WorldWideScience

Sample records for catawba nuclear station

  1. Catawba nuclear station preoperational ALARA review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the particular emphasis placed on preoperational as los as reasonably achievable (ALARA) considerations at Duke Power's Catawba Nuclear Station. A strong station commitment to the ALARA philosophy, and review of existing capabilities, led to development of an aggressive two-part ALARA program. Capabilities consisted of sufficient numbers of available personnel, lengthy lead time during construction, a very detailed plastic model, and a sister plant of similar design. The program, as developed, consisted of a preoperational program, which looked at design and construction aspects of ALARA, and the operational program, dealing with the ALARA committee and operational problems. MAnagement's philosophy of holding everyone responsible for ALARA provided the motivation to organize the preoperational program to use that resource. The Health Physics group accepted responsibility for development, coordination, and reviewer training. The problem provided a base to build on as station personnel gained experience in their own crafts and radiation protection in general

  2. Liquid radwaste process optimization at Catawba Nuclear Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since commercial operation in 1985, Catawba Nuclear Station has experienced significant filtration problems with the radioactive liquid waste system. The performance of the filtration and ion exchange equipment has been significantly worse than other Duke Power stations. Full scale tests have been performed to investigate the causes and potential solutions to the waste processing difficulties. The initial waste stream characterization study revealed a large percentage of sub-micron particles. This information immediately suggested that the existing filtration equipment was not adequately sized to effectively process the waste stream. New technologies which would effectively enhance the performance of the processing system and reduce both operating and maintenance costs were researched. This included bag filters, depth filtration, custom designed ion exchange vessels and radionuclide specific ion exchange media. The subsequent full scale testing resulted in a processing scheme which resulted in extended filter life, over 100 percent increase in ion exchange bed life, 90 percent reduction in filter media costs and improved radionuclide removal. 4 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  3. 76 FR 40754 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; McGuire Nuclear Station, Units...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-11

    ..., 50-270, And 50-287] Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; McGuire... Application for Amendments to Facility Operating Licenses The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC, the... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR...

  4. 76 FR 24538 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; McGuire Nuclear Station...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-02

    ..., 50-270, and 50-287] Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; McGuire... Application for Amendment to Facility Operating License The U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC, the... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR...

  5. System Definition Document: Reactor Data Necessary for Modeling Plutonium Disposition in Catawba Nuclear Station Units 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Department of Energy (USDOE) has contracted with Duke Engineering and Services, Cogema, Inc., and Stone and Webster (DCS) to provide mixed-oxide (MOX) fuel fabrication and reactor irradiation services in support of USDOE's mission to dispose of surplus weapons-grade plutonium. The nuclear station units currently identified as mission reactors for this project are Catawba Units 1 and 2 and McGuire Units 1 and 2. This report is specific to Catawba Nuclear Station Units 1 and 2, but the details and materials for the McGuire reactors are very similar. The purpose of this document is to present a complete set of data about the reactor materials and components to be used in modeling the Catawba reactors to predict reactor physics parameters for the Catawba site. Except where noted, Duke Power Company or DCS documents are the sources of these data. These data are being used with the ORNL computer code models of the DCS Catawba (and McGuire) pressurized-water reactors

  6. Full-scale test of ethanolamine at Catawba Nuclear Station Units 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document reports on the full scale test at Catawba Unit 1 and 2, that was performed to determine the effects of ethanolamine as a pH additive to the secondary side of pressurized water reactors. Ethanolamine was injected into the feedwater at both units at Catawba to control the pH in the secondary system. Cation conductance, specific conductance, pH, soluble and insoluble metals, and anions and cations were measured throughout the test. The purpose of this work was to measure the performance of ethanolamine compared to morpholine

  7. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-413 and 50-414)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report supplements the Safety Evaluation Report (NUREG-0954) issued in February 1983 by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with respect to the application filed by Duke Power Company, North Carolina Municipal Power Agency Number 1, North Carolina Membership Corporation, and Saluda River Electric Cooperative, Inc., as applicants and owners, for licenses to operate the Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-413 and 50-414, respectively). The facility is located in York County, South Carolina, approximately 9.6 km (6 mi) north of Rock Hill and adjacent to Lake Wylie. This supplement provides additional information supporting the license for initial criticality and power ascension to full-power opertion for Unit 1

  8. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-413 and 50-414)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report supplements the Safety Evaluation Report (NUREG-0954) issued in February 1983 by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with respect to the application filed by Duke Power Company, North Carolina Municipal Power Agency Number 1, North Carolina Membership Corporation, and Saluda River Electric Cooperative, Inc. as applicants and owners, for licenses to operate the Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-413 and 50-414, respectively). The facility is located in York County, South Carolina, approximately 9.6 km (6 mi) north of Rock Hill and adjacent to Lake Wylie. This supplement provides additional information supporting the license for fuel loading and precriticality testing for Unit 1

  9. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2. Docket Nos. 50-413 and 50-414. Suppl. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This reort supplements the Safety Evaluation Report (NUREG-0954) issued in February 1983 by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with respect to the application filed by Duke Power Company, North Carolina Municipal Power Agency Number 1, North Carolina Membership Corporation, and Saluda River Electric Cooperative, Inc. as applicants and owners, for licenses to operate the Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-413 and 50-414, respectively). The facility is located in York County, South Carolina, approximately 9.6 km (6 mi) north of Rock Hill and adjacent to Lake Wylie. This supplement provides more recent information regarding resolution or updating of some of the open and confirmatory items and license conditions identified in the Safety Evaluation Report, and discusses the recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards in its report dated March 15, 1983

  10. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-413 and 50-414). Supplement 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report supplements the Safety Evaluation Report (NUREG-0954) and Supplement 1 with respect to the application filed by Duke Power Company, North Carolina Municipal Power Agency Number 1, North Carolina Membership Corporation, and Saluda River Electric Cooperative, Inc., as applicants and owners, for licenses to operate the Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos., 50-413 and 50-414, respectively). The facility is located in York County, South Carolina, approximately 9.6 km (6 mi) north of Rock Hill and adjacent to Lake Wylie. This supplement provides more recent information regarding resolution or updating of some of the open and confirmatory issues and license conditions identified in the Safety Evaluation Report

  11. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2. Docket Nos. 50-413 and 50-414, Duke Power Company, et al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by Duke Power Company, North Carolina Municipal Power Agency Number 1, North Carolina Electric Membership Corporation, and Saluda River Electric Cooperative, Inc. as applicants and owners, for licenses to operate the Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-413 and 50-414), has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located in York County, South Carolina, approximately 9.6 km (6 mi) north of Rock Hill and adjacent to Lake Wylie. Subject to favorable resolution of the items discussed in this report, the staff concludes that the facility can be operated by the applicant without endangering the health and safety of the public

  12. Final environmental statement related to the operation of Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2. Docket Nos. 50-413 and 50-414, Duke Power Company, et al

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Final Environmental Statement contains the second assessment of the environmental impact associated with the operation of the Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and 10 CFR 51, as amended, of the NRC regulations. This statement examines: the affected environment, environmental consequences and mitigating actions, and environmental and economic benefits and costs. Land use and terrestrial and aquatic-ecological impacts will be small. Operational impacts to historic and archeological sites will be negligible. The effects of routine operations, energy transmission, and periodic maintenance of rights-of-way and transmission facilities should not jeopardize any populations of endangered or threatened species. No significant impacts are anticipated from normal operational releases of radioactivity. The risk associated with accidental radiation exposure is very low. The net socioeconomic effects of the project will be beneficial

  13. Nuclear power stations licensing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The judicial aspects of nuclear stations licensing are presented. The licensing systems of the United States, Spain, France and Federal Republic of Germany are focused. The decree n0 60.824 from July 7 sup(th), 1967 and the following legislation which define the systematic and area of competence in nuclear stations licensing are analysed

  14. Isotopic Details of the Spent Catawba-1 MOX Fuel Rods at ORNL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ellis, Ronald James [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-04-01

    The United States Department of Energy funded Shaw/AREVA MOX Services LLC to fabricate four MOX Lead Test Assemblies (LTA) from weapons-grade plutonium. A total of four MOX LTAs (including MX03) were irradiated in the Catawba Nuclear Station (Unit 1) Catawba-1 PWR which operated at a total thermal power of 3411 MWt and had a core with 193 total fuel assemblies. The MOX LTAs were irradiated along with Duke Energy s irradiation of eight Westinghouse Next Generation Fuel (NGF) LEU LTAs (ref.1) and the remaining 181 LEU fuel assemblies. The MX03 LTA was irradiated in the Catawba-1 PWR core (refs.2,3) during cycles C-16 and C-17. C-16 began on June 5, 2005, and ended on November 11, 2006, after 499 effective full power days (EFPDs). C-17 started on December 29, 2006, (after a shutdown of 48 days) and continued for 485 EFPDs. The MX03 and three other MOX LTAs (and other fuel assemblies) were discharged at the end of C-17 on May 3, 2008. The design of the MOX LTAs was based on the (Framatome ANP, Inc.) Mark-BW/MOX1 17 17 fuel assembly design (refs. 4,5,6) for use in Westinghouse PWRs, but with MOX fuel rods with three Pu loading ranges: the nominal Pu loadings are 4.94 wt%, 3.30 wt%, and 2.40 wt%, respectively, for high, medium, and low Pu content. The Mark-BW/MOX1 (MOX LTA) fuel assembly design is the same as the Advanced Mark-BW fuel assembly design but with the LEU fuel rods replaced by MOX fuel rods (ref. 5). The fabrication of the fuel pellets and fuel rods for the MOX LTAs was performed at the Cadarache facility in France, with the fabrication of the LTAs performed at the MELOX facility, also in France.

  15. Discharges from nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HM Inspectorate of Pollution commissioned, with authorising responsibilities in England and Wales, a study into the discharges of radioactive effluents from Nuclear Power Stations. The study considered arisings from nuclear power stations in Europe and the USA and the technologies to treat and control the radioactive discharges. This report contains details of the technologies used at many nuclear power stations to treat and control radioactive discharges and gives, where information was available, details of discharges and authorised discharge limits. (author)

  16. Safeguarding nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The basic features of nuclear fuel accounting and control in present-day power reactors are considered. Emphasis is placed on reactor operations and spent-fuel characteristics for Light-Water Reactors (LWRs) and Heavy-Water Reactors (HWRs)

  17. 76 FR 4724 - Catawba Sox, LLC Formerly Known as Catawba Sox, Inc. Including Workers Whose Unemployment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-01-26

    ... of Catawba Sox, LLC, formerly known as Catawba Sox, Inc., Newton, North Carolina. The notice was published in the Federal Register on August 2, 2010 (75 FR 45162). At the request of the State agency, the... Whose Unemployment Insurance UI) Wages Are Paid Through Ellis Hosiery Mill, LLC, Newton, NC;...

  18. Insurance of nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrical utility companies have invested large sums in the establishment of nuclear facilities. For this reason it is normal for these companies to attempt to protect their investments as much as possible. One of the methods of protection is recourse to insurance. For a variety of reasons traditional insurance markets are unable to function normally for a number of reasons including, the insufficient number of risks, an absence of meaningful accident statistics, the enormous sums involved and a lack of familiarity with nuclear risks on the part of insurers, resulting in a reluctance or even refusal to accept such risks. Insurers have, in response to requests for coverage from nuclear power station operators, established an alternative system of coverage - insurance through a system of insurance pools. Insurers in every country unite in a pool, providing a net capacity for every risk which is a capacity covered by their own funds, and consequently without reinsurance. All pools exchange capacity. The inconvenience of this system, for the operators in particular, is that it involves a monopolistic system in which there are consequently few possibilities for the negotiation of premiums and conditions of coverage. The system does not permit the establishment of reserves which could, over time, reduce the need for insurance on the part of nuclear power station operators. Thus the cost of nuclear insurance remains high. Alternatives to the poor system of insurance are explored in this article. (author)

  19. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Cartawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-413 and 50-414). Supplement No. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report supplements the Safety Evaluation Report (NUREG-0954) issued in February 1983 by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with respect to the application filed by Duke Power Company, North Carolina Municipal Power Agency Number 1, North Carolina Membership Corporation, Saluda River Electric Cooperative, Inc., and Piedmont Municipal Power Agency, as applicants and owners, for licenses to operate the Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-413 and 50-414, respectively). The facility is located in York County, South Carolina, approximately 9.6 km (6 mi) north of Rock Hill and adjacent to Lake Wylie. This supplement provides additional information supporting the license for initial criticality and power ascension to full-power operation for Unit 2

  20. Technical specifications, Catawba Nuclear Station, Unit 1 (Docket No. 50-413). Appendix A to License No. NPF-35

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information is presented concerning safety limits for operation of reactor control systems, power distribution, instrumentation, reactor coolant system, emergency core cooling system, containment system, electrical power systems, refueling operations, radioactive effluents, environmental monitoring, reactor site, and administrative aspects

  1. Technical specifications Catawba Nuclear Station, Unit 1 (Docket No. 50-413). Appendix A to License No. NPF-31

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This appendix includes: definitions, safety limits and limiting safety system settings, limiting conditions for operation and surveillance requirements, bases, design features, and administrative controls

  2. 75 FR 43571 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC; Catawba Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; Environmental Assessment And...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-26

    ... damage or melting of the fuel in the reactor core, fuel rod integrity has been shown to be unaffected by... action to delete the license condition for fuel burnup is needed to allow a higher maximum rod average... reactor operation, transportation, waste management, and storage of spent fuel. The amendment would...

  3. Technical specifications, Catawba Nuclear Station, Unit 1 (Docket No. 50-413). Appendix A to License No. NPF-24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This appendix comprises the following: definitions, safety limits and limiting safety system settings, limiting conditions for operation and surveillance requirements, design features, and administrative controls

  4. Simulators of nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report deals with the simulators of nuclear power stations used for the training of operators and for the analysis of operations. It reviews the development of analogical, hybrid and digital simulators up to the present, indicating the impact resulting from the TMI-2 accident. It indicates, the components of simulators and the present accepted terminology for a classification of the various types of simulators. It reviews the present state of the art of the technology: how a basic mathematical model of a nuclear power system is worked out and what are the technical problems associated with more accurate models. Examples of elaborate models are given: for a PWR pressurizer, for an AGR steam generator. It also discusses certain problems of hardware technology. Characteristics of present replica simulators are given with certain details: simulated transient evolutions and malfunctions, accuracy of simulation. The work concerning the assessment of the validity of certain simulators is reported. A list of simulator manufacturers and a survey of the principal simulators in operation in the countries of the European Community, in the United States, and in certain other countries are presented. Problem associated with the use of simulators as training facilities, and their use as operational devices are discussed. Studies and research in progress for the expected future development of simulators are reviewed

  5. 77 FR 76541 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-12-28

    ... COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... requested by Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc. (the licensee), for operation of the Pilgrim Nuclear Power... Impact Statement for ] License Renewal of Nuclear Plants Regarding Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station,...

  6. 77 FR 18271 - Terrestrial Environmental Studies for Nuclear Power Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-27

    ... COMMISSION Terrestrial Environmental Studies for Nuclear Power Stations AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... revision to Regulatory Guide (RG) 4.11, ``Terrestrial Environmental Studies for Nuclear Power Stations... environmental studies and analyses supporting licensing decisions for nuclear power reactors. ADDRESSES:...

  7. 78 FR 61400 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station, Issuance of Director's Decision

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-03

    ... COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc., Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station, Issuance of Director's Decision... and ML102210411, respectively), concerns the operation of Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station (Pilgrim... (non- EQ) inaccessible cables at Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station (Pilgrim) are capable of...

  8. Starting of nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The procedure is briefly characterized of jobs in nuclear power plant start-up and the differences are pointed out from those used in conventional power generation. Pressure tests are described oriented to tightness, tests of the secondary circuit and of the individual nodes and facilities. The possibility is shown of increased efficiency of such jobs on an example of the hydraulic tests of the second unit of the Dukovany nuclear power plant where the second and the third stages were combined in the so-colled integrated hydraulic test. (Z.M.). 5 figs

  9. Studying dynamics of indicators of nuclear power stations exploitation (the case of US nuclear power stations)

    OpenAIRE

    Varshavsky, Leonid

    2013-01-01

    Analysis of external and internal factors influencing significant improvement of economic indicators of US nuclear power stations in the 1990s is carried out. Approaches to modeling dynamics of capacity factors of nuclear power stations are proposed. Comparative analysis of dynamics of capacity factors and occupational radiation exposure for various generations of US nuclear power plants is carried out. Dynamical characteristics of «learning by doing» effects for analyzed indicators are measu...

  10. 75 FR 75706 - Dresden Nuclear Power Station, Units 2 and 3 and Quad Cities Nuclear Power Station, Unit Nos. 1...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-06

    ... Power Station, Units 2 and 3 and Quad Cities Nuclear Power Station, Unit Nos. 1 and 2; Notice of... Nuclear Power Station, Units 2 and 3, respectively, located in Grundy County, Illinois, and to Renewed Facility Operating License Nos. DPR-29 and DPR-30 for Quad Cities Nuclear Power Station, Unit Nos. 1 and...

  11. Distributed systems for protecting nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advantages of distributed control systems for the control of nuclear power stations are obviously of great interest. Some years ago, EPRI, (Electric Power Research Institute) showed that multiplexing the signals is technically feasible, that it enables the availability specifications to be met and costs to be reduced. Since then, many distributed control systems have been proposed by the manufacturers. This note offers some comments on the application of the distribution concept to protection systems -what should be distributed- and ends with a brief description of a protection system based on microprocessors for the pressurized power stations now being built in France

  12. 75 FR 2164 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station; Environmental Assessment and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-14

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station; Environmental Assessment and...), for operation of Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station (Pilgrim), located in Plymouth County, MA....

  13. Phasing out Britain's nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report examines the technical and economic feasibility of phasing-out Britain's nuclear power stations. It considers a range of strategies, from complete closure by 1990, to allowing them to run the full course of their planned lives, which for some reactors would be well into the next century. For reasons stated, closure of all Britain's nuclear power stations by 1990 or shortly afterwards would be likely to lead to a shortfall in generating capacity. Sufficient new generating capacity could not be provided quickly enough to avoid this shortfall, so power cuts at times of winter peak demand would probably occur. However, the older Magnox reactors, which comprise nine of the sixteen nuclear power stations, could be closed by the end of the present decade without risking power cuts. The seven AGRs, which are all newer, could be closed between 1995 and 2000, as replacement capacity was completed. 6 GW of new capacity, equivalent to three coal-fired power stations of standard design, would be needed for this purpose. The phasing out of nuclear power would add to the electricity industry operating costs. Taking all costs together - decommissioning, operating costs and the capital cost of replacement - the increase in electricity price is unlikely to exceed 10%. It is essential that the phasing-out of nuclear power is supported by new investment in the UK coal industry. Given the long time lag in completing new developments, it would be wise to make an early start on this new capacity in order to avoid large coal imports in the 1990s. (author)

  14. Multivariable control in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Multivariable methods have the potential to improve the control of large systems such as nuclear power stations. Linear-quadratic optimal control is a multivariable method based on the minimization of a cost function. A related technique leads to the Kalman filter for estimation of plant state from noisy measurements. A design program for optimal control and Kalman filtering has been developed as part of a computer-aided design package for multivariable control systems. The method is demonstrated on a model of a nuclear steam generator, and simulated results are presented

  15. Report on Darlington nuclear generating station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Select Committee on Energy was appointed on July 10, 1985 by the Legislative Assembly of the Province of Ontario in order to inquire into and report on Ontario Hydro affairs within ten months. Two sessions were planned the first of which was a review of the Darlington Nuclear Generating Station. Darlington is a large, 4 unit nuclear-powered electricity generating station currently under construction on the shore of Lake Ontario in the town of Newcastle. At the time the Committee met, construction had been underway for over four years. The first two units are scheduled to become operational in 1988 and 1989 with the second two scheduled to become operational in 1991 and 1992. The total estimated cost of the station is $10.895 billion of which $3.66 billion has been spent and $3.385 billion has been committed. Though the nuclear industry has been a major area of investment in Ontario over the past decade, the demand for electrical power from nuclear stations has been significantly decreased. This report focusses on the need for Darlington and public policy issues involved in planning and completing it. The Committee proposed the following recommendations: 1) The relationship between the Government of Ontario and Ontario Hydro and their individual responsibilities should be clarified. 2) An independent review of the Ontario Hydro demand/supply options should be carried out. 3) No further significant contracts for Darlington units 3 and 4 should be let for materials not required for construction during the next 6 months while the Committee studies demand and supply options

  16. Requirement profile for nuclear power station personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The starting point in deriving the requirement profile for the shift personnel in the control rooms of nuclear power stations is information of a technical, organisational and ergonomic kind. The technique used, the distribution of work to different work areas and the configuration of the workplace is determined by the tasks and the environmental conditions in which they have to be done. (orig./DG)

  17. 78 FR 35646 - Byron Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2, and Braidwood Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-06-13

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Byron Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2, and Braidwood Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2 AGENCY: Nuclear... U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has received an application, dated May 29, 2013,...

  18. Commentary: childhood cancer near nuclear power stations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fairlie Ian

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In 2008, the KiKK study in Germany reported a 1.6-fold increase in solid cancers and a 2.2-fold increase in leukemias among children living within 5 km of all German nuclear power stations. The study has triggered debates as to the cause(s of these increased cancers. This article reports on the findings of the KiKK study; discusses past and more recent epidemiological studies of leukemias near nuclear installations around the world, and outlines a possible biological mechanism to explain the increased cancers. This suggests that the observed high rates of infant leukemias may be a teratogenic effect from incorporated radionuclides. Doses from environmental emissions from nuclear reactors to embryos and fetuses in pregnant women near nuclear power stations may be larger than suspected. Hematopoietic tissues appear to be considerably more radiosensitive in embryos/fetuses than in newborn babies. Recommendations for advice to local residents and for further research are made.

  19. Underground construction of nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the discussions about the safety of nuclear installations the question of building nuclear power stations below ground is being raised again and again. Almost all the experts in the field regard further investigations of underground construction as necessary or desirable. Although in present above-ground plant designs safety measures must ensure that the consequences of hypothetical accidents will in any case be accommodated without involving any hazard to the public, there are some question marks when it comes to ensuring protection against acts of war and sabotage. This contribution outlines the variants of underground designs of nuclear power stations and their feasibility at the present state of the art. The question is studied whether underground construction will increase the safety of the public as against present above-ground designs. Another problem considered is the question of whether the extensive protective measures required under the present licensing procedures and implemented in these plants already preclude any real hazard to the environment with a high degree of certainty, which would leave no necessity for underground constructions. (orig.)

  20. Delayed Station Blackout Event and Nuclear Safety

    OpenAIRE

    Andrija Volkanovski; Andrej Prošek

    2015-01-01

    The loss of off-site power (LOOP) event occurs when all electrical power to the nuclear power plant from the power grid is lost. Complete failure of both off-site and on-site alternating current (AC) power sources is referred to as a station blackout (SBO). Combined LOOP and SBO events are analyzed in this paper. The analysis is done for different time delays between the LOOP and SBO events. Deterministic safety analysis is utilized for the assessment of the plant parameters for different tim...

  1. Forecasting Canadian nuclear power station construction costs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Because of the huge volume of capital required to construct a modern electric power generating station, investment decisions have to be made with as complete an understanding of the consequences of the decision as possible. This understanding must be provided by the evaluation of future situations. A key consideration in an evaluation is the financial component. This paper attempts to use an econometric method to forecast the construction costs escalation of a standard Canadian nuclear generating station (NGS). A brief review of the history of Canadian nuclear electric power is provided. The major components of the construction costs of a Canadian NGS are studied and summarized. A database is built and indexes are prepared. Based on these indexes, an econometric forecasting model is constructed using an apparently new econometric methodology of forecasting modelling. Forecasts for a period of 40 years are generated and applications (such as alternative scenario forecasts and range forecasts) to uncertainty assessment and/or decision-making are demonstrated. The indexes, the model, and the forecasts and their applications, to the best of the author's knowledge, are the first for Canadian NGS constructions. (author)

  2. Living near a nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The need to expand nuclear power and its advantages are discussed publicly nearly each week. According to politicians and the nuclear lobby investing tens of billions Sk at Mochovce will bring Slovakia the often cited 'independence and energy self-sufficiency'. It will also mean profit for Slovenske elektrarne and the company's shareholders - the state and Italian company, Enel. In addition to the lively discussion on the pros and cons of nuclear energy, TREND was also interested in the living conditions around the concrete and strictly guarded, potentially dangerous plants and in the opinion of the people most affected by Mochovce and Jaslovske Bohunice on expansion of the existing and the building of new nuclear power plants. The construction of nuclear powers stations in these regions was not only about new jobs. The state 'prescribed' iodine pills and did not allow any construction in the region and, in the case of Mochovce, ordered the complete demolition of a village. The only thing that remained from Mochovce village was the church. 'And when it was found that the power plant would not reach it, it was even given a new roof. Former inhabitants, especially the older ones that had problems accepting the evacuation, used to visit it often,' explained Jan Foldy, the head of the local municipality in Kalna nad Hronom. After many years, life in the neighbouring villages is not bad. Their budgets are overflowing and so they can afford to spoil their inhabitants with free cable TV and high standard sport facilities, which should partly compensate for the fact that the people are living so close to a nuclear facility. (authors)

  3. 75 FR 38147 - FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company; Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-07-01

    ... COMMISSION FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company; Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station; Exemption 1.0 Background... No. NFP-3, which authorizes operation of the Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1 (DBNPS). The... regulations. Therefore, the exemption is authorized by law. Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station...

  4. Engineering blasting and vibration monitor near nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The record of earth and stone work blasting test near the Daya bay nuclear power station is presented. Through the test, the schemes of earth and stone work blasting excavation and vibration monitor are gained, ensuring not only the safe operation of Daya bay nuclear power station but also the progress of Lingao nuclear power station engineering. Practice indicates that the two schemes are feasible

  5. Nuclear power stations located around Latvia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper consider technical parameters of the nuclear power stations (NPPs) located around Latvia at a distance up to 1500 km. On this territory 163 NPPs were built meant for commercial use. They gave up to 123535 M We(net) in total. At the end of the twentieth century from the mentioned number there remained 141 functioning NPPs yielding totally 115327 M We(net). From these latter the majority (67.4 %) are water-cooled type reactors, half of them, 47, having been built after the projects by specialists of the former US. On the neighbouring territories (Russia, Ukraine, Romania, Czech and Slovak Republics) 18 NPPs are currently under construction, which are envisaged to yield about 14089 M We in total. (author)

  6. Ardennes nuclear power station. Annual report, 1976

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Ardennes nuclear power station suffered two serious production setbacks in 1976 in spite of the satisfactory behavior of the equipment. The first is due to exceptionally unfavorable temperature and flow-rate conditions of the river Meuse, which caused a loss of production of about 300 million kWh. The second arises from the application of the Service des Mines regulations (decree of February 26th 1974) which in 1976 entailed the thorough inspection of the primary circuit and the ten-yearly hydraulic trial during the routine shutdown. This shutdown, intended for three months, in fact lasted an extra two weeks. Calculating the immobilization necessary for a general revision of the material, the production loss ascribable to statutory inspection may also estimated to 300 GWh. The net energy produced was 1362 GWh, the number of hours connected 5536h, the availability coefficient in time 62%, the total number of shutdowns 14. The equipment as a whole works very well. The tests carried out on the occasion of the ten-yearly trial showed the state of the main circuit to be perfectly satisfactoy, while inspections during the hydraulic trial at 207 bar revealed no anomalies. Where the behavior of the steam generators is concerned, only 20 tubes over a total of 6500 have been obstructed since the unit was started up in 1967. The cost per kWh electric of the station is 8.82 French centimes

  7. Computer management of refueling for nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author analyzes the disadvantages of refueling management for nuclear power station at present. A method of computer management of refueling for nuclear power station is put forward and the main functions of the system are explained. The implementation method of the system is also discussed. Finally the expanded prospect is given

  8. 75 FR 14209 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ... COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station; Exemption 1.0 Background.... DPR-28, which authorizes operation of the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station (VY). The license....55, ``Requirements for physical protection of licensed activities in nuclear power reactors...

  9. 76 FR 30204 - Exelon Nuclear, Dresden Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1; Exemption From Certain Security Requirements

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-24

    ... COMMISSION Exelon Nuclear, Dresden Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1; Exemption From Certain Security... issued for Dresden Nuclear Power Station (DNPS), Unit 1, located in Grundy County, Illinois. DNPS Unit 1... ``Requirements for physical protection of licensed activities in nuclear power reactors against...

  10. 77 FR 47680 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station Receipt of Request for Action

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station Receipt of Request for Action... (NRC or the Commission) take action with regard to the Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station (Pilgrim)....

  11. 75 FR 12311 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc; Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station Environmental Assessment...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-15

    ... COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc; Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station Environmental Assessment and... Nuclear Operations, Inc. (Entergy or the licensee), for operation of Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station... no significant impact [part 73, Power Reactor Security Requirements, 74 FR 13926, 13967 (March...

  12. 75 FR 14208 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-24

    ... COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station; Exemption 1.0 Background Entergy..., which authorizes operation of the Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station (Pilgrim). The license provides, among..., ``Requirements for physical protection of licensed activities in nuclear power reactors against...

  13. Review of radioactive discharges from nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    HM Inspectorate of Pollution commissioned, with authorising responsibilities in England and Wales, a study into the discharges of radioactive effluents from Nuclear Power Stations. The study considered arisings from nuclear power stations in Europe and the USA and the technologies to treat and control the radioactive discharges. This report is a review of the arisings and concludes that suitable technologies exist, which if applied, could reduce discharges from nuclear power plants in England and Wales in line with the rest of Europe. (author)

  14. Delayed Station Blackout Event and Nuclear Safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrija Volkanovski

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The loss of off-site power (LOOP event occurs when all electrical power to the nuclear power plant from the power grid is lost. Complete failure of both off-site and on-site alternating current (AC power sources is referred to as a station blackout (SBO. Combined LOOP and SBO events are analyzed in this paper. The analysis is done for different time delays between the LOOP and SBO events. Deterministic safety analysis is utilized for the assessment of the plant parameters for different time delays of the SBO event. Obtained plant parameters are used for the assessment of the probabilities of the functional events in the SBO event tree. The results show that the time delay of the SBO after the LOOP leads to a decrease of the core damage frequency (CDF from the SBO event tree. The reduction of the CDF depends on the time delay of the SBO after the LOOP event. The results show the importance of the safety systems to operate after the plant shutdown when the decay heat is large. Small changes of the basic events importance measures are identified with the introduction of the delay of the SBO event.

  15. 76 FR 82201 - General Site Suitability Criteria for Nuclear Power Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-30

    ... Power Stations AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission. ACTION: Draft regulatory guide; request for... regulatory guide DG-4021, ``General Site Suitability Criteria for Nuclear Power Stations.'' This guide... for nuclear power stations. DATES: Submit comments by February 25, 2012. Comments received after...

  16. The safety reinforcement measures at Shika Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster was initiated by the Tohoku earthquake and subsequent massive tsunami on 11 March 2011. To prevent the event as the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear disaster, we had implemented the necessary safety reinforcement measures in Shika Nuclear Power Stations. In this paper, we are going to introduce the flood prevention measures that prevent seawater from entering the power stations. And we also secured emergency power supplies for the case of loss of all AC power supplies. In addition, we secured the function of coolant systems by diversifying water sources and deployment of fire engines and so forth. As the next step, including the adaptation of Shika Nuclear Power Stations for the new regulations that are going to be forced on next July, not staying the existing state, we are going to study and implement the further measures to improve safety and reliability of Shika Nuclear Power Stations. (author)

  17. Electrical wire for use in nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrical wire and cable suitable for use in nuclear generating stations, having at least one electrical conductor, a micaceous insulating layer surrounding the conductor and a layer of fluoropolymer insulation surrounding the micaceous layer are described

  18. 78 FR 784 - Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-04

    ... COMMISSION Entergy Nuclear Operations, Inc.; Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station; Exemption 1.0 Background Entergy..., which authorizes operation of the Pilgrim Nuclear Power Station (PNPS). The license provides, among...) the exemptions are authorized by law, will not present an undue risk to public health or safety,...

  19. Application of additional diesel generators in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to enlarge the nuclear safety margin, ensure safe shutdown of nuclear reactors under loss of on-site and offsite power supply, and raise the unit availability through elongation of diesel fallback time under unavailability of emergency diesel generators, at present, nuclear power stations of most countries and zones in the world such as France, the U.S., south Africa, South Korea and Taiwan have been equipped with additional diesel generators, making the safety performance of above-mentioned nuclear power stations advanced in the world. The wiring procedures, power supply mode, testing methods and the power supply and connection schemes of motor control center are described

  20. Erection all risks insurance for nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear power stations are built and installed with components and facilities highly sophisticated on the basis of modern science and technology. Therefore, it has various features in both risks and insurance provision. In considering the damage insurance for nuclear installations, the insurance for nuclear power stations is the most characteristic, and further, the outline can be grasped relatively easily. Among the various damage insurances for nuclear power stations, an insurance for all risks during their erection is described: risk-covering method, the objects of insurance, insurance-contracting particles, damages compensated by the insurance, damages and expenses not compensated, the amounts covered and the limits in damage compensation, the term of insurance, the burden charges of the insured party, the amounts of damage and the amounts covered, adjustment with a nuclear-power property insurance. (Mori, K.)

  1. Nuclear power generation modern power station practice

    CERN Document Server

    1971-01-01

    Nuclear Power Generation focuses on the use of nuclear reactors as heat sources for electricity generation. This volume explains how nuclear energy can be harnessed to produce power by discussing the fundamental physical facts and the properties of matter underlying the operation of a reactor. This book is comprised of five chapters and opens with an overview of nuclear physics, first by considering the structure of matter and basic physical concepts such as atomic structure and nuclear reactions. The second chapter deals with the requirements of a reactor as a heat source, along with the diff

  2. A Series Dissertation on Tianwan Nuclear Power Station--Summary of Tianwan Nuclear Power Station Project

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Qiankun

    2006-01-01

    This is a summary in relation to the construction and operation of Tianwan Nuclear Power Station (the Project) at Lianyungang, Jiangsu Province, the People' s Republic of China. The breakdown specialty topic shall been given in times to come. In this report, the author attempted to give some general description of the Project, including the Project site' s general layout and geographical conditions. A description of its exposure to the elements is also provided, supported by some data made available to us. The key component parts of the Project are described, namely, the nuclear island which includes the reactor, steam generator and so on; the conventional island and the balance of plant. Wherever possible, the improvements to the reactor design over the operating V320 are highlighted, which result in the V428 reactor model. The supplier and contractor for the major equipment such as the reactor and the turbine is the Russian company, namely Atomstroyexport (ASE). There are third country suppliers who provide other equipment. For instance, Siemens supplies the full digital I&C system and Framatome ANP supplies the emergency diesel generators; the metal-clad switchgear cabinet by ABB of Australia; the main steam isolation valve unit by CCI AG of Switzerland. All these foreign suppliers are well known globally. Their experience and quality of the equipment supplied by them are well recognized by the people in the respective fields. As for the civil work and erection work, the most experienced and trustworthy local contractors have been selected. These contractors have proven their competence in similar contract work before. For the testing of the equipment, stringent and proper procedures which meet international standards are adopted. Finally, the author wished on this report could provide the world a safety and advanced Nuclear Project building in China.

  3. 75 FR 16523 - FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company; Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... COMMISSION FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company; Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station; Exemption 1.0 Background FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company (FENOC, the licensee) is the holder of Facility Operating License... M.S. Fertel, Nuclear Energy Institute). The licensee's request for an exemption is...

  4. Activity transport in nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this paper is to give a basic understanding of the operational limitations caused by radiation fields in the present design of CANDU-PHW reactors. A simple model of activity transport is described, and the significance of various radioisotopes identified. The impact which radiation fields have at the Divisional, Station Manager and Operation levels, is outlined in the context of typical work situations. (author)

  5. 76 FR 44376 - Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station; Notice of Withdrawal of Application for Amendment to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-25

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station; Notice of Withdrawal of Application for Amendment to... request of Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station (the licensee) to withdraw its August 19,...

  6. Nuclear power station and environmental protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Environmental pollution has become a major problem of the present times. In addition to the pollution of air, water, noise and food, there is pollution by industries and factories. Nuclear power plant is the best option to meet the increasing demand for power and to make use of available uranium and thorium in the country. It is generally believed that nuclear power plants increase pollution and are hazardous and not safe. An attempt has been made to analyse these beliefs on a scientific basis. (author). 5 refs., 3 figs

  7. Work sampling studies: Bruce Nuclear Generating Stations 'A' and 'B'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Work sampling in Ontario Hydro's Nuclear Operations Branch is one of the programs that address questions of human performance. The work sampling methodology was designed to measure actual 'hands on tool' time (wrench time), and other activities associated with station maintenance staff. This paper describes the methodology and discusses the results of wrench time studies conducted at Bruce Nuclear Generating Stations 'A' and 'B'. On the basis of the data collected, conclusions are drawn as to the usefulness of the work sampling technique. 4 refs., 13 tabs., 1 fig., 1 appendix

  8. Bid invitations for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Types of bid invitations, basic requirements on bid invitation documents, basic content of a turnkey bid invitation (bid invitation letter, instructions to the bidders, terms and conditions of the draft contract, technical specifications, site data and information), nuclear fuel procurement, differences turnkey - non-turnkey, legal, commerical, and technical matters concerning the contract document. (HP)

  9. Model of a nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model reduced in scale compared to the original of a nuclear powerstation including its buildings, including the reactor building and turbine hall, the plant, components, machines and pipework as components to be cut out with appropriate sticky edges for the individual model components to be glued on sheets, particularly of strong paper or cardboard, is shown. By folding and/or bending the cutout components and glueing the sticky edges, the model parts with edged or curved surfaces can be produced. (orig./HP)

  10. Tritium releases and impact about EDF nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a description of the different ways of formation of tritium in the nuclear power stations (either by fission or by activation), the authors discuss the levels of tritium releases by these power stations, indicate the tritium average activities in liquid and gaseous radioactive releases in 2008. They indicate the choices made by EDF and the actions performed to control these releases. They describe how the presence of tritium in the environment is monitored and how measurements are published. They discuss the interpretation of these measurements (in water streams, water sheets, sediments, along the Channel French coasts), and the impact of the tritium released by the nuclear power stations. They evoke modelling studies and researches supported by EDF on the impact of tritium on mankind

  11. The Staffing of Central Electricity Generating Board Nuclear Power Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An account is given of the staffing requirements and organization at a CEBG nuclear power station. The training of staff and licensing requirements for reactoroperating staff are discussed. Experience gained to data of the outcome of pre-operating training and detailed planning in the operational sphere is given. (author)

  12. Safety of CANDU nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear plant contains a large amount of radioactive material which could be a potential threat to public health. The plant is therefore designed, built and operated so that the risk to the public is low. Careful design of the normal reactor systems is the first line of defense. These systems are highly resistant to an accident happening in the first place, and can also be effective in stopping it if it does happen. Independent and redundant safety sytems minimize the effects of an accident, or stop it completely. They include shutdown systems, emergency core cooling systems, and containment systems. Massive impairment of any one safety system together with an accident can be tolerated. This 'defence in depth' approach recognizes that men and machines are imperfect and that the unexpected happens. The nuclear power plant need not be perfect to be safe. To allow meaningful judgements we must know how safe the plant is. The Atomic Energy Control Board guidelines give one such measure, but they may overestimate the true risk. We interpret these guidelines as an upper limit to the total risk, and trace their evolution. (author)

  13. Report on the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the compilation of information obtained by various organizations regarding the accident (and the consequences of the accident) that occurred at Unit 4 of the nuclear power station at Chernobyl in the USSR on April 26, 1986. The various authors are identified in a footnote to each chapter. An overview of the report is provided. Very briefly the other chapters cover: the design of the Chernobyl nuclear station Unit 4; safety analyses for Unit 4; the accident scenario; the role of the operator; an assessment of the radioactive release, dispersion, and transport; the activities associated with emergency actions; and information on the health and environmental consequences from the accident. These subjects cover the major aspects of the accident that have the potential to present new information and lessons for the nuclear industry in general

  14. The Technical Training Programme for Nuclear Power Station Personnel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canada's Nuclear Power Demonstration station (NPD), initiated by the federal agency Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, is operated and staffed by the Hydro-Electric Power Commission of Ontario, a provincial public utility. Obtaining and training staff for the station was hampered by the fact that until recently most of Ontario's electricity requirements were supplied by the abundant hydro-electric resources of the province. Increasing use of thermal-electric energy since 1950 created an extreme shortage of staff experienced in the operation of thermal stations. To meet this situation, trained manpower for nuclear generating stations was developed by the following steps: (1) An initial group of professional engineers was selected from among persons with considerable experience in nuclear work, thermal stations and electrical operation; (2) Another group of highly experienced operators and maintainers was selected; (3) The selected groups were given a rigorous training programme involving operation of both nuclear and coal-fired stations, instruction from the designers of NPD and training in the classroom and on the job; and (4) A nuclear training centre was established to select and train additional staff, conduct formal examinations and be generally responsible for personnel quality standards. Independent examinations of personnel were conducted by the Atomic Energy Control Board, a separate federal regulatory agency. Five general categories of personnel are being developed: (1) Supervisors: professional engineers responsible for operation, maintenance and administrative supervision, rotated periodically to increase their versatility; (2) Operators: four levels of qualification depending on the requirements of the job; (3) Control maintainers: four levels of qualification, responsible for maintenance of all instruments, control equipment and electrical equipment; (4) Mechanical maintainers: various levels and combinations of skills (welding, machining, fitting, etc

  15. Peculiar Features of Nuclear Power and Steam and Gas Plant of Thermal Power Station

    OpenAIRE

    I. A. Bokoun

    2014-01-01

    The paper reveals peculiar features concerning of power generation at a nuclear power station and a steam and gas plant of a thermal power station. According to technical and economical indices a nuclear power station is at a disadvantage in relation to a steam and gas plant of a thermal power station.

  16. 77 FR 36302 - Yankee Atomic Electric Company, Yankee Nuclear Power Station, Confirmatory Order Modifying...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-06-18

    ... COMMISSION Yankee Atomic Electric Company, Yankee Nuclear Power Station, Confirmatory Order Modifying License... of 10 CFR part 72, Subpart K at the Yankee Nuclear Power Station. The facility is located at the... Facility Operating License for Yankee Nuclear Power Station must be modified to include provisions...

  17. Online control loop tuning in Pickering Nuclear Generating Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most analog controllers in the Pickering B Nuclear Generating Stations adopted PID control scheme. In replacing the analog controllers with digital controllers, the PID control strategies, including the original tuning parameters were retained. The replacement strategy resulted in minimum effort on control loop tuning. In a few cases, however, it was found during commissioning that control loop tuning was required as a result of poor control loop performance, typically due to slow response and controlled process oscillation. Several factors are accounted for the necessities of control loop re-tuning. Our experience in commissioning the digital controllers showed that online control tuning posted some challenges in nuclear power plant. (author)

  18. Special address: Fukushima Dai-Ichi Nuclear Power Station update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station event and progression. It discusses the recovery road map and the IAEA fact finding mission which provides important preliminary results. It concludes that the response of the expert and dedicated staff in extreme conditions resulted in the best possible response given the exceptional circumstances. The Japanese government's response to protect the public including evacuation has been impressive and well organized. The hazards for several sites has been underestimated.

  19. Nuclear power stations: uneasiness about them and democracy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A report following a press conference at which the author, in discussing the state of the Graben 1140 MW BWR station project, also made some general observations about nuclear energy problems in Switzerland. Matters raised in the paper include legal requirements, safety and health, waste disposal problems, transportation of fuel for reprocessing and finance. The paper is intended to allay public anxiety. (S.W.)

  20. Distributed systems for the protection of nuclear stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advantages of distributed control systems usually mentioned are improved exploitation, cost reduction, and adaptation to changes in technology. These advantages are obviously very interesting for nuclear power plant applications, and many such systems have been proposed. This note comments on the application of the distributed system concept to protection systems - what should be distributed - and closes with a brief description of a protection system based on microprocessors for pressurized water stations being built in France. (auth)

  1. CAE - nuclear engineering analysis on work-station computers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Emergence of the inexpensive and widely available 32-bit-work-station computer is revolutionizing the scientific and engineering computing environment. These systems reach or exceed threshold for many midscale nuclear applications and bridge the gap between the era of expensive computing: cheap people and the era of cheap computing: expensive people. Experience at the Idaho National Engineering Laboratory (INEL) has demonstrated the efficacy of this new computer technology. For the past 1 1/2 yr, a Hewlett-Packard 9000/540 32-bit multi-user microcomputer has been used to perform many calculations typical of a nuclear design effort. This system is similar with respect to performance and memory to such work stations as the SUN-3, HP-9000/32, or the Apollo DN-3000 that are available for under $20,000 for a fully configured single-user station. The system is being used for code development, model setup and checkout, and a full range of nuclear applications. Various one- and two-dimensional discrete ordinates transport codes are used on a routine basis. These include the well-known ANISN code as well as locally developed transport models. Typical one-dimensional multigroup calculations can be executed in clock times <10 min

  2. 75 FR 10833 - In the Matter of Entergy Nuclear Operations; Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station; Demand for...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION In the Matter of Entergy Nuclear Operations; Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station; Demand for.... The license authorizes the operation of the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station (Vermont Yankee)...

  3. Automatic defect identification on PWR nuclear power station fuel pellets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article presents a new automatic identification technique of structural failures in nuclear green fuel pellet. This technique was developed to identify failures occurred during the fabrication process. It is based on a smart image analysis technique for automatic identification of the failures on uranium oxide pellets used as fuel in PWR nuclear power stations. In order to achieve this goal, an artificial neural network (ANN) has been trained and validated from image histograms of pellets containing examples not only from normal pellets (flawless), but from defective pellets as well (with the main flaws normally found during the manufacturing process). Based on this technique, a new automatic identification system of flaws on nuclear fuel element pellets, composed by the association of image pre-processing and intelligent, will be developed and implemented on the Brazilian nuclear fuel production industry. Based on the theoretical performance of the technology proposed and presented in this article, it is believed that this new system, NuFAS (Nuclear Fuel Pellets Failures Automatic Identification Neural System) will be able to identify structural failures in nuclear fuel pellets with virtually zero error margins. After implemented, the NuFAS will add value to control quality process of the national production of the nuclear fuel.

  4. Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station operation and management indicators system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ever since the commercial operation of Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station (GNPS), dynamic objective management concept that features modern enterprises has been adopted by the station to manage all operational activities with the guidance of business plan. And some quantitative indicators have been employed in order to measure effectively the progress status of these operational activities. After several years' evolvement, a hierarchical and standard performance indicators system has been developed and is playing an active part in the plant's efforts towards top quartile of world nuclear power industry. Structured hierarchically with higher levels resolving into lower levels and lower levels committing to higher levels, the indicator system represents the corporate vision, WANO (World Association of Nuclear Operators) performance indicators, plant integrated indicators and departmental key indicators, covering such areas as safety, production, environment, human resource and cost control. The indicator system not only reflects performance-centered management concept, but also shows the controllability of the whole operational process of the station. Indicators of a certain level serve as both early warnings to superior indicators (lagging indicators in this case) and effects to inferior indicators (leading indicators in this case). The dynamic status of these indicators, numbered more than 230, will eventually be fed back to the business plan and realized through daily work of every branch, and even every member of the workforce. With the indicator system as a quantitative management tool, and an effective tracking system, GNPS has achieved great success in self-assessment, objective definition, improvement follow up, resource re-allocation, and management-staff communication. Periodic plant performance assessment is performed through spider chart and other pictorial diagrams. Indicators are displayed at the plant entrance, offices, Main Control Room and SIS network

  5. Expansion potential for existing nuclear power station sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is a preliminary analysis of the expansion potential of the existing nuclear power sites, in particular their potential for development into nuclear energy centers (NECs) of 10 (GW(e) or greater. The analysis is based primarily on matching the most important physical characteristics of a site against the dominating site criteria. Sites reviewed consist mainly of those in the 1974 through 1976 ERDA Nuclear Power Stations listings without regard to the present status of reactor construction plans. Also a small number of potential NEC sites that are not associated with existing power stations were reviewed. Each site was categorized in terms of its potential as: a dispersed site of 5 GW(e) or less; a mini-NEC of 5 to 10 GW(e); NECs of 10 to 20 GW(e); and large NECs of more than 20 GW(e). The sites were categorized on their ultimate potential without regard to political considerations that might restrain their development. The analysis indicates that nearly 40 percent of existing sites have potential for expansion to nuclear energy centers

  6. 78 FR 71675 - License Amendment Application for Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-11-29

    ... COMMISSION License Amendment Application for Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory... Operating License No. DPR-28 for the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power Station, located in Windham County, VT... proposed amendment to Facility Operating License No. DPR-28 for the Vermont Yankee Nuclear Power...

  7. Report on the accident at the Chernobyl Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the compilation of information obtained by various organizations regarding the accident (and the consequences of the accident) that occurred at Unit 4 of the nuclear power station at Chernobyl in the USSR on April 26, 1986. Each organization has independently accepted responsibility for one or more chapters. The specific responsibility of each organization is indicated. The various authors are identified in a footnote to each chapter. Very briefly the other chapters cover: the design of the Chernobyl nuclear station Unit 4; safety analyses for Unit 4; the accident scenario; the role of the operator; an assessment of the radioactive release, dispersion, and transport; the activities associated with emergency actions; and information on the health and environmental consequences from the accident. These subjects cover the major aspects of the accident that have the potential to present new information and lessons for the nuclear industry in general. The task of evaluating the information obtained in these various areas and the assessment of the potential implications has been left to each organization to pursue according to the relevance of the subject to their organization. Those findings will be issued separately by the cognizant organizations. The basic purpose of this report is to provide the information upon which such assessments can be made

  8. The role of the State Nuclear Safety Authority during nuclear power station construction and operation in Czechoslovakia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The author describes the main elements of the State Nuclear Safety Authority's work and discusses its role in legislation as well as its working methods. Information is provided on the practical experience of the Authority with nuclear power station site selection in Czechoslovakia, and the quality control measures applied to the power-producing components of nuclear power stations are elucidated. (author)

  9. Turbo-generator sets in conventional and nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of unit power in conventional and nuclear power stations in Germany and the USA - the development of design criteria for conventional and reheat turbines - a survey of constructional types and problems of conventional reheat turbines by the example of turbine types for 150, 300, 600 and 1,200 MW - saturated steam turbines for boiling-water and pressurized-water reactors - maintenance, automatics, and turbine protection systems - reliability and availability - common turbine defects: outlook on limiting outputs of turbines and generators with different cooling systems and low-pressure parts. (orig./AK)

  10. Technical specifications for cold shutdown (Barsebaeck nuclear power station)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    From a reactor safety point of view, it is clear that the conditions at power operation and at cold shutdown are quite different. Because of this a special set of regulations, i.e. Technical Specifications for Cold Shutdown (TSCS), has been prepared for the Barseback nuclear power station. This paper gives a short description of these TSCS. Background, general principles, history, preparation, structure and experiences of TSCS are discussed. In order to provide some deeper information about some part of TSCS, a specific example has been chosen, namely the TSCS concerning the residual heat removal systems

  11. 75 FR 47856 - Nebraska Public Power District: Cooper Nuclear Station; Notice of Availability of the Final...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-09

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Nebraska Public Power District: Cooper Nuclear Station; Notice of Availability of the Final... operation for the Cooper Nuclear Station (CNS). CNS is located near Brownville, Nebraska, on the...

  12. 75 FR 76055 - Nebraska Public Power District Cooper Nuclear Station; Notice of Issuance of Renewed Facility...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-07

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Docket No. 50-298; NRC-2008-0617] Nebraska Public Power District Cooper Nuclear Station; Notice of... operator of the Cooper Nuclear Station (CNS). Renewed facility operating license No. DPR-46...

  13. 76 FR 39134 - ZIONSOLUTIONS, LLC; Zion Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2 Exemption From Recordkeeping...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-07-05

    ... COMMISSION ZIONSOLUTIONS, LLC; Zion Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2 Exemption From Recordkeeping Requirements 1.0 Background Zion Nuclear Power Station (ZNPS or Zion), Unit 1, is a Westinghouse 3250 MWt... licensing basis requirements previously applicable to the nuclear power units and associated...

  14. The effects of the nuclear disaster at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station on local governments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All Japan council of local governments with atomic power stations consisted of 24 reactor site and 6 neighboring local governments to solve reactor site related problems. Nuclear disaster at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station affected member local governments to be forced in severe conditions such as 'removal of administrative function' or 'refuge over a wide district beyond local government area', not imagined before. The council set up working group for thirteen local governments themselves to investigate this disaster and find safety and prevention of disaster measures to be deployed in nuclear administration, which published report in March 2012. This article described outline of investigation and derived problems and direction of their solution. Main items were related with communication, resident evacuation, prevention of disaster system, and management of refuge site. (T. Tanaka)

  15. Foreign Material Exclusion Program at CNE Cernavoda Nuclear Generating Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Urjan, Daniel [S.N. ' Nuclearelectrica' SA, CNE Cernavoda Nuclear Power Plant, Medgidiei 2 Street, 905200 Cernavoda, Constanta (Romania)

    2008-07-01

    In the face of a continuing attention to operations and maintenance costs at nuclear power plants, the future of the industry depends largely upon increasing plant availability and improving operating efficiency. The success in achieving these objectives is dependent upon the success of each plant's equipment maintenance program. Preventing the introduction of foreign materials into a nuclear power plant system or component requires a careful, thoughtful, and professional approach by all site personnel. This paper describes a proactive approach to prevent the introduction of foreign material into systems and components, by providing an overview of technical considerations required to develop, implement, and manage a foreign material exclusion program at CNE Cernavoda Unit 1 and 2 Nuclear Power Station. It is also described an example of Foreign Material Intrusion which happened during the 2003 planned maintenance outage at Cernavoda Unit no.1. This paper also defines personnel responsibilities and key nomenclature and a means for evaluating prospective work tasks and activities against standardized criteria, in order to identify the appropriate level of the required FME controls. (author)

  16. Foreign Material Exclusion Program at CNE Cernavoda Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the face of a continuing attention to operations and maintenance costs at nuclear power plants, the future of the industry depends largely upon increasing plant availability and improving operating efficiency. The success in achieving these objectives is dependent upon the success of each plant's equipment maintenance program. Preventing the introduction of foreign materials into a nuclear power plant system or component requires a careful, thoughtful, and professional approach by all site personnel. This paper describes a proactive approach to prevent the introduction of foreign material into systems and components, by providing an overview of technical considerations required to develop, implement, and manage a foreign material exclusion program at CNE Cernavoda Unit 1 and 2 Nuclear Power Station. It is also described an example of Foreign Material Intrusion which happened during the 2003 planned maintenance outage at Cernavoda Unit no.1. This paper also defines personnel responsibilities and key nomenclature and a means for evaluating prospective work tasks and activities against standardized criteria, in order to identify the appropriate level of the required FME controls. (author)

  17. Upgrading of HP turbines for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many papers have been written on the upgrading of nuclear plant LP turbines but there are also strong reasons for the upgrading of the HP turbines. Two principal reasons are discussed in this paper. Fouling by deposition on the feedwater side of the stream generator tubes, frequently results in a reduction of pressure at the turbine stop valve and a consequent loss of power output. This loss of power can be largely offset by fitting increased capacity blading in part of the HP turbine which increases the swallowing capacity of the turbine. It is necessary to consider the increased capacity blading, bypassing of heaters and future fouling to arrive at an optimum solution. Since the design of the operating nuclear stations GEC ALSTHOM have made very significant advances in the design of steam turbine HP blading and it is now possible to upgrade the HP turbine with blades of modern design to give a substantial increase in power output. The pay back period for such a upgrade is short and the paper describes some of the Company's successful nuclear HP upgrading in the UK. The two actions described above can be combined, or indeed, be carried out in conjunction with an LP upgrade

  18. Probabilistic safety analysis for the Unterweser Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In October last year, a plant-specific probabilistic safety analysis (PSA) was conducted for the Unterweser Nuclear Power Station as part of the periodic safety review (PSR). As a living PSA, the probabilistic safety analysis was based on the first analysis conducted in 1995; its scope was extended in accordance with the 1996 PSA guideline. Besides the in-plant initiating events in the power mode, which were considered already in the 1995 PSA, the current PSA included external impacts, fires in the plant, and events occurring during plant outages as well as plant-specific data. Also findings of current research were incorporated. The results obtained show the KKU plant to enjoy a high level of safety and allow the PSA to be used alongside plant operation. (orig.)

  19. Medical Actions in Emergencies at Nuclear Power Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Casualties which could occur as a result of accidents at nuclear power stations can be categorized as follows. Those due to: (a) Over-exposure to external radiation; or (b) Excessive contamination of body surfaces with radioactive materials with, possibly, absorption of toxic quantities of these materials; (c) Combinations of (a) and (b) complicated by conventional injuries. This paper discusses the arrangements made within the Central Electricity Generating Board for dealing with casualties, taking account of the limited medical and nursing facilities. These arrangements can be summarized as follows: (a) Immediate actions on site, including first aid and rescue; (b) Plans have been agreed with the medical staff of appropriate hospitals for dealing with eventualities of this nature; (c) Adequate training programs have been instituted to include nursing and first-aid teams; (d) Rehabilitation and reemployment of injured personnel. Details of dosimetry both physical and biological which would be used to assess the extent of radioactive exposure are described. (author)

  20. Aging assessment of electrical cables from NPD nuclear generating station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degradation of NPD Nuclear Generating Station control and power cables after approximately 25 years of service was assessed. The PVC and SBR insulated cables were also exposed to radiation, accident and post-accident conditions, and accelerated aging to simulate extended service life. The degradation of the samples from the containment boiler room was minimal, caused mainly by thermal conditions rather than radiation. Although irradiation to 55 Mrad, simulating normal operation and accident radiation levels, caused degradation, the cables could still function during accident and post-accident conditions. Accelerated thermal aging to simulate an additional 10 years of service at 45 degrees C caused embrittlement of the PVC and a 60% decrease in elongation of the SBR. Comparison of test results of aged NPD cables with newer PVC cables obtained from Pickering NGS 'A' shows that the newer cables have improved aging stability and therefore should provide adequate service during their design life of 31 years

  1. Influence of radiation on maintenance in a nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Maintenance in nuclear power plant differs from that in fossil fuel power plant in many aspects because the maintenance in the former has to be carried out in radiation area. These aspects are : (1) manpower planning to minimise time of repair in order to reduce the radiation dose received by the maintenance crew, (2) difficulties in isolating components to be repaired from reactor which is normally filled with water, (3) shielding and decontamination to reduce radiation fields around equipment and (4) need to write the detailed procedures and use special tools, brief and train personnel before-hand on similar equipment or mock-ups. These aspects are discussed. Two of the major repair jobs carried out at the Tarapur Atomic Power Station are described in brief. The jobs were : (1) tube plugging of secondary steam generators and (2) repair to the guide brackets of dryer -separator assembly in the reactor vessel. (M.G.B.)

  2. Accounting and cost control of a nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1) chart or classification of accounts, 2) all plant expenses, 3) cost control, 4) storage of spare parts and supplies, 5) control of applicable dose rate, 6) charges for insurance. The accuracy of accounting and cost control is a primary thing for the efficiency in a nuclear power station. The much more important factor is the availability. It is necessary to save costs by a more effective storage or a more detailed and automatic process of single jobs in the workshop. But a very definite experience made in Obrigheim is the fact that not only commercial people know which financial loss will occur if the plant is out of operation one hour. This knowledge is also important for the technical people and for the workers in the workshops. The technical responsibility and the security in operation of the plant and the commercial understanding for the risk of non-availability do not exclude each other. (HP)

  3. Response robot and Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When we remote control the robot in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station reactor building, in addition to the environmental conditions narrow, stairs, rubble, such as high temperature, high humidity, there is a problem which we have not experienced. One is the radiation resistance of the robotic system, and the other is a matter of remote communication. Robot must be active under a hight radiation in behalf of person, a method that can reduce the exposure a radiation is only shielding. It causes increase of the weight of the robot, shielding worsen the exercise performance of small robot. In addition, thick concrete structures to block reactor building is the failure of the radio communications. (author)

  4. Development situation about the Canadian CANDU Nuclear Power Generating Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CANDU reactor is the most versatile commercial power reactor in the world. The acronym 'CANDU', a registered trademark of Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, stands for 'CANada Deuterium Uranium'. CANDU uses heavy water as moderator and uranium (originally, natural uranium) as fuel. All current power reactors in Canada are of the CANDU type. Canada exports CANDU type reactor in abroad. CANDU type is used as the nuclear power plants to produce electrical. Today, there are 41 CANDU reactors in use around the world, and the design has continuously evolved to maintain into unique technology and performance. The CANDU-6 power reactor offers a combination of proven, superior and state-of-the-art technology. CANDU-6 was designed specifically for electricity production, unlike other major reactor types. One of its characteristics is a very high operating and fuel efficiency. Canada Nuclear Power Generating Stations were succeeded in a commercial reactor of which the successful application of heavy water reactor, natural uranium method and that on-power fuelling could be achieved. It was achieved through the joint development of a major project by strong support of the federal government, public utilities and private enterprises. The potential for customization to any country's needs, with competitive development and within any level of domestic industrial infrastructure, gives CANDU technology strategic importance in the 21st century

  5. Operating Experience at the Aagesta Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweden's first nuclear power reactor Agesta, achieved criticality on July 17, 1963. Full power (65 MWt) was attained on March 20, 1964. Aagesta is a heavy water cooled and moderated pressure vessel reactor used for production of electricity as well as for district heating. The design, assembly and construction etc, of the reactor was described in detail in a staff report by AB Atomenergi, 'The Aagesta Nuclear Power Station' edited by B McHugh, which was published in September, 1964. In the book experiences from the commissioning and the first operation of the reactor were reported as well as findings from the extensive reactor physics studies made during this period. The report now presented is written by members of the operating team at Aagesta since its start. It reflects in general the experiences up to the end of 1965. The Aagesta Log, however, covers the period up to the normal summer stop 1966. The reactor has hitherto produced 506,000 MWh power of which 48,700 MWh have been electric power. In July 1965 the responsibility for the reactor operation was taken over by the Swedish State Power Board from AB Atomenergi, which company had started the reactor and operated it until the summer break 1965

  6. Multivariable control in nuclear power stations -survey of design methods

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The development of larger nuclear generating stations increases the importance of dynamic interaction between controllers, because each control action may affect several plant outputs. Multivariable control provides the techniques to design controllers which perform well under these conditions. This report is a foundation for further work on the application of multivariable control in AECL. It covers the requirements of control and the fundamental mathematics used, then reviews the most important linear methods, based on both state-space and frequency-response concepts. State-space methods are derived from analysis of the system differential equations, while frequency-response methods use the input-output transfer function. State-space methods covered include linear-quadratic optimal control, pole shifting, and the theory of state observers and estimators. Frequency-response methods include the inverse Nyquist array method, and classical non-interactive techniques. Transfer-function methods are particularly emphasized since they can incorporate ill-defined design criteria. The underlying concepts, and the application strengths and weaknesses of each design method are presented. A review of significant applications is also given. It is concluded that the inverse Nyquist array method, a frequency-response technique based on inverse transfer-function matrices, is preferred for the design of multivariable controllers for nuclear power plants. This method may be supplemented by information obtained from a modal analysis of the plant model. (auth)

  7. Nuclear generating station and heavy water plant cost estimates for strategy studies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear generating station capital, operating and maintenance costs are basic input data for strategy analyses of alternate nuclear fuel cycles. This report presents estimates of these costs for natural uranium CANDU stations, CANDU stations operating on advanced fuel cycles, and liquid metal fast breeder reactors. Cost estimates for heavy water plants are also presented. The results show that station capital costs for advanced fuel cycles are not expected to be significantly greater than those for natural uranium stations. LMFBR capital costs are expected to be 25-30 percent greater than for CANDU's. (auth)

  8. Study of wet blasting of components in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report looks at the method of wet blasting radioactive components in nuclear power stations. The wet blaster uses pearl shaped glass beads with the dimensions of 150-250 μm mixed with water as blasting media. The improved design, providing outer operator's positions with proper radiation protection and more efficient blasting equipment has resulted in a lesser dose taken by the operators. The main reason to decontaminate components in nuclear power plants is to enable service on these components. On components like valves, pump shafts, pipes etc. oxides form and bind radiation. These components are normally situated at some distance from the reactor core and will mainly suffer from radiation from so called activation products. When a component is to be decontaminated it can be decontaminated to a radioactive level where it will be declassified. This report has found levels ranging from 150-1000 Bq/kg allowing declassification of radioactive materials. This difference is found between different countries and different organisations. The report also looks at the levels of waste generated using wet blasting. This is done by tracking the contamination to determine where it collects. It is either collected in the water treatment plant or collected in the blasting media. At Barsebaeck the waste levels, from de-contaminating nearly 800 components in one year, results in a waste volume of about 0,250 m3. This waste consists of low and medium level waste and will cost about 3 600 EURO to store. The conclusions of the report are that wet blasting is an indispensable way to treat contaminated components in modern nuclear power plants. The wet blasting equipment can be improved by using a robot enabling the operators to remotely treat components from the outer operator's positions. There they will benefit from better radiation protection thus further reduce their taken dose. The wet blasting equipment could also be used to better control the levels of radioactivity on

  9. 75 FR 10517 - Nebraska Public Power District, Cooper Nuclear Station; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-08

    ... significant effect on the quality of the human environment (75 FR 8153; February 23, 2010). This exemption is... COMMISSION Nebraska Public Power District, Cooper Nuclear Station; Exemption 1.0 Background Nebraska Public... authorizes operation of the Cooper Nuclear Station (CNS). The license provides, among other things, that...

  10. 75 FR 52997 - Nebraska Public Power District; Cooper Nuclear Station; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-30

    ... Register on March 27, 2009 (74 FR 13926-13993), effective May 26, 2009, with a full implementation date of... COMMISSION Nebraska Public Power District; Cooper Nuclear Station; Exemption 1.0 Background Nebraska Public... authorizes operation of the Cooper Nuclear Station (CNS). The license provides, among other things, that...

  11. Radiocarbon mass balance for a Magnox nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • First comprehensive assessment of C-14 arisings in a Magnox nuclear power station. • C-14 production in graphite and coolant gas quantified by activation modelling. • Principal C-14 production pathway is via C-13 with a small contribution from N-14. • C-14 mass balance model provides a basis for analyses on other reactors. - Abstract: Nuclear power generation in the United Kingdom is based principally on graphite-moderated gas-cooled reactors. The mass of irradiated graphite associated with these reactors, including material from associated experimental, prototype and plutonium production reactors, exceeds 96,000 tonnes. One of the principal long-lived radionuclides produced during graphite irradiation is radiocarbon (C-14). Its potential as a hazard must be taken into account in decommissioning and graphite waste management strategies. While C-14 production processes are well-understood, radionuclide distributions and concentrations need to be characterised. A common misconception is that generic statements can be made about C-14 precursors and their location. In fact, the composition of the original manufactured material, the chemical environment of the graphite during service and its irradiation history will all influence C-14 levels. The analysis presented here provides the first assessment of the principal C-14 activation pathways for a UK Magnox reactor. Activation modelling has been used to predict C-14 production rates in both the graphite core and the carbon dioxide coolant over a selected period of operation and the results compared with monitored site C-14 discharges. Principal activation routes have been identified, which should inform future graphite waste management strategies relating to radiocarbon

  12. Safety culture program for the Cofrentes nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    IBERDROLA (who is the owner of the Cofrentes NPS and shared other Spanish nuclear units) has paid careful attention through his nuclear safety and quality unit to safety and quality culture concepts and methodologies developed during the second half of the past decade and the beginning of the 90's. Moreover, a good management as well as work-men responsability and motivation should conform a good level of safety culture. We thus felt that we needed to combine a safety culture plan and a continuous quality improvement program so as to obtain the best possible safety and culture results. Consequently, IBERDROLA established a pilot program for his Cofrentes NPS in 1992 to drive for quality, as a top management policy, actively pursued by corporate and station managers. In summary, the pilot program consists of a 'Safety Culture Plan' which establishes the vision, mission, principles, global obj ectives and especific obj ectives and tasks, and of a 'continuous quality improvement plan' in which three phases have been set ut: phase I - learn to work as a team, fix the methodology and look for results; phase II - focused toward objectives, simplification and improvement of work processes, phase III - look toward supporting recommendations and achieving the policy goals. However, we may already say that we have preceived greater management and workmen involvement, better planning of significant issues and an improvement in the team-work environment. Nevertheless, we are in the process of changing certain mechanisms and ways of behaviour that we have detected as drawbacks in the past, in order to further improve in this area. (author)

  13. Economic and financial benefits as a compensation for living near a nuclear power station. A case study of Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although dwellers living near a nuclear power station are entitled to economic/financial benefits such as increased job opportunities and local tax revenues pertaining to the power station, it is not clear whether such benefits are appreciated by the dwellers. Two findings of this study based upon a social survey of local dwellers living near the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station are summarized as follows. First, an increase in the per capita sizes of the local tax revenue and national subsidies resulted in a larger share of respondents who thought that those revenues are beneficial. Therefore, local dwellers are aware of the sizes of economic/financial benefits. Second, given the same risk level of nuclear disaster, a larger per capita financial benefit resulted in a larger share of respondents who felt compensated for the nuclear risk. However, this increase in the number of compensated respondents is low relative to the increase in the amount of financial benefits. (author)

  14. Completion of Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station Unit No. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No. 4 plant in Kashiwazaki Kariwa Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. is a BWR plant in which the results of the LWR improvement and standardization project by Japanese independent technology were adopted. Hitachi Ltd. has applied the experiences of construction and operation obtained so far, the improved technology based on research and development and the latest technologies to it, in addition to the technology which was verified in the preceding No. 5 plant. In the aspect of the systems and facilities, the various improvements based on the experience in past plants were reflected from the initial stage of design. Also in the design techniques, the three-dimensional CAD system using the newest computer technology was applied to the layout and piping design, and the quality and efficiency of design were improved. In the aspect of construction, a crawler crane with the largest lifting capacity in the world was used, and the large section module method, by which large prefabricated machinery, equipment and piping are directly lifted in, was applied. By these means, the safety of workings was secured, the construction period was shortened, and the plant showed good, stable results in the trial, and started the commercial operation in August, 1994. No. 4 plant is a BWR plant of 1100 MW output. The applied new technologies and the contents of the improvement of the design and facilities are shown. The outline and the features of the construction works and the trial operation are reported. (K.I.)

  15. Simulator training and licensing examination for nuclear power station operator

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For the recruitment, training and position qualification of the simulator instructors and feedback of training effect, the management approaches are formulated in 'The System for Simulator Training and Licensing Examination of Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station Operators'. The concrete requirements on the professional knowledge, work experience and foreign language ability of a simulator instructor are put forward. The process of instructor training is designed. The training items include the trainer training, pedagogy training, time management training, operation activities training during outage of unit, 'shadow' training and on-the-jot training on simulator courses. Job rotation is realized between simulator instructor and licensing personnel on site. New simulator instructor must pass the qualification identification. After a duration of 2 years, re-qualification has to be carried out. On the basis of the operator training method introduced from EDF (electricite De France), some new courses are developed and the improvement on the initial training, retaining courses, the technical support and the experience feedback by using the simulator is done also. (authors)

  16. The Fukushima Nuclear Power Station incident and marine pollution

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the facts relating to the radioactive wastewater discharged by the Fukushima Nuclear Power Station in Japan, this paper intends to explore the international legal obligations for Japan from three perspectives, namely, the immediate notification, the prevention of transboundary harm and the prevention of dumping. Furthermore, this article defines and compares two types of international legal liabilities, the traditional state responsibility and the responsibility for transboundary harm. Through comparison, the international legal liability of Japan is discussed. After detailed analysis, the conclusion is that Japan should be responsible for the obligation of immediate notification and since Japan unilaterally discharge the wastes without prior specific permits of other contracting countries, it should also be responsible for the violation of prevention of dumping. Since so far, no material injury has emerged and there would appear to be no culpability as regards the prevention of transboundary harm. Finally, this paper stresses the necessity to develop a worldwide agreement concerning the liability for transboundary harm and to establish an institutional framework for the enforcement of a state’s obligations, and also the great significance of international cooperation between nations and organisations in relation to marine environmental protection.

  17. Technical Specifications, Catawba Nuclear Station, Unit Nos. 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-413 and 50-414). Appendix ''A'' to License Nos. NPF-35 and NPF-52

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These specifications cover: definitions, safety limits and limiting safety system settings, bases, limiting conditions for operation and surveillance requirements, design features, and administrative controls

  18. Technical Specifications, Catawba Nuclear Station, Unit Nos. 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-413 and 50-414). Appendix ''A'' to License Nos. NPF-35 and NPF-48

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    These specifications cover: definitions, safety limits and limiting safety system settings, bases, limiting conditions for operation and surveillance requirements, design features, and administrative controls

  19. Study of wet blasting of components in nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hall, J

    1999-12-01

    This report looks at the method of wet blasting radioactive components in nuclear power stations. The wet blaster uses pearl shaped glass beads with the dimensions of 150-250 {mu}m mixed with water as blasting media. The improved design, providing outer operator's positions with proper radiation protection and more efficient blasting equipment has resulted in a lesser dose taken by the operators. The main reason to decontaminate components in nuclear power plants is to enable service on these components. On components like valves, pump shafts, pipes etc. oxides form and bind radiation. These components are normally situated at some distance from the reactor core and will mainly suffer from radiation from so called activation products. When a component is to be decontaminated it can be decontaminated to a radioactive level where it will be declassified. This report has found levels ranging from 150-1000 Bq/kg allowing declassification of radioactive materials.This difference is found between different countries and different organisations. The report also looks at the levels of waste generated using wet blasting. This is done by tracking the contamination to determine where it collects. It is either collected in the water treatment plant or collected in the blasting media. At Barsebaeck the waste levels, from de-contaminating nearly 800 components in one year, results in a waste volume of about 0,250 m{sup 3}. This waste consists of low and medium level waste and will cost about 3 600 EURO to store. The conclusions of the report are that wet blasting is an indispensable way to treat contaminated components in modern nuclear power plants. The wet blasting equipment can be improved by using a robot enabling the operators to remotely treat components from the outer operator's positions. There they will benefit from better radiation protection thus further reduce their taken dose. The wet blasting equipment could also be used to better control the levels of

  20. The economic consequences of the Sizewell 'B' nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The subject is covered in chapters, entitled: introduction (the background to Sizewell 'B'); policy options (Sizewell 'B'; a new coal-fired station; the no-new-station option; a PWR programme); economic framework (direct effects; financing; final macroeconomic effects); the construction phase (capital costs; direct effects; final effects; summary); the operating phase (a new power station as a replacement for older stations; the period of base-load operation; the later years of operation; summary); conclusions and policy recommendations. The first recommendation is that if a new power station is built it should be a coal-fired station rather than a PWR. The second recommendation is that if a new coal station is built there is a case for building it early, ahead of demand. (U.K.)

  1. 75 FR 8757 - Nebraska Public Power District, Cooper Nuclear Station, Unit 1; Notice of Availability of the...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-25

    ... COMMISSION Nebraska Public Power District, Cooper Nuclear Station, Unit 1; Notice of Availability of the..., and Public Meetings for The License Renewal of Cooper Nuclear Station, Unit 1 Notice is hereby given... Cooper Nuclear Station, Unit 1 (CNS-1). CNS-1 is located near Brownville, Nebraska, on the Missouri...

  2. Commerical electric power cost studies. Capital cost addendum multi-unit coal and nuclear stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the culmination of a study performed to develop designs and associated capital cost estimates for multi-unit nuclear and coal commercial electric power stations, and to determine the distribution of these costs among the individual units. This report addresses six different types of 2400 MWe (nominal) multi-unit stations as follows: Two Unit PWR Station-1139 MWe Each, Two Unit BWR Station-1190 MWe Each, Two Unit High Sulfur Coal-Fired Station-1232 MWe Each, Two Unit Low Sulfur Coal-Fired Station-1243 MWe Each, Three Unit High Sulfur Coal-Fired Station-794 MWe Each, Three Unit Low Sulfur Coal-Fired Station-801 MWe Each. Recent capital cost studies performed for ERDA/NRC of single unit nuclear and coal stations are used as the basis for developing the designs and costs of the multi-unit stations. This report includes the major study groundrules, a summary of single and multi-unit stations total base cost estimates, details of cost estimates at the three digit account level and plot plan drawings for each multi-unit station identified

  3. 78 FR 45984 - Yankee Atomic Electric Company, Yankee Nuclear Power Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... COMMISSION Yankee Atomic Electric Company, Yankee Nuclear Power Station AGENCY: Nuclear Regulatory Commission... of Spent Fuel in NRC-Approved Storage Casks at Power Reactor Sites (55 FR 29181; July 18, 1990), the... on the site of any nuclear power reactor. In its Statement of Considerations (SOC) for the Final...

  4. Modern power station practice: incorporating modern power system practice. V. J: Nuclear power generation. 3. ed.

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contents of this new edition of the nuclear volume of Modern Power Station Practice reflect the considerable expansion and development of nuclear power generation in the UK since the initial volume was published in 1964. During that period the Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) programme has been completed, the approval of Sizewell B launches a new generation of Pressurized Water Reactor (PWR) stations and the first of the Magnox has completed its useful life. Thus the current volume presents a comprehensive picture of the design, development and operation of the majority of the nuclear station designs currently being operated throughout the world. Four independent but complementary chapters cover Nuclear physics and basic technology; Nuclear station design; Nuclear station operation and Nuclear safety. Although each chapter is complete within itself, some overlap of technical matter between the chapters is inevitable and indeed essential, reflecting the co-operation of widely differing technical disciplines necessary to ensure the safe and economic design and operation of nuclear stations. (Author)

  5. Ethanolamine experience at Koeberg nuclear power station, South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following testing of ethanolamine as an alternative to ammonia on Unit 2 in 1997, Unit 1 of the Koeberg Nuclear Power Station was converted to ethanolamine in 1998. The Unit has now operated for just over one and a half cycle on ETA. The decision to change to ETA was made to achieve further reductions in feedwater iron transport. Koeberg has always operated ammonia/hydrazine AVT control and ran the feedwater pH at 9.6-9.7 before the changeover. The original pH levels were increased in response to concerns over flow-accelerated corrosion. A by product of reducing the FAC rates is a reduction in iron transport. Although nominally all-ferrous, there are a number of small copper-containing components and the Koeberg Engineering Department would not countenance a further increase in ammonia concentrations in case of copper transport to the SGs. This led to ethanolamine being selected as an alternative to ammonia. The Koeberg condensate polishing plant has been modified, largely to accommodate ETA operation, but is not currently operable in the modified configuration. It is therefore on standby while ETA is implemented. The SG blowdown demineralizers have begun to be operated past ammonia/ETA break, but optimisation is largely dependent on CPP availability in the modified configuration. This paper documents the Koeberg experience to date of operation under an ethanolamine-AVT regime. As one of the few plants outside of the USA to have changed to ethanolamine, it is hoped we can make a valuable contribution for other non-US plants considering such a move. (authors)

  6. Standard concerning the design of nuclear power stations in earthquake-prone districts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The measures of security assurance against the effect of radioactive contamination has become more and more complex due to the construction of nuclear power stations of diverse types. The aseismatic measures for the nuclear power stations built in the districts where earthquakes of different intensity occur are important problems. All main machinery and equipments and emergency systems in power stations must be protected from earthquakes, and this makes the solution of problems difficult. At present in USSR, the provisional standard concerning the design of atomic energy facilities built in earthquake-prone districts is completed. The basic philosophy of the standard is to decide the general requirements as the conditions for the design of nuclear power stations built in earthquake-prone districts. The lowest earthquake activity in the construction districts is considered as magnitude 4, and in the districts where earthquake activity is magnitude 9 or more, the construction of nuclear power stations is prohibited. Two levels of earthquake action are specified for the design: design earthquake and the largest design earthquake. The construction sites of nuclear power stations must be 15 to 150 km distant from the potential sources of earthquakes. Nuclear power stations are regarded as the aseismatically guaranteed type when the safety of reactors is secured under the application of the standard. The buildings and installations are classified into three classes regarding the aseismatic properties. (Kako, I.)

  7. Welding of stainless steel pool of pressurized water reactor nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The construction of stainless steel lining of million kilowatt grade pressurized water reactor nuclear power station is a new technology. The author introduces its welding method, parameter verification measure and key factors of construction quality control and so on

  8. Research and development activities for cleanup of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station

    OpenAIRE

    佐々木 紀樹; 上西 修司; 宮本 泰明; 船坂 英之

    2013-01-01

    The Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident and restoration works have produced significant volume of radioactive waste. The waste has very different characteristics from usual radioactive waste produced in nuclear power stations and it requires extensive research and development for management of the waste. R&D works such as radionuclide analysis of the waste, hydrogen generation/diffusion analysis of a storage vessel, corrosion evaluation of storage vessels, etc. have been performe...

  9. Education and training of operators and maintenance staff at Hamaoka Nuclear Power Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station, in order to ensure higher safety and reliability of plant operation, education and training is provided consistently, on a comprehensive basis, for all operating, maintenance and other technical staff, aimed at developing more capable human resources in the nuclear power division. To this end, Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station has the 'Nuclear Training Center' on its site. The training center provides the technical personnel including operators and maintenance personnel with practical training, utilizing simulators for operation training and the identical facilities with those at the real plant. Thus, it plays a central role in promoting comprehensive education and training concerning nuclear power generation. Our education system covers knowledge and skills necessary for the safe and stable operation of nuclear power plant, targeting new employees to managerial personnel. It is also organized systematically in accordance with experience and job level. We will report the present education and training of operators and maintenance personnel at Hamaoka Nuclear Training Center. (author)

  10. AECB staff annual assessment of the Bruce B Nuclear Generating Station for the year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Energy Control Board is the independent federal agency that controls all nuclear activities in Canada. A major use of nuclear energy in Canada is electricity production. The AECB assesses every station's performance against legal requirements, including the conditions in the operating licence. Each station is inspected and all aspects of the station's operation and management is reviewed. This report is the AECB staff assessment of reactor safety at the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station B for 1996. It was concluded that Ontario Hydro operated Bruce B safely in 1996. Although the Bruce B plant is safe,it was noted that the number of outages and the number of secondary and tertiary equipment failures during reactor unit upsets increased. Ontario Hydro needs to pay special attention to prevent such a decrease in the safety performance at Bruce B

  11. AECB staff annual assessment of the Bruce A Nuclear Generating Station for the year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Energy Control Board is the independent federal agency that controls all nuclear activities in Canada. A major use of nuclear energy in Canada is electricity production. The AECB assesses every station's performance against legal requirements, including the conditions in the operating licence. Each station is inspected and all aspects of the station's operation and management is reviewed. This report is the AECB staff assessment of reactor safety at the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station A for 1996. Ontario Hydro operated Bruce A safely in 1996, maintaining the risk to workers and the public at an acceptably low level. Special safety system performance at Bruce A was adequate. Availability targets were all met. Improvement is needed to reduce the number of operating licence non-compliances

  12. The duty health physicist program at Byron Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Duty Health Physicist Program at Byron Station was established to deal with routine health physics tasks and provide an interface between frontline and upper radiation-chemistry management. The program consists of a weekly rotation of selected members of the health physics staff into the duty health physicist position to handle the assigned duty tasks. The tasks include, but are not limited to, daily isotopic and air sample review, effluent release package review, maximum permissible concentration calculations, dose approvals, as-low-as-reasonably-achievable action review of pending jobs, and general availability to answer questions and address problems in health-physics-related areas of plant operation. The daily attendance of the duty health physicist at the radiation-chemistry and station plan-of-the-day meetings has increased the overall presence and visibility of the health physics program to upper station management and other station departments. Since its inception in July of 1985, the Duty Health Physics Program has been a major contributor to the observed 50% reduction in reportable personnel errors in the radiation-chemistry department (based on personnel-error-related deviation reports and license event reports generated on the radiation-chemistry department at Byron Station). Although difficulty to quantify, other important benefits of this program are also discussed in this paper

  13. 77 FR 52765 - Dominion Nuclear Connecticut, Inc. Millstone Power Station, Unit 3; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-30

    ... Millstone Power Station Unit 1, a permanently defueled boiling water reactor nuclear unit, and Millstone...-water nuclear power reactors,'' requires that each power reactor meet the acceptance criteria for ECCS... Reactions at High Temperatures, III. Experimental and Theoretical Studies of the Zirconium-Water...

  14. 77 FR 26318 - Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC., Oconee Nuclear Station, Units 1, 2, and 3 Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-05-03

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC., Oconee Nuclear Station, Units 1, 2, and 3 Exemption 1.0 Background Duke Energy Carolinas, LLC (the licensee) is the holder of Renewed Facility Operating Licenses...

  15. Operating Nuclear Power Stations in a Regulated Cyber Security Environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dorman, E.

    2014-07-01

    The United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) issued 10CFR73.54 to implement a regulated Cyber Security Program at each operating nuclear reactor facility. Milestones were implemented December 31, 2012 to mitigate the attack vectors for the most critical digital assets acknowledged by the industry and the NR C. The NRC inspections have begun. The nuclear Cyber Security Plan, implemented by the site Cyber Security Program (Program), is an element of the operating license at each facility. (Author)

  16. Aseismic design of the Heysham II Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief description of the seismic criteria established for use with the Steam Generating Heavy Water Reactor (SCHWR) and taken for the Heysham II Project is given. The qualification strategy adopted for Heysham II is described, and a brief overview is given of some of the more important design changes required for seismic purposes on that station

  17. Review of Cytogenetic analysis of restoration workers for Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suto, Yumiko

    2016-09-01

    Japan faced with the nuclear accident of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (NPS) caused by the combined disaster of the Great East Japan Earthquake and the subsequent tsunamis on 11 March 2011. National Institute of Radiological Sciences received all nuclear workers who were engaged in emergency response tasks at the NPS and suspected of being overexposed to acute radiation. Biological dosimetry by dicentric chromosome assay was helpful for medical triage and management of the workers.

  18. 76 FR 72007 - ZionSolutions, LLC; Zion Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2; Exemption From Certain Security...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-11-21

    ... COMMISSION ZionSolutions, LLC; Zion Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2; Exemption From Certain Security Requirements 1.0 Background Zion Nuclear Power Station (ZNPS or Zion), Unit 1, is a Westinghouse 3250 MWt... activities in nuclear power reactors against radiological sabotage,'' paragraph (b)(1) states, ``The...

  19. 78 FR 79017 - Zion Solutions, LLC; Zion Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2; Exemption From Certain Physical...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-27

    ... COMMISSION Zion Solutions, LLC; Zion Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2; Exemption From Certain Physical Security Requirements 1.0 Background Zion Nuclear Power Station (ZNPS) Units 1 and 2 were permanently shut... ``Requirements for physical protection of licensed activities in nuclear power reactors against...

  20. 76 FR 81542 - In the Matter of ZIONSOLUTIONS, LLC; Zion Nuclear Power Station; Independent Spent Fuel Storage...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-12-28

    ... COMMISSION In the Matter of ZIONSOLUTIONS, LLC; Zion Nuclear Power Station; Independent Spent Fuel Storage..., Licensing and Inspection Directorate, Division of Spent Fuel Storage and Transportation, Office of Nuclear... providing notice, in the matter of Zion Nuclear ] Power Station Independent Spent Fuel Storage...

  1. 77 FR 11168 - In the Matter of Exelon Corporation; Constellation Energy Group, Inc.; Nine Mile Nuclear Station...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-24

    ... Exelon Corporation; Constellation Energy Group, Inc.; Nine Mile Nuclear Station, LLC; Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2; Order Approving Application Regarding Proposed Corporate Merger and... Ventures), and Constellation Energy Nuclear Group, LLC (CENG), acting on behalf of itself, and the...

  2. US central station nuclear electric generating units: significant milestones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Listings of US nuclear power plants include significant dates, reactor type, owners, and net generating capacity. Listings are made by state, region, and utility. Tabulations of status, schedules, and orders are also presented

  3. Natural Disasters and Safety Risks at Nuclear Power Stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tutnova, T.

    2012-04-01

    In the aftermath of Fukushima natural-technological disaster the global opinion on nuclear energy divided even deeper. While Germany, Italy and the USA are currently reevaluating their previous plans on nuclear growth, many states are committed to expand nuclear energy output. In China and France, where the industry is widely supported by policymakers, there is little talk about abandoning further development of nuclear energy. Moreover, China displays the most remarkable pace of nuclear development in the world: it is responsible for 40% of worldwide reactors under construction, and aims at least to quadruple its nuclear capacity by 2020. In these states the consequences of Fukushima natural-technological accident will probably result in safety checks and advancement of new reactor technologies. Thus, China is buying newer reactor design from the USA which relies on "passive safety systems". It means that emergency power generators, crucial for reactor cooling in case of an accident, won't depend on electricity, so that tsunami won't disable them like it happened in the case of Fukushima. Nuclear energy managed to draw lessons from previous nuclear accidents where technological and human factors played crucial role. But the Fukushima lesson shows that the natural hazards, nevertheless, were undervalued. Though the ongoing technological advancements make it possible to increase the safety of nuclear power plants with consideration of natural risks, it is not just a question of technology improvement. A necessary action that must be taken is the reevaluation of the character and sources of the potential hazards which natural disasters can bring to nuclear industry. One of the examples is a devastating impact of more than one natural disaster happening at the same time. This subject, in fact, was not taken into account before, while it must be a significant point in planning sites for new nuclear power plants. Another important lesson unveiled is that world nuclear

  4. Training of technical staff for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nine papers presented at the Seminar are printed. All are indexed separately. Two of the papers cover the facilities and training programmes for British naval personnel operating powered submarines. Four are concerned with the Central Electicity Board's training of nuclear power plant personnel, one specifically for the Hinckley Point-B reactor. Italian and Swedish nuclear power plant operator training programmes are reviewed in the other two papers. (U.K.)

  5. AECB staff annual assessment of the Point Lepreau Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Energy Control Board is the independent federal agency that controls all nuclear activities in Canada. A major use of nuclear energy in Canada is electricity production. The AECB assesses every station's performance against legal requirements, including the conditions in the operating licence. Each station is inspected and all aspects of the station's operation and management is reviewed. This report is the AECB staff assessment of reactor safety at the Point Lepreau Generating Station in 1996. Point Lepreau operated safely but the worsening trends in NB Power's safety performance leads to the conclusion that urgent action is required. NB Power is required to report formally to the AECB on progress with measures to improve safety management every six months. Further licensing action will be taken on NB Power if it fails to make the improvements

  6. Spare parts procurement program for Byron/Braidwood Nuclear Power Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper outlines the engineering effort being undertaken for Byron/Braidwood Nuclear Power Station to develop a comprehensive Spare Parts Procurement Program which will significantly reduce the maintenance costs associated with the Plants' safety-related components. The Byron and Braidwood Nuclear Power Stations are owned and operated by Commonwealth Edison Company (CECO), Chicago, Illinois. Each station consists of two Westinghouse, Four Loop PWR units, with 1176 MW gross electrical output for each unit. The two stations are identical in design, except for the ultimate heat sink. Byron utilizes cooling towers, whereas Braidwood uses a cooling lake. This paper describes the reasons behind this effort, the objectives, and the approach adopted to accomplishing the goals

  7. Developing the concept of maintenance and repairs in projects of power units for new-generation nuclear power stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gurinovich, V. D.; Yanchenko, Yu. A.

    2012-05-01

    Results from conceptual elaboration of individual requirements for the system of maintenance and repairs that must be implemented in the projects of new-generation nuclear power stations are presented taking as an example the power unit project for a nuclear power station equipped with a standard optimized VVER reactor with enhanced information support (the so-called VVER TOI reactor). Implementation of these concepts will help to achieve competitiveness of such nuclear power stations in the domestic and international markets.

  8. Development of a risk-informed safety management system at the Gentilly-2 Nuclear Generating Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komljenovic, D.; Hotte, G.; Beaudet, M. [Hydro-Quebec, Nuclear Generating Station Gentilly-2, Gentilly, Quebec (Canada)], E-mail: komljenovic.dragan@hydro.qc.ca

    2009-07-01

    The paper presents an overview regarding current and future activities related to the management of safety and regulatory framework at the Gentilly-2 Nuclear Generating Station. The paper discusses alignment of these activities with the best Canadian and international practices. It also proposes manners to develop a consistent risk-informed safety management system. The paper takes particularly into consideration the impact of this new framework on the refurbishment project, and the operations after the refurbishment of the station. (author)

  9. Information management for nuclear power stations: System Design Concept

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A study of the information management structure required to support nuclear power plant construction was performed by a joint university-industry group under the sponsorship of the Department of Energy (DOE), formerly the Energy Research and Development Administration (ERDA). The purpose of this study was (1) to study methods for the control of information during the construction and start-up of nuclear power plants, and (2) identify those data elements intrinsic to nuclear power plants which must be maintained in a structured format for quick access and retrieval. Maintenance of the massive amount of data needed for control of a nuclear project during design, procurement, construction, start-up/testing, and operational phases requires a structuring which allows immediate update and retrieval based on a wide variety of access criteria. The objective of the research described has been to identify design concepts which support the development of an information control system responsive to these requirements. A conceptual design of a Management Information Data Base System which can meet the project control and information exchange needs of today's large nuclear power plant construction projects has been completed and an approach recommended for development and implementation of a complete operational system

  10. Quality assurance for nuclear power stations in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The quality assurance programmes of the Japanese industry show some special features, both in the nuclear field and in non-nuclear technology. Among them e.g. the meticulous care given by Japanese workers to their work and duties, and the high training level and skill of employees in the development and other departments. Another important feature is the common practice of Japanese firms, to guarantee lifetime employment to workers and employees. The quality assurance programme for nuclear power plants covers such aspects as basic design features, detailed planning and construction, fuel element fabrication, basic research, licensing and operation. The responsibility for efficient execution of the programmes lies with the administration, the utilities, the suppliers, as well as all other contractors to a project. The tasks to be fulfilled by organisations, firms, etc., are briefly explained. (orig./HSCH)

  11. Slovak power stations, Nuclear Power Plants Mochovce (Annual report 1997)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Nuclear power plants Mochovce in 1997 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (1) Director's foreword; (2) Power plant management; (3) Highlights of 1997; (4) Capital construction; (5) Nuclear safety; (6) Radiation safety; (7) Work safety and health protection at work; (9) Fire protection; (10) Units upgrading - safety measures; (11) Maintenance; (12) Operation; (13) Environmental impacts of operations; (14) List of balances; (15) Human sources; (16) International co-operation; (17) Public relations

  12. Education and training of operators and maintenance staff at commercial nuclear power stations in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Safe and stable operation of a nuclear power station requires personnel fostering. In Japan, with the objectives of systematically securing qualified people for a long period of time, and maintaining and improving their skills and knowledge, the utilities have created strict personnel training plans, for continuous education and training. Concrete examples of education and training for operators and maintenance personnel at commercial nuclear power stations in Japan, such as education systems training, facility and contents of curriculum, are detailed including some related matters. Recent activities to catch up with environment changes surrounding education and training of operators and maintenance staff are also mentioned. (author)

  13. Results of INPO management review of nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Managing a nuclear plant might well be the toughest industrial job in the United States today. Everyday, nuclear plant managers must deal with the twin concerns of producing megawatts reliably and protecting the safety of the plant personnel and the public. A nuclear plant manager must possess a combination of special technical and managerial skills to do his job well. He also must be supported fully and actively by his utility's corporate management and organization. For more than five years, INPO teams have observed nuclear plant performance and on-site management. For nearly three years, we have been looking at corporate management support. The authors review the results of these plant and corporate evaluations from a management standpoint. More specifically, they look at two areas: One, how and why INPO evaluates plant performance and plant and corporate management, and two, what INPO evaluators have been during these evaluations. Or, to put it another way, what are the characteristics of good management at the best plants we've visited, and what are the areas for improvement that INPO sees most often

  14. Decontamination of control rod housing from Palisades Nuclear Power Station.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaminski, M.D.; Nunez, L.; Purohit, A.

    1999-05-03

    Argonne National Laboratory has developed a novel decontamination solvent for removing oxide scales formed on ferrous metals typical of nuclear reactor piping. The decontamination process is based on the properties of the diphosphonic acids (specifically 1-hydroxyethane-1,1-diphosphonic acid or HEDPA) coupled with strong reducing-agents (e.g., sodium formaldehyde sulfoxylate, SFS, and hydroxylamine nitrate, HAN). To study this solvent further, ANL has solicited actual stainless steel piping material that has been recently removed from an operating nuclear reactor. On March 3, 1999 ANL received segments of control rod housing from Consumers Energy's Palisades Nuclear Plant (Covert, MI) containing radioactive contamination from both neutron activation and surface scale deposits. Palisades Power plant is a PWR type nuclear generating plant. A total of eight segments were received. These segments were from control rod housing that was in service for about 6.5 years. Of the eight pieces that were received two were chosen for our experimentation--small pieces labeled Piece A and Piece B. The wetted surfaces (with the reactor's pressurized water coolant/moderator) of the pieces were covered with as a scale that is best characterized visually as a smooth, shiny, adherent, and black/brown in color type oxide covering. This tenacious oxide could not be scratched or removed except by aggressive mechanical means (e.g., filing, cutting).

  15. Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station five-year business plan and operating results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guangdong Nuclear Power Joint Venture Company, Ltd. first 5-Year Business Plan (hereinafter referred to as 5-Year Business Plan) serves as guidance of both the operations and management of the company. Continuous performance improvement of the nuclear power station has been achieved through the fulfillment of goals and improvement plan defined by the 5-Year Business Plan, and through standard and systematic management. Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station (GNPS) has made great contributions to sustainable economic developments of both Guangdong and Hong Kong since its commercial operation in 1994. As of the end of 1999, the cumulative off-take electricity generated by GNPS had reached 69.9 billion kWh. Of the WANO indicators universally applied by nuclear power industry throughout the world, 6 indicators of Daya Bay performance entered the world top quartile while 9 the medium level

  16. Retrieval of Intermediate Level Waste at Trawsfyndd Nuclear Power Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wall, S.; Shaw, I.

    2002-02-25

    In 1996 RWE NUKEM Limited were awarded two contracts by BNFL Magnox Generation as part of the decommissioning programme for the Trawsfynydd power station. From the normal operations of the two Magnox reactors, intermediate level waste (ILW) had accumulated on site, this was Miscellaneous Activated Components (MAC) and Fuel Element Debris (FED). The objective of these projects is retrieval of the waste from storage vaults, monitoring, packaging and immobilization in a form suitable for on site storage in the medium term and eventual disposal to a waste repository. The projects involve the design, supply, commissioning and operation of equipment to retrieve, pack and immobilize the waste, this includes recovery from vaults in both reactor and pond locations and final decommissioning and removal of plant from site after completion of waste recovery.

  17. Review of 12-hour shifts at nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This project reviewed the practice of 12-hour shift work schedules at nuclear power plants, and its relationship to safety. The current literature was examined for information on accidents, fatigue and personal preferences. Interviews with operators and maintainers showed that these groups had attitude and preference differences related to both 12 hour shift schedules and overtime work opportunities. Several factors related to 12-hour schedules were identified which could affect safety, but which have not been adequately considered. (24 refs.)

  18. Health physics training at V.C. Summer Nuclear Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Health Physics training for radiation workers and Health Physics Specialists continues to receive full attention by regulatory agencies such as the NRC and ANI. Guidance for such training continues to develop in a direction which forces utilities to continuously increase the quality and quantity of their Health Physics Training Program. This occurs at a time when our rapidly growing industry is placing greatly increased demands on the available work force of highly trained nuclear workers

  19. Reliability-centered maintenance in nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes experiences in implementing RCM programs within the nuclear power group. It addresses how this engineered approach provided more direction for predictive maintenance efforts, and a better application of personnel, skills, and limited maintenance dollars. This has resulted in cost savings in terms of plant availability, lessened radiation exposure of staff, and intangibles among other areas. Payback times of such programs are on the level of one year at present

  20. Indicators for monitoring of safety operation and condition of nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A common goal of all employees in the nuclear power field is safety operation of nuclear power stations. The evaluation and control of NPP safety operation are a part of the elements of safety management. The present report is related only to a part of the total assessment and control of the plant safety operation, namely - the indicator system for monitoring of Kozloduy NPP operation and condition. (author)

  1. Avian radioecology on a nuclear power station site. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Levy, C.K.; Maletskos, C.J.; Youngstrom, K.A.

    1975-01-01

    A summary of a six-year avian radioecology study at the site of a nuclear power plant in Massachusetts is reported. A completed historical summary is followed by a description of mathematical models developed to calculate the effects on bird body burdens of various changes in environmental radionuclide levels. Examples are presented. Radionuclide metabolism studies in which acute doses of /sup 131/I and /sup 137/Cs were administered to four species of wild birds are presented. Radionuclides were administered both intravenously and orally; no apparent differences in uptake or elimination rates were observed between the two methods.

  2. Development of expert evaluation system for advanced nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The wheels of the nuclear power industry in China are going to roll on the fast rails soon: It is important to establish an expert evaluation system for optimally selecting new types of NPPs in the future based on scientific evaluation. Under such a background, an expert evaluation system is developed to evaluate Various types of NPPs for the following two decades by taking into account the advices of selected top specialists in Chinese nuclear power industry, and by adopting different evaluation methods. The evaluation system is designed to use the database-MS-SQL Server or Oracle for manipulating experts' knowledge and objective data for scaling NPPs by user-selected evaluation methods for evaluating NPPs. The system includes two subsystems: one is called the Data Management Module and the other called the Evaluation Arithmetic Module. The Data Management Module is used to manage expert knowledge in forms of item marks of the NPPs given by experts of nuclear engineering. The Evaluation Arithmetic Module is used to analyze and deal with the evaluation based on the data in the Database by certain designed evaluation method, and to provide the evaluation results. Based on the users' selection, the evaluation of the NPPs is processed, and the results can be dynamically listed in table or displayed in graphics. So it can be used as a consulting tool to help users make optimal selection of prospective NPPs. The system is developed in architecture of the mixture framework C/S(Client/Server) and B/S(Browse/Server), thus is safe, advanced, extensible and user- friendly. The present system is computer network based, so it can be used not only in personal PC and local network, but also in the Web Server which can be browsed by remote users. To develop such an evaluation system is an initiative R and D project in Chinese nuclear R and D activities. Although the evaluation system is far from perfect, however, the preliminary evaluation results produced by the evaluation

  3. Construction and preoperational test of Kashiwasaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station Unit No. 6

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Natsume, Nobuo; Noda, Hiroshi [Tokyo Electric Power Co. (Japan)

    1996-12-31

    Unit 6 of the Kashiwazaki-Kariwa nuclear power station of Tokyo Electric Power Company, the world`s first advanced boiling water reactor (ABWR), is progressing ahead of the originally established schedule since the start of its construction in September 1991, and commercial operation is scheduled to start before the end of 1996.

  4. 75 FR 8153 - Nebraska Public Power District; Cooper Nuclear Station Environmental Assessment and Finding of No...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... March 27, 2009 (74 FR 13926). There will be no change to radioactive effluents that affect radiation... impact [Part 73, Power Reactor Security Requirements, 74 FR 13926 (March 27, 2009)]. The NRC staff's... COMMISSION Nebraska Public Power District; Cooper Nuclear Station Environmental Assessment and Finding of...

  5. Cause analysis of cracks in circulating water culvert of Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In view of the widespread cracks discovered in the reinforced-concrete circulating water culvert of Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station, cause analysis for the cracks is made in terms of construction and design. It is concluded that the cracks mainly resulted from shrinkage and temperature. Corresponding countermeasures are put forward thereafter for reference of similar projects

  6. The integral lifting of sky-dome of 2RX security cover of nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The experiences of the integral lifting of sky-dome of 2RX security cover, weighted 170.5 tons, in the second period construction of Qinshan Nuclear Power Station is introduced, especially in four aspects of preparing jobs of lifting, simulating lifting, testing lifting, and formal lifting

  7. Ageing and life-time management in nuclear power stations - concept and examples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Knowledge, assessment and understanding of phenomena caused by ageing, together with systematic utilization and extension of the technical life-time of components and systems, are of critical importance to the safety and economy of electricity generation in nuclear power stations. Economic use can be optimized by integrated ageing and life-time management; it can also be used to improve performance characteristics. (orig.)

  8. Childhood cancer mortality in relation to the St Lucie nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An unusual county-wide excess of childhood cancers of brain and other nervous tissue in the late 1990s in St Lucie County, Florida, prompted the Florida Department of Health to conduct a case-control study within the county assessing residential chemical exposures. No clear associations were found, but claims were then made that the release of radioactive substances such as strontium 90 from the St Lucie nuclear power station, which began operating in 1976, might have played a role. To test the plausibility of this hypothesis, we extended by 17 years a previous study of county mortality conducted by the National Cancer Institute. Rates of total cancer, leukaemia and cancer of brain and other nervous tissue in children and across all ages in St Lucie County were evaluated with respect to the years before and after the nuclear power station began operation and contrasted with rates in two similar counties in Florida (Polk and Volusia). Over the prolonged period 1950-2000, no unusual patterns of childhood cancer mortality were found for St Lucie County as a whole. In particular, no unusual patterns of childhood cancer mortality were seen in relation to the start-up of the St Lucie nuclear power station in 1976. Further, there were no significant differences in mortality between the study and comparison counties for any cancer in the time period after the power station was in operation. Relative rates for all childhood cancers and for childhood leukaemia were higher before the nuclear facility began operating than after, while rates of brain and other nervous tissue cancer were slightly lower in St Lucie County than in the two comparison counties for both time periods. Although definitive conclusions cannot be drawn from descriptive studies, these data provide no support for the hypothesis that the operation of the St Lucie nuclear power station has adversely affected the cancer mortality experience of county residents

  9. Seismic risk assessment as applied to the Zion Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assist the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) in its licensing and evaluation role, the NRC funded the Seismic Safety Margins Research Program (SSMRP) at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) with the goal of developing tools and data bases to evaluate the risk of earthquake caused radioactive release from a commercial nuclear power plant. This paper describes the SSMRP risk assessment methodology and the results generated by applying this methodology to the Zion Nuclear Generating Station. In addition to describing the failure probabilities and risk values, the effects of assumptions about plant configuration, plant operation, and dependence will be given

  10. Technology, Safety and Costs of Decommissioning Nuclear Reactors At Multiple-Reactor Stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wittenbrock, N. G.

    1982-01-01

    Safety and cost information is developed for the conceptual decommissioning of large (1175-MWe) pressurized water reactors (PWRs) and large (1155-MWe) boiling water reactors {BWRs) at multiple-reactor stations. Three decommissioning alternatives are studied: DECON (immediate decontamination), SAFSTOR (safe storage followed by deferred decontamination), and ENTOMB (entombment). Safety and costs of decommissioning are estimated by determining the impact of probable features of multiple-reactor-station operation that are considered to be unavailable at a single-reactor station, and applying these estimated impacts to the decommissioning costs and radiation doses estimated in previous PWR and BWR decommissioning studies. The multiple-reactor-station features analyzed are: the use of interim onsite nuclear waste storage with later removal to an offsite nuclear waste disposal facility, the use of permanent onsite nuclear waste disposal, the dedication of the site to nuclear power generation, and the provision of centralized services. Five scenarios for decommissioning reactors at a multiple-reactor station are investigated. The number of reactors on a site is assumed to be either four or ten; nuclear waste disposal is varied between immediate offsite disposal, interim onsite storage, and immediate onsite disposal. It is assumed that the decommissioned reactors are not replaced in one scenario but are replaced in the other scenarios. Centralized service facilities are provided in two scenarios but are not provided in the other three. Decommissioning of a PWR or a BWR at a multiple-reactor station probably will be less costly and result in lower radiation doses than decommissioning an identical reactor at a single-reactor station. Regardless of whether the light water reactor being decommissioned is at a single- or multiple-reactor station: • the estimated occupational radiation dose for decommissioning an LWR is lowest for SAFSTOR and highest for DECON • the estimated

  11. Sodium coolant purification systems for a nuclear power station equipped with a BN-1200 reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseev, V. V.; Kovalev, Yu. P.; Kalyakin, S. G.; Kozlov, F. A.; Kumaev, V. Ya.; Kondrat'ev, A. S.; Matyukhin, V. V.; Pirogov, E. P.; Sergeev, G. P.; Sorokin, A. P.; Torbenkova, I. Yu.

    2013-05-01

    Both traditional coolant purification methods (by means of traps and sorbents for removing cesium), the use of which supported successful operation of nuclear power installations equipped with fast-neutron reactors with a sodium coolant, and the possibility of removing oxygen from sodium through the use of hot traps are analyzed in substantiating the purification system for a nuclear power station equipped with a BN-1200 reactor. It is shown that a cold trap built into the reactor vessel must be a mandatory component of the reactor plant primary coolant circuit's purification system. The use of hot traps allows oxygen to be removed from the sodium coolant down to permissible concentrations when the nuclear power station operates in its rated mode. The main lines of works aimed at improving the performance characteristics of cold traps are suggested based on the results of performed investigations.

  12. Swedish approaches to radiation protection at nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper compares Swedish health physics programs at nuclear power plants to U.S. programs. Analysis of the Swedish programs includes examination of health physics staff training, size and longevity. Health physics practices are discussed, especially practices during refueling outages. The paper is based on site visits to Ringhals and Oskarshamn by U.S. radiation protection managers in October, 1995, under the sponsorship of the North American Regional Technical Center, ISOE, NEA/IAEA. The reactor vessel decontamination at Oskarshamn 1 BWR is discussed including good health physics practices and radiological results. Ringhals unique management organization is discussed with respect to health physics division of responsibilities and differences between in-plant and on-site health physics groups. Analytical results of failed fuel events at Ringhals is also presented including the observed occurrence of cobalt knock-off. Finally, trends in Swedish plants collective doses are summarized. Comprehensive Swedish studies of potential collective doses over the next 20 years are discussed including management options related to dose reduction options

  13. Nuclear stations: a sufficient safety standard and no demand for immediate outage, according to ASN

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The complementary safety assessments (CSA) that have been made for each nuclear station have shown, according to the ASN (French Nuclear Safety Authority), first that all nuclear power plants have a sufficient safety standard and secondly that some solutions exist to increase the safety margin. The ASN proposes: -) the setting of new measures, adapted to each nuclear plant for assuring the basic safety requirements in case of extreme situations as described in CSA; -) the setting of a force made of qualified teams and equipment to intervene on a nuclear accident very quickly; -) the reinforcing of dispositions for avoiding the dewatering of fuels in spent fuel pools; -) the carrying out of feasibility studies for reinforcing the protection of underground and surface waters in case of a major accident. (A.C.)

  14. The Wm. H. Zimmer Nuclear Power Station: Draft environmental statement (Docket No. 50-358)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed action is the issuance of an operating license to the Cincinnati Gas and Electric Company, the Columbus and Southern Ohio Electric Company, and the Dayton Power and Light Company for the startup and operation of the Wm. H. Zimmer Nuclear Power Station (Docket No. 50-358) (the station), located on the Ohio River in Clermont County, about 24 miles southeast of Cincinnati, Ohio. The information in this statement represents the second assessment of the environmental impact associated with the Zimmer Nuclear Power Station pursuant to the guidelines of the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and 10 CFR Part 51 of the Commission's Regulations. After receipt of an application in 1970 to construct this plant, the staff carried out a review of impact that would occur during the plant's construction and operation. This evaluation was issued as a final environmental statement in September 1972. As the result of this environmental review, a safety review, an evaluation by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards, and a public hearing in Cincinnati, Ohio, the AEC (now NRC) issued a permit in October 1972 for the construction of Unit 1 of the Zimmer Nuclear Power Station. As of June 1976, the construction of the plant was 54% complete. With a proposed fuel-loading data of April 1978, the applicant has petitioned for license to operate Unit 1 and has submitted (September 1975) the required safety and environmental reports to substantiate this petition. 96 refs., 17 figs., 34 tabs

  15. AECB staff annual assessment of the Bruce B Nuclear Generating Station for the year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) staff assessment of reactor safety at the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station B for 1995. Our on-site Project Officers and Ottawa-based specialists monitored the station during the year. AECB staff conclude that Ontario Hydro operated Bruce B safely in 1995. Radiation doses to workers and the public were well below the legal limits and remained well within Ontario Hydro's internal targets. Worker radiation doses increased slightly but were comparable to previous years. 7 tabs., 3 figs

  16. Standardization of the method of evaluating aseismatic capability of the ground for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    As for the ground for nuclear power stations, it is required to carry out high reliable construction based on the analysis and design by detailed investigation and test and reliable procedure. The fundamental policy is shown in ''Guide for aseismatic design examination regarding power reactor facilities'' decided by Japan Society of Civil Engineers, and ''Guide for safety examination regarding geological features and ground for nuclear power stations'' decided by the Committee on Examination of Nuclear Reactor Safety. However, geological features and ground are diverse, accordingly, it is significant to systematize the relation among investigation, test, analysis, evaluation, design and construction for the works of civil engineers and for obtaining the understanding and trust of people. The Ground Subcommittee was organized in September, 1979, and concluded the examination in March, 1984. The result is ''Method of investigation and test of geological features and ground, and method of evaluating aseismatic stability of ground for nuclear power stations''. The contents are general remarks, the method of investigating geological features, the method of investigating and testing ground, and the method of evaluating aseismatic stability of foundation ground for reactor buildings, surrounding slopes and important outdoor structures. (Kako, I.)

  17. Electrical system design and reliability at Ontario Hydro nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper provides an overview of design practice and the predicted and actual reliability of electrical station service Systems at Ontario Nuclear Generating Stations. Operational experience and licensing changes have indicated the desirability of improving reliability in certain instances. For example, the requirement to start large emergency coolant injection pumps resulted in the turbine generator units in a multi-unit station being used as a back-up power supply. Results of reliability analyses are discussed. To mitigate the effects of common mode events Ontario Hydro adopted a 'two group' approach to the design of safety related Systems. This 'two group' approach is reviewed and a single fully environmentally qualified standby power supply is proposed for future use. (author)

  18. Computerized training program usage at the Fort Calhoun Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The increased US Nuclear Regulatory Commission and Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) interest in the nuclear power industry training programs resulted in the Omaha Public Power District staff at the Fort Calhoun Nuclear Power Station investigating the potential for computerizing their recently accredited training records, student training requirements, and the process of determining student certification status. Additional areas that were desirable were a computerized question data bank with random test generation, maintaining history of question usage, and tracking of the job task analysis process and course objectives. SCI Software's online personnel training information management system (OPTIM) was selected, subsequent to a bid evaluation, to provide these features while operating on the existing corporate IBM mainframe

  19. Subsea nuclear power generating stations for offshore oil production operations. Preliminary safety and licensing information document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1977-02-15

    This document presents preliminary safety and licensing information relating to the manufacture, installation, and operation of small subsea nuclear generating stations in remote offshore locations, and the associated onshore base-site activities of reactor refueling and system refurbishment at 4-year intervals. The purpose of the proposed facilities is to provide a subsea power capability for offshore oil production operations in areas where surface conditions, water depths, or other environmental constraints may preclude the use of surface-mounted power sources. This will provide the capability to achieve the maximum recovery of petroleum resources from the U.S. frontier areas. Summary descriptions of a typical subsea nuclear generating station and a typical base site-facility are presented. General safety and licensing considerations are discussed, and a representative schedule of licensing activities is outlined.

  20. Benefits of 20 kHz PMAD in a nuclear space station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sundberg, Gale R.

    1987-01-01

    Compared to existing systems, high frequency ac power provides higher efficiency, lower cost, and improved safety benefits. The 20 kHz power system has exceptional flexibility, is inherently user friendly, and is compatible with all types of energy sources; photovoltaic, solar dynamic, rotating machines and nuclear. A 25 kW, 20 kHz ac power distribution system testbed was recently (1986) developed. The testbed possesses maximum flexibility, versatility, and transparency to user technology while maintaining high efficiency, low mass, and reduced volume. Several aspects of the 20 kHz power management and distribution (PMAD) system that have particular benefits for a nuclear power Space Station are discussed.

  1. Validation of seismic soil structure interaction (SSI) methodology for a UK PWR nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The seismic loading information for use in the seismic design of equipment and minor structures within a nuclear power plant is determined from a dynamic response analysis of the building in which they are located. This dynamic response analysis needs to capture the global response of both the building structure and adjacent soil and is commonly referred to as a soil structure interaction (SSI) analysis. NNC have developed a simple and cost effective methodology for the seismic SSI analysis of buildings in a PWR nuclear power station at a UK soft site. This paper outlines the NNC methodology and describes the approach adopted for its validation

  2. Report of NII investigation into allegations of faulty welding at Hinkley 'B' nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This reports the procedure and findings of the Nuclear Installations Inspectorate's investigation into allegations of welding and radiography malpractice at Hinkley Point-B power station. These concerned welds and their radiographic testing made on pipework carrying water or steam associated with one of the main electricity turbo generators, during construction in 1971. The water or steam is not radioactive and pipe failure would have no nuclear safety significance. Both the Central Electricity Generating Board and the NII investigated the allegations. Both investigations concluded that there was no evidence to support the allegations. (U.K.)

  3. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Shoreham Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 1. Docket No. 50-322

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supplement No. 3 to the Safety Evaluation Report of Long Island Lighting Company's application for a license to operate the Shoreham Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1, located in Suffolk County, New York, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This supplement addresses several items that have come to light since the previous supplement was issued

  4. 78 FR 11904 - Zion Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2; ZionSolutions, LLC; Consideration of Indirect Transfer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-02-20

    ... From the Federal Register Online via the Government Publishing Office NUCLEAR REGULATORY COMMISSION Zion Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2; ZionSolutions, LLC; Consideration of Indirect Transfer... the indirect transfer of Facility Operating License Nos. DPR-39 and DPR-48 for Zion Nuclear...

  5. 78 FR 32278 - Vogtle Electric Generating Station, Units 3 and 4; Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Change to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-29

    ... COMMISSION Vogtle Electric Generating Station, Units 3 and 4; Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Change to... issued to Southern Nuclear Operating Company, Inc., and Georgia Power Company, Oglethorpe Power... information located in Table 3.3-1, ``Definition of Wall Thicknesses for Nuclear Island Buildings,...

  6. The effects of solar-geomagnetically induced currents on electrical systems in nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Subudhi, M. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States); Carroll, D.P. [Florida Univ., Gainesville, FL (United States); Kasturi, S. [MOS, Inc., Melville, NY (United States)

    1994-01-01

    This report presents the results of a study to evaluate the potential effects of geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) caused by the solar disturbances on the in-plant electrical distribution system and equipment in nuclear power stations. The plant-specific electrical distribution system for a typical nuclear plant is modeled using the ElectroMagnetic Transient Program (EMTP). The computer model simulates online equipment and loads from the station transformer in the switchyard of the power station to the safety-buses at 120 volts to which all electronic devices are connected for plant monitoring. The analytical model of the plant`s electrical distribution system is studied to identify the transient effects caused by the half-cycle saturation of the station transformers due to GIC. This study provides results of the voltage harmonics levels that have been noted at various electrical buses inside the plant. The emergency circuits appear to be more susceptible to high harmonics due to the normally light load conditions. In addition to steady-state analysis, this model was further analyzed simulating various plant transient conditions (e.g., loss of load or large motor start-up) occurring during GIC events. Detail models of the plant`s protective relaying system employed in bus transfer application were included in this model to study the effects of the harmonic distortion of the voltage input. Potential harmonic effects on the uniterruptable power system (UPS) are qualitatively discussed as well.

  7. The effects of solar-geomagnetically induced currents on electrical systems in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the results of a study to evaluate the potential effects of geomagnetically induced currents (GICs) caused by the solar disturbances on the in-plant electrical distribution system and equipment in nuclear power stations. The plant-specific electrical distribution system for a typical nuclear plant is modeled using the ElectroMagnetic Transient Program (EMTP). The computer model simulates online equipment and loads from the station transformer in the switchyard of the power station to the safety-buses at 120 volts to which all electronic devices are connected for plant monitoring. The analytical model of the plant's electrical distribution system is studied to identify the transient effects caused by the half-cycle saturation of the station transformers due to GIC. This study provides results of the voltage harmonics levels that have been noted at various electrical buses inside the plant. The emergency circuits appear to be more susceptible to high harmonics due to the normally light load conditions. In addition to steady-state analysis, this model was further analyzed simulating various plant transient conditions (e.g., loss of load or large motor start-up) occurring during GIC events. Detail models of the plant's protective relaying system employed in bus transfer application were included in this model to study the effects of the harmonic distortion of the voltage input. Potential harmonic effects on the uniterruptable power system (UPS) are qualitatively discussed as well

  8. The regulation of the commissioning of the Sizewell B nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes the regulatory aspects of the control of the commissioning of Sizewell B. The way in which the legislation has been used in dealing with commissioning and the early phases of operation is also discussed, with particular emphasis on the manner in which it has been applied to control all aspects of nuclear safety during the transition from a construction to an operational power station. (author)

  9. Radiation effects of Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station accident on fishes on offshore area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dynamic modeling of 137Cs accumulation by the fish, as reference aquatic biota species, was developed for evaluating dynamic concentration process, based on monitoring data of 137Cs concentrations in the sea water offshore and long shore after the accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station. The dependence of 137Cs dynamic concentration by the fish was provided on 137Cs concentration in the water and fish age. (authors)

  10. [Evaluating psychophysiologic adaptation state in operators of Bilibino nuclear power station].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isaeva, N A; Torubarov, F S; Denisova, E A; Zvereva, Z F; Koronotova, M A

    2014-01-01

    The study revealed that 60% operators of Bilibino nuclear power station suffer from psychosomatic diseases, 41.7% of them are assigned to occupational group of workers, and major part of the examinees with psychosomatic diseases (45.82%) are aged 41-50, high integral level ofpsychophysiologic adaptation is revealed in 5 examinees (12.5%), medium integral level--in 12 examinees (30%). Lower integral level of psychophysiologic adaptation manifested in decrease in psychophysiologic and physiologic levels.

  11. Welding and nondestructive examination issues at Seabrook Nuclear Station: An independent review team report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In response to congressional concerns about the adequacy of the welding and nondestructive examination (NDE) programs at the Seabrook Nuclear Station, NRC senior management established an independent review team (IRT) to conduct an assessment. The IRT focused on the quality of the finished hardware and associated records, as well as on the adequacy of the overall quality assurance program as applied to the fabrication and NDE programs for pipe welds. This report documents the findings of that investigation

  12. Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station outdoors electrical equipment pollution status analysis and improving

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    According to the practice operation experience of the outdoors electrical equipment in Guangdong Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station, following to the engineering technical standard applied in China, by analysis and assessment of pollution classes, it is considered that the class four is reasonable. And indicated the voltage distance should be more than 3.5 cm/kV. Some improvements had been executed and effects are good. And further suggest some improving comments

  13. Improving the reliability modeling concerning the emergency core cooling system at Gentilly-2 Nuclear Generating Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komljenovic, D.; Vaillancourt, R.; Croteau, M. [Hydro Quebec, Gentilly-2, Nuclear Generating Station, Quebec (Canada); Abdul-Nour, G.; Darragi, M. [Univ. du Quebec a Trois Rivieres, Trois Rivieres, Quebec (Canada)

    2003-07-01

    This technical paper presents an approach to improving the reliability modeling concerning the performance of the Emergency Core Cooling (ECC) System at Gentilly-2 Nuclear Generating Station following a loss of coolant accident (LOCA). It includes a quantitative unavailability analysis based on the current system design and operation. The study is performed as a part of a project with regard to an extension of the plant planned outage period. (author)

  14. Maintenance model for the No. 2 1300 MW unit at Philippsburg nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1979 a maintenance model to the scale 1:1 was constructed for the second extension of Philippsburg Nuclear Power Station. The objective of this model, the building of which was completed at the end of 1982, the physical arrangement of the overall maintenance regime and the practice-oriented application of the ergonomics, in particular in relation to the optimization of the man-machine interface, are described. (orig.)

  15. Numerical analysis of transient pressure variation in the condenser of a nuclear power station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xinjun; Zhou, Zijie; Song, Zhao [Xi' an Jiaotong University, Xi' an (China); Lu, Qiankui; Li, Jiafu [Dong Fang Turbine Co., Ltd, Deyang (China)

    2016-02-15

    To research the characteristics of the transient variation of pressure in a nuclear power station condenser under accident condition, a mathematical model was established which simulated the cycling cooling water, heat transfer and pressure in the condenser. The calculation program of transient variation characteristics was established in Fortran language. The pump's parameter, cooling line's organization, check valve's feature and the parameter of siphonic water-collecting well are involved in the cooling water flow's mathematical model. The initial conditions of control volume are determined by the steady state of the condenser. The transient characteristics of a 1000 MW nuclear power station's condenser and cooling water system were examined. The results show that at the condition of plant-power suspension of pump, the cooling water flow rate decreases rapidly and refluxes, then fluctuates to 0. The variation of heat transfer coefficient in the condenser has three stages: at start it decreases sharply, then increases and decreases, and keeps constant in the end. Under three conditions (design, water and summer), the condenser pressure goes up in fluctuation. The time intervals between condenser's pressure signals under three conditions are about 26.4 s, which can fulfill the requirement for safe operation of nuclear power station.

  16. Nuclear Power Station Kalkar, 300 MWe Nuclear Prototype Power Station with Fast Sodium Cooled Reactor (SNR-300), Short Description of the Reactor Core Mark-Ia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear power station Kalkar is a prototype with a sodium cooled fast reactor (SNR-300) and a thermal power of 762 MW. The initial licensing procedure in 1972 was based on the so-called Mark-I core. During the following years, this core underwent some changes, for instance the thickness of the radial blanket was reduced to lower the electricity generation costs, the design of the absorber systems had been further optimized, and it became clear, that a full core with plutonium from MAGNOX-reactors could not be realized and that fuel from light-water reactors had also to be used. In this licensing document the modified reactor core Mark-Ia is described, and the radiological consequences of the core modification are quantified to be tolerable

  17. [Water-soluble anions of atmosphere on Tianwan nuclear power station].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Heng-Qiang; He, Ying; Zheng, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Fa-Rong; Pang, Shi-Ping; Wang, Cai-Xia; Wang, Xiao-Ru

    2010-11-01

    Three major water-soluble anions (Cl-, SO4(2-) and NO3-) in the atmosphere of the Tianwan nuclear power station in Lianyungang were determined by ion chromatography from June 2005 to May 2006. The results showed that the annual average concentration of Cl-, SO4(2-) and NO3- in the atmosphere of Tianwan nuclear power station was (33.12 +/- 53.63) microg x m(-3), (53.34 +/- 30.34) microg x m(-3) and (8.34 +/- 4.47) microg x m(-3), respectively. The concentrations of the three water-soluble anions showed evident trend of seasonal variation. The concentrations of Cl-, SO4(2-) reached the highest level in summer and the lowest level in winter, while the concentration of NO3- in autumn and winter was higher than those in summer and spring. Meteorological parameters such as wind direction, wind speed, temperature and relative humidity were studied and showed definite influence to the anions concentration of the atmosphere. This is the first simultaneous monitoring of corrosive anions in the atmosphere of Chinese coastal nuclear power plant, and it will provide basis for the prevention of marine atmospheric corrosion, which will ensure the safely operating of our nuclear power industry. PMID:21250433

  18. The Satellite Nuclear Power Station - An option for future power generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, J. R.; Clement, J. D.

    1973-01-01

    A new concept in nuclear power generation is being explored which essentially eliminates major objections to nuclear power. The Satellite Nuclear Power Station, remotely operated in synchronous orbit, would transmit power safely to the ground by a microwave beam. Fuel reprocessing would take place in space and no radioactive materials would ever be returned to earth. Even the worst possible accident to such a plant should have negligible effect on the earth. An exploratory study of a satellite nuclear power station to provide 10,000 MWe to the earth has shown that the system could weigh about 20 million pounds and cost less than $1000/KWe. An advanced breeder reactor operating with an MHD power cycle could achieve an efficiency of about 50% with a 1100 K radiator temperature. If a hydrogen moderated gas core reactor is used, its breeding ratio of 1.10 would result in a fuel doubling time of a few years. A rotating fluidized bed or NERVA type reactor might also be used. The efficiency of power transmission from synchronous orbit would range from 70% to 80%.

  19. Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station: an example of the state role in regional nuclear projects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A nuclear power plant siting policy which confines new construction to existing sites will lead to the formation of large regional power centers, each involving many utilities from several states. The Palo Verde Nuclear Project in Arizona has been examined in terms of the role state regulation plays in large regional nuclear projects. State regulatory processes do not reflect the regional nature of large power centers. Decisions and actions by individual state regulatory commissions create risk and uncertainty for all the utility participants in regional projects. A climate and mechanism to encourage and facilitate interstate cooperation are needed to enhance the viability of the confined siting policy and the regional power center concept

  20. 76 FR 25378 - Exelon Generation Company, LLC; PSEG Nuclear, LLC; Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station, Units 2 and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-05-04

    ... December 14, 2010 (75 FR 77913). However, by letter dated April 26, 2011, the licensee withdrew the... COMMISSION Exelon Generation Company, LLC; PSEG Nuclear, LLC; Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station, Units 2 and... Nos. DPR-44 and DPR-56 for the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station (PBAPS), Units 2 and 3, located...

  1. 75 FR 6071 - Exelon Generation Company, LLC; PSEG Nuclear, LLC; Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station Units 2 and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-05

    ..., 2009 (74 FR 20744). However, by letter dated January 19, 2010, the licensee withdrew the proposed... COMMISSION Exelon Generation Company, LLC; PSEG Nuclear, LLC; Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station Units 2 and 3... Operating License Nos. DPR-44 and DPR-56 for the Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station (PBAPS), Units 2 and...

  2. Integrated Plant Safety Assessment, Systematic Evaluation Program: Yankee Nuclear Power Station (Docket No. 50-29)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has prepared Supplement 1 to the final Integrated Plant Safety Assessment Report (IPSAR) (NUREG-0825), under the scope of the Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP), for Yankee Atomic Electric Company's Yankee Nuclear Power Station located in Rowe, Massachusetts. The SEP was initiated by the NRC to review the design of older operating nuclear power plants to reconfirm and document their safety. This report documents the review completed under the SEP for those issues that required refined engineering evaluations or the continuation of ongoing evaluations after the Final IPSAR for the Yankee plant was issued. The review has provided for (1) an assessment of the significance of differences between current technical positions on selected safety issues and those that existed when Yankee was licensed, (2) a basis for deciding how these differences should be resolved in an integrated plant review, and (3) a documented evaluation of plant safety. 2 tabs

  3. The economic performance of nuclear thermal power station in southeast area of our country

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper is a supplementary to ''An Economic Comparison between Nuclear and Coal Electric Power Station in Southeast Area of Our Country'', written by Luo Anren. As the efficiency of a co-generation power plant is much higher than that of the conventional one, a small or medium-sized steam supplying nuclear power plant will be also more economic than a fuel-fired power plant even with a capacity of 1000MWe. It is more suitable to the situation in China to develop a series of small and medium-sized nuclear power plants supplying process steam or hot water for district heating. This will be beneficial to energy saving as well as to environmental protection. (Author)

  4. International Remote Monitoring Project Embalse Nuclear Power Station, Argentina Embalse Remote Monitoring System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schneider, Sigfried L.; Glidewell, Donnie D.; Bonino, Anibal; Bosler, Gene; Mercer, David; Maxey, Curt; Vones, Jaromir; Martelle, Guy; Busse, James; Kadner, Steve; White, Mike; Rovere, Luis

    1999-07-21

    The Autoridad Regulatoria Nuclear of Argentina (ARN), the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA), ABACC, the US Department of Energy, and the US Support Program POTAS, cooperated in the development of a Remote Monitoring System for nuclear nonproliferation efforts. This system was installed at the Embalse Nuclear Power Station last year to evaluate the feasibility of using radiation sensors in monitoring the transfer of spent fuel from the spent fuel pond to dry storage. The key element in this process is to maintain continuity of knowledge throughout the entire transfer process. This project evaluated the fundamental design and implementation of the Remote Monitoring System in its application to regional and international safeguard efficiency. New technology has been developed to enhance the design of the system to include storage capability on board sensor platforms. This evaluation has led to design enhancements that will assure that no data loss will occur during loss of RF transmission of the sensors.

  5. AECB staff annual assessment of the Pickering A and B Nuclear Generating Stations for the year 1994

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (PNGS) is located on the north shore of Lake Ontario, about 32 km east of downtown Toronto. It consists of two stations, PNGS-A and PNGS-B. Each station contains four reactor units. PNGS-A consists of Units 1 to 4, while PNGS-B consists of Units 5 to 8. Each unit can generate about 540 megawatts of electricity. All eight units are located within a single enclosure. Ontario Hydro's Pickering Nuclear Division has assigned one Station Director with authority over both stations, but each station has its own organization. AECB issue a separate operating licence for each station. This report presents the Atomic Energy Control Board staff assessment of the Pickering stations' safety performance in 1994 and other aspects that they consider to have significant impact on nuclear safety. AECB based their conclusions on their observations, audits, inspections and review of information that Ontario Hydro submits to them as required by the station Operating Licences. 11 tabs., 8 figs

  6. 75 FR 76498 - Firstenergy Nuclear Operating Company, Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station; Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-08

    ... Advanced Nuclear Power Topical Report BAW-2308, Revisions 1-A and 2-A, ``Initial RT NDT of Linde 80 Weld... alternate method, as described in Topical Report BAW-2308, Revisions 1- A and 2-A, ``Initial RT NDT of...

  7. Manufacture and quality control of concrete for Ikata Nuclear Power Station, Shikoku Electric Power Co., Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ikata Nuclear Power Station, only one nuclear power station in Shikoku, is located at the root of Sada Peninsula on Seto Inland sea side. At present, No.1 and No.2 plants of 566 MW each are in commercial operation, and on the east side, No.3 plant is under construction. No.3 plant is a PWR type plant of 890 MWe output, and the start of commercial operation is scheduled in March, 1995. In the construction of No.3 plant, the concrete used for civil engineering and building works is about 430,000 m3, and for the improvement of the quality control of concrete, the pursuit of economic efficiency, the fostering of concrete technology of employee and the coprosperity with local industries, the facilities for manufacturing concrete were constructed within the premise of the power station. The amount of use of concrete and respective materials classified by respective fiscal years, and the amount of manufacture of concrete that determines the scale of the concrete plant are shown. As to the construction of the concrete plant, the foundation work was started in March, 1987, and the machine foundation and building works were started in May, 1987. The acceptance was completed on August 17, 1987. The facilities of manufacturing concrete, the manufacture of concrete, and the quality control of materials and concrete are reported. (author)

  8. Ten-yearly report on operations at the Garigliano nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This document is the final report on operation of the Garigliano Nuclear Power Station as required under the participation contract between Enel and Euratom and refers to the first ten years of commercial operation (1 May 1964-31 December 1973) of the power station. In the decade in question the Garigliano Power Station has assumed an important position in the world spectrum of nuclear energy since it was the first thermal-power reactor in the world to have irradiated considerable quantities of plutonium as a fuel in its own core for the production of energy. An experimental programme on this was started in 1966 with theoretical study of plutonium recycling and was followed by the charging of the Garigliano reactor with some mixed oxide elements (PuO2-UO2) in 1968 and 1970. The excellent performance of these prototype elements, which among other things were examined in detail at the end of each radiation cycle, prompted Enel to decide in favour of the use of entire batches of recycled fuel elements of the PuO2-UO2 type in the reactor from 1975 onwards

  9. Quality control for the construction of Ikata Nuclear Power Station No. 2 Unit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the construction of No. 2 unit in Ikata Nuclear Power Station, Shikoku Electric Power Co., the quality control was practiced making effective use of the experience in preceding stations including the Three Mile Island station, U.S., and improving those. The construction works were also performed in consideration of ensuring the safe running of No. 1 unit in commercial operation. In this report, first the outline of No. 2 unit facility and the quality control in the construction processes are described sequentially. For the comprehensive quality control activity over a series of plant design, manufacturing, installation and commissioning processes, the quality control policy was fixed, the system was established, the plan was prepared, and the quality control was promoted as planned and systematically. The outline of the quality control in each stage is described as follows. Design stage: It was implemented for the confirmation of applicable standards and references, the management of drawings submitted for approval, the selection of materials used, the coordination among sub-contractors, design change and the reflection of experience in preceding stations. Manufacturing stage. It was performed for material control, manufacturing management, factory test and control. Installation stage. It was practiced for the management of installation works, the inspection during the installation, and the check-up and control after the installation. Several quality control items were implemented also in the method of construction works and construction management. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  10. Cost comparison of 4x500 MW coal-fuelled and 4x850 MW CANDU nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lifetime costs for a 4x850 MW CANDU generating station are compared to those for 4x500 MW bituminous coal-fuelled generating stations. Two types of coal-fuelled stations are considered; one burning U.S. coal which includes flue gas desulfurization and one burning Western Canadian coal. Current estimates for the capital costs, operation and maintenance costs, fuel costs, decommissioning costs and irradiated fuel management costs are shown. The results show: (1) The accumulated discounted costs of nuclear generation, although initially higher, are lower than coal-fuelled generation after two or three years. (2) Fuel costs provide the major contribution to the total lifetime costs for coal-fuelled stations whereas capital costs are the major item for the nuclear station. (3) The break even lifetime capacity factor between nuclear and U.S. coal-fuelled generation is projected to be 5%; that for nuclear and Canadian coal-fuelled generation is projected to be 9%. (4) Large variations in the costs are required before the cost advantage of nuclear generation is lost. (5) Comparison with previous results shows that the nuclear alternative has a greater cost advantage in the current assessment. (6) The total unit energy cost remains approximately constant throughout the station life for nuclear generation while that for coal-fuelled generation increases significantly due to escalating fuel costs. The 1978 and 1979 actual total unit energy cost to the consumer for several Ontario Hydro stations are detailed, and projected total unit energy costs for several Ontario Hydro stations are shown in terms of escalated dollars and in 1980 constant dollars

  11. Experiences of occupational dose reduction at the Fugen nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Occupational radiation dose has been effectively suppressed by efforts against both internal and external exposure in the Fugen nuclear power station. The tritium internal dose is completely suppressed by developments of high sensitivity tritium monitors with hollow fiber radon filters, comfortable tritium protection suits, and established working procedure for equipment maintenance of the heavy water system. The internal occupational dose has been suppressed to a negligible level comparing to the external dose. The external occupational dose had increased with dose rates of the primary cooling system. Establishment of radiation work procedure for maintenance works and development of chemical decontamination has been effectively saving the external occupational dose. The chemical decontaminations carried out in 1989 and 1991 are the first applications to the whole primary cooling system of operating power stations in Japan. This paper describes these efforts and effects on occupational dose reduction in Fugen. (author)

  12. Design of full speed 985 MW turbine for Daya Bay nuclear station, China

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Daya Bay will be the first utility-operated nuclear power station in the People's Republic of China. It will be situated some 30 miles north-east of Hong Kong. The station will consist of two power units, each based on pressurized water reactors of 2905 MWth power output supplied by Framatome of France. The two conventional islands complete with their civil, mechanical and electrical designs and plants and comprising two 985 MWe, 3000 rpm steam turbines will be supplied by GEC Turbine Generators of the UK. The turbines are the largest full speed machines ever built in Britain. The steam cycle and plant layout are illustrated. The construction and operation of the turbines and associated valves etc are explained. The turbine control is discussed. (author)

  13. Processing of sump sludges at the Commonwealth Edison Byron Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A basic criterion for the disposal of radioactive waste by shallow land burial is that the material must not contain free liquids. In addition burial sites' requirements regarding radioactive waste containing oils, even though solidified, are restrictive. At Commonwealth Edison Byron Nuclear Generating Station a methodology for processing treated waste sludges, originating form the turbine building's floor drains was developed and implemented. As a result of this effort, 322 drums of oil and water sludge were processed. A dry cake, i.e., no free liquids, was produced, packaged, and readied for disposal. The dry cake contained less than 2% oil. The liquid phases resulting from the processing of the treated waste sludge were oil (that was to be processed for disposal as non-radioactive) and filtrate containing less than 5 ppm total suspended solids (TSS) and oil/grease. The filtrate TSS was below the Station's National Pollution Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) permit release limits. 4 figs

  14. The Palo Verde story: a foundation for future multi-station nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1973, the design and planning for the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station Was started featuring three 3800 MWt Combustion Engineering Standard System 80 Nuclear Steam Supply Systems. Arizona Public Service Company (APS) was the Project Manager and Operating Agent and Bechtel Power Corporation the architect/engineer and constructor. The Palo Verde units are located in a desert environment some 50 miles west of Phoenix, Arizona. It is a 'dry site' in that there are no liquid discharges from the site. The cooling tower makeup water sewage is waste effluent from the City of Phoenix treated at an on site reclamation facility. The effluent has had primary and secondary treatment at the Phoenix plant prior to delivery to PVNGS. The units are physically separate from each other but are of identical design. There are no shared safety systems between the units. Unit 1 and Unit 2 are both in commercial operation (January, 1986 and September, 1986 respectively). Unit 3 is scheduled to load fuel late in the first quarter of 1987. This paper presents some of the engineering and management practices used during design, construction, and startup and operational experiences and other unique features of this multi-unit nuclear station. The site arrangement is shown in Figure 1

  15. Palo verde story: a foundation for future multi-station nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 1973, the design and planning for the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station was started featuring three 3800 MWt Combustion Engineering Standard System 80 Nuclear Steam Supply Systems. Arizona Public Service Company (APS) was the Project Manager and Operating Agent and Bechtel Power Corporation the architect/engineer and constructor. The Palo Verde units are located in a desert environment some 50 miles west of Phoenix, Arizona. It is a dry site in that there are no liquid discharges from the site. The cooling tower makeup water sewage is waste effluent from the City of Phoenix treated at an on site reclamation facility. The effluent has had primary and secondary treatment at the Phoenix plant prior to delivery to PVNGS. The units are physically separate from each other but are of identical design. There are no shared safety systems between the units. This paper presents some of the engineering and management practices used during design, construction, and startup and operational experiences and other unique features of this multi-unit nuclear station

  16. Safety improvement and responses to renewed regulations in case of Kashiwazakikariwa Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In response to the accident of TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, various initiatives have been advancing for the safety of nuclear power generation. Amid this, the application for conformance review on the new regulatory standards of Kashiwazakikariwa Nuclear Power Station units 6 and 7 has been made. This paper firstly explains the following three items as the basic policy of safety measures that were set from the lessons of the accident: (1) strengthening of defense in depth, (2) security of flexibility and responsiveness against incidents beyond assumption, and (3) strengthening of management and organizational skills in case of an accident. Then, it explains the evaluation and measures against earthquake and tsunami, such as the assessment of fault activity, and the evaluation and measures against tsunami. For the protection and reliability assurance of design criteria subject facilities, it mainly explains the evaluation and measures from the standpoints of protection from external incidents and reliability assurance. In addition, it explains the facilities countering a serious accident, and the technical capacity at the time of an accident, on the basis of several study examples of accident countermeasures. (A.O.)

  17. Nuclear power station siting experience in the United Kingdom: past and present and proposals for the future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Foremost of the many factors in site selection considerations are population distribution, cooling-water availability and amenity. Others are safety of potable water sources, geological stability and the risk of external hazards. Where cooling-water supplies are a limiting factor, the choica of reactor system is of major importance. To determine as early as possible the effect a station might have on its environment, desk studies, visual surveys and wind-tunnel tests are carried out. The Central Electricity Generating Board places great importance on obtaining the fullest degree of acceptance by the public for its nuclear stations and ensures that full consultation is provided with the relevant authorities at all stages of power-station development. It also provides public exhibitions, public meetings and liaison with the local inhabitants. Recruitment of station staff where possible from the immediate area of the station and formation of sports and social clubs are two of the practical steps which help to integrate the station into the local community. Whilst the current energy crisis has reinforced the need for a substantial nuclear programme, possible ways of further reducing the impact of nuclear stations on the environment are being considered. The paper concludes that sufficient nuclear sites can be provided for future needs but that continuing effort will be required to ensure public acceptance. (author)

  18. Interim report on the accident at Fukushima Nuclear Power Stations of Tokyo Electric Power Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Investigation Committee on the Accident at the Fukushima Nuclear Power Stations (the Investigation Committee) of Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) was established by the Cabinet decision on May 24, 2011. Its objectives are: to conduct investigation for finding out the causes of accidents at the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station (Fukushima Dai-ichi NPS) and Fukushima Dai-ni Nuclear Power Station (Fukushima Dai-ni NPS) of TEPCO as well as the causes of accident damage; and to make policy recommendations for limiting the expansion of damage and preventing reoccurrence of similar accidents. The Investigation Committee has conducted its investigation and evaluation since its first meeting on June 7, 2011. Its activities included: site visits to the Fukushima Dai-ichi and Dai-ni NPSs, as well as to other facilities; hearing of heads of local governments around the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPS; and hearing of people concerned through interviews mainly arranged by the Secretariat. As of December 16, 2011, the number of interviewees reached 456. The investigation and evaluation by the Investigation Committee are still ongoing and the Interim Report does not cover every item that the Committee aims at investigating and evaluating. Fact-finding of even some of those items discussed in the Interim Report are not yet completed. The Investigation Committee continues to conduct its investigation and evaluation and will issue its Final Report in the summer of 2012. This brief executive summary covers mainly considerations and evaluation of the issues in Chapter VII of the Interim Report, with brief reference to Chapters I to VI. The Investigation Committee recommendations are printed in bold. (author)

  19. The emergency medical programs of japan and foreign countries for radiation accidents in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In our country, the medical emergency programs for the people living near nuclear power stations are well organized, however, preparation of medical staffs who are well trained is considered to be not sufficient. In the USA, on call 24 hours response to a radiological emergency is provided and funded by Department of Energy(DOE) or electric companies. Especially, REAC/TS is a part of DOE response network, in which there are provided well-trained physicians, nurses, health physicists, coordinators and support personnels. In United Kingdom, National Radiological Protection Board(NRPB) is responsible to a radiological emergency program. Each nuclear power station has its own emergency program consisting of a team of physicians, nurses and health physicists. In France, French Atomic Energy Commission (CEA) is a responsible agency for a radiological emergency program. On call 24 hours response to a radiological emergency is provided in Fontenay-aux Roses Institute and Curie Institute. Curie Institute also responds to radiological emergencies in other countries at the request of WHO. In Germany(West Germany), compulsory assurance system covers a radiological emergency program and a radiological protection. There are seven centers in West Germany, in which well-trained medical staffs are provided against radiological injuries. In this report, I tried to propose a new concept about emergency medical programs for nuclear power station accidents in Japan. I think it is a very urgent theme to provide on call 24 hours radiological emergency program, in which patients suffered from acute radiation sickness with internal contamination or contaminated radiation burns will be treated without any trouble. We have to make our best efforts to complete basic or clinical research about radiation injuries including bone marrow transplantation, radioprotectors, chelating agents and radiation burns etc. (J.P.N.)

  20. Service hall in Number 1 Fukushima Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Company, Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are six BWR type nuclear power plants in the Number 1 Fukushima Nuclear Power Station, Tokyo Electric Power Company, Inc. The service hall of the station is located near the entrance of the station. In the center of this service hall, there is the model of a nuclear reactor of full scale. This mock-up shows the core region in the reactor pressure vessel for the number one plant. The diameter and the thickness of the pressure vessel are about 5 m and 16 cm, respectively. The fuel assemblies and control rods are set just like the actual reactor, and the start-up operation of the reactor is shown colorfully and dynamically by pushing a button. When the control rods are pulled out, the boiling of water is demonstrated. The 1/50 scale model of the sixth plant with the power generating capacity of 1100 MWe is set, and this model is linked to the mock-up of reactor written above. The operations of a recirculating loop, a turbine and a condenser are shown by switching on and off lamps. The other exhibitions are shielding concrete wall, ECCS model, and many kinds of panels and models. This service hall is incorporated in the course of study and observation of civics. The good environmental effects to fishes and shells are explained in this service hall. Official buildings and schools are built near the service hall utilizing the tax and grant concerning power generation. This service hall contributes to give much freedom from anxiety to the public by the tour. (Nakai, Y.)

  1. 75 FR 80549 - FirstEnergy Nuclear Operating Company, Davis-Besse Nuclear Power Station; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-12-22

    ...) properties using Framatome Advanced Nuclear Power Topical Report (TR) BAW-2308, Revisions 1A and 2A, ``Initial RT NDT of Linde 80 Weld Materials.'' The licensee requested an exemption from Appendix G to 10 CFR... temperature (RT NDT ) parameter, the determination of which is specified by paragraph NB-2331 of Section...

  2. The AP1000{sup R} nuclear power plant innovative features for extended station blackout mitigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vereb, F.; Winters, J.; Schulz, T.; Cummins, E.; Oriani, L. [Westinghouse Electric Company LLC, 1000 Westinghouse Drive, Cranberry Township, PA 16066 (United States)

    2012-07-01

    Station Blackout (SBO) is defined as 'a condition wherein a nuclear power plant sustains a loss of all offsite electric power system concurrent with turbine trip and unavailability of all onsite emergency alternating current (AC) power system. Station blackout does not include the loss of available AC power to buses fed by station batteries through inverters or by alternate AC sources as defined in this section, nor does it assume a concurrent single failure or design basis accident...' in accordance with Reference 1. In this paper, the innovative features of the AP1000 plant design are described with their operation in the scenario of an extended station blackout event. General operation of the passive safety systems are described as well as the unique features which allow the AP1000 plant to cope for at least 7 days during station blackout. Points of emphasis will include: - Passive safety system operation during SBO - 'Fail-safe' nature of key passive safety system valves; automatically places the valve in a conservatively safe alignment even in case of multiple failures in all power supply systems, including normal AC and battery backup - Passive Spent Fuel Pool cooling and makeup water supply during SBO - Robustness of AP1000 plant due to the location of key systems, structures and components required for Safe Shutdown - Diverse means of supplying makeup water to the Passive Containment Cooling System (PCS) and the Spent Fuel Pool (SFP) through use of an engineered, safety-related piping interface and portable equipment, as well as with permanently installed onsite ancillary equipment. (authors)

  3. Establishment of high ground power supply center at Onagawa Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large earthquake occurred on March 11, 2011 and tsunami was generated following it. The East Japan suffered serious damage by the earthquake and tsunami. This is called the Great East Japan Earthquake. Onagawa Nuclear Power Station (NPS) is located closest to the epicenter of Great East Japan Earthquake. We experienced intense shake by the earthquake and some flooding from the tsunami, however, we have succeeded safely cold shutdown of the reactors. In this paper, we introduce the reinforcement of power supply to increase reliability and power supply center with high voltage electric power supply trucks which is original treatment at Onagawa NPS. (author)

  4. Radiation exposure to the orbiting lunar station and lunar surface related to reusable nuclear shuttle operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchinson, P. I.

    1972-01-01

    The radiation environment created by the Reusable Nuclear Vehicle (RNS) in performing its normal mission functions while in the lunar vicinity and the impact of that environment on the Orbiting Lunar Station (OLS) and/or the lunar surface are examined. Lunar surface exposures from the operating reactor were evaluated for both the arrival and departure burns and while there is little probability that manned bases would lie along the paths in which measurable exposures would be recorded, the analyses do indicate the need to consider this possibility in planning such operations. Conclusions supported by the analyses and recommended operational constraints for the RNS are presented.

  5. Summary of Great Japan Earthquake response at Onagawa Nuclear Power Station and further safety improvement measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large earthquake occurred on March 11, 2011 and tsunami was generated following it. The East Japan suffered serious damage by the earthquake and tsunami. This is called the Great East Japan Earthquake. Onagawa Nuclear Power Station (NPS) is located closest to the epicenter of Great East Japan Earthquake. We experienced intense shake by the earthquake and some flooding from the tsunami, however, we have succeeded safely cold shutdown of the reactors. In this paper, we introduce summary of Great East Japan Earthquake response at Onagawa NPS and safety improvement measures which are based on both experience of Onagawa NPS and lesson from Fukushima Daiichi NPS accident. (author)

  6. Problems of implementing a large contract abroad: the Cordoba nuclear power station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Caruso, P.

    1984-11-01

    The building of Argentina's second nuclear power station proved to be a true test of project-management skills: the contract was to be a joint effort between an Italian and a Canadian company, to be implemented in a country thousands of miles away; the Argentinian government changed four times during the course of the project; and the local currency was always unstable and unpredictable. The various difficulties that arose, and how they were solved, are described, and the role of the project management is evaluated.

  7. Problems of implementing a large contract abroad: the Cordoba nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The building of Argentina's second nuclear power station proved to be a true test of project-management skills: the contract was to be a joint effort between an Italian and a Canadian company, to be implemented in a country thousands of miles away; the Argentinian government changed four times during the course of the project; and the local currency was always unstable and unpredictable. The various difficulties that arose, and how they were solved, are described, and the role of the project management is evaluated. (author)

  8. Effects of entrainment through Oconee Nuclear Station on carbon-14 assimilation rates of phytoplankton

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carbon assimilation rates of phytoplankton communities entrained through Oconee Nuclear Station were measured on six dates during 1974. Thermal, mechanical, condenser, and multiple entrainment effects on uptake rates were compared by incubating samples in vitro in controlled-temperature water baths. Duplicate light and dark bottles containing water from four cooling-system locations were exposed to temperatures approximating intake and discharge temperatures. The relationships were variable, but exposure of the hypolimnetic intake water at near-discharge temperatures (thermal effect) stimulated primary productivity in four of six experiments. Multiple entrainment and mechanical effects caused no consistent change in assimilation rates

  9. Measuring device for determining the radiation in a nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One can use an ionization chamber to determine the radiation in a nuclear power-station, whose electrodes are connected via a plug and socket connection to a cable. To make the plug and socket connection resistant to a LOCA (loss of coolant accident), a tubular case is provided with a centring flange projecting into a baseplate of the ionisation chamber. Cable cores with a screen passing through the tube are taken through sleeves, which are cast with a silicon casting mass completely penetrating the screen. (orig.)

  10. Sizewell nuclear power station: investigation of radiation exposure pathways from liquid effluents. Local habits survey 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A habits and consumption survey to review radiation exposure pathways due to liquid effluents released from the CEGB Sizewell site is described. It is relevant to both the Sizewell A and proposed Sizewell B nuclear power stations. The main objectives are to provide input data to a radiological assessment by means of identifying critical groups and to provide data for guidance in a review of environmental monitoring programmes. The way in which data for the different pathways should be combined in order to aid the subsequent radiological assessment is discussed. Recommendations are made for adjustments to the present monitoring programmes. (U.K.)

  11. Estimating the efficiency from using hydrogen toppings at nuclear power stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portyankin, A. V.; Khrustalev, V. A.

    2011-09-01

    A low-cost version of modernizing a nuclear power station is considered in which the main profile (standard size) of the power unit is retained and insignificant changes are made in the turbine unit's operational parameters. These changes consist in that steam supplied to the high-pressure cylinder is subjected to slight initial superheating, and that that the design superheating of steam upstream of the low-pressure cylinder is increased to some extent. In addition, different versions that can be used for heating the working steam to the required temperatures in the H2/O2 steam generator's mixing chamber are analyzed.

  12. An Aerial Gamma Ray Survey of the Surrounding Area of Sizewell Nuclear Power Station

    OpenAIRE

    Sanderson, D.C.W.; Allyson, J.D.; Cresswell, A

    1997-01-01

    An airborne gamma ray survey of the surroundings of the Sizewell nuclear power station was conducted to define the present levels of radiation background for reference purposes. A twin engine helicopter fitted with a high volume NaI detector and two semiconductor detectors was used. A 20x30km area around the site was surveyed with 500 m line spacing, with an inner zone of 6x6 km being investigated with 250 m line spacing. More than 10,000 gamma ray spectra were recorded between 1st and 3r...

  13. 78 FR 45987 - Vogtle Electric Generating Station, Units 3 and 4; Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Change to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... COMMISSION Vogtle Electric Generating Station, Units 3 and 4; Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Change to... COLs were issued to Southern Nuclear Operating Company, Inc., and Georgia Power Company, Oglethorpe... Search.'' For problems with ADAMS, please contact the NRC's Public Document Room (PDR) reference staff...

  14. 78 FR 45989 - Vogtle Electric Generating Station, Units 3 and 4; Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Change to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... COMMISSION Vogtle Electric Generating Station, Units 3 and 4; Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Change to... COLs were issued to Southern Nuclear Operating Company, Inc., and Georgia Power Company, Oglethorpe..., select ``ADAMS Public Documents'' and then select ``Begin Web-based ADAMS Search.'' For problems...

  15. 78 FR 46617 - Vogtle Electric Generating Station, Units 3 and 4; Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Change to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-01

    ... COMMISSION Vogtle Electric Generating Station, Units 3 and 4; Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Change to...-91 and NPF-92. The COLs were issued to Southern Nuclear Operating Company, Inc., and Georgia Power Company, Oglethorpe Power Corporation, Municipal Electric Authority of Georgia, and the City of...

  16. 78 FR 50455 - Vogtle Electric Generating Station, Units 3 and 4; Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Changes to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-19

    ... COMMISSION Vogtle Electric Generating Station, Units 3 and 4; Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Changes to... NPF-92. The COLs were issued to Southern Nuclear Operating Company, Inc., and Georgia Power Company..., located in Burke County, Georgia. The amendment requests changes that modify the Chemical and...

  17. 78 FR 49551 - Vogtle Electric Generating Station, Units 3 and 4; Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Change to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-08-14

    ... COMMISSION Vogtle Electric Generating Station, Units 3 and 4; Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Change to... and NPF-92. The COLs were issued to Southern Nuclear Operating Company, Inc., and Georgia Power Company, ] Oglethorpe Power Corporation, Municipal Electric Authority of Georgia, and the City of...

  18. Stages in planning and construction of the Muelheim-Kaerlich nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On October 23, 1972, RWE gave a letter of intent and on January 9, 1973 an order for the construction of a nuclear power plant on a turn-key basis to the consortium of BBC, BBR and Hochtief. The power plant in question was the Muelheim-Kaerlich nuclear power station with a pressurized-water reactor of a gross efficiency of 1,295 MWe. After considerable delay of the project, the first building permit was issued to the builder-owner on January 15, 1975, and the constructional work on the building site started immediately afterwards. As the planning and constructional work has so far been carried out according to schedule and the consortium intends to keep the effects of the belated license as small as possible, the start-off of the plant will probably be in summer 1979 if the constructional work is not interrupted. (orig./AK)

  19. Experience with reactor power cutback system at Palo Verde nuclear generating station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station (PVNGS) is a three unit site which illustrates System 80 nuclear steam supply system (NSSS) design. The System 80 NSSS is the Combustion Engineering (C-E) standard design rated at 3817 Mwth. PVNGS Units 1 and 2 achieved commercial operation on February 13, 1986 and September 22, 1986, respectively, while Unit 3 has a forecast date for commercial operation in the third quarter of 1987. The System 80 design incorporates a reactor power cutback system (RPCS) feature which reduces plant trips caused by two common initiating events: loss of load/turbine trip (LOL) and loss of one main feedwater pump (LOMFWP). The key design objective of the RPCS is to improve overall plant availability and performance, while minimizing challenges to the plant safety system

  20. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Shoreham Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 1 (Docket No. 50-322)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supplement 10 (SSER 10) to the Safety Evaluation Report on Long Island Lighting Company's application for a license to operate the Shoreham Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1, located in Suffolk County, New York, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This supplement addresses several items that have been reviewed by the staff since the previous supplement was issued

  1. An aerial radiological survey of the Quad Cities Nuclear Power Station and surrounding area, Cordova, Illinois

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted over the Quad Cities Nuclear Power Station in Cordova, Illinois, during the period May 9 through May 18, 1989. The survey was conducted at an altitude of 61 meters (200 feet) over a 65-square-kilometer (25-square-mile) area centered on the power station. The purpose of the survey was to document the terrestrial gamma environment of the Quad Cities Power Station and surrounding area and to determine any radiological impact on the area over the past twenty years. The results of the aerial survey are reported as inferred gamma radiation exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level in the form of a contour map. Outside the plant boundary, exposure rates were found to vary between 5 and 15 microroentgens per hour (μR/h) and were attributed to naturally-occurring uranium, thorium, and radioactive potassium gamma emitters. The aerial data were compared to ground-based ''benchmark'' exposure rate measurements and radionuclide assay of soil samples obtained within the survey boundary. The ground-based measurements were found to be in good agreement with those inferred from the aerial measuring system

  2. Personnel exposure control system with auto thermoluminescence dosimeter in Shimane Nuclear Power Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matsubayashi, Hideo; Ochi, Susumu (Chugoku Electric Power Co. Inc., Hiroshima (Japan))

    1982-03-01

    In the past, film badges and pocket dosimeters were put on the persons who entered a controlled area in a nuclear power station to measure the external radiation exposure. For these, read out error or mistake, delay in taking out the result, trouble for monitoring many persons, etc. were problems. To solve these problems, the auto thermoluminescence dosimeter (ATLD) system has been introduced in Shimane Nuclear Power Station in place of pocket dosimeters since the second half of fiscal 1978. The outline of the system and the composition and software of the TLD automatic readout system are described. For the control of access to controlled areas, workers are forced to pass the check point where watchmen check everyone's ID card, and subjected to the check-up with the TLD automatic readout device. The checking items in the case of entering the areas are: (1) confirmation of licensee, (2) confirmation of the term of validity for the medical examination on ionizing radiation, (3) checking for exposure dose compared to the controlled exposure level, (4) confirmation of time limit to stay in controlled areas, and (5) TLD element annealing condition. The checking items in the case of leaving the areas are: (1) checking for identifying the TLD element that the personnel has brought in, (2) exposure dose compared to the controlled exposure level, (3) time for which the personnel stayed in controlled areas.

  3. Personnel exposure control system with auto thermoluminescence dosimeter in Shimane Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the past, film badges and pocket dosimeters were put on the persons who enter a controlled area in a nuclear power station to measure the external radiation exposure. For these, read out error or mistake, delay in taking out the result, trouble for monitoring many persons, etc. were problems. To solve these problems, the auto thermoluminescence dosimeter (ATLD) system has been introduced in Shimane Nuclear Power Station in place of pocket dosimeters since the second half of fiscal 1978. The outline of the system and the composition and software of the TLD automatic readout system are described. For the control of access to controlled areas, workers are forced to pass the check point where watchmen check everyone's ID card, and subjected to the check-up with the TLD automatic readout device. The checking items in the case of entering the areas are: (1) confirmation of licensee, (2) confirmation of the term of validity for the medical examination on ionizing radiation, (3) checking for exposure dose compared to the controlled exposure level, (4) confirmation of time limit to stay in controlled areas, and (5) TLD element annealing condition. The checking items in the case of leaving the areas are: (1) checking for identifying the TLD element that the personnel has brought in, (2) exposure dose compared to the controlled exposure level, (3) time for which the personnel stayed in controlled areas. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  4. The development of access control system in Fukushima No.2 nuclear power station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ookubo, S.; Nakai, Y.; Oohira, N.; Kishishita, S. [Tokyo Electric power Co., Tokyo (Japan); Kobayashi, H.; Sano, F. [Fuji Electric Co., Tokyo (Japan); Masuda, M.; Tajima, T.; Oohira, K. [Toshiba Corporation, Tokyo (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    A new radiation work control system has been developed for controlling the entrance and exit of workers from the radiation controlled area in a nuclear power station and has been run in the Fukushima No. 2 Nuclear Power Station of Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. since October, 1999. The system is designed to reduce workers burden by simplifying the operation of each equipment that controls access to radiation controlled areas, and to minimize radiation exposure by automatically acquiring dose data during each access and each task. The new system adopted electronic personal dosimeters (gamma radiation EPD) which permit data collection by radio communication, thus improving the conventional alarm-equipped personal dosimeter (EPD) and increasing reliability as primary dosimeters. Furthermore, additional electronic personal dosimeters capable of measuring beta radiation (gamma and beta radiations EPD) were also utilized in specific tasks in October 2001. After a six-month test run of these EPDs, the film badges were discontinued in April 2002 and replaced solely with the EPDs. EPDs are now used as the primary dosimetry for radiation workers.

  5. Nuclear Power Station Kalkar, 300 MWe Nuclear Prototype Power Station with Fast Sodium Cooled Reactor (SNR-300), Safety Report Reactor Core Mark-Ia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear power station Kalkar is a prototype with a sodium cooled fast reactor (SNR-300) and a thermal power of 762 MW. The initial licensing procedure in 1972 was based on the so-called Mark-I core. During the following years, this core underwent some changes, for instance the thickness of the radial blanket was reduced to lower the electricity generation costs, the design of the absorber systems had been further optimized, and it became clear, that a full core with plutonium from MAGNOX-reactors could not be realized and that fuel from light-water reactors had also to be used. In this licensing document the modified reactor core Mark-Ia is described together with its assemblies and their loading procedure. The content of radioactive materials and the irradiation protection measures are discussed and those accidents are describe in an enveloping manner, from which an influence of the core modification cannot be excluded. Finally, both core versions (Mark-I and Mark-Ia) are compared with each other

  6. Climate change benefits and energy supply benefits as determinants of acceptance of nuclear power stations: Investigating an explanatory model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Visschers, Vivianne H.M., E-mail: vvisschers@ethz.ch [ETH Zurich, Institute for Environmental Decisions (IED), Consumer Behavior, Universitaetsstrasse 22 CHN J 75.2, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland); Keller, Carmen; Siegrist, Michael [ETH Zurich, Institute for Environmental Decisions (IED), Consumer Behavior, Universitaetsstrasse 22 CHN J 75.2, 8092 Zurich (Switzerland)

    2011-06-15

    Several countries are currently discussing whether they will rebuild their nuclear power stations in order to continue this type of energy production in the future. The public, with its own opinion about nuclear power stations, has an influential voice in this discussion. As a result, policy makers and nuclear scientists are interested in the public's perception of nuclear power and in what determines this perception. We therefore examined an explanatory model of the public's acceptance of nuclear power based on a telephone survey among a representative sample in Switzerland. The model included such factors as risk perception, benefit perception, affective feelings, and social trust. Moreover, we distinguished between two types of benefit perception: benefit for the climate and a secure energy supply. The model fitted very well to our data and explained acceptance very well. Acceptance was mainly influenced by perceived benefits for a secure energy supply and, to a lesser extent, both by perceived benefits for the climate and by risk perception. Affective feelings about nuclear power appeared to be a central factor in the model. Implications for communication about nuclear power stations and for further research are discussed. - Highlights: > Explanatory model of determinants of nuclear power acceptance was studied in the representative survey. > Perceived benefits for a secure energy supply had the largest influence on acceptance. > Perceived benefits for the climate seemed less influential on acceptance. > Affect had a central role in the explanatory model. > Implications for communication about nuclear power plants are discussed.

  7. Optimizing the use of operating experience at Ontario Hydro's Bruce Nuclear Generating Station 'A'

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the most significant lessons learned from the Three Mile Island event (March 1979), and again with the Chernobyl disaster - (April 1986) was the ongoing requirement to learn from our mistakes and near misses, and those of our fellow utilities around the world: so that as an industry we do not repeat the same mistakes. The very future of our industry will depend on how well each one of us accomplishes this important ask. This paper describes in detail the challenges encountered by one station when incorporating a comprehensive 'Operating Program'. It begins with the Corporate Office's directives to its stations for such a program; and follows up with the details of the actual station implementation of the program, and day to day operating experiences. The paper describes in detail the following Operating Experience programs: - Root Cause Determination process. The Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, Human Performance Enhancement System (HPES) as an integral component of the Root Cause process. Finding solutions for our station for problems identified elsewhere is covered herein; - Significant Event Recommendation Tracking System: - Commitment Tracking System; - Operating Experience (Sharing Lessons Learned) System. The paper will show all the above processes tie closely together and complement each other. The paper discusses the staff required for such processes and their training requirements. It recommends process time lines, reporting mechanisms, and sign off requirements. It will describe the equipment utilized to carry out this work effectively, and with a minimum of staff. One unique feature of the Bruce 'A' system is an 'Effectiveness Follow-Up', usually three to six months after the event recommendations have been completed. By rechecking the finished actions and reviewing them with the personnel involved with the originating event we ensure that the real root causes have been identified and resolved. (author)

  8. Program for the thermal design and simulation of the operation of a steam condenser for thermal and nuclear power stations and its application to the condenser at the Cofrentes nuclear power station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia Bartual, R.; Pallares Huici, E.

    A program is being developed for an IBM-PC or AT computer based on a calculation system which synthesises the heat transfer process which takes place in the steam condensors at conventional thermal power stations. The program incorporates a useful tool capable of representing characteristic operating curves for a given condensor. Describes its application to the steam condenser at the Cofrentes nuclear power station. 4 refs., 5 tabs., 8 figs.

  9. Final report on the accident at Fukushima Nuclear Power Stations of Tokyo Electric Power Company

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On March 11, 2011, the Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station (hereafter, 'Fukushima Dai-ichi NPS') and Fukushima Dai-ni Nuclear Power Station (hereafter, 'Fukushima Dai-ni NPS') of Tokyo Electric Power Company (hereafter, 'TEPCO') were damaged in the Tohoku District - off the Pacific Ocean Earthquake and the ensuing tsunami. In particular, an extremely severe accident measuring Level 7 on the International Nuclear and Radiological Event Scale (INES) occurred at the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPS. The Investigation Committee was established on May 24, 2011 by a Cabinet decision. Its mission is to make policy recommendations, by investigating and verifying the causes of the accident and ensuing damage, on measures to prevent the further spread of damage caused by the accident and a recurrence of similar accidents in the future. The Investigation Committee inspected the accident sites including the Fukushima Dai-ichi NPS and the Fukushima Dai-ni NPS, and interviewed individuals concerned, including the mayors and residents of relevant municipalities. The number of interviewees reached 772 in total. The Investigation Committee published its Interim Report on December 26, 2011 and its Final Report on July 23, 2012. The Final Report, with the Interim Report as its complementary piece, describes mainly the results of investigations after the Interim Report. This Executive Summary is a condensed version of the Final Report, mainly Chapter VI of the main text which analyzes the problems and provides recommendations. The contents of the parenthesis [ ] that follow the title indicate the relevant corresponding locations in the Final Report (Main text). Recommendations are indicated in bold. (author)

  10. Report of examination of the ruptured pipe at the Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station Unit-1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-12-01

    In order to investigate root cause of the pipe rupture, which took place at the Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station Unit-1 of Chubu Electric Power Company on November 7, 2001, a task force was established within the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) and initiated a detailed investigation of the ruptured pipe. The Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) was asked from the Ministry of Education, Culture, Sports, Science and Technology (MEXT) in response to the request from NISA to cooperate as an independent neutral organization with NISA and perform an examination of the ruptured pipe independently from Chubu Electric Power Company. JAERI accepted the request by considering the fact that JAERI is an integrated research institution for nuclear research and development, a prime research institution for nuclear safety research, a research institution with experience of root-cause investigation of various nuclear incidents and accidents of domestic as well as overseas, and a research institution provided with advanced examination facilities necessary for examination of the ruptured pipe. The JAERI examination group was formed at the Tokai Research Establishment and conducted detailed and thorough examination of the pieces taken from the ruptured pipe primarily in the Reactor Fuel Examination Facility (RFEF) with the use of tools such as scanning electron microscopes and other equipments. Purpose of examination was to provide technical information in order to identify causes of the pipe rupture through examination of the pieces taken from the ruptured region of the pipe. The following findings and conclusion were made as the result of the present examination. (1) Wall thickness of the pipe was significantly reduced in the ruptured region. (2) Dimple pattern resulting from ductile fracture by shearing was observed in the fracture surfaces of nearly all of the pieces and no indication of fatigue crack growth was found. (3) Microstructure showed a typical carbon

  11. Measurements of tritium (HTO, TFWT, OBT) in environmental samples at varying distances from a nuclear generating station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kotzer, T.G.; Workman, W.J.G

    1999-12-01

    Concentrations of tritium have been measured in environmental samples (vegetation, water, soil, air) from sites distal and proximal to a CANDU nuclear generating station in Southern Ontario (OPG-Pickering). Levels of tissue-free water tritium (TFWT) and organically bound tritium (OBT) in vegetation are as high as 24,000 TU immediately adjacent to the nuclear generating station and rapidly decrease to levels of tritium which are comparable to natural ambient concentrations for tritium in the environment (approximately {<=} 60 TU). Tritium concentrations (OBT, TFTW) have also been measured in samples of vegetation and tree rings growing substantial distances away from nuclear generating stations and are within a factor of 1 to 2 of the ambient levels of tritium measured in precipitation in several parts of Canada (approximately {<=}30 TU). (author)

  12. Transient analysis on failures of feed water pump at CPR1000 nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Taking 3 x 50% motor-driven feed water pumps of CPR1000 nuclear power station as research object, and using CPR1000 digital control system simulation platform based on RELAP5 and Simulink codes, the best estimate calculation of effects on reactor operation caused by single or double failures of feed water pump and corresponding mitigation measures were performed. The results show that the effect on reactor operation caused by single failure of feed water pump is small, and the relevant parameters can quickly return to the steady-state condition before the accident. In the case of double faults of feed water pump: When the initial nuclear power is equal or less than 75% FP, the steam generator (SG) will not reach low-low level; when the initial nuclear power is above 75% FP, and the initial turbine load is equal or less than 90% FP, turbine load need step down to 50% FP to avoid SG low-low level; when the initial turbine load is above 90% FP, shutdown of the reactor is proposed. (authors)

  13. Use of intelligent loop diagrams at San Onofre Nuclear Generation Station (SONGS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The use of advanced information systems will result in five million dollars potential cost reduction and two years less time for producing over 2000 Instrumentation and Control Loop Diagrams for the three nuclear units at San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS). This new information technology will also assist plant management at SONGS in generating even larger savings from reduction in operations and maintenance costs. The key element of the new solution is the use of plant drawings, the traditional primary source of plant information, for on-line access to all plant databases and information systems, by replacing paper drawings with intelligent electronic drawings. The implementation of this concept for the Instrumentation and Control Loop Diagrams, presently in progress, is part of the Integrated Nuclear Data Management Systems (INDAMS) program at SONGS, a joint effort which includes support from Stone and Webster Advanced Systems Development Services, International Business Machines Corporation (IBM), and Dassault Systems of France. The initial results have encouraged plant management to speed up the implementation process

  14. Possibilities and limitations of analogue methods for studying the dynamics of nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1. Introduction: the present paper is devoted to analog simulation of problems related to nuclear reactors other than the simulation of the kinetic equations which is well known. 2. Thermodynamic problems: various problems relative to temperature evolution in a reactor, in a pipe, in an exchanger, in a turbine, are studied, and simulation techniques used by earlier authors are critically reviewed. 3. Pipe simulators: it is shown that this problem can be solved by the use of specialized simulators which will be described and analysed. 4. Rotating machine simulators: the particular aspect of rotating machine calculations introducing frequent use of diagrams is emphasized. A simulator requiring both digital and analogue methods is described. 5. The study of a nuclear power station: as an example it is proposed to discuss problems a rising in connection with the preceding elements (a, b, c, d) when simulating the behaviour of large nuclear plants. The part played by ordinary computing elements for the simulation of the different servomechanism transfer functions is considered and process of regulation is outlined. 6. Conclusion: the necessity of the use of high quality simulators and computers is underlined and the accuracy of the solutions is discussed. (author)

  15. Introduction of water chemistry conditions of the secondary coolant circuit with metering organic amines at nuclear power stations equipped with VVER-1000 reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyapkov, V. F.; Erpyleva, S. F.; Bykova, V. V.

    2009-05-01

    Results from introduction of new water chemistry conditions involving metering of organic amines (morpholine and ethanolamine) at nuclear power stations equipped with VVER-1000 reactors are presented.

  16. AECB staff annual assessment of the Pickering A and B Nuclear Generating Stations for the year 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the Atomic Energy Control Board (AECB) staff assessment of safety at the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station (PNGS-A and PNGS-B) for 1995. Our on-site Project Officers and Ottawa-based specialists monitored the stations throughout the year. In 1995, compliance with the Transportation Packaging of Radioactive Materials Regulations and the Cost Recovery Fees Regulations was satisfactory. The performance of the special safety systems was good. Releases of radioactive materials from the station were low and well below the legal limits for public safety. 10 tabs., 7 figs

  17. Effect of Hurricane Andrew on the Turkey Point Nuclear Generating Station from August 20--30, 1992

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    On August 24, 1992, Hurricane Andrew, a Category 4 hurricane, struck the Turkey Point Electrical Generating Station with sustained winds of 145 mph (233 km/h). This is the report of the team that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) jointly sponsored (1) to review the damage that the hurricane caused the nuclear units and the utility's actions to prepare for the storm and recover from it, and (2) to compile lessons that might benefit other nuclear reactor facilities

  18. Effect of Hurricane Andrew on the Turkey Point Nuclear Generating Station from August 20--30, 1992. [Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hebdon, F.J. [Institute of Nuclear Power Operations, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1993-03-01

    On August 24, 1992, Hurricane Andrew, a Category 4 hurricane, struck the Turkey Point Electrical Generating Station with sustained winds of 145 mph (233 km/h). This is the report of the team that the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and the Institute of Nuclear Power Operations (INPO) jointly sponsored (1) to review the damage that the hurricane caused the nuclear units and the utility`s actions to prepare for the storm and recover from it, and (2) to compile lessons that might benefit other nuclear reactor facilities.

  19. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 3 (Docket No. 50-423)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by Northeast Nuclear Energy Company, as applicant and agent for the owners, for a license to operate the Millstone Nuclear Power Station Unit 3 (Docket No. 50-423), has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located in the town of Waterford, New London County, Connecticut, on the north shore of Long Island Sound. Subject to favorable resolution of the items discussed in this report, the NRC staff concludes that the facility can be operated by the applicant without endangering the health and safety of the public

  20. Design of the system of maintenance operations occupational safety and health database application of nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the KKS code of building equipment in nuclear power station, this paper introduces the method of establishing the system of maintenance operation occupational safety and health database application. Through the application system of maintenance occupational safety and health database, it can summarize systematically all kinds of maintenance operation dangerous factor of nuclear power station, and make a convenience for staff to learn the maintenance operation dangerous factors and the prevention measures, so that it can achieve the management concept of 'precaution crucial, continuous improvement' that advocated by OSHMS. (authors)

  1. Indian Point Nuclear Power Station: verification analysis of County Radiological Emergency-Response Plans

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report was developed as a management tool for use by the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA) Region II staff. The analysis summarized in this report was undertaken to verify the extent to which procedures, training programs, and resources set forth in the County Radiological Emergency Response Plans (CRERPs) for Orange, Putnam, and Westchester counties in New York had been realized prior to the March 9, 1983, exercise of the Indian Point Nuclear Power Station near Buchanan, New York. To this end, a telephone survey of county emergency response organizations was conducted between January 19 and February 22, 1983. This report presents the results of responses obtained from this survey of county emergency response organizations

  2. Redundant design of control station in digital safety I and C system for nuclear power plant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A redundant design of control station in digital safety I and C system for nuclear power plant was introduced. A hot-backup redundant system was built by two asynchronous main controllers, which composed identical hardware. The two redundant controllers used CPLD (complex programmable logic device) to exchange status and execute arbitration. A specified link made by FIFO (first in first out) device and Ethernet PHY (physical layer) device implemented the data synchronization between the two asynchronous controllers. This design was put into practice in the design of digital I and C safety system, reached a short master-slave switching time with no disturbance, and improved the system's reliability. (authors)

  3. Development of decommissioning engineering support system (DEXUS) of the Fugen Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fugen Nuclear Power Station (NPS) was shut down permanently in March 2003, and preparatory activities are underway to decommission the Fugen NPS. An engineering system to support the decommissioning is being developed to create a dismantling plan using state-of-art software such as 3-dimensional computer aided design (3D-CAD) and virtual reality (VR). In particular, an exposure dose evaluation system using VR has been developed and tested. The total system can be used to quantify radioactive waste, to visualize radioactive inventory, to simulate the dismantling plan, to evaluate workload in radiation environments and to optimize the decommissioning plan. The system will also be useful for educating and training workers and for gaining public acceptance. (author)

  4. Recent experience related to neutronic transients in Ontario Hydro CANDU nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ontario Hydro presently operates 18 CANDU reactors in the province of Ontario, Canada. All of these reactors are of the CANDU Pressurized Heavy Water design, although their design features differ somewhat reflecting the evolution that has taken place from 1971 when the first Pickering unit started operation to the present as the Darlington units are being placed in service. Over the last three years, two significant neutronic transients took place at the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station 'A' (NGS A) one of which resulted in a number of fuel failures. Both events provided valuable lessons in the areas of operational safety, fuel performance And accident analysis. The events and the lessons learned are discussed in this paper

  5. The First Two Years of Operating Experience of the Kahl Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kahl, being the first European private atomic power station, has been operating at load since June 1961. Kahl is equipped with a boiling-water reactor, operating in an indirect cycle and with natural circulation. Its electrical net capacity is 15 MW, and the power produced until February 1963 amounts to 140 million kWh. In the paper the operating experience, particularly the extensive testing programme such as concerning transient behaviour and gammascanning, will be reviewed. Results about the operating performance of certain plant components such as control-rod-drive system, off-gas system and turbine will be presented. After this testing programme the plant has been operated at base load for some time in order to obtain realistic experience on fuel performance. After completion of the base-load phase of operation a nuclear superheating test loop will be installed and run in the Kahl reactor. (author)

  6. Construction method for Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station Unit 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Tokyo Electric Power Co., Inc. Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station Unit 5, which is a BWR plant with 1,100MW electric output, started construction in October, 1983 and began public operation on April 10, 1990. This is the first plant which fully applied the results of The Second Improvement and Standardization Program for Light Water Reactors and also the latest facility of which reliability has been much more improved using the technologies developed everywhere. Especially, by introducing the large-scale crawler crane to the construction site first in Japan, the prefabrication methods were widely applied and new methods were established to overcome the reduction of work efficiency caused by the winter season weather condition, thus reducing the construction schedule and improving safety of site work. (author)

  7. Analysis of internal events for the Unit 1 of the Laguna Verde nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume presents the results of the starter event analysis and the event tree analysis for the Unit 1 of the Laguna Verde nuclear power station. The starter event analysis includes the identification of all those internal events which cause a disturbance to the normal operation of the power station and require mitigation. Those called external events stay beyond the reach of this study. For the analysis of the Laguna Verde power station eight transient categories were identified, three categories of loss of coolant accidents (LOCA) inside the container, a LOCA out of the primary container, as well as the vessel break. The event trees analysis involves the development of the possible accident sequences for each category of starter events. Events trees by systems for the different types of LOCA and for all the transients were constructed. It was constructed the event tree for the total loss of alternating current, which represents an extension of the event tree for the loss of external power transient. Also the event tree by systems for the anticipated transients without scram was developed (ATWS). The events trees for the accident sequences includes the sequences evaluation with vulnerable nucleus, that is to say those sequences in which it is had an adequate cooling of nucleus but the remoting systems of residual heat had failed. In order to model adequately the previous, headings were added to the event tree for developing the sequences until the point where be solved the nucleus state. This process includes: the determination of the failure pressure of the primary container, the evaluation of the environment generated in the reactor building as result of the container failure or cracked of itself, the determination of the localization of the components in the reactor building and the construction of boolean expressions to estimate the failure of the subordinated components to an severe environment. (Author)

  8. Terrestrial mammal fauna and habitat in environmental assessment reports of thermal and nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yatake, Hatsuho; Nashimoto, Makoto; Chiba, Shinji [Central Research Inst. of Electric Power Industry, Abiko, Chiba (Japan). Abiko Research Lab

    2000-04-01

    We analyzed the geological distribution of mammals, relationships between ecological distribution of mammals and land use, and vegetation type in the 49 environmental assessment reports of thermal and nuclear power stations in the coastal area of Japan. Seven orders and 17 families of 66 terrestrial mammal species including subspecies were listed from the reports. This is about 40% of the total species of terrestrial mammals observed in Japan. Mammals were divided into 3 groups: distributed in the nationwide, in limited districts, and in limited area. The geological distributions of Insectivora, Rodentia, Chiroptera and naturalized mammals, of which have not been well known, were arranged in a topographic map at the scale of 1:50,000 in this survey. The characteristics of power station sites were classified into 4 categories as follows: Industrial site, Industrial-agricultural mixed site, Industrial-agricultural-forest mixed site, and forest site. The relationships between site categories and species compositions were analyzed. The listed species were fifteen species in the industrial site, however, there were thirty six species in the forest site. The mammal species were classified into six groups by vegetation types of habitat; forest-dwelling, grassland-dwelling, farmland and orchard-dwelling, wide-dwelling except residential area, wide-dwelling mammals including residential area, and residential area-dwelling mammals. (author)

  9. An aerial radiological survey of the Millstone Nuclear Power Station and surrounding area

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vojtech, R.J.

    1994-03-01

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted during the period of September 10 to 18, 1990, over a 40-square-mile (104-square-kilometer) area surrounding the Millstone Nuclear Power Station (MNPS). The MNPS is located on the Long Island Sound shoreline, three kilometers south of Waterford, Connecticut. The purpose of the survey was to measure and document the terrestrial gamma ray environment of the plant and surrounding areas. A contour map showing radiation exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level was constructed from the aerial data and overlaid on an aerial photograph and a United States Geological Survey map of the area. The exposure rates within the survey region are quite uniform. The area is characterized by an exposure rate of 10-12 microroentgens per hour including an estimated cosmic ray contribution of 3.6 {mu}R/h. This is typical of natural background. The only exception to the natural background readings is the Millstone station itself, which is characterized by an exposure rate consistent with the standard operation of the reactor units. Radionuclide assays of soil samples and pressurized-ion-chamber gamma ray measurements were obtained at five locations within the survey boundaries. These measurements were taken in support of, and are in agreement with, the aerial data. The radiological environment near the plant is consistent with normal plant operation.

  10. A modernized high-pressure heater protection system for nuclear and thermal power stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svyatkin, F. A.; Trifonov, N. N.; Ukhanova, M. G.; Tren'kin, V. B.; Koltunov, V. A.; Borovkov, A. I.; Klyavin, O. I.

    2013-09-01

    Experience gained from operation of high-pressure heaters and their protection systems serving to exclude ingress of water into the turbine is analyzed. A formula for determining the time for which the high-pressure heater shell steam space is filled when a rupture of tubes in it occurs is analyzed, and conclusions regarding the high-pressure heater design most advisable from this point of view are drawn. A typical structure of protection from increase of water level in the shell of high-pressure heaters used in domestically produced turbines for thermal and nuclear power stations is described, and examples illustrating this structure are given. Shortcomings of components used in the existing protection systems that may lead to an accident at the power station are considered. A modernized protection system intended to exclude the above-mentioned shortcomings was developed at the NPO Central Boiler-Turbine Institute and ZioMAR Engineering Company, and the design solutions used in this system are described. A mathematical model of the protection system's main elements (the admission and check valves) has been developed with participation of specialists from the St. Petersburg Polytechnic University, and a numerical investigation of these elements is carried out. The design version of surge tanks developed by specialists of the Central Boiler-Turbine Institute for excluding false operation of the high-pressure heater protection system is proposed.

  11. An aerial radiological survey of the Millstone Nuclear Power Station and surrounding area

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An aerial radiological survey was conducted during the period of September 10 to 18, 1990, over a 40-square-mile (104-square-kilometer) area surrounding the Millstone Nuclear Power Station (MNPS). The MNPS is located on the Long Island Sound shoreline, three kilometers south of Waterford, Connecticut. The purpose of the survey was to measure and document the terrestrial gamma ray environment of the plant and surrounding areas. A contour map showing radiation exposure rates at 1 meter above ground level was constructed from the aerial data and overlaid on an aerial photograph and a United States Geological Survey map of the area. The exposure rates within the survey region are quite uniform. The area is characterized by an exposure rate of 10-12 microroentgens per hour including an estimated cosmic ray contribution of 3.6 μR/h. This is typical of natural background. The only exception to the natural background readings is the Millstone station itself, which is characterized by an exposure rate consistent with the standard operation of the reactor units. Radionuclide assays of soil samples and pressurized-ion-chamber gamma ray measurements were obtained at five locations within the survey boundaries. These measurements were taken in support of, and are in agreement with, the aerial data. The radiological environment near the plant is consistent with normal plant operation

  12. The International Remote Monitoring Project -- First results of the Argentina nuclear power station field trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonino, A.; Pizarro, L.; Perez, A. [Ente Nacional Regulador Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Schoeneman, J.L.; Dupree, S.A.; Martinez, R.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States); Maxey, C. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States)

    1995-12-31

    As part of the International Remote Monitoring Project field trials, during the month of March, 1995 a Remote Monitoring System (RMS) was installed at the Embalse Nuclear Power Station in Embalse, Argentina. This system monitors the status of four typical Candu spent fuel dry storage silos. The monitoring equipment for each silo consists of analog temperature and gamma radiation sensors and digital motion and electronic fiber-optic seals connected to a wireless Authenticate Item Monitoring System (AIMS). All sensor data are authenticated and transmitted via RF link to Receiver Processor Units (RPU) coupled to Remote Monitoring System equipment located in a nearby IAEA/ENREN inspector office. One of these RPUs is connected to Remote Monitoring equipment capable of information transmission (via commercial telephone links) to Data Review Stations (DRS) at ENREN laboratories in Buenos Aires, Argentina, and at Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico. The other RPU is used for on-site data storage and analysis. It is anticipated that this information will soon be transmitted to a DRS at the ABACC facility in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. During these trials site data will be collected and analyzed periodically from Buenos Aires, Albuquerque, and Rio de Janeiro. Installation detail and data analysis will be presented in this paper.

  13. Biological investigations off the Oskarshamn nuclear power station during the 1980's

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Oscarshamn power station consists of three nuclear reactors, of which the first came into production in 1972 and the last in 1985. The power station uses large volumes of cooling-water; altogether 100 m3/s is heated 10 degrees C. During the 1970's, the investigations of the ecological effects of the use of cooling-water had a wide coverage, whereas during the 1980's, the years treated here, the investigations have mainly been concentrated on fish and bottom fauna. The temperature increase stimulates growth of many organisms and causes attraction. The cooling-water plume and the counter-currents it causes increase the transports of nutrients. The concentration of nutrients in different ways contributes to increased production further up in the food chains and strengthens the attraction of fish. The losses of fish in the cooling system have been relatively small. The parasitization frequency of eels in the receiving bay is extremely high, but otherwise there have been no abnormal disease or parasite attacks. Disturbances to the reproduction of fish in the heated water are present. The importance of this, particularly for surrounding areas, should be investigated within the continued monitoring. (authors)

  14. Investigation of atmospheric diffusion by immission measurements of xenon-133 from Fessenheim nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atmospheric xenon radioactivity was measured from mid 1983 to the end of 1984 in the surroundings of Fessenheim nuclear power station on the right bank of the Rhine. The level of activity (annual mean at Hartheim 1.6 pCi/m3 against a background of about 0.2 pCi/m3) makes it possible to carry out a diffusion study. Using a one-dimensional Gauss model, expected values of immission were calculated, taking into account the average strength of the source. Radiation balance, degree of cover or global radiation/degree of cover and wind speed, were used as parameters for atmospheric stability. The agreement between the calculated and measured immission based on weekly averages is satisfactory: about 2/3 of all calculated immissions deviate by less than a factor of 3.5 from the measured values. The accuracy of prediction of the model rises for longer averaging periods; for three months averaging, there is a factor of 1.5 deviation. The drop in concentration between the stations at different distances from the source is predicted too steeply by a factor of 1.5 by the model. (orig.)

  15. Investigation of atmospheric diffusion by immission measurements of xenon-133 from Fessenheim nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The atmospheric xenon radioactivity was measured from mid 1983 to the end of 1984 in the surroundings of Fessenheim nuclear power station on the right bank of the Rhine. The level of activity (annual mean at Hartheim 1.6 pCi/m3 against a background of about 0.2 pCi/m3) makes it possible to carry out a diffusion study. Using a one-dimensional Gauss model, expected values of immission were calculated, taking into account the average strength of the source. Radiation balance, degree of cover or global radiation/ degree of cover and wind speed, were used as parameters for atmospheric stability. The agreement between the calculated and measured immission based on weekly averages is satisfactory: about 2/3 of all calculated immissions deviate by less than a factor of 3.5 from the measured values. The accuracy of prediction of the model rises for longer averaging periods; for three months averaging, there is a factor of 1.5 deviation. The drop in concentration between the stations at different distances from the source is predicted too steeply by a factor of 1.5 by the model. (orig./HP)

  16. Second periodic safety review of Angra Nuclear Power Station, unit 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Carlos F.O.; Crepaldi, Roberto; Freire, Enio M., E-mail: ottoncf@tecnatom.com.br, E-mail: emfreire46@gmail.com, E-mail: robcrepaldi@hotmail.com [Tecnatom do Brasil Engenharia e Servicos Ltda, Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil); Campello, Sergio A., E-mail: sacampe@eletronuclear.gov.br [Eletrobras Termonuclear S.A. (ELETRONUCLEAR), Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2015-07-01

    This paper describes the second Periodic Safety Review (PSR2-A1) of Angra Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1, prepared by Eletrobras Eletronuclear S.A. and Tecnatom do Brasil Engenharia e Servicos Ltda., during Jul.2013-Aug.2014, covering the period of 2004-2013. The site, in Angra dos Reis-RJ, Brazil, comprises: Unit 1, (640 MWe, Westinghouse PWR, operating), Unit 2 (1300 MWe, KWU/Areva, operating) and Unit 3 (1405 MWe, KWU/Areva, construction). The PSR2-A1 attends the Standards 1.26-Safety in Operation of Nuclear Power Plants, Brazilian Nuclear Regulatory Commission (CNEN), and IAEA.SSG.25-Periodic Safety Review of Nuclear Power Plants. Within 18 months after each 10 years operation, the operating organization shall perform a plant safety review, to investigate the evolution consequences of safety code and standards, regarding: Plant design; structure, systems and components behavior; equipment qualification; plant ageing management; deterministic and probabilistic safety analysis; risk analysis; safety performance; operating experience; organization and administration; procedures; human factors; emergency planning; radiation protection and environmental radiological impacts. The Review included 6 Areas and 14 Safety Parameters, covered by 33 Evaluations.After document evaluations and discussions with plant staff, it was generated one General and 33 Specific Guide Procedures, 33 Specific and one Final Report, including: Description, Strengths, Deficiencies, Areas for Improvement and Conclusions. An Action Plan was prepared by Electronuclear for the recommendations. It was concluded that the Unit was operated within safety standards and will attend its designed operational lifetime, including possible life extensions. The Final Report was submitted to CNEN, as one requisite for renewal of the Unit Permanent Operation License. (author)

  17. Environmental radiological studies downstream from Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the information compiled in 1984 while assessing the environmental impact of radionuclides in aquatic releases from the Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Generating Station. Gamma-emitting radionuclides discharged since 1981 are found in many of the dietary components derived from the creeks receiving the effluent wastewater. Some soils and crops are found to contain radionuclides that originate from the contaminated water that was transferred to land during the irrigation season. 134Cs and 137Cs are the primary gamma-emitting radionuclides detected in the edible flesh of fish from the creeks. Concentrations in the flesh of fish decreased exponentially with distance from the plant. No significant differences in the 137Cs activity were found between male and female fish of equal size, but concentrations may vary in fish of different size, with the season and diet. 21% of the total 137Cs and 134Cs discharged between 1981 and 1984 is associated with the creek sediments to a distance of 27 km from the plant. Fractions of the missing inventory have been transferred to land during the irrigation season or to downstream regions more distant than 27 km from the plant. The radiocesium content of the sediments in 1984 decreased significantly in a downstream direction, much in the same manner as concentrations decreased in fish. Radioactivity originating from the plant was not above detection limits in any terrestrial food item sampled beyond 6.5 km from the plant. Based on the usage factors provided by individuals interviewed in a 1984 survey, the fish and aquatic-organism ingestion pathway contributed the largest radiological dose to humans utilizing products contaminated with the radionuclides in the liquid wastes discharged from the Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Generating Station in 1984

  18. The seismic assessment of British energy nuclear power stations and some pragmatic solutions to seismic modifications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    British Energy owns and operates 8 Nuclear Power Stations in the United Kingdom. These include seven Advanced Gas-cooled Reactor (AGR) sites and one Pressurised Water Reactor (PWR) site at Sizewell B. As part of the site licence conditions the structures, plant and systems have to be maintained throughout their operational life in such a manner as to maintain their fitness for purpose and to carry out the role allocated to them by the reference safety case. A review, referred to as the Periodic Safety Review of the plant, is carried out every 10 years. The original design intent, changes to codes of practices and the effects of any ageing and/or deterioration are considered and any remedial action necessary is identified. The effects of external hazards are considered as part of that review. Many of the older stations were not designed for, and had never been assessed for the effects of earthquakes. As a consequence, major review work against site-specific seismic hazards has been carried out. In general, the seismic assessment of the plant, systems and structures relies on 'seismic walk-down' techniques, seismic qualification databases, similarity arguments, mathematical models and code of practice comparisons. These techniques are applied to the 'success paths' set out for the two lines of protection required under British Energy 'Nuclear Safety principles'. Where any of the above arguments result in plant modifications, these are implemented on site. The assessment process is described in this paper and some pragmatic solutions to the retrofitting of restraints to, amongst others, electrical cabinets, pipework, masonry walls, and tanks are discussed. Some novel techniques such as the use of structural adhesives are described in detail. (author)

  19. Final environmental statement for Shoreham Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1: (Docket No. 50-322)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed action is the issuance of an Operating License to the Long Island Lighting Company (LILCO) for the startup and operation of the Shoreham Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1 (the plant) located on the north shore of Long Island, the State of New York, County of Suffolk, in the town of Brookhaven. The Shoreham station will employ a boiling-water reactor (BWR), which will operate at a thermal output of 2436 MW leading to a gross output of 846 MWe and a net output of about 820 MWe. The unit will be cooled by once-through flow of water from the Long Island Sound. One nuclear unit with a net capacity of 820 MWe will be added to the generating resources of the Long Island Lighting Company. This will have a favorable effect on reserve margins and provide a cost savings of approximately $62.1 million (1980 dollars) in production costs in 1980 if the unit comes on line as scheduled; additional cost savings will be realized in subsequent years. Approximately 100 acres (40 hectares) of the 500-acre (202-hectare) site of rural (mostly wooded) land owned by the applicant have been cleared. Most of this will be unavailable for other uses during at least the 40-year life of the plant. No offsite acreage has been or will be cleared. Land in the vicinity of the site has undergone some residential development that is typical for all of this area of Long Island. The operation of Shoreham Unit 1 will have insignificant impacts on this and other types of land uses in the vicinity of the site. 33 figs., 56 tabs

  20. Draft environmental statement related to the operation of Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 3 (Docket No. 50-423)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Draft Environmental Statement contains the second assessment of the environmental impact associated with the operation of Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit 3, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 51, as amended, of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations. This statement examines the environment, environmental consequences and mitigating actions, and environmental and economic benefits and costs

  1. Technology, safety and costs of decommissioning a reference boiling water reactor power station: Comparison of two decommissioning cost estimates developed for the same commercial nuclear reactor power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study presents the results of a comparison of a previous decommissioning cost study by Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) and a recent decommissioning cost study of TLG Engineering, Inc., for the same commercial nuclear power reactor station. The purpose of this comparative analysis on the same plant is to determine the reasons why subsequent estimates for similar plants by others were significantly higher in cost and external occupational radiation exposure (ORE) than the PNL study. The primary purpose of the original study by PNL (NUREG/CR-0672) was to provide information on the available technology, the safety considerations, and the probable costs and ORE for the decommissioning of a large boiling water reactor (BWR) power station at the end of its operating life. This information was intended for use as background data and bases in the modification of existing regulations and in the development of new regulations pertaining to decommissioning activities. It was also intended for use by utilities in planning for the decommissioning of their nuclear power stations. The TLG study, initiated in 1987 and completed in 1989, was for the same plant, Washington Public Supply System's Unit 2 (WNP-2), that PNL used as its reference plant in its 1980 decommissioning study. Areas of agreement and disagreement are identified, and reasons for the areas of disagreement are discussed. 31 refs., 3 figs., 22 tabs

  2. Radioactive effluents from nuclear power stations and reprocessing plants in the European Community

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents the available data on radioactive gaseous and liquid effluents discharged by nuclear power stations and nuclear fuel reprocessing plants in the European Community from 1972 to 1976. Discharges are expressed both in absolute terms and relative to the net production of electricity from the fuel. On the basis of the discharges recorded for 1976 the resulting maximum exposure of members of the population is quantified and compared with the dose limits prescribed by Euratom radiological protection standards and with the exposure resulting from natural radioactivity. It is concluded that there is no case in which a discharge could have given rise to an exposure exceeding the relevant prescribed limit. Not only did the possible maximum exposures incurred by individuals leave an appreciable safety margin relative to that limit but, for the vast majority of installations, they were comparable with or were considerably lower than the geographical and temporal variations in exposures resulting from natural radioactivity. Where environmental levels have been detectable the measured results have of course been used but, with few exceptions, the levels have remained less than the very low limits of detection currently possible. In general, where theoretical models are used to evaluate exposure, they are designed to give conservative results and hence it is likely that the true exposures are even less than those calculated

  3. Structural integrity analysis of the degraded drywell containment at the Oyster Creek Nuclear generating station.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Petti, Jason P.

    2007-01-01

    This study examines the effects of the degradation experienced in the steel drywell containment at the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station. Specifically, the structural integrity of the containment shell is examined in terms of the stress limits using the ASME Boiler and Pressure Vessel (B&PV) Code, Section III, Division I, Subsection NE, and examined in terms of buckling (stability) using the ASME B&PV Code Case N-284. Degradation of the steel containment shell (drywell) at Oyster Creek was first observed during an outage in the mid-1980s. Subsequent inspections discovered reductions in the shell thickness due to corrosion throughout the containment. Specifically, significant corrosion occurred in the sandbed region of the lower sphere. Since the presence of the wet sand provided an environment which supported corrosion, a series of analyses were conducted by GE Nuclear Energy in the early 1990s. These analyses examined the effects of the degradation on the structural integrity. The current study adopts many of the same assumptions and data used in the previous GE study. However, the additional computational recourses available today enable the construction of a larger and more sophisticated structural model.

  4. Status report on the conceivable outside pressure exerted on nuclear power stations by gaseous explosions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The following incidents to be taken into account in the whole process beginning with gas release and ending with a possible stress exerted on the power plant building are discussed in detail: Conditions leading to the release of large amounts of gas; formation of an explorable gas mixture cloud; ignition and course of explosion; pressure wave propagation in the surrounding air; construction dynamics and damaging effects. Experimental results obtainable so far and analyses of large explosions are discussed with a view to their consequences. Special emphasis is placed on the question as to whether extremely unfavourable conditions may lead to a detonation of the cloud instead of a deflagration. Considering the physical laws of cloud formation and the special initiation conditions governing free gas-air-mixtures as a result of gas dynamics and reaction kinetics it can be concluded that a detonation seems to be very unlikely. It is examined what kind of studies are still to be canied out in order to clarity the question of a possible detonation. On the other hand, it is not yet possible to give a decisive answer to the question of whether and to what extent nuclear power plants are endangered by gas cloud deflagration. Due to the complex wave field resulting from diffraction and reflexion of the incoming pressure wave by the buildings of the nuclear power station, a variety of stress functions are possible that may, under certain circumstances, lead to a selective excitation of single vibration modes of the structure. (orig.)

  5. Transparent Inflatable Column Film Dome for Nuclear Stations, Stadiums, and Cities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Bolonkin

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available In a series of previous articles, one of the authors published designs of the AB Dome which can cover a city, important large installations or subregions by a transparent thin film supported by a small additional air overpressure. The AB Dome keeps the outside atmospheric conditions from the interior protecting a city from chemical, bacterial, and radioactive weapons (wastes. The design in this article differs from previous one as this design employs an inflatable columns which does not need an additional pressure (overpressure inside the dome and is cheaper in construction (no powered air pumping station and in operation (no special entrance airlock and permanent pumping expense. When dome is supported by columns, no overpressure is required inside the dome which is important when the dome covers a damaged nuclear reactor. The nuclear reactor may produce radioactive gases and dust, and, as inflatable domes are not typically hermetically sealed, the increased pressure inside the dome can leak out gas and dust into the atmosphere. The suggested design does not have this drawback. Positive pressure gradients expel dust particles—neutral pressure gradients will not. (Negative pressure gradients may even be possible in certain configurations.

  6. Contaminated water issues at Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station. Its geological background and challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The contaminated water issues at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (NPS) of the Tokyo Electric Power Company, Incorporated (TEPCO) have not been solved yet even after 4 years since the severe nuclear accident triggered by the 2011 off the Pacific coast of Tohoku Earthquake. The issues are crucial for the safe decommissioning of the Fukushima Daiichi NPS, however there have been many problems related to the contaminated water. The groundwater bypass, that has been employed as one of the countermeasures to reduce the ingress of groundwater into the reactor and turbine buildings is not effective as expected. These are due to the lack of investigations and understanding on the complex geology and hydrogeology at the site. The hydrogeological profiles and subsequent groundwater simulation models prepared by the TEPCO and the Government of Japan are very simple. Although the disclosed columnar sections in the NPS site are limited, it was revealed that the facies of the D4 unit of the Dainenji Formation, which is mainly composed of mudstone and sandstone, significantly changes even in a local scale. In this paper, the author reviewed the geological background of the NPS site, brief history of the contaminated water issues, subsurface ground conditions below the contaminated water tanks, and problems on geological and hydrogeological data with subsequent groundwater modeling analysis. The author also pointed out the geological challenges of the on-going measures to reduce groundwater ingress, such as groundwater bypass, frozen (ice) wall, and the activating of the subdrain system in the NPS. (author)

  7. Tianwan nuclear power station radioactive waste treatment and automatic conveying and temporary store system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The treatment method of middle, low radioactive waste and the system of convey and temporal store in Tianwan nuclear power station were introduced. The primary system has some shortcoming, for example, the orientation precision isn't high, the work intensity is large, the operator is under superfluous nuclear radiation, and the capacity of storehouse isn't large, so the system need rebuild. In the premise of holding present house and facility, frequency conversion system was installed in the crane. In virtue of two laser telemeters and one revolving coder, three-dimensional coordinate parameter of crane can be measured. The application of IPC and PLC make the convey progress automatization, and the progress can be monitored by monitor system. After rebuild, the radioactivity to operator was reduced. Because of function of velocity regulating, the startup, running and braking of the crane is smooth, and the shake range of waste barrel was reduced. The crane orientation precision reach 1 mm, that reduce single waste barrel space, so the capacity of storehouse is evidently improved. (authors)

  8. The nuclear-resonance-scattering station at the PETRA II undulator beamline

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Franz, H.; Hukelmann, B.; Schneider, J.R. [HASYLAB at DESY (Germany)

    2000-07-15

    PETRA II, a 12 GeV accelerator at DESY, Hamburg, is used to produce synchrotron radiation (SR) for experiments in the hard X-ray regime when it is not running as injector for HERA. The beam from an undulator is split by a diamond crystal in Laue geometry to feed two experimental stations, one of which is now dedicated for nuclear resonance experiments. The X-ray energy may be chosen in the range from 5 to 55 keV covering all isotopes already observed with SR and many interesting candidates for new resonances. Tuning may be performed by optimising the magnetic gap and the storage ring energy. In particular, the opportunities for timing experiments are unique due to a very flexible filling mode of the storage ring. The flux at the sample position is comparable to undulator beams at ESRF. The second beamline covers higher energies up to some 300 keV and may also be used for nuclear resonance experiments.

  9. The nuclear-resonance-scattering station at the PETRA II undulator beamline

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franz, H.; Hukelmann, B.; Schneider, J. R.

    2000-07-01

    PETRA II, a 12 GeV accelerator at DESY, Hamburg, is used to produce synchrotron radiation (SR) for experiments in the hard X-ray regime when it is not running as injector for HERA. The beam from an undulator is split by a diamond crystal in Laue geometry to feed two experimental stations, one of which is now dedicated for nuclear resonance experiments. The X-ray energy may be chosen in the range from 5 to 55 keV covering all isotopes already observed with SR and many interesting candidates for new resonances. Tuning may be performed by optimising the magnetic gap and the storage ring energy. In particular, the opportunities for timing experiments are unique due to a very flexible filling mode of the storage ring. The flux at the sample position is comparable to undulator beams at ESRF. The second beamline covers higher energies up to some 300 keV and may also be used for nuclear resonance experiments.

  10. AECB staff annual assessment of the Pickering A and B Nuclear Generating Stations for the year 1996

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atomic Energy Control Board is the independent federal agency that controls all nuclear activities in Canada. A major use of nuclear energy in Canada is electricity production. The AECB assesses every station's performance against legal requirements, including the conditions in the operating licence. Each station is inspected and all aspects of the station's operation and management is reviewed. This report is the AECB staff assessment of reactor safety at the Pickering A and B Generating Stations for 1996. PNGS-A and PNGS-B operated safely during 1996. Although the risk to the workers and the public is low, major safety related changes are necessary at the stations and the sustainability of those changes needs to be demonstrated. Improvement is needed by Ontario Hydro in meeting the time limits for reporting reportable events. Ontario Hydro's follow up to events and causal factor analyses continue to need improvements. Improvements are needed to operational safety and reactor maintenance at both A and B. There are signs of improvement through Ontario Hydro's plan for recovery, and in station management changes. There also appears to be commitment to safety expressed at the highest level of the utility

  11. 75 FR 67784 - STP Nuclear Operating Company South Texas Project Electric Generating Station, Units 3 and 4...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-11-03

    ... Water Act Section 402(p) Texas Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (TPDES) general permit for... surface water quality. BMPs would be ] described in a Stormwater Pollution Prevention Plan (SWPPP) that... COMMISSION STP Nuclear Operating Company South Texas Project Electric Generating Station, Units 3 and...

  12. 77 FR 49463 - Southern California Edison, San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, Units 2 and 3; Application and...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-16

    ... Edison Company (SCE, the licensee) for operation of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS... request (LAR) for SONGS, Units 2 and 3, dated July 29, 2011, requesting approval to convert the Current... Technical Specifications (STS) for Combustion Engineering Plants, NUREG-1432. In 1996, SONGS was the...

  13. Addressing Obsolescence in Operating Power Stations by Implementation of Safety Related Digital Upgrades Paper for Spanish Nuclear Society

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Legrand, R.

    2014-07-01

    Obsolescence of Instrumentation and Controls is a major problem facing operating Nuclear Power Stations globally. AREVA is the only supplier that has supported the successful licensing, engineering, procurement, installation and commissioning of a full-scope digital Instrumentation and Control (I and C) Protection System in the United States. (Author)

  14. 78 FR 45990 - Vogtle Electric Generating Station, Units 3 and 4; Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Change to...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-30

    ... COMMISSION Vogtle Electric Generating Station, Units 3 and 4; Southern Nuclear Operating Company; Change to... Operating Company, Inc., and Georgia Power Company, Oglethorpe Power Corporation, Municipal Electric... requests to revise the design of the bracing used to support the Turbine Building structure. This...

  15. Integrated Plant Safety Assessment: Systematic Evaluation Program. Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1, Northeast Nuclear Energy Company, Docket No. 50-245. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the review of the Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1, operated by Northeast Nuclear Energy Company (located in Waterford, Connecticut). Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1, is one of ten plants reviewed under Phase II of this program. This report indicates how 137 topics selected for review under Phase I of the program were addressed. Equipment and procedural changes have been identified as a result of the review. It is expected that this report will be one of the bases in considering the issuance of a full-term operating license in place of the existing provisional operating license. This report also addresses the comments and recommendations made by the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards in connection with its review of the Draft Report, issued in November 1982

  16. Steam Dryer Segmentation and Packaging at Grand Gulf Nuclear Station - 13577

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Entergy recently performed an Extended Power Up-rate (EPU) on their Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, near Port Gibson, Mississippi. To support the EPU, a new Steam Dryer Assembly was installed during the last refueling outage. Due to limited access into the containment, the large Replacement Steam Dryer (RSD) had to be brought into the containment in pieces and then final assembly was completed on the refueling floor before installation into the reactor. Likewise, the highly contaminated Original Steam Dryer (OSD) had to be segmented into manageable sections, loaded into specially designed shielded containers, and rigged out of containment where they will be safely stored until final disposal is accomplished at an acceptable waste repository. Westinghouse Nuclear Services was contracted by Entergy to segment, package and remove the OSD from containment. This work was performed on critical path during the most recent refueling outage. The segmentation was performed underwater to minimize radiation exposure to the workers. Special hydraulic saws were developed for the cutting operations based on Westinghouse designs previously used in Sweden to segment ABB Reactor Internals. The mechanical cutting method was selected because of its proven reliability and the minimal cutting debris that is generated by the process. Maintaining stability of the large OSD sections during cutting was accomplished using a custom built support stand that was installed into the Moisture Separator Pool after the Moisture Separator was installed back in the reactor vessel. The OSD was then moved from the Steam Dryer Pool to the Moisture Separator Pool for segmentation. This scenario resolved the logistical challenge of having two steam dryers and a moisture separator in containment simultaneously. A water filtration/vacuum unit was supplied to maintain water clarity during the cutting and handling operations and to collect the cutting chips. (authors)

  17. Development of expert system for piping design in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pipings in a nuclear power station extend over about 500 km, and the design work requires the adjustment of piping arrangement and the assurance of system functions, structural strength, operability and maintainability. These complicated design works take a huge amount of time and require a lot of skilled engineers. In order to cope with these situations, in IHI it was attempted to develop an expert system for piping design to support the layout design works by employing a knowledge engineering technique which has shown the remarkable progress recently. The prototype system aiming at the application to actual plants has been completed. In this paper, the outline of this system is described. To develop the expert system, more than 200 items of the expert knowledges were extracted from skilled engineers to form the knowledge data base. The knowledge data base is expressed by more than 600 rules including LISP functions. The system has been developed by employing the AS3260C of EWS as the hardware, and ART (Automated Reasoning Tool) as the basic software. The allocation of pipe routing area, piping passage, routing, piping arrangement and the example of performance are explained. (K.I.)

  18. The radiological consequences of delaying the final dismantling of a Magnox nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The timing of the final dismantling process after shutdown and decommissioning of Magnox power stations will depend on balancing the need to reuse the site against the advantages of allowing residual radioactivity to decay. A delay of 130 years would reduce the dose commitment to dismantling staff as far as practicable and remove the need to depend on robotic systems. This in turn would lead to cost savings of about Pound 800M, at 1986 prices, totalled over all the CEGB's Magnox power. If final dismantling were to be delayed, it is intended that the residual reactor building would be maintained in a sealed, weathertight condition, and it is confidently expected that this will be achieved. This report investigates the consequences of any failure in this containment using, as a demonstration of the robustness of the radiological case for delay, some extreme scenarios in which the nuclear island is presumed to have collapsed. To demonstrate the robustness of the case for delay, the radiological consequences over a time period, which is roughly one order of magnitude both greater and smaller than the 130 y optimum are considered. The radiological consequences which might result, over a 1500 year period, from the leakage of radioactive materials from the reactor structure in the event that final dismantling were to be delayed are determined. Any engineering constraints which these radiological consequences might impose are discussed. (author)

  19. Results of the 3rd regular inspection of Unit 2 in Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The 3rd regular inspection of Unit 2 in the Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station in fiscal 1981 was carried out from October 14, 1981, to February 17, 1982. Inspection was made on the reactor proper, reactor cooling system, instrumentation and control system, waste management, reactor containment, etc. By visual, disassembling, leakage, functional, performance and other inspections, the results were as follows. (1) Cracks were detected in the impeller of a control rod-driving water pump. The main shaft and impeller were replaced. (2) During adjustment operation, nitrogen gas leaked in the containment vessel from the diaphragm of an air-operated valve in the vessel. The diaphragm was replaced. Radiation exposure dose during the inspection was all below the permissible level. During the regular inspection, the following improvement works and others were done: new installation of the trip for a reactor recirculation pump, and the replacement of the control rod-driving mechanism, power range instrumentation and the small diameter piping for a steam-engine. (Mori, K.)

  20. Retrofit of existing Dow solidification system at quad cities nuclear station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Over the past year ATCOR has been involved in the design, testing and supply of an In-container Mixing System Retrofit for Commonwealth Edison's Quad Cities Nuclear Station Solidification System. The system supplied by DOW, itself a retrofit of a urea formaldehyde system, was based upon use of 50 cubic foot containers (liners). ATCOR's retrofit increased liner capacity to 170 cubic feet and allowed in-cask solidification of highly radioactive material. This paper discusses the reasons for the decision to replace equipment within the originally furnished system and the development of the ATCOR plan to proof-test this equipment prior to delivery at the site. Results of this pre-testing, and a comparison between pre-tested conditions and the actual in-plan start-up tests are presented. Development of improved instrumentation and mechanical modifications which enhance the reliability of the ATCOR/DOW process In-container Mixing System was provided as a part of this project. Test results are presented on instruments, controls and the unique method of mechanical attachment of the Mixing Head to the solidification container

  1. International Remote Monitoring Project Argentina nuclear power station remote monitoring system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A remote monitoring system, designed to monitor spent fuel transfers from wet to dry storage, was installed at the Embalse Nuclear Power Station at Embalse, Argentina. The system consists of 6 gamma and one neutron radiation sensors. Five gamma sensors utilize RF transmission to communicate with Echelon nodes connected to a Local Operating Network (LON). One gamma and one neutron sensor are hardwired to the LON network. Each sensor Echelon node is bound to a single Datalogger that stores data until it receives an acquisition command to download to the Data Acquisition Software (DASW) database. The data from the Datalogger are transferred and stored in the Data Acquisition Software database, which resides on the IAEA MOS-MUX server. At a pre-determined interval, data from the DASW database are converted into Excel files and transferred to the IAEA database every 24 hours. At an predetermined interval all data are transferred to the distribution server located at the ARN laboratory at Ezeiza, Argentina. Remote access to data from the distribution server will be made from IAEA headquarters, Vienna, Austria, from ABACC in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, from the IAEA field office in Buenos Aires, from ARN, and from Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

  2. Reinforcing method for littoral structures in thermal and nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Recently, the thermal and nuclear power stations in Japan are often exposed directly to severe sea condition owing to the situation of their location and construction. In this paper, underwater asphalt construction method (asphalt mats, sand mastic) and hydrocrete construction method (underwater unseparable concrete) are described as the reinforcing method for littoral structures such as breakwaters, protective banks, water intakes and discharge chennels. The asphalt mats are formed in precast state, burying reinforcing core materials such as glass fiber nets or wires in asphalt mastic, the mixture of asphalt, filler and aggregate. The sand mastic is the fluid asphalt compound, in which asphalt, stone dust and sand are heated and mixed, and is poured and solidified into the gaps in rubble mounds in water, to reinforce them. The hydrocrete is the underwater concrete of high quality made by blending special polymer compound to ordinary concrete, which does not separate during free descent in water, and the contamination of water quality is scarce. The features and applications of these construction methods are explained. Also, the examples of actual construction works are shown. (Kako, I.)

  3. The network architecture and site test of DCIS in Lungmen nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Lungmen Nuclear Power Station (LMNPS) is located in North-Eastern Seashore of Taiwan. LMNPP has two units. Each unit generates 1350 Megawatts. It is the first ABWR Plant in Taiwan and is under-construction now. Due to contractual arrangement, there are seven large I and C suppliers/designers, which are GE NUMAC, DRS, Invensys, GEIS, Hitachi, MHI, and Stone and Webster company. The Distributed Control and Information System (DCIS) in Lungmen are fully integrated with the state-of-the-art computer and network technology. General Electric is the leading designer for integration of DCIS. This paper presents Network Architecture and the Site Test of DCIS. The network architectures are follows. GE NUMAC System adopts the point to point architecture, DRS System adopts Ring type architecture with SCRAMNET protocol, Inevnsys system adopts IGiga Byte Backbone mesh network with Rapid Spanning Tree Protocol, GEIS adopts Ethernet network with EGD protocol, Hitachi adopts ring type network with proprietary protocol. MHI adopt Ethernet network with UDP. The data-links are used for connection between different suppliers. The DCIS architecture supports the plant automation, the alarm prioritization and alarm suppression, and uniform MMI screen for entire plant. The Test Program regarding the integration of different network architectures and Initial DCIS architecture Setup for 161KV Energization will be discussed. Test tool for improving site test schedule, and lessons learned from FAT will be discussed too. And conclusions are at the end of this paper. (authors)

  4. Lessons learned from the seismic reevaluation of San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A seismic reevaluation program was conducted for the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, Unit No. 1 (SONGS 1). SEP was created by the NRC to provide (1) an assessment of the significance of differences between current technical positions on safety issues and those that existed when a particular plant was licensed, (2) a basis for deciding on how these differences should be resolved in an integrated plant review, and (3) a documented evaluation of plant safety. The Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP) seismic review for SONGS 1 was exacerbated by the results of an evaluation of an existing capable fault near the site during the design review for Units 2 and 3, which resulted in a design ground acceleration of 0.67g. Southern California Edison Company (SCE), the licensee for SONGS 1, realized that a uniform application of existing seismic criteria and methods would not be feasible for the upgrading of SONGS 1 to such a high seismic requirement. Instead, SCE elected to supplement existing seismic criteria and analysis methods by developing criteria and methods closer to the state of the art in seismic evaluation techniques

  5. Plume tracer experiments at Hinkley Point 'A' [Nuclear Power Station] during 1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The results of the first part of a programme of plume dispersion measurements at the Hinkley Point Nuclear Power Station are described. Using SF6 gas and pyrotechnic smoke tracer techniques developed during an earlier study at Oldbury, measurements of ground level plume behaviour out to about 4 km and elevated plume behaviour out to about 1 km have been made in a series of twelve 1 hour trials and one 15 minute trial. Whereas the Oldbury study considered passive emissions, attention in this study has been focussed on the behaviour of the buoyant shield cooling air emission. Data on plume rise and the degree of plume entrainment by the building wake and on the effects of entrainment and wind meander on plume width and concentration, are presented and discussed in relation to current modelling recommendations. A limited number of 10 minute averaged measurements of plume concentration and 41-Ar decay gamma count were also made at 2 km range and their correlation and variability examined. (author)

  6. Radiation dose reduction efficiency of buildings after the accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoru Monzen

    Full Text Available Numerous radionuclides were released from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (F1-NPS in Japan following the magnitude 9.0 earthquake and tsunami on March 11, 2011. Local residents have been eager to calculate their individual radiation exposure. Thus, absorbed dose rates in the indoor and outdoor air at evacuation sites in the Fukushima Prefecture were measured using a gamma-ray measuring devices, and individual radiation exposure was calculated by assessing the radiation dose reduction efficiency (defined as the ratio of absorbed dose rate in the indoor air to the absorbed dose rate in the outdoor air of wood, aluminum, and reinforced concrete buildings. Between March 2011 and July 2011, dose reduction efficiencies of wood, aluminum, and reinforced concrete buildings were 0.55 ± 0.04, 0.15 ± 0.02, and 0.19 ± 0.04, respectively. The reduction efficiency of wood structures was 1.4 times higher than that reported by the International Atomic Energy Agency. The efficiency of reinforced concrete was similar to previously reported values, whereas that of aluminum structures has not been previously reported. Dose reduction efficiency increased in proportion to the distance from F1-NPS at 8 of the 18 evacuation sites. Time variations did not reflect dose reduction efficiencies at evacuation sites although absorbed dose rates in the outdoor air decreased. These data suggest that dose reduction efficiency depends on structure types, levels of contamination, and evacuee behaviors at evacuation sites.

  7. Ecological effects of nuclear steam electric station operations on estuarine systems. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report summarizes the findings of studies of the impact of the Calvert Cliffs Nuclear Power Plant on the aquatic biota of Chesapeake Bay. Physical findings show that the typical radial extent of influence of the discharge on the physical and chemical environment of the Bay is rather limited (< 2 km). This suggestion is bolstered by findings of phytoplankton and zooplankton studies: when effects were noted at all, they only appeared at sampling stations nearest (within 2 km of) the discharge. Also, direct entrainment effects on these groups were either small (in the case of phytoplankton) or species-specific (in the case of zooplankton). Benthos showed mixed responses to plant operations - the populations of some species were enhanced, one species was adversely affected, and others were unaffected. The major plant effect on the benthos was due to habitat resource enrichment, and the consequence was higher standing stocks (e.g., more food for fish) in the affected area. Direct plant effects on finfish are dominated by impingement. Mortality as a result of impingement, for many species, tends to be moderate to slight. Effects as a result of entrainment of eggs and larvae are limited because the Calvert Cliffs area is not a major spawning location for any species. In sum, the Calvert Cliffs plant appears to have a limited effect on the Chesapeake Bay ecosystem. 180 references, 6 figures, 18 tables

  8. Evaluation of transient test results of Shimane Nuclear Power Station, Chugoku Electric Power Co., Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The start-up test of the plant No.1 of Shimane Nuclear Power Station, has been successfully completed for a rather short period. This report describes on the abnormal transient changes that may be considered to occur in BWR plants. The report also states appropriateness of the evaluation of transient change by plant dynamics-analyzing code. The possible causes of abnormal transient change include the systems of main steam, feed water, recirculation and control rod actuation. Start-up test items were selected by preliminary evaluation. The following close investigations were carried out prior to the start-up test; examination of the preceding plants, investigation by plant dynamics analysis, various preliminary tests before the start-up test and organization setup for the start-up test. The evaluation items in rated output test were: total closing of main steam isolation valve, turbine trip (sudden closing of main steam stop valve), load shut-off (sudden closing of regulating valve) feed pump trip, and recirculation motor-generator set trip. The plant has been confirmed to be fully safe and to have the expected performance through individual abnormal transient tests. The improvements of the analysis code will be subsequently continued and reflected to the plant design. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  9. Experiences of ultra-low-crud high-nickel control in Onagawa nuclear power station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saito, M.; Goto, Y.; Shinomiya, T.; Sato, M. [Tohoku Electric Power Co., Inc. (Japan); Yamazaki, K.; Hirasawa, H.; Yotsuyanagi, T. [Toshiba Corp. (Japan)

    2002-07-01

    We have adopted various countermeasures for worker dose reduction to plants in Onagawa Nuclear Power Station. ''Ni/Fe ratio control'' has been adopted to Unit 1, and ''ultra-low-crud high-nickel control'' has been adopted to Unit 2 and 3, along with other countermeasures like wide utilization of low Co materials, for the purpose of dose rate reduction of primary recirculation piping which is thought to be one of the main exposure sources. In this paper, we describe, first, the reason and background that ultra-low-crud high-nickel control has been adopted to Unit 2, and, second, water chemistry of Unit 2 up to the 5. cycle under ultra-low-crud high-nickel control compared to that of Unit 1 under Ni/Fe ratio control. Following those, we show brief analysis of the fuel crud of Unit 2 and water chemistry of Unit 3 only at the startup stage. (authors)

  10. Direction on characterization of fuel debris for defueling process in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yano, Kimihiko; Kitagaki, Toru; Ikeuchi, Hirotomo; Wakui, Ryohei; Higuchi, Hidetoshi; Kaji, Naoya; Koizumi, Kenji; Washiya, Tadahiro [Japan Atomic Energy Agency 4-33 Muramatsu, Tokaimura, Nakagun, Ibaraki 319-1194 (Japan)

    2013-07-01

    For the decommissioning of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (1F), defueling of the fuel debris in the reactor core of Units 1-3 is planned to start within 10 years. Preferential items in the characterization of the fuel debris were identified for this work, in which the procedure and handling tools were assumed on the basis of information on 1F and experience after the Three Mile Island Unit 2 (TMI-2) accident. The candidates for defueling tools for 1F were selected from among the TMI- 2 defueling tools. It was found that they could be categorized into six groups according to their operating principles. The important properties of the fuel debris for defueling were selected considering the effect of the target materials on the tool performance. The selected properties are shape, size, density, thermal conductivity, heat capacity, melting point, hardness, elastic modulus, and fracture toughness. Of these properties, the mechanical properties (hardness, elastic modulus, fracture toughness) were identified as preferential items, because too few data on these characteristics of fuel debris are available in past severe accident studies. (authors)

  11. Construction and operating experience of Shika Nuclear Power Station Unit No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    No. 1 plant in Shika Nuclear Power Station, Hokuriku Electric Power Co., Inc. is a Mark 1 improved type plant of 540 MW output, in which the results of improvement and standardization were adopted, and started the commercial operation in July, 1993. To this plant, the newest results of technical development based on the experiences of design, construction and operation obtained so far by Hitachi Ltd. were applied, such as the automation of operation, the advanced monitoring of operation condition by image display, the speed control of recirculation pumps by thyristors, the volume reduction and solidification of waste and so on. The detailed planning of piping and the layout by three-dimensional CAD were adopted on full scale. The site and appearance designs were carried out by regarding the harmony with nature as important. In the construction, the efficiency was increased, and the construction period was shortened by increasing the size of sections, adopting module method and so on. The sufficient performance was confirmed by all the test, and after the commercial operation for 9 months, the first periodic inspection was carried out from April, 1994, and was finished as scheduled. The features of the reactor containment vessel, reactor system and engineering safety facility, turbine system, instrumentation and control system and waste treatment facility are explained. The construction works at the site, the trial operation and the first periodic inspection are reported. (K.I.)

  12. Construction works for No.3 plant in Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the Hamaoka Nuclear Power Station, Chubu Electric Power Co., Inc., No.1 plant of 540 MW and No.2 plant of 840 MW started the operation in March, 1976, and November, 1978, respectively. As to No.3 plant with 1100 MW output, the excavation for the foundations of main buildings was begun in November, 1982, and main construction works were started in March, 1983. As of July, 1984, the rate of progress was about 65%, and the start of commercial operation is scheduled in September, 1987. The topography and geological features of the site are explained. The specifications of No.3 plant of BWR type are shown. The method of water intake was decided by considering the minimizing of the effect of the works on fishery and the coast with much drift sand, in front of the site. The major construction works are those of site preparation, water intake tower, water intake tunnel, water intake tank, drainage canal, the foundation for circulating water pipes and various ducts. The total earth volume of this construction works was about 2.1 million m3, the total quantity of ready mixed concrete was about 120,000 m3, and the reinforcement used was about 9,000 t. Attention was paid especially to the quality control and safety. The state of progress of building works was about 43%. (Kako, I.)

  13. Industrial hygiene survey report of Millstone Nuclear Power Station No. 3 construction site, Waterford, Connecticut

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Personal and area air samples were analyzed for total dust, organic solvent vapors, and metals during spray, brush, and roller painting and paint removal operations at Millstone Nuclear Power Station Number 3 construction site, Waterford, Connecticut, March 1981. Solvent exposures were generally well below their relevant standards. Total dust exposures during paint removal ranged up to 1,000 milligrams per cubic meter (mg/m3) in the containment building. The OSHA standard for total dust is 15mg/m3. Exposures to lead dusts exceeded the OSHA standard of 0.05mg/m3 in the turbine, auxiliary, and containment buildings. Chromium exposures were generally below the OSHA standard of 1mg/m3, except for 2.4mg/m3 in a personal sample taken during paint removal in the containment building. Very few engineering controls other than 3M single use respirators were observed. The authors note that the chromium exposure data is difficult to interpret as the form of the chromium is not known. If the chromium existed as hexavalent chromium exposure was excessive. The authors conclude that in view of the measured exposures to total dust, lead, and chromium, engineering controls and respiratory protection are inadequate. Recommendations include implementing better controls and respiratory protection

  14. Stade nuclear power station (KKS): four giants on tour; Kernkraftwerk Stade - KKS: Vier Riesen gehen auf Reisen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beverungen, M.; Viermann, J. [GNS Gesellschaft fuer Nuklear-Service mbH, Essen (Germany)

    2008-04-15

    The Stade nuclear power station was the first nuclear power plant in the Federal Republic of Germany to deliver heat in addition to electricity. Since 1984, district heat was distributed to a saltworks nearby. The power plant, which is situated on the banks of the river Elbe, was commissioned in 1972 after approximately 4 years of construction. Together with the Wuergassen plant, it was among the first commercial nuclear power plants in this country. E.ON Kernkraft holds a 2/3 interest, Vattenfall Europe a 1/3 interest in the nuclear power plant. The Stade nuclear power station was decommissioned on November 14, 2003 for economic reasons which, in part, were also politically motivated. In September 2005, the permit for demolition of the nuclear part was granted. The release from supervision under the Atomic Energy Act is expected for 2014. In the course of demolition, the 4 steam generators of the Stade nuclear power station were removed. These components, which have an aggregate weight of approx. 660 tons, are to be safely re-used in Sweden. In September 2007, the steam generators were loaded on board the Swedish special vessel, MS Sigyn, by means of a floating crane. After shipment to Sweden, heavy-duty trucks carried the components to the processing hall of Studsvik AB for further treatment. After 6 months of treatment, the contaminated inner surfaces of the tube bundles of the steam generators have been decontaminated successfully, among other items. This has increased the volume of material available for recycling and thus decreased the volume of residues. (orig.)

  15. Tritium releases from the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station and birth defects and infant mortality in nearby communities 1971-1988

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study was commissioned to examine whether there were elevated rates of stillbirth, birth defects, or death in the first year of life between 1971 and 1988 among offspring of residents of communities within a 25-kilometre radius of the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station. The study was also to investigate whether there were any statistical associations between the monthly airborne or waterborne tritium emissions from the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station and the rates of these reproductive outcomes. Overall analysis did not support a hypothesis of increased rates of stillbirths, neonatal mortality or infant mortality near the Pickering Nuclear Generating Station, or a hypothesis of increased birth prevalence of birth defects for 21 of 22 diagnostic categories. The prevalence of Down Syndrome was elevated in both Pickering and Ajax; however, there was no consistent pattern between tritium release levels and Down Syndrome prevalence, chance could not be ruled out for the associations between Down Syndrome and tritium releases or ground-monitored concentrations, the association was detected in an analysis where multiple testing was done which may turn up significant associations by change, and maternal residence at birth and early in pregnancy needs to be verified. The association between Down Syndrome and low-level radiation remains indeterminate when existing evidence from epidemiological studies is summed. The estimated radiation exposure from the nuclear plant for residents of Pickering and Ajax is lower by a factor of 100 than the normal natural background radiation. Further study is recommended. (21 tabs., 29 figs., 5 maps, 37 refs.)

  16. Operating Experience with Nuclear Power Stations in Member States in 2010. 2011 Edition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report is the forty-second in the Agency's series of annual reports on operating experience with nuclear power stations in Member States. For the sixth time it is issued purely in an electronic version. The report is a direct output from the Agency's Power Reactor Information System (PRIS), whose databank contains all operating experience data published in the Agency's operating experience annual reports since 1970 and basic information on power reactors, including design data. It presents operating experience data for all worldwide nuclear power plants after starting commercial operation. The PRIS databank is available free of charge to IAEA Member States through its public website and on-line application PRIS-Statistics. The web-site www.iaea.org/pris contains publicly available information about reactor units and nuclear industry results. The PRIS-Statistics (http://prisweb.iaea.org) allows direct access to the database through the Internet. This application allows registered users report generation through pre-designed reports and filters. Load, operation and availability factors are used as the basic performance indicators. Energy unavailability factors, separately for planned and unplanned unavailability (due either to causes under plant management control or external causes out of plant management control), are used as a measure of energy lost through a unit not being available. However, some ambiguity remains in the operators' reports of the unavailability data, resulting in inconsistencies in these factors. It is recognized that there is an inherent difficulty in reporting unavailability in energy due to external causes with relation to energy losses due to load following operation and grid limitation. It should be noted that, for load, operation and unavailability factors, there might be differences between the data of this report and those published elsewhere. To avoid confusion, reference should be made to the definitions given in Section 2. In

  17. Technical specifications for Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Unit 1 (Docket No. 50-416). Appendix A to License No. NPF-13

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Unit 1 Technical Specifications were prepared by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to set forth the limits, operating conditions and other requirements applicable to a nuclear facility as set forth in Section 50.36 of 10 CFR part 50 for the protection of the health and safety of the public

  18. 田湾核电站核安全文化建设%The Cultivation and Development of Nuclear Safety Culture in Tianwan Nuclear Power Station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    毛志新

    2015-01-01

    The cultivation and development of nuclear safety culture in Tianwan Nuclear Power Station go through four stages: cognition, promotion, continuous improvement and commitment to excellence, establishing a Tianwan characteristic nuclear safety culture, which is carrying through traits of a healthy nuclear safety culture, building an image of the Tianwan people, insisting on zero tolerance, and strengthen the sense of responsibility. In addition, following PDCA circulation pattern, regular safety culture assessmentin nuclear power station is carried out, areas to be improved are identified, closed-loop control is achieved. After years of efforts, with the abstraction of the safety concept, safety culture mechanism and system construction, safety culture training and publicity, etc. In Tianwan nuclear power station, the station has obtained remarkable results, ensured excellence of nuclear safety culture, so that the level of nuclear safety and operating performance are improved.%田湾核电核安全文化建设经过了认知、提升、持续改进和追求卓越4个阶段,形成了"贯彻健康核安全文化特征,打造中核田湾人形象,坚持零容忍,强化责任心"的具有田湾特色的核安全文化.另外,做到遵循PDCA循环模式,评估活动常态化,定期对电站的核安全文化进行评估,找出待改进的领域,从而改进提升,达到闭环控制的目的.田湾核电站多年在安全理念提炼、安全文化制度和体系建设、安全文化培训和宣传等方面不断努力,保证卓越的核安全文化落地,从而提升核电站的核安全水平和运行业绩.

  19. Surveillance capsule results from Oconee Nuclear Station Units 1, 2 and 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The first capsules of the reactor vessel surveillance programme of Oconee Nuclear Station Units 1, 2 and 3 were removed and evaluated after the first cycle of operation to verify neutron fluence calculations and to confirm the predictive techniques used to evaluate the irradiation response of the vessel's weld and shell materials. Fluence calculations based on dose meter evaluation demonstrated that the generic design curve was conservative and that the degree of conservatism could be reduced for future designs. Projection of current data, assuming equilibrium cycle and no change in fuel or reactor operating scheme, shows that the end-of-life fluence value at the pressure vessel inside surface will be approximately one half of the generic value. The changes in Charpy impact data, as measured by the change in RTsub(NDT) and the decrease in upper shelf energy, were compared with values obtained by procedures described in Regulatory Guide 1.99. At the very low neutron fluences where the mechanical properties of the irradiated material have not changed significantly, the actual shift measured at 35MLE is larger than the shift measured at 50ftlbf. This relationship might be reasoned because the normal relationship between energy absorption, yield strength, and lateral expansion indicates that for a given lateral expansion value, the corresponding energy absorption increases as yield strength increases. For higher neutron fluence values, it is expected that the difference between the shifts at 50ftlbf and at 35MLE will be greater. Consequently, the change in RTsub(NDT) will be controlled by the change in 35MLE temperature. (author)

  20. Draft environmental impact statement. River Bend Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federal financing of an undivided ownership interest of River Bend Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 on a 3293-acre site near St. Francisville, Louisiana is proposed in a supplement to the final environmental impact statement of September 1974. The facility would consist of a boiling-water reactor that would produce a maximum of 2894 megawatts (MW) of electrical power. A design level of 3015 MW of electric power could be realized at some time in the future. Exhaust steam would be cooled by mechanical cooling towers using makeup water obtained from and discharged to the Mississippi River. Power generated by the unit would be transmitted via three lines totaling 140 circuit miles traversing portions of the parishes of West Feliciana, East Feliciana, East Baton Rouge, West Baton Rouge, Pointe Coupee, and Iberville. The unit would help the applicant meet the power needs of rural electric consumers in the region, and the applicant would contribute significanlty to area tax base and employment rolls during the life of the unit. Construction related activities would disturb 700 forested acres on the site and 1156 acres along the transmission routes. Of the 60 cubic feet per second (cfs) taken from the river, 48 cfs would evaporate during the cooling process and 12 cfs would return to the river with dissolved solids concentrations increased by 500%. The terrace aquifer would be dewatered for 16 months in order to lower the water table at the building site, and Grants Bayou would be transformed from a lentic to a lotic habitat during this period. Fogging and icing due to evaporation and drift from the cooling towers would increase slightly. During the construction period, farming, hunting, and fishing on the site would be suspended, and the social infractructure would be stressed due to the influx of a maximum of 2200 workers

  1. Sorption (Kd) measurements in support of dose assessments for Zion Nuclear Station Decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yim S. P.; Sullivan T.; Milian, L.

    2012-12-12

    The Zion Nuclear Power Station is being decommissioned. ZionSolutions proposes to leave much of the below grade structures in place and to fill them with “clean” concrete demolition debris from the above grade parts of the facility. This study, commissioned by ZionSolutions and conducted by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) was performed to provide site-specific data for performance assessment calculations to support the request to terminate the NRC license and allow unrestricted use of the facility. Specifically, this study measured the distribution coefficient for five radionuclides of concern using site-specific soils and groundwater. The distributions coefficient is a measure of the amount of the radionuclide that will remain sorbed to the soil or concrete that is present relative to the amount that will remain in solution. A high distribution coefficient indicates most of the radionuclide will remain on the solid material and will not be available for transport by the groundwater. The radionuclides of concern are Fe-55, Co-60, Ni-63, Sr-90, and Cs-137. Tests were performed following ASTM C1733-10, Standard Test Methods for Distribution Coefficients of Inorganic Species by the Batch Method. Sr-85 was used in the testing as an analogue for Sr-90 because it behaves similarly with respect to sorption and has a gamma emission that is easier to detect than the beta emission from Sr-90. Site-specific soils included disturbed sand (sand removed during construction and used as backfill), native sand, silt/clay and silt. In addition, concrete cores from the Unit-1 Containment Building and the Crib House were broken into particles less than 2 mm in size and tested to obtain distribution coefficients for the five nuclides.

  2. Results of the first year of operation at Embalse Nuclear Power Station in Argentina

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bonino, A.; Pizarro, L.; Higa, Z. [Ente Nacional Regulador Nuclear, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Dupree, S.A.; Schoeneman, J.L. [Sandia National Labs., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-07-16

    As a part of the International Remote Monitoring Project, during March 1995, a Remote Monitoring System (RMS) was installed at the Embalse Nuclear Power Station in Embalse, Argentina. This system monitors the status of four typical Candu spent fuel dry storage silos. The monitoring equipment for each silo consists of analog sensors for temperature and gamma radiation measurement; digital sensors for motion detection; and electronic fiber-optic seals. The monitoring system for each silo is connected to a wireless Authenticate Item Monitoring System (AIMS). This paper describes the operation of the RMS during the first year of the trial and presents the results of the signals reported by the system compared with the on site inspections conducted by the regulatory bodies, ABACC, IAEA, ENREN. As an additional security feature, each sensor periodically transmits authenticated State-of-Health (SOH) messages. This feature provides assurance that all sensors are operational and have not been tampered with. The details of the transmitted information and the incidents of loss of SOH, referred to as Missing SOH Event, and the possible causes which produced the MSOHE are described. The RMS at the embalse facility uses gamma radiation detectors in a strong radiation field of spent fuel dry storage silos. The detectors are Geiger Muller tubes and Silicon solid state diodes. The study of the thermal drift of electronics in GM detectors and the possible radiation damage in silicon detectors is shown. Since the initial installation, the system has been successfully interrogated from Buenos Aires and Albuquerque. The experience gained, and the small changes made in the hardware in order to improve the performance of the system is presented.

  3. Assessment of the accident in the Harrisburg Nuclear Power Station. 2nd interim report to the Committee of the Interior of the German Federal Parliament

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report falls under the following headings: summary and main points of interest; introduction; description of the events at Harrisburg (description of the power station; sequence of events; safety assessment of the course of the accident; release of radioactive substances into the surroundings; monitoring of the surroundings; disaster protection planning); re-examination of the safety of German nuclear power stations based on current analyses of the Harrisburg accident (re-examination of nuclear power stations already in operation; results of the examinations carried out so far; re-examination of nuclear power stations for which no operating licences have yet been granted; conclusions for monitoring of the surroundings; conclusions for emergency protection planning); classification of the Harrisburg events in risk considerations and the wider social context (considerations on risk; the risk of nuclear power stations in the wider social context; optimization of technology and the wider social context; the possibilities of further reduction in the residual risk of nuclear power stations and for improving the consensus of opinion both nationally and internationally on the subject of nuclear power station safety); the repercussions of the Harrisburg accident in other countries up to the time of writing (Belgium, Finland, France, Great Britain, Italy, Holland, Japan, Sweden, Switzerland, USA, USSR). (U.K.)

  4. Application of the counterfactual method to assess of the local economic impact of a nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several studies have examined the local economic effects of nuclear power stations. However, their heterogeneity within countries and between countries indicate that one must be very cautious in drawing general conclusions about the positive and negative local economic effects of nuclear power stations over time. Using information about a specific nuclear facility in Spain and its zone of influence, we investigate the local economic impact of a nuclear facility by applying an infrequently used methodology called the “counterfactual” method. The purpose of this application of the counterfactual method is to establish what would have happened if the nuclear power plant had not been built where it was. This method permits observation of the impact of the nuclear power plant on the evolution of a set of variables whose influence is extremely important for the local area, such as the population, unemployment level, per capita income, and municipal governments’ revenues. Generalization of this method could offer the possibility of providing comparative results. However, the method must be complemented with other short-term approaches to provide a more specific analysis of the economic effects on the local actors involved and to offer incentives to policymakers to design and develop policies aimed at boosting economic activity in the area. - Highlights: • The Trillo Nuclear Power Plant plays a key role in stimulating its local environment. • The counterfactual method is estimated based on the performance of control group. • At least at the beginning of its operation the population dynamism was clear. • There is not strong evidence about the rise of employment and local public revenues. • The expenditure flow assesses the local turnover, jobs and municipal revenues

  5. Technical specifications, Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 3 (Docket No. 50-423). Appendix ''A'' to License No. NPF-49

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information is presented concerning specifications on the following aspects of the Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 3: safety limits and limiting safety system settings; limiting conditions for operation and surveillance requirements; design features; and administrative controls

  6. Technical specifications, Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Unit No. 3 (Docket No. STN 50-530): Appendix ''A'' to License No. NPF-74

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents specifications for the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Unit No. 3 concerning: safety limits and limiting safety system settings; limiting conditions for operation and surveillance requirements; design features; and administrative controls. (FI)

  7. Technical specifications, Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station, Unit No. 2 (Docket No. 50-410): Appendix ''A'' to License No. NPF-69

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents specifications for the Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station, Unit No. 2 concerning: safety limits, and limiting safety system settings; limiting conditions for operation and surveillance requirements; design features; and administrative controls. (FI)

  8. Damage of the Unit 1 reactor building overhead bridge crane at Onagawa Nuclear Power Station caused by the Great East Japan Earthquake and its repair works

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The driving shaft bearings of the Unit 1 overhead bridge crane were damaged by the Great East Japan Earthquake at Onagawa Nuclear Power Station. The situation, investigation and repair works of the bearing failure are introduced in this paper. (author)

  9. Technical Specifications, Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station, Unit No. 2 (Docket No. 50-410). Appendix A to License No. NPF-54

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents specifications for the Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station, Unit No. 2 concerning: safety limits and limiting safety system settings; limiting conditions for operation and surveillance requirements; design features; and administrative controls

  10. Integrated-plant-safety assessment Systematic Evaluation program. Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1, Northeast Nuclear Energy Company, Docket No. 50-245

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Systematic Evaluation Program was initiated in February 1977 to review the designs of older operating nuclear reactor plants to reconfirm and document their safety. The review provides: (1) an assessment of how these plants compare with current licensing safety requirements relating to selected issues, (2) a basis for deciding on how these differences should be resolved in an integrated plant review, and (3) a documented evaluation of plant safety. This report documents the review of the Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1, operated by Northeast Nuclear Energy Company (located in Waterford, Connecticut). Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1, is one of ten plants reviewed under Phase II of this program. This report indicates how 137 topics selected for review under Phase I of the program were addressed. Equipment and procedural changes have been identified as a result of the review. It is expected that this report will be one of the bases in considering the issuance of a full-term operating license in place of the existing provisional operating license

  11. Critical evaluation of the nonradiological environmental technical specifications. Volume 4. San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Adams, S.M.; Cunningham, P.A.; Gray, D.D.; Kumar, K.D.

    1976-08-10

    A comprehensive study of the data collected as part of the environmental Technical Specifications program for Unit 1 of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS 1) was conducted for the Office of Nuclear Regulatory Research of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The program included an analysis of the hydrothermal and ecological monitoring data collected during 1975. The hydrothermal analysis includes a discussion of models used in plume predictions prior to plant operation and an evaluation of the present hydrothermal monitoring program. The ecological evaluation was directed toward reviewing the strengths and weaknesses of the various sampling programs designed to monitor the planktonic, benthic, and nektonic communities inhabiting the inshore coastal area in the vicinity of San Onofre.

  12. A study on activities of nuclear stations in the U.S. in the aim of enhancing safety culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After the discovery of a Reactor Vessel Head Degradation at Davis Besse, the NRC, a regulatory body in the U.S., launched an evaluation scheme regarding nuclear stations' Safety Culture. In this evaluation, the NRC examines every inspection finding of conventional Reactor Oversight Program inspections to find out what was the most dominant causal factor with SC aspects. There are no similar analyses of this kind opened to public. This study has its goal of obtaining some useful clue for realizing how to project SC enhancement activities, by making analysis on every ROP inspection finding as well as collecting examples of good practices in improving organizational performance of stations in the U.S. As for the inspection results of ROP, there are no obvious change in the trend of number and types of ROP findings. On the other hand, because of the variety in average number of findings at stations, we could assume that actual condition of SC within a particular station quite differs from other stations. Looking at ROP reports minutely, you may realize that all U.S. stations have been making great effort to improve the efficiency of its Corrective Action Program which is regarded as the key ability to identify and fix undesirable incidents broke out at the station. It is a noteworthy aspect that CAP is not a simple program of quality assurance but also one of the items in power stations to be improved continuously. The concrete elements of this process are realizing current organizational condition by series of Performance Indicators, setting the next goals with the PIs, also evaluating the degree of the achievements with them, and modifying or re-defining new goal of the organization in accordance with new situation. This idea is introduced into broad range of organizational activities all over the U.S., which assure their improvement to be objective and effective. Simultaneously, such way of operation have its staff devoted in own responsibility, which eventually

  13. Safety Evaluation Report related to the full-term operating license for Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station (Docket No. 50-219)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Safety Evaluation Report for the full-term operating license application filed by GPU Nuclear Corporation and Jersey Central Power ampersand Light Company for the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located in Ocean County, New Jersey. The staff concludes that the facility can continue to be operated without endangering the health and safety of the public. 1 figs., 5 tabs

  14. Eddy current automatic inspection of heat exchangers in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This presentation describes the eddy current tube inspection techniques for heavy heat exchangers in nuclear power stations. The purpose of these eddy current tests, is first to determine the integrity of the heat exchanger tubes, and to characterize the related types of defects in each case following to their analysis and cause determination and subsequent inspection planning. This task requires a group highly qualified personnel with high tech automate equipment. The organization of the group required a correct function and task assignment in order to achieve efficiency in scheduling, with simultaneous inspection to different components in a continuous base and uninterruptedly. A lead specialist is in charge of the group, which is set up by several shift supervisors, a qualified tele manipulator installation crew a number of qualified tele manipulator operators, and the specialist for data acquisition and certified eddy current signal evaluators plus some other support technicians and administrations helpers. In order to comply with inspection requirements, a bunch of technical procedures had to be developed. The following equipment is available nowadays: Zetec SM-13, SM-23 and SM-22 tele manipulators for inspection probes positioning, with different shapes and configuration (rotating probes, flexible probes for U-Bends, and magnetic saturation probes endowed with their own driving units) and remote data acquisition units identified as MIZ-18 A and MIZ-30, which are remotely operated from a mobile lab installed in a trailer, outside the reactor building. The available equipment allows a simultaneous inspection of three different plant components (two steam generators and a moderator heat exchanger). We are also in a position of performing eddy current tube inspection in more than a NSP at the same time. The Zetec Eddynet software is used in the manipulator operation and for the data acquisition and defect evaluation. This software operates within Windows

  15. Safety-evaluation report related to operation of McGuire Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2. Docket Nos. 50-369 and 50-370

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report supplements the Safety Evaluation Report Related to the Operation of McGuire Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2 (SER (NUREG-0422)) issued in March 1978 by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with respect to the application filed by Duke Power Company, as applicant and owner, for licenses to operate the McGuire Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-369 and 50-370). The facility is located in Mecklenburg County, North Carolina, about 17 mi north-northwest of Charlotte, North Carolina. This supplement provides information related to issuance of a full-power authorization for Unit 2. The staff concludes that the McGuire Nuclear Station can be operated by the licensee without endangering the health and safety of the public

  16. Water supply for the Nuclear Rocket Development Station at the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's Nevada Test Site

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Richard Arden

    1972-01-01

    The Nuclear Rocket Development Station, in Jackass Flats, occupies about 123 square miles in the southwestern part of the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission's Nevada Test Site. Jackass Flats, an intermontane valley bordered by highlands on all sides except for a drainage outlet in the southwestern corner, has an average annual rainfall of 4 inches. Jackass Flats is underlain by alluvium, colluvium, and volcanic rocks of Cenozoic age and, at greater depth, by sedimentary rocks of Paleozoic age. The alluvium and the colluvium lie above the saturated zone throughout nearly all of Jackass Flats. The Paleozoic sedimentary rocks contain limestone and dolomite units that are excellent water producers elsewhere ; however, these units are too deep in Jackass Flats to be economic sources of water. The only important water-producing unit known in the vicinity of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station is a welded-tuff aquifer, the Topopah Spring Member of the Paintbrush Tuff, which receives no significant recharge. This member contains about 500 feet of highly fractured rock underlying an area 11 miles long and 3 miles wide in western Jackass Flats. Permeability of the aquifer is derived mostly from joints and fractures; however, some permeability may be derived from gas bubbles in the upper part of the unit. Transmissivity, obtained from pumping tests, ranges from 68,000 to 488,000 gallons per day per foot. Volume of the saturated part of the aquifer is about 3.5 cubic miles, and the average specific yield probably ranges from 1 to 5 percent. The volume of ground water in storage is probably within the range of 37-187 billion gallons. This large amount of water should be sufficient to supply the needs of the Nuclear Rocket Development Station for many years. Water at the Nuclear Rocket Development Station is used for public supply, construction, test-cell coolant, exhaust cooling, and thermal shielding during nuclear reactor and engine testing, and washdown. Present (1967) average

  17. 76 FR 48184 - Exelon Nuclear, Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station, Unit 1; Exemption From Certain Security...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-08

    ... a permanently shut down nuclear reactor facility. PBAPS Unit 1 was a high-temperature, gas-cooled... nuclear power reactors against radiological sabotage,'' paragraph (b)(1) states, ``The licensee shall... its objective to provide high assurance that activities involving special nuclear material are...

  18. Final environmental statement related to the operation of Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 3 (Docket No. 50-423)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Final Environmental Statement contains the second assessment of the environmental impact associated with the operation of Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit 3, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 51, as amended, of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations. This statement examines the environment, environmental consequences and mitigating actions, and environmental and economic benefits and costs. Land use and terrestrial and aquatic ecological impacts will be small. Operational impacts to historic and archeologic sites will be small. The effects of routine operations, energy transmission, and periodic maintenance of rights-of-way and transmission facilities should not jeopardize any populations of endangered or threatened species. No significant impacts are anticipated from normal operational releases of radioactivity. The risk of radiation exposure associated with accidental release of radioactivity is very low. The net socioeconomic effects of the project will be beneficial. On the basis of the analysis and evaluation set forth in this environmental statement, it is concluded that the action called for under NEPA and 10 CFR 51 is the issuance of an operating license for Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit 3. 101 references, 33 figures, 30 tables

  19. Projected costs of generating electricity from nuclear and coal-fired power stations for commissioning in 1995

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report updates and extends the previous NEA study, ''The Costs of Generating Electricity in Nuclear and Coal-fired Power Stations'', published by the OECD in late 1983. Despite the changed expectations concerning coal prices and the considerable movements in exchange rates since the first study was completed, the conclusions remain essentially the same. Nuclear Power is projected to be economically superior by a significant margin to coal-fired plants for base load electricity production in Europe, Japan and some regions of North America. In areas of North America in close proximity to supplies of cheap coal, this would be the more economic fuel, unless future nuclear investment costs can be reduced to match the best US and Canadian experience. In all regions considered, the economic advantage of both coal and nuclear over oil and gas-fired plants for commissioning in the mid-1990s is expected to be substantial. These conclusions are based on an analysis of cost projections for 900 MWe to 1400 MWe Light Water Reactors to be commissioned in 1995, operating at a levelised load factor of about 72 per cent over an assumed 25 years economic life and calculated with a 5 per cent (real) discount rate. This parallels the reference reactor selected for the NEA report ''The Economics of the Nuclear Fuel Cycle'', which was published by the OECD in June 1985, though it deviates somewhat from the reference conditions of the previous generation cost study. Contemporary coal-fired stations ranging in capacity from 330 MWe to 700 MWe with the same assumed economic life and load factor provide the basis for comparison. Some data are included on CANDU Pressurised Heavy Water Reactors, and a brief comment is annexed on the relevance of the comparisons for the smaller plants that may be of interest to countries with smaller electricity networks or where special circumstances apply

  20. Station Black-Out Analysis with MELCOR 1.8.6 Code for Atucha 2 Nuclear Power Plant

    OpenAIRE

    Analia Bonelli; Oscar Mazzantini; Martin Sonnenkalb; Marcelo Caputo; Juan Matias García; Pablo Zanocco; Marcelo Gimenez

    2012-01-01

    A description of the results for a Station Black-Out analysis for Atucha 2 Nuclear Power Plant is presented here. Calculations were performed with MELCOR 1.8.6 YV3165 Code. Atucha 2 is a pressurized heavy water reactor, cooled and moderated with heavy water, by two separate systems, presently under final construction in Argentina. The initiating event is loss of power, accompanied by the failure of four out of four diesel generators. All remaining plant safety systems are supposed to be avail...

  1. Summary of Great East Japan Earthquake response at Onagawa Nuclear Power Station and further safety improvement measures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A large earthquake occurred on March 11, 2011 and tsunami was generated following it. The East Japan suffered serious damage by the earthquake and tsunami. This is called the Great East Japan Earthquake. Onagawa Nuclear Power Station (NPS) is located closest to the epicenter of Great East Japan Earthquake. We experienced intense shake by the earthquake and some flooding from the tsunami, however, we have succeeded safely cold shutdown of the reactors. In this paper, we introduce summary of Great East Japan Earthquake response a Onagawa NPS and safety improvement measures which are based on both experience of Onagawa NPS and lesson from Fukushima Daiichi NPS accident. (author)

  2. Dresden Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 1: Primary cooling system chemical decontamination: Draft environmental statement (Docket No. 50-10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The staff has considered the environmental impact and economic costs of the proposed primary cooling system chemical decontamination at Dresden Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1. The staff has focused this statement on the occupational radiation exposure associated with the proposed Unit 1 decontamination program, on alternatives to chemical decontamination, and on the environmental impact of the disposal of the solid radioactive waste generated by this decontamination. The staff has concluded that the proposed decontamination will not significantly affect the quality of the human environment. Furthermore, any impacts from the decontamination program are outweighed by its benefits. 2 figs., 7 tabs

  3. Inventory estimation of 137Cs in radioactive wastes generated from contaminated water treatment system in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the analysis of data from contaminated water, the concentration of 137Cs in radioactive waste such as used cesium adsorption vessels and sludge generated from the Cesium Adsorption Device and Second Cesium Adsorption Device and from the Decontamination Device, which were operating or suspended as a part of the contaminated water treatment system at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station was calculated. An estimate is made of the total amount of 137Cs recovered by decontamination from 28 June, 2011 to 12 August, 2014. (author)

  4. The Atomic Energy Control Board criteria for identification and evaluation of fire hazards in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents information for the identification and evaluation of fire hazards in nuclear power stations. The report consists of two volumes. Volume 1 contains background material which outlines tools and analytical techniques currently available to deterministically analyse fire hazards. Volume 2 presents criteria for evaluating fire hazard reports. The criteria are consistent with the existing AECB regulatory approach in Canada and cover the topics which should be included in a fire hazard analysis. This volume also provides details of each topic so that the quality of an analysis may be evaluated

  5. The design of 985MW, 2-pole, 3000 rpm turbine generators for Daya Bay nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The philosophy and details of the design of a 985 MW, 1158 MVA, 3000 rpm turbine generator, two of which are under construction in the United Kingdom for the Daya Bay nuclear power station in China, are presented. A general description of the generator is followed by a more detailed account of the rotor and stator design, the excitation system and auxiliary systems including hydrogen seals, the stator winding water system and the hydrogen control system. The transport of these large units and the possible future development of even larger unit ratings are briefly considered. (U.K.)

  6. Selection and Assessment of Possible Sites for a Nuclear Power Station to Provide Electricity for the Mexican Grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The fast growth of the country's power consumption and corresponding rise in cost for maintaining oil and gas reserves at the level required to meet future demands make it necessary to investigate the possibility of using other national power sources, such as coal and fissionable fuels. In view of the high cost of capital in Mexico and the high ratio of unit installation costs to unit production costs for nuclear power stations, it is concluded that only reactors with capacities of more than 300 MW(e), operating as base units with load factors above 80%, will be able to compete with conventional power stations in the near future. Estimates of maximum power requirements and demands on the national grids between 1966 and 1976 are used to assess the practicability of incorporating a 300-MW(e) nuclear power station in the central grid. In conjunction with a 200-MW(e) pumping plant, this could operate throughout its life with a mean load factor of above 85%. Safety considerations and the shortage of water preclude the Valle de Mexico as a possible site for a nuclear power station. Factors such as these and the elimination of irrigated farming areas, which in Mexico can usually be created only by very costly investment in labour and plant, will be the criteria governing the delimitation, in the three basins adjoining the Valle de Mexico, of the areas regarded as suitable for siting power reactors. Account has been taken only of areas lying between 50 and 100 km from Mexico City which, with its surrounding industrial areas, accounts for 80% of the total load on the grid., Preliminary optimization calculations in connection with the present-worth installation and operating costs of transmission lines for three possible sites, two possible installed capacities (500 and 1000 MW) and two possible voltages corresponding to the standardized values used in the grid (85 and 220 kV) indicate that 85 kV should be adopted if the installed capacity is 500 MW and 220 kV if it is 1000

  7. A report on anti-earthquake countermeasures of the switchyard etc. with a view to securing reliability of offsite power supply for Nuclear Power Stations etc. (Attachment)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Submission of a report on anti-earthquake countermeasures of the switchyard etc. with a view to securing reliability of offsite power supply for Nuclear Power Stations etc. to Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency of Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry

  8. Maintenance and life assessment of steam generators at Embalse Nuclear Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The Embalse Nuclear Generating Station (ENGS) has four vertical I-800 U-tubes Steam Generators (SGs) manufactured by Babcock and Wilcox (B and W). They are one of the most important components from the point of view of safety and cost-related elements for potential life extensions in case of a replacement thereof. A Plant Life Management program has commenced covering the entire plant and one of the first pilot study was the SG Life Assessment (LA), which consisted in a systematic way to evaluate the aging mechanisms focused on the plant refurbishment and life extension. Because of this, maintenance-based ageing assessment from beginning of operation has been analyzed and LA-frame maintenance and inspections programs were carried out. The most important taken actions have been the Eddy Current (EC) In Service Inspection Program (ISI) which performs 100% of the tubes of two SG every 1.5 years started in 1992, the mechanical cleaning by blasting of the internal tube surface, the sludge removal from the secondary side tubesheet, the divider plate replacement, the installation of antivibration bars (AVB's), installation of TSP inspection ports and an exhaustive inspection of the secondary internals as a preliminary result of the LA. The most relevant aging mechanism up to 2004 was the Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) of U-bend supports and consequent fretting of tubes. The eddy current inspections allowed the fretting degradation to be detected and mitigated by installing AVB's. Currently, efficiency of this mitigating action is followed by vibration measurements and visual inspections. However, other degradation mechanism that could have origin due to the Ubend FAC like loose part damage (LPD) it is being analyzed since could be an issue in the near future. At present, FAC degradation on the cold leg side and sludge deposition on the hot leg side of the carbon steel Tube Support Plates (TSP) are the main ageing issues at the point that SGs life extension is

  9. Maintenance and life assessment of steam generators at Embalse Nuclear Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Embalse Nuclear Generating Station (ENGS) has four vertical I-800 U-tubes Steam Generators (SGs) manufactured by Babcock and Wilcox (B and W). They are one of the most important components from the point of view of safety and cost-related elements for potential life extensions in case of a replacement thereof. A Life Management program has been started covering the entire plant and starting with the Life Assessment (LA) of this component which consists in a systematic way to evaluate aging mechanisms focused on the plant refurbishment and life extension. Because of this, maintenance-based ageing assessment from beginning of operation is analyzed and current LA-frame maintenance and inspections programs are carried out in order to maintain a high availability of the SGs then to enable the planning for the plant life extension. The most important taken actions have been the Eddy Current (EC) In Service Inspection program which performs 100% of the tubes of two SG every 1.5 years started in 1992, the mechanical cleaning by blasting of the internal tube surface, the sludge removal from the secondary side tubesheet, the divider plate replacement, the installation of antivibration bars (AVB's), installation of TSP inspection ports and an exhaustive inspection of the secondary internals as a preliminary result of the Life Assessment started during early 2000. The most relevant aging mechanism up to 2004 was the Flow Accelerated Corrosion (FAC) of U-bend supports and consequent fretting of tubes. The eddy current inspections allowed the fretting degradation to be detected and mitigated by installing AVB's. Currently, efficiency of this mitigating action is being performed by vibration measurements and visual inspections. However, other degradation mechanism that could have origin due to the U-bend FAC like loose part damage (LPD) is being to be analyzed since could be an issue in the future. At present, FAC degradation on the cold leg side and sludge deposition on the

  10. Impact of offshore nuclear generating stations on recreational behavior at adjacent coastal sites. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multi-faceted investigation was undertaken to project the impact of offshore nuclear power plants on beach visitation at adjacent beaches. 1. Related literature was reviewed concerning human adjustment to natural hazards, risk-taking behavior, and public attitudes toward nuclear power. 2. Approximately 2400 people were interviewed at beaches in three states with respect to: (a) intended avoidance of beaches near a hypothetical floating nuclear plant (FNP), (b) relative importance of proximity to a FNP, when compared to other beach attributes, (c) onshore-offshore preference for coastal nuclear plant location, (d) behavioral impact of NRC licensing of FNP's, (e) relative tourism impact of coastal nuclear plant compared to coastal coal-fired plant, (f) public concerns about nuclear safety, (g) public attitudes toward alternative energy sources, (h) public confidence in sources of information about nuclear power, (i) visual impact of a FNP, and (j) knowledge about nuclear power. 3. Four beach areas near currently operating coastal nuclear power plants were studied to assess impacts on tourism resulting from plant construction. Data suggest that proximity of a FNP is less important than other beach attributes in determining beach attractiveness, probably no more than (and perhaps less than) 5% to 10% of current beach patrons would avoid a beach after FNP siting three miles directly offshore, and impact of a FNP would decrease exponentially as distance away increased

  11. Impact of offshore nuclear generating stations on recreational behavior at adjacent coastal sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A multi-faceted investigation was undertaken to project the impact of offshore nuclear power plants on beach visitation at adjacent beaches. Related literature was reviewed concerning human adjustment to natural hazards, risk-taking behavior, and public attitudes toward nuclear power. Approximately 2400 people were interviewed at beaches in three states with respect to: intended avoidance of beaches near a hypothetical floating nuclear plant (FNP), relative importance of proximity to a FNP, when compared to other beach attributes, onshore-offshore preference for coastal nuclear plant location, behavioral impact of NRC licensing of FNPs, relative tourism impact of coastal nuclear plant compared to coastal coal-fired plant, public concerns about nuclear safety, public attitudes toward alternative energy sources, public confidence in sources of information about nuclear power, visual impact of a FNP, and knowledge about nuclear power. Four beach areas near currently operating coastal nuclear power plants were studied to assess impacts on tourism resulting from plant construction. Data suggest that proximity of a FNP is less important than other beach attributes in determining beach attractiveness, probably no more than (and perhaps less than) 5% to 10% of current beach patrons would avoid a beach after FNP siting three miles directly offshore, and impact of a FNP would decrease exponentially as distance away increased

  12. XOQDOQ: computer program for the meteorological evaluation of routine effluent releases at nuclear power stations. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Provided is a user's guide for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) computer program X0QDOQ which implements Regulatory Guide 1.111. This NUREG supercedes NUREG-0324 which was published as a draft in September 1977. This program is used by the NRC meteorology staff in their independent meteorological evaluation of routine or anticipated intermittent releases at nuclear power stations. It operates in a batch input mode and has various options a user may select. Relative atmospheric dispersion and deposition factors are computed for 22 specific distances out to 50 miles from the site for each directional sector. From these results, values for 10 distance segments are computed. The user may also select other locations for which atmospheric dispersion deposition factors are computed. Program features, including required input data and output results, are described. A program listing and test case data input and resulting output are provided

  13. XOQDOQ: computer program for the meteorological evaluation of routine effluent releases at nuclear power stations. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sagendorf, J.F.; Goll, J.T.; Sandusky, W.F.

    1982-09-01

    Provided is a user's guide for the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission's (NRC) computer program X0QDOQ which implements Regulatory Guide 1.111. This NUREG supercedes NUREG-0324 which was published as a draft in September 1977. This program is used by the NRC meteorology staff in their independent meteorological evaluation of routine or anticipated intermittent releases at nuclear power stations. It operates in a batch input mode and has various options a user may select. Relative atmospheric dispersion and deposition factors are computed for 22 specific distances out to 50 miles from the site for each directional sector. From these results, values for 10 distance segments are computed. The user may also select other locations for which atmospheric dispersion deposition factors are computed. Program features, including required input data and output results, are described. A program listing and test case data input and resulting output are provided.

  14. How Space Radiation Risk from Galactic Cosmic Rays at the International Space Station Relates to Nuclear Cross Sections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Zi-Wei; Adams, J. H., Jr.

    2005-01-01

    Space radiation risk to astronauts is a major obstacle for long term human space explorations. Space radiation transport codes have thus been developed to evaluate radiation effects at the International Space Station (ISS) and in missions to the Moon or Mars. We study how nuclear fragmentation processes in such radiation transport affect predictions on the radiation risk from galactic cosmic rays. Taking into account effects of the geomagnetic field on the cosmic ray spectra, we investigate the effects of fragmentation cross sections at different energies on the radiation risk (represented by dose-equivalent) from galactic cosmic rays behind typical spacecraft materials. These results tell us how the radiation risk at the ISS is related to nuclear cross sections at different energies, and consequently how to most efficiently reduce the physical uncertainty in our predictions on the radiation risk at the ISS.

  15. Alteration in reactor installation (addition of Unit 2) in the Sendai Nuclear Power Station of Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The deliveration by the Nuclear Safety Commission was commenced on the alteration in reactor installation, as it had been inquired by the Ministry of International Trade and Industry. The alteration is the additional installation of the reactor No. 2 in the Sendai Nuclear Power Station, Kyushu Electric Power Co., Inc. It is a PWR power plant with thermal output of about 2,660 MW (electric output of 890 MW), to be installed, adjoining to the reactor No. 1 of the same type and capacity under construction. In the examination by MITI, it was confirmed that the technological capabilities for its construction and operation and the radiation protection measures in power generation are both sufficient. The contents of the examination include the siting conditions, the location and construction of reactor facilities, etc. (J.P.N.)

  16. US central station nuclear electric generating units: significant milestones (status as of July 1, 1980)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The status of 189 US nuclear power plants is reported in a table which gives the name, owner, capacity, type, NSSS architect and contractor and data of public announcement, NSSS order, licensing, and initial operation. The plants are also indexed according to state, region, utility, and alphabetical name. The utility nuclear steam supply system orders are also listed

  17. Oconee Nuclear Station, Units 1, 2, and 3. Semiannual operating report, January--June 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information is presented concerning operations, performance characteristics, changes, tests, inspections, containment leak tests, maintenance, primary coolant chemistry, station staff changes, reservoir investigations, plume mapping, and operational environmental radioactivity monitoring data for oconee Units 1, 2, and 3. The non-radiological environmental surveillance program is also described. (FS)

  18. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Shoreham Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 1 (Docket No. 50-322). Supplement No. 9

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supplement 9 (SSER 9) to the Safety Evaluation Report on Long Island Lighting Company's application for a license to operate the Shoreham Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1, located in Suffolk County, New York, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This supplement addresses several items that have been reviewed by the staff since the previous supplement was issued

  19. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Shoreham Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 1 (Docket No. 50-322). Supplement No. 8

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supplement 8 (SSER 8) to the Safety Evaluation Report on Long Island Lighting Company's application for a license to operate the Shoreham Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1, located in Suffolk County, New York, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This supplement addresses several items that have been reviewed by the staff since the previous supplement was issued

  20. Safety-evaluation report related to the operation of Shoreham Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 1 (Docket No. 50-322)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supplement 4 (SSER 4) to the Safety Evaluation Report on Long Island Lighting Company's application for a license to operate the Shoreham Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1, located in Suffolk County, New York, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This supplement addresses several items that have been reviewed by the staff since the previous supplement was issued

  1. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Shoreham Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 1 (Docket No. 50-322). Supplement No. 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supplement 6 (SSER 6) to the Safety Evaluation Report on Long Island Lighting Company's application for a license to operate the Shoreham Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1, located in Suffolk County, New York, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This supplement addresses several items that have been reviewed by the staff since the previous supplement was issued

  2. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Shoreham Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 1 (Docket No. 50-322). Supplement No. 7

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supplement 7 (SSER 7) to the Safety Evaluation Report on Long Island Lighting Company's application for a license to operate the Shoreham Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1, located in Suffolk County, New York, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This supplement addresses several items that have been reviewed by the staff since the previous supplement was issued

  3. Advanced LP turbine installation at 1300 MW nuclear power station Unterweser

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports on Preussen Elektra AG's Unterweser power plant. The steam turbine-generator features a disk-type LP turbine rotor design developed in the late 1960's to early 1970's. This rotor design has been installed in 19 nuclear power plants. The 47 rotors in these plants have been in operation for an average of almost 10 years. The design of the 1970 vintage nuclear LP turbine rotors was based on extensive experience gained with disk-type rotors of fossil turbines built in the 1950's. When EPRI reported about corrosion cracking in nuclear LP turbines, a program was initiated by Siemens/KWU as original steam turbine supplier to ultrasonically inspect all their disk-type rotors in nuclear power plats. Indications on one rotor disk in the Unterweser plant was found. This single event was the only one found out of 310 disks inspected in nuclear power plants

  4. Analysis of data from sensitive U.S. monitoring stations for the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear reactor accident.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biegalski, S R; Bowyer, T W; Eslinger, P W; Friese, J A; Greenwood, L R; Haas, D A; Hayes, J C; Hoffman, I; Keillor, M; Miley, H S; Moring, M

    2012-12-01

    The March 11, 2011 9.0 magnitude undersea megathrust earthquake off the coast of Japan and subsequent tsunami waves triggered a major nuclear event at the Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power station. At the time of the event, units 1, 2, and 3 were operating and units 4, 5, and 6 were in a shutdown condition for maintenance. Loss of cooling capacity to the plants along with structural damage caused by the earthquake and tsunami resulted in a breach of the nuclear fuel integrity and release of radioactive fission products to the environment. Fission products started to arrive in the United States via atmospheric transport on March 15, 2011 and peaked by March 23, 2011. Atmospheric activity concentrations of (131)I reached levels of 3.0×10(-2) Bqm(-3) in Melbourne, FL. The noble gas (133)Xe reached atmospheric activity concentrations in Ashland, KS of 17 Bqm(-3). While these levels are not health concerns, they were well above the detection capability of the radionuclide monitoring systems within the International Monitoring System of the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban Treaty. PMID:22137556

  5. The impact of nuclear power stations and of a fuel reprocessing plant on the Rhone river and its prodelta

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Rhone, with its 6 nuclear sites (17 reactors of various types and a fuel reprocessing unit), presents a relevant example for comparing the impact of these various installations on the aquatic ecosystem. Artificial radioactivity (γ emitters, Pu, 3H, 90Sr...) and natural radioactivity are monitored in sediments and various living organisms in the river and its prodelta. A summary of the radioecological procedure is given and illustrated with examples selected from results obtained over the last fifteen years (data resulting from about 7500 samples taken up- and downstream of the installations and in the prodelta). The evolution of results obtained during this period by γ spectrometry on fish up- and downstream of the nuclear power station at Bugey and the Marcoule fuel reprocessing unit is presented. The role of aquatic vegetation as indicator of radiocontamination is also illustrated. The evolution in the concentration levels of γ emitting artificial radionuclides in sediments and mussels in the prodelta is commented on in order to show the global radioecological impact of the Rhone in the Mediterranean sea. The analyses presented show that it is possible to quantify the influence of each source term on the total artificial radioactivity of the compartments of the ecosystem. The source terms are atmospheric fallout from early nuclear weapon tests and of the Chernobyl accident, and liquid wastes of various composition from nuclear installations

  6. Proceedings of the workshop on future control station designs and human performance issues in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nuclear community is currently at a stage where new reactors are being built, advanced reactors are being planned, and existing reactors are undergoing various forms of modernization of their control stations. Nuclear power plants are characterised by a high degree of complexity, where efficient and safe performance is dependent on both a sound technical design and effective teamwork and work practices. Team interactions have long traditions in current nuclear power plants. The way people operate and maintain the plants may need to accommodate technical advances associated with control station modernization and advanced plant control stations. The nuclear community likely to see the introduction of new designs, new tools to support the staff, changes to staffing types and levels, concepts of operation for new reactors that are different from current reactors, e.g., multi-unit control, possible remote operation, distributed decision making, and cooperation across distances. Based on recent experience, there is limited knowledge about human performance issues with regard to upgraded control rooms. However, even less knowledge exists regarding operation and maintenance of control stations for future and more advanced reactor designs. In order to explore these issues, the CSNI Special Experts' Group on Human and Organisational Factors (SEGHOF), now the Working Group on Human and Organizational Factors (WGHOF), and the Halden Reactor Project (HRP) hosted a joint workshop which provided an international forum for utilities, vendors, research bodies and regulators to discuss human performance issues related to control stations for future nuclear power plant designs and for modified control rooms for existing plants. The Norwegian petroleum industry also shared their experiences, especially with integrated and distributed operations among off-shore and on-shore control centres. There were 74 participants from 20 countries at the workshop. Twenty-two papers were

  7. Application of reliability-centered maintenance to the auxiliary feedwater system at San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reliability-centered maintenance (RCM) is a systematic methodology for defining applicable and effective preventive maintenance (PM) tasks. In 1984, the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) studied the air transport industry's RCM program as a candidate for technology transfer to the nuclear power industry. EPRI initiated two RCM pilot projects that directly utilized the RCM methodology developed by the aviation industry. The first RCM application was to the component cooling water systems of Florida Power and Light's Turkey Point Units 3 and 4. The second application was to the main feedwater system at Duke Power's McGuire Station. The results of these studies clearly indicate the benefits of the system-oriented RCM approach, and many areas for cost-effective improvements to PM programs were identified. After the completion of these two pilot studies, Southern California Edison and EPRI initiated an application of RCM to the auxiliary feedwater (AFW) system at the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 2. In contrast to the previous EPRI-sponsored applications to normally operating systems, the AFW system is a standby safety system. The study results demonstrate the usefulness of extending the RCM methodology to standby safety systems. The specific results show promise of reducing the PM costs for the AFW system at San Onofre while maintaining highly reliable system performance. The recommendations from this study are currently being considered for implementation by the plant maintenance staff

  8. Evaluation of environmental data relating to selected nuclear power plant sites. The Zion Nuclear Power Station site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murarka, I.P.; Policastro, A.; Daniels, E.; Ferrante, J.; Vaslow, F.

    1976-11-01

    Environmental monitoring data for the years 1972 through 1975 pertaining to the Zion Station, which began commercial operation in 1974, were analyzed by the most practical qualitative and quantitative methods. Thermal plume, water chemistry and aquatic biota data were evaluated and the results are presented. The results showed no significant immediate deleterious effects, thus confirming preoperational predictions. Although the plant has not operated long enough to reveal long-term deleterious effects, the present indications do not lead to a concerned prediction that any are developing. The data utilized, the methods of analysis, and the results obtained are presented in detail, along with recommendations for improving monitoring techniques.

  9. The second update of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Station accident. June 1 through August 31, 2011

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fukushima Daiichi accident occurred on March 11, 2011. The Japanese government and Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) encountered great deal of difficulties to stabilize the nuclear power reactor. Although the maximum radiation level has decreased, it still accounts for one-fifth of the level detected as of end of August 2011. There are currently growing concerns regarding the complexities of nuclear energy that are faced by the society of Japan. Owing to the occurrence of the Fukushima Daiichi accident, the firm belief on absolute safety of Japan's nuclear power plants has suddenly collapsed. Over the past decades, people tended to trust the government and electric power companies, which assured the safety and ensured about the necessity of nuclear power. However the recent disaster that took place in Fukushima has triggered public anger and distrusts that lead to negative campaigns against nuclear energy, in addition to oppositions against the government and nuclear power companies. The harsh public criticism has forced the government to separate the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) from affiliation with the Ministry of Economy, Trade and Industry (METI). This action was taken since NISA had expressed contradictions with METI, which is the promoting agency for nuclear energy, The nation-wide opinion poll and surveys undertaken by Asahi Shimbun, a leading Japanese daily newspaper, has announced that 74% of respondents supported the policy to phase-out all nuclear power plants with the final goal to completely end the operation of nuclear plants. A mere 14% of the respondents disagree. There are approximately 100,000 or more residents that evacuated from the dangerous Fukushima Daiichi zone and were suffering from immediate threats such as radiation exposure, health problems, sanitary contamination, products shipment ban, business slump, groundless rumors, etc. These conditions have severely weakened their capability to completely recover and

  10. Operating Experience with Nuclear Power Stations in Member States in 2013. 2014 Edition (CD-ROM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This CD-ROM contains the 45th edition of the IAEA's series of annual reports on operating experience with nuclear power plants in Member States. It is a direct output from the IAEA's Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) and contains information on electricity production and overall performance of individual plants during 2013. In addition to annual information, the report contains a historical summary of performance during the lifetime of individual plants and figures illustrating worldwide performance of the nuclear industry. The CD-ROM contains also an overview of design characteristics and dashboards (not included into the web version) of all operating nuclear power plants worldwide

  11. Operating Experience with Nuclear Power Stations in Member States in 2011. 2012 Edition (CD-ROM)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This CD contains the 43rd edition of the IAEA's series of annual reports on operating experience with nuclear power plants in Member States. It is a direct output from the IAEA's Power Reactor Information System (PRIS) and contains information on electricity production and overall performance of individual operational plants during 2011. In addition to annual information, the report contains a historical summary of performance during the lifetime of individual plants and figures illustrating worldwide performance of the nuclear industry. The CD contains also an overview of design characteristics and dashboards of all operating nuclear power plants worldwide.

  12. Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Workshop

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume II, reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986, to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators. The technical issues discussed most extensively were: man/machine interfaces, component interfaces, thermal gradients of startup and cooldown and the need for an accurate industry database for trend analysis of the diesel generator system

  13. A pilot application of risk-based methods to establish in-service inspection priorities for nuclear components at Surry Unit 1 Nuclear Power Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vo, T.; Gore, B.; Simonen, F.; Doctor, S. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)

    1994-08-01

    As part of the Nondestructive Evaluation Reliability Program sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission, the Pacific Northwest Laboratory is developing a method that uses risk-based approaches to establish in-service inspection plans for nuclear power plant components. This method uses probabilistic risk assessment (PRA) results and Failure Modes and Effects Analysis (FEMA) techniques to identify and prioritize the most risk-important systems and components for inspection. The Surry Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 was selected for pilot applications of this method. The specific systems addressed in this report are the reactor pressure vessel, the reactor coolant, the low-pressure injection, and the auxiliary feedwater. The results provide a risk-based ranking of components within these systems and relate the target risk to target failure probability values for individual components. These results will be used to guide the development of improved inspection plans for nuclear power plants. To develop inspection plans, the acceptable level of risk from structural failure for important systems and components will be apportioned as a small fraction (i.e., 5%) of the total PRA-estimated risk for core damage. This process will determine target (acceptable) risk and target failure probability values for individual components. Inspection requirements will be set at levels to assure that acceptable failure probabilistics are maintained.

  14. 75 FR 10328 - Wolf Creek Nuclear Operating Corporation, Wolf Creek Generating Station; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-05

    ... exemption will not have a significant effect on the quality of the human environment (75 FR 5631; February 3... orders of the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC, the Commission) now or hereafter in effect....

  15. Fuel Receiving and Storage Station. Nuclear Regulatory Commission's safety evaluation report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The safety evaluation report covers design of structures, components, equipment, and systems; nuclear criticality safety; radiological safety; accident analysis; conduct of operations; quality assurance; common defense and security; financial qualifications; financial protection and indemnity requirements; and technical specifications

  16. Evaluation of the prompt alerting systems at four nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Towers, D.A.; Anderson, G.S.; Keast, D.N.; Kenoyer, J.L.; Desrosiers, A.E.

    1982-09-01

    This report presents evaluations of the prompt notification siren systems at the following four US nuclear power facilities: Trojan, Three Mile Island, Indian Point, and Zion. The objective of these evaluations was to provide examples of an analytical procedure for predicting siren-system effectiveness under specific conditions in the 10-mile emergency planning zone (EPZ) surrounding nuclear power plants. This analytical procedure is discussed in report No. PNL-4227.

  17. Estimation of the costs of electricity generation in nuclear and other types of power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    (Study of the Nuclear Power Sector in the Context of the Energy Study in Catalonia to the 2020 Horizon) prepared by the same authors, which analyses the characteristics of the nuclear sector in Catalonia. This an other studies has provided the basis for the preparation of the Pla de l'Energia a Catalunya a l'Horitzo de l'Any 2010 (Catalonia Energy Plan to the 2010 Horizon). (Author)

  18. Evaluation of the prompt alerting systems at four nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents evaluations of the prompt notification siren systems at the following four US nuclear power facilities: Trojan, Three Mile Island, Indian Point, and Zion. The objective of these evaluations was to provide examples of an analytical procedure for predicting siren-system effectiveness under specific conditions in the 10-mile emergency planning zone (EPZ) surrounding nuclear power plants. This analytical procedure is discussed in report No. PNL-4227

  19. Information Exchange among COG Member Stations, Utility/AECL Design and External Nuclear Organizations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper presents the COG Information Exchange Program the mandate of which reads: 'To promote the safety reliability and excellence of CANDU plants worldwide by facilitating the sharing of operating experience amongst the members of COG'. To fulfill its mandate the COG operates Information Exchange Program which: 1. Provides a user-friendly facility, COGNET, for staff of COG member organizations to communicate with each other and with external stations, utilities and organizations on topics applicable to CANDU operation, safety, maintenance, design and performance; 2. Offers one-stop shopping for information applicable to the design, operation, maintenance, safety and performance of CANDU's; 3. Reports and compares the performance of all CANDU stations; 4. Organizes opportunities for individuals involved with the operation of CANDU's to meet with their peers and with CANDU industry experts to share operating experience; 5. Facilitates the identification of generic CANDU problems which leads to the addressing of these problems by others through co-operative projects, designer feedback and R and D programs. The paper has the following content: 1. COGNET; 1.1. COGNET Message Forums; 1.2. COGNET Operations Forums; 1.3. COGNET Private Messages; 2. Report Databases and Library; 2.1. REPEX (Technical Reports); 2.2. PCN (CANDU Plant Modifications); 2.3. SEREX (CANDU Station Events); 2.4. INPO (International Events); 3. CANDU Performance; 3.1. COG NEWSLETTERS; 3.2. Performance Indicators; 4. Workshops; 4.1. COG Workshops

  20. Biological and radioecological investigations at the Ringhals nuclear power station, 1968-1987

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The summary is based on 19 papers, which are presented in the References. The reports concern fish, bottom-living animals, zooplankton and algae as well as the presence of radioactivity in the aquatic and terrestrial environments. The investigation has been conducted at the request of Vaesterbygden's Water Rights Court and present the experiences of twelve operational years, of which the last four years have been with the power station at full capacity. In judging the effects of the operation of the power station, particular emphasis has been placed on questions given priority by the Water Rights Court, namely fishing and radioactivity. As regards fishing, the direct effects of the cooling-system on fish in different developmental stages have been assessed to be of importance. Water-borne radioactivity has been traced in organisms and sediment in the area. The concentrations of different radionucleids originating from the power station are highest in algae and lowest in fish-meat. The results form the basis of calculations of the radioactive dose to man. (orig./HP)

  1. The Development of Calder Hall and Chapelcross as Base Load Nuclear Power Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The initial design conception of Calder Hall and Chapelcross was as dual-purpose power reactors with the major emphasis on production of plutonium for military purposes. During the design stage optimization was carried out to enable the best possible results to be achieved from the electricity generation point of view. Both stations are integral parts of the National Electricity Grid supply system as base-load power stations and supply about 15% of the demand in the regions in which they are located. Their performance in this capacity has been developed considerably during the seven years that have elapsed since Calder Hall was officially opened in 1956. The power output of the reactors has been increased by over one-third above the initial design figure. This has been largely achieved by careful research into the methods of temperature assessment of the fuel elements and the use of control rods as movable absorbers to supplement the fixed absorbers used for flux shaping. The criterion on which temperature control is based has been developed over the years in order to allow the maximum output to be obtained while still retaining very adequate safety margins. One result of this has been that the turbo*alternator sets have been modified to increase their outputs from the original design figure of 21 MW(e) to 27/30 MW(e) in order to cope with the extra steam. Calder Hall and Chapelcross reactors are now achieving overall load factors in excess of 92% in spite of the fact that refuelling is carried out off-load. Increases in load factor have been largely achieved by marked reductions in the time taken up by refuelling and by careful planning of essential maintenance work which involves shutting down reactors. In this respect gains have been made by the application of method study and critical path techniques. Losses due to failed fuel elements have been very small. In addition to the operation of the Station for electricity generation, a large number of special

  2. Integrated plant safety assessment, Systematic Evaluation Program: Dresden Nuclear Power Station, Unit 2 (Docket No. 50-237)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) has prepared Supplement 1 to the final Integrated Plant Safety Assessment Report (IPSAR) (NUREG-0823), under the scope of the Systematic Evaluation Program (SEP), for the Commonwealth Edison Company (CECo) Dresden Nuclear Power Station, Unit 2 located in Grundy County, Illinois. The NRC initiated the SEP to provide the framework for reviewing the design of older operating nuclear reactor plants to reconfirm and document their safety. This report documents the review completed by means of the SEP for those issues that required refined engineering evaluations or the continuation of ongoing evaluations subsequent to issuing the final IPSAR for Dresden Unit 2. The review was provided for (1) an assessment of the significance of differences between current technical positions on selected issues and those that existed when Dresden Unit 2 was licensed, (2) a basis for deciding on how these differences should be resolved in an integrated plant review, and (3) a documented evaluation of plant safety. The final IPSAR and this supplement forms part of the bases for considering the conversion of the existing provisional operating license to a full-term operating license. 83 refs., 9 tabs

  3. Necessity of radiation education suggested from press report during earthquake damage of Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although Kashiwazaki-Kariwa Nuclear Power Station was affected by Chuetsu-Oki earthquake, the important components in the reactor building were hardly damaged, and fundamental nuclear safety was ensured. However, as the mass communication media reported the pictures of the black smoke of fire accident of the transformer, sloshing of the pool, etc. without declaration of 'Safety' by the Central Government or sufficient explanation, the habitants on the site and the Japan's people were put into anxiety and thus, harmful rumor was spread. The people obtain the information from the mass communication media, and they believed all the reports of the mass media. Behind it, there is a fundamental knowledge among them that Radiation = 'dangerous', 'bad for health' and 'awful' = Nuclear Power Generation. This knowledge has been fixed more firmly due to the report of the earthquake damage. In order to escape from this deep-rooted scheme, it is necessary to spread the correct knowledge on the radiation. At this time, the Official Curriculum Guidelines for Junior High School are revised, and the radiation education is started for the first time in 30 years. We analyzed and evaluated the results of the survey performed by Radiation Education Forum, and, simultaneously, we considered the necessity of the radiation education judging from the reports of the mass communication media. (author)

  4. Control of Materials in Italian Nuclear Power Stations and Research Institutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The paper deals with the management of nuclear materials at a facility with a gas-graphite power reactor using natural uranium, at another with a boiling-water reactor using enriched uranium, at an industrial installation with a research reactor and at a nuclear research laboratory. For each of these installations the control of radioactive materials during fabrication and transport operations, while the materials are being used in reactors or in laboratories, and at the time when the receiver takes delivery of the materials is discussed. The first part of the paper deals, from the management point of view, with all the recording operations and the methods employed for the internal auditing of data on losses, production and transfer of nuclear materials. The second part assesses the shortcomings of the systems at present used in Italy and the problems of official materials management and control services, insofar as they affect safety. (author)

  5. Technical information management; A facet of the reliable operation at the nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KHNP has the twenty nuclear power units in operation. In the management of numerous power plants, there must have been several kinds of business. One of them is the management of the numerous kinds of and the huge amount of technical information. In many countries there exists a common national organization responsible for some parts of the operating experience programme. KNHP also has organized a centralized team being designed to collect, review, screen, analyze, disseminate and apply the various kinds of the technical information to the plants. There hereby I intend to introduce the KONIT (KOrea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co., LTD Nuclear Information Team) and its role/responsibility, performance, and business tool (a system called KONIS)

  6. Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Phase 1, Study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoopingarner, K.R.; Vause, J.W.; Dingee, D.A.; Nesbitt, J.F.

    1987-08-01

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume I, reviews diesel-generator experience to identify the systems and components most subject to aging degradation and isolates the major causes of failure that may affect future operational readiness. Evaluations show that as plants age, the percent of aging-related failures increases and failure modes change. A compilation is presented of recommended corrective actions for the failures identified. This study also includes a review of current, relevant industry programs, research, and standards. Volume II reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986 to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators.

  7. Aging of nuclear station diesel generators: Evaluation of operating and expert experience: Phase 1, Study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pacific Northwest Laboratory evaluated operational and expert experience pertaining to the aging degradation of diesel generators in nuclear service. The research, sponsored by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC), identified and characterized the contribution of aging to emergency diesel generator failures. This report, Volume I, reviews diesel-generator experience to identify the systems and components most subject to aging degradation and isolates the major causes of failure that may affect future operational readiness. Evaluations show that as plants age, the percent of aging-related failures increases and failure modes change. A compilation is presented of recommended corrective actions for the failures identified. This study also includes a review of current, relevant industry programs, research, and standards. Volume II reports the results of an industry-wide workshop held on May 28 and 29, 1986 to discuss the technical issues associated with aging of nuclear service emergency diesel generators

  8. Examination of failed studs from No. 2 steam generator at the Maine Yankee Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three studs removed from service on the primary manway cover from steam generator No. 2 of the Maine Yankee station were sent to Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) for examination. The examination consisted of visual/dye penetrant examination, optical metallography and Scanning Electron Microscopy/Energy Dispersive Spectroscopy (SEM/EDS) evaluation. One bolt was through cracked and its fracture face was generally transgranular in nature with numerous secondary intergranular cracks. The report concludes that the environmenally assisted cracking of the stud was due to the interaction of the various lubricants used with steam leaks associated with this manway cover

  9. Review of the performance and best practices of the Wolsong Nuclear Power Stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    KHNP's stations have a long track record of impressive performance, and are currently one of the top five reactors worldwide in terms of capacity factor. Their success can be traced back to the company goal of 'one cycle trouble free.' This goal has grown into a working culture and has permeated throughout the entire organization. With this strong focus, the initiatives in maintenance, operations, task management, information management, worker safety and research and development all contribute to improving plant performance, reliability and economics. (author)

  10. Integrated plant safety assessment: systematic evaluation program. Oyster Creek nuclear generating station. GPU Nuclear Corporation and Jersey Central Power and Light Company. Docket No. 50-219

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Systematic Evaluation Program was initiated in February 1978 by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to review the designs of older operating nuclear reactor plants to reconfirm and document their safety. The review provides (1) an assessment of how these plants compare with current licensing safety requirements relating to selected issues, (2) a basis for deciding on how these differences should be resolved in an integrated plant review, and (3) a documented evaluation of plant safety. This report documents the review of the Oyster Creek Nuclear Generating Station (located in Ocean County, New Jersey), one of ten plants reviewed under Phase II of this program, and indicates how 137 topics selected for review under Phase I of the program were addressed. Equipment and procedural changes have been identified as a result of the review. It is expected that this report will be one of the bases in considering the issuance of a full-term operating license in place of the existing provisional operating license

  11. Long-term security of electrical and control engineering equipment in nuclear power stations to withstand a loss of coolant accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electrical and control engineering equipment, which has to function even after many years of operation in the event of a fault in a saturated steam atmosphere of 160 C maximum, is essential in nuclear power stations in order to control a loss of coolant accident. The nuclear power station operators have, for this purpose, developed verification strategies for groups of components, by means of which it is ensured that the electrical and control engineering components are capable of dealing with a loss of coolant accident even at the end of their planned operating life. (orig.)

  12. Heavy density concrete for nuclear radiation shielding and power stations: [Part] 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In India at present, the share of power generated from nuclear sources is just 3 per cent of the total power generated from all sources. It is planned to increase this share to 10 per cent by the turn of this century. To do this, the present capacity of 8 nuclear power reactors and 2 fuel reprocessing plants will have to be increased five fold. The necessary construction work involved in this project will require on an average 7600m3 of heavy density concrete for the next few years on the assumption that 15m3 of heavy density concrete is required per megawatt of newly installed capacity for power generation. The paper, presented in three parts, deals with various aspects of heavy density concrete. The first part gives the background information and effects of nuclear radiation. It also discusses factors to be considered in the selection of materials for a concrete shield. These factors are density, chemical composition, nuclear properties, purity and consistency, ease of processing, and placement and cost. Important minerals and other aggregates used in the manufacture of heavy density concrete are briefly described. Selection criteria for aggregates and aggregate production are discussed. (author)

  13. 77 FR 50533 - Dominion Nuclear Connecticut, Inc.; Millstone Power Station, Unit 3

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-08-21

    ... the ECCS for reactors that have fuel rods fabricated either with Zircaloy or ZIRLO\\TM\\. Appendix K to... systems for light-water nuclear power reactors,'' and Appendix K to 10 CFR Part 50, ``ECCS Evaluation Models,'' to allow the use of Optimized ZIRLO\\TM\\ fuel rod cladding in future core reload...

  14. 75 FR 52045 - Arizona Public Service Company, Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 3; Environmental...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-08-24

    ...- water nuclear power reactors,'' and 10 CFR part 50, appendix K, ``ECCS Evaluation Models,'' for Facility... Assessment Identification of the Proposed Action: The proposed action would permit the use of fuel rods with... exemption would allow up to eight lead fuel assemblies (LFAs) manufactured by Westinghouse with fuel...

  15. Application of reliability centered maintenance for nuclear power station in Japan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The reliability centered maintenance (RCM) method has been widely used with good results in aviation companies in the U.S. to ensure positive preventive maintenance and management. In addition, the Electric Power Research Institute has been making studies and tests in an effort to apply the RCM method to nuclear power plants. The present report shows and discusses some results of a preliminary study aimed at the introduction of the RCM method to nuclear power plants in Japan. The history of the development and application of RCM is outlined first, and the procedure of its implementation is then described and discussed. The procedure consists of five major steps: collection of data, identification of system components, analysis of the functions of the system, selection of required tasks for preventive management, and packaging. Some actual examples of the application of RCM to nuclear power plants in the U.S. are described. And finally, the report discusses some major problems to be solved to permit the application of RCM to nuclear power plants in Japan. (N.K.)

  16. Materials for the field test - students' attitudes to nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This working paper contains all the materials developed for and used in the field test of 'Student Attitudes toward Atomic Power Stations'. This research is a component of a larger project called 'Attitudes and Attitudes Change with Regard to Problems of Energy Supply and their Consequences for our Environment'. A central aim of this project is the development of instrumental strategies enabling the student to build up in this field a critically reflective and active behavior and attitudes based on sound problem consciousness. These instrumental strategies are derived from theories of social, learning and environmental psychology. A concrete result of these efforts are the materials of the field test mentioned above. They include: a) The draft of an instructional unit 'Atomic Power Stations - Prosperity or Disaster' with - a booklet on the subject matter for students and teachers - a paper on the contents of the instructional unit and their sequence - information for the students concerning the aims of the investigation - working materials for the students - reading materials for the teachers informing them about the proposed instructional strategies based on the psychological theories: (1) model-learning and the structuring of knowledge, (2) how to activate and motivate students, (3) the stabilization of attitudes and (4) small group work. b) Instruments for testing and observation. These instruments were used within a criterion-oriented evaluation and for a test of the effects of the different proposed items used in the instruction. (orig./HP)

  17. Process and container system for transferring or transporting fuel elements from a nuclear power station to a store

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A system of containers with three types of containers (an inside container, a transport container and a storage container) is used. One either sets the inside container open on the lid side into the transport container first in the water pond of the nuclear power station, and one then sets the fuel elements into the inside container, or one places the inside container, loaded with fuel elements away from the transport container, into the transport container. Both containers are then closed and are transported to the store as a unit. The storage container open on the lid side is prepared there, the floor of the transport container is opened and this, together with the inside container, is lifted above the storage container or set above the storage container. The inside container is then lowered onto the storage container, the transport container is removed and the lid of the storage container is closed. (orig./HP)

  18. Operation and maintenance experience with computer based systems of Nuclear Power Plant - Kaiga Generating Station-1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many computerized systems like PDCS, CCTMS, BMS, COIS have been introduced for the first time in NPCIL at KGS. As these systems were new and more sophisticated compared to the equivalent systems at earlier plants, problems and challenges encountered during operation and maintenance were many and different of its kind. As the technology update in the IT field is fast, obsoleteness of the hardware and software poses a threat to the system availability and maintenance which remains a great concern in a Nuclear Power Plant. This paper gives details of the major problems resolved and steps taken for a trouble free operation of some computer based systems at Kaiga Generating Station 1 and 2. (author)

  19. Seismic structural fragility investigation for the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 1 (Project I); SONGS-1 AFWS Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wesley, D.A.; Hashimoto, P.S.

    1982-04-01

    An evaluation of the seismic capacities of several of the San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station, Unit 1 (SONGS-1) structures was conducted to determine input to the overall probabilistic methodology developed by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. Seismic structural fragilities to be used as input consist of median seismic capacities and their variabilities due to randomness and uncertainty. Potential failure modes were identified for each of the SONGS-1 structures included in this study by establishing the seismic load-paths and comparing expected load distributions to available capacities for the elements of each load-path. Particular attention was given to possible weak links and details. The more likely failure modes were screened for more detailed investigation.

  20. The fourth and last update of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident. December 1, 2011 to March 11, 2012

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This article provides the fourth update on the Fukushima Daiichi accident, from December 1, 2011 to March 11, 2012. As the last update, it will close the series that constitutes the one-year historical record of the accident, focusing on the attainment of a stable shut-down cooling state at the stricken Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station (NPS), although the recovery operation will continue for many years in the future. The contents of this last undate deal particularly with the Mid-and-long-Term roadmap for debris disposal, the decontamination and decommissioning of the Fukushima Daiichi NPS, the issues of radioactive contamination and decontamination around the Fukushima Daiichi NPS, and four investigation committees' interim reports on the Fukushima Daiichi accident, published by TEPCO, the government, the National Diet and an independent body respectively. Furthermore, specific effects of the Fukushima Daiichi accident on international collaboration will be summarized at the end of this article. (author)

  1. Pilot tests for dismantling by blasting of the biological shield of a shut down nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following free-field tests on concrete blocks the feasibility of explosive dismantling of the biological shield of nuclear power stations has been succesfully tested at the former hotsteam reaction in Karlstein/Main Germany. For this purpose a model shield of scale 1:2 was embedded into the reactor structure at which bore-hole blasting tests employing up to about 15 kg of explosive were performed. An elaborate measurement system allowed to receive detailed information on the blast side-effects: Special emphasis was focussed on the quantitative registration of the dynamic blast loads; data for the transfer of the dismantling method to the removal of real ractor structures were obtained. (orig.)

  2. Glass fiber sensors for detecting special nuclear materials at portal and monitor stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Safeguards and Security Systems LLC (NucSafe) participated in the Illicit Trafficking Radiation Assessment Program (ITRAP) recently conducted by the Austrian Research Center, Seibersdorf (ARCS) for IAEA, INTERPOL, and the World Customs Organization (IAEA, in press). This presentation reviews ITRAP test results of NucSafe instrumentation. NucSafe produces stationary, mobile, and hand-held systems that use neutron and gamma ray sensors to detect Special Nuclear Materials (SNM). Neutron sensors are comprised of scintillating glass fibers (trade name 'PUMA' for Pu Materials Analysis), which provide several advantages over 3He and 10BF3 tubes. PUMA 6Li glass fiber sensors offer greater neutron sensitivity and dynamic counting range with significantly less microphonic susceptibility than tubes, while eliminating transport and operational hazards. PUMA sensors also cost less per active area than gas tubes, which is important since rapid neutron detection at passenger, freight, and vehicle portals require large sensor areas to provide the required sensitivity

  3. Analysis of internal events for the Unit 1 of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Station. Appendixes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This volume contains the appendices for the accident sequences analysis for those internally initiated events for Laguna Verde Unit 1, Nuclear Power Plant. The appendix A presents the comments raised by the Sandia National Laboratories technical staff as a result of the review of the Internal Event Analysis for Laguna Verde Unit 1 Nuclear Power Plant. This review was performed during a joint Sandia/CNSNS multi-day meeting by the end 1992. Also included is a brief evaluation on the applicability of these comments to the present study. The appendix B presents the fault tree models printed for each of the systems included and.analyzed in the Internal Event Analysis for LVNPP. The appendice C presents the outputs of the TEMAC code, used for the cuantification of the dominant accident sequences as well as for the final core damage evaluation. (Author)

  4. Steam generator materials and secondary side water chemistry in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main purpose of this work is to summarize the European and North American experiences regarding the materials used for the construction of the steam generators and their relative corrosion resistance considering the water chemestry control method. Reasons underlying decision for the adoption of Incoloy 800 as the material for the secondary steam generator system for Atucha I Nuclear Power Plant (Atucha Reactor) and Embalse de Rio III Nuclear Power Plant (Cordoba Reactor) are pointed out. Backup information taken into consideration for the decision of utilizing the All Volatil Treatment for the water chemistry control of the Cordoba Reactor is detailed. Also all the reasonswhich justify to continue with the congruent fosfatic method for the Atucha Reactor are analyzed. Some investigation objectives which would eventually permit the revision of the decisions taken on these subjects are proposed. (E.A.C.)

  5. Design approaches to mitigate electrical installation problems in nuclear power generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Large power generating stations have experienced a constant rise in the in-plant costs of electrical installation. Many techniques can be employed such as computerized cable and conduit schedules, open type raceway supports, bulk cable pulling, setting up of planning teams for cable, termination, etc. The improvements recommended in this study can result in significant cost savings as shown in Table 2 as a result of minimized rework during construction, increased productivity of field personnel, and construction schedule improvements. The method include additional design details to the constructor, improved design of cable tray supports, increased use of computer aided design for electrical raceways and cable pulling and cable termination, without using cable lugs. The implementation of these methods on the Large Scale Prototype Breeder Plant has resulted in an estimated installation cost saving of over $11 million

  6. The key to superior water chemistry at a PWR nuclear station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper demonstrates how a condensate polishing unit can be successfully used to treat the feedwater for circulating-type pressurized water reactors (PWRs). Water chemistry at the Salem Generating Station, a two-unit, four-loop Westinghouse PWR located in New Jersey, is discussed. Topics considered include a plant description and the history of early operation, the role of constant surveillance, makeup water quality, the effect of freezing on gel-type anion exchange resin, a total organic carbon (TOC) survey, steam generator chemistry, steam generator inspection, condensate polisher operation, and management philosophy. The SEPREX condensate polishing process, in which the complete separation of the anion exchange resin from the cation exchange resin is achieved by flotation separation, is examined. It is concluded that the utilization of a condensate polishing process such as SEPREX provides the operating personnel at the plant with the necessary means to maintain the minimum desired level of contaminants within the steam generator

  7. Operating Experience at the Yankee Atomic Electric Company Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Operation of the Yankee plant began in November 1960 and since that time the station has generated over 2 x 109 kWh gross. The overall use factor from first generation of power in 1960 is just over 67%. The economic picture has also been very encouraging. The Yankee plant is not only continuing to demonstrate its ability to supply base-load power for the New England area but is also providing new information of benefit to the economics of all closed-cycle reactors. Problems have been encountered, some of a fairly significant nature, but every indication to date is that these are correctable and that plant operation will become even more dependable with continually improving economics as time goes on. (author)

  8. Establishing an effective dose equivalent monitoring program for a commercial nuclear power station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thompson, Barbara Jane

    The purpose of this thesis is to determine whether monitoring personnel with multiple dosimeter badges to determine effective dose equivalent (EDE) is both acceptable to the Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) and practical for the nuclear power industry. Until now, most nuclear power plants have used a single dosimeter or occasionally multiple dosimeters to monitor the "deep dose equivalent (DDE)" as defined by the International Commission on Radiological Units (ICRU). The measurement of EDE, to replace DDE, is now deemed by international and regulatory agencies to better approximate a worker's dose related to long-term risks of occupational radiation exposure. The definition of DDE, and the formulation of EDE for use as a new indicator of occupational exposure, are presented in this thesis. Radiation exposure measurements using multiple dosimeters on each worker for certain tasks were collected for this thesis on workers at a Dominion/Virginia Company nuclear power plant. These multiple dosimeter measurements have been examined to determine how such a new personnel monitoring system compares to the former one at the Dominion plant, in which only one dosimeter reading was used predominately to calculated deep dose equivalent. This is based on the assumption that most workers were exposed to uniform radiation fields and that the single dosimeter reading was representative of the highest average exposure for the worker's task. These multiple dosimetry measurements show that it is both feasible and advantageous to provide such dosimetry in situations where exposures may be non-uniform and significant enough to approach yearly exposure limits in a single day, such as in the tasks required during refueling outages.

  9. Start. Slovak power stations, Nuclear Power Plants Mochovce (Annual report 1998)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A brief account of activities carried out by the Nuclear power plants Mochovce in 1998 is presented. These activities are reported under the headings: (1) Director's foreword; (2) Power plant management; (3) Highlights of 1998; (4) Quality system; (5) Electricity and heat generation; Maintenance; Capital construction; (6) Radiation safety; Environmental impacts of operations; (7) List of balances; Human resources; (8) International co-operation; Public relations

  10. The nuclear power stations of the French atomic energy programme (1960)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After recalling the entry of nuclear energy into energy production in France, the paper emphasizes the evolution of techniques applied in the designing of French nuclear power plants and describes the means employed for reducing costs per kWh of EDF2 and EDF3 compared with EDF1: the electric power per ton of uranium varies from 493 kW/t for EDF1 to 970 kW/t for EDF3. For this purpose the thermal power and electric power of units are changed respectively from 290 MWt for EDF1 to 1200 or 1600 MWt for EDF3 and from 28 to 250 MW. The results are obtained by an improvement in neutronic characteristics, developments in nuclear fuel technology, and simplification of the system of charging the reactor, whose means of maintenance are increased; the EDF2 heat-exchangers have been so designed as to increase the unit power of the elements, which will attain 9 MWt, as against 3 for EDF1. For EDF3 an advance project forecasts a thermodynamic layout with only one pressure stage. The paper ends with a description of the burst-slug detection systems, and an appendix gives a detailed comparative table of EDF1, EDF2 and EDF3 plant characteristics. (author)

  11. Explosive cutting techniques for dismantling of concrete structures in a nuclear power station following decommissioning

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report describes the work that has been jointly carried out, based on a common and complementary research programme, by the Battelle Institut e.V., Frankfurt and Taylor Woodrow Construction Ltd., Southall, on the controlled use of explosives for the cutting and safe removal of activated and contaminated parts of nuclear facilities without impairing the overall structural integrity. Previous work had demonstrated the feasibility of using explosive techniques for the stripping off of an equivalent thickness of concrete, for radiation protection, from the inside walls of nuclear facilities. The present research work aims at complementing, improving and optimizing the foregoing work. Extensive investigations have been executed on the adjustment of blasting parameters, material and structural effects, drilling techniques, particle distribution and on procedures for remote handling. The report presents the results obtained from field trials and theoretical analysis undertaken to augment the development programme. It concludes that the controlled use of explosives offers a safe and favourable dismantling technique for the decommissioning of nuclear facilities

  12. Applications of power beaming from space-based nuclear power stations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Powell, J. R.; Botts, T. E.; Hertzberg, A.

    Power beaming from space-based nuclear reactors to earth, aircraft, or spacecraft is offered as an alternative to the SPSS. A rotating bed reactor (RBR) is described, in which the nuclear fuel is an annular bed of small particulates held in a rotating basket through which a coolant passes. Advantages over a previous nuclear rocket program, NERVA, are given as minimized size, external moderation and reflection, and several GW available from a reactor about one cu m in size. Testing of a model fluidized bed is described, noting favorable results from U-233 fuel, a projected 50 cm diam bed, and total mass of 3 metric tons. Two Brayton cycle generator systems are examined, and it is found that a turbine inlet temperature of 2,000 K and a simple Brayton cycle without regeneration yields a best efficiency of 30%. The RBR components are discussed, and microwave and laser power beaming systems are compared; economic projections indicate laser beaming to cruising aircraft is competitive with current jet fuel use.

  13. Final Environmental Statement related to the operation of Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station, Unit No. 2 (Docket No. 50-410)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Final Environmental Statement contains the assessment of the environmental impact associated with the operation of the Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station, Unit 2, pursuant to the National Environmental Policy Act of 1969 (NEPA) and Title 10 of the Code of Federal Regulations, Part 51, as amended, of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission regulations. This statement examines the environment, environmental consequences and mitigating actions, and environmental and economic benefits and costs

  14. Leach studies on cement-solidified ion exchange resins from decontamination processes at operating nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effects of varying pH and leachant compositions on the physical stability and leachability of radionuclides and chelating agents were determined for cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin wastes collected from two operating commercial light water reactors. Small scale waste-form specimens were collected during waste solidifications performed at the Brunswick Steam Electric Plant Unit 1 and at the James A. FitzPatrick Nuclear Power Station. The collected specimens were leach tested, and their compressive strength was measured in accordance with the Nuclear Regulatory Commission's ''Technical Position on Waste Form'' (Revision 1), from the Low-Level Waste Management Branch. Leachates from these studies were analyzed for radionuclides, selected transition metals, and chelating agents to assess the leachability of these waste form constituents. Leachants used for the study were deionized water, simulated seawater, and groundwater compositions similar to those found at Barnwell, South Carolina and Hanford, Washington. Results of this study indicate that initial leachant pH does not affect leachate pH or releases from cement-solidified decontamination ion-exchange resin waste forms. However, differences in leachant composition and the presence of chelating agents may affect the releases of radionuclides and chelating agents. In addition, results from this study indicate that the cumulative releases of radionuclides and chelating agents observed for forms that disintegrated were similar to those for forms that maintained their general physical integrity

  15. Measurements of 131I in the thyroids of employees involved in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Great East Japan Earthquake Disaster on 11 March 2011 caused an unprecedented accident at the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station operated by Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO). Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories of Japan Atomic Energy Agency performed internal dose measurements of 560 employees involved in the accident during the period from 20 April to 5 August in 2011 at the request of TEPCO. The present paper describes our measurements of 131I in the thyroid that is the predominant contributor to the internal dose. These measurements were carried out using an HPGe detector installed in a low-background shielded chamber made of 20-cm-thick steel and the detector was placed adjacent to the subject's neck. The typical minimum detectable activity of this technique was 10 Bq for a counting time of 10 min; however, this sensitivity made it difficult to identify a residual thyroid content of 131I corresponding to a committed effective dose of 20 mSv for late subjects. This paper discussed technical issues experienced through the measurements such as the influence of 131I in the rest of the body, the calibration phantom of use, and so on. (author)

  16. Accident of the Fukushima-Daiichi nuclear power station. Situation two years after the event - IRSN file

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two years after the Fukushima accident, this report proposes a review of the situation in Japan, and of the European and international actions aimed at preventing the occurrence of another nuclear accident and its radiological consequences. It is based on information available at the end of January or February 2013. After a recall of the situation in Japan and Europe in 2011 (recall of the accident, of the different simulation, calculation and information actions undertaken by the IRSN, launching of a program of additional safety assessments and of European stress tests), the report addresses the situation in Japan two years after the accident: evolution of the nuclear risk management governance, status of the Fukushima-Daiichi power station, health and environmental impact and management of the post-accidental phase, actions undertaken by the IRSN (dose assessment, cooperation in the field of severe accidents, participation to the Fukushima Dialogue). The next part details the contribution of the IRSN to the strengthening of safety and radiation protection at the international level (in relationship with international organizations: IAEA, UNSCEAR and WHO). Additional technical information is provided in appendix, as well as a report on the environmental impact of the accident, and a report on the post-accidental management of the accident

  17. Use of Reliability-Centered Maintenance for the McGuire nuclear station feedwater system. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An earlier prototype application of Reliability-Centered Maintenance (RCM) to the Component Cooling Water System at Florida Power and Light's Turkey Point Plant demonstrated that the RCM methodology is applicable for developing or revising Preventive Maintenance (PM) programs in operating nuclear power plants. This report discusses an additional RCM application made to the Main Feed Water System at Duke Power Company's McGuire Nuclear Station. The study was conducted in order to demonstrate more fully all aspects of the RCM approach. The report reviews the RCM methodology and details its application to the Main Feed Water System. The resulting RCM-based PM program is briefly compared to the current PM program for the system. The RCM process suggested four current PM tasks as candidates for Condition Directed (CD) consideration or revision and two current CD tasks as candidates for expanded scope. The RCM-based program also added nine new CD tasks as candidates to improve the effectiveness of the PM program and two new Failure Finding tasks as candidates to avoid startup delays. The report also discusses the lessons learned through the two studies. The study shows the RCM methodology to be an effective tool both for defining a PM program and for providing traceable documentation to enhance the credibility of the PM program

  18. Analysis of current state of transformer equipment, its role and place in affording safety, increasing power- and ecological effectiveness operation of units of nuclear power stations of Ukraine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Analysis of technical state, life service and reliability of modern transformer equipment of power generating units of nuclear power stations (NPS) was conducted. Cause-and-effect factors of pre-emergency and emergency faults of transformers have been analyzed. Technical offers aimed at improvement of efficiency and reliability parameters of transformer equipment operation on NPS units were developed.

  19. Principles on administrative implementation of nuclear safety regulations. Case study of the investigation framework by nuclear regulation authority on the shatter zones at the Tsuruga Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The investigation by experts commissioned by the Nuclear Regulations Authority (NRA) concluded that 'the D-1' shatter zone directly beneath the base mat of the Tsuruga Power Station Unit 2 might be an active fault. According to NRA's interpretation of regulations, an active fault beneath critical facilities alone disables their operations. The administrative procedure of this investigation and conclusion, however, raised three regulatory problems as follows; the deficiency to effectively reflect associated scientific knowledge to evolve, insufficient institutional independence of risk assessment from risk management, and legal difficulty in conducting administrative dispute to enforce administrative remedies. This report, through analyzing these regulatory problems, proposes the following three regulatory reforms in order to alleviate them. (1) Reform internal consultative experts committees appointed by the NRA, which are excercizing decisive influences on administrative disposition while without any statutory basis, into a statutory council or a special purpose committee under the Act for Establishement of Nuclear Regulation Authority. (2) Substantialize institutional separation of risk assessment from risk management in NRA by statutory measures. (3) Make procedures and rules concerning experts' deliberative judgements into administrative bylaws to the extent necessary to secure accountability and self-regulation in the NRA. (author)

  20. Operation results of 950 MWe nuclear power station and countermeasures hereafter in Republic of Korea

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In Republic of Korea, at present 8 nuclear power plants are in operation, one plant is under construction, and two plants are in design stage. The capacity of the nuclear power plants in operation is 6666 MWe, and in 1987, 53 % of the total generated electric power in Republic of Korea was supplied by these plants. 8 power plants of them are 950 MWe PWRs, the therefore, the standardization and home production of 950 MWe PWRs have been advanced. At present, the ratio of home production was raised to 42 %. 5 PWRs of 950 MWe class are in operation now, and the cumulative operation experience reached 9 reactor-years. The capacity factor in 1987 was improved up to 74 %. The Kori No.3 plant attained the continuous operation for 302 days from fuel exchange to fuel exchange. 47 cases of the unscheduled shutdown which occurred from the beginning of the commercial operation of No.1 plant to the end of August, 1988 were evaluated. In the first year of the commercial operation, 1985, the rate of emergency stop was 16 cases/reactor-year, and in 1988, it was 2.25 cases/reactor-year. The main cause of unscheduled shutdown was the irregular troubles and the defective design of primary system components causing 20 cases, and the emergency stop due to human factor was 13 cases. Exposure control, waste management, and the improvement of operation hereafter are reported. (Kako, I.)

  1. Glass fiber sensors for detecting special nuclear materials at portal and monitor stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear Safeguards and Security Systems LLC (NucSafe) participated in the Illicit Trafficking Radiation Assessment Program (ITRAP) recently conducted by the Austrian Research Center, Seibersdorf (ARCS) for IAEA, INTERPOL, and the World Customs Organization (IAEA, in press). This presentation reviews ITRAP test results of NucSafe instrumentation. NucSafe produces stationary, mobile, and hand-held systems that use neutron and gamma ray sensors to detect Special Nuclear Materials. Neutron sensors are comprised of scintillating glass fibers (trade name 'PUMA' for Pu Materials Analysis), which provide several advantages over 3He and 10BF3 tubes. PUMA 6Li glass fiber sensors offer greater neutron sensitivity and dynamic counting range with significantly less microphonic susceptibility than tubes, while eliminating transport and operational hazards. PUMA sensors also cost less per active area than gas tubes, which is important since rapid neutron detection at passenger, freight, and vehicle portals require large sensor areas to provide the required sensitivity. Two PUMA glass fiber neutron and gamma ray sensor systems were designed that exceed the ITRAP detection and ancillary requirements for continuous SNM monitoring of: 1) vehicles and 2) pedestrians. Monte Carlo and first principal calculations were applied to model detection limits for both systems. Modeling results for the glass fiber neutron sensors evaluated for the Vehicle Monitoring System are shown

  2. Application of point system in the project control of Ling'ao Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schedule control and cost control are very complicated issues even we set up the detail schedules and engineering measurements requirements for erection of a nuclear power project. In order to solve these problems, a Point System is used in Ling Ao (LA) Nuclear Power Project. This paper introduces the method. The Point System is a measurement system of workload. The measurement unit of any erection works is a Point only. A Point of workload is defined as the equivalent measurement quantities, which could be completed by a relevant skill worker within an hour. A set of procedure manuals for different installations has been set up. The calculation models of equipment installation, piping, cabling are addressed for example in the paper. The application of the Point System in the schedule control is shown in the paper. The following issues are highlighted: to define the duration of a piping activity in the Project Level 2 Schedule, to draught the curves of Point Schedules for different erection fields, to analyze the productive efficiency, to define erection quota of each month for different erection teams, to follow up the erection progress on site. The application of the Point System in the payment of erection contract is outlined. The calculation formula of a monthly payment is given. The advantage of the payment calculation method is discussed, for example, more accurate, very easy and clearly to check the measurement quantities completed on site, to control lump-sum cost. (authors)

  3. Construction and start-up testing experience of Kashiwazakikariwa Nuclear Power Station Unit No.1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to overcome the new location condition in Japan Sea coast, new techniques were developed and adopted to ensure the safety in construction and to shorten the construction period as far as possible. The commercial operation was started on September 18, 1985. This plant is a BWR plant of 1100 MWe output. The results of the improvement and standardization of BWRs and the measures for reliability improvement and radiation dose reduction were fully adopted in this plant. The site of the power station and the layout of the main facilities are explained. As the features of the location condition, the severe weather condition in winter such as snow, wind and lightning and high waves in the sea were considered. The rockbed for installing the foundation of the reactor building was deep, and the aseismatic design condition was made stricter, accordingly, the quantity of materials increased. A tent dome was developed to cover above the reactor containment vessel being assembled, a lightning forecast system was installed, and synchro-lift method was adopted for caisson breakwaters. The countermeasures to the deep rockbed and the measures to shorten the construction period were taken. The results of the trial operation are reported. (Kako, I.)

  4. The accident at TEPCO's Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Station: What went wrong and what lessons are universal?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Omoto, Akira

    2013-12-01

    After a short summary of the nuclear accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, this paper discusses “what went wrong” by illustrating the problems of the specific layers of defense-in-depth (basic strategy for assuring nuclear safety) and “what lessons are universal.” Breaches in the multiple layers of defense were particularly significant in respective protection (a) against natural disasters (first layer of defense) as well as (b) against severe conditions, specifically in this case, a complete loss of AC/DC power and isolation from the primary heat sink (fourth layer of defense). Confusion in crisis management by the government and insufficient implementation of offsite emergency plans revealed problems in the fifth layer of defense. By taking into consideration managerial and safety culture that might have relevance to this accident, in the author's view, universal lessons are as follows: Resilience: the need to enhance organizational capabilities to respond, monitor, anticipate, and learn in changing conditions, especially to prepare for the unexpected. This includes increasing distance to cliff edge by knowing where it exists and how to increase safety margin. Responsibility: the operator is primarily responsible for safety, and the government is responsible for protecting public health and environment. For both, their right decisions are supported by competence, knowledge, and an understanding of the technology, as well as humble attitudes toward the limitations of what we know and what we can learn from others. Social license to operate: the need to avoid, as much as possible regardless of its probability of occurrence, the reasonably anticipated environmental impact (such as land contamination), as well as to build public confidence/trust and a renewed liability scheme.

  5. The accident at TEPCO's Fukushima-Daiichi Nuclear Power Station: What went wrong and what lessons are universal?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After a short summary of the nuclear accident at the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station, this paper discusses “what went wrong” by illustrating the problems of the specific layers of defense-in-depth (basic strategy for assuring nuclear safety) and “what lessons are universal.” Breaches in the multiple layers of defense were particularly significant in respective protection (a) against natural disasters (first layer of defense) as well as (b) against severe conditions, specifically in this case, a complete loss of AC/DC power and isolation from the primary heat sink (fourth layer of defense). Confusion in crisis management by the government and insufficient implementation of offsite emergency plans revealed problems in the fifth layer of defense. By taking into consideration managerial and safety culture that might have relevance to this accident, in the author's view, universal lessons are as follows: a)Resilience: the need to enhance organizational capabilities to respond, monitor, anticipate, and learn in changing conditions, especially to prepare for the unexpected. This includes increasing distance to cliff edge by knowing where it exists and how to increase safety margin. b)Responsibility: the operator is primarily responsible for safety, and the government is responsible for protecting public health and environment. For both, their right decisions are supported by competence, knowledge, and an understanding of the technology, as well as humble attitudes toward the limitations of what we know and what we can learn from others. c)Social license to operate: the need to avoid, as much as possible regardless of its probability of occurrence, the reasonably anticipated environmental impact (such as land contamination), as well as to build public confidence/trust and a renewed liability scheme

  6. Large-scale demonstration of reliability centered maintenance at two nuclear generating stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper reports that after successful single-system pilot applications of Reliability Centered Maintenance (RCM) at various utilities, EPRI with Rochester Gas and Electric and Southern California Edison is undertaking multiple-system applications of RCM at their respective nuclear plants. The objective is to demonstrate the feasibility and cost-effectiveness of large-scale RCM application. In addition, each utility has plant-specific objectives to improve maintenance and plant availability. Each project has selected a prioritized list of some 15-20 systems on which to perform RCM. Each project is employing somewhat different RCM analysis methods, both of which conform to a global RCM definition applicable to all EPRI RCM work to date. Each project has developed important insights for improving cost and value of future analyses. Both projects will have applied the RCM process, including implementation, on several plant systems by April 1989

  7. Development and application of probabilistic safety assessment PSA in Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper discusses the development and application of Level 1 PSA used for safety review, risk monitoring and on line maintenance of the nuclear power plant. PSA development includes the analysis of event tree, fault tree, FMEA, PSA quantification and the equipment reliability database. We have collected and processed the reliability data of external power source, the equipment reliability data and the initial event frequency. The thermal-hydraulics analysis of some important events and accidents, human factor analysis, and the calculation of human error probability have been made. During the development of event trees and fault trees, the effect of some support systems such as compressed air distribution system, ventilation system and electrical system have been taken into account. The system manuals, operation procedures and emergency operating procedures of Daya Bay NPP are referred to in this project. The operators of the NPP were involved in the establishment of all event trees and fault trees analysis. Furthermore, we have accepted the suggestion of IAEA experts, completed the logic chart of initial events to the initial events analysis of Daya Bay NPP, and optimized the code system of PSA model again. Together with the development of the reliability database, by absorbing the advanced experience of EDF, we have gained the reports about equipment's classifying, function and experience feedback information of Daya Bay NPP. According to the quantitative calculation of the latest Level 1 PSA Model of Daya Bay NPP, the results of Core Damage Frequency (CDF) is: CDF = 2.13E-5/reactor . year. The latest PSA Model of Daya Bay NPP includes: 1) 12 sorts of initial events, 67 sub-initial events, 70 fault trees; 2) 25 nuclear safety related systems were developed by fault trees and FMEA ; 3) 2609 fault tree logic gates; 4) 2146 basic events; 5) 680 core damage accident sequences. (authors)

  8. Estimation, prediction and standardization of radiation dose levels to the population in connection with nuclear power station operation in the USSR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report presents values of the actual gas-aerosol releases from operating nuclear power stations in the USSR. Preliminary predicted evaluations of possible gas-aerosol releases from nuclear power stations under design are also made. Taking this as a basis and using a new calculation model there has been made an evaluation of the individual and population doses from releases of this kind, with an allowance for the metabolism of radioactive aerosols in the environment. The new model makes it also possible to consider population doses from foodstuff contaminated at the region of a nuclear station and then transported to other regions. Considering the ever growing number of ionizing radiation sources and in particular that of nuclear power stations this paper raises the problem of the necessity of an international agreement on the principles of regulating the population dose and on distributing the dose limit to the population from various radiation sources used in human activity and having a world-wide significance. As a matter for discussion the following distribution pattern of the dose limit to the population (in quota) is suggested: water-cooled and water-moderated reactors - 6%, single-circuit-grand-graphite reactors - 8%, gas-cooled reactors - 3%, fast reactors - 3%, experimental reactors - 5%, thermal nuclear stations - 4%, reactors of other types - 6%, fuel-reprocessing plants - 18%, the ore, hydrometallurgy, fuel elements production - 5%, radiation chemistry, irradiators - 2%, burial grounds of liquid and solid wastes - 4%, building materials - 5%, agricultural fertilizers - 4%, accelerators, X-ray tubes, television sets -1%, reserve for other sources - 25%. It is suggested to enlarge the number of radionuclides attributed to the ''world-wide'' series considering their relatively high contribution to the population dose

  9. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-416 and 50-417). Supplement 6

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supplement 6 to the Safety Evaluation Report for Mississippi Power and Light Company et al. joint application for licenses to operate the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2, located on the east bank of the Mississippi River near Port Gibson in Claiborne County, Mississippi, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This supplement reports the NRC staff's evaluation of open items from previous supplements and Technical Specification changes required before authorizing operation of Unit 1 above 5% of rated power

  10. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Millstone Nuclear Power Station Unit No. 3 (Docket No. 50-4423). Supplement No. 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In July 1984 staff of the Nuclear Regulatory Commission issued its Safety Evaluation Report regarding the application of Northeast Nuclear Energy Company (applicant and agent for the owners) for a license to operate Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 3 (Docket 50-423). The facility is located in the town of Waterford, New London County, Connecticut, on the north shore of Long Island Sound. This first supplement to NUREG-1031 reports the status of certain items that remained unresolved at the time the Safety Evaluation Report was published

  11. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2 (Docket Nos. 50-416 and 50-417). Supplement No. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Supplement 5 to the Safety Evaluation Report for Mississippi Power and Light Company, et al., joint application for licenses to operate the Grand Gulf Nuclear Station, Units 1 and 2, located on the east bank of the Mississippi River near Port Gibson in Claiborne County, Mississippi, has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. This supplement reports the status on the resolution of those issues that require further evaluation before authorizing operation of Unit 1 above 5% of rated power

  12. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station, Unit No. 2 (Docket No. 50-410)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Safety Evaluation Report for the application filed by the Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation, as applicant and co-owner, for a license to operate the Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station, Unit 2 (Docket No. 50-410), has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located near Oswego, New York. Subject to favorable resolution of the items discussed in this report, the NRC staff concludes that the facility can be operated by the applicant without endangering the health and safety of the public

  13. Pu isotopes in the western North Pacific Ocean before the accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, M.; Zheng, J.; Aono, T.

    2011-12-01

    Anthropogenic radionuclides such as Pu-239 (half-life: 24100 yr), Pu-240 (half-life: 6560 yr) and Pu-241 (half-life: 14.325 yr) mainly have been released into the environment as the result of atmospheric nuclear weapons testing. In the North Pacific Ocean, two distinct sources of Pu isotopes can be identified; i.e., the global stratospheric fallout and close-in tropospheric fallout from nuclear weapons testing at the Pacific Proving Grounds in the Marshall Islands. The atom ratio of Pu-240/Pu-239 is a powerful fingerprint to identify the sources of Pu in the ocean. The Pu-240/Pu-239 atom ratios in seawater and marine sediment samples collected in the western North Pacific before the accident at Fukushima Dai-ichi Nuclear Power Station will provide useful background data for understanding the process controlling Pu transport and for distinguishing future Pu sources. The atom ratios of Pu-240/Pu-239 in water columns from the Yamato and Tsushima Basins in the Japan Sea were significantly higher than the mean global fallout ratio of 0.18; however, there were no temporal variation of atom ratios during the period from 1984 to 1993 in the Japan Sea. The total Pu-239+240 inventories in the whole water columns were approximately doubled during the period from 1984 to 1993 in the two basins. The atom ratio of Pu-240/Pu-239 in surface water from Sagami Bay, western North Pacific Ocean, was 0.224 and showed no notable variation from the surface to the bottom with the mean atom ratio being 0.234. The atom ratios for the Pacific coast, near the Rokkasho nuclear fuel reprocessing plant, were approximately the same as the 0.224 ratio obtained from Sagami Bay, western North Pacific margin. The atom ratios in the surficial sediments from Sagami Bay ranged from 0.229 to 0.247. The mean atom ratio in the sediment columns in the East China Sea ranged from 0.248 for the Changjiang estuary to 0.268 for the shelf edge. The observed atom ratios were significantly higher than the mean

  14. Direct measurements of employees involved in the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident for internal dose estimates. JAEA's experiences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Japan Atomic Energy Agency (JAEA) performed internal dose measurements of employees involved in the Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power station accident. Nuclear Fuel Cycle Engineering Laboratories (NFCEL), one of the JAEA's core centers, examined 560 of these employees by direct (in vivo) measurements during the period from April 20 to August 5 in 2011. These measurements consisted of whole-body counting for radiocesium and thyroid counting for radioiodine. The whole-body counting was conducted with two types of whole-body counters (WBCs): a standing-type WBC with two large NaI(Tl) detectors (FastscanTM, Canberra Inc.) and a chair-type WBC with HPGe detectors (GC5021, Canberra Inc.) installed in a shielded chamber made of 20-cm-thick steel. The thyroid counting was mainly performed using one of the two HPGe detectors equipped with the chair-type WBC. The subjects examined in this work were divided into two groups: Group 1 was the first 39 subjects who were measured up to June 17, 2011 and Group 2 was the remaining 521 subjects who were measured on and after June 18, 2011. The performance of our direct measurements was validated by comparing measurement results of the Group 1 subjects using two different methods (e.g., the standing-type WBC vs. the chair-type WBC). Tentative internal dose estimates of the subjects of Group 1 were also performed based on the assumption of a single intake scenario on either March 12, when the first hydrogen explosion occurred at the station or the first day of work after the accident. It was found that the contribution of 131I to the total internal dose greatly exceeded those of 134Cs and 137Cs, the other major nuclides detected in the measurements. The maximum committed effective dose (CED) was found in a male subject whose thyroid content of 131I was 9760 Bq on May 23, 2011; the CED of this subject was estimated to be 600 mSv including a small contribution of 134Cs and 137Cs. The typical minimum detectable activity for 131I in the

  15. MEASUREMENTS OF THE CONFINEMENT LEAKTIGHTNESS AT THE KOLA NUCLEAR POWER STATION (UNIT 2) IN RUSSIA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This is the final report on the INSP project entitled, ''Kola Confinement Leaktightness'' conducted by BNL under the authorization of Project Work Plan WBS 1.2.2.1. This project was initiated in February 1993 to assist the Russians to reduce risks associated with the continued operation of older Soviet-designed nuclear power plants, specifically the Kola VVER-440/230 Units 1 and 2, through upgrades in the confinement performance to reduce the uncontrolled leakage rate. The major technical objective of this-project was to improve the leaktightness of the Kola NPP VVER confinement boundaries, through the application of a variety of sealants to penetrations, doors and hatches, seams and surfaces, to the extent that current technology permitted. A related objective was the transfer, through training of Russian staff, of the materials application procedures to the staff of the Kola NPP. This project was part of an overall approach to minimizing uncontrolled releases from the Kola NPP VVER440/230s in the event of a serious accident, and to thereby significantly mitigate the consequences of such an accident. The US provided materials, application technology, and applications equipment for application of sealant materials, surface coatings, potting materials and gaskets, to improve the confinement leaktightness of the Kola VVER-440/23Os. The US provided for training of Russian personnel in the applications technology

  16. Environmental radiological studies downstream from the Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Generating Station, 1985

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Information compiled in 1985 while assessing the environmental impact of radionuclides previously discharged with aqueous releases from the Rancho Seco Nuclear Power Generating Plant is presented. In October 1984, the quantities of gamma-emitting radionuclides in water discharged to Clay Creek from the plant were reduced below operationally defined detection limits for liquid effluents. However, radionuclides previously discharged persist in the downstream environment and are found in many aquatic dietary components. 134Cs and 137Cs are the primary gamma-emitting radionuclides detected in the edible flesh of different fish, crayfish, and frogs. Coefficients for exponential equations are generated, from a least square analysis, that relate the change in concentration of 137Cs in fish to distance downstream and time between March and October 1985. Concentrations of 137Cs in surface creek sediments also decreased in the downstream direction much in the same manner as concentrations decreased in fish. However, there was no significant difference in the radiocesium concentrations in surface sediements collected from comparable locations during both 1984 and 1985

  17. Organohalogen products from chlorination of cooling water at nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bean, R.M.

    1983-10-01

    Eight nuclear power units at seven locations in the US were studied to determine the effects of chlorine, added as a biocide, on the composition of cooling water discharge. Water, sediment and biota samples from the sites were analyzed for total organic halogen and for a variety of organohalogen compounds. Haloforms were discharged from all plants studied, at concentrations of a few ..mu..g/L (parts-per-billion). Evidence was obtained that power plants with cooling towers discharge a significant portion of the haloforms formed during chlorination to the atmosphere. A complex mixture of halogenated phenols was found in the cooling water discharges of the power units. Cooling towers can act to concentrate halogenated phenols to levels approaching those of the haloforms. Examination of samples by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry did not result in identification of any significant concentrations of lipophilic base-neutral compounds that could be shown to be formed by the chlorination process. Total concentrations of lipophilic (Bioabsorbable) and volatile organohalogen material discharged ranged from about 2 to 4 ..mu..g/L. Analysis of sediment samples for organohalogen material suggests that certain chlorination products may accumulate in sediments, although no tissue bioaccumulation could be demonstrated from analysis of a limited number of samples. 58 references, 25 figures, 31 tables.

  18. Utilization of robot technology for accident response and decommissioning of Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accident response and decommissioning of Fukushima Daiichi required utilization of robot technology. This article described activities and history of introduction of robots and remote control devices to the accident response and future issues to be solved. Just after the accident, six special project teams (PTs) were established for disaster measures and restoration from Fukushima accident, one of which was remote control PT to discuss how to introduce robots and remote control devices for emergency response. ROBOtics Taskforce for Anti-Disaster (ROBOTAD) was established for information exchange about state of disaster response. Experimental data on radiation resistance of remote control devices and difficulties of wireless communications in buildings were published. Needs of robots and remote control devices introduction focused on reduction of radiation exposure of workers for exploration in building, sampling, setting of measuring instruments, decontamination, shielding and transport of use materials and equipment. In August 2013, International Research Institute for nuclear Decommissioning (IRID) was established for R and D management organization in the area of removal of fuel from spent fuel pools, retrieval of fuel debris and treatment and disposal of radioactive wastes including development of robots and remote control devices. Validation tests and operator training for remote control devices for retrieval of fuel debris were also planned using newly prepared mockup facility. Implementation process of disaster response robot should be also promoted. (T. Tanaka)

  19. Organohalogen products from chlorination of cooling water at nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eight nuclear power units at seven locations in the US were studied to determine the effects of chlorine, added as a biocide, on the composition of cooling water discharge. Water, sediment and biota samples from the sites were analyzed for total organic halogen and for a variety of organohalogen compounds. Haloforms were discharged from all plants studied, at concentrations of a few μg/L (parts-per-billion). Evidence was obtained that power plants with cooling towers discharge a significant portion of the haloforms formed during chlorination to the atmosphere. A complex mixture of halogenated phenols was found in the cooling water discharges of the power units. Cooling towers can act to concentrate halogenated phenols to levels approaching those of the haloforms. Examination of samples by capillary gas chromatography/mass spectrometry did not result in identification of any significant concentrations of lipophilic base-neutral compounds that could be shown to be formed by the chlorination process. Total concentrations of lipophilic (Bioabsorbable) and volatile organohalogen material discharged ranged from about 2 to 4 μg/L. Analysis of sediment samples for organohalogen material suggests that certain chlorination products may accumulate in sediments, although no tissue bioaccumulation could be demonstrated from analysis of a limited number of samples. 58 references, 25 figures, 31 tables

  20. MEASUREMENTS OF THE CONFINEMENT LEAKTIGHTNESS AT THE KOLA NUCLEAR POWER STATION (UNIT 2) IN RUSSIA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    GREENE,G.A.; GUPPY,J.G.

    1998-08-01

    This is the final report on the INSP project entitled, ``Kola Confinement Leaktightness'' conducted by BNL under the authorization of Project Work Plan WBS 1.2.2.1. This project was initiated in February 1993 to assist the Russians to reduce risks associated with the continued operation of older Soviet-designed nuclear power plants, specifically the Kola VVER-440/230 Units 1 and 2, through upgrades in the confinement performance to reduce the uncontrolled leakage rate. The major technical objective of this-project was to improve the leaktightness of the Kola NPP VVER confinement boundaries, through the application of a variety of sealants to penetrations, doors and hatches, seams and surfaces, to the extent that current technology permitted. A related objective was the transfer, through training of Russian staff, of the materials application procedures to the staff of the Kola NPP. This project was part of an overall approach to minimizing uncontrolled releases from the Kola NPP VVER440/230s in the event of a serious accident, and to thereby significantly mitigate the consequences of such an accident. The US provided materials, application technology, and applications equipment for application of sealant materials, surface coatings, potting materials and gaskets, to improve the confinement leaktightness of the Kola VVER-440/23Os. The US provided for training of Russian personnel in the applications technology.

  1. Montague Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2: Final environmental statement (Docket Nos. 50-496 and 50-497)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed action is the issuance of construction permits to the Northeast Nuclear Energy Company for the construction of the Montague Nuclear Power Station, Units 1 and 2, located on the Connecticut River in the Town of Montague, Massachusetts. The plant will employ two identical boiling-water reactors to produce up to 3579 megawatts thermal (MWt) each. Two steam turbine-generators will use this heat to provide 1150 MWe (net) of electrical power capacity from each turbine-generator. A design power level of 3759 MWt (1220 Mwe net) for each unit is anticipated at a future date and is considered in the assessments contained in this statement. The waste heat will be rejected through natural-draft cooling towers using makeup water obtained from and discharged to the Connecticut River. The 1900-acre site is about 90% forest, with the remaining acreage in transmission-line corridor and old-field vegetation. The total loss of mixed-age forest will be 1273 acres. Nodesignated scenic areas will be crossed. Sixty acres of public lands, State forests, and parks will be lost to transmission facilities as well as losses associated with crossings of 2.0 miles of water bodies and 11.9 miles of wetlands. The maximum estimated potential loss of salable wood products will be $849,600. A maximum of 85.8 cfs of cooling water will be withdrawn from the Connecticut River. A maximum of 17.2 cfs will be returned to the river with the dissolved solids concentration increased by a factor of about 5. A maximum of 68.6 cfs will be evaporated to the atmosphere by the cooling towers. 143 refs., 58 figs., 69 tabs

  2. Investigating the knowledge and preparedness of proximal residents to a general-emergency event at the Koeberg Nuclear Power Station

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alberto P. Francioli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Ward 23 in the City of Cape Town South Africa is situated within 16 km of Koeberg Nuclear Power Station (KNPS. Massive investments were made to provide the 13 800 residents of Ward 23 with information on emergency preparedness and evacuation procedures in case of a general-emergency event at KNPS. However, it is not known whether these efforts to inform and prepare the proximal residents for a general emergency have been effective or not. The objective of this study was to investigate the level of knowledge of and preparedness for an emergency exhibited by residents of Ward 23. Data was collected through the distribution of semi-structured questionnaires to 204 residents at the study site to ascertain their views on the provision and accessibility of emergency information and to find out whether they utilised this information to prepare themselves. The results revealed that the majority of interviewed residents had very poor knowledge concerning emergency procedures, and few had made any effort to prepare themselves. The majority of better-informed and prepared residents tended to reside closer to KNPS. The poor levels of knowledge and preparedness are attributed to residents’ lack of awareness concerning the availability of information, misconceptions regarding a nuclear hazard and a general emergency event or a lack of incentive to inform themselves due to a perceived high sense of security and the improbability of such an event occurring. To improve resident knowledge and preparedness, efforts should be made to advertise the availability and importance of such emergency information and enhance incentives for residents to inform themselves.

  3. Microbiologically influenced corrosion of stainless steel tubing and piping in the service water system at North Anna Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since original plant construction in the 1970's, the carbon steel piping of the service water system (SWS) of Virginia Power's North Anna Nuclear Power Station has experienced general corrosion and pitting due to microbiologically influenced corrosion (MIC). Corrosion of the carbon steel piping was combatted by the implementation of chemical treatment of the SWS and by repair/replacement of portions of the piping utilizing type 316L stainless steel (SS) on 10 in. and smaller piping and 100% solids epoxy coating on the rest of the piping. Only recently, in early 1994, MIC was discovered on the 18 gage 304 S welded tubes in the Component Cooling Heat Exchangers (CCHXs). Earlier, MIC was discovered on 316L SS pipe base metal adjacent to several socket weld locations on small diameter piping. This paper will concentrate on the Virginia Power action plan to combat further degradation due to MIC and to maintain operable SS piping and equipment with SS tubing which is exposed to service water

  4. Annex VI. Development in reliable centered maintenance and on-condition maintenance at Guangdong nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Reliable Centered Maintenance (RCM) was introduced in Guangdong Nuclear Power Station (GNPS) from the US in 1998. RCM has demonstrated real and pragmatic benefits and GNPS has developed a RCM analysis system that suits the local environment. This paper, in the first part, introduces the RCM concept and analysis method as applied by GNPS. This part will enable the reader to have a basic understanding of the importance of RCM theory and how it contributes to safe, stable, economic operations. However, just applying the RCM logic itself does not solve all the issues. The RCM programme requires a radical change in the skills, thinking and management systems. A traditional TBPM (Time-based Preventive Maintenance) programme mostly requires skilled mechanics, a spares management system, and outage planning. The RCM world is far more complex. One of the biggest challenges is determining the unacceptable criteria or datum (p-point) in on-condition monitoring (predictive monitoring/maintenance). These issues are discussed in the second part of this paper. (author)

  5. Development of radioactive wastewater treatment systems at Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station and Toshiba's efforts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In keeping the condition of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (NPS) of The Tokyo Electric Power Company, Inc. under control, following the serious damage to the NPS as a result of the Great East Japan Earthquake and subsequent tsunami on March 11, 2011, both stable cooling of the reactors and spent fuel pools and control of the radioactive wastewater to prevent release have been crucial issues. The reactor cooling has depended on the injection of water from outside, with seawater used first for approximately one month, after which the supply was changed to filtered water. In both cases, however, the water flowed into the reactor buildings and turbine buildings. Toshiba contributed to the realization of circulating water injection cooling at the NPS by supplying a radioactive wastewater transferral system and the first purification system in the initial three months, followed by a second purification system, called SARRYTM, which provided stable treatment capability. These systems make it possible to reuse injected water by purification for further injection, eliminating the need for additional water from the outside. These systems also decrease wastewater generation in the NPS and minimize the risk of spills into the environment. (author)

  6. Experience in ultrasonic gap measurement between calandria tubes and liquid injection shutdown systems nozzles in Bruce Nuclear Generating Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The gaps between calandria tubes (CT) and Liquid Injection Shutdown System (LISS) nozzles at the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station ''A'' (Bruce A) are known to decrease with time due to radiation induced creep/sag of the calandria tubes. If this gap decreases to a point where the calandria tubes come into contact with the LISS nozzle, the calandria tubes could fail as a result of fretting damage. Proximity measurements were needed to verify the analytical models and ensure that CT/LISS nozzle contact does not occur earlier than predicted. The technique used was originally developed at Ontario Hydro Technologies (formerly Ontario Hydro Research Division) in the late seventies and put into practical use by Research and Productivity Council (RPC) of New Brunswick, who carried out similar measurements at Point Lepreau NGS in 1989 and 1991. The gap measurement was accomplished y inserting an inspection probe, containing four ultrasonic transducers (2 to measure gaps and 2 to check for probe tilt) and a Fredericks electrolytic potentiometer as a probe rotational sensor, inside LISS Nozzle number-sign 7. The ultrasonic measurements were fed to a system computer that was programmed to convert the readings into fully compensated gaps, taking into account moderator heavy water temperature and probe tilt. Since the measured gaps were found to be generally larger than predicted, the time to CT/LISS nozzle contact is now being re-evaluated and the planned LISS nozzle replacement will likely be deferred, resulting in considerable savings

  7. Systems analysis of radiation safety during dismantling of power-plant equipment at a nuclear power station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A systems analysis of the radiation safety makes possible an ad hoc determination of the elements forming the system, as well as the establishment of the characteristics of their interaction with radiation-effect factors. Here the authors will present part of the hierarchical analysis procedure, consisting in general of four separate procedures. The purpose is to investigate and analyze the mean and stable (on the average) indices of radiation safety, within the framework of alternative mathematical models of dismantling the power-plant equipment of a nuclear power station. The following three of the four procedures are discussed: (1) simulated projection, of the processing of radioactive waste; (2) analysis of the redistribution of radionuclides during the industrial cycle of waste treatment; (3) planning the collective dose load during the dismantling operation. Within the framework of the first of these procedures, the solutions to the problem of simulating a waste-treatment operation of maximum efficiency are analyzed. This analysis is based on the use of a data base for the parameters of the installations, assemblies, and equipment, enabling the integration of these in a simulation of a complex automated facility. The results were visualized in an AUTOCAD-10 medium using a graphical data base containing an explanation of the rooms

  8. Decommissioning optimization of the Loviisa nuclear power station dismantling the pressure vessel and decontamination of primary circuit

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The report describes radioactivities and radiation levels in decommissioning situation at the Loviisa Nuclear Power Station and optimization of plant decommissioning in view of costs and radiation doses. In calculation of the activity inventory, the existing activity calculations, the literature data and the measuring results and experiences gained at the Loviisa plant have been used as basic data. The radiation levels have been calculated with a computer program based on the point kernel method. A technique for dismantling the reactor pressure vessel and internals as large parts has been developed. As compared with segmenting into small parts, the developed dismantling technique saves FIM 12.3 million of immediate costs and 0.7 manSv of collective radiation doses, if the plant is decommissioned two years after the final reactor shutdown. Saving in total decommissioning costs and doses is 3-4%. Costs of primary circuit chemical decontamination of one plant unit are FIM 1.7 million. Major part of the costs is caused by solidification and final disposal of active waste produced in decontamination. The primary circuit decontamination saves 0.36 manSv in collective radiation doses caused by dismantling operations, if the plant is decommissioned two years after the final reactor shutdown. Price of a saved manSv is FIM 4.8 million. (author)

  9. Source Term Analysis for the Nuclear Power Station Goesgen-Daeniken; Quelltermanalysen fuer das Kernkraftwerk Goesgen-Daeniken

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hosemann, J.P.; Megaritis, G.; Guentay, S.; Hirschmann, H.; Luebbesmeyer, D.; Lieber, K.; Jaeckel, B.; Birchley, J.; Duijvestijn, G

    2001-08-01

    Analyses are performed for three accident scenarios postulated to occur in the Goesgen Nuclear Power Plant, a 900 MWe Pressurised Water Reactor of Siemens design. The scenarios investigated comprise a Station Blackout and two separate cases of small break loss-of-coolant accident which lead, respectively, to high, intermediate and low pressure conditions in the reactor system. In each case the accident assumptions are highly pessimistic, so that the sequences span a large range of plant states and a damage phenomena. Thus the plant is evaluated for a diversity of potential safety challenges. A suite of analysis tools are used to examine the reactor coolant system response, the core heat-up, melting, fission product release from the reactor system, the transport and chemical behaviour of those fission products in the containment building, and the release of radioactivity (source term) to the environment. Comparison with reference values used by the licensing authority shows that the use of modern analysis tools and current knowledge can provide substantial reduction in the estimated source term. Of particular interest are insights gained from the analyses which indicate opportunities for operators to reduce or forestall the release. (author)

  10. Integrated safety assessment report: Integrated Safety Assessment Program: Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1 (Docket No. 50-245): Draft report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Integrated Safety Assessment Program (ISAP) was initiated in November 1984, by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to conduct integrated assessments for operating nuclear power reactors. The integrated assessment is conducted in a plant-specific basis to evaluate all licensing actions, licensee initiated plant improvements and selected unresolved generic/safety issues to establish implementation schedules for each item. In addition, procedures will be established to allow for a periodic updating of the schedules to account for licensing issues that arise in the future. This report documents the review of Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 1, operated by Northeast Nuclear Energy Company (located in Waterford, Connecticut). Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 1, is one of two plants being reviewed under the pilot program for ISAP. This report indicates how 85 topics selected for review were addressed. This report presents the staff's recommendations regarding the corrective actions to resolve the 85 topics and other actions to enhance plant safety. The report is being issued in draft form to obtain comments from the licensee, nuclear safety experts, and the Advisory Committee for Reactor Safeguards (ACRS). Once those comments have been resolved, the staff will present its positions, along with a long-term implementation schedule from the licensee, in the final version of this report

  11. Recommendations on selecting the closing relations for calculating friction pressure drop in the loops of nuclear power stations equipped with VVER reactors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alipchenkov, V. M.; Belikov, V. V.; Davydov, A. V.; Emel'yanov, D. A.; Mosunova, N. A.

    2013-05-01

    Closing relations describing friction pressure drop during the motion of two-phase flows that are widely applied in thermal-hydraulic codes and in calculations of the parameters characterizing the flow of water coolant in the loops of reactor installations used at nuclear power stations and in other thermal power systems are reviewed. A new formula developed by the authors of this paper is proposed. The above-mentioned relations are implemented in the HYDRA-IBRAE thermal-hydraulic computation code developed at the Nuclear Safety Institute of the Russian Academy of Sciences. A series of verification calculations is carried out for a wide range of pressures, flowrates, and heat fluxes typical for transient and emergency operating conditions of nuclear power stations equipped with VVER reactors. Advantages and shortcomings of different closing relations are revealed, and recommendations for using them in carrying out thermal-hydraulic calculations of coolant flow in the loops of VVER-based nuclear power stations are given.

  12. "Life without nuclear power": A nuclear plant retirement formulation model and guide based on economics. San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station case: Economic impacts and reliability considerations leading to plant retirement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wasko, Frank

    Traditionally, electric utilities have been slow to change and very bureaucratic in nature. This culture, in and of itself, has now contributed to a high percentage of United States electric utilities operating uneconomical nuclear plants (Crooks, 2014). The economic picture behind owning and operating United States nuclear plants is less than favorable for many reasons including rising fuel, capital and operating costs (EUCG, 2012). This doctoral dissertation is specifically focused on life without nuclear power. The purpose of this dissertation is to create a model and guide that will provide electric utilities who currently operate or will operate uneconomical nuclear plants the opportunity to economically assess whether or not their nuclear plant should be retired. This economic assessment and stakeholder analysis will provide local government, academia and communities the opportunity to understand how Southern California Edison (SCE) embraced system upgrade import and "voltage support" opportunities to replace "base load" generation from San Onofre Nuclear Generating Station (SONGS) versus building new replacement generation facilities. This model and guide will help eliminate the need to build large replacement generation units as demonstrated in the SONGS case analysis. The application of The Nuclear Power Retirement Model and Guide will provide electric utilities with economic assessment parameters and an evaluation assessment progression needed to better evaluate when an uneconomical nuclear plant should be retired. It will provide electric utilities the opportunity to utilize sound policy, planning and development skill sets when making this difficult decision. There are currently 62 nuclear power plants (with 100 nuclear reactors) operating in the United States (EIA, 2014). From this group, 38 are at risk of early retirement based on the work of Cooper (2013). As demonstrated in my model, 35 of the 38 nuclear power plants qualify to move to the economic

  13. Safety Evaluation Report related to the full-term operating license for Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 1 (Docket No. 50-245)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Safety Evaluation Report for the full-term operating license application filed by the Connecticut Light and Power Company, the Hartford Electric Light Company, Western Massachusetts Electric Company and the Millstone Point Company [(now known as Connecticut Light and Power Company (CL and P) and Western Massachusetts Electric Company (WMECO) having authority to possess Millstone-1, 2, and 3, and the Northeast Nuclear Energy Company (NNECO) as the responsible entity for operation of the facilities)] for Millstone Nuclear Power Station Unit 1 has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located in the town of Waterford, Connecticut. Subject to favorable resolution of the items discussed in this report, the staff concludes that the facility can continue to be operated without endangering the health and safety of the public

  14. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 3 (Docket No. 50-423). Supplement No. 4

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report supplements the Safety Evaluation Report (NUREG-1031) issued in July 1984, Supplement 1 issued in March 1985, Supplement 2 issued in September 1985, and Supplement 3 issued in November 1985, by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission with respect to the application filed by Northeast Nuclear Energy Company (applicant and agent for the owners) for a license to operate Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit No. 3 (Docket 50-423). The facility is located in the Town of Waterford, New London County, Connecticut, on the north shore of Long Island Sound. This supplement provides more recent information supporting the license for initial criticality and power ascension to 5% power operation for Millstone 3. 37 refs., 10 tabs

  15. Problems concerned with local erosion-corrosion of welded connections in the pipelines of a power unit at a nuclear power station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomarov, G. V.; Lovchev, V. N.; Gutsev, D. F.; Shipkov, A. A.; Golubeva, T. N.; Greblov, P. N.

    2012-08-01

    Results from a study aimed at analyzing the damageability and determining the mechanism due to which thinning occurs in the metal of welded connections in the feed water supply control assemblies used in power units of nuclear power stations equipped with RBMK-1000 reactors are presented together with the outcomes from calculation studies aimed at analyzing the effect of hydrodynamic characteristics on the kinetics characterizing the thinning of a welded joint and adjacent elements of a pipeline. Data from a calculation of the erosion-corrosion rate of welded connections in the divergent parts of assemblies controlling the supply of feed water in power units of nuclear power stations equipped with RBMK-1000 reactors are given.

  16. Damage of the reclaimed land in Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station by the 2011 off the pacific coast of Tohoku earthquake

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Some facilities of the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (NPS) have been constructed on the reclaimed land. According to the disaster photos disclosed by the Nuclear and Industrial Safety Agency (NISA) and the Tokyo Electric Power Company, Incorporated (TEPCO), the damage caused by the earthquake motion was found at the facilities of water supply, drainage, and power supply systems. As a result, it is presumed that leakage paths of the contaminated water become complicated. To examine countermeasures against the contaminated water issues, it is indispensable to investigate the seismic damage of the reclaimed land and the facilities by the earthquake motion in detail to clarify the leakage paths of the contaminated water. (author)

  17. 芜湖建设核电站可行性分析%On the Feasibility of Wuhu Nuclear Power Station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    杨莹

    2013-01-01

      核电是一种清洁、安全、潜在价值高的新能源,升值空间大同时风险成本也较高。通过对芜湖核电站建设工程的选址条件考察、预期效益估计、风险分析,得出以下结论:芜湖符合核电站选址标准;核电站工程符合芜湖长期发展战略,为芜湖带来的预期效益高于预期风险;针对核电站的风险存在,应通过加强管理、改良技术、增强意识、严格监测等方式降低风险成本。%Nuclear power is a new , clean and safe energy source with high potential value , which has large value -added room , and high risk cost at the same time.By investigating the location ,estimating the expected benefits and analyzing the risks of Wuhu nuclear power station , it is concluded that the siting criteria of nuclear power station is in accord with the long-term development strategy in Wuhu ,and brings Wuhu expected benefits over expected risk .Considering the risks that exists in nuclear power station, it is necessary for us to reduce the risk cost by enhancing management , improving technology adopted , strengthening the regulation of the power station .operation.

  18. 氚内照射剂量评价方法在核电站的应用%Discussion on Tritium Internal Dose Assessment at Nuclear Power Station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    邓安嫦; 杨海兰; 马雄楠

    2011-01-01

    应用氚监测及内照射剂量的估算与评价方法对田湾核电站大修期间的工作人员氚内照射剂量进行评价,并与大亚湾核电站的监测结果进行比较。结果表明,两个核电站氚监测结果有差异,通过分析认为引致差异的原因主要是两个电站冷却剂中氚产量的差异。%The method of tritium monitoring and internal dose assessment is used to assess the internal dose to the occupational workers at Tianwan Nuclear Power Plant during outage period. The results were compared with the monitoring results obtained at Daya Bay Nuclear Power Station. The differences between two nuclear power station are considered being primarily from the production of tritium in coolant in both stations.

  19. Sociological impacts of nuclear generating stations - summary report on the NRC post-licensing studies. Final report 1 Oct 78-4 Jan 82

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Post-Licensing Studies had four objectives. The first was to identify the socioeconomic effects resulting from the construction and operation of each of twelve nuclear power stations. The socioeconomic variables examined included: economic, demographic, housing, government, public response, and social organization characteristics. The second objective was to determine the way in which the identified effects were evaluated by study area groups. The third objective was to identify the determinants of the project-related effects. This task required knowledge of what combination of site, project, or other determinants was responsible for the project-related effects and for the evaluation of the effects. The fourth objective was to make recommendations with respect to assessment methodologies that could best be used to project the socioeconomic effects of the construction and operation of proposed nuclear generating stations. The objectives of the Post-Licensing Studies are met by the twelve individual case studies and by the Summary Report. The case studies identified the nuclear power stations and describe the evaluation of the effects by area residents. The Summary Report describes the collective findings of the individual case studies, compares the findings across sites to identify possible determinants of the effects, and examines the implication of the findings for future siting decisions and for the methodology most appropriate for projective assessments

  20. Avian radioecology on a nuclear power station site. Technical progress report, 1 July 1974--30 June 1975

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The continuation of a program demonstrating that free-ranging wild birds can be used to assess environmental radionuclide levels is described. Wild passerine birds are trapped at a nuclear power station site and at two control sites, uniquely marked, non-destructively counted for levels of gamma-emitting radionuclides, and released. Subsequent recapture rates are as high as 80 percent for certain species. Nuclides detected included 40K, 95Zr-95Nb, 137Cs, and apparent 131I, the latter at levels just above detection limits (0.07 pCi/g). Significant variations in mean 137Cs body burdens in Blue Jays and Bobwhite have been observed between sites less than 6 km apart. A significant temporal decrease in 137Cs body burdens has been observed in various species of birds only at the reactor site. Vegetation and meteorological studies have been initiated to help explain these body-burden differences. The effective half-life of 137Cs in the Blue Jay is 6.7 +- 1.5 days. The highest observed level of 95Zr-95Nb (1.08 +- 0.07 pCi/g) was in a Grey Catbird. The effective half-life of the 95Zr-95Nb was 69.9 +- 15 days, corresponding to the physical half-life of this isotope pair (65.5d), and the activity abruptly disappeared after the twelfth day of captivity suggesting that it was present in particulate form either on the feathers or skin, or in the bird's pulmonary system. Inter-laboratory comparisons of radionuclide measurements are reported. The number of birds banded during the current reporting period is 2720, while 2047 specimens were radioassayed, an increase of 9 percent and 313 percent, respectively. An exercise to test the practicality of obtaining avian samples from remote sites (i.e., > 50 miles away) for radionuclide measurement was performed satisfactorily. (U.S.)

  1. Study of condenser pressure response in loss of turbine/generator and offsite power event for Lungmen Nuclear Power Station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the event of loss of turbine/generator and offsite power, the circulating water pumps will trip and there is no more cooling available for the condenser. Turbine stop valve closure will occur and steam flow will be bypassed to the condenser through the turbine bypass valves. Since the cooling to the condenser is lost and the steam flows into the condenser continuously, the pressure of the condenser will increase rapidly and consequently reach the high pressure setpoint to initiate closure of the main steam isolation valves (MSIVs). After the MSIVs are fully closed, the reactor is isolated and the energy in the reactor can only be discharged to the suppression pool through the safety relief valves. This will cause the containment pressure and temperature to increase. The condenser's capability to absorb reactor energy determines the MSIVs closure initiation time. The longer the MSIVs can remain open the less the challenge to the containment pressure and temperature response. The Lungmen nuclear power station is an advanced boiling water reactor plant in Taiwan. The construction of the plant is currently near the stage of completeness of pre-operational test and is expected to proceed further to the initial fuel loading and startup test. The loss of turbine/generator and offsite power test is one of the major transient test cases in the Lungmen startup test program. And one of the objectives of the test is to verify the energy absorption capability of the main condenser. In this study, a Lungmen condenser RELAP5 model was built to simulate the pressure response of the condenser in the event of loss of turbine/generator and offsite power. The MSIVs closure initiation time at different reactor power level was calculated, and the results were provided to Lungmen plant and will be used as a reference basis for evaluating the condenser performance during the startup test stage. (author)

  2. Improved sampling and analytical techniques for characterization of very-low-level radwaste materials from commercial nuclear power stations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robertson, D.E. [Pacific Northwest Labs., Richland, WA (United States); Robinson, P.J. [Electric Power Research Inst., Palo Alto, CA (United States)

    1989-11-01

    This paper summarizes the unique sampling methods that were utilized in a recently completed project sponsored by the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI) to perform accurate and precise radiological characterizations of several very-low-level radwaste materials from commercial nuclear power stations. The waste types characterized during this project included dry active waste (DAW), oil, secondary-side ion exchange resin, and soil. Special precautions were taken to insure representative sampling of the DAW. This involved the initial direct, quantitative gamma spectrometric analyses of bulk quantities (208-liter drums) of DAW utilizing a specially constructed barrel scanner employing a collimated intrinsic germanium detector assembly. Subsamples of the DAW for destructive radiochemical analyses of the difficult-to-measure 10CF61 radionuclides were then selected which had the same isotopic composition (to within {+-}25%) as that measured for the entire drum of DAW. The techniques for accomplishing this sampling are described. Oil samples were collected from the top, middle and bottom sections of 208-liter drums for radiochemical analyses. These samples were composited to represent the entire drum of oil. The accuracy of this type of sampling was evaluated by comparisons with direct, quantitative assays of a number of the drums using the barrel scanning gamma-ray spectrometer. The accuracy of sampling drums of spent secondary-side ion exchange resin was evaluated by comparing the radionuclide contents of grab samples taken from the tops of the drums with direct assays performed with the barrel scanner. The results of these sampling evaluations indicated that the sampling methods used were generally adequate for providing a reasonably representative subsample from bulk quantities of DAW, oil, and resin. The study also identified a number of potential pitfalls, in sampling of these materials.

  3. Field experience with advanced methods of on-line monitoring of water chemistry and corrosion degradation in nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Advanced methods for on-line, in-situ water chemistry and corrosion monitoring in nuclear power stations have been developed during the past decade. The terms ''on-line'' and ''in-situ'' characterize approaches involving continuous measurement of relevant parameters in high temperature water, preferably directly in the systems and components and not in removed samples at room temperature. This paper describes the field experience to-date with such methods in terms of three examples: (1) On-line chemistry monitoring of the primary coolant during shutdown of a Type WWER-440 PWR. (2) Redox and corrosion potential measurements in final feedwater preheaters and steam generators of two large KWU PWRs over several cycles of plant operation. (3) Real-time, in-situ corrosion surveillance inside the calundia vault of a CANDU reactor. The way in which water chemistry sensors and corrosion monitoring sensors complement each other is outlined: on-line, in-situ measurement of pH, conductivity and redox potential gives information about the possible corrosivity of the environment. Electrochemical noise techniques display signals of corrosion activity under the actual environmental conditions. A common experience gained from separate use of these different types of sensors has been that new and additional information about plants and their actual process conditions is obtained. Moreover, they reveal the intimate relationship between the operational situation and its consequences for the quality of the working fluid and the corrosion behaviour of the plant materials. On this basis, the efficiency of the existing chemistry sampling and control system can be checked and corrosion degradation can be minimized. Furthermore, activity buildup in the primary circuit can be studied. Further significant advantages can be expected from an integration of these various types of sensors into a common water chemistry and corrosion surveillance system. For confirmation, a complete set of sensors

  4. Investigation on the environmental radioactivity of the proposed location for Nuclear Power Plant Station in Ujung Watu area, Central Java

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the period of November 1981 and March 1983, preliminary investigation of the environmental radioactivity at the proposed location of nuclear power station in Ujung Watu area in Central Java has been carried out. The investigated area covers an area within a radius of 5 km of the proposed location. During this period a total of about 319 environmental samples which consist of soils, grasses, drinking and surface waters, several food-item of agricultural and sea product have been collected. Measurement of exposure and absorbed dose level were also carried out at 52 and 27 locations within the investigated area. Measurement of exposure dose was carried out using scintillation probe detector coupled to rate meter and absorbed dose level was measured using TL-dosemeter. The samples were analysed for the gross - α and β radioactivity, the content of H-3, Cs-137 and Sr-90. Results showed that the radiation level of the area has a range of 4 ± 18 mR/h with an average of about 4.6 x 1.4 mR/h. Absorbed dose showed a value within the range of 4.5 - 6.9 x 10-7 Gy/day with an average value of 6.2 ± 1.2 x 10-7 Gy/day. The value area is within the normal range of natural level. Measurement of fall-out indicated that the integral impact of Cs-137 and Sr-90 from fall-out to this area were about 2.6 MBq/km2 and 1.5 MBg/km2 respectively. However, no Cs-137 and Sr-90 were detected in the samples collected during this study. (author). 9 refs

  5. Sorption (Kd) measurements on cinder block and grout in support of dose assessments for Zion Nuclear Station decommissioning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Milian L.; Sullivan T.

    2014-06-24

    The Zion Nuclear Power Station is being decommissioned. ZionSolutions proposes to leave much of the below grade structures in place and to fill them with a backfill to provide structural support. Backfills under consideration include “clean” concrete demolition debris from the above grade parts of the facility, a flowable grout, cinder block construction debris and sand. A previous study (Yim, 2012) examined the sorption behavior of five nuclides (Fe-55, Co-60, Ni-63, Sr-85, and Cs-137) on concrete and local soils. This study, commissioned by ZionSolutions and conducted by the Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL) examines the sorption behavior on cinder block and grout materials. Specifically, this study measured the distribution coefficient for four radionuclides of concern using site-groundwater and cinder block from the Zion site and a flowable grout. The distributions coefficient is a measure of the amount of the radionuclide that will remain sorbed to the solid material that is present relative to the amount that will remain in solution. A high distribution coefficient indicates most of the radionuclide will remain on the solid material and will not be available for transport by the groundwater. The radionuclides examined in this set of tests were Co-60, Ni-63, Sr-85, and Cs-137. Tests were performed following ASTM C1733-10, Standard Test Methods for Distribution Coefficients of Inorganic Species by the Batch Method. Sr-85 was used in the testing as an analogue for Sr-90 because it behaves similarly with respect to sorption and has a gamma emission that is easier to detect than the beta emission from Sr-90.

  6. Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1, 2 and 3 (Docket Nos. STN 50-528, STN 50-529 and STN 50-530): Final environmental statement

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed action is the issuance of construction permits to the Arizona public Service Company for the construction of the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1, 2, and 3. Preparation of the 3800-acre site will involve the clearing of up to 2500 acres of land, 1500 of which will be prominently devoted to station facilities. An additional 1200- to 1300-acre evaporation pond will ultimately be developed during the lifetime of the station. About 2200 site acres, previously devoted to agriculture, will be excluded from this land use. Soil disturbance during construction of the station, transmission lines, and water conveyance pipeline will tend to promote erosion and increase siltation in local ephemeral water courses. Stringent measures will be taken to minimize these effects. The total radiation dose to construction workers is estimated to be 15 man-rem. This dose is a small fraction of the approximately 470 man-rem which will be received by the construction force over the same period from natural background radiation. Station, transmission line, and water pipeline construction will kill, remove, displace, or otherwise disturb involved flora and fauna, and will eliminate varying amounts of wildlife breeding, nesting, and forage habitat. These will not be important permanent impacts to the population stability and structure of the involved local ecosystems of the Sonoran desert; however, measures will be taken to minimize such effects as do result form the proposed action

  7. The unknown on the doorstep: Hong Kong's fears concerning Daya Bay, China's first major nuclear power station and the public relations challenges

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Guangdong Nuclear Power Station at Daya Bay is located east of the Shenzhen Special Economic Zone in Southern China. It is a joint venture between Hong Kong and China. In terms of construction schedule, budget and performance, Daya Bay ranks amongst the best plants anywhere. This achievement is even more apparent when one takes into account the fact that Daya Bay is the first major nuclear power station in China and that a large amount of interface and co-ordination is required to bring together French and British technologies in a non-English speaking environment. This Paper addresses the various and challenging public relations issues faced by Daya Bay during the last 15 years (from feasibility study stage). The negotiation for the Daya Bay nuclear power station project coincided with the political negotiations between China and Britain over the future of Hong Kong - the 1997 issue. (The political negotiations commenced in September 1982 and concluded in late 1984). Concerns over the nuclear project were heard during this phase but were limited to local environmental groups rather than the general public. The focus was more on the environmental and radiological impact of a nuclear power station than specific technical and safety issues. As for the general public, the project wasn't much of an issue until April, 1986 (Chernobyl accident). Period from 1986-1993 was the period of construction of the Daya Bay nuclear power station. An antinuclear campaign was launched by a few local activists who claimed to have collected signatures from one million people in Hong Kong urging the Chinese Government to shelve the project. The Hong Kong public did not understand the difference between Chernobyl type and PWR-type nuclear reactors (Daya Bay is a PWR) nor were they aware that even in the case of Chernobyl, only residents within 30 km needed to be evacuated. These rational arguments and facts could not compete with the horror stories and news photos appearing in the

  8. Activities of radionuclides in the Pacific coastal area of Fukushima since the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident - Activities of radionuclides in the coast area off Fukushima after TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aono, Tatsuo; Fukuda, Miho; Yoshida, Satoshi [National Institute of Radiological Sciences, 263-8555, Chiba (Japan); Sohtome, Tadahiro; Mizuno, Takuji [Fukushima Prefecture Fisheries Experimental Station, 970-0316, Fukushima (Japan); Igarashi, Satoshi [Fukushima Prefecture Fisheries Experimental Station, 970-0316, Fukushima (Japan); Fukushima Prefecture Sea-Farming Association, 970-8044, Fukushima (Japan); Ito, Yukari; Kanda, Jota; Ishimaru, Takashi [Tokyo University of Marine Science and Technology, 108-0075, Tokyo (Japan)

    2014-07-01

    The accident of TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS) has caused the release of the huge quantities of radionuclide by the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami, and then the serious problems gave rise to pollution in marine environment widely in the coast area off Fukushima. Monitoring of radioactivity in seawater and biota are important for understanding the dispersion of radionuclides and the effects of radioecology in the marine environment around the coast of Fukushima and the Pacific. The activities of Cs-134 and Cs-137 in seawater decreased exponentially and then were almost same levels before the accident around off Fukushima after about three years from the accident. However, the high activities of radio caesium (Cs) have been monitored in marine biota off Fukushima. The aims of the present study were to examine the temporal changes in radioactivity and to clarify the variation factor and the effect of radioecology in marine biota. Cs-134 and Cs-137, and Ag-110m, were released by this accident, determined in biota sample such as the plankton, fish and benthos, although it is well-known that molluscs and crustaceans concentrate silver in visceral parts. However, Sr-90 was not detected and the activities of plutonium were almost same level before this accident in the marine biota around off Fukushima. Concentration ratios of Cs (CR-Cs) in marine organism were from 2.6 E+1 in the muscle part of squid to 1.0 E+4 in the viscera of clam. The large differences in CR-Cs by the parts of marine organism were not observed. It is suggested that rapid change in the activities of radio Cs and silver in seawater, resuspension of particles from sediments and food chain effects led to high radionuclide activities in marine biota after this accident. CR-Cs in plankton was also calculated with the activities in seawater, which were collected around sampling area during this monitoring period. These resulting values ranged from 5.8 E+1 to 7.8 E+2

  9. Activities of radionuclides in the Pacific coastal area of Fukushima since the TEPCO Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident - Activities of radionuclides in the coast area off Fukushima after TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The accident of TEPCO's Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station (FDNPS) has caused the release of the huge quantities of radionuclide by the 2011 Great East Japan Earthquake and Tsunami, and then the serious problems gave rise to pollution in marine environment widely in the coast area off Fukushima. Monitoring of radioactivity in seawater and biota are important for understanding the dispersion of radionuclides and the effects of radioecology in the marine environment around the coast of Fukushima and the Pacific. The activities of Cs-134 and Cs-137 in seawater decreased exponentially and then were almost same levels before the accident around off Fukushima after about three years from the accident. However, the high activities of radio caesium (Cs) have been monitored in marine biota off Fukushima. The aims of the present study were to examine the temporal changes in radioactivity and to clarify the variation factor and the effect of radioecology in marine biota. Cs-134 and Cs-137, and Ag-110m, were released by this accident, determined in biota sample such as the plankton, fish and benthos, although it is well-known that molluscs and crustaceans concentrate silver in visceral parts. However, Sr-90 was not detected and the activities of plutonium were almost same level before this accident in the marine biota around off Fukushima. Concentration ratios of Cs (CR-Cs) in marine organism were from 2.6 E+1 in the muscle part of squid to 1.0 E+4 in the viscera of clam. The large differences in CR-Cs by the parts of marine organism were not observed. It is suggested that rapid change in the activities of radio Cs and silver in seawater, resuspension of particles from sediments and food chain effects led to high radionuclide activities in marine biota after this accident. CR-Cs in plankton was also calculated with the activities in seawater, which were collected around sampling area during this monitoring period. These resulting values ranged from 5.8 E+1 to 7.8 E+2

  10. Safety Evaluation Report related to the operation of Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station, Unit No. 2 (Docket No. 50-410). Supplement No. 5

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report supplements the Safety Evaluation Report (NUREG-1047, February 1985) for the application filed by Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation, as applicant and co-owner, for a license to operate Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station, Unit 2 (Docket No. 50-410). It has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located near Oswego, New York. Supplement 1 to the Safety Evaluation Report was published in June 1985 and contained the report from the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards as well as the resolution of a number of outstanding issues from the Safety Evaluation Report. Supplement 2 was published in November 1985 and contained the resolution of a number of outstanding and confirmatory issues. Supplement 3 was published in July 1986 and contained the resolution of a number of outstanding and confirmatory items, one new confirmatory item, the evaluation of the Engineering Assurance Program, and the evaluation of a number of exemption requests. Supplement 4 was published in September 1986 and contained the resolution of a number of outstanding and confirmatory issues and the evaluation of a number of exemption requests. This report contains the resolution of a number of issues that have been resolved since Supplement 4 was issued. It also contains the evaluation of a number of requests for exemption from the applicant. This report also supports the issuance of the low-power license for Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station, Unit 2

  11. In-service inspection - a vital role in monitoring and health assessment of nuclear pressure vessels, piping and components at Tarapur Atomic Power Station - 1 and 2

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tarapur Atomic Power Station is a twin unit Boiling Water Reactors (BWRs) built in 1960's and presently operating at 160MWe. TAPS has completed 36 years of successful commercial operation and is continuing to provide safe, economic and reliable power supply. The design life of Tarapur nuclear reactors is 40 Effective Full Power Years (EFPY). So far TAPS has completed about 20EFPY for each reactor. In order to estimate the healthiness of nuclear components, a comprehensive study was made by the station in consultation with design group of Nuclear Power Corporation of India Ltd.. In-Service Inspection (ISI) substantially enhances confidence in component performance. Consolidated inspection early in service life provides greater assurance of component's integrity. Periodic in-service inspection provides vital information in the form of flaw characterization for assessment of structural integrity. This paper describes various degradation mechanisms (SCC, IGSCC, TGSCC, EC, FAC etc.,) identified for critical components, their method of detection, methodologies followed for In-Service inspection and developmental activities to assess the integrity of nuclear reactor vessels, piping and components for continued service. Also a comprehensive examination carried out on Structures, Systems and Components (SSCs) as part of plant ageing management programme is also discussed. (author)

  12. International Challenge to Predict the Impact of Radioxenon Releases from Medical Isotope Production on a Comprehensive Nuclear Test Ban Treaty Sampling Station

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eslinger, Paul W.; Bowyer, Ted W.; Achim, Pascal; Chai, T.; Deconninck, Benoit; Freeman, Katie; Generoso, Sylvia; Hayes, Philip; Heidmann, Verena; Hoffman, Ian; Kijima, Yuichi; Krysta, Monika; Malo, Alain; Maurer, Christian; Ngan, Fantine; Robins, Peter; Ross, J. Ole; Saunier, Olivier; Schlosser, Clemens; Schoeppner, Michael; Schrom, Brian T.; Seibert, P.; Stein, Ariel; Ungar, Kurt; Yi, Jing

    2016-03-01

    Abstract The International Monitoring System (IMS) is part of the verification regime for the Comprehensive Nuclear-Test-Ban-Treaty Organization (CTBTO). At entry-into-force, half of the 80 radionuclide stations will be able to measure concentrations of several radioactive xenon isotopes produced in nuclear explosions, and then the full network may be populated with xenon monitoring afterward (Bowyer et al., 2013). Fission-based production of 99Mo for medical purposes also releases radioxenon isotopes to the atmosphere (Saey, 2009). One of the ways to mitigate the effect of emissions from medical isotope production is the use of stack monitoring data, if it were available, so that the effect of radioactive xenon emissions could be subtracted from the effect from a presumed nuclear explosion, when detected at an IMS station location. To date, no studies have addressed the impacts the time resolution or data accuracy of stack monitoring data have on predicted concentrations at an IMS station location. Recently, participants from seven nations used atmospheric transport modeling to predict the time-history of 133Xe concentration measurements at an IMS station in Germany using stack monitoring data from a medical isotope production facility in Belgium. Participants received only stack monitoring data and used the atmospheric transport model and meteorological data of their choice. Some of the models predicted the highest measured concentrations quite well (a high composite statistical model comparison rank or a small mean square error with the measured values). The results suggest release data on a 15 min time spacing is best. The model comparison rank and ensemble analysis suggests that combining multiple models may provide more accurate predicted concentrations than any single model. Further research is needed to identify optimal methods for selecting ensemble members and those methods may depend on the specific transport problem. None of the submissions based only

  13. Integrated Plant Safety Assessment: Systematic Evaluation Program. Yankee Nuclear Power Station, Yankee Atomic Electric Company, Docket No. 50-29. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Systematic Evaluation program was initiated in February 1977 by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to review the designs of older operating nuclear reactor plants to confirm and document their safety. The review provides: (1) an assessment of how these plants compare with current licensing safety requirements relating to selected issues, (2) a basis for deciding on how these differences should be resolved in an integrated plant review, and (3) a documented evaluation of plant safety. This report documents the review of Yankee Nuclear Power Station, operated by Yankee Atomic Electric Company. The Yankee plant is one of 10 plants reviewed under Phase II of this program. This report indicates how 137 topics selected for review under Phase I of the program were addressed. Equipment and procedural changes have been identified as a result of the review

  14. Integrated Plant Safety Assessment, Systematic Evaluation Program. Yankee Nuclear Power Station, Yankee Atomic Electric Company, Docket No. 50-29. Draft report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Systematic Evaluation Program was initiated in February 1977 by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to review the designs of older operating nuclear reactor plants to confirm and document their safety. The review provides (1) an assessment of how these plants compare with current licensing safety requirements relating to selected issues, (2) a basis for deciding on how these differences should be resolved in an integrated plant review, and (3) a documented evaluation of plant safety. This report documents the review of Yankee Nuclear Power Station, operated by Yankee Atomic Electric Company. The Yankee plant is one of 10 plants reviewed under Phase II of this program. This report indicates how 137 topics selected for review under Phase I of the program were addressed. Equipment and procedural changes have been identified as a result of the review

  15. Interlocutory decree of April 9, 1979 - not legally binding - on the right to take action against licensing procedures for nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mandatory risk assessment which differentiates according to the type of protected interests threatened implies for third party actions taken against the licensing of nuclear power stations that only the one who can advance that his life or health is in danger can obtain the practical exclusion of nuclear damage which had been postulated by the Federal Constitutional Court (NJW 1979, 359-Kalkar Fast Breeder Reactor). In contrast to this is any person, whose legal position only consists of material goods, referred to a lower standard of nuclear (power) installations. The decision is more specific on the right of a commune to take action, referring to Sec. 1(2) and 7 of the AtG, Sec. 2 and 3 of the AtomanlVO. The lower Court decision of the Administrative Court of Wuerttemberg was published in NJW 1977, p. 1649. (orig./HSCH)

  16. Safety evaluation report related to the operation of Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station, Unit No. 2 (Docket No. 50-410)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report supplements the Safety Evaluation Report (NUREG-1047, February 1985) for the application filed by Niagara Mohawk Power Corporation, as applicant and co-owner, for a license to operate the Nine Mile Point Nuclear Station, Unit No. 2 (Docket No. 50-410). It has been prepared by the Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation of the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The facility is located near Oswego, New York. Supplement 1 to the Safety Evaluation Report was published in June 1985 and contained the report from the Advisory Committee on Reactor Safeguards as well as the resolution to a number of outstanding issues from the Safety Evaluation Report. Supplement 2 was published in November 1985 and contained the resolution to a number of outstanding and confirmatory issues. Subject to favorable resolution of the issues discussed in this report, the NRC staff concludes that the facility can be operated by the applicant without endangering the health and safety of the public

  17. The South African experience in spent fuel management at the Koeberg Nuclear Power Station - Perspectives from the National Nuclear Regulator (NNR)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: Units 1 and 2 at the Koeberg Nuclear Power Station (KNPS), near Cape Town in South Africa, were put into commercial service in 1984 and 1985 respectively. Initially it was intended that spent fuel assemblies would be stored in the spent fuel pools at the power station for a maximum period of four years where after they would be transferred to a dry storage facility which would be created at a safe site, unidentified at the time. By 1986 an appropriate dry storage facility system had not yet been identified, and as the exhaustion of the installed capacity of the pools (285 cells per pool) was approaching, the initial racks were replaced in 1988 with high density racking with a capacity of 728 cells per pool. In 1990 an order for four Castor type X/28 F licensed for dual transport/storage casks was placed by Eskom (the South African Electricity Utility and Operator of the KNPS), in anticipation that transportation from the Koeberg spent fuel pools, to the remote dry storage site would take place. The casks could also function as a contingency storage capacity for 112 spent fuel assemblies. In 1995 Eskom began a feasibility study to establish an optimum storage facility. Ultimately two storage options were identified: Dry storage in casks; and High density storage in the spent fuel pool (spent fuel pool reracking) - Super high density racks were considered to accommodate the storage requirements at Koeberg for 40 years. Eskom finally concluded that wet storage was the most viable option to consider. However due to delays in the spent fuel pool reracking project Eskom had to develop a contingency plan, which involved the use of the dry storage casks referred to above. These casks could provide enough storage space to delay the need for high density storage racks by one fuel cycle on each unit. The safety case, presented by Eskom for the use of the casks as an interim spent fuel storage measure for three years, was approved by the NNR in February 2000 and

  18. Assessing the possible radiological impact of routine radiological discharges from proposed nuclear power stations in England and Wales

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this work is to assess the possible radiological impact on the population of the United Kingdom (UK) from new nuclear power stations proposed for up to eight sites in England and Wales. The radiological impact was measured in terms of collective dose to the UK, European and world populations from a single year’s discharge integrated to 500 and 100 000 years and the annual dose to an average member of the UK population (known as the per-caput dose). The doses were calculated for two reactor types, UK EPR™ and AP1000™, using the annual expected discharges estimated by the designers of the reactors and assuming two reactors per site. In addition, typical individual doses to adults living close to the sites were calculated on the basis of continuous discharges for 60 years (the assumed lifetime of the reactors). The dose to a representative person (previously known as the critical group) was not calculated, as this has been done elsewhere. The assessments were carried out using the software program PC-CREAM 08® which implements the updated European Commission methodology for assessing the radiological impact of routine releases of radionuclides to the environment. The collective dose truncated to 500 years to the UK population was estimated to be 0.5 manSv assuming UK EPR reactors on all sites and 0.6 manSv assuming AP1000s on three sites with UK EPRs on the other sites. The most significant contribution to the collective dose to the UK population is due to the global circulation of carbon-14 released to the atmosphere. The annual dose to an average member of the UK population from all sites was calculated to be around 10 nSv y−1 and would therefore contribute little to an individual’s total radiation dose. All the calculated doses to a typical adult living near the sites assuming continuous discharges for 60 years were found to be below 1 μSv y−1. (paper)

  19. Fossil-fuelled and nuclear power stations. Pt. 2; Strom- und waermeerzeugende Anlagen auf fossiler und nuklearer Grundlage. T. 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehowsky, P. [Siemens AG Unternehmensbereich KWU, Erlangen (Germany). Abt. 9414; Leidemann, W. [Siemens AG Unternehmensbereich KWU, Erlangen (Germany). Abt. 9414; Lezuo, A. [Siemens AG Unternehmensbereich KWU, Erlangen (Germany). Abt. 9414; Seifritz, W.; Fischedick, M. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Energiewirtschaft und Rationelle Energieanwendung (IER); Herrmann, D. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Energiewirtschaft und Rationelle Energieanwendung (IER); Pfeifer, T. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Energiewirtschaft und Rationelle Energieanwendung (IER); Fahl, U. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Energiewirtschaft und Rationelle Energieanwendung (IER); Voss, A. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Energiewirtschaft und Rationelle Energieanwendung (IER); Barnert, H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Sicherheitsforschung und Reaktortechnik; Singh, J. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Sicherheitsforschung und Reaktortechnik

    1994-12-01

    This report contains technical descriptions of systems for electric power and/or heat supply. The data sheets for industrial-scale fossil and nuclear power plants were mainly provided by Siemens AG/KWU. IER Stuttgart supplied the text describing the status and prospects of electric power and heat generation technology as well as the data sheets for small-scale CHP systems. The data sheets for HTR reactors were provided by the Institut fuer Sicherheitsforschung und Reaktortechnik (ISR) of Forschungszentrum Juelich, while the data sheets for nuclear heating stations and revolutionary new reactor concepts were obtained from Prof. W. Seifritz, Windisch (CH). Electric power supply and district heating is a central issue in the future development of the electric power industry, owing to the fact that the generated end use energy sources are emission-free and suited for a wide range of applications and will be used to an increasing extent in the future. High-efficiency centralized conversion systems offer a good chance of reducing specific fuel consumption and conversion-related emissions by means of technical measures. Finally, the desired end use energy sources can be generated from highly different fuels and primary energy sources which differ considerably with regard to their cost, range, and specific emissions. This means that a step-by-step modification of the primary energy base will not only be an important contribution to economic efficiency and reliability of supply but will also provide good options for achieving emission-free energy supply. (orig./KOW) [Deutsch] Der vorliegende Bericht 4.06 enthaelt Technikbeschreibungen von Anlagen zur Elektroenergie- und/oder Waermeerzeugung. Die Datenblaetter zu fossilen und nuklearen Anlagen grosser Leistung wurden ueberwiegend durch die Siemens AG/KWU erarbeitet. Vom IER Stuttgart stammen die vorangestellte textliche Beschreibung zu Stand und Entwicklungsperspektiven der Elektroenergie- und Waermeerzeugungstechnik sowie

  20. Fossil-fuelled and nuclear power stations. Pt. 1; Strom- und waermeerzeugende Anlagen auf fossiler und nuklearer Grundlage. T. 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wehovsky, P [Siemens AG Unternehmensbereich KWU, Erlangen (Germany). Abt. 9414; Leidemann, W. [Siemens AG Unternehmensbereich KWU, Erlangen (Germany). Abt. 9414; Lezuo, A. [Siemens AG Unternehmensbereich KWU, Erlangen (Germany). Abt. 9414; Seifritz, W.; Fischedick, M. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Energiewirtschaft und Rationelle Energieanwendung (IER); Herrmann, D. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Energiewirtschaft und Rationelle Energieanwendung (IER); Pfeifer, T. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Energiewirtschaft und Rationelle Energieanwendung (IER); Fahl, U. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Energiewirtschaft und Rationelle Energieanwendung (IER); Voss, A. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Energiewirtschaft und Rationelle Energieanwendung (IER); Barnert, H. [Forschungszentrum Juelich GmbH (Germany). Inst. fuer Sicherheitsforschung und Reaktortechnik; Singh, J. [Stuttgart Univ. (Germany). Inst. fuer Energiewirtschaft und Rationelle Energieanwendung (IER)

    1994-12-01

    This report contains technical descriptions of systems for electric power and/or heat supply. The data sheets for industrial-scale fossil and nuclear power plants were mainly provided by Siemens AG/KWU. IER Stuttgart supplied the text describing the status and prospects of electric power and heat generation technology as well as the data sheets for small-scale CHP systems. The data sheets for HTR reactors were provided by the Institut fuer Sicherheitsforschung und Reaktortechnik (ISR) of Forschungszentrum Juelich, while the data sheets for nuclear heating stations and revolutionary new reactor concepts were obtained from Prof. W. Seifritz, Windisch (CH). Electric power supply and district heating is a central issue in the future development of the electric power industry, owing to the fact that the generated end use energy sources are emission-free and suited for a wide range of applications and will be used to an increasing extent in the future. High-efficiency centralized conversion systems offer a good chance of reducing specific fuel consumption and conversion-related emissions by means of technical measures. Finally, the desired end use energy sources can be generated from highly different fuels and primary energy sources which differ considerably with regard to their cost, range, and specific emissions. This means that a step-by-step modification of the primary energy base will not only be an important contribution to economic efficiency and reliability of supply but will also provide good options for achieving emission-free energy supply. (orig./KOW) [Deutsch] Der vorliegende Bericht 4.06 enthaelt Technikbeschreibungen von Anlagen zur Elektroenergie- und/oder Waermeerzeugung. Die Datenblaetter zu fossilen und nuklearen Anlagen grosser Leistung wurden ueberwiegend durch die Siemens AG/KWU erarbeitet. Vom IER Stuttgart stammen die vorangestellte textliche Beschreibung zu Stand und Entwicklungsperspektiven der Elektroenergie- und Waermeerzeugungstechnik sowie

  1. 内陆核电耗水指标浅析%Brief analysis on water consumption index of inland nuclear power station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    郭有; 曹佑群; 先涛; 张成荣

    2012-01-01

    分析了内陆核电厂相关系统的用水和耗水情况,探讨了影响耗水量的主要因素,并给出了某内陆核电厂两台机组用水和耗水量等参考数据.在对常规火电和市政耗水指标分析的基础上,基于内陆核电机组通常担任基荷,没有出力限制等特点,建议为内陆核电厂设置日耗水和年耗水两个耗水评估和控制指标,并分北方和南方两区给出了耗水控制指标建议值,供水资源主管部门、业主和核电设计人员参考.%The water use and water consumption in the related systems of inland nuclear power station are analyzed herein; in which the main factors affecting the water consumption are discussed and then the reference data from two generating units in an inland nuclear power station such as water use, water consumption, etc. are given as well. On the basis of the analysis on the water consumption indexes from both the conventional thermal power plant and the municipal water consumption, it is suggested to set the daily and annual water consumption indexes for the relevant assessment and control for the inland nuclear power plant under the consideration of the characteristics of the inland nuclear power station that the generating units therein normally serve for the base load without any restrictions on the outputs; furthermore, the recommended values for the water consumption control indexes for both the north and south regions in China are also given, so as to provide the corresponding references for the water resources authorities, the owner anddesigner of the nuclear power station concerned.

  2. Measurements of shielding effects and nuclear abundances on board the International Space Station in the Lazio-Sirad and Altcriss Experiments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Casolino, M.; Altcriss Collaboration

    In this work we examine the effect of shielding on the nuclear abundance and particle flux on board the International Space Station The first measurements were performed during the Italian Soyuz 2 mission Lazio-Sirad experiment April 2005 using a set of multi-material nextel nomex polyethylene tiles placed in the angle of view of the Sileye-3 Alteino experiment Subsequently the ESA Altcriss project begun in 2005 continued and extended these measurements in a long duration campaign to perform these observations at different points inside the Russian section of the station Various sets of dosimeters shielded and unshielded are being used in parallel with the active detector In this work we will discuss the results of the Lazio-Sirad and the first measurements of the Altcriss campaign

  3. The risk of leukaemia in young children from exposure to tritium and carbon-14 in the discharges of German nuclear power stations and in the fallout from atmospheric nuclear weapons testing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wakeford, Richard

    2014-05-01

    Towards the end of 2007, the results were published from a case-control study (the "KiKK Study") of cancer in young children, diagnosed nuclear power stations in western Germany. The study found a tendency for cases of leukaemia to live closer to the nearest nuclear power station than their matched controls, producing an odds ratio that was raised to a statistically significant extent for residence within 5 km of a nuclear power station. The findings of the study received much publicity, but a detailed radiological risk assessment demonstrated that the radiation doses received by young children from discharges of radioactive material from the nuclear reactors were much lower than those received from natural background radiation and far too small to be responsible for the statistical association reported in the KiKK Study. This has led to speculation that conventional radiological risk assessments have grossly underestimated the risk of leukaemia in young children posed by exposure to man-made radionuclides, and particular attention has been drawn to the possible role of tritium and carbon-14 discharges in this supposedly severe underestimation of risk. Both (3)H and (14)C are generated naturally in the upper atmosphere, and substantial increases in these radionuclides in the environment occurred as a result of their production by atmospheric testing of nuclear weapons during the late 1950s and early 1960s. If the leukaemogenic effect of these radionuclides has been seriously underestimated to the degree necessary to explain the KiKK Study findings, then a pronounced increase in the worldwide incidence of leukaemia among young children should have followed the notably elevated exposure to (3)H and (14)C from nuclear weapons testing fallout. To investigate this hypothesis, the time series of incidence rates of leukaemia among young children nuclear weapons testing, or that incidence rates are related to level of exposure to fallout, is apparent from these

  4. Public health assessment for Leonard Chemical Company, Inc. , Catawba, York County, South Carolina, Region 4. Cerclis No. SCD991279324. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1994-02-17

    The Leonard Chemical Company (LCC) site covers approximately 6 acres of land in an industrial area about 1/2 mile east of Catawba and 9 miles southeast of Rock Hill, South Carolina. LCC provided waste solvent treatment, storage, and disposal services. The waste solvents were generated by cleaning processes and contained alcohols, ketones, and chlorinated hydrocarbons. Contaminants were identified in on-site soils and groundwater and in off-site groundwater, surface water, and sediments. No off-site soil samples were collected. Contaminants of concern at the LCC site include: acetone, arsenic, bis(2-ethylhexyl)phthalate, cadmium, chromium, copper, 4,4'-DDT, 1,2-dichlroethane, dimethyl phthalate, iron, isophorone, lead, methylene chloride, methy-ethyl-ketone, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), tetrachloroethene, toluene, 1,1,1-trichloroethane, 1,1,2-trichloroethane, and vinyl chloride. The LCC site is classified as being an indeterminate public health hazard. The classification was based on the fact that the available data do not indicate that humans are being or have been exposed to levels of contaminants that could be expected to cause adverse health effects.

  5. TEPCO's risk communication activities in Fukushima Prefecture in light of the lessons learned from the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper introduces the risk communication activities of the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) in Fukushima Prefecture. It analyzed the organizational cause as the background for the Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station Accident, and concluded that the root cause of the accident is the thought that 'safety has already been secured, and operation rate and the like are important management issues, which incurred the insufficient preparedness for accident.' It has taken six measures as nuclear safety reform plans. One of these is the 'enhancement of risk communication activities.' The nuclear power leader take the initiative to disclose risk under the idea that 'there is no absolute safety (zero risk) in nuclear power,' and promote risk communication for continuously obtaining the understanding of the regional community and society about safety measures, etc. To implement risk communication, 'risk communicators' are installed, and they propose for the management and nuclear leader, about the risk perception and measures associated with public disclosure and its limit, and perform risk communication in accordance with the policy. As the examples of these initiatives, this paper introduces the cases of Fukushima Prefecture, questionnaire study, and evaluations by international organizations. (A.O.)

  6. Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station Units 1, 2, and 3: Draft environmental statement (Docket Nos. STN 50-528, 529, and 530)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The proposed action is the issuance of construction permits to the Arizona Public Service Corporation for the construction of the Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1, 2 and 3. Preparation of the 3880-acre site will involve the clearing of up to 2500 acres of land, 1500 of which will be permanently devoted to station facilities. An additional 1200- to 1300-acre evaporation pond will ultimately be developed during the lifetime of the station. About 2200 site acres, previously devoted to agriculture, will be excluded from this land use (Sec. 4. 1). Soil disturbance during construction of the station, transmission lines, and water conveyance pipeline will tend to promote erosion and increase siltation in local ephemeral water courses. Stringent measures will be taken to minimize these effects (Sec. 4.5). Station, transmission line, and water pipeline construction will kill, remove displace, or otherwise disturb involved flora and fauna, and will eliminate varying amounts of wildlife breeding, nesting, and forage habitat. These will not be important impacts to the population stability and structure of the involved local ecosystems of the Sonoran desert; however, measures will be taken to minimize such effects (Sec. 4.3 and 4.5). Approximately 60 acres of agricultural land will be temporarily affected by construction in transmission corridors. The great majority can be returned to that use upon completion of construction, thus the impact is considered minor. Similarly, most grazing lands affected along these corridors, as well as along the water pipeline corridor, can eventually be returned to that use. New archaeological resources could be discovered along the path of final transmission corridor alignments. The applicant will take measures to locate and protect such resources if they exist. 75 refs., 24 figs., 65 tabs

  7. THREE-YEAR RETENTION OF RADIOACTIVE CAESIUM IN THE BODY OF TEPCO WORKERS INVOLVED IN THE FUKUSHIMA DAIICHI NUCLEAR POWER STATION ACCIDENT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakano, T; Tani, K; Kim, E; Kurihara, O; Sakai, K; Akashi, M

    2016-09-01

    Direct measurements of seven highly exposed workers at the Tokyo Electric Power Company Fukushima Daiichi Nuclear Power Station accident have been performed continuously since June 2011. Caesium clearance in the monitored workers is in agreement with the biokinetic models proposed by the International Commission on Radiological Protection. After 500 d from the initial measurement, however, the caesium clearance slowed. It was thought to be unlikely that additional Cs intake had occurred after the initial intake, as activity in foods was kept low. And, the contribution from the detector over the chest was enhanced with time. This indicates that insoluble Cs particles were inhaled and a long metabolic rate showed.

  8. The ANF [Advanced Nuclear Fuels Corporation]-RELAP small-break LOCA [loss-of-coolant accident] analysis for the Comanche Peak steam electric station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The system response code RELAP/MOD2 Idaho National Engineering Laboratory cycle 36.02, with modifications developed by Advanced Nuclear Fuels Corporation (ANF), was used to perform small-break loss-of-coolant accident (SBLOCA) calculations for the Comanche Peak steam electric station (CPSES) unit 1. The ability of the ANF-RELAP code to calculate the SBLOCA system response for the four-loop pressurized water reactor is presented by discussing the overall system response, the system mass distribution, and the core response

  9. Effect of Coolant Inventories and Parallel Loop Interconnections on the Natural Circulation in Various Heat Transport Systems of a Nuclear Power Plant during Station Blackout

    OpenAIRE

    Avinash J. Gaikwad; Vijayan, P. K.; Sharad Bhartya; Kannan Iyer; Rajesh Kumar; A. D. Contractor; Lele, H. G.; Vhora, S. F.; A. K. Maurya; Ghosh, A K; H. S. Kushwaha

    2008-01-01

    Provision of passive means to reactor core decay heat removal enhances the nuclear power plant (NPP) safety and availability. In the earlier Indian pressurised heavy water reactors (IPHWRs), like the 220 MWe and the 540 MWe, crash cooldown from the steam generators (SGs) is resorted to mitigate consequences of station blackout (SBO). In the 700 MWe PHWR currently being designed an additional passive decay heat removal (PDHR) system is also incorporated to condense the steam generated in the b...

  10. Technical evaluation report on the proposed design modifications and technical specification changes on grid voltage degradation for the Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report documents the technical evaluation of the proposed design modifications and Technical Specification change for protection of Class 1E equipment from grid voltage degradation for the Millstone Nuclear Power Station, Unit 1. The review criteria are based on several IEEE standards and the Code of Federal Regulations. The evaluation finds that the licensee has not provided sufficient information on the undervoltage protection system to allow a complete evaluation into the adequacy of protecting the Class 1E equipment from sustained voltage degradation

  11. Design optimization of the Laguna Verde nuclear power station fuel recharge; Optimacion del diseno de recargas de combustible para la Central Laguna Verde

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortes Campos, Carlos Cristobal [Instituto de Investigaciones Electricas, Cuernavaca (Mexico); Montes Tadeo, Jose Luis [Instituto Nacional de Investigaciones Nucleares (ININ), Salazar (Mexico)

    1991-12-31

    It is described, in general terms, the procedure that is followed to accomplish the optimization of the recharge design, and an example is shown where this procedure was applied for the analysis of the type BWR reactor of Unit No. 1 of the Laguna Verde Nuclear Power Station. [Espanol] Se describe en terminos generales el procedimiento que se sigue para realizar la optimacion del diseno de recargas, y se muestra un ejemplo en el que se utilizo dicho procedimiento para el analisis del reactor tipo BWR de la unidad 1, de la Central Laguna Verde (CLV).

  12. Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) analyses of the BNGS-B vacuum building. Report No. 92-185-K. [BNGS (Bruce Nuclear Generating Station)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jain, D.K.

    1992-01-01

    Microbially influenced corrosion (MIC) has been found to play a significant role in causing corrosion, especially in those industries which use natural waters. The most significant of the organisms found to cause corrosion are the sulphate-reducing bacteria (SRB), particularly with anoxic deposits or stagnant weirs. In May 1992, the Bruce Nuclear Generating Station B Vacuum Building was inspected for MIC after being in service for 10 years. This report provides results for both on-site MIC inspection and for microbiological analysis of sediments, water, and slime deposits for evidence of MIC bacteria.

  13. Research on Pump-induced Pulsation of the Principal Loops of Nuclear Power Stations%主回路泵致声振动分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    周莹; 蔡坤

    2015-01-01

    The reactor coolant pump is the core equipment of nuclear power stations. The pump-induced pulsations can cause the vibration of the main equipment’s components, which is regarded as one of the main reasons of fatigue failure of the components. In this paper, the effect of the pump-induced pulsation on the principal loop of a nuclear station was calculated and analyzed. Then, the feasibility of application of ACSTIC program to the acoustic vibration analysis of the principal loop was verified theoretically and numerically. Finally, the acoustic vibration performance of the principal loop of the nuclear power station was simulated by means of the ACSTIC program, and the harmonic vibration responses of the main equipment’s components were obtained. The result can be used for the fatigue analysis and evaluation of the main equipment’s components and the optimization of the design of main loops of nuclear power stations.%主泵是核电站主回路中的核心设备之一,它产生的压力脉动会导致主设备部件振动,是设备发生疲劳失效的主要原因之一。首先,对泵—声耦合对核电站主回路的作用进行分析计算,然后采用理论分析和数值分析相结合的方法验证ACSTIC程序进行声振动分析的适用性,最后采用ACSTIC声振动程序模拟核电厂主回路模型,计算主设备部件的谐振动响应值。计算结果可用于主设备部件的疲劳分析评定,也可用于主回路优化设计。

  14. 压水堆核电站核三级屏蔽电泵试验鉴定程序%Testing of Nuclear Three-stage Shielded Electric Pump for Pressurized Water Reactor Nuclear Power Station

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李作维; 孙悦; 薄大威

    2015-01-01

    This paper analyzes the necessity of obtaining the design/manufacture license of three generation nuclear power plants with two generation of pressurized water reactor nuclear power plant. Describe the function and structure of the three stage pump. Especially introduce the program and test method of the two generation of nuclear power station in three gener-ation pressurized water reactor nuclear power station.%分析了二代加压水堆核电站核三级屏蔽电泵取得民用核安全设备 (屏蔽泵) 设计/制造许可证的必要性, 对核三级屏蔽电泵的功能、 规格及结构进行了详细的阐述, 并重点针对二代加压水堆核电站核三级屏蔽电泵试验鉴定的程序及试验方法进行了介绍, 为核三级屏蔽电泵鉴定提供了依据.

  15. 75 FR 8149 - Arizona Public Service Company, et al. Palo Verde Nuclear Generating Station, Units 1, 2, and 3...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-02-23

    ... species. No impacts are expected to historic and cultural resources, or to socioeconomic resources... Nuclear Regulatory Commission. James R. Hall, Senior Project Manager, Plant Licensing Branch IV,...

  16. Mechanical Properties and Microstructures of the HAZs of 11Cr F/M Steel for Gen-IV Nuclear Power Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yongkui; Wang, Jian; Lu, Shanping; Rong, Lijian; Li, Dianzhong

    2015-02-01

    The weldability of a newly developed 11Cr ferritic/martensitic (F/M) steel to be used in Pb-Bi liquid cooled ADS for the fourth generation nuclear power station was studied by experiments and numerical simulation. In this work, an appropriate method for obtaining simulated heat-affected zones (HAZs) was developed. HAZs, including CG-HAZ, FG-HAZ, and IC-HAZ, were successfully simulated by Gleeble at heating rates of 209, 176, and 149 °C/s and peak temperatures of 1314, 1138, and 998 °C, respectively. Results of tension and impact tests indicated that the simulated HAZs had much higher strength and poorer toughness than the base metal. The poor toughness is caused by high carbon, silicon contents, and quenched martensitic microstructures. The tempering treatment is necessary for the developed steel before application in nuclear reactor.

  17. Beyond defense-in-depth: cost and funding of state and local government radiological emergency response plans and preparedness in support of commercial nuclear power stations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Inadequate, sporadic, uncertain and frustrating are words local, state and Federal officials use to describe the current hodgepodge funding approach to State and local government radiological emergency response plans and preparedeness in support of commercial nuclear power stations. The creation of a Radiological Emergency Response Plans and Preparedness Fund for State and Local Government is offered as a preferred solution. Monies for the Fund could be derived from a one time Fee of $1 million levied on the operator of each nuclear power station. Every five years, adjustments could be made in the Fee to assure full recovery of costs because of inflation, revised criteria and other cost related factors. Any surplus would be refunded to the utilities. Any state that has obtained NRC concurrence or is in the process could be reimbursed for previous expenditures up to two years prior to NRC concurrence. Concurrence in all state and local government plans is the objective of the funding program. The Fund should be administered by the Nuclear Regulatory Commission. The report also discusses actions by Federal and state agencies and points to long range considerations, such as a training institute, including transportation and non-commercial and other fixed nuclear facilities, where preparedness could be enhanced by a coherent funding mechanism. All recommendations are based on an inquiry by the Office of state Programs, NRC, into the historical and future costs and funding of radiological emergency response plans and preparedness at the state and local government levels and are derived from discussions with many local, State and Federal officials

  18. 75 FR 12312 - South Carolina Electric and Gas Company; Virgil C. Summer Nuclear Station, Unit 1; Exemption

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-03-15

    ... emergency core cooling systems for light- water nuclear power reactors,'' requires, among other items, that: Each boiling or pressurized light-water nuclear power reactor fueled with uranium oxide pellets within... regulations of 10 CFR 50.46 and 10 CFR part 50, Appendix K, make no provision for use of fuel rods clad in...

  19. 76 FR 52357 - Exelon Generation Company, LLC; PSEG Nuclear, LLC; Peach Bottom Atomic Power Station, Unit 3...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2011-08-22

    ... Branch 1-2, Division of Operating Reactor Licensing, Office of Nuclear Reactor Regulation, U.S. Nuclear... Power Ratio (SLMCPR) values. The SLMCPR is established to assure that at least 99.9% of the fuel rods in... Reactor Fuel,'' Revision 18. The basis of the SLMCPR calculation is to ensure that during normal...

  20. 77 FR 21815 - South Carolina Electric And Gas Company (Virgil C. Summer Nuclear Station Units 2 and 3); Order...

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-04-11

    ... after about 70 hours, and in the Unit 3 reactor after about 36 hours, resulting in damage to the nuclear... high-temperature reaction of steam and zirconium fuel cladding generating hydrogen gas. This concern... the general design criteria (GDC) for nuclear power plants. All currently operating reactors...