WorldWideScience

Sample records for cataracts

  1. Cataracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Training and Jobs Home > Statistics and Data > Cataracts Cataracts Listen Language English Cataracts Defined A cataract is a clouding of the ... 2010 2010 U.S. Age-Specific Prevalence Rates for Cataract by Age, and Race/Ethnicity The risk of ...

  2. Cataract

    Science.gov (United States)

    A cataract is a clouding of the lens in your eye. It affects your vision. Cataracts are very common in older people. By age ... than half of all Americans either have a cataract or have had cataract surgery. A cataract can ...

  3. Cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lam, Dennis; Rao, Srinivas K; Ratra, Vineet; Liu, Yizhi; Mitchell, Paul; King, Jonathan; Tassignon, Marie-José; Jonas, Jost; Pang, Chi P; Chang, David F

    2015-01-01

    Cataract is the leading cause of reversible blindness and visual impairment globally. Blindness from cataract is more common in populations with low socioeconomic status and in developing countries than in developed countries. The only treatment for cataract is surgery. Phacoemulsification is the gold standard for cataract surgery in the developed world, whereas manual small incision cataract surgery is used frequently in developing countries. In general, the outcomes of surgery are good and complications, such as endophthalmitis, often can be prevented or have good ouctomes if properly managed. Femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery, an advanced technology, can automate several steps; initial data show no superiority of this approach over current techniques, but the results of many large clinical trials are pending. The greatest challenge remains the growing 'backlog' of patients with cataract blindness in the developing world because of lack of access to affordable surgery. Efforts aimed at training additional cataract surgeons in these countries do not keep pace with the increasing demand associated with ageing population demographics. In the absence of strategie that can prevent or delay cataract formation, it is important to focus efforts and resources on developing models for efficient delivery of cataract surgical services in underserved regions. For an illustrated summary of this Primer, visit: http://go.nature.com/eQkKll. PMID:27188414

  4. Cataract Vision Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... for Cataracts? Cataract Causes Cataract Diagnosis Cataract Treatment Cataract Surgery IOL Implants: Lens Replacement and Cataract Surgery Cataract Vision Simulator Cataract Vision Simulator Jun. 11, ...

  5. Cataract (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    A cataract is a cloudy or opaque area in the lens of the eye. Cataracts usually develop as a person gets older and ... substances can also accelerate the development of a cataract. Cataracts can cause visual problems such as difficulty ...

  6. Cataract - adult

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... home to avoid falls and injuries. The only treatment for a cataract is surgery to remove it. If a cataract ... Early diagnosis and treatment are key to preventing permanent ... a hypermature cataract) can begin to leak into other parts of ...

  7. Cataract removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... the following ways, depending on the type of cataract: Phacoemulsification: With this procedure, the doctor uses a tool that produces sound waves to break up the cataract into small pieces. The pieces are then suctioned ...

  8. Recognizing Cataracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please review our exit disclaimer . Subscribe Recognizing Cataracts Watch for Vision Changes as You Age As life ... your eyes from harmful ultraviolet rays from the sun. Try wearing sunglasses or a hat with a ...

  9. Radiation cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Until very recently, ocular exposure guidelines were based on the assumption that radiation cataract is a deterministic event requiring threshold doses generally greater than 2 Gy. This view was, in part, based on older studies which generally had short follow-up periods, failed to take into account increasing latency as dose decreased, had relatively few subjects with doses below a few Gy, and were not designed to detect early lens changes. Newer findings, including those in populations exposed to much lower radiation doses and in subjects as diverse as astronauts, medical workers, atomic bomb survivors, accidentally exposed individuals, and those undergoing diagnostic or radiotherapeutic procedures, strongly suggest dose-related lens opacification at significantly lower doses. These observations resulted in a recent re-evaluation of current lens occupational exposure guidelines, and a proposed lowering of the presumptive radiation cataract threshold to 0.5 Gy/year and the occupational lens exposure limit to 20 mSv/year, regardless of whether received as an acute, protracted, or chronic exposure. Experimental animal studies support these conclusions and suggest a role for genotoxicity in the development of radiation cataract. Recent findings of a low or even zero threshold for radiation-induced lens opacification are likely to influence current research efforts and directions concerning the cellular and molecular mechanisms underlying this pathology. Furthermore, new guidelines are likely to have significant implications for occupational and/or accidental exposure, and the need for occupational eye protection (e.g. in fields such as interventional medicine).

  10. Radiation cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report reviews the relationship of ionizing radiation to the occurrence of cataracts (posterior lenticular opacities) among the A-bomb survivors in Hiroshima and Nagasaki. The new DS86 doses are available for 1,983 (93.4%) of the 2,124 A-bomb survivors analyzed in 1982. The DS86 kerma neutron component for Hiroshima is much smaller than its comparable T65DR component, but still 4.2 fold higher (0.38 Gy at 6 Gy) than that in Nagasaki (0.09 Gy at 6 Gy). Thus, if the eye is especially sensitive to neutrons, there may yet be some useful information on their effects, particularly in Hiroshima. Under the best fitting dose-response model, an L (gamma)-L (neutron) with two thresholds, both the gamma and neutron regression coefficients of the occurrence of cataracts on dose are positive and highly significant for the DS86 eye organ doses. The DS86 gamma coefficient is almost the same as that associated with the T65DR gamma dose, the ratio of the two coefficients being 1.1 (95% confidence limits: 0.5-2.3) for DS86 kerma in the individual dose data, and if the risks based on the DS86 eye organ dose and DS86 kerma are compared, the ratio is 1.3 (0.6-2.8). However, the risk estimates associated with neutron exposure are 6.4 (2.2-19.2) fold higher for the DS86 kerma than the T65DR kerma and 1.6 (0.5-2.3) fold higher for the DS86 eye organ dose than for the DS86 kerma. (author)

  11. Cataract surgery - series (image)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataract surgery usually works very well. The operation has few risks, the pain and recovery period are short, ... improved. Ninety-five percent or more of all cataract surgeries result in improved vision.

  12. Nutritional modulation of cataract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cataract, or lens opacification, remains a major cause of blindness worldwide. Cataracts reduce vision in over eighty million people, causing blindness in eighteen million people. The number afflicted by cataract will increase dramatically as the proportion of the elderly global population increase...

  13. Facts and Myths about Cataracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Lasers are used to remove cataracts FACT: In cataract treatment, the clouded lens is surgically removed and then ... membrane behind the implant may become cloudy after cataract surgery. Laser treatment then may be used to open up the ...

  14. Surgery for Congenital Cataract

    OpenAIRE

    David Yorston FRCS FRCOphth

    2004-01-01

    The management of congenital cataract is very different to the treatment of a routine age-related cataract. In adults, surgery may be delayed for years without affecting the visual outcome. In infants, if the cataract is not removed during the first year of life, the vision will never be fully regained after surgery. In adults, if the aphakia is not corrected immediately, it can be corrected later. In young children, if the aphakia is not corrected, the vision will never develop normally.

  15. Cataract surgery in uveitis

    OpenAIRE

    Hazari Ajit; Sangwan Virender

    2002-01-01

    Purpose:To study the visual outcome of cataract surgery in eyes with uveitis.Methods: A retrospective analysis of patients with uveitis operated for cataract. Results: 106 eyes of 89 patients with uveitis were operated for cataract. In 62.3% eyes (66/106), post -operative follow-up was at least 6 months. There was significant improvement (P<0.001) in visual acuity after cataract surgery. Provided the uveitis was well controlled for three months pre-operatively, additional pre...

  16. Training a cataract surgeon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M Babar Qureshi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Training in cataract surgery is one of the key factors needed to ensure high quality cataract surgery with good visual outcomes and patient satisfaction. The training has to impart the right skills to the right person by the right trainer and in the right environment.

  17. Atomic bomb cataracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eye disturbance caused by atomic bomb radiation can be divided into three groups: direct injury immediately after exposure, eye lesions associated with radiation syndrome, and delayed disturbance. The crystalline lens of the eye is the most radiosensitive. Atomic bomb cataract has been investigated in a number of studies. The first section of this chapter discusses radiation cataract in terms of the incidence and characteristics. The second section deals with atomic bomb cataract, which can be diagnosed based on the four criteria: (1) opacity of the crystalline lens, (2) a history of proximal exposure, (3) lack of eye disease complicating cataract, and (4) non-exposure to radiation other than atomic bombing. The prevalence of cataract and severity of opacity are found to correlate with exposure doses and age at the time of exposure. Furthermore, it is found to correlate with distance from the hypocenter, the condition of shielding, epilation, and the presence or absence or degree of radiation syndrome. (N.K.)

  18. Facts about Cataract

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... retinal detachment. Other eye disorders, such as high myopia (nearsightedness), can further increase your risk of retinal ... which have shown varying results in delaying the progression of cataract. Genetic studies, which show promise for ...

  19. Cataract Surgery Tool

    Science.gov (United States)

    1977-01-01

    The NASA-McGannon cataract surgery tool is a tiny cutter-pump which liquefies and pumps the cataract lens material from the eye. Inserted through a small incision in the cornea, the tool can be used on the hardest cataract lens. The cutter is driven by a turbine which operates at about 200,000 revolutions per minute. Incorporated in the mechanism are two passages for saline solutions, one to maintain constant pressure within the eye, the other for removal of the fragmented lens material and fluids. Three years of effort have produced a design, now being clinically evaluated, with excellent potential for improved cataract surgery. The use of this tool is expected to reduce the patient's hospital stay and recovery period significantly.

  20. Viscoless microincision cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Sallet

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Guy SalletDepartment of Opthamology, Aalsters Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, BelgiumAbstract: A cataract surgery technique is described in which incisions, continuous circular capsulorhexis and hydrodissection are made without the use of any viscoelastics. Two small incisions are created through which the different parts of the procedure can take place, maintaining a stable anterior chamber under continuous irrigation. Subsequent bimanual phacoemulsification can be done through these microincisions. At the end of the procedure, an intraocular lens can be inserted through the self-sealing incision under continuous irrigation. 50 consecutive cataract patients were operated on without the use of viscoelastics and then compared with a group of 50 patients who had been helped with viscoelastics. No difference in outcome, endothelial cell count or pachymetry was noted between the two groups. No intraoperative complication was encountered. Viscoless cataract surgery was a safe procedure with potential advantages.Keywords: ophthalmic visco-surgical device, viscoless cataract surgery, microincision

  1. Cataract surgery in uveitis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hazari Ajit

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose:To study the visual outcome of cataract surgery in eyes with uveitis.Methods: A retrospective analysis of patients with uveitis operated for cataract. Results: 106 eyes of 89 patients with uveitis were operated for cataract. In 62.3% eyes (66/106, post -operative follow-up was at least 6 months. There was significant improvement (P<0.001 in visual acuity after cataract surgery. Provided the uveitis was well controlled for three months pre-operatively, additional pre-operative anti-inflammatory medications did not significantly affect (P=0.842 post -operative inflammation. Patients who received extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE or phacoemulsification with posterior chamber IOL (PCIOL obtained better visual acuity at 6 weeks (P=0.009 and P=0.032 respectively than those with only ECCE without IOL. In 37 eyes vision did not improve due to persistent uveitis (23.9%, 16/67, cystoid macular oedeme (20.9%, 14/67, and posterior capsule opacification (14.9%, 10/67. Conclusion: Cataract extraction and PCIOL implantation is safe in eyes with uveitis. Additional preoperative medications may not alleviate post-operative inflammation if uveitis is well controlled for at least three months before surgery.

  2. Cataract and Cataract Surgery: Nationwide Prevalence and Clinical Determinants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Sang Jun; Lee, Ju Hyun; Kang, Se Woong; Hyon, Joon Young; Park, Kyu Hyung

    2016-06-01

    This study aimed to investigate the prevalence and clinical determinants of cataract and cataract surgery in Korean population. The 2008-2012 Korean National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey was analyzed, which included 20,419 participants aged ≥ 40 years. The survey is a multistage, probability-cluster survey, which can produce nationally representative estimates. Prevalence of cataract and cataract surgery was estimated. Clinical determinants for those were investigated using logistic regression analyses (LRAs). The prevalence of cataract was 42.28% (95% confidence interval [CI], 40.67-43.89); 40.82% (95% CI, 38.97-42.66) for men and 43.62% (95% CI, 41.91-45.33) for women (P = 0.606). The prevalence of cataract surgery was 7.75% (95% CI, 7.30-8.20); 6.38% (95% CI, 5.80-6.96) for men and 9.01% (95% CI, 8.41-9.61) for women (P Cataract was associated with older age (P Cataract surgery was consistently associated with older age, occupation, DM, asthma, and anemia in two LRAs, which compared participants with cataract surgery to those without cataract surgery and those having a cataract but without any cataract surgery, respectively. Hypertension, arthritis, and dyslipidemia were associated with cataract surgery at least in one of these LRAs. These results suggest that there are 9.4 million individuals with cataract and 1.7 million individuals with cataract surgery in Korea. Further studies are warranted to reveal the causality and its possible mechanism of developing/exacerbating cataract in novel determinants (i.e., anemia, asthma, and arthritic conditions) as well as well-known determinants. PMID:27247507

  3. Paediatric cataract implant surgery outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Istiantoro Istiantoro

    2003-01-01

    This study evaluated the surgical outcome of various surgical technique in paediatric cataract implant surgery, at Jakarta Eye Center, Jakarta, Indonesia. This was a retrospective study of 57 eyes in 44 children who had primary cataract implants surgery. Three surgical techniques used were : 1. Extracapsular cataract extraction with intraocular lens implantation with intact posterior capsule which was performed on 21 eyes (group 1). 2. Extracapsular cataract extraction with intraocular lens i...

  4. Radiation and cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    When this paper was about to go to press, the International Commission on Radiological Protection released a statement recommending a change in the threshold dose for the eye lens and dose limits for eye for occupationally exposed persons. It is clear that the earlier published threshold for radiation cataract is no longer valid. Epidemiological studies among Chernobyl clean-up workers, A bomb survivors, astronauts, residents of contaminated buildings, radiological technicians and recent surveys of staff in interventional rooms indicate that there is an increased incidence of lens opacities at doses below 1 Gy. Nevertheless, eye lens dosimetry is at a primitive stage and needs to be developed further. Despite uncertainties concerning dose threshold and dosimetry, it is possible to significantly reduce the risk of radiation cataract through the use of appropriate eye protection. By increasing awareness among those at risk and better adoption and increased usage of protective measures, radiation cataract can become preventable despite lowering of dose limits. (authors)

  5. Liquefaction for cataract extraction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Labiris, Georgios; Toli, Aspasia; Polychroni, Damaskini; Gkika, Maria; Angelonias, Dimitrios; Kozobolis, Vassilios P.

    2016-01-01

    A systematic review of the recent literature regarding the implementation of the liquefaction in cataract surgery and its short-term and long-term outcomes in various parameters that affect the quality of patients' life, including visual rehabilitation and possible complications was performed based on the PubMed, Medline, Nature and the American Academy of Ophthalmology databases in November 2013 and data from 14 comparative studies were included in this narrative review. Liquefaction is an innovative technology for cataract extraction that uses micropulses of balanced salt solution to liquefy the lens nucleus. Most studies reported that liquefaction is a reliable technology for mild to moderate cataracts, while fragmentation difficulties may be encountered with harder nuclei. PMID:26949656

  6. Cataract extraction with erisophake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    ALEXANDER, H B

    1951-01-01

    Today the erisophake offers the most successful means for the intracapsular extraction of cataracts. The advantages of this method are that no counterpressure is required so that the incidence of vitreous loss is reduced; the vacuum cup provides a firmer grasp of the lens with less danger of rupture of the lens capsule; and the vacuum cup can be used for the delivery of practically all types of cataract in the adult, including intumescent and Morgagnian cataracts as well as lenses with exfoliating and friable capsules. While the forceps method of intracapsular extraction is generally successful in not more than 70 to 75 per cent of cases, the erisophake may offer success in 90 per cent of cases. PMID:14792378

  7. Daily tonometric curves after cataract surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Sacca, S; Marletta, A; Pascotto, A; Barabino, S; Rolando, M.; Giannetti, R.; Calabria, G.

    2001-01-01

    AIM—To evaluate daily tonometric curves after cataract surgery in patients with cataract only and in patients with cataract and glaucoma.
METHODS—108 patients scheduled for cataract surgery were randomly allocated to two groups: 57 patients with cataract only (normal) and 51 with cataract and primary open angle glaucoma (POAG). All patients underwent extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) (manual technique with long wound), phacoemulsification (automated technique with short wound), or nucl...

  8. Connexin mutants and cataracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    EricCBeyer

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The lens is a multicellular, but avascular tissue that must stay transparent to allow normal transmission of light and focusing of it on the retina. Damage to lens cells and/or proteins can cause cataracts, opacities that disrupt these processes. The normal survival of the lens is facilitated by an extensive network of gap junctions formed predominantly of connexin46 and connexin50. Mutations of the genes that encode these connexins (GJA3 and GJA8 have been identified and linked to inheritance of cataracts in human families and mouse lines. In vitro expression studies of several of these mutants have shown that they exhibit abnormalities that may lead to disease. Many of the mutants reduce or modify intercellular communication due to channel alterations (including loss of function or altered gating or due to impaired cellular trafficking which reduces the number of gap junction channels within the plasma membrane. However, the abnormalities detected in studies of other mutants suggest that they cause cataracts through other mechanisms including gain of hemichannel function (leading to cell injury and death and formation of cytoplasmic accumulations (that may act as light scattering particles. These observations and the anticipated results of ongoing studies should elucidate the mechanisms of cataract development due to mutations of lens connexins and abnormalities of other lens proteins. They may also contribute to our understanding of the mechanisms of disease due to connexin mutations in other tissues.

  9. Cataract surgery and anticoagulants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koopmans, SA; VanRij, G

    1996-01-01

    A questionnaire was sent to 240 members of the Netherlands Intraocular implant Club (NIOIC) to register their policy followed in 1993 with regard to anticoagulant therapy (ACT) and the use of aspirin in patients having cataract surgery. Ninety-one (32%) forms were suitable for analysis. Most eye sur

  10. Manual small incision cataract surgery in eyes with white cataracts

    OpenAIRE

    Venkatesh Rengaraj; Das Manoranjan; Prashanth Sadasivam; Muralikrishnan Radhakrishnan

    2005-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the safety and efficacy of Manual Small Incision Cataract Surgery (MSICS) in cases of white cataract with the use of trypan blue as an adjunct for performing continuous curvilinear capsulorthexis (CCC). MATERIALS AND METHODS: Prospective observational study on 100 consecutive eyes of 100 patients with white cataract who had undergone MSICS with trypan blue assisted CCC. The nucleus was prolapsed into anterior chamber by using a sinskey hook and extracted out of the eye u...

  11. Three cases of extracapsular cataract extraction for radiation cataract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hirokane, Kenji; Kosaka, Toshiya; Nii, Hiroki; Kiuchi, Yoshiaki; Nakano, Kensuke; Choshi, Kanji [Hiroshima Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine

    1996-02-01

    Extracapsular cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation was performed on 4 eyes of 3 patients with radiation cataract. Case 1 was a 60-year-old man who was exposed to the ionizing radiation of the atomic bomb in Hiroshima 730 meters from the center of the explosion. He developed atomic bomb radiation senile cataracts in both eyes. Despite cataract surgery, a central plaque remained on the posterior capsule in the region corresponding to the central dense opacity in both eyes. Case 2 was an 81-year-old man who was in a streetcar 1,000 meters from the center of the explosion at the time of the atomic bombing. Senile and radiation-induced cataract decreased the visual acuity in both eyes. After extracapsular cataract extraction in his right eye, central opacification and a fibrous white membrane remained on the posterior capsule. These were removed by Nd-YAG laser capsulotomy six days after surgery. Case 3 was a 56-year-old man who developed radiation cataract after radiation therapy to a malignant lymphoma in the right orbit. Phacoemulsification and aspiration could not remove the fibrous white membrane from the posterior capsule in this case. Central opacities and fibrous white membranes on the posterior capsule after cataract surgery appears to be a characteristic of radiation cataract. (author).

  12. Three cases of extracapsular cataract extraction for radiation cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extracapsular cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation was performed on 4 eyes of 3 patients with radiation cataract. Case 1 was a 60-year-old man who was exposed to the ionizing radiation of the atomic bomb in Hiroshima 730 meters from the center of the explosion. He developed atomic bomb radiation senile cataracts in both eyes. Despite cataract surgery, a central plaque remained on the posterior capsule in the region corresponding to the central dense opacity in both eyes. Case 2 was an 81-year-old man who was in a streetcar 1,000 meters from the center of the explosion at the time of the atomic bombing. Senile and radiation-induced cataract decreased the visual acuity in both eyes. After extracapsular cataract extraction in his right eye, central opacification and a fibrous white membrane remained on the posterior capsule. These were removed by Nd-YAG laser capsulotomy six days after surgery. Case 3 was a 56-year-old man who developed radiation cataract after radiation therapy to a malignant lymphoma in the right orbit. Phacoemulsification and aspiration could not remove the fibrous white membrane from the posterior capsule in this case. Central opacities and fibrous white membranes on the posterior capsule after cataract surgery appears to be a characteristic of radiation cataract. (author)

  13. Phacoemulsification in subluxated cataract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen M

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of phacoemulsification in eyes with subluxated cataract. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study comprised 22 eyes of 20 consecutive patients with subluxated cataracts of varying aetiology operated between March 1998 and March 2001. Detailed preoperative assessment included visual acuity (VA, slitlamp examination, presence of vitreous in anterior chamber, extent of subluxation, intraocular pressure (IOP and detailed fundus examination. Phacoemulsification was done to retain the natural bag support and all patients had acrylic foldable Acrysof IOL implantation either in-the-bag or by scleral fixation. Postoperative observations included best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA, IOP, pupillary reaction and the IOL position. Results: The aetiology of the subluxation was traumatic in 11 patients and non-traumatic in 9 patients. Fifteen were males and 5 were females. Mean follow-up was 11.7 ± 9.71 months (range 4-39. The average age was 39.15 ± 16.33 (range 5 - 74. A 2-port anterior chamber vitrectomy was performed in 6 eyes (27.2%. Capsule tension ring (CTR was implanted in 15 eyes (68.18%. Twelve eyes (54.5% had in-the-bag implants, while 5 (22.72% had scleral fixation. The remaining 5 eyes (22.72% had one haptic in-the-bag and another sutured to sclera. No major intraoperative complications were noted. Twelve eyes (54.5% had clinically and geometrically well centered IOLs while 9 eyes (40.9% had geometrically decentered IOLs. One patient was lost to follow-up. Fifteen eyes (55.55% had postoperative BCVA of 6/12 - 6/6 while 2 eyes (7.40% had BCVA of 6/18. The remaining 4 eyes (14.81% had less than 6/24 BCVA due to pre-existing posterior segment pathology. Postoperative complications included rise in IOP in 1 eye (4.54%, pupillary capture of the IOL optic in 2 eyes (9.09%; the same 2 eyes (9.09% required redialing of IOL. One eye (4.54% had to undergo refixation (one haptic was fixed to sclera year after cataract

  14. Changing indications for cataract surgery.

    OpenAIRE

    Cairns, L.; Sommer, A

    1984-01-01

    Despite the fact that two community-based surgeons switched from routine intracapsular cataract extraction to planned extracapsular cataract surgery and routine implantation of posterior chamber lenses, they did not materially increase the size of their surgical load or change their indications for cataract surgery. In contrast a similar change in surgical technique by two high-referral hospital-based surgeons was associated with a marked increase in operative rates and increased preoperative...

  15. Etiopathogenesis of cataract: An appraisal

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta, Varun B; Manjusha Rajagopala; Basavaiah Ravishankar

    2014-01-01

    Natural eye lens is a crystalline substance to produce a clear passage for light. Cataract is opacity within the clear lens of the eye and is the dominant cause of socio-medical problem i.e., blindness worldwide. The only available treatment of cataract is surgery. However, insufficient surgical facilities in poor and developing countries and post-operative complications inspire researchers to find out other modes of treatment for cataract. In this review, an attempt has been made to appraise...

  16. Cataracts in uranium miners

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The question was studied of whether or not uranium miners with a long history of work underground develop alterations of the eye lens as a result of a long-term chronic exposure to gamma radiation. Investigated were the area of opacities and the occurrence of alterations of the lens posterior pole in a group of 800 uranium miners (i.e., 1,600 eyes) with work underground longer than 10 years. As against controls, no statistical differences were found in the lens transparency. Significant differences were also not found in the extent of cataracts and the occurrence of posterior pole alterations, nor in the rate of an increased occurrence of cataracts due to age. (L.O.)

  17. Pseudoexfoliation syndrome and secondary cataract

    OpenAIRE

    Kuchle, M.; A. Amberg; Martus, P.; Nguyen, N.; NAUMANN, G.

    1997-01-01

    AIM/BACKGROUND—The pseudoexfoliation (PEX) syndrome is frequently associated with impairment of the blood-aqueous barrier. This study analysed if this might stimulate secondary cataract following cataract extraction.
METHODS—This historical cohort study included 197 eyes of 197 patients (99 with and 98 without PEX) that underwent extracapsular cataract extraction with posterior chamber lens implantation (PMMA optic) between 1985 and 1991. Secondary cataract was defined as opacification of the...

  18. Femtosecond laser cataract surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Nagy, Zoltan Z.; McAlinden, Colm

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser (FSL) cataract surgery is in its infancy but is rapidly gaining popularity due to the improved consistency and predictability for corneal incisions and anterior capsulorhexis. It enables subsequently less phacoemulsification energy and time to be employed, which has gains in terms of reduced corneal oedema. In addition, the FSL allows better circularity of the anterior capsulotomy, capsule overlap, intraocular lens (IOL) placement and centration of the IOL. These advantages ...

  19. Astigmatism following cataract surgery.

    OpenAIRE

    Reading, V M

    1984-01-01

    The changes in corneal curvature were determined at regular intervals over a one-year period following intracapsular cataract extraction by microsurgical techniques. During the first postoperative month photokeratometric measurements showed rapid changes in astigmatism associated with large changes in the direction of the axis. Thereafter astigmatism against-the-rule predominated. Data from the small group of patients who underwent surgery in which the technique of phacoemulsification was use...

  20. Keratoplasty and cataract extraction

    OpenAIRE

    Panda Anita; Kumar T

    1991-01-01

    Fifty eyes were evaluated following penetrating keratoplasty and cataract extraction. Twenty five of them had intracapsular lens extraction while the remaining 25 had intercapsular method of extracapsular lens extraction. Both operative and post operative complications were more in group I. Visual outcome and graft clarity were also better in eyes of group II. Combined keratoplasty and intercapsular method of extracapsular lens extraction was recommended in eyes having both corneal and lentic...

  1. Keratoplasty and cataract extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panda Anita

    1991-01-01

    Full Text Available Fifty eyes were evaluated following penetrating keratoplasty and cataract extraction. Twenty five of them had intracapsular lens extraction while the remaining 25 had intercapsular method of extracapsular lens extraction. Both operative and post operative complications were more in group I. Visual outcome and graft clarity were also better in eyes of group II. Combined keratoplasty and intercapsular method of extracapsular lens extraction was recommended in eyes having both corneal and lenticular pathology.

  2. Cataract and ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation-induced cataract has been up to now considered as a quite rare pathology, needing high-dose radiations (beyond a dose threshold roughly estimated at 2 Grays to the lens) consisting mainly in head tumour radiotherapy complications. Several new studies on different exposed populations such as astronauts, japanese atomic bomb survivors, people undergoing X-ray examinations, Chernobyl accident 'liquidators' as well as data from animal experiments, suggest that dose threshold for detectable opacities as well as for clinical posterior sub-capsular cataract occurring, might be far lower than those previously assumed. Even the existence of a dose threshold is no longer an absolute certitude insofar as radiation-induced cataract pathogenesis might consist not really in a deterministic effect (direct tissue harmful effect, killing or seriously injuring a critical population of cells) as believed until now, but rather in a stochastic effect (genomic damage in target-cells, altered cell division, abnormal lens fiber cell differentiation). More practically, these new data may lead us to reconsider radioprotection of specifically exposed populations: mainly patients and workers. Regarding workers, labour legislation (lens equivalent dose limit of 150 mSv during 12 consecutive months) might be, in the medium term, reassessed downwards. (author)

  3. Radiation-induced cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dose assessments for cataract threshold doses are available based on epidemiological studies of radiotherapy patients, survivors of the nuclear bombing of Hiroshima and Nagasaki, and of persons with occupational exposure to radiation. According to these, short-term application of low-level LET radiation of a dose ranging between 0.5 and 2.0 Gy may suffice to cause a cataract in the course of a few months or years which results in inpairment of vision (UNSCEAR, 1982). In fractionated irradiation, cataractogenic threshold dose increases to 4 Sv at treatment times between 3 weeks and 3 months, and to more than 5 Sv at more than 3 months (ICRP 41). Densely ionizing radiation must be assumed to have threshold doses between 2 and 20 Sv. An ICRP assessment (ICRP Publ. No. 41, 1984) gives a threshold dose of more than 8 Sv for a vision-impairing cataract if these was protracted irradiation at a low-level dose rate. Concerning radiation protection, a maximum lens dose of 150 mSv per annum was recommended which should not be exceeded. This indicates a maximum of 7.5 Sv of exposure throughout a period of 50 years of working life. (orig./HP)

  4. SMALL INCISION CATARACT SURGERY VERSUS PHACOEMULSIFICATION FOR IMMATURE CATARACT: A SINGLE BLIND RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    OpenAIRE

    Md. Jawed; Himadri; De, Abhijit; Rathindra; Deshmukh Md Saudmiya

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Manual small incision cataract surgery (SICS) has given visual results almost equivalent to Phacoemulsification but limited studies are available regarding the efficacy of small incision cataract surgery in phaco suitable immature cataracts. OBJECTIVE: To compare manual small incision cataract surgery and Phacoemulsification in immature cataracts. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A single blind randomized controlled trial was conducted with 105 eyes each for small incisi...

  5. Simultaneous pterygium and cataract surgery.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gulani A

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available In our country both pterygium and cataract have a high incidence. Hence in this study, thirty patients with pterygium and cataract were treated with a simultaneous pterygium excision and cataract extraction procedure. These patients after pterygium excision were treated intra-operatively with 500 rads of beta radiation over the pterygium site. Then, the cataract was extracted and the patients were treated post-operatively with topical betamethasone 0.1% for a duration of three months. They were followed up for a duration of 6 months postoperatively. Nineteen patients (63% had visual recovery to 6/12. Twelve of 30 patients (40% had recurrence of pterygium. The combined procedure did not result in any surgical complications following cataract removal. Post-operatively, after 6 months 13 patients had with the rule astigmatism (WRA for a mean WRA of 1.3 D, and 17 had against the rule astigmatism (ARA for a mean ARA of 1.2 D.

  6. Diplopia as the Complication of Cataract Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gawęcki, Maciej; Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2016-01-01

    The authors present systematic review of aetiology and treatment of diplopia related to cataract surgery. The problem is set in the modern perspective of changing cataract surgery. Actual incidence is discussed as well as various modalities of therapeutic options. The authors provide the guidance for the contemporary cataract surgeon, when to expect potential problem in ocular motility after cataract surgery. PMID:26998351

  7. Diplopia as the Complication of Cataract Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Maciej Gawęcki; Andrzej Grzybowski

    2016-01-01

    The authors present systematic review of aetiology and treatment of diplopia related to cataract surgery. The problem is set in the modern perspective of changing cataract surgery. Actual incidence is discussed as well as various modalities of therapeutic options. The authors provide the guidance for the contemporary cataract surgeon, when to expect potential problem in ocular motility after cataract surgery.

  8. Outcome after surgery of congenital cataract

    OpenAIRE

    Lundvall, Anna

    2002-01-01

    The visual outcome in infants undergoing surgery for bilateral congenital cataract has improved considerably because of improved surgical methods and the realisation that early detection, allowing early cataract extraction and immediate optical correction, can prevent otherwise irreversible deprivation amblyopia. The management of unilateral congenital cataract is still of the most difficult problems in paediatric ophtalmology. In unilateral congenital cataract, interven...

  9. Femtosecond laser cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Zoltan Z; McAlinden, Colm

    2015-01-01

    Femtosecond laser (FSL) cataract surgery is in its infancy but is rapidly gaining popularity due to the improved consistency and predictability for corneal incisions and anterior capsulorhexis. It enables subsequently less phacoemulsification energy and time to be employed, which has gains in terms of reduced corneal oedema. In addition, the FSL allows better circularity of the anterior capsulotomy, capsule overlap, intraocular lens (IOL) placement and centration of the IOL. These advantages have resulted in improved visual and refractive outcomes in the short term. Complication rates are low which reduce with surgeon experience. This review article focuses on the Alcon LenSx system. PMID:26605364

  10. Cataract surgery to lower intraocular pressure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Berdahl John

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cataract and glaucoma are common co morbidities. Cataract surgery is frequently performed in patients with glaucoma. In this study, a review of literature with search terms of cataract, glaucoma and intraocular pressure is followed by evaluation and synthesis of data to determine the effect of cataract surgery on intraocular pressure. Cataract surgery seems to lower intraocular pressure on a sustained basis, especially in patients with higher preoperative intraocular pressure. The mechanism of action of these finds remains speculative.

  11. Etiopathogenesis of cataract: An appraisal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varun B Gupta

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural eye lens is a crystalline substance to produce a clear passage for light. Cataract is opacity within the clear lens of the eye and is the dominant cause of socio-medical problem i.e., blindness worldwide. The only available treatment of cataract is surgery. However, insufficient surgical facilities in poor and developing countries and post-operative complications inspire researchers to find out other modes of treatment for cataract. In this review, an attempt has been made to appraise various etiological factors of cataract to make their perception clear to build up counterpart treatment. Present study is an assortment of various available literatures and electronic information in view of cataract etiopathogenesis. Various risk factors have been identified in development of cataracts. They can be classified in to genetic factors, ageing (systemic diseases, nutritional and trace metals deficiencies, smoking, oxidative stress etc., traumatic, complicated (inflammatory and degenerative diseases of eye, metabolic (diabetes, galactosemia etc., toxic substances including drugs abuses, alcohol etc., radiation (ultraviolet, electromagnetic waves etc. are implicated as significant risk factors in the development of cataract.

  12. Recovery after cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porela-Tiihonen, Susanna; Kokki, Hannu; Kaarniranta, Kai; Kokki, Merja

    2016-04-01

    Cataract surgery is the most common ophthalmological surgical procedure, and it is predicted that the number of surgeries will increase significantly in the future. However, little is known about the recovery after surgery. The first aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence, severity and duration of pain and other ocular discomfort symptoms experienced after cataract surgery. The other objectives were to identify the factors associated with lower postoperative patient satisfaction and to measure the effect of cataract surgery on patients' health-related quality of life (HRQoL) and visual function in everyday life. The study design was a prospective follow-up study. The course of the recovery and the presence of ocular symptoms were evaluated by interviewing the patients via a questionnaire at 1 day, 1 week, 6 weeks and one year after surgery The visual functioning in everyday life was measured with Visual Functioning Index VF-7 and Catquest-9SF-questionnaires and furthermore the HRQoL was measured with the 15D-instrument before surgery and at 12 months after surgery. The patients returned the questionnaires by mail and were interviewed in the hospital on the day of the surgery. The same patients filled-in all the questionnaires. The patient reports were used to collect the data on medical history. A total of 303 patients were approached at Kuopio University Hospital in 2010-2011 and of these 196 patients were eligible and willing to participate, with postoperative data being available from 186 (95%) patients. A systematic review article was included in the study procedure and it revealed the wide range in the reported incidence of postoperative ocular pain. Some of the identified randomized controlled studies reported no or only minor pain whereas in some studies significant pain or pain lasting for several weeks has been described in more than 50% of the study patients. In the present study setting, pain was reported by 34% during the first

  13. The Pediatric Cataract Register (PECARE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haargaard, Birgitte; Nyström, Alf; Rosensvärd, Annika; Tornqvist, Kristina; Magnusson, Gunilla

    2015-01-01

    between January 2008 and December 2012 were included. Statistical comparison of the different screening strategies was made. RESULTS: The number of children undergoing surgery for congenital cataract before 1 year of age was 31 (17 bilateral cases) in Denmark and 92 (38 bilateral cases) in Sweden. The......PURPOSE: To analyse and discuss screening for the detection of congenital cataract in two Nordic countries, Denmark and Sweden. METHODS: Until 2011, in Denmark, no guideline concerning screening for congenital cataract existed. Since 2011, Danish guidelines regarding eye examination include...... examination with a pencil light at age 5 weeks, whereas newborn red reflex examination using a handheld ophthalmoscope is routine protocol in Swedish maternity wards. Data regarding age of referral were derived from the Pediatric Cataract Register (PECARE). All children operated on before 1 year of age...

  14. Complications of cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Elsie; Mahroo, Omar A R; Spalton, David J

    2010-11-01

    Modern cataract surgery is safe in more than 95 per cent of patients. In the small number of cases where a serious complication occurs, the most common is an intra-operative posterior capsular rupture. This can lead to vitreous loss or a dropped nucleus and can increase the risk of post-operative cystoid macular oedema or retinal detachment. Post-operatively, posterior capsular opacification is the most common complication and can be readily treated with a YAG capsulotomy. The most devastating complication is endophthalmitis, the rate of which is now significantly decreased through the use of intracameral antibiotics. As a clinician, the most important step is to assess the patient pre-operatively to predict higher risk individuals and to counsel them appropriately. In these patients, various pre- or intra-operative management steps can be taken in addition to routine phacoemulsification to optimise their visual outcome. PMID:20735786

  15. Congenital cataract screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhale Rajavi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital cataract is a leading cause of visual deprivation which can damage the developing visual system of a child; therefore early diagnosis, management and long-term follow-up are essential. It is recommended that all neonates be screened by red reflex examination at birth and suspected cases be referred to ophthalmic centers. Early surgery (1 year is highly recommended. After surgery, amblyopia treatment and periodic follow-up examinations should be started as soon as possible to achieve a satisfactory visual outcome. Practitioners should consider the possibility of posterior capsular opacity, elevated intraocular pressure and amblyopia during follow-up, especially in eyes with microphthalmia and/or associated congenital anomalies. All strabismic children should undergo slit lamp examination prior to strabismus surgery to rule out congenital lens opacities. From a social point of view, equal and fair medical care should be provided to all children regardless of gender.

  16. Ionizing radiation induced cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Until recently it was believed that the cataract (opacity of the eye lens) is a deterministic effect with a dose threshold of several Gray in dependence on the exposure conditions. Studies in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, in the vicinity of Chernobyl, of American radiologic technologists, astronauts, and patients after having received several computer tomographies of the head region, however, have shown that this assumption is not correct. It had been overlooked in the past that with decreasing dose the latency period is increasing. Therefore, the originally available studies were terminated too early. The more recent studies show that, in the case of a threshold existing at all, it is definitely below 0.8 Gy independently of an acute or a chronic exposure. All studies, however, include 0 Gy in the confidence interval, so that the absence of a dose threshold cannot be excluded. The German Commission on Radiological Protection (Strahlenschutzkommission, SSK) suggested therefore among others: targeted recording of the lens dose during activities which are known to be associated with possible significant lens exposure, examination of the lens should be included as appropriate in the medical monitoring of people occupationally exposed to radiation, if there is potentially high lens exposure, adoption of research strategies to develop a basic understanding of the mechanisms underlying radiation induced cataracts. The International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) actually assumes a threshold dose of 0.5 Gy and, based on this assumption, has recommended in 2011 to reduce the dose limit for the eye lens from 150 mSv in a year to 20 mSv in a year for people occupationally exposed to ionising radiation. (orig.)

  17. Cataract formation following vitreoretinal procedures

    OpenAIRE

    Feng H; Adelman RA

    2014-01-01

    Hao Feng, Ron A Adelman Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and prevalence of cataract formation, progression, and extraction in patients that underwent vitreoretinal procedures and to evaluate factors that can potentially predispose patients to postoperative cataracts.Materials and methods: The medical records of consecutive patients who underwent vitreoretinal surgery at the Yale Eye Cent...

  18. Neuroleptanalgesia and extracapsular cataract extraction.

    OpenAIRE

    Hodgkins, P R; Teye-Botchway, L; Morrell, A. J.; Fetherston, T J; Perthen, C; Brown, N E

    1992-01-01

    Peribulbar and retrobulbar anaesthesia are commonly used techniques in cataract extraction. They offer satisfactory analgesia and akinesia but serious complications although uncommon are consistently reported. Intravenous sedation combined with a facial nerve block offers an alternative method of anaesthesia. This is a retrospective study of patients who underwent extracapsular cataract extraction using this technique between 1 January 1986 and 1 September 1990. The operating conditions were ...

  19. Sequelae of neglected senile cataract

    OpenAIRE

    2013-01-01

    Cataract is the most common cause of blindness in the world. An attack of phacolytic and phacomorphic glaucoma as a result of neglected cataract constitutes a medical emergency that must be addressed immediately. Ocular emergencies such as these is challenging for the surgeon with guarded or poor prognosis. We describe the presentation, management and prognosis of three cases of phacomorphic and phacolytic glaucoma. All three patients underwent aggressive management of intraocular pressure. D...

  20. VISUAL OUTCOME AFTER CATARACT SURGERY IN COMPLICATED CATARACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available AIMS: To study various factors responsible for visual outcome after cataract surgery in complicated cataract secondary to uveitis. SETTINGS AND STUDY DESIGN: A Retrospective, Clinical study was carried out at tertiary eye care center in central Maharashtra from Jan. 2002 to Jan. 2007 which included 60 eyes of 52 patients. METHODS AND MATERIAL: It was a retrospective study of patients with uveitis undergone cataract surgery between Jan. 2002 to Jan. 2007, at Shri Ganapati Netralaya, Jalna. It included patients of all age groups, both genders, diagnosed of complicated cataract due to uveits subjected to cataract surgery with IOL implantation and detailed preoperative and postoperative -UCVA, BCVA, SLE, and Fundus evaluation with at least 3 months follow up. Follow up was on 1'st post-operative day, 1 week post-operative, 1 month post-operative and 3 months post-operative. We excluded patients with complicated cataract other than uveitic origin, post-operative follow up less than 3 months and patients with ocular diseases other than uveitis. TESTS APPLIED: Paired & Unpaired t-test. RESULTS: 1 Visual acuity: BCVA (>6/12 in 43(71.67 % eyes. 2 TYPE OF SURGERY: ECCE+IOL,(3 SICS+IOL,(5 SICS+AV(1 PE+IOL.(51 3 Type of IOL used: PMMA,(46 HSM,(2 Acrylic.(11 4 Postoperative complications:- CME-1(1.66%, Recurrence of Uveitis-9(15%, PCO:-19(31.66%, Posterior synaechie: 3 (5%, Hyphema:-2 (3.33%, Hypotony:-4 (6.66%, Secondary Glaucoma:-2 (3.33% RD:-1 (1.66%. CONCLUSIONS: 1 Visual outcome after cataract surgery in complicated cataract is statistically significant (P<0.0001 in our study. 2 The best technique of surgery remains Phacoemulsification with in-the-bag IOL implantation of PCIOL. 3 Use of pupil dilating technique's (Iris hook, Sphincterotomy is helpful in making adequate size capsulorrhexis and thereby reducing post-operative complications like anterior capsular opacification & capsular phimosis. 4 The most important predictor of successful cataract

  1. Cataract surgery in pseudoexfoliation syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sangal, Neha; Chen, Teresa C

    2014-01-01

    Pseudoexfoliation (PXF) syndrome is characterized by the deposition of distinctive fibrillar material in the anterior segment of the eye. It is an age-related process that is associated with open and narrow angle glaucomas and the formation of cataracts. Not only is PXF associated with the formation of dense nuclear cataracts, it is also well known that those presenting with PXF are at a higher risk of developing complications during, and even after, cataract surgery. Complications associated with cataract surgery in PXF can occur from poor pupillary dilation, zonular weakness leading to intraoperative or postoperative lens dislocation and vitreous loss, postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) spikes potentiating glaucomatous damage, capsular phimosis, prolonged inflammation, and postoperative corneal decompensation. The surgeon should be prepared to encounter the various potential intraoperative and postoperative complications in eyes with pseudoexfoliation syndrome during cataract surgery. In this way, the surgeon can plan his/her surgical technique to help avoid surprises during cataract surgery and be prepared to manage the potential postoperative complications that can occur in pseudoexfoliation eyes. PMID:25325866

  2. Manual small incision cataract surgery in eyes with white cataracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh Rengaraj

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To assess the safety and efficacy of Manual Small Incision Cataract Surgery (MSICS in cases of white cataract with the use of trypan blue as an adjunct for performing continuous curvilinear capsulorthexis (CCC. MATERIALS AND METHODS: Prospective observational study on 100 consecutive eyes of 100 patients with white cataract who had undergone MSICS with trypan blue assisted CCC. The nucleus was prolapsed into anterior chamber by using a sinskey hook and extracted out of the eye using irrigating vectis. Intraoperative and postoperative findings (according to OCTET classification as well as postoperative visual outcomes were used as main measures to report the safety and efficacy of the surgery. RESULTS: Of the 100 eyes, 16 had intumescent, 67 had mature and 17 had hypermature cataract. Intraoperatively CCC was incomplete in 4 eyes (4% and had to be converted to canopener capsulotomy. None of the eyes had posterior capsular rupture or zonular dialysis and no eyes were converted to conventional Extra Capsular Cataract Extraction (ECCE. Postoperatively, 6 eyes (6% developed corneal oedema with >10 Descemets folds and 7 eyes (7% had corneal oedema with < 10 Descemets folds. Mild iritis was seen in 6 eyes (6% and moderate iritis with fibrin membrane was seen in 3 eyes (3%. Iridodialysis was observed in 1 eye (1%. Of the 99 patients (99% categorised under good visual outcomes category, 94 patients (94% had a best-corrected visual acuity of 6/9 or better on the 40th post-operative day. CONCLUSION: In developing countries like India where phacoemulsification may not be affordable to a majority of those requiring cataract surgery, MSICS proves to be a safe and efficacious alternative for white cataracts especially with the adjunctive use of trypan blue dye.

  3. EARLY COMPLICATIONS OF CATARACT SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Constantin

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: There are different complications of the cataract surgery described in the literature. The impact of these complications on the visual function is in correlation with many factors, some of them being imprecise and unable to be used as prognostic factors before and after the surgery. The modern technique and the surgeon’s experience lowers the complications incidence to a minimum, but even so, some problems cannot be avoided. AIM: The aim of this study is to analyse the early cataract surgery complications for patients operated in 2012 at the Ophthalmology Unit, Railway Hospital, Iaşi. MATERIAL AND METHOD: We conducted a retrospective analysis of the medical records of the patients who underwent cataract surgery in 2012. There were a total of 480 cataract surgeries, the majority of them (92,7% being age related cataracts in different stages of evolution, of which 31.45% being mature cataracts. In 476 eyes, artificial lens was inserted per-primam (474 eyes with posterior chamber intraocular lens and 2 eyes with anterior chamber intraocular lens, in one case the posterior chamber intraocular lens was sutured to the sclera, in 3 cases the eyes remained without lens. RESULTS: The incidence of severe complications or with potential of severe development was: severe corneal oedema 0.83% (4 cases, remaining lens fragments in the vitreous cavity 0.62% (3 cases, toxic anterior segment syndrome (TASS 0.41% (2 cases. There were no endophthalmitis, expulsive haemorhage or retinal detachment after cataract surgery. CONCLUSIONS: The number of early complications of our patients is the same with numbers shown in other studies. With a better surgical technique, a good examination of the patient, a thorough explanation of the procedure to the patient, the use of high quality substances during surgery and proper technology we can lower even more the incidence of the complications.

  4. Cost effectiveness of second eye cataract surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Frampton, Geoff; Harris, Petra; Cooper, Keith; Lotery, Andrew J; Shepherd, Jonathan

    2014-01-01

    Background Elective cataract surgery is the most commonly performed surgical procedure in the NHS. In bilateral cataracts, the eye with greatest vision impairment from cataract is operated on first. First-eye surgery can improve vision and quality of life. However, it is unclear whether or not cataract surgery on the second eye provides enough incremental benefit to be considered clinically effective and cost-effective. Objective To conduct a systematic review of clinical effectiv...

  5. Simultaneous Penetrating Keratoplasty and Cataract Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Mohammad-Ali Javadi; Sepehr Feizi; Hamid-Reza Moein

    2013-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the clinical outcomes of simultaneous penetrating keratoplasty (PK), cataract removal and intraocular lens implantation (triple procedure), and to compare the safety and efficacy of two different cataract extraction techniques during the course of PK. Methods: This retrospective comparative study was conducted on patients who had undergone a triple procedure. The technique of cataract extraction was either opensky extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) or phacoemul...

  6. Are cataracts associated with osteoporosis?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemet AY

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Arie Y Nemet,1 Joel Hanhart,2 Igor Kaiserman,3,4 Shlomo Vinker5,6 1Department of Ophthalmology, Meir Medical Center, Kfar Saba, 2Department of Ophthalmology, Shaare Zedek Medical Center, Jerusalem, 3Department of Ophthalmology, Barzilai Medical Center, Ashkelon, 4Faculty of Health Sciences, Ben Gurion University, Be'er Sheba, 5Department of Family Medicine, Clalit Health Services, Rehovot, 6Department of Family Medicine, Tel Aviv University, Tel Aviv, Israel Background: Calcium is considered an important factor in the development of both osteoporosis and cataract. This study evaluated the association between osteoporosis and cataracts. Objective: To evaluate the prevalence of osteoporosis among patients undergoing cataract surgery, and the association between the two. Patients and methods: This was a retrospective observational case-control study, conducted in the Central District of Clalit Health Services (a district of the largest health maintenance organization in Israel. All Clalit members in the district older than 50 years who underwent cataract surgery from 2000 to 2007 (n=12,984 and 25,968 age- and sex-matched controls comprised the sample. Electronic medical records of all patients in the study were reviewed. The main outcome measure was the prevalence of osteoporosis and the odds ratio of having osteoporosis among cataract patients compared with controls. Results: Demographically, 41.8% were men with a mean age of 68.7 ± 8.2 years. A logistic regression model for osteoporosis showed that age, female sex, higher socioeconomic class, smoking, chronic renal failure, hyperthyroidism, rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel diseases, and cataract are all associated with increased prevalence of osteoporosis. Obesity is a protective factor for osteoporosis. In all age-groups, osteoporosis was more prevalent in cataract patients than in the control group. Conclusion: Among other well-known risk factors, osteoporosis is associated with the

  7. [Keratoplasty combined with cataract surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraine, M; Gueudry, J; Retout, A; Genevois, O

    2012-09-01

    Corneal pathologies leading to keratoplasty are often associated with cataract and combined surgery is therefore mandatory. Triple procedure with penetrating keratoplasty and concurrent cataract extraction followed by intra ocular lens (IOL) implantation is usually the preferential choice because visual rehabilitation is theoretically more rapid. Surgeons have to be aware of surgical conditions during open-sky surgery because vitreous pressure is not counterbalanced by anterior chamber pressure. Today, many surgeons prefer non-simultaneous procedures with cataract surgery performed months after grafting because of the improvement in spherical refractive error. More recently, new triple procedures, Descemet's stripping automated keratoplasty and concurrent cataract surgery have gained popularity, especially in patients with Fuchs dystrophy associated with cataract. Surgery starts with phacoemulsification, followed by endothelium exchange through a 3 to 5 mm incision. Advantages against classic triple procedure are quick visual rehabilitation, fewer induced refractive errors, minimal postoperative discomfort and corneal integrity. Surgeons have to consider an eventual postoperative hyperopic shift secondary to corneal lenticule shape when choosing adequate intraocular lens. PMID:22921023

  8. Paediatric cataract implant surgery outcome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Istiantoro Istiantoro

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available This study evaluated the surgical outcome of various surgical technique in paediatric cataract implant surgery, at Jakarta Eye Center, Jakarta, Indonesia. This was a retrospective study of 57 eyes in 44 children who had primary cataract implants surgery. Three surgical techniques used were : 1. Extracapsular cataract extraction with intraocular lens implantation with intact posterior capsule which was performed on 21 eyes (group 1. 2. Extracapsular cataract extraction with intraocular lens implantation and posterior capsulorhexis (PCCC and optic capture which was performed on 24 eyes (group 2. 3. Extracapsular cataract extraction with intra­ocular lens implantation, posterior capsulorhexis and anterior vitrectomy which was performed on 24 eyes (group 3. All patients were followed up more than one year. Our results showed that posterior capsule opacity (PCO was developed in 20 eyes with intact capsules in group 1. All eyes had a clear visual axis in group 2. PCO developed only in one eye in group 3. In conclusion,  PCCC and optic capture with or without anterior vitrectomy are effective methods in preventing PCO in infant and children. (Med J Indones 2003; 12: 21-6Keywords: posterior capsule opacification, posterior capsulorhexis, optic capture, anterior vitrectomy

  9. Cataract surgery and intraocular pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Melancia, Diana; Abegão Pinto, Luis; Marques-Neves, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Cataract surgery is one of the most performed surgeries in the developed world. In addition to its significant impact on visual acuity, phacoemulsification has been hailed as a potential intraocular pressure (IOP)-lowering procedure. While current evidence suggests an overall significant and sustained decrease in IOP to exist after cataract surgery, the specific ocular characteristics that could help predict which patients are likely to benefit from this IOP-lowering effect remain unclear. This definition is important in glaucoma patients if this surgery is to be used in the treatment for this disease. Our review aims to summarize the literature on the subject, depicting possible mechanisms behind this IOP decrease, which type of patients are more likely to benefit from this surgery for IOP-lowering purposes and ultimately help optimizing disease management for the increasing number of patients with concomitant glaucoma and cataract. PMID:25765255

  10. Cataract formation following vitreoretinal procedures

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng H

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Hao Feng, Ron A Adelman Department of Ophthalmology and Visual Science, Yale University School of Medicine, New Haven, CT, USA Purpose: To evaluate the incidence and prevalence of cataract formation, progression, and extraction in patients that underwent vitreoretinal procedures and to evaluate factors that can potentially predispose patients to postoperative cataracts.Materials and methods: The medical records of consecutive patients who underwent vitreoretinal surgery at the Yale Eye Center with at least 6 months of follow-up and no prior intraocular surgery were obtained. Preoperative, intraoperative, and postoperative data were recorded and analyzed in this retrospective observational study. The main outcome measures were defined as cataract extraction, formation, and progression after vitreoretinal procedures. The lens status of the surgical eye was recorded preoperatively and at 1 month, 3 months, 6 months, 12 months, 24 months, and 36 months postoperatively.Results: A total of 193 eyes of 180 patients fulfilled the inclusion criteria. The percentages of eyes with mild lens change were 96% after 20-gauge pars plana vitrectomy (PPV, 72% after small gauge (23- and 25-gauge PPV, 38% after scleral buckle (SB, 38% after pneumatic retinopexy (PR, and 91% after PPV plus SB (PPV+SB. Posterior subcapsular and nuclear sclerotic cataracts were the most common with almost all developing within 24 months. There was no statistically significant difference (P=1.00 between the rate of cataract extraction after 20-gauge (41% and small gauge PPV (42%, but there was a statistically significant difference between PPV and non-PPV (SB, 6%; PR, 7%; P<0.001 and PPV and PPV+SB groups (69%; P=0.0063.Conclusion: Cataracts were common following PPV regardless of the gauge. SB and PR led to the lowest while PPV+SB led to the highest risk of postoperative cataracts. Keywords: cataracts, vitreoretinal surgery, vitrectomy, scleral buckle, pneumatic retinopexy

  11. Perceptions of patients about cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliveira Regina de Souza Carvalho de Salles

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: To identify in adult patients suffering from cataract the perceptions regarding the disease and its surgical treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS: An exploratory survey was conducted among adult patients suffering from cataract and participating in a large-scale cataract management program at the University of São Paulo General Hospital in 2004. The interviews were conducted by research assistants previously trained to pose questions and record answers. RESULTS: The sample consisted of 170 men and women (43.5% and 56.5%, respectively, aged between 40 and 88 years. Of the 170 participants, 43.5% were from the State of São Paulo, 14.7% from the State of Bahia, 12.4% from the State of Minas Gerais, 5.9% from the State of Pernambuco, 1.8% from other countries, and the remaining 21.7% were from other Brazilian states. Of those who were actively working (n = 87, 43.7% had an occupational level corresponding to nonspecialized manual labor, 27.6% were in specialized manual labor jobs, 25.3% had routine nonmanual occupations, 1.1% supervised manual labor, and 2.3% had low-ranking supervision or inspection jobs over nonmanual occupations. Of those who were not actively working (n = 82, 53.6% were retired, 45.2% were housewives, and 1.2% were unemployed. Concerning conceptions about cataract, 79.0% referred to it as "a small skin fold that gradually covers the eye" and 32.4% mentioned, in addition, other conceptions. Concerning the cause, of the alternatives presented to them, 80% reported aging, 47.1% blamed "overusing the eyes in the workplace or at home", 7.1% believed they had cataract due to some kind of "spell." Of the associated answers, 94.1% referred to "blurred vision" in people suffering from cataract, 72.4% thought the person may become blind, and 66.5% believed that the patients suffering from cataract are depressed because they cannot see. Regarding surgery, 28.8% were afraid of undergoing surgery; of those, 16.3% cited with the fear

  12. Immediate Sequential Bilateral Cataract Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Andresen, Jens; Erngaard, Ditte; Flesner, Per; Tendal, Britta; Hjortdal, Jesper

    2015-01-01

    performed using the Cochrane Review Manager software. The quality of the evidence was assessed using the GRADE method (Grading of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation). We did not find any difference in the risk of complications or visual outcome in patients randomized to ISBCS or surgery......-based national Danish guidelines for cataract surgery. A systematic literature review in PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane central databases identified three randomized controlled trials that compared outcome in patients randomized to ISBCS or bilateral cataract surgery on two different dates. Meta-analyses were...

  13. CATARACT SURGERY IN PSEUDOEXFOLIATION SYNDROME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Abbin George

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Pseudoexfoliation (PEX syndrome is an age-related systemic disorder with major ocular manifestations. It is characterized by the production and deposition of fibrillogranular amyloid-like extracellular material within many ocular tissues. Pseudoexfoliation is also a risk factor for glaucoma and also correlated to an increased incidence of cataract formation. Cataract surgery in eyes with pseudoexfoliation is connected with many complications and presents challenges that require careful preoperative planning and intraoperative care to ensure safe surgery and successful postoperative outcome. Zonular weakness and poor pupillary dilation are the two major risk factors for surgical complications and poor visual acuity after surgery. With proper preparation and the use of specialized adjunctive devices, phacoemulsification is the preferred procedure of cataract extraction in this group of patients. Postoperatively, patients require frequent and detailed follow-up to monitor for complications such as intraocular pressure rise, inflammation and intraocular lens dislocation. In conclusion, with appropriate preoperative, intraoperative and postoperative care, the risk of complications can be minimized and favorable outcomes may be achieved in cataract surgery in eyes with pseudoexfoliation syndrome.

  14. Driving When You Have Cataracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... when they want. I Driving is a complex skill. Our ability to drive safely can be challenged by changes in our ... drive with you to see how well you drive with your cataract. I The ... to improve your driving skills. Improving your skills could help keep you and ...

  15. Visual acuity testing in cataract-An insight (cataract classification density based.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angra S

    1990-01-01

    Full Text Available The senile cataracts have been graded on the basis of density objectively. The letter visual acuity, laser interferometric visual acuity and pin hole visual acuity were compared in various grades of cataracts and controls (phakic and aphakic in 140 eyes. It was found that good correlation exists in all eyes except when cataract density is grade III or IV. The laser interferometry has good prognostic value when the predictability is assessed in early stages of cataract (Grade I & II.

  16. Cost-effectiveness analysis of cataract surgery with intraocular lens implantation: extracapsular cataract extraction versus phacoemulsification

    OpenAIRE

    Mohd R.A. Manaf; Aljunid, Syed M; Faridah H. Annuar; Chuah K. Leong; Normalina Mansor

    2007-01-01

    A randomized single blinded clinical trial to compare the cost-effectiveness of cataract surgery between extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) and phacoemulsification (PEA) was conducted at Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (HUKM) from March 2000 until August 2001. The cost of a cataract surgery incurred by hospital, patients and households were calculated preoperatively, one week, two months (for both techniques) and six months (for ECCE only). Effectiveness of cataract surgery was ...

  17. Long-Term Results of Cataract Surgery in Patients with Unilateral Childhood Cataract

    OpenAIRE

    Suzan Güven Yılmaz; Duygu İnci Bozbıyık; Süheyla Köse; Önder Üretmen

    2012-01-01

    Pur po se: To evaluate the long-term visual outcome and to determine the surgical complications after cataract surgery in patients with unilateral childhood cataract. Ma te ri al and Met hod: We retrospectively reviewed the records of 18 cases with unilateral childhood cataract who had undergone cataract surgery before the age of seven. Primary intraocular lens (IOL) implantation was made in children who were older than 1 year of age. Secondary IOL implantation was made after 18 m...

  18. Quality of care from the perspective of the cataract patient: QUOTE Cataract Questionnaire.

    OpenAIRE

    Nijkamp, M D; Sixma, H.J.; Afman, H.; Hiddema, F; Koopmans, S.A.; Borne, B. van den; Hendrikse, F.; Nuijts, R M M A

    2002-01-01

    PURPOSE: To examine the potential of a questionnaire (QUOTE Cataract) to measure quality of care from the perspective of cataract patients in quality-assurance or improvement programs. SETTING: Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital Maastricht, Maastricht, University Hospital Groningen, Groningen, and Rotterdam Eye Hospital, Rotterdam, The Netherlands. METHODS: Cataract patients (N = 540) who had cataract surgery 2 to 8 months previously rated 31 quality-of-care aspects in terms of ...

  19. Cataract and ionizing radiation; Cataracte et rayonnements ionisants

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wassilieff, S. [Ecole des Applications Militaires de l' Energie Atomique, 50 - Cherbourg Octeville (France)

    2009-10-15

    The radiation-induced cataract has been up to now considered as a quite rare pathology, needing high-dose radiations (beyond a dose threshold roughly estimated at 2 Grays to the lens) consisting mainly in head tumour radiotherapy complications. Several new studies on different exposed populations such as astronauts, japanese atomic bomb survivors, people undergoing X-ray examinations, Chernobyl accident 'liquidators' as well as data from animal experiments, suggest that dose threshold for detectable opacities as well as for clinical posterior sub-capsular cataract occurring, might be far lower than those previously assumed. Even the existence of a dose threshold is no longer an absolute certitude insofar as radiation-induced cataract pathogenesis might consist not really in a deterministic effect (direct tissue harmful effect, killing or seriously injuring a critical population of cells) as believed until now, but rather in a stochastic effect (genomic damage in target-cells, altered cell division, abnormal lens fiber cell differentiation). More practically, these new data may lead us to reconsider radioprotection of specifically exposed populations: mainly patients and workers. Regarding workers, labour legislation (lens equivalent dose limit of 150 mSv during 12 consecutive months) might be, in the medium term, reassessed downwards. (author)

  20. Cataracts in patients injected with 224Ra

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cataracts were reported as of June 1984, by 6% (12/218) of patients injected with 224Ra as juveniles and by 5% (32/681) injected as adults. The high incidence among those injected as juveniles is unusual and their subsequent ages, when reporting the cataracts, averaged only 34 years (range 14-46 years). In the juveniles of known dosage receiving more than 28 μCi 224Ra/kg, the cataract incidence was 14% (11/80) compared to only 0.8% (1/131) below 28 μ Ci 224Ra/kg. The cataract incidence increased significantly with dosage in the juveniles and in the adults. The appearance of these cataracts, as viewed by slitlamp biomicroscopy or in histological sections, is described. The appearance did not differ from classical radiation cataract in principle. (orig.)

  1. The cataract response in radium 224 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A group of 831 patients were studied, after injection with known dosages of radium 224 in Germany shortly after the Second World War. From a total of 58 cataract diagnoses, 25 occurred before the age of 54. Data consist of ophthalmological reports from examinations after vision impairment. Mathematical analysis suggests that almost all of the 25 early cataracts and a substantial part of the later cataracts are treatment-related. The probability of induction of severe cataracts is roughly proportional to the square of the dosage, that is, the radium 224 activity per unit body weight, and also to the square of the time after treatment. An extended analysis also accounts for spontaneous cataracts; this shows for the spontaneous cataracts a probability that increases with roughly the eighth power of the age. (author)

  2. Simulation-based certification for cataract surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Kjaerbo, Hadi; la Cour, Morten; Konge, Lars

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the EyeSi(™) simulator in regard to assessing competence in cataract surgery. The primary objective was to explore all simulator metrics to establish a proficiency-based test with solid evidence. The secondary objective was to evaluate whether the skill assessment was specific...... to cataract surgery. METHODS: We included 26 ophthalmic trainees (no cataract surgery experience), 11 experienced cataract surgeons (>4000 cataract procedures) and five vitreoretinal surgeons. All subjects completed 13 different modules twice. Simulator metrics were used for the assessments. RESULTS......: Total module score on seven of 13 modules showed significant discriminative ability between the novices and experienced cataract surgeons. The intermodule reliability coefficient was 0.76 (p < 0.001). A pass/fail level was defined from the total score on these seven modules using the contrasting...

  3. Pseudoexfoliation - A Dreaded Nightmare in Cataract Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kar, Sushil Kumar; Bhuyan, Lopamudra; Nanda, Ashok Kumar

    2015-01-01

    Aim: Pseudoexfoliation (PXE) is a common and clinically important systemic condition in elderly people that affects the outcome of cataract surgery. It can cause various complications during cataract surgery due to pupillary rigidity and zonular weakness and instability. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the frequency and types of complications of Phacoemulsification in patients with cataract and PXE.Materials and Methods: This cross sectional, prospective study was carried out on 60 ...

  4. Evaluation of Cataract Preventive Action of Phycocyanin

    OpenAIRE

    Kothadia AD; AM Shenoy; Shabaraya AR; Rajan MS; UM Viradia; Patel NH

    2011-01-01

    Phycocyanin is a biliprotein pigment found in blue-green algae Spirulina platensis, which have attracted attention because of their nutritional value and medicinal properties. This pigment has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective activity in different experimental models. This data supports the view that phycocyanin may prevent cataract progression. Cataract preventive action of phycocyanin was evaluated against naphthalene and galactose induced cataract experimental models in ...

  5. Medico-legal implications of traumatic cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moreschi, Carlo; Da Broi, Ugo; Lanzetta, Paolo

    2013-02-01

    Traumatic cataract is due to lens damage when mechanical, irradiative, electrical or chemical agents injury the globe. The appearance of a traumatic cataract is typically short and unilateral with rare spontaneous resolution and often involves other ocular anatomical areas. Medico-legal evaluation of the appearance and the consequences of a traumatic cataract requires a correct methodological approach with the support of qualified ophthalmological competences. PMID:23357390

  6. Regression of Labrador keratopathy following cataract extraction.

    OpenAIRE

    Dahan, E; Judelson, J; Welsh, N H

    1986-01-01

    Labrador keratopathy (LK) is an acquired corneal degeneration thought to be caused by chronic exposure to solar irradiation. Reports so far suggest that it is a progressive or at least a stationary condition. There are no detailed reports on recommended therapy. A prospective clinical study was conducted to show regression of LK following extracapsular cataract extraction. Seventeen black patients (26 eyes) with LK and mature cataracts underwent extracapsular cataract extraction. The severity...

  7. Ultraviolet radiation cataract development and ascorbate supplementation

    OpenAIRE

    Mody, Vino C Jr

    2008-01-01

    Background: Cataract is the major cause of blindness in the world, and long-term solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is a major risk factor. The pathogenesis of UVRinduced cataract is studied in various animal models and cell systems. The significance of oxidation processes in cataract and other eye diseases has made the study of protective antioxidants increasingly important. Ascorbate, or vitamin C, is an important dietary antioxidant and essential nutrient in the human and ...

  8. Oxidative stress and age-related cataract

    OpenAIRE

    Zheng Selin, Jinjin

    2015-01-01

    Age-related cataract is a clouding of the lens that leads to decreased vision. It increases with age and is one of the leading causes of blindness worldwide. The only treatment currently available is surgery. Therefore, it is important to identify modifiable risk factors for cataract prevention. The cause of cataract is not fully understood and may be multifactorial, involving oxidative stress, a condition of disrupted balance between oxidants and antioxidants. Oxidative damage to lens protei...

  9. Sutureless Cataract Surgery: Principles and Steps

    OpenAIRE

    John Sandford-Smith

    2003-01-01

    Introduction. Cataracts cause about 50% of world blindness. There is little likelihood of effective prevention becoming available in the next few years and so the only treatment will remain surgical. For many of the other major causes of world blindness, like trachoma, xerophthalmia and onchocerciasis, the remedy is community-based, not hospital-based, and requires prevention rather than treatment. The prevalence of blinding cataract will only increase as people live longer, so cataract will ...

  10. The cataract response in radium 224 patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Enhanced incidence of severe cataracts has been observed in a group of 831 patients injected with Ra224 in Germany shortly after the 1939-45 war. From 58 diagnoses 25 occurred before the age of 54. There was a strong correlation between observed incidence and injected activity. Almost all the 25 early cataracts, and a substantial number of the later could be treatment-related. The probability of induction of severe cataracts is roughly proportional to the square of the time after treatment. Extended analysis also accounts for spontaneous cataracts, a probability increasing with roughly the eighth power of the age. (UK)

  11. [History of cataract operations in Hungary].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marsovszky, László

    2013-11-10

    The history of the cataract operations dates back to thousands of years ago. Initially, surgery was carried out using rudimentary operating techniques resulting in the loss of many eyes. Cataract surgery has evolved immersely and now it is a highly refined surgical practice. Evolution of the cataract surgery was closely linked to broadening of anatomical-pathological knowledge and to the development of the instruments applied. Although Daviel performed the first intentional cataract removal in 1747, almost one hundred years passed before the extracapsular cataract extraction method finally replaced the old couching technique. By the middle of the 20th century, with the progression of the operation techniques and instruments, different forms of intracapsular cataract extraction methods became prevalent. Introduction and widespread use of the artificial intraocular lenses from the second half of the 20th century led to the rediscovery and further perfection of the extracapsular cataract extraction technique. Today, phacoemulsification through small incision, along with the foldable intraocular lenses is the gold standard of cataract surgery. The aim of this study is to present the different cataract surgery methods applied throughout the centuries, as well as the difficulties encountered. It discusses pioneering steps of each era, in order to give a closer look at the most frequently performed surgical intervention in ophthalmology. PMID:24184933

  12. Lanosterol reverses protein aggregation in cataracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ling; Chen, Xiang-Jun; Zhu, Jie; Xi, Yi-Bo; Yang, Xu; Hu, Li-Dan; Ouyang, Hong; Patel, Sherrina H; Jin, Xin; Lin, Danni; Wu, Frances; Flagg, Ken; Cai, Huimin; Li, Gen; Cao, Guiqun; Lin, Ying; Chen, Daniel; Wen, Cindy; Chung, Christopher; Wang, Yandong; Qiu, Austin; Yeh, Emily; Wang, Wenqiu; Hu, Xun; Grob, Seanna; Abagyan, Ruben; Su, Zhiguang; Tjondro, Harry Christianto; Zhao, Xi-Juan; Luo, Hongrong; Hou, Rui; Perry, J Jefferson P; Gao, Weiwei; Kozak, Igor; Granet, David; Li, Yingrui; Sun, Xiaodong; Wang, Jun; Zhang, Liangfang; Liu, Yizhi; Yan, Yong-Bin; Zhang, Kang

    2015-07-30

    The human lens is comprised largely of crystallin proteins assembled into a highly ordered, interactive macro-structure essential for lens transparency and refractive index. Any disruption of intra- or inter-protein interactions will alter this delicate structure, exposing hydrophobic surfaces, with consequent protein aggregation and cataract formation. Cataracts are the most common cause of blindness worldwide, affecting tens of millions of people, and currently the only treatment is surgical removal of cataractous lenses. The precise mechanisms by which lens proteins both prevent aggregation and maintain lens transparency are largely unknown. Lanosterol is an amphipathic molecule enriched in the lens. It is synthesized by lanosterol synthase (LSS) in a key cyclization reaction of a cholesterol synthesis pathway. Here we identify two distinct homozygous LSS missense mutations (W581R and G588S) in two families with extensive congenital cataracts. Both of these mutations affect highly conserved amino acid residues and impair key catalytic functions of LSS. Engineered expression of wild-type, but not mutant, LSS prevents intracellular protein aggregation of various cataract-causing mutant crystallins. Treatment by lanosterol, but not cholesterol, significantly decreased preformed protein aggregates both in vitro and in cell-transfection experiments. We further show that lanosterol treatment could reduce cataract severity and increase transparency in dissected rabbit cataractous lenses in vitro and cataract severity in vivo in dogs. Our study identifies lanosterol as a key molecule in the prevention of lens protein aggregation and points to a novel strategy for cataract prevention and treatment. PMID:26200341

  13. Lens transglutaminase and cataract formation.

    OpenAIRE

    Lorand, L.; Hsu, L K; Siefring, G E; Rafferty, N S

    1981-01-01

    A protein polymer characteristically present in human cataract was shown to contain significant amounts of gamma-glutamyl-epsilon-lysine isopeptides. It is proposed that these crosslinks are produced by the action of transglutaminase (R-glutaminyl-peptide:amine-gamma-glutamyl-yltransferase, EC 2.3.2.13), which is all the more plausible because lens contains the enzyme and endogenous protein substrates for it. The enzyme is similar to that obtained from liver and is Ca2+ dependent. Highest app...

  14. Adrenomyeloneuropathy associated with congenital cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two cases of adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) in a family and the results of their MRI study are reported. Case 1, a 24-year-old male proband, was admitted to our hospital because of gait disturbance for three years. Bilateral cataracts were pointed out at birth, which required left side lenticotomy at age four. Neurological examinations on admission revealed a marked spastic paraparesis with pathological reflexes and a mild hypesthesia in the distal part of the left leg. No abnormal findings were detected in X-ray studies on the spine and spinal cord, electromyography and nerve conduction test. Serum very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) levels were apparently elevated, and the serum cortisol response to ACTH was low. Case 2, a 53-year-old woman, is the mother of Case 1 having a complaint of gait disturbance since age 51. She presented a mild spastic paraparesis with localized hypesthesia in the distal part of the both legs. She also had bilateral congenital cataracts. Her serum VLCFAs analysis indicated the intermediate levels between that of AMN and the normal control. Adrenal functions were normal. Cranial MRI (TR 2,000 msec/TE 80 msec) study disclosed high signal intensity areas in bilateral internal capsules in Case 1. These findings, suggesting the pathological change of dysmyelination, seemed to be well compatible with the clinical pictures. With these clinical findings and the laboratory data, these two cases were diagnosed as AMN. In addition, association of congenital cataract with AMN in both cases was characteristic in this family, which hasn't been reported in the literature. On regarding the genetic background of these two disorders, AMN and congenital cataract, it was speculated that each gene could be closely located on the same or very adjacent locus, possibly on Xq. (author)

  15. Visual acuity in unilateral cataract.

    OpenAIRE

    Thompson, D. A.; Møller, H; Russell-Eggitt, I.; Kriss, A

    1996-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patching the fellow eye in infancy is a well recognised therapy to encourage visual development in the lensectomised eye in cases of unilateral congenital cataract. The possibility of iatrogenic deficits of the fellow eye was investigated by comparing the vision of these patients with untreated unilateral patients and binocularly normal controls. METHODS: Sweep visual evoked potentials (VEPs) offer a rapid and objective method for estimating grating acuity. Sweep VEPs were used to...

  16. Vitreous haemorrhage after cataract extraction.

    OpenAIRE

    Littlewood, K R; Constable, I J

    1985-01-01

    One hundred eyes undergoing intracapsular cataract extraction and 100 undergoing extracapsular extraction were examined prospectively within one week postoperatively and again at 6-10 weeks postoperatively. Indirect ophthalmoscopy showed vitreous haemorrhage in 36% of the intracapsular group and 13% of the extracapsular group. Vitreous haemorrhage was significantly related to the occurrence of operative hyphaema (p less than 0.01) but not to iridectomy (p greater than 0.05). In the intracapsu...

  17. Extracapsular cataract extraction - some problems.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, R. J.; Doran, R.; Caswell, A

    1982-01-01

    Comments are made on the method of removing the anterior capsule during the performance of extracapsular cataract operations. The difficulty of performing this manoeuvre adequately is emphasised. Observations carried out during the postoperative period by means of the slit-lamp revealed some hitherto undescribed changes in the capsule. The edge of the anterior capsule can be clearly seen and looks like broken glass. Fine fibrils have been observed attached to the fractured capsular edge. In t...

  18. Persistent strabismus after cataract extraction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dujić Mirjana P.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Transient ocular misalignment as a complication of parabulbar and peribulbar anesthesia has already been reported in the literature. The aim of our study was to present a case of irreversible iatrogenic vertical strabismus after cataract surgery, which had to be operated on. Methods. Clinical and orthoptic evaluation of a female patient with vertical diplopia after phacoemulsification cataract surgery. Results. One week after the uneventful surgery, a 68-year-old patient complained of a sudden vertical deviation in the operated eye. The patient had not had a history of previous motility disorders. On examination, the patient showed hypertropia in the left eye of 15−20 degrees in primary position. Three and 6 months postoperatively, there was no a spontaneous improvement, while the persistent vertical deviation was 40 prism dioptres. Strabismus surgery was required 1 year after the cataract surgery. Conclusion. Diplopia is a complication of peribulbar anesthesia which could be persistent. The superior and inferior rectus muscle are especially vulnerable. Its occurrence may be technique - related and the incidence increases when hyaluronidase is not available.

  19. Association between metabolic syndrome and agerelated cataract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sangshin; Park; Eun-Hee; Lee

    2015-01-01

    ·AIM: To determine the effect of metabolic syndrome on age-related cataract formation.·METHODS: We analyzed data for 2852 subjects [41.8%men and 58.2% women; mean(±SD) age, 52.9 ±13.9y],taken from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey 2008. Metabolic syndrome was diagnosed by criteria proposed by the Joint Interim Societies. Cataract was diagnosed by using the Lens Opacities Classification System III. The association between metabolic syndrome and cataract was determined using age-adjusted and multivariable logistic regression analyses.· RESULTS: In multivariable analyses, men with metabolic syndrome had a 64% increased risk of nuclear cataract [odds ratio(OR), 1.64; 95% confidence interval(CI), 1.12-2.39]. Women with metabolic syndrome had a56% increased risk of cortical cataract(OR, 1.56; 95% CI,1.06-2.30). Men and women with metabolic syndrome had a 46%(OR, 1.46; 95% CI, 1.01-2.12) and 49%(OR,1.49; 95% CI, 1.07-2.08) increased risk of any cataract,respectively. The prevalence of nuclear and any cataract significantly increased with an increasing number of disturbed metabolic components in men, and prevalence of all types of cataracts increased in women. Men using hypoglycemic medication had an increased risk of nuclear(OR, 2.62; 95% CI, 1.41-4.86) and any(OR, 2.27;95% CI, 1.14-4.51) cataract, and women using antidyslipidemia medication had an increased risk of cortical(OR, 2.18; 95% CI, 1.12-4.24) and any(OR, 2.21;95% CI, 1.14-4.26) cataract.·CONCLUSION: Metabolic syndrome and its components,such as abdominal obesity, high blood pressure, andimpaired fasting glucose, are associated with age-related cataract formation in the Korean population.

  20. Pediatric cataract: challenges and future directions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Medsinge, Anagha; Nischal, Ken K

    2015-01-01

    Cataract is a significant cause of visual disability in the pediatric population worldwide and can significantly impact the neurobiological development of a child. Early diagnosis and prompt surgical intervention is critical to prevent irreversible amblyopia. Thorough ocular evaluation, including the onset, duration, and morphology of a cataract, is essential to determine the timing for surgical intervention. Detailed assessment of the general health of the child, preferably in conjunction with a pediatrician, is helpful to rule out any associated systemic condition. Although pediatric cataracts have a diverse etiology, with the majority being idiopathic, genetic counseling and molecular testing should be undertaken with the help of a genetic counselor and/or geneticist in cases of hereditary cataracts. Advancement in surgical techniques and methods of optical rehabilitation has substantially improved the functional and anatomic outcomes of pediatric cataract surgeries in recent years. However, the phenomenon of refractive growth and the process of emmetropization have continued to puzzle pediatric ophthalmologists and highlight the need for future prospective studies. Posterior capsule opacification and secondary glaucoma are still the major postoperative complications necessitating long-term surveillance in children undergoing cataract surgery early in life. Successful management of pediatric cataracts depends on individualized care and experienced teamwork. We reviewed the etiology, preoperative evaluation including biometry, choice of intraocular lens, surgical techniques, and recent developments in the field of childhood cataract. PMID:25609909

  1. Lutein and cataract: from bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manayi, Azadeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Raman, Thiagarajan; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Habtemariam, Solomon; Daglia, Maria; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    Cataract is one of the most important leading causes of blindness in the world. Extensive research showed that oxidative stress may play an important role in the initiation and progression of a cataract and other age-related eye diseases. Extra-generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the eye tissue has been shown as one of the most important risk factors for cataracts and other age-related eye diseases. With respect to this, it can be hypothesized that dietary antioxidants may be useful in the prevention and/or mitigation of cataract. Lutein is an important xanthophyll which is widely found in different vegetables such as spinach, kale and carrots as well as some other foods such as eggs. Lutein is concentrated in the macula and suppresses the oxidative stress in the eye tissues. A plethora of literature has shown that increased lutein consumption has a close correlation with reduction in the incidence of cataract. Despite this general information, there is a negligible number of review articles considering the beneficial effects of lutein on cataracts and age-related eye diseases. The present review is aimed at discussing the role of oxidative stress in the initiation and progression of a cataract and the possible beneficial effects of lutein in maintaining retinal health and fighting cataract. We also provide a perspective on the chemistry, sources, bioavailability and safety of lutein. PMID:26042352

  2. Cataract surgery after Descemet stripping endothelial keratoplasty

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunita Chaurasia

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Management of endothelial dysfunction in phakic patients is sometimes a dilemma for corneal surgeons. Phakic patients with visually significant cataract and endothelial dysfunction are preferably managed by performing combined cataract surgery with endothelial keratoplasty. However, combined surgery may be deferred in eyes with early incipient cataract, younger age and where anterior chamber is poorly visualized. As cataract formation may be accelerated after endothelial keratoplasty, these eyes may need cataract surgery subsequently. Surgical intervention in eyes with endothelial keratoplasty is of concern as this may affect the graft adversely and threaten graft survival. In this report, we describe the intraoperative surgical details and postoperative clinical course of a patient who underwent phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation after Descemet stripping automated endothelial keratoplasty (DSAEK.

  3. Surgical consequences in coexisting cataract and glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, M; Glovinsky, Y

    1995-04-01

    Of the three classical approaches to surgery for coexisting cataract and glaucoma, last year's publications dealt with the surgical consequences of combined cataract and glaucoma operations only. When used in combined cataract and glaucoma surgery, a small-incision extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) with phacoemulsification (PHACO) was found to be only slightly superior to the standard manual ECCE in terms of postoperative intraocular pressure (IOP) control. Injections of 5-fluorouracil postoperatively did not improve IOP control in PHACO-ECCE-trabeculectomy or manual ECCE-trabeculectomy. A preliminary uncontrolled report suggests, however, that intraoperative mitomycin C application in PHACO-ECCE-trabeculectomy may result in excellent postoperative IOP control without antiglaucomatous medications, and with no significant mitomycin C-related complications. Controlled studies on mitomycin C application in small-incision cataract and glaucoma surgery are needed to assess its long-term effect on IOP and astigmatism. PMID:10150852

  4. Pediatric cataract: challenges and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medsinge A

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anagha Medsinge,1,2 Ken K Nischal1,2 1Pediatric Ophthalmology, Strabismus, and Adult Motility, Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, (UPMC 2University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Abstract: Cataract is a significant cause of visual disability in the pediatric population worldwide and can significantly impact the neurobiological development of a child. Early diagnosis and prompt surgical intervention is critical to prevent irreversible amblyopia. Thorough ocular evaluation, including the onset, duration, and morphology of a cataract, is essential to determine the timing for surgical intervention. Detailed assessment of the general health of the child, preferably in conjunction with a pediatrician, is helpful to rule out any associated systemic condition. Although pediatric cataracts have a diverse etiology, with the majority being idiopathic, genetic counseling and molecular testing should be undertaken with the help of a genetic counselor and/or geneticist in cases of hereditary cataracts. Advancement in surgical techniques and methods of optical rehabilitation has substantially improved the functional and anatomic outcomes of pediatric cataract surgeries in recent years. However, the phenomenon of refractive growth and the process of emmetropization have continued to puzzle pediatric ophthalmologists and highlight the need for future prospective studies. Posterior capsule opacification and secondary glaucoma are still the major postoperative complications necessitating long-term surveillance in children undergoing cataract surgery early in life. Successful management of pediatric cataracts depends on individualized care and experienced teamwork. We reviewed the etiology, preoperative evaluation including biometry, choice of intraocular lens, surgical techniques, and recent developments in the field of childhood cataract. Keywords: children, pediatric cataract, infantile

  5. Cataract research using electronic health records

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waudby Carol J

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The eMERGE (electronic MEdical Records and Genomics network, funded by the National Human Genome Research Institute, is a national consortium formed to develop, disseminate, and apply approaches to research that combine DNA biorepositories with electronic health record (EHR systems for large-scale, high-throughput genetic research. Marshfield Clinic is one of five sites in the eMERGE network and primarily studied: 1 age-related cataract and 2 HDL-cholesterol levels. The purpose of this paper is to describe the approach to electronic evaluation of the epidemiology of cataract using the EHR for a large biobank and to assess previously identified epidemiologic risk factors in cases identified by electronic algorithms. Methods Electronic algorithms were used to select individuals with cataracts in the Personalized Medicine Research Project database. These were analyzed for cataract prevalence, age at cataract, and previously identified risk factors. Results Cataract diagnoses and surgeries, though not type of cataract, were successfully identified using electronic algorithms. Age specific prevalence of both cataract (22% compared to 17.2% and cataract surgery (11% compared to 5.1% were higher when compared to the Eye Diseases Prevalence Research Group. The risk factors of age, gender, diabetes, and steroid use were confirmed. Conclusions Using electronic health records can be a viable and efficient tool to identify cataracts for research. However, using retrospective data from this source can be confounded by historical limits on data availability, differences in the utilization of healthcare, and changes in exposures over time.

  6. Characterization of molecular mechanisms of in vivo UVR induced cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galichanin, Konstantin; Talebizadeh, Nooshin; Söderberg, Per

    2012-01-01

    Cataract is the leading cause of blindness in the world (1). The World Health Organization defines cataract as a clouding of the lens of the eye which impedes the transfer of light. Cataract is a multi-factorial disease associated with diabetes, smoking, ultraviolet radiation (UVR), alcohol, ionizing radiation, steroids and hypertension. There is strong experimental (2-4) and epidemiological evidence (5,6) that UVR causes cataract. We developed an animal model for UVR B induced cataract in both anesthetized (7) and non-anesthetized animals (8). The only cure for cataract is surgery but this treatment is not accessible to all. It has been estimated that a delay of onset of cataract for 10 years could reduce the need for cataract surgery by 50% (9). To delay the incidence of cataract, it is needed to understand the mechanisms of cataract formation and find effective prevention strategies. Among the mechanisms for cataract development, apoptosis plays a crucial role in initiation of cataract in humans and animals (10). Our focus has recently been apoptosis in the lens as the mechanism for cataract development (8,11,12). It is anticipated that a better understanding of the effect of UVR on the apoptosis pathway will provide possibilities for discovery of new pharmaceuticals to prevent cataract. In this article, we describe how cataract can be experimentally induced by in vivo exposure to UVR-B. Further RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry are presented as tools to study molecular mechanisms of UVR-B induced cataract. PMID:23222480

  7. CORNEAL ASTIGMATISM AFTER MANUAL SMALL INCISION CATARACT SURGERY

    OpenAIRE

    Rajni; Mohd Ayaz; Pallvi; Syed Tariq

    2014-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cataract is the leading cause of preventable blindness in India. Manual Small Incision Cataract Surgery is still the preferred method of cataract surgery because of its low cost and non-dependence on costly equipments. Postoperatively astigmatism is an important cause of poor uncorrected visual acuity after cataract surgery. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess corneal astigmatism in manual small incision cataract surgery in superior versus temporal ...

  8. Bimanual microincisional cataract surgery technique and clinical outcome

    OpenAIRE

    Al-Muammar, Abdulrahman

    2009-01-01

    Bimanual microincisional cataract surgery has been introduced recently as a technique for cataract surgery and it is gaining interest of many cataract surgeons in the world. Over the last few years many changes were made in the phacoemulsification machines and the intraocular lenses design which allowed bimanual microincisional cataract surgery to be safer and more efficient. The purpose of this review is to introduce the technique of bimanual microincisional cataract surgery and to review al...

  9. Cataract incidence after total-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: The aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate cataract incidence in a homogeneously-treated group of patients after total-body irradiation (TBI) followed by autologous bone marrow transplantation or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. Methods and Materials: Between 1982 and 1994, a total of 260 patients received either autologous bone marrow or blood stem cell transplantation for hematological malignancy at the University of Heidelberg. Two hundred nine of these patients received TBI in our hospital. Radiotherapy was applied as hyperfractionated TBI, with a median dose of 14.4 Gy in 12 fractions over 4 days. Minimum time between fractions was 4 h. Photons with an energy of 23 MeV were used with a dose rate of 7-18 cGy/min. Ninety-six of the 209 irradiated patients were still alive in 1996; 86 of these patients (52 men, 33 women) answered a questionnaire and could be examined ophthalmologically. The median age at time of TBI was 38.5 years, with a range of 15-59 years. Results: The median follow-up is now 5.8 years, with a range of 1.7-13 years. Cataract occurred in 28/85 patients (32.9%) after a median of 47 months (1-104 months). In 6 of 28 patients who developed a cataract, surgery of the cataract was performed. Whole-brain irradiation prior to TBI had been performed more often in the group of patients developing cataract (14.3%) versus 10.7% in the group of patients without cataract. However, there was no statistical difference (Chi-square, p > 0.05). Conclusion: Cataract is a common side effect of TBI. Cataract incidence found in our patients is comparable to results of other centers using a fractionated regimen for TBI. To assess the incidence of cataract after TBI, a long-term follow-up is required

  10. Manual Suture Less Small Incision Cataract Surgery in Patients with Uveitic Cataract

    OpenAIRE

    Rahul Bhargava; Prachi Kumar; Hafsa Bashir; Shiv Kumar Sharma; Anurag Mishra

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this study is to evaluate the outcome of manual small incision cataract surgery (SICS) in eyes with uveitic cataract. Setting: Medical college hospital of the subcontinent. Design: Retrospective case series. Materials and Methods: In this retrospective study, patients who underwent SICS with posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation for uveitic cataract from 2006 to 2009 were evaluated. Patients with less than 3 months follow-up were excluded. Post-opera...

  11. Visual outcome following extracapsular cataract extraction in mature cataracts with pseudoexfoliation syndrome: A retrospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Abdullah Al-Mujaini; Wali, Upender K.

    2013-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: To report the best corrected visual acuity, at the end of one year, in 33 patients (35 eyes), who underwent extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) with posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation (PC-IOL) for mature and hypermature cataracts, with pseudoexfoliation (PEX). Design: Retrospective, non-comparative, single-institutional (Sultan Qaboos University Hospital) study. Participants: Thirty-three patients with mature and hypermature cataracts, with PEX opera...

  12. Socioeconomic barriers to cataract surgery in Nepal: the south Asian cataract management study

    OpenAIRE

    Snellingen, T; Shrestha, B.; Gharti, M; Shrestha, J.; Upadhyay, M; Pokhrel, R

    1998-01-01

    BACKGROUND—Previous studies have shown that, despite an increasing availability of cataract surgery, important socioeconomic barriers exist in the acceptance of surgery in many rural areas of south Asia. Nepal has developed a comprehensive national network of eye hospitals but the surgical coverage for the treatment of cataract blind is still low.
AIMS—To determine the utilisation of cataract surgery and the level of physical and psychosocial impairment and the socioeconomic barriers to surge...

  13. Sutureless Cataract Surgery: Principles and Steps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Sandford-Smith

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cataracts cause about 50% of world blindness. There is little likelihood of effective prevention becoming available in the next few years and so the only treatment will remain surgical. For many of the other major causes of world blindness, like trachoma, xerophthalmia and onchocerciasis, the remedy is community-based, not hospital-based, and requires prevention rather than treatment. The prevalence of blinding cataract will only increase as people live longer, so cataract will continue to be, by far, the most important treatable cause of blindness.

  14. An X-ray vision of cataract

    CERN Document Server

    Antunes, A; Barros, P S M; Morelhao, S L; Antunes, Andrea; Safatle, Angelica M.V.; Barros, Paulo S.M.; Morelhao, Sergio L.

    2005-01-01

    This work reports the exploitation of diffraction enhanced X-ray imaging (DEI) for studying cataract in addition to the finding of heavy scattering centers of light, probably Ca-rich precipitates in cataractous lenses. DEI selectively probes diffuse-scattering, refraction, and absorption properties of features in the lenses. Fiber cell compaction areas and dilute distribution of precipitates are identifiable, as well as highly absorbing aggregations providing contrast even in the conventional radiography setup. This finding opens new opportunities for clinical diagnosis, for understaning the causes of cataract, and in developing medicines for this disease.

  15. Understanding Cataract Risk in Aerospace Flight Crew And Review of Mechanisms of Cataract Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Jeffrey A.; McCarten, M.; Manuel, K.; Djojonegoro, B.; Murray, J.; Cucinotta, F.; Feiversen, A.; Wear, M.

    2006-01-01

    Induction of cataracts by occupational exposure in flight crew has been an important topic of interest in aerospace medicine in the past five years, in association with numerous reports of flight-associated disease incidences. Due to numerous confounding variables, it has been difficult to determine if there is increased cataract risk directly caused by interaction with the flight environment, specifically associated with added radiation exposure during flight. Military aviator records from the United States Air Force (USAF) and Navy (USN) and US astronauts at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)/Lyndon B. Johnson Space Center (JSC) were evaluated for the presence, location and age of diagnosis of cataracts. Military aviators were found to have a statistically significant younger average age of onset of their cataracts compared with astronauts, however the incidence density of cataracts was found to be statistically higher in astronauts than in military aviators. USAF and USN aviator s cataracts were most commonly located in the posterior subcapsular region of the lens while astronauts cataracts were most likely to originate generally in the cortical zone. A prospective clinical trial which controls for confounding variables in examination technique, cataract classification, diet, exposure, and pharmacological intervention is needed to determine what percentage of the risk for cataracts are due to radiation, and how to best develop countermeasures to protect flight crews from radiation bioeffects in the future.

  16. Glaucoma after Congenital Cataract Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mahmoodreza Panahi Bazaz

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To determine the incidence and risk factors associated with glaucoma following congenital cataract surgery (CCS in children under age of 15 Methods: This prospective cohort (since 2006 consisted of children less than 15 years of age who underwent cataract surgery with or without intraocular lens (IOL implantation. The role of the following factors on the development of glaucoma after CCS including age at surgery, gender, laterality of the cataract, IOL implantation, congenital ocular anomalies, intra- and postoperative complications, length of follow-up, central corneal thickness (CCT as well as the effect of the age of onset, time to development of glaucoma, and response to treatment were evaluated. Results: Overall, 161 eyes of 96 patients were included in this study of which 28 eyes developed glaucoma. Incidence of glaucoma was 17.4%. Mean±SD age at surgery was 9.3±6.9 (range, 1-24 months in glaucomatous and 40.4±41.1 (range, 1 m-13.6 year months in non-glaucomatous group (p<0.001. All glaucoma patients had the operation under two years of age. In group 1, 9 (60% and in group 2, 24 (30% patients were female (p=0.001. In group 1, 17 eyes (60.7% and in the group 2, 41 eyes (30.8% were aphakic (p=0.001. Mean time to diagnosis of glaucoma was 111.2 days (range 30-1200 days. Mean follow-up time was 3.1 years (range, 1-6 years. In 22 (78.6% eyes glaucoma was diagnosed within six months after surgery. Glaucoma was controlled with medications in 23 eyes (82% and with surgery in five eyes. Conclusion: In this study the incidence of glaucoma after CCS was 17.4% over a follow-up period of six years. Younger age at the time of lensectomy increases the risk of secondary glaucoma. IOL implantation may protect against glaucoma. Female gender was affected more than male.

  17. Relationship of cataract to radiation sensitivity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This investigation was conducted to ascertain whether cellular hypersensitivity to radiation may be identified as a possible cause of cataract in persons exposed to low levels of radiation. Patients were studied in whom posterior subcapsular cataract (PSC) had followed probable exposure to low levels of radiation or in whom PSC had developed before the age of 60 without known exposure. Patients with cataract were compared with age and sex matched controls. Radiation sensitivity was estimated by measuring clonal growth of skin fibroblasts and peripheral blood lymphocytes after exposure to graded doses of radiation and by measuring postirradiation reconstruction of separated nuclear material from lymphocytes. Results show variations in radiation sensitivity between patients, without significant differences from the controls. It is concluded that radiation hypersensitivity is not normally associated with development of posterior subcapsular cataract. (author)

  18. Evaluation of Cataract Preventive Action of Phycocyanin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kothadia AD

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Phycocyanin is a biliprotein pigment found in blue-green algae Spirulina platensis, which have attracted attention because of their nutritional value and medicinal properties. This pigment has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and hepatoprotective activity in different experimental models. This data supports the view that phycocyanin may prevent cataract progression. Cataract preventive action of phycocyanin was evaluated against naphthalene and galactose induced cataract experimental models in wistar rats at dose 200 mg/kg/day p.o and vitamin E was used as a reference standard. Phycocyanin treated animals showed no opacification in the lens and they also showed significantly increased level of glutathione (GSH, soluble proteins and water content as compared to positive control group in the lens in both the experimental models. Cataract preventive action of phycocyanin may be due to is antioxidant and free radical scavenging activity.

  19. [The surgical results in traumatic cataract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiseliţă, D; Vancea, P P; Filimon, O; Brănişteanu, D; Bredetean, M; Poiata, I

    1995-01-01

    The retrospective analysis of the postoperative course in 204 traumatic cataracts (140 isolated, simple cataracts and 64 aggravated ones) showed an apparent functional improvement in the simple cases (preoperative and postoperative visual acuity 0.0139 and 0.8520, respectively); the incidence of postoperative detachment of retina was of 4.9%, that of postoperative endophthalmitis that of cystoid macular edema of 3.2%; complications more commonly occurred in aggravated traumatic cataracts and partially accounted for the poorer functional results. During the investigated interval (1988-1992) a rapid shift to extracapsular cataract extraction and posterior chamber lens implants was made. The crystalline grafts preserved binocular vision in 92% of the cases and contact lens in 50% of the cases. Lens implant remains a matchless solution for the visual rehabilitation of the patients with aphakia. PMID:7654673

  20. Intraocular lens employed for cataract surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roszkowska, A. M.; Torrisi, L.

    2014-04-01

    The aim of this paper is to illustrate the techniques of cataract surgery with implantation of intraocular lenses and some physical properties of the used materials. The new technology, coupled with extensive experience and the studied cases, permits to increase the standardization and accuracy of the engravings, by reducing the use and handling of surgical instruments inside the eye. At present it is possible to replace the cataract with crystalline lenses based on biopolymers such as PMMA, silicone, acrylic hydrophilic and hydrophobic acrylic. These materials are increasingly able to replace the natural lens and to ensure the fully functional of the eye. The role of femtosecond lasers in cataract surgery, to assist or replace several aspects of the manual cataract surgery, are discussed.

  1. Broken intraocular lens during cataract surgery.

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkpatrick, J N; Cook, S D

    1992-01-01

    A case of planned routine extracapsular cataract extraction is described where surgery was complicated peroperatively by fracture of the posterior chamber lens implant. The technique of lens implantation is discussed.

  2. Intraocular lens employed for cataract surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this paper is to illustrate the techniques of cataract surgery with implantation of intraocular lenses and some physical properties of the used materials. The new technology, coupled with extensive experience and the studied cases, permits to increase the standardization and accuracy of the engravings, by reducing the use and handling of surgical instruments inside the eye. At present it is possible to replace the cataract with crystalline lenses based on biopolymers such as PMMA, silicone, acrylic hydrophilic and hydrophobic acrylic. These materials are increasingly able to replace the natural lens and to ensure the fully functional of the eye. The role of femtosecond lasers in cataract surgery, to assist or replace several aspects of the manual cataract surgery, are discussed.

  3. Cataracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ...

  4. Cataract - Multiple Languages: MedlinePlus

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Chinese - Simplified (简体中文) Chinese - Traditional (繁體中文) French (français) Hindi (हिन्दी) Japanese (日本語) Korean (한국어) Portuguese (português) ... Cataracte - français (French) Bilingual PDF Health Information Translations Hindi (हिन्दी) Cataract हिन्दी (Hindi) Bilingual PDF ...

  5. Childhood cataract in sub-Saharan Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Courtright, Paul

    2011-01-01

    Investment by organizations and agencies has led to a growing body of evidence and information to assist ophthalmologists and others to meet the needs of children with cataract in Africa. The geographic distribution of research, training, and programme development across Africa has been uneven; investment has been greatest in eastern and southern Africa. Population based surveys (using key informants) suggest that 15–35% of childhood blindness is due to congenital or developmental cataract. T...

  6. Cataract Extraction in High Myopic Eyes

    OpenAIRE

    Wan-Chen Ku; Lan-Hsin Chuang; Chi-Chun Lai

    2002-01-01

    Background: According to the high prevalence of myopia in Taiwan, we analyze theadopted cataract extractions, identify predicting factors for postoperativevision, and to assess the incidence of retinal complications after Nd: YAGlaser capsulotomy in high myopic eyes.Methods: One hundred and twenty-five eyes, which the axial lengths were longer than26 mm, following cataract extraction were enrolled. Surgeries adoptedincluded phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation, extracapsular...

  7. Retinal detachment following cataract surgery with capsulorhexis.

    OpenAIRE

    Kelley, J S; Doxanas, M T

    1995-01-01

    PURPOSE: To estimate the incidence of retinal detachment after cataract surgery with capsulorhexis. METHODS: A consecutive series of 2,150 cataract operations were followed for incidence of retinal detachment. A series of 1,000 patients from this group were analyzed for high risk factors: myopia, age, sex, operative complications and capsulotomy. RESULTS: With minimum one year follow up in 90% of patients the incidence of retinal detachment was 0.25% (5 cases). CONCLUSION: The true incidence ...

  8. Impairment of lacrimal drainage after cataract surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Hamid Fesharaki; Hasan Razmjoo; Masoud Aghajani

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Complaining of tearing was found in some of our patients after phacoemulsification surgery for senile cataract. Secondary acquired lacrimal drainage obstruction has been proposed to happen due to different causes. This study was performed at Feiz hospital in Isfahan, Iran from September to December of 2004 to evaluate the effects of phacoemulsification surgery on tear drainage in eyes with senile cataract. METHODS: This cohort study was performed on 110 patients with senile catara...

  9. Cataract extraction without retrobulbar anaesthetic injection.

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, R

    1990-01-01

    Extracapsular cataract extraction with lens implant under local anaesthesia consisting of amethocaine drops followed by a simple subconjunctival injection in the upper part of the globe but without a retrobulbar injection was carried out in 175 eyes of 165 patients. The purpose of the study was to establish the feasibility of this type of anaesthesia in cataract surgery with the principal object of avoiding the possibility of retrobulbar haemorrhage and the other, rarer, complications of retr...

  10. Current practice of cataract extraction and anaesthesia.

    OpenAIRE

    Hodgkins, P R; Luff, A J; Morrell, A. J.; Botchway, L. T.; Featherston, T. J.; Fielder, A R

    1992-01-01

    A questionnaire regarding preferred methods of cataract extraction and anaesthesia was sent to 456 consultant ophthalmologists in England and Wales. Replies were received from 86% (n = 392), 83% (n = 380) having completed the questionnaire in full. The most frequently employed surgical approach was non-automated extracapsular cataract extraction. Only 2% of surgeons (n = 8) used phacoemulsification routinely and 2% (n = 7) used intracapsular extraction. Intraocular lens implantation was the s...

  11. Progression of diabetic retinopathy after cataract extraction.

    OpenAIRE

    Pollack, A; Dotan, S.; Oliver, M.

    1991-01-01

    The course of diabetic retinopathy following cataract extraction was studied retrospectively in 89 patients (89 eyes). Cataract extraction was extracapsular in 12 eyes (13.5%), extracapsular with intraocular lens implantation in 37 (41.6%), and intracapsular in 40 (45%). In 55 eyes (61.8%) there was no change in the retinal status after surgery, and in 34 (38.2%) there was progression of diabetic retinopathy. In the eyes showing progression there was appearance or aggravation of non-prolifera...

  12. Can drugs or micronutrients prevent cataract?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harding, J J

    2001-01-01

    Cataract is the major cause of blindness and of visual impairment worldwide, so its prevention is of the greatest importance. At present no drug therapy is licensed for use in the UK or the US, so the only treatment for cataract is by surgery, which is expensive and has adverse effects. This article reviews research on prevention of cataract by a variety of agents, including micronutrients as well as drugs. Benefits have been claimed for many compounds or mixtures and this review concentrates on those most extensively studied. Information on possible benefits of putative anticataract agents comes from a variety of approaches, from laboratory experiments, both in vitro and in vivo, to epidemiological studies in patients. Sorbitol-lowering drugs were the first to be examined systematically and progressed to clinical trials which were disappointing, and now the entire rationale for their use in prevention of cataract is questionable. Micronutrients showed little promise in animals but came to clinical trial in patients with cataract without the publication of any major benefit. Pantethine showed more promise in animal studies but the only clinical trial was abandoned early. A variety of laboratory and epidemiological evidence supports the benefits of aspirin-like drugs but there has been no trial specifically in patients with cataract. Add-on studies to trials of aspirin for other indications have not been encouraging. Research into other compounds is interesting but less advanced. PMID:11482741

  13. Cataract incidence after total-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Aim of this retrospective study was to evaluate cataract incidence in a homogeneous group of patients after total-body irradiation followed by autologous bone marrow transplantation or peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. Method and Materials: Between 11/1982 and 6/1994 in total 260 patients received in our hospital total-body irradiation for treatment of haematological malignancy. In 1996-96 patients out of these 260 patients were still alive. 85 from these still living patients (52 men, 33 women) answered evaluable on a questionnaire and could be examined ophthalmologically. Median age of these patients was 38,5 years (15 - 59 years) at time of total-body irradiation. Radiotherapy was applied as hyperfractionated total-body irradiation with a median dose of 14,4 Gy in 12 fractions over 4 days. Minimum time between fractions was 4 hours, photons with a energy of 23 MeV were used, and the dose rate was 7 - 18 cGy/min. Results: Median follow-up is now 5,8 years (1,7 - 13 years). Cataract occurred in (28(85)) patients after a median time of 47 months (1 - 104 months). In 6 out of these 28 patients who developed a cataract, surgery of the cataract was performed. Whole-brain irradiation prior to total-body irradiation was more often in the group of patients developing a cataract (14,3%) vs. 10,7% in the group of patients without cataract. Conclusion: Cataract is a common side effect of total-body irradiation. Cataract incidence found in our patients is comparable to results of other centres using a fractionated regimen for total-body irradiation. The hyperfractionated regimen used in our hospital does obviously not result in a even lower cataract incidence. In contrast to acute and late toxicity in other organ/organsystems, hyperfractionation of total-body irradiation does not further reduce toxicity for the eye-lens. Dose rate may have more influence on cataract incidence

  14. Tools to fight the cataract epidemic: A review of experimental animal models that mimic age related nuclear cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Julie C; Umapathy, Ankita; Donaldson, Paul J

    2016-04-01

    Cataract is the leading cause of blindness worldwide and accounts for approximately half of all forms of vision loss. Currently, the only way to treat cataracts is by surgery. However, with an ageing population, the demand for surgery and the need for cost effective alternative solutions grows exponentially. To reduce the need for cataract surgery, alternative medical therapies to delay cataracts are urgently required. However, given the difficulty in accessing human cataract lenses, investigating the process of cataract formation and testing the efficacy of potential therapies in humans is problematic. Therefore, researchers have looked to create suitable animal models of cataractogenesis to identify therapeutic options. This review will provide an overview of the cataract specific changes previously reported in human cataract lenses, before focussing on the specific changes that occur in age related nuclear (ARN) cataract, the most common form of cataract in humans. This will be followed by a discussion of a range of existing animal cataract models and their respective suitability for mimicking the processes associated with the development of ARN cataract, and therefore their utility as models to test anti-cataract therapies for future use in humans. PMID:26391448

  15. Healthy Amount of Vitamin C Might Keep Cataracts at Bay

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cataracts occur naturally with age and cause the eye's lens to become cloudy. Cataracts can be removed but ... prevent oxidation that leads to clouding of the eye lens. A vitamin C-rich diet may boost the ...

  16. The first cataract surgeons in Latin America: 1611–1830

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Christopher T; Wainsztein, Ricardo D

    2016-01-01

    We strove to identify the earliest cataract surgeons in Latin America. Probably by 1611, the Genovese oculist Francisco Drago was couching cataracts in Mexico City. The surgeon Melchor Vásquez de Valenzuela probably performed cataract couching in Lima by 1697. Juan Peré of France demonstrated cataract couching in Veracruz and Mexico City between 1779 and 1784. Juan Ablanedo of Spain performed couching in Veracruz in 1791. Cataract extraction might have been performed in Havana and Caracas by 1793 and in Mexico by 1797. The earliest contemporaneously documented cataract extractions in Latin America were performed in Guatemala City by Narciso Esparragosa in 1797. In addition to Esparragosa, surgeons born in the New World who established the academic teaching of cataract surgery included José Miguel Muñoz in Mexico and José María Vargas in Caracas. Although cataract surgery came quite early to Latin America, its availability was initially inconsistent and limited. PMID:27143845

  17. Evolution of cataract surgery: Smaller incision - less complications

    OpenAIRE

    Draganić Vladimir; Vukosavljević Miroslav; Milivojević Milorad; Resan Mirko; Petrović Nenad

    2012-01-01

    Background/Aim. Cataract surgery has become one of the safest procedures in medicine thanks to advances in technology and surgical techniques. Although minimal, we still witness different complications. The aim of this study was to compare visual outcome and complication rate in different techniques of cataract surgery, ie in cataract surgeries with various corneal incision width. Methods. The study included 3,457 consecutive patients, ie 4,670 eyes that had undergone cataract surgery. ...

  18. High-Fidelity Cataract Surgery Simulation and Third World Blindness

    OpenAIRE

    Singh, Ajay; Strauss, Glenn H.

    2015-01-01

    The burden of global cataract blindness continues to rise, because the number of surgical ophthalmologists is insufficient, and they are unevenly distributed. There is an urgent need to train surgeons quickly and comprehensively in high-quality, low-cost cataract removal techniques. The authors suggest manual small-incision cataract surgery as a safe alternative to phacoemulsification cataract surgery in the developing world. They discuss the development of a novel, full-immersion, physics-ba...

  19. PROGNOSIS, PREVENTION, AND TREATMENT OF DIABETIC CATARACT SURGERY POSTOPERATIVE COMPLICATIONS

    OpenAIRE

    M. A. Kovalevskaya; N. V. Vedrintseva; L. A. Filina; T. Yu. Perova

    2015-01-01

    Aim. To study immune and antioxidant status of diabetic cataract patients and to assess the efficacy of preoperative preparation for diabetic cataract surgery to prevent intra- and postoperative complications and the efficacy of cataract treatment in metabolic syndrome patients. Patients and methods. 136 cataract patients (272 eyes) were examined (mean age 62±3.2 years). Among these patients, women predominated (n = 74). Control group included 25 healthy volunteers (10 men and 15 women) aged ...

  20. A study of awareness and knowledge about cataract among students

    OpenAIRE

    Sanjeev Kumar Puri; Suma Elangovan

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cataract can cause visual dysfunction ranging from mild to severe loss of vision. The rate of development of senile cataract is generally slow and the vision loss is usually gradual but can result in blindness if treatment is delayed. The main objective was to study the awareness about cataract among students (non-medical). Methods: A questionnaire based study was conducted among 430 students (non-medical). The questions tested their awareness about cataract and also about the...

  1. Cataract Surgical Outcomes In Diabetic Patients: Case Control Study

    OpenAIRE

    Onakpoya Oluwatoyin; Bekibele Charles; Adegbehingbe Stella

    2009-01-01

    Purpose: To determine the visual outcome of cataract surgery in diabetes mellitus with advanced cataract in a tertiary institution in Nigeria. Design: A retrospective case control study conducted at the University College Hospital, Ibadan Nigeria. Subjects: Twenty three consecutive patients with diabetes and 23 age and sex matched non-diabetic control patients who had extracapsular cataract extraction for advanced cataract between 2002-2005. Main outcome: Mean post operative visual acu...

  2. Mouse models of congenital cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Graw, J

    1999-06-01

    Mouse mutants affecting lens development are excellent models for corresponding human disorders. The mutant aphakia has been characterised by bilaterally aphakic eyes (Varnum and Stevens, J Hered 1968;59:147-50); the corresponding gene was mapped to chromosome 19 (Varnum and Stevens, Mouse News Lett 1975;53:35). Recent investigations in our laboratory refined the linkage of 0.6 cM proximal to the marker D19Mit10. Several candidate genes have been excluded (Chuk1, Fgf8, Lbp1, Npm3, Pax2, Pitx3). The Cat3 mutations are characterised by vacuolated lenses caused by alterations in the initial secondary lens fibre cell differentiation. Secondary malformations develop at the cornea and iris, but the retina remains unaffected. The mutation has been mapped to chromosome 10 close to the markers D10Mit41 and D10Mit95. Several candidate genes have been excluded (Dcn, Elk3, Ldc, Mell8, Tr2-11). The series of Cat2 mutations have been mapped close to the gamma-crystallin genes (Cryg; Löster et al., Genomics 1994;23:240-2). The Cat2nop mutation is characterised by a mutation in the third exon of Crygb leading to a truncated gamma B-crystallin and the termination of lens fibre cell differentiation. The Cat2 mutants are interesting models for human cataracts caused by mutations in the human CRYG genes at chromosome 2q32-35. PMID:10627821

  3. SMALL INCISION CATARACT SURGERY VERSUS PHACOEMULSIFICATION FOR IMMATURE CATARACT: A SINGLE BLIND RANDOMIZED CONTROLLED TRIAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Jawed

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Manual small incision cataract surgery (SICS has given visual results almost equivalent to Phacoemulsification but limited studies are available regarding the efficacy of small incision cataract surgery in phaco suitable immature cataracts. OBJECTIVE: To compare manual small incision cataract surgery and Phacoemulsification in immature cataracts. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A single blind randomized controlled trial was conducted with 105 eyes each for small incision cataract surgery and Phacoemulsification. RESULT: Mean IOL power was similar in both Phacoemulsifications as well as SICS. Four cases of posterior capsular rupture occurred in Phacoemulsification while one case of zonular dialysis occurred in SICS. Uncorrected visual acuity was good (6/6-6/18 in 80.0 % of the phaco and 93.33 % of the SICS group. CONCLUSION: SICS surgical technique resulted in significantly better visual acuity on the 1st postoperative day in comparison with phaco. Hence, SICS with rigid PMMA IOL implantation being a cheaper, faster and easier technique, may be recommended for immature cataract surgery in the developing countries

  4. Cataract Surgery in Eyes with Shallow Anterior Chamber

    OpenAIRE

    Hüseyin Bayramlar; Remzi Karadağ; Ünsal Sarı

    2014-01-01

    Shallow anterior chamber may be encountered in an eye planned for cataract surgery as well as during phacoemulsification. In both situations, cataract surgery is a challenging case. In this article, we tried to review the situations and management of shallow anterior chamber in cataract surgery. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 388-91

  5. Cataract Surgery in Eyes with Shallow Anterior Chamber

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hüseyin Bayramlar

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Shallow anterior chamber may be encountered in an eye planned for cataract surgery as well as during phacoemulsification. In both situations, cataract surgery is a challenging case. In this article, we tried to review the situations and management of shallow anterior chamber in cataract surgery. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2014; 44: 388-91

  6. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation in human cataractous lens epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasavada Abhay

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The anterior lens epithelial cells undergo a variety of degenerative and proliferative changes during cataract formation. Acid phosphatase is primarily responsible for tissue regeneration and tissue repair. The lipid hydroperoxides that are obtained by lipid peroxidation of polysaturated or unsaturated fatty acids bring about deterioration of biological membranes at cellular and tissue levels. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation activities were studied on the lens epithelial cells of nuclear cataract, posterior subcapsular cataract, mature cataract, and mixed cataract. Of these, mature cataractous lens epithelium showed maximum activity for acid phosphatase (516.83 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and maximum levels of lipid peroxidation (86.29 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. In contrast, mixed cataractous lens epithelium showed minimum activity of acid phosphatase (222.61 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and minimum levels of lipid peroxidation (54.23 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. From our study, we correlated the maximum activity of acid phosphatase in mature cataractous lens epithelium with the increased areas of superimposed cells associated with the formation of mature cataract. Likewise, the maximum levels of lipid peroxidation in mature cataractous lens epithelium was correlated with increased permeability of the plasma membrane. Conversely, the minimum levels of lipid peroxidation in mixed cataractous lens epithelium makes us presume that factors other than lipid peroxidation may also account for the formation of mixed type of cataract.

  7. Small incision cataract surgery: tips for avoiding surgical complications

    OpenAIRE

    Reeta Gurung; Albrecht Hennig

    2008-01-01

    Small incision cataract surgery (SICS) is one of the cataract surgical techniques commonly used in developing countries. This technique usually results in a good visual outcome and is useful for high-volume cataract surgery.1–3This article describes how to minimise surgical complications in SICS.

  8. Reduction of intraocular pressure and improvement of vision after cataract surgeries in angle closure glaucoma with concomitant cataract patients

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Zong-Mei; Niu, Qing; Nie, Yan; Zhang, Jin

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study is to compare the efficacy of three different cataract surgeries in eyes with angle closure glaucoma (ACG) with concomitant cataract. Methods: A retrospective comparative analysis of 106 ACG patients (112 eyes) with concomitant cataract was conducted between February, 2012 and February, 2014. Clinical outcomes of ACG patients with concomitant cataract underwent phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation (group A, n = 34, 36 eyes, angle closure < 180°); combine...

  9. Risk of retinal detachment following cataract extraction: results from the International Cataract Surgery Outcomes Study.

    OpenAIRE

    Norregaard, J. C.; Thoning, H.; Andersen, T. F.; Bernth-Petersen, P.; Javitt, J C; Anderson, G F

    1996-01-01

    AIMS: To estimate the risk of retinal detachment (RD) following cataract extraction in Denmark, and to compare the risk with that following cataract extraction in the USA, and with that in a sample of Danish patients who did not have ocular surgery. METHODS: A sample was created from the administrative Danish Hospital Register and included 19,252 patients who underwent first eye cataract surgery between 1985 and 1987, and who were 50 years of age or older. The patients were then followed for ...

  10. Studies on the cause of radiation cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Since the advent of medical radiations, the radiation injuries have been intensively studied, particularly the eye. Most of the previous investigation has concerned radiation cataractogenesis. There are a variety of opinions regarding the causes of the radiation cataract formation. In this investigation, I consider direct and indirect effects as two mechanisms for radiation induction of cataracts. It is shown that radiation cataracts in albino rabbits should be studied by reference to the alteration of the lens, dynamic study of the aqueous humor and microcirculation of the iris and ciliary body. Experimental evidence from this study supports the hypothesis that cataractogenesis may be caused by the circulatory insufficiency due to radiation damage of the fine vasculature supplying nutrition to the iris and ciliary body. However I can not perfectly deny that cataractogenesis may be caused by the direct radiation injury in this study. (author)

  11. Dropped nucleus following phacoemulsification cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajunisah, I; Reddy, S C

    2007-12-01

    Twenty two cases of dropped nucleus following 1,196 phacoemulsification procedures in cataract surgery were examined retrospectively to determine the incidence, predisposing factors and visual outcomes of this dreaded complication. All the cases underwent pars plana vitrectomy and the lens fragments were removed with phacofragmotome, vitrectomy cutter or delivered through limbus. The incidence of dropped nucleus was 1.84%. The predisposing factors were hard cataracts (13.6%), polar cataracts (9.1%), previously vitrectomized eyes (4.5%) and high myopia (4.5%). The final visual outcome was > or = 6/12 in 10 eyes (45.5%); complications were seen in 5 eyes (22.7%). The interval between initial surgery and vitrectomy, the method of fragment removal and the type of lens implanted, did not influence the final visual outcome. PMID:18705466

  12. Clear corneal incision in cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ammar M Al Mahmood

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Since the introduction of sutureless clear corneal cataract incisions, the procedure has gained increasing popularity worldwide because it offers several advantages over the traditional sutured scleral tunnels and limbal incisions. Some of these benefits include lack of conjunctival trauma, less discomfort and bleeding, absence of suture-induced astigmatism, and faster visual rehabilitation. However, an increasing incidence of postoperative endophthalmitis after clear corneal cataract surgery has been reported. Different authors have shown a significant increase up to 15-fold in the incidence of endophthalmitis following clear corneal incision compared to scleral tunnels. The aim of this report is to review the advantages and disadvantages of clear corneal incisions in cataract surgery, emphasizing on wound construction recommendations based on published literature.

  13. [The development of cataract surgery after 1745].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pouw, C A M Karin; Zegers, Richard H C

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, cataract surgery is the most commonly performed surgical procedure in the Netherlands. This is due to the increasing incidence of cataracts, the changing indication for surgery in our society where good vision is becoming increasingly important, and the quality of the operation. How was this modern procedure developed? Cataracts were treated by couching until the middle of the 18th century. Since then, many discoveries by a number of doctors changed the procedure gradually from couching to lens extraction and through extracapsular to intracapsular extraction with the simultaneous implantation of an intraocular lens. This article outlines the development and also discusses some of the many inventions in the field of instrumentation and materials that have brought this intervention to its current high level; these include the cryo-probe, implantation of artificial lenses, the use of hyaluronic acid, phaco-emulsification, smaller incisions without sutures and the development of foldable intraocular lenses. PMID:23548190

  14. Cataracts induced by microwave and ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microwaves most commonly cause anterior and/or posterior subcapsular lenticular opacities in experimental animals and, as shown in epidemiologic studies and case reports, in human subjects. The formation of cataracts seems to be related directly to the power of the microwave and the duration of exposure. The mechanism of cataractogenesis includes deformation of heat-labile enzymes, such as glutathione peroxide, that ordinarily protect lens cell proteins and membrane lipids from oxidative damage. Oxidation of protein sulfhydryl groups and the formation of high-molecular-weight aggregates cause local variations in the orderly structure of the lens cells. An alternative mechanism is thermoelastic expansion through which pressure waves in the aqueous humor cause direct physical damage to the lens cells. Cataracts induced by ionizing radiation (e.g., X-rays and gamma rays) usually are observed in the posterior region of the lens, often in the form of a posterior subcapsular cataract. Increasing the dose of ionizing radiation causes increasing opacification of the lens, which appears after a decreasing latency period. Like cataract formation by microwaves, cataractogenesis induced by ionizing radiation is associated with damage to the lens cell membrane. Another possible mechanism is damage to lens cell DNA, with decreases in the production of protective enzymes and in sulfur-sulfur bond formation, and with altered protein concentrations. Until further definitive conclusions about the mechanisms of microwaves and ionizing radiation induced cataracts are reached, and alternative protective measures are found, one can only recommend mechanical shielding from these radiations to minimize the possibility of development of radiation-induced cataracts. 74 references

  15. [The denominations cataract and glaucoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornquist, R

    1997-01-01

    Since ancient times a grey or white pupil in an nearly blind eye was thought to be caused by a mucous substance in front of the lens. It was called "hypochysis" or "hypochyma" in Greece and "suffusio" in Rome. Later the term "cataract" (=waterfall) was the most popular denomination. A surgical method was tried very early with usually good effect, when with a thin needle, introduced into the eye, the opaque material was removed from the pupillary area. In the middle of the 17th century more careful investigations showed that there was no membrane in front of the lens, but the lens itself was opaque. The final proof was delivered when an extraction of the lens was performed with good effect. In ancient times incurable blindness, which was called glaucoma, was thought to be located to the lens, which probably had a very important role in the seeing process. The name (of Greek orgin) is translated "green" or "blue-green", which was sometimes notified to be the color of the lens, seen through the pupil, in these cases. A period of great confusion followed when the removal of this very important part of the eye did not lead to blindness but rather an improved vision. As there were significant difficulties in identifying the specific color of the pupil the name glaucoma seemed to be very inadequate. In the beginning of the 19th century a disease entity (which is to-day called acute closed-angle glaucoma) seemed to eventually fullfill the demand of a greenlooking pupil. The most characteristic symptoms are pain and a high intraocular pressure causing a corneal edema and a change of the blackness of the pupil to hazy grey (and maybe a little green?). PMID:11625470

  16. Cataract: refractive error, diabetes, and morphology.

    OpenAIRE

    Perkins, E. S.

    1984-01-01

    A retrospective analysis of 388 records of patients undergoing surgery for cataract between the years 1968 and 1978 showed that more women than men were admitted. About 13.7% of the patients were diabetic, and there was a striking excess of women over men with diabetes and cataract. The diabetic patients required surgery at an earlier age than the non-diabetics. Patients who had been refracted at least 5 years before surgery showed an incidence of myopia of -1.00 D or more of 25.4%. In 34% of...

  17. Sensory exotropia subsequent to senile cataract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LOU Ding-hua; XU Ye-sheng; LI Yu-min

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation in patients with sensory exotropia subsequent to senile cataract. The authors prospectively studied the role of phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation on 25 patients by observing visual acuity, ocular alignment, binocular vision and diplopia pre-, 1 month post- and 3 months post-operation. The patients underwent follow-up for three months. Postoperatively, one patient had a corrected visual acuity of 20/50, and 24 patients had 20/40 or better. The ocular alignment, binocular vision and diplopia were resolved spontaneously. Phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation performed together is effective on sensory exotropia subsequent to senile cataract.

  18. Outsourced cataract surgery and postoperative endophthalmitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solborg Bjerrum, Søren; Kiilgaard, Jens F; Mikkelsen, Kim Lyngby; la Cour, Morten

    2013-01-01

    To compare the risk of postoperative endophthalmitis (PE) after cataract surgery at eye departments in public hospitals and private hospitals/eye clinics and to evaluate if the Danish National Patient Registry (NPR) is a reliable database to monitor the PE risk.......To compare the risk of postoperative endophthalmitis (PE) after cataract surgery at eye departments in public hospitals and private hospitals/eye clinics and to evaluate if the Danish National Patient Registry (NPR) is a reliable database to monitor the PE risk....

  19. Partially coherent interferometric biometry in cataract surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drexler, Wolfgang; Findl, Oliver; Menapace, Rupert; Hitzenberger, Christoph K.; Fercher, Adolf F.

    1999-02-01

    In an earlier study we showed that precise axial eye length measurement on cataract eyes is possible with the dual beam partial coherence interferometry technique (PCI). A high correlation with the standard ultrasound technique has been obtained. Recently, in a prospective study, partially coherent interferometry and ultrasound biometry were compared in cataract surgery using the SRK II formula based on US applanation biometry. Three months after surgery PCI was repeated and refractive outcome was determined. The use of PCI would have improved refractive outcome by about 30%.

  20. Prevalence and aetiology of cataract in Punjab.

    OpenAIRE

    Chatterjee, A.; Milton, R C; Thyle, S

    1982-01-01

    Three districts in the Punjab plains were surveyed in 1976-7 for senile cataract and potential risk factors. The prevalence of senile cataract was 15.3% among 1269 persons examined who were aged 30 ang older, and 4.3% for all ages. These figures confirmed previous reports of high prevalence. The prevalence was 1% for ages 30-49 and increased markedly in the sixth and seventh decades to 67% for ages 70 and older. Univariate age-adjusted analyses of selected socioeconomic, demographic, dietary,...

  1. MANUAL SMALL INCISION CATARACT SURGERY (MSICS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mishra

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available : In developing country like India, the primary goal is to provide all the benefits to common man at minimal possible cost in visual rehabilitation of cataract. In achieving this goal, the surgery (MICS described in this article can be extremely helpful. It has almost all the advantages of phacoemulsification, at the same time it is inexpensive. The wound construction, various techniques of nucleus delivery in MSICS are described precisely. This may stimulate the reader towards this surgery, which is the only way to tackle the huge backlog of cataract in developing countries, particularly in India, where 60% of rural people live in less than thirty rupees a day.

  2. High-fidelity cataract surgery simulation and third world blindness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Ajay; Strauss, Glenn H

    2015-04-01

    The burden of global cataract blindness continues to rise, because the number of surgical ophthalmologists is insufficient, and they are unevenly distributed. There is an urgent need to train surgeons quickly and comprehensively in high-quality, low-cost cataract removal techniques. The authors suggest manual small-incision cataract surgery as a safe alternative to phacoemulsification cataract surgery in the developing world. They discuss the development of a novel, full-immersion, physics-based surgical training simulator as the centerpiece of a scalable, comprehensive training system for manual small-incision cataract surgery. PMID:24996918

  3. [Objective evaluation the application of femtosecond laser in cataract surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Y Z

    2016-02-11

    Femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) is a novel technology and the biggest revolution in the field of cataract in the latest several years. However, increasing large-scale population randomized controlled trials (RCT) have demonstrated that FLACS does not provide significant advantages over conventional phacoemulsification cataract surgery (CPCS) for common cataract patients. Furthermore, the cost and space requirement of the femtosecond equipment are another two limitations for the universal application of FSL in cataract surgery. However, FLACS may be beneficial for complex cataract situations, such as lens dislocation, zonular laxity, traumatic cataract, low preoperative endothelial cell values, and significant corneal astigmatism. With the progress of science and technology, FLACS can be expected to achieve integration with phacoemulsification systems, and equipment costs can be reduced, making it more widely used in clinical practice in the future. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2016, 52: 81-84). PMID:26906700

  4. Do patients with age related maculopathy and cataract benefit from cataract surgery?

    OpenAIRE

    Shuttleworth, G.; Luhishi, E; Harrad, R

    1998-01-01

    AIMS—To assess the benefits of cataract extraction in patients with age related maculopathy (ARM).
METHODS—1073 randomly selected cataract operations were reviewed and 99 cases of preoperatively recognised ARM were identified for investigation. Data relating to visual function were retrieved from case notes, and patient responses to a questionnaire were analysed.
RESULTS—98% had dry or unspecified ARM. Only 2% had exudative maculopathy. 81% of cases had an improvement in best distance acuity;...

  5. Sutureless Non-phaco Cataract Surgery: A Solution to Reduce Worldwide Cataract Blindness?

    OpenAIRE

    Albrecht Hennig

    2003-01-01

    The Search for Appropriate Sutureless Cataract Surgery. During the last decade, in industrialised countries phacoemulsification has largely replaced ab-externo extracapsular cataract extraction with posterior chamber intraocular lenses (ECCE/PC IOL) with sutures. The small self-sealing phaco incision provides rapid visual rehabilitation, and the surgery is increasingly done on an outpatient basis. However, in developing countries phacoemulsification is performed only on selected patients, usu...

  6. Cataract-free interval and severity of cataract after total body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation: influence of treatment parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To determine prospectively the cataract-free interval (latency time) after total body irradiation (TBI) and bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and to assess accurately the final severity of the cataract. Methods and Materials: Ninety-three of the patients who received TBI as a part of their conditioning regimen for BMT between 1982 and 1995 were followed with respect to cataract formation. Included were only patients who had a follow-up period of at least 23 months. TBI was applied in one fraction of 8 Gy or two fractions of 5 or 6 Gy. Cataract-free period was assessed and in 56 patients, who could be followed until stabilization of the cataract had occurred, final severity of the cataract was determined using a classification system. With respect to final severity, two groups were analyzed: subclinical low-grade cataract and high-grade cataract. Cataract-free period and final severity were determined with respect to type of transplantation, TBI dose, and posttransplant variables such as graft versus host disease (GVHD) and steroid treatment. Results: Cataract incidence of the analyzed patients was 89%. Median time to develop a cataract was 58 months for autologous transplanted patients. For allogeneic transplanted patients treated or not treated with steroids, median times were 33 and 46 months, respectively. Final severity was not significantly different for autologous or allogeneic patients. In allogeneic patients, however, final severity was significantly different for patients who had or had not been treated with steroids for GVHD: 93% versus 35% high-grade cataract, respectively. Final severity was also different for patients receiving 1 x 8 or 2 x 5 Gy TBI, from patients receiving 2 x 6 Gy as conditioning therapy: 33% versus 79% high-grade cataract, respectively. The group of patients receiving 2 x 6 Gy comprised, however, more patients with steroid treatment for GVHD. So the high percentage of high-grade cataract in the 2 x 6 Gy group might also

  7. Cost-effectiveness analysis of cataract surgery with intraocular lens implantation: extracapsular cataract extraction versus phacoemulsification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohd R.A. Manaf

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available A randomized single blinded clinical trial to compare the cost-effectiveness of cataract surgery between extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE and phacoemulsification (PEA was conducted at Hospital Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (HUKM from March 2000 until August 2001. The cost of a cataract surgery incurred by hospital, patients and households were calculated preoperatively, one week, two months (for both techniques and six months (for ECCE only. Effectiveness of cataract surgery was assessed using Visual Function 14 (VF-14, quality of life measurement specifically for vision. The cost analysis results from each 50 subjects of ECCE and PEA group showed that average cost for one ECCE after six months post-operation is USD 458 (± USD 72 and for PEA is USD 528 (± USD 125. VF-14 score showed a significant increased after a week, two months and six months post-operation compared to the score before operation for both techniques (p<0.001. However, there was no significant difference between them (p = 0.225. This study indicated that ECCE is more cost effective compared to PEA with cost per one unit increment of VF-14 score of USD 14 compared to USD 20 for PEA. (Med J Indones 2007; 16:25-31 Keywords: cataract, cost-effectiveness, extracapsular cataract extraction, phacoemulsification, visual function 14

  8. Cataract surgery following KAMRA presbyopic implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan TE

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Tien-En Tan,1,2 Jodhbir S Mehta2–4 1Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore; 2Singapore National Eye Centre, Singapore; 3Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore; 4Department of Clinical Sciences, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore Abstract: Intrastromal corneal inlays are an emerging treatment for presbyopic patients. The KAMRA™ small aperture inlay was the first such inlay to receive Conformité Européenne (CE marking in 2005. It has been shown to improve uncorrected near and intermediate visual acuity without adversely affecting uncorrected distance visual acuity. Due to the age of presbyopic patients, they may eventually develop cataracts. In two such cases, we found that cataract surgery with the KAMRA implant left in place was not technically more difficult, and that the surgical procedure could be improved by additional ocular rotations to improve visualization. Biometry readings were reliable, and it appeared that the SRK/T formula was accurate for calculation of intraocular lens power. Cataract surgery with the KAMRA implant left in situ is a viable option for patients. Keywords: cataract surgery, KAMRA, corneal inlay, AcuTarget, presbyopia

  9. Role of sphincterotomy in extracapsular cataract surgery.

    OpenAIRE

    Cole, M D; Brown, R.; Ridgway, A. E.

    1986-01-01

    Forty patients subjected to extracapsular cataract extraction with posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation in whom a sphincterotomy was required are reported on. This method was used to counter the problems created by a small pupil during surgery. The technique is described and results evaluated.

  10. Cataract Extraction in High Myopic Eyes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan-Chen Ku

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Background: According to the high prevalence of myopia in Taiwan, we analyze theadopted cataract extractions, identify predicting factors for postoperativevision, and to assess the incidence of retinal complications after Nd: YAGlaser capsulotomy in high myopic eyes.Methods: One hundred and twenty-five eyes, which the axial lengths were longer than26 mm, following cataract extraction were enrolled. Surgeries adoptedincluded phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation, extracapsularcataract extraction with intraocular lens implantation, phacoemulsification,and extracapsular cataract extraction. Logistic regression was utilizedto assess predictive factors for postoperative vision.Results: Postoperative vision of 41 eyes (32.8% of the 125 high myopic eyesimproved at least 4 lines of Snellen acuity. Thirty-two eyes (25.6%achieved good postoperative vision (BCVA≥20/40, and 26 eyes (20.8%demonstrated poor postoperative vision (BCVA<20/200. Younger age andshorter axial length were appreciated for better visual outcome ( p < 0.05.Nd: YAG laser capsulotomy is required for posterior capsular opacity. Threein 125 eyes (2.4% developed retinal complications and 2 of them had retinaldetachment subsequently within one month after Nd: YAG laser capsulotomy.Conclusion: Most high myopic patients achieved visual improvement after cataract surgeries.Age and axial length are the predictive factors in high myopicpatients. It is crucial to examine retina prior to Nd: YAG laser capsulotomyto prevent retinal complication.

  11. Simultaneous Penetrating Keratoplasty and Cataract Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad-Ali Javadi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To determine the clinical outcomes of simultaneous penetrating keratoplasty (PK, cataract removal and intraocular lens implantation (triple procedure, and to compare the safety and efficacy of two different cataract extraction techniques during the course of PK. Methods: This retrospective comparative study was conducted on patients who had undergone a triple procedure. The technique of cataract extraction was either opensky extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE or phacoemulsification (PE. In the ECCE group, the posterior chamber intraocular lens (PCIOL was implanted in the ciliary sulcus, while in the PE group PCIOLs were fixated within the capsular bag. Outcome measures included best spectacle corrected visual acuity (BSCVA, refractive results, graft clarity and complications. Results: Seventy-six eyes of 69 consecutive patients with mean age of 61.4±14.2 years were enrolled. Mean follow-up period was 61.4±37.2 months over which mean BSCVA was significantly improved from 1.40±0.68 to 0.44±0.33 LogMAR (P<0.001. Mean postoperative spherical equivalent refractive error was -2.13±3.02 D, which significantly differed from the target refraction (-0.73±0.29 D, P=0.004. At final follow-up, 89.5% of the corneal grafts remained clear. Conclusion: The triple procedure is a safe and effective approach to restore vision in patients with coexisting corneal pathologies and cataracts. However, unacceptable postoperative refractive error can be anticipated.

  12. Surgical treatment of patients with bilateral cataracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I.E. Ioshin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT The Determination of the tactics for surgical cataract treatment in the fellow eye in patients with bilateral cataracts did not received any unambiguous solution till now and the periods of operation performance are interpreted differently. The authors analyzed the results of treatment in 486 patients with bilateral cataracts. The authors identified a possible favorable interval between first and second operations in case of bilateral cataract, which was based on the clinical, functional and immunological parameters. Phacoemulsifications with peri-operative antibiotic prophylaxis were carried out not later than 4 days after the operation on the first eye, if there were no complications intra-operatively and in post-operative period in the first eye. Recommended time of surgery in the fellow eye in 114 patients of the main group allowed to reveal high functional results (0.7-1.0 in 90.4% in the first eye and in 85.1% of cases in the fellow eye, that promoted the restoration of binocular functions in 98 % of cases after surgery in the shortest possible time. In all patients of the main group the clear vision at different distances were achieved after surgery with bilateral implantation of multifocal IOLs in both eyes in the maximum shortest time. Selected dates of cataract surgery in both eyes taking into account the general and associated ocular pathology allows to reduce the emotional cost, time and organizational problems in preparation for the operation, adding the benefits of quality of early rehabilitation after surgery in both eyes.

  13. Axial length variability in cataract surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the mean axial length and biometric measures in patients undergoing cataract surgery and further compare the variability of axial length between the gender and with age. Study Design: Cross-sectional observational study. Place and Duration of Study: Eye Unit I, Department of Ophthalmology, Liaquat University of Medical and Health Sciences, Hyderabad, Pakistan from January 2010 to December 2012. Methodology: All patients referred for cataract surgery were assessed. The study included 886 eyes which were straightforward cataract cases with no other ocular problem. The data was collected for axial length, keratometric values and Intra-Ocular Lens (IOL) power prior to cataract surgery. The collected data was then analyzed using SPSS version 19 for windows software. Results: Gender based comparison showed significant difference in age, axial length, keratometric values and IOL power between the two groups (p=0.000). 86% of the eyes had an axial length between 21.00 mm and 23.99 mm. In univariate analysis there was significant (p=0.000) relation between overall age and axial length. The keratometric values ranged between 36.75 D and 52.50 D. Majority of the IOL powers ranged between 20.00 D and 23.00 D. Conclusion: The mean axial length of patients undergoing cataract surgery was 22.96 +- 1.04 mm, was comparable to Indian and Chinese population but shorter than the Western population. Females had shorter axial lengths, similar to other studies. Axial length was positively associated with age among the females, the cause of which is yet to be determined. (author)

  14. Theater for Development Methodology in Childhood Cataract Case Finding

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roseline Ekanem Duke

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The key informant methodology for case finding for childhood cataract  was utilized  in a rural population in Nigeria to identify suitable children who would benefit surgically from intervene for cataract and restore vision such children. It was however noticed that some parents who had children with cataract did not bring their children to the primary health center for examination and recommendation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the benefits of using the theatre for development approach in childhood cataract case finding. The delay in identification and referral of children with cataract at an appropriate age for surgical intervention and optical rehabilitation is the main cause of poor vision following surgery for the condition as amblyopia results. Therefore early presentation, identification, referral and surgical intervention as well as appropriate optical rehabilitation is the key to successful surgical outcome of childhood cataract and good visual prognosis. The theater for development (TfD approach methodology was implemented in a community in Akpabuyo local government are of Cross River state, Nigeria as a means to enhance community participation, health promotion and education and to complement the key informant methodology in case finding for childhood cataract. Three children with cataracts were referred by the community following the TfD intervention, for cataract surgery and uptake of follow up care after surgery. The TfD approach appears to be a useful method for encouraging community participation in the case finding of childhood cataract.

  15. Cataracts and Other Common Eye Diseases | NIH MedlinePlus the Magazine

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... on. Feature: Treating Cataracts Cataracts and Other Common Eye Diseases Past Issues / Summer 2014 Table of Contents Click ... are more likely to develop a cataract. Diabetic Eye Disease Diabetic Retinopathy : A scene as it might be ...

  16. Magnetic resonance imaging study on rat sugar cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Proton nuclear magnetic resonance (1H-NMR) is one of the most important methods for noninvasively evaluating the state of water in the biological system. It could be useful for evaluation of the early changes of cataract. In this study, in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) was applied to rat galactosemic cataract, which is a model of the human diabetic cataract, and compared with the histological findings. The relationship between the relaxation times (T1, T2) and the water contents were discussed. The T1 and T2 values were prolonged and the high intensity area of the lens cortex was enlarged from the early stage of the cataract (two days after the intake of galactose). These changes preceded the histological changes. This suggests that MRI is applicable for the evaluation of anti-cataract agents, for example aldose reductase inhibitors, against human diabetic cataract. (author)

  17. Risk of Retinal Detachment After Pediatric Cataract Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haargaard, Birgitte; Andersen, Elisabeth W; Oudin, Anna; Poulsen, Gry; Wohlfahrt, Jan; la Cour, Morten; Melbye, Mads

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the long-term risk of retinal detachment following pediatric cataract surgery and to identify risk factors for retinal detachment. METHODS: We included all children (aged 0 to 17 years) who during the time period of 1977 to 2005 underwent pediatric cataract surgery in Denmark...... was based on medical chart review. RESULTS: Among 1043 eyes of 656 children undergoing surgery for pediatric cataract, 25 eyes (23 children) developed retinal detachment at a median time of 9.1 years after surgery. The overall 20-year risk of retinal detachment was 7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 3...... (16% [95% CI: 6%-24%]). CONCLUSIONS: The estimated overall risk of retinal detachment 20 years after pediatric cataract surgery was 7%, but only 3% for isolated cataract. Particularly high risks of retinal detachment after cataract surgery were associated with mental retardation and having other...

  18. Laser-assisted cataract surgery and other emerging technologies for cataract removal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aasuri Murali

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available As we near the end of this century, refractive cataract surgery has become a reality through concerted contributions from ultrasonic phacoemulsification, foldable intraocular lens (IOL implantation technology and keratorefractive surgery. As we enter the new millennium, our sights are set on realizing another dream: accommodative IOL surgery. Towards achieving this goal, many advances have been made in both techniques and technology of cataract removal. Lasers in particular have been under investigation for cataract removal for nearly two decades. The technology has now reached a stage where cataract can indeed be removed entirely with laser alone. Neodymium:YAG and erbium:YAG are the laser sources currently utilized by manufacturers of laser phaco systems. Initial clinical experience reported in the literature has served to highlight the capabilities of lasers and the need for further refinement. Despite the excitement associated with the availability of this alluring new technology for cataract removal, it is necessary to develop more effective laser systems and innovative surgical techniques that optimize its capabilities if laser phaco surgery is to be a genuine improvement over current techniques.

  19. Sutureless Non-phaco Cataract Surgery: A Solution to Reduce Worldwide Cataract Blindness?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Albrecht Hennig

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available The Search for Appropriate Sutureless Cataract Surgery. During the last decade, in industrialised countries phacoemulsification has largely replaced ab-externo extracapsular cataract extraction with posterior chamber intraocular lenses (ECCE/PC IOL with sutures. The small self-sealing phaco incision provides rapid visual rehabilitation, and the surgery is increasingly done on an outpatient basis. However, in developing countries phacoemulsification is performed only on selected patients, usually those able to pay high treatment charges. The reasons for this include the cost of a phaco machine and consumables such as foldable IOLs. Until now, phacoemulsification has played a very limited role in the reduction of cataract blindness in low income countries. Therefore, eye surgeons in developing countries are searching for alternatives to phacoemulsification. We need a surgical technique which is easy to learn, provides an immediate good uncorrected visual outcome, and is affordable to most cataract patients. Such a technique would advance cataract surgery in low income countries and contribute to reaching the goal of VISION 2020: The Right to Sight.

  20. Manual cataract extraction via a subconjunctival limbus oblique incision for mature cataracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Yang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aims: To report the technique and outcomes of sutureless manual cataract extraction via a subconjunctival limbus oblique incision for mature cataracts. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study comprised of 112 eyes of 83 patients with mature cataract who all had manual cataract extraction via a subconjunctival limbus oblique incision. A transconjunctival tunnel is fashioned with a 3.0 mm keratome, 0.5 mm behind the limbal vascular arcades. A limbal tunnel, with a transverse extent of 9 mm in the cornea and 7.0 mm in the limbus, is created beneath the conjunctival/Tenon′s tissue using an angled bevel-up crescent blade. Outcome measures included visual acuity, intraoperative complications, surgically induced astigmatism, endothelial cell loss rate and surgery time. Results: Self-sealing wound was achieved in 112 eyes (98.2%. The nucleus was delivered in whole in 108 eyes (96.4%. Intraoperative complications included hyphema in 3 eyes (2.7%, iridodialysis in 2 eyes 1.8%, posterior capsular rupture and zonular dialysis in 2 eyes (1.8%. At the 3-month follow-up, 91% patients achieved a best-corrected visual acuity of 20/20 or better, the mean of surgically induced astigmatism was -0.62 ± 0.41 Diopters and endothelial cell loss was 4.2%. Average surgical time was 3.75 min per case. Conclusion: This subconjunctival limbus oblique incision has the potential to serve as safe and effective technique for mature cataracts.

  1. Safety and efficacy of the transition from extracapsular cataract extraction to manual small incision cataract surgery in prevention of blindness campaigns

    OpenAIRE

    Isabel Signes-Soler; Jaime Javaloy; Gonzalo Munoz; Tomas Moya; Raul Montalban; Cesar Albarran

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the safety and the visual outcomes of two experienced cataract surgeons who converted from extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) to manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS) during a campaign for the prevention of blindness. Methods: Two surgeons used the ECCE technique (ECCE group) during a campaign in Burkina Faso on 93 consecutive cataract patients with a corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA)

  2. The effects of blunt trauma and cataract surgery on corneal endothelial cell density

    OpenAIRE

    Yeniad Baris; Corum Isik; Ozgun Cahit

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: This study was designed to investigate the effects of trauma and cataract surgery on corneal endothelial cell density (ECD) in patients with a traumatic cataract due to blunt trauma without globe laceration. Materials and Methods: In this prospective study, 31 subjects with traumatic cataract (traumatic cataract group) and 30 subjects with a senile cataract (control group) were enrolled. The subjects with traumatic cataract were subdivided into two groups: uncomplicated surgery subg...

  3. Cataract Surgery and Falls, Fractures, and Mortality in the United States Population

    OpenAIRE

    Tseng, Victoria Li-Ting

    2016-01-01

    Cataract surgery is the mainstay of treatment for visually significant cataract. Aside from vision improvement, one secondary benefit of cataract surgery that has been reported is the reduction of fracture risk. This dissertation examines associations between cataract surgery and factors related to fracture risk, including the association between cataract surgery and falls and the association between cataract surgery and long-term mortality. The first study of this dissertation uses data from...

  4. Microscopic MR imaging of cataracts at 200 MHz

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An MR microscope (gradient strength, up to 100 gauss/cm; diameter, 7 mm; typical resolution, 20-40 μm) operating at 200 MHz is used to study cataract formation in a rat cataract model. Factors determining image intensity at 200 MHz such as T1, T2, and diffusion are discussed. In particular, these gradient strengths are typical for pulsed gradient diffusion experiments. The authors compare image intensity with the cellular changes accompanying cataract formation

  5. Sutureless Cataract Extraction: Complications and Management; Learning Curves

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bernd Schroeder

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available A key issue in converting to sutureless cataract surgery is training. This article first describes the main surgical steps and complications of sutureless cataract extraction and their management. The second part reports on the training of 11 surgeons in sutureless cataract extraction at Sagarmatha Choudhary Eye Hospital, Lahan. The stepwise, supervised training is described and the learning curves of 11 surgeons analysed.

  6. Surgical magnification for intracapsular cataract surgery in a rural hospital

    OpenAIRE

    Braganza Andrew; Cheng Arthur; Thomas Ravi; Muliyil Jayaprakash

    1996-01-01

    Intracapsular cataract extraction is still the most common type of operation performed in India, especially in eye camps, and most of these are done without magnification. To assess the surgical outcome of intracapsular cataract surgery in a rural hospital with various magnifying systems, 121 consecutive eyes (121 patients) with uncomplicated cataract were randomly allocated to surgery with the operating microscope, binocular loupe or unaided eye. The surgery was performed by either consultan...

  7. Theater for Development Methodology in Childhood Cataract Case Finding

    OpenAIRE

    Roseline Ekanem Duke

    2016-01-01

    The key informant methodology for case finding for childhood cataract  was utilized  in a rural population in Nigeria to identify suitable children who would benefit surgically from intervene for cataract and restore vision such children. It was however noticed that some parents who had children with cataract did not bring their children to the primary health center for examination and recommendation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the benefits of using the theatre for developmen...

  8. The First Cataract Surgeons in Anglo-America

    OpenAIRE

    Leffler, Christopher T; Schwartz, Stephen G.; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Puneet S. Braich

    2014-01-01

    We tried to identify the earliest cataract surgeons in the English-speaking areas of America. In 1751, couching was performed on the Caribbean island of Montserrat by John Morphy. William Stork of England, who couched cataracts, practiced in Jamaica in 1760 and then in cities from Annapolis to Boston between 1761 and 1764. Frederick William Jericho of Germany, upon completion of his training at Utrecht, published his 1767 treatise on his preferred surgical technique of extracapsular cataract ...

  9. Extracapsular cataract extraction under local anaesthesia without retrobulbar injection.

    OpenAIRE

    Redmond, R M; Dallas, N L

    1990-01-01

    Day-case cataract surgery and the need for local anaesthesia are likely to increase. Retrobulbar (and peribulbar) anaesthetic injection is a common technique in cataract surgery, but serious complications are persistently reported. Subconjunctival injection is an alternative that avoids these risks. This retrospective study compares two groups of patients that underwent extracapsular cataract surgery under local anaesthetic. One group (retrobulbar) had uncomplicated retrobulbar injection with...

  10. The pattern of cataract surgery in India: 1992

    OpenAIRE

    Gupta A; Ellwein Leon

    1995-01-01

    Surgery for cataract blindness, a major health problem, is undergoing a rapid transition. This study characterizes cataract surgery in India in terms of practice setting and surgical procedure. A survey questionnaire was mailed in December 1992 to 4356 members of the All India Ophthalmological Society, resident in India, requesting data on cataract surgery cases within the past 12 months. Two thousand one hundred thirty-four (49%) ophthalmologists responded to the survey. Of the 1,023,...

  11. Cytological factors relating to posterior capsule opacification following cataract surgery.

    OpenAIRE

    Jacob, T J; Humphry, R. C.; Davies, E. G.; Thompson, G M

    1987-01-01

    Simulated extracapsular cataract extractions on cadaver eyes were performed which demonstrated that the cells of the anterior capsule remain largely intact and that only a small amount of cortical lens matter remains postoperatively. Human lens epithelial cells from normal and cataractous lenses were grown in culture. There was no appreciable difference in growth rate between cells from normal and those from cataractous lenses or between equatorial and central capsule cells. The cells grew fr...

  12. Some blood plasma constituents correlate with human cataract.

    OpenAIRE

    Donnelly, C.A; Seth, J; Clayton, R M; Phillips, C I; Cuthbert, J; Prescott, R J

    1995-01-01

    AIMS--To look for differences between matched pairs of patients and controls in concentrations of various plasma constituents which might indicate dysfunctions associated with cataract. METHOD--One thousand patients were taken from the cataract waiting list of a specialist eye hospital. For each patient a matched control of the same sex and half-decade of age but without cataract was taken from the patient list of the family doctor of the patient; the control was the next alphabetically after...

  13. New cystotome for intercapsular cataract procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, P W; Allarakhia, L

    1990-05-01

    Intercapsular cataract extraction, a variation of extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE), has recently become popular, particularly in Europe and Asia. It is gaining popularity in the United States among both phacoemulsification and planned ECCE surgeons. The initial steps in the intercapsular capsulotomy include either a linear or curvilinear opening. To facilitate anterior capsulotomy for intercapsular surgery, we developed a disposable 27-gauge cystotome with a specially designed curved configuration. This cystotome also facilitates capsulotomies in deep-set eyes, which may be difficult when standard cystotomes are used. The new cystotome has a conventional beveled tip with a 90-degree bend and a main shaft curved at a radius of 14.5 mm. When attached to a syringe this cystotome allows the surgeon a more comfortable holding position during the capsulotomy procedure. PMID:2355328

  14. Maximal mydriasis evaluation in cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Tony

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose the Maximal Mydriasis Test (MMT as a simple and safe means to provide the cataract surgeon with objective and dependable pre-operative information on the idiosyncratic mydriatic response of the pupil. The MMT results of a consecutive series of 165 eyes from 100 adults referred for cataract evaluation are presented to illustrate its practical applications and value. The results of the MMT allows the surgeon to anticipate problem eyes pre-operatively so that he can plan his surgical strategy more appropriately and effectively. Conversely, the surgeon can also appropriately and confidently plan surgical procedures where wide pupillary dilation is important. The MMT has also helped improve our cost-effectiveness by cutting down unnecessary delays in the operating room and enabling better utilisation of restricted costly resources.

  15. Measuring aniseikonia using scattering filters to simulate cataract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Jason

    2011-12-01

    The relationship between anisometropia and aniseikonia (ANK) is not well understood. Ametropic cataract patients provide a unique opportunity to study this relationship after undergoing emmetropizing lens extraction. Because light scatter may affect ANK measurement in cataract patients, its effect should also be evaluated. The Basic Aniseikonia Test (BAT) was evaluated using afocal size lenses to produce specific changes in retinal height. Several light scattering devices were then evaluated to determine which produced effects most similar to cataract. Contrast sensitivity and visual acuity (VA) losses were measured with each device and compared to those reported in cataract. After determining the most appropriate light scattering device, twenty healthy patients with normal visual function were recruited to perform the BAT using the filters to simulate cataract. Cataract patients were recruited from Vision America and the University of Alabama at Birmingham School of Optometry. Patients between 20 and 75 years of age with at least 20/80 VA in each eye, ≥ 2D ametropia, and normal binocular function were recruited. Stereopsis and ANK were tested and each patient completed a symptom questionnaire. ANK measurements using afocal size lenses indicated that the BAT underestimates ANK, although the effect was minimal for vertical targets and darkened surroundings, as previously reported. Based on VA and contrast sensitivity loss, Vistech scattering filters produced changes most similar to cataract. Results of the BAT using Vistech filters demonstrated that a moderate cataract but not a mild cataract may affect the ANK measurement. ANK measurements on cataract patients indicated that those with ≥ 2 D ametropia in each eye may suffer from induced ANK after the first cataract extraction. With upcoming healthcare reform, unilateral cataract extraction may be covered, but not necessarily bilateral, depending on patient VA in each eye. However, a questionnaire about symptoms

  16. A PROSPECTIVE STUDY OF TRAUMATIC CATARACT AND ITS VISUAL OUTCOME

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Siddharam S

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available : INTRODUCTION: Ocular trauma is the leading cause of unilateral blindness all over the world.[1] The incidence of ocular trauma varies in different parts of the world. From India, the reported incidence is 20.53%.[2] Any strategy for prevention requires knowledge of the cause of injury, which may enable more appropriate targeting of resources towards preventing such injuries.[3] Eye trauma represents a large, potentially preventable burden on both victims and society as a whole. Traumatic cataracts occur secondary to blunt or penetrating ocular trauma, Infrared energy (glass-blower's cataract, electric shock and ionizing radiation are other rare causes of traumatic cataracts.[4] It form a separate category of cataracts as they present with other ocular morbidity like corneal tears, iris injury, vitreous hemorrhage and retinal tears; and they are to some extent, preventable. The methods used to evaluate the visual outcome in eyes managed for traumatic cataracts and senile cataracts are similar, but the damage to other ocular tissues owing to trauma may compromise the visual gain in eyes treated surgically for traumatic cataracts.[5] Hence, the success rates may differ between eyes with these two types of cataract. The aim of this study was to evaluate the final visual outcome of a patient with surgical extraction of traumatic cataract along with demographic features and modes of trauma.

  17. Advances in pharmacological strategies for the prevention of cataract development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Cataractous-opacification of the lens is one of the leading causes of blindness in India. The situation can be managed by surgical removal of the cataractous lens. Various pharmacological strategies have been proposed for the prevention and treatment of cataract. Information on possible benefits of putative anticataract agents comes from a variety of approaches, ranging from laboratory experiments, both in vitro and in vivo , to epidemiological studies in patients. This review deals with the various mechanisms, and possible pharmacological interventions for the prevention of cataract. The article also reviews research on potential anticataractous agents, including aldose reductase inhibitors, glutathione boosters, antiglycating agents, vitamins and various drugs from indigenous sources.

  18. Assessing the elasticity change of cataract lens with OCE

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Chen; Liu, Chih-Hao; Raghunathan, Raksha; Singh, Manmohan; Li, Jiasong; Han, Zhaolong; Larin, Kirill V.

    2016-03-01

    Cataract is one of the most common degenerative diseases that causes blindness. Careful quantification of lens biomechanical properties can greatly assist in early detection of the disease as well as personalization of treatment procedures. In this study, we utilize a phase-sensitive optical coherence elastography (OCE) system to assess the effects of the cold cataract on the biomechanical properties of porcine crystalline lens in vitro. Relaxation rates of air puff induced elastic waves were measured on the same crystalline lens with and without cold cataract. Results demonstrate that the relaxation rate and, thus, associated elasticity of the porcine lens, increased due to the presence of cold cataract.

  19. Control of astigmatism in cataract surgery.

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, N. A.; Sparrow, J M

    1988-01-01

    A study is reported on cataract surgery, with intraocular lens implant, with measurement of the preoperative astigmatism and of the postoperative astigmatism over 28 weeks. Nine interrupted 10/0 nylon sutures are used to close a limbal section. Preoperative astigmatism is compensated for in the method of suturing by the placement of additional sutures. Postoperatively sutures are cut in line with the plus cylinder axis in eyes showing excessive astigmatism with the rule. Final postoperative a...

  20. Sensory exotropia subsequent to senile cataract

    OpenAIRE

    Lou, Ding-hua; Xu, Ye-sheng; Yu-min LI

    2005-01-01

    To evaluate the phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation in patients with sensory exotropia subsequent to senile cataract. The authors prospectively studied the role of phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation on 25 patients by observing visual acuity, ocular alignment, binocular vision and diplopia pre-, 1 month post- and 3 months post-operation. The patients underwent follow-up for three months. Postoperatively, one patient had a corrected visual acuity of 20/50, a...

  1. Intraocular eyelash after uneventful cataract surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Knyazer, Boris

    2010-01-01

    Boris Knyazer, Jaime Levy, Itamar Klemperer, Tova LifshitzDepartment of Ophthalmology, Soroka University Medical Center, Ben-Gurion, University of the Negev, Beer-Sheva, IsraelIntroduction: Intraocular eyelash is an uncommon complication after cataract surgery. We report a very rare case of corneal foreign body after uneventful phacoemulsification surgery. Methods: A 66-year-old man referred to our outpatient ophthalmology clinic for routine examination one week after uneventful phacoemulsifi...

  2. MANUAL SMALL INCISION CATARACT SURGERY (MSICS)

    OpenAIRE

    Mishra,, A.N.; Manavalan; Ramya; Jeevitha; Vinnarasi; Latha; Sridevi; Parth

    2014-01-01

    : In developing country like India, the primary goal is to provide all the benefits to common man at minimal possible cost in visual rehabilitation of cataract. In achieving this goal, the surgery (MICS) described in this article can be extremely helpful. It has almost all the advantages of phacoemulsification, at the same time it is inexpensive. The wound construction, various techniques of nucleus delivery in MSICS are described precisely. This may stimulate the reader towar...

  3. Cataract influence on iris recognition performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Trokielewicz, Mateusz; Czajka, Adam; Maciejewicz, Piotr

    2014-11-01

    This paper presents the experimental study revealing weaker performance of the automatic iris recognition methods for cataract-affected eyes when compared to healthy eyes. There is little research on the topic, mostly incorporating scarce databases that are often deficient in images representing more than one illness. We built our own database, acquiring 1288 eye images of 37 patients of the Medical University of Warsaw. Those images represent several common ocular diseases, such as cataract, along with less ordinary conditions, such as iris pattern alterations derived from illness or eye trauma. Images were captured in near-infrared light (used in biometrics) and for selected cases also in visible light (used in ophthalmological diagnosis). Since cataract is a disorder that is most populated by samples in the database, in this paper we focus solely on this illness. To assess the extent of the performance deterioration we use three iris recognition methodologies (commercial and academic solutions) to calculate genuine match scores for healthy eyes and those influenced by cataract. Results show a significant degradation in iris recognition reliability manifesting by worsening the genuine scores in all three matchers used in this study (12% of genuine score increase for an academic matcher, up to 175% of genuine score increase obtained for an example commercial matcher). This increase in genuine scores affected the final false non-match rate in two matchers. To our best knowledge this is the only study of such kind that employs more than one iris matcher, and analyzes the iris image segmentation as a potential source of decreased reliability

  4. Stabilisation of refraction following extracapsular cataract extraction.

    OpenAIRE

    Baranyovits, P.

    1990-01-01

    Regular serial refraction was used to determine the rate of stabilisation of refraction following routine extracapsular cataract surgery in 85 eyes. Patients were divided into four groups depending on wound closure technique: limbal section closed by interrupted 8-0 virgin silk, 9-0 polydioxanone or 10-0 nylon sutures, and corneal section closed by continuous 10-0 nylon suture. Stabilisation of refraction, sufficient to prescribe satisfactory glasses, occurred at three months except in the in...

  5. Cataract surgery in Fuchs' heterochromic iridocyclitis.

    OpenAIRE

    Sherwood, D. R.; Rosenthal, A R

    1992-01-01

    Eighteen eyes in 17 patients with Fuchs' heterochromic iridocyclitis underwent cataract extraction with or without intraocular lens implantation (17 extracapsular and one intracapsular). Intraoperative complications included hyphaema, poor pupillary dilatations, and localised zonule dehiscence with vitreous loss. Only four eyes developed a marked anterior uveitus (two pseudophakic and two aphakic) which resolved within 2 weeks with topical steroids. Three eyes developed a rise in intraocular ...

  6. Vitamin D deficiency and posterior subcapsular cataract

    OpenAIRE

    Brown, Craig

    2015-01-01

    Craig J Brown,1 Faical Akaichi21The Eye Center, Fayetteville, AR, USA; 2Scotland’s Rural College, Edinburgh, UKPurpose: To evaluate risk factors associated with posterior subcapsular cataract (PSC) development and the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and etiology of PSC.Methods: Of 195 consecutive patients from a private ophthalmology practice, diagnosed with PSC, serum vitamin D3 (25-OH D) levels were obtained for 175, and associations among risk factors, comorbidities, an...

  7. Vitamin D deficiency and posterior subcapsular cataract

    OpenAIRE

    Brown CJ; Akaichi F

    2015-01-01

    Craig J Brown,1 Faical Akaichi21The Eye Center, Fayetteville, AR, USA; 2Scotland’s Rural College, Edinburgh, UKPurpose: To evaluate risk factors associated with posterior subcapsular cataract (PSC) development and the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and etiology of PSC.Methods: Of 195 consecutive patients from a private ophthalmology practice, diagnosed with PSC, serum vitamin D3 (25-OH D) levels were obtained for 175, and associations among risk factors, comorbidities, and PS...

  8. Hollow needle cataract aspiration in antiquity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pérez-Cambrodí, Rafael J; Ascaso, Francisco J; Diab, Fathi; Alzamora-Rodríguez, Antonio; Grzybowski, Andrzej

    2015-12-01

    The dislocation of the crystalline lens or couching technique was the predominant procedure to surgically remove cataracts until the 18th century A.D. However, in the Middle Ages, some Arab physicians tried to aspirate the opaque lens by means of a glass tube following a paracentesis. Some literary sources attributed the origins of this technique to Antyllus of Alexandria, a Greek surgeon who lived in the 2nd century A.D. in the Roman Empire. Nevertheless, this statement remains unclear and is probably the consequence of posterior interpretations or incorrect translations of the manuscripts. In recent years, the discovery of the hollow needles from Montbellet (France) and Viladamat (Spain), in archaeological settlements dated between the 1st century and 3rd century A.D., has reopened the possibility of cataract extraction as an option in the surgical management of soft cataracts in the antiquity. In any case, these findings are exceptional, and thus, probably this technique was not widely practised and very likely disparaged by the medical community. PMID:26385516

  9. Capsulotomy for phacoemulsification in hypermature cataracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vajpayee, R B; Angra, S K; Honavar, S G; Katoch, S; Prasad, N; Bansal, A; Anand, J

    1995-11-01

    We describe a modified surgical technique of anterior capsulotomy and phacoemulsification for use in hypermature cataracts. Surgical steps included inferior linear capsulotomy with aspiration of milky cortex, inflation of the capsular sac with viscoelastic, a reverse triangular anterior capsulotomy with Vannas scissors, and in-the-bag bimanual sculpting of the nucleus. An oval 5 mm x 6 mm posterior chamber intraocular lens was used with single horizontal or no-stitch wound closure. The technique was used successfully in 20 cases of hypermature cataract. The mean time required to perform phacoemulsification was 3.46 minutes (range 1.2 to 6.3 minutes), with a standard deviation of 1.29. Visual acuity on the first postoperative day ranged from 20/20 to 20/60 (median 20/40). At one week, the mean astigmatism was 1.01 diopters (range 0.25 to 2.75 diopters). The mean endothelial cell loss was 13% (range 3.6% to 26.0%). Based on our results, the modified phacoemulsification technique merits consideration for use in hypermature cataracts. PMID:8551435

  10. Incidence and Characteristics of Cataract Surgery in France from 2009 to 2012 : Incidence and characteristics of cataract surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Daien, Vincent; Le Pape, Annick; Hève, Didier; Carriere, Isabelle; Villain, Max

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To report age- and sex-specific incidence rates of cataract surgery in France and evaluate the trends of cataract surgery from 2009 to 2012. Design: Cohort study Subjects: Data for all patients who underwent primary cataract surgery in France between January 2009 and December 2012 were collected from the national database. Methods: Annual incidence rates were calculated and adjusted to the corresponding-year national population data from the French national institute of statistics....

  11. Combined 23-gauge transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy and cataract surgery in cases with cataract and posterior segment diseases

    OpenAIRE

    Yazici Ahmet; Kara Necip; Bozkurt Ercument; Cakir Mehmet; Goker Hasan; Demirok Ahmet; Yilmaz Omer

    2010-01-01

    Background: Combined cataract surgery and transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy are a good option in patients with cataract and vitreoretinal diseases. Aim: To evaluate the effectiveness, outcomes, and complications of combined 23-gauge transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy and cataract surgery. Settings and Design: A retrospective case series was conducted at the Beyoglu Eye Education and Research Hospital. Materials and Methods: In this study, 28 eyes of 28 patients underwent combine...

  12. Manual suture less small incision cataract surgery in patients with uveitic cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rahul Bhargava

    2014-01-01

    Conclusion: SICS with posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation is safe in most cataracts due to uveitis and improves BCVA at 6 months. Inflammation should be well-controlled pre-operatively for at least 3 months. Posterior capsule opacification, macular edema and persistent uveitis were the main factors affecting visual outcome. SICS requires minimal instrumentation, surgical time is short and can also be performed in rural clinics and eye-camps, where phacoemulsification machines are unavailable. SICS may be a more practical and cost-effective technique for uveitic cataract, in such circumstances.

  13. Risk of endophthalmitis after cataract extraction: results from the International Cataract Surgery Outcomes study

    OpenAIRE

    Norregaard, J. C.; Thoning, H.; Bernth-Petersen, P.; Andersen, T. F.; Javitt, J.; G. Anderson

    1997-01-01

    AIM—To estimate risk of infectious endophthalmitis after cataract extraction in Denmark and to compare results with the risk of this complication in the USA
METHODS—In the national Danish administrative hospital register, 19 426 patients were identified who underwent first eye cataract surgery from 1985 to 1987 and who were 50 years of age or older. Of these, 61 patients had postoperative endophthalmitis.
RESULTS—A 12 month cumulative risk of rehospitalisation for endophthalmitis was estimate...

  14. Barriers to cataract surgery in Africa: A systematic review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaheer Aboobaker

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cataract remains the leading cause of blindness in Africa. We performed a systematic literature search of articles reporting barriers to cataract surgery in Africa. PubMed and Google Scholar databases were searched with the terms "barriers, cataract, Africa, cataract surgery, cataract surgical coverage (CSC, and rapid assessment of avoidable blindness (RAAB." The review covered from 1999 to 2014. In RAAB studies, barriers related to awareness and access were more commonly reported than acceptance. Other type of studies reported cost as the most common barrier. Some qualitative studies tended to report community and family dynamics as barriers to cataract surgery. CSC was lower in females in 88.2% of the studies. The variability in outcomes of studies of barriers to cataract surgery could be due to context and the type of data collection. It is likely that qualitative data will provide a deeper understanding of the complex social, family, community, financial and gender issues relating to barriers to uptake of cataract surgery in Africa.

  15. Antioxidant markers in human senile and diabetic cataract ous

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To determine the role of free radicals and antioxidant enzymes in patients suffering from cataract due to aging and diabetes. The study was conducted on 80 cataract patients. Lens and plasma samples from senile and diabetic subjects suffering from cataract were analyzed and activity of Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase (Cu, Zn-SOD) was measured using xanthine oxidase system. Catalase (CAT) activity was estimated. Levels of malondialdehyde (MDA) was measured by thiobarbituric acid reaction. Student's t- test was employed for analysis of results. Significant difference (p<0.001) was found in activity of Cu, Zn-SOD in cataract lenses from diabetic patients as compared to senile subjects, CAT activities was also lower (p<0.001) in lenses from diabetic cataract patients when compared to lenses from senile cataractous subjects. Lens MDA levels were significantly higher (p<0.001) in cataract lenses from diabetic patients than in senile subjects. Plasma MDA levels were lowest (p<0.001) in controls as compared to senile and diabetic cataractous patients. (author)

  16. Congenital cataract screening in maternity wards is effective

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Magnusson, Gunilla; Bizjajeva, Svetlana; Haargaard, Birgitte; Lundström, Mats; Nyström, Alf; Tornqvist, Kristina

    2013-01-01

    screening policy. Response frequency was 96% (122/127). Data were derived from The Pediatric Cataract Register, PECARE Sweden. All Swedish children diagnosed with congenital cataract and operated on before 1 year of age between January 2007 and December 2009 were included. Statistical comparison with...

  17. Application of femtotechnologies and terahertz spectroscopy methods in cataract diagnostics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakhnov, S. N.; Leksutkina, E. V.; Smolyanskaya, O. A.; Usov, A. V.; Parakhuda, S. E.; Grachev, Ya. V.; Kozlov, S. A.

    2011-08-01

    We study the destructive action of femtosecond pulses (200 fs) on the human cataractous crystalline lens and the transmission of the cataractous lens in the terahertz spectral range of electromagnetic oscillations (0.2-1 THz) in relation to the density of the nucleus of the lens.

  18. [Diabetic cataract and flavonoids (first results) (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuenberger, P M

    1978-04-01

    The possible effects of Quercetine, a potent inhibitor of aldose-reductase, on cataract formation and vascular permeability were investigated in streptozotocine-diabetic rats. Preliminary results after peroral administration of Quercetine did not allow to demonstrate a clear inhibitory effect on cataract formation. PMID:418268

  19. Congenital cataract. Report 2. Current strategies of congenital cataract management in children: a review

    OpenAIRE

    N. Ya. Senchenko; K. A. Nagaeva; E. K. Ayuyeva1; T.N. Iureva

    2014-01-01

    Different approaches to surgical and pleoptic treatment of congenital cataract and amblyopia of obscure origin in children are represented. Main tendencies that determine the indications to surgical procedures and their terms are described. Current techniques of aphakia correction, their advantages and disadvantages as well as pleoptic methods of visual system stimulation are discussed

  20. Cataract extraction in eyes filled with silicone oil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moisseiev, J; Bartov, E; Cahane, M; Blumenthal, M; Treister, G

    1992-11-01

    A surgical technique for cataract extraction in eyes filled with silicone oil was developed that has two major objectives: removal of the entire cataractous lens and complete preservation of the silicone oil volume. A regular extracapsular cataract extraction or phacoemulsification is performed, and the incision is closed with the final sutures. All steps are performed under continuous positive pressure achieved with an anterior chamber maintainer connected to a bottle of balanced saline solution. An inferior basal iridectomy is created with a vitrectomy probe, and the posterior capsule is then slowly pulled out through the limbal incision with intraocular forceps, again under positive pressure, in an eye that is actually a closed system, without any loss of silicone. This step results in transformation of the extracapsular cataract extraction condition into an intracapsular cataract extraction condition. The described technique was successfully performed in nine eyes. In the younger patients, the whole procedure was completed through two very small limbal openings. PMID:1444927

  1. [Developments in modern cataract surgery – a critical overview].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menapace, Rupert

    2016-01-01

    Cataract surgery has tremendously evolved in recent years. Innovations include micro-incision cataract surgery through incisions smaller than 2mm, high-fluidics phacoaspiration and laser phacoemulsification to minimize or replace the use of ultrasound, the advent of femtolasers for high-precision incisions in the cornea, the lens capsule and the cataractous lens, aspheric intraocular lenses (IOLs) to enhance the quality and contrast of the image, multifocal and enhanced-depth-of-focus IOLs to correct presbyopia, advancements in biometry and IOL power calculation, prevention of secondary capsule opacification by improvements in the design and material of the IOLs and surgical techniques like capsule polishing and posterior capsulorhexis, and pharmacological prophylaxis and possible future treatment of the cataract itself. Finally, cost-effectiveness and future potential of same-session bilateral cataract surgery are discussed. PMID:26982642

  2. Cataracts in retired actinide-exposed radiation workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation-induced cataracts are predominantly of the posterior sub-capsular (PSC) type, whereas about 90% of age-related cataracts are of other types. Retired workers, likely to have transuranic body burdens, from three DOE-supported installations were questioned regarding their eye-care history and asked for permission to contact their eye-care providers regarding any cataracts. In 97 cases with lifetime exposure records 20 cases (20.6%) were reported to have PSC cataracts. However, of 24 individuals with recorded lifetime doses of 200-600 mSv, nine (37.5%) had PSC cataracts, compared with 15.1% of 73 cases with doses of less than 200 mSv. This difference is statistically significant at the 5% level. (authors)

  3. The genetic and molecular basis of congenital cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandro Santana

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Congenital cataracts are one of the most treatable causes of visual impairment and blindness during infancy, with an estimated prevalence of 1 to 6 cases per 10,000 live births. Approximately fifty percent of all congenital cataract cases may have a genetic cause. All three types of Mendelian inheritance have been reported for cataract; however, autosomal dominant transmission seems to be the most frequent. The transparency and high refractive index of the lens are achieved by the precise architecture of the fiber cells and the homeostasis of the lens proteins in terms of their concentration, stability, and supramolecular organization. Research on hereditary congenital cataract led to the identification of several classes of candidate genes that encode proteins such crystallins, lens specific connexins, aquaporine, cytoskeletal structural proteins, and developmental regulators. The purpose of this study was to review the literature on the recent advances made in understanding the molecular genetic basis of congenital cataracts.

  4. Cataract extraction after brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thirteen eyes of 55 consecutive patients treated with brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid developed postirradiation cataracts. Cataract development was more common in older patients and in patients with larger and more anterior tumors. Eleven eyes had extracapsular cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation. Initial visual improvement occurred in 91% of eyes, with an average improvement of 5.5 lines. Visual acuity was maintained at 20/60 or better in 55% of the eyes over an average period of follow-up of 24 months (range, 6 to 40 months). These data suggest that, visually, cataract extraction can be helpful in selected patients who develop a cataract after brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid

  5. Cataract extraction after brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fish, G.E.; Jost, B.F.; Snyder, W.I.; Fuller, D.G.; Birch, D.G. (Texas Retina Associates, Dallas (USA))

    1991-05-01

    Thirteen eyes of 55 consecutive patients treated with brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid developed postirradiation cataracts. Cataract development was more common in older patients and in patients with larger and more anterior tumors. Eleven eyes had extracapsular cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation. Initial visual improvement occurred in 91% of eyes, with an average improvement of 5.5 lines. Visual acuity was maintained at 20/60 or better in 55% of the eyes over an average period of follow-up of 24 months (range, 6 to 40 months). These data suggest that, visually, cataract extraction can be helpful in selected patients who develop a cataract after brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid.

  6. Internal wave structures in abyssal cataract flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, Nikolay; Liapidevskii, Valery; Morozov, Eugene; Tarakanov, Roman

    2014-05-01

    We discuss some theoretical approaches, experimental results and field data concerning wave phenomena in ocean near-bottom stratified flows. Such strong flows of cold water form everywhere in the Atlantic abyssal channels, and these currents play significant role in the global water exchange. Most interesting wave structures arise in a powerful cataract flows near orographic obstacles which disturb gravity currents by forced lee waves, attached hydraulic jumps, mixing layers etc. All these effects were observed by the authors in the Romanche and Chain fracture zones of Atlantic Ocean during recent cruises of the R/V Akademik Ioffe and R/V Akademik Sergei Vavilov (Morozov et al., Dokl. Earth Sci., 2012, 446(2)). In a general way, deep-water cataract flows down the slope are similar to the stratified flows examined in laboratory experiments. Strong mixing in the sill region leads to the splitting of the gravity current into the layers having the fluids with different densities. Another peculiarity is the presence of critical layers in shear flows sustained over the sill. In the case under consideration, this critical level separates the flow of near-bottom cold water from opposite overflow. In accordance with known theoretical models and laboratory measurements, the critical layer can absorb and reflect internal waves generated by the topography, so the upward propagation of these perturbations is blocked from above. High velocity gradients were registered downstream in the vicinity of cataract and it indicates the existence of developed wave structures beyond the sill formed by intense internal waves. This work was supported by RFBR (grants No 12-01-00671-a, 12-08-10001-k and 13-08-10001-k).

  7. Cataract and progressing keratoconus — solution?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. B. Pershin

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To develop an uniform method of the treatment for patients with progressive keratoconus (stage 1‑2 and cataract. Patients and methods: 4 patients (5 eyes with cataract and progressive keratoconus stage 1‑2 were enrolled in the study. Mean age was 42 years. In all patients, standard ophthalmic examination as well corneal topography, anterior segment optical coherence tomography, biometry, and IOL power calculations using IOLMaster were performed. Mean uncorrected visual acuity (UCVA was 0.1 while mean best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA was 0.4. Surgical technique included two steps. The first step was the creation of corneal tunnels with femtosecond laser with subsequent phaco and monofocal aspheric IOL implantation. The second step (1‑2 weeks later was the implantation of intrastromal ring segments based on corneal topography and corneal crosslinking.Results: After the first step, all patients had myopic refraction (from –1.0 D to –2.5 D. Cylindrical component was almost unchanged. After the second step, the patients reported the vision improvement, mainly due to UCVA. Both spherical (myopic and cylindrical components decreased, mainly due to the steep meridian. After the treatment, optical power of the cornea decreased, mainly due to the steep meridian. UCVA was 0.6 or more in 60 % of cases, final BCVA was 0.8‑1.0 in 80 % of cases. Neither intraoperative nor postoperative (follow-up was 2 years complications were observed.Conclusions: Combined phaco and prior creation of corneal tunnels with subsequent intrastromal ring segment implantation and crosslinking in patients with cataract and progressive keratoconus stage 1‑2 is safe, provides good predictable outcome and significantly reduces rehabilitation period.

  8. VISUAL OUTCOME FOLLOWING SURGERY OF TRAUMATIC CATARACT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad Rao

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To assess the visual outcome following traumatic cataract surgery and to assess the predictors of better visual outcome STUDY SETUP AND DESIGN: This is a prospective case study made on consecutive series of patients with traumatic cataract who underwent surgery between November 2012 to July 2013 at Government Regional eye hospital, Andhra medical college, Visakhapatnam . METHODS: Study was made on 100 eyes of 100 patients. Patient’s detailed history, clinical features, pre - operative examination, surgical intervention, post - operative visual acuity and follow up refraction changes record. RESULTS: In total , 100 eyes of 100 patients were included . Out of 100 cases, 78 cases (78% were males and 22 cases (22% were females. Good visual acuity of 6/6 – 6/18 was achieved by 70 cases, (70% out of which 58 cases (58% are closed globe type and 12 cases ( 12% are open globe type. 4 cases ( 4% achieved visual acuity of 6/24 to 6/609 . ( 1 26 cases ( 26% achieved a poor visual outcome of < 6/60 out of which 22 cases (22% are open globe type and 4 cases 4% are closed globe type . ( 2 CONCLUSIONS: Closed globe injury has a favorable prognosis for a satisfactory better that 6/18 visual recovery after surgical management of traumatic cataract , compared to open globe type. In case of open globe injury . (3 prompt wound repair , proper use of drugs to reduce infection , inflammation followed by timely surgery may improve the visual prognosis if there is no other sight threatening injury.

  9. The association between refractive errors and cataract: The Tehran eye study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Hashemi

    2011-01-01

    Conclusion : Individuals with nuclear and PSC showed a significantly higher prevalence of myopia while the prevalence of hyperopia was lower in those with cataract. High myopia was seen in higher grades of nuclear cataract. The high percentage of hyperopia was also significant in patients with cortical cataract. More studies are necessary to clarify the correlation between cortical cataract and hyperopia.

  10. Copper levels in human mixed, nuclear brunescence, and posterior subcapsular cataract.

    OpenAIRE

    Balaji, M.; K. Sasikala; Ravindran, T

    1992-01-01

    The study was undertaken to determine the copper content in different human cataractous lenses. The level of copper increased with increasing age in nuclear brunescence and mixed cataractous lens and a low amount of copper was observed in the posterior subcapsular cataractous lens with increasing age. Cataractous lenses of females have greater amounts of copper compared with males.

  11. Comparison of Delayed-Onset Glaucoma and Early-Onset Glaucoma after Infantile Cataract Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kang, Kui Dong; Yim, Hye Bin; Biglan, Albert W.

    2006-01-01

    Purpose To investigate the causes and characteristics of glaucoma in children following cataract surgery. Methods Twenty-four patients (37 eyes) with uncomplicated congenital cataracts who developed glaucoma after cataract surgery were studied retrospectively. Variables included cataract morphology, surgical techniques, post-operative complications, time to the onset of glaucoma, gonioscopic findings, presence of microcornea and the histopathologic characteristics of the filtration angle (in ...

  12. Femtosecond laser in refractive and cataract surgeries

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Han-Han; Liu; Ying; Hu; Hong-Ping; Cui

    2015-01-01

    In the past few years, 9 unique laser platforms have been brought to the market. As femtosecond(FS) laserassisted ophthalmic surgery potentially improves patient safety and visual outcomes, this new technology indeed provides ophthalmologists a reliable new option. But this new technology also poses a range of new clinical and financial challenges for surgeons. We provide an overview of the evolution of FS laser technology for use in refractive and cataract surgeries. This review describes the available laser platforms and mainly focuses on discussing the development of ophthalmic surgery technologies.

  13. [The progress of studies on intraocular lens implantation in cataract with high myopia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xue; Wan, Xiuhua

    2015-07-01

    With development of the technology of cataract surgery, combined phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation in cataract with high myopia has been widely carried out in clinical treatment. Due to the particularity of high myopia, phacoemulsification in patients with cataract and high myopia is difficult and has recently received a lot of attentions. In this paper, preoperative examinations, the selection of intraocular lenses, surgery methods and surgical complications of cataract surgery in patients with cataract and high myopia are briefly reviewed. PMID:26310259

  14. Recent Advances in Cataract Operations: Phacoemulsification, Intraocular Lens Implantation and Prolonged-Wear Soft Contact Lenses

    OpenAIRE

    Salz, James J.

    1981-01-01

    A standard cataract extraction involves removal of the entire cataractous lens through a 12- to 13-mm incision with the aid of a cryoprobe while phacoemulsification consists of removing the cataract through a 3-mm incision by breaking the lens into small pieces with an ultrasonically vibrating needle which is then used to aspirate the fragmented cataract. Most ophthalmic surgeons choose to carry out the standard cataract extraction because although phacoemulsification offers a more rapid reha...

  15. The challenges in improving outcome of cataract surgery in low and middle income countries

    OpenAIRE

    Robert Lindfield; Kalluru Vishwanath; Faustin Ngounou; Rohit C Khanna

    2012-01-01

    Cataract is the leading cause of blindness globally and surgery is the only known measure to deal with it effectively. Providing high quality cataract surgical services is critical if patients with cataract are to have their sight restored. A key focus of surgery is the outcome of the procedure. In cataract surgery this is measured predominantly, using visual acuity. Population- and hospital-based studies have revealed that the visual outcome of cataract surgery in many low and middle income ...

  16. Human lens colouration, age and cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The human lens biosynthesises UV filter compounds which effectively remove light in the 300-400nm band. These chemicals are present either as an aid to visual acuity, or to filter out damaging UV radiation. The primate UV filters are 3-hydroxykynurenine analogues derived from the metabolism of tryptophan. We have recently demonstrated that these endogenous UV filters are not innocuous, but are in fact capable of binding to proteins, including the crystalline proteins which make up the bulk of the lens. Thus, over time, the levels of protein - bound UV filters increase and this results in the human lens becoming progressively more yellow as we age. This colouration affects our colour vision and it may also be responsible for the brown colour of lenses which is the hallmark of age-related nuclear cataract. An understanding of the intrinsic instability of the endogenous UV filters, combined with changes in the internal transport of these and other small molecular weight compounds including antioxidants, such as glutathione, is allowing us to gain an insight into the processes responsible for the development of age-related cataract: the major cause of world blindness

  17. How to prevent endophthalmitis in cataract surgeries?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelkar Aditya

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Postoperative endophthalmitis is a very devastating complication and every step should be taken to reduce its occurrence. Unattended air conditioning filter systems are often the culprits and regular maintenance of the filters is of paramount importance. Shedders of pathogenic organisms amongst the theater personnel should be identified by regular screening and should be promptly treated. In addition to the use of Povidone iodine 5% solution in the conjunctival sac few minutes prior to surgery, proper construction of wound, injectable intraocular lenses, use of prophylactic intracameral antibiotics or prophylactic subconjunctival antibiotic injection at the conclusion of cataract surgery, placing a patch after the surgery for at least 4 h and initiating topical antibiotics from the same day of surgery helps to lower the frequency of postoperative endophthalmitis. Intraoperative posterior capsule rupture and anterior vitrectomy are risk factors for acute endophthalmitis, and utmost care to prevent posterior capsular rent should be taken while performing cataract surgery. Also, in case of such complication, these patients should be closely monitored for early signs of endophthalmitis in the postoperative period. In the unfortunate event of endophthalmitis the diagnosis should be prompt and treatment must be initiated as early as possible.

  18. Endothelial trauma in the surgery of cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Đurović Branislav M.

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Cataract surgery is most common in human surgery and comprises 80% of eye surgery programs. Owing to sophisticated technologies, it has become a routine surgery with lowered complications rate; hence, the functional outcome is more conditioned by operative trauma. The aim of this study was to demonstrate the significance of specular microscopy in the evaluation of operative trauma during extra-capsular cataract extraction (ECCE and phacoemulsification (P, in a controlled environment. The study included 100 consecutive patients who met the established criteria, and groups were formed according to the type of surgery by the assignment of successive numbers from a random number table. Examination and photographs of the corneal endothelium, as well as pachymetry were performed on Keeler-Konan Poclington Specular Microscope (KSP. The obtained results revealed significant dissimilarity in endothelial cell reduction (9.17% in group E, and 4.72% in group P, which generated statistically significant correlation of pre-operative and post-operative pachymetry in the group E (p=0.0004. On the basis of the results obtained by specular microscopy, it was concluded that under the same conditions phacoemulsification caused reduced operative trauma of the corneal endothelium.

  19. Risk of occupational radiation-induced cataract in medical workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study was determination of criteria for recognition of a pre senile cataract as a professional disease in health care personnel exposed to small doses of ionizing radiation. Method: The study included 3240 health workers in medical centers of Serbia in the period 1992-2002. A total of 1560 workers were employed in the zone (group A) and 1680 out of ionizing radiation zone (group B). Among group A, two groups had been selected: 1. Group A-1: Health workers in the ionizing radiation zone who contracted lens cataract during their years of service while dosimetry could not reveal higher absorbed dose (A-1=115); 2. Group A-2: Health workers in the ionizing radiation zone with higher incidence of chromosomal aberrations and without cataract (A-2=100). Results: More significant incidence of cataract was found in group A, χ2=65.92; p<0.01. Radiation risk was higher in health workers in radiation zone than in others, relative risk is 4, 6. Elevated blood sugar level was found in higher percentage with health workers working in radiation zone who developed cataract. Conclusion: Low doses of radiation are not the cause of occupational cataract as individual occupational disease. X-ray radiation may be a significant cofactor of cataract in radiological technicians. (author)

  20. Time series analysis of age related cataract hospitalizations and phacoemulsification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moineddin Rahim

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cataract surgery remains a commonly performed elective surgical procedure in the aging and the elderly. The purpose of this study was to utilize time series methodology to determine the temporal and seasonal variations and the strength of the seasonality in age-related (senile cataract hospitalizations and phacoemulsification surgeries. Methods A retrospective, cross-sectional time series analysis was used to assess the presence and strength of seasonal and temporal patterns of age-related cataract hospitalizations and phacoemulsification surgeries from April 1, 1991 to March 31, 2002. Hospital admission rates for senile cataract (n = 70,281 and phacoemulsification (n = 556,431 were examined to determine monthly rates of hospitalization per 100,000 population. Time series methodology was then applied to the monthly aggregates. Results During the study period, age-related cataract hospitalizations in Ontario have declined from approximately 40 per 100,000 to only one per 100,000. Meanwhile, the use of phacoemulsification procedures has risen dramatically. The study found evidence of biannual peaks in both procedures during the spring and autumn months, and summer and winter troughs. Statistical analysis revealed significant overall seasonal patterns for both age-related cataract hospitalizations and phacoemulsifications (p Conclusion This study illustrates the decline in age-related cataract hospitalizations in Ontario resulting from the shift to outpatient phacoemulsification surgery, and demonstrates the presence of biannual peaks (a characteristic indicative of seasonality, in hospitalization and phacoemulsification during the spring and autumn throughout the study period.

  1. The Effect of Cataract on Eye Movement Perimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Thepass

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine how different grades of cataract affect sensitivity threshold and saccadic reaction time (SRT in eye movement perimetry (EMP. Methods. In EMP, the visual field is tested by assessing the saccades that a subject makes towards peripheral stimuli using an eye tracker. Forty-eight cataract patients underwent pre- and postoperative EMP examination in both eyes. The subjects had to fix a central stimulus presented on the eye tracker monitor and to look at any detected peripheral stimulus upon its appearance. A multilevel mixed model was used to determine the factors that affected the sensitivity threshold and the SRT as a function of cataract grade. Results. We found no effect of cataract severity (LOCS III grades I through IV on SRT and the sensitivity thresholds. In cataract of LOCS III grade V, however, we found an increase by 27% and 21% (p<0.001, respectively, compared to the SRT and the sensitivity threshold in LOCS III grade I. Eyes that underwent cataract surgery showed no change in mean SRTs and sensitivity thresholds after surgery in LOCS III grade IV and lower. Conclusion. The present study shows that EMP can be readily used in patients with cataract with LOCS III grade IV and below.

  2. Role of cataract surgery in lowering intraocular pressure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To study the effects of cataract surgery in lowering of intraocular pressure (IOP). Study Design: Retrospective study. Place and Duration of Study: The Department of Ophthalmology, Combined Military Hospital, Rawalpindi from January 2011 to December 2013. Patients and Methods: The study included a total of 250 patients; of which 100 cases had simple cataract with no coexisting disease, 100 cases had cataract with primary open angle glaucoma and 50 cases of cataract had accompanying pseudoexfoliation glaucoma. All patients were assessed and recorded preoperatively for their IOP, vision, depth of anterior chamber (ACD), angle of anterior chamber by gonioscopy and glaucoma medications being used. Cataract surgery was performed by phacoemulsification and IOL implantations in all cases. These patients were followed up for a period of six months. Results: The intraocular ressure of all these patients was recorded at monthly interval for six months. The IOP showed a significant decrease in all cases and remained constant till the end of the study. A marked improvement of vision was noted in all cases. The depth of the anterior chamber increased and the angle also widened in all cases. Discussion: Cataract surgery has been found to reduce IOP along with improvement in vision. Patients with glaucoma have a dual benefit of reduced IOP and visual improvement after cataract surgery. (author)

  3. Small incision cataract surgery: Complications and mini-review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gogate Parikshit

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available This article reviews the literature on manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS and its complications. Various articles on MSICS published in indexed journals were reviewed, as well as the sections on complications of MSICS. The Pubmed search engine on the Internet was used to find out articles published since 1985 on MSICS in any language in indexed journals. Books published by Indian authors and the website of Indian Journal of Ophthalmology were also referred to. MSICS has become very popular technique of cataract surgery in India, and it is often used as an alternative to phacoemulsification. Studies on its efficacy and safety for cataract surgery show that, being a variant of extracapsular cataract surgery, MSICS also has similar intraoperative and postoperative complications. The considerable handling inside the anterior chamber during nucleus delivery increase the chances of iris injury, striate keratitis, and posterior capsular rupture. The surgeon has to be extra careful in the construction of the scleral tunnel and to achieve a good capsulorrhexis. Postoperative inflammation and corneal edema are rare if surgeons have the expertise and patience. The final astigmatism is less than that in the extracapsular cataract surgery and almost comparable to that in phacoemulsification. There is, however, a concern of posterior capsular opacification in the long term, which needs to be addressed. Although MSICS demands skill and patience from the cataract surgeon, it is a safe, effective, and economical alternative to competing techniques and can be the answer to tackle the large backlog of blindness due to cataract.

  4. Femtosecond laser cataract surgery: technology and clinical practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roberts, Timothy V; Lawless, Michael; Chan, Colin Ck; Jacobs, Mark; Ng, David; Bali, Shveta J; Hodge, Chris; Sutton, Gerard

    2013-03-01

    The recent introduction of femtosecond lasers to cataract surgery has generated much interest among ophthalmologists around the world. Laser cataract surgery integrates high-resolution anterior segment imaging systems with a femtosecond laser, allowing key steps of the procedure, including the primary and side-port corneal incisions, the anterior capsulotomy and fragmentation of the lens nucleus, to be performed with computer-guided laser precision. There is emerging evidence of reduced phacoemulsification time, better wound architecture and a more stable refractive result with femtosecond cataract surgery, as well as reports documenting an initial learning curve. This article will review the current state of technology and discuss our clinical experience. PMID:22788831

  5. Ocular safety limits for 1030nm femtosecond laser cataract surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jenny; Sramek, Christopher; Paulus, Yannis M.; Lavinsky, Daniel; Schuele, Georg; Anderson, Dan; Dewey, David; Palanker, Daniel V.

    2013-03-01

    Application of femtosecond lasers to cataract surgery has added unprecedented precision and reproducibility but ocular safety limits for the procedure are not well-quantified. We present an analysis of safety during laser cataract surgery considering scanned patterns, reduced blood perfusion, and light scattering on residual bubbles formed during laser cutting. Experimental results for continuous-wave 1030 nm irradiation of the retina in rabbits are used to calibrate damage threshold temperatures and perfusion rate for our computational model of ocular heating. Using conservative estimates for each safety factor, we compute the limits of the laser settings for cataract surgery that optimize procedure speed within the limits of retinal safety.

  6. Effect of coffee (caffeine) against human cataract blindness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varma, Shambhu D

    2016-01-01

    Previous biochemical and morphological studies with animal experiments have demonstrated that caffeine given topically or orally to certain experimental animal models has significant inhibitory effect on cataract formation. The present studies were undertaken to examine if there is a correlation between coffee drinking and incidence of cataract blindness in human beings. That has been found to be the case. Incidence of cataract blindness was found to be significantly lower in groups consuming higher amounts of coffee in comparison to the groups with lower coffee intake. Mechanistically, the caffeine effect could be multifactorial, involving its antioxidant as well as its bioenergetic effects on the lens. PMID:26869755

  7. Recombinant tissue plasminogen activator following paediatric cataract surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Mehta, J; ADAMS, G

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The use of recombinant tissue plasminogen activator (r-TPA) has been advocated in the treatment of postsurgical fibrinous membrane formation following cataract surgery in adults. Its use in paediatric cases is not well documented.
METHOD—A retrospective review of paediatric cataract extractions performed at Moorfields Eye Hospital between 1 January 1997 and 4 April 1999 was carried out.
RESULTS—Cataract extractions were performed in 37 patients, 22 in males 15 in females. Four (9.2...

  8. Randomised, single-masked non-inferiority trial of femtosecond laser-assisted versus manual phacoemulsification cataract surgery for adults with visually significant cataract: the FACT trial protocol.

    OpenAIRE

    Day, A. C.; Burr, J.M.; Bunce, C; Doré, C J; Sylvestre, Y.; Wormald, R. P.; Round, J.; McCudden, V.; Rubin, G; Wilkins, M R

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cataract is one of the leading causes of low vision in the westernised world, and cataract surgery is one of the most commonly performed operations. Laser platforms for cataract surgery are now available, the anticipated advantages of which are broad and may include better visual outcomes through greater precision and reproducibility, and improved safety. FACT is a randomised single masked non-inferiority trial to establish whether laser-assisted cataract surgery is as good as o...

  9. Visco chop-a new technique for nucleus separation for soft cataracts in femtolaser assisted cataract surgery

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sri; Ganesh; Sheetal; Brar

    2015-01-01

    <正>INTRODUCTION Femtosecond laser technology,introduced clinically for ophthalmic surgery as a technique for creating lamellar flaps in laser in situ keratomileusis(LASIK),has recently been developed into a tool for cataract surgery.Preliminary experience for femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery show appropriate safety and efficacy,and possible advantage over conventional cataract surgery[1-4].The ability of the femtosecond laser to fragment the lens results in the need for less ultrasound energy to be expended inside the eye.Several studies indicate that less effective phacoemulsification time is needed to emulsify the lens

  10. Cataract surgery in a case of carotid cavernous fistula

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay Gopinathan Nair

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF is an abnormal communication between the cavernous sinus and the carotid arterial system. The ocular manifestations include conjunctival chemosis, proptosis, globe displacement, raised intraocular pressure and optic neuropathy. Although management of CCF in these patients is necessary, the ophthalmologist may also have to treat other ocular morbidities such as cataract. Cataract surgery in patients with CCF may be associated with many possible complications, including suprachoroidal hemorrhage. We describe cataract extraction surgery in 60-year-old female with bilateral spontaneous low-flow CCF. She underwent phacoemulsification via a clear corneal route under topical anesthesia and had an uneventful postoperative phase and recovered successfully. Given the various possible ocular changes in CCF, one must proceed with an intraocular surgery with caution. In this communication, we wish to describe the surgical precautions and the possible pitfalls in cataract surgery in patients with CCF.

  11. Cytoprotective mechanism of action of curcumin against cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raman, Thiagarajan; Ramar, Manikandan; Arumugam, Munusamy; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad; Varsha, Mosur Kumaraswamy Nagarajan Sai

    2016-06-01

    This review discusses the relationship between oxidative stress and cataract formation, molecular mechanism of curcumin action and potential benefits of treatment with the antioxidant curcumin. The first section deals with curcumin and endogenous antioxidants. The second section focuses on the action of curcumin on lipid peroxidation. Calcium homeostasis and curcumin will be discussed in the third section. The fourth section discusses the role of crystallin proteins that are responsible for maintaining lens transparency and the role of curcumin in regulating crystallin expression. The interaction of curcumin with transcription factors will be dealt in the fifth section. The final section will focus on the effect of curcumin on aldose reductase, which is associated with hyperglycemia and cataract. One of the strongest antioxidants is curcumin which has been shown to be very effective against cataract. This compound is better than other antioxidants in preventing cataract but its limited bioavailability can be addressed by employing nanotechnology. PMID:26894964

  12. The Effect of Cataract Surgery on Circadian Photoentrainment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted, Adam Elias; Sander, Birgit; Haargaard, Birgitte;

    2015-01-01

    of cataract surgery on circadian photoentrainment and to determine any difference between blue-blocking and neutral intraocular lenses (IOLs). DESIGN: The study was a single-center, investigator-driven, double-masked, block-randomized clinical trial. PARTICIPANTS: One eye in 76 patients with...... bilateral age-related cataract eligible for cataract surgery was included. METHODS: Intervention was cataract surgery by phacoemulsification. Patients were randomized to receive a blue-blocking or neutral IOL. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcome was activation of intrinsic photosensitive ganglion cells...... (P = 0.004) for actigraphy and a tendency toward an earlier melatonin onset (P = 0.095) were found. Peak salivary melatonin concentration increased after surgery (P = 0.037). No difference was detected between blue-blocking and neutral IOLs, whereas low preoperative blue light transmission was...

  13. Cataract incidence in the cohort of occupationally exposed workers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. V. Bragin

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To assess cataract incidence in the cohort of workers occupationally exposed to prolonged radiation. Material and Methods: Cataract incidence was studied in the cohort of workers of the first Russian nuclear enterprise — the Mayak, who were firstly employed at one of the main facilities (reactors, radiochemical and plutonium production plants in 1948‑1958 and followed up to the end of 2008 (12210 persons. Total of 3100 cataract cases were registered in the study cohort. All cataract cases were reviewed and verified by experts; the study included only confirmed senile cataracts. All workers of the study cohort were exposed to external gamma-rays; mean cumulative dose from external gamma-rays was 0.91±0.01 Gy in males and 0.65±0.01 Gy in females. Statistical analysis provided non-standardized and standardized incidence rates per 100 000 workers. Standardization by sex and age was performed by indirect method using internal reference.Results: 2523 cases of senile cataract were included in the study. Mean age of cataract diagnosis was 62.88±0.26 years in males and 64.88±0.28 years in females. Standardized incidence rates of cataract in females were significantly higher as compared to males and increased with workers age. Comparison between the subcohorts of workers with / without diagnosed cataracts demonstrated that among workers with cataracts the proportions of the following groups of workers were significantly higher: workers employed before 1954; workers employed at reactors; smoking workers; workers with the smoking index exceeding 20 pack*years; workers who consumed alcohol; workers with excessive body weight; workers with glaucoma and arterial hypertension. Moreover the mean cumulative dose from external gamma-rays and / or neutron exposure was significantly higher in the subcohort of workers diagnosed with cataracts than that in the subcohort of workers free of the disease. The highest cataract incidence

  14. LIPID PEROXIDATION AND LIPID PROFILE IN PATIENTS WITH SENILE CATARACT

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    Satya Devi

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available : Lipid peroxidation products and biochemical parameters like fasting blood sugar and lipid profile were estimated in serum of 40 senile cataract cases (45-60 years and 40 persons of age and sex matched healthy controls. Plasma Thiobarbituric acid reactive substances (TBARS levels [as Malondialdehyde (MDA] were significantly higher in patients with senile cataract (573±64.4nmol/dl, P<0.001 as compared to healthy controls (378±31.31 nmol/dl. Serum cholesterol, Triglycerides, LDLC, VLDLC levels were increased as compared to controls. But HDLC levels were decreased in senile cataract patients as compared to controls. No significant change was observed in FBS values. The present study shows that the oxidative stress may play an important role in the senile cataract.

  15. Femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery: A current review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Majid Moshirfar

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available To evaluate the safety, efficacy, advantages, and limitations of femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery through a review of the literature. A PubMed search was conducted using topic-appropriate keywords to screen and select articles. Initial research has shown appropriate safety and efficacy of femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery, with improvements in anterior capsulotomy, phacofragmentation, and corneal incision. Limitations of these studies include small sample size and short-term follow-up. Cost-benefit analysis has not yet been addressed. Preliminary data for femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery shows appropriate safety and efficacy, and possible advantage over conventional cataract surgery. Questions to eventually be answered include comparisons of long-term postoperative complication rates-including infection and visual outcomes-and analysis of contraindications and financial feasibility.

  16. Cataract surgery outcomes in a Tertiary Hospital, Riyadh

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    Bader Al-Qahtani

    2016-01-01

    Conclusion: Cataract removal is a safe and effective surgery which can improve the quality of life. It has some complications that can be minimised with good pre-operative evaluation and post-operative rehabilitation.

  17. Six year trend in cataract surgical techniques in Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Hashemi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose : To determine the cataract surgery techniques performed in Iran from 2000 to 2005. Materials and Methods : This study was part of the Iranian Cataract Surgery Survey (ICSS which was a retrospective cross-sectional study. All major ocular surgery units and 10% of randomly selected minor units throughout Iran were included. Excluding the 2 week Iranian New Year holiday, 1 week per season between 2000 and 2005 (a total of 24 weeks was selected for each center, and data on all cataract surgeries performed during these weeks were collected by reviewing patient records. The ANOVA repeated measure test was performed to determine longitudinal changes with a P0.05. Conclusion : Phacoemulsification with IOL implantation has become the preferred cataract surgery method in Iran during recent years.

  18. EPHA2 polymorphisms and age-related cataract in India.

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    Periasamy Sundaresan

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVE: We investigated whether previously reported single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs of EPHA2 in European studies are associated with cataract in India. METHODS: We carried out a population-based genetic association study. We enumerated randomly sampled villages in two areas of north and south India to identify people aged 40 and over. Participants attended a clinical examination including lens photography and provided a blood sample for genotyping. Lens images were graded by the Lens Opacification Classification System (LOCS III. Cataract was defined as a LOCS III grade of nuclear ≥4, cortical ≥3, posterior sub-capsular (PSC ≥2, or dense opacities or aphakia/pseudophakia in either eye. We genotyped SNPs rs3754334, rs7543472 and rs11260867 on genomic DNA extracted from peripheral blood leukocytes using TaqMan assays in an ABI 7900 real-time PCR. We used logistic regression with robust standard errors to examine the association between cataract and the EPHA2 SNPs, adjusting for age, sex and location. RESULTS: 7418 participants had data on at least one of the SNPs investigated. Genotype frequencies of controls were in Hardy-Weinberg Equilibrium (p>0.05. There was no association of rs3754334 with cataract or type of cataract. Minor allele homozygous genotypes of rs7543472 and rs11260867 compared to the major homozygote genotype were associated with cortical cataract, Odds ratio (OR = 1.8, 95% Confidence Interval (CI (1.1, 3.1 p = 0.03 and 2.9 (1.2, 7.1 p = 0.01 respectively, and with PSC cataract, OR = 1.5 (1.1, 2.2 p = 0.02 and 1.8 (0.9, 3.6 p = 0.07 respectively. There was no consistent association of SNPs with nuclear cataract or a combined variable of any type of cataract including operated cataract. CONCLUSIONS: Our results in the Indian population agree with previous studies of the association of EPHA2 variants with cortical cataracts. We report new findings for the association with PSC which is

  19. The Tear Osmolarity Changes After Cataract Surgery

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    Banu Öncel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pur po se: To determine the tear osmolarity changes in patients who had undergone phacoemulsification surgery. Ma te ri al and Met hod: Tear osmolarity measurements were performed in 30 eyes of 30 patients who had undergone cataract surgery without any complication. Measurements were performed before surgery and consecutively at 1st month, 3rd month, and 6th month after the surgery. TearLab osmometer (TearLab Corporation, San Diego, CA, USA device was used for the measurements and paired ttest was used for statistical analysis. Re sults: The mean age of the patients was 72.3±3.7 (67-78 years. Thirteen patients were men and 17 patients were women. The mean osmolarity values were 305.8±6.5 mOsm/L before the surgery and 312.3±6.4 mOsm/L at 1st month, 307.5±5.1 mOsm/L at 3rd month and 305.1±5.7 at 6th month after the surgery. The difference between the values before surgery and at 1st month was found statistically significant (p=0.001. Dis cus si on: The tear osmolarity increases at the first month after surgery but decreases to the levels measured before surgery at the 3rd month. The increase at the first month may be due to the corneal incisions and medication used after the surgery. We think that we have to take into account this similarity increase in all cataract patients, especially in those who also have dry eye disease. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2012; 42: 35-7

  20. Visual experience during phacoemulsification cataract surgery under topical anaesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Visual awareness during phacoemulsification cataract surgery is an important determinant of patient satisfaction with any anaesthetic technique. Topical anaesthesia could be associated with significant visual awareness because it does not affect optic nerve function.
METHODS—The visual experience during phacoemulsification cataract surgery under topical anaesthesia (without sedation) was assessed for 106 consecutive unselected patients. Patients were interviewed immediately af...

  1. Convulsions during cataract surgery under peribulbar anesthesia: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Bensghir, Mustapha; Badou, Najlae; Houba, Abdelhafid; Balkhi, Hicham; Haimeur, Charki; Azendour, Hicham

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Locoregional anesthesia techniques are increasingly used for cataract surgery. From these techniques, peribulbar anesthesia has been very successful over the retrobulbar anesthesia seen its effectiveness and safety. However, peribulbar anesthesia is not without risk. Case presentation A 70-year-old African man was scheduled for cataract surgery and lens implant for his right eye. His medical history included hypertension, diabetes mellitus and gall bladder surgery. There were no ...

  2. Evaluation of Complications of Extracapsular Cataract Extraction Performed by Trainees

    OpenAIRE

    Ezegwui, IR; Aghaji, AE; Okpala, NE; Onwasigwe, EN

    2014-01-01

    Background: Cataract extraction is the most common intraocular surgery taught to residents. Aim: This study aims to review the complications of trainee-performed extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) so as to identify the steps in which the trainee can benefit from closer supervision and practice. Subjects and Methods: This was a descriptive retrospective study of complications in the initial 150 ECCE with intraocular lens implant performed by two Ophthalmologists, from the University of N...

  3. New technology update: femtosecond laser in cataract surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Nagy ZZ

    2014-01-01

    Zoltan Z NagyDepartment of Ophthalmology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, HungaryAbstract: Femtosecond lasers represent a new frontier in cataract surgery. Since their ­introduction and first human treatment in 2008, a lot of new developments have been achieved. In this review article, the physical principle of femtolasers is discussed, together with the indications and side effects of the method in cataract surgery. The most important clinical results are also presented regarding c...

  4. New technology update: femtosecond laser in cataract surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Nagy, Zoltan

    2014-01-01

    Zoltan Z NagyDepartment of Ophthalmology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, HungaryAbstract: Femtosecond lasers represent a new frontier in cataract surgery. Since their ­introduction and first human treatment in 2008, a lot of new developments have been achieved. In this review article, the physical principle of femtolasers is discussed, together with the indications and side effects of the method in cataract surgery. The most important clinical results are also presented reg...

  5. Decrease and conquer: Phacoemulsification technique for hard nucleus cataracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hong Kyun

    2009-10-01

    I describe a technique to improve the control and safety of phacoemulsification during hard nucleus cataract surgery. Whereas the goal of the conventional nucleofractis technique is complete fragmentation of the lens, the technique aims to separate the endonuclear core from the epinucleus. This is done in 3 steps: circumferential disassembly, decreasing the central nucleus volume, and conquering the remnant. The technique offers safer and more effective phacoemulsification in patients with hard nucleus cataracts. PMID:19781457

  6. PRE OPERATIVE CORNEAL ASTIGMATISM IN PATIENTS WITH CATARACT

    OpenAIRE

    Venkateswara Rao; Hanumantha Rao; Sivacharan; Anitha Devi

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To determine corneal astigmatism in patients with cataract posted for surgery. To achieve good visual outcome, significant corneal astigmatism has to be taken care of at the time of surgery either by corneal or limba l relaxing incisions or by implantation of toric intraocular lens. MATERIALS AND METHODS: This is a prospective observational case series conducted on 200 patients with cataract who attended the out - patient department of ophthalmology and c...

  7. "Vitreous loss: Incidence and complications in extracapsular Cataract extractions "

    OpenAIRE

    Nikeghbali A; Mirsamadi M; Hashemi M

    2000-01-01

    One of the dangerous complications of cataract extractions is vitreous loss. The purpose of this stuy is to evaluate the incidence of vitreous loss and its sepuale while teaching residents at Rasoul Akram Hospital in Iran. This study has been conducted on existing records of 730 eyes which were subjectd to extracapsular cataract extractions by 3rd and 4th year, right handed resident of Rasoul Akram hospital. The information was taken from the records of patients who had vitreous loss during c...

  8. Topical Anesthesia for Cataract Surgery: The Patients' Perspective

    OpenAIRE

    Aytekin Apil; Baki Kartal; Metin Ekinci; Halil Huseyin Cagatay; Sadullah Keles; Erdinc Ceylan; Ozgur Cakici

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. To evaluate the analgesic efficacy of 0.5% propacaine hydrochloride as topical anesthesia during phacoemulsification surgery. Methods. Intraoperative pain intensity was assessed using a 5-category verbal rating scale during each of three surgical stages. Pain scores from each surgical stage and total pain scores were compared for the factors of patient age, gender, cataract laterality, and type. Results. In comparison of cataract type subgroups, the mean total pain scores and mean st...

  9. Time series analysis of age related cataract hospitalizations and phacoemulsification

    OpenAIRE

    2006-01-01

    Background Cataract surgery remains a commonly performed elective surgical procedure in the aging and the elderly. The purpose of this study was to utilize time series methodology to determine the temporal and seasonal variations and the strength of the seasonality in age-related (senile) cataract hospitalizations and phacoemulsification surgeries. Methods A retrospective, cross-sectional time series analysis was used to assess the presence and strength of seasonal and temporal patterns of ag...

  10. Cataract surgery without anaesthesia: two descriptions by Arthur Jacob.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haridas, R P

    2009-07-01

    Dr Arthur Jacob (1790-1874), of Dublin, Ireland, was one of the leading ophthalmologists of his time. He was the first to describe the membrane that contains the rods and cones in the eye (membrana Jacobi) and basal cell carcinoma (Jacob's ulcer). He made a curved needle for cataract surgery from a sewing needle (Jacob's needle). Two descriptions of cataract surgery without anaesthesia are presented. PMID:19705632

  11. TARGET EMMETROPIA IN MANUAL SMALL INCISION CATARACT SURGERY

    OpenAIRE

    Sathish; Prakash; Kanchana; Uma; Ambika A.; Amar; Mohan; Jafar,, T

    2013-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Patient dissatisfaction is very common even with go od cataract surgery. Cataract surgery done by phacoemulsification with f oldable IOL implantation results in minimal astigmatism. This results in early rehabilitation t hereby rendering the patient nearly emmetropic for both distant and near work. But the drawbacks of this surgical technique are high cost, steep learning curve and is entirely mach ine dependent. This study has been conducted to ...

  12. Six year trend in cataract surgical techniques in Iran

    OpenAIRE

    Hassan Hashemi; Fatemeh Alipour; Shiva Mehravaran; Farhad Rezvan; Farshid Alaeddini; Akbar Fotouhi

    2011-01-01

    Purpose : To determine the cataract surgery techniques performed in Iran from 2000 to 2005. Materials and Methods : This study was part of the Iranian Cataract Surgery Survey (ICSS) which was a retrospective cross-sectional study. All major ocular surgery units and 10% of randomly selected minor units throughout Iran were included. Excluding the 2 week Iranian New Year holiday, 1 week per season between 2000 and 2005 (a total of 24 weeks) was selected for each center, and data on all cat...

  13. Effect of Cataract Surgery With Phacoemulsification on Diabetic Retinopathy

    OpenAIRE

    BİRİNCİ, H.; SEZGİN, S.; OGE, I.

    2009-01-01

    To asses the influence of cataract surgery and posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation on retinopathy progression, and visual acuity in patients with different stages of diabetic retinopathy (DR). Ninety-three eyes of 76 patients with or without diabetic retinopathy were evaluated prospectively following cataract extraction with posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation between January 1995 and December 2000. The ocular findings were recorded on each follow-up visits for at l...

  14. Oxidative stress as a predictor of cataract surgery outcomes

    OpenAIRE

    M. A. Kovalevskaya; N. V. Vedrintseva

    2015-01-01

    Exhaustion of anti-oxidative potential and oxidative stress are considered as trigger mechanisms of cataract development. Products of free radical oxidation are accumulated in lens. Decrease in water solubility of proteins results in the sorption of uncharged proteins on cellular membranes. This affects regular lenticular membrane folding. Light scattering on folded membranes of lenticular fibers is considered as a primary cause of lens opacities in cataract. Most problems occur in complicate...

  15. MRSA and cataract surgery – reflections for practice

    OpenAIRE

    Porter, LF; Khan, RU; Hannan, A.; Kelly, SP

    2010-01-01

    Introduction Postoperative bacterial endophthalmitis is a devastating complication of cataract surgery. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) endophthalmitis is rare. Recent debate over MRSA screening in United Kingdom (UK) National Health Service (NHS) hospital services has implications for cataract patients and ophthalmology services. Aims To discuss issues for clinical practice as based on reflective experience at a UK district general NHS hospital in relation to care of MRSA-...

  16. Glaucoma in aphakia and pseudophakia after congenital cataract surgery.

    OpenAIRE

    Mandal Anil; Netland Peter

    2004-01-01

    Glaucoma is one of the most common causes of visual loss despite successful congenital cataract surgery. The overall incidence does not appear to have decreased with modern microsurgical techniques. The onset of glaucoma may be acute or insidious and notoriously refractory to treatment. Angle closure glaucoma may occur in the early postoperative period; but the most common type of glaucoma to develop after congenital cataract surgery is open angle glaucoma. Several risk factors have been iden...

  17. Safety of warfarin therapy during cataract surgery under topical anesthesia

    OpenAIRE

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose: To analyze the safety of warfarin therapy during cataract surgery under topical anesthesia. Methods: This was a prospective nonrandomized comparative study of 60 eyes of 60 patients treated with or without concurrent oral warfarin anticoagulant therapy, referred for cataract surgery under topical anesthesia. The sample included a treatment (n=30) and a control (n=30) group. Results: There were no records of intraoperative or postoperative intracameral bleeding complications ...

  18. Benign prostatic hyperplasia: clinical treatment can complicate cataract surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Fernando Facio; Renata Kashiwabuschi; Yutaro Nishi; Ricardo Leao; Peter Mcdonnell; Arthur Burnett

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of alpha-1 adrenergic receptor antagonists for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) regarding potential risks of complications in the setting of cataract surgery. AIM: To address recommendations, optimal control therapy, voiding symptoms and safety within the setting of cataract surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A comprehensive literature review was performed using MEDLINE with MeSH terms and keywords "benign prostatic hyperplasia", "intraopera...

  19. Outcomes of congenital and infantile cataract in the United Kingdom.

    OpenAIRE

    Chak, M. H. G.

    2005-01-01

    Congenital cataract is a rare disorder but is a priority of Vision 2020, the international programme for the elimination of avoidable blindness, reflecting its treatment potential and the consequences for the child and family if left untreated. As the aetiology of congenital cataract is unknown in the majority of cases with only a minority being preventable, informing secondary and tertiary approaches to prevent visual impairment is currently essential. The quality of life of children with co...

  20. CT findings of traumatic cataract (analysis of 53 cases)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To study the findings and the diagnostic value of CT in traumatic cataract. Materials and methods: Out of 75 patients with orbital trauma, 55 cataractous lens were confirmed by clinical observations and operations. The CT appearances of cataract lens were analyzed and compared with the contralateral normal lens. Results: The lens density of the injured eye without traumatic cataract was similar to that of the contralateral normal lens. In 83.6%(46/55) of traumatic cataractous lens, the density was lower than that of the contralateral normal lens and the lens density of 17 was similar to that of the vitreous body. The decrease of lens density was related to the course of disease and the degree of damage, but not related to the cause of trauma, the coincidence rate of the CT and clinical diagnoses was 83.6%. The false negative rate was 16.4%. Conclusion: Decreased density of the injured lens is suggestive of formation of traumatic cataract

  1. Comparison of optical coherence tomography imaging of cataracts with histopathology

    Science.gov (United States)

    DiCarlo, Cheryl D.; Roach, William P.; Gagliano, Donald A.; Boppart, Stephen A.; Hammer, Daniel X.; Cox, Ann B.; Fujimoto, James G.

    1999-10-01

    This paper presents a comparison of in vivo optical coherence tomography (OCT) captured cataract images to subsequent histopathological examination of the lenticular opacities. OCT imaging was performed on anesthetized Rhesus monkeys, known as the delayed effects colony (DEC), with documented cataracts. These monkeys were exposed to several types of radiation during the mid and late 1960s. The radiation and age related cataracts in these animals were closely monitored using a unique grading system developed specifically for the DEC. In addition to this system, a modified version of a common cataract grading scheme for use in humans was applied. Of the original 18 monkeys imaged, lenses were collected at necropsy from seven of these animals, processed, and compared to OCT images. Results showed a direct correlation between the vertical OCT images and the cataractous lesions seen on corresponding histopathological sections of the lenses. Based on the images obtained and their corresponding documented comparison to histopathology, OCT showed tremendous potential to aid identification and characterization of cataracts. There can be artifactual problems with the images related to movement and shadows produced by opacities. However, with the advent of increased speed in imaging and multiplanar imaging, these disadvantages may easily be overcome.

  2. CORNEAL ASTIGMATISM AFTER MANUAL SMALL INCISION CATARACT SURGERY

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    Rajni

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Cataract is the leading cause of preventable blindness in India. Manual Small Incision Cataract Surgery is still the preferred method of cataract surgery because of its low cost and non-dependence on costly equipments. Postoperatively astigmatism is an important cause of poor uncorrected visual acuity after cataract surgery. Purpose: The purpose of this study was to assess corneal astigmatism in manual small incision cataract surgery in superior versus temporal incision. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A total of 100 patients were included in our study. 50 patients received superior incision and 50 patients received temporal incision. Surgically induced astigmatism was calculated in these patients postoperatively. RESULTS: We observed mean 1.16 D of surgically induced astigmatism in patients with superior incision and mean 0.62 D of astigmatism in patients with temporal incision at the end of 12th postoperative week. CONCLUSION: The results of the present study showed a favourable influence of temporal incision over superior incision in manual incision cataract surgery in terms of surgically induced astigmatism.

  3. The pattern of cataract surgery in India: 1992

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    Gupta A

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Surgery for cataract blindness, a major health problem, is undergoing a rapid transition. This study characterizes cataract surgery in India in terms of practice setting and surgical procedure. A survey questionnaire was mailed in December 1992 to 4356 members of the All India Ophthalmological Society, resident in India, requesting data on cataract surgery cases within the past 12 months. Two thousand one hundred thirty-four (49% ophthalmologists responded to the survey. Of the 1,023,070 cataract cases reported, two-thirds were private patients. Among private patients, 26.0% received extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE with intraocular lens (IOL implantation and 20.7% received ECCE without an IOL. Among patients operated under government auspices, 9.1% received ECCE with IOL and 22.4% received ECCE without IOL. Overall, 82.8% of active surgeons reported experience with the ECCE procedure. The cataract case load in the private sector and the frequency of ECCE, with or without IOL implantation, among both private and government-operated cases is greater than previously recognized.

  4. Overview of the current attempts toward the medical treatment of cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A variety of agents are currently available that claim to either prevent, delay, or reverse cataracts associated with aging (senile cataracts), radiation, or diabetes and galactosemia (sugar cataracts). Senile cataract therapy includes formulation containing inorganic salts, nutritional supplements, natural product extracts, sulfhydryl, and sulfonic acid containing compounds and miscellaneous redox and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory compounds. Agents associated with the treatment of radiation cataracts include antioxidants and free radial scavengers. Aldose reductase inhibitors have been effective in the prevention of sugar cataracts. A summary of these agents and their potential ocular effects are presented

  5. Overview of the current attempts toward the medical treatment of cataract

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kador, P.F.

    1983-04-01

    A variety of agents are currently available that claim to either prevent, delay, or reverse cataracts associated with aging (senile cataracts), radiation, or diabetes and galactosemia (sugar cataracts). Senile cataract therapy includes formulation containing inorganic salts, nutritional supplements, natural product extracts, sulfhydryl, and sulfonic acid containing compounds and miscellaneous redox and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory compounds. Agents associated with the treatment of radiation cataracts include antioxidants and free radial scavengers. Aldose reductase inhibitors have been effective in the prevention of sugar cataracts. A summary of these agents and their potential ocular effects are presented.

  6. Evolution of cataract surgery: Smaller incision - less complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Draganić Vladimir

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Cataract surgery has become one of the safest procedures in medicine thanks to advances in technology and surgical techniques. Although minimal, we still witness different complications. The aim of this study was to compare visual outcome and complication rate in different techniques of cataract surgery, ie in cataract surgeries with various corneal incision width. Methods. The study included 3,457 consecutive patients, ie 4,670 eyes that had undergone cataract surgery. The used surgical techniques were: extracapsular cataract extraction, phacoemulsification/ forceps IOL implantation, phacoemulsification/ injector IOL implantation, microincision cataract surgery (MICS. Patient follow up was 6 months. Patients were evaluated for: visual aquity, corneal astigmatism, cellular reaction in the anterior chamber, IOL position. Results. Uncorrected visual aquity 30 days postoperatively was ≥ 0.5 in 30% of the eyes - ECCE; 54.7% of the eyes - phacoemulsification/forceps IOL implantation; 63.0% of the eyes - phacoemulsification/injector IOL implantation; 5/8 of the eyes - MICS. Endophthalmitis was detected in 0.15% of the eyes - ECCE and 0.1% of the eyes - phacoemulsification/forceps IOL implantation. In eyes with phacoemulsification/injector IOL implantation or microincision cataract surgery (MICS there were no cases of endophthalmitis. After a 6-month period intraocular lens were dislocated in 7.2% of the eyes - ECCE, and 0.6% of the eyes - phacoemulsification/PMMA IOL. There was no IOL dislocation in other surgical techniques. Conclusion. Shorter corneal incision implies less complications, less operative trauma, faster visual rehabilitation and better visual outcome.

  7. Comparing the efficacy and safety of phacoemulsification in white mature and other types of senile cataracts

    OpenAIRE

    Ermisş, S S; Öztürk, F; Inan, Ü Ü

    2003-01-01

    Aim: To compare the intraoperative difficulty and postoperative outcome in patients who have white mature cataract in one eye and other types of senile cataract in the other eye undergoing clear corneal phacoemulsification and foldable intraocular lens implantation.

  8. CORTICAL CLEANUP WITHOUT SIDE PORT IN SMALL INCISION CATARACT SURGERY

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    Udaya Kumar

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The aim of study was to achieve complete cortical cleanup and avoid problems related with sideport during Small Incision Cataract Surgery (SICS so as to have a good visual out come with minimal recovery period, and a better quality of life. After nucleus delivery, cortical cleanup is an important step in any cataract surgical procedure. Cortex especially subincisional area (11 to 1 o’clock is difficult to manage intraoperatively. Bimanual irrigation aspiration through two side ports, aspiration by J cannula, iris massage manoeuver, ice cream scoop manoeuver are various techniques of cortical matter aspiration. We acquired the technique of aspiration of subincisional cortex without using side port in all cases by paying attention on type of cataract, status of pupil, use of Adrenalin mixed BSS intraoperatively, Tunnel construction, Capsulorhexis size and capsular rim size at 12 o’clock. MATERIAL AND METHODS In this retrospective study of 1 year from 2013 to 2014, 60 patients (60 eyes aged 40 years or older attending the General Ophthalmic Department were included in the study group with another group of 60 patients (60 eyes as controls. The study was on age related cataracts which are basically. 1 Cortical cataract 2 Nuclear cataract 3 Subcapsular cataract. Proper assessment of cortical cataract based on its maturity such as a Immature b Mature c Hyper mature and d Morgagnian cataract, nucleus for its opalescence and color, size of posterior subcapsular opacity and pupillary status (Dilating well or not with mydriatics were taken into consideration. Eyes with pseudoexfoliation having poor pupillary dilation were also included. Eyes with congenital anomalies, congenital cataract, gross corneal and retinal pathologies, and glaucoma were excluded. RESULTS Among 60 study eyes in the study group 35 presented with cortical, 20 with nuclear cataract and 5 with posterior subcapsular cataracts. In 58(96.6% cases, sideport was not required; 3(5% eyes

  9. Long term outcomes of bilateral congenital and developmental cataracts operated in Maharashtra, India. Miraj pediatric cataract study III

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parikshit M Gogate

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim : To study long term outcome of bilateral congenital and developmental cataract surgery. Subjects: 258 pediatric cataract operated eyes of 129 children. Materials and Methods: Children who underwent pediatric cataract surgery in 2004-8 were traced and examined prospectively in 2010-11. Demographic and clinical factors were noted from retrospective chart readings. All children underwent visual acuity estimation and comprehensive ocular examination in a standardized manner. L. V. Prasad Child Vision Function scores (LVP-CVF were noted for before and after surgery. Statistics: Statistical analysis was done with SPSS version 16 including multi-variate analysis. Results: Children aged 9.1 years (std dev 4.6, range 7 weeks-15 years at the time of surgery. 74/129 (57.4% were boys. The average duration of follow-up was 4.4 years (stddev 1.6, range 3-8 years. 177 (68.6% eyes had vision 6/18 and 157 (60.9% had BCVA >6/60 3-8 years after surgery. 48 (37.2% had binocular stereoacuity <480 sec of arc by TNO test. Visual outcome depended on type of cataract (P = 0.004, type of cataract surgery (P < 0.001, type of intra-ocular lens (P = 0.05, age at surgery (P = 0.004, absence of post-operative uveitis (P = 0.01 and pre-operative vision (P < 0.001, but did not depend on delay (0.612 between diagnosis and surgery. There was a statistically significant improvement for all the 20 questions of the LVP-CVF scale (P < 0.001. Conclusion : Pediatric cataract surgery improved the children′s visual acuity, stereo acuity and vision function. Developmental cataract, use of phacoemulsification, older children and those with better pre-operative vision had betterlong-termoutcomes.

  10. Risk factors for age-related cataract : A prospective cohort study

    OpenAIRE

    Lindblad, Birgitta Ejdervik

    2008-01-01

    Cataract is the most common cause of blindness in the world. Epidemiologic studies have shown that the etiology of cataract is multifactorial. Cataract increases with age and oxidative damage to the lens proteins is suggested to be of importance. The only currently available treatment is surgical extraction of the lens; two thirds of these operations are performed in women. Today in Sweden cataract extraction is the most common operation, with nearly 80,000 operations bei...

  11. Cost-effectiveness of cataract surgery in a public health eye care programme in Nepal.

    OpenAIRE

    Marseille, E.

    1996-01-01

    Presented is an assessment of the cost-effectiveness of cataract surgery using cost and services data from the Lumbini Zonal Eye Care Programme in Nepal. The analysis suggests that cataract surgery may be even more cost-effective than previously reported. Under a "best estimate" scenario, cataract surgery had a cost of US$5.06 per disability-adjusted life year (DALY). This places it among the most cost-effective of public health interventions. Sensitivity analysis indicates that cataract surg...

  12. Usefulness of Surgical Media Center as a Cataract Surgery Educational Tool

    OpenAIRE

    Tomoichiro Ogawa; Takuya Shiba; Hiroshi Tsuneoka

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study retrospectively analyzed cataract surgeries to examine the usefulness of Surgical Media Center (SMC) (Abbott Medical Optics Inc.), a new cataract surgery recording device, for training of cataract surgery. Methods. We studied five hundred cataract surgeries conducted with a phacoemulsification system connected to the SMC. After surgery, the surgical procedures were reviewed, with changes in aspiration rate, vacuum level, and phaco power displayed as graphs superimposed on ...

  13. STUDY OF ASTIGMATISM IN SMALL INCISSION CATARACT SURGERY BETWEEN TEMPORAL AND SUPERIOR INCISSIONS

    OpenAIRE

    Sivacharan; Hanumantharao

    2014-01-01

    Surgically induced astigmatism is a part of cataract surgery. Surgically induced astigmatism varies with distance the incision is made from limbus and site of incision. Small incision cataract surgery a suturless technique of cataract surgery can be done through both temporal and superior sclerocorneal incisions. Since majority of patients undergoing cataract surgery have an against the rule astigmatism, a temporal sclerocorneal incision is better than superior sclera incision...

  14. TGFβ induces morphological and molecular changes similar to human anterior subcapsular cataract

    OpenAIRE

    Lovicu, Frank J.; Schulz, Mark W; Hales, Angela M; Vincent, Lisa N; Paul A Overbeek; Chamberlain, Coral G.; McAvoy, John W.

    2002-01-01

    Background: Transforming growth factor β (TGFβ) has been shown to induce subcapsular plaques in cultured rat lenses as well as in lenses of transgenic mice. In the present study the authors have extended their analysis of these cataract models to determine how closely they mimic human cataract. In particular, they studied the maturation of cataract in the transgenic model to determine if it develops similar features as previously described for anterior subcapsular cataract (ASC) in humans. Fu...

  15. Cataract surgery in Southern Ethiopia: distribution, rates and determinants of service provision.

    OpenAIRE

    Habtamu, E.; Eshete, Z; Burton, MJ

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Cataract is the leading cause of blindness worldwide, with the greatest burden found in low-income countries. Cataract surgery is a curative and cost-effective intervention. Despite major non-governmental organization (NGO) support, the cataract surgery performed in Southern Region, Ethiopia is currently insufficient to address the need. We analyzed the distribution, productivity, cost and determinants of cataract surgery services. METHODS Confidential interviews were conducte...

  16. STUDY OF ASTIGMATISM IN SMALL INCISSION CATARACT SURGERY BETWEEN TEMPORAL AND SUPERIOR INCISSIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sivacharan

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Surgically induced astigmatism is a part of cataract surgery. Surgically induced astigmatism varies with distance the incision is made from limbus and site of incision. Small incision cataract surgery a suturless technique of cataract surgery can be done through both temporal and superior sclerocorneal incisions. Since majority of patients undergoing cataract surgery have an against the rule astigmatism, a temporal sclerocorneal incision is better than superior sclera incisions in respect to astigmatism.

  17. Feasibility and Complications between Phacoemulsification and Manual Small Incision Surgery in Subluxated Cataract

    OpenAIRE

    Ruchi Goel; Saurabh Kamal; Sushil Kumar; Jugal Kishore; Malik, K. P. S.; Sonam Angmo Bodh; Smriti Bansal; Madhu Singh

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the feasibility of cataract surgery with implantation of endocapsular supporting devices and intraocular lens (IOL) in subluxated cataract in phacoemulsification and manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS). Design. Prospective randomized intervention case series consisting of 60 eyes with visually significant subluxated cataract. Method. The patients were randomly distributed between the two groups equally. The main outcome measure was implantation of in-the-bag IOL...

  18. Modified Small Incision Cataract Surgery and Intraocular Lens Implantation in HIV Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Kagmeni Giles; Christelle Domngang; Georges Nguefack-Tsague; Ebana Mvogo Come; Peter Wiedemann

    2015-01-01

    AIM To describe a surgical technique suitable for cataract surgery in regions with a high prevalence of HIV infection. METHODS We reviewed the medical records of 20 consecutive AIDS patients with cataract who underwent modified small-incision cataract surgery (mSICS) with posterior chamber lens implantation. Classic extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) was compared to mSICS. The number of potentially risky steps for contamination during surgery and duration of surgery were analyzed. A ris...

  19. Life quality assessment of patients after phacoemulsification or extracapsular cataract extraction

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To study the quality of life, treatment outcomes, and satisfaction in patients who have undergone cataract surgery Methods: This comparative case series study was conducted at the Ophthalmology Service of the Bettina Ferro de Souza University Hospital, Belém, Pará, Brazil. Totally, 60 patients with cataract were included; 50% underwent conventional extracapsular cataract extraction (ECEE) and 50% underwent cataract extraction by phacoemulsification (PHACO). Patients were interviewe...

  20. Effect of Aqueous Extract of Embelica officinalis on Selenite Induced Cataract in Rats

    OpenAIRE

    Kavitha Nair, Nair; Patel, Kirti; Gandhi, Tejal

    2010-01-01

    Cataract is clouding of the eye lens that reduces the amount of incoming light and results in deteriorating vision. Blindness is thought to reach 75 million by 2020. Of these, unoperated cataract may be expected to account for at least 35 million. Thus, the burden of cataract is increasing remorselessly. Embelica officinalis is reported to have a very good antioxidant property and thus we hypothesized that it could be a good candidate in treatment of cataract. Hence, the aim of this study was...

  1. Effect of radioprotective agents on X-ray cataracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of some protective agents on cataract development is briefly reviewed and new evidence is presented on the efficacy of a phosphorothioate compound (Amifostine) in inhibiting the development of X-ray-induced cataract. Morphological studies showed that at the end of 4 months, lenses from X-irradiated rats which had not received any drugs showed liquefaction in the equatorial region and at the posterior pole, as well as a marked swelling of the fibers in the anterior cortex. Animals which received 1.16g/kg of WR77913 showed considerable protection against the development of radiation induced cataracts with morphological changes in the lens being less severe than in animals receiving no drugs. When animals were treated with 0.5g/kg of Amifostine (WR2721) the lenses showed much greater protection against cataract development than with WR77913. Amifostine appears to be more effective than WR77913 in inhibiting X-ray-induced cataract development. 20 refs

  2. Effect of radioprotective agents on X-ray cataracts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, V.N.; Ikebe, H.; Giblin, F.J.; Clark, J.I.; Livesey, J.C. (Oakland Univ., Rochester, MI (USA))

    1989-01-01

    The effect of some protective agents on cataract development is briefly reviewed and new evidence is presented on the efficacy of a phosphorothioate compound (Amifostine) in inhibiting the development of X-ray-induced cataract. Morphological studies showed that at the end of 4 months, lenses from X-irradiated rats which had not received any drugs showed liquefaction in the equatorial region and at the posterior pole, as well as a marked swelling of the fibers in the anterior cortex. Animals which received 1.16g/kg of WR77913 showed considerable protection against the development of radiation induced cataracts with morphological changes in the lens being less severe than in animals receiving no drugs. When animals were treated with 0.5g/kg of Amifostine (WR2721) the lenses showed much greater protection against cataract development than with WR77913. Amifostine appears to be more effective than WR77913 in inhibiting X-ray-induced cataract development. 20 refs.

  3. The relationship between alpha B-crystallin and radiational cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To examine the expression of soluble α B-crystallin in radiation cataract of rat lens, and to probe the correlation between αB-crystallin and the radiation cataract. Methods: Eyes were irradiated with linear accelerator to establish the model of radiation cataract, rats were divided into the control group, experimental control group and X-irradiated group. All rats were sacrificed three months later, then the lenses were isolated carefully and homogenized in lysate. Lens homogenate was divided into soluble and insoluble fractions by centrifugating at 15000 g at 4 degree C for 20 minutes. The super-natant was obtained for the detection of αB-crystallin with western blot analysis. Results: Observed three months, lens in the normal control group and experimental control group were transparent; typical radiation cataract was formed by degrees in the 25 Gy groups. The soluble αB-crystallin level markedly decreased compared to the control group (P<0.05). Conclusion: X-ray can degrade the soluble αB-crystallin level in lens and lead to cataract. (authors)

  4. The first cataract surgeons in Anglo-America.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leffler, Christopher T; Schwartz, Stephen G; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Braich, Puneet S

    2015-01-01

    We tried to identify the earliest cataract surgeons in the English-speaking areas of America. In 1751, couching was performed on the Caribbean island of Montserrat by John Morphy. William Stork of England, who couched cataracts, practiced in Jamaica in 1760 and then in cities from Annapolis to Boston between 1761 and 1764. Frederick William Jericho of Germany, upon completion of his training at Utrecht, published his 1767 treatise on his preferred surgical technique of extracapsular cataract extraction. Jericho had practiced in the Leeward Islands by 1776 and then in cities from Charleston to Boston between 1783 and 1785. The French surgeon Lewis Leprilete was the first to advertise cataract extraction in the United States in 1782 and probably passed on the skill to his protégé, Nathaniel Miller of Massachusetts. Leprilete was also the first to publicize Benjamin Franklin's invention of bifocals. These pioneers exposed American doctors and the public to cataract surgery. Shortly after their arrival, evidence emerges of other surgeons performing these procedures in America. PMID:25444521

  5. Cataract surgical outcomes in diabetic patients: Case control study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Onakpoya Oluwatoyin

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To determine the visual outcome of cataract surgery in diabetes mellitus with advanced cataract in a tertiary institution in Nigeria. Design: A retrospective case control study conducted at the University College Hospital, Ibadan Nigeria. Subjects: Twenty three consecutive patients with diabetes and 23 age and sex matched non-diabetic control patients who had extracapsular cataract extraction for advanced cataract between 2002-2005. Main outcome: Mean post operative visual acuity and surgical complications. Results: Twenty three patients with diabetes mellitus and 23 non diabetic controls were studied; mean duration of diabetes was 8.1 ± 7.2 years. The mean post operative visual acuity in diabetics was 0.11±0.38, 0.33±0.57 and 0.38±0.49 at one week, two months and six months compared with 0.23±0.19, 0.46±0.37 and 0.48±0.31 in non diabetics. (p=0.207, 0.403 and 0.465 respectively. Improvement in preoperative visual acuity was noted in 84.2% and 90% in diabetics and non-diabetics respectively. Poor visual outcome in diabetics was mainly due to diabetic retinopathy, maculopathy or diabetes related surgical complications. Conclusion: Visual improvement was seen following surgery for advanced cataract in diabetics in this study population. Post operative monitoring for treatment of diabetic retinopathy may enhance visual outcome.

  6. Patient's experiences with quality of hospital care: the Dutch Consumer Quality Index Cataract Questionnaire.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stubbe, J.H.; Brouwer, W.; Delnoij, D.M.J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients' feedback is of great importance in health care policy decisions. The Consumer Quality Index Cataract Questionnaire (CQI Cataract) was used to measure patients' experiences with quality of care after a cataract operation. This study aims to evaluate the reliability and the dimen

  7. Cx43, ZO-1, alpha-catenin and beta-catenin in cataractous lens epithelial cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Anshul I Arora; Kaid Johar; Devarshi U Gajjar; Darshini A Ganatra; Forum B Kayastha; Anuradha K Pal; Alpesh R Patel; Rajkumar S; Abhay R Vasavada

    2012-12-01

    Specimens of the anterior lens capsule with an attached monolayer of lens epithelial cells (LECs) were obtained from patients (=52) undergoing cataract surgery. Specimens were divided into three groups based on the type of cataract: nuclear cataract, cortical cataract and posterior subcapsular cataract (PSC). Clear lenses (=11) obtained from donor eyes were used as controls. Expression was studied by immunofluorescence, real-time PCR and Western blot. Statistical analysis was done using the student’s -test. Immunofluorescence results showed punctate localization of Cx43 at the cell boundaries in controls, nuclear cataract and PSC groups. In the cortical cataract group, cytoplasmic pools of Cx43 without any localization at the cell boundaries were observed. Real-time PCR results showed significant up-regulation of Cx43 in nuclear and cortical cataract groups. Western blot results revealed significant increase in protein levels of Cx43 and significant decrease of ZO-1 in all three cataract groups. Protein levels of alpha-catenin were decreased significantly in nuclear and cortical cataract group. There was no significant change in expression of beta-catenin in the cataractous groups. Our findings suggest that ZO-1 and alpha-catenin are important for gap junctions containing Cx43 in the LECs. Alterations in cell junction proteins may play a role during formation of different types of cataract.

  8. The congenital "ant-egg" cataract phenotype is caused by a missense mutation in connexin46

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Yao, Wenliang; Eiberg, Hans; Funding, Mikkel; Riise, Ruth; Kjær, Klaus Wilbrandt; Hejtmancik, James Fielding; Rosenberg, Thomas

    2006-01-01

    "Ant-egg" cataract is a rare, distinct variety of congenital/infantile cataract that was reported in a large Danish family in 1967. This cataract phenotype is characterized by ant-egg-like bodies embedded in the lens in a laminar configuration and is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. We r...

  9. Cataract surgery in juvenile xanthogranuloma: Case report and a brief review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    R Muralidhar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available There is limited literature on the management of cataracts in juvenile xanthogranuloma (JXG. A 2-month-old girl presented to us with hyphema, secondary glaucoma OU and skin nodules suggestive of JXG. She developed bilateral cataracts during her follow-up and was treated successfully with cataract surgery and aphakic rehabilitation.

  10. Vitrectorhexis versus forceps posterior capsulorhexis in pediatric cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lav Kochgaway

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available This study was done to compare the results of posterior continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis created using forceps with those created using vitrector in eyes suffering from congenital cataract. Vitrectorhexis term was first used by Wilson et al in 1999. [1] Fifty eyes with congenital and developmental cataract were included in this study. The posterior capsulorhexis was created using utrata forceps in 17 eyes or through a vitrector in 33 eyes. Forceps capsulorhexis was performed before IOL implantation, while vitrectorhexis was performed after IOL implantation in the bag. The results of both the surgery were compared using the following criteria: incidence of extension of rhexis, ability to achieve posterior rhexis of appropriate size, ability to implant the IOL in the bag, the surgical time, and learning curve. Vitrectorhexis after IOL implantation was an easy to learn alternative to manual posterior continuous curvilinear capsulorhexis in pediatric cataract surgery. It was more predictable and reproducible, with a short learning curve and lesser surgical time.

  11. [Simultaneous bilateral cataract surgery--advantages and disadvantages].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obuchowska, Iwona; Mariak, Zofia

    2006-01-01

    During the past decade, advances in techniques and technology led to major changes in cataract surgical practice patterns. In this progression towards ever faster eye rehabilitation after surgery, simultaneous bilateral cataract surgery (SBCS) may be the next and ultimate step. It is not routinely performed: however, there are certain situations in which SBCS might be beneficial to the patients. It has been considered a good option in patients who have significant cataract in both eyes and are not good candidates for having anesthesia and surgery twice. The question is, if the benefits by bilateral surgery justify the risk of simultaneous complications, in particular endophthalmitis. In this perspective we present the clinical, social and economic advantages and disadvantages of such surgical procedures. PMID:17290841

  12. Safety of warfarin therapy during cataract surgery under topical anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newton Kara-Junior

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To analyze the safety of warfarin therapy during cataract surgery under topical anesthesia. Methods: This was a prospective nonrandomized comparative study of 60 eyes of 60 patients treated with or without concurrent oral warfarin anticoagulant therapy, referred for cataract surgery under topical anesthesia. The sample included a treatment (n=30 and a control (n=30 group. Results: There were no records of intraoperative or postoperative intracameral bleeding complications in both the groups. At 1-month postoperative follow-up, 90.0% of patients presented spectacle-corrected visual acuity of at least 20/40. Conclusion: Cataract surgery by phacoemulsification with topical anesthesia can be successfully conducted without discontinuing warfarin.

  13. Predicting the Incidence of Human Cataract through Retinal Imaging Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Ting Horng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available With the progress of science, technology and medicine, the proportion of elderly people in society has gradually increased over the years. Thus, the medical care and health issues of this population have drawn increasing attention. In particular, among the common medical problems of the elderly, the occurrence of cataracts has been widely observed. In this study, we developed retinal imaging technology by establishing a human eye module with ray tracing. Periodic hole arrays with different degrees were constructed on the anterior surface of the lens to emulate the eyesight decline caused by cataracts. Then, we successfully predicted the incidence of cataracts among people with myopia ranging from −3.0 D to −9.0 D. Results show that periodic hole arrays cause severe eyesight decline when they are centralized in the visual center. However, the wide distribution of these arrays on the anterior surface of the lens would not significantly affect one’s eyesight.

  14. Predicting the Incidence of Human Cataract through Retinal Imaging Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horng, Chi-Ting; Sun, Han-Ying; Liu, Hsiang-Jui; Lue, Jiann-Hwa; Yeh, Shang-Min

    2015-11-01

    With the progress of science, technology and medicine, the proportion of elderly people in society has gradually increased over the years. Thus, the medical care and health issues of this population have drawn increasing attention. In particular, among the common medical problems of the elderly, the occurrence of cataracts has been widely observed. In this study, we developed retinal imaging technology by establishing a human eye module with ray tracing. Periodic hole arrays with different degrees were constructed on the anterior surface of the lens to emulate the eyesight decline caused by cataracts. Then, we successfully predicted the incidence of cataracts among people with myopia ranging from -3.0 D to -9.0 D. Results show that periodic hole arrays cause severe eyesight decline when they are centralized in the visual center. However, the wide distribution of these arrays on the anterior surface of the lens would not significantly affect one's eyesight. PMID:26610533

  15. Outcomes of Surgery for Posterior Polar Cataract Using Torsional Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selçuk Sızmaz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to report outcomes of surgery for posterior polar cataract using torsional ultrasound. Material and Method: Medical records of 26 eyes of 21 consecutive patients with posterior polar cataract who had cataract surgery using the torsional phacoemulsification were evaluated retrospectively. The surgical procedure used, phacoemulsification parameters, intraoperative complications, and postoperative visual outcome were recorded. Results: Of the 26 eyes, 24 (92.3% had small to medium posterior polar opacity. Two eyes had large opacity. All surgeries were performed using the torsional handpiece. Posterior capsule rupture occurred in 4 (15.3% eyes. The mean visual acuity improved significantly after surgery (p<0.001. The postoperative visual acuity was worse than 20/20 in 5 eyes. The cause of the low acuity was amblyopia. Discussion: Successful surgical results and good visual outcome can be achieved with phacoemulsification using the torsional handpiece. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2013; 43: 345-7

  16. [Incisions for biaxial and coaxial microincision cataract surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, M; Kohnen, T

    2010-02-01

    Microincision cataract surgery (MICS) represents a new level in the development of cataract surgery. Phacoemulsification with intraocular lens (IOL) implantation via incisions of biaxial approach, with separation of the phaco tip and irrigation (B-MICS). Compared with standard small-incision cataract surgery, the advantages of MICS are less corneal astigmatism and fewer corneal surface irregularities, with favorable implications for visual quality and early rehabilitation. In the effort toward smaller incisions, special interest should be given to wound integrity, especially regarding the risk of endophthalmitis. With limited corneal elastic capacity, irreversible expansion of the incision with tissue laceration may occur. Smaller incisions are superior only if they cause less trauma. This requires an optimized relationship between incision size and manipulation during IOL implantation as well as attention to safety issues. MICS offers a platform for new benchmarks in phacoemulsification. PMID:20107810

  17. Natural therapies for ocular disorders, part two: cataracts and glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Head, K A

    2001-04-01

    Pathophysiological mechanisms of cataract formation include deficient glutathione levels contributing to a faulty antioxidant defense system within the lens of the eye. Nutrients to increase glutathione levels and activity include lipoic acid, vitamins E and C, and selenium. Cataract patients also tend to be deficient in vitamin A and the carotenes, lutein and zeaxanthin. The B vitamin riboflavin appears to play an essential role as a precursor to flavin adenine dinucleotide (FAD), a co-factor for glutathione reductase activity. Other nutrients and botanicals, which may benefit cataract patients or help prevent cataracts, include pantethine, folic acid, melatonin, and bilberry. Diabetic cataracts are caused by an elevation of polyols within the lens of the eye catalyzed by the enzyme aldose reductase. Flavonoids, particularly quercetin and its derivatives, are potent inhibitors of aldose reductase. Glaucoma is characterized by increased intraocular pressure (IOP) in some but not all cases. Some patients with glaucoma have normal IOP but poor circulation, resulting in damage to the optic nerve. Faulty glycosaminoglycan (GAG) synthesis or breakdown in the trabecular meshwork associated with aqueous outflow has also been implicated. Similar to patients with cataracts, those with glaucoma typically have compromised antioxidant defense systems as well. Nutrients that can impact GAGs such as vitamin C and glucosamine sulfate may hold promise for glaucoma treatment. Vitamin C in high doses has been found to lower IOP via its osmotic effect. Other nutrients holding some potential benefit for glaucoma include lipoic acid, vitamin B12, magnesium, and melatonin. Botanicals may offer some therapeutic potential. Ginkgo biloba increases circulation to the optic nerve; forskolin (an extract from Coleus forskohlii) has been used successfully as a topical agent to lower IOP; and intramuscular injections of Salvia miltiorrhiza have shown benefit in improving visual acuity and

  18. Prevention of cataract in diabetic mice by topical pyruvate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hegde KR

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available KR Hegde1,3, S Kovtun1, SD Varma1,21Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, 2Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 3Coppin State University, Department of Natural Sciences, Baltimore, MD, USABackground: It has been previously reported that oral administration of sodium pyruvate inhibits oxidative stress and cataract formation in diabetic animals. With a view to exploring the clinical usefulness of these findings, this study examined its preventive effect when administered topically as an eye drop.Methods: Diabetes was induced by intraperitoneal injections of streptozotocin. At the onset of diabetes, an eye drop preparation containing 2.5% sodium pyruvate was administered six times a day at 90-minute intervals. Treatment was continued for 6 weeks. Cataract formation was monitored ophthalmoscopically after mydriasis with 1% tropicamide eye drops. Subsequently, the treated and untreated diabetic animals and the age-matched normal controls were euthanized, their eyes enucleated, and the lenses isolated for biochemical assessment of protein glycation and glutathione levels.Results: Treatment with pyruvate eye drops was found to be significantly effective in inhibiting protein glycation. Glutathione levels were also better maintained. In addition, ophthalmoscopic examination revealed that the incidence of cataract in the pyruvate-treated group was only 12% as compared with the untreated diabetics in whom the incidence was 73%. Cataracts at this stage were largely equatorial.Conclusion: The results demonstrate that topical application of pyruvate can potentially be useful in attenuating or preventing cataract formation induced by diabetes and other conditions of oxidative stress.Keywords: pyruvate eye drops, diabetic cataract, protein glycation, oxidative stress

  19. Low-Dose Radiation Cataract and Genetic Determinants of Radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleiman, Norman Jay [Columbia University

    2013-11-30

    The lens of the eye is one of the most radiosensitive tissues in the body. Ocular ionizing radiation exposure results in characteristic, dose related, progressive lens changes leading to cataract formation. While initial, early stages of lens opacification may not cause visual disability, the severity of such changes progressively increases with dose until vision is impaired and cataract extraction surgery may be required. Because of the transparency of the eye, radiation induced lens changes can easily be followed non-invasively over time. Thus, the lens provides a unique model system in which to study the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure in a complex, highly organized tissue. Despite this observation, considerable uncertainties remain surrounding the relationship between dose and risk of developing radiation cataract. For example, a growing number of human epidemiological findings suggest significant risk among various groups of occupationally and accidentally exposed individuals and confidence intervals that include zero dose. Nevertheless, questions remain concerning the relationship between lens opacities, visual disability, clinical cataract, threshold dose and/or the role of genetics in determining radiosensitivity. Experimentally, the response of the rodent eye to radiation is quite similar to that in humans and thus animal studies are well suited to examine the relationship between radiation exposure, genetic determinants of radiosensitivity and cataractogenesis. The current work has expanded our knowledge of the low-dose effects of X-irradiation or high-LET heavy ion exposure on timing and progression of radiation cataract and has provided new information on the genetic, molecular, biochemical and cell biological features which contribute to this pathology. Furthermore, findings have indicated that single and/or multiple haploinsufficiency for various genes involved in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, such as Atm, Brca1 or Rad9

  20. New technology update: femtosecond laser in cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nagy ZZ

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Zoltan Z NagyDepartment of Ophthalmology, Semmelweis University, Budapest, HungaryAbstract: Femtosecond lasers represent a new frontier in cataract surgery. Since their ­introduction and first human treatment in 2008, a lot of new developments have been achieved. In this review article, the physical principle of femtolasers is discussed, together with the indications and side effects of the method in cataract surgery. The most important clinical results are also presented regarding capsulotomy, fragmentation of the crystalline lens, corneal wound creation, and refractive results. Safety issues such as endothelial and macular changes are also discussed. The most important advantage of femtolaser cataract technology at present is that all the important surgical steps of cataract surgery can be planned and customized, delivering unparalleled accuracy, repeatability, and consistency in surgical results. The advantages of premium lenses can be maximally used in visual and presbyopia restoration as well. The advantages of ­premium lenses can be maximally used, not only in visual, but in presbyopia restoration as well. Quality of vision can be improved with less posterior chamber lens (PCL tilt, more centralized position of the PCL, possibly less endothelial damage, less macular edema, and less posterior capsule opacification (PCO formation. This technological achievement should be followed by other technical developments in the lens industry. Hopefully this review article will help us to understand the technology and the results to ­demonstrate the differences between the use of femtolasers and phacoemulsification-based cataract surgery. The most important data of the literature are summarized to show ophthalmologists the benefits of the technology in order to provide the best refractive results to the patient.Keywords: femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery, capsulotomy, lens fragmentation, corneal wound, arcuate keratotomy, safety

  1. Clinical-epidemiological behaviour of patients after cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leydi E. Jacomino Hernández

    2010-12-01

    Full Text Available Background: Cataract is the leading cause of blindness in the world. Its only effective treatment is surgery, with a high rate of efficiency, but it is not always practiced due to several reasons that limit access to health services.Objective: To identify clinical and epidemiological behaviour of patients after cataract surgery. Methods: An observational, descriptive and cross-sectional study conducted in the "José Joaquín Palma" Ophthalmology Center in the town of San Cristóbal, Guatemala. We included all patients over 18 years old meeting the inclusion criteria who had had a cataract surgery between July and December 2007. The following variables were analyzed: age, sex, skin color, place of origin, ocular and systemic personal medical history, etiologic type of cataract and intra and immediate postoperative complications. Results: 63.3% of the patients are in the 60 years on age group, with a slight predominance of females (51.89% and most of them come from the rural areas (66.66%. Among personal medical histories myopia was detected (14.17% and among systemic medical histories there were arterial hypertension (25.98% and diabetes mellitus (22.04%. Senile cataract was more frequent (52.75%. The most frequent intraoperative complications were posterior capsule ruptures with or without vitreous loss (29.548% and 3.37% respectively and corneal edema in the immediate postoperative (5.48%. Conclusions: The results of clinical and epidemiological characterization of patients after cataract surgery included in this series do not differ from those of similar studies, except for the personal glaucoma history.

  2. Vision related quality of life: A cataract study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Latinović Slobodanka

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Since 1996, advanced methods and new instruments for the assessment of vision quality of life (VisQoL index (37 and 15 have been developed and applied at the University Eye Clinic in Novi Sad. Many researches assume that postoperative results should not be evaluated only by postoperative visual acuity, but also by subjective perception of visual function and the patients ability to perform everyday activities, i.e. by quality of life. Therefore, our clinical results were based on both parameters of visual function, as the most objective attributes for assessing outcomes of certain types of cataract surgery. Material and Methods. Based on the results of the Cataract Study in Vojvodina in 2004, 5.7% of patients waiting for cataract surgery were already blind, 16.5% had low vision with cataract on both eyes, and 57% of patients had monocular blindness. Results and Discussion. With improvement of visual acuity to 0.5 or higher, after cataract surgery in 96.5% of patients, the cumulative VisQoL 15-index changed from 59.3 to 95.5. Intraocular lens implantation contributed most to the significant improvement in the vision related quality of life. Our study showed that pseudophakic patients had better quality of life than aphakic patients, who had the same visual acuity and refractive correction. Difficulties in performing everyday activities, such as shopping, using the telephone and reading, were found in 12.7% of aphakic, but only in 3% of pseudophakic patients. Conclusion. Advanced phacoemulsification techniques enable operated cataract patients immediate vision recovery, better quality of life, and personal satisfaction with visual function in everyday activities.

  3. Summertime UV exposure of Hungarian cataract patients. A pilot study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biologically effective UV dose accumulated by patients with incipient cataract during the three summer months (Jun. - Aug.) of 1995 in Hungary was determined with uracil thin layer personal dosimeters developed by the Res. Biophys. Lab. of the Hungarian Acad. Sci., Budapest. The average biologically effective UV dose of 37 patients (22 cataract, 15 control), whose mean age was 61 ± 9.5 years (cataract 62.6 ± 8.5 years, control: 59.6 ± 10.8 years), was 0.139 H(U) (55.6 MED = 11676 Jm-2 eff). Patients with cortical anterior opacity (7/22) had the highest mean effective UV dose of 0.180 H(U) (72 MED), while patients with post. subcapsular (7/22) and nuclear (2/22) opacities got only 0.051 H(U) (20.4 MED) and 0.072 H(U) (28.8 MED) respectively, half of the cataract patients mean effective dose of 0.142 H(U), or less. The odds of cataract patients for having a workplace with UV exposure (from sunlight o artificial) was higher (OR = 8.0 p = 0.09) (95%C.I.: 0.78 - 197.45). Cataract and control patients answered 'yes' to outgoing behavior regarding their spare time at the same ratio, but 'outgoing' persons accumulated about 4 times higher dose in average (0.219 H(U)), than those who were not (0.059 H(U). At the higher dose range of 0.1-1.0 H(U) the average dose of cataract patients H(U)=0.385, (154 MED) was higher, compared to the control group H(U) =0.252, (100.8 MED) of the same range, suggesting a more outdoor going behavior in the summer, and a possible role of solar UV radiation at cataract formation and progression. (author). 34 refs., 4 figs., 11 tabs

  4. TARGET EMMETROPIA IN MANUAL SMALL INCISION CATARACT SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sathish

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Patient dissatisfaction is very common even with go od cataract surgery. Cataract surgery done by phacoemulsification with f oldable IOL implantation results in minimal astigmatism. This results in early rehabilitation t hereby rendering the patient nearly emmetropic for both distant and near work. But the drawbacks of this surgical technique are high cost, steep learning curve and is entirely mach ine dependent. This study has been conducted to know if it is possi ble to achieve minimal astigmatism with MSICS with rigid PMMA IOL in selected cases th us achieving cost effectiveness and reducing the duration of surgery.

  5. Clinical-epidemiological behaviour of patients after cataract surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Leydi E. Jacomino Hernández; Idalia Triana Casado; Juan C. Medina Perdomo

    2010-01-01

    Background: Cataract is the leading cause of blindness in the world. Its only effective treatment is surgery, with a high rate of efficiency, but it is not always practiced due to several reasons that limit access to health services.Objective: To identify clinical and epidemiological behaviour of patients after cataract surgery. Methods: An observational, descriptive and cross-sectional study conducted in the "José Joaquín Palma" Ophthalmology Center in the town of San Cristóbal, Guatemala. W...

  6. Cataract prevalence and prevention in Europe: a literature review

    OpenAIRE

    Prokofyeva, Elena; Wegener, Alfred; Zrenner, Eberhart

    2012-01-01

    This literature review is aimed at the evaluation of the potential for cataract prevention in Europe. It was performed using Pub-MED with Mesh and free text terms. Studies included were: a) performed on a population of Caucasian origin at an age range of 40-95 years, b) cataract was clinically verified, c) drug record of prescriptions, their indication, a record of every diagnosis, dosage, and quantity of prescribed medicine were available, d) sample size >300, e) published between 1990 and 2...

  7. Combined cataract phacoemulsification and aniridia endocapsular rings implantation in a patient with bilateral congenital aniridia and cataract: A case report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzalez-Salinas, Roberto; Pena-Guani, Fabiola

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this article was to determine the long-term outcome of surgical treatment in a patient with bilateral congenital aniridia and congenital cataracts. The patient was treated by cataract removal and implantation of a single piece IOL in both eyes. Two aniridia rings were also implanted in the capsular bag. The best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), intraocular pressure (IOP), stability of the intraocular lens (IOL) and subjective glare reduction were measured for two years after the surgery. After 10 months, the IOP in the left eye had increased to 26 mmHg despite the fact that anti-glaucoma medication was added. Therefore, the patient was scheduled for an Ahmed valve implantation. These results suggest that good visual outcomes can be achieved in patients with bilateral congenital aniridia and cataracts. Nevertheless, the IOPs must be continuously monitored, and glaucoma screening performed to prevent further complications. PMID:26949363

  8. Efficacy and safety of femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery versus conventional phacoemulsification for cataract: a meta-analysis of randomized controlled trials

    OpenAIRE

    Xiaoyun Chen; Wei Xiao; Shaobi Ye; Weirong Chen; Yizhi Liu

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the efficacy and safety of femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) versus conventional phacoemulsification cataract surgery (CPCS) in the treatment of cataract. Randomized controlled trials (RCTs) were searched in PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials. Nine qualified studies with a total of 989 eyes were included. Compared with CPCS, FLACS significantly reduced mean phaco energy and effective phacoemulsification...

  9. Cataract in leprosy patients: cataract surgical coverage, barriers to acceptance of surgery, and outcome of surgery in a population based survey in Korea

    OpenAIRE

    Courtright, P.; Lewallen, S; Tungpakorn, N.; Cho, B; Lim, Y; Lee, H.; S. Kim

    2001-01-01

    BACKGROUND/AIMS—Cataract is the leading cause of blindness in leprosy patients. There is no population based information on the cataract surgical coverage, barriers to use of surgical services, and outcome of surgery in these patients. We sought to determine these measures of cataract programme effectiveness in a cured leprosy population in South Korea.
METHODS—The population consisted of residents of six leprosy resettlement villages in central South Korea. All residents were invited to part...

  10. EVALUATION OF VISUAL OUTCOME AFTER CATARACT EVALUATION OF VISUAL OUTCOME AFTER CATARACT SURGERY IN CAMP PATIENTS - A STUDY FROM CENTRAL INDIA

    OpenAIRE

    Madhu; Sarkar,, D.; Manghani; Soni

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND : Cataract is the leading cause of avoidable blindness in India. Around 4 million people become blind each year because of cataract. AIM : To assess the visual outcome and complications associated with cataract surgery in camp patients operated at a Medical College tertiary hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS : It was a retrospective study where 412 camp patients underwent posterior chamber intrao cular lens implantation surgery over a period of o...

  11. Mimicking cataract-induced visual dysfunction by means of protein denaturation in egg albumen

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mandracchia, B.; Finizio, A.; Ferraro, P.

    2016-03-01

    As the world's population ages, cataract-induced visual dysfunction and blindness is on the increase. This is a significant global problem. The most common symptoms of cataracts are glared and blurred vision. Usually, people with cataract have trouble seeing and reading at distance or in low light and also their color perception is altered. Furthermore, cataract is a sneaky disease as it is usually a very slow but progressive process, which creates adaptation so that patients find it difficult to recognize. All this can be very difficult to explain, so we built and tested an optical device to help doctors giving comprehensive answers to the patients' symptoms. This device allows visualizing how cataract impairs vision mimicking the optical degradation of the crystalline related cataracts. This can be a valuable optical tool for medical education as well as to provide a method to illustrate the patients how cataract progression process will affect their vision.

  12. Cataract surgery following cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy for posterior uveal malignant melanoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors reviewed the records of thirteen patients with posterior uveal malignant melanoma who had developed a mature radiation cataract following cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy. Cataract extraction had been performed in seven of these patients as of the survey date of this investigation. The authors attempted to determine if cataract extraction increased the risk of metastatic melanoma, improved or worsened visual function, or resulted in any consistent intraoperative or postoperative complications that did not occur if the cataract was retained. This analysis showed that removing the cataract did not appear to increase the risk of death from metastatic melanoma, but it also indicated that cataract extraction did not seem to improve the visual function of the irradiated eye. On the basis of this experience to date, the authors offer suggested guidelines for the management of patients who develop a mature cataract following cobalt-60 plaque radiotherapy of a posterior uveal malignant melanoma

  13. Post-cataract prevention of inflammation and macular edema by steroid and nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory eye drops

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Tendal, Britta; Jørgensen, Karsten Juhl;

    2014-01-01

    with topical nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) in controlling inflammation and preventing pseudophakic cystoid macular edema (PCME) after uncomplicated cataract surgery. PARTICIPANTS: Patients undergoing uncomplicated surgery for age-related cataract. METHODS: We performed a systematic......PURPOSE: Favorable outcome after cataract surgery depends on proper control of the inflammatory response induced by cataract surgery. Pseudophakic cystoid macular edema is an important cause of visual decline after uncomplicated cataract surgery. DESIGN: We compared the efficacy of topical steroids...

  14. Comparison of age-specific cataract prevalence in two population-based surveys 6 years apart

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rochtchina Elena

    2006-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In this study, we aimed to compare age-specific cortical, nuclear and posterior subcapsular (PSC cataract prevalence in two surveys 6 years apart. Methods The Blue Mountains Eye Study examined 3654 participants (82.4% of those eligible in cross-section I (1992–4 and 3509 participants (75.1% of survivors and 85.2% of newly eligible in cross-section II (1997–2000, 66.5% overlap with cross-section I. Cataract was assessed from lens photographs following the Wisconsin Cataract Grading System. Cortical cataract was defined if cortical opacity comprised ≥ 5% of lens area. Nuclear cataract was defined if nuclear opacity ≥ Wisconsin standard 4. PSC was defined if any present. Any cataract was defined to include persons who had previous cataract surgery. Weighted kappa for inter-grader reliability was 0.82, 0.55 and 0.82 for cortical, nuclear and PSC cataract, respectively. We assessed age-specific prevalence using an interval of 5 years, so that participants within each age group were independent between the two surveys. Results Age and gender distributions were similar between the two populations. The age-specific prevalence of cortical (23.8% in 1st, 23.7% in 2nd and PSC cataract (6.3%, 6.0% was similar. The prevalence of nuclear cataract increased slightly from 18.7% to 23.9%. After age standardization, the similar prevalence of cortical (23.8%, 23.5% and PSC cataract (6.3%, 5.9%, and the increased prevalence of nuclear cataract (18.7%, 24.2% remained. Conclusion In two surveys of two population-based samples with similar age and gender distributions, we found a relatively stable cortical and PSC cataract prevalence over a 6-year period. The increased prevalence of nuclear cataract deserves further study.

  15. Emerging issues in radiogenic cataracts and cardiovascular disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In 2011, the International Commission on Radiological Protection issued a statement on tissue reactions (formerly termed non-stochastic or deterministic effects) to recommend lowering the threshold for cataracts and the occupational equivalent dose limit for the crystalline lens of the eye. Furthermore, this statement was the first to list circulatory disease (cardiovascular and cerebrovascular disease) as a health hazard of radiation exposure and to assign its threshold for the heart and brain. These changes have stimulated various discussions and may have impacts on some radiation workers, such as those in the medical sector. This paper considers emerging issues associated with cataracts and cardiovascular disease. For cataracts, topics dealt with herein include (1) the progressive nature, stochastic nature, target cells and trigger events of lens opacification, (2) roles of lens protein denaturation, oxidative stress, calcium ions, tumor suppressors and DNA repair factors in cataractogenesis, (3) dose rate effect, radiation weighting factor, and classification systems for cataracts, and (4) estimation of the lens dose in clinical settings. Topics for cardiovascular disease include experimental animal models, relevant surrogate markers, latency period, target tissues, and roles of inflammation and cellular senescence. Future research needs are also discussed. (author)

  16. Nutritional antioxidants and age-related cataract and maculopathy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loss of vision is the second greatest, next to death, fear among the elderly. Age-related cataract (ARC) and maculopathy (ARM) are two major causes of blindness worldwide. There are several important reasons to study relationships between risk for ARC/ARM and nutrition: (1) because it is likely that...

  17. Cataract production in mice by heavy charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cataractogenic effects of heavy charged particles have been evaluated in mice in relation to dose and ionization density (LET/sub infinity/). The study was undertaken due to the high potential for eye exposures to HZE particles among SPS personnel working in outer space. This has made it imperative that the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in relation to LET/sub infinity/ for various particles be defined so that appropriate quality factors (Q) could be assigned for estimation of risk. Although mice and men differ in susceptibility to radiation-induced cataracts, the results from this project should assist in defining appropriate quality factors in relation to LET/sub infinity/, particle mass, charge, or velocity. Evaluation of results indicated that : (1) low single doses (5 to 20 rad) of iron (56Fe) or argon (40Ar) particles are cataractogenic at 11 to 18 months after irradiation; (2) onset and density of the opacification are dose related; (3) cataract density (grade) at 9, 11, 13, and 16 months after irradiation shows partial LET/sub infinity/-dependence; and (4) the severity of cataracts is reduced significantly when 417 rad of 60Co gamma radiation is given in 24 weekly 17 rad fractions compared to giving this radiation as a single dose, but cataract severity is not reduced by fractionation of 12C doses over 24 weeks

  18. Combined trabeculectomy and cataract extraction-A retrospective study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasad V

    1988-01-01

    Full Text Available Ninety six eyes haying senile cataract and as-sociated open-angle glaucoma had been operated upon over a period of seven years by a combined procedure. The advantages of combined opera-tion have been discussed. The results were en-couraging.

  19. Cataract surgery audit at a private hospital in Saudi Arabia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tariq Alasbali

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The recent trend of intentional overcorrection in one eye following modern cataract surgery in order to provide some functional near vision indicates that benchmark for success in getting “good visual outcomes” postoperatively (vision of ≥6/18 may need to be revised.

  20. #606721 PARTIAL LIPODYSTROPHY, CONGENITAL CATARACTS, AND NEURODEGENERATION [OMIM

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available FIELD NO 606721 FIELD TI #606721 PARTIAL LIPODYSTROPHY, CONGENITAL CATARACTS, AND NEURODEGENERAT ... , glucose, and cholesterol levels were normal. The lean ... body phenotype and metabolic defects observed in t ... E.; Lisanti, M. P.: Caveolin-1-deficient mice are lean , resistant to diet-induced obesity, and show hyper ...

  1. Anesthetic management of cardiac patient for cataract surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We are reporting the successful anesthetic management of a 6 years old child, who had cyanotic congenital heart disease and underwent an operation for cataract extraction. Ketamine was used for the induction and maintenance of anesthesia. Ventilation was assisted manually by using laryngeal masks. (author)

  2. Bilateral photic maculopathy after extracapsular cataract surgery: a case report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalfin, Steven

    1997-05-01

    A 42 year old Caucasian female underwent uncomplicated extracapsular cataract extraction with posterior chamber lens implantation in the left eye, using a Zeiss model OpMi-6 operating microscope. Her postoperative course was unremarkable and she achieved a corrected visual acuity of 20/15+3. A lesion consistent with a photoretinal injury was noted inferior to the fovea. Seven months later the patient underwent cataract extraction in the right eye. Special care was taken to minimize light exposure during the procedure, including reducing the microscope illumination, minimizing operating time, intraoperative pharmacologic miosis, and using a corneal light shield. Despite these precautions, the patient developed a photoretinal injury almost identical to that in the contralateral eye. Postoperative corrected visual acuity was 20/15+3. Recent studies have reported incidences of retinal photic injuries from operating microscopes between 0 and 28 percent of patients. Several risk factors have been identified, including light intensity, intensity of the blue light component, and exposure time. The occurrence of a retinal photic injury in this patient despite precautions, development of bilateral cataracts at a young age, and a strong family history of early cataracts may indicate an inherited susceptibility to light induced damage. The American National Standards Institute is developing a product performance standard which will be applicable to operating microscopes used in ophthalmic surgery. The as yet undetermined role of individual susceptibility to retinal photic injury should be considered in the formulation of this standard.

  3. Morphological features in eyes with endophthalmitis after cataract surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solborg Bjerrum, Søren; Prause, Jan Ulrik; Fuchs, Helle Josefine; la Cour, Morten; Kiilgaard, Jens F

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: To assess the ocular damage that occurs in eyes with postoperative endophthalmitis after cataract surgery (PE) based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) retinal scans of PE eyes and histological specimens of eyes removed due to PE. METHODS: Case-control study and case series. Fifty...

  4. Complicated extracapsular cataract surgery in pseudoexfoliation syndrome: a case report.

    OpenAIRE

    Kirkpatrick, J N; Harrad, R A

    1992-01-01

    Crystalline lens dislocation and zonular dialysis during intraocular surgery are recognised features of the pseudoexfoliation syndrome (PES). A case is reported in which zonular dialysis occurred in both eyes during extracapsular cataract extraction. In particular surgery was complicated by difficulty in performing anterior capsulotomy. Careful preoperative assessment and peroperative technique may help to reduce the risk of surgical complication in PES.

  5. Radioprotective effects of melatonin on radiation-induced cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the mechanisms proposed to explain lens opacification is the oxidation of crystallins, either by radiation or reactive oxygen species (ROS). It has been shown that melatonin has both an anti-peroxidative effect on several tissues and a scavenger effect on ROS. The purpose of this study was to determine the antioxidant role of melatonin (5 mg/kg/day) against radiation-induced cataract in the lens after total-cranium irradiation of rats with a single dose of 5 Gy. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups. Control group received neither melatonin nor irradiation. Irradiated rats (IR) and melatonin+irradiated rats (IR+Mel) groups were exposed to total cranium irradiation of 5 Gy in a single dose by using a cobalt-60 teletherapy unit. IR+Mel and melatonin (Mel) groups were administered 5 mg/kg melatonin daily by intraperitoneal injections during ten days. Chylack's cataract classification was used in this study. At the end of the 10th day, the rats were killed and their eyes were enucleated to measure the antioxidant enzymes i.e. the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and lipid peroxidation level (malondialdehyde (MDA)). Irradiation significantly increased the MDA level, as an end product of lipid peroxidation, and also significantly decreased SOD and GSH-Px activity, emphasizing the generation of increased oxidative stress. Rats injected with melatonin only did not cause cataract formation. Melatonin supplementation with irradiation significantly increased the activity of SOD and GSH-Px enzymes and significantly decreased the MDA level. Total cranium irradiation of 5 Gy in a single dose enhanced cataract formation, and melatonin supplementation protected the lenses from radiation-induced cataract formation. Our results suggest that supplementing cancer patients with adjuvant therapy of melatonin may reduce patients suffering from toxic therapeutic regimens such as chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy and may provide

  6. Retreat of a Giant Cataract in a Martian Outflow Channel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, S.; Warner, N. H.; Kim, J.; Lin, S.; Muller, J.

    2010-12-01

    The circum-Chryse catastrophic outflow channels are the largest valley systems on Mars. Large-magnitude floods are widely considered to have eroded them primarily during the Hesperian epoch. Here we test the hypothesis that outflow channel erosion has been accomplished largely by upstream migration of large cataracts or knickpoints as a consequence of abrupt base-level changes. We describe the evolution of a ~600-m-deep tributary outflow channel to Ares Vallis, Mars. High-resolution topography, image analysis, and crater statistics indicate that this tributary canyon developed by the upstream migration of a large, ~300-m-tall cataract during multiple flood events that span ~1 Ga of Mars history (3.7 to 2.6 Ga). Issuing from Hydapsis Chaos, these floods were initiated at a similar time and occurred over a similar time range to flooding in Ares Vallis, suggesting a potential regional control on flood initiation and chaos formation. Additionally, we provide evidence that cataract retreat and significant incision within the tributary canyon occurred only after a series of down-cutting events within Ares Vallis. Topography data and crater statistics taken from the floor of Ares Vallis indicate a ~300 m base level drop that coincides temporally with an Early Amazonian (~2.6 Ga) flood event and cataract formation within the tributary canyon. The results both confirm the hypothesis of long-term, multiple flood events within martian outflow channels and demonstrate the influence of base-level change on their incision. We compare this martian cataract to terrestrial examples from megaflood terrain.

  7. New technology update: femtosecond laser in cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nagy, Zoltan Z

    2014-01-01

    Femtosecond lasers represent a new frontier in cataract surgery. Since their introduction and first human treatment in 2008, a lot of new developments have been achieved. In this review article, the physical principle of femtolasers is discussed, together with the indications and side effects of the method in cataract surgery. The most important clinical results are also presented regarding capsulotomy, fragmentation of the crystalline lens, corneal wound creation, and refractive results. Safety issues such as endothelial and macular changes are also discussed. The most important advantage of femtolaser cataract technology at present is that all the important surgical steps of cataract surgery can be planned and customized, delivering unparalleled accuracy, repeatability, and consistency in surgical results. The advantages of premium lenses can be maximally used in visual and presbyopia restoration as well. The advantages of premium lenses can be maximally used, not only in visual, but in presbyopia restoration as well. Quality of vision can be improved with less posterior chamber lens (PCL) tilt, more centralized position of the PCL, possibly less endothelial damage, less macular edema, and less posterior capsule opacification (PCO) formation. This technological achievement should be followed by other technical developments in the lens industry. Hopefully this review article will help us to understand the technology and the results to demonstrate the differences between the use of femtolasers and phacoemulsification-based cataract surgery. The most important data of the literature are summarized to show ophthalmologists the benefits of the technology in order to provide the best refractive results to the patient. PMID:24970994

  8. Focussing both eyes on health outcomes: revisiting cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davis Jennifer C

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The appropriateness of cataract surgery procedures has been questioned, the suggestion being that the surgery is sometimes undertaken too early in the disease progression. Our three study questions were: What is the level of visual impairment in patients scheduled for cataract surgery? What is the improvement following surgery? Given the thresholds for a minimal detectable change (MDC and a minimal clinically important difference (MCID, do gains in visual function reach the MDC and MCID thresholds? Methods The sample included a prospective cohort of cataract surgery patients from four Fraser Health Authority ophthalmologists. Visual function (VF-14 was assessed pre-operatively and at seven weeks post-operatively. Two groups from this cohort were included in this analysis: ‘all first eyes’ (cataract extraction on first eye and ‘both eyes’ (cataract removed from both eyes. Descriptive statistics, change scores for VF-14 for each eye group and proportion of patients who reach the MDC and MCID are reported. Results One hundred and forty-two patients are included in the ‘all first eyes’ analyses and 55 in the ‘both eyes’ analyses. The mean pre-operative VF-14 score for the ‘all first eyes’ group was 86.7 (on a 0–100 scale where 100 is full visual function. The mean change in VF-14 for the 'both eyes' group was 7.5. Twenty-three percent of patients achieved improvements in visual function beyond the MCID threshold and 35% saw improvement beyond the MDC. Conclusions Neither threshold level for MDC or MCID for the VF-14 scale was achieved for a majority of patients. A plausible explanation for this is the very high levels of pre-operative visual functioning.

  9. Results of endocapsular phacofracture debulking of hard cataracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davison JA

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available James A Davison Wolfe Eye Clinic, Marshalltown, IA, USA Purpose/aim of the study: To present a phacoemulsification technique for hard cataracts and compare postoperative results using two different ultrasonic tip motions during quadrant removal.Materials and methods: A phacoemulsification technique which employs in situ fracture and endocapsular debulking for hard cataracts is presented. The prospective study included 56 consecutive cases of hard cataract (LOCS III NC [Lens Opacification Classification System III, nuclear color], average 4.26, which were operated using the Infiniti machine and the Partial Kelman tip. Longitudinal tip movement was used for sculpting for all cases which were randomized to receive longitudinal or torsional/interjected longitudinal (Intelligent Phaco [IP] strategies for quadrant removal. Measurements included cumulative dissipated energy (CDE, 3 months postoperative surgically induced astigmatism (SIA, and corneal endothelial cell density (ECD losses.Results: No complications were recorded in any of the cases. Respective overall and longitudinal vs IP means were as follows: CDE, 51.6±15.6 and 55.7±15.5 vs 48.6±15.1; SIA, 0.36±0.2 D and 0.4±0.2 D vs 0.3±0.2 D; and mean ECD loss, 4.1%±10.8% and 5.9%±13.4% vs 2.7%±7.8%. The differences between longitudinal and IP were not significant for any of the three categories.Conclusion: The endocapsular phacofracture debulking technique is safe and effective for phacoemulsification of hard cataracts using longitudinal or torsional IP strategies for quadrant removal with the Infiniti machine and Partial Kelman tip. Keywords: astigmatism, cataract, corneal endothelium, phacoemulsification, viscoelastic

  10. Stenotrophomonas maltophilia endophthalmitis following cataract surgery: clinical and microbiological results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chang JS

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Jonathan S Chang, Harry W Flynn Jr, Darlene Miller, William E Smiddy Department of Ophthalmology, Bascom Palmer Eye Institute, Miller School of Medicine, University of Miami, Miami, FL, USA Background: Stenotrophomonas maltophilia is a Gram-negative organism known to cause opportunistic infections. It is a rare source of endophthalmitis, often in the setting of trauma, but has been reported following cataract extraction. The purpose of this study was to evaluate antimicrobial sensitivities, clinical characteristics, and treatment outcomes in patients with endophthalmitis caused by S. maltophilia following cataract extraction. Methods: A retrospective case review of records from January 1, 1990 to June 30, 2010 was performed at the Bascom Palmer Eye Institute. Results: Eight cases of S. maltophilia endophthalmitis were identified following cataract surgery. Initial visual acuity ranged from 20/200 to light perception. Time to diagnosis with cultures was 2–118 days. Patients received either intravitreal tap and inject (n = 5 or pars plana vitrectomy with intravitreal antibiotic injections (n = 3. All patients had vitreous or anterior chamber cultures positive for S. maltophilia. Seven of seven isolates tested were found to be sensitive to ceftazidime. Seven of eight isolates were sensitive to polymyxin B, six of eight isolates were sensitive to amikacin, and five of the seven isolates tested were sensitive to ciprofloxacin. Two of four tested isolates were sensitive to trimethoprim-sulbactam. All eight isolates were resistant to gentamicin and seven of the seven tested isolates were resistant to imipenem. All patients received intravitreal ceftazidime as part of the initial treatment regimen. Final visual acuity ranged from 20/25 to 4/200. Conclusion: S. maltophilia endophthalmitis is a rare source of endophthalmitis following cataract surgery. A case series of eight independent patients is reported, along with antibiotic resistance profiles and

  11. STUDY OF THE SUBSTRUCTURE OF THE MORGAGNI AND BRUNESCENS CATARACT WITH THE TAO NONCOATING TECHNIQUE .1. MORGAGNI CATARACT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JONGEBLOED, WL; KALICHARAN, D; LOS, LI; WORST, JGF

    1992-01-01

    Lens tissue from a Morgagni cataract was examined by SEM and TEM. For SEM, after prefixation with glutaraldehyde and postfixation with the tannic acid/arginine/OsO4 non-coating (TAO) technique, and for TEM, after prefixation with glutaraldehyde, postfixation with OsO4/K4Fe(CN)6 and poststaining with

  12. STUDY OF THE SUBSTRUCTURE OF THE MORGAGNI AND BRUNESCENS CATARACT WITH THE TAO NONCOATING TECHNIQUE .2. BRUNESCENS CATARACT

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    JONGEBLOED, WL; KALICHARAN, D; LOS, LI; WORST, JGF

    1992-01-01

    Lens tissue from a Brunescens cataract was prepared for SEM study by prefixation with glutaraldehyde and postfixation with the tannic acid/arginine/OsO4 combination; for TEM study the material was prefixed with glutaraldehyde, postfixed with OsO4/K4Fe(CN), and poststained with uranyl acetate/lead ci

  13. On the delights of being an ex-cataract patient: Visual experiences before and after cataract operations; what they indicate

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Nes, Floris L.

    2014-02-01

    This paper is about changes in the author's visual perception over most of his lifetime, but in particular in the period before and after cataract operations. The author was myopic (-3D) until the operations, and emmetropic afterwards - with mild astigmatic aberrations that can be compensated with cylindrical spectacles, but in his case rarely are, because of the convenience of not needing to wear distance glasses in daily life anymore. The perceptual changes concern color vision, stereopsis and visual acuity. The post-cataract changes were partly expected, for example less yellow and more blue images, but partly wholly unexpected, and accompanied by feelings of excitement and pleasure; even delight. These unexpected changes were a sudden, strongly increased depth vision and the sensation of seeing suddenly sharper than ever before, mainly at intermediate viewing distances. The visual acuity changes occur after, exceptionally, his distance glasses are put on. All these sensations lasted or last only for a short time. Those concerning stereopsis were dubbed 'super depth', and were confined to the first two months after the second cataract operation. Those concerning acuity were termed 'super-sharpness impression'; SSI. These can be elicited more or less at will, by putting on the spectacles described; but will then disappear again, although the spectacles are kept on. Ten other ex-cataract patients have been interviewed on their post-operation experiences. The 'super-depth' and SSI experiences may be linked to assumed neurophysiological mechanisms such as the concept of Bayesian reweighting of perceptual criteria.

  14. Endothelial cell loss and refractive predictability in femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery compared with conventional cataract surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Krarup, Therese; Holm, Lars Morten; la Cour, Morten;

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: To investigate the amount of endothelial cell loss (ECL) and refractive predictability by femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) compared to conventional phacoemulsification cataract surgery (CPS). METHODS: Forty-seven patients had one eye operated by FLACS and the contralat......PURPOSE: To investigate the amount of endothelial cell loss (ECL) and refractive predictability by femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) compared to conventional phacoemulsification cataract surgery (CPS). METHODS: Forty-seven patients had one eye operated by FLACS...... and the contralateral eye operated by CPS (stop and chop technique). Both eyes had intraocular aspheric lenses implanted. Uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA), corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), central corneal endothelial cell count and hexagonality with a non-contact specular microscope were assessed...... ± 0.42) by CPS (p = 0.56). Mean CDVA was 0.89 (0.3; 1.25) by FLACS and 0.93 (0.4; 1.25) by CPS at 3 months postoperatively (p = 0.36). Within both groups, 70% gained a CDVA of 6/6. Mean surgery time was 9.3 min (SD ± 1.9) by FLACS and 8.0 min (SD ± 1.9) by CPS, (p = 0.0018). Mean phaco energy was 3...

  15. Exome sequencing of 18 Chinese families with congenital cataracts: a new sight of the NHS gene.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wenmin Sun

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: The aim of this study was to investigate the mutation spectrum and frequency of 34 known genes in 18 Chinese families with congenital cataracts. METHODS: Genomic DNA and clinical data was collected from 18 families with congenital cataracts. Variations in 34 cataract-associated genes were screened by whole exome sequencing and then validated by Sanger sequencing. RESULTS: Eleven candidate variants in seven of the 34 genes were detected by exome sequencing and then confirmed by Sanger sequencing, including two variants predicted to be benign and the other pathogenic mutations. The nine mutations were present in 9 of the 18 (50% families with congenital cataracts. Of the four families with mutations in the X-linked NHS gene, no other abnormalities were recorded except for cataract, in which a pseudo-dominant inheritance form was suggested, as female carriers also had different forms of cataracts. CONCLUSION: This study expands the mutation spectrum and frequency of genes responsible for congenital cataract. Mutation in NHS is a common cause of nonsyndromic congenital cataract with pseudo-autosomal dominant inheritance. Combined with our previous studies, a genetic basis could be identified in 67.6% of families with congenital cataracts in our case series, in which mutations in genes encoding crystallins, genes encoding connexins, and NHS are responsible for 29.4%, 14.7%, and 11.8% of families, respectively. Our results suggest that mutations in NHS are the common cause of congenital cataract, both syndromic and nonsyndromic.

  16. Strabismus and Nystagmus Following Cataract Surgeries in Childhood

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ayşe Yeşim Oral

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Pur po se: To evaluate the incidence of strabismus in pediatric cataracts and the effects of strabismus and nystagmus accompanied by cataract on postoperative visual acuity. Ma te ri als and Met hod: Seventy-four eyes of 45 patients under 15 years old who had undergone cataract operation were included in this study. The mean postoperative follow-up period was 1.57±2.25 years (ranged between 3 months and 9 years. Twenty-nine of the patients (64% had bilateral and 16 of the patients (36% had unilateral cataract. Preoperative and postoperative visual acuities, as well as the presence of nystagmus and strabismus were recorded. Re sults: Seventeen of the patients (38% had strabismus: 9 of them (53% had esotropia (ET, and 8 of them had (47% exotropia (XT. Fourteen (19% of the total number of cases had nystagmus. The mean age was 5.8±4.4 years for the total group of patients, 4.6±3.0 years for patients with strabismus and 5.1±3.7 years for patients with nystagmus. Visual acuity measurements were not possible in 26 uncooperative patients. The visual acuity was 0.3 logMAR and over in 15 (31% and 1.0 logMAR and under in 12 (25% of the remaining of 48 eyes. Of a total of 28 eyes with strabismus, we were unable to measure visual acuity in 10 patients, and the visual acuities were 0.3 logMAR and over in 7 (39% and 1.0 logMAR and under in 5 (28% of the rest of the 18 patients. The mean visual acuity was significantly lower in the 8 of 14 patients with nystagmus whose visual acuity could be measured (1.25±0.45 logMAR than in both the patients without strabismus (0.44±0.59 logMAR and the patients with strabismus (0.66±0.56 logMAR (p=0.019 and p=0.015, respectively. Dis cus si on: Although strabismus is seen more often in childhood cataracts compared to general population, the presence of strabismus has no negative effect on visual acuity after cataract surgery, while nystagmus is the main factor limiting the visual outcome. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2012; 42

  17. Results of cataract surgery in the very elderly population

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michalska-Małecka K

    2013-08-01

    Full Text Available Katarzyna Michalska-Małecka,1 Mariusz Nowak,2 Piotr Gościniewicz,1 Jacek Karpe,3 Ludmiła Słowińska-Łożyńska,4 Agnieszka Łypaczewska,1 Dorota Romaniuk11Department of Ophthalmology, University Hospital No 5, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, 2Pathophysiology Division, Department of Pathophysiology and Endocrinology, Medical University of Silesia, Zabrze, 3Department of Anesthesiology and Intensive Therapy, Medical University of Silesia, Zabrze, 4Department of Biophysics, Faculty of Medicine in Zabrze, Medical University of Silesia, Katowice, Silesia, PolandAim: The aim of our study was to retrospectively evaluate the effectiveness and safety of cataract surgery and intraocular lens implantation (IOL for patients aged 90 years or older, whom we define as “very elderly.”Methods: The study involved a total number of 122 patients (122 eyes with senile cataracts. The mean age of patients was 91.2 ± 2.3 years (range 90–100 years old. Phacoemulsification (phaco was done on 113 of 122 eyes, and 9 of 122 eyes had extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE. Postoperative visual acuity and intraocular pressure (IOP were analyzed on the first postoperative day, 3 months after surgery, and 6 months after surgery.Results: Best corrected visual acuity (BCVA improved in 100 of 122 eyes (82.0%. BCVA remained the same in 20 of 122 eyes (16.4% and decreased in 2 of 122 eyes (1.6%, mainly because of coexisting age-related macular degeneration (AMD. The BCVA 3 months after surgery was ≥0.8 in 23 of 122 eyes (18.9%, between 0.5 and 0.7 in 28 of 122 eyes (22.3%, and between 0.2 and 0.4 in 33 of 122 eyes (27.1%. We found significant implications of cataract surgery on decreasing IOP in the studied group of patients suffering from glaucoma compared to the patients without glaucoma.Conclusion: Advanced age is not a contraindication for cataract surgery. The results of the study showed that when systemic conditions are stable, both phaco and ECCE with

  18. Locus for a human hereditary cataract is closely linked to the γ-crystallin gene family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Within the human γ-crystallin gene cluster polymorphic Taq I sites are present. These give rise to three sets of allelic fragments from the γ-crystallin genes. Together these restriction fragment length polymorphisms define eight possible haplotypes, three of which (Q, R, and S) were found in the Dutch and English population. A fourth haplotype (P) was detected within a family in which a hereditary Coppock-like cataract of the embryonic lens nucleus occurs in heterozygotes. Haplotype P was found only in family members who suffered from cataract, and all family members who suffered from cataract had haplotype P. The absolute correlation between the presence of haplotype P and cataract within this family shows that the γ-crystallin gene cluster and the locus for the Coppock-like cataract are closely linked. This linkage provides genetic evidence that the primary cause of a cataract in humans could possibly be a lesion in a crystallin gene

  19. Selenite cataract and its attenuation by vitamin E in wistar rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mathew Joe

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To study the role of vitamin E in preventing cataract formation in experimental animals. Methods: An experimental model (selenite cataract was selected for this study. Selenite cataract was produced in rats by subcutaneous administration of sodium selenite. Biochemical and histological changes following induction of selenite cataract in weanling wistar rats were studied vis-à-vis the role of vitamin E in attenuating or preventing cataractogenesis. Results: Vitamin E was capable of preventing selenite cataractogenesis. Selenite cataract did not develop in 91.6% (11 of 12 and 76.7% (8 of 12 vitamin E treated rats, when administered on the 12th and 10th post partum day respectively. Conclusion: The study confirmed that selenite induced cataract in wistar rats is attenuated by vitamin E.

  20. Health Literacy, Computer Skills and Quality of Patient-Physician Communication in Chinese Patients with Cataract

    OpenAIRE

    Xianchai Lin; Mei Wang; Yajing Zuo; Mingge Li; Xiaofeng Lin; Siping Zhu; Yongxin Zheng; Minbin Yu; Lamoureux, Ecosse L.

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: The aim of the study was to assess levels of health literacy and computer skills in Chinese patients with cataract, and their impact on the doctor-patient relationship. METHODS: We undertook a cross-sectional study of cataract patients scheduled for cataract extraction procedures in Guangdong Province, China. Generic health literacy was assessed using 3 established screening questions. Adequate computer skills was determined if patients had used a computer and routinely used search e...

  1. Possible use of neutron activation analysis in studying trace elements in senile cataracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of certain life parameters (age, sex, place of residence) on the occurrence of trace elements in turpid human lens (senile cataract) was studied using instrumental neutron activation analysis. The results obtained suggest the dependence of some trace elements deposition in cataracts on age, sex and residence. The work was motivated by the aim to search for possible correlation between the environment and trace elements deposition in eye cataracts. (author)

  2. A Comparison of Different Operating Systems for Femtosecond Lasers in Cataract Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Wu, B. M.; Williams, G P; Tan, A; Mehta, J S

    2015-01-01

    The introduction of femtosecond lasers is potentially a major shift in the way we approach cataract surgery. The development of increasingly sophisticated intraocular lenses (IOLs), coupled with heightened patient expectation of high quality postsurgical visual outcomes, has generated the need for a more precise, highly reproducible and standardized method to carry out cataract operations. As femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) becomes more commonplace in surgical centers, fur...

  3. Change in Astigmatism After Temporal Clear Corneal Cataract Extraction in the Pediatric Population

    OpenAIRE

    Lam, Helene Y; Yen, Kimberly G

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the early postoperative change in astigmatism in pediatric patients having cataract extraction with intraocular lens implantation using sutured temporal clear corneal incision. Methods: A retrospective chart review was performed on all pediatric patients who underwent clear corneal cataract surgery with intraocular lens implantation between 12/01/2005 and 11/30/2006. Results: A total of 31 eyes of 22 patients who underwent temporal clear corneal cataract surgery and intra...

  4. Complications of cataract surgery in patients with BPH treated with alpha 1A-blockers

    OpenAIRE

    Jan Teper, Slawomir; Dobrowolski, Dariusz; Wylegala, Edward

    2011-01-01

    The prevalence of benign prostate hyperplasia (BPH) and cataract increases with age. Both diseases may develop concomitantly and may affect almost 50% of elderly men as comorbidities. Cataract is treated surgically and it has been reported that there may be an association between use of alpha-blockers for BPH, particularly alpha1A-adrenergic receptor selective drugs, and complications of cataract surgery known as Intraoperative Floppy Iris Syndrome (IFIS). The article reviews literature publi...

  5. Effect of a cataract simulation on clinical and real world vision.

    OpenAIRE

    Elliott, D B; Bullimore, M A; Patla, A E; Whitaker, D

    1996-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND: Many reports have indicated that some patients with cataract can retain good visual acuity but complain of significant visual problems. This is the first in a series of papers trying to determine what causes these symptoms and whether other clinical tests can predict the real world vision loss. METHODS: The effect of a cataract simulation with a similar angular distribution of light scatter as real cataract on clinical (visual acuity, contrast sensitivity, and disability glar...

  6. An instrument for assessment of subjective visual disability in cataract patients

    OpenAIRE

    Pesudovs, K; Coster, D

    1998-01-01

    AIMS/BACKGROUND—The construction and validation of an instrument for the assessment of subjective visual disability in the cataract patient is described. This instrument is specifically designed for measuring the outcome of cataract surgery with respect to visual disability.
METHODS—Visually related activities thought to be affected by cataract were considered for the questionnaire. These were reduced by pilot study and principal components analysis to 18 items. A patient's assessment of his/...

  7. The morphometric peculiarities of the eyes with tractional macular edema after age-related cataract phacoemulsification

    OpenAIRE

    V.A. Rudenko; E. L. Sorokin; Egorov, V. V.

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose. To study the morphometric peculiarities of eyes with tractional macular edema after phacoemulsification of age-related cataract. Material and methods. There were examined 72 patients (72 eyes) with macular edema (ME) developed after phacoemulsification of age-related cataract. The control group included 72 eyes of 72 patients without ME after phacoemulsification for age-related cataract in the follow-up of 1.5-2 years. The measurement of the axial length and h...

  8. A VidEo-Based Intelligent Recognition and Decision System for the Phacoemulsification Cataract Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Shu Tian; Xu-Cheng Yin; Zhi-Bin Wang; Fang Zhou; Hong-Wei Hao

    2015-01-01

    The phacoemulsification surgery is one of the most advanced surgeries to treat cataract. However, the conventional surgeries are always with low automatic level of operation and over reliance on the ability of surgeons. Alternatively, one imaginative scene is to use video processing and pattern recognition technologies to automatically detect the cataract grade and intelligently control the release of the ultrasonic energy while operating. Unlike cataract grading in the diagnosis system with ...

  9. Modern Capabilities of Surgical Management of Patients with Open-Angle Glaucoma Combined with Cataract

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Cataract and glaucoma affecting mainly elderly people sometimes are associated; therefore the problem of their combined treatment is urgent. The aim of the investigation was to assess the efficiency of modern surgery in patients with combined cataract and open-angle glaucoma. Materials and Methods. The present open prospective study is based on the examination and surgery findings of patients with associated cataract and different stages of open-angle glaucoma (200 eyes). Depending on...

  10. Sub-tenon anesthesia in the operation of cataract using phacoemulsification technique

    OpenAIRE

    Avramović Siniša; Vukosavljević Miroslav

    2008-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Already in 1884, Knapp reported a successful cataract operation using 5% of cocaine in eyedrops. Today, different methods of local anesthesia in the operation of cataract are used, such as retrobulbary, peribulbary, subconjunctival, sub-tenon, topical and intracameral anesthesia. Phacoemulsification is a modern approach to the operation of cataract that is increasingly applied in our country. Aiming to eliminate the risk of severe complications caused by retrobulbary anesthesia, ...

  11. Perbandingan Kejadian Astigmatisma Pasca Operasi Katarak Dengan Menggunakan Tehnik Fakoemulsifikasi Dan Small Incision Cataract Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Marlinda, Sri

    2013-01-01

    Backgraund : Astigmatism change after cataract surgery is common, but if the astigmatism is too high it can effect the visual acuity. The astigmatism change depends on the incision methods, sclera rigidity, and age Objective : To compare the astigmatism change between scleral on the SICS and clearcorneal incision methods on facoemulsification after cataract surgery and intraocular lens implantation. Method : Sixty patients after cataract surgery with IOL implantation were evaluated....

  12. Cataract extraction and lens implantation with and without trabeculectomy: an intrapatient comparison.

    OpenAIRE

    Bobrow, J C

    1998-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine whether cataract extraction and lens implantation combined with trabeculectomy provides better long-term results than cataract extraction and lens implantation alone in a group of patients with primary open-angle glaucoma and cataract randomly selected to receive surgery with trabeculectomy in one eye and without in the other. METHODS: A prospective, randomized clinical trial involving 35 patients with bilateral symmetric primary open-angle glaucoma and visually disabl...

  13. Audit of outcome of an extracapsular cataract extraction and posterior chamber intraocular lens training course

    OpenAIRE

    Alhassan, M; Kyari, F.; Achi, I.; Ozemela, C.; Abiose, A

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND—A training course for cataract surgery with intraocular lens implantation was organised in April 1997 at the National Eye Centre, Kaduna, Nigeria. Operations were performed by six Nigerian consultant ophthalmologists under the supervision of two surgeons from Aravind Eye Hospital, India.
METHODS—A total of 175 eyes with uncomplicated cataracts were operated on after careful selection. All but six patients had extracapsular cataract extraction with posterior chamber intraocular lens...

  14. Peroperative microbial contamination of anterior chamber aspirates during extracapsular cataract extraction and phacoemulsification

    OpenAIRE

    Beigi, B; WESTLAKE, W.; Mangelschots, E.; Chang, B.; Rich, W; Riordan, T

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND—The normal conjunctival flora is one of the main sources of intraocular contamination during cataract surgery. The theory that the positive anterior chamber (AC) pressure during phacoemulsification (phaco), and the smaller wound utilised, might reduce the rate of contamination was studied.
METHODS—The peroperative AC aspirates of 210 consecutive patients undergoing cataract surgery were assessed. In group 1, 100 patients underwent a standard extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE)...

  15. Factors Associated with Cataract in Korea: A Community Health Survey 2008-2012

    OpenAIRE

    Rim, Tyler Hyungtaek; Kim, Dong Wook; Kim, Sung Eun; Kim, Sung Soo

    2015-01-01

    Purpose To investigate sociodemographic factors, health behaviors, and comorbidities associated with cataracts in a large, nationally representative Korean sample. Materials and Methods This cross-sectional study included 715554 adults aged 40 years or older who participated in the 2008-2012 Community Health Survey. Significant risk factors were identified using multivariate logistic regression analysis for self-reported cataract, and a nomogram for analysis of cataract risk was generated. Re...

  16. Evaluation of Changes of Macular Thickness in Diabetic Retinopathy after Cataract Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Kwon, Soon Il; Hwang, Duck Jin; Seo, Ji Young; Park, In Won

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To assess the macular thickness changes after cataract surgery in diabetic patients using optical coherence tomography (OCT). Methods We retrospectively reviewed the records of 104 diabetic patients who underwent cataract surgery. We examined the changes of macular thickness using OCT before cataract surgery and 1 week, 1-, 2- and 6-months after surgery. The central subfield mean thickness (CSMT) was used to evaluate macular edema which was defined as an increase of CSMT (ΔCSMT) > 30%...

  17. Targeting CYP450 modulation to decrease the risk of induced cataract in the experimental model

    OpenAIRE

    Patel D; Gandhi T; Patel K; Patil D; Parikh P

    2010-01-01

    Background: Diabetes is one of the major causes of cataract. Some drugs prescribed for the treatment of diabetes are the modulators of CYP450, which may alter the risk of cataract. Objective: To study the effect of CYP450 modulation in galactosemic cataract. Materials and Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley suckling rats were allotted to four groups (n = 6), as follows: Group 1: Normal control, Group 2: Galactose control, Group 3: CYP450 inhibitor pretreated and Group 4: CYP450 inducer pretreated. C...

  18. Cataract surgery in patients with ocular surface disease: An update in clinical diagnosis and treatment

    OpenAIRE

    Afsharkhamseh, Neda; Movahedan, Asadolah; Motahari, Hooman; Ali R Djalilian

    2014-01-01

    In this article we review essentials of diagnosis and management of ocular surface disease in patients who undergo cataract surgery. It is clearly shown that dry eye disease worsens following the cataract surgery in patients with prior history of ocular surface disease, Also new cases of dry eye might appear. Current strategies for the timely diagnosis and proper management of dry eye syndrome in the face of cataract surgery patients are mainly emphasized. To achieve the best outcome in catar...

  19. A Cost-benefit Analysis of Cataract Surgery based on the English Longitudinal Survey of Ageing

    OpenAIRE

    Martin Weale

    2009-01-01

    This paper uses the English Longitudinal Survey of Ageing to explore the selfreport effect of cataract operations on eyesight. Calibrating the results to an existing study of the effect of imperfect eyesight on qualty of life, the impact of cataract operations on quality-adjusted life-years is found to be very similar to that established in specific studies and well above the costs of cataract operations. The implications of this for the treatment of medical care in the national accounts are ...

  20. DO WOMEN SEEK CATARACT SURGERY LATER THAN MEN: A CASE STUDY OF RURAL POPULATION OF GURGAON?

    OpenAIRE

    Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Cataract is the leading cause of preventable blindness in developing countries including India. Various barriers exist for acceptance of cataract surgery. Literature search reveals gender to be an important barrier in universal acceptance of cataract surgery. The present study seeks to explore one significant potential factor which may account for this, namely that females seek treatment later than males due to varied factors. METHOD: A retrospective study of 100 male and 100 ...

  1. Relationship between cataracts and epilation in atomic bomb survivors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Among 1713 atomic bomb survivors who underwent ophthalmological examinations from 1963-1964, the risk of cataract formation per unit dose of radiation was significantly greater for those who reported hair loss of 67% or more after exposure (the epilation group) than for those who reported less or no hair loss (the no-epilation group) (P,0.01). Such an epilation effect has also been associated with leukemia mortality and the frequency of chromosome aberrations. Although this might be interpreted as indicating differential sensitivity to radiation between the epilation group and the no-epilation group, it could also be explained by imprecision in dose estimates. We have calculated that a 48% random error in DS86 dose estimates could be in accordance with the dose-response relationship for the prevalence of cataracts in the epilation group or the no-epilation group. Possible mechanisms for variations in radiosensitivity are discussed. 37 refs., 2 figs., 4 tabs

  2. Current discussions of DDREF, cataracts, circulatory diseases and dose limits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although more than a century of radiation research has provided a lot of insight into radiation risk, there are still fields that need clarification. This is particularly true for the low dose range, meaning doses up to ∼100 mSv. One can detect biological effects in that dose range, but it is unclear whether these biological effects like mutations or chromosomal aberrations translate into health effects like cancer, cataracts or circulatory diseases. Thus, for radiation protection purposes, assumptions have to made that must be reappraised on the basis of new findings from time to time. Affected by new insights are currently the DDREF (dose and dose-rate effectiveness factor), cataracts and circulatory diseases. If the new findings are very convincing, dose limits have to be changed at short notice. If there are only weak indications, stability of the radiation protection system is more important than changing limits all the time. (authors)

  3. DEPLOYMENT OF SIX SIGMA METHODOLOGY IN PHACOEMULSIFICATION CATARACT SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ibrahim SAHBAZ

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study is to show how a public eye care center in Turkey initiated Six Sigma principles to reduce the number of complications encountered during and after phacoemulsification cataract surgeries. To analyze the 3-year data, main tools of Six Sigma’s Define-Measure-Analyze-Improve-Control (DMAIC improvement cycle such as SIPOC table, Fishbone Diagram and, Failure, Mode and Effect Analysis were implemented. Experience of the ophthalmic surgeon, patient’s anatomy, cooperation of patient during the surgery, sterilization and hygiene, attention of assistant surgeon, calibration of equipment and quality/chemical composition of intraocular material were identified to be Critical-to-Quality (CTQ factors for a successful phacoemulsification cataract surgery. The most frequently occurring complication was found to be iris atrophy. The process sigma level for the process was found to be 3.958.

  4. Sutureless cataract incision closure using laser-activated tissue glues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eaton, Alexander M.; Bass, Lawrence S.; Libutti, Steven K.; Schubert, Herman D.; Treat, Michael R.

    1991-06-01

    With the advent of phacoemulsification and foldable intraocular lenses, there is renewed interest in sutureless cataract wound. We report the use of laser activated tissue glues for the closure of scleral tunnel cataract incisions. Two glue mixtures were tested in enucleated porcine eyes. Glue A was composed of hyaluronic acid, human albumin, and indocyanine green dye. Glue B contained hyaluronic acid, chondroitin sulfate, human albumin, and indocyanine green dye. A Spectra Physics diode laser (808 nm) with a power density of 7-1 1 watts/cm2 was used for glue activation. Wound bursting pressures, as determined by the presence of fluid at the wound margin, was significantly higher with both glue combinations than without the glue (Pcataract incisions.

  5. Aspiration of radiation cataract in children of retinoblastoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We operated on the radiation cataracts of 12 retinoblastoma patients who had been treated by conservative therapeutic means including radiation, cryoapplication, photocoagulation, and cytostatic agents. Before the surgery, we checked that the tumor had disappeared or scarred by means of CT-scan, Ultrasonography, X-ray, and so on. Visual acuity of 1.0 or more was retained in two eyes (17 %). Four eyes (33 %) retained visual acuity of 0.6-0.4, one eye (8 %) retained 0.1 and the remaining five eyes (42 %) had visual acuity of less than 0.1. We experienced no serious complications during or after the surgeries. The reason for poorer visual acuity was either macular involvement of the tumor or radiation retinopathy due to larger dosis of radiation. Therefore, we conclude that aspiration of radiation cataract is an effective treatment of retinoblastoma patients after the tumor has disappeared or scarred. (author)

  6. Small-incision manual extracapsular cataract extraction using selective hydrodissection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blumenthal, M; Ashkenazi, I; Assia, E; Cahane, M

    1992-10-01

    Hydrodissection is a technique in which balanced salt solution is injected through a cannula into various layers of a cataractous lens to separate the lens lamella in a nonspecific location. Selective hydrodissection allows separation of the lens lamella at different desired anatomical layers. The technique allows the smallest possible nucleus, ie, the hard-core nucleus, to be hydroexpressed as a separate entity, requiring, correspondingly, a relatively small capsulorhexis and limbal incision. Then, in a second maneuver, the epinucleus, which engulfs the hardcore nucleus to form the adult nucleus, also can be aspirated or hydroexpressed as a whole. Selective hydrodissection permits scleral incision and stitchless surgery in planned extracapsular cataract extraction and also may serve as an intermediate step for surgeons who wish to convert to or learn phacoemulsification techniques. PMID:1436973

  7. There will be early- and late-onset radiation cataracts that may arise by different pathomechanisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cataract is a clouding of the crystalline lens of the eye. Radiation cataract has been known for over a century, but its underlying mechanisms remain incompletely understood. In 2011, the International Commission on Radiological Protection (ICRP) issued the Seoul Statement to lower the dose threshold for vision-impairing cataract. ICRP deduced its acute threshold from epidemiological evidence demonstrating zero threshold, but concluded that cataract is a tissue reaction with a threshold albeit small. This paper is the first to hypothesize that there will be early- and late-onset cataracts that may arise by different pathomechanisms, and discusses this hypothesis according to available epidemiological and biological evidence. On one hand, early-onset posterior subcapsular cataract (PSC) may arise with a threshold after acute exposure. On the other, late-onset PSC or cortical cataract may arise without threshold after exposure regardless of the rate of dose delivery. Early-onset PSC may be attributable to excessive proliferation of lens epithelial cells, and late-onset PSC may involve its impaired proliferation. Late-onset cortical cataract may be associated with acceleration of aging process. If this hypothesis holds true, cataract will be a tissue reaction as well as a stochastic effect, challenging the current framework to classify radiation effects into these two categories. (author)

  8. Lens Epithelial Cell Proliferation and Cell Density in Human Age-related Cataract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xialin Liu; Yizhi Liu; Jianliang Zheng; Qiang Huang; Huling Zheng

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To discuss the potential effect of the lens epithelial cell proliferation in age-related cataract.Methods: In vitro cell proliferation was assayed by MTT method to evaluate the lens epithelial cell density, index, and proliferation capacity in normal lens and all kinds of age-related cataract. Capsulotomy specimens from all kinds of patients who underwent cataract phacoemulsification extraction surgery were compared with the lens epithelial specimens from non-cataract lenses of Eye Bank eyes.Results: Lens epithelial cell density of central anterior capsule (LECD) in female normal lens was higher than that in male, LECD in nuclear cataract( > NⅢ ) was higher than that in normal lens, but in the mature cortical cataract, LF CD was lower. Mitotic index of three kinds of age-related cataracts in vivo had no statistical difference, neither did cell proliferation capacity of cultivated cells in vitro.Conclusion: The individual difference of lens epithelial cell density and proliferation capacity in vivo may be an important underlying cause for senile cataract in the cellular level, especially for nuclear cataract.

  9. Clinical significance of perioperative determination of plasma ET and serum TNF levels in patients with cataracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the clinical significance of changes of plasma ET and serum TNF levels after operation in patients with cataracts. Methods: Plasma ET and serum TNF levels were detected with RIA in 32 patients with cataracts both before and after operation as well as in 30 controls. Results: Before operation, the plasma ET and serum TNF levels in patients with cataract were significantly higher than those in controls (P0.05). Conclusion: Plasma ET and serum TNF levels were closely related to the disease process of cataract and were of prognostic value. (authors)

  10. The aqueous humour antioxidative capacity in different types and color of the age-related cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Žorić Lepša

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Oxidative stress results from increased oxidative processes, decreased antioxidative protection, or both processes simultaneously. Photooxidative stress, as a form of oxidative stress, induced by the energy of solar radiation, today is considered as crucial in the age-related cataractogenesis. Other known and unknown, endogenous and egsogenous factors that contribute to the oxidative stress intensity, can influence the cataract type and brunescence. Thus the oxidative stress intensity and its form might determine the cataract type and brunescence, and also make the efforts in cataract prevention more complex. Hence, the objective of the present paper was to investigate the current amount of antioxidative capacity in aqueous humour during the cataract genesis of different types and pigmentation of cataract. Methods. Transversal review of 80 samples of humour aqueous obtained during extracapsular cataract extraction. Aqueouses were analyzed by tiobarbituric acid (TBA method for the total antioxidant activity estimation, expressed as %iMDA, and by using 0.1 ml of aqueous. Results. The mixed type of cataract showed the statistically significantly lower values of the intensities of antioxidative protection in aqueous humour compared to cortical and nuclear cataracts (p < 0.001, respectively. Between pure nuclear and cortical cataracts we found the small differences of the investigated parameter, but they pointed to the decreased level of antioxidative protection, i.e. the increased intensity of the aqueous humour oxidative stress in the cortical cataract type. A significant correlation between the cortical cataract maturation and the %iMDA (p < 0.05 was found. Conclusions. The role of the oxidative stress, here expressed as the antioxidative capacity of aqueous humour, could not be the same for all the cataract types. The lower level of antioxidative protection of aqueous in brunescent and mixed cataracts may point to the higher

  11. Is ultrasonography essential before surgery in eyes with advanced cataracts?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salman Amjad

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Ultrasonography is an important tool for evaluating the posterior segment in eyes with opaque media. Aim: To study the incidence of posterior segment pathology in eyes with advanced cataract and to see whether certain features could be used as predictors for an abnormal posterior segment on ultrasound. Setting: Tertiary care hospital in South India. Methods and Materials: In this prospective study conducted over a 6-month period, all eyes with dense cataracts precluding visualization of fundus underwent assessment with ultrasound. Presence of certain patient and ocular "risk" factors believed to be associated with a higher incidence of abnormal posterior segment on ultrasound were looked for and the odds ratio (OR for posterior segment pathology in these eyes was calculated. Results: Of the 418 eyes assessed, 36 eyes (8.6% had evidence of posterior segment pathology on ultrasound. Retinal detachment (17 eyes; 4.1% was the most frequent abnormality detected. Among patient features, diabetes mellitus (OR= 4.9, P=0.003 and age below 50 years (OR= 15.4, P=0.001 were associated with a high incidence of abnormal ultrasound scans. In ocular features, posterior synechiae (OR= 20.2, P=0.000, iris coloboma (OR= 34.6, P=0.000, inaccurate projection of rays (OR= 15.1, P=0.002, elevated intraocular pressure (OR= 15.1, P=0.004, and keratic precipitates (OR= 22.4, P=0.004 were associated with high incidence of posterior segment pathology. Only four eyes (1.5% without these features had abnormal posterior segment on ultrasonography. Conclusions: Certain patient and ocular features are indicative of a high risk for posterior segment pathology and such patients should be evaluated by ultrasonography prior to cataract surgery. In the absence of these risk factors, the likelihood of detecting abnormalities on preoperative ultrasonography in eyes with advanced cataracts is miniscule.

  12. Prevention of cataract in diabetic mice by topical pyruvate

    OpenAIRE

    Hegde KR; Kovtun S; Varma SD

    2011-01-01

    KR Hegde1,3, S Kovtun1, SD Varma1,21Ophthalmology and Visual Sciences, 2Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, University of Maryland School of Medicine, 3Coppin State University, Department of Natural Sciences, Baltimore, MD, USABackground: It has been previously reported that oral administration of sodium pyruvate inhibits oxidative stress and cataract formation in diabetic animals. With a view to exploring the clinical usefulness of these findings, this study examined its preventive effect wh...

  13. Simultaneous Bilateral Cataract Surgery in General Anesthesia Patients

    OpenAIRE

    Tien-En Huang; Hsi-Kung Kuo; Sue-Ann Lin; Po-Chiung Fang; Pei-Chang Wu; Yi-Hao Chen; Yung-Jen Chen

    2007-01-01

    Background: The aim of this study was to evaluate the indications, safety, benefits, disadvantagesand advantages, and the visual outcomes for simultaneous bilateralcataract surgery (SBCS) under general anesthesia.Methods: This retrospective case review pertained to a period spanning from June1998 through June 2005 inclusively, and comprised of 27 consecutivepatients (54 eyes) that underwent simultaneous bilateral cataract surgeryunder general anesthesia at the Kaohsiung Chang Gung Memorial Ho...

  14. Perioperative Modulating Factors on Astigmatism in Sutured Cataract Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Cho, Yang Kyeung; Kim, Man Soo

    2009-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate the factors that affect postoperative astigmatism and post-suture removal astigmatism, and to evaluate the risk factors associated with astigmatism axis shift. Methods We performed a retrospective chart review of 130 eyes that had undergone uneventful phacoemulsification cataract surgery. Preoperative astigmatism was divided into four groups (Groups I, II, III, and IV) according to the differences between the axis of preoperative astigmatism (flattest axis) and the incisio...

  15. Non-Irritant Baby Shampoos May Cause Cataract Development

    OpenAIRE

    Omer Faruk Tekbas; Yusuf Uysal; Recai Ogur; Bulent Uysal; Cagatay Guler

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The effect of different shampoo formulations as a risk factor for cataract formation was investigated in Sprague Dawley rats in the present study. METHODS: Study was performed by using 20 rats. Two different shampoos used by adult subjects and two different baby shampoos were used in the study. Different shampoos were used in different groups for 14 days, and they were followed for changes. RESULTS: Different degree of opacities were observed in 4 (40%), 4 (40%), 5 (50%), and 6 (6...

  16. Cirurgia da catarata infantil unilateral Unilateral pediatric cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adriana Maria Drummond Brandão

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: Analisar os resultados visuais de uma série de crianças operadas de catarata unilateral. MÉTODOS: Um estudo retrospectivo foi realizado através da análise de 35 prontuários médicos do Serviço de Catarata Congênita da UNIFESP/EPM. RESULTADOS: Quanto à etiologia, a primeira causa de catarata foi idiopática, a segunda causa foi o trauma e a terceira foi a rubéola congênita. Em 51,4% dos olhos tinham acuidade visual pré-operatória de ausência de fixação. E em 42,8% dos casos operados a acuidade visual final foi igual ou melhor que 20/200. DISCUSSÃO: Embora a cirurgia em catarata unilateral seja motivo de controvérsias entre os oftalmologistas, obteve-se melhora de acuidade visual em número significativo de casos.PURPOSE: To analyze the results in a series of children submitted to unilateral cataract surgery. METHODS: A retrospective study was conducted through the analysis of 35 patient files from the Congenital Cataract Service of UNIFESP/EPM. RESULTS: The main cause of unilateral cataract was idiopathic, the second cause was ocular trauma and the third cause was congenital rubella. Initial visual acuity was very poor in 51.4% of the cases (did not fix or follow, and the best corrected final visual acuity was better than 20/200 in 42.8% of the eyes. DISCUSSION: Although controversial, the surgical treatment of unilateral cataract, in this study, showed improvement in many cases.

  17. An unusual pedigree with microcornea-cataract syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Stefaniak, E; Zaremba, J.; Cieślińska, I; Kropińska, E

    1995-01-01

    A pedigree with 14 patients affected with microcornea-cataract (MC) syndrome is described. MC syndrome is very rare and this pedigree is probably the sixth to be reported. Transmission is most likely autosomal dominant, but the unusual feature of the present family is the fact that the proportion of affected members is so high that one is tempted to suspect preferential transmission of the chromosome carrying the MC gene.

  18. Instruments for cataract surgery: results from our survey

    OpenAIRE

    Daksha Patel; Phil Hoare

    2011-01-01

    For any operation, including cataract surgery, the appropriate instruments must be available and in good working order. If instruments are not available, or are blunt, or do not function properly, it may be necessary to delay or postpone surgery. Using such instruments in an operation can result in a poor outcome, or even pose a risk to surgeons and their assistants.The impact is therefore considerable, and can damage the reputation of the hospital in the community.

  19. Is there overutilisation of cataract surgery in England?

    OpenAIRE

    Black, N.; Browne, J.; van der Meulen, J.H.; Jamison, L.; Copley, L.P.; Lewsey, J.

    2009-01-01

    Objectives: Following a 3.7-fold increase in the rate of cataract surgery in the UK between 1989 and 2004, concern has been raised as to whether this has been accompanied by an excessive decline in the threshold such that some operations are inappropriate. The objective was to measure the impact of surgery on a representative sample of patients so as to determine whether or not overutilisation of surgery is occurring. Design: Prospective cohort assessed before and 3 months after surgery. ...

  20. Cataract Surgery in Eyes with Filtered Primary Angle Closure Glaucoma

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    Sasan Moghimi

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the effect of cataract surgery on intraocular pressure (IOP in filtered eyes with primary angle closure glaucoma (PACG. Methods: In this prospective interventional case series, 37 previously filtered eyes from 37 PACG patients with mean age of 62.1±10.4 years were consecutively enrolled. All patients had visually significant cataracts and phacoemulsification was performed at least 12 months after trabeculectomy. Visual acuity, IOP and the number of glaucoma medications were recorded preoperatively, and 1, 3, 6 and 12 months after surgery. Anterior chamber (AC depth was measured preoperatively and 3 months after cataract surgery with A-scan ultrasonography. The main outcome measure was IOP at 12 months. Results: IOP was decreased significantly from 18.16±5.91 mmHg at baseline to 15.37±2.90 mmHg at final follow-up (P<0.01. The mean number of glaucoma medications was significantly decreased from 1.81±0.24 to 0.86±1.00 (P=0.001 at 1 year postoperatively. At final follow up, 36 (97.2% eyes and 32 (86.4% eyes had IOP≤21 and IOP≤18 mmHg, respectively; 14 (37.8% eyes and 9 (24.3% eyes had IOP≤21 and IOP≤18 mmHg without medications, respectively. The magnitude of IOP reduction was correlated with higher preoperative IOP (r=0.85, P<0.001, shallower preoperative AC depth (r=-0.38, P=0.01 and greater changes in AC depth (r=-0.39, P=0.01. Conclusion: Cataract surgery reduces IOP and the number of glaucoma medications in previously filtered PACG eyes. This reduction seems to be greater in patients with higher preoperative IOP and shallower anterior chambers.

  1. Predicting the Incidence of Human Cataract through Retinal Imaging Technology

    OpenAIRE

    Chi-Ting Horng; Han-Ying Sun; Hsiang-Jui Liu; Jiann-Hwa Lue; Shang-Min Yeh

    2015-01-01

    With the progress of science, technology and medicine, the proportion of elderly people in society has gradually increased over the years. Thus, the medical care and health issues of this population have drawn increasing attention. In particular, among the common medical problems of the elderly, the occurrence of cataracts has been widely observed. In this study, we developed retinal imaging technology by establishing a human eye module with ray tracing. Periodic hole arrays with different ...

  2. Prevalence of myopic shifts among patients seeking cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafael Iribarren

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available Modern cataract surgery by phacoemulsification is a widely accepted procedure with a rapid recovery time. The prescription of specific intraocular lens, implanted during surgery, makes it possible to anticipate whether the patient will need reading glasses after the procedure. The present study analyses a sample of cataract surgery patients to show the frequency of myopic shifts related to nuclear opacity, which can result in clear near vision before surgery. A non-selected sample of consecutive patients who underwent elective cataract surgery in a private clinic was studied retrospectively. The myopic shift in refraction was assessed by comparing the old prescription with the spectacle correction at the time of interviewing.The mean age of the 229 subjects studied was 71.5 ± 10.4 years (109, 47.6%, males. A myopic shift in refraction, defined as at least - 0.5 diopters, was present in 37.1% of subjects (95% CI: 30.8%-43.4%. The mean change in refraction in these subjects was -2.52 ± 1.52 diopters. The percentage of subjects who had developed a myopic shift was significantly greater in those who presented greater nuclear opalescence. There were also differences in the mean myopic shift by refractive group, with the emmetropes having the greatest myopic shift. In this study of patients seeking cataract surgery in a clinical setting, more than one third had myopic shifts in refraction. This must be taken into account in order that patients maintain the benefit of clear near vision after surgery.

  3. EXPERIMENTAL STUDY ON THE CORNEAL ENDOTHELIUM OF TRAUMATIC CATARACT

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1991-01-01

    The cell morphology of corneal endothelium in 84 mice with experimental traumatic cataract was investigated with stained corneal buttons. In the experimental group, the boundaries between adjacent corneal endothelial cells were significantly distorted, some cell boundaries manifested degenerative changes that led to coalescence of the cells. The mean density and mean area of endothelial cells of the controls showed significant difference from those of the experimental group during the 12 weeks of observ...

  4. Argon laser photocoagulation of cyclodialysis clefts after cataract surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Three patients with cyclodialysis clefts, hypotony and hypotonic retinopathy subsequent to cataract surgery were treated with argon laser photocoagulation. The hypotony was reversed in each patient and their visual acuity was normalized. Laser photocoagulation is a noninvasive treatment that can be repeated easily and safely. The complications of the treatment are minor. A hypertensive episode commonly occurs in the early postoperative period. (au) 8 refs

  5. PSYCHOLOGICAL REACTIONS TO CATARACT SURGERY WITH INTRAOCULAR LENS IMPLANTATION

    OpenAIRE

    Chaudhury, S.; Chakraborty, P.K.; Gurunadh, V.S.; Ratha, P.

    1995-01-01

    A prospective study of fifty patients who underwent cataract surgery with intraocular lens (IOL) implantation was undertaken. Factors aggravating and allaying pre-operative, intra-operative and post-operative anxiety were studied A good doctor-patient relations/lip, confidence in the ophthalmologist, and knowledge of successful surgery with IOL implantation in an acquaintance were the major anxiety relieving factors. The main anxiety provoking factors were concerns about the success of surger...

  6. Modern cataract surgery in a highly myopic population.

    OpenAIRE

    Gross, K A; Pearce, J L

    1987-01-01

    A retrospective series of 117 highly myopic eyes with extracapsular cataract extractions and posterior chamber lens implants is presented. The results are analysed with reference to the current understanding of the complications anticipated. Of particular note is the use of low-powered posteriorly vaulted posterior chamber implants, with and without primary posterior capsulotomy. The results show a low retinal detachment rate (one eye, mean follow-up 12 months); low induced astigmatism (avera...

  7. Conjunctival inclusion cysts following small incision cataract surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Narayanappa Shylaja; Dayananda S; Dakshayini M; Gangasagara Suresh; Prabhakaran Venkatesh

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence of acquired conjunctival inclusion cysts following various ophthalmic surgeries such as strabismus surgery, scleral buckling, pars plana vitrectomy, ptosis surgery and phacoemulsification has been reported. We report two cases of conjunctival inclusion cysts following manual Small Incision Cataract Surgery (SICS) in two male patients aged 65 and 67 years. The cysts originated from the scleral tunnel used for manual SICS. Both were treated by excision and confirmed histopatholog...

  8. Nucleus management in manual small incision cataract surgery by phacosection

    OpenAIRE

    Ravindra M

    2009-01-01

    Nucleus management is critical in manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS), as the integrity of the tunnel, endothelium and posterior capsule needs to be respected. Several techniques of nucleus management are in vogue, depending upon the specific technique of MSICS. Nucleus can be removed in toto or bisected or trisected into smaller segments. The pressure in the eye can be maintained at the desired level with the use of an anterior chamber maintainer or kept at atmospheric levels. In ...

  9. Small incision cataract surgery: Complications and mini-review

    OpenAIRE

    Gogate Parikshit

    2009-01-01

    This article reviews the literature on manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS) and its complications. Various articles on MSICS published in indexed journals were reviewed, as well as the sections on complications of MSICS. The Pubmed search engine on the Internet was used to find out articles published since 1985 on MSICS in any language in indexed journals. Books published by Indian authors and the website of Indian Journal of Ophthalmology were also referred to. MSICS has become ver...

  10. Effect of cataract extraction on the pupil response to mydriatics.

    OpenAIRE

    Gibbens, M V; Goel, R.; Smith, S E

    1989-01-01

    Pupil diameters in the dark, in the light, and after mydriasis with tropicamide+ phenylephrine have been measured in 25 patients before and six months after cataract surgery. The aphakic pupil showed reduced mobility as evidenced by a smaller diameter in the and a larger one in the light. In patients who had intracapsular extraction or extracapsular extraction with intraocular lens implantation the pupils dilated less well than preoperatively. The difference in response to mydriatics is of pr...

  11. Craniofacial Microsomia: Goldenhar Syndrome in Association with Bilateral Congenital Cataract

    OpenAIRE

    Shrestha, U. D.; S. Adhikari

    2015-01-01

    Craniofacial microsomia (CFM) includes a spectrum of malformations primarily involving structures derived from the first and second branchial arches. Patients with hemifacial microsomia and epibulbar dermoids are said to have Goldenhar syndrome (GHS). Four-month-old boy with whitish pupillary reflex presented with the features of GHS in pediatric ophthalmology clinic. The child had ocular and auricular manifestations. There were no vertebral anomalies, but he had bilateral congenital cataract...

  12. MRSA and cataract surgery – reflections for practice

    OpenAIRE

    LF, Porter; RU Khan2; Hannan, A.; et al.

    2010-01-01

    LF Porter1, RU Khan2, A Hannan3, SP Kelly11Royal Bolton Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Bolton, UK; 2Departments of Microbiology, Royal Bolton Hospital NHS Foundation Trust, Bolton, UK; 3Haughton Thornley Medical Centers, NHS Tameside and Glossop, UKIntroduction: Postoperative bacterial endophthalmitis is a devastating complication of cataract surgery. Methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) endophthalmitis is rare. Recent debate over MRSA screening in United Kingdom (UK) National H...

  13. Nuclear cataract and myopia during hyperbaric oxygen therapy.

    OpenAIRE

    Palmquist, B. M.; Philipson, B.; Barr, P. O.

    1984-01-01

    The effect on the human lens of prolonged hyperbaric oxygen therapy is reported. Eye examinations were given to 25 patients before, during, and after a series of 150 or more exposures to hyperbaric oxygen. All patients changed refraction in the direction of myopia during treatment. Fifteen of the patients had clear lens nuclei before treatment. Seven of these developed a nuclear cataract with reduced visual acuity during treatment. Reversible lens myopia has previously been noticed as a side ...

  14. Characterization of Emodin as a Therapeutic Agent for Diabetic Cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Kun-Che; Li, Linfeng; Sanborn, Theresa M; Shieh, Biehuoy; Lenhart, Patricia; Ammar, David; LaBarbera, Daniel V; Petrash, J Mark

    2016-05-27

    Aldose reductase (AR) in the lens plays an important role in the pathogenesis of diabetic cataract (DC) by contributing to osmotic and oxidative stress associated with accelerated glucose metabolism through the polyol pathway. Therefore, inhibition of AR in the lens may hold the key to prevent DC formation. Emodin, a bioactive compound isolated from plants, has been implicated as a therapy for diabetes. However, its inhibitory activity against AR remains unclear. Our results showed that emodin has good selectively inhibitory activity against AR (IC50 = 2.69 ± 0.90 μM) but not other aldo-keto reductases and is stable at 37 °C for at least 7 days. Enzyme kinetic studies demonstrated an uncompetitive inhibition against AR with a corresponding inhibition constant of 2.113 ± 0.095 μM. In in vivo studies, oral administration of emodin reduced the incidence and severity of morphological markers of cataract in lenses of AR transgenic mice. Computational modeling of the AR-NADP(+)-emodin ternary complex indicated that the 3-hydroxy group of emodin plays an essential role by interacting with Ser302 through hydrogen bonding in the specificity pocket of AR. All the findings above provide encouraging evidence for emodin as a potential therapeutic agent to prevent cataract in diabetic patients. PMID:27140653

  15. Micro-PIXE analysis of thick frozen lenses with cataracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The microprobe of 27 MeV α particles has been utilized for the study of a possible role of ions in causing hereditary cataracts of mice. The distributions of S to Ca in lenses were determined at a resolution around 50 μm. In order to obtain the elemental concentrations on wet weight basis, thick frozen hydrated specimens were analyzed. The sample preparation method and the experimental setup developed to minimize redistributions of diffusible elements as well as dehydration of specimens are described. The ratio of the X-ray peak intensity to the continuum background intensity was used for quantification. The accuracy of this P/B method used for PIXE analyses of thick soft tissues was examined both by computer calculations and by experiments with biological standards such as Spurr's epoxy resins and NBS SRMs. The elemental distributions in cataractous lenses were obtained for two different types of hereditary cataract: Nakano mice and its congenic strain. The features of distributions and quantitative concentrations of S, Cl, K and Ca were compared. (orig.)

  16. Radiation-induced cataracts. Glance at some new data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation-induced cataract has been up to now considered as a quite rare pathology, needing high-dose radiations (beyond a dose threshold roughly estimated at 2 Grays to the lens) consisting mainly in head tumour radiotherapy complications. Several new studies on different exposed populations such as astronauts, Japanese atomic bomb survivors, people undergoing X-ray examinations, Chernobyl accident 'liquidators' as well as data from animal experiments, suggest that dose threshold for detectable opacities as well as for clinical posterior sub-capsular cataract occurring, might be far lower than those previously assumed. Even the existence of a dose threshold is no longer an absolute certitude insofar as radiation-induced cataract pathogenesis might consist not really in a deterministic effect (direct tissue harmful effect, killing or seriously injuring a critical population of cells) as believed until now, but rather in a stochastic effect (genomic damage in target-cells, altered cell division, abnormal lens fibre cell differentiation). More practically, these new data may lead us to reconsider radioprotection of specifically exposed populations : mainly patients and workers. Regarding workers, labour legislation (lens equivalent dose limit of 150 mSv during 12 consecutive months) might be, in the medium term, reassessed downwards. (author)

  17. The macular photostress test in diabetes, glaucoma, and cataract

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baptista, António M. G.; Sousa, Raul A. R. C.; Rocha, Filomena A. S. Q.; Fernandes, Paula Sepúlveda; Macedo, António F.

    2013-11-01

    Purpose. The photostress recovery time test (PSRT) has been widely reported as a helpful screening clinical tool. However, the poor standardization of its measurement technique remains to be a limitation among clinicians. The purpose of this study is to apply a recommended clinical technique to measure the PSRT in some of the most commons eye diseases to ascertain whether these diseases affect the PSRT values. Methods. One hundred and one controls and 105 patients, with diagnosed diabetes (without visible signs of diabetic retinopathy), primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) or cataracts underwent photostress testing. The test was performed with a direct ophthalmoscope for illuminating the macula for 30 seconds. Participants belonged to three age classes: A, B and C; and were divided into four groups: control, diabetic, POAG and cataract. The age range for A, B and C classes were respectively 43-54, 55-64 and 65-74 years. The groups were also further compared within each age class. In addition, the influence of age on PSRT was evaluated using the control group. Results. Results demonstrate that PSRT changes with age (pCataract and POAG groups did not affect the PSRT significantly. Conclusions. The technique used for the Photostress showed that diabetics, younger than 54 years, may have faster PSRT and that, aging delays PSRT.

  18. Non-Irritant Baby Shampoos May Cause Cataract Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Faruk Tekbas

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The effect of different shampoo formulations as a risk factor for cataract formation was investigated in Sprague Dawley rats in the present study. METHODS: Study was performed by using 20 rats. Two different shampoos used by adult subjects and two different baby shampoos were used in the study. Different shampoos were used in different groups for 14 days, and they were followed for changes. RESULTS: Different degree of opacities were observed in 4 (40%, 4 (40%, 5 (50%, and 6 (60% eyes in Groups A, B, C, and D, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference for formation of cataract between the groups (p>0.05. The number of irritated eyes was significantly lower (p<0.05 in groups C (10% and D (20% compared to groups A (90% and B (80%. CONCLUSION: The use of non-irritant baby shampoos does not seem to eliminate the risk of cataract formation and these should even be used more carefully as the non-irritant shampoo will have more contact with the eye. [TAF Prev Med Bull. 2008; 7(1: 1-6

  19. Non-Irritant Baby Shampoos May Cause Cataract Development

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Omer Faruk Tekbas

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The effect of different shampoo formulations as a risk factor for cataract formation was investigated in Sprague Dawley rats in the present study. METHODS: Study was performed by using 20 rats. Two different shampoos used by adult subjects and two different baby shampoos were used in the study. Different shampoos were used in different groups for 14 days, and they were followed for changes. RESULTS: Different degree of opacities were observed in 4 (40%, 4 (40%, 5 (50%, and 6 (60% eyes in Groups A, B, C, and D, respectively. There was no statistically significant difference for formation of cataract between the groups (p>0.05. The number of irritated eyes was significantly lower (p<0.05 in groups C (10% and D (20% compared to groups A (90% and B (80%. CONCLUSION: The use of non-irritant baby shampoos does not seem to eliminate the risk of cataract formation and these should even be used more carefully as the non-irritant shampoo will have more contact with the eye. [TAF Prev Med Bull 2008; 7(1.000: 1-6

  20. Multicolor pattern scan laser for diabetic retinopathy with cataract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Takao; Hirano; Yasuhiro; Iesato; Toshinori; Murata

    2014-01-01

    · AIM: To evaluate the ability of various laser wavelengths in delivering sufficient burns to the retina in eyes with cataract using a new multicolor pattern scan laser with green(532 nm), yellow(577 nm), and red(647 nm)lasers.·METHODS: The relationship between the Emery-Little(EL) degree of cataract severity and the laser wavelength required to deliver adequate burns was investigated in102 diabetic eyes. Treatment time, total number of laser shots, and intra-operative pain were assessed as well.·RESULTS: All EL-1 grade eyes and 50% of EL-2 eyes were successfully treated with the green laser, while 50%of EL-2 eyes, 96% of EL-3 eyes, and 50% of EL-4 eyes required the yellow laser. The red laser was effective in the remaining 4% of EL-3 and 50% of EL-4 eyes.·CONCLUSION: Longer wavelength lasers are more effective in delivering laser burns through cataract when we use a multicolor pattern scan laser system.

  1. Influence of cataract surgery in biopsychosocial adaptation in the elderly

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leonor Rosario Diaz Alfonso

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: The twenty-first century is characterized by a progressive aging in the population, with the subsequent demand of medical care it implies due to the polimorbility rates typical of this stage of life. Objective: to prove the positive influence of cataract surgery in biopsychosocial adaptation of elderlies. Methods: a descriptive study conducted from January to June 2008 in the General University Hospital "Dr. Aldereguía Gustavo Lima’’ in Cienfuegos. The 60 elder patients who underwent surgery cataract in that period were included. Geriatric evaluation was used as assessment instrument. It was applied before and 3 months after cataract surgery and included the Yesavage Geriatric Depression Rating Scale to measure emotional function and the Katz index for functional evaluation. The variables used are part of the preoperative geriatric assessment. Among them we can find biomedical, social, functional and psychological aspects as well as-risk benefit and anesthetic risks analysis. Results: the largest amount of patients was between 70 and 74 years old, predominantly males and white skinned. Most frequent personal pathological records were arthropathies, diabetes mellitus and hypertension. A significant relationship between initial visual acuity levels and depression rates was found; as well as limitations in performing basic daily life activities. Conclusions: with surgical intervention an improved visual acuity was achieved and a number of functional capacities were reestablished to allow a better biopsychosocial adaptation in elderlies.

  2. Retinal safety of near-infrared lasers in cataract surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jenny; Sramek, Christopher; Paulus, Yannis M.; Lavinsky, Daniel; Schuele, Georg; Anderson, Dan; Dewey, David; Palanker, Daniel

    2012-09-01

    Femtosecond lasers have added unprecedented precision and reproducibility to cataract surgery. However, retinal safety limits for the near-infrared lasers employed in surgery are not well quantified. We determined retinal injury thresholds for scanning patterns while considering the effects of reduced blood perfusion from rising intraocular pressure and retinal protection from light scattering on bubbles and tissue fragments produced by laser cutting. We measured retinal damage thresholds of a stationary, 1030-nm, continuous-wave laser with 2.6-mm retinal spot size for 10- and 100-s exposures in rabbits to be 1.35 W (1.26 to 1.42) and 0.78 W (0.73 to 0.83), respectively, and 1.08 W (0.96 to 1.11) and 0.36 W (0.33 to 0.41) when retinal perfusion is blocked. These thresholds were input into a computational model of ocular heating to calculate damage threshold temperatures. By requiring the tissue temperature to remain below the damage threshold temperatures determined in stationary beam experiments, one can calculate conservative damage thresholds for cataract surgery patterns. Light scattering on microbubbles and tissue fragments decreased the transmitted power by 88% within a 12 deg angle, adding a significant margin for retinal safety. These results can be used for assessment of the maximum permissible exposure during laser cataract surgery under various assumptions of blood perfusion, treatment duration, and scanning patterns.

  3. Microbiological profile of anterior chamber aspirates following uncomplicated cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prajna N

    1998-01-01

    Full Text Available Anterior chamber aspirate cultures were done for 66 patients who underwent either an uncomplicated intracapsular cataract extraction, extracapsular cataract extraction with posterior-chamber intraocular lens implantation, or phacoemulsification with posterior-chamber intraocular lens implantation. The aspirate was obtained at the time of wound closure. The aspirates were immediately transferred to the microbiology laboratory where one drop of the aspirate was placed on a glass slide for gram stain, and the remainder was unequally divided and inoculated into blood agar, chocolate agar and thioglycolate broth. The cultures were incubated at 37° C with 5% CO2 and held for 5 days. Of 66 patients 4 (6%, had smear-positive anterior chamber aspirates. None of the aspirates showed any growth on any of the 3 culture media used. None of the eyes in the study developed endophthalmitis. This study concludes that there is no contamination of the anterior chamber by viable bacteria after cataract surgery, irrespective of the mode of intervention.

  4. Peculiarity of A-bomb cataract complicated by incipient senile cataract-report of 2 recent cases

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Two cases of typical cataract caused by atomic bomb radiation were observed. Both patients were male and had been exposed near the hypocenter (950m and 140m from the hypocenter) when they were young (12 years and 5 months, and 15 years and 3 months). Wounds at the exposure were not fetal, but their exposure doses were close to the lethal dose (570 and 609 rad). Their acute symptoms were severe. Nevertheless, their symptoms recovered by rest and good nutrition. Lenticular opacities (delayed ocular damage caused by atomic radiation) occurred in one patient 3 years and 7 months after the exposure and in the other patient 4 years after the exposure. It was 33 years and 10 month after the exposure when both patients aged 45 and 48 had senile cataract. Effects of aging on both patients exposed to large doses of radiation in young ages were suggested. (Tsunoda, M.)

  5. Combined 23-gauge transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy and cataract surgery in cases with cataract and posterior segment diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yazici Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Combined cataract surgery and transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy are a good option in patients with cataract and vitreoretinal diseases. Aim: To evaluate the effectiveness, outcomes, and complications of combined 23-gauge transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy and cataract surgery. Settings and Design: A retrospective case series was conducted at the Beyoglu Eye Education and Research Hospital. Materials and Methods: In this study, 28 eyes of 28 patients underwent combined 23-gauge transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy and phacoemulsification and IOL implantation for cataract and various posterior segment diseases. The outcome measures included, visual acuity, intraocular pressure changes, and anatomical success were evaluated. Results: The mean follow-up was 4.8 months (range, 3-15 months. Mean overall preoperative visual acuity was 20/333, and final acuity was 20/95 (P < 0.001. Mean intraocular pressure (IOP on the preoperative and first postoperative day was 15.6 ± 7.5 and 13.8 ± 3.3 mmHg, respectively (P > 0.05. Three eyes (10.7% had postoperative hypotony (<6 mmHgthat all recovered spontaneously within the first postoperative week. Three eyes (10.7% required laser treatment for iatrogenic retinal tears. Anatomical success was obtained in all cases. No serious complications such as endophthalmitis were observed during the follow-up period. Conclusion: Combined transconjunctival sutureless vitrectomy and phacoemulsification was effective and safe in patients with significant lens opacities and vitreoretinal pathology. Although the anatomic and visual outcomes were satisfactory, the outcomes depended mainly on underlying vitreoretinal pathology.

  6. Comparison of Morphological and Functional Endothelial Cell Changes after Cataract Surgery: Phacoemulsification Versus Manual Small-Incision Cataract Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Sunil Ganekal; Ashwini Nagarajappa

    2014-01-01

    Purpose: To compare the morphological (cell density, coefficient of variation and standard deviation) and functional (central corneal thickness) endothelial changes after phacoemulsification versus manual small-incision cataract surgery (MSICS). Design: Prospective randomized control study. Materials and Methods: In this prospective randomized control study, patients were randomly allocated to undergo phacoemulsification (Group 1, n = 100) or MSICS (Group 2, n = 100) using a random nu...

  7. Efficacy comparison between manual small incision cataract surgery and phacoemulsification in cataract patients: a meta-analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ye, Zi; He, Shou-Zhi; Li, Zhao-Hui

    2015-01-01

    Objective: Systematic review of manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS) and phacoemulsification (PHACO) on the postoperative visual quality and surgical complications. Methods: Relevant literatures on clinical efficacy of PHACO and MSICS were included by retrieving in Medline, PubMed, Chinese Biomedical Literature Database (CBM) and Chinese Academic Journal (CNKI) databases. Meta-analysis was conducted by RevMan5.0 software with OR and its 95% CI for the effect size. Results: A total o...

  8. Cataract surgery: interim results and complications of a randomised controlled trial. Oxford Cataract Treatment and Evaluation Team (OCTET).

    OpenAIRE

    1986-01-01

    A randomised controlled trial in progress for more than five years, with no loss to follow-up (except death), assessed 333 eyes treated by three methods of cataract surgery. They were (A) intracapsular extraction and contact lens usage, (B) intracapsular extraction and implantation of an iris supported lens (Federov I), and (C) extracapsular extraction and implantation of an iridocapsular lens (Binkhorst 2-loop). The purpose of the paper is to report interim visual results, complications, and...

  9. The Effect of Trabeculectomy on Cataract Formation or Progression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhale Rajavi

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To determine the effect of trabeculectomy on cataract formation or progression in patients with chronic glaucoma. METHODS: This controlled clinical trial was performed on patients over 50 years of age with glaucoma who were referred to Imam Hossein Hospital, Tehran, Iran, from 2006 to 2007. Trabeculectomy was indicated only in one eye while the fellow eye had well-controlled intraocular pressure with medication(s. The fellow eyes served as controls. Lens opacity was evaluated using three criteria: visual acuity (VA, and Lens Opacification Classification System III (LOCS III photographs and scores. RESULTS: Overall 82 eyes of 41 patients including 53.7% male and 46.3% female subjects with mean age of 62.5±9.3 (range 50-75 years were evaluated. Cataract progression in operated eyes was statistically significant according to VA (P=0.02, LOCS III photo-graphs (P=0.05 and LOCS III scores (P=0.01. However, compared to fellow control eyes, cataract progression was significant according to VA (P=0.023 and LOCS III scores (P=0.057 but not based on LOCS III photographs. Mean VA reduction was 2 Snellen lines in operated eyes; there were 3 cases of cataract formation or

  10. Intraoperative and Immediate Postoperative Outcomes of Cataract Surgery using Phacoemulsification in Eyes with and without Pseudoexfoliation Syndrome

    OpenAIRE

    Dwivedi, Neelam R; Dubey, Arun K; Shankar, P Ravi

    2014-01-01

    Background: To compare the intraoperative and immediate postoperative behavior and complications in eyes with pseudoexfoliation (PEX) syndrome with eyes having senile cataract without PEX during cataract surgery using phacoemulsification (PKE).

  11. Targeting CYP450 modulation to decrease the risk of induced cataract in the experimental model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patel D

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Diabetes is one of the major causes of cataract. Some drugs prescribed for the treatment of diabetes are the modulators of CYP450, which may alter the risk of cataract. Objective: To study the effect of CYP450 modulation in galactosemic cataract. Materials and Methods: Male Sprague-Dawley suckling rats were allotted to four groups (n = 6, as follows: Group 1: Normal control, Group 2: Galactose control, Group 3: CYP450 inhibitor pretreated and Group 4: CYP450 inducer pretreated. Cataract was induced in animals of all groups except group 1 by feeding them galactose (50%, 21 days after parturition. From the eighteenth day of life, CYP450 inhibitor (nifedipine; 8.1 mg/kg and CYP450 inducer (pioglitazone; 3.8 mg/kg were given orally to groups 3 and 4, respectively. The maturation pattern of the cataract was observed by an operating microscope, every third day. Biochemical changes in the lenses of all groups, for example, CYP450 activity expressed as ΅M NADPH oxidized / unit time, alterations in the levels of total proteins, soluble proteins, and reduced glutathione (GSH following the induction of cataract, were estimated. Results: The microscopic examination of the lenses indicated that CYP450 inhibitor pre-treatment delayed (fourteenth day the occurrence of cataract, while CYP450 inducer pretreatment demonstrated an early (ninth day cataract as compared to galactose control rats (twelfth day. A significant decrease and increase in CYP450 activity was observed with the CYP450 inhibitor and inducer pre-treatment, respectively. There was no alteration in the GSH level, but a significant increase in total and soluble protein was found in groups 3 and 4 as compared to group 2. Conclusion: CYP450 may have a role in the initiation of cataract without any effect on the maturation pattern, as revealed by the delayed occurrence of cataract with the CYP450 inhibitor and an early onset of cataract with the CYP450 inducer.

  12. Audit of extracapsular cataract extraction and posterior chamber lens implantation as a routine treatment for age related cataract in east Africa

    OpenAIRE

    Yorston, D; Foster, A.

    1999-01-01

    AIMS—To evaluate the outcome of extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) and posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation (PC-IOL) in an African eye clinic during the transition from intracapsular cataract extraction to ECCE and PC-IOL.
METHODS—A retrospective survey of 461 consecutive operations for age related cataract with a mean follow up of 52.9 weeks (range 0-275) and a minimum follow up of 4 weeks in 87.9% of eyes.
RESULTS—A best corrected vision of 6/18 or better was obtained in 94...

  13. Lipid peroxidation and cataracts: N-acetylcarnosine as a therapeutic tool to manage age-related cataracts in human and in canine eyes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babizhayev, Mark A; Deyev, Anatoly I; Yermakova, Valentina N; Brikman, Igor V; Bours, Johan

    2004-01-01

    Cataract formation represents a serious problem in the elderly, with approximately 25% of the population aged >65 years and about 50% aged >80 years experiencing a serious loss of vision as a result of this condition. Not only do cataracts diminish quality of life, they also impose a severe strain on global healthcare budgets. In the US, 43% of all visits to ophthalmologists by Medicare patients are associated with cataract. Surgery represents the standard treatment of this condition, and 1.35 million cataract operations are performed annually in the US, costing 3.5 billion US dollars (year of costing, 1998). Unfortunately, the costs of surgical treatment and the fact that the number of patients exceeds surgical capacities result in many patients being blinded by cataracts worldwide. This situation is particularly serious in developing countries; worldwide 17 million people are blind because of cataract formation, and the problem will grow in parallel with aging of the population. In any event, surgical removal of cataracts may not represent the optimal solution. Although generally recognised as being one of the safest operations, there is a significant complication rate associated with this surgical procedure. Opacification of the posterior lens capsule occurs in 30-50% of patients within 2 years of cataract removal and requires laser treatment, a further 0.8% experience retinal detachments, approximately 1% are rehospitalised for corneal problems, and about 0.1% develop endophthalmitis. Although the risks are small, the large number of procedures performed means that 26,000 individuals develop serious complications as a result of cataract surgery annually in the US alone. Thus, risk and cost factors drive the investigation of pharmaceutical approaches to the maintenance of lens transparency. The role of free radical-induced lipid oxidation in the development of cataracts has been identified. Initial stages of cataract are characterised by the accumulation of

  14. Induced astigmatism after cataract surgery - a retrospective analysis of cases from the University of Port Harcourt Teaching Hospital, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    A. O. Adio; N. Aruoto

    2011-01-01

    Visual rehabilitation after cataract surgery may often be disappointing due to induction of corneal astigmatism following issues in realigning, point to point, the corneal wound margin in the process of surgery despite biometry and use of the appropriateintraocular lens. The purpose of this study is to determine the amount of surgically induced astigmatism after sutured cataract extraction-extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) and intracapsular cataract extraction (ICCE) and intraocular le...

  15. Frequency of secondary cataract development in pseudophakic eyes with posterior chamber IOL of current designs in case of axial myopia

    OpenAIRE

    G. V. Sorokoletov; V.K. Zuyev; E. R. Tumanyan; A.N. Bessarabov; V.N. Vescikova

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Purpose. To evaluate a frequency of secondary cataract development in different periods of postoperative follow-up after cataract phacoemulsification depending on the degree of axial myopia and the implanted IOL design. Material and methods. A retrospective analysis of secondary cataract formation in the long-term follow-up after cataract phacoemulsification with foldable intraocular lens implantation was performed in 16575 eyes out of 8722 patients with emmetropia ...

  16. A and B mode ultrasonography in preoperative evaluation of lens and posterior segment of dogs eyes with cataract

    OpenAIRE

    Bianca C. Martins; Emilio F. Rodrigues Jr; Ana L. G Souza; de Almeida, Denise E; Brito, Fábio L.C.; Júlio C. Canola; Dennis Brooks; José L. Laus

    2010-01-01

    Ultrasonography of the lens and posterior segment is an indispensable step in the preoperative evaluation of dogs with cataracts, since ophthalmoscopy is not feasible when there is opacification of the lens. This study evaluated the echographic conditions of cataractous lens and fundus of the eye in dogs affected by cataracts. The study was conducted in 30 dogs (56 eyes), 10 males and 20 females, with different types of cataracts at different stages of development. Echography in A and B modes...

  17. A Comparison of Endothelial Cell Loss in Combined Cataract and MIGS (Hydrus) Procedure to Phacoemulsification Alone: 6-Month Results

    OpenAIRE

    Antonio M Fea; Giulia Consolandi; Giulia Pignata; Paola Maria Loredana Cannizzo; Carlo Lavia; Filippo Billia; Teresa Rolle; Grignolo, Federico M.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To compare the corneal endothelial cell loss after phacoemulsification, alone or combined with microinvasive glaucoma surgery (MIGS), in nonglaucomatous versus primary open angle glaucoma (POAG) eyes affected by age-related cataract. Methods. 62 eyes of 62 patients were divided into group 1 (n = 25, affected by age-related cataract) and group 2 (n = 37, affected by age-related cataract and POAG). All patients underwent cataract surgery. Group 2 was divided into subgroups A (n = 19, c...

  18. Femtosecond laser combined with non-chopping rotation phacoemulsification technique for soft-nucleus cataract surgery: a prospective study

    OpenAIRE

    Hui Chen; Haotian Lin; Wan Chen; Bo Zhang; Wu Xiang; Jing Li; Weirong Chen; Yizhi Liu

    2016-01-01

    Soft-lens cataract surgeries are becoming increasingly common for cataract surgeons and chopping the soft nucleus using conventional techniques is problematic. We introduced a femtosecond laser combined with a non-chopping rotation phacoemulsification technique for soft-nucleus cataract surgery and evaluated the safety and efficacy of using this technique. Sixty-six patients with soft-nucleus cataracts ranging from grade 1~3 were divided into 3 groups based on nuclear staging. Those groups we...

  19. Effect Of Heparin Sodium In Protection Of The Lens Against Cataract Induced With Intravitreal Injection Of Sodium Selenite- In Rabbits

    OpenAIRE

    Bahaa A. Abdul-Hussein

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Objective To evaluate the possible protective role of heparin sodium eye drops against sodium selenite induced cataract in rabbits.Materials and Methods A group of 18 adult rabbits Oryctologus cuniculus were divided into 3 groups each one of 6 rabbits normal group without treatment and induction control group received DW pre and post induction of cataract and heparin sodium group received heparin sodium eye drops pre and post induction of cataract. The cataract had been induced by i...

  20. A comparison of anterior and posterior chamber lenses after cataract extraction in rural Africa: a within patient randomised trial

    OpenAIRE

    Waddell, K M; Reeves, B C; Johnson, G J

    2004-01-01

    Background: Extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) with a posterior chamber intraocular lens (PC IOL) is the preferred method of cataract surgery in developed countries. However, intracapsular cataract extraction (ICCE) with an anterior chamber lens (AC IOL) may be appropriate in rural Africa. A randomised controlled trial was carried out to compare these surgical strategies.

  1. A Mutant Gene Found to Be the Pathogenic Origin of Infantile Cataract

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhao Baohua; Guo Haiyan

    2002-01-01

    @@ According to a report in the June 24 issue of Nature Genetics, mutations in a gene named heat-shock transcription factor 4 (HSF4) have been discovered to be responsible for lamellar and Marner cataract. Experts believe that this will open new horizons for revealing the pathogenic origin of congenital cataract.

  2. The challenges in improving outcome of cataract surgery in low and middle income countries

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Robert Lindfield

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cataract is the leading cause of blindness globally and surgery is the only known measure to deal with it effectively. Providing high quality cataract surgical services is critical if patients with cataract are to have their sight restored. A key focus of surgery is the outcome of the procedure. In cataract surgery this is measured predominantly, using visual acuity. Population- and hospital-based studies have revealed that the visual outcome of cataract surgery in many low and middle income settings is frequently sub-optimal, often failing to reach the recommended standards set by the World Health Organization (WHO. Another way of measuring outcome of cataract surgery is to ask patients for their views on whether surgery has changed the functioning of their eyes and their quality of life. There are different tools available to capture patient views and now, these patient-reported outcomes are becoming more widely used. This paper discusses the visual outcome of cataract surgery and frames the outcome of surgery within the context of the surgical service, suggesting that the process and outcome of care cannot be separated. It also discusses the components of patient-reported outcome tools and describes some available tools in more detail. Finally, it describes a hierarchy of challenges that need to be addressed before a high quality cataract surgical service can be achieved.

  3. Risk of cataract among medical staff in neurosurgical department occupationally exposed to radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study we present the risk of cataract among medical staff in neurosurgical department occupationally exposed to radiation compared to those of non-radiation workers. Cataract is the most common degenerative opacity of the crystalline lens developing with aging. Other risk factors for cataract are: infrared and ultraviolet radiation, systemic diseases (diabetes, hypertonic disease), eye diseases (glaucoma, high myopia), drugs (steroids), etc. High risk of developing cataract we find among staff occupationally exposed to radiation during operations - interventional cardiologists and neurosurgeons. This study includes 30 people between 33 and 60 years of age working in neurosurgical department and control group (the same amount and age of people not exposed to radiation in their work). After visual acuity measurement, the lens was examined by retroillumination method (red reflex) and using a bio microscope. The patients were asked for presence of ocular and systemic diseases, eye trauma, drug, alcohol and tobacco abuse and for how many years they work in this department. There was one case with cataract among neurosurgeons. The doctor doesn't have eye or systemic diseases, doesn't take any drugs and is not alcohol or tobacco abuser. In the control group there were two persons with subcapsular cataract but they have diabetes. Radiation is one of the risk factors for cataract. Continuing of this epidemiological survey will provide further knowledge on the potential risk of occupational radiation-induced cataract among neurosurgical staff and will contribute for optimization of radiation protection. (authors)

  4. Risk factors for nuclear and cortical cataracts: A hospital based study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bangera Sheshappa Mamatha

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: Higher dietary intake of carotenoids is associated with a lower risk of cataracts. Nuclear and cortical cataracts are associated with various risk factors such as diabetes, hypertension, cigarette smoking and tobacco, similar to studies conducted in other Asian and European populations, irrespective of ethnic origin.

  5. Combined intravitreal bevacizumab with phacoemulsification in visually significant cataract and visually significant exudative maculopathy

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Mansour; Bashshur, Ziad F.; Sibai, Tarek A.; Abla Mehio-Sibai; Hamam, Rola N.

    2011-01-01

    Purpose : We investigated the visual outcome of combined phacoemulsification with intravitreal bevacizumab, in eyes with dense cataract and visually significant exudative maculopathy. Materials and Methods : Prospective longitudinal pilot study of consecutive patients treated by two surgeons in 2006, using intravitreal bevacizumab at the end of phacoemulsification. The historical control group consisted of consecutive subjects with exudative maculopathy and dense cataract treated by the s...

  6. 42 CFR 1001.1701 - Billing for services of assistant at surgery during cataract operations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-10-01

    ... PROGRAMS Permissive Exclusions § 1001.1701 Billing for services of assistant at surgery during cataract... surgery during a cataract operation, or (ii) Charges that include a charge for an assistant at surgery... 42 Public Health 5 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Billing for services of assistant at surgery...

  7. Phacoemulsification cataract surgery in a large cohort of diabetes patients: visual acuity outcomes and prognostic factors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ostri, Christoffer; Lund-Andersen, Henrik; Sander, Birgit; La Cour, Morten

    2011-01-01

    To assess visual acuity outcomes after phacoemulsification cataract surgery in a large population of diabetic patients with all degrees of diabetic retinopathy.......To assess visual acuity outcomes after phacoemulsification cataract surgery in a large population of diabetic patients with all degrees of diabetic retinopathy....

  8. The challenges in improving outcome of cataract surgery in low and middle income countries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lindfield, Robert; Vishwanath, Kalluru; Ngounou, Faustin; Khanna, Rohit C

    2012-01-01

    Cataract is the leading cause of blindness globally and surgery is the only known measure to deal with it effectively. Providing high quality cataract surgical services is critical if patients with cataract are to have their sight restored. A key focus of surgery is the outcome of the procedure. In cataract surgery this is measured predominantly, using visual acuity. Population- and hospital-based studies have revealed that the visual outcome of cataract surgery in many low and middle income settings is frequently sub-optimal, often failing to reach the recommended standards set by the World Health Organization (WHO). Another way of measuring outcome of cataract surgery is to ask patients for their views on whether surgery has changed the functioning of their eyes and their quality of life. There are different tools available to capture patient views and now, these patient-reported outcomes are becoming more widely used. This paper discusses the visual outcome of cataract surgery and frames the outcome of surgery within the context of the surgical service, suggesting that the process and outcome of care cannot be separated. It also discusses the components of patient-reported outcome tools and describes some available tools in more detail. Finally, it describes a hierarchy of challenges that need to be addressed before a high quality cataract surgical service can be achieved. PMID:22944761

  9. Synergistic effect of osmotic and oxidative stress in slow-developing cataract formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Alfred W H; Ho, Ye-shih; Chung, Sookja K; Chung, Stephen S M

    2008-11-01

    Diabetes is a major contributing factor in cataract development. In animal models where cataracts develop within days or weeks of diabetes it is well established that osmotic stress from the accumulation of sorbitol leads to cataract development. This mechanism might explain the rare cases of acute cataract sometimes found in patients with uncontrolled sustained hyperglycemia but cannot account for the vast majority of cataracts that developed after years of diabetes. Thus, a model that can simulate diabetic slow-developing cataract is needed. The contribution of osmotic and oxidative stress in cataract development in sorbitol dehydrogenase (SDH) deficient mice, a model for slow-developing cataract in diabetic patients was determined. Contribution of osmotic stress was assessed by HPLC measurement of sorbitol and by observing the effect of blocking sorbitol accumulation by aldose reductase (AR) null mutation in the SDH deficient mice. Contribution of oxidative stress was assessed by observing the effect of vitamin E treatment and the effect of null mutation of glutathione peroxidase-1 (Gpx-1) on cataract development in these mice. Lenticular sorbitol level was significantly increased in the SDH deficient mice, and blocking sorbitol accumulation by the AR null mutation prevented cataract development, demonstrating the contribution of osmotic stress in cataract development. SDH deficiency did not affect lens oxidative stress status. However, treatment with vitamin E significantly reduced the incidence of cataract, and Gpx-1 deficiency exacerbated cataract development in these mice. Our findings suggest that chronic oxidative stress impaired the osmoregulatory mechanism of the lens. This was not evident until modest increases in lens sorbitol increased the demand of its osmoregulatory function. This osmoregulatory dysfunction model is supported by the fact that the activity of Na+/K+-ATPase, the key regulator of cellular ions and water balance, was dramatically

  10. Determination of Serum Ceruloplasmin Concentration in Patients with Primary Open Angle Glaucoma with Cataract and Patients with Cataract Only: A Pilot Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarnat-Kucharczyk, Monika; Rokicki, Wojciech; Zalejska-Fiolka, Jolanta; Pojda-Wilczek, Dorota; Mrukwa-Kominek, Ewa

    2016-01-01

    Background The aim of this article was to describe the role of ceruloplasmin and to report preliminary results of ceruloplasmin concentrations in patients with primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) with cataract and in patients with only cataract. Glaucoma, a neurodegenerative disease, is a heterogeneous group of conditions characterized by loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGC), their axons, progressive optic nerve damage, and visual field deterioration. Material/Methods The POAG group included 30 patients and the cataract group included 25 patients. Results Ceruloplasmin plays an essential role in iron metabolism and inactivating free radicals. In the presented pilot study, serum ceruloplasmin level was lower in the POAG group in comparison to the group with only cataract. Conclusions In treating persistent inflammation in the course of glaucoma, antiglaucoma drugs may increase the permeability of the blood-ocular barrier, which may be connected with the lower concentration of serum ceruloplasmin in the glaucoma patients group. PMID:27109647

  11. Capsulotomy and hydroprocedures for nucleus prolapse in manual small incision cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Rengaraj; Veena, Kannusamy; Ravindran, Ravilla D

    2009-01-01

    Manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS) involves the manual removal of nucleus through a scleral tunnel. To achieve 100% success every time, one has to do a good capsulotomy and should master the technique to prolapse the nucleus into anterior chamber. During conversion from extracapsular cataract surgery to MSICS, one can perform a can-opener capsulotomy and prolapse the nucleus. However, it is safer and better to perform a capsulorrhexis and hydroprolapse the nucleus, as it makes the rest of the steps of MSICS comfortable. Use of trypan blue in white and brown cataracts makes the capsulorrhexis and prolapse simple and safe. Extra caution should be taken in cases with hypermature cataracts with weak zonules and subluxated cataracts. PMID:19075402

  12. Capsulotomy and hydroprocedures for nucleus prolapse in manual small incision cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Venkatesh Rengaraj

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS involves the manual removal of nucleus through a scleral tunnel. To achieve 100% success every time, one has to do a good capsulotomy and should master the technique to prolapse the nucleus into anterior chamber. During conversion from extracapsular cataract surgery to MSICS, one can perform a can-opener capsulotomy and prolapse the nucleus. However, it is safer and better to perform a capsulorrhexis and hydroprolapse the nucleus, as it makes the rest of the steps of MSICS comfortable. Use of trypan blue in white and brown cataracts makes the capsulorrhexis and prolapse simple and safe. Extra caution should be taken in cases with hypermature cataracts with weak zonules and subluxated cataracts.

  13. Study of trace-element metabolism during the formation of rat's cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A cataract in the lenses of Wistar rats was induced by injecting Na2SeO3; they exibited various kinds of cataract between 8 and 28 days. The trace element analyses of samples of different kinds of lenses were carried out by PIXE method. The ratio of their concentrations relative to the control values concerning the formation time of cataract was studied. It was found that the metabolites of most trace elements in the control lenses are stable, but in various kinds of cataractous lenses they display certain changes. S, Cl, Ca, Fe and Zn appeared to accumulate relative to the controls, while P, K and Rb showed deficiency. The functions of trace element metabolism during the formation of cataract are also discussed. (author) 8 refs.; 2 figs.; 2 tabs

  14. Incidence of cataracts in rhesus monkeys treated with whole-body irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of cataract formation was investigated in rhesus monkeys exposed to different doses of whole-body irradiation. Application of 850 to 900 rad (8.5 to 9 Gy) caused cataracts in 17% of the monkeys within 3 years after treatment; after 10 to 15 years, incidence increased to 100%. Young lenses showed a significantly lower incidence than adult lenses, although no differences in the stage of cataractogenesis could be demonstrated. Sex differences did not play a role in incidence and severity of cataracts. Lower doses (400 rad or 4 Gy) did not cause cataracts. In view of the close similarity between monkeys and humans, these results indicate that a single dose of 850 to 900 rad, sometimes employed in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia in children, carries a strong risk of cataract development

  15. A study of the radiation cataract as late effects of radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In a review of 61 patients irradiated their eye balls in the Department of Radiology, Fukuoka University, from 1973 to 1997, radiation cataract as late effect occurred in 17 patients (27.9%), in 25 eye balls (22.1%). The periods from irradiation to appearance the cataract were related closely with total radiation doses to the lens. The radiation cataract developed earlier on cases irradiation with large total dose than with small total dose. According to the fraction size, the radiation cataract rates were higher in the patients irradiated over 1.5 Gy than the patients irradiated under 1.5 Gy, with significant difference. Five percent radiation cataract dose after 5 year was TDF 13 (95% confidence limits 11-14), 50% dose was 21 (19-23), and 95% dose was 35 (31-39). (author)

  16. Small eyes big problems: is cataract surgery the best option for the nanophthalmic eyes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nanophthalmos refers to an eyeball of short axial length, usually less than 20 mm which leads to angle closure glaucoma due to relatively large lens. Intra-ocular lens extraction relieves the angle closure in nanophthalmos. Cataract surgery in a nanophthalmic eye is technically difficult with high risk of complications such as posterior capsular rupture, uveal effusion, choroidal haemorrhage, vitreous haemorrhage, malignant glaucoma, retinal detachment and aqueous misdirection. Various options are explained in the literature to perform cataract surgery in nanophthalmos, like extracapsular cataract extraction with or without sclerostomy; small-incision cataract extraction by phacoemulsification which not only helps maintain the anterior chamber during surgery but also reduces the incidence of complications due to less fluctuation of intraocular pressure (IOP) during the surgery. Cataract surgery deepens and widens the anterior chamber angle in nanophthalmic eyes and has beneficial effects on IOP in eyes with nanophthalmos but is associated with a high incidence of complications. (author)

  17. Feasibility and Complications between Phacoemulsification and Manual Small Incision Surgery in Subluxated Cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchi Goel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To compare the feasibility of cataract surgery with implantation of endocapsular supporting devices and intraocular lens (IOL in subluxated cataract in phacoemulsification and manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS. Design. Prospective randomized intervention case series consisting of 60 eyes with visually significant subluxated cataract. Method. The patients were randomly distributed between the two groups equally. The main outcome measure was implantation of in-the-bag IOL, requirement of additional procedure and complications, if any. Results. Capsular bag retention in subluxated lenses is possible in 90% cases in phacoemulsification versus 76.67% cases in MSICS (=0.16. Both groups, achieved similar best corrected visual acuity (=0.73, although additional procedures, intraoperative, and postoperative complications were more common in MSICS. Conclusions. Achieving intact capsulorhexis and nuclear rotation in MSICS may be difficult in cases with large nucleus size and severe subluxation, but subluxated cataracts can be effectively managed by both phacoemuslification and MSICS.

  18. Favorable Long-term Prognosis of Cataract Surgery in Herpes Zoster Ophthalmicus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaudhary, Kulbhushan Prakash; Mahajan, Deepti; Panwar, Praveen

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: Scleritis is a rare presentation of herpes zoster ophthalmicus, complicated most commonly by iridocyclitis and raised intraocular pressure. These complications can recur in subsequent years, therefore they should be managed well. Case Report: We describe a female patient who developed scleritis, complicated cataract and secondary glaucoma 2 years after being diagnosed by HZO. Secondary glaucoma was managed medically, and the patient underwent extracapsular cataract extraction for the complicated cataract. Final visual acuity was 6/6 and IOP was 22.4 mm Hg. This is a rare report describing favorable long-term (>20 years) prognosis for surgical management of cataract associated with HZO together with scleritis, secondary glaucoma and post-herpetic neuralgia. Conclusion: A favorable outcome may be attained with surgery for complicated cataract associated with HZO if the condition is managed optimally and intraocular inflammation is well controlled. PMID:27413505

  19. Quality assessment of cataract surgery in Denmark - risk of retinal detachment and postoperative endophthalmitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjerrum, Søren Solborg

    The main purpose of this thesis was to examine whether the Danish National Patient Registry (NPR) could be used to monitor and assess the quality of cataract surgery in Denmark by studying the risks of two serious postoperative complications following cataract surgery - retinal detachment (RD) and......-operated fellow eyes up to 10 years after cataract surgery. The epidemiology of RD in the non-operated fellow eyes was different from the epidemiology of RD in the background population as young men had the highest risk of RD in the non-operated fellow eyes. This means that the absolute risk of PRD was highest...... for young men because they had a higher risk of RD before they underwent cataract surgery. In the second study (paper II), we used data from the NPR and reviewed patient charts to assess the risk of PE after cataract surgery performed in public eye departments and private hospitals/clinics in the...

  20. Small eyes big problems: is cataract surgery the best option for the nanophthalmic eyes?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utman, Saqib Ali Khan

    2013-09-01

    Nanophthalmos refers to an eyeball of short axial length, usually less than 20 mm which leads to angle closure glaucoma due to relatively large lens. Intra-ocular lens extraction relieves the angle closure in nanophthalmos. Cataract surgery in a nanophthalmic eye is technically difficult with high risk of complications such as posterior capsular rupture, uveal effusion, choroidal haemorrhage, vitreous haemorrhage, malignant glaucoma, retinal detachment and aqueous misdirection. Various options are explained in the literature to perform cataract surgery in nanophthalmos, like extracapsular cataract extraction with or without sclerostomy; small-incision cataract extraction by phacoemulsification which not only helps maintain the anterior chamber during surgery but also reduces the incidence of complications due to less fluctuation of intraocular pressure (IOP) during the surgery. Cataract surgery deepens and widens the anterior chamber angle in nanophthalmic eyes and has beneficial effects on IOP in eyes with nanophthalmos but is associated with a high incidence of complications. PMID:24034192

  1. Reversible Cataract as the Presenting Sign of Diabetes Mellitus: Report of Two Cases and Literature Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiu Min Wang

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Background: Type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM is the most common form of diabetes in young children. Serious optic complications, e.g. diabetic retinopathy and diabetic cataract involvement, are not usually detected in T1DM patients at the onset of the disease.Case Presentation: Two girls aged 11 years and 9 years were hospitalized in our unit in 2008 and 2009. They presented cataracts 1 and 6 months before the diagnosis of T1DM, respectively. After blood glucose level was controlled by insulin therapy, the cataract was resolved, totally in one and partly in the other girl. Meanwhile, visual acuity of both cases recovered, closely associated with fluctuation of plasma glucose level. In this study, we describe the symptoms, probable mechanism and treatment of diabetic cataract.Conclusion: Early antihyperglycemic therapy and maintenance of stable blood glucose level may reverse acute diabetic cataract or prevent it from getting worse.

  2. Clinical study on evaluation of anti-cataract effect of Triphaladi Ghana Vati and Elaneer Kuzhambu Anjana in Timira (immature cataract)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhati, Hitesh; Manjusha, R.

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Senile cataract is the leading cause of blindness according to the World Health Report, 1998. Till date no accepted medical treatment is available for cataract. In Ayurveda visual disturbances are described in the context of Timira, Kacha and Linganasha. Timira is an early stage characterized by blurring of vision and Linganasha is end stage where complete loss of vision occurs. Ancient scholars have advocated different Anjana application and oral medications in the Timira and Kacha stage. Aim: To study the efficacy of test drugs Triphaladi Ghana Vati and Elaneer Kuzhambu Anjana in immature cataract. Materials and Methods: In this trial patients having Senile Immature Cataract were randomized with equal probability to one of the two treatment Groups A and B (n = 20 each). In Group A Triphaladi Ghana Vati 500 mg internally for 3 months and in Group B Triphaladi Ghana Vati 500 mg internally and Elaneer Kuzhambu Anjana for local application were given. Assessment was done on the basis of blurring of vision, visualization of nonexisting things, difficulty in bright light and dim light or night vision, distant visual acuity, pinhole vision, best corrected visual acuity and cataract grading on slit lamp. Results: Both groups showed statistically significant changes in blurring of vision, difficulty in glare, daytime and bright light, distant visual activity, pinhole vision, and best-corrected visual acuity. Group B also showed significant changes in difficulty in night time, visualization of nonexisting things and in nuclear cataract. Conclusion: The study establishes that test drugs can reduce and control the progress of immature cataract, and combined therapy was found more effective. Chakshushya Rasayana, early diagnosis and proper management on Doshic lines can prevent arrest or delay senile cataract.

  3. Cataract after total body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation degree of visual impairment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To assess the degree of visual impairment as a result of cataract formation after total body irradiation (TBI) for bone marrow transplantation. Methods and Materials: The data from 93 patients who received TBI in 1 or 2 fractions as a part of their conditioning regimen for bone marrow transplantation were analyzed with respect to the degree of visual impairment as a result of cataract formation. The probability to develop severe visual impairment (SVI) was determined for all patients, and the degree of visual impairment was assessed for 56 patients with stabilized cataract, using three categories: no, mild, or severe. Results: For all 93 patients, the probability of developing a cataract causing SVI was 0.44. For allogeneic patients, it was 0.33 without and 0.71 with steroid treatment (p<0.001). All SVI-free probability curves reached a plateau distinct from the cataract-free curves. Apparently, cataracts developing late in the follow-up period rarely cause SVI. Of the patients with stabilized cataract, 32% had no visual impairment, 16% had mild, and 52% severe impairment. No or mild visual impairment was present in 61% of all patients with stable cataract and no steroid treatment compared with only 13% of the patients treated with steroids (p=0.035). Conclusion: SVI occurs in only some of the patients (52%) with stable cataract after TBI for bone marrow transplantation in 1 or 2 fractions. Steroid treatment markedly increases the probability of developing visual problems as result of a cataract after TBI

  4. Rate of posterior capsular rent as a complication of resident performed cataract extraction procedures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cataract extraction is the most commonly offered treatment for cataract. This is done surgically by a number of methods which include extracapsular cataract extraction and phacoemulsification. This study was done to assess the rate of posterior capsule rupture as a complication of resident performed cataract extraction procedures. Methods: It is a descriptive case series conducted from 1st March to 1st April 2014 at Al Shifa Trust Eye Hospital, a tertiary care hospital. Cataract extraction procedures were done by first to fourth year residents. The surgical procedures done were extracapsular cataract extraction, phacoemulsification and lens matter aspiration. Results: A total of 577 cases were operated, 307 males and 270 females. Out of which 336 were right eyes and 241 left eyes. The patients were in the age range 17-80 years. Only 61 out of 577 cases had posterior capsular rent. In phacoemulsification rate of posterior capsular rent was 29% and in extracapsular cataract extraction 69%. According to the year of residency cases done by first year were 24, second year 131, third year 231 and fourth year 191 with posterior capsular rents in 3, 23, 5 and 30 cases respectively. A total of 11 cases were left aphakic, 10 after extracapsular cataract extraction and 1 after phacoemulsification. Conclusion: There is a relatively high rate of posterior capsular rupture in cataract extraction procedures performed by residents. This rate is directly related to the procedure, being low for phacoemulsification and high for extracapsular cataract extraction. Rate of posterior capsular rupture is also directly related to the skill and expertise of the surgeon, being high for second year residents as compared to third and fourth year residents. (author)

  5. "Vitreous loss: Incidence and complications in extracapsular Cataract extractions "

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    Nikeghbali A

    2000-09-01

    Full Text Available One of the dangerous complications of cataract extractions is vitreous loss. The purpose of this stuy is to evaluate the incidence of vitreous loss and its sepuale while teaching residents at Rasoul Akram Hospital in Iran. This study has been conducted on existing records of 730 eyes which were subjectd to extracapsular cataract extractions by 3rd and 4th year, right handed resident of Rasoul Akram hospital. The information was taken from the records of patients who had vitreous loss during cataract surgery and the following data was extracted. The presence of any systemic diseases, phase of operation where vitreous loss occurred, vision on the next day, one month and 3 months later, the cause of low vision and any post operative sequale of the eye were evaluated. Extracted data collected and the prevalence of vitreous loss and its sequale were indentified and presented. Forty-nine eyes (6.7% had vitreous loss, thirty-one of them were in the left eye (63.3% and eighteen of them were in the right eye (36.7%. Regarding the stage of operation in which vitrous loss had occurred: twenty –eight eyes while nucleous delivery (57.7% eighteen eyes during aspiration of cortical material (36.7% and in three cases during IOL implantation. Five eyes had pseudoexfoliaton syndrome, four patients were diabetic and three had high myopia. Post operational sequale of these 49 eyes were: thirty-five with transient corneal edema (71.4%. Nine with misshaped pupils (18.9%, four with high astigmatism (8.1%, tow with cystoid macular edema (4%, two with retinal detachment (4% and seven with cloudy vitreous. (14.3%. The incidence of vitreous loss is more than expected. More extensive research to evaluated the prognositc factors according to the eye (OD/OS and the stage of the operation the leads to vitreous loss and to decrease its incidence is still needed.

  6. Intraoperative and Early Postoperative Complications of Manual Sutureless Cataract Extraction

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To determine the intraoperative and early postoperative complications of manual sutureless cataract extraction. Study Design: Case series. Place and Duration of Study: Redo Eye Hospital, Rawalpindi, Pakistan, from January 2009 to December 2010. Methodology: Three hundred patients of cataract through purposive non-probability sampling were selected. The patients underwent manual sutureless cataract surgery (MSCS) by single experienced surgeon and intraoperative complications were documented. The surgical technique was modified to deal with any intraoperative complications accordingly. Patients were examined on the first postoperative day and on the first postoperative week for any postoperative complications. The data was entered in Statistical Package for Social Sciences (SPSS) version 13.0 and the results were calculated in frequencies. Results: Among the 300 cases, 81.3% surgeries went uneventful whereas 18.6% had some complication. The common intraoperative complications were superior button-hole formation in 5%; posterior capsular rent in 5% and premature entry with iris prolapse in 3% cases. Postoperatively, the commonly encountered complications were striate keratopathy in 9.6% and hyphema 9%. At first week follow-up, 4% had striate keratopathy and 0.6% had hyphema. Striate keratopathy resolved with topical medication on subsequent follow-up. A total of 9 cases (3%) underwent second surgery: 2 cases for lens matter wash, 2 cases for hyphema and 5 cases needed suturing of wound for shallow anterior chamber due to wound leak. Conclusion: Superior button-hole formation, posterior capsular rent and premature entry were the common intraoperative complications of MSCS whereas the common early postoperative complications were striate keratopathy and hyphema. (author)

  7. Application of intracameral moxifloxacin to prevent endophthalmitis in cataract surgery

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    Servet Cetinkaya

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate the safety and efficacy of intracameral moxifloxacin in preventing endophthalmitis after cataract surgery.METHODS:Sixty-five eyes of 65 patients underwent cataract surgery between January and June 2012. Some patients received intracameral moxifloxacin at the end of surgery, while others did not(controls. Pre- and postperative logarithm of the minimum angle of resolution(logMARbest corrected visual acuity(BCVA, intraocular pressure(IOP, corneal edema, and anterior chamber(ACstatus were examined.RESULTS: Thirty-three patients(19 males, 14 females; average age, 64.81±11.61y(range: 41-82yreceived moxifloxacin and 32 patients(15 males, 17 females; average age, 65.43±11.10y(range: 42-81ydid not. The differences in patient age(P=0.827and sex(P=0.396were insignificant. Preoperative BCVA was approximately 20/130 in both groups. After surgery, moxifloxacin and control patients had a BCVA of 20/25 and 20/23, respectively(P=0.160. Preoperative IOP was 14.93±2.77mmHg(range: 11-21mmHgin moxifloxacin patients and 15.06±2.42mm Hg(range: 12-21mmHgin controls(P=0.850. After surgery, IOP was not statistically different between two groups(moxifloxacin: 14.06±2.31(range: 10-19mmHg, controls: 14.03±2.36mmHg(range: 10-19mmHg, P=0.960. Slight differences in corneal edema(P=0.623and anterior chamber cell(P=0.726incidences between two groups were not statistically significant. CONCLUSION: Intracameral moxifloxacin is safe and effective in preventing endophtalmitis after cataract surgery.

  8. Clinical observation of small-incision extracapsular cataract extraction with intraocular lens implantation for the treatment of cataract in the sight restoration project

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    Xiao-Jian Cheng

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To analyze the clinical effects of small-incision extracapsular cataract extraction with intraocular lens implantation for the treatment of cataract.METHODS:Totally 642 cases 676 eyes of cataract were treated by small-incision extracapsular cataract extraction with intraocular lens implantation. Complication during and after operations and postoperative visual acuity was observed.RESULTS:Visual acuity of 670 eyes was ≥0.05 and off-blindness rate was 99.11%, and there was 627 eyes ≥0.3 and the off-disability rate was 92.75% after 1mo. Rupture of posterior capsule during surgery occurred in 24 eyes. Fifty-four eyes were corneal edema, and anterior chamber exudation were 26 eyes, and 23 eyes were hypertension after operation. CONCLUSION: There are a little complications during and after operation for cataract treated by small-incision extracapsular cataract extraction with intraocular lens implantation. Patients have good recovery after operation. This operation does not need high-standard equipments and is suitable in the sight restoration project.

  9. αA crystallin may protect against geographic atrophy-meta-analysis of cataract vs. cataract surgery for geographic atrophy and experimental studies.

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    Peng Zhou

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cataract and geographic atrophy (GA, also called advanced "dry" age-related macular degeneration are the two major causes of visual impairment in the developed world. The association between cataract surgery and the development of GA was controversial in previous studies. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We performed a meta-analysis by pooling the current evidence in literature and found that cataract is associated with an increased risk of geographic atrophy with a summary odds ratio (OR of 3.75 (95% CI: 95% CI: 1.84-7.62. However, cataract surgery is not associated with the risk of geographic atrophy (polled OR=3.23, 95% CI: 0.63-16.47. Further experiments were performed to analyze how the αA-crystallin, the major component of the lens, influences the development of GA in a mouse model. We found that theαA-crystallin mRNA and protein expression increased after oxidative stress induced by NaIO(3 in immunohistochemistry of retinal section and western blot of posterior eyecups. Both functional and histopathological evidence confirmed that GA is more severe in αA-crystallin knockout mice compared to wild-type mice. CONCLUSIONS: Therefore, αA-crystallin may protect against geographic atrophy. This study provides a better understanding of the relationship between cataract, cataract surgery, and GA.

  10. Blindness and cataract in children in developing countries

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    Parikshit Gogate

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Blindness in children is considered a priority area for VISION 2020, as visually impaired children have a lifetime of blindness ahead of them. Various studies across the globe show that one-third to half of childhood blindness is either preventable or treatable1 and that cataract is the leading treatable cause of blindness in children.The 8th General Assembly of the International Agency for the Prevention of Blindness (IAPB provided an opportunity to be acquainted with recent research and programme development work in the prevention of childhood blindness.

  11. Study of serum sodium and potassium concentration in cataract patients

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    Smita A. Deokar

    2014-04-01

    Conclusion: Na, K-ATPase is responsible for maintaining the correct concentrations of sodium and potassium in lens cells. In ageing, lens fibers undergoes oxidation, and glycation may decrease Na, K-ATPase activity. The asymmetrical distribution of Na, K-ATPase activity in the epithelium and fibers may contribute to ionic currents that flow in and around the lens. So, abnormal elevation of lens sodium can be used as a marker in the opacification of the lens cortex in age-related human cataract. [Int J Res Med Sci 2014; 2(2.000: 592-594

  12. Investigation of metal elements in cataract patients using hair samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This investigation is confined to the study of hair samples from cataract victims. Hair mineral analysis is an analytical test, which measures the mineral content of the hair. The main purpose of this research is to make a relationship between the deposition of metals (listed above) and that of human cataract. This research is carried out on the basis to check for the imbalance of these metals deposited in the human body. These hair samples underwent normal acid digestion and atomic absorption for each metal was taken. As a result the concentrations of these metals were further analyzed to make a proper justification of the various metals that was assessed lead, zinc, magnesium and iron said to be the most predominant in relation to the other metals that was analyzed. The deposition of these metals in high concentration does not necessary mean that they are not the main reason for the development of human cataract.The sampled hair, obtained by cutting the first inch and one-half growth closest to the scalp at the nape of the neck or other part of the body. Testing is then performed using highly sophisticated detection equipment such Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy to achieve the most accurate precise results. These elements were analyzed using a Varian 20 plus Atomic Absorption Spectrometer. Approximately 0.1 g of the hair sample was placed at the bottom of a 250 ml round bottom flask which was attached to a reflux condenser. The sample was digested with 4 ml H2 SO4 (98%) and 4 ml HNO3 (69%) on moderate heat for approximately 30 minutes or until the hair was completely dissolved to a yellow solution. 3 ml of 30% hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) were then added and the mixture was heated for 30 minutes to clear the solution. Various metals such as lead, zinc, copper, cadmium, magnesium, iron, chromium and cobalt were tested for in the hair sample of cataract patients using atomic absorption spectrometry. (Author)

  13. Cataract surgery: ensuring equal access for boys and girls

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    Sylvia Shirima

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available In Tanzania, many children are not brought for surgery in a timely fashion and follow up is often poor. Research at Kilimanjaro Christian Medical Centre (KCMC has shown that girls are more likely than boys to be negatively affected: * Only half as many girls as boys received cataract surgery. * Girls tended to be brought for surgery later than boys. * Girls who did receive surgery were less likely than boys to be brought for the appropriate two-week follow-up visit (36 per cent of girls vs 64 per cent of boys.

  14. Postoperative Endophthalmitis Caused by Staphylococcus haemolyticus following Femtosecond Cataract Surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Wong, Margaret; Baumrind, Benjamin R.; Frank, James H.; Halpern, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    A 53-year-old Caucasian man underwent femtosecond cataract surgery and then presented with pain and hand motions vision 1 day following surgery. Anterior segment examination showed a 2-mm-layered hypopyon, a well-centered intraocular lens in the sulcus, and an obscured view to the fundus. B-scan ultrasonography showed significant vitritis and that the retina was attached. A tap and an injection of vancomycin 1 mg per 0.1 ml and of ceftazidime 2.25 mg per 0.1 ml were performed. The tap eventua...

  15. Surgical approaches to posterior polar cataract: a review

    OpenAIRE

    Vasavada, A. R.; Raj, S M; Vasavada, V; Shrivastav, S

    2012-01-01

    The aim of this study is to provide a comprehensive overview of surgical methods used in the emulsification of posterior polar cataracts (PPCs) that have been devised to minimize the risk of posterior capsule rupture (PCR) and its consequences. A Pubmed and Medline search of relevant literature on PPC was done. Only articles relevant to the treatment of PPC were included. The posterior capsule in eyes with PPC are known to have an abnormal adhesion to the polar opacity or a pre-existing weakn...

  16. Selective suture cutting for control of astigmatism following cataract surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Bansal R; Gupta Amod; Grewal SPS

    1992-01-01

    Use of 10-0 monofilament nylon in ECCE cataract surgery leads to high with the rule astigmatism. Many intraoperative and post operative methods have been used to minimise post operative astigmatism. We did selective suture cutting in 38 consecutive patients. Mean keratometric astigmatism at three and six weeks post operative was 5.76 and 5.42 dioptres (D) respectively. 77.5% of eyes had astigmatism above 2 D. Selective suture cutting along the axis of the plus high cylinder was done af...

  17. Astigmatism correction in cataract surgery with Rayner toric intraocular lenses

    OpenAIRE

    Painter, Sally

    2010-01-01

    Sally L Painter, Kikkeri S Arun, Jonathan K Kam, CK PatelOxford Eye Hospital, John Radcliffe Hospital, Headley Way, Headington, Oxford, United KingdomBackground: Cataract surgery is increasingly regarded as a refractive procedure. Corneal astigmatism can be reduced by the insertion of a toric intraocular lens (T-IOL). Rayner T-flex T-IOLs are licensed for the correction of astigmatism.Methods: In this retrospective study, 46 eyes from 34 patients, in whom T-IOLs were inserted, have been exami...

  18. Conjunctival inclusion cysts following small incision cataract surgery

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    Narayanappa Shylaja

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of acquired conjunctival inclusion cysts following various ophthalmic surgeries such as strabismus surgery, scleral buckling, pars plana vitrectomy, ptosis surgery and phacoemulsification has been reported. We report two cases of conjunctival inclusion cysts following manual Small Incision Cataract Surgery (SICS in two male patients aged 65 and 67 years. The cysts originated from the scleral tunnel used for manual SICS. Both were treated by excision and confirmed histopathologically. No recurrence was noted at three months follow-up. To our knowledge, conjunctival inclusion cysts following SICS have not been reported previously. Careful reflection of conjunctiva during tunnel construction and posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation may prevent their occurrence.

  19. Persistently raised intraocular pressure following extracapsular cataract extraction.

    OpenAIRE

    David, R; Tessler, Z.; Yagev, R.; BRISCOE, D; Biedner, B. Z.; Gilad, E.; YASSUR;, Y.

    1990-01-01

    In this population based study we have reviewed the files of all patients who underwent an extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE) between 1984 and 1987, were normotensives prior to surgery, and were followed up for at least 10 months after the ECCE. From a total of 1047 operations 746 qualified for the inclusion criteria; of these, 16 (2.1%) were found to have a consistently raised intraocular pressure (greater than 21 mmHg) on more than two occasions) at four months or later after surgery ...

  20. Changes in anterior chamber flare and cells following cataract surgery.

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, S. M.; Spalton, D. J.

    1994-01-01

    The laser flare cell meter allows rapid non-invasive quantification of aqueous flare and cells. In this prospective study laser photometry was used to document the recovery of the blood-aqueous barrier in 27 normal eyes following cataract surgery. Aqueous flare and cells were highest on the first postoperative day, declining rapidly in the first week and returning to preoperative levels by 3 months. In six eyes (22.2%) there was an increase in either flare and cells or flare alone during the ...

  1. Popular beliefs regarding the treatment of senile cataract

    OpenAIRE

    Temporini Edméa Rita; Kara Junior Newton; José Newton Kara; Holzchuh Nilo

    2002-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify popular beliefs regarding the treatment of senile cataract in patients enrolled in the community health programs on eye rehabilitation. METHODS: A cross-sectional survey was carried out using an interview questionnaire that was applied to 776 subjects drawn from a non-probabilistic sample in five cities of the state of São Paulo. The sample was made up of 47.2% males and 52.8% females, aged 50 to 96 years (average age 71.6 years). RESULTS: Of the total of subjects studi...

  2. EVALUATION OF VISUAL OUTCOME AFTER CATARACT EVALUATION OF VISUAL OUTCOME AFTER CATARACT SURGERY IN CAMP PATIENTS - A STUDY FROM CENTRAL INDIA

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    Madhu

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND : Cataract is the leading cause of avoidable blindness in India. Around 4 million people become blind each year because of cataract. AIM : To assess the visual outcome and complications associated with cataract surgery in camp patients operated at a Medical College tertiary hospital. MATERIALS AND METHODS : It was a retrospective study where 412 camp patients underwent posterior chamber intrao cular lens implantation surgery over a period of one year. Data was compiled based on demographic characteristics , and post - operative complications. It was graded as per Oxford Cataract Treatment and Evaluation Team (OCTET definitions on first post - operat ive day. After one month post - operative complications , best corrected visual acuity and refractive errors were also analyzed. RESULTS : 412 eyes underwent cataract surgery with posterior chamber intraocular lens implantation . The maximum patients were in th e age group of 60 - 69 years , 180 (43.6% patients. , Among these patients 240 were males (58.2 % and 172 were females (41.7 %. Small incision cataract surgery (SICS with intraocular lens implant was the commonest surgical method (80% used. 792 eyes of 41 2 patients had cataract , of which 596 had the cortical type (75.3 % and 196 had the nuclear type (24.7 %. Of the cortical type , 428 were immature and 168 were mature cataracts Based on OCTET grading , the most common first post - operative day complication was mild iridocyclitis (26.2% followed by transient corneal edema in 86 patients. The major post - operative complications after 4 weeks of cataract surgery were pigments on PCIOL in 18 (4.36% cases and capsular flap in 12 cases. After 4 weeks post - operati ve best corrected visual acuity of eye 6/18 in 89.8% cases. The commonest refractive error was Myopia with against the rule astigmatism seen in 172 out of 300 patients. CONCLUSION : Acceptable results can be obtained from eye camp surgery patients with expe rienced

  3. Iris recognition as a biometric method after cataract surgery

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    Roizenblatt Jaime

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Biometric methods are security technologies, which use human characteristics for personal identification. Iris recognition systems use iris textures as unique identifiers. This paper presents an analysis of the verification of iris identities after intra-ocular procedures, when individuals were enrolled before the surgery. Methods Fifty-five eyes from fifty-five patients had their irises enrolled before a cataract surgery was performed. They had their irises verified three times before and three times after the procedure, and the Hamming (mathematical distance of each identification trial was determined, in a controlled ideal biometric environment. The mathematical difference between the iris code before and after the surgery was also compared to a subjective evaluation of the iris anatomy alteration by an experienced surgeon. Results A correlation between visible subjective iris texture alteration and mathematical difference was verified. We found only six cases in which the eye was no more recognizable, but these eyes were later reenrolled. The main anatomical changes that were found in the new impostor eyes are described. Conclusions Cataract surgeries change iris textures in such a way that iris recognition systems, which perform mathematical comparisons of textural biometric features, are able to detect these changes and sometimes even discard a pre-enrolled iris considering it an impostor. In our study, re-enrollment proved to be a feasible procedure.

  4. Postoperative Endophthalmitis Caused by Staphylococcus haemolyticus following Femtosecond Cataract Surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Margaret; Baumrind, Benjamin R; Frank, James H; Halpern, Robert L

    2015-01-01

    A 53-year-old Caucasian man underwent femtosecond cataract surgery and then presented with pain and hand motions vision 1 day following surgery. Anterior segment examination showed a 2-mm-layered hypopyon, a well-centered intraocular lens in the sulcus, and an obscured view to the fundus. B-scan ultrasonography showed significant vitritis and that the retina was attached. A tap and an injection of vancomycin 1 mg per 0.1 ml and of ceftazidime 2.25 mg per 0.1 ml were performed. The tap eventually yielded culture results positive for Staphylococcus haemolyticus, which was sensitive to vancomycin. We report a case of endophthalmitis that occurred on postoperative day 1 following complicated cataract surgery. This is an uncommon bacterium that is not widely reported in the literature as a cause of endophthalmitis in the postoperative period. We urge clinicians to consider S. haemolyticus as an offending agent, especially when the infection presents very early and aggressively in the postoperative period. PMID:26951642

  5. [Historical notes on the terms "glaucoma" and "cataract" (author's transl)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rintelen, F

    1977-02-01

    The Greek term "glaucoma" has nothing to do with the disease we call glaucoma today and that we use to translate incorrectly with "grüner Star" throughout the German-speaking countries. The Greek adjective "glaucos" does not mean green but gleaming, sparkling. It signified the discolouring of the pupil in glaucoma. It was later replaced by the pathogenetic term hypochysis, Latin suffusio, denoting the supposed "trübe Feuchte" (opaque humour) that was taught to gather and congeal in front of the crystalline lens. Later on "glaukosis" was reserved for incurable cases, disease of the crystalline lens itself, which was looked at as the "organon visus" up to Felix Plater. The word "cataract"--waterfall--does not exist in Greek medicine. It appears in Salernitan medical science around the year 1000 as a synonym for hypochysis, the disease we call cataract today and which has been identified as opacity of the lens since Brisseau (1705). The nature of "incurable" glaucoma, later considered as a disease of the vitreous body, was clearly recognized as a consequence of intraocular increase of pressure only by v. Graefe. PMID:323562

  6. Recognising ‘high-risk’ eyes before cataract surgery

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    Parikshit Gogate

    2008-03-01

    Full Text Available Certain eyes are at a higher risk of complication during cataract surgery. Operations on such ‘high-risk’ eyes are also more likely to yield a poor visual outcome (defined as best corrected vision less than 6/60 after surgery.1Learning to recognise when eyes are at greater risk, and acting accordingly, will help you to avoid complications. Even so, before the operation takes place, it is good practice to explain to such patients that a poor outcome is a possibility. This makes these patients’ expectations more realistic and improves postoperative compliance and follow-up. In most cases, patients who are blind with complicated cataract will be happy with even a modest improvement of their vision.It is also important to have available all the equipment you may need to manage a possible complication, for example a vitrectomy machine in the case of capsular rupture and vitreous loss.Depending on where you are in the world, certain ‘high-risk’ eyes will be more common: for example, pseudoexfoliation in Somalia and India, onchocerciasis in Sudan, and angle-closure glaucoma in Asia. You will get to know your local problems as you perform more operations.

  7. Orbital cellulits following cataract surgery under peribulbar anaesthesia

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    Mukherjee, Chandoshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available [english] Introduction: Orbital cellulits following cataract surgery is extremely rare. We describe a case of orbital and facial cellulitis that occurred after routine cataract operation with peribulbar anaesthesia. There were no preoperative systemic or ocular risk factors for postoperative infection. Case description: An 89-year-old man presented to eye casualty, the day after he underwent an uneventful phacoemulsification and posterior chamber lens implantation in the left eye under peribulabr anaesthesia, with soreness, swelling and reduced visual acuity (6/18 in the operated eye. On initial presentation periorbital swelling was noted, the eye was minimally tender, intraocular pressure was raised at 28 mHg and fundoscopy was limited due to a hazy cornea. The patient was discharged on topical medication with a diagnosis of allergic reaction to postoperative drops.The following day, the patient re-presented with worsening orbital swelling involving the left cheek. Ocular findings remained unchanged. CT scan revealed left orbit soft tissue swelling and a locule of air medial to the medial rectus. There were no signs of sinus infection or periosteal inflammation. A diagnosis of left orbital and facial cellulitis was made and the patient was treated with intravenous antibiotics.Discussion: Our patient did not have any predisposing risk factors, therefore most likely cause of cellulitis is surgical trauma during administration of the peribulbar block. This case illustrates the need for adequate skin preparation before the administration of peribulbar anaesthesia and minimal tissue trauma during the procedure.

  8. Antimicrobial Drugs in Prophylaxis of Complications after Cataract Phacoemulsification

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    I.N. Okolov

    2009-02-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose To study effectiveness of topical antimicrobial drugs in combination with antiseptic agents for prevention of postoperative infectious complications of cataract phacoemulsification. Material and methods We examined 240 patients prior to elective cataract phacoemulsification. All patients instilled antimicrobal drops into the eye to be operated according to two schemes. Microbiological examination of the content of the conjunctival sac after drop administration before the surgery and immediately after the surgery was performed in all patients. Results Preoperatively, microbial contamination on the conjunctiva was found in 128 patients (53,3%. Coagulase-negative staphylococcus (31,2% and diphtheroids (41,4% were the most abundant. In the first scheme of treatment, significant reduction of microbial contamination is recorded only after Tobrex instillations. Two-days prophylaxis significantly reduced microbial contamination in all studied groups. No reliable difference between drugs was found. There was no significant difference between two schemes. Conclusions Administration of local antimicrobal drugs significantly inhibits bacterial contamination of the conjunctiva. Torbex had the highest antimicrobial effect in one-hour scheme of prophylaxis while all drugs were similar by effectiveness in three-day scheme.

  9. Identification of Proteins that Modify Cataract of the Eye Lens

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    Hoehenwarter, Wolfgang; Tang, Yajun; Ackermann, Renate; Pleissner, Klaus-Peter; Schmid, Monika; Stein, Robert; Zimny-Arndt, Ursula; Kumar, Nalin M.; Jungblut, Peter R.

    2010-01-01

    The occurrence of a nuclear cataract in the eye lens due to disruption of theα3Cx46 connexin gene, Gja3, is dependent on strain background in a mouse model, implicating factors that modify the pathology. The differences upon cataractogenesis in the urea soluble proteins of the lens of two mouse strains, C57BL/6J and 129/SvJ, were analyzed by a comparative proteomics approach. Determination of the complete proteome of an organ offers the opportunity to characterize at a molecular level, differences in gene expression and post-translational modifications occurring during pathology and between individuals. The abundance of 63 protein species was altered between the strains. A unique aspect of this study is the identification of chaperonin subunit 6A, mortalin, ERp29 and syntaxin binding protein 6 in the eye lens. DNA polymorphisms resulting in non-conservative amino acid changes that led to altered physicochemical properties of the proteins were detected for mortalin, chaperonin subunit 6A, annexin A1 and possibly gamma N crystallin. The results show HSP27/25 and/or ERp29 are the likely major modifying factors for cataractogenesis. Extension of the results suggests that small heat shock proteins have a major role for influencing cataract formation in humans. PMID:19003866

  10. Clinical features and treatment of endophthalmitis after cataract surgery.

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    Zhu, J; Li, Z H

    2015-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the clinical features and treatment results of endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. Five patients with endophthalmitis after phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation were enrolled in this study. The pathogenesis, clinical manifestation, and surgical outcomes of 5 patients were compared. Three patients were surgically treated with anterior chamber irrigation and vitrectomy with intravitreal injection. The remaining two patients were medically treated with an intravitreal injection of vancomycin and ceftazidime. Treatment results of the five patients were analyzed. Four patients had positive cultures for bacteria (two cases Staphylococcus epidermidis, one case Enterococcus faecalis, and one case head-like Staphylococcus). The culture of the fifth patient did not have bacterial growth. One year following treatment, four patients had restored visual acuity and a clear vitreous cavity. Retinal detachment and other complications were not observed. The remaining patient had a visual acuity of index at 30 cm one year following treatment. For patients with endophthalmitis after cataract surgery, a biochemical laboratory examination should be promptly performed and should include a bacterial culture and drug sensitivity test. When necessary, vitrectomy combined with an intravitreal injection of vancomycin should be performed to treat the infection early and to help retain useful vision. PMID:26125869

  11. Intraocular lenses and clinical treatment in paediatric cataract

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    Camila Ribeiro Koch Pena

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric cataract is the most common treatable cause of blindness in children. Prevalence, etiology and morphology vary with the socioeconomic development. The treatment goal is to reduce amblyopia, being difficult management especially in unilateral cases. The decision on aphakia or primary intraocular lens should be individualized as well as correction with contact lens or spectacles. The intraocular lens single-piece hydrophobic acrylic are the most implanted in children and the preferably is in the capsular bag. The Sanders-Retzlaff-Kraff theoretic (SRK/T stressing that is described as more predictable, following Holladay I and SRK II and the recommendation is to under correction +6.0 or +8.0 dioptrias expecting the growth of the eye. The posterior capsule opacity is the most frequent complication and varies with the material choice of the lens. Glaucoma is the most serious postoperative complication and depends on the timing of the surgery, primary lens implantation and time of post surgical follow-up. The adherence to occlusion therapy with patching is critical to the visual prognosis and is determined by the child’s age and laterality of the cataract. There was significant improvement in the surgery and in IOLs, however the final visual prognosis is still not desirable.

  12. Perioperative prophylaxis for endophthalmitis after cataract surgery in Iran

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    Marzieh Katibeh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To describe prophylactic patterns employed against endophthalmitis after cataract surgery in Iran. Methods: This cross-sectional study included 486 ophthalmologists filling in a self-administered questionnaire during the 20 th Annual Congress of the Iranian Society of Ophthalmology in December 2010, Tehran, working in both private and academic medical centers. Prophylactic measures used preoperatively, intraoperatively and postoperatively and self-reported rates of endophthalmitis were assessed as the main outcome measurements. Results: In the preoperative phase, 75.5% of surgeons used povidone-iodine in the conjunctival sac and 71.4% of them did not use antibiotics. The rate of intraoperative prophylaxis was 61.9% either in the form of intracameral antibiotics or subconjunctival injection (mostly cephazolin or gentamicin. Only 7.8% of participants used intracameral cephalosporins. Postoperative antibiotics [mostly chloramphenicol (57% and ciprofloxacin (28%] were used by 94.2% of surgeons. On average, ten years of practice were required to observe one case of endophthalmitis. Conclusion: The surgeons in present setting used various prophylactic regimens against endophthalmitis after cataract surgery. Setting a local and evidence-based clinical practice guideline seems necessary.

  13. A PROSPECTIVE OBSERVATIONAL STUDY TO ANALYZE THE CAUSES AND TYPES OF PRE SENILE CATARACT IN SOUTH INDIAN PATIENTS

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    Manoj

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Cataract is the opacification of the crystalline lens and or its capsule. Senile cataract is the cataract occurring commonly in the elderly who are above 50 years of age. It is one of the major causes of blindness in both the developing and the developed countries. Cataracts which develop prior to age of 50 are defined as pre senile cataract. There may be several reasons for an individual to develop such pre senile cataract. Some of the major identified risk factors are ocular trauma, uncontrolled diabetes, nutritional deficiencies, environmental factors like chronic exposure to sunlight as in tropics, cigarette smoking, refractive errors like high myopia, chronic intake of certain drugs for some systemic illness and certain ocular inflammatory diseases. AIM AND OBJECTIVES: To determine the various types of pre senile cataract and to determine the common causes of pre senile cataract. DESIGN: Prospective Observational study. METHODS & MATERIALS: The patients attending the out-patient clinics of the ophthalmology department who are found to have pre senile cataract and who give consent to participate in the observational study are requested to fill the questionnaire and undergo a complete ocular examination. The type of cataract and any cause of the cataract formation identified from the questionnaire, examination or investigations done are documented and analyzed using frequency distribution. RESULTS: 100 eyes of 54 patients were included in the study. Most common type of cataract was found to be posterior sub capsular cataract. The common causes identified were sunlight exposure, chronic steroid use, diabetes, uveitis and smoking. CONCLUSION: Protection from sunlight, avoidance of chronic steroid usage, screening and adequate control of diabetes, meticulous management of uveitis and avoiding cigarette smoking helps to prevent early development of cataracts.

  14. The clinical utility of new combination phenylephrine/ketorolac injection in cataract surgery

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    Lawuyi LE

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Lola Elizabeth Lawuyi, Avinash Gurbaxani Moorfields Eye Hospital Dubai, Dubai, UAE Abstract: The maintenance of mydriasis throughout cataract extraction surgery and the control of ocular inflammation are crucial for successful surgical outcomes. The development of miosis during cataract surgery compromises the visualization of the surgical field and working space for surgeons. This may lead to complications that include posterior capsular tear and associated vitreous loss, longer surgical time, and postoperative inflammation. Postoperative inflammation is often uncomfortable and frustrating for patients. It causes pain, redness, and photophobia. This compromises the best-uncorrected vision following surgery and often leads to multiple clinic visits. This article examines the literature published on the current treatments used to manage mydriasis, pain, and inflammation in cataract extraction surgery. Combination phenylephrine/ketorolac injection offers an exciting new class of medication for use in cataract surgery. With the recent approval of Omidria™ (combination of phenylephrine 1% and ketorolac 0.3% by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA for intraocular use, we review the clinical utility of this new combination injection in cataract surgery. PubMed, MEDLINE, and conference proceedings were searched for the relevant literature using a combination of the following search terms: cataract extraction surgery, pupil dilation (mydriasis, miosis, phenylephrine, ketorolac, Omidria™, intracameral mydriatic. Relevant articles were reviewed and their references checked for further relevant literature. All abstracts were reviewed and full texts retrieved where available. Keywords: cataract extraction surgery, ketorolac, mydriasis, miosis, Omidria™, phenylephrine

  15. Incidence of radiation-induced cataract in single and parabiotic rats

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Grossly visible cataract developed by 500 days postradiation in 74 percent of the irradiated members of parabiotic pairs of NEDH rats, one of which had received 1000 R whole-body 250 kVp x radiation while the other was shielded to assure survival of the pair. The earliest time at which induced cataract was noted was 106 days postradiation, with the peak rate of occurrence between 300 and 400 days. Other ocular components than the lens, notably the iris and ciliary body, also showed radiation effects. The incidence of cataract in the shielded partners was 0.2 percent, the same as in control parabiont pairs. No spontaneous cataracts were found in single control rats. There was no abscopal effect on the eyes of the shielded partners. Conversely, presence of the shielded partner offered no protection to the irradiated eyes. A few single rats survived a whole-body dose of 1000 R. Three hundred days after radiation 3 percent of such rats developed cataract. By 600 days 82 percent of the survivors had developed cataract. As the dose was increased in several experiments from 700 to 1100 R, the incidence of cataract in survivors also increased from 31 percent to 90 percent

  16. Usefulness of Surgical Media Center as a Cataract Surgery Educational Tool.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogawa, Tomoichiro; Shiba, Takuya; Tsuneoka, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Purpose. This study retrospectively analyzed cataract surgeries to examine the usefulness of Surgical Media Center (SMC) (Abbott Medical Optics Inc.), a new cataract surgery recording device, for training of cataract surgery. Methods. We studied five hundred cataract surgeries conducted with a phacoemulsification system connected to the SMC. After surgery, the surgical procedures were reviewed, with changes in aspiration rate, vacuum level, and phaco power displayed as graphs superimposed on the surgical video. We examined whether use of SMC is able to demonstrate the differences in technique between experienced and trainee operators, to identify inappropriate phacoemulsification techniques from analyzing the graphs, and to elucidate the cause of intraoperative complications. Results. Significant differences in the time taken to reach maximum vacuum and the speed of increase in vacuum during irrigation and aspiration were observed between experienced and trainee operators. Analysis of the graphs displayed by SMC detected inappropriate phacoemulsification techniques mostly in cases operated by trainee operators. Conclusions. Using SMC, it was possible to capture details of cataract surgery objectively. This recording device allows surgeons to review cataract surgery techniques and identify the cause of intraoperative complication and is a useful education tool for cataract surgery. PMID:26881060

  17. Serum Antioxidative Enzymes Levels and Oxidative Stress Products in Age-Related Cataract Patients

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    Chang, Dong; Zhang, Xuefei; Rong, Shengzhong; Sha, Qian; Liu, Peipei; Han, Tao; Pan, Hongzhi

    2013-01-01

    Purpose. To investigate the activity of antioxidative enzymes and the products of oxidative stress in patients with age-related cataracts and compare the findings with those in healthy control subjects. Method. Sixty patients with age-related cataract and sixty healthy controls of matched age and gender were included in this study. Serum samples were obtained to detect the antioxidative enzymes of superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase (CAT), and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and oxidation degradation products of malondialdehyde (MDA), 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE), conjugated diene (CD), advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP), protein carbonyl (PC), and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG). Results. Serum SOD, GSH-Px, and CAT activities in cataract group were significantly decreased as compared to the control subjects (P < 0.05). The levels of MDA, 4-HNE, and CD in cataract patients were significantly higher than those in the control subjects (P < 0.05, P < 0.01). Cataract patients had higher levels of 8-OHdG, AOPP, and PC with respect to the comparative group of normal subjects (P < 0.01). And there was no statistical significance in concentration of antioxidative enzymes and oxidative stress products in patients with different subtype cataract. Conclusions. Oxidative stress is an important risk factor in the development of age-related cataract, and augmentation of the antioxidant defence systems may be of benefit to prevent or delay cataractogenesis. PMID:23781296

  18. Serum Antioxidative Enzymes Levels and Oxidative Stress Products in Age-Related Cataract Patients

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    Dong Chang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To investigate the activity of antioxidative enzymes and the products of oxidative stress in patients with age-related cataracts and compare the findings with those in healthy control subjects. Method. Sixty patients with age-related cataract and sixty healthy controls of matched age and gender were included in this study. Serum samples were obtained to detect the antioxidative enzymes of superoxide dismutase (SOD, catalase (CAT, and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px, and oxidation degradation products of malondialdehyde (MDA, 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE, conjugated diene (CD, advanced oxidation protein products (AOPP, protein carbonyl (PC, and 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine (8-OHdG. Results. Serum SOD, GSH-Px, and CAT activities in cataract group were significantly decreased as compared to the control subjects (P<0.05. The levels of MDA, 4-HNE, and CD in cataract patients were significantly higher than those in the control subjects (P<0.05, P<0.01. Cataract patients had higher levels of 8-OHdG, AOPP, and PC with respect to the comparative group of normal subjects (P<0.01. And there was no statistical significance in concentration of antioxidative enzymes and oxidative stress products in patients with different subtype cataract. Conclusions. Oxidative stress is an important risk factor in the development of age-related cataract, and augmentation of the antioxidant defence systems may be of benefit to prevent or delay cataractogenesis.

  19. Alterations of Serum Electrolytes and Malondialdehyde in Cataract Patients Attending General Hospital Owerri

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    Nnodim Johnkennedy

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Aim: This study was carried out to determine the level of serum electrolyte and malondialdehyde in cataract patients. Material and Methods: 80 cataract patients within the age of 55 years to 75 years attending General Hospital Owerri for routine blood glucose check were used in this study. Also 80 apparently healthy subjects without cataract within the age of 55 years and 75 years were used as control. The level of electrolytes particularly sodium and potassium were measured. The levels of glucose, urea, creatinine were measured in order to rule out diabetes and kidney malfunction respectively in both study and control groups. Result:It was observed that the level of sodium and Malondialdehyde (MDA were significantly increased in cataract patients when compared with controls (p0.05. Conclusion: This observation shows that increased sodium level in cataract patients could probably result in elevation of aqueous humor of the lens which contributes to osmotic disorder across the lens membrane. This could aggravate the progression of cataract as a result of MDA elevation. Therefore, salt restricted diet could be beneficial to cataract patients by preventing electrolyte disorder, hypernatremia and maintain the electrolyte balance.

  20. Risk Factors for Cataract After Palladium-103 Ophthalmic Plaque Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To examine how tumor characteristics and dose affect cataract development after plaque radiation therapy. Methods and Materials: Three hundred and eighty-four patients were diagnosed with uveal melanoma and treated with palladium-103 (103Pd) plaque radiation therapy. Of these, 282 (74%) inclusion met exclusion criteria for follow-up time, tumor location, and phakic status. Then patient-, ophthalmic-, and radiation-specific factors (patient age, diabetes, hypertension, tumor location, tumor dimensions, and lens dose) were examined (by a Cox proportional regression model) as predictors for the development of radiation-related cataract. Results: Radiation cataract developed in 76 (24%) of patients at a mean follow-up of 39.8 months (range, 1-192). Patients with anteriorly located tumors were noted to have a higher incidence of cataract at 43.0% (43 of 100 patients) vs. 18.1% (33 cataracts per 182 patients) for posteriorly located tumors (p <0.0001). However, multivariate Cox proportional modeling showed that increasing patient age at time of treatment (p for trend = 0.0003) and higher lens dose (p for trend = 0.001) were the best predictors (biomarkers) for radiation cataract. Conclusions: Although anterior tumor location, greater tumor height, and increased patient age (at treatment) were associated with significantly greater risk for radiation cataract, dose to lens was the most significant factor.