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Sample records for cataracts mechanisms involved

  1. Cataracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Specific Prevalence Rates for Cataract by Age, and Race/Ethnicity The risk of cataract increases with each ... Race/Ethnicity 2010 Prevalence Rates of Cataract by Race In 2010, white Americans age 40 and older ...

  2. Investigation of lens morphology and mechanical characteristics of lens capsule and lens nucleus in patients with agerelated and diabetic cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Tishkova

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the influence of carbohydrate metabolism on the structure and mechanical properties of the lens capsule and nucleus.Methods: Human lens pathology was studied in different forms of cataract. 220 patients with a cataract (220 eyes were included in this study. Morphological, immunohystological and immunocytochemical investigations of lens substance (antibodies to a- (a-А and a-В, b-, g- crystallines, spectroscopic analyses of smears and morphometric analyses of slices, investigation of lens morphology and mechanical caracteristics of lens capsule and lens nucleus were performed.Results: The capsule of the lens in patients with senile cataract contains more Na+, Cl-. The capsule of the lens in patients with senile cataract contains more Ca2+, O. Mechanical strength of the capsule in the case of diabetes mellitus was lower comparatively with senile cataract in the same age groups. More significant expression of a-В and b-crystallines was found in patients with diabetes mellitus comparatively with patients with age-related cataract. Morphological features were founded in patients with cortical and nuclear forms of senile cataract and the diabetic cataract.Conclusion: During surgery (ultrasonic microcoaxial phacoemulsification the equivalent of ultrasound was recorded. Lower density of the lens nucleus of patients with diabetes mellitus made it possible to use lower energy parameters. Using the torsion ultrasound in those cases allowed us to decrease the influence of ultrasound on eye tissues and reduce the time of achieving the maximum BCVA in the postsurgical period.

  3. Investigation of lens morphology and mechanical characteristics of lens capsule and lens nucleus in patients with agerelated and diabetic cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S. Tishkova

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To investigate the influence of carbohydrate metabolism on the structure and mechanical properties of the lens capsule and nucleus.Methods: Human lens pathology was studied in different forms of cataract. 220 patients with a cataract (220 eyes were included in this study. Morphological, immunohystological and immunocytochemical investigations of lens substance (antibodies to a- (a-А and a-В, b-, g- crystallines, spectroscopic analyses of smears and morphometric analyses of slices, investigation of lens morphology and mechanical caracteristics of lens capsule and lens nucleus were performed.Results: The capsule of the lens in patients with senile cataract contains more Na+, Cl-. The capsule of the lens in patients with senile cataract contains more Ca2+, O. Mechanical strength of the capsule in the case of diabetes mellitus was lower comparatively with senile cataract in the same age groups. More significant expression of a-В and b-crystallines was found in patients with diabetes mellitus comparatively with patients with age-related cataract. Morphological features were founded in patients with cortical and nuclear forms of senile cataract and the diabetic cataract.Conclusion: During surgery (ultrasonic microcoaxial phacoemulsification the equivalent of ultrasound was recorded. Lower density of the lens nucleus of patients with diabetes mellitus made it possible to use lower energy parameters. Using the torsion ultrasound in those cases allowed us to decrease the influence of ultrasound on eye tissues and reduce the time of achieving the maximum BCVA in the postsurgical period.

  4. [Mechanical pupillary dilatation using rings in small pupils during cataract surgery : Video article].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wirbelauer, C; Schmidt, S; Puk, C

    2018-03-22

    The purpose of mechanical pupillary dilatation in small pupils is a sufficient visualization of the lens to be able to perform capsulorhexis, phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation. The indications for mechanical dilatation are fulfilled in patients where a sufficient pharmacological preoperative pupil dilatation is not possible. During routine cataract surgery specific foldable rings can be employed to dilate the pupil with the appropriate injector under viscoelastic substances. These rings are carefully placed at the pupillary margin until circular pupillary dilatation up to 6-7 mm is achieved. After intraocular lens implantation and before removing the viscoelastic substance the rings are slowly folded into the injector and then removed. The surgical technique is demonstrated in detail with the help of a video of the operation, which is available online. Mechanical pupillary dilatation was possible in all patients studied (n = 14), which allowed uncomplicated phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation. For both ring systems studied the mean pupillary dilatation was 6.6 mm. At the end of surgery, the pupillary diameter was 4.89 mm using a Malyugin ring (MST, Redmond, Washington, USA) and 4.93 mm with an I‑ring (Visitec, Waltham, MA, USA; P > 0.05). Small lesions at the pupillary margin or pigment dispersion during implantation or explantation depended mostly on the individual patient situation and not on the ring used. Mechanical pupillary dilatation with rings allows sufficient dilatation to perform cataract surgery. Both the Malyugin ring and the I‑ring achieved smooth and atraumatic pupillary dilatation.

  5. Congenital cataract

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... both eyes. Moderate to severe cataracts that affect vision, or a cataract that is in only 1 eye, will need to be treated with cataract removal surgery. In most (noncongenital) cataract surgeries, an artificial intraocular lens (IOL) is inserted into the eye. ...

  6. Is the Memory Effect of the Blind Spot Involved in Negative Dysphotopsia after Cataract Surgery?

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    Martin Wenzel

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We present novel clinical observations on negative dysphotopsia (ND in eyes that have undergone cataract surgery. In the past, shadow effects were alleged to be located in the far peripheral temporal visual field 50° to 100° away from the optical axis. In a small series of eight patients we found evidence of photic effects, described by the patients as shadows in the periphery that were objectively located much more centrally. In all cases, we could find an association of these phenomena with the blind spot. We hypothesize that the memory effect of the blind spot which is dislocated and changed in magnification due to replacement of the crystalline lens could be one determinant for pseudophakic ND. The scotoma of the optic nerve head and the main arteries and veins of the phakic eye are displaced in the pseudophakic eye depending on the specific characteristics and position of the intraocular lens within the eye.

  7. Treating Cataracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... bright lights at night. I even saw three moons. It was very disturbing. Even though I'd ... the NIH's National Eye Institute, performs cataract surgery. Photo courtest of Dr. Rachel Bishop A cataract is ...

  8. Cataract removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... better. The procedure almost always includes placing an artificial lens (IOL) in the eye. Description Cataract surgery ... the old lens (cataract). It helps improve your vision. The doctor may close the incision with very ...

  9. The myosin chaperone UNC45B is involved in lens development and autosomal dominant juvenile cataract

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Comyn, Sophie; Mang, Yuan

    2014-01-01

    in this region, in ACACA and UNC45B. As alterations of the UNC45B protein have been shown to affect eye development in model organisms, effort was focused on the heterozygous UNC45B missense mutation. UNC45B encodes a myosin-specific chaperone that, together with the general heat shock protein HSP90, is involved...... in myosin assembly. The mutation changes p.Arg805 to Trp in the UCS domain, an amino acid that is highly conserved from yeast to human. UNC45B is strongly expressed in the heart and skeletal muscle tissue, but here we show expression in human embryo eye and zebrafish lens. The zebrafish mutant steif......, carrying an unc45b nonsense mutation, has smaller eyes than wild-type embryos and shows accumulation of nuclei in the lens. Injection of RNA encoding the human wild-type UNC45B protein into the steif homozygous embryo reduced the nuclei accumulation and injection of human mutant UNC45B cDNA in wild...

  10. Solar ultraviolet radiation cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfgren, Stefan

    2017-03-01

    Despite being a treatable disease, cataract is still the leading cause for blindness in the world. Solar ultraviolet radiation is epidemiologically linked to cataract development, while animal and in vitro studies prove a causal relationship. However, the pathogenetic pathways for the disease are not fully understood and there is still no perfect model for human age related cataract. This non-comprehensive overview focus on recent developments regarding effects of solar UV radiation wavebands on the lens. A smaller number of fundamental papers are also included to provide a backdrop for the overview. Future studies are expected to further clarify the cellular and subcellular mechanisms for UV radiation-induced cataract and especially the isolated or combined temporal and spatial effects of UVA and UVB in the pathogenesis of human cataract. Regardless of the cause for cataract, there is a need for advances in pharmaceutical or other treatment modalities that do not require surgical replacement of the lens. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  11. Cataract Vision Simulator

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and Videos: What Do Cataracts Look Like? Cataract Vision Simulator Leer en Español: Simulador: Catarata Jun. 11, 2014 How do cataracts affect your vision? A cataract is a clouding of the eye's ...

  12. Facts about Cataract

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... cataract in their 40s and 50s. But during middle age, most cataracts are small and do not affect ... symptoms of early cataract may be improved with new eyeglasses, brighter lighting, anti-glare sunglasses, or magnifying ...

  13. Aging and Health: Cataracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Problems Glaucoma Macular Degeneration Join our e-newsletter! Aging & Health A to Z Cataracts Basic Facts & Information ... Are Cataracts? Cataracts are a common result of aging and occur frequently in older people. About one ...

  14. Neurobiological mechanisms involved in sleep bruxism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lavigne, G J; Kato, T; Kolta, A; Sessle, B J

    2003-01-01

    Sleep bruxism (SB) is reported by 8% of the adult population and is mainly associated with rhythmic masticatory muscle activity (RMMA) characterized by repetitive jaw muscle contractions (3 bursts or more at a frequency of 1 Hz). The consequences of SB may include tooth destruction, jaw pain, headaches, or the limitation of mandibular movement, as well as tooth-grinding sounds that disrupt the sleep of bed partners. SB is probably an extreme manifestation of a masticatory muscle activity occurring during the sleep of most normal subjects, since RMMA is observed in 60% of normal sleepers in the absence of grinding sounds. The pathophysiology of SB is becoming clearer, and there is an abundance of evidence outlining the neurophysiology and neurochemistry of rhythmic jaw movements (RJM) in relation to chewing, swallowing, and breathing. The sleep literature provides much evidence describing the mechanisms involved in the reduction of muscle tone, from sleep onset to the atonia that characterizes rapid eye movement (REM) sleep. Several brainstem structures (e.g., reticular pontis oralis, pontis caudalis, parvocellularis) and neurochemicals (e.g., serotonin, dopamine, gamma aminobutyric acid [GABA], noradrenaline) are involved in both the genesis of RJM and the modulation of muscle tone during sleep. It remains unknown why a high percentage of normal subjects present RMMA during sleep and why this activity is three times more frequent and higher in amplitude in SB patients. It is also unclear why RMMA during sleep is characterized by co-activation of both jaw-opening and jaw-closing muscles instead of the alternating jaw-opening and jaw-closing muscle activity pattern typical of chewing. The final section of this review proposes that RMMA during sleep has a role in lubricating the upper alimentary tract and increasing airway patency. The review concludes with an outline of questions for future research.

  15. Decision-making and management of uveitic cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Shu-Wen Chan

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The visual outcome of uveitic cataract surgery depends on the underlying uveitic diagnosis, the presence of vision-limiting pathology and perioperative optimization of disease control. A comprehensive preoperative ophthalmic assessment for the presence of concomitant ocular pathology, with particular emphasis on macula and optic nerve involvement, is essential to determine which patients will benefit from improved vision after cataract surgery. Meticulous examination in conjunction with adjunct investigations can help in preoperative surgical planning and in determining the need for combined or staged procedures. The eye should be quiescent for a minimum of 3 months before cataract surgery. Perioperative corticosteroid prophylaxis is important to reduce the risk of cystoid macular edema and recurrence of the uveitis. Antimicrobial prophylaxis may also reduce the risk of reactivation in eyes with infectious uveitis. Uveitic cataracts may be surgically demanding due to the presence of synechiae, membranes, and pupil abnormalities that limit access to the cataract. This can be overcome by manual stretching, multiple sphincterotomies or mechanical dilation with pupil dilation devices. In patients <2 years of age and in eyes where the inflammation is poorly controlled, intraocular lens implantation should be deferred. Intensive local and/or oral steroid prophylaxis should be given postoperatively if indicated. Patients must be monitored closely for disease recurrence, excessive inflammation, raised intraocular pressure, hypotony, and other complications. Complications must be treated aggressively to improve visual rehabilitation. With proper patient selection, improved surgical techniques and optimization of peri- and post-operative care, patients with uveitic cataracts can achieve good visual outcomes.

  16. Childhood Cataract: Home to Hospital

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    Mohammad A Muhit MBBS MSc(Ophth MSc(CEH

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Globally, there are 190,000 children who are blind from cataract.1 Cataract in children may be present at birth (congenital cataract or may appear anytime during the first few years of life (developmental cataract. Childhood cataract is the most common treatable cause of childhood blindness, being responsible for 10-30% of all childhood blindness. A recent national study in Bangladesh showed that 1 in every 3 blind children is unnecessarily blind from congenital/developmental cataract.

  17. Childhood cataract: home to hospital.

    OpenAIRE

    Muhit, MA

    2004-01-01

    Globally, there are 190,000 children who are blind from cataract.1 Cataract in children may be present at birth (congenital cataract) or may appear anytime during the first few years of life (developmental cataract). Childhood cataract is the most common treatable cause of childhood blindness, being responsible for 10-30% of all childhood blindness. A recent national study in Bangladesh showed that 1 in every 3 blind children is unnecessarily blind from congenital/developmental cataract.

  18. Atomic bomb cataracts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shiraeda, Kanji

    1992-01-01

    Eye disturbance caused by atomic bomb radiation can be divided into three groups: direct injury immediately after exposure, eye lesions associated with radiation syndrome, and delayed disturbance. The crystalline lens of the eye is the most radiosensitive. Atomic bomb cataract has been investigated in a number of studies. The first section of this chapter discusses radiation cataract in terms of the incidence and characteristics. The second section deals with atomic bomb cataract, which can be diagnosed based on the four criteria: (1) opacity of the crystalline lens, (2) a history of proximal exposure, (3) lack of eye disease complicating cataract, and (4) non-exposure to radiation other than atomic bombing. The prevalence of cataract and severity of opacity are found to correlate with exposure doses and age at the time of exposure. Furthermore, it is found to correlate with distance from the hypocenter, the condition of shielding, epilation, and the presence or absence or degree of radiation syndrome. (N.K.)

  19. Bilateral cataracts associated with glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nair, V; Hasan, S U; Romanchuk, K; Al Awad, E; Mansoor, A; Yusuf, K

    2013-07-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD) has an essential role in the defense against cellular oxidative injury. In neonates, the most common manifestation of G6PD deficiency is jaundice and hemolysis due to factors causing oxidative stress. Less known are the ocular associations described with G6PD deficiency, including cataracts. Oxidative injury is involved in the pathogenesis of almost all forms of cataracts, causing the lens proteins to undergo modifications, denaturation and form insoluble aggregates resulting in cataracts. Although cataracts in adult males have been reported in several studies, there are few reports of cataracts in infants with G6PD deficiency. We describe a preterm male neonate with G6PD deficiency who developed bilateral cataracts following an episode of neonatal sepsis and severe hemolysis necessitating an exchange blood transfusion.

  20. Heterochromia after pediatric cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lenart, T D; Drack, A V; Tarnuzzer, R W; Fernandes, A; Lambert, S R

    2000-02-01

    Changes in iris color have been noted anecdotally after cataract surgery in infants, but they have not been studied systematically. The mechanism for these iris color changes has not previously been reported in the biomedical literature. Photographs were taken of both eyes of 15 children and 11 rhesus monkeys who had undergone unilateral cataract surgery. Masked examiners reviewed the photographs and compared the iris color of the eyes that were operated on with the eyes that were not operated on. Between 4 and 6 weeks postoperatively, the level of prostaglandin F(2alpha) in the aqueous humor (n = 4) and vitreous humor (n = 2) was measured in both the operated and nonoperated eyes of 4 monkeys that had undergone a neonatal lensectomy during the first 5 days of life. Thirteen of 15 children had a darker iris color in the operated eye in relation to the nonoperated (control) eye. Four of 11 monkeys had a uniformly darker iris in the operated eye; the other 7 monkeys had regional darkening or patches of darker iris in the eye that was operated on. The prostaglandin F(2alpha) levels in neonatal monkeys were higher in the aqueous humor and in the vitreous humor of the operated eye in relation to the nonoperated eye. In some children, cataract surgery is associated with a darkening of the iris color in the operated eye. We speculate that this darkening results from an exuberant prostaglandin release stimulated by the cataract surgery and may occur through the same or a similar mechanism by which latanoprost causes the darkening of iris color.

  1. Corneal sensation after cataract and refractive surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlhaas, M

    1998-10-01

    Most surgical procedures involving the anterior segment of the eye disrupt the normal organization of corneal innervation. Since denervation of the cornea results in impaired epithelial wound healing, increased epithelial permeability, decreased epithelial metabolic activity, and loss of cytoskeletal structures associated with cellular adhesion, it is important to identify the factors that determine the extent of neural regeneration. Mechanisms of corneal nerve damage and studies of corneal nerve fiber loss and reinnervation after cataract and refractive surgery--epikeratophakia, cryokeratomileusis, keratomileusis in situ, photorefractive keratectomy, laser in situ keratomileusis, and phacoemulsification--are reviewed and the decrease in corneal sensitivity, as a measure of corneal destruction and corneal metabolism, after these surgical procedures is compared.

  2. Keratomycosis after cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendicute, J; Orbegozo, J; Ruiz, M; Sáiz, A; Eder, F; Aramberri, J

    2000-11-01

    To evaluate cases and results of keratomycosis that developed after cataract surgery. Hospital de Guipúzcoa, San Sebastián, Spain. This retrospective study comprised 8 patients who developed keratomycosis soon after cataract surgery. Culture analysis revealed 7 cases of Aspergillus fumigatus and 1 of Aspergillus flavus. After medical treatment with antifungal agents, 6 cases resolved and 2 required evisceration. The presence of fungi in corneal ulcers that develop after cataract surgery should be considered. Initiation of early treatment determines the prognosis. Among the therapeutic options, collagen shields soaked in amphotericin B may be effective.

  3. On transport mechanisms in solar cells involving organic semiconductors

    OpenAIRE

    Nolasco Montaño, Jairo César

    2011-01-01

    The knowledge of transport mechanisms in solar cells is useful to determine electrical losses. In my doctoral thesis we studied the transport mechanisms in solar cells involving organic semiconductors. We show that models which have been used to study amorphous inorganic solar cells can be applied on organic ones. We conclude that: multitunelling capture emission and tunelling-enhanced interface recombination mechanisms contribute to the dark current characteristics in P3HT/Si, Pc/C60 and P3H...

  4. Viscoless microincision cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guy Sallet

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Guy SalletDepartment of Opthamology, Aalsters Stedelijk Ziekenhuis, BelgiumAbstract: A cataract surgery technique is described in which incisions, continuous circular capsulorhexis and hydrodissection are made without the use of any viscoelastics. Two small incisions are created through which the different parts of the procedure can take place, maintaining a stable anterior chamber under continuous irrigation. Subsequent bimanual phacoemulsification can be done through these microincisions. At the end of the procedure, an intraocular lens can be inserted through the self-sealing incision under continuous irrigation. 50 consecutive cataract patients were operated on without the use of viscoelastics and then compared with a group of 50 patients who had been helped with viscoelastics. No difference in outcome, endothelial cell count or pachymetry was noted between the two groups. No intraoperative complication was encountered. Viscoless cataract surgery was a safe procedure with potential advantages.Keywords: ophthalmic visco-surgical device, viscoless cataract surgery, microincision

  5. Cataracts induced by microwave and ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lipman, R.M.; Tripathi, B.J.; Tripathi, R.C.

    1988-01-01

    Microwaves most commonly cause anterior and/or posterior subcapsular lenticular opacities in experimental animals and, as shown in epidemiologic studies and case reports, in human subjects. The formation of cataracts seems to be related directly to the power of the microwave and the duration of exposure. The mechanism of cataractogenesis includes deformation of heat-labile enzymes, such as glutathione peroxide, that ordinarily protect lens cell proteins and membrane lipids from oxidative damage. Oxidation of protein sulfhydryl groups and the formation of high-molecular-weight aggregates cause local variations in the orderly structure of the lens cells. An alternative mechanism is thermoelastic expansion through which pressure waves in the aqueous humor cause direct physical damage to the lens cells. Cataracts induced by ionizing radiation (e.g., X-rays and gamma rays) usually are observed in the posterior region of the lens, often in the form of a posterior subcapsular cataract. Increasing the dose of ionizing radiation causes increasing opacification of the lens, which appears after a decreasing latency period. Like cataract formation by microwaves, cataractogenesis induced by ionizing radiation is associated with damage to the lens cell membrane. Another possible mechanism is damage to lens cell DNA, with decreases in the production of protective enzymes and in sulfur-sulfur bond formation, and with altered protein concentrations. Until further definitive conclusions about the mechanisms of microwaves and ionizing radiation induced cataracts are reached, and alternative protective measures are found, one can only recommend mechanical shielding from these radiations to minimize the possibility of development of radiation-induced cataracts. 74 references

  6. Molecular mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of septic shock.

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Bojórquez, Lucia Nikolaia; Dehesa, Alejandro Zentella; Reyes-Terán, Gustavo

    2004-01-01

    Pathogenesis of the development of sepsis is highly complex and has been the object of study for many years. The inflammatory phenomena underlying septic shock are described in this review, as well as the enzymes and genes involved in the cellular activation that precedes this condition. The most important molecular aspects are discussed, ranging from the cytokines involved and their respective transduction pathways to the cellular mechanisms related to accelerated catabolism and multi-organic failure.

  7. Molecular mechanisms involved in taste learning and memory

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    Andrés Molero-Chamizo

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available Taste learning, and particularly conditioned taste aversion (CTA, is an adaptive learning involving complex brain mechanisms and molecular pathways. Taste learning and CTA are critical behaviors for survival, and the knowledge of the molecular bases involved in the acquisition, retention and extinction of CTA can help to understand the brain mechanisms of normal and altered taste learning. The aim of this review is to describe recent findings on the molecular mechanisms of taste learning, from the genetic, receptors, and intracellular and extracellular signaling biological levels. We can conclude that some molecular pathways and processes for the acquisition of taste learning and the formation of taste memories are well identified. However, new molecular, neurobiological and behavioral studies are needed to thoroughly elucidate the complexity of the taste system and the neural mechanisms of CTA.

  8. Methylphenidate (Ritalin)-associated cataract and glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Chao-Kung; Kuang, Tung-Mei; Chou, Joe Ching-Kuang

    2006-12-01

    Methylphenidate hydrochloride (Ritalin) is the drug of choice for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD). However, an association of Ritalin with glaucoma has been reported. We report a case of Ritalin-associated cataract and glaucoma. A 10-year-old boy was diagnosed with ADHD and had received methylphenidate hydrochloride, 60 mg/day for 2 years. He presented with blurred vision. Best-corrected visual acuity was 6/60 in both eyes. Ocular examinations revealed intraocular pressure (IOP) of 30 mmHg under medication, dense posterior subcapsular opacity of lens, pale disc with advanced cupping, and marked constriction of visual field. Despite maximal anti-glaucomatous medication, IOP still could not be controlled. The patient then received combined cataract and glaucoma surgery. Visual acuity improved and IOP was within normal limits in both eyes postoperatively. Large dose of methylphenidate may cause cataract and glaucoma. The mechanism remains unclear. Doctors should be aware of the possible ocular side effects of methylphenidate.

  9. [Cataract surgery in children].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlović, S

    2000-01-01

    Cataract extraction in children has improved and became more popular over the past few decades but, due to particular features of children's eyes, still remains controversial--especially regarding the intraocular lens implantation. In contrast to adults, indications for cataract surgery in children are much more difficult to determine. Since subjective visual acuity cannot be obtained, greater reliance must be placed on the morphology and location of the lens opacity, and the behavior of the child. Forced preferential looking and visual evoked potentials can be helpful, but they should not be the only criteria. In management of pediatric cataract, correction of postoperative aphakia is still an incompletely resolved problem. Conventionally, optical correction is achieved by spectacles or contact lenses. The power of both spectacles and contact lenses can be readily adjusted to compensate for ocular growth. The success of both depends significantly on parental compliance and the child's acceptance. Hutchinson reported that 44% children with aphakia stopped wearing glasses or contact lenses 2 months after surgery. Contact lens wearing can also result in a number of corneal complications, including infectious keratitis, corneal vascularization and hypoxic corneal ulceration. IOL implantation is theoretically superior to glasses and contact lenses since it provides almost immediate optical correction which is much more reliable because it does not depend on parental or child's compliance. Still, there are many controversies about IOL implantation in infants and young children like IOL-size, material, IOL power calculation, prevention and management of secondary cataract, as well as long term safety of IOLs in children's eyes. Although short-term anatomic results after cataract extraction and primary IOL implantation in children are excellent and stable, long-term follow-up is necessary to answer questions about the long-term safety of implants in children's eyes. A

  10. Visual Outcome of Cataract Surgery

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    non-governmental organization (Amen Foundation) to commence a free cataract surgery programme in January. 2008. Since its inception, the patient turnout for cataract surgery has increased. The World Health Organization (WHO) categorizes the outcome of cataract surgeries into 3 groups: good (visual acuity of 6/ 6-6/ ...

  11. Cytomegalovirus Congenital Cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ridha Wahyutomo

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Cytomegalovirus congenital infection is an infection caused by the the subfamily â Herpesviridae, during pregnancy. The incidence of infections among newborn infants is 1 %. One of the effects of congenitally acquired infection is the congenital cataract. A 6-year-old child complained to have a blurred vision diagnosed with cytomegalovirus congenital cataract. The diagnosis was confirmed by a positive serology testing for Ig M and Ig G CMV. The laboratory test using Giemsa staining to find inclusion bodies and a faster PCR could not be carried out (Sains Medika, 3(1:84-88.

  12. Choroidal metastasis from renal cell carcinoma presenting with cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shoaib, K.K.; Haq, I.; Zafar, N.

    2008-01-01

    We report a case of rare involvement of the eye with choroidal metastasis from renal cell carcinoma presenting 08 years after the primary tumor was removed. The patient initially presented with cataract most probably induced by the tumor. After cataract extraction, tumor was detected when it induced vitreous involvement and retinal detachment. Enucleation was performed and an extraocular mass was also excised. Histopathology confirmed the diagnosis of metastasis from renal cell carcinoma in the ocular tumor, extraocular mass and the vitreous. (author)

  13. cataract surgical services

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    countries of Asia, Africa, and Latin. America (3,4). With an estimated 12,000 bilaterally blind people ... (OMA's). 1 general medical practitioner. Loptometry technician. 1 general nurse and. 3 health assistants. Ocular morbidities cataract and aphakia corneal scarring/phthisis glaucoma refractive errors others. Percent. 52.4.

  14. Mechanisms Involved in Exercise-Induced Cardioprotection: A Systematic Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Pereira Borges

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Acute myocardial infarction is the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Furthermore, research has shown that exercise, in addition to reducing cardiovascular risk factors, can also protect the heart against injury due to ischemia and reperfusion through a direct effect on the myocardium. However, the specific mechanism involved in exerciseinduced cardiac preconditioning is still under debate. Objective: To perform a systematic review of the studies that have addressed the mechanisms by which aerobic exercise promotes direct cardioprotection against ischemia and reperfusion injury. Methods: A search was conducted using MEDLINE, Literatura Latino-Americana e do Caribe de Informação em Ciências da Saúde, and Scientific Electronic Library Online databases. Data were extracted in a standardized manner by two independent researchers, who were responsible for assessing the methodological quality of the studies. Results: The search retrieved 78 studies; after evaluating the abstracts, 30 studies were excluded. The manuscripts of the remaining 48 studies were completely read and, of these, 20 were excluded. Finally, 28 studies were included in this systematic review. Conclusion: On the basis of the selected studies, the following are potentially involved in the cardioprotective response to exercise: increased heat shock protein production, nitric oxide pathway involvement, increased cardiac antioxidant capacity, improvement in ATP-dependent potassium channel function, and opioid system activation. Despite all the previous investigations, further research is still necessary to obtain more consistent conclusions.

  15. MODERN POSSIBILITIES FOR PROPHYLAXIS OF CATARACT PROGRESSION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E. G. Polunina

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cataract is one of the  most  common  diseases, especially in the  elderly. Despite  the  fact that  the  share of elderly people  in economically developed countries is higher than  in developing countries, the incidence  of cataract in people over 50 years  in Western countries is 15% and it is about  40%  in developing countries. The reasons are  unbalanced nutrition,  lack of specialized ophthalmic  care  at the initial stages of the disease, the impact of adverse environmental conditions,  etc.  Surgical treatment is the only curative method. However, there are  not always enough indications for this treatment on the one hand, and it is not always possible due to patient’s unfavorable physical status, on the other  hand.  The supportive anti-cataract therapy  should be provided with the dynamic follow-up in such  cases. The pharmaceutical industry offers anti-cataract drugs  with a different composition  and properties, they are  based on the  mechanisms of the  onset  and development of the  disease. “Oxidative stress” is one  of the  main factors, which can  be the  cause of both  nuclear  and  cortical  cataracts. There  are scattering zones in the mature nucleus  of the lens, an increase in extracellular  spaces between corrugated membrane protein-like deposits in case of cataract. It is generally believed that  the  basis  of these deposits are  denatured, initially water-soluble  proteins, which turn  into opaque  substances due to the action of quinoids products formed through  the disturbed metabolism of aromatic aminoacids (tryptophan, tyrosine,  etc..  Based  on this theory, an anti-cataract substance — pirenoxine was developed.  It inhibits the action of quinoids and prevents the formation of the len’s opacities  and the cataracts progression.

  16. Phacoemulsification in subluxated cataract.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Praveen M

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: To evaluate the outcome of phacoemulsification in eyes with subluxated cataract. Materials and Methods: This retrospective study comprised 22 eyes of 20 consecutive patients with subluxated cataracts of varying aetiology operated between March 1998 and March 2001. Detailed preoperative assessment included visual acuity (VA, slitlamp examination, presence of vitreous in anterior chamber, extent of subluxation, intraocular pressure (IOP and detailed fundus examination. Phacoemulsification was done to retain the natural bag support and all patients had acrylic foldable Acrysof IOL implantation either in-the-bag or by scleral fixation. Postoperative observations included best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA, IOP, pupillary reaction and the IOL position. Results: The aetiology of the subluxation was traumatic in 11 patients and non-traumatic in 9 patients. Fifteen were males and 5 were females. Mean follow-up was 11.7 ± 9.71 months (range 4-39. The average age was 39.15 ± 16.33 (range 5 - 74. A 2-port anterior chamber vitrectomy was performed in 6 eyes (27.2%. Capsule tension ring (CTR was implanted in 15 eyes (68.18%. Twelve eyes (54.5% had in-the-bag implants, while 5 (22.72% had scleral fixation. The remaining 5 eyes (22.72% had one haptic in-the-bag and another sutured to sclera. No major intraoperative complications were noted. Twelve eyes (54.5% had clinically and geometrically well centered IOLs while 9 eyes (40.9% had geometrically decentered IOLs. One patient was lost to follow-up. Fifteen eyes (55.55% had postoperative BCVA of 6/12 - 6/6 while 2 eyes (7.40% had BCVA of 6/18. The remaining 4 eyes (14.81% had less than 6/24 BCVA due to pre-existing posterior segment pathology. Postoperative complications included rise in IOP in 1 eye (4.54%, pupillary capture of the IOL optic in 2 eyes (9.09%; the same 2 eyes (9.09% required redialing of IOL. One eye (4.54% had to undergo refixation (one haptic was fixed to sclera year after cataract

  17. Cataract surgery output and cost of hospitalization for cataract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Si nous devons réussir à éliminer les arrièrs problèmes des cataracts de plus de ½ million cas, nos efforts sur la chirurgie de cataracte devraient porter principalement sur des programmes visant sur des measures preventives contre les incidences de la cécité. 106 cas des chirurgies cataracts avaient été opérées Durant la ...

  18. [Ocular involvement in spondylarthritis--new mechanisms, new therapies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itulescu, T C M; Alexandrescu, Cristina; Voinea, Liliana-Mary

    2014-01-01

    Spondyloarthrites (SPA) represent a group of heterogenous rheumatic diseases (ankylosing spondylitis/SA, psoriatic arthritis/PsA, reactive arthritis/ReA, spondyloarthritis in bowel inflammatory diseases/BID, undifferentiated spondyloarthritis/undif SpA) with distinct clinical features and common genetic predisposition (HLA-B27). SpA may also affect other organs, ocular involvement, represented by uveitis and conjunctivitis, being one of the most important extraskeletal manifestations. Pathogenic mechanisms of ocular involment in SpA are not entirely known; nevertheless, the inflammatory process which characterizes the main rheumatic diseases seems to be responsible for this extraskeletal manifestation. SpA treatment targeted at clinical remission has a favourable effect not only on articular but also on ocular involvement. The discovery of new pathogenic mechanisms of both rheumatic and eye disease in SpA have contributed to identification of new pathogenic therapies. The interdisciplinary team work of rheumatologists and ophtalmologists have prove essential for the management of SpA patients with ocular manifestations.

  19. Numerical and Experimental Study of Mechanisms Involved in Boiling Histotripsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pahk, Ki Joo; Gélat, Pierre; Sinden, David; Dhar, Dipok Kumar; Saffari, Nader

    2017-12-01

    The aim of boiling histotripsy is to mechanically fractionate tissue as an alternative to thermal ablation for therapeutic applications. In general, the shape of a lesion produced by boiling histotripsy is tadpole like, consisting of a head and a tail. Although many studies have demonstrated the efficacy of boiling histotripsy for fractionating solid tumors, the exact mechanisms underpinning this phenomenon are not yet well understood, particularly the interaction of a boiling vapor bubble with incoming incident shockwaves. To investigate the mechanisms involved in boiling histotripsy, a high-speed camera with a passive cavitation detection system was used to observe the dynamics of bubbles produced in optically transparent tissue-mimicking gel phantoms exposed to the field of a 2.0-MHz high-intensity focused ultrasound (HIFU) transducer. We observed that boiling bubbles were generated in a localized heated region and cavitation clouds were subsequently induced ahead of the expanding bubble. This process was repeated with HIFU pulses and eventually resulted in a tadpole-shaped lesion. A simplified numerical model describing the scattering of the incident ultrasound wave by a vapor bubble was developed to help interpret the experimental observations. Together with the numerical results, these observations suggest that the overall size of a lesion induced by boiling histotripsy is dependent on the sizes of (i) the heated region at the HIFU focus and (ii) the backscattered acoustic field by the original vapor bubble. Copyright © 2017 World Federation for Ultrasound in Medicine and Biology. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Cataract and ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiation-induced cataract has been up to now considered as a quite rare pathology, needing high-dose radiations (beyond a dose threshold roughly estimated at 2 Grays to the lens) consisting mainly in head tumour radiotherapy complications. Several new studies on different exposed populations such as astronauts, japanese atomic bomb survivors, people undergoing X-ray examinations, Chernobyl accident 'liquidators' as well as data from animal experiments, suggest that dose threshold for detectable opacities as well as for clinical posterior sub-capsular cataract occurring, might be far lower than those previously assumed. Even the existence of a dose threshold is no longer an absolute certitude insofar as radiation-induced cataract pathogenesis might consist not really in a deterministic effect (direct tissue harmful effect, killing or seriously injuring a critical population of cells) as believed until now, but rather in a stochastic effect (genomic damage in target-cells, altered cell division, abnormal lens fiber cell differentiation). More practically, these new data may lead us to reconsider radioprotection of specifically exposed populations: mainly patients and workers. Regarding workers, labour legislation (lens equivalent dose limit of 150 mSv during 12 consecutive months) might be, in the medium term, reassessed downwards. (author)

  1. Paediatric cataract: challenges and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dr P Vijayalakshmi

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Amblyopia should always be anticipated in children with unilateral cataract, asymmetrical bilateral cataracts (or where there is a delay between the first and second eye operation, or a delay of more than a year between diagnosis/ detection and surgery, cataracts with anisometropia or traumatic cataracts with corneal scars. When amblyopia is detected, occlusion therapy (eye patching must be instituted at the earliest opportunity. The patching regimen is the same with any strabismic amblyopia and sometimes needs to be aggressive at the start. It is crucial to explain the need for patching to the parents, since compliance is the greatest obstacle to the success of amblyopia treatment.

  2. Electrical cataract and optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biro, Z; Pamer, Z

    1994-01-01

    We report on a 20 year old male, who developed mature cataract (Electrical Cataract) on both eyes after a severe electric shock from high voltage. Both of his hands and the left foot had to be amputated, because of the severe injury. Although electrical cataract due to high voltage or lightning is rare, they may still occur after industrial or home electric accidents. Even if extracapsular cataract extraction with intraocular lens implantation is successfully performed, the final visual acuity will depend on other ocular damage due to the electric current.

  3. Complement involvement in periodontitis: molecular mechanisms and rational therapeutic approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hajishengallis, George; Maekawa, Tomoki; Abe, Toshiharu; Hajishengallis, Evlambia; Lambris, John D.

    2015-01-01

    The complement system is a network of interacting fluid-phase and cell surface-associated molecules that trigger, amplify, and regulate immune and inflammatory signaling pathways. Dysregulation of this finely balanced network can destabilize host-microbe homeostasis and cause inflammatory tissue damage. Evidence from clinical and animal model-based studies suggests that complement is implicated in the pathogenesis of periodontitis, a polymicrobial community-induced chronic inflammatory disease that destroys the tooth-supporting tissues. This review discusses molecular mechanisms of complement involvement in the dysbiotic transformation of the periodontal microbiome and the resulting destructive inflammation, culminating in loss of periodontal bone support. These mechanistic studies have additionally identified potential therapeutic targets. In this regard, interventional studies in preclinical models have provided proof-of-concept for using complement inhibitors for the treatment of human periodontitis. PMID:26306443

  4. Quantum-Mechanical Calculations on Molecular Substructures Involved in Nanosystems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beata Szefler

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In this review article, four ideas are discussed: (a aromaticity of fullerenes patched with flowers of 6-and 8-membered rings, optimized at the HF and DFT levels of theory, in terms of HOMA and NICS criteria; (b polybenzene networks, from construction to energetic and vibrational spectra computations; (c quantum-mechanical calculations on the repeat units of various P-type crystal networks and (d construction and stability evaluation, at DFTB level of theory, of some exotic allotropes of diamond D5, involved in hyper-graphenes. The overall conclusion was that several of the yet hypothetical molecular nanostructures herein described are serious candidates to the status of real molecules.

  5. Cataract surgery in patients with ocular pseudoexpholiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrovic, Mirjana Janicijevic; Vulovic, Tatjana Sarenac; Vulovic, Dejan; Janicijevic, Katarina; Petrovic, Marko; Vujic, Dragan

    2013-01-01

    Retrospective 5-year study based on general and ophthalmic history records, and including 268 eyes (174 patients), aged 50 years and over. Ophthalmological examination involved visual acuity, measuring of intraocular pressure, slit lamp examination and indirect ophthalmoscopy. Type of surgical treatment was tailored for each patient (extra capsular cataract extraction, phaco-emulsiphication). Preoperative slit lamp examination showed phacodonesis in 17.91% (47), iridodonesis in 2.98% (8), pigment dispersion in 6.72% (18), lens subluxation in 4.85% (13) on the total. Extra capsular cataract extraction was performed in 36.94% (99) and phaco-emulsiphication in the others. Analysis of intra operative complications showed: posterior capsular rupture 17.91% (48), zonular dialysis or break 5.97% (16), lens subluxation 1.86% (5), intraocular bleeding 2.98% (8), vitreous loss 13.80% (37). Postoperative complications include: anterior chamber reaction 45.90% (123), intraocular lens tilt 15.67% (42), endothelial decompensation 21.64% (58), subluxation/luxation IOL 3.73% (10), secondary cataract 21.46% (58), pigment dispersion 37.68% (101), increased IOP 13.80% (37), residual lens matter 13.80% (37), hyphema 3.73% (10), posterior synechiae 6.72% (18), iris prolapsus 2.73% (8). Cataract surgery in PES will frequently encounter small pupils, shallow anterior chambers, posterior adhesions, weak zonular support, partial subluxation or complete dislocation of lens. Authors presented the best possible approach on PES and surgical methods for patients with cataract with special accent of possible surgical complications.

  6. Mechanisms involved in the antiplatelet effect of C-phycocyanin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chiu, Hui-Fen; Yang, Shih-Ping; Kuo, Yu-Ling; Lai, Yuan-Shu; Chou, Tz-Chong

    2006-02-01

    C-phycocyanin (cpc), a biliprotein isolated from Spirulina platensis, has been reported to exert many therapeutic and nutritional values. In the present study, we examined whether cpc has an antiplatelet activity in vitro and further investigated the possible anti-aggregatory mechanisms involved. Our results showed that preincubation of cpc (1-50 microg/ml) with rabbit washed platelets dose-dependently inhibited the platelet aggregation induced by collagen (10 microg/ml) or arachidonic acid (100 microm), with an IC50 of about 10 microg/ml. Furthermore, the thromboxane B2 formation caused by collagen or arachidonic acid was significantly inhibited by cpc due to suppression of cyclooxygenase and thromboxane synthase activity. Similarly, the rise of platelet intracellular calcium level stimulated by arachidonic acid and collagen-induced platelet membrane surface glycoprotein IIb/IIIa expression were also attenuated by cpc. In addition, cpc itself significantly increased the platelet membrane fluidity and the cyclic AMP level through inhibiting cyclic AMP phosphodiesterase activity. These findings strongly demonstrate that cpc is an inhibitor of platelet aggregation, which may be associated with mechanisms including inhibition of thromboxane A2 formation, intracellular calcium mobilization and platelet surface glycoprotein IIb/IIIa expression accompanied by increasing cyclic AMP formation and platelet membrane fluidity.

  7. Mechanisms and factors involved in hip injuries during frontal crashes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoganandan, N; Pintar, F A; Gennarelli, T A; Maltese, M R; Eppinger, R H

    2001-11-01

    This study was conducted to collect data and gain insights relative to the mechanisms and factors involved in hip injuries during frontal crashes and to study the tolerance of hip injuries from this type of loading. Unembalmed human cadavers were seated on a standard automotive seat (reinforced) and subjected to knee impact test to each lower extremity. Varying combinations of flexion and adduction/abduction were used for initial alignment conditions and pre-positioning. Accelerometers were fixed to the iliac wings and twelfth thoracic vertebral spinous process. A 23.4-kg padded pendulum impacted the knee at velocities ranging from 4.3 to 7.6 m/s. The impacting direction was along the anteroposterior axis, i.e., the global X-axis, in the body-fixed coordinate system. A load cell on the front of the pendulum recorded the impact force. Peak impact forces ranged from 2,450 to 10,950 N. The rate of loading ranged from 123 to 7,664 N/msec. The impulse values ranged from 12.4 to 31.9 Nsec. Injuries were not apparent in three tests. Eight tests resulted in trauma. Fractures involving the pelvis including the acetabulum and proximal femur occurred in five out of the eight tests, and distal femoral bone fracture occurred in one test. These results underscore the importance of leg pre-positioning and the orientation of the impacting axis to produce specific types of trauma to the pelvic region of the lower extremity.

  8. Mechanisms involved in BACE upregulation associated to stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martisova, Eva; Solas, Maite; Gerenu, Gorka; Milagro, Fermin I; Campion, Javier; Ramirez, Maria J

    2012-09-01

    The objective of the present work was to study a purported involvement of stress in amyloid pathology through the modulation of BACE expression. Early-life stressed rats (maternal separation, MS) showed significant increases in corticosterone levels, BACE expression and Aβ levels. The CpG7 site of the BACE promoter was significantly hypomethylated in MS, and corticosterone levels negatively correlated to the methylation status of CpG7. The activation of the stress-activated protein kinase JNK was also increased in MS rats. In SHSY-5Y neuroblastoma cells, corticosterone induced a rapid increase in BACE expression that was abolished by specific inhibiton of JNK activation or by spironolactone, a mineralocorticoid receptor antagonist, but not by mifepristone, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist. Corticosterone was also able to increase pJNK expression and this effect was fully reverted by spironolactone. Mice chronically treated with corticosterone showed increased BACE and pJNK expression. These increases were reverted by treatment with spironolactone or with a JNK inhibitor. It is suggested that increased corticosterone levels associated to stress lead to increase BACE transcription both through epigenetic mechanisms and activation of JNK.

  9. X-linked cataract and Nance-Horan syndrome are allelic disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coccia, Margherita; Brooks, Simon P; Webb, Tom R; Christodoulou, Katja; Wozniak, Izabella O; Murday, Victoria; Balicki, Martha; Yee, Harris A; Wangensteen, Teresia; Riise, Ruth; Saggar, Anand K; Park, Soo-Mi; Kanuga, Naheed; Francis, Peter J; Maher, Eamonn R; Moore, Anthony T; Russell-Eggitt, Isabelle M; Hardcastle, Alison J

    2009-07-15

    Nance-Horan syndrome (NHS) is an X-linked developmental disorder characterized by congenital cataract, dental anomalies, facial dysmorphism and, in some cases, mental retardation. Protein truncation mutations in a novel gene (NHS) have been identified in patients with this syndrome. We previously mapped X-linked congenital cataract (CXN) in one family to an interval on chromosome Xp22.13 which encompasses the NHS locus; however, no mutations were identified in the NHS gene. In this study, we show that NHS and X-linked cataract are allelic diseases. Two CXN families, which were negative for mutations in the NHS gene, were further analysed using array comparative genomic hybridization. CXN was found to be caused by novel copy number variations: a complex duplication-triplication re-arrangement and an intragenic deletion, predicted to result in altered transcriptional regulation of the NHS gene. Furthermore, we also describe the clinical and molecular analysis of seven families diagnosed with NHS, identifying four novel protein truncation mutations and a novel large deletion encompassing the majority of the NHS gene, all leading to no functional protein. We therefore show that different mechanisms, aberrant transcription of the NHS gene or no functional NHS protein, lead to different diseases. Our data highlight the importance of copy number variation and non-recurrent re-arrangements leading to different severity of disease and describe the potential mechanisms involved.

  10. [Incremental cost effectiveness of multifocal cataract surgery].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pagel, N; Dick, H B; Krummenauer, F

    2007-02-01

    Supplementation of cataract patients with multifocal intraocular lenses involves an additional financial investment when compared to the corresponding monofocal supplementation, which usually is not funded by German health care insurers. In the context of recent resource allocation discussions, however, the cost effectiveness of multifocal cataract surgery could become an important rationale. Therefore an evidence-based estimation of its cost effectiveness was carried out. Three independent meta-analyses were implemented to estimate the gain in uncorrected near visual acuity and best corrected visual acuity (vision lines) as well as the predictability (fraction of patients without need for reading aids) of multifocal supplementation. Study reports published between 1995 and 2004 (English or German language) were screened for appropriate key words. Meta effects in visual gain and predictability were estimated by means and standard deviations of the reported effect measures. Cost data were estimated by German DRG rates and individual lens costs; the cost effectiveness of multifocal cataract surgery was then computed in terms of its marginal cost effectiveness ratio (MCER) for each clinical benefit endpoint; the incremental costs of multifocal versus monofocal cataract surgery were further estimated by means of their respective incremental cost effectiveness ratio (ICER). An independent meta-analysis estimated the complication profiles to be expected after monofocal and multifocal cataract surgery in order to evaluate expectable complication-associated additional costs of both procedures; the marginal and incremental cost effectiveness estimates were adjusted accordingly. A sensitivity analysis comprised cost variations of +/- 10 % and utility variations alongside the meta effect estimate's 95 % confidence intervals. Total direct costs from the health care insurer's perspective were estimated 3363 euro, associated with a visual meta benefit in best corrected visual

  11. Congenital cataract screening

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhale Rajavi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Congenital cataract is a leading cause of visual deprivation which can damage the developing visual system of a child; therefore early diagnosis, management and long-term follow-up are essential. It is recommended that all neonates be screened by red reflex examination at birth and suspected cases be referred to ophthalmic centers. Early surgery (1 year is highly recommended. After surgery, amblyopia treatment and periodic follow-up examinations should be started as soon as possible to achieve a satisfactory visual outcome. Practitioners should consider the possibility of posterior capsular opacity, elevated intraocular pressure and amblyopia during follow-up, especially in eyes with microphthalmia and/or associated congenital anomalies. All strabismic children should undergo slit lamp examination prior to strabismus surgery to rule out congenital lens opacities. From a social point of view, equal and fair medical care should be provided to all children regardless of gender.

  12. Methylphenidate (Ritalin-associated Cataract and Glaucoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Kung Lu

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available Methylphenidate hydrochloride (Ritalin is the drug of choice for attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD. However, an association of Ritalin with glaucoma has been reported. We report a case of Ritalin-associated cataract and glaucoma. A 10-year-old boy was diagnosed with ADHD and had received methylphenidate hydrochloride, 60 mg/day for 2 years. He presented with blurred vision. Best-corrected visual acuity was 6/60 in both eyes. Ocular examinations revealed intraocular pressure (IOP of 30 mmHg under medication, dense posterior subcapsular opacity of lens, pale disc with advanced cupping, and marked constriction of visual field. Despite maximal anti-glaucomatous medication, IOP still could not be controlled. The patient then received combined cataract and glaucoma surgery. Visual acuity improved and IOP was within normal limits in both eyes postoperatively. Large dose of methylphenidate may cause cataract and glaucoma. The mechanism remains unclear. Doctors should be aware of the possible ocular side effects of methylphenidate.

  13. Curcumin and turmeric delay streptozotocin-induced diabetic cataract in rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suryanarayana, Palla; Saraswat, Megha; Mrudula, Tiruvalluru; Krishna, T Prasanna; Krishnaswamy, Kamala; Reddy, G Bhanuprakash

    2005-06-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of curcumin and its source, turmeric, on streptozotocin-induced diabetic cataract in rats. Wistar-NIN rats were selected and diabetes was induced by streptozotocin (35 mg/kg body weight, intraperitoneally) and divided into four groups (group II-V). The control (group I) rats received only vehicle. Group I and II animals received an unsupplemented AIN-93 diet, and those in groups III, IV, and V received 0.002% and 0.01% curcumin and 0.5% turmeric, respectively, in an AIN-93 diet for a period of 8 weeks. Cataract progression due to hyperglycemia was monitored by slit lamp biomicroscope and classified into four stages. At the end of 8 weeks, the animals were killed and the biochemical pathways involved in the pathogenesis of cataract such as oxidative stress, polyol pathway, alterations in protein content and crystallin profile in the lens were investigated, to understand the possible mechanism of action of curcumin and turmeric. Blood glucose and insulin levels were also determined. Although, both curcumin and turmeric did not prevent streptozotocin-induced hyperglycemia, as assessed by blood glucose and insulin levels, slit lamp microscope observations indicated that these supplements delayed the progression and maturation of cataract. The present studies suggest that curcumin and turmeric treatment appear to have countered the hyperglycemia-induced oxidative stress, because there was a reversal of changes with respect to lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, protein carbonyl content and activities of antioxidant enzymes in a significant manner. Also, treatment with turmeric or curcumin appears to have minimized osmotic stress, as assessed by polyol pathway enzymes. Most important, aggregation and insolubilization of lens proteins due to hyperglycemia was prevented by turmeric and curcumin. Turmeric was more effective than its corresponding levels of curcumin. The results indicate that turmeric and curcumin

  14. [INVOLVEMENT OF PLANT CYTOSKELETON INTO CELLULAR MECHANISMS OF METALS TOXICITY].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horiunova, L; Krasylenko, Yu A; Yemets, A I; Blume, Ya B

    2016-01-01

    This review summarizes published date and the results of the author's own researches cantering the participation of plant cells cytoskeleton. It is considered cytotoxic impact of metals on the cytoskeleton's components, including microtubules and actin filaments. Particular attention is paid to the cellular and molecular mechanisms of influence of metals on cytoskeleton. We discussed the most probable binding sites of heavy metals and alternative mechanisms of their impact on the cytoskeleton.

  15. Sensing mechanisms involved in Ca2+ and Mg2+ homeostasis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ferre, S.; Hoenderop, J.G.J.; Bindels, R.J.M.

    2012-01-01

    Calcium (Ca(2+)) and magnesium (Mg(2+)) ions are involved in many vital physiological functions. In the human body, Ca(2+) and Mg(2+) homeostatic systems rely on three components: (i) tissues (re)absorbing or storing Ca(2+) and Mg(2+), mainly kidney, intestine, and bone; (ii) hormones that modulate

  16. Mechanisms Involved in Nematode Control by Endophytic Fungi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouten, Alexander

    2016-08-04

    Colonization of plants by particular endophytic fungi can provide plants with improved defenses toward nematodes. Evidently, such endophytes can be important in developing more sustainable agricultural practices. The mechanisms playing a role in this quantitative antagonism are poorly understood but most likely multifactorial. This knowledge gap obstructs the progress regarding the development of endophytes or endophyte-derived constituents into biocontrol agents. In part, this may be caused by the fact that endophytic fungi form a rather heterogeneous group. By combining the knowledge of the currently characterized antagonistic endophytic fungi and their effects on nematode behavior and biology with the knowledge of microbial competition and induced plant defenses, the various mechanisms by which this nematode antagonism operates or may operate are discussed. Now that new technologies are becoming available and more accessible, the currently unresolved mechanisms can be studied in greater detail than ever before.

  17. IOL Implants: Lens Replacement and Cataract Surgery (Intraocular Lenses)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Cataract Surgery vs. Laser-Assisted Cataract Surgery Cataract Vision Simulator Cataract Pictures and Videos: What Do ... Mar. 27, 2018 An intraocular lens (or IOL) is a tiny, artificial lens for the eye. It replaces the eye's ...

  18. Mechanisms Involved in Nematode Control by Endophytic Fungi

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schouten, Sander

    2016-01-01

    Colonization of plants by particular endophytic fungi can provide plants with improved defenses toward nematodes. Evidently, such endophytes can be important in developing more sustainable agricultural practices. The mechanisms playing a role in this quantitative antagonism are poorly understood

  19. Mechanisms of molecular mimicry involving the microbiota in neurodegeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedland, Robert P

    2015-01-01

    The concept of molecular mimicry was established to explain commonalities of structure which developed in response to evolutionary pressures. Most examples of molecular mimicry in medicine have involved homologies of primary protein structure which cause disease. Molecular mimicry can be expanded beyond amino acid sequence to include microRNA and proteomic effects which are either pathogenic or salutogenic (beneficial) in regard to Parkinson's disease, Alzheimer's disease, and related disorders. Viruses of animal or plant origin may mimic nucleotide sequences of microRNAs and influence protein expression. Both Parkinson's and Alzheimer's diseases involve the formation of transmissible self-propagating prion-like proteins. However, the initiating factors responsible for creation of these misfolded nucleating factors are unknown. Amyloid patterns of protein folding are highly conserved through evolution and are widely distributed in the world. Similarities of tertiary protein structure may be involved in the creation of these prion-like agents through molecular mimicry. Cross-seeding of amyloid misfolding, altered proteostasis, and oxidative stress may be induced by amyloid proteins residing in bacteria in our microbiota in the gut and in the diet. Pathways of molecular mimicry induced processes induced by bacterial amyloid in neurodegeneration may involve TLR 2/1, CD14, and NFκB, among others. Furthermore, priming of the innate immune system by the microbiota may enhance the inflammatory response to cerebral amyloids (such as amyloid-β and α-synuclein). This paper describes the specific molecular pathways of these cross-seeding and neuroinflammatory processes. Evolutionary conservation of proteins provides the opportunity for conserved sequences and structures to influence neurological disease through molecular mimicry.

  20. General mechanism for helium blistering involving displaced atom transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McDonell, W.R.

    1979-01-01

    A mechanism developed to account for formation of vertically elongated blisters in high displacement environments produced by /sup 252/Cf alpha particles and fission fragments has been extended to formation of done-shaped blisters in the low displacement environments produced by simple helium ion beams. In this mechanism, transport of displaced atoms to relieve compressive stresses in the helium-implanted layer allows interconnections of small, subsurface bubbles to form the blister cavity. The same transport may cause thickening of the blister caps at low implantation energies. The transition from dome-shaped to vertically elongated blistering occurs between the 300 and 3000 displacements per helium atom produced by simple helium ions and /sup 252/Cf radiations respectively.

  1. Studies on Acinetobacter baumannii involving multiple mechanisms of carbapenem resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sen, B; Joshi, S G

    2016-03-01

    Characterize the genetic type and resistance mechanisms of 16 carbapenem-resistant Acinetobacter baumannii (CRAB) isolates recovered between January 2010 and March 2011 from US tertiary-care hospital. A modified Hodge test demonstrated the presence of carbapenemases, but meropenem and ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) double-disc synergy tests and PCR for metallo-β-lactamase (MBL) genes were negative. The genes of ampC β-lactamase and efflux pump of adeABC and adeIJK were detected. The presence of oxacillinase (OXA)-like genes, blaOXA-51-like , blaOXA-23-like and blaOXA-40-like genes, and insertion sequence ISAba1 in promoter region of blaOXA-51-like and blaOXA-23-like genes were detected; and confirmed by RT-PCR analyses. The sequencing of blaOXA-51-like genes revealed two major alleles, blaOXA-66-like (blaOXA-82 ) and blaOXA-113 from 31·2 to 68·8% of isolates respectively. The blaOXA-23 and blaOXA-72 genes showed high expression and found co-harbouring blaOXA-51-like gene preceded by ISAba-1. All CRAB isolates revealed significant reduction in carO transcription, indicated downregulation of CarO porin system, a potentially independent mechanism of carbapenam resistance. Sequencing of carO gene from representative isolates showed no ISAba1 insertional inactivation. Pulsed-field gel electrophoresis revealed a clonal relationship. CRAB exhibited diversity of mechanisms of carbapenem resistance, and clonal relationship. Studies on distinct outbreaks of CRAB are alarming situation for clinicians. © 2015 The Society for Applied Microbiology.

  2. Involvement of thiol-based mechanisms in plant development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rouhier, Nicolas; Cerveau, Delphine; Couturier, Jérémy; Reichheld, Jean-Philippe; Rey, Pascal

    2015-08-01

    Increasing knowledge has been recently gained regarding the redox regulation of plant developmental stages. The current state of knowledge concerning the involvement of glutathione, glutaredoxins and thioredoxins in plant development is reviewed. The control of the thiol redox status is mainly ensured by glutathione (GSH), a cysteine-containing tripeptide and by reductases sharing redox-active cysteines, glutaredoxins (GRXs) and thioredoxins (TRXs). Indeed, thiol groups present in many regulatory proteins and metabolic enzymes are prone to oxidation, ultimately leading to post-translational modifications such as disulfide bond formation or glutathionylation. This review focuses on the involvement of GSH, GRXs and TRXs in plant development. Recent studies showed that the proper functioning of root and shoot apical meristems depends on glutathione content and redox status, which regulate, among others, cell cycle and hormone-related processes. A critical role of GRXs in the formation of floral organs has been uncovered, likely through the redox regulation of TGA transcription factor activity. TRXs fulfill many functions in plant development via the regulation of embryo formation, the control of cell-to-cell communication, the mobilization of seed reserves, the biogenesis of chloroplastic structures, the metabolism of carbon and the maintenance of cell redox homeostasis. This review also highlights the tight relationships between thiols, hormones and carbon metabolism, allowing a proper development of plants in relation with the varying environment and the energy availability. GSH, GRXs and TRXs play key roles during the whole plant developmental cycle via their antioxidant functions and the redox-regulation of signaling pathways. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Redox regulation of differentiation and de-differentiation. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Water involvement in the mechanisms of retina electrical activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chirieri-Kovacs, E.; Vasilescu, V.

    1982-01-01

    Retina is an excitable system containing approximately 90% water. As we found that deuteration selectively changes amplitudes and latencies of retina biopotentials, specifically the ON and OFF responses, we used it to probe the role of water in those processes. A study of the retina deuteration kinetics was simultaneously performed. This revealed the existence of at least two retinal water compartments. The data suggested a third compartment also, with a lower motional ''degree of freedom,'' existing where H 2 O-D 2 O exchange becomes important only after saturation by D 2 O of the first two compartments. Correlation of the electrophysiological effects of D 2 O with the kinetic data suggests that the ON response is related to the first water compartment and the OFF response to the third. The results point to independence on the ON and OFF response mechanisms and, very probably, to their different morphological origins

  4. Kinetics and mechanisms of reactions involving small aromatic reactive intermediates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, M.C. [Emory Univ., Atlanta, GA (United States)

    1993-12-01

    Small aromatic radicals such as C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O and C{sub 6}H{sub 4} are key prototype species of their homologs. C{sub 6}H{sub 5} and its oxidation product, C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O are believed to be important intermediates which play a pivotal role in hydrocarbon combustion, particularly with regard to soot formation. Despite their fundamental importance, experimental data on the reaction mechanisms and reactivities of these species are very limited. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}, most kinetic data except its reactions with NO and NO{sub 2}, were obtained by relative rate measurements. For C{sub 6}H{sub 5}O, the authors have earlier measured its fragmentation reaction producing C{sub 5}H{sub 5} + CO in shock waves. For C{sub 6}H{sub 4}, the only rate constant measured in the gas phase is its recombination rate at room temperature. The authors have proposed to investigate systematically the kinetics and mechanisms of this important class of molecules using two parallel laser diagnostic techniques--laser resonance absorption (LRA) and resonance enhanced multiphoton ionization mass spectrometry (REMPI/MS). In the past two years, study has been focused on the development of a new multipass adsorption technique--the {open_quotes}cavity-ring-down{close_quotes} technique for kinetic applications. The preliminary results of this study appear to be quite good and the sensitivity of the technique is at least comparable to that of the laser-induced fluorescence method.

  5. Blindness, cataract surgery and mortality in Ethiopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Benjamin J; Sanders, David S; Oliva, Matthew S; Orrs, Mark S; Glick, Peter; Ruit, Sanduk; Chen, Wei; Luoto, Jill; Tasfaw, Alemu Kerie; Tabin, Geoffrey C

    2016-09-01

    To examine the relationships between blindness, the intervention of cataract surgery and all-cause mortality in a rural Ethiopian population. Population-based, interventional prospective study. Community-based detection methods identified blind Ethiopian persons from two selected kebeles in Amhara region, Ethiopia. Data from 1201 blind patients were collected-628 cataract-blind and 573 blind from other conditions. Free cataract surgery was provided for consenting, cataract-blind patients. Follow-up surveys were conducted after 12 months (±1 month)-the main outcome measure for this report is all-cause mortality at 1 year. During the follow-up period, 110 persons died from the selected population (mortality 9.2%), which consisted of those cataract-blind patients who received cataract surgery (N=461), cataract-blind patients who did not receive surgery (N=167) and all non-cataract-blind patients (N=573). Of the 461 patients who received cataract surgery, 44 patients died (9.5%). Of the 740 patients who did not receive surgery, 66 died (8.9%)-28 patients from the cohort of cataract-blind patients who did not receive surgery (16.8%) and 38 patients from the cohort of non-cataract blind (6.6%). Subgroup analysis revealed significantly increased odds of mortality for cataract-blind patients over 75 years of age who did not receive surgery and for unmarried patients of all age groups. In this population, mortality risk was significantly elevated for older cataract-blind patients when compared with non-cataract-blind patients-an elevation of risk that was not noted in an age-matched cohort of cataract-blind patients who underwent cataract surgery as early as 1-year follow-up. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Advances in hard nucleus cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Cui

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Security and perfect vision and fewer complications are our goals in cataract surgery, and hard-nucleus cataract surgery is always a difficulty one. Many new studies indicate that micro-incision phacoemulsification in treating hard nucleus cataract is obviously effective. This article reviews the evolution process of hard nuclear cataract surgery, the new progress in the research of artificial intraocular lens for microincision, and analyse advantages and disadvantages of various surgical methods.

  7. Possible mechanism involved in sleep deprivation-induced memory dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalonia, H; Bishnoi, M; Kumar, A

    2008-09-01

    Sleep deprivation disrupts various vital biological and metabolic processes that are necessary for health. The present study was designed to investigate the possible mechanisms of sleep deprivation-induced memory dysfunction by using different behavioral, biochemical and neurochemical parameters. Male Wistar rats were sleep deprived for 72 h using a grid suspended over water. Elevated plus maze, passive avoidance and Morris water maze tests were used to assess memory retention in 72-h sleep-deprived animals. Various electrophysiological (sleep-wake cycle), biochemical (lipid peroxidation, reduced glutathione, nitrite, catalase, acetylcholinesterase) and neurochemical parameters (norepinephrine, dopamine and serotonin) were also assessed. Sleep deprivation resulted in memory dysfunction in all the behavioral paradigms, alteration in the sleep-wake cycle (delayed sleep latency, shortening of rapid eye movement [REM] and non-REM [NREM] sleep and increased waking period) and oxidative stress (increased lipid peroxidation and nitrite levels, depletion of reduced glutathione and catalase activity). In addition, increased levels of acetylcholinesterase (AChE; the enzyme responsible for the degradation of acetylcholine) and reduction in norepinephrine and dopamine levels were seen in 72-h sleep-deprived animals. In conclusion, sleep deprivation-induced memory deficits may possibly be due to the combined effect of oxidative damage and alterations in neurotransmitter levels. Copyright 2008 Prous Science, S.A.U. or its licensors. All rights reserved.

  8. Mechanisms involved in alternariol-induced cell cycle arrest

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Solhaug, A., E-mail: Anita.Solhaug@vetinst.no [Norwegian Veterinary Institute, Oslo (Norway); Vines, L.L. [Michigan State University, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, East Lansing, MI (United States); Ivanova, L.; Spilsberg, B. [Norwegian Veterinary Institute, Oslo (Norway); Holme, J.A. [Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Division of Environmental Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Pestka, J. [Michigan State University, Department of Food Science and Human Nutrition, East Lansing, MI (United States); Collins, A. [University of Oslo, Department of Nutrition, Faculty of Medicine, Oslo (Norway); Eriksen, G.S. [Norwegian Veterinary Institute, Oslo (Norway)

    2012-10-15

    Alternariol (AOH), a mycotoxin produced by Alternaria sp, is often found as a contaminant in fruit and cereal products. Here we employed the murine macrophage cell line RAW 264.7 to test the hypothesis that AOH causes toxicity as a response to DNA damage. AOH at concentrations of 15-30 {mu}M almost completely blocked cell proliferation. Within 30 min treatment, AOH (30 {mu}M) significantly increased the level of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Furthermore, DNA base oxidations as well as DNA strand breaks and/or alkaline labile sites were detected by the comet assay after 2 h exposure of AOH. Cell death (mostly necrosis) was observed after prolonged exposure to the highest concentration of AOH (60 {mu}M for 24 and 48 h) in our study. The DNA damage response involved phosphorylation (activation) of histone H2AX and check point kinase-1- and 2 (Chk-1/2). Moreover, AOH activated p53 and increased the expression of p21, Cyclin B, MDM2, and Sestrin 2; likewise the level of several miRNA was affected. AOH-induced Sestrin 2 expression was regulated by p53 and could at least partly be inhibited by antioxidants, suggesting a role of ROS in the response. Interestingly, the addition of antioxidants did not inhibit cell cycle arrest. Although the formation of ROS by itself was not directly linked cell proliferation, AOH-induced DNA damage and resulting transcriptional changes in p21, MDM2, and Cyclin B likely contribute to the reduced cell proliferation; while Sestrin 2 would contribute to the oxidant defense.

  9. Immediate Sequential Bilateral Cataract Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kessel, Line; Andresen, Jens; Erngaard, Ditte

    2015-01-01

    The aim of the present systematic review was to examine the benefits and harms associated with immediate sequential bilateral cataract surgery (ISBCS) with specific emphasis on the rate of complications, postoperative anisometropia, and subjective visual function in order to formulate evidence......-based national Danish guidelines for cataract surgery. A systematic literature review in PubMed, Embase, and Cochrane central databases identified three randomized controlled trials that compared outcome in patients randomized to ISBCS or bilateral cataract surgery on two different dates. Meta-analyses were...... performed using the Cochrane Review Manager software. The quality of the evidence was assessed using the GRADE method (Grading of Recommendation, Assessment, Development, and Evaluation). We did not find any difference in the risk of complications or visual outcome in patients randomized to ISBCS or surgery...

  10. Cataract and Retinal Detachment Following Electric Shock Injury in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To report a case of cataract and retinal detachment following an electrical injury in an adult Nigerian male. C a se report: A 28-year-old man presented with a history of progressive and painless loss of vision in the right eye, three years after an electric shock injury. There was no history of mechanical trauma.

  11. Mechanism involved in enhancement of osteoblast differentiation by hyaluronic acid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Michinao; Ariyoshi, Wataru; Iwanaga, Kenjiro; Okinaga, Toshinori; Habu, Manabu; Yoshioka, Izumi; Tominaga, Kazuhiro; Nishihara, Tatsuji

    2011-01-01

    Research highlights: → In this study was to investigate the effects of HA on osteoblast differentiation induced by BMP-2. → MG63 cells were incubated with BMP-2 and HA for various time periods. → Phosphorylation of Smad 1/5/8, p38, and ERK proteins was determined by western blot analysis. To elucidate the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated Smad 1/5/8, stimulated cells were subjected to immunofluorescence microscopy. → HA enhanced BMP-2 induces osteoblastic differentiation in MG63 cells via down-regulation of BMP-2 antagonists and ERK phosphorylation. -- Abstract: Objectives: Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) is expected to be utilized to fill bone defects and promote healing of fractures. However, it is unable to generate an adequate clinical response for use in bone regeneration. Recently, it was reported that glycosaminoglycans, including heparin, heparan sulfate, keratan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, chondroitin-4-sulfate, chondroitin-6-sulfate, and hyaluronic acid (HA), regulate BMP-2 activity, though the mechanism by which HA regulates osteogenic activities has not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of HA on osteoblast differentiation induced by BMP-2. Materials and methods: Monolayer cultures of osteoblastic lineage MG63 cells were incubated with BMP-2 and HA for various time periods. To determine osteoblastic differentiation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in the cell lysates was quantified. Phosphorylation of Smad 1/5/8, p38, and ERK proteins was determined by Western blot analysis. To elucidate the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated Smad 1/5/8, stimulated cells were subjected to immunofluorescence microscopy. To further elucidate the role of HA in enhancement of BMP-2-induced Smad signaling, mRNA expressions of the BMP-2 receptor antagonists noggin and follistatin were detected using real-time RT-PCR. Results: BMP-2-induced ALP activation, Smad 1/5/8 phosphorylation, and nuclear translocation

  12. Mechanism involved in enhancement of osteoblast differentiation by hyaluronic acid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kawano, Michinao [Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Science, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Ariyoshi, Wataru [Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Iwanaga, Kenjiro [Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Science, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Okinaga, Toshinori [Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Habu, Manabu [Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Science, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Yoshioka, Izumi [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Department of Medicine of Sensory and Motor Organs, University of Miyazaki, Kiyotake, Miyazaki 889-1692 (Japan); Tominaga, Kazuhiro [Division of Maxillofacial Diagnostic and Surgical Science, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Oral Bioresearch Center, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Nishihara, Tatsuji, E-mail: tatsujin@kyu-dent.ac.jp [Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Oral Bioresearch Center, Kyushu Dental College, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan)

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} In this study was to investigate the effects of HA on osteoblast differentiation induced by BMP-2. {yields} MG63 cells were incubated with BMP-2 and HA for various time periods. {yields} Phosphorylation of Smad 1/5/8, p38, and ERK proteins was determined by western blot analysis. To elucidate the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated Smad 1/5/8, stimulated cells were subjected to immunofluorescence microscopy. {yields} HA enhanced BMP-2 induces osteoblastic differentiation in MG63 cells via down-regulation of BMP-2 antagonists and ERK phosphorylation. -- Abstract: Objectives: Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) is expected to be utilized to fill bone defects and promote healing of fractures. However, it is unable to generate an adequate clinical response for use in bone regeneration. Recently, it was reported that glycosaminoglycans, including heparin, heparan sulfate, keratan sulfate, dermatan sulfate, chondroitin-4-sulfate, chondroitin-6-sulfate, and hyaluronic acid (HA), regulate BMP-2 activity, though the mechanism by which HA regulates osteogenic activities has not been fully elucidated. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of HA on osteoblast differentiation induced by BMP-2. Materials and methods: Monolayer cultures of osteoblastic lineage MG63 cells were incubated with BMP-2 and HA for various time periods. To determine osteoblastic differentiation, alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in the cell lysates was quantified. Phosphorylation of Smad 1/5/8, p38, and ERK proteins was determined by Western blot analysis. To elucidate the nuclear translocation of phosphorylated Smad 1/5/8, stimulated cells were subjected to immunofluorescence microscopy. To further elucidate the role of HA in enhancement of BMP-2-induced Smad signaling, mRNA expressions of the BMP-2 receptor antagonists noggin and follistatin were detected using real-time RT-PCR. Results: BMP-2-induced ALP activation, Smad 1/5/8 phosphorylation, and

  13. Review Recent progress in identification and characterization of loci associated with sex-linked congenital cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, D D; Du, J Z; Topolewski, J; Wang, X M

    2016-07-29

    Congenital cataract is a common cause of blindness in children; however, its pathogenesis remains unclear. Genetic factors have been shown to play an important role in the pathogenesis of congenital cataract. The current genetic models of congenital cataract include autosomal dominant, autosomal recessive, and sex-linked inheritance. Sex-linked congenital cataract could be inherited through the X or Y chromosome. Congenital cataract is a symptom associated with several X-linked disorders, including Nance-Horan syndrome, Lowe syndrome, Conradi-Hünermann-Happle syndrome, oculo-facio-cardio-dental syndrome, and Alport syndrome. On the other hand, the mechanism and characteristics of Y-linked congenital cataract remains to be identified. Despite its rarity, sex-linked congenital cataract has been known to seriously affect the quality of life of patients. In this review, we present our current understanding of the genes and loci associated with sex-linked congenital cataract. This could help identify novel approaches for the prevention, early diagnosis, and comprehensive disease treatment.

  14. Mechanism(S) Involved in the Colon-Specific Expression of the Thiamine Pyrophosphate (Tpp) Transporter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nabokina, Svetlana M; Ramos, Mel Brendan; Said, Hamid M

    2016-01-01

    Microbiota of the large intestine synthesizes considerable amount of vitamin B1 (thiamine) in the form of thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP). We have recently demonstrated the existence of an efficient and specific carrier-mediated uptake process for TPP in human colonocytes, identified the TPP transporter (TPPT) involved (product of the SLC44A4 gene), and shown that expression of TPPT along the gastrointestinal (GI) tract is restricted to the colon. Our aim in this study was to determine the molecular basis of the colon-specific expression of TPPT focusing on a possible epigenetic mechanism. Our results showed that the CpG island predicted in the SLC44A4 promoter is non-methylated in the human colonic epithelial NCM460 cells, but is hyper-methylated in the human duodenal epithelial HuTu80 cells (as well as in the human retinal pigment epithelial ARPE19 cells). In the mouse (where TPPT expression in the GI tract is also restricted to the colon), the CpG island predicted in the Slc44a4 promoter is non-methylated in both the jejunum and colon, thus arguing against possible contribution of DNA methylation in the colon-specific expression of TPPT. A role for histone modifications in the tissue-specific pattern of Slc44a4 expression, however, was suggested by the findings that in mouse colon, histone H3 in the 5'-regulatory region of Slc44a4 is tri-methylated at lysine 4 and acetylated at lysine 9, whereas the tri-methylation at lysine 27 modification was negligible. In contrast, in the mouse jejunum, histone H3 is hyper-trimethylated at lysine 27 (repressor mark). Similarly, possible involvement of miRNA(s) in the tissue-specific expression of TPPT was also suggested by the findings that the 3'-UTR of SLC44A4 is targeted by specific miRNAs/RNA binding proteins in non-colonic, but not in colonic, epithelial cells. These studies show, for the first time, epigenetic mechanisms (histone modifications) play a role in determining the tissue-specific pattern of expression of TPPT

  15. Simulation-based certification for cataract surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thomsen, Ann Sofia Skou; Kiilgaard, Jens Folke; Kjaerbo, Hadi

    2015-01-01

    PURPOSE: To evaluate the EyeSi(™) simulator in regard to assessing competence in cataract surgery. The primary objective was to explore all simulator metrics to establish a proficiency-based test with solid evidence. The secondary objective was to evaluate whether the skill assessment was specific...... to cataract surgery. METHODS: We included 26 ophthalmic trainees (no cataract surgery experience), 11 experienced cataract surgeons (>4000 cataract procedures) and five vitreoretinal surgeons. All subjects completed 13 different modules twice. Simulator metrics were used for the assessments. RESULTS: Total...

  16. Low-Dose Radiation Cataract and Genetic Determinants of Radiosensitivity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kleiman, Norman Jay [Columbia University

    2013-11-30

    The lens of the eye is one of the most radiosensitive tissues in the body. Ocular ionizing radiation exposure results in characteristic, dose related, progressive lens changes leading to cataract formation. While initial, early stages of lens opacification may not cause visual disability, the severity of such changes progressively increases with dose until vision is impaired and cataract extraction surgery may be required. Because of the transparency of the eye, radiation induced lens changes can easily be followed non-invasively over time. Thus, the lens provides a unique model system in which to study the effects of low dose ionizing radiation exposure in a complex, highly organized tissue. Despite this observation, considerable uncertainties remain surrounding the relationship between dose and risk of developing radiation cataract. For example, a growing number of human epidemiological findings suggest significant risk among various groups of occupationally and accidentally exposed individuals and confidence intervals that include zero dose. Nevertheless, questions remain concerning the relationship between lens opacities, visual disability, clinical cataract, threshold dose and/or the role of genetics in determining radiosensitivity. Experimentally, the response of the rodent eye to radiation is quite similar to that in humans and thus animal studies are well suited to examine the relationship between radiation exposure, genetic determinants of radiosensitivity and cataractogenesis. The current work has expanded our knowledge of the low-dose effects of X-irradiation or high-LET heavy ion exposure on timing and progression of radiation cataract and has provided new information on the genetic, molecular, biochemical and cell biological features which contribute to this pathology. Furthermore, findings have indicated that single and/or multiple haploinsufficiency for various genes involved in DNA repair and cell cycle checkpoint control, such as Atm, Brca1 or Rad9

  17. Pediatric cataract surgery in Madagascar

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2013-03-28

    the‑world‑factbook/geos/ma.html. [Cited 2010 Oct 31]. 11. Nkumbe HE, Randrianotahina HC. Meeting the need for childhood cataract surgical services in Madagascar. Afr J Paediatr Surg 2011;8:182‑4. 12. Muhit MA. Childhood ...

  18. The Pediatric Cataract Register (PECARE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haargaard, Birgitte; Nyström, Alf; Rosensvärd, Annika

    2015-01-01

    examination with a pencil light at age 5 weeks, whereas newborn red reflex examination using a handheld ophthalmoscope is routine protocol in Swedish maternity wards. Data regarding age of referral were derived from the Pediatric Cataract Register (PECARE). All children operated on before 1 year of age...

  19. Factors associated with strabismus after cataract extraction and primary intraocular lens implantation in congenital cataracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo Jung Lee

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To evaluate factors associated with the development of strabismus after cataract extraction and primary intraocular lens implantation.METHODS: The medical records of 122 patients, aged 1.5mo to 9y, who had undergone cataract extraction with primary intraocular lens implantation between January 1993 and August 2011 were reviewed. Fourteen patients (17 eyes with strabismus before cataract surgery were excluded. Patients were divided into those with congenital bilateral cataracts (64 patients, 128 eyes and those with unilateral cataracts (44 patients, 44 eyes. The associations between the development of strabismus and age at cataract surgery, pre- and post-cataract extraction corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA, interocular CDVA difference, nystagmus, surgical method, and secondary cataract were evaluated.RESULTS: Factors significantly associated with the development of strabismus included age at cataract surgery (≤1y, preoperative mean CDVA ≤20/100, presence of nystagmus in the bilateral cataract group and postoperative interocular CDVA difference >20/70 in the unilateral group. Postoperative CDVA ≤20/100 and preservation of posterior capsule, and presence of secondary cataract were significant factors in both groups.CONCLUSION: Children with congenital cataracts should be monitored carefully after cataract surgery for the development of strabismus, especially when they underwent surgery at age ≤1y, and they have nystagmus, large postoperative interocular CDVA difference, poor preoperative and postoperative CDVA, preservation of the posterior capsule, or secondary cataract.

  20. The morphology and natural history of childhood cataracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amaya, Luis; Taylor, David; Russell-Eggitt, Isabelle; Nischal, Ken K; Lengyel, Dora

    2003-01-01

    The morphology of congenital cataract reflects a combination of the timing and nature of the cause, the anatomy of the lens including its capsule, its development, and changes that take place with time. Morphology may variably affect prognosis, give a clue to the etiology and the age of onset and, in an isolated case, sometimes suggest heritability. The spectrum of morphological variations is enormous and can be complex. A comprehensive approach is to classify the variations according to the area of the lens involved, and sub-dividing them by a detailed description of the shape and appearance. Each specific morphological type is then analyzed determining the etiology, visual prognosis, and management. The use of gene markers has allowed many of these variations to be identified and categorized. Cataracts in childhood can involve the whole lens, in which case they are called total, Morgagnian, or disk-like. They can affect only the center of the lens: lamellar, nuclear, oil droplet, cortical, or coronary. They can be anterior: anterior polar, anterior subcapsular, or anterior lenticonus. The posterior aspect of the lens can also be affected in different fashions: Mittendorf's dot, posterior lenticonus, posterior cortical cataracts, or posterior subcapsular. There are five more forms that must be described separately: punctuate lens opacities, sutural cataracts, coralliform or crystalline, wedge-shaped, and persistent hyperplastic primary vitreous.

  1. Bacterial tick-borne diseases caused by Bartonella spp., Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Coxiella burnetii, and Rickettsia spp. among patients with cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chmielewski, Tomasz; Brydak-Godowska, Joanna; Fiecek, Beata; Rorot, Urszula; Sędrowicz, Elżbieta; Werenowska, Małgorzata; Kopacz, Dorota; Hevelke, Agata; Michniewicz, Magdalena; Kęcik, Dariusz; Tylewska-Wierzbanowska, Stanisława

    2014-06-05

    Clinical data have shown that tick-borne diseases caused by Borrelia burgdorferi sensu lato, Bartonella spp., Coxiella burnetii, and Rickettsia spp. can affect the central nervous system, including the eye. The aim of this study was to establish a relationship between the incidence of cataract and evidence of bacterial infections transmitted by ticks. Fluid with lenticular masses from inside of the eye and blood from 109 patients were tested by PCR and sequencing. Sera from patients and the control group were subjected to serological tests to search specific antibodies to the bacteria. Microbiological analysis revealed the presence of Bartonella sp. DNA in intraoperative specimens from the eye in 1.8% of patients. Serological studies have shown that infections caused by B. burgdorferi sensu lato and Bartonella sp. were detected in 34.8% and 4.6% of patients with cataract surgery, respectively. Presence of DNA of yet uncultured and undescribed species of Bartonella in eye liquid indicates past infection with this pathogen. Specific antibodies to B. burgdorferi sensu lato and Bartonella sp. are detected more frequently in patients with cataract compared to the control group. This could indicate a possible role of these organisms in the pathological processes within the eyeball, leading to changes in the lens. Further studies are needed to identify Bartonella species, as well as to recognize the infectious mechanisms involved in cataract development.

  2. Pathophysiology of major depressive disorder: mechanisms involved in etiology are not associated with clinical progression

    OpenAIRE

    Verduijn, J; Milaneschi, Y; Schoevers, R A; van Hemert, A M; Beekman, A T F; Penninx, B W J H

    2015-01-01

    Meta-analyses support the involvement of different pathophysiological mechanisms (inflammation, hypothalamic-pituitary (HPA)-axis, neurotrophic growth and vitamin D) in major depressive disorder (MDD). However, it remains unknown whether dysregulations in these mechanisms are more pronounced when MDD progresses toward multiple episodes and/or chronicity. We hypothesized that four central pathophysiological mechanisms of MDD are not only involved in etiology, but also associated with clinical ...

  3. Adrenomyeloneuropathy associated with congenital cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Komori, Tetsuo; Nagashima, Toshiko; Hirose, Kazuhiko; Tanabe, Hitoshi; Tsubaki, Tadao

    1988-01-01

    Two cases of adrenomyeloneuropathy (AMN) in a family and the results of their MRI study are reported. Case 1, a 24-year-old male proband, was admitted to our hospital because of gait disturbance for three years. Bilateral cataracts were pointed out at birth, which required left side lenticotomy at age four. Neurological examinations on admission revealed a marked spastic paraparesis with pathological reflexes and a mild hypesthesia in the distal part of the left leg. No abnormal findings were detected in X-ray studies on the spine and spinal cord, electromyography and nerve conduction test. Serum very long chain fatty acids (VLCFAs) levels were apparently elevated, and the serum cortisol response to ACTH was low. Case 2, a 53-year-old woman, is the mother of Case 1 having a complaint of gait disturbance since age 51. She presented a mild spastic paraparesis with localized hypesthesia in the distal part of the both legs. She also had bilateral congenital cataracts. Her serum VLCFAs analysis indicated the intermediate levels between that of AMN and the normal control. Adrenal functions were normal. Cranial MRI (TR 2,000 msec/TE 80 msec) study disclosed high signal intensity areas in bilateral internal capsules in Case 1. These findings, suggesting the pathological change of dysmyelination, seemed to be well compatible with the clinical pictures. With these clinical findings and the laboratory data, these two cases were diagnosed as AMN. In addition, association of congenital cataract with AMN in both cases was characteristic in this family, which hasn't been reported in the literature. On regarding the genetic background of these two disorders, AMN and congenital cataract, it was speculated that each gene could be closely located on the same or very adjacent locus, possibly on Xq. (author)

  4. Patient satisfaction with cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wasfi Ehab I

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Introduction Measuring the patient satisfaction is a very important issue that will help very much in improving the service provided to patients and improve the level of satisfaction. Aim To evaluate patient satisfaction with the cataract surgery service and identify any areas for improvement, determination of patient satisfaction with referral, out-patient consultation, pre-assessment clinic, surgery and post-operative care, also to report patients' comments relating to improvement in service provision. Methodology A retrospective study was undertaken for 150 patients underwent cataract surgery at Barrow General Hospital, UK, the survey sample was by postal questionnaires. We collected our data from the theatre lists for a period of 4 month. Results This study included 150 patients; the response rate was (72% 108 patients, Most patients were referred from their general practitioner 86.1%, 93 (86.1% patients were happy with the time interval from seeing their GP to eye clinic. In the eye out patient department many factors significantly affected the level of patient satisfaction, in general the more information provided for the patient the more the satisfaction. Conclusion Patient satisfaction is on important health outcome old understanding both the domains of satisfaction as well as their relative importance to patients is necessary to improve the overall quality of patient care. Meeting the doctor, presenting all relevant information and giving printed information are very important factors in improving the patient's satisfaction with cataract surgery.

  5. Medicolegal pitfalls of cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Bryan S

    2015-01-01

    To provide a general overview of medicolegal issues that may arise before, during, and after cataract surgery. The Department of Health and Human Services Office of Inspector General has designated ophthalmology as an auditing target, an unusual step to take for an entire specialty. Ongoing False Claims Act litigation may provide greater clarity on billing Medicare for a premium intraocular lens patient's return to the operating room and charging for an intervening exam when performing cataract surgery on both eyes. Ophthalmologists should continue to follow basic principles that help decrease medicolegal risk. These include a thorough informed consent discussion before surgery and accurate and contemporaneous documentation. When complications arise, surgeons should handle them in accordance with best practices and refer patients appropriately. Problems can arise from inattentive postoperative care, so ophthalmologists should train staff members on handling of patient calls. Implementing safety protocols for intraocular lens implantation and asking for legal advice when considering certain types of financial arrangements are also prudent. Cataract surgeons also should follow guidelines for billing noncovered services carefully.

  6. Retinal detachment repair and cataract surgery in patients with atopic dermatitis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gnana Jothi, V; McGimpsey, S; Sharkey, J A; Chan, W C

    2017-09-01

    PurposeThe aim of this study is to report a case series of ocular complications including retinal detachment (RD) and cataract in atopic dermatitis (AD) and surgical management involving a majority of Caucasian patients.Patients and methodsThis study is an observational case series, originally designed as an audit. It involves detailed discussion of history, clinical features, and surgical management of patients presenting with retinal detachment and cataracts secondary to severe AD. Six consecutive patients with diagnosis of severe AD requiring posterior segment and cataract surgery were included in the study.ResultsEight eyes of six patients had retinal detachment. Most of them involved the temporal retina. The retinal breaks were located anteriorly close to the ora serrata in six eyes and Giant tear retinal (GRT) detachment was found in two eyes. Five eyes had proliferative vitreo-retinopathy (PVR) at presentation. All six patients had bilateral cataracts and cataract surgery was performed in eleven eyes. Bilateral simultaneous surgery was essential in two patients. Three eyes had secondary intra-ocular lens (IOL) implantation with pars plana vitrectomy for subluxed lens implant.ConclusionsAnterior retinal breaks and temporal RD are common in retinal detachment secondary to AD. PVR is often present, which makes surgical management difficult. Cataract formation is quite often and late subluxation of IOL may occur.

  7. Concanavalin A-induced posterior subcapsular cataract: a new model of cataractogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gwon, A; Mantras, C; Gruber, L; Cunanan, C

    1993-12-01

    To evaluate the effect of Concanavalin A (Con A) on cataract formation in New Zealand Albino rabbits. Uveitis is a chronic inflammatory condition of the eye involving the anterior and/or posterior segments. It may be acute or chronic and is associated with the development of posterior subscapular cataract over time. Con A is a nonspecific inflammatory agent and mitogen for T cells and some B cells. Used extensively in immunogenic studies Con A has been shown to induce uveitis after intravitreal injection in New Zealand Albino rabbits. In two separate studies, Con A was injected intracamerally or intravitreally into one eye of 12 New Zealand Albino rabbits and an equal volume of balanced salt solution was injected into the opposite eye as a control. In a third study, the effect of topical steroids after intravitreal injection of Con A was evaluated. In all studies, anterior and posterior inflammation and the development of cataract was monitored by slit lamp biomicroscopy and photography. Cataract formation was also studied histopathologically. Initially, all eyes treated with Con A demonstrated moderate anterior chamber inflammation while eyes treated with balanced salt solution showed no inflammation. Three months after treatment, posterior subcapsular cataracts were present in all rabbit eyes treated with intravitreal Con A. In the third study, topical steroid treatment of Con A-induced inflammation significantly reduced anterior chamber inflammation but had no effect on vitreous humor and posterior subcapsular cataract formation. This experimental model was the first to demonstrate the development of posterior subcapsular cataracts after Con-A induced inflammation. The cataract was clinically and histologically similar to human posterior subscapular cataracts.

  8. Mouse models of cataract

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    2009-12-31

    Dec 31, 2009 ... *E-mail: graw@helmholtz-muenchen.de. and to analyse the mechanisms leading to the opacification ... dependant at least in part, on the mode and site of action of the mutated gene(s). Mutation in the ... Cryg genes are expressed in the eye lens at a very high level and thought to encode structural proteins.

  9. Mechanisms involved in regulation of osteoclastic differentiation by mechanical stress-loaded osteoblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneuji, Takeshi; Ariyoshi, Wataru; Okinaga, Toshinori; Toshinaga, Akihiro; Takahashi, Tetsu; Nishihara, Tatsuji

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → Effect of compressive force on osteoblasts were examined. → Compressive force induced OPG expression and suppressed osteoclastogenesis. → This enhancement of OPG is dependent on Wnt/Ca2+ signal pathway. -- Abstract: Mechanical stress is known to be important for regulation of bone turnover, though the detailed mechanisms are not fully understood. In the present study, we examined the effect of mechanical stress on osteoblasts using a novel compression model. Mouse osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were embedded in three-dimensional (3D) gels and cultured with continuous compressive force (0-10.0 g/cm 2 ) for 48 h, and the conditioned medium were collected. RAW264.7 cells were then incubated with the conditioned medium for various times in the presence of receptor activator of nuclear factor-κB ligand (RANKL). Conditioned medium was found to inhibit the differentiation of RAW264.7 cells into osteoclasts induced by RANKL via down-regulation of the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), phosphorylation of IκBα, and nuclear translocation of p50 and p65. Interestingly, the conditioned medium also had a high level of binding activity to RANKL and blocked the binding of RANK to RANKL. Furthermore, the binding activity of conditioned medium to RANKL was reduced when the 3D gel was supplemented with KN-93, an inhibitor of non-canonical Wnt/Ca 2+ pathway. In addition, expression level of osteoprotegerin (OPG) mRNA was increased in time- and force-dependent manners, and remarkably suppressed by KN-93. These results indicate that osteoblastic cells subjected to mechanical stress produce OPG, which binds to RANKL. Furthermore, this binding activity strongly inhibited osteoclastogenesis through suppression of TRAF6 and the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) signaling pathway, suggesting that enhancement of OPG expression induced by mechanical stress is dependent on non-canonical Wnt/Ca 2+ pathway.

  10. Radioprotective effects of melatonin on radiation-induced cataract

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Karslioglu, Ie.; Ertekin, M.V.; Taysi, S.; Kocer, Ie.; Sezen, O.; Koc, M.; Bakan, N.; Gepdiremen, A.

    2005-01-01

    One of the mechanisms proposed to explain lens opacification is the oxidation of crystallins, either by radiation or reactive oxygen species (ROS). It has been shown that melatonin has both an anti-peroxidative effect on several tissues and a scavenger effect on ROS. The purpose of this study was to determine the antioxidant role of melatonin (5 mg/kg/day) against radiation-induced cataract in the lens after total-cranium irradiation of rats with a single dose of 5 Gy. Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into four groups. Control group received neither melatonin nor irradiation. Irradiated rats (IR) and melatonin+irradiated rats (IR+Mel) groups were exposed to total cranium irradiation of 5 Gy in a single dose by using a cobalt-60 teletherapy unit. IR+Mel and melatonin (Mel) groups were administered 5 mg/kg melatonin daily by intraperitoneal injections during ten days. Chylack's cataract classification was used in this study. At the end of the 10 th day, the rats were killed and their eyes were enucleated to measure the antioxidant enzymes i.e. the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and lipid peroxidation level (malondialdehyde (MDA)). Irradiation significantly increased the MDA level, as an end product of lipid peroxidation, and also significantly decreased SOD and GSH-Px activity, emphasizing the generation of increased oxidative stress. Rats injected with melatonin only did not cause cataract formation. Melatonin supplementation with irradiation significantly increased the activity of SOD and GSH-Px enzymes and significantly decreased the MDA level. Total cranium irradiation of 5 Gy in a single dose enhanced cataract formation, and melatonin supplementation protected the lenses from radiation-induced cataract formation. Our results suggest that supplementing cancer patients with adjuvant therapy of melatonin may reduce patients suffering from toxic therapeutic regimens such as chemotherapy and/or radiotherapy and may provide

  11. Mechanism(s) involved in opioid drug abuse modulation of HAND.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dutta, Raini; Roy, Sabita

    2012-07-01

    Drug abuse and HIV infection are interlinked. From the onset of the HIV/AIDS epidemic, the impact of illicit drug use on HIV disease progression has been a focus of many investigations. Both laboratory-based and epidemiological studies strongly indicate that drug abuse may exacerbate HIV disease progression and increase mortality and morbidity in these patients. Increase susceptibility to opportunistic infection has been implicated as one of the major causes for this detriment. Furthermore, opioids are known to elicit prevalence of neurodegenerative disorders in HIV-infected patients. Numerous authors have delineated various molecular as well as cellular mechanisms associated with neurological complications in these patients. This review gives an overview of these findings. Understanding the mechanisms will allow for the development of targeted therapies aimed at reducing the progression of neurocognitive decline in the drug abusing HIV infected individuals.

  12. Mechanisms involved in regulation of osteoclastic differentiation by mechanical stress-loaded osteoblasts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaneuji, Takeshi [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kyushu Dental College, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental College, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Ariyoshi, Wataru; Okinaga, Toshinori; Toshinaga, Akihiro [Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental College, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Takahashi, Tetsu [Division of Oral and Maxillofacial Reconstructive Surgery, Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Kyushu Dental College, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Oral Bioresearch Center, Kyushu Dental College, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Nishihara, Tatsuji, E-mail: tatsujin@kyu-dent.ac.jp [Division of Infections and Molecular Biology, Department of Health Promotion, Kyushu Dental College, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan); Oral Bioresearch Center, Kyushu Dental College, 2-6-1 Manazuru, Kokurakita-ku, Kitakyushu 803-8580 (Japan)

    2011-04-29

    Highlights: {yields} Effect of compressive force on osteoblasts were examined. {yields} Compressive force induced OPG expression and suppressed osteoclastogenesis. {yields} This enhancement of OPG is dependent on Wnt/Ca2+ signal pathway. -- Abstract: Mechanical stress is known to be important for regulation of bone turnover, though the detailed mechanisms are not fully understood. In the present study, we examined the effect of mechanical stress on osteoblasts using a novel compression model. Mouse osteoblastic MC3T3-E1 cells were embedded in three-dimensional (3D) gels and cultured with continuous compressive force (0-10.0 g/cm{sup 2}) for 48 h, and the conditioned medium were collected. RAW264.7 cells were then incubated with the conditioned medium for various times in the presence of receptor activator of nuclear factor-{kappa}B ligand (RANKL). Conditioned medium was found to inhibit the differentiation of RAW264.7 cells into osteoclasts induced by RANKL via down-regulation of the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-associated factor 6 (TRAF6), phosphorylation of I{kappa}B{alpha}, and nuclear translocation of p50 and p65. Interestingly, the conditioned medium also had a high level of binding activity to RANKL and blocked the binding of RANK to RANKL. Furthermore, the binding activity of conditioned medium to RANKL was reduced when the 3D gel was supplemented with KN-93, an inhibitor of non-canonical Wnt/Ca{sup 2+} pathway. In addition, expression level of osteoprotegerin (OPG) mRNA was increased in time- and force-dependent manners, and remarkably suppressed by KN-93. These results indicate that osteoblastic cells subjected to mechanical stress produce OPG, which binds to RANKL. Furthermore, this binding activity strongly inhibited osteoclastogenesis through suppression of TRAF6 and the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) signaling pathway, suggesting that enhancement of OPG expression induced by mechanical stress is dependent on non-canonical Wnt

  13. Discrepant expression of cytokines in inflammation- and age-related cataract patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wan Chen

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: Inflammatory cataracts secondary to Behcet's disease (BD or Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada disease (VKH are thought to result from a pathological dysregulation of cytokines that is different from that of age-related (AR cataracts. However, little is known about the function of cytokines in the development of inflammatory cataracts. The purpose of this study was to identify possible differences in cytokine expression in inflammation- and age-related cataract patients. METHODS: Analysis techniques involving the concomitant use of a cocktail of antibody-coated non-magnetic beads were used to determine the cytokine expression profiles of BD, VKH and AR cataract patients. Furthermore, anterior chamber aqueous flares and inflammatory cells were quantitatively measured with a laser flare cell meter (LFCM. RESULTS: The expressions of interleukin-2 (IL-2, IL-4, IL-6, IL-10, IL-17A, and interferon-γ (IFN-γ were analyzed in aqueous humor (AqH, phytohemagglutinin (PHA-stimulated and non-PHA-stimulated cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs from the three types of cataract patients. IL-6 and IFN-γ were identified above the detection limits, but, among the BD and VKH cataract patients, only the levels of IL-6 were significantly higher in both the AqH and PBMC non-PHA cultures compared with the levels observed in the AR cataract patients. In contrast, IFN-γ was significantly elevated in the AqH of the BD cataract patients compared with the VKH and AR cataract patients. In the PHA-stimulated PBMC cultures, IL-2, IFN-γ, IL-6, and IL-17A were significantly increased, and the IL-6 level was significantly higher in the VKH patients than in the BD and AR cataract patients. The correlation analyses of the cytokines and inflammation indexes of the AqH obtained with the LFCM revealed that only IL-6 was significantly correlated with the inflammation index. CONCLUSION: Distinct expression profiles of cytokines and the correlations of these profiles

  14. Lutein and cataract: from bench to bedside.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manayi, Azadeh; Abdollahi, Mohammad; Raman, Thiagarajan; Nabavi, Seyed Fazel; Habtemariam, Solomon; Daglia, Maria; Nabavi, Seyed Mohammad

    2016-10-01

    Cataract is one of the most important leading causes of blindness in the world. Extensive research showed that oxidative stress may play an important role in the initiation and progression of a cataract and other age-related eye diseases. Extra-generation of reactive oxygen and nitrogen species in the eye tissue has been shown as one of the most important risk factors for cataracts and other age-related eye diseases. With respect to this, it can be hypothesized that dietary antioxidants may be useful in the prevention and/or mitigation of cataract. Lutein is an important xanthophyll which is widely found in different vegetables such as spinach, kale and carrots as well as some other foods such as eggs. Lutein is concentrated in the macula and suppresses the oxidative stress in the eye tissues. A plethora of literature has shown that increased lutein consumption has a close correlation with reduction in the incidence of cataract. Despite this general information, there is a negligible number of review articles considering the beneficial effects of lutein on cataracts and age-related eye diseases. The present review is aimed at discussing the role of oxidative stress in the initiation and progression of a cataract and the possible beneficial effects of lutein in maintaining retinal health and fighting cataract. We also provide a perspective on the chemistry, sources, bioavailability and safety of lutein.

  15. Retrobulbar versus subconjunctival anesthesia for cataract surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives: To compare the effectiveness, in terms of pain relief and akinesia of retrobulbar and subconjunctival an aesthesia during cataract surgery and also to compare the degree of postoperative ptosis associated with each technique. Materials and Methods: Consecutive adult patients undergoing cataract surgery ...

  16. Dexmedetomidine premedication in cataract surgery under topical ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Keywords: cataract surgery, dexmedetomidine, intraocular pressure, patient and surgeon satisfaction, topical anesthesia. Introduction. Traditionally, cataract surgeries are performed under regional anaesthesia with either a peribulbar or retrobulbar block. With the anaesthesia has also evolved from painful regional blocks to ...

  17. Survey of Cataract Surgical Techniques in Nigeria

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PROF SABE NWOSU

    polymethylmethacrylate. DISCUSSION. The results of this survey suggest that all practicing ophthalmologists in Nigeria perform cataract surgery with wide incision extracapsular cataract extraction and intraocular lens implant (ECCE/IOL) as the most frequently employed technique. Although pseudophakic technology in ...

  18. Prevalence of Cataract Blindness in Rural Ethiopia

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Bernt Lindtjørn

    Background: Over three-quarter of all blindness worldwide are preventable and usually caused by cataract and trachoma. Objective: To assess the ... Ophthalmologists from other areas conduct cataract operations once or twice each ... Some patients may have two eyes disorder causing visual impairment. The accepted ...

  19. Visual Outcome of Cataract Surgery | Ukponmwan | Nigerian ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To assess the visu al ou tcome of cataract su rgery in a tertiary hosp ital in Nigeria. Methods: Three hu nd red and seventy eyes (370) that had cataract su rgery in the op hthalmology d ep artment of University of Benin Teaching Hosp ital (UBTH) from July 2007 to December 2008 were includ ed in the stu d y.

  20. Evaluation of Complications of Extracapsular Cataract Extraction ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hanumantp

    taught to residents. Since ECCE is the basic cataract surgery taught in developing countries, it is important to evaluate the complication rate of a trainee as a guide to the learning curve. Evaluation of Complications of Extracapsular. Cataract Extraction Performed by Trainees. Ezegwui IR, Aghaji AE, Okpala NE1, Onwasigwe ...

  1. Pediatric cataract surgery in Madagascar | Randrianotahina ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Conclusions: In Madagascar, presentation for congenital and developmental cataract is very late, visual outcome poor and follow‑up inadequate. There is an urgent need for a childhood blindness program to effectively deal with pediatric cataract, an avoidable cause of blindness and visual disability in children on the island ...

  2. Economic Constraints in Managing Complicated Cataracts | Ogun ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Failure to perceive light, inaccurate light projection, or sonographic evidence of retinal detachment are all reasons to avoid cataract surgery, as there is no hope of visual recovery. However, when a patient already accepts a blind eye, but wants cataract surgery to remove the cosmetic blemish of leukocoria, they may ...

  3. Pediatric cataract: challenges and future directions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Medsinge A

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Anagha Medsinge,1,2 Ken K Nischal1,2 1Pediatric Ophthalmology, Strabismus, and Adult Motility, Children’s Hospital of Pittsburgh of University of Pittsburgh Medical Center, (UPMC 2University of Pittsburgh School of Medicine, Pittsburgh, PA, USA Abstract: Cataract is a significant cause of visual disability in the pediatric population worldwide and can significantly impact the neurobiological development of a child. Early diagnosis and prompt surgical intervention is critical to prevent irreversible amblyopia. Thorough ocular evaluation, including the onset, duration, and morphology of a cataract, is essential to determine the timing for surgical intervention. Detailed assessment of the general health of the child, preferably in conjunction with a pediatrician, is helpful to rule out any associated systemic condition. Although pediatric cataracts have a diverse etiology, with the majority being idiopathic, genetic counseling and molecular testing should be undertaken with the help of a genetic counselor and/or geneticist in cases of hereditary cataracts. Advancement in surgical techniques and methods of optical rehabilitation has substantially improved the functional and anatomic outcomes of pediatric cataract surgeries in recent years. However, the phenomenon of refractive growth and the process of emmetropization have continued to puzzle pediatric ophthalmologists and highlight the need for future prospective studies. Posterior capsule opacification and secondary glaucoma are still the major postoperative complications necessitating long-term surveillance in children undergoing cataract surgery early in life. Successful management of pediatric cataracts depends on individualized care and experienced teamwork. We reviewed the etiology, preoperative evaluation including biometry, choice of intraocular lens, surgical techniques, and recent developments in the field of childhood cataract. Keywords: children, pediatric cataract, infantile

  4. Possible mechanisms involved in the vasorelaxant effect produced by clobenzorex in aortic segments of rats

    OpenAIRE

    Lozano-Cuenca, J.; González-Hernández, A.; López-Canales, O.A.; Villagrana-Zesati, J.R.; Rodríguez-Choreão, J.D.; Morín-Zaragoza, R.; Castillo-Henkel, E.F.; López-Canales, J.S.

    2017-01-01

    Clobenzorex is a metabolic precursor of amphetamine indicated for the treatment of obesity. Amphetamines have been involved with cardiovascular side effects such as hypertension and pulmonary arterial hypertension. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the direct application of 10?9?10?5 M clobenzorex on isolated phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings produces vascular effects, and if so, what mechanisms may be involved. Clobenzorex produced an immediate concentration-...

  5. Mechanisms involved in the transport of mercuric ions in target tissues

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bridges, Christy C.; Zalups, Rudolfs K.

    2016-01-01

    Mercury exists in the environment in various forms, all of which pose a risk to human health. Despite guidelines regulating the industrial release of mercury into the environment, humans continue to be exposed regularly to various forms of this metal via inhalation or ingestion. Following exposure, mercuric ions are taken up by and accumulate in numerous organs, including brain, intestine, kidney, liver, and placenta. In order to understand the toxicological effects of exposure to mercury, a thorough understanding of the mechanisms that facilitate entry of mercuric ions into target cells must first be obtained. A number of mechanisms for the transport of mercuric ions into target cells and organs have been proposed in recent years. However, the ability of these mechanisms to transport mercuric ions and the regulatory features of these carriers have not been characterized completely. The purpose of this review is to summarize the current findings related to the mechanisms that may be involved in the transport of inorganic and organic forms of mercury in target tissues and organs. This review will describe mechanisms known to be involved in the transport of mercury and will also propose additional mechanisms that may potentially be involved in the transport of mercuric ions into target cells. PMID:27422290

  6. Identification of cataract and post-cataract surgery optical images using artificial intelligence techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Acharya, Rajendra Udyavara; Yu, Wenwei; Zhu, Kuanyi; Nayak, Jagadish; Lim, Teik-Cheng; Chan, Joey Yiptong

    2010-08-01

    Human eyes are most sophisticated organ, with perfect and interrelated subsystems such as retina, pupil, iris, cornea, lens and optic nerve. The eye disorder such as cataract is a major health problem in the old age. Cataract is formed by clouding of lens, which is painless and developed slowly over a long period. Cataract will slowly diminish the vision leading to the blindness. At an average age of 65, it is most common and one third of the people of this age in world have cataract in one or both the eyes. A system for detection of the cataract and to test for the efficacy of the post-cataract surgery using optical images is proposed using artificial intelligence techniques. Images processing and Fuzzy K-means clustering algorithm is applied on the raw optical images to detect the features specific to three classes to be classified. Then the backpropagation algorithm (BPA) was used for the classification. In this work, we have used 140 optical image belonging to the three classes. The ANN classifier showed an average rate of 93.3% in detecting normal, cataract and post cataract optical images. The system proposed exhibited 98% sensitivity and 100% specificity, which indicates that the results are clinically significant. This system can also be used to test the efficacy of the cataract operation by testing the post-cataract surgery optical images.

  7. Topical‑intracameral anesthesia in manual small incision cataract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cataract remains a leading cause of blindness worldwide. Manual small incision cataract surgery (MSICS) is currently practiced as the technique of choice in Sub‑Saharan Africa to reduce the backlog of cataract blindness. Optimal pain control during surgery remains a challenge to cataract surgeons. Aim: To ...

  8. Review: Femtosecond Laser Assisted Cataract Surgery (FLACS): An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Age-related cataract is one of the most important causes of visual impairment, and cataract surgery is one of the commonest surgeries performed worldwide. Femtosecond laser assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) is a new and promising technology in the arena of cataract operations. Femtosecond lasers (FSL) are used in ...

  9. A theoretical study of the molecular mechanism of the GAPDH Trypanosoma cruzi enzyme involving iodoacetate inhibitor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carneiro, Agnaldo Silva; Lameira, Jerônimo; Alves, Cláudio Nahum

    2011-10-01

    The glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase enzyme (GAPDH) is an important biological target for the development of new chemotherapeutic agents against Chagas disease. In this Letter, the inhibition mechanism of GAPDH involving iodoacetate (IAA) inhibitor was studied using the hybrid quantum mechanical/molecular mechanical (QM/MM) approach and molecular dynamic simulations. Analysis of the potential energy surface and potential of mean force show that the covalent attachment of IAA inhibitor to the active site of the enzyme occurs as a concerted process. In addition, the energy terms decomposition shows that NAD+ plays an important role in stabilization of the reagents and transition state.

  10. Hierarchy of mechanisms involved in generating Na/K-ATPase polarity in MDCK epithelial cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mays, R.W.; Siemers, K.A.; Fritz, B.A.; Lowe, A.W.; van Meer, G.; Nelson, W.J.

    1995-01-01

    We have studied mechanisms involved in generating a polarized distribution of Na/K-ATPase in the basal-lateral membrane of two clones of MDCK II cells. Both clones exhibit polarized distributions of marker proteins of the apical and basal-lateral membranes, including Na/K-ATPase, at steady state.

  11. Evaluation of autophagy as a mechanism involved in air pollutant-induced pulmonary injury

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evaluation of autophagy as a mechanism involved in air pollutant-induced pulmonary injuryHenriquez, A.1, Snow, S.2, Miller, D1.,Schladweiler, M.2 and Kodavanti, U2.1 Curriculum in Toxicology, UNC, Chapel Hill, NC. 2 EPHD/NHEERL, US EPA, RTP, Durham, NC. ...

  12. Childhood Cataract: Magnitude, Management, Economics and Impact

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    BR Shamanna

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence of blindness among children in different regions varies from 0.2/1000 children to over 1.5/1000 children with a global figure estimated at 0.7/1000. This means that there are an estimated 1.4 million blind children worldwide.1 The proportion of blindness in children due to cataract varies considerably between regions from 10%-30% with a global average estimated at 14%, giving 190,000 children blind from cataract. 2 While the magnitude of childhood cataracts varies from place to place, it is a priority within all blindness control programmes for children. Children who are blind have to overcome a lifetime of emotional, social and economic difficulties which affect the child, the family and society.3 Loss of vision in children influences their education, employment and social life. The numbers blind with cataract do not reflect the years of disability and lost quality of life. Childhood blindness is second only to adult cataract as a cause of blind-person years. Approximately 70 million blind-person years are caused by childhood blindness of which about 10 million blind-person years (14% is due to childhood cataract. Timely recognition and intervention can eliminate blind-years due to childhood cataract, as the condition is treatable.

  13. Education on invasive mechanical ventilation involving intensive care nurses: a systematic review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guilhermino, Michelle C; Inder, Kerry J; Sundin, Deborah

    2018-03-26

    Intensive care unit nurses are critical for managing mechanical ventilation. Continuing education is essential in building and maintaining nurses' knowledge and skills, potentially improving patient outcomes. The aim of this study was to determine whether continuing education programmes on invasive mechanical ventilation involving intensive care unit nurses are effective in improving patient outcomes. Five electronic databases were searched from 2001 to 2016 using keywords such as mechanical ventilation, nursing and education. Inclusion criteria were invasive mechanical ventilation continuing education programmes that involved nurses and measured patient outcomes. Primary outcomes were intensive care unit mortality and in-hospital mortality. Secondary outcomes included hospital and intensive care unit length of stay, length of intubation, failed weaning trials, re-intubation incidence, ventilation-associated pneumonia rate and lung-protective ventilator strategies. Studies were excluded if they excluded nurses, patients were ventilated for less than 24 h, the education content focused on protocol implementation or oral care exclusively or the outcomes were participant satisfaction. Quality was assessed by two reviewers using an education intervention critical appraisal worksheet and a risk of bias assessment tool. Data were extracted independently by two reviewers and analysed narratively due to heterogeneity. Twelve studies met the inclusion criteria for full review: 11 pre- and post-intervention observational and 1 quasi-experimental design. Studies reported statistically significant reductions in hospital length of stay, length of intubation, ventilator-associated pneumonia rates, failed weaning trials and improvements in lung-protective ventilation compliance. Non-statistically significant results were reported for in-hospital and intensive care unit mortality, re-intubation and intensive care unit length of stay. Limited evidence of the effectiveness of

  14. Cataracts

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Uveitis Focus On Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic Surgery Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ... Glaucoma Education Center Pediatric Ophthalmology Education Center Oculofacial Plastic ... Center Laser Surgery Education Center Redmond Ethics Center ...

  15. Cataract

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... activities such as driving, reading, or looking at computer or video screens, even with glasses. Some people ... M. is also a founding member of Hi-Ethics and subscribes to the principles of the Health ...

  16. Sutureless Cataract Surgery: Principles and Steps

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John Sandford-Smith

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Cataracts cause about 50% of world blindness. There is little likelihood of effective prevention becoming available in the next few years and so the only treatment will remain surgical. For many of the other major causes of world blindness, like trachoma, xerophthalmia and onchocerciasis, the remedy is community-based, not hospital-based, and requires prevention rather than treatment. The prevalence of blinding cataract will only increase as people live longer, so cataract will continue to be, by far, the most important treatable cause of blindness.

  17. Application of Six Sigma methodology to a cataract surgery unit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taner, Mehmet Tolga

    2013-01-01

    The article's aim is to focus on the application of Six Sigma to minimise intraoperative and post-operative complications rates in a Turkish public hospital cataract surgery unit. Implementing define-measure-analyse-improve and control (DMAIC) involves process mapping, fishbone diagrams and rigorous data-collection. Failure mode and effect analysis (FMEA), pareto diagrams, control charts and process capability analysis are applied to redress cataract surgery failure root causes. Inefficient skills of assistant surgeons and technicians, low quality of IOLs used, wrong IOL placement, unsystematic sterilisation of surgery rooms and devices, and the unprioritising network system are found to be the critical drivers of intraoperative-operative and post-operative complications. Sigma level was increased from 2.60 to 3.75 subsequent to extensive training of assistant surgeons, ophthalmologists and technicians, better quality IOLs, systematic sterilisation and air-filtering, and the implementation of a more sophisticated network system. This article shows that Six Sigma measurement and process improvement can become the impetus for cataract unit staff to rethink their process and reduce malpractices. Measuring, recording and reporting data regularly helps them to continuously monitor their overall process and deliver safer treatments. This is the first Six Sigma ophthalmology study in Turkey.

  18. Posterior vitreous detachment and retinal detachment after cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ripandelli, Guido; Coppé, Andrea Maria; Parisi, Vincenzo; Olzi, Diego; Scassa, Cecilia; Chiaravalloti, Adele; Stirpe, Mario

    2007-04-01

    To evaluate possible changes of vitreous status in emmetropic eyes after uneventful phacoemulsification surgery, and possible related complications such as the onset of retinal detachment (RD). Retrospective case series. Four hundred fifty-three emmetropic eyes from 453 patients (mean age, 62.03+/-5.57 years) subjected to uneventful phacoemulsification with intraocular lens implantation in the capsular bag were considered in the study. They had a refractive error within +/-0.5 diopters (mean, -0.21+/-0.08). Eyes with peripheral retinal lattice degeneration were included only if asymptomatic and only if the degeneration involved one retinal quadrant. After cataract surgery, the 453 eyes were evaluated preoperatively at days 1, 15, and 30 and months 3, 6, 12, 18, 24, 36, 48, and 60. The whole period of follow-up was 5 years. Evaluation of vitreous status by biomicroscopic examination, indirect binocular ophthalmoscopy, and B-scan ultrasonography. Postoperative onset of posterior vitreous detachment (PVD) and RD. After cataract surgery, a PVD occurred in 107 of 141 (75.88%) eyes without preoperative PVD or lattice degeneration. Posterior vitreous detachment occurred in 41 of 47 eyes (87.23%) with preoperative lattice degeneration and no PVD. Eyes with preoperative lattice degeneration and postoperative PVD showed a higher incidence of RD after cataract surgery (21.27%) than eyes without preoperative PVD or lattice degeneration (0.70%). In all patients with lattice degeneration, RD originated from horseshoe retinal tears on lattice areas located on the superior quadrants. No correlation was observed between the development of RD and age. Our results suggest that the onset of postoperative PVD should be considered an important risk factor for the development of RD after cataract surgery, particularly in eyes with lattice areas.

  19. Seminal vesicle intraepithelial involvement by prostate cancer: putative mechanism and clinicopathological significance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyai, Kosuke; Kristiansen, Anna; Egevad, Lars; Pina-Oviedo, Sergio; Divatia, Mukul K; Shen, Steven S; Miles, Brian J; Ayala, Alberto G; Park, Yong Wook; Ro, Jae Y

    2014-09-01

    We have recently shown seminal vesicle intraepithelial involvement of prostate cancer in cases with seminal vesicle invasion (pT3b). Based on the manner of seminal vesicle invasion, there could be 2 possible mechanisms of seminal vesicle intraepithelial involvement: direct intraepithelial invasion from prostate carcinoma in the muscular wall of seminal vesicles or intraepithelial involvement of cancer from the invaginated extraprostatic space (IES)/ejaculatory duct system to extraprostatic seminal vesicle. We aimed to clarify the manner and clinicopathological significance of seminal vesicle intraepithelial involvement. Of 1629 consecutive radical prostatectomies, 109 cases (6.7%) showed seminal vesicle invasion in whole-mounted radical prostatectomy specimens. In these pT3b cases, 18 (17%) showed seminal vesicle intraepithelial involvement by prostate cancer. Stromal invasion of the IES/ejaculatory duct system and ejaculatory duct intraepithelial invasion by prostate cancer were identified in 62 and 5 of 109 pT3b cases, respectively. However, the presence/absence of IES/ejaculatory duct system involvement by prostate cancer does not predict seminal vesicle intraepithelial involvement. No statistically significant correlation was observed between all pathologic parameters/biochemical recurrence and the presence/absence of seminal vesicle intra-epithelial involvement in the pT3b cases. These findings suggest that seminal vesicle intraepithelial involvement is more likely due to direct invasion of carcinoma from the muscular wall of seminal vesicles rather than intraepithelial extension from the ejaculatory duct system in the IES. Further studies with a substantially greater case number are needed to clarify the clinicopathological significance of seminal vesicle intraepithelial involvement in a better manner. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Inferior oblique muscle injury from local anesthesia for cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hunter, D G; Lam, G C; Guyton, D L

    1995-03-01

    Vertical rectus muscle injury is commonly cited as a cause of strabismus after cataract surgery. Injury to the inferior oblique muscle or nerve as a complication of cataract surgery has not been described previously. Four patients without pre-existing strabismus who had diplopia after cataract surgery were studied. Analysis included prism and cover testing, Lancaster red-green testing, and fundus torsion assessment. Three patients had a delayed-onset hypertropia with fundus extorsion in the eye that underwent surgery, which is consistent with inferior oblique muscle overaction secondary to presumed contracture. The fourth patient had an immediate-onset hypotropia with fundus intorsion in the eye that underwent surgery, which is consistent with inferior oblique muscle paresis. Damage to a vertical rectus muscle or "unmasking" of a pre-existing superior oblique muscle paresis could not explain the history and findings in this group of four patients. The inferior oblique muscle contracture observed in three patients may have been caused by local anesthetic myotoxicity, whereas the paresis observed in one patient may have been due to mechanical trauma or anesthetic toxicity directly to the nerve innervating the muscle. Inferior oblique muscle or nerve injury should be considered as another possible cause of postoperative strabismus, especially when significant fundus torsion accompanies a vertical deviation.

  1. Genetics Home Reference: hyperferritinemia-cataract syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... can hold as many as 4,500 iron atoms inside its spherical structure. This storage capacity allows ... with congenital cataracts University of Arizona College of Medicine Patient Support and Advocacy Resources (1 link) National ...

  2. Cataract Surgery in Anterior Megalophthalmos: A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    GALVIS, Virgilio; TELLO, Alejandro; M. RANGEL, Carlos

    2015-01-01

    Anterior megalophthalmos is characterized by megalocornea associated with a very broad anterior chamber and ciliary ring elongation. It is also called X-linked megalocornea. It is accompanied by early development of cataracts, zonular anomalies, and, rarely, vitreoretinal disorders. Subluxation of a cataract can occur in cataract surgery because of zonular weakness. In addition, in most patients, standard intraocular lens (IOL) decentration is a risk because of the enlarged sulcus and capsular bag. These unique circumstances make cataract surgery challenging. To date, several approaches have been developed. Implantation of a retropupillary iris-claw aphakic intraocular lens may be a good option because it is easier than suturing the IOL and can have better and more stable anatomic and visual outcomes, compared to other techniques. PMID:27350950

  3. [Genetic and biochemical mechanisms of involvement of antioxidant defense enzymes in the development of bronchial asthma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polonikov, A V; Ivanov, V P; Bogomazov, A D; Solodilova, M A

    2015-01-01

    In the present review we have analyzed and summarized recent literature data on genetic and biochemical mechanisms responsible for involvement of antioxidant defense enzymes in the etiology and pathogenesis of bronchial asthma. It has been shown that the mechanisms of asthma development are linked with genetically determined abnormalities in the functioning of antioxidant defense enzymes. These alterations are accompanied by a systemic imbalance between oxidative and anti-oxidative reactions with the shift of the redox state toward increased free radical production and oxidative stress, a key element in the pathogenesis of bronchial asthma.

  4. Galactose intolerance and the risk of cataract.

    OpenAIRE

    Winder, A. F.; Fells, P.; Jones, R. B.; Kissun, R. D.; Menzies, I. S.; Mount, J. N.

    1982-01-01

    Cataracts may arise in association with various major and minor disorders restricting galactose metabolism, and the risk is broadly associated with the degree of galactose intolerance. A family is described in which a girl presented at the age of 7 3/4 years with cataracts, galactosuria, and partial deficiencies of the enzymes galactokinase and galactose-1-phosphate uridyl transferase. Galactose intolerance as determined by an oral test was impaired and fluctuated with variation in activity o...

  5. Fluorometholone-induced cataract after photorefractive keratectomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bilgihan, K; Gürelik, G; Akata, F; Hasanreisoglu, B

    1997-01-01

    The use of topical corticosteroids following photorefractive keratectomy (PRK) is widespread. The major complications of potent corticosteroids are glaucoma and cataract formation; in order to decrease these complications, 0.1% fluorometholone administration is usually preferred after PRK. We report here a case of lens opacification which was induced by 0.1% fluorometholone administration after PRK in a period of 4 months. To our knowledge, this is the first reported case of 0.1% fluorometholone-induced cataract after PRK.

  6. Surgical interventions for bilateral congenital cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, V; Chen, S

    2001-01-01

    Congenital cataracts are opacities of the lens in one or both eyes of children, causing a reduction in vision bad enough to require surgery. Cataract is the largest preventable cause of visual loss in childhood. Paediatric cataracts provide different challenges to those in adults. Intense inflammation, amblyopia and posterior capsule opacification can affect results of treatment. Two treatments commonly considered for congenital cataract are lensectomy and lens aspiration. The objective of this review is to assess the effects of surgical treatments for bilateral symmetrical congenital cataracts. Success is measured according to the vision attained and occurrence of adverse events. We searched the Cochrane Controlled Trials Register - CENTRAL (which includes the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group specialised register), MEDLINE, EMBASE, the Science Citation Index and the reference list of the included study. We also contacted trial investigators and experts in the field for details of further studies. We included all prospective, randomised controlled trials that compared one type of cataract surgery to another or to no surgery, in children aged 15 years or younger with bilateral congenital cataracts. Two reviewers extracted data. No meta-analysis was performed. One trial met the inclusion criteria. This trial randomised 130 eyes of 65 children. Follow up of 56 children at three years found no difference in visual acuity between lensectomy and lens aspiration with primary capsulotomy. Secondary opacification developed at a higher rate in the lens aspiration group (66%) compared to the lensectomy group (2%). The two methods of surgery for bilateral congenital cataracts in this review have good visual results but the incidences of side effects differ. Further randomised trials are required to inform modern practice.

  7. Possible participation of endogenous opioid peptides on the mechanism involved in analgesia induced by vouacapan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duarte, I D; Ferreira-Alves, D L; Nakamura-Craig, M

    1992-01-01

    The involvement of opioid peptides in the mechanism of action of vouacapan, a new experimental compound extracted from seeds of Pterodon poligalaeflorus Benth, was investigated both in mice utilizing acetic acid writhing response and in rats utilizing inflammatory hyperalgesia induced by carrageenan and modified Randall-Selitto method. Vouacapan, in both models, caused a dose-dependent analgesia when injected p.o., s.c. and i.p. The analgesic effect was partially blocked by naloxone, nalorphine and n-methyl-nalorphine. Significant tolerance to analgesic effect was observed following repeated administration of vouacapan or morphine. On the last day of treatment, cross administration revealed symmetrical and asymmetrical cross-tolerance between vouacapan and morphine, in rats and mice, respectively. We conclude that a release of endorphins could be involved in the analgesic mechanism of vouacapan in both models tudied.

  8. Mechanisms involved in VPAC receptors activation and regulation: lessons from pharmacological and mutagenesis studies.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ingrid eLanger

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available VIP plays diverse and important role in human physiology and physiopathology and their receptors constitute potential targets for the treatment of several diseases such as neurodegenerative disorder, asthma, diabetes and inflammatory diseases. This article reviews the current knowledge regarding the two VIP receptors, VPAC1 and VPAC2, with respect to mechanisms involved in receptor activation, G protein coupling, signaling, regulation and oligomerization.

  9. Use of static lung mechanics to identify early pulmonary involvement in patients with ankylosing spondylitis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aggarwal A

    2001-04-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To assess if a detailed analysis of lung mechanics could help in early recognition of pulmonary abnormalities in patients with ankylosing spondylitis. METHODS: Static pulmonary mechanics were studied in 17 patients (16 men and one woman of ankylosing spondylitis with no obvious clinical or radiological evidence of pulmonary involvement. Lung pressure-volume relationship was generated using a whole body plethysmograph, and a monoexponential equation fitted to this data. RESULTS: Total lung capacity (TLC was reduced in one (5.9% and static lung compliance (Cst in nine (52.9% patients. Four (23.5% patients had normal TLC, yet Cst and shape constant (K were reduced. Five (29.4% patients had reduced TLC and Cst; four of them had low K. One (5.9% patient had normal TLC but elevated Cst and K. CONCLUSIONS: Pulmonary involvement in patients with ankylosing spondylitis is probably diffuse and begins much earlier than generally presumed. Evaluation of static lung mechanics can identify pulmonary involvement early in the course of disease in several of these patients.

  10. Identification of genes involved in regulatory mechanism of pigments in broiler chickens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tarique, T M; Yang, S; Mohsina, Z; Qiu, J; Yan, Z; Chen, G; Chen, A

    2014-09-05

    Chicken is an important model organism that unites the evolutionary gap between mammals and other vertebrates and provide major source of protein from meat and eggs for all over the world population. However, specific genes underlying the regulatory mechanism of broiler pigmentation have not yet been determined. In order to better understand the genes involved in the mechanism of pigmentation in the muscle tissues of broilers, the Affymetrix microarray hybridization experiment platform was used to identify gene expression profiles at 7 weeks of age. Broilers fed canthaxanthin, natural lutein, and orangeII pigments (100 mg/kg) were used to explore gene expression profiles). Our data showed that the 7th week of age was a very important phase with regard to gene expression profiles. We identified a number of differentially expressed genes; in canthaxanthin, natural lutein, and orangeII, there were 54 (32 upregulated and 22 downregulated), 23 (15 upregulated and 8 downregulated), and 7 (5 upregulated and 2 downregulated) known genes, respectively. Our data indicate that the numbers of differentially expressed genes were more upregulated than downregulated, and several genes showed conserved signaling to previously known functions. Thus, functional characterization of differentially expressed genes revealed several categories that are involved in important biological processes, including pigmentation, growth, molecular mechanisms, fat metabolism, cell proliferation, immune response, lipid metabolism, and protein synthesis and degradation. The results of the present study demonstrate that the genes associated with canthaxanthin, natural lutein, and orangeII are key regulatory genes that control the regulatory mechanisms of pigmentation.

  11. Involvement of midbrain tectum neurokinin-mediated mechanisms in fear and anxiety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Brenes

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Electrical stimulation of midbrain tectum structures, particularly the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG and inferior colliculus (IC, produces defensive responses, such as freezing and escape behavior. Freezing also ensues after termination of dPAG stimulation (post-stimulation freezing. These defensive reaction responses are critically mediated by γ-aminobutyric acid and 5-hydroxytryptamine mechanisms in the midbrain tectum. Neurokinins (NKs also play a role in the mediation of dPAG stimulation-evoked fear, but how NK receptors are involved in the global processing and expression of fear at the level of the midbrain tectum is yet unclear. The present study investigated the role of NK-1 receptors in unconditioned defensive behavior induced by electrical stimulation of the dPAG and IC of male Wistar rats. Spantide (100 pmol/0.2 μL, a selective NK-1 antagonist, injected into these midbrain structures had anti-aversive effects on defensive responses and distress ultrasonic vocalizations induced by stimulation of the dPAG but not of the IC. Moreover, intra-dPAG injections of spantide did not influence post-stimulation freezing or alter exploratory behavior in rats subjected to the elevated plus maze. These results suggest that NK-1 receptors are mainly involved in the mediation of defensive behavior organized in the dPAG. Dorsal periaqueductal gray-evoked post-stimulation freezing was not affected by intra-dPAG injections of spantide, suggesting that NK-1-mediated mechanisms are only involved in the output mechanisms of defensive behavior and not involved in the processing of ascending aversive information from the dPAG.

  12. Involvement of midbrain tectum neurokinin-mediated mechanisms in fear and anxiety

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brenes, J.C.; Broiz, A.C.; Bassi, G.S.; Schwarting, R.K.W.; Brandão, M.L.

    2012-01-01

    Electrical stimulation of midbrain tectum structures, particularly the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) and inferior colliculus (IC), produces defensive responses, such as freezing and escape behavior. Freezing also ensues after termination of dPAG stimulation (post-stimulation freezing). These defensive reaction responses are critically mediated by Y -aminobutyric acid and 5-hydroxytryptamine mechanisms in the midbrain tectum. Neurokinins (NKs) also play a role in the mediation of dPAG stimulation-evoked fear, but how NK receptors are involved in the global processing and expression of fear at the level of the midbrain tectum is yet unclear. The present study investigated the role of NK-1 receptors in unconditioned defensive behavior induced by electrical stimulation of the dPAG and IC of male Wistar rats. Spantide (100 pmol/0.2 µL), a selective NK-1 antagonist, injected into these midbrain structures had anti-aversive effects on defensive responses and distress ultrasonic vocalizations induced by stimulation of the dPAG but not of the IC. Moreover, intra-dPAG injections of spantide did not influence post-stimulation freezing or alter exploratory behavior in rats subjected to the elevated plus maze. These results suggest that NK-1 receptors are mainly involved in the mediation of defensive behavior organized in the dPAG. Dorsal periaqueductal gray-evoked post-stimulation freezing was not affected by intra-dPAG injections of spantide, suggesting that NK-1-mediated mechanisms are only involved in the output mechanisms of defensive behavior and not involved in the processing of ascending aversive information from the dPAG

  13. Involvement of midbrain tectum neurokinin-mediated mechanisms in fear and anxiety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brenes, J.C. [Experimental and Physiological Psychology, Philipps-University of Marburg, Marburg (Germany); Broiz, A.C.; Bassi, G.S. [Instituto de Neurociências e Comportamento, Campus USP, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Laboratório de Psicobiologia, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Schwarting, R.K.W. [Experimental and Physiological Psychology, Philipps-University of Marburg, Marburg (Germany); Brandão, M.L. [Instituto de Neurociências e Comportamento, Campus USP, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil); Laboratório de Psicobiologia, Faculdade de Filosofia, Ciências e Letras de Ribeirão Preto, Universidade de São Paulo, Ribeirão Preto, SP (Brazil)

    2012-03-09

    Electrical stimulation of midbrain tectum structures, particularly the dorsal periaqueductal gray (dPAG) and inferior colliculus (IC), produces defensive responses, such as freezing and escape behavior. Freezing also ensues after termination of dPAG stimulation (post-stimulation freezing). These defensive reaction responses are critically mediated by {sub Y}-aminobutyric acid and 5-hydroxytryptamine mechanisms in the midbrain tectum. Neurokinins (NKs) also play a role in the mediation of dPAG stimulation-evoked fear, but how NK receptors are involved in the global processing and expression of fear at the level of the midbrain tectum is yet unclear. The present study investigated the role of NK-1 receptors in unconditioned defensive behavior induced by electrical stimulation of the dPAG and IC of male Wistar rats. Spantide (100 pmol/0.2 µL), a selective NK-1 antagonist, injected into these midbrain structures had anti-aversive effects on defensive responses and distress ultrasonic vocalizations induced by stimulation of the dPAG but not of the IC. Moreover, intra-dPAG injections of spantide did not influence post-stimulation freezing or alter exploratory behavior in rats subjected to the elevated plus maze. These results suggest that NK-1 receptors are mainly involved in the mediation of defensive behavior organized in the dPAG. Dorsal periaqueductal gray-evoked post-stimulation freezing was not affected by intra-dPAG injections of spantide, suggesting that NK-1-mediated mechanisms are only involved in the output mechanisms of defensive behavior and not involved in the processing of ascending aversive information from the dPAG.

  14. Changes in intraocular pressure and anterior segment morphometry after uneventful phacoemulsification cataract surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Dooley, I

    2012-02-01

    PURPOSE: To study changes in anterior segment morphometry after uneventful phacoemulsification cataract surgery, and to investigate whether there is a relationship between any observed changes and intraocular pressure (IOP) reduction after the procedure. METHODS: The anterior chamber depth (ACD), anterior chamber volume (ACV), anterior chamber angle (ACA), central corneal thickness (CCT), and IOP were measured in 101 non-glaucomatous eyes before and after uneventful phacoemulsification cataract surgery. RESULTS: After cataract surgery, the mean ACD, ACV, and ACA values increased by 1.08 mm, 54.4 mm(3), and 13.1 degrees , respectively, and the mean IOP (corrected for CCT) decreased by 3.2 mm Hg. The predictive value of a previously described index (preoperative ACD\\/preoperative IOP (corrected for CCT) or CPD ratio) for IOP (corrected for CCT) reduction after cataract surgery was confirmed, reflected in an r(2) value of 23.3% between these two parameters (P<0.001). Other indices predictive of IOP reduction after cataract surgery were also identified, including preoperative IOP\\/preoperative ACV and preoperative IOP\\/preoperative ACA, reflected in r(2) values of 13.7 and 13.7%, respectively (P<0.001 and P<0.001, respectively). CONCLUSIONS: Our study confirms the predictive value of the CPD ratio for IOP reduction after cataract surgery, and may contribute to the decision-making process in patients with glaucoma or ocular hypertension. Furthermore, two novel indices of preoperative parameters that are predictive for IOP reduction after cataract surgery were identified, and enhance our understanding of the mechanisms underlying IOP changes after this procedure.

  15. Phytoremediation potential of the novel atrazine tolerant Lolium multiflorum and studies on the mechanisms involved

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Merini, Luciano J. [Catedra de Microbiologia Industrial y Biotecnologia, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Bobillo, Cecilia [Servicio de Huellas Digitales Geneticas, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica, Microbiologia Industrial y Biotecnologia, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Junin 956, BS As (Argentina); Cuadrado, Virginia [Catedra de Microbiologia Industrial y Biotecnologia, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina); Corach, Daniel [Servicio de Huellas Digitales Geneticas, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica, Microbiologia Industrial y Biotecnologia, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Junin 956, BS As (Argentina); Giulietti, Ana M., E-mail: agiule@ffyb.uba.a [Catedra de Microbiologia Industrial y Biotecnologia, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Argentina)

    2009-11-15

    Atrazine impact on human health and the environment have been extensively studied. Phytoremediation emerged as a low cost, environmental friendly biotechnological solution for atrazine pollution in soil and water. In vitro atrazine tolerance assays were performed and Lolium multiflorum was found as a novel tolerant species, able to germinate and grow in the presence of 1 mg kg{sup -1} of the herbicide. L. multiflorum presented 20% higher atrazine removal capacity than the natural attenuation, with high initial degradation rate in microcosms. The mechanisms involved in atrazine tolerance such as mutation in psbA gene, enzymatic detoxification via P{sub 450} or chemical hydrolysis through benzoxazinones were evaluated. It was demonstrated that atrazine tolerance is conferred by enhanced enzymatic detoxification via P{sub 450}. Due to its atrazine degradation capacity in soil and its agronomical properties, L. multiflorum is a candidate for designing phytoremediation strategies for atrazine contaminated agricultural soils, especially those involving run-off avoiding. - Finding of a novel atrazine-tolerant species, as a potential candidate for phytoremediating herbicide-contaminated agriculture soils and elucidation of the mechanisms involved in tolerance.

  16. Phytoremediation potential of the novel atrazine tolerant Lolium multiflorum and studies on the mechanisms involved

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Merini, Luciano J.; Bobillo, Cecilia; Cuadrado, Virginia; Corach, Daniel; Giulietti, Ana M.

    2009-01-01

    Atrazine impact on human health and the environment have been extensively studied. Phytoremediation emerged as a low cost, environmental friendly biotechnological solution for atrazine pollution in soil and water. In vitro atrazine tolerance assays were performed and Lolium multiflorum was found as a novel tolerant species, able to germinate and grow in the presence of 1 mg kg -1 of the herbicide. L. multiflorum presented 20% higher atrazine removal capacity than the natural attenuation, with high initial degradation rate in microcosms. The mechanisms involved in atrazine tolerance such as mutation in psbA gene, enzymatic detoxification via P 450 or chemical hydrolysis through benzoxazinones were evaluated. It was demonstrated that atrazine tolerance is conferred by enhanced enzymatic detoxification via P 450 . Due to its atrazine degradation capacity in soil and its agronomical properties, L. multiflorum is a candidate for designing phytoremediation strategies for atrazine contaminated agricultural soils, especially those involving run-off avoiding. - Finding of a novel atrazine-tolerant species, as a potential candidate for phytoremediating herbicide-contaminated agriculture soils and elucidation of the mechanisms involved in tolerance.

  17. The carbon footprint of cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morris, D S; Wright, T; Somner, J E A; Connor, A

    2013-04-01

    Climate change is predicted to be one of the largest global health threats of the 21st century. Health care itself is a large contributor to carbon emissions. Determining the carbon footprint of specific health care activities such as cataract surgery allows the assessment of associated emissions and identifies opportunities for reduction. To assess the carbon footprint of a cataract pathway in a British teaching hospital. This was a component analysis study for one patient having first eye cataract surgery in the University Hospital of Wales, Cardiff. Activity data was collected from three sectors, building and energy use, travel and procurement. Published emissions factors were applied to this data to provide figures in carbon dioxide equivalents (CO2eq). The carbon footprint for one cataract operation was 181.8 kg CO2eq. On the basis that 2230 patients were treated for cataracts during 2011 in Cardiff, this has an associated carbon footprint of 405.4 tonnes CO2eq. Building and energy use was estimated to account for 36.1% of overall emissions, travel 10.1% and procurement 53.8%, with medical equipment accounting for the most emissions at 32.6%. This is the first published carbon footprint of cataract surgery and acts as a benchmark for other studies as well as identifying areas for emissions reduction. Within the procurement sector, dialogue with industry is important to reduce the overall carbon footprint. Sustainability should be considered when cataract pathways are designed as there is potential for reduction in all sectors with the possible side effects of saving costs and improving patient care.

  18. Review of endocrine disorders associated with environmental toxicants and possible involved mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maqbool, Faheem; Mostafalou, Sara; Bahadar, Haji; Abdollahi, Mohammad

    2016-01-15

    Endocrine disrupting chemicals (EDC) are released into environment from different sources. They are mainly used in packaging industries, pesticides and food constituents. Clinical evidence, experimental models, and epidemiological studies suggest that EDC have major risks for human by targeting different organs and systems in the body. Multiple mechanisms are involved in targeting the normal system, through estrogen receptors, nuclear receptors and steroidal receptors activation. In this review, different methods by which xenobiotics stimulate signaling pathways and genetic mutation or DNA methylation have been discussed. These methods help to understand the results of xenobiotic action on the endocrine system. Endocrine disturbances in the human body result in breast cancer, ovarian problems, thyroid eruptions, testicular carcinoma, Alzheimer disease, schizophrenia, nerve damage and obesity. EDC characterize a wide class of compounds such as organochlorinated pesticides, industrial wastes, plastics and plasticizers, fuels and numerous other elements that exist in the environment or are in high use during daily life. The interactions and mechanism of toxicity in relation to human general health problems, especially endocrine disturbances with particular reference to reproductive problems, diabetes, and breast, testicular and ovarian cancers should be deeply investigated. There should also be a focus on public awareness of these EDC risks and their use in routine life. Therefore, the aim of this review is to summarize all evidence regarding different physiological disruptions in the body and possible involved mechanisms, to prove the association between endocrine disruptions and human diseases. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. A novel mechanism of P-type ATPase autoinhibition involving both termini of the protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ekberg, Kira; Palmgren, Michael; Veierskov, Bjarke

    2010-01-01

    The activity of many P-type ATPases is found to be regulated by interacting proteins or autoinhibitory elements located in N- or C-terminal extensions. An extended C terminus of fungal and plant P-type plasma membrane H+-ATPases has long been recognized to be part of a regulatory apparatus...... involving an autoinhibitory domain. Here we demonstrate that both the N and the C termini of the plant plasma membrane H+-ATPase are directly involved in controlling the pump activity state and that N-terminal displacements are coupled to secondary modifications taking place at the C-terminal end....... This identifies the first group of P-type ATPases for which both ends of the polypeptide chain constitute regulatory domains, which together contribute to the autoinhibitory apparatus. This suggests an intricate mechanism of cis-regulation with both termini of the protein communicating to obtain the necessary...

  20. Assessment of Mechanisms Involved in Antinociception Produced by the Alkaloid Caulerpine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiz Henrique Agra Cavalcante-Silva

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available In previous works we showed that oral administration of caulerpine, a bisindole alkaloid isolated from algae of the genus Caulerpa, produced antinociception when assessed in chemical and thermal models of nociception. In this study, we evaluated the possible mechanism of action of this alkaloid in mice, using the writhing test. The antinociceptive effect of caulerpine was not affected by intraperitoneal (i.p. pretreatment of mice with naloxone, flumazenil, l-arginine or atropine, thus discounting the involvement of the opioid, GABAergic, l-arginine-nitric oxide and (muscarinic cholinergic pathways, respectively. In contrast, i.p. pretreatment with yohimbine, an α2-adrenoceptor antagonist, or tropisetron, a 5-HT3 antagonist, significantly blocked caulerpine-induced antinociception. These results suggest that caulerpine exerts its antinociceptive effect in the writhing test via pathways involving α2-adrenoceptors and 5-HT3 receptors. In summary, this alkaloid could be of interest in the development of new dual-action analgesic drugs.

  1. Absorption of Carotenoids and Mechanisms Involved in Their Health-Related Properties.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cervantes-Paz, Braulio; Victoria-Campos, Claudia I; Ornelas-Paz, José de Jesús

    Carotenoids participate in the normal metabolism and function of the human body. They are involved in the prevention of several diseases, especially those related to the inflammation syndrome. Their main mechanisms of action are associated to their potent antioxidant activity and capacity to regulate the expression of specific genes and proteins. Recent findings suggest that carotenoid metabolites may explain several processes where the participation of their parent carotenoids was unclear. The health benefits of carotenoids strongly depend on their absorption and transformation during gastrointestinal digestion. The estimation of the 'bioaccessibility' of carotenoids through in vitro models have made possible the evaluation of the effect of a large number of factors on key stages of carotenoid digestion and intestinal absorption. The bioaccessibility of these compounds allows us to have a clear idea of their potential bioavailability, a term that implicitly involves the biological activity of these compounds.

  2. Antidepressants use and risk of cataract development: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yana; Dai, Qi; Zhu, Liwei; Wu, Shuangqing

    2018-02-06

    Epidemiological studies suggest that antidepressants use may increase the risk of cataract, but the results are inconclusive. We aimed to examine this association by performing a systematic review and meta-analysis. Relevant studies were identified by searching PubMed and Web of Science databases through June 2017. We included studies that reported risk estimates for the association between antidepressants use and cataract risk. A random-effects model was used to calculate the summary odds ratio (OR) with its 95% confidence interval (CI). We identified seven studies of antidepressants use and risk of cataract involving 447,672 cases and 1,510,391 controls. Overall, the combined ORs (95% CIs) of cataract for selective serotonin reuptake inhibitors (SSRIs), serotonin noradrenalin reuptake inhibitors (SNRIs), and tricyclic antidepressants (TCAs) were 1.12 (1.06-1.19), 1.13 (1.04-1.24), and 1.19 (1.11-1.28), respectively. A certain degree of heterogeneity was observed across studies (P antidepressants use and risk of cataract. Because of the heterogeneity and limited eligible studies, further prospective studies are warranted to confirm the preliminary findings of our study.

  3. Pathogenic Mechanisms Involved in the Hematological Alterations of Arenavirus-induced Hemorrhagic Fevers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto G. Pozner

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Viral hemorrhagic fevers (VHFs caused by arenaviruses are acute diseases characterized by fever, headache, general malaise, impaired cellular immunity, eventual neurologic involvement, and hemostatic alterations that may ultimately lead to shock and death. The causes of the bleeding are still poorly understood. However, it is generally accepted that these causes are associated to some degree with impaired hemostasis, endothelial cell dysfunction and low platelet counts or function. In this article, we present the current knowledge about the hematological alterations present in VHF induced by arenaviruses, including new aspects on the underlying pathogenic mechanisms.

  4. Mechanisms regulating proteostasis are involved in sympatric speciation of the blind mole rat, Spalax galili.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Karl A; Li, Kexin; Nevo, Eviatar; Buffenstein, Rochelle

    2016-01-01

    Genome-wide analysis demonstrates extensive genomic adaptive complexes involved in sympatric speciation between blind mole rats (Spalax galili) in abutting populations living in basalt and chalk soils. Among the gene ontology (GO) enrichment, musculature and metabolism stood out in basalt dwellers while nutrition and neurogenetics were highlighted in chalk residents. Measurements of mechanisms regulating protein homeostasis inspired by these GO terms suggest that at the proteomic level there is also a habitat/soil-type driven divergence with the basalt residents exhibiting higher proteasome activity whereas elevated levels of markers of autophagy are evident in the chalk inhabitants.

  5. Uptake of cataract surgery in Sava Region, Madagascar: role of cataract case finders in acceptance of cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razafinimpanana, Narivony; Nkumbe, Henry; Courtright, Paul; Lewallen, Susan

    2012-04-01

    The number of people coming for cataract surgery in Madagascar remains low and most ophthalmologists could do many more surgeries than currently done. Knowing why people identified with cataract do not accept surgery will help to design programs that use existing resources more effectively. The study was carried out in Sava Region of Madagascar. People with blinding (acceptance were proximity to hospital (people from Sambava district were twice as likely to present as people from more distant districts) and perceived price of transport and food (being higher for people not accepting). The actual price of surgery was not the main barrier to acceptance of surgery; instead it appears that distance to the hospital and the willingness to pay are important predictors. Strategies to improve uptake need to be revised in order to ensure that people have access to and use cataract surgical services.

  6. Epigenetic mechanisms in the development of memory and their involvement in certain neurological diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosales-Reynoso, M A; Ochoa-Hernández, A B; Juárez-Vázquez, C I; Barros-Núñez, P

    Today, scientists accept that the central nervous system of an adult possesses considerable morphological and functional flexibility, allowing it to perform structural remodelling processes even after the individual is fully developed and mature. In addition to the vast number of genes participating in the development of memory, different known epigenetic mechanisms are involved in normal and pathological modifications to neurons and therefore also affect the mechanisms of memory development. This study entailed a systematic review of biomedical article databases in search of genetic and epigenetic factors that participate in synaptic function and memory. The activation of gene expression in response to external stimuli also occurs in differentiated nerve cells. Neural activity induces specific forms of synaptic plasticity that permit the creation and storage of long-term memory. Epigenetic mechanisms play a key role in synaptic modification processes and in the creation and development of memory. Changes in these mechanisms result in the cognitive and memory impairment seen in neurodegenerative diseases (Alzheimer disease, Huntington disease) and in neurodevelopmental disorders (Rett syndrome, fragile X, and schizophrenia). Nevertheless, results obtained from different models are promising and point to potential treatments for some of these diseases. Copyright © 2013 Sociedad Española de Neurología. Publicado por Elsevier España, S.L.U. All rights reserved.

  7. Viral evasion mechanisms of early antiviral responses involving regulation of ubiquitin pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajsbaum, Ricardo; García-Sastre, Adolfo

    2013-08-01

    Early innate and cell-intrinsic responses are essential to protect host cells against pathogens. In turn, viruses have developed sophisticated mechanisms to establish productive infections by counteracting host innate immune responses. Increasing evidence indicates that these antiviral factors may have a dual role by directly inhibiting viral replication as well as by sensing and transmitting signals to induce antiviral cytokines. Recent studies have pointed at new, unappreciated mechanisms of viral evasion of host innate protective responses including manipulating the host ubiquitin (Ub) system. Virus-mediated inhibition of antiviral factors by Ub-dependent degradation is emerging as a crucial mechanism for evading the antiviral response. In addition, recent studies have uncovered new mechanisms by which virus-encoded proteins inhibit Ub and Ub-like (Ubl) modification of host proteins involved in innate immune signaling pathways. Here we discuss recent findings and novel strategies that viruses have developed to counteract these early innate antiviral defenses. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Pharmacological therapies for cataract and refractive errors: landscaping niches of ocular drug patenting.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucke, Hermann Am; Mucke, Peter; Mucke, Eva

    2012-05-01

    We have used a focused and comprehensive ophthalmology patent database to characterize the international patenting landscape dedicated to the pharmacological treatment of cataract, corneal opacities and dystrophies, and complicated refractive errors. A total of 201 disclosures related to cataract or corneal clouding (published between 1982 and 2011), and 99 documents (published between 1991 and 2011) related to refractive or geometry errors were identified. Current applications for the treatment or prevention of primary cataract have ceased to address diabetic cataract specifically through the inhibition of glycation-specific mechanisms. The most innovative approaches for pharmacotherapy of the lens focus on phase separation inhibitors, modulators of the TGF-β pathway, and matrix metalloproteinase inhibition. Patenting for the prevention of secondary cataracts as a delayed complication of intraocular lens insertion follows similar routes. For keratoconus, progressive myopia and Avellino corneal dystrophy, the focus remains on efficiently stabilizing the corrected shape of the cornea in the course of orthokeratology treatments. We expect future patenting in the fields of our investigation to concentrate more heavily on molecular medicine, in close lockstep with biotechnology and genetic testing.

  9. Robot-assisted simulated cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourcier, Tristan; Chammas, Jimmy; Becmeur, Pierre-Henri; Sauer, Arnaud; Gaucher, David; Liverneaux, Philippe; Marescaux, Jacques; Mutter, Didier

    2017-04-01

    To evaluate the feasibility of robot-assisted simulated cataract surgery. Institut de Recherche Contre les Cancers de l'Appareil Digestif, European Institute of Telesurgery, and Strasbourg University Hospital, Strasbourg, France. Experimental study. Cataract surgeries were performed on a Kitaro cataract wet-lab training system simultaneously using the Da Vinci Xi robotic surgical system and the Whitestar Signature phacoemulsification system. For each procedure, the duration and successful completion of the surgery with or without ocular complications were assessed. Procedures were successfully performed on 25 lens nuclei. The feasibility of robot-assisted simulated cataract surgery was confirmed. The robotic surgical system provided the intraocular dexterity and operative field visualization necessary to perform the main steps of the phacoemulsification procedure; that is, corneal incisions, capsulorhexis, grooving, cracking, quadrant removal, and irrigation/aspiration of the ophthalmic viscosurgical device (OVD). The intervention of a second surgeon was required for the intraocular injections of OVD, balanced salt solution, and intraocular lenses. The mean operative time was 26.44 minutes ± 5.15 (SD). All lens nuclei were removed. Inadvertent enlargement of the main corneal incision caused by the phaco handpiece was observed in 2 cases. Experimental robot-assisted cataract surgery was technically feasible using the new robotic surgical system combined with a phacoemulsification machine. Copyright © 2017 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Mechanisms involved in extraterritorial facial pain following cervical spinal nerve injury in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imamura Yoshiki

    2011-02-01

    mechanical allodynia and thermal hyperalgesia occur in the lateral facial skin after CNX and also suggest that ERK phosphorylation of Vc and C1-C2 neurons and astroglial cell activation are involved in orofacial extraterritorial pain following cervical nerve injury.

  11. Cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the neuroprotective effects of VEGF on motoneurons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jerònia eLladó

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF, originally described as a factor with a regulatory role in vascular growth and development, it is also known for its direct effects on neuronal cells. The discovery in the past decade that transgenic mice expressing reduced levels of VEGF developed late-onset motoneuron pathology, reminiscent of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS, opened a new field of research on this disease. VEGF has been shown to protect motoneurons from excitotoxic death, which is a relevant mechanism involved in motoneuron degeneration in ALS. Thus, VEGF delays motoneuron degeneration and increases survival in animal models of ALS. VEGF exerts its anti-excitotoxic effects on motoneurons through molecular mechanisms involving the VEGF receptor-2 resulting in the activation of the PI3-K/Akt signaling pathway, upregulation of GluR2 subunit of AMPA receptors, inhibition of p38MAPK and induction of the anti-apoptotic molecule Bcl-2. In addition, VEGF acts on astrocytes to reduce astroglial activation and to induce the release of growth factors. The potential use of VEGF as a therapeutic tool in ALS is counteracted by its vascular effects and by its short effective time frame. More studies are needed to assess the optimal isoform, route of administration and time frame for using VEGF in the treatment of ALS.

  12. Antinociceptive Activity of Methanol Extract of Muntingia calabura Leaves and the Mechanisms of Action Involved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. H. Mohd. Sani

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Muntingia calabura L. (family Elaeocarpaceae has been traditionally used to relieve various pain-related ailments. The present study aimed to determine the antinociceptive activity of methanol extract of M. calabura leaves (MEMC and to elucidate the possible mechanism of antinociception involved. The in vivo chemicals (acetic acid-induced abdominal constriction and formalin-, capsaicin-, glutamate-, serotonin-induced paw licking test and thermal (hot plate test models of nociception were used to evaluate the extract antinociceptive activity. The extract (100, 250, and 500 mg/kg was administered orally 60 min prior to subjection to the respective test. The results obtained demonstrated that MEMC produced significant (P<0.05 antinociceptive response in all the chemical- and thermal-induced nociception models, which was reversed after pretreatment with 5 mg/kg naloxone, a non-selective opioid antagonist. Furthermore, pretreatment with L-arginine (a nitric oxide (NO donor, NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl esters (L-NAME; an inhibitor of NO synthase (NOS, methylene blue (MB; an inhibitor of cyclic-guanosine monophosphate (cGMP pathway, or their combination also caused significant (P<0.05 change in the intensity of the MEMC antinociception. In conclusion, the MEMC antinociceptive activity involves activation of the peripheral and central mechanisms, and modulation via, partly, the opioid receptors and NO/cGMP pathway.

  13. Astrocytes are involved in trigeminal dynamic mechanical allodynia: potential role of D-serine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dieb, W; Hafidi, A

    2013-09-01

    Trigeminal neuropathic pain affects millions of people worldwide. Despite decades of study on the neuronal processing of pain, mechanisms underlying enhanced pain states after injury remain unclear. N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA) receptor-dependent changes play a critical role in triggering central sensitization in neuropathic pain. These receptors are regulated at the glycine site through a mandatory endogenous co-agonist D-serine, which is synthesized by astrocytes. Therefore, the present study was carried out to determine whether astrocytes are involved, through D-serine secretion, in dynamic mechanical allodynia (DMA) obtained after chronic constriction of the infraorbital nerve (CCI-IoN) in rats. Two weeks after CCI-IoN, an important reaction of astrocytes was present in the medullary dorsal horn (MDH), as revealed by an up-regulation of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) in allodynic rats. In parallel, an increase in D-serine synthesis, which co-localized with its synthesis enzyme serine racemase, was strictly observed in astrocytes. Blocking astrocyte metabolism by intracisternal delivery of fluorocitrate alleviated DMA. Furthermore, the administration of D-amino-acid oxidase (DAAO), a D-serine-degrading enzyme, or that of L-serine O-sulfate (LSOS), a serine racemase inhibitor, significantly decreased pain behavior in allodynic rats. These results demonstrate that astrocytes are involved in the modulation of orofacial post-traumatic neuropathic pain via the release of the gliotransmitter D-serine.

  14. [The denominations cataract and glaucoma].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tornquist, R

    1997-01-01

    Since ancient times a grey or white pupil in an nearly blind eye was thought to be caused by a mucous substance in front of the lens. It was called "hypochysis" or "hypochyma" in Greece and "suffusio" in Rome. Later the term "cataract" (=waterfall) was the most popular denomination. A surgical method was tried very early with usually good effect, when with a thin needle, introduced into the eye, the opaque material was removed from the pupillary area. In the middle of the 17th century more careful investigations showed that there was no membrane in front of the lens, but the lens itself was opaque. The final proof was delivered when an extraction of the lens was performed with good effect. In ancient times incurable blindness, which was called glaucoma, was thought to be located to the lens, which probably had a very important role in the seeing process. The name (of Greek orgin) is translated "green" or "blue-green", which was sometimes notified to be the color of the lens, seen through the pupil, in these cases. A period of great confusion followed when the removal of this very important part of the eye did not lead to blindness but rather an improved vision. As there were significant difficulties in identifying the specific color of the pupil the name glaucoma seemed to be very inadequate. In the beginning of the 19th century a disease entity (which is to-day called acute closed-angle glaucoma) seemed to eventually fullfill the demand of a greenlooking pupil. The most characteristic symptoms are pain and a high intraocular pressure causing a corneal edema and a change of the blackness of the pupil to hazy grey (and maybe a little green?).

  15. The Paediatric Cataract Register (PECARE): an overview of operated childhood cataract in Sweden and Denmark.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Gunilla; Haargaard, Birgitte; Basit, Saima; Lundvall, Anna; Nyström, Alf; Rosensvärd, Annika; Tornqvist, Kristina

    2018-02-01

    To report basic epidemiological data concerning surgically treated childhood cataract in Sweden and Denmark. Data were derived from the Paediatric Cataract Register (PECARE), a binational, web-based surgical register representing Sweden and Denmark. All children operated before 8 years of age between 1 January 2007 and 31 December 2013 were included. Age-specific prevalence per 100 000 population was calculated. A total 574 operations in 213 boys (51.7%) and 199 girls (48.3%), altogether 412 children, were registered, the vast majority (n = 395/412; 95.9%) being individuals with congenital/infantile cataract. Of these 412, a total of 294 (147 boys and 147 girls) were Swedish and 118 (66 boys and 52 girls) were Danish. The age-specific prevalence of operated cataract in Sweden was 31/100 000 and in Denmark 28/100 000. In 454 of 574 eyes (79.1%), the cataract was dense. Altogether, 266 of 574 (46.3%) were operated during the first year of life, 193 during the first 12 weeks representing 33.6% of all operations. A primary intraocular lens (IOL) implantation was done in altogether 411 of 574 eyes (71,6%). In total, 210 unilateral cataract operations (210/574; 36.6%) were performed. Persistent fetal vasculature (PFV) was present in 64 of 193 (33.1%) of those with a congenital unilateral cataract. In 84 individuals (84/395; 21.3%) with congenital or infantile cataract, a coexisting disorder was found. The age-specific binational prevalence of operated congenital/infantile cataract in Sweden and Denmark is 30/100 000. About half of the operations are performed within the first year of life, one-third within the first 3 months. In our study population, a primary IOL was implanted in the majority of cases. © 2017 Acta Ophthalmologica Scandinavica Foundation. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  16. Possible mechanisms involved in the vasorelaxant effect produced by clobenzorex in aortic segments of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lozano-Cuenca, J; González-Hernández, A; López-Canales, O A; Villagrana-Zesati, J R; Rodríguez-Choreão, J D; Morín-Zaragoza, R; Castillo-Henkel, E F; López-Canales, J S

    2017-08-07

    Clobenzorex is a metabolic precursor of amphetamine indicated for the treatment of obesity. Amphetamines have been involved with cardiovascular side effects such as hypertension and pulmonary arterial hypertension. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the direct application of 10-9-10-5 M clobenzorex on isolated phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings produces vascular effects, and if so, what mechanisms may be involved. Clobenzorex produced an immediate concentration-dependent vasorelaxant effect at the higher concentrations (10-7.5-10-5 M). The present outcome was not modified by 10-6 M atropine (an antagonist of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors), 3.1×10-7 M glibenclamide (an ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker), 10-3 M 4-aminopyridine (4-AP; a voltage-activated K+ channel blocker), 10-5 M indomethacin (a prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor), 10-5 M clotrimazole (a cytochrome P450 inhibitor) or 10-5 M cycloheximide (a general protein synthesis inhibitor). Contrarily, the clobenzorex-induced vasorelaxation was significantly attenuated (Pclobenzorex on phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings involved stimulation of the NO/cGMP/PKG/Ca2+-activated K+ channel pathway.

  17. Space radiation and cataracts in astronauts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Manuel, F. K.; Jones, J.; Iszard, G.; Murrey, J.; Djojonegro, B.; Wear, M.

    2001-01-01

    For over 30 years, astronauts in Earth orbit or on missions to the moon have been exposed to space radiation comprised of high-energy protons and heavy ions and secondary particles produced in collisions with spacecraft and tissue. Large uncertainties exist in the projection of risks of late effects from space radiation such as cancer and cataracts due to the paucity [corrected] of epidemiological data. Here we present epidemiological [corrected] data linking an increased risk of cataracts for astronauts with higher lens doses (>8 mSv) of space radiation relative to other astronauts with lower lens doses (astronauts participating in NASA's Longitudinal Study of Astronaut Health (LSAH) and individual occupational radiation exposure data. These results, while preliminary because of the use of subjective scoring methods, suggest that relatively low doses of space radiation may predispose crew to [corrected] an increased incidence and early appearance of cataracts.

  18. Routine preoperative medical testing for cataract surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keay, Lisa; Lindsley, Kristina; Tielsch, James; Katz, Joanne; Schein, Oliver

    2014-01-01

    Background Cataract surgery is practiced widely and substantial resources are committed to an increasing cataract surgical rate in developing countries. With the current volume of cataract surgery and the increases in the future, it is critical to optimize the safety and cost-effectiveness of this procedure. Most cataracts are performed on older individuals with correspondingly high systemic and ocular comorbidities. It is likely that routine preoperative medical testing will detect medical conditions, but it is questionable whether these conditions should preclude individuals from cataract surgery or change their perioperative management. Objectives (1) To investigate the evidence for reductions in adverse events through preoperative medical testing, and (2) to estimate the average cost of performing routine medical testing. Search methods We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (The Cochrane Library 2011, Issue 12), MEDLINE (January 1950 to December 2011), EMBASE (January 1980 to December 2011), Latin American and Caribbean Literature on Health Sciences (LILACS) (January 1982 to December 2011), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov) and the WHO International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). There were no date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. The electronic databases were last searched on 9 December 2011. We used reference lists and the Science Citation Index to search for additional studies. Selection criteria We included randomized clinical trials in which routine preoperative medical testing was compared to no preoperative or selective preoperative testing prior to age-related cataract surgery. Data collection and analysis Two review authors independently assessed abstracts to identify possible trials for inclusion. For each included study, two review authors

  19. Anaesthesia for paediatric cataracts in developing countries - a ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Paediatric cataracts are now the leading cause of treatable childhood blindness in developing countries. Cataract in children is typically removed under general anaesthesia. To provide an overview of methods of anaesthesia for paediatric cataracts in resource-limited countries. We conducted a systematic literature review ...

  20. functional and psychological outcome of cataract surgeries in platea

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Perpetua

    the quality of life for many cataract-blind patients. Key words: cataract, blindness, outcome, Plateau State. INTRODUCTION. Up to 75% of blindness worldwide is a result of five preventable and treatable conditions. Cataract, an avoidable. 1 cause of blindness, is the leading cause of blindness and low vision worldwide.

  1. Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome and possibly causing cortical cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Heid Rocha Hemerly

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available According to the World Health Organization, cataract is the leading cause of blindness and visual impairment throughout the world. However, the etiology of cataracts often remains unknown. This report describes the development of cortical cataract in a patient after Parinaud's oculoglandular syndrome caused by the fungus Sporothrix schenckii.

  2. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation in human cataractous lens epithelium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasavada Abhay

    1993-01-01

    Full Text Available The anterior lens epithelial cells undergo a variety of degenerative and proliferative changes during cataract formation. Acid phosphatase is primarily responsible for tissue regeneration and tissue repair. The lipid hydroperoxides that are obtained by lipid peroxidation of polysaturated or unsaturated fatty acids bring about deterioration of biological membranes at cellular and tissue levels. Acid phosphatase and lipid peroxidation activities were studied on the lens epithelial cells of nuclear cataract, posterior subcapsular cataract, mature cataract, and mixed cataract. Of these, mature cataractous lens epithelium showed maximum activity for acid phosphatase (516.83 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and maximum levels of lipid peroxidation (86.29 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. In contrast, mixed cataractous lens epithelium showed minimum activity of acid phosphatase (222.61 moles of p-nitrophenol released/g lens epithelium and minimum levels of lipid peroxidation (54.23 O.D./min/g lens epithelium. From our study, we correlated the maximum activity of acid phosphatase in mature cataractous lens epithelium with the increased areas of superimposed cells associated with the formation of mature cataract. Likewise, the maximum levels of lipid peroxidation in mature cataractous lens epithelium was correlated with increased permeability of the plasma membrane. Conversely, the minimum levels of lipid peroxidation in mixed cataractous lens epithelium makes us presume that factors other than lipid peroxidation may also account for the formation of mixed type of cataract.

  3. Isomerization of aspartyl residues in crystallins and its influence upon cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujii, Noriko; Takata, Takumi; Fujii, Norihiko; Aki, Kenzo

    2016-01-01

    Age-related cataracts, which probably form due to insolubilization of lens proteins, can lead to loss of vision. Although the exact reason is unknown, lens protein aggregation may be triggered by increases in PTMs such as D-β-, L-β- and D-α-Asp isomers. These isomers have been observed in aged lens; however, there have been few quantitative and site-specific studies owing to the lack of a quick and precise method for distinguishing between D- and L-Asp in a peptide or protein. We describe a new method for detecting peptides containing Asp isomers at individual sites in any protein by using an LC-MS/MS system combined with commercial enzymes that specifically react with different isomers. We also summarize current data on the effect of Asp isomerization on lens crystallins. The new technique enabled the analysis of isomers of Asp residues in lens proteins precisely and quickly. An extensive proportion of Asp isomerization was observed at all Asp sites of crystallins in the insoluble fraction of aged lens. In addition, d-amino acid substitutions in crystallin-mimic peptides showed altered structural formation and function. These results indicate that isomerization of Asp residues affects the stability, structure and inter-subunit interaction of lens crystallins, which will induce crystallin aggregation and insolubilization, disrupt the associated functions, and ultimately contribute to the onset of senile cataract formation. The mechanism underlying the onset of age-related diseases may involve isomerization, whereby D-amino acids are incorporated in the L-amino acid world of life. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Crystallin Biochemistry in Health and Disease. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  4. Cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the establishment of HIV-1 latency

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    Donahue Daniel A

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Latently infected cells represent the major barrier to either a sterilizing or a functional HIV-1 cure. Multiple approaches to reactivation and depletion of the latent reservoir have been attempted clinically, but full depletion of this compartment remains a long-term goal. Compared to the mechanisms involved in the maintenance of HIV-1 latency and the pathways leading to viral reactivation, less is known about the establishment of latent infection. This review focuses on how HIV-1 latency is established at the cellular and molecular levels. We first discuss how latent infection can be established following infection of an activated CD4 T-cell that undergoes a transition to a resting memory state and also how direct infection of a resting CD4 T-cell can lead to latency. Various animal, primary cell, and cell line models also provide insights into this process and are discussed with respect to the routes of infection that result in latency. A number of molecular mechanisms that are active at both transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels have been associated with HIV-1 latency. Many, but not all of these, help to drive the establishment of latent infection, and we review the evidence in favor of or against each mechanism specifically with regard to the establishment of latency. We also discuss the role of immediate silent integration of viral DNA versus silencing of initially active infections. Finally, we discuss potential approaches aimed at limiting the establishment of latent infection.

  5. An overview of potential molecular mechanisms involved in VSMC phenotypic modulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ming-Jie; Zhou, Yi; Chen, Lei; Wang, Yan-Qin; Wang, Xu; Pi, Yan; Gao, Chang-Yue; Li, Jing-Cheng; Zhang, Li-Li

    2016-02-01

    The fully differentiated medial vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) of mature vessels keep quiescent and contractile. However, VSMC can exhibit the plasticity in phenotype switching from a differentiated and contractile phenotype to a dedifferentiated state in response to alterations in local environmental cues, which is called phenotypic modulation or switching. Distinguishing from its differentiated state expressing more smooth muscle (SM)-specific/selective proteins, the phenotypic modulation in VSMC is characterized by an increased rate of proliferation, migration, synthesis of extracellular matrix proteins and decreased expression of SM contractile proteins. Although it has been well demonstrated that phenotypic modulation of VSMC contributes to the occurrence and progression of many proliferative vascular diseases, little is known about the details of the molecular mechanisms of VSMC phenotypic modulation. Growing evidence suggests that variety of molecules including microRNAs, cytokines and biochemical factors, membrane receptors, ion channels, cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix play important roles in controlling VSMC phenotype. The focus of the present review is to provide an overview of potential molecular mechanisms involved in VSMC phenotypic modulation in recent years. To clarify VSMC differentiation and phenotypic modulation mechanisms will contribute to producing cell-based therapeutic interventions for aberrant VSMC differentiation-related diseases.

  6. Outsourced cataract surgery and postoperative endophthalmitis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Solborg Bjerrum, Søren; Kiilgaard, Jens F; Mikkelsen, Kim Lyngby

    2013-01-01

    To compare the risk of postoperative endophthalmitis (PE) after cataract surgery at eye departments in public hospitals and private hospitals/eye clinics and to evaluate if the Danish National Patient Registry (NPR) is a reliable database to monitor the PE risk.......To compare the risk of postoperative endophthalmitis (PE) after cataract surgery at eye departments in public hospitals and private hospitals/eye clinics and to evaluate if the Danish National Patient Registry (NPR) is a reliable database to monitor the PE risk....

  7. Peptide Bond Synthesis by a Mechanism Involving an Enzymatic Reaction and a Subsequent Chemical Reaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abe, Tomoko; Hashimoto, Yoshiteru; Zhuang, Ye; Ge, Yin; Kumano, Takuto; Kobayashi, Michihiko

    2016-01-22

    We recently reported that an amide bond is unexpectedly formed by an acyl-CoA synthetase (which catalyzes the formation of a carbon-sulfur bond) when a suitable acid and l-cysteine are used as substrates. DltA, which is homologous to the adenylation domain of nonribosomal peptide synthetase, belongs to the same superfamily of adenylate-forming enzymes, which includes many kinds of enzymes, including the acyl-CoA synthetases. Here, we demonstrate that DltA synthesizes not only N-(d-alanyl)-l-cysteine (a dipeptide) but also various oligopeptides. We propose that this enzyme catalyzes peptide synthesis by the following unprecedented mechanism: (i) the formation of S-acyl-l-cysteine as an intermediate via its "enzymatic activity" and (ii) subsequent "chemical" S → N acyl transfer in the intermediate, resulting in peptide formation. Step ii is identical to the corresponding reaction in native chemical ligation, a method of chemical peptide synthesis, whereas step i is not. To the best of our knowledge, our discovery of this peptide synthesis mechanism involving an enzymatic reaction and a subsequent chemical reaction is the first such one to be reported. This new process yields peptides without the use of a thioesterified fragment, which is required in native chemical ligation. Together with these findings, the same mechanism-dependent formation of N-acyl compounds by other members of the above-mentioned superfamily demonstrated that all members most likely form peptide/amide compounds by using this novel mechanism. Each member enzyme acts on a specific substrate; thus, not only the corresponding peptides but also new types of amide compounds can be formed. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  8. Coral bleaching under thermal stress: putative involvement of host/symbiont recognition mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tambutte Sylvie

    2009-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Coral bleaching can be defined as the loss of symbiotic zooxanthellae and/or their photosynthetic pigments from their cnidarian host. This major disturbance of reef ecosystems is principally induced by increases in water temperature. Since the beginning of the 1980s and the onset of global climate change, this phenomenon has been occurring at increasing rates and scales, and with increasing severity. Several studies have been undertaken in the last few years to better understand the cellular and molecular mechanisms of coral bleaching but the jigsaw puzzle is far from being complete, especially concerning the early events leading to symbiosis breakdown. The aim of the present study was to find molecular actors involved early in the mechanism leading to symbiosis collapse. Results In our experimental procedure, one set of Pocillopora damicornis nubbins was subjected to a gradual increase of water temperature from 28°C to 32°C over 15 days. A second control set kept at constant temperature (28°C. The differentially expressed mRNA between the stressed states (sampled just before the onset of bleaching and the non stressed states (control were isolated by Suppression Subtractive Hybridization. Transcription rates of the most interesting genes (considering their putative function were quantified by Q-RT-PCR, which revealed a significant decrease in transcription of two candidates six days before bleaching. RACE-PCR experiments showed that one of them (PdC-Lectin contained a C-Type-Lectin domain specific for mannose. Immunolocalisation demonstrated that this host gene mediates molecular interactions between the host and the symbionts suggesting a putative role in zooxanthellae acquisition and/or sequestration. The second gene corresponds to a gene putatively involved in calcification processes (Pdcyst-rich. Its down-regulation could reflect a trade-off mechanism leading to the arrest of the mineralization process under stress

  9. A novel frameshift mutation in CX46 associated with hereditary dominant cataracts in a Chinese family

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    Xiu-Kun Cui

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To investigate the genetic mutations that are associated the hereditary autosomal dominant cataract in a Chinese family. METHODS: A Chinese family consisting of 20 cataract patients (including 9 male and 11 female and 2 unaffected individuals from 5 generations were diagnosed to be a typical autosomal dominant cataract pedigree. Genomic DNA samples were extracted from the peripheral blood cells of the participants in this pedigree. Exon sequence was used for genetic mutation screening. In silico analysis was used to study the structure characteristics of connexin 46 (CX46 mutant. Immunoblotting was conduceted for testing the expression of CX46. RESULTS: To determine the involved genetic mutations, 11 well-known cataract-associated genes (cryaa, cryab, crybb1, crybb2, crygc, crygd, Gja3, Gja8, Hsf4, Mip and Pitx3 were chosen for genetic mutation test by using exon sequencing. A novel cytosine insertion at position 1195 of CX46 cDNA (c.1194_1195ins C was found in the samples of 5 tested cataract patients but not in the unaffected 2 individuals nor in normal controls, which resulted in 30 amino acids more extension in CX46C-terminus (cx46fs400 compared with the wild-type CX46. In silico protein structure analysis indicated that the mutant showed distinctive hydrophobicity and protein secondary structure compared with the wild-type CX46. The immunoblot results revealed that CX46 protein, which expressed in the aging cataract lens tissues, was absence in the proband lens. In contrast, CX50, alpha A-crystallin and alphaB-crystallin expressed equally in both proband and aging cataract tissues. Those results revealed that the cx46fs400 mutation could impair CX46 protein expression. CONCLUSION: The insertion of cytosine at position 1195 of CX46 cDNA is a novel mutation site that is associated with the autosomal dominant cataracts in this Chinese family. The C-terminal frameshift mutation is involved in regulating CX46 protein expression.

  10. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in the Antitumor Activity of Cannabinoids on Gliomas: Role for Oxidative Stress

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    Massi, Paola [Department of Pharmacology, Chemotherapy and Toxicology, University of Milan, Via Vanvitelli 32, 20129 Milan (Italy); Valenti, Marta; Solinas, Marta; Parolaro, Daniela, E-mail: daniela.parolaro@uninsubria.it [Department of Structural and Functional Biology, Section of Pharmacology, Center of Neuroscience, University of Insubria, Via A. da Giussano 10, 20152 Busto Arsizio, Varese (Italy)

    2010-05-26

    Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa, have been shown to exert antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects on a wide spectrum of tumor cells and tissues. Of interest, cannabinoids have displayed great potency in reducing the growth of glioma tumors, one of the most aggressive CNS tumors, either in vitro or in animal experimental models curbing the growth of xenografts generated by subcutaneous or intrathecal injection of glioma cells in immune-deficient mice. Cannabinoids appear to be selective antitumoral agents as they kill glioma cells without affecting the viability of non-transformed cells. This review will summarize the anti-cancer properties that cannabinoids exert on gliomas and discuss their potential action mechanisms that appear complex, involving modulation of multiple key cell signaling pathways and induction of oxidative stress in glioma cells.

  11. [Immune mechanisms involved in the development and eradication of anti-factor VIII alloantibodies in hemophilia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishiguro, Akira

    2011-01-01

    Hemophilia A is an X-linked hereditary bleeding disorder caused by a congenital deficiency in blood coagulation factor VIII (FVIII). Therapy to prevent or treat bleeding is replacement of FVIII. The most significant complication of treatment in patients with hemophilia A is the development of alloantibodies that inhibit FVIII activity, termed inhibitors. In the presence of inhibitors, replacement of the missing clotting factor with FVIII preparations becomes less effective. Once replacement therapy is ineffective, morbidity increases. It remains unsolved to prevent inhibitor formation. The only strategy is long-term administration of a large quantity of FVIII in an attempt to eradicate the inhibitors through immune tolerance. However, little is known about the mechanisms involved in the induction of tolerance. This review will focus on the current understanding of why inhibitors develop and can be eradicated. The development of inhibitors by intravenous infusions of FVIII without adjuvant poses an intriguing challenge to immunologists.

  12. Understanding the neural mechanisms involved in sensory control of voice production.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parkinson, Amy L; Flagmeier, Sabina G; Manes, Jordan L; Larson, Charles R; Rogers, Bill; Robin, Donald A

    2012-05-15

    Auditory feedback is important for the control of voice fundamental frequency (F0). In the present study we used neuroimaging to identify regions of the brain responsible for sensory control of the voice. We used a pitch-shift paradigm where subjects respond to an alteration, or shift, of voice pitch auditory feedback with a reflexive change in F0. To determine the neural substrates involved in these audio-vocal responses, subjects underwent fMRI scanning while vocalizing with or without pitch-shifted feedback. The comparison of shifted and unshifted vocalization revealed activation bilaterally in the superior temporal gyrus (STG) in response to the pitch shifted feedback. We hypothesize that the STG activity is related to error detection by auditory error cells located in the superior temporal cortex and efference copy mechanisms whereby this region is responsible for the coding of a mismatch between actual and predicted voice F0. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  13. Afferent control mechanisms involved in the development of soleus fiber alterations in simulated hypogravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenkman, B. S.; Nemirovskaya, T. L.; Shapovalova, K. B.; Podlubnaya, Z. A.; Vikhliantsev, I. M.; Moukhina, A. M.; Kozlovskaya, I. B.

    2007-02-01

    It was recently established that support withdrawal (withdrawal of support reaction force) in microgravity provokes a sequence of functional shifts in the activity of motor units (inactivation of slow ones) and peripheral muscle apparatus which lead to the decline of postural muscle contractility and alterations in fiber characteristics. However, mechanisms involved in inactivation of the slow motor units and appropriate slow-twitch muscle fiber disuse under the supportless conditions remained unknown. We show here that artificial inactivation of muscles-antagonists (which are known to be hyperactive during unloading) counteracts some of the unloading-induced events in the rat soleus (fiber size reduction, slow-to-fast fiber-type transition and decline of titin and nebulin content). It was also demonstrated that direct activation of the muscarinic receptors of the neostriatum neurons prevented slow-to-fast fiber-type transformation in soleus of hindlimb suspended rats.

  14. Molecular Mechanisms Involved in the Antitumor Activity of Cannabinoids on Gliomas: Role for Oxidative Stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Massi, Paola; Valenti, Marta; Solinas, Marta; Parolaro, Daniela

    2010-01-01

    Cannabinoids, the active components of Cannabis sativa, have been shown to exert antiproliferative and proapoptotic effects on a wide spectrum of tumor cells and tissues. Of interest, cannabinoids have displayed great potency in reducing the growth of glioma tumors, one of the most aggressive CNS tumors, either in vitro or in animal experimental models curbing the growth of xenografts generated by subcutaneous or intrathecal injection of glioma cells in immune-deficient mice. Cannabinoids appear to be selective antitumoral agents as they kill glioma cells without affecting the viability of non-transformed cells. This review will summarize the anti-cancer properties that cannabinoids exert on gliomas and discuss their potential action mechanisms that appear complex, involving modulation of multiple key cell signaling pathways and induction of oxidative stress in glioma cells

  15. Rose hip exerts antidiabetic effects via a mechanism involving downregulation of the hepatic lipogenic program.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Ulrika; Henriksson, Emma; Ström, Kristoffer; Alenfall, Jan; Göransson, Olga; Holm, Cecilia

    2011-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the metabolic effects of a dietary supplement of powdered rose hip to C57BL/6J mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD). Two different study protocols were used; rose hip was fed together with HFD to lean mice for 20 wk (prevention study) and to obese mice for 10 wk (intervention study). Parameters related to obesity and glucose tolerance were monitored, and livers were examined for lipids and expression of genes and proteins related to lipid metabolism and gluconeogenesis. A supplement of rose hip was capable of both preventing and reversing the increase in body weight and body fat mass imposed by a HFD in the C57BL/6J mouse. Oral and intravenous glucose tolerance tests together with lower basal levels of insulin and glucose showed improved glucose tolerance in mice fed a supplement of rose hip compared with control mice. Hepatic lipid accumulation was reduced in mice fed rose hip compared with control, and the expression of lipogenic proteins was downregulated, whereas AMP-activated protein kinase and other proteins involved in fatty acid oxidation were unaltered. Rose hip intake lowered total plasma cholesterol as well as the low-density lipoprotein-to-high-density lipoprotein ratio via a mechanism not involving altered gene expression of sterol regulatory element-binding protein 2 or 3-hydroxymethylglutaryl-CoA reductase. Taken together, these data show that a dietary supplement of rose hip prevents the development of a diabetic state in the C57BL/6J mouse and that downregulation of the hepatic lipogenic program appears to be at least one mechanism underlying the antidiabetic effect of rose hip.

  16. Cellular mechanisms involved in CO(2) and acid signaling in chemosensitive neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Putnam, Robert W; Filosa, Jessica A; Ritucci, Nicola A

    2004-12-01

    An increase in CO(2)/H(+) is a major stimulus for increased ventilation and is sensed by specialized brain stem neurons called central chemosensitive neurons. These neurons appear to be spread among numerous brain stem regions, and neurons from different regions have different levels of chemosensitivity. Early studies implicated changes of pH as playing a role in chemosensitive signaling, most likely by inhibiting a K(+) channel, depolarizing chemosensitive neurons, and thereby increasing their firing rate. Considerable progress has been made over the past decade in understanding the cellular mechanisms of chemosensitive signaling using reduced preparations. Recent evidence has pointed to an important role of changes of intracellular pH in the response of central chemosensitive neurons to increased CO(2)/H(+) levels. The signaling mechanisms for chemosensitivity may also involve changes of extracellular pH, intracellular Ca(2+), gap junctions, oxidative stress, glial cells, bicarbonate, CO(2), and neurotransmitters. The normal target for these signals is generally believed to be a K(+) channel, although it is likely that many K(+) channels as well as Ca(2+) channels are involved as targets of chemosensitive signals. The results of studies of cellular signaling in central chemosensitive neurons are compared with results in other CO(2)- and/or H(+)-sensitive cells, including peripheral chemoreceptors (carotid body glomus cells), invertebrate central chemoreceptors, avian intrapulmonary chemoreceptors, acid-sensitive taste receptor cells on the tongue, and pain-sensitive nociceptors. A multiple factors model is proposed for central chemosensitive neurons in which multiple signals that affect multiple ion channel targets result in the final neuronal response to changes in CO(2)/H(+).

  17. Metabolism and serum levels of tryptophan in senile cataract patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, C; Angi, M R; De Carli, M; Vanzan, S; Allegri, G

    1982-03-30

    In order to clarify the role of tryptophan in the patogenesis of senile cataract, we have studied the serum total and free levels of tryptophan in cataract patients as compared with age and sex-matched controls, and the urinary excretion of 10 metabolites after oral load of the amino acid. This excretion increases in the cataract group both as total per cent and as kynurenine. No difference has been found in the free and total serum tryptophan between normal subjects and cataract patients. A possible role of the kynurenines in the pathogenesis of senile cataract is suggested.

  18. Molecular characterization of HIV-1 subtype C gp-120 regions potentially involved in virus adaptive mechanisms.

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    Alessandra Cenci

    Full Text Available The role of variable regions of HIV-1 gp120 in immune escape of HIV has been investigated. However, there is scant information on how conserved gp120 regions contribute to virus escaping. Here we have studied how molecular sequence characteristics of conserved C3, C4 and V3 regions of clade C HIV-1 gp120 that are involved in HIV entry and are target of the immune response, are modulated during the disease course. We found an increase of "shifting" putative N-glycosylation sites (PNGSs in the α2 helix (in C3 and in C4 and an increase of sites under positive selection pressure in the α2 helix during the chronic stage of disease. These sites are close to CD4 and to co-receptor binding sites. We also found a negative correlation between electric charges of C3 and V4 during the late stage of disease counteracted by a positive correlation of electric charges of α2 helix and V5 during the same stage. These data allow us to hypothesize possible mechanisms of virus escape involving constant and variable regions of gp120. In particular, new mutations, including new PNGSs occurring near the CD4 and CCR5 binding sites could potentially affect receptor binding affinity and shield the virus from the immune response.

  19. A possible new mechanism involved in ferro-cyanide metabolism by plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xiao-Zhang; Li, Fan; Li, Kun

    2011-09-01

    Ferro-cyanide is one of the commonly found species at cyanide-contaminated soils and groundwater. Unlike botanical metabolism of KCN via the β-cyanoalanine pathway, processes involved in the plant-mediated assimilation of ferro-cyanide are still unclear. The objective of this study was to investigate a possible mechanism involved in uptake and assimilation of ferro-cyanide by plants. Detached roots of plants were exposed to ferro-cyanide in a closed-dark hydroponic system amended with HgCl(2), AgNO(3), LaCl(3), tetraethylammonium chloride (TEACl), or Na(3)VO(4), respectively, at 25 ± 0.5°C for 24 h. Total CN, free CN(-), and dissolved Fe(2+) were analyzed spectrophotometrically. Activity of β-cyanoalanine synthase involved in cyanide assimilation was also assayed using detached roots of plants in vivo. Dissociation of ferro-cyanide [Fe(II)(CN)(6)](-4) to free CN(-) and Fe(2+) in solution was negligible. The applied inhibitors did not show any significant impact on the uptake of ferro-cyanide by soybean (Glycine max L. cv. JD 1) and hybrid willows (Salix matsudana Koidz × alba L.; p > 0.05), but rice (Oryza sativa L. cv. JY 98) was more susceptible to the inhibitors compared with the controls (p ferro-cyanide by soybean, hybrid willows, and maize (Zea mays L. cv. PA 78; p ferro-cyanide was observed compared with the control without any cyanides (p > 0.05), whereas roots exposed to KCN showed a considerable increase in enzyme activity (p ferro-cyanide. Ferro-cyanide is likely metabolized by plants directly through an unknown pathway rather than the β-cyanoalanine pathway.

  20. Possible mechanisms involved in the vasorelaxant effect produced by clobenzorex in aortic segments of rats

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    J. Lozano-Cuenca

    Full Text Available Clobenzorex is a metabolic precursor of amphetamine indicated for the treatment of obesity. Amphetamines have been involved with cardiovascular side effects such as hypertension and pulmonary arterial hypertension. The aim of the present study was to investigate whether the direct application of 10–9–10–5 M clobenzorex on isolated phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings produces vascular effects, and if so, what mechanisms may be involved. Clobenzorex produced an immediate concentration-dependent vasorelaxant effect at the higher concentrations (10–7.5–10–5 M. The present outcome was not modified by 10–6 M atropine (an antagonist of muscarinic acetylcholine receptors, 3.1×10–7 M glibenclamide (an ATP-sensitive K+ channel blocker, 10–3 M 4-aminopyridine (4-AP; a voltage-activated K+ channel blocker, 10–5 M indomethacin (a prostaglandin synthesis inhibitor, 10–5 M clotrimazole (a cytochrome P450 inhibitor or 10–5 M cycloheximide (a general protein synthesis inhibitor. Contrarily, the clobenzorex-induced vasorelaxation was significantly attenuated (P<0.05 by 10–5 M L-NAME (a direct inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, 10–7 M ODQ (an inhibitor of nitric oxide-sensitive guanylyl cyclase, 10–6 M KT 5823 (an inhibitor of protein kinase G, 10–2 M TEA (a Ca2+-activated K+ channel blocker and non-specific voltage-activated K+ channel blocker and 10–7 M apamin plus 10–7 M charybdotoxin (blockers of small- and large-conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channels, respectively, and was blocked by 8×10–2 M potassium (a high concentration and removal of the vascular endothelium. These results suggest that the direct vasorelaxant effect by clobenzorex on phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings involved stimulation of the NO/cGMP/PKG/Ca2+-activated K+ channel pathway.

  1. A non-cardiomyocyte autonomous mechanism of cardioprotection involving the SLO1 BK channel

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    Andrew P. Wojtovich

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Opening of BK-type Ca2+ activated K+ channels protects the heart against ischemia-reperfusion (IR injury. However, the location of BK channels responsible for cardioprotection is debated. Herein we confirmed that openers of the SLO1 BK channel, NS1619 and NS11021, were protective in a mouse perfused heart model of IR injury. As anticipated, deletion of the Slo1 gene blocked this protection. However, in an isolated cardiomyocyte model of IR injury, protection by NS1619 and NS11021 was insensitive to Slo1 deletion. These data suggest that protection in intact hearts occurs by a non-cardiomyocyte autonomous, SLO1-dependent, mechanism. In this regard, an in-situ assay of intrinsic cardiac neuronal function (tachycardic response to nicotine revealed that NS1619 preserved cardiac neurons following IR injury. Furthermore, blockade of synaptic transmission by hexamethonium suppressed cardioprotection by NS1619 in intact hearts. These results suggest that opening SLO1 protects the heart during IR injury, via a mechanism that involves intrinsic cardiac neurons. Cardiac neuronal ion channels may be useful therapeutic targets for eliciting cardioprotection.

  2. Propagation of an Aβ Dodecamer Strain Involves a Three-Step Mechanism and a Key Intermediate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dean, Dexter N; Rana, Pratip; Campbell, Ryan P; Ghosh, Preetam; Rangachari, Vijayaraghavan

    2018-02-06

    Proteinaceous deposits composed of fibrillar amyloid-β (Aβ) are the primary neuropathological hallmarks in Alzheimer disease (AD) brains. The nucleation-dependent aggregation of Aβ is a stochastic process with frequently observed heterogeneity in aggregate size, structure, and conformation that manifests in fibril polymorphism. Emerging evidence indicates that polymorphic variations in Aβ fibrils contribute to phenotypic diversity and the rate of disease progression in AD. We recently demonstrated that a dodecamer strain derived from synthetic Aβ42 propagates to morphologically distinct fibrils and selectively induces cerebral amyloid angiopathy phenotype in transgenic mice. This report supports the growing contention that stable oligomer strains can influence phenotypic outcomes by faithful propagation of their structures. Although we determined the mechanism of dodecamer propagation on a mesoscopic scale, the molecular details of the microscopic reactions remained unknown. Here, we have dissected and evaluated individually the kinetics of macroscopic phases in aggregation to gain insight into the process of strain propagation. The bulk rates determined experimentally in each phase were used to build an ensemble kinetic simulation model, which confirmed our observation that dodecamer seeds initially grow by monomer addition toward the formation of a key intermediate. This is followed by conversion of the intermediate to fibrils by oligomer elongation and association mechanisms. Overall, this report reveals important insights into the molecular details of oligomer strain propagation involved in AD pathology. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. A cascade of recently discovered molecular mechanisms involved in abiotic stress tolerance of plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saeed, Muhammad; Dahab, Abdel hafiz Adam; Wangzhen, Guo; Tianzhen, Zhang

    2012-04-01

    Today, agriculture is facing a tremendous threat from the climate change menace. As human survival is dependent on a constant supply of food from plants as the primary producers, we must aware of the underlying molecular mechanisms that plants have acquired as a result of molecular evolution to cope this rapidly changing environment. This understanding will help us in designing programs aimed at developing crop plant cultivars best suited to our needs of a sustainable agriculture. The field of systems biology is rapidly progressing, and new insight is coming out about the molecular mechanisms involved in abiotic stress tolerance. There is a cascade of changes in transcriptome, proteome, and metabolome of plants during these stress responses. We have tried to cover most pronounced recent developments in the field of "omics" related to abiotic stress tolerance of plants. These changes are very coordinated, and often there is crosstalk between different components of stress tolerance. The functions of various molecular entities are becoming more clear and being associated with more precise biological phenomenon.

  4. Protein Machineries Involved in the Attachment of Heme to Cytochrome c: Protein Structures and Molecular Mechanisms

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    Carlo Travaglini-Allocatelli

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cytochromes c (Cyt c are ubiquitous heme-containing proteins, mainly involved in electron transfer processes, whose structure and functions have been and still are intensely studied. Surprisingly, our understanding of the molecular mechanism whereby the heme group is covalently attached to the apoprotein (apoCyt in the cell is still largely unknown. This posttranslational process, known as Cyt c biogenesis or Cyt c maturation, ensures the stereospecific formation of the thioether bonds between the heme vinyl groups and the cysteine thiols of the apoCyt heme binding motif. To accomplish this task, prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells have evolved distinctive protein machineries composed of different proteins. In this review, the structural and functional properties of the main maturation apparatuses found in gram-negative and gram-positive bacteria and in the mitochondria of eukaryotic cells will be presented, dissecting the Cyt c maturation process into three functional steps: (i heme translocation and delivery, (ii apoCyt thioreductive pathway, and (iii apoCyt chaperoning and heme ligation. Moreover, current hypotheses and open questions about the molecular mechanisms of each of the three steps will be discussed, with special attention to System I, the maturation apparatus found in gram-negative bacteria.

  5. Senescence as a novel mechanism involved in β-adrenergic receptor mediated cardiac hypertrophy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Rongrong; Zhu, Baoling; Sun, Yan; Shi, Dandan; Chen, Li; Zhang, Youyi; Li, Zijian; Xue, Lixiang

    2017-01-01

    Pathological cardiac hypertrophy used to be elucidated by biomechanical, stretch-sensitive or neurohumoral mechanisms. However, a series of hints have indicated that hypertrophy process simulates senescence program. However, further evidence need to be pursued. To verify this hypothesis and examine whether cardiac senescence is a novel mechanism of hypertrophy induced by isoproterenol, 2-month-old male Sprague Dawley rats were subjected to isoproterenol infusion (0.25mg/kg/day) for 7 days by subcutaneous injection). Key characteristics of senescence (senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, lipofuscin, expression of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors) were examined in cardiac hypertrophy model. Senescence-like phenotype, such as increased senescence-associated β-galactosidase activity, accumulation of lipofuscin and high levels of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (e.g. p16, p19, p21 and p53) was found along the process of cardiac hypertrophy. Cardiac-specific transcription factor GATA4 increased in isoproterenol-treated cardiomyocytes as well. We further found that myocardial hypertrophy could be inhibited by resveratrol, an anti-aging compound, in a dose-dependent manner. Our results showed for the first time that cardiac senescence is involved in the process of pathological cardiac hypertrophy induced by isoproterenol. PMID:28783759

  6. A host defense mechanism involving CFTR-mediated bicarbonate secretion in bacterial prostatitis.

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    Chen Xie

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Prostatitis is associated with a characteristic increase in prostatic fluid pH; however, the underlying mechanism and its physiological significance have not been elucidated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this study a primary culture of rat prostatic epithelial cells and a rat prostatitis model were used. Here we reported the involvement of CFTR, a cAMP-activated anion channel conducting both Cl(- and HCO(3(-, in mediating prostate HCO(3(- secretion and its possible role in bacterial killing. Upon Escherichia coli (E. coli-LPS challenge, the expression of CFTR and carbonic anhydrase II (CA II, along with several pro-inflammatory cytokines was up-regulated in the primary culture of rat prostate epithelial cells. Inhibiting CFTR function in vitro or in vivo resulted in reduced bacterial killing by prostate epithelial cells or the prostate. High HCO(3(- content (>50 mM, rather than alkaline pH, was found to be responsible for bacterial killing. The direct action of HCO(3(- on bacterial killing was confirmed by its ability to increase cAMP production and suppress bacterial initiation factors in E. coli. The relevance of the CFTR-mediated HCO(3(- secretion in humans was demonstrated by the upregulated expression of CFTR and CAII in human prostatitis tissues. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The CFTR and its mediated HCO(3(- secretion may be up-regulated in prostatitis as a host defense mechanism.

  7. The prevalence of alcohol misuse in patients undergoing cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, A R; Wilkins, M; Dew, T; Sherwood, R; Coakes, R; Peters, T J

    1998-04-01

    If a factor could be identified which delayed the onset of cataract by 10 years, the number of annual cataract operations worldwide has been estimated to decrease by 45%. A case-control study compared alcohol consumption in 78 patients attending for routine cataract surgery in South East London with data from a large population-based survey. Male cataract patients had a significantly greater risk of being harmful drinkers (odds ratio = 8, p = 0.007) than the controls. The harmful male drinkers were significantly younger than the non-drinkers with cataract (mean difference 15 years, p < 0.007). Female cataract patients were not more likely to be excessive drinkers than controls. The female drinkers with cataract were of a similar age to the non-drinking female patients with cataract. Haematological and biochemical indices of alcohol toxicity indicated five patients who were likely to be harmful drinkers, but who had denied this on direct questioning. Seven (26%) of the male patients had a low serum 25 hydroxycholecalciferol although the levels were normal in the female patients. These results support the view that excess alcohol consumption is related to cataract formation and suggest that alcohol causes premature cataract formation in male, but not female patients. Alcohol consumption is amenable to intervention and suggests that such intervention could have a significant impact on the need for cataract surgery.

  8. Multiple mechanisms involved in the large-spectrum therapeutic potential of cannabidiol in psychiatric disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campos, Alline Cristina; Moreira, Fabricio Araújo; Gomes, Felipe Villela; Del Bel, Elaine Aparecida; Guimarães, Francisco Silveira

    2012-01-01

    Cannabidiol (CBD) is a major phytocannabinoid present in the Cannabis sativa plant. It lacks the psychotomimetic and other psychotropic effects that the main plant compound Δ9-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) being able, on the contrary, to antagonize these effects. This property, together with its safety profile, was an initial stimulus for the investigation of CBD pharmacological properties. It is now clear that CBD has therapeutic potential over a wide range of non-psychiatric and psychiatric disorders such as anxiety, depression and psychosis. Although the pharmacological effects of CBD in different biological systems have been extensively investigated by in vitro studies, the mechanisms responsible for its therapeutic potential are still not clear. Here, we review recent in vivo studies indicating that these mechanisms are not unitary but rather depend on the behavioural response being measured. Acute anxiolytic and antidepressant-like effects seem to rely mainly on facilitation of 5-HT1A-mediated neurotransmission in key brain areas related to defensive responses, including the dorsal periaqueductal grey, bed nucleus of the stria terminalis and medial prefrontal cortex. Other effects, such as anti-compulsive, increased extinction and impaired reconsolidation of aversive memories, and facilitation of adult hippocampal neurogenesis could depend on potentiation of anandamide-mediated neurotransmission. Finally, activation of TRPV1 channels may help us to explain the antipsychotic effect and the bell-shaped dose-response curves commonly observed with CBD. Considering its safety profile and wide range of therapeutic potential, however, further studies are needed to investigate the involvement of other possible mechanisms (e.g. inhibition of adenosine uptake, inverse agonism at CB2 receptor, CB1 receptor antagonism, GPR55 antagonism, PPARγ receptors agonism, intracellular (Ca2+) increase, etc.), on CBD behavioural effects. PMID:23108553

  9. Endoplasmic reticulum quality control is involved in the mechanism of endoglin-mediated hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ali, Bassam R; Ben-Rebeh, Imen; John, Anne; Akawi, Nadia A; Milhem, Reham M; Al-Shehhi, Nouf A; Al-Ameri, Mouza M; Al-Shamisi, Shamma A; Al-Gazali, Lihadh

    2011-01-01

    Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT) is an autosomal dominant genetic condition affecting the vascular system and is characterised by epistaxis, arteriovenous malformations and mucocutaneous and gastrointestinal telangiectases. This disorder affects approximately 1 in 8,000 people worldwide. Significant morbidity is associated with this condition in affected individuals, and anaemia can be a consequence of repeated haemorrhages from telangiectasia in the gut and nose. In the majority of the cases reported, the condition is caused by mutations in either ACVRL1 or endoglin genes, which encode components of the TGF-beta signalling pathway. Numerous missense mutations in endoglin have been reported as causative defects for HHT but the exact underlying cellular mechanisms caused by these mutations have not been fully established despite data supporting a role for the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) quality control machinery. For this reason, we examined the subcellular trafficking of twenty-five endoglin disease-causing missense mutations. The mutant proteins were expressed in HeLa and HEK293 cell lines, and their subcellular localizations were established by confocal fluorescence microscopy alongside the analysis of their N-glycosylation profiles. ER quality control was found to be responsible in eight (L32R, V49F, C53R, V125D, A160D, P165L, I271N and A308D) out of eleven mutants located on the orphan extracellular domain in addition to two (C363Y and C382W) out of thirteen mutants in the Zona Pellucida (ZP) domain. In addition, a single intracellular domain missense mutant was examined and found to traffic predominantly to the plasma membrane. These findings support the notion of the involvement of the ER's quality control in the mechanism of a significant number, but not all, missense endoglin mutants found in HHT type 1 patients. Other mechanisms including loss of interactions with signalling partners as well as adverse effects on functional residues are likely

  10. Mechanism of oxidative stress involved in the toxicity of ZnO nanoparticles against eukaryotic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Saliani

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available ZnO NPs (zinc oxide nanoparticles has generated significant scientific interest as a novel antibacterial and anticancer agent. Since oxidative stress is a critical determinant of ZnO NPs-induced damage, it is necessary to characterize their underlying mode of action. Different structural and physicochemical properties of ZnO NPs such as particle surface, size, shape, crystal structure, chemical position, and presence of metals can lead to changes in biological activities including ROS (reactive oxygen species production. However, there are some inconsistencies in the literature on the relation between the physicochemical features of ZnO NPs and their plausible oxidative stress mechanism. Herein, the possible oxidative stress mechanism of ZnO NPs was reviewed. This is worthy of further detailed evaluations in order to improve our understanding of vital NPs characteristics governing their toxicity. Therefore, this study focuses on the different reported oxidative stress paradigms induced by ZnO NPs including ROS generated by NPs, oxidative stress due to the NPs-cell interaction, and role of the particle dissolution in the oxidative damage. Also, this study tries to characterize and understand the multiple pathways involved in oxidative stress induced by ZnO NPs. Knowledge about different cellular signaling cascades stimulated by ZnO NPs lead to the better interpretation of the toxic influences induced by the cellular and acellular parameters. Regarding the potential benefits of toxic effects of ZnO NPs, in-depth evaluation of their toxicity mechanism and various effects of these nanoparticles would facilitate their implementation for biomedical applications.

  11. Cataract surgery following KAMRA presbyopic implant

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tan TE

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Tien-En Tan,1,2 Jodhbir S Mehta2–4 1Yong Loo Lin School of Medicine, National University of Singapore, Singapore; 2Singapore National Eye Centre, Singapore; 3Singapore Eye Research Institute, Singapore; 4Department of Clinical Sciences, Duke-NUS Graduate Medical School, Singapore Abstract: Intrastromal corneal inlays are an emerging treatment for presbyopic patients. The KAMRA™ small aperture inlay was the first such inlay to receive Conformité Européenne (CE marking in 2005. It has been shown to improve uncorrected near and intermediate visual acuity without adversely affecting uncorrected distance visual acuity. Due to the age of presbyopic patients, they may eventually develop cataracts. In two such cases, we found that cataract surgery with the KAMRA implant left in place was not technically more difficult, and that the surgical procedure could be improved by additional ocular rotations to improve visualization. Biometry readings were reliable, and it appeared that the SRK/T formula was accurate for calculation of intraocular lens power. Cataract surgery with the KAMRA implant left in situ is a viable option for patients. Keywords: cataract surgery, KAMRA, corneal inlay, AcuTarget, presbyopia

  12. impairs gap junction function causing congenital cataract

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Navya

    2017-03-24

    Mar 24, 2017 ... Connexin 46 (Cx46) is important for gap junction channels formation which plays crucial role in the preservation of lens homeostasis and transparency. Previously, we have identified a missense mutation. (p.V44M) of Cx46 in a congenital cataract family. This study aims at dissecting the potential.

  13. Economic Constraints in Managing Complicated Cataracts

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    intraocular pressures. While it is a standard practice to request for an ocular ultrasound scan in patients with traumatic cataracts when the fundus cannot be seen, the rationale is to determine the possible cause of visual loss and give the patient an idea of visual prognosis before surgery. However, where there is no hope of.

  14. Cataract-free interval and severity of cataract after total body irradiation and bone marrow transplantation: influence of treatment parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kempen-Harteveld, M. Loes van; Struikmans, Henk; Kal, Henk B.; Tweel, Ingeborg van der; Mourits, Maarten; Verdonck, Leo F.; Schipper, Jan; Battermann, Jan J.

    2000-01-01

    Purpose: To determine prospectively the cataract-free interval (latency time) after total body irradiation (TBI) and bone marrow transplantation (BMT) and to assess accurately the final severity of the cataract. Methods and Materials: Ninety-three of the patients who received TBI as a part of their conditioning regimen for BMT between 1982 and 1995 were followed with respect to cataract formation. Included were only patients who had a follow-up period of at least 23 months. TBI was applied in one fraction of 8 Gy or two fractions of 5 or 6 Gy. Cataract-free period was assessed and in 56 patients, who could be followed until stabilization of the cataract had occurred, final severity of the cataract was determined using a classification system. With respect to final severity, two groups were analyzed: subclinical low-grade cataract and high-grade cataract. Cataract-free period and final severity were determined with respect to type of transplantation, TBI dose, and posttransplant variables such as graft versus host disease (GVHD) and steroid treatment. Results: Cataract incidence of the analyzed patients was 89%. Median time to develop a cataract was 58 months for autologous transplanted patients. For allogeneic transplanted patients treated or not treated with steroids, median times were 33 and 46 months, respectively. Final severity was not significantly different for autologous or allogeneic patients. In allogeneic patients, however, final severity was significantly different for patients who had or had not been treated with steroids for GVHD: 93% versus 35% high-grade cataract, respectively. Final severity was also different for patients receiving 1 x 8 or 2 x 5 Gy TBI, from patients receiving 2 x 6 Gy as conditioning therapy: 33% versus 79% high-grade cataract, respectively. The group of patients receiving 2 x 6 Gy comprised, however, more patients with steroid treatment for GVHD. So the high percentage of high-grade cataract in the 2 x 6 Gy group might also

  15. Cataract surgery practices in the United States Veterans Health Administration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Havnaer, Annika G; Greenberg, Paul B; Cockerham, Glenn C; Clark, Melissa A; Chomsky, Amy

    2017-04-01

    To describe current cataract surgery practices within the United States Veterans Health Administration (VHA). Veterans Health Administration hospitals in the U.S. Retrospective data analysis. An initial e-mail containing a link to an anonymous 32-question survey of cataract surgery practices was sent to participants in May 2016. Two reminder e-mails were sent to nonresponders 1 week and 2 weeks after the initial survey was sent; the remaining nonresponders were called twice over a 2-week period. The data were analyzed using descriptive statistics. The response rate was 75% (67/89). Cataract surgeons routinely ordered preoperative testing in 29 (45%) of 65 sections and preoperative consultations in 26 (39%) of 66 sections. In 22 (33%) of 66 sections, cataract surgeons administered intracameral antibiotics. In 61 (92%) of 66 sections, cataract surgeons used toric intraocular lenses (IOLs). In 20 (30%) of 66 sections, cataract surgeons used multifocal IOLs. Cataract surgeons in 6 (9%) of 66 sections performed femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery. In 6 (9%) of 66 sections, cataract surgeons performed immediate sequential bilateral cataract surgery. Forty-nine (74%) ophthalmology chiefs reported a high level of satisfaction with Veterans Affairs ophthalmology. The survey results indicate that in cataract surgery in the VHA, routine preoperative testing is commonly performed and emerging practices, such as femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery and immediate sequential bilateral cataract surgery, have limited roles. The results of this survey could benchmark future trends in U.S. cataract surgery practices, especially in teaching hospital settings. Copyright © 2017 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Orbital cellulits following cataract surgery under peribulbar anaesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mukherjee, Chandoshi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available [english] Introduction: Orbital cellulits following cataract surgery is extremely rare. We describe a case of orbital and facial cellulitis that occurred after routine cataract operation with peribulbar anaesthesia. There were no preoperative systemic or ocular risk factors for postoperative infection. Case description: An 89-year-old man presented to eye casualty, the day after he underwent an uneventful phacoemulsification and posterior chamber lens implantation in the left eye under peribulabr anaesthesia, with soreness, swelling and reduced visual acuity (6/18 in the operated eye. On initial presentation periorbital swelling was noted, the eye was minimally tender, intraocular pressure was raised at 28 mHg and fundoscopy was limited due to a hazy cornea. The patient was discharged on topical medication with a diagnosis of allergic reaction to postoperative drops.The following day, the patient re-presented with worsening orbital swelling involving the left cheek. Ocular findings remained unchanged. CT scan revealed left orbit soft tissue swelling and a locule of air medial to the medial rectus. There were no signs of sinus infection or periosteal inflammation. A diagnosis of left orbital and facial cellulitis was made and the patient was treated with intravenous antibiotics.Discussion: Our patient did not have any predisposing risk factors, therefore most likely cause of cellulitis is surgical trauma during administration of the peribulbar block. This case illustrates the need for adequate skin preparation before the administration of peribulbar anaesthesia and minimal tissue trauma during the procedure.

  17. Mechanisms involved in calcium oxalate endocytosis by Madin-Darby canine kidney cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A.H. Campos

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Calcium oxalate (CaOx crystals adhere to and are internalized by tubular renal cells and it seems that this interaction is related (positively or negatively to the appearance of urinary calculi. The present study analyzes a series of mechanisms possibly involved in CaOx uptake by Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK cells. CaOx crystals were added to MDCK cell cultures and endocytosis was evaluated by polarized light microscopy. This process was inhibited by an increase in intracellular calcium by means of ionomycin (100 nM; N = 6; 43.9% inhibition; P<0.001 or thapsigargin (1 µM; N = 6; 33.3% inhibition; P<0.005 administration, and via blockade of cytoskeleton assembly by the addition of colchicine (10 µM; N = 8; 46.1% inhibition; P<0.001 or cytochalasin B (10 µM; N = 8; 34.2% inhibition; P<0.001. Furthermore, CaOx uptake was reduced when the activity of protein kinase C was inhibited by staurosporine (10 nM; N = 6; 44% inhibition; P<0.01, or that of cyclo-oxygenase by indomethacin (3 µM; N = 12; 17.2% inhibition; P<0.05; however, the uptake was unaffected by modulation of potassium channel activity with glibenclamide (3 µM; N = 6, tetraethylammonium (1 mM; N = 6 or cromakalim (1 µM; N = 6. Taken together, these data indicate that the process of CaOx internalization by renal tubular cells is similar to the endocytosis reported for other systems. These findings may be relevant to cellular phenomena involved in early stages of the formation of renal stones.

  18. Chronic alcohol exposure inhibits biotin uptake by pancreatic acinar cells: possible involvement of epigenetic mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Padmanabhan; Kapadia, Rubina; Biswas, Arundhati; Said, Hamid M

    2014-11-01

    Chronic exposure to alcohol affects different physiological aspects of pancreatic acinar cells (PAC), but its effect on the uptake process of biotin is not known. We addressed this issue using mouse-derived pancreatic acinar 266-6 cells chronically exposed to alcohol and wild-type and transgenic mice (carrying the human SLC5A6 5'-promoter) fed alcohol chronically. First we established that biotin uptake by PAC is Na(+) dependent and carrier mediated and involves sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT). Chronic exposure of 266-6 cells to alcohol led to a significant inhibition in biotin uptake, expression of SMVT protein, and mRNA as well as in the activity of the SLC5A6 promoter. Similarly, chronic alcohol feeding of wild-type and transgenic mice carrying the SLC5A6 promoter led to a significant inhibition in biotin uptake by PAC, as well as in the expression of SMVT protein and mRNA and the activity of the SLC5A6 promoters expressed in the transgenic mice. We also found that chronic alcohol feeding of mice is associated with a significant increase in the methylation status of CpG islands predicted to be in the mouse Slc5a6 promoters and a decrease in the level of expression of transcription factor KLF-4, which plays an important role in regulating SLC5A6 promoter activity. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that chronic alcohol exposure negatively impacts biotin uptake in PAC and that this effect is exerted (at least in part) at the level of transcription of the SLC5A6 gene and may involve epigenetic/molecular mechanisms. Copyright © 2014 the American Physiological Society.

  19. Development of neurodevelopmental disorders: a regulatory mechanism involving bromodomain-containing proteins

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    Li Junlin

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Neurodevelopmental disorders are classified as diseases that cause abnormal functions of the brain or central nervous system. Children with neurodevelopmental disorders show impaired language and speech abilities, learning and memory damage, and poor motor skills. However, we still know very little about the molecular etiology of these disorders. Recent evidence implicates the bromodomain-containing proteins (BCPs in the initiation and development of neurodevelopmental disorders. BCPs have a particular domain, the bromodomain (Brd, which was originally identified as specifically binding acetyl-lysine residues at the N-terminus of histone proteins in vitro and in vivo. Other domains of BCPs are responsible for binding partner proteins to form regulatory complexes. Once these complexes are assembled, BCPs alter chromosomal states and regulate gene expression. Some BCP complexes bind nucleosomes, are involved in basal transcription regulation, and influence the transcription of many genes. However, most BCPs are involved in targeting. For example, some BCPs function as a recruitment platform or scaffold through their Brds-binding targeting sites. Others are recruited to form a complex to bind the targeting sites of their partners. The regulation mediated by these proteins is especially critical during normal and abnormal development. Mutant BCPs or dysfunctional BCP-containing complexes are implicated in the initiation and development of neurodevelopmental disorders. However, the pathogenic molecular mechanisms are not fully understood. In this review, we focus on the roles of regulatory BCPs associated with neurodevelopmental disorders, including mental retardation, Fragile X syndrome (FRX, Williams syndrome (WS, Rett syndrome and Rubinstein-Taybi syndrome (RTS. A better understanding of the molecular pathogenesis, based upon the roles of BCPs, will lead to screening of targets for the treatment of neurodevelopmental disorders.

  20. Involvement of metabolites in early defense mechanism of oil palm (Elaeis guineensis Jacq.) against Ganoderma disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nusaibah, S A; Siti Nor Akmar, A; Idris, A S; Sariah, M; Mohamad Pauzi, Z

    2016-12-01

    Understanding the mechanism of interaction between the oil palm and its key pathogen, Ganoderma spp. is crucial as the disease caused by this fungal pathogen leads to a major loss of revenue in leading palm oil producing countries in Southeast Asia. Here in this study, we assess the morphological and biochemical changes in Ganoderma disease infected oil palm seedling roots in both resistant and susceptible progenies. Rubber woodblocks fully colonized by G. boninense were applied as a source of inoculum to artificially infect the roots of resistant and susceptible oil palm progenies. Gas chromatography-mass spectrometry was used to measure an array of plant metabolites in 100 resistant and susceptible oil palm seedling roots treated with pathogenic Ganoderma boninense fungus. Statistical effects, univariate and multivariate analyses were used to identify key-Ganoderma disease associated metabolic agitations in both resistant and susceptible oil palm root tissues. Ganoderma disease related defense shifts were characterized based on (i) increased antifungal activity in crude extracts, (ii) increased lipid levels, beta- and gamma-sitosterol particularly in the resistant progeny, (iii) detection of heterocyclic aromatic organic compounds, benzo [h] quinoline, pyridine, pyrimidine (iv) elevation in antioxidants, alpha- and beta-tocopherol (iv) degraded cortical cell wall layers, possibly resulting from fungal hydrolytic enzyme activity needed for initial penetration. The present study suggested that plant metabolites mainly lipids and heterocyclic aromatic organic metabolites could be potentially involved in early oil palm defense mechanism against G. boninense infection, which may also highlight biomarkers for disease detection, treatment, development of resistant variety and monitoring. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  1. Neural Correlates of Successful and Unsuccessful Strategical Mechanisms Involved in Uncertain Decision-Making.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julie Giustiniani

    Full Text Available The ability to develop successful long-term strategies in uncertain situations relies on complex neural mechanisms. Although lesion studies have shown some of the mechanisms involved, it is still unknown why some healthy subjects are able to make the right decision whereas others are not. The aim of our study was to investigate neurophysiological differences underlying this ability to develop a successful strategy in a group of healthy subjects playing a monetary card game called the Iowa Gambling Task (IGT. In this task, subjects have to win and earn money by choosing between four decks of cards, two were advantageous in the long term and two disadvantageous. Twenty healthy right-handed subjects performed the IGT while their cerebral activity was recorded by electroencephalography. Based on their behavioral performances, two groups of subjects could clearly be distinguished: one who selected the good decks and thus succeeded in developing a Favorable strategy (9 subjects and one who remained Undecided (11 subjects. No neural difference was found between each group before the selection of a deck, but in both groups a greater negativity was found emerging from the right superior frontal gyrus 600 ms before a disadvantageous selection. During the processing of the feedback, an attenuation of the P200 and P300 waveforms was found for the Undecided group, and a P300 originating from the medial frontal gyrus was found in response to a loss only in the Favorable group. Our results suggest that undecided subjects are hyposensitive to the valence of the cards during gambling, which affects the feedback processing.

  2. Multiple mechanisms involved in diabetes protection by lipopolysaccharide in non-obese diabetic mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jun; Cao, Hui; Wang, Hongjie; Yin, Guoxiao; Du, Jiao; Xia, Fei; Lu, Jingli; Xiang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation has been proposed to be important for islet cell inflammation and eventually β cell loss in the course of type 1 diabetes (T1D) development. However, according to the “hygiene hypothesis”, bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an agonist on TLR4, inhibits T1D progression. Here we investigated possible mechanisms for the protective effect of LPS on T1D development in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. We found that LPS administration to NOD mice during the prediabetic state neither prevented nor reversed insulitis, but delayed the onset and decreased the incidence of diabetes, and that a multiple-injection protocol is more effective than a single LPS intervention. Further, LPS administration suppressed spleen T lymphocyte proliferation, increased the generation of CD4 + CD25 + Foxp3 + regulatory T cells (Tregs), reduced the synthesis of strong Th1 proinflammatory cytokines, and downregulated TLR4 and its downstream MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. Most importantly, multiple injections of LPS induced a potential tolerogenic dendritic cell (DC) subset with low TLR4 expression without influencing the DC phenotype. Explanting DCs from repeated LPS-treated NOD mice into NOD/SCID diabetic mice conferred sustained protective effects against the progression of diabetes in the recipients. Overall, these results suggest that multiple mechanisms are involved in the protective effects of LPS against the development of diabetes in NOD diabetic mice. These include Treg induction, down-regulation of TLR4 and its downstream MyD88-dependent signaling pathway, and the emergence of a potential tolerogenic DC subset. - Highlights: • Administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) prevented type 1 diabetes in NOD mice. • Downregulating TLR4 level and MyD88-dependent pathway contributed to protection of LPS. • LPS administration also hampered DC maturation and promoted Treg differentiation

  3. Multiple mechanisms involved in diabetes protection by lipopolysaccharide in non-obese diabetic mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jun [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Department of Pharmacology, College of Medicine, Wuhan University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Cao, Hui [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Wang, Hongjie [Section of Neurobiology, Torrey Pines Institute for Molecular Studies, Port Saint Lucie, FL (United States); Yin, Guoxiao; Du, Jiao; Xia, Fei; Lu, Jingli [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China); Xiang, Ming, E-mail: xiangming@mails.tjmu.edu.cn [Department of Pharmacology, School of Pharmacy, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan (China)

    2015-06-15

    Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) activation has been proposed to be important for islet cell inflammation and eventually β cell loss in the course of type 1 diabetes (T1D) development. However, according to the “hygiene hypothesis”, bacterial endotoxin lipopolysaccharide (LPS), an agonist on TLR4, inhibits T1D progression. Here we investigated possible mechanisms for the protective effect of LPS on T1D development in non-obese diabetic (NOD) mice. We found that LPS administration to NOD mice during the prediabetic state neither prevented nor reversed insulitis, but delayed the onset and decreased the incidence of diabetes, and that a multiple-injection protocol is more effective than a single LPS intervention. Further, LPS administration suppressed spleen T lymphocyte proliferation, increased the generation of CD4{sup +}CD25{sup +}Foxp3{sup +} regulatory T cells (Tregs), reduced the synthesis of strong Th1 proinflammatory cytokines, and downregulated TLR4 and its downstream MyD88-dependent signaling pathway. Most importantly, multiple injections of LPS induced a potential tolerogenic dendritic cell (DC) subset with low TLR4 expression without influencing the DC phenotype. Explanting DCs from repeated LPS-treated NOD mice into NOD/SCID diabetic mice conferred sustained protective effects against the progression of diabetes in the recipients. Overall, these results suggest that multiple mechanisms are involved in the protective effects of LPS against the development of diabetes in NOD diabetic mice. These include Treg induction, down-regulation of TLR4 and its downstream MyD88-dependent signaling pathway, and the emergence of a potential tolerogenic DC subset. - Highlights: • Administration of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) prevented type 1 diabetes in NOD mice. • Downregulating TLR4 level and MyD88-dependent pathway contributed to protection of LPS. • LPS administration also hampered DC maturation and promoted Treg differentiation.

  4. Endoplasmic reticulum quality control is involved in the mechanism of endoglin-mediated hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bassam R Ali

    Full Text Available Hereditary haemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT is an autosomal dominant genetic condition affecting the vascular system and is characterised by epistaxis, arteriovenous malformations and mucocutaneous and gastrointestinal telangiectases. This disorder affects approximately 1 in 8,000 people worldwide. Significant morbidity is associated with this condition in affected individuals, and anaemia can be a consequence of repeated haemorrhages from telangiectasia in the gut and nose. In the majority of the cases reported, the condition is caused by mutations in either ACVRL1 or endoglin genes, which encode components of the TGF-beta signalling pathway. Numerous missense mutations in endoglin have been reported as causative defects for HHT but the exact underlying cellular mechanisms caused by these mutations have not been fully established despite data supporting a role for the endoplasmic reticulum (ER quality control machinery. For this reason, we examined the subcellular trafficking of twenty-five endoglin disease-causing missense mutations. The mutant proteins were expressed in HeLa and HEK293 cell lines, and their subcellular localizations were established by confocal fluorescence microscopy alongside the analysis of their N-glycosylation profiles. ER quality control was found to be responsible in eight (L32R, V49F, C53R, V125D, A160D, P165L, I271N and A308D out of eleven mutants located on the orphan extracellular domain in addition to two (C363Y and C382W out of thirteen mutants in the Zona Pellucida (ZP domain. In addition, a single intracellular domain missense mutant was examined and found to traffic predominantly to the plasma membrane. These findings support the notion of the involvement of the ER's quality control in the mechanism of a significant number, but not all, missense endoglin mutants found in HHT type 1 patients. Other mechanisms including loss of interactions with signalling partners as well as adverse effects on functional

  5. Study of Possible Mechanisms Involved in the Inhibitory Effects of Coumarin Derivatives on Neutrophil Activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drábiková, Katarína; Perečko, Tomáš; Nosál', Radomír; Harmatha, Juraj; Šmidrkal, Jan; Jančinová, Viera

    2013-01-01

    To specify the site of action of the synthetic coumarin derivatives 7-hydroxy-3-(4′-hydroxyphenyl) coumarin (HHC) and 7-hydroxy-3-(4′-hydroxyphenyl) dihydrocoumarin (HHDC), we evaluated their effects on extra- and intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation in phorbol-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) stimulated human neutrophils. We studied also the effects of HHC and HHDC on possible molecular mechanisms which participate in the activation of NADPH oxidase, that is, on PKC activity, on phosphorylation of some PKC isoforms (α, βII, and δ), and on phosphorylation of the NADPH oxidase subunit p40phox. Without affecting cytotoxicity, both coumarines tested were effective inhibitors/scavengers of ROS produced by neutrophils on extracellular level. HHC markedly diminished oxidant production and also, intracellularly, decreased PKC activity and partly phosphorylation of PKCα, βII. On the other hand, we did not observe any effect of coumarin derivatives on phosphorylation of PKCδ and on phosphorylation of the NADPH oxidase subunit p40phox, which were suggested to be involved in the PMA-dependent intracellular activation process. In agreement with our previous findings, we assume that the different molecular structures of HHC and HHDC with their different physicochemical and free radical scavenging characteristics are responsible for their diverse effects on the parameters tested. PMID:24349608

  6. Mechanisms and secondary factors involved in the induction of radiation transformation in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Little, J.B.

    1983-01-01

    The long term of this research program was to gain information concerning the mechanisms that determine the carcinogenic effects of ionizing radiation, particularly high LET radiation exposure. The experimental approach involves parallel studies of the induction of malignant transformation in BALB/3T3 cells and of specific gene mutations in human lymphoblastoid cells. Emphasis was on the biologic effects of internally incorporated Auger electron emitting radionuclides and the initiation of studies to determine the effects of low dose-rate neutron exposure. Auger electron irradiation sever as a model for high LET-type radiation effects and as an experimental tool for studying the effects of radiation at specific sites within the cell. Auger-emitting radiosotopes are commonly used in clinical nuclear medicine, rendering them a potential hazard to human populations. We examined the influence of cellular localization of Auger-emitting radionuclides and the spectrum of energy distribution in DNA on their mutagenic, cytogenetic, and transformational effects. The effects of 125 I (an energetic beta emitter) were compared. We studied the induction of cytogenetic changes by 125 I exposure of the cell membrane, as well as its potential to promote (enhance) transformation initiated by low dose external x-ray exposure. We will investigate the Relative Biological Effectiveness for mutagenesis and transformation of low doses of fast neutrons delivered continuously at variable low dose-rates. 34 refs., 1 tab

  7. Involvement of Sodium Nitroprusside (SNP in the Mechanism That Delays Stem Bending of Different Gerbera Cultivars

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aung H. Naing

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Longevity of cut flowers of many gerbera cultivars (Gerbera jamesonii is typically short because of stem bending; hence, stem bending that occurs during the early vase life period is a major problem in gerbera. Here, we investigated the effects of sodium nitroprusside (SNP on the delay of stem bending in the gerbera cultivars, Alliance, Rosalin, and Bintang, by examining relative fresh weight, bacterial density in the vase solution, transcriptional analysis of a lignin biosynthesis gene, antioxidant activity, and xylem blockage. All three gerbera cultivars responded to SNP by delaying stem bending, compared to the controls; however, the responses were dose- and cultivar-dependent. Among the treatments, SNP at 20 mg L-1 was the best to delay stem bending in Alliance, while dosages of 10 and 5 mg L-1 were the best for Rosalin and Bintang, respectively. However, stem bending in Alliance and Rosalin was faster than in Bintang, indicating a discrepancy influenced by genotype. According to our analysis of the role of SNP in the delay of stem bending, the results revealed that SNP treatment inhibited bacterial growth and xylem blockage, enhanced expression levels of a lignin biosynthesis gene, and maintained antioxidant activities. Therefore, it is suggested that the cause of stem bending is associated with the above-mentioned parameters and SNP is involved in the mechanism that delays stem bending in the different gerbera cultivars.

  8. Mechanisms involved in alleviation of intestinal inflammation by bifidobacterium breve soluble factors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elise Heuvelin

    Full Text Available OBJECTIVES: Soluble factors released by Bifidobacterium breve C50 (Bb alleviate the secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by immune cells, but their effect on intestinal epithelium remains elusive. To decipher the mechanisms accounting for the cross-talk between bacteria/soluble factors and intestinal epithelium, we measured the capacity of the bacteria, its conditioned medium (Bb-CM and other Gram(+ commensal bacteria to dampen inflammatory chemokine secretion. METHODS: TNFalpha-induced chemokine (CXCL8 secretion and alteration of NF-kappaB and AP-1 signalling pathways by Bb were studied by EMSA, confocal microscopy and western blotting. Anti-inflammatory capacity was also tested in vivo in a model of TNBS-induced colitis in mice. RESULTS: Bb and Bb-CM, but not other commensal bacteria, induced a time and dose-dependent inhibition of CXCL8 secretion by epithelial cells driven by both AP-1 and NF-kappaB transcription pathways and implying decreased phosphorylation of p38-MAPK and IkappaB-alpha molecules. In TNBS-induced colitis in mice, Bb-CM decreased the colitis score and inflammatory cytokine expression, an effect reproduced by dendritic cell conditioning with Bb-CM. CONCLUSIONS: Bb and secreted soluble factors contribute positively to intestinal homeostasis by attenuating chemokine production. The results indicate that Bb down regulate inflammation at the epithelial level by inhibiting phosphorylations involved in inflammatory processes and by protective conditioning of dendritic cells.

  9. FINANCING MECHANISMS FOR INVESTMENT PROJECTS IN THE AGRICULTURAL SECTOR OF UKRAINE'S ECONOMY INVOLVING ANGEL INVESTORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Nagachevska

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The challenges connected with attracting foreign investments into the agricultural sector of the Ukrainian economy as well as diversification of forms of international investments are actual due to the immediate needs of realization of innovative development, technological upgrading and strengthening of agricultural sector attractiveness on the world market. Current situation and problems connected with attracting foreign investments into the agricultural sector of the Ukrainian economy are revealed. It is detected that level of attracting foreign investments into the agricultural sector of Ukraine and into AIC together don't meet the needs of its innovative potential. The following factors of agricultural sector attractiveness have been considered: high soil fertility and favorable weather conditions for growing crops; export capacity; high yield of the Ukrainian farming companies; undervalued assets and low level of capitalization of agricultural companies; attractive tax regime for agricultural producers. It is recommended that agricultural producers should indicate these factors in investment proposals and projects that they present to potential international investors. State investment policy in the agricultural sector is viewed to consolidate the resource base and the sources of investment have been determined. Suggestions to expand the financing mechanisms for investment projects in the agricultural sector involving angel investors have been justified. Economic feasibility of attracting foreign investments for financing of innovation activity of farming companies has been revealed. The key requirements and main stages of investments of angel investment association have been described.

  10. Cx43, ZO-1, alpha-catenin and beta-catenin in cataractous lens

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Specimens of the anterior lens capsule with an attached monolayer of lens epithelial cells (LECs) were obtained from patients (=52) undergoing cataract surgery. Specimens were divided into three groups based on the type of cataract: nuclear cataract, cortical cataract and posterior subcapsular cataract (PSC).

  11. Cx43, ZO-1, alpha-catenin and beta-catenin in cataractous lens ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Specimens of the anterior lens capsule with an attached monolayer of lens epithelial cells (LECs) were obtained from patients (=52) undergoing cataract surgery. Specimens were divided into three groups based on the type of cataract: nuclear cataract, cortical cataract and posterior subcapsular cataract (PSC).

  12. Theater for Development Methodology in Childhood Cataract Case Finding

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    Roseline Ekanem Duke

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The key informant methodology for case finding for childhood cataract  was utilized  in a rural population in Nigeria to identify suitable children who would benefit surgically from intervene for cataract and restore vision such children. It was however noticed that some parents who had children with cataract did not bring their children to the primary health center for examination and recommendation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the benefits of using the theatre for development approach in childhood cataract case finding. The delay in identification and referral of children with cataract at an appropriate age for surgical intervention and optical rehabilitation is the main cause of poor vision following surgery for the condition as amblyopia results. Therefore early presentation, identification, referral and surgical intervention as well as appropriate optical rehabilitation is the key to successful surgical outcome of childhood cataract and good visual prognosis. The theater for development (TfD approach methodology was implemented in a community in Akpabuyo local government are of Cross River state, Nigeria as a means to enhance community participation, health promotion and education and to complement the key informant methodology in case finding for childhood cataract. Three children with cataracts were referred by the community following the TfD intervention, for cataract surgery and uptake of follow up care after surgery. The TfD approach appears to be a useful method for encouraging community participation in the case finding of childhood cataract.

  13. PROGNOSIS, PREVENTION, AND TREATMENT OF DIABETIC CATARACT SURGERY POSTOPERATIVE COMPLICATIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. A. Kovalevskaya

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. To study immune and antioxidant status of diabetic cataract patients and to assess the efficacy of preoperative preparation for diabetic cataract surgery to prevent intra- and postoperative complications and the efficacy of cataract treatment in metabolic syndrome patients. Patients and methods. 136 cataract patients (272 eyes were examined (mean age 62±3.2 years. Among these patients, women predominated (n = 74. Control group included 25 healthy volunteers (10 men and 15 women aged 32‑56 (mean age 44.3±2.4 years without ocular diseases (50 eyes. Two patient groups were examined. Group 1 included 78 patients (mean age 54±1.5 younger than 60 (52.5 % with similar lens morphological changes and metabolic disorders who were diagnosed with complicated (diabetic cataract. Group 2 included 58 patients with age-related cataract. Tear, anterior chamber (AC humor, and blood tests were performed. Immune status, lipid peroxidation parameters in tear fluid and blood, active peroxiredoxin 6 (PRDX6 and / or its breakdown fragments in tear fluid and AC humor were studied. In group 1 (age-related cataracts, somatic disorders were diagnosed in 4.5 % of cases, in group 2 (complicated cataracts, somatic disorders were diagnosed in 100 % of cases. Expression of protective enzymes against oxidative stress in tear fluid was studied. Activity of tear antioxidant enzymes under oxidative stress conditions in therapy and after cataract surgery was evaluated. Results. Postoperatively, increase in PRDX6 level was revealed in age-related cataract patients. The absence of phaco complications confirms these findings. In complicated (diabetic cataracts, PRDX6 level was 6‑times less than in age-related cataracts. Conclusions. Prophylaxis of inflammatory complications in age-related cataract patients can be performed using the following schedule: 0.5 % levofloxacin 4 times daily, bromfenac once daily. 

  14. Mechanism involved in trichloroethylene-induced liver cancer: Importance to environmental cleanup. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bull, R.J.; Miller, J.H.; Sasser, L.B.; Schultz, I.R.; Thrall, B.D.

    1998-01-01

    'The objective of this project is to develop critical data for changing risk-based clean-up standards for trichloroethylene (TCE). The project is organized around two interrelated tasks: Task 1 addresses the tumorigenic and dosimetry issues for the metabolites of TCE that produce liver cancer in mice, dichloroacetate (DCA) and trichloroacetate (TCA). Early work had suggested that TCA was primarily responsible for TCE-induced liver tumors, but several, more mechanistic observations suggest that DCA may play a prominent role. This task is aimed at determining the basis for the selection hypothesis and seeks to prove that this mode of action is responsible for TCE-induced tumors. This project will supply the basic dose-response data from which low-dose extrapolations would be made. Task 2 seeks specific evidence that TCA and DCA are capable of promoting the growth of spontaneously initiated cells from mouse liver, in vitro. The data provide the clearest evidence that both metabolites act by a mechanism of selection rather than mutation. These data are necessary to select between a linear (i.e. no threshold) and non-linear low-dose extrapolation model. As of May of 1998, this research has identified two plausible modes of action by which TCE produces liver tumors in mice. These modes of action do not require the compounds to be mutagenic. The bulk of the experimental evidence suggests that neither TCE nor the two hepatocarcinogenic metabolites of TCE are mutagenic. The results from the colony formation assay clearly establish that both of these metabolites cause colony growth from initiated cells that occur spontaneously in the liver of B 6 C 3 F 1 mice, although the phenotypes of the colonies differ in the same manner as tumors differ, in vivo. In the case of DCA, a second mechanism may occur at a lower dose involving the release of insulin. This observation is timely as it was recently reported that occupational exposures to trichloroethylene results in 2 to 4-fold

  15. Bilateral cataract formation via acute spontaneous fracture of the lens following treatment of hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yevgeniy V. Sychev

    2017-09-01

    Conclusions and importance: Acute transient cataracts that develop during correction of hyperglycemic hyperosmolar syndrome are thought to result from osmotic lens swelling. In this case report, internal fracture of the lens was produced by mechanical forces generated in the process of lens swelling occurring as a consequence of initial hyperglycemia and its subsequent correction. This case represents a rare ocular complication of hyperglycemia correction, and provides new evidence that mechanical forces can be part of diabetic cataractogenesis.

  16. Multi-stakeholder perspectives in defining health-services quality in cataract care.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stolk-Vos, Aline C; van de Klundert, Joris J; Maijers, Niels; Zijlmans, Bart L M; Busschbach, Jan J V

    2017-08-01

    To develop a method to define a multi-stakeholder perspective on health-service quality that enables the expression of differences in systematically identified stakeholders' perspectives, and to pilot the approach for cataract care. Mixed-method study between 2014 and 2015. Cataract care in the Netherlands. Stakeholder representatives. We first identified and classified stakeholders using stakeholder theory. Participants established a multi-stakeholder perspective on quality of cataract care using concept mapping, this yielded a cluster map based on multivariate statistical analyses. Consensus-based quality dimensions were subsequently defined in a plenary stakeholder session. Stakeholders and multi-stakeholder perspective on health-service quality. Our analysis identified seven definitive stakeholders, as follows: the Dutch Ophthalmology Society, ophthalmologists, general practitioners, optometrists, health insurers, hospitals and private clinics. Patients, as dependent stakeholders, were considered to lack power by other stakeholders; hence, they were not classified as definitive stakeholders. Overall, 18 stakeholders representing ophthalmologists, general practitioners, optometrists, health insurers, hospitals, private clinics, patients, patient federations and the Dutch Healthcare Institute sorted 125 systematically collected indicators into the seven following clusters: patient centeredness and accessibility, interpersonal conduct and expectations, experienced outcome, clinical outcome, process and structure, medical technical acting and safety. Importance scores from stakeholders directly involved in the cataract service delivery process correlated strongly, as did scores from stakeholders not directly involved in this process. Using a case study on cataract care, the proposed methods enable different views among stakeholders concerning quality dimensions to be systematically revealed, and the stakeholders jointly agreed on these dimensions. The methods

  17. Study of the Genes and Mechanism Involved in the Radioadaptive Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dasgupta, Pushan R.

    2009-01-01

    The radioadaptive response is a phenomenon where exposure to a prior low dose of radiation reduces the level of damage induced by a subsequent high radiation dose. The molecular mechanism behind this is still not well understood. Learning more about the radioadaptive response is critical for long duration spaceflight since astronauts are exposed to low levels of cosmic radiation. The micronucleus assay was used to measure the level of damage caused by radiation. Although cells which were not washed with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) after a low priming dose of 5cGy did not show adaptation to the challenge dose, washing the cells with PBS and giving the cells fresh media after the low dose did allow radioadaptation to occur. This is consistent with the results of a previous publication by another research group. In the present study, genes involved in DNA damage signaling and the oxidative stress response were studied using RT PCR techniques in order to look at changes in expression level after the low dose with or without washing. Our preliminary results indicate that upregulation of oxidative stress response genes ANGPTL7, NCF2, TTN, and SRXN1 may be involved in the radioadaptive response. The low dose of radiation alone was found to activate the oxidative stress response genes GPR156 and MTL5, whereas, washing the cells alone caused relatively robust upregulation of the oxidative stress response genes DUSP1 and PTGS2. Washing after the priming dose showed some changes in the expression level of several DNA damage signaling genes. In addition, we studied whether washing the cells after the priming dose has an effect on the level of nitric oxide in both the media and cells, since nitric oxide levels are known to increase in the media of the cells after a high dose of radiation only if the cells were already exposed to a low priming dose. Based on this preliminary study, we propose that washing the cells after priming exposure actually eliminates some factor

  18. The central anorexigenic mechanism of adrenocorticotropic hormone involves the caudal hypothalamus in chicks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shipp, Steven L; Yi, Jiaqing; Dridi, Sami; Gilbert, Elizabeth R; Cline, Mark A

    2015-10-01

    Adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH), consisting of 39 amino acids, is most well-known for its involvement in an organism's response to stress. It also participates in satiety, as exogenous ACTH causes decreased food intake in rats. However, its anorexigenic mechanism is not well understood in any species and its effect on appetite is not reported in the avian class. Thus, the present study was designed to evaluate central ACTH's effect on food intake and to elucidate the mechanism mediating this response using broiler chicks. Chicks that received intracerebroventricular (ICV) injection of 1, 2, or 4 nmol of ACTH reduced food intake, under both ad libitum and 180 min fasted conditions. Water intake was also reduced in ACTH-injected chicks under both feeding conditions, but when measured without access to feed it was not affected. Blood glucose was not affected in either feeding condition. Following ACTH injection, c-Fos immunoreactivity was quantified in key appetite-associated hypothalamic nuclei including the ventromedial hypothalamus (VMH), dorsomedial hypothalamus, lateral hypothalamus (LH), arcuate nucleus (ARC) and the parvo- and magno-cellular portions of the paraventricular nucleus. ACTH-injected chicks had increased c-Fos immunoreactivity in the VMH, LH, and ARC. Hypothalamus was collected at 1h post-injection, and real-time PCR performed to measure mRNA abundance of some appetite-associated factors. Neuropeptide Y, pro-opiomelanocortin, glutamate decarboxylase 1, melanocortin receptors 2-5, and urocortin 3 mRNA abundance was not affected by ACTH treatment. However, expression of corticotropin releasing factor (CRF), urotensin 2 (UT), agouti-related peptide (AgRP), and orexin (ORX), and melanocortin receptor 1 (MC1R) mRNA decreased in the hypothalamus of ACTH-injected chicks. In conclusion, ICV ACTH causes decreased food intake in chicks, and is associated with VMH, LH, and ARC activation, and a decrease in hypothalamic mRNA abundance of CRF, UT, AgRP, ORX

  19. Mechanisms of Action Involved in Ozone Therapy: Is healing induced via a mild oxidative stress?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sagai Masaru

    2011-12-01

    moderate oxidative stress. Recently these concepts have become widely accepted. The versatility of ozone in treating vascular and degenerative diseases as well as skin lesions, hernial disc and primary root carious lesions in children is emphasized. Further researches able to elucidate whether the mechanisms of action of ozone therapy involve nuclear transcription factors, such as Nrf2, NFAT, AP-1, and HIF-1α are warranted.

  20. Maximal mydriasis evaluation in cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ho Tony

    1992-01-01

    Full Text Available We propose the Maximal Mydriasis Test (MMT as a simple and safe means to provide the cataract surgeon with objective and dependable pre-operative information on the idiosyncratic mydriatic response of the pupil. The MMT results of a consecutive series of 165 eyes from 100 adults referred for cataract evaluation are presented to illustrate its practical applications and value. The results of the MMT allows the surgeon to anticipate problem eyes pre-operatively so that he can plan his surgical strategy more appropriately and effectively. Conversely, the surgeon can also appropriately and confidently plan surgical procedures where wide pupillary dilation is important. The MMT has also helped improve our cost-effectiveness by cutting down unnecessary delays in the operating room and enabling better utilisation of restricted costly resources.

  1. Atypical case of ocular hemosiderosis: leopard cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masket, Samuel; Ceran, Basak Bostanci

    2011-10-01

    We present an interventional case report of an 83-year-old woman who developed ocular hemosiderosis secondary to massive retinal and intravitreal bleeding associated with a choroidal neovascular membrane as a result of age-related macular degeneration. Anterior segment manifestations included low-grade inflammation, posterior synechiae, reversible hyperchromic heterochromia, and a mature cataract with "leopard spots." The longstanding vitreous hemorrhage was thought to be the etiology of these findings. At the request of the vitreoretinal surgeon, cataract surgery was performed to provide visualization of the posterior segment. However, the patient's visual potential was limited by her underlying retinal pathology. Neither author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Additional disclosure is found in the footnotes. Copyright © 2011 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. [Correlation between Alzheimer disease and cataract].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, S S; Zhu, S Q

    2017-04-11

    Alzheimer disease (AD) is a progressive neurodegenerative disease and is a leading cause of dementia among elders. In the early phase of AD, even if neuropathological changes presented, but little to none clinical symptoms were found. Therefore, it is difficult to diagnose AD in the beginning of the disease. It is vital to find a noninvasive way for both diagnose and prognosis of AD. Studies have found that β-amyloid (Aβ) works as a connection between AD and cataract. This review will discuss AD and its associated markers which may be present in the lens and cataract related AD to provide more basis for early diagnosis of AD. (Chin J Ophthalmol, 2017, 53: 314-316) .

  3. Involvement of immunologic mechanisms in a guinea pig model of western red cedar asthma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salari, H; Howard, S; Chan, H; Dryden, P; Chan-Yeung, M

    1994-05-01

    Western red cedar asthma is the most common form of occupational asthma in the Pacific Northwest. Plicatic acid (PA) is the chemical component of Western red cedar that causes asthma. The role of immunologic processes involved in the PA-induced asthmatic reaction has not been established. To characterize the mechanisms of PA-induced asthmatic reaction, guinea pigs were sensitized to PA through biweekly injection of PA-ovalbumin conjugate with aluminum hydroxide as an adjuvant for a period of 6 months. Specific IgG1 antibodies to PA were detected in the blood 3 months after sensitization of animals. The level of specific IgG1 antibodies to ovalbumin after 6 months was about two times the level of specific IgG1 to PA. At 6 months, tracheal tissue from PA-ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs contracted after exposure to either PA or ovalbumin in vitro. The degree of contraction induced by PA was two to three times less than the contraction induced by ovalbumin. PA caused histamine, prostaglandin D2, and leukotriene D4 release from both lung mast cells and blood basophils. The amount of histamine and eicosanoids released by PA was also two to three times less than the amount of mediators released by ovalbumin. When the trachea of normal guinea pigs was passively sensitized with serum from PA-ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs, it contracted in response to PA or ovalbumin in an organ bath. When the serum of PA-ovalbumin-sensitized guinea pigs was depleted of immunoglobulins and then used for passive sensitization of normal trachea, no contraction was observed when challenged with PA, suggesting that IgG1 antibodies mediate the tracheal reaction to PA.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  4. Signaling pathways and cell mechanics involved in wound closure by epithelial cell sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenteany, G; Janmey, P A; Stossel, T P

    2000-07-13

    Sheets of cells move together as a unit during wound healing and embryonic tissue movements, such as those occurring during gastrulation and neurulation. We have used epithelial wound closure as a model system for such movements and examined the mechanisms of closure and the importance of the Rho family of Ras-related small GTPases in this process. Wounds induced in Madin-Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cell monolayers close by Rac- and phosphoinositide-dependent cell crawling, with formation of lamellipodia at the wound margin, and not by contraction of a perimarginal actomyosin purse-string. Although Rho-dependent actin bundles usually form at the margin, neither Rho activity nor formation of these structures is required for wound closure to occur at a normal rate. Cdc42 activity is also not required for closure. Inhibition of Rho or Cdc42 results, however, in statistically significant decreases in the regularity of wound closure, as determined by the ratio of wound margin perimeter over the remaining denuded area at different times. The Rac-dependent force generation for closure is distributed over several rows of cells from the wound margin, as inhibition of motility in the first row of cells alone does not inhibit closure and can be compensated for by generation of motile force in cells behind the margin. Furthermore, we observed high levels of Rac-dependent actin assembly in the first few rows of cells from the wound margin. Wounds in MDCK cell sheets do not close by purse-string contraction but by a crawling behavior involving Rac, phosphoinositides and active movement of multiple rows of cells. This finding suggests a new distributed mode of signaling and movement that, nevertheless, resembles individual cell motility. Although Rho and Cdc42 activities are not required for closure, they have a role in determining the regularity of closure.

  5. Study of the mechanisms involved in the laser superficial hardening process of metallic alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Edmara Marques Rodrigues da

    2001-01-01

    The laser superficial hardening process of a ferrous alloy (gray cast iron) and of an aluminum-silicon alloy was investigated in this work. These metallic alloys are used in the automobile industry for manufacturing cylinders and pistons, respectively. By application of individual pulses and single tracks, the involved mechanisms during the processing were studied. Variables such as energy density, power density, temporal width, beam diameter on the sample surface, atmosphere of the processing region, overlapping and scanning velocity. The hardened surface was characterized by optical and scanning electronic microscopy, dispersive energy microanalysis, X-ray mapping, X-ray diffraction, and measurements of roughness and Vickers microhardness. Depending on the processing parameters, it is possible to obtain different microstructures. The affected area of gray cast iron, can be hardened by remelting or transformation hardening (total or partial) if the reached temperature is higher or not that of melting temperature. Laser treatment originated new structures such as retained austenite, martensite and, occasionally, eutectic of cellular dendritic structure. Aluminum-silicon alloy does not have phase transformation in solid state, it can be hardened only by remelting. The increase of hardness is a function of the precipitation hardening process, which makes the silicon particles smaller and more disperse in the matrix. Maximal values of microhardness (700-1000 HV) were reached with the laser treatment in gray cast iron samples. The initial microhardness is of 242 HV. For aluminum-silicon alloy, the laser remelting increases the initial microhardness of 128 HV to the range of 160-320 HV. The found results give a new perspective for using the CLA/IPEN's laser in the heat treatment area. Besides providing a higher absorptivity to the materials, compared with the CO 2 laser, and optical fiber access, the superficial hardening with Nd:YAG laser, depending on the level of

  6. Achyranthes aspera Attenuates epilepsy in experimental animals: possible involvement of GABAergic mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanatha, Gollapalle Lakshminarayanashastry; Venkataranganna, Marikunte V; Prasad, Nunna Bheema Lingeswara; Godavarthi, Ashok

    2017-06-01

    The present study was aimed to examine the possible anticonvulsant property of aerial parts of Achyranthes aspera using various experimental models of epilepsy in mice. Petroleum ether extract of aerial parts of A. aspera (PeAA), methanolic eAA (MeAA) and aqueous eAA (AeAA) was initially evaluated against six-hertz seizure model in mice, based on the outcomes the effective extract was further evaluated against maximal electroshock (MES) and pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) models in mice. In addition, the potent extract was evaluated against the PTZ model by co-administering with flumazenil (FMZ), and also evaluated for its effect on GABA levels in brain and NMDA-induced lethality in mice. Furthermore, the probable locomotor deficit-inducing property of the extract was evaluated by actophotometer test in mice. In results, only MeAA showed protection against six-hertz-induced seizures in mice, based on these outcomes only MeAA was evaluated in MES and PTZ models. Notably, the MeAA (200, 400 and 800 mg/kg) has offered mild and dose dependent protection against MES and PTZ-induced seizures in mice. Alongside, the MeAA (400 mg/kg) showed a significant increase in GABA levels in the brain compared to control, and in line with these findings the anti-PTZ effect of MeAA (400 mg/kg, p.o.) was blocked when co-administered with flumazenil (5 mg/kg, i.p.). However, the MeAA has not shown significant protection against NMDA-induced mortality and also did not cause significant change in locomotor activity compared to before treatment. These findings suggest that MeAA possess mild anticonvulsant activity and the outcomes further confirmed the involvement of GABAergic mechanism behind the anticonvulsant activity of MeAA.

  7. Mechanisms involved in the selective transfer of long chain polyunsaturted fatty acids to the fetus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alfonso eGil-Sánchez

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available The concentration of long chain polyunsaturated fatty acid (LCPUFA in the fetal brain increases dramatically from the third trimester until 18 months of life. Several studies have shown an association between the percentage of maternal plasma docosahexaenoic acid (DHA during gestation and development of the cognitive functions in the neonate. Since only very low levels of LCPUFA are synthesized in the fetus and placenta, their primary source for the fetus is that of maternal origin. Both in vitro and human in vivo studies using labelled fatty acids have shown the preferential transfer of LCPUFA from the placenta to the fetus compared with other fatty acids, although the mechanisms involved are still uncertain. The placenta takes up circulating maternal non-esterified fatty acids (NEFA and fatty acids released mainly by maternal lipoprotein lipase and endothelial lipase. These NEFA may enter the cell by passive diffusion or by means of membrane carrier proteins. Once in the cytosol, NEFA bind to cytosolic fatty acid-binding proteins for transfer to the fetal circulation or can be oxidized within the trophoblasts and even re-esterified and stored in lipid droplets (LD. Although trophoblast cells are not specialized in lipid storage, LCPUFA may up-regulate peroxisome proliferator activated receptor-γ (PPARγ and hence the gene expression of fatty acid transport carriers, fatty acid acyl-CoA synthetases and adipophilin or other enzymes related with lipolysis, modifying their rate of placental transfer and metabolization. The placental transfer of LCPUFA during pregnancy seems to be a key factor in the neurological development of the fetus. Increased knowledge on the factors that modify placental transfer of fatty acids would contribute to our understanding of this complex process.

  8. Microarray Analysis of the Molecular Mechanism Involved in Parkinson’s Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng Tan

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. This study aimed to investigate the underlying molecular mechanisms of Parkinson’s disease (PD by bioinformatics. Methods. Using the microarray dataset GSE72267 from the Gene Expression Omnibus database, which included 40 blood samples from PD patients and 19 matched controls, differentially expressed genes (DEGs were identified after data preprocessing, followed by Gene Ontology (GO and Kyoto Encyclopedia of Genes and Genomes (KEGG pathway enrichment analyses. Protein-protein interaction (PPI network, microRNA- (miRNA- target regulatory network, and transcription factor- (TF- target regulatory networks were constructed. Results. Of 819 DEGs obtained, 359 were upregulated and 460 were downregulated. Two GO terms, “rRNA processing” and “cytoplasm,” and two KEGG pathways, “metabolic pathways” and “TNF signaling pathway,” played roles in PD development. Intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM1 was the hub node in the PPI network; hsa-miR-7-5p, hsa-miR-433-3p, and hsa-miR-133b participated in PD pathogenesis. Six TFs, including zinc finger and BTB domain-containing 7A, ovo-like transcriptional repressor 1, GATA-binding protein 3, transcription factor dp-1, SMAD family member 1, and quiescin sulfhydryl oxidase 1, were related to PD. Conclusions. “rRNA processing,” “cytoplasm,” “metabolic pathways,” and “TNF signaling pathway” were key pathways involved in PD. ICAM1, hsa-miR-7-5p, hsa-miR-433-3p, hsa-miR-133b, and the abovementioned six TFs might play important roles in PD development.

  9. Influence factors of visual quality after phacoemulsification for cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhen-Lin Lin

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cataract refers to the degenerative changes in lens quality caused by various causes of reduced transparency or color change. Surgical treatment is the main treatment modality at present. Among them, phacoemulsification has become the main surgical treatment for cataract because of its advantages such as short operation time, small incision and quicker healing. Today, cataract surgery has gradually shift to refractive surgery, and is no longer simply as cataract surgery. But after cataract phacoemulsification, the symptoms and visual quality are different. The main causes include refractive error, postoperative dry eyes and postoperative corneal astigmatism. This article reviews the factors that influence the visual quality of cataract phacoemulsification and its future trends.

  10. The Effect of Cataract Surgery on Circadian Photoentrainment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted, Adam Elias; Sander, Birgit; Haargaard, Birgitte

    2015-01-01

    of cataract surgery on circadian photoentrainment and to determine any difference between blue-blocking and neutral intraocular lenses (IOLs). DESIGN: The study was a single-center, investigator-driven, double-masked, block-randomized clinical trial. PARTICIPANTS: One eye in 76 patients with bilateral age......PURPOSE: Cataract decreases blue light transmission. Because of the selective blue light sensitivity of the retinal ganglion cells governing circadian photoentrainment, cataract may interfere with normal sleep-wake regulation and cause sleep disturbances. The purpose was to investigate the effect......-related cataract eligible for cataract surgery was included. METHODS: Intervention was cataract surgery by phacoemulsification. Patients were randomized to receive a blue-blocking or neutral IOL. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Primary outcome was activation of intrinsic photosensitive ganglion cells using post...

  11. Vitamin D deficiency and posterior subcapsular cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brown CJ

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Craig J Brown,1 Faical Akaichi21The Eye Center, Fayetteville, AR, USA; 2Scotland’s Rural College, Edinburgh, UKPurpose: To evaluate risk factors associated with posterior subcapsular cataract (PSC development and the relationship between vitamin D deficiency and etiology of PSC.Methods: Of 195 consecutive patients from a private ophthalmology practice, diagnosed with PSC, serum vitamin D3 (25-OH D levels were obtained for 175, and associations among risk factors, comorbidities, and PSC were assessed.Results: In all 175 PSC patients, mean 25-OH D levels were low (24 ng/mL ±11 SD compared with age/sex-matched standards. Significant differences in 25-OH D levels were noted between PSC subjects taking/not taking calcium supplements, systemic steroids, osteoporosis medications, etc. Alone, smoking status and calcium channel blockers and/or topical steroids use made no significant difference in PSC subjects 25-OH D levels, but two or more of these factors were associated with lowered levels of 25-OH D (P<0.001. Low vitamin D was correlated with female sex, autoimmune disease, and non-skin cancer diagnosis, but not with age, or other comorbidities or medication use. In five early-stage PSC patients taking 5,000 IU of 25-OH D daily for vitamin D deficiency, there was resolution of their cataracts during the 2-year follow-up period.Conclusion: Vitamin D levels for most PSC patients fell below the 30 ng/mL calcium homeostasis threshold. Some comorbidities and non-ophthalmic interventions are associated with the development of PSC at less depressed levels of 25-OH D. In this series, vitamin D deficiency was associated with PSC cataract, suggesting that raising the level of vitamin D intake may reduce PSC incidence.Keywords: posterior subcapsular, cataracts, vitamin D deficiency, risk factors, hypocalcemia, case report

  12. Cataract and its surgery in Fiji.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brian, Garry; Ramke, Jacqueline; Szetu, John; Qoqonokana, Mundi Qalo

    2011-07-01

    To characterize cataract and its surgery among adults aged ≥40 years in Fiji. Population-based cross-sectional survey using multistage cluster random sampling. 1381 (= 73.0% participation); eight provinces on Viti Levu. Interview-based questionnaire; visual acuity measured; autorefraction; dilated ocular examination. Prevalence; predictors; surgical outcomes. Being Indian (P = 0.001), elderly (P Fiji population aged ≥40 years, prevalence of cataract-induced low vision and blindness were each 1.7% (95% confidence interval [CI] 1.0-2.4%). At least one eye of 4.6% and both of 1.8% participants had surgery (86.4% extracapsular). Gender (P = 0.213), age (P = 0.472) and rural/urban domicile (P = 0.895) were not predictors of surgery among those who required it in at least one eye. After intraocular lens surgery: 50.7% had pupillary posterior capsular opacification; mean spherical equivalent was -1.37 ± 1.95D (range, -6.38 to +2.25D); mean cylindrical error was 2.31 ± 1.75D (range, 0.0 to 8.75D); ≥N8 for 39.5%; ≥6/18 for 56.6%; Fiji population aged ≥40 years, Cataract Surgical Coverage (Person) was 47.5% (95%CI 29.2-65.8%) at Fiji cataract services and outcomes compare favourably with those of neighbouring Papua New Guinea and Timor Leste. © 2011 The Authors. Clinical and Experimental Ophthalmology © 2011 Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Ophthalmologists.

  13. [Computer-assisted phacoemulsification for hard cataracts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zemba, M; Papadatu, Adriana-Camelia; Sîrbu, Laura-Nicoleta; Avram, Corina

    2012-01-01

    to evaluate the efficiency of new torsional phacoemulsification software (Ozil IP system) in hard nucleus cataract extraction. 45 eyes with hard senile cataract (degree III and IV) underwent phacoemulsification performed by the same surgeon, using the same technique (stop and chop). Infiniti (Alcon) platform was used, with Ozil IP software and Kelman phaco tip miniflared, 45 degrees. The nucleus was split into two and after that the first half was phacoemulsificated with IP-on (group 1) and the second half with IP-off (group 2). For every group we measured: cumulative dissipated energy (CDE), numbers of tip closure that needed manual desobstruction the amount of BSS used. The mean CDE was the same in group 1 and in group 2 (between 6.2 and 14.9). The incidence of occlusion that needed manual desobstruction was lower in group 1 (5 times) than in group 2 (13 times). Group 2 used more BSS compared to group 1. The new torsional software (IP system) significantly decreased occlusion time and balanced salt solution use over standard torsional software, particularly with denser cataracts.

  14. Principles and paradigms of pediatric cataract management

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Basti Surendra

    1995-01-01

    Full Text Available Propensity for increased postoperative inflammation and capsular opacification, a refractive state that is constantly in a state of flux due to growth of the eye, difficulty in documenting anatomic and refractive changes due to poor compliance, and a tendency to develop amblyopia, makes management of cataract in the child different from that in the adult. The recent past has unraveled several caveats of pediatric cataract management - the importance of atraumatic surgery and complete removal of lens matter, benefits of in-the-bag intraocular lens(IOL implantation, role of titrating IOL power to counter refractive changes due to growth of the eye, prudery of continuously following these eyes for early detection of aphakic glaucoma and benefits of some surgical innovations. Although these promise to significantly improve our management of pediatric cataract, their long-term benefits are yet to be determined. We will also have to harness newer techniques, especially in the areas of wound construction and capsule management, and will have to develop effective strategies for the refractive management of infantile aphakia.

  15. Combined surgery versus cataract surgery alone for eyes with cataract and glaucoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingjuan Lisa; Hirunyachote, Phenpan; Jampel, Henry

    2015-07-14

    Cataract and glaucoma are leading causes of blindness worldwide, and their co-existence is common in elderly people. Glaucoma surgery can accelerate cataract progression, and performing both surgeries may increase the rate of postoperative complications and compromise the success of either surgery. However, cataract surgery may independently lower intraocular pressure (IOP), which may allow for greater IOP control among patients with co-existing cataract and glaucoma. The decision between undergoing combined glaucoma and cataract surgery versus cataract surgery alone is complex. Therefore, it is important to compare the effectiveness of these two interventions to aid clinicians and patients in choosing the better treatment approach. To assess the relative effectiveness and safety of combined surgery versus cataract surgery (phacoemulsification) alone for co-existing cataract and glaucoma. The secondary objectives include cost analyses for different surgical techniques for co-existing cataract and glaucoma. We searched CENTRAL (which contains the Cochrane Eyes and Vision Group Trials Register) (2014, Issue 10), Ovid MEDLINE, Ovid MEDLINE In-Process and Other Non-Indexed Citations, Ovid MEDLINE Daily, Ovid OLDMEDLINE (January 1946 to October 2014), EMBASE (January 1980 to October 2014), PubMed (January 1948 to October 2014), Latin American and Caribbean Health Sciences Literature Database (LILACS) (January 1982 to October 2014), the metaRegister of Controlled Trials (mRCT) (www.controlled-trials.com), ClinicalTrials.gov (www.clinicaltrials.gov), and the World Health Organization (WHO) International Clinical Trials Registry Platform (ICTRP) (www.who.int/ictrp/search/en). We did not use any date or language restrictions in the electronic searches for trials. We last searched the electronic databases on 3 October 2014.We checked the reference lists of the included trials to identify further relevant trials. We used the Science Citation Index to search for references to

  16. Theater for Development Methodology in Childhood Cataract Case Finding

    OpenAIRE

    Roseline Ekanem Duke

    2016-01-01

    The key informant methodology for case finding for childhood cataract  was utilized  in a rural population in Nigeria to identify suitable children who would benefit surgically from intervene for cataract and restore vision such children. It was however noticed that some parents who had children with cataract did not bring their children to the primary health center for examination and recommendation. The purpose of this study is to investigate the benefits of using the theatre for developmen...

  17. Elevated Frequency of Cataracts in Birds from Chernobyl

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mousseau, Timothy Alexander; Møller, Anders Pape

    2013-01-01

    Background Radiation cataracts develop as a consequence of the effects of ionizing radiation on the development of the lens of the eye with an opaque lens reducing or eliminating the ability to see. Therefore, we would expect cataracts to be associated with reduced fitness in free-living animals. Methodology/Principal Findings We investigated the incidence of lens opacities typical of cataracts in more than 1100 free-living birds in the Chernobyl region in relation to background radiation. The incidence of cataracts increased with level of background radiation both in analyses based on a dichotomous score and in analyses of continuous scores of intensity of cataracts. The odds ratio per unit change in the regressor was 0.722 (95% CI 0.648, 0.804), which was less than odds ratios from investigations of radiation cataracts in humans. The relatively small odds ratio may be due to increased mortality in birds with cataracts. We found a stronger negative relationship between bird abundance and background radiation when the frequency of cataracts was higher, but also a direct effect of radiation on abundance, suggesting that radiation indirectly affects abundance negatively through an increase in the frequency of cataracts in bird populations, but also through direct effects of radiation on other diseases, food abundance and interactions with other species. There was no increase in incidence of cataracts with increasing age, suggesting that yearlings and older individuals were similarly affected as is typical of radiation cataract. Conclusions/Significance These findings suggest that cataracts are an under-estimated cause of morbidity in free-living birds and, by inference, other vertebrates in areas contaminated with radioactive materials. PMID:23935827

  18. Editorial: Improving cataract outcomes through good postoperative care

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nick Astbury

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Cataract surgery is one of the most successful and frequently performed operations worldwide, and yet cataract remains the commonest cause of global blindness. This is in part due to the shortage and uneven distribution of trained personnel in some countries. More worryingly, a high rate of cataract blindness also reflects poor visual outcomes after surgery, as has been documented in many RAAB (rapid assessment of avoidable blindness studies.

  19. Elevated frequency of cataracts in birds from chernobyl.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Alexander Mousseau

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Radiation cataracts develop as a consequence of the effects of ionizing radiation on the development of the lens of the eye with an opaque lens reducing or eliminating the ability to see. Therefore, we would expect cataracts to be associated with reduced fitness in free-living animals. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We investigated the incidence of lens opacities typical of cataracts in more than 1100 free-living birds in the Chernobyl region in relation to background radiation. The incidence of cataracts increased with level of background radiation both in analyses based on a dichotomous score and in analyses of continuous scores of intensity of cataracts. The odds ratio per unit change in the regressor was 0.722 (95% CI 0.648, 0.804, which was less than odds ratios from investigations of radiation cataracts in humans. The relatively small odds ratio may be due to increased mortality in birds with cataracts. We found a stronger negative relationship between bird abundance and background radiation when the frequency of cataracts was higher, but also a direct effect of radiation on abundance, suggesting that radiation indirectly affects abundance negatively through an increase in the frequency of cataracts in bird populations, but also through direct effects of radiation on other diseases, food abundance and interactions with other species. There was no increase in incidence of cataracts with increasing age, suggesting that yearlings and older individuals were similarly affected as is typical of radiation cataract. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These findings suggest that cataracts are an under-estimated cause of morbidity in free-living birds and, by inference, other vertebrates in areas contaminated with radioactive materials.

  20. Femtosecond laser assisted cataract surgery followed by coaxial phacoemulsification or microincisional cataract surgery: differences and advantages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alio, Jorge L; Soria, Felipe; Abdou, Ahmed A

    2014-01-01

    This review outlines the advantages and the differences of femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery (FLACS) following a coaxial or microincision cataract surgery phacoemulsification in the surgical outcome and greater control of cataract surgery. FLACS offers minimal tissue damage and extreme precision during corneal incision creation, continuous circular capsulorhexis (CCC) and nuclear fragmentation. It also allows diminishing the mean average ultrasound power to emulsify the nucleus followed by a coaxial or a biaxial procedure. The impact of reduced phacoemulsification energy on the corneal endothelium is an interesting topic that is being investigated. Despite its benefits, this technology has relevant financial issues and a high learning curve. FemtoMICS appears to be surgically and statistically more efficient than the FemtoCoaxial technique and Femtoincisions prove to be stable and do not change the corneal high order aberration significantly with favorable results of the triplanar configuration.

  1. Measurements of attenuation coefficient for evaluating the hardness of a cataract lens by a high-frequency ultrasonic needle transducer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Ruimin; Tsui, Po-Hsiang; Zhou, Qifa; Humayun, Mark S; Shung, K Kirk

    2010-01-01

    A cataract is a clouding of the lens in the eye that affects vision. Phacoemulsification is the mostly common surgical method for treating cataracts, and determining that the optimal phacoemulsification energy is dependent on measuring the hardness of the lens. This study explored the use of an ultrasound needle transducer for invasive measurements of ultrasound attenuation coefficient to evaluate the hardness of the cataract lens. A 47 MHz high-frequency needle transducer with a diameter of 0.9 mm was fabricated by a polarized PMN-33%PT single crystal in the present study. The attenuation coefficients at different stages of an artificial porcine cataract lens were measured using the spectral shift approach. The hardness of the cataract lens was also evaluated by mechanical measurement of its elastic properties. The results demonstrated that the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient was increased from 0.048 ± 0.02 to 0.520 ± 0.06 dB mm−1 MHz−1 corresponding to an increase in Young’s modulus from 6 ± 0.4 to 96 ± 6.2 kPa as the cataract further developed. In order to evaluate the feasibility of combining needle transducer and phacoemulsification probe for real-time measurement during cataract surgery, the needle transducer was mounted on the phacoemulsification probe for a vibration test. The results indicated that there was no apparent damage to the tip of the needle transducer and the pulse–echo test showed that a good performance in sensitivity was maintained after the vibration test. PMID:19759408

  2. Measurements of attenuation coefficient for evaluating the hardness of a cataract lens by a high-frequency ultrasonic needle transducer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Huang, C.-C.; Chen Ruimin; Zhou Qifa; Shung, K Kirk; Tsui, P.-H.; Humayun, Mark S

    2009-01-01

    A cataract is a clouding of the lens in the eye that affects vision. Phacoemulsification is the mostly common surgical method for treating cataracts, and determining that the optimal phacoemulsification energy is dependent on measuring the hardness of the lens. This study explored the use of an ultrasound needle transducer for invasive measurements of ultrasound attenuation coefficient to evaluate the hardness of the cataract lens. A 47 MHz high-frequency needle transducer with a diameter of 0.9 mm was fabricated by a polarized PMN-33%PT single crystal in the present study. The attenuation coefficients at different stages of an artificial porcine cataract lens were measured using the spectral shift approach. The hardness of the cataract lens was also evaluated by mechanical measurement of its elastic properties. The results demonstrated that the ultrasonic attenuation coefficient was increased from 0.048 ± 0.02 to 0.520 ± 0.06 dB mm -1 MHz -1 corresponding to an increase in Young's modulus from 6 ± 0.4 to 96 ± 6.2 kPa as the cataract further developed. In order to evaluate the feasibility of combining needle transducer and phacoemulsification probe for real-time measurement during cataract surgery, the needle transducer was mounted on the phacoemulsification probe for a vibration test. The results indicated that there was no apparent damage to the tip of the needle transducer and the pulse-echo test showed that a good performance in sensitivity was maintained after the vibration test.

  3. Mechanisms involved in the psychological distress of Black Caribbeans in the United States

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govia, Ishtar O.

    The mental health of ethnic minorities in the United States is of urgent concern. The accelerated growth of groups of ethnic minorities and immigrants in the United States and the stressors to which they are exposed, implores academic researchers to investigate more deeply health disparities and the factors that exacerbate or minimize such inequalities. This dissertation attended to that concern. It used data from the National Survey of American Life (NSAL), the first survey with a national representative sample of Black Caribbeans, to explore mechanisms that involved in the psychological distress of Black Caribbeans in the United States. In a series of three studies, the dissertation investigated the role and consequence of (1) chronic discrimination, immigration factors, and closeness to ethnic and racial groups; (2) personal control and social support; and (3) family relations and social roles in the psychological distress of Black Caribbeans. Study 1 examined how the associations between discrimination and psychological distress were buffered or exacerbated by closeness to ethnic group and closeness to racial group. It also examined how these associations differed depending on immigration factors. Results indicated that the buffering or exacerbating effect of ethnic and racial group closeness varied according to the type of discrimination (subtle or severe) and were more pronounced among those born in the United States. Using the stress process framework, Study 2 tested moderation and mediation models of the effects of social support and personal control in the association between discrimination and distress. Results from a series of analyses on 579 respondents suggested that personal control served as a mediator in this relationship and that emotional support exerted a direct distress deterring function. Study 3 investigated sex differences in the associations between social roles, intergenerational family relationship perceptions and distress. Results

  4. VISUAL OUTCOME OF TRAUMATIC PAEDIATRIC CATARACT AT A TERTIARY EYE CARE CENTRE IN WEST BENGAL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Smiti Rani Srivastava

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Traumatic cataract is common presentation of penetrating and blunt ocular trauma in children. Ocular trauma is the leading cause of unilateral blindness all over the world. The incidence of ocular trauma varies in different parts of the world. From India, the reported incidence is 20.53%. Traumatic cataract causes significant blindness in paediatric populations particularly in developing countries. The aim of the study is to evaluate the final visual outcome of the patients with traumatic cataract. MATERIALS AND METHODS We conducted a prospective study of 100 children from 4 to 16 years of age presenting in Outpatient Department of Regional Institute of Ophthalmology, Kolkata, with traumatic cataract between April 2015 to March 2017. Detailed history, systemic and local examinations and relevant investigations done followed by medical and surgical intervention and patients were followed up till six months and final visual acuity recorded. RESULTS There was a male predilection with a male-to-female ratio 2.85:1.56 (56% patients sustained penetrating trauma, while 44 (44% were inflicted with blunt injury. Commonest causative agent was trauma with organic foreign bodies in 20 eyes (20% followed by stones in 14 eyes (14%. Anterior segment was more involved than posterior segment. Final best corrected visual acuity after six months was better than or equal to 6/18 in 64 eyes (64%. The major early postoperative complications include anterior uveitis in 26 (26% and corneal oedema in 8 (8% patients, while late postoperative complication was posterior capsular uveitis in 36% patients. CONCLUSION Paediatric traumatic cataract can cause ocular morbidity. Timely and proper medical and surgical intervention can result in good visual outcome. The parents, caretakers and teachers have an important role to play in prevention by recognising hazardous situation and taking preventing measures.

  5. Spontaneous dislocation of lens bag with acrylic lens after uneventful cataract surgery ? unusual complication of cataract surgery

    OpenAIRE

    Shah, Mehul A.; Shah, Shreya M.; Mehta, Ruchir; Shah, Prerna

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Spontaneous dislocation of intraocular lens with bag is rare.Methods: We report a case of a 56-year-old male who presented with spontaneous anterior dislocation of an in-the-bag intraocular lens 3 years after manual small incision cataract surgery. He had undergone manual small incision cataract surgery with foldable acrylic intraocular lens implantation, and 18 months after cataract surgery ND: YAG capsulotomy with uneventful post capsulotomy follow-up. 17 months after capsul...

  6. A novel mechanism of hippocampal LTD involving muscarinic receptor-triggered interactions between AMPARs, GRIP and liprin-α

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dickinson Bryony A

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Long-term depression (LTD in the hippocampus can be induced by activation of different types of G-protein coupled receptors, in particular metabotropic glutamate receptors (mGluRs and muscarinic acethycholine receptors (mAChRs. Since mGluRs and mAChRs activate the same G-proteins and isoforms of phospholipase C (PLC, it would be expected that these two forms of LTD utilise the same molecular mechanisms. However, we find a distinct mechanism of LTD involving GRIP and liprin-α. Results Whilst both forms of LTD require activation of tyrosine phosphatases and involve internalisation of AMPARs, they use different molecular interactions. Specifically, mAChR-LTD, but not mGluR-LTD, is blocked by peptides that inhibit the binding of GRIP to the AMPA receptor subunit GluA2 and the binding of GRIP to liprin-α. Thus, different receptors that utilise the same G-proteins can regulate AMPAR trafficking and synaptic efficacy via distinct molecular mechanisms. Conclusion Our results suggest that mAChR-LTD selectively involves interactions between GRIP and liprin-α. These data indicate a novel mechanism of synaptic plasticity in which activation of M1 receptors results in AMPAR endocytosis, via a mechanism involving interactions between GluA2, GRIP and liprin-α.

  7. Mechanisms involved in the evasion of the host defence by Pseudomonas aeruginosa

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A

    1991-01-01

    Pseudomonas aeruginosa, an extracellular opportunistic pathogen, utilizes two major mechanisms to evade the host defence system. One of these mechanisms is the production of a large number of extracellular products, such as proteases, toxins, and lipases. The two proteases, alkaline protease and ...

  8. A CLINICAL STUDY AND MANAGEMENT OF PAEDIATRIC CATARACT, OUR EXPERIENCE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satish D. Shet

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Control of childhood blindness is one of the priorities identified for achieving the goals of Vision-2020 by WHO. This is considered a priority because blind-years (number of years that a blind person lives after going blind due to childhood blindness are second only to cataract and half of childhood blindness is avoidable (treatable/preventable. Paediatric cataract accounts for 12% of the 1.4 million blind children globally. The prevalence of childhood cataract has been reported as 1 to 15 cases in 10,000 children in developing countries. Compared to industrialised countries, this figure is 10 times higher. Early detection and timely treatment of various childhood disorders such as congenital cataract are the most crucial factors for successful outcome. A suitable measure to address amblyopia and posterior capsule opacification post operatively is imperative for successful visual rehabilitation of such children. The objectives of this study were- 1 To study the clinical profile of paediatric cataract. 2 To evaluate the visual outcome after cataract surgery in these patients. 3 To evaluate different causes of visual impairment following management. MATERIALS AND METHODS A prospective study conducted at Karnataka institute of medical sciences department of ophthalmology from October 2015 to September 2016. All children below 14 years of age presenting with cataract will undergo thorough ophthalmologic examination and cataract surgery. RESULTS The results of the present study with 25 paediatric patients (36 eyes indicates that excellent vision can be expected after cataract surgery and posterior chamber IOL implantation coupled with appropriate amblyopia therapy. CONCLUSION The paediatric cataract patients are referred from primary health centers, and district hospital from north Karnataka to KIMS Hubli. All paediatric patients are from lower socio economic status. Early detection of cataracts and referrals to the ophthalmologist can

  9. The Relationship of age, attitude, knowladge, cost to cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminatul Fitria

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available Cataract is the leading cause of 51% blindness case in the world. Cataract can only be cured trough surgery, but most people with cataract in Indonesia is not in undergoing surgery due to several factors. The increasing number of cataract victim whose not undergoing any treatment to cure them will resulting in increasing number of blindness case, so blindness cause by cataracts can be a public health problem. This research was conducted to determine the relationship of age, attitudes, knowledge and the cost of the action to perform cataract surgery. This research was an observational analytic study with cross sectional design. The samples were cataract patients in Undaan Eye Hospital Surabaya who were randomly selected using a simple random sampling based on medical records of 60 people. Data collection was done by taking secondary data and interviews to patients. Those variables was analyzed with chi square or Fisher’s exact with significancy level at 95%. The result showed that there were correlation between knowledge (p = 0.017, operating costs (p = 0.001 and attitude (0.000 while age was not related (p = 1.000, the actions to perform cataract surgery. The conclusion from this research was the attitude, knowledge and operating costs related to the actions to perform cataract surgery, while age was not related to the actions to perform cataract surgery. It is recommended to give through leaflets or other media in the lobby for improving patient education, counseling to the patient family, the doctor’s advice to convince patient for surgery. Keywords: practice, surgery, cataract, attitudes, costs

  10. The effect of blue-blocking and neutral intraocular lenses on circadian photoentrainment and sleep one year after cataract surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brøndsted, Adam Elias; Haargaard, Birgitte; Sander, Birgit

    2017-01-01

    PURPOSE: To compare the long-term effect on circadian photoentrainment and sleep in patients implanted with neutral and blue-blocking intraocular lenses 1 year after cataract surgery. METHODS: Randomized, controlled trial involving 67 patients with age-related cataract. Intervention was cataract......; the latter was also used to determine objective sleep quality. The Pittsburgh Sleep Quality Index determined subjective sleep quality. RESULTS: One year after surgery, peak melatonin concentration was 3.3 pg/ml (95% CI, 2-5.5) corresponding to 50% lower for the participants allocated to blue-blocking IOLs...... compared with participants allocated to neutral IOLs. Compared with preoperative levels, the ipRGC response had increased by 13.7% (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.2-22.6) 1 year after surgery. Objective sleep quality was also improved as the time of wakefulness after sleep onset had improved by 5 min (95...

  11. Small-incision cataract extraction combined trabeculectomy for primary angle-closure glaucoma with cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Feng Wu

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To observe the curative effect of treating small-incision cataract extraction by intraocular lens implantation combined with trabeculectomy for primary angle-closure glaucoma with cataract. METHODS: Totally 44 cases(52 eyesof primary angle-closure glaucoma combined with cataract were selected to undergo the combined surgery, in order to observe the patients' pre- and postoperative eyesights, intraocular pressures and the postoperative complications.RESULTS: The postoperative eyesight was improved significantly as compared with the preoperative eyesight. The intraocular pressure was declined dramatically. The result was of statistical significance(P0.05. All the 52 cases' surgeries were performed by the same surgeon. The surgeries were processed smoothly, with 6 postoperative eyes of anterior chamber inflammation cell response, 3 eyes of anterior chamber fibrinoid exudate, 2 eyes of shallow anterior chamber through mydriasis and treatment with glucocorticoids and non-steroidal eyedrops before absorption, and no complications like malignant glaucoma, cyclodialysis, etc. were reported through mydriasis and pressure bandaging before recovery.CONCLUSION: Treating the primary angle-closure glaucoma combined with cataract through the combined surgery has high reliability and desirable curative effect. The surgical method is simple to learn and applicable for promotion on the basic level.

  12. Swarming mechanisms in the yellow fever mosquito: aggregation pheromones involved in the mating behavior of Aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosquitoes of various species mate in swarms comprised of tens to thousands flying males. Yet little information is known about mosquito swarming mechanism. Discovering chemical cues involved in mosquito biology leads to better adaptation of disease control interventions. In this study, we aimed ...

  13. A COMPARATIVE STUDY OF THE AMOUNT OF ASTIGMATISM FOLLOWING CONVENTIONAL EXTRACAPSULAR CATARACT EXTRACTION AND MANUAL SMALL INCISION CATARACT SURGERY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rajkumari Bigyabati

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Cataract is the principal cause of avoidable blindness in India and throughout the world. Surgical removal of the cataractous lens remains the only effective treatment for management of cataract blindness. The success of cataract surgery is determined by best and earliest visual recovery. But the occurrence of postoperative astigmatism has become a major hurdle in achieving this goal. AIMS The study was designed to compare the amount of astigmatism following conventional extracapsular cataract extraction (ECCE and manual small incision cataract surgery (SICS. MATERIALS AND METHODS The study was carried out in 100 eyes of 75 patients aged between 50 and 80 years admitted for cataract surgery. Out of these, 50 eyes were operated by conventional extracapsular cataract extraction and 50 eyes by manual small incision cataract surgery. The patients were followed up at 2 nd , 4 th , 6 th and 8 th weeks. At each follow-up visual acuity, refraction and acceptance and keratometry were recorded and the findings analysed for astigmatism. RESULTS In the current study, the mean (SD astigmatism developed at the end of the 2 nd , 4 th and 6 th of follow-up was significantly lower in the SICS group as compared to the ECCE group (P<0.000. At the end of 8 weeks of follow-up, the mean (SD astigmatism of the SICS group was 0.64±0.56 D as compared to the mean (SD of the ECCE group of 1.39±86 D and the difference was found to be significant (p<0.014. CONCLUSION The current study concludes that manual small incision cataract surgery is a better technique to control postoperative astigmatism than conventional extracapsular cataract extraction.

  14. Challenges to the Elimination of Cataract Blindness in Nigeria as ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ophthalmic manpower for primary health centers is lacking. Equipments for modern cataract surgery is lacking as only 45.2% of practitioners have them for practice in their institutions. Institutional cataract surgery output is low; averaging 50-92 a year, ...

  15. Cataract Extraction With Intraocular Lens Implant: Early Experience ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    -surgery was good (>/= 6/18.) confirming that Cataract surgery with IOL implant is safe and effective in restoring vision to the cataract blind in this part of the world. Most of the cases of postoperative astigmatism were corrected with refraction.

  16. Trainee ophthalmologists' opinions on ways to improve cataract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-02-08

    Feb 8, 2010 ... (74.1%), effective primary eye care- 25 (92.6%) and marketing of cataract surgical services- 23 (85.2%). However, only 16 ... gouvernement local (74.1%), 20 efficace principal Eye Care 25 (92.6%), et 23 (85.2%), services de marketing de la cataracte .... attractive rural allowance (10-20% of basic salary).

  17. a comparative study between manual small incision cataract surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... October 2012 to October 2014 for cataract surgery were followed up for 6 weeks after surgery. They were divided into two groups based on the type of surgical procedure opted by the patients. Group A consisted of 50 patients who underwent Manual Small Incision Cataract. Surgery with rigid Polymethyl Methacrylate IOL ...

  18. Delay in Surgical Uptake for Cataract Services in a Pediatric ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tulyasys

    (19%). These differences were statistically significant. (P = 0.027). Regarding laterality, out of 34, 27 (79%) children with bilateral cataracts were presented for surgery and that of 42, 29 (69%) children with unilateral cataracts were presented for the examination, however, the differences were statistically insignificant (P = 0.3) ...

  19. Poor cataract surgical output: Eye care workers perspective in north ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2012-01-25

    Jan 25, 2012 ... Background: Cataract remains a disease of priority being the leading cause of blindness globally. Although surgically curable, cataract surgical output has remained low in Nigeria, Kwara state inclusive. A study was carried out to investigate the perception of eye care workers (ECW) on low surgical output ...

  20. Barriers to up take cataract surgery in Gandaki Zone, Nepal.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sapkota, Y D; Pokharel, G P; Dulal, S; Byanju, R N; Maharjan, I M

    2004-01-01

    Cataract though avoidable remains as leading cause of blindness in Nepal. Though, Himalaya Eye Hospital rendering high quality surgical service through its base hospital and out reach service in Gandaki Zone having cataract surgical rate is below 1500 per million. Therefore, it is mater of interest to investigate the reason and the finding would be helpful to plan the future cataract programme to CSR to desirable level, if we know the reason(s) that forced them living as blind in community and not seeking available surgical services. All person with cataract affecting their visual acuity to financial 24.1% and other clinical reason were found to be 12% as a reason for not seeking available surgical service. The cataract service marketing, eye health education disseminating the information on cataract and its curability is not found to be adequate. Therefore, the future cataract programme should give more concentration on creating awareness on cataract and subsidizing the available surgical service and service need to be brought to more proximity for the needy poor people.

  1. Phacoemulsification of bilateral cataracts in two pet rabbits | Gomes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Two 3 year-old, healthy, client-owned Lop rabbits presented with bilateral cataracts. After performing a physical examination, bloodwork, ocular ultrasonography and electroretinography, both animals were deemed good surgical candidates for phacoemulsification. Bilateral cataract surgery was performed and both rabbits ...

  2. Rapid assessment of cataract surgical coverage in rural Zululand ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    562 old-age pensioners. Method. Subjects found to be ?lind (visual acuity < 3/60) and those reporting a history of eye surgery were examined using a torch and direct ophthalmoscop~by an ophthalmologist. Outcome measures. Cases of blindness due to operable cataract and post-cataract surgical subjects were identified.

  3. Carbon footprint and cost-effectiveness of cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, Rengaraj; van Landingham, Suzanne W; Khodifad, Ashish M; Haripriya, Aravind; Thiel, Cassandra L; Ramulu, Pradeep; Robin, Alan L

    2016-01-01

    This article raises awareness about the cost-effectiveness and carbon footprint of various cataract surgery techniques, comparing their relative carbon emissions and expenses: manual small-incision cataract surgery (MSICS), phacoemulsification, and femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery. As the most commonly performed surgical procedure worldwide, cataract surgery contributes significantly to global climate change. The carbon footprint of a single phacoemulsification cataract surgery is estimated to be comparable to that of a typical person's life for 1 week. Phacoemulsification has been estimated to be between 1.4 and 4.7 times more expensive than MSICS; however, given the lower degree of postoperative astigmatism and other potential complications, phacoemulsification may still be preferable to MSICS in relatively resource-rich settings requiring high levels of visual function. Limited data are currently available regarding the environmental and financial impact of femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery; however, in its current form, it appears to be the least cost-effective option. Cataract surgery has a high value to patients. The relative environmental impact and cost of different types of cataract surgery should be considered as this treatment becomes even more broadly available globally and as new technologies are developed and implemented.

  4. Cataract surgery in patients with pseudoexfoliation syndrome: current updates

    OpenAIRE

    Fontana,Luigi; Coassin,Marco; Iovieno,Alfonso; Moramarco,Antonio; Cimino,Luca

    2017-01-01

    Luigi Fontana, Marco Coassin, Alfonso Iovieno, Antonio Moramarco, Luca Cimino Ophthalmology Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova – IRCCS, Reggio Emilia, Italy Abstract: Pseudoexfoliation is a ubiquitous syndrome of multifactorial origin affecting elderly people by increasing the risk of cataract and secondary glaucoma development. Despite modern techniques and technologies for cataract surgery, pseudoexfoliation syndrome represents a challenge for surgeons because of the increased ...

  5. Visual outcome after cataract surgery at the University College ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: The aim of this study was to determine the visual outcome of patients who had cataract surgery in the University College Hospital Ibadan. Methodology: This is an observational descriptive, longitudinal study of consecutive patients undergoing cataract surgery at the University College Hospital conducted between May ...

  6. The Impact of Cataract Surgery on Subjective Visual Functions and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-12-13

    Dec 13, 2016 ... Purpose: To determine the impact of cataract surgery on visual functions (VFs) and quality of life (QoL) in patients with cataract at the. National Eye Center ... Correlation was assessed among subjective VF, QoL, and visual acuity (VA). The preoperative ..... Financial support and sponsorship. The study was ...

  7. The Impact of Cataract Surgery on Subjective Visual Functions and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To determine the impact of cataract surgery on visual functions (VFs) and quality of life (QoL) in patients with cataract at the National Eye Center, Kaduna. Methods: VFs and QoL questionnaires were administered to the patients preoperatively and 6 weeks postoperatively. Correlation was assessed among ...

  8. Outcomes of Cataract Surgery Following Treatment for Retinoblastoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyeong Min; Lee, Byung Joo; Kim, Jeong Hun; Yu, Young Suk

    2017-02-01

    To evaluate the long-term visual outcomes and complications of cataract surgery in eyes previously treated for retinoblastoma. We reviewed the medical records of patients who underwent cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation at Seoul National University Children's Hospital for a secondary cataract that developed after retinoblastoma treatment. During the period between 1990 and 2014, 208 eyes of 147 patients received eye-salvaging treatment (radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and local therapy) for retinoblastoma at Seoul National University Children's Hospital. Among these eyes, a secondary cataract was detected in 17 eyes of 14 patients, and five eyes of five patients underwent cataract surgery. The median age of cataract formation was 97 months (range, 38 to 153 months). The medial interval between the diagnosis of retinoblastoma and cataract formation was 79 months (range, 29 to 140 months). All patients received posterior chamber intraocular lens insertion after irrigation and aspiration of the lens through a scleral tunnel incision. Anterior vitrectomy and posterior capsulotomy were performed in two eyes and a laser capsulotomy was subsequently performed in one eye. No intraoperative and postoperative complications occurred. The median follow-up after surgery was 36 months (range, 14 to 47 months). The final best corrected visual acuities were improved in all five eyes. No intraocular tumor recurrences or metastases occurred. After retinoblastoma regression, cataract extraction in our series was not associated with tumor recurrence or metastasis. Visual improvement was noted in every patient.

  9. The risk of cataract in relation to metal arc welding.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slagor, Rebekka Michaelsen; La Cour, Morten; Bonde, Jens Peter

    2016-09-01

    There are indications that solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) increases the risk of cataract, but there is only circumstantial evidence that metal welding, an important occupational source of UVR exposure, is a risk factor. The objective of this study is to unravel if metal welding increases the risk of cataract. We compared the risk of being diagnosed with cataract from 1987-2012 in a historic cohort of 4288 male metal arc welders against a reference group comprised of Danish skilled and unskilled male workers with similar age distribution. For the welders' cohort, information on welding was collected from questionnaires and, for both cohorts, information about cataract diagnosis and operation was gathered from Danish national registers. Using Cox regression analysis, the hazard ratio (HR) for cataract diagnosis and/or operation was calculated in the follow-up period adjusted for baseline data regarding age, diabetes, and social group. There were 266 welders and 29 007 referents with a diagnosis and/or operation for cataract. The unadjusted HR for cataract comparing ever-welders with referents was 1.07 [95% confidence interval (95% CI) 0.95-1.21] and the adjusted HR was 1.08 (95% CI 0.95-1.22). Age and diabetes were as expected strong risk factors. We found no increased risk of developing cataract among Danish metal welders who worked with arc welding from 1950-1985. This may be attributed to the effectiveness of personal safety equipment.

  10. Solar cataract: A clinical report | Ahuama | Journal of Health and ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Solar Ultraviolet radiation is caractogenic, as there is increasing evidence implicating ultraviolet radiation as a risk factor in the aetiology of cataracts. Through absorption from sunlight exposure especially into the violet and of the visible range of the solar spectrum, cataract formation may occur due to physiochemical ...

  11. related cataract in the rural areas of South Africa

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objectives. The Bureau for the Prevention of Blindness is responsible for the provision of cataract surgery to the rural indigent population of South Africa. It is important for the Bureau to know both the prevalence and the incidence of cataract blindness in the population. Design, setting and subjects. Blindness prevalence.

  12. Meeting the need for childhood cataract surgical services in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cataract has emerged as the most important cause of blindness in children worldwide, and has been one of the priorities of VISION 2020, the global initiative to eliminate avoidable blindness by 2020. More than 2500 children are estimated to be blind from cataract in Madagascar. The aim of this study was to ...

  13. Comprehensive management of pediatric cataract in Africa | Adio ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Worldwide, childhood blindness is 0.75/1000 children giving an estimated number of 1.4 million suffering from blindness worldwide. Of the blind children worldwide, congenital cataract is the major cause in African countries. The management of cataract in children poses a challenge to the African ophthalmologist, and the ...

  14. Exploiting ensemble learning for automatic cataract detection and grading.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Ji-Jiang; Li, Jianqiang; Shen, Ruifang; Zeng, Yang; He, Jian; Bi, Jing; Li, Yong; Zhang, Qinyan; Peng, Lihui; Wang, Qing

    2016-02-01

    Cataract is defined as a lenticular opacity presenting usually with poor visual acuity. It is one of the most common causes of visual impairment worldwide. Early diagnosis demands the expertise of trained healthcare professionals, which may present a barrier to early intervention due to underlying costs. To date, studies reported in the literature utilize a single learning model for retinal image classification in grading cataract severity. We present an ensemble learning based approach as a means to improving diagnostic accuracy. Three independent feature sets, i.e., wavelet-, sketch-, and texture-based features, are extracted from each fundus image. For each feature set, two base learning models, i.e., Support Vector Machine and Back Propagation Neural Network, are built. Then, the ensemble methods, majority voting and stacking, are investigated to combine the multiple base learning models for final fundus image classification. Empirical experiments are conducted for cataract detection (two-class task, i.e., cataract or non-cataractous) and cataract grading (four-class task, i.e., non-cataractous, mild, moderate or severe) tasks. The best performance of the ensemble classifier is 93.2% and 84.5% in terms of the correct classification rates for cataract detection and grading tasks, respectively. The results demonstrate that the ensemble classifier outperforms the single learning model significantly, which also illustrates the effectiveness of the proposed approach. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Molecular mechanism for the involvement of nuclear receptor FXR in HBV-associated hepatocellular carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong-dong Niu

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Farnesoid X receptor (FXR, also termed nuclear receptor NR1H4 is critically involved in the regulation of nascent bile formation and bile acid enterohepatic circulation. FXR and bile acids have been shown to play roles in liver regeneration and inflammatory responses. There is increasing evidence suggesting that FXR and the FXR signaling pathway are involved in the pathophysiology of a wide range of liver diseases, such as viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, and hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC. Here we discuss the latest discoveries of FXR functions with relevance to bile acid metabolism and HBV-associated HCC. More specifically, the goal of this review is to discuss the roles of FXR and bile acids in regulating HBV replication and how disregulation of the FXR-bile acid signaling pathway is involved in HBV-associated hepatocarcinogenesis.

  16. Internal wave structures in abyssal cataract flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makarenko, Nikolay; Liapidevskii, Valery; Morozov, Eugene; Tarakanov, Roman

    2014-05-01

    We discuss some theoretical approaches, experimental results and field data concerning wave phenomena in ocean near-bottom stratified flows. Such strong flows of cold water form everywhere in the Atlantic abyssal channels, and these currents play significant role in the global water exchange. Most interesting wave structures arise in a powerful cataract flows near orographic obstacles which disturb gravity currents by forced lee waves, attached hydraulic jumps, mixing layers etc. All these effects were observed by the authors in the Romanche and Chain fracture zones of Atlantic Ocean during recent cruises of the R/V Akademik Ioffe and R/V Akademik Sergei Vavilov (Morozov et al., Dokl. Earth Sci., 2012, 446(2)). In a general way, deep-water cataract flows down the slope are similar to the stratified flows examined in laboratory experiments. Strong mixing in the sill region leads to the splitting of the gravity current into the layers having the fluids with different densities. Another peculiarity is the presence of critical layers in shear flows sustained over the sill. In the case under consideration, this critical level separates the flow of near-bottom cold water from opposite overflow. In accordance with known theoretical models and laboratory measurements, the critical layer can absorb and reflect internal waves generated by the topography, so the upward propagation of these perturbations is blocked from above. High velocity gradients were registered downstream in the vicinity of cataract and it indicates the existence of developed wave structures beyond the sill formed by intense internal waves. This work was supported by RFBR (grants No 12-01-00671-a, 12-08-10001-k and 13-08-10001-k).

  17. Activated spinal astrocytes are involved in the maintenance of chronic widespread mechanical hyperalgesia after cast immobilization

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-01-01

    Background In the present study, we examined spinal glial cell activation as a central nervous system mechanism of widespread mechanical hyperalgesia in rats that experienced chronic post-cast pain (CPCP) 2 weeks after cast immobilization. Activated spinal microglia and astrocytes were investigated immunohistologically in lumbar and coccygeal spinal cord segments 1 day, 5 weeks, and 13 weeks following cast removal. Results In the lumbar cord, astrocytes were activated after microglia. Astrocytes also were activated after microglia in the coccygeal cord, but with a delay that was longer than that observed in the lumbar cord. This activation pattern paralleled the observation that mechanical hyperalgesia occurred in the hindleg or the hindpaw before the tail. The activating transcription factor 3 (ATF3) immune response in dorsal root ganglia (DRG) on the last day of cast immobilization suggested that nerve damage might not occur in CPCP rats. The neural activation assessed by the phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase (pERK) immune response in DRG arose 1 day after cast removal. In addition, L-α-aminoadipate (L-α-AA), an inhibitor of astrocyte activation administered intrathecally 5 weeks after cast removal, inhibited mechanical hyperalgesia in several body parts including the lower leg skin and muscles bilaterally, hindpaws, and tail. Conclusions These findings suggest that activation of lumbar cord astrocytes is an important factor in widespread mechanical hyperalgesia in CPCP. PMID:24456903

  18. Cataract surgery in Knobloch syndrome: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bongiovanni CS

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Carmen Sílvia Bongiovanni1, Carla Cristina Serra Ferreira1, Ana Paula Silvério Rodrigues1, João Borges Fortes Filho2, Márcia Beatriz Tartarella11Department of Ophthalmology, Congenital Cataract Section, Medical School, Federal University of São Paulo, São Paulo; 2Department of Ophthalmology, Medical School, Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Porto Alegre, BrazilAbstract: Knobloch syndrome is an autosomal recessive disorder associated with early-onset ocular abnormalities and central nervous system malformations. Ocular abnormalities are usually severe, and include high myopia, vitreoretinal degeneration, retinal detachment, macular abnormalities, and cataract. The most frequent systemic changes are midline malformations of the brain, ventricular dilation, and occipital encephalocele. Cognitive delay may occur. We report a case of cataract in a child with Knobloch syndrome. Cataract surgery and follow-up are described.Keywords: Knobloch syndrome, cataract, phacoemulsification, vitreous, right eye, left eye, genetic

  19. Cataract extraction after brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fish, G.E.; Jost, B.F.; Snyder, W.I.; Fuller, D.G.; Birch, D.G.

    1991-01-01

    Thirteen eyes of 55 consecutive patients treated with brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid developed postirradiation cataracts. Cataract development was more common in older patients and in patients with larger and more anterior tumors. Eleven eyes had extracapsular cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation. Initial visual improvement occurred in 91% of eyes, with an average improvement of 5.5 lines. Visual acuity was maintained at 20/60 or better in 55% of the eyes over an average period of follow-up of 24 months (range, 6 to 40 months). These data suggest that, visually, cataract extraction can be helpful in selected patients who develop a cataract after brachytherapy for malignant melanoma of the choroid

  20. The Role and Mechanisms of Action of Glucocorticoid Involvement in Memory Storage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carmen Sandi

    1998-01-01

    integral aspect of the neurobiological mechanism underlying memory formation. By reviewing the work carried out in different learning models in chicks (passive avoidance learning and rats (spatial orientation in the Morris water maze and contextual fear conditioning, a role for brain corticosterone action through the glucocorticoid receptor type on the mechanisms of memory consolidation is hypothesized. Evidence is also presented to relate post-training corticosterone levels to the strength of memory storage. Finally, the possible molecular mechanisms that might mediate the influences of glucocorticoids in synaptic plasticity subserving long-term memory formation are considered, mainly by focusing on studies implicating a steroid action through (i glutamatergic transmission and (ii cell adhesion molecules.

  1. The Role and Mechanisms of Action of Glucocorticoid Involvement in Memory Storage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandi, Carmen

    1998-01-01

    Adrenal steroid hormones modulate learning and memory processes by interacting with specific glucocorticoid receptors at different brain areas. In this article, certain components of the physiological response to stress elicited by learning situations are proposed to form an integral aspect of the neurobiological mechanism underlying memory formation. By reviewing the work carried out in different learning models in chicks (passive avoidance learning) and rats (spatial orientation in the Morris water maze and contextual fear conditioning), a role for brain corticosterone action through the glucocorticoid receptor type on the mechanisms of memory consolidation is hypothesized. Evidence is also presented to relate post-training corticosterone levels to the strength of memory storage. Finally, the possible molecular mechanisms that might mediate the influences of glucocorticoids in synaptic plasticity subserving long-term memory formation are considered, mainly by focusing on studies implicating a steroid action through (i) glutamatergic transmission and (ii) cell adhesion molecules. PMID:9920681

  2. Cataract in Latin America: findings from nine recent surveys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Limburg, Hans; Silva, Juan C; Foster, Allen

    2009-05-01

    To review recent data on blindness and low vision due to cataract in Latin America. Presentation of findings from population-based prevalence surveys conducted between 1999 and 2006 in nine Latin American countries covering 30,544 people aged 50 years and older. Prevalence of cataract blindness in people 50 years and older ranged from 0.5% in Buenos Aires to 2.3% in four provinces of Guatemala. Low vision from cataract ranged from 0.9% in Buenos Aires to 10.7% in Piura and Tumbes Districts in Peru. Cataract surgical coverage (CSC) was good in Campinas, Brazil; low in Paraguay, Peru, and Guatemala; and moderate in the other areas. Good visual outcome after cataract surgery nearly conformed to World Health Organization (WHO) guidelines in Buenos Aires (more than 80% of operated eyes able to see 20/60 or better), but ranged from 60% to 79% in most of the other settings, and was less than 60% in Guatemala and Peru. "Unaware that treatment is possible," "contraindications," "cannot afford," and "fear of operation" were the most common explanations for failure to come forward for surgery. In Campinas, Brazil, cataract is fairly well controlled. In Buenos Aires, the visual outcomes after cataract surgery nearly meet WHO standards. In most countries in Latin America, however, cataract intervention needs to be intensified and visual outcome improved. Reducing the costs of cataract surgery and providing effective health education and adequate program management are essential to combat the expected increase in visual impairment due to cataract in the region.

  3. Up-date on neuro-immune mechanisms involved in allergic and non-allergic rhinitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gerven, L.; Boeckxstaens, G.; Hellings, P.

    2012-01-01

    Non-allergic rhinitis (NAR) is a common disorder, which can be defined as chronic nasal inflammation, independent of systemic IgE-mediated mechanisms. Symptoms of NAR patients mimic those of allergic rhinitis (AR) patients. However, AR patients can easily be diagnosed with skin prick test or

  4. Different mechanisms are involved in the antibody mediated inhibition of ligand binding to the urokinase receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, K; Høyer-Hansen, G; Rønne, E

    1999-01-01

    Certain monoclonal antibodies are capable of inhibiting the biological binding reactions of their target proteins. At the molecular level, this type of effect may be brought about by completely different mechanisms, such as competition for common binding determinants, steric hindrance or interfer...

  5. [Biological effects of arsenic and diseases: The mechanisms involved in arsenic-induced carcinogenesis].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suzuki, Takehiro; Takumi, Shota; Okamura, Kazuyuki; Nohara, Keiko

    2016-07-01

    Chronic arsenic exposure is associated with many diseases, including cancers. Our study using in vivo assay in gpt-delta transgenic mice showed that arsenic particularly induces G : C to T : A transversions, a mutation type induced through oxidative-stress-induced 8-OHdG formation. Gestational arsenic exposure of C3H mice was reported to increase hepatic tumor incidence. We showed that gestational arsenic exposure increased hepatic tumors having activated oncogene Ha-ras by C to A mutation. We also showed that DNA methylation status of Fosb region is implicated in tumor augmentation by gestational arsenic exposure. We further showed that long-term arsenic exposure induces premature senescence. Recent studies reported that senescence is involved in not only tumor suppression, but also tumorgenesis. All these effects of arsenic might be involved in arsenic-induced carcinogenesis.

  6. An intermolecular binding mechanism involving multiple LysM domains mediates carbohydrate recognition by an endopeptidase

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wong, Mei Mei Jaslyn Elizabeth; Midtgaard, Søren Roi; Gysel, Kira

    2015-01-01

    LysM domains, which are frequently present as repetitive entities in both bacterial and plant proteins, are known to interact with carbohydrates containing N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) moieties, such as chitin and peptidoglycan. In bacteria, the functional significance of the involvement of multi......LysM domains, which are frequently present as repetitive entities in both bacterial and plant proteins, are known to interact with carbohydrates containing N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) moieties, such as chitin and peptidoglycan. In bacteria, the functional significance of the involvement...... solution studies of this endopeptidase revealed the presence of a homodimer. The structure of the two LysM domains co-crystallized with N-acetyl-chitohexaose revealed a new intermolecular binding mode that may explain the differential interaction between LysM domains and short or long chitin oligomers...

  7. Study of the effects of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids: Molecular mechanisms involved intestinal inflammation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoch, B.; Barnett, M. P. G.; Roy, N. C.; McNabb, W. C.

    2009-07-01

    The use of omics techniques in combination with model systems and molecular tools allows to understand how foods and food components act on metabolic pathways to regulate transcriptional processes. Polyunsaturated fatty acids have distinctive nutritional and metabolic effects because they give rise to lipid mediated products and affect the expression of various genes involved in intestinal inflammation. The present review focuses on the molecular effects of dietary polyunsaturated fatty acids on intestinal inflammation. (Author) 74 refs.

  8. VIGS for dissecting mechanisms involved in the symbiotic interaction of microbes with plants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønlund, Mette

    2015-01-01

    Virus-induced gene silencing (VIGS) is an alternative reverse genetics tool for silencing of genes in some plants which are difficult to transform. The pea early browning virus (PEBV) has been developed as a VIGS vector and used in pea for functional analysis of several genes. Here, a PEBV-VIGS p......-VIGS protocol is described which is suitable for reverse genetics studies in pea for genes involved in the symbiosis with arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi and Rhizobium....

  9. Molecular mechanisms involved in the bidirectional relationship between diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Harpreet Singh; Luthra, Shailly

    2013-05-01

    Both diabetes and periodontitis are chronic diseases. Diabetes has many adverse effects on the periodontium, and conversely periodontitis may have deleterious effects further aggravating the condition in diabetics. The potential common pathophysiologic pathways include those associated with inflammation, altered host responses, altered tissue homeostasis, and insulin resistance. This review examines the relationship that exists between periodontal diseases and diabetes mellitus with a focus on potential common pathophysiologic mechanisms.

  10. MECHANISMS INVOLVED IN THE ASSOCIATION BETWEEN PERIDONTAL DISEASES AND CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

    OpenAIRE

    Teles, Ricardo; Wang, Cun-Yu

    2011-01-01

    It is now well accepted that besides the cholesterol associated mechanisms of atherogenesis, inflammation plays a crucial role in all stages of the development of the atherosclerotic lesion. This “inflammation hypothesis” raises the possibility that, through systemic elevations of pro-inflammatory cytokines, periodontal diseases might also contribute to systemic inflammation and, therefore, to atherogenesis. In fact, there is evidence that periodontal diseases are associated with higher syste...

  11. A new bacterial staining method involving Gram stain with theoretical considerations of the staining mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noda, Y; Tôei, K

    1992-01-01

    In order to investigate the mechanism of Gram staining of bacteria, tests with anionic dyes followed by treatment with cationic octyltrimethylammonium (OTMA) were carried out. The study revealed that tetrabromophenolphthalein ethylester (TBPE) gave the most reliable staining of Gram-negative bacteria with negative staining of Gram-positive bacteria. Tests on many species of bacteria showed that TBPE positive bacteria were Gram-negative and vice versa, without exception.

  12. Molecular mechanisms involved in the bidirectional relationship between diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grover, Harpreet Singh; Luthra, Shailly

    2013-01-01

    Both diabetes and periodontitis are chronic diseases. Diabetes has many adverse effects on the periodontium, and conversely periodontitis may have deleterious effects further aggravating the condition in diabetics. The potential common pathophysiologic pathways include those associated with inflammation, altered host responses, altered tissue homeostasis, and insulin resistance. This review examines the relationship that exists between periodontal diseases and diabetes mellitus with a focus on potential common pathophysiologic mechanisms. PMID:24049328

  13. Biochemical Mechanisms and Microorganisms Involved in Anaerobic Testosterone Metabolism in Estuarine Sediments

    OpenAIRE

    Shih, Chao-Jen; Chen, Yi-Lung; Wang, Chia-Hsiang; Wei, Sean T.-S.; Lin, I-Ting; Ismail, Wael A.; Chiang, Yin-Ru

    2017-01-01

    Current knowledge on the biochemical mechanisms underlying microbial steroid metabolism in anaerobic ecosystems is extremely limited. Sulfate, nitrate, and iron [Fe (III)] are common electron acceptors for anaerobes in estuarine sediments. Here, we investigated anaerobic testosterone metabolism in anaerobic sediments collected from the estuary of Tamsui River, Taiwan. The anaerobic sediment samples were spiked with testosterone (1 mM) and individual electron acceptors (10 mM), including nitra...

  14. Involvement of Arabidopsis Prolyl 4 Hydroxylases in Hypoxia, Anoxia and Mechanical Wounding

    OpenAIRE

    Vlad, Florina; Spano, Thodhoraq; Vlad, Daniela; Daher, Firas Bou; Ouelhadj, Akli; Fragkostefanakis, Sotirios; Kalaitzis, Panagiotis

    2007-01-01

    Arabidopsis prolyl 4 hydroxylases (P4Hs) catalyze an important post-translational modification in plants, though the only information on their patterns of expression is solely based on Arabidopsis microarray analysis data. In addition, the expression patterns of plants P4Hs in response to hypoxia, anoxia and other abiotic stresses such as mechanical wounding have never been studied extensively, despite their central role in hypoxic response of several other organisms through the regulation of...

  15. Involvement of glucokinase translocation in the mechanism by which resorcinol inhibits glycolysis in hepatocytes.

    OpenAIRE

    Agius, L

    1997-01-01

    Proglycosyn and resorcinol stimulate glycogen synthesis and inhibit glycolysis in hepatocytes. The former effect is attributed to inactivation of phosphorylase mediated by glucuronidated metabolites. This study investigated the mechanism by which resorcinol inhibits glycolysis. Resorcinol (150 microM) inhibited glycolysis in hepatocytes incubated with glucose (15-35 mM) but not with dihydroxyacetone (10 mM). The inhibition of glycolysis at elevated glucose concentration was associated with in...

  16. Involvement of epigenetic mechanisms in the development of posttraumatic stress disorder

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomaž Zupanc

    2012-03-01

    victims with no childhood abuse were found. It was suggested that changes in glucocorticoid system are mediated by tissue-specific changes in gene expression. Recent studies suggest that epigenetic mechanisms may play an important role in the interplay between stress exposure and genetic vulnerability. Conclusions: Integrating epigenetics into a model that permits prior experience to have a central role in determining individual differences is also consistent with a developmental perspective of PTSD vulnerability.

  17. Molecular mechanisms involved in the bidirectional relationship between diabetes mellitus and periodontal disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harpreet Singh Grover

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Both diabetes and periodontitis are chronic diseases. Diabetes has many adverse effects on the periodontium, and conversely periodontitis may have deleterious effects further aggravating the condition in diabetics. The potential common pathophysiologic pathways include those associated with inflammation, altered host responses, altered tissue homeostasis, and insulin resistance. This review examines the relationship that exists between periodontal diseases and diabetes mellitus with a focus on potential common pathophysiologic mechanisms.

  18. Mechanisms involved in the association between periodontal diseases and cardiovascular disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teles, R; Wang, C-Y

    2011-07-01

    It is now well accepted that besides the cholesterol associated mechanisms of atherogenesis, inflammation plays a crucial role in all stages of the development of the atherosclerotic lesion. This 'inflammation hypothesis' raises the possibility that through systemic elevations of pro-inflammatory cytokines, periodontal diseases might also contribute to systemic inflammation and, therefore, to atherogenesis. In fact, there is evidence that periodontal diseases are associated with higher systemic levels of high-sensitivity C-reactive protein and a low grade systemic inflammation. This phenomenon has been explained based on mechanisms associated with either the infectious or the inflammatory nature of periodontal diseases. The purposes of this article were to review (1) the evidence suggesting a role for oral bacterial species, particularly periodontal pathogens, in atherogenesis; (2) the potential mechanisms explaining an etiological role for oral bacteria in atherosclerosis; (3) the evidence suggesting that periodontal infections are accompanied by a heightened state of systemic inflammation; (4) the potential sources of systemic inflammatory biomarkers associated with periodontal diseases; and (5) the effects of periodontal therapy on systemic inflammatory biomarkers and cardiovascular risk. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. Phenanthrene causes ocular developmental toxicity in zebrafish embryos and the possible mechanisms involved

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Lixing [State Key Laboratory of Cellular Stress Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Wang, Chonggang [State Key Laboratory of Cellular Stress Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen (China); Zhang, Youyu; Wu, Meifang [State Key Laboratory of Cellular Stress Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); Zuo, Zhenghong, E-mail: zuozhenghong@xmu.edu.cn [State Key Laboratory of Cellular Stress Biology, School of Life Sciences, Xiamen University, Xiamen 361005 (China); State Key Laboratory of Marine Environmental Science, Xiamen University, Xiamen (China)

    2013-10-15

    Highlights: • Phe exposure caused obvious morphological changes in the retina. • Phe exposure caused apoptosis and reduction of cell proliferation in the retina. • Phe causes ocular toxicity might be via the AhR/Zeb1/Mitf/Pax6 signaling pathway. • AhR is a repressor of Zeb1. -- Abstract: Recent studies show that polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) may be a candidate cause of developmental defects of the retina, but the mechanism is still unclear. We evaluated the mechanism(s) underlying PAH-induced retinal development defects due to exposure to environmental concentrations of Phenanthrene (Phe) in zebrafish. We found that exposure to environmental concentrations of Phe caused obvious morphological changes, developmental retardation, apoptosis, and reduction of cell proliferation in the retina. Our results indicated that Phe could cause visual system developmental defects. Phe exposure up-regulated aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) and microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (Mtif) expression, and down-regulated zinc finger E-box binding homeobox 1 (Zeb1) and paired box 6 (Pax6). Moreover, we demonstrated that AhR was a repressor of Zeb1. We propose that Phe's ocular toxicity is mediated by up-regulating AhR, which then down-regulates Zeb1, in turn inducing Mitf expression while inhibiting Pax6 expression.

  20. Association of CHMP4B and Autophagy with Micronuclei: Implications for Cataract Formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonia P. Sagona

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a mechanism of cellular self-degradation that is very important for cellular homeostasis and differentiation. Components of the endosomal sorting complex required for transport (ESCRT machinery are required for endosomal sorting and also for autophagy and the completion of cytokinesis. Here we show that the ESCRT-III subunit CHMP4B not only localizes to normal cytokinetic bridges but also to chromosome bridges and micronuclei, the latter surrounded by lysosomes and autophagosomes. Moreover, CHMP4B can be co-immunoprecipitated with chromatin. Interestingly, a CHMP4B mutation associated with autosomal dominant posterior polar cataract abolishes the ability of CHMP4B to localize to micronuclei. We propose that CHMP4B, through its association with chromatin, may participate in the autophagolysosomal degradation of micronuclei and other extranuclear chromatin. This may have implications for DNA degradation during lens cell differentiation, thus potentially protecting lens cells from cataract development.

  1. Effect of Geranylgeranylacetone on Ultraviolet Radiation Type B-Induced Cataract in Heat-Shock Transcription Factor 1 Heterozygous Mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ogasawara, Satoshi; Hashizume, Kouhei; Okuno, Takashi; Imaizumi, Toshiyasu; Inomata, Yui; Tezuka, Yu; Sanbe, Atushi; Kurosaka, Daijiro

    2017-05-01

    We investigated whether heat-shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) was involved in ultraviolet radiation type B (UVR-B)-induced lens opacity (cataract) using HSF1 heterozygous mice. We also examined the effects of geranylgeranylacetone (GGA), an inducer of heat-shock proteins via activation of HSF, on the UVR-B-induced cataract. Male HSF1 +/- and WT mice were unilaterally exposed to UVR-B (total: 1200mJ) at 16 weeks of age. At 48 h after the last UVR-B irradiation, the lens was isolated and the induction of the cataract was quantified as the cataract area ratio (opacity area/anterior capsule). GGA was orally administered at a dosage of 500 mg/kg once a day for two days before the first UVR-B exposure until the end of the experiment (21days in total). The HSF1 expression was more greatly decreased in the lens from HSF1 +/- mice than in that from WT mice (p B exposure could mainly induce cataracts in the anterior capsule in both HSF1 +/- and WT mice, while the opacity of the lens was markedly enhanced in HSF 1+/- mice compared to that in WT mice(p (0.01). GGA treatment could prevent the induction of lens opacity by UVR-B exposure in both WT and HSF1 +/- mice as compared with the non-administration group (p B radiation was seen in lens protein levels of αA-crystallin, αB-crystallin, or γ-crystallin with or without GGA administration among all groups of mice. In contrast to the crystallins, the lens protein level of HSP25 was decreased by UVR-B exposure in both HSF1 +/- and WT mice, and was significantly recovered in WT mice by the GGA treatment (p B-induced cataracts, possibly via regulation of HSPs such as HSP25.

  2. Different mechanisms are involved in the antibody mediated inhibition of ligand binding to the urokinase receptor

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    List, K; Høyer-Hansen, G; Rønne, E

    1999-01-01

    or interference with conformational properties of the receptor critical for ligand binding. This distinction is central when employing the antibodies as tools in the elucidation of the structure-function relationship of the protein in question. We have studied the effect of monoclonal antibodies against......PA/uPAR complex. The continuous recording of binding and dissociation, obtained in BIA, is central in characterizing these phenomena. The identification of a non-competitive inhibitory mechanism against this receptor reveals the presence of a determinant which influences the binding properties of a remote site...

  3. A novel mechanism involved in the coupling of mitochondrial biogenesis to oxidative phosphorylation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelena Ostojić

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondria are essential organelles that are central to a multitude of cellular processes, including oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS, which produces most of the ATP in animal cells. Thus it is important to understand not only the mechanisms and biogenesis of this energy production machinery but also how it is regulated in both physiological and pathological contexts. A recent study by Ostojić et al. [Cell Metabolism (2013 18, 567-577] has uncovered a regulatory loop by which the biogenesis of a major enzyme of the OXPHOS pathway, the respiratory complex III, is coupled to the energy producing activity of the mitochondria.

  4. The involvement of noradrenergic mechanisms in the suppressive effects of diazepam on the hypothalamicpituitary- adrenal axis activity in female rats

    OpenAIRE

    Švob Štrac, Dubravka; Muck-Šeler, Dorotea

    2012-01-01

    Aim To elucidate the involvement of noradrenergic system in the mechanism by which diazepam suppresses basal hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis activity. Methods Plasma corticosterone and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) levels were determined in female rats treated with diazepam alone, as well as with diazepam in combination with clonidine (α2-adrenoreceptor agonist), yohimbine (α2-adrenoreceptor antagonist), alpha-methylp- tyrosine (α-MPT, an inhibitor of ca...

  5. Swarming Mechanisms in the Yellow Fever Mosquito: Aggregation Pheromones are Involved in the Mating Behavior of Aedes aegypti

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-12-01

    Vol. 39, no. 2 Journal of Vector Ecology 347 Swarming mechanisms in the yellow fever mosquito: aggregation pheromones are involved in the mating...Downes 1966, Provost and Haeger 1967), Aedes albopictus (Nijhot and Craig 1971), Culiseta inornata (Kliewer et al. 1966, Lang and Foster 1976), and some...aegypti Linnaeus is one of the most medically important mosquitoes as the main vector of dengue, chikungunya, and yellow fever viruses, in addition to its

  6. Identification and Characterization of the Phage Gene sav, Involved in Sensitivity to the Lactococcal Abortive Infection Mechanism AbiV

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaber, Jakob Brandt Borup; Rousseau, G. M.; Hammer, Karin

    2009-01-01

    Lactococcus lactis phage mutants that are insensitive to the recently characterized abortive infection mechanism AbiV were isolated and analyzed in an effort to elucidate factors involved in the sensitivity to AbiV. Whole-genome sequencing of the phage mutants p2.1 and p2.2 revealed mutations...... effect. Conserved, evolutionarily related regions in SaV polypeptides of different phage groups are likely to be responsible for the AbiV-sensitive phenotype and the toxicity....

  7. The Effect of Cataract on Eye Movement Perimetry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Thepass

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine how different grades of cataract affect sensitivity threshold and saccadic reaction time (SRT in eye movement perimetry (EMP. Methods. In EMP, the visual field is tested by assessing the saccades that a subject makes towards peripheral stimuli using an eye tracker. Forty-eight cataract patients underwent pre- and postoperative EMP examination in both eyes. The subjects had to fix a central stimulus presented on the eye tracker monitor and to look at any detected peripheral stimulus upon its appearance. A multilevel mixed model was used to determine the factors that affected the sensitivity threshold and the SRT as a function of cataract grade. Results. We found no effect of cataract severity (LOCS III grades I through IV on SRT and the sensitivity thresholds. In cataract of LOCS III grade V, however, we found an increase by 27% and 21% (p<0.001, respectively, compared to the SRT and the sensitivity threshold in LOCS III grade I. Eyes that underwent cataract surgery showed no change in mean SRTs and sensitivity thresholds after surgery in LOCS III grade IV and lower. Conclusion. The present study shows that EMP can be readily used in patients with cataract with LOCS III grade IV and below.

  8. Evaluation of the macula prior to cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKeague, Marta; Sharma, Priya; Ho, Allen C

    2018-01-01

    To describe recent evidence regarding methods of evaluation of retinal structure and function prior to cataract surgery. Studies in patients with cataract but no clinically detectable retinal disease have shown that routine use of optical coherence tomography (OCT) prior to cataract surgery can detect subtle macular disease, which may alter the course of treatment or lead to modification of consent. The routine use of OCT has been especially useful in patients being considered for advanced-technology intraocular lenses (IOLs) as subtle macular disease can be a contraindication to the use of these lenses. The cost-effectiveness of routine use of OCT prior to cataract surgery has not been studied. Other technologies that assess retinal function rather than structure, such as microperimetry and electroretinogram (ERG) need further study to determine whether they can predict retinal potential in cataract patients. There is growing evidence for the importance of more detailed retinal evaluation of cataract patients even with clinically normal exam. OCT has been the most established and studied method for retinal evaluation in cataract patients, but other technologies such as microperimetry and ERG are beginning to be studied.

  9. Risk of occupational radiation-induced cataract in medical workers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Snezana, Milacic

    2008-01-01

    The objective of this study was determination of criteria for recognition of a pre senile cataract as a professional disease in health care personnel exposed to small doses of ionizing radiation. Method: The study included 3240 health workers in medical centers of Serbia in the period 1992-2002. A total of 1560 workers were employed in the zone (group A) and 1680 out of ionizing radiation zone (group B). Among group A, two groups had been selected: 1. Group A-1: Health workers in the ionizing radiation zone who contracted lens cataract during their years of service while dosimetry could not reveal higher absorbed dose (A-1=115); 2. Group A-2: Health workers in the ionizing radiation zone with higher incidence of chromosomal aberrations and without cataract (A-2=100). Results: More significant incidence of cataract was found in group A, χ 2 =65.92; p<0.01. Radiation risk was higher in health workers in radiation zone than in others, relative risk is 4, 6. Elevated blood sugar level was found in higher percentage with health workers working in radiation zone who developed cataract. Conclusion: Low doses of radiation are not the cause of occupational cataract as individual occupational disease. X-ray radiation may be a significant cofactor of cataract in radiological technicians. (author)

  10. Mechanism of Anti-glioblastoma Effect of Temzolomide Involved in ROS-Mediated SIRT 1 Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuan Jiang

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To explore the new molecular mechanism of anti-tumor effect of temzolomide (TMZon glioblastoma cell strain. Methods: MTT methods and Hoechst 33342 staining method were applied to determine the effect of TMZ on the proliferation and apoptosis of glioblastoma cell strains U251 and SHG44, while flow cytometry was used to detect the impact of TMZ on cellular cycles. Additionally, DCFH-DA probe was adopted to test intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS level while Real-time PCR and Western blot tests were applied to determine the influence of TMZ on SIRT1 expression. Results: TMZ in different concentrations added into glioblastoma cell strain for 72 h could concentration-dependently inhibit the proliferation of glioblastoma cells, 100 μmol/L of which could also block cells in phase G2/M and improve cellular apoptosis. In addition, TMZ could evidently increase intracellular ROS level so as to activate SIRT1. Conclusion: The mechanism of anti-tumor effect of TMZ on glioblastoma may be associated with ROS-induced SIRT1 pathway, providing theoretical basis for the clinical efficacy of TMZ.

  11. Activity-Dependent Dendritic Spine Shrinkage and Growth Involve Downregulation of Cofilin via Distinct Mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calabrese, Barbara; Saffin, Jean-Michel; Halpain, Shelley

    2014-01-01

    A current model posits that cofilin-dependent actin severing negatively impacts dendritic spine volume. Studies suggested that increased cofilin activity underlies activity-dependent spine shrinkage, and that reduced cofilin activity induces activity-dependent spine growth. We suggest instead that both types of structural plasticity correlate with decreased cofilin activity. However, the mechanism of inhibition determines the outcome for spine morphology. RNAi in rat hippocampal cultures demonstrates that cofilin is essential for normal spine maintenance. Cofilin-F-actin binding and filament barbed-end production decrease during the early phase of activity-dependent spine shrinkage; cofilin concentration also decreases. Inhibition of the cathepsin B/L family of proteases prevents both cofilin loss and spine shrinkage. Conversely, during activity-dependent spine growth, LIM kinase stimulates cofilin phosphorylation, which activates phospholipase D-1 to promote actin polymerization. These results implicate novel molecular mechanisms and prompt a revision of the current model for how cofilin functions in activity-dependent structural plasticity. PMID:24740405

  12. Intersections of pathways involving biotin and iron relative to therapeutic mechanisms for progressive multiple sclerosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heidker, Rebecca M; Emerson, Mitchell R; LeVine, Steven M

    2016-12-01

    While there are a variety of therapies for relapsing remitting multiple sclerosis (MS), there is a lack of treatments for progressive MS. An early study indicated that high dose biotin therapy has beneficial effects in approximately 12-15% of patients with progressive MS. The mechanisms behind the putative improvements seen with biotin therapy are not well understood, but have been postulated to include: 1) improving mitochondrial function which is impaired in MS, 2) increasing synthesis of lipids and cholesterol to facilitate remyelination, and 3) affecting gene expression. We suggest one reason that a greater percentage of patients with MS didn't respond to biotin therapy is the inaccessibility or lack of other nutrients, such as iron. In addition to biotin, iron (or heme) is necessary for energy production, biosynthesis of cholesterol and lipids, and for some protective mechanisms. Both biotin and iron are required for myelination during development, and by inference, remyelination. However, iron can also play a role in the pathology of MS. Increased deposition of iron can occur in some CNS structures possibly promoting oxidative damage while low iron levels can occur in other areas. Thus, the potential, detrimental effects of iron need to be considered together with the need for iron to support metabolic demands associated with repair and/or protective processes. We propose the optimal utilization of iron may be necessary to maximize the beneficial effects of biotin. This review will examine the interactions between biotin and iron in pathways that may have therapeutic or pathogenic implications for MS.

  13. Possible Mechanisms Involved in Attenuation of Lipopolysaccharide-Induced Memory Deficits by Methyl Jasmonate in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eduviere, Anthony Taghogho; Umukoro, Solomon; Adeoluwa, Olusegun A; Omogbiya, Itivere Adrian; Aluko, Oritoke Modupe

    2016-12-01

    This present study was carried out to investigate the likely mechanisms by which methyl jasmonate (MJ), 'an agent widely used in aromatherapy for neurological disorders, attenuates lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced memory deficits in mice. Mice were given intraperitoneal administration of LPS (250 µg/kg) alone or in combination with MJ (10-40 mg/kg), donepezil, DP (1 mg/kg), or vehicle for 7 successive days. Thereafter, memory was assessed using object recognition test (ORT). Acetylcholinesterase and myeloperoxidase activities were estimated in brain tissue homogenates. Brain levels of nitric oxide and markers of oxidative stress as well as histopathologic changes of the prefrontal cortex and cornu ammonis 1 (CA1) of the hippocampal region were also assessed. MJ (10-40 mg/kg) attenuated LPS-induced memory impairment in ORT. Moreover, the increased brain activities of acetylcholinesterase and myeloperoxidase enzymes were suppressed by MJ when compared with control (p memory deficits via mechanisms related to inhibition of acetylcholinesterase, myeloperoxidase, oxidative stress and neuronal degeneration.

  14. Sensitizing Children to the Social and Emotional Mechanisms involved in Racism: a program evaluation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sofia Triliva

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes and discusses the results of an intervention aiming to sensitize children to the social and emotional processes involved in racism. The intervention was applied and evaluated in 10 Greek elementary schools. The goals and the intervention methods of the program modules are briefly outlined and the results of the program evaluation are elaborated and discussed. Two-hundred students participated in the program and 180 took part in the pre-and-post-testing which assessed their ability to identify emotions associated with prejudice, discrimination and stereotypical thinking; to understand similarities and differences between people; and to develop perspective taking and empathic skills in relation to diverse others. Results indicate gains in all three areas of assessment although the increased ability to identify similarities between people can also be attributed to age/grade effects. The implications of the findings are discussed with regard to antiracism intervention methods and evaluation strategies.

  15. Mechanisms of Prescription Drug Diversion Among Drug-Involved Club- and Street-Based Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inciardi, James A.; Surratt, Hilary L.; Kurtz, Steven P.; Cicero, Theodore J.

    2010-01-01

    Objective Prescription drug diversion involves the unlawful channeling of regulated pharmaceuticals from legal sources to the illicit marketplace, and can occur along all points in the drug delivery process, from the original manufacturing site to the wholesale distributor, the physician's office, the retail pharmacy, or the patient. However, empirical data on diversion are limited. Method In an attempt to develop a better understanding of how specific drug-using populations are diverting prescription opioids and other medications, or obtaining controlled drugs that have already been diverted, qualitative interviews and focus group data were collected on four separate populations of prescription drug abusers in Miami, Florida—club drug users, street-based illicit drug users, methadone maintenance patients, and HIV positive individuals who abuse and/or divert drugs. Results Sources of abused prescription drugs cited by focus group participants were extremely diverse, including their physicians and pharmacists; parents and relatives; “doctor shopping”; leftover supplies following an illness or injury; personal visits to Mexico, South America and the Caribbean; prescriptions intended for the treatment of mental illness; direct sales on the street and in nightclubs; pharmacy and hospital theft; through friends or acquaintances; under-the-door apartment flyers advertising telephone numbers to call; and “stealing from grandma's medicine cabinet.” Conclusion While doctor shoppers, physicians and the Internet receive much of the attention regarding diversion, the data reported in this paper suggest that there are numerous active street markets involving patients, Medicaid recipients and pharmacies as well. In addition, there are other data which suggest that the contributions of residential burglaries, pharmacy robberies and thefts, and “sneak thefts” to the diversion problem may be understated. PMID:17305688

  16. A possible new mechanism involved in non-uniform field breakdown in gaseous dielectrics

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pinnaduwage, L.A.; Christophorou, L.G.

    1994-01-01

    The electrical breakdown of gases under uniform field conditions is fairly well understood in terms of the Townsend's breakdown theory. In most cases involving uniform fields, the breakdown voltage can be estimated via this theory using basic electron impact parameters for molecules in their ground electronic states. In contrast, a consistent model of gaseous breakdown under nonuniform fields is not available at present although substantial progress has been made recently. We point out the possibility that electron impact processes involving high-lying electronically-excited states may play a significant role under non-uniform field conditions. Thus, such processes may need to be included in order to obtain a better understanding of non-uniform field breakdown phenomena. The general, breakdown characteristics of highly non-uniform field gaps can be illustrated by that for a point-plane geometry. It has been found that the breakdown voltage for such a gap can be calculated by a simple streamer criterion if the pressure P, is above a critical value, P c ; for P c , the estimated breakdown voltage is found to coincide with the corona inception voltage, with the actual breakdown occurring at a higher voltage, corona discharges occur only for P c . In other words, the presence of corona in the pressure region below P c seems to prevent the breakdown from occurring at the predicted value. This has led to the term ''corona stabilization'' to describe the enhancement in the breakdown voltage for pressures below P c . Non-uniform field breakdown measurements in gases will be discussed. We will discuss the possibility that the ''corona stabilization'' is due to the prevention of avalanche progression by attachment of free electrons to molecules in their high-lying electronically-excited states. Information on electron attachment to electronically-excited states of molecules was not available up until the late 1980's

  17. Unexpected potential protective associations between outdoor air pollution and cataracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Yoon-Hyeong; Park, Su Jin; Paik, Hae Jung; Kim, Mee Kum; Wee, Won Ryang; Kim, Dong Hyun

    2018-02-01

    Air pollution is one of the biggest public health issues, and the eye is continuously exposed to multiple outdoor air pollution. However, to date, no large-scale study has assessed the relationship between air pollutants and cataracts. We investigated associations between outdoor air pollution and cataracts in the Korean population. A population-based cross-sectional study was performed using data from the Korea National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, including 18,622 adults more than 40 years of age. The presence of cataracts and their subtypes were evaluated by ophthalmologists. Air pollution data (levels of particulate matter, ozone, nitrogen dioxide, and sulfur dioxide) for the 2 years prior to the ocular examinations were collected from national monitoring stations. The associations of multiple air pollutants with cataracts were assessed by multivariate logistic regression analyses. Sociodemographic factors and previously known risk factors for cataracts were controlled as covariates (model 1 included sociodemographic factors, sun exposure, and behavioral factors, while model 2 further included clinical factors). Higher ozone concentrations were protectively associated with overall cataract which included all subtypes [single pollutant model: 0.003 ppm increase-model 1 (OR 0.89, p = 0.014), model 2 (OR 0.87, p = 0.011); multi-pollutant model: 0.003 ppm increase-model 1 (OR 0.80, p = 0.002), model 2 (OR 0.87, p = 0.002)]. Especially, higher ozone concentrations showed deeply protective association with nuclear cataract subtype [0.003 ppm increase-single pollutant model: model 2 (OR 0.84, p = 0.006), multi-pollutant model: model 2 (OR 0.73, p < 0.001)]. Higher tropospheric ozone concentrations showed protective associations with overall cataract and nuclear cataract subtype in the Korean population.

  18. Potassium channel and NKCC cotransporter involvement in ocular refractive control mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sheila G Crewther

    Full Text Available Myopia affects well over 30% of adult humans globally. However, the underlying physiological mechanism is little understood. This study tested the hypothesis that ocular growth and refractive compensation to optical defocus can be controlled by manipulation of potassium and chloride ion-driven transretinal fluid movements to the choroid. Chicks were raised with +/-10D or zero power optical defocus rendering the focal plane of the eye in front of, behind, or at the level of the retinal photoreceptors respectively. Intravitreal injections of barium chloride, a non-specific inhibitor of potassium channels in the retina and RPE or bumetanide, a selective inhibitor of the sodium-potassium-chloride cotransporter were made, targeting fluid control mechanisms. Comparison of refractive compensation to 5 mM Ba(2+ and 10(-5 M bumetanide compared with control saline injected eyes shows significant change for both positive and negative lens defocus for Ba(2+ but significant change only for negative lens defocus with bumetanide (Rx(SAL(-10D = -8.6 +/- .9 D; Rx(Ba2+(-10D = -2.9 +/- .9 D; Rx(Bum(-10D = -2.9 +/- .9 D; Rx(SAL(+10D = +8.2 +/- .9 D; Rx(Ba2+(+10D = +2.8 +/- 1.3 D; Rx(Bum(+10D = +8.0 +/- .7 D. Vitreous chamber depths showed a main effect for drug conditions with less depth change in response to defocus shown for Ba(2+ relative to Saline, while bumetanide injected eyes showed a trend to increased depth without a significant interaction with applied defocus. The results indicate that both K channels and the NKCC cotransporter play a role in refractive compensation with NKCC blockade showing far more specificity for negative, compared with positive, lens defocus. Probable sites of action relevant to refractive control include the apical retinal pigment epithelium membrane and the photoreceptor/ON bipolar synapse. The similarities between the biometric effects of NKCC inhibition and biometric reports of the blockade of the retinal ON response, suggest a

  19. Calcium ion involvement in growth inhibition of mechanically stressed soybean (Glycine max) seedlings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, R. S.; Mitchell, C. A.

    1989-01-01

    A 40-50% reduction in soybean [Glycine max (L.) Merr. cv. Century 84] hypocotyl elongation occurred 24 h after application of mechanical stress. Exogenous Ca2+ at 10 mM inhibited growth by 28% if applied with the Ca2+ ionophore A23187 to the zone of maximum hypocotyl elongation. La3+ was even more inhibitory than Ca2+, especially above 5 mM. Treatment with ethyleneglycol-bis-(beta-aminoethylether)-N, N, N', N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) alone had no effect on growth of non-stressed seedlings at the concentrations used but negated stress-induced growth reduction by 36% at 4 mM when compared to non-treated, stressed controls. Treatment with EDTA was ineffective in negating stress-induced growth inhibition. Calmodulin antagonists calmidazolium, chlorpromazine, and 48/80 also negated stress-induced growth reduction by 23, 50, and 35%, respectively.

  20. Cancer multidrug resistance: mechanisms involved and strategies for circumvention using a drug delivery system.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibria, Golam; Hatakeyama, Hiroto; Harashima, Hideyoshi

    2014-01-01

    Multidrug resistance (MDR), the principal mechanism by which many cancers develop resistance to chemotherapy, is one of the major obstacles to the successful clinical treatment of various types of cancer. Several key regulators are responsible for mediating MDR, a process that renders chemotherapeutic drugs ineffective in the internal organelles of target cells. A nanoparticulate drug delivery system (DDS) is a potentially promising tool for circumventing such MDR, which can be achieved by targeting tumor cells themselves or tumor endothelial cells that support the survival of MDR cancer cells. The present article discusses key factors that are responsible for MDR in cancer cells, with a specific focus on the application of DDS to overcome MDR via the use of chemotherapy or macromolecules.

  1. Plastic and Neuroprotective Mechanisms Involved in the Therapeutic Effects of Cannabidiol in Psychiatric Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alline C. Campos

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Beneficial effects of cannabidiol (CBD have been described for a wide range of psychiatric disorders, including anxiety, psychosis, and depression. The mechanisms responsible for these effects, however, are still poorly understood. Similar to clinical antidepressant or atypical antipsychotic drugs, recent findings clearly indicate that CBD, either acutely or repeatedly administered, induces plastic changes. For example, CBD attenuates the decrease in hippocampal neurogenesis and dendrite spines density induced by chronic stress and prevents microglia activation and the decrease in the number of parvalbumin-positive GABA neurons in a pharmacological model of schizophrenia. More recently, it was found that CBD modulates cell fate regulatory pathways such as autophagy and others critical pathways for neuronal survival in neurodegenerative experimental models, suggesting the potential benefit of CBD treatment for psychiatric/cognitive symptoms associated with neurodegeneration. These changes and their possible association with CBD beneficial effects in psychiatric disorders are reviewed here.

  2. Critical review on the physical and mechanical factors involved in tissue engineering of cartilage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaut, Carrie; Sugaya, Kiminobu

    2015-01-01

    Articular cartilage defects often progress to osteoarthritis, which negatively impacts quality of life for millions of people worldwide and leads to high healthcare expenditures. Tissue engineering approaches to osteoarthritis have concentrated on proliferation and differentiation of stem cells by activation and suppression of signaling pathways, and by using a variety of scaffolding techniques. Recent studies indicate a key role of environmental factors in the differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells to mature cartilage-producing chondrocytes. Therapeutic approaches that consider environmental regulation could optimize chondrogenesis protocols for regeneration of articular cartilage. This review focuses on the effect of scaffold structure and composition, mechanical stress and hypoxia in modulating mesenchymal stem cell fate and the current use of these environmental factors in tissue engineering research.

  3. Mechanisms Involved in Thromboxane A2-induced Vasoconstriction of Rat Intracavernous Small Penile Arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grann, Martin; Comerma Steffensen, Simon Gabriel; Arcanjo, Daniel Dias Rufino

    2015-01-01

    by activation of thromboxane receptors concentration-dependently increased calcium and contraction. U46619-induced calcium influx was blocked by nifedipine, a blocker of L-type calcium channels, and by 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate, a blocker of transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. Inhibitors of ROCK, Y...... relaxation in rat mesenteric arteries. Our findings suggest that U46619 contraction depends on Ca2+ influx through L-type and TRP channels, and ROCKdependent mechanisms in penile arteries. Inhibition of the ROCK pathway is a potential approach for the treatment of erectile dysfunction associated......Diabetes is associated with erectile dysfunction and with hypercontractility in erectile tissue and this is in part ascribed to increased formation of thromboxane. Rho kinase (ROCK) is a key regulator of calcium sensitization and contraction in vascular smooth muscle. This study investigated...

  4. Attentional Biases toward Attractive Alternatives and Rivals: Mechanisms Involved in Relationship Maintenance among Chinese Women.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yidan; Zhao, Guang; Tu, Shen; Zheng, Yong

    2015-01-01

    A long-term romantic relationship can offer many benefits to committed individuals. Thus, humans possess relationship maintenance mechanisms to protect against threats from those who serve as attractive alternatives or intrasexual rivals. Many studies have indicated that romantic love can act as a commitment device to activate these mechanisms. To examine the attentional bias associated with relationship maintenance among 108 college students (49 single and 59 committed females) in China, we used a semantic priming procedure to activate mental representations associated with romantic love and then asked participants to complete a dot-probe task for the purpose of making a distinction between the engage and disengage components of attention. No significant engaging effects toward attractive faces were observed among committed females, but the following significant disengaging effects were found: when primed with romantic love, single females showed increased attention toward and difficulty in disengaging from attractive male faces, whereas females already in a committed relationship did not alter their attention, remaining as inattentive to attractive alternatives as they were in the baseline condition. In addition, committed females responded to love priming by exhibiting difficulty in disengaging from attractive rivals. The present findings provide evidence in the Chinese cultural context for the existence of early-stage attentional processes in the domain of relationship maintenance that committed Chinese females protected an ongoing relationship by not only being inattentive to attractive males who could serve as attractive alternatives, but also being more attentive to attractive females who could be potential rivals when mental representations associated with romantic love were primed.

  5. Catecholamine biosynthesis pathway potentially involved in banana defense mechanisms to crown rot disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lassois, L; De Clerck, C; Frettinger, P; De Lapeyre De Bellaire, L; Lepoivre, P; Haïssam Jijakli, M

    2011-01-01

    Variations in Cavendish bananas susceptibility to crown rot disease have been observed (Lassois et al., 2010a), but the molecular mechanisms underlying these quantitative host-pathogen relationships were still unknown. The present study was designed to compare gene expression between bananas (Musa acuminata, AAA, 'Grande-Naine') showing a high post-harvest susceptibility (S+) and bananas showing a low post-harvest susceptibility (S-) to crown rot disease. This comparison was performed between crowns (S+ and S-) collected one hour before standardized artificial inoculations with Colletotrichum musae. Fruit susceptibility was evaluated through lesion size on the crown 13 days later. Gene expression comparisons were performed with the cDNA-AFLP technique (Lassois et al., 2009). This revealed that a gene showing a strong homology with a dopamine-beta-monooxygenase (DoH) is differently expressed between S+ and S (Lassois et al., 2011). Furthermore, semi-quantitative real-time RT-PCR analyses between S+ and S- were applied to confirm the differential expression results for DoH obtained by cDNA-AFLP. Two biological replicates were tested. These semi-quantitative analyses were performed not only on tissues collected one hour before C. musae inoculation but also on crown tissues collected 13 days after inoculation. The real-time RT-PCR confirmed that DoH was upregulated in the S tissues collected at harvest, just before C. musae inoculation. This gene was also highly upregulated in the S- tissues collected 13 days after crown inoculation. Similar results were obtained for both biological replicates. Our results suggest that catecholamine's could play a role in banana defense mechanisms to crown rot disease.

  6. Attentional Biases toward Attractive Alternatives and Rivals: Mechanisms Involved in Relationship Maintenance among Chinese Women.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yidan Ma

    Full Text Available A long-term romantic relationship can offer many benefits to committed individuals. Thus, humans possess relationship maintenance mechanisms to protect against threats from those who serve as attractive alternatives or intrasexual rivals. Many studies have indicated that romantic love can act as a commitment device to activate these mechanisms. To examine the attentional bias associated with relationship maintenance among 108 college students (49 single and 59 committed females in China, we used a semantic priming procedure to activate mental representations associated with romantic love and then asked participants to complete a dot-probe task for the purpose of making a distinction between the engage and disengage components of attention. No significant engaging effects toward attractive faces were observed among committed females, but the following significant disengaging effects were found: when primed with romantic love, single females showed increased attention toward and difficulty in disengaging from attractive male faces, whereas females already in a committed relationship did not alter their attention, remaining as inattentive to attractive alternatives as they were in the baseline condition. In addition, committed females responded to love priming by exhibiting difficulty in disengaging from attractive rivals. The present findings provide evidence in the Chinese cultural context for the existence of early-stage attentional processes in the domain of relationship maintenance that committed Chinese females protected an ongoing relationship by not only being inattentive to attractive males who could serve as attractive alternatives, but also being more attentive to attractive females who could be potential rivals when mental representations associated with romantic love were primed.

  7. Involvement of glucokinase translocation in the mechanism by which resorcinol inhibits glycolysis in hepatocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agius, L

    1997-01-01

    Proglycosyn and resorcinol stimulate glycogen synthesis and inhibit glycolysis in hepatocytes. The former effect is attributed to inactivation of phosphorylase mediated by glucuronidated metabolites. This study investigated the mechanism by which resorcinol inhibits glycolysis. Resorcinol (150 microM) inhibited glycolysis in hepatocytes incubated with glucose (15-35 mM) but not with dihydroxyacetone (10 mM). The inhibition of glycolysis at elevated glucose concentration was associated with inhibition of glucose-induced dissociation of glucokinase and aldolase. The resorcinol concentration that caused half-maximal inhibition (20-43 microM) increased with increasing glucose concentration (15-35 mM). Resorcinol inhibited the translocation of glucokinase and the stimulation of detritiation of [2-3H]glucose and [3-3H]glucose caused by sorbitol (10-200 microM), but it potentiated the stimulation of glycogen synthesis. The inhibition of glycolysis by resorcinol could not be accounted for by diversion of substrate to glycogen. The glucose 6-phosphate content correlated with the free glucokinase activity. Resorcinol counteracted the increase in glucose 6-phosphate and fructose 2,6-bisphosphate caused by elevated glucose concentration or by sorbitol. The suppression of glucose 6-phosphate at high glucose concentration (15-35 mM) could be explained by the low activity of free glucokinase. However, the suppression at 5 mM glucose was due in part to an independent mechanism. The effect of resorcinol on glucokinase translocation was partly counteracted by galactosamine, which suppresses UDP-glucose and inhibits glucuronide formation, and was mimicked by phenol and p-nitrophenol but not by p-nitrophenylglucuronide. It is concluded that resorcinol inhibits glycolysis at elevated glucose concentration or when stimulated by sorbitol through increased glucokinase binding. The results indicate a link between glucuronidation and glucokinase translocation. PMID:9271087

  8. Attentional Biases toward Attractive Alternatives and Rivals: Mechanisms Involved in Relationship Maintenance among Chinese Women

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Yidan; Zhao, Guang; Tu, Shen; Zheng, Yong

    2015-01-01

    A long-term romantic relationship can offer many benefits to committed individuals. Thus, humans possess relationship maintenance mechanisms to protect against threats from those who serve as attractive alternatives or intrasexual rivals. Many studies have indicated that romantic love can act as a commitment device to activate these mechanisms. To examine the attentional bias associated with relationship maintenance among 108 college students (49 single and 59 committed females) in China, we used a semantic priming procedure to activate mental representations associated with romantic love and then asked participants to complete a dot-probe task for the purpose of making a distinction between the engage and disengage components of attention. No significant engaging effects toward attractive faces were observed among committed females, but the following significant disengaging effects were found: when primed with romantic love, single females showed increased attention toward and difficulty in disengaging from attractive male faces, whereas females already in a committed relationship did not alter their attention, remaining as inattentive to attractive alternatives as they were in the baseline condition. In addition, committed females responded to love priming by exhibiting difficulty in disengaging from attractive rivals. The present findings provide evidence in the Chinese cultural context for the existence of early-stage attentional processes in the domain of relationship maintenance that committed Chinese females protected an ongoing relationship by not only being inattentive to attractive males who could serve as attractive alternatives, but also being more attentive to attractive females who could be potential rivals when mental representations associated with romantic love were primed. PMID:26309232

  9. [The progress of studies on intraocular lens implantation in cataract with high myopia].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xue; Wan, Xiuhua

    2015-07-01

    With development of the technology of cataract surgery, combined phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation in cataract with high myopia has been widely carried out in clinical treatment. Due to the particularity of high myopia, phacoemulsification in patients with cataract and high myopia is difficult and has recently received a lot of attentions. In this paper, preoperative examinations, the selection of intraocular lenses, surgery methods and surgical complications of cataract surgery in patients with cataract and high myopia are briefly reviewed.

  10. Anterior internal lenticonus accompanied by congenital nuclear cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhe; Sun, Chuan-Bin; Yao, Ke

    2011-12-01

    Internal lenticonus is a very rare morphologic abnormality of crystalline lens which has been reported in only several cases in the literature. We herein reported the clinical characteristics and surgical findings of the anterior internal lenticonus accompanied by congenital nuclear cataract. Cataract extraction accompanied with intraocular lens implantation was uneventfully performed, and a good visual outcome was achieved in this case. Viral infection during embryonal and fetal period might account for the formation of the anterior internal lenticonus and congenital nuclear cataract in our case.

  11. Recent status on femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Ming Wang

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery performs the anterior capsulotomy, lens fragmentation, corneal incisions making and astigmatic limbal relaxing incision with femtosecond laser, which effectively reduces the complications of conventional phacoemulsification surgery and improves the postoperative visual quality of patients. It further improves the technology and effect of cataract surgery and has broad clinical application prospects. This paper compares pros and cons as well as the clinical values of femtosecond laser-assisted cataract surgery with conventional phacoemulsification surgery based on the overview of published articles.

  12. Unilateral, Isolated, Paediatric Lightning-Induced Cataract: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. J. Rogers

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available A six-year-old girl presented with gradual loss of vision in the left eye a year after sustaining a lightning strike while in her home. Examination revealed healed burns to her cheek, left arm, and right leg and a dense left cataract. There was no evidence of other ocular sequelae, and her right eye was normal. Cataract surgery and lens implantation were performed on the left eye with good results. Isolated, unilateral, paediatric cataract due to lightning is discussed.

  13. Microincision versus small-incision coaxial cataract surgery using different power modes for hard nuclear cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Eun Chul; Byun, Yong Soo; Kim, Man Soo

    2011-10-01

    To compare the efficacy of microincision and small-incision coaxial phacoemulsification in treating hard cataracts using different ultrasound power modes. Department of Ophthalmology, Seoul St. Mary's Hospital, College of Medicine, Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, Korea. Randomized clinical trial. Eyes with hard cataract were randomized to have an initial incision of 1.80 mm, 2.20 mm, or 2.75 mm. The eyes in each group were equally randomized to treatment with burst, pulse, or continuous mode. Ultrasound time (UST), mean cumulative dissipated energy (CDE), corrected distance visual acuity (CDVA), surgically induced corneal astigmatism, incisional and central corneal thickness (CCT), and endothelial cell counts were evaluated. The study enrolled 180 eyes, 60 in each group. Two months postoperatively, there were no statistically significant differences in UST, CDE, CDVA, CCT, or percentage endothelial cell loss between the 3 incision groups. The 2.75 mm incision induced more astigmatism at 2 months and less incisional corneal edema at 1 week than the 1.80 mm or 2.20 mm incision (Phard cataract. The intraoperative energy use and ocular damage was less with the pulse and burst modes than with the continuous mode. No author has a financial or proprietary interest in any material or method mentioned. Copyright © 2011 ASCRS and ESCRS. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Mechanisms involved in the intestinal absorption of dietary vitamin A and provitamin A carotenoids☆

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrison, Earl H.

    2012-01-01

    Vitamin A is an essential nutrient for humans and is converted to the visual chromophore, 11-cis-retinal, and to the hormone, retinoic acid. Vitamin A in animal-derived foods is found as long chain acyl esters of retinol and these are digested to free fatty acids and retinol before uptake by the intestinal mucosal cell. The retinol is then reesterified to retinyl esters for incorporation into chlylomicrons and absorbed via the lymphatics or effluxed into the portal circulation facilitated by the lipid transporter, ABCA1. Provitamin A carotenoids such as β-carotene are found in plant-derived foods. These and other carotenoids are transported into the mucosal cell by scavenger receptor class B type I (SR-BI). Provitamin A carotenoids are partly converted to retinol by oxygenase and reductase enzymes and the retinol so produced is available for absorption via the two pathways described above. The efficiency of vitamin A and carotenoid intestinal absorption is determined by the regulation of a number of proteins involved in the process. Polymorphisms in genes for these proteins lead to individual variability in the metabolism and transport of vitamin A and carotenoids. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled Retinoid and Lipid Metabolism. PMID:21718801

  15. Epigenetic mechanisms involved in the effects of stress exposure: focus on 5-hydroxymethylcytosine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hack, Laura M; Dick, Alec L W; Provençal, Nadine

    2016-08-01

    5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC) is a recently re-discovered transient intermediate in the active demethylation pathway that also appears to play an independent role in modulating gene function. Epigenetic marks, particularly 5-methylcytosine, have been widely studied in relation to stress-related disorders given the long-lasting effect that stress has on these marks. 5hmC is a good candidate for involvement in the etiology of these disorders given its elevated concentration in mammalian neurons, its dynamic regulation during development of the central nervous system, and its high variability among individuals. Although we are unaware of any studies published to date examining 5 hmC profiles in human subjects who have developed a psychiatric disorder after a life stressor, there is emerging evidence from the animal literature that 5hmC profiles are altered in the context of fear-conditioning paradigms and stress exposure, suggesting a possible role for 5hmC in the biological underpinnings of stress-related disorders. In this review, the authors examine the available approaches for profiling 5hmC and describe their advantages and disadvantages as well as discuss the studies published thus far investigating 5hmC in the context of fear-related learning and stress exposure in animals. The authors also highlight the global versus locus-specific regulation of 5hmC in these studies. Finally, the limitations of the current studies and their implications are discussed.

  16. Evolutionary mechanisms involved in the virulence of infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV), a piscine orthomyxovirus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Markussen, Turhan; Jonassen, Christine Monceyron; Numanovic, Sanela; Braaen, Stine; Hjortaas, Monika; Nilsen, Hanne; Mjaaland, Siri

    2008-01-01

    Infectious salmon anaemia virus (ISAV) is an orthomyxovirus causing a multisystemic, emerging disease in Atlantic salmon. Here we present, for the first time, detailed sequence analyses of the full-genome sequence of a presumed avirulent isolate displaying a full-length hemagglutinin-esterase (HE) gene (HPR0), and compare this with full-genome sequences of 11 Norwegian ISAV isolates from clinically diseased fish. These analyses revealed the presence of a virulence marker right upstream of the putative cleavage site R 267 in the fusion (F) protein, suggesting a Q 266 → L 266 substitution to be a prerequisite for virulence. To gain virulence in isolates lacking this substitution, a sequence insertion near the cleavage site seems to be required. This strongly suggests the involvement of a protease recognition pattern at the cleavage site of the fusion protein as a determinant of virulence, as seen in highly pathogenic influenza A virus H5 or H7 and the paramyxovirus Newcastle disease virus

  17. An intermolecular binding mechanism involving multiple LysM domains mediates carbohydrate recognition by an endopeptidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wong, Jaslyn E. M. M. [Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Midtgaard, Søren Roi [University of Copenhagen, Universitetsparken 5, 2100 Copenhagen (Denmark); Gysel, Kira [Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark); Thygesen, Mikkel B.; Sørensen, Kasper K.; Jensen, Knud J. [University of Copenhagen, Thorvaldsensvej 40, 1871 Frederiksberg C (Denmark); Stougaard, Jens; Thirup, Søren; Blaise, Mickaël, E-mail: mickael.blaise@cpbs.cnrs.fr [Aarhus University, Gustav Wieds Vej 10C, 8000 Aarhus (Denmark)

    2015-03-01

    The crystal and solution structures of the T. thermophilus NlpC/P60 d, l-endopeptidase as well as the co-crystal structure of its N-terminal LysM domains bound to chitohexaose allow a proposal to be made regarding how the enzyme recognizes peptidoglycan. LysM domains, which are frequently present as repetitive entities in both bacterial and plant proteins, are known to interact with carbohydrates containing N-acetylglucosamine (GlcNAc) moieties, such as chitin and peptidoglycan. In bacteria, the functional significance of the involvement of multiple LysM domains in substrate binding has so far lacked support from high-resolution structures of ligand-bound complexes. Here, a structural study of the Thermus thermophilus NlpC/P60 endopeptidase containing two LysM domains is presented. The crystal structure and small-angle X-ray scattering solution studies of this endopeptidase revealed the presence of a homodimer. The structure of the two LysM domains co-crystallized with N-acetyl-chitohexaose revealed a new intermolecular binding mode that may explain the differential interaction between LysM domains and short or long chitin oligomers. By combining the structural information with the three-dimensional model of peptidoglycan, a model suggesting how protein dimerization enhances the recognition of peptidoglycan is proposed.

  18. Study of the physical mechanisms involved in the femtosecond laser optical breakdown of dielectric materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mouskeftaras, Alexandros

    2013-01-01

    We have carried out detailed time resolved experimental studies of the mechanism of electron excitation-relaxation, when an ultrashort (60 fs -1 ps) laser (UV and IR) pulse interacts with a wide band gap dielectric material. The studies cover a range of different dielectric materials and the investigated regimes span from nondestructive ionization of the material at the low power end (∼TW/cm 2 ) to ablative domain at a higher laser power (∼10 TW/cm 2 ). This gives fundamental insight into the understanding of the laser damaging process taking place under our irradiation conditions. The usage of time-resolved spectral interferometry technique allows to directly measure the electron density of the irradiated material under different excitation conditions and hence leads to quantification of the process. The measurements, carried out at the optical breakdown threshold utilizing different pulse durations, raise questions regarding the usage of critical excitation density as a universal ablation criterion. A new criterion related to the exchanged energy is proposed. Additionally, the use of an experimental setup implementing a double pump pulse allows the identification of different excitation mechanisms taking place at time scales of the order of the pulse duration used. Electronic avalanche is observed in some materials (SiO 2 , NaCl) while this is not the case for others (Al 2 O 3 , MgO). These differences are discussed in detail. Next, we measure the energy spectrum of excited electrons with a complementary technique: the photoemission spectroscopy. These results allow us on one hand to show a crossed effect between the two 'pump' pulses and on the other hand to measure electron relaxation characteristic times, as a function of their kinetic energy. Finally, a morphological study of craters resulting from ablation in the case of a single pulse has been carried out for different irradiation parameters: number of shots, energy and pulse duration. This work has

  19. The Oculist's Eye: Connections between Cataract Couching, Anatomy, and Visual Theory in the Renaissance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baker, Tawrin

    2017-01-01

    We now know that cataract couching involves depressing an occluded crystalline lens to the bottom of the vitreous chamber, but from the time of Galen until the seventeenth-century cataracts were thought to be separate concretions arising between the crystalline lens and the pupil. From Antiquity through the Renaissance, the combination of visual theory in which the crystalline humor is the author of vision, and surgical experience—that couching cataracts restored some degree of sight—resulted in anatomists depicting a large space between the crystalline lens and the pupil. In the Renaissance, oculists—surgical specialists with little higher education or connections to learned surgery or medicine—overwhelmingly performed eye surgeries. This article examines how the experience and knowledge of oculists, of barber-surgeons, and of learned surgeons influenced one another on questions of anatomy, visual theory, and surgical experience. By analyzing the writings of the oculist George Bartisch (c. 1535–1607), the barber-surgeon Ambroise Paré (1510–1590), and the learned surgeon Hieronymus Fabricius ab Aquapendente (1533–1619), we see that the oculists’ understanding of the eye—an eye constructed out of the probing, tactile experience of eye surgery—slowly lost currency among the learned toward the beginning of the seventeenth century.

  20. Preoperative corneal astigmatism among adult patients with cataract in Northern Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammed Isyaku

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The prevalence and nature of corneal astigmatism among patients with cataract has not been well-documented in the resident African population. This retrospective study was undertaken to investigate preexisting corneal astigmatism in adult patients with cataract. We analyzed keratometric readings acquired by manual Javal-Schiotz keratometry before surgery between January 1, 2011 and December 31, 2011. There were 3,169 patients (3286 eyes aged between 16 and 110 years involved with a Male to female ratio of 1.4:1. Mean keratometry in diopters was K1 = 43.99 and K2 = 43.80. Mean corneal astigmatism was 1.16 diopter and a majority (45.92% of eyes had astigmatism between 1.00 and 1.99 diopters. Two-thirds of the eyes (66.9% in this study had preoperative corneal astigmatism equal to or above 1.00 diopter. Findings will help local cataract surgeons to estimate the potential demand for toric intraocular lenses.

  1. Potential markers and metabolic processes involved in the mechanism of radiation-induced heart injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slezak, Jan; Kura, Branislav; Babal, Pavel; Barancik, Miroslav; Ferko, Miroslav; Frimmel, Karel; Kalocayova, Barbora; Kukreja, Rakesh C; Lazou, Antigone; Mezesova, Lucia; Okruhlicova, Ludmila; Ravingerova, Tanya; Singal, Pawan K; Szeiffova Bacova, Barbara; Viczenczova, Csilla; Vrbjar, Norbert; Tribulova, Narcis

    2017-10-01

    Irradiation of normal tissues leads to acute increase in reactive oxygen/nitrogen species that serve as intra- and inter-cellular signaling to alter cell and tissue function. In the case of chest irradiation, it can affect the heart, blood vessels, and lungs, with consequent tissue remodelation and adverse side effects and symptoms. This complex process is orchestrated by a large number of interacting molecular signals, including cytokines, chemokines, and growth factors. Inflammation, endothelial cell dysfunction, thrombogenesis, organ dysfunction, and ultimate failing of the heart occur as a pathological entity - "radiation-induced heart disease" (RIHD) that is major source of morbidity and mortality. The purpose of this review is to bring insights into the basic mechanisms of RIHD that may lead to the identification of targets for intervention in the radiotherapy side effect. Studies of authors also provide knowledge about how to select targeted drugs or biological molecules to modify the progression of radiation damage in the heart. New prospective studies are needed to validate that assessed factors and changes are useful as early markers of cardiac damage.

  2. Studies of the mechanisms involved in the laser surface hardening process of aluminum base alloys

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Silva, Luciana Ventavele da

    2011-01-01

    The Al-Si alloys are widely used in industry to replace the steel and gray cast iron in high-tech sectors. The commercial importance of these alloys is mainly due to its low weight, excellent wear (abrasion) and corrosion resistance, high resistance at elevated temperatures, low coefficient of thermal expansion and lesser fuel consumption that provide considerable reduction of emission of pollutants. In this work, Al-Si alloy used in the automotive industry to manufacture pistons of internal combustion engines, was undergone to surface treatments using LASER remelting (Nd:YAG, λ = 1.06 μm, pulsed mode). The LASER enables various energy concentrations with accurate transfer to the material without physical contact. The intense energy transfer causes the occurrence of structural changes in the superficial layer of the material. Experiments with single pulses and trails were conducted under various conditions of LASER processing in order to analyze microstructural changes resulting from treatments and their effects on the hardness. For the characterization of hardened layer was utilized the following techniques: optical microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS), x-ray mapping, Vickers microhardness and maximum roughness tests. The high cooling rate caused a change in the alloy structure due to the refinement of the primary eutectic silicon particles, resulting in increase of the mechanical properties (hardness) of the Al-Si alloy. (author)

  3. Auxin-induced growth of Avena coleoptiles involves two mechanisms with different pH optima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Although rapid auxin-induced growth of coleoptile sections can persist for at least 18 hours, acid-induced growth lasts for a much shorter period of time. Three theories have been proposed to explain this difference in persistence. To distinguish between these theories, the pH dependence for auxin-induced growth of oat (Avena sativa L.) coleoptiles has been determined early and late in the elongation process. Coleoptile sections from which the outer epidermis was removed to facilitate buffer entry were incubated, with or without 10 micromolar indoleacetic acid, in 20 millimolar buffers at pH 4.5 to 7.0 to maintain a fixed wall pH. During the first 1 to 2 hours after addition of auxin, elongation occurs by acid-induced extension (i.e. the pH optimum is Auxin causes no additional elongation because the buffers prevent further changes in wall pH. After 60 to 90 minutes, a second mechanism of auxin-induced growth, whose pH optimum is 5.5 to 6.0, predominates. It is proposed that rapid growth responses to changes in auxin concentration are mediated by auxin-induced changes in wall pH, whereas the prolonged, steady-state growth rate is controlled by a second, auxin-mediated process whose pH optimum is less acidic.

  4. Flavonoids Active Against Osteosarcoma: A Review of the Molecular Mechanisms Involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hui; Gao, Yutong; Dong, Yonghui; Cheng, Peng; Chen, Anmin; Huang, Hui

    2017-01-01

    Osteosarcoma is the most frequent primitive malignant bone tumor affecting adolescents and young adults worldwide. The tumor exhibits aggressive growth in the primary site and readily metastasizes to other organs. There has been no significant improvement in the 5-year survival rate since the 1970s and the figure remains at 60-70%. In addition, the side effects of chemotherapeutic drugs and resistance to chemotherapy compromise the effects of treatment for osteosarcoma. In recent years, the development of flavonoids drugs inhibiting carcinogenesis is attracting great interest in the scientific community. Flavonoids are one kind of polyphenolic compounds widely found in vegetables and fruits. Moreover, flavonoids have become popular compounds, exhibiting comprehensive antitumor activities, while being safe and inexpensive. Here, the literature on the benefits afforded by flavonoids in terms of osteosarcoma treatment is reviewed and certain flavonoids and their effects on osteosarcoma are discussed. These compounds can perturb the cell cycle, induce apoptosis, inhibit tumor cell invasion and metastasis, potentiate the actions of chemotherapeutic agents, trigger autophagy, and stimulate antitumor activity in vivo. In summary, we highlight the currently well-accepted flavonoid compounds and detail the molecular mechanisms by which flavonoids may treat osteosarcoma, and thus the flavonoids exhibit great promise as anti-osteosarcoma agents. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  5. Auxin-induced growth of Avena coleoptiles involves two mechanisms with different pH optima

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cleland, R. E.

    1992-01-01

    Although rapid auxin-induced growth of coleoptile sections can persist for at least 18 hours, acid-induced growth lasts for a much shorter period of time. Three theories have been proposed to explain this difference in persistence. To distinguish between these theories, the pH dependence for auxin-induced growth of oat (Avena sativa L.) coleoptiles has been determined early and late in the elongation process. Coleoptile sections from which the outer epidermis was removed to facilitate buffer entry were incubated, with or without 10 micromolar indoleacetic acid, in 20 millimolar buffers at pH 4.5 to 7.0 to maintain a fixed wall pH. During the first 1 to 2 hours after addition of auxin, elongation occurs by acid-induced extension (i.e. the pH optimum is <5 and the elongation varies inversely with the solution pH). Auxin causes no additional elongation because the buffers prevent further changes in wall pH. After 60 to 90 minutes, a second mechanism of auxin-induced growth, whose pH optimum is 5.5 to 6.0, predominates. It is proposed that rapid growth responses to changes in auxin concentration are mediated by auxin-induced changes in wall pH, whereas the prolonged, steady-state growth rate is controlled by a second, auxin-mediated process whose pH optimum is less acidic.

  6. Chemical Compounds and Mechanisms Involved in the Formation and Stabilization of Foam in Sparkling Wines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kemp, Belinda; Condé, Bruna; Jégou, Sandrine; Howell, Kate; Vasserot, Yann; Marchal, Richard

    2018-02-08

    The visual properties of sparkling wine including foam and bubbles are an indicator of sparkling wine quality. Foam properties, particularly foam height (FH) and foam stability (TS), are significantly influenced by the chemical composition of the wine. This review investigates our current knowledge of specific chemical compounds and, the mechanisms by which they influence the foam properties of sparkling wines. Grape and yeast proteins, amino acids, polysaccharides, phenolic compounds, organic acids, fatty acids, ethanol and sugar are examined with respect to their contribution to foam characteristics in sparkling wines made with the traditional, transfer, and charmat and carbonation methods. Contradictory results have been identified that appear to be due to the analytical methods used to measure and quantify compounds and foam. Biopolymer complexes are discussed and absent knowledge with regards to thaumatin-like proteins (TLPs), polysaccharides, amino acids, oak-derived phenolic compounds and organic acids are identified. Future research is also likely to concentrate on visual analysis of sparkling wines by in-depth imaging analysis and specific sensory analysis techniques.

  7. Biochemical Mechanisms and Microorganisms Involved in Anaerobic Testosterone Metabolism in Estuarine Sediments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Chao-Jen; Chen, Yi-Lung; Wang, Chia-Hsiang; Wei, Sean T-S; Lin, I-Ting; Ismail, Wael A; Chiang, Yin-Ru

    2017-01-01

    Current knowledge on the biochemical mechanisms underlying microbial steroid metabolism in anaerobic ecosystems is extremely limited. Sulfate, nitrate, and iron [Fe (III)] are common electron acceptors for anaerobes in estuarine sediments. Here, we investigated anaerobic testosterone metabolism in anaerobic sediments collected from the estuary of Tamsui River, Taiwan. The anaerobic sediment samples were spiked with testosterone (1 mM) and individual electron acceptors (10 mM), including nitrate, Fe 3+ , and sulfate. The analysis of androgen metabolites indicated that testosterone biodegradation under denitrifying conditions proceeds through the 2,3- seco pathway, whereas testosterone biodegradation under iron-reducing conditions may proceed through an unidentified alternative pathway. Metagenomic analysis and PCR-based functional assays suggested that Thauera spp. were the major testosterone degraders in estuarine sediment samples incubated with testosterone and nitrate. Thauera sp. strain GDN1, a testosterone-degrading betaproteobacterium, was isolated from the denitrifying sediment sample. This strain tolerates a broad range of salinity (0-30 ppt). Although testosterone biodegradation did not occur under sulfate-reducing conditions, we observed the anaerobic biotransformation of testosterone to estrogens in some testosterone-spiked sediment samples. This is unprecedented since biotransformation of androgens to estrogens is known to occur only under oxic conditions. Our metagenomic analysis suggested that Clostridium spp. might play a role in this anaerobic biotransformation. These results expand our understanding of microbial metabolism of steroids under strictly anoxic conditions.

  8. Biochemical Mechanisms and Microorganisms Involved in Anaerobic Testosterone Metabolism in Estuarine Sediments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Jen Shih

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Current knowledge on the biochemical mechanisms underlying microbial steroid metabolism in anaerobic ecosystems is extremely limited. Sulfate, nitrate, and iron [Fe (III] are common electron acceptors for anaerobes in estuarine sediments. Here, we investigated anaerobic testosterone metabolism in anaerobic sediments collected from the estuary of Tamsui River, Taiwan. The anaerobic sediment samples were spiked with testosterone (1 mM and individual electron acceptors (10 mM, including nitrate, Fe3+, and sulfate. The analysis of androgen metabolites indicated that testosterone biodegradation under denitrifying conditions proceeds through the 2,3-seco pathway, whereas testosterone biodegradation under iron-reducing conditions may proceed through an unidentified alternative pathway. Metagenomic analysis and PCR-based functional assays suggested that Thauera spp. were the major testosterone degraders in estuarine sediment samples incubated with testosterone and nitrate. Thauera sp. strain GDN1, a testosterone-degrading betaproteobacterium, was isolated from the denitrifying sediment sample. This strain tolerates a broad range of salinity (0–30 ppt. Although testosterone biodegradation did not occur under sulfate-reducing conditions, we observed the anaerobic biotransformation of testosterone to estrogens in some testosterone-spiked sediment samples. This is unprecedented since biotransformation of androgens to estrogens is known to occur only under oxic conditions. Our metagenomic analysis suggested that Clostridium spp. might play a role in this anaerobic biotransformation. These results expand our understanding of microbial metabolism of steroids under strictly anoxic conditions.

  9. Effects of nitric oxide on magnocellular neurons of the supraoptic nucleus involve multiple mechanisms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M.P. da Silva

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Physiological evidence indicates that the supraoptic nucleus (SON is an important region for integrating information related to homeostasis of body fluids. Located bilaterally to the optic chiasm, this nucleus is composed of magnocellular neurosecretory cells (MNCs responsible for the synthesis and release of vasopressin and oxytocin to the neurohypophysis. At the cellular level, the control of vasopressin and oxytocin release is directly linked to the firing frequency of MNCs. In general, we can say that the excitability of these cells can be controlled via two distinct mechanisms: 1 the intrinsic membrane properties of the MNCs themselves and 2 synaptic input from circumventricular organs that contain osmosensitive neurons. It has also been demonstrated that MNCs are sensitive to osmotic stimuli in the physiological range. Therefore, the study of their intrinsic membrane properties became imperative to explain the osmosensitivity of MNCs. In addition to this, the discovery that several neurotransmitters and neuropeptides can modulate their electrical activity greatly increased our knowledge about the role played by the MNCs in fluid homeostasis. In particular, nitric oxide (NO may be an important player in fluid balance homeostasis, because it has been demonstrated that the enzyme responsible for its production has an increased activity following a hypertonic stimulation of the system. At the cellular level, NO has been shown to change the electrical excitability of MNCs. Therefore, in this review, we focus on some important points concerning nitrergic modulation of the neuroendocrine system, particularly the effects of NO on the SON.

  10. Modeling the mechanism involved during the sorption of methylene blue onto fly ash.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, K Vasanth; Ramamurthi, V; Sivanesan, S

    2005-04-01

    Batch sorption experiments were carried out to remove methylene blue from its aqueous solutions using fly ash as an adsorbent. Operating variables studied were initial dye concentration, fly ash mass, pH, and contact time. Maximum color removal was observed at a basic pH of 8. Equilibrium data were represented well by a Langmuir isotherm equation with a monolayer sorption capacity of 5.718 mg/g. Sorption data were fitted to both Lagergren first-order and pseudo-second-order kinetic models and the data were found to follow pseudo-second-order kinetics. Rate constants at different initial concentrations were estimated. The process mechanism was found to be complex, consisting of both surface adsorption and pore diffusion. The effective diffusion parameter D(i) values were estimated at different initial concentrations and the average value was determined to be 2.063 x 10(-9)cm2/s. Analysis of sorption data using a Boyd plot confirms the particle diffusion as the rate-limiting step for the dye concentration ranges studied in the present investigation (20 to 60 mg/L).

  11. Adaptation of grapevine flowers to cold involves different mechanisms depending on stress intensity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mélodie Sawicki

    Full Text Available Grapevine flower development and fruit set are influenced by cold nights in the vineyard. To investigate the impact of cold stress on carbon metabolism in the inflorescence, we exposed the inflorescences of fruiting cuttings to chilling and freezing temperatures overnight and measured fluctuations in photosynthesis and sugar content. Whatever the temperature, after the stress treatment photosynthesis was modified in the inflorescence, but the nature of the alteration depended on the intensity of the cold stress. At 4°C, photosynthesis in the inflorescence was impaired through non-stomatal limitations, whereas at 0°C it was affected through stomatal limitations. A freezing night (-3°C severely deregulated photosynthesis in the inflorescence, acting primarily on photosystem II. Cold nights also induced accumulation of sugars. Soluble carbohydrates increased in inflorescences exposed to -3°C, 0°C and 4°C, but starch accumulated only in inflorescences of plants treated at 0 and -3°C. These results suggest that inflorescences are able to cope with cold temperatures by adapting their carbohydrate metabolism using mechanisms that are differentially induced according to stress intensity.

  12. Magnetic Resonance investigation into the mechanisms involved in the development of high-altitude cerebral edema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sagoo, Ravjit S; Hutchinson, Charles E; Wright, Alex; Handford, Charles; Parsons, Helen; Sherwood, Victoria; Wayte, Sarah; Nagaraja, Sanjoy; Ng'Andwe, Eddie; Wilson, Mark H; Imray, Christopher He

    2017-01-01

    Rapid ascent to high altitude commonly results in acute mountain sickness, and on occasion potentially fatal high-altitude cerebral edema. The exact pathophysiological mechanisms behind these syndromes remain to be determined. We report a study in which 12 subjects were exposed to a FiO 2  = 0.12 for 22 h and underwent serial magnetic resonance imaging sequences to enable measurement of middle cerebral artery velocity, flow and diameter, and brain parenchymal, cerebrospinal fluid and cerebral venous volumes. Ten subjects completed 22 h and most developed symptoms of acute mountain sickness (mean Lake Louise Score 5.4; p Cerebral oxygen delivery was maintained by an increase in middle cerebral artery velocity and diameter (first 6 h). There appeared to be venocompression at the level of the small, deep cerebral veins (116 cm 3 at 2 h to 97 cm 3 at 22 h; p cerebral oxygen delivery was maintained by increased arterial inflow and this preceded the development of cerebral edema. Venous outflow restriction appeared to play a contributory role in the formation of cerebral edema, a novel feature that has not been observed previously. © The Author(s) 2016.

  13. Predictive Mechanisms Are Not Involved the Same Way during Human-Human vs. Human-Machine Interactions: A Review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sahaï, Aïsha; Pacherie, Elisabeth; Grynszpan, Ouriel; Berberian, Bruno

    2017-01-01

    Nowadays, interactions with others do not only involve human peers but also automated systems. Many studies suggest that the motor predictive systems that are engaged during action execution are also involved during joint actions with peers and during other human generated action observation. Indeed, the comparator model hypothesis suggests that the comparison between a predicted state and an estimated real state enables motor control, and by a similar functioning, understanding and anticipating observed actions. Such a mechanism allows making predictions about an ongoing action, and is essential to action regulation, especially during joint actions with peers. Interestingly, the same comparison process has been shown to be involved in the construction of an individual's sense of agency, both for self-generated and observed other human generated actions. However, the implication of such predictive mechanisms during interactions with machines is not consensual, probably due to the high heterogeneousness of the automata used in the experimentations, from very simplistic devices to full humanoid robots. The discrepancies that are observed during human/machine interactions could arise from the absence of action/observation matching abilities when interacting with traditional low-level automata. Consistently, the difficulties to build a joint agency with this kind of machines could stem from the same problem. In this context, we aim to review the studies investigating predictive mechanisms during social interactions with humans and with automated artificial systems. We will start by presenting human data that show the involvement of predictions in action control and in the sense of agency during social interactions. Thereafter, we will confront this literature with data from the robotic field. Finally, we will address the upcoming issues in the field of robotics related to automated systems aimed at acting as collaborative agents.

  14. Predictive Mechanisms Are Not Involved the Same Way during Human-Human vs. Human-Machine Interactions: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aïsha Sahaï

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, interactions with others do not only involve human peers but also automated systems. Many studies suggest that the motor predictive systems that are engaged during action execution are also involved during joint actions with peers and during other human generated action observation. Indeed, the comparator model hypothesis suggests that the comparison between a predicted state and an estimated real state enables motor control, and by a similar functioning, understanding and anticipating observed actions. Such a mechanism allows making predictions about an ongoing action, and is essential to action regulation, especially during joint actions with peers. Interestingly, the same comparison process has been shown to be involved in the construction of an individual's sense of agency, both for self-generated and observed other human generated actions. However, the implication of such predictive mechanisms during interactions with machines is not consensual, probably due to the high heterogeneousness of the automata used in the experimentations, from very simplistic devices to full humanoid robots. The discrepancies that are observed during human/machine interactions could arise from the absence of action/observation matching abilities when interacting with traditional low-level automata. Consistently, the difficulties to build a joint agency with this kind of machines could stem from the same problem. In this context, we aim to review the studies investigating predictive mechanisms during social interactions with humans and with automated artificial systems. We will start by presenting human data that show the involvement of predictions in action control and in the sense of agency during social interactions. Thereafter, we will confront this literature with data from the robotic field. Finally, we will address the upcoming issues in the field of robotics related to automated systems aimed at acting as collaborative agents.

  15. Mechanism of phytohormone involvement in feedback regulation of cotton leaf senescence induced by potassium deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ye; Li, Bo; Du, Mingwei; Eneji, A Egrinya; Wang, Baomin; Duan, Liusheng; Li, Zhaohu; Tian, Xiaoli

    2012-10-01

    To elucidate the phytohormonal basis of the feedback regulation of leaf senescence induced by potassium (K) deficiency in cotton (Gossypium hirsutum L.), two cultivars contrasting in sensitivity to K deficiency were self- and reciprocally grafted hypocotyl-to-hypocotyl, using standard grafting (one scion grafted onto one rootstock), Y grafting (two scions grafted onto one rootstock), and inverted Y grafting (one scion grafted onto two rootstocks) at the seedling stage. K deficiency (0.03mM for standard and Y grafting, and 0.01mM for inverted Y grafting) increased the root abscisic acid (ABA) concentration by 1.6- to 3.1-fold and xylem ABA delivery rates by 1.8- to 4.6-fold. The K deficiency also decreased the delivery rates of xylem cytokinins [CKs; including the zeatin riboside (ZR) and isopentenyl adenosine (iPA) type] by 29-65% and leaf CK concentration by 16-57%. The leaf ABA concentration and xylem ABA deliveries were consistently greater in CCRI41 (more sensitive to K deficiency) than in SCRC22 (less sensitive to K deficiency) scions under K deficiency, and ZR- and iPA-type levels were consistently lower in the former than in the latter, irrespective of rootstock cultivar or grafting type, indicating that cotton shoot influences the levels of ABA and CKs in leaves and xylem sap. Because the scions had little influence on phytohormone levels in the roots (rootstocks) of all three types of grafts and rootstock xylem sap (collected below the graft union) of Y and inverted Y grafts, it appears that the site for basipetal feedback signal(s) involved in the regulation of xylem phytohormones is the hypocotyl of cotton seedlings. Also, the target of this feedback signal(s) is more likely to be the changes in xylem phytohormones within tissues of the hypocotyl rather than the export of phytohormones from the roots.

  16. Clinical--imaging aspects of young permanent teeth traumas and the ethiopatogenic mechanisms involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemţoi, A; Dănila, I; Lăduncă, Oana; Petcu, Ana; Bamboi, Ana; Haba, Danisia

    2013-01-01

    Dental trauma occurring to children and teenagers all over the world represents a serious issue in Public Health. This present study wants to investigate the etiology and the environment in which the dental trauma occurs and also wants to establish a connection between dental trauma and social-economic status. The study was made to collect information about dental trauma on human subjects involving 372 children and teenagers, both female and male, between 8 and 20 years of age. The data obtained from the clinical and radiological exams for each patient have been registered in a special conceived register, which represented a stage of the study. The frequency of dental trauma varied from 62.1% for males to 37.9% for women. Most of them have suffered from dental trauma between the age of 14 and 16 (30.1%), and a few between 18 and 20 years (2.2%). Dental trauma has occurred most frequently in school, during sports lessons, followed by those in public places like the street (23.1%), from which 17.1% have been associated with bicycle accidents, 3.5% with scooter accidents and 2.5% with car accidents. Children and teenagers who live in areas with a low social economic level have been the fewest to seek medical attention due to difficult access to medical services. Overall, this study wanted to present the importance of knowing the frequency of dental trauma in children and teenagers and to point out the need of promoting medical education to parents regarding the means they can use to reduce the risk factors associated with dental trauma.

  17. Vacuolar Sequestration of Paraquat Is Involved in the Resistance Mechanism in Lolium perenne L. spp. multiflorum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunharo, Caio A. C. G.; Hanson, Bradley D.

    2017-01-01

    . These results strongly indicate that vacuolar sequestration is involved in the resistance to paraquat in this population of LOLMU. PMID:28890724

  18. Involvement of spinal NR2B-containing NMDA receptors in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in rats

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yano Takahisa

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxaliplatin is a platinum-based chemotherapy drug characterized by the development of acute and chronic peripheral neuropathies. The chronic neuropathy is a dose-limiting toxicity. We previously reported that repeated administration of oxaliplatin induced cold hyperalgesia in the early phase and mechanical allodynia in the late phase in rats. In the present study, we investigated the involvement of NR2B-containing N-methyl-D-aspartate (NMDA receptors in oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia in rats. Results Repeated administration of oxaliplatin (4 mg/kg, i.p., twice a week caused mechanical allodynia in the fourth week, which was reversed by intrathecal injection of MK-801 (10 nmol and memantine (1 μmol, NMDA receptor antagonists. Similarly, selective NR2B antagonists Ro25-6981 (300 nmol, i.t. and ifenprodil (50 mg/kg, p.o. significantly attenuated the oxaliplatin-induced pain behavior. In addition, the expression of NR2B protein and mRNA in the rat spinal cord was increased by oxaliplatin on Day 25 (late phase but not on Day 5 (early phase. Moreover, we examined the involvement of nitric oxide synthase (NOS as a downstream target of NMDA receptor. L-NAME, a non-selective NOS inhibitor, and 7-nitroindazole, a neuronal NOS (nNOS inhibitor, significantly suppressed the oxaliplatin-induced pain behavior. The intensity of NADPH diaphorase staining, a histochemical marker for NOS, in the superficial layer of spinal dorsal horn was obviously increased by oxaliplatin, and this increased intensity was reversed by intrathecal injection of Ro25-6981. Conclusion These results indicated that spinal NR2B-containing NMDA receptors are involved in the oxaliplatin-induced mechanical allodynia.

  19. INTRACORNEAL AND SCLERAL CYST FOLLOWING CATARACT EXTRACTION

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gabriel van Rij

    2002-12-01

    Full Text Available Background. A six-year-old boy presented with a large progressive intracorneal and scleral cyst. Two years before, bilateral cataract surgery through a 6.5-mm corneal incision was performed elsewhere.Methods. The posterior wall of the cyst could be excised, as well as the anterior wall in the sclera. Upon histo-pathology the cyst wall was lined by epithelium. The epithelial cells of the anterior side in the cornea were removed with a curette and a corpus alienum drill. Three and a half years after removal of the cyst, there was no recurrence. Visual acuity was 0.8. Conclusions. An intracorneal and scleral inclusion cyst was successfully removed by surgical excision and the removal of epithelial cells by a curette and a corpus alienum drill.

  20. Mechanisms involved in the association between periodontitis and complications in pregnancy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcela eYang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The association between periodontitis and gestation complications such as premature delivery, low weight at birth and preeclampsia has been suggested. Nevertheless, epidemiological data have shown contradictory data, mainly due to differences in clinical parameters of periodontitis assessment. Furthermore, differences in microbial composition and immune response between aggressive and chronic periodontitis are not addressed by these epidemiological studies. We aimed to review the current data on the association between gestation complications and periodontitis, and the mechanisms underlying this association. Shifts in the microbial composition of the subgingival biofilm may occur during pregnancy, leading to a potentially more hazardous microbial community. Pregnancy is characterized by physiological immune tolerance. However, the infection leads to a shift in maternal immune response to a pathogenic pro-inflammatory response, with production of inflammatory cytokines and toxic products. In women with periodontitis, the infected periodontal tissues may act as reservoirs of bacteria and their products which can disseminate to the fetus-placenta unit. In severe periodontitis patients, the infection agents and their products are able to activate inflammatory signaling pathways locally and in extra-oral sites, including the placenta-fetal unit, which may not only induce preterm labor, but also lead to preeclampsia and restrict intrauterine growth. Despite these evidences, the effectiveness of periodontal treatment in preventing gestational complications was still not established since it may be influenced by several factors such as severity of disease, composition of microbial community, treatment strategy, and period of treatment throughout pregnancy. This lack of scientific evidence does not exclude the need to control infection and inflammation in periodontitis patients during pregnancy, and treatment protocols should be validated.

  1. Pomegranate-mediated chemoprevention of experimental hepatocarcinogenesis involves Nrf2-regulated antioxidant mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishayee, Anupam; Bhatia, Deepak; Thoppil, Roslin J.; Darvesh, Altaf S.; Nevo, Eviatar; Lansky, Ephraim P.

    2011-01-01

    Hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), one of the most prevalent and lethal cancers, has shown an alarming rise in the USA. Without effective therapy for HCC, novel chemopreventive strategies may effectively circumvent the current morbidity and mortality. Oxidative stress predisposes to hepatocarcinogenesis and is the major driving force of HCC. Pomegranate, an ancient fruit, is gaining tremendous attention due to its powerful antioxidant properties. Here, we examined mechanism-based chemopreventive potential of a pomegranate emulsion (PE) against dietary carcinogen diethylnitrosamine (DENA)-induced rat hepatocarcinogenesis that mimics human HCC. PE treatment (1 or 10 g/kg), started 4 weeks prior to the DENA challenge and continued for 18 weeks thereafter, showed striking chemopreventive activity demonstrated by reduced incidence, number, multiplicity, size and volume of hepatic nodules, precursors of HCC. Both doses of PE significantly attenuated the number and area of γ-glutamyl transpeptidase-positive hepatic foci compared with the DENA control. PE also attenuated DENA-induced hepatic lipid peroxidation and protein oxidation. Mechanistic studies revealed that PE elevated gene expression of an array of hepatic antioxidant and carcinogen detoxifying enzymes in DENA-exposed animals. PE elevated protein and messenger RNA expression of the hepatic nuclear factor E2-related factor 2 (Nrf2). Our results provide substantial evidence, for the first time, that pomegranate constituents afford chemoprevention of hepatocarcinogenesis possibly through potent antioxidant activity achieved by upregulation of several housekeeping genes under the control of Nrf2 without toxicity. The outcome of this study strongly supports the development of pomegranate-derived products in the prevention and treatment of human HCC, which remains a devastating disease. PMID:21389260

  2. Cytolytic mechanisms involved in non-MHC-restricted cytotoxicity in Chediak-Higashi syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakazawa, T; Agematsu, K; Yasui, K; Onodera, T; Inoue, R; Kaneko, H; Kondo, N; Yamamoto, M; Kayagaki, N; Yagita, H; Okumura, K; Komiyama, A

    1999-01-01

    To determine the mechanisms responsible for the impaired lymphocyte-mediated cytotoxicity in Chediak-Higashi syndrome (CHS), we investigated the killing ability of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from three patients with CHS using several kinds of target cells that were sensitive to perforin, Fas ligand (FasL), and/or tumour necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α). Freshly isolated CHS PBL did not kill K562 target cells, killing of which by normal PBL was perforin-dependent, as demonstrated by complete inhibition by concanamycin A (CMA), an inhibitor of perforin-based cytotoxicity. In contrast, the CHS PBL exhibited substantial cytotoxicity against Jurkat cells, which was only partially inhibited by CMA treatment but not by the addition of neutralizing anti-FasL or anti-TNF-α antibodies. IL-2-activated CHS PBL exhibited substantial levels of cytotoxicity against K562 and Jurkat cells, the levels being 74% and 83% of the respective normal control values, respectively. CMA treatment showed that while the cytotoxicity of IL-2-activated CHS PBL against K562 was largely dependent on perforin, that against Jurkat was largely not. IL-2-activated CHS PBL expressed FasL mRNA, and killed Fas transfectants. These findings indicate that CHS PBL have an ability to kill some target cells via a perforin-mediated pathway, especially when they are activated by IL-2. It was also demonstrated that CHS PBL can exert cytotoxicity against certain target cells by utilizing FasL and an undefined effector molecule other than perforin, FasL, or TNF-α. PMID:10540167

  3. Use of Lentinan To Control Sharp Eyespot of Wheat, and the Mechanism Involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Zhongxiao; Wang, Hongyan; Wang, Kaiyun; Jiang, Lili; Wang, Dong

    2017-12-20

    Lentinan (LNT), a complex polysaccharide with a β-(1→3)-linked backbone of d-glucose residues, has been reported to inhibit plant diseases. Our objective was to explore the efficacy and action mechanism of LNT used as a seed dressing to control sharp eyespot of wheat. Seed dressing promoted wheat growth. At control germination rates of 50%, 8 g of LNT/100 kg of seeds of the Jimai 22, Shannong 23, and Luyuan 502 cultivars significantly increased seed germination to 54%, 52%, and 51%, respectively. Seven days after emergence, the heights and root activity of wheat treated with LNT were significantly greater than those of controls. These effects were dose-dependent. At this time, the plant heights of Jimai 22, Shannong 23, and Luyuan 502 cultivars were 9.52, 8.52, and 10.52 cm, respectively, significantly higher than that of the controls. LNT prevented the development of wheat sharp eyespot. In the highly susceptible Jimai 22 cultivar, sharp eyespot development was reduced by 33.7%, 31.9%, and 30.4% at 7, 14, and 21 days after germination. LNT somewhat increased phenylalanine ammonia-lyase, peroxidase, and superoxide dismutase activity; reduced the malondialdehyde content; increased chlorophyll a and b levels; and enhanced the root vigor of wheat. These effects peaked 7 days after germination. LNT increased transcription of the genes encoding alternative oxidase (AOX) and β-1,3-glucanase (GLU), the salicylic acid signaling pathway-related gene NbPR1a, and the sharp eyespot resistance-related gene RS33. A significant dose-effect relationship was evident in terms of AOX transcription; we thus speculate that AOX may be the target gene.

  4. Endocannabinoids are Involved in Male Vertebrate Reproduction: Regulatory Mechanisms at Central and Gonadal Level

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bovolin, Patrizia; Cottone, Erika; Pomatto, Valentina; Fasano, Silvia; Pierantoni, Riccardo; Cobellis, Gilda; Meccariello, Rosaria

    2014-01-01

    Endocannabinoids (eCBs) are natural lipids regulating a large array of physiological functions and behaviors in vertebrates. The eCB system is highly conserved in evolution and comprises several specific receptors (type-1 and type-2 cannabinoid receptors), their endogenous ligands (e.g., anandamide and 2-arachidonoylglycerol), and a number of biosynthetic and degradative enzymes. In the last few years, eCBs have been described as critical signals in the control of male and female reproduction at multiple levels: centrally, by targeting hypothalamic gonadotropin-releasing-hormone-secreting neurons and pituitary, and locally, with direct effects on the gonads. These functions are supported by the extensive localization of cannabinoid receptors and eCB metabolic enzymes at different levels of the hypothalamic–pituitary–gonadal axis in mammals, as well as bonyfish and amphibians. In vivo and in vitro studies indicate that eCBs centrally regulate gonadal functions by modulating the gonadotropin-releasing hormone–gonadotropin–steroid network through direct and indirect mechanisms. Several proofs of local eCB regulation have been found in the testis and male genital tracts, since eCBs control Sertoli and Leydig cells activity, germ cell progression, as well as the acquisition of sperm functions. A comparative approach usually is a key step in the study of physiological events leading to the building of a general model. Thus, in this review, we summarize the action of eCBs at different levels of the male reproductive axis, with special emphasis, where appropriate, on data from non-mammalian vertebrates. PMID:24782832

  5. The mechanism involved in the loss of PTEN expression in NSCLC tumor cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Gang; Zhao, Jingfeng; Peng, Xianjing [Department of Radiology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); Liang, Jian; Deng, Xin [Ruikang Hospital, Guangxi University of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Nanning 530003 (China); Chen, Yuxiang, E-mail: chenyx008@yahoo.cn [Department of Radiology, Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China); School of Biological Science and Technology, Central South University, Changsha 410008 (China)

    2012-02-17

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Radiation stimulates PTEN reexpression in NSCLC independent of p53 activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PTEN reexpression is mediated by miR-29b overexpression. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer miR-29b regulates Dnmts expression in NSCLC tumor cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Target therapy could be established by overexpressing miR-29b expression. -- Abstract: Loss of PTEN expression is observed in most non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). However, the mechanism by which PTEN expression is regulated in NSCLC has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts), microRNA-29b (miR-29b), and anti-miR-29b inhibitor in PTEN promoter methylation and PTEN gene expression in H358 NSCLC cells in vitro and in vivo. PTEN mRNA was measured by RT-PCR. PTEN and Dnmts protein levels were measured by Western blot. miR-29b expression was detected by Northern blot. A xenograft H358 tumor mouse model was established by subcutaneously inoculating H358 cells into the right hind limbs of nude mice. We found that radiation induced cell apoptosis and hypomethylation in PTEN promoter, PTEN and miR-29b expression, and downregulation of Dnmt1, 3a and 3b expression in H358 tumor cells. The effect of radiation on gene expression and apoptosis was blocked by anti-miR-29b inhibitor. In the xenograft H358 tumor model, anti-miR-29b inhibitor reversed radiation-induced tumor growth delay, PTEN reexpression and downregulation of Dnmts expression. Our study suggested that miR-29b is an upstream molecule of PTEN. miR-29b regulates PTEN gene expression through downregulating Dnmts expression and subsequently induces hypomethylation in PTEN promoter. Targeting therapy could be established in NSCLC by upregulating miR-29b expression.

  6. The mechanism involved in the loss of PTEN expression in NSCLC tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Gang; Zhao, Jingfeng; Peng, Xianjing; Liang, Jian; Deng, Xin; Chen, Yuxiang

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► Radiation stimulates PTEN reexpression in NSCLC independent of p53 activation. ► PTEN reexpression is mediated by miR-29b overexpression. ► miR-29b regulates Dnmts expression in NSCLC tumor cells. ► Target therapy could be established by overexpressing miR-29b expression. -- Abstract: Loss of PTEN expression is observed in most non-small cell lung cancers (NSCLC). However, the mechanism by which PTEN expression is regulated in NSCLC has not been fully elucidated. In this study, we investigated the role of DNA methyltransferases (Dnmts), microRNA-29b (miR-29b), and anti-miR-29b inhibitor in PTEN promoter methylation and PTEN gene expression in H358 NSCLC cells in vitro and in vivo. PTEN mRNA was measured by RT-PCR. PTEN and Dnmts protein levels were measured by Western blot. miR-29b expression was detected by Northern blot. A xenograft H358 tumor mouse model was established by subcutaneously inoculating H358 cells into the right hind limbs of nude mice. We found that radiation induced cell apoptosis and hypomethylation in PTEN promoter, PTEN and miR-29b expression, and downregulation of Dnmt1, 3a and 3b expression in H358 tumor cells. The effect of radiation on gene expression and apoptosis was blocked by anti-miR-29b inhibitor. In the xenograft H358 tumor model, anti-miR-29b inhibitor reversed radiation-induced tumor growth delay, PTEN reexpression and downregulation of Dnmts expression. Our study suggested that miR-29b is an upstream molecule of PTEN. miR-29b regulates PTEN gene expression through downregulating Dnmts expression and subsequently induces hypomethylation in PTEN promoter. Targeting therapy could be established in NSCLC by upregulating miR-29b expression.

  7. Anorexic response to rapamycin does not appear to involve a central mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toklu, Hale Z; Bruce, Erin B; Sakarya, Yasemin; Carter, Christy S; Morgan, Drake; Matheny, Michael K; Kirichenko, Nataliya; Scarpace, Philip J; Tümer, Nihal

    2016-09-01

    The authors have previously demonstrated that a low and intermittent peripheral dose of rapamycin (1 mg/kg three times/week) to rats inhibited mTORC1 signalling, but avoided the hyperlipidemia and diabetes-like syndrome associated with higher doses of rapamycin. The dosing regimen reduced food intake, body weight, adiposity, serum leptin and triglycerides. mTORC1 signalling was inhibited in both liver and hypothalamus, suggesting some of the actions, in particular the decrease in food intake, may be the results of a central mechanism. To test this hypothesis, rapamycin (30 μg/day for 4 weeks) was infused into 23-25-month-old F344xBN rats by intracerebroventricular (icv) mini pumps. Our results demonstrated that central infusion did not alter food intake or body weight, although there was a tendency for a decrease in body weight towards the end of the study. mTORC1 signalling, evidenced by decreased phosphorylation of S6 protein at end of 4 weeks, was not activated in liver, hypothalamus or hindbrain. Fat and lean mass, sum of white adipose tissues, brown adipose tissue, serum glucose, insulin and leptin levels remained unchanged. Thus, these data suggest that the anorexic and body weight responses evident with peripheral rapamycin are not the result of direct central action. The tendency for decreased body weight towards the end of study, suggests that there is either a slow transport of centrally administered rapamycin into the periphery, or that there is delayed action of rapamycin at sites in the brain. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  8. The Tear Osmolarity Changes After Cataract Surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Banu Öncel

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Pur po se: To determine the tear osmolarity changes in patients who had undergone phacoemulsification surgery. Ma te ri al and Met hod: Tear osmolarity measurements were performed in 30 eyes of 30 patients who had undergone cataract surgery without any complication. Measurements were performed before surgery and consecutively at 1st month, 3rd month, and 6th month after the surgery. TearLab osmometer (TearLab Corporation, San Diego, CA, USA device was used for the measurements and paired ttest was used for statistical analysis. Re sults: The mean age of the patients was 72.3±3.7 (67-78 years. Thirteen patients were men and 17 patients were women. The mean osmolarity values were 305.8±6.5 mOsm/L before the surgery and 312.3±6.4 mOsm/L at 1st month, 307.5±5.1 mOsm/L at 3rd month and 305.1±5.7 at 6th month after the surgery. The difference between the values before surgery and at 1st month was found statistically significant (p=0.001. Dis cus si on: The tear osmolarity increases at the first month after surgery but decreases to the levels measured before surgery at the 3rd month. The increase at the first month may be due to the corneal incisions and medication used after the surgery. We think that we have to take into account this similarity increase in all cataract patients, especially in those who also have dry eye disease. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2012; 42: 35-7

  9. Significance of axial length monitoring in children with congenital cataract and update of measurement methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhan, Jiao; Lin, Haotian; Zhang, Xinyu; Chen, Weirong; Liu, Yizhi

    2013-06-01

    Congenital cataract is the main cause of blindness in children, with significantly varying treatment effects. The development of axial length is an important factor that affects the prognosis of these children. However, when compared with the eyes of normal children, the mechanism of growth of the axial length is so complicated that the reported findings differ significantly in terms of the measuring apparatus, assessment methods, and statistical outcome, making the rule of axial length development still unclear. In this paper, we first review the process of axial length development in normal healthy children and compare different hypotheses about certain factors that could affect the development of axial length. The results of some current research about the characteristics of axial length development in congenital cataract children are then reviewed. Lastly, the advantages and disadvantages of current axial length measurements methods are compared and analyzed. The purpose of this review is to improve our understanding of the complexity and importance of axial length development and to suggest better use of axial length monitoring measurements in congenital cataract children for pediatric ophthalmologists, with the hope of offering assistance that will enhance long-term therapeutic effects for these children.

  10. Preventive Effect of Zea mays L. (Purple Waxy Corn on Experimental Diabetic Cataract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paphaphat Thiraphatthanavong

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, substances possessing antioxidant can prevent cataractogenesis of diabetic cataract. Therefore, this study was carried out to determine the anticataract effect of Zea mays L. (purple waxy corn, a flavonoids rich plant, in experimental diabetic cataract. Enucleated rat lenses were incubated in artificial aqueous humor containing 55 mM glucose with various concentrations of Zea mays L. (purple waxy corn ranging between 2, 10, and 50 mg/mL at room temperature for 72 h. At the end of the incubation period, the evaluation of lens opacification, MDA level, and the activities of SOD, CAT, GPx, and AR in lens were performed. The results showed that both medium and high doses of extract decreased lens opacity together with the decreased MDA level. In addition, medium dose of extract increased GPx activity while the high dose decreased AR activity. No other significant changes were observed. The purple waxy corn seeds extract is the potential candidate to protect against diabetic cataract. The mechanism of action may occur via the decreased oxidative stress and the suppression of AR. However, further research in vivo is still essential.

  11. Automatic polarographic elucidation of electrode mechanisms by means of a knowledge-based system, part 3: Mechanisms ECE, EE and mechanisms involving adsorption

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Palys, M.J.; Palys, M.J.; Bos, M.; van der Linden, W.E.

    1993-01-01

    The previously described expert system has been extended: rules allowing the elucidation of a larger number of mechanisms have been added and automatic control of additional experimental parameters such as concentration and composition of the solution in the cell and the electrode size has been made

  12. The Vulnerability of Vessels Involved in the Role of Embolism and Hypoperfusion in the Mechanisms of Ischemic Cerebrovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yong Peng Yu

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Accurate definition and better understanding of the mechanisms of stroke are crucial as this will guide the effective care and therapy. In this paper, we review the previous basic and clinical researches on the causes or mechanisms of ischemic cerebrovascular diseases (ICVD and interpret the correlation between embolism and hypoperfusion based on vascular stenosis and arterial intimal lesions. It was suggested that if there is no embolus (dynamic or in situ emboli, there might be no cerebral infarction. Three kinds of different clinical outcomes of TIA were theoretically interpreted based on its mechanisms. We suppose that there is a correlation between embolism and hypoperfusion, and which mechanisms (hypoperfusion or hypoperfusion induced microemboli playing the dominant role in each type of ICVD depends on the unique background of arterial intimal lesions (the vulnerability of vessels. That is to say, the vulnerability of vessels is involved in the role of embolism and hypoperfusion in the mechanisms of ischemic cerebrovascular diseases. This inference might enrich and provide better understandings for the underlying etiologies of ischemic cerebrovascular events.

  13. Six year Trend in Cataract Surgical Techniques in Iran

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashemi, Hassan; Alipour, Fatemeh; Mehravaran, Shiva; Rezvan, Farhad; Alaeddini, Farshid; Fotouhi, Akbar

    2011-01-01

    Purpose To determine the cataract surgery techniques performed in Iran from 2000 to 2005. Materials and Methods This study was part of the Iranian Cataract Surgery Survey (ICSS) which was a retrospective cross-sectional study. All major ocular surgery units and 10% of randomly selected minor units throughout Iran were included. Excluding the 2 week Iranian New Year holiday, 1 week per season between 2000 and 2005 (a total of 24 weeks) was selected for each center, and data on all cataract surgeries performed during these weeks were collected by reviewing patient records. The ANOVA repeated measure test was performed to determine longitudinal changes with a P0.05). Conclusion Phacoemulsification with IOL implantation has become the preferred cataract surgery method in Iran during recent years. PMID:21731326

  14. Expert System Diagnosis of Cataract Eyes Using Fuzzy Mamdani Method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santosa, I.; Romla, L.; Herawati, S.

    2018-01-01

    Cataracts are eye diseases characterized by cloudy or opacity of the lens of the eye by changing the colour of black into grey-white which slowly continues to grow and develop without feeling pain and pain that can cause blindness in human vision. Therefore, researchers make an expert system of cataract eye disease diagnosis by using Fuzzy Mamdani and how to care. The fuzzy method can convert the crisp value to linguistic value by fuzzification and includes in the rule. So this system produces an application program that can help the public in knowing cataract eye disease and how to care based on the symptoms suffered. From the results of the design implementation and testing of expert system applications to diagnose eye disease cataracts, it can be concluded that from a trial of 50 cases of data, obtained test results accuracy between system predictions with expert predictions obtained a value of 78% truth.

  15. Treating Cataracts: Dr. Rachel Bishop's Top Tips for Your Eyes

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... please turn JavaScript on. Feature: Treating Cataracts Dr. Rachel Bishop's Top Tips for Your Eyes Past Issues / ... exams, a healthy lifestyle, and eye protection. Dr. Rachel Bishop, chief of consult services at the National ...

  16. The risk of cataract in relation to metal arc welding

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Slagor, Rebekka Michaelsen; Dornonville de la Cour, Morten; Bonde, Jens Peter

    2016-01-01

    Objectives: There are indications that solar ultraviolet radiation (UVR) increases the risk of cataract, but there is only circumstantial evidence that metal welding, an important occupational source of UVR exposure, is a risk factor. The objective of this study is to unravel if metal welding...... increases the risk of cataract. Method: We compared the risk of being diagnosed with cataract from 1987–2012 in a historic cohort of 4288 male metal arc welders against a reference group comprised of Danish skilled and unskilled male workers with similar age distribution. For the welders’ cohort.......95–1.21] and the adjusted HR was 1.08 (95% CI 0.95–1.22). Age and diabetes were as expected strong risk factors. Conclusion: We found no increased risk of developing cataract among Danish metal welders who worked with arc welding from 1950–1985. This may be attributed to the effectiveness of personal safety equipment....

  17. Detection of TORCH pathogens in children with congenital cataracts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Bin; Yang, Yabo

    2016-08-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the correlation between infection rates with TORCH pathogens including toxoplasma, rubella virus, cytomegalovirus, and herpes simplex virus (HSV) I and II and congenital cataracts. In total, the data from 69 children with congenital cataract treated at the Children's Hospital of the Zhejiang University School of Medicine between May 2006 and September 2013 were examined, including the complete serum test results for immunoglobulin (Ig)G and IgM that target TORCH pathogenic antibodies. These results were compared with the antibody levels of 5,914 children in a control group. Using SPSS 19.0 software, variance equation Levene tests, mean equation t tests, and completely randomized design of four tables χ 2 tests were applied. The HSV II IgG positivity rates significantly differed between the cataract and control groups. These results suggested that HSV may be one of the pathogenic viruses that leads to congenital cataracts.

  18. Cataract surgery during active methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mansour AM

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Ahmad M Mansour,1,2 Haytham I Salti11Department of Ophthalmology, American University of Beirut, 2Rafic Hariri University Hospital, Beirut, LebanonAbstract: We present two patients with active, foul-smelling, methicillin-resistant ­Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA wounds of the forehead and sternum following craniotomy or open heart surgery. Both had debilitating cataracts and were told by the infectious diseases team that cataract surgery is very risky. Both underwent sequential bilateral phacoemulsification with no sign of infection. Patients with active MRSA wound infections may safely undergo cataract surgery with additional precautions observed intraoperatively (good wound construction and postoperatively (topical antibiotics and close observation. Banning such surgeries can unnecessarily jeopardize the lifestyles of such patients.Keywords: cataract, infection, methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus, phacoe­mulsification

  19. Cataract surgery in a case of carotid cavernous fistula

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    Akshay Gopinathan Nair

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available A carotid-cavernous fistula (CCF is an abnormal communication between the cavernous sinus and the carotid arterial system. The ocular manifestations include conjunctival chemosis, proptosis, globe displacement, raised intraocular pressure and optic neuropathy. Although management of CCF in these patients is necessary, the ophthalmologist may also have to treat other ocular morbidities such as cataract. Cataract surgery in patients with CCF may be associated with many possible complications, including suprachoroidal hemorrhage. We describe cataract extraction surgery in 60-year-old female with bilateral spontaneous low-flow CCF. She underwent phacoemulsification via a clear corneal route under topical anesthesia and had an uneventful postoperative phase and recovered successfully. Given the various possible ocular changes in CCF, one must proceed with an intraocular surgery with caution. In this communication, we wish to describe the surgical precautions and the possible pitfalls in cataract surgery in patients with CCF.

  20. Randomised, single-masked non-inferiority trial of femtosecond laser-assisted versus manual phacoemulsification cataract surgery for adults with visually significant cataract : the FACT trial protocol

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Day, Alexander C; Burr, Jennifer M; Bunce, Catey; Doré, Caroline J; Sylvestre, Yvonne; Wormald, Richard P L; Round, Jeff; McCudden, Victoria; Rubin, Gary; Wilkins, Mark R; Schilder, Anne|info:eu-repo/dai/nl/09110906X

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Cataract is one of the leading causes of low vision in the westernised world, and cataract surgery is one of the most commonly performed operations. Laser platforms for cataract surgery are now available, the anticipated advantages of which are broad and may include better visual

  1. Cataract Surgery with a Refractive Corneal Inlay in Place

    OpenAIRE

    Stojanovic, N. R.; Panagopoulou, S. I.; Pallikaris, I. G.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. To present a case of cataract surgery performed in a patient with a refractive corneal inlay in place. Methods. A 48-year-old female patient presented to our institute with bilateral cataract. The patient had undergone refractive corneal inlay implantation three years ago in her right, nondominant eye for presbyopia correction. Biometry and intraocular lens (IOL) power calculation were performed without removing the inlay. Phacoemulsification and IOL insertion were carried out in bot...

  2. Effect of Oral Alpha Lipoic Acid in Preventing the Genesis of Canine Diabetic Cataract: A Preliminary Study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, David L

    2017-03-16

    Blinding cataract is a significant effect of canine diabetes with 75% of animals affected two years after diagnosis. Lens opacification occurs primarily through the generation of sorbitol, a sugar alcohol, through the action of aldose reductase (AR). The osmotic effect of sorbitol draws water into the lens, causing opacification. Inhibition of AR should thus prevent the generation of cataracts. A topical AR inhibitor has been shown to have this effect, as has the commercially available neutraceutical OcuGLO, containing the AR inhibitor alpha lipoic acid (ALA) together with other plant-based antioxidants. Here a comparison is made between the number of diabetic dogs developing cataracts when given oral ALA alone and those given a mix containing ascorbic acid and tocopherol. Animals given ALA developed significantly fewer lens opacities than those given conventional antioxidants. Cataracts which formed occurred at a significantly greater duration after the commencement of treatment than those on the antioxidant mix. Although this is a small study conducted over a short period, the significant benefit of ALA in diabetic dogs is a reason to evaluate these effects in larger trials. As AR is involved in diabetic retinopathy and neuropathy, this enzyme inhibitor may be worthy of evaluation in preventing these conditions in human diabetics also.

  3. Effect of Oral Alpha Lipoic Acid in Preventing the Genesis of Canine Diabetic Cataract: A Preliminary Study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David L. Williams

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Blinding cataract is a significant effect of canine diabetes with 75% of animals affected two years after diagnosis. Lens opacification occurs primarily through the generation of sorbitol, a sugar alcohol, through the action of aldose reductase (AR. The osmotic effect of sorbitol draws water into the lens, causing opacification. Inhibition of AR should thus prevent the generation of cataracts. A topical AR inhibitor has been shown to have this effect, as has the commercially available neutraceutical OcuGLO, containing the AR inhibitor alpha lipoic acid (ALA together with other plant-based antioxidants. Here a comparison is made between the number of diabetic dogs developing cataracts when given oral ALA alone and those given a mix containing ascorbic acid and tocopherol. Animals given ALA developed significantly fewer lens opacities than those given conventional antioxidants. Cataracts which formed occurred at a significantly greater duration after the commencement of treatment than those on the antioxidant mix. Although this is a small study conducted over a short period, the significant benefit of ALA in diabetic dogs is a reason to evaluate these effects in larger trials. As AR is involved in diabetic retinopathy and neuropathy, this enzyme inhibitor may be worthy of evaluation in preventing these conditions in human diabetics also.

  4. MYC translocation-negative classical Burkitt lymphoma cases: an alternative pathogenetic mechanism involving miRNA deregulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Leucci, E; Cocco, M; Onnis, A

    2008-01-01

    at the standardization of FISH procedures in lymphoma diagnosis, we found that five cases out of 35 classic endemic BLs were negative for MYC translocations by using a split-signal as well as a dual-fusion probe. Here we investigated the expression pattern of miRNAs predicted to target c-Myc, in BL cases, to clarify...... whether alternative pathogenetic mechanisms may be responsible for lymphomagenesis in cases lacking the MYC translocation. miRNAs are a class of small RNAs that are able to regulate gene expression at the post-transcriptional level. Several studies have reported their involvement in cancer...

  5. Benign prostatic hyperplasia: clinical treatment can complicate cataract surgery

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    Fernando Facio

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSE: To investigate the effects of alpha-1 adrenergic receptor antagonists for the treatment of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH regarding potential risks of complications in the setting of cataract surgery. AIM: To address recommendations, optimal control therapy, voiding symptoms and safety within the setting of cataract surgery. MATERIALS AND METHODS: A comprehensive literature review was performed using MEDLINE with MeSH terms and keywords "benign prostatic hyperplasia", "intraoperative floppy iris syndrome", "adrenergic alpha-antagonist" and "cataract surgery". In addition, reference lists from identified publications were reviewed to identify reports and studies of interest from 2001 to 2009. RESULTS: The first report of intraoperative floppy iris syndrome (IFIS was observed during cataract surgery in patients taking systemic alpha-1 AR antagonists in 2005. It has been most commonly seen related to use of tamsulosin. Changes of medication and washout periods of up to 2 weeks have been attempted to reduce the risk of complications in the setting of cataract surgery. CONCLUSION: Patients under clinical treatment for BPH should be informed about potential risks of this drug class so that it can be discuss with their healthcare providers, in particular urologist and ophthalmologist, prior to cataract surgery.

  6. Visual loss in HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis: A case series and review of the mechanisms involved

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    Anand Moodley

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Permanent visual loss is a devastating yet preventable complication of cryptococcal meningitis. Early and aggressive management of cerebrospinal fluid pressure in conjunction with antifungal therapy is required. Historically, the mechanisms of visual loss in cryptococcal meningitis have included optic neuritis and papilloedema. Hence, the basis of visual loss therapy has been steroid therapy and intracranial pressure lowering without clear guidelines. With the use of high-resolution magnetic resonance imaging of the optic nerve, an additional mechanism has emerged, namely an optic nerve sheath compartment syndrome (ONSCS caused by severely elevated intracranial pressure and fungal loading in the peri-optic space. An improved understanding of these mechanisms and recognition of the important role played by raised intracranial pressure allows for more targeted treatment measures and better outcomes. In the present case series of 90 HIV co-infected patients with cryptococcal meningitis, we present the clinical and electrophysiological manifestations of Cryptococcus-induced visual loss and review the mechanisms involved.

  7. Arbuscular Mycorrhizal Fungi for the Biocontrol of Plant-Parasitic Nematodes: A Review of the Mechanisms Involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schouteden, Nele; De Waele, Dirk; Panis, Bart; Vos, Christine M

    2015-01-01

    Arbuscular mycorrhizal fungi (AMF) are obligate root symbionts that can protect their host plant against biotic stress factors such as plant-parasitic nematode (PPN) infection. PPN consist of a wide range of species with different life styles that can cause major damage in many important crops worldwide. Various mechanisms have been proposed to play a role in the biocontrol effect of AMF against PPN. This review presents an overview of the different mechanisms that have been proposed, and discusses into more detail the plausibility of their involvement in the biocontrol against PPN specifically. The proposed mechanisms include enhanced plant tolerance, direct competition for nutrients and space, induced systemic resistance (ISR) and altered rhizosphere interactions. Recent studies have emphasized the importance of ISR in biocontrol and are increasingly placing rhizosphere effects on the foreground as well, both of which will be the focal point of this review. Though AMF are not yet widely used in conventional agriculture, recent data help to develop a better insight into the modes of action, which will eventually lead toward future field applications of AMF against PPN. The scientific community has entered an exciting era that provides the tools to actually unravel the underlying molecular mechanisms, making this a timely opportunity for a review of our current knowledge and the challenges ahead.

  8. MiRNAs regulate oxidative stress related genes via binding to the 3' UTR and TATA-box regions: a new hypothesis for cataract pathogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Changrui; Liu, Zhao; Ma, Le; Pei, Cheng; Qin, Li; Gao, Ning; Li, Jun; Yin, Yue

    2017-08-14

    Age-related cataracts are related to oxidative stress. However, the genome-wide screening of cataract related oxidative stress related genes are not thoroughly investigated. Our study aims to identify cataract regulated miRNA target genes that are related to oxidative stress and to propose a new possible mechanism for cataract formation. Microarrays were used to determine the mRNA expression profiles of both transparent and cataractous lenses. The results were analyzed by significance analyses performed by the microarray software, and bioinformatics analysis was further conducted using Molecular Annotation System. The Eukaryotic Promoter Database (EPD) was used to retrieve promoter sequences and identify TATA-box motifs. Online resource miRWalk was exploited to screen for validated miRNAs targeting mRNAs related to oxidative stress. RNAhybrid online tool was applied to predict the binding between significantly regulated miRNAs in cataract lenses and target mRNAs. Oxidative stress pathway was significantly regulated in cataractous lens samples. Pro-oxidative genes were half up-regulated (11/20), with a small number of genes down-regulated (4/20) and the rest of them with no significant change (5/20). Anti-oxidative genes were partly up-regulated (17/69) and partly down-regulated (17/69). Four down-regulated miRNAs (has-miR-1207-5p, has-miR-124-3p, has-miR-204-3p, has-miR-204-5p) were found to target 3' UTR of pro-oxidative genes and could also bind to the TATA-box regions of anti-oxidative genes (with the exception of has-miR-204-3p), whilst two up-regulated miRNAs (has-miR-222-3p, has-miR-378a-3p) were found to target 3' UTR of anti-oxidative genes and could simultaneously bind to the TATA-box regions of pro-oxidative genes. We propose for the first time a hypothesis that cataract regulated miRNAs could contribute to cataract formation not only by targeting 3' UTR but also by targeting TATA-box region of oxidative stress related genes. This results in the

  9. Brain mechanisms involved in predatory aggression are activated in a laboratory model of violent intra-specific aggression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tulogdi, Aron; Toth, Mate; Halasz, Jozsef; Mikics, Eva; Fuzesi, Tamas; Haller, Jozsef

    2010-11-01

    Callous-unemotional violence associated with antisocial personality disorder is often called 'predatory' because it involves restricted intention signaling and low emotional/physiological arousal, including decreased glucocorticoid production. This epithet may be a mere metaphor, but may also cover a structural similarity at the level of the hypothalamus where the control of affective and predatory aggression diverges. We investigated this hypothesis in a laboratory model where glucocorticoid production is chronically limited by adrenalectomy with glucocorticoid replacement (ADXr). This procedure was proposed to model important aspects of antisocial violence. Sham and ADXr rats were submitted to resident/intruder conflicts, and the resulting neuronal activation patterns were investigated by c-Fos immunocytochemistry. In line with earlier findings, the share of attacks aimed at vulnerable targets (head, throat and belly) was dramatically increased by ADXr, while intention signaling by offensive threats was restricted. Aggressive encounters activated the mediobasal hypothalamus, a region involved in intra-specific aggression, but sham and ADXr rats did not differ in this respect. In contrast, the activation of the lateral hypothalamus that is tightly involved in predatory aggression was markedly larger in ADXr rats; moreover, c-Fos counts correlated positively with the share of vulnerable attacks and negatively with social signaling. Glucocorticoid deficiency increased c-Fos activation in the central amygdala, a region also involved in predatory aggression. In addition, activation patterns in the periaqueductal gray - involved in autonomic control - also resembled those seen in predatory aggression. These findings suggest that antisocial and predatory aggression are not only similar but are controlled by overlapping neural mechanisms. © 2010 The Authors. European Journal of Neuroscience © 2010 Federation of European Neuroscience Societies and Blackwell Publishing

  10. The corticotropin-releasing hormone network and the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis: molecular and cellular mechanisms involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bonfiglio, Juan José; Inda, Carolina; Refojo, Damián; Holsboer, Florian; Arzt, Eduardo; Silberstein, Susana

    2011-01-01

    Corticotropin-releasing hormone (CRH) plays a key role in adjusting the basal and stress-activated hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA). CRH is also widely distributed in extrahypothalamic circuits, where it acts as a neuroregulator to integrate the complex neuroendocrine, autonomic, and behavioral adaptive response to stress. Hyperactive and/or dysregulated CRH circuits are involved in neuroendocrinological disturbances and stress-related mood disorders such as anxiety and depression. This review describes the main physiological features of the CRH network and summarizes recent relevant information concerning the molecular mechanism of CRH action obtained from signal transduction studies using cells and wild-type and transgenic mice lines. Special focus is placed on the MAPK signaling pathways triggered by CRH through the CRH receptor 1 that plays an essential role in CRH action in pituitary corticotrophs and in specific brain structures. Recent findings underpin the concept of specific CRH-signaling pathways restricted to specific anatomical areas. Understanding CRH action at molecular levels will not only provide insight into the precise CRH mechanism of action, but will also be instrumental in identifying novel targets for pharmacological intervention in neuroendocrine tissues and specific brain areas involved in CRH-related disorders. Copyright © 2011 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  11. Involvement of type I and type II mechanisms on the photoinactivation of non-enveloped DNA and RNA bacteriophages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costa, Liliana; Faustino, Maria A F; Tomé, João P C; Neves, Maria G P M S; Tomé, Augusto C; Cavaleiro, José A S; Cunha, Angela; Almeida, Adelaide

    2013-03-05

    Microbial photodynamic inactivation (PDI), involving the use of a photosensitizer (PS), light and molecular oxygen, with the subsequent production of reactive oxygen species (ROS), has been considered a promising and effective technology for viral inactivation. Although singlet oxygen is generally accepted as the main damaging species in PDI, ROS like free radicals may also be involved in the process, inducing damages to proteins, lipids, nucleic acids and other molecular structures. In this study, the relative importance of each mechanism (type I and type II) on the photoinactivation of non-enveloped DNA (T4-like phage) and RNA (Qβ phage) viruses was evaluated. For this purpose, two cationic porphyrins (Tri-Py(+)-Me-PF and Tetra-Py(+)-Me) and four different ROS scavengers were used. The scavenging effect of sodium azide and L-histidine (singlet oxygen quenchers) and of D-mannitol and L-cysteine (free radical scavengers) was assessed by exposure of both phages (T4-like and Qβ) to each cationic porphyrin (5.0μM for T4-like phage and 0.5μM for Qβ phage) and white light (40Wm(-2)) in the presence of different concentrations of the scavengers (5, 10, 50 and 100mM). Sodium azide and L-histidine gave the best protection, reducing the phototoxic effect of Tri-Py(+)-Me-PF on T4-like phage respectively by 80% and 72% and in the presence of Tetra-Py(+)-Me by 90% and 78%. Free radical scavengers D-mannitol and L-cysteine did not significantly reduce the rate of T4-like phage photoinactivation (around 20% protection, for both PS). The sodium azide protection on Qβ phage photoinactivation, in the presence of Tri-Py(+)-Me-PF, was lower (39%) when compared with T4-like phage. D-mannitol did not exert on Qβ phage any protective effect after 90min of irradiation. The effect of the simultaneous presence of singlet oxygen and free radicals scavengers at 100mM confirmed that singlet oxygen (type II mechanism) is clearly the main ROS involved in T4-like and Qβ phages

  12. Investigation of cataract surgery in Leshan, Sichuan Province

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu Han

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To comprehensively investigate the current status of cataract surgery in Leshan city, and find the existing problems according to the survey results as a guide to cataract prevention and treatment in future. METHODS: We surveyed the status of cataract surgery containing equipments, surgeons and surgery conditions in 17 ophthalmology departments of general hospitals from Leshan including 6 counties, 1 county-level city and 4 districts during 2012. Cataract surgery methods, according to various surgery financial resources, surgical performances and surgical incision, were divided into phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation(Phaco+IOL, extracapsular cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation(ECCE+IOL, and each method contained 2 groups. We analyzed the outcomes following preoperative examination, surgeons, surgical methods, surgical equipments, types of IOL, surgical quantity, surgical results, and intraoperative complication. RESULTS: In whole city there were 16 operating microscopes, 43 slit lamp microscopes, 12 non-contact tonometers, 1 intraocular lens Master, 8 optical A/B type ultrasonic examination systems, 4 YAG lasers and 12 phacoemulsification instruments. There 15 doctors could complete cataract surgery independently, and 5 of them were phacoemulsification surgeons. The total number of completed cataract surgeries reached 6 211 eyes, containing 3 564 eyes for Phaco+IOL(57%(preoperative visual acuity ≥0.3 in Phaco+IOL1 were 1 520 eyes, 24%and 2 647 eyes for ECCE+IOL(43%(1 533 eyes in ECCE+IOL1, 25%. In various groups, off-blindness rate was 94.80%-100%, off-disability rate was 90.41%-100%, and 94.96%-100% received intraocular lens implantation, intraoperative complication rate was 1.00%-15.10%. CONCLUSION: The distribution of surgeons and equipments in the whole city is unbalanced, and the utilization rate of phaco equipment is low. The levels are different in various hospitals on surgical technique

  13. Differential involvement of TRPV1 receptors at the central and peripheral nerves in CFA-induced mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanai, Yoshihito; Hara, Tomokazu; Imai, Aki; Sakakibara, Ayano

    2007-05-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) antagonists are known to attenuate two typical symptoms of inflammatory hyperalgesia: thermal and mechanical. However, it is not clear whether the sites of participation of TRPV1 for each symptom are different. In this study, we clarified the difference between the site of TRPV1 involvement in both symptoms by analysing the anti-hyperalgesic activity of two kinds of TRPV1 antagonists given locally (i.e. intraplantarly and intrathecally) in rats with CFA (complete Freund's adjuvant)-induced inflammation. TRPV1 antagonists BCTC (N-(4-tertiarybutylphenyl)-4-(3-cholorphyridin-2-yl) tetrahydropyrazine-1(2H)-carbox-amide, 1-300 microg) and SB-366791 (N-(3-methoxyphenyl)-4-chlorocinnamide, 30-300 microg) administered intraplantarly in a dose-dependent manner inhibited CFA-induced thermal hyperalgesia. In addition, CFA-induced thermal hyperalgesia was significantly reversed by intrathecal administration of 1-100 microg of BCTC and SB-366791. While intraplantar BCTC (1-300 microg) and SB-366791 (30-300 microg) did not reverse CFA-induced mechanical hyperalgesia, 1-100 microg of intrathecally administered BCTC and SB-366791 dose-dependently reduced mechanical hyperalgesia. Regression analysis showed that a correlation exists between the inhibitory effects on thermal hyperalgesia and mechanical hyperalgesia after intrathecal administration (correlation factor = 0.6521), but not after intraplantar administration (correlation factor = 0.0215). These data suggest that TRPV1 in the peripheral endings of the primary afferents plays a key role in thermal hyperalgesia, but it makes only a minor contribution in CFA-induced mechanical hyperalgesia. Furthermore, it is suggested that the spinal TRPV1 is critical in the development of both types of hyperalgesia.

  14. Involvement of delta opioid receptors in alcohol withdrawal-induced mechanical allodynia in male C57BL/6 mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alongkronrusmee, Doungkamol; Chiang, Terrance; van Rijn, Richard M

    2016-10-01

    As a legal drug, alcohol is commonly abused and it is estimated that 17 million adults in the United States suffer from alcohol use disorder. Heavy alcoholics can experience withdrawal symptoms including anxiety and mechanical allodynia that can facilitate relapse. The molecular mechanisms underlying this phenomenon are not well understood, which stifles development of new therapeutics. Here we investigate whether delta opioid receptors (DORs) play an active role in alcohol withdrawal-induced mechanical allodynia (AWiMA) and if DOR agonists may provide analgesic relief from AWiMA. To study AWiMA, adult male wild-type and DOR knockout C57BL/6 mice were exposed to alcohol by a voluntary drinking model or oral gavage exposure model, which we developed and validated here. We also used the DOR-selective agonist TAN-67 and antagonist naltrindole to examine the involvement of DORs in AWiMA, which was measured using a von Frey model of mechanical allodynia. We created a robust model of alcohol withdrawal-induced anxiety and mechanical allodynia by orally gavaging mice with 3g/kg alcohol for three weeks. AWiMA was exacerbated and prolonged in DOR knockout mice as well as by pharmacological blockade of DORs compared to control mice. However, analgesia induced by TAN-67 was attenuated during withdrawal in alcohol-gavaged mice. DORs appear to play a protective role in the establishment of AWiMA. Our current results indicate that DORs could be targeted to prevent or reduce the development of AWiMA during alcohol use; however, DORs may be a less suitable target to treat AWiMA during active withdrawal. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Enhancement of non-heme iron absorption by anchovy (Engraulis japonicus) muscle protein hydrolysate involves a nanoparticle-mediated mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Haohao; Zhu, Suqin; Zeng, Mingyong; Liu, Zunying; Dong, Shiyuan; Zhao, Yuanhui; Huang, Hai; Lo, Y Martin

    2014-08-27

    The mechanisms by which meat enhances human absorption of non-heme iron remain unknown. Recently, anchovy (Engraulis japonicus) muscle protein hydrolysate (AMPH) was found to mediate the formation of nanosized ferric hydrolysis products in vitro. The current paper evaluates the effects of AMPH on the bioavailability and the intestinal speciation of non-heme iron in rats, followed by an investigation of cellular uptake pathways of in vitro-formed AMPH-stabilized nanosized ferric hydrolysis products (ANPs) by polarized human intestinal epithelial (Caco-2) cells. The hemoglobin regeneration efficiencies in anemic rats followed the order ferric citrate (9.79 ± 2.02%) < commercial bare α-Fe2O3 nanoparticles (16.37 ± 6.65%) < mixture of ferric citrate and AMPH (40.33 ± 6.36%) ≈ ferrous sulfate (40.88 ± 7.67%) < ANPs (56.25 ± 11.35%). Percentage contents of intestinal low-molecular-weight iron in the groups of FC+AMPH, FeSO4, and ANPs were significantly lower than the corresponding hemoglobin regeneration efficiencies (P < 0.05), providing strong evidence for the involvement of nanosized iron in intestinal iron absorption from FC+AMPH, FeSO4, and ANPs. Calcein-fluorescence measurements of the labile iron pool of polarized Caco-2 cells revealed the involvement of both divalent transporter 1 and endocytosis in apical uptake of ANPs, with endocytosis dominating at acidic extracellular pH. Overall, AMPH enhancement of non-heme iron absorption involves a nanoparticle-mediated mechanism.

  16. Clinical evaluation on the coaxial microincision cataract surgery in hard nuclear cataracts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qing-Cheng Shi

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available AIM: To assess and compare the results of 2.2mm microincision coaxial cataract surgery(MCCSphacoemulsification with the conventional 3.0mm MCCS in hard nuclear cataracts. METHODS: Totally 132 eyes with hard cataract(Ⅳ level and abovewere randomized to two groups: 2.2mm MCCS(group 1:60 eyesand 3.0mm MCCS(group 2:72 eyes. All patients underwent standard phacoemulsification and intraocular lens implantation surgery by one experienced surgeon. The average ultrasound power(AVEwas recorded during the operation. The incidences of capsule rupture and postoperative corneal edema were compared.Visual acuity, surgically induced astigmatism(SIAand the descent rate of endothelial cell density were compared at intervals of 1 day, 1 month and 3 months after surgery. Statistic analysis was taken by Student's t test and Chi square test. RESULTS: There was no significant difference on the incidences of capsule rupture, postoperative corneal edema and AVE(P> 0.05between the two groups(3.3%, 10.0%, 65.09±20.15and(4.2%, 11.1%, 69.13±15.44. One day after the surgery, the 2.2mm MCCS group showed better uncorrected visual acuity as compared to the 3.0mm MCCS group(P < 0.05. There were no significant differences on best-corrected visual acuity on 1 month and 3 months after the surgery. There was no significant difference on the descent rate of endothelial cell density(16.54%±10.20%, 17.69%±10.65%3 months after the surgery. One day, 1 month and 3 months after the surgery, SIA was 0.77±0.31,0.66±0.29, 0.52±0.25D in the 2.2mm MCCS group, and 1.41±0.73,0.98±0.61D,0.82±0.35D in the 3.0mm MCCS group, respectively. The differences were statistically significant. CONCLUSION: The operative safety of the 2.2mm MCCS group were the same as 3.0mm MCCS group with the hard nuclear cataracts. The 2.2mm MCCS phacoemulsification could significantly reduce SIA and get better earlier visual rehabilitation.

  17. Effect of food azo dye tartrazine on learning and memory functions in mice and rats, and the possible mechanisms involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Yonglin; Li, Chunmei; Shen, Jingyu; Yin, Huaxian; An, Xiulin; Jin, Haizhu

    2011-08-01

    Tartrazine is an artificial azo dye commonly used in human food and pharmaceutical products. The present study was conducted to evaluate the toxic effect of tartrazine on the learning and memory functions in mice and rats. Animals were administered different doses of tartrazine for a period of 30 d and were evaluated by open-field test, step-through test, and Morris water maze test, respectively. Furthermore, the biomarkers of the oxidative stress and pathohistology were also measured to explore the possible mechanisms involved. The results indicated that tartrazine extract significantly enhanced active behavioral response to the open field, increased the escape latency in Morris water maze test and decreased the retention latency in step-through tests. The decline in the activities of catalase, glutathione peroxidase (GSH-Px), and superoxide dismutase (SOD) as well as a rise in the level of malonaldehyde (MDA) were observed in the brain of tartrazine-treated rats, and these changes were associated with the brain from oxidative damage. The dose levels of tartrazine in the present study produced a few adverse effects in learning and memory functions in animals. The mechanisms might be attributed to promoting lipid peroxidation products and reactive oxygen species, inhibiting endogenous antioxidant defense enzymes and the brain tissue damage. Tartrazine is an artificial azo dye commonly used in human food and pharmaceutical products. Since the last assessment carried out by the Joint FAO/WHO Expert Committee on Food Additives in 1964, many new studies have been conducted. However, there is a little information about the effects on learning and memory performance. The present study was conducted to evaluate the toxic effect of tartrazine on the learning and memory functions in animals and its possible mechanism involved. Based on our results, we believe that more extensive assessment of food additives in current use is warranted. © 2011 Institute of Food

  18. On the Path of Election and Martyrdom: Some Psychic Mechanisms Involved in the Anders Behring Breivik's Determination as a Terrorist.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotti, Patricia

    2015-08-01

    On 22 July 2011, the Norwegian Anders Behring Breivik carried out two attacks in Oslo that cost the lives of 77 people, injured many others, and plunged the entire Norwegian nation into mourning. When he was arrested, Breivik presented himself as a member of the Knights Templar, whose mission is to defend the Christian Western world. He considers that he has sacrificed himself by his actions for his people and says that he has prepared himself for martyrdom. In analysing Breivik's words and writings, this article attempts to identify the thought mechanisms involved in Breivik's idea of election (megalomania) and martyrology. It highlights the importance of a mechanism of "return to the sender," whereby Breivik returns the reproaches directed at him by an agency of judgment (ego ideal or superegoic object). It emphasizes the existence of a "burning desire" and yearning (Sehnsucht) for this same persecuting superegoic object, an object that Breivik constantly wants to find again, even if in death. Taking into consideration Searles's hypothesis that the sense of being persecuted is a defence against the impossibility of mourning, and also H. Blum's hypothesis that persecutory feelings are indicative of fears of a "regressive loss of object constancy," the different psychic mechanisms and modes of functioning underlying Breivik's terrorist determination are related here to what we know about his affective development and infantile relationships.

  19. Identification of up-regulated proteins potentially involved in the antagonism mechanism of Bacillus amyloliquefaciens G1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Haipeng; Zheng, Weidong; He, Shan; Wang, Hao; Wang, Tu; Lu, Liqun

    2013-06-01

    The use of Bacillus probiotics has been demonstrated as a promising method in the biocontrol of bacterial diseases in aquaculture. However, the molecular antibacterial mechanism of Bacillus still remains unclear. In order to explore the antibacterial mechanism of the potential antagonistic Bacillus amyloliquefaciens strain G1, comparative proteomics between B. amyloliquefaciens strain G1 and its non-antagonistic mutant strain was investigated. The 2-dimensional electrophoresis gel maps of their total extracted proteins were described and 42 different proteins were found to be highly expressed in strain G1 in comparison with those in the mutant strain. 35 of these up-regulated proteins were successfully identified using MALDI-TOF-TOF MS and databank analysis, and their biological functions were analyzed through the KEGG database. The increased expression of these proteins suggested that high levels of energy metabolism, biosynthesis and stress resistance could play important roles in strain G1's antagonism. To our knowledge, this is the first report on the proteins involved in the antagonism mechanism of B. amyloliquefaciens using a proteomic approach and the proteomic data also contribute to a better understanding of the molecular basis for the antagonism of B. amyloliquefaciens.

  20. Insertion of molecular oxygen into a palladium(II) methyl bond: a radical chain mechanism involving palladium(III) intermediates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boisvert, Luc; Denney, Melanie C; Hanson, Susan Kloek; Goldberg, Karen I

    2009-11-04

    The reaction of (bipy)PdMe(2) (1) (bipy = 2,2'-bipyridine) with molecular oxygen results in the formation of the palladium(II) methylperoxide complex (bipy)PdMe(OOMe) (2). The identity of the product 2 has been confirmed by independent synthesis. Results of kinetic studies of this unprecedented oxygen insertion reaction into a palladium alkyl bond support the involvement of a radical chain mechanism. Reproducible rates, attained in the presence of the radical initiator 2,2'-azobis(2-methylpropionitrile) (AIBN), reveal that the reaction is overall first-order (one-half-order in both [1] and [AIBN], and zero-order in [O(2)]). The unusual rate law (half-order in [1]) implies that the reaction proceeds by a mechanism that differs significantly from those for organic autoxidations and for the recently reported examples of insertion of O(2) into Pd(II) hydride bonds. The mechanism for the autoxidation of 1 is more closely related to that found for the autoxidation of main group and early transition metal alkyl complexes. Notably, the chain propagation is proposed to proceed via a stepwise associative homolytic substitution at the Pd center of 1 with formation of a pentacoordinate Pd(III) intermediate.

  1. Metal and metalloid foliar uptake by various plant species exposed to atmospheric industrial fallout: Mechanisms involved for lead

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schreck, E., E-mail: eva.schreck@ensat.fr [Universite de Toulouse (France); INP, UPS (France); EcoLab (Laboratoire Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Environnement) (France); ENSAT, Avenue de l' Agrobiopole, 31326 Castanet Tolosan (France); CNRS (France); EcoLab, 31326 Castanet Tolosan (France); Foucault, Y. [Universite de Toulouse (France); INP, UPS (France); EcoLab (Laboratoire Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Environnement) (France); ENSAT, Avenue de l' Agrobiopole, 31326 Castanet Tolosan (France); CNRS (France); EcoLab, 31326 Castanet Tolosan (France); STCM, Societe de Traitements Chimiques des Metaux, 30 Avenue de Fondeyre 31200 Toulouse (France); Sarret, G. [ISTerre (UMR 5275), Universite J. Fourier and CNRS, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Sobanska, S. [LASIR (UMR CNRS 8516), Universite de Lille 1, Bat. C5, 59655 Villeneuve d' Ascq cedex (France); Cecillon, L. [ISTerre (UMR 5275), Universite J. Fourier and CNRS, BP 53, 38041 Grenoble cedex 9 (France); Castrec-Rouelle, M. [Universite Pierre and Marie Curie (UPMC-Paris 6), Bioemco (Biogeochimie et Ecologie des Milieux Continentaux), Site Jussieu, Tour 56, 4 Place Jussieu, 75252 Paris cedex 05 (France); Uzu, G. [Laboratoire d' Aerologie (UMR 5560), OMP, UPS 14, Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); GET (UMR 5563), IRD, 14, Avenue Edouard Belin, 31400 Toulouse (France); Dumat, C. [Universite de Toulouse (France); INP, UPS (France); EcoLab (Laboratoire Ecologie Fonctionnelle et Environnement) (France); ENSAT, Avenue de l' Agrobiopole, 31326 Castanet Tolosan (France); CNRS (France); EcoLab, 31326 Castanet Tolosan (France)

    2012-06-15

    Fine and ultrafine metallic particulate matters (PMs) are emitted from metallurgic activities in peri-urban zones into the atmosphere and can be deposited in terrestrial ecosystems. The foliar transfer of metals and metalloids and their fate in plant leaves remain unclear, although this way of penetration may be a major contributor to the transfer of metals into plants. This study focused on the foliar uptake of various metals and metalloids from enriched PM (Cu, Zn, Cd, Sn, Sb, As, and especially lead (Pb)) resulting from the emissions of a battery-recycling factory. Metal and metalloid foliar uptake by various vegetable species, exhibiting different morphologies, use (food or fodder) and life-cycle (lettuce, parsley and rye-grass) were studied. The mechanisms involved in foliar metal transfer from atmospheric particulate matter fallout, using lead (Pb) as a model element was also investigated. Several complementary techniques (micro-X-ray fluorescence, scanning electron microscopy coupled with energy dispersive X-ray microanalysis and time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry) were used to investigate the localization and the speciation of lead in their edible parts, i.e. leaves. The results showed lead-enriched PM on the surface of plant leaves. Biogeochemical transformations occurred on the leaf surfaces with the formation of lead secondary species (PbCO{sub 3} and organic Pb). Some compounds were internalized in their primary form (PbSO{sub 4}) underneath an organic layer. Internalization through the cuticle or penetration through stomata openings are proposed as two major mechanisms involved in foliar uptake of particulate matter. - Graphical abstract: Overall picture of performed observations and mechanisms potentially involved in lead foliar uptake. Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Foliar uptake of metallic particulate matter (PM) is of environmental and health concerns. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The leaf morphology influences the adsorption

  2. Resistance to coumaphos and diazinon in Boophilus microplus (Acari: Ixodidae) and evidence for the involvement of an oxidative detoxification mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Andrew Y; Davey, Ronald B; Miller, Robert J; George, John E

    2003-07-01

    The levels of resistance to two organophosphate acaricides, coumaphos and diazinon, in several Mexican strains of Boophilus microplus (Canestrini) were evaluated using the FAO larval packet test. Regression analysis of LC50 data revealed a significant cross-resistance pattern between those two acaricides. Metabolic mechanisms of resistance were investigated with synergist bioassays. Piperonyl butoxide (PBO) reduced coumaphos toxicity in susceptible strains, but synergized coumaphos toxicity in resistant strains. There was a significant correlation between PBO synergism ratios and the coumaphos resistance ratios. The results suggest that an enhanced cytochrome P450 monooxygenase (cytP450)-mediated detoxification mechanism may exist in the resistant strains, in addition to the cytP450-mediated metabolic pathway that activates coumaphos. PBO failed to synergize diazinon toxicity in resistant strains, suggesting the cytP450 involved in detoxification were specific. Triphenylphosphate (TPP) synergized toxicity of both acaricides in both susceptible and resistant strains, and there was no correlation between TPP synergism ratios and the LC50 estimates for either acaricide. Esterases may not play a major role in resistance to coumaphos and diazinon in those strains. Bioassays with diethyl maleate (DEM) revealed a significant correlation between DEM synergism ratios and LC50 estimates for diazinon, suggesting a possible role for glutathione S-transferases in diazinon detoxification. Resistance to coumaphos in the Mexican strains of B. microplus was likely to be conferred by both a cytP450-mediated detoxification mechanism described here and the mechanism of insensitive acetylcholinesterases reported elsewhere. The results of this study also underscore the potential risk of coumaphos resistance in B. microplus from Mexico to the U.S. cattle fever tick eradication program.

  3. Involvement of Mζ-Like Protein Kinase in the Mechanisms of Conditioned Food Aversion Memory Reconsolidation in the Helix lucorum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solntseva, S V; Kozyrev, S A; Nikitin, V P

    2015-06-01

    We studied the involvement of Mζ-like protein kinase (PKMζ) into mechanisms of conditioned food aversion memory reconsolidation in Helix lucorum. Injections PKMζ inhibitor ZIP in a dose of 5 mg/kg on day 2 or 10 after learning led to memory impairment and amnesia development. Injections of the inhibitor in doses of 1.5 or 2.5 mg/kg had no effect. Repeated training on day 11 after induction of amnesia resulted in the formation of memory on the same type of food aversion similar to first training. The number of combinations of conditional (food) and reinforcing (electrical shock) stimuli was similar during initial and repeated training. We hypothesize that the inhibition of Mζ-like protein kinase erases the memory trace and a new memory is formed during repeated training.

  4. Study of the Chemical Mechanism Involved in the Formation of Tungstite in Benzyl Alcohol by the Advanced QEXAFS Technique

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olliges‐Stadler, Inga; Stötzel, Jan; Koziej, Dorota

    2012-01-01

    Insight into the complex chemical mechanism for the formation of tungstite nanoparticles obtained by the reaction of tungsten hexachloride with benzyl alcohol is presented herein. The organic and inorganic species involved in the formation of the nanoparticles were studied by time‐dependent gas...... chromatography and X‐ray diffraction as well as by time‐resolved in situ X‐ray absorption near‐edge structure and extended X‐ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy. Principal component analysis revealed two intermediates, which were identified as WCl4 and WOCl4 by using linear combination analysis. Quick...... of the tungsten hexachloride in benzyl alcohol followed by the generation of intermediates with WO double bonds and finally the construction of the WOW network of the tungstite structure....

  5. Wallerian degeneration slow mouse neurons are protected against cell death caused by mechanisms involving mitochondrial electron transport dysfunction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tokunaga, Shinji; Araki, Toshiyuki

    2012-03-01

    Ischemia elicits a variety of stress responses in neuronal cells, which result in cell death. wld(S) Mice bear a mutation that significantly delays Wallerian degeneration. This mutation also protects all neuronal cells against other types of stresses resulting in cell death, including ischemia. To clarify the types of stresses that neuronal cell bodies derived from wld(S) mice are protected from, we exposed primary cultured neurons derived from wld(S) mice to various components of hypoxic stress. We found that wld(S) mouse neurons are protected against cellular injury induced by reoxygenation following hypoxic stress. Furthermore, we found that wld(S) mouse neurons are protected against functional impairment of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. These data suggest that Wld(S) protein expression may provide protection against neuronal cell death caused by mechanisms involving mitochondrial electron transport dysfunction. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. A paracrine mechanism involving renal tubular cells, adipocytes and macrophages promotes kidney stone formation in a simulated metabolic syndrome environment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuo, Li; Tozawa, Keiichi; Okada, Atsushi; Yasui, Takahiro; Taguchi, Kazumi; Ito, Yasuhiko; Hirose, Yasuhiko; Fujii, Yasuhiro; Niimi, Kazuhiro; Hamamoto, Shuzo; Ando, Ryosuke; Itoh, Yasunori; Zou, Jiangang; Kohri, Kenjiro

    2014-06-01

    We developed an in vitro system composed of renal tubular cells, adipocytes and macrophages to simulate metabolic syndrome conditions. We investigated the molecular communication mechanism of these cells and their involvement in kidney stone formation. Mouse renal tubular cells (M-1) were cocultured with adipocytes (3T3-L1) and/or macrophages (RAW264.7). Calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals were exposed to M-1 cells after 48-hour coculture and the number of calcium oxalate monohydrate crystals adherent to the cells was quantified. The expression of cocultured medium and M-1 cell inflammatory factors was analyzed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and quantitative polymerase chain reaction, respectively. The inflammatory markers MCP-1, OPN and TNF-α were markedly up-regulated in cocultured M-1 cells. OPN expression increased in M-1 cells cocultured with RAW264.7 cells while MCP-1 and TNF-α were over expressed in M-1 cells cocultured with 3T3-L1 cells. Coculturing M-1 cells simultaneously with 3T3-L1 and RAW264.7 cells resulted in a significant increase in calcium oxalate monohydrate crystal adherence to M-1 cells. Inflammatory cytokine changes were induced by coculturing renal tubular cells with adipocytes and/or macrophages without direct contact, indicating that crosstalk between adipocytes/macrophages and renal tubular cells was mediated by soluble factors. The susceptibility to urolithiasis of patients with metabolic syndrome might be due to aggravated inflammation of renal tubular cells triggered by a paracrine mechanism involving these 3 cell types. Copyright © 2014 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Laser-assisted cataract surgery: benefits and barriers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatch, Kathryn M; Talamo, Jonathan H

    2014-01-01

    The use of the femtosecond laser (FSL) in cataract surgery may represent the largest advancement in the field since the inception of phacoemulsification. The goal of this review is to outline the benefits of and barriers to this technology. There are several significant potential benefits of the FSL in cataract surgery over conventional manual cataract surgery: precise capsulotomy formation, clear corneal and limbal relaxing incision construction, lens fragmentation, and lens softening. Evidence suggests that refractive benefits include more precise effective lens position as well as reduced effective phacoemulsification time with the use of FSL compared with manual surgery. Patients with conditions such as Fuchs' endothelial dystrophy, pseudoexfoliation, history of trauma, or brunescent cataracts may particularly benefit from this technology. There are significant financial and logistical issues to consider prior to the purchase of a FSL, including the cost of the laser, and charges to patients, and how the laser affects the patient flow in the operating room. The FSL may significantly change the current approach to cataract surgery.

  8. Nanotechnology for the Prevention and Treatment of Cataract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cetinel, Sibel; Montemagno, Carlo

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this article was to review recent advances in the applications of nanotechnology in cataract treatment and prevention strategies. A literature review on the use of nanotechnology for the prevention and treatment of cataract was done. Research articles about nanotechnology-based treatments and prevention technologies for cataract were searched on Web of Science, and the most recent advances were reported. Nonsteroid anti-inflammatory drugs, natural antioxidants, biologic and chemical chaperones, and chaperones such as molecules have found great application in preventing and treating cataracts. Current scientific research on new treatment strategies, which focuses on the biochemical basis of the disease, will likely result in new anticataract agents. However, none of the drug formulations will be approved for use unless efficient delivery is promised. Nanoparticle engineering together with biomimetic strategies enable the development of next-generation, more efficient, less complex, and personalized treatments. The only currently available treatment for cataracts, surgical replacement of the opacified lens, is not an easily accessible option in developing countries. New treatment strategies based on topical drugs would enable treatment to reach massive populations facing the threat of blindness and more effectively deal with the postsurgical complications. Nanotechnology plays a key role in improving drug delivery systems with enhanced controlled release, targeted delivery, and bioavailability to overcome diffusion limitations in the eye.

  9. Improvement in cognitive impairment after cataract surgery in elderly patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Hiroki; Tsukamoto, Hidetoshi; Mukai, Satoshi; Kato, Tomoko; Minamoto, Atsushi; Ohno, Yuko; Yamashita, Hidetoshi; Mishima, Hiromu K

    2004-03-01

    To evaluate whether cognitive impairment improves in elderly patients who have cataract surgery with intraocular lens (IOL) implantation. Kouki Hospital, Yamaguchi, Japan. A prospective observational study evaluated patients' scores on the Revised Hasegawa Dementia Scale (HDS-R) and the HDS-R minus 1 item regarding immediate regeneration (ie, function of vision and memory). Twenty patients (6 men, 14 women) with cognitive impairment had cataract surgery in 1 eye between March 1996 and July 2001 at Kouki Hospital, Japan. The mean age of the patients was 81.8 years (range 61 to 90 years). Twenty patients (4 men, 16 women) with cognitive impairment who did not have cataract surgery were selected as a control. The mean age in the control group was 84.3 years (range 70 to 93 years). The HDS-R was administered twice between March 1996 and July 2001. The mean HDS-R scores in the cataract surgery group improved from 12.5 points +/- 5.3 (SD) preoperatively to 16.6 +/- 6.2 points postoperatively; the improvement was significant (t = -5.02; Pcognitive impairment improved in 12 patients (60%), was unchanged in 7 (35%), and was worse in 1 (5%). Cataract surgery improved cognitive impairment in elderly Japanese patients.

  10. Impact of cataract surgery in reducing visual impairment: a review.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khandekar, Rajiv; Sudhan, Anand; Jain, B K; Deshpande, Madan; Dole, Kuldeep; Shah, Mahul; Shah, Shreya

    2015-01-01

    The aim was to assess the impact of cataract surgeries in reducing visual disabilities and factors influencing it at three institutes of India. A retrospective chart review was performed in 2013. Data of 4 years were collected on gender, age, residence, presenting a vision in each eye, eye that underwent surgery, type of surgery and the amount the patient paid out of pocket for surgery. Visual impairment was categorized as; absolute blindness (no perception of light); blind (visual impairment (SVI) (visual impairment (6/18-6/60) and; normal vision (≥6/12). Statistically analysis was performed to evaluate the association between visual disabilities and demographics or other possible barriers. The trend of visual impairment over time was also evaluated. We compared the data of 2011 to data available about cataract cases from institutions between 2002 and 2009. There were 108,238 cataract cases (50.6% were female) that underwent cataract surgery at the three institutions. In 2011, 71,615 (66.2%) cases underwent surgery. There were 45,336 (41.9%) with presenting vision visual disability. The goal of improving vision related quality of life for cataract patients during the early stages of visual impairment that is common in industrialized countries seems to be non-attainable in the rural India.

  11. Mechanisms of formation and function of eosinophil lipid bodies: inducible intracellular sites involved in arachidonic acid metabolism

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bozza Patricia T

    1997-01-01

    Full Text Available Lipid bodies, inducible lipid-rich cytoplasmic inclusions, are characteristically abundant in cells associated with inflammation, including eosinophils. Here we reviewed the formation and function of lipid bodies in human eosinophils. We now have evidence that the formation of lipid bodies is not attributable to adverse mechanisms, but is centrally mediated by specific signal transduction pathways. Arachidonic acid and other cis fatty acids by an NSAID-inhibitable process, diglycerides, and PAF by a 5-lipoxygenase dependent pathway are potent stimulators of lipid body induction. Lipid body formation develops rapidly by processes that involve PKC, PLC, and de novo mRNA and protein synthesis. These structures clearly serve as repositoires of arachidonyl-phospholipids and are more than inert depots. Specific enzymes, including cytosolic phospholipase A2, MAP kinases, lipoxygenases and cyclooxygenases, associate with lipid bodies. Lipid bodies appear to be dynamic, organelle-like structures involved in intracellular pathways of lipid mobilization and metabolism. Indeed, increases in lipid body numbers correlated with enhanced production of both lipoxygenase- and cyclooxygenase-derived eicosanoids. We hypothesize that lipid bodies are distinct inducible sites for generating eicosanoids as paracrine mediators with varied activities in inflammation. The capacity of lipid body formation to be specifically and rapidly induced in leukocytes enhances eicosanoid mediator formation, and conversely pharmacologic inhibition of lipid body induction represents a potential novel and specific target for anti-inflammatory therapy.

  12. Initial study on the possible mechanisms involved in the effects of high doses of perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) on prolactin secretion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salgado, R; Pereiro, N; López-Doval, S; Lafuente, A

    2015-09-01

    Perfluorooctane sulfonate (PFOS) is a fluorinated organic compound. This chemical is neurotoxic and can alter the pituitary secretion. This is an initial study aimed at knowing the toxic effects of high doses of PFOS on prolactin secretion and the possible mechanisms involved in these alterations. For that, adult male rats were orally treated with 3.0 and 6.0 mg of PFOS/kg body weight (b.w.)/day for 28 days. At the end of the treatment, the serum levels of prolactin and estradiol as well as the concentration of dopamine, 3,4-dihydroxyphenylacetic acid (DOPAC), homovanillic acid (HVA) and gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA) were quantified in the anterior and in the mediobasal hypothalamus. PFOS, at the administered doses, reduced prolactin and estradiol secretion, increased the concentration of dopamine and GABA in the anterior hypothalamus, and decreased the ratios DOPAC/dopamine and HVA/dopamine in this same hypothalamic area. The outcomes reported in this study suggest that (1) high doses of PFOS inhibit prolactin secretion in adult male rats; (2) only the periventricular-hypophysial dopaminergic (PHDA) neurons seem to be involved in this inhibitory effect but not the tuberoinfundibular dopaminergic (TIDA) and the tuberohypophysial dopaminergic (THDA) systems; (3) GABAergic cells from the paraventricular and supraoptic nuclei could be partially responsible for the PFOS action on prolactin secretion; and finally (4) estradiol might take part in the inhibition exerted by elevated concentration of PFOS on prolactin release. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. Mecanismos envolvidos na cicatrização: uma revisão Mechanisms involved in wound healing: a revision

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Aberto Balbino

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Os mecanismos envolvidos no processo de reparo de tecidos estão revisados nesse trabalho. O processo de cicatrização ocorre fundamentalmente em três fases: inflamação, formação de tecido de granulação e deposição de matriz extracelular e remodelação. Os eventos celulares e tissulares de cada uma dessas fases estão descritos e discutidos. Os mediadores químicos estão correlacionados com os eventos do processo de cicatrização e as células envolvidas. Especial ênfase é dada à participação dos fatores de crescimento.The mechanisms involved in tissue repair are revised. The wound healing process occurs basically in three phases: inflammation, formation of granulating tissue and extracellular tissue deposition, and tissue remodeling. The cellular and tissue events of each phase are described and discussed. The chemical mediators and their interplay with the wound healing events and cells involved are also discussed. However, especial attention was given to the role played by the growth factors in the tissue repair process.

  14. Tetrahydrocannabinol Induces Brain Mitochondrial Respiratory Chain Dysfunction and Increases Oxidative Stress: A Potential Mechanism Involved in Cannabis-Related Stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valérie Wolff

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cannabis has potential therapeutic use but tetrahydrocannabinol (THC, its main psychoactive component, appears as a risk factor for ischemic stroke in young adults. We therefore evaluate the effects of THC on brain mitochondrial function and oxidative stress, key factors involved in stroke. Maximal oxidative capacities Vmax (complexes I, III, and IV activities, Vsucc (complexes II, III, and IV activities, Vtmpd (complex IV activity, together with mitochondrial coupling (Vmax/V0, were determined in control conditions and after exposure to THC in isolated mitochondria extracted from rat brain, using differential centrifugations. Oxidative stress was also assessed through hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 production, measured with Amplex Red. THC significantly decreased Vmax (−71%; P<0.0001, Vsucc (−65%; P<0.0001, and Vtmpd (−3.5%; P<0.001. Mitochondrial coupling (Vmax/V0 was also significantly decreased after THC exposure (1.8±0.2 versus 6.3±0.7; P<0.001. Furthermore, THC significantly enhanced H2O2 production by cerebral mitochondria (+171%; P<0.05 and mitochondrial free radical leak was increased from 0.01±0.01 to 0.10±0.01% (P<0.001. Thus, THC increases oxidative stress and induces cerebral mitochondrial dysfunction. This mechanism may be involved in young cannabis users who develop ischemic stroke since THC might increase patient’s vulnerability to stroke.

  15. Mechanisms involved in the vasorelaxant effects produced by the acute application of amfepramone in vitro to rat aortic rings

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    López-Canales, J.S. [Section of Postgraduate Studies and Investigation, Higher School of Medicine from the National Polytechnic Institute, Mexico City (Mexico); Department of Cellular Biology, National Institute of Perinatology, Mexico City (Mexico); Lozano-Cuenca, J.; Muãoz-Islas, E.; Aguilar-Carrasco, J.C. [Department of Cellular Biology, National Institute of Perinatology, Mexico City (Mexico); López-Canales, O.A.; López-Mayorga, R.M.; Castillo-Henkel, E.F.; Valencia-Hernández, I.; Castillo-Henkel, C. [Section of Postgraduate Studies and Investigation, Higher School of Medicine from the National Polytechnic Institute, Mexico City (Mexico)

    2015-03-27

    Amfepramone (diethylpropion) is an appetite-suppressant drug used for the treatment of overweight and obesity. It has been suggested that the systemic and central activity of amfepramone produces cardiovascular effects such as transient ischemic attacks and primary pulmonary hypertension. However, it is not known whether amfepramone produces immediate vascular effects when applied in vitro to rat aortic rings and, if so, what mechanisms may be involved. We analyzed the effect of amfepramone on phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings with or without endothelium and the influence of inhibitors or blockers on this effect. Amfepramone produced a concentration-dependent vasorelaxation in phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings that was not affected by the vehicle, atropine, 4-AP, glibenclamide, indomethacin, clotrimazole, or cycloheximide. The vasorelaxant effect of amfepramone was significantly attenuated by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and tetraethylammonium (TEA), and was blocked by removal of the vascular endothelium. These results suggest that amfepramone had a direct vasorelaxant effect on phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings, and that inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and the opening of Ca{sup 2+}-activated K{sup +} channels were involved in this effect.

  16. Molecular mechanisms involved in the inhibition of tumor cells proliferation exposed to elevated concentrations of the epidermal growth factor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guillen, Isabel A; Berlanga, Jorge; Camacho, Hanlet

    2013-01-01

    The EGF promotes inhibition of cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo models depending on its concentration, application schema and the type of tumor cells on which it acts. Our research hypothesis was based on the fact that the EGF varies the expression of genes involved in a negative regulation of tumor cell lines proliferation carrying high levels of its receptor (EGFR). Our objectives were, to obtain information about the effect of EGF on tumor cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo models and, know the gene expression patterns of a group of genes involved in cancer signaling pathways and EGFR. The results showed that EGF at nanomolar concentrations inhibits the tumor cells proliferation bearing high levels of EGFR and, promotes the survival of treated animals, establishing a direct relationship between the inhibition of cell proliferation, high concentrations of EGF and, high amount of EGFR in the cells. The differential gene expression profile showed a variation in a group of genes which exert a powerful control over the cell cycle progression, gene transcription and apoptosis. It was concluded that the inhibition of tumor cell proliferation by the action of EGF is due to activation of molecular mechanisms controlling cell cycle progression. This work won the Annual Award of the Cuban Academy of Sciences in 2012

  17. Mechanisms involved in the vasorelaxant effects produced by the acute application of amfepramone in vitro to rat aortic rings

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    López-Canales, J.S.; Lozano-Cuenca, J.; Muãoz-Islas, E.; Aguilar-Carrasco, J.C.; López-Canales, O.A.; López-Mayorga, R.M.; Castillo-Henkel, E.F.; Valencia-Hernández, I.; Castillo-Henkel, C.

    2015-01-01

    Amfepramone (diethylpropion) is an appetite-suppressant drug used for the treatment of overweight and obesity. It has been suggested that the systemic and central activity of amfepramone produces cardiovascular effects such as transient ischemic attacks and primary pulmonary hypertension. However, it is not known whether amfepramone produces immediate vascular effects when applied in vitro to rat aortic rings and, if so, what mechanisms may be involved. We analyzed the effect of amfepramone on phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings with or without endothelium and the influence of inhibitors or blockers on this effect. Amfepramone produced a concentration-dependent vasorelaxation in phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings that was not affected by the vehicle, atropine, 4-AP, glibenclamide, indomethacin, clotrimazole, or cycloheximide. The vasorelaxant effect of amfepramone was significantly attenuated by NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and tetraethylammonium (TEA), and was blocked by removal of the vascular endothelium. These results suggest that amfepramone had a direct vasorelaxant effect on phenylephrine-precontracted rat aortic rings, and that inhibition of endothelial nitric oxide synthase and the opening of Ca 2+ -activated K + channels were involved in this effect

  18. Mechanisms involved in antinociception induced by a polysulfated fraction from seaweed Gracilaria cornea in the temporomandibular joint of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coura, Chistiane Oliveira; Chaves, Hellíada Vasconcelos; do Val, Danielle Rocha; Vieira, Lorena Vasconcelos; Silveira, Felipe Dantas; Dos Santos Lopes, Fernanda Maxcynne Lino; Gomes, Francisco Isaac Fernandes; Frota, Annyta Fernandes; Souza, Ricardo Basto; Clemente-Napimoga, Juliana Trindade; Bezerra, Mirna Marques; Benevides, Norma Maria Barros

    2017-04-01

    Temporomandibular disorder is a common clinical condition involving pain in the temporomandibular joint (TMJ) region. This study assessed the antinociceptive effects of a polysulfated fraction from the red seaweed Gracilaria cornea (Gc-FI) on the formalin-induced TMJ hypernociception in rats and investigated the involvement of different mechanisms. Male Wistar rats were pretreated with injection (sc) of saline or Gc-FI 1h before intra- TMJ injection of formalin to evaluate the nociception. The results showed that pretreatment with Gc-FI significantly reduced formalin-induced nociceptive behavior. Moreover, the antinociceptive effect of the Gc-FI was blocked by naloxone (a non-selective opioid antagonist), suggesting the involvement of opioids selective receptors. Thus, the pretreatment with selective opioids receptors antagonists, reversed the antinociceptive effect of the Gc-FI in the TMJ. The Gc-FI antinociceptive effect depends on the nitric oxide/cyclic GMP/protein kinase G/ATP-sensitive potassium channel (NO/cGMP/PKG/K + ATP ) pathway because it was prevented by pretreatment with inhibitors of nitric oxide synthase, guanylate cyclase enzyme, PKG and a K + ATP blocker. In addition, after inhibition with a specific heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1) inhibitor, the antinociceptive effect of the Gc-FI was not observed. Collectively, these data suggest that the antinociceptive effect induced by Gc-FI is mediated by μ/δ/κ-opioid receptors and by activation NO/cGMP/PKG/K + ATP channel pathway, besides of HO-1. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Mechanisms involved in repairing the lesions induced in pBR 322 by PUVA treatment (8-Methoxypsoralen + ultraviolet A light)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bauluz, C.

    1988-01-01

    This work deals with the genotoxic effects derived from damaging pBR322 DNA through PUVA treatment (8-Methoxypsoralen plusUVA light), both with respect to the lethality and mutagenicity of the lesions produced by the treatment. The mechanisms involved in the repair of the plasmid lesions have been investigated by transforming several strains of E. coli differing in their DNA-repair capacities. The frequency, distribution and type of mutations occurring in a restriction fragment of the damaged plasmid were determined in order to establish the mutagenic features of the PUVA treatment. Damages produced bY PUVA habe a strong lethal effect on plasmid survival; however, partial recovery is possible through some of the bacterial DNA repair pathways, namely Excision repair, SOS-repair and a third mechanism which appears to be independent from the analised genes and is detected at high density of lesions per plasmid molecule. PUVA treatment produces a high increase in plasmid mutagenesis; however, the contribution of such an increase to the whole plasmid survival is negligible. Only punctual mutations were detected and consisted mainly in base-pair substitutions. Some mutation-prone regions were sound inside the investigated DNA fragment, a though their existence is more likely to be related with the structure acquired by the damaged DNA than with the type of damaging agent. (Author)

  20. Reaction mechanisms in aromatic hydrocarbon formation involving the C{sub 5}H{sub 5} cyclopentadienyl moiety

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melius, C.F.; Colvin, M.E. [Sandia National Labs., Livermore, CA (United States); Marinov, N.M.; Pitz, W.J. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA (United States); Senkan, S.M. [Univ. of California, Los Angeles, CA (United States). Dept. of Chemical Engineering

    1996-02-01

    The quantum chemical BAC-MP4 and BAC-MP2 methods have been used to investigate the reaction mechanisms leading to polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) ring formation. In particular the authors have determined the elementary reaction steps in the conversion of two cyclopentadienyl radicals to naphthalene. This reaction mechanism is shown to be an extension of the mechanism occurring in the H atom-assisted conversion of fulvene to benzene. The net reaction involves the formation of dihydrofulvalene, which eliminates a hydrogen atom and then rearranges to form naphthalene through a series of ring closures and openings. The importance of forming the {single_bond}CR({center_dot}){single_bond}CHR{single_bond}CR{prime}{double_bond}CR{double_prime}-moiety, which can undergo rearrangement to form three-carbon-atom ring structures, is illustrated with the C{sub 4}H{sub 7} system. The ability of hydrogen atoms to migrate around the cyclopentadienyl moiety is illustrated both for methyl-cyclopentadiene, C{sub 5}H{sub 5}CH{sub 3}, and dihydrofulvalene, C{sub 5}H{sub 5}C{sub 5}H{sub 5}, as well as for their radical species, C{sub 6}H{sub 7} and C{sub 5}H{sub 5}C{sub 5}H{sub 4}. The mobility of hydrogen in the cyclopentadienyl moiety plays an important role both in providing resonance-stabilized radical products and in creating the {single_bond}CR({center_dot}){single_bond}CHR{single_bond}CR{prime}{double_bond}CR{double_prime}-moiety for ring formation. The results illustrate the radical pathway for converting five-membered rings to aromatic six-membered rings. Furthermore, the results indicate the important catalytic role of H atoms in the aromatic ring formation process.

  1. Structure reveals regulatory mechanisms of a MaoC-like hydratase from Phytophthora capsici involved in biosynthesis of polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huizheng Wang

    Full Text Available Polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHAs have attracted increasing attention as "green plastic" due to their biodegradable, biocompatible, thermoplastic, and mechanical properties, and considerable research has been undertaken to develop low cost/high efficiency processes for the production of PHAs. MaoC-like hydratase (MaoC, which belongs to (R-hydratase involved in linking the β-oxidation and the PHA biosynthetic pathways, has been identified recently. Understanding the regulatory mechanisms of (R-hydratase catalysis is critical for efficient production of PHAs that promise synthesis an environment-friendly plastic.We have determined the crystal structure of a new MaoC recognized from Phytophthora capsici. The crystal structure of the enzyme was solved at 2.00 Å resolution. The structure shows that MaoC has a canonical (R-hydratase fold with an N-domain and a C-domain. Supporting its dimerization observed in structure, MaoC forms a stable homodimer in solution. Mutations that disrupt the dimeric MaoC result in a complete loss of activity toward crotonyl-CoA, indicating that dimerization is required for the enzymatic activity of MaoC. Importantly, structure comparison reveals that a loop unique to MaoC interacts with an α-helix that harbors the catalytic residues of MaoC. Deletion of the loop enhances the enzymatic activity of MaoC, suggesting its inhibitory role in regulating the activity of MaoC.The data in our study reveal the regulatory mechanism of an (R-hydratase, providing information on enzyme engineering to produce low cost PHAs.

  2. Redundant mechanisms are involved in suppression of default cell fates during embryonic mesenchyme and notochord induction in ascidians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kodama, Hitoshi; Miyata, Yoshimasa; Kuwajima, Mami; Izuchi, Ryoichi; Kobayashi, Ayumi; Gyoja, Fuki; Onuma, Takeshi A; Kumano, Gaku; Nishida, Hiroki

    2016-08-01

    During embryonic induction, the responding cells invoke an induced developmental program, whereas in the absence of an inducing signal, they assume a default uninduced cell fate. Suppression of the default fate during the inductive event is crucial for choice of the binary cell fate. In contrast to the mechanisms that promote an induced cell fate, those that suppress the default fate have been overlooked. Upon induction, intracellular signal transduction results in activation of genes encoding key transcription factors for induced tissue differentiation. It is elusive whether an induced key transcription factor has dual functions involving suppression of the default fates and promotion of the induced fate, or whether suppression of the default fate is independently regulated by other factors that are also downstream of the signaling cascade. We show that during ascidian embryonic induction, default fates were suppressed by multifold redundant mechanisms. The key transcription factor, Twist-related.a, which is required for mesenchyme differentiation, and another independent transcription factor, Lhx3, which is dispensable for mesenchyme differentiation, sequentially and redundantly suppress the default muscle fate in induced mesenchyme cells. Similarly in notochord induction, Brachyury, which is required for notochord differentiation, and other factors, Lhx3 and Mnx, are likely to suppress the default nerve cord fate redundantly. Lhx3 commonly suppresses the default fates in two kinds of induction. Mis-activation of the autonomously executed default program in induced cells is detrimental to choice of the binary cell fate. Multifold redundant mechanisms would be required for suppression of the default fate to be secure. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Testosterone decreases urinary bladder smooth muscle excitability via novel signaling mechanism involving direct activation of the BK channels

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hristov, Kiril L.; Parajuli, Shankar P.; Provence, Aaron

    2016-01-01

    In addition to improving sexual function, testosterone has been reported to have beneficial effects in ameliorating lower urinary tract symptoms by increasing bladder capacity and compliance, while decreasing bladder pressure. However, the cellular mechanisms by which testosterone regulates detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) excitability have not been elucidated. Here, we used amphotericin-B perforated whole cell patch-clamp and single channel recordings on inside-out excised membrane patches to investigate the regulatory role of testosterone in guinea pig DSM excitability. Testosterone (100 nM) significantly increased the depolarization-induced whole cell outward currents in DSM cells. The selective pharmacological inhibition of the large-conductance voltage- and Ca2+-activated K+ (BK) channels with paxilline (1 μM) completely abolished this stimulatory effect of testosterone, suggesting a mechanism involving BK channels. At a holding potential of −20 mV, DSM cells exhibited transient BK currents (TBKCs). Testosterone (100 nM) significantly increased TBKC activity in DSM cells. In current-clamp mode, testosterone (100 nM) significantly hyperpolarized the DSM cell resting membrane potential and increased spontaneous transient hyperpolarizations. Testosterone (100 nM) rapidly increased the single BK channel open probability in inside-out excised membrane patches from DSM cells, clearly suggesting a direct BK channel activation via a nongenomic mechanism. Live-cell Ca2+ imaging showed that testosterone (100 nM) caused a decrease in global intracellular Ca2+ concentration, consistent with testosterone-induced membrane hyperpolarization. In conclusion, the data provide compelling mechanistic evidence that under physiological conditions, testosterone at nanomolar concentrations directly activates BK channels in DSM cells, independent from genomic testosterone receptors, and thus regulates DSM excitability. PMID:27605581

  4. Effects and mechanisms of 3α,5α,-THP on emotion, motivation, and reward functions involving pregnane xenobiotic receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheryl A Frye

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Progestogens [progesterone (P4 and its products] play fundamental roles in the development and/or function of the central nervous system during pregnancy. We, and others, have investigated the role of pregnane neurosteroids for a plethora of functional effects beyond their pro-gestational processes. Emerging findings regarding the effects, mechanisms, and sources of neurosteroids have challenged traditional dogma about steroid action. How the P4 metabolite and neurosteroid, 3α-hydroxy-5α-pregnan-20-one (3α,5α-THP, influences cellular functions and behavioral processes involved in emotion/affect, motivation, and reward, is the focus of the present review. To further understand these processes, we have utilized an animal model assessing the effects, mechanisms, and sources of 3α,5α-THP. In the ventral tegmental area (VTA, 3α,5α-THP has actions to facilitate affective, and motivated, social behaviors through non-traditional targets, such as GABA, glutamate, and dopamine receptors. 3α,5α-THP levels in the midbrain VTA both facilitate, and/or are enhanced by, affective and social behavior. The pregnane xenobiotic receptor (PXR mediates the production of, and/or metabolism to, various neurobiological factors. PXR is localized to the midbrain VTA of rats. The role of PXR to influence 3α,5α-THP production from central biosynthesis, and/or metabolism of peripheral P4, in the VTA, as well as its role to facilitate, or be increased by, affective/social behaviors is under investigation. Investigating novel behavioral functions of 3α,5α-THP extends our knowledge of the neurobiology of progestogens, relevant for affective/social behaviors, and their connections to systems that regulate affect and motivated processes, such as those important for stress regulation and neuropsychiatric disorders (anxiety, depression, schizophrenia, drug dependence. Thus, further understanding of 3α,5α-THP’s role and mechanisms to enhance affective and motivated

  5. Mechanisms underlying the neurotoxicity induced by glyphosate-based herbicide in immature rat hippocampus: Involvement of glutamate excitotoxicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cattani, Daiane; Oliveira Cavalli, Liz Vera Lúcia de; Heinz Rieg, Carla Elise; Domingues, Juliana Tonietto; Dal-Cim, Tharine; Tasca, Carla Inês; Mena Barreto Silva, Fátima Regina; Zamoner, Ariane

    2014-01-01

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Roundup ® induces Ca 2+ influx through L-VDCC and NMDA receptor activation. • The mechanisms underlying Roundup ® neurotoxicity involve glutamatergic excitotoxicity. • Kinase pathways participate in Roundup ® -induced neural toxicity. • Roundup ® alters glutamate uptake, release and metabolism in hippocampal cells. - Abstract: Previous studies demonstrate that glyphosate exposure is associated with oxidative damage and neurotoxicity. Therefore, the mechanism of glyphosate-induced neurotoxic effects needs to be determined. The aim of this study was to investigate whether Roundup ® (a glyphosate-based herbicide) leads to neurotoxicity in hippocampus of immature rats following acute (30 min) and chronic (pregnancy and lactation) pesticide exposure. Maternal exposure to pesticide was undertaken by treating dams orally with 1% Roundup ® (0.38% glyphosate) during pregnancy and lactation (till 15-day-old). Hippocampal slices from 15 day old rats were acutely exposed to Roundup ® (0.00005–0.1%) during 30 min and experiments were carried out to determine whether glyphosate affects 45 Ca 2+ influx and cell viability. Moreover, we investigated the pesticide effects on oxidative stress parameters, 14 C-α-methyl-amino-isobutyric acid ( 14 C-MeAIB) accumulation, as well as glutamate uptake, release and metabolism. Results showed that acute exposure to Roundup ® (30 min) increases 45 Ca 2+ influx by activating NMDA receptors and voltage-dependent Ca 2+ channels, leading to oxidative stress and neural cell death. The mechanisms underlying Roundup ® -induced neurotoxicity also involve the activation of CaMKII and ERK. Moreover, acute exposure to Roundup ® increased 3 H-glutamate released into the synaptic cleft, decreased GSH content and increased the lipoperoxidation, characterizing excitotoxicity and oxidative damage. We also observed that both acute and chronic exposure to Roundup ® decreased 3 H-glutamate uptake and

  6. Fitness costs of increased cataract frequency and cumulative radiation dose in natural mammalian populations from Chernobyl

    OpenAIRE

    Lehmann, Philipp; Boraty?ski, Zbyszek; Mappes, Tapio; Mousseau, Timothy A.; M?ller, Anders P.

    2016-01-01

    A cataract is a clouding of the lens that reduces light transmission to the retina, and it decreases the visual acuity of the bearer. The prevalence of cataracts in natural populations of mammals, and their potential ecological significance, is poorly known. Cataracts have been reported to arise from high levels of oxidative stress and a major cause of oxidative stress is ionizing radiation. We investigated whether elevated frequencies of cataracts are found in eyes of bank voles Myodes glare...

  7. Formation of conical fractures in sedimentary basins: Experiments involving pore fluids and implications for sandstone intrusion mechanisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mourgues, R.; Bureau, D.; Bodet, L.; Gay, A.; Gressier, J. B.

    2012-01-01

    a flat cone. We make use of a P.I.V. (Particle Imaging Velocimetry) technique to analyse plastic deformation, showing that these inclined fractures are opened in mixed modes. Close to the surface, they change into steep shear bands where fluids can infiltrate. The final morphology of the fracture network is very similar to the common tripartite architecture of various injection complexes, indicating that different mechanisms may be involved in the formation of dykes. Feeder dykes under the sill zones may open as tensile fractures, while overlying dykes may be guided by the deformation induced by the growth of sills. These deformation conditions may also favour the formation of fluid escape structures and pockmarks.

  8. Predicting the Incidence of Human Cataract through Retinal Imaging Technology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horng, Chi-Ting; Sun, Han-Ying; Liu, Hsiang-Jui; Lue, Jiann-Hwa; Yeh, Shang-Min

    2015-11-19

    With the progress of science, technology and medicine, the proportion of elderly people in society has gradually increased over the years. Thus, the medical care and health issues of this population have drawn increasing attention. In particular, among the common medical problems of the elderly, the occurrence of cataracts has been widely observed. In this study, we developed retinal imaging technology by establishing a human eye module with ray tracing. Periodic hole arrays with different degrees were constructed on the anterior surface of the lens to emulate the eyesight decline caused by cataracts. Then, we successfully predicted the incidence of cataracts among people with myopia ranging from -3.0 D to -9.0 D. Results show that periodic hole arrays cause severe eyesight decline when they are centralized in the visual center. However, the wide distribution of these arrays on the anterior surface of the lens would not significantly affect one's eyesight.

  9. Safety of warfarin therapy during cataract surgery under topical anesthesia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Newton Kara-Junior

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available ABSTRACT Purpose: To analyze the safety of warfarin therapy during cataract surgery under topical anesthesia. Methods: This was a prospective nonrandomized comparative study of 60 eyes of 60 patients treated with or without concurrent oral warfarin anticoagulant therapy, referred for cataract surgery under topical anesthesia. The sample included a treatment (n=30 and a control (n=30 group. Results: There were no records of intraoperative or postoperative intracameral bleeding complications in both the groups. At 1-month postoperative follow-up, 90.0% of patients presented spectacle-corrected visual acuity of at least 20/40. Conclusion: Cataract surgery by phacoemulsification with topical anesthesia can be successfully conducted without discontinuing warfarin.

  10. Visual outcome of traumatic cataract surgery in Ibadan, Nigeria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bekibele, C O; Fasina, O

    2008-12-01

    To review the visual outcome of traumatic cataracts operated at the University College Hospital, Ibadan with the view to making recommendations for improved outcome. All patients operated at the University College Hospital Ibadan, Nigeria between May 1999 and April 2004 with traumatic cataract were reviewed retrospectively to determine visual outcome and main causes of poor visual outcome notes of patients 32 patients, age range 2 to 71 years, mean age 25.6 +/- SD 16.1 years were reviewed. 22 (68.8%) were males while 10 (31.2%) were females. Causes of traumatic cataract included wood/stick splinters in 7 (21.9%), cane/whiplash injury 6 (18.8%), and propelled missile injuries, 5 (15.6%). Less important cause of injuries were gun shot, road traffic accident and fist injuries. 11 (35.6%) of the patients had best corrected post operative visual acuity of >6/18, 10 (32.2%) noted.

  11. A locus for isolated cataract on human Xp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francis, P J; Berry, V; Hardcastle, A J; Maher, E R; Moore, A T; Bhattacharya, S S

    2002-02-01

    To genetically map the gene causing isolated X linked cataract in a large European pedigree. Using the patient registers at Birmingham Women's Hospital, UK, we identified and examined 23 members of a four generation family with nuclear cataract. Four of six affected males also had complex congenital heart disease. Pedigree data were collated and leucocyte DNA extracted from venous blood. Linkage analysis by PCR based microsatellite marker genotyping was used to identify the disease locus and mutations within candidate genes screened by direct sequencing. The disease locus was genetically refined to chromosome Xp22, within a 3 cM linkage interval flanked by markers DXS9902 and DXS999 (Zmax=3.64 at theta=0 for marker DXS8036). This is the first report of a locus for isolated inherited cataract on the X chromosome. The disease interval lies within the Nance-Horan locus suggesting allelic heterogeneity. The apparent association with congenital cardiac anomalies suggests a possible new oculocardiac syndrome.

  12. Outcomes of Surgery for Posterior Polar Cataract Using Torsional Ultrasound

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Selçuk Sızmaz

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: The aim of this study is to report outcomes of surgery for posterior polar cataract using torsional ultrasound. Material and Method: Medical records of 26 eyes of 21 consecutive patients with posterior polar cataract who had cataract surgery using the torsional phacoemulsification were evaluated retrospectively. The surgical procedure used, phacoemulsification parameters, intraoperative complications, and postoperative visual outcome were recorded. Results: Of the 26 eyes, 24 (92.3% had small to medium posterior polar opacity. Two eyes had large opacity. All surgeries were performed using the torsional handpiece. Posterior capsule rupture occurred in 4 (15.3% eyes. The mean visual acuity improved significantly after surgery (p<0.001. The postoperative visual acuity was worse than 20/20 in 5 eyes. The cause of the low acuity was amblyopia. Discussion: Successful surgical results and good visual outcome can be achieved with phacoemulsification using the torsional handpiece. (Turk J Ophthalmol 2013; 43: 345-7

  13. Predicting the Incidence of Human Cataract through Retinal Imaging Technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Ting Horng

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available With the progress of science, technology and medicine, the proportion of elderly people in society has gradually increased over the years. Thus, the medical care and health issues of this population have drawn increasing attention. In particular, among the common medical problems of the elderly, the occurrence of cataracts has been widely observed. In this study, we developed retinal imaging technology by establishing a human eye module with ray tracing. Periodic hole arrays with different degrees were constructed on the anterior surface of the lens to emulate the eyesight decline caused by cataracts. Then, we successfully predicted the incidence of cataracts among people with myopia ranging from −3.0 D to −9.0 D. Results show that periodic hole arrays cause severe eyesight decline when they are centralized in the visual center. However, the wide distribution of these arrays on the anterior surface of the lens would not significantly affect one’s eyesight.

  14. Incidence and risk factors for chronic uveitis following cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Chirag; Kim, Stephen Jae; Chomsky, Amy; Saboori, Mazeyar

    2013-04-01

    To determine the incidence of and associated risk factors for uveitis after cataract surgery. A total of 17,757 eyes were identified and records of 42 eyes that developed uveitis and 2320 eyes that did not were reviewed. Postsurgical uveitis was defined as persistent inflammation for ≥ 6 months after surgery. Forty-two eyes of 35 patients developed uveitis (0.24%). Eleven patients underwent consecutive cataract surgery but developed unilateral uveitis, and intraoperative complications occurred in 55% of uveitic eyes compared to 0% in fellow eyes (p < 0.05). Median duration of inflammation was 8 and 11.5 months in eyes with and without vitrectomy (p < 0.05). Intraocular complications occurred in 44 and 8.3% of eyes that did and did not develop uveitis, respectively (p = 0.01). Postsurgical uveitis developed after approximately 1 in 400 cataract surgeries and occurred more frequently in eyes experiencing intraoperative complications.

  15. The congenital "ant-egg" cataract phenotype is caused by a missense mutation in connexin46

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lars; Yao, Wenliang; Eiberg, Hans

    2006-01-01

    "Ant-egg" cataract is a rare, distinct variety of congenital/infantile cataract that was reported in a large Danish family in 1967. This cataract phenotype is characterized by ant-egg-like bodies embedded in the lens in a laminar configuration and is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait. We...

  16. Audit of visual outcome of cataract surgeries in a private eye hospital ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: The aim was to determine the quality of cataract surgeries in Port Harcourt, and ascertain the difference in the outcome, if any, between small incision cataract surgery (SICS) and extra capsular cataract extraction (ECCE). Materials and Methods: This is a retrospective study carried out in a Private Eye Hospital in Port ...

  17. Audit of Visual Outcome of Cataract Surgeries in a Private Eye ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    tulyasys

    The WHO categorization of visual outcome following cataract surgery was employed in this study.[4] This places outcomes, as “good” (≥6/18), “borderline”. INTRODUCTION. Cataract surgery is the most common operation performed in ophthalmology.[1]. Cataract blindness is reversible by this surgery. However, some.

  18. Patient's experiences with quality of hospital care: the Dutch Consumer Quality Index Cataract Questionnaire.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Stubbe, J.H.; Brouwer, W.; Delnoij, D.M.J.

    2007-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Patients' feedback is of great importance in health care policy decisions. The Consumer Quality Index Cataract Questionnaire (CQI Cataract) was used to measure patients' experiences with quality of care after a cataract operation. This study aims to evaluate the reliability and the

  19. Phacoemulsification in total white cataract with Stevens-Johnson syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vasavada Abhay

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Cataract surgery with Stevens-Johnson syndrome (S-J is associated with a high incidence of complications and can worsen the primary disease. We report a case of phacoemulsification of a total, white cataract barely visible through the vascularized, keratinized cornea in the only seeing eye of a patient with S-J syndrome. We describe the intra-operative difficulties encountered during phacoemulsification and the surgical tools and techniques employed to overcome the surgical difficulties. The postoperative course was uneventful and the patient regained useful, navigational vision.

  20. Evaluation of povidone-iodine applications in cataract surgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xi Zhang

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available As a routine measure to prevent intraocular inflammation, rinsing conjunctival sac with povidone-iodine(PVP-Ihas been increasingly adopted in cataract surgery. It can effectively reduce the complications of cataract surgery, including endophthalmitis and corneal complications. However, PVP-I itself has certain side effects. Therefore, to achieve the best bactericidal effect and to avoid eye injury, it is necessary to find out the optimal treatment duration and concentration. This article offers a review on the latest researches worldwide in this field.

  1. Mechanisms Involved in Acquisition of blaNDM Genes by IncA/C2 and IncFIIY Plasmids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wailan, Alexander M; Sidjabat, Hanna E; Yam, Wan Keat; Alikhan, Nabil-Fareed; Petty, Nicola K; Sartor, Anna L; Williamson, Deborah A; Forde, Brian M; Schembri, Mark A; Beatson, Scott A; Paterson, David L; Walsh, Timothy R; Partridge, Sally R

    2016-07-01

    blaNDM genes confer carbapenem resistance and have been identified on transferable plasmids belonging to different incompatibility (Inc) groups. Here we present the complete sequences of four plasmids carrying a blaNDM gene, pKP1-NDM-1, pEC2-NDM-3, pECL3-NDM-1, and pEC4-NDM-6, from four clinical samples originating from four different patients. Different plasmids carry segments that align to different parts of the blaNDM region found on Acinetobacter plasmids. pKP1-NDM-1 and pEC2-NDM-3, from Klebsiella pneumoniae and Escherichia coli, respectively, were identified as type 1 IncA/C2 plasmids with almost identical backbones. Different regions carrying blaNDM are inserted in different locations in the antibiotic resistance island known as ARI-A, and ISCR1 may have been involved in the acquisition of blaNDM-3 by pEC2-NDM-3. pECL3-NDM-1 and pEC4-NDM-6, from Enterobacter cloacae and E. coli, respectively, have similar IncFIIY backbones, but different regions carrying blaNDM are found in different locations. Tn3-derived inverted-repeat transposable elements (TIME) appear to have been involved in the acquisition of blaNDM-6 by pEC4-NDM-6 and the rmtC 16S rRNA methylase gene by IncFIIY plasmids. Characterization of these plasmids further demonstrates that even very closely related plasmids may have acquired blaNDM genes by different mechanisms. These findings also illustrate the complex relationships between antimicrobial resistance genes, transposable elements, and plasmids and provide insights into the possible routes for transmission of blaNDM genes among species of the Enterobacteriaceae family. Copyright © 2016, American Society for Microbiology. All Rights Reserved.

  2. Fos- and Jun-related transcription factors are involved in the signal transduction pathway of mechanical loading in condylar chondrocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papachristou, Dionisios; Pirttiniemi, Pertti; Kantomaa, Tuomo; Agnantis, Niki; Basdra, Efthimia K

    2006-02-01

    The chondrocytes of the articular condylar cartilage proliferate, hypertrophy and ultimately undergo apoptosis (programmed cell death), being replaced by osteoblasts. Converging results consolidate activator protein-1 (AP-1) transcription factor as the pivotal downstream effector in the early response of stress-sensitive cells to mechanical loading, and the Fra-1, Fra-2, JunB and JunD members of the AP-1 transcription factor family, as mediators in bone remodelling and apoptotic phenomena. The aim of the present study was to examine the involvement of the Fra-1, Fra-2, JunB and JunD proteins in the biochemical response of functionally loaded mandibular condylar cartilage, and the subsequent initiation of cartilage maturation and apoptotic phenomena. Thirty, female, 14-day-old Wistar rats were assigned to two groups: one group was fed a soft diet and the other a hard diet. At day 21 after weaning, experimental animals from both groups were killed at 6, 12 and 48 hours and their condyles harvested. The condylar cartilage of both groups was immunostained using specific antibodies against Fra-1, Fra-2, JunB and JunD. Statistical analysis of the data revealed over-expression of Fra-1, Fra-2, JunB and JunD proteins in all stages of differentiation of chondrocytes derived from the mandibular condylar cartilage of animals fed on a hard diet. Moreover, the involvement of these proteins significantly increased with time in both groups. Since the aforementioned proteins play key roles in remodelling phenomena of bone and cartilage tissue, influencing pivotal cellular functions such as maturation, differentiation and apoptosis, the results of the present study suggest that mandibular condylar chondrocytes sense functional loading changes and respond by induction of proteins associated with biological phenomena that ultimately influence the growth of the condylar cartilage.

  3. Spontaneous dislocation of lens bag with acrylic lens after uneventful cataract surgery - unusual complication of cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Mehul A; Shah, Shreya M; Mehta, Ruchir; Shah, Prerna

    2015-01-01

    Spontaneous dislocation of intraocular lens with bag is rare. We report a case of a 56-year-old male who presented with spontaneous anterior dislocation of an in-the-bag intraocular lens 3 years after manual small incision cataract surgery. He had undergone manual small incision cataract surgery with foldable acrylic intraocular lens implantation, and 18 months after cataract surgery ND: YAG capsulotomy with uneventful post capsulotomy follow-up. 17 months after capsulotomy, the patient presented with sudden decrease of vision. On anterior segment examination, the intraocular lens with bag was dislocated into the anterior chamber. It was managed with intraocular lens explantation with bag, anterior vitrectomy and sclera fixated intraocular lens. Spontaneous intraocular lens dislocation with bag is possible after 1.5 years of uneventful surgery which may be managed using different techniques.

  4. Oral Efficacy of Apigenin against Cutaneous Leishmaniasis: Involvement of Reactive Oxygen Species and Autophagy as a Mechanism of Action.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernanda Fonseca-Silva

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The treatment for leishmaniasis is currently based on pentavalent antimonials and amphotericin B; however, these drugs result in numerous adverse side effects. The lack of affordable therapy has necessitated the urgent development of new drugs that are efficacious, safe, and more accessible to patients. Natural products are a major source for the discovery of new and selective molecules for neglected diseases. In this paper, we evaluated the effect of apigenin on Leishmania amazonensis in vitro and in vivo and described the mechanism of action against intracellular amastigotes of L. amazonensis.Apigenin reduced the infection index in a dose-dependent manner, with IC50 values of 4.3 μM and a selectivity index of 18.2. Apigenin induced ROS production in the L. amazonensis-infected macrophage, and the effects were reversed by NAC and GSH. Additionally, apigenin induced an increase in the number of macrophages autophagosomes after the infection, surrounding the parasitophorous vacuole, suggestive of the involvement of host autophagy probably due to ROS generation induced by apigenin. Furthermore, apigenin treatment was also effective in vivo, demonstrating oral bioavailability and reduced parasitic loads without altering serological toxicity markers.In conclusion, our study suggests that apigenin exhibits leishmanicidal effects against L. amazonensis-infected macrophages. ROS production, as part of the mechanism of action, could occur through the increase in host autophagy and thereby promoting parasite death. Furthermore, our data suggest that apigenin is effective in the treatment of L. amazonensis-infected BALB/c mice by oral administration, without altering serological toxicity markers. The selective in vitro activity of apigenin, together with excellent theoretical predictions of oral availability, clear decreases in parasite load and lesion size, and no observed compromises to the overall health of the infected mice encourage us to supports

  5. Initial experience using a femtosecond laser cataract surgery system at a UK National Health Service cataract surgery day care centre.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Day, Alexander C; Dhallu, Sandeep K; Maurino, Vincenzo; Wilkins, Mark R

    2016-07-27

    To describe the initial outcomes following installation of a cataract surgery laser system. National Health Service cataract surgery day care unit in North London, UK. 158 eyes of 150 patients undergoing laser-assisted cataract surgery. Laser cataract surgery using the AMO Catalys femtosecond laser platform. intraoperative complications including anterior and posterior capsule tears. docking to the laser platform, successful treatment delivery, postoperative visual acuities. Mean case age was 67.7±10.8 years (range 29-88 years). Docking was successful in 94% (148/158 cases), and in 4% (6/148 cases) of these, the laser delivery was aborted part way during delivery due to patient movement. A total of 32 surgeons, of grades from junior trainee to consultant, performed the surgeries. Median case number per surgeon was 3 (range from 1-20). The anterior capsulotomy was complete in 99.3% of cases, there were no anterior capsule tears (0%). There were 3 cases with posterior capsule rupture requiring anterior vitrectomy, and 1 with zonular dialysis requiring anterior vitrectomy (4/148 eyes, 2.7%). These 4 cases were performed by trainee surgeons, and were either their first laser cataract surgery (2 surgeons) or their first and second laser cataract surgeries (1 surgeon). Despite the learning curve, docking and laser delivery were successfully performed in almost all cases, and surgical complication rates and visual outcomes were similar to those expected based on national data. Complications were predominately confined to trainee surgeons, and with the exception of intraoperative pupil constriction appeared unrelated to the laser-performed steps. Published by the BMJ Publishing Group Limited. For permission to use (where not already granted under a licence) please go to http://www.bmj.com/company/products-services/rights-and-licensing/

  6. Do older drivers with bilateral cataract self-regulate their driving while waiting for first eye cataract surgery?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Agramunt, Seraina; Meuleners, Lynn B; Fraser, Michelle L; Chow, Kyle C; Ng, Jonathon Q; Raja, Vignesh; Morlet, Nigel

    2017-01-01

    To analyze the association between visual impairment and driver self-regulation among a cohort of older drivers waiting for first eye cataract surgery. Ninety-six drivers with bilateral cataract aged 55+ years were assessed before first eye cataract surgery. Data collection consisted of a researcher-administered questionnaire, objective visual measures (visual acuity, contrast sensitivity and stereopsis), a visual attention test (the useful field of view test) and a cognitive test (the Mini-Mental State Examination). Driver self-regulation practices were collected using the Driving Habits Questionnaire and were also measured with an in-vehicle monitoring device. Characteristics of self-regulators and non-self-regulators were compared and a logistic regression model was used to examine the association between 3 objective visual measures and driver self-regulation status. After controlling for potential confounding factors, only binocular contrast sensitivity ( p =0.01), age ( p =0.03) and gender ( p =0.03) were significantly associated with driver self-regulation status. The odds of participants with better contrast sensitivity scores (better vision) self-regulating their driving in at least 1 driving situation decreased (odds ratio [OR]: 0.01, 95% CI: 0.00-0.28) while those of increasing age reported an increased odds of self-regulating their driving (OR: 1.08, 95% CI: 1.01-1.15). The odds of males self-regulating their driving was decreased compared with females (OR: 0.28, 95% CI: 0.09-0.86). Worse binocular contrast sensitivity scores, increasing age and being female were significantly associated with driver self-regulation. The study highlighted that while self-regulation was common among cataract patients, a proportion of those with poor vision did not self-regulate. Further research should determine how cataract patients could benefit from self-regulation strategies while waiting for cataract surgery.

  7. The results of ab interno laser thermal sclerostomy combined with cataract surgery versus trabeculectomy combined with cataract surgery 6 to 12 months postoperatively.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kendrick, R; Kollarits, C R; Khan, N

    1996-07-01

    When cataract surgery and glaucoma surgery are combined, the theoretical advantages of pressure control, removal of the visual impairment, and protection against an increase in intraocular pressure (IOP) in the immediate postoperative period are gained. The authors' objective was to determine whether ab interno laser thermal sclerostomy (LTS) combined with cataract surgery would be as effective as trabeculectomy combined with cataract surgery. Ab interno LTS was compared with trabeculectomy, retrospectively, for patients who had undergone combined cataract and glaucoma surgery. There was no significant difference in the numbers of patients using no medications or fewer medications at 6 and 12 months. There was a greater reduction in IOP in the LTS group. LTS may be better than trabeculectomy in combined cataract and glaucoma surgery because it reduces the IOP more. Compared with trabeculectomy, LTS is simpler to perform and adds less operating time to cataract surgery. Continued follow-up is recommended.

  8. Cooperative mechanisms involved in chronic antidiuretic response to bendroflumethiazide in rats with lithium-induced nephrogenic diabetes insipidus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moosavi, S M S; Karimi, Z

    2014-03-01

    Previous studies of central diabetes insipidus suggested that thiazides acutely exerted a paradoxical antidiuresis by either indirectly activating volume-homeostatic reflexes to decrease distal fluid-delivery, or directly stimulating distal water-reabsorption. This study investigated whether the direct and indirect actions of bendroflumethiazide (BFTZ) simultaneously cooperated and also whether the renal nerves were involved in inducing long-term antidiuresis in nephrogenic diabetes insipidus (NDI). BFTZ or vehicle was gavaged into bilateral renal denervated and innervated rats with lithium-induced NDI for 10 days, constituting four groups. At one day before (D0) and one, five and ten days after starting administration of BFTZ or vehicle, rats were placed in metabolic cages to collect urine for 6 hours. BFTZ-treatment in both renal innervated and denervated rats caused equivalent reductions in urine-flow, creatinine clearance, lithium clearance and free-water clearance, but rises in urine-osmolality, fractional proximal reabsorption and fractional distal reabsorption at all days compared to D0, as well as to those of their relevant vehicle-received group. Therefore, the chronic antidiuretic response to BFTZ in conscious NDI rats was exerted through a concomitant cooperation of its direct distal effect of stimulating water-reabsorption and its indirect effect of reducing distal fluid-delivery by activating volume-homeostatic mechanisms, which appeared independent of the renal nerves.

  9. Gut microbiota-involved mechanisms in enhancing systemic exposure of ginsenosides by coexisting polysaccharides in ginseng decoction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Shan-Shan; Xu, Jun; Zhu, He; Wu, Jie; Xu, Jin-Di; Yan, Ru; Li, Xiu-Yang; Liu, Huan-Huan; Duan, Su-Min; Wang, Zhuo; Chen, Hu-Biao; Shen, Hong; Li, Song-Lin

    2016-03-01

    Oral decoctions of traditional Chinese medicines (TCMs) serve for therapeutic and prophylactic management of diseases for centuries. Small molecules and polysaccharides are the dominant chemicals co-occurred in the TCM decoction. Small molecules are well-studied by multidisciplinary elaborations, whereas the role of polysaccharides remains largely elusive. Here we explore a gut microbiota-involved mechanism by which TCM polysaccharides restore the homeostasis of gut microbiota and consequently promote the systemic exposure of concomitant small molecules in the decoction. As a case study, ginseng polysaccharides and ginsenosides in Du-Shen-Tang, the decoction of ginseng, were investigated on an over-fatigue and acute cold stress model. The results indicated that ginseng polysaccharides improved intestinal metabolism and absorption of certain ginsenosides, meanwhile reinstated the perturbed holistic gut microbiota, and particularly enhanced the growth of Lactobacillus spp. and Bacteroides spp., two major metabolic bacteria of ginsenosides. By exploring the synergistic actions of polysaccharides with small molecules, these findings shed new light on scientization and rationalization of the classic TCM decoctions in human health care.

  10. Plant-plant-microbe mechanisms involved in soil-borne disease suppression on a maize and pepper intercropping system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Min Yang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Intercropping systems could increase crop diversity and avoid vulnerability to biotic stresses. Most studies have shown that intercropping can provide relief to crops against wind-dispersed pathogens. However, there was limited data on how the practice of intercropping help crops against soil-borne Phytophthora disease. PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Compared to pepper monoculture, a large scale intercropping study of maize grown between pepper rows reduced disease levels of the soil-borne pepper Phytophthora blight. These reduced disease levels of Phytophthora in the intercropping system were correlated with the ability of maize plants to form a "root wall" that restricted the movement of Phytophthora capsici across rows. Experimentally, it was found that maize roots attracted the zoospores of P. capsici and then inhibited their growth. When maize plants were grown in close proximity to each other, the roots produced and secreted larger quantities of 2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-2H-1,4-benzoxazin-3(4H-one (DIMBOA and 6-methoxy-2-benzoxazolinone (MBOA. Furthermore, MBOA, benzothiazole (BZO, and 2-(methylthio-benzothiazole (MBZO were identified in root exudates of maize and showed antimicrobial activity against P. capsici. CONCLUSIONS: Maize could form a "root wall" to restrict the spread of P. capsici across rows in maize and pepper intercropping systems. Antimicrobe compounds secreted by maize root were one of the factors that resulted in the inhibition of P. capsici. These results provide new insights into plant-plant-microbe mechanisms involved in intercropping systems.

  11. Parallel Post-Polyketide Synthase Modification Mechanism Involved in FD-891 Biosynthesis in Streptomyces graminofaciens A-8890.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kudo, Fumitaka; Kawamura, Koichi; Furuya, Takashi; Yamanishi, Hiroto; Motegi, Atsushi; Komatsubara, Akiko; Numakura, Mario; Miyanaga, Akimasa; Eguchi, Tadashi

    2016-02-02

    To isolate a key polyketide biosynthetic intermediate for the 16-membered macrolide FD-891 (1), we inactivated two biosynthetic genes coding for post-polyketide synthase (PKS) modification enzymes: a methyltransferase (GfsG) and a cytochrome P450 (GfsF). Consequently, FD-892 (2), which lacks the epoxide moiety at C8-C9, the hydroxy group at C10, and the O-methyl group at O-25 of FD-891, was isolated from the gfsF/gfsG double-knockout mutant. In addition, 25-O-methyl-FD-892 (3) and 25-O-demethyl-FD-891 (4) were isolated from the gfsF and gfsG mutants, respectively. We also confirmed that GfsG efficiently catalyzes the methylation of 2 and 4 in vitro. Further, GfsF catalyzed the epoxidation of the double bond at C8-C9 of 2 and 3 and subsequent hydroxylation at C10, to afford 4 and 1, respectively. These results suggest that a parallel post-PKS modification mechanism is involved in FD-891 biosynthesis. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. Monitoring resistance of Cydia pomonella (L.) Spanish field populations to new chemical insecticides and the mechanisms involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bosch, Dolors; Rodríguez, Marcela A; Avilla, Jesús

    2018-04-01

    Widespread resistance of Cydia pomonella to organophosphates was demonstrated in populations from the Spanish Ebro Valley area which showed high levels of enzymatic detoxification. To determine the efficacy of new insecticides, neonate larval bioassays were carried out on 20 field codling moth populations collected from three different Spanish apple production areas. Synergist bioassays were performed to determine the enzymatic mechanisms involved. The least active ingredients were methoxyfenozide, with 100% of the populations showing significantly lower mortality than the susceptible strain, and lambda-cyhalothrin, with very high resistance ratios (872.0 for the most resistant field population). Approximately 50% of the populations were resistant or tolerant to thiacloprid. By contrast, tebufenozide was very effective in all the field populations, as was chlorpyrifos-ethyl despite its widespread use during the last few years. Indoxacarb, spinosad and chlorantraniliprole also provided high efficacy, as did emamectin and spinetoram, which are not yet registered in Spain. The resistant Spanish codling moth populations can be controlled using new reduced-risk insecticides. The use of synergists showed the importance of the concentration applied and the difficulty of interpreting results in field populations that show multiple resistance to different active ingredients. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2017 Society of Chemical Industry.

  13. Evidence for a two-metal-ion mechanism in the cytidyltransferase KdsB, an enzyme involved in lipopolysaccharide biosynthesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helgo Schmidt

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharide (LPS is located on the surface of Gram-negative bacteria and is responsible for maintaining outer membrane stability, which is a prerequisite for cell survival. Furthermore, it represents an important barrier against hostile environmental factors such as antimicrobial peptides and the complement cascade during Gram-negative infections. The sugar 3-deoxy-D-manno-oct-2-ulosonic acid (Kdo is an integral part of LPS and plays a key role in LPS functionality. Prior to its incorporation into the LPS molecule, Kdo has to be activated by the CMP-Kdo synthetase (CKS. Based on the presence of a single Mg²⁺ ion in the active site, detailed models of the reaction mechanism of CKS have been developed previously. Recently, a two-metal-ion hypothesis suggested the involvement of two Mg²⁺ ions in Kdo activation. To further investigate the mechanistic aspects of Kdo activation, we kinetically characterized the CKS from the hyperthermophilic organism Aquifex aeolicus. In addition, we determined the crystal structure of this enzyme at a resolution of 2.10 Å and provide evidence that two Mg²⁺ ions are part of the active site of the enzyme.

  14. Emergence of macrolide-resistant Campylobacter strains in chicken meat in Poland and the resistance mechanisms involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rożynek, Elżbieta; Maćkiw, Elżbieta; Kamińska, Wanda; Tomczuk, Katarzyna; Antos-Bielska, Małgorzata; Dzierżanowska-Fangrat, Katarzyna; Korsak, Dorota

    2013-07-01

    In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms involved in erythromycin resistance in the first resistant Campylobacter strains isolated from chicken meat in Poland, and analyzed their genetic relatedness. A total of 297 samples of raw chicken meat and giblets from retail trade in the Warsaw area collected between 2006 and 2009 were examined. Among 211 Campylobacter strains (52 C. jejuni and 159 C. coli), 10 C. coli isolates (4.7%) were resistant to erythromycin. All the C. jejuni strains were susceptible. Among the high-level macrolide-resistant isolates, two different point mutations within the domain V of the 23S rRNA gene were observed. Eight of the strains had adenine→guanine transitions at position 2075, two other isolates at position 2074. Sequence analysis of ribosomal proteins L4 (rplD) and L22 (rplV) indicated that ribosomal protein modifications did not contribute to macrolide resistance. A mutation in the inverted repeat in the cmeR and cmeABC intergenic region was found in a single resistant strain. The genetic relatedness of Campylobacter isolates showed that two resistant strains obtained from the same production plant in a 2-month interval were genetically identical. The risk of transmission of resistant strains via the food chain highlights the need for constant monitoring of resistance in Campylobacter isolates of human and animal hosts.

  15. Fuchs Heterochromic Iridocylitis: Clinical Characteristics and Outcome of Cataract Extraction with Intra Ocular Lens Implantation in a Kashmiri Population- A Hospital Based Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lone, Imtiyaz; Mir, Adil Majid; Rashid, Aamir; Latif, Mehreen

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Fuchs Heterochromic Iridocylitis (FHI) is a rare form of uveitis which is frequently complicated by cataract and glaucoma, but it does not show typical features of uveitis like pain, redness and posterior synechia. Aim To study the clinical characteristics and outcome of cataract extraction with Intra Ocular Lens (IOL) implantation in patients with FHI. Materials and Methods The present prospective study was carried out in the Postgraduate Department of Ophthalmology, Sher-i-Kashmir Institute of Medical Sciences (SKIMS), Bemina from March 2012 to January 2015. The study included 33 eyes of 32 patients of FHI who underwent thorough clinical examination and cataract surgery with IOL implantation and were evaluated based on their visual outcome and intra and post-operative complications. Post-operative follow-up was done on 1st day, one week, one month, two month, six month and at twelve months. Results Mean age of our study group was 33.9 years (Range 18 to 65 years). No male or female preponderance was seen. There was bilateral involvement of eyes in only one case. Cataract and stellate keratic precipitates were present in all cases whereas, heterochromia was present in only six eyes (18.75%). Best Corrected Visual Acuity (BCVA) showed a significant improvement following cataract surgery (p 6/12). Most common causes of decreased vision post-operatively were vitreous opacities in nine eyes (27.27%) followed by glaucoma in eight eyes (24.24%) and posterior capsular opacification in six eyes (18.18%). Conclusion Cataract extraction with IOL lens implantation in FHI is a safe procedure associated with good visual prognosis and few complications. However, glaucoma is one of the main concerns and should be closely monitored both pre and post-operatively. PMID:28208900

  16. Newt tail regeneration: a model for gravity-dependent morphogenesis and clues to the molecular mechanisms involved.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radugina, Elena A.; Almeida, Eduardo; Grigoryan, Eleonora

    factors and are expressed during development, we hypothesized they may play a role newt tail regenerative morphogenesis under altered g-levels. Specifically there is increasing evidence for HSPs expression changes as a result of hyper-and microgravity. HSPs are also expressed throughout regeneration, rather than just after surgery. To test this hypothesis we performed heat shock on intact and regenerating newts and collected tail tissues. In these experiments we observed that some tails had uplifted tips while others mimicked hook-like regenerates at 1g or 2g. These findings suggest that heat shock, and HSPs induction, may be involved in the mechanism responsible for gravity effects on morphogenesis, or at least interact with them. Current work underway is focused on analyzing the expression of mRNA and localization of proteins for two members of the group, Hsp70 and Hsp90. In summary, we developed and characterized a new practical animal model in which gravity mechanostimulation at 1g, versus unloading in aquaria, causes prominent effects on newt tail regenerative morphogenesis. This model can be achieved without the use of a centrifuge, significantly simplifying its research applications. Initial results using this model suggest that induction of HSPs may be involved in gravity regulation of newt tail regenerative morphogenesis. Further research based on this simple model may help to unravel mechanisms of gravity influence relevant not only to newt tail regeneration, but also to a broad range of other biological processes in amphibian models.

  17. The value of serial personal photographs in timing the onset of unilateral cataracts in children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawhney, Gagan K; Hutchinson, Amy K; Lambert, Scott R

    2009-10-01

    To determine the value of serial personal photographs in timing the onset of unilateral cataracts in children over 6 months of age. Personal photographs from children with unilateral cataracts who underwent cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation when > or =6 months of age were reviewed. Photographs were evaluated for changes in the red reflex, which might indicate the presence of a cataract. Twelve children underwent cataract surgery at a mean age of 37 months. They were followed for a mean of 32 months. Ten children were diagnosed as having an acquired cataract by photographic review documenting a previously normal red reflex. The visual acuity in the affected eye of 4 of these children improved to > or =20/60. Cataracts were visible on photographs prior to clinical diagnosis in 6 patients, from 0.5 to 22 months prior to clinical diagnosis. Visual outcomes did not relate closely to the photographically documented duration of the cataract prior to treatment. Photographs were not helpful in timing the onset of cataract in 2 children due to the poor quality of the images. Serial personal photographs are sometimes helpful in determining whether cataracts are acquired. However, the usefulness of personal photographs alone in predicting the visual outcome after cataract surgery was limited in this small, retrospective study.

  18. High-Throughput Genetic Screening of 51 Pediatric Cataract Genes Identifies Causative Mutations in Inherited Pediatric Cataract in South Eastern Australia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shari Javadiyan

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Pediatric cataract is a leading cause of childhood blindness. This study aimed to determine the genetic cause of pediatric cataract in Australian families by screening known disease-associated genes using massively parallel sequencing technology. We sequenced 51 previously reported pediatric cataract genes in 33 affected individuals with a family history (cases with previously known or published mutations were excluded using the Ion Torrent Personal Genome Machine. Variants were prioritized for validation if they were predicted to alter the protein sequence and were absent or rare with minor allele frequency 60% of familial pediatric cataract in Australia, indicating that still more causative genes remain to be identified.

  19. Effects of cataracts on flicker electroretinograms recorded with RETeval™ system: new mydriasis-free ERG device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miura, Gen; Nakamura, Yosuke; Sato, Eiju; Yamamoto, Shuichi

    2016-03-05

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate the effects of cataracts on the flicker electroretinograms (ERGs) recorded with the RETeval™ system under mydriatic-free conditions. This was a retrospective study of 82 eyes of 60 patients with cataracts and 52 eyes of 38 patients who were pseudophakic. Flicker ERGs were recorded with the RETeval™ system (LKC Technologies, Gaithersburg, MD) under mydriatic-free condition with skin electrodes. Flicker ERGs were elicited by white light delivered at a frequency of 28.3 Hz and intensity of 8 Td-s. The implicit times and amplitudes of the ERGs recorded from the Grade 2 cataract, Grade 3 cataract, and pseudophakic groups were compared. The mean amplitude was significantly smaller in both cataract groups than the pseudophakic group (Grade 2 cataract vs pseudophakic group, P flicker ERGs. The presence of cataracts should be taken into consideration when interpreting the flicker ERG recorded with RETeval™.

  20. Cataract treatment: must we remain blind to couching? | Okoye ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Aim: To highlight the persistence of couching as a treatment for cataract in our community and its attendant complications. Materials and Methods: Retrospective study, using hospital records of 9 patients who had undergone couching and presented at the eye clinic, University of Nigeria Teaching Hospital, Enugu between ...

  1. A Sudden Total Loss of Vision After Routine Cataract Surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We share our experience of a 50-year-old controlled hypertensive woman who had routine cataract surgery in her left eye. She was given retrobulbar Xylocaine with adrenalin and postoperative gentamycin. She subsequently became blind in the operated eye after developing macular infarction by the first day post ...

  2. Cataract surgery in patients with pseudoexfoliation syndrome: current updates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fontana L

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Luigi Fontana, Marco Coassin, Alfonso Iovieno, Antonio Moramarco, Luca Cimino Ophthalmology Unit, Arcispedale Santa Maria Nuova – IRCCS, Reggio Emilia, Italy Abstract: Pseudoexfoliation is a ubiquitous syndrome of multifactorial origin affecting elderly people by increasing the risk of cataract and secondary glaucoma development. Despite modern techniques and technologies for cataract surgery, pseudoexfoliation syndrome represents a challenge for surgeons because of the increased weakness of the zonular apparatus and limited pupil dilation. Due to the inherent difficulties during surgery, the risk of vitreous loss in these patients is several times higher than in cataract patients without pseudoexfoliation. Using currently available surgical devices (ophthalmic viscosurgical device, iris retractors and ring dilators, capsular tension ring, etc., the risk of intraoperative complications may be much reduced, allowing the surgeon to handle difficult cases with greater confidence and safety. This review analyzes the methodologic approach to the patient with zonular laxity with the aim of providing useful advices to limit the risks of intraoperative and postoperative complications. From the preoperative planning, to the intraoperative management of the small pupil and phacodonesis, and to the postoperative correction of capsule phimosis and intraocular lens dislocation, a step approach to the surgical management of pseudoexfoliation patients is illustrated. Keywords: pseudoexfoliation syndrome, cataract surgery, zonular laxity, intraocular lens implant, complications

  3. Trainee ophthalmologists' opinions on ways to improve cataract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To know the opinions of trainee ophthalmologists on ways to improve cataract surgical rate (CSR) with a view to having insight into actions that should be of high priority for achieving this improvement. Methods: A survey of 27 trainee ophthalmologists using structured self-administered questionnaire. Results: ...

  4. Visual Outcome Of Traumatic Cataract Surgery In Ibadan, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    To review the visual outcome of traumatic cataracts operated at the University College Hospital, Ibadanwith the view to making recommendations for improved outcome. ... causes of poor visual outcome <6/18, using a structured data entry form and information obtained from the operation register and case notes of patients

  5. Risk of Retinal Detachment After Pediatric Cataract Surgery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haargaard, Birgitte; Andersen, Elisabeth W; Oudin, Anna

    2014-01-01

    was based on medical chart review. RESULTS: Among 1043 eyes of 656 children undergoing surgery for pediatric cataract, 25 eyes (23 children) developed retinal detachment at a median time of 9.1 years after surgery. The overall 20-year risk of retinal detachment was 7% (95% confidence interval [CI]: 3...

  6. Rapid assessment of cataract surgical outcome at pension pay ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Cataract is a major cause of blindness globally and primarily a disease of the elderly people. In Nigeria, retirees from public service fall under this category. Compulsory retirement age for all grades in the public service in Nigeria is 60 years, Judicial Officers and Academic Staff of Universities retire at 70 and 65 ...

  7. Topical‑intracameral anesthesia in manual small incision cataract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2015-09-21

    Sep 21, 2015 ... type of cataract by morphology, pain perception, and surgeons experience were recorded. Descriptive and ... no correlation between degree of pain perception and gender (P = 0.806) or age (P = 0.388). Patient's cooperation was .... sensations of pain, temperature, and touch, and are blocked by lower ...

  8. Preliminary observation of refractive cataract surgery assisted by femtosecond laser

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Li Wang

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available AIM:To compare the differences of visual acuity and corneal astigmatism postoperatively between conventional refractive cataract surgery and that assisted by femtosecond laser.METHODS:Sixty patients(60 eyeswith age-related cataract and cornea astigmatism were divided into femtosecond group and conventional group randomly or voluntarily. The flat shaft, steep shaft and diopter of corneal astigmatism in patients in femtosecond group were inputted into the online vector calculators to get the location and width of the incision. Then femtosecond laser was used to make corneal releasing incision, the main and auxiliary incision. Phacoemulsification and aspheric multifocal intraocular lens implantation were undergone. Patients in conventional group received full-thickness relaxing incision by cornea paracentesis knife at the steepest meridian axis during phacoemulsification. Then aspheric multifocal intraocular lenses were implanted. Uncorrected distance visual acuity(UCDVA, uncorrected near visual acuity(UCNVAand cornea astigmatism were observed at 1d,1wk and 1mo postoperative. RESULTS:UCVA of patients in both groups was improved after the surgeries. UCDVA and UCNVA of femtosecond group were higher than those of conventional group, while the cornea astigmatism of femtosecond group was lower than that of conventional group.CONCLUSION:Refractile cataract surgery assisted by femtosecond laser canoffer better visual quality than conventional refractive cataract surgery because of lower cornea astigmatism and better visual acuity.

  9. Ant-egg cataract. An electron microscopic study

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schrøder, H D; Nissen, S H

    1979-01-01

    The ultrastructure of the ant-egg cataractous lens has been studied. Comparison of tissue demineralized by means of EDTA with untreated tissue showed the calcium salts in the ant-eggs to be mostly crystalline. A laminar appearance of the ant-egg seen in EDTA treated material suggested an intermit...

  10. Complications of Cataract Surgery at the University Teaching ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    DR. MRS. UKPONMWAN

    treatment is surgical cataract extraction with intraocular lens implant. The causes of po or visual outcome after ... done and the type of intraocular lens inserted were noted. There is a standard protocol used in the ..... canaliculitis, lacrimal duct obstruction, contact lens wear, and ocular prosthesis in the other eye, use of 5% ...

  11. Prevalence of Cataract Blindness in Rural Ethiopia | Woldeyes ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Visual acuity (VA) was measured using a Snellen's E chart at 6 metres and eye examinations were performed using torch light, 2.5 X magnifying glasses and an ophthalmoscope. Cataract was defined as lens opacity identified as the cause of blindness and low vision after ruling out other causes. Unfortunately, there was no ...

  12. ASSESSMENT OF PLASMA ZINC STATUS OF SENILE CATARACT ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ... function and cellular metabolism like protection of lens from oxidative damage and photochemistry of vision. Deficiency of zinc may be due to decreased intake, metabolic disorders, poor absorption and medication and may result in prolonged dark adaptation time, night blindness, retinal degenerations and cataract.

  13. How to Improve Outcome of Paediatric Cataract Surgery in Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Oseluese

    acrylic biomaterial are commonly implanted in the USA, the United. Kingdom, Canada and other developed countries but are prohibitively expensive in developing countries (more than $100).1. Simultaneous cataract surgery for children, under general anaesthesia, should be strongly considered in developing countries.

  14. Anesthetic management of cardiac patient for cataract surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Farooq, F.B.; Sultan, S.T.

    2003-01-01

    We are reporting the successful anesthetic management of a 6 years old child, who had cyanotic congenital heart disease and underwent an operation for cataract extraction. Ketamine was used for the induction and maintenance of anesthesia. Ventilation was assisted manually by using laryngeal masks. (author)

  15. Cataract Surgical Outreach in a Tertiary Hospital in Nigeria: An ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Odarosa M Uhumwangho

    18.7). Hand Movement. 109 (52.2). Light Perception. 55 (26.3). No Light Perception. 4 (1.9). Total. 209 (100). Table 4: Complications in cataract surgery. Complication. Number (Percent). IOL subluxation. 6 (2.9). Vitritis. 16 (7.6). Hyphaema. 4 (1.9).

  16. Affordability of cataract surgery using the Big Mac prices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Van C. Lansingh

    2015-01-01

    Conclusion: The price of cataract surgery does not consider the patient's capacity to pay, based on a simple tool such as the BMcI. This suggests affordability issues, particularly when patients work for minimum wages and/or do not have access to free health care.

  17. Relevance of routine preoperation laborotary tests before cataract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: To investigate the outcome and the relevance of routine laboratory tests, i.e., full blood count (FBC), packed cell volume (PCV), haemoglobin (Hb), and fasting blood sugar (FBS) before cataract and glaucoma surgery. Materials and Methods: A retrospective review of records of all patients who had ...

  18. Suture associated corneal abscess three years after cataract surgery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    We describe a case of corneal abscess presenting three years after uneventful cataract extraction with posterior chamber lens implantation through a limbal incision secured with threesutures placed in the clear cornea. After removing the abscess, a loose10/0 nylon suture was found at the base of an ulcer. The suture was ...

  19. Evaluating cataract surgery numbers and constraints to the delivery ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The state hospital with lesser yearly budget performed more surgeries in the reviewed four-year-period compared to the tertiary hospital. The major barriers to the demand for cataract services were poverty, distance to eye clinic, fear of surgery, lack of awareness, cultural belief, ignorance, cost of surgery, long waiting hours ...

  20. Trainee ophthalmologists' opinions on ways to improve cataract ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2010-02-08

    Feb 8, 2010 ... (74.1%), effective primary eye care- 25 (92.6%) and marketing of cataract surgical services- 23 (85.2%). However, only 16 (59.3%) trainees ... rate (CSR) falls below 500, compared to India and affluent economies, where CSR is ..... College of Nigeria (NPMCN); Friday August 17, 2001. p. 8-9. 3. Faal H. The ...

  1. Combined Cataract and Glaucoma Surgery: An assessment of 68 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Methods: A retrospective review of the case notes of patients who underwent combined glaucoma and cataract surgery with lens implantation in a private eye centre, The Eye Foundation Hospital, was carried out, using the following parameters: age, pre-operative intraocular pressure (IOP), post-operative intraocular ...

  2. Congenital cataracts in two siblings with Wolfram syndrome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mets, Rebecca B; Emery, Sarah B; Lesperance, Marci M; Mets, Marilyn B

    2010-12-01

    Wolfram syndrome is characterized by optic atrophy, insulin dependent diabetes mellitus, diabetes insipidus and deafness. There are several other associated conditions reported in the literature, but congenital or early childhood cataracts are not among them. Observational case series with confirmatory genetic analysis. A pair of siblings, followed over 17 years, who manifest congenital or early childhood cataracts, diabetes insipidus, diabetes mellitus, optic atrophy, and deafness. They are both compound heterozygotes for mutations (V415 deletion and A684V substitution) in the WFS1 gene. Their father has congenital sensorineural hearing loss and developed optic atrophy. He is heterozygous for A684V in WFS1. Wolfram syndrome should be in the differential diagnosis of genetic syndromes associated with congenital and early childhood cataracts. Here, we report on a mother who is a phenotypically normal carrier of an autosomal recessive Wolfram syndrome gene, and a father who has some of the findings of the syndrome and carries a single mutation that appears to be responsible for his hearing loss and optic atrophy. Their 2 children are compound heterozygotes and manifest the full Wolfram syndrome, in addition to cataracts.

  3. Evaluation of surgical outcome after cataract surgery with lens ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Ann Burgess

    Design: Retrospective record analysis. Subjects: Record cards of patients operated for cataract at Sakubva Eye Unit, Mutare, Zimbabwe in the period January – ... irrigation/aspiratin cannula. Residual cortex was aspirated and the anterior chamber (AC) deepened with viscoelastic or air depending on availability. A.

  4. Mobile femtosecond laser platform for pediatric cataract surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fung, Simon S M; Brookes, John; Wilkins, Mark R; Adams, Gillian G W

    2017-10-26

    To describe the use of a mobile femtosecond laser platform in assisting paediatric cataract surgery. A mobile femtosecond laser was brought into the operating room and calibrated on the day of the surgery. After general anesthesia is induced, the femtosecond laser was docked onto the eyes with a liquid-filled interface, without any perioperative adaptations or additional surgical procedures. An anterior capsulotomy was created with the femtosecond laser, followed by conventional cataract extraction and intraocular lens implantation. Five eyes of 3 children with congenital cataracts were treated with this technique. Docking and capsulorhexis were successful in all cases. No perioperative or intraoperative complications were noted in any of the cases. At median follow-up of 15 months (range 6-18 months), all patients had improved best-corrected visual acuity. Using the mobile femtosecond laser platform, a perfectly sized anterior capsulotomy could be created with high precision and accuracy in paediatric cataract cases, while ensuring that perioperative care for the children undergoing the procedure was not compromised.

  5. Visual Outcome after Small Incision Cataract Surgery in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective: The aim of this study was to determine the visual outcome of patients who had manual small incision cataract surgery in a high volume secondary eye hospital in southwestern Nigeria, and to identify reasons for poor outcome. Methodology: This is an observational descriptive, longitudinal study of consecutive ...

  6. Cataract surgery with intraocular lens implantation in children aged ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Cataract surgery with intraocular lens implantation in children aged 5-15 in local anaesthesia: visual outcomes and complications. ... The mean implanted IOL power was 22.01 ±3.16 D. IOL was succefuly implanted in 54 eyes (87.07%). Eight eyes (9.67%) were left aphakic. Increase in BCVA of 4 logMAR lines and above ...

  7. Cataract production in mice by heavy charged particles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ainsworth, E.H.; Jose, J.; Yang, V.V.; Barker, M.E.

    1981-03-01

    The cataractogenic effects of heavy charged particles have been evaluated in mice in relation to dose and ionization density (LET/sub infinity/). The study was undertaken due to the high potential for eye exposures to HZE particles among SPS personnel working in outer space. This has made it imperative that the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) in relation to LET/sub infinity/ for various particles be defined so that appropriate quality factors (Q) could be assigned for estimation of risk. Although mice and men differ in susceptibility to radiation-induced cataracts, the results from this project should assist in defining appropriate quality factors in relation to LET/sub infinity/, particle mass, charge, or velocity. Evaluation of results indicated that : (1) low single doses (5 to 20 rad) of iron ( 56 Fe) or argon ( 40 Ar) particles are cataractogenic at 11 to 18 months after irradiation; (2) onset and density of the opacification are dose related; (3) cataract density (grade) at 9, 11, 13, and 16 months after irradiation shows partial LET/sub infinity/-dependence; and (4) the severity of cataracts is reduced significantly when 417 rad of 60 Co gamma radiation is given in 24 weekly 17 rad fractions compared to giving this radiation as a single dose, but cataract severity is not reduced by fractionation of 12 C doses over 24 weeks

  8. Barriers to Utilization of Cataract Surgical Services in Ekiti State ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2016-11-09

    Nov 9, 2016 ... cataract surgical services was financial constraint as claimed by 65 (49.2%) of them; other reasons include ignorance ... and the new creations are licensed under the identical terms. For reprints contact: reprints@medknow. ... The questionnaire administered includes information on biodata, demographic ...

  9. Combined Cataract and Glaucoma Surgery: An assessment of 68 ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    should be considered as a good operative choice in elderly patients who present with significant cataracts in ... elderly patients with limited ability to tolerate two surgeries, or those on two or more medications to control IOP. .... this improved to hand movements before deteriorating from post-operative complications to total ...

  10. Persistent fetal vasculature: ocular features, management of cataract and outcomes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcia Beatriz Tartarella

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available PURPOSES: To describe ocular features, management of cataract and functional outcomes in patients with persistent fetal vasculature. METHODS: Retrospective, descriptive case series of patients with persistent fetal vasculature. Data were recorded from the Congenital Cataract Section of Federal University of São Paulo, Brazil from 2001 to 2012. All patients were evaluated for sex, age at diagnosis, systemic findings, laterality, age at surgery, and initial and final follow-up visual acuities. Follow-up and complications after cataract surgery were recorded. Ultrasound was performed in all cases and ocular eco-Doppler was performed in most. RESULTS: The study comprised 53 eyes from 46 patients. Age at diagnosis ranged from 5 days of life to 10 years-old (mean 22.7 months. Twenty-seven patients were male (58.7%. Persistent fetal vasculature was bilateral in 7 patients (15.2%. Forty-two eyes (79.2% had combined (anterior and posterior forms PFV presentation, 5 eyes (9.4% had only anterior persistent fetal vasculature presentation and 6 eyes (11.3% had posterior persistent fetal vasculature presentation. Thirty-eight eyes (71.7% were submitted to cataract surgery. Lensectomy combined with anterior vitrectomy was performed in 18 eyes (47.4%. Phacoaspiration with intraocular lens implantation was performed in 15 eyes (39.5%, and without lens implantation in 5 eyes (13.2%. Mean follow-up after surgery was 44 months. Postoperative complications were posterior synechiae (3 cases, retinal detachment (2 cases, phthisis (3 cases, posterior capsular opacification (8 cases, inflammatory pupillary membrane (5 cases, glaucoma (4 cases, intraocular lens implantation displacement (1 case and vitreous hemorrhage (2 cases. Complications were identified in 19 (50% of the 38 operated eyes. Visual acuity improved after cataract surgery in 83% of the eyes. CONCLUSIONS: Patients with persistent fetal vasculature have variable clinical presentation. There is an

  11. Smoking, socioeconomic factors, and age-related cataract: The Singapore Malay Eye study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Renyi; Wang, Jie Jin; Mitchell, Paul; Lamoureux, Ecosse L; Zheng, Yingfeng; Rochtchina, Elena; Tan, Ava G; Wong, Tien Yin

    2010-08-01

    To describe the relationship of smoking, sex, and socioeconomic factors with age-related cataract in Malay adults in Singapore. In a population-based study, 3280 Malay individuals aged 40 to 80 years participated (78.7% response rate). All had interviews, systemic examination, and laboratory investigations. Lens opacity was graded from slitlamp and retroillumination photographs using the Wisconsin Cataract Grading System. Smoking-cataract associations were compared with the Blue Mountains Eye Study in Australia. Of 2927 participants (89.2%) with gradable lens photographs, 1338 (45.7%) had cataract. After adjusting for age, sex, body mass index, hypertension, and diabetes, current smokers had a higher prevalence of nuclear cataract (odds ratio [OR], 2.06; 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.46-2.98), cortical cataract (OR, 1.33; 95% CI, 1.02-1.74), posterior subcapsular cataract (OR, 1.39; 95% CI, 1.02-1.91), or any cataract (OR, 1.48; 95% CI, 1.10-1.99). These associations were not seen in the Blue Mountains Eye Study. Primary or lower education (OR, 1.67; 95% CI, 1.06-2.64) and low monthly income (OR, 1.43; 95% CI, 1.09-1.87) were both associated with nuclear cataract, while small-sized public housing was associated with posterior subcapsular cataract (OR, 1.70; 95% CI, 1.28-2.25). Among men, 43.5% currently smoked compared with only 3.2% of women. The population attributable risk of nuclear cataract due to smoking was estimated to be 17.6% in men. Smoking and indicators of low socioeconomic status were associated with cataract in Malay persons, with 1 in 6 nuclear cataract cases in men attributable to smoking. Smoking-cataract associations were stronger in Malay than in white persons.

  12. Mechanisms involved in carbachol-induced Ca2+ sensitization of contractile elements in rat proximal and distal colon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takeuchi, Tadayoshi; Kushida, Masahiko; Hirayama, Nobue; Kitayama, Muneyoshi; Fujita, Akikazu; Hata, Fumiaki

    2004-01-01

    Mechanisms involved in Ca2+ sensitization of contractile elements induced by the activation of muscarinic receptors in membrane-permeabilized preparations of the rat proximal and distal colon were studied. In α-toxin-permeabilized preparations from the rat proximal and distal colon, Ca2+ induced a rapid phasic and subsequent tonic component. After Ca2+-induced contraction reached a plateau, guanosine 5′-triphosphate (GTP) and carbachol (CCh) in the presence of GTP further contracted preparations of both the proximal and distal colon (Ca2+ sensitization). Y-27632, a rho-kinase inhibitor, inhibited GTP plus CCh-induced Ca2+ sensitization more significantly in the proximal colon than in the distal colon. Y-27632 at 10 μM had no effect on Ca2+-induced contraction or slightly inhibited phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate-induced Ca2+ sensitization in either proximal or distal colon. Chelerythrine, a protein kinase C inhibitor, inhibited GTP plus CCh-induced Ca2+ sensitization in the distal colon, but not in the proximal colon. The component of Ca2+ sensitization that persisted after the chelerythrine treatment was completely inhibited by Y-27632. In β-escin-permeabilized preparations of the proximal colon, C3 exoenzyme completely inhibited GTP plus CCh-induced Ca2+ sensitization, but PKC(19–31) did not. In the distal colon, C3 exoenzyme abolished GTP-induced Ca2+ sensitization. It inhibited CCh-induced sensitization by 50 % and the remaining component was inhibited by PKC(19–31). These results suggest that both protein kinase C and rho pathways in parallel mediate the Ca2+ sensitization coupled to activation of muscarinic receptors in the rat distal colon, whereas the rho pathway alone mediates this action in the proximal colon. PMID:15159278

  13. Mechanisms involved in the anti-inflammatory action of a polysulfated fraction from Gracilaria cornea in rats.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chistiane Oliveira Coura

    Full Text Available The anti-inflammatory mechanisms of the sulfated polysaccharidic fraction obtained from red marine alga Gracilaria cornea (Gc-FI were investigated using a paw edema model induced in rats by different inflammatory agents (carrageenan, dextran, serotonin, bradykinin, compound 48/80 or L-arginine. Gc-FI at the doses of 3, 9 or 27 mg/kg, subcutaneously--s.c., significantly inhibited rat paw edema induced by carrageenan and dextran, as confirmed by myeloperoxidase and Evans' blue assessments, respectively. Gc-FI (9 mg/kg, s.c. inhibited rat paw edema induced by histamine, compound 48/80 and L-arginine. Additionally, Gc-FI (9 mg/kg, s.c. inhibited Cg-induced edema in animals with intact mast cells but did not inhibit that with degranulated mast cells by compound 48/80, revealing a protective role on mast cell membranes. Gc-FI down-regulated the IL-1β, TNF-α and COX-2 mRNA and protein levels compared with those of the carrageenan group, based on qRT-PCR and immunohistochemistry analyses. After inhibition with ZnPP IX, a specific heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1 inhibitor, the anti-inflammatory effect of Gc-FI was not observed in Cg-induced paw edema, suggesting that the anti-inflammatory effect of Gc-FI is, in part, dependent on the integrity of the HO-1 pathway. Gc-FI can target a combination of multiple points involved in inflammatory phenomena.

  14. The asymmetric binding of PGC-1α to the ERRα and ERRγ nuclear receptor homodimers involves a similar recognition mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Takacs

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: PGC-1α is a crucial regulator of cellular metabolism and energy homeostasis that functionally acts together with the estrogen-related receptors (ERRα and ERRγ in the regulation of mitochondrial and metabolic gene networks. Dimerization of the ERRs is a pre-requisite for interactions with PGC-1α and other coactivators, eventually leading to transactivation. It was suggested recently (Devarakonda et al that PGC-1α binds in a strikingly different manner to ERRγ ligand-binding domains (LBDs compared to its mode of binding to ERRα and other nuclear receptors (NRs, where it interacts directly with the two ERRγ homodimer subunits. METHODS/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we show that PGC-1α receptor interacting domain (RID binds in an almost identical manner to ERRα and ERRγ homodimers. Microscale thermophoresis demonstrated that the interactions between PGC-1α RID and ERR LBDs involve a single receptor subunit through high-affinity, ERR-specific L3 and low-affinity L2 interactions. NMR studies further defined the limits of PGC-1α RID that interacts with ERRs. Consistent with these findings, the solution structures of PGC-1α/ERRα LBDs and PGC-1α/ERRγ LBDs complexes share an identical architecture with an asymmetric binding of PGC-1α to homodimeric ERR. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: These studies provide the molecular determinants for the specificity of interactions between PGC-1α and the ERRs, whereby negative cooperativity prevails in the binding of the coactivators to these receptors. Our work indicates that allosteric regulation may be a general mechanism controlling the binding of the coactivators to homodimers.

  15. Mechanisms involved in nicotinic acetylcholine receptor-induced neurotransmitter release from sympathetic nerve terminals in the mouse vas deferens.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Damian J Williams

    Full Text Available Prejunctional nicotinic acetylcholine receptors (nAChRs amplify postganglionic sympathetic neurotransmission, and there are indications that intraterminal Ca(2+ stores might be involved. However, the mechanisms by which nAChR activation stimulates neurotransmitter release at such junctions is unknown. Rapid local delivery (picospritzing of the nAChR agonist epibatidine was combined with intracellular sharp microelectrode recording to monitor spontaneous and field-stimulation-evoked neurotransmitter release from sympathetic nerve terminals in the mouse isolated vas deferens. Locally applied epibatidine (1 µM produced 'epibatidine-induced depolarisations' (EIDs that were similar in shape to spontaneous excitatory junction potentials (SEJPs and were abolished by nonselective nAChR antagonists and the purinergic desensitizing agonist α,β-methylene ATP. The amplitude distribution of EIDs was only slightly shifted towards lower amplitudes by the selective α7 nAChR antagonists α-bungarotoxin and methyllcaconitine, the voltage-gated Na(+ channel blocker tetrodotoxin or by blocking voltage-gated Ca(2+ channels with Cd(2+. Lowering the extracellular Ca(2+ concentration reduced the frequency of EIDs by 69%, but more surprisingly, the Ca(2+-induced Ca(2+ release blocker ryanodine greatly decreased the amplitude (by 41% and the frequency of EIDs by 36%. Ryanodine had no effect on electrically-evoked neurotransmitter release, paired-pulse facilitation, SEJP frequency, SEJP amplitude or SEJP amplitude distribution. These results show that activation of non-α7 nAChRs on sympathetic postganglionic nerve terminals induces high-amplitude junctional potentials that are argued to represent multipacketed neurotransmitter release synchronized by intraterminal Ca(2+-induced Ca(2+ release, triggered by Ca(2+ influx directly through the nAChR. This nAChR-induced neurotransmitter release can be targeted pharmacologically without affecting spontaneous or electrically

  16. Crosstalk between the mesothelium and lymphomatous cells: insight into the mechanisms involved in the progression of body cavity lymphomas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lignitto, Laura; Mattiolo, Adriana; Negri, Elena; Persano, Luca; Gianesello, Lisa; Chieco-Bianchi, Luigi; Calabrò, Maria Luisa

    2014-02-01

    The peculiar localization of body cavity lymphomas implies a specific contribution of the intracavitary microenvironment to the pathogenesis of these tumors. In this study, primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) was used as a model of body cavity lymphoma to investigate the role of mesothelial cells, which line the serous cavities, in lymphoma progression. The crosstalk between mesothelial and lymphomatous cells was studied in cocultures of primary human mesothelial cells (HMC) with PEL cells and a xenograft mouse model of peritoneal PEL. PEL cells were found to induce type 2 epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) in HMC, which converted into a myofibroblastic phenotype characterized by loss of epithelial markers (pan cytokeratin and E-cadherin), expression of EMT-associated transcriptional repressors (Snail1, Slug, Zeb1, Sip1), and acquisition of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), a mesenchymal protein. A progressive thickening of serosal membranes was observed in vivo, accompanied by loss of cytokeratin staining and appearance of α-SMA-expressing cells, confirming that fibrosis occurred during intracavitary PEL development. On the other hand, HMC were found to modulate PEL cell turnover in vitro, increasing their resistance to apoptosis and proliferation. This supportive activity on PEL cells was retained after transdifferentiation, and was impaired by interferon-α2 b treatment. On the whole, our results indicate that PEL cells induce type 2 EMT in HMC, which support PEL cell growth and survival, providing a milieu favorable to lymphoma progression. Our findings provide new clues into the mechanisms involved in lymphoma progression and may indicate new targets for effective treatment of malignant effusions growing in body cavities. © 2013 The Authors. Cancer Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  17. Mechanisms involved in the hydrothermal growth of ultra-thin and high aspect ratio ZnO nanowires

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Demes, Thomas [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, Grenoble-INP, LMGP, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Ternon, Céline, E-mail: celine.ternon@grenoble-inp.fr [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, Grenoble-INP, LMGP, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, LTM, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Morisot, Fanny [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, Grenoble-INP, LMGP, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, Grenoble-INP" 2, IMEP-LaHC, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Riassetto, David [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, Grenoble-INP, LMGP, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Legallais, Maxime [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, Grenoble-INP, LMGP, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, Grenoble-INP" 2, IMEP-LaHC, F-38000 Grenoble (France); Roussel, Hervé; Langlet, Michel [Univ. Grenoble Alpes, CNRS, Grenoble-INP, LMGP, F-38000 Grenoble (France)

    2017-07-15

    Highlights: • ZnO nanowires are grown on sol-gel ZnO seed layers by hydrothermal synthesis. • Ultra-thin and high aspect ratio nanowires are obtained without using additives. • Nanowire diameter is 20–25 nm regardless of growth time and seed morphology. • A nanowire growth model is developed on the basis of thermodynamic considerations. • The nanowires are intended for integration into electrically conductive nanonets. - Abstract: Hydrothermal synthesis of ZnO nanowires (NWs) with tailored dimensions, notably high aspect ratios (AR) and small diameters, is a major concern for a wide range of applications and still represents a challenging and recurring issue. In this work, an additive-free and reproducible hydrothermal procedure has been developed to grow ultra-thin and high AR ZnO NWs on sol-gel deposited ZnO seed layers. Controlling the substrate temperature and using a low reagent concentration (1 mM) has been found to be essential for obtaining such NWs. We show that the NW diameter remains constant at about 20–25 nm with growth time contrary to the NW length that can be selectively increased leading to NWs with ARs up to 400. On the basis of investigated experimental conditions along with thermodynamic and kinetic considerations, a ZnO NW growth mechanism has been developed which involves the formation and growth of nuclei followed by NW growth when the nuclei reach a critical size of about 20–25 nm. The low reagent concentration inhibits NW lateral growth leading to ultra-thin and high AR NWs. These NWs have been assembled into electrically conductive ZnO nanowire networks, which opens attractive perspectives toward the development of highly sensitive low-cost gas- or bio-sensors.

  18. Cytotoxic mechanisms of Zn2+ and Cd2+ involve Na+/H+ exchanger (NHE) activation by ROS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koutsogiannaki, Sophia; Evangelinos, Nikolaos; Koliakos, George; Kaloyianni, Martha

    2006-01-01

    The signaling mechanism induced by cadmium (Cd) and zinc (Zn) in gill cells of Mytilus galloprovincialis was investigated. Both metals cause an increase in ·O 2 - production, with Cd to be more potent (216 ± 15%) than Zn (150 ± 9.5%), in relation to control value (100%). The metals effect was reversed after incubation with the amiloride analogue, EIPA, a selective Na + /H + exchanger (NHE) inhibitor as well as in the presence of calphostin C, a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor. The heavy metals effect on ·O 2 - production was mediated via the interaction of metal ions with α 1 - and β-adrenergic receptors, as shown after incubation with their respective agonists and antagonists. In addition, both metals caused an increase in intracellular pH (pHi) of gill cells. EIPA together with either metal significantly reduced the effect of each metal treatment on pHi. Incubation of gill cells with the oxidants rotenone, antimycin A and pyruvate caused a significant increase in pHi (ΔpHi 0.830, 0.272 and 0.610, respectively), while in the presence of the anti-oxidant N-acetyl cysteine (NAC) a decrease in pHi (ΔpHi -0.090) was measured, indicating that change in reactive oxygen species (ROS) production by heavy metals affects NHE activity. When rosiglitazone was incubated together with either heavy metal a decrease in O 2 - production was observed. Our results show a key role of NHE in the signal transduction pathway induced by Zn and Cd in gill cells, with the involvement of ROS, PKC, adrenergic and PPAR-γ receptors. In addition, differences between the two metals concerning NHE activation, O 2 - production and interaction with adrenergic receptors were observed

  19. Slimmer or fertile? Pharmacological mechanisms involved in reduced sperm quality and fertility in rats exposed to the anorexigen sibutramine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cibele S Borges

    Full Text Available Sperm acquire motility and fertility capacity during epididymal transit, under the control of androgens and sympathetic innervations. It is already known that the acceleration of epididymal sperm transit time can lead to lower sperm quality. In a previous work we showed that rats exposed to the anorexigen sibutramine, a non-selective serotonin-norepinephrine reuptake inhibitor, presented faster sperm transit time, lower epididymal sperm reserves and potentiation of the tension of epididymal duct to norepinephrine exposed acutely in vitro to sibutramine. In the present work we aimed to further investigate pharmacological mechanisms involved in these alterations and the impact on rat sperm quality. For this, adult male Wistar rats were treated with sibutramine (10 mg/kg/day or vehicle for 30 days. Sibutramine decreased final body, seminal vesicle, ventral prostate and epididymal weights, as well as sperm transit time in the epididymal cauda. On the contrary of the in vitro pharmacological assays, in which sibutramine was added directly to the bath containing strips of distal epididymal cauda, the ductal tension was not altered after in vivo sub-chronic exposure to sibutramine. However, there is pharmacological evidence that the endogenous epididymal norepinephrine reserves were reduced in these animals. It was also shown that the decrease in prostate weight can be related to increased tension developed of the gland, due to sibutramine sympathomimetic effects. In addition, our results showed reduced sperm quality after in utero artificial insemination, a more sensitive procedure to assess fertility in rodents. The epididymal norepinephrine depletion exerted by sibutramine, associated with decreases in sperm transit time, quantity and quality, leading to reduced fertility in this experimental model, reinforces the concerns about the possible impact on fertility of man taking sibutramine as well as other non-selective serotonin

  20. Involvement of two uptake mechanisms of gold and iron oxide nanoparticles in a co-exposure scenario using mouse macrophages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dimitri Vanhecke

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Little is known about the simultaneous uptake of different engineered nanoparticle types, as it can be expected in our daily life. In order to test such co-exposure effects, murine macrophages (J774A.1 cell line were incubated with gold (AuNPs and iron oxide nanoparticles (FeOxNPs either alone or combined. Environmental scanning electron microscopy revealed that single NPs of both types bound within minutes on the cell surface but with a distinctive difference between FeOxNPs and AuNPs. Uptake analysis studies based on laser scanning microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, and inductively coupled plasma optical emission spectrometry revealed intracellular appearance of both NP types in all exposure scenarios and a time-dependent increase. This increase was higher for both AuNPs and FeOxNPs during co-exposure. Cells treated with endocytotic inhibitors recovered after co-exposure, which additionally hinted that two uptake mechanisms are involved. Cross-talk between uptake pathways is relevant for toxicological studies: Co-exposure acts as an uptake accelerant. If the goal is to maximize the cellular uptake, e.g., for the delivery of pharmaceutical agents, this can be beneficial. However, co-exposure should also be taken into account in the case of risk assessment of occupational settings. The demonstration of co-exposure-invoked pathway interactions reveals that synergetic nanoparticle effects, either positive or negative, must be considered for nanotechnology and nanomedicine in particular to develop to its full potential.