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Sample records for catatonia

  1. Catatonia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walther, Sebastian; Strik, Werner

    2016-08-01

    One of the most exciting psychiatric conditions is the bizarre psychomotor syndrome called catatonia, which may present with a large number of different motor signs and even vegetative instability. Catatonia is potentially life threatening. The use of benzodiazepines and electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) has been efficient in the majority of patients. The rich clinical literature of the past has attempted to capture the nature of catatonia. But the lack of diagnostic clarity and operationalization has hampered research on catatonia for a long time. Within the last decades, it became clear that catatonia had to be separated from schizophrenia, which was finally accomplished in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders, Fifth Edition (DSM-5). In DSM-5, catatonia syndrome may be diagnosed as a specifier to major mood disorders, psychotic disorders, general medical conditions, and as catatonia not otherwise specified. This allows diagnosing the syndrome in a large variety of psychiatric disorders. Currently, the pathobiology remains widely unknown. Suspected neurotransmitter systems include gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) and glutamate. Neuroimaging reports pointed to reduced resting state activity and reduced task activation in motor areas of the frontal and parietal cortex. The new classification of catatonia will foster more clinical research and neuroscientific approaches by testing catatonia in various populations and applying stringent criteria. The scarce number of prospective trials will hopefully increase, as more trials will be encouraged within a more precise concept of catatonia. PMID:27255726

  2. CATATONIA IN OBSESSIVE COMPULSIVE DISORDER

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    Jagadheesan, K.; Nizamie, Haque S.; Thakur, Anupam

    2002-01-01

    Catatonia occurs in a wide range of neuropsychiatric conditions. Among the psychiatric disorders, occurrence of catatonia has rarely been documented in obsessive-complsive disorder. Given the paucity of reports, we report two cases of obsessive compulsive disorder that presented as catatonia.

  3. The Syndrome of Catatonia

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    James Allen Wilcox

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Catatonia is a psychomotor syndrome which has historically been associated with schizophrenia. Many clinicians have thought that the prevalence of this condition has been decreasing over the past few decades. This review reminds clinicians that catatonia is not exclusively associated with schizophrenia, and is still common in clinical practice. Many cases are related to affective disorders or are of an idiopathic nature. The illusion of reduced prevalence has been due to evolving diagnostic systems that failed to capture catatonic syndromes. This systemic error has remained unchallenged, and potentiated by the failure to perform adequate neurological evaluations and catatonia screening exams on psychiatric patients. We find that current data supports catatonic syndromes are still common, often severe and of modern clinical importance. Effective treatment is relatively easy and can greatly reduce organ failure associated with prolonged psychomotor symptoms. Prompt identification and treatment can produce a robust improvement in most cases. The ongoing prevalence of this syndrome requires that psychiatrists recognize catatonia and its presentations, the range of associated etiologies, and the import of timely treatment.

  4. Catatonia Associated with Initiating Paliperidone Treatment

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    McKeown, Nathanael J.; Bryan, James H.; Horowitz, B Zane

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of catatonia, which occurred shortly after starting a new antipsychotic, paliperidone, an active metabolite of risperidone. Catatonia may be caused by a variety of conditions, including metabolic, neurologic, psychiatric and toxic processes. Interestingly, risperidone, which has been thought to cause several cases of catatonia, has also been recommended as a potential treatment. We discuss potential mechanisms for causes of drug-induced catatonia as well as potential treatment options. PMID:20823970

  5. Catatonia Associated with Initiating Paliperidone Treatment

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    McKeown, Nathanael J.; Bryan, James H; B Zane Horowitz

    2010-01-01

    We present a case of catatonia, which occurred shortly after starting a new antipsychotic, paliperidone, an active metabolite of risperidone. Catatonia may be caused by a variety of conditions, including metabolic, neurologic, psychiatric and toxic processes. Interestingly, risperidone, which has been thought to cause several cases of catatonia, has also been recommended as a potential treatment. We discuss potential mechanisms for causes of drug-induced catatonia as well as potential treatme...

  6. Catatonia Associated with Initiating Paliperidone Treatment

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    Nathanael J. McKeown

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available We present a case of catatonia, which occurred shortly after starting a new antipsychotic,paliperidone, an active metabolite of risperidone. Catatonia may be caused by a variety of conditions,including metabolic, neurologic, psychiatric and toxic processes. Interestingly, risperidone, whichhas been thought to cause several cases of catatonia, has also been recommended as a potentialtreatment. We discuss potential mechanisms for causes of drug-induced catatonia as well as potentialtreatment options. [West J Emerg Med. 2010; 11(2:186-188.

  7. Cannabis Induced Periodic Catatonia: A Case Report

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    Bajaj, Vikrant; Pathak, Prashant; Mehrotra, Saurabh; Singh, Vijender; Govil, Sandeep; Khanna, Aman

    2011-01-01

    Catatonia is a syndrome of specific motor abnormalities closely associated with disorders in mood, affect, thought and cognition. The principal signs of the disorder are mutism, immobility, negativism, posturing, stereotypy and echo phenomena. Catatonia is commonly seen in various psychiatric disorders, neurological disorders and certain medical…

  8. Catatonia due to systemic lupus erythematosus

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    Francisco de Assis Pinto Cabral Júnior Rabello

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Objectives Discuss neuropsychiatric aspects and differential diagnosis of catatonic syndrome secondary to systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE in a pediatric patient. Methods Single case report. Result A 13-year-old male, after two months diagnosed with SLE, started to present psychotic symptoms (behavioral changes, hallucinations and delusions that evolved into intense catatonia. During hospitalization, neuroimaging, biochemical and serological tests for differential diagnosis with metabolic encephalopathy, neurological tumors and neuroinfections, among other tests, were performed. The possibility of neuroleptic malignant syndrome, steroid-induced psychosis and catatonia was also evaluated. A complete reversal of catatonia was achieved after using benzodiazepines in high doses, associated with immunosuppressive therapy for lupus, which speaks in favor of catatonia secondary to autoimmune encephalitis due to lupus. Conclusion Although catatonia rarely is the initial clinical presentation of SLE, the delay in recognizing the syndrome can be risky, having a negative impact on prognosis. Benzodiazepines have an important role in the catatonia resolution, especially when associated with parallel specific organic base cause treatment. The use of neuroleptics should be avoided for the duration of the catatonic syndrome as it may cause clinical deterioration.

  9. Hysteria and catatonia as motor disorders in historical context

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    Shorter, Edward

    2006-01-01

    Abstract It is difficult to imagine motor symptoms in psychiatry as different as hysteria and catatonia. The mechanism of hysteria is presumed to be psychogenic, while catatonia has always been considered to be among the most organic syndromes in psychiatry. Yet hysteria and catatonia have historically been regarded as allied conditions, an observation borne out by recent developments in neuroscience as wel...

  10. Catatonia versus neuroleptic malignant syndrome: the diagnostic dilemma and treatment

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    Manoj Kumar Sahoo

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Catatonia is a syndrome, comprised of symptoms such as motor immobility, excessive motor activity, extreme negativism, and stereotyped movements. Neuroleptic is able to induce catatonia like symptoms, that is, the neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS. In NMS, patients typically show symptoms such as an altered mental state, muscle rigidity, tremor, tachycardia, hyperpyrexia, leukocytosis, and elevated serum creatine phosphorous kinase. Several researchers have reported studies on catatonia and the association between catatonia and NMS, but none were from this part of the eastern India. In our case, we observed overlapping symptoms of catatonia and NMS; we wish to present a case of this diagnostic dilemma in a patient with catatonia, where a detailed history, investigation, and symptom management added as a great contribution to the patient′s rapid improvement.

  11. [The dominant inheritance of periodic catatonia].

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    von Trostorff, S

    1981-03-01

    In 143 patients suffering from periodic catatonia we found the disease in a direct succession five times in four generations and 17 times in three generations. With direct succession in four generations we found in two cases manifest psychosis in all generations, in three generations one member was formed by a most severely abnormal personality. In the sequence of three generations, the psychosis occurred continuously in ten families, in seven cases an abnormal personality pointed to the disease by his peculiarities. Since the occurrence of psychic diseases and abnormalities in the family is frequently concealed, the cases found are of great importance and indicate a dominant hereditary course. This assumption is substantiated by number of diseased half-brothers and sisters. Cataphasia in several generations in a direct sequence is a rarer phenomenon. Besides periodic catatonia, it showed the greatest affliction among the various forms of schizophrenia. PMID:7244040

  12. Catatonia in Down syndrome; a treatable cause of regression

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    Ghaziuddin, Neera; Nassiri, Armin; Miles, Judith H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The main aim of this case series report is to alert physicians to the occurrence of catatonia in Down syndrome (DS). A second aim is to stimulate the study of regression in DS and of catatonia. A subset of individuals with DS is noted to experience unexplained regression in behavior, mood, activities of daily living, motor activities, and intellectual functioning during adolescence or young adulthood. Depression, early onset Alzheimer’s, or just “the Down syndrome” are often blamed...

  13. A Case of Catatonia and Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome Probably Associated with Antipsychotic in Korea

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    Choi, Ho-Dong; Kim, Kyoung-Keun; Koo, Bon-Hoon

    2011-01-01

    Several studies have reported on catatonia caused by the use of antipsychotic drugs and on the association between catatonia and neuroleptic malignant syndrome (NMS), but none has reported such a case in Korea. Here, we report the case of a 20-year-old woman whose catatonia and NMS appeared associated with the administration of an atypical antipsychotic drug. We discuss the association between NMS and catatonia due to neuroleptic use.

  14. Catatonia in inpatients with psychiatric disorders: A comparison of schizophrenia and mood disorders.

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    Grover, Sandeep; Chakrabarti, Subho; Ghormode, Deepak; Agarwal, Munish; Sharma, Akhilesh; Avasthi, Ajit

    2015-10-30

    This study aimed to evaluate the symptom threshold for making the diagnosis of catatonia. Further the objectives were to (1) to study the factor solution of Bush Francis Catatonia Rating Scale (BFCRS); (2) To compare the prevalence and symptom profile of catatonia in patients with psychotic and mood disorders among patients admitted to the psychiatry inpatient of a general hospital psychiatric unit. 201 patients were screened for presence of catatonia by using BFCRS. By using cluster analysis, discriminant analysis, ROC curve, sensitivity and specificity analysis, data suggested that a threshold of 3 symptoms was able to correctly categorize 89.4% of patients with catatonia and 100% of patients without catatonia. Prevalence of catatonia was 9.45%. There was no difference in the prevalence rate and symptom profile of catatonia between those with schizophrenia and mood disorders (i.e., unipolar depression and bipolar affective disorder). Factor analysis of the data yielded 2 factor solutions, i.e., retarded and excited catatonia. To conclude this study suggests that presence of 3 symptoms for making the diagnosis of catatonia can correctly distinguish patients with and without catatonia. This is compatible with the recommendations of DSM-5. Prevalence of catatonia is almost equal in patients with schizophrenia and mood disorders. PMID:26260564

  15. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy and Catatonia in the Setting of Benzodiazepine Withdrawal

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    Peng, Teng J.

    2016-01-01

    We report two serious and unusual complications of benzodiazepine withdrawal in a single patient: takotsubo cardiomyopathy and catatonia. This 61-year-old female patient was brought to the emergency department with lethargy and within hours had declined into a state of catatonia. Although there was never a complaint of chest pain, ECG showed deep anterior T-wave inversions and cardiac enzymes were elevated. An echocardiogram was consistent with takotsubo cardiomyopathy. She later received 1 mg of midazolam and within minutes had resolution of catatonic symptoms. Careful history revealed that she had omitted her daily dose of lorazepam for 3 days prior to admission. To our knowledge, the case presented herein is the first report of simultaneous catatonia and takotsubo cardiomyopathy in the setting of benzodiazepine withdrawal. The pathogenesis of both conditions is poorly understood but may be indirectly related to the sudden decrease in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signaling during benzodiazepine withdrawal. PMID:27547472

  16. The relationship between catatonia and dissociation: A preliminary investigation.

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    Ross, Colin A; Browning, Elena

    2016-01-01

    Unlike the relationship between dissociation and Schneiderian first-rank symptoms, the relationship between dissociation and catatonia has not been investigated empirically. In order to gather some initial data about catatonia, dissociation, and childhood adverse experiences, we administered the Bush-Francis Catatonia Scale (BFCS), the Dissociative Experiences Scale (DES), the Adverse Childhood Experiences Questionnaire, and the Dissociative Disorders Interview Schedule to 100 inpatients in a hospital trauma program. The average DES score was 44.1 (SD = 22.4), and 86 participants were in the DES-Taxon. The average score on the BFCS was 7.7 (SD = 10.3); 81 participants scored 2 or higher, and 67 scored 5 or higher. The results showed that, in this sample, catatonic symptoms are frequent and related to adverse childhood experiences but seem to be a separate symptom category from both dissociation and psychosis. PMID:26751346

  17. Practical and Legal Challenges to Electroconvulsive Therapy in Malignant Catatonia.

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    Shenai, Neeta; White, Crystal D; Azzam, Pierre N; Gopalan, Priya; Solai, LalithKumar K

    2016-01-01

    In cases of malignant catatonia, prompt administration of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) can decrease mortality, whereas delays to initiating ECT have resulted in adverse outcomes, including death. We present a clinical vignette of malignant catatonia that required court-ordered ECT, followed by a discussion of practical and legal obstacles to expediting emergent ECT when patients cannot provide consent. We review particularly exacting mandates for involuntary ECT from three states: California, Texas, and New York. As compared to standard practice for other clinical interventions when a patient lacks decision-making capacity, ECT is highly regulated; in some cases, these regulations can interfere with life-saving treatment. PMID:27148914

  18. Resignation Syndrome: Catatonia? Culture-Bound?

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    Sallin, Karl; Lagercrantz, Hugo; Evers, Kathinka; Engström, Ingemar; Hjern, Anders; Petrovic, Predrag

    2016-01-01

    Resignation syndrome (RS) designates a long-standing disorder predominately affecting psychologically traumatized children and adolescents in the midst of a strenuous and lengthy migration process. Typically a depressive onset is followed by gradual withdrawal progressing via stupor into a state that prompts tube feeding and is characterized by failure to respond even to painful stimuli. The patient is seemingly unconscious. Recovery ensues within months to years and is claimed to be dependent on the restoration of hope to the family. Descriptions of disorders resembling RS can be found in the literature and the condition is unlikely novel. Nevertheless, the magnitude and geographical distribution stand out. Several hundred cases have been reported exclusively in Sweden in the past decade prompting the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare to recognize RS as a separate diagnostic entity. The currently prevailing stress hypothesis fails to account for the regional distribution and contributes little to treatment. Consequently, a re-evaluation of diagnostics and treatment is required. Psychogenic catatonia is proposed to supply the best fit with the clinical presentation. Treatment response, altered brain metabolism or preserved awareness would support this hypothesis. Epidemiological data suggests culture-bound beliefs and expectations to generate and direct symptom expression and we argue that culture-bound psychogenesis can accommodate the endemic distribution. Last, we review recent models of predictive coding indicating how expectation processes are crucially involved in the placebo and nocebo effect, delusions and conversion disorders. Building on this theoretical framework we propose a neurobiological model of RS in which the impact of overwhelming negative expectations are directly causative of the down-regulation of higher order and lower order behavioral systems in particularly vulnerable individuals. PMID:26858615

  19. Resignation syndrome: Catatonia? Culture-bound?

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    Karl eSallin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Resignation syndrome (RS designates a long-standing disorder predominately affecting psychologically traumatised children and adolescents in the midst of a strenuous and lengthy migration process. Typically a depressive onset is followed by gradual withdrawal progressing via stupor into a state that prompts tube feeding and is characterised by failure to respond even to painful stimuli. The patient is seemingly unconscious. Recovery ensues within months to years and is claimed to be dependent on the restoration of hope to the family.Descriptions of disorders resembling RS can be found in the literature and the condition is unlikely novel. Nevertheless, the magnitude and geographical distribution stand out. Several hundred cases have been reported exclusively in Sweden in the past decade prompting the Swedish National Board of Health and Welfare to recognise RS as a separate diagnostic entity. The currently prevailing stress hypothesis fails to account for the regional distribution and contributes little to treatment. Consequently, a re-evaluation of diagnostics and treatment is required. Psychogenic catatonia is proposed to supply the best fit with the clinical presentation. Treatment response, altered brain metabolism or preserved awareness would support this hypothesis.Epidemiological data suggests culture-bound beliefs and expectations to generate and direct symptom expression and we argue that culture-bound psychogenesis can accommodate the endemic distribution.Last, we review recent models of predictive coding indicating how expectation processes are crucially involved in the placebo and nocebo effect, delusions and conversion disorders. Building on this theoretical framework we propose a neurobiological model of RS in which the impact of overwhelming negative expectations are directly causative of the down-regulation of higher order and lower order behavioural systems in particularly vulnerable individuals.

  20. Increased biogenic catecholamine and metabolite levels in two patients with malignant catatonia

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    Nisijima K

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Koichi Nisijima Department of Psychiatry, Jichi Medical University, Tochigi, Japan Abstract: The pathophysiology of malignant catatonia, a rare life-threatening psychiatric syndrome, has not yet been elucidated. This paper reports on two patients with malignant catatonia who showed elevated urinary or plasma catecholamine levels. Patient 1 had high catecholamine and metabolite levels in a 24-hour urine sample, and patient 2 had elevated plasma catecholamine levels. These findings indicate the presence of peripheral sympathetic nervous system hyperactivity in malignant catatonia. Symptoms of autonomic dysfunction, including tachycardia, labile blood pressure, and diaphoresis, are typical features of malignant catatonia and may be related to the increased levels of biogenic amines in these cases. Although the findings in the present study cannot entirely explain the pathophysiology of malignant catatonia, they do indicate that hyperactivity of the sympathetic nervous system may be involved in the pathology of this condition. Keywords: malignant catatonia, catecholamine levels, neuroleptic malignant syndrome

  1. Some patients with advanced malignancies also have reversible catatonia or limbic encephalitis

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    Joseph Martin Alisky

    2015-01-01

    Two potentially treatable disorders, paraneoplastic catatonia and paraneoplastic limbic encephalitis, may be hidden within the presentation of end stage cancer patients, because catatonia and limbic encephalitis usually feature severely altered mental status, confusion, anorexia, and minimal responsiveness that are also common with people dying of cancer. If catatonia and limbic encephalitis are correctly diagnosed and treated, there should be definite and dramatic improvement that would tran...

  2. [Successful amantadine treatment of a patient with ECT-resistant catatonia].

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    Walstra, A N; den Broek, M VAN; Giltay, E J; van Paassen, J; van Noorden, M S

    2016-01-01

    Catatonia is a common neuropsychiatric syndrome. There is a life-threatening subtype of this disease known as malignant catatonia. One of the hypotheses regarding the pathogenesis is an imbalance of multiple neurotransmitters (gaba, glutamate and dopamine). The first step in treatment is to administer benzodiazepines; if the response is insufficient, the treatment can be replaced by electroconvulsive therapy (ect). So far, there is no consensus with regard to the tertiary treatment step. On the basis of a case report we describe the beneficial effects of administering an nmda receptor antagonist, amantadine, as the tertiary step for treating a patient with treatment-resistant malignant catatonia. PMID:27527886

  3. Treatment of a Prader-Willi Patient with Recurrent Catatonia

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    Hana M. Poser

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Prader-Willi is a genetic disorder characterized by neonatal hypotonia, hyperphagia, short stature, hypogonadism, and mental delay. This disorder can result from multiple mechanisms, most commonly a deletion of paternal chromosome 15, leaving a single maternally derived chromosome 15. Individuals who have a maternal uniparental disomy of chromosome 15 have a higher risk for developing psychosis compared to other forms of Prader-Willi. The following report details the treatment course of a 24-year-old female with Prader-Willi and recurrent catatonia. The patient initially had a positive lorazepam challenge test but subsequently failed treatment with benzodiazepines. She then received eight electroconvulsive therapy (ECT treatments after which she showed improvement from initial catatonic state. However, the resolution in her symptoms did not follow a linear course but would show periods of improvement followed by a return of catatonic features. This case provides an example of the complexity of treatment of a patient with a genetic disorder and recurrent catatonia.

  4. Chronic catatonia with obsessive compulsive disorder symptoms treated with lorazepam, memantine, aripiprazole, fluvoxamine and neurosurgery

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    Mukai, Yuki; Two, Aimee; Jean-Baptiste, Michel

    2011-01-01

    Catatonia is a syndrome with protean manifestations and multiple aetiologies. In this report, the authors describe the case of a young woman who presented for care after a 13-year period of catatonia-like symptoms, including mutism, refusal to eat and persistent neck flexion. Medical management included placement of a percutaneous endoscopic gastric tube for nutritional support. A thorough medical investigation later revealed the presence of a cervical spine haemangioma that was treated surgi...

  5. Rapidly-progressive catatonia responsive to zolpidem in a patient with ovarian teratoma-associated paraneoplastic encephalitis.

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    Amorim, Edilberto; McDade, Eric M

    2016-08-01

    Psychiatric symptoms and catatonia are key components of the clinical presentation of paraneoplastic encephalitis; additionally symptoms can be long-lasting and often difficult to treat. We report a 73-year-old patient with rapidly progressive catatonia not responsive to immunotherapy, tumor resection, electroconvulsive therapy, or benzodiazepines who had significant improvement after zolpidem administration. This report suggests that zolpidem is an option in the treatment of patients with refractory catatonia and paraneoplastic encephalitis. PMID:26964475

  6. Catatonia in Down syndrome; a treatable cause of regression

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    Ghaziuddin N

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Neera Ghaziuddin,1 Armin Nassiri,2 Judith H Miles3 1Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 2Community Psychiatry, San Jose, California, 3Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Department of Child Health, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri, USA Objective: The main aim of this case series report is to alert physicians to the occurrence of catatonia in Down syndrome (DS. A second aim is to stimulate the study of regression in DS and of catatonia. A subset of individuals with DS is noted to experience unexplained regression in behavior, mood, activities of daily living, motor activities, and intellectual functioning during adolescence or young adulthood. Depression, early onset Alzheimer’s, or just “the Down syndrome” are often blamed after general medical causes have been ruled out. Clinicians are generally unaware that catatonia, which can cause these symptoms, may occur in DS.Study design: Four DS adolescents who experienced regression are reported. Laboratory tests intended to rule out causes of motor and cognitive regression were within normal limits. Based on the presence of multiple motor disturbances (slowing and/or increased motor activity, grimacing, posturing, the individuals were diagnosed with unspecified catatonia and treated with anti-catatonic treatments (benzodiazepines and electroconvulsive therapy [ECT].Results: All four cases were treated with a benzodiazepine combined with ECT and recovered their baseline functioning.Conclusion: We suspect catatonia is a common cause of unexplained deterioration in adolescents and young adults with DS. Moreover, pediatricians and others who care for individuals with DS are generally unfamiliar with the catatonia diagnosis outside schizophrenia, resulting in misdiagnosis and years of morbidity. Alerting physicians to catatonia in DS is essential to prompt diagnosis, appropriate treatment, and identification of the frequency

  7. Rapid Relief of Catatonia in Mood Disorder by Lorazepam and Diazepam

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    Yu-Chi Huang

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Background: Catatonia has risks of severe morbidity and mortality and needs early treatment. In this study, we investigated more patients to discuss the efficacy of this treatment in patients with major depressive disorder (MDD or bipolar I disorder (BPI. Methods: During a period of 9 years, we identified 12 catatonic patients with mood disorder, with MDD (n = 10 and BPI (n = 2 in the emergency department, inpatient and outpatient units of a general hospital. The patients received intramuscular injection (IMI of 2 mg lorazepam once or twice during the first 2 h. If intramuscular lorazepam failed, intravenous dripping (IVD of 10 mg diazepam in 500 mL normal saline every 8 h for 1 day was prescribed. Results: Eight patients had full remission of catatonia after receiving one dose of 2 mg lorazepam IMI. Two patients needed two doses of 2 mg lorazepam IMI. Two patients with BPI recovered from catatonia using one dose of 10 mg diazepam IVD over 8 h after they failed to respond to two doses of 2 mg lorazepam IMI. The response rate to lorazepam IMI was 83.3%. All catatonic features remitted in 24 h with 100% response rate. Conclusions: The lorazepam-diazepam treatment strategy is a safe and effective method to relieve catatonia in mood disorder within 1 day. Psychiatrist consultation is helpful for final diagnosis and rapid treatment of catatonia.

  8. Red Lentil Extract: Neuroprotective Effects on Perphenazine Induced Catatonia in Rats

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    Tarahomi, Shahram; Arzi, Ardeshir; Goudarzi, Mehdi; Bahadoram, Mohammad; Rashidi-Nooshabadi, Mohammadreza

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Parkinsonism is a neurodegenerative disease that is defined by certain symptoms such as muscle rigidity, impaired movement, catatonia, tremor and disorientation of body. Aim The aim was to investigate the effect of red lentil extract on perphenazine-induced Catatonia in model of rat. Materials and Methods This experimental study was done on 48 male albino rats (weight 180–200g) of the Sprague-Dawley strain. Animals were randomly divided into six groups and were pre-treated with a single dose of red lentil extract (200, 400, 800 and 1000 mg/kg), most effective dose of bromocriptine (30mg/kg) and normal saline (5ml/kg) via intraperitoneal (IP) route. perphenazine (5 mg/kg) was after 30 minutes, administered (IP) to induce catatonia. The scoring method of Morpurgo was used to determine the muscular rigidity of animals. Results The results showed that the 200mg/kg red lentil extract treated group had no significant reduction in catatonic responses after perphenazine administration in comparison with control group while the groups that received 800 and 1000mg/kg of red lentil extract showed significant difference (pextract of red lentil has protective effect on Catatonia induced by perphenazine in rats. So this extract may be probably beneficial for catatonia in Parkinsonism.

  9. Catatonia: Etiopathological diagnoses and treatment response in a tertiary care setting: A clinical study

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    Santosh Ramdurg

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim: Catatonia is caused by a variety of psychiatric and organic conditions. The onset, clinical profile, and response to treatment may vary depending on the underlying cause. The study is an attempt to explore clinical profile, possible etiological correlates with neurotic/psychotic spectrum illnesses, and response to treatment and outcome in patients of catatonia. Materials and Methods: Retrospective chart analysis by using semistructured data sheet for the analysis of sociodemographic data, clinical profile, precipitating event, and response to treatment in patients with catatonic symptoms admitted to IHBAS (Institute of Human Behaviour and Allied Sciences, New Delhi, India from January 2009 to December 2010 was undertaken. Results: Catatonia was commonly observed in patients with the following profile - late twenties, female, Hindu religion, urban background, and housewives. Psychotic spectrum disorder (57%, N=35 was the most commonly entertained diagnosis and affective disorder (18%, N=11 being the second common. Thirty four percent of the subjects responded to lorazepam treatment and rest required modified electroconvulsive therapy (MECT. Conclusion: Catatonia is more likely to be associated with Schizophrenia and Other Psychotic Disorders in Indian settings. Majority of patients responded to therapy either by lorazepam alone or to its augmentation with modified ECT. The study being a retrospective one, the sample being representative of the treatment seeking group only, and unavailability of the follow up data were the limitations of the study

  10. Recurrent Idiopathic Catatonia: Implications beyond the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5th Edition

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    Caroff, Stanley N.; Hurford, Irene; Bleier, Henry R.; Gorton, Gregg E.; Campbell, E. Cabrina

    2015-01-01

    We describe a case of recurrent, life-threatening, catatonic stupor, without evidence of any associated medical, toxic or mental disorder. This case provides support for the inclusion of a separate category of “unspecified catatonia” in the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders 5th edition (DSM-5) to be used to classify idiopathic cases, which appears to be consistent with Kahlbaum’s concept of catatonia as a distinct disease state. But beyond the limited, cross-sectional, syn...

  11. Catatonia in Down syndrome; a treatable cause of regression

    OpenAIRE

    Ghaziuddin N; Nassiri A; Miles JH

    2015-01-01

    Neera Ghaziuddin,1 Armin Nassiri,2 Judith H Miles3 1Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 2Community Psychiatry, San Jose, California, 3Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Department of Child Health, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri, USA Objective: The main aim of this case series report is to alert physicians to the occurrence of catatonia in Down syndrome (DS). A second aim is to stimulate the study of regression in DS...

  12. Catatonia in Down syndrome; a treatable cause of regression

    OpenAIRE

    Ghaziuddin, Neera

    2015-01-01

    Neera Ghaziuddin,1 Armin Nassiri,2 Judith H Miles3 1Department of Psychiatry, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, Michigan, 2Community Psychiatry, San Jose, California, 3Thompson Center for Autism and Neurodevelopmental Disorders and Department of Child Health, University of Missouri, Columbia, Missouri, USA Objective: The main aim of this case series report is to alert physicians to the occurrence of catatonia in Down syndrome (DS). A second aim is to stimulate the study of regression in DS...

  13. No causative DLL4 mutations in periodic catatonia patients from 15q15 linked families.

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    McKeane, D P; Meyer, J; Dobrin, S E; Melmed, K M; Ekawardhani, S; Tracy, N A; Lesch, K P; Stephan, D A

    2005-06-01

    Two well-supported theories of schizophrenia pathogenesis are the neurotransmitter theory and the neurodevelopmental theory, suggesting, respectively, that dysregulation of neurotransmitter signaling and abnormal brain development are causative in this disease. The strongest evidence of neurotransmitter involvement are suggestions of abnormal dopamine signaling in the prefrontal cortex and one of the strongest indications of developmental abnormalities contributing to this disease is an inverse layering of the prefrontal cortex. These two theories of schizophrenia pathogenesis can be united by their involvement of the prefrontal cortex, where structural abnormalities could lead to neurochemical abnormalities. Accordingly, any gene expressed in the prefrontal cortex of developing brains is a functional candidate for schizophrenia. We have previously reported strong linkage to 15q15 (LOD = 3. 57; P = 2.6 x 10(-5)) in a collection of German multiplex families segregating the periodic catatonia subtype of schizophrenia in a nearly Mendelian fashion. A gene within our 15q15 linkage region, DLL4, is expressed in developing forebrain and produces a NOTCH4 ligand. Variants of NOTCH4 are associated with schizophrenia, thus DLL4 is both a functional as well as a positional candidate for schizophrenia. We screened this gene for mutations in three affected individuals and two unrelated controls and found two previously unreported SNPs, one non-synonymous polymorphism that changed an arganine to a histadine in Exon 7 and one synonymous polymorphism in exons. The non-synonymous SNP is a rare variant in that it was not found in 100 control chromosomes; however, it did not cosegregate with the disease in the extended family so it is not causative in this pedigree. It is unlikely that mutations in DLL4 are causative in this collection of families with linkage to 15q15. PMID:15820317

  14. Differences in the Treatment Response to Antithyroid Drugs versus Electroconvulsive Therapy in a Case of Recurrent Catatonia due to Graves’ Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takahiro Saito

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We reported a case which presented recurrent episodes of catatonia as a result of Graves’ disease with hyperthyroidism. The patient showed different treatment response in each episodes; in the first episode, psychiatric and physical symptoms were resolved by a combination of antithyroid and anxiolytic therapies, while in the second episode, the combination therapy did not ameliorate her symptoms and ECT was indicated. We postulated that decreased CSF level of TTR and the resulting susceptibility to the derangement of peripheral thyroid function might be involved in this different treatment response.

  15. Catatonia : Disappeared or under-diagnosed?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuinier, S; Arts, NJM; Hoogendoorn, MLC; Kahn, RS; Verhoeven, WMA

    2005-01-01

    Background: Over the last century, especially during the latter half, the prevalence of the diagnosis of catatonic schizophrenia decreased considerably. Several explanations for this phenomenon have been put forward. Sampling and Methods: The present study investigated the frequency of the diagnosis

  16. Resignation Syndrome: Catatonia? Culture-Bound?

    OpenAIRE

    Sallin, Karl; Lagercrantz, Hugo; Evers, Kathinka; Engström, Ingemar; Hjern, Anders; Petrovic, Predrag

    2016-01-01

    Resignation syndrome (RS) designates a long-standing disorder predominately affecting psychologically traumatized children and adolescents in the midst of a strenuous and lengthy migration process. Typically a depressive onset is followed by gradual withdrawal progressing via stupor into a state that prompts tube feeding and is characterized by failure to respond even to painful stimuli. The patient is seemingly unconscious. Recovery ensues within months to years and is claimed to be dependen...

  17. Porphyria or Catatonia: Diagnostic Dilemma on the Medical Wards.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurkjian, Natalie; Tucker, Phebe

    2016-01-01

    A 24-year-old Caucasian female, DD, was admitted to the medical service at an academic hospital with symptoms of weakness in bilateral lower extremities, falls, headaches, and altered mental status. Psychiatry was consulted to evaluate for psychiatric causes of her symptoms. This case presented a diagnostic challenge as the patient's identified symptoms changed almost daily, depending on what practitioner or medical service she encountered. In this study, we discuss the differential diagnoses, tests and treatments the patient received, with a review of literature helping differentiate between diagnostic parameters. PMID:27027143

  18. Unrecognized catatonia as a cause for delayed weaning in Intensive Care Unit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rupesh Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The cause of altered sensorium in critical care settings includes metabolic derangements, drug and toxin overdose, central nervous system infections, neurodegenerative disorders, vascular events, hypo-perfusion states, and septic encephalopathy. Here, we present a case of an elderly woman who presented to us with altered sensorium with respiratory failure requiring mechanical ventilation. Her metabolic parameters, imaging, and cerebrospinal fluid study were all normal despite that she continued to remain in altered sensorium and had an unrecognized behavioral state that delayed her weaning.

  19. A case of malignant catatonia with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension treated by electroconvulsive therapy

    OpenAIRE

    Hobo, Mizue; Uezato, Akihito; Nishiyama, Mitsunori; Suzuki, Mayumi; Kurata, Jiro; Makita, Koshi; Yamamoto, Naoki; Nishikawa, Toru

    2016-01-01

    Background Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is a progressive and fatal cardiovascular disease if left untreated. In patients with IPAH with psychiatric illness or other complications, careful attention is required when administering medical therapies that may affect their hemodynamics. Patients suffering from IPAH who undergo anesthesia and surgery have a high mortality and morbidity rate. We describe the treatment of intractable psychiatric symptoms with electroconvulsive th...

  20. Catatonia, Neuroleptic Malignant Syndrome, and Cotard Syndrome in a 22-Year-Old Woman: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Weiss

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The following case study describes a 22-year-old woman with depression and symptoms of psychosis who developed neuroleptic malignant syndrome after using Risperidone, thus requiring life support equipment and Bromocriptine, later recovering after seven days. From a psychiatric and neurological point of view, however, the persistence of catatonic syndrome and Cotard syndrome delusions was observed, based on assertions such as “I do not have a heart,” “my heart is not beating,” “I can not breathe,” “I am breaking apart,” “I have no head” (ideas of negation and statements about the patient being responsible for the “death of the whole world” (ideas of enormity. Brain NMR revealed leukoencephalopathy, interpreted as scar lesions caused by perinatal neurological damage, after discarding other pathologies. The patient responded well to electroconvulsive therapy after 11 sessions. Organic vulnerability to these syndromes, as well as their coexistence and clinical differentiation is discussed in the light of the data observed.

  1. Lithium as a rescue therapy for regression and catatonia features in two SHANK3 patients with autism spectrum disorder: case reports

    OpenAIRE

    Serret, Sylvie; Thümmler, Susanne; Dor, Emmanuelle; Vesperini, Stephanie; Santos, Andreia; Askenazy, Florence

    2015-01-01

    Background Phelan-Mc Dermid syndrome is a contiguous disorder resulting from 22q13.3 deletion implicating the SHANK3 gene. The typical phenotype includes neonatal hypotonia, moderate to severe intellectual disability, absent or delayed speech, minor dysmorphic features and autism or autistic-like behaviour. Recently, point mutations or micro-deletions of the SHANK3 gene have been identified, accompanied by a phenotype different from the initial clinically description in Phelan McDermid syndro...

  2. Prevalence of the catatonic syndrome in an acute inpatient sample

    OpenAIRE

    Mirella eStuivenga; Manuel eMorrens

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In this exploratory open label study we investigated the prevalence of catatonia in an acute psychiatric inpatient population. In addition, differences in symptom presentation of catatonia depending on the underlying psychiatric illness were investigated.METHODS: 130 patients were assessed with the Bush-Francis Catatonia Rating Scale (BFCRS), the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS), the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS) and the Simpson-Angus Scale (SAS). A factor analysis wa...

  3. Parsing the components of the psychomotor syndrome in schizophrenia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Docx, L.; Morrens, M.; Bervoets, C.; Hulstijn, W.; Hert, M. De; Baeken, C.; Audenaert, K.; Sabbe, B.G.C.C.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: Catatonia, extrapyramidal signs, psychomotor slowing, and (motoric) neurological soft signs are well-known psychomotor symptoms in schizophrenia. This study aims at investigating the interrelations between these symptoms. In addition, associations between psychomotor symptoms, clinical sy

  4. Pop & rock / Lauri Sommer

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Sommer, Lauri, 1973-

    2001-01-01

    Heliplaatide Catatonia "Paper Scissors Stone", Khan "No Comprendo", Carlos Santana "Divine Light. Reconstrction & Mix: Bill Laswell", Carlos, Blink 182 "Take Off Your Jacket & Pants", Emmi "Solitary Movements", Neu "Neu!", "No Hidden Catch. Eesti Depeche Mode tribuut" tutvustused

  5. Brain Stimulation Therapies

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... case of suicide risk and catatonia, for example). ECT: Why it’s done ECT is most often used ... first week, and older individuals respond especially quickly. ECT: How it works Before ECT is administered, a ...

  6. Catatonic syndrome associated with lead intoxication: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Modabbernia, Mohammad Jafar; Mirsafa, Ali Reza; Modabbernia, Amirhossein; Pilehroodi, Farhad; Shirazi, Maryam

    2009-01-01

    Introduction Little is known about catatonia associated with lead intoxication. Case presentation A retired printing house worker man presented with one week history of refusal to eat and mutism. He was treated with possible diagnosis of catatonia with administration of Lorazepam 3 mg P.O. daily. Significant improvement occurred after 48 hours. In further examinations, there was no evidence of physical and mental disorders while impairment in neuropsychiatry test, identification of Dohle body...

  7. Electroconvulsive therapy and anticoagulation after pulmonary embolism: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julio Cesar Lazaro

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT is considered the most effective treatment for catatonia regardless its underlying condition. The rigid fixed posture and immobility observed in catatonia may lead to several clinical complications, of which, pulmonary embolism (PE is one of the most severe. The rapid improvement of the psychiatric condition in catatonia-related PE is essential, since immobility favors the occurrence of new thromboembolic events and further complications. In that scenario, ECT should be considered, based on a risk-benefit analysis, aiming at the faster resolution of the catatonia. Methods Case report and literature review. Results A 66-years-old woman admitted to the psychiatric ward with catatonia due to a depressive episode presented bilateral PE. Clinically stable, but still severely depressed after a trial of antidepressants, she was treated with ECT in the course of full anticoagulation with enoxaparin. After five ECT sessions, her mood was significantly better and she was walking and eating spontaneously. She did not present complications related either to PE or to anticoagulation. After the eighth ECT session, she evolved with hypomania, which was managed with oral medication adjustments. The patient was completely euthymic at discharge. Conclusion The case we presented provides further evidence to the anecdotal case reports on the safety of ECT in the course of concomitant full anticoagulant therapy after PE, and illustrates how, with the proper precautions, the benefits of ECT in such condition might outweigh its risks.

  8. Cotard′s syndrome: Two case reports and a brief review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Grover

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cotard′s syndrome is a rare neuropsychiatric condition in which the patient denies existence of one′s own body to the extent of delusions of immortality. One of the consequences of Cotard′s syndrome is self-starvation because of negation of existence of self. Although Cotard′s syndrome has been reported to be associated with various organic conditions and other forms of psychopathology, it is less often reported to be seen in patients with catatonia. In this report we present two cases of Cotard′s syndrome, both of whom had associated self-starvation and nutritional deficiencies and one of whom had associated catatonia.

  9. Cotard's syndrome: Two case reports and a brief review of literature.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Sandeep; Aneja, Jitender; Mahajan, Sonali; Varma, Sannidhya

    2014-11-01

    Cotard's syndrome is a rare neuropsychiatric condition in which the patient denies existence of one's own body to the extent of delusions of immortality. One of the consequences of Cotard's syndrome is self-starvation because of negation of existence of self. Although Cotard's syndrome has been reported to be associated with various organic conditions and other forms of psychopathology, it is less often reported to be seen in patients with catatonia. In this report we present two cases of Cotard's syndrome, both of whom had associated self-starvation and nutritional deficiencies and one of whom had associated catatonia. PMID:25540544

  10. A Systematic Review of Interventions Used to Treat Catatonic Symptoms in People with Autistic Spectrum Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeJong, Hannah; Bunton, Penny; Hare, Dougal J.

    2014-01-01

    A systematic review was conducted to examine the efficacy of a range of treatments for autistic catatonia. The review identified 22 relevant papers, reporting a total of 28 cases including both adult and paediatric patients. Treatment methods included electroconvulsive therapy (ECT), medication, behavioural and sensory interventions. Quality…

  11. Pop / Mart Juur

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Juur, Mart, 1964-

    2002-01-01

    Heliplaatidest Kiss "The Very Best of Kiss". Andrew Lloyd Webber presents: "A R Rahman's Bombay Dreams". Naughty By Nature "Ilkons". Erinevad esinejad "One word one sound". Diana King "Respect". Caater "Club Space (Estonian Edition)". J.M.K.E. "Ainult planeet". Collage "Parimad lood 1970-1976". Cinematic Orchestra "Every Day". Catatonia "Greatest Hits". Boards of Canada "Geogaddi"

  12. Disturbed neural circuits in a subtype of chronic catatonic schizophrenia demonstrated by F-18-FDG-PET and F-18-DOPA-PET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Permanent verbal, visual scenic and coenaestetic hallucinations are the most prominent psychopathological symptoms aside from psychomotor disorders in speech-sluggish catatonia, a subtype of chronic catatonic schizophrenia according to Karl Leonhard. These continuous hallucinations serve as an excellent paradigm for the investigation of the assumed functional disturbances of cortical circuits in schizophrenia. Data from positron emission tomography (F-18-FDG-PET and F-18-DOPA-PET) from three patients with this rare phenotype were available (two cases of simple speech-sluggish catatonia, one case of a combined speech-prompt/speech-sluggish subtype) and were compared with a control collective. During their permanent hallucinations, all catatonic patients showed a clear bitemporal hypometabolism in the F-18-FDG-PET. Both patients with the simple speech-sluggish catatonia showed an additional bilateral thalamic hypermetabolism and an additional bilateral hypometabolism of the frontal cortex, especially on the left side. In contrast, the patient with the combined speech-prompt/speech-sluggish catatonia showed a bilateral thalamic hypo-metabolism combined with a bifrontal cortical hypermetabolism. However, the left/right ratio of the frontal cortex also showed a lateralization effect with a clear relative hypometabolism of the left frontal cortex. The F-18-DOPA-PET of both schizophrenic patients with simple speech-sluggish catatonia showed a normal F-18-DOPA storage in the striatum, whereas in the right putamen of the patient with the combined form a higher right/left ratio in F-DOPA storage was discernible, indicating an additional lateralized influence of the dopaminergic system in this subtype of chronic catatonic schizophrenia. (author)

  13. Prevalence of the catatonic syndrome in an acute inpatient sample

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirella eStuivenga

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: In this exploratory open label study we investigated the prevalence of catatonia in an acute psychiatric inpatient population. In addition, differences in symptom presentation of catatonia depending on the underlying psychiatric illness were investigated.METHODS: 130 patients were assessed with the Bush-Francis Catatonia Rating Scale (BFCRS, the Positive and Negative Syndrome Scale (PANSS, the Young Mania Rating Scale (YMRS and the Simpson-Angus Scale (SAS. A factor analysis was conducted in order to generate 6 catatonic symptom clusters. Composite scores based on this principal component analysis were calculated. RESULTS: When focusing on the first 14 items of the BFCRS, 101 patients (77.7% had at least 1 symptom scoring 1 or higher, whereas 66 patients (50.8% had at least 2 symptoms. Interestingly, when focusing on the DSM-5 criteria of catatonia, 22 patients (16.9% could be considered for this diagnosis. Furthermore, different symptom profiles were found, depending on the underlying psychopathology. Psychotic symptomatology correlated strongly with excitement symptomatology (r=.528,p<.001 and to a lesser degree with the stereotypy/mannerisms symptom cluster (r=.289; p=.001 and the echo/perseveration symptom cluster (r=.185;p=.035. Similarly, manic symptomatology correlated strongly with the excitement symptom cluster (r=.596;p<.001 and to a lesser extent with the stereotypy/mannerisms symptom cluster (r=.277;p=.001.CONCLUSION: There was a high prevalence of catatonic symptomatology. Depending on the criteria being used, we noticed an important difference in exact prevalence, which makes it clear that we need clear-cut criteria. Another important finding is the fact that the catatonic presentation may vary depending on the underlying pathology, although an unambiguous delineation between these catatonic presentations cannot be made. Future research is needed to determine diagnostical criteria of catatonia which are clinically

  14. Lorazepam provocation test in purported schizophrenia with lack of treatment response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John E. Berg

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Some patients with severe mental disorders are refractory to psychotherapeutic or psychopharmacological interventions. We present a patient who at the age of 19 developed several schizophrenia - suspect symptoms. Soon inexplicable general seizures where observed. He was treated with antipsychotics, but had two bouts of malignant neuroleptic syndrome. Electroconvulsive therapy (ECT gave some symptom relief and he continued on maintenance ECT for years with weekly intervals. Interruption of this treatment pattern rapidly increased symptom load. After seven years a lorazepam provocation test was performed as he had a new relapse after 3 weeks without ECT. In the ensuing hours his aggressiveness and nonsense speaking rapidly diminished. Kahlbaums observation of seizures as part of a catatonia was not understood in this case. The publication of the new DSM-V diagnosis of catatonia may hopefully reduce the probability of treating a patient for schizophrenia for years without access to a more targeted medication and ECT plan.

  15. A case of pervasive refusal syndrome: a diagnostic conundrum.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    McNicholas, Fiona

    2013-01-01

    A case is presented of an 11-year-old girl with pervasive refusal syndrome (PRS) who ultimately recovered acutely and completely after an 18-month paediatric hospitalisation. There was an apparent absence of previously proposed important aetiological factors in PRS, such as family pathology and markedly traumatic or abusive experiences, and her recovery was sudden and complete. The authors consider the differential diagnoses of PRS paying particular attention to the possibility of a conversion disorder or catatonia, given the absence of PRS in the North American literature. Consideration of catatonia is important as it has a diagnostic test and responds rapidly to appropriate treatment, in contrast to conventional treatment for PRS and conversion disorder.

  16. [Onset and course of schizophrenia (the results of a statistical study)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angst, J; Baastrup, P C; Grof, P; Hippius, H; Peldinger, V

    1975-01-01

    The report contains the results of an examination of 709 patients with catatonia, paranoid, schizoaffective forms of schizophrenia. The study involved an investigation of the form, sex, general amount of psychotic episodes depending upon the time of observation, duration of productive episodes and the intervals between them. The achieved results indicate to a close correlation between the productive manifestations in schixophrenia and affective psychosis. PMID:1179895

  17. Maurycy Urstein: forgotten Polish contributor to German psychiatry

    OpenAIRE

    Marcinowski, Filip

    2014-01-01

    Polish psychiatrist Maurycy Urstein (1872–1940) is nowadays almost forgotten. He is not mentioned in the history of Polish psychiatry which only partially may be explained by the fact that his most essential works were published in German language. His scientific oeuvre contains dozens of publications, including four monographs on catatonia. Urstein was an ardent advocate of the autointoxication theory of psychiatric disorders, fierce opponent of psychoanalysis and enthusiast of the use of bi...

  18. Alteration in the level of endogenous hypothalamic prostaglandins induced by delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol in the rat.

    OpenAIRE

    Coupar, I M; Taylor, D A

    1982-01-01

    1 Whole brain and regional brain levels of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2)-like material have been determined following administration of delta 9-tetrahydrocannabinol (delta 9 -THC) in rats. 2 Intravenous administration of delta 9-THC 2 mg/kg, resulted in marked behavioural changes and hypothermia. The behavioural changes consisted mainly of catatonia (most apparent at 30 min after administration of delta 9-THC), followed by sedation (most evident at 60 min). Hypothermia was marked from 30 min after ...

  19. Aripiprazole in the Treatment of Refractory Mood Disorders: A Case Series

    OpenAIRE

    Muneer, Ather

    2014-01-01

    Major depressive disorder and bipolar disorders are among the commonest neuropsychiatric conditions, affecting persons of both sexes which belong to all age groups. Comorbidity is the rule rather than the exception; anxiety spectrum disorders, somatoform disorders, eating disorders and substance use disorders frequently co-exist with mood disorders. Catatonia is a serious complication of the latter and every patient with a severe affective exacerbation should be assessed for the presence of c...

  20. Anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis: an important differential diagnosis in psychosis.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Barry, Helen

    2012-02-01

    We present four cases of confirmed anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis; three presented initially with serious psychiatric symptoms and the other developed significant psychiatric symptoms during the initial phase of illness. Brain biopsy findings of one patient are also described. Psychiatrists should consider anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis in patients presenting with psychosis and additional features of dyskinesias, seizures and catatonia, particularly where there is no previous history of psychiatric disorder.

  1. Introduction of a Venous Thromboembolism Prophylaxis Protocol for Older Adult Psychiatric Patients.

    OpenAIRE

    Croxford, Anna; Clare, Adam; McCurdy, Kathleen

    2015-01-01

    Hospital-Acquired venous thromboembolism (VTE) is a common cause of morbidity and mortality in older adults. In psychiatric patients these risks are increased due to multiple factors including poor mobility, restraint, catatonia, sedation, and conventional antipsychotic use. Diagnosis and treatment of psychiatric patients presenting with signs and symptoms of a VTE can be delayed due to a patient's communication difficulties, non-compliance, or attribution of symptoms to a psychosomatic cause...

  2. Singlid.File under : White American Rock : Sound / Märt Milter

    Index Scriptorium Estoniae

    Milter, Märt

    1998-01-01

    Uutest singlitest : Urban Species "Woman", Cesaria Evora "Sangue De Beirona (remix de Francois K)", Catatonia "Strange Glue", Chris Isaak "Please", Echobeatz "Mas Que Nada", Morcheeba "Blindfold", Chris Rea "Sweet Summer Day", 187 Lockdown "The Don", Bebe Winars "Stay/Thank You", Embrace "My Weakness Is None Of Your Business", Goo Goo Dolls "Iris" ja ameerika popi plaatidest Better Than Ezra "How Does Your Garden Grow?", Barenaked Ladies "Stunt", The Uninvited "The Uninvited, Lilys "Better Can't Make Your Life Better", CIV "Civ", Hootie & The Blowfish "Musical Chairs"

  3. Maurycy Urstein: forgotten Polish contributor to German psychiatry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcinowski, Filip

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Polish psychiatrist Maurycy Urstein (1872–1940 is nowadays almost forgotten. He is not mentioned in the history of Polish psychiatry which only partially may be explained by the fact that his most essential works were published in German language. His scientific oeuvre contains dozens of publications, including four monographs on catatonia. Urstein was an ardent advocate of the autointoxication theory of psychiatric disorders, fierce opponent of psychoanalysis and enthusiast of the use of biological methods of treatment in psychiatry. Both some eccentric views and specific personality probably equally contributed to his almost complete isolation among psychiatrists in the interwar Poland.

  4. Photovoltaic solar energy like an alternative in the urban spaces; La energia solar fotovoltaica como una alternativa en los espacios urbanos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bosque, G. S.; Domingo, M. N.; Puig, J.

    2008-07-01

    The present report is a study about the possibility and viability of installing photovoltaic panels at the roof of neighbourhood buildings in the Districte de l'Eixmple of Barcelona. Its purpose is to raise awareness among the population about the actual problem of climate change, having the cities as a key element to encourage energy saving and reducing emissions of carbon dioxide (CO{sub 2}). The results show and approximate value of surface and power needed to satisfy the household energy consumption for the inhabitants in Barcelona and Catatonia with solar energy. The results also show a comparative in the Districte de l'Eixample in its three main dimensions: socio-economic, environmental and politic. (Author)

  5. 'Chasing the dragon': new knowledge for an old practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordova, Juan P; Balan, Sabish; Romero, Jorge; Korniyenko, Aleksandr; Alviar, Carlos L; Paniz-Mondolfi, Alberto; Jean, Raymonde

    2014-01-01

    Heroin administration by "chasing the dragon," whereby the user places freebase heroin on aluminum foil, heats it below with a flame, and inhales the pyrolysate through a straw, can be associated with the rare development of a delayed-onset spongiform leukoencephalopathy. We report the case of a 46-year-old woman with a psychiatric diagnosis of depression and heroin dependence by "chasing the dragon" admitted with features of altered mental status and later development of catatonia, abulia, and akinetic mutism. A brain magnetic resonance image evidenced bilateral symmetric high-signal lesions in the white matter of the cerebrum and cerebellum on T2-weighted images compatible with toxic leukoencephalopathy. The patient's condition resolved after a hospital stay of 2 months with supportive treatment. Acute onset of neurobehavioral changes, including confusion, apathy, and cerebellar signs in a person with exposure to heroin, should prompt one to consider toxic leukoencephalopathy as a cause of presentation. PMID:21519216

  6. Osseous metaplasia in gliosarcoma: an unusual histologic finding. Case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eduardo Cambruzzi

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Gliosarcoma (GS is a malignant neoplasm of the central nervous system that has coexisting glial and mesenchymal components. GSs are rarely related to osseous metaplasia. The authors report a case of GS in a male patient presenting apathy and catatonia. Computed tomography/magnetic resonance imaging showed an expansive process affecting the left frontal lobe. At microscopy, a malignant glioma constituted by highly atypical glial cells intermingled with spindle-shaped cells was identified. The lesion showed areas of necrosis with pseudopalisading formation, focus of osseous metaplasia, and positive immunoexpression of S100, CD99 and vimentin in both elements. Only the sarcomatous component exhibited negative immunoexpression of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP. The diagnosis of GS was then established.

  7. Electroconvulsive therapy and/or plasmapheresis in autoimmune encephalitis?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gough, Jessica L; Coebergh, Jan; Chandra, Brunda; Nilforooshan, Ramin

    2016-08-16

    Autoimmune encephalitis is a poorly understood condition that can present with a combination of neurological and psychiatric symptoms, either of which may predominate. There are many autoantibodies associated with a variety of clinical syndromes - anti-N-Methyl-D-Aspartate receptor (NMDAR) is the commonest. Currently, the most widely used therapy is prompt plasmapheresis and steroid treatment (and tumour resection if indicated), followed by second line immunosuppression if this fails. Given the growing awareness of autoimmune encephalitis as an entity, it is increasingly important that we consider it as a potential diagnosis in order to provide timely, effective treatment. We discuss several previously published case reports and one new case. These reports examined the effects of electroconvulsive therapy (ECT) on patients with autoimmune encephalitis, particularly those in whom psychiatric symptoms are especially debilitating and refractory to standard treatment. We also discuss factors predicting good outcome and possible mechanisms by which ECT may be effective. Numerous cases, such as those presented by Wingfield, Tsutsui, Florance, Sansing, Braakman and Matsumoto, demonstrate effective use of ECT in anti-NMDAR encephalitis patients with severe psychiatric symptoms such as catatonia, psychosis, narcolepsy and stupor who had failed to respond to standard treatments alone. We also present a new case of a 71-year-old female who presented to a psychiatric unit initially with depression, which escalated to catatonia, delusions, nihilism and auditory hallucinations. After anti-NMDAR antibodies were isolated, she was treated by the neurology team with plasmapheresis and steroids, with a partial response. She received multiple sessions of ECT and her psychiatric symptoms completely resolved and she returned to her premorbid state. For this reason, we suggest that ECT should be considered, particularly in those patients who are non-responders to standard therapies. PMID

  8. On the clinical impact of cerebral dopamine D2 receptor scintigraphy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The present review describes findings and clinical indications for the dopamine D2 receptor scintigraphy. Methods for the examination of D2 receptors are positron emission tomography (PET) using 11C- or 18F-labelled butyrophenones or benzamides or single photon emission tomography (SPECT) using 123I-iodobenzamide (IBZM) respectively. The most important indication in neurology is the differential diagnosis of Parkinsonism: Patients with early Parkinson's disease show an increased D2 receptor binding (D2-RB) compared to control subjects. However, patients suffering from Steele-Richardson-Olszewski-Syndrome or Multiple System Atrophy show a decreased D2-RB and are generally non-responsive to treatment. Postsynaptic blockade of D2 receptors results in a drug induced Parkinsonian syndrome, which can be diagnosed by D2 scintigraphy. Further possible indications occur in psychiatry: The assessment of receptor occupancy is useful in schizophrenic patients treated with neuroleptics. Additionally, D2 receptor scintigraphy might help to clarify the differential diagnosis between neuroleptic malignant syndrome and lethal catatonia. The method might be useful for supervising neurobiochemical changes in drug dependency and during withdrawal. Assessment of dopamine D2 receptor binding can simplify the choice of therapy in depressive disorder: Patients showing a low D2 binding are likely to improve following an antidepressive drug treatment whereas sleep deprivation is promising in patients with high D2 binding. (orig.)

  9. Stereotypic Movements in Case of Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob Disease: Possible Role of Anti-NMDA Receptor Antibodies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michelle Molina

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Sporadic Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (sCJD and anti-NMDA receptor antibody encephalitis (NMDAE can both produce a rapidly progressive dementia with resulting state of catatonia or akinetic mutism. Both are associated with movement disorders. In published case series, myoclonus appears to be the most frequent movement disorder in sCJD, while stereotypic, synchronized, one-cycle-per-second movements such as arm or leg elevation, jaw opening, grimacing, head turning, and eye deviation are seen in NMDAE. We report a case of a 59-year-old woman with rapidly worsening cognitive disturbance leading to a nearly catatonic state interrupted by stereotypic movements. sCJD was diagnosed via periodic sharp wave complexes on EEG as well as cerebrospinal fluid (CSF 14-3-3 and tau protein elevation. Characteristic movement disorder of NMDAE was present in absence of ovarian mass or CSF pleiocytosis. Given prior case reports of presence of anti-NMDA receptor antibodies in sCJD, we propose that the movement disorder in this case was caused by anti-NMDA receptor antibodies whose formation was secondary to neuronal damage from prion disease. It is important to consider sCJD even in cases that have some clinical features suggestive of NMDAE.

  10. How does our brain constitute defense mechanisms? First-person neuroscience and psychoanalysis.

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    Northoff, Georg; Bermpohl, Felix; Schoeneich, Frank; Boeker, Heinz

    2007-01-01

    Current progress in the cognitive and affective neurosciences is constantly influencing the development of psychoanalytic theory and practice. However, despite the emerging dialogue between neuroscience and psychoanalysis, the neuronal processes underlying psychoanalytic constructs such as defense mechanisms remain unclear. One of the main problems in investigating the psychodynamic-neuronal relationship consists in systematically linking the individual contents of first-person subjective experience to third-person observation of neuronal states. We therefore introduced an appropriate methodological strategy, 'first-person neuroscience', which aims at developing methods for systematically linking first- and third-person data. The utility of first-person neuroscience can be demonstrated by the example of the defense mechanism of sensorimotor regression as paradigmatically observed in catatonia. Combined psychodynamic and imaging studies suggest that sensorimotor regression might be associated with dysfunction in the neural network including the orbitofrontal, the medial prefrontal and the premotor cortices. In general sensorimotor regression and other defense mechanisms are psychoanalytic constructs that are hypothesized to be complex emotional-cognitive constellations. In this paper we suggest that specific functional mechanisms which integrate neuronal activity across several brain regions (i.e. neuronal integration) are the physiological substrates of defense mechanisms. We conclude that first-person neuroscience could be an appropriate methodological strategy for opening the door to a better understanding of the neuronal processes of defense mechanisms and their modulation in psychoanalytic psychotherapy. PMID:17426413

  11. ["My disease is one of the mind and difficult to define": Robert Walser (1879-1956) and his mental illness].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partl, S; Pfuhlmann, B; Jabs, B; Stöber, G

    2011-01-01

    Robert Walser (1878-1956) is among the most prominent German-speaking writers born in Switzerland. His early writings are fascinating due to his intensive affectivity and oneiric experiences; his late work impresses through his idiosyncratic use of language and his micrographs. Due to a psychotic disease he stayed in Swiss Mental State Hospitals (Waldau and Herisau) throughout the final 27 years of his life. According to his case records Robert Walser suffered from a schizophrenic disorder (ICD-10) and from a combined sluggish/manneristic catatonia according to K. Leonhard. Walser's psychotic disorder was characterized by a chronic course with sharp-cut symptomatology with stiff postures, repetitive behaviour, movement mannerisms and omissions (manneristic component) complemented by loss of incentive, severe autism and persistent verbal hallucinations (speech-sluggish component). In the late stages his psychopathology affected the process of thinking and writing in a specific manner: his handwriting became illegibly small, and his train of thoughts did not get to the point. At age 54 he stopped writing when transferred from Waldau to Herisau, and subsequently, due to manneristic omission, he was never again able to restart literary writing. The analysis of Robert Walser's psychotic disease may contribute to a deeper understanding of his literary production, which influenced such classical German authors like Franz Kafka, Hermann Hesse and Robert Musil. PMID:21274695

  12. Evaluation of total creatine kinase levels in a spectrum of neuro-psychiatric disorders in a tertiary neurosciences centre

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    Anshu Gupta

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: To study usefulness of total creatine kinase (CK as a screening tool in various neurological and psychiatric disorders in emergency setting of a tertiary care hospital. Materials and Methods: A 1-year retrospective study was conducted on 102 patients with complaints pertaining to neurological and psychiatric disorders in a tertiary neurosciences centre in a metropolitan city. Blood samples in plain vial were received in Emergency Laboratory and total CK levels were measured by automated analyzer and its correlation with various diseases was analyzed. Results: It was observed that CK activity was raised in various psychiatric conditions-acute transient psychotic disorder, alcohol dependence syndrome, delirium, psychosis, mental retardation, catatonia, bipolar affective disorder (BAD, depression and mania and also in neurological disorders-seizures, meningitis, myasthenia gravis (multiple sclerosis, Guillain-Barre syndrome, extra pyramidal syndrome, neuroleptic malignant syndrome and infarct. Conclusion: This study demonstrated that CK is a sensitive and an important screening parameter in diagnosis and monitoring of various neurological and psychiatric disorders in emergency setting. It is also helpful in identifying people at high risk for various neuro-psychiatric diseases.

  13. Catatonic Syndrome in Anti-NMDA Receptor Encephalitis

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    Mythri, Starlin Vijay; Mathew, Vivek

    2016-01-01

    Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor encephalitis is a newly recognised autoimmune condition. With its typical clinical pattern, consistent association with the presence of auto antibodies and rapid improvement with immunotherapy, this condition is giving insights into the boundaries between psychiatry and other neurosciences, and is opening avenues for future research. In a young lady who presented with catatonia, we considered anti-NMDA receptor encephalitis, after ruling out other aetiologies. After a positive antibody test we treated her with immunotherapy. She showed gradual improvement in her psychotic and catatonic symptoms. Knowledge regarding the nature and function of NMDA receptors and pathophysiology of this particular encephalitis is important for psychiatric practice. The great opportunity for research in this area due to its association with psychotic disorders is evident but an appeal to temper the enthusiasm by considering the historical lessons learnt from Karl Jaspers’ critique of General Paresis of Insane, is in place. Catatonic syndrome has to be conceptualised broadly and should be recognised with a separate nosological position.

  14. Catatonía, a propósito de un caso.

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    Nora Olazabal Eizaguirre

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Presentamos un cuadro clínico de mutismo, acinesia y estupor con fiebre y retención urinaria en una mujer de 65 años como ejemplo de catatonia. La sintomatología catatónica se ha establecido como un síndrome común a múltiples etiologías tanto médicas como psiquiátricas. Además se han descrito factores precipitantes de tipo farmacológico, tóxico y orgánico para esta entidad. Por tanto, es necesaria una aproximación multidisciplinar a este tipo de cuadros para afinar el diagnóstico etiológico. Varios autores apuntan a un infradiagnóstico de este síndrome. Durante la evaluación, diagnóstico y tratamiento de esta paciente, hallamos la necesidad de criterios diagnósticos claros y actualizados y de algoritmos de tratamiento basados en evidencias. Las benzodiazepinas y la terapia electroconvulsiva suponen el tratamiento de primera línea, junto con las medidas de soporte y la prevención de complicaciones. Se han publicado otras estrategias no protocolizadas de tratamiento alternativas en casos refractarios.

  15. Excited delirium: Consideration of selected medical and psychiatric issues

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    Edith Samuel

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Edith Samuel1, Robert B Williams1, Richard B Ferrell21Department of Psychology, Atlantic Baptist University, Moncton, New Brunswick Canada; 2Department of Psychiatry, Dartmouth Medical School, Lebanon, New Hampshire, USAAbstract: Excited delirium, sometimes referred to as agitated or excited delirium, is the label assigned to the state of acute behavioral disinhibition manifested in a cluster of behaviors that may include bizarreness, aggressiveness, agitation, ranting, hyperactivity, paranoia, panic, violence, public disturbance, surprising physical strength, profuse sweating due to hyperthermia, respiratory arrest, and death. Excited delirium is reported to result from substance intoxication, psychiatric illness, alcohol withdrawal, head trauma, or a combination of these. This communication reviews the history of the origins of excited delirium, selected research related to its causes, symptoms, management, and the links noted between it and selected medical and psychiatric conditions. Excited delirium involves behavioral and physical symptoms that are also observed in medical and psychiatric conditions such as rhabdomyolysis, neuroleptic malignant syndrome, and catatonia. A useful contribution of this communication is that it links the state of excited delirium to conditions for which there are known and effective medical and psychiatric interventions.Keywords: excited delirium, excited states, cocaine misuse, restraint or in custody deaths

  16. Catatonic Dilemma in a 33-Year-Old Woman: A Discussion

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    Alexander Koch

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Case. We report a case of catatonia with elevated CK, elevated temperature, and hypoferritinemia after abrupt discontinuation of clozapine in a patient with known proneness to catatonic symptoms. Reinstatement of clozapine therapy was contraindicated due to leukopenia. Neuroleptic malign syndrome could not be ruled out by the administration of quetiapine; this prevented the quick use of other potent D2 antagonists. Some improvement was achieved through supportive therapy, high dose of lorazepam, and a series of 10 ECT sessions. Returning to baseline condition was achieved by a very careful increase of olanzapine. Discussion. Catatonic symptoms in schizophrenia as well as in NMS might be caused by a lack of striatal dopamine (CS or dopamine D2 antagonism (NMS. CS might be a “special” kind of schizophrenia featuring both hypo- and hyperactivity of dopaminergic transmission. ECT has been described as a “psychic rectifier” or a “reset for the system.” The desirable effect of ECT in cases of CS might be dopaminergic stimulation in the striatum and decrease of both the dopaminergic activity in the limbic system and the serotonergic activity on 5-HT2 receptors. The desirable effect of ECT in NMS would be explained by activation of dopaminergic transmission and/or liberation of dopaminergic receptors from the causative neuroleptics.

  17. Acute psychosis due to non-paraneoplastic anti-NMDA-receptor encephalitis in a teenage girl: Case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kramina, Sandra; Kevere, Laura; Bezborodovs, Nikita; Purvina, Santa; Rozentals, Guntis; Strautmanis, Jurgis; Viksna, Zane

    2015-12-01

    Anti-N-methyl-d-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) encephalitis is a disease occurring when antibodies produced by the body's own immune system attack NMDA-type glutamate receptors in the brain. Most anti-NMDAR encephalitis cases are associated with paraneoplastic syndrome. We analyze the case of a 15-year-old girl who was hospitalized in a child psychiatry clinic in Riga, Latvia, with de novo acute polymorphic psychotic disorder gradually progressing to a catatonic state. The patient received antipsychotic and electroconvulsive therapy with no beneficial effect. The council of doctors discussed differential diagnoses of schizophrenia-induced catatonia and the autoimmune limbic encephalitis-induced catatonic condition. When the diagnosis of anti-NMDAR autoimmune encephalitis was finally confirmed by repeated immunological assays (specific immunoglobulin [Ig] G and IgM in her blood serum and cerebrospinal fluid), and a paraneoplastic process was ruled out, she was started on immunomodulating therapy (methylprednisolone, Ig, plasmapheresis, rituximab), which changed the course of her disease. On immunomodulating treatment, her physical and mental health have gradually improved to almost complete reconvalescence. Psychiatrists should consider anti-NMDAR encephalitis as a differential diagnosis in first-episode psychosis patients presenting with disorientation, disturbed consciousness, pronounced cognitive deficits, movement disorder, dysautonomia, or rapid deterioration, and test for specific IgG NR1 autoantibodies, even if there are no specific findings on routine neuroimaging, electroencephalography (EEG), or cerebrospinal fluid tests. PMID:26663628

  18. [Treatable neurometabolic diseases. Association with schizophrenia spectrum disorders].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonnot, Olivier; Herrera, Paula; Kuster, Alice

    2015-09-01

    Schizophrenia spectrum disorders are presented on 1% of subjects over general population. Organic pathologies prevalence in schizophrenia spectrum patients is not well determined, and it is probably underestimated. In the present update review, we are going to highlight seven treatable neurometabolic diseases (NMD) associated to sub-clinic neurological symptoms. It is not infrequent to witness the absence of any clinical neurological signs going along with the NMD. Psychiatric symptoms may be the only clinical alarm that can guide physicians to an acute diagnosis. This is why it is a challenging pathology, defying our clinical accuracy as psychiatrist or any other practitioners confronted to this population. Hereby we are going to expose a literature review and comprehensive tables in order to present in a glance the essential clinical features of disorders of homocysteine metabolism, urea cycle disorders, Niemann-Pick disease type C, acute porphyria, cerebrotendinous-xanthomatosis. These conditions are sensible to major improvement strongly correlated to the accuracy of diagnosis. Literature analysis led us to propose a comprehensive list of atypical psychiatric symptoms including highly predominant visual hallucinations, compared to auditory ones, as well as confusion, catatonia or progressive cognitive decline. We highlight the importance of considering antipsychotic treatment resistance as a crucial sign leading to suspect an organic factor beneath the psychiatric features. PMID:26248708

  19. The computational anatomy of psychosis

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    Rick A Adams

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available This paper considers psychotic symptoms in terms of false inferences or beliefs. It is based on the notion that the brain is an inference machine that actively constructs hypotheses to explain or predict its sensations. This perspective provides a normative (Bayes optimal account of action and perception that emphasises probabilistic representations; in particular, the confidence or precision of beliefs about the world. We will consider hallucinosis, abnormal eye movements, sensory attenuation deficits, catatonia and delusions as various expressions of the same core pathology: namely, an aberrant encoding of precision. From a cognitive perspective, this represents a pernicious failure of metacognition (beliefs about beliefs that can confound perceptual inference. In the embodied setting of active (Bayesian inference, it can lead to behaviours that are paradoxically more accurate than Bayes optimal behaviour. Crucially, this normative account is accompanied by a neuronally plausible process theory based upon hierarchical predictive coding. In predictive coding, precision is thought to be encoded by the postsynaptic gain of neurons reporting prediction error. This suggests that both pervasive trait abnormalities and florid failures of inference in the psychotic state can be linked to factors controlling postsynaptic gain – such as NMDA receptor function and (dopaminergic neuromodulation. We illustrate these points using biologically plausible simulations of perceptual synthesis, smooth pursuit eye movements and attribution of agency – that all use the same predictive coding scheme and pathology: namely, a reduction in the precision of prior beliefs, relative to sensory evidence.

  20. Anaesthetic, cardiovascular and respiratory effects of a new steroidal agent CT 1341: a comparison with other intravenous anaesthetic drugs in the unrestrained cat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Child, K J; Davis, B; Dodds, M G; Twissell, D J

    1972-10-01

    1. The anaesthetic, cardiovascular, respiratory and adverse effects produced by the intravenous injection of CT 1341, thiopentone, methohexitone, pentobarbitone, propanidid and ketamine have been compared in unrestrained cats prepared with chronically implanted venous and arterial cannulae. Aortic blood pressure and heart rates were monitored before, during and after loss of consciousness.2. CT 1341 produced rapid induction of anaesthesia followed by moderately rapid recovery, was active over a wide range of doses and caused minimal respiratory depression and few adverse effects. It caused an initial short-lasting tachycardia and fall in aortic blood pressure succeeded by a secondary depressor response.3. The safety margin was narrower with the barbiturate drugs than with CT 1341, and large doses induced apnoea and respiratory depression. Small doses of methohexitone elicited excitatory effects and large doses caused severe respiratory and circulatory depression, and recovery from anaesthesia was protracted.4. Propanidid induced short-lasting light anaesthesia. The safety margin was narrowest with this drug and induction was associated with adverse circulatory, respiratory and other effects.5. Ketamine was active over a wide range of doses but exhibited qualitatively different properties from the other anaesthetics. Induction was slower after small doses and these produced circulatory stimulation, catatonia and bizarre behavioural effects. Large doses caused respiratory and circulatory depression and recovery was protracted.6. It is concluded that CT 1341 has a wider therapeutic latitude, produces less respiratory depression and has other advantages over the currently used intravenous anaesthetics. PMID:4651769

  1. Twenty years of electroconvulsive therapy in a psychiatric unit at a university general hospital

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    Amilton dos Santos Jr.

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To describe the sociodemographic and clinical profile of patients who underwent electroconvulsive therapy (ECT at a university general hospital. Method: In this retrospective study, records from all patients undergoing ECT between January 1988 and January 2008 at the psychiatric unit of the general hospital of Universidade Estadual de Campinas (UNICAMP were reviewed. Telephone contact was made with patients/relatives to collect follow-up data. Results: A total of 200 charts were reviewed. The majority of patients were women, with a mean age of 39 years, and history of psychiatric hospitalization. The main indications for ECT were depression and catatonia. Complications were observed in less than half of the cases, and most were temporary and not severe. There was a good psychiatric outcome for 89.7% of the patients, especially for catatonic patients (100%, p = 0.02. Thirty-four percent of the cases were later contacted by telephone calls, at a mean of 8.5 years between the procedure and the contact. Among these, three (1.5% reported persistent memory disorders and 73% considered ECT a good treatment. Conclusion: ECT has been performed according to international guidelines. In the vast majority of cases, undesirable effects were temporary and not severe. Response to ECT was positive in most cases, particularly in catatonic patients.

  2. Neuroprotective effect of Tinospora cordifolia ethanol extract on 6-hydroxy dopamine induced Parkinsonism

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    Jayasankar Kosaraju

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study investigates the neuroprotective activity of ethanol extract of Tinospora cordifolia aerial parts against 6-hydroxy dopamine (6-OHDA lesion rat model of Parkinson′s disease (PD. Materials and Methods: T. cordifolia ethanol extract (TCEE was standardized with high performance thin layer chromatography using berberine. Experimental PD was induced by intracerebral injection of 6-OHDA (8 μg. Animals were divided into five groups: sham operated, negative control, positive control (levodopa 6 mg/kg and two experimental groups (n = 6/group. Experimental groups received 200 and 400 mg/kg of TCEE once daily for 30 days by oral gavage. Biochemical parameters including dopamine level, oxidative stress, complex I activity and brain iron asymmetry ratio and locomotor activity including skeletal muscle co-ordination and degree of catatonia were assessed. Results: TCEE exhibited significant neuroprotection by increasing the dopamine levels (1.96 ± 0.20 and 2.45 ± 0.40 ng/mg of protein and complex I activity (77.14 ± 0.89 and 78.50 ± 0.96 nmol/min/mg of protein at 200 and 400 mg/kg respectively when compared with negative control group. Iron asymmetry ratio was also significantly attenuated by TCEE at 200 (1.57 ± 0.18 and 400 mg/kg (1.11 ± 0.15 when compared with negative control group. Neuroprotection by TCEE was further supported by reduced oxidative stress and restored locomotor activity in treatment groups. Conclusion: Results show that TCEE possess significant neuroprotection in 6-OHDA induced PD by protecting dopaminergic neurons and reducing the iron accumulation.

  3. Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate-receptor encephalitis: diagnosis, optimal management, and challenges

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    Mann AP

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Andrea P Mann,1 Elena Grebenciucova,2 Rimas V Lukas21Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Neuroscience, 2Department of Neurology, University of Chicago, Chicago, IL, USAObjective: Anti-N-methyl-D-aspartate-receptor (NMDA-R encephalitis is a new autoimmune disorder, often paraneoplastic in nature, presenting with complex neuropsychiatric symptoms. Diagnosed serologically, this disorder is often responsive to immunosuppressant treatment. The objective of this review is to educate clinicians on the challenges of diagnosis and management of this disorder.Materials and methods: A review of the relevant literature on clinical presentation, pathophysiology, and recommended management was conducted using a PubMed search. Examination of the results identified articles published between 2007 and 2014.Results: The literature highlights the importance of recognizing early common signs and symptoms, which include hallucinations, seizures, altered mental status, and movement disorders, often in the absence of fever. Although the presence of blood and/or cerebrospinal fluid autoantibodies confirms diagnosis, approximately 15% of patients have only positive cerebrospinal fluid titers. Antibody detection should prompt a search for an underlying teratoma or other underlying neoplasm and the initiation of first-line immunosuppressant therapy: intravenous methylprednisolone, intravenous immunoglobulin, or plasmapheresis, or a combination thereof. Second-line treatment with rituximab or cyclophosphamide should be implemented if no improvement is noted after 10 days. Complications can include behavioral problems (eg, aggression and insomnia, hypoventilation, catatonia, and autonomic instability. Those patients who can be managed outside an intensive care unit and whose tumors are identified and removed typically have better rates of remission and functional outcomes.Conclusion: There is an increasing need for clinicians of different specialties, including

  4. The role of memantine in the treatment of psychiatric disorders other than the dementias: a review of current preclinical and clinical evidence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sani, Gabriele; Serra, Giulia; Kotzalidis, Giorgio D; Romano, Silvia; Tamorri, Stefano M; Manfredi, Giovanni; Caloro, Matteo; Telesforo, C Ludovica; Caltagirone, Saverio S; Panaccione, Isabella; Simonetti, Alessio; Demontis, Francesca; Serra, Gino; Girardi, Paolo

    2012-08-01

    Memantine, a non-competitive NMDA receptor antagonist approved for Alzheimer's disease with a good safety profile, is increasingly being studied in a variety of non-dementia psychiatric disorders. We aimed to critically review relevant literature on the use of the drug in such disorders. We performed a PubMed search of the effects of memantine in animal models of psychiatric disorders and its effects in human studies of specific psychiatric disorders. The bulk of the data relates to the effects of memantine in major depressive disorder and schizophrenia, although more recent studies have provided data on the use of the drug in bipolar disorder as an add-on. Despite interesting preclinical data, results in major depression are not encouraging. Animal studies investigating the possible usefulness of memantine in schizophrenia are controversial; however, interesting findings were obtained in open studies of schizophrenia, but negative placebo-controlled, double-blind studies cast doubt on their validity. The effects of memantine in anxiety disorders have been poorly investigated, but data indicate that the use of the drug in obsessive-compulsive disorder and post-traumatic stress disorder holds promise, while findings relating to generalized anxiety disorder are rather disappointing. Results in eating disorders, catatonia, impulse control disorders (pathological gambling), substance and alcohol abuse/dependence, and attention-deficit hyperactivity disorder are inconclusive. In most psychiatric non-Alzheimer's disease conditions, the clinical data fail to support the usefulness of memantine as monotherapy or add-on treatment However, recent preclinical and clinical findings suggest that add-on memantine may show antimanic and mood-stabilizing effects in treatment-resistant bipolar disorder. PMID:22784018

  5. Shape theory. Functional connections of information, energy, and temperature in phasics and physiology; Gestalttheorie. Funktionelle Zusammenhaenge von Information, Energie und Temperatur in Physik und Physiologie

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    Wengel, Claus

    2012-11-01

    Starting from the phenomenon of the information input and the information output system in the central nervous system, which was conceived in physiology, as well as from the phenomenon of the disturbance oc consciousness, which was in neuropsychiatry psychopathometrically and by this quantitatively determinable, the author was occupied by the general question: How systems can be described, which possess and exchange temperature, energy, and information? A connection of thermodynamics and information theory was found and presented in this work. It came to the redefinition of several quantities, which can be applied both in mathematical physics and in mathematical physiology. First the negentropy was defined in fact as first partial derivation of the total information on the absolute temperature. Further definitions follow: That of the shape (measured in bit.J/K), that of the action (measured in bit.J), as well that of the structure (measured in bit.J/K{sup 2}). Functional connections of information, energy, and temperature as well as of further quantities became recognizable and were written. Mathematical physics were thereby enriched, also by conservation laws. But also mathematical physiology was extended. Here diseases like the inflammatory diseases catatonia, epilepsy, tumor, vegetative dystonies, anorexy, dementia, as well as the phenomenon vitality and the phenomenon sleeping were comprehended by formulas. As consequences resulted proposals resulted for the prophylaxis and for the therapy and for the design of a live-preserving and live-elongating way of life. These proposals are in the sections, which treat the diseases, detailedly listed and derived. Furthermore a first law of psychodynamics was formulated - in analogy to the first law of thermodynamics.

  6. Síntomas psicóticos, paranoides y catatónicos como debut de enfermedad de Cushing en una paciente con síndrome de Turner: Reporte de caso y revisión de la litera Psicotic, paranoid and catatonic symptoms as Cushing disease onset in a Turner syndrome patient: Case report and literature revision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ray Ticse A

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Se conoce que el hipercortisolismo y la sobreactividad del eje hipotalamo pituitario adrenal están asociados a la presentación de enfermedades psiquiátricas. En pacientes con síndrome de Cushing son frecuentes los trastornos del ánimo aunque también se presentan casos de psicosis durante el curso de la enfermedad. Sin embargo es inusual la presencia y más aún el debut con un cuadro de psicosis catatónica. El exceso de cortisol produce daño estructural en el sistema nervioso central tanto reversible como irreversible, especialmente en el hipocampo. Presentamos el caso de una paciente mujer joven con diagnóstico previo de síndrome de Turner, cariotipo 45 X0, quien presentó un cuadro psiquiátrico caracterizado por síntomas depresivos psicóticos y posteriormente catatonia como forma inusual de debut de enfermedad de Cushing y presentó mejoría posterior a la resección de la pituitaria. No se tiene evidencia que el síndrome de Turner influya sobre esta rara forma de presentación.It is known that hipercortisolism and overactivity of the Hypotalamus pituitary adrenal axis are associated to psiquiatric diseases presentation. In patients with Cushingsyndrome, mood disorders are common, also psicosis cases also are present during the disease. But, the presence and mostly the onset with a episode of catatonic psicosis is unusual. The cortisol excess produce structural damage in the Central Nervous System, reversible and irreversible, specially in the hypocampus. We show the case of a young woman with previous diagnostic of Turner syndrome, karyotype 45 X0, who presented a psychiatric episode caracterized for depresive psicotic symptoms and posteriorly a catatonic state as an unusual form of Cushing disease onset. This patient presented health improvement after pituitary resection. There is not evidencia that Turner syndrome influes over this unusual form of presentation.

  7. Phenotype-Based Genetic Association Studies (PGAS—Towards Understanding the Contribution of Common Genetic Variants to Schizophrenia Subphenotypes

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    Hannelore Ehrenreich

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Neuropsychiatric diseases ranging from schizophrenia to affective disorders and autism are heritable, highly complex and heterogeneous conditions, diagnosed purely clinically, with no supporting biomarkers or neuroimaging criteria. Relying on these “umbrella diagnoses”, genetic analyses, including genome-wide association studies (GWAS, were undertaken but failed to provide insight into the biological basis of these disorders. “Risk genotypes” of unknown significance with low odds ratios of mostly <1.2 were extracted and confirmed by including ever increasing numbers of individuals in large multicenter efforts. Facing these results, we have to hypothesize that thousands of genetic constellations in highly variable combinations with environmental co-factors can cause the individual disorder in the sense of a final common pathway. This would explain why the prevalence of mental diseases is so high and why mutations, including copy number variations, with a higher effect size than SNPs, constitute only a small part of variance. Elucidating the contribution of normal genetic variation to (disease phenotypes, and so re-defining disease entities, will be extremely labor-intense but crucial. We have termed this approach PGAS (“phenotype-based genetic association studies”. Ultimate goal is the definition of biological subgroups of mental diseases. For that purpose, the GRAS (Göttingen Research Association for Schizophrenia data collection was initiated in 2005. With >3000 phenotypical data points per patient, it comprises the world-wide largest currently available schizophrenia database (N > 1200, combining genome-wide SNP coverage and deep phenotyping under highly standardized conditions. First PGAS results on normal genetic variants, relevant for e.g., cognition or catatonia, demonstrated proof-of-concept. Presently, an autistic subphenotype of schizophrenia is being defined where an unfortunate accumulation of normal genotypes, so

  8. On the clinical impact of cerebral dopamine D{sub 2} receptor scintigraphy; Zur klinischen Wertigkeit der zerebralen Dopamin-D{sub 2}-Rezeptorszintigraphie

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    Larisch, R. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin; Klimke, A. [Duesseldorf Univ. (Germany). Psychiatrische Klinik

    1998-12-31

    The present review describes findings and clinical indications for the dopamine D{sub 2} receptor scintigraphy. Methods for the examination of D{sub 2} receptors are positron emission tomography (PET) using {sup 11}C- or {sup 18}F-labelled butyrophenones or benzamides or single photon emission tomography (SPECT) using {sup 123}I-iodobenzamide (IBZM) respectively. The most important indication in neurology is the differential diagnosis of Parkinsonism: Patients with early Parkinson`s disease show an increased D{sub 2} receptor binding (D{sub 2}-RB) compared to control subjects. However, patients suffering from Steele-Richardson-Olszewski-Syndrome or Multiple System Atrophy show a decreased D{sub 2}-RB and are generally non-responsive to treatment. Postsynaptic blockade of D{sub 2} receptors results in a drug induced Parkinsonian syndrome, which can be diagnosed by D{sub 2} scintigraphy. Further possible indications occur in psychiatry: The assessment of receptor occupancy is useful in schizophrenic patients treated with neuroleptics. Additionally, D{sub 2} receptor scintigraphy might help to clarify the differential diagnosis between neuroleptic malignant syndrome and lethal catatonia. The method might be useful for supervising neurobiochemical changes in drug dependency and during withdrawal. Assessment of dopamine D{sub 2} receptor binding can simplify the choice of therapy in depressive disorder: Patients showing a low D{sub 2} binding are likely to improve following an antidepressive drug treatment whereas sleep deprivation is promising in patients with high D{sub 2} binding. (orig.) [Deutsch] Die vorliegende Arbeit gibt eine Uebersicht ueber Befunde und klinische Indikationen zur Dopamin-D{sub 2}-Rezeptorszintigraphie. Methoden zur Untersuchung der D{sub 2}-Rezeptoren sind die Positronen-Emissions-Tomographie (PET) mit {sup 11}C- oder {sup 18}F-markierten Butyrophenonen oder Benzamiden oder die Einzelphotonen-Emissions-Tomographie (SPECT) mit {sup 123}I