In this study, we employed a novel approach to analyze structural plasticity explicitly in neurons activated by exposure to either cued or uncued footshocks. We used male and female Arc-dVenus transgenic mice, which express the Venus fluorophore driven by the activity-related Arc promoter, to identify neurons that were active during either scenario. We then targeted fluorescent microinjections to Arc+ and neighboring Arc- neurons in the basolateral area of the amygdala (BLA) and auditory association cortex (TeA). In both BLA and TeA, Arc+ neurons had reduced thin and mushroom spine densities compared to Arc- neurons. This effect was present in males and females alike and also in both cued and uncued shock groups. Overall, this study adds to our understanding of how neuronal activity affects structural plasticity, and represents a methodological advance in the ways we can directly relate structural changes to experience-related neural activity. PMID:27155146

  15. Neuron Image Analyzer: Automated and Accurate Extraction of Neuronal Data from Low Quality Images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kwang-Min; Son, Kilho; Palmore, G Tayhas R

    2015-01-01

    Image analysis software is an essential tool used in neuroscience and neural engineering to evaluate changes in neuronal structure following extracellular stimuli. Both manual and automated methods in current use are severely inadequate at detecting and quantifying changes in neuronal morphology when the images analyzed have a low signal-to-noise ratio (SNR). This inadequacy derives from the fact that these methods often include data from non-neuronal structures or artifacts by simply tracing pixels with high intensity. In this paper, we describe Neuron Image Analyzer (NIA), a novel algorithm that overcomes these inadequacies by employing Laplacian of Gaussian filter and graphical models (i.e., Hidden Markov Model, Fully Connected Chain Model) to specifically extract relational pixel information corresponding to neuronal structures (i.e., soma, neurite). As such, NIA that is based on vector representation is less likely to detect false signals (i.e., non-neuronal structures) or generate artifact signals (i.e., deformation of original structures) than current image analysis algorithms that are based on raster representation. We demonstrate that NIA enables precise quantification of neuronal processes (e.g., length and orientation of neurites) in low quality images with a significant increase in the accuracy of detecting neuronal changes post-stimulation. PMID:26593337

  16. ACQUISITION AND LOSS OF NEURONAL CA2+/CALMODULIN-DEPENDENT PROTEIN KINASE DURING NEURONAL DIFFERENTIATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neurons display characteristic schedules by which they acquire and lose the neuron-specific Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein Kinase-Gr (CaM Kinase-Gr) during differentiation. uch schedules are exemplified by patterns of expression of this kinase in the developing cerebellum and ...

  17. Neuronal Survival, Morphology and Outgrowth of Spiral Ganglion Neurons Using a Defined Growth Factor Combination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jana Schwieger

    Full Text Available The functionality of cochlear implants (CI depends, among others, on the number and excitability of surviving spiral ganglion neurons (SGN. The spatial separation between the SGN, located in the bony axis of the inner ear, and the CI, which is inserted in the scala tympani, results in suboptimal performance of CI patients and may be decreased by attracting the SGN neurites towards the electrode contacts. Neurotrophic factors (NTFs can support neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth.Since brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF is well known for its neuroprotective effect and ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF increases neurite outgrowth, we evaluated if the combination of BDNF and CNTF leads to an enhanced neuronal survival with extended neurite outgrowth. Both NTFs were added in effective high concentrations (BDNF 50 ng/ml, CNTF 100 ng/ml, alone and in combination, to cultured dissociated SGN of neonatal rats for 48 hours.The neuronal survival and neurite outgrowth were significantly higher in SGN treated with the combination of the two NTFs compared to treatment with each factor alone. Additionally, with respect to the morphology, the combination of BDNF and CNTF leads to a significantly higher number of bipolar neurons and a decreased number of neurons without neurites in culture.The combination of BDNF and CNTF shows a great potential to increase the neuronal survival and the number of bipolar neurons in vitro and to regenerate retracted nerve fibers.

  18. Exosomes secreted by cortical neurons upon glutamatergic synapse activation specifically interact with neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathilde Chivet

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Exosomes are nano-sized vesicles of endocytic origin released into the extracellular space upon fusion of multivesicular bodies with the plasma membrane. Exosomes represent a novel mechanism of cell–cell communication allowing direct transfer of proteins, lipids and RNAs. In the nervous system, both glial and neuronal cells secrete exosomes in a way regulated by glutamate. It has been hypothesized that exosomes can be used for interneuronal communication implying that neuronal exosomes should bind to other neurons with some kind of specificity. Here, dissociated hippocampal cells were used to compare the specificity of binding of exosomes secreted by neuroblastoma cells to that of exosomes secreted by cortical neurons. We found that exosomes from neuroblastoma cells bind indiscriminately to neurons and glial cells and could be endocytosed preferentially by glial cells. In contrast, exosomes secreted from stimulated cortical neurons bound to and were endocytosed only by neurons. Thus, our results demonstrate for the first time that exosomes released upon synaptic activation do not bind to glial cells but selectively to other neurons suggesting that they can underlie a novel aspect of interneuronal communication.

  19. Closing the Phenotypic Gap between Transformed Neuronal Cell Lines in Culture and Untransformed Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Myers, Tereance A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.; Kaushal, Deepak; Ott, C. Mark; HonerzuBentrup, Kerstin; Ramamurthy, Rajee; Nelman-Gonzales, Mayra; Pierson, Duane L.; Philipp, Mario T.

    2008-01-01

    Studies of neuronal dysfunction in the central nervous system (CNS) are frequently limited by the failure of primary neurons to propagate in vitro. Neuronal cell lines can be substituted for primary cells but they often misrepresent normal conditions. We hypothesized that a dimensional (3-D) cell culture system would drive the phenotype of transformed neurons closer to that of untransformed cells. In our studies comparing 3-D versus 2-dimensional (2-D) culture, neuronal SH-SY5Y (SY) cells underwent distinct morphological changes combined with a significant drop in their rate of cell division. Expression of the proto-oncogene N-myc and the RNA binding protein HuD was decreased in 3-D culture as compared to standard 2-D conditions. We observed a decline in the anti-apoptotic protein Bcl-2 in 3-D culture, coupled with increased expression of the pro-apoptotic proteins Bax and Bak. Moreover, thapsigargin (TG)-induced apoptosis was enhanced in the 3-D cells. Microarray analysis demonstrated significantly differing mRNA levels for over 700 genes in the cells of each culture type. These results indicate that a 3-D culture approach narrows the phenotypic gap between neuronal cell lines and primary neurons. The resulting cells may readily be used for in vitro research of neuronal pathogenesis.

  20. Hyperexcitable neurons and altered non-neuronal cells in the compressed spinal ganglion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert H. LaMotte; Chao MA

    2008-01-01

    The cell body or soma in the dosal root ganglion (DRG) is normally excitable and this excitability can increase and persist after an injury of peripheral sensory neurons. In a rat model of radicular pain, an intraforaminal implantation of a rod that chronically compressed the lumbar DRG ("CCD" model) resulted in neuronal somal hyperexcitability and spontaneous activity that was accom-panied by hyperalgesia in the ipsilateral hind paw. By the 5th day after onset of CCD, there was a novel upregulation in neuronal expression of the chemokine, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP- 1 or CCL2) and also its receptor, CCR2. The neurons developed, in response to topically applied MCP-1, an excitatory response that they normally do not have. CCD also activated non-neuronal cells including, for example, the endothelial cells as evidenced by angiogenesis in the form of an increased number of capillaries in the DRG after 7 days. A working hypothesis is that the CCD induced changes in neurons and non-neuronal cells that may act together to promote the survival of the injured tissue. The release of ligands such as CCL2, in addition to possibly activating nociceptive neurons (maintaining the pain), may also act to preserve injured cells in the face of ischemia and hypoxia, for example, by promoting angiogenesis. Thus, somal hyperexcitability, as often said of inflammation, may represent a double edged sword.

  1. Human von Economo neurons express transcription factors associated with Layer V subcerebral projection neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cobos, Inma; Seeley, William W

    2015-01-01

    The von Economo neurons (VENs) are large bipolar Layer V projection neurons found chiefly in the anterior cingulate and frontoinsular cortices. Although VENs have been linked to prevalent illnesses such as frontotemporal dementia, autism, and schizophrenia, little is known about VEN identity, including their major projection targets. Here, we undertook a developmental transcription factor expression study, focusing on markers associated with specific classes of Layer V projection neurons. Using mRNA in situ hybridization, we found that VENs prominently express FEZF2 and CTIP2, transcription factors that regulate the fate and differentiation of subcerebral projection neurons, in humans aged 3 months to 65 years. In contrast, few VENs expressed markers associated with callosal or corticothalamic projections. These findings suggest that VENs may represent a specialized Layer V projection neuron for linking cortical autonomic control sites to brainstem or spinal cord regions. PMID:23960210

  2. Context-induced reinstatement of methamphetamine seeking is associated with unique molecular alterations in Fos-expressing dorsolateral striatum neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rubio, F Javier; Liu, Qing-Rong; Li, Xuan; Cruz, Fabio C; Leão, Rodrigo M; Warren, Brandon L; Kambhampati, Sarita; Babin, Klil R; McPherson, Kylie B; Cimbro, Raffaello; Bossert, Jennifer M; Shaham, Yavin; Hope, Bruce T

    2015-04-01

    Context-induced reinstatement of drug seeking is a well established animal model for assessing the neural mechanisms underlying context-induced drug relapse, a major factor in human drug addiction. Neural activity in striatum has previously been shown to contribute to context-induced reinstatement of heroin, cocaine, and alcohol seeking, but not yet for methamphetamine seeking. In this study, we found that context-induced reinstatement of methamphetamine seeking increased expression of the neural activity marker Fos in dorsal but not ventral striatum. Reversible inactivation of neural activity in dorsolateral but not dorsomedial striatum using the GABA agonists muscimol and baclofen decreased context-induced reinstatement. Based on our previous findings that Fos-expressing neurons play a critical role in conditioned drug effects, we assessed whether context-induced reinstatement was associated with molecular alterations selectively induced within context-activated Fos-expressing neurons. We used fluorescence-activated cell sorting to isolate reinstatement-activated Fos-positive neurons from Fos-negative neurons in dorsal striatum and used quantitative PCR to assess gene expression within these two populations of neurons. Context-induced reinstatement was associated with increased expression of the immediate early genes Fos and FosB and the NMDA receptor subunit gene Grin2a in only Fos-positive neurons. RNAscope in situ hybridization confirmed that Grin2a, as well as Grin2b, expression were increased in only Fos-positive neurons from dorsolateral, but not dorsomedial, striatum. Our results demonstrate an important role of dorsolateral striatum in context-induced reinstatement of methamphetamine seeking and that this reinstatement is associated with unique gene alterations in Fos-expressing neurons. PMID:25855177

  3. Isolated Bell’s palsy - An unusual presentation of dengue infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Peter S; Malhotra N; Peter P; Sood R

    2013-01-01

    Dengue fever is a very common arthropod – borne infection in tropical countries. Neurological complications in dengue fever are relatively uncommon and among these, isolated cranial neuropathies have been reported only very rarely. We present an unusual neurological complication of Bell’s palsy (lower motor neuron 7 th nerve palsy) associated with dengue infection. To the best of our knowledge, there have been very few documented cases of Flavivirus causing isolated Bell’s palsy.

  4. Genetics Home Reference: isolated growth hormone deficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... deficiency dwarfism, pituitary growth hormone deficiency dwarfism isolated GH deficiency isolated HGH deficiency isolated human growth hormone deficiency isolated somatotropin deficiency isolated somatotropin deficiency disorder ...

  5. Memristors Empower Spiking Neurons With Stochasticity

    KAUST Repository

    Al-Shedivat, Maruan

    2015-06-01

    Recent theoretical studies have shown that probabilistic spiking can be interpreted as learning and inference in cortical microcircuits. This interpretation creates new opportunities for building neuromorphic systems driven by probabilistic learning algorithms. However, such systems must have two crucial features: 1) the neurons should follow a specific behavioral model, and 2) stochastic spiking should be implemented efficiently for it to be scalable. This paper proposes a memristor-based stochastically spiking neuron that fulfills these requirements. First, the analytical model of the memristor is enhanced so it can capture the behavioral stochasticity consistent with experimentally observed phenomena. The switching behavior of the memristor model is demonstrated to be akin to the firing of the stochastic spike response neuron model, the primary building block for probabilistic algorithms in spiking neural networks. Furthermore, the paper proposes a neural soma circuit that utilizes the intrinsic nondeterminism of memristive switching for efficient spike generation. The simulations and analysis of the behavior of a single stochastic neuron and a winner-take-all network built of such neurons and trained on handwritten digits confirm that the circuit can be used for building probabilistic sampling and pattern adaptation machinery in spiking networks. The findings constitute an important step towards scalable and efficient probabilistic neuromorphic platforms. © 2011 IEEE.

  6. Inhibitory control of hippocampal inhibitory neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Topolnik

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Information processing within neuronal networks is determined by a dynamic partnership between principal neurons and local circuit inhibitory interneurons. The population of GABAergic interneurons is extremely heterogeneous and comprises, in many brain regions, cells with divergent morphological and physiological properties, distinct molecular expression profiles, and highly specialized functions. GABAergic interneurons have been studied extensively during the past two decades, especially in the hippocampus, which is a relatively simple cortical structure. Different types of hippocampal inhibitory interneurons control spike initiation (e.g., axo-axonic and basket cells and synaptic integration (e.g., bistratified and oriens–lacunosum moleculare interneurons within pyramidal neurons and synchronize local network activity, providing a means for functional segregation of neuronal ensembles and proper routing of hippocampal information. Thus, it is thought that, at least in the hippocampus, GABAergic inhibitory interneurons represent critical regulating elements at all stages of information processing, from synaptic integration and spike generation to large-scale network activity. However, this raises an important question: if inhibitory interneurons are fundamental for network computations, what are the mechanisms that control the activity of the interneurons themselves? Given the essential role of synaptic inhibition in the regulation of neuronal activity, it would be logical to expect that specific inhibitory mechanisms have evolved to control the operation of interneurons. Here, we review the mechanisms of synaptic inhibition of interneurons and discuss their role in the operation of hippocampal inhibitory circuits.

  7. Axonal PPARγ promotes neuronal regeneration after injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lezana, Juan Pablo; Dagan, Shachar Y; Robinson, Ari; Goldstein, Ronald S; Fainzilber, Mike; Bronfman, Francisca C; Bronfman, Miguel

    2016-06-01

    PPARγ is a ligand-activated nuclear receptor best known for its involvement in adipogenesis and glucose homeostasis. PPARγ activity has also been associated with neuroprotection in different neurological disorders, but the mechanisms involved in PPARγ effects in the nervous system are still unknown. Here we describe a new functional role for PPARγ in neuronal responses to injury. We found both PPAR transcripts and protein within sensory axons and observed an increase in PPARγ protein levels after sciatic nerve crush. This was correlated with increased retrograde transport of PPARγ after injury, increased association of PPARγ with the molecular motor dynein, and increased nuclear accumulation of PPARγ in cell bodies of sensory neurons. Furthermore, PPARγ antagonists attenuated the response of sensory neurons to sciatic nerve injury, and inhibited axonal growth of both sensory and cortical neurons in culture. Thus, axonal PPARγ is involved in neuronal injury responses required for axonal regeneration. Since PPARγ is a major molecular target of the thiazolidinedione (TZD) class of drugs used in the treatment of type II diabetes, several pharmaceutical agents with acceptable safety profiles in humans are available. Our findings provide motivation and rationale for the evaluation of such agents for efficacy in central and peripheral nerve injuries. PMID:26446277

  8. Hydrodynamic Limit for Spatially Structured Interacting Neurons

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, Aline; Ost, Guilherme; Rodríguez, Andrés A.

    2015-12-01

    We study the hydrodynamic limit of a stochastic system of neurons whose interactions are given by Kac Potentials that mimic chemical and electrical synapses and leak currents. The system consists of \\varepsilon ^{-2} neurons embedded in [0,1)^2, each spiking randomly according to a point process with rate depending on both its membrane potential and position. When neuron i spikes, its membrane potential is reset to 0 while the membrane potential of j is increased by a positive value \\varepsilon ^2 a(i,j), if i influences j. Furthermore, between consecutive spikes, the system follows a deterministic motion due both to electrical synapses and leak currents. The electrical synapses are involved in the synchronization of the membrane potentials of the neurons, while the leak currents inhibit the activity of all neurons, attracting simultaneously their membrane potentials to 0. We show that the empirical distribution of the membrane potentials converges, as \\varepsilon vanishes, to a probability density ρ _t(u,r) which is proved to obey a nonlinear PDE of Hyperbolic type.

  9. Spin orbit torque based electronic neuron

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sengupta, Abhronil, E-mail: asengup@purdue.edu; Choday, Sri Harsha; Kim, Yusung; Roy, Kaushik [School of Electrical and Computer Engineering, Purdue University, West Lafayette, Indiana 47907 (United States)

    2015-04-06

    A device based on current-induced spin-orbit torque (SOT) that functions as an electronic neuron is proposed in this work. The SOT device implements an artificial neuron's thresholding (transfer) function. In the first step of a two-step switching scheme, a charge current places the magnetization of a nano-magnet along the hard-axis, i.e., an unstable point for the magnet. In the second step, the SOT device (neuron) receives a current (from the synapses) which moves the magnetization from the unstable point to one of the two stable states. The polarity of the synaptic current encodes the excitatory and inhibitory nature of the neuron input and determines the final orientation of the magnetization. A resistive crossbar array, functioning as synapses, generates a bipolar current that is a weighted sum of the inputs. The simulation of a two layer feed-forward artificial neural network based on the SOT electronic neuron shows that it consumes ∼3× lower power than a 45 nm digital CMOS implementation, while reaching ∼80% accuracy in the classification of 100 images of handwritten digits from the MNIST dataset.

  10. Reliable neuronal systems: the importance of heterogeneity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Lengler

    Full Text Available For every engineer it goes without saying: in order to build a reliable system we need components that consistently behave precisely as they should. It is also well known that neurons, the building blocks of brains, do not satisfy this constraint. Even neurons of the same type come with huge variances in their properties and these properties also vary over time. Synapses, the connections between neurons, are highly unreliable in forwarding signals. In this paper we argue that both these fact add variance to neuronal processes, and that this variance is not a handicap of neural systems, but that instead predictable and reliable functional behavior of neural systems depends crucially on this variability. In particular, we show that higher variance allows a recurrently connected neural population to react more sensitively to incoming signals, and processes them faster and more energy efficient. This, for example, challenges the general assumption that the intrinsic variability of neurons in the brain is a defect that has to be overcome by synaptic plasticity in the process of learning.

  11. Binding by asynchrony: the neuronal phase code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoltan Nadasdy

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Neurons display continuous subthreshold oscillations and discrete action potentials. When action potentials are phase-locked to the subthreshold oscillation, we hypothesize they represent two types of information: the presence/absence of a sensory feature and the phase of subthreshold oscillation. If subthreshold oscillation phases are neuron-specific, then the sources of action potentials can be recovered based on the action potential times. If the spatial information about the stimulus is converted to action potential phases, then action potentials from multiple neurons can be combined into a single axon and the spatial configuration reconstructed elsewhere. For the reconstruction to be successful, we introduce two assumptions: that a subthreshold oscillation field has a constant phase gradient and that coincidences between action potentials and intracellular subthreshold oscillations are neuron-specific as defined by the "interference principle." Under these assumptions, a phase coding model enables information transfer between structures and reproduces experimental phenomenons such as phase precession, grid cell architecture, and phase modulation of cortical spikes. This article reviews a recently proposed neuronal algorithm for information encoding and decoding from the phase of action potentials (Nadasdy 2009. The focus is given to the principles common across different systems instead of emphasizing system specific differences.

  12. Development of dendrite polarity in Drosophila neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Sarah E

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Drosophila neurons have dendrites that contain minus-end-out microtubules. This microtubule arrangement is different from that of cultured mammalian neurons, which have mixed polarity microtubules in dendrites. Results To determine whether Drosophila and mammalian dendrites have a common microtubule organization during development, we analyzed microtubule polarity in Drosophila dendritic arborization neuron dendrites at different stages of outgrowth from the cell body in vivo. As dendrites initially extended, they contained mixed polarity microtubules, like mammalian neurons developing in culture. Over a period of several days this mixed microtubule array gradually matured to a minus-end-out array. To determine whether features characteristic of dendrites were localized before uniform polarity was attained, we analyzed dendritic markers as dendrites developed. In all cases the markers took on their characteristic distribution while dendrites had mixed polarity. An axonal marker was also quite well excluded from dendrites throughout development, although this was perhaps more efficient in mature neurons. To confirm that dendrite character could be acquired in Drosophila while microtubules were mixed, we genetically disrupted uniform dendritic microtubule organization. Dendritic markers also localized correctly in this case. Conclusions We conclude that developing Drosophila dendrites initially have mixed microtubule polarity. Over time they mature to uniform microtubule polarity. Dendrite identity is established before the mature microtubule arrangement is attained, during the period of mixed microtubule polarity.

  13. Monitoring mRNA Translation in Neuronal Processes Using Fluorescent Non-Canonical Amino Acid Tagging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kos, Aron; Wanke, Kai A; Gioio, Anthony; Martens, Gerard J; Kaplan, Barry B; Aschrafi, Armaz

    2016-05-01

    A steady accumulation of experimental data argues that protein synthesis in neurons is not merely restricted to the somatic compartment, but also occurs in several discrete cellular micro-domains. Local protein synthesis is critical for the establishment of synaptic plasticity in mature dendrites and in directing the growth cones of immature axons, and has been associated with cognitive impairment in mice and humans. Although in recent years a number of important mechanisms governing this process have been described, it remains technically challenging to precisely monitor local protein synthesis in individual neuronal cell parts independent from the soma. This report presents the utility of employing microfluidic chambers for the isolation and treatment of single neuronal cellular compartments. Furthermore, it is demonstrated that a protein synthesis assay, based on fluorescent non-canonical amino acid tagging (FUNCAT), can be combined with this cell culture system to label nascent proteins within a discrete structural and functional domain of the neuron. Together, these techniques could be employed for the detection of protein synthesis within developing and mature neurites, offering an effective approach to elucidate novel mechanisms controlling synaptic maintenance and plasticity. PMID:27026294

  14. Involvement of JNK and Caspase Activation in Hoiamide A-Induced Neurotoxicity in Neocortical Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhengyu Cao

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available The frequent occurrence of Moorea producens (formerly Lyngbya majuscula blooms has been associated with adverse effects on human health. Hoiamide A is a structurally unique cyclic depsipeptide isolated from an assemblage of the marine cyanobacteria M. producens and Phormidium gracile. We examined the influence of hoiamide A on neurite outgrowth in neocortical neurons and found that it suppressed neurite outgrowth with an IC50 value of 4.89 nM. Further study demonstrated that hoiamide A stimulated lactic acid dehydrogenase (LDH efflux, nuclear condensation and caspase-3 activity with EC50 values of 3.66, 2.55 and 4.33 nM, respectively. These data indicated that hoiamide A triggered a unique neuronal death profile that involves both necrotic and apoptotic mechanisms. The similar potencies and similar time-response relationships between LDH efflux and caspase-3 activation/nuclear condensation suggested that both necrosis and apoptosis may derive from interaction with a common molecular target. The broad-spectrum caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK completely inhibited hoiamide A-induced neurotoxicity. Additionally, hoiamide A stimulated JNK phosphorylation, and a JNK inhibitor attenuated hoiamide A-induced neurotoxicity. Collectively, these data demonstrate that hoiamide A-induced neuronal death requires both JNK and caspase signaling pathways. The potent neurotoxicity and unique neuronal cell death profile of hoiamide A represents a novel neurotoxic chemotype from marine cyanobacteria.

  15. Fast and slow activation kinetics of voltage-gated sodium channels in molluscan neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilly, W F; Gillette, R; McFarlane, M

    1997-05-01

    Whole cell patch-clamp recordings of Na current (I(Na)) were made under identical experimental conditions from isolated neurons from cephalopod (Loligo, Octopus) and gastropod (Aplysia, Pleurobranchaea, Doriopsilla) species to compare properties of activation gating. Voltage dependence of peak Na conductance (gNa) is very similar in all cases, but activation kinetics in the gastropod neurons studied are markedly slower. Kinetic differences are very pronounced only over the voltage range spanned by the gNa-voltage relation. At positive and negative extremes of voltage, activation and deactivation kinetics of I(Na) are practically indistinguishable in all species studied. Voltage-dependent rate constants underlying activation of the slow type of Na channel found in gastropods thus appear to be much more voltage dependent than are the equivalent rates in the universally fast type of channel that predominates in cephalopods. Voltage dependence of inactivation kinetics shows a similar pattern and is representative of activation kinetics for the two types of Na channels. Neurons with fast Na channels can thus make much more rapid adjustments in the number of open Na channels at physiologically relevant voltages than would be possible with only slow Na channels. This capability appears to be an adaptation that is highly evolved in cephalopods, which are well known for their high-speed swimming behaviors. Similarities in slow and fast Na channel subtypes in molluscan and mammalian neurons are discussed. PMID:9163364

  16. Controlled neuronal cell patterning and guided neurite growth on micropatterned nanofiber platforms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Patterning neuronal cells and guiding neurite growth are important for applications such as prosthetics, cell based biosensors, and tissue engineering. In this paper, a microdevice is presented that provides neuronal cell patterning and guided neurite growth on a collagen coated gelatin/PCL nanofiber mat. The pattern consisted of a grid of polystyrene microwells/nodes to confine the cell bodies and orthogonal grooves to guide neurite growth from each node. Vacuum assisted cell seeding was used to localize cell bodies in the microwells and physically separate the cells during seeding. The electrospun nanofiber mats under the polystyrene microstructures were coated with collagen to enhance the cellular attachment and enhance differentiation. We evaluated the performance of our device using adhesion, viability, and differentiation assays of neuron-like PC12 cells compared to controls for vacuum seeding, spatial isolation and guidance, and collagen coating of the fibers. The device provided PC12 cell patterning with increased adhesion, differentiation, and guided neurite outgrowth compared to controls, demonstrating its potential for in vitro neuronal cell patterning studies. (paper)

  17. Human dental pulp stem cells express many pluripotency regulators and differentiate into neuronal cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Behnam Ebrahimi; Mohammad Mehdi Yaghoobi; Ali Mohammadi Kamal-abadi; Maryam Raoof

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells were isolated from human dental pulp using an optimized method, in which pulp pieces were digested by enzymes and immobilized to enhance cell outgrowth. Stem cell marker expression was detected by reverse transcription-PCR (RT-PCR), and differentiation markers were detected by real-time quantitative RT-PCR and immunocytochemistry. Results showed that dental pulp stem cells actively expressed nanog, oct4, nucleostemin slain-1, jmjd1a, jmjd2c, and cyclin D1. When stem cells were induced to differentiate into neurons, nucleostemin, nanog, and cyclin D1 expres-sion significantly decreased, whereas expression of neuronal markers, such as microtubule asso-ciated protein-2 and neurofilament-heavy, significantly increased. These results suggested that stem cells exited a pluripotent state and entered a neuronal differentiation pathway. In addition, results demonstrated that human dental pulp serves as a reservoir of stem cells that express defined stem cell markers; these cells were easily isolated and were induced to differentiate towards a desired cell lineage.

  18. Oestradiol synthesized by female neurons generates sex differences in neuritogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ruiz-Palmero, Isabel; Ortiz-Rodriguez, Ana; Melcangi, Roberto Cosimo; Caruso, Donatella; Garcia-Segura, Luis M.; Rune, Gabriele M.; Arevalo, Maria-Angeles

    2016-01-01

    Testosterone produced by the foetal testis is converted by male neurons to oestradiol, which masculinizes neuronal morphology. Female neurons are known to synthesize oestradiol in absence of exogenous testosterone. However, the role of neuronal oestradiol on the differentiation of foetal female neurons is unknown. Here we show that, due to endogenous neuronal oestradiol synthesis, female hippocampal neurons have higher expression of the neuritogenic protein Neurogenin 3 and enhanced neuritogenesis than males. Exogenous application of testosterone or its metabolite dihydrotestosterone increases Neurogenin 3 expression and promotes neuritogenesis in males, but reduces these parameters in females. Together our data indicate that gonadal-independent oestradiol synthesis by female neurons participates in the generation of sex differences in hippocampal neuronal development. PMID:27553191

  19. Current Source Density Estimation for Single Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dorottya Cserpán

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Recent developments of multielectrode technology made it possible to measure the extracellular potential generated in the neural tissue with spatial precision on the order of tens of micrometers and on submillisecond time scale. Combining such measurements with imaging of single neurons within the studied tissue opens up new experimental possibilities for estimating distribution of current sources along a dendritic tree. In this work we show that if we are able to relate part of the recording of extracellular potential to a specific cell of known morphology we can estimate the spatiotemporal distribution of transmembrane currents along it. We present here an extension of the kernel CSD method (Potworowski et al., 2012 applicable in such case. We test it on several model neurons of progressively complicated morphologies from ball-and-stick to realistic, up to analysis of simulated neuron activity embedded in a substantial working network (Traub et al, 2005. We discuss the caveats and possibilities of this new approach.

  20. Inflammatory mechanism in ischemic neuronal injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ya-Dan WEN; Hui-Ling ZHANG; Zheng-Hong QIN

    2006-01-01

    Inflammation has been implicated as a secondary mechanism underlying neuronal injury induced by ischemia.A variety of experimental models, including thromboembolic stroke, focal and global ischemia, have been used to evaluate contributions of inflammation to neuronal damage. The vasculature endothelium promotes inflammation through upregulation of adhesion molecules such as intercellular adhesion molecule (ICAM), E-selectin, and P-selectin that bind to circulating leukocytes and facilitate migration of leukocytes into the central nervous system (CNS). Once being in the CNS, leukocytes produce cytotoxic molecules that promote cell death. The response of macrophages and microglia to injury may either be beneficial by scavenging necrotic debris or be detrimental by facilitating cell death of neurons that would otherwise recover. While many studies have tested these hypotheses, the significance of inflammation in stroke models is inconclusive. This review summarizes data regarding roles of cell adhesion molecules, astrocytes, microglia and leukocytes in stroke.

  1. The molecular physiology of CRH neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilera, Greti; Liu, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Corticotropin releasing hormone (CRH) is essential for stress adaptation by mediating hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, behavioral and autonomic responses to stress. Activation of CRH neurons depends on neural afferents from the brain stem and limbic system, leading to sequential CRH release and synthesis. CRH transcription is required to restore mRNA and peptide levels, but termination of the response is essential to prevent pathology associated with chronic elevations of CRH and HPA axis activity. Inhibitory feedback mediated by glucocorticoids and intracellular production of the repressor, Inducible Cyclic AMP Early Repressor (ICER), limit the magnitude and duration of CRH neuronal activation. Induction of CRH transcription is mediated by the cyclic AMP/protein kinase A/cyclic AMP responsive element binding protein (CREB)-dependent pathways, and requires cyclic AMP-dependent nuclear translocation of the CREB co-activator, Transducer of Regulated CREB activity (TORC). This article reviews current knowledge on the mechanisms regulating CRH neuron activity. PMID:21871477

  2. Detecting cell assemblies in large neuronal populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes-dos-Santos, Vítor; Ribeiro, Sidarta; Tort, Adriano B L

    2013-11-15

    Recent progress in the technology for single unit recordings has given the neuroscientific community the opportunity to record the spiking activity of large neuronal populations. At the same pace, statistical and mathematical tools were developed to deal with high-dimensional datasets typical of such recordings. A major line of research investigates the functional role of subsets of neurons with significant co-firing behavior: the Hebbian cell assemblies. Here we review three linear methods for the detection of cell assemblies in large neuronal populations that rely on principal and independent component analysis. Based on their performance in spike train simulations, we propose a modified framework that incorporates multiple features of these previous methods. We apply the new framework to actual single unit recordings and show the existence of cell assemblies in the rat hippocampus, which typically oscillate at theta frequencies and couple to different phases of the underlying field rhythm. PMID:23639919

  3. GABAergic actions on cholinergic laterodorsal tegmental neurons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kohlmeier, K A; Kristiansen, Uffe

    2010-01-01

    Cholinergic neurons of the pontine laterodorsal tegmentum (LDT) play a critical role in regulation of behavioral state. Therefore, elucidation of mechanisms that control their activity is vital for understanding of how switching between wakefulness, sleep and anesthetic states is effectuated. In...... vivo studies suggest that GABAergic mechanisms within the pons play a critical role in behavioral state switching. However, the postsynaptic, electrophysiological actions of GABA on LDT neurons, as well as the identity of GABA receptors present in the LDT mediating these actions is virtually unexplored...... neurons. Post-synaptic location of GABA(A) receptors was demonstrated by persistence of muscimol-induced inward currents in TTX and low Ca(2+) solutions. THIP, a selective GABA(A) receptor agonist with a preference for d-subunit containing GABA(A) receptors, induced inward currents, suggesting the...

  4. Postsynaptic scaffolds for nicotinic receptors on neurons

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Robert A NEFF III; David GOMEZ-VARELA; Catarina C FERNANDES; Darwin K BERG

    2009-01-01

    Complex postsynaptic scaffolds determine the structure and signaling capabilities of glutamatergic synapses. Recent studies indicate that some of the same scaffold components contribute to the formation and function of nicotinic synapses on neurons. PDZ-containing proteins comprising the PSD-95 family co-localize with nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs) and mediate downstream signaling in the neurons. The PDZ-proteins also promote functional nicotinic innerva- tion of the neurons, as does the scaffold protein APC and transmembrane proteins such as neuroligin and the EphB2 recep- tor. In addition, specific chaperones have been shown to facilitate nAChR assembly and transport to the cell surface. This review summarizes recent results in these areas and raises questions for the future about the mechanism and synaptic role of nAChR trafficking.

  5. Microglia in neuronal plasticity: Influence of stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delpech, Jean-Christophe; Madore, Charlotte; Nadjar, Agnes; Joffre, Corinne; Wohleb, Eric S; Layé, Sophie

    2015-09-01

    The central nervous system (CNS) has previously been regarded as an immune-privileged site with the absence of immune cell responses but this dogma was not entirely true. Microglia are the brain innate immune cells and recent findings indicate that they participate both in CNS disease and infection as well as facilitate normal CNS function. Microglia are highly plastic and play integral roles in sculpting the structure of the CNS, refining neuronal circuitry and connectivity, and contribute actively to neuronal plasticity in the healthy brain. Interestingly, psychological stress can perturb the function of microglia in association with an impaired neuronal plasticity and the development of emotional behavior alterations. As a result it seemed important to describe in this review some findings indicating that the stress-induced microglia dysfunction may underlie neuroplasticity deficits associated to many mood disorders. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled 'Neuroimmunology and Synaptic Function'. PMID:25582288

  6. Mechanosensor Channels in Mammalian Somatosensory Neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick Delmas

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Mechanoreceptive sensory neurons innervating the skin, skeletal muscles andviscera signal both innocuous and noxious information necessary for proprioception, touchand pain. These neurons are responsible for the transduction of mechanical stimuli intoaction potentials that propagate to the central nervous system. The ability of these cells todetect mechanical stimuli impinging on them relies on the presence of mechanosensitivechannels that transduce the external mechanical forces into electrical and chemical signals.Although a great deal of information regarding the molecular and biophysical properties ofmechanosensitive channels in prokaryotes has been accumulated over the past two decades,less is known about the mechanosensitive channels necessary for proprioception and thesenses of touch and pain. This review summarizes the most pertinent data onmechanosensitive channels of mammalian somatosensory neurons, focusing on theirproperties, pharmacology and putative identity.

  7. Runx transcription factors in neuronal development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiga Takashi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Runt-related (Runx transcription factors control diverse aspects of embryonic development and are responsible for the pathogenesis of many human diseases. In recent years, the functions of this transcription factor family in the nervous system have just begun to be understood. In dorsal root ganglion neurons, Runx1 and Runx3 play pivotal roles in the development of nociceptive and proprioceptive sensory neurons, respectively. Runx appears to control the transcriptional regulation of neurotrophin receptors, numerous ion channels and neuropeptides. As a consequence, Runx contributes to diverse aspects of the sensory system in higher vertebrates. In this review, we summarize recent progress in determining the role of Runx in neuronal development.

  8. Irreplaceability of Neuronal Ensembles after Memory Allocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naoki Matsuo

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Lesion studies suggest that an alternative system can compensate for damage to the primary region employed when animals acquire a memory. However, it is unclear whether functional compensation occurs at the cellular ensemble level. Here, we inhibited the activities of a specific subset of neurons activated during initial learning by utilizing a transgenic mouse that expresses tetanus toxin (TeNT under the control of the c-fos promoter. Notably, suppression interfered with relearning while sparing the ability to acquire and express fear memory for a distinct context. These results suggest that the activity of the initial ensemble is preferentially dedicated to the same learning and that it is not replaceable once it is allocated. Our results provide substantial insights into the machinery underlying how the brain allocates individual memories to discrete neuronal ensembles and how it ensures that repetitive learning strengthens memory by reactivating the same neuronal ensembles.

  9. Isolation and differentiation of neural stem/progenitor cells from fetal rat dorsal root ganglia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2010-01-01

    To find a promising alternative to neurons or schwann cells (SCs) for peripheral nerve repair applications,this study sought to isolate stem cells from fetal rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) explants.Molecular expression analysis confirmed neural stem cell characteristics of DRG-derived neurospheres in terms of expressing neural stem cell-specific genes and a set of well-defined genes related to stem cell niches and glial fate decision.Under the influence of neurotrophic factors,bFGF and NGF,the neurospheres gave rise to neurofilament-expressing neurons and S100-expressing Schwann cell-like cells by different pathways.This study suggests that a subpopulation of stem cells that reside in DRGs is the progenitor of neurons and glia,which could directly induce the differentiation toward neurons,or SCs.

  10. Isolated Galaxies and Isolated Satellite Systems

    CERN Document Server

    Ann, H B; Choi, Yun-Young

    2009-01-01

    We search for isolated galaxies using a volume-limited sample of galaxies with 0.02r_{vir,nei} and \\rho <\\bar{\\rho} well segregates the CIG galaxies. We confirm the morphology conformity between the host and their satellites, which suggests importance of hydrodynamic interaction among galaxies within their virial radii in galaxy evolution.

  11. Age-related deficits in synaptic plasticity rescued by activating PKA or PKC in sensory neurons of Aplysia californica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T Kempsell

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Brain aging is associated with declines in synaptic function that contribute to memory loss, including reduced postsynaptic response to neurotransmitters and decreased neuronal excitability. To understand how aging affects memory in a simple neural circuit, we studied neuronal proxies of memory for sensitization in mature versus advanced age Aplysia. Glutamate- (L-Glu- evoked excitatory currents were facilitated by the neuromodulator serotonin (5-HT in sensory neurons (SN isolated from mature but not aged animals. Activation of PKA and PKC signaling rescued facilitation of L-Glu currents in aged SN. Similarly, PKA and PKC activators restored increased excitability in aged tail SN. These results suggest that altered synaptic plasticity during aging involves defects in second messenger systems

  12. Firing clamp: A novel method for single-trial estimation of excitatory and inhibitory synaptic neuronal conductances

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anton Chizhov

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding non-stationary neuronal activity as seen in vivo requires estimation of both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic conductances from a single trial of recording. We propose a new intracellular recording method for this purpose called “firing clamp”. Synaptic conductances are estimated from the characteristics of artificially evoked probe spikes, namely the spike amplitude and the mean subthreshold potential, which are sensitive to both excitatory and inhibitory synaptic input signals. The probe spikes, timed at a fixed rate, are evoked in the dynamic-clamp mode by injected meander-like current steps, with the step duration depending on neuronal membrane voltage. We test the method with perforated-patch recordings from isolated cells stimulated by external application or synaptic release of transmitter, and validate the method with simulations of a biophysically-detailed neuron model. The results are compared with the conductance estimates based on conventional current-clamp recordings.

  13. Effects of disinhibition on spatiotemporal pattern of neuronal first recruitment in neuronal networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liangbin Pan; Xindong Sing; Guangxin Xiang; Jing Zhu; Jing Cheng

    2009-01-01

    The propagation of neuronal activities is a key feature to understanding information processing in networks.The analysis based on first-spikes of bursts in turn plays an important role in the research of neuronal activity propagation.Our focus here is to investigate how spatiotemporal patterns of neuronal first-spikes are affected by disinhibition.Multi-electrode arrays were used to record stimulationevoked bursts of multiple neurons in randomly cultured neuronal networks.Both the precise timing of and the rank relationships between first-spikes were analyzed.Compared with evoked bursts in the network's native state,the precise first-spike latencies in its disinhibited state are more consistent and the propagation of its bursting activities is much faster.Additional points of interest are that disinhibited neuronal networks can be evoked to generate stable and distinguishable neuronal first recruitment spatiotemporal patterns specific to the stimulation site,and that the disinhibition may cause the original spatiotemporal patterns to change in a heterogeneous manner with regards to different propagation pathways.(C) 2009 National Natural Science Foundation of China and Chinese Academy of Sciences.Published by Elsevier Limited and Science inChina Press.All rights reserved.

  14. Identification of Neuronal Network Properties from the Spectral Analysis of Calcium Imaging Signals in Neuronal Cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Valencia

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Neuronal networks in vitro are prominent systems to study the development of connections in living neuronal networks and the interplay between connectivity, activity and function. These cultured networks show a rich spontaneous activity that evolves concurrently with the connectivity of the underlying network. In this work we monitor the development of neuronal cultures, and record their activity using calcium fluorescence imaging. We use spectral analysis to characterize global dynamical and structural traits of the neuronal cultures. We first observe that the power spectrum can be used as a signature of the state of the network, for instance when inhibition is active or silent, as well as a measure of the network's connectivity strength. Second, the power spectrum identifies prominent developmental changes in the network such as GABAA switch. And third, the analysis of the spatial distribution of the spectral density, in experiments with a controlled disintegration of the network through CNQX, an AMPA-glutamate receptor antagonist in excitatory neurons, reveals the existence of communities of strongly connected, highly active neurons that display synchronous oscillations. Our work illustrates the interest of spectral analysis for the study of in vitro networks, and its potential use as a network-state indicator, for instance to compare healthy and diseased neuronal networks.

  15. Optophysiological approach to resolve neuronal action potentials with high spatial and temporal resolution in cultured neurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephane ePages

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Cell to cell communication in the central nervous system is encoded into transient and local membrane potential changes (ΔVm. Deciphering the rules that govern synaptic transmission and plasticity entails to be able to perform Vm recordings throughout the entire neuronal arborization. Classical electrophysiology is, in most cases, not able to do so within small and fragile neuronal subcompartments. Thus, optical techniques based on the use of fluorescent voltage-sensitive dyes (VSDs have been developed. However, reporting spontaneous or small ΔVm from neuronal ramifications has been challenging, in part due to the limited sensitivity and phototoxicity of VSD-based optical measurements. Here we demonstrate the use of water soluble VSD, ANNINE-6plus, with laser scanning microscopy to optically record ΔVm in cultured neurons. We show that the sensitivity (> 10 % of fluorescence change for 100 mV depolarization and time response (submillisecond of the dye allows the robust detection of action potentials (APs even without averaging, allowing the measurement of spontaneous neuronal firing patterns. In addition, we show that back-propagating APs can be recorded, along distinct dendritic sites and within dendritic spines. Importantly, our approach does not induce any detectable phototoxic effect on cultured neurons. This optophysiological approach provides a simple, minimally invasive and versatile optical method to measure electrical activity in cultured neurons with high temporal (ms resolution and high spatial (µm resolution.

  16. Spiking Deep Networks with LIF Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Hunsberger, Eric; Eliasmith, Chris

    2015-01-01

    We train spiking deep networks using leaky integrate-and-fire (LIF) neurons, and achieve state-of-the-art results for spiking networks on the CIFAR-10 and MNIST datasets. This demonstrates that biologically-plausible spiking LIF neurons can be integrated into deep networks can perform as well as other spiking models (e.g. integrate-and-fire). We achieved this result by softening the LIF response function, such that its derivative remains bounded, and by training the network with noise to prov...

  17. IMPLEMENTATION OF A NEURON MODEL USING FPGAS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Bañuelos-Saucedo

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available Artificial neural networks base their processing capabilities in a parallel architecture, and this makes them useful to solve pattern recognition, system identification, and control problems. In this paper, we present a FPGA (Field Programmable Gate Array based digital implementation of a McCulloch-Pitts type of neuron model with three types of non-linear activation function: step, ramp-saturation, and sigmoid. We present the VHDL language code used to implement the neurons as well as to present simulation results obtained with Xilinx Foundation 3.0 software. The results are analyzed in terms of speed and percentage of chip usage.

  18. DYNAMICS IN A CLASS OF NEURON MODELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the dynamics in a class of discrete-time neuron mod-els. The neuron model we discussed, defined by such periodic input-output mapping as a sinusoidal function, has a remarkably larger memory capacity than the conven-tional association system with the monotonous function. Our results show that the orbit of the model takes a conventional bifurcation route, from stable equilibrium, to periodicity, even to chaotic region. And the theoretical analysis is verified by numerical simula...

  19. DYNAMICS IN A CLASS OF NEURON MODELS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Junping; Ruan Jiong

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we investigate the dynamics in a class of discrete-time neuron mo-dels. The neuron model we discussed, defined by such periodic input-output mapping as a sinusoidal function, has a remarkably larger memory capacity than the conven-tional association system with the monotonous function. Our results show that the orbit of the model takes a conventional bifurcation route, from stable equilibrium, to periodicity, even to chaotic region. And the theoretical analysis is verified by numerical simulations.

  20. Human mirror neuron system and its plasticity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Chen; Tifei Yuan; Yin Wang; Jun Ding

    2008-01-01

    The mirror neuron system (MNS) was first discovered in non-human primates; these neurons fire when a monkey performs an action or observes another monkey (or even some people) performing that same action. Recent findings have suggested that neural rehabilitation might be achieved through the activation of the MNS in patients after stroke. We propose two major mechanisms (one involving adult neurogenesis and another involving brain-derived neurotrophic factor) that may underlie the activation, modulation and expe-rience-dependent plasticity in the MNS, for further study on promoting central nerve functional reconstruc-tion and rehabilitation of patients with central nervous system injury.

  1. Temporal characteristics of gustatory responses in rat parabrachial neurons vary by stimulus and chemosensitive neuron type.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Geran

    Full Text Available It has been demonstrated that temporal features of spike trains can increase the amount of information available for gustatory processing. However, the nature of these temporal characteristics and their relationship to different taste qualities and neuron types are not well-defined. The present study analyzed the time course of taste responses from parabrachial (PBN neurons elicited by multiple applications of "sweet" (sucrose, "salty" (NaCl, "sour" (citric acid, and "bitter" (quinine and cycloheximide stimuli in an acute preparation. Time course varied significantly by taste stimulus and best-stimulus classification. Across neurons, the ensemble code for the three electrolytes was similar initially but quinine diverged from NaCl and acid during the second 500 ms of stimulation and all four qualities became distinct just after 1s. This temporal evolution was reflected in significantly broader tuning during the initial response. Metric space analyses of quality discrimination by individual neurons showed that increases in information (H afforded by temporal factors was usually explained by differences in rate envelope, which had a greater impact during the initial 2s (22.5% increase in H compared to the later response (9.5%. Moreover, timing had a differential impact according to cell type, with between-quality discrimination in neurons activated maximally by NaCl or citric acid most affected. Timing was also found to dramatically improve within-quality discrimination (80% increase in H in neurons that responded optimally to bitter stimuli (B-best. Spikes from B-best neurons were also more likely to occur in bursts. These findings suggest that among PBN taste neurons, time-dependent increases in mutual information can arise from stimulus- and neuron-specific differences in response envelope during the initial dynamic period. A stable rate code predominates in later epochs.

  2. Isolating the shaft

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paper describes the environment contact preventing isolation of the shaft used to dispose off waste at the Dounreay site (Great Britain) and containing a mixture of radioactive and chemical waste. Well drilling, hydraulic testing, ability to work of isolation are phases of the working. Application of remote controlled transport facility for the waste removal from horizontal tunnel is discussed. Financial problems are treated

  3. Herpes simplex virus-mediated human hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase gene transfer into neuronal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palella, T.D.; Silverman, L.J.; Schroll, C.T.; Homa, F.L.; Levine, M.; Kelley, W.N.

    1988-01-01

    The virtually complete deficiency of the purine salvage enzyme hypoxanthine-guanine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT) results in a devastating neurological disease, Lesch-Nyhan syndrome. Transfer of the HPRT gene into fibroblasts and lymphoblasts in vitro and into hematopoietic cells in vivo has been accomplished by other groups with retroviral-derived vectors. It appears to be necessary, however, to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal cells to correct the neurological dysfunction of this disorder. The neurotropic virus herpes simplex virus type 1 has features that make it suitable for use as a vector to transfer the HPRT gene into neuronal tissue. This report describes the isolation of an HPRT-deficient rat neuroma cell line, designated B103-4C, and the construction of a recombinant herpes simplex virus type 1 that contained human HPRT cDNA. These recombinant viruses were used to infect B103-4C cells. Infected cells expressed HPRT activity which was human in origin.

  4. Roles of mitochondria and temperature in the control of intracellular calcium in adult rat sensory neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, S. H.; Carl, A; McHugh, J.M.; Goff, H.R.; Kenyon, J L

    2007-01-01

    We recorded Ca2+ current and intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) in isolated adult rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG) neurons at 20 and 30 °C. In neurons bathed in tetraethylammonium and dialyzed with cesium, warming reduced resting average [Ca2+]i from 87 to 49 nM and the time constant of the decay of [Ca2+]i transients (τr) from 1.3 s to 0.99 s (Q10 = 1.4). The Buffer Index, the ratio between Ca2+ influx and Δ[Ca2+]i (∫ICa·dt/Δ[Ca2+]i), increased 2- to 3-fold with warming. Neither inhibition of the pl...

  5. A drive-reinforcement model of single neuron function: An alternative to the Hebbian neuronal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klopf, A. Harry

    1986-08-01

    A neuronal learning mechanism is proposed that accounts for the basic animal learning phenomena that have been observed. Among the classical conditioning phenomena predicted by the neuronal model are delay conditioning, trace conditioning, simultaneous conditioning, conditioned stimulus duration and amplitude effects, unconditioned stimulus amplitude effects, interstimulus interval effects, second and higher order conditioning, conditioned inhibition, habituation and extinction, reacquisition effects, backward conditioning, blocking, overshadowing and serial compound conditioning. The proposed neuronal model and learning mechanism offer a new building block for constructing neural network-like computer arthitectures for artificial intelligence.

  6. Aromatase inhibitors augment nociceptive behaviors in rats and enhance the excitability of sensory neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robarge, Jason D; Duarte, Djane B; Shariati, Behzad; Wang, Ruizhong; Flockhart, David A; Vasko, Michael R

    2016-07-01

    Although aromatase inhibitors (AIs) are commonly used therapies for breast cancer, their use is limited because they produce arthralgia in a large number of patients. To determine whether AIs produce hypersensitivity in animal models of pain, we examined the effects of the AI, letrozole, on mechanical, thermal, and chemical sensitivity in rats. In ovariectomized (OVX) rats, administering a single dose of 1 or 5mg/kg letrozole significantly reduced mechanical paw withdrawal thresholds, without altering thermal sensitivity. Repeated injection of 5mg/kg letrozole in male rats produced mechanical, but not thermal, hypersensitivity that extinguished when drug dosing was stopped. A single dose of 5mg/kg letrozole or daily dosing of letrozole or exemestane in male rats also augmented flinching behavior induced by intraplantar injection of 1000nmol of adenosine 5'-triphosphate (ATP). To determine whether sensitization of sensory neurons contributed to AI-induced hypersensitivity, we evaluated the excitability of neurons isolated from dorsal root ganglia of male rats chronically treated with letrozole. Both small and medium-diameter sensory neurons isolated from letrozole-treated rats were more excitable, as reflected by increased action potential firing in response to a ramp of depolarizing current, a lower resting membrane potential, and a lower rheobase. However, systemic letrozole treatment did not augment the stimulus-evoked release of the neuropeptide calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) from spinal cord slices, suggesting that the enhanced nociceptive responses were not secondary to an increase in peptide release from sensory endings in the spinal cord. These results provide the first evidence that AIs modulate the excitability of sensory neurons, which may be a primary mechanism for the effect of these drugs to augment pain behaviors in rats. PMID:27072527

  7. Increased dopaminergic activity in socially isolated rats: an electrophysiological study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabricius, Katrine; Helboe, Lone; Fink-Jensen, Anders;

    2010-01-01

    The development of animal models mimicking symptoms associated with schizophrenia has been a critical step in understanding the neurobiological mechanisms underlying the disease. Long-term social isolation from weaning in rodents, a model based on the neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia......, has been suggested to mimic some of the deficits seen in schizophrenic patients. We confirm in the present study that socially isolated rats display an increase in both spontaneous and d-amphetamine-induced locomotor activity, as well as deficits in sensorimotor gating as assessed in a pre......-pulse inhibition paradigm. In addition, in vivo electrophysiological studies revealed changes in dopaminergic cell firing activity in the ventral tegmental area of isolated rats when compared to group-housed controls. These alterations include an increase in the number of spontaneously active dopaminergic neurons...

  8. Energy and information in Hodgkin-Huxley neurons

    CERN Document Server

    Moujahid, A; Torrealdea, F J

    2015-01-01

    The generation of spikes by neurons is energetically a costly process and the evaluation of the metabolic energy required to maintain the signalling activity of neurons a challenge of practical interest. Neuron models are frequently used to represent the dynamics of real neurons but hardly ever to evaluate the electrochemical energy required to maintain that dynamics. This paper discusses the interpretation of a Hodgkin-Huxley circuit as an energy model for real biological neurons and uses it to evaluate the consumption of metabolic energy in the transmission of information between neurons coupled by electrical synapses, i.e. gap junctions. We show that for a single postsynaptic neuron maximum energy efficiency, measured in bits of mutual information per ATP molecule consumed, requires maximum energy consumption. On the contrary, for groups of parallel postsynaptic neurons we determine values of the synaptic conductance at which the energy efficiency of the transmission presents clear maxima at relatively ver...

  9. Brain May Compensate for Dopamine Neuron Loss Early in Parkinson's

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... More Science News Brain May Compensate for Dopamine Neuron Loss Early in Parkinson’s - May 09 2014 Scientists ... at least 25 percent of the brain’s dopamine neurons already have been lost. So why do symptoms ...

  10. Neuronal autoantibodies in patients with Rasmussen's encephalitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samanci, Bedia; Tektürk, Pınar; Tüzün, Erdem; Erdağ, Ece; Kınay, Demet; Yapıcı, Zuhal; Baykan, Betül

    2016-06-01

    Rasmussen's encephalitis (RE) is a rare disease with unknown pathophysiology. To disclose whether anti-neuronal autoimmunity participates in the aetiology of RE, various neuronal autoantibodies (NAAbs) were investigated in sera of patients with RE and controls. The study included five patients who fulfilled the RE diagnostic criteria (clinical, EEG, and MRI findings) as the patient group, and 50 multiple sclerosis patients and 50 healthy subjects as the control groups. Sera were evaluated for various NAAbs by radioimmunoassay or cell-based assays. All sera were also screened for uncharacterized antibodies to neuronal cell surface or synapse antigens by indirect immunofluorescence using hippocampal cell cultures. The mean age at onset of seizures was 8.3±3.4 years (range: 4-13.5) and mean follow-up time was 11.2±5.4 years (range: 5-19). All patients had unihemispheric atrophy of the cerebral cortex and epilepsia partialis continua. Two of the patients had moderate cognitive impairment, while the others were severely affected, as shown by neuropsychological testing. NAAb positivity was not detected in any of the patients. Immune aetiology is thought to have a role in RE, but the responsible players have not yet been elucidated. Our extensive antibody screening in a small number of patients does not support the presence of antigen-specific anti-neuronal autoimmunity in RE pathophysiology. PMID:27248684

  11. Beyond the frontiers of neuronal types

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demian eBattaglia

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Cortical neurons and, particularly, inhibitory interneurons display a large diversity of morphological, synaptic, electrophysiological and molecular properties, as well as diverse embryonic origins. Various authors have proposed alternative classification schemes that rely on the concomitant observation of several multimodal features. However, a broad variability is generally observed even among cells that are grouped into a same class. Furthermore, the attribution of specific neurons to a single defined class is often difficult, because individual properties vary in a highly graded fashion, suggestive of continua of features between types. Going beyond the description of representative traits of distinct classes, we focus here on the analysis of atypical cells. We introduce a novel paradigm for neuronal type classification, assuming explicitly the existence of a structured continuum of diversity. Our approach, grounded on the theory of fuzzy sets, identifies a small optimal number of model archetypes. At the same time, it quantifies the degree of similarity between these archetypes and each considered neuron. This allows highlighting archetypal cells, which bear a clear similarity to a single model archetype, and edge cells, which manifest a convergence of traits from multiple archetypes.

  12. Astrocytic actions on extrasynaptic neuronal currents

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Balazs ePal

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available In the last few decades, knowledge about astrocytic functions has significantly increased. It was demonstrated that astrocytes are not passive elements of the central nervous system, but active partners of neurons. There is a growing body of knowledge about the calcium excitability of astrocytes, the actions of different gliotransmitters and their release mechanisms, as well as the participation of astrocytes in the regulation of synaptic functions and their contribution to synaptic plasticity. However, astrocytic functions are even more complex than being a partner of the 'tripartite synapse', as they can influence extrasynaptic neuronal currents either by releasing substances or regulating ambient neurotransmitter levels. Several types of currents or changes of membrane potential with different kinetics and via different mechanisms can be elicited by astrocytic activity. Astrocyte-dependent phasic or tonic, inward or outward currents were described in several brain areas. Such currents, together with the synaptic actions of astrocytes, can contribute to neuromodulatory mechanisms, neurosensory and –secretory processes, cortical oscillatory activity, memory and learning or overall neuronal excitability. This mini-review is an attempt to give a brief summary of astrocyte-dependent extrasynaptic neuronal currents and their possible functional significance.

  13. Application of Game Theory to Neuronal Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfons Schuster

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper is a theoretical investigation into the potential application of game theoretic concepts to neural networks (natural and artificial. The paper relies on basic models but the findings are more general in nature and therefore should apply to more complex environments. A major outcome of the paper is a learning algorithm based on game theory for a paired neuron system.

  14. Neuronal Computations Made Visible with Subcellular Resolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaschula, Richard; Salecker, Iris

    2016-06-30

    Sensory information is gradually processed within dedicated neural circuits to generate specific behaviors. In this issue, Yang et al. push technology boundaries to measure both voltage and calcium signals from subcellular compartments of genetically defined interconnected neurons and shed light on local neural computations critical for motion detection. PMID:27368098

  15. Characterization of astrocytic and neuronal benzodiazepine receptors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bender, A.S.

    1988-01-01

    Primary cultures of astrocytes and neurons express benzodiazepine receptors. Neuronal benzodiazepine receptors were of high-affinity, K{sub D} values were 7.5-43 nM and the densities of receptors (B{sub max}) were 924-4131 fmol/mg protein. Astrocytes posses a high-affinity benzodiazepine receptor, K{sub D} values were 6.6-13 nM. The B{sub max} values were 6,033-12,000 fmol/mg protein. The pharmacological profile of the neuronal benzodiazepine receptor was that of the central-type benzodiazepine receptor, where clonazepam has a high-affinity and Ro 5-4864 (4{prime}-chlorodiazepam) has a low-affinity. Whereas astrocytic benzoidazepine receptor was characteristic of the so called peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors, which shows a high-affinity towards Ro 5-4863, and a low-affinity towards clonazepam. The astrocytic benzodiazepine receptors was functionally correlated with voltage dependent calcium channels, since dihydropyridines and benzodiazepines interacted with ({sup 3}H) diazepam and ({sup 3}H) nitrendipine receptors with the same rank order of potency, showing a statistically significant correlation. No such correlation was observed in neurons.

  16. Voltage fluctuations in neurons: signal or noise?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yarom, Yosef; Hounsgaard, Jorn

    2011-01-01

    , we discuss noise-free neuronal signaling and detrimental and beneficial forms of noise in large-scale functional neural networks. Evidence that noise and variability in some cases go hand in hand with behavioral variability and increase behavioral choice, richness, and adaptability opens new avenues...

  17. Suicide in patients with motor neuron disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bak, Søren; Stenager, E N; Stenager, Egon;

    1994-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to assess, through an epidemiological study, whether suicide risk is increased in patients with motor neuron disease (MND). The study involved 116 patients with MND. In the study period 92 patients died, 47 males and 45 females. No patients committed suicide. The...

  18. Neuronal messengers in the human cerebral circulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gulbenkian, S; Uddman, R; Edvinsson, L

    2001-01-01

    neuronal regulation of cerebral blood flow. Although little is known about the physiological actions and inter-relationships among all these putative neurotransmitters, their presence within cerebrovascular nerve fibers will make it necessary to revise our view on the mechanisms of cerebrovascular...

  19. GaAs optoelectronic neuron arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Steven; Grot, Annette; Luo, Jiafu; Psaltis, Demetri

    1993-01-01

    A simple optoelectronic circuit integrated monolithically in GaAs to implement sigmoidal neuron responses is presented. The circuit integrates a light-emitting diode with one or two transistors and one or two photodetectors. The design considerations for building arrays with densities of up to 10,000/sq cm are discussed.

  20. Daidzein induces neuritogenesis in DRG neuronal cultures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yang Shih-Hung

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Absract Background Daidzein, a phytoestrogen found in isoflavone, is known to exert neurotrophic and neuroprotective effects on the nervous system. Using primary rat dorsal root ganglion (DRG neuronal cultures, we have examined the potential neurite outgrowth effect of daidzein. Methods Dissociated dorsal root ganglia (DRG cultures were used to study the signaling mechanism of daidzein-induced neuritogenesis by immunocytochemistry and Western blotting. Results In response to daidzein treatment, DRG neurons showed a significant increase in total neurite length and in tip number per neuron. The neuritogenic effect of daidzein was significantly hampered by specific blockers for Src, protein kinase C delta (PKCδ and mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinases (MEK/ERK, but not by those for estrogen receptor (ER. Moreover, daidzein induced phosphorylation of Src, PKCδ and ERK. The activation of PKCδ by daidzein was attenuated in the presence of a Src kinase inhibitor, and that of ERK by daidzein was diminished in the presence of either a Src or PKCδ inhibitor. Conclusion Daidzein may stimulate neurite outgrowth of DRG neurons depending on Src kinase, PKCδ and ERK signaling pathway.