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Sample records for catecholamine secretion markers

  1. Possible modulatory effect of endogenous islet catecholamines on insulin secretion

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    Gagliardino Juan J

    2001-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The possible participation of endogenous islet catecholamines (CAs in the control of insulin secretion was tested. Methods Glucose-induced insulin secretion was measured in the presence of 3-Iodo-L-Tyrosine (MIT, a specific inhibitor of tyrosine-hydroxylase activity, in fresh and precultured islets isolated from normal rats. Incubated islets were also used to measure CAs release in the presence of low and high glucose, and the effect of α2-(yohimbine [Y] and idazoxan [I] and α1-adrenergic antagonists (prazosin [P] and terazosin [T] upon insulin secretion elicited by high glucose. Results Fresh islets incubated with 16.7 mM glucose released significantly more insulin in the presence of 1 μM MIT (6.66 ± 0.39 vs 5.01 ± 0.43 ng/islet/h, p Conclusion Our results suggest that islet-originated CAs directly modulate insulin release in a paracrine manner.

  2. Stimulation of catecholamine secretion from cultured chromaffin cells by an ionophore-mediated rise in intracellular sodium

    OpenAIRE

    1982-01-01

    The significance of intracellular Na+ concentration in catecholamine secretion of cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was investigated using the monovalent carboxylic ionophore monensin. This ionophore, which is known to mediate a one-for-one exchange of intracellular K+ for extracellular Na+, induces a slow, prolonged release of catecholamines which, at 6 h, amounts of 75-90% of the total catecholamines; carbachol induces a rapid pulse of catecholamine secretion of 25-35%. Although secr...

  3. Profiles of secreted neuropeptides and catecholamines illustrate similarities and differences in response to stimulation by distinct secretagogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podvin, Sonia; Bundey, Richard; Toneff, Thomas; Ziegler, Michael; Hook, Vivian

    2015-09-01

    The goal of this study was to define profiles of secreted neuropeptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters that undergo co-release from sympathoadrenal chromaffin cells upon stimulation by distinct secretagogues. Chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla participate in the dynamic responses to stress, especially that of 'fight and flight', and, thus, analyses of the co-release of multiple neurotransmitters is necessary to gain knowledge of how the stress response regulates cell-cell communication among physiological systems. Results of this study demonstrated that six different secretagogues stimulated the co-release of the neuropeptides Met-enkephalin, galanin, NPY, and VIP with the catecholamines dopamine, norepinephrine, and epinephrine. Importantly, the quantitative profiles of the secreted neurotransmitters showed similarities and differences upon stimulation by the different secretagogues evaluated, composed of KCl depolarization, nicotine, carbachol, PACAP, bradykinin, and histamine. The rank-orders of the secreted profiles of the neurotransmitters were generally similar among these secretagogues, but differences in the secreted amounts of each neurotransmitter occurred with different secretagogues. Epinephrine among the catecholamines showed the highest level of secretion. (Met)enkephalin showed the largest levels of secretion compared to the other neuropeptides examined. Levels of secreted catecholamines were greater than that of the neuropeptides. These data support the hypothesis that profiles of secreted neuropeptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters show similarities and differences upon stimulation by distinct secretagogues. These results illustrate the co-release of concerted neurotransmitter profiles that participate in the stress response of the sympathoadrenal nervous system.

  4. Bidirectional regulation of bakuchiol, an estrogenic-like compound, on catecholamine secretion

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    Mao, Haoping; Wang, Hong; Ma, Shangwei; Xu, Yantong; Zhang, Han; Wang, Yuefei [Tianjin State Key Laboratory of Modern Chinese Medicine, Key Laboratory of Pharmacology of Traditional Chinese Medicine Formulae (China); Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin (China); Niu, Zichang [First Teaching Hospital of Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin (China); Fan, Guanwei; Zhu, Yan [Tianjin State Key Laboratory of Modern Chinese Medicine, Key Laboratory of Pharmacology of Traditional Chinese Medicine Formulae (China); Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin (China); Gao, Xiu Mei, E-mail: gaoxiumei@tjutcm.edu.cn [Tianjin State Key Laboratory of Modern Chinese Medicine, Key Laboratory of Pharmacology of Traditional Chinese Medicine Formulae (China); Institute of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Tianjin (China)

    2014-01-01

    Excess or deficiency of catecholamine (CA) secretion was related with several diseases. Recently, estrogen and phytoestrogens were reported to regulate the activity of CA system. Bakuchiol is a phytoestrogen isolated from the seeds of Psoralea corylifolia L. (Leguminosae) which has been used in Traditional Chinese medicine as a tonic or aphrodisiac. In the present study, bovine adrenal medullary cells were employed to investigate the effects and mechanisms of bakuchiol on the regulation of CA secretion. Further, its anti-depressant like and anti-stress effects were evaluated by using behavioral despair and chronic immobilization stress models. Our results indicated that bakuchiol showed bidirectional regulation on CA secretion. It stimulated basal CA secretion in a concentration dependent manner (p < 0.01), while it reduced 300 μM acetylcholine (ACh) (p < 0.01), 100 μM veratridine (Ver) (p < 0.01) and 56 mM K{sup +} (p < 0.05) induced CA secretion, respectively. We also found that the stimulation of basal CA secretion by bakuchiol may act through estrogen-like effect and the JNK pathway in an extra-cellular calcium independent manner. Further, bakuchiol elevated tyrosine hydroxylase Ser40 and Ser31 phosphorylation (p < 0.01) through the PKA and ERK1/2 pathways, respectively. Bakuchiol inhibited ACh, Ver and 56 mM K{sup +} induced CA secretion was related with reduction of intracellular calcium rise. In vivo experiments, we found that bakuchiol significantly reduced immobilization time in behavioral despair mouse (p < 0.05 or 0.01), and plasma epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE) levels in chronic immobilization stress (p < 0.05). Overall, these results present a bidirectional regulation of bakuchiol on CA secretion which indicated that bakuchiol may exert anti-stress and the potential anti-depressant-like effects. - Highlights: • Bakuchiol stimulated basal catecholamine secretion. • Bakuchiol inhibited various secretagogues induced catecholamine secretion

  5. Stimulation of catecholamine secretion from cultured chromaffin cells by an ionophore-mediated rise in intracellular sodium.

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    Suchard, S J; Lattanzio, F A; Rubin, R W; Pressman, B C

    1982-09-01

    The significance of intracellular Na+ concentration in catecholamine secretion of cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was investigated using the monovalent carboxylic ionophore monensin. This ionophore, which is known to mediate a one-for-one exchange of intracellular K+ for extracellular Na+, induces a slow, prolonged release of catecholamines which, at 6 h, amounts of 75-90% of the total catecholamines; carbachol induces a rapid pulse of catecholamine secretion of 25-35%. Although secretory granule numbers appear to be qualitatively reduced after carbachol, multiple carbachol, or Ba2+ stimulation, overall granule distribution remains similar to that in untreated cells. Monensin-stimulated catecholamine release requires extracellular Na+ but not Ca2+ whereas carbachol-stimulated catecholamine release requires extracellular Ca2+ and is partially dependent on extracellular Na+. Despite its high selectivity for monovalent ions, monensin is considerably more effective in promoting catecholamine secretion than the divalent ionophores, A23187 and ionomycin, which mediate a more direct entry of extracellular Ca2+ into the cell. We propose that the monensin-stimulated increase in intracellular Na+ levels causes an increase in the availability of intracellular Ca2+ which, in turn, stimulates exocytosis. This hypothesis is supported by the comparable stimulation of catecholamine release by ouabain which inhibits the outwardly directed Na+ pump and thus permits intracellular Na+ to accumulate. The relative magnitudes of the secretion elicited by monensin, carbachol, and the calcium ionophores, are most consistent with the hypothesis that, under normal physiological conditions, Na+ acts by decreasing the propensity of Ca2+-sequestering sites to bind the Ca2+ that enters the cell as a result of acetylcholine stimulation. PMID:7130269

  6. Trichosporin-B-III, an alpha-aminoisobutyric acid-containing peptide, causes Ca(2+)-dependent catecholamine secretion from adrenal medullary chromaffin cells.

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    Tachikawa, E; Takahashi, S; Furumachi, K; Kashimoto, T; Iida, A; Nagaoka, Y; Fujita, T; Takaishi, Y

    1991-11-01

    We examined the effect of trichosporin-B-III, an alpha-aminoisobutyric acid-containing antibiotic peptide consisting of 19 amino acid residues and a phenylalaninol, on catecholamine secretion from cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells. Incubation of the cells with trichosporin-B-III (3-20 microM) caused an increase in the secretion of catecholamines. The secretion induced by trichosporin-B-III at low concentrations (3 and 5 microM) was completely dependent on external Ca2+, whereas that induced by higher concentrations (10 and 20 microM) was partly independent of Ca2+. Trichosporin-B-III at low concentration (5 microM) did not increase the release of lactate dehydrogenase, a marker enzyme of cytoplasm, from the cells. In contrast, the peptide at higher concentration (10 microM) increased the release of the enzyme. Trichosporin-B-III also caused both 45Ca2+ influx into the cells and an increase in the intracellular free Ca2+ concentration. The increases in catecholamine secretion and 45Ca2+ influx behaved similarly in relation to trichosporin-B-III concentration (3-10 microM). The time courses of the increases in secretion, 45Ca2+ influx, and intracellular free Ca2+ concentration induced by trichosporin-B-III were also quite similar. Trichosporin-B-III-induced (at 5 microM) secretion was not affected by the elimination of Na+ from the incubation medium or by the addition of tetrodotoxin, a blocker of highly selective voltage-dependent Na+ channels, or hexamethonium, a blocker of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. On the other hand, both diltiazem (2-200 microM) and nicardipine (1-200 microM), blockers of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, inhibited the secretion induced by trichosporin-B-III (5 microM) in a concentration-dependent manner. Trichosporin-B-III-induced (at 5 microM) secretion also was suppressed by the addition of Mn2+ (5 mM) to the medium. The diltiazem (20 microM) inhibition of trichosporin-B-III-induced (at 5 microM) secretion was reversed by

  7. Ouabain distinguishes between nicotinic and muscarinic receptor-mediated catecholamine secretions in perfused adrenal glands of cat.

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    Yamada, Y.; Nakazato, Y; Ohga, A.

    1989-01-01

    1. The effect of ouabain on catecholamine (adrenaline and noradrenaline) secretion induced by agents acting on cholinoceptors was studied in perfused cat adrenal glands. Acetylcholine (ACh) (5 x 10(-7) to 10(-3) M), pilocarpine (10(-5) to 10(-3) M) and nicotine (10(-6) to 5 x 10(-5) M) caused dose-dependent increases in catecholamine secretion. Both ACh and nicotine released more noradrenaline than adrenaline and the reverse was the case for pilocarpine. 2. Ouabain (10(-5) M) enhanced catecho...

  8. Beta-amyloid peptides undergo regulated co-secretion with neuropeptide and catecholamine neurotransmitters

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    Toneff, Thomas; Funkelstein, Lydiane; Mosier, Charles; Abagyan, Armen; Ziegler, Michael; Hook, Vivian

    2013-01-01

    Beta-amyloid (Aβ) peptides are secreted from neurons, resulting in extracellular accumulation of Aβ and neurodegeneration of Alzheimer's disease. Because neuronal secretion is fundamental for the release of neurotransmitters, this study assessed the hypothesis that Aβ undergoes co-release with neurotransmitters. Model neuronal-like chromaffin cells were investigated, and results illustrate regulated, co-secretion of Aβ(1–40) and Aβ(1–42) with peptide neurotransmitters (galanin, enkephalin, an...

  9. Catecholamines levels and parotid secretion in children with chronic atopic dermatitis.

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    Crespi, H; Armando, I; Tumilasci, O; Levin, G; Massimo, J; Barontini, M; Perec, C

    1982-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the in vivo state of both branches of the autonomic nervous system in children with chronic atopic dermatitis. In 15 patients, age 4 to 11, the following parameters were analyzed: (1) basal plasma levels of epinephrine, norepinephrine, and dopamine; (2) poststimulation (standing and i.v. furosemide administration); (3) basal urinary excretion of epinephrine, norepinephrine, and vainillin mandelic acid; (4) 30 min postfurosemide administration; (5) parotid secretory response to intraoral 0.1 m citric acid: flow rate, saliva pH, and concentrations of bicarbonate, chlorides, inorganic phosphates, total protein, and amylase activity. No differences in plasma and urinary basal levels of the catecholamines were observed. In response to standing, plasma norepinephrine from atopic children showed a greater increase than that seen in normal healthy children. From the salivary factors studied, no differences were found in parotid flow-rate, bicarbonates, chlorides, and inorganic phosphates. Protein concentration as well as amylase activity were significantly decreased in children with atopic dermatitis. These findings suggest that in atopic dermatitis, the beta-sympathetic mediated responses are impaired; on the other hand, parasympathetic mediated responses remain preserved. PMID:7086169

  10. Electrolyte and protein secretion by the perfused rabbit mandibular gland stimulated with acetylcholine or catecholamines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Case, R M; Conigrave, A D; Novak, I;

    1980-01-01

    1. A method is described for the isolation and vascular perfusion in vitro of the mandibular gland of the rabbit. The perfusate is a physiological salt solution containing glucose as the only metabolic substrate.2. During perfusion with solutions containing acetylcholine, the gland secretes....... Acetylcholine evoked a small secretory response at a concentration of 8 x 10(-9) mol l(-1) and a maximum response at 8 x 10(-7) mol l(-1). Eserine (2 x 10(-5) mol l(-1)) evoked secretory responses comparable to those evoked by acetylcholine in a concentration of 8 x 10(-9) mol l(-1). Secretion, whether...... unstimulated or evoked by acetylcholine or eserine, could be blocked completely by atropine.4. During prolonged stimulation with acetylcholine, the fluid secretory response declined rapidly over a period of about 15 min from an initial high value to a much lower plateau value. After 3 or more hours...

  11. Butanol isomers exert distinct effects on voltage-gated calcium channel currents and thus catecholamine secretion in adrenal chromaffin cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah McDavid

    Full Text Available Butanol (C4H10OH has been used both to dissect the molecular targets of alcohols/general anesthetics and to implicate phospholipase D (PLD signaling in a variety of cellular functions including neurotransmitter and hormone exocytosis. Like other primary alcohols, 1-butanol is a substrate for PLD and thereby disrupts formation of the intracellular signaling lipid phosphatidic acid. Because secondary and tertiary butanols do not undergo this transphosphatidylation, they have been used as controls for 1-butanol to implicate PLD signaling. Recently, selective pharmacological inhibitors of PLD have been developed and, in some cases, fail to block cellular functions previously ascribed to PLD using primary alcohols. For example, exocytosis of insulin and degranulation of mast cells are blocked by primary alcohols, but not by the PLD inhibitor FIPI. In this study we show that 1-butanol reduces catecholamine secretion from adrenal chromaffin cells to a much greater extent than tert-butanol, and that the PLD inhibitor VU0155056 has no effect. Using fluorescent imaging we show the effect of these drugs on depolarization-evoked calcium entry parallel those on secretion. Patch-clamp electrophysiology confirmed the peak amplitude of voltage-gated calcium channel currents (I(Ca is inhibited by 1-butanol, with little or no block by secondary or tert-butanol. Detailed comparison shows for the first time that the different butanol isomers exert distinct, and sometimes opposing, effects on the voltage-dependence and gating kinetics of I(Ca. We discuss these data with regard to PLD signaling in cellular physiology and the molecular targets of general anesthetics.

  12. Butanol isomers exert distinct effects on voltage-gated calcium channel currents and thus catecholamine secretion in adrenal chromaffin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDavid, Sarah; Bauer, Mary Beth; Brindley, Rebecca L; Jewell, Mark L; Currie, Kevin P M

    2014-01-01

    Butanol (C4H10OH) has been used both to dissect the molecular targets of alcohols/general anesthetics and to implicate phospholipase D (PLD) signaling in a variety of cellular functions including neurotransmitter and hormone exocytosis. Like other primary alcohols, 1-butanol is a substrate for PLD and thereby disrupts formation of the intracellular signaling lipid phosphatidic acid. Because secondary and tertiary butanols do not undergo this transphosphatidylation, they have been used as controls for 1-butanol to implicate PLD signaling. Recently, selective pharmacological inhibitors of PLD have been developed and, in some cases, fail to block cellular functions previously ascribed to PLD using primary alcohols. For example, exocytosis of insulin and degranulation of mast cells are blocked by primary alcohols, but not by the PLD inhibitor FIPI. In this study we show that 1-butanol reduces catecholamine secretion from adrenal chromaffin cells to a much greater extent than tert-butanol, and that the PLD inhibitor VU0155056 has no effect. Using fluorescent imaging we show the effect of these drugs on depolarization-evoked calcium entry parallel those on secretion. Patch-clamp electrophysiology confirmed the peak amplitude of voltage-gated calcium channel currents (I(Ca)) is inhibited by 1-butanol, with little or no block by secondary or tert-butanol. Detailed comparison shows for the first time that the different butanol isomers exert distinct, and sometimes opposing, effects on the voltage-dependence and gating kinetics of I(Ca). We discuss these data with regard to PLD signaling in cellular physiology and the molecular targets of general anesthetics.

  13. Inhibition of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake and catecholamine secretion by phenothiazines and pimozide in adrenal medulla cells cultures

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    Slepetis, R.; Kirshner, N.

    1982-05-01

    The inhibition by several phenothiazine drugs and pimozide of the uptake of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ and secretion of catecholamines by cultured adrenal medulla cells stimulated with nicotine, veratridine, 50 mM K/sup +/, ionomycin and Ba/sup 2 +/ was studied. The inhibition of /sup 45/Ca/sup 2 +/ uptake, except for ionomycin, closely parallelled the inhibition of catecholamine secretion. The nicotine-and veratridine-stimulated effects were several fold more sensitive to inhibition by the drugs than were those stimulated by 50mM K/sup +/, ionomycin and Ba/sup 2 +/; the ionomycin-stimulated effects were least sensitive to inhibition. These studies indicate that the drugs have multiple effects on stimulus-secretion coupling in adrenal medulla cells. It is suggested that inhibition of the veratridine- and nicotine-stimulated events is due to membrane perturbations caused by the drugs, that inhibition of the 50mM K/sup +/- and Ba/sup 2 +/-stimulated events is due to alterations in the voltage sensitive membrane Ca/sup 2 +/ channel, and that inhibition of secretion elicited by ionomycin may be due to inhibition of Ca/sup 2 +/-calmodulin reactions or to more profound nonspecific membrane effects.

  14. Exploring the Impact of Short- and Long-Term Hydrocortisone Replacement on Cognitive Function, Quality of Life and Catecholamine Secretion: A Pilot Study.

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    Harbeck, Birgit; Danneberg, Sven; Rahvar, Amir-Hossein; Haas, Christian S; Lehnert, Hendrik; Kropp, Peter; Mönig, Heiner

    2016-09-01

    Hydrocortisone (HC) substitution is essential in the treatment for patients with adrenal insufficiency (AI). Current replacement regimens however only incompletely mimic the physiological circadian rhythm of cortisol secretion, thereby resulting in subclinical temporary hypo- and hypercortisolism. Several studies point toward impairment of cognitive functions under these conditions, in part due to affected catecholamine secretion. Aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of long-term versus short-term HC replacement therapy on the adrenomedullary system and cognitive functions. Fourteen patients with primary or secondary AI were divided into two groups, depending on the duration of disease and HC replacement therapy (<15 years). All subjects underwent standardized neurocognitive testing; in addition, cortisol and catecholamine levels as well as physiological parameters and quality of life (QoL) were assessed. Patients with HC replacement therapy ≥15 years (n = 7) received significantly higher equivalent glucocorticoid doses than those with a shorter lasting therapy (n = 7; p = 0.048). Neuropsychological tests, QoL, physiological parameters, and cortisol levels did not differ significantly between both groups. Of note, norepinephrine levels were significantly lower in patients on short-term HC replacement therapy (p = 0.025). However, there were no significant differences in catecholamines with respect to the underlying pathophysiology, gender, or age. Irrespective of the duration of use, male patients scored significantly better for single aspects of QoL, whereas females performed significantly better in the attention test. Overall, we showed that duration of cortisol replacement therapy may have an impact on catecholamine release, but does not seem to affect cognitive functions and QoL. PMID:27170300

  15. The influence of night-flight noise on sleep and catecholamine secretion. Der Einfluss von Nachtfluglaerm auf den Schlaf und die Katecholaminausscheidung

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    Maschke, C.; Breinl, S. (Technische Univ. Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Technische Akustik); Grimm, R.; Ising, H. (BGA, Berlin (Germany). Inst. fuer Wasser-, Boden- und Lufthygiene)

    1992-03-01

    The influence of noise from night flying on electro-bioligical reactions and on the secretion of catecholamines (adrenaline and noradrenaline) was studied in eight healthy adults whose place of residence exposes them to day-time aircraft noise. The inter-relationships were then analysed, with daytime noise exposure, personality traits and general day-to-day condition reflected in control variables. The subjects were each observed during five nights without noise exposure (Leq=dB(A)) and five nights with noise exposure (Leq=36 to 56 dB(A)), when the following factors were varied: frequency of nocturnal flights; and sound level. All these flights were transmitted via a sound system between the third and sixth hour of the night. In the case of adrenaline, the original data already showed a significant increase with noise exposure. Taking various day-time exposures into account, significant mean value differences between noisy and peaceful nights were assessed in 8-hour collected urine for both catecholamines. Furthermore, catecholamine concentration increases with sound level. (orig.).

  16. Catecholamines in the human diencephalon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Babović Siniša S.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Catecholamines are chemical compounds which play an important role as neurotransmitters in many vital functions of the organism. The paper presents a short survey of their biosynthesis, disintegration and functions, with respect to the neuroanatomical location of cell groups which contain these compounds. Catecholamines in the human hypothalamus Because the authors were most interested in the behavior of catecholamines in the diencephalon, particularly in the hypothalamus, they focused their attention on cells secreting catecholamines (dopamine, noradrenaline, adrenaline, octopamine. The paper also deals with the connections between cellular structures which emit and receive the neuronal impulses that transport catecholamines as neurotransmitters. These include the following dopaminergic systems: nigrostriatal, tuberohypophysial, retinal, periventricular, periglomerular and dopaminergic systems in mesolimbic, mesocortical and diencephalic regions. The paper also indicates other areas in human brain with adrenaline and noradrenaline secreting cells. .

  17. Differentially expressed protein markers in human submandibular and sublingual secretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Shen; Denny, Patricia; Denny, Paul; Xie, Yongming; Loo, Joseph A; Wolinsky, Lawrence E; Li, Yang; McBride, Jim; Ogorzalek Loo, Rachel R; Navazesh, Mavash; Wong, David T

    2004-11-01

    Proteome analysis of secretions from individual salivary glands is important for understanding the health of the oral cavity and pathogenesis of certain diseases. However, cross-contamination of submandibular (SM) and sublingual (SL) glandular secretions can occur. The close anatomic relationship of the SM and SL ductal orifices can lead to such contamination. Additionally, these glands may share common ducts. To insure the purity of SM/SL secretions for proteomic analysis, it is important to develop unique biomarkers which could be used to verify the integrity of the individual glandular saliva. In this study, a proteomics approach based on mass spectrometry and gel electrophoresis techniques was utilized to identify and verify a set of proteins (cystatin C, calgranulin B and MUC5B mucin), which are differentially expressed in SM/SL secretions. SM/SL fluids were obtained from nine healthy subjects. Cystatin C was found to be an SM-selective protein as it was found in all SM fluids but not detected in two SL fluids. MUC5B mucin and calgranulin B, on the other hand, were found to be SL-selective proteins. All SL samples contained MUC5B mucin, whereas MUC5B mucin was not detected in four SM samples. Eight of the SL samples contained calgranulin B; however, calgranulin B was absent in eight SM samples. This set of protein markers, especially calgranulin B, can be used to determine the purity of SM/SL samples, and therefore identify potential individuals who do not exhibit cross-contaminated SM/SL secretions, an important requirement for subsequent proteome analysis of pure SM and SL secretions.

  18. Modulation of adrenal catecholamine secretion by in vivo gene transfer and manipulation of G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2 activity.

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    Lymperopoulos, Anastasios; Rengo, Giuseppe; Zincarelli, Carmela; Soltys, Stephen; Koch, Walter J

    2008-02-01

    We recently reported that the upregulation of adrenal G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2 (GRK2) causes enhanced catecholamine (CA) secretion by desensitizing sympatho-inhibitory alpha (2)-adrenergic receptors (alpha (2)ARs) of chromaffin cells, and thereby aggravating heart failure (HF). In this study, we sought to develop an efficient and reproducible in vivo adrenal gene transfer method to determine whether manipulation of adrenal GRK2 levels/activity regulates physiological CA secretion in rats. We specifically investigated two different in vivo gene delivery methods: direct injection into the suprarenal glands, and retrograde delivery through the suprarenal veins. We delivered adenoviral (Ad) vectors containing either GRK2 or an inhibitor of GRK2 activity, the beta ARKct. We found both delivery approaches equally effective at supporting robust (>80% of the whole organ) and adrenal-restricted transgene expression, in the cortical region as well as in the medullar region. Additionally, rats with AdGRK2-infected adrenals exhibit enhanced plasma CA levels when compared with control rats (AdGFP-injected adrenals), whereas plasma CA levels after Ad beta ARKct infection were significantly lower. Finally, in isolated chromaffin cells, alpha (2)ARs of AdGRK2-infected cells failed to inhibit CA secretion whereas Ad beta ARKct-infected cells showed normal alpha (2)AR responsiveness. These results not only indicate that in vivo adrenal gene transfer is an effective way of manipulating adrenal gland signalling, but also identify GRK2 as a critically important molecule involved in CA secretion.

  19. Enhancement of energy expenditure following a single oral dose of flavan-3-ols associated with an increase in catecholamine secretion.

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    Yusuke Matsumura

    Full Text Available Numerous clinical studies have reported that ingestion of chocolate reduces the risk of metabolic syndrome. However, the mechanisms by which this occurs remain unclear. In this murine study, the metabolic-enhancing activity of a 10 mg/kg mixture of flavan-3-ol fraction derived from cocoa (FL was compared with the same single dose of (--epicatechin (EC. Resting energy expenditure (REE was significantly increased in mice treated with the FL versus the group administered the distilled water vehicle (Cont during periods of ad libitum feeding and fasting. Mice were euthanized under the effect of anesthesia 2, 5, and 20 hr after treatment with FL or Cont while subsequently fasting. The mRNA levels of the uncoupling protein-1 (UCP-1 and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α in brown adipose tissue (BAT were significantly increased 2 hr after administration of FL. UCP-3 and PGC-1α in the gastrocnemius were significantly increased 2 and 5 hr after administration of the FL. The concentrations of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK 1α were found to be significant in the gastrocnemius of mice 2 and 5 hr after ingesting FL. However, these changes were not observed following treatment with EC. Plasma was collected for measurement of catecholamine levels in other animals euthanized by decapitation 2 and 4 hr after their respective group treatment. Plasma adrenaline level was significantly elevated 2 hr after treatment with FL; however, this change was not observed following the administration of EC alone. The present results indicated that FL significantly enhanced systemic energy expenditure, as evidenced by an accompanying increase in the type of gene expression responsible for thermogenesis and lipolysis, whereas EC exhibited this less robustly or effectively. It was suggested the possible interaction between thermogenic and lipolytic effects and the increase in plasma catecholamine concentrations

  20. Enhancement of energy expenditure following a single oral dose of flavan-3-ols associated with an increase in catecholamine secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumura, Yusuke; Nakagawa, Yuta; Mikome, Katsuyuki; Yamamoto, Hiroki; Osakabe, Naomi

    2014-01-01

    Numerous clinical studies have reported that ingestion of chocolate reduces the risk of metabolic syndrome. However, the mechanisms by which this occurs remain unclear. In this murine study, the metabolic-enhancing activity of a 10 mg/kg mixture of flavan-3-ol fraction derived from cocoa (FL) was compared with the same single dose of (-)-epicatechin (EC). Resting energy expenditure (REE) was significantly increased in mice treated with the FL versus the group administered the distilled water vehicle (Cont) during periods of ad libitum feeding and fasting. Mice were euthanized under the effect of anesthesia 2, 5, and 20 hr after treatment with FL or Cont while subsequently fasting. The mRNA levels of the uncoupling protein-1 (UCP-1) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1 alpha (PGC-1α) in brown adipose tissue (BAT) were significantly increased 2 hr after administration of FL. UCP-3 and PGC-1α in the gastrocnemius were significantly increased 2 and 5 hr after administration of the FL. The concentrations of phosphorylated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) 1α were found to be significant in the gastrocnemius of mice 2 and 5 hr after ingesting FL. However, these changes were not observed following treatment with EC. Plasma was collected for measurement of catecholamine levels in other animals euthanized by decapitation 2 and 4 hr after their respective group treatment. Plasma adrenaline level was significantly elevated 2 hr after treatment with FL; however, this change was not observed following the administration of EC alone. The present results indicated that FL significantly enhanced systemic energy expenditure, as evidenced by an accompanying increase in the type of gene expression responsible for thermogenesis and lipolysis, whereas EC exhibited this less robustly or effectively. It was suggested the possible interaction between thermogenic and lipolytic effects and the increase in plasma catecholamine concentrations after

  1. Catecholamine blood test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norepinephrine -- blood; Epinephrine -- blood; Adrenalin -- blood; Dopamine -- blood ... A blood sample is needed. ... the test. This is especially true if both blood and urine catecholamines are to be measured. You ...

  2. Residual Salivary Secretion Ability May Be a Useful Marker for Differential Diagnosis in Autoimmune Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Etsuko Maeshima

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. We have elucidated decreased resting salivary flow in approximately 60% of patients with autoimmune diseases not complicated by Sjögren syndrome (SjS. In this study, salivary stimulation tests using capsaicin were performed to examine residual salivary secretion ability in patients with autoimmune diseases. Materials and Methods. Fifty-eight patients were divided into three groups: patients with primary or secondary SjS (SjS group, patients with systemic sclerosis not complicated by SjS (SSc group, and patients with other autoimmune diseases (non-SjS/non-SSc group. Simple filter paper and filter paper containing capsaicin were used to evaluate salivary flow rates. Results. Resting salivary flow rates were significantly lower in the SjS and SSc groups than in the non-SjS/non-SSc group but did not differ significantly between the SjS and SSc groups. Capsaicin-stimulated salivary flow rates were significantly lower in the SjS and SSc groups than in the non-SjS/non-SSc group, but not significantly different between the SjS and SSc groups. In the non-SjS/non-SSc group, salivary flow rates increased after capsaicin stimulation to the threshold level for determination of salivary gland dysfunction, whereas no improvement was observed in the SjS and SSc groups. Conclusion. Residual salivary secretion ability may be a useful marker for differential diagnosis in autoimmune diseases.

  3. EFFECT OF MOXIBUSTION ON CATECHOLAMINE

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    Objective: To investigate whether moxibustion affects the secretion of catecholamine as adrenalin, noradrenaline and dopamine. Methods: Twenty Wistar rats were allocated to two groups. One was moxibustion-group (10 rats), and the other was non-moxibustion-group (10 rats). Four ignited moxa-cones were applied to bilateral "Shenshu" (肾俞 BL 23). When a moxa-cone burned out, another one was replaced. At the end of each experiment, blood sample (2 mL/rat) was collected from the heart for assaying plasma adrenalin, noradrenaline and dopamine contents with high pressure liquid chromatography. Results:The presented results showed that plasma adrenalin and noradrenaline contents of moxibustion-group are significantly higher than those of non-moxibustion-group (P<0.01). However, there is no significant difference of dopamine between moxibustion- and non-moxibustion- groups (P > 0.05). Conclusion: These results demonstrated that moxibustion stimulates the secretion of adrenaline and noradrenaline in normal rats.

  4. Copeptin as a marker for arginine-vasopressin/antidiuretic hormone secretion in the diagnosis of paraneoplastic syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuttke, A; Dixit, K C; Szinnai, G; Werth, S C; Haagen, U; Christ-Crain, M; Morgenthaler, N; Brabant, G

    2013-12-01

    Direct measurement of arginine-vasopressin/antidiuretic hormone (AVP/ADH) concentrations is not included in the standard diagnostic procedures for paraneoplastic syndrome of inappropriate ADH secretion (SIADH). Here, we evaluate the potential of copeptin measurement as a surrogate marker of AVP/ADH secretion for the direct diagnosis of suspected SIADH in cancer patients. Forty-six unselected cancer patients with serum sodium concentrations permanently below 135 mmol/L were included in this study. We compared standard diagnostic criteria for SIADH to the measurement of plasma copeptin in relation to osmolality. Normative data for comparison were constructed from 24 healthy controls studied under basal conditions, experimental dehydration, and hypotonic hypervolemia as well as from 222 hospital patients with no suspicion of an altered ADH regulation. Log transformation of copeptin revealed a linear relationship to plasma osmolality in the controls (R = 0.495, p < 0.001). Compared to these normative data, copeptin levels in most cancer patients were inappropriately high for plasma osmolality and were not significantly correlated. These results, suggestive for paraneoplastic SIADH, could be confirmed by conventional diagnostic procedures for SIADH. Current strategies to diagnose SIADH are difficult to perform under outpatients conditions. Our approach allows screening from a single plasma sample for true paraneoplastic ADH oversecretion and thus rapid selection for a specific therapy with an AVP receptor antagonist.

  5. Catecholamines, mood, and cardiovascular control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.H.M. Tulen (Joke)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractThe research presented in this thesis addresses the above mentioned issue on the basis of four psychophysiological experiments. These experiments were aimed at separately manipulating concentrations of circulating adrenaline and noradrenaline by means of infusions of catecholamines, phar

  6. Impact of Chromogranin A deficiency on catecholamine storage, catecholamine granule morphology and chromaffin cell energy metabolism in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pasqua, Teresa; Mahata, Sumana; Bandyopadhyay, Gautam K; Biswas, Angshuman; Perkins, Guy A; Sinha-Hikim, Amiya P; Goldstein, David S; Eiden, Lee E; Mahata, Sushil K

    2016-03-01

    Chromogranin A (CgA) is a prohormone and granulogenic factor in neuroendocrine tissues with a regulated secretory pathway. The impact of CgA depletion on secretory granule formation has been previously demonstrated in cell culture. However, studies linking the structural effects of CgA deficiency with secretory performance and cell metabolism in the adrenomedullary chromaffin cells in vivo have not previously been reported. Adrenomedullary content of the secreted adrenal catecholamines norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (EPI) was decreased 30-40 % in Chga-KO mice. Quantification of NE and EPI-storing dense core (DC) vesicles (DCV) revealed decreased DCV numbers in chromaffin cells in Chga-KO mice. For both cell types, the DCV diameter in Chga-KO mice was less (100-200 nm) than in WT mice (200-350 nm). The volume density of the vesicle and vesicle number was also lower in Chga-KO mice. Chga-KO mice showed an ~47 % increase in DCV/DC ratio, implying vesicle swelling due to increased osmotically active free catecholamines. Upon challenge with 2 U/kg insulin, there was a diminution in adrenomedullary EPI, no change in NE and a very large increase in the EPI and NE precursor dopamine (DA), consistent with increased catecholamine biosynthesis during prolonged secretion. We found dilated mitochondrial cristae, endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi complex, as well as increased synaptic mitochondria, synaptic vesicles and glycogen granules in Chga-KO mice compared to WT mice, suggesting that decreased granulogenesis and catecholamine storage in CgA-deficient mouse adrenal medulla is compensated by increased VMAT-dependent catecholamine update into storage vesicles, at the expense of enhanced energy expenditure by the chromaffin cell. PMID:26572539

  7. Catecholamines and diabetic autonomic neuropathy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J

    1995-01-01

    In diabetic patients with autonomic neuropathy plasma noradrenaline concentration, used as an index of sympathetic nervous activity, is low. This decrease is, however, only found in patients with a long duration of diabetes with clinically severe autonomic neuropathy. This apparent insensitivity...... of plasma catecholamine measurements is not due to changes in the clearance of catecholamines in diabetic autonomic neuropathy. The physiological responses to infused adrenaline and to noradrenaline are enhanced, for noradrenaline mainly cardiovascular responses. Adrenoceptors (alpha and beta adrenoceptors......) are not altered in circulating blood cells in diabetic autonomic neuropathy. Thus, a generalized up-regulation of adrenoceptors does not occur in diabetic autonomic neuropathy....

  8. Hidden markers, open secrets: on naming, race-marking, and race-making in Cuba

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael Zeuske

    2002-07-01

    Full Text Available Focuses on how in Cuba race-marking was interrelated with surname-giving, also after the abolition of slavery. Through researching life histories on the local level in the Cienfuegos region, the author examines names of former slaves, finding that these were after abolition in notarial records often marked with the adjectives s.o.a., or "sin otro apellido" (without other surname, taking into account the Iberian double surname tradition. This, according to him, points to a stigmatization of these black citizens and related to their former status as possession, and is thus a racial marker, only more hidden than the open racial assignations during slavery. He relates these postemancipation surnames of former slaves to the dotation of surnames during slavery, whereby most surnames of slaves were those of the last owner of the slaves. He also discusses differences in name-giving between the notarial records and everyday life. He further indicates that a new racism developed in the Cuban society of the late 19th c. and early 20th c., which was voiced more openly in the realm of culture, and regarding events as incarceration and death, and more hidden within the civil and judicial spheres, where the fiction of a race-blind republic was maintained.

  9. Suckling and salsolinol attenuate responsiveness of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis to stress: focus on catecholamines, corticotrophin-releasing hormone, adrenocorticotrophic hormone, cortisol and prolactin secretion in lactating sheep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasiec, M; Tomaszewska-Zaremba, D; Misztal, T

    2014-12-01

    In mammals, the responsiveness of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis to stress is reduced during lactation and this mainly results from suckling by the offspring. The suckling stimulus causes a release of the hypothalamic 1-metyl-6,7-dihydroxy-1,2,3,4-tetrahydroisoquinoline (salsolinol) (a derivative of dopamine), one of the prolactin-releasing factors. To investigate the involvement of salsolinol in the mechanism suppressing stress-induced HPA axis activity, we conducted a series of experiments on lactating sheep, in which they were treated with two kinds of isolation stress (isolation from the flock with lamb present or absent), combined with suckling and/or i.c.v infusion of salsolinol and 1-methyl-3,4-dihydro-isoqinoline (1-MeDIQ; an antagonistic analogue of salsolinol). Additionally, a push-pull perfusion of the infundibular nucleus/median eminence (IN/ME) and blood sample collection with 10-min intervals were performed during the experiments. Concentrations of perfusate corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) and catecholamines (noradrenaline, dopamine and salsolinol), as well as concentrations of plasma adenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), cortisol and prolactin, were assayed. A significant increase in perfusate noradrenaline, plasma ACTH and cortisol occurred in response to both kinds of isolation stress. Suckling and salsolinol reduced the stress-induced increase in plasma ACTH and cortisol concentrations. Salsolinol also significantly reduced the stress-induced noradrenaline and dopamine release within the IN/ME. Treatment with 1-MeDIQ under the stress conditions significantly diminished the salsolinol concentration and increased CRH and cortisol concentrations. Stress and salsolinol did not increase the plasma prolactin concentration, in contrast to the suckling stimulus. In conclusion, salsolinol released in nursing sheep may have a suppressing effect on stress-induced HPA axis activity and peripheral prolactin does not appear to participate in

  10. Circulating catecholamines in acute asthma.

    OpenAIRE

    Ind, P. W.; Causon, R C; Brown, M. J.; Barnes, P. J.

    1985-01-01

    Plasma catecholamine concentrations were measured in 15 patients (six male) aged 14-63 years attending the casualty department with acute severe asthma (peak expiratory flow 27% (SEM 3%) of predicted). Nine patients were admitted and six were not. The plasma noradrenaline concentration, reflecting sympathetic nervous discharge, was two to three times normal in all patients and was significantly higher in those who required admission compared with those discharged home (mean 7.7 (SEM 0.6) v 4....

  11. CA153 in Breast Secretions as a Potential Molecular Marker for Diagnosing Breast Cancer: A Meta Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Fang; Zhu, Shengbo; Yang, Renqi; Huang, Yiyong; Zhang, Hongyu; Xu, Hong; Yang, Jianqing

    2016-01-01

    Purpose Many studies have reported that carbohydrate antigen 153 (CA153) in breast secretions (BS) can discriminate breast cancer (BC) patients from healthy individuals, indicating CA153 in BS as a potential index for BC. This meta-analysis aimed to evaluate the actual diagnostic value of CA153 in BS. Methods Related papers were obtained from Pubmed, Embase, Scopus, Ovid, Sciverse, the Cochrane library, Chinese Biomedical literature Database (CBM), Technology of Chongqing (VIP), Wan Fang Data, and Chinese National Knowledge Infrastructure (CNKI). Pooled sensitivity, specificity, and diagnostic odds ratio (DOR) of CA153 in BS for BC diagnosis were analyzed with the random effect model. SROC and the area under the curve (AUC) were applied to assess overall diagnostic efficiency. Results This meta-analysis included five studies with a total of 329 BC patients and 381 healthy subjects. For CA153 in BS, the summary sensitivity, specificity, and DOR to diagnose BC were 0.63 (95% confidence interval (CI): 0.57∼0.68), 0.82 (95% CI: 0.78∼0.86), and 9.18 (95% CI: 4.22∼19.95), respectively. Furthermore, the AUC of BS CA153 in the diagnosis of BC was 0.8614. Conclusions CA153 in BS is a valuable molecular marker in diagnosing BC and should be applied in standard clinical practices of BC screening upon confirmation of our findings in a larger prospective study. PMID:27636552

  12. Congener specific effects by polychlorinated biphenyls on catecholamine content and release in chromaffin cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Messeri, M.D. [Medizinisches Institut fuer Umwelthygiene an der Heinrich-Heine-Univ., Duesseldorf (Germany); Bickmeyer, U. [Medizinisches Institut fuer Umwelthygiene an der Heinrich-Heine-Univ., Duesseldorf (Germany); Weinsberg, F. [Physiologisches Institut, Universitaetskrankenhaus Hamburg Eppendorf, Martinistasse 52, D-20246 Hamburg (Germany); Wiegand, H. [Medizinisches Institut fuer Umwelthygiene an der Heinrich-Heine-Univ., Duesseldorf (Germany)

    1997-05-01

    The effects of the non-planar polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB) congener 2,2`,4,4`-tetrachlorobiphenyl (2,4-TCB) and of the coplanar PCB congener 3,3`,4,4`-tetrachlorobiphenyl (3,4-TCB) were investigated on the catecholamine content and release from bovine adrenal chromaffin cells in culture. Each congener was tested at three concentrations (20, 50 and 100 {mu}M) and two exposure periods (24 h and 5 days). Catecholamine release induced by K{sup +}-stimulation as well as catecholamine content of Triton X-100 treated cell cultures were examined using high-performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). 2,4-TCB showed dose- and time-dependent effects. 2,4-TCB at 100 {mu}M reduced the K{sup +}-stimulated catecholamine release after 24 h of exposure. After 5 days of exposure, 2,4 TCB at 50 and 100 {mu}M drastically reduced the K{sup +}-stimulated catecholamine release. 3,4-TCB even at a concentration of 100 {mu}M over exposure of either 24 h or 5 days had no effects on the K{sup +}-stimulated secretion. When chromaffin cells, exposed to 2,4-TCB, were lysed with 0.5% Triton X-100, a dose- and time-dependent reduction of the catecholamine content appeared. The 3,4-TCB did not reduce the catecholamine content. Conversely there seemed to be a trend towards an increase in catecholamine content. Spontaneous release of catecholamines was strongly increased by the non-planar 2,4 TCB, while the coplanar 3,4 TCB showed no effects on this parameter. Furthermore, the effects of 2,4 TCB appeared to be reversible after replacing the highest concentration (100 {mu}M) of the TCB-solution with culture-medium at the end of the 24-h exposure. Thus, K{sup +}-stimulated catecholamine release and the catecholamine content of bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was effectively reduced by the non-planar PCB congener whereas spontaneous catecholamine release was strongly increased. The coplanar PCB congener was ineffective at the same conditions. (orig.). With 5 figs., 2 tabs.

  13. Advancing forensic RNA typing: On non-target secretions, a nasal mucosa marker, a differential co-extraction protocol and the sensitivity of DNA and RNA profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berge, Margreet; Bhoelai, Bryan; Harteveld, Joyce; Matai, Anuska; Sijen, Titia

    2016-01-01

    The forensic identification of human body fluids and tissues by means of messenger RNA (mRNA) profiling is a long studied methodology that is increasingly applied to casework samples. Previously, we have described an mRNA multiplex system that targets blood, saliva, semen, menstrual secretion, vaginal mucosa and skin (Lindenbergh et al. and van den Berge et al.). In this study we consider various topics to improve this mRNA profiling system or its use and adapt the method accordingly. Bodily secretions that may be encountered at a crime scene whilst not targeted by the multiplex-id est nasal mucosa, sweat, tears, faeces and urine-were examined for false positive signals. The results prompted us to identify a nasal mucosa marker that allows the discrimination of nasal mucosa from saliva or vaginal mucosa and nosebleed blood from peripheral blood. An updated version of the multiplex was prepared to which the nasal mucosa marker was added and in which markers for semen, vaginal mucosa and blood were replaced. Lactobacillus markers were regarded unsuitable as replacement for vaginal mucosa mRNA markers because of background signals on penile swabs that appeared devoid of female DNA. Furthermore, we provide approaches to deal with highly unbalanced mixtures. First, a differential extraction protocol was incorporated into a co-extraction protocol to allow DNA and RNA analysis of separated non-sperm and sperm fractions. In a second approach, besides the standard multiplex, a customized multiplex is used which excludes markers for prevailing cell types. This allows the use of lower cDNA inputs for the prevailing cell types and higher inputs for cell types that appear masked. Additionally, we assessed the relation between the percentage of alleles or markers detected in DNA or RNA profiles when decreasing sample amounts are analysed. While blood, saliva, semen and menstrual secretion show the trend that DNA profiling is more sensitive than RNA profiling, the reverse is seen

  14. Advancing forensic RNA typing: On non-target secretions, a nasal mucosa marker, a differential co-extraction protocol and the sensitivity of DNA and RNA profiling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berge, Margreet; Bhoelai, Bryan; Harteveld, Joyce; Matai, Anuska; Sijen, Titia

    2016-01-01

    The forensic identification of human body fluids and tissues by means of messenger RNA (mRNA) profiling is a long studied methodology that is increasingly applied to casework samples. Previously, we have described an mRNA multiplex system that targets blood, saliva, semen, menstrual secretion, vaginal mucosa and skin (Lindenbergh et al. and van den Berge et al.). In this study we consider various topics to improve this mRNA profiling system or its use and adapt the method accordingly. Bodily secretions that may be encountered at a crime scene whilst not targeted by the multiplex-id est nasal mucosa, sweat, tears, faeces and urine-were examined for false positive signals. The results prompted us to identify a nasal mucosa marker that allows the discrimination of nasal mucosa from saliva or vaginal mucosa and nosebleed blood from peripheral blood. An updated version of the multiplex was prepared to which the nasal mucosa marker was added and in which markers for semen, vaginal mucosa and blood were replaced. Lactobacillus markers were regarded unsuitable as replacement for vaginal mucosa mRNA markers because of background signals on penile swabs that appeared devoid of female DNA. Furthermore, we provide approaches to deal with highly unbalanced mixtures. First, a differential extraction protocol was incorporated into a co-extraction protocol to allow DNA and RNA analysis of separated non-sperm and sperm fractions. In a second approach, besides the standard multiplex, a customized multiplex is used which excludes markers for prevailing cell types. This allows the use of lower cDNA inputs for the prevailing cell types and higher inputs for cell types that appear masked. Additionally, we assessed the relation between the percentage of alleles or markers detected in DNA or RNA profiles when decreasing sample amounts are analysed. While blood, saliva, semen and menstrual secretion show the trend that DNA profiling is more sensitive than RNA profiling, the reverse is seen

  15. Arecoline inhibits catecholamine release from perfused rat adrenal gland

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dong-yoon LIM; Il-sik KIM

    2006-01-01

    Aim: To study the effect of arecoline, an alkaloid isolated from Areca catechu, on the secretion of catecholamines (CA) evoked by cholinergic agonists and the membrane depolarizer from isolated perfused rat adrenal gland. Methods: Adrenal glands were isolated from male Sprague-Dawley rats. The adrenal glands were perfused with Krebs bicarbonate solution by means of a peristaltic pump. The CA content of the perfusate was measured directly using the fluorometric method.Results: Arecoline (0.1-1.0 mmol/L) perfused into an adrenal vein for 60 min produced dose- and time-dependent inhibition in CA secretory responses evoked by acetylcholine (ACh) (5.32 mmol/L), 1.1-dimethyl-4-phenyl piperazinium iodide (DMPP) (100 μmol/L for 2 min) and 3-(m-choloro-phenyl-carbamoyl-oxy)-2-butynyl trimethyl ammonium chloride (McN-A-343) (100 μmol/L for 2 min). However, lower doses of arecoline did not affect CA secretion of high K+ (56 mmol/L); higher doses greatly reduced CA secretion of high K+. Arecoline also failed to affect basal catecholamine output. Furthermore, in adrenal glands loaded with arecoline (0.3 mmol/L), CA secretory response evoked by Bay-K-8644 (10 μmol/L), an activator of L-type Ca2+ channels, was markedly inhibited, whereas CA secretion by cyclopiazonic acid (10 μmol/L), an inhibitor of cytoplasmic Ca2+-ATPase, was not affected. Nicotine (30 μmol/L), which was peffused into the adrenal gland for 60min, however, initially enhanced ACh-evoked CA secretory responses. As time elapsed, these responses became more inhibited, whereas the initially enhanced high K+-evoked CA release diminished. CA secretion evoked by DMPP and McNA-343 was significantly depressed in the presence of nicotine. Conclusion:Arecoline dose-dependently inhibits CA secretion from isolated perfused rat adrenal gland evoked by activation of cholinergic receptors. At lower doses arecoline does not inhibit CA secretion through membrane depolarization, but at larger doses it does. This inhibitory

  16. 1-Hour OGTT Plasma Glucose as a Marker of Progressive Deterioration of Insulin Secretion and Action in Pregnant Women

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Ghio

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Considering old GDM diagnostic criteria, alterations in insulin secretion and action are present in women with GDM as well as in women with one abnormal value (OAV during OGTT. Our aim is to assess if changes in insulin action and secretion during pregnancy are related to 1-hour plasma glucose concentration during OGTT. We evaluated 3 h/100 g OGTT in 4,053 pregnant women, dividing our population on the basis of 20 mg/dL increment of plasma glucose concentration at 1 h OGTT generating 5 groups (<120 mg/dL, =661; 120–139 mg/dL, =710; 140–159 mg/dL, =912; 160–179 mg/dL, =885; and ≥180 mg/dL, =996. We calculated incremental area under glucose (AUCgluc and insulin curves (AUCins, indexes of insulin secretion (HOMA-B, and insulin sensitivity (HOMA-R, AUCins/AUCgluc. AUCgluc and AUCins progressively increased according to 1-hour plasma glucose concentrations (both <0.0001 for trend. HOMA-B progressively declined (<0.001, and HOMA-R progressively increased across the five groups. AUCins/AUCgluc decreased in a linear manner across the 5 groups (<0.001. Analysing the groups with 1-hour value <180 mg/dL, defects in insulin secretion (HOMA-B: −29.7% and sensitivity (HOMA-R: +15% indexes were still apparent (all <0.001. Progressive increase in 1-hour OGTT is associated with deterioration of glucose tolerance and alterations in indexes of insulin action and secretion.

  17. GPCRs of adrenal chromaffin cells & catecholamines: The plot thickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymperopoulos, Anastasios; Brill, Ava; McCrink, Katie A

    2016-08-01

    The circulating catecholamines (CAs) epinephrine (Epi) and norepinephrine (NE) derive from two major sources in the whole organism: the sympathetic nerve endings, which release NE on effector organs, and the chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla, which are cells that synthesize, store and release Epi (mainly) and NE. All of the Epi in the body and a significant amount of circulating NE derive from the adrenal medulla. The secretion of CAs from adrenal chromaffin cells is regulated in a complex way by a variety of membrane receptors, the vast majority of which are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including adrenergic receptors (ARs), which act as "presynaptic autoreceptors" in this regard. There is a plethora of CA-secretagogue signals acting on these receptors but some of them, most notably the α2ARs, inhibit CA secretion. Over the past few years, however, a few new proteins present in chromaffin cells have been uncovered to participate in CA secretion regulation. Most prominent among these are GRK2 and β-arrestin1, which are known to interact with GPCRs regulating receptor signaling and function. The present review will discuss the molecular and signaling mechanisms by which adrenal chromaffin cell-residing GPCRs and their regulatory proteins modulate CA synthesis and secretion. Particular emphasis will be given to the newly discovered roles of GRK2 and β-arrestins in these processes and particular points of focus for future research will be highlighted, as well.

  18. GPCRs of adrenal chromaffin cells & catecholamines: The plot thickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lymperopoulos, Anastasios; Brill, Ava; McCrink, Katie A

    2016-08-01

    The circulating catecholamines (CAs) epinephrine (Epi) and norepinephrine (NE) derive from two major sources in the whole organism: the sympathetic nerve endings, which release NE on effector organs, and the chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla, which are cells that synthesize, store and release Epi (mainly) and NE. All of the Epi in the body and a significant amount of circulating NE derive from the adrenal medulla. The secretion of CAs from adrenal chromaffin cells is regulated in a complex way by a variety of membrane receptors, the vast majority of which are G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), including adrenergic receptors (ARs), which act as "presynaptic autoreceptors" in this regard. There is a plethora of CA-secretagogue signals acting on these receptors but some of them, most notably the α2ARs, inhibit CA secretion. Over the past few years, however, a few new proteins present in chromaffin cells have been uncovered to participate in CA secretion regulation. Most prominent among these are GRK2 and β-arrestin1, which are known to interact with GPCRs regulating receptor signaling and function. The present review will discuss the molecular and signaling mechanisms by which adrenal chromaffin cell-residing GPCRs and their regulatory proteins modulate CA synthesis and secretion. Particular emphasis will be given to the newly discovered roles of GRK2 and β-arrestins in these processes and particular points of focus for future research will be highlighted, as well. PMID:26851510

  19. Are both sympatric species Ilex perado and Ilex canariensis secretly hybridizing? Indication from nuclear markers collected in Tenerife

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manen Jean-François

    2004-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intra-specific and intra-individual polymorphism is frequently observed in nuclear markers of Ilex (Aquifoliaceae and discrepancy between plastid and nuclear phylogenies is the rule in this genus. These observations suggest that inter-specific plastid or/and nuclear introgression played an important role in the process of evolution of Ilex. With the aim of a precise understanding of the evolution of this genus, two distantly related sympatric species collected in Tenerife (Canary Islands, I. perado and I. canariensis, were studied in detail. Introgression between these two species was previously never reported. One plastid marker (the atpB-rbcL spacer and two nuclear markers, the ribosomal internal transcribed spacer (ITS and the nuclear encoded plastid glutamine synthetase (nepGS were analyzed for 13 and 27 individuals of I. perado and I. canariensis, respectively. Results The plastid marker is intra-specifically constant and correlated with species identity. On the other hand, whereas the nuclear markers are conserved in I. perado, they are highly polymorphic in I. canariensis. The presence of pseudogenes and recombination in ITS sequences of I. canariensis explain this polymorphism. Ancestral sequence polymorphism with incomplete lineage sorting, or past or recent hybridization with an unknown species could explain this polymorphism, not resolved by concerted evolution. However, as already reported for many other plants, past or recent introgression of an alien genotype seem the most probable explanation for such a tremendous polymorphism. Conclusions Data do not allow the determination with certitude of the putative species introgressing I. canariensis, but I. perado is suspected. The introgression would be unilateral, with I. perado as the male donor, and the paternal sequences would be rapidly converted in highly divergent and consequently unidentifiable pseudogenes. At least, this study allows the establishment of

  20. Sodium-dependent inhibition by PN200-110 enantiomers of nicotinic adrenal catecholamine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cárdenas, A. M.; Montiel, C.; Artalejo, A. R.; Sánchez-García, P.; García, A. G.

    1988-01-01

    1. Dimethylphenylpiperazinium (DMPP) or high K concentrations evoke catecholamine release from perfused cat adrenal glands; in both cases the secretory response was significantly enhanced in the absence of Na. Tetrodotoxin did not modify the nicotinic secretory response. 2. The (+)- and (-)-enantiomers of the dihydropyridine Ca channel blocker PN200-110 show a high degree of stereoselectivity in the inhibition of catecholamine secretion evoked by high K or by DMPP in the presence of Na, the (+)-enantiomer being 57 and 80 times more potent, respectively, than the (-)-enantiomer. Both, noradrenaline and adrenaline release were equally depressed by PN200-110. 3. The IC50 values for (+)- and (-)-PN200-110 for blockade of the secretory response induced by K or DMPP in the presence of Na are in the same range. In the absence of Na, (-)-PN200-110 did not affect DMPP-evoked secretion; however, the (+)-enantiomer partially inhibited it. 4. The results suggest that the physiological catecholamine release from chromaffin cells is preceded by Na entry through the nicotinic receptor-associated ionophore; this causes cell depolarization, opening of voltage-dependent, dihydropyridine-sensitive Ca channels and Ca entry into the cell. In the absence of Na, additional Ca influx through an alternative pathway (the nicotinic cholinoceptor ionophore?) might also activate secretion. PMID:2975522

  1. Copeptin, a surrogate marker for arginine vasopressin secretion, is associated with higher glucose and insulin concentrations but not higher blood pressure in obese men

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Asferg, C L; Andersen, Ulrik Bjørn; Linneberg, A;

    2014-01-01

    AIM: To explore the putative associations of plasma copeptin, the C-terminal portion of provasopressin and a surrogate marker for arginine vasopressin secretion, with obesity-related health problems, such as hyperlipidaemia, hyperinsulinaemia, hyperglycaemia, high blood pressure and an android fat...... distribution. METHODS: In 103 obese men (mean age ± standard deviation: 49.4 ± 10.2 years) and 27 normal weight control men (mean age: 51.5 ± 8.4 years), taking no medication, we measured 24-h ambulatory blood pressure, fasting blood concentrations of copeptin, lipids, glucose and insulin, and determined body...... composition by dual energy X-ray absorptiometry scanning. RESULTS: The obese men had higher [median (interquartile range)] plasma copeptin concentrations [6.6 (4.6-9.5) vs. 4.9 (3.5-6.8) pmol/l, P = 0.040] compared with the normal weight men. In the obese men, plasma copeptin was not related to 24-h systolic...

  2. Pheochromocytomas and secreting paragangliomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gimenez-Roqueplo Anne-Paule

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Catecholamine-producing tumors may arise in the adrenal medulla (pheochromocytomas or in extraadrenal chromaffin cells (secreting paragangliomas. Their prevalence is about 0.1% in patients with hypertension and 4% in patients with a fortuitously discovered adrenal mass. An increase in the production of catecholamines causes symptoms (mainly headaches, palpitations and excess sweating and signs (mainly hypertension, weight loss and diabetes reflecting the effects of epinephrine and norepinephrine on α- and β-adrenergic receptors. Catecholamine-producing tumors mimic paroxysmal conditions with hypertension and/or cardiac rhythm disorders, including panic attacks, in which sympathetic activation linked to anxiety reproduces the same signs and symptoms. These tumors may be sporadic or part of any of several genetic diseases: familial pheochromocytoma-paraganglioma syndromes, multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2, neurofibromatosis 1 and von Hippel-Lindau disease. Familial cases are diagnosed earlier and are more frequently bilateral and recurring than sporadic cases. The most specific and sensitive diagnostic test for the tumor is the determination of plasma or urinary metanephrines. The tumor can be located by computed tomography, magnetic resonance imaging and metaiodobenzylguanidine scintigraphy. Treatment requires resection of the tumor, generally by laparoscopic surgery. About 10% of tumors are malignant either at first operation or during follow-up, malignancy being diagnosed by the presence of lymph node, visceral or bone metastases. Recurrences and malignancy are more frequent in cases with large or extraadrenal tumors. Patients, especially those with familial or extraadrenal tumors, should be followed-up indefinitely.

  3. Catecholamines and cognition after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenkins, Peter O; Mehta, Mitul A; Sharp, David J

    2016-09-01

    Cognitive problems are one of the main causes of ongoing disability after traumatic brain injury. The heterogeneity of the injuries sustained and the variability of the resulting cognitive deficits makes treating these problems difficult. Identifying the underlying pathology allows a targeted treatment approach aimed at cognitive enhancement. For example, damage to neuromodulatory neurotransmitter systems is common after traumatic brain injury and is an important cause of cognitive impairment. Here, we discuss the evidence implicating disruption of the catecholamines (dopamine and noradrenaline) and review the efficacy of catecholaminergic drugs in treating post-traumatic brain injury cognitive impairments. The response to these therapies is often variable, a likely consequence of the heterogeneous patterns of injury as well as a non-linear relationship between catecholamine levels and cognitive functions. This individual variability means that measuring the structure and function of a person's catecholaminergic systems is likely to allow more refined therapy. Advanced structural and molecular imaging techniques offer the potential to identify disruption to the catecholaminergic systems and to provide a direct measure of catecholamine levels. In addition, measures of structural and functional connectivity can be used to identify common patterns of injury and to measure the functioning of brain 'networks' that are important for normal cognitive functioning. As the catecholamine systems modulate these cognitive networks, these measures could potentially be used to stratify treatment selection and monitor response to treatment in a more sophisticated manner.

  4. Inhibitory effect of acteoside on melittin-induced catecholamine exocytosis through inhibition of Ca(2+)-dependent phospholipase A2 and extracellular Ca(2+) influx in PC12 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Ho Sun; Ko, Myung Soo; Jo, Young Soo; Whang, Wan Kyunn; Sim, Sang Soo

    2015-10-01

    To investigate the inhibitory effect of acteoside on the process of exocytosis induced by melittin, we measured Ca(2+) mobilization, arachidonic acid (AA) release and catecholamine exocytosis in PC12 chromaffin cells. Melittin significantly increased the intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization via receptor-operated calcium channel but not the intracellular Ca(2+) release. It caused AA release via activation of Ca(2+)-dependent phospholipase A2 (PLA2) and catecholamine secretion in a dose-dependent manner. Acteoside dose-dependently inhibited the release of AA and intracellular Ca(2+) mobilization induced by melittin. Acteoside reduced the catecholamine release and raised the amount of intracellular chromogranin A which is co-released with catecholamine from melittin-stimulated PC12 cells. Taken together, our results suggest that acteoside could suppress the exocytosis via inhibition of Ca(2+)-dependent PLA2 and extracellular Ca(2+) influx in PC12 cells stimulated by melittin. PMID:25899996

  5. Correlation between catecholamine release and sodium pump inhibition in the perfused adrenal gland of the cat

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, A.G.; Garcia-Lopez, E.; Montiel, C.; Nicolas, G.P.; Sanchez-Garcia, P.

    1981-01-01

    1 Ca2+ reintroduction to retrogradely perfused and ouabain (10-4 M)-treated cat adrenal glands caused a catecholamine secretory response which was greater the longer the time of exposure to the cardiac glycoside. Such a response was proportional to the external Na+ concentration [Na+]o. 2 A qualitatively similar, yet smaller response was observed when glands were perfused with Krebs solution lacking K+ ions; thus, K+ deprivation mimicked the secretory effects of ouabain. Catecholamine secretion evoked by Ca2+ reintroduction in K+-free solution (0-K+) was also proportional to [Na+]o and greater the longer the time of exposure of the gland to 0-K+ solution. 3 The ionophore X537A also mimicked the ouabain effects, since Ca2+ reintroduction to glands treated with this agent (25 μM) caused a sharp secretory response. When added together with X537A, ouabain (10-4 M) did not modify the response to the ionophore. 4 N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), another Na+, K+-ATPase inhibitor, did not evoke the release of catecholamines; on the contrary, NEM (10-4 M) inhibited the catecholamine secretory response to high [K+]o, acetylcholine, Ca2+ reintroduction and ouabain. 5 Ouabain (10-4 M) inhibited the uptake of 86Rb into adreno-medullary tissue by 60%. Maximal inhibition had already occurred 2 min after adding the drug, indicating a lack of temporal correlation between ATPase inhibition and the ouabain secretory response, which took longer (about 30-40 min) to reach its peak. NEM (10-4 M) blocked 86Rb uptake in a similar manner. 6 The results are further evidence in favour of the presence of a Na+-Ca2+ exchange system in the chromaffin cell membrane, probably involved in the control of [Ca2+]i and in the modulation of catecholamine secretion. This system is activated by increasing [Na+]i, either directly (ionophore X537A, increased [Na+]o) or indirectly (Na+ pump inhibition). However, the simple inhibition of Na+ pumping does not always lead to a catecholamine secretory response; such is

  6. Spatial and activity-dependent catecholamine release in rat adrenal medulla under native neuronal stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wolf, Kyle; Zarkua, Georgy; Chan, Shyue-An; Sridhar, Arun; Smith, Corey

    2016-09-01

    Neuroendocrine chromaffin cells of the adrenal medulla in rat receive excitatory synaptic input through anterior and posterior divisions of the sympathetic splanchnic nerve. Upon synaptic stimulation, the adrenal medulla releases the catecholamines, epinephrine, and norepinephrine into the suprarenal vein for circulation throughout the body. Under sympathetic tone, catecholamine release is modest. However, upon activation of the sympathoadrenal stress reflex, and increased splanchnic firing, adrenal catecholamine output increases dramatically. Moreover, specific stressors can preferentially increase release of either epinephrine (i.e., hypoglycemia) or norepinephrine (i.e., cold stress). The mechanism for this stressor-dependent segregated release of catecholamine species is not yet fully understood. We tested the hypothesis that stimulation of either division of the splanchnic selects for epinephrine over norepinephrine release. We introduce an ex vivo rat preparation that maintains native splanchnic innervation of the adrenal gland and we document experimental advantages and limitations of this preparation. We utilize fast scanning cyclic voltammetry to detect release of both epinephrine and norepinephrine from the adrenal medulla, and report that epinephrine and norepinephrine release are regulated spatially and in a frequency-dependent manner. We provide data to show that epinephrine is secreted preferentially from the periphery of the medulla and exhibits a higher threshold and steeper stimulus-secretion function than norepinephrine. Elevated stimulation of the whole nerve specifically enhances epinephrine release from the peripheral medulla. Our data further show that elimination of either division from stimulation greatly attenuated epinephrine release under elevated stimulation, while either division alone can largely support norepinephrine release. PMID:27597763

  7. A study of the action of clonidine on secretion from the adrenal medulla in dogs.

    OpenAIRE

    Anglade, F.; Dang Tran, L.; De Saint Blanquat, G.; Gaillard, G.; Michel-Damase, C.; Montastruc, J. L.; Montastruc, P; Rostin, M.; Tran, M. A.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of clonidine on adrenal catecholamine (adrenaline and noradrenaline) secretion were investigated in chloralose-anaesthetized dogs. Intravenous administration of clonidine (10 and 20 micrograms kg-1) induced a decrease in both adrenal catecholamine secretion rates and cardiovascular parameters (blood pressure and heart rate). In contrast, a dose of 5 micrograms kg-1 was ineffective. Intracisternal clonidine (in a lower dose of 3 micrograms kg-1) also decreased adrenaline and noradr...

  8. Dexmedetomidine induced catecholamine suppression in pheochromocytoma

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Sanjeev; Singh, Arti

    2014-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma is a neuroendocrine tumour of chromaffin cells, though rare but a known cause of paroxysmal hypertension with a triad of headache, diaphoresis and palpitation. The biochemical diagnosis of pheochromocytoma is based on estimation of plasma nor-adrenaline, adrenaline and their metabolites in plasma or urine. Clonidine suppression test is performed to differentiate the raised catecholamine level due to pheochromocytoma or other than heochromocytoma especially in cases where plas...

  9. Modified monolithic silica capillary for preconcentration of catecholamines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei Chang; Tusyo-shi Komazu

    2009-01-01

    Preconcentration of catecholamines by the modified monolithic silica in the capillary was investigated in this study. In order to achieve a microchip-based method for determining catecholamines in the saliva, the monolithic silica was fabricated in the capillary and the monolithic silica was chemically modified by on-column reaction with phenylboronate. Different modified methods were compared. The concentration conditions were optimized. This study indicates the applicability of the modified monolithic silica capillary when it was used to concentrate catecholamines.

  10. Competitive binding inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay that uses the secreted aspartyl proteinase of Candida albicans as an antigenic marker for diagnosis of disseminated candidiasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morrison, Christine J; Hurst, Steven F; Reiss, Errol

    2003-09-01

    The secreted aspartyl proteinases (Saps) of Candida albicans have been implicated as virulence factors associated with adherence and tissue invasion. The potential use of proteinases as markers of invasive candidiasis led us to develop a competitive binding inhibition enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) to detect Sap in clinical specimens. Daily serum and urine specimens were collected from rabbits that had been immunosuppressed with cyclophosphamide and cortisone acetate and infected intravenously with 10(7) C. albicans blastoconidia. Disseminated infection was confirmed by organ culture and histopathology. Although ELISA inhibition was observed when serum specimens from these rabbits were used, more significant inhibition, which correlated with disease progression, occurred when urine specimens were used. Urine collected as early as 1 day after infection resulted in significant ELISA inhibition (mean inhibition +/- standard error [SE] compared with preinfection control urine, 15.7% +/- 2.7% [P ELISA results. Dissemination to the kidney and spleen occurred in one rabbit challenged by intragastric inoculation, and urine from this rabbit demonstrated significant inhibition in the ELISA (mean inhibition +/- SE by day 3 after infection, 32.9% +/- 2.7% [P test sensitivity was 83%, the specificity was 92%, the positive predictive value was 84%, the negative predictive value was 91%, and the efficiency was 89% (166 urine samples from 33 rabbits tested). The specificity, positive predictive value, and efficiency could be increased to 97, 95, and 92%, respectively, if at least two positive test results were required for a true positive designation. The ELISA was sensitive and specific for the detection of Sap in urine specimens from rabbits with disseminated C. albicans infection, discriminated between colonization and invasive disease, reflected disease progression and severity, and has the potential to be a noninvasive means to diagnose disseminated candidiasis.

  11. Secretory patterns of catecholamines in Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Miwa; Nozawa, Aoi; Ueda, Keiichi; Bungo, Takashi; Terao, Hiromi; Asahina, Kiyoshi

    2012-05-15

    Catecholamines (CAs), namely adrenaline (A), noradrenaline (NA), and dopamine (DA), are secreted by the sympathoadrenal system and participate in a diverse array of functions, e.g., heat production, cardiovascular regulation, stress response and so on. However, little is known regarding peripheral CA fluctuations in cetaceans; nevertheless aquatic animals like them have needed to modify their physiological response especially for thermoregulation in water and oxygen economy during diving. To understand CA dynamism in cetaceans, diurnal changes in serum A, NA, and DA concentrations were measured during the winter and summer solstices in four Indo-Pacific bottlenose dolphins (Tursiops aduncus). The average serum NA concentration was much higher than the average A and DA concentrations, and all concentrations were higher than those reported in other cetacean species. No distinct diurnal fluctuations were observed in CA concentrations in either solstice, suggesting inhibition of the decrease in CA concentrations during nocturnal periods by the unique sleep pattern of dolphins. All the serum CA concentrations were negatively correlated with water temperature as body temperatures were, indicating that the sympathoadrenal system might be more active during winter than in summer season, suggesting a role of CA in thermoregulation. PMID:22405705

  12. Serotonin versus catecholamine deficiency: behavioral and neural effects of experimental depletion in remitted depression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Homan, P; Neumeister, A; Nugent, A C; Charney, D S; Drevets, W C; Hasler, G

    2015-01-01

    Despite immense efforts into development of new antidepressant drugs, the increases of serotoninergic and catecholaminergic neurotransmission have remained the two major pharmacodynamic principles of current drug treatments for depression. Consequently, psychopathological or biological markers that predict response to drugs that selectively increase serotonin and/or catecholamine neurotransmission hold the potential to optimize the prescriber's selection among currently available treatment options. The aim of this study was to elucidate the differential symptomatology and neurophysiology in response to reductions in serotonergic versus catecholaminergic neurotransmission in subjects at high risk of depression recurrence. Using identical neuroimaging procedures with [(18)F] fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography after tryptophan depletion (TD) and catecholamine depletion (CD), subjects with remitted depression were compared with healthy controls in a double-blind, randomized, crossover design. Although TD induced significantly more depressed mood, sadness and hopelessness than CD, CD induced more inactivity, concentration difficulties, lassitude and somatic anxiety than TD. CD specifically increased glucose metabolism in the bilateral ventral striatum and decreased glucose metabolism in the bilateral orbitofrontal cortex, whereas TD specifically increased metabolism in the right prefrontal cortex and the posterior cingulate cortex. Although we found direct associations between changes in brain metabolism and induced depressive symptoms following CD, the relationship between neural activity and symptoms was less clear after TD. In conclusion, this study showed that serotonin and catecholamines have common and differential roles in the pathophysiology of depression. PMID:25781231

  13. Nonreutilizaton of adrenal chromaffin granule membranes following secretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The intracellular postexocytotic fate of the adrenal chromaffin granule membrane (reutilization vs. nonreutilization) was addressed through two experimental approaches. First, (3H) leucine pulse-chase labeling experiments were conducted in two systems - the isolated retrograde perfused cat adrenal gland and cultured bovine adrenal chromaffin cells to compare chromaffin granule soluble dopamine-B-hydroxylase (DBH) turnover (marker for granule soluble content turnover) to that of membrane-bound DBH (marker for granule membrane turnover). Experiments in cat adrenal glands showed that at all chase periods the granule distribution of radiolabeled DBH was in agreement with the DBH activity distribution (73% membrane-bound/27% soluble) - a result consistent with parallel turnover of soluble and membrane-bound DBH. Experiments in cultured bovine cells showed that labeled soluble and membrane-bound DBH had parallel turnover patterns and at all chase period, the distribution of radiolabeled DBH between the soluble contents and membranes was similar to the DBH activity distribution (50% soluble/50% membrane-bound). The above experiments showed that the soluble contents and membranes turnover in parallel and are consistent with nonreutilization of chromaffin granule membranes following exocytosis. Isolated retrograde perfused bovine adrenal glands were subjected to repetitive acetylcholine stimulation to induce exocytosis and then the dense and less-dense chromaffin granule fractions were isolated. Since both approaches gave results consistent with membrane nonreutilization, the authors conclude that once a chromaffin granule is involved in exocytosis, its membrane is not reutilized for the further synthesis, storage, and secretion of catecholamines

  14. Catecholamines promote Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae growth by regulating iron metabolism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lu Li

    Full Text Available Catecholamines are host stress hormones that can induce the growth of many bacteria by facilitating iron utilization and/or regulate the expression of virulence genes through specific hormone receptors. Whether these two responsive pathways are interconnected is unknown. In our previous study, it was found that catecholamines can regulate the expression of a great number of genes of Actinobacillus pleuropneumoniae, an important swine respiratory pathogen. However, bacterial growth was not affected by catecholamines in rich medium. In this study, it was discovered that catecholamines affected A. pleuropneumoniae growth in chemically defined medium (CDM. We found that serum inhibited A. pleuropneumoniae growth in CDM, while epinephrine, norepinephrine and dopamine promoted A. pleuropneumoniae growth in the CDM containing serum. The known bacterial hormone receptor QseC didn't play roles in this process. Ion-supplementation and transcriptome analysis indicated that serum addition resulted in iron-restricted conditions which were alleviated by the addition of catecholamines. Transferrin, one of the components in serum, inhibited the growth of A. pleuropneumoniae in CDM, an effect reversed by addition of catecholamines in a TonB2-dependent manner. Our data demonstrate that catecholamines promote A. pleuropneumoniae growth by regulating iron-acquisition and metabolism, which is independent of the adrenergic receptor QseC.

  15. Catecholamines in Entamoebae: recent (re)discoveries

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Dan Eichinger; Alida Coppi; Jesse Frederick; Salim Merali

    2002-11-01

    Free-living and enteric amoebae have similar two-stage life cycles, and both organisms depend on being able to monitor environmental conditions to determine whether to continue multiplying as trophozoites, or to differentiate into dormant or transmissible cysts. Conditions that support high trophozoite densities might also be expected to select for mechanisms of information exchange between these cells. We recently determined that trophozoites of at least one species of Entamoeba release and respond to catecholamine compounds during differentiation from the trophozoite stage into the cyst stage. It turns out that this is not an entirely novel finding, as a number of previous studies have demonstrated parts of this story in free-living or enteric amoebae. We briefly review here major points of the previous studies and describe some of our recent results that have extended them.

  16. Impaired Sympathoadrenal Axis Function Contributes to Enhanced Insulin Secretion in Prediabetic Obese Rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Eliza Andreazzi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The involvement of sympathoadrenal axis activity in obesity onset was investigated using the experimental model of treating neonatal rats with monosodium L-glutamate. To access general sympathetic nervous system activity, we recorded the firing rates of sympathetic superior cervical ganglion nerves in animals. Catecholamine content and secretion from isolated adrenal medulla were measured. Intravenous glucose tolerance test was performed, and isolated pancreatic islets were stimulated with glucose and adrenergic agonists. The nerve firing rate of obese rats was decreased compared to the rate for lean rats. Basal catecholamine secretion decreased whereas catecholamine secretion induced by carbachol, elevated extracellular potassium, and caffeine in the isolated adrenal medulla were all increased in obese rats compared to control. Both glucose intolerance and hyperinsulinaemia were observed in obese rats. Adrenaline strongly inhibited glucose-induced insulin secretion in obese animals. These findings suggest that low sympathoadrenal activity contributes to impaired glycaemic control in prediabetic obese rats.

  17. Modified monolithic silica capillary for preconcentration of catecholamines

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2009-01-01

    Preconcentration of catecholamines by the modified monolithic silica in the capillary was investigated in this study. In order to achieve a microchip-based method for determining catecholamines in the saliva,the monolithic silica was fabricated in the capillary and the monolithic silica was chemically modified by on-column reaction with phenylboronate. Different modified methods were compared. The concentration conditions were optimized. This study indicates the applicability of the modified monolithic sili...

  18. Circulating and tissue catecholamines in rats with chronic neurogenic hypertension

    OpenAIRE

    Dominiak, P; Kees, Frieder K.; Grobecker, H

    1986-01-01

    To study the role of peripheral catecholamines in plasma and different tissues in neurogenic hypertension we measured directly blood pressure, maximum rate of left ventricular pressure rise (dp/dtmax) and heart rate through an aortic catheter 5 weeks after total sino-aortic baroreceptor deafferentation in male Sprague-Dawley rats. Blood samples were collected through the same catheter to determine plasma catecholamine concentrations. Blood pressure and dp/dtmax were significantly higher in ne...

  19. Genetic Markers of Insulin Sensitivity and Insulin Secretion Are Associated With Spontaneous Postnatal Growth and Response to Growth Hormone Treatment in Short SGA Children

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Rikke Beck; Thankamony, Ajay; Day, Felix;

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: The wide heterogeneity in the early growth and metabolism of children born small for gestational age (SGA), both before and during GH therapy, may reflect common genetic variations related to insulin secretion or sensitivity. METHOD: Combined multiallele single nucleotide polymorphism sc...

  20. Potentiation of K+-evoked catecholamine release in the cat adrenal gland treated with ouabain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garcia, A. G.; Garcia-Lopez, E.; Horga, J. F.; Kirpekar, S. M.; Montiel, C.; Sanchez-Garcia, P.

    1981-01-01

    1 A vigorous catecholamine secretory response was evoked by small increments (2-10 mM) of the extracellular concentration of K+ ([K+])o) in cat adrenal glands treated with ouabain (10(-4) M), and perfused with Krebs-bicarbonate solution at room temperature. 2 The secretory response depends on [K+]o; increments of [K+]o as small as 2 mM for 2 min evoked a clear secretory response; at 10-17.7 mM K+, the maximal secretory response was observed. In normal glands, not treated with ouabain, no increase of the rate of catecholamine output was observed by raising [K+]o up to 17.7 mM for 2 min. 3 The K+ secretory response was time-dependent, requiring at least 1 min to be initiated; on continued exposure to 10 mM [K+]o, the enhanced response remained for at least 1 h. 4 In low [Na+]o, the K+-secretory response was unchanged. However, in 0-Ca2+, high-Mg2+ solutions, or in the presence of D600, an organic Ca2+ antagonist, it was abolished. 5 The K+-induced secretory response was not altered in the presence of tetrodoxin or tetraethylammonium. 6 It is concluded that ouabain potentiated the catecholamine secretory response to raised [K+]o by increasing the amount of Ca2+ available to the secretory machinery through (a) mobilization of an enhanced pool of membrane-bound Ca2+, (b) activation of membrane Ca2+ inward current; or (c) decrease of intracellular Ca2+ buffering systems. The activation by ouabain of a membrane Na+-Ca2+ exchange system is not involved in this K+-secretory response. It is suggested that the plasma membrane ATPase enzyme system, by changing the affinity of its Ca2+ binding sites, might control the availability of this cation to the secretory machinery and, therefore, modulate catecholamine secretion in the adrenal gland. PMID:7296168

  1. Tubular Secretion in CKD.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suchy-Dicey, Astrid M; Laha, Thomas; Hoofnagle, Andrew; Newitt, Rick; Sirich, Tammy L; Meyer, Timothy W; Thummel, Ken E; Yanez, N David; Himmelfarb, Jonathan; Weiss, Noel S; Kestenbaum, Bryan R

    2016-07-01

    Renal function generally is assessed by measurement of GFR and urinary albumin excretion. Other intrinsic kidney functions, such as proximal tubular secretion, typically are not quantified. Tubular secretion of solutes is more efficient than glomerular filtration and a major mechanism for renal drug elimination, suggesting important clinical consequences of secretion dysfunction. Measuring tubular secretion as an independent marker of kidney function may provide insight into kidney disease etiology and improve prediction of adverse outcomes. We estimated secretion function by measuring secreted solute (hippurate, cinnamoylglycine, p-cresol sulfate, and indoxyl sulfate) clearance using liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometric assays of serum and timed urine samples in a prospective cohort study of 298 patients with kidney disease. We estimated GFR by mean clearance of creatinine and urea from the same samples and evaluated associations of renal secretion with participant characteristics, mortality, and CKD progression to dialysis. Tubular secretion rate modestly correlated with eGFR and associated with some participant characteristics, notably fractional excretion of electrolytes. Low clearance of hippurate or p-cresol sulfate associated with greater risk of death independent of eGFR (hazard ratio, 2.3; 95% confidence interval, 1.1 to 4.7; hazard ratio, 2.5; 95% confidence interval, 1.0 to 6.1, respectively). Hazards models also suggested an association between low cinnamoylglycine clearance and risk of dialysis, but statistical analyses did not exclude the null hypothesis. Therefore, estimates of proximal tubular secretion function correlate with glomerular filtration, but substantial variability in net secretion remains. The observed associations of net secretion with mortality and progression of CKD require confirmation. PMID:26614381

  2. Adrenoceptors mediating relaxation to catecholamines in rat isolated jejunum.

    OpenAIRE

    MacDonald, A.; Forbes, I. J.; Gallacher, D.; Heeps, G.; McLaughlin, D. P.

    1994-01-01

    1. The characteristics of adrenoceptors mediating relaxation to catecholamines in rat isolated jejunum were investigated. 2. Catecholamines and BRL 37344 produced relaxation of the KCl-contracted strips with an order of potency of isoprenaline (1.0) > BRL 37344 (0.63) > noradrenaline (0.1) > adrenaline (0.04). 3. In the presence of both prazosin (1 microM) and propranolol (1 microM) only small dextral shifts of the concentration-response curves to agonists were observed and an order of potenc...

  3. Irukandji syndrome, catecholamines, and mid-ventricular stress cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiong, Keith

    2009-03-01

    We present here the first reported case of mid-ventricular stress cardiomyopathy secondary to 'Irukandji syndrome', following envenomisation from a jellyfish. Carukia barnesi is a cubozoan or box jellyfish found in Far North Queensland, Australia prevalent during the warmer months of the year. It has been associated with 'Irukandji syndrome' as characterized by a sympathetic overdrive secondary to an excess of endogenous catecholamines release. There have been previous cases of sudden onset of left ventricular dysfunction and jellyfish. The author believes that this case is important because it highlights the possible association between the sudden release in catecholamines and stress cardiomyopathy. PMID:18801721

  4. Middle cerebral artery blood velocity and plasma catecholamines during exercise

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pott, F; Jensen, K; Hansen, H;

    1996-01-01

    During dynamic exercise, mean blood velocity (Vmean) in the middle cerebral artery (MCA) demonstrates a graded increase to work rate and reflects regional cerebral blood flow. At a high work rate, however, vasoactive levels of plasma catecholamines could mediate vasoconstriction of the MCA...

  5. 21 CFR 862.1165 - Catecholamines (total) test system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Catecholamines (total) test system. 862.1165 Section 862.1165 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  6. LORRY DRIVERS WORK STRESS EVALUATED BY CATECHOLAMINES EXCRETED IN URINE

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    VANDERBEEK, AJ; MEIJMAN, TF; FRINGSDRESEN, MHW; KUIPER, JI

    1995-01-01

    Objectives-To evaluate lorry drivers' work stress by measurement of adrenaline and noradrenaline excreted in the urine, and to find out which factors in their working situation are related to the excretion rates of these catecholamines. Methods-The urinary excretion of adrenaline and noradrenaline o

  7. Effect of endogenous catecholamines on apoptosis of Con A-activated lymphocytes of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Jian-Lan; Peng, Yu-Ping; Qiu, Yi-Hua; Wang, Jian-Jun

    2007-12-01

    of Bax, Fas, FasL and caspase-3 mRNAs and proteins in the Con A-stimulated lymphocytes was remarkably enhanced by the treatment with pargyline of 10(-6) M and 10(-5) M, but the expression of Bcl-2 mRNA and protein was notably attenuated by the pargyline treatment. These results imply that endogenous CAs synthesized and secreted by lymphocytes accelerate lymphocyte apoptosis by altering fine balance between the expression of antiapoptotic and proapoptotic markers at transcriptional and translational levels, and suggest that both the death receptor pathway and the mitochondrial pathway are involved in the endogenous CAs-induced apoptosis.

  8. Role of alpha-crystallin, early-secreted antigenic target 6-kDa protein and culture filtrate protein 10 as novel diagnostic markers in osteoarticular tuberculosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nazia Rizvi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarticular tuberculosis constitutes about 3% of all tuberculosis cases. Early and accurate diagnosis of tuberculosis is a challenging problem especially in the case of osteoarticular tuberculosis owing to the lower number of bacilli. However, an accurate and timely diagnosis of the disease results in an improved efficacy of the given treatment. Besides the limitations of conventional methods, nowadays molecular diagnostic techniques have emerged as a major breakthrough for the early diagnosis of tuberculosis with high sensitivity and specificity. Alpha-crystallin is a dominantly expressed protein responsible for the long viability of the pathogen during the latent phase under certain stress conditions such as hypoxia and nitric oxide stress. Two other proteins—early secreted antigenic target-6 and culture filtrate protein-10—show high expression in the active infective phase of Mycobacterium tuberculosis. In this article, we focus on the different proteins expressed dominantly in latent/active tuberculosis, and which may be further used as prognostic biomarkers for diagnosing tuberculosis, both in latent and active phases.

  9. Salivary surrogates of plasma nitrite and catecholamines during a 21-week training season in swimmers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Mauricio Díaz Gómez

    Full Text Available The collection of samples of saliva is noninvasive and straightforward, which turns saliva into an ideal fluid for monitoring the adaptive response to training. Here, we investigated the response of the salivary proteins alpha-amylase (sAA, chromogranin A (sCgA, and the concentration of total protein (sTP as well as salivary nitrite (sNO2 in relation to plasma catecholamines and plasma nitrite (pNO2, respectively. The variation in these markers was compared to the intensity and load of training during a 21-week training season in 12 elite swimmers. Overall, the salivary proteins tracked the concentration of plasma adrenaline and were inversely correlated with the training outcomes. No correlations were observed between sNO2 and pNO2. However, sNO2 correlated positively with the intensity and load of training. We argue that the decrease in sympathetic activity is responsible for the decrease in the concentration of proteins throughout the training season. Furthermore, the increase in nitrite is likely to reflect changes in hemodynamics and regulation of vascular tone. The association of the salivary markers with the training outcomes underlines their potential as noninvasive markers of training status in professional athletes.

  10. The novel plasminogen receptor, plasminogen receptor(KT) (Plg-R(KT)), regulates catecholamine release.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Hongdong; Baik, Nagyung; Kiosses, William B; Krajewski, Stan; Miles, Lindsey A; Parmer, Robert J

    2011-09-23

    Neurotransmitter release by catecholaminergic cells is negatively regulated by prohormone cleavage products formed from plasmin-mediated proteolysis. Here, we investigated the expression and subcellular localization of Plg-R(KT), a novel plasminogen receptor, and its role in catecholaminergic cell plasminogen activation and regulation of catecholamine release. Prominent staining with anti-Plg-R(KT) mAb was observed in adrenal medullary chromaffin cells in murine and human tissue. In Western blotting, Plg-R(KT) was highly expressed in bovine adrenomedullary chromaffin cells, human pheochromocytoma tissue, PC12 pheochromocytoma cells, and murine hippocampus. Expression of Plg-R(KT) fused in-frame to GFP resulted in targeting of the GFP signal to the cell membrane. Phase partitioning, co-immunoprecipitation with urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (uPAR), and FACS analysis with antibody directed against the C terminus of Plg-R(KT) were consistent with Plg-R(KT) being an integral plasma membrane protein on the surface of catecholaminergic cells. Cells stably overexpressing Plg-R(KT) exhibited substantial enhancement of plasminogen activation, and antibody blockade of non-transfected PC12 cells suppressed plasminogen activation. In functional secretion assays, nicotine-evoked [(3)H]norepinephrine release from cells overexpressing Plg-R(KT) was markedly decreased (by 51 ± 2%, p < 0.001) when compared with control transfected cells, and antibody blockade increased [(3)H]norepinephrine release from non-transfected PC12 cells. In summary, Plg-R(KT) is present on the surface of catecholaminergic cells and functions to stimulate plasminogen activation and modulate catecholamine release. Plg-R(KT) thus represents a new mechanism and novel control point for regulating the interface between plasminogen activation and neurosecretory cell function.

  11. Contribution of SK and BK channels in the control of catecholamine release by electrical stimulation of the cat adrenal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, C; López, M G; Sánchez-García, P; Maroto, R; Zapater, P; García, A G

    1995-01-01

    1. Transmural electrical stimulation (10 Hz, 1 ms, 40 V for 10 s) of cat adrenal glands perfused at room temperature with Krebs-Hepes solution produced catecholamine secretory responses which were reproducible when stimulations were applied at 5 min intervals. Such responses were inhibited about 20% by atropine (1 microM) and 80% by hexamethonium (30 microM). Apamin (100 nM) increased the secretory response 2.5-fold in the presence of atropine and 8-fold in the presence of hexamethonium. 2. Potentiation by apamin of secretory responses evoked by 100-pulse trains was similar at 5, 10 and 20 Hz (about 2-fold). When glands were continuously stimulated at 3 Hz, apamin increased 4-fold the initial secretion plateau. Continuous stimulation at a higher frequency (20 Hz) produced a sharp secretory peak followed by a small, sustained plateau; apamin did not alter this plateau. Apamin also enhanced the secretory responses obtained with sustained stimulation with acetylcholine (10 or 200 microM). 3. Secretion peaks induced by brief acetylcholine pulses (10 microM for 10 s) applied to isolated and superfused cat adrenal chromaffin cells were enhanced more than 3-fold by 100 nM apamin. Charybdotoxin (10 nM) did not enhance these secretory peaks. 4. In perfused cat adrenal glands, charybdotoxin (10 nM) affected neither the secretion evoked by trains of electrical stimulation applied at different frequencies nor the secretion evoked by acetylcholine pulses. 5. In 0.5 mM [Ca2+]o, apamin enhanced 3-fold the secretion evoked by electrical stimulation trains of 100 pulses (10 Hz, 10 s) and almost 6-fold the acetylcholine (10 microM for 10 s)-induced secretion. In 5 mM Ca2+, apamin enhanced the secretory responses to electrical stimulation and acetylcholine 2- and 10-fold, respectively. Charybdotoxin enhanced 2.5-fold the secretory response to electrical stimulation in 0.5 mM Ca2+, although this effect was not statistically significant. A synergistic interaction between the two toxins

  12. Contribution of SK and BK channels in the control of catecholamine release by electrical stimulation of the cat adrenal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montiel, C; López, M G; Sánchez-García, P; Maroto, R; Zapater, P; García, A G

    1995-07-15

    1. Transmural electrical stimulation (10 Hz, 1 ms, 40 V for 10 s) of cat adrenal glands perfused at room temperature with Krebs-Hepes solution produced catecholamine secretory responses which were reproducible when stimulations were applied at 5 min intervals. Such responses were inhibited about 20% by atropine (1 microM) and 80% by hexamethonium (30 microM). Apamin (100 nM) increased the secretory response 2.5-fold in the presence of atropine and 8-fold in the presence of hexamethonium. 2. Potentiation by apamin of secretory responses evoked by 100-pulse trains was similar at 5, 10 and 20 Hz (about 2-fold). When glands were continuously stimulated at 3 Hz, apamin increased 4-fold the initial secretion plateau. Continuous stimulation at a higher frequency (20 Hz) produced a sharp secretory peak followed by a small, sustained plateau; apamin did not alter this plateau. Apamin also enhanced the secretory responses obtained with sustained stimulation with acetylcholine (10 or 200 microM). 3. Secretion peaks induced by brief acetylcholine pulses (10 microM for 10 s) applied to isolated and superfused cat adrenal chromaffin cells were enhanced more than 3-fold by 100 nM apamin. Charybdotoxin (10 nM) did not enhance these secretory peaks. 4. In perfused cat adrenal glands, charybdotoxin (10 nM) affected neither the secretion evoked by trains of electrical stimulation applied at different frequencies nor the secretion evoked by acetylcholine pulses. 5. In 0.5 mM [Ca2+]o, apamin enhanced 3-fold the secretion evoked by electrical stimulation trains of 100 pulses (10 Hz, 10 s) and almost 6-fold the acetylcholine (10 microM for 10 s)-induced secretion. In 5 mM Ca2+, apamin enhanced the secretory responses to electrical stimulation and acetylcholine 2- and 10-fold, respectively. Charybdotoxin enhanced 2.5-fold the secretory response to electrical stimulation in 0.5 mM Ca2+, although this effect was not statistically significant. A synergistic interaction between the two toxins

  13. Differential regulation of renal phospholipase C isoforms by catecholamines.

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, P Y; Asico, L D; Eisner, G M; Jose, P A

    1995-01-01

    Dopamine and D1 agonists and NE all increase phosphatidyl inositol-specific phospholipase C (PLC) activity, but whereas dopamine produces a natriuresis, NE has an antinatriuretic effect. To determine if catecholamines differentially regulate the expression of PLC isoforms, we infused fenoldopam, a D1 agonist, or pramipexole, a D1/D2 agonist, intravenously or infused fenoldopam or NE into the renal artery of anesthetized rats. After 3-4 h of infusion, when the expected natriuresis (fenoldopam ...

  14. Catecholamine and cortisol levels in Oxford college rowers.

    OpenAIRE

    Pearson, R; Ungpakorn, G; Harrison, G. A.

    1995-01-01

    Urinary catecholamines and cortisol levels in two teams of Oxford college eight oarsmen were compared on three different day types: training days, racing days, and non-rowing days. Adrenaline and cortisol were raised on racing and training days compared to non-racing days. Noradrenaline was raised on training days, reflecting longer periods of physical exercise during training. There was evidence of a progressive lowering of adrenaline output over consecutive race days and that the outcome of...

  15. Plasma catecholamines during exercise-induced bronchoconstriction in bronchial asthma.

    OpenAIRE

    Zieliński, J; Chodosowska, E; Radomyski, A; Araszkiewicz, Z; Kozlowski, S

    1980-01-01

    Plasma levels of adrenaline and noradrenaline during and after submaximal exercise in patients with bronchial asthma were investigated. Three groups were studied comprising 10 patients with exercise-induced bronchoconstriction (EIB), 10 asthmatic patients without EIB and four normal control subjects. Plasma catecholamines were measured at rest, at the end of exercise, and five and 15 minutes after exercise. Changes in airway resistance were assessed by measuring peak expiratory flow rate. Sig...

  16. Hypersensitivity of lung vessels to catecholamines in systemic hypertension.

    OpenAIRE

    Guazzi, M D; Alimento, M; Fiorentini, C; Pepi, M; Polese, A.

    1986-01-01

    Among patients with primary systemic hypertension pressure and arteriolar resistance in the pulmonary circulation exceed normal values and are hyper-reactive to sympathetic stimulation. A study was therefore carried out in 16 patients with uncomplicated essential hypertension and nine healthy subjects to compare the pulmonary vascular reactivity to exogenous catecholamines. In the normotensive group the dose response relation to adrenaline (microgram: dyn) was 1 = -4, 2 = -9, 3 = -9, and 4 = ...

  17. Lorry drivers' work stress evaluated by catecholamines excreted in urine.

    OpenAIRE

    van der Beek, A J; Meijman, T.F; Frings-Dresen, M. H.; Kuiper, J I; Kuiper, S.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To evaluate lorry drivers' work stress by measurement of adrenaline and noradrenaline excreted in the urine, and to find out which factors in their working situation are related to the excretion rates of these catecholamines. METHODS--The urinary excretion of adrenaline and noradrenaline of 32 lorry drivers, who also had loading and unloading activities to perform, was studied for one working day and one rest day. Each driver was asked to provide six urine samples on both days. RE...

  18. Catecholamine levels in plasma and CSF in migraine.

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez, F; Castillo, J; Pardo, J.; Lema, M; Noya, M

    1993-01-01

    There is clinical and pharmacological evidence of the existence of sympathetic dysfunction in migraine. Adrenaline and noradrenaline concentrations were determined in plasma and CSF of patients during attacks of common or classic migraine, comparing them with controls suffering from stress. Plasma noradrenaline levels were significantly lower in the patients with common migraine than in controls (p < 0.05). Other catecholamine levels in plasma and CSF in both migraine groups were only slightl...

  19. Plasma catecholamines after endotracheal administration of adrenaline during postnatal resuscitation.

    OpenAIRE

    K. O. Schwab; von Stockhausen, H B

    1994-01-01

    To analyse the degradation of adrenaline after cardiopulmonary resuscitation of preterm neonates, free and sulphoconjugated adrenaline, noradrenaline, and dopamine were determined in 31 preterm neonates by a radioenzymatic method. Nine of the neonates received a high dose (250 micrograms/kg) of endotracheally administered adrenaline (1:1000); three of them had more than one dose of adrenaline. With the exception of sulphoconjugated dopamine, the free and sulphoconjugated catecholamine concent...

  20. Catecholamines in amniotic fluid as indicators of intrapartum fetal stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yashiro,Yuriko

    1985-08-01

    Full Text Available Catecholamines were measured in the amniotic fluid and in the first voided newborn urine obtained from appropriate-for-date infants of term deliveries. Catecholamine values in the amniotic fluid and urine were nearly equal when expressed in terms of creatinine. Significant positive correlations were observed between the amniotic fluid and urine of norepinephrine and epinephrine. In normal cases (n = 32 that underwent uneventful vaginal delivery, the 95% confidence limits for norepinephrine and epinephrine in the amniotic fluid were 1.53 to 2.33 ng/ml and 0.16 to 0.30 ng/ml, respectively. In cases of moderate stress (n = 12, only norepinephrine showed significantly higher values than the normal cases, while in cases of severe stress (n = 12, norepinephrine became more significantly high, and epinephrine was found to be elevated significantly. A significant difference was noted in the incidence of fetal stress between the infants with more than and those with less than 2.30 ng/ml of norepinephrine, the upper limits of the normal 95% confidence limits. However, for epinephrine such a significant difference was not noted. It was concluded that amniotic fluid catecholamines are of fetal origin and reflect fetal sympathoadrenal activity directly, even during labor, and that their level may be a good indicator of fetal condition and stress.

  1. The catecholamine system in health and disease —Relation to tyrosine 3-monooxygenase and other catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes—

    OpenAIRE

    Nagatsu, Toshiharu

    2007-01-01

    Catecholamines [dopamine, noradrenaline (norepinephrine), and adrenaline (epinephrine); CAs] are neurotransmitters in the central and peripheral nervous systems as well as hormones in the endocrine system. CAs in the brain play a central role in versatile functions as slow-acting neurotransmitters functioning in synaptic neurotransmission, modulating the effects of fast-acting neurotransmitters such as glutamate and γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). In this review, I focus on recent advances in the...

  2. Catecholamine-resistant hypotension and myocardial performance following patent ductus arteriosus ligation.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Noori, S

    2014-08-14

    Objective:We performed a multicenter study of preterm infants, who were about to undergo patent ductus arteriosus ligation, to determine whether echocardiographic indices of impaired myocardial performance were associated with subsequent development of catecholamine-resistant hypotension following ligation.Study Design:A standardized treatment approach for hypotension was followed at each center. Infants were considered to have catecholamine-resistant hypotension if their dopamine infusion was >15 μg kg(-1)min(-1). Echocardiograms and cortisol measurements were obtained between 6 and 14 h after the ligation (prior to the presence of catecholamine-resistant hypotension).Result:Forty-five infants were enrolled, 10 received catecholamines (6 were catecholamine-responsive and 4 developed catecholamine-resistant hypotension). Catecholamine-resistant hypotension was not associated with decreased preload, shortening fraction or ventricular output. Infants with catecholamine-resistant hypotension had significantly lower levels of systemic vascular resistance and postoperative cortisol concentration.Conclusion:We speculate that low cortisol levels and impaired vascular tone may have a more important role than impaired cardiac performance in post-ligation catecholamine-resistant hypotension.Journal of Perinatology advance online publication, 14 August 2014; doi:10.1038\\/jp.2014.151.

  3. Catecholamine-containing nerve fibres in the human abdominal vagus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lundberg, J; Ahlman, H; Dahlström, A; Kewenter, J

    1976-03-01

    The vagal nerve of man has been investigated for the presence of adrenergic nerve fibres using the histochemical fluorescence method of Hillarp and Falck. Following 30-60 min of nerve ligation during surgical operations, the right anterior main trunk (subdiafragmatic level) from one patient, and the anterior nerve of Latarget of 5 patients were found to contain unmyelinated nerve fibres with accumulations of green fluorescent material representing a catecholamine. The observations indicate the presence of adrenergic nerve fibres running caudally in the human vagal nerve, in accordance with similar findings in other mammals, e.g. cats and dogs.

  4. EFECTS OF PILATES ON LOW BACK PAIN AND URINE CATECHOLAMINE

    OpenAIRE

    MOHAMED AMIN ZEADA

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Purpose. The popularity of the Pilates method created by Joseph H. Pilates in the early 1920s has increased worldwide in the last decade, confirming the fact that Pilates is much more than a fitness fad. According to a survey conducted by American Sports Data Inc, more than 10.5 million Americans participated in a Pilate's class in 2004. The aim of this study was to determine effectiveness of Pilate's protocol in decreasing of low back pain and urine catecholamine levels. Methods. T...

  5. Cerebrospinal fluid biomarkers of central catecholamine deficiency in Parkinson’s disease and other synucleinopathies

    OpenAIRE

    Goldstein, David S.; Holmes, Courtney; Sharabi, Yehonatan

    2012-01-01

    Central catecholamine deficiency characterizes α-synucleinopathies such as Parkinson’s disease. We hypothesized that cerebrospinal fluid levels of neuronal metabolites of catecholamines provide neurochemical biomarkers of these disorders. To test this hypothesis we measured cerebrospinal fluid levels of catechols including dopamine, norepinephrine and their main respective neuronal metabolites dihydroxyphenylacetic acid and dihydroxyphenylglycol in Parkinson’s disease and two other synucleino...

  6. Direct visualization of secretion from single bovine adrenal chromaffin cells by laser-induced native fluorescence imaging microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, W.; Yeung, E.S. [Ames Laboratory---USDOE and Department of Chemistry, Iowa State University, Ames, Iowa 50011 (United States)

    1998-03-01

    Direct visualization of the secretion process of individual bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was achieved with laser-induced native fluorescence imaging microscopy. By monitoring the native fluorescence of catecholamines excited by the 275 nm laser line with an intensified charge-coupled-device (CCD) camera, we obtained good temporal and spatial resolution simultaneously without using additional fluorescent probes. Large variations were found among individual cells in terms of the amounts of catecholamines secreted and the rates of secretion. Different regions of a cell also behave differently during the secretion process. However, the degree of this local heterogeneity is smaller than in neurons and neuralgia. The influence of deep-ultraviolet (UV) laser excitation on cells is also discussed. This quantitative imaging technique provides a useful noninvasive approach for the study of dynamic cellular changes and the understanding of the molecular mechanisms of secretory processes. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital Society for Applied Spectroscopy}

  7. Prefrontal /accumbal catecholamine system processes high motivational salience.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefano ePuglisi-Allegra

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Motivational salience regulates the strength of goal seeking, the amount of risk taken, and the energy invested from mild to extreme. Highly motivational experiences promote highly persistent memories. Although this phenomenon is adaptive in normal conditions, experiences with extremely high levels of motivational salience can promote development of memories that can be re-experienced intrusively for long time resulting in maladaptive outcomes.Neural mechanisms mediating motivational salience attribution are, therefore, very important for individual and species survival and for well-being. However, these neural mechanisms could be implicated in attribution of abnormal motivational salience to different stimuli leading to maladaptive compulsive seeking or avoidance. We have offered the first evidence that prefrontal cortical norepinephrine transmission is a necessary condition for motivational salience attribution to highly salient stimuli, through modulation of dopamine in the nucleus accumbens, a brain area involved in all motivated behaviors. Moreover, we have shown that prefrontal-accumbal catecholamine system determines approach or avoidance responses to both reward- and aversion-related stimuli only when the salience of the unconditioned stimulus is high enough to induce sustained catecholamine activation, thus affirming that this system processes motivational salience attribution selectively to highly salient events.

  8. Differential regulation of renal phospholipase C isoforms by catecholamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, P Y; Asico, L D; Eisner, G M; Jose, P A

    1995-01-01

    Dopamine and D1 agonists and NE all increase phosphatidyl inositol-specific phospholipase C (PLC) activity, but whereas dopamine produces a natriuresis, NE has an antinatriuretic effect. To determine if catecholamines differentially regulate the expression of PLC isoforms, we infused fenoldopam, a D1 agonist, or pramipexole, a D1/D2 agonist, intravenously or infused fenoldopam or NE into the renal artery of anesthetized rats. After 3-4 h of infusion, when the expected natriuresis (fenoldopam or pramipexole) or antinatriuresis (NE) occurred, the kidneys were removed for analysis of PLC isoform protein expression activity. Western blot analysis revealed that in renal cortical membranes, fenoldopam and pramipexole increased expression of PLC beta 1 and decreased expression of PLC gamma 1; PLC delta was unchanged. In the cytosol, pramipexole and fenoldopam increased expression of both PLC beta 1 and PLC gamma 1. No effects were noted in the medulla. A preferential D1 antagonist, SKF 83742, which by itself had no effect, blocked the effects of pramipexole, thus confirming the involvement of the D1 receptor. In contrast, NE also increased PLC beta 1 but did not affect PLC gamma 1 protein expression in membranes. The changes in PLC isoform expression were accompanied by similar changes in PLC isoform activity. These studies demonstrate for the first time differential regulation of PLC isoforms by catecholamines. PMID:7814630

  9. Catecholamine-induced excitation of nociceptors in sympathetically maintained pain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jørum, Ellen; Ørstavik, Kristin; Schmidt, Roland; Namer, Barbara; Carr, Richard W; Kvarstein, Gunnvald; Hilliges, Marita; Handwerker, Hermann; Torebjörk, Erik; Schmelz, Martin

    2007-02-01

    Sympathetically maintained pain could either be mediated by ephaptic interactions between sympathetic efferent and afferent nociceptive fibers or by catecholamine-induced activation of nociceptive nerve endings. We report here single fiber recordings from C nociceptors in a patient with sympathetically maintained pain, in whom sympathetic blockade had repeatedly eliminated the ongoing pain in both legs. We classified eight C-fibers as mechano-responsive and six as mechano-insensitive nociceptors according to their mechanical responsiveness and activity-dependent slowing of conduction velocity (latency increase of 0.5+/-1.1 vs. 7.1+/-2.0 ms for 20 pulses at 0.125 Hz). Two C-fibers were activated with a delay of several seconds following strong endogenous sympathetic bursts; they were also excited for about 3 min following the injection of norepinephrine (10 microl, 0.05%) into their innervation territory. In these two fibers, a prolonged activation by injection of low pH solution (phosphate buffer, pH 6.0, 10 microl) and sensitization of their heat response following prostaglandin E2 injection were recorded, evidencing their afferent nature. Moreover, their activity-dependent slowing was typical for mechano-insensitive nociceptors. We conclude that sensitized mechano-insensitive nociceptors can be activated by endogenously released catecholamines and thereby may contribute to sympathetically maintained pain. No evidence for ephaptic interaction between sympathetic efferent and nociceptive afferent fibers was found. PMID:16997471

  10. Adrenergic Modulation of Pancreatic Glucagon Secretion in Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerich, John E.; Langlois, Maurice; Noacco, Claudio; Schneider, Victor; Forsham, Peter H.

    1974-01-01

    In order to characterize the influence of the adrenergic system on pancreatic glucagon secretion in man, changes in basal glucagon secretion during infusions of pure alpha and beta adrenergic agonists and their specific antagonists were studied. During infusion of isoproterenol (3 μg/min), a beta adrenergic agonist, plasma glucagon rose from a mean (±SE) basal level of 104±10 to 171±15 pg/ml, P < 0.0002. Concomitant infusion of propranolol (80 μg/min), a beta adrenergic antagonist, prevented the effects of isoproterenol, although propranolol itself had no effect on basal glucagon secretion. During infusion of methoxamine (0.5 mg/min), an alpha adrenergic agonist, plasma glucagon declined from a mean basal level of 122±15 to 75±17 pg/ml, P < 0.001. Infusion of phentolamine (0.5 mg/min), an alpha adrenergic antagonist, caused a rise in plasma glucagon from a mean basal level of 118±16 to 175±21 pg/ml, P < 0.0001. Concomitant infusion of methoxamine with phentolamine caused a reversal of the effects of phentolamine. The present studies thus confirm that catecholamines affect glucagon secretion in man and demonstrate that the pancreatic alpha cell possesses both alpha and beta adrenergic receptors. Beta adrenergic stimulation augments basal glucagon secretion, while alpha adrenergic stimulation diminishes basal glucagon secretion. Furthermore, since infusion of phentolamine, an alpha adrenergic antagonist, resulted in an elevation of basal plasma glucagon levels, there appears to be an inhibitory alpha adrenergic tone governing basal glucagon secretion. The above findings suggest that catecholamines may influence glucose homeostasis in man through their effects on both pancreatic alpha and beta cell function. Images PMID:4825234

  11. Lipids in airway secretions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipids form a significant portion of airway mucus yet they have not received the same attention that epithelial glycoproteins have. We have analysed, by thin layer chromatography, lipids present in airway mucus under 'normal' and hypersecretory (pathological) conditions.The 'normals' included (1) bronchial lavage obtained from healthy human volunteers and from dogs and (2) secretions produced ''in vitro'' by human (bronchial) and canine (tracheal) explants. Hypersecretory mucus samples included (1) lavage from dogs made bronchitic by exposure to SO2, (2) bronchial aspirates from acute and chronic tracheostomy patients, (3) sputum from patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic bronchitis and (4) postmortem secretions from patients who died from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) or from status asthmaticus. Cholesterol was found to be the predominant lipid in 'normal' mucus with lesser amounts of phospholipids. No glycolipids were detected. In the hypersecretory mucus, in addition to neutral and phospholipids, glycolipids were present in appreciable amounts, often the predominant species, suggesting that these may be useful as markers of disease. Radioactive precursors 14C acetate and 14C palmitate were incorporated into lipids secreted ''in vitro'' by canine tracheal explants indicating that they are synthesised by the airway. (author)

  12. Lipids in airway secretions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bhaskar, K.R.; DeFeudis O' Sullivan, D.; Opaskar-Hincman, H.; Reid, L.M.

    1987-01-01

    Lipids form a significant portion of airway mucus yet they have not received the same attention that epithelial glycoproteins have. We have analysed, by thin layer chromatography, lipids present in airway mucus under 'normal' and hypersecretory (pathological) conditions.The 'normals' included (1) bronchial lavage obtained from healthy human volunteers and from dogs and (2) secretions produced ''in vitro'' by human (bronchial) and canine (tracheal) explants. Hypersecretory mucus samples included (1) lavage from dogs made bronchitic by exposure to SO/sub 2/, (2) bronchial aspirates from acute and chronic tracheostomy patients, (3) sputum from patients with cystic fibrosis and chronic bronchitis and (4) postmortem secretions from patients who died from sudden infant death syndrome (SIDS) or from status asthmaticus. Cholesterol was found to be the predominant lipid in 'normal' mucus with lesser amounts of phospholipids. No glycolipids were detected. In the hypersecretory mucus, in addition to neutral and phospholipids, glycolipids were present in appreciable amounts, often the predominant species, suggesting that these may be useful as markers of disease. Radioactive precursors /sup 14/C acetate and /sup 14/C palmitate were incorporated into lipids secreted ''in vitro'' by canine tracheal explants indicating that they are synthesised by the airway.

  13. Effect of heart failure on catecholamine granule morphology and storage in chromaffin cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahata, Sushil K; Zheng, Hong; Mahata, Sumana; Liu, Xuefei; Patel, Kaushik P

    2016-09-01

    One of the key mechanisms involved in sympathoexcitation in chronic heart failure (HF) is the activation of the adrenal glands. Impact of the elevated catecholamines on the hemodynamic parameters has been previously demonstrated. However, studies linking the structural effects of such overactivation with secretory performance and cell metabolism in the adrenomedullary chromaffin cells in vivo have not been previously reported. In this study, HF was induced in male Sprague-Dawley rats by ligation of the left coronary artery. Five weeks after surgery, cardiac function was assessed by ventricular hemodynamics. HF rats showed increased adrenal weight and adrenal catecholamine levels (norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopamine) compared with sham-operated rats. Rats with HF demonstrated increased small synaptic and dense core vesicle in splanchnic-adrenal synapses indicating trans-synaptic activation of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes, increased endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi lumen width to meet the demand of increased catecholamine synthesis and release, and more mitochondria with dilated cristae and glycogen to accommodate for the increased energy demand for the increased biogenesis and exocytosis of catecholamines from the adrenal medulla. These findings suggest that increased trans-synaptic activation of the chromaffin cells within the adrenal medulla may lead to increased catecholamines in the circulation which in turn contributes to the enhanced neurohumoral drive, providing a unique mechanistic insight for enhanced catecholamine levels in plasma commonly observed in chronic HF condition. PMID:27402067

  14. The physiology of salivary secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Proctor, Gordon B

    2016-02-01

    Saliva in the mouth is a biofluid produced mainly by three pairs of major salivary glands--the submandibular, parotid and sublingual glands--along with secretions from many minor submucosal salivary glands. Salivary gland secretion is a nerve-mediated reflex and the volume of saliva secreted is dependent on the intensity and type of taste and on chemosensory, masticatory or tactile stimulation. Long periods of low (resting or unstimulated) flow are broken by short periods of high flow, which is stimulated by taste and mastication. The nerve-mediated salivary reflex is modulated by nerve signals from other centers in the central nervous system, which is most obvious as hyposalivation at times of anxiety. An example of other neurohormonal influences on the salivary reflex is the circadian rhythm, which affects salivary flow and ionic composition. Cholinergic parasympathetic and adrenergic sympathetic autonomic nerves evoke salivary secretion, signaling through muscarinic M3 and adrenoceptors on salivary acinar cells and leading to secretion of fluid and salivary proteins. Saliva gland acinar cells are chloride and sodium secreting, and the isotonic fluid produced is rendered hypotonic by salivary gland duct cells as it flows to the mouth. The major proteins present in saliva are secreted by salivary glands, creating viscoelasticity and enabling the coating of oral surfaces with saliva. Salivary films are essential for maintaining oral health and regulating the oral microbiome. Saliva in the mouth contains a range of validated and potential disease biomarkers derived from epithelial cells, neutrophils, the microbiome, gingival crevicular fluid and serum. For example, cortisol levels are used in the assessment of stress, matrix metalloproteinases-8 and -9 appear to be promising markers of caries and periodontal disease, and a panel of mRNA and proteins has been proposed as a marker of oral squamous cell carcinoma. Understanding the mechanisms by which components enter

  15. The role of prefrontal catecholamines in attention and working memory

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrad eNoudoost

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available While much progress has been made in identifying the brain regions and neurochemical systems involved in the cognitive processes disrupted in mental illnesses, To date, the level of detail at which neurobiologists can describe the chain of events giving rise to cognitive functions is very rudimentary. Much of the intense interest in understanding cognitive functions is motivated by the hope that it might be possible to understand these complex functions at the level of neurons and neural circuits. Here, we review the current state of the literature regarding how modulations in catecholamine levels within the prefrontal cortex alter the neuronal and behavioral correlates of cognitive functions, particularly attention and working memory.

  16. Google Secrets

    CERN Document Server

    Davis, Yvette

    2011-01-01

    Become a Google guru with these effective tips, tricks, and techniques Sure, you use Google. But do you really use Google-and everything it has to offer-in the most effective way possible? Wish you could just sit down with a Google expert who would show you how to take your Google savviness to the next level? With Google Secrets, you can! Tech expert Jerri Ledford reveals the ins, outs, and little-known facts about Google to show you how to sharpen your skills so you can get more done, more efficiently. You may already be familiar with Google's most popular applications, but this indispensable

  17. Proton NMR study of the interactions of catecholamines with phospholipids from chicken erythrocyte membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varoucha, D.

    1985-01-01

    High-resolution NMR spectroscopy has been applied to the study of the interaction of catecholamines, norepinephrine, epinephrine, isoproterenol and their antagonists propranolol and alprenolol with sonicated phospholipids extracted from chicken erythrocyte membranes (CEM). The catecholamine molecules are immobilized by the phospholipids of CEM and the magnitude of the effect seems to depend on the alkyl substitution of their amino group. Upon introduction of alprenolol and propranolol into phospholipid vesicles a broadening of the resonances of the n-methyl alkyl chain and the terminal methyl protons was observed. The results present evidence about the specificity of the interactions of catecholamines with phospholipids from CEM.

  18. ALTERATION OF CATECHOLAMINES IN PHOECHROMOCYTOMA (PC12) CELLS IN VITRO BY THE METABOLITES OF CHLOROTRIAZINE HERBICIDE

    Science.gov (United States)

    The effects of four major chlorotriazine metabolites on the constitutive synthesis of the catecholamines dopamine (DA) and norepinephrine (NE) were examined using undifferentiated PC12 cells. NE release and intracellular DA and NE concentrations were quantified following treatme...

  19. Increased biogenic catecholamine and metabolite levels in two patients with malignant catatonia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nisijima K

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Koichi Nisijima Department of Psychiatry, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi, Japan Abstract: The pathophysiology of malignant catatonia, a rare life-threatening psychiatric syndrome, has not yet been elucidated. This paper reports on two patients with malignant catatonia who showed elevated urinary or plasma catecholamine levels. Patient 1 had high catecholamine and metabolite levels in a 24-hour urine sample, and patient 2 had elevated plasma catecholamine levels. These findings indicate the presence of peripheral sympathetic nervous system hyperactivity in malignant catatonia. Symptoms of autonomic dysfunction, including tachycardia, labile blood pressure, and diaphoresis, are typical features of malignant catatonia and may be related to the increased levels of biogenic amines in these cases. Although the findings in the present study cannot entirely explain the pathophysiology of malignant catatonia, they do indicate that hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system may be involved in the pathology of this condition. Keywords: malignant catatonia, catecholamine levels, neuroleptic malignant syndrome

  20. Elevated plasma catecholamines in young hypertensive and hyperkinetic patients: Effect of pindolol

    OpenAIRE

    Dominiak, P; Grobecker, H

    1982-01-01

    1 The sympathetic nervous system plays an important role in the regulation of blood pressure. Plasma catecholamine concentrations are considered to be reliable indices of sympatho-neuronal (noradrenaline) and sympatho-adrenal (adrenaline) activity and reactivity in man.

  1. The pharmacology of catecholamine involvement in the neural mechanisms of reward.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauquier, A

    1980-01-01

    The neurophysiological basis of motivation became a major research goal with the discovery of brain self-stimulation. Correlative anatomical and neurochemical mapping of self-stimulation sites led to the catecholamine theory of self-stimulation. The present review summarizes the pharmacological evidence pertinent to this theory and formulates conclusions on the functional role of catecholamine systems in behavior reinforced by electrical brain-stimulation.

  2. Electrochemical sensors and biosensors for determination of catecholamine neurotransmitters: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, José A; Fernandes, Paula M V; Pereira, Carlos M; Silva, F

    2016-11-01

    This work describes the state of the art of electrochemical devices for the detection of an important class of neurotransmitters: the catecholamines. This class of biogenic amines includes dopamine, noradrenaline (also called norepinephrine) and adrenaline (also called epinephrine). Researchers have focused on the role of catecholamine molecules within the human body because they are involved in many important biological functions and are commonly associated with several diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson. Furthermore, the release of catecholamines as a consequence of induced stimulus is an important indicator of reward-related behaviors, such as food, drink, sex and drug addiction. Thus, the development of simple, fast and sensitive electroanalytical methodologies for the determination of catecholamines is currently needed in clinical and biomedical fields, as they have the potential to serve as clinically relevant biomarkers for specific disease states or to monitor treatment efficacy. Currently, three main strategies have used by researchers to detect catecholamine molecules, namely: the use electrochemical materials in combination with, for example, HPLC or FIA, the incorporation of new materials/layers on the sensor surfaces (Tables 1-7) and in vivo detection, manly by using FSCV at CFMEs (Section 10). The developed methodologies were able not only to accurately detect catecholamines at relevant concentration levels, but to do so in the presence of co-existing interferences in samples detected (ascorbate, for example). This review examines the progress made in electrochemical sensors for the selective detection of catecholamines in the last 15 years, with special focus on highly innovative features introduced by nanotechnology. As the literature in rather extensive, we try to simplify this work by summarizing and grouping electrochemical sensors according to the manner their substrates were chemically modified. We also discuss the current and future

  3. Electrochemical sensors and biosensors for determination of catecholamine neurotransmitters: A review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, José A; Fernandes, Paula M V; Pereira, Carlos M; Silva, F

    2016-11-01

    This work describes the state of the art of electrochemical devices for the detection of an important class of neurotransmitters: the catecholamines. This class of biogenic amines includes dopamine, noradrenaline (also called norepinephrine) and adrenaline (also called epinephrine). Researchers have focused on the role of catecholamine molecules within the human body because they are involved in many important biological functions and are commonly associated with several diseases, such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson. Furthermore, the release of catecholamines as a consequence of induced stimulus is an important indicator of reward-related behaviors, such as food, drink, sex and drug addiction. Thus, the development of simple, fast and sensitive electroanalytical methodologies for the determination of catecholamines is currently needed in clinical and biomedical fields, as they have the potential to serve as clinically relevant biomarkers for specific disease states or to monitor treatment efficacy. Currently, three main strategies have used by researchers to detect catecholamine molecules, namely: the use electrochemical materials in combination with, for example, HPLC or FIA, the incorporation of new materials/layers on the sensor surfaces (Tables 1-7) and in vivo detection, manly by using FSCV at CFMEs (Section 10). The developed methodologies were able not only to accurately detect catecholamines at relevant concentration levels, but to do so in the presence of co-existing interferences in samples detected (ascorbate, for example). This review examines the progress made in electrochemical sensors for the selective detection of catecholamines in the last 15 years, with special focus on highly innovative features introduced by nanotechnology. As the literature in rather extensive, we try to simplify this work by summarizing and grouping electrochemical sensors according to the manner their substrates were chemically modified. We also discuss the current and future

  4. Effect of indomethacin on hydralazine-induced renin and catecholamine release in the conscious rabbit.

    OpenAIRE

    Campbell, W B; Graham, R M; Jackson, E K; Loisel, D. P.; Pettinger, W A

    1980-01-01

    1. The effects of hydralazine on mean arterial pressure (MAP) heart rate (HR), plasma renin activity (PRA) and plasma catecholamines were examined in conscious rabbits before and after prostaglandin synthesis inhibition with indomethacin. 2. Hydralazine (3 mg/kg. i.v.) produced a 12% decrease in MAP and significant increases in HR, PRA and plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline. 3. Indomethacin (5 mg/kg, s.c.) failed to alter significantly the control MAP, HR, PRA or plasma catecholamines but in...

  5. Brain catecholamines in spontaneously hypertensive and DOCA-salt hypertensive rats.

    OpenAIRE

    Fujino, Kazuyuki

    1984-01-01

    The concentrations and alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine (alpha-MPT) induced disappearance of catecholamines, adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine, were measured in selected areas of the brainstem and hypothalamus of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt hypertensive rats. The catecholamine levels were measured by a sensitive radioenzymatic assay method combined with microdissection of the rat brain. The adrenaline concentration was higher in the area A1 of...

  6. Marker development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, M.R.

    1987-05-01

    This report is to discuss the marker development for radioactive waste disposal sites. The markers must be designed to last 10,000 years, and place no undue burdens on the future generations. Barriers cannot be constructed that preclude human intrusion. Design specifications for surface markers will be discussed, also marker pictograms will also be covered.

  7. Mussel-inspired catecholamine polymers as new sizing agents for fiber-reinforced composites

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Wonoh; Lee, Jea Uk; Byun, Joon-Hyung

    2015-04-01

    Mussel-inspired catecholamine polymers (polydopamine and polynorepinephrine) were coated on the surface of carbon and glass fibers in order to increase the interfacial shear strength between fibers and polymer matrix, and consequently the interlaminar shear strength of fiber-reinforced composites. By utilizing adhesive characteristic of the catecholamine polymer, fiber-reinforced composites can become mechanically stronger than conventional composites. Since the catecholamine polymer is easily constructed on the surface by the simultaneous polymerization of its monomer under a weak basic circumstance, it can be readily coated on micro-fibers by a simple dipping process without any complex chemical treatments. Also, catecholamines can increase the surface free energy of micro-fibers and therefore, can give better wettability to epoxy resin. Therefore, catecholamine polymers can be used as versatile and effective surface modifiers for both carbon and glass fibers. Here, catecholamine-coated carbon and glass fibers exhibited higher interfacial shear strength (37 and 27% increases, respectively) and their plain woven composites showed improved interlaminar shear strength (13 and 9% increases, respectively) compared to non-coated fibers and composites.

  8. Treadmill exercise does not change gene expression of adrenal catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes in chronically stressed rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LJUBICA GAVRILOVIC

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Chronic isolation of adult animals represents a form of psychological stress that produces sympatho-adrenomedullar activation. Exercise training acts as an important modulator of sympatho-adrenomedullary system. This study aimed to investigate physical exercise-related changes in gene expression of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes (tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine-ß-hydroxylase and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding (CREB in the adrenal medulla, concentrations of catecholamines and corticosterone (CORT in the plasma and the weight of adrenal glands of chronically psychosocially stressed adult rats exposed daily to 20 min treadmill running for 12 weeks. Also, we examined how additional acute immobilization stress changes the mentioned parameters. Treadmill running did not result in modulation of gene expression of catecholamine synthesizing enzymes and it decreased the level of CREB mRNA in the adrenal medulla of chronically psychosocially stressed adult rats. The potentially negative physiological adaptations after treadmill running were recorded as increased concentrations of catecholamines and decreased morning CORT concentration in the plasma, as well as the adrenal gland hypertrophy of chronically psychosocially stressed rats. The additional acute immobilization stress increases gene expression of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes in the adrenal medulla, as well as catecholamines and CORT levels in the plasma. Treadmill exercise does not change the activity of sympatho-adrenomedullary system of chronically psychosocially stressed rats.

  9. Altered catecholamine receptor affinity in rabbit aortic intimal hyperplasia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Intimal thickening is a universal response to endothelial denudation and is also thought to be a precursor of atherosclerosis. The authors have demonstrated selective supersensitivity in arterial intimal hyperplasia to norepinephrine and they now report a possible mechanism for this. Binding studies in rabbit aorta with the selective alpha 1-adrenergic radioligand 125I-HEAT demonstrated that there was no change in receptor density (20 ± 4 fmole/10(6) cells) in intact vascular smooth muscle cells at either 5 or 14 days after denudation. However, competition studies showed a 2.6-fold increase in alpha 1-adrenergic receptor affinity for norepinephrine in intimal hyperplastic tissue (P less than 0.05). This increased affinity for norepinephrine was associated with a greater increase in 32P-labeled phosphatidylinositol (148% intimal thickening versus 76% control) and phosphatidic acid (151% intimal thickening versus 56% control) following norepinephrine stimulation of free floating rings of intimal hyperplastic aorta. These data suggest that the catecholamine supersensitivity in rabbit aortic intimal hyperplasia is receptor mediated and may be linked to the phosphatidylinositol cycle

  10. Altered catecholamine receptor affinity in rabbit aortic intimal hyperplasia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    O' Malley, M.K.; Cotecchia, S.; Hagen, P.O. (Duke University Medical Center, Durham, NC (USA))

    1991-08-01

    Intimal thickening is a universal response to endothelial denudation and is also thought to be a precursor of atherosclerosis. The authors have demonstrated selective supersensitivity in arterial intimal hyperplasia to norepinephrine and they now report a possible mechanism for this. Binding studies in rabbit aorta with the selective alpha 1-adrenergic radioligand 125I-HEAT demonstrated that there was no change in receptor density (20 {plus minus} 4 fmole/10(6) cells) in intact vascular smooth muscle cells at either 5 or 14 days after denudation. However, competition studies showed a 2.6-fold increase in alpha 1-adrenergic receptor affinity for norepinephrine in intimal hyperplastic tissue (P less than 0.05). This increased affinity for norepinephrine was associated with a greater increase in 32P-labeled phosphatidylinositol (148% intimal thickening versus 76% control) and phosphatidic acid (151% intimal thickening versus 56% control) following norepinephrine stimulation of free floating rings of intimal hyperplastic aorta. These data suggest that the catecholamine supersensitivity in rabbit aortic intimal hyperplasia is receptor mediated and may be linked to the phosphatidylinositol cycle.

  11. Effect of copper deficiency on plasma and adrenal catecholamines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, B.W.; Bhathena, S.J.; Fields, M.; Voyles, N.R.; Timmers, K.I.; Recant, L.

    1986-03-01

    Copper (Cu) ion is an essential component of enzymes involved in catecholamine (CAT) metabolism. Copper deficiency (CuD) has been shown to affect the CAT content of brain (decreased norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA)) and heart (increased DA and decreased NE). It is thus possible that plasma and adrenal CAT could be altered by CuD. The authors, then, investigated the effect of CuD on plasma and adrenal CAT in rats fed copper-deficient (0.6 ..mu..g Cu/g) or copper-supplemented (6.0 ..mu..g Cu/g) diets with either 62% starch (S) or fructose (F) as the carbohydrate source for 7 weeks after weaning. CuD was ascertained by decreased plasma Cu and ceruloplasmin activity. CuD increased the levels of all three CAT (NE, P < 0.001, epinephrine (E), P < 0.0001 and DA, P < 0.01) in plasma, but had no effect on adrenal CAT content. Dietary F had no significant effect on plasma CAT compared to S but did increase E in adrenal tissue (P < 0.001). They have previously demonstrated that CuD is accompanied by increased plasma glucose, triglyceride and cholesterol and decreased insulin. Thus, increased plasma CAT along with decreased plasma insulin may explain, in part, the glucose intolerance and abnormal lipid metabolism observed in CuD.

  12. Irrelevant stimulus processing in ADHD: catecholamine dynamics and attentional networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco eAboitiz

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available A cardinal symptom of Attenion Deficit and Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD is a general distractibility where children and adults shift their attentional focus to stimuli that are irrelevant to the ongoing behavior. This has been attributed to a deficit in dopaminergic signaling in cortico-striatal networks that regulate goal-directed behavior. Furthermore, recent imaging evidence points to an impairment of large scale, antagonistic brain networks that normally contribute to attentional engagement and disengagement, such as the task-positive networks and the Default Mode Network (DMN. Related networks are the ventral attentional network (VAN involved in attentional shifting, and the salience network (SN related to task expectancy. Here we discuss the tonic-phasic dynamics of catecholaminergic signaling in the brain, and attempt to provide a link between this and the activities of the large-scale cortical networks that regulate behavior. More specifically, we propose that a disbalance of tonic catecholamine levels during task performance produce an emphasis of phasic signaling and increased excitability of the VAN, yielding distractibility symptoms. Likewise, immaturity of the SN may relate to abnormal tonic signaling and an incapacity to build up a proper executive system during task performance. We discuss different lines of evidence including pharmacology, brain imaging and electrophysiology, that are consistent with our proposal. Finally, restoring the pharmacodynamics of catecholaminergic signaling seems crucial to alleviate ADHD symptoms; however, the possibility is open to explore cognitive rehabilitation strategies to top-down modulate network dynamics compensating the pharmacological deficits.

  13. Altered β1-3-adrenoceptor influence on α2-adrenoceptor-mediated control of catecholamine release and vascular tension in hypertensive rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Torill eBerg

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available α2- and β-adrenoceptors (AR reciprocally control catecholamine release and vascular tension. Disorders in these functions are present in spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR. The present study tested if α2AR dysfunctions resulted from altered α2AR/βAR interaction. Blood pressure was recorded through a femoral artery catheter and cardiac output by an ascending aorta flow probe. Total peripheral vascular resistance (TPR was calculated. Norepinephrine release was stimulated by a 15-min tyramine-infusion, which allows presynaptic release-control to be reflected as differences in overflow to plasma. Surgical stress activated some secretion of epinephrine. L-659,066 (α2AR-antagonist enhanced norepinephrine overflow in normotensive controls (WKY but not SHR. Nadolol (β1+2 and ICI-118551 (β2, but not atenolol (β1 or SR59230A (β(3/1L prevented this increase. All βAR antagonists allowed L-659,066 to augment tyramine-induced norepinephrine overflow in SHR and epinephrine secretion in both strains. Inhibition of cAMP-degradation with milrinone and β3AR agonist (BRL37344 enhanced the effect of L-659,066 on release of both catecholamines in SHR and epinephrine in WKY. β1/2AR antagonists and BRL37344 opposed the L-659,066-dependent elimination of the TPR-response to tyramine in WKY. α2AR/βAR antagonists had little influence on the TPR-response in SHR. Milrinone potentiated the L-659,066-dependent reduction of the TPR-response to tyramine. Conclusions: β2AR activity was a required substrate for α2AR auto inhibition of norepinephrine release in WKY. β1+2AR opposed α2AR inhibition of norepinephrine release in SHR and epinephrine secretion in both strains. βAR-α2AR reciprocal control of vascular tension was absent in SHR. Selective agonist provoked β3AR-Gi signaling and influenced the tyramine-induced TPR-response in WKY and catecholamine release in SHR.

  14. Increased gene expression of catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes in adrenal glands contributes to high circulating catecholamines in pigs with tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszek, A; Kiczak, L; Bania, J; Paslawska, U; Zacharski, M; Janiszewski, A; Noszczyk-Nowak, A; Dziegiel, P; Kuropka, P; Ponikowski, P; Jankowska, E A

    2015-04-01

    High levels of circulating catecholamines have been established as fundamental pathophysiological elements of heart failure (HF). However, it is unclear whether the increased gene expression of catecholamine-synthesis enzymes in the adrenal glands contributes to these hormone abnormalities in large animal HF models. We analyzed the mRNA levels of catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes: tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), aromatic L-amino acid decarboxylase (AAAD), dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH) and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT) in adrenal glands of 18 pigs with chronic systolic non-ischaemic HF (tachycardia-induced cardiomyopathy due to right ventricle pacing) and 6 sham-operated controls. Pigs with severe HF demonstrated an increased expression of TH and DBH (but neither AAAD nor PNMT) as compared to animals with milder HF and controls (Padrenal mRNA expression of TH and DBH was accompanied by a reduced left ventricle ejection fraction (LVEF) (Padrenal mRNA expression of TH and DBH, and the high levels of circulating adrenaline and noradrenaline (all Padrenals to the circulating pool of catecholamines in subjects with systolic HF.

  15. Tumor Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... guidelines on a variety of topics, including tumor markers for breast cancer, colorectal cancer, lung cancer, and others. The ... of recurrence 70-Gene signature (Mammaprint®) Cancer type: Breast ... Can tumor markers be used in cancer screening? Because tumor markers ...

  16. Personality traits of aggression-submissiveness and perfectionism associate with ABO blood groups through catecholamine activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hobgood, Donna K

    2011-08-01

    Personality trait research has shown associations with many genes, prominently those of the catecholamine metabolism such as dopamine beta hydroxylase (DBH), catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT), and monoamine oxidase A (MAOA). Because DBH gene is in linkage disequilibrium with ABO gene, there is reason to think that other catecholamine genes using the same substrate as DBH may also have associations with ABO blood groups, and this paper demonstrates how this may be so. Reasons include similarities in hapmap population frequency distributions, similarities in illness risks between ABO blood groups and DBH activities as well as between ABO blood groups and COMT activities and between ABO blood groups and MAOA activities. If ABO blood groups can be demonstrated to associate with all these catecholamine genes, then the catecholamine personality trait research can be applied to ABO blood groups and tested for confirmation. ABO blood typing is widely available and affords ability to test this hypothesis and thus confirm the possible joint association of personality traits of aggression-submissiveness and perfectionism to catecholamine genes and to ABO blood groups. Clinical applications and implications are discussed. PMID:21601990

  17. Preparation of sticky Escherichia coli through surface display of an adhesive catecholamine moiety.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Joseph P; Choi, Min-Jung; Kim, Se Hun; Lee, Seung Hwan; Lee, Haeshin

    2014-01-01

    Mussels attach to virtually all types of inorganic and organic surfaces in aqueous environments, and catecholamines composed of 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (DOPA), lysine, and histidine in mussel adhesive proteins play a key role in the robust adhesion. DOPA is an unusual catecholic amino acid, and its side chain is called catechol. In this study, we displayed the adhesive moiety of DOPA-histidine on Escherichia coli surfaces using outer membrane protein W as an anchoring motif for the first time. Localization of catecholamines on the cell surface was confirmed by Western blot and immunofluorescence microscopy. Furthermore, cell-to-cell cohesion (i.e., cellular aggregation) induced by the displayed catecholamine and synthesis of gold nanoparticles on the cell surface support functional display of adhesive catecholamines. The engineered E. coli exhibited significant adhesion onto various material surfaces, including silica and glass microparticles, gold, titanium, silicon, poly(ethylene terephthalate), poly(urethane), and poly(dimethylsiloxane). The uniqueness of this approach utilizing the engineered sticky E. coli is that no chemistry for cell attachment are necessary, and the ability of spontaneous E. coli attachment allows one to immobilize the cells on challenging material surfaces such as synthetic polymers. Therefore, we envision that mussel-inspired catecholamine yielded sticky E. coli that can be used as a new type of engineered microbe for various emerging fields, such as whole living cell attachment on versatile material surfaces, cell-to-cell communication systems, and many others. PMID:24123747

  18. The relationship between catecholamines levels in mother and fetus, and pathogenesis of pregnancy-induced hypertension

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张为远; 赵艳辉; 殷艳玲

    2003-01-01

    Objective To study the relationship between pregnancy-induced hypertension (PIH) and catecholamine levels.Methods Catecholamines levels in maternal and fetal blood were determined in 116 patients with PIH and 40 normal control subjects using high performance liquid chromatography. The normal control subjects and PIH cases were selected from patients at term pregnancy receiving elective cesarean section. Results Plasma norepinephrine (NE) levels were significantly higher in patients with severe PIH than those in control subjects (P<0.05). Both patients and control subjects had higher NE levels in the umbilical artery blood than in the umbilical vein blood (P<0.05). NE levels in the umbilical artery blood were five times higher than those in the maternal blood.Conclusion The pathogenesis of PIH may relate to catecholamine concentrations in fetus.

  19. Acute coagulopathy of trauma: balancing progressive catecholamine induced endothelial activation and damage by fluid phase anticoagulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansson, P I; Ostrowski, S R

    2010-01-01

    Acute coagulopathy of trauma predicts a poor clinical outcome. Tissue trauma activates the sympathoadrenal system resulting in high circulating levels of catecholamines that influence hemostasis dose-dependently through immediate effects on the two major compartments of hemostasis, i.e., the...... circulating blood and the vascular endothelium. There appears to be a dose-dependency with regards to injury severity and the hemostatic response to trauma evaluated in whole blood by viscoelastic assays like thrombelastography (TEG), changing from normal to hypercoagulable, to hypocoagulable and finally...... evolutionary developed response that counterbalances the injury and catecholamine induced endothelial activation and damage. Given this, the rise in circulating catecholamines in trauma patients may favor a switch from hyper- to hypocoagulability in the blood to keep the progressively more procoagulant...

  20. Accelerated Curing Speed of Ethyl a-Cyanoacrylate by Polymer with Catecholamine Groups

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张峰; 刘四委; 张艺; 许家瑞; 危岩

    2012-01-01

    Four kinds of poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) derivatives with the similar backbone and different side groups have been synthesized successfully. When both catecholamine and double bond are tethered to polymer backbone, i.e., the PEG backbone, simultaneously, the polymer can accelerate the curing speed of ethyl a-cyanoacrylate (commer- cially available as 502) greatly under the same conditions (the curing time of such system is no more than 5 s). Probably this is due to the autoxidation of catecholamines. Through the redox-cycling, catecholamines can produce, collect free radicals, and thus initiate the free radical polymerization. Due to the fast-curing of such material when mixed with a-cyanoacrylate, we could design and develop a new bicomponent super bioglue used in the dentistry or other bioenvironment requiring super fast settlement for further surgical operations.

  1. Copper-mediated oxidative degradation of catecholamines and oxidative damage of protein

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goncalves, P.R.; Harria, M.I.N.; Felix, J.M.; Hoffmann, M.E. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, SP (Brazil). Inst. de Biologia

    1997-12-31

    Full text. Degradative oxidation of catecholamines has been a matter of large interest in recent years due to the evidences associating their autoxidation with the etiology of neurotoxic and cardiotoxic processes. In this work we present data on the degradative oxidation of catecholamines of physiological importance: isoproterenol (IP), epinephrine (EP), norepinephrine (NEP), deoxyepinephrine (DEP) and dopamine (DA). The degradative oxidation of the catecholamines was followed by measurement of spectral changes and oxygen consumption by neutral aqueous solutions. The data show that Cu{sup 2+} strongly accelerated the rate of catecholamine oxidation, following the decreasing order; EP>DEP>IP>NEP>DA. The production of superoxide anion radical during catecholamine oxidation was very slow, even in the presence of Cu{sup 2+}. The ability of IP to induce damages on bovine serum albumin (BSA) was determined by measuring the formation of carbonyl-groups in the protein, detected by reduction with tritiated Na BH{sub 4}. The incubation of BSA with IP (50-500{mu}M), in the presence of 100{mu}M Cu{sup 2+} leaded to an increased and dose dependent {sup 3} H-incorporation by the oxidized protein. The production of oxidative damage by IP/Cu{sup 2+} was accompanied by marked BSA fragmentation, detected by SDS-polyacrylamide gel dependent (25-400{mu}M IP) des appearance of the original BSA band and appearance of smaller fragments spread in the gel, when incubation has been done in the presence of 100{mu}M Cu{sup 2+}. These results suggest that copper-catalysed oxidative degradation of proteins induced by catecholamines might be critically involved in the toxic action of these molecules

  2. Effect of. beta. -endorphin on catecholamine levels in rat hypothalamus and cerebral cortex

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Slavnov, V.N.; Valueva, G.V.; Markov, V.V.; Luchitskii, E.V.

    1986-10-01

    The authors studied the effect of beta-endorphin on catecholamine concentrations in the hypothalmus and cerebral cortex in rats, as a contribution to the explanation of the mechanism of action of this peptide on certain pituitary trophic functions. Concentrations of dopamine, noradrenalin, and adrenalin were determined by a radioenzymatic method. A Mark 3 scintillation system was used for radiometric investigation of the samples. The results of these experiments indicate that beta-endorphin has a marked effect on brain catecholamine levels mainly in the hypothalamus.

  3. A dopaminergic receptor modulates catecholamine release from the cat adrenal gland.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Artalejo, A R; García, A G; Montiel, C; Sánchez-García, P

    1985-01-01

    Nicotine evokes the release of catecholamines from perfused cat adrenal glands in a concentration-dependent manner, the median effective concentration for nicotine being 5 microM. Two 2 min pulses of 5 microM-nicotine, 40 min apart (S1 and S2) gave net catecholamine outputs of 7.64 and 3.55 micrograms/8 min, respectively. The ratio S2/S1 in control glands was 0.5. Increasing concentrations of apomorphine (1-10 microM) markedly inhibited catecholamine release during the second nicotine pulse (S2). At 1 microM-apomorphine, the release during S2 was significantly reduced to 16% of S1; with 10 microM-apomorphine, the secretory response was reduced further to only 3% of S1, the ratio S2/S1 being 0.03. The presence of haloperidol, sulpiride or picobenzide (each 0.5 microM) during S2, completely reversed the inhibition of catecholamine release produced by apomorphine. Haloperidol itself increased the nicotinic secretory response during S2; so, while the ratio S2/S1 was 0.5 in control conditions, this ratio increased significantly to 0.95 if haloperidol (0.5 microM) was present during S2, suggesting that the presence of this dopaminergic antagonist removed a negative feed-back mechanism that inhibits nicotine-evoked catecholamine release. If present during S2, dopamine (1 microM) also markedly inhibited catecholamine release evoked by nicotine; this inhibition was again reversed by 0.5 microM-haloperidol. Neither the opiate antagonist naloxone nor the alpha-adrenoceptor blocking agent phentolamine (at concentrations of 0.5-5 microM) affected the inhibition by apomorphine of the secretory response to nicotine. These data strongly suggest that the cat adrenal medulla chromaffin cell membrane contains a dopaminergic receptor which modulates the catecholamine secretory process triggered by stimulation of the nicotinic cholinoceptor. The fact that dopamine is released in measurable amounts, together with adrenaline and noradrenaline, from perfused cat adrenal glands in response

  4. Capillary electrophoresis with direct chemiluminescence detection for the analysis of catecholamines in human urine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cheng Quan Wang; Hui Wang; Yan Ming Liu

    2007-01-01

    A rapid and sensitive method for the analysis of three catecholamines by capillary electrophoresis (CE) with direct chemiluminescence (CL) detection is described. The detection limits (S/N = 3) were 1.3 × 10-8 g/mL for isoprenaline,1.0 × 10-8 g/mL for epinephrine and 2.8 × 10-8 g/mL for dopamine. The proposed method was successfully applied to the analysis of catecholamines in urine samples of cigarette smokers and nonsmokers. The results showed that there is a close relation between the release of dopamine in human body fluids and cigarette smoking/nonsmoking.

  5. Role of catecholamines and nitric oxide on pigment displacement of the chromatophores of freshwater snakehead teleost fish, Channa punctatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Saikat P; Jadhao, Arun G; Palande, Nikhil V

    2014-04-01

    We are reporting for the first time that the catecholamines (adrenaline and noradrenaline) inhibit the effect of nitric oxide (NO) on melanosome dispersion in freshly isolated scales of the freshwater snakehead fish, Channa punctatus. We studied the effect of NO and catecholamines on the pigment displacement by observing the changes in the melanophore index. The scales when treated with solution containing NO donor sodium nitroprusside (SNP) showed dispersion of melanosomes, whereas NO synthase blocker N-omega-Nitro-L-arginine suppresses this action of SNP. Treatment with adrenaline and noradrenaline on the isolated scales caused aggregation of melanosomes. Scales treated with solution containing catecholamines and SNP resulted in aggregation of melanosomes suggesting that catecholamines mask the effect of SNP. These results suggest that the catecholamines are inhibiting the effect of NO and causing the aggregation of the melanosomes may be via surface receptors.

  6. Influence of personality characteristics on spectrum of catecholamines and course of ischemic heart disease in elderly patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zarubina Е.G.

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the study of interrelation between characteristics of psychological profile of elderly patients, level of stress hormones in blood serum and character of IHD course. Materials and Methods. The level of catecholamines and cortisol in blood was investigated in two groups of elderly patients (379 patients formed according to their psychological profile with the help of Cattell questionnaire. Multispiral coronarography was conducted in patients suffering IHD. Results. The established differences of stress level correlated with the characteristics of the course of IHD at all the examined patients. In spite of various levels and reactions of adaptive hormones on stress situations the prevalence of IHD appeared to be the same in both groups although manifestation and clinical severity of coronary insufficiency varied in patients of different groups. The number of patients suffered myocardial infarction, among them with Q-wave, occurred to be higher in one of the groups despite the fact that changes in their coronary arteries were less expressed. Conclusion. The character of psychological profile causes different stress resistance of patients and leads to various levels of stress hormones in blood serum. Depression can become a marker of severe course of cardiovascular pathology. The character of psychological profile influences the course of IHD.

  7. Determination of catecholamines by ion chromatography coupled to acidic potassium permanganate chemiluminescence detection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong Wei Wu; Mei Lan Chen; Dan Shou; Yan Zhu

    2012-01-01

    A simple,fast,sensitive,highly selective and eco-friendly analytical method for the determination of catecholamines in human urine by ion chromatography (IC) with chemiluminescence (CL) detection was described in this paper.Using 12 mmoi/L H2SO4 without any organic additive as eluent,three catecholamines including epinephrine (EP),norepinephrine (NE) and dopamine (DA)were well separated on a cation-exchange column.The CL detection was based on the reaction of analytes with acidic potassium permanganate in the presence of formaldehyde as an enhancer.The absence of methanol and acetonitrile in eluent made the proposed method more sensitive and eco-friendly.Under the optimal conditions,the linear range of the proposed method was in the range of 0.02-0.5 μg/mL.The limit of detection (LOD) was in the range of 0.6 and 5.1 μg/L.The relative standard deviations (RSD) for 0.1 μg/mL mixed standard solution were in the range of 0.8-1.9% (n =11).The method has been applied to the determination of catecholamines in human urine successfully.Excellent spiked recoveries were achieved for catecholamines ranged from 91.2% to 112.7%.

  8. Catecholamines and dihydroxyphenylalanine in metamorphosing larvae of the nudibranch Phestilla sibogae Bergh (Gastropoda: Opisthobranchia).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pires, A; Coon, S L; Hadfield, M G

    1997-09-01

    The content of catecholamines and dihydroxyphenylalanine in larvae of the nudibranch Phestilla sibogae was analyzed by high-performance liquid chromatography with electrochemical detection. Dihydroxyphenylalanine, norepinephrine and dopamine were identified in larvae of all ages examined (5 through 12 days post-fertilization). Dihydroxyphenylalanine could be accurately quantified only in larvae of ages 8 through 12 days, when its average concentration increased from 0.62 to 6.71 x 10(-2) pmol micrograms protein-1. Between ages 5 and 12 days dopamine rose from 0.081 to 0.616 pmol microgram protein-1, and norepinephrine from 0.45 to 2.17 x 10(-2) pmol micrograms protein-1. Dihydroxyphenylalanine, dopamine and norepinephrine were also measured at different stages of metamorphic progress in 10- to 12-day larvae. Dihydroxyphenylalanine increased by a factor of 2.4 between the onset and completion of metamorphosis, but levels of dopamine and norepinephrine remained stable. One millimolar alpha-methyl-DL-m-tyrosine, an inhibitor of catecholamine synthesis, inhibited natural metamorphosis and depleted endogenous norepinephrine and especially dopamine, respectively, to 75% and 35% of control values. The existence of unexpectedly high levels of catecholamines in metamorphically competent larvae, and the association of catecholamine depletion with inhibition of metamorphosis, indicate that these compounds may participate in the control of gastropod development. PMID:9309865

  9. Possible space flight-induced catecholamine cardiomyopathy: Neil Armstrong's last 20 lunar minutes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rowe WJ

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available William J RoweFormer Assistant Clinical Professor of Medicine, Medical University of Ohio at Toledo, Ohio, USAAbstract: The hypothesis underpinning this paper is that space flight may predispose to catecholamine cardiomyopathy. Catecholamine levels in space are twice those of the supine levels on Earth. Serum magnesium levels are significantly reduced, with potential vicious cycles triggered by elevation of catecholamines. These are conducive to coronary vasospasm with clot formation from oxidative stress and calcium overload, and ultimately, temporary impairment of left ventricular function could occur. Experimental animals in space have shown a significant increase in norepinephrine levels with various microcirculatory disorders and serious myocardial pathology. During extravehicular activity (space walks, astronauts show heart rates of 150–174 beats per minute. Before exposure to the iron-laden dust brought into the habitat on his space suit, Neil Armstrong's heart rates on the lunar surface were 130–160 beats per minute, and accompanied by dyspnea on two occasions during his last 20 minutes on the moon. A stress test done on the day after splashdown was consistent with "ischemic left ventricular dysfunction". To support this hypothesis, echocardiography on the international space station might show left ventricular hypokinesia. Alpha adrenergic blockade, correction of invariable significant magnesium deficits, along with correction of invariable atrial natriuretic peptide deficits, may counteract the vasoconstrictive action of norepinephrine.Keywords: space flight, catecholamines, cardiomyopathy, magnesium, oxidative stress, heat intolerance, calcium

  10. The Control of Responsiveness in ADHD by Catecholamines: Evidence for Dopaminergic, Noradrenergic and Interactive Roles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oades, Robert D.; Sadile, Adolfo G.; Sagvolden, Terje; Viggiano, Davide; Zuddas, Alessandro; Devoto, Paola; Aase, Heidi; Johansen, Espen B.; Ruocco, Lucia A.; Russell, Vivienne A.

    2005-01-01

    We explore the neurobiological bases of attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD) from the viewpoint of the neurochemistry and psychopharmacology of the catecholamine-based behavioural systems. The contributions of dopamine (DA) and noradrenaline (NA) neurotransmission to the motor and cognitive symptoms of ADHD (e.g. hyperactivity, variable…

  11. Fully automated high-performance liquid chromatographic assay for the analysis of free catecholamines in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, R; Robinet, D; Barbier, C; Sartre, J; Huguet, C

    1990-08-24

    A totally automated and reliable high-performance liquid chromatographic method is described for the routine determination of free catecholamines (norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopamine) in urine. The catecholamines were isolated from urine samples using small alumina columns. A standard automated method for pH adjustment of urine before the extraction step has been developed. The extraction was performed on an ASPEC (Automatic Sample Preparation with Extraction Columns, Gilson). The eluate was collected in a separate tube and then automatically injected into the chromatographic column. The catecholamines were separated by reversed-phase ion-pair liquid chromatography and quantified by fluorescence detection. No manual intervention was required during the extraction and separation procedure. One sample may be run every 15 min, ca. 96 samples in 24 h. Analytical recoveries for all three catecholamines are 63-87%, and the detection limits are 0.01, 0.01, and 0.03 microM for norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopamine, respectively, which is highly satisfactory for urine. Day-to-day coefficients of variation were less than 10%.

  12. Reversibility of increased formation of catecholamines in patients with alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Reisenauer, C.; Biermann, J.;

    2004-01-01

    investigate whether the increase in urinary excretion rates and plasma levels of catecholamines in alcohol-abusing patients are reversible during prolonged abstinence, especially with respect to the severity of ALD. METHODS: Urinary excretion rates and plasma levels of noradrenaline (NA), adrenaline (A) and...

  13. Catecholamine responses to virtual combat: implications for post-traumatic stress and dimensions of functioning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Highland, Krista B; Costanzo, Michelle E; Jovanovic, Tanja; Norrholm, Seth D; Ndiongue, Rochelle B; Reinhardt, Brian J; Rothbaum, Barbara; Rizzo, Albert A; Roy, Michael J

    2015-01-01

    Posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms can result in functional impairment among service members (SMs), even in those without a clinical diagnosis. The variability in outcomes may be related to underlying catecholamine mechanisms. Individuals with PTSD tend to have elevated basal catecholamine levels, though less is known regarding catecholamine responses to trauma-related stimuli. We assessed whether catecholamine responses to a virtual combat environment impact the relationship between PTSD symptom clusters and elements of functioning. Eighty-seven clinically healthy SMs, within 2 months after deployment to Iraq or Afghanistan, completed self-report measures, viewed virtual-reality (VR) combat sequences, and had sequential blood draws. Norepinephrine responses to VR combat exposure moderated the relationship between avoidance symptoms and scales of functioning including physical functioning, physical-role functioning, and vitality. Among those with high levels of avoidance, norepinephrine change was inversely associated with functional status, whereas a positive correlation was observed for those with low levels of avoidance. Our findings represent a novel use of a virtual environment to display combat-related stimuli to returning SMs to elucidate mind-body connections inherent in their responses. The insight gained improves our understanding of post-deployment symptoms and quality of life in SMs and may facilitate enhancements in treatment. Further research is needed to validate these findings in other populations and to define the implications for treatment effectiveness. PMID:25852586

  14. Fully automated high-performance liquid chromatographic assay for the analysis of free catecholamines in urine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Said, R; Robinet, D; Barbier, C; Sartre, J; Huguet, C

    1990-08-24

    A totally automated and reliable high-performance liquid chromatographic method is described for the routine determination of free catecholamines (norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopamine) in urine. The catecholamines were isolated from urine samples using small alumina columns. A standard automated method for pH adjustment of urine before the extraction step has been developed. The extraction was performed on an ASPEC (Automatic Sample Preparation with Extraction Columns, Gilson). The eluate was collected in a separate tube and then automatically injected into the chromatographic column. The catecholamines were separated by reversed-phase ion-pair liquid chromatography and quantified by fluorescence detection. No manual intervention was required during the extraction and separation procedure. One sample may be run every 15 min, ca. 96 samples in 24 h. Analytical recoveries for all three catecholamines are 63-87%, and the detection limits are 0.01, 0.01, and 0.03 microM for norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopamine, respectively, which is highly satisfactory for urine. Day-to-day coefficients of variation were less than 10%. PMID:2277100

  15. Plasma catecholamines and hyperglycaemia influence thermoregulation in man during prolonged exercise in the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mora-Rodríguez, R; González-Alonso, J; Below, P R; Coyle, E F

    1996-03-01

    1. We manipulated plasma catecholamines (combined adrenaline and noradrenaline concentrations) to three levels during prolonged exercise to determine their effect on cutaneous and forearm vascular conductance (CVC and FVC), oesophageal temperature (T(oes)) and cardiovascular responses. 2. On three occasions, seven endurance-trained men cycled at 65% VO2, max in the heat (33.1 +/- 0.7 degrees C) for 120-150 min. During the control trial (150 min duration), 0.45% saline was intravenously infused (SI) starting at 30 min, at a rate that replaced a third of the fluid losses. The infusion start time and rate were identical in all three trials. During SI, plasma catecholamine levels increased progressively and were 18.2 +/- 2.7 pmol ml-1 at 150 min. In another trial (120 min duration), adrenaline was infused (AI) at 0.1 microgram kg-1 min-1 and plasma catecholamine levels were elevated 6 pmol ml-1 above SI during the 60-120 min period. In a third trial (150 min duration), an 18% glucose solution was infused (GI) at a rate that maintained plasma glucose levels above 11 mM and plasma catecholamine levels were 5.0-5.5 pmol ml-1 lower (P Heat production and sweat rate were not different during the three trials and neither was the decline in stroke volume, cardiac output and mean arterial pressure. 4. Soon after beginning AI, CVC decreased 15%, T(oes) increased by 0.4 +/- 0.1 degree C and heart rate increased by 6 +/- 1 beats min-1; these significant (P skin. The mechanisms by which hyperglycaemia (i.e. 11 mM) attenuates hyperthermia are less clear and may be due to others factors besides attenuation of the plasma catecholamine response to exercise. PMID:8866876

  16. An unusual case of Carney triad with high level catecholamine-secreting but no existence of extra-adrenal paraganglioma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    QIAO Gui-bin; FANG Yi; ZENG Wei-sheng; PENG Li-jun; HUANG Wen-jie

    2010-01-01

    @@ In 1977, Carney originally described the association of gastric epithelioid leiomyosarcoma, pulmonary chondroma and extra-adrenal paraganglioma, and this unusual syndrome was subsequently called "Carney triad".

  17. Characterisation of the sympathetic nervous system of Asian (Elephas maximus) and African (Loxodonta africana) elephants based on urinary catecholamine analyses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehnhard, M

    2007-05-01

    Assessing the welfare status of captive animals using non-invasive measurements of hormones is of growing interest because this can serve as an effective tool to facilitate the optimization of environmental and husbandry conditions. Both the African elephant (Loxodonta africana) and the Asian elephant (Elephas maximus) exhibit extremely low breeding success in captivity, and because elevated levels of stress may negatively influence reproductive functions, this study sought to establish a method for assessing sympathoadrenal activity in captive female elephants. We found a circadian variation in urinary noradrenaline (norepinephrine, NE), adrenaline (epinephrine, Epi) and dopamine (DA) under short day length. Peak activity of noradrenaline and dopamine was noted at 3 a.m. Adrenaline showed a biphasic pattern with a minor peak recorded at 3 a.m. and a major peak 9 a.m. Under long-day photoperiodic conditions, simultaneous peaks of noradrenaline and adrenaline were again noted at 3 a.m. whereas dopamine does not appear to have a distinct circadian pattern under long-day length. A transfer of two elephant cows resulted in a marked increase in urinary adrenaline and noradrenaline levels, confirming that the transfer represented a stressful event. During the peripartal period, noradrenaline concentrations increased and maximum concentrations were obtained at delivery. Daily measurements of urinary dopamine throughout the follicular phase revealed an increase in dopamine secretion close to ovulation. This increase might indicate a role of dopamine in the ovulatory mechanisms. These results suggest that changes in urinary catecholamine excretion reflect fluctuations in sympathoadrenal activity and may be a useful indicator of stress. PMID:17336981

  18. Catecholamines, cardiac natriuretic peptides and chromogranin A: evolution and physiopathology of a 'whip-brake' system of the endocrine heart.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tota, Bruno; Cerra, Maria Carmela; Gattuso, Alfonsina

    2010-09-15

    In the past 50 years, extensive evidence has shown the ability of vertebrate cardiac non-neuronal cells to synthesize and release catecholamines (CA). This formed the mindset behind the search for the intrinsic endocrine heart properties, culminating in 1981 with the discovery of the natriuretic peptides (NP). CA and NP, co-existing in the endocrine secretion granules and acting as major cardiovascular regulators in health and disease, have become of great biomedical relevance for their potent diagnostic and therapeutic use. The concept of the endocrine heart was later enriched by the identification of a growing number of cardiac hormonal substances involved in organ modulation under normal and stress-induced conditions. Recently, chromogranin A (CgA), a major constituent of the secretory granules, and its derived cardio-suppressive and antiadrenergic peptides, vasostatin-1 and catestatin, were shown as new players in this framework, functioning as cardiac counter-regulators in 'zero steady-state error' homeostasis, particularly under intense excitatory stimuli, e.g. CA-induced myocardial stress. Here, we present evidence for the hypothesis that is gaining support, particularly among human cardiologists. The actions of CA, NP and CgA, we argue, may be viewed as a hallmark of the cardiac capacity to organize 'whip-brake' connection-integration processes in spatio-temporal networks. The involvement of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS)/nitric oxide (NO) system in this configuration is discussed. The use of fish and amphibian paradigms will illustrate the ways that incipient endocrine-humoral agents have evolved as components of cardiac molecular loops and important intermediates during evolutionary transitions, or in a distinct phylogenetic lineage, or under stress challenges. This may help to grasp the old evolutionary roots of these intracardiac endocrine/paracrine networks and how they have evolved from relatively less complicated designs. The latter can also be used

  19. Authentication Without Secrets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pierson, Lyndon G. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States); Robertson, Perry J. [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-11-01

    This work examines a new approach to authentication, which is the most fundamental security primitive that underpins all cyber security protections. Current Internet authentication techniques require the protection of one or more secret keys along with the integrity protection of the algorithms/computations designed to prove possession of the secret without actually revealing it. Protecting a secret requires physical barriers or encryption with yet another secret key. The reason to strive for "Authentication without Secret Keys" is that protecting secrets (even small ones only kept in a small corner of a component or device) is much harder than protecting the integrity of information that is not secret. Promising methods are examined for authentication of components, data, programs, network transactions, and/or individuals. The successful development of authentication without secret keys will enable far more tractable system security engineering for high exposure, high consequence systems by eliminating the need for brittle protection mechanisms to protect secret keys (such as are now protected in smart cards, etc.). This paper is a re-release of SAND2009-7032 with new figures numerous edits.

  20. Features Of Daily Dynamics Of Catecholamine Level In Myocardium Under The Influence Of Low Alcohol Drinks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    O.I. Kostin

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available The research goal was to study the features of daily dynamics of adrenaline and noradrenaline content in various parts of myocardium at the rats receiving nonalcoholic and alcohol-containing beer at ordinary light regimen. Substantial increase of level of adrenaline and noradrenaline in all parts of myocardium at the rats received nonalcoholic and spirit-based beer in comparison with the control. At the rats received nonalcoholic beer, authentically higher content of adrenaline and low noradrenaline in myocardium in comparison with animals received alcohol-containing beer was observed. The circadian dynamics of catecholamine level in all parts of heart myocardium was disturbed at animals of both experimental groups in comparison with the control. The revealed disturbances of level of daily catecholamine dynamics in myocardium under the influence of beer, undoubtedly, are bound with negative action of nonalcoholic nature ingredients present in beer. Key words: adrenaline, noradrenaline, myocardium, low alcohol drinks.

  1. Changes in eosinophil and corticosterone levels and catecholamine metabolism during emotionalpainful stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Malyshev, V.V.; Manukhin, B.N.; Petrova, V.A.

    1985-08-01

    The aim of this investigation was to study blood levels of eosinophils, corticosterone (CS), adrenalin, noradrenalin (NA), and dopamine (DA) during the development of the stress reaction, and also to study neuronal uptake and synthesis of catecholamines in the adrenals and heart. In some animal groups, the neuronal uptake of /sup 3/H-NA and the intensity of /sup 3/H-Na and /sup 3/H-DA synthesis from /sup 3/H-tyrosine were investigated by a method described previously, 2 h after the end of induction of emotional-painful stress (EPS). Radioactivity was measured on an SL-30 liquid scintillation counter. A regular relationship was found between changes in blood eosinophil level, the CH concentration, and catecholamine metabolism in the course of EPS.

  2. Reversibility of increased formation of catecholamines in patients with alcoholic liver disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Parlesak, Alexandr; Reisenauer, C.; Biermann, J.;

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: While chronic alcohol abuse has been shown to be associated with increased production of catecholamines, little is known about the reversibility of this increased sympathetic activity and the influence of severity of alcoholic liver disease (ALD). The aim of the present study...... was to investigate whether the increase in urinary excretion rates and plasma levels of catecholamines in alcohol-abusing patients are reversible during prolonged abstinence, especially with respect to the severity of ALD. METHODS: Urinary excretion rates and plasma levels of noradrenaline (NA), adrenaline (A......) and dopamine (DA) were determined in 15 subjects with mild to moderate ALD (ALD1) and in 7 alcoholic cirrhotics (ALD2) on admission and after 2 and 12 weeks of abstinence. Eight healthy males, age-matched to ALD1, served as controls (HC). RESULTS: Urinary excretion rates (24 h) and resting plasma...

  3. Effects of imipramine of the orthostatic changes in blood pressure, heart rate and plasma catecholamines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J R; Johansen, Torben; Arentoft, A;

    1983-01-01

    The effect of imipramine on the orthostatic changes in heart rate, blood pressure and plasma catecholamines were examined in six healthy male subjects on two occasions on high sodium balance (Na+ excretion greater than 120 mmol per day) and on low sodium balance (Na+ excretion less than 110 mmol...... per day), respectively. Orthostatic tests were carried out before and 2 h after ingestion of 150 mg imipramine hydrochloride. Imipramine caused a moderate increase in supine systolic blood pressure, and a pronounced increase in the rise in heart rate, when the subjects assumed erect position...... ingestion on a high sodium balance. The plasma catecholamine levels in supine and standing position were not influenced by imipramine or by the changes in sodium balance. The data may suggest that inhibition of presynaptic reuptake of noradrenaline and/or alpha 2-adrenoceptor blockade causes the moderate...

  4. Effect of consecutive cooling and immobilization on catecholamine metabolism in rat tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matlina, E. S.; Waysman, S. M.; Zaydner, I. G.; Kogan, B. M.; Nozdracheva, L. V.

    1979-01-01

    The combined effect of two stressor stimuli--cooling and immobilization--acting successively on the sympathetic-adrenaline system was studied experimentally in rats that were cooled for 8 hours at 7 C on the first day and immobilized for 6 hours on the next day. The biochemical and histochemical methods used and the experimental technique involved are described in detail. The following conclusions were formulated: (1) the successive action of cooling and immobilization results in a stronger decrease in the adrenaline and noradrenaline content in the adrenal gland than that which could be due to a simple summation of the cooling and immobilization effects; (2) successive cooling and immobilization are followed by activation of catecholamine synthesis in the adrenal gland; and (3) 1-DOPA administration (45 mg/kg 3 times in 2 days) intraabdominally activated catecholamine synthesis in the adrenal glands in both the control and test animals.

  5. Catecholamine-o-methyltransferase polymorphisms are associated with postoperative pain intensity.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Lee, Peter J

    2011-02-01

    single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes for catecholamine-O-methyltransferase (COMT), μ-opioid receptor and GTP cyclohydrolase (GCH1) have been linked to acute and chronic pain states. COMT polymorphisms are associated with experimental pain sensitivity and a chronic pain state. No such association has been identified perioperatively. We carried out a prospective observational clinical trial to examine associations between these parameters and the development of postoperative pain in patients undergoing third molar (M3) extraction.

  6. Catecholamine release and potentiation of thromboxane A2 production by nicotine in the greyhound.

    OpenAIRE

    Dusting, G J; D.M. Li

    1986-01-01

    Thromboxane A2 was generated by infusing arachidonic acid (2.5 micrograms ml-1) into an extra-corporeal circuit of blood withdrawn from anaesthetized dogs, and assayed on a blood-bathed bioassay cascade of porcine and bovine coronary artery strips, chick rectum and rat stomach strip. All tissues except chick rectum were treated with phentolamine and propranolol to abolish direct effects of catecholamines. The arachidonate-induced contractions of artery strips were abolished by a thromboxane s...

  7. Preparation of Sticky Escherichia coli through Surface Display of an Adhesive Catecholamine Moiety

    OpenAIRE

    Park, Joseph P.; Choi, Min-Jung; Kim, Se Hun; Lee, Seung Hwan; Lee, Haeshin

    2014-01-01

    Mussels attach to virtually all types of inorganic and organic surfaces in aqueous environments, and catecholamines composed of 3,4-dihydroxy-l-phenylalanine (DOPA), lysine, and histidine in mussel adhesive proteins play a key role in the robust adhesion. DOPA is an unusual catecholic amino acid, and its side chain is called catechol. In this study, we displayed the adhesive moiety of DOPA-histidine on Escherichia coli surfaces using outer membrane protein W as an anchoring motif for the firs...

  8. Effect of catecholamines and thermal exposure on lymphocyte proliferation, IL-1α & β in buffaloes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R.C. Upadhyay

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available In order to study the effect of catecholamines (epinephrine/norepinephrine and thermal exposure on in vitro buffalo Lymphocyte Proliferation (LP apparently healthy 2- 2 1/2 years old Murrah buffalo heifers maintained as per the standard feeding and management practices were selected from Institute herd. Jugular blood was collected in the forenoon on the day of experiment and processed for Total Leucocyte Count (TLC and Differential Leucocyte Count (DLC. Lymphocyte proliferation assays were performed using whole blood and cells were incubated with epinephrine and norepinephrine (1, 1.5,2 ng/ml at 37oC with 5% CO2. Cells were counted after 72 hrs of incubation and Lymphocyte Proliferation Index (LPI was calculated. Thermal stress effect on the cultures was observed after exposure at 45oC for 4 hr after 72hrs of incubation. The cells were separated from media and media was used for analysis of IL-1α & 1β by ELISA kit. Lymphocyte proliferation Index decreased in responses to Epinephrine and Norepinephrine (P<0.01. Concentration of epinephrine and norepinephrine (1, 1.5,2 ng /ml had no distinguishable effect on LPI. IL-1α & IL-1β levels when compared with control in supernatant (exposed to 45°C were low (P<0.01 and P<0.05, respectively. There was a significant positive correlation between LPI and IL-1α (r=0.80; P<0.01 and between LPI and IL-1β (r=0.78; P<0.05. The study indicated that lymphocyte proliferation in vitro and IL-1α & β levels were affected by catecholamines and thermal exposure. Further the levels of catecholamines had significant (P<0.01 negative effect on LPI indicating that catecholamines levels modulate immunity through IL-1α and IL-1β in buffaloes.

  9. Stereoselectivity of extraneuronal uptake of catecholamines in guinea-pig trachealis smooth muscle cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Bryan, L. J.; O'Donnell, S R

    1984-01-01

    The extraneuronal uptake of the (-)- and (+)-isomers of three catecholamines, isoprenaline, adrenaline and noradrenaline, were compared in guinea-pig trachealis smooth muscle cells, by a fluorescence microphotometric method. Preliminary experiments showed that the initial rates of uptake of the (-)-isomers were greater than those of the (+)-isomers in tissues incubated in 25 microM adrenaline or noradrenaline or 50 microM isoprenaline. More detailed experiments showed that the Km values of th...

  10. Heart rate variability and circulating catecholamine concentrations during steady state exercise in healthy volunteers.

    OpenAIRE

    Breuer, H W; Skyschally, A; Schulz, R; C. Martin; Wehr, M.; Heusch, G

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVES--To assess whether exercise induced suppression of heart rate variability in the low frequency domain (0.06-0.15 Hz) is related to the increase in circulating catecholamine concentrations. DESIGN--Randomised crossover trial of three exercise tests characterised by different workloads. Pharmacological simulation of exercise-induced changes in vagal and sympathetic activity. PARTICIPANTS--Six healthy men with a mean age of 31.2 (SD 3.0) years. INTERVENTIONS--Three different workloads...

  11. Bone Markers

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bone turnover: C-telopeptide (C-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (CTx)) – a marker for bone resorption. It is ... resorption include: N-telopeptide (N-terminal telopeptide of type 1 collagen (NTx)) – a peptide fragment from the amino terminal ...

  12. Circulating renalase, catecholamines, and vascular adhesion protein 1 in hypertensive patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maciorkowska, Dominika; Zbroch, Edyta; Malyszko, Jolanta

    2015-11-01

    The aim of the study was to estimate and correlate circulating levels of renalase, vascular adhesion protein-1 (VAP-1), catecholamines in patients with primary hypertension. The renalase, VAP-1, and catecholamines concentration was estimated in 121 hypertensive patients. The correlation between renalase, VAP-1 levels and catecholamine concentration in blood, blood pressure control, pharmacological therapy, and medical history were taken in to consideration. The median office blood pressure was 145.5/86 mm Hg and was significantly higher than the median home blood pressure measurement value, which was 135/80 mm Hg, P hypertension comparing to healthy individuals (3.83 μg/mL and 248.37 ng/mL, P blood was observed (r = 0.549; P Hypertensive patients with diabetes mellitus had almost statistically significant higher VAP-1 concentration compared with hypertensive patients without diabetes mellitus (Me = 403.22 ng/mL vs. Me = 326,68 ng/mL, P = .064). In multiple regression analysis, renalase was predicted by plasma dopamine and norepinephrine as also diastolic office blood pressure and left ventricle ejection fraction. Circulating renalase and VAP-1 levels are elevated in patients with poor blood pressure control. Its correlation with noradrenalin concentration need further studies to find out the role of renalase as also VAP-1 in pathogenesis and treatment of hypertension. PMID:26403854

  13. Corticotropin releasing factor and catecholamines enhance glutamatergic neurotransmission in the lateral subdivision of the central amygdala.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silberman, Yuval; Winder, Danny G

    2013-07-01

    Glutamatergic neurotransmission in the central nucleus of the amygdala (CeA) plays an important role in many behaviors including anxiety, memory consolidation and cardiovascular responses. While these behaviors can be modulated by corticotropin releasing factor (CRF) and catecholamine signaling, the mechanism(s) by which these signals modify CeA glutamatergic neurotransmission remains unclear. Utilizing whole-cell patch-clamp electrophysiology recordings from neurons in the lateral subdivision of the CeA (CeAL), we show that CRF, dopamine (DA) and the β-adrenergic receptor agonist isoproterenol (ISO) all enhance the frequency of spontaneous excitatory postsynaptic currents (sEPSC) without altering sEPSC kinetics, suggesting they increase presynaptic glutamate release. The effect of CRF on sEPSCs was mediated by a combination of CRFR1 and CRFR2 receptors. While previous work from our lab suggests that CRFRs mediate the effect of catecholamines on excitatory transmission in other subregions of the extended amygdala, blockade of CRFRs in the CeAL failed to significantly alter effects of DA and ISO on glutamatergic transmission. These findings suggest that catecholamine and CRF enhancement of glutamatergic transmission onto CeAL neurons occurs via distinct mechanisms. While CRF increased spontaneous glutamate release in the CeAL, CRF caused no significant changes to optogenetically evoked glutamate release in this region. The dissociable effects of CRF on different types of glutamatergic neurotransmission suggest that CRF may specifically regulate spontaneous excitatory transmission.

  14. Dopamine receptors on adrenal chromaffin cells modulate calcium uptake and catecholamine release

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bigornia, L.; Suozzo, M.; Ryan, K.A.; Napp, D.; Schneider, A.S.

    1988-10-01

    The presence of dopamine-containing cells in sympathetic ganglia, i.e., small, intensely fluorescent cells, has been known for some time. However, the role of dopamine as a peripheral neurotransmitter and its mechanism of action are not well understood. Previous studies have demonstrated the presence of D2 dopamine receptors on the surface of bovine adrenal chromaffin cells using radioligand binding methods and dopamine receptor inhibition of catecholamine release from perfused adrenal glands. In the present study, we provide evidence confirming a role of dopamine receptors as inhibitory modulators of adrenal catecholamine release from bovine chromaffin cell cultures and further show that the mechanism of modulation involves inhibition of stimulated calcium uptake. Apomorphine gave a dose-dependent inhibition (IC50 = 1 microM) of 45Ca2+ uptake stimulated by either nicotine (10 microM) or membrane depolarization with an elevated K+ level (60 mM). This inhibition was reversed by a series of specific (including stereospecific) dopamine receptor antagonists: haloperidol, spiperone, sulpiride, and (+)-butaclamol, but not (-)-butaclamol. In addition, the calcium channel agonist Bay K 8644 was used to stimulate uptake of 45Ca2+ into chromaffin cells, and this uptake was also inhibited by the dopamine receptor agonist apomorphine. The combined results suggest that dopamine receptors on adrenal chromaffin cells alter Ca2+ channel conductance, which, in turn, modulates catecholamine release.

  15. Plasma glucose, insulin and catecholamine responses to a Wingate test in physically active women and men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vincent, Sophie; Berthon, Phanélie; Zouhal, Hassane; Moussa, Elie; Catheline, Michel; Bentué-Ferrer, Danièle; Gratas-Delamarche, Arlette

    2004-01-01

    The influence of gender on the glucose response to exercise remains contradictory. Moreover, to our knowledge, the glucoregulatory responses to anaerobic sprint exercise have only been studied in male subjects. Hence, the aim of the present study was to compare glucoregulatory metabolic (glucose and lactate) and hormonal (insulin, catecholamines and estradiol only in women) responses to a 30-s Wingate test, in physically active students. Eight women [19.8 (0.7) years] and eight men [22.0 (0.6) years] participated in a 30-s Wingate test on a bicycle ergometer. Plasma glucose, insulin, and catecholamine concentrations were determined at rest, at the end of both the warm-up and the exercise period and during the recovery (5, 10, 20, and 30 min). Results showed that the plasma glucose increase in response to a 30-s Wingate test was significantly higher in women than in men [0.99 (0.15) versus 0.33 (0.20) mmol l(-1) respectively, Pwomen than in men [14.7 (2.9) versus 2.3 (1.9) pmol l(-1) respectively, P<0.05]. However, there was no gender difference concerning the catecholamine response. The study indicates a gender-related difference in post-exercise plasma glucose and insulin responses after a supramaximal exercise.

  16. Immunoglobins in mammary secretions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hurley, W L; Theil, Peter Kappel

    2013-01-01

    Immunoglobulins secreted in colostrum and milk by the lactating mammal are major factors providing immune protection to the newborn. Immunoglobulins in mammary secretions represent the cumulative immune response of the lactating animal to exposure to antigenic stimulation that occurs through inte...

  17. Dynamic quantum secret sharing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this Letter we consider quantum secret sharing (QSS) between a sender and a dynamic agent group, called dynamic quantum secret sharing (DQSS). In the DQSS, the change of the agent group is allowable during the procedure of sharing classical and quantum information. Two DQSS schemes are proposed based on a special kind of entangled state, starlike cluster states. Without redistributing all the shares, the changed agent group can reconstruct the sender's secret by their cooperation. Compared with the previous quantum secret sharing scheme, our schemes are more flexible and suitable for practical applications. -- Highlights: ► We consider quantum secret sharing between a sender and a dynamic agent group, called dynamic quantum secret sharing (DQSS). ► In the DQSS, the change of the agent group is allowable during the procedure of sharing classical and quantum information. ► Two DQSS schemes are proposed based on a special kind of entangled state, starlike cluster states. ► Without redistributing all the shares, the changed agent group can reconstruct the sender's secret by their cooperation. ► Compared with the previous quantum secret sharing scheme, our schemes are more flexible and suitable for practical applications.

  18. The Involvement of Ser1898 of the Human L-Type Calcium Channel in Evoked Secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niv Bachnoff

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A PKA consensus phosphorylation site S1928 at the α11.2 subunit of the rabbit cardiac L-type channel, CaV1.2, is involved in the regulation of CaV1.2 kinetics and affects catecholamine secretion. This mutation does not alter basal CaV1.2 current properties or regulation of CaV1.2 current by PKA and the beta-adrenergic receptor, but abolishes CaV1.2 phosphorylation by PKA. Here, we test the contribution of the corresponding PKA phosphorylation site of the human α11.2 subunit S1898, to the regulation of catecholamine secretion in bovine chromaffin cells. Chromaffin cells were infected with a Semliki-Forest viral vector containing either the human wt or a mutated S1898A α11.2 subunit. Both subunits harbor a T1036Y mutation conferring nifedipine insensitivity. Secretion evoked by depolarization in the presence of nifedipine was monitored by amperometry. Depolarization-triggered secretion in cells infected with either the wt α11.2 or α11.2/S1898A mutated subunit was elevated to a similar extent by forskolin. Forskolin, known to directly activate adenylyl-cyclase, increased the rate of secretion in a manner that is largely independent of the presence of S1898. Our results are consistent with the involvement of additional PKA regulatory site(s at the C-tail of α11.2, the pore forming subunit of CaV1.2.

  19. Incretin secretion: direct mechanisms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balk-Møller, Emilie; Holst, Jens Juul; Kuhre, Rune Ehrenreich

    2014-01-01

    The incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) are secreted from gastro-intestinal K- and L-cells, respectively, and play an important role in post-prandial blood glucose regulation. They do this by direct stimulation of the pancreatic β...... enzyme responsible for incretin degradation (dipeptidyl peptidase-4) is inhibited (drugs are already on the market) while the secretion of endogenous GLP-1 secretion is stimulated at the same time may prove particularly rewarding. In this section we review current knowledge on the mechanisms for direct...

  20. Les mots du secret

    OpenAIRE

    Delage, Agnès

    2016-01-01

    Cet article analyse les reconfigurations sémantiques du lexique et des mots du secret en usage dans l’Europe du Sud entre le Moyen Âge et l’époque moderne. En partant des approches récentes du secret et de la dissimulation dans un contexte contemporain de revendication d’un « droit au secret », nous analysons comment l’historiographie actuelle des XVIe et XVIIe siècles aborde une histoire longue des régimes de positivité du secret en Europe. En partant de l’époque pré-moderne, nous étudions l...

  1. Effects of lactic acid and catecholamines on contractility in fast-twitch muscles exposed to hyperkalemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hansen, Anders Krogh; Clausen, Torben; Nielsen, Ole Baekgaard

    2005-07-01

    Intensive exercise is associated with a pronounced increase in extracellular K+ ([K+]o). Because of the ensuing depolarization and loss of excitability, this contributes to muscle fatigue. Intensive exercise also increases the level of circulating catecholamines and lactic acid, which both have been shown to alleviate the depressing effect of hyperkalemia in slow-twitch muscles. Because of their larger exercise-induced loss of K+, fast-twitch muscles are more prone to fatigue caused by increased [K+]o than slow-twitch muscles. Fast-twitch muscles also produce more lactic acid. We therefore compared the effects of catecholamines and lactic acid on the maintenance of contractility in rat fast-twitch [extensor digitorum longus (EDL)] and slow-twitch (soleus) muscles. Intact muscles were mounted on force transducers and stimulated electrically to evoke short isometric tetani. Elevated [K+]o (11 and 13 mM) was used to reduce force to approximately 20% of control force at 4 mM K+. In EDL, the beta2-agonist salbutamol (10(-5) M) restored tetanic force to 83 +/- 2% of control force, whereas in soleus salbutamol restored tetanic force to 93 +/- 1%. In both muscles, salbutamol induced hyperpolarization (5-8 mV), reduced intracellular Na+ content and increased Na+-K+ pump activity, leading to an increased K+ tolerance. Lactic acid (24 mM) restored force from 22 +/- 4% to 58 +/- 2% of control force in EDL, an effect that was significantly lower than in soleus muscle. These results amplify and generalize the concept that the exercise-induced acidification and increase in plasma catecholamines counterbalance fatigue arising from rundown of Na+ and K+ gradients. PMID:15743886

  2. Chronic cardiac pressure overload induces adrenal medulla hypertrophy and increased catecholamine synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schneider, Johanna; Lother, Achim; Hein, Lutz; Gilsbach, Ralf

    2011-06-01

    Increased activity of the sympathetic system is an important feature contributing to the pathogenesis and progression of chronic heart failure. While the mechanisms and consequences of enhanced norepinephrine release from sympathetic nerves have been intensely studied, the role of the adrenal gland in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and progression of heart failure is less well known. Thus, the aim of the present study was to determine the effect of chronic cardiac pressure overload in mice on adrenal medulla structure and function. Cardiac hypertrophy was induced in wild-type mice by transverse aortic constriction (TAC) for 8 weeks. After TAC, the degree of cardiac hypertrophy correlated significantly with adrenal weight and adrenal catecholamine storage. In the medulla, TAC caused an increase in chromaffin cell size but did not result in chromaffin cell proliferation. Ablation of chromaffin α(2C)-adrenoceptors did not affect adrenal weight or epinephrine synthesis. However, unilateral denervation of the adrenal gland completely prevented adrenal hypertrophy and increased catecholamine synthesis. Transcriptome analysis of microdissected adrenal medulla identified 483 up- and 231 downregulated, well-annotated genes after TAC. Among these genes, G protein-coupled receptor kinases 2 (Grk2) and 6 and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (Pnmt) were significantly upregulated by TAC. In vitro, acetylcholine-induced Pnmt and Grk2 expression as well as enhanced epinephrine content was prevented by inhibition of nicotinic acetylcholine receptors and Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent signaling. Thus, activation of preganglionic sympathetic nerves innervating the adrenal medulla plays an essential role in inducing adrenal hypertrophy, enhanced catecholamine synthesis and induction of Grk2 expression after cardiac pressure overload.

  3. Autoradiography of high affinity uptake of catecholamines by primary astrocyte cultures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uptake of D,L-[3H]norepinephrine ([3H]NE) and [3H]dopamine ([3H]DA) by primary astrocyte cultures prepared from neonatal rat brains, was studied by measuring accumulation of tritium label, and localizing such uptake at the cellular level by autoradiography. The results confirm the authors previous findings of the existence of a high affinity uptake process for catecholamines in primary astrocyte cultures based on uptake properties, and in the present study also localizes such uptake to the major, astrocytic cell type. (Auth.)

  4. Training status (endurance or sprint) and catecholamine response to the Wingate-test in women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacob, C; Zouhal, H; Vincent, S; Gratas-Delamarche, A; Berthon, P M; Bentué-Ferrer, D; Delamarche, P

    2002-07-01

    The aim of this study was to verify if, as for men, training status induces different catecholamine responses to exercise. To do this, we investigated the effect of training status (sprint or endurance) on plasma catecholamine response to a supramaximal exercise in women. Nineteen subjects took part in our study: six untrained subjects (UT), seven endurance trained subjects (ET) and six sprint trained ones (ST). The trained subjects (ET and ST) were all competing at a high national level. The maximal power (W max ) and the mean power (W) were determined from the Wingate-test. Blood lactate, adrenaline (A) and noradrenaline (NA) were analysed at rest (La 0, A 0 and NA 0 ), immediately at the end of the exercise (A max and NA max ) and after 5 min recovery (La max [3 min in arterialized blood], A 5 and NA 5 ). The disappearance of A and NA was judged by the ratio (A max -A 5 )/A max and (NA max -NA 5 )/NA 5. The ratio A max /NA max was considered as an index of the adrenal medulla responsiveness to the sympathetic nervous activity. As expected, during the Wingate-test ST exhibited significantly higher performances compared to UT and ET. But in contrast to the men's data no difference was observed between the three groups both for La max (13.1 +/- 0.8 mmol x L (-1); 14.8 +/- 1.0 mmol x L (-1) and 11.2 +/- 0.5 mmol x L (-1) respectively for ET, ST and UT), NA max (22.1 +/- 1.2 nmol x L (-1); 13.1 +/- 2.4 nmol x L (-1) and 20.2 +/- 7 nmol x L (-1)respectively for ET, ST and UT) and A max (4.1 +/- 0.8 nmol x L (-1); 2.6 +/- 0.6 nmol x L (-1); 13.1 +/- 0.6 nmol x L (-1) respectively for ET, ST and UT). Consequently the ratio A max /NA max was similar in UT, ET and ST (respectively 0.2 +/- 0.03; 0.2 +/- 0.04; 0.17 +/- 0.04), These results indicated, in contrast to the men's data, that the catecholamine response to the Wingate-test did not differ between female subjects of different status of training. In conclusion this study did not find any significant effect of training

  5. Bronchial secretion concentrations of tobramycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, M R; Schoell, J; Hicklin, G; Kasik, J E; Coleman, D

    1982-02-01

    The mean concentrations of tobramycin in bronchial secretions from patients with pneumonia were almost two times greater than secretions from patients free of lung infection. Mean tobramycin bronchial secretion to serum concentration ratios also were higher when obtained from infected lungs (0.66 versus 0.17) These data suggest that lung infection enhances the concentrations of tobramycin in bronchial secretions. PMID:7065524

  6. Effects of altered catecholamine metabolism on pigmentation and physical properties of sclerotized regions in the silkworm melanism mutant.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang Qiao

    Full Text Available Catecholamine metabolism plays an important role in the determination of insect body color and cuticle sclerotization. To date, limited research has focused on these processes in silkworm. In the current study, we analyzed the interactions between catecholamines and melanin genes and their effects on the pigmentation patterns and physical properties of sclerotized regions in silkworm, using the melanic mutant melanism (mln silkworm strain as a model. Injection of β-alanine into mln mutant silkworm induced a change in catecholamine metabolism and turned its body color yellow. Further investigation of the catecholamine content and expression levels of the corresponding melanin genes from different developmental stages of Dazao-mln (mutant and Dazao (wild-type silkworm revealed that at the larval and adult stages, the expression patterns of melanin genes precipitated dopamine accumulation corresponding to functional loss of Bm-iAANAT, a repressive effect of excess NBAD on ebony, and upregulation of tan in the Dazao-mln strain. During the early pupal stage, dopamine did not accumulate in Dazao-mln, since upregulation of ebony and black genes led to conversion of high amounts of dopamine into NBAD, resulting in deep yellow cuticles. Scanning electron microscope analysis of a cross-section of adult dorsal plates from both wild-type and mutant silkworm disclosed the formation of different layers in Dazao-mln owing to lack of NADA, compared to even and dense layers in Dazao. Analysis of the mechanical properties of the anterior wings revealed higher storage modulus and lower loss tangent in Dazao-mln, which was closely associated with the altered catecholamine metabolism in the mutant strain. Based on these findings, we conclude that catecholamine metabolism is crucial for the color pattern and physical properties of cuticles in silkworm. Our results should provide a significant contribution to Lepidoptera cuticle tanning research.

  7. Effects of inorganic mercury (Hg{sup 2+}) on calcium channel currents and catecholamine release from bovine chromaffin cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weinsberg, F. [Medical Inst. of Environmental Hygiene, Heinrich Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Bickmeyer, U. [Medical Inst. of Environmental Hygiene, Heinrich Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany); Wiegand, H. [Medical Inst. of Environmental Hygiene, Heinrich Heine University, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    1995-01-01

    The effects of Hg{sup 2+} on calcium channel currents and the potassium-evoked catecholamine release of bovine chromaffin cells in culture were examined. The effects of Cd{sup 2+} were studied for comparison. Calcium channel currents were recorded in the whole-cell configuration of the patch-clamp technique. In a concentration of 100 {mu}M, Hg{sup 2+} blocked the currents completely; 100 {mu}M Cd{sup 2+} had the same effect. Potassium-evoked catecholamine release from chromaffin cells was measured at different timepoints with HPLC under control conditions and in the presence of different Hg{sup 2+} concentrations. Low Hg{sup 2+} concentrations (0.1 and 1 {mu}M) did not affect the amount of the catecholamines epinephrine (E) and norepinephrine (NE) which was released. Under identical conditions 1 {mu}M Cd{sup 2+} also had no effect on release. With 10 {mu}M Hg{sup 2+} there was a time-dependent increase in the potassium-evoked catecholamine release (by 27% after 8 min). The E/NE ratio was not altered. In contrast to this, the release was slightly reduced with 10 {mu}M Cd{sup 2+}. In the presence of 100 {mu}M Hg{sup 2+}, there was a reduction of the release during an early phase, followed by an increase. The calcium channel block by 100 {mu}M Cd{sup 2+} also reduced the release significantly. Catecholamine release of bovine chromaffin cells is driven into two opposite directions by Hg{sup 2+}. On the one hand, a calcium channel block reduces the release, while on the other hand effects occur which can increase the release. Both tendencies occur simultaneously, but have different concentration- and time-dependencies. The catecholamine output at a given timepoint reflects the `sum` of these different effects. (orig.)

  8. [The symbolic power of bodily secretions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaksen, Lise Widding

    2002-01-10

    Are ethical and political questions discussed more in aesthetic than in social terms? Political debates in contemporary art are often expressed through the use of symbolic power structures that are related to bodily secretions and products. By visualizing the less delicate parts of the organic body, contemporary artists focus on the vulnerability of the human body and its illness and pain. If human suffering is aestheticized: is this a question of form or a question of creating a cultural cover-up? Bodily secretions are associated with a range of complex social and cultural meanings and symbols. Metaphors related to body products may function as markers of ethnic, religious, social and sexual differences. In postmodern cultural criticism, the symbolic power of body metaphors is of great importance.

  9. Direct methods for dynamic monitoring of secretions from single cells by capillary electrophoresis and microscopy with laser-induced native fluorescence detection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tong, W.

    1997-10-08

    Microscale separation and detection methods for real-time monitoring of dynamic cellular processes (e.g., secretion) by capillary electrophoresis (CE) and microscopic imaging were developed. Ultraviolet laser-induced native fluorescence (LINF) provides simple, sensitive and direct detection of neurotransmitters and proteins without any derivatization. An on-column CE-LINF protocol for quantification of the release from single cell was demonstrated. Quantitative measurements of both the amount of insulin released from and the amount remaining in the cell ({beta}TC3) were achieved simultaneously. Secretion of catecholamines (norepinephrine (NE) and epinephrine (E)) from individual bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was determined using the on-column CE-LINF. Direct visualization of the secretion process of individual bovine adrenal chromaffin cells was achieved by LINF imaging microscopy with high temporal and spatial resolution. The secretion of serotonin from individual leech Retzius neurons was directly characterized by LINF microscopy with high spatial resolution.

  10. Neuroanatomical Evidence for Catecholamines as Modulators of Audition and Acoustic Behavior in a Vocal Teleost.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forlano, Paul M; Sisneros, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    The plainfin midshipman fish (Porichthys notatus) is a well-studied model to understand the neural and endocrine mechanisms underlying vocal-acoustic communication across vertebrates. It is well established that steroid hormones such as estrogen drive seasonal peripheral auditory plasticity in female Porichthys in order to better encode the male's advertisement call. However, little is known of the neural substrates that underlie the motivation and coordinated behavioral response to auditory social signals. Catecholamines, which include dopamine and noradrenaline, are good candidates for this function, as they are thought to modulate the salience of and reinforce appropriate behavior to socially relevant stimuli. This chapter summarizes our recent studies which aimed to characterize catecholamine innervation in the central and peripheral auditory system of Porichthys as well as test the hypotheses that innervation of the auditory system is seasonally plastic and catecholaminergic neurons are activated in response to conspecific vocalizations. Of particular significance is the discovery of direct dopaminergic innervation of the saccule, the main hearing end organ, by neurons in the diencephalon, which also robustly innervate the cholinergic auditory efferent nucleus in the hindbrain. Seasonal changes in dopamine innervation in both these areas appear dependent on reproductive state in females and may ultimately function to modulate the sensitivity of the peripheral auditory system as an adaptation to the seasonally changing soundscape. Diencephalic dopaminergic neurons are indeed active in response to exposure to midshipman vocalizations and are in a perfect position to integrate the detection and appropriate motor response to conspecific acoustic signals for successful reproduction. PMID:26515325

  11. Catecholamine metabolism drives generation of mitochondrial DNA deletions in dopaminergic neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neuhaus, Johannes F G; Baris, Olivier R; Hess, Simon; Moser, Natasha; Schröder, Hannsjörg; Chinta, Shankar J; Andersen, Julie K; Kloppenburg, Peter; Wiesner, Rudolf J

    2014-02-01

    Accumulation of mitochondrial DNA deletions is observed especially in dopaminergic neurons of the substantia nigra during ageing and even more in Parkinson's disease. The resulting mitochondrial dysfunction is suspected to play an important role in neurodegeneration. However, the molecular mechanisms involved in the preferential generation of mitochondrial DNA deletions in dopaminergic neurons are still unknown. To study this phenomenon, we developed novel polymerase chain reaction strategies to detect distinct mitochondrial DNA deletions and monitor their accumulation patterns. Applying these approaches in in vitro and in vivo models, we show that catecholamine metabolism drives the generation and accumulation of these mitochondrial DNA mutations. As in humans, age-related accumulation of mitochondrial DNA deletions is most prominent in dopaminergic areas of mouse brain and even higher in the catecholaminergic adrenal medulla. Dopamine treatment of terminally differentiated neuroblastoma cells, as well as stimulation of dopamine turnover in mice over-expressing monoamine oxidase B both induce multiple mitochondrial DNA deletions. Our results thus identify catecholamine metabolism as the driving force behind mitochondrial DNA deletions, probably being an important factor in the ageing-associated degeneration of dopaminergic neurons.

  12. The effects of mind-body training on stress reduction, positive affect, and plasma catecholamines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Ye-Ha; Kang, Do-Hyung; Jang, Joon Hwan; Park, Hye Yoon; Byun, Min Soo; Kwon, Soo Jin; Jang, Go-Eun; Lee, Ul Soon; An, Seung Chan; Kwon, Jun Soo

    2010-07-26

    This study was designed to assess the association between stress, positive affect and catecholamine levels in meditation and control groups. The meditation group consisted of 67 subjects who regularly engaged in mind-body training of "Brain-Wave Vibration" and the control group consisted of 57 healthy subjects. Plasma catecholamine (norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (E), and dopamine (DA)) levels were measured, and a modified form of the Stress Response Inventory (SRI-MF) and the Positive Affect and Negative Affect Scale (PANAS) were administered. The meditation group showed higher scores on positive affect (p=.019) and lower scores on stress (pmeditation (p=.031) than in the control group. The control group demonstrated a negative correlation between stress and positive affects (r=-.408, p=.002), whereas this correlation was not observed in the meditation group. The control group showed positive correlations between somatization and NE/E (r=.267, p=.045) and DA/E (r=.271, p=.042) ratios, whereas these correlations did not emerge in the meditation group. In conclusion, these results suggest that meditation as mind-body training is associated with lower stress, higher positive affect and higher plasma DA levels when comparing the meditation group with the control group. Thus, mind-body training may influence stress, positive affect and the sympathetic nervous system including DA activity.

  13. Ovarian tumors secreting insulin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Battocchio, Marialberta; Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Chiarelli, Silvia; Trento, Mariangela; Ambrosio, Maria Rosaria; Pasquali, Claudio; De Carlo, Eugenio; Dassie, Francesca; Mioni, Roberto; Rebellato, Andrea; Fallo, Francesco; Degli Uberti, Ettore; Martini, Chiara; Vettor, Roberto; Maffei, Pietro

    2015-08-01

    Combined ovarian germ cell and neuroendocrine tumors are rare. Only few cases of hyperinsulinism due to ovarian ectopic secretion have been hypothesized in the literature. An ovarian tumor was diagnosed in a 76-year-old woman, referred to our department for recurrent hypoglycemia with hyperinsulinism. In vivo tests, in particular fasting test, rapid calcium infusion test, and Octreotide test were performed. Ectopic hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemia was demonstrated in vivo and hypoglycemia disappeared after hysteroadnexectomy. Histological exam revealed an ovarian germ cell tumor with neuroendocrine and Yolk sac differentiation, while immunostaining showed insulin positivity in neuroendocrine cells. A cell culture was obtained by tumoral cells, testing Everolimus, and Pasireotide. Insulin was detected in cell culture medium and Everolimus and Pasireotide demonstrated their potentiality in reducing insulin secretion, more than controlling cell viability. Nine cases of hyperinsulinism due to ovarian ectopic secretion reported in literature have been reviewed. These data confirm the ovarian tissue potentiality to induce hyperinsulinemic hypoglycemic syndrome after neoplastic transformation. PMID:25896552

  14. Secrets of Successful Homeschooling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rivero, Lisa

    2011-01-01

    Parents who homeschool gifted children often find the daily practice of home education very different from what they had imagined. Gifted children are complex in both personality and learning styles. Parents who say that homeschooling works well for their gifted children have learned from others or discovered on their own several secrets that make…

  15. Physiology of bile secretion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alejandro Esteller

    2008-01-01

    The formation of bile depends on the structural and functional integrity of the bile-secretory apparatus and its impairment,in different situations,results in the syndrome of cholestasis.The structural bases that permit bile secretion as well as various aspects related with its composition and flow rate in physiological conditions will first be reviewed.Canalicular bile is produced by polarized hepatocytes that hold transporters in their basolateral (sinusoidal) and apical (canalicular) plasma membrane.This review summarizes recent data on the molecular determinants of this primary bile formation.The major function of the biliary tree is modification of canalicular bile by secretory and reabsorptive processes in bileduct epithelial cells (cholangiocytes) as bile passes through bile ducts.The mechanisms of fluid and solute transport in cholangiocytes will also be discussed.In contrast to hepatocytes where secretion is constant and poorly controlled,cholangiocyte secretion is regulated by hormones and nerves.A short section dedicated to these regulatory mechanisms of bile secretion has been included.The aim of this revision was to set the bases for other reviews in this series that will be devoted to specific issues related with biliary physiology and pathology.

  16. Modulation of catecholamine-synthesizing enzymes in adrenal medulla and stellate ganglia by treadmill exercise of stressed rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gavrilovic, Ljubica; Spasojevic, Natasa; Dronjak, Sladjana

    2012-03-01

    The sympatho-adrenal system represents one of the main systems involved in the response to stressful events because its stress-induced activation results in an increased release of catecholamines. Exercise training acts as an important modulator of sympatho-adrenal system, adrenal medulla and stellate ganglia being two components of this system. This study aimed at investigating physical exercise-related changes in gene expression of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH) and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase in the adrenal medulla and stellate ganglia of chronically psychosocially stressed adult rats exposed daily to 20-min treadmill exercise for 12 weeks, using TaqMan RT-PCR assay. Chronic psychosocial stress decreased gene expression of the examined enzymes in the adrenal medulla and treadmill exercise did not lead to further modulation of the corresponding gene expression. On the other hand, chronic psychosocial stress produced a significant increase of TH (about 51%) and DBH (about 103%) gene expression in stellate ganglia, while treadmill exercise decreased gene expression of these enzymes to control levels in psychosocially stressed rats. Our data indicate that treadmill exercise leads to a decreased gene transcription of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes in stellate ganglia and attenuation of cardiac noradrenaline production in stressful situations. Reduction of catecholamine synthesis in stellate ganglia may be linked to the beneficial effects of treadmill exercise on cardiovascular system in stressed animals.

  17. Effect of oral propranolol administration on azygos, renal and hepatic uptake and output of catecholamines in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, F; Christensen, N J; Sørensen, T I;

    1991-01-01

    Circulating catecholamines are increased in cirrhosis with portal hypertension, and increase further after propranolol. In 23 cirrhotic patients, plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine were determined in an artery, the azygos vein, the right renal vein and a hepatic vein before and after an oral 8...

  18. Variable, voltage-dependent, blocking effects of nitrendipine, verapamil, diltiazem, cinnarizine and cadmium on adrenomedullary secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López, M. G.; Moro, M. A.; Castillo, C. F.; Artalejo, C. R.; García, A. G.

    1989-01-01

    1. Catecholamine release from cat adrenal glands perfused at a high rate (4 ml min-1) at 37 degrees C with modified Krebs solutions lacking Ca and containing 1.2 mM K (hyperpolarizing solution) or 118 mM K (depolarizing solution) was triggered by 10-s pulses of Ca (0.5 mM) in the presence of 118 mM K. Hyperpolarized glands released 1280 +/- 135 ng per pulse and depolarized glands 831 +/- 98 ng per pulse (n = 29). 2. While the dihydropyridine Ca channel blocker nitrendipine inhibited secretion in hyperpolarized glands with an IC50 of 214 nM, in depolarizing conditions the drug was much more potent (IC50 = 0.99 nM). In contrast, the inorganic Ca channel blocker cadmium inhibited secretion with the same potency both in hyperpolarized or depolarized glands. 3. Cinnarizine, diltiazem and verapamil exhibited intermediate degrees of voltage-dependence in blocking secretion. The IC50 ratios between hyperpolarized and depolarized glands were 215, 36, 19, 8 and 0.76 respectively for nitrendipine, cinnarizine, diltiazem, verapamil and cadmium. Because the experimental design (strong depolarization in the absence of Ca) favours the highest opening probability of Ca channels, it seems that these drugs bind preferentially to their receptors when these channels are in their open state. 4. Variable voltage-dependent effects of the five Ca channel blockers on adrenomedullary catecholamine release suggests different sites and mechanisms of action on, or near L-type Ca channels in chromaffin cells. In addition, these findings might help to explain why these drugs exhibit tissue selectivity and why they act differently in normal polarized as compared to ischaemic depolarized cells. PMID:2720300

  19. Extracellular secretion of recombinant proteins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linger, Jeffrey G.; Darzins, Aldis

    2014-07-22

    Nucleic acids encoding secretion signals, expression vectors containing the nucleic acids, and host cells containing the expression vectors are disclosed. Also disclosed are polypeptides that contain the secretion signals and methods of producing polypeptides, including methods of directing the extracellular secretion of the polypeptides. Exemplary embodiments include cellulase proteins fused to secretion signals, methods to produce and isolate these polypeptides, and methods to degrade lignocellulosic biomass.

  20. Cyclic nucleotides of canine antral smooth muscle. Effects of acetylcholine, catecholamines and gastrin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baur, S; Grant, B; Wooton, J

    1981-01-01

    1. The effects of acetylcholine, catecholamines and gastrin on the intracellular content of cyclic AMP and cyclic GMP in antral circular muscle have been determined. 2. Acetylcholine results in a significant but transient increase in intracellular cyclic GMP. 3. Isoproterenol and norepinephrine increase intracellular cyclic AMP. Based on half-maximal effective doses, isoproterenol is 2.7-times more effective than norepinephrine. The increase in intracellular cyclic AMP by both agents is inhibited by propranolol but not phentolamine, indicating that both agents act on the muscle cell by a beta-receptor-coupled mechanism. 4. Gastrin has no demonstrable effect on either cyclic AMP or cyclic GMP. This suggests that while gastrin and acetylcholine can produce a like myoelectric response in the muscle cell, the action of gastrin is mediated by a separate receptor, presumably on the muscle cell, and not by a release of acetylcholine.

  1. Uracil Grafted Carbon Electrode: Electrocatalytic Behavior of Tryptophan, Tyrosine, Catecholamine and Related Compounds

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LIN Xiang-Qin; KANG Guang-Feng; ZHU Xiao-Hong

    2008-01-01

    A uracil grafted glassy carbon electrode (Ura/GCE) was fabricated and characterized by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), cyclic voltammertry (CV) and differential pulse voltammetry (DPV) techniques. The electrochemical behavior of tryptophan (Trp), tyrosine (Tyr), catecholamine such as dopamine (DA), epinephrine (EP) and norepinephrine (NE), and related compounds involving uric acid (UA) and ascorbic acid (AA) at the Ura/GCE was investigated. All these bioactive species could be electrocatalytically oxidized to generate very different current sensitivities. This electrode can be used as a versatile electrochemical sensor for DA, EP, NE, UA, Trp and Tyr determination. The DPV peak potential, current sensitivity, linear range and detection limit of these species were obtained and used for analysis of molecular interactions between uracil and those electroactive species. A mechanism for the surface accumulation was discussed.

  2. Sex effect on catecholamine responses to sprint exercise in adolescents and adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Botcazou, Maïtel; Jacob, Christophe; Gratas-Delamarche, Arlette; Vincent, Sophie; Bentué-Ferrer, Danièle; Delamarche, Paul; Zouhal, Hassane

    2007-05-01

    The purpose of this study was to clarify the effect of sex on plasma catecholamine responses to sprint exercise in adolescents and adults. Thirty-six untrained participants took part in this study-9 girls and 10 boys (Tanner Stage 4) and 9 women and 8 men. Each participant performed a 6-s sprint test on a cycle ergometer. Plasma adrenaline (A) and noradrenaline (NA) concentrations were determined successively at rest (A0 and NA0), immediately after the 6-s sprint test (AEX and NAEX), and after 5 min of recovery (A5 and NA5). Peak power, expressed in absolute values or relative to body weight and fat-free mass, was significantly higher in boys than in girls and higher in men than in women (p sprint (p men than in women (p women than in girls (p men than in boys (p sprint exercise.

  3. Effect of catecholamines and insulin on plasma volume and intravascular mass of albumin in man

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hilsted, J; Christensen, N J; Larsen, S

    1989-01-01

    1. The effect of intravenous catecholamine infusions and of intravenous insulin on plasma volume and intravascular mass of albumin was investigated in healthy males. 2. Physiological doses of adrenaline (0.5 microgram/min and 3 microgram/min) increased peripheral venous packed cell volume...... significantly; intravenous noradrenaline at 0.5 microgram/min had no effect on packed cell volume, whereas packed cell volume increased significantly at 3 micrograms of noradrenaline/min. No significant change in packed cell volume was found during saline infusion. 3. During adrenaline infusion at 6 micrograms...... in packed cell volume, plasma volume, intravascular mass of albumin and transcapillary escape rate of albumin during hypoglycaemia may be explained by the combined actions of adrenaline and insulin....

  4. Neuronal CRTC-1 governs systemic mitochondrial metabolism and lifespan via a catecholamine signal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burkewitz, Kristopher; Morantte, Ianessa; Weir, Heather J M; Yeo, Robin; Zhang, Yue; Huynh, Frank K; Ilkayeva, Olga R; Hirschey, Matthew D; Grant, Ana R; Mair, William B

    2015-02-26

    Low energy states delay aging in multiple species, yet mechanisms coordinating energetics and longevity across tissues remain poorly defined. The conserved energy sensor AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and its corresponding phosphatase calcineurin modulate longevity via the CREB regulated transcriptional coactivator (CRTC)-1 in C. elegans. We show that CRTC-1 specifically uncouples AMPK/calcineurin-mediated effects on lifespan from pleiotropic side effects by reprogramming mitochondrial and metabolic function. This pro-longevity metabolic state is regulated cell nonautonomously by CRTC-1 in the nervous system. Neuronal CRTC-1/CREB regulates peripheral metabolism antagonistically with the functional PPARα ortholog, NHR-49, drives mitochondrial fragmentation in distal tissues, and suppresses the effects of AMPK on systemic mitochondrial metabolism and longevity via a cell-nonautonomous catecholamine signal. These results demonstrate that while both local and distal mechanisms combine to modulate aging, distal regulation overrides local contribution. Targeting central perception of energetic state is therefore a potential strategy to promote healthy aging.

  5. Plasma catecholamine level and portal venous pressure as guides to prognosis in patients with cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tage-Jensen, U; Henriksen, Jens Henrik; Christensen, E;

    1988-01-01

    clinical and biochemical variables and survival. Forty-seven (58%) of the patients died during the follow-up period. Univariate analysis showed that plasma noradrenaline and adrenaline concentrations, portal pressure, indocyanine green clearance, serum sodium, bilirubin, and albumin concentrations, and the......Circulating noradrenaline is increased in patients with cirrhosis, especially in decompensated patients with ascites. Eighty-one patients with alcoholic cirrhosis were followed for up to 8 years in order to establish a possible relationship between plasma catecholamines, haemodynamics, and routine...... presence of ascites or cardiovascular disease were of significant prognostic value. In a multivariate analysis (Cox regression model), plasma noradrenaline concentration, portal pressure, serum bilirubin concentration, and the presence of ascites and cardiovascular disease remained significant independent...

  6. Decontamination of Metal Ions in Soil by Supercritical CO{sub 2} Extraction with Catecholamine Ligand

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Jihye; Kim, Hakwon; Park, Kwangheon [Kyunghee University, Yongin (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The role of fuel cladding and reactor vessels is to help prevent the leakage of radioactive materials, including the fission products. However, if these shielding materials are damaged by a severe disaster such as the Fukushima Accident, radioactive materials could leak outside of a power plant site. Indeed, after the Fukushima Accident, radioactive materials have been detected in air and water samples. The air and water pollution lead to soil pollution, which is particularly difficult to decontaminate, as soil pollution has several types that vary according to the characteristics of a pollutant or its area. The existing decontamination methods generate a secondary waste owing to use of chemical toxicity solvents. It is also disadvantageous due to the additional cost of handling them. Therefore, new effective decontamination methods that reduce the use of toxicity solvents are necessary. For example, using supercritical CO{sub 2} has been studied as a new decontamination method. This study examines the method of decontaminating metallic ions inside of the soil using supercritical CO{sub 2} and a catecholamine compound. This study examined the effects of extracting metallic ions inside the soil using supercritical CO{sub 2} and catecholamine as the ligand. Based on these results, it is evident that when only the extraction agent was used, there was no extraction effect and that only when the ligand, co-ligand, and additive were used together was there an extraction effect. Following this, the optimal extraction-agent ratio was confirmed using varying amounts of extraction agents. The most effective extraction ratio of ligand to co-ligand was 1:2 in E-9 when 0.3 ml of H{sub 2}O were added.

  7. Catecholamine metabolism in paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma: similar tumors in different sites?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Grouzmann

    Full Text Available Pheochromocytoma (PHEO and paraganglioma (PGL are catecholamine-producing neuroendocrine tumors that arise respectively inside or outside the adrenal medulla. Several reports have shown that adrenal glucocorticoids (GC play an important regulatory role on the genes encoding the main enzymes involved in catecholamine (CAT synthesis i.e. tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT. To assess the influence of tumor location on CAT metabolism, 66 tissue samples (53 PHEO, 13 PGL and 73 plasma samples (50 PHEO, 23 PGL were studied. Western blot and qPCR were performed for TH, DBH and PNMT expression. We found a significantly lower intra-tumoral concentration of CAT and metanephrines (MNs in PGL along with a downregulation of TH and PNMT at both mRNA and protein level compared with PHEO. However, when PHEO were partitioned into noradrenergic (NorAd and mixed tumors based on an intra-tumoral CAT ratio (NE/E >90%, PGL and NorAd PHEO sustained similar TH, DBH and PNMT gene and protein expression. CAT concentration and composition were also similar between NorAd PHEO and PGL, excluding the use of CAT or MNs to discriminate between PGL and PHEO on the basis of biochemical tests. We observed an increase of TH mRNA concentration without correlation with TH protein expression in primary cell culture of PHEO and PGL incubated with dexamethasone during 24 hours; no changes were monitored for PNMT and DBH at both mRNA and protein level in PHEO and PGL. Altogether, these results indicate that long term CAT synthesis is not driven by the close environment where the tumor develops and suggest that GC alone is not sufficient to regulate CAT synthesis pathway in PHEO/PGL.

  8. Catecholamine metabolism in paraganglioma and pheochromocytoma: similar tumors in different sites?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grouzmann, Eric; Tschopp, Oliver; Triponez, Frédéric; Matter, Maurice; Bilz, Stefan; Brändle, Michael; Drechser, Tilman; Sigrist, Sarah; Zulewski, Henryk; Henzen, Christoph; Fischli, Stefan; Abid, Karim

    2015-01-01

    Pheochromocytoma (PHEO) and paraganglioma (PGL) are catecholamine-producing neuroendocrine tumors that arise respectively inside or outside the adrenal medulla. Several reports have shown that adrenal glucocorticoids (GC) play an important regulatory role on the genes encoding the main enzymes involved in catecholamine (CAT) synthesis i.e. tyrosine hydroxylase (TH), dopamine β-hydroxylase (DBH) and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT). To assess the influence of tumor location on CAT metabolism, 66 tissue samples (53 PHEO, 13 PGL) and 73 plasma samples (50 PHEO, 23 PGL) were studied. Western blot and qPCR were performed for TH, DBH and PNMT expression. We found a significantly lower intra-tumoral concentration of CAT and metanephrines (MNs) in PGL along with a downregulation of TH and PNMT at both mRNA and protein level compared with PHEO. However, when PHEO were partitioned into noradrenergic (NorAd) and mixed tumors based on an intra-tumoral CAT ratio (NE/E >90%), PGL and NorAd PHEO sustained similar TH, DBH and PNMT gene and protein expression. CAT concentration and composition were also similar between NorAd PHEO and PGL, excluding the use of CAT or MNs to discriminate between PGL and PHEO on the basis of biochemical tests. We observed an increase of TH mRNA concentration without correlation with TH protein expression in primary cell culture of PHEO and PGL incubated with dexamethasone during 24 hours; no changes were monitored for PNMT and DBH at both mRNA and protein level in PHEO and PGL. Altogether, these results indicate that long term CAT synthesis is not driven by the close environment where the tumor develops and suggest that GC alone is not sufficient to regulate CAT synthesis pathway in PHEO/PGL. PMID:25946206

  9. Catecholamines and their enzymes in discrete brain areas of rats after space flight on biosatellites Cosmos.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kvetnansky, R; Culman, J; Serova, L V; Tigranjan, R A; Torda, T; Macho, L

    1983-01-01

    The activity of the catecholaminergic system was measured in the hypothalamus of rats which had experienced an 18.5-19.5-day-long stay in the state of weightlessness during space flights on board Soviet biosatellites of the type Cosmos. In the first two experiments, Cosmos 782 and 936, the concentration of norepinephrine and the activities of synthesizing enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase and dopamine-beta-hydroxylase and of the degrading enzyme monoamine oxidase were measured in the total hypothalamus. None of the given parameters was changed after space flight. In the light of the changes of these parameters recorded after exposure to acute stress on Earth, this finding indicates that long-term state of weightlessness does not represent an intensive stressogenic stimulus for the system studied. In the space experiment Cosmos 1129, the concentration of norepinephrine, epinephrine, and dopamine was studied in isolated nuclei of the hypothalamus of rats within 6-10 hr following return from space. Norepinephrine was found to be significantly reduced in the arcuate nucleus, median eminence and periventricular nucleus, epinephrine in the median eminence, periventricular and suprachiasmatic nuclei, whereas dopamine was not significantly changed after space flight. The decreased catecholamine levels found in some hypothalamic nuclei of rats which had undergone space flight indicate that no chronic intensive stressor could have acted during the flight, otherwise the catecholamine concentration would have been increased in the nuclei. The decreased levels must have been induced by the effect of a stressogenic factor acting for a short time only, and that either during the landing maneuver or immediately after landing. Thus long-term exposure of the organism to the state of weightlessness does not represent a stressogenic stimulus for the catecholaminergic system in the hypothalamus, which is one of the regulators of the activation of neuroendocrine reactions under stress.

  10. [CO2-stunning of slaughter pigs: effects on EEG, catecholamines and clinical reflexes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hartung, J; Nowak, B; Waldmann, K H; Ellerbrock, S

    2002-03-01

    Investigations were carried out on the response of slaughter pigs to CO2 stunning with two different gas concentrations (80 vol%, 90 vol%, 73 s) under practical conditions in a one gondola-dip-lift system. EEG measurements were performed and blood constituents such as catecholamines (adrenaline, nor-adrenaline) and lactate as well as clinical reactions (nasal septum and corneal reflex, heart beats) investigated. Special EEG-electrodes were adapted for the measurement on pigs and a mobile data logger was prepared for the use in the lairage of the slaughter house and in the stunning unit. The CO2 concentrations were measured continuously close to the head of the pigs when transported up and down in the stunning gondola. The results show that the technique is suited to monitor the effects of different CO2 gas concentrations on the EEG of the pigs under practical conditions. There is strong evidence that CO2 concentrations of 80 vol% applied over 70 s as required by law are not sufficient to stun pigs properly. A large part of the animals still showed typical reflexes when leaving the stunning pit. When an atmosphere of 90 vol% CO2 is applied, most animals are already dead before bleeding commences. This may create problems in respect to meat hygiene. The blood analysis revealed very high concentrations of catecholamines after stunning. The values for adrenaline and nor-adrenaline in the sticking blood rose by a factor of about 1000 as compared to the concentrations in blood samples taken in the lairage before stunning. It seems necessary to revise the current legislation on gas stunning and to look in greater detail in the effects of CO2 stunning on the welfare of slaughter pigs.

  11. Brain catecholamines in spontaneously hypertensive and DOCA-salt hypertensive rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fujino,Kazuyuki

    1984-08-01

    Full Text Available The concentrations and alpha-methyl-p-tyrosine (alpha-MPT induced disappearance of catecholamines, adrenaline, noradrenaline and dopamine, were measured in selected areas of the brainstem and hypothalamus of spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR and deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA-salt hypertensive rats. The catecholamine levels were measured by a sensitive radioenzymatic assay method combined with microdissection of the rat brain. The adrenaline concentration was higher in the area A1 of young SHR, but not in adult SHR, than in age-matched control rats. Noradrenaline concentrations and the alpha-MPT induced noradrenaline disappearance were less in the rostral part of the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS and the nucleus hypothalamic anterior of young SHR, and in the rostral part of the NTS of adult SHR. On the other hand in DOCA-salt hypertensive rats, the concentrations of adrenaline and noradrenaline were the same as in control rats in the examined areas. The alpha-MPT induced noradrenaline disappearance was less in the rostral part of the NTS of DOCA-salt hypertensive rats. Dopamine concentrations and the alpha-MPT induced dopamine disappearance were the same in the examined areas of SHR and DOCA-salt hypertensive rats. The results suggest that SHR have a change in adrenergic neural activity in the brainstem and a decrease in noradrenergic neural activity in the brainstem and hypothalamus while DOCA-salt hypertensive rats have a decrease in noradrenergic neural activity in the brainstem. Such changes in brain catecholaminergic neurons may have played an important role in the development of hypertension in these rats.

  12. Assessment of serum catecholamine concentrations in patients with pheochromocytoma undergoing videolaparoscopic adrenalectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcos F. Rocha

    2005-08-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: We analyzed the changes in serum catecholamine concentrations, i.e. adrenaline and noradrenaline, in response to surgical stress in patients with pheochromocytoma who undergone videolaparoscopic adrenalectomy. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Between January 1998 and March 2002, 11 patients underwent 12 videolaparoscopic adrenalectomies. In one case, the adrenalectomy was bilateral. Serum catecholamines were measured at 6 surgical times: T0: control before induction; T1: following the induction, laryngoscopy and intubation sequence; T2: after installing the pneumoperitoneum; T3: during manipulation-exeresis of the pheochromocytoma; T4: following ablation of the pheochromocytoma; T5: in the recovery room following intervention when the patient was extubated and was hemodynamically stable. RESULTS: Mean concentrations of serum noradrenaline were significantly different when the T0 and T2 surgical times were compared (T0: 3161 pg/mL; T2: 40440 pg/mL; p < 0.01, T0 and T3 (T0: 3161 pg/mL; T3: 46021 pg/mL; p < 0.001, T1 and T3 (T1: 5531 pg/mL; T3: 46021 pg/mL; p < 0.01, T2 and T4 (T2: 40440 pg/mL; T4: 10773 pg/mL; p < 0.01 and T3 and T5 (T3: 46021 pg/mL; T5: 2549 pg/mL; p < 0.001. Mean concentrations of serum adrenaline were significantly different when the T0 and T3 surgical times were compared (T0: 738 pg/mL; T3: 27561 pg/mL; p < 0.01. CONCLUSION: The pneumoperitoneum significantly increases serum noradrenaline concentrations, manipulation of the adrenal gland significantly increases the serum concentrations of noradrenaline and adrenaline, and the pheochromocytoma ablation significantly decreases serum noradrenaline concentrations.

  13. Telling stories: keeping secrets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jensen, Joan M

    2009-01-01

    This article addresses the reticence of some farm women to share their experiences with historians and how that desire to keep secrets collides with the desire by scholars to tell the stories of these women. It argues that scholars must continue to struggle with the issue of which stories to tell publicly and which to keep private. The author discusses her own experience telling stories about rural women in the 1970s and the need to give voice to the heritage of rural women, especially of groups that have feared revealing their experiences. She offers examples of historians of rural women who have successfully worked with formerly silenced populations and urges historians to continue to tell stories about these lives, to reevaluate what has been already learned, to ask new questions, and to discuss which secrets need to be shared.

  14. Bucarest, Strictement Secret

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ionela Mihai

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available L’émission Bucarest, strictement secret représente un documentaire organisésous la forme d’une série télé, qui dépeint le Bucarest à partir de deux perspectives: de l’histoire, de la conte et du lieu. La valeur d’une cité réside dans l’existence d’une mystique, d’un romantisme abscons, à part et des caractères empruntés de drames de Shakespeare, mystérieux, serrés d’angoisse et des secrets qui assombrissent leur existence. Par conséquence, le rôle du metteur en scène est de dévoiler leur vraie identité et de remettre en place, autant que possible, la vérité.

  15. Adipocytes Secrete Leukotrienes

    OpenAIRE

    Mothe-Satney, Isabelle; Filloux, Chantal; Amghar, Hind; Pons, Catherine; Bourlier, Virginie; Galitzky, Jean; Paul A. Grimaldi; Féral, Chloé C.; Bouloumié, Anne; Obberghen, Emmanuel Van; Neels, Jaap G.

    2012-01-01

    Leukotrienes (LTs) are potent proinflammatory mediators, and many important aspects of innate and adaptive immune responses are regulated by LTs. Key members of the LT synthesis pathway are overexpressed in adipose tissue (AT) during obesity, resulting in increased LT levels in this tissue. We observed that several mouse adipocyte cell lines and primary adipocytes from mice and humans both can secrete large amounts of LTs. Furthermore, this production increases with a high-fat diet (HFD) and ...

  16. Portillo's State Secrets: Mysteries

    OpenAIRE

    Clarke, David

    2015-01-01

    Blog/article commissioned by The National Archives to accompany Episode 4 of the BBC 2 series 'Portillo's State Secrets' (BBC 2, 26 March 2015). The article discusses and places in historical context the contents of Metropolitan Police files on the Jack the Ripper murders; the investigation of the 'Kitchener Coffin Hoax' of WW1 and the Ministry of Defence file on the so-called Rendlesham Forest UFO incident at RAF Woodbridge in 1980.

  17. The study of exosomes and microvesicles secreted from breast cancer cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Exosomes are small secreted vesicles of endocytic origin with a size range of 50-150 nm. They are secreted by many cell types and display multiple biological functions including immune-activation, immune-suppression, antigen presentation, and the shuttling of mRNA and miRNA, as well as other cargo. We have characterised the exosomes secreted from two breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231 and MCF7. Exosomes secreted from both cell lines display typical markers including ALIX, Tsg101, CD9 and CD...

  18. Dynamic secrets in communication security

    CERN Document Server

    Xiao, Sheng; Towsley, Donald

    2013-01-01

    Dynamic secrets are constantly generated and updated from messages exchanged between two communication users. When dynamic secrets are used as a complement to existing secure communication systems, a stolen key or password can be quickly and automatically reverted to its secret status without disrupting communication. 'Dynamic Secrets in Communication Security' presents unique security properties and application studies for this technology. Password theft and key theft no longer pose serious security threats when parties frequently use dynamic secrets. This book also illustrates that a dynamic

  19. Windows 8 secrets

    CERN Document Server

    Thurrott, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Tips, tricks, treats, and secrets revealed on Windows 8 Microsoft is introducing a major new release of its Windows operating system, Windows 8, and what better way to learn all its ins and outs than from two internationally recognized Windows experts and Microsoft insiders, authors Paul Thurrott and Rafael Rivera? They cut through the hype to get at useful information you'll not find anywhere else, including what role this new OS plays in a mobile and tablet world. Regardless of your level of knowledge, you'll discover little-known facts about how things work, what's new and different, and h

  20. MONA Implementation Secrets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klarlund, Nils; Møller, Anders; Schwartzbach, Michael Ignatieff

    2002-01-01

    a period of six years. Compared to the first naive version, the present tool is faster by several orders of magnitude. This speedup is obtained from many different contributions working on all levels of the compilation and execution of formulas. We present a selection of implementation "secrets" that have......The MONA tool provides an implementation of the decision procedures for the logics WS1S and WS2S. It has been used for numerous applications, and it is remarkably efficient in practice, even though it faces a theoretically non-elementary worst-case complexity. The implementation has matured over...

  1. Ghrelin and gastric acid secretion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Koji Yakabi; Junichi Kawashima; Shingo Kato

    2008-01-01

    Ghrelin, a novel growth hormone-releasing peptide, was originally isolated from rat and human stomach. Ghrelin has been known to increase the secretion of growth hormone (GH), food intake, and body weight gain when administered peripherally or centrally. Ghrelin is also known to stimulate the gastric motility and the secretion of gastric acid. In the previous studies, the action of ghrelin on acid secretion was shown to be as strong as that of histamine and gastrin in-vivo experiment. In the studies, the mechanism for the action of ghrelin was also investigated. It was shown that vagotomy completely inhibited the action of ghrelin on the secretion of gastric acid suggesting that vagal nerve is involved in the mechanism for the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. As famotidine did not inhibit ghrelin-in-duced acid secretion in the study by Masuda et al, they concluded that histamine was not involved in the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. However, we have shown that famotidine completely inhibited ghrelin-induced acid secretion and histidine decarboxylase (HDC) mRNA was increased in gastric mucosa by ghrelin injection which is inhibited by vagotomy Our results indicate that histamine is involved in the action of ghrelin on acid secretion. Furthermore synergistic action of gastrin and ghrelin on gastric add secretion was shown. Although gastrin has important roles in postprandial secretion of gastric acid, ghrelin may be related to acid secretion during fasting period or at night. However, further studies are needed to elucidate the physiological role of ghrelin in acid secretion.

  2. On Converting Secret Sharing Scheme to Visual Secret Sharing Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Daoshun

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Traditional Secret Sharing (SS schemes reconstruct secret exactly the same as the original one but involve complex computation. Visual Secret Sharing (VSS schemes decode the secret without computation, but each share is m times as big as the original and the quality of the reconstructed secret image is reduced. Probabilistic visual secret sharing (Prob.VSS schemes for a binary image use only one subpixel to share the secret image; however the probability of white pixels in a white area is higher than that in a black area in the reconstructed secret image. SS schemes, VSS schemes, and Prob. VSS schemes have various construction methods and advantages. This paper first presents an approach to convert (transform a -SS scheme to a -VSS scheme for greyscale images. The generation of the shadow images (shares is based on Boolean XOR operation. The secret image can be reconstructed directly by performing Boolean OR operation, as in most conventional VSS schemes. Its pixel expansion is significantly smaller than that of VSS schemes. The quality of the reconstructed images, measured by average contrast, is the same as VSS schemes. Then a novel matrix-concatenation approach is used to extend the greyscale -SS scheme to a more general case of greyscale -VSS scheme.

  3. Endocrine determinants of changes in insulin sensitivity and insulin secretion during a weight cycle in healthy men.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judith Karschin

    Full Text Available Changes in insulin sensitivity (IS and insulin secretion occur with perturbations in energy balance and glycemic load (GL of the diet that may precede the development of insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia. Determinants of changes in IS and insulin secretion with weight cycling in non-obese healthy subjects remain unclear.In a 6wk controlled 2-stage randomized dietary intervention 32 healthy men (26±4y, BMI: 24±2kg/m2 followed 1wk of overfeeding (OF, 3wks of caloric restriction (CR containing either 50% or 65% carbohydrate (CHO and 2wks of refeeding (RF with the same amount of CHO but either low or high glycaemic index at ±50% energy requirement. Measures of IS (basal: HOMA-index, postprandial: Matsuda-ISI, insulin secretion (early: Stumvoll-index, total: tAUC-insulin/tAUC-glucose and potential endocrine determinants (ghrelin, leptin, adiponectin, thyroid hormone levels, 24h-urinary catecholamine excretion were assessed.IS improved and insulin secretion decreased due to CR and normalized upon RF. Weight loss-induced improvements in basal and postprandial IS were associated with decreases in leptin and increases in ghrelin levels, respectively (r = 0.36 and r = 0.62, p<0.05. Weight regain-induced decrease in postprandial IS correlated with increases in adiponectin, fT3, TSH, GL of the diet and a decrease in ghrelin levels (r-values between -0.40 and 0.83, p<0.05 whereas increases in early and total insulin secretion were associated with a decrease in leptin/adiponectin-ratio (r = -0.52 and r = -0.46, p<0.05 and a decrease in fT4 (r = -0.38, p<0.05 for total insulin secretion only. After controlling for GL associations between RF-induced decrease in postprandial IS and increases in fT3 and TSH levels were no longer significant.Weight cycling induced changes in IS and insulin secretion were associated with changes in all measured hormones, except for catecholamine excretion. While leptin, adiponectin and ghrelin seem to be the major

  4. Effect of angiotensin II, catecholamines and glucocorticoid on corticotropin releasing factor (CRF-induced ACTH release in pituitary cell cultures.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Murakami,Kazuharu

    1984-08-01

    Full Text Available The effects of angiotensin II, catecholamines and glucocorticoid on CRF-induced ACTH release were examined using rat anterior pituitary cells in monolayer culture. Synthetic ovine CRF induced a significant ACTH release in this system. Angiotensin II produced an additive effect on CRF-induced ACTH release. The ACTH releasing activity of CRF was potentiated by epinephrine and norepinephrine. Dopamine itself at 0.03-30 ng/ml did not show any significant effect on ACTH release, but it inhibited CRF-induced ACTH release. Corticosterone at 10(-7 and 10(-6M inhibited CRF-induced ACTH release. These results indicate that angiotensin II, catecholamines and glucocorticoid modulate ACTH release at the pituitary level.

  5. Catecholamine and electrolyte content in the animal vascular wall in radiation sickness and during administration of radioprotectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of adrenaline upon the balance of catecholamines and electrolytes in blood vessels in different time periods after whole-body X-ray irradiation and also under conditions of prophylactic prescription of cystamine is studied. The work is conducted in 90 adult cats of both sexes with the mass 2-4 kg. The whole-body X-ray irradiation is carried out at a dose of 400 R. It is shown that X-ray irradiation depending on the stage of radiaiton sickness causes quantitative and qualitative changes of normal biochemical response of vessel tissue for the introduction of different doses of adrenaline. Cystamine decreses the expression of quantitative changes and frequency of qualitative non-adequate changes of electrolyte composition and balance of catecholamines in vessel tissue of irradiated animals when introducing adrenaline in a dose of 15 μg/kg

  6. Effect of catecholamines on IL-2 production and NK cytotoxicity of rats in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yu-ping PENG; Yi-hua QIU; Jian-lan JIANG; Jian-jun WANGTM

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To explore effects of exogenous and endogenous catecholamines on function of lymphocytes and primary mechanisms mediating the effects. METHODS: Splenocytes of rats were exposed to norepinephrine (NE), α- or β-adrenoceptor antagonists plus NE, or α-methyl-p-tyrosine (α-MT), and then concanavalin A (Con A)-induced intefleukin-2 (IL-2) production and natural killer (NK) cell cytotoxicity were determined by MTT assay and LDH assay, respectively. RESULTS: Optical density (OD) values of NE-treated groups, which reflected IL-2 production,were 0.63, 0.61, and 0.60, respectively for 1×10-10, 1×10-9, and 1×10-8 mol/L NE. They were all significantly reduced in comparison with control value of 0.68 (P<0.01). The effect of NE was blocked by either phentolamine (an α-adrenoceptor antagonist) or propanolol (a β-adrenoceptor antagonist). OD values of α-MT, an inhibitor of tyrosine hydroxylase, at doses of l× 10-10, 1× 10-9, and 1× 10-8 mol/L respectively were 0.71, 0.71, and 0.69, which were all notably higher than that of control (0.65, P<0.01). NK cytotoxicity was markedly attenuated by both NE and α-MT at the three doses mentioned above (17.69 %, 17.06 %, and 16.89 % versus 25.18 % for NE; 18.85 %,18.44 %, and 17.04 % versus 23.22 % for α-MT; all P<0.01). The suppression of NK cytotoxicity by NE was prevented by propranolol but not by phentolamine. CONCLUSION: Exogenous NE exerts a suppressive action in modulating functions of T and NK cells, with the former via both α- and β-adrenoceptor mediated mechanisms and the later mainly through β-adrenoceptors. Endogenous catecholamines synthesized by lymphocytes have also an autoregulatory effect on the lymphocytes themselves.

  7. EFFECTS OF ALFENTANIL AND ESMOLOL ON HEMODYNAMIC AND CATECHOLAMINE RESPONSE TO TRACHEAL INTUBATION

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    龚志毅; 罗爱伦

    1999-01-01

    Objective. To compare the effects of alfentanil and esmolol on hemodynamic and catecholamine responsee to tracheal intubation.Mahods. Thirty-five adult patients were randomly allocated to one of three groups, Group A (control group), Group B (esmolol groap) and Group C (alfentanil group). The patients received either 2 mg/kg esmolol (in Group B) or 30μg/kg alfentanil (in Group C) before intulmtion. Tracheal intubation was performed with 4 mg/kg thiopental and 0. 1 mg/kg vecuronium and 3% isoflurane. Systolic blood pressure(SBP), diastolic blood pressure (DBP), mean blood pressure (MBP), heart rate (HR), norepinephrine(NE),epinephrine(E) and dopamine (DA) were measured before and after intubtttion.Results.The control group had a baseline SBP of 149±23 mmHg while Groups B,C had a baseline SBP of 148±23,and 150±21mmHg,respectively(P>0.05),Three min after tracheal intubation,the control group SBP increased to 160±30mmHg and Group B remained at the baseline level ,147±5mmHg,and Goup C significantly decreased to 91±22mmHg(P<0.01).Two min after intubation HR in Group B increased significantly but 3 min after intubation HR in Groups B and C were significantly lower than that of control group(P<0.05).NE in Groups A and B increased significatly to 5.75±3.51 and 6.75±3.30nmol/L 3 min after intubation(P<0.01).In Group C,3min after intubation NE was not significantly different from the baseline but E becreased significantly(P<0.01).Conclusion.2mg/kg esmolol can moderate the hemodynamic response to tracheal intubation to a certain extent and 30μg/kg alfentanil can completely attenuate the hemodynamic and catecholamine responses.

  8. AB154. Effect of early adrenal vein ligation on blood pressure and catecholamine fluctuation during laparoscopic adrenalectomy for pheochromocytoma

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, Guojun; Yu, Chuigong; Yu, Lei; Zhang, Geng; Yang, Lijun; Lin, Yuanjian

    2014-01-01

    Objective To find out whether previous control of the adrenal vein is a crucial procedure in laparoscopic adrenalectomy for pheochromocytoma. Method From January 2000 to December 2010, 114 pheochromocytoma patients underwent laparoscopic adrenalectomy through transperitoneal or retroperitoneal approach. All the 114 patients were divided into two groups randomly (group 1, dissection after ligation; group 2, dissection before ligation). Blood samples to dose catecholamines using high performanc...

  9. Catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes are expressed in replicating cells of the peripheral but not the central nervous system.

    OpenAIRE

    Rothman, T P; Specht, L A; Gershon, M D; Joh, T H; Teitelman, G; Pickel, V M; Reis, D J

    1980-01-01

    We sought to determine whether the precursors of catecholamine-containing neurons in the developing peripheral and central nervous systems of chickens and rats express the biosynthetic enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase [THase; tyrosine 3-monooxygenase; L-tyrosine, tetrahydropteridine: oxygen oxidoreductase (3-hydroxylating), EC 1.14.16.2] or dopamine beta-hydroxylase [DBHase; 3,4-dihydroxyphenylethylamine, ascorbate:oxygen oxidoreductase (beta-hydroxylating), EC 1.14.17.1], prior to the time they ...

  10. Evaluation and validation of a method for determining platelet catecholamine in patients with obstructive sleep apnea and arterial hypertension.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia C Feres

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Measurements of plasma and urinary catecholamine are susceptible to confounding factors that influence the results, complicating the interpretation of sympathetic nervous system (SNS activity in the Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA and arterial hypertension (HYP conditions. OBJECTIVE: In this study, we validated a test for platelet catecholamine and compared the catecholamine levels (adrenaline and noradrenaline in urine, plasma and platelets in patients with OSA and HYP compared with controls. METHODS: In the validation, 30 healthy, nonsmoking volunteers who were not currently undergoing treatment or medication were selected as the control group. One hundred fifty-four individuals (114 OSA, 40 non-OSA were consecutively selected from the outpatient clinic of the Sleep Institute and underwent clinical, polysomnographic and laboratory evaluation, including the urinary, plasma and platelet levels of adrenaline (AD and noradrenaline (NA. Patients were then allocated to groups according to the presence of OSA and/or hypertension. RESULTS: A logistic regression model, controlled for age and BMI, showed that urinary AD and urinary NA were risk factors in the OSA+HYP group and the HYP group; however, the model showed higher levels of platelet NA for OSA without HYP. After 1 year of CPAP (continuous upper airway pressure treatment, patients (n = 9 presented lower levels of urinary NA (p = 0.04 and platelet NA (p = 0.05. CONCLUSION: Urinary NA and AD levels were significantly associated with the condition of hypertension with and without OSA, whereas platelet NA with OSA without comorbidity. These findings suggest that platelet catecholamine levels might reflect nocturnal sympathetic activation in OSA patients without hypertension.

  11. Human ketone body production and utilization studied using tracer techniques: Regulation by free fatty acids, insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ketone body concentrations fluctuate markedly during physiological and pathological conditions. Tracer techniques have been developed in recent years to study production, utilization, and the metabolic clearance rate of ketone bodies. This review describes data on the roles of insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones in the regulation of ketone body kinetics. The data indicate that insulin lowers ketone body concentrations by three independent mechanisms: first, it inhibits lipolysis, and thus lowers free fatty acid availability for ketogenesis; second, it restrains ketone body production within the liver; third, it enhances peripheral ketone body utilization. To assess these effects in humans in vivo, experimental models were developed to study insulin effects with controlled concentrations of free fatty acids, insulin, glucagon, and ketone bodies. Presently available data also support an important role of catecholamines in increasing ketone body concentrations. Evidence was presented that norepinephrine increases ketogenesis not only by stimulating lipolysis, and thus releasing free fatty acids, but also by increasing intrahepatic ketogenesis. Thyroid hormone availability was associated with lipolysis and ketogenesis. Ketone body concentrations after an overnight fast were only modestly elevated in hyperthyroidism resulting from increased peripheral ketone body clearance. There was a significant correlation between serum triiodothyronine levels and the ketone body metabolic clearance rate. Thus, ketone body homeostasis in human subjects resulted from the interaction of hormones such as insulin, catecholamines, and thyroid hormones regulating lipolysis, intrahepatic ketogenesis, and peripheral ketone body utilization. 58 references

  12. Plasma catecholamines during endurance exercise of different intensities as related to the individual anaerobic threshold.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urhausen, A; Weiler, B; Coen, B; Kindermann, W

    1994-01-01

    The study investigated the concentrations of free plasma catecholamines (CAT), adrenaline and noradrenaline, in comparison to heart rate and lactic acid concentrations during endurance exercises (EE) of different intensities related to the individual anaerobic threshold (IAT). A group of 14 endurance trained male athletes took part in the tests on a treadmill. After an exhausting incremental graded test (increasing 0.5 m.s-1 every 3 min) to determine the IAT, the subjects performed EE of 45 min in randomized order with intensities of 85%, 95%, 100% and 105% (E85-E105) of the IAT. The heart rate and CAT increased continuously during all EE. The CAT reacted sensitively to EE above IAT (E105) and showed an overproportional increase in comparison to EE performed with an intensity at or below IAT. At the same time, at exercise intensities up to IAT (E85-E100) a lactate steady state was observed whereas mean lactate concentrations increased during E105. The changes of lactate concentration allowed a better differentiation between E85-E100 as CAT measurements. In E95, E100 and E105 there was a partial overlap of heart rate, which in contrast to lactate concentration only differed by about 5%, so that small variations in heart rate could have coincided with considerable differences of exercise intensity when working at intensities near or above IAT. It was concluded that the range of IAT seemed to represent a real physiological breakpoint which corresponded to the aerobic-anaerobic transition. PMID:7957150

  13. EFFECT OF ACUPUNCTURE COMBINED WITH EPIDURAL ANESTHESIA ON PLASMA CATECHOLAMINE CONTENT IN CHOLECYSTECTOMY PATIENTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Changgen; Peng Xiaoyun; Xu Mingyu; Wang Zhongcheng

    2001-01-01

    Objective: To observe changes of plasma catecholamine (CA) level in patients experiencing cholecystectomy under acupuncture anesthesia combined with epidural administration of small dose of anesthetics. Methods:33 cholecystectomy patients were randomly divided into acupuncture combined with epidural anesthesia (A) group (n = 11), acupoint-skin electrical stimulation combined with epidural anesthesia (B) group (n= 11 ) and simple epidural anesthesia (C) group (n= 11). Acupoints used were bilateral Zusanli (ST 36) and Neiguan (PC 6) and stimulated with parameters of frequency 2/15 Hz, intermittent waves, electric current 2~3 mA for group A and 13mA for group B. Extradural anesthetic administered was 1.5% Lidocaine 5 mL. Venous blood samples were collected one day before,NE of group A and B lowered in comparison with pre-operation, particularly group A (P <0.01), while in group C,plasma NE level increased slightly; plasma E of group A and B increased significantly compared with pre-operation (P levels recovered basically in comparison with those of one day before operation. It indicates that acupuncture or acupoint-skin electrical stimulation is capable of regulating sympathetic activity during epidural anesthesia. The anesthetic effec t has a closer relation with changes of plasma NE level rather than changes of plasma E or DA levels. C_onclusion:Acupuncture or acupoint-surface electrical stimulation combined with epidural anesthesia may be of reducing or releasing surgical operation generated stress response during cholecystectomy.

  14. Reactivities of Quinone Methides versus o-Quinones in Catecholamine Metabolism and Eumelanin Biosynthesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugumaran, Manickam

    2016-01-01

    Melanin is an important biopolymeric pigment produced in a vast majority of organisms. Tyrosine and its hydroxylated product, dopa, form the starting material for melanin biosynthesis. Earlier studies by Raper and Mason resulted in the identification of dopachrome and dihydroxyindoles as important intermediates and paved way for the establishment of well-known Raper–Mason pathway for the biogenesis of brown to black eumelanins. Tyrosinase catalyzes the oxidation of tyrosine as well as dopa to dopaquinone. Dopaquinone thus formed, undergoes intramolecular cyclization to form leucochrome, which is further oxidized to dopachrome. Dopachrome is either converted into 5,6-dihydroxyindole by decarboxylative aromatization or isomerized into 5,6-dihydroxyindole-2-carboxylic acid. Oxidative polymerization of these two dihydroxyindoles eventually produces eumelanin pigments via melanochrome. While the role of quinones in the biosynthetic pathway is very well acknowledged, that of isomeric quinone methides, however, remained marginalized. This review article summarizes the key role of quinone methides during the oxidative transformation of a vast array of catecholamine derivatives and brings out the importance of these transient reactive species during the melanogenic process. In addition, possible reactions of quinone methides at various stages of melanogenesis are discussed. PMID:27657049

  15. Solvent Extraction and QSPR of Catecholamines with a Bis(2-ethlhexyl) Hydrogen Phosphate

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoshizuka, Kazuharu.; Fujimoto, Yuko.; Ota, Keisuke.; Inoue, Katsutoshi. [Saga University, Saga (Japan). Dept. of Applied Chemistry

    1999-02-01

    In order to develop an effective separation recess for catecholamine (CA), a basic investigation on solvent extraction of dopamine (DA), adrenaline (Ad) and noradrenaline (NA) from hydrochloric acid solution and their stripping is conducted at 30 degree C employing bis(2-ethylhexyl) hydrogen phosphate (D2EHPA) in chloroform, n-hexane and toluene as the organic diluents. From the dependencies of the distribution ratios on the concentrations of reactant species, i.e. CA, hydrogen ion and D2EHPA, it is elucidated that CA (RNH{sub 2}) is extracted with D2EHPA (HR`) according to the ion exchange mechanism, as the complex type, RNH{sub 3}R` (HR`){sub 3}, and the equilibrium constants (K{sub ex,CA}) for the extraction reactions are also evaluated. The quantitative structure property relationship (QSPR) of K{sub ex,CA} values for each organic diluent is discussed using molecular modeling with semi-empirical molecular orbital calculations considering the solvent effect. (author)

  16. Escherichia coli O157:H7 gene expression in the presence of catecholamine norepinephrine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dowd, Scot E

    2007-08-01

    Various forms of host stresses (e.g. physiological, psychological) are thought to influence susceptibility to pathogenic microorganisms. Catecholamines such as norepinephrine are released into the GI environment during acute stress and may influence the infective process of bacterial pathogens associated with the GI tract. To examine the effects of norepinephrine on expression of virulence factors in Escherichia coli O157:H7, the clinical-type isolate EDL933 (ATCC 43895) was grown in serum-Standard American Petroleum Institute media in the presence or absence of norepinephrine. After 5 h of exposure to norepinephrine, treatment and control cultures (not exposed to norepinephrine) were harvested, their RNA isolated, and gene expression evaluated. There was a dramatic increase in the expression of virulence factor transcripts including stx1, stx2, and eae. Also induced were transcripts involved in iron metabolism. Conversely, there was comparative repression of iron acquisition and phage shock protein-related transcripts in the presence of norepinephrine. Novel observations from these data suggested that exposure to norepinephrine induced glutamate decarboxylase acid resistance as well as an SOS response in E. coli O157:H7. The results corroborate many of the previous findings detailed in the literature and provide new observations that could expand the scope of microbial endocrinology. PMID:17573936

  17. Catecholamine-induced vasoconstriction is sensitive to carbonic anhydrase I activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Puscas I.

    2001-01-01

    Full Text Available We studied the relationship between alpha- and beta-adrenergic agonists and the activity of carbonic anhydrase I and II in erythrocyte, clinical and vessel studies. Kinetic studies were performed. Adrenergic agonists increased erythrocyte carbonic anhydrase as follows: adrenaline by 75%, noradrenaline by 68%, isoprenaline by 55%, and orciprenaline by 62%. The kinetic data indicated a non-competitive mechanism of action. In clinical studies carbonic anhydrase I from erythrocytes increased by 87% after noradrenaline administration, by 71% after orciprenaline and by 82% after isoprenaline. The increase in carbonic anhydrase I paralleled the increase in blood pressure. Similar results were obtained in vessel studies on piglet vascular smooth muscle. We believe that adrenergic agonists may have a dual mechanism of action: the first one consists of a catecholamine action on its receptor with the formation of a stimulus-receptor complex. The second mechanism proposed completes the first one. By this second component of the mechanism, the same stimulus directly acts on the carbonic anhydrase I isozyme (that might be functionally coupled with adrenergic receptors, so that its activation ensures an adequate pH for stimulus-receptor coupling for signal transduction into the cell, resulting in vasoconstriction.

  18. Effects of ovarian stimulation on blood pressure and plasma catecholamine levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tollan, A; Oian, P; Kjeldsen, S E; Holst, N; Eide, I

    1993-07-01

    Effects of ovarian stimulation for in vitro fertilization on blood pressure and plasma catecholamine levels were studied in 10 women. The examinations were carried out before hormonal treatment with human menopausal gonadotropin (day three of the menstrual cycle, mean serum oestradiol concentration 0.2 nmol l-1, and on the day after ovulation induction with human chorionic gonadotropin (cycle days 10-12, mean serum oestradiol concentration 7.4 nmol l-1). Systolic and diastolic blood pressures (mean +/- SD) decreased 6.7 +/- 8.6 mm Hg, p = 0.049, and 5.3 +/- 4.7 mm Hg, p = 0.009, respectively), and venous plasma noradrenaline increased (42 +/- 44 pg ml-1, p = 0.02) during ovarian stimulation. No significant change was observed in either arterial noradrenaline, arterial adrenaline or venous adrenaline. After stimulation a positive correlation was observed between systolic blood pressure and arterial adrenaline (r = 0.73, p = 0.027), and between systolic blood pressure and the arterial-venous difference for adrenaline (r = 0.81, p = 0.007). The increased venous noradrenaline levels may be a reflex-mediated activation of the sympathetic nervous tone due to a decrease in blood pressure, or may indicate reduced neuronal re-uptake of released noradrenaline. The mechanisms behind the strong correlation between adrenaline and blood pressure are unclear, but may be induced by the supraphysiological oestradiol levels. Thus, adrenaline seems to be more important for blood pressure control in this particular setting.

  19. Ceramic subsurface marker prototypes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lukens, C.E. [Rockwell International Corp., Richland, WA (United States). Rockwell Hanford Operations

    1985-05-02

    The client submitted 5 sets of porcelain and stoneware subsurface (radioactive site) marker prototypes (31 markers each set). The following were determined: compressive strength, thermal shock resistance, thermal crazing resistance, alkali resistance, color retention, and chemical resistance.

  20. Serum inhibin B as a marker of Spermatogenesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pierik, F.H.; Vreeburg, J.T.M.; Stijnen, T; Jong, F.H.

    2007-01-01

    Inhibin B is produced by Sertoli cells, provides negative feedback on FSH secretion, and may prove to be an important marker for the functioning of seminiferous tubules. The purpose of the present study was to examine the relationship between the spermatogenic function of the testis of subfertile me

  1. The mode of action of caffeine on catecholamine release from perfused adrenal glands of cat.

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada, Y.; Nakazato, Y; Ohga, A.

    1989-01-01

    1 Adrenaline and noradrenaline secretion induced by caffeine was investigated in the perfused cat adrenal glands. 2 Caffeine (10-80 mM) caused a dose-dependent increase in both adrenaline and noradrenaline secretion when applied for 1 min and 10 min after replacing Ca2+ with 10(-5)M EGTA in the perfusion solution. The ratio of adrenaline to noradrenaline was about 1:1. Mg2+ and/or Ca2+ inhibited the response to caffeine. 3 When caffeine (40 mM) was repeatedly applied in the absence of extrace...

  2. Physiology and endocrinology symposium: evidence that oviduct secretions influence sperm function: a retrospective view for livestock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Killian, G

    2011-05-01

    The mammalian oviduct has long been recognized as an organ essential for successful reproduction. Bovine, ovine, porcine, and equine animal models have offered clear advantages for oviduct study related to gamete physiology, fertilization, and early embryonic development. Livestock species are amenable to surgical alteration of the reproductive tract, estrous cycle manipulation, gamete cryopreservation, and AI, as well as in vitro fertilization and embryo production. Although most reproductive technology developed for livestock was intended to benefit production animal agriculture, these techniques are a treasure trove of tools for researchers to better understand how the oviduct influences gamete function. Oviduct secretions obtained from in vitro tissue cultures or via indwelling oviduct catheters have been used for analyses to define the protein, lipid, carbohydrate, enzyme, and electrolyte compositions of the secretions during the estrous cycle or in response to hormone treatment. Oviduct secretions or components purified from them have also been used in in vitro assays to assess their ability to bind to sperm, influence sperm viability, motility, sperm capacitation, the acrosome reaction, sperm-egg binding, and egg penetration, as well as subsequent embryonic development. Compelling data have emerged which show that the composition of secretions differs during the estrous cycle and that their composition differs whether they originate from the ampullary or isthmic regions of the oviduct. These differences in composition are functionally relevant and associated with different responses by sperm. Evidence indicatess that oviduct-specific glycoproteins, glycosaminoglycans, carbohydrates, norepinepherine, catecholamines, heat-shock protein, and osteopontin are components of the oviductal milieu that have the capacity to modulate sperm function. Future research on the livestock oviduct will likely define the role that oviduct secretions have in modulating sperm

  3. Ergodic Secret Alignment

    CERN Document Server

    Bassily, Raef

    2010-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce two new achievable schemes for the fading multiple access wiretap channel (MAC-WT). In the model that we consider, we assume that perfect knowledge of the state of all channels is available at all the nodes in a causal fashion. Our schemes use this knowledge together with the time varying nature of the channel model to align the interference from different users at the eavesdropper perfectly in a one-dimensional space while creating a higher dimensionality space for the interfering signals at the legitimate receiver hence allowing for better chance of recovery. While we achieve this alignment through signal scaling at the transmitters in our first scheme (scaling based alignment (SBA)), we let nature provide this alignment through the ergodicity of the channel coefficients in the second scheme (ergodic secret alignment (ESA)). For each scheme, we obtain the resulting achievable secrecy rate region. We show that the secrecy rates achieved by both schemes scale with SNR as 1/2log(SNR...

  4. Multiparty Quantum Secret Report

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    DENG Fu-Guo; LI Xi-Han; LI Chun-Yan; ZHOU Ping; LIANG Yu-Jie; ZHOU Hong-Yu

    2006-01-01

    @@ A multiparty quantum secret report scheme is proposed with quantum encryption. The boss Alice and her M agents first share a sequence of (M + 1)-particle Greenberger-Horne-Zeilinger (GHZ) states that only Alice knows which state each (M + 1)-particle quantum system is in. Each agent exploits a controlled-not (CNot) gate to encrypt the travelling particle by using the particle in the GHZ state as the control qubit. The boss Alice decrypts the travelling particle with a CNot gate after performing a σx operation on her particle in the GHZ state or not.After the GHZ states (the quantum key) are used up, the parties check whether there is a vicious eavesdropper,say Eve, monitoring the quantum line, by picking out some samples from the GHZ states shared and measuring them with two measuring bases. After confirming the security of the quantum key, they use the remaining GHZ states repeatedly for the next round of quantum communication. This scheme has the advantage of high intrinsic efficiency for the qubits and total efficiency.

  5. Administration of docosahexaenoic acid influences behavior and plasma catecholamine levels at times of psychological stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamazaki, T; Sawazaki, S; Nagasawa, T; Nagao, Y; Kanagawa, Y; Yazawa, K

    1999-01-01

    The purpose of the present research was to clarify the effect of docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) intake on behavior and plasma catecholamines (CA). In Study 1, 42 students took either DHA-rich oil capsules containing 1.5-1.8 g DHA/d or control oil capsules containing 97% soybean oil plus 3% of another fish oil for 3 mon in a double-blind fashion. They took a psychological test (PF Study) at the start and end of the study. This study started at the end of summer vacation and ended just before the final exams. In the control group, external aggression (aggression against others) in PF Study was significantly increased at the end of the study as compared with that measured at the start (+8.9%), whereas it was not significantly changed in the DHA group (-1.0%). In a similar double-blind study (Study 2), we measured external aggression under nonstressful conditions. External aggression slightly decreased in the control group, whereas there were no significant changes in the DHA group. In Study 3 with 14 students, plasma CA were measured at the start and end of capsule administration period of 2 mon. Subjects were under continuous stress of the final exams that lasted throughout the whole study period. The ratio of plasma epinephrine to norepinephrine concentrations was significantly increased in the DHA group (78%), whereas it stayed at the same level in the control group. In Study 4, mice were fed either DHA-deficient diet or -sufficient diet for 4 wk, and their rearing frequency (an anxiety index) was measured. In the DHA-sufficient group, the rearing frequency was significantly less than in the other group. These effects of DHA intake may be applied to people in an attempt to ameliorate stress-related diseases. PMID:10419086

  6. Secret Key Generation via a Modified Quantum Secret Sharing Protocol

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith IV, Amos M [ORNL; Evans, Philip G [ORNL; Lawrie, Benjamin J [ORNL; Legre, Matthieu [ID Quantique, Inc.; Lougovski, Pavel [ORNL; Ray, William R [ORNL; Williams, Brian P [ORNL; Qi, Bing [ORNL; Grice, Warren P [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    We present and experimentally show a novel protocol for distributing secret information between two and only two parties in a N-party single-qubit Quantum Secret Sharing (QSS) system. We demonstrate this new algorithm with N = 3 active parties over 6km of telecom. ber. Our experimental device is based on the Clavis2 Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) system built by ID Quantique but is generalizable to any implementation. We show that any two out of the N parties can build secret keys based on partial information from each other and with collaboration from the remaining N > 2 parties. This algorithm allows for the creation of two-party secret keys were standard QSS does not and signicantly reduces the number of resources needed to implement QKD on a highly connected network such as the electrical grid.

  7. Secret key generation via a modified quantum secret sharing protocol

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, A. M.; Evans, P. G.; Lawrie, B.; Legré, M.; Lougovski, P.; Ray, W.; Williams, B. P.; Qi, B.; Grice, W. P.

    2015-05-01

    We present and experimentally show a novel protocol for distributing secret information between two and only two parties in a N-party single-qubit Quantum Secret Sharing (QSS) system. We demonstrate this new algorithm with N = 3 active parties over ~6km of telecom. fiber. Our experimental device is based on the Clavis2 Quantum Key Distribution (QKD) system built by ID Quantique but is generalizable to any implementation. We show that any two out of the N parties can build secret keys based on partial information from each other and with collaboration from the remaining N - 2 parties. This algorithm allows for the creation of two-party secret keys were standard QSS does not and significantly reduces the number of resources needed to implement QKD on a highly connected network such as the electrical grid.

  8. Blockade of catecholamine-induced growth by adrenergic and dopaminergic receptor antagonists in Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella enterica and Yersinia enterocolitica

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyte Mark

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability of catecholamines to stimulate bacterial growth was first demonstrated just over a decade ago. Little is still known however, concerning the nature of the putative bacterial adrenergic and/or dopaminergic receptor(s to which catecholamines (norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopamine may bind and exert their effects, or even whether the binding properties of such a receptor are similar between different species. Results Use of specific catecholamine receptor antagonists revealed that only α, and not β, adrenergic antagonists were capable of blocking norepinephrine and epinephrine-induced growth, while antagonism of dopamine-mediated growth was achieved with the use of a dopaminergic antagonist. Both adrenergic and dopaminergic antagonists were highly specific in their mechanism of action, which did not involve blockade of catecholamine-facilitated iron-acquisition. Use of radiolabeled norepinephrine suggested that the adrenergic antagonists could be acting by inhibiting catecholamine uptake. Conclusion The present data demonstrates that the ability of a specific pathogen to respond to a particular hormone is dependent upon the host anatomical region in which the pathogen causes disease as well as the neuroanatomical specificity to which production of the particular hormone is restricted; and that both are anatomically coincidental to each other. As such, the present report suggests that pathogens with a high degree of exclusivity to the gastrointestinal tract have evolved response systems to neuroendocrine hormones such as norepinephrine and dopamine, but not epinephrine, which are found with the enteric nervous system.

  9. Pulmonary surfactant and its components inhibit secretion of phosphatidylcholine from cultured rat alveolar type II cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pulmonary surfactant is synthesized and secreted by alveolar type II cells. Radioactive phosphatidylcholine has been used as a marker for surfactant secretion. The authors report findings that suggest that surfactant inhibits secretion of 3H-labeled phosphatidylcholine by cultured rat type II cells. The lipid components and the surfactant protein group of M/sub r/ 26,000-36,000 (SP 26-36) inhibit secretion to different extents. Surfactant lipids do not completely inhibit release; in concentrations of 100 μg/ml, lipids inhibit stimulated secretion by 40%. SP 26-36 inhibits release with an EC50 of 0.1 μg/ml. At concentrations of 1.0 μg/ml, SP 26-36 inhibits basal secretion and reduces to basal levels secretion stimulated by terbutaline, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate, and the ionophore A23187. The inhibitory effect of SP 26-36 can be blocked by washing type II cells after adding SP 26-36, by heating the proteins to 1000C for 10 min, by adding antiserum specific to SP 26-36, or by incubating cells in the presence of 0.2 mM EGTA. SP 26-36 isolated from canine and human sources also inhibits phosphatidylcholine release from rat type II cells. Neither type I collagen nor serum apolipoprotein A-1 inhibits secretion. These findings are compatible with the hypothesis that surfactant secretion is under feedback regulatory control

  10. A Rare Cause of Hypokalemia: Aldosterone-Secreting Adrenocortical Carcinoma Dear Editor,

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ethem Turgay Cerit

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Adrenocortical carcinoma (ACC is a rare malignancy accounting for 0.05-0.2% of all cancers (1. Determinants of prognosis are the stage of disease and completeness of resection(2. Approximately 60% of ACCs are hormonally active and glucocorticoids and/or androgens are most frequently over-secreted (2. Rapid development of signs and symptoms of Cushing’s syndrome is the most frequent presentation (3. Aldosterone-secreting ACC is extremely uncommon, comprising 0% to 7% of all functioning ACCs and presents with severe hypertension and profound hypokalemia (4. Here we report a case diagnosed as aldosterone producing adrenocortical carcinoma presented with severe hypokalemia and hypertension. A 32-year-old man referred to our instution because of pain and marked weakness especially in his lower extremities for 2 months. On admission his blood pressure was 180 mmHg systolic and 110 mmHg diastolic. Laboratory investigation revealed severe hypokalemia (2.6 mmol/l (normal: 3.5-5.5 mmol/l, elevated serum aldosterone (39.0 ng/dl (normal: 0.8-13 ng/dl with suppressed plasma renin activity (0.07 ng/ml/h. Serum sodium level was 142 mmol/l (normal: 135-146 mmol/l. Serum aldosterone level was not supressed (38.2 ng/dl after saline infusion test. Serum dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEA-SO4 was 150 mcg/dl (normal: 80-560, Δ4-androstenedione was 1.91 ng/ml (normal: 0.5-4.8 and total testosterone was 447.3 ng/dl (normal: 229.8-799.8 (Table 1. Suppressed renin levels, increased aldosterone levels with an aldosterone/renin ratio >30 were suggestive findings of aldosterone-producing adenoma of the adrenal gland or bilateral adrenal hyperplasia. Computed tomography demonstrated a large (4.6 cm left-sided adrenal tumour which is heterogeneous and has lobulated margin without a contrasting pattern of adenoma (Figure 1. 24-h urinary catecholamines and low-dose dexamethasone-suppressed plasma cortisol concentrations were all normal. At surgery, an adrenal mass (70

  11. Cocaine treatment increases expression of a 40 kDa catecholamine-regulated protein in discrete brain regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharan, Niki; Chong, Victor Z; Nair, Venugopalan D; Mishra, Ram K; Hayes, Robert J; Gardner, Eliot L

    2003-01-01

    Previous reports from our laboratory have described brain-specific catecholamine-regulated proteins, which bind dopamine and related catecholamines. Evidence from the molecular cloning of a 40 kDa catecholamine-regulated protein (CRP40) revealed that CRP40 is dopamine-inducible and has properties similar to those of the 70 kDa heat shock protein (HSP70) family. The present study investigates the effects of acute and chronic cocaine treatment on CRP40 expression in the striatum, nucleus accumbens, prefrontal cortex, and medulla. Acute treatment with cocaine increased CRP40 expression in the nucleus accumbens and striatum, whereas chronic treatment with cocaine increased CRP40 expression in the nucleus accumbens only. Neither of these treatments affected CRP40 levels in the prefrontal cortex or medulla. In addition, pretreatment with the spin-trapping agent alpha-phenyl-tert-butylnitrone did not attenuate cocaine-induced expression of CRP40, suggesting that the observed increases in CRP40 levels were not caused by free radicals. On the other hand, pretreatment with anisomycin, a protein synthesis inhibitor, blocked the cocaine-induced expression of CRP40. Thus, protein synthesis may be involved in the observed CRP40 level increases. Furthermore, neither acute nor chronic cocaine treatment affected levels of inducible or constitutively expressed HSP70, which indicates a specificity of cocaine's effects on CRP40. Since cocaine has been shown to increase extracellular dopamine levels, these findings suggest that increased expression of CRP40 is associated with high extracellular levels of dopamine (or its metabolites). Elevated levels of CRP40 could play a protective role for dopamine neurons in response to increased oxidative stress that has been shown to be induced by cocaine and that can lead to apoptosis and neurodegeneration. PMID:12422371

  12. Secret Key Generation From Mobility

    CERN Document Server

    Gungor, Onur; Koksal, C Emre

    2011-01-01

    We consider secret key generation from relative localization information of a pair of nodes in a mobile wireless network in the presence of a mobile eavesdropper. Our scheme consists of two phases: in the first phase, legitimate node pair exchanges beacon signals to establish localization information based on noisy observations of these beacons; in the second phase, nodes generate secret key bits via a public discussion. Our problem can be categorized under the source models of information theoretic secrecy, where the distance between the legitimate nodes acts as the observed common randomness. We characterize the achievable secret key bit rate in terms of the observation noise variance at the legitimate nodes and the eavesdropper. This work provides a framework that combines information theoretic secrecy and wireless localization, and proves that the localization information provides a significant additional resource for secret key generation in mobile wireless networks.

  13. Effects of their nutrient precursors on the synthesis and release of serotonin, the catecholamines, and acetylcholine - Implications for behavioral disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wurtman, Richard J.

    1988-01-01

    Authentic foods affect brain serotonin synthesis by modifying brain tryptophan levels, carbohydrates increasing and proteins decreasing these levels. The carbohydrate-induced rise in brain serotonin tends to diminish the likelihood that one carbohydrate-rich, protein-poor meal or snack will be followed by another. This mechanism is apparently disturbed in carbohydrate-craving obesity, which may explain why this syndrome responds well to d-fenfluramine, a serotoninergic drug. Pure nutrients like tyrosine or choline can also affect the rates at which their neurotransmitter products, the catecholamines and acetylcholine, are synthesized in and released from nerve terminals, suggesting that these compounds may find uses as drugs.

  14. Alpha 2-adrenoceptor-mediated contractile response to catecholamines in smooth muscle strips isolated from rainbow trout stomach (Salmo gairdneri).

    OpenAIRE

    Kitazawa, T.; Kondo, H.; Temma, K.

    1986-01-01

    The type of adrenoceptor involved in the contractile response to catecholamines in smooth muscle strips isolated from rainbow trout stomach was determined. Noradrenaline (10 nM-10 microM) and adrenaline (10 nM-3 microM) caused non-sustained contractions which were markedly decreased by phentolamine (5.4 microM) but not by carteolol (5 microM). Phenylephrine (1 microM-1 mM) was less effective in causing muscle contraction and methoxamine produced no contraction. Clonidine (100 nM-300 microM) c...

  15. Embryonic Stem Cell Markers

    OpenAIRE

    Lan Ma; Liang Li; Wenxiu Zhao; Xiang Ji; Fangfang Zhang

    2012-01-01

    Embryonic stem cell (ESC) markers are molecules specifically expressed in ES cells. Understanding of the functions of these markers is critical for characterization and elucidation for the mechanism of ESC pluripotent maintenance and self-renewal, therefore helping to accelerate the clinical application of ES cells. Unfortunately, different cell types can share single or sometimes multiple markers; thus the main obstacle in the clinical application of ESC is to purify ES cells from other type...

  16. Stimulation of incretin secreting cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pais, Ramona; Gribble, Fiona M.; Reimann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are secreted from enteroendocrine cells in the gut and regulate physiological and homeostatic functions related to glucose control, metabolism and food intake. This review provides a systematic summary of the molecular mechanisms underlying secretion from incretin cells, and an understanding of how they sense and interact with lumen and vascular factors and the enteric nervous system t...

  17. Nonlinear secret image sharing scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Ho; Lee, Gil-Je; Yoo, Kee-Young

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, most of secret image sharing schemes have been proposed by using Shamir's technique. It is based on a linear combination polynomial arithmetic. Although Shamir's technique based secret image sharing schemes are efficient and scalable for various environments, there exists a security threat such as Tompa-Woll attack. Renvall and Ding proposed a new secret sharing technique based on nonlinear combination polynomial arithmetic in order to solve this threat. It is hard to apply to the secret image sharing. In this paper, we propose a (t, n)-threshold nonlinear secret image sharing scheme with steganography concept. In order to achieve a suitable and secure secret image sharing scheme, we adapt a modified LSB embedding technique with XOR Boolean algebra operation, define a new variable m, and change a range of prime p in sharing procedure. In order to evaluate efficiency and security of proposed scheme, we use the embedding capacity and PSNR. As a result of it, average value of PSNR and embedding capacity are 44.78 (dB) and 1.74t⌈log2 m⌉ bit-per-pixel (bpp), respectively.

  18. Nonlinear secret image sharing scheme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Sang-Ho; Lee, Gil-Je; Yoo, Kee-Young

    2014-01-01

    Over the past decade, most of secret image sharing schemes have been proposed by using Shamir's technique. It is based on a linear combination polynomial arithmetic. Although Shamir's technique based secret image sharing schemes are efficient and scalable for various environments, there exists a security threat such as Tompa-Woll attack. Renvall and Ding proposed a new secret sharing technique based on nonlinear combination polynomial arithmetic in order to solve this threat. It is hard to apply to the secret image sharing. In this paper, we propose a (t, n)-threshold nonlinear secret image sharing scheme with steganography concept. In order to achieve a suitable and secure secret image sharing scheme, we adapt a modified LSB embedding technique with XOR Boolean algebra operation, define a new variable m, and change a range of prime p in sharing procedure. In order to evaluate efficiency and security of proposed scheme, we use the embedding capacity and PSNR. As a result of it, average value of PSNR and embedding capacity are 44.78 (dB) and 1.74t⌈log2 m⌉ bit-per-pixel (bpp), respectively. PMID:25140334

  19. Security of audio secret sharing scheme encrypting audio secrets with bounded shares

    OpenAIRE

    鷲尾, 槙也; 渡邊, 曜大

    2014-01-01

    Secret sharing is a method of encrypting a secret into multiple pieces called shares so that only qualified sets of shares can be employed to reconstruct the secret. Audio secret sharing (ASS) is an example of secret sharing whose decryption can be performed by human ears. This paper examines the security of an audio secret sharing scheme encrypting audio secrets with bounded shares, and optimizes the security with respect to the probability distribution used in its encryption.

  20. Arginine-vasopressin in catecholamine-refractory septic versus non-septic shock in extremely low birth weight infants with acute renal injury

    OpenAIRE

    Meyer, Sascha; Gottschling, Sven; Baghai, Ali; Wurm, Donald; Gortner, Ludwig

    2006-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to assess the efficacy of arginine-vasopressin (AVP) as a rescue therapy in catecholamine-refractory septic and non-septic shock in extremely low birth weight (ELBW) infants with acute renal injury. Methods Prospective assessment of AVP therapy in three ELBW infants with catecholamine-refractory septic shock and acute renal injury (mean birth weight 600 ± 30 g) and three ELBW infants with non-septic shock and acute renal injury (mean birth weight 770 ± 1...

  1. Determination of catecholamines based on the measurement of the metal nanoparticle-enhanced fluorescence of their terbium complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a method for the determination of the three catecholamines (CAs) epinephrine (EP), norepinephrine (NE), and dopamine (DA) at sub-nanomolar levels. It is found that the luminescence of the complexes formed between the CAs and Tb 3+ ion is strongly enhanced in the presence of colloidal silver nanoparticles (Ag-NPs). The Ag-NPs cause a transfer of the resonance energy to the fluorophores through the interaction of the excited-state fluorophores and surface plasmon electrons in the Ag-NPs. Under the optimized condition, the luminescence intensity of the system is linearly related to the concentration of the CAs. Linearity is observed in the concentration ranges of 2. 5-110 nM for EP, 2. 8-240 nM for NE, and 2. 4-140 nM for DA, with limits of detection as low as 0. 25 nM, 0. 64 nM and 0. 42 nM, respectively. Relative standard deviations were determined at 10 nM concentrations (for n = 10) and gave values of 0. 98%, 1. 05% and 0. 96% for EP, NE and DA, respectively. Catecholamines were successfully determined in pharmaceutical preparations, and successful recovery experiments are demonstrated for urine and serum samples. (author)

  2. Inhibition of catecholamine degradation ameliorates while chemical sympathectomy aggravates the severity of acute Friend retrovirus infection in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bloemker, Dominique; Mollerus, Sina; Gibbert, Kathrin; Dittmer, Ulf; del Rey, Adriana; Schedlowski, Manfred; Engler, Harald

    2016-05-01

    Several lines of evidence indicate that the sympathetic nervous system (SNS) might be involved in the pathogenesis and progression of retroviral infections. However, experimental data are scarce and findings inconsistent. Here, we investigated the role of the SNS during acute infection with Friend virus (FV), a pathogenic murine retrovirus that causes polyclonal proliferation of erythroid precursor cells and splenomegaly in adult mice. Experimental animals were infected with FV complex, and viral load, spleen weight, and splenic noradrenaline (NA) concentration was analyzed until 25 days post infection. Results show that FV infection caused a massive but transient depletion in splenic NA during the acute phase of the disease. At the peak of the virus-induced splenomegaly, splenic NA concentration was reduced by about 90% compared to naïve uninfected mice. Concurrently, expression of the catecholamine degrading enzymes monoamine oxidase A (MAO-A) and catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) was significantly upregulated in immune cells of the spleen. Pharmacological inhibition of MAO-A and COMT by the selective inhibitors clorgyline and 3,5-dinitrocatechol, respectively, efficiently blocked NA degradation and significantly reduced viral load and virus-induced splenomegaly. In contrast, chemical sympathectomy prior to FV inoculation aggravated the acute infection and extended the duration of the disease. Together these findings demonstrate that catecholamine availability at the site of viral replication is an important factor affecting the course of retroviral infections. PMID:26880342

  3. Effects of chronic sleep deprivation on autonomic activity by examining heart rate variability, plasma catecholamine, and intracellular magnesium levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takase, Bonpei; Akima, Takashi; Satomura, Kimio; Ohsuzu, Fumitaka; Mastui, Takemi; Ishihara, Masayuki; Kurita, Akira

    2004-10-01

    Chronic sleep deprivation is associated with cardiovascular events. In addition, autonomic activity determined from the levels of the heart rate variability (HRV), plasma catecholamine, and intracellular magnesium (Mg) are important in the pathophysiology of cardiovascular events. This study therefore aimed to determine the effects of chronic sleep deprivation on autonomic activity by examining the HRV, plasma catecholamine, and intracellular magnesium levels. Thirty (30) healthy male college students ranging in age from 20 to 24 years of age (average 22 +/- 1 years; mean +/- SD) with no coronary risk factors such as hypertension, diabetes mellitus, hyperlipidemia or a family history of premature coronary artery disease (CAD) were included in the study. Over a 4-week period, the volunteers' plasma levels of epinephrine, norepinephrine, and erythrocyte-Mg were measured. The study was made during the 4 weeks before and immediately after college finals exams. HRV, obtained from 24-hour ambulatory ECG monitoring, included time and frequency domain indices. The HRV indices and erythrocyte-Mg decreased while norepinephrine increased during chronic sleep deprivation. It is concluded that chronic sleep deprivation causes an autonomic imbalance and decreases intracellular Mg, which could be associated with chronic sleep deprivation-induced cardiovascular events. PMID:15754837

  4. Alterations in catecholamine turnover in specific regions of the rat brain following acute exposure to nitrous oxide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karuri, A R; Kugel, G; Engelking, L R; Kumar, M S

    1998-04-01

    The effects of nitrous oxide (N2O) on steady-state concentrations and turnover rates of catecholamines in the olfactory bulb, hypothalamus, brain stem, hippocampus, striatum, thalamus, cerebral cortex, and spinal cord were determined in rats. Animals were exposed for 2 h to either 60% N2O or air. Immediately following exposure, all animals were injected intraperitoneally with alpha-methylparatyrosine (alphaMPT), a competitive inhibitor of tyrosine hydroxylase, and sacrificed at 0, 30, or 90 min postinjection. Brain catecholamine concentrations were determined using high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with electrochemical detection (HPLC-EC). Results indicate that N2O exposure significantly elevates steady-state concentrations of norepinephrine (NE) in the hypothalamus and striatum yet decreases amine levels in the brain stem region. Steady-state levels of dopamine (DA) were not significantly altered in any region of the CNS by N2O exposure. Acute exposure to N2O also resulted in significant decreases in the turnover rate of NE in the brain stem, yet it increased turnover of this amine in the olfactory bulb, hypothalamus, and striatum. Acute exposure to N2O resulted in a decreased turnover rate of DA in the hippocampus and striatum. In contrast, N2O appears to increase DA turnover in the olfactory bulb. These results indicate that acute exposure to N2O in rats causes region-specific alterations in steady-state levels and turnover rates of DA and NE within the central nervous system.

  5. EPR studies of chromium(V) intermediates generated via reduction of chromium(VI) by DOPA and related catecholamines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pattison, D I; Lay, P A; Davies, Michael Jonathan

    2000-01-01

    previously but have been reassigned as octahedral Cr(V) species with mixed catechol-derived ligands, [CrV(semiquinone)2(catecholate)]+. Experiments with excess K2Cr2O7 show complex behavior with the catecholamines and TBC. Several weak Cr(V) signals are detected after mixing, and the spectra evolve over time.......969, but the species responsible for this signal was not identified. Several other minor Cr signals are detected, which are attributed (by comparison with isoelectronic V(IV) species) to Cr(V) complexes coordinated by a single catecholamine ligand (and auxiliary ligands e.g. H2O), or to [Cr(O)L2]- (L = diolato......) species with a sixth ligand (e.g. H2O). Addition of catalase or deoxygenation of the solutions did not affect the main EPR signals. When the substrates were in excess (pH > 4.5), primary and secondary (cyclized) semiquinones were also detected. Semiquinone stabilization by Zn(II) complexation yielded...

  6. Thyroid hormones and renin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, W F

    Circulating angiotensin is produced by the action of renin from the kidneys on circulating angiotensinogen. There are other renin-angiotensin systems in various organs in the body, and recent observations raise the intriguing possibility that angiotensin II is produced by a totally intracellular pathway in the juxtaglomerular cells, the gonadotrops of the anterior pituitary, neurons, in the brain, salivary duct cells, and neuroblastoma cells. Circulating angiotensin II levels depend in large part on the plasma concentration of angiotensinogen, which is hormonally regulated, and on the rate of renin secretion. Renin secretion is regulated by an intrarenal baroreceptor mechanism, a macula densa mechanism, angiotensin II, vasopressin, and the sympathetic nervous system. The increase in renin secretion produced by sympathetic discharge is mediated for the most part by beta-adrenergic receptors, which are probably located on the juxtaglomerular cells. Hyperthyroidism would be expected to be associated with increased renin secretion in view of the increased beta-adrenergic activity in this condition, and hypothyroidism would be associated with decreased plasma renin activity due to decreased beta-adrenergic activity. Our recent research on serotonin-mediated increases in renin secretion that depend on the integrity of the dorsal raphe nucleus and the mediobasal hypothalamus has led us to investigate the effect of the pituitary on the renin response to p-chloroamphetamine. The response is potentiated immediately after hypophysectomy, but 22 days after the operation, it is abolished. This slowly developing decrease in responsiveness may be due to decreased thyroid function.

  7. Proximal tubular secretion of creatinine by organic cation transporter OCT2 in cancer patients

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    G. Ciarimboli (Giuliano); C.S. Lancaster (Cynthia); E. Schlatter (Eberhard); R.M. Franke (Ryan); J.A. Sprowl (Jason); H. Pavenstädt (Hermann); V. Massmann (Vivian); D. Guckel (Denise); A.H.J. Mathijssen (Ron); W. Yang (Wenjian); C.H. Pui (Ching-Hon); M.V. Relling (Mary); E. Herrmann (Eva); A. Sparreboom (Alex)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractPurpose: Knowledge of transporters responsible for the renal secretion of creatinine is key to a proper interpretation of serum creatinine and/or creatinine clearance as markers of renal function in cancer patients receiving chemotherapeutic agents. Experimental Design: Creatinine transp

  8. Impact of protein uptake and degradation on recombinant protein secretion in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tyo, Keith E. J.; Liu, Zihe; Magnusson, Ylva;

    2014-01-01

    and transcriptomics, we identify metabolic and regulatory markers that are consistent with uptake of whole proteins by endocytosis, followed by intracellular degradation and catabolism of substituent amino acids. Uptake and degradation of recombinant protein products may be common in S. cerevisiae protein secretion...

  9. Embryonic Stem Cell Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lan Ma

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Embryonic stem cell (ESC markers are molecules specifically expressed in ES cells. Understanding of the functions of these markers is critical for characterization and elucidation for the mechanism of ESC pluripotent maintenance and self-renewal, therefore helping to accelerate the clinical application of ES cells. Unfortunately, different cell types can share single or sometimes multiple markers; thus the main obstacle in the clinical application of ESC is to purify ES cells from other types of cells, especially tumor cells. Currently, the marker-based flow cytometry (FCM technique and magnetic cell sorting (MACS are the most effective cell isolating methods, and a detailed maker list will help to initially identify, as well as isolate ESCs using these methods. In the current review, we discuss a wide range of cell surface and generic molecular markers that are indicative of the undifferentiated ESCs. Other types of molecules, such as lectins and peptides, which bind to ESC via affinity and specificity, are also summarized. In addition, we review several markers that overlap with tumor stem cells (TSCs, which suggest that uncertainty still exists regarding the benefits of using these markers alone or in various combinations when identifying and isolating cells.

  10. On family secrets and -K.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Orgad, Yariv

    2014-08-01

    In this paper I present a novel interpretation of family secrets. Leaning on Bion's concept of -K, the constitution of secrecy is interpreted in terms of family dynamics that actively prevent knowledge formation and mental growth. Family secrets are interpreted as a destructive process that attacks the family's truth-generating-space - the shared semiotic space within which meanings are constituted through family relationships. The paper explores the microstructure interpersonal process of -K through the analysis of Mike Leigh's movie, Secrets and Lies. Two scenes in the movie are used to demonstrate how -K is worked out in the form of a specific intersubjective semiotic endeavor that unconsciously blocks the process of meaning-making. PMID:24902493

  11. Extracellular vesicles secreted from cancer cell lines stimulate secretion of MMP-9, IL-6, TGF-β1 and EMMPRIN.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redzic, Jasmina S; Kendrick, Agnieszka A; Bahmed, Karim; Dahl, Kristin D; Pearson, Chad G; Robinson, William A; Robinson, Steven E; Graner, Michael W; Eisenmesser, Elan Z

    2013-01-01

    Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are key contributors to cancer where they play an integral role in cell-cell communication and transfer pro-oncogenic molecules to recipient cells thereby conferring a cancerous phenotype. Here, we purified EVs using straightforward biochemical approaches from multiple cancer cell lines and subsequently characterized these EVs via multiple biochemical and biophysical methods. In addition, we used fluorescence microscopy to directly show internalization of EVs into the recipient cells within a few minutes upon addition of EVs to recipient cells. We confirmed that the transmembrane protein EMMPRIN, postulated to be a marker of EVs, was indeed secreted from all cell lines studied here. We evaluated the response to EV stimulation in several different types of recipient cells lines and measured the ability of these purified EVs to induce secretion of several factors highly upregulated in human cancers. Our data indicate that purified EVs preferentially stimulate secretion of several proteins implicated in driving cancer in monocytic cells but only harbor limited activity in epithelial cells. Specifically, we show that EVs are potent stimulators of MMP-9, IL-6, TGF-β1 and induce the secretion of extracellular EMMPRIN, which all play a role in driving immune evasion, invasion and inflammation in the tumor microenvironment. Thus, by using a comprehensive approach that includes biochemical, biological, and spectroscopic methods, we have begun to elucidate the stimulatory roles.

  12. Extracellular vesicles secreted from cancer cell lines stimulate secretion of MMP-9, IL-6, TGF-β1 and EMMPRIN.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jasmina S Redzic

    Full Text Available Extracellular vesicles (EVs are key contributors to cancer where they play an integral role in cell-cell communication and transfer pro-oncogenic molecules to recipient cells thereby conferring a cancerous phenotype. Here, we purified EVs using straightforward biochemical approaches from multiple cancer cell lines and subsequently characterized these EVs via multiple biochemical and biophysical methods. In addition, we used fluorescence microscopy to directly show internalization of EVs into the recipient cells within a few minutes upon addition of EVs to recipient cells. We confirmed that the transmembrane protein EMMPRIN, postulated to be a marker of EVs, was indeed secreted from all cell lines studied here. We evaluated the response to EV stimulation in several different types of recipient cells lines and measured the ability of these purified EVs to induce secretion of several factors highly upregulated in human cancers. Our data indicate that purified EVs preferentially stimulate secretion of several proteins implicated in driving cancer in monocytic cells but only harbor limited activity in epithelial cells. Specifically, we show that EVs are potent stimulators of MMP-9, IL-6, TGF-β1 and induce the secretion of extracellular EMMPRIN, which all play a role in driving immune evasion, invasion and inflammation in the tumor microenvironment. Thus, by using a comprehensive approach that includes biochemical, biological, and spectroscopic methods, we have begun to elucidate the stimulatory roles.

  13. Impaired follistatin secretion in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rinnov, Anders Rasmussen; Plomgaard, Peter; Pedersen, Bente Klarlund;

    2016-01-01

    compared to healthy control participants. DESIGN, SETTING, PARTICIPANTS: To experimentally increase the glucagon-insulin ratio (mimicking the hormonal effect of exercise), we infused glucagon / somatostatin (to inhibit insulin secretion) and compared the acute follistatin increase in eight male cirrhosis...... compared to healthy controls (27.6 ± 3.8 % versus 34.5 ± 2.9 %, respectively; p = 0.001). CONCLUSIONS: Patients with cirrhosis show impaired capacity to acutely secrete follistatin. The decrease in acute follistatin release may contribute to loss of muscle mass in liver cirrhosis....

  14. Histaminergic regulation of prolactin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knigge, U P

    1990-01-01

    Histamine (HA), which acts as a neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, participates in the neuroendocrine regulation of prolactin (PRL) secretion. HA has a predominant stimulatory effect which is mediated via H2-receptors following central administration and via H1-receptors following......, while the PRL-inhibitory effect of HA may involve other transmitters than DA. In contrast to its stimulatory effect in men, HA had no effect on basal PRL secretion in women, but enhanced the PRL response to TRH. In rats or in humans the PRL stimulatory effect of HA is not caused by the cardiovascular...

  15. Secrets and Disclosures: How Young Children Handle Secrets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anagnostaki, Lida; Wright, Michael J.; Papathanasiou, Athanasia

    2013-01-01

    The authors examined the influence of content and verbal cues on young children's understanding of secret information and of its disclosure. Participants were 209 5- and 6-year-old children in an experiment where a puppet, named Zinc, was the protagonist. Children were asked to whom Zinc would disclose a list of pieces of information, some of…

  16. Is There a Correlation between Vitamin C Status and Catecholamines Concentrations in Hemodialysis Patients?

    OpenAIRE

    Coquet, Isaline; Doise, Jean-Marc; Guilland, Jean-Claude; Vergely, Catherine; Mousson, Christiane; Rochette, Luc

    2008-01-01

    It is well established that there is a high incidence of cardiovascular diseases in hemodialysis patients, and involvement of oxidative stress has been hypothesised in these phenomena. Plasma norepinephrine is an independent predictor of many causes of mortality in general, and high norepinephrine levels predict cardiovascular complications in end stage renal disease. The aim of our study was to evaluate the potential link between vitamin C status, a marker of oxidative stress, and catecholam...

  17. Proteomic mapping of secreted proteins of Trichoderma spp.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li S; Bramley P M; Smith J; Cannon P F

    2004-01-01

    @@ A series of highly taxonomically diverse Trichoderma strains were investigated using proteomic approaches, to investigate the utility of protein profiles as taxonomic markers and to identify proteins of potential economic importance. Initial studies have focused on a comparison of single strains of T.aureoviride, T. saturnisporum, T. polysporum, T. longbrachiatum and T. spirale, along with two strains of T. harzianum. All seven strains were grown in synthetic medium supplemented with 2 % (w/v) glycerol, to maximize the diversity of extracellular protein production. Samples of secreted protein were separated by 2D gel electrophoresis and will be characterized by MALDI-TOF peptide fingerprinting.

  18. Effects of space flight conditions on the function of the immune system and catecholamine production simulated in a rodent model of hindlimb unloading

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aviles, Hernan; Belay, Tesfaye; Vance, Monique; Sonnenfeld, Gerald

    2005-01-01

    The rodent model of hindlimb unloading has been successfully used to simulate some of the effects of space flight conditions. Previous studies have indicated that mice exposed to hindlimb-unloading conditions have decreased resistance to infections compared to restrained and normally housed control mice. OBJECTIVE: The purpose of this study was to clarify the mechanisms involved in resistance to infection in this model by examining the effects of hindlimb unloading on the function of the immune system and its impact on the production of catecholamines. METHODS: Female Swiss Webster mice were hindlimb-unloaded during 48 h and the function of the immune system was assessed in spleen and peritoneal cells immediately after this period. In addition, the kinetics of catecholamine production was measured throughout the hindlimb-unloading period. RESULTS: The function of the immune system was significantly suppressed in the hindlimb-unloaded group compared to restrained and normally housed control mice. Levels of catecholamines were increased in the hindlimb-unloaded group and peaked at 12 h following the commencement of unloading. CONCLUSION: These results suggest that physiological responses of mice are altered early after hindlimb unloading and that catecholamines may play a critical role in the modulation of the immune system. These changes may affect the ability of mice to resist infections. Copyright (c) 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  19. Effects of low-sodium diet vs. high-sodium diet on blood pressure, renin, aldosterone, catecholamines, cholesterol, and triglyceride (Cochrane Review)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Graudal, Niels A; Hubeck-Graudal, Thorbjørn; Jürgens, Gesche

    2012-01-01

    The question of whether reduced sodium intake is effective as a health prophylaxis initiative is unsolved. The purpose was to estimate the effects of low-sodium vs. high-sodium intake on blood pressure (BP), renin, aldosterone, catecholamines, and lipids....

  20. Effect of catecholamine-receptor stimulating agents on blood pressure after local application in the nucleus tractus solitarii of the medulla oblongata

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zandberg, P.; Jong, Wybren de; Wied, D. de

    1979-01-01

    The effect of various catecholamines and α-mimetics, given by microinjection in the A2-region of the nucleus tractus solitarii (NTS), on blood pressure was investigated in anesthetizedmale rats. A dose-dependent decrease of blood pressure and heart rate was induced by adrenaline as the most effectiv

  1. FOIA: What's a Trade Secret?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hawker, Curtis

    The Freedom of Information Act (FOIA) was amended in 1974 in order to restrict government control and to facilitate the public's access to information. However, part of the FOIA bans federal officials from disclosing "trade secrets" and commercial or financial information obtained in confidential circumstances. This exemption has resulted in a…

  2. The secret of the universe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asimov, I.

    The author turns his attention to such questions as: How near is the nearest star? How heavy is the Sun? How does the Doppler effect work? and countless others. In addition, he provides an explanation of how mankind first became engaged in business and commerce, and advances his own unique theory on the secret of the universe.

  3. Raspberry Pi for secret agents

    CERN Document Server

    Sjogelid, Stefan

    2015-01-01

    This book is an easy-to-follow guide with practical examples in each chapter. Suitable for the novice and expert alike, each topic provides a fast and easy way to get started with exciting applications and also guides you through setting up the Raspberry Pi as a secret agent toolbox.

  4. A potential benefit of albinism in Astyanax cavefish: downregulation of the oca2 gene increases tyrosine and catecholamine levels as an alternative to melanin synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilandžija, Helena; Ma, Li; Parkhurst, Amy; Jeffery, William R

    2013-01-01

    Albinism, the loss of melanin pigmentation, has evolved in a diverse variety of cave animals but the responsible evolutionary mechanisms are unknown. In Astyanax mexicanus, which has a pigmented surface dwelling form (surface fish) and several albino cave-dwelling forms (cavefish), albinism is caused by loss of function mutations in the oca2 gene, which operates during the first step of the melanin synthesis pathway. In addition to albinism, cavefish have evolved differences in behavior, including feeding and sleep, which are under the control of the catecholamine system. The catecholamine and melanin synthesis pathways diverge after beginning with the same substrate, L-tyrosine. Here we describe a novel relationship between the catecholamine and melanin synthesis pathways in Astyanax. Our results show significant increases in L-tyrosine, dopamine, and norepinephrine in pre-feeding larvae and adult brains of Pachón cavefish relative to surface fish. In addition, norepinephrine is elevated in cavefish adult kidneys, which contain the teleost homologs of catecholamine synthesizing adrenal cells. We further show that the oca2 gene is expressed during surface fish development but is downregulated in cavefish embryos. A key finding is that knockdown of oca2 expression in surface fish embryos delays the development of pigmented melanophores and simultaneously increases L-tyrosine and dopamine. We conclude that a potential evolutionary benefit of albinism in Astyanax cavefish may be to provide surplus L-tyrosine as a precursor for the elevated catecholamine synthesis pathway, which could be important for adaptation to the challenging cave environment.

  5. A potential benefit of albinism in Astyanax cavefish: downregulation of the oca2 gene increases tyrosine and catecholamine levels as an alternative to melanin synthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helena Bilandžija

    Full Text Available Albinism, the loss of melanin pigmentation, has evolved in a diverse variety of cave animals but the responsible evolutionary mechanisms are unknown. In Astyanax mexicanus, which has a pigmented surface dwelling form (surface fish and several albino cave-dwelling forms (cavefish, albinism is caused by loss of function mutations in the oca2 gene, which operates during the first step of the melanin synthesis pathway. In addition to albinism, cavefish have evolved differences in behavior, including feeding and sleep, which are under the control of the catecholamine system. The catecholamine and melanin synthesis pathways diverge after beginning with the same substrate, L-tyrosine. Here we describe a novel relationship between the catecholamine and melanin synthesis pathways in Astyanax. Our results show significant increases in L-tyrosine, dopamine, and norepinephrine in pre-feeding larvae and adult brains of Pachón cavefish relative to surface fish. In addition, norepinephrine is elevated in cavefish adult kidneys, which contain the teleost homologs of catecholamine synthesizing adrenal cells. We further show that the oca2 gene is expressed during surface fish development but is downregulated in cavefish embryos. A key finding is that knockdown of oca2 expression in surface fish embryos delays the development of pigmented melanophores and simultaneously increases L-tyrosine and dopamine. We conclude that a potential evolutionary benefit of albinism in Astyanax cavefish may be to provide surplus L-tyrosine as a precursor for the elevated catecholamine synthesis pathway, which could be important for adaptation to the challenging cave environment.

  6. Wnt Secretion and Gradient Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir L. Katanaev

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Concentration gradients formed by the lipid-modified morphogens of the Wnt family are known for their pivotal roles during embryogenesis and adult tissue homeostasis. Wnt morphogens are also implicated in a variety of human diseases, especially cancer. Therefore, the signaling cascades triggered by Wnts have received considerable attention during recent decades. However, how Wnts are secreted and how concentration gradients are formed remains poorly understood. The use of model organisms such as Drosophila melanogaster has provided important advances in this area. For instance, we have previously shown that the lipid raft-associated reggie/flotillin proteins influence Wnt secretion and spreading in Drosophila. Our work supports the notion that producing cells secrete Wnt molecules in at least two pools: a poorly diffusible one and a reggie/flotillin-dependent highly diffusible pool which allows morphogen spreading over long distances away from its source of production. Here we revise the current views of Wnt secretion and spreading, and propose two models for the role of the reggie/flotillin proteins in these processes: (i reggies/flotillins regulate the basolateral endocytosis of the poorly diffusible, membrane-bound Wnt pool, which is then sorted and secreted to apical compartments for long-range diffusion, and (ii lipid rafts organized by reggies/flotillins serve as “dating points” where extracellular Wnt transiently interacts with lipoprotein receptors to allow its capture and further spreading via lipoprotein particles. We further discuss these processes in the context of human breast cancer. A better understanding of these phenomena may be relevant for identification of novel drug targets and therapeutic strategies.

  7. Secretion of immunoregulatory cytokines by mesenchymal stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dobroslav; Kyurkchiev; Ivan; Bochev; Ekaterina; Ivanova-Todorova; Milena; Mourdjeva; Tsvetelina; Oreshkova; Kalina; Belemezova; Stanimir; Kyurkchiev

    2014-01-01

    According to the minimal criteria of the International Society of Cellular Therapy, mesenchymal stem cells(MSCs) are a population of undifferentiated cells defined by their ability to adhere to plastic surfaces when cultured under standard conditions, express a certain panel of phenotypic markers and can differentiate into osteogenic, chondrogenic and adipogenic lineages when cultured in specific inducing media. In parallel with their major role as undifferentiated cell reserves, MSCs have immunomodulatory functions which are exerted by direct cell-to-cell contacts, secretion of cytokines and/or by a combination of both mechanisms. There are no convincing data about a principal difference in the profile of cytokines secreted by MSCs isolated from different tissue sources, although some papers report some quantitative but not qualitative differences in cytokine secretion. The present review focuses on the basic cytokines secreted by MSCs as described in the literature by which the MSCs exert immunodulatory effects. It should be pointed out that MSCs themselves are objects of cytokine regulation. Hypothetical mechanisms by which the MSCs exert their immunoregulatory effects are also discussed in this review. These mechanisms may either influence the target immune cells directly or indirectly by affecting the activities of predominantly dendritic cells. Chemokines are also discussed as participants in this process by recruiting cells of the immune systems and thus making them targets of immunosuppression. This review aims to present and discuss the published data and the personal experience of the authors regarding cytokines secreted by MSCs and their effects on the cells of the immune system.

  8. Effect of oral propranolol administration on azygos, renal and hepatic uptake and output of catecholamines in cirrhosis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bendtsen, Flemming; Christensen, N J; Sørensen, T I;

    1991-01-01

    Circulating catecholamines are increased in cirrhosis with portal hypertension, and increase further after propranolol. In 23 cirrhotic patients, plasma norepinephrine and epinephrine were determined in an artery, the azygos vein, the right renal vein and a hepatic vein before and after an oral 80......-mg dose of propranolol. Baseline azygos and renal venous norepinephrine levels were significantly higher than arterial norepinephrine levels (+20%, p less than 0.005; and +28%, p less than 0.001, respectively). Hepatic venous norepinephrine and all venous epinephrine values were below the arterial...... values (all p less than 0.05). After propranolol intake, arterial norepinephrine and epinephrine increased (+16%, p less than 0.01; and +93%, p less than 0.001, respectively). Significant increases in norepinephrine and epinephrine were found in azygos and renal veins (all p less than 0.01), whereas...

  9. Effects of pantethine, cysteamine and pantothenic acid on open-field behavior and brain catecholamines in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vécsei, L; Widerlöv, E; Alling, C

    1989-01-01

    Cysteamine (1.95 mM/kg) markedly decreased the locomotor, rearing and grooming activities, as well as the number of defecation boluses in an open-field test. An equimolar dose of pantethine reduced the locomotor activity to a lesser extent, but has the same potency in decreasing the number of defecation boluses, whereas pantothenic acid did not affect the behavior of the rats. Cysteamine, and to a lesser extent pantethine, reduced the noradrenaline and increased the dopamine and DOPAC concentrations in the hypothalamus. Pantothenic acid itself did not influence the hypothalamic catecholamine concentrations. These results suggest that the lower efficacy of pantethine compared to cysteamine on both behavioral and neurochemical parameters is probably due to a rate-limiting activity of the enzyme pantetheinase in the conversion of pantetheine to cysteamine. PMID:2619420

  10. CARDIAC RISK STRATIFICATION IN PATIENTS WITH CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE: A CATECHOLAMINES-β- ADRENOCEPTOR-cAMP PATHWAY

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-xin Peng; Jiang Shan; Su-jun Zhang; Chun-li Rong; Jun-ping Li; Na Wang; Hao Xue; Shi-ling Zheng; Min Wu

    2005-01-01

    Objective To investigate the stratification risk of catecholamines-β-adrenoceptor (β-AR)-cAMP pathway for cardiogenic death events in patients with congestive heart failure (CHF).Methods A total of 83 identified CHF patients with a baseline and follow-up plasma levels of norepinephrine (NE)and epinephrine (E), lymphocytes β-AR density (Bmax), and intralymphocyte cAMP content in peripheral blood were followed up. Major cardiogenic death events were registered.Results The period between the initial entry and the last follow-up measurement were 51± 16 months, the total duration of clinical follow-up after the last measurement were 14±8 months. During follow-up, 39 patients died of cardiogenic (sudden death 17 patients, worsening heart failure 22 patients). Persistence of high NE, E, and cAMP from baseline to follow-up were confirmed as risk predicting factors of cardiovascular events. Persistence NE above 4.0 nmol/L, E above adverse prognostic predictors. The major cardiogenic death events rates per 100 patients-years were 1.33 and 4.82 in patients with NE below and above 4.0 nmol/L (HR: 2.91; 95% CI: 1.08-7.33; P = 0.015); were 1.42 and 4.36 in the patients with E levels below and above 3.5 nmol/L (HR: 2.64; 95% CI: 1.02-6.41; P = 0.019); were 1.81 and 4.67 in the 0.017), but difference was not significant between the β-AR density below and above median.Conclusions Persistent increase in circulating catecholamines and intralymphocyte cAMP content may increase the long-term mortality in CHF patients.

  11. A putative morphological substrate of the catecholamine-influenced neuropeptide Y (NPY) release in the human hypothalamus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ko, Laam; Rotoli, Giorgio; Grignol, George; Hu, Walter; Merchenthaler, Istvan; Dudas, Bertalan

    2011-06-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is a 36 amino acid peptide, which among others, plays a pivotal role in stress response. Although previous studies confirmed that NPY release is increased by stress in several species, the exact mechanism of the stress-induced NPY release has not been elucidated yet. In the present study, we examined, with morphological means, the possibility that catecholamines directly influence NPY release in the human hypothalamus. Since the use of electron microscopic techniques is virtually impossible in immunostained human samples due to the long post mortem time, double-label immunohistochemistry was utilised in order to reveal the putative catecholaminergic-NPY associations. The present study is the first to demonstrate juxtapositions between the catecholaminergic, tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)/dopamine-beta hydroxylase (DBH)-immunoreactive (IR) and NPY-IR neural elements in the human hypothalamus. These en passant type associations are most numerous in the infundibular and periventricular areas of the human diencephalon. Here, NPY-IR neurons often form several contacts with catecholaminergic fibre varicosities, without any observable gaps between the contacting elements, suggesting that these juxtapositions may represent functional synapses. The lack of phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT)-NPY juxtapositions and the relatively few observed DBH-NPY associations suggest that the vast majority of the observed TH-NPY juxtapositions represent dopaminergic synapses. Since catecholamines are known to be the crucial components of the stress response, the presence of direct, catecholaminergic (primarily dopaminergic)-NPY-IR synapses may explain the increased NPY release during stress. The released NPY in turn is believed to play an active role in the responses that are directed to maintain the homeostasis during stressful conditions.

  12. Changes in serum prolactin and corticosterone and pituitary prolactin and hypothalamic catecholamines in response to immobilization stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palazzolo, D.L.; Quadri, S.K.

    1986-03-01

    Effects of immobilization on serum prolactin (PRL) and corticosterone and on pituitary prolactin and hypothalamic catecholamines were determined in adult male Sprague-Dawley rats. The rats were immobilized for 0, 0.25, 0.5, 1, 3, or 6 hrs before decapitation at 1600 hrs. The hormones were determined by radioimmunoassays and catecholamines by high performance liquid chromatography. Immobilization for 15 min raised serum PRL from 13.1 +/- 2.6 ng/ml to 44.5 +/- 8.2 ng/ml. PRL levels returned to preimmobilization levels by 30 min and declined to 6.5 +/- 0.8 ng/ml by 6 hr (P < 0.05). Pituitary PRL concentrations decreased from 39.8 +/- 5.3 ug/pituitary at 0 hr to 27.2 +/- 2.2 ug/pituitary at 6 hr, indicating that continued stress causes a decrease in the synthesis and release of PRL. Serum corticosterone levels increased from 60.8 +/- 11.4 ng/ml at 0 hr to 198.5 +/- 42.7 ng/ml at 0.5 hr, then declined to 110.2 +/- 15.4 ng/ml by 6 hr indicating that, unlike PRL, high corticosterone levels are sustained during 6 hrs of stress. The hypothalamic concentrations (ng/mg tissue) of dopamine and norepinephrine declined from 0.72 +/- 0.13 and 3.2 + 0.2 at 0 hr to 0.28 +/- 0.08 and 1.2 +/- 0.3 respectively (P < 0.05) at 6 hr, most probably indicating an increased release of dopamine in the portal vessels which in turn led to the decrease in the synthesis and release of PRL.

  13. Tumour markers in urology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The same applies essentially also for the bladder carcinomas: There is no reliable marker for these cancers which would be useful for clinical purposes. TPA has proven to be too non-specific in malignoma-detection and therefore hardly facilitates clinical decision-making in individual cases. The CEA is not sensitive enough to be recommendable for routine application. However, in advanced stages a CEA examination may be useful if applied within the scope of therapeutic efforts made to evaluate efficacy. In cases of carcinomas of the prostate the sour prostate-specific phosphatase (SPP) and, more recently, especially the prostate-specific antigen (PSA) have proven in follow-up and therapy monitoring, whereby the PSA is superior to the SPP. Nevertheless, both these markers should be employed in therapy monitoring because differences in behaviour will be observed when the desired treatment effect is only achieved in one of the two markers producing tumour cell clonuses. Both markers, but especially the PSA, are quite reliably in agreement with the result of the introduced chemo-/hormone therapy, whereby an increase may be a sure indicator of relapse several months previous to clinical symptoms, imaging procedures, so-called routine laboratory results and subjective complaints. However, none of the 2 markers is appropriate for the purposes of screening or early diagnosis of carcinomas of the prostate. (orig.)

  14. Some Economics of Trade Secret Law

    OpenAIRE

    Friedman, David D; William M. Landes; Posner, Richard A

    1991-01-01

    Despite the practical importance of trade secrets to the business community, the law of trade secrets is a neglected orphan in economic analysis. This paper sketches an approach to the economics of trade secret law that connects it more closely both to other areas of intellectual property and to broader issues in the positive economic theory of the common law.

  15. Stimulation of incretin secreting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pais, Ramona; Gribble, Fiona M; Reimann, Frank

    2016-02-01

    The incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are secreted from enteroendocrine cells in the gut and regulate physiological and homeostatic functions related to glucose control, metabolism and food intake. This review provides a systematic summary of the molecular mechanisms underlying secretion from incretin cells, and an understanding of how they sense and interact with lumen and vascular factors and the enteric nervous system through transporters and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) present on their surface to ultimately culminate in hormone release. Some of the molecules described below such as sodium coupled glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1), G-protein coupled receptor (GPR) 119 and GPR40 are targets of novel therapeutics designed to enhance endogenous gut hormone release. Synthetic ligands at these receptors aimed at treating obesity and type 2 diabetes are currently under investigation. PMID:26885360

  16. Stimulation of incretin secreting cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pais, Ramona; Gribble, Fiona M.; Reimann, Frank

    2016-01-01

    The incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are secreted from enteroendocrine cells in the gut and regulate physiological and homeostatic functions related to glucose control, metabolism and food intake. This review provides a systematic summary of the molecular mechanisms underlying secretion from incretin cells, and an understanding of how they sense and interact with lumen and vascular factors and the enteric nervous system through transporters and G-protein coupled receptors (GPCRs) present on their surface to ultimately culminate in hormone release. Some of the molecules described below such as sodium coupled glucose transporter 1 (SGLT1), G-protein coupled receptor (GPR) 119 and GPR40 are targets of novel therapeutics designed to enhance endogenous gut hormone release. Synthetic ligands at these receptors aimed at treating obesity and type 2 diabetes are currently under investigation. PMID:26885360

  17. Electronic enhancement of tear secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brinton, Mark; Lim Chung, Jae; Kossler, Andrea; Kook, Koung Hoon; Loudin, Jim; Franke, Manfred; Palanker, Daniel

    2016-02-01

    Objective. To study electrical stimulation of the lacrimal gland and afferent nerves for enhanced tear secretion, as a potential treatment for dry eye disease. We investigate the response pathways and electrical parameters to safely maximize tear secretion. Approach. We evaluated the tear response to electrical stimulation of the lacrimal gland and afferent nerves in isofluorane-anesthetized rabbits. In acute studies, electrical stimulation was performed using bipolar platinum foil electrodes, implanted beneath the inferior lacrimal gland, and a monopolar electrode placed near the afferent ethmoid nerve. Wireless microstimulators with bipolar electrodes were implanted beneath the lacrimal gland for chronic studies. To identify the response pathways, we applied various pharmacological inhibitors. To optimize the stimulus, we measured tear secretion rate (Schirmer test) as a function of pulse amplitude (1.5-12 mA), duration (0.1-1 ms) and repetition rate (10-100 Hz). Main results. Stimulation of the lacrimal gland increased tear secretion by engaging efferent parasympathetic nerves. Tearing increased with stimulation amplitude, pulse duration and repetition rate, up to 70 Hz. Stimulation with 3 mA, 500 μs pulses at 70 Hz provided a 4.5 mm (125%) increase in Schirmer score. Modulating duty cycle further increased tearing up to 57%, compared to continuous stimulation in chronically implanted animals (36%). Ethmoid (afferent) nerve stimulation increased tearing similar to gland stimulation (3.6 mm) via a reflex pathway. In animals with chronically implanted stimulators, a nearly 6 mm increase (57%) was achieved with 12-fold less charge density per pulse (0.06-0.3 μC mm-2 with 170-680 μs pulses) than the damage threshold (3.5 μC mm-2 with 1 ms pulses). Significance. Electrical stimulation of the lacrimal gland or afferent nerves may be used as a treatment for dry eye disease. Clinical trials should validate this approach in patients with aqueous tear deficiency, and

  18. Unconventional secretion by autophagosome exocytosis

    OpenAIRE

    Pfeffer, Suzanne R

    2010-01-01

    In this issue, Duran et al. (2010. J. Cell Biol. doi: 10.1083/jcb.200911154) and Manjithaya et al. (2010. J. Cell Biol. doi: 10.1083/jcb.200911149) use yeast genetics to reveal a role for autophagosome intermediates in the unconventional secretion of an acyl coenzyme A (CoA)–binding protein that lacks an endoplasmic reticulum signal sequence. Medium-chain acyl CoAs are also required and may be important for substrate routing to this pathway.

  19. 免疫细胞内源性儿茶酚胺的免疫调节作用%Immunoregulatory role of endogenous catecholamines synthesized by immune cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    姜建兰; 邱一华; 彭聿平; 王建军

    2006-01-01

    It has been well known that catecholamines (CAs) in the body, including norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (E) and dopamine (DA), are synthesized and secreted by neurons and endocrine cells and mainly modulate visceral activities such as cardiovascular,respiratory and digestive functions. The studies over the past nearly 30 years have shown that CAs can also regulate immune function.The immunomodulation of CAs is generally considered as a role mediating the regulation of nervous and endocrine systems. However,recent studies reveal that immune cells can also synthesize CAs, which is an update of traditional concept. A classical metabolic pathway of CAs shared by the nervous and endocrine systems is present in the immune cells, i.e., the immunocytes have the enzymes for synthesis of CAs [e.g. tyrosine hydroxylase (TH)] and the enzymes for degradation of CAs [e.g. monoamine oxidase (MAO) and catechol-O-methyl transferase (COMT)]. The endogenous CAs synthesized by immune cells can regulate many immune functions,including cellular proliferation, differentiation, apoptosis and cytokine production. These roles of the endogenous CAs may be mediated by an autocrine/paracrine pathway via relevant receptors on the immunocytes and intracellular cAMP. Intracellular oxidative mechanism may also be involved in immunoregulation of endogenous CAs in immune cells. In addition, some metabolic abnormalities of CAs in the immune cells probably induce some autoimmune diseases, such as multiple sclerosis (MS) and rheumatoid arthritis.These findings not only provide evidence for the new concept that the immune system is possible to become the third CA system other than the nervous and endocrine systems, but also extend our comprehension on functional significance of the endogenous CAs synthesized by immune cells.%机体内儿茶酚胺(catecholamines,CAs)包括去甲肾上腺素(norepinephrine,NE)、肾上腺素(epinephrine,E)和多巴胺(dopamine,DA).CAs由神经元和内分泌细胞合成

  20. Transporter-mediated biofuel secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doshi, Rupak; Nguyen, Tuan; Chang, Geoffrey

    2013-05-01

    Engineering microorganisms to produce biofuels is currently among the most promising strategies in renewable energy. However, harvesting these organisms for extracting biofuels is energy- and cost-intensive, limiting the commercial feasibility of large-scale production. Here, we demonstrate the use of a class of transport proteins of pharmacological interest to circumvent the need to harvest biomass during biofuel production. We show that membrane-embedded transporters, better known to efflux lipids and drugs, can be used to mediate the secretion of intracellularly synthesized model isoprenoid biofuel compounds to the extracellular milieu. Transporter-mediated biofuel secretion sustainably maintained an approximate three- to fivefold boost in biofuel production in our Escherichia coli test system. Because the transporters used in this study belong to the ubiquitous ATP-binding cassette protein family, we propose their use as "plug-and-play" biofuel-secreting systems in a variety of bacteria, cyanobacteria, diatoms, yeast, and algae used for biofuel production. This investigation showcases the potential of expressing desired membrane transport proteins in cell factories to achieve the export or import of substances of economic, environmental, or therapeutic importance.

  1. Multiscale modelling of saliva secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sneyd, James; Crampin, Edmund; Yule, David

    2014-11-01

    We review a multiscale model of saliva secretion, describing in brief how the model is constructed and what we have so far learned from it. The model begins at the level of inositol trisphosphate receptors (IPR), and proceeds through the cellular level (with a model of acinar cell calcium dynamics) to the multicellular level (with a model of the acinus), finally to a model of a saliva production unit that includes an acinus and associated duct. The model at the level of the entire salivary gland is not yet completed. Particular results from the model so far include (i) the importance of modal behaviour of IPR, (ii) the relative unimportance of Ca(2+) oscillation frequency as a controller of saliva secretion, (iii) the need for the periodic Ca(2+) waves to be as fast as possible in order to maximise water transport, (iv) the presence of functional K(+) channels in the apical membrane increases saliva secretion, (v) the relative unimportance of acinar spatial structure for isotonic water transport, (vi) the prediction that duct cells are highly depolarised, (vii) the prediction that the secondary saliva takes at least 1mm (from the acinus) to reach ionic equilibrium. We end with a brief discussion of future directions for the model, both in construction and in the study of scientific questions.

  2. Secretory IgA in saliva can be a useful stress marker

    OpenAIRE

    Tsujita, Satoshi; Morimoto, Kanehisa

    1999-01-01

    To evaluate secretory immunoglobulin A (slgA) in saliva as an immunological stress marker, we reviewed the literature on slgA and its variation caused by psychosocial factors. Among the studies on the effect of academic stress on slgA secretion, we could distinguish two kinds of stress effects: the immediate stress effect which increases slgA secretion immediately after stress, and the delayed stress effect which decreases slgA secretion several days after stress. On the basis of production a...

  3. Oxidative stress biomarkers in endometrial secretions: A comparison between successful and unsuccessful in vitro fertilization cycles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahiminejad, Mohammad Ehsan; Moaddab, Amirhossein; Ganji, Maziar; Eskandari, Nika; Yepez, Mayel; Rabiee, Soghra; Wise, Meredith; Ruano, Rodrigo; Ranjbar, Akram

    2016-08-01

    A potential role of oxidative stress has been implicated in the outcome of various steps of assisted reproductive technology (ART). In a prospective cohort study, a total of 100 patients undergoing IVF/ICSI procedure due to male factor infertility were recruited based on the inclusion criteria. In all patients, 1-2ml of endometrial secretions was aspirated prior to embryo transfer. The oxidative stress markers in endometrial secretions, including superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT) activities, lipid peroxidation (LPO), total thiol groups (TTG), and total antioxidant power (TAP) were investigated and compared among study groups including term pregnancy, failed IVF cycle, and miscarriage. Pmiscarriage, and 61 cases (61%), resulted in failed IVF cycle. SOD, LPO, CAT, and TAP levels in the endometrial secretions of the three groups were statistically different (P-value <0.01, <0.001, <0.001, and <0.001, respectively). TTG levels in endometrial secretion of three groups were not statistically different (P-value=0.837). Our results indicated that higher levels of antioxidants such as SOD, CAT, or TAP, and lower levels of oxidative stress markers such as LPO in the endometrial secretions were associated with successful IVF outcome. PMID:27232354

  4. Cheater identifiable visual secret sharing scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Gan Zhi; Chen Kefei

    2005-01-01

    The visual secret sharing scheme proposed by Naor and Shamir provides a way to encrypt a secret black-white image into shares. A qualified group of participants can recover the secret message without using any cryptographic computation. But the original scheme can easily be corrupted by malicious participant. We propose an extension of VSS(visual secret sharing) to identify cheaters before the secret is recovered. Without the need for any additional information and cryptographic computation, every participant can verify the validity of shares of other participants, thus the security of VSS is enhanced.

  5. The Swift Turbidity Marker

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omar, Ahmad Fairuz; MatJafri, Mohd Zubir

    2011-01-01

    The Swift Turbidity Marker is an optical instrument developed to measure the level of water turbidity. The components and configuration selected for the system are based on common turbidity meter design concepts but use a simplified methodology to produce rapid turbidity measurements. This work is aimed at high school physics students and is the…

  6. Magik Markers Trehvis

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    2008-01-01

    Müra-rock'i viljelevast USA duost Magik Markers (ansambel osaleb režissöör Veiko Õunapuu uue mängufilmi "Püha Tõnu kiusamine" võtetel, kontsert 15. nov. Tartus klubis Trehv, vt. www.magikmarkers.audiosport.org.)

  7. Secret sharing scheme with inherited characteristic

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ye Zhenjun; Meng Fanzhen

    2006-01-01

    To assure the shareholders can look for their "legal" attorneys to renew the secret, once the secret sharing scheme is initialized, a secret sharing scheme with inherited characteristic is constructed. In this scheme, each shareholder can produce a new share by his algorithm, which is equivalent to the primary one. Together with other shares, the primary secret can be renewed. Since this scheme is constructed not by replacing the primary share with a new share produced by the dealer in his primitive secret sharing scheme, so no matter how much shares the shareholder produces, these shares can not be gathered together to renew the secret in this scheme. Compared with the existing secret sharing schemes, this scheme provides more agility for the shareholders by investing each of them a function but not affect its security.

  8. Proton pump inhibitors inhibit pancreatic secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Jing; Barbuskaite, Dagne; Tozzi, Marco;

    2015-01-01

    The mechanism by which pancreas secretes high HCO3- has not been fully resolved. This alkaline secretion, formed in pancreatic ducts, can be achieved by transporting HCO3- from serosa to mucosa or by moving H+ in the opposite direction. The aim of the present study was to determine whether H...... localizations in duct cell monolayers (Capan-1) and human pancreas, and notably the gastric pumps are localized on the luminal membranes. In Capan-1 cells, PPIs inhibited recovery of intracellular pH from acidosis. Furthermore, in rats treated with PPIs, pancreatic secretion was inhibited but concentrations...... of major ions in secretion follow similar excretory curves in control and PPI treated animals. In addition to HCO3-, pancreas also secretes K+. In conclusion, this study calls for a revision of the basic model for HCO3- secretion. We propose that proton transport is driving secretion, and that in addition...

  9. LcrG secretion is not required for blocking of Yops secretion in Yersinia pestis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matson Jyl S

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background LcrG, a negative regulator of the Yersinia type III secretion apparatus has been shown to be primarily a cytoplasmic protein, but is secreted at least in Y. pestis. LcrG secretion has not been functionally analyzed and the relevance of LcrG secretion on LcrG function is unknown. Results An LcrG-GAL4AD chimera, originally constructed for two-hybrid analyses to analyze LcrG protein interactions, appeared to be not secreted but the LcrG-GAL4AD chimera retained the ability to regulate Yops secretion. This result led to further investigation to determine the significance of LcrG secretion on LcrG function. Additional analyses including deletion and substitution mutations of amino acids 2–6 in the N-terminus of LcrG were constructed to analyze LcrG secretion and LcrG's ability to control secretion. Some changes to the N-terminus of LcrG were found to not affect LcrG's secretion or LcrG's secretion-controlling activity. However, substitution of poly-isoleucine in the N-terminus of LcrG did eliminate LcrG secretion but did not affect LcrG's secretion controlling activity. Conclusion These results indicate that secretion of LcrG, while observable and T3SS mediated, is not relevant for LcrG's ability to control secretion.

  10. Measurement of short-term changes in heart rate and in plasma concentrations of cortisol and catecholamine in a small marsupial.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoddart, D M; Bradley, A J

    1991-07-01

    Using a chronically placed jugular catheter and a silver electrode, it was possible to monitor short-term changes in the plasma concentration of cortisol and catecholamine in the marsupial sugar glider (Petaurus breviceps) and to monitor both heart and respiration rates. Males judged to be low in the social hierarchy of a particular group were exposed to the whole-body odor of a dominant male from the same social group, a foreign dominant male, or a castrate male. While there was no evidence of a change in any of the physiological parameters when a male was exposed to either a castrate male or a female, a rapid increase occurred in heart rate and plasma concentrations of cortisol, glucose and catecholamine when the donor was a dominant male from the same or a different social group.

  11. Synchronous connections: nursing's little secret.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krejci, J W

    1995-07-01

    As nurses prepare for their place in health care reform, it is becoming more important than ever to be clear about the unique contribution nurses make to health care outcomes. In our technology-driven society, however, some of nursing's most powerful contributions go unacknowledged. An unexpected finding of a study on nurse experts' perceptions of synchrony revealed that nurses themselves frequently do not document or even dialog about important contributions if they cannot be captured within the dominant paradigm of high-technology care. The article describes nurses "little secret" that must be exposed.

  12. Weegee’s City Secrets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan TRACHTENBERG

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available En tant que photographe indépendant de meurtres, d’accidents, d’incendies, mais aussi de moments de loisirs dans la ville — de scènes de violence et de plaisir — Weegee travaillait essentiellement la nuit et utilisait un flash puissant associé à son appareil-photo de presse. Ses « secrets pour réaliser des photographies avec un flash » consistent à donner des conseils pratiques et techniques pour débutants. Mais au cœur de la rhétorique de ses « secrets » se trouvent des réflexions subtiles et convaincantes révélant la relation entre la lumière et l’obscurité, et plus particulièrement la manière dont la lumière du flash permet de rendre visible l’obscurité. Dans le récit de Weegee, le flash confère à la photographie le pouvoir d’écrire — d’écrire avec la lumière, un mode de représentation singulièrement approprié pour enregistrer des instants de vie dans les rues nocturnes de la ville.As a freelance photographer of crime, accidents, fires, and also of the recreational life of the city—scenes of violence and of pleasure—Weegee worked mainly at night and employed a powerful photoflash attachment to his press camera. His "secrets of shooting with photoflash" consist of practical technical advice for beginners. But within the rhetoric of his "secrets" there lie cogent and subtle reflections on the relation of light to darkness, especially on the way the flash of light makes darkness visible. In Weegee’s account, the photoflash gives photography the power of writing—writing with light, a mode of picturing uniquely suited to recording instants of life on city streets at night.

  13. Electrical Stimulation at the ST36 Acupoint Protects against Sepsis Lethality and Reduces Serum TNF Levels through Vagus Nerve- and Catecholamine-Dependent Mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albino Villegas-Bastida

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Electrical vagus nerve (VN stimulation during sepsis attenuates tumor necrosis factor (TNF production through the cholinergic anti-inflammatory pathway, which depends on the integrity of the VN and catecholamine production. To characterize the effect of electroacupuncture at ST36 (EA-ST36 on serum TNF, IL-6, nitrite, and HMGB1 levels and survival rates, based on VN integrity and catecholamine production, a sepsis model was induced in rats using cecal ligation and puncture (CLP. The septic rats were subsequently treated with EA-ST36 (CLP+ST36, and serum samples were collected and analyzed for cytokines levels. The serum TNF, IL-6, nitrite, and HMGB1 levels in the CLP+ST36 group were significantly lower compared with the group without treatment, the survival rates were significantly higher (P<0.05, and the acute organ injury induced by CLP was mitigated by EA-ST36; however, when subdiaphragmatic vagotomy was performed, the serum levels of TNF in the CLP+ST36 group did not show a significant difference compared with the group without electrostimulation, and, similarly, no significant difference in serum TNF levels was found under the pharmacological blockade of catecholamines. These results suggest that in rats with CLP sepsis models EA-ST36 reduces serum TNF levels through VN- and atecholamine-dependent mechanisms.

  14. Attenuation of stress-elicited brain catecholamines, serotonin and plasma corticosterone levels by calcined gold preparations used in Indian system of medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Zahoor Ahmad; Gilani, Rabia Afzal; Sharma, Pragya; Vohora, Shashi Bharat

    2005-06-01

    Problems associated with mental health have increased tremendously in modern times. The search for effective and safe alternatives should, therefore, be pursued vigorously. Forced immobilization is one of the best explored models of stress in rats and the role of corticosterone, serotonin (5-HT) and catecholamines, i.e. norepinephrine, epinephrine, dopamine is well documented. We investigated the therapeutic potential of two gold preparations (Ayurvedic Swarna Bhasma and Unani Kushta Tila Kalan) in restraint induced stress at different time points of 1 hr, 2 hr and 4 hr. We pretreated rats with two gold preparations, Ayurvedic Swarna Bhasma and Unani Kushta Tila Kalan (25 mg/kg, orally for 10 days) prior to restraint stress. Brain catecholamine, serotonin and plasma corticosterone levels were determined following 1, 2 and 4 hr restraint stress, using HPLC and also plasma corticosterone using luminescence spectrophotometry. Gold preparations restored restraint stress-induced elevation in levels of brain catecholamines (norepinephrine, epinephrine and dopmine), 5-HT and plasma corticosterone to near normal levels. Gold, widely used in modern medicine for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis, is highly valued for various medicinal uses in Indian systems of medicine. Traditional gold preparations are attributed with tonic/rejuvenating and antioxidant properties. Our earlier studies revealed interesting analgesic, immunostimulant, adaptogenic and glycogen sparing properties in these preparations, but their effects in stress and depression have not been investigated yet. Significant restoration of altered values to near normal levels suggest potentials for gold preparations in stress and depression.

  15. The urine marker test

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elbe, Anne-Marie; Jensen, Stine Nylandsted; Elsborg, Peter;

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Urine sample collection for doping control tests is a key component of the World Anti-Doping Agency's fight against doping in sport. However, a substantial number of athletes experience difficulty when having to urinate under supervision. Furthermore, it cannot always be ensured...... that athletes are actually delivering their own urine. A method that can be used to alleviate the negative impact of a supervised urination procedure and which can also identify urine as coming from a specific athlete is the urine marker test. Monodisperse low molecular weight polyethylene glycols (PEGs......) are given orally prior to urination. Urine samples can be traced to the donor by analysis of the PEGs previously given. OBJECTIVE: The objective of this study was to investigate the use of the urine marker during urine doping control testing. METHODS: Two studies investigated athletes' acceptance...

  16. Accurate prediction of secreted substrates and identification of a conserved putative secretion signal for type III secretion systems.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Samudrala

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available The type III secretion system is an essential component for virulence in many Gram-negative bacteria. Though components of the secretion system apparatus are conserved, its substrates--effector proteins--are not. We have used a novel computational approach to confidently identify new secreted effectors by integrating protein sequence-based features, including evolutionary measures such as the pattern of homologs in a range of other organisms, G+C content, amino acid composition, and the N-terminal 30 residues of the protein sequence. The method was trained on known effectors from the plant pathogen Pseudomonas syringae and validated on a set of effectors from the animal pathogen Salmonella enterica serovar Typhimurium (S. Typhimurium after eliminating effectors with detectable sequence similarity. We show that this approach can predict known secreted effectors with high specificity and sensitivity. Furthermore, by considering a large set of effectors from multiple organisms, we computationally identify a common putative secretion signal in the N-terminal 20 residues of secreted effectors. This signal can be used to discriminate 46 out of 68 total known effectors from both organisms, suggesting that it is a real, shared signal applicable to many type III secreted effectors. We use the method to make novel predictions of secreted effectors in S. Typhimurium, some of which have been experimentally validated. We also apply the method to predict secreted effectors in the genetically intractable human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis, identifying the majority of known secreted proteins in addition to providing a number of novel predictions. This approach provides a new way to identify secreted effectors in a broad range of pathogenic bacteria for further experimental characterization and provides insight into the nature of the type III secretion signal.

  17. Lipoprotein marker for hypertriglyceridemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cubicciotti, Roger S.; Karu, Alexander E.; Krauss, Ronald M.

    1986-01-01

    Methods and compositions are provided for the detection of a particular low density lipoprotein which has been found to be a marker for patients suffering from type IV hypertriglyceridemia. A monoclonal antibody capable of specifically binding to a characteristic epitopic site on this LDL subspecies can be utilized in a wide variety of immunoassays. Hybridoma cell line SPL.IVA5A1 was deposited at the American Type Culture Collection on Mar. 29, 1984, and granted accession no. HB 8535.

  18. The protein architecture of human secretory vesicles reveals differential regulation of signaling molecule secretion by protein kinases.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Steven J Bark

    Full Text Available Secretory vesicles are required for release of chemical messengers to mediate intercellular signaling among human biological systems. It is necessary to define the organization of the protein architecture of the 'human' dense core secretory vesicles (DCSV to understand mechanisms for secretion of signaling molecules essential for cellular regulatory processes. This study, therefore, conducted extensive quantitative proteomics and systems biology analyses of human DCSV purified from human pheochromocytoma. Over 600 human DCSV proteins were identified with quantitative evaluation of over 300 proteins, revealing that most proteins participate in producing peptide hormones and neurotransmitters, enzymes, and the secretory machinery. Systems biology analyses provided a model of interacting DCSV proteins, generating hypotheses for differential intracellular protein kinases A and C signaling pathways. Activation of cellular PKA and PKC pathways resulted in differential secretion of neuropeptides, catecholamines, and β-amyloid of Alzheimer's disease for mediating cell-cell communication. This is the first study to define a model of the protein architecture of human DCSV for human disease and health.

  19. Bacterial secrets of secretion: EuroConference on the biology of type IV secretion processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baron, Christian; OCallaghan, David; Lanka, Erich

    2002-03-01

    Type IV secretion systems (TFSS) mediate secretion or direct cell-to-cell transfer of virulence factors (proteins or protein-DNA complexes) from many Gram-negative animal, human and plant pathogens, such as Agrobacterium tumefaciens, Bartonella tribocorum, Bordetella pertussis, Brucella suis, Helicobacter pylori, Legionella pneumophila and Rickettsia prowazekii, into eukaryotic cells. Bacterial conjugation is also classified as a TFSS-like process mediating the spread of broad-host-range plasmids between Gram-negative bacteria such as RP4 and R388, which carry antibiotic resistance genes. Genetic, biochemical, cell biological and structural biology experiments led to significant progress in the understanding of several aspects of TFSS processes. X-ray crystallography revealed that homologues of the A. tumefaciens inner membrane-associated proteins VirB11 and VirD4 from H. pylori and R388, respectively, may form channels for substrate translocation or assembly of the transmembrane TFSS machinery. Biochemical and cell biological experiments revealed interactions between components of the periplasmic core components VirB8, VirB9 and VirB10, which may form the translocation channel. Analysis of A. tumefaciens virulence proteins VirE2 and VirF suggested that the periplasmic translocation route of the pertussis toxin from B. pertussis may be more generally valid than previously anticipated. Secretion and modification of toxins from H. pylori and L. pneumophila profoundly affect host cell metabolism, thus entering the discipline of cellular microbiology. Finally, results from genome sequencing projects revealed the presence of up to three TFSS in a single organism, and the analysis of their interplay and adaptation to different functions will be a future challenge. TFSS-carrying plasmids were discovered in different ecosystems, suggesting that genetic exchange may speed up their evolution and adaptation to different cell-cell interactions. PMID:11918819

  20. Quantum secret sharing with minimized quantum communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fortescue, Ben; Gour, Gilad

    2013-03-01

    Standard techniques for sharing a quantum secret among multiple players (such that certain subsets of the players can recover the secret while others are denied all knowledge of the secret) require a large amount of quantum communication to distribute the secret, which is likely to be the most costly resource in any practical scheme. Two known methods for reducing this cost are the use of imperfect ``ramp'' secret sharing (in which security is sacrificed for efficiency) and classical encryption (in which certain elements of the players' shares consist of classical information only). We demonstrate how one may combine these methods to reduce the required quantum communication below what has been previously achieved, in some cases to a provable minimum, without any loss of security. The techniques involved are closely-related to the properties of stabilizer codes, and thus have strong potential for being adapted to a wide range of quantum secret sharing schemes.

  1. The Impact of a Pulmonary-Artery-Catheter-Based Protocol on Fluid and Catecholamine Administration in Early Sepsis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carina Bethlehem

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. The pulmonary artery catheter (PAC remains topic of debate. Despite abundant data, it is of note that many trials did not incorporate a treatment protocol. Methods. We retrospectively evaluated fluid balances and catecholamine doses in septic patients after the introduction of a PAC-based treatment protocol in comparison to historic controls. Results. 2×70 patients were included. The first day the PAC group had a significantly higher positive fluid balance in comparison to controls (6.1±2.6 versus 3.8±2.4 litre, <0.001. After 7 days the cumulative fluid balance in the PAC group was significantly lower than in controls (9.4±7.4 versus 13±7.6 litre, =0.001. Maximum dose of norepinephrine was significantly higher in the PAC group. Compared to controls this was associated with a significant reduction in ventilator and ICU days. Conclusions. Introduction of a PAC-based treatment protocol in sepsis changed the administration of fluid and vasopressors significantly.

  2. Cysteamine and pantethine effects on passive avoidance behavior, shuttle box learning, open-field activity, striatal catecholamines and somatostatin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vécsei, L; Widerlöv, E; Ekman, R; Alling, C

    1989-01-01

    The effects of cysteamine and pantethine were compared on different behavioral tests and neurochemical parameters in rats. Cysteamine, administered in high dose (3.90 mM/kg s.c.), decreased the locomotor and rearing activities of rats, while it slightly but not significantly increased the avoidance latency in a passive avoidance test. Pantethine, 24 hr after its administration, significantly increased the dihydroxyphenyl acetic acid (DOPAC) levels in the striatum. Cysteamine slightly reduced the DOPAC level without influencing the catecholamine levels in this brain area. The striatal somatostatin concentration was reduced 24 hr after the administration of cysteamine, while pantethine did not influence it. After repeated daily injections of pantethine, the drug facilitated the shuttle box learning process and increased the intertrial and open-field activities of the animals. Cysteamine only slightly increased the locomotion and rearing and did not influence the shuttle box learning. Both pantethine and cysteamine slowed the rate of the "body weight increase" of the animals when compared to a saline-treated group. These findings suggest that the locomotor activation induced by pantethine 24 hr after its administration plays an important role in its behavioral effects. It might be that the striatal dopaminergic transmission, modified by administration of pantethine, plays some role in the higher locomotor activity induced by the substance. PMID:2570553

  3. Thirst perception and osmoregulation of vasopressin secretion are altered during recovery from septic shock.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shidasp Siami

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: Vasopressin (AVP secretion during an osmotic challenge is frequently altered in the immediate post-acute phase of septic shock. We sought to determine if this response is still altered in patients recovering from septic shock. DESIGN: Prospective interventional study. SETTING: Intensive care unit (ICU at Raymond Poincaré and Etampes Hospitals. PATIENTS: Normonatremic patients at least 5 days post discontinuation of catecholamines given for a septic shock. INTERVENTION: Osmotic challenge involved infusing 500 mL of hypertonic saline solution (with cumulative amount of sodium not exceeding 24 g over 120 minutes. MEASUREMENTS AND MAIN RESULTS: Plasma AVP levels were measured 15 minutes before the infusion and then every 30 minutes for two hours. Non-responders were defined as those with a slope of the relation between AVP and plasma sodium levels less than < 0.5 ng/mEq. Among the 30 included patients, 18 (60% were non-responders. Blood pressure and plasma sodium and brain natriuretic peptide levels were similar in both responders and non-responders during the course of the test. Critical illness severity, hemodynamic alteration, electrolyte disturbances, treatment and outcome did not differ between the two groups. Responders had more severe gas exchange abnormality. Thirst perception was significantly diminished in non-responders. The osmotic challenge was repeated in 4 non-responders several months after discharge and the abnormal response persisted. CONCLUSION: More than half of patients recovering from septic shock have an alteration of osmoregulation characterised by a dramatic decrease in vasopressin secretion and thirst perception during osmotic challenge. The mechanisms of this alteration but also of the relationship between haematosis and normal response remain to be elucidated.

  4. Physiology of Epithelial Chloride and Fluid Secretion

    OpenAIRE

    Frizzell, Raymond A.; Hanrahan, John W.

    2012-01-01

    Epithelial salt and water secretion serves a variety of functions in different organ systems, such as the airways, intestines, pancreas, and salivary glands. In cystic fibrosis (CF), the volume and/or composition of secreted luminal fluids are compromised owing to mutations in the gene encoding CFTR, the apical membrane anion channel that is responsible for salt secretion in response to cAMP/PKA stimulation. This article examines CFTR and related cellular transport processes that underlie epi...

  5. Removal of Duodenum Elicits GLP-1 Secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Mezza, Teresa; Prioletta, Annamaria;

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVETo evaluate the effect of removal of the duodenum on the complex interplay between incretins, insulin, and glucagon in nondiabetic subjects.RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODSFor evaluation of hormonal secretion and insulin sensitivity, 10 overweight patients without type 2 diabetes (age 61 ± 19...... and a remarkable increase in GLP-1 levels, which was not translated into increased insulin secretion. Rather, the hypoinsulinemia may have caused an increase in glucagon secretion....

  6. Random Secretion of Growth Hormone in Humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prank, Klaus; Kloppstech, Mirko; Nowlan, Steven J.; Sejnowski, Terrence J.; Brabant, Georg

    1996-08-01

    In normal humans, growth hormone (GH) is secreted from a gland located adjacent to the brain (pituitary) into the blood in distinct pulses, but in patients bearing a tumor within the pituitary (acromegaly) GH is excessively secreted in an irregular manner. It has been hypothesized that GH secretion in the diseased state becomes random. This hypothesis is supported by demonstrating that GH secretion in patients with acromegaly cannot be distinguished from a variety of linear stochastic processes based on the predictability of the fluctuations of GH concentration in the bloodstream.

  7. [Functional morphology of stomach secretions].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liebich, H G

    1985-01-01

    The stimulation of gastric secretion is regulated by neurovagal, endocrine and immunological reactions. During the gastric phase of digestion, especially acetylcholin, gastrin and histamin react as main transmitters, activated by mediators (prostaglandines, leucotrienes, lipoxygenases). The dominant role of nervus vagus has to be seen in the transactions of vago-vagal reflexes, the stimulation of gastrin liberation by an non-cholinergic mechanism and the regulation of the gastric microcirculation. The antrum pylori can be seen as an immunological area of reception, where immunological active cells (macrophages, NK-lymphocytes and T-lymphocytes) are recognizing antigens (e.g. food antigens). These immunocytes induce a cascade of endocrine and exocrine mechanisms of digestion. Mastcells, located intra-and extraepithelial, take a regulatory influence in producing histamins, leucotrienes and also prostaglandines.

  8. Noninvasive clearance of airway secretions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, K A; Anderson, B D

    1996-06-01

    Airway clearance techniques are indicated for specific diseases that have known clearance abnormalities (Table 2). Murray and others have commented that such techniques are required only for patients with a daily sputum production of greater than 30 mL. The authors have observed that patients with diseases known to cause clearance abnormalities can have sputum clearance with some techniques, such as positive expiratory pressure, autogenic drainage, and active cycle of breathing techniques, when PDPV has not been effective. Hasani et al has shown that use of the forced exhalatory technique in patients with nonproductive cough still resulted in movement of secretions proximally from all regions of the lung in patients with airway obstruction. It is therefore reasonable to consider airway clearance techniques for any patient who has a disease known to alter mucous clearance, including CF, dyskinetic cilia syndromes, and bronchiectasis from any cause. Patients with atelectasis from mucous plugs and hypersecretory states, such as asthma and chronic bronchitis, patients with pain secondary to surgical procedures, and patients with neuromuscular disease, weak cough, and abnormal patency of the airway may also benefit from the application of airway clearance techniques. Infants and children up to 3 years of age with airway clearance problems need to be treated with PDPV. Manual percussion with hands alone or a flexible face mask or cup and small mechanical vibrator/percussors, such as the ultrasonic devices, can be used. The intrapulmonary percussive ventilator shows growing promise in this area. The high-frequency oscillator is not supplied with vests of appropriate sizes for tiny babies and has not been studied in this group. Young patients with neuromuscular disease may require assisted ventilation and airway oscillations can be applied. CPAP alone has been shown to improve achievable flow rates that will increase air-liquid interactions for patients with these diseases

  9. DYNAMIC AND VERIFIABLE SECRET SHARING AMONG WEIGHTED PARTICIPANTS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yanshuo ZHANG; Zhuojun LIU

    2007-01-01

    A secret sharing scheme permits a secret to be shared among participants in such a way that only qualified subsets of participants can recover the secret. Secret sharing is useful in management of cryptographic keys. Based on identity, we analyze the secret sharing scheme among weighted participants. Then we present a dynamic scheme about secret sharing among weighted participants. At last, we analyze the secret sharing scheme among weighted participants, which can make all weighted participants verifiable and dynamic.

  10. Secretome Identifies Tenascin-X as a Potent Marker of Ovarian Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marianne Kramer

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available CA-125 has been a valuable marker for the follow-up of ovarian cancer patients but it is not sensitive enough to be used as diagnostic marker. We had already used secretomic methods to identify proteins differentially secreted by serous ovarian cancer cells compared to healthy ovarian cells. Here, we evaluated the secretion of these proteins by ovarian cancer cells during the follow-up of one patient. Proteins that correlated with CA-125 levels were screened using serum samples from ovarian cancer patients as well as benign and healthy controls. Tenascin-X secretion was shown to correlate with CA-125 value in the initial case study. The immunohistochemical detection of increased amount of tenascin-X in ovarian cancer tissues compared to healthy tissues confirms the potent interest in tenascin-X as marker. We then quantified the tenascin-X level in serum of patients and identified tenascin-X as potent marker for ovarian cancer, showing that secretomic analysis is suitable for the identification of protein biomarkers when combined with protein immunoassay. Using this method, we determined tenascin-X as a new potent marker for serous ovarian cancer.

  11. The secreted expression of PSP94 in E. coli.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2001-01-01

    AIM: PSP94 has been shown promise as a potential prostate cancer marker and it was reported that PSP94 can inhibit the growth of prostate cancer cell in vitro and in vivo. This study aimed to construct recombinant human PSP94 expression vector. METHODS:The PSP94 cDNA was obtained from normal prostate tissue, and recombinant plasmid pUC19-PSP94 was constructed. The target gene was identified and sequenced. Then the PSP94 gene was inserted to the secretory expression vector. RESULTS:The gene sequence of PSP94 was identified. The recombinant vector was constructed. The secreted PSP94 was isolated and identified by Western blot. CONCLUSION:The recombinated PSP94 could expressed PSP94 successfully.

  12. "The Secret Garden": A Literary Journey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Anne Devereaux

    1998-01-01

    Outlines the life of Frances Hodgson Burnett, author of "The Secret Garden." Argues that it not only tells an enthralling tale, but takes readers on a journey through the history of English literature. Discusses the gothic tradition and romanticism of "The Secret Garden." Lists classic elements in the book and offers five ideas for stimulating…

  13. On Secret Sharing with Nonlinear Product Reconstruction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cascudo Pueyo, Ignacio; Cramer, Ronald; Mirandola, Diego;

    2015-01-01

    Multiplicative linear secret sharing is a fundamental notion in the area of secure multiparty computation and, since recently, in the area of two-party cryptography as well. In a nutshell, this notion guarantees that the product of two secrets is obtained as a linear function of the vector consis...

  14. Decrypted secrets methods and maxims of cryptology

    CERN Document Server

    Bauer, Friedrich L

    2006-01-01

    A reference work on cryptology offering technical and biographical details. This book reviews secret codes and their uses - the foundations of cryptography. It also deals with the process of covertly decrypting a secret code - cryptanalysis, and gives particular advice on assessing methods.

  15. Cortactin enhances exosome secretion without altering cargo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangoda, Lahiru; Mathivanan, Suresh

    2016-07-18

    The role of cortactin, a regulator of late endosomal trafficking, in the biogenesis and secretion of exosomes is poorly understood. In this issue, Sinha et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201601025) elucidate the role of cortactin as a positive regulator of late endosomal docking and exosome secretion. PMID:27432895

  16. Entanglement Enhances Security in Secret Sharing

    OpenAIRE

    Demkowicz-Dobrzanski, Rafal; De, Aditi Sen; Sen, Ujjwal; Lewenstein, Maciej

    2008-01-01

    We analyze tolerable quantum bit error rates in secret sharing protocols, and show that using entangled encoding states is advantageous in the case when the eavesdropping attacks are local. We also provide a criterion for security in secret sharing -- a parallel of the Csiszar-Korner criterion in single-receiver cryptography.

  17. Radioimmunoassay in the detection of insulin secretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some antihypertensive drugs have been shown to cause clinically significant alteration in the endocrine function. This study was conducted to investigate the effect of a new antihypertensive drug, rilmenidine on insulin secretion, which is an important determinant for glucose metabolism. In-vitro method was used to study the direct effect of rilmenidine on glucose induced insulin secretion using isolated rat pancreas. Insulin was assayed using radioimmunoassay. Concentrations of rilmenidine used were based on the peak plasma concentration achieved with an oral standard dose of 1 mg. This study showed that rilmenidine at low concentration was able to stimulate insulin secretion whereas at higher concentration inhibited the insulin secretion. This probably was due to its effect on the imidazoline receptor and the alpha2 adrenoceptor known to induce and inhibit insulin secretion respectively. (Author)

  18. Pancreatic bicarbonate secretion involves two proton pumps

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Novak, Ivana; Wang, Jing; Henriksen, Katrine L.;

    2011-01-01

    Pancreas secretes fluid rich in digestive enzymes and bicarbonate. The alkaline secretion is important in buffering of acid chyme entering duodenum and for activation of enzymes. This secretion is formed in pancreatic ducts, and studies to date show that plasma membranes of duct epithelium express...... and non-gastric H(+)-K(+)-ATPases. We measured intracellular pH and secretion in small ducts isolated from rat pancreas and showed their sensitivity to H(+)-K(+) pump inhibitors and ion substitutions. Gastric and non-gastric H(+)-K(+) pumps were demonstrated on RNA and protein levels, and pumps were...... localized to the plasma membranes of pancreatic ducts. Quantitative analysis of H(+)/HCO(3)(-) and fluid transport shows that the H(+)-K(+) pumps can contribute to pancreatic secretion in several species. Our results call for revision of the bicarbonate transport physiology in pancreas, and most likely...

  19. Toxins and Secretion Systems of Photorhabdus luminescens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Athina Rodou

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Photorhabdus luminescens is a nematode-symbiotic, gram negative, bioluminescent bacterium, belonging to the family of Enterobacteriaceae.Recent studies show the importance of this bacterium as an alternative source of insecticides, as well as an emerging human pathogen. Various toxins have been identified and characterized in this bacterium. These toxins are classified into four major groups: the toxin complexes (Tcs, the Photorhabdus insect related (Pir proteins, the “makes caterpillars floppy” (Mcf toxins and the Photorhabdus virulence cassettes (PVC; the mechanisms however of toxin secretion are not fully elucidated. Using bioinformatics analysis and comparison against the components of known secretion systems, multiple copies of components of all known secretion systems, except the ones composing a type IV secretion system, were identified throughout the entire genome of the bacterium. This indicates that Photorhabdus luminescens has all the necessary means for the secretion of virulence factors, thus it is capable of establishing a microbial infection.

  20. Refeeding-induced brown adipose tissue glycogen hyper-accumulation in mice is mediated by insulin and catecholamines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher M Carmean

    Full Text Available Brown adipose tissue (BAT generates heat during adaptive thermogenesis through a combination of oxidative metabolism and uncoupling protein 1-mediated electron transport chain uncoupling, using both free-fatty acids and glucose as substrate. Previous rat-based work in 1942 showed that prolonged partial fasting followed by refeeding led to a dramatic, transient increase in glycogen stores in multiple fat depots. In the present study, the protocol was replicated in male CD1 mice, resulting in a 2000-fold increase in interscapular BAT (IBAT glycogen levels within 4-12 hours (hr of refeeding, with IBAT glycogen stores reaching levels comparable to fed liver glycogen. Lesser effects occurred in white adipose tissues (WAT. Over the next 36 hr, glycogen levels dissipated and histological analysis revealed an over-accumulation of lipid droplets, suggesting a potential metabolic connection between glycogenolysis and lipid synthesis. 24 hr of total starvation followed by refeeding induced a robust and consistent glycogen over-accumulation similar in magnitude and time course to the prolonged partial fast. Experimentation demonstrated that hyperglycemia was not sufficient to drive glycogen accumulation in IBAT, but that elevated circulating insulin was sufficient. Additionally, pharmacological inhibition of catecholamine production reduced refeeding-induced IBAT glycogen storage, providing evidence of a contribution from the central nervous system. These findings highlight IBAT as a tissue that integrates both canonically-anabolic and catabolic stimulation for the promotion of glycogen storage during recovery from caloric deficit. The preservation of this robust response through many generations of animals not subjected to food deprivation suggests that the over-accumulation phenomenon plays a critical role in IBAT physiology.

  1. Effect of immobilization stress on gene expression of catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes in heart auricles of socially isolated rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. Gavrilovic

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Chronic stress is associated with the development of cardiovascular diseases. The sympathoneural system plays an important role in the regulation of cardiac function both in health and disease. In the present study, the changes in gene expression of the catecholamine biosynthetic enzymes tyrosine hydroxylase (TH, dopamine-β-hydroxylase (DBH and phenylethanolamine N-methyltransferase (PNMT and protein levels in the right and left heart auricles of naive control and long-term (12 weeks socially isolated rats were investigated by Taqman RT-PCR and Western blot analysis. The response of these animals to additional immobilization stress (2 h was also examined. Long-term social isolation produced a decrease in TH mRNA level in left auricles (about 70% compared to the corresponding control. Expression of the DBH gene was markedly decreased both in the right (about 62% and left (about 81% auricles compared to the corresponding control, group-maintained rats, whereas PNMT mRNA levels remained unchanged. Exposure of group-housed rats to acute immobilization for 2 h led to a significant increase of mRNA levels of TH (about 267%, DBH (about 37% and PNMT (about 60% only in the right auricles. Additional 2-h immobilization of individually housed rats did not affect gene expression of these enzymes in either the right or left auricle. Protein levels of TH, DBH and PNMT in left and right heart auricles were unchanged either in both individually housed and immobilized rats. The unchanged mRNA levels of the enzymes examined after short-term immobilization suggest that the catecholaminergic system of the heart auricles of animals previously exposed to chronic psychosocial stress was adapted to maintain appropriate cardiovascular homeostasis.

  2. Acupuncture inhibits the decrease in brain catecholamine contents and the impairment of passive avoidance task in ovariectomized mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toriizuka, K; Okumura, M; Iijima, K; Haruyama, K; Cyong, J C

    1999-01-01

    The effects of acupuncture on the disorders elicited by abnormalities of endocrine system were investigated in ovariectomized mice. Female mice (strain; C57BL/6) were ovariectomized (OVX) and acupuncture points, Shenshu ([Japanese pictograph see text] : BL23) on both side of the back were continuously stimulated by subcutaneous needles for 20 days. After completion of experimental sessions, animals were sacrificed and specific brain regions were assayed for catecholamine contents by high performance liquid chromatography with electro chemical detector (ECD-HPLC). The mitogenic activities of splenic lymphocytes were measured by using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTS) assay and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) assay. Furthermore, the effects of needle stimulation on learning and memory ability were studied by the step-through type passive avoidance test. Norepinephrine and dopamine contents in the frontoparietal cerebral cortex, ventral hippocampus and olfactory bulb were decreased in the OVX group, and both MTS activity and ALP activity were decreased 20 days after ovariectomy. The mean latent period was also shortened in the passive avoidance test in the OVX group. However, applying needle stimulation increased norepinephrine and dopamine contents in the brain regions, and enhanced mitogenic activities of splenic lymphocytes. The stimulation also improved memory-related behavior. It was concluded from this study that after mice were stimulated by subcutaneous needle insertion, overall changes were observed in central nervous system (including retention of memory) and immune functions. The study suggests that acupuncture improves the memory loss and decrease of immune responses accompanying aging and/or menopause, and the that it may have an important role in medical care for the elderly.

  3. Identification of body fluid-specific DNA methylation markers for use in forensic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Lyul; Kwon, Oh-Hyung; Kim, Jong Hwan; Yoo, Hyang-Sook; Lee, Han-Chul; Woo, Kwang-Man; Kim, Seon-Young; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Yong Sung

    2014-11-01

    DNA methylation, which occurs at the 5'-position of the cytosine in CpG dinucleotides, has great potential for forensic identification of body fluids, because tissue-specific patterns of DNA methylation have been demonstrated, and DNA is less prone to degradation than proteins or RNA. Previous studies have reported several body fluid-specific DNA methylation markers, but DNA methylation differences are sometimes low in saliva and vaginal secretions. Moreover, specific DNA methylation markers in four types of body fluids (blood, saliva, semen, and vaginal secretions) have not been investigated with genome-wide profiling. Here, we investigated novel DNA methylation markers for identification of body fluids for use in forensic science using the Illumina HumanMethylation 450K bead array, which contains over 450,000 CpG sites. Using methylome data from 16 samples of blood, saliva, semen, and vaginal secretions, we first selected 2986 hypermethylated or hypomethylated regions that were specific for each type of body fluid. We then selected eight CpG sites as novel, forensically relevant DNA methylation markers: cg06379435 and cg08792630 for blood, cg26107890 and cg20691722 for saliva, cg23521140 and cg17610929 for semen, and cg01774894 and cg14991487 for vaginal secretions. These eight selected markers were evaluated in 80 body fluid samples using pyrosequencing, and all showed high sensitivity and specificity for identification of the target body fluid. We suggest that these eight DNA methylation markers may be good candidates for developing an effective molecular assay for identification of body fluids in forensic science.

  4. Identification of body fluid-specific DNA methylation markers for use in forensic science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jong-Lyul; Kwon, Oh-Hyung; Kim, Jong Hwan; Yoo, Hyang-Sook; Lee, Han-Chul; Woo, Kwang-Man; Kim, Seon-Young; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Kim, Yong Sung

    2014-11-01

    DNA methylation, which occurs at the 5'-position of the cytosine in CpG dinucleotides, has great potential for forensic identification of body fluids, because tissue-specific patterns of DNA methylation have been demonstrated, and DNA is less prone to degradation than proteins or RNA. Previous studies have reported several body fluid-specific DNA methylation markers, but DNA methylation differences are sometimes low in saliva and vaginal secretions. Moreover, specific DNA methylation markers in four types of body fluids (blood, saliva, semen, and vaginal secretions) have not been investigated with genome-wide profiling. Here, we investigated novel DNA methylation markers for identification of body fluids for use in forensic science using the Illumina HumanMethylation 450K bead array, which contains over 450,000 CpG sites. Using methylome data from 16 samples of blood, saliva, semen, and vaginal secretions, we first selected 2986 hypermethylated or hypomethylated regions that were specific for each type of body fluid. We then selected eight CpG sites as novel, forensically relevant DNA methylation markers: cg06379435 and cg08792630 for blood, cg26107890 and cg20691722 for saliva, cg23521140 and cg17610929 for semen, and cg01774894 and cg14991487 for vaginal secretions. These eight selected markers were evaluated in 80 body fluid samples using pyrosequencing, and all showed high sensitivity and specificity for identification of the target body fluid. We suggest that these eight DNA methylation markers may be good candidates for developing an effective molecular assay for identification of body fluids in forensic science. PMID:25128690

  5. Adult female of Strongyloides stercoralis in respiratory secretions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bava Amadeo Javier Bava; Domnguez Cecilia; Troncoso Alcides

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To communicate the presence of adult females, rabditoid larvae and eggs of Strongyloides stercoralis (S. stercoralis) in the respiratory secretions obtained by tracheal aspirate from a HIV-negative patient who was suffering from polymyositis, and treated with corticoids and amethopterin and assisted by pneumonia. Methods: The respiratory secretions submitted to the Parasitology Laboratory of the Muñiz Hospital were made more concentrated by centrifugation (1 500 r/min for 15 seconds). Wet mount microscopy was performed with the pellet. Results: It revealed adult females, rabditoid larvae and eggs of S. stercoralis. Further parasitological studies performed after the start of the treatment with ivermectin on fresh fecal samples, gastric lavages and tracheal aspirates showed scanty mobile filariform and rabditoid larvae of the same parasite. Conclusions: The presence of adult female S. stercoralis which has never been observed before in the clinical samples submitted to our Laboratory for investigation can be considered as an indirect marker of the severe immunosupression of the patient.

  6. Adult female of strongyloides stercoralis in respiratory secretions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Bava; Amadeo; Javier; Bava; Domínguez; Cecilia; Troncoso; Alcides

    2013-01-01

    Objective:To communicate the presence of adult females,rabditoid larvae and eggs of Strongyloides stercoralis(S.stercoralis)in the respiratory secretions obtained by tracheal aspirate from a HIV-negative patient who was suffering from polymyositis,and treated with corticoids and amethopterin and assisted by pneumonia.Methods:The respiratory secretions submitted to the Parasitology Laboratory of the Mu(?)iz Hospital were made more concentrated by centrifugation(1 500 r/min for 15 seconds).Wet mount microscopy was performed with the pellet.Results:It revealed adult females,rabditoid larvae and eggs of S.stercoralis.Further parasitological studies performed after the start of the treatment with ivermectin on fresh fecal samples,gastric lavages and tracheal aspirates showed scanty mobile filariform and rabditoid larvae of the same parasite.Conclusions:The presence of adult female S.stercoralis which has never been observed before in the clinical samples submitted to our Laboratory for investigation can be considered as an indirect marker of the severe immunosupression of the patient.

  7. Non-classical protein secretion in bacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausbøll Anders

    2005-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background We present an overview of bacterial non-classical secretion and a prediction method for identification of proteins following signal peptide independent secretion pathways. We have compiled a list of proteins found extracellularly despite the absence of a signal peptide. Some of these proteins also have known roles in the cytoplasm, which means they could be so-called "moon-lightning" proteins having more than one function. Results A thorough literature search was conducted to compile a list of currently known bacterial non-classically secreted proteins. Pattern finding methods were applied to the sequences in order to identify putative signal sequences or motifs responsible for their secretion. We have found no signal or motif characteristic to any majority of the proteins in the compiled list of non-classically secreted proteins, and conclude that these proteins, indeed, seem to be secreted in a novel fashion. However, we also show that the apparently non-classically secreted proteins are still distinguished from cellular proteins by properties such as amino acid composition, secondary structure and disordered regions. Specifically, prediction of disorder reveals that bacterial secretory proteins are more structurally disordered than their cytoplasmic counterparts. Finally, artificial neural networks were used to construct protein feature based methods for identification of non-classically secreted proteins in both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Conclusion We present a publicly available prediction method capable of discriminating between this group of proteins and other proteins, thus allowing for the identification of novel non-classically secreted proteins. We suggest candidates for non-classically secreted proteins in Escherichia coli and Bacillus subtilis. The prediction method is available online.

  8. Accurate prediction of secreted substrates and identification of a conserved putative secretion signal for type III secretion systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Samudrala, Ram; Heffron, Fred; McDermott, Jason E.

    2009-04-24

    The type III secretion system is an essential component for virulence in many Gram-negative bacteria. Though components of the secretion system apparatus are conserved, its substrates, effector proteins, are not. We have used a machine learning approach to identify new secreted effectors. The method integrates evolutionary measures, such as the pattern of homologs in a range of other organisms, and sequence-based features, such as G+C content, amino acid composition and the N-terminal 30 residues of the protein sequence. The method was trained on known effectors from Salmonella typhimurium and validated on a corresponding set of effectors from Pseudomonas syringae, after eliminating effectors with detectable sequence similarity. The method was able to identify all of the known effectors in P. syringae with a specificity of 84% and sensitivity of 82%. The reciprocal validation, training on P. syringae and validating on S. typhimurium, gave similar results with a specificity of 86% when the sensitivity level was 87%. These results show that type III effectors in disparate organisms share common features. We found that maximal performance is attained by including an N-terminal sequence of only 30 residues, which agrees with previous studies indicating that this region contains the secretion signal. We then used the method to define the most important residues in this putative secretion signal. Finally, we present novel predictions of secreted effectors in S. typhimurium, some of which have been experimentally validated, and apply the method to predict secreted effectors in the genetically intractable human pathogen Chlamydia trachomatis. This approach is a novel and effective way to identify secreted effectors in a broad range of pathogenic bacteria for further experimental characterization and provides insight into the nature of the type III secretion signal.

  9. Cancer and tumour markers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cancer has been a major cause of death world wide and in Nigeria there are six commonest forms of manifestation of cancer known. Of these prostrate cancer is the highest with 16% occurrence of all known cancers according to a study by the Histopathology Department of the UCH. Many factors, amongst them dietary, environmental, lifestyle, age and sedentary work are possible causes. With the global rise in incidents, the IAEA initiated the Tumour Marker Project as a means of screening cancers in 15 African countries including Nigeria. In Nigeria, 4 groups of the commonest cancers have been chosen for screening. These are prostrate cancer, primary liver cancer, cancer of the GI tract and trophoblastic cancer

  10. Polarized secretion of Leukemia Inhibitory Factor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vernallis Ann B

    2008-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The direction of cytokine secretion from polarized cells determines the cytokine's cellular targets. Leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF belongs to the interleukin-6 (IL-6 family of cytokines and signals through LIFR/gp130. Three factors which may regulate the direction of LIF secretion were studied: the site of stimulation, signal peptides, and expression levels. Stimulation with IL-1β is known to promote IL-6 secretion from the stimulated membrane (apical or basolateral in the human intestinal epithelial cell line Caco-2. Since LIF is related to IL-6, LIF secretion was also tested in Caco-2 following IL-1β stimulation. Signal peptides may influence the trafficking of LIF. Two isoforms of murine LIF, LIF-M and LIF-D, encode different signal peptides which have been associated with different locations of the mature protein in fibroblasts. To determine the effect of the signal peptides on LIF secretion, secretion levels were compared in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK clones which expressed murine LIF-M or LIF-D or human LIF under the control of an inducible promoter. Low and high levels of LIF expression were also compared since saturation of the apical or basolateral route would reveal specific transporters for LIF. Results When Caco-2 was grown on permeable supports, LIF was secreted constitutively with around 40% secreted into the apical chamber. Stimulation with IL-1β increased LIF production. After treating the apical surface with IL-1β, the percentage secreted apically remained similar to the untreated, whereas, when the cells were stimulated at the basolateral surface only 20% was secreted apically. In MDCK cells, an endogenous LIF-like protein was detected entirely in the apical compartment. The two mLIF isoforms showed no difference in their secretion patterns in MDCK. Interestingly, about 70% of murine and human LIF was secreted apically from MDCK over a 400-fold range of expression levels within clones and a 200

  11. POPULAR MOLECULAR MARKERS IN BACTERIA

    OpenAIRE

    Weilong, Liu; Lv, Li; MD. ASADUZZAMAN KHAN AND FEIZHOU ZHU

    2012-01-01

    Molecular markers are defined as the fragments of DNA sequence associated with a genome, which are used to identify a particular DNA sequence. Nowadays, with the explosive growth of genetic research and bacterial classification, molecular marker is an important tool to identify bacterial species. Taking account to its significant roles in clinic, medicine and food industry, in this review article, we summarize the traditional research and new development about molecular markers (also called g...

  12. Identification of protein secretion systems and novel secreted proteins in Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krehenbrink Martin

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins secreted by bacteria play an important role in infection of eukaryotic hosts. Rhizobia infect the roots of leguminous plants and establish a mutually beneficial symbiosis. Proteins secreted during the infection process by some rhizobial strains can influence infection and modify the plant defence signalling pathways. The aim of this study was to systematically analyse protein secretion in the recently sequenced strain Rhizobium leguminosarum bv. viciae 3841. Results Similarity searches using defined protein secretion systems from other Gram-negative bacteria as query sequences revealed that R. l. bv. viciae 3841 has ten putative protein secretion systems. These are the general export pathway (GEP, a twin-arginine translocase (TAT secretion system, four separate Type I systems, one putative Type IV system and three Type V autotransporters. Mutations in genes encoding each of these (except the GEP were generated, but only mutations affecting the PrsDE (Type I and TAT systems were observed to affect the growth phenotype and the profile of proteins in the culture supernatant. Bioinformatic analysis and mass fingerprinting of tryptic fragments of culture supernatant proteins identified 14 putative Type I substrates, 12 of which are secreted via the PrsDE, secretion system. The TAT mutant was defective for the symbiosis, forming nodules incapable of nitrogen fixation. Conclusion None of the R. l. bv. viciae 3841 protein secretion systems putatively involved in the secretion of proteins to the extracellular space (Type I, Type IV, Type V is required for establishing the symbiosis with legumes. The PrsDE (Type I system was shown to be the major route of protein secretion in non-symbiotic cells and to secrete proteins of widely varied size and predicted function. This is in contrast to many Type I systems from other bacteria, which typically secrete specific substrates encoded by genes often localised in close proximity to

  13. Biochemical markers of bone turnover

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biochemical markers of bone turnover has received increasing attention over the past few years, because of the need for sensitivity and specific tool in the clinical investigation of osteoporosis. Bone markers should be unique to bone, reflect changes of bone less, and should be correlated with radiocalcium kinetics, histomorphometry, or changes in bone mass. The markers also should be useful in monitoring treatment efficacy. Although no bone marker has been established to meet all these criteria, currently osteocalcin and pyridinium crosslinks are the most efficient markers to assess the level of bone turnover in the menopausal and senile osteoporosis. Recently, N-terminal telopeptide (NTX), C-terminal telopeptide (CTX) and bone specific alkaline phosphatase are considered as new valid markers of bone turnover. Recent data suggest that CTX and free deoxypyridinoline could predict the subsequent risk of hip fracture of elderly women. Treatment of postmenopausal women with estrogen, calcitonin and bisphosphonates demonstrated rapid decrease of the levels of bone markers that correlated with the long-term increase of bone mass. Factors such as circadian rhythms, diet, age, sex, bone mass and renal function affect the results of biochemical markers and should be appropriately adjusted whenever possible. Each biochemical markers of bone turnover may have its own specific advantages and limitations. Recent advances in research will provide more sensitive and specific assays

  14. Subcellular compartmentalization of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium with catecholamines in adrenal medullary chromaffin vesicles may explain the lack of toxicity to adrenal chromaffin cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reinhard, J.F. Jr.; Diliberto, E.J. Jr.; Viveros, O.H.; Daniels, A.J.

    1987-11-01

    Cultures of bovine adrenomedullary chromaffin cells accumulated 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP/sup +/) in a time- and concentration-dependent manner by a process that was prevented by desmethylimipramine. The subcellular localization of the incorporated (methyl-/sup 3/H)MPP/sup +/ was examined by differential centrifugation and sucrose density gradient fractionation and was found to be predominantly colocalized with catecholamines in chromaffin vesicles, and negligible amounts were detected within the mitochondrial fraction. When chromaffin cell membranes were made permeable with the detergent digitonin the absence of calcium, there was no increase in the release of (/sup 3/H)MPP/sup +/, indicating that there is negligible accumulation of the neurotoxin in the cytosol. Simultaneous exposure to digitonin and calcium induced cosecretion of MPP/sup +/ and catecholamines. Stimulation of the cells with nicotine released both catecholamines and MPP/sup +/ at identical rates and percentages of cellular content in a calcium-dependent manner. Last, when cells were incubated with MPP/sup +/ in the presence of tetrabenazine (an inhibitor of vesicular uptake), the chromaffin cell toxicity of MPP/sup +/ was potentiated. The authors submit that the ability of the chromaffin cells to take up and store MPP/sup +/ in the chromaffin vesicle prevents the toxin's interaction with other structures and, thus, prevents cell damage. As an extension of this hypothesis, the relative resistance of some brain monoaminergic neurons to the toxic actions of 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine may result from the subcellular sequestration of MPP/sup +/ in the storage vesicle.

  15. IR, UV-Vis, magnetic and thermal characterization of chelates of some catecholamines and 4-aminoantipyrine with Fe(III) and Cu(II)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Gehad G.; Zayed, M. A.; El-Dien, F. A. Nour; El-Nahas, Reham G.

    2004-07-01

    The dopamine derivatives participate in the regulation of wide variety of physiological functions in the human body and in medication life. Increase and/or decrease in the concentration of dopamine in human body reflect an indication for diseases such as Schizophrenia and/or Parkinson diseases. α-Methyldopa (α-MD) in tablets is used in medication of hypertension. The Fe(III) and Cu(II) chelates with coupled products of adrenaline hydrogen tartarate (AHT), levodopa (LD), α-MD and carbidopa (CD) with 4-aminoantipyrine (4-AAP) are prepared and characterized. Different physico-chemical methods like IR, magnetic and UV-Vis spectra are used to investigate the structure of these chelates. Fe(III) form 1:2 (M:catecholamines) chelates while Cu(II) form 1:1 chelates. Catecholamines behave as a bidentate mono- or dibasic ligands in binding to the metal ions. IR spectra show that the catecholamines are coordinated to the metal ions in a bidentate manner with O,O donor sites of the phenolic - OH. Magnetic moment measurements reveal the presence of Fe(III) chelates in octahedral geometry while the Cu(II) chelates are square planar. The thermal decomposition of Fe(III) and Cu(II) complexes is studied using thermogravimetric (TGA) and differential thermal analysis (DTA) techniques. The water molecules are removed in the first step followed immediately by decomposition of the ligand molecules. The activation thermodynamic parameters, such as, energy of activation, enthalpy, entropy and free energy change of the complexes are evaluated and the relative thermal stability of the complexes are discussed.

  16. Central role for sodium in the pathogenesis of blood pressure changes independent of angiotensin, aldosterone and catecholamines in type 1 (insulin-dependent) diabetes mellitus

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Feldt-Rasmussen, B; Mathiesen, E R; Deckert, T;

    1987-01-01

    .41, p less than 0.01). Extracellular volume was increased in patients (p less than 0.05), whereas plasma volume was normal. Supine serum angiotensin II was suppressed in the patients (p less than 0.001). A negative correlation was found between mean blood pressure and supine serum aldosterone (n = 68, r...... = -0.24, p less than 0.05), and exchangeable sodium and aldosterone (n = 66, r = -0.36, p less than 0.002) in all patients. The catecholamine levels were also suppressed or normal in the patients.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)...

  17. Novel diagnosis for citrus stubborn disease by detection of a spiroplasma citri-secreted protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Jinxia; Pagliaccia, Deborah; Morgan, Robyn; Qiao, Yongli; Pan, Songqin; Vidalakis, Georgios; Ma, Wenbo

    2014-02-01

    Citrus stubborn disease (CSD), first identified in California, is a widespread bacterial disease found in most arid citrus-producing regions in the United States and the Mediterranean Region. The disease is caused by Spiroplasma citri, an insect-transmitted and phloem-colonizing bacterium. CSD causes significant tree damage resulting in loss of fruit production and quality. Detection of CSD is challenging due to low and fluctuating titer and sporadic distribution of the pathogen in infected trees. In this study, we report the development of a novel diagnostic method for CSD using an S. citri-secreted protein as the detection marker. Microbial pathogens secrete a variety of proteins during infection that can potentially disperse systemically in infected plants with the vascular flow. Therefore, their distribution may not be restricted to the pathogen infection sites and could be used as a biological marker for infection. Using mass spectrometry analysis, we identified a unique secreted protein from S. citri that is highly expressed in the presence of citrus phloem extract. ScCCPP1, an antibody generated against this protein, was able to distinguish S. citri-infected citrus and periwinkle from healthy plants. In addition, the antiserum could be used to detect CSD using a simple direct tissue print assay without the need for sample processing or specialized lab equipment and may be suitable for field surveys. This study provides proof of a novel concept of using pathogen-secreted protein as a marker for diagnosis of a citrus bacterial disease and can probably be applied to other plant diseases.

  18. Ultrastructural and histochemical markers of endometrial secretion induction in habitual miscarriage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ilizarova, N A; Marinkin, I O; Ageeva, T A; Bgatova, N P; Kuleshov, V M; Aidagulova, S V

    2009-10-01

    Biphasic hormone therapy at the stage of pre-gestation treatment of patients with habitual miscarriages stimulates the expression of progesterone receptors in the endometrium during the secretory phase of the menstrual cycle with full-value ultrastructural rearrangement of the endometrial glandular components in comparison with the patients receiving metabolic therapy alone. PMID:20396766

  19. Markers of renal function tests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shivaraj Gowda

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: The markers of renal function test assess the normal functioning of kidneys. These markers may be radioactive and non radioactive. They indicate the glomerular filtration rate, concentrating and diluting capacity of kidneys (tubular function. If there is an increase or decrease in the valves of these markers it indicates dysfunction of kidney. Aim: The aim of this review is to compare and analyze the present and newer markers of renal function tests which help in diagnosis of clinical disorders. Material & Methods: An extensive literature survey was done aiming to compare and compile renal function tests makers required in diagnosis of diseases. Results: Creatinine, urea, uric acid and electrolytes are makers for routine analysis whereas several studies have confirmed and consolidated the usefulness of markers such as cystatin C and β-Trace Protein. Conclusion: We conclude that further investigation is necessary to define these biomarkers in terms of usefulness in assessing renal function.

  20. Applying secret sharing for HIS backup exchange.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuroda, Tomohiro; Kimura, Eizen; Matsumura, Yasushi; Yamashita, Yoshinori; Hiramatsu, Haruhiko; Kume, Naoto; Sato, Atsushi

    2013-01-01

    To secure business continuity is indispensable for hospitals to fulfill its social responsibility under disasters. Although to back up the data of the hospital information system (HIS) at multiple remote sites is a key strategy of business continuity plan (BCP), the requirements to treat privacy sensitive data jack up the cost for the backup. The secret sharing is a method to split an original secret message up so that each individual piece is meaningless, but putting sufficient number of pieces together to reveal the original message. The secret sharing method eases us to exchange HIS backups between multiple hospitals. This paper evaluated the feasibility of the commercial secret sharing solution for HIS backup through several simulations. The result shows that the commercial solution is feasible to realize reasonable HIS backup exchange platform when template of contract between participating hospitals is ready. PMID:24110653

  1. Secretion management in the mechanically ventilated patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mantellini E.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: the aim of this work is to highlight the importance of a correct management of the secretions in the patient submitted to mechanical ventilation (MV. Methods: analysis of the current bibliography related to respiratory infections and secretion in patients with mechanically ventilation. We focus on the use of in-ex suflator achine (cough machine associated with High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO.Results: we observe a reduction of pulmonary infection and a better management of bronchial secretion in patient undergone to the use of in-ex suflator machine (cough machine associated with High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO.Conclusions: the correct approach to patients submitted to mechanical ventilation (MV expect the use of High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO (VEST and in-ex suflator machine (cough machine to decrease pulmonary infection thank to a reduction of permanence of bronchial secretions in the lungs .

  2. Cell Secretion: Current Structural and Biochemical Insights

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Trikha

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Essential physiological functions in eukaryotic cells, such as release of hormones and digestive enzymes, neurotransmission, and intercellular signaling, are all achieved by cell secretion. In regulated (calcium-dependent secretion, membrane-bound secretory vesicles dock and transiently fuse with specialized, permanent, plasma membrane structures, called porosomes or fusion pores. Porosomes are supramolecular, cup-shaped lipoprotein structures at the cell plasma membrane that mediate and control the release of vesicle cargo to the outside of the cell. The sizes of porosomes range from 150nm in diameter in acinar cells of the exocrine pancreas to 12nm in neurons. In recent years, significant progress has been made in our understanding of the porosome and the cellular activities required for cell secretion, such as membrane fusion and swelling of secretory vesicles. The discovery of the porosome complex and the molecular mechanism of cell secretion are summarized in this article.

  3. Insulin and Glucagon Secretion In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajan, Arun S.

    1998-01-01

    Long-duration space flight is associated with many physiological abnormalities in astronauts. In particular, altered regulation of the hormones insulin and glucagon may contribute to metabolic disturbances such as increased blood sugar levels, which if persistently elevated result in toxic effects. These changes are also observed in the highly prevalent disease diabetes, which affects 16 million Americans and consumes over $100 billion in annual healthcare costs. By mimicking the microgravity environment of space in the research laboratory using a NASA-developed bioreactor, one can study the physiology of insulin and glucagon secretion and determine if there are alterations in these cellular processes. The original specific objectives of the project included: (1) growing ('cell culture') of pancreatic islet beta and alpha cells that secrete insulin and glucagon respectively, in the NASA bioreactor; (2) examination of the effects of microgravity on insulin and glucagon secretion; and (3) study of molecular mechanisms of insulin and glucagon secretion if altered by microgravity.

  4. Regulation of glucagon secretion by incretins

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Jens Juul; Christensen, M; Lund, A;

    2011-01-01

    Glucagon secretion plays an essential role in the regulation of hepatic glucose production, and elevated fasting and postprandial plasma glucagon concentrations in patients with type 2 diabetes (T2DM) contribute to their hyperglycaemia. The reason for the hyperglucagonaemia is unclear, but recent...... studies have shown lack of suppression after oral but preserved suppression after isoglycaemic intravenous glucose, pointing to factors from the gut. Gastrointestinal hormones that are secreted in response to oral glucose include glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) that strongly inhibits glucagon secretion......, and GLP-2 and GIP, both of which stimulate secretion. When the three hormones are given together on top of isoglycaemic intravenous glucose, glucagon suppression is delayed in a manner similar to that observed after oral glucose. Studies with the GLP-1 receptor antagonist, exendin 9-39, suggest...

  5. Cholecystokinin inhibits gastrin secretion independently of paracrine somatostatin secretion in the pig

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmidt, P T; Hansen, L; Hilsted, L;

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cholecystokinin inhibits the secretion of gastrin from antral G cells, an effect that is speculated to be mediated by D cells secreting somatostatin. The aim of the study was to test directly whether cholecystokinin inhibition of antral gastrin secretion is mediated by somatostatin....... METHODS: The effects of CCK on gastrin and somatostatin secretion were studied in isolated vascularly perfused preparations of pig antrum before and after immunoneutralization brought about by infusion of large amounts of a high affinity monoclonal antibody against somatostatin. RESULTS: CCK infusion...... at 10(-9) M and 10(-8) M decreased gastrin output to 70.5% +/- 7.6% (n = 8) and 76.3% +/- 3.6% (n = 7) of basal output, respectively. CCK at 10(-10) M had no effect (n = 6). Somatostatin secretion was dose-dependently increased by CCK infusion and increased to 268 +/- 38.2% (n = 7) of basal secretion...

  6. Standpoints and protection of business secrets

    OpenAIRE

    Brane Bertoncelj

    2001-01-01

    The human impact on an information system where data bases, containing business secretes, are stored is one of the most unreliable and unforeseeable factors. For this reason, it must not be underestimated. The results of this study indicate a correlation between behavioural intention and protection of business secretes. There is a statistically significant correlation between behavioural intention and behavioural supervision. This means that an increased level of perceived supervision over o...

  7. Secretion management in the mechanically ventilated patient

    OpenAIRE

    Mantellini E.; Perrero L.; Provenzano G.; Petrozzino S.

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: the aim of this work is to highlight the importance of a correct management of the secretions in the patient submitted to mechanical ventilation (MV). Methods: analysis of the current bibliography related to respiratory infections and secretion in patients with mechanically ventilation. We focus on the use of in-ex suflator achine (cough machine) associated with High Frequency Chest Wall Oscillation (HFCWO).Results: we observe a reduction of pulmonary infection and a better managemen...

  8. Linear multi-secret sharing schemes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIAO Liangliang; LIU Mulan

    2005-01-01

    In this paper the linear multi-secret sharing schemes are studied by using monotone span programs. A relation between computing monotone Boolean functions by using monotone span programs and realizing multi-access structures by using linear multisecret sharing schemes is shown. Furthermore, the concept of optimal linear multi-secret sharing scheme is presented and the several schemes are proved to be optimal.

  9. Peptides and neurotransmitters that affect renin secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganong, W. F.; Porter, J. P.; Bahnson, T. D.; Said, S. I.

    1984-01-01

    Substance P inhibits renin secretion. This polypeptide is a transmitter in primary afferent neurons and is released from the peripheral as well as the central portions of these neurons. It is present in afferent nerves from the kidneys. Neuropeptide Y, which is a cotransmitter with norepinephrine and epinephrine, is found in sympathetic neurons that are closely associated with and presumably innervate the juxtagolmerular cells. Its effect on renin secretion is unknown, but it produces renal vasoconstriction and natriuresis. Vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) is a cotransmitter with acetylocholine in cholinergic neurons, and this polypeptide stimulates renin secretion. We cannot find any evidence for its occurence in neurons in the kidneys, but various stimuli increase plasma VIP to levels comparable to those produced by doses of exogenous VIP which stimulated renin secretion. Neostigmine increases plasma VIP and plasma renin activity, and the VIP appears to be responsible for the increase in renin secretion, since the increase is not blocked by renal denervation or propranolol. Stimulation of various areas in the brain produces sympathetically mediated increases in plasma renin activity associated with increases in blood pressure. However, there is pharmacological evidence that the renin response can be separated from the blood pressure response. In anaesthetized dogs, drugs that increase central serotonergic discharge increase renin secretion without increasing blood pressure. In rats, activation of sertonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus increases renin secretion by a pathway that projects from this nucleus to the ventral hypothalamus, and from there to the kidneys via the sympathetic nervous system. The serotonin releasing drug parachloramphetamine also increases plasma VIP, but VIP does not appear to be the primary mediator of the renin response. There is preliminary evidence that the serotonergic neurons in the dorsal raphe nucleus are part of the

  10. Structure of a type IV secretion system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Low, Harry H; Gubellini, Francesca; Rivera-Calzada, Angel; Braun, Nathalie; Connery, Sarah; Dujeancourt, Annick; Lu, Fang; Redzej, Adam; Fronzes, Rémi; Orlova, Elena V; Waksman, Gabriel

    2014-04-24

    Bacterial type IV secretion systems translocate virulence factors into eukaryotic cells, distribute genetic material between bacteria and have shown potential as a tool for the genetic modification of human cells. Given the complex choreography of the substrate through the secretion apparatus, the molecular mechanism of the type IV secretion system has proved difficult to dissect in the absence of structural data for the entire machinery. Here we use electron microscopy to reconstruct the type IV secretion system encoded by the Escherichia coli R388 conjugative plasmid. We show that eight proteins assemble in an intricate stoichiometric relationship to form an approximately 3 megadalton nanomachine that spans the entire cell envelope. The structure comprises an outer membrane-associated core complex connected by a central stalk to a substantial inner membrane complex that is dominated by a battery of 12 VirB4 ATPase subunits organized as side-by-side hexameric barrels. Our results show a secretion system with markedly different architecture, and consequently mechanism, to other known bacterial secretion systems. PMID:24670658

  11. Spinal astrocytes produce and secrete dynorphin neuropeptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wahlert, Andrew; Funkelstein, Lydiane; Fitzsimmons, Bethany; Yaksh, Tony; Hook, Vivian

    2013-04-01

    Dynorphin peptide neurotransmitters (neuropeptides) have been implicated in spinal pain processing based on the observations that intrathecal delivery of dynorphin results in proalgesic effects and disruption of extracellular dynorphin activity (by antisera) prevents injury evoked hyperalgesia. However, the cellular source of secreted spinal dynorphin has been unknown. For this reason, this study investigated the expression and secretion of dynorphin-related neuropeptides from spinal astrocytes (rat) in primary culture. Dynorphin A (1-17), dynorphin B, and α-neoendorphin were found to be present in the astrocytes, illustrated by immunofluorescence confocal microscopy, in a discrete punctate pattern of cellular localization. Measurement of astrocyte cellular levels of these dynorphins by radioimmunoassays confirmed the expression of these three dynorphin-related neuropeptides. Notably, BzATP (3'-O-(4-benzoyl)benzoyl adenosine 5'-triphosphate) and KLA (di[3-deoxy-D-manno-octulosonyl]-lipid A) activation of purinergic and toll-like receptors, respectively, resulted in stimulated secretion of dynorphins A and B. However, α-neoendorphin secretion was not affected by BzATP or KLA. These findings suggest that dynorphins A and B undergo regulated secretion from spinal astrocytes. These findings also suggest that spinal astrocytes may provide secreted dynorphins that participate in spinal pain processing.

  12. Development of secreted proteins as biotherapeutic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonin-Debs, Angelika L; Boche, Irene; Gille, Hendrik; Brinkmann, Ulrich

    2004-04-01

    As one of the most important classes of proteins, secreted factors account for about one-tenth of the human genome, 3000 - 4000 in total, including factors of signalling pathways, blood coagulation and immune defence, as well as digestive enzymes and components of the extracellular matrix. Secreted proteins are a rich source of new therapeutics and drug targets, and are currently the focus of major drug discovery programmes throughout the industry. Many of the most important novel drugs developed in biotechnology have resulted from the application of secreted proteins as therapeutics. Secreted proteins often circulate throughout the body and, therefore, have access to most organs and tissues. Because of that, many of the factors are themselves therapeutic agents. This paper gives an overview on the features and functions of human secreted proteins and peptides, as well as strategies by which to discover additional therapeutic proteins from the human 'secretome'. Furthermore, a variety of examples are provided for the therapeutic use of recombinant secreted proteins as 'biologicals', including features and applications of recombinant antibodies, erythropoietin, insulin, interferon, plasminogen activators, growth hormone and colony-stimulating factors. PMID:15102604

  13. The challenges of treating paraganglioma patients with {sup 177}Lu-DOTATATE PRRT: Catecholamine crises, tumor lysis syndrome and the need for modification of treatment protocols

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makis, William; Mccann, Karey; Mcewan, Alexander J. B. [Dept. of Diagnostic Imaging, Cross Cancer Institute, Alberta (China)

    2015-09-15

    A high percentage of paragangliomas express somatostatin receptors that can be utilized for targeted radioisotope therapy. The aim of this study was to describe and discuss the challenges of treating these tumors with {sup 177}Lu-[DOTA0,Tyr3]octreotate (DOTATATE) radioisotope therapy using established protocols. Three paraganglioma patients were treated with 4–5 cycles of {sup 177}Lu-DOTATATE and were evaluated for side effects and response to therapy. Two of the three patients developed severe adverse reactions following their first {sup 177}Lu-DOTATATE treatment. One patient developed a catecholamine crisis and tumor lysis syndrome within hours of treatment, requiring intensive care unit (ICU) support, and another developed a catecholamine crisis 3 days after treatment, requiring hospitalization. The treatment protocols at our institution were subsequently modified by increasing the radioisotope infusion time from 15 to 30 min, as recommended in the literature, to 2–4 h and by reducing the administered dose of {sup 177}Lu-DOTATATE. Subsequent {sup 177}Lu-DOTATATE treatments utilizing the modified protocols were well tolerated, and response to therapy was achieved in all three patients, resulting in significantly improved quality of life. {sup 177}Lu-DOTATATE is an exciting new therapeutic option in the management of paragangliomas; however, current treatment protocols described in the literature may need to be modified by lengthening the infusion time and/or lowering the initial treatment dose to prevent or reduce the severity of adverse reactions.

  14. MarkerSet: a marker selection tool based on markers location and informativity in experimental designs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Demeure Olivier

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recent sequencing of full genomes has led to the availability of many SNP markers which are very useful for the mapping of complex traits. In livestock production, there are still no commercial arrays and many studies use home-made sets of SNPs. Thus, the current methodologies for SNP genotyping are still expensive and it is a crucial step to select the SNPs to use. Indeed, the main factors affecting the power of the linkage analyses are the density of the genetic map and the heterozygosity of markers in tested animal parents. Findings This is why we have developed a PERL program selecting a defined number of markers based on their locations on the genome and their informativity in specific experimental designs. As an option, different experimental designs can be combined in order to select the best possible common marker set. The program has been tested using different conditions of marker informativity and density with both real and simulated datasets. The results show the efficiency of our program to select the most informative markers even if there is a wide range of informativity for whole genome scan mapping analyses. In case of combination of different experimental crosses, the multidesign mode can optimize the SNP markers selection. Conclusion Written in PERL, it assures a maximum portability to other operating systems (OS and the source code availability for user modifications. Except for the simulation mode which could be time consuming, MarkerSet can compute results in a very short time.

  15. γ-aminobutyric acid secreted from islet β-cells modulates exocrine secretion in rat pancreas

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yong-Deuk Park; Zheng-Yun Cui; Guang Wu; Hyung-Seo Park; Hyoung-Jin Park

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the role of endogenous γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) in pancreatic exocrine secretion.METHODS: The isolated, vascularly perfused rat pancreas was employed in this study to eliminate the possible influences of extrinsic nerves and hormones.Cholecystokinin (CCK; 10 pmol/L) was intra-arterially given to stimulate exocrine secretion of the pancreas.RESULTS: Glutamine, a major precursor of GABA, which was given intra-arterially at concentrations of 1, 4 and 10 mmol/L, dose-dependently elevated the CCK-stimulated secretions of fluid and amylase in the normal pancreas.Bicuculline (10 μmol/L), a GABAA receptor antagonist,blocked the enhancing effect of glutamine (4 mmol/L) on the CCK-stimulated exocrine secretions. Glutamine, at concentrations of 1, 4 and 10 mmol/L, dose-dependently increased the GABA concentration in portal effluent of the normal pancreas. The effects of glutamine on the CCK-stimulated exocrine secretion as well as the GABA secretion were markedly reduced in the streptozotocintreated pancreas.CONCLUSION: GABA could be secreted from β-cells into the islet-acinar portal system after administration of glutainine, and could enhance the CCK-stimulated exocrine secretion through GABAA receptors. Thus,GABA in islet β-cells is a hormone modulating pancreatic exocrine secretion.

  16. Intestinal Bicarbonate Secretion in Cystic Fibrosis Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Clarke LL

    2001-07-01

    Full Text Available Gene-targeted disruption of the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductance regulator (CFTR in mice results in an intestinal disease phenotype that is remarkably similar to bowel disease in cystic fibrosis patients. In the intestinal segment downstream from the stomach (i.e., the duodenum, CFTR plays an important role in bicarbonate secretion that protects the epithelium from acidic gastric effluent. In this report, we examine the role of CFTR in cAMP-stimulated bicarbonate secretion in the murine duodenum and the mechanisms of acid-base transport that are revealed in CFTR knockout (CF mice. Ion substitution, channel blocker and pH stat studies comparing duodena from wild-type and CF mice indicate that CFTR mediates a HCO(3(- conductance across the apical membrane of the epithelium. In the presence of a favorable cell-to-lumen HCO(3(- gradient, the CFTR-mediated HCO(3(- current accounts for about 80% of stimulated HCO(3(- secretion. Exposure of the duodenal mucosa to acidic pH reveals another role of CFTR in facilitating HCO(3(- secretion via an electroneutral, 4,4'-diisothiocyanato-stilbene-2,2' disulfonic acid (DIDS sensitive Cl(-/HCO(3(- exchange process. In CF duodenum, other apical membrane acid-base transporters retain function, thereby affording limited control of transepithelial pH. Activity of a Cl(--dependent anion exchanger provides near-constant HCO(3(- secretion in CF intestine, but under basal conditions the magnitude of secretion is lessened by simultaneous activity of a Na(+/H(+ exchanger (NHE. During cAMP stimulation of CF duodenum, a small increase in net base secretion is measured but the change results from cAMP inhibition of NHE activity rather than increased HCO(3(- secretion. Interestingly, a small inward current that is sensitive to the anion channel blocker, 5-nitro-2(3-phenylpropyl amino-benzoate (NPPB, is also activated during cAMP stimulation of the CFTR-null intestine but the identity of the current is yet to be

  17. Understanding oceanic migrations with intrinsic biogeochemical markers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raül Ramos

    Full Text Available Migratory marine vertebrates move annually across remote oceanic water masses crossing international borders. Many anthropogenic threats such as overfishing, bycatch, pollution or global warming put millions of marine migrants at risk especially during their long-distance movements. Therefore, precise knowledge about these migratory movements to understand where and when these animals are more exposed to human impacts is vital for addressing marine conservation issues. Because electronic tracking devices suffer from several constraints, mainly logistical and financial, there is emerging interest in finding appropriate intrinsic markers, such as the chemical composition of inert tissues, to study long-distance migrations and identify wintering sites. Here, using tracked pelagic seabirds and some of their own feathers which were known to be grown at different places and times within the annual cycle, we proved the value of biogeochemical analyses of inert tissue as tracers of marine movements and habitat use. Analyses of feathers grown in summer showed that both stable isotope signatures and element concentrations can signal the origin of breeding birds feeding in distinct water masses. However, only stable isotopes signalled water masses used during winter because elements mainly accumulated during the long breeding period are incorporated into feathers grown in both summer and winter. Our findings shed new light on the simple and effective assignment of marine organisms to distinct oceanic areas, providing new opportunities to study unknown migration patterns of secretive species, including in relation to human-induced mortality on specific populations in the marine environment.

  18. Understanding oceanic migrations with intrinsic biogeochemical markers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Raül; González-Solís, Jacob; Croxall, John P; Oro, Daniel; Ruiz, Xavier

    2009-01-01

    Migratory marine vertebrates move annually across remote oceanic water masses crossing international borders. Many anthropogenic threats such as overfishing, bycatch, pollution or global warming put millions of marine migrants at risk especially during their long-distance movements. Therefore, precise knowledge about these migratory movements to understand where and when these animals are more exposed to human impacts is vital for addressing marine conservation issues. Because electronic tracking devices suffer from several constraints, mainly logistical and financial, there is emerging interest in finding appropriate intrinsic markers, such as the chemical composition of inert tissues, to study long-distance migrations and identify wintering sites. Here, using tracked pelagic seabirds and some of their own feathers which were known to be grown at different places and times within the annual cycle, we proved the value of biogeochemical analyses of inert tissue as tracers of marine movements and habitat use. Analyses of feathers grown in summer showed that both stable isotope signatures and element concentrations can signal the origin of breeding birds feeding in distinct water masses. However, only stable isotopes signalled water masses used during winter because elements mainly accumulated during the long breeding period are incorporated into feathers grown in both summer and winter. Our findings shed new light on the simple and effective assignment of marine organisms to distinct oceanic areas, providing new opportunities to study unknown migration patterns of secretive species, including in relation to human-induced mortality on specific populations in the marine environment. PMID:19623244

  19. [Circulating "tumor markers" in gastrointestinal tumors].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borlinghaus, P; Lamerz, R

    1991-09-01

    Tumor markers (TM) of the neoplastic cell can be divided into non-shedded substances and antigens shedded in blood, urine or other body fluids. For clinicians circulating TM are more important. All relevant circulating TM are not useful in screening of asymptomatic patients because of insufficient sensitivity and specificity. With caution they are useful in the observation of risk groups. Circulating TM have their main significance as additional parameters in monitoring symptomatic patients with malignancies. Several follow up determinations are more important than one single measurement. During follow up of tumor patients TM should not be checked automatically if there are no diagnostic or therapeutical consequences. The clinically most important circulating TM in non-hormone secreting tumors of the gastrointestinal tract are the oncofetal antigens CEA and AFP and antigens defined by monoclonal antibodies e. g. CA 19-9 and CA 72-4. AFP is the primary TM in hepatocellular carcinoma, often elevated in hepatoblastoma and always normal in cholangiocellular carcinoma. CEA is the TM of first choice in patients with colorectal carcinomas and liver metastasis. CA 19-9 is TM of first choice in pancreatic carcinoma and additionally of diagnostic value in cholangiocellular carcinoma and tumors of the bile ducts. In cancer of the stomach CA 19-9 and CEA are secondary TM in combination with CA 72-4 as primary TM. Care should be taken that slight and moderate elevations of TM can be observed in benign diseases of liver, pancreas and bowel.

  20. Radioenzymatic test for catecholamines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention deals with a method to determine total endogenic epinephrine and norepinephrine in human and mammal systems consisting of a supernatant of deproteinated tissue homogenate, blood serum, or blood plasma. The method uses a tritium tracer technique where the epinephrine (norepinephrine) is reactet to O-methylated (3H) epinephrine (norepinephrine) in an enzymatic reaction while the product is oxygenated to vanillin-3H and analyzed with the aid of a liquid scintillation spectrometer. Another patent claim deals with a method for the purification of the enzyme catechin-O-methyl transferase from rat liver and ways to optimize the enzymatic reaction as well as with a method of optimizing oxygenation to vanillin-3H, its isolation and measurements. (VJ)

  1. Secretion of SerpinB2 from endothelial cells activated with inflammatory stimuli

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boncela, Joanna; Przygodzka, Patrycja [Institute of Medical Biology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Lodz (Poland); Wyroba, Elzbieta [Nencki Institute of Experimental Biology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Warsaw (Poland); Papiewska-Pajak, Izabela [Department of Molecular and Medical Biophysics, Medical University of Lodz (Poland); Cierniewski, Czeslaw S., E-mail: czeslaw.cierniewski@umed.lodz.pl [Institute of Medical Biology, Polish Academy of Sciences, Lodz (Poland); Department of Molecular and Medical Biophysics, Medical University of Lodz (Poland)

    2013-05-01

    Due to the lack of an N-terminal signal peptide, SerpinB2 (plasminogen activator inhibitor type 2) accumulates in cells and only a small percentage of it is secreted. The extracellular concentration of SerpinB2 significantly increases during inflammation. In the present study we investigated the mechanism with which SerpinB2 can be secreted from endothelial cells activated with LPS. We evaluated the intracellular distribution of SerpinB2 by double immunogold labeling followed by a high resolution electron microscopy analysis. We found that SerpinB2 gathers in the vesicular structures and in the endothelial cell periphery. These vesicles stained positive for the trans-Golgi network marker TGN46, which is consistent with their formation by the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) and Golgi-dependent pathways. SerpinB2 was delivered to the plasma membrane, apparently together with TGN46 in the same vesicles, which after fusion with the membranes released cargo. Secretion of SerpinB2 was partially inhibited by brefeldin A. The secreted SerpinB2 was predominantly in its nonglycosylated 43 kDa form as evaluated by Western immunoblotting. Our data suggest that increased expression of SerpinB2 by an inflammatory stimulus is sufficient to generate structures that resemble secretory vesicles. These vesicles may represent the mechanism by which high local concentrations of SerpinB2 are released at inflammation sites from endothelial cells. - Highlights: ► LPS stimulates generation of secretory vesicles containing SerpinB2. ► SerpinB2 concentrates in TGN46 positive vesicles close to the plasma membrane. ► Brefeldin A inhibits secretion of SerpinB2. ► The secreted SerpinB2 was predominantly in its nonglycosylated 43 kDa.

  2. Quantum Ramp Secret Sharing Scheme and Quantum Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Heling; Wang, Huifeng; Wang, Bin

    2016-09-01

    In order to improve the efficiency of quantum secret sharing, quantum ramp secret sharing schemes were proposed (Ogawa et al., Phys. Rev. A 72, 032318 [2005]), which had a trade-off between security and coding efficiency. In quantum ramp secret sharing, partial information about the secret is allowed to leak to a set of participants, called an intermediate set, which cannot fully reconstruct the secret. This paper revisits the size of a share in the quantum ramp secret scheme based on a relation between the quantum operations and the coherent information. We also propose an optimal quantum ramp secret sharing scheme.

  3. [Tumor markers for hepatocellular carcinoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tateishi, Ryosuke; Enooku, Kenichiro; Shiina, Shuichiro; Koike, Kazuhiko

    2012-05-01

    Three tumor markers for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) are available in Japan: alpha-fetoprotein (AFP), protein induced by vitamin K absence or antagonists-II (PIVKA-II), and Lens culinaris agglutinin-reactive fraction of alpha-fetoprotein (AFP-L3). Although AFP has drawbacks in its specificity, it is widely utilized in treatment evaluation and prognosis prediction. PIVKA-II is a unique marker that does not correlate with AFP value and can predict microvascular invasion. AFP-L3 is a highly specific marker and strong predictor of poor prognosis. These three markers are indispensable in every aspect of clinical practice of hepatocellular carcinoma including surveillance, diagnosis, treatment evaluation, and prognosis prediction.

  4. Prenatal Screening Using Maternal Markers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Howard Cuckle

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Maternal markers are widely used to screen for fetal neural tube defects (NTDs, chromosomal abnormalities and cardiac defects. Some are beginning to broaden prenatal screening to include pregnancy complications such as pre-eclampsia. The methods initially developed for NTDs using a single marker have since been built upon to develop high performance multi-maker tests for chromosomal abnormalities. Although cell-free DNA testing is still too expensive to be considered for routine application in public health settings, it can be cost-effective when used in combination with existing multi-maker marker tests. The established screening methods can be readily applied in the first trimester to identify pregnancies at high risk of pre-eclampsia and offer prevention though aspirin treatment. Prenatal screening for fragile X syndrome might be adopted more widely if the test was to be framed as a form of maternal marker screening.

  5. Secretion of SerpinB2 from endothelial cells activated with inflammatory stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boncela, Joanna; Przygodzka, Patrycja; Wyroba, Elzbieta; Papiewska-Pajak, Izabela; Cierniewski, Czeslaw S

    2013-05-01

    Due to the lack of an N-terminal signal peptide, SerpinB2 (plasminogen activator inhibitor type 2) accumulates in cells and only a small percentage of it is secreted. The extracellular concentration of SerpinB2 significantly increases during inflammation. In the present study we investigated the mechanism with which SerpinB2 can be secreted from endothelial cells activated with LPS. We evaluated the intracellular distribution of SerpinB2 by double immunogold labeling followed by a high resolution electron microscopy analysis. We found that SerpinB2 gathers in the vesicular structures and in the endothelial cell periphery. These vesicles stained positive for the trans-Golgi network marker TGN46, which is consistent with their formation by the endoplasmatic reticulum (ER) and Golgi-dependent pathways. SerpinB2 was delivered to the plasma membrane, apparently together with TGN46 in the same vesicles, which after fusion with the membranes released cargo. Secretion of SerpinB2 was partially inhibited by brefeldin A. The secreted SerpinB2 was predominantly in its nonglycosylated 43kDa form as evaluated by Western immunoblotting. Our data suggest that increased expression of SerpinB2 by an inflammatory stimulus is sufficient to generate structures that resemble secretory vesicles. These vesicles may represent the mechanism by which high local concentrations of SerpinB2 are released at inflammation sites from endothelial cells.

  6. Expression dynamics of secreted protease genes in Trichophyton rubrum induced by key host's proteinaceous components.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Wenchuan; Liu, Tao; Wang, Jin; Li, Ruoyu; Jin, Qi

    2009-11-01

    Trichophyton rubrum is the most common agent of dermatophytosis, a disease that affects millions of individuals worldwide. Its molecular pathogenicity mechanisms are still not completely elucidated. It has been widely recognized that proteases secreted by T. rubrum are the key virulence factors during host infection. However, our knowledge about the expression of its secreted proteases in host infection is still obscure. This investigation provides the expression patterns and dynamics of secreted protease genes belonging to the subtilisins (SUB) and metalloproteases (MEP) gene families in T. rubrum. The data was obtained under simulated host infection conditions through relative quantification of real time PCR. Keratin, collagen, and elastin induced the expression of similar protease genes, and the expression patterns and dynamics of these protease genes in media containing human skin sections were different from those in media containing individual protein substrates. According to the expression dynamics of these protease genes, we conclude that Sub3, Sub4, and Mep4 may be the dominant proteases secreted by T. rubrum during host infection, and that these proteases could be good targets for new antifungal chemotherapy and molecular diagnostic markers. This work presents useful molecular details to further our understanding of the pathogenesis of dermatophytosis.

  7. Role of adipose secreted factors and kisspeptin in the metabolic control of gonadotropin secretion and puberty

    Science.gov (United States)

    Factors secreted by adipose tissue continue to be discovered. Evidence indicates a strong link between neural influences and adipocyte expression and secretion of a wide array of cytokines, neurotrophic factors, growth factors, binding proteins, and neuropeptides. These “adipokines” are linked to im...

  8. Meaningful Share Generation for Increased Number of Secrets in Visual Secret-Sharing Scheme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Ulutas

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a new scheme for hiding two halftone secret images into two meaningful shares created from halftone cover images. Meaningful shares are more desirable than noise-like (meaningless shares in Visual Secret Sharing because they look natural and do not attract eavesdroppers' attention. Previous works in the field focus on either increasing number of secrets or creating meaningful shares for one secret image. The method outlined in this paper both increases the number of secrets and creates meaningful shares at the same time. While the contrast ratio of shares is equal to that of Extended Visual Cryptography, two secrets are encoded into two shares as opposed to one secret in the Extended Visual Cryptography. Any two natural-looking images can be used as cover unlike the Halftone Visual Cryptography method where one cover should be the negative of the other cover image and can only encode one secret. Effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by an experiment.

  9. Progress on macrophage’s proinflammatory products as markers of acute endometriosis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alicja Ziętek; Konrad Futyma; Łukasz Nowakowski; Marek Gogacz; Tomasz Rechberger

    2015-01-01

    To provide the review of the macrophage activity products as pathophysiological markers of endometriosis by literature survey (PubMed, Cochrane). Immunoreactive cells and several of their synthesis products concentrations are elevated in the serum and peritoneal fluid in patients with endometriosis.The enhanced reactive proteins contributed to local inflammation and aggregation of endometriotic lesions. Immune response and immune surveillance of tissue play an important role in pathogenesis of endometriosis. Activated macrophages in peritoneal environment secrete immunoreactive cytokines which are responsible for inflammatory cascade of reactions. The immunoreactive cytokines should be a target not only as a disease marker but also as a part of therapeutic protocol.

  10. Incretin hormone secretion over the day

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ahren, B; Carr, RD; Deacon, Carolyn F.

    2010-01-01

    The two incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are key factors in the regulation of islet function and glucose metabolism, and incretin-based therapy for type 2 diabetes has gained considerable interest during recent years. Regulat......The two incretin hormones glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) are key factors in the regulation of islet function and glucose metabolism, and incretin-based therapy for type 2 diabetes has gained considerable interest during recent years....... Regulation of incretin hormone secretion is less well characterized. The main stimulus for incretin hormone secretion is presence of nutrients in the intestinal lumen, and carbohydrate, fat as well as protein all have the capacity to stimulate GIP and GLP-1 secretion. More recently, it has been established...... that a diurnal regulation exists with incretin hormone secretion to an identical meal being greater when the meal is served in the morning compared to in the afternoon. Finally, whether incretin hormone secretion is altered in disease states is an area with, so far, controversial results in different studies...

  11. Dynamics of protein secretion during adipocyte differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ojima, Koichi; Oe, Mika; Nakajima, Ikuyo; Muroya, Susumu; Nishimura, Takanori

    2016-08-01

    The major functions of adipocytes include both lipid storage and the production of secretory factors. However, the type of proteins released from mouse 3T3-L1 cells during adipocyte differentiation remains poorly understood. We examined the dynamics of secreted proteins during adipocyte differentiation using mass spectrometry (MS) combined with an iTRAQ (®) labeling method that enables the simultaneous analysis of relative protein expression levels. A total of 215 proteins were identified and quantified from approximately 10 000 MS/MS spectra. Of these, approximately 38% were categorized as secreted proteins based on gene ontology classification. Adipokine secretion levels were increased with the progression of differentiation. By contrast, levels of fibril collagen components, such as subunits of type I and III collagens, were decreased during differentiation. Basement membrane components attained their peak levels at day 4 when small lipid droplets accumulated in differentiated 3T3-L1 cells. Simultaneously, peak levels of collagen microfibril components that comprise type V and VI collagen subunits were also observed. Our data demonstrated that extracellular matrix components were predominantly released during the early and middle stages of adipocyte differentiation, with a subsequent increase in the secretion of adipokines. This suggests that 3T3-L1 cells secrete adipokines after their ECM is constructed during adipocyte differentiation. PMID:27516960

  12. Biochemical Methods to Analyze Wnt Protein Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glaeser, Kathrin; Boutros, Michael; Gross, Julia Christina

    2016-01-01

    Wnt proteins act as potent morphogens in various aspects of embryonic development and adult tissue homeostasis. However, in addition to its physiological importance, aberrant Wnt signaling has been linked to the onset and progression of different types of cancer. On the cellular level, the secretion of Wnt proteins involves trafficking of lipid-modified Wnts from the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) to Golgi and further compartments via the Wnt cargo receptor evenness interrupted. Others and we have recently shown that Wnt proteins are secreted on extracellular vesicles (EVs) such as microvesicles and exosomes. Although more details about specific regulation of Wnt secretion steps are emerging, it remains largely unknown how Wnt proteins are channeled into different release pathways such as lipoprotein particles, EVs and cytonemes. Here, we describe protocols to purify and quantify Wnts from the supernatant of cells by either assessing total Wnt proteins in the supernatant or monitoring Wnt proteins on EVs. Purified Wnts from the supernatant as well as total cellular protein content can be investigated by immunoblotting. Additionally, the relative activity of canonical Wnts in the supernatant can be assessed by a dual-luciferase Wnt reporter assay. Quantifying the amount of secreted Wnt proteins and their activity in the supernatant of cells allows the investigation of intracellular trafficking events that regulate Wnt secretion and the role of extracellular modulators of Wnt spreading. PMID:27590148

  13. Serum Markers of Intrahepatic Cholangiocarcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Malaguarnera

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cholangiocarcinoma (CCA is a relatively rare type of primary liver cancer that originates in the bile duct epithelium. It is an aggressive malignancy typified by unresponsiveness to chemotherapy and radiotherapy. Despite advances in radiologic techniques and laboratory diagnostic test, the diagnosis of CCA remains highly challenging. Development in molecular techniques has led to go into the possible use of serum markers in diagnosing of cholangiocarcinoma. This review summarizes the principal characteristics of serum markers of cholangiocarcinoma. The tumour markers used frequently such as Carbohydrate antigen 19-9 (CA 19-9, Carcinogenic Embryonic antigen (CEA, and Cancer Antigen 125 have shown sufficient sensitivity and specificity to detect and monitor CCA. In particular, the combination of these tumour markers seems to increase their efficiency in diagnosing of cholangiocarcinoma. New markers such as Soluble fragment of cytokeratin 19 (CYFRA 21-1 Mucins, Tumour Markers2- pyruvate-Kinase (TuM2- PK and metalloproteinase-7 (MMP-7 have been recently shown to help in the diagnosis of CCA, with in some cases a prognostic value.

  14. Pituitary glycoprotein hormone a-subunit secretion by cirrhotic patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira M.C.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Secretion of the a-subunit of pituitary glycoprotein hormones usually follows the secretion of intact gonadotropins and is increased in gonadal failure and decreased in isolated gonadotropin deficiency. The aim of the present study was to determine the levels of the a-subunit in the serum of patients with cirrhosis of the liver and to compare the results obtained for eugonadal cirrhotic patients with those obtained for cirrhotic patients with hypogonadotropic hypogonadism. Forty-seven of 63 patients with cirrhosis (74.6% presented hypogonadism (which was central in 45 cases and primary in 2, 7 were eugonadal, and 9 women were in normal menopause. The serum a-subunit was measured by the fluorimetric method using monoclonal antibodies. Cross-reactivity with LH, TSH, FSH and hCG was 6.5, 1.2, 4.3 and 1.1%, respectively, with an intra-assay coefficient of variation (CV of less than 5% and an interassay CV of 5%, and sensitivity limit of 4 ng/l. The serum a-subunit concentration ranged from 36 to 6253 ng/l, with a median of 273 ng/l. The median was 251 ng/l for patients with central hypogonadism and 198 ng/l for eugonadal patients. The correlation between the a-subunit and basal LH levels was significant both in the total sample (r = 0.48, P<0.01 and in the cirrhotic patients with central hypogonadism (r = 0.33, P = 0.02. Among men with central hypogonadism there was a negative correlation between a-subunit levels and total testosterone levels (r = 0.54, P<0.01 as well as free testosterone levels (r = -0.53, P<0.01. In conclusion, although the a-subunit levels are correlated with LH levels, at present they cannot be used as markers for hypogonadism in patients with cirrhosis of the liver.

  15. [Bulimia, bulimia-anorexia and nocturnal secretion of melatonin and cortisol].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parienti, V; Kennedy, S H; Brown, G M; Costa, D

    1988-01-01

    The authors compared nocturnal variations of melatonin (MT) and cortisol levels in subjects with bulimia (n = 12), 6 with a normal body weight and 6 with anorexia nervosa, as well as 6 control subjects. The hypothesis, formulated for anorexia nervosa, that a decrease of noradrenergic activity induces a decrease of pineal activity, therefore a decrease of melatonin secretion, was not confirmed by our study. Moreover, in subjects with bulimia in the absence of anorexia nervosa, no significant decrease of nocturnal melatonin secretion was reported. Significant differences were due to cortisol variations when comparing MTmax/Cmin ratios. Melatonin did not add any complementary biological cue for diagnostic assessment for subjects with eating disorder and depression. The results of this study suggest that melatonin does not appear to be a useful biological marker in bulimia.

  16. 6-[F-18]Fluoro-L-Dihydroxyphenylalanine Positron Emission Tomography Is Superior to Conventional Imaging with I-123-Metaiodobenzylguanidine Scintigraphy, Computer Tomography, and Magnetic Resonance Imaging in Localizing Tumors Causing Catecholamine Excess

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fiebrich, Helle-Brit; Brouwers, Adrienne H.; Kerstens, Michiel N.; Pijl, Milan E. J.; Kema, Ido P.; de Jong, Johan R.; Jager, Pieter L.; Elsinga, Philip H.; Dierckx, Rudi A. J. O.; van der Wal, Jacqueline E.; Sluiter, Wim J.; de Vries, Elisabeth G. E.; Links, Thera P.

    2009-01-01

    Context: Catecholamine excess is rare, but symptoms may be life threatening. Objective: The objective of the study was to investigate the sensitivity of 6-[F-18]fluoro-L-dihydroxyphenylalanine positron emission tomography (F-18-DOPAPET), compared with I-123-metaiodobenzylguanidine (I-123-MIBG) scint

  17. Hiding secret data into a carrier image

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ovidiu COSMA

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The object of steganography is embedding hidden information in an appropriate multimedia carrier, e.g., image, audio, or video. There are several known methods of solving this problem, which operate either in the space domain or in the frequency domain, and are distinguished by the following characteristics: payload, robustness and strength. The payload is the amount of secret data that can be embedded in the carrier without inducing suspicious artefacts, robustness indicates the degree in which the secret data is affected by the normal processing of the carrier e.g., compression, and the strength indicate how easy the presence of hidden data can be detected by steganalysis techniques. This paper presents a new method of hiding secret data into a digital image compressed by a technique based on the Discrete Wavelet Transform (DWT [2] and the Set Partitioning In Hierarchical Trees (SPIHT subband coding algorithm [6]. The proposed method admits huge payloads and has considerable strength.

  18. The 'Secret' of success part 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Busby, Mike

    2011-03-01

    Practice success is defined across the four'dimensions' of oral health, patient satisfaction, job satisfaction and financial profit. It is suggested that the 'secret' of success in dental practice is to make patient (customer) satisfaction the primary focus. Not a very earth shattering or surprising'secret' perhaps! This is hardly a new idea, and not a concept restricted to dental practice. This principle applies to all businesses. This series of articles reviews evidence from across a broad spectrum of publications: from populist business publications through to refereed scientific papers, this'secret' seems to be confirmed. The evidence for which aspects of our service are most important in achieving patient satisfaction (and therefore success) is explored. Good oral health outcomes for patients are defined as the primary purpose of dental practice and, therefore, an essential dimension of success. The link between positive patient perceptions of general care and their own oral health to practice success is explored. PMID:21500624

  19. Standpoints and protection of business secrets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brane Bertoncelj

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The human impact on an information system where data bases, containing business secretes, are stored is one of the most unreliable and unforeseeable factors. For this reason, it must not be underestimated. The results of this study indicate a correlation between behavioural intention and protection of business secretes. There is a statistically significant correlation between behavioural intention and behavioural supervision. This means that an increased level of perceived supervision over one's own behaviour is related to behavioural intention. A great majority of participants would not divulge a business secret due to internal moral factors, i.e., they possess the appropriate capabilities to determine the advantages of social moral values over personal values.

  20. Fluorescent markers for the Spitzenkörper and exocytosis in Zymoseptoria tritici ☆

    OpenAIRE

    M. Guo; Kilaru, S.; M. Schuster; Latz, M.; Steinberg, G.

    2015-01-01

    Fungal hyphae are highly polarized cells that invade their substrate by tip growth. In plant pathogenic fungi, hyphal growth is essential for host invasion. This makes polarity factors and secretion regulators potential new targets for novel fungicides. Polarization requires delivery of secretory vesicles to the apical Spitzenkörper, followed by polarized exocytosis at the expanding cell tip. Here, we introduce fluorescent markers to visualize the apical Spitzenkörper and the apical site of e...

  1. Identification of colorectal cancer metastasis markers by an angiogenesis-related cytokine-antibody array

    OpenAIRE

    Abajo, A.; Bitarte, N; Zarate, R; Boni, V; Lopez, I; Gonzalez-Huarriz, M. (Marisol); Rodriguez, J.; Bandres, E; Garcia-Foncillas, J.

    2012-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the angiogenesis-related protein expression profile characterizing metastatic colorectal cancer (mCRC) with the aim of identifying prognostic markers. METHODS: The expression of 44 angiogenesis-secreted factors was measured by a novel cytokine antibody array methodology. The study evaluated vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and its soluble vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (sVEGFR)-1 protein levels by enzyme immunoassay (EIA) in a panel of 16 CRC...

  2. Telomerase Inhibition Decreases Alpha-Fetoprotein Expression and Secretion by Hepatocellular Carcinoma Cell Lines: In Vitro and In Vivo Study

    OpenAIRE

    Roula Tahtouh; Anne-Sophie Azzi; Nada Alaaeddine; Soulaima Chamat; Hasnaa Bouharoun-Tayoun; Layal Wardi; Issam Raad; Riad Sarkis; Najibe Abou Antoun; George Hilal

    2015-01-01

    Alpha-fetoprotein (AFP) is a diagnostic marker for hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). A direct relationship between poor prognosis and the concentration of serum AFP has been observed. Telomerase, an enzyme that stabilizes the telomere length, is expressed by 90% of HCC. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of telomerase inhibition on AFP secretion and the involvement of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway. Proliferation and viability tests were performed using tetrazolium salt. A...

  3. Pancreatic enzyme secretion during intravenous fat infusion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, G P; Stein, T A

    1987-01-01

    The nutritional support of patients with pancreatic and high gastrointestinal fistulas and severe pancreatitis frequently involves intravenous fat infusion. There are conflicting reports on the effect of intravenous fat on pancreatic exocrine secretion. In 10 dogs with chronic pancreatic fistulas, pancreatic juice was collected during secretin (n = 10) or secretin + cholecystokinin (n = 4) stimulation, with and without intravenous fat infusion (5 g/hr). The hormonal-stimulated secretion of lipase, amylase, trypsin, total protein, bicarbonate, and water was unchanged during fat infusion. This study supports the use of intravenous fat as a nutritional source when it is desirable to avoid stimulation of the pancreas.

  4. Biochemical Markers of Myocardial Damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodor, Geza S

    2016-04-01

    Heart diseases, especially coronary artery diseases (CAD), are the leading causes of morbidity and mortality in developed countries. Effective therapy is available to ensure patient survival and to prevent long term sequelae after an acute ischemic event caused by CAD, but appropriate therapy requires rapid and accurate diagnosis. Research into the pathology of CAD have demonstrated the usefulness of measuring concentrations of chemicals released from the injured cardiac muscle can aid the diagnosis of diseases caused by myocardial ischemia. Since the mid-1950s successively better biochemical markers have been described in research publications and applied for the clinical diagnosis of acute ischemic myocardial injury. Aspartate aminotransferase of the 1950s was replaced by other cytosolic enzymes such as lactate dehydrogenase, creatine kinase and their isoenzymes that exhibited better cardiac specificity. With the availability of immunoassays, other muscle proteins, that had no enzymatic activity, were also added to the diagnostic arsenal but their limited tissue specificity and sensitivity lead to suboptimal diagnostic performance. After the discovery that cardiac troponins I and T have the desired specificity, they have replaced the cytosolic enzymes in the role of diagnosing myocardial ischemia and infarction. The use of the troponins provided new knowledge that led to revision and redefinition of ischemic myocardial injury as well as the introduction of biochemicals for estimation of the probability of future ischemic myocardial events. These markers, known as cardiac risk markers, evolved from the diagnostic markers such as CK-MB or troponins, but markers of inflammation also belong to these groups of diagnostic chemicals. This review article presents a brief summary of the most significant developments in the field of biochemical markers of cardiac injury and summarizes the most recent significant recommendations regarding the use of the cardiac markers in

  5. Imaging markers for Alzheimer disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bocchetta, Martina; Chételat, Gael; Rabinovici, Gil D.; de Leon, Mony J.; Kaye, Jeffrey; Reiman, Eric M.; Scheltens, Philip; Barkhof, Frederik; Black, Sandra E.; Brooks, David J.; Carrillo, Maria C.; Fox, Nick C.; Herholz, Karl; Nordberg, Agneta; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William J.; Johnson, Keith A.; Rowe, Christopher C.; Sperling, Reisa A.; Thies, William; Wahlund, Lars-Olof; Weiner, Michael W.; Pasqualetti, Patrizio; DeCarli, Charles

    2013-01-01

    Revised diagnostic criteria for Alzheimer disease (AD) acknowledge a key role of imaging biomarkers for early diagnosis. Diagnostic accuracy depends on which marker (i.e., amyloid imaging, 18F-fluorodeoxyglucose [FDG]-PET, SPECT, MRI) as well as how it is measured (“metric”: visual, manual, semiautomated, or automated segmentation/computation). We evaluated diagnostic accuracy of marker vs metric in separating AD from healthy and prognostic accuracy to predict progression in mild cognitive impairment. The outcome measure was positive (negative) likelihood ratio, LR+ (LR−), defined as the ratio between the probability of positive (negative) test outcome in patients and the probability of positive (negative) test outcome in healthy controls. Diagnostic LR+ of markers was between 4.4 and 9.4 and LR− between 0.25 and 0.08, whereas prognostic LR+ and LR− were between 1.7 and 7.5, and 0.50 and 0.11, respectively. Within metrics, LRs varied up to 100-fold: LR+ from approximately 1 to 100; LR− from approximately 1.00 to 0.01. Markers accounted for 11% and 18% of diagnostic and prognostic variance of LR+ and 16% and 24% of LR−. Across all markers, metrics accounted for an equal or larger amount of variance than markers: 13% and 62% of diagnostic and prognostic variance of LR+, and 29% and 18% of LR−. Within markers, the largest proportion of diagnostic LR+ and LR− variability was within 18F-FDG-PET and MRI metrics, respectively. Diagnostic and prognostic accuracy of imaging AD biomarkers is at least as dependent on how the biomarker is measured as on the biomarker itself. Standard operating procedures are key to biomarker use in the clinical routine and drug trials. PMID:23897875

  6. Tumour markers in germ cell tumours and thyroid cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mann, K.

    1988-02-01

    In patients with germ cell tumours of gonadal and extragonadal origin both markers, human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) and alphafetoprotein (AFP) are madatory for diagnosis and control of treatment. In seminoma, we found preoperatively elevated levels of hCG(+hCG-..beta..) in 42/349 patients (12%) up to 1200 mlU/ml using a polyclonal radioimmunoassay (1. IRP hCG standard 75/537). Lactatedehydrogenase can be useful in marker negative patients. Serum levels reflect tumour burden even if not highly specific. Presently, placental alkaline phosphatase is under discussion for seminoma. However, commercial kits are not available. As a relatively high secretion of hCG/..beta../hCG was found in gestational trophoblastic diseases, this parameters may be useful for differential diagnosis in pregnancy. In the follow-up of patients with differentiated thyroid carcinoma the determination of thyroglobulin (Tg) in combination with ultrasound of the thyroid and X-ray of the chest is sufficient. For Tg-determination thyroid hormone replacement therapy must be discontinued only in rare single cases with borderline levels, which need radioiodtesting additionally. Calcitonin is the most important marker in medullary thyroid carcinoma. Pentagastrin stimulated calcitonin as screening test is necessary, if multiple endocrine adenomatosis or the familial forms are suspected. In single cases benefit came from new scintigraphic methods such as /sup 131/I-metaiodo-benzylguanidine or /sup 201/thallium-chloride.

  7. Differences in intracellular calcium dynamics cause differences in α-granule secretion and phosphatidylserine expression in platelets adhering on glass and TiO2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Swati; Donati, Alessia; Reviakine, Ilya

    2016-06-01

    In this study, the activation of purified human platelets due to their adhesion on glass and TiO2 in the absence of extracellular calcium was investigated. Differences in α-granule secretion between platelets adhering on the two surfaces were detected by examining the expression and secretion of the α-granule markers P-selectin (CD62P) and β-thromboglobulin. Similarly, differences in the expression of phosphatidylserine (PS), and in the activation of the major integrin GPIIb/IIIa, on the surfaces of the adhering platelets, were also observed. While all of these activation markers were expressed in platelets adhering on glass, the surface markers were not expressed in platelets adhering on TiO2, and β-thromboglobulin secretion levels were substantially reduced. Differences in marker expression and secretion correlated with differences in the intracellular calcium dynamics. Calcium ionophore treatment triggered α-granule secretion and PS expression in TiO2-adhering platelets but had no effect on the activation of GPIIb/IIIa. These results demonstrate specificity in the way surfaces of artificial materials activate platelets, link differences in the intracellular calcium dynamics observed in the platelets adhering on the two surfaces to the differences in some of the platelet responses (α-granule secretion and PS expression), but also highlight the involvement of synergistic, calcium-independent pathways in platelet activation. The ability to control activation in surface-adhering platelets makes this an attractive model system for studying platelet signaling pathways and for tissue engineering applications. PMID:27124595

  8. Molecular mechanisms involved in casein gene expression and secretion in mouse mammary epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouse mammary epithelial cells (MMEC) secrete a group of milk-specific proteins including various caseins and whey proteins. Dissociated mammary epithelial cells maintain expression of most of their differentiated functions only if cells are plated on a suitable substratum. Casein production and section, cell morphology, and production of α-lactalbumin have been used as markers to assess the degree of differentiation of mammary cells in culture. The general consensus is that cells express their differentiated properties at high levels and for longer periods of time on such substrata. In this paper, the authors demonstrate that modulation of the expression of caseins by floating collagen gels is manifested at several regulatory points

  9. 产后抑郁症血浆儿茶酚胺浓度对照研究%The Plasma Catecholamines Control Study of Postnatal Depression

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陆亚文; 吴怀安; 闫小华; 徐宏里; 郑铮; 李英霞

    2003-01-01

    Objective:To explore the plasma catecholamines (CAs) concentration of postnatal depression and to analyze the re-lationships between postnatal depression and CAs level. Methods: Using high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) to mea-sure the subjects'' plasma noradrenaline (NE)、 adrenaline (E) and dopamine (DA) concentration. The postnatal depression group was compared with depression, ante partum and normal group. Results: NE level of plasma in the depression group and the post-natal depression group were all higher than those of normal group P 0.05) . Conclusion: the plasma NE increase is relative to postnatal depression episode, the plasma DA may be relative to postnatal depression episode. The relationship between plasma and postnatal depression remains unclear.

  10. Effects of nomifensine, an inhibitor of endogenous catecholamine re-uptake, in acromegaly, in hyperprolactinaemia, and against stimulated prolactin release in man.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scanlon, M F; Gomez-Pan, A; Mora, B; Cook, D B; Dewar, J H; Hildyard, A; Weightman, D R; Evered, D C; Hall, R

    1977-01-01

    1. Nomifensine, an inhibitor of endogenous catecholamine re-uptake, did not affect the growth hormone (GH) or prolactin levels in patients with acromegaly or hyperprolactinaemia. It does not, therefore, have any therapeutic role in these conditions at the dosage used in this study. 2. It had no effect on thyrotrophin-releasing hormone (TRH)-induced thyrotrophin (TSH) or prolactin release in males, yet caused marked suppression of monoiodotyrosine (MIT)-induced prolactin release in males but not in females. 3. The significant suppression of MIT-induced prolactin release in males is likely to reflect the dopamine (DA) agonist activity of the drug and its lack of effect in the other situations tested could be dose related. 4. It is proposed that the difference in male and female patterns of prolactin response to MIT after nomifensine, could be due to a "damping" effect of oestrogen on the hypothalamic dopaminergic system.

  11. Tumour markers in gastrointestinal cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lamerz, R.

    1988-02-01

    For non-endocrine gastrointestinal tumours the following tumour markers are of clinical interest: For esophageal cancer CEA (sensitivity, s: 40-60%) and SCC (squamous cell carcinoma antigen, x: 20-50%); for gastric cancer CEA (s: 30-40%) as well as CA 19-9 (s: 30-40%) because of complementary results (additive s: 50-60); for hepatocellular cancer AFP (first choice, s: 70-90%; second choice CA 19-9, s: 50-70%); for cholangiocellular cancer CA 19-9 (s: 40-70%); for secondary liver cancer in general CEA; for biliary tract cancer CA 19-9 (s: 40-70%) as well as for excretory pancreatic cancer (s: 70-90%); for colorectal cancer CEA (s: 40-70%) as a first choice marker, and CA 19-9 (s: 20-60%) as a second choice marker, and for anal cancer SCC. The frequency of tumour marker determinations depends on follow-up care recommendations for different tumour diseases (e.g. 1-3 monthly during the 1st and 2nd postoperative year, following chemotherapy courses, on change of therapy, on restaging and at unclear alteration of the clinical state). Tumour markers are only valuable adjuncts to the medical care of tumour patients and therefore useless as solitary findings or on missing therapeutic consequence.

  12. Cold exposure enhances fat utilization but not non-esterified fatty acids, glycerol or catecholamines availability during submaximal walking and running

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dominique Daniel Gagnon

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Cold exposure modulates the use of carbohydrates and fat during exercise. This phenomenon has mostly been observed in controlled cycling studies, but not during walking and running when core temperature and oxygen consumption are controlled, as both may alter energy metabolism. This study aimed at examining energy substrate availability and utilization during walking and running in the cold when core temperature and oxygen consumption are maintained. Ten lightly clothed male subjects walked or ran for 60-min, at 50% and 70% of maximal oxygen consumption, respectively, in a climatic chamber set at 0°C or 22°C. Thermal, cardiovascular, and oxidative responses were measured every 15-min during exercise. Blood samples for serum non-esterified fatty acids, glycerol, glucose, beta-hydroxybutyrate, plasma catecholamines, and serum lipids were collected immediately prior, and at 30- and 60-min of exercise. Skin temperature strongly decreased while core temperature did not change during cold trials. Heart rate was also lower in cold trials. A rise in fat utilization in the cold was seen through lower respiratory quotient (-0.03 ± 0.02, greater fat oxidation (+0.14 ± 0.13 g•min-1 and contribution of fat to total energy expenditure (+1.62 ± 1.99 kcal•min-1. No differences from cold exposure were observed in blood parameters. During submaximal walking and running, a greater reliance on derived fat sources occurs in the cold, despite the absence of concurrent alterations in non-esterified fatty acids, glycerol, or catecholamine concentrations. This disparity may suggest a greater reliance on intra-muscular energy sources such as triglycerides during both walking and running.

  13. Scalable Mechanisms for Rational Secret Sharing

    CERN Document Server

    Dani, Varsha; Saia, Jared

    2012-01-01

    We consider the classical secret sharing problem in the case where all agents are selfish but rational. In recent work, Kol and Naor show that, when there are two players, in the non-simultaneous communication model, i.e. when rushing is possible, there is no Nash equilibrium that ensures both players learn the secret. However, they describe a mechanism for this problem, for any number of players, that is an epsilon-Nash equilibrium, in that no player can gain more than epsilon utility by deviating from it. Unfortunately, the Kol and Naor mechanism, and, to the best of our knowledge, all previous mechanisms for this problem require each agent to send O(n) messages in expectation, where n is the number of agents. This may be problematic for some applications of rational secret sharing such as secure multi-party computation and simulation of a mediator. We address this issue by describing mechanisms for rational secret sharing that are designed for large n. Both of our results hold for n > 2, and are Nash equil...

  14. Characterization of a secreted Chlamydia protease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shaw, Allan C; Vandahl, Brian; Larsen, Martin Røssel;

    2002-01-01

    Chlamydia. Several secretion candidates from Chlamydia trachomatis D and Chlamydia pneumoniae were detected by this method. Two protein spots were identified among the candidates. These represent fragments of the 'chlamydial protease- or proteasome-like activity factor' (CPAF) and were clearly present in 2D...... fragments of CPAF exist in C. pneumoniae as well as in C. trachomatis....

  15. Acetylcholine regulates ghrelin secretion in humans

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F. Broglio (Fabio); E. Ghigo (Ezio); C. Gottero; F. Prodam; S. Destefanis; A. Benso; C. Gauna (Carlotta); L.J. Hofland (Leo); E. Arvat; A-J. van der Lely (Aart-Jan); P.M. van Koetsveld (Peter)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractGhrelin secretion has been reportedly increased by fasting and energy restriction but decreased by food intake, glucose, insulin, and somatostatin. However, its regulation is still far from clarified. The cholinergic system mediates some ghrelin actions, e.g. stimulatio

  16. Kinins as mediators of intestinal secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaginella, T S; Kachur, J F

    1989-01-01

    Kinins are small peptides that have diverse biological actions. Concentrations of kinins in the nanomolar or subnanomolar range induce intestinal smooth muscle contraction and evoke mucosal electrolyte secretion. Hyperkininemia is associated with effects on gastrointestinal motility and intestinal mucosal inflammation. Bradykinin and kallidin are the predominant kinins with effects on the gastrointestinal tract of mammals. Bradykinin stimulates chloride ion secretion by the guinea pig and rabbit ileum, rabbit colon, rat colon and monolayers of human HCA-7 cells. Kinins directly or indirectly stimulate phospholipase A2 and phospholipase C. Cells in the lamina propria of the mucosa (e.g., fibroblasts, mast cells, leukocytes), by liberating cyclooxygenase and lipoxygenase metabolites of arachidonic acid, are involved in the kinin response; direct effects on epithelial cells cannot be ruled out, however. Antagonists now exist for kinin receptors. Based on studies with these antagonists in smooth muscle preparations, two subgroups of kinin receptor have been identified. The B2-type receptor appears to be responsible for both the contraction of ileal muscle and ileal secretion. Kinins are probably more important as pathophysiological rather than as physiological mediators. They may amplify the effect of inflammatory products that induce intestinal secretion. The precise involvement of kinins in clinical mucosal secretory states and diarrhea will require quantitative assessment of their levels during each phase of mucosal inflammation. Additional studies on the mechanism of action of kinins will be essential in designing therapy to mitigate the symptoms associated with mucosal inflammation.

  17. The Best Kept Secret in Gifted Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alvino, James

    2004-01-01

    It is perhaps one of the best-kept secrets in educating gifted high school youth, and yet for 45 years, Hugh O'Brian Youth Leadership (HOBY) has been going strong, "Motivating Tomorrow's Leaders Today." After spending nine inspirational days in 1958 with Albert Schweitzer (Nobel Prize physician and philosopher) at his clinic in the African jungle,…

  18. Secrets of Mlearning Failures: Confronting Reality

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cochrane, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Having implemented and evaluated over 35 mlearning projects in a variety of contexts in higher education over the past 6 years the researcher is ready to share the untold secret: not all mlearning projects succeed! This article critiques three of the researcher's mlearning projects that can be classed as "failures" and compares them to successful…

  19. An Approach to Hide Secret Speech Information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WU Zhi-jun; DUAN Hai-xin; LI Xing

    2006-01-01

    This paper presented an approach to hide secret speech information in code excited linear prediction(CELP)-based speech coding scheme by adopting the analysis-by-synthesis (ABS)-based algorithm of speech information hiding and extracting for the purpose of secure speech communication. The secret speech is coded in 2.4Kb/s mixed excitation linear prediction (MELP), which is embedded in CELP type public speech. The ABS algorithm adopts speech synthesizer in speech coder. Speech embedding and coding are synchronous, i.e. a fusion of speech information data of public and secret. The experiment of embedding 2.4 Kb/s MELP secret speech in G.728 scheme coded public speech transmitted via public switched telephone network (PSTN) shows that the proposed approach satisfies the requirements of information hiding, meets the secure communication speech quality constraints, and achieves high hiding capacity of average 3.2 Kb/s with an excellent speech quality and complicating speakers' recognition.

  20. Secret Shopping as User Experience Assessment Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyce, Crystal M.

    2015-01-01

    Secret shopping is a form of unobtrusive evaluation that can be accomplished with minimal effort, but still produce rich results. With as few as 11 shoppers, the author was able to identify trends in user satisfaction with services provided across two entry-level desks at Illinois Wesleyan University's The Ames Library. The focus of this secret…

  1. Insulin: pancreatic secretion and adipocyte regulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumgard, L H; Hausman, G J; Sanz Fernandez, M V

    2016-01-01

    Insulin is the primary acute anabolic coordinator of nutrient partitioning. Hyperglycemia is the main stimulant of insulin secretion, but other nutrients such as specific amino acids, fatty acids, and ketoacids can potentiate pancreatic insulin release. Incretins are intestinal hormones with insulinotropic activity and are secreted in response to food ingestion, thus integrating diet chemical composition with the regulation of insulin release. In addition, prolactin is required for proper islet development, and it stimulates β-cell proliferation. Counterintuitively, bacterial components appear to signal insulin secretion. In vivo lipopolysaccharide infusion acutely increases circulating insulin, which is paradoxical as endotoxemia is a potent catabolic condition. Insulin is a potent anabolic orchestrator of nutrient partitioning, and this is particularly true in adipocytes. Insulin dictates lipid accretion in a dose-dependent manner during preadipocyte development in adipose tissue-derived stromal vascular cell culture. However, in vivo studies focused on insulin's role in regulating adipose tissue metabolism from growing, and market weight pigs are sometimes inconsistent, and this variability appears to be animal, age and depot dependent. Additionally, porcine adipose tissue synthesizes and secretes a number of adipokines (leptin, adiponectin, and so forth) that directly or indirectly influence insulin action. Therefore, because insulin has an enormous impact on agriculturally important phenotypes, it is critical to have a better understanding of how insulin homeostasis is governed.

  2. Biological Markers and Salivary Cortisol

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Åse Marie; Gunnarsson, Lars-Gunnar; Harris, Anette;

    2011-01-01

    This chapter focuses on salivary cortisol in relation to biological markers. Specifically, associations with conventional cardiovascular risk factors and metabolic abnormalities (body mass index, waist circumference, waist/hip ratio, lipid status, glucose, blood pressure, heart rate and heart rate...... variations and pharmacological interventions were also excluded. After meeting all exclusion criteria, 42 papers remained. In total, 273 associations between salivary cortisol and any of the markers mentioned were studied, comprising 241 associations on metabolic abnormalities, 30 on inflammation, and 2...... on stress hormones. Of the salivary cortisol measures reported for evaluations of all markers tested were 136 (49%) single time points, 100 (37%) deviations, 36 (13%) AUC, and 1 (1%) dexamethasone test. Of these, 72 (26%) were statistically significant, and 201 (74%) indicated non-significant findings...

  3. Rac Regulates Giardia lamblia Encystation by Coordinating Cyst Wall Protein Trafficking and Secretion

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krtková, Jana; Thomas, Elizabeth B.; Alas, Germain C. M.; Schraner, Elisabeth M.; Behjatnia, Habib R.; Hehl, Adrian B.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Encystation of the common intestinal parasite Giardia lamblia involves the production, trafficking, and secretion of cyst wall material (CWM). However, the molecular mechanism responsible for the regulation of these sequential processes remains elusive. Here, we examined the role of GlRac, Giardia’s sole Rho family GTPase, in the regulation of endomembrane organization and cyst wall protein (CWP) trafficking. Localization studies indicated that GlRac is associated with the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and the Golgi apparatus-like encystation-specific vesicles (ESVs). Constitutive GlRac signaling increased levels of the ER marker PDI2, induced ER swelling, reduced overall CWP1 production, and promoted the early maturation of ESVs. Quantitative analysis of cells expressing constitutively active hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged GlRac (HA-RacCA) revealed fewer but larger ESVs than control cells. Consistent with the phenotype of premature maturation of ESVs in HA-RacCA-expressing cells, constitutive GlRac signaling resulted in increased CWP1 secretion and, conversely, morpholino depletion of GlRac blocked CWP1 secretion. Wild-type cells unexpectedly secreted large quantities of CWP1 into the medium, and free CWP1 was used cooperatively during cyst formation. These results, in part, could account for the previously reported observation that G. lamblia encysts more efficiently at high cell densities. These studies of GlRac show that it regulates encystation at several levels, and our findings support its coordinating role as a regulator of CWP trafficking and secretion. The central role of GlRac in regulating membrane trafficking and the cytoskeleton, both of which are essential to Giardia parasitism, further suggests its potential as a novel target for drug development to treat giardiasis. PMID:27555307

  4. The rab11 effector protein FIP1 regulates adiponectin trafficking and secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian P Carson

    Full Text Available Adiponectin is an adipokine secreted by white adipocytes involved in regulating insulin sensitivity in peripheral tissues. Secretion of adiponectin in adipocytes relies on the endosomal system, however, the intracellular machinery involved in mediating adiponectin release is unknown. We have previously reported that intracellular adiponectin partially compartmentalizes with rab 5 and rab11, markers for the early/sorting and recycling compartments respectively. Here we have examined the role of several rab11 downstream effector proteins (rab11 FIPs in regulating adiponectin trafficking and secretion. Overexpression of wild type rab11 FIP1, FIP3 and FIP5 decreased the amount of secreted adiponectin expressed in HEK293 cells, whereas overexpression of rab11 FIP2 or FIP4 had no effect. Furthermore shRNA-mediated depletion of FIP1 enhanced adiponectin release whereas knock down of FIP5 decreased adiponectin secretion. Knock down of FIP3 had no effect. In 3T3L1 adipocytes, endogenous FIP1 co-distributed intracellularly with endogenous adiponectin and FIP1 depletion enhanced adiponectin release without altering insulin-mediated trafficking of the glucose transporter Glut4. While adiponectin receptors internalized with transferrin receptors, there were no differences in transferrin receptor recycling between wild type and FIP1 depleted adipocytes. Consistent with its inhibitory role, FIP1 expression was decreased during adipocyte differentiation, by treatment with thiazolidinediones, and with increased BMI in humans. In contrast, FIP1 expression increased upon exposure of adipocytes to TNFα. In all, our findings identify FIP1 as a novel protein involved in the regulation of adiponectin trafficking and release.

  5. HMGB1 induces secretion of matrix vesicles which participate in microcalcification of atherosclerotic plaques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN Qiang; BEI Jun-jie; LIU Chuan; FENG Shi-bin; ZHAO Wei-bo; ZHOU Zhou; YU Zheng-ping; DU Xiao-jun; HU Hou-yuan

    2016-01-01

    AIM:Early calcification of atherosclerotic plaques are colocalized with macrophage and high mobility group box 1 (HMGB1), a cytokine associated with biomineralizing process under physiological and pathological conditions .Our study aims to evaluate whether HMGB1 induces ectopic mineralization via promoting the secretion of matrix vesicles ( MVs) from macrophages .METHODS:HMGB1 was added to the medium of macrophages , the secretion of MVs in the supernatant was tested by flow cytometry analysis .The mineral deposition in calcifying medium was detected by Alizarin Red staining and von Kossa staining .Transmission electron microscopy showed the formation of hydroxyapatite crystals in MVs .Then we subcutaneous injection into mice with MVs to induce regional minera-lization.RESULTS:HMGB1 significantly promoted secretion of MVs from macrophages as raveled by flow cytometry analysis .TNAP activity, considered as a marker of MVs maturation , was higher in HMGB1-induced MVs compared to the control-MVs.HMGB1-MVs also led to mineral deposition in an in vitro MVs-collagen mineralization model .Subcutaneous injection into mice with MVs derived from HMGB1-treated cells showed a greater potential to initiate regional mineralization .Mechanistic experiments revealed that HMGB 1 activated neutral sphingomyelinase 2 ( nSMase2 ) that involved the receptor for advanced glycation end products ( RAGE ) and p38 MAPK (upstream of nSMase2).Inhibition of nSMase2 with GW4869 or p38 MAPK with SB-239063 prevented MVs secretion and min-eral deposition .CONCLUSIONS: HMGB1 induces MVs secretion from macrophages at least in part , via the RAGE/p38 MAPK/nSMase2 signaling pathway .Our findings thus reveal a novel mechanism by which HMGB 1 may participated in the early calcification of atherosclerotic plaques .

  6. Application of molecular markers in livestock improvement

    OpenAIRE

    Teneva A.; Petrović M.P.

    2010-01-01

    With recent developments in DNA technologies, a large number of genetic polymorphisms at DNA sequence level has been introduced over the last decades as named DNA-based markers. The discovery of new class of DNA profiling markers has facilitated the development of marker-based gene tags, mapbased cloning of livestock important genes, variability studies, phylogenetic analysis, synteny mapping, marker-assisted selection of favourable genotypes, etc. The most commonly used DNA-based markers hav...

  7. Activated platelets enhance IL-10 secretion and reduce TNF-α secretion by monocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gudbrandsdottir, Sif; Hasselbalch, Hans C; Nielsen, Claus H

    2013-01-01

    Activated platelets are known to modulate immune responses by secreting or shedding a range of immunomodulatory substances. We examined the influence of activated platelets on cytokine production by normal human mononuclear cells, induced by tetanus toxoid (TT), human thyroglobulin (TG), Escheric......Activated platelets are known to modulate immune responses by secreting or shedding a range of immunomodulatory substances. We examined the influence of activated platelets on cytokine production by normal human mononuclear cells, induced by tetanus toxoid (TT), human thyroglobulin (TG...... production. Moreover, Ab-mediated blockade of CD40L counteracted the effect of platelets and platelet supernatants on TNF-α production. Monocytes separated into two populations with respect to IL-10 production induced by TG; the high-secreting fraction increased from 0.8 to 2.1% (p ... of activated platelets. Adherence of platelets increased TG- and TT-induced IL-10 secretion by monocytes (p

  8. Properties of Duvernoy's secretions from opisthoglyphous and aglyphous colubrid snakes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinstein, S A; Kardong, K V

    1994-10-01

    Relatively little attention has been given to the biological properties of Duvernoy's secretions produced by opisthoglyphous and some aglyphous colubrid snakes. A review is presented of literature pertaining to these secretions. Most detailed analyses of Duvernoy's secretions and their biological properties have been performed since the late 1970s. The dispholidines, Dispholidus typus and Thelotornis sp., and the natricines, Rhabdophis tigrinus and R. subminiata, have received the most attention due to the high toxicity of their secretions and their medical importance. These species produce secretions with variably strong prothrombin-activating activity, defibrinating activity, and hemorrhagic potential. Boigines, and natricines other than Rhabdophis, produce secretions of low to moderate toxicity and are variably hemorrhagic and proteolytic. Xenodontines and homalopsines similarly show hemorrhagic potential with low to moderate toxicity. Neurotoxic activity has been reported only from secretions of the boigines, Boiga blandingi and B. irregularis and the xenodontine, Heterodon platyrhinos. These species produce secretions containing postsynaptically acting components. Analyses of some of these secretions have shown that enzymes common to many ophidian venoms such as phospholipases A and L-amino acid oxidase are uncommon in the colubrid secretions studied. This may be due to few studies assaying for multiple enzyme activities and/or the unavailability of many secretion samples for study. Methods of secretion extraction, storage, and assay are discussed. Projected future research and the adaptive implications of Duvernoy's secretions are considered.

  9. The reseach progress of the microenvironmental effects of catecholamine%儿茶酚胺类神经递质微环境效应的研究进展

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘涛; 郁章玉

    2014-01-01

    儿茶酚胺包括肾上腺素、去甲肾上腺素和多巴胺,是人体内一类重要的神经递质。因为含有邻苯二酚等多种活性基团,儿茶酚胺对电极表面附近环境的变化有着高度的敏感性,呈现出明显的微环境效应。本文从电化学实验和量子化学计算两个角度综述了儿茶酚胺类神经递质微环境效应的最新研究进展,重点介绍了电极表面的化学修饰情况和生理介质中的生物分子两种微环境因素对儿茶酚胺氧化能力的影响。大量的文献表明,化学修饰电极可改善儿茶酚胺在电极表面的分布与活性,对儿茶酚胺的电化学行为产生特有的催化效应。生理介质中的生物分子能够与儿茶酚胺及其氧化产物醌通过弱相互作用形成超分子,从而影响儿茶酚胺的电化学氧化能力。在此基础上,本文还对儿茶酚胺微环境效应的微观本质的研究前景进行了展望。%Catecholamine,including adrenaline,noradrenaline,and dopamine,is an important neurotransmitter in human body. The active groups of catecholamine neurotransmitters,such as catechol groups,are sensitive to the microenvironment around electrode surface,and present obvious microenvironmental effects. This article reviews the recent progress of the microenvironmental effects of catecholamine from the view of electrochemical chemistry and quantum chemistry. In this article,we introduce the impact of two mi-croenvironment factors,chemical modification at electrode surface and biomolecule in physiological medium,on the oxidation ability of catecholamine. The literatures show that chemically modified electrode can improve the distribution and activity of catecholamine on the electrode surface,and produce specific catalytic effect to the electrochemical behavior of catecholamine. In addition,the bio-molecules in physiological medium can form supramolecular complexes with catecholamine and its oxidative product quinone

  10. Somatomammotrophic cells in GH-secreting and PRL-secreting human pituitary adenomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bassetti, M; Brina, M; Spada, A; Giannattasio, G

    1989-11-01

    A morphological study has been carried out on 20 GH-secreting adenomas removed from acromegalic normoprolactinemic patients, on 29 PRL-secreting adenomas removed from hyperprolactinemic patients without signs of acromegaly and on one normal human anterior pituitary gland collected at autopsy. The protein A-gold immunoelectron microscopic technique has been utilized in order to verify the presence of mixed cells producing both GH and PRL (somatomammotrophs) in these pituitary tissues. In the normal pituitary a considerable number of somatomammotrophs (15-20%) was found, thus supporting the idea that these cells are normal components of the human anterior pituitary gland. In 10 GH-secreting adenomas and in 10 PRL-secreting adenomas somatomammotrophs were present in a variable number (from 4 to 20% of the whole cell population in GH adenomas and from 1 to 47% in PRL tumors). It can be concluded therefore that these cells, largely present in all GH/PRL-secreting adenomas, can also be found in GH-secreting and PRL-secreting tumors without clinical evidence of a mixed secretion. Adenomatous somatomammotrophs displayed ultrastructural features of adenomatous somatotrophs and mammotrophs (prominent Golgi complexes, abundant rough endoplasmic reticulum, irregular nuclei). The size and the number of granules were variable. In some cells GH and PRL were stored in distinct secretory granules, in others in mixed granules or both in mixed and distinct granules, thus suggesting that in adenomatous somatomammotrophs the efficiency of the mechanisms of sorting of the two hormones varies from one cell to another.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  11. High LIN28A Expressing Ovarian Cancer Cells Secrete Exosomes That Induce Invasion and Migration in HEK293 Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Enriquez, Vanessa A; Cleys, Ellane R; Da Silveira, Juliano C; Spillman, Monique A; Winger, Quinton A; Bouma, Gerrit J

    2015-01-01

    Epithelial ovarian cancer is the most aggressive and deadly form of ovarian cancer and is the most lethal gynecological malignancy worldwide; therefore, efforts to elucidate the molecular factors that lead to epithelial ovarian cancer are essential to better understand this disease. Recent studies reveal that tumor cells release cell-secreted vesicles called exosomes and these exosomes can transfer RNAs and miRNAs to distant sites, leading to cell transformation and tumor development. The RNA-binding protein LIN28 is a known marker of stem cells and when expressed in cancer, it is associated with poor tumor outcome. We hypothesized that high LIN28 expressing ovarian cancer cells secrete exosomes that can be taken up by nontumor cells and cause changes in gene expression and cell behavior associated with tumor development. IGROV1 cells were found to contain high LIN28A and secrete exosomes that were taken up by HEK293 cells. Moreover, exposure to these IGROV1 secreted exosomes led to significant increases in genes involved in Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition (EMT), induced HEK293 cell invasion and migration. These changes were not observed with exosomes secreted by OV420 cells, which contain no detectable amounts of LIN28A or LIN28B. No evidence was found of LIN28A transfer from IGROV1 exosomes to HEK293 cells.

  12. Involvement of type VI secretion system in secretion of iron chelator pyoverdine in Pseudomonas taiwanensis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wen-Jen; Kuo, Tzu-Yen; Hsieh, Feng-Chia; Chen, Pi-Yu; Wang, Chang-Sheng; Shih, Yu-Ling; Lai, Ying-Mi; Liu, Je-Ruei; Yang, Yu-Liang; Shih, Ming-Che

    2016-01-01

    Rice bacterial blight caused by Xanthomonas oryzae pv. oryzae (Xoo) is one of the most destructive rice diseases worldwide. Therefore, in addition to breeding disease-resistant rice cultivars, it is desirable to develop effective biocontrol agents against Xoo. Here, we report that a soil bacterium Pseudomonas taiwanensis displayed strong antagonistic activity against Xoo. Using matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization imaging mass spectrometry, we identified an iron chelator, pyoverdine, secreted by P. taiwanensis that could inhibit the growth of Xoo. Through Tn5 mutagenesis of P. taiwanensis, we showed that mutations in genes that encode components of the type VI secretion system (T6SS) as well as biosynthesis and maturation of pyoverdine resulted in reduced toxicity against Xoo. Our results indicated that T6SS is involved in the secretion of endogenous pyoverdine. Mutations in T6SS component genes affected the secretion of mature pyoverdine from the periplasmic space into the extracellular medium after pyoverdine precursor is transferred to the periplasm by the inner membrane transporter PvdE. In addition, we also showed that other export systems, i.e., the PvdRT-OpmQ and MexAB-OprM efflux systems (for which there have been previous suggestions of involvement) and the type II secretion system (T2SS), are not involved in pyoverdine secretion. PMID:27605490

  13. Prognostic markers of canine pyometra

    OpenAIRE

    M.C. Sant'Anna; L.G.P. Giordano; K.K.M.C. Flaiban; Muller, E.E.; M.I.M. Martins

    2014-01-01

    The pyometra is a disease that affects middle age and elderly female dogs during diestrus. Hormonal, microbiological, biochemical and hematological aspects are well described. However, few studies have evaluated the role of each in the prognosis of canine pyometra. The aim of this study was to identify markers associated with clinical worsening of dogs with pyometra. We prospectively evaluated 80 dogs with pyometra tre...

  14. Literature Review of Discourse Marker

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    赵蕴萱; 王孝伟

    2011-01-01

    This paper is devoted to supplying theoretical foundation for discourse markers(DMs),introducing the relevant definitions as well as the previous classifications of DMs.The functions of discourse markers are also added so as to provide a deep insight into

  15. Testing theories about ethnic markers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels Holm; Petersen, Michael Bang; Høgh-Olesen, Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    In recent years, evolutionary psychologists and anthropologists have debated whether ethnic markers have evolved to solve adaptive problems related to interpersonal coordination or to interpersonal cooperation. In the present study, we add to this debate by exploring how individuals living in a m...

  16. EasyClone-MarkerFree

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fabre, Mathew Malcolm Jessop; Jakociunas, Tadas; Stovicek, Vratislav;

    2016-01-01

    Clone-MarkerFree. The integration of linearized expression cassettes into defined genomic loci is facilitated by CRISPR/Cas9. Cas9 is recruited to the chromosomal location by specific guide RNAs (gRNAs) expressed from a set of gRNA helper vectors. Using our genome engineering vector suite, single and triple insertions are obtained...

  17. Biliary cholesterol secretion : More than a simple ABC

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dikkers, Arne; Tietge, Uwe J. F.

    2010-01-01

    Biliary cholesterol secretion is a process important for 2 major disease complexes, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease and cholesterol gallstone disease With respect to cardiovascular disease, biliary cholesterol secretion is regarded as the final step for the elimination of cholesterol originat

  18. A Secure and Efficient (t, n) Multi- Secret Sharing Scheme

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PANG Liao-jun; WANG Yu-min

    2005-01-01

    Based on Shamir' s secret sharing, a (t, n)multi-secret sharing scheme is proposed in this paper. p secrets can be shared among n participants, and t or more participants can co-operate to reconstruct these secrets at the same time, but t-1 or fewer participants can derive nothing about these secrets. Each participant's secret shadow is as short as each secret. Compared with the existing schemes,the proposed scheme is characterized by the lower complexity of the secret reconstruction and less public information. The security of this scheme is the same as that of Shamir' s threshold scheme. Analyses show that this scheme is an efficient, computationally secure scheme.

  19. SECURE VISUAL SECRET SHARING BASED ON DISCRETE WAVELET TRANSFORM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Jyothi Lekshmi

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Visual Cryptography Scheme (VCS is an encryption method to encode secret written materials. This method converts the secret written material into an image. Then encode this secret image into n shadow images called shares. For the recreation of the original secret, all or some selected subsets of shares are needed; individual shares are of no use on their own. The secret image can be recovered simply by selecting some subset of these n shares, makes transparencies of them and stacking on top of each other. Nowadays, the data security has an important role. The shares can be altered by an attacker. So providing security to the shares is important. This paper proposes a method of adding security to cryptographic shares. This method uses two dimensional discrete wavelet transform to hide visual secret shares. Then the hidden secrets are distributed among participants through the internet. All hidden shares are extracted to reconstruct the secret.

  20. Mining secreted proteins that function in pepper fruit development and ripening using a yeast secretion trap (YST)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Je Min, E-mail: jemin@knu.ac.kr [Department of Plant Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Department of Horticultural Science, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sang-Jik [Biotechnology Institute, Nongwoo Bio Co, Ltd, Yeoju (Korea, Republic of); Department of Plant Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Rose, Jocelyn K.C. [Department of Plant Biology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY (United States); Yeam, Inhwa [Department of Horticulture and Breeding, Andong National University, Andong (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Byung-Dong [Department of Plant Science, College of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • Yeast secretion trap (YST) is a valuable tool for mining secretome. • A total of 80 secreted proteins are newly identified via YST in pepper fruits. • The secreted proteins are differentially regulated during pepper development and ripening. • Transient GFP-fusion assay and in planta secretion trap can effectively validate the secretion of proteins. - Abstract: Plant cells secrete diverse sets of constitutively- and conditionally-expressed proteins under various environmental and developmental states. Secreted protein populations, or secretomes have multiple functions, including defense responses, signaling, metabolic processes, and developmental regulation. To identify genes encoding secreted proteins that function in fruit development and ripening, a yeast secretion trap (YST) screen was employed using pepper (Capsicum annuum) fruit cDNAs. The YST screen revealed 80 pepper fruit-related genes (CaPFRs) encoding secreted proteins including cell wall proteins, several of which have not been previously described. Transient GFP-fusion assay and an in planta secretion trap were used to validate the secretion of proteins encoded by selected YST clones. In addition, RNA gel blot analyses provided further insights into their expression and regulation during fruit development and ripening. Integrating our data, we conclude that the YST provides a valuable functional genomics tool for the identification of substantial numbers of novel secreted plant proteins that are associated with biological processes, including fruit development and ripening.

  1. Glycated albumin suppresses glucose-induced insulin secretion by impairing glucose metabolism in rat pancreatic β-cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muto Takashi

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glycated albumin (GA is an Amadori product used as a marker of hyperglycemia. In this study, we investigated the effect of GA on insulin secretion from pancreatic β cells. Methods Islets were collected from male Wistar rats by collagenase digestion. Insulin secretion in the presence of non-glycated human albumin (HA and GA was measured under three different glucose concentrations, 3 mM (G3, 7 mM (G7, and 15 mM (G15, with various stimulators. Insulin secretion was measured with antagonists of inducible nitric oxide synthetase (iNOS, and the expression of iNOS-mRNA was investigated by real-time PCR. Results Insulin secretion in the presence of HA and GA was 20.9 ± 3.9 and 21.6 ± 5.5 μU/3 islets/h for G3 (P = 0.920, and 154 ± 9.3 and 126.1 ± 7.3 μU/3 islets/h (P = 0.046, for G15, respectively. High extracellular potassium and 10 mM tolbutamide abrogated the inhibition of insulin secretion by GA. Glyceraldehyde, dihydroxyacetone, methylpyruvate, GLP-1, and forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase, did not abrogate the inhibition. Real-time PCR showed that GA did not induce iNOS-mRNA expression. Furthermore, an inhibitor of nitric oxide synthetase, aminoguanidine, and NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester did not abrogate the inhibition of insulin secretion. Conclusion GA suppresses glucose-induced insulin secretion from rat pancreatic β-cells through impairment of intracellular glucose metabolism.

  2. Intestinal Ioidide Secretion and its Dependence Upon Mucosal I Permeability

    OpenAIRE

    Ilundáin Larrañeta, María Anunciación; Ondarra, A.; Larralde, J.

    1985-01-01

    Iodide secretion across different regions of rat small inlestine ha.s been investigated in vitro using the standard Wilson- Wisema technique. Net I secretion was observed along the entire small intestine, being significantly higher in the central region. Anaerobic conditions, ouabain {2 mM) and Na• free Ringer solution prevented net I· secretion, whilts, both theophyilline (1 mM) and carbachol {0,1 mM) enhanced the observed basal intestinal I· secretion. Furthermore, Caº'-deprived bathing...

  3. Quantum Secret Sharing Based on Chinese Remainder Theorem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Rong-Hua; SU Qian; GUO Ying; LEE Moon Ho

    2011-01-01

    A novel quantum secret sharing (QSS) scheme is proposed on the basis of Chinese Remainder Theorem (CRT).In the scheme, the classical messages are mapped to secret sequences according to CRT equations, and distributed to different receivers by different dimensional superdense-coding respectively.CRT's secret sharing function, together with high-dimensional superdense-coding, provide convenience, security, and large capability quantum channel for secret distribution and recovering.Analysis shows the security of the scheme.

  4. Secretions and structures of the head of Sagitta setosa (Chaetognatha)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kapp, Helga; Mathey, Juliane

    1989-03-01

    The different secretions of the mouth, the vestibular organs, and the vestibular pits of chaetognaths are shown on scanning electron micrographs of the head of Sagitta setosa. The secreting organs are described and the functions of the secretions are discussed. In addition, the secretion under the praeputium, a pit between the two rows of anterior teeth, and the surface structure of the teeth are described.

  5. F-actin scaffold stabilizes lamellar bodies during surfactant secretion

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Mohammad N.; Gusarova, Galina A.; Monma, Eiji; Das, Shonit R.; Bhattacharya, Jahar

    2013-01-01

    Alveolar type 2 (AT2) cells secrete surfactant that forms a protective layer on the lung's alveolar epithelium. Vesicles called lamellar bodies (LBs) store surfactant. Failure of surfactant secretion, which causes severe lung disease, relates to the manner in which LBs undergo exocytosis during the secretion. However, the dynamics of LBs during the secretion process are not known in intact alveoli. Here, we addressed this question through real-time confocal microscopy of single AT2 cells in l...

  6. IA-2 modulates dopamine secretion in PC12 cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nishimura, Takuya; Harashima, Shin-ichi; Yafang, Hu; Notkins, Abner Louis

    2009-01-01

    The secretion of the hormone insulin from beta cells is modulated by the expression of the dense core vesicle transmembrane protein IA-2. Since IA-2 is found in neuroendocrine cells throughout the body, the present experiments were initiated to determine whether the expression of IA-2 also modulates the secretion of neurotransmitters. Using the dopamine-secreting pheochromocytoma cell line PC12, we found that the overexpressions of IA-2 increased the cellular content and secretion of dopamine...

  7. Secretion of Flavins by Three Species of Methanotrophic Bacteria▿ †

    OpenAIRE

    Balasubramanian, Ramakrishnan; Levinson, Benjamin T; Rosenzweig, Amy C.

    2010-01-01

    We detected flavins in the growth medium of the methanotrophic bacterium Methylocystis species strain M. Flavin secretion correlates with growth stage and increases under iron starvation conditions. Two other methanotrophs, Methylosinus trichosporium OB3b and Methylococcus capsulatus (Bath), secrete flavins, suggesting that flavin secretion may be common to many methanotrophic bacteria.

  8. 30 CFR 47.81 - Provisions for withholding trade secrets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... Section 47.81 Mineral Resources MINE SAFETY AND HEALTH ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF LABOR EDUCATION AND TRAINING HAZARD COMMUNICATION (HazCom) Trade Secret Hazardous Chemical § 47.81 Provisions for withholding trade secrets. (a) Operators may withhold the identity of a trade secret chemical, including the...

  9. Omeprazole promotes proximal duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertz-Nielsen, A; Hillingsø, Jens; Bukhave, K;

    1996-01-01

    with control experiments. Also the combination of omeprazole and ranitidine increased (p = 0.05) duodenal bicarbonate secretion, while ranitidine alone caused no change in either basal or stimulated secretion. In the stomach basal as well as vagally stimulated bicarbonate secretion was independent of the means...

  10. Linear Secret Sharing Schemes and Rearrangements of Access Structures

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liang-liang Xiao; Mu-lan Liu

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we study linear secret sharing schemes by monotone span programs, according to the relation between realizing access structures by linear secret sharing schemes and computing monotone Boolean functions by monotone span programs. Weconstruct some linear secret sharing schemes. Furthermore, we study the rearrangements of access structures that is very important in practice.

  11. Charting Secrets Stop Reading Start Practicing

    CERN Document Server

    Bedford, Louise

    2012-01-01

    It is a common myth that the sharemarket is a fast ticket to the easy life. Buy a few shares and watch them go up. Call your broker for up-to-the-minute price information as you drive the Porsche to the golf club. Yell 'Sell! Sell! Sell' into your mobile as you ski through the Swiss Alps. Nothing could be further from the truth. Louise Bedford believes that the only way to be successful in the market is to spend time studying and putting in the hard work, just like any other job. With this in mind, she has written Charting Secrets. Not just another trading book, Charting Secrets is a workbook

  12. Apical secretion of apolipoproteins from enterocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Danielsen, E M; Hansen, Gert Helge; Poulsen, Mona Dam

    1993-01-01

    Synthesis and secretion of apolipoproteins in pig small intestine was studied by pulse-chase labeling of jejunal segments, kept in organ culture. Apo A-1 and apo B-48 were the two major proteins released, constituting 25 and 10%, respectively, of the total amount of labeled protein in the mucosal...... that enterocytes release most of their newly made free apo A-1 and a significant portion of apo B-48 by exocytosis via the brush border membrane into the intestinal lumen. Fat absorption reduced apolipoprotein secretion to the medium and induced the formation of chylomicrons, containing apo A-1 at their surface......-side medium where they appeared with a t1/2 of 50-60 min. Using tissue from fasting animals, > 85% of newly synthesized apo A-1 and about one third of apo B-48 was released to the mucosal-side medium. Newly synthesized apolipoprotein that remained associated with the intestinal segment accumulated...

  13. Visual Secret Sharing Based Digital Image Watermarking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Surekha

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a spatial domain image watermarking technique based on Visual Secret Sharing (VSS and unique statistical properties is proposed. A random looking image is generated during watermark hiding process and is secretly registered with an arbitrator for verification during conflicts. Another random looking image is generated during watermark revelation stage and is combined with the existing one, to recover the watermark. This whole process is done without altering the image to be protected and hence the quality of the cover image is high. When compared with similar existing techniques, the proposed technique has three main advantages: Provides greater convenience in carrying and storing the intermediate images called shares; Provides high security; Reduce tradeoff between spatial and frequency domain techniques in terms of robustness

  14. Analysis of Secreted Proteins Using SILAC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Henningsen, Jeanette; Blagoev, Blagoy; Kratchmarova, Irina

    2014-01-01

    Secreted proteins serve a crucial role in the communication between cells, tissues, and organs. Proteins released to the extracellular environment exert their function either locally or at distant points of the organism. Proteins are secreted in a highly dynamic fashion by cells and tissues in th...... isotopes. Here, we describe the use of Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino acids in Cell culture (SILAC) for the quantitative analysis of the skeletal muscle secretome during myogenesis....... body responding to the stimuli and requirements presented by the extracellular milieu. Characterization of secretomes derived from various cell types has been performed using different quantitative mass spectrometry-based proteomics strategies, several of them taking advantage of labeling with stable...

  15. Secrets of over-indebted people

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie BILLAUDEAU

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Today, the economic and financial crisis is brought to light and it is now clear that many people are directly impacted by this phenomenon. However, a lot of situations are obviously hidden and in particular those concerning over-indebted people. These people often find that it is difficult to express the hardship they are going through and keep silent because is more comfortable for them. The media also does not tackle this burning issue because the complexity of some situations complicates the message. Therefore, a giant gap has appeared leaving over-indebted people entrapped in their secret. Starting from this hypothesis, this article will examine the results of a research conducted on the over-indebted people (survey on written press, analysis of TV broadcasts, analysis of records related to person in debts and responses of people in debts and the secrets that this phenomenon involves.

  16. The SNARE machinery in mast cell secretion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Axel eLorentz

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Mast cells are known as inflammatory cells which exert their functions in allergic and anaphylactic reactions by secretion of numerous inflammatory mediators. During an allergic response, the high-affinity IgE receptor, FcεRI, becomes cross-linked by receptor-bound IgE and antigen resulting in immediate release of pre-synthesized mediators – stored in granules – as well as in de novo synthesis of various mediators like cytokines and chemokines. Soluble N-ethylmaleimide-Sensitive Factor (NSF Attachment Protein (SNAP Receptors (SNARE proteins were found to play a central role in regulating membrane fusion events during exocytosis. In addition, several accessory regulators like Munc13, Munc18, Rab GTPases, SCAMPs, complexins or synaptotagmins were found to be involved in membrane fusion. In this review we summarize our current knowledge about the SNARE machinery and its mechanism of action in mast cell secretion.

  17. Product Lines Can Jeopardize Their Trade Secrets

    OpenAIRE

    Acher, Mathieu; Bécan, Guillaume; Combemale, Benoit; Baudry, Benoit; Jézéquel, Jean-Marc

    2015-01-01

    International audience What do you give for free to your competitor when you exhibit a product line? This paper addresses this question through several cases in which the discovery of trade secrets of a product line is possible and can lead to severe consequences. That is, we show that an outsider can understand the variability realization and gain either confidential business information or even some economical direct advantage. For instance, an attacker can identify hidden constraints an...

  18. Mucin secretion induced by titanium dioxide nanoparticles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric Y T Chen

    Full Text Available Nanoparticle (NP exposure has been closely associated with the exacerbation and pathophysiology of many respiratory diseases such as Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD and asthma. Mucus hypersecretion and accumulation in the airway are major clinical manifestations commonly found in these diseases. Among a broad spectrum of NPs, titanium dioxide (TiO(2, one of the PM10 components, is widely utilized in the nanoindustry for manufacturing and processing of various commercial products. Although TiO(2 NPs have been shown to induce cellular nanotoxicity and emphysema-like symptoms, whether TiO(2 NPs can directly induce mucus secretion from airway cells is currently unknown. Herein, we showed that TiO(2 NPs (<75 nm can directly stimulate mucin secretion from human bronchial ChaGo-K1 epithelial cells via a Ca(2+ signaling mediated pathway. The amount of mucin secreted was quantified with enzyme-linked lectin assay (ELLA. The corresponding changes in cytosolic Ca(2+ concentration were monitored with Rhod-2, a fluorescent Ca(2+ dye. We found that TiO(2 NP-evoked mucin secretion was a function of increasing intracellular Ca(2+ concentration resulting from an extracellular Ca(2+ influx via membrane Ca(2+ channels and cytosolic ER Ca(2+ release. The calcium-induced calcium release (CICR mechanism played a major role in further amplifying the intracellular Ca(2+ signal and in sustaining a cytosolic Ca(2+ increase. This study provides a potential mechanistic link between airborne NPs and the pathoetiology of pulmonary diseases involving mucus hypersecretion.

  19. George's secret key to the universe

    CERN Document Server

    Hawking, Lucy; Galfard, Christophe; Parsons, Gary

    2007-01-01

    In their bestselling book for young readers, noted physicist Stephen Hawking and his daughter, Lucy, provide a grand and funny adventure that explains fascinating information about our universe, including Dr. Hawking's latest ideas about black holes. It's the story of George, who's taken through the vastness of space by a scientist, his daughter, and their super-computer named Cosmos. George's Secret Key to the Universe was a New York Times bestseller and a selection of Al's Book Club on the Today show.

  20. Paliperidone Induced Hypoglycemia by Increasing Insulin Secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omi, Tsubasa; Riku, Keisen; Fukumoto, Motoyuki; Kanai, Koji; Omura, Yumi; Takada, Hiromune; Matunaga, Hidenori

    2016-01-01

    We report the case of a 41-year-old woman with schizophrenia who developed persistent hypoglycemia following paliperidone administration. After discontinuing paliperidone, the hypoglycemia resolved, but symptoms of diabetes emerged. Therefore, it appears that the hypoglycemia induced by paliperidone may mask symptoms of diabetes. Paliperidone may induce hypoglycemia by increasing insulin secretion. This report could help elucidate the relationship between atypical antipsychotics and glucose metabolism. PMID:27478670

  1. Por Secretion System of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    OpenAIRE

    Sato, Keiko

    2011-01-01

    The virulence factors of pathogenic bacteria are major secretory proteins that are directly linked to their pathogenicity These secretory proteins are translocated across the membranes of bacterial cells by translocase nanomachines, which consists of integral membrane proteins. The periodontal pathogen, Porphyromonas gingivalis, secretes trypsin-like proteases (gingipains) either as a large complex on the bacterial cell surface or into the extracellular milieu. Gingipains are important virule...

  2. Legionella secreted effectors and innate immune responses

    OpenAIRE

    Luo, Zhao-Qing

    2011-01-01

    Legionella pneumophila is a facultative intracellular pathogen capable of replicating in a wide spectrum of cells. Successful infection by Legionella requires the Dot/Icm type IV secretion system, which translocates a large number of effector proteins into infected cells. By co-opting numerous host cellular processes, these proteins function to establish a specialized organelle that allows bacterial survival and proliferation. Even within the vacuole, L. pneumophila triggers robust immune res...

  3. ACTH-Secreting Pheochromocytoma. Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N S Kuznetsov

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Ectopic hormone-secreting pheochromocytomas are rare. Only case reports exist in the literature. Despite the large number of guides on diagnosis and treatment of pheochromocytoma, and Cushing syndrome, the extreme rarity of ectopic ACTH-syndrome caused by pheochromocytoma, and complexity of clinical cause numerous diagnostic errors leading to treatment failure. Therefore, we belive it appropriate to share our experience of this group of patients.

  4. How to hide a secret direction

    OpenAIRE

    Bagan, E.; Calsamiglia, J.; Demkowicz-Dobrzanski, R.; Munoz-Tapia, R.

    2006-01-01

    We present a procedure to share a secret spatial direction in the absence of a common reference frame using a multipartite quantum state. The procedure guarantees that the parties can determine the direction if they perform joint measurements on the state, but fail to do so if they restrict themselves to local operations and classical communication (LOCC). We calculate the fidelity for joint measurements, give bounds on the fidelity achievable by LOCC, and prove that there is a non-vanishing ...

  5. Secrets of mlearning failures: confronting reality

    OpenAIRE

    Cochrane, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    Having implemented and evaluated over 35 mlearning projects in a variety of contexts in higher education over the past 6 years the researcher is ready to share the untold secret: not all mlearning projects succeed! This article critiques three of the researcher’s mlearning projects that can be classed as ‘‘failures’’ and compares them to successful projects to draw out critical implications for mlearning project design and implementation to avoid common pitfalls leading to potential project f...

  6. Association of expression levels of pluripotency/stem cell markers with the differentiation outcome of Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells into insulin producing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Dina H; Kamal, Mohamed M; El-Kholy, Abd El-Latif G; El-Mesallamy, Hala O

    2016-08-01

    Recently, there has been much attention towards generation of insulin producing cells (IPCs) from stem cells, especially from Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells (WJ-MSCs). However, generation of mature IPCs remains a challenge. Assessment of generation of IPCs was usually done by examining β-cell markers, however, assessment of pluripotency/stem cell markers drew less attention. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the levels of pluripotency/stem cell markers during differentiation of WJ-MSCs into IPCs and the association of these levels with differentiation outcomes. WJ-MSCs were isolated, characterized then induced to differentiate into IPCs using three different protocols namely A, B and C. Differentiated IPCs were assessed by the expression of pluripotency/stem cell markers, together with β-cell markers using qRT-PCR, and functionally by measuring glucose stimulated insulin secretion. Differentiated cells from protocol A showed lowest expression of pluripotency/stem cell markers and relatively best GSIS. However, protocol B showed concomitant expression of pluripotency/stem cell and β-cell markers with relatively less insulin secretion as compared to protocol A. Protocol C failed to generate glucose-responsive IPCs. In conclusion, sustained expression of pluripotency/stem cell markers could be associated with the incomplete differentiation of WJ-MSCs into IPCs. A novel finding for which further investigations are warranted. PMID:27265786

  7. Association of expression levels of pluripotency/stem cell markers with the differentiation outcome of Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells into insulin producing cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kassem, Dina H; Kamal, Mohamed M; El-Kholy, Abd El-Latif G; El-Mesallamy, Hala O

    2016-08-01

    Recently, there has been much attention towards generation of insulin producing cells (IPCs) from stem cells, especially from Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells (WJ-MSCs). However, generation of mature IPCs remains a challenge. Assessment of generation of IPCs was usually done by examining β-cell markers, however, assessment of pluripotency/stem cell markers drew less attention. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to investigate the levels of pluripotency/stem cell markers during differentiation of WJ-MSCs into IPCs and the association of these levels with differentiation outcomes. WJ-MSCs were isolated, characterized then induced to differentiate into IPCs using three different protocols namely A, B and C. Differentiated IPCs were assessed by the expression of pluripotency/stem cell markers, together with β-cell markers using qRT-PCR, and functionally by measuring glucose stimulated insulin secretion. Differentiated cells from protocol A showed lowest expression of pluripotency/stem cell markers and relatively best GSIS. However, protocol B showed concomitant expression of pluripotency/stem cell and β-cell markers with relatively less insulin secretion as compared to protocol A. Protocol C failed to generate glucose-responsive IPCs. In conclusion, sustained expression of pluripotency/stem cell markers could be associated with the incomplete differentiation of WJ-MSCs into IPCs. A novel finding for which further investigations are warranted.

  8. Activated microglia enhance neurogenesis via trypsinogen secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nikolakopoulou, Angeliki M; Dutta, Ranjan; Chen, Zhihong; Miller, Robert H; Trapp, Bruce D

    2013-05-21

    White matter neurons in multiple sclerosis brains are destroyed during demyelination and then replaced in some chronic multiple sclerosis lesions that exhibit a morphologically distinct population of activated microglia [Chang A, et al. (2008) Brain 131(Pt 9):2366-2375]. Here we investigated whether activated microglia secrete factors that promote the generation of neurons from white matter cells. Adult rat brain microglia (resting or activated with lipopolysaccharide) were isolated by flow cytometry and cocultured with neonatal rat optic nerve cells in separate but media-connected chambers. Optic nerve cells cocultured with activated microglia showed a significant increase in the number of cells of neuronal phenotype, identified by neuron-specific class III beta-tubulin (TUJ-1) labeling, compared with cultures with resting microglia. To investigate the possible source of the TUJ-1-positive cells, A2B5-positive oligodendrocyte progenitor cells and A2B5-negative cells were isolated and cocultured with resting and activated microglia. Significantly more TUJ-1-positive cells were generated from A2B5-negative cells (∼70%) than from A2B5-positive cells (~30%). Mass spectrometry analysis of microglia culture media identified protease serine 2 (PRSS2) as a factor secreted by activated, but not resting, microglia. When added to optic nerve cultures, PRSS2 significantly increased neurogenesis, whereas the serine protease inhibitor, secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor, decreased activated microglia-induced neurogenesis. Collectively our data provide evidence that activated microglia increase neurogenesis through secretion of PRSS2.

  9. An Ectopic ACTH Secreting Metastatic Parotid Tumour

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thomas Dacruz

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A 60-year old woman presented with features of Cushing’s syndrome (CS secondary to an ectopic adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH secreting metastatic parotid tumour 3 years after excision of the original tumour. She subsequently developed fatal intestinal perforation and unfortunately died despite best possible medical measures. Ectopic ACTH secretion accounts for 5–10% of all patients presenting with ACTH dependent hypercortisolism; small cell carcinoma of lung (SCLC and neuroendocrine tumours (NET account for the majority of such cases. Although there are 4 previous case reports of ectopic ACTH secreting salivary tumours in literature, to our knowledge this is the first published case report in which the CS developed after 3 years of what was deemed as a successful surgical excision of primary salivary tumour. Our patient initially had nonspecific symptoms which may have contributed to a delay in diagnosis. Perforation of sigmoid colon is a recognised though underdiagnosed complication associated with steroid therapy and hypercortisolism. This case demonstrates the challenges faced in diagnosis as well as management of patients with CS apart from the practical difficulties faced while trying to identify source of ectopic ACTH.

  10. Unconventional Protein Secretion in Animal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Fanny; Tang, Bor Luen

    2016-01-01

    All eukaryotic cells secrete a range of proteins in a constitutive or regulated manner through the conventional or canonical exocytic/secretory pathway characterized by vesicular traffic from the endoplasmic reticulum, through the Golgi apparatus, and towards the plasma membrane. However, a number of proteins are secreted in an unconventional manner, which are insensitive to inhibitors of conventional exocytosis and use a route that bypasses the Golgi apparatus. These include cytosolic proteins such as fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) and interleukin-1β (IL-1β), and membrane proteins that are known to also traverse to the plasma membrane by a conventional process of exocytosis, such as α integrin and the cystic fibrosis transmembrane conductor (CFTR). Mechanisms underlying unconventional protein secretion (UPS) are actively being analyzed and deciphered, and these range from an unusual form of plasma membrane translocation to vesicular processes involving the generation of exosomes and other extracellular microvesicles. In this chapter, we provide an overview on what is currently known about UPS in animal cells. PMID:27665549

  11. Characterization of VAMP-2 in the lung: implication in lung surfactant secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengcheng; Howard, Marcia D; Zhang, Honghao; Chintagari, Narendranath Reddy; Bell, Anna; Jin, Nili; Mishra, Amarjit; Liu, Lin

    2012-09-01

    Lung surfactant is crucial for reducing the surface tension of alveolar space, thus preventing the alveoli from collapse. Lung surfactant is synthesized in alveolar epithelial type II cells and stored in lamellar bodies before being released via the fusion of lamellar bodies with the apical plasma membrane. SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein-attachment protein receptors) play an essential role in membrane fusion. We have previously demonstrated the requirement of t-SNARE (target SNARE) proteins, syntaxin 2 and SNAP-23 (N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor-attachment protein 23), in regulated surfactant secretion. Here, we characterized the distribution of VAMPs (vesicle-associated membrane proteins) in rat lung and alveolar type II cells. VAMP-2, -3 and -8 are shown in type II cells at both mRNA and protein levels. VAMP-2 and -8 were enriched in LB (lamellar body) fraction. Immunochemistry studies indicated that VAMP-2 was co-localized with the LB marker protein, LB-180. Functionally, the cytoplasmic domain of VAMP-2, but not VAMP-8 inhibited surfactant secretion in type II cells. We suggest that VAMP-2 is the v-SNARE (vesicle SNARE) involved in regulated surfactant secretion. PMID:22571236

  12. EEN regulates the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma cells by potentiating IGF-1 secretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Levels of EEN expression paralleled with the rate of cell proliferation. • EEN was involved in the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma (MM) cells. • EEN regulated the activity of IGF-1-Akt/mTOR pathway. • EEN regulated proliferation and survival of MM cells by enhancing IGF-1 secretion. - Abstract: The molecular mechanisms of multiple myeloma are not well defined. EEN is an endocytosis-regulating molecule. Here we report that EEN regulates the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma cells, by regulating IGF-1 secretion. In the present study, we observed that EEN expression paralleled with cell proliferation, EEN accelerated cell proliferation, facilitated cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase by regulating cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) pathway, and delayed cell apoptosis via Bcl2/Bax-mitochondrial pathway. Mechanistically, we found that EEN was indispensable for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) secretion and the activation of protein kinase B-mammalian target of rapamycin (Akt-mTOR) pathway. Exogenous IGF-1 overcame the phenotype of EEN depletion, while IGF-1 neutralization overcame that of EEN over-expression. Collectively, these data suggest that EEN may play a pivotal role in excessive cell proliferation and insufficient cell apoptosis of bone marrow plasma cells in multiple myeloma. Therefore, EEN may represent a potential diagnostic marker or therapeutic target for multiple myeloma

  13. EEN regulates the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma cells by potentiating IGF-1 secretion

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Er-Wen [Guangzhou Institute of Forensic Science, Guangzhou (China); Department of Forensic Pathology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Xue, Sheng-Jiang [Department of Forensic Pathology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Li, Xiao-Yan [Department of Pharmacy, The Third Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Xu, Suo-Wen [Department of Pharmacology and Toxicology, School of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Cheng, Jian-Ding; Zheng, Jin-Xiang [Department of Forensic Pathology, Zhongshan School of Medicine, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Shi, He; Lv, Guo-Li; Li, Zhi-Gang; Li, Yue; Liu, Chang-Hui; Chen, Xiao-Hui; Liu, Hong [Guangzhou Institute of Forensic Science, Guangzhou (China); Li, Jie, E-mail: mdlijie@sina.com [Department of Anaesthesiology, Sun Yat-Sen Memorial Hospital, Sun Yat-Sen University, Guangzhou (China); Liu, Chao, E-mail: liuchaogaj@21cn.com [Guangzhou Institute of Forensic Science, Guangzhou (China)

    2014-05-02

    Highlights: • Levels of EEN expression paralleled with the rate of cell proliferation. • EEN was involved in the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma (MM) cells. • EEN regulated the activity of IGF-1-Akt/mTOR pathway. • EEN regulated proliferation and survival of MM cells by enhancing IGF-1 secretion. - Abstract: The molecular mechanisms of multiple myeloma are not well defined. EEN is an endocytosis-regulating molecule. Here we report that EEN regulates the proliferation and survival of multiple myeloma cells, by regulating IGF-1 secretion. In the present study, we observed that EEN expression paralleled with cell proliferation, EEN accelerated cell proliferation, facilitated cell cycle transition from G1 to S phase by regulating cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) pathway, and delayed cell apoptosis via Bcl2/Bax-mitochondrial pathway. Mechanistically, we found that EEN was indispensable for insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) secretion and the activation of protein kinase B-mammalian target of rapamycin (Akt-mTOR) pathway. Exogenous IGF-1 overcame the phenotype of EEN depletion, while IGF-1 neutralization overcame that of EEN over-expression. Collectively, these data suggest that EEN may play a pivotal role in excessive cell proliferation and insufficient cell apoptosis of bone marrow plasma cells in multiple myeloma. Therefore, EEN may represent a potential diagnostic marker or therapeutic target for multiple myeloma.

  14. Characterization of VAMP-2 in the lung: implication in lung surfactant secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Pengcheng; Howard, Marcia D; Zhang, Honghao; Chintagari, Narendranath Reddy; Bell, Anna; Jin, Nili; Mishra, Amarjit; Liu, Lin

    2012-09-01

    Lung surfactant is crucial for reducing the surface tension of alveolar space, thus preventing the alveoli from collapse. Lung surfactant is synthesized in alveolar epithelial type II cells and stored in lamellar bodies before being released via the fusion of lamellar bodies with the apical plasma membrane. SNAREs (soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive fusion protein-attachment protein receptors) play an essential role in membrane fusion. We have previously demonstrated the requirement of t-SNARE (target SNARE) proteins, syntaxin 2 and SNAP-23 (N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor-attachment protein 23), in regulated surfactant secretion. Here, we characterized the distribution of VAMPs (vesicle-associated membrane proteins) in rat lung and alveolar type II cells. VAMP-2, -3 and -8 are shown in type II cells at both mRNA and protein levels. VAMP-2 and -8 were enriched in LB (lamellar body) fraction. Immunochemistry studies indicated that VAMP-2 was co-localized with the LB marker protein, LB-180. Functionally, the cytoplasmic domain of VAMP-2, but not VAMP-8 inhibited surfactant secretion in type II cells. We suggest that VAMP-2 is the v-SNARE (vesicle SNARE) involved in regulated surfactant secretion.

  15. Early bichemical markers of effects: Enzyme induction, oncogene activation and markers of oxidative damage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Henrik E.; Loft, Steffen

    1995-01-01

    Early bichemical marker, enzyme induction, oncogene activation, oxidative damage, low-density lipoprotein......Early bichemical marker, enzyme induction, oncogene activation, oxidative damage, low-density lipoprotein...

  16. Glucagon-like peptide 2 stimulates glucagon secretion, enhances lipid absorption, and inhibits gastric acid secretion in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meier, Juris J; Nauck, Michael A; Pott, Andrea;

    2006-01-01

    (P = .07). GLP-2 administration caused an approximately 15% reduction in pentagastrin-stimulated gastric acid and chloride secretion (P secretion but does not seem to have an influence on gastric...... emptying. The stimulation of glucagon secretion by GLP-2 may counteract the glucagonostatic effect of GLP-1. Changes in postprandial lipid excursions seem to reflect enhanced intestinal nutrient absorption during GLP-2 administration....

  17. Advanced Steganography Algorithm using Encrypted secret message

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joyshree Nath

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In the present work the authors have introduced a new method for hiding any encrypted secret message inside a cover file. For encrypting secret message the authors have used new algorithm proposed by Nath et al(1. For hiding secret message we have used a method proposed by Nath et al(2. In MSA(1 method we have modified the idea of Play fair method into a new platform where we can encrypt or decrypt any file. We have introduced a new randomization method for generating the randomized key matrix to encrypt plain text file and to decrypt cipher text file. We have also introduced a new algorithm for encrypting the plain text multiple times. Our method is totally dependent on the random text_key which is to be supplied by the user. The maximum length of the text_key can be of 16 characters long and it may contain any character(ASCII code 0 to 255. We have developed an algorithm to calculate the randomization number and the encryption number from the given text_key. The size of the encryption key matrix is 16x16 and the total number of matrices can be formed from 16 x 16 is 256! which is quite large and hence if someone applies the brute force method then he/she has to give trail for 256! times which is quite absurd. Moreover the multiple encryption method makes the system further secured. For hiding secret message in the cover file we have inserted the 8 bits of each character of encrypted message file in 8 consecutive bytes of the cover file. We have introduced password for hiding data in the cover file. We propose that our new method could be most appropriate for hiding any file in any standard cover file such as image, audio, video files. Because the hidden message is encrypted hence it will be almost impossible for the intruder to unhide the actual secret message from the embedded cover file. This method may be the most secured method in digital water marking.

  18. Constructions for Anonymous Secret Sharing Schemes Using Combinatorial Designs

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying-pu Deng; Li-feng Guo; Mu-lan Liu

    2007-01-01

    In an anonymous secret sharing scheme the secret can be reconstructed without knowledge of which participants hold which shares. In this paper some constructions of anonymous secret sharing schemes with 2 thresholds by using combinatorial designs are given. Let υ(t, ω, q) denote the minimum size of the set of shares of a perfect anonymous (t, ω) threshold secret sharing scheme with q secrets. In this paper we prove that υ(t, ω, q) = Θ(q) if t and ω are fixed and that the lower bound of the size of the set of shares in [4] is not optimal under certain condition.

  19. Indomethacin decreases gastroduodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mertz-Nielsen, A; Hillingsø, Jens; Bukhave, K;

    1995-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Cyclooxygenase inhibitors reduce mucosal bicarbonate secretion in the duodenum, but the evidence for their effect on bicarbonate secretion in the stomach remains controversial. We have, therefore, studied how indomethacin influences gastroduodenal bicarbonate secretion and luminal...... healthy volunteers. Bicarbonate and PGE2 were measured in the gastroduodenal effluents by back-titration and radioimmunoassay, respectively. RESULTS: Vagal stimulation and duodenal luminal acidification (0.1 M HCl; 20 ml; 5 min) increased gastroduodenal bicarbonate secretion (p ... markedly inhibited both basal and stimulated gastric and duodenal mucosal bicarbonate secretion, and this reduction was similar to the degree of cyclooxygenase inhibition estimated by the luminal release of PGE2 (p

  20. Shift visual cryptography scheme of two secret images

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A new visual cryptography scheme of two secret images, which is named the shift visual cryptography of two secret images, is given. The compound function family of a general construction model is also introduced. The uniqueness and validity of this model are proved, and the minimum rows and columns for realizing the scheme are obtained. Compared with visual cryptography of one secret image, the shift visual cryptography scheme can share two secret images with the same size of pixels expansion without losing the contrast. It has randomness and various forms, and furthermore, we can also visually recover two secret images even if the two shares are different in form and color.

  1. Verifiable Quantum ( k, n)-threshold Secret Key Sharing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yu-Guang; Teng, Yi-Wei; Chai, Hai-Ping; Wen, Qiao-Yan

    2011-03-01

    Based on Lagrange interpolation formula and the post-verification mechanism, we show how to construct a verifiable quantum ( k, n) threshold secret key sharing scheme. Compared with the previous secret sharing protocols, ours has the merits: (i) it can resist the fraud of the dealer who generates and distributes fake shares among the participants during the secret distribution phase; Most importantly, (ii) It can check the cheating of the dishonest participant who provides a false share during the secret reconstruction phase such that the authorized group cannot recover the correct secret.

  2. EFFECTS OF SECRETABLE PLACENTAL FACTORS UPON SECRETION OF CYTOKINES BY THP-1 MONOCYTE-LIKE CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya. S. Onokhina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Мonocytes in feto-placental circulation are exposed to factors secreted by placental tissue. These factors influence monocyte functions in pregnancy. In present study, an in vitro model (monocyte-like THP-1 cells was used for assessing effects of soluble placental factors obtained from women with physiological pregnancies, or preeclampsia cases. The following effects of placental factors were revealed: increased secretion of VEGF by THP-1 cells along with decreased secretion of IL-6, IL-8 and MCP-1 under the influence of placental factors from the I. trimester of pregnancy in comparison with III. trimester. Secretion of IL-6 and MCP-1 by THP-1 cells was increased, and secretion of soluble TNFRII was decreased upon co-cultivation with soluble placental factors from the women with preeclampsia, as compared with placental products from physiological pregnancies.The work is supported by grants ГК № 02.740.11.0711 from Ministry of Education and Science, and НШ-3594.2010.7 grant from the President of Russian Federation.

  3. Molecular markers for thyroid cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The importance of the study of the thyroid nodule lies in excluding the possibility of a malignant lesion because the majority of lesions are benign but there is a malignancy risk of 5 to 10%. Most of them are well differentiated carcinomas originating in the follicular epithelium. In spite of the fact that the majority are benign lesions, distinguishing them from carcinomas is crucial to treatment and adequate follow-up. Fine-needle biopsy allows making the diagnosis in most of cases. However, this method is restricted, particularly when diagnosing follicular lesions. In an effort to improve the diagnostic accuracy of biopsy and to provide new diagnosing criteria, a number of molecular markers have been put forward, some of which has wide range of approval whereas others still awaits to be validated for further implementation. This article presented an updated review of molecular markers with higher number of evidence, more accessible and potentially usable from a methodological viewpoint for diagnosis of the thyroid nodule before surgery. The importance of the study of the thyroid nodule lies in excluding the possibility of a malignant lesion because the majority of lesions are benign but there is a malignancy risk of 5 to 10%. Most of them are well differentiated carcinomas originating in the follicular epithelium. In spite of the fact that the majority are benign lesions, distinguishing them from carcinomas is crucial to treatment and adequate follow-up. Fine-needle biopsy allows making the diagnosis in most of cases. However, this method is restricted, particularly when diagnosing follicular lesions. In an effort to improve the diagnostic accuracy of biopsy and to provide new diagnosing criteria, a number of molecular markers have been put forward, some of which has wide range of approval whereas others still awaits to be validated for further implementation. This article presented an updated review of molecular markers with higher number of evidence, more

  4. Markers of acidosis and stress in a sprint versus a conducted electrical weapon.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Jeffrey D; Dawes, Donald M; Nystrom, Paul C; Collins, Donal P; Nelson, Rebecca S; Moore, Johanna C; Miner, James R

    2013-12-10

    Both profound acidosis and catecholamine excess have been proposed as underlying physiologic derangements in subjects at high risk for arrest related death (ARD). In this study, the objective was to determine a level of physical exertion that is "equivalent" in terms of levels of acidosis and catecholamines to a "standard" TASER X26 exposure. Data were collected on subjects who underwent a 5-s TASER X26 exposure or a sprint of variable distances during a law enforcement training exercise. Our results show that levels of acidosis and catecholamines are less among subjects exposed to the TASER X26 than among subjects who sprinted 20 yards or more. PMID:24314505

  5. Caffeine Alters Blood Potassium and Catecholamine Concentrations but not the Perception of Pain and Fatigue with a 1 km Cycling Sprint

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean M. Cordingley

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background: Caffeine has been used by some athletes to improve short-term high-intensity exercise performance; however, the literature is equivocal. Objectives: The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of caffeine on plasma potassium and catecholamine concentrations, pain and fatigue perception, to determine whether potassium ion handling and altered perception related to the central nervous system are associated with enhanced performance during a 1 km cycling time trial.  Methods: Thirteen well trained men with a mean age of 27 ± 6 yrs (body mass: 76.4 ± 6.4 kg, height: 180 ± 7 cm, and max: 57.5 ± 4.6 ml·kg-1·min-1 were recruited.  Participants were randomized to a caffeine (5 mg·kg-1 or a placebo condition using a double blind, cross over design.  Results: Caffeine had no significant effects on the 1 km time-trial performance indicators of time (82.1 ± 2.4 vs. 81.9 ± 3.9s, peak (633.0 ± 83.6 vs. 638.7 ± 110.1 watts or average power (466.0 ± 37.3 vs. 467.5 ± 59.9 watts; caffeine and placebo conditions respectively.  In addition, caffeine had no significant effect on oxygen consumption ( (4.11 ± 0.24 vs 4.06 ± 0.29 L,the perception of pain (5.6 ± 2.4 vs. 5.5 ± 2.6 or fatigue (7.1 ± 1.8 vs.7.1 ± 1.8: caffeine and placebo conditions respectively.  There was a significantly greater increase in post-exercise blood lactate (p<0.05 and catecholamines (p<0.05 as well as a lower pre-exercise blood potassium concentration (p<0.05 in the caffeine condition. Conclusions: The results suggest that caffeine can enhance certain metabolic parameters, but these changes were unable to augment short-distance (1km, high-intensity cycling performance.Keywords: ergogenic, anaerobic exercise, performance, oxygen consumption

  6. Vocatives and discourse markers in textualinteractive grammar

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Penhavel

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we discuss the class of Vocatives and the class of Discourse Markers as proposed within Textualinteractive Grammar, and we try to demonstrate that Vocatives can work as Discourse Markers.

  7. The role of jasmonates in floral nectar secretion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesan Radhika

    Full Text Available Plants produce nectar in their flowers as a reward for their pollinators and most of our crops depend on insect pollination, but little is known on the physiological control of nectar secretion. Jasmonates are well-known for their effects on senescence, the development and opening of flowers and on plant defences such as extrafloral nectar. Their role in floral nectar secretion has, however, not been explored so far. We investigated whether jasmonates have an influence on floral nectar secretion in oil-seed rape, Brassica napus. The floral tissues of this plant produced jasmonic acid (JA endogenously, and JA concentrations peaked shortly before nectar secretion was highest. Exogenous application of JA to flowers induced nectar secretion, which was suppressed by treatment with phenidone, an inhibitor of JA synthesis. This effect could be reversed by additional application of JA. Jasmonoyl-isoleucine and its structural mimic coronalon also increased nectar secretion. Herbivory or addition of JA to the leaves did not have an effect on floral nectar secretion, demonstrating a functional separation of systemic defence signalling from reproductive nectar secretion. Jasmonates, which have been intensively studied in the context of herbivore defences and flower development, have a profound effect on floral nectar secretion and, thus, pollination efficiency in B. napus. Our results link floral nectar secretion to jasmonate signalling and thereby integrate the floral nectar secretion into the complex network of oxylipid-mediated developmental processes of plants.

  8. Isotonic secretion via frog skin glands in vitro. Water secretion is coupled to the secretion of sodium ions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nielsen, R

    1990-05-01

    In isolated frog skin at least three different types of cells are engaged in the transepithelial ion and water transport; these are the granular cells, the mitochondria-rich cells and the glandular cells. The experiments presented were carried out on isolated frog skin bathed in Cl- or NO3- Ringer's solution, where the active transepithelial Na+ uptake via the granular cells was blocked by amiloride. Transepithelial current and water flow were measured. When a negative current was passed across the skins (the skins were clamped at -100 mV), the current was mainly carried by a net influx of Cl- via the mitochondria-rich cells. The current had no effect on the transepithelial water movement. This finding indicates that there is nearly no coupling between the Cl- flux and the movement of water via the mitochondria-rich cells. Prostaglandin E2 activates the glandular cells of the exocrine glands in the skin. When prostaglandin E2 was added under these experimental conditions (the skins were clamped at -100 mV, with amiloride in the apical bathing solution, and the glandular secretion of ions was blocked by the use of NO3- Ringer's solution), then the transepithelial current became more negative. This change in current was mainly due to an increase in the Na+ efflux via the glands. Thus PGE2 increase the Na+ conductance of the skin glands. Together with this increase in the Na+ efflux a highly significant increase in the water secretion was observed. The water movement (secretion) across the skin was under these conditions coupled to the PGE2-induced efflux of Na+, and when one Na+ was pulled from the basolateral to the apical solution via this pathway 215 molecules of water followed. This must be due to electro-osmosis (friction between ions and water) or current-induced local osmosis. PMID:2356751

  9. How not to share a set of secrets

    CERN Document Server

    Sahasranand, K R; S, Rajan

    2010-01-01

    This note analyzes one of the existing space efficient secret sharing schemes and suggests vulnerabilities in its design. The said algorithm is nearly a 100% failure for robust key management schemes where the secrets to be shared are small compared to the number of people among whom the secret is shared, for reasonable choices of prime modulus p. The paper also proposes a space optimal secret sharing scheme which is an extension of Shamir's scheme, in which a set of k secrets is shared among n parties, requiring any m of them to come together for the reconstruction of the secret (n >= m >= k). It eliminates the need for random values for implementation and is not tied by the constraint that only a (k, n) scheme could be implemented with k secrets.

  10. New phenotypic marker for lipopolysaccharide responsiveness.

    OpenAIRE

    Gollapudi, S V; Gregory, S. H.; Kern, M

    1980-01-01

    Lipopolysaccharide-enhanced secretion of non-immunoglobulin proteins by bone marrow cells derived from responder, nonresponder, and low-responder mouse strains did not precisely correlate with the lipopolysaccharide responsiveness assessment based on the mitogenic reactivity of splenocytes. These findings suggest that enhancement of secretion of non-immunoglobulin protein may be useful for further characterization of lipopolysaccharide responsiveness.

  11. Mechanisms underlying glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide and glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reimann, Frank; Gribble, Fiona M

    2016-04-01

    The incretin hormones, glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide and glucagon-like peptide-1, are secreted from intestinal K- and L cells, respectively, with the former being most abundant in the proximal small intestine, whereas the latter increase in number towards the distal gut. Although an overlap between K- and L cells can be observed immunohistochemically or in murine models expressing fluorescent markers under the control of the two hormone promoters, the majority (>80%) of labeled cells seems to produce only one of these hormones. Transcriptomic analysis showed a close relationship between small intestinal K- and L cells, and glucose sensing mechanisms appear similar in both cell types with a predominant role of electrogenic glucose uptake through sodium-coupled glucose transporter 1. Similarly, both cell types produce the long-chain fatty acid sensing G-protein-coupled receptors, FFAR1 (GPR40) and FFAR4 (GPR120), but differ in the expression/functionality of other lipid sensing receptors. GPR119 and FFAR2/3, for example, have clearly documented roles in glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion, whereas agonists for the endocannabinoid receptor type 1 have been found to show largely selective inhibition of glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide secretion. In conclusion, although K- and L cell populations overlap and share key molecular nutrient-sensing mechanisms, subtle differences between the responsiveness of the different cell types might be exploited to differentially modulate glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide or glucagon-like peptide-1 secretion. PMID:27186350

  12. Regulation of MMP-3 expression and secretion by the chemokine eotaxin-1 in human chondrocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao Pin-Zhir

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Osteoarthritis (OA is characterized by the degradation of articular cartilage, marked by the breakdown of matrix proteins. Studies demonstrated the involvement of chemokines in this process, and some may potentially serve as diagnostic markers and therapeutic targets; however, the underlying signal transductions are not well understood. Methods We investigated the effects of the CC chemokine eotaxin-1 (CCL11 on the matrix metalloproteinase (MMP expression and secretion in the human chondrocyte cell line SW1353 and primary chondrocytes. Results Eotaxin-1 significantly induced MMP-3 mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner. Inhibitors of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK and p38 kinase were able to repress eotaxin-1-induced MMP-3 expression. On the contrary, Rp-adenosine-3',5'-cyclic monophosphorothioate (Rp-cAMPs, a competitive cAMP antagonist for cAMP receptors, and H-89, a protein kinase A (PKA inhibitor, markedly enhanced eotaxin-1-induced MMP-3 expression. These results suggest that MMP-3 expression is specifically mediated by the G protein-coupled eotaxin-1 receptor activities. Interestingly, little amount of MMP-3 protein was detected in the cell lysates of eotaxin-1-treated SW1353 cells, and most of MMP-3 protein was in the culture media. Furthermore we found that the eotaxin-1-dependent MMP-3 protein secretion was regulated by phospholipase C (PLC-protein kinase C (PKC cascade and c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK/mitogen-activated protein (MAP kinase pathways. These data indicate a specific regulation of MMP-3 secretion also by eotaxin-1 receptor activities. Conclusions Eotaxin-1 not only induces MMP-3 gene expression but also promotes MMP-3 protein secretion through G protein-coupled eotaxin-1 receptor activities. Chemokines, such as eotaxin-1, could be a potential candidate in the diagnosis and treatment of arthritis.

  13. Secret Objective Standoff: International Safeguards Educational Exercise

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Okowita, Samantha L [ORNL

    2014-01-01

    The International Safeguards Regime, being so multi-faceted, can be overwhelming to those first introduced to its many components. The organizers and lecturers of workshops and courses on nonproliferation often provide a series of independent lectures and must somehow demonstrate the cohesive and effective nature of the system. An exercise titled The Secret Objective Standoff was developed to complement lectures with hands-on learning to assist participants in bringing all the many components (IAEA agreements, export controls, treaty obligations, international diplomacy, etc.) of the International Safeguards Regime together. This exercise divides participants into teams that are assigned the role of either a country or the IAEA and asks that they fully immerse themselves in their roles. The teams are then randomly assigned three unique and secret objectives that are intended to represent realistic and current geopolitical scenarios. Through construction, trading, or hoarding of four resources (experts, technology, money, and uranium), the teams have a finite number of turns to accomplish their objectives. Each turn has three phases random dispersal of resources, a timed discussion where teams can coordinate and strategize with others, and an action phase. During the action phase, teams inform the moderator individually and secretly what they will be doing that turn. The exercise has been tested twice with Oak Ridge National Laboratory personnel, and has been conducted with outside participants twice, in each case the experience was well received by both participants and instructors. This exercise provides instructors the ability to modify the exercise before or during game play to best fit their educational goals. By offering a range of experiences, from an in-depth look at specific components to a generalized overview, this exercise is an effective tool in helping participants achieve a full understanding the International Safeguards Regime.

  14. Parathyroid hormone secretion in chronic renal failure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, J C; Rasmussen, A Q; Ladefoged, S D;

    1996-01-01

    The aim of study was to introduce and evaluate a method for quantifying the parathyroid hormone (PTH) secretion during hemodialysis in secondary hyperparathyroidism due to end-stage renal failure. We developed a method suitable for inducing sequential hypocalcemia and hypercalcemia during....../ionized calcium curves were constructed, and a mean calcium set-point of 1.16 mmol/liter was estimated compared to the normal mean of about 1.13 mmol/liter. In conclusion, we demonstrate that it is important to use a standardized method to evaluate parathyroid hormone dynamics in chronic renal failure. By the use...

  15. Secret neutrino interactions: a pseudoscalar model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Archidiacono, Maria; Hannestad, Steen; Sloth Hansen, Rasmus; Tram, Thomas

    2016-05-01

    Neutrino oscillation experiments point towards the existence of additional mostly sterile neutrino mass eigenstates in the eV mass range. At the same time, such sterile neutrinos are disfavoured by cosmology (Big Bang Nucleosynthesis, Cosmic Microwave Background and Large Scale Structure), unless they can be prevented from being thermalised in the early Universe. To this aim, we introduce a model of sterile neutrino secret interactions mediated by a new light pseudoscalar: The new interactions can accomodate sterile neutrinos in the early Universe, providing a good fit to all the up to date cosmological data.

  16. Removal of Duodenum Elicits GLP-1 Secretion

    OpenAIRE

    Muscogiuri, Giovanna; Mezza, Teresa; Prioletta, Annamaria; Sorice, Gian Pio; Clemente, Gennaro; Sarno, Gerardo; Nuzzo, Gennaro; Pontecorvi, Alfredo; Holst, Jens J; Giaccari, Andrea

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To evaluate the effect of removal of the duodenum on the complex interplay between incretins, insulin, and glucagon in nondiabetic subjects. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS For evaluation of hormonal secretion and insulin sensitivity, 10 overweight patients without type 2 diabetes (age 61 ± 19.3 years and BMI 27.9 ± 5.3 kg/m2) underwent a mixed-meal test and a hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp before and after pylorus-preserving pancreatoduodenectomy for ampulloma. RESULTS All patients ...

  17. Pentagon's secret report about climate change

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This book reveals the content of a secret report ordered by the department of defense of the Pentagon which aims at foreseeing the possible consequences of a rapid climatic change on the security of the USA. The report is based on the most recent studies about the general climate conditions at the worldwide scale. They foresee for 2010 a fast cooling following several years of increasing warming up. A realistic detailed scenario of the geopolitical consequences of this change is made: floods, conflicts, populations migration, lack of drinkable water, starvation, generalized riots etc. (J.S.)

  18. Secreted Sialidase Activity of Canine Mycoplasmas

    OpenAIRE

    May, Meghan; Brown, Daniel R.

    2009-01-01

    Through a survey of the phylogenetic distribution of sialidase among mycoplasmas, we detected activity secreted by the type strains of three of eleven species frequently or first isolated from dogs. The specific activity of washed cells of the type strains of Mycoplasma canis, Mycoplasma cynos, and Mycoplasma molare ranged from 5.2 ± 0.8 × 10-6 to 1.1 ± 0.3 × 10-5 enzymatic units per colony-forming unit (U/CFU). Cells of M. molare strain H542T had twice the specific activity (P < 0.05) of M. ...

  19. Simultaneous automatic determination of catecholamines and their 3-O-methyl metabolites in rat plasma by high-performance liquid chromatography using peroxyoxalate chemiluminescence reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsunoda, M; Takezawa, K; Santa, T; Imai, K

    1999-05-01

    A highly specific and sensitive automated high-performance liquid chromatographic method for the simultaneous determination of catecholamines (CAs; norepinephrine, epinephrine, and dopamine) and their 3-O-methyl metabolites (normetanephrine, metanephrine, and 3-methoxytyramine) is described. Automated precolumn ion-exchange extraction of diluted plasma is coupled with HPLC separation of CAs and their 3-O-methyl metabolites on an ODS column, postcolumn coulometric oxidation, fluorescence derivatization with ethylenediamine, and finally peroxyoxalate chemiluminescence reaction detection. The detection limits were about 3 fmol for norepinephrine, epinephrine, and dopamine, 5 fmol for normetanephrine, and 10 fmol for metanephrine and 3-methoxytyramine (signal-to-noise ratio of 3). Fifty microliters of rat plasma was used and 4-methoxytyramine was employed as an internal standard. The relative standard deviations for the method (n = 5) were 2.5-7.6% for the intraday assay and 6.3-9.1% for the interday assay. The method was applicable to the determination of normetanephrine and metanephrine in 50 microl of rat plasma. PMID:10222014

  20. Glucagon-like peptide-1 modulates neurally evoked mucosal chloride secretion in guinea pig small intestine in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baldassano, Sara; Wang, Guo-Du; Mulè, Flavia; Wood, Jackie D

    2012-02-01

    Glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) acts at the G protein-coupled receptor, GLP-1R, to stimulate secretion of insulin and to inhibit secretion of glucagon and gastric acid. Involvement in mucosal secretory physiology has received negligible attention. We aimed to study involvement of GLP-1 in mucosal chloride secretion in the small intestine. Ussing chamber methods, in concert with transmural electrical field stimulation (EFS), were used to study actions on neurogenic chloride secretion. ELISA was used to study GLP-1R effects on neural release of acetylcholine (ACh). Intramural localization of GLP-1R was assessed with immunohistochemistry. Application of GLP-1 to serosal or mucosal sides of flat-sheet preparations in Ussing chambers did not change baseline short-circuit current (I(sc)), which served as a marker for chloride secretion. Transmural EFS evoked neurally mediated biphasic increases in I(sc) that had an initial spike-like rising phase followed by a sustained plateau-like phase. Blockade of the EFS-evoked responses by tetrodotoxin indicated that the responses were neurally mediated. Application of GLP-1 reduced the EFS-evoked biphasic responses in a concentration-dependent manner. The GLP-1 receptor antagonist exendin-(9-39) suppressed this action of GLP-1. The GLP-1 inhibitory action on EFS-evoked responses persisted in the presence of nicotinic or vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor antagonists but not in the presence of a muscarinic receptor antagonist. GLP-1 significantly reduced EFS-evoked ACh release. In the submucosal plexus, GLP-1R immunoreactivity (IR) was expressed by choline acetyltransferase-IR neurons, neuropeptide Y-IR neurons, somatostatin-IR neurons, and vasoactive intestinal peptide-IR neurons. Our results suggest that GLP-1R is expressed in guinea pig submucosal neurons and that its activation leads to a decrease in neurally evoked chloride secretion by suppressing release of ACh at neuroepithelial junctions in the enteric neural networks

  1. Proteases induce secretion of collagenase and plasminogen activator by fibroblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Werb, Z.; Aggeler, J.

    1978-04-01

    We have observed that treatment of rabbit synovial fibroblasts with proteolytic enzymes can induce secretion of collagenase (EC 3.4.24.7) and plasminogen activator (EC 3.4.21.-). Cells treated for 2 to 24 hr with plasmin, trypsin, chymotrypsin, pancreatic elastase, papain, bromelain, thermolysin, or ..cap alpha..-protease but not with thrombin or neuraminidase secreted detectable amounts of collagenase within 16 to 48 hr. Treatment of fibroblasts with trypsin also induced secretion of plasminogen activator. Proteases initiated secretion of collagenase (up to 20 units per 10/sup 6/ cells per 24 hr) only when treatment produced decreased cell adhesion. Collagenase production did not depend on continued presence of proteolytic activity or on subsequent cell adhesion, spreading, or proliferation. Routine subculturing with crude trypsin also induced collagenase secretion by cells. Secretion of collagenase was prevented and normal spreading was obtained if the trypsinized cells were placed into medium containing fetal calf serum. Soybean trypsin inhibitor, ..cap alpha../sub 1/-antitrypsin, bovine serum albumin, collagen, and fibronectin did not inhibit collagenase production. Although proteases that induced collagenase secretion also removed surface glycoprotein, the kinetics of induction of cell protease secretion were different from those for removal of fibronectin. Physiological inducers of secretion of collagenase and plasminogen activator by cells have not been identified. These results suggest that extracellular proteases in conjunction with plasma proteins may govern protease secretion by cells.

  2. [Immunological markers of rheumatoid arthritis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matuszewska, Agnieszka; Madej, Marta; Wiland, Piotr

    2016-03-25

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is the most common connective tissue disease of autoimmune origin. The disease is characterized by chronic inflammation leading to bone erosions and organ involvement. RA is a progressive disease. It affects the quality of life, leading to disability and death mainly due to premature cardiovascular disease. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential for prognosis and quality of life improvement. In 2010 the American College of Rheumatology (ACR) and The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR) established new RA classification criteria. Besides clinical symptoms it includes two immunologic criteria: rheumatoid factor (RF) and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (anti-CCP antibodies). RF is the first well-known RA immunologic marker. It is observed in 80-85% of patients with RA. Elevated serum level of RF has been associated with increased disease activity, radiographic progression, and the presence of extraarticular manifestations. The sensitivity of RF is 50-90%, and specificity is 50-95%. Anti-CCP antibodies appear to be a more specific marker than RF. They are often present at the very beginning of the disease, or even years before the first symptoms. The prognostic value of anti-CCP antibodies is well established. High serum level of anti-CCP correlates with poor prognosis and early erosions of the joints. The sensitivity of anti-CCP2 is 48-80%, and specificity is 96-98%. New immunologic markers include anti-carbamylated protein antibodies (anti-CarP) and antibodies against heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (anti-hnRNP A2/B1, RA33). Scientists aim to identify a highly sensitive and specific biomarker of the disease that not only has diagnostic and prognostic value but also may predict the response to treatment.

  3. Immunological markers of rheumatoid arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agnieszka Matuszewska

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Rheumatoid arthritis (RA is the most common connective tissue disease of autoimmune origin. The disease is characterized by chronic inflammation leading to bone erosions and organ involvement. RA is a progressive disease. It affects the quality of life, leading to disability and death mainly due to premature cardiovascular disease. Early diagnosis and appropriate treatment are essential for prognosis and quality of life improvement. In 2010 the American College of Rheumatology (ACR and The European League Against Rheumatism (EULAR established new RA classification criteria. Besides clinical symptoms it includes two immunologic criteria: rheumatoid factor (RF and anti-citrullinated protein antibodies (anti-CCP antibodies. RF is the first well-known RA immunologic marker. It is observed in 80-85% of patients with RA. Elevated serum level of RF has been associated with increased disease activity, radiographic progression, and the presence of extraarticular manifestations. The sensitivity of RF is 50-90%, and specificity is 50-95%. Anti-CCP antibodies appear to be a more specific marker than RF. They are often present at the very beginning of the disease, or even years before the first symptoms. The prognostic value of anti-CCP antibodies is well established. High serum level of anti-CCP correlates with poor prognosis and early erosions of the joints. The sensitivity of anti-CCP2 is 48-80%, and specificity is 96-98%. New immunologic markers include anti-carbamylated protein antibodies (anti-CarP and antibodies against heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (anti-hnRNP A2/B1, RA33. Scientists aim to identify a highly sensitive and specific biomarker of the disease that not only has diagnostic and prognostic value but also may predict the response to treatment.

  4. Molecular Markers: an Introduction and Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Firas Rashad Al-Samarai

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The dramatic development of molecular genetics has laid the groundwork for genomics. It has introduced new generations of molecular markers for use in the genetic improvement of farm animals. These markers provide more accurate genetic information and better understanding of the animal genetic resources. Scientists, unfamiliar with the different molecular techniques tend to get lost as each has its own advantages and disadvantages. This review represents a trail to shade alight on the different types of molecular markers by introducing a brief summary on the development of genetic markers including both the classical genetic markers and more advanced DNA-based molecular markers. This review could be helpful to better understand the characteristics of different genetic markers and the genetic diversity of animal genetic resources.

  5. Trade Secret Law and Information Systems: Can Your Students Keep a Secret?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Willey, Lorrie; Ford, Janet C.; White, Barbara Jo; Clapper, Danial L.

    2011-01-01

    The impact of intellectual property (IP) law on information systems (IS) professionals in business cannot be overstated. The IS 2010 model curriculum guidelines for undergraduate IS programs stress the importance of information security and knowledge about IP. While copyright and patents are the most well-known types of IP, another, trade secrets,…

  6. Weapons of Mass Secretion : The Type III Secretion System of Shigella flexneri

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sani, Musa

    2007-01-01

    In bacteria that are pathogenic for animals, type III secretion systems allow extracellular bacteria adhering to the surface of a host cell to inject specialized proteins across the plasma membrane. The injected proteins subvert the functioning of the aggressed cell or destroy its communications, fa

  7. Myeloma cells suppress osteoblasts through sclerostin secretion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wingless-type (Wnt) signaling through the secretion of Wnt inhibitors Dickkopf1, soluble frizzled-related protein-2 and -3 has a key role in the decreased osteoblast (OB) activity associated with multiple myeloma (MM) bone disease. We provide evidence that another Wnt antagonist, sclerostin, an osteocyte-expressed negative regulator of bone formation, is expressed by myeloma cells, that is, human myeloma cell lines (HMCLs) and plasma cells (CD138+ cells) obtained from the bone marrow (BM) of a large number of MM patients with bone disease. We demonstrated that BM stromal cells (BMSCs), differentiated into OBs and co-cultured with HMCLs showed, compared with BMSCs alone, reduced expression of major osteoblastic-specific proteins, decreased mineralized nodule formation and attenuated the expression of members of the activator protein 1 transcription factor family (Fra-1, Fra-2 and Jun-D). Moreover, in the same co-culture system, the addition of neutralizing anti-sclerostin antibodies restored OB functions by inducing nuclear accumulation of β-catenin. We further demonstrated that the upregulation of receptor activator of nuclear factor κ-B ligand and the downregulation of osteoprotegerin in OBs were also sclerostin mediated. Our data indicated that sclerostin secretion by myeloma cells contribute to the suppression of bone formation in the osteolytic bone disease associated to MM

  8. Inappropriate erythropoietin secretion in polycythemia vera

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chikkappa, G. (Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY); Burlington, H.; Chanana, A.D.; Chandra, P.; Cronkite, E.P.; Reincke, U.; Zanjani, E.

    1977-01-01

    A patient with classical polycythemia vera (PV) was found to have an inappropriately elevated serum erythropoietin (Ep) level. Investigations did not reveal any lesion or blood abnormality known to be associated with excessive Ep production and erythrocytosis. Sudden withdrawal of blood to reduce the Hb and Hct from 18.5 gm% and 56% to 13.6 gm% and 41.5%, respectively, resulted in an increment of serum Ep to abnormal level. With iron treatment there was a brisk return of Hb and Hct to prebleeding levels which was associated with reduction in the serum Ep. The inverse relationship between the EP and Hb or Hct is inconsistent with the presence of excessive Ep-producing lesion. These results suggested that the threshold for Ep secretion from normal Ep-secreting tissue to Hb and Hct levels is set at an abnormal level. This patient's marrow cells when cultured in vitro in the absence of Ep, unlike other PV patients' (except one) marrow cells, did not grow erythroid colonies. In the presence of Ep, however, the colonies comparable to those formed from normal marrow cultures were obtained. These results suggested that his marrow erythropoietic cells were neither Ep independent nor Ep-hyperresponsive, as has been suggested by some investigators for erythropoiesis in PV. This patient presents phenomena that hitherto have not been reported.

  9. Cushing's syndrome due to ectopic ACTH secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cieszyński, Łukasz; Berendt-Obołończyk, Monika; Szulc, Michał; Sworczak, Krzysztof

    2016-01-01

    Cushing's syndrome (CS) is defined as a constellation of clinical signs and symptoms occurring due to hypercortisolism. Cortisol excess may be endogenous or exogenous. The most common cause of CS is glucocorticoid therapy with supraphysiological (higher than in the case of substitution) doses used in various diseases (e.g. autoimmune). One possible CS cause is ectopic (extra-pituitary) ACTH secretion (EAS) by benign or malignant tumours. Since its first description in 1963, EAS aetiology has changed, i.e. as well as small cell lung cancer (SCLC), higher incidence in other malignancies has been reported. Ectopic ACTH secretion symptoms are usually similar to hypercortisolism symptoms due to other causes. A clinical suspicion of CS requires laboratory investigations. There is no single and specific laboratory test for making a CS diagnosis, and therefore multiple dynamic tests should be ordered. A combination of multiple laboratory noninvasive and invasive tests gives 100% sensitivity and 98% specificity for EAS diagnosis. If the EAS is caused by localised malignancy, surgery is the optimal treatment choice. Radical tumour excision may be performed in 40% of patients, and 80% of them are cured of the disease. The authors present an interesting clinical case of EAS, which is always a huge diagnostic challenge for clinicians. (Endokrynol Pol 2016; 67 (4): 458-464). PMID:27387249

  10. Loose excitation-secretion coupling in astrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardjan, Nina; Parpura, Vladimir; Zorec, Robert

    2016-05-01

    Astrocytes play an important housekeeping role in the central nervous system. Additionally, as secretory cells, they actively participate in cell-to-cell communication, which can be mediated by membrane-bound vesicles. The gliosignaling molecules stored in these vesicles are discharged into the extracellular space after the vesicle membrane fuses with the plasma membrane. This process is termed exocytosis, regulated by SNARE proteins, and triggered by elevations in cytosolic calcium levels, which are necessary and sufficient for exocytosis in astrocytes. For astrocytic exocytosis, calcium is sourced from the intracellular endoplasmic reticulum store, although its entry from the extracellular space contributes to cytosolic calcium dynamics in astrocytes. Here, we discuss calcium management in astrocytic exocytosis and the properties of the membrane-bound vesicles that store gliosignaling molecules, including the vesicle fusion machinery and kinetics of vesicle content discharge. In astrocytes, the delay between the increase in cytosolic calcium activity and the discharge of secretions from the vesicular lumen is orders of magnitude longer than that in neurons. This relatively loose excitation-secretion coupling is likely tailored to the participation of astrocytes in modulating neural network processing. PMID:26358496

  11. Role of potassium in acid secretion

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    John P Geibel

    2005-01-01

    Potassium (K+) ions are critical for the activation and catalytic cycle of the gastric H+,K+-ATPase, resulting in the secretion of hydrochloric acid into the parietal cell canaliculus. As both symptom, severity and esophageal mucosal damage in gastro-esophageal reflux disease (GERD) are related to the degree of acid exposure, K+ is a logical target for approaches to inhibit acid production.The probable K+ binding site on the gastric H+,K+-ATPase has recently been described and studies are elucidating how K+ activates the enzyme. K+ channels in the apical membrane of the parietal cell are implicated in the recycling of K+ and, to date, three potential K+ channels (KCNQ1, Kir2.1 and Kir4.1) have been identified. The channels represent theoretical sites for agents to control acid secretion but it will be difficult to develop selective blockers. An alternative strategy is to prevent K+ from activating gastric H+,K+-ATPase; the potassiumcompetitive acid blocker (P-CAB) class inhibits acidsecretion by binding at or near the K+ binding site.Ongoing research is further defining the role of K+ in the functioning of the gastric H+,K+-ATPase, as well as determining the clinical utility of agents directed toward this important cation.

  12. Gastric Lipase Secretion in Children with Gastritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krystyna Sztefko

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Gastric lipase is one of the prepancreatic lipases found in some mammalian species and in humans. Our knowledge of the hormonal regulation of gastric lipase secretion in children and adolescents is still very limited. The aim of this study was to compare the activity of human gastric lipase (HGL in gastric juice in healthy adolescents and in patients with gastritis. The adolescents were allocated to three groups: the first including patients with Helicobacter pylori gastritis (HPG; n = 10, the second including patients with superficial gastritis caused by pathogens other than H. pylori (non-HPG; n = 14 and the control group including healthy adolescents (n = 14. Activity of HGL was measured in gastric juice collected during endoscopy. Plasma concentrations of cholecystokinin (CCK, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1 and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP were measured in all adolescents. Activity of HGL in the non-HPG group was significantly lower than in the HPG group (p < 0.005 and the control group (p < 0.005. Mean plasma GIP levels in the control group were lower than in the non-HPG group (p < 0.003 and the HPG group (p < 0.01. We conclude that the regulation of HGL secretion by GLP-1 and CCK is altered in patients with gastritis. Moreover, GIP is a potent controller of HGL activity, both in healthy subjects and in patients with gastritis.

  13. The marine bacteria Shewanella frigidimarina NCIMB400 upregulates the type VI secretion system during early biofilm formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linares, Denis; Jean, Natacha; Van Overtvelt, Perrine; Ouidir, Tassadit; Hardouin, Julie; Blache, Yves; Molmeret, Maëlle

    2016-02-01

    Shewanella sp. are facultative anaerobic Gram-negative bacteria, extensively studied for their electron transfer ability. Shewanella frigidimarina has been detected and isolated from marine environments, and in particular, from biofilms. However, its ability to adhere to surfaces and form a biofilm is poorly understood. In this study, we show that the ability to adhere and to form a biofilm of S. frigidimarina NCIMB400 is significantly higher than that of Shewanella oneidensis in our conditions. We also show that this strain forms a biofilm in artificial seawater, whereas in Luria-Bertani, this capacity is reduced. To identify proteins involved in early biofilm formation, a proteomic analysis of sessile versus planktonic membrane-enriched fractions allowed the identification of several components of the same type VI secretion system gene cluster: putative Hcp1 and ImpB proteins as well as a forkhead-associated domain-containing protein. The upregulation of Hcp1 a marker of active translocation has been confirmed using quantitative reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction. Our data demonstrated the presence of a single and complete type VI secretion system in S. frigidimarina NCIMB400 genome, upregulated in sessile compared with planktonic conditions. The fact that three proteins including the secreted protein Hcp1 have been identified may suggest that this type VI secretion system is functional. PMID:26617163

  14. Prognostic markers of canine pyometra

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.C. Sant'Anna

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available The pyometra is a disease that affects middle age and elderly female dogs during diestrus. Hormonal, microbiological, biochemical and hematological aspects are well described. However, few studies have evaluated the role of each in the prognosis of canine pyometra. The aim of this study was to identify markers associated with clinical worsening of dogs with pyometra. We prospectively evaluated 80 dogs with pyometra treated surgically. Group 1 consisted of dogs that were discharged within 48 hours after surgery and Group 2 consisted of those who required prolonged hospitalization or died. The findings of hematological, biochemical and blood lactate levels were compared between groups and variables such as bacterial multidrug resistance, systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS, hyperlactatemia and increased creatinine were analyzed through the dispersion of frequencies between groups. Among the variables studied, the presence of SIRS and elevated serum creatinine >2.5mg/mL were effective in predicting the worsening of the disease and can be used as prognostic markers of canine pyometra.

  15. Threshold Quantum Secret Sharing of Secure Direct Communication

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bao-Kui; YANG Yu-Guang; WEN Qiao-Yan

    2009-01-01

    We propose a (t, n)-threshold quantum secret sharing protocol of secure direct communication following some ideas of Zhang's protocol [Phys. Lett. A 342 (2005) 60] and Tokunaga et al.'s protocol [Phys. Rev. A 71 (2005) 012314]. The sender distributes the classical secret shares to his or her n agents and each agent owns a secret share in advance. The sender's secure direct communication message can be extracted by an agent subset by collaboration in such a way that at least t or more agents can obtain the secret message with the mutual assistances but any t - 1 or fewer agents cannot. In contrast to the previous multiparty quantum secret sharing protocols in which the sender's secret message can be recovered only if all the agents collaborate, our protocol is more practical and more flexible.

  16. Serotonergic involvement in stress-induced vasopressin and oxytocin secretion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Henrik; Knigge, Ulrich; Kjaer, Andreas;

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To investigate the involvement of serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine - 5-HT) receptors in mediation of stress-induced arginine vasopressin (AVP) and oxytocin (OT) secretion in male rats. DESIGN: Experiments on laboratory rats with control groups. METHODS: Different stress paradigms were...... applied after pretreatment with intracerebroventricular infusion of saline or different 5-HT antagonists. RESULTS: Restraint stress (5 min), hypotensive hemorrhage or dehydration for 24 h increased AVP secretion fivefold and OT secretion threefold. Swim stress for 3 min had no effect on AVP secretion......, but increased OT secretion threefold. Ether vapor or hypoglycemia had no effect on AVP or OT secretion. The restraint stress-induced AVP response was inhibited by pretreatment with the 5-HT(2A+2C) antagonists ketanserin (KET) and LY-53857 (LY) and the 5-HT(3+4) antagonist ICS-205930 (ICS), whereas the 5-HT(1A...

  17. Discovery of markers of exposure specific to bites of Lutzomyia longipalpis, the vector of Leishmania infantum chagasi in Latin America.

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    Clarissa Teixeira

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Sand flies deliver Leishmania parasites to a host alongside salivary molecules that affect infection outcomes. Though some proteins are immunogenic and have potential as markers of vector exposure, their identity and vector specificity remain elusive. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We screened human, dog, and fox sera from endemic areas of visceral leishmaniasis to identify potential markers of specific exposure to saliva of Lutzomyia longipalpis. Human and dog sera were further tested against additional sand fly species. Recombinant proteins of nine transcripts encoding secreted salivary molecules of Lu. longipalpis were produced, purified, and tested for antigenicity and specificity. Use of recombinant proteins corresponding to immunogenic molecules in Lu. longipalpis saliva identified LJM17 and LJM11 as potential markers of exposure. LJM17 was recognized by human, dog, and fox sera; LJM11 by humans and dogs. Notably, LJM17 and LJM11 were specifically recognized by humans exposed to Lu. longipalpis but not by individuals exposed to Lu. intermedia. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Salivary recombinant proteins are of value as markers of vector exposure. In humans, LJM17 and LJM11 emerged as potential markers of specific exposure to Lu. longipalpis, the vector of Leishmania infantum chagasi in Latin America. In dogs, LJM17, LJM11, LJL13, LJL23, and LJL143 emerged as potential markers of sand fly exposure. Testing these recombinant proteins in large scale studies will validate their usefulness as specific markers of Lu. longipalpis exposure in humans and of sand fly exposure in dogs.

  18. Effects of phenylalaninol on centrally induced gastric acid secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashizume, H; Miyamae, T; Morikawa, T; Hagiwara, M

    1992-11-01

    The effects of phenylalaninol (D-isomer) on gastric acid secretion and gastric ulcer were studied in rats. The compound reduced the gastric acid secretion stimulated by intracisternal thyrotropin releasing hormone and intravenous 2-deoxy-D-glucose, but not that stimulated by subcutaneous carbachol or histamine. Phenylalaninol prevented stress- and indomethacin-induced gastric ulcers. We conclude that phenylalaninol inhibits ulcer formation mainly by central inhibition of gastric acid secretion. PMID:1477931

  19. A Novel Secret Sharing Technique Using QR Code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun-Chou Chuang

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Any mobile device with capture function can read content from a barcode tag directly. When a barcode contains important data or privacy information, the risk of security becomes an important problem. In this paper, the QR code is employed to design the secret sharing mechanism so that the data privacy during data transmission can be enhanced. The secret data is divided into some shadows by the secret sharing mechanism and the results are embedded into barcode tags. The secret can be recovered only when the number of shadows is greater than or equal to the predefined threshold. In sum, the proposed technique improves data security for data transmission.

  20. Security of the AES with a Secret S-Box

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tiessen, Tyge; Knudsen, Lars Ramkilde; Kölbl, Stefan;

    2015-01-01

    How does the security of the AES change when the S-box is replaced by a secret S-box, about which the adversary has no knowledge? Would it be safe to reduce the number of encryption rounds? In this paper, we demonstrate attacks based on integral cryptanalysis which allow to recover both the secret...... key and the secret S-box for respectively four, five, and six rounds of the AES. Despite the significantly larger amount of secret information which an adversary needs to recover, the attacks are very efficient with time/data complexities of 217/216, 238/240 and 290/264, respectively. Another...